header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

All stories filed under acva...

  1. 2017-02-06: 2017-02-06 ACVA 40
  2. 2017-02-08: 2017-02-08 ACVA 41
  3. 2017-02-13: 2017-02-13 ACVA 42
  4. 2017-02-15: 2017-02-15 ACVA 43
  5. 2017-02-22: 2017-02-22 ACVA 44
  6. 2017-03-06: 2017-03-06 ACVA 45
  7. 2017-03-08: 2017-03-08 ACVA 46
  8. 2017-03-20: 2017-03-20 ACVA 47
  9. 2017-04-03: 2017-04-03 ACVA 48

Displaying the most recent stories under acva...

2017-04-03 ACVA 48

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody.

I would like to call the meeting to order. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) and the motion adopted on September 29, the committee resumes its study of mental health and suicide prevention among veterans.

We'll start with a panel today. We have four witnesses. We'll start with statements of up to 10 minutes from each witness, and then we'll swing into questions and answers. We'll start first with Michael McKean by video conference from Barrie.

Good afternoon, Michael. The floor is yours.

Mr. Michael McKean (As an Individual):

Good day. I am providing key points as testimony to assist in the study of mental health and suicide prevention. I draw on 35-plus years of service to Canada with both the reserve force for 16 years and the regular force for 21 years, and with my ongoing efforts to reintegrate into civilian life since being medically released on December 15, 2013.

My views on mental health and specifically suicide prevention flow from having lost a friend who was a reserve officer; my involvement with a veteran of Bosnia who attempted suicide while I was his commanding officer; my experience on Operation Attention, roto 0, in Kabul, Afghanistan, from July 17, 2011 to February 15, 2012; and my ongoing transition struggles.

Preparation and training allows small teams to overcome even unimaginable conditions. Recovery requires similar support systems, which are not yet there for many veterans.

I enrolled as a private soldier in the 26th Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, during December 1975. My entire career in uniform has been as a gunner or gunner officer.

From my initial class in military psychology and leadership at the Royal Military College of Canada, I realized that successful leadership required a profound understanding of human desires and fears. The knowledge and experience bestowed upon me by Canada has helped me to better appreciate the words of my grandfather, a veteran of the First World War, with service at the front and in the Home Guard for World War II, and my military mentors, and it has been augmented by the study of Sun Tzu, Clausewitz, Viktor Frankl, Toffler, Roméo Dallaire, and Chris Linford.

When the call for testimony to this committee originally went out in 2016, my thoughts were that limited services were available to Canadian Armed Forces veterans from Veterans Affairs Canada to address reserve force mental health suicide prevention, and that both the CAF and VAC could and should be involving veterans in the process of change.

I am recommending the use of a systems approach to the integration of veterans, especially reserve force veterans, in a metric that leverages the existing operational stress injury social support—or OSISS—framework. This requires a modification, a change of attitude, so that we focus away from full-time OSISS coordinators, expand the volunteer opportunities, and stop the budget roller coaster.

Military theory—Sun Tzu, Clausewitz—which has been immortalized by the words of Napoleon Bonaparte, who said that “the moral is to the physical as three to one”, is a guiding principle. When I was in Afghanistan in August of 2011, I injured my right knee. While I was laying on the operating table getting seven stitches with the assistance of morphine, I knew that the injury I had was similar to ones that I had experienced over my career, which should have resulted in two weeks or more on crutches. Those were the medical orders in the past.

When they finished, I was asked if I could bear weight on my leg. I put my game face on and said yes. The reason was that if I had more than two days of light duties—forget about crutches—I would be returned to unit. My unit would have had serious problems. Shortly after I arrived in theatre they changed the operating procedures to prevent travel outside the wire with less than four personnel. Our team consisted of six. We lost one person—RTU—shortly before my injury, and we had another individual go home on compassionate leave for two weeks approximately two weeks after my injury. My team would not have been able to go outside the wire if I had been on light duties or on pain medication that would have precluded my driving.

During 2000-01 as a newly appointed commanding officer I found myself struggling to assist a reserve force officer recently returned from deployment in Bosnia. The system failed then to identify the obvious alcohol abuse symptoms he was exhibiting, and after his attempted suicide, provision of assistance only occurred through his wife's extended health care benefits. During 2012-13 on return from deployment to Afghanistan I felt like a failure and this was repeatedly reinforced as I fell into almost every conceivable crack in the system: no follow-up on a mental health recommendation for OSI assessment; limited, incomplete communication of information to the release base, the reserve unit; financial issues, eight months before pension resolved; access issues for mental health services, wait, wait, and end up bridging through the Canadian Forces member assistance program; and confusion on the medical release process.

I was actually assigned a VAC case manager and then, oops, they realized that I had to go back and wait for the Canadian Armed Forces to sort it out. I didn't get a CAF case manager until 2013. At that point, despite testimony to this committee, JPSU was not identified as an option even though it was very clear that I had recently returned from a deployment. There was confusion at every stage of the disability claim process. I actually had to go to Archives Canada and get them to provide the information because the system had not gotten around to addressing things in a timely manner and the documents went to archives.

A possible way forward is to involve veterans in change management. Warrior Rising, which is a book produced by retired Lieutenant-Colonel Chris Linford, on page 356 highlights, as has other testimony to this committee, including that of retired Lieutenant General Dallaire, that “a highly skilled ill/injured military veteran needs relevant work.”

Since 2012, I have spent a significant amount of time studying what has been done for operational stress injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder. There are lessons learned from work, both positive and negative, done by the U.K., the United States, etc. It offers more than a starting point that would entail many years of further study before action is taken, which is what I perceive to be what the Government of Canada is currently looking at doing.

There are post-traumatic stress disorder best practices and knowledge. I make these comments in the context that from 2012 to 2014, as part of my retraining, I completed my master's degree in social work and I became a registered social worker in the province of Ontario. I was able to do that because I had 20 years of experience as a drug education coordinator, and health promotion coordinator, prior to my deployment to Afghanistan. My take-away on this is that veterans have the experience to help if attitudes and full-time limitations can change.

What do I mean by attitude change? Most of the medical priority job opportunities are for full-time positions and the ones that I have looked at require that the individual obtain health provider sign-off that they are stable and will not be triggered. I do not currently satisfy these requirements. I am reading to you from a prepared script because I tend to lose focus and I get triggered by things if I'm not careful.

With the encouragement of my psychologist, I pursued part-time opportunities only to be confronted with failure as my qualifications fell short of Calian criteria for providing mental health assistance to Canadian Armed Forces members. This was despite becoming an authorized Blue Cross provider for social work and being a clinical care manager in 2014, based on my extensive experience as a military officer and a drug education coordinator, working in health promotion with all of the courses and background that I'd taken.

(1540)



I had a total of one referral over the last three years, and then they cancelled it because they decided that it was inappropriate. That was all I was told.

Over the last three years, I have successfully worked in a volunteer capacity in reserve force mental health suicide prevention. Reserve units are geographically located across Canada. They offer a simple way to connect with many veterans who move away from larger communities. Working with reserve units offers one of the few ways to more appropriately address reserve force mental health challenges.

Although far from perfect, the OSISS framework currently offers a mechanism to connect JPSU transition services to the community. That could be enhanced by the integration of veterans, especially reserve force veterans, and could also benefit by linking to ongoing efforts to help veterans, like the Royal Canadian Legion operational stress injury special section. These are not competing entities; they're part of an overall system.

One of the problems is, if we go back to the budget issues, OSISS puts limits on its coordinators. They're not allowed to take calls after hours, because that would be considered overtime. If you don't have an extended group of volunteers, the March 2017 stop travel, then restart, offers a perfect example of the kind of roller coaster that we get into. The volunteer training course for OSISS volunteers was cancelled because of budget shortfalls, and now we're having to play catch-up, which will cost months.

Thank you.

(1545)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. McKean.

Mr. Mitic.

Mr. Jody Mitic (City Councillor, City of Ottawa, As an Individual):

I'm Jody Mitic, a city councillor here in Ottawa. I was in the military for 20 years, from 1994 to 2014, and was wounded in January 2007. I am an advocate for mental health. Although I was surprisingly cleared by three different professionals to be mentally stable, I think my wife would question it.

I got into politics to advocate for my brothers and sisters. I believe the more of us that are at any table as elected officials will help. I'm lucky right now that my MP is Andrew Leslie, a former commander of the army.

Overall, mental health is as much a veterans issue as it is a military issue, two different departments with the same goal of having people with mental stability throughout a career that asks a lot of them. When we take a guy off the street or a girl off the street, and put them into basic training, we teach them RICE on day one almost.

Do you guys know RICE? Anyone? Doctor? It's rest, ice, compression, and elevation. If you sprain your ankle, we need you to know that stuff because the medics are busy. Every little scratch can't be something where you run to the doctor and get a band-aid. You have to be able to take care of yourself.

What is RICE for your mind? Anyone? Right. We don't have that in our society overall. This is also a public health issue. I can go down to the Shoppers Drug Mart with a cold, get advice from the pharmacist, and ask, “What medication or home remedy would you recommend?”, and they usually have a pretty good answer. We can't do that for mental health at any level: military, veteran, or civilian.

We have to go back to the drawing board and train our people from day one to deal with mental stress. I believe there was a colonel, he wrote On Killing. I forget his name. He was an American, a green beret. He called it stress inoculation, and a lot of the experts do.

I noticed, in my career, that it was something we didn't do a lot of, specifically to prep mentally. We did a lot of push-ups, chin-ups, running, and target practice, but we didn't really train for the day that we would see our buddy vaporized in front of us by stepping on an IED—

Mrs. Sherry Romanado (Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne, Lib.):

It was Dave Grossman.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Dave Grossman, yes, there you go—great guy. They're hard books to read, but there's a lot of great information.

The first time you see the insides of a person is when you're on the battlefield. There are ways to train for that. I always quote the show Band of Brothers, where they're crawling through pig guts. We never did anything like that in my entire career. As I said, the first time I zipped up a body bag was the first time I was putting one of my buddies in it.

At the time, you're in combat; you can deal with it. Later on, you reflect on it, but there's no buffer. There's nothing to say this is what you're going to feel, it's normal, and you should be sad. You're not a wussy if you cry because your buddy died, but the attitude at the beginning was that way.

Fast forward to when someone becomes a veteran, as cases have shown.... A friend of mine's father-in-law was a Korean War veteran in his eighties, and suddenly he had PTSD from the war. It shows you that it could take a lifetime for it to expose itself. I may one day have symptoms and have to deal with it. My wife was released medically from the forces for PTSD. She was a medic.

I feel the overall approach needs to be teamwork between DND and VAC to come up with a game plan from the day we enlist someone to the day we bring them into the veteran's house. I don't know what the answer is. I think there are a lot treatments that work for seven out of 10, and then there are those three, and then seven out of 10 of those, and seven out of 10 of those. Whether it's dogs, yoga, virtual reality, MDMA, or whatever other treatments we hear about, they all work for about seven out of 10.

The flip side of that is the support system. I can tell you that Alannah was heavily affected by the DND side, where we went in expecting certain supports, very clearly written out, only to have them either be changed or yanked away or modified without our knowledge. Also, we were made almost to feel like we were having to fight for them. I hate when I talk to my brothers and sisters and they say they're fighting back for this and fighting back for that. It should never be a fight. You should not feel like you're in a scrap when you're going to a department.

We're fortunate as Canada's veterans that we have a whole ministry dedicated to our support. A lot of us feel as though we're fighting with this ministry that's supposed to be there to help us through life. I don't know what the answer to that is either, but I know, when it comes to dealing with the system, that causes a ton of mental stress to a lot of my brothers and sisters, to the point where they just won't....

Recently one of the widows, who was also serving and has a daughter the same age as our oldest, disappeared off social media, stopped returning calls. We found out that something had happened with her Veterans Affairs file, and it had completely shut her down socially. She didn't even want to pick up the phone, because just to call her Veterans Affairs office or the 1-800 number was a trigger, frankly. She just didn't want to have to deal with it.

I don't know what the answers are. I just know that we have a ministry for our support, and we have a lot of veterans feeling that they're fighting with it. I really wish we could change the tone on how that happens.

That's it for me.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. MacKinnon.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon (As an Individual):

Good afternoon.

My name is Phil MacKinnon. I retired just under a year ago from the Canadian Forces after 26-plus years of service. I joined in 1989 as a private. As a private I was told what to do, where to go, and when to be there. I did my job and would gladly do it again.

As you work your way up through the ranks, you're given more responsibility, but your orders come from higher so you're still told where to go, what to do, and when to be there.

Now I'm retired. No one tells me where to go other than my wife, and I'm not really sure I can repeat where she tells me to go sometimes, but a lot of times, you don't know what to do. When I was in the military, I had a doctor's appointment. It was a parade. I was there. I'm not in the military anymore. I haven't even got a family doctor yet because of the wait-list. I'm in an area that is underserved, so I have no family doctor. I have to try to make appointments to visit either the emergency room or a family medical clinic that will take someone in.

It's the same thing with mental health. When I had an appointment, I was there. For me, speaking to someone like that helped a lot. When my guys went through a traumatic incident, as their supervisor, it was incumbent upon me to ensure that they sought counselling for what was required. It was mandated for us.

My trade was military police. We dealt with a lot of traumatic issues. It could be anything from a very severe domestic to a suicide, what have you. My guys would go, they would do their stuff, and then I would ensure that they saw counselling.

Now I'm that person who's in need and to try to seek counselling, I don't even know where to go. I have talked to a case manager who I recently was in contact with, and she starting to get me on the right track again, but when I was diagnosed in 2006 with PTSD, I went through a lot of counselling, two, sometimes even three times a week. Before that my solace came from a bottle. On an average weekend I would drink two, maybe three 40-ouncers, sometimes a little bit more, depending on how rough a week it was.

I deployed in 2001 to Bosnia on roto 8, where I found out I was actually in a minefield, although it was supposedly cleared by the agencies. In 2003 I ended up on roto 0 in Kabul, Afghanistan, and went back on roto 4 in Kabul, and roto 0 in Kandahar. I finished that tour in 2005.

Prior to that I was deployed on Op Recuperation. I'm sure a few people here probably remember the ice storm. During the ice storm in 1998, I was deploying back home. I was told there was HLVW that had gone off the side of the road, and we needed to do an accident report on it. Okay, not a problem.

There was a whiteout behind us. Before the OPP could get there to close down the highway, my patrol vehicle was hit by a 10-tonne truck from Toronto. I was in the driver's seat. The only thing that saved me was that I couldn't get the damn seatbelt undone. That seatbelt and the vest that I was wearing saved my life. I still have nightmares about it. I still have nightmares about Afghanistan. That's the way it is, but the counsellor who I had down in Halifax—and, God, I wish I could remember her name—was phenomenal, a psychologist. She told me one thing that has always stuck with me. She said, “You'll never get over it, but you'll learn to get through it.”

(1555)



In 2014, I was posted to Toronto. We couldn't sell our house in North Bay so I went down to Toronto in IR, that is, imposed restriction. I was down there living in a tiny apartment. It was 490 square feet, my entire apartment, and you'd have to step out onto the balcony to change your mind. I was on the 22nd floor. The pain and the mental stress of being away from the family take a toll on a body, but you have nowhere to turn because you don't know who to turn to. When I'd get back to North Bay, I'd seek out my psychologist and talk to him whenever I could. Now, though, for his own medical reasons he's had to retire.

As far as I'm concerned, there needs to be a system in place so that veterans transitioning from the military can be taken on as priority cases. When I was diagnosed I had a lot of problems. I had anger issues, and the last thing you want is a Cape Bretoner with a badge, a bad attitude, PTSD, and nothing to lose. That's just a recipe for disaster.

There needs to be something to allow you to transition from the military, where they're providing your mental health resources, to an civilian system Veterans Affairs can refer you to immediately. If you have a civilian psychologist, you should be able to keep the same individuals. I have friends who have put calls into OSISS and have not received callbacks. They've sent them emails and not received an email back, even acknowledging them. There is a big disconnect and it's a gap that needs to be bridged and needs to be bridged quickly.

Thank you.

(1600)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Brindle.

Mr. Joseph Brindle (As an Individual):

I didn't know what to put down or say, so I'm going to wing it. I have prepared a PowerPoint, which has not been translated, but I'll make it available to the committee afterwards. It goes into further detail.

I was looking for a title for this, and I called it “My 14-year Suicide Attempt”.

I grew up in Ontario housing in Markham, Eglinton, and Scarborough, quite poor, with a lot of discipline problems, such as break and enter, and theft. I failed grade 7. They thought I was a bit slow and wanted to send me to a special school, but my mom talked to them to keep me in a regular school. I was a survivor of long-term sexual abuse by a friend of the family.

When I was eight years old, I set our family apartment on fire and narrowly escaped that. I basically shut myself away from age 12 to about age 18, hiding down in the basement and working on an old car. It was my safe spot. I didn't socialize. I didn't date.

Then this thing called YTEP came up, where you could join the military for a year as a reserve and try out the system to see if you liked it and if they liked you. I applied as an aero-engine technician, to follow up on my love of mechanics. There were no openings, so they suggested I take ammunition technician, a trade I knew nothing about. I did. They said that if I did well on my course, there was a very good chance I could remuster or change trades once I had a foot in the door. This was a lie. Ammo tech is one of the few trades you cannot remuster out of. It's the smallest trade in the Canadian Armed Forces, with about 140 strong when I was in.

However, I did enjoy working with explosives. There are two aspects to ammo tech: the supply side and the operational side, the improvised explosive device disposal. I decided to go that route, just due to the interest in it. At that time, IED wasn't a word as familiar to everyone as it is now.

My first posting was at CFAD Rocky Point, out in B.C. As I mentioned, it was a very small trade, and all of a sudden it had an influx of 12 privates, which they don't normally have, so I was sent out to Rocky Point, which had no provisions for privates, no accommodations, and no junior staff. I was put on a naval base, Nelles Block, about 40 kilometres away, in transient quarters for six months, driving to a job with a bunch of old civilian ammunition workers who didn't want to work.

I hated my job. Isolation and depression set in. I arrived there in September 1986, and on December 6, 1986, I wrapped my brand new car around a pole after I had consumed a bottle of cheap navy liquor. At the time, you could drink on the ships for about 25¢ for a beer and 25¢ for a glass of whisky. I started to work on my alcoholism very strongly then.

To counteract this, the military sent me on a three-day life skills course, which is essentially a course to tell you, “Don't do this again or you'll go on a spin dry course.” It tells you to hide it. They kept me away from trouble and B.C. by tasking me and sending me on my trade qualification 5 early, and then immediately posting me to 2 Service Battalion special service force, Petawawa.

Petawawa was an absolute dream. It was all field. I loved it. I thrived in the field position, and I also became a very functional alcoholic, where you can drink until four and run in at six. That was fairly standard in the early nineties' Canadian Armed Forces. I am certain it's changed now.

I became HC improvised explosive disposal-qualified in April 1990. In this, I accomplished my initial goal. To top it off, at the age of 23, I was the youngest IED technician in Canadian history, which is yet to be matched—and it won't, because of the qualifications you need now to get it.

From there, I was posted to the Canadian Forces School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering in 1991 as an instructor. While there, I was a member of the nuclear, biological, and chemical emergency response team as their explosive engineer. In Borden, in 1991, they found mustard gas Livens containers from World War I. I heard about it, because I was actually in my IED course when they found them, and they didn't know what to do with them. In 1994, when I was a member of the team, they decided they wanted to dispose of them.

The number one was away, so I was called up and I ended up disposing of the mustard gas. Now, the only way to breach these was explosively, so you had to ensure that you used just enough explosives to crack the shell but not crack the burster and contaminate all of Borden with mustard gas. I was contaminated and had to go through full decon. Mustard gas preserves very well. I had seven bars on a CAM, too. Every time I see balsamic vinegar now, which looks identical to mustard gas, I have a panic attack.

(1605)



My time at Borden was the happiest time in my life. I met my wife. I had three children. My military career was progressing extremely well. I was promoted ahead of my peers. I was socially adjusted to family life and meeting new people. My drinking had become more social, not drink until four and run in at six. It was about family. My quality of life at that point could not have been better.

Then I was posted to Toronto in 1994. I was posted to the Canadian Forces base supply, as a 2IC of the ammo section and was meant to be the supply tech. As I was posted and the message was cut, Toronto announced that it was closing. We had two positions there: a master corporal and a sergeant. They didn't replace the sergeant because they lost the spot. In a small trade like ammo tech, you can't just take another sergeant from somewhere and put them in there.

The assumption was that if it was closing out, a master corporal could close it out. The problem is that there was an also a EOD team there. It was EOD 14, and they needed a chief. I was temporarily promoted to sergeant and sent over to the U.K. to have an advanced IED course and made the chief of EOD centre 14. During that time, notification hit the press that CFB Toronto was closing, which created concern for the community.

Various police forces announced an amnesty period for military-related artifacts. This had the unintended effect of increasing EOD teams by factors of hundreds. I was temporarily promoted to sergeant, as I mentioned. I was unaided until closure, after hundreds of emergency calls, thousands upon thousands of kilometres, often driven with hazardous cargo, such as 10 disposal IEDs, and the most horrifying event of my life, a post-blast investigation involving a young boy.

I was promoted to sergeant as I left Toronto, with an outstanding PER from the base commander, but Toronto closed and so did the fanfare. I lived in Angus, so I drove down every day.

All of a sudden, instead of going to Toronto one day, I went back to Borden, and they made me the explosives safety officer for southwestern Ontario. For the next years, I visited cadet units and militia units and gave briefings on explosives safety. I was living in hotels, driving a rental care, and had lots of money for claims, so I could hide my alcoholism. My days consisted of basically drinking until about three, waking up about noon, getting myself cleaned up, visiting a cadet unit, checking their lockers, doing an inspection, having a few beers with the senior cadet officer, telling some war stories, and then repeating if necessary the next day, until I found the courage to go home because I couldn't face my family anymore.

My drinking increased heavily. By that point, I was alcohol dependent. My weight substantially increased, from my perfect BMI in Toronto to BMI 31,and I was diagnosed with sleep apnea. In 1999, I received a medical category that wouldn't allow me to be unit tasked or operational. No one looked into the circumstances as to why I put that weight on. My symptoms of depression had set in, and my family life was deteriorating. I had worked alone for four years with no support, after an operational spot. I was nowhere near a base to be part of the unit functions and the camaraderie that a base has, be it a bowling afternoon, a beer call, or what have you. No one noticed the changes except my family, and I was away from my family.

After 15 years in, one year as reserve YTEP, I retired from the military on August 12, 2000, with a promotion PER to warrant officer. I was released in the tail end of the last force reduction plan, so there were no questions asked. It was a numbers game. They wanted to get rid of people, and they didn't care how they did it. When I asked for my release, no questions were asked. I was released in less than two weeks from my request. I received a basic physical exam and no mental health observation.

I departed from Canada for Kosovo and started my civilian career of disposing cluster bombs in Kosovo. I then went up to Kurdistan, northern Iraq, and performed humanitarian demining for the United Nations. I attempted to rejoin the Canadian Forces in 2001, and the recruitment centre did not respond. Then, a plane flew into some buildings and that changed everything. I spent the next years in Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran, Turkey, Amman, Laos, Yemen, Russia, the Balkan states, performing EOD work, mine clearance, and then later high-voltage clearance of the power lines in Iraq, Afghanistan, Tanzania, and Rwanda.

(1610)



I spent six years in total in Baghdad and two years in Afghanistan as a civilian working outside the wire. I'm being recognized by the United Nations for finding the largest cache of explosives ever in Afghanistan.

Do I have much time?

The Chair:

Could you wrap it up?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I'll wrap it up quickly.

I live like there's no tomorrow. I tried to get back with my family and it didn't work, which eventually led to three suicide attempts. The first was in 2010 in Iraq and another in 2013 in Tanzania, which was discovered by my work, which then fired me. I was sent home and at that point, I didn't know I was a veteran. I was in Canada. I had been out of the country for 14 years. I had no idea where to go or what to do, and eventually, I ended up in a hotel room slicing my wrists.

Obviously, I survived that third attempt and then spent a month in the mental health unit. It was there that an intern, who was a reservist, told me that I was a veteran and that's when I started getting help. I've recovered to the point now that, with the help of a service dog, I'm actually starting school in September.

My path through recovery has been long—from January 24, 2014, when I had my last drink. The road to recovery has been outstanding. I have my relationship back with my children. I can be in the same room as my ex-wife with my grandson now. I just want an opportunity to live a normal life and to volunteer and work in my community.

Quickly, these are my recommendations to the Canadian Forces.

There should be an introduction to VAC during basic training. As soon as you qualify for basic training and are released as an honourable discharge, you are a veteran and there's a good chance you may become a client of VAC. Soldiers should be made aware of this. As of 2000, as a sergeant in the Canadian Armed Forces, I didn't know I was a veteran. That's because Afghanistan happened and you only knew you were a veteran if you went to Afghanistan—even someone who was working in Afghanistan under a different uniform.

Mental health exams need to be done prior to enrolment, before selection for specialist trades, after operational task ends, prior to command of an operational team, and before release.

I also have some quick recommendations to VAC.

We don't need more case managers. Case managers need more help. They should have assistants working directly for them who can answer the vets' calls directly—a veteran 911. We have to be treated differently. If you have an episode in an office, you don't call the police and send out three police cars and a paramedic because we are suicidal. I said, “Delay, deny, hope we die and don't finish our claims” and that resulted in a suicide attempt at my house, apparently. That was last October.

Regarding service dog assistants, the studies have been done on the benefits of a service dog. I wouldn't be here today without this dog. The studies have been done. There has been enough supportive information. VAC needs to adopt a program now because dogs will save lives. I have this dog from Audeamus, and Marc Lapointe is in the area. We really need to resource this now. If I didn't have her, I would not be here. I went through some very dark days in the last three years and she's helped me through them.

The last thing is incentives for civilian medical doctors. When you are not a part of the medical community, you come out with nothing. You don't even have a health card. Doctors realize that veterans are a burden to their practice because of the documentation they require for absolutely everything we need, so they won't take us on. There have to be incentives for medical doctors to look after vets.

Thank you.

(1615)

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll start with six minutes.

Go ahead, Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and I want to thank all four of you for your service to your country.

The information you have provided to us has been just tremendous. Much of what we've heard in this committee on the issue of mental health and suicide prevention has been dealing with the issues of identity loss and stigma that arise through some of the issues that our veterans are seeing.

Mr. McKean, I think you were talking about recognition of prior learning and allowing veterans to take that aspect of what they learned in the years in the military and putting them in positions afterwards to help them. I think what you are saying is that there needs to be some recognition of what veterans have learned over their careers that will be of assistance later on. I'm just wondering if I am following you correctly on that. If so, can you expand on that?

Mr. Michael McKean:

You are following me correctly. In 2012, I had to take my uniform off because I was too emotional. I cried. I was not prepared to continue in uniform. That said, when I was retraining as a social worker, I was not allowed to do a practicum at the mental health services on the base because I knew too much about the military. Having been recognized by Blue Cross but not by the Canadian Armed Forces, specifically Calian who manages most of the contract work for social work health care services, I have been avoided because I know more than people want to know. There is concern, which is part of the testimony from other individuals, that I would become an advocate.

Many veterans have significant experience that can be used. Most people who are transitioning are not able to work full time, but if we recognize the valuable knowledge that they have and put in place a system that's robust enough, I believe we can address a lot of the issues, because veterans who have been injured and have gone through the process understand the identity loss. They have lived through the issues and they can help other individuals overcome those things and can explain to case managers and others who are not familiar with the system.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you, sir.

Mr. Mitic, you talked a lot about training. You basically talked about stress inoculation. We've heard a lot about that. We've also talked about—and Mr. Brindle talked about the same thing—how we train our soldiers from day one to be a machine, but at the very end of it, we don't decommission you. We don't “detrain” you to be a civilian.

You talked about training on day one on mental stress. How do you see that? How do you see that in those initial—

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Are you putting me in charge now? Is this blue sky? I'm in charge?

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Yes.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

When I joined, as I said, it was in 1994 and if you had any issue mentally, a different word was used. You were a “wuss”, even if it was physical. I sprained an ankle pretty badly on exercise once and I was told to suck it up. Funny, I don't have ankles anymore, so it's not really an issue. That was a joke, guys.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Jody Mitic: In centuries past—I'm a geek for history—every warrior class has had its reflective moments, its self-examining moments. If you look at samurais, they practised perfect calligraphy. If you look at the Spartans, they had their mountain where they would go and take their hallucinogenics and things like that. They also had the camaraderie of the march to and from battle.

What we've lost in the western modern military is these moments where we would reflect. Even the monk knights prayed and fasted a lot. It's basically meditation and self-reflection.

I would from day one come up with a system somehow. Maybe we would talk about best practices and we would teach our soldiers that as much as they want to bench press 300 pounds, we need them to spend 20 to 30 minutes a day thinking about how they're going to feel the first time they take a life or the first time a friend of theirs falls in battle. Also, we need to simulate these actions somehow. I know I keep talking about crawling through pig guts, but that's a very visceral training tool to prepare you.

We'd have a gentleman like Joe. Sorry, what did you say you actually go by?

A voice: Don.

Mr. Jody Mitic: Don would set up explosives to simulate artillery coming in on us. That was great. When I was under mortar attack by the Taliban, it kind of felt the same, so I kind of knew that my heart rate would go up and I was prepared for it a little bit.

I think this is where DND has to step up and start from day one with a soldier and train them to deal with mental stress. Also, tell them it's okay to feel scared. It's okay for this. It's okay for that. Rely on your training, because a lot of the tough-guy attitude comes from people saying, “Don't be such a wuss. Suck it up.” That's great in the moment when you're under attack or something, but in training, I believe the mental attitude needs to be fostered that you toughen through repetition. That's a training thing, and that's a budget thing, because that kind of training is expensive. It's also just a concept that we seem to have lost in the last seven years or so.

(1620)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, gentlemen, for joining us today and for your service to Canada.

Mr. MacKinnon, I really appreciated your testimony and some of the comments you made. With regard to counselling, you said you're not sure where to go or how that works. I know there has been an expansion of the number of counselling services you can actually take. Is there an actual problem you've identified with regard to getting counselling services? Is there a barrier for you, personally, that you see could be fixed?

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

Spilling your guts to one person is hard to do. To two people, it's a lot harder. Now you're getting into numbers of three and four, and people don't want to do it.

There needs to be somewhere.... For example, throughout my career I had one posting that was six years, one posting that was seven years, and everything else was either two or three years. I was down in Halifax and the two years I was down there I started getting the help I needed, and that put me on the right track. There was nothing in London. I got to northern Ontario after that and I was gone too much. When I was home I made contact through the military with a civilian psychologist, but as I said, that psychologist has now retired.

We're in an under-serviced area, so to start over for a third or fourth time...and in that area, there is not that wide a variety. If there are more people there who will take on military personnel.... It needs to be more open. They need to actually tell you how to go about getting in contact with these people, whether it's through Veterans Affairs or through the military. To my knowledge, there are very few there, and the ones who are there now, because this one doctor retired, are already over-booked, so you can't get in to see them.

(1625)

Mr. Colin Fraser:

It would be very helpful to have a formal structure in place for how this is going to work, and to have specialized people in the field available through VAC.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

Yes, exactly.

If you were to have a total breakdown today, do you have a doctor to go to? You're in Ottawa, and we're in North Bay, which is an under-serviced area.

VAC needs to look at some of these areas where there is a large defence community. They need to come up with some sort of plan to help these people or else they need to petition the government to give them greater incentives to move to this area so these people can be serviced.

It's not financially feasible for someone in North Bay to drive two and a half hours down the road to Petawawa, or four and a half hours to Ottawa for an hour visit once a week or twice a month. I have to stop about half a dozen times to get to Ottawa because of back injuries and knee injuries and all that. Besides the mental strain, you have the physical pain, and that takes a lot out of a person.

I'd like nothing better than to go back and to speak to a psychologist, but that's not going to happen right now.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

All right, thank you, Mr. MacKinnon.

Mr. Brindle, you mentioned a veterans 911. There is a VAC number to call 24 hours a day, 365. Are you familiar with that service?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I am.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

One of the things—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

That's not the point I'm trying to get at, though.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Okay. All right.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

When a vet is in crisis, the 911 system that works for civilians doesn't work for the military. I'll give a clear example.

I walked into the base Borden VAC office to get the disability claim I submitted in September 2015, and in fact I had a meltdown. I was angry and the woman felt threatened. I said, “Oh, typical VAC—delay, deny, wait till we die.” Two hours later, I had three OPP officers and a paramedic sitting in my driveway. That's where the 911 call should go. That person who felt threatened in the VAC office should have called the veterans 911.

Your case manager should be involved if a case manager would be of assistance, or there should be a group within the system to contact the veteran, because sometimes they just want to talk. They are just so frustrated with the system that sometimes they have a blow-up. Then they over-respond. They think you're suicidal and they send out the cavalry. Two days later, I got a registered letter banning me from that office. That's the way I was treated over a statement.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

I appreciate that, Mr. Brindle. I'm glad you clarified.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I'm not the only one.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

What do you think about having available peer support?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Peer support works great when they're not cutting budgets for OSISS clinics, because the only place I go out sometimes is for a breakfast with the group in Borden.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

I mean in a crisis situation, do you think peer support—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I don't have any peers. When I quit drinking I lost all my friends. I've been out of the military for 14 years. Most of the colleagues that I worked with on contract are.... Most of them are dead. One is Australian, so I keep in touch overseas, but I have no friends. All my ammo-tech friends were from 15 years ago. Again, keep in mind that for the last six years of my career, I worked alone.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Okay, thanks.

The Chair:

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here and bringing us this expertise. It's very important to all of us here to make sure that what we tell the government with regard to the needs of our veterans and mental health supports is documented and supported by the experiences we have heard here.

I have so many questions, but I want to start with you, Mr. Mitic. You talked about the reality of when you and your wife Alannah transitioned out. You said that fighting with VAC creates mental stress, and that Alannah would apply for benefits and then things would shift and the benefits would not be there.

Can you describe or explain that more fully? What kind of impact did that have on your family?

(1630)

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Frankly, those were my benefits. In that case, to be fair to VAC, it was the DND side, but I hear similar stories from people who are applying to Veterans Affairs as well.

Actually, Alannah had some hearing damage from a mine strike. She applied and was denied immediately, and then she had to appeal. That did its thing, so she got a settlement. Then somebody lost her file, and her case manager was reassigned and she didn't know, so there was this 14-month delay where she was constantly calling the office and not getting anywhere.

She had stressed out enough when I was being messed around with by our case manager in the military. That one was a shock to us, because these are people in uniform who we thought were there to support us. I'm not saying they didn't support us. They did, but not in the spirit in which we would have expected them to treat injured, wounded soldiers.

She is much smarter than I am, so she was able to find her way through the system and deal with the right people. She's also Irish, so when she really gets on a roll, people tend to stand to. Her biggest thing, and my biggest thing, has always been.... As I said in my opening statement, this is a ministry established to help veterans transition into normal life, but so many veterans feel that it's not even worth calling, as in the case of our friend, for fear of receiving negative news or being denied something they expect should be easy-peasy.

I am considered to have my stuff together and to be relatively successful, but any time I have to deal with Veterans Affairs, I get a little uneasy. I look for better things to do, whatever they might be, because I just don't want to deal with, “Well I thought it was this”, and they say, “Well, no, it's not that. It's this”. There are certain benefits you would think are automatic that just aren't.

I was on a committee under former Minister O'Toole when the last government was in charge, and a lot of it was about cutting the red tape and getting rid of all these forms that have to be repeated, but that's just part of it. It's also about the ease of accessing benefits. Call them entitlements for service or whatever you want to call them, but the spirit of it just doesn't seem to be what a lot of veterans feel it should be.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

It's a wise husband who admits his wife is much smarter, very wise.

I wanted to ask a bit about family supports, and we've heard they are absolutely critical, very essential.

What works successfully for families? Anyone can jump in here. Is it training? Is it marriage counselling, medical health care for spouses and children, or respite care and better access to VAC for spouses? Do those play a role in making things smoother, easier, and less stressful?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

In a short answer, yes, all of it.

I think in the last budget there was money for home care, or there's a tax break now. That's been 70 years coming. That should have been done 70 years ago. It's amazing.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Informal home health care.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It has increased up to $1,000 a month.

If you're the spouse who's giving up a career, and that's not just a career but a future pension, $1,000 a month is—

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Better than nothing.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It's better than nothing, but it's not a career.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

I understand, but this is now a benefit that people can rely on if they do decide to abandon a career.

I think of Captain Trevor Greene, who took an axe to the head. He was considered, clinically, a vegetable. He's now walking and talking. He walked down the aisle to marry his wife. The only reason he got there is that she decided that he was her full-time job. That kind of support, for her, is amazing. There are a lot of non-profits—True Patriot Love comes to mind, or Wounded Warriors—that could supplement that amount very well for home caregivers who decide to go that route.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

My next question is for everyone. You were talking about the budget, but it doesn't include recognition of the sacred obligation to veterans. It is a rather contentious issue in regard to veterans who are looking for a pension because they've been medically released. What is your feeling in regard to that sacred obligation to veterans?

(1635)

The Chair:

I'm sorry. We're at six minutes and 30 seconds, so we'll have to make that your next question.

Mr. Eyolfson.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Thank you.

Thank you all for coming and for your service.

Mr. Brindle, I'd like to refer to something that Mr. Mitic referred to: the camaraderie that people have that goes back to those ancient traditions of marching together. It sounds to me from your account that you were denied that a lot throughout your career.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

The only time I really had it was in Petawawa and at my first post in Borden, where I was with the school and when I was with a service battalion, because we were very tight. When you're constantly on exercise working with people you know, you know how they tie their shoes. Then, to go off on your own, you fall through many gaps.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Exactly.

When you were describing having to stay at this naval base and commute 40 kilometres to work every day, was there any avenue for you to address that and perhaps—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Not as a private.

As a private, you fall into a navy base where you have.... The rules are completely crazy compared to an army base. You can't wear work dress off base. If I got dropped off at the base hospital, which was off base, I had to Star Trek my ass over to the base or get yelled at by the base chief for not wearing my CFs outside the base. It's a culture shock for someone who joined the army.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

You talked about having to struggle with alcoholism, which has been, unfortunately, a very common theme among many of the accounts we've heard at this committee.

I'm a physician. I've had much experience dealing with patients who have that. It's come to our attention that when someone has a problem with any substance, it's sometimes the first indicator that there's a deeper, underlying problem.

You mentioned that it had been pointed out to you that this problem was there. At any time, did any of your superiors say to you that you may have a problem and then refer you for further evaluation as to whether this...or did they just say, “Buck up and stop drinking”?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Only after my accident.

It was a single-car accident. I was by myself. I had left the barracks. I don't even remember the accident because I have a scar here and I had a concussion. I just woke up in the hospital the next day. There were no cell phones. I had to find a bus to get back. My face was a watermelon. I was put on a three-day life skills course and basically warned that if there were any other incidents I'd end up in a spin dry course that would screw my career. That was the only threat. That taught me how to hide it.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Were you at any time offered access to any substance abuse or alcoholism treatment program?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

No. I went to Petawawa where drinking was part and parcel of showing your manliness. It is what it is. Friday afternoon was always a beer call in the MWO's office.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Yes. I wish I could say—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

That was an O group. That's where a lot more information was passed on than you could ever get out of anything. That was just part of the operation.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

For sure. I wish I could say that was the first time I've heard that kind of account on this committee. It's unfortunately not.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

It teaches you how to be a functioning alcoholic, where you can get up and be functional at 6 a.m. I turned that into a career, a career where, because I was a contractor, my drinking could go unchecked. In fact, they prefer it if you're drinking, because you don't realize what you're doing. Who in their right mind would sign up to work in Baghdad?

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Sure, okay.

You mentioned that after you were released, you had that suicide attempt that put you in the hospital, and that one intern had informed you that you were a veteran. How long after you released from the forces did this happen?

(1640)

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Fourteen years.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Fourteen years....

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Yes. I was out of the country for 14 years.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

When you were releasing, were you given any information as to the services that would be available to you should you need them?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

No. I was actually still on leave when I was in Kosovo; I was released so fast. I spent about five days going around getting my checkout list done, and my plaque was mailed to me from the base.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Were you given a VAC number when you were released?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

No.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Okay.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I received absolutely zero information on VAC services, because the force reduction plan was on, and it was all about numbers. They really didn't care about mental health.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Okay.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

It was a question they didn't want to ask.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

I understand.

When you were told this, were you able to start accessing benefits from VAC at that time?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

No. I became a client while I was in the hospital, and then I went on a voluntary rehab course in Belleville, Ontario. It wasn't the vet-sponsored one. It was a fairly tough one—a kick in the ass when I needed it. From there I started completing all the paperwork, and I was assigned a case manager.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

The was 14 years after you released.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

After 14 years I got my first case manager, yes.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

All right.

On behalf of the Government of Canada, I apologize that this happened to you. It should not have happened.

The Chair:

Ms. Lockhart.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to each of you for your testimony today. It's been very good for us.

Mr. Mitic, you mentioned that you think we need to change the tone. We've talked about that a lot in this committee. One example that we had heard about, and I'm not sure if it was in this study or the previous study, was that the time that was allocated for veterans to use training and education and the career transition program was only two years, and that this actually caused more stress.

What do you think might be a more appropriate time frame? Might that change the tone, if there weren't these tight time frames to utilize benefits?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Time frames in the context of who you're dealing with, I think, are ridiculous. A two-year time frame on someone.... Let's say everything goes perfectly, all the i's are dotted and all the t's are crossed, and they get out and they're medically unfit to do anything. Then in two, three, four, or maybe five years they're up and about, feeling good, thinking they'd like to go to school and maybe go out and get a job. It's, “Oh sorry, man. That was a two-year window.”

In my case, I lost both feet. Let's say the system had worked, and Rick Hillier hadn't said, “You're not releasing anyone wounded in combat until I say so.” That would have had me released in 2010 or maybe 2011 and still dealing with the loss of my entire career, identity, etc., and figuring out what I wanted to do or go to school for. For most of the things I asked about taking, I was told, no, I couldn't take that. I think the new budget changes what you can go to school for, which is great. In my case, as an infantry sniper, there's not a lot of transition to the civilian world unless I want to go work for certain people in Aleppo, which I don't.

The two-year window to decide what to take or even if you're healthy enough to take it, in my opinion.... It took me a solid five years just to recover physically from my injury. Mentally, as I said, ask Alannah what she thinks. These arbitrary time limits are baffling to me in some cases. You either qualify for a benefit or you don't. Especially considering you're dealing with people who are mentally or physically, or both sometimes, smashed. With someone who doesn't want to be released, to tell them to get a grip and wrap their head around going to school.... I know lots of troops that have gone to school and done something they hated, and they have no desire to go into the field or the training that they took advantage of. That's one place where I think we should just lose the time limits. Let the individual decide when they're ready.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you.

Mr. Brindle.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I just want to follow up quickly with that. I start school in September, and the day I start I have two years. I don't know what's going to happen to me in the next two years. I don't know how I'm going to react in public. I'm anxious and I want to go to school, but there shouldn't be a two-year limit on it for me to complete this course. If I need to take six months off to get my progression well.... I've haven't been in a classroom since I was 18 as a full-time student. Two years, there's no reason for it. Are you going to kick me out after two years? Possibly, because of my disability, it might take me three years. It doesn't make sense.

(1645)

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you for that.

Mr. MacKinnon, you talked about colleagues you knew who had reached out to the OSISS and then received an email back instead of a phone call.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

We never received an email or a phone call.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Excuse me, that's even worse. One of the things that I think has been really important here is that we talked about that personal contact with VAC or OSISS, and we hear you say again how important that is, and that one's quite obvious. But are there other aspects that you think are really important to help our veterans with their mental health concerns? As I said, there was the personal contact, but are there any other things like that in our delivery that you feel are really important?

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

Like I said, there may be a lot of resources out there, but you have to get the word out what those resources are and where they can be located, and how to access them. A lot of veterans don't know this. You can go to a Legion and somebody there may or may not know. Go to the Veterans Affairs' offices, and it depends on whether they're understaffed or they're even staffed at all.

I tried calling my case manager. I had to call the 1-800 number, so I had to go through about a half-hour spiel with the person on this phone who then says, “Okay, I'll transfer you. If I can't get hold of your case manager, do you want to leave a message?” No, I want to talk to the case manager. If I wanted to leave a message, I'd just go to her office. If she's not there, then I'd leave a message, but I want to talk to her.

I'm not sure if there's a big moratorium on direct lines to the VAC case managers. I don't know why everybody wants you to go through the 1-800 number. If you have a case manager, you should be able to get a direct-dial number for them. Make them available.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Okay.

I just have one other quick question. Are any of you aware that there is a handbook of benefits? We have one nod, but that's not—

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

I know that there are benefits, exactly what they are....

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Actually, you find out either by discussion...and Facebook is a good place to find out what benefits you can get. The pamphlet I'm not familiar with, but for the benefits there are so many hurdles. For example, there's a recent benefit that's out where you can claim $300 for a tablet because of apps that help with PTSD. However, the approval authority is not your doctor. It's a psychiatrist. Trying to get in to see a psychiatrist, you can spend $500 to get a $300 claim. It took me 18 months to see my psychiatrist to get my prescription sorted out.

They create things, and it sounds great in the book, but it doesn't translate into anything substantial because you just don't have the ability. You don't have a medical doctor, a family doctor. To try to see a psychiatrist is a whole other level. It's great to have a benefit, but if you can't get access to it, it's useless.

The Chair:

Ms. Wagantall.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, CPC):

Thank you.

I want to thank you all for your service. I know we say this in Canada, and I love this country as well, and your service is phenomenal, but I want to just say from my husband and myself and our children, and our grandchildren, being on this committee has brought this home to me significantly, and my grandkids are learning. I think it's really important that you understand that it's everyday Canadians who really do appreciate what you've done.

I have so many questions.

First of all, Mr. Brindle, you talked about your dog, and I know the Audeamus group, and I've met personally with Chris, and Marc and Katalin. They are doing amazing research at the University of Saskatchewan and B.C. on specific training for the multiplicity of concerns that challenge a veteran. Very specifically they have strong metrics and measurements, and they're veteran-centred. That's what they're all about.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

As an example, I applied to Courageous Companions at the time, in November 2014. At that time, Marc Lapointe was assigned to me.

He called me and we spent about four hours on the phone going through various symptoms. Then he decided which dog I should have—I didn't. The last thing in my imagination was a Jack Russell as a service dog. Because of my specific symptoms, they took a dog and trained her up for me. I didn't receive her until July.

(1650)

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Can I ask how much you paid for her?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Nothing.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay. Because this is a significant thing. We're always talking about money here. I know there are other groups. I'm not specifically mentioning any, but they can cost up to $30,000.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Yes.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Here we have again a situation of veterans helping veterans.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Yes. It's all run by veterans.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Exactly.

We seem to struggle here with the confidence. You talk about trust to get the care you need. It seems to me there's a lack of trust to believe that you know what you need most and can provide that in a way that would be the most beneficial.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

There's no way I could sit in front of this board without her here. I'm terrified of the public.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay.

You mentioned that service dogs need to be taken care of now and that this takes care of the needs, the mental illness, that many of our veterans are facing, and armed forces.

Now, Lieutenant-General Roméo Dallaire came before this committee. We were talking about mefloquine. I asked whether we needed to study it, and he just broke right in and said no, enough with the studies, just get rid of it.

In this case, there's so much evidence out there about what service dogs can do. Basically, what is your perspective?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

My perspective is that the studies have been done. I believe everyone goes by the bad example of the Legion who spent millions on phony dogs from the States that were not properly serviced and qualified. That just put a black mark on the service dog group as a whole.

Audeamus is a fully not-for-profit.... I didn't have to pay a penny. Her value is over $20,000, for the amount of training that was put into her. They did it all on the backs of other veterans. We do fundraisers and stuff. I'm now volunteering my time to the project.

My eventual plan is to become a trainer so I can train a dog and give it to another veteran. We have to do this ourselves because VAC doesn't want to look at the issues of dogs and the benefits.

A caregiver award was just announced, but my costs for specialty foods, veterinary services, I have to pay out of my own pocket.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay.

I'm understanding the government's perspective that this has to be done properly so that we don't have issues as in the past. But that being said, it's not that we have to study this further. We just need to get this done.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

The study is done.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

We could recommend that they come and speak to people like you. I know Audeamus has tried to get a meeting with VAC. I have to say that of all the things we're doing around this table, one of the best things we can do as a committee is to have those folks come and make a presentation to us.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I make myself open to anyone if I can save a life. I don't want anyone to travel the road I did. If there's any further discussion on it, I am happy to take the time and follow up.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

I'd recommend on our committee that within our various groups we all take the time to ask these folks to come to your office and meet as a caucus and see what they have to offer us.

I agree with you. I think it's phenomenal.

Mr. McKean, could you talk a little further about this concept of change of attitude and the use of volunteers and veterans?

Mr. Michael McKean:

Currently the OSISS system requires health care professionals to sign off that people can work full time and not be triggered. One problem with that is you significantly limit the number of people who will apply. You're basically encouraging people to put their game face on and pretend it's not an issue or to avoid situations where they will be triggered.

As I was saying, even though I was on the official list as a Blue Cross provider for social work and clinical care manager, I have been avoided. When I tried to do a clinical practicum on the base, I was told that too many people knew me and that I had too much background on this.

I successfully did a clinical practicum in a mental health facility, Waypoint psychiatric hospital, and in a high school dealing with difficult youth. They had no trouble accepting me, but with my peers, my brothers and sisters in uniform, basically the approach was, “He has PTSD. We don't want that. We don't want people like this around so let's not deal with them.”

Whereas OSISS is generally recognized, and that's one of the reasons that people are able to connect, right now we're dealing with a budget roller coaster that is limiting their ability to bring on volunteers, which is causing burnout. It's a vicious circle.

(1655)

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay, so this limiting of funding meant volunteer training was cancelled.

Mr. Michael McKean:

Cancelled. Now they're trying to sort out the French training in Quebec and whether they'll be able to put English or bilingual people on that. But then you cause more travel, and you're limiting the available people. Plus, you're making people feel like failures, because they get themselves organized to be able to attend a week-long training and then it's, “Hurry up and wait.”

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall: Thanks.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Bratina.

Mr. Bob Bratina (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Thank you.

In my previous life I was a mayor, and I had a senior adviser of military heritage and protocol, Geordie Elms. He'd been the commanding officer of the Argylls, with a good military history. I would often speak at schools and talk to kids about “team Canada”. I told them that we've seen the hockey and this and that, but the greatest team Canada is the one with the Canada flash on your shoulder, which is the Canadian Armed Forces.

I will direct this question to you first, Mr. McKean. Did you have that team Canada feeling, that feeling of self-respect and that you were on a great team? Did you lose that feeling as a result of the experiences you've talked to us about here? Do you still feel in your heart that you did a job for Canada, and that Canada is proud of you?

Mr. Michael McKean:

I absolutely had the feeling that I was part of team Canada. As I mentioned, when I was in Afghanistan I was injured. I put my game face on and continued. I went through my sleep disturbances. I went through all sorts of things because I felt a job needed to be done. I felt it was important that I do it and that I not withdraw so that other people had to carry the load.

I felt very sad when I returned to Canada. It was basically, “You're back. Focus on what you're doing. Perform or get out.” When I transferred back to the reserves.... I had been part-time reserve, regular force, part-time reserve. I was a CO with Jody when he was down with the Argylls. We had team spirit. We had the units. The reserve units in Canada are very significant creators of that perspective. They're our link to the community. That's where you will find a mechanism to get health care services in the community, especially if you start drawing on some of the T2 health from the States, because they are able to provide health care services to remote and under-serviced areas through telehealth and other things.

I couldn't continue. I felt that I was perceived to be bent or broken. I felt that many people were turning their backs on me and that I was no longer considered part of the team. I'm still trying to help other veterans, basically on a volunteer basis, because that's the only mechanism that works.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

It's interesting that you make the comment about the reserves. In my four years as mayor, there was one event that could never be surpassed in terms of bringing the community together, although it was a very sad event. It was the funeral of Nathan Cirillo. That city came together. That reserve unit and all of our reserves, the “Rileys” and so on, felt the love from the community. Obviously you've lost a little bit of that, or somewhat of that, because of the experiences you've had.

Could I ask Mr. Mitic to respond to the same point?

(1700)

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Just for clarity, as fine and historied a unit as the Argylls are, I was a Lorne Scot, sir.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Bob Bratina:

That's fine.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

I'm sorry, could you ask your question again?

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Did you feel a part of team Canada, and pride that you were working for Canada—

Mr. Jody Mitic:

In the military?

Mr. Bob Bratina:

In the military.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

I didn't stay 20 years because I thought I was wasting time.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

I understand that, but subsequently, because of the veterans issues and the problems that we're talking about, did you lose a little bit of that?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

No, you lose all of it. That's what I was saying earlier. You have a support system. I think Phil pointed it out, and I've said it before too. You're told where to go, what to wear, what to bring, we'll feed you, we'll get you there, we'll do your leave pass, blah, blah. You just have to be there. Then all of a sudden you're injured. An infantry unit looks forward, and I don't blame the CO or the RSM or anybody for worrying about the guys going out the door who are going to be going into combat and not worrying about the pieces of the machine that have fallen off.

But as I said, when you get into the system, and you realize when you're still on the DND side, these are folks in uniform with the same flash who swore the same oath to the Queen and country that you did, and you're told...you just get so much negativity. You're denied benefits. I'm convinced I'm still owed tens of thousands of dollars from the JPSU, which, for my mental health, I've just written off. I have a job that pays well and I've been lucky, but one day I might not be. That was more stressful than stepping on the land mine.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

To conclude this, what I'm getting at is that in addition to financial resources, we want to make sure that all veterans know what services are available. We're trying for as many resources as we can, but do we need to train or retrain or talk to the people in vet services and DND about the respect and self-respect and self-worth that individuals need to continue to feel?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

That has come up often. It's been 10 years since I got wounded, and that same sentence has been used at least half a dozen times that I can remember. Yes is the short answer, but at the same time I think the people who are on the front line of service need the latitude to make certain decisions that would make it a lot more timely. Sometimes it's less the language, it's more the time it can take. Two weeks to us if you're living your life and doing things don't seem like a lot, but if you're homebound and let's say you've hurt your back and you can't do any household chores, a two- or three- or six-week delay as it goes through the system and gets talked about.... Your house is a pigsty, and now you're self-conscious to invite anyone over. You feel you're disappointing yourself because you can't do the dishes. It just builds and builds. Streamlining some services would be great because—I forget who said it and I steal it all the time—when you look at the level of oversight and red tape it's almost as if for every dollar that goes out the door, you spend a buck fifty examining it and making sure it's okay.

A lot of the time, it's the time involved in getting the benefit and less about the language.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

All right. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I only have five minutes. I want to ask two questions but the first one I think is really important from your perspective, so I'm going to need some quick answers on this.

The DND ombudsman whom I respect greatly, Gary Walbourne, has made recommendations with respect to transitioning because the overwhelming information that we're receiving is that the transition is the most difficult part. He's made recommendations, as has this committee in a report to Parliament, to ensure that DND makes certain that every aspect of our CAF members' life is taken care of with respect to pensions and potential doctors, before they're handed over to VAC.

Ombudsman Walbourne refers to it as a concierge service. I'm interested from all four of you how much value you see in that system, but very quickly because I have another question.

Michael.

(1705)

Mr. Michael McKean:

I believe it would be very important. Right now, we've spoken with the Barrie family health team. They're very interested in working with the military in the IPSC and the JPSU, but Base Borden is not currently on the pilot basis. I work with veterans every week who say that kind of service is critical because the points made by their people are the only way they're going to transition to find a family physician or other support. Because if you don't get that, you're behind the eight ball.

Mr. John Brassard:

It goes beyond that, too, to ensure that your pension information and the money is there as you transition, not 16 weeks later.

Philip, I know you spoke about transition. How much value do you see in that? How would that have helped you?

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

It's a good idea but very impractical.

Mr. John Brassard:

In what sense?

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

They haven't the resources in certain areas such as mine that are underserved in civilian health care practitioners. It might be great in Ottawa, Toronto, or Halifax, but not in places such as North Bay.

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay.

Joseph.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

There's just too much of a disconnect between Veterans Affairs and the Canadian Forces. There's a Veterans Affairs office on every base. Part of your out-clearance for your release should be checking out with them and spending a day becoming a client, because in all likelihood you will become a client, possibly at 50 or 60 years of age, as military injuries start to sprout up.

It's important that Veterans Affairs be key to everyone who's being released. If it's dental work, they make sure our dental work is 100%, but for mental work, they don't care. People don't like to go to the dentist, so you have to order them to go there. That's why you have dental parade. It's the same thing with mental health and Veterans Affairs. No one is going to want to admit that they're a veteran or that they're disabled, but if it's part of an out-clearance where they must sit with Veterans Affairs and go through it, they could receive pamphlets about how to fill out documents correctly, or an introduction to My VAC Account, which can all be done within a couple of hours. Then we'd have vets who are informed and not finding out about it on Facebook.

Mr. John Brassard:

Jody, what do you feel?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Transitioning was brutal. As I said, I'm considered somebody who has their stuff together, and the transition was overwhelming. Information was being thrown at you from a firehose. An example could be something as simple as this. If you're in the military, you have a service number, K41302461. That was mine for 20 years. Ask me my VAC service number.

Mr. John Brassard:

You haven't a clue.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

I have no idea. Why do I need a whole new VAC file when I could just walk to the clerk's desk, say, “Thanks, see you guys later”, walk out as Mr. Mitic, show up at my VAC office, and say, “Here you guys go”, and we can go through my file? It could be the same number, the same file, just change the cover from blue to red or something. The transition would feel a lot smoother. It's things such as that.

Mr. John Brassard:

It would be less stressful.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

It's a duplication. Phil said it's one thing to talk to one person about your deepest, darkest fears and secrets, but then there's the next person, and the next person, and then you just finally don't want to do it. It's the same when you're transitioning. You're filling out the same form, paperwork you've already done when you were in the service. It's the same form and the same information, just a different department on the top.

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds for a question.

Mr. John Brassard:

I'm not going to get this done in 30 seconds. Briefly, as we've sat at this committee and studied mental health and suicide prevention, we've heard often that suicidal tendencies are a result of prior mental health issues. How much of an impact did your military career have on your mental health issues?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Personally, I don't know. I've accepted things such as suicide, depression, and all that as being side effects that some of us get in this gig. First responders have the same issues, and emergency room doctors and nurses. They're tough jobs, and people do them voluntarily for a reason.

Mr. John Brassard:

Mr. Chair, could I ask the witnesses to provide a synopsis of the impact from perhaps their military careers compared to what they were experiencing previously in their lives, maybe even some of the experiences of some of the people they know? I know it's a difficult question, but we hear that often, and that's why I felt that it was important to bring it up.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

The only reason I would hesitate, sir, is that I joined the military at 17, and most of my colleagues did as well, young men and young women. In my opinion, I became an adult and a man in the military. Everyone's crazy when they're 17, right? We're all looking for who we're going to be as adults. It would be tough for me to judge whether I was different or the same.

Better people to ask would be my family.

(1710)

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay. I'll leave it there. Thank you.

The Chair:

With that, if you want to answer that question, get it in to the clerk and he will get it to all the committee members—if you can.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Sure. I'll still try.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

In regard to the recognition of the sacred obligation to veterans, it feels very much as though that has been forgotten. How important is it that we remember that and make it part of how we function, how we interact, how we deal with and support our veterans?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

I think the sacred obligation would come back to the spirit of what we're dealing with. If my comrades didn't have to say things like, “I'm fighting with Veterans Affairs for this”, that would be a big step. There are a few benefits that were lost along the way without really asking us that I think should be re-implemented. There were a few things that were taken away or modified with the new Veterans Charter that I don't think were fully vetted out when they made these decisions, which could be re-implemented. That would go a long way as well, the biggest one being the lifetime medical pensions.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. That's my next question. How important is that pension for medically releasing veterans? We keep hearing it's coming. Would that make a lot of difference in terms of how veterans felt in regard to recognition for their service?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

In my case, personally, I didn't know the charter took away the lifetime pension. If you asked most combat soldiers, instead of a lifetime monetary pension, you're going to get this lump sum, and then there's going to be this patchwork of benefits that you may or may not qualify for at certain times in your life, it would have been, “No, go pound rocks”. Look, it's not like it's a ton of money. A 100% pension, maybe indexed under the price consumer chart—whatever that thing is—would be maybe five grand a month for 100% disability. It's not like we're talking a ton of money, but it's something that.... Again, right now I'm able to work and make a few bucks, but one day I might not be able to, and I'll know I have a roof over my head and food on the table at the minimum.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. Thank you.

One of the things that we've also heard is, yes, there are mental health services available for CF personnel, but once you leave, those mental health supports are not specific to the needs of veterans. For example, group therapy is one of the ways of trying to, I guess, provide veterans with help. Mixing veterans and non-veterans doesn't work, and I wonder if you could comment on that.

The Chair:

I'm going to have to let somebody in, and I'll come back that. We're just going to run a short little round around the time out.

Your three minutes are up, and I'm going to flip to Mr. Kitchen for three minutes. We'll come back to Mr. Graham, and then you to finish it.

Okay, Mr. Kitchen, you have three minutes.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Brindle—and feel free, if I'm overstepping my bounds on this question, to not answer the question, or if it makes you uncomfortable at all—I realize this may be hard, but I'm wondering if you would be able to give some suggestions on approaches that you might take when that veteran is in that crisis situation. Regarding that suicide attempt that's in that crisis position, do you have any suggestions that you might have to.... We talk about a suicide hotline. What good is a hotline if no one's going to pick up that phone? Right?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

It all comes down to the word “suicide”.

It's a scary word. I'm not afraid of it. I'm actually quite lucky. I feel like someone who has diabetes, or a heart condition, or a kidney condition and knows it. I have a certain condition where, under the exact correct circumstances, I don't want to live anymore. I avoid those circumstances, such as booze and working overseas, and I work with my therapist on meditation and yoga. That is my treatment to avoid suicide. It's no different from having a heart condition and eating a Baconator every day—you're going to shorten your life.

We have this stigma on the word “suicide”. We have to get rid of that, so that you're not afraid. If you have a suicide ideation or you're thinking about it, you're not thinking about actually doing it. It enters your mind over a long process. Your mind starts playing games with you and starts eliminating the reasons why you should live, on your own.... That fear of coming out and saying, “I just feel down”, without all the cavalry being called in all of a sudden, is the way you balance it, especially if you're doing medicine changes, you're by yourself, and you don't have anyone to talk to. You ride it out, thinking that it's going to get better, and you don't want to call and get everyone wound up again.

When you lose your temper in the Veterans Affairs office I've seen what happens, so you bite your tongue. You try not to get angry about the system, which, as we've all heard, is not just aimed at me. It's a system-wide problem when you can submit a claim in September 2015 and still argue it.... A lot of us joke that they do it on purpose to test us, to see if we actually are injured. When it comes down to that, there is no camaraderie. There is no brotherhood like we had in the forces. It becomes you and an insurance company. I don't see it as VAC; I see it as an insurance company. We all know the word “appeal”, because you're denied the first time.

To go back to the question of suicide, look at the word as not so scary. Everyone in this room is capable of suicide based on the information available to them at the moment they choose to do it. No one is above it. Let's not be scared of it. Let's get some peer support groups and start getting the word out that it's okay to speak about it.

(1715)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham, you have three minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Brindle—or Don, if you will—I really appreciate that you came in and told us about the whole story, not just the end of your career. Hearing the background I think is important.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I thought it was important because there have been recent studies saying that almost half of Canadian Forces personnel have suffered at some point from child abuse. Being a survivor of it, I thought it was important for you to realize that. As well, the depression rate is much higher in the Canadian Forces than the national average. Those items have to be addressed in the Canadian Forces.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a quick question for you. You mentioned “spin dry” a couple of times. Can you tell me more about what spin dry is?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Spin dry is a course. If you get into any trouble with alcohol, you're sent away to it. I believe it was held in Kingston or something like that. There are probably various locations.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

It's at various locations throughout—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

An MP would have much better information on spin dry, because he's—

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

I've never done it—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I'm not saying he did, but he has probably sent a lot of people there. Or he has reported—

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

Their CO did.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Yes, their CO, as based on his report. It's a course that you go on to quit alcohol. If you get into serious trouble with alcohol in the forces, you go on a spin dry. I don't know the official course name, but everyone knows it as spin dry.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

It's alcohol awareness.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Yes, alcohol awareness.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You referred to it as effectively a career ender.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

It is. If you as a corporal get sent on a spin dry course, you're going to be a career corporal.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I get you.

You mentioned that you found out you were a veteran. I thought that was a very interesting position to be in—to find out that you're a veteran. When you left the service, what happened?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I made very bad irrational decisions based on my injuries.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There was nobody saying, “By the way, you're a veteran now and here's where you can go.” It was just—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

No. They were so quick to get me out. I was still on leave and I was in Kosovo. I was still effectively in the Canadian Armed Forces when I was destroying cluster bombs. The problem is that it happened so fast that I didn't even realize what I had done.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

Did you get out under the first or the second plan?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

The second plan.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

Was that in 1995?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

No. It was the tail end. It was in 2000, but it was still at the tail end of the last FRP.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

Okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There must be a lot of people out there in the same situation who still haven't found out that they're a veteran, so—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

There are. Actually, I can list them by name, two of the guys I've lost. One of them is Jacques Richaud, who died in Iraq. He was a Canadian ammo tech. Paul Straughn is still in Libya right now.

You're afraid to come home because you don't know what you have. I've now said, in trying to be an advocate, “Call Veterans Affairs and you can get help.” But I didn't. No one said that to me. When you're out of the country, working in a complete combat zone, you're not watching commercials on the Canadian CBC saying that there's help. You don't see pamphlets in your doctor's office, because you don't go to a doctor's office.

I was not a Canadian for 14 years. I was a resident of Russia, a resident of Tanzania, and a resident of Baghdad, but the Veterans Affairs outreach doesn't go there. The last thing on my mind.... Then, when you start talking about PTSD.... I still had doubt for 10 years, not even believing that I had PTSD. It only sunk in on my first attempt—and PTSD was out with more knowledge—that I had a problem, but I still didn't know to phone Veterans Affairs.

(1720)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How do we reach these people in Libya and Baghdad and wherever else they are who are not coming home?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

That's a great question. You have peer outreach.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Our final three minutes go to Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I would like to come back to the question about mental health supports after a veteran is released and the fact that there isn't a whole lot available, so that veterans find themselves in group therapy. Could you give a response to that in terms of the veterans' needs?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Sorry, you said the group...?

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I mean group therapy with non-veterans, a mix.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

I never did that for mental health, but I did it for my physical rehabilitation. Canadian Armed Forces medical centre, which we used to have here in Ottawa, would have been my preferred place to do rehab. If I were going to go and do mental health therapy I would prefer to be around my brothers and sisters. Being the young fit guy in a hospital full of older diabetic car accident victims is not good for morale, and I spiralled pretty quickly when I realized I was the only army guy there. It would be the same in any other facility. Maybe it could be with first responders. DND and VAC should get together and sponsor a place just for military and/or veterans, because there seem to be plenty of clients available, and I don't think it would be a waste of money at all.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

And they're only getting more.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

There are probably going to be a lot more in the next decade.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you for that.

I have a quick question. I say quick, but it will probably take a great deal more than the minute and a half I have left. It has to do with the JPSU. We've had testimony about it. According to some it's working well, and according to others it's extremely limited and not working at all well. Have you had personal experience?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

When I was wounded, JPSU was a concept. It was stood up after I was wounded. I was one of the first injured soldiers posted to the JPSU as part of Soldier On, and even though I was one of the team at JPSU, my service was less than stellar. Frankly, as I said, I've written off a lot of that part of my life just for my mental health. I'd rather not revisit it. Alannah and I speak sometimes about how they owe us money for things at the house, a lot to which was to have our house modified for wheelchair use. We're convinced that we'd be looking at probably $50,000, which we paid out of pocket, that we're owed, but just the thought of going and talking to someone, or starting that process has me curled up in the fetal position. That's not a good look for a professional tough guy, so I try to stay away from that.

Here's the theme that I see though, even with the Veterans Affairs stuff. About 70% to 75% are okay with things, and things seem to go smoothly, and then there's the 25% of us who are maybe 70% or more injured. We need the most care, and that seems to be on the JPSU and the Veterans Affairs side. For the simpler cases, of course there are a couple of forms, a couple of stamps, and you're good to go. The complex cases seem to be where things really start to have issues. I found that with JPSU and with Veterans Affairs.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

The reality is that from this point on, cases are going to be more and more complex.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

That's true, but also as I age, I'll become more and more complex myself. I was 30 when I was wounded. I'm 40 now and even right now I'm having issues just walking around, just to come here today. There was a question as to whether I would show up because of my mobility issues. I'll be 50 and then 60 and I'm going to need more services, and sometimes I wonder how things are going to go when I'm that age and when I really need someone to support me.

(1725)

The Chair:

Thank you. That ends our time for today. If there's anything you'd like to add to your testimony, you can email it to our clerk and he will get it to the committee.

On behalf of the committee today, I want to thank all of you for what you've done for our country, and I want to thank all of you for taking time out of today. I know it's tough to come and relate your stories to our committee. Without people like you, we wouldn't be sitting here today, and I hope your testimony will help us to make decisions that will help the men and women who serve.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des anciens combattants

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Neil Ellis (Baie de Quinte, Lib.)):

Bonjour tout le monde.

Je vais ouvrir la séance. Conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement et de la motion adoptée le 29 septembre, le Comité reprend son étude de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide chez les vétérans.

Nous allons débuter par un premier groupe de quatre témoins qui auront 10 minutes chacun pour leur déclaration, après quoi nous passerons à la période des questions. Nous allons débuter par Michael McKean, qui est parmi nous par vidéoconférence depuis Barrie.

Bonjour, Michael. Vous avez la parole.

M. Michael McKean (à titre personnel):

Bonjour. Je vais soulever des points importants pour contribuer à l'étude de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide. Je m'appuie sur plus de 35 années de service militaire au Canada, dans la réserve pendant 16 ans et dans la force régulière pendant 21 ans, ainsi que sur les efforts que je continue de déployer pour réintégrer la vie civile après avoir été libéré de l'armée, le 15 décembre 2013, pour raisons médicales.

Mon point de vue sur la santé mentale, et plus précisément sur la prévention du suicide, s'appuie sur d'autres éléments: sur le fait que j'ai perdu un ami, un officier de réserve; sur mon intervention auprès d'un vétéran de la Bosnie qui avait tenté de se suicider quand il était sous mon commandement; sur mon expérience dans le cadre de l'opération Attention, lors de Roto 0, à Kaboul, en Afghanistan, du 17 juillet 2011 au 15 février 2012 et, enfin, sur les difficultés que j'ai éprouvées dans mon passage à la vie civile.

La préparation et l'instruction permettent à de petites équipes de résister aux conditions les plus inimaginables. Cependant, le rétablissement exige des systèmes de soutien semblables à la préparation qui ne sont encore pas mis à la disposition de la plupart des vétérans.

Je suis entré dans l'armée en tant que simple soldat, dans le 26e Régiment d'artillerie de campagne de l'Artillerie royale canadienne, en décembre 1975. Durant toute ma carrière, j'ai été artilleur ou officier artilleur.

Après avoir étudié la psychologie militaire et l'art du commandement au Collège militaire royal du Canada, je me suis rendu compte que l'art du commandement exige une profonde compréhension des peurs et des désirs humains. La connaissance et l'expérience que le Canada m'a permis d'acquérir m'ont permis de mieux apprécier ce que j'ai appris de mon grand-père, un ancien combattant de la Première Guerre mondiale ayant servi sur le front de même que dans une unité territoriale lors de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, de mes mentors militaires, ainsi que de la lecture des écrits de Souen Tseu, de Clausewitz, de Viktor Frankl, de Toffler, de Roméo Dallaire et de Chris Linford.

Quand le Comité a lancé sa première invitation à venir témoigner devant lui, en 2016, je m'étais dit que les anciens combattants des Forces armées canadiennes ne bénéficient que de services limités de la part d'Anciens Combattants Canada pour ce qui est de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide dans la réserve, et que les FAC et ACC pouvaient et devaient faire participer les vétérans au processus de changement.

Je recommande l'application d'une approche systémique pour intégrer les vétérans, surtout ceux de la réserve, selon des modèles s'appuyant sur le cadre actuel de soutien social aux blessés de stress opérationnel, le SSBSO. Pour cela, il convient de changer les choses, de changer d'attitude pour ne plus uniquement compter sur les coordonnateurs du SSBSO à temps plein, mais sur un effectif complémentaire de bénévoles, et de stabiliser les budgets dans la durée.

Le principe directeur qu'il convient de retenir découle d'une théorie militaire — celle de Souen Tseu et de Clausewitz — qui a été immortalisée par les mots de Napoléon Bonaparte qui a dit: « Le moral est au physique dans un rapport de un à trois. » Pendant mon tour en Afghanistan, en août 2011, j'ai été blessé au genou droit. Tandis qu'on me faisait sept points de suture, sous morphine, sur la table d'opération, je me suis dit que cette blessure n'était pas différente de celles que j'avais déjà eues durant ma carrière, mais qu'avant, j'aurais eu droit à deux semaines de convalescence, voire plus. C'était la consigne médicale à l'époque.

Quand le médecin eut terminé de me recoudre, il m'a demandé si je pouvais appuyer tout mon poids sur ma jambe. Pour lui donner le change, je lui ai répondu par l'affirmative. Je m'étais dit que, si l'on m'accordait deux jours de tâches allégées — et pas question d'utiliser des béquilles — on me renverrait ensuite dans mon unité. Sinon, celle-ci allait avoir de sérieux problèmes. Peu après mon arrivée sur le théâtre des opérations, les procédures opérationnelles avaient été modifiées et le commandement avait imposé que les sorties en dehors du périmètre de sécurité ne se fassent plus à moins de quatre. Nous, nous étions six dans mon groupe, mais l'un des nôtres avait été renvoyé à l'unité, peu après ma blessure, et un autre avait été envoyé chez lui, en permission pour raisons familiales de deux semaines, et cela une quinzaine de jours après que je me fus blessé. Mon équipe n'aurait donc pas pu sortir du périmètre de sécurité si j'avais été affecté à des tâches allégées ou si j'avais dû prendre des médicaments m'empêchant de me mettre au volant.

En 2000-2001, tout juste après avoir été nommé chef d'unité, j'ai fait des pieds et des mains pour aider un officier de la réserve, récemment rentré d'un déploiement en Bosnie. Personne n'avait détecté ses syndromes d'alcoolisme, pourtant évidents, et, après sa tentative de suicide, ce n'est que grâce à l'assurance maladie complémentaire de son épouse qu'il a pu recevoir des soins. En 2012-2013, de retour de mon déploiement en Afghanistan, j'ai eu l'impression de vivre un échec à répétition, d'autant que je suis passé à travers toutes les mailles possibles et imaginables du filet: pas suivi d'une recommandation qui m'avait été faite en santé mentale pour subir une évaluation TSO; communication limitée, incomplète de renseignements aux responsables de la base, une unité de réserve, chargés d'administrer ma libération; problèmes financiers dus à un délai de huit mois avant que mes problèmes de pension soient résolus; problèmes d'accès à des services de santé mentale; mises en attente à répétition pour, en fin de compte, finir par déprendre du programme d'Aide aux membres des Forces canadiennes pour la transition, et série de confusions dans le processus de libération pour raisons médicales.

Après qu'on eut confié mon dossier à un gestionnaire de cas d'ACC, on s'est soudainement rendu compte qu'il fallait que j'attende que les Forces armées canadiennes aient réglé le dossier de leur côté. Il a fallu ensuite que j'attende 2013 pour relever, de nouveau, d'un gestionnaire de cas d'ACC. Malgré les témoignages que ce comité a entendus, à l'époque, l'UISP n'était pas une option envisageable, même s'il était évident que je venais tout juste de rentrer de déploiement. La confusion a régné à chaque étape du traitement de ma demande de prestation. Il a d'ailleurs fallu que je me rende à Archives Canada pour obtenir les renseignements nécessaires parce que les services habilités n'étaient pas parvenus à faire ce qu'il fallait à temps et que les documents avaient été envoyés aux archives.

Dans l'avenir, une solution consisterait à faire participer les vétérans à la gestion du changement. À la page 356 du livre du lieutenant-colonel à la retraite, Chris Linford, intitulé « Warrior Rising », on peut lire que tout vétéran ayant été grièvement blessé ou gravement malade doit avoir l'occasion d'occuper des fonctions véritables, ce qu'ont confirmé d'autres témoins que vous avez entendus, y compris le lieutenant-général à la retraite Dallaire.

Depuis 2012, je consacre énormément de temps à étudier tout ce qui s'est fait pour traiter les blessures de stress opérationnel et le trouble de stress post-traumatique. Nous avons tiré des enseignements, à la fois positifs et négatifs, des travaux effectués au Royaume-Uni, aux États-Unis et ailleurs. Ces travaux sont le point de départ de très nombreuses années d'études complémentaires qui précéderont l'adoption de mesures, ce que me semble vouloir faire le gouvernement du Canada.

En matière de trouble de stress post-traumatique, il y a tout ce que l'on sait et les pratiques exemplaires. Je vous parle de cela parce que, entre 2012 et 2014, dans le cadre de ma reconversion, j'ai obtenu une maîtrise en travail social et je suis devenu travailleur social inscrit en Ontario. J'y suis parvenu parce que j'ai pu m'appuyer sur 20 années d'expérience de coordonnateur du Programme d'éducation antidrogues et de coordonnateur de promotion de la santé, avant d'être déployé en Afghanistan. Je retiens de tout cela que les vétérans possèdent l'expérience nécessaire pour apporter un coup de main, à condition que l'on change les attitudes et les limitations permanentes.

Que veut dire changer d'attitude? Eh bien, la plupart des emplois prioritaires pour raisons médicales correspondent à des postes à temps plein et ceux qui ont retenu mon attention exigent que le postulant obtienne d'abord un certificat signé par un professionnel de la santé attestant qu'il est stable et qu'il ne risque pas de rechuter. Je ne réponds actuellement pas à ce genre d'exigence. Je vous lis un texte préparé d'avance parce que j'ai tendance à divaguer et, si je ne fais pas attention, je risque de rechuter à cause de cela.

Encouragé par mon psychologue, j'ai exploré la possibilité de travailler à temps partiel pour me rendre compte, malheureusement, que mes qualifications ne répondaient pas aux critères du groupe Calian en matière d'assistance en santé mentale aux militaires canadiens. Et cela bien que j'étais devenu fournisseur autorisé de la Croix bleue en travail social et gestionnaire de soins cliniques en 2014, grâce à ma vaste expérience d'officier et de coordonnateur du Programme d'éducation antidrogues, expérience qui m'avait amené à faire de la promotion de la santé, notamment grâce à tous les cours que j'ai suivis.

(1540)



En trois ans, on ne m'a fixé qu'un seul rendez-vous qui a d'ailleurs été annulé parce que les responsables ont décidé que ça ne convenait pas, un point c'est tout.

Depuis trois ans, je suis bénévole au programme de santé mentale et de prévention du suicide de la réserve. Les unités de la réserve sont réparties un peu partout au Canada. Elles représentent une façon simple d'établir un lien avec de nombreux vétérans qui ont déménagé des grands centres urbains. Le travail effectué en collaboration avec les unités de la réserve représente une des façons de s'attaquer plus efficacement aux problèmes de la santé mentale au sein de la réserve.

Même s'il est loin d'être parfait, le cadre du SSBSO offre un mécanisme permettant d'établir un lien entre les services de transition de l'UISP et les collectivités. Il serait possible d'améliorer cette formule en intégrant les vétérans, surtout ceux de la réserve, et en tissant un réseau pour aider les vétérans, un peu comme le fait la Section spéciale des blessures de stress opérationnel de la Légion royale canadienne. Il ne s'agit pas d'organismes qui se font concurrence, mais plutôt d'organismes qui se complètent au sein du système.

Pour en revenir à la question du budget, l'un des problèmes qui se pose tient au fait que le SSBSO impose des limites à ses coordonnateurs. Ceux-ci n'ont pas le droit de prendre des appels après les heures de bureau, parce que cela serait considéré comme du temps supplémentaire. Or, il faut pouvoir compter sur un groupe de bénévoles important, sans quoi on risque de vivre le genre de montagnes russes qu'illustre l'interdiction temporaire de voyager de mars 2017. En effet, le cours de formation des bénévoles du SSBSO a dû être annulé à cause d'un manque de fonds et il faut maintenant faire du rattrapage qui va s'échelonner sur plusieurs mois.

Merci.

(1545)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur McKean.

Monsieur Mitic.

M. Jody Mitic (conseiller municipal, Ville d'Ottawa, à titre personnel):

Je m'appelle Jody Mitic et je suis conseiller municipal, ici, à Ottawa. J'ai servi dans les forces armées pendant 20 ans, de 1994 à 2014, et j'ai été blessé en janvier 2007. Je plaide pour la santé mentale. À ma plus grande surprise, trois professionnels m'ont déclaré mentalement stable, et je pense que ma femme ne serait pas d'accord avec ce diagnostic.

Je me suis lancé en politique pour m'exprimer au nom de mes frères et de mes soeurs d'armes. Je crois que, plus nous serons nombreux à faire partie du groupe des élus et mieux nous pourrons contribuer à la cause. J'ai la chance que mon député, Andrew Leslie, soit un ancien commandant de l'armée.

En règle générale, la santé mentale est tout autant un problème de vétérans que de militaires actifs et il concerne donc deux ministères partageant un même objectif: compter sur des gens mentalement stables pendant toute une carrière qui est très exigeante. Dans les premiers temps de l'instruction des jeunes gens et des jeunes filles qui entrent à l'armée, on leur apprend le terme mnémotechnique RICE ou RGCE en français.

Savez-vous ce que signifie RICE ou RGCE? Quelqu'un? Docteur? Eh bien, ça veut dire repos, glace, compression et élévation. Quand on se tord la cheville, il faut pouvoir se débrouiller tout seul parce que les infirmiers sont occupés ailleurs. On ne peut pas se précipiter chez un médecin pour se faire panser la moindre égratignure. Il faut pouvoir se débrouiller tout seul.

Quel est l'équivalent du RGCE pour le mental? Quelqu'un? C'est ça. Pour l'instant, il n'y a pas d'équivalent dans notre société. Voilà un autre problème de santé publique. Si j'ai un rhume, je peux toujours aller au Shoppers Drug Mart du coin pour me faire conseiller par le pharmacien à qui j'aurai demandé quel médicament ou potion maison il me recommande. En général, les pharmaciens ont de bonnes réponses. Or, cela est impossible dans le cas de la santé mentale, autant pour les militaires actifs que pour les vétérans ou pour les civils.

Il faut donc tout reprendre à zéro et former nos gens, dès le premier jour, pour qu'ils puissent faire face au stress mental. C'est un colonel américain, je crois, un Béret vert, qui a écrit le livre « On Killing ». Je ne me souviens plus de son nom. Il parle de l'inoculation du stress, comme beaucoup d'autres experts.

Tout au cours de ma carrière, j'ai remarqué qu'on ne fait pas grand-chose pour préparer les gens à faire face au stress mental. Certes, nous faisions beaucoup de pompes, de tractions, de la course et de tir sur cible, mais nous n'étions pas vraiment préparés au jour où nous verrions un copain se faire éclater devant nous pour avoir marché sur un engin improvisé...

Mme Sherry Romanado (Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne, Lib.):

C'était Dave Grossman.

M. Jody Mitic:

C'est cela, Dave Grossman, vous avez raison... un type super. Ce ne sont pas des ouvrages faciles à lire, mais ils sont très instructifs.

La première fois qu'on voit les tripes d'un être humain, c'est sur un champ de bataille. Il y a des façons de se former à cela. Je cite toujours l'épisode de la mini-série « Frères d'armes » où les protagonistes doivent ramper dans des tripes de porc. Je n'ai jamais rien fait de tel de toute ma carrière. Comme je le disais, la première fois où j'ai fermé la fermeture éclair d'un sac à dépouille, c'est quand il y avait un de mes camarades dedans.

Quand on est dans le feu de l'action, on n'y pense pas, mais on y réfléchit après coup et c'est brutal. On ne sait pas comment on va réagir, on ne sait pas que c'est normal et qu'il faut être triste. On n'est pas une fillette si on pleure parce qu'on a perdu un copain, mais avant, c'est ainsi qu'on voyait les choses.

Passons à la situation du vétéran, comme nous avons pu le constater dans certains cas... Un ami de mon beau-père, qui avait fait la guerre de Corée, a soudainement reçu un diagnostic de TSPT lié à la guerre, alors qu'il avait plus de 80 ans. Cela montre que cette maladie peut mettre très longtemps avant de se manifester. Un jour, les symptômes peuvent apparaître et il faut composer avec. Mon épouse a été libérée pour raisons médicales des forces armées, pour TSPT. Elle était infirmière.

Selon moi, il faut favoriser le travail d'équipe entre le MDN et ACC et s'appuyer sur une stratégie établie dès le moment de l'enrôlement de la recrue jusqu'au jour où celle-ci deviendra vétéran. Je n'ai pas la réponse. Je sais qu'il existe de nombreux traitements qui fonctionnent, dans sept cas sur dix, et puis il y a les trois autres cas, et les sept cas sur dix et les sept cas sur dix du premier pourcentage. Il existe donc d'autres traitements, comme les chiens thérapeutiques, le yoga, la réalité virtuelle ou le MDMA qui fonctionnent tous dans environ sept cas sur dix.

D'un autre côté, il y a le système de soutien. Je peux vous dire qu'Alannah a été très perturbée par ce qui s'est passé au MDN, parce que nous nous attendions à recevoir un certain soutien, qui était clairement prévu, et que nous avons découvert que les choses avaient changé, qu'elles avaient été modifiées, bousculées, sans que nous le sachions. Et puis, on nous a presque fait sentir que nous devions nous battre pour obtenir ce genre de service. Je déteste entendre mes frères et mes sœurs d'armes me dire qu'ils doivent se battre pour obtenir ceci ou cela. On ne devrait jamais avoir à se battre pour ce genre de chose. On ne devrait jamais se sentir comme un moins que rien quand on s'adresse à un ministère.

Les vétérans canadiens ont la chance de pouvoir compter sur tout un ministère. Cependant, beaucoup d'entre nous doivent se battre contre ce ministère qui est pourtant censé être là pour nous aider toute la vie durant. Je n'ai pas la réponse à ce problème, mais je sais, pour avoir traité avec le système, que cela occasionne énormément de stress mental à bien des frères et des soeurs d'armes, au point où ils ne...

Récemment, la veuve d'un des nôtres, qui avait elle-même servi dans les forces armées et qui a une fille du même âge que notre aînée, a complètement disparu des médias sociaux et a cessé de répondre aux appels téléphoniques. Nous avons constaté qu'elle s'était entièrement coupée du reste de la société à cause d'un problème dans son dossier d'Anciens Combattants Canada. Elle ne voulait même pas répondre au téléphone à la simple idée de devoir composer le numéro de son bureau d'Anciens Combattants ou le 1-800. Elle n'était plus capable de faire face à cette situation.

Je ne connais pas la réponse. Tout ce que je sais, c'est que nous avons un ministère qui est là pour nous appuyer et qu'un grand nombre de vétérans trouvent qu'ils doivent se battre avec ce ministère. J'aimerais que l'on puisse changer de ton.

Voilà, j'ai terminé.

(1550)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur MacKinnon.

M. Philip MacKinnon (à titre personnel):

Bonjour.

Je m'appelle Phil MacKinnon. J'ai pris ma retraite des Forces canadiennes, il y a un an, après plus de 26 années de service. Je m'étais engagé comme simple soldat en 1989. À ce titre, on me disait tout ce que je devais faire, où je devais aller et quand. Je me suis acquitté de mes tâches et je recommencerais avec plaisir.

Dans l'armée, au fur et à mesure qu'on grimpe les échelons, on se voit confier de plus en plus de responsabilités, mais on continue de recevoir des ordres d'en haut, de se faire dire où il faut aller, ce qu'il faut faire et quand.

Je suis maintenant à la retraite. Plus personne ne me dit où aller, à part ma femme, et je ne suis pas vraiment certain de pouvoir vous répéter où elle m'expédie parfois. Quoi qu'il en soit, dans le civil, il arrive très souvent qu'on ne sache pas vraiment ce qu'il faut faire. Dans l'armée, quand c'était le moment de la visite médicale et qu'on me donnait un rendez-vous, je m'y présentais. Mais je ne suis plus dans l'armée et je n'ai pas encore de médecin de famille, parce que je suis sur une liste d'attente. Comme je réside dans une région mal desservie, je n'ai pas de médecin de famille. Je dois chercher la salle d'urgence ou la clinique médicale familiale qui accepte des patients.

C'est la même chose dans le cas de la santé mentale. Avant, je me rendais aux rendez-vous qu'on me fixait. Ça m'aidait beaucoup de parler avec un psy. Quand un de mes gars subissait un accident dramatique, j'estimais qu'il m'incombait, puisque j'étais le supérieur, de réclamer un service de counseling en son nom. C'est ce qu'on attendait de nous.

J'ai été policier militaire, dans ce métier, j'ai dû faire face à bien des situations traumatisantes qui pouvaient aller de l'incident domestique grave au suicide, et à bien d'autres choses. Mes gars se rendaient sur place pour faire leur boulot, après quoi, je devais m'assurer qu'ils voient un psy.

C'est maintenant à mon tour d'avoir besoin de services de counseling, mais je ne sais même pas vers qui me tourner. Toutefois, j'ai récemment été mis en contact avec une gestionnaire de cas qui a commencé à me remettre sur les rails, mais quand on m'a diagnostiqué un TSPT en 2006, j'ai suivi beaucoup de séances de counseling, à raison de deux, parfois même trois fois par semaine. Avant, je trouvais mon réconfort dans la dive bouteille. Dans un week-end normal, il m'arrivait de boire deux, voire trois 40 onces, parfois un petit peu plus, si la semaine avait été éprouvante.

En 2001, pendant mon déploiement en Bosnie, lors de la Roto 8, je me suis un jour retrouvé en plein champ miné, bien que celui-ci aurait dû être déminé par les organismes chargés de cette tâche. En 2003, j'ai fait partie de la Roto 0 à Kaboul, en Afghanistan, où je suis retourné avec la Roto 4 et, avec la Roto 0, je suis allé à Kandahar. J'ai fini ce tour en 2005.

Avant cela, j'avais été déployé dans le cadre de l'opération Récupération. Je suis sûr que quelques-uns d'entre vous se rappellent la tempête de verglas de 1998, lors de laquelle j'ai été déployé sur place. On m'avait annoncé qu'un VLLR avait fait une sortie de route et que nous devions aller remplir un rapport d'accident. Jusque-là, pas de problème.

Avant que la PPO n'ait fermé la route, un camion de 10 tonnes, venant de Toronto, est entré dans mon véhicule de patrouille, le chauffeur ayant été aveuglé par la poudrerie. J'étais au volant. J'ai été sauvé parce que je ne suis pas parvenu à déboucler cette foutue ceinture de sécurité. C'est elle et mon gilet pare-balles qui m'ont sauvé. J'en ai encore des cauchemars. J'ai aussi des cauchemars sur l'Afghanistan. C'est ainsi, mais ma conseillère, à Halifax — et j'aimerais bien me rappeler son nom — était une psychologue extraordinaire. C'est elle qui m'a dit quelque chose qui m'a frappé et que je retiendrai toujours. Elle m'a dit: « Vous ne vous en remettrez jamais, mais vous apprendrez à vivre avec. »

(1555)



En 2014, j'ai été posté à Toronto. Comme nous n'étions pas arrivés à vendre notre maison de North Bay, je suis allé à Toronto en vertu d'une restriction imposée, ou RI. J'occupais un réduit de 490 pieds carrés, si petit que, pour me changer les idées, je devais aller sur le balcon. J'étais au 22e étage. La douleur et le stress mental occasionnés par le fait que j'étais éloigné de ma famille ont eu des effets sur mon physique, mais je n'avais personne vers qui me tourner, parce que je ne savais pas. Cela étant, chaque fois que je rentrais à North Bay, j'allais voir mon psychologue pour lui parler à la première occasion. Mais voilà que lui-même a dû prendre sa retraite pour des raisons médicales.

Personnellement, j'estime qu'il faudrait mettre en place un système permettant aux vétérans, lors de leur passage à la vie civile, d'être vus en priorité. À l'époque où j'ai reçu mon diagnostic, j'avais beaucoup de problèmes. J'avais un problème de maîtrise de la colère et on ne veut surtout pas d'un Cap-Bretonnais, porteur d'un insigne, qui ait un sale caractère, qui souffre de TSPT et qui n'a rien à perdre. Ce serait la recette pour la catastrophe.

Il faut disposer d'un mécanisme permettant aux militaires de passer à la vie civile, de pouvoir compter sur des ressources en santé mentale et sur une orientation immédiate assurée par Anciens Combattants Canada. Celui ou celle qui a un psychologue dans le civil devrait pouvoir garder la même personne. Je connais des amis qui ont appelé en vain le SSBSO. Ils ont envoyé des courriels restés sans réponse, sans même un accusé de réception. Il y a lieu de combler au plus vite cet énorme déficit.

Merci.

(1600)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Brindle.

M. Joseph Brindle (à titre personnel):

Comme je ne vois pas ce que je devrais sauter ou garder de mon exposé, je vais improviser. J'ai préparé un document détaillé en PowerPoint qui n'a pas été traduit, mais que je vous ferai remettre tout de suite après.

Après m'être posé la question, j'ai décidé d'intituler mon exposé: « Mes 14 années de tentative de suicide ».

J'ai grandi dans des coopératives d'habitation de l'Ontario très pauvres à Markham, à Eglinton et à Scarborough, où il y avait beaucoup de problèmes d'incivilité comme des entrées par effraction et des vols. J'ai raté ma 7e année. On pensait que j'avais un léger retard d'apprentissage et on a alors songé à m'envoyer dans une école spéciale, mais ma mère est parvenue à convaincre tout le monde de me maintenir dans le système régulier. Et puis, j'ai été longtemps victime d'un ami de la famille qui m'a agressé sexuellement.

Quand j'avais 8 ans, j'ai mis le feu à l'appartement familial et m'en suis tiré de peu. De l'âge de 12 ans à l'âge de 18 ans, je me suis cantonné à mon sous-sol et j'ai passé le plus clair de mon temps à retaper une vieille guimbarde. C'était mon refuge où je me sentais en sécurité. Je ne socialisais pas, je ne fréquentais personne.

Et puis, je suis tombé sur le PIEJ, le Programme d'instruction et d'emploi pour les jeunes, grâce auquel on pouvait entrer dans l'armée à titre de réserviste pendant un an pour essayer le système, pour voir si l'on aimait ça et si l'on était aimé. J'avais demandé à être technicien de moteurs d'avion parce que j'adorais la mécanique. Comme il n'y avait pas de place, on m'a invité à devenir technicien en munitions, métier dont j'ignorais tout. J'ai accepté. On m'avait dit que si j'obtenais de bons résultats, j'aurais de bonnes chances de pouvoir me faire reclasser plus tard ou de changer de métier, puisque j'aurais déjà un pied dans la porte. C'était un mensonge. Ce métier de technicien en munitions est l'un des rares dont on ne peut sortir. C'est celui où l'on compte le moins de spécialistes au sein des Forces armées canadiennes, puisqu'il n'y en a que 140 environ.

Toutefois, j'ai aimé travailler au contact des explosifs, dans les deux volets que comporte ce métier: l'approvisionnement et le côté opérationnel, soit la neutralisation des engins explosifs. J'ai décidé de continuer parce que cela m'intéressait. À l'époque, l'expression engin explosif improvisé, ou EEI, n'était pas aussi fréquente qu'aujourd'hui.

J'ai d'abord été affecté au Dépôt de munitions des Forces canadiennes de Rocky Point, le DMFC, en Colombie-Britannique. Comme je le disais, nous n'étions pas nombreux dans cette spécialité, mais voilà que d'un seul coup, le DMFC a dû accueillir 12 soldats, tandis que rien n'était prévu pour les loger ni pour loger le personnel subalterne. J'ai donc été envoyé à Nelles Block, une base navale située à une quarantaine de kilomètres de Rocky Point, pour occuper un logement réservé aux gens de passage. J'y ai passé six mois à faire la navette en compagnie d'un groupe de travailleurs âgés, spécialistes du domaine, qui n'avaient pas envie de travailler.

J'ai détesté mon boulot et j'ai commencé à me sentir isolé et déprimé. J'étais arrivé sur place en septembre 1986 et, le 6 décembre, je pliais ma voiture flambant neuve contre un poteau après avoir ingurgité de la robine de marin. À l'époque, on pouvait encore avoir de l'alcool à bord des bateaux et il en coûtait environ 25 ¢ pour une bière ou pour un verre de whisky. C'est alors que j'ai commencé à vraiment sombrer dans l'alcool.

Comme pour contrecarrer cette tendance chez moi, l'armée m'a envoyé suivre un cours de dynamique de la vie où l'on se faisait essentiellement dire: « Ne continuez pas, sans quoi vous allez partir en vrille. » On m'a appris à camoufler mon problème. On m'a d'ailleurs éloigné de ce problème en Colombie-Britannique en me demandant de faire tout de suite mon niveau 5 de qualification et en m'affectant immédiatement au 2e Bataillon du service spécial du Détachement du service, à Petawawa.

Là, ce fut un véritable rêve. Nous étions toujours sur le terrain et j'adorais ça. Je m'épanouissais dans mes fonctions et j'en ai profité pour devenir un parfait alcoolique, parce qu'on pouvait boire jusqu'à 4 heures du matin et aller courir à 6 heures. Au début des années 1990, c'était la norme dans les Forces armées canadiennes. Je suis certain que les choses ont changé depuis.

J'ai obtenu ma qualification de technicien en neutralisation d'engins explosifs improvisés, ou NEEI, en avril 1990. Cela étant, je venais de réaliser mon objectif initial, soit de devenir, à 23 ans, le plus jeune technicien en NEEI de l'histoire canadienne, record encore inégalé — et qui ne le sera jamais, à cause des qualifications maintenant nécessaires.

Sur ce, j'ai été affecté comme instructeur à l'École du génie électrique et mécanique des Forces canadiennes, en 1991. Là, je faisais partie de l'équipe d'intervention en cas d'urgence nucléaire, biologique et chimique, en qualité de spécialiste en explosifs. La même année, on avait découvert à Borden des contenants de gaz moutarde encore actif datant de la Première Guerre mondiale. J'en avais entendu parler parce que cette découverte avait été faite tandis que je suivais mon cours de NEEI. Personne ne savait alors comment en disposer. Puis, en 1994, tandis que j'étais membre de l'équipe NBC, l'armée a décidé de neutraliser ces obus.

Mon patron étant absent, c'est moi qu'on a appelé et qui ai fini par éliminer le gaz moutarde. À l'époque, la seule technique consistait à faire sauter une charge assez forte pour fissurer l'enveloppe de l'obus, sans toutefois faire exploser la charge de dispersion, ce qui aurait entraîné la contamination de tout Borden au gaz moutarde. Dans le courant de l'opération, j'ai été contaminé et j'ai dû passer au travers de toute la procédure de décontamination. Le gaz moutarde est un gaz qui se conserve très bien. Mon détecteur affichait sept barres. Désormais, chaque fois que je vois du vinaigre balsamique, qui ressemble au gaz moutarde, je suis pris de panique.

(1605)



C'est à Borden que j'ai été le plus heureux. J'y ai rencontré mon épouse avec qui j'ai eu trois enfants. Tout allait très bien dans ma carrière militaire et je passais devant tout le monde pour les promotions. Je m'étais bien adapté à la vie de famille et je faisais des connaissances sur le plan social. J'étais devenu un simple buveur mondain qui ne consommait plus jusqu'à 4 heures du matin pour aller courir à 6 heures. Ma vie tournait autour de ma famille. Je ne pouvais rêver mieux comme qualité de vie.

Puis, en 1994, on m'a affecté à Toronto, à la base d'approvisionnement des Forces canadiennes, en qualité de commandant adjoint de la section des munitions où j'étais censé être le technicien en approvisionnement. Peu après, on m'annonçait que la base de Toronto allait fermer. Il y avait alors deux postes: celui de caporal-chef et celui de sergent. Le poste de sergent n'a pas été remplacé parce qu'il avait été éliminé. Dans un métier comportant aussi peu d'effectifs, on ne peut pas simplement aller chercher un sergent ailleurs pour le placer là où on en a besoin.

Le commandement s'était dit que, tant qu'à fermer Toronto, autant laisser un caporal-chef s'en occuper. Le problème, c'est qu'il fallait également un chef à l'équipe anti-EEI sur place, la EEI 14. On m'a donc temporairement promu sergent et on m'a expédié au Royaume-Uni pour y suivre un cours supérieur d'anti-EEI avant de me nommer chef de la 14e équipe anti-EEI. C'est à ce moment-là que la nouvelle de la fermeture de la base de Toronto s'est répandue dans la presse, alarmant du même coup la collectivité.

Divers corps policiers avaient accordé une amnistie aux propriétaires d'articles militaires, ce qui avait eu pour effet imprévu d'augmenter de plusieurs centaines le nombre d'équipes anti-EEI nécessaires. Comme je l'ai dit, j'avais été temporairement promu au grade de sergent. Jusqu'à la fermeture complète de la base, je n'ai reçu aucun coup de main, malgré des appels d'urgence, malgré aussi des centaines de milliers de kilomètres parcourus au volant, le plus souvent pour transporter des marchandises dangereuses, comme dix engins explosifs improvisés qu'il fallait détruire. J'ai aussi vécu l'événement le plus horrible de ma vie, une enquête post-explosion concernant un jeune garçon.

À mon départ de Toronto, on m'a promu sergent avec, à la clé, une cote « exceptionnelle » dans mon évaluation du rendement signée par le commandant de la base. Cependant, la fermeture de Toronto allait aussi marquer la fin des beaux jours. Je vivais à Angus et je devais faire la navette tous les jours.

Du jour au lendemain, plutôt que d'aller à Toronto, j'ai été renvoyé à Borden où je me suis retrouvé officier de sécurité des explosifs pour le sud-ouest de l'Ontario. Dans les années qui suivirent, j'ai visité des unités de cadets et de la milice et j'ai donné des exposés sur la sécurité des explosifs. Je vivais dans des chambres d'hôtel, je conduisais une voiture de location et je pouvais me faire rembourser une fortune en dépenses courantes, ce qui me permettait de camoufler mon alcoolisme. Je passais mes journées à boire jusqu'aux environs de 3 heures du matin; je me levais aux alentours de midi, je me douchais, j'allais visiter une unité de cadets. Je vérifiais les casiers, j'effectuais une inspection, je prenais quelques bières en compagnie de l'élève-officier supérieur à qui je racontais mes récits de guerre, et je recommençais le lendemain si besoin était jusqu'à ce que je trouve le courage nécessaire pour rentrer à la maison, parce que je ne me sentais plus capable de faire face à ma famille.

Je me suis mis à boire de plus en plus, au point de devenir complètement dépendant. J'ai pris beaucoup de poids et je suis passé du parfait indice de masse corporelle que j'avais à Toronto à un IMC de 31, avec en prime, un diagnostic d'apnée du sommeil. En 1999, les médecins ont considéré que je n'étais plus apte à travailler en unité ou à être envoyé en opération. Personne n'a cherché à savoir pourquoi j'avais pris autant de poids. Je présentais des symptômes de dépression et ma vie familiale se détériorait. Je venais de passer quatre années à travailler seul, sans aucun soutien, après un tour en opération. Je me retrouvais loin de toute base où j'aurais pu faire partie d'une unité et ressentir les bienfaits de l'esprit de corps, que ce soit à la faveur d'une après-midi à jouer aux quilles, d'une tournée de bière ou que sais-je encore. Personne n'avait remarqué de changement chez moi, sauf les membres de ma famille et j'étais loin d'eux.

Après 15 années dans les forces régulières et une année dans la réserve, dans le cadre du PIEJ, j'ai pris ma retraite le 12 août 2000 avec le grade d'adjudant. Comme j'ai été libéré dans les derniers jours du plan de réduction des forces, on ne m'a posé aucune question. Il fallait simplement réduire les effectifs, les Forces canadiennes voulaient se débarrasser d'une partie du personnel et personne ne se préoccupait de savoir qui partait. Quand j'ai demandé à être libéré de mes obligations militaires, on ne m'a posé aucune question. Je me suis retrouvé dans le civil moins de deux semaines après en avoir fait la demande. On m'a fait passer un examen physique de base, mais aucune évaluation psychologique.

Je suis alors parti pour le Kosovo où j'ai commencé mon nouveau métier dans le civil qui consistait à désamorcer des bombes à fragmentation. Après, je suis allé au Kurdistan, dans le nord de l'Iraq, où j'ai fait du travail de déminage dans le cadre des programmes humanitaires de l'ONU. J'ai tenté de réintégrer les Forces canadiennes en 2001, mais le centre de recrutement n'a pas donné suite. Puis est arrivé le jour où des avions se sont écrasés contre les tours jumelles, ce qui a tout changé. Dans les années qui suivirent, je me suis retrouvé en Afghanistan, en Iraq, en Iran, en Turquie, à Amman, au Laos, au Yémen, en Russie et dans les États baltes à neutraliser et à détruire des explosifs, puis à faire de la dépose de câbles à haute tension en Iraq, en Afghanistan, en Tanzanie et au Rwanda.

(1610)



En tout, j'ai passé six ans à Bagdad et deux ans en Afghanistan en qualité de civil travaillant en dehors du périmètre de sécurité. J'ai été reconnu par l'ONU pour avoir découvert la plus importante cache d'explosifs en Afghanistan.

Me reste-t-il beaucoup de temps?

Le président:

Pourriez-vous conclure?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je vais conclure rapidement.

Je vivais comme s'il n'y avait pas de lendemain. J'ai tenté de renouer avec ma famille, mais cela n'a pas fonctionné et a abouti à trois tentatives de suicide. La première était en 2010, en Irak, puis à nouveau, en 2013, en Tanzanie. Ce sont mes collègues qui m'ont trouvé, puis j'ai été congédié. J'ai été renvoyé à la maison et, à ce moment-là, je ne savais pas que j'étais un vétéran. Je me suis retrouvé au Canada. J'avais été à l'extérieur du pays pendant 14 ans. Je ne savais pas où aller ni quoi faire, et j'ai fini par aboutir dans une chambre d'hôtel et me trancher les veines des poignets.

De toute évidence, j'ai survécu à cette troisième tentative, puis j'ai passé un mois dans une unité de santé mentale. C'est là qu'un interne, qui était un réserviste, m'a dit que j'étais un vétéran, et c'est là que j'ai commencé à obtenir de l'aide. J'ai récupéré au point que maintenant, avec l'aide d'un chien d'assistance, je dois commencer l'école en septembre.

Mon parcours vers la guérison a été long et a commencé le 24 janvier 2014, au moment où j'ai pris mon dernier verre d'alcool. Ce cheminement vers la guérison a été extraordinaire. J'ai repris contact avec mes enfants. Je peux maintenant me trouver dans la même pièce que mon ex-conjointe et mon petit-fils. Je veux juste avoir la possibilité de vivre une vie normale et de faire du bénévolat et de travailler dans ma communauté.

Brièvement, voici mes recommandations aux Forces canadiennes.

Il devrait y avoir une présentation d'ACC pendant l'entraînement de base. Dès que vous avez réussi votre entraînement de base et que vous êtes libéré avec mention honorable, vous êtes un vétéran, et il y a de bonnes chances que vous deveniez un client d'ACC. Les soldats devraient être informés de cela. En 2000, en tant que sergent des Forces armées canadiennes, je ne savais pas que j'étais un vétéran. Tout ça à cause de l'Afghanistan. Seuls les soldats ayant servi en Afghanistan savaient qu'ils étaient des vétérans, même ceux qui y avaient travaillé sous un autre uniforme.

Des examens de la santé mentale devraient être effectués avant l'enrôlement, avant la sélection pour des métiers spécialisés, après une tâche opérationnelle, avant le commandement d'une équipe opérationnelle et avant la libération.

J'ai aussi quelques brèves recommandations pour ACC.

Nous n'avons pas besoin d'un plus grand nombre de gestionnaires de cas. Ce sont les gestionnaires de cas qui ont besoin de plus d'aide. Ils devraient avoir des adjoints travaillant pour eux, qui pourraient répondre aux appels des vétérans directement, un genre de ligne 911 pour les vétérans. Nous devons être traités différemment. Lorsqu'une personne fait une crise dans un bureau, vous ne devriez pas appeler la police et une ambulance en pensant que cette personne est suicidaire. Tout ce que j'ai dit c'est: « Ils nous font attendre, ils nient, ils souhaitent que nous mourions et qu'ils n'aient pas à donner suite à nos demandes », et cela a apparemment été considéré comme une tentative de suicide. C'était en octobre dernier.

En ce qui a trait aux chiens d'assistance, des études ont été menées au sujet des bienfaits qu'ils peuvent apporter. Je ne serais pas ici aujourd'hui sans ce genre de chien. Des études ont été menées. Il existe suffisamment de documentation à ce sujet. ACC doit adopter un programme maintenant, parce que ces chiens sauvent des vies. J'ai eu cette chienne grâce à Audeamus, et à Marc Lapointe, qui travaille dans ce domaine. Il faut réellement consacrer des ressources à ce genre de service. Si je n'avais pas ma chienne, je ne serais pas ici. J'ai connu des heures très sombres au cours des trois dernières années, et sans elle, je n'aurais pas pu passer au travers.

Le dernier élément que je voudrais mentionner est celui des incitatifs pour les médecins civils. Lorsque vous ne faites pas partie du système de santé, vous n'avez droit à rien. Vous n'avez même pas de carte santé. Les médecins se rendent compte que les vétérans sont un fardeau pour leur pratique, notamment en raison de la documentation qui doit être fournie pour à peu près tout ce dont nous avons besoin. Ils ne nous prennent donc pas comme patients. Il devrait y avoir des incitatifs pour que les médecins prennent en charge les vétérans.

Merci.

(1615)

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Nous allons commencer les interventions de six minutes.

Allez-y, monsieur Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à vous quatre pour les services que vous avez rendus au pays.

Vous nous avez fourni énormément d'information. Une grande partie des témoignages que nous avons entendus dans ce comité concernant les questions de santé mentale et de prévention du suicide mentionnaient des problèmes de perte d'identité et de stigmates associés aux situations qu'ont vécues nos vétérans.

Monsieur McKean, je crois que vous avez parlé de la reconnaissance des acquis et du fait de permettre aux vétérans de mettre à profit ce qu'ils ont appris pendant leur carrière militaire et de leur offrir des postes par la suite, pour les aider. Je crois que ce que vous dites c'est qu'il faut reconnaître le savoir accumulé par les vétérans pendant leur carrière et qui leur sera utile plus tard. Je me demande seulement si je vous ai bien compris. Si oui, pouvez-vous expliquer davantage?

M. Michael McKean:

Vous m'avez très bien compris. En 2012, j'ai dû abandonner l'uniforme parce que j'étais trop émotif. Je pleurais sans arrêt et je n'étais pas prêt à poursuivre ma carrière militaire. Ceci étant dit, lorsque je me suis recyclé en travail social, on ne m'a pas autorisé à faire de stage dans les services de santé mentale sous prétexte que j'en savais trop au sujet de la vie militaire. J'ai été reconnu par la Croix-Bleue, mais pas par les Forces armées canadiennes, et plus particulièrement Calian, qui gère la plupart des services à contrat dans le domaine des soins de santé et du travail social. On m'a laissé de côté parce que j'en savais trop. On craignait que je joue le rôle de défenseur, ce qui est ressorti aussi dans d'autres témoignages.

De nombreux vétérans ont une expérience considérable, qui peut être mise à profit. La plupart des gens en transition ne peuvent pas travailler à temps plein, mais si nous reconnaissons les connaissances précieuses qu'ils ont, et si nous mettons en place un système suffisamment robuste, je crois que nous pourrons régler un grand nombre de problèmes, parce que les vétérans qui ont été blessés et qui sont passés par là comprennent la perte d'identité. Ils ont traversé des épreuves et ils peuvent en aider d'autres à faire de même, ainsi qu'informer les gestionnaires de cas et les autres intervenants qui ne sont pas familiers avec le système.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Je vous remercie, monsieur.

Monsieur Mitic, vous avez beaucoup parlé de l'entraînement. Vous avez notamment mentionné l'inoculation du stress. Nous avons entendu beaucoup de choses à ce sujet. Il a en outre été question, et M. Brindle l'a mentionné aussi, de la façon dont nous formons nos soldats, dès le premier jour, pour qu'ils deviennent des machines, sans les déprogrammer lorsqu'ils terminent leur service. Nous ne les « déformons » pas pour qu'ils deviennent des civils.

Vous avez aussi parlé de formation, dès le premier jour, concernant le stress mental. Comment percevez-vous cela? Comment voyez-vous cela dans ces premières...

M. Jody Mitic:

Est-ce que vous me posez vraiment la question? Vous êtes sérieux?

M. Robert Kitchen:

Oui.

M. Jody Mitic:

Comme je l'ai dit, je me suis enrôlé en 1994 et, à ce moment-là, si vous aviez un problème mental, on utilisait un terme différent. Vous étiez considéré comme une « femmelette », même si votre problème était physique. Un jour, pendant un exercice, je me suis fait une vilaine foulure à la cheville, et on m'a dit d'endurer. Ironiquement, je n'ai plus de chevilles, donc ce n'est plus un problème. C'était une blague mes amis.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Jody Mitic: Au cours des siècles passés — je suis un maniaque d'histoire — chaque classe de guerrier avait ses moments de réflexion, ses moments d'auto-examen. Les samouraïs excellaient à la calligraphie. Les Spartiates avaient leur montagne où ils se retiraient pour prendre des hallucinogènes, et ainsi de suite. Ils faisaient aussi preuve d'un grand esprit de camaraderie pendant le déplacement des troupes.

Ces moments de réflexion ont disparu dans le monde militaire moderne occidental. Même les moines soldats priaient et jeûnaient beaucoup. Il s'agissait essentiellement de méditation et d'autoréflexion.

Dès le départ, j'instaurerais un genre de système. Il serait question des meilleures pratiques et on enseignerait à nos soldats que, même s'ils préfèrent lever des poids de 300 livres, ils devraient consacrer de 20 à 30 minutes par jour à réfléchir à comment ils se sentiront la première fois qu'ils tueront quelqu'un, ou la première fois qu'un de leurs amis tombera au combat. Nous devons aussi simuler ces situations, dans une certaine mesure. Je sais que je parle sans arrêt de ramper dans des viscères de porc, mais il s'agit d'une méthode d'entraînement très efficace.

Puis, il y a des hommes comme Joe. Désolé, comment vous appelez-vous déjà?

Une voix: Don.

M. Jody Mitic: Don utilisait des explosifs pour simuler des attaques d'artillerie. C'est très bien. Lors d'une attaque au mortier par les talibans, j'ai eu un peu la même impression, et j'avais une petite idée que mon rythme cardiaque augmenterait, mais j'y étais préparé un peu.

Je crois que le MDN doit intervenir et apprendre aux soldats dès le premier jour à gérer leur stress mental. Il faut aussi leur dire qu'ils ont le droit d'avoir peur. Il faut leur dire qu'ils ont le droit d'éprouver toutes sortes de sentiments. Il faut leur dire de mettre à profit leur entraînement, parce qu'une part importante de cette attitude de dur à cuire vient de ceux qui disent: « Ne sois pas aussi femmelette. Endure. » Cette attitude est bonne au combat, mais pendant l'entraînement, je crois qu'il faut mettre l'accent sur l'attitude mentale qui permet de reconnaître que l'on s'endurcit avec le temps. C'est une question d'entraînement, une question de budget, parce que ce genre d'entraînement est coûteux. Il s'agit aussi d'un concept qui semble s'être perdu au cours des sept dernières années.

(1620)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Colin Fraser (Nova-Ouest, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Merci, messieurs, de vous joindre à nous aujourd'hui et merci aussi pour les services que vous avez rendus au Canada.

Monsieur MacKinnon, j'ai réellement apprécié votre témoignage et certaines des observations que vous avez faites. En ce qui a trait au counseling, vous aviez dit que vous ne saviez pas vraiment où aller et comment cela fonctionnait. Je sais qu'on a élargi le nombre de services de counseling qui sont offerts. Avez-vous fait face à un problème concret lorsque vous avez voulu obtenir des services de counseling? Un obstacle particulier s'est-il posé pour vous, qui pourrait être supprimé?

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Il est difficile d'exposer ses états d'âme devant quelqu'un. Devant deux personnes, c'est encore pire. Et lorsqu'il y en a trois ou quatre, les gens refusent carrément de le faire.

Il doit y avoir un endroit... Par exemple, pendant ma carrière, j'ai eu une affectation de six ans, une affectation de sept ans, et toutes les autres, de deux ou trois ans. J'ai été basé à Halifax, et pendant les deux années que j'ai passées là, j'ai commencé à obtenir l'aide dont j'avais besoin et cela m'a remis dans le droit chemin. Il n'y avait rien à London. Puis, je suis allé dans le Nord de l'Ontario, mais j'étais absent trop souvent. Lorsque j'étais à la maison, j'ai pris contact avec un psychologue civil, par l'entremise de l'armée, mais comme je l'ai dit, il est maintenant à la retraite.

Nous sommes dans une région où il manque de services, et lorsqu'il faut recommencer pour la troisième ou la quatrième fois... et dans une région où la variété des services offerts n'est pas grande. Si on était davantage prêt à accepter le personnel militaire... Il faut plus d'ouverture. Il faut dire aux gens comment entrer en contact avec ces services, que ce soit par l'entremise d'Anciens Combattants ou de l'armée. À ma connaissance, les ressources sont très peu nombreuses là-bas, et celles qui restent, depuis qu'un médecin a pris sa retraite, sont déjà débordées, ce qui fait qu'il est impossible d'obtenir un rendez-vous.

(1625)

M. Colin Fraser:

Il serait très utile de mettre en place une structure de fonctionnement définie et de disposer de personnel spécialisé sur le terrain, par l'entremise d'ACC.

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Oui, exactement.

Si vous étiez sur le point de sombrer aujourd'hui, auriez-vous la possibilité de voir un médecin? Vous êtes à Ottawa, et nous sommes à North Bay, où il y a pénurie de services.

ACC doit se préoccuper davantage des régions où l'on retrouve de nombreux militaires. Un plan doit être mis au point pour aider ces personnes, ou encore, il faut réclamer du gouvernement qu'il verse davantage d'incitatifs pour que des spécialistes s'installent dans cette région, afin d'offrir des services.

Il n'est pas financièrement abordable pour quelqu'un de North Bay de faire deux heures et demie de route pour se rendre à Petawawa, ou quatre heures et demie de route pour se rendre à Ottawa, pour un rendez-vous d'une heure, une fois par semaine ou deux fois par mois. Lorsque je me rends à Ottawa, je dois m'arrêter cinq ou six fois en raison de mes douleurs au dos et au genou, notamment. En plus de la tension mentale, il y a la douleur physique, qui est très pénible à supporter.

Il n'y a rien que j'aimerais autant que de pouvoir rencontrer à nouveau un psychologue, mais ce n'est pas pour tout de suite.

M. Colin Fraser:

D'accord, merci, monsieur MacKinnon.

Monsieur Brindle, vous avez mentionné une ligne 911 pour les vétérans. Il y a un numéro d'ACC que vous pouvez appeler 24 heures par jour, 365 jours par année. Êtes-vous familier avec ce service?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Oui, je le connais.

M. Colin Fraser:

Parmi les choses...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Ce n'est pas de cela que je veux parler, toutefois.

M. Colin Fraser:

D'accord.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Lorsqu'un vétéran est en crise, le système 911 que les civils utilisent ne fonctionne pas pour les militaires. Je vais vous donner un exemple concret.

Je me suis rendu au bureau d'ACC de la base de Borden au sujet de la demande de prestations d'invalidité que j'avais faite en septembre 2015, et j'ai craqué. J'étais en colère et la femme qui était là s'est sentie menacée. J'ai dit: « Oh, typique d'ACC — retarder les choses, nier les faits et attendre que les gens meurent. » Deux heures plus tard, il y avait trois agents de la Police provinciale de l'Ontario et une ambulance dans mon entrée. C'est à ça que servirait la ligne 911 pour les vétérans. Cette personne qui s'est sentie menacée au bureau d'ACC aurait pu appeler le 911 des vétérans.

Le gestionnaire de cas pourrait intervenir, si cela pouvait être utile, ou il pourrait y avoir un groupe organisé qui pourrait contacter le vétéran, parce que parfois, tout ce que ces gens veulent, c'est de parler. Ils sont parfois tellement frustrés par le système qu'ils éclatent. Cela entraîne une trop grande réaction. Ces personnes s'imaginent que vous êtes suicidaire et elles envoient la cavalerie. Deux jours plus tard, j'ai reçu une lettre recommandée pour me dire que j'étais banni de ce bureau. C'est le traitement que j'ai reçu, juste pour cette remarque.

M. Colin Fraser:

Je comprends, monsieur Brindle. Je suis content que vous ayez précisé.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je ne suis pas le seul.

M. Colin Fraser:

Que pensez-vous d'un soutien par les pairs?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Le soutien par les pairs fonctionne bien lorsque les budgets des cliniques du SSBSO ne sont pas réduits. Il arrive parfois que ma seule sortie soit pour déjeuner avec le groupe à Borden.

M. Colin Fraser:

Je veux dire, en situation de crise, croyez-vous que le soutien des pairs...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je n'ai pas accès à cela. Lorsque j'ai arrêté de boire, j'ai perdu tous mes amis. J'ai quitté l'armée il y a 14 ans. La plupart des collègues avec qui je travaillais à contrat sont... La plupart d'entre eux sont décédés. L'un d'eux est australien, et j'ai encore des contacts avec lui, mais je n'ai pas d'amis. Mes amitiés avec les techniciens de munitions remontent à 15 ans. N'oubliez pas que, pendant les six dernières années de ma carrière, je travaillais seul.

M. Colin Fraser:

D'accord, merci.

Le président:

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci d'être présents parmi nous et de nous faire profiter de votre expertise. Il est très important pour nous tous ici de nous assurer que les recommandations que nous faisons au gouvernement au sujet des besoins de nos vétérans et des soutiens en santé mentale sont documentées et étayées par les expériences dont nous avons pris connaissance dans ce comité.

J'ai beaucoup de questions, mais je veux commencer par vous, monsieur Mitic. Vous nous avez parlé de ce qui vous est arrivé lorsque vous et votre femme Alannah avez quitté les forces armées. Vous avez mentionné qu'il est difficile mentalement de traiter avec ACC, et qu'Alannah avait demandé des indemnités, mais qu'en raison de certains événements, elle n'en a pas reçu.

Pouvez-vous nous décrire ou nous expliquer la situation plus clairement? Quel genre d'impact cela a-t-il eu sur votre famille?

(1630)

M. Jody Mitic:

En fait, il s'agissait de mes indemnités. Dans ce cas, pour être plus juste à l'endroit d'ACC, c'est le MDN qui était en cause. Toutefois, j'entends des histoires similaires de la part de gens qui demandent des indemnités à Anciens Combattants aussi.

En fait, Alannah a subi une altération de l'ouïe par suite de l'explosion d'une mine. Elle a soumis une demande, qui a été refusée immédiatement, puis elle est allée en appel. Cela a été efficace, et elle a obtenu règlement. Puis, quelqu'un a perdu son dossier et son gestionnaire de cas a été réaffecté sans qu'elle le sache. Pendant 14 mois, donc, elle a dû appeler constamment le bureau, sans jamais obtenir de réponse.

Elle a subi énormément de stress par suite des difficultés que j'ai connues avec notre gestionnaire de cas de l'armée. Cela nous a réellement ébranlés, parce qu'il s'agit de gens en uniforme et que nous pensions qu'ils étaient là pour nous appuyer. Je ne dis pas qu'ils ne nous ont pas aidés. Ils l'ont fait, mais pas de la façon dont on s'y attendait pour des soldats blessés.

Ma femme est beaucoup plus intelligente que moi, ce qui fait qu'elle a pu s'orienter dans le système et traiter avec les bonnes personnes. Elle est aussi d'origine irlandaise, ce qui fait qu'elle réussit toujours à obtenir ce qu'elle veut. Pour elle, et pour moi, la chose la plus importante a toujours été... Comme je l'ai dit en commençant, il existe un ministère qui a été créé pour aider les vétérans à faire la transition à une vie normale, mais ces derniers sont nombreux à croire qu'il ne vaut même pas la peine de faire des démarches, comme dans le cas de notre ami, parce qu'ils craignent d'avoir de mauvaises nouvelles ou de se voir refuser quelque chose qui semblait facile à obtenir.

On peut dire que je suis organisé et que j'obtiens assez de succès, mais chaque fois que je dois traiter avec Anciens Combattants, je suis un peu mal à l'aise. J'essaie toujours de remettre cela à plus tard, parce que je ne veux tout simplement pas me retrouver dans la situation où je me dis: « Je pensais que c'était cela », et qu'on me répond « Non, ce n'est pas cela. C'est ceci. » Certaines indemnités qu'on croirait automatiques ne le sont tout simplement pas.

J'ai fait partie d'un comité relevant du ministre O'Toole, dans l'ancien gouvernement, dont le mandat était principalement de réduire les formalités et d'éliminer tous ces formulaires qu'il faut remplir sans cesse. Mais cela n'était qu'une partie du mandat. On voulait aussi faciliter l'accès aux indemnités. Peu importe qu'on les appelle indemnités liées au service ou autrement, cela ne semble pas être ce à quoi de nombreux vétérans s'attendent.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Vous êtes un mari très avisé, qui admet que sa femme est beaucoup plus intelligente que lui. Très avisé, en effet.

J'aimerais que vous nous parliez davantage des soutiens à la famille, dont on nous a dit qu'ils étaient absolument essentiels, très utiles.

Qu'est-ce qui fonctionne bien pour les familles? Est-ce que quelqu'un peut répondre? Faut-il de la formation? Des conseils matrimoniaux, des soins de santé pour les conjoints et les enfants, ou des soins de relève et un meilleur accès à ACC pour les conjoints? Qu'est-ce qui pourrait faciliter les choses et rendre la situation moins stressante?

M. Jody Mitic:

Pour faire une réponse courte, tout cela.

Je crois que dans le dernier budget, on a prévu de l'argent pour les soins à domicile, ou un allègement fiscal. Il a fallu 70 ans avant que cela ne se réalise. Cela aurait dû être fait il y a 70 ans. C'est incroyable.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Les soins de santé à domicile informels.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Le montant a augmenté pour passer à 1 000 $ par mois.

Pour le conjoint qui renonce à sa carrière, et on ne parle pas seulement de carrière, mais aussi de pension, 1 000 $ par mois, c'est...

M. Jody Mitic:

Mieux que rien.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Effectivement, c'est mieux que rien, mais cela ne remplace pas une carrière.

M. Jody Mitic:

Je comprends, mais il y a maintenant une indemnité pour les gens qui renoncent à leur carrière.

Je pense au capitaine Trevor Greene, qui a subi une attaque à la hache. Cliniquement, il était considéré comme un légume. Aujourd'hui, il peut marcher et parler. Il a même pu remonter l'allée vers l'autel lorsqu'il s'est marié. La seule raison pour laquelle il a pu le faire, c'est que sa femme a décidé de s'occuper de lui à temps plein. Ce genre de soutien, de sa part, est extraordinaire. Il existe de nombreux organismes sans but lucratif, je pense à True Patriot Love, ou à Wounded Warriors, dont les fonds pourraient très bien compléter cette somme pour les personnes qui décident de s'engager dans cette voie.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à tous. Vous avez parlé du budget, mais celui-ci ne reconnaît pas l'obligation sacrée envers les vétérans. Il s'agit d'une question très litigieuse dans le cas des vétérans qui souhaitent obtenir une pension après avoir été libérés pour des raisons de santé. Quelles sont vos impressions au sujet de cette obligation sacrée envers les vétérans?

(1635)

Le président:

Je suis désolé. Nous en sommes à six minutes 30 secondes. Il devra donc s'agir de votre prochaine question.

Monsieur Eyolfson.

M. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Merci.

Je vous remercie tous de votre présence ici et des services rendus.

Monsieur Brindle, j'aimerais parler d'un sujet que M. Mitic a abordé, à savoir la camaraderie entre les militaires, qui remonte à cette tradition ancienne de marcher ensemble vers le champ de bataille. J'ai l'impression, selon ce que vous avez dit, que vous n'avez pas beaucoup profité de cela pendant votre carrière.

M. Joseph Brindle:

La seule fois que j'ai connu réellement cela, c'était à Petawawa, et lors de ma première affectation à Borden, à l'école et dans un bataillon des services, parce que nous étions très près les uns des autres. Lorsque vous êtes constamment en exercice avec des personnes, vous finissez par tout savoir d'elles. Lorsque vous vous retrouvez seul, ensuite, vous connaissez des passages à vide.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Exactement.

Lorsque vous décriviez votre séjour à cette base navale et les 40 kilomètres que vous deviez parcourir chaque jour pour vous rendre au travail, y avait-il une solution qui s'offrait à vous et peut-être...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Pas comme simple soldat.

Comme simple soldat, lorsque vous vous retrouvez dans une base navale où vous avez... Les règles sont complètement différentes de celles d'une base de l'armée de terre. Il est interdit de porter la tenue de travail à l'extérieur de la base. Si on me déposait à l'hôpital de la base, qui était situé à l'extérieur de celle-ci, je devais me téléporter à la base, sous peine de me faire réprimander par le chef pour ne pas avoir porté mon uniforme à l'extérieur de la base. C'est tout un choc culturel pour quelqu'un qui vient d'entrer dans l'armée.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Vous avez parlé de votre lutte contre l'alcoolisme, un thème qui, malheureusement, est revenu très fréquemment dans les présentations que nous avons entendues à ce comité.

Je suis médecin. J'ai beaucoup d'expérience de patients qui ont connu ce problème. Il semble bien que lorsque quelqu'un a un problème de toxicomanie, quel qu'il soit, il s'agit parfois du premier indicateur d'un problème sous-jacent beaucoup plus profond.

Vous avez mentionné qu'on vous avait dit que vous aviez ce problème. Est-ce que jamais aucun de vos superviseurs ne vous a dit que vous aviez un problème et vous a envoyé pour une évaluation plus poussée, afin de savoir s'il s'agissait... ou vous ont-ils seulement dit: « Prends-toi en main et arrête de boire? »

M. Joseph Brindle:

Seulement après mon accident.

Ma voiture était la seule impliquée dans l'accident. Je suis parti seul de la caserne. Je ne me rappelle même pas de l'accident, mais j'ai une cicatrice ici et j'ai fait une commotion cérébrale. Je me suis réveillé le jour suivant à l'hôpital. Il n'y avait pas de téléphone cellulaire. J'ai dû trouver un autobus pour rentrer. Mon visage était comme un melon d'eau. On m'a fait suivre un cours d'aptitudes de vie et on m'a essentiellement averti que si un autre incident se produisait, je devrais suivre une thérapie et que cela nuirait à ma carrière. C'est la seule menace que l'on m'ait faite. C'est ainsi que j'ai appris à cacher mon problème.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Vous a-t-on, à un moment donné, offert de participer à un programme de traitement de la toxicomanie ou de l'alcoolisme?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Non. Je me suis retrouvé à Petawawa, où la consommation d'alcool était une façon de démontrer sa virilité. Disons les choses comme elles sont, le vendredi après-midi, il y avait toujours une possibilité de consommer de la bière dans le bureau de l'adjudant-maître.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Oui. J'aimerais pouvoir dire...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Il s'agissait d'un groupe des ordres. On y avait accès à beaucoup plus d'information que n'importe où ailleurs. Cela faisait partie des opérations.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Évidemment, j'aimerais pouvoir dire que c'est la première fois que j'entends ce genre de choses à ce comité. Malheureusement non.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Cela vous apprend comment devenir un alcoolique fonctionnel; à vous lever à 6 h et à être fonctionnel. J'en ai fait ma carrière, une carrière qui, parce que j'étais un entrepreneur, m'a permis de cacher mon alcoolisme. En fait, on préfère vous voir boire, parce qu'ainsi, vous ne vous rendez pas compte de ce que vous faites. Sinon, quelle personne en pleine possession de ses moyens accepterait de s'engager pour aller à Bagdad?

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Évidemment, d'accord.

Vous avez mentionné qu'après avoir été libéré, vous avez fait une tentative de suicide qui vous a mené à l'hôpital, et que là-bas, un interne vous a informé que vous étiez un vétéran. Combien de temps après votre libération des forces cela s'est-il produit?

(1640)

M. Joseph Brindle:

Quatorze ans.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Quatorze ans...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Oui. J'ai été à l'extérieur du pays pendant 14 ans.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Lorsqu'on vous a libéré, vous a-t-on donné de l'information concernant les services dont vous pouviez vous prévaloir au besoin?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Non. Lorsque j'étais au Kosovo, j'étais toujours en congé. J'ai été libéré si rapidement. J'ai pris environ cinq jours pour compléter ma liste de vérification de départ, et ma plaque m'a été envoyée par la poste à partir de la base.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Vous a-t-on donné un numéro d'ACC lorsqu'on vous a libéré?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Non.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je n'ai absolument reçu aucun renseignement concernant les services d'ACC, parce que nous étions au beau milieu du plan de réduction des forces et qu'on pensait uniquement aux chiffres. La santé mentale ne faisait pas partie des préoccupations.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord.

M. Joseph Brindle:

On ne voulait pas poser la question.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Je comprends.

Lorsque vous avez appris cela, avez-vous pu commencer à avoir accès aux indemnités d'ACC?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Non. Je suis devenu client lorsque j'étais à l'hôpital, puis j'ai suivi volontairement un cours de réadaptation à Belleville, en Ontario. Il s'agissait d'un programme parrainé par les vétérans, assez difficile, un coup de pied au derrière alors que j'en avais besoin. C'est à ce moment-là que j'ai commencé à remplir tous les formulaires et qu'on m'a affecté un gestionnaire de cas.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

C'était 14 ans après votre libération?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Après 14 ans, j'ai eu accès à mon premier gestionnaire de cas, oui.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord.

Au nom du gouvernement du Canada, je voudrais m'excuser pour ce qui vous est arrivé. Cela n'aurait pas dû se produire.

Le président:

Madame Lockhart.

Mme Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à chacun d'entre vous pour votre témoignage aujourd'hui. Cela a été très enrichissant pour nous.

Monsieur Mitic, vous avez mentionné que, selon vous, le ton devrait changer. Nous en avons beaucoup parlé au sein de ce comité. On nous a mentionné le fait, et je ne sais pas si c'était dans le cadre de la présente étude ou de l'étude précédente, que l'on donnait uniquement deux ans aux vétérans pour se prévaloir d'un programme de formation, d'études et de transition de carrière, ce qui entraînait beaucoup plus de stress.

Quelle serait selon vous l'échéance idéale? Si les échéances pour se prévaloir des indemnités n'étaient pas aussi serrées, est-ce que cela changerait le ton?

M. Jody Mitic:

Les échéances dans ce contexte sont, je crois, ridicules. Imposer une échéance de deux ans à quelqu'un... Même si tout allait parfaitement bien, si tous les points étaient mis sur les i et les barres sur les t, et que la personne était libérée, mais était incapable médicalement de faire quoi que ce soit. Puis, deux, trois, quatre ou peut-être cinq ans plus tard, la personne pourrait se sentir bien à nouveau et décider d'aller à l'école et de se trouver un emploi, pour se faire dire: « Désolé, vous aviez deux ans. »

J'ai perdu mes deux pieds. Si le système avait fonctionné et que Rick Hillier n'avait pas dit: « Vous ne devez libérer personne blessé au combat tant que je ne le dirai pas », j'aurais été libéré en 2010, ou peut-être 2011, j'aurais dû faire face à la perte de toutes mes possibilités de carrière, de mon identité, etc., et j'aurais été obligé de décider ce que je voulais faire ou quel cours je voulais suivre. La plupart des cours que j'ai demandé de suivre m'ont été refusés. Je crois que dans le nouveau budget, les règles à ce sujet ont changé, ce qui est très bien. Dans mon cas, en tant que soldat d'infanterie, les possibilités de transition au monde civil sont peu nombreuses, à moins de vouloir aller travailler pour certaines personnes, à Alep, ce que je ne veux pas faire.

La fenêtre de deux ans pour décider des cours à suivre ou même pour déterminer si vous êtes suffisamment en santé pour suivre des cours est à mon avis... Il m'a fallu cinq bonnes années uniquement pour récupérer physiquement de ma blessure. Mentalement, comme je l'ai dit, demandez à Alannah ce qu'elle en pense. Ces échéances arbitraires sont déroutantes pour moi, dans certains cas. Vous êtes admissible à une indemnité ou non. Particulièrement si l'on tient compte du fait qu'il s'agit de personnes qui sont amochées mentalement ou physiquement, ou les deux parfois. Lorsque l'on dit à quelqu'un qui ne veut pas être libéré de se ressaisir et de se faire à l'idée d'aller à l'école... Je connais de nombreux membres des troupes qui ont fréquenté l'école et qui ont fait quelque chose qu'ils détestaient; qui n'avaient aucun désir d'aller dans le domaine ou de suivre la formation qui leur était offert. Il s'agit d'un aspect pour lequel, je crois, on devrait éliminer ces échéances. Laissons les personnes décider lorsqu'elles sont prêtes.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci.

Monsieur Brindle.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je veux simplement compléter cela rapidement. Je vais commencer l'école en septembre, et à partir de cette date, j'ai deux ans. Je ne sais pas ce qui va m'arriver au cours des deux prochaines années. Je ne sais pas comment je vais réagir en public. Je suis anxieux et je veux aller à l'école, mais on ne devrait pas m'imposer une limite de deux ans pour terminer ce cours. Si j'ai besoin de m'absenter pendant six mois pour progresser, eh bien... Je ne suis pas allé à l'école depuis l'âge de 18 ans comme étudiant à temps plein. Il n'y a pas de raison d'imposer une échéance de deux ans. Allez-vous me jeter dehors après deux ans? Peut-être qu'en raison de mon invalidité, il me faudra trois ans. Cela n'a pas de sens.

(1645)

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci de votre témoignage.

Monsieur MacKinnon, vous avez parlé de collègues que vous connaissiez qui ont communiqué avec le SSBSO et qui ont reçu un courriel, plutôt qu'un appel téléphonique.

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Nous n'avons jamais reçu de courriel, ni d'appel téléphonique.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Excusez-moi, c'est encore pire. Parmi les choses qui, selon moi, sont très importantes figurent ces contacts personnels avec ACC ou le SSBSO, et nous vous avons entendu répéter combien cela est important et évident. Y a-t-il d'autres aspects qui, à votre avis, sont réellement importants pour aider nos vétérans à résoudre leurs problèmes de santé mentale? Comme je l'ai dit, il y a les contacts personnels, mais y a-t-il autre chose, dans le même genre, que vous considérez comme réellement utile?

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Comme je l'ai dit, il y a peut-être beaucoup de ressources disponibles, mais il faut en parler et indiquer où elles sont offertes et comment y accéder. Beaucoup de vétérans ne sont pas au courant de cela. Une personne peut se rendre à un bureau de la Légion et rencontrer là quelqu'un qui a de l'information ou non. Elle peut se présenter aux bureaux des Anciens Combattants, mais la réponse qu'elle recevra dépendra de l'effectif présent, si effectif il y a.

J'ai tenté d'appeler mon gestionnaire de cas. J'ai dû composer le numéro 1-800, pour me faire dire après une demi-heure « D'accord, je vais vous transférer. Si je ne peux pas joindre votre gestionnaire de cas, voulez-vous laisser un message? » Non, je veux parler au gestionnaire de cas. Si j'avais voulu laisser un message, je me serais rendu à son bureau. Si elle n'avait pas été là, j'aurais laissé un message, mais ce que je veux, c'est lui parler.

Je ne suis pas certain qu'il y ait un grand moratoire concernant les lignes directes avec les gestionnaires de cas d'ACC. Je ne sais pas pourquoi il faut nécessairement passer par le numéro 1-800. Si vous avez un gestionnaire de cas, il devrait être possible d'avoir un numéro direct pour l'appeler. Ces gens devraient être plus disponibles.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

D'accord.

J'ai une autre question rapide. Savez-vous qu'il existe un guide des indemnités? Quelqu'un fait signe que oui, mais ce n'est pas...

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Je sais qu'il existe des indemnités, mais exactement où les trouver...

M. Joseph Brindle:

En fait, on finit par le savoir après en avoir discuté... et Facebook est un bon endroit pour avoir une idée des indemnités qu'il est possible d'obtenir. Je ne suis pas familier avec le guide, mais pour les indemnités, il existe tellement d'obstacles. Par exemple, une nouvelle indemnité est disponible et vous permet de réclamer 300 $ pour l'achat d'une tablette, afin de vous donner accès aux applications utiles pour les gens qui ont un trouble de stress post-traumatique. Toutefois, ce n'est pas le médecin qui approuve. Il faut un psychiatre. Pour voir un psychiatre, il faut parfois dépenser jusqu'à 500 $; tout ça pour un remboursement de 300 $. Il m'a fallu 18 mois pour avoir un rendez-vous avec mon psychiatre et mettre de l'ordre dans mes ordonnances.

On crée des choses, qui semblent extraordinaires sur papier, mais cela n'aboutit à rien de concret, en raison du manque de capacité. Les gens n'ont pas de médecin de famille, et pour un psychiatre, on parle d'un autre niveau complètement. Les indemnités sont intéressantes, mais s'il n'est pas possible d'y avoir accès, elles sont inutiles.

Le président:

Madame Wagantall.

Mme Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, PCC):

Merci.

J'aimerais vous remercier pour tous les services que vous avez rendus. Je sais que nous disons cela au Canada, et j'aime mon pays aussi, mais les services que vous rendez sont phénoménaux, mais je veux le dire aussi de la part de mon mari, de moi-même et de nos enfants, ainsi que de nos petits-enfants, ce comité m'ayant ouvert les yeux à de nombreux égards et permis de les sensibiliser à ce sujet. Je crois qu'il est réellement important que vous compreniez que ce sont les Canadiens ordinaires qui apprécient réellement ce que vous avez fait.

J'ai tellement de questions.

Tout d'abord, monsieur Brindle, vous avez parlé de votre chienne, et je connais le groupe Audeamus, en plus d'avoir rencontré personnellement Chris, Marc et Katalin. Ils font des recherches extraordinaires à l'Université de la Saskatchewan et en Colombie-Britannique sur de la formation particulière concernant la multitude de problèmes auxquels font face les vétérans. De façon plus précise, ils disposent de toutes sortes de mesures solides, et leur démarche est axée sur les vétérans. C'est là leur tâche.

M. Joseph Brindle:

À titre d'exemple, j'ai fait une demande à Courageous Companions, à cette époque, en novembre 2014. À ce moment-là, on m'a confié à Marc Lapointe.

Il m'a appelé et nous avons passé environ quatre heures au téléphone pour parler de mes divers symptômes. Puis, il a décidé quel chien me conviendrait le mieux. Je n'en avais aucune idée. Le dernier chien auquel j'aurais pensé comme chien d'assistance est un Jack Russell. Compte tenu de mes symptômes particuliers, ils ont entraîné une chienne juste pour moi. Ce n'est qu'en juillet qu'on me l'a donnée.

(1650)

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Puis-je vous demander combien vous avez payé pour cette chienne?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Rien du tout.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord. Parce que je trouve que cela est important. Nous parlons toujours d'argent ici. Je sais qu'il existe d'autres groupes. Je ne mentionne personne en particulier, mais je sais que ces chiens peuvent coûter jusqu'à 30 000 $.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Oui.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Nous sommes ici devant un cas de vétéran qui aide des vétérans.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Oui. Cet organisme est géré entièrement par des vétérans.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Exactement.

Il semble y avoir ici un problème de confiance. Vous parliez de la confiance nécessaire pour obtenir les soins dont vous avez besoin. Il me semble y avoir un manque de confiance en votre capacité de déterminer ce dont vous avez le plus besoin, en vue de vous fournir cela de la façon la plus profitable.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je ne pourrais absolument pas m'asseoir à cette table sans elle. Je suis terrifié à l'idée de parler en public.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord.

Vous avez mentionné qu'il faut s'occuper des chiens de service dès aujourd'hui et que cela permettrait de satisfaire aux besoins, comme les maladies mentales qui affectent un grand nombre de nos anciens combattants et des militaires des forces armées.

Le lieutenant-général Roméo Dallaire est venu témoigner devant ce comité. Nous avons parlé de la méfloquine. Je lui ai demandé s'il fallait l'étudier et il m'a interrompu pour dire que non, qu'il y avait eu assez d'études et qu'il fallait s'en débarrasser.

Dans le cas présent, il y a peu de preuves de ce que les chiens de services peuvent faire. Quel est votre point de vue général?

M. Joseph Brindle:

À mon avis, les études ont déjà été faites. Je pense que tout le monde se base sur l'expérience ratée de la Légion, qui a dépensé des millions sur de faux chiens de service en provenance des États-Unis qui n'étaient pas suffisamment dressés pour être fonctionnels. Cela a fait du tort à la catégorie entière des chiens de service.

Audeamus vient d'un organisme sans but lucratif... Je n'ai pas payé un sou. Elle a coûté plus de 20 000 $ en dressage. Tout ça s'est fait au détriment d'autres anciens combattants. Nous faisons des collectes de fonds, ce genre de choses. Je contribue bénévolement à ce projet maintenant.

Mon projet est de devenir dresseur pour pouvoir dresser un chien et le donner à un autre ancien combattant. Nous devons le faire nous-mêmes parce que l'ACC ne veut entendre parler ni des chiens ni de leurs bienfaits.

Un prix de fournisseur de soins vient d'être décerné, mais je dois toujours payer de ma poche la nourriture spéciale et les soins vétérinaires.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord.

Je comprends le point de vue du gouvernement: il faut faire ça correctement pour ne pas rencontrer les mêmes problèmes que par le passé. Cela étant dit, il n'est pas nécessaire de continuer à étudier le sujet, il faut passer à l'action.

M. Joseph Brindle:

L'étude a déjà été faite.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

On pourrait leur recommander de se présenter pour parler à des gens comme vous. Je sais qu'Audeamus a essayé de rencontrer l'ACC. Je dois dire que, de tout ce que nous faisons à cette table, l'une des meilleures choses à faire est de faire venir ces personnes pour nous faire une présentation.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je me tiens généralement prêt à aider si cela peut sauver des vies. Je veux que personne n'ait à suivre le même cheminement que moi. S'il y a de nouvelles discussions sur le sujet, c'est avec plaisir que je prendrai le temps nécessaire pour aller de l'avant.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Je recommanderais aux divers groupes de notre comité de prendre le temps de demander à ces gens de venir dans leur bureau, pour se rassembler en tant que caucus afin d'étudier ce qu'ils peuvent contribuer.

Je suis d'accord avec vous. Je pense que c'est une excellente idée.

Monsieur McKean, pouvez-vous nous parler un peu plus du concept de changement d'attitude et du recours aux bénévoles et aux vétérans?

M. Michael McKean:

Dans le système SSBSO, les professionnels de la santé doivent déclarer que leurs patients peuvent continuer de travailler à temps plein et qu'il n'y a pas de déclencheur de crise. Un des problèmes avec cette façon de faire, c'est qu'elle limite de façon importante le nombre de personnes qui vont s'inscrire. En gros, on encourage les gens à faire semblant d'aller bien, comme s'il n'y avait pas de problème, et à éviter les situations comprenant un élément déclencheur.

Comme je le disais, bien que j'étais sur la liste comme fournisseur de services de travail social et gestionnaire de soins cliniques de Croix-Bleue, on m'a évité. Quand j'ai voulu faire un stage clinique sur la base, on m'a dit que trop de personnes me connaissaient et que j'en savais trop sur le sujet.

J'ai fait un stage réussi dans un institut psychiatrique, Waypoint psychiatric hospital, et dans une école secondaire avec des jeunes difficiles. Ils m'ont accepté sans aucun problème, mais l'approche de mes pairs, de mes frères et soeurs en uniforme, c'était de dire: « Elle a le trouble de stress post-traumatique. On n'en veut pas ici. On n'aime pas avoir ces gens-là dans le coin, alors on ne s'en occupe pas. »

Par contre, le SSBSO, lui, est en général connu et c'est une des façons permettant aux gens d'établir une relation avec nous. En ce moment le budget augmente et diminue sans arrêt; cela diminue notre capacité à recruter des bénévoles, ce qui entraîne des épuisements professionnels. C'est un cercle vicieux.

(1655)

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord. Les limites de financement signifient donc que la formation des bénévoles a été annulée.

M. Michael McKean:

C'est ça, annulée. Ils essayent maintenant d'organiser la formation en français au Québec et tentent de voir s'ils pourront former des anglophones ou des personnes bilingues. Mais cela signifie plus de déplacements et moins de personnes disponibles. De plus, les gens ont l'impression de ne pas être au niveau parce qu'ils s'organisent pour suivre une formation d'une semaine, qu'il faut se dépêcher, puis on leur dit d'attendre.

Mme Cathay Wagantall: Merci.

Le président:

Merci

Monsieur Bratina.

M. Bob Bratina (Hamilton-Est—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Merci.

Il y a longtemps de cela, j'ai été maire et j'avais un conseiller en chef du patrimoine et du protocole militaire, Geordie Elms, qui a été commandant de Argylls et qui possédait de bons antécédents militaires. Je faisais souvent des allocutions dans les écoles et je parlais souvent de l'Équipe Canada de hockey. Je disais aux élèves que nous avions rencontré l'Équipe et que nous avions fait ceci et cela, mais je leur disais aussi que la meilleure Équipe Canada, c'est celle dont les joueurs portent leur symbole sur l'épaule: les membres des Forces armées canadiennes.

Je vais poser cette question à M. McKean: Aviez-vous le sentiment de faire partie de l'Équipe Canada, aviez-vous cette estime de soi? Aviez-vous le sentiment de faire partie d'une excellente équipe? Avez-vous perdu ce sentiment en raison des expériences dont vous venez de nous parler? Avez-vous toujours dans le coeur le sentiment d'avoir accompli quelque chose pour le Canada et que le pays est fier de vous?

M. Michael McKean:

Oui, j'avais vraiment ce sentiment de faire partie de l'Équipe Canada. Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, j'ai été blessé en Afghanistan. J'ai continué sans ne rien laisser paraître. J'ai continué malgré mon trouble du sommeil. J'ai fait face à tout un tas de problèmes parce que j'avais un travail à accomplir. Je pensais qu'il était important que je le fasse et que je ne me retire pas, car autrement, j'aurais laissé le fardeau aux autres.

Je me suis senti très triste à mon retour au Canada. En gros, on me disait: « Tu es de retour. Concentre-toi sur ta tâche. Fais ton travail correctement ou va-t'en. » J'ai été dans la Réserve, dans la Force régulière, puis de nouveau dans la Réserve. J'ai été commandant avec Jody quand il était dans les Argylls. Nous avions l'esprit d'équipe. Nous avions les unités. Les unités de la Réserve contribuent fortement à générer cet état d'esprit. Ses membres sont le lien avec la communauté. C'est là qu'il existe un mécanisme pour trouver des soins de santé, en particulier si vous commencez à utiliser la formule T2 Health américaine, parce que ce système permet d'offrir des services de soins de santé dans les régions éloignées ou là où il y a un manque de services, cela grâce à la télésanté et à d'autres moyens.

Je ne pouvais pas continuer. J'avais l'impression d'être « endommagé, cassé ». J'avais le sentiment que de nombreuses personnes me tournaient le dos et qu'on ne me considérait plus comme faisant partie de l'équipe. Je continue d'essayer d'aider des anciens combattants comme bénévole parce que le bénévolat est le seul mécanisme qui fonctionne.

M. Bob Bratina:

C'est intéressant que vous fassiez ce commentaire sur la Réserve. Durant mes quatre années en tant que maire, un événement s'est produit qui a rassemblé la communauté plus que n'importe quel autre, même s'il était triste. Il s'agit des funérailles de Nathan Cirillo. La ville s'est mobilisée. L'unité de Réserve et toutes nos Réserves, les Rileys et d'autres encore, ont ressenti l'affection de la communauté à leur égard. Évidemment, vous avez perdu un peu de ce sentiment à cause des expériences que vous avez vécues.

Puis-je demander à M. Mitic de répondre à la même question?

(1700)

M. Jody Mitic:

Je voudrais préciser que bien que les Argylls soient une unité excellente et à la riche histoire, je faisais partie des Lorne Scots, monsieur.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Bob Bratina:

Bien.

M. Jody Mitic:

Pardon, pourriez-vous répéter la question s'il vous plaît?

M. Bob Bratina:

Sentiez-vous que vous faisiez partie de l'Équipe Canada et ressentiez-vous de la fierté à travailler pour le pays?

M. Jody Mitic:

Dans l'armée?

M. Bob Bratina:

Oui, dans l'armée.

M. Jody Mitic:

Je n'y suis pas resté 20 ans parce que j'avais l'impression d'y perdre mon temps.

M. Bob Bratina:

Je comprends bien, mais avez-vous plus tard perdu un peu de cette fierté en raison des problèmes d'Anciens combattants Canada et des problèmes dont nous sommes en train de parler?

M. Jody Mitic:

Non, on la perd toute. C'est ce que je disais tout à l'heure. Il existe un système de soutien. Je pense que Phil l'a déjà fait remarquer et moi aussi. On vous dit où aller, quels vêtements porter, quoi amener, on vous nourrit, on vous dit qu'on y arrivera ensemble, on vous donne votre titre de permission et bla bla bla. Tout ce qu'il faut faire, c'est être présent. Et puis d'un seul coup, vous êtes blessé. Les unités d'infanterie regardent devant elles, et je ne blâme ni le commandant ni le sergent-major régimentaire de ne pas se soucier des soldats qui s'en iront bientôt. Au combat, on ne se soucie pas de ceux qui tombent.

Cependant, comme je l'ai dit, quand vous entrez dans le système et que vous réalisez que vous êtes toujours du côté Défense nationale, vous avez des gens en uniforme du même grade, qui ont fait le même serment à la Reine et à leur pays que vous, et on vous dit… Il y a tant de négativité. On vous refuse vos avantages sociaux. Je suis convaincu que l'Unité interarmées de soutien du personnel me doit encore des dizaines de milliers de dollars auxquels j'ai tout simplement renoncé pour protéger ma santé mentale. J'ai un travail qui paye bien, j'ai eu de la chance, mais je n'en aurai peut-être pas toujours. Cette expérience m'a causé plus de stress que la mine sur laquelle j'ai marché.

M. Bob Bratina:

Pour conclure, je veux en venir au fait qu'au delà des ressources financières, nous voulons que les anciens combattants soient au courant des services qui leur sont offerts. Nous voulons trouver autant de ressources que possible, mais est-il nécessaire de former ou de former de nouveau le personnel d'Anciens Combattants Canada et de la Défense nationale sur le respect, l'estime de soi et la conscience de sa propre valeur que doivent ressentir leurs clients? Faut-il en parler avec eux?

M. Jody Mitic:

Cela revient souvent. Je me suis blessé il y a 10 ans et cette même phrase a été utilisée au moins cinq ou six fois, si ma mémoire ne me fait pas défaut. La réponse courte est « oui ». Mais en même temps, les personnes offrant le service de première ligne doivent, d'après moi, avoir plus de latitude pour prendre certaines décisions qui rendraient la prestation des services plus rapide. Parfois, la difficulté n'est pas tant la façon de parler des gens, mais le temps. Deux semaines, ça semble peu si on vit une vie normale et qu'on fait des choses. Mais si vous ne pouvez pas sortir de chez vous, disons parce que vous vous êtes fait une blessure au dos et que vous ne pouvez pas du tout faire vos tâches ménagères, une attente de deux, ou trois ou six semaines pendant que votre dossier progresse dans le système et qu'on en parle… Votre maison est une porcherie, si bien que vous êtes trop gêné pour inviter qui que ce soit chez vous. Vous vous décevez vous-même parce que vous ne pouvez pas faire la vaisselle. Ces choses s'accumulent constamment. Ce serait vraiment bien de rationaliser les services parce que vous l'avez dit, et je vous vole souvent cette formule, quand on regarde le poids du contrôle et de la bureaucratie, c'est comme si, pour chaque dollar payé, on dépensait un dollar cinquante à l'examiner pour être sûr que tout va bien.

Très souvent, c'est plus une question de temps qu'il faut pour recevoir les avantages que le langage utilisé.

M. Bob Bratina:

D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Brassard.

M. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je n'ai que cinq minutes. J'aimerais poser deux questions. Je pense que la première est importante de votre point de vue, alors il me faut des réponses courtes.

L'ombudsman de la Défense nationale, Gary Walbourne, pour qui j'ai un profond respect, a émis des recommandations sur la transition parce que la très grande quantité d'informations que nous recevons indique que la transition est la partie la plus difficile. Il a fait des recommandations, comme l'a fait ce comité, dans un rapport au Parlement pour faire en sorte que la Défense nationale s'assure que tous les aspects de la vie des membres de nos forces armées sont couverts pour ce qui est des pensions et des médecins potentiels, avant qu'ils soient envoyés à l'ACC.

Monsieur l'ombudsman Walbourne appelle cela le service de « conciergerie ». Cela m'intéresse de connaître la valeur que chacun d'entre vous trouve dans ce système, mais très rapidement s'il vous plaît parce que j'ai une autre question.

Michael.

(1705)

M. Michael McKean:

Je pense que ce serait très important. À l'heure actuelle, nous avons parlé à l'équipe de santé de la famille Barrie. Ils aimeraient beaucoup travailler avec l'armée dans le CISP et l'UISP, mais la base Borden ne fait pas partie du programme-pilote pour l'instant. Les anciens combattants avec qui je travaille me disent chaque semaine que ce type de services est essentiel parce que ce n'est qu'avec les informations que leur communiquent les personnes qui s'occupent d'eux qu'ils vont faire une bonne transition, en trouvant un médecin de famille ou d'autres formes de soutien, parce que s'ils n'ont pas ça, ils sont désavantagés.

M. John Brassard:

Ça va au-delà de ça. Il s'agit aussi de faire en sorte que les renseignements sur la pension et l'argent soient disponibles pendant la transition, pas 16 semaines plus tard.

Philip, vous avez parlé de la transition. Quelle valeur voyez-vous en ces services? Est-ce que ça vous aurait aidé?

M. Philip MacKinnon:

C'est une bonne idée, mais peu pratique.

M. John Brassard:

En quel sens?

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Dans certaines régions comme la mienne, ils n'ont pas assez de ressources et il manque de professionnels de soins de santé civils. La situation est peut-être excellente à Ottawa, à Toronto ou à Halifax, mais pas dans les régions comme North Bay.

M. John Brassard:

D'accord.

Joseph.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Il y a un trop gros fossé entre Anciens combattants Canada et les Forces canadiennes. Chaque base compte un bureau d'Anciens combattants. Dans le cadre des formalités de libération, il faudrait y passer une journée pour devenir client, parce que vous deviendrez très probablement un de leurs clients vers 50 ou 60 ans, à l'âge où les blessures faites à l'armée commencent à se manifester.

Anciens combattants Canada doit être l'élément clé pour toutes les personnes libérées. Si on a un problème de dents, ils s'assurent que toutes les interventions de soins dentaires nécessaires sont faites, mais ils n'ont rien à faire de la santé mentale. Les gens n'aiment pas aller chez le dentiste, alors il faut les obliger à y aller. C'est pourquoi nous avons une inspection dentaire. C'est la même chose pour la santé mentale à l'ACC. Personne ne voudra admettre qu'il est ancien combattant ou qu'il a un handicap, mais si un entretien avec l'ACC fait partie du processus de libération, les gens pourraient recevoir des brochures sur la façon correcte de remplir les documents ou une présentation de Mon dossier ACC. Cela peut se faire en quelques heures. Les vétérans seraient alors informés et ne trouveraient pas les informations sur Facebook.

M. John Brassard:

Jody, qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Jody Mitic:

Ma transition à la vie civile a été un choc. Comme je l'ai dit, on me considère comme quelqu'un de stable, mais je me suis senti dépassé lors de ma transition. On m'envoyait des tonnes d'informations à la fois. Voici un exemple simple: si vous êtes dans l'armée de terre, vous avez un numéro matricule. K41302461 a été mon numéro pendant 20 ans. Demandez-moi mon numéro ACC.

M. John Brassard:

Vous n'en avez aucune idée.

M. Jody Mitic:

Je n'en ai aucune idée. Pourquoi ai-je besoin d'un nouveau dossier CAA alors que je pourrais simplement aller vers le préposé et lui dire: « Merci, au revoir », puis aller à mon bureau ACC et dire: « Voilà mon dossier »? On le passerait ensuite en revue. On pourrait conserver le même numéro, le même dossier. Il suffirait de changer la couleur de la couverture, du rouge au bleu par exemple. La transition serait beaucoup plus facile. C'est de ce genre de choses que je parle.

M. John Brassard:

Ça serait moins stressant.

M. Jody Mitic:

Il y a duplication. Phil a dit que c'était une chose de parler à une personne de ses peurs et de ses secrets les plus profonds, mais on doit le répéter à la personne suivante, puis à une autre encore. Au final, on n'a plus envie d'en parler. La même chose se produit pendant la transition. On remplit les mêmes formulaires, les mêmes papiers que ceux qu'on a déjà remplis quand on était en service actif. C'est le même formulaire, les mêmes informations. Tout ce qui change, c'est l'organisation indiquée en haut de page.

Le président:

Vous avez 30 secondes pour une question.

M. John Brassard:

Je ne vais pas y arriver en 30 secondes. Brièvement, pendant les discussions de ce comité, nous avons examiné la santé mentale et la prévention du suicide. Nous avons appris que les tendances suicidaires sont le résultat de problèmes de santé mentale préexistants. Dans quelle mesure votre carrière dans l'armée a-t-elle eu un impact sur vos problèmes de santé mentale?

M. Jody Mitic:

Pour moi, je ne sais pas. J'ai accepté que des choses comme le suicide et la dépression soient des effets secondaires pour certains d'entre nous qui faisons ce travail. Les premiers intervenants ont les mêmes problèmes, comme les médecins et le personnel infirmier urgentiste. C'est un travail difficile et les gens le font volontairement et ont une bonne raison de le faire.

M. John Brassard:

Monsieur le président, puis-je demander aux témoins de fournir un synopsis de l’impact sur leur carrière militaire, par exemple, en comparaison de ce qu’ils ont connu dans la vie civile, et même des témoignages de personnes qu’ils connaissent? Je comprends qu’il s’agit là d’une question difficile, mais puisqu’on la pose fréquemment, je me suis permis de la soulever.

M. Jody Mitic:

Le seul facteur qui me ferait hésiter, monsieur, c’est que j’ai commencé ma carrière militaire à 17 ans, comme la plupart de mes collègues, hommes ou femmes. Je dirais volontiers que c'est en tant que militaire que je suis devenu adulte et homme. On est tous un peu fous à 17 ans, n'est-ce pas? Nous nous demandons bien ce que nous allons devenir une fois adultes. Il me serait difficile de juger si j’étais alors différent ou la même personne.

C’est aux membres de ma famille qu’il faudrait poser cette question.

(1710)

M. John Brassard:

D'accord. Tenons-nous-en à cela. Merci.

Le président:

Dans ce cas, si vous désirez répondre à cette question, faites-en part au greffier, qui se chargera de transmettre votre réponse à tous les membres du Comité — si cela vous convient.

M. Jody Mitic:

Certainement. Je vais continuer à essayer.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Quant à la reconnaissance de l’obligation sacrée due aux anciens combattants, j’ai fortement l'impression qu’il y a eu là un oubli. N’est-il pas important que nous nous souvenions de cela et que nous l’intégrions dans notre mode de fonctionnement, dans nos interactions avec les vétérans, dans notre façon de traiter avec eux et de les soutenir?

M. Jody Mitic:

Je crois que cette obligation sacrée correspond à l’esprit de ce qui nous occupe. Si mes camarades n'avaient pas eu à émettre de commentaires, tels que « Je cherche à faire valoir ceci ou cela auprès des anciens combattants », ce serait un grand pas de franchi. Il y a quelques avantages qui ont été perdus en cours de route et qui ne valent pas vraiment la peine d’être revendiqués. Il y a certaines choses qui ont été enlevées ou modifiées dans la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants et qui, à mon avis, n'ont pas été pleinement écartées lorsque ces décisions ont été prises. On pourrait les restaurer. Cela pourrait aussi concourir à améliorer la situation, qu’il suffise de mentionner les prestations de soins médicaux à vie.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D’accord. C'est là ma prochaine question. Quelle importance représente cette pension aux yeux des anciens combattants obtenant leur congé médical? Nous entendons dire que c'est pour bientôt. Est-ce que les anciens combattants verraient une grande différence en ce qui concerne la reconnaissance de leur service?

M. Jody Mitic:

Quant à moi, personnellement, je ne savais pas que la Charte avait aboli la pension à vie. Si vous proposiez à la plupart des soldats combattants une somme forfaitaire au lieu d’une pension à vie, somme qui serait assortie d'un ensemble de bénéfices auxquels ils auraient — peut-être — droit à un moment de leur vie, ils vous répondraient sans doute quelque chose comme: « Non, allez vous faire voir ailleurs. » Remarquez que ce n’est pas comme s’il s’agissait d’une somme mirobolante. Une pleine pension, éventuellement indexée à l’indice des prix à la consommation — vous voyez ce que je veux dire — représenterait peut-être 5 000 $ par mois dans le cas d'une invalidité totale. Encore là, ce n'est pas le Pérou, mais ça pourrait... Quoi qu’il en soit, en ce moment, je peux travailler et faire un peu d’argent. Même s’il n’en sera peut-être pas toujours ainsi, j’aurai l’assurance d’avoir un toit pour me couvrir et un minimum de nourriture sur ma table.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord. Merci.

Nous avons également entendu dire qu’il existait des services de santé mentale offerts au personnel des Forces canadiennes. Cependant, une fois que vous avez quitté votre emploi, ce soutien psychologique n’est plus adapté aux besoins des anciens combattants. Par exemple, la thérapie de groupe est l’un des moyens d’apporter de l’aide aux vétérans. Cette aide ne saurait cibler à la fois les membres des Forces et les anciens combattants. Auriez-vous, par hasard, un commentaire à formuler à ce sujet?

Le président:

Je vais revenir là-dessus, mais je dois maintenant céder la parole à quelqu’un d’autre. Nous allons juste devoir étirer un tout petit peu le temps prévu.

Vous avez terminé vos trois minutes, et je dois passer à M. Kitchen pour trois minutes. Nous reviendrons à M. Graham, et puis à vous, pour le mot de la fin.

D’accord, monsieur Kitchen, vous disposez de trois minutes.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Brindle — sentez-vous libre de ne pas répondre du tout à cette question si j’outrepasse ici mes limites ou si elle vous met dans une situation inconfortable —, je comprends que cela pourra vous paraître dur, mais je me demande si vous pourriez fournir quelques suggestions quant aux approches auxquelles vous seriez prêt à recourir si l’ancien combattant se retrouvait dans une telle situation de crise. Pour ce qui est de la tentative de suicide qui se rattache à cet état de crise, auriez-vous des suggestions qui pourraient... Nous parlons d'une ligne de prévention de suicide. À quoi bon avoir une telle ligne s’il n’y a personne pour répondre? Non?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Tout tourne autour du mot « suicide ».

Même s’il glace le sang dans les veines, ce mot ne me fait pas peur. Je me sens comme quelqu’un qui a le diabète ou un problème cardiaque ou encore rénal, et qui le sait. Je souffre d'un certain état où dans des circonstances précises, je n’ai plus du tout envie de vivre. J’évite donc ces circonstances, je me tiens loin de l’alcool et du travail outre-mer, et je travaille avec mon thérapeute à faire de la méditation et du yoga. C’est ma façon à moi d’éviter le suicide. Ce n’est guère différent d’avoir un problème cardiaque et de manger un Baconator tous les jours — il n’y a rien de tel pour écourter sa vie.

Nous sommes tous angoissés par le mot « suicide ». Il nous faut surmonter cette peur. Si vous avez des idées suicidaires et y pensez régulièrement, ça ne veut pas dire que vous allez passer à l’action. L’idée s’infiltre dans votre esprit au terme d’un long processus. Votre esprit commence à vous jouer des tours en éliminant les raisons pour lesquelles vous devriez continuer à vivre par vous-même... Cette peur de tout révéler et de dire « Je me sens déprimé », sans faire intervenir toute la cavalerie d’un seul coup, est votre façon de composer avec le problème, surtout si vous avez des changements de médication. Vous ne dépendez que de vous-même et n’avez personne vers qui vous tourner. Vous prenez votre mal en patience, pensant que tout va s’arranger. Vous n’avez pas envie d’appeler et d’ameuter tout le monde encore une fois.

Rien ne sert de perdre son sang-froid au ministère des Anciens Combattants. Ayant vu comment ça se passe, je sais qu’il vaut mieux mettre sa langue dans sa poche. Ça ne vaut pas la peine de se fâcher contre un système qui n’est pas dirigé contre soi. Le problème se trouve à l’échelle du système. Vous pouvez faire une réclamation en septembre 2015 et être encore en train d’en débattre... Beaucoup prétendent en blaguant qu’ils le font exprès pour nous tester, pour voir si nous sommes vraiment blessés. Rendus là, il n’y a plus de camaraderie, plus de fraternité comme dans les Forces. C’est vous contre une compagnie d’assurance. Je ne vois plus d’ACC, je vois une compagnie d'assurance. Nous connaissons tous le mot « appel », puisqu’on a dû essuyer un refus la première fois.

Pour en revenir à la question du suicide, il faut tenter de la dédramatiser. Quiconque dans cette salle est capable de se suicider en se basant sur l'information dont il dispose au moment qu’il aura choisi pour passer à l’acte. N’ayons pas peur d’en parler. Organisons des groupes de soutien et faisons savoir à tous que ce n’est pas un sujet tabou.

(1715)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham, vous disposez de trois minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Brindle — ou Don, si vous le permettez —, j’apprécie beaucoup que vous ayez pris le temps de venir nous exposer toute l’histoire, plutôt que simplement la fin de votre carrière. À mon avis, il est important de pouvoir mettre le tout en contexte.

M. Joseph Brindle:

J’ai cru qu’il était important de le faire, depuis que des études récentes ont indiqué que près de la moitié des membres des Forces canadiennes avaient été victimes d’abus, à un moment ou l’autre, pendant leur jeunesse. Ayant survécu à ce fléau, j’ai estimé qu’il fallait vous sensibiliser à la situation. De même, le taux de dépression est beaucoup plus élevé dans les Forces canadiennes que la moyenne nationale. Il faut aborder de front cette situation propre aux Forces canadiennes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une question rapide à vous poser. À deux reprises, vous avez parlé de sevrage. Pourriez-vous préciser à quoi vous faisiez allusion?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Le sevrage s’effectue dans le cadre d’un cours. Si vous avez des problèmes d’alcool, c’est là qu’on vous envoie. Je crois que ce cours est donné à Kingston, entre autres. Il y a probablement d’autres endroits aussi.

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Le cours est offert à divers endroits, un peu partout...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Un député devrait être beaucoup mieux informé sur le sevrage, du fait que...

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Je n’y ai jamais assisté...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je ne prétends pas qu’il y est allé, mais il y a probablement envoyé un bon nombre de personnes. Ou il en a fait rapport...

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Leur supérieur l’aura fait.

M. Joseph Brindle:

En effet, c’est leur supérieur, selon le rapport. Il s’agit d’un cours destiné à ceux qui veulent décrocher de l’alcool. Lorsqu’on a de sérieux problèmes d’alcool dans les Forces canadiennes, la solution c’est le sevrage. Je ne connais pas le nom officiel du cours, mais c’est comme ça qu’on l’appelle.

M. Philip MacKinnon:

C'est la « sensibilisation à l’alcool ».

M. Joseph Brindle:

Exact, la sensibilisation à l’alcool.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous en avez parlé comme d’une véritable fin de carrière.

M. Joseph Brindle:

C’en est une. Si vous êtes caporal et qu’on vous envoie en cure de sevrage, cela veut dire que vous allez faire carrière en tant que caporal.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous suis.

Vous avez mentionné que vous vous étiez rendu compte d’être désormais devenu un vétéran. Lorsque vous avez quitté l’armée, que s’est-il passé?

M. Joseph Brindle:

J’ai pris des décisions fort mal avisées en raison de mes blessures.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il n’y avait personne pour me dire: « Au fait, en tant qu'ancien combattant, voici où vous pourriez vous adresser. » C’était simplement...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Non. Ils étaient tellement pressés de me voir partir. J’étais encore en congé alors que je me trouvais au Kosovo. J’étais toujours au service des Forces canadiennes lorsque je détruisais des bombes à fragmentation. Le problème est que ça s’est produit tellement vite que je n’ai même pas eu le temps de me rendre compte de ce que j’avais fait.

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Avez-vous été couvert par le premier ou le deuxième plan?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Le deuxième plan.

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Était-ce en 1995?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Non, c’était à la toute fin. C’était en 2000, mais c'était encore à la toute fin du dernier Programme de réduction des forces.

M. Philip MacKinnon:

D’accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il doit y avoir plein de gens dans la même situation qui n’ont pas encore compris qu’ils sont devenus vétérans, alors...

M. Joseph Brindle:

C’est sûr qu’il y en a. Je peux vous en nommer deux, parmi les camarades que j’ai perdus. Le premier s’appelle Jacques Richaud, qui est mort en Irak. Il était technicien en munitions pour les Forces canadiennes. Le second, Paul Straughn, se trouve encore en Libye en ce moment.

On a peur de rentrer au pays parce qu’on ne sait pas ce qu’on a. Dans un esprit d’encouragement, je me souviens d’avoir dit: « Appelez au ministère des Anciens Combattants, ils sont là pour vous aider. » Mais ça n’a pas été le cas. Personne ne me l’a d’ailleurs jamais dit. Lorsqu’on est à l’étranger, en pleine zone de combat, on n’a pas le temps de regarder les publicités sur CBC ou Radio-Canada nous disant qu’il existe de l’aide. Vous n’avez pas la chance de tomber sur un dépliant dans le bureau du médecin, tout simplement parce que vous n’allez pas chez le médecin.

J’ai été pendant 14 ans à l'extérieur du pays. J’ai vécu en Russie, en Tanzanie et à Bagdad, mais le ministère des Anciens Combattants ne pousse pas ses antennes jusque-là. C’est la dernière chose que j’avais en tête... Puis, lorsqu’on commence à parler de TSPT... J’en ai douté pendant 10 ans, ne pouvant croire que j’avais le TSPT. Je n’ai vraiment compris qu’à ma première tentative — et le TSPT était alors mieux connu — que j’avais un problème, mais je ne savais pas encore comment joindre par téléphone le ministère des Anciens Combattants.

(1720)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comment faire pour communiquer avec ceux qui se trouvent en Libye, à Bagdad, ou n’importe où, et qui ne sont pas encore rentrés au pays?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Très bonne question. Il y a toujours les travailleurs de proximité.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen, vous disposez des trois minutes de la fin.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J’aimerais revenir sur la question du soutien en matière de santé mentale après qu’un vétéran a été libéré et sur le fait que le soutien n’est pas très présent, ce qui fait que les vétérans se retrouvent en thérapie de groupe. Pourriez-vous répondre à cela en tenant compte des besoins des vétérans?

M. Jody Mitic:

Pardon, vous avez parlé de groupe...?

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je veux parler de thérapie de groupe avec des non-vétérans. Une situation mixte.

M. Jody Mitic:

Je n’y suis jamais allé pour une question de santé mentale, mais bien pour une réadaptation physique. Le centre médical des Forces armées canadiennes, qui se trouve ici à Ottawa, aurait été mon endroit de prédilection pour cette réadaptation. Si j’avais besoin de thérapie en santé mentale, je préférerais être entouré de mes frères et soeurs. Ce n’est pas trop bon pour le moral d’un jeune homme en forme de se retrouver dans un hôpital rempli de victimes d'accidents de la route, plutôt âgées et souvent diabétiques. J’ai sursauté quand j’ai compris que j’étais le seul militaire dans le lot. Ce serait la même chose n’importe où ailleurs. Peut-être faudrait-il voir avec les intervenants de première ligne. Le MDN et ACC devraient conjuguer leurs efforts pour aménager des cliniques exclusivement pour les militaires ou les vétérans, parce qu’il semble y avoir là une clientèle abondante. Je ne crois pas qu’il s’agirait là d’une perte d’argent.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Et il y en a de plus en plus.

M. Jody Mitic:

Il y en aura probablement beaucoup plus dans la décennie à venir.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci pour cette intervention.

Une question rapide. Je dis rapide, mais il faudra sans doute beaucoup plus que la minute et demie qui vous reste pour y répondre. Cela concerne l’UISP. Nous avons eu un témoignage là-dessus. Selon certains, cela fonctionne bien, selon d’autres, c’est extrêmement limité et ça ne fonctionne pas bien du tout. En avez-vous fait personnellement l’expérience?

M. Jody Mitic:

Lorsque j’ai été blessé, l'UISP n’était qu’un concept. Cela a été mis sur pied après ma blessure. J’ai été l’un des premiers soldats blessés à être affectés à l'UISP dans le cadre du programme Sans limites, et même si je faisais partie de l’équipe à l’UISP, mon service était loin d’être reluisant. En toute vérité, comme je l’ai déjà dit, j’ai effacé de ma mémoire une bonne partie de ce moment de ma vie pour préserver ma santé mentale. Je préfère ne pas revenir là-dessus. Alannah et moi discutons parfois de l’argent qu’ils nous doivent pour certaines choses à la maison, notamment pour procéder à des modifications pour le déplacement en fauteuil roulant. Nous croyons qu’il serait juste que nous nous fassions rembourser les 50 000 $ que nous avons dû payer de notre poche, mais à la seule idée d’avoir à entreprendre des démarches et à parlementer avec des gens, je me crispe en position foetale. Puisque ce n’est pas le profil qu’on attend d'un professionnel aguerri, j’essaie de ne pas trop y penser.

Voici ce que j’entrevois, même avec la bureaucratie d'Anciens Combattants. Entre 70 et 75 % semblent bien s’en tirer. Mais il reste 25 % qui sont handicapés à 70 % ou plus. C’est nous qui avons besoin d’un maximum de soins, et cela semble être du côté de l'UISP et d'Anciens Combattants. Pour les cas les plus simples, il suffit bien sûr de quelques formulaires et d’un timbre ou deux, et le tour est joué. J’ai découvert ça avec l’UISP et Anciens Combattants.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

En réalité, à partir de maintenant, les cas deviendront de plus en plus complexes.

M. Jody Mitic:

C’est vrai. En vieillissant, je constate que je deviendrai moi-même de plus en plus complexe. J’avais 30 ans lorsque j’ai été blessé. J’en ai maintenant 40, et cela m’est de plus en plus difficile de me déplacer, juste de venir ici aujourd’hui, par exemple. Je me suis demandé si j’allais me présenter en raison de mon problème de mobilité. Quand j’aurai 50 ou 60 ans, j’aurai besoin de plus de services. Parfois, je me demande comment les choses vont se dérouler quand je serai plus vieux et que j’aurai vraiment besoin que quelqu’un s’occupe de moi.

(1725)

Le président:

Merci. C’était tout pour aujourd’hui. Si vous désirez ajouter quoi que ce soit à votre témoignage, n’hésitez pas à le faire parvenir par courriel à notre greffier, qui le transmettra au Comité.

Au nom du Comité d’aujourd'hui, je tiens à vous remercier, tous et chacun, de ce que vous avez fait pour notre pays, et également de vous être déplacés aujourd’hui. Je sais qu’il est difficile de venir raconter ses expériences devant notre comité. Sans des gens comme vous, nous ne serions pas là aujourd’hui. J’espère que votre témoignage contribuera à la prise de décisions qui sauront aider les hommes et les femmes qui servent dans les Forces.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

acva committee hansard 35863 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:43 on April 03, 2017

2017-03-20 ACVA 47

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody. I would like to call the meeting to order.

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) and the motion adopted on September 29, the committee is resuming its study on mental health and suicide prevention among veterans.

For the first part we have, from the Department of National Defence, Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris, senior epidemiologist, Canadian Forces health services group; and Dr. Alexandra Heber, chief of psychiatry, health professionals division.

We'll start with your 10 minutes before we go into questioning.

The floor is yours. Thank you.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris (Senior Epidemiologist, Directorate of Force Health Protection, Canadian Forces Health Services Group, Department of National Defence):

Mr. Chairman and members of the House committee on veterans affairs, thank you for the opportunity to speak with you today. For the past decade I have been a senior epidemiologist for the directorate of force health protection, more colloquially known as DFHP, which is part of the CF health services group. I hold a master's degree in science in epidemiology from the University of Toronto, as well as a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the U.K. Prior to joining DFHP, I worked as an epidemiologist at the provincial and regional levels as well as in the academic sector.

As an epidemiologist my primary role, really, is to respond to the needs for statistics and data on the part of the decision-makers within CF health services and the larger Canadian Armed Forces—also known as CAF, which I'm sure you know by now. Clinicians and decision-makers who develop the policies, implement clinical practice, or work towards keeping the CAF healthy really need to know who their population is and what their needs are, and that's where I fit into the larger picture. I'm behind the scenes, providing those who “do” with the statistical information they need to proceed in an evidence-based fashion. I do so as part of a larger directorate, the directorate of force health protection.

DFHP functions similarly to how a provincial health authority would work, but does so specifically for the CAF. The key pillars of public health are surveillance and assessment of the population's health, health protection, health promotion, and disease prevention.

With respect to public health surveillance, an important part of what we do is to monitor the health of the CAF, primarily through surveys such as the health and lifestyle information survey, as well as through other health surveillance functions. These can be broader in scope, as is the case with the CF disease and injuries surveillance system, which monitors disease and injury during deployment specifically, as well as the CF health evaluations and reporting outcomes surveillance system, which can be adapted to look at a number of health-related conditions and concerns. These systems can also be a lot more specific, as is the case with the mortality database or the suicide surveillance system, the latter of which is the source of the information from which the report on annual suicide mortality in the CAF is created. The trends and the patterns that we identify through our work using these diverse sources of information are then used by policy- and decision-makers in developing and implementing evidence-based, health-related policies and programs across the CAF.

As mentioned, one of our reports that you're most likely familiar with is the “2016 Report on Suicide Mortality in the Canadian Armed Forces”, which covers suicides between 1995 and 2015. I'll refer to it from here on in as the 2016 suicide report.

We within the CAF, both civilians and military, consider every suicide a tragedy. Suicide is firmly recognized as an important public health concern. As such, this report has been produced since 1995, with annual releases since 2008, in an effort to gain greater insight into suicide in the CAF. Monitoring and analyzing suicide events of CAF members provides valuable information to guide and refine ongoing suicide prevention efforts.

(1535)

[Translation]

While we do collect and monitor data on all suicides, including males or females and regular or reserve force members, the annual reports cover only regular force male members. The reason is that reserve force and female suicide numbers are too small for us to release detailed information about the cases without running the risk of identifying the individuals and compromising their privacy. Although their experiences are included in the evidence used to drive mental health policies and suicide prevention endeavours within the Canadian Armed Forces, the information is not presented in the annual reports.

All suicides are ascertained by the coroner from the province in which they occur. The information is then provided to and tracked by the directorate of mental health, which cross-references it with the information collected by the administrative investigation support centre. The centre is part of the directorate of special examinations and inquiries.

Whenever a death is deemed to be a suicide, the deputy surgeon general orders a medical professional technical suicide review report, or MPTSR. The investigation is conducted by a team consisting of a mental health professional and a general duty medical officer. This team reviews all pertinent health records and conducts interviews with medical personnel, unit members, family members and other individuals who may be knowledgeable about the circumstances of the suicide in question. Together, all this information is used to create the findings in the annual suicide report.

Over time, the picture of suicide in the Canadian Armed Forces has changed. While the rates may vary somewhat from year to year, a consistent and clear picture has emerged over the last decade. Canadian Army personnel, more specifically those in the combat arms trades, are at a greater risk of suicide than the Royal Canadian Navy and Royal Canadian Air Force members.

There’s some emerging evidence that deployment may also be a concern. However, we need to be careful with this broad description of deployment, since it can include many types of deployments—for example, humanitarian, peacekeeping or active combat—and many different experiences, both good and bad. Further research and analysis is required in order to determine whether, on its own, deployment is really linked in some way to the risk of suicide.[English]

We're starting to get a much better understanding, through the work done by my colleagues from the directorate of mental health, as well as within DFHP, about underlying risk factors for suicide. For example, amongst the regular force males who took their own lives in 2015, over 70% of them had documented evidence of marital breakdown or distress prior to their deaths. Debt, family and friend illness, and substance abuse were identified risk factors.

These are also often seen in the general population. Most of them had more than one non-mental health risk factor at the time of their death. While troubling, this is consistent with what is being seen by other militaries, and I think it highlights the direction in which our research and surveillance efforts should be increasingly concentrated moving forward.

With this in mind, DND, as part of the Public Health Agency of Canada, led an interdepartmental working group on suicide-related surveillance data, which is one of the expected deliverables of the federal framework for suicide prevention. Membership within this working group is an excellent venue to see what work is being done by fellow federal agencies around suicide surveillance and prevention, and to share information on how to be more effective and consistent in our collaborative approaches.

We also have a long-standing relationship with VAC. We have been collaborating for a number of years on the CF cancer mortality study, which has looked at suicide risk over an individual's lifetime, both during and after service. We're currently collaborating with them and Statistics Canada on a second iteration of the study. We plan on looking at cancer and causes of death, including suicide, in still serving and released regular force and reserve class C personnel who enrolled in the CAF between 1976 and 2015.

We also sit on the steering committee for the veterans suicide mortality study, which will be looking at suicide risk amongst all former regular force and reserve class C veterans who released from the Canadian Armed Forces, also between 1972 and 2015.

In summary, surveillance is an important and integral component of understanding the risk factors and trends associated with suicide among serving and released personnel. Collaboration between departments and researchers has been ongoing, as demonstrated through the CF CAMS 2 and other research initiatives, and will prove to be extremely helpful in understanding this complex issue.

Thank you.

(1540)

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll begin with six minutes with Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, both doctors, for coming. I appreciate it. Hopefully you will help shed light on some of the issues in epidemiology and the studies that we may not know a lot about.

I'm wondering what you think about the parameters that you have available. What I'm trying to get at is that The Globe and Mail reported recently that 70 suicides have occurred in the last five years, I believe they said, which they were equating basically with our soldiers' coming out of Afghanistan.

I don't know whether you've seen or read that report. How do you see that playing into this report that we're talking about today?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

At the moment, through the annual suicide report, looking at deployment as a variable is very difficult. When we deal in epidemiology or statistics, there's a concept called “power”. In essence, you have to have a certain number of individuals to be able to parse the information. Although we've been collecting suicide information for upwards of 20 years now—and let's be clear, one suicide is one suicide too many—statistically speaking, we have very few, so we cannot parse that information. For me to be able to answer whether Afghanistan is or is not a factor, is something, from a purely mechanical point of view, I cannot do at this point.

However, if I may elaborate, through CF CAMS 2, we have a cohort of nearly 250,000 individuals. Obviously not every one was in service during the Afghanistan years—some predate those years. Nonetheless, we're able now to look at basically everyone who's been in Afghanistan and who enrolled post-1975.

We hope to be able to start looking at specific deployments, as opposed to just looking at deployment as a dichotomous yes or no.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

You've talked a bit about some of the parameters that you use. Can you expand on all the parameters you look at? For example, do you look at things such as identity loss, and whether that is an issue or not within your research?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

You need to remember that I'm only one piece of the puzzle. I am there to help analyze the information. That information is not provided to us. You would have to speak to someone who participates in the MPTSRs to get a better handle as to whether that's something they look at or not.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

If you're not getting the correct data, you can't report on—

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

I wouldn't say it's incorrect data. It's—

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Let's say widespread data. It's hard for you to analyze if you don't have the data.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

There are two factors. I'm just speculating here, but it may be that it's so rare that we can't look at it, and it may be that it isn't there. I can't speak to that.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Are you involved at all in...?

Sorry, go ahead.

Dr. Alexandra Heber (Chief of Psychiatry, Health Professionals Division, Department of Veterans Affairs):

Can I add something to that from the Veterans Affairs perspective?

First, I want to introduce myself. Although I am not making a statement, I think you should have a little bit of a sense of my background. I've worked in the mental health field for over 30 years. In 2003 I started working for the Canadian military in Ottawa as a psychiatrist, and three years later I put on the uniform. So I served, including in Afghanistan. I released in 2015 and I started the job as chief psychiatrist of Veterans Affairs Canada in September 2016.

Although I'm not here to represent the Canadian Forces, I have some knowledge of this. Regarding your question about identity, I will tell you that it is something we are very interested in at Veterans Affairs. We are looking at the period of transition of person from being a military member to a veteran and what happens to people in that period. We want to know their vulnerabilities and what we can we do for them as organizations. There's a lot of talk about closing the seam, especially for our vulnerable populations, the people we know have mental health diagnoses or physical problems that are impeding their quality of life. These are people we know we want to help through that transition period.

(1545)

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Do you have privacy challenges in collecting your data? I'm speaking about both points of view.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

It's different. We have different issues.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

It's different. To be honest, I am at the end of the chain. I get the data once it's been dealt with by the individuals from the CSEA, the individuals who deal with deaths within the Canadian Armed Forces.

The data is provided by them to the directorate of mental health. They are cross-referenced and confirmed by the directorate of mental health, and then they are passed on to us because we have the analytic expertise.

So as far as I know, the answer to your question is no.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Does VAC have challenges in getting that information?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

We have a very different system from that of the Canadian Forces, where we have a wraparound health care system. Everybody in the forces is taken care of by the Canadian Forces' health care system. That doesn't happen once somebody leaves. Once they retire, their health needs are taken care of by the provincial health authorities. If a veteran has come forward or has in some way been identified as somebody who has a condition that is service related and for which they need help, then we provide all kinds of services. For example, we will financially support—and support in many other ways—their health care. We do not, however, have a health care system in the same way that the Canadian Armed Forces has.

You ask a good question. If something happens to a veteran, for example, if a veteran commits suicide and we would like some information, the health care information is contained within the provincial health care system. We don't have access to that information. We have access to some information, because these people usually have a case manager in our system, but the case managers are there to coordinate all the different services they get. They are not the health care providers.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mrs. Lockhart.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Dr. Rolland-Harris, thank you for your testimony.

You mentioned in your testimony that some of the trends you're seeing highlight the direction in which the research and surveillance efforts should be increasingly concentrated, moving forward.

Can you expand on that a bit for us?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

In essence, if you followed the transition or how the annual reports have been progressing since 2008, there are two main trends that have appeared.

The first is that the rate of suicide in the Canadian Armed Forces in general—here I'm talking about all types of uniform—is not statistically higher. The rate of suicide in the whole Canadian Armed Forces is not higher than in the Canadian general population. That's the first trend.

The second trend that we have been seeing, since 2008 or so, maybe a little bit before, is that members of the army component of the Canadian Armed Forces have been at significantly higher risk of taking their own lives, relative to the Canadian population and the other colours of uniform.

(1550)

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Are you saying that although the number is on par with the general population, it's offset between the navy, air force, and army?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Yes, there's a balance that happens. We've been very transparent in that we look at each colour of uniform separately. We're not trying to hide what's happening by just looking at a general trend. The fact there are different things happening in the different arms of the Canadian Armed Forces is something the leadership takes very seriously.

To go back to what you were asking, in essence, those two patterns have been around for a while. Yes, obviously, the rates move a little bit from year to year, but the narrative is the same. Going forward—and this is what we're doing both within DFHP and DMH—we're continuing to monitor those trends.

Don't get me wrong; we're not going to stop. Rather than expending so much energy and always focusing just on the piece after the fact, we're also trying to take some of those resources to figure out what some of the risk factors are before, so that those who set programs, the ones who write policy, can target things that matter. Maybe down the road, with this work, we'll see those trends go down. That's what I'm suggesting.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Very good. Thank you.

Dr. Heber, have you seen any differences in how the programs required have changed over time? We've gone through many different phases with our military over the years. How are things different, and what are the needs now in comparison?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

It's a very good question. Thank you for that.

Again, I'm a psychiatrist. I work in the mental health world. Certainly, from my perspective, from the time I started working for the Canadian Armed Forces, the big change has been our participation in Afghanistan. People coming back from those deployments have been suffering from trauma-related injuries and other mental health injuries. Everyone who deploys does not necessarily develop PTSD; they can develop other mental health problems as well, and sometimes they develop several.

As those members were released from the military over time, Veterans Affairs Canada has seen a similar increase in younger veterans coming into their system with mental health problems and needing care. As I remember from when I was still in the military, Veterans Affairs Canada has been very forward-looking. In the early to mid-2000s it started setting up what are called operational stress injury clinics across the country. We now have 11 of them across Canada. We also now have satellite clinics coming out of those clinics. These are clinics where we have multidisciplinary teams, specially trained and with a great deal of experience, treating post-traumatic stress disorder and other operational stress injuries.

People were recognizing that something was happening. Because of our very good relationship with our colleagues in the CF, we were able to see what was happening and the growth in the numbers of those with PTSD coming back from deployment. We were able to say that we had better set up some services, because we're going to have these men and women coming into our system.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Okay. Thanks.

Do I have a few more seconds?

The Chair:

There's sixty left.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Okay.

I want to go back to the statistics.

Have we done any research to see how many of those who committed suicide had received mental health care? Is this a matter of their not receiving care, or are we still struggling with how we're treating them?

I don't know who will answer.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

The MPTSR, the “Medical Professional Technical Suicide Review Report”, which is an investigation of every suicide—male, female, regular, or reserve—looks at access to care. The rates of access to care are quite high, so this opens a whole Pandora's box of the underlying mechanisms of access to care, which I think are multiple, and it could be a very long conversation.

(1555)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

And thank you very much for this. It sounds very complex and that there are clearly multiple pieces to this puzzle, so please forgive me if I'm trying to sort this out.

Regarding the people coming into the CAF, I wonder if some pre-screening is possible with regard to their emotional health, because it seems to me that this is all tangled up together.

Dr. Rolland-Harris, you said that 70% had documented evidence of marital breakdown, distress, debt, family/friend illness, substance abuse, which it would seem to suggest a susceptibility to suicide rather than the other way around. Do you, then—if you can—say that this individual may be predisposed, may have a background such that we had better be very careful, and monitor and watch for potential suicide?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

I don't know the specifics of the recruitment process. However, I do know that the 2009 expert panel explicitly stipulated that they were not interested in looking at screening out individuals for mental health reasons.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Is it a matter of being fair and not prejudging an individual, or—

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Honestly, I don't know what the motivations are. You'd have to talk to the individuals who....

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

For recruitment there is screening, as people do go through a medical examination, and part of that is a history-taking where people are asked about their previous medical history, including mental health history. Yes, that does happen.

Based on that, whether someone is screened in or out would often be on a case-by-case basis. It would depend what exactly that history was about.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Yes, I can understand that you wouldn't want to have a prejudice that would keep someone out, and yet if there's a vulnerability, it is a frightening thing to do to a human being to allow them to get into this quagmire that could lead to their death.

I understand the statistical reasons and the need to protect privacy with regard to the analysis of male versus female suicides, but with that in mind, could you perhaps speculate or give some idea of the trend in female suicides, whether it is or is not comparable to the trend among males?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

I can't comment on that. The numbers are statistically quite small—

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Too small, too limited...?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

—which is a good news story, I suppose, by itself.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Yes, but you are possibly going to be able to identify some of the trends in future, or is that not possible?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

It's unlikely that we'll be able to do so with the annual suicide report. However, with the CF cancer and mortality study, the cohort is much larger and includes everyone who has ever worn a uniform since 1976, in essence. So the population is much larger, and we're not stopping looking at these individuals once they release; we're continuing to watch them, so the cohort is much larger. It is plausible that we will be able to have a better feel for what's happening with women's suicide as part of that larger study.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. Thank you.

Dr. Heber, you talked about the fact that a member of the Canadian Armed Forces has wraparound health service, and it occurred to me that sometimes when people leave they may not seek medical help or may not be able to find a doctor in the public system. I wonder if there has been any finding that an inability to access health care might have been part of the reason for suicide, or do you have any thoughts on that?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

When we look at the veteran population, it becomes complicated, because out of the 700,000 veterans in Canada—and I'm sure you know this—120,000 are clients of Veterans Affairs Canada.

When we're talking about veterans, there are many people out there who have retired, and we know nothing about them. If they haven't come forward and asked for services, we don't know about them. That's the first issue.

Because we don't provide the health care directly, there are always a lot of problems with us gaining access to information, though if somebody leaves the forces, they have a case manager. That case manager will find out what's going on with their care, because the case manager is going to help organize further care for that veteran.

We don't have perfect information on everybody, so it's much harder for us to do that.

(1600)

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I can see there are many challenges here. This may seem simplistic, but with regard to this difference in the OSIs of army veterans as opposed to those for navy and air force veterans, might it have to do with the fact that when you're on the ground in a deployment, the realities of the violence and the impacts of that hostility are greater because you're there on the ground, as opposed to being on a ship or in the air? The others are still part of the deployment but not on the ground.

The Chair:

I'm sorry, but we're out of time.

We go to Mr. Bratina.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Darn. We don't get to answer your question.

Mr. Bob Bratina (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Thank you.

Dr. Heber, you have a terrific background, one that's ideal for the job you do. Could you flesh out what you do in the day? Do you ever interview patients anymore? Tell me how you actually carry out your very important role.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Thank you. It's very much an advisory position. I work for the chief medical officer. She is in charge of the health professionals division within Veterans Affairs Canada. Also within that division is our directorate of mental health. Similar to the directorate of mental health in the Canadian Forces, we have set up a directorate of mental health. A lot of this is very new and has happened in the last couple of years. Some of the people who work in that directorate you will be interviewing next.

I will provide advice, guidance, and leadership in a clinical way to that directorate, to the director, to the chief medical officer, and to anybody else who needs my advice or my expertise, such as the ADM, the deputy minister, and so on. I'm kind of multi-tasking.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Is it a work in progress? Are we in a brave new world with regard to how we're approaching these issues that have cropped up recently?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

I'm sure part of it is in response to that. Several years ago, a look was taken at Veterans Affairs Canada, which had devolved from the time after the Second World War when we did have a robust health care system. Over the years, I guess, they felt there wasn't the same need. Then when medicare came in, people were taken care of by the provinces, so that sort of clinical role of Veterans Affairs decreased and decreased.

Certainly, in the last several years, especially with people coming out suffering from operational stress injuries and physical injuries because of some of the challenges during their career, I think very appropriately, it was seen that we needed to beef up the health professionals division within Veterans Affairs.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Dr. Rolland-Harris, epidemiology is a fascinating science. One of the issues is getting to ask the right questions, because it seems a lot of what you're doing is just collecting raw data, statistics on how many went in, how many came out, how many suicides there were, and that's all important data.

I don't know whether it's about exit interviews or the interrelationship with former soldiers, members of the armed forces, but in your work, do you do something beyond simply gathering data?

(1605)

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

I disseminate a lot of the work that we do, such as today, and at conferences, and those sorts of things but I want it to be clear that, at the end of the day, I am there to help the decision-makers, the action-takers, and so I'm behind the scenes.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Statistically, what methods are generally used by victims of suicide?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Statistically, if you look in the annual report, the two main methods specifically for regular force males, I want to clarify, are hangings and firearms. Just so we're clear, that's consistent with what we see in the general population. The top two methods are the same both in the Canadian Armed Forces and in the general population.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

In other words, the availability of means such as firearms isn't necessarily...if someone's determined—

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

No, it's very rare, if not never the case, that individuals use their military-issue firearm. They use their personal firearms. That's something that is collected very rigorously.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

You made the point, which needs to be reinforced with regard to deployment, that statistically we can't draw all the connections yet. I say so because it's common for us to think that someone who was in Afghanistan and had a bomb blow up near them is, of course, going to have...but you're saying that statistically you can't really draw all those connections yet.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

No, not at this point, and whether it's a lack of statistical power or if it's a true absence of a relationship is unclear at this point. As I said in my opening statement, you have to understand that “deployment” is a broad term.

You can have two individuals with the same military occupation code technically doing the same job in the same location on the same deployment who have entirely different experiences, or when they come back, one is scarred, and one is not. Deployment is an easy way of classifying things to look at relationships, but it's a very, very complicated concept, really, to be able to parse statistically.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Do you mind if I add something?

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Please go ahead.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

I think one of our concerns always with the issue of deployment and that tight relationship being made between deployment and suicide is that it makes it possible. We always fear that those who commit suicide and never deployed get lost in that picture. It's an over-simplistic picture, because for sure there are the MPTSRs that Elizabeth talks about. I did MPTSRs when I was in the military, and we certainly did them for people who had never deployed but who committed suicide for a number of reasons, some of which we didn't always understand. It's important to remember that there are many factors leading that person onto that suicidal pathway. Deployment may be one of them, but not necessarily.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you both very much for coming and sharing this helpful information with us today.

I just want to touch on a point in response to a question by Ms. Lockhart. I believe you twice referred to the MPTSRs. Now, as I understand it, those are done in each case where there is a suicide, and that data is then collected. All of the MPTSRs are put together as findings in annual suicide report. Is that correct?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Yes, chapter 1 of the annual suicide report.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

I see, okay. I don't believe we have a copy of that before our committee. I'm wondering if you can table the latest annual suicide report.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Sure, I can give you my copy that I have here, and it's also available on the web if you just search 2016 CAF suicide report.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you very much. That would be helpful.

Dr. Heber, with regard to some of what we're talking about here, are you able to identify some of the factors that put a veteran, as you see it, at a higher risk of suicidal ideation? What are some of the actual factors?

I know we talked about transition to some extent, and we've heard a lot of different opinions about what these factors may be, but I'd be interested in hearing your thoughts.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

The first thing I'll say is that the factors that lead to what I call that “suicide pathway” are similar for veterans and for any member of the general Canadian population. The first factor is that almost all people—90% or more—likely have a mental health problem at the time they commit suicide. This finding is from international research; it's one of the most robust findings we have. It's a very important factor. It's why when we are doing work to prepare suicide prevention strategies, a lot of that work does focus on good mental health care and on getting people into care, because we know it's one of the factors that's consistently there. The other factor that is usually present right before the suicide is some stressful life event. Often it is something like a relationship breakup, or perhaps the person has run into trouble with the law or has lost their job. It's usually related: it's relational, and it's to do with a loss. This person has a mental illness—usually there's some depression in that mental health problem—and then they have this crisis, this loss, that happens. That sets them off starting to think about suicide.

There are a number of other factors that we know contribute to this. This access to lethal means is a really important factor. We know from public health research that the easier the access is.... Often people do this impulsively. Often, if people can be stopped from committing suicide today, and especially if help is provided, they will not go on to commit suicide.

(1610)

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Identifying the underlying mental health illness is the preventative way to stop the escalation from happening?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

It's certainly one of the things we know contributes. Therefore, it's something on which, if we make an effort, we know that it will be helpful.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

What can we be doing better for our veterans to help identify it and make it easier for them to come forward to get help for their underlying mental health challenges?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

In the last year, Veterans Affairs Canada has been working on updating our mental health strategy. As well, we are currently developing a joint suicide prevention strategy with the Canadian Armed Forces—we're working together on this. We are doing so in part because we want to pay special attention to that transition period to make sure that we are covering people when they need the support the most, so that they don't fall through the cracks. For many years, going back to at least 2000, there have been a number of programs and initiatives in place around suicide prevention in the veteran population, but we are now updating that information and are creating a joint strategy for our two organizations.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Are you seeing less stigmatization, though, of forces members coming forward with an underlying mental health illness? If we're trying to get them before these difficult life challenges happen—and the transition piece is a difficult time for any soldier exiting the forces—is there some way to break down that stigma that we haven't been using? If so, what might that be?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

There are a few answers to that question.

First of all, with regard to the people who we know are exiting the military with a known mental health problem for which they've been receiving treatment, we're pretty good already at making sure we do that warm handover from one organization to the other. When I was in the military, I was the head of the operational trauma and stress support centre in Ottawa. We have an OSI clinic run by Veterans Affairs Canada in Ottawa. There were a number of my patients who I handed over to the Veterans Affairs clinic before they left the military. We have a lot of that going on for people who have already been identified.

One of our concerns, of course, is people who have not been identified, people who maybe don't even realize that they have mental health issues until they leave and face extra stresses from having left the military. One of the things we have put in place is an exit interview for all members who are leaving. It is a transition interview where they meet with somebody from Veterans Affairs Canada. Even if they have never had a problem and they don't see themselves as needing our help, we've met with them face-to-face and said, “Here's who we are. Here's where we are. Here's our number; call us if you need us.”

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The veterans advisory group that the Minister of Veterans Affairs set up is hosting a meeting this week on mental health. One of the issues they are going to be discussing is suicide. Are either of you invited to that meeting?

(1615)

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Yes, I am presenting at that meeting on Wednesday. It's the mental health advisory group of the Minister of Veterans Affairs.

Mr. John Brassard:

First of all, I'm glad to hear that.

Dr. Harris, you're not going to be there?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

No, I'm not invited.

Mr. John Brassard:

Here's the thing, and you've spoken about it. As a committee, we're studying mental health issues and suicide prevention. You mentioned that Veterans Affairs and the Canadian Armed Forces are studying mental health strategies and suicide prevention strategies. We now have an advisory committee that's going to be dealing with this in a one-day summit on suicide. Do we have too many cooks in the kitchen to deal with this issue? Are there way too many people involved in this? I ask because ask because nothing is getting done.

It's frustrating on my part to hear about all these studies, advisory groups, and meetings, and yet seemingly there is not much being done in the way of implementing a strategy. It seems that a lot of people are running around justifying their existence, but nobody is really doing anything. I'm just wondering about this. When do we get to that point where stuff is actually done in order to deal with this issue?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

I don't think I'm particularly well placed to answer that question realistically.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Let me answer that question. We do a great deal.

We do a great deal in Veterans Affairs Canada. As I said, from 2000, on the whole issue of suicide, even though, as I said before, there are challenges for our knowing about suicides in the veteran population, we have worked on putting many things into place, both for suicide prevention and for getting people access to mental health care.

Again, as I said, we know that leads to.... It's one of the most important things for us to do to help prevent suicides. All of our case managers receive suicide prevention training, and that training is updated every year. Also, any front-line worker at Veterans Affairs Canada now receives suicide prevention training. If you phone and somebody answers the phone, they've received that kind of training. They have a sense of what to do if they are concerned about the person on the other end of that line.

In addition to having case management and front-line workers who, again, can coordinate care for anybody who comes in and has a service-related mental health injury, they can be referred to an OSI clinic. If they're in an area where there are no OSI clinics, we have 4,000 mental health providers in Canada who we can access from Veterans Affairs Canada to serve our population.

Mr. John Brassard:

With all of the things you're doing and all of the studies that are going on, are we ever going to get to a point where we can actually prevent this from happening?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

You know—and Elizabeth said this—we really believe that one suicide is too many, but I think that if you look at any population, you can see that suicide does occur. Will we ever be able to prevent every single suicide? I don't know, but that's what we're working towards.

Mr. John Brassard:

Dr. Harris, statistically, I want to ask you about prescription drugs and opioids as a means to treat those who are suffering from PTSD, perhaps, or from an occupational stress injury. Have you statistically kept track of how many of those who commit suicide are on these types of medications?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

The MPTSR keeps track of what medications individuals are on at the time and preceding their death, and anecdotally we haven't seen anything—

Mr. John Brassard:

Does that form part of a report?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

We don't report on opioids specifically within the MPTSR annual reports, no, but the numbers would be very small, so we probably wouldn't be able to.

Mr. John Brassard:

Recently, the Department of Veterans Affairs reduced the amount of marijuana that can be prescribed from 10 grams to three grams. Were either of you consulted in that decision at all?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

No, but I'm not a physician.

Mr. John Brassard:

I understand.

Doctor, were you consulted in that decision at all?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

I'm sorry. I need you to repeat your question about what Veterans Affairs Canada has done.

(1620)

Mr. John Brassard:

They reduced the amount of marijuana allowed for veterans from 10 grams to three grams a day.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Let me say first that Veterans Affairs Canada does not prescribe or authorize marijuana or any medications. What we do is fund treatments, and we fund marijuana to a certain extent. Before, Veterans Affairs Canada was funding up to 10 grams per day of marijuana for an individual. That amount will be cut down based on the amount that's funded—not Veterans Affairs. If a family physician, for example, is authorizing the marijuana and feels strongly that this person needs more than three grams, he or she needs to consult a specialist physician on the reason that the person is receiving the marijuana, and do another assessment and say, yes, this person needs more than three grams a day.

Mr. John Brassard:

I'm aware of the process. I'm asking whether, as the chief of psychiatry, you were consulted on this decision. Were you consulted on this decision to reduce it from 10 grams to three grams?

The reason I'm asking is that we had the minister here, who said he had consulted broadly with a wide range of professionals. As the chief of psychiatry, were you consulted on this decision?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

This decision was actually made before I started working for Veterans Affairs Canada, but I know the people who sat on the expert panel who were consulted. They included—

Mr. John Brassard:

Your predecessor?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

I had no predecessor. These were experts in using marijuana for medical purposes.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Eyolfson.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Thank you for coming.

Dr. Heber, I have a bit of a bias on this particular issue. I'm an RCMP brat.

We have been talking about the Canadian Forces members and their suicide rate. I know the numbers are probably smaller, just from the fact of the number of members who have served, but how did the suicide rates among RCMP veterans compare with Canadian Forces veterans?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

I do not know what the comparison is. I'm sorry.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

All right. Thank you.

Dr. Rolland-Harris, this has been touched on in a couple of questions so far. We talked about tracking the female suicides.

I'm a physician. I've had to learn statistics, and I know the challenges of analyzing data when the numbers are small. I think we both agree it's fortunate that the numbers are small, but it does cause that challenge.

In medicine in general we've had an issue over the years where so much medical research has been gender-based, usually towards males, right from basic science research onward. I was a medical researcher before I was a physician. We always used male rats, because if you used two genders there was too much variation. Hence, you develop medications that might not work for females. Although I understand that putting it in a report is one thing, because, as I say, the numbers are so low you might identify....

Are you looking at methods that can better analyze and maybe get more conclusions from the female population, where it's so challenging?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Yes. I mentioned the CF cancer and mortality study, CF CAMS, which is one of the big drivers behind the study. It's twofold. One is to be able to have a large enough population so we can look at more specific details, including differences in gender. But we're also, to use a term my colleague from VAC uses, trying to “close” that seam. Rather than just looking at still-serving and then released individuals as two sets of groups in two separate silos, we're looking at what we call the “life course” of the military member. We're trying to get a better picture of what's happening both during and after their service.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

You're welcome.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Dr. Heber, when you have an active patient under the care of a psychiatrist, you have the warm handover you talked about. However, as you pointed out as well, there are many veterans who present later, well after their service is concluded. Of course, these are people who will be under provincial health systems and are going to present to family physicians and emergency departments, which is where I've spent my career.

Has Veterans Affairs been putting out education for primary care medical providers in the field that is specific to the medical and psychiatric needs of veterans and what the warning signs are?

(1625)

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Yes. We've started, in the last couple of years especially, initiating relationships with the College of Family Physicians of Canada, with providers, with some organizations, such as Calian, that have clinics and are interested in accepting veterans as their patients. We're looking at all kinds of things to help us make sure veterans are in care so that every veteran has a family physician.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

To further expand on that, because again, I spent my career as an emergency physician, I wonder if there been outreach specifically to the associations that govern or train emergency physicians, let's say either the Royal College of Physicians or the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians.

I ask because this isn't just a concern with veterans, but with people in general. There are so many people who either don't have family doctors or just can't get in.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Right, and they show up in the emergency department.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Many show up in the emergency department.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Absolutely.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Has there been any specific outreach to the emergency medicine community so that they can be better informed as to where to consult and where to direct the care of these veterans who show up on their doorstep?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

I just looked over my shoulder at my medical director, and she just smiled, so I actually don't know. But if there hasn't been, that's a great suggestion, and we will look into that.

Really, we would like every front-line physician in Canada to be aware of issues that veterans may present with.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Yes, that's useful. Unlike in a family clinic, you often don't know the patient. You've never met them.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Yes, that's right.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

They say emergency medicine is the art of making correct decisions with insufficient information. When a veteran shows up on your doorstep, that is so very true.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Yes.

Even for emergency physicians to ask people if they've ever been a member.... Often that question isn't even asked of the patient who comes in.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

I have no further questions.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Clarke. [Translation]

Mr. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for giving me the floor.

I want to welcome Ms. Heber and Ms. Rolland-Harris and thank them for being here today.

My first question was provided by the person I'm replacing today, Cathy Wagantall, a very honourable woman.

Many veterans have repeatedly told us that a number of their brothers in arms committed suicide after taking mefloquine, an antimalarial drug. One of the veterans who wrote to my colleague, Ms. Wagantall, told us that he personally knew 11 veterans who committed suicide and that all 11 of them had taken mefloquine.

In the 21 years covered and of the 239 suicides recorded, how many of the brave men and women had been in malaria zones?

Do you have this information?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

I don't have it on hand.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

In other words, you don't know how many of the 239 people took this drug.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Exactly. I'm not saying that the information wasn't collected. I'm simply saying that I don't have it on hand. Therefore, I can't analyze it.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Okay. I understand.

Ms. Heber, at the Department of Veterans Affairs, could we obtain an answer by making an access to information request or by simply asking the minister?

(1630)

[English]

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

On approximately how many veterans have...?

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Of the 239 veterans who completed suicide, as the words have to be said, how many of them would have taken the medication mefloquine? Can we find this type of information through ATIP or through a question during question period?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

It's a good question. Again, it would depend where they had deployed and whether.... I mean, there should be records. I assume that those records would be within the Canadian military.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Yes, you're right.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

It would have been while they were serving that they took it.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Perfect. Thank you for that insight into National Defence.

A year ago, when I was on this committee as the Veterans Affairs critic, on May 9, 2016, I filed an Order Paper question. For the region of Quebec City, I asked what percentage of persons had financial prestations for each physical and mental illness—for example, knees, hearing, and so on.

Interestingly, for one year, 2015-16, in the Quebec region, 8% of the claims for money concerned post-traumatic syndromes, 2% deep depression, 1% anxiety, 1% lack of sleep, and 1% alcohol and drug abuse. Overall, almost 13% of the claims for money were put forward by people suffering from mental health issues that we could probably sometimes connect to suicide.

Of the 15 members, or sorry, I think it's 14, who committed suicide in 2015, how many of them were in the process of claiming?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

You're talking about— [Translation]

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

We're talking about financial benefits here.[English]

I forgot the word in English, but how many of those 14 veterans were on prestations financières or asking for one, or filling out some papers?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Just so that we're clear, the annual suicide report is not regarding veterans but still-serving individuals.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

I am unclear what you're talking about, because we don't actually have numbers.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

“Financial benefits”, that's the word. So those 14 persons were serving.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

They were still serving, the ones in the annual report.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

So the question still stands: of those 14 soldiers who were serving, how many of them, by any chance, filed claims for any financial benefits?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Do you mean claims once they were released?

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

During—

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Sorry, we don't have access to that information.

The Chair:

You have eight seconds remaining.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Do you have a system to flag people who are potentially going to commit suicide? I know it's very difficult, but is there any system such as that, perhaps?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Yes. At Veterans Affairs Canada, in the case management file, we have put in place a flag for that.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

Perhaps I can come back to the question in regard to the higher suicide rate among those who are in the army as compared to navy and air force, and any correlation or thoughts you might have.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Do you want to speak to that?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Again, I think anything I would say would really be speculation. What you said might be reasonable. Is it related to people who've had more traumatic experiences overseas during their deployments? It could be. The bottom line is that we don't really know, but certainly that increase in the army, or certain parts of the army, has coincided right with our time in Afghanistan. I think it's pretty reasonable to say there's probably a connection there.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

The reason we haven't parsed it in any more detail is that statistically we don't have sufficient power. We can only really look at one variable at a time, such as deployment, yes or no; or army or non-army, and those sorts of things. If we start looking at what's called a bivariate analysis, looking at two variables at a time, we find ourselves not being able to say anything because there's no statistical power to back it up.

(1635)

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

The numbers are so small, that's why.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Again, the CF CAMS is, I think, one of the pillars of our research going forward. One of the things that we may be able to do is to look at the colour of the uniform and whether it makes a difference, in concert with other risk factors that we know are frequently related to suicide.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It's interesting that the numbers tell us some things, and yet you can't infer anything concrete sometimes from those very same numbers. I understand your frustration.

Dr. Heber, you were talking about the warm handover. Obviously, we hear from veterans who do not feel very warm and fuzzy, and they talk about the frustration, the barrier, financial problems such as the pension cheque not arriving on time, and the fact that they feel abandoned, alienated, and something important has been take away from them. You talked about that, so obviously there must have been a recognition that there was a problem in terms of that warm handover. There's obviously been a conscious effort to change that. Is that ongoing? Is that something that you're going to continue, and how so?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Yes. Again, part of the reason we are doing a joint suicide strategy is that we want to make sure that we put special emphasis on that time. Again, with some of the research that's being done in Veterans Affairs Canada, we're really looking at these issues like identity and what happens to a person's identity, especially people who joined the military when they were very young and this is not just the only employment they've ever known, but that they've grown up in the military and this is the family they've known, because it really is. We have a fairly small military in our country. People get to know each other. I served only eight and a half years, but I knew everybody in health services in the Canadian military. There is a strong sense of shared identity.

The Chair:

Thank you. That ends our time for this panel.

I'd like to thank both of you for all the work you do helping our men and women who have served.

We'll take a quick four-minute break, and we'll start with our next panel.

(1635)

(1640)

The Chair:

Welcome, everybody. In our second hour we have, from the Department of Veterans Affairs, Dr. Courchesne, director general, health professionals division; Johanne Isabel, national manager, mental health services unit; and from the Department of Health, Chantale Malette, national manager, employee assistance services.

I don't think we're going to use the whole 10 minutes, but we'll have an introduction by our panellists, and we'll start with Ms. Isabel. [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Isabel (National Manager, Mental Health Services Unit, Directorate of Mental Health, Department of Veterans Affairs):

Good evening, everyone. My name is Johanne Isabel, and I've been working at Veterans Affairs Canada since 2001. My spouse is a retired member of the Canadian Armed Forces.

Mr. Chair and committee members, we're pleased to be talking about the Veterans Affairs Canada assistance service, a counselling and referral service offered 24 hours a day, seven days a week to our veterans and retired RCMP members and to their family members. The service is confidential. If a veteran isn't registered for a Veterans Affairs Canada service or program, the veteran can still use this program.

Here's a brief history of the program.

In 2000, Veterans Affairs Canada worked with Health Canada to provide a service that was similar to the Canadian Armed Forces member assistance program. We wanted to make sure that veterans and their families could transition more smoothly from military life to civilian life. We wanted to provide this service to serve our clients properly during the transition.

On December 1, 2014, your committee recommended that the assistance program for veterans be improved. From 2000 to 2014, veterans could receive up to eight individual counselling sessions with a health professional. As I already mentioned, based on your recommendations and since April 1, 2014, the program has been providing 20 individual counselling sessions to all our veterans and their family members and to retired RCMP members.

I'll now turn the floor over to Ms. Malette.

(1645)

Ms. Chantale Malette (National Manager, Business and Customer Relations, Employee Assistance Services, Department of Health):

Hello. My name is Chantale Malette.[English]

The services that are offered through the VAC assistance service are mainly confidential, bilingual services, accessible via a 1-800 number and through the Health Canada phone line 24 hours a day 365 days a year. Mental health professionals answer every call. All counsellors have at least a master's or a Ph.D. The veteran then has access automatically, right away, to a mental health professional.

Telephone services are also offered for the hearing impaired. There is immediate access to crisis support and counselling by a mental health professional with a minimum of a master's degree. If the person calling is in crisis, the mental health professional will take whatever time is necessary to stabilize the person before referring them for face-to-face counselling.

We refer to our national network of specialized private practitioners, according to needs, anywhere in Canada. We have face-to-face counselling. We also offer telephone counselling, especially when services are required in an isolated area or if they are required by the client. We also offer e-counselling when appropriate.

We refer to external resources or VAC if the time required to resolve the issue exceeds the coverage provided by the program. We use the sessions and the hours covered under the program to bridge the person, to support the veteran until long-term care is available.

In terms of suicide prevention, for every call the client's state is verified. We verify the level of stress. We verify the suicidal or homicidal thoughts. If the caller is identified as having suicidal ideation, the counsellor will ask for the caller's authorization to contact their VAC case manager and inform him or her of the situation.

In terms of counsellors, we have access to over 900 mental health professionals across Canada. They all have a minimum of a master's degree in a psychosocial field and at least five years' experience in private practice. They have had a government security screening. They have malpractice insurance. They're registered with a recognized professional association. Professional references are checked as well.

In terms of quality assurance, every time a veteran consults a mental health professional, we provide this person with a satisfaction survey to get more information on their satisfaction with the program. We also do yearly visits to counsellors' offices. We visit at least 5% every year. We also are accredited by EASNA, the employee assistance society of North America, and COA, the Council on Accreditation. We adhere to the highest standards in the industry.

(1650)

[Translation]

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

Here are a few statistics.

From 2012 to 2016, the number of people who used the service went from 614 to 1,140. Therefore, there was an increase. This was mainly the result of the decision to improve the services by increasing the number of counselling sessions to 20. For a veteran or a veteran's family member who wants to address a major issue, it's worthwhile to have counselling sessions over a longer period. It's very positive.

Of the 1,143 people mentioned here, 68% are veterans, 28% are veterans' family members and 2% are retired RCMP members. The people who use the services are, on average, in their late forties or early fifties. People use the Veterans Affairs Canada assistance service mainly for psychological issues not related to military service or for couples counselling.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Great. Thank you.

Mr. Kitchen, I believe you're going to split your time with Mr. Brassard.

Mr. Kitchen, go ahead.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you all for being here.

Doctor, thank you very much for coming back to the committee.

I appreciate your presentation and your giving us some of the statistics. When you talk about 24 hours, seven days a week, 365 days, how does someone access that with this number? For example, I come from Saskatchewan. You talk about having 900 mental health professionals. If someone in Saskatchewan is phoning at midnight, who are they phoning?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

They are calling Ottawa. All the counsellors who answer the VAC assistance service are in Ottawa, so when the person dials the 1-800 number they will automatically have access to a mental health professional, who will verify the state of the client and refer them for face-to-face counselling anywhere in Canada, including in Saskatchewan if they want.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

We talked about knowledge translation. One of the things I see here is knowledge translation and getting this knowledge out to veterans.

Have you actually done a survey or a study to find out how many veterans know about this? [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

Many efforts have been made to further promote the service. The information has been posted on our website. The information is also consulted a great deal on our Facebook and Twitter platforms. The information on the service is sent to veterans on a monthly basis. Ms. Malette works extensively with the Canadian Armed Forces, the RCMP and all the Veterans Affairs Canada offices to explain and show the benefits of the program. [English]

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

How do we get this information to the homeless veteran who doesn't have a computer, doesn't tweet, doesn't use Facebook, and may be living in northern Saskatchewan or northern Ontario or wherever it may be? How do we get that information to them? [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

That's a very good question.

You're right. We can always do better. Our case managers receive information. Since 2012, the VAC assistance service has been used more often. Could it be used even more? Yes. Is it effective? Yes. Could homeless veterans benefit from it? Yes, and we're constantly working to make that happen. Could we do more? The answer is yes.

We try to vary the ways we let them know about the assistance service. We have various programs to ensure that homeless veterans also receive information about the assistance service. We distribute brochures to them to let them know about the service.

(1655)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The committee is studying mental health and suicide prevention among veterans. You're on the front lines of all that's going on here.

What sort of recommendations would you like to see the committee make in terms of dealing with the issue of suicide prevention and some of the mental health issues?

Do you want me to pick somebody? Doctor? I know you have been here before.

Dr. Cyd Courchesne (Director General, Health Professionals Division, Chief Medical Officer, Department of Veterans Affairs):

Yes I have, and we look forward to the report. As Madame Isabel mentioned, it was based on recommendations that came out of this committee that we increase the counselling sessions from eight to 20, because our numbers show that this is a service. I would like to remind you that this is a service available regardless of whether someone is in receipt of benefits from Veterans Affairs. It is for anyone who is one of those 600,000 veterans out there in Canada.

In terms of suicide prevention, you heard from my two very articulate colleagues that we continue our research to understand this very complex problem. We're working together more closely with our Canadian Forces colleagues, especially around the periods of vulnerability that are identified through epidemiology or research, so that we can strengthen our programs.

Mr. John Brassard:

Do you work with stakeholders? For example, do you work with the provinces and municipalities? Is there any of that outreach to deal with the homeless population? Municipalities, for example, do numbers, and there are other organizations, as we found out through testimony, that count homeless veterans. Do you reach out to those organizations?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

I'll start, and then I'll pass it on.

Within the Department of Veterans Affairs, we do have colleagues who are working specifically on a strategy for veterans in crisis, for the homeless. These are issues we can't work alone on, so they're very much connected with municipal and provincial organizations, with all these people out there on the beat. We wouldn't be able to do that without these important stakeholders. [Translation]

I don't know whether my colleague has something to add.

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

No. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Eyolfson.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you, and my thanks to you all for coming.

Dr. Courchesne, welcome back. Am I saying your last name correctly?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

Yes, that's very good.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Okay, thank you.

I'd like to follow up with what I was asking Dr. Heber before. It sounded like there was a communication. You might have had an answer there. In response to the outreach to primary care physicians, is there any specific communication with the emergency medicine community?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

We don't communicate with emergency medicine specifically, but we work very closely with the College of Family Physicians of Canada. They've struck a special group to produce educational material for all the family physicians in Canada, educating them on the health issues of military families. They've also expressed that they wanted to produce a best-advice guide on veterans' health.

The Occupational and Environmental Medicine Association of Canada has invited us to come and present on veterans' health issues, and I'll be presenting there with my colleague Jim Thompson on what the research has shown us about being able to educate as many doctors as possible. We're also connected with the Vanier Institute of the Family. We're very interested in families and veterans. So, yes, we do a lot of educating.

(1700)

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

We did also work with the CAMH in Toronto. They have a series of mental health modules online, and one on mental health and addiction 101 was added. It's a 20-minute bilingual online module that could be used by all health professionals.

We also are working with the Canadian Mental Health Commission and Mental Health First Aid Canada. There's a two-day training course being provided to the veterans community. What do we mean by “the veterans community”? It's being offered to all primary care providers, families members, and friends. Our goal is to have 3,000 members, or as many as we can, who will take the two-day training course before the end of 2020.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

All right. Thank you.

To expand on this, has there been outreach towards the medical schools in Canada to put these issues into the actual curriculum?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

I'm trying to think if there was an outreach when I was in the military. Through the Canadian Medical Association, the Canadian Forces were represented at the specialist and the GP levels. I sat on the GP forum, and we had representatives at the Canadian Federation of Medical Students. So there has been a start towards socializing these issues with them. Certainly the Canadian Medical Association has been very good, in making a declaration in 2014 that they were encouraging family doctors to take veterans on in their practices. We've had very good support from our medical associations in Canada.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

All right, thank you. That's good to hear.

Are there any trends in how these veterans with mental health concerns are presenting themselves? We know that in the military and in society in general, there's always a stigma with mental illness. Everyone's been working hard to reduce that stigma. With general public education to reduce that stigma, are we seeing a positive result in veterans presenting themselves earlier or presenting before they're in crisis? Is that having the effect we want it to?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

You heard from a professional statistician epidemiologist, and I would be going out on a limb if I said that we were definitely seeing positive results, because they would ask me where are the statistics to support that.

I am going to bring it back to our veterans assistance line. One of the reasons for that—because we're talking about stigma—is that it's anonymous; it's available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. You don't need to qualify for any of our programs to use it, and I think that goes a long way.

That might be the first phone call, the first step they take to talk to someone, and to realize that maybe they have a bigger problem. The professionals that work the VAC assistance line work with veterans. They know our programs. They know when to say, “Well, maybe you should connect with a case manger and explore more supports to help you with your situation”.

That's what I wanted to say about stigma, and bringing it back to the VAC assistance line. You don't have to pre-qualify for anything; you just call, and you get access immediately.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Dr. Courchesne, for coming back and filling in some of the gaps for us.

I want to go back to some specifics. You're now offering 20 face-to-face sessions plus sessions for the family. In terms of those 20 visits, is there a specific time frame you could count on? When those 20 visits end, is there a follow-up to evaluate their efficacy? What happens if there is still that need for more?

I wasn't sure if you had commented on that.

(1705)

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

I'm going to let Madame Malette answer the question with respect to the length of the sessions.

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Normally, we can provide up to 20 hours, and most of the time that is sufficient. When we have situations that require more than 20 hours, we will certainly have a conversation with VAC regarding the required services, and we will normally provide the intervention that is needed. It can be up to 25 or 30 hours, if necessary.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I was very interested in the reference made, both by Madame Malette and you, Dr. Courchesne, to interacting with practitioners, talking to the providers, talking to family doctors, and the idea of family doctors taking on veterans.

Is part of the intent to verify the quality of the service provided and to find out from those family doctors what they're discovering in the course of their interactions with veterans? Are you learning from them, I guess, is what I'm asking?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

Are you talking about the health professionals that provide the counselling to the veterans through VAC assistance?

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

You talked about educating family physicians, and I wondered if it's a two-way street.

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

That was in response to your colleague's question as to whether we were doing outreach with associations and family doctors. We're not in a position to contact those family doctors. I'm not sure—

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Perhaps Madame Isabel said that you have quality visits to practitioners' offices, and I wondered if, in that process, you're learning important things from those practitioners.

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

Those are not family physicians that provide the service through VAC assistance. It's Health Canada that monitors the quality of the services provided through the VAC assistance. Am I right?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Yes.

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

Again, this is anonymous, so none of the information is shared with us. We just know how many people use the service and perhaps whether they're satisfied with the service.

Once in a while, we do deal with some complaints and all that, which we follow up on, but the providers would never communicate with us to exchange that information.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It just seems that we're constantly in quicksand regarding how to prevent suicide and how to address the needs of people. It seems to always come back to this ambivalence and not knowing exactly what course to take. I'm trying to sort through that, not very successfully obviously, but I'm trying to sort through all of that.

Dr. Heber referred to VAC updating the mental health strategy and collaborating with DND to create this joint strategy in regard to suicide. I wonder if you could speak to that. I wanted to ask the question before about what those pieces look like. What does that strategy look like?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

I'll answer that, if you'll allow.

You have heard that suicide is not a simple issue. Many factors play into it. I know people don't always like to hear about research, but research is very important because it provides us with so much information, so we can formulate programs, services, and strategies to confront this issue.

There are several aspects to the strategy. There is prevention, intervention, and what we would call “post-vention”. That's just a fancy way of putting things in baskets and organizing our activities.

I would say that everything that you've heard here about the VAC assistance line and, I would say, all the programs that Veterans Affairs offers to the veterans, is all part of the prevention strategies or prevention actions.

We also learn from research that the transition period is an important period of vulnerability for our releasing members, so we want to concentrate on that. What more can we do besides exit interviews, getting them case managers, helping them navigate the system, and getting them the benefits and the treatments that they need. All of that exists. All of that will be improved and that's all part of the strategy that we're developing with our Canadian Forces colleagues.

(1710)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Go ahead, Mr. Fraser. [Translation]

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to thank you three for being here today to give your presentations and answer our questions.

I want to start with you, Ms. Isabel. You mentioned the 20 in-person counselling sessions. The number of counselling sessions therefore increased from 8 to 20.

Can you explain the steps a person must take to receive these 20 counselling sessions? Is it easy to obtain approval? Are there forms to fill in? Do the members encounter difficulties before obtaining approval for these sessions?

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

No. The first step for a veteran, a veteran's family member or a retired RCMP member is simply to call the 1-800 number. As Ms. Malette said, the team is in Ottawa. A staff member will ask questions and ask how things are going. The staff member will also determine the urgency of the call. If a client has suicidal thoughts, the protocol will be a bit different. However, if the client says they want to meet with a counsellor or mental health professional in person, depending on the client's region, the staff member can refer the client within a time frame ranging from 24 hours to five days. The time frame is based on the level of urgency. The veteran or the person making the request can receive the service in person, with a counsellor.

The client isn't the one who will determine the number of counselling sessions required, whether that number is 2 or 20. The decision is made after a health professional conducts an assessment. The veteran or client and the health professional will discuss the issue and the difficulties to address. This assessment will determine the number of sessions.

Earlier, it was asked whether the number of sessions ever needed to be increased to more than 20. The answer is yes, and it's important. A judgment call must be made, based on a client's needs. Sometimes, it's necessary. However, I also want to mention that this doesn't happen in the majority of cases. In a given year, Ms. Malette may call me three or four times to increase the number of sessions. In this case, we're talking about approximately five or six additional sessions.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Ms. Isabel, do you think the program steps are working well right now? Do you have any recommendations for improving the program?

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

I've been working with Health Canada since 2012. We've received very few complaints or negative comments regarding the number of counselling sessions, especially since we increased the number of sessions to 20. The service is used more often. I don't have any recommendations in this regard.

(1715)

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Okay. Thank you.

I would now like to speak to Ms. Malette.

You said the service was accessible through the 1-800 number. You also mentioned Facebook, Twitter and other similar things. Is there a way to communicate instantly with a staff member, online, by computer?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

No. At this time, there's no way to do so because it would be very difficult to assess the person's condition and to get back in touch with the person. For the moment, the safest method is for the person to call the 1-800 number. A mental health professional will respond and immediately verify the person's condition. The mental health professional can then get back in touch with the person, take note of the person's telephone number, and so on. Therefore, there's direct contact with the person. [English]

Mr. Colin Fraser:

One of the things we've heard in previous testimony is how important it is to have peer support, to have somebody who has served be a person who can talk to a veteran who may be in crisis now.

Is there somebody who can immediately be put in touch with them if they call the 1-800 number? You talked about some of the criteria for working at the contact centre. Is there somebody, a peer, who could be put in touch with them immediately?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

We would refer to existing resources, for example OSISS. We work closely with them as well. If a veteran needed to speak with a peer, then we would use the services already in place.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

But that could be quite a bit of time from that telephone call. It wouldn't be within the hour.

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Maybe not within the hour, but we would certainly make the call right away, and we would either stay on the phone with this person or we would do frequent follow-ups during the evening. We would find out the best way to support this person at that time.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Has anybody ever used the service and asked if a veteran works there? Does that question ever get asked?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

It's never happened.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Those are my questions.

The Chair:

We are running out of time. I just have one clarifying question on your pamphlet here. It says: A voluntary and confidential service to help all Veterans and their families as well as primary caregivers who have personal concerns that affect their well-being. The service is available free of charge.

As a caregiver or a family member, do you need a veteran's reference to use this service? [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

It's a service provided by Health Canada. The person simply needs to mention that they're a veteran's spouse and they can have immediate access to the service. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

That ends our round. On behalf of our committee here today, I would like to thank all three of you for coming with your testimony and for all you do to help our men and women who have served.

Mrs. Romanado, go ahead.

Mrs. Sherry Romanado (Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne, Lib.):

I know I wouldn't normally have the floor.

Would it be possible for the members of Parliament to receive a copy of this? I am not sure all members of Parliament are aware that this service exists. I would highly recommend that you make sure they have it.

The Chair:

Great. Thank you.

Mr. Fraser, go ahead.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Mr. Chair, I am just wondering why we are finishing at 5:20.

The Chair:

We could go to Mr. Bratina for six minutes, if he wishes to take that.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Thank you.

Did the increase in number from 614 to 1,143 and the extension of the 20 visits put any demands on resources? Were you able to do that within the complement of staff you had, or did it cause you to spend more money?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

We have actually hired more mental health professionals.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

These young people.... There was a reference to the military background, but what about orientation? How do you bring them into a military setting? I could see a certificate course in something like this, to add to their M.A. Is there an orientation process?

(1720)

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

It is a good question. I have to admit that right now we don't have a certificate or a specific program. We had a discussion last week, following recommendations from the family advisory committee at Veterans Affairs Canada. It was recommended that we provide more training for our mental health providers working with the VAC assistance service. Next week we'll have a call in to discuss this and try to identify how it could be done.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

I'm sure you need these very qualified people, who typically would be younger people coming out of the university setting. It would be more difficult for, say, veterans with some years of service to become qualified. They would have the natural ability to relate to a veteran, but there are specific issues that these people are trained for, which is beyond the scope of just an interested former service person.

On the question of the satisfaction survey, can you give me an indication of how that takes place?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

When the client sees one of our counsellors, the counsellor provides a voluntary survey with questions regarding the services that the client has received. They provide the person with a pre-stamped envelope as well, so the person can send us the information, which is then shared with VAC.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

It's always important, whatever we do, to review it and see whether we are making progress. So that's good to hear.

On the face-to-face counselling sessions, how long would a session typically go?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Normally, a session is one hour.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

In the satisfaction survey, is there a reflection that this is generally a good amount of time?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Yes.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Would 20 be an extreme or maximum? I gather from what you said that some people would have one or two sessions and your group would determine whether further sessions were needed, as opposed to somebody saying, “I'd like to come back next week too.”

Ms. Chantale Malette:

That's right. There needs to be an intervention that is provided to the client. Based on the intervention needed, the amount of sessions is decided.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

When someone calls the number, how do they identify themselves?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

They will identify themself as either a veteran or former military member.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

They simply say, “I'm former military and I need some help”?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Most of the time, yes, but if they can't or if they've just heard about us and don't know if they qualify for the service, we will ask questions of the person as to whether they have military life experience and if, at that point, they are regular members or former military.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

One of the things we're looking at that we've talked about many times at this committee is continuing the identity of the veteran with their service time and, therefore, maybe having a card or something so they know right away that they have a way of identifying themselves as a veteran. Would you see the use in that?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Yes. I think....

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

Yes, that would be a plus.

Having said that, as I mentioned, people don't have to justify it if they were in the military; they just have to mention it. We may believe that some people are receiving services because they've mentioned that they were veterans, but I doubt that people would do that. As for the fact that they don't have to provide any justification, the card would not really be a plus value in that specific case for that specific program.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

It would be very rare, but we've seen cases of people showing up for Remembrance Day with uniforms and medals and....

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

You're right, sir.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Thank you very much.

Those are my questions.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Quickly, I would like to follow up on Mr. Fraser's question. He commented about using peer support.

I want a little more clarification on that and whether you have ever looked at it or thought about this. It's one of the things we're hearing a lot about from our veterans. They're asking, “Isn't somebody there?” We haven't taken our veterans to actually help our veterans. There's this opportunity when you get a call like this where you might be able, on a conference call, to access someone 24-7, someone who can speak the language, because oftentimes people can't speak the language. I know a lot of psychologists and a lot of M.A. and Ph.D. students who do not know the language.

To me at least, having access for that veteran easily attainable in that crisis situation would be a valuable asset for your services. I'm wondering (a), if you have thought about it, and (b) if you haven't and this is the first time, if you see that being of some value.

(1725)

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

I'll take the first crack at this.

Based on the numbers and the calls, it's not just the veterans. There are RCMP members and there are family members and children. Most of the calls are not for service-related issues, so I would say that so far it has not been an issue. But again, the people who answer the phones are very aware of all the services we have, including OSISS, which has a very large network of peer support people who are ready to assist us. If it's not within the hour, they have a strong network of people that will jump in to assist whenever we reach out to them....

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Right, but I'm not talking about service, about someone asking for a service availability. I'm talking about a veteran in crisis with a mental health issue. No matter what that mental health problem may be—because there are many different types of mental health issues—the fact that they might actually have a veteran or someone in the military who, having been there, understands, sometimes just that comfort is enough to maybe bring them down or calm them down. As for having that in a conference call, is that not something that you would see having value?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

Well, absolutely. There's no doubt as to the value of peer support. Absolutely, it would be of value.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Is there a way that could be put into this program?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

We can certainly look at it.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Ms. Lockhart.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to talk a bit about families and the training provided to them. With other witnesses, we've talked about the first aid training that is presently happening for mental health and suicide prevention. Has there been any thought put to having similar training for family members even before military release? Has that been discussed?

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

I'm not sure.

I guess what I can say is that right now, as I mentioned, we are working with the Mental Health Commission of Canada to provide two days of mental health first aid training. Right now we have been providing close to 14 sessions across the country, and our goal is to provide at least 150. This is one way that family members can have a bit more knowledge on mental health. This is going to allow them to have a better understanding and maybe see how their husbands or spouses are reacting with different signs.

Also, Dr. Courchesne alluded to our partnership with Saint Elizabeth on a caregiver program that is going to be available in the spring.

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

Also, these programs are offered through the military family resource centre, so they are available to family members before the CF member releases.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

The only other question I had about that is whether those are paid for in advance or whether the families need to pay for those and be reimbursed.

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

When we are talking about the mental health first aid...it's free of charge.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

All right.

What about travel, though, to get there?

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

I have to admit that the travel to get there is not.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

I bring that up just because it's been identified as a barrier for some families.

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

Okay, thanks a lot for letting us know.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I just have a quick question.

When somebody calls the 1-800 number, I was wondering what the process is. What do they hear? Would the first thing they hear be that their call is important and to please stand by, or do they go straight to a person? Are there any recorded messages? Take me through the process of it.

Ms. Chantale Malette:

A mental health professional answers the phone. There is no answering machine that welcomes the client. It's a live person.

(1730)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So if somebody calls, in an immediate, “help is needed” crisis, what happens?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

The counsellor will evaluate the situation and ask questions on the level of stress, the suicidal thoughts, and ideation. Also, the counsellor will spend whatever time is necessary with the person over the phone before that person is referred to a mental health professional or other services, or even before we call 911, if necessary.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So you will do that if you need to.

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

Also, I should follow up on the point Sherry made earlier. She suggested giving this information out to MPs. As an MP, what information and resources are available to me to get out there? We have 338 MPs who have offices in every riding. A lot of places they're very far from any kind of veterans services office. What can we do to help your mission, basically?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

All this information is also available on our website also.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, I haven't heard about the Internet in my riding, but there you go.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

We also publish every week through Twitter and social media. We have repeat tweets that go out advertising all of the services available at the department. [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

We care about our veterans. You're all invited, in one way or another, to promote the service and to provide brochures in your offices. I would be very pleased to prepare boxes of information for you. That way, you can distribute them in your respective regions. Our veterans are important. We want to improve their situation.

Is everything in place to do so?

Maybe not, but with your support and recommendations,[English]this is what we are striving for. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Could you be proactive by sending those documents to our offices?

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

Absolutely. I'll do that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate it.[English]

We're past that pass.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

I just have a question on that. We all do householders, and I just wonder if you could make something that might go in a householder and send it to my staff, and maybe we could promote it through this committee in a householder. That's just an idea.

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

Okay.

The Chair:

With that, on behalf of the committee I'd like to thank you for your testimony today and everything you do for our men and women who serve. If there's any information you didn't get to us, send it to our clerk and he'll distribute it to the committee. Again, I'd like to take you up on the householder idea.

I need a motion to adjourn.

Mr. Robert Kitchen: I so move.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: Thank you.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des anciens combattants

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Neil Ellis (Baie de Quinte, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. La séance est ouverte.

Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement et à la motion adoptée le 29 septembre, le Comité reprend son étude de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide chez les vétérans.

Pour la première partie, nous accueillons la Dre Elizabeth Rolland-Harris, épidémiologiste principale, Groupe des Services de santé des Forces canadiennes, du ministère de la Défense nationale, ainsi que la Dre Alexandra Heber, chef de la psychiatrie, Division des professionnels de la santé.

Nous allons commencer par vos déclarations de 10 minutes avant de passer aux questions.

La parole est à vous. Merci.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris (épidémiologiste principale, Direction – Protection de la santé de la Force, Groupe des Services de santé des Forces canadiennes, ministère de la Défense nationale):

Monsieur le président et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité des anciens combattants de la Chambre, je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de discuter avec vous aujourd'hui. Depuis dix ans, je suis épidémiologiste principale pour la Direction de la protection de la santé de la Force, plus communément appelée la DPSF, laquelle fait partie du Groupe des Services de santé des Forces. Je suis titulaire d'une maîtrise ès sciences en épidémiologie de l'Université de Toronto ainsi que d'un doctorat en épidémiologie de l'École d'hygiène et de médecine tropicale de Londres, au Royaume-Uni. Avant de me joindre à la DPSF, j'ai travaillé à titre d'épidémiologiste aux échelons provincial et régional ainsi que dans le secteur universitaire.

En tant qu'épidémiologiste, mon premier rôle, — en réalité —, c'est de répondre aux besoins des décideurs des services de santé des FC et de l'ensemble des Forces armées canadiennes — aussi appelées les FAC, et je suis certaine que vous le savez déjà — en matière de statistiques et de données. Les cliniciens et les décideurs qui élaborent les politiques, mettent en oeuvre la pratique clinique ou travaillent dans le but de garder les FAC en santé ont vraiment besoin de savoir qui est leur population et quels sont ses besoins, et c'est là que j'interviens. Je suis en coulisse, à fournir aux « faiseurs » les renseignements statistiques dont ils ont besoin pour agir en se fondant sur des données probantes. Je le fais dans le cadre d'une grande direction, celle de la protection de la santé de la Force.

La DPSF fonctionne de la même manière qu'une autorité provinciale de santé publique, mais elle ne sert que les FAC. Les principaux piliers de la santé publique sont la surveillance et l'évaluation de la santé de la population, la protection de la santé, la promotion de la santé et la prévention de la maladie.

En ce qui concerne la surveillance de la santé publique, une partie importante de ce que nous faisons consiste à suivre la santé des membres des FAC, principalement au moyen de sondages comme celui du Système d'information sur la santé et les habitudes de vie et grâce à d'autres fonctions de surveillance de la santé. Ces fonctions peuvent avoir une portée plus large, comme c'est le cas du Système de surveillance des maladies et les blessures dans les FC, qui surveille les cas de maladie et de blessures durant les déploiements, en particulier, ainsi que du système de suivi nommé évaluations de la santé et signalement des résultats de santé des Forces canadiennes, qu'il est possible d'adapter afin d'observer un certain nombre d'états et de problèmes de santé. Ces systèmes peuvent également être un peu plus précis, comme c'est le cas de la base de données sur la mortalité ou du système de surveillance du suicide, lequel est la source d'information à partir de laquelle est produit le rapport annuel sur le suicide dans les FAC. Les décideurs et les responsables des politiques utilisent ensuite les tendances et les modèles que nous dégageons dans le cadre de notre travail à l'aide de ces diverses sources de renseignements pour élaborer et mettre en oeuvre des politiques et des programmes fondés sur des données probantes et relatifs à la santé à l'échelle des FAC.

Comme je l'ai mentionné, le « Rapport de 2016 sur la mortalité par suicide dans les Forces armées canadiennes » est un de nos rapports que vous connaissez fort probablement; il porte sur les cas de suicide entre 1995 et 2015. Je l'appellerai à partir de maintenant le rapport de 2016 sur le suicide.

Au sein des FAC, nous — les civils et les militaires — considérons tous les suicides comme des tragédies. Le suicide est fermement reconnu comme un problème de santé publique important. Ainsi, ce rapport est produit depuis 1995, et des versions annuelles sont publiées depuis 2008 afin que l'on apprenne à mieux connaître le phénomène du suicide dans les FAC. La surveillance et l'analyse des événements de suicide de membres des FAC fournissent des renseignements précieux qui orientent et perfectionnent les efforts déployés de façon continue afin de prévenir le suicide.

(1535)

[Français]

Bien que nous recueillions et suivions les données sur tous les suicides, qu'il s'agisse d'hommes ou de femmes, de membres de la Force régulière ou de la Force de réserve, les rapports annuels ne portent que sur les militaires de sexe masculin membres de la Force régulière. C'est ainsi parce que le nombre de suicides de femmes et de réservistes est trop modeste pour que nous puissions divulguer des détails sur ces cas sans risquer d'identifier des personnes et de compromettre leur droit à la confidentialité. Par conséquent, même si l'expérience de ces gens est versée dans les preuves qui servent à orienter les politiques en matière de santé mentale et les efforts de prévention du suicide au sein des Forces armées canadiennes, les renseignements qui les concernent ne figurent pas dans les rapports annuels.

Tous les suicides sont confirmés par le coroner de la province dans laquelle ils ont eu lieu. Ce renseignement est fourni à la Direction de la santé mentale, qui en assure le suivi et le recoupe avec les renseignements recueillis par le Centre de soutien pour les enquêtes administratives, qui fait partie de la Direction des enquêtes et examens spéciaux.

Chaque fois qu'un décès est jugé constituer un suicide, le médecin-chef adjoint ordonne la production d'un rapport d'examen technique du suicide par des professionnels de la santé, ou ETSPS; en anglais, c'est MPTSR. Cette enquête est menée par une équipe formée d'un professionnel de la santé mentale et d'un médecin militaire généraliste. Ensemble, ils examinent tous les dossiers de santé pertinents et réalisent des entrevues avec le personnel médical, les membres de l'unité, les membres de la famille et d'autres personnes pouvant avoir des connaissances sur les circonstances du suicide en question. Pris de concert, ces renseignements servent à la formulation des constatations que l'on trouve dans le rapport annuel sur le suicide.

Le visage du suicide dans les Forces armées canadiennes a changé au fil du temps. Bien que les taux puissent varier quelque peu d'une année à l'autre, une image claire et constante a fini par émerger au cours de la dernière décennie. Les militaires rattachés à l'Armée canadienne, plus précisément ceux qui appartiennent aux groupes professionnels des armées de combat, courent un risque plus marqué de suicide que les membres de la Marine royale canadienne ou de l'Aviation royale canadienne.

Certaines preuves commencent à se faire jour quant au rôle possiblement joué par les déploiements. Nous devons néanmoins user de prudence en ce qui a trait à cette vaste désignation, car elle peut englober plusieurs types de déploiement, par exemple les déploiements humanitaires, de maintien de la paix ou de combat actif, et plusieurs expériences différentes, tant bénéfiques que nuisibles. Il faudra procéder à davantage de recherche et d'analyse avant de déterminer si, en soi, le déploiement est, de quelque manière que se soit, vraiment lié au risque de suicide.[Traduction]

Nous commençons à acquérir une bien meilleure compréhension, grâce au travail effectué par mes collègues de la Direction de la santé mentale et au sein de la DPSF, au sujet des facteurs de risque qui sous-tendent le suicide. Par exemple, plus de 70 % des hommes de la Force régulière qui se sont enlevé la vie en 2015 avaient des preuves documentées de rupture conjugale ou de détresse avant leur décès. L'endettement, la maladie de membres de la famille et d'amis et la toxicomanie ont été désignés comme des facteurs de risque.

On les observe aussi souvent au sein de la population en général. La plupart de ces hommes avaient plus d'un facteur de risque non lié à la santé mentale au moment de leur décès. Même si cette situation est troublante, elle correspond à celle qui est observée par d'autres forces militaires, et je pense qu'elle fait ressortir la direction dans laquelle nos efforts de recherche et de surveillance devraient être de plus en plus concentrés dans l'avenir.

Dans cette optique, le MDN — en tant que ministère faisant partie de l'Agence de la santé publique du Canada — a dirigé un groupe de travail interministériel sur les données de surveillance relatives au suicide, qui fait partie des résultats attendus du Cadre fédéral de prévention du suicide. L'appartenance à ce groupe de travail constitue une excellente fenêtre pour observer le travail que font les autres organismes fédéraux en matière de surveillance et de prévention du suicide et pour échanger des renseignements sur la façon de rendre nos approches de collaboration plus efficaces et cohérentes.

Nous entretenons également une relation de longue date avec Anciens Combattants Canada. Nous collaborons avec ce ministère depuis des années dans le cadre de l'Étude sur la mortalité et l'incidence du cancer au sein des FC, qui porte sur le risque de suicide au cours de la vie d'une personne, durant et après le service. Nous collaborons actuellement avec ce ministère et Statistique Canada relativement à une deuxième édition de l'étude. Nous prévoyons nous pencher sur le cancer et sur les causes de décès — y compris le suicide — chez les membres du personnel actifs et libérés de la Force régulière et du service en classe C de la Réserve qui se sont enrôlés dans les FAC entre 1976 et 2015.

Nous siégeons également au comité directeur de l'Étude sur la mortalité par suicide chez les anciens combattants, qui étudiera les risques de suicide chez tous les anciens combattants de la Force régulière et les anciens réservistes en service de classe C libérés des Forces armées canadiennes, aussi entre 1972 et 2015.

En résumé, la surveillance est un élément important et fait partie intégrante de la compréhension des facteurs de risque et des tendances associés au suicide chez les membres du personnel actifs et libérés. La collaboration entre les ministères et les chercheurs se poursuit, comme en témoigne la deuxième édition de l'Étude du cancer et de la mortalité chez les membres des FC et d'autres initiatives de recherche, et elle s'avérera extrêmement utile pour ce qui est de comprendre ce problème complexe.

Merci.

(1540)

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons commencer par des questions de six minutes, avec M. Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les deux médecins de leur présence. Je l'apprécie. J'espère que vous allez nous aider à faire la lumière sur certains des problèmes liés à l'épidémiologie et sur les études au sujet desquelles nous n'en savons peut-être pas beaucoup.

Je me demande ce que vous pensez des paramètres auxquels vous avez accès. Là où je veux en venir, c'est que le Globe and Mail a récemment déclaré que 70 suicides avaient eu lieu au cours des cinq dernières années — je crois que c'est ce qui a été dit —, et que les rédacteurs attribuaient essentiellement ces suicides au retour de nos soldats de l'Afghanistan.

Je ne sais pas si vous avez vu ou lu cet article. Comment voyez-vous cette situation se jouer dans le rapport dont nous discutons aujourd'hui?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Pour l'instant, au moyen du rapport annuel sur le suicide, il est très difficile de considérer le déploiement comme une variable. Lorsque nous avons affaire à de l'épidémiologie ou à des statistiques, il y a une notion appelée le « pouvoir ». Essentiellement, il faut disposer d'un certain nombre de personnes pour pouvoir analyser l'information. Même si nous recueillons de l'information sur le suicide depuis maintenant plus de 20 ans — et, disons-le clairement: un seul suicide en est un de trop —, d'un point de vue statistique, nous en avons très peu, alors nous ne pouvons pas analyser cette information. Pour que je puisse répondre en disant si l'Afghanistan est un facteur ou non... d'un point de vue purement mécanique, c'est quelque chose que je ne peux pas faire pour l'instant.

Toutefois, si je puis donner des détails, dans le cadre de la deuxième édition de l'Étude sur la mortalité et l'incidence du cancer au sein des FC, nous disposons d'une cohorte de près de 250 000 personnes. Manifestement, elles n'étaient pas toutes en service durant les années de l'Afghanistan; certaines l'ont été avant cette période. Néanmoins, nous pouvons maintenant examiner essentiellement toutes les personnes qui sont allées en Afghanistan et qui se sont enrôlées après 1975.

Nous espérons être en mesure de commencer à étudier des déploiements précis, au lieu de simplement étudier le déploiement en tant que variable dichotomique correspondant à un oui ou à un non.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Vous avez un peu abordé certains des paramètres que vous utilisez. Pouvez-vous nous donner des détails sur l'ensemble des paramètres que vous examinez? Par exemple, examinez-vous des éléments comme la perte d'identité et le fait qu'il s'agit d'un problème ou non dans vos recherches?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Vous devez vous rappeler que je ne suis qu'une pièce du casse-tête. Je suis là pour aider à analyser les renseignements. Ces renseignements ne nous sont pas fournis. Vous devriez vous adresser à quelqu'un qui participe à l'ETSPS afin de vous faire une meilleure idée du fait qu'il s'agit de quelque chose qu'on examine ou pas.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Si vous n'obtenez pas les bonnes données, vous ne pouvez pas rendre compte de...

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je ne dirais pas que ce sont des données inexactes. C'est...

M. Robert Kitchen:

Disons, des données étendues. Il est difficile pour vous de procéder à une analyse si vous ne disposez pas des données nécessaires.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Il y a deux facteurs. Je ne fais que formuler une hypothèse, mais il se pourrait que les données soient si rares que nous ne puissions pas les examiner, et il se pourrait qu'elles n'existent pas. Je ne pourrais pas dire.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Participez-vous d'une manière ou d'une autre à...?

Désolé, allez-y.

Dre Alexandra Heber (chef de la psychiatrie, Division des Professionnels de la santé, ministère des Anciens Combattants):

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose à cela, du point de vue d'Anciens Combattants?

Tout d'abord, je veux me présenter. Même si je ne fais pas de déclaration, je pense que vous devriez avoir une petite idée de mes antécédents. Je travaille dans le domaine de la santé mentale depuis plus de 30 ans. En 2003, j'ai commencé à travailler pour l'armée canadienne, à Ottawa, en tant que psychiatre, et, trois ans plus tard, j'ai revêtu l'uniforme. Alors, j'ai servi, y compris en Afghanistan. J'ai été libérée en 2015, et j'ai commencé à occuper le poste de chef de la psychiatrie d'Anciens Combattants en septembre 2016.

Même si je ne suis pas là pour représenter les Forces canadiennes, je possède certaines compétences à ce sujet. Concernant votre question au sujet de l'identité, je vous dirai que c'est une chose à quoi nous nous intéressons beaucoup, à Anciens Combattants. Nous examinons la période de transition de la personne du statut de militaire à celui d'ancien combattant et ce qui arrive aux gens durant cette période. Nous voulons connaître leurs vulnérabilités et savoir ce que nous pouvons faire pour eux, en tant qu'organisation. Il est beaucoup question de combler les lacunes, surtout pour nos populations vulnérables, les gens qui, nous le savons, ont reçu des diagnostics en santé mentale ou qui ont des problèmes physiques nuisant à leur qualité de vie. Ce sont les gens que nous voulons aider — nous le savons — tout au long de cette période de transition.

(1545)

M. Robert Kitchen:

Rencontrez-vous des problèmes liés à la protection des renseignements personnels dans le cadre de la collecte de vos données? Je parle des deux points de vue.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

C'est différent. Nos problèmes sont différents.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

C'est différent. Pour être honnête, je suis au bout de la chaîne. Je reçois les données une fois que les gens du CSEA s'en sont occupées, les personnes qui s'occupent des décès au sein des Forces armées canadiennes.

Ce sont ces personnes qui fournissent les données à la Direction de la santé mentale. Elles sont comparées et confirmées par la Direction de la santé mentale, puis elles nous sont transmises parce que nous possédons l'expertise en matière d'analyse.

Alors, pour autant que je sache, la réponse à votre question est non.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Est-ce qu'AAC a de la difficulté à obtenir ces renseignements?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Notre système est très différent de celui des Forces canadiennes, c'est-à-dire que notre système de soins de santé est holistique. Tous les militaires sont pris en charge par le système de soins de santé des Forces canadiennes. Cette prise en charge n'a pas lieu une fois que la personne part. Une fois qu'elle a pris sa retraite, ses besoins en santé sont pris en charge par les autorités sanitaires provinciales. Si un ancien combattant se présente ou a été désigné d'une manière ou d'une autre comme une personne ayant un problème de santé qui est lié au service et à l'égard duquel il a besoin d'aide, nous fournissons toutes sortes de services. Par exemple, nous appuyons financièrement et de bien d'autres manières, ces soins de santé. Toutefois, nous ne sommes pas dotés d'un système de soins de santé de la même manière que les Forces armées canadiennes.

Vous posez une bonne question. Si quelque chose arrive à un ancien combattant... Par exemple, si un ancien combattant se suicide et que nous voudrions obtenir des renseignements, les renseignements sur les soins de santé sont contenus dans le système de soins de santé provincial. Nous n'avons pas accès à ces renseignements. Nous avons accès à certains d'entre eux, car ces personnes ont habituellement un gestionnaire de cas dans notre système, mais les gestionnaires de cas sont là pour coordonner tous les services différents qu'ils reçoivent. Ce ne sont pas des fournisseurs de soins de santé.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Lockhart.

Mme Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame Rolland-Harris, je vous remercie de votre témoignage.

Vous avez mentionné que certaines des tendances que vous observez font ressortir la direction dans laquelle les efforts de recherche de surveillance devraient de plus en plus être concentrés, dans l'avenir.

Pouvez-vous nous donner un peu de détails à ce sujet?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Essentiellement, si vous avez suivi la transition ou la progression des rapports annuels depuis 2008, deux tendances principales se sont dégagées.

La première, c'est que le taux de suicide au sein des Forces armées canadiennes en général — je veux dire par là tous les types d'uniforme — n'est pas statistiquement plus élevé. Le taux de suicide dans l'ensemble des Forces armées canadiennes n'est pas plus élevé qu'au sein de la population canadienne en général. Voilà la première tendance.

La deuxième tendance, que nous observons depuis environ 2008 — peut-être un peu avant —, c'est que les membres de l'élément armée des Forces armées canadiennes présentent un risque significativement plus élevé de s'enlever la vie par rapport à la population canadienne et aux autres couleurs d'uniforme.

(1550)

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Êtes-vous en train de dire que, même si le nombre équivaut à celui de la population en général, il est compensé entre la Marine, la force aérienne et l'armée?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Oui, un équilibre s'établit. Nous sommes très transparents à l'égard du fait que nous étudions chaque couleur d'uniforme séparément. Nous ne tentons pas d'occulter ce qui se passe en nous contentant d'étudier une tendance générale. Le fait que des choses différentes se produisent dans les diverses branches des Forces armées canadiennes, c'est quelque chose que les dirigeants prennent très au sérieux.

Pour revenir à la question que vous posiez, essentiellement, ces deux tendances prévalent depuis un certain temps. Oui, évidemment, les taux changent un peu d'année en année, mais le discours est le même. Pour l'avenir — et c'est ce que nous faisons au sein de la DPSF et de la DSM —, nous continuons à surveiller ces tendances.

Ne vous méprenez pas; nous n'allons pas arrêter. Au lieu de dépenser beaucoup d'énergie et de toujours nous concentrer seulement sur la situation après coup, nous essayons également d'utiliser quelques-unes de ces ressources pour découvrir quels sont certains des facteurs de risque préalables, de sorte que les personnes qui établissent les programmes, celles qui rédigent les politiques, puissent cibler les choses qui comptent. Peut-être que, plus tard, grâce à ce travail, nous verrons ces tendances diminuer. Voilà ce que je pense.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Très bien. Merci.

Docteure Heber, avez-vous observé des différences dans la façon dont les programmes requis ont changé au fil du temps? Nous avons franchi de nombreuses étapes différentes en ce qui concerne notre armée, au fil des ans. En quoi la situation est-elle différente, et quels sont les besoins actuels, en comparaison?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

C'est une très bonne question. Merci de la poser.

Encore une fois, je suis psychiatre. Je travaille dans le monde de la santé mentale. Certes, de mon point de vue, depuis le moment où j'ai commencé à travailler pour les Forces armées canadiennes, le grand changement a été notre participation à la guerre en Afghanistan. Les personnes qui sont revenues de ces déploiements présentaient des troubles liés à un traumatisme et d'autres troubles de santé mentale. Les personnes déployées ne souffrent pas toutes nécessairement d'un TSPT; elles peuvent aussi présenter d'autres problèmes de santé mentale, parfois plusieurs à la fois.

À mesure que ces militaires ont été libérés de l'armée, au fil du temps, Anciens Combattants Canada a observé une augmentation semblable des jeunes anciens combattant qui entraient dans son système, souffraient de problèmes de santé mentale et avaient besoin de soins. Selon mes souvenirs de l'époque où j'étais encore dans l'armée, Anciens Combattants Canada a été très prévoyant. Durant la première moitié des années 2000, le ministère a commencé à établir ce qu'on appelle des cliniques de traitement des blessures de stress opérationnel dans l'ensemble du pays. Nous en avons maintenant 11 réparties dans tout le Canada. En outre, nous sommes maintenant dotés de cliniques satellites découlant de ces cliniques. Il s'agit d'endroits où nous affectons des équipes multidisciplinaires spécialement qualifiées et possédant beaucoup d'expérience liée au traitement des troubles de stress post-traumatique et des blessures de stress opérationnel.

Les gens reconnaissaient qu'il se passait quelque chose. Grâce à notre très bonne relation avec nos collègues des FC, nous avons été en mesure de voir ce qui arrivait et d'observer la croissance du nombre de militaires atteints de TSPT au retour de leur déploiement. Nous avons été en mesure d'affirmer qu'il valait mieux que nous organisions la prestation de certains services, car ces hommes et ces femmes allaient entrer dans notre système.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

D'accord. Merci.

Me reste-t-il encore quelques secondes?

Le président:

Il en reste soixante.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

D'accord.

Je veux revenir aux statistiques.

Avons-nous effectué des recherches afin de voir combien des personnes qui se sont suicidées avaient reçu des soins en santé mentale? L'affaire tient-elle au fait qu'ils n'ont pas reçu de soins, ou bien avons-nous encore de la difficulté à déterminer comment les traiter?

Je ne sais pas qui va répondre.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Le rapport d'ETSPS — d'examen technique des suicides par des professionnels de la santé — qui est une enquête sur tous les cas de suicide — hommes, femmes, Forces régulières ou Réserve — tient compte de l'accès aux soins. Les taux d'accès aux soins sont très élevés, alors ce fait ouvre toute une boîte de Pandore relativement aux mécanismes sous-jacents d'accès aux soins, lesquels — selon moi — sont multiples, et la conversation pourrait être très longue.

(1555)

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Et merci beaucoup de cette information. La situation semble très complexe, et on dirait que ce casse-tête compte clairement un grand nombre de morceaux, alors veuillez m'excuser si j'essaie de démêler tout cela.

Concernant les gens qui entrent dans les FAC, je me demande si un dépistage préalable est possible en ce qui a trait à leur santé émotionnelle, car il me semble que tout est interrelié.

Madame Rolland-Harris, vous avez affirmé que, dans 70 % des cas, il y avait des preuves documentées de rupture conjugale, de détresse, d'endettement, de maladie de membres de la famille ou d'amis, de toxicomanie, ce qui semblerait indiquer une susceptibilité au suicide plutôt que l'inverse. Affirmez-vous, dans ce cas — si vous le pouvez —, que telle personne pourrait être prédisposée, pourrait avoir des antécédents qui font en sorte qu'il vaudrait mieux que nous fassions très attention en surveillant et en observant les possibilités de suicide?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je ne connais pas les particularités du processus de recrutement. Toutefois, je sais que le groupe d'expert de 2009 a déclaré expressément qu'il ne souhaitait pas envisager le dépistage des gens pour des motifs liés à la santé mentale.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Est-ce une question d'être juste et de ne pas avoir de préjugés envers une personne, ou bien...

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Honnêtement, je ne connais pas les motivations. Il faudrait que vous parliez aux personnes qui...

Dre Alexandra Heber:

On procède à un dépistage aux fins du recrutement, car les gens subissent un examen médical, et une partie de cet examen est une anamnèse où les gens se font poser des questions au sujet de leurs antécédents médicaux, y compris leurs antécédents de santé mentale. Oui, ce dépistage a lieu.

Dans ce contexte, la décision de dépister ou non une personne est souvent prise au cas par cas. Elle dépendrait du genre d'anamnèse dont il s'agissait, exactement.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Oui, je peux comprendre que vous ne voudriez pas qu'un préjugé tienne une personne à l'écart; pourtant, s'il y a une vulnérabilité, il est effrayant de permettre à un être humain de mettre les pieds dans ce bourbier qui pourrait mener à son décès.

Je comprends les motifs d'ordre statistique et le besoin de protéger les renseignements personnels en ce qui a trait à l'analyse des cas de suicide d'hommes par rapport aux femmes, mais, dans cette optique, vous pourriez peut-être formuler des hypothèses ou nous donner une certaine idée des tendances au chapitre des suicides commis par des femmes... nous dire si elles sont comparables ou non aux tendances chez les hommes?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je ne peux pas formuler de commentaires à ce sujet. Les chiffres sont statistiquement très petits...

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Trop petits, trop limités...?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

... ce qui est une bonne nouvelle, je suppose, en soi.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Oui, mais vous allez peut-être pouvoir cerner certaines des tendances dans l'avenir, ou est-ce impossible?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Il est peu probable que nous soyons en mesure de le faire au moyen du rapport annuel sur le suicide. Toutefois, grâce à l'Étude sur la mortalité et l'incidence du cancer au sein des FC, la cohorte est bien plus grande et comprend quiconque a déjà porté un uniforme depuis 1976, essentiellement. Ainsi, la population est bien plus grande, et nous n'arrêtons pas d'observer ces personnes une fois qu'elles sont libérées; nous continuons à les surveiller, alors la cohorte est bien plus grande. Il est possible que nous puissions nous faire une meilleure idée de la situation du suicide chez les femmes dans le cadre de cette vaste étude.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord. Merci.

Docteure Heber, vous avez évoqué le fait qu'un membre des Forces armées canadiennes reçoit des services de santé holistiques, et je me suis rendu compte que, parfois, quand les gens partent, ils ne demandent peut-être pas d'aide médicale ou pourraient ne pas être en mesure de trouver un médecin dans le système public. Je me demande s'il y a eu des conclusions selon lesquelles l'incapacité d'accéder à des soins de santé pourrait avoir motivé en partie le suicide, ou bien avez-vous des réflexions à formuler à ce sujet?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Lorsque nous regardons la population d'anciens combattants, cela devient compliqué, car, des 700 000 anciens combattants du Canada — et je suis certaine que vous le savez —, 120 000 sont des clients d'Anciens Combattants Canada.

Lorsqu'il est question d'anciens combattants, bien d'autres gens ont pris leur retraite, et nous ne savons rien d'eux. S'ils ne se sont pas présentés pour demander des services, nous ne connaissons pas leur situation. Voilà le premier problème.

Comme nous ne fournissons pas les soins de santé directement, nous avons toujours beaucoup de difficulté à obtenir l'accès à l'information, quoique, si une personne quitte les forces, un gestionnaire de cas lui est attribué. Ce gestionnaire de cas découvrira ce qui se passe du point de vue des soins que reçoit l'ancien combattant en question, car il va l'aider à organiser la prestation d'autres soins.

Nous ne disposons pas de renseignements parfaits sur tout le monde, alors il est beaucoup plus difficile pour nous de faire cela.

(1600)

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je peux voir qu'il y a là de nombreux défis. Cela pourrait sembler simpliste, mais, en ce qui a trait à la distinction entre les BSO des anciens combattants de l'armée et celles des anciens combattants de la Marine et de la force aérienne, ne pourrait-elle pas être liée au fait que, quand on est déployé au sol, les réalités de la violence et les répercussions de cette hostilité sont plus grandes parce qu'on est sur le terrain, au lieu d'être à bord d'un navire ou dans les airs? Les autres font tout de même partie du déploiement, mais pas sur le terrain.

Le président:

Je suis désolé, mais notre temps est écoulé.

Nous allons passer à M. Bratina.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Zut. Nous n'avons pas l'occasion de répondre à votre question.

M. Bob Bratina (Hamilton-Est—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Merci.

Docteure Heber, vous avez une expérience formidable, qui est idéale compte tenu du travail que vous faites. Pourriez-vous préciser ce que vous faites durant la journée? Vous arrive-t-il encore d'interroger des patients? Dites-moi comment vous jouez votre rôle très important.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Merci. Il s'agit pas mal d'un poste consultatif. Je travaille avec la médecin-chef. Elle est responsable de la Division des professionnels de la santé d'Anciens Combattants Canada. Notre Direction de la santé mentale se trouve également à l'intérieur de cette division. Un peu comme les Forces canadiennes, nous avons établi une direction de la santé mentale. Une grande part de cette initiative est très nouvelle et a eu lieu au cours des deux ou trois dernières années. Certaines des personnes qui travaillent dans cette direction font partie des prochains témoins que vous allez interroger.

Je fournis des conseils, des consignes et des directives, d'une manière clinique, à cette direction, au directeur, à la médecin-chef et à toute autre personne qui a besoin de mes conseils ou de mon expertise, comme le SMA, le sous-ministre, et ainsi de suite. Je suis polyvalente, en quelque sorte.

M. Bob Bratina:

S'agit-il d'un travail en cours? Sommes-nous dans une ère nouvelle en ce qui a trait à la façon dont nous abordons les problèmes qui sont apparus récemment?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Je suis certaine qu'une partie de l'initiative a été établie en réaction à ces problèmes. Il y a plusieurs années, Anciens Combattants Canada, qui avait régressé par rapport à l'époque de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, quand nous avions un système de soins de santé solide, a fait l'objet d'un examen. Au fil des ans — je suppose —, on a estimé que le besoin n'était plus le même. Ensuite, quand l'assurance-maladie a été instaurée, les gens ont été pris en charge par les provinces, alors ce genre de rôle clinique d'Anciens Combattants n'a cessé de diminuer.

Certes, au cours des dernières années, surtout compte tenu des gens qui déclarent avoir subi des blessures de stress opérationnel et des blessures physiques en raison de certaines des difficultés rencontrées durant leur carrière — à très juste titre, selon moi —, on a considéré que nous devions renforcer la Division des professionnels de la santé d'Anciens Combattants.

M. Bob Bratina:

Madame Rolland-Harris, l'épidémiologie est une science fascinante. L'un des problèmes consiste à arriver à poser les bonnes questions, car il semble qu'une grande part de ce que vous faites consiste tout simplement à recueillir des données brutes, des statistiques concernant le nombre de personnes qui ont été admises, le nombre qui sont sorties et le nombre de suicides qui ont eu lieu, et ce sont toutes des données importantes.

Je ne sais pas s'il s'agit des entrevues de sortie ou des liens entre les anciens soldats, les membres des forces armées, mais, dans le cadre de votre travail, faites-vous quelque chose au-delà de la simple collecte de données?

(1605)

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je parle beaucoup du travail que nous faisons, comme aujourd'hui, et à l'occasion de conférences, et ce genre de choses, mais je veux expliquer clairement qu'au bout du compte, je suis là pour aider les décideurs, les personnes qui prennent des mesures, alors je travaille en coulisse.

M. Bob Bratina:

D'un point de vue statistique, quelles méthodes sont généralement utilisées par les victimes du suicide?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

D'un point de vue statistique, si vous regardez dans le rapport annuel, les deux principales méthodes employées, plus particulièrement dans le cas des hommes de la Force régulière — je veux le préciser — ce sont la pendaison et les armes à feu. Simplement pour que ce soit clair: cela correspond à ce que nous observons au sein de la population en général. Les deux principales méthodes sont les mêmes dans les Forces armées canadiennes et au sein de la population en général.

M. Bob Bratina:

Autrement dit, l'accessibilité de moyens tels que les armes à feu n'est pas nécessairement... si une personne est déterminée...

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Non, c'est très rare, il n'arrive pratiquement jamais qu'une personne utilise son arme à feu militaire. Elle utilise son arme à feu personnelle. Les armes à feu militaires sont récupérées très rigoureusement.

M. Bob Bratina:

Vous avez formulé l'argument, qui doit être renforcé en ce qui a trait au déploiement, selon lequel, d'un point de vue statistique, nous ne pouvons pas encore établir les liens. Je dis cela parce qu'il est fréquent pour nous de penser qu'une personne qui est allée en Afghanistan et auprès de qui une bombe a explosé... il est certain qu'elle va avoir... mais vous affirmez que, d'un point de vue statistique, vous ne pouvez pas encore établir tous ces liens.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Non, pas pour l'instant, et nous n'arrivons pas encore à déterminer s'il s'agit d'un manque de données statistiques ou d'une véritable absence de liens. Comme je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire, vous devez comprendre que le terme « déploiement » est vaste.

Deux personnes ayant le même code de profession militaire, qui font techniquement le même travail au même endroit, dans le cadre du même déploiement, peuvent avoir une expérience entièrement différente, ou bien, à leur retour, la première est traumatisée, et l'autre ne l'est pas. Le déploiement est un moyen facile de classer les choses pour étudier les liens, mais il s'agit d'une notion très, très complexe, en réalité... pour qu'on puisse l'analyser statistiquement.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Voyez-vous un inconvénient si j'ajoute quelque chose?

M. Bob Bratina:

Allez-y, s'il vous plaît.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Je pense que l'une des préoccupations que nous avons toujours à l'égard de la question du déploiement et de ce lien étroit qui est établi entre le déploiement et le suicide tient au fait qu'il le rend possible. Nous craignons toujours que les personnes qui se suicident et qui ne sont jamais déployées soient perdues dans ce portrait. Il s'agit d'un portrait trop simpliste, car il est certain qu'il y a les ETSPS dont parle Elizabeth. J'ai effectué de tels examens quand j'étais dans l'armée, et nous les faisions certainement dans le cas de personnes qui n'avaient jamais été déployées, mais qui s'étaient suicidées pour un certain nombre de raisons, que nous ne comprenions pas toujours. Il importe de se rappeler que de nombreux facteurs entraînent la personne sur la voie du suicide. Le déploiement pourrait être l'un d'entre eux, mais pas nécessairement.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Colin Fraser (Nova-Ouest, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie toutes les deux infiniment de vous êtes présentées et de nous faire part de ces renseignements utiles aujourd'hui.

Je veux simplement aborder un élément en réponse à une question posée par Mme Lockhart. Je crois que vous avez mentionné deux fois les ETSPS. À ce que je crois comprendre, ces examens sont effectués dans chaque cas où un suicide est commis, et ces données sont ensuite recueillies. Tous les ETSPS sont réunis en tant que constatations dans le rapport annuel sur le suicide. Est-ce exact?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Oui, le chapitre 1 du rapport annuel sur le suicide.

M. Colin Fraser:

Je vois, d'accord. Je ne crois pas qu'une copie de ce rapport ait été soumise à notre comité. Je me demande si vous pouvez déposer la dernière version du rapport annuel sur le suicide.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Bien sûr, je peux vous donner la copie que j'ai apportée, et le rapport est également accessible sur le Web; vous n'avez qu'à chercher « rapport de 2016 sur le suicide au sein des FAC ».

M. Colin Fraser:

Merci beaucoup. Ce serait utile.

Docteure Heber, en ce qui concerne certains éléments dont il est question, êtes-vous en mesure de nommer quelques facteurs qui font qu'un vétéran, selon vous, présente un risque plus élevé d'avoir des idées suicidaires? Quels sont certains des facteurs en cause?

Je sais que nous avons parlé de la transition dans une certaine mesure, et nous avons entendu beaucoup d'opinions diverses au sujet de ce que pourraient être ces facteurs, mais je souhaiterais entendre vos réflexions.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

La première chose que je dirai, c'est que les facteurs qui mènent à ce que j'appelle la « voie du suicide » sont semblables dans le cas des anciens combattants et dans celui de tout membre de la population canadienne en général. Le premier facteur, c'est que presque toutes les personnes — au moins 90 % — ont probablement un problème de santé mentale au moment où elles se suicident. Cette conclusion est tirée d'un rapport de recherche internationale; il s'agit de l'une des conclusions les plus solides dont nous disposons. Il s'agit d'un facteur très important. C'est pourquoi, lorsque nous travaillons à la préparation de stratégies de prévention du suicide, une grande partie de ce travail est axée sur la prestation de bons soins en santé mentale et sur le fait de permettre aux gens d'accéder aux soins, car nous savons qu'il s'agit de l'un des facteurs que l'on retrouve constamment. L'autre facteur qui est habituellement présent juste avant le suicide, c'est un événement stressant dans la vie. Souvent, c'est quelque chose comme la rupture d'une relation ou bien peut-être que la personne a eu des démêlés avec les forces de l'ordre ou a perdu son emploi. C'est habituellement lié: c'est relationnel, et cela a à voir avec une perte. La personne a une maladie mentale — il y a habituellement une certaine dépression dans ce problème de santé mentale — puis elle vit une crise, une perte, qui se produit. C'est l'élément déclencheur qui fait qu'elle commence à penser au suicide.

Nous savons qu'un certain nombre d'autres facteurs contribuent à ces pensées. L'accès à des moyens mortels est un facteur très important. Grâce à la recherche en santé publique, nous savons que plus l'accès est facile... Souvent, les gens le font impulsivement. Souvent, s'il est possible d'empêcher la personne de se suicider aujourd'hui, et surtout si de l'aide lui est fournie, elle ne se suicidera pas par la suite.

(1610)

M. Colin Fraser:

Le fait de cerner la maladie mentale sous-jacente est la façon préventive d'empêcher la situation de dégénérer?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Nous savons qu'il s'agit certainement de l'un des éléments qui y contribuent. Par conséquent, c'est quelque chose sur quoi, si nous faisons un effort... Nous savons que ce sera utile.

M. Colin Fraser:

Que pouvons-nous faire mieux pour nos anciens combattants dans le but d'aider à cerner la maladie mentale et de leur faciliter la tâche afin qu'ils se présentent et qu'ils obtiennent de l'aide pour régler leurs problèmes de santé mentale sous-jacents?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Au cours de la dernière année, Anciens Combattants Canada a travaillé sur la mise à jour de notre stratégie relative à la santé mentale. En outre, nous élaborons actuellement une stratégie mixte de prévention du suicide avec les Forces armées canadiennes... nous collaborons à cet égard. Nous le faisons en partie parce que nous voulons prêter une attention particulière à la période de transition pour nous assurer que nous protégeons les gens lorsqu'ils ont le plus besoin de soutien, afin qu'ils ne passent pas entre les mailles du filet. Pendant de nombreuses années — si on remonte au moins à l'an 2000, un certain nombre de programmes et d'initiatives ont été en place relativement à la prévention du suicide au sein de la population d'Anciens Combattants, mais nous mettons maintenant à jour ces renseignements et créons une stratégie mixte pour nos deux organisations.

M. Colin Fraser:

Observez-vous moins de stigmatisation, par contre, chez les membres des forces qui se présentent avec une maladie mentale sous-jacente? Si nous tentons d'intervenir auprès d'eux avant que ces problèmes difficiles aient lieu dans leur vie — et la transition est une période difficile pour tout soldat sortant des forces —, y a-t-il un certain moyen d'éliminer cette stigmatisation, que nous n'employons pas? Le cas échéant, de quoi pourrait-il s'agir?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Il y a quelques réponses à cette question.

Tout d'abord, en ce qui concerne les personnes qui, nous le savons, quittent l'armée en étant atteintes d'un problème de santé mentale connu, pour lequel elles reçoivent un traitement, nous sommes déjà assez bons pour ce qui est de nous assurer que nous effectuons un transfert avec accompagnement d'une organisation à l'autre. Quand j'étais dans l'armée, j'étais la chef du centre de soins pour trauma et stress opérationnels, à Ottawa. Nous disposons dans cette ville d'une clinique de traitement des BSO dirigée par Anciens Combattants Canada. Il y avait un certain nombre de mes patients que j'avais transférés à la clinique d'Anciens Combattants avant leur départ de l'armée. Nous effectuons beaucoup de ces transferts dans le cas des personnes qui ont déjà été désignées.

Bien entendu, l'une de nos préoccupations, ce sont les gens qui n'ont pas été désignés, ceux qui ne se rendent peut-être même pas compte du fait qu'ils ont des problèmes de santé mentale avant leur départ et qui font face à des situations de stress supplémentaires liées au fait d'avoir quitté l'armée. L'un des éléments que nous avons mis en place, c'est une entrevue de sortie pour tous les membres qui partent. Il s'agit d'une entrevue de transition, où ils rencontrent un représentant d'Anciens Combattants Canada. Même s'ils n'ont jamais eu de problèmes et qu'ils ne se considèrent pas comme une personne ayant besoin de notre aide, nous les avons rencontrés en personne et leur avons dit: « Voici qui nous sommes. Voici où nous en sommes. Voici notre numéro; appelez-nous si vous avez besoin de nous. »

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Brassard.

M. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le groupe consultatif des anciens combattants mis sur pied par le ministère des Anciens Combattants tient une rencontre cette semaine au sujet de la santé mentale. L'un des sujets qui y sera abordé est le suicide. L'un de vous a-t-il été invité à cette rencontre?

(1615)

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Oui, j'y présenterai un exposé mercredi. Il s'agit du groupe consultatif sur la santé mentale du ministère des Anciens Combattants.

M. John Brassard:

Tout d'abord, je suis heureux d'entendre cela.

Madame Harris, vous n'y serez pas?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Non, on ne m'a pas invitée.

M. John Brassard:

Voici le problème, et vous en avez parlé. En tant que Comité, nous étudions les problèmes de santé mentale et la prévention du suicide. Vous avez dit qu'Anciens Combattants et les Forces armées canadiennes étudient des stratégies liées à la santé mentale et à la prévention du suicide. Nous disposons maintenant d'un comité consultatif qui va aborder la question à l'occasion d'un sommet d'une journée sur le suicide. Y a-t-il trop de gens pour régler cette question? Trop de cuisiniers gâtent la sauce. Je pose la question parce que rien ne se fait.

Pour ma part, je suis exaspéré d'entendre parler de toutes ces études, de tous ces groupes consultatifs et de toutes ces rencontres et de constater qu'en apparence, on ne prend aucune mesure pour mettre en oeuvre une stratégie. Je vois beaucoup de gens tenter de justifier leur existence à qui veut bien l'entendre, mais personne ne fait réellement quelque chose. Je me pose seulement la question. Quand en arriverons-nous à prendre de réelles mesures pour régler cette question?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je pense que je ne suis pas particulièrement bien placée pour répondre à la question de façon réaliste.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Laissez-moi répondre à la question. Nous faisons énormément de choses.

Nous sommes très actifs à Anciens Combattants Canada. En ce qui a trait à la question du suicide, même si, comme je l'ai déjà dit, il nous est difficile de savoir ce qui en est pour le suicide chez les vétérans, depuis 2000, nous avons travaillé pour mettre en place de nombreuses mesures, pour prévenir le suicide et aussi pour permettre aux gens d'avoir accès à des soins de santé mentale.

Encore une fois, comme je l'ai dit, nous savons que cela mène à... C'est l'une des choses les plus importantes que nous devons faire pour aider à prévenir les suicides. Tous nos gestionnaires de cas reçoivent une formation sur la prévention du suicide, et cette formation est mise à jour chaque année. De plus, tous les travailleurs de première ligne d'Anciens Combattants Canada suivent maintenant une formation sur la prévention du suicide. Ils ont reçu une formation pour répondre à ceux qui téléphonent. Ils savent quoi faire s'ils sont inquiets au sujet de la personne au bout du fil.

En plus de pouvoir compter sur des gestionnaires de cas et des travailleurs de première ligne qui, je le répète, peuvent coordonner des soins, quiconque se présente avec un problème de santé mentale lié au service peut être aiguillé vers une clinique pour TSO. Si cette personne se trouve dans une région où il n'y a pas de clinique de TSO, nous disposons de 4 000 fournisseurs de services de santé mentale au Canada auxquels nous pouvons faire appel par l'entremise d'Anciens Combattants Canada pour servir notre population.

M. John Brassard:

Avec toutes les choses que vous faites et toutes les études qui sont en cours, allons-nous réellement réussir un jour à éviter que cela se produise?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Vous savez — et Elizabeth l'a dit — que nous croyons réellement qu'un suicide en est un de trop, mais je pense que si on regarde n'importe quelle population, on constate qu'il y a des suicides. Serons-nous jamais capables de prévenir chaque suicide? Je ne le sais pas, mais c'est ce que nous essayons de faire.

M. John Brassard:

Madame Harris, j'aimerais que vous me parliez des médicaments sur ordonnance et des opioïdes comme moyen de traiter ceux qui souffrent d'un TSPT, peut-être, ou d'une blessure de stress opérationnel, du point de vue statistique. Avez-vous fait un suivi statistique du nombre de personnes qui se suicident alors qu'elles étaient soignées à l'aide de ces types de médicaments?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

L'ETSPS permet de faire un suivi des médicaments que prenait la personne au moment de son décès et avant son décès, et, soit dit en passant, nous n'avons rien vu...

M. John Brassard:

Cela fait-il partie d'un rapport?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Aucun rapport annuel d'ETSPS ne traite expressément des opioïdes non, mais les chiffres seraient si peu importants que ce serait probablement impossible d'en publier un.

M. John Brassard:

Récemment, le ministère des Anciens Combattants a fait passer de 10 à 3 grammes la quantité de marijuana qui pouvait être prescrite. L'une d'entre vous a-t-elle été consultée au sujet de cette décision?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Non, mais je ne suis pas médecin.

M. John Brassard:

Je comprends.

Madame, avez-vous été consultée à l'égard de cette décision?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Je suis désolée. J'aimerais que vous répétiez votre question au sujet de ce qu'a fait Anciens Combattants Canada.

(1620)

M. John Brassard:

Le ministère a diminué la quantité de marijuana pouvant être prescrite à un vétéran; elle est passée de 10 à 3 grammes par jour.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Tout d'abord, j'aimerais dire qu'Anciens Combattants Canada ne prescrit pas ni n'autorise la consommation de marijuana ou la prise de tout autre médicament. Ce que nous faisons, c'est financer des traitements, et nous finançons la marijuana dans une certaine mesure. Auparavant, Anciens Combattants Canada finançait jusqu'à 10 grammes de marijuana par jour par personne. Cette quantité sera réduite en fonction de la quantité financée — cela ne tient pas à Anciens Combattants. Si un médecin de famille, par exemple, autorise la consommation de marijuana et croit fermement que la personne a besoin de plus de trois grammes, il doit consulter un médecin spécialiste pour discuter de la raison pour laquelle cette personne se voit prescrire de la marijuana, et procéder à une autre évaluation et préciser qu'effectivement cette personne a besoin de plus de trois grammes par jour.

M. John Brassard:

Je suis au courant du processus. Je me demande si, en tant que chef du service de psychiatrie, vous avez été consultée au sujet de la décision. Vous a-t-on consultée au sujet de la décision de faire passer la quantité de 10 grammes à 3 grammes?

Si je pose la question, c'est parce que nous avons reçu le ministre, et il nous a dit avoir mené une consultation élargie auprès d'un grand éventail de professionnels. Donc, à titre de chef du service de psychiatrie, avez-vous été consultée au sujet de cette décision?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

En fait, la décision a été prise avant que je commence à travailler pour Anciens Combattants Canada, mais je connais des gens ayant fait partie du comité d'experts qui ont été consultés. Il y a notamment...

M. John Brassard:

Votre prédécesseur?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Je n'ai pas de prédécesseur. Il s'agissait d'experts en consommation de marijuana thérapeutique.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Eyolfson.

M. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Merci d'être ici.

Docteure Heber, j'ai un certain parti pris à l'égard de cette question particulière. Mes parents étaient membres de la GRC.

Nous avons parlé des membres des Forces canadiennes et de leur taux de suicide. Je sais que les chiffres sont probablement moins importants, simplement à cause du nombre de membres qui ont servi, mais comment le taux de suicide chez les vétérans de la GRC se compare-t-il à celui des anciens combattants des Forces canadiennes?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Je ne le sais pas. Je suis désolée.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord. Merci.

Madame Rolland-Harris, quelques questions posées jusqu'à maintenant ont effleuré le sujet. Nous avons discuté du suivi des suicides chez les femmes.

Je suis médecin. J'ai dû suivre des cours de statistique et je sais à quel point il est difficile d'analyser des données lorsque les chiffres sont peu importants. Je pense que nous sommes tous les deux d'accord pour dire que c'est une bonne chose que les chiffres soient bas, mais cela représente tout de même un défi.

De façon générale, nous observons un problème depuis des années en médecine. Une très grande proportion des recherches sont sexospécifiques — elles concernent habituellement les hommes — , qu'il s'agisse de recherche fondamentale ou d'un tout autre ordre. J'étais un chercheur en médecine avant d'être médecin. Nous nous servions toujours de rats de sexe masculin, parce que si on utilisait les deux sexes, la variation était trop importante. Par conséquent, on met au point des médicaments qui ne sont peut-être pas adaptés aux femmes. Même si je comprends que c'est une chose d'en faire part dans un rapport, parce que comme je l'ai dit, les chiffres sont si bas que vous pourriez relever...

Cherchez-vous des méthodes qui permettraient de mieux analyser la population féminine et peut-être d'obtenir plus de conclusions à son sujet, parce qu'il est si difficile d'en obtenir?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Oui. J'ai parlé de l'étude du cancer et de la mortalité chez les membres des FC, l'ECM FC, qui est l'un des grands moteurs derrière l'étude. Il y a deux objectifs. L'un consiste à être en mesure d'obtenir une population assez grande pour nous permettre d'examiner des détails plus précis, y compris les différences sexospécifiques. Mais nous, pour reprendre l'expression de mon collègue d'ACC, tentons de combler les écarts. Au lieu de simplement considérer ceux qui servent toujours et ceux qui ont été libérés comme deux groupes distincts, nous examinons ce que nous appelons le « parcours » d'un militaire. Nous essayons d'obtenir un meilleur portrait de ce qui se passe pendant et après le service.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je vous en prie.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Docteure Heber, lorsqu'un de vos patients en cours de traitement est pris en charge par un psychiatre, il bénéficie du transfert avec accompagnement dont vous parliez. Toutefois, comme vous l'avez souligné également, de nombreux vétérans se présentent plus tard, bien après la fin de leur service. Bien sûr, ces gens vont relever des systèmes de santé provinciaux et se tourneront vers leur médecin de famille ou se présenteront au service des urgences, où j'ai travaillé toute ma carrière.

Est-ce qu'Anciens Combattants a donné aux fournisseurs de soins médicaux primaires sur le terrain de la formation propre aux besoins médicaux et psychiatriques des vétérans et présentant les signes avant-coureurs?

(1625)

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Oui. Nous avons commencé, il y a quelques années plus précisément, à tisser des relations avec le Collège des médecins de famille du Canada, les fournisseurs et certaines organisations, comme Calian, qui ont des cliniques et qui sont intéressés à prendre des vétérans comme patients. Nous examinons toutes les possibilités pour faire en sorte que les vétérans soient pris en charge et qu'ils aient tous un médecin de famille.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Pour revenir sur la question, parce que, encore une fois, j'ai passé ma carrière comme urgentologue, je me demande si on fait des efforts de sensibilisation visant précisément les associations qui régissent ou qui forment les urgentologues, disons soit le Collège royal des médecins ou l'Association canadienne des médecins d'urgence.

Je pose la question parce qu'il s'agit d'une préoccupation qui concerne non seulement les vétérans, mais aussi les gens en général. De nombreuses personnes n'ont pas de médecin de famille ou n'arrivent pas à en obtenir un.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

C'est exact, et ces gens se présentent au service des urgences.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Nombre d'entre eux se présentent au service des urgences.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Absolument.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Y a-t-il eu une forme quelconque de sensibilisation auprès de la communauté d'urgentologie pour lui permettre d'être mieux informée et de savoir qui consulter et vers qui aiguiller ces vétérans qui se présentent pour obtenir des soins?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Je viens tout juste de regarder ma directrice médicale derrière moi, et elle m'a tout simplement souri, donc je ne le sais pas, en fait. Mais s'il n'y en a pas eu, c'est une excellente suggestion, et nous allons nous pencher sur la question.

En fait, nous aimerions que chaque médecin de première ligne au Canada soit au courant des troubles dont peuvent souffrir les vétérans.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Oui, c'est utile. Contrairement à une clinique familiale, bien souvent, on ne connaît pas les patients. On ne les a jamais rencontrés.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Oui, c'est exact.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

On dit que l'urgentologie est l'art de prendre les bonnes décisions sans avoir suffisamment de renseignements. C'est réellement le cas lorsqu'on pense à un vétéran qui vient cogner à notre porte.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Oui.

Même les urgentologues ne vont pas demander aux gens s'ils ont déjà été membres... Souvent, cette question n'est même pas posée au patient qui se présente.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Je n'ai pas d'autre question.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Clarke. [Français]

M. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, PCC):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, de me céder la parole.

Je vous souhaite la bienvenue, mesdames Heber et Rolland-Harris. Je vous remercie d'être parmi nous aujourd'hui.

La première question que je vais vous poser m'a été fournie par la personne que je remplace ici aujourd'hui, soit Mme Cathy Wagantall, une femme très honorable.

Bon nombre de vétérans nous disent, de façon répétée, que plusieurs de leurs frères d'armes se sont suicidés après avoir pris un médicament antipaludique, soit la méfloquine. Un des vétérans, qui a écrit à ma collègue Mme Wagantall, nous a dit qu'il connaissait personnellement 11 vétérans qui s'étaient suicidés et que, selon lui, les 11 avaient pris de la méfloquine.

Sur la période de 21 ans que vous avez couverte et les 239 suicides que vous avez répertoriés, dans combien de cas ces valeureux militaires s'étaient-ils trouvés dans des zones où il y avait de la malaria?

Disposez-vous de cette information?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je ne l'ai pas sous la main.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Autrement dit, vous ne savez pas combien de ces 239 personnes auraient pris ce médicament.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

En effet. Je ne dis pas que cette donnée n'a pas été recueillie, mais simplement que je ne l'ai pas sous la main. Je ne peux donc pas l'analyser.

M. Alupa Clarke:

D'accord. Je comprends.

Madame Heber, au ministère des Anciens Combattants, pourrait-on obtenir cette réponse en se prévalant de l'accès à l'information ou en posant simplement la question au ministre?

(1630)

[Traduction]

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Au sujet du nombre approximatif de vétérans qui ont...?

M. Alupa Clarke:

Des 239 vétérans qui ont commis un suicide, puisqu'il faut le dire, combien d'entre eux ont pris de la méfloquine? Est-il possible de trouver ce genre d'information en présentant une demande d'accès à l'information ou en posant une question durant la période de questions?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

C'est une bonne question. Encore une fois, cela dépend de l'endroit où ils ont été déployés et de si... Je veux dire, il devrait y avoir des dossiers. Je présume que ce sont les Forces armées qui les possèdent.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Oui, vous avez raison.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Les militaires en auraient pris durant leur service.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Parfait. Merci de cette perspective sur la Défense nationale.

Il y a un an, lorsque je siégeais au Comité à titre de porte-parole en matière d'Anciens Combattants, j'ai déposé, le 9 mai 2016, une question à inscrire au feuilleton. Pour la région de Québec, j'ai demandé quel pourcentage de gens touchaient des prestations pour chaque maladie physique et mentale, touchant par exemple pour des problèmes de genoux, d'audition, et ainsi de suite.

Fait intéressant, pour une année, soit 2015-2016, dans la région de Québec, 8 % des demandes de prestation étaient liées au syndrome de stress post-traumatique, 2 % à la dépression profonde, 1 % à l'anxiété, 1 % au manque de sommeil et 1 % à l'alcoolisme et à la toxicomanie. Dans l'ensemble, près de 13 % des demandes de prestation ont été présentées par des personnes souffrant de troubles de santé mentale que nous pourrions probablement parfois associer au suicide.

Des 15 membres, ou excusez-moi, je pense que c'est 14, qui se sont suicidés en 2015, combien d'entre eux étaient en processus de demande?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Vous parlez de... [Français]

M. Alupa Clarke:

On parle ici de prestations financières.[Traduction]

Combien de ces 14 vétérans touchaient des prestations financières — j'oublie le terme en anglais —, ou en ont fait la demande ou ont rempli des papiers à cet égard?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Juste pour que les choses soient claires, le rapport annuel sur le suicide concerne non pas les vétérans, mais les militaires qui sont toujours en service.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Je ne sais pas exactement de quoi vous parlez, parce que nous n'avons pas les chiffres en fait.

M. Alupa Clarke:

« Financial benefits », c'est le terme que je cherchais. Donc, ces 14 personnes étaient en service.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Ceux qui figurent dans le rapport annuel étaient toujours en service.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Donc, la question est la même: de ces 14 soldats qui étaient en service, savez-vous à tout hasard combien d'entre eux ont déposé une demande de prestation?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Voulez-vous dire qui ont présenté une demande après avoir été libérés de leur service?

M. Alupa Clarke:

Durant...

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je m'excuse, mais nous n'avons pas accès à ces renseignements.

Le président:

Il vous reste huit secondes.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Disposez-vous d'un système pour signaler les personnes qui sont susceptibles de commettre un suicide? Je sais que c'est très complexe, mais peut-être existe-t-il un système semblable?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Oui. À Anciens Combattants Canada, dans le dossier de gestion de cas, nous avons mis en place une alerte à cet égard.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Je peux peut-être revenir sur la question concernant le taux de suicide plus élevé chez les membres des Forces armées que chez les membres de la Marine et de la Force aérienne et vous demander de partager toute corrélation remarquée ou pensée que vous pourriez avoir.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Voulez-vous en parler?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Encore une fois, je pense que tout ce que je dirais serait de la pure spéculation. Ce que vous avez dit pourrait être raisonnable. Est-ce lié aux gens qui ont vécu des expériences outre-mer plus traumatisantes durant leur déploiement? Ce pourrait être le cas. En fin de compte, nous ne le savons pas vraiment, mais chose certaine, cette augmentation du taux de suicide dans les Forces armées, ou dans certaines parties des Forces armées, a coïncidé avec notre mission en Afghanistan. Je pense qu'il est très raisonnable de dire qu'il y a ici un lien.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Si nous n'avons pas analysé la question plus en profondeur, c'est parce que nous ne disposons pas de statistiques suffisantes. Nous ne pouvons examiner qu'une seule variable à la fois, comme s'il y a eu un déploiement ou non, s'il s'agit d'un militaire ou non, et ce genre de choses. Si nous commençons à examiner ce qu'on appelle une analyse bidimensionnelle, qui consiste à analyser deux variables à la fois, nous ne serons pas en mesure de dire quoi que ce soit parce que nous de disposons pas de statistiques suffisantes pour appuyer nos dires.

(1635)

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Les chiffres sont si peu élevés, voilà pourquoi.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Encore une fois, je pense que l'ECM FC est l'un des piliers de notre recherche pour l'avenir. L'une des choses que nous pourrions faire consiste à regarder la couleur de l'uniforme et à se demander si cela fait une différence, tout en examinant d'autres facteurs de risque que nous savons être fréquemment liés au suicide.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Il est intéressant de voir que les chiffres nous disent certaines choses et qu'il est pourtant impossible de tirer des conclusions concrètes à partir de ces mêmes chiffres. Je comprends votre mécontentement.

Madame Heber, vous parliez de transfert avec accompagnement. D'après ce que nous entendons, il y a manifestement des vétérans qui ne se sentent pas accompagnés et qui parlent de leur frustration, des obstacles rencontrés, de leurs problèmes financiers, comme l'arrivée tardive du chèque de pension, du fait qu'ils se sentent abandonnés et aliénés et qu'ils ont le sentiment que quelque chose d'important leur a été enlevé. Vous avez parlé de cette réalité; on a donc manifestement reconnu qu'il y avait un problème en ce qui a trait au transfert avec accompagnement. Certes, on a déployé un effort délibéré pour changer la situation. Est-ce toujours le cas? Est-ce quelque chose que vous allez poursuivre? Si oui, comment?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Oui. Je le répète: l'une des raisons pour lesquelles nous mettons en place une stratégie conjointe de prévention du suicide tient au fait que nous voulons nous assurer d'accorder une attention particulière à cette période. Encore une fois, avec certaines des recherches qui sont en cours à Anciens Combattants Canada, nous nous penchons réellement sur ces questions, comme celle de l'identité d'une personne et de ce qu'elle devient, particulièrement pour celles qui se sont enrôlées alors qu'elles étaient très jeunes et pour qui c'est plus que le seul emploi qu'elles ont connu: elles ont grandi parmi des militaires, et c'est la famille qu'elles connaissent. Notre armée est assez petite. Les gens se connaissent tous. J'ai servi seulement huit ans et demi, mais je connaissais tous les intervenants des services de santé des Forces canadiennes. Il y règne un fort sentiment d'identité commune.

Le président:

Merci. C'est tout le temps que nous avions pour ce groupe de témoins.

J'aimerais vous remercier toutes les deux du travail que vous faites pour aider les hommes et les femmes qui ont servi notre pays.

Nous allons prendre une courte pause de quatre minutes, puis nous commencerons avec le prochain groupe de témoins.

(1635)

(1640)

Le président:

Bienvenue à tous. Pour notre deuxième heure, nous avons avec nous la docteure Courchesne, directrice générale, Direction générale des Professionnels de la santé; et Johanne Isabel, gestionnaire nationale, Services de santé mentale, toutes les deux du ministère des Anciens Combattants. Nous accueillons également Chantale Malette, gestionnaire nationale, Services d'aide aux employés, du ministère de la Santé.

Je ne pense pas que nous utiliserons les dix minutes, mais nos témoins feront une déclaration liminaire et nous allons commencer par Mme Isabel. [Français]

Mme Johanne Isabel (gestionnaire nationale, Services de santé mentale, Direction de la santé mentale, ministère des Anciens Combattants):

Bonsoir à tous. Je m'appelle Johanne Isabel et je travaille à Anciens Combattants Canada depuis 2001. Mon conjoint, pour sa part, est un retraité des Forces armées canadiennes.

Monsieur le président, membres du Comité, c'est pour nous un plaisir de faire une présentation sur le Service d'aide d'Anciens Combattants Canada. Il s'agit d'un service de consultation et d'aiguillage qui est offert 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours par semaine, à nos vétérans, à nos membres retraités de la GRC ainsi qu'aux membres de la famille de ces personnes. Ce service est confidentiel. Si un vétérans n'est pas inscrit à un service ou à un programme d'Anciens Combattants Canada, il peut tout de même recourir à ce programme.

Voici un bref historique du programme.

En 2000, Anciens Combattants Canada a travaillé en collaboration avec Santé Canada dans le but d'offrir un service similaire au Programme d'aide aux membres des Forces armées canadiennes. Nous voulions nous assurer que les vétérans et leur famille pourraient passer de la vie militaire à la vie civile de façon plus fluide. C'est pour bien servir notre clientèle lors de la transition que nous voulions offrir ce même service.

Le 1er décembre 2014, votre comité a recommandé que le programme d'aide destiné aux anciens combattants soit bonifié. Entre 2000 et 2014, les anciens combattants pouvaient recevoir jusqu'à huit séances individuelles de counselling avec un professionnel de la santé. Comme je l'ai mentionné déjà, à la suite de vos recommandations et depuis le 1er avril 2014, le programme offre 20 séances individuelles de consultation à tous nos vétérans, aux membres de leur famille et aux membres retraités de la GRC.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à Mme Malette.

(1645)

Mme Chantale Malette (gestionnaire nationale, Relations opérationnelles et des clients, Services d’aide aux employés, ministère de la Santé):

Bonjour. Je m'appelle Chantale Malette.[Traduction]

Les services qui sont offerts par le truchement du Service d'aide d'ACC sont principalement confidentiels, bilingues et accessibles en tout temps à partir d'un numéro 1-800 et sur la ligne téléphonique de Santé Canada. Des professionnels en santé mentale répondent à chaque appel. Tous les conseillers ont à tout le moins une maîtrise ou un doctorat. Le vétéran peut donc accéder automatiquement et sur-le-champ à un professionnel en santé mentale.

Les services téléphoniques sont aussi offerts aux personnes malentendantes. Une personne peut obtenir un soutien immédiat en cas de crise et du counseling de la part d'un professionnel en santé mentale qui détient au moins une maîtrise. Si la personne qui appelle est en crise, le professionnel en santé mentale prendra tout le temps nécessaire pour la calmer avant de l'aiguiller vers un service de counseling en personne.

Nous faisons appel à notre réseau national de praticiens spécialisés du secteur privé selon nos besoins, partout au Canada. Nous offrons du counseling en personne et par téléphone, particulièrement lorsque des services sont requis dans une zone éloignée ou que le client en fait la demande. Nous offrons aussi du counseling en ligne au besoin.

Nous avons recours à des ressources externes ou à ACC si le temps nécessaire pour résoudre le problème excède la période couverte par le programme. Nous utilisons les séances et les heures offertes dans le cadre du programme pour assurer la transition de la personne, pour soutenir le vétéran jusqu'à ce que des soins de longue durée soient disponibles.

En ce qui concerne la prévention du suicide, on vérifie l'état du client pour chaque appel. Nous vérifions le niveau de stress et s'il y a des pensées suicidaires ou meurtrières. Si le conseiller considère que l'appelant a des pensées suicidaires, il lui demandera son autorisation pour communiquer avec son gestionnaire de cas à ACC et l'informer de la situation.

En ce qui a trait aux conseillers, nous avons accès à plus de 900 professionnels en santé mentale à l'échelle du Canada. Ils ont tous au moins une maîtrise dans un domaine psychosocial et cinq années d'expérience en pratique privée. Ils ont fait l'objet d'un contrôle de sécurité par le gouvernement, ont une assurance contre la faute professionnelle et sont membres d'une association professionnelle reconnue. Les références professionnelles sont également vérifiées.

Au sujet de l'assurance qualité, chaque fois qu'un vétéran consulte un professionnel en santé mentale, nous invitons la personne à répondre à un sondage sur la satisfaction afin d'obtenir plus de renseignements quant à sa satisfaction à l'égard du programme. Nous procédons aussi à des visites annuelles des bureaux des conseillers. Nous en visitons au moins 5 % chaque année. Nous sommes également accrédités par l'EASNA, la Employee assistance society of North America, et le COA, le Council on Accreditation. Nous respectons les normes les plus élevées de l'industrie.

(1650)

[Français]

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Voici maintenant quelques statistiques.

Entre 2012 et 2016, le nombre de personnes ayant utilisé le Service est passé de 614 à 1 140. Il y a donc eu une augmentation. Celle-ci est due principalement à la décision de bonifier les services en faisant passer à 20 le nombre de consultations. Pour un vétéran ou un membre de sa famille qui veut traiter d'un problème important, il est intéressant de bénéficier de consultations sur une plus longue période. C'est très positif.

Pour ce qui est des 1 143 personnes indiquées ici, 68 % d'entre elles sont des vétérans, 28 % sont des membres de leur famille et 2 % sont des personnes retraitées de la GRC. Les gens qui utilisent les services sont, en moyenne, dans la fin de la quarantaine ou au début de la cinquantaine. Les gens utilisent le Service d'aide d'Anciens Combattants Canada principalement pour des problèmes psychologiques non liés au service militaire ou pour du counseling destiné aux couples.

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Excellent. Merci.

Monsieur Kitchen, je pense que vous allez diviser votre temps avec M. Brassard.

Allez-y monsieur Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous tous d'être ici.

Je vous remercie d'être venue témoigner de nouveau devant le Comité.

Je vous remercie de votre exposé et de nous avoir donné quelques statistiques. Lorsque vous parlez d'un numéro accessible en tout temps, pouvez-vous me dire de quelle manière une personne peut accéder à ce numéro? Par exemple, je viens de la Saskatchewan. Vous dites avoir 900 professionnels en santé mentale à votre disposition. Si une personne de la Saskatchewan compose le numéro à minuit, à qui téléphone-t-elle?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Elle appelle à Ottawa. Tous les conseillers qui répondent pour le Service d'aide d'ACC sont à Ottawa, donc lorsque la personne compose le numéro 1-800, elle a automatiquement accès à un professionnel en santé mentale qui vérifiera son état et qui l'aiguillera vers un service de counseling en personne n'importe où au Canada, y compris en Saskatchewan si elle le veut.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Nous avons parlé de transfert des connaissances. D'après ce que je vois, il est question de transfert des connaissances et de transmission de ces connaissances à nos vétérans.

Avez-vous réalisé un sondage ou une étude pour savoir combien de vétérans connaissent l'existence de ce service? [Français]

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Beaucoup d'efforts ont été faits afin de promouvoir davantage le Service. L'information a été mise sur notre site Web. Elle est également beaucoup consultée sur nos plateformes Facebook et Twitter. De façon mensuelle, l'information sur ce service est transmise aux anciens combattants. Mme Malette intervient beaucoup auprès des Forces canadiennes, de la GRC et de tous les bureaux d'Anciens Combattants Canada, afin de bien expliquer et de présenter les avantages de ce programme. [Traduction]

M. Robert Kitchen:

De quelle manière pouvons-nous acheminer cette information aux vétérans sans abri qui n'ont pas d'ordinateur, qui ne gazouillent pas, qui n'utilisent pas Facebook et qui vivent peut-être dans le Nord de la Saskatchewan ou de l'Ontario ou peu importe? Comment pouvons-nous leur transmettre cette information? [Français]

Mme Johanne Isabel:

C'est une très bonne question.

Vous avez raison: nous pouvons toujours faire mieux. Nos gestionnaires de cas reçoivent de l'information. Depuis 2012, le Service d'aide d'ACC est plus utilisé. Pourrait-il l'être davantage? Oui. Est-il efficace? Oui. Les anciens combattants sans abri pourraient-ils en bénéficier? Oui, et nous travaillons constamment en ce sens. Pourrions-nous en faire davantage? La réponse est oui.

Nous veillons à diversifier les moyens de leur faire connaître le Service d'aide. Nous avons divers programmes qui visent à ce que les anciens combattants sans abri reçoivent aussi de l'information sur le Service d'aide. Nous leur distribuons des dépliants afin de leur faire connaître ce service.

(1655)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Brassard.

M. John Brassard:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le Comité étudie la santé mentale et la prévention du suicide chez les vétérans. Vous êtes en première ligne de tout ce qui se passe ici.

Quelle sorte de recommandations aimeriez-vous voir le Comité formuler en ce qui a trait à la gestion de la prévention du suicide et de certains problèmes de santé mentale?

Voulez-vous que je choisisse quelqu'un? Docteure? Je sais que vous êtes déjà venue ici.

Dre Cyd Courchesne (directrice générale, Direction Générale des Professionnels de la santé, médecin-chef, ministère des Anciens Combattants):

Oui, c'est le cas,et nous attendons avec impatience le rapport. Comme l'a mentionné Mme Isabel, c'est à la suite des recommandations formulées par votre Comité que nous avons fait passer de huit à vingt le nombre de séances de counseling, parce que nos chiffres montrent qu'il s'agit d'un service nécessaire. J'aimerais vous rappeler que ce service est offert peu importe si la personne touche des prestations d'Anciens Combattants. Il s'adresse aux 600 000 vétérans vivant au Canada.

En ce qui a trait à la prévention du suicide, comme l'ont dit mes deux collègues qui ont été très éloquentes, nous poursuivons nos recherches afin de comprendre ce problème très complexe. Nous travaillons en plus étroite collaboration avec nos collègues des Forces canadiennes, particulièrement durant les périodes de vulnérabilité qui sont définies à l'aide d'une étude épidémiologique ou de recherche, afin de renforcer nos programmes.

M. John Brassard:

Travaillez-vous avec des intervenants? Par exemple, travaillez-vous avec les provinces ou les municipalités? Avez-vous essayé d'une façon ou d'une autre d'établir des liens avec d'autres organisations afin d'aider la population de sans-abri? Les municipalités, par exemple, recueillent des statistiques, et il y a d'autres organisations, comme nous l'avons appris dans d'autres témoignages, qui vérifient combien il y a d'anciens combattants sans abri. Essayez-vous d'établir des liens avec ces organisations?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Je vais me lancer, puis ma collègue pourra terminer.

Effectivement, certains de nos collègues au ministère des Anciens Combattants travaillent sur une stratégie visant précisement les vétérans en état de crise, les vétérans sans abri. Il s'agit de problèmes que nous ne pouvons pas affronter sans aide. C'est pourquoi on entretient des liens étroits avec des organisations municipales et provinciales, avec toutes ces personnes sur le terrain. Nous n’arriverions à rien sans l'aide importante fournie par ces intervenants.[Français]

Je ne sais pas si ma collègue a quelque chose à ajouter.

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Non. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Eyolfson.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci, et merci à tous d'être venus.

Bienvenue, docteure Courchesne. Ai-je bien prononcé votre nom de famille?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Oui, c'est très bien.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord, merci.

J'aimerais pousser plus loin les questions que j'ai posées à la Dre Heber plus tôt. D'après ce que j'ai compris, il y a une communication qui est établie. Vous auriez peut-être su répondre à ma question. Je voulais savoir, relativement à l'aide demandée aux médecins de premier recours, s'il y a une communication particulière établie avec le milieu de la médecine d'urgence?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Nous ne communiquons pas avec des urgentologues précisément, mais nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec le Collège de médecins de famille du Canada. Cette organisation a créé un groupe spécialisé afin de produire du matériel didactique pour tous les médecins de famille du Canada; le but étant de leur fournir de l'information sur les questions de santé concernant les familles de militaires. Elle a aussi fait savoir qu'elle avait l'intention de produire un guide de conseils pratiques sur la santé des anciens combattants.

L'Association canadienne de la médecine du travail et de l'environnement nous a invités à venir présenter un exposé sur les questions de santé qui touchent les anciens combattants. Mon collègue Jim Thompson et moi-même avons l'intention de présenter un exposé sur les résultats de diverses études; nous voulons informer le plus grand nombre de médecins possible. Nous avons également des liens avec l'Institut Vanier de la famille. Nous nous intéressons de près aux familles et aux anciens combattants. Donc, oui, nous menons beaucoup d'activités informatives.

(1700)

Mme Johanne Isabel:

En outre, nous avons aussi travaillé avec le Centre de toxicomanie et de santé mentale à Toronto, ou CAMH. Le CAMH a mis en ligne une série de modules sur la santé mentale, dont un comprend de l'information de base sur la santé mentale et la toxicomanie. C'est un module bilingue de 20 minutes, et tous les professionnels de la santé peuvent y accéder en ligne.

Nous travaillons également avec la Commission de la santé mentale du Canada ainsi qu'avec Premiers soins en santé mentale Canada. La communauté des anciens combattants peut suivre un cours de formation de deux jours. Par « communauté des anciens combattants », je veux dire que la formation est offerte à tous les fournisseurs de soins primaires, aux membres de la famille et aux amis. Notre objectif est que 3 000 membres, ou le plus possible, suivent ce cours de formation de deux jours d'ici la fin de 2020.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord, merci.

J'aimerais approfondir les choses un peu. Avez-vous communiqué avec les écoles de médecine du Canada afin que ces questions soient traitées dans le cadre du programme de cours actuel?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

J'essaie de me rappeler s'il y a eu ce genre d'effort de sensibilisation pendant mon temps dans les Forces armées. Par l'intermédiaire de l'Association médicale canadienne, les Forces canadiennes étaient représentées à l'échelon des médecins spécialistes et à celui des médecins généralistes. J'ai siégé au Forum des omnipraticiens, et nous avions des représentants dans la Fédération d'étudiants en médecine du Canada. Donc, ces questions ont commencé à être traitées sur le plan social. L'Association médicale canadienne a sans aucun doute fait du très bon travail: en 2014, elle a déclaré qu'elle allait encourager les médecins de famille à traiter les anciens combattants dans le cadre de leur pratique. Les associations médicales du Canada nous sont d'un très précieux soutien.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord, merci. Je suis content de l'apprendre.

Avez-vous remarqué des tendances relativement à la façon dont les anciens combattants souffrant de problèmes de santé mentale cherchent de l'aide? Nous savons que, dans les Forces armées et dans la société en général, les gens souffrant de troubles de santé mentaux ont toujours été stigmatisés. Tout le monde travaille dur pour réduire cette stigmatisation. Les campagnes de sensibilisation du public visant à réduire la stigmatisation ont-elles eu des effets positifs? Les anciens combattants se présentent-ils par eux-mêmes plus tôt? Se présentent-ils avant d'être en crise? L'effet est-il celui escompté?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Vous avez déjà entendu l'avis d'un statiscien professionnel spécialiste en épidémiologie, et je ne prendrai pas le risque de dire qu'il y a incontestablement eu des résultats favorables, parce que je n'ai pas de statistiques à l'appui si on m'en demandait.

Je pourrais vous reparler de notre ligne téléphonique d'aide pour les anciens combattants. Un de ses avantages est que — en ce qui concerne la stigmatisation — elle est anonyme. On peut appeler 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7. Vous n'avez pas à être admissible à l'un de nos programmes ou à un autre pour l'utiliser, et je crois que c'est ce qui la rend si pratique.

Dès que la personne fait son premier appel — franchit cette première étape où elle décide de parler à quelqu'un — elle va peut-être se rendre compte qu'elle a un problème plus grave. Les professionnels à l'autre bout de la ligne téléphonique d'aide d'ACC travaillent avec des anciens combattants. Ils connaissent nos programmes. Ils savent quand ils doivent dire: « Eh bien, peut-être devriez-vous parler avec un de nos gestionnaires de cas afin d'obtenir davantage de soutien pour vous aider avec votre situation ».

Voilà ce que je voulais dire à propos de la stigmatisation; je voulais faire un lien avec la ligne d'aide téléphonique d'ACC. Il n'y a aucun critère d'admission préalable: vous n'avez qu'à appeler, et on vous connecte immédiatement.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, docteure Courchesne, d'être revenue éclaircir certains points pour nous.

Je veux revenir sur certains points précis. Vous offrez actuellement 20 consultations en personne en plus des séances pour la famille. Y a-t-il un calendrier précis d'établi pour ces 20 consultations? Une fois les 20 séances terminées, fait-on un suivi pour évaluer leur efficacité? Que se passe-t-il si d'autres séances sont nécessaires?

Je ne sais pas si vous en avez parlé.

(1705)

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Je vais laisser Mme Malette répondre à la question sur la durée des séances.

Mme Chantale Malette:

Habituellement, nous sommes en mesure d'offrir 20 heures de séances, et la plupart du temps, c'est suffisant. Pour les cas où nous avons besoin de plus de 20 heures, nous allons, bien sûr, communiquer avec ACC à propos des services requis, et, habituellement, nous allons fournir l'intervention nécessaire. S'il le faut, nous pouvons aller jusqu'à 25 ou 30 heures.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

J'ai été très intéressée par ce que vous avez mentionné, madame Malette et vous, docteure Courchesne, à propos de l'interaction avec les praticiens et de la communication avec les fournisseurs et les médecins de famille. J'ai aussi été intriguée par l'idée de demander aux médecins de famille de prendre en charge des anciens combattants.

Votre intention est-elle, en partie, de vérifier la qualité des services offerts à la lumière de ce que ces médecins de famille vont découvrir pendant leurs interactions avec les anciens combattants? Ce que je veux savoir, j'imagine, c'est si vous en tirez des leçons?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Voulez-vous dire les professionnels de la santé qui fournissent des services de counseling aux anciens combattants avec l'aide d'ACC?

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Vous avez mentionné informer les médecins de famille, et je voulais savoir s'ils vous rendent la pareille.

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Quand j'ai dit cela, je répondais à la question de votre collègue sur les activités de sensibilisation que nous menons auprès des associations et des médecins de famille. Nous ne sommes pas en mesure de communiquer avec ces médecins de famille. Je ne sais pas si...

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Mme Isabel, je crois, a dit que vous meniez des visites constructives à des bureaux de praticiens, et je voulais savoir si vous en profitiez pour en tirer des leçons importantes.

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Ce ne sont pas des médecins de famille qui s'occupent du Service d'aide d'ACC. C'est Santé Canada qui surveille la qualité du Service d'aide d'ACC. Ai-je raison?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Oui.

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Je me répète: ce service est anonyme. C'est pourquoi aucune partie de l'information ne nous est communiquée. Nous savons uniquement combien de personnes utilisent le service, et peut-être si elles en sont satisfaites ou non.

De temps en temps, il nous arrive de traiter des plaintes, et nous faisons le suivi dans ce cas, mais les fournisseurs ne communiquent jamais avec nous pour nous fournir ce genre d'informations.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

On dirait seulement que nous courons toujours contre la montre pour essayer de prévenir les suicides et de répondre aux besoins des gens. On dirait qu'on est toujours pris dans cette ambivalence où on ne sait pas quel chemin prendre. J'essaie de démêler tout cela, et, apparemment, je n'y arrive pas très bien, mais j'essaie tout de même de démêler les choses.

La Dre Heber a mentionné que ACC a mis à jour sa stratégie relative à la santé mentale. Le ministère collabore aussi avec la Défense nationale afin de mettre au point une stratégie conjointe sur le suicide. Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus à ce sujet? Je voulais poser cette question plus tôt à propos de la forme de ces composantes. En quoi consiste cette stratégie?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Je vais répondre à cette question, si vous me le permettez.

Vous savez que le suicide n'est pas un problème simple. Il y a un grand nombre de facteurs sous-jacents. Je sais que les gens en ont parfois assez d'entendre parler d'études, mais les études sont très importantes, puisqu'elles nous fournissent une très grande partie de l'information dont nous avons besoin pour élaborer les programmes, les services et les stratégies que nous utilisons pour affronter ce problème.

La stratégie comprend plusieurs aspects. Il y a la prévention, les interventions ainsi que ce qu'on pourrait appeler la « postvention ». Essentiellement, c'est une façon élaborée de dire qu'on délimite et qu'on organise nos activités.

Je dirais que tout ce que vous avez entendu à propos de la ligne d'aide téléphonique d'ACC et même tous les programmes offerts par ACC aux anciens combattants s'inscrivent dans les stratégies ou mesures de prévention.

D'après les études, nous savons que les membres libérés des Forces armées sont particulièrement vulnérables pendant la période de transition; c'est pourquoi nous voulons axer des efforts dessus. Pouvons-nous faire autre chose que leur faire subir une entrevue de fin de service, leur assigner un gestionnaire de cas, les aider à s'y retrouver dans le système et s'assurer qu'ils ont accès aux avantages et aux traitements dont ils ont besoin? Tout cela, c'est déjà fait. Nous allons améliorer tout ce que je viens de mentionner dans le cadre de la stratégie que nous élaborons avec nos collègues des Forces canadiennes.

(1710)

Le président:

Merci.

Allez-y, monsieur Fraser. [Français]

M. Colin Fraser:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous trois d'être ici aujourd'hui pour livrer votre présentation et répondre à nos questions.

J'aimerais commencer par vous, madame Isabel. Vous avez mentionné les 20 consultations qui se font en personne. Le nombre de consultations est donc passé de 8 à 20.

Pouvez-vous nous expliquer les étapes que doit suivre une personne pour qu'on lui accorde ces 20 consultations? Est-ce facile de recevoir cette approbation? Y a-t-il des formulaires à remplir? Les membres font-ils face à des difficultés avant de recevoir l'approbation pour ces consultations?

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Non. La première étape, que ce soit pour un vétéran, un membre de sa famille ou un membre retraité de la GRC, est simplement de composer le numéro 1 800. Comme Mme Malette le mentionnait, l'équipe est à Ottawa. Un membre du personnel va poser des questions, demander comment ça va. Il va aussi déterminer l'urgence de l'appel. Si un client a des idées suicidaires, le protocole sera un peu différent. Cependant, lorsque le client mentionne qu'il veut rencontrer en personne un conseiller ou un professionnel de la santé mentale, dépendamment de la région où il se trouve, le membre du personnel pourra le recommander dans un délai pouvant aller de 24 heures à un maximum de cinq jours, selon l'urgence. Le vétéran ou la personne qui fait la demande pourra recevoir ce service en personne, avec un conseiller.

Concernant le nombre de séances de consultation nécessaires, à savoir si ce sera deux ou vingt, ce n'est pas le client qui va le déterminer. Cela se fait à la suite d'une évaluation effectuée par un professionnel de la santé. Le vétéran ou le client ainsi que le professionnel de la santé vont discuter ensemble du problème et et des difficultés à traiter. Cette évaluation va déterminer le nombre de séances.

Tout à l'heure, on a demandé s'il arrivait que l'on doive augmenter le nombre de séances à plus de 20. La réponse est oui et c'est important. Il faut faire preuve de jugement, en fonction des besoins d'un client. Parfois, c'est nécessaire. Cependant, j'aimerais également mentionner que ce n'est pas la majorité des cas. Dans une année, Mme Malette peut m'appeler trois ou quatre fois pour augmenter le nombre de consultations. Dans ce cas, on parle d'environ cinq à six séances supplémentaires.

M. Colin Fraser:

Madame Isabel, à votre avis, les étapes du programme fonctionnent-elles bien maintenant? Auriez-vous des recommandations à formuler afin d'améliorer le programme?

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Je travaille avec Santé Canada depuis 2012. Nous avons eu très peu de plaintes ou de commentaires négatifs par rapport au nombre de séances, d'autant plus que nous avons augmenté le nombre de consultations à 20. Il s'agit d'un service qui est plus utilisé. À cet égard, je n'ai pas de recommandations à faire.

(1715)

M. Colin Fraser:

D'accord. Merci.

J'aimerais maintenant m'adresser à Mme Malette.

Vous avez mentionné que l'accès au service se faisait par la ligne téléphonique 1 800. Vous avez aussi parlé de Facebook, Twitter et autres choses semblables. Y a-t-il une manière de communiquer instantanément avec un membre du personnel, en ligne, par ordinateur?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Non. En ce moment, il n'y a aucune façon de le faire parce que cela deviendrait très difficile d'évaluer l'état de la personne et de pouvoir recommuniquer avec elle. En ce moment, la façon la plus sûre de le faire, c'est par la ligne 1 800 où un professionnel de la santé mentale répond et vérifie tout de suite l'état de la personne. Ensuite, il peut recommuniquer avec cette personne, noter son numéro de téléphone et ainsi de suite. Il y a donc un contact direct avec la personne. [Traduction]

M. Colin Fraser:

Une chose qui est ressortie des témoignages précédents est l'importance du soutien des pairs, c'est-à-dire le fait qu'un ancien combattant qui est peut-être en état de crise actuellement puisse parler avec quelqu'un qui a aussi fait partie des Forces armées.

Si un ancien combattant appelle la ligne 1-800, pourra-t-il parler immédiatement à quelqu'un? Vous avez mentionné certains des critères d'embauche au centre d'appels. Est-ce qu'il est possible de mettre la personne qui appelle en communication avec quelqu'un — un pair — immédiatement?

Mme Chantale Malette:

La personne serait aiguillée vers des ressources existantes, par exemple, le SSBSO. Nous travaillons également en étroite collaboration avec eux. Si un ancien combattant a besoin de parler avec un pair, nous utiliserions les services déjà en place.

M. Colin Fraser:

Mais cela prendrait un assez long moment après l'appel, plus d'une heure.

Mme Chantale Malette:

Cela prendrait peut-être plus d'une heure, mais il va sans dire que l'appel serait fait immédiatement, et on resterait avec la personne au téléphone ou on ferait le suivi à de nombreuses reprises au cours de la soirée. On trouverait la meilleure façon d'aider la personne à ce moment.

M. Colin Fraser:

Est-il déjà arrivé qu'une personne appelle et demande si elle peut parler à un ancien combattant? A-t-on déjà posé ce genre de questions?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Ce n'est jamais arrivé.

M. Colin Fraser:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je n'ai pas d'autres questions.

Le président:

Il ne nous reste plus beaucoup de temps. J'aimerais vous demander un éclaircissement, à propos de votre dépliant. Je cite: C'est un service volontaire et confidentiel, pour aider tous les anciens combattants, leurs familles ainsi que les principaux dispensateurs de soins qui vivent des préoccupations personnelles qui peuvent affecter leur bien-être. Le service vous est offert sans aucuns frais.

Les fournisseurs de soins ou les membres de la famille ont-ils besoin d'être référés par un ancien combattant pour utiliser ces services? [Français]

Mme Johanne Isabel:

En fait, c'est un service qui est offert par Santé Canada. La personne a tout simplement besoin de mentionner qu'elle est la conjointe d'un vétéran et puis elle peut avoir accès immédiatement au service. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Voilà qui met fin à la période de questions. Au nom du Comité, j'aimerais vous remercier toutes les trois d'être venues témoigner ici aujourd'hui. Je tiens aussi à vous remercier de tout ce que vous faites pour aider les hommes et les femmes qui ont servi leur pays.

Madame Romanado, allez-y.

Mme Sherry Romanado (Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne, Lib.):

Je suis consciente du fait que je n'aurais pas la parole en temps normal.

Serait-il possible de faire parvenir une copie de ceci à tous les députés fédéraux? Je ne crois pas que tous les députés savent que ce service existe. Je vous recommande fortement de vous assurer qu'ils en reçoivent une copie.

Le président:

Parfait. Merci.

Monsieur Fraser, allez-y.

M. Colin Fraser:

Monsieur le président, je voulais savoir pourquoi nous finissons à 17 h 20.

Le président:

Nous pouvons donner six minutes à M. Bratina, s'il le souhaite.

M. Bob Bratina:

Merci.

L'augmentation de 614 à 1 143 et le temps supplémentaire pour les 20 consultations ont-ils exigé davantage de ressources? Êtes-vous parvenus à répondre à la demande avec le personnel à votre disposition, ou avez-vous eu à mobiliser d'autres fonds?

Mme Chantale Malette:

À dire vrai, nous avons eu à embaucher davantage de professionnels en santé mentale.

M. Bob Bratina:

Ces jeunes gens... On a mentionné des personnes avec des antécédents dans les Forces armées, mais qu'en est-il de l'orientation? Comment les formez-vous par rapport au contexte militaire? J'imagine qu'il faut une certification ou quelque chose du genre, en plus de leur maîtrise. Est-ce qu'il y a un processus d'orientation?

(1720)

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Vous posez une bonne question. Je dois admettre qu'actuellement il n'y a pas de certification ou de programme précis. Nous avons tenu une discussion à ce sujet la semaine dernière, à la suite des recommandations du conseil consultatif des familles d'Anciens Combattants Canada. On nous a recommandé d'allonger la formation pour nos fournisseurs de services en santé mentale qui travaillent au Service d'aide d'ACC. La semaine prochaine, nous allons tenir une téléconférence pour en discuter et trouver les solutions.

M. Bob Bratina:

Je suis sûr que vous avez besoin de personnes hautement qualifiées, et il s'agit probablement des jeunes qui sortent de l'université. Ce serait plus difficile, disons, pour un vétéran qui a passé quelques années en service d'être certifié. Un vétéran pourrait naturellement comprendre ce que vit un autre ancien combattant, mais les gens sont formés pour réagir à des problèmes précis qui dépassent les capacités d'un ancien combattant, malgré son intérêt pour la chose.

En ce qui concerne le sondage de satisfaction, pouvez-vous me parler un peu de la façon dont c'est fait?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Lorsqu'un client consulte l'un de nos conseillers, le conseiller va lui remettre un sondage à remplir volontairement. Les questions portent sur les services que le client a reçus. On fournit également à la personne une enveloppe affranchie pour que la personne puisse nous faire parvenir l'information. Ensuite, nous la communiquons à ACC.

M. Bob Bratina:

Peu importe ce que nous faisons, c'est toujours important d'examiner la situation et de voir comment les choses progressent. Je suis heureux de l'apprendre.

Habituellement, combien de temps dure une séance de counseling en personne?

Mme Chantale Malette:

D'ordinaire, une séance dure une heure.

M. Bob Bratina:

Est-ce une bonne durée, dans l'ensemble? Cela est-il reflété dans le sondage de satisfaction?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Oui.

M. Bob Bratina:

Vingt séances, est-ce extrême ou un nombre maximum? D'après ce que vous avez dit, les gens vont aller à une ou deux séances, puis votre groupe décide si d'autres séances sont nécessaires. Ce n'est pas la personne qui décide et dit: « J'aimerais revenir la semaine prochaine. »

Mme Chantale Malette:

C'est exact. On doit intervenir auprès du client, et c'est en fonction de l'intervention nécessaire que nous décidons du nombre de séances.

M. Bob Bratina:

Quand une personne téléphone à la ligne d'aide, comment fait-elle pour s'identifier?

Mme Chantale Malette:

La personne peut s'identifier soit comme un vétéran ou ancien combattant.

M. Bob Bratina:

On a qu'à dire: « Je suis un ancien combattant et j'ai besoin d'aide », c'est ça?

Mme Chantale Malette:

La plupart du temps, oui. Mais dans le cas contraire, ou dans les cas où la personne vient seulement d'apprendre l'existence du service et ne sait pas si elle y est admissible, nous allons lui poser des questions pour savoir si elle a déjà fait partie des Forces armées et, le cas échéant, si elle est membre de la Force régulière ou un ancien combattant.

M. Bob Bratina:

L'un des sujets d'étude du Comité, et nous en avons parlé souvent, est la continuité de l'identité des vétérans une fois leur service terminé. Il vaudrait peut-être mieux qu'ils aient une carte ou quelque chose du genre afin de leur permettre de s'identifier d'emblée comme anciens combattants. Croyez-vous que cela serait pratique?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Oui, je crois...

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Oui, ce serait un avantage.

Cela dit, comme je l'ai mentionné, les gens n'ont pas à prouver qu'ils ont déjà fait partie des Forces armées, ils n'ont qu'à le dire. Même si on peut croire que des gens peuvent recevoir des services simplement en prétendant être des vétérans, je serais surprise que cela arrive réellement. Puisqu'ils n'ont pas à fournir de preuve, une carte n'ajouterait pas vraiment de valeur dans ce cas précis, dans le cadre de ce programme en particulier.

M. Bob Bratina:

Il y a des cas très rares, mais on a déjà vu des gens se pointer au jour du Souvenir en uniforme avec des médailles et...

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Vous avez raison, monsieur.

M. Bob Bratina:

Merci beaucoup.

Je n'ai plus d'autres questions.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Rapidement, j'aimerais approfondir la question de M. Fraser à propos du soutien des pairs.

Pouvez-vous nous fournir un peu plus de précisions à ce sujet? Je voulais savoir si c'est quelque chose que vous aviez examiné ou même seulement si vous y aviez réfléchi. Les vétérans en parlent souvent, entre autres choses. Ils disent: « Est-ce qu'il y a quelqu'un qui écoute? » Nous ne demandons pas à nos vétérans d'aider réellement nos autres vétérans. Nous avons l'occasion de faire en sorte que les gens qui appellent pourraient parler, par téléconférence, 24 h sur 24, 7 jours sur 7, à quelqu'un qui les comprend, parce que la plupart du temps, les gens ne les comprennent pas. Je connais un grand nombre de psychologues et d'étudiants à la maîtrise et au doctorat qui ne comprennent pas ce que les vétérans disent.

À mon avis, cela ajouterait de la valeur à vos services si les vétérans pouvaient avoir ce genre d'accès facile lorsqu'ils sont en état de crise. Je voulais savoir, premièrement, si vous y aviez réfléchi, et deuxièmement, si ce n'est pas le cas et que c'est la première fois qu'on vous présente l'idée, si vous croyez qu'elle a une certaine valeur.

(1725)

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Je vais me lancer.

D'après les statistiques et les appels, ce ne sont pas seulement les vétérans qui utilisent ce service. Il y a aussi des membres de la GRC, des membres de la famille et des enfants. La plupart des appels ne concernent pas des questions liées au service dans les Forces armées. C'est pourquoi, jusqu'ici, je dirais que ce n'a pas été un problème. De toute façon, à nouveau, les gens qui répondent aux appels sont parfaitement au courant de tous les services que nous offrons, y compris le SSBSO, lequel dispose d'un très grand réseau de pairs qui sont prêts à soutenir les gens et à nous aider. Si ce n'est pas possible en moins d'une heure, il y a un réseau bien établi de gens qui sont prêts à prendre la relève dès qu'on leur demande.

M. Robert Kitchen:

D'accord, mais ma question ne concernait pas le service ou une personne qui demande d'accéder à un service. Je parle des anciens combattants en crise qui souffrent de problèmes de santé mentale, peu importe de quel type de problème il s'agit, parce qu'on sait qu'il y a de nombreux types différents de troubles de santé mentale. Un vétéran ou un membre des Forces armées qui comprend la personne en crise pourra peut-être suffire à la réconforter, à l'apaiser ou à la calmer. En ce qui concerne les téléconférences, ne croyez-vous pas que cela pourrait ajouter de la valeur?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Oui, absolument. Personne ne remet en question la valeur du soutien par les pairs. Absolument, cela ajouterait de la valeur.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Serait-il possible de l'intégrer au programme?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Nous allons certainement examiner cette possibilité.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Madame Lockhart.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais qu'on parle un peu des familles et de la formation qu'ils reçoivent. Avec les autres témoins, nous avons parlé de la formation en premiers soins présentement offerte dans le cadre des programmes de santé mentale et de prévention du suicide. Avez-vous déjà songé à offrir une formation similaire aux membres de la famille avant même la libération des Forces? En avez-vous discuté?

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Je n'en suis pas sûre.

J'imagine que ce que je pourrais dire, actuellement, c'est que, comme je l'ai mentionné, nous travaillons avec la Commission de la santé mentale du Canada afin de fournir deux journées de formation en premiers soins relativement à la santé mentale. Jusqu'ici, nous avons fourni près de 14 séances d'un bout à l'autre du pays, et notre objectif est d'en fournir au moins 150. C'est l'une des façons dont les membres d'une famille peuvent s'informer un peu plus à propos de la santé mentale. Ainsi, ils vont avoir une meilleure compréhension de ce qui se passe et reconnaître les différents signes dans les réactions de leur époux ou épouse.

La Dre Courchesne a également fait mention de notre partenariat avec Saint Elizabeth relativement au programme mis en oeuvre au printemps.

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Tous ces programmes sont également offerts par l'intermédiaire du Centre de ressources pour les familles de militaires. Ainsi, les membres de la famille y ont accès avant la libération du membre des Forces canadiennes.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Je n'ai qu'une seule autre question: ces services sont-ils payés à l'avance, ou alors les familles doivent-elles payer elles-mêmes et demander d'être remboursées?

Mme Johanne Isabel:

En ce qui concerne les premiers soins de santé mentale... c'est gratuit.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

D'accord.

Mais qu'en est-il du déplacement?

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Je dois l'admettre, le déplacement ne l'est pas.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

C'est un point que je veux soulever, parce que certaines familles ont mentionné cela comme étant un obstacle.

Mme Johanne Isabel:

D'accord, merci de nous le laisser savoir.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

D'accord, merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je n'ai qu'une question rapide.

Quand une personne appelle la ligne 1-800, quel est le processus? Qu'est-ce qu'elle entend? Dès qu'elle compose le numéro, est-ce qu'elle entend que son appel est important et qu'elle doit demeurer en ligne, ou est-ce qu'elle s'adresse directement à une personne? Est-ce qu'il y a des messages préenregistrés? Pouvez-vous me donner une idée du processus?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Un professionnel de la santé mentale répond au téléphone. Ce n'est pas une machine qui répond au client. C'est une vraie personne.

(1730)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Disons que quelqu'un appelle parce qu'il y a un état de crise et que de l'aide est nécessaire immédiatement, qu'est-ce qui se passe?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Le conseiller va évaluer la situation et poser des questions sur le niveau de stress, les idées suicidaires et l'idéation suicidaire. Le conseiller va également passer tout le temps nécessaire avec la personne au téléphone avant de l'aiguiller vers un professionnel de la santé mentale ou d'autres services. Au besoin, on peut aussi appeler le 911 avant tout cela.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, vous faites ce qui est nécessaire.

Mme Chantale Malette:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Je devrais aussi faire suite à un point que Sherry a soulevé plus tôt. Elle a recommandé de faire parvenir cette information aux députés fédéraux. En tant que député, quels renseignements et quelles ressources sont à ma disposition? Nous sommes 338 députés, avec des bureaux dans chaque circonscription. Souvent, ils sont très loin de tout bureau du Service d'aide d'ACC. Que pouvons-nous faire pour vous aider dans votre mission, en gros?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Toute cette information est également publiée sur notre site Internet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Eh bien, l'Internet n'est pas encore arrivé dans ma circonscription, voyez-vous.

Des voix: Ah! Ah!

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Nous publions également chaque semaine des messages sur Twitter et dans les médias sociaux. Nous avons des gazouillis récurrents qui informent le public de tous les services offerts par le ministère. [Français]

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Nos anciens combattants nous tiennent à coeur. Vous êtes tous invités, d'une façon ou d'une autre, à promouvoir le Service et à offrir des dépliants dans vos bureaux. Ce sera pour moi un immense plaisir que de préparer des boîtes d'information à votre intention. Cela vous permettra de les distribuer dans vos régions respectives. Nos vétérans sont importants. Nous voulons améliorer leur situation.

Est-ce que, pour ce faire, tout est en place?

Peut-être pas, mais avec votre soutien et vos recommandations,[Traduction]c'est ce que nous cherchons à accomplir. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous est-il possible d'être proactifs en faisant parvenir ces documents à nos bureaux?

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Absolument. Je vais le faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je l'apprécie.[Traduction]

La balle est dans votre camp.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

J'ai une question à ce sujet. Nous préparons tous des bulletins parlementaires, et je voulais savoir s'il serait possible de nous faire parvenir quelque chose que nous pourrions utiliser dans nos bulletins parlementaires. Pourriez-vous l'envoyer à mon personnel? Peut-être que le Comité pourrait en faire la promotion auprès du public dans un bulletin parlementaire. C'est juste une idée.

Mme Johanne Isabel:

D'accord.

Le président:

Sur ce, au nom du Comité, je tiens à vous remercier d'être venus témoigner aujourd'hui et de tout ce que vous faites pour aider les hommes et les femmes qui servent notre pays. Si vous avez d'autres renseignements à nous faire parvenir, envoyez-les au greffier, et il se chargera de les faire parvenir au Comité. Également, j'aimerais aussi que vous réfléchissiez à mon idée pour les bulletins parlementaires.

Quelqu'un veut-il présenter la motion d'ajournement?

M. Robert Kitchen: J'en fais la proposition.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: Merci.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

acva committee hansard 33437 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:43 on March 20, 2017

2017-03-08 ACVA 46

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

Good afternoon, everybody. We are meeting pursuant to Standing Order 81(5) regarding supplementary estimates (C) 2016-17, votes 1c and 5c under Veterans Affairs, referred to the committee on Tuesday, February 14, 2017.

Appearing today in our first panel of witnesses is the Honourable Kent Hehr, Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence. Joining him from the Department of Veterans Affairs is Walter Natynczyk, deputy minister.

We'll start with them for 10 minutes, and then we'll go into questions.

Welcome, gentlemen. The floor is yours.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence):

Thank you very much.

Good afternoon, Chair Ellis and members of the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs.

I am pleased to present the 2016-17 supplementary estimates (C) and the 2017-18 main estimates to Parliament on behalf of Veterans Affairs Canada.

I'd like to thank the members of the committee for their dedication to veterans' issues, particularly for their recent focus on mental health and their study of service delivery.

Our government is committed to ensuring that eligible veterans, retired Royal Canadian Mounted Police members, and their families have access to the mental health support they need, when and where they need it. No doubt the work of this committee will add to our knowledge and understanding of how we can do better in this regard.

Our government continues to focus on increasing access to mental health care and expanding outreach to ensure improved supports and services for veterans at risk of suicide. That is why I am working closely with my colleague, theMinister of National Defence, to close the seam between our two departments and to ensure a smoother, easier transition for releasing military members.

Turning to the subject of this meeting, the 2016-17 supplementary estimates, I'd like to point out that the largest increases are for the earnings loss benefit and the disability award. Furthermore, the number of disability claims submitted to Veterans Affairs increased by 19% in fiscal year 2015-16. This is a good thing. It means more people are coming forward to get the help they need.

I will now turn to the main estimates for the 2017-18 fiscal year.

The Prime Minister charged me with ensuring that we honour the service of our veterans, reduce complexity, and do more to ensure the financial security of Canada's veterans. I can say with pride that we have made lots of progress. The main estimates before you today reflect many of our accomplishments to date. In fact, they reflect a net increase of $1.06 billion over 2016-17. This is nearly 30% more than that in the previous fiscal year. This demonstrates that we have dramatically increased financial security and access to services for veterans and their families, and we are not done yet.

As of April 1, the disability award will be increased from $310,000 to a maximum of $360,000 and will be indexed to inflation. We will issue a top-up payment to anyone who has already received a disability award, meaning more money in the pockets of ill and injured veterans. Furthermore, this change will be retroactive to 2006, when the disability award was first introduced. This demonstrates our commitment to “one veteran, one standard”.

Also beginning this April, changes to the permanent impairment allowance will ensure that veterans are more appropriately compensated for the impact of service-related impairments on their career. The benefit will be renamed the “career impact allowance” to better reflect its intent of assigning different gradients to adequately reflect how an individual might have moved through their career had they not become ill or injured.

Increasing the maximum of the disability award and expanding access to the permanent impairment allowance were recommendations made by the Veterans Ombudsman, Mr. Guy Parent. I always value the ombudsman's feedback, and I am proud to be implementing substantive changes that were recommended to us by the ombudsman. Our ombudsman has indicated that this move has moved the marker forward in regard to access to fair compensation. We will continue to work towards building a veteran-centric model that supports a seamless transition from military to civilian life.

One increase in the operating expenses you will note is for the reopening of Veterans Affairs offices. I am very proud to say that our government has already opened seven of the nine offices closed by the previous government. This May we will reopen the remaining two, plus an additional office in Surrey, British Columbia.

We also expanded outreach to veterans in the north. VAC staff will visit northern communities every month to meet with veterans and their families and to connect them with services and benefits.

Commemorating all the brave men and women who serve is a core responsibility of Veterans Affairs Canada. Honouring the service of our brave soldiers, sailors, and aviators is essential to ensuring that we as a nation never forget their dedication and sacrifice.

(1540)



The Canada Remembers program keeps alive and promotes an understanding of the achievements of and the sacrifices made by those who served in times of war, military conflict, peacekeeping, and beyond. Our government is investing approximately $11 million to commemorate the 100th anniversaries of the Battle of Vimy Ridge and the Battle of Passchendaele, as well as the 75th anniversary of the Dieppe raid. We will continue to pay tribute to and acknowledge those who have made Canada the country it is today.

Over the last year and a half we have accomplished a great amount for Canada's veterans. We increased the earnings loss benefit from 75% to 90% of a veteran's pre-release salary. This will be indexed to inflation. This ensures those undergoing rehabilitation have the financial support they need during their recovery.

We've simplified the approvals process for a number of disability claims, such as PTSD and hearing loss, allowing us to respond to more claims faster. In fact, compared to the year before, we made 27% more decisions in the last fiscal year.

We are well on our way to delivering on our commitment to hire 400 new employees, with 381 of them hired to date. This includes 113 new case managers. We are making great progress in reducing the average veteran-to-case-manager ratio from 40:1 to 25:1.

In October we increased the amount of the survivor's estate exemption for the funeral and burial program so that more veterans and their families have access to dignified funerals.

While we have achieved a lot, we recognize that there is much, much more to be done.

We continue to dedicate resources to finding ways to improve the mental health services and supports available to veterans and their families. I know that this is the focus of your current course of study and that there is an increased awareness of this important issue. I maintain that we can always do better, and I recognize that while the majority of veterans receive the mental health support they need, we can do more to reach those who do not. I am looking forward to hearing your recommendations as to how we can continue to improve.

There is still work to be done to develop a lifelong pension, an option for that. We will continue to consult with stakeholders and parliamentarians to develop the best approach.

A crucial area where VAC can and must do better is in delivering timely benefit decisions. We are pursuing this on a number of levels. I am working with the Minister of National Defence to close the gap between National Defence and Veterans Affairs by reducing complexity, overhauling service delivery, and strengthening partnerships.

Veterans Affairs has done an extensive review of its service delivery model with the goal of putting veterans first in programs and services, making things simpler and easier to understand, and facilitating improved access. We consulted widely with veterans, staff, external experts, and Canadians, and we'll publish a final report that outlines key recommendations. We will have a plan to put 90% of the recommendations into action within three years and the full suite of changes in five.

The physical, mental, and financial well-being of our veterans is our overarching goal. Veterans Affairs Canada has done much, and with the estimates delivered today, we will be able to fulfill many of our promises.

Thank you so much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We will begin our questioning with Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister and General, for being here today.

One of the items that is noticeably missing from the main and supplementary estimates is one of the main things, which is a campaign promise that was made by the Prime Minister as he stood in Belleville. It's part of your mandate letter as well, Minister. It's to establish lifelong pensions as an option for injured veterans. I don't see that anywhere in here, and I'm asking why.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

We remain fully committed to providing an option for a pension for life for our veterans who have been injured or have become ill as a result of their service in the military. This is part of our campaign commitment. It remains part of the to-do list. I know that we have accomplished much in terms of financial security in moving $5.6 billion last year in improving the ELB and improving the disability award, all of these things that will flow into a better system of financial compensation for our veterans.

I can say that we are committed to this. It will be delivered.

(1545)

Mr. John Brassard:

Can I ask what timeline you're committed to for this, Minister?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

We have a timeline that we are elected as a government for a four-year term. Of course, that—

Mr. John Brassard:

So when can veterans expect this promise to be kept?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Your veterans can expect this promise to be kept within the four-year term of the Liberal government. I will be proud to stand up and say we have delivered that pension option for our veterans.

Mr. John Brassard:

The next question I have is with respect to the issue you spoke about before. We're currently going through a mental health study on PTSD. One of the issues we're consistently hearing about is the transitional aspect out of the military into civilian life, and the challenges that exist with that. One of them is employment challenges.

Over the course of the last week, I've received several letters from veterans. In one case, his application to work for the public service sat in the queue for a year. There was another case in which a 26-year veteran was actually willing to move to get work. There seemingly is a vacuum right now that exists with respect to hiring veterans.

I'm asking, where is VAC today with respect to hiring veterans in the public service? I'll remind you, Minister, that in December you told the committee that VAC was focusing on hiring opportunities for veterans, not only in VAC but in other departments in the public system. Right now we see the current levels of veterans being hired at 2.2% in the public service.

What has VAC done with other departments, including Veterans Affairs, to promote priority hiring of veterans?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I'd really like to thank the member for his question. This is an area I have flagged in my department as one we would like to see better results in, both in hiring people within the public service as well as in seeing more success of our veterans once they transition out of military life. I know some of that work is starting with closing the seam with Minister Sajjan. I know we're putting an increased focus on some of his work within my department.

For more details on that, I think, General, perhaps you could enlighten us.

General (Retired) Walter Natynczyk (Deputy Minister, Department of Veterans Affairs):

Mr. Chair, ladies and gentlemen, we are certainly focused on engaging veterans and getting them into the government, and indeed finding them their new purpose. We know, as you mentioned, that as part of mental well-being, veterans need to have a purpose and a focus and they need to move on. Many of them get out of the Canadian Armed Forces at the average age of 37, so they have many years to serve.

Based on the minister's direction, I and Deputy Minister Forster from National Defence have reached out to all of the deputy ministers. We actually gave a presentation to all of the deputy ministers across government. The minister has also authorized the creation of a veterans hiring unit inside Veterans Affairs that will work with the human resources departments of all of the departments and match those veterans seeking employment with those departments.

We've also sent letters to agencies such as Parks Canada because they have special hiring rules, and we nee to ensure that veterans have access to those rules. We're ensuring that it's not only Ottawa-centric but also coast to coast, keeping in mind that we have parks across the country and Correctional Services has offices across the country and Revenue Canada has offices across the country. It has to be more than just Ottawa.

We're working with the rest of the government to enable all of that. Also, we're working with companies. We're going through Canada Company, the military employment transitions program, so that veterans have the appropriate skill sets and the right resumés to get into commercial companies.

Mr. John Brassard:

I may come back to that if I have time.

Within the supplementary estimates, there's a line item of $2.5 million for advertising—advertising what?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

As you're aware, we had a very robust year in our first year of government, opening offices, providing information about changes to benefits that were coming down, and even moving forward on giving veterans a better burial. There was much information that needed to be shared with our veterans and the people who were out there.

To get more specifics on that, I'll turn it over to General Natynczyk.

Mr. John Brassard:

Can you break down what the advertising is for, General?

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

Mr. Chair, ladies and gentlemen, we get the advertising from a central pot for the Canada Remembers program. This is something that is organized out of the Privy Council Office. We make a bid so that for Remembrance Day and so on we can get access to that.

When my chief financial officer is up here, she could probably expand on that answer.

(1550)

The Chair:

Mr. Eyolfson is next.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister, and General, for coming.

You were talking about the reopening of the Veterans Affairs offices. I had the honour of taking your place to open one of them in Brandon, Manitoba. It was quite an honour to be able to do that.

Obviously this happened before your mandate started. Was it ever made clear to you why these were closed in the first place?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

My understanding is that this was part of the deficit reduction initiative under the former government's direction. Of course, when you cut taxes, you obviously many times have to cut services. In my view, Veterans Affairs was the department that got hit, in many instances in terms of a reduction in front-line staff. At one point there was close to a one-third reduction in front-line staff in my department as a result of the directives of that initiative. As well, there was the closing of offices, and there were some things that we found didn't get moved on that in our view should have gotten moved on.

That was how that happened. Nevertheless, we've now recommitted to veterans. We've found that it's important to have these service locations for veterans and their families to have points of contact, to come in with their concerns, to share their stories, to find information, and to be able to better their lives. I'm proud to say that seven of the nine have been opened, with a view that more people are using those services. I know that when we've gone back to communities where they were closed, from Corner Brook to Brandon and everywhere in between, people have been very excited. They look at it not only as a place where people can get help but as a way we honour the men and women who have served our military, and in fact honour the 2.3 million Canadians who have served since Confederation in our armed forces.

I'm very proud of this government's achievement and of what we've all done to make this happen for our veterans and those who have served.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

Further to that, I understand that when these offices were closed, staff was laid off. Where are we in getting the staff for the ones that have opened up to get to the staffing levels we need?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

For the exact details of this, I'll kick it over to General Natynczyk.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

As the minister said in his opening remarks, sir, we have hired 381 employees across the country. Of that number, 113 are case managers. Office by office, we're staffing up in all of them. In some parts of the country, it is a challenge to find the right skill sets—the social workers, the psychologists, and so on. At the same time, we're also seeing that people do want to join the Veterans Affairs team. Our mission is noble and they want to serve our veterans, so we have great quality to choose from.

We'll continue to staff right up to the mark. At the same time, the ratio of veterans to case managers, as the minister mentioned, is declining, which is all the better for the service to our veterans.

If you wanted information office by office on who we have out there, we could have Mr. Michel Doiron, the assistant deputy minister for service delivery, give you that breakdown.

You mentioned visiting the Brandon office. When I was visiting the Kelowna office recently, I was thrilled to see these folks who are so keen there, to see veterans there, and to see a master corporal, a former medic who served in Petawawa, as a case manager in Kelowna now. I'm just thrilled to see that kind of experience and to see those skill sets applied to our mission.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

Further to the increase in services with these offices opening, can you give us a general idea of how the service is being improved for veterans who are in the northern and more isolated communities?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I have one thing to add to what we said earlier. We're also rapidly approaching our 25:1 average for case managers to veterans. This is a very important milestone that we're close to reaching. Social work best practices say we need an average of 25:1 to best serve our veterans who need that additional support, so I'm very proud of that as well.

With regard to our veterans offices in the north, of course we have many indigenous as well as other people in the north who have served in the military. We're very proud of that. We've never had a Veterans Affairs presence up there. That has entailed oftentimes long travel time to cities far away and time away from family, which we thought was unnecessary and unfair.

We acted on those concerns. We've now allowed for a mobile VAC operating unit. It's a mobile operation, because it's a vast territory to get around in. They are up there on a once-a-month basis. They travel around communities finding veterans who need to sign up for services, supporting those who are already on VAC services, and making sure that veterans get the timely help they need even in our northern and remote areas.

(1555)

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

There was a reference to our strategy in developing mental health services. In the half minute we have left, what would you say, in general terms, are the biggest challenges to improving mental health services for veterans?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

In many ways we do very well, and yet, as our Prime Minister always says, “Better is always possible.”

It's a matter of a couple of things. One is ensuring that we're keeping and adding to our expertise and our staff component when necessary in order to provide that mental health hands-on outreach that we need. We think we have a better ability to do that through the hiring of an additional 381 people to date. We think that assists us.

Also, I have other mandate letter items I need to accomplish. One concerns the centre of excellence, which will be on mental health and post-traumatic stress disorder. We believe it will allow for us to capture best practices, to go out robustly into the academic world and otherwise to make sure we're at the top of our game and that we're continuing to do the best we can with the emerging information that comes out in this field.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Ms. Mathyssen is next.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here, Minister.

I have a number of questions.

I note an increase in the estimates, but you know that there are a number of veterans who are not happy. They feel that they have not been provided with the benefits they have earned and are entitled to and that they're falling through the cracks.

What kind of funding do you anticipate you would need to rebuild that trust with veterans and to move through the backlog of veterans waiting for pensions?

The DND ombudsman crunched the numbers and came to this committee and provided us with those numbers. How prepared are you to allocate that sum of money outlined by the ombudsman to Veterans Affairs?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

We ran on a commandment to do things better for veterans and their families, full stop. I have a mandate letter from our Prime Minister that encompassed our commitments to veterans. We accomplished six of those 15 things, and two of them regarding financial security have really moved the meter a long way, and that's according to our Veterans Ombudsman. In the last budget we committed $5.6 billion to veterans and their families. That is now rolling out.

We've moved the disability award from $310,000 to a maximum of $360,000. We've moved the earnings loss benefit from 75% of a soldier's pre-release salary to 90%. These are tangible results that are putting more money in veterans' pockets. We are answering the bell on financial security and we remain committed to providing more financial security, including an option for a pension for life. That is still in our mandate letter. We are still committed to it, and of course we will be delivering on that promise.

We see that we have moved a great deal forward in terms of financial security, and we will continue to look at ways in which we can do that to have our veterans live firmly in the middle class.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay, so you've moved the disability award up, but it's not realized yet. That's still on the to-do list. It's just technically on paper. It hasn't actually happened yet. At least, that was my sense from what you said.

(1600)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

The cheque will be in the mail, I believe, by April 1, unless the general wants to correct me on that.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

You said you're going to deliver on those lifelong pensions within the term of this government. How will you make sure that veterans who receive lump sums under the new Veterans Charter and who want to transition to a lifelong pension are dealt with? How will you make sure that they receive what they should have been entitled to under the lifelong pension? As an act of good faith, would you be prepared to drop the case that you're fighting with Equitas?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

There are two separate questions here, and I'll try to separate them.

You'll note that we did make our disability award retroactive. We went back to 2006, and people who had received a disability award of only up to $310,000, if they were 100% disabled, will now get $360,000. We thought that was the right thing to do. We brought that forward because we were committed to showing a one veteran, one standard approach, and that's what we try to do in every aspect of what we bring.

We are dealing with a system right now that has been made up of a patchwork of programs slapped together from our government to other governments, and that actually makes it awfully difficult. In my department, I have injured soldiers who are 20 years old and injured soldiers who are 100. It makes it very complex. That said, we are committed to bringing in a pension option that works for veterans and families.

In terms of the court case, we are governing in terms of bringing in good public policy for veterans and their families. That's what I can do; that's in my control. Many of the things in our mandate letter are issues that were brought up by the Equitas lawsuit. In fact, many of the people who are on the Equitas lawsuit are part of my advisory team on financial security, mental health, and others. I'm very proud that they are working with us on solutions to problems facing the veterans community that were ignored for an awfully long time. They are actually very happy with many of the solutions we've brought to bear.

That said, they, like you, want us to get it done. I recognize that.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Yes, I met with some of those folks, and some of them aren't happy.

You talked about the maximum disability award. It's a lot of money, but how many veterans actually receive it?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Do you want a breakdown of who receives what range in Veterans Affairs, from 5% to 100% disability? Is that what you'd like?

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Yes. Actually, you can send that later. It's just that $360,000 sounds like a lot of money, and there is this sense that a lot of people are getting it. I wonder exactly how many are getting it.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I will get you the information, but I think it would help if I framed veterans compensation with a little more clarity for you.

One, there is an income stream. Any ill or injured soldiers who cannot work because of their service to this country will receive an income stream. That's called earnings loss benefit, or another program similar to it, whereby no injured soldier will receive less than $44,000 and change, I believe. That would be their annual income. Even if they were a senior private, which is the lowest rank on the file, they will receive that as a yearly benefit to them and their families.

Furthermore, the $360,000 is a pain and suffering payment. These two programs mirror each other. They help and augment each other to stabilize veterans and their families and allow them, if they are ill or injured and cannot work, to be fully compensated. If they can work, they are still going to get a payment through the disability award for pain and suffering, to recognize that they have suffered as a result of their military service.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Bratina, go ahead.

Mr. Bob Bratina (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Thank you.

We've been hearing a lot of testimony on a number of issues, but one thing that keeps cropping up seems to be the gap or the seam that occurs between the active service part at the Department of National Defence and the issues that we are dealing with at Veterans Affairs. What have you been working on in terms of closing the gap between the active service area and the veterans area?

(1605)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

That's an excellent question. That's much of the work that has been taken over by our department and through our work with the Minister of National Defence and Chief of the Defence Staff Vance over the course of the last eight to nine months, understanding that we need to professionalize the release of members from our Canadian Armed Forces. It's what we essentially have to do.

We do a great job of getting people into the military and getting them through basic training, getting them on missions, and getting them places to live and everything while they're in service. We have to get that same type of attitude and structure in place so that when they are released, medically or otherwise, they're100% good to go on the day they leave. They have their pension cheque lined up and they understand what their supports look like so that if they're going to move to a community, they understand whether that community has services to help them or not. We need to do that, and that's why I'm very pleased that those conversations are happening and that the work is being done to recognize whether our soldiers are releasing with better outcomes.

Here's the real truth, guys, and I think.... “Guys”—ladies and gentlemen; it is 2017, by the way.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Yes.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Just understand that it was a euphemism. It was a slip. Chair Ellis, I apologize. You were looking at me with great scorn and disdain there for a second.

Many people in the military do their military service and transfer successfully. Still, we have a far too large number, roughly 27%, who struggle in some form or fashion, whether that be employment, education, addiction, mental health, illness, or injury, and that is why we have Veterans Affairs. That's why we need to professionalize the release. We have a lot of work to be done. This is not going to be solved overnight. I wish it were, but it's not.

We're working to ensure that we professionalize the release, and I am very happy with the commitment of the Minister of National Defence, the Chief of the Defence Staff, and our department, who are working together to solve these issues. It's a financial issue, a rehab issue, a return-to-work issue, a return-to-school issue. There are a whole host of things that are going to allow us to have more success. Those conversations are getting detailed, and I can tell you they're moving along.

Is that fair?

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Yes. I've had the honour of presenting young veterans with civic pins and commemorative materials over the past few years. These are remarkable young men and women. I'm shocked when I see the number. The number I just looked up is 75,000 Second World War veterans, one of whom in my city is a 96-year-old Dieppe veteran who's hale and hearty and looking forward, actually, to the 75th anniversary commemoration this year.

I wonder if you could comment on these individuals who have been under the care and compassion of Veterans Affairs for 70 years. Do you hear much about the cohort of the oldest veterans? The Korean War I would put in there too; I believe those men and women are in their eighties now. What about them?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

We're proud to commemorate the service and sacrifice of the men and women who have served in our military from the start of this great country to Vimy Ridge to Juno Beach to Korea to our peacekeeping missions, and then the Gulf War, Afghanistan, and all the peacekeeping missions in between our current efforts. It really is glorious, and veterans and Canadian Armed Forces members continue to keep this country safe, proud, and free.

We also know that we've been delivering our services to World War II and other veterans for a long time now. We have pretty good expertise in providing that service at various locations across this country. I know that around 6,400 people use long-term care paid for in some ways and fashions by Veterans Affairs. We work with over 1,500 locations across this country to get them the help they need to better live their lives. This is essentially through augmentation of national health care. We've gone to community care, and despite how you will sometimes hear something to the contrary, the vast majority of veterans want to live in the community where they're from, wherever it is, across this nation. That allows us to run a reasonable, pragmatic system with an eye to fiscal responsibility that allows us to deliver services in an efficient way.

One of the sad things is that many of these veterans will be moving on. Nevertheless, our government is committing to commemorating what they've done and continuing to keep their services and sacrifices alive. That's often why we do these various things, but I think it's also why we always have to look at November 11, our Remembrance Day ceremony in Ottawa and in this country. I know I was very happy with MP Fraser's private member's bill that now recognizes that we will be moving towards having a national holiday, at least federally. I think that sets the tone and sets the direction we're going as a nation.

(1610)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Go ahead, Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Minister, for being here today. General, it's nice to see you again, and thank you so much.

I'd like to ask a question regarding long-term care.

Minister, I appreciate the work you've been doing, and a lot has been accomplished in the first year. With regard to long-term care, though, there's a recurring issue within my province of Nova Scotia, and I know in many care facilities across the country, with regard to how VAC is adapting to long-term care and how we are serving non-traditional veterans within these care facilities moving forward.

I wonder if you could comment on that and give us some light about how your department is thinking on this issue and what we can expect in the future.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

That's a good question. As I said in the previous answer, we're committed to providing veterans who have taken part in various endeavours to serve this country with long-term care in appropriate places.

We must also remember that we work very closely with provincial governments that are now primarily responsible for much of the long-term care apparatus in this country. Veterans Affairs partners with them on an ongoing basis to continue having a pragmatic government that recognizes different levels of governments' responsibilities and ensures that veterans still get the help they need, when and where they need it.

Over the course of the last three months, I know we have tried to get more flexibility into our arrangements. Particularly in your province, we've had some success on that, working with your premier and your health minister to try to make some more flexible, reasonable arrangements that sometimes the line items in government documents don't allow for when the hands of the minister are tied with respect to authorities.

We're proud of the work we did in that regard. We now have more agreements out there with various places.

General, maybe you could highlight some of the work we've done to add some flexibility into what we're doing, to get more veterans the help they need in their older years.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

Mr. Chair, ladies and gentlemen, again, as the minister indicated, the federal government doesn't run hospitals. With the handover transition of Ste. Anne's Hospital last year, all hospitals are now in the possession of the provinces, yet, as the minister mentioned in an earlier question, we support veterans in approximately 1,500 long-term care facilities coast to coast, because the research shows, and our veterans are saying, that veterans want to be close to family. Some of them want to be in one of those traditional 18 hospitals.

Province by province we are working, as we did in Nova Scotia and as we are in Ontario with Parkwood in London, Ontario, and Sunnybrook and others, to ensure for that generation of post-World War II and post-Korea veterans, we can work with the provinces to get community beds for veterans in each of those facilities. I'm really pleased that we have the kind of co-operation that we have from them.

Those same community beds would be available to allied veterans, veterans who fought for other nations, who clearly are eligible, and also for modern-day veterans, those from the peacekeeping era and through the Afghanistan era. If indeed they need access to long-term care, they will have those long-term beds. We have in excess of 600 modern-day veterans in community beds coast to coast.

(1615)

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Great. Thank you.

I'd like to turn now to something you touched on earlier, which is the improvement in the case management ratio from 40:1 to 25:1. I know a lot of good work has been done in that regard already in one year.

We've heard about something, and I'm wondering if you could comment on it. It is not just the improved ratio, which is very important to ensuring that the veterans are receiving adequate service and that they're being paid attention to; it's also whether there have been improvements in training for the case managers to ensure that they have a better understanding of the needs of the veteran and that they are more sensitive to some of the situations we've seen in the past that we are trying to avoid as we go forward.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I've had the honour and privilege of being in this job for a year and almost six months, and I can tell you I'm very proud of the Veterans Affairs staff throughout this country, from our head office in P.E.I., where Veterans Affairs is located, right through this country where people are working in our various offices, our various centres, and our OSI clinics and the like. They are highly professional public servants, highly committed to veterans' outcomes, who are doing their job every day, and I'm very proud of them. I'll put our case managers and their effectiveness and their commitment to the job up against virtually anyone you can name throughout government and throughout the private sector.

People in my department are very committed to the job, and I know if they need.... We have very many programs within Veterans Affairs that allow them to skill up, to get the help they need should they wish to have more opportunities to learn. I've just been super-thrilled with the commitment of our public servants.

As politicians, we get to do some neat things. We get to set the direction and do some public policy, but it's really the people on the front lines, the public servants, who better our veterans' lives. You see that throughout government and you definitely see it in mine.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you so much.

I want to briefly acknowledge and thank the minister for the recognition of my private member's bill, which made it through the heritage committee yesterday. Just to make sure it's clear, it does modify the language in the federal Holidays Act to make it consistent and also affirms Parliament's recognition of this important day, but of course it's still up to the provinces to determine whether it is a non-working day.

We look forward to that going to the House for third reading. Thank you for mentioning that, Minister.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Thank you for the details. The devil's off them now.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Wagantall is next.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, CPC):

Thank you, Minister and Deputy Minister, for being here today.

My first question is around the whole process of getting our veterans employed. We've heard here that the public service is very much focused on hiring our veterans when they're qualified to serve. There's a priority there.

I had a veteran contact me last week who was highly qualified, having served in the forces in accounting, who applied to help with the Phoenix system, and never did have a communication of any kind with an actual human being. Is there any kind of an identifier to flag veterans applying for positions? If so, is there any kind of a tracking of applications, interviews, and placements of veterans?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

That's an excellent question, and one that I identified as a problem when I came in as a minister. We're not transitioning veterans successfully to jobs in the public service as well as I would like, nor are we having as much success in getting private sector jobs for some veterans who struggle. We are working on that, and the general filled in my answer on that.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

It's going to be a priority.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I hope you would bring us your individual case, if he'd allow us as a department to—

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Sure, I'll send it over.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

That would be good. We could possibly assist. We have to make sure that is happening with other veterans who may be finding the same thing. General, would you comment?

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

Again, we are very much focused on hiring those priority veterans, especially those who have left the Canadian Armed Forces with an injury, and all those others with the right skills. We are engaging all the departments. The minister sent a letter to all his colleagues across government—all the cabinet ministers—to engage ministers.

Rear-Admiral Elizabeth Stuart, our chief financial officer in corporate services, our retired ADM, will be at this table later. She can probably fill in a few more details on that.

(1620)

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

We'll look forward to getting actual numbers. That would be great.

Second, I am from Saskatchewan. An office has been reopened in Saskatoon. When it was opened, you weren't able to be there, and I understand that, but—

Hon. Kent Hehr:

It was in the summer, just—

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

The announcement was in the summer, before it opened in November. That's correct. It indicates approximately 2,900 veterans will be served there. If you're looking at 25 per case manager, you'd be looking at around 115 case managers to deal with things there. Right now there is one case worker, and that individual commutes from Regina. When they can't make it, there's no one else there to fill that role. What is the timeline? What are you thinking? There are a lot of veterans in rural Saskatchewan. They have to come to Saskatoon, and timing is an important issue.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

You ask an excellent question. In many jurisdictions across this country, it is easier to hire people with the unique skill set needed to serve veterans than it is in other—

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

But there are none in Saskatoon, the whole city?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I'll get to that.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

We know the importance of getting to that average ratio in terms of supporting people in their communities. That's why we reopened that office.

For more details on the specifics of Saskatoon, I'll have to turn to the general.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

We'll see how quickly this cascades to the assistant deputy minister of service delivery.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Gen Walter Natynczyk: I know that we've hired in Saskatchewan. I also know that in Regina we have an office. We have the integrated personnel support centre at CFB Moose Jaw. With regard to where the actual individuals are on these lists and how many are parked in Saskatoon, I'll have to rely on the assistant deputy minister, Michel Doiron.

Again, we are working toward finding the right folks in the area, with the right skill sets and the case management experience for these roles. In some parts of the country it's been tough. It's not a shortage of resources from a funding standpoint; it's making sure we find the right folks with the experience and skill sets for those locations.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

That would probably apply to the...I understood that when this office opened, there would also be an OSI clinic there, on the fifth floor. That's what I was told.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

I can tell you right now that we're still supporting Saskatchewan from Deer Lodge in Manitoba, which is—

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall: Not good.

Gen Walter Natynczyk: —not optimized, but I would not go into future intention like that.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay. Thanks.

The Chair:

You have one minute and 20 seconds.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

All right.

Very briefly, you heard my question in the House today in regard to mefloquine.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

You're asking it to the right person.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Good. I'm glad to hear that.

Australia just released information on what they are doing for all their soldiers, the impacts on them and what the effects are. Attempted and committed suicide are possible outcomes. They are providing treatment and care specifically for individuals identified as having taken mefloquine and needing this care.

How do we get this on the radar here so that these individuals have the care they need? They're not being treated for mefloquine toxicity, and it's not being recognized.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

First off, I'm very proud of the 4,000 people we have working from coast to coast to coast on mental health issues—

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

This isn't mental health. This is a brain stem injury. It's physical. It requires different treatment than PTSD requires. That's what's come through very clearly in the studies in Germany, Australia, the U.S., and Britain.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Any veteran who comes forward who has an illness or injury tied to military service will be served by our department with the best available technology and expertise that this country can provide.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Ms. Lockhart.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister and General, for being with us today. As you know, we've been working on a mental health study and have concluded our service delivery study. A lot of the testimony you've given today has given us some answers to some of the things we've been hearing through that testimony, so I thank you.

One thing we've heard from veterans is that their access to cannabis for medical purposes has really made a positive change in their lives. Some of them feel that the changes VAC has made are really taking away their medication. In regard to your department's decision to reassess the acceptable amounts of marijuana for medical purposes, what evidence led you to make that decision?

(1625)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I think we have to start with this at a higher level. When I came into the department, there was no policy rationale for the provision of 10 grams a day of cannabis for a veteran for their medicinal purposes, whether for mental health, physical ailments, or whatever. We searched and we searched, and lo and behold, none was found.

Because cannabis is not a drug that is regulated by Health Canada—there are no provisions on that there or otherwise—I said we needed to get together with the medical community, veterans, stakeholders, and licensed producers to try to get a policy framework. It's not a drug regulated by Health Canada. We felt we were in a policy void, in a vacuum.

Through those meetings, our searching, our consultations with the medical community and otherwise, and other expertise—people are looking at this emerging field—we came across much information. The studies go both ways. In fact, there are some medical practitioners who believe it's harmful. Some say there's a benefit. Our government is trying to do things based on evidence and science and good policy.

We even came across information from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons stating that the vast majority of people should not be taking more than three grams a day. They look at that as an upper limit for people to safely use when dealing with any medical condition. It's evidence like this that we are coming across from talking with many doctors, with veterans.

We understood that many of them were, in their situation, finding their lives improved. We get that. This was no easy decision that we made, but we felt we had to do it.

We feel we have allowed for some flexibility. Of course, we will reimburse. Remember that Veterans Affairs Canada is a reimburser of marijuana. People can get medicinal marijuana, should they choose, from various licensed producers across this country. Right now we will only pay for three grams, and only when you go to your physician.

We've understood that treating everyone the same is not always going to be effective, so we've allowed some flexibility in the program. If you go to a specialist and they affirm your diagnosis and affirm that cannabis is a valid treatment for it, and they've looked at your medical file and agree with your physician that this is where you should go, then there is that ability for us to reimburse for more.

We felt that this was necessary. You have to remember that the health and wellness of veterans and their families is at the core of what we do, and our policy decisions are driven toward that end. In our view, this policy fits with that mandate, full stop.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you, Minister.

When we've been studying mental health, one of the things we've been talking about that ties into this as well is research on marijuana use when it comes to mental health treatment and PTSD. Is that an area that you anticipate...? Is there some way that VAC can contribute to research in the future for all of these items?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I think that's an excellent question.

One thing we're going to be moving ahead on is having a centre of excellence for mental health and PTSD. We envision a large component of that being dedicated for research to understand the best practices out there and allow us to get people help in regard to mental health. There is no doubt that is a growing issue for us at Veterans Affairs Canada.

I'm also very proud of an organization called CIMVHR. I forgot the acronym. Can you help with that?

(1630)

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

The Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Very good, General.

It's where our university systems have tied into researching this area. There's a long history of funnelling in information and of getting people moving the needle forward on veterans' issues. We have a strong partnership with them. In fact, before I make some stuff up and get myself in trouble, General, would you fill in the details here?

The Chair:

Sorry, Minister. Thank you. I have to move on to the next round.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Okay, good, but it's a very good program.

The Chair:

Mr. Kitchen, you have five minutes.

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister and General, thank you both for being back with us here today.

I'd like to go back to medical marijuana. How much are you anticipating saving with the changes that you've made?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I'm frankly not sure. I didn't factor any of that into my calculations. You'd have to look at.... I don't even know if we have any calculations on that.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

Sir, if I may, from our perspective this is an issue, as the Minister said, about wellness, about well-being, about the medical professionals' advice that anything north of three grams may not be in the best interests of the veteran, so this was not costed in terms of what we foresaw with regard to cost savings because this is not about the money. This is about wellness.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

That's what we've heard from a lot of our witnesses in our studies. A lot of the witnesses have said to us something along the lines of it being in the best interests of their families and of the veterans, and we found that a lot of these witnesses have told us that the use of marijuana has actually given them back some functionality in their lives, has reduced their heavy opioid use over the years and minimized the number of medications that they have to take. Would you not agree, then, that we should be doing a study on medical marijuana?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Well, I'll talk about the policy as we implement it.

Because of the information we had from meeting with the medical experts and the veterans, we believe that we've come up with a flexible policy that allows us to keep people safe as well as allowing for flexibility if they want to go to a specialist or want to get what they believe is in their best interest.

In terms of research, I believe it's something we are looking into. It's something that people at CIMVHR and other organizations out there are doing, and I believe we have an obligation as a department to keep track of this emerging research to see where it goes.

Do you have anything to add?

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

I'd just like to add that when the minister spoke at the CIMVHR conference in Vancouver in November, he tasked the department, in partnership with the Canadian Armed Forces, to conduct the research to again look at best practices with regard to the merits and the details of using marijuana for medical purposes.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Right, but what I'm talking about is more along the lines of actually doing an efficacy study. I'm not talking about talking to people. I'm talking about doing an actual study, a good research study. Would you not agree that it should be done?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I think this is an emerging field where we need much more information—

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

We need more information on it, so do you not agree that we as a committee here should be accessing that information so that we can provide a better outcome and service to our veterans?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

It's probably something to take under advisement.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Mr. Chair, I'd like to move a motion, if I can. We have before us a notice of motion: That the committee undertake a study of no more than six meetings on the implications to Canadian veterans' mental health following the reduction of the daily limit of medical marijuana through the medical marijuana program administered by Veterans Affairs Canada.

The Chair:

It's on the floor.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Mr. Chair, I move that we now adjourn debate on that. We have the minister before us to answer our questions, and before debating this motion and taking it into consideration, I believe it would be better to adjourn debate on it and finish up with the minister.

(1635)

The Chair:

This will be a vote on adjourning the debate.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Mr. Chair, I would ask that we have a recorded vote.

The Chair:

Okay.

(Motion agreed to: yeas 6; nays 3)

The Chair:

The motion is carried.

We stopped the clock. You have about a minute and a half left.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Minister, I have a question for you on the increase of $1 billion mentioned in the report in front of us. Can you tell us how many veterans have come forward this year to access the services?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

If you look at our numbers, primarily our $1 billion.... We saw a 19% increase in the number of disability benefit claims that came into our office. That's a good thing. It means more people are coming in to get the help they need when they need it.

We've also had an increase in the number of claims that have been rolled through our department. People have actually received the services they applied for, and we're very happy with the direction we're moving on that.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Are you privy to tell us the comparison between the year before and this one?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

It's about 19%, but I'll give that to the General.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

Sorry, I don't have that particular detail. I've got year-by-year in terms of releases from the Canadian Armed Forces, but when I put it through folks who've come in after their release, I don't have that data point, so we'll have to come back to you.

The Chair:

Thank you for getting that back to us.

Go ahead, Ms. Mathyssen, for three minutes.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I want to get back to the issue of veterans and jobs. When veterans remain in the reserves but they're not on the government payroll, the Canadian government claims their intellectual property right. That makes it very difficult for them to find work in their field, because their particular expertise is being taken by the government.

Have you looked into this policy, and are you willing to address this problem?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

First, reserves are more under the purview of the Department of National Defence, but we are working on a whole host of issues in closing the seam and looking at the whole host of people who are involved in our military apparatus and how they transition out.

To your exact question, I've heard this from time to time. I'm certain it's been brought up by reserves. It's something to consider in the mix when we continue to go forward and close the seam with General Vance to make sure we professionalize the release service to make sure people are getting the supports they need.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

I have nothing to add.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It seems only fair that these reservists have access to their own intellectual property.

The DND ombudsman has suggested a concierge service to ensure those being medically released are helped through the process—pension services, medical needs—because we're hearing from some veterans that it can be overwhelming.

What is your response to that? Is this something you'd be prepared to look at?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I appreciate the ombudsman's report and I always review it with vigour. He and our Veterans Ombudsman are hearing what people are saying about the issue. I know the gap between National Defence and Veterans Affairs can and must be closed. We are working with Minister Sajjan and CDS Vance to ensure, as I said earlier, that release is professionalized.

We want to ensure that when men and women who have served in our Canadian Armed Forces leave, they have their pension, they're good to go, and they have a place to live. We want to ensure they're going to find their new normal and know how they're going to access, if necessary, Veterans Affairs services, so that they're not struggling for five or 10 years before they come in our door. They will know right away that we're out there, that we can help and get them the services they need.

(1640)

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

If I can just add, as the minister indicated in his opening comment, the department has gone through a service delivery review, and a key part of it is ensuring that the department is helping each and every one of those veterans, as they're transitioning out, to begin that process earlier in their release process. Currently it's at six months before they're released. We're trying to go even earlier, working side by side with the Canadian Armed Forces case managers, so that when these people leave the Canadian Armed Forces, they are settled on where they want to live, and if they can find a job, we do our utmost to find them a job, try to find a doctor, and so on and so forth.

It's all of that. Actually, we've been using the term “concierge” as a goal. We've got some ways to go, because again, we're seeing about 5,000 to 6,000 members of the Canadian Armed Forces leaving the force each and every year. We're trying to tailor a package for every one of them based upon their specific individual and family needs.

The Chair:

Thank you.

That ends our day of testimony with this panel. On behalf of the committee, I'd like to thank both the minister and the deputy minister for showing up here today.

I want to add a comment about hiring veterans, and I encourage all members to do so. I have hired one from my riding in the Bay of Quinte, and this person is a very hard worker and well trained. General, and thank you for that.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We will break for a minute, and we'll bring the next—

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I'd like to thank everyone on the committee for their hard work, their focus, and their efforts on behalf of Canadian veterans. It really means a lot.

The Chair:

We'll adjourn for a couple of minutes.

(1640)

(1645)

The Chair:

We'll come back to order.

We have votes at 5:30 p.m. and we need to have a couple of votes here at the end of the meeting for the main and supplementary estimates, so we're going to have to go with probably just one round of questioning.

Our witnesses are here. From the Department of Veterans Affairs, we have with us Elizabeth Stuart, assistant deputy minister, chief financial officer, corporate services branch; Michel Doiron, assistant deputy minister, service delivery; and Bernard Butler, assistant deputy minister, strategic policy and commemoration.

You guys aren't here to present formally, I guess, so we can start our first round.

Go ahead, Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I have a real treat for you, Mr. Doiron. Thanks to you for coming back, and thanks to Ms. Stuart and Mr. Butler.

I have some questions from some veterans. Specifically, I have four questions here, but if I may, Mr. Chair, I will share a bit of my time with Ms. Wagantall.

How much time do I have?

(1650)

The Chair:

You have six minutes.

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay. Can you give me notice at the four-minute mark?

Here's one of these questions that need to be asked. You can open nine offices and hire 400 staff, but what is the approval rate for the applications for benefits?

Mr. Michel Doiron (Assistant Deputy Minister, Service Delivery, Department of Veterans Affairs):

We are running in the mid-80s right now in the approval rate on first applications.

Mr. John Brassard:

The mid-80s...?

Mr. Michel Doiron:

If you're talking about mental health or PTSD, we're actually running at about 94%. It would depend on the exact...but the average for all is in the mid-80s.

Mr. John Brassard:

The next question is, what is the feedback cycle from veterans regarding services and benefits?

Mr. Michel Doiron:

That's a loaded question, sir.

Mr. John Brassard:

It's from a veteran, Mr. Doiron.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Okay—

Mr. John Brassard:

You can expect it to be loaded.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Yes, sir.

It would all depend on which services we're talking about. If you're talking about our adjudicative services, the comments we get back are that they're too long and we need too much information. As part of the service delivery review and some other things we're doing, we're trying to facilitate that, to de-medicalize the process and make it a bit easier. Notwithstanding the fact that we're doing it with an approval rate in the mid-80s, the forms are too complicated and the process is too complicated.

If you're talking about case management, we get very positive comments back, but those are mostly in terms of the ill and injured. That's more of a hand-holding, more of a partnership, with the veteran. It would depend on what services we're talking about.

That said, though, we don't hear a lot from the silent majority, so we are in the process of doing a survey with veterans to actually go out and solicit their views on Veterans Affairs. We're hoping to have the results of that at some point in April.

Mr. John Brassard:

The next question is about case managers sending the applications to Charlottetown, adding time and bureaucracy to the process. Is there any intent or thought being given to letting case managers approve benefit applications to save time?

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Not for the case managers themselves, but we are looking at whether we can move some of that decision-making closer to the veteran at a different level. That's not with the case managers themselves, but with some of our veterans service agents, or by having some disability benefit agents in the offices across the country who could do that on site much faster.

Mr. John Brassard:

This is the last question.

How much time do I have, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You have about three and a half minutes.

Mr. John Brassard:

In terms of the appeal board, why aren't the appeal board decisions communicated to VAC so that those decisions are followed at VAC?

Mr. Michel Doiron:

You mean from VRAB, right?

Mr. John Brassard:

Yes, the Veterans Review and Appeal Board. I'm sorry. I tried to shorten my question due to the time.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

That's fine.

We do receive some information from VRAB and we do work with them to see if there are trends, so that if they're reversing something that we're doing systematically, we can adjust. If it's going to go to VRAB and be overturned every time, we might as well look at what's happening at the front end. That we are doing, but we don't receive the individual rulings. They are sent to the veteran. It's personal information.

Mr. John Brassard:

To go to my question, when General Natynczyk was here back in December, he mentioned the hiring of short-term employees because of the increase in the file workload. We're starting to see that through these supplementary estimates. What number of short-term employees has VAC hired? How many are actually working on caseloads? Do you have that information in front of you?

Mr. Michel Doiron:

I'll provide you with that information.

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

I don't have that. You mean terms and casuals? I do have a breakdown, but I don't have it here. I'll provide that.

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay.

I'm going to cede my time to Ms. Wagantall.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Thank you so much.

I'd like to talk about Saskatoon again just a bit. I understand that 400 new positions have been created; 381 have been filled, and 113 of those are case managers. That means there are 19 positions left to hit 400. In Saskatchewan, the indication is that there's a potential caseload of 2,900 veterans, and to date we have one case manager. We would need 115 more.

My question is, since a significant number of those 400 were in the queue already under the previous minister, is this government prepared to continue to hire past that 400 to make sure that the 25:1—

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Mr. Chair, I think I'm going to correct something in that. Yes, there are 2,900 veterans, but the 25:1 is for case management.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay, so it's the harder and more difficult....

Mr. Michel Doiron:

It's the harder cases. Also, in Saskatoon, presently we have five case-managed veterans.

(1655)

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

That's why there are not 100 case managers in Saskatoon. It's the same thing for every office. We can pick the number. The other veterans are handled by our veterans service agents, who carry a much bigger load because it's not the same service.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Yes.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Somebody may be on VIP and get a call once a year. That's the veterans independence program.

Let's say there's an issue—

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay, that makes sense.

How many of those are situated in Saskatoon?

Mr. Michel Doiron:

We have one case manager. We're ready. If there's a demand, we will increase that. We have six employees, total, in Saskatoon.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Thank you.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Also, I think we're fully staffed at the moment in Saskatoon.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Thank you. That's my question.

The Chair:

Okay. Mr. Graham is next.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I have a variety of questions. I'm fairly new to this committee. Minister Hehr talked about 381 new hires, and Mr. Brassard broached this a little bit. Do we know how many of those are veterans, and do we have a breakdown of their rank at retirement? I'm curious to know if we have a lot of enlisted personnel, or if it's mainly admirals and generals who are getting these jobs.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

I don't have the number of the 381 who are veterans. We can get that. We have the total number of veterans in Veterans Affairs. When it comes to rank, though, we hire them at all levels. We have senior officers, like the rear admiral or the general here. We also have a lot of corporals, sergeants, and junior and senior NCOs with various skill sets. They're all over the organization.

As an example, in my adjudication unit I have a fair number of corporals and sergeants who do adjudications. They were nurses or medics in the armed forces, and often they are officers, but they're not all officers. We hire nurses or medics if they have the qualification.

I can try to get you the number of the people we've hired, because I don't have the breakdown of the 381.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As to the 381, I'm curious if there's a bias towards certain skill sets and ranks or if it really does cover everybody.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

We do have the number of total hires. Do you want to...?

Rear-Admiral (Retired) Elizabeth Stuart (Assistant Deputy Minister, Chief Financial Officer and Corporate Services, Department of Veterans Affairs):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

As a follow-on to the statement made earlier by the deputy minister regarding the veterans in the public service hiring unit, we've stood up a team in late November and early December. It's very small at the moment, but we have a phased approach to improve the hiring of veterans in the public service. The phased approach looks to Veterans Affairs Canada being a role model, first and foremost. Obviously DND is very experienced, because the Canadian Armed Forces and National Defence work in an integrated fashion.

We are seeking in the next phase to have a positive effect on hiring throughout the entire public service and then to branch out into industry. Also, we know there are a lot of not-for-profits and organizations that are already assisting in this manner.

Since the coming into force of Bill C-27, the Veterans Hiring Act, we have seen some take-up by priority veterans who have been medically released, either for reasons attributable to service or reasons not attributable to service. The Public Service Commission has a mandate to collect data on those veterans, but to date there is no mandatory reporting of hires in the public service who are veterans. For example, at Veterans Affairs Canada we have sent every new employee a voluntary survey. It's still not mandatory to self-identify as a veteran, and I would imagine that some veterans may not wish to do so, but it has improved our reporting.

I can give you some statistics. From the coming into force of the Veterans Hiring Act on July 1, 2015, we had 315 priority hires in the public service, 18 of them within Veterans Affairs Canada. The total of veterans employed at VAC who have self-identified through our survey currently is 115.

We are working with the Public Service Commission to try to improve our ability to collect data on veterans, and we have sent a letter asking to have a question regarding military service added to the public service employee survey.

We're working on several venues, and we haven't finished our work by any means as yet.

(1700)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I got into this committee right in the middle of our study on veterans' suicides. That's all we've discussed until today, so I've learned quite a lot in a very short period of time.

One of the threads that I've seen is a loss of confidence in Veterans Affairs by veterans over the past decade. I'll call it that. We've seen a lot of damage caused by huge cuts by the previous government. What we're finding is that the veterans don't care about the parties; it's that they don't have confidence in the service anymore. It's not just about money.

How do we more broadly rebuild that confidence with the veterans? What steps do we need to take, and what's the path to get there?

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Sir, we have a long way to go to rebuild that trust. We're doing a lot of stuff presently. We have stakeholder summits where we bring in veterans or our various advisory committees. We're spending a lot more time.

Some of us chair some of the advisory committees that have more interaction with veterans. It's having more open communication with veterans and trying to explain what's behind the decisions. Sometimes the right answer is no. It is unfortunate, but it is the answer. Then it's explaining why it's no and trying to make it understandable to the veteran.

We have a long way to go, because over the years—and you will excuse me if I don't get into politics, being a bureaucrat—for all kinds of reasons, when it comes to services, that trust has eroded. We're working very hard.

There was a question about training. We give a lot of training to our new employees. We're hiring. We're spending a lot of time in training those 381 new employees to bring care, compassion, and respect.

You have to remember that Veterans Affairs is not—

I'm being told to stop.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen is next.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you very much. Welcome back.

I want to begin with you, Mr. Doiron. The last time you were here I asked you about military sexual assault. You said: We've been working very closely with “It's Just 700” and we take this extremely seriously. We're talking to them so our adjudicators have a better understanding of sexual trauma. Our doctors are very well aware, and we're working with them to put something on our website.

We've heard testimony from other organizations, quite recently actually, and they said that they haven't heard anything in months. I'm wondering whether you are going to create space on the VAC website with clear links and information for veterans with military sexual trauma.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Thank you for the question, Mr. Chair.

First, we have been talking to the associations. I can't tell you if my director general of adjudications spoke in the last month, but in 2017 I was debriefed on a conversation he had with one of the associations, so there are some conversations going on.

We have trained our adjudicators on sexual trauma. We don't get a diagnostic for sexual trauma. We get a diagnostic for mental health. We get a diagnostic sometimes for a physical injury. Most times it's a mental health injury. We have trained our adjudicators to recognize it and to actually escalate it when there's any doubt, to make sure that we are properly covering it.

I think it was December when I was here, but since then I know we've overturned or actually looked at some pretty controversial and difficult cases. I don't want to get into them because they're personal, but they were very difficult cases.

As for the website, I'm not aware. I know we were working to put some stuff up, but I don't know if it's up or not. I'll have to check that, but I'm not sure.

The space we will put up will just say that it is something we are looking at or something that you can apply for, but you can't apply for military sexual trauma. It's not a condition. The condition they get is a mental health condition or a physical injury. There are a lot of different injuries. From working with the chair of It's Just 700, we have been educated quite a lot on what some of the psychologists and psychiatrists out there are actually diagnosing, which we did not know. We're actually working closely with them to address some of this.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I'd like to know exactly what is going on when you determine that, because it seems to me that a veteran knows if he or she has been sexually assaulted and understands that yes, this is an injury, but that veteran needs to find out where to get help. If that website is the conduit, then he or she needs to be able to use it in an effective way.

I'll go to my next question. I was talking to veterans over the weekend, and they talked about still feeling very vulnerable in regard to their financial needs and this whole issue of denial. Just receiving a letter from Veterans Affairs can trigger post-traumatic stress.

In terms of repairing that broken relationship, how are you improving communications in terms of those managers? We have to do better in terms of how we deal with these individuals. Is that getting down to the rank and file and those people who are directly involved with veterans?

(1705)

Mr. Michel Doiron:

We can always do better. I think I'll start there. It doesn't matter that we're approving them in the mid- to high-80s, we can always do better.

Before we say no in adjudications, we do call the individual to ask if there's anything else they can provide us. Sometimes they have the documents and they didn't send them. They didn't think it was important, but as for the “no” letter, we know about the envelope syndrome, that receiving an envelope from the Government of Canada is for some people traumatic. It's not just an envelope from Veterans Affairs, but from income tax or anywhere else, so we are working and have worked closely with the ombudsman's office to try to simplify our letters.

I have to say that although they're better, I don't think we're there. We still have to do some work on that. As I said earlier, sometimes the right answer is no, because it's not related to service. We do have to comply with the act that we are given to administer. There are some traumatic stories out there, and I see them, but the reality is that if it was not caused by your military service.... The veterans affairs act says it's supposed to....

We've changed in the last three years, giving the benefit of the doubt to the veteran now. We've changed that. When I arrived a little bit more than three years ago, you had to prove it was caused by service. You had to give us your CF 98 that said you had been injured. We've now moved on that. Do we always get it right? No, but I think we've gone a long way, so that now, if you're in certain trades, if your knees are gone and you're an infantry person and you've served 25 years and you come to us, it would be a yes. You may not have blown your knee in one jump, but over 25 years of humping who knows how many miles, the joints are gone.

We're working on that, but there are still some “no” letters that go out, and they're traumatic for the individuals.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Lockhart is next.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you all for appearing today.

In the context of looking at the main estimates, under operating expenditures there's an increase of $60.3 million. We've done a service delivery report, which I assume you've seen. Is there anything concrete that has happened from a service delivery standpoint, either resulting from that report or work that you're doing? I know you've just mentioned a few things, but are there other things that might be reflected in that dollar amount? Perhaps this isn't something that needed additional budget.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Thank you for your report. Yes, I have read your report very closely, and we're providing a government response to it, but I was quite pleased, as I said last time, with what was in the report. ACVA has always given us some good direction over the years in their reports, and we actually use them sometimes to change the rules or the laws.

We are continuously working on change. The deputy and the minister talked about the service delivery review, which we did at the same time you were doing your review. It just happened that way. We are implementing the service delivery review, which is all about improving services, improving the communication, being more veteran-centric. Those are all points that you raised in your recommendations, so we're doing the same thing.

As for the $63 million itself, maybe the admiral would like to speak.

RAdm Elizabeth Stuart:

Yes, I'd be delighted. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Our vote 1 operating expenditures, as they are contained in the main estimates for the next fiscal year, consist of the following increases: $13.5 million in regular operating expenses for the department; other health purchase services increasing by $60.9 million, for things such as glasses, nursing services, medical and dental treatment, long-term care, and prescriptions reimbursement; and new Veterans Charter support services increasing by $13.5 million, mainly for vocational and medical rehab issues. We have a decrease in Ste. Anne's Hospital, given the transfer of jurisdiction for the hospital last year from the federal government to the Province of Quebec, and a bit of a decrease, $2.6 million, in the education centre at Vimy, because we've largely completed what needed to be done. The net of all of those is a $61.4 million increase from the main estimates of last year.

(1710)

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you.

One of the other things we're hearing about is support for families. I'm wondering if you can talk to us about any changes or improvements in our service to families.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Yes, we also hear about supports for families, and unfortunately the way the act is construed is that the services for the most part come through the veteran, and we have to comply with the act. However, that said, we had the pilot on the MFRCs—

Mr. Bernard Butler (Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategic Policy and Commemoration, Department of Veterans Affairs):

Those are the military family resource centres.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

—military family resource centres, which we're piloting across the country and where veterans and their families can go and receive certain services. We have our 1-800 helpline that a family member or a veteran can call. They can receive up to 20 sessions, because we know that when the veteran suffers, the family suffers. It's okay to bring them to an OSI clinic, but some veterans will not invite—if I can use that term—the spouse. They can go, or a kid.... I was talking to one veteran not too long ago whose child had some trauma because of the parent's trauma. We do have some programming.

The family caregiver relief program is another one that was put out a couple of years ago to give a caregiver some respite. It's not a huge amount, but it gives them some respite to help them take some time off if they're always taking care of the family. I think we have a lot more to do on the family side, but it is in all our conversations because we know that if you can help the family, you're also helping the member.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

One of the other items that has come up from our testimony is the practice of reimbursing families for third party services. Is that something that's being looked at? It's been stated as being a barrier for families.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Do you want to take that one?

Mr. Bernard Butler:

I'm sorry; it's for reimbursement for what type of service?

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

It's for third party services. It's perhaps an equestrian camp or something like that. It's services provided by a third party.

Mr. Bernard Butler:

Mr. Chair, thank you for the question. I can speak to the issue generally around those types of ancillary support programs.

As you probably know, we have pilots going on in equine therapy, looking at dog therapy, and certain things like that as they become more robust in terms of formal decisions on where we're going with them. As Michel indicated, our whole approach right now is to try to tailor all of our programs in way that is more veteran-centric, as opposed to being program-based.

From a program point of view, it's sometimes much easier to do things with a contribution arrangement, insisting on receipts and a lot of invoices. This new approach that we're looking at is trying to convert as many programs as we can to grant-based programs, which would be beneficial both to veterans and to families. The whole idea is to try to streamline our approach, to reduce the administrative burden on veterans and families, and then to try to ensure that access to them is quicker, more effective, and less troublesome for them.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

I'm happy to hear that. Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you. That ends this round of questioning. I would like to thank you for appearing today and for all the great things you do for our men and women.

With that, I'm going to have to have some votes on the estimates. We're just going to keep going, as we're short on time.

First we'll vote on the supplementary estimates (C), 2016-17: VETERANS AFFAIRS ç Vote 1c—Operating expenditures..........$65,448,828 ç Vote 5c—Grants and contributions..........$69,400,000

(Votes 1c and 5c agreed to)

The Chair: Shall the chair report votes 1c and 5c under Veterans Affairs of supplementary estimates (C), 2016-17 to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Now we'll vote on the main estimates, 2017-18. VETERANS AFFAIRS ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$931,958,962 ç Vote 5—Grants and contributions..........$3,728,239,000

(Votes 1 and 5 agreed to) VETERANS REVIEW AND APPEAL BOARD ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$9,449,156

(Vote 1 agreed to)

The Chair: Shall the chair report votes 1 and 5 under Veterans Affairs and vote 1 under Veterans Review and Appeal Board of the main estimates, 2017-18 to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair:Thank you.

I have a motion to adjourn from Mr. Bratina. All in favour?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair:Thank you very much. The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des anciens combattants

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Neil Ellis (Baie de Quinte, Lib.)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte.

Bonjour, tout le monde. Conformément au paragraphe 81(5) du Règlement, le Comité entreprend l'examen du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) 2016-2017: crédits 1c et 5c sous la rubrique Ministère des Anciens Combattants, renvoyés au Comité le mardi 14 février 2017.

Comparaissent aujourd'hui, dans notre premier groupe de témoins, l'honorable Kent Hehr, ministre des Anciens Combattants et ministre associé de la Défense nationale, ainsi que Walter Natynczyk, sous-ministre du ministère des Anciens Combattants.

Nous leur donnerons la parole pendant 10 minutes, puis nous passerons aux questions.

Bienvenue, messieurs. La parole est à vous.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (ministre des Anciens Combattants et ministre associé de la Défense nationale):

Merci beaucoup.

Bon après-midi, monsieur le président Ellis et les membres du Comité permanent des anciens combattants.

C'est avec plaisir que je présente le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) 2016-2017 et le Budget principal des dépenses 2017-2018 au Parlement, au nom d'Anciens Combattants Canada.

J'aimerais remercier les membres du Comité pour leur dévouement en ce qui a trait aux enjeux qui touchent les vétérans, et plus particulièrement pour l'attention récente qu'ils ont accordée à la santé mentale et pour leur étude de la prestation des services.

Notre gouvernement a pris l'engagement de veiller à ce que les vétérans et les membres de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada à la retraite qui sont admissibles, ainsi que leur famille, aient accès au soutien en santé mentale dont ils ont besoin, au moment et à l'endroit où ils en ont besoin. Il ne fait aucun doute que les travaux de ce comité permettront d'élargir nos connaissances, ainsi que notre compréhension des améliorations que nous pouvons apporter à ce chapitre.

Notre gouvernement continue de mettre l'accent sur l'élargissement de l'accès aux soins de santé mentale et sur l'amélioration de la sensibilisation, afin de fournir de meilleurs soutiens et services aux vétérans qui présentent des risques de suicide. C'est pourquoi je collabore étroitement avec mon collègue, le ministre de la Défense nationale, pour rapprocher nos deux ministères et assurer une transition plus facile aux militaires qui sont libérés.

En ce qui a trait au sujet de la présente réunion, le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses 2016-2017, j'aimerais souligner que les hausses les plus marquées concernent les allocations pour perte de revenu et les indemnités d'invalidité. J'ajouterais que le nombre de demandes d'indemnités d'invalidité soumises à Anciens Combattants a augmenté de 19 % au cours de l'exercice 2015-2016. Il s'agit d'une bonne chose, et cela montre qu'un plus grand nombre de personnes font des démarches pour obtenir l'aide dont elles ont besoin.

Je vais maintenant parler du Budget principal des dépenses pour l'exercice 2017-2018.

Le premier ministre m'a chargé de veiller à ce que nous reconnaissions les services rendus par nos vétérans, réduisions la complexité des processus et fassions davantage pour assurer la sécurité financière des vétérans au Canada. Je peux affirmer avec fierté que nous avons réalisé beaucoup de progrès. Le Budget principal des dépenses qui vous est soumis aujourd'hui rend compte d'un grand nombre de nos réalisations à ce jour. Il fait état d'une augmentation nette de 1,06 milliard de dollars par rapport à 2016-2017. Il s'agit d'une hausse de près de 30 % comparativement à l'exercice précédent. Cela s'accompagne d'un accroissement marqué de la sécurité financière et de l'accès aux services pour les vétérans et leur famille, et notre tâche n'est pas terminée.

En date du 1er avril, l'indemnité d'invalidité sera majorée pour passer de 310 000 $ à un maximum de 360 000 $ et elle sera indexée en fonction de l'inflation. Nous verserons un paiement supplémentaire à quiconque a déjà touché une indemnité d'invalidité, ce qui signifie plus d'argent dans les poches des vétérans malades et blessés. Par ailleurs, ce changement sera rétroactif à 2006, année où l'indemnité d'invalidité avait été adoptée. Cela va dans le sens de notre engagement à l'égard de l'approche « un vétéran, une norme ».

En outre, à partir du mois d'avril, les modifications apportées à l'allocation pour déficience permanente feront en sorte que les vétérans recevront une compensation plus appropriée pour les répercussions sur leur carrière d'une déficience permanente attribuable à leur service. L'allocation sera renommée « allocation pour incidence sur la carrière », afin de mieux refléter son objectif d'attribuer différents gradients et de rendre compte ainsi adéquatement du cheminement professionnel qu'aurait suivi une personne si elle n'était pas malade ou n'avait pas été blessée.

L'augmentation du maximum de l'indemnité d'invalidité et l'élargissement de l'accès à l'allocation pour déficience permanente découlent de recommandations faites par l'ombudsman des vétérans, M. Guy Parent. J'accorde toujours de la valeur aux commentaires de l'ombudsman, et je suis fier de mettre en oeuvre les changements de fond qui nous ont été recommandés par lui. Notre ombudsman a indiqué que cette démarche représentait une évolution pour ce qui est de l'accès à une compensation équitable. Nous continuerons d'élaborer un modèle axé sur le vétéran, qui appuie une transition sans heurts de la vie militaire à la vie civile.

Parmi les augmentations des dépenses d'exploitation que vous noterez figure la réouverture des bureaux des Anciens Combattants. Je suis très fier de dire que notre gouvernement a déjà rouvert sept des neuf bureaux fermés par le gouvernement précédent. Le mois de mai marquera la réouverture des deux qui restent, ainsi que l'ouverture d'un nouveau, à Surrey, en Colombie-Britannique.

Nous allons aussi élargir les services offerts aux vétérans dans le Nord. Les employés d'ACC rendront visite à des collectivités du Nord tous les mois, afin d'y rencontrer des vétérans et leur famille et de leur parler des services et des avantages qui sont disponibles.

Une des responsabilités premières d'Anciens Combattants Canada est de rendre hommage à tous les braves hommes et femmes qui servent dans les forces armées. Il est essentiel de souligner les services rendus par nos braves soldats, marins et aviateurs, pour faire en sorte qu'en tant que nation, nous n'oublions jamais leur dévouement et leur sacrifice.

(1540)



Le programme Le Canada se souvient s'efforce de garder vivant le souvenir des réalisations et des sacrifices consentis par ceux et celles qui ont servi le Canada en temps de guerre, de conflits armés et de paix, notamment, ainsi que de promouvoir la compréhension de ces efforts. Notre gouvernement investit environ 11 millions de dollars pour commémorer le 100e anniversaire de la Bataille de la crête de Vimy et de la Bataille de Passchendaele, ainsi que le 75e anniversaire du Débarquement de Dieppe. Nous continuerons d'honorer et de reconnaître ceux qui ont fait du Canada le pays qu'il est aujourd'hui.

Au cours de la dernière année et demie, nous avons accompli beaucoup de choses pour les vétérans canadiens. Nous avons fait passer l'allocation pour perte de revenus de 75 à 90 % de la solde d'un vétéran avant sa libération. De plus, ce montant sera indexé pour tenir compte de l'inflation. Ainsi, nous veillons à ce que ceux qui participent à un programme de réadaptation aient le soutien financier dont ils ont besoin.

Nous avons simplifié le processus d'approbation pour un certain nombre de demandes de prestations d'invalidité, notamment pour l'ESPT et l'hypoacousie, ce qui nous permet de traiter un plus grand nombre de demandes plus rapidement. En fait, comparativement à l'année précédente, le nombre de décisions rendues a augmenté de 27 % au cours du dernier exercice.

Nous avons parcouru beaucoup de chemin en ce qui a trait à notre engagement de recruter 400 nouveaux employés, avec l'embauche de 381 personnes jusqu'à maintenant. Cela comprend 113 nouveaux gestionnaires de cas. Nous réalisons des progrès importants quant à la réduction du ratio moyen de personnes par gestionnaire de cas pour le faire passer de 40:1 à 25:1.

En octobre, nous avons rehaussé le montant de l'exemption des avoirs de succession, dans le cadre du Programme de funérailles et d'inhumation, afin qu'un plus grand nombre de vétérans et leur famille aient accès à des funérailles en toute dignité.

Même si nous avons accompli beaucoup de choses, nous reconnaissons qu'il faut en faire beaucoup, beaucoup plus.

Nous continuons de consacrer les ressources, afin de trouver des façons d'améliorer les services en santé mentale et le soutien mis à la disposition des vétérans et de leur famille. Je sais que cela est au centre de votre étude et qu'il existe une sensibilisation accrue à l'égard de cet enjeu important. Je maintiens que nous pouvons toujours faire mieux, et je reconnais que même si la majorité des vétérans reçoivent le soutien dont ils ont besoin en santé mentale, nous pouvons faire davantage pour rejoindre ceux qui ne profitent pas d'un tel soutien. J'attends avec impatience vos recommandations quant à la façon dont nous pouvons continuer à améliorer les choses.

Il reste du travail à faire en ce qui a trait au versement d'une pension à vie et aux options qui s'offrent à ce chapitre. Nous continuerons de consulter les intervenants et les parlementaires pour élaborer la meilleure approche possible.

Il existe un domaine crucial dans lequel ACC peut et doit faire davantage, à savoir l'accélération des décisions concernant les indemnités. Nous poursuivons cette démarche à divers niveaux. Je collabore avec le ministre de la Défense nationale pour combler le fossé qui existe entre nos deux ministères, grâce à une réduction de la complexité des processus, à une révision de la prestation des services et au renforcement des partenariats.

Le ministère des Anciens Combattants a procédé à un examen exhaustif de son modèle de prestation de services, avec comme objectif de mettre les vétérans à l'avant-plan des programmes et des services, de simplifier les processus, d'en faciliter la compréhension et d'améliorer l'accès. Nous avons tenu de vastes consultations avec des vétérans, des employés, des experts externes et des Canadiens, et nous publierons un rapport final comprenant des recommandations clés. Nous adopterons un plan en vue de mettre en oeuvre 90 % des recommandations sur une période de trois ans, et l'ensemble complet des changements d'ici cinq ans.

Le bien-être physique, mental et financier de nos vétérans est notre principal objectif. Anciens Combattants Canada a déjà fait beaucoup, et grâce au budget d'aujourd'hui, nous pourrons réaliser un grand nombre de nos promesses.

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons commencer notre période de questions avec M. Brassard.

M. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous, monsieur le ministre et général, de votre présence parmi nous aujourd'hui.

Un élément est manifestement absent du Budget principal des dépenses et du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses, alors qu'il figurait parmi les promesses du premier ministre à Belleville, pendant la campagne électorale, et qu'il fait partie de notre lettre de mandat, monsieur le ministre. Il s'agit de l'option d'une pension à vie pour les vétérans blessés. Je ne vois rien à ce sujet dans le budget, et je me demande pourquoi.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Nous maintenons notre engagement de fournir une option de pension à vie à nos vétérans qui ont été blessés ou sont devenus malades par suite de leur service dans les forces armées. Cela fait partie de nos engagements de campagne et figure toujours dans la liste des choses à accomplir. Je sais que nous avons fait un grand pas en avant au chapitre de la sécurité financière, grâce à l'attribution de 5,6 milliards de dollars l'an dernier pour la bonification de l'allocation pour perte de revenus et de l'indemnité d'invalidité, tout cela dans l'optique d'améliorer le système de compensation financière de nos vétérans.

Je peux dire que nous maintenons notre engagement à cet égard et que nous le réaliserons.

(1545)

M. John Brassard:

Puis-je vous demander quelle échéance vous avez prévue pour cela, monsieur le ministre?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Notre échéance correspond à celle de notre mandat de quatre ans comme gouvernement. Évidemment, cela...

M. John Brassard:

Donc, quand les vétérans peuvent-ils s'attendre à ce que cette promesse devienne réalité?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Nos vétérans peuvent s'attendre à ce que nous donnions suite à cette promesse au cours du mandat de quatre ans du gouvernement libéral. Je serai heureux lorsque je pourrai affirmer que cette option de pension est offerte à nos vétérans.

M. John Brassard:

Ma prochaine question concerne le sujet que vous avez abordé précédemment. Nous menons actuellement une étude en santé mentale sur l'ESPT. Parmi les enjeux dont nous entendons constamment parler figurent la transition de la vie militaire à la vie civile et les défis que cela pose, au chapitre de l'emploi, notamment.

Au cours de la dernière semaine, j'ai reçu plusieurs lettres de vétérans. Dans l'une d'elles, la personne mentionnait que sa demande d'emploi dans la fonction publique était demeurée en suspens pendant un an. Dans une autre, il était question d'un vétéran de 26 ans prêt à déménager pour obtenir du travail. Il semble exister des lacunes à l'heure actuelle en ce qui a trait à l'embauche des vétérans.

Je me demande où se situe le ministère des Anciens Combattants aujourd'hui pour ce qui est du recrutement des vétérans dans la fonction publique. Je vous rappellerai, monsieur le ministre, qu'en décembre, vous aviez indiqué au Comité qu'ACC mettait l'accent sur les débouchés pour les vétérans, non seulement au sein même du ministère, mais dans d'autres ministères de la fonction publique. À l'heure actuelle, nous voyons que les niveaux actuels de recrutement des vétérans dans la fonction publique se situent à 2,2 %.

Qu'a fait le ministère des Anciens Combattants avec d'autres ministères, ainsi que dans ses rangs, pour promouvoir le recrutement prioritaire des vétérans?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je remercie sincèrement le député pour sa question. Il s'agit d'un domaine où j'ai indiqué aux fonctionnaires de mon ministère que nous aimerions voir de meilleurs résultats, tant au chapitre du recrutement des personnes dans la fonction publique, que de celui de la transition réussie de nos vétérans à la vie civile. Je sais qu'une partie des travaux en ce sens ont permis de jeter les bases d'une plus grande collaboration avec le ministre Sajjan. Je sais que, dans mon ministère, nous mettons davantage l'accent sur les travaux qui se font de son côté.

Général, je crois que vous pourriez peut-être nous éclairer davantage à ce sujet.

Général (à la retraite) Walter Natynczyk (sous-ministre, ministère des Anciens Combattants):

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs, il est certain que nous mettons l'accent sur la participation et l'intégration des vétérans dans la fonction publique, afin qu'ils trouvent dans les faits un nouveau sens à leur vie. Nous savons, comme vous l'avez mentionné, que le bien-être mental des vétérans repose sur cela et qu'ils doivent aller de l'avant. Les militaires qui sont libérés des Forces armées canadiennes ont en moyenne 37 ans, ce qui fait qu'il leur reste de nombreuses années utiles.

À la demande du ministre, le sous-ministre Forster, de la Défense nationale, et moi-même avons fait des représentations auprès de l'ensemble des sous-ministres. En fait, nous avons présenté un exposé à tous les sous-ministres du gouvernement. Le ministre a en outre autorisé la création d'un service de recrutement des vétérans, au sein d'Anciens Combattants, qui collaborera avec les services des ressources humaines de tous les ministères et tentera de trouver un emploi au sein de ceux-ci pour les vétérans qui le souhaitent.

Nous avons aussi envoyé des lettres à des organismes comme Parcs Canada, qui a des règles spéciales de recrutement, afin de nous assurer que les vétérans prennent connaissance de ces règles. Nous veillons à ce que ces mesures ne se limitent pas à Ottawa, mais s'étendent à l'ensemble du pays. Il faut se rappeler qu'il y a des parcs partout au pays, et que Service correctionnel a des bureaux partout au pays, tout comme Revenu Canada. Les mesures ne doivent pas se limiter à Ottawa.

Nous collaborons avec le reste du gouvernement pour faire en sorte que tout cela se concrétise. Nous collaborons aussi avec des entreprises. Nous faisons appel à Compagnie Canada, le programme sans but lucratif d'aide à la transition de carrière des militaires, afin que les vétérans aient l'ensemble de compétences appropriées et un bon curriculum vitae pour obtenir des emplois dans des entreprises commerciales.

M. John Brassard:

Je reviendrai peut-être à cela si j'ai le temps.

Dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses, il y a un poste de 2,5 millions de dollars pour la publicité. De quelle publicité s'agit-il?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Comme vous le savez, notre première année au gouvernement a été très chargée et a été marquée par l'ouverture de bureaux, la fourniture d'information concernant les modifications apportées aux indemnités, ainsi que les mesures visant à offrir de meilleures funérailles aux vétérans. Cela a donné lieu à la communication d'une somme importante d'information à nos vétérans et au public en général.

Afin de vous donner plus de détails à ce sujet, je vais demander au général Natynczyk de répondre à votre question.

M. John Brassard:

Pouvez-vous nous donner la ventilation de ces dépenses de publicité, général?

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs, la publicité est assurée de façon centralisée dans le cadre du Programme Le Canada se souvient. L'organisation revient du Bureau du Conseil privé. Nous présentons une soumission afin d'avoir accès à ce budget, pour le jour du Souvenir, etc.

Dans son témoignage, la dirigeante principale des finances de mon ministère pourra probablement élaborer davantage.

(1550)

Le président:

Monsieur Eyolfson, vous avez la parole.

M. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur le ministre et général, de votre présence parmi nous aujourd'hui.

Vous parlez de la réouverture de bureaux d'Anciens Combattants. J'ai eu le plaisir de vous remplacer pour l'ouverture de l'un d'entre eux, à Brandon, au Manitoba. J'ai été très honoré de pouvoir participer à cela.

De toute évidence, les fermetures ont commencé avant le début de votre mandat. Vous a-t-on déjà expliqué clairement pourquoi ces bureaux ont été fermés au départ?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Selon ce que je comprends, cela faisait partie de l'initiative de réduction du déficit de l'ancien gouvernement. Évidemment, lorsque vous réduisez les impôts, cela vous amène souvent à réduire les services. À mon avis, le ministère des Anciens Combattants est celui qui a été le plus touché; les compressions ayant porté dans de nombreux cas sur son personnel de première ligne. À un moment donné, on a procédé à une réduction de près du tiers du personnel de première ligne de mon ministère, par suite des directives comprises dans cette initiative. Par ailleurs, outre la fermeture des bureaux, certains dossiers n'ont pas progressé, selon nous, alors qu'ils auraient dû.

C'est cela qui s'est produit. Néanmoins, nous avons renouvelé notre engagement à l'égard des vétérans. Nous avons déterminé qu'il est important de mettre ces points de service à la disposition des vétérans et de leur famille, pour qu'ils sachent où s'adresser, où soumettre leurs préoccupations, où partager leurs histoires, où trouver de l'information pour avoir une vie meilleure. Je suis fier de dire que sept des neuf bureaux ont ouvert leurs portes, afin qu'un plus grand nombre de personnes puissent utiliser ces services. Je sais que lorsque nous sommes allés dans les collectivités concernées, de Corner Brook à Brandon, et partout ailleurs, les gens étaient très enthousiastes. Ils voient ces bureaux non seulement comme des endroits où les gens peuvent obtenir de l'aide, mais aussi comme une façon d'honorer les hommes et les femmes qui ont servi dans les forces armées et, en fait, de souligner l'apport des 2,3 millions de Canadiens qui ont servi dans nos forces armées depuis la Confédération.

Je suis très fier de cette réalisation de notre gouvernement et de tout ce que nous avons fait pour nos vétérans et ceux qui ont servi dans les forces canadiennes.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Par ailleurs, si je ne me trompe pas, lorsque ces bureaux ont été fermés, des employés ont été mis à pied. Où en sommes-nous en ce qui a trait au recrutement de personnel pour ceux qui ont ouvert leurs portes, afin d'atteindre les niveaux d'effectif dont nous avons besoin?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Pour les détails exacts à ce sujet, je vais passer la parole au général Natynczyk.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Monsieur, comme le ministre l'a dit dans son allocution d'ouverture, nous avons recruté 381 employés au pays. De ce nombre, 113 sont des gestionnaires de cas. Nous procédons à la dotation des postes bureau par bureau. Dans certaines régions du pays, il est difficile de trouver les bons agencements de connaissances, des travailleurs sociaux, des psychologues, etc. En même temps, nous voyons que les gens ont le goût de se joindre à l'équipe d'Anciens Combattants. Notre mission est noble et ils veulent servir nos vétérans, ce qui fait que nous disposons d'un bassin de candidats très qualifiés.

Nous poursuivrons la dotation jusqu'à l'atteinte de notre objectif. Parallèlement, le ratio vétérans-gestionnaire de cas est en baisse, comme l'a mentionné le ministre, ce qui est synonyme d'amélioration de nos services.

Si vous souhaitez des renseignements bureau par bureau concernant l'effectif, nous pourrions demander à M. Michel Doiron, sous-ministre adjoint de la Prestation des services, de nous fournir une ventilation.

Vous avez mentionné votre visite au bureau de Brandon. Lorsque je me suis rendu au bureau de Kelowna, récemment, j'ai été impressionné de voir le dévouement des gens là-bas, de rencontrer des vétérans, un caporal-chef, un ambulancier paramédical qui a servi à Petawawa et qui travaille maintenant comme gestionnaire de cas à Kelowna. Je suis impressionné de voir ce genre d'expérience et ces ensembles de compétences mis à contribution pour réaliser notre mission.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Par suite de l'augmentation des services, en raison de l'ouverture de ces bureaux, pouvez-vous nous donner une idée générale de la façon dont les services seront améliorés pour les vétérans qui se trouvent dans les collectivités du Nord et les collectivités éloignées?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

J'aimerais ajouter une chose à ce que j'ai dit précédemment. Nous progressons rapidement vers notre objectif moyen de 25 vétérans par gestionnaire de cas. Il s'agit d'une étape très importante, que nous sommes sur le point de franchir. Selon les pratiques éprouvées dans le domaine du travail social, nous avons besoin d'un ratio moyen de 25:1 pour servir le mieux nos vétérans qui ont besoin de soutien additionnel. Je suis donc très fier de cela aussi.

En ce qui a trait à nos bureaux dans le Nord, il y a évidemment de nombreux Autochtones et de nombreux autres habitants du Nord qui ont servi dans les forces armées. Nous sommes très fiers de cela. Il n'y a jamais eu de présence du ministère des Anciens Combattants là-bas. Cela faisait en sorte que les gens devaient souvent faire de longs trajets vers des villes éloignées et passer du temps loin de leur famille, ce qui nous croyons était inutile et injuste.

Nous nous sommes occupés de ce problème. Nous avons prévu un service mobile d'AAC. Ce service est mobile parce que le territoire à couvrir est vaste. Les visites sur place se font sur une base mensuelle. Les employés se rendent dans les différentes communautés pour rencontrer les vétérans qui veulent soumettre des demandes de services, pour appuyer ceux qui reçoivent déjà des services, et pour s'assurer que les vétérans obtiennent l'aide dont ils ont besoin, même dans les régions du Nord et les régions éloignées.

(1555)

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Il a été fait mention de notre stratégie pour offrir des services en santé mentale. Dans la demi-minute qui reste, comment décririez-vous, en termes généraux, les plus grands défis que présente l'amélioration des services en santé mentale pour les vétérans?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Nous fournissons de très bons services, à de nombreux égards; toutefois, comme le dit souvent notre premier ministre, il est toujours possible de faire mieux.

Il ne suffit que de quelques améliorations. Tout d'abord, nous devons veiller à maintenir et à augmenter notre expertise et notre effectif, lorsque cela est nécessaire, afin de fournir les services concrets en santé mentale qui sont nécessaires. Nous croyons que nous serons mieux en mesure d'y arriver par suite du recrutement de 381 nouveaux employés jusqu'à maintenant. Je crois que cela nous aidera.

Il reste aussi du travail à faire pour d'autres éléments compris dans la lettre de mandat. L'un d'eux a trait au centre d'excellence, qui s'occupera de santé mentale et de stress post-traumatique. Nous croyons que ce centre nous permettra de tirer parti de pratiques éprouvées, de faire des percées robustes dans le secteur de la recherche universitaire et de nous assurer autrement que nous poursuivons notre recherche d'excellence et que nous continuons de tirer parti le mieux possible des connaissances émergentes.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Madame Mathyssen, c'est à vous.

Mme Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NPD):

Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci d'être présent parmi nous aujourd'hui, monsieur le ministre.

J'ai un certain nombre de questions.

Je note que le budget comporte des augmentations, mais vous savez qu'il y a un certain nombre de vétérans qui sont mécontents. Ils sont d'avis qu'ils ne reçoivent pas les indemnités auxquelles ils ont droit et qu'ils ont gagnées, et qu'ils sont laissés pour compte.

De quel type de financement auriez-vous besoin pour rétablir cette confiance chez les vétérans et pour venir à bout de cet arriéré de cas de vétérans en attente de pensions?

L'ombudsman du ministère de la Défense nationale a mis des chiffres sur papier et les a soumis à ce comité. Dans quelle mesure êtes-vous prêt à affecter les sommes mentionnées par l'ombudsman des Anciens Combattants?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Nous avons été chargés d'améliorer les choses pour les vétérans et leur famille, point à la ligne. J'ai une lettre de mandat de notre premier ministre, dans laquelle il est fait état de nos engagements à l'égard des vétérans. Nous avons mené à bien six de ces 15 engagements, et pour deux d'entre eux concernant la sécurité financière, nous avons parcouru beaucoup de chemin, selon notre ombudsman des vétérans. Dans le dernier budget, nous avons prévu 5,6 milliards de dollars pour les vétérans et leur famille. Les mesures prévues se concrétisent.

Nous avons fait passer l'indemnité d'invalidité de 310 000 $ à un maximum de 360 000 $. Nous avons rehaussé l'allocation pour perte de revenus, qui représentait 75 % de la solde d'un soldat avant sa libération, pour la faire passer à 90 %. Il s'agit là de mesures concrètes qui mettent plus d'argent dans les poches des vétérans. Nous répondons à l'appel en ce qui a trait à la sécurité financière et nous maintenons notre engagement de l'accroître, y compris grâce à une option de pension à vie. Cela figure toujours dans notre lettre de mandat. Nous maintenons notre engagement à cet égard et, évidemment, nous respecterons cette promesse.

Il ne fait aucun doute que nous avons parcouru beaucoup de chemin en ce qui a trait à la sécurité financière, et nous continuerons d'examiner des façons de faire, afin de permettre à nos vétérans de joindre de façon définitive les rangs de la classe moyenne.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord, vous avez prévu une augmentation de l'indemnité d'invalidité, mais cela ne s'est pas encore concrétisé. La démarche reste à faire et la mesure n'est là que techniquement, sur papier. Rien ne s'est encore produit. C'est à tout le moins l'impression que j'ai, compte tenu de ce que vous avez dit.

(1600)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Les chèques seront envoyés, je crois, d'ici le 1er avril, à moins que le général veuille me corriger.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Vous avez dit que vous alliez respecter cette promesse de pension à vie pendant votre mandat. Comment veillerez-vous à ce que les vétérans qui reçoivent des montants forfaitaires en vertu de la nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants et qui veulent faire la transition à une pension à vie ne soient pas laissés de côté? Comment vous assurerez-vous qu'ils reçoivent le montant auquel ils auraient eu droit grâce à une pension à vie? Pour prouver votre bonne foi, seriez-vous prêt à abandonner votre bataille contre Equitas?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Il s'agit là de deux questions distinctes, et je vais tenter de les aborder séparément.

Vous remarquerez que notre indemnité d'invalidité sera rétroactive. Nous remonterons à 2006, et les personnes qui ont reçu une indemnité maximum de 310 000 $ seulement, alors que leur invalidité a été établie à 100 %, toucheront maintenant 360 000 $. Nous pensions qu'il s'agissait de la bonne façon de faire. Nous avons mis cela de l'avant parce que nous souhaitions faire la démonstration de notre approche un vétéran, une norme, et c'est ce que nous tentons de faire pour tous les aspects des mesures que nous prenons.

À l'heure actuelle, nous sommes aux prises avec un système constitué de programmes disparates mis en oeuvre par les gouvernements successifs, ce qui rend les choses extrêmement difficiles. Dans mon ministère, nous avons des soldats blessés âgés de 20 ans et des soldats blessés âgés de 100 ans. Cela rend les choses très complexes. Ceci étant dit, nous nous sommes engagés à offrir une option de pension répondant aux besoins des vétérans et de leur famille.

En ce qui a trait à l'affaire devant les tribunaux, nous gouvernons en ayant comme objectif d'élaborer de bonnes politiques publiques pour les vétérans et leur famille. J'ai le pouvoir de le faire et cela relève de mon contrôle. Nombre des enjeux compris dans notre lettre de mandat font suite à la poursuite d'Equitas. En fait, nombre des personnes concernées par la poursuite d'Equitas font partie de mon équipe consultative concernant la sécurité financière, la santé mentale et d'autres questions. Je suis très fier qu'ils collaborent avec nous pour trouver des solutions aux problèmes auxquels font face les vétérans, qui ont été laissés de côté pendant très longtemps. Ils sont en fait très satisfaits d'un grand nombre des solutions que nous proposons.

Ceci étant dit, tout comme vous, ils souhaitent que nous agissions. Je le reconnais.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

C'est vrai. J'ai rencontré certaines de ces personnes, et certaines d'entre elles sont mécontentes.

Vous avez parlé de l'indemnité d'invalidité maximale. Il s'agit d'une grosse somme d'argent, mais à combien de vétérans est-elle versée dans les faits?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Voulez-vous une ventilation des personnes qui touchent l'indemnité prévue, selon le pourcentage d'invalidité, qui va de 5 % à 100 %? Est-ce que c'est ce que vous souhaitez?

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Oui. En fait, vous pourrez nous faire parvenir cela plus tard. Une indemnité de 360 000 $ représente toute une somme, et on a l'impression qu'un grand nombre de gens y ont droit. Je me demande combien de personnes exactement en profitent.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je vais vous trouver les renseignements, mais je crois qu'il serait utile que je vous décrive un peu plus précisément les compensations versées aux vétérans.

Il y a d'abord un flux de revenus, dont profitent tous les soldats malades ou blessés qui ne peuvent pas travailler en raison des services qu'ils ont rendus à leur pays. Il s'agit de l'allocation pour perte de revenus, ou d'une autre indemnité similaire, grâce à laquelle aucun soldat blessé ne peut recevoir moins de 44 000 $, je crois. Il s'agit là de son revenu annuel. Cela s'applique même aux simples soldats, le grade militaire le plus bas, qui touchent ce montant sous forme de prestation annuelle pour eux et leur famille.

Par ailleurs, le montant de 360 000 $ représente une indemnité pour les souffrances endurées. Ces deux programmes se complètent l'un et l'autre. Ils contribuent l'un et l'autre à assurer une vie stable aux vétérans et à leur famille et leur permettent, s'ils sont malades ou blessés et ne peuvent travailler, de recevoir une compensation complète. S'ils peuvent travailler, un paiement leur est quand même versé, grâce à l'indemnité d'invalidité pour les souffrances endurées, afin de reconnaître ce qu'ils ont souffert en raison de leur service militaire.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Bratina, c'est à vous.

M. Bob Bratina (Hamilton-Est—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Merci.

Nous avons entendu de nombreux témoignages sur un certain nombre de questions, mais l'élément qui revient sans cesse semble être le fossé ou l'écart qui sépare le service actif au sein du ministère de la Défense nationale et les problèmes dont s'occupe le ministère des Anciens Combattants. Qu'avez-vous réussi à faire pour combler l'écart entre le service actif et la vie après le service?

(1605)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Il s'agit là d'une excellente question. Cela fait partie dans une large mesure des travaux qui ont été menés par notre ministère et de notre collaboration avec le ministre de la Défense nationale et le chef d'état-major de la Défense Vance, au cours des huit ou neuf derniers mois, dans l'optique de la nécessité de professionnaliser la libération des membres de nos forces armées canadiennes. C'est essentiellement ce que nous devons faire.

Nous réussissons à recruter des gens dans l'armée, à leur faire suivre la formation de base, à les envoyer en mission, à leur donner un endroit où vivre, et tout le reste, pendant qu'ils servent. Nous devons mettre en place le même genre d'attitude et de structure, afin que lorsqu'ils sont libérés, pour des raisons médicales ou autres, ils soient prêts à passer à autre chose dès le jour de leur libération. Ils doivent connaître le montant de leur pension et comprendre les soutiens qui leur sont offerts, afin que lorsqu'ils s'installent dans une collectivité, ils sachent si cette collectivité a les services dont ils ont besoin ou non. Nous devons faire cela, et c'est pourquoi je suis très content que ce débat ait lieu et que des travaux soient menés pour faire en sorte que nos soldats libérés obtiennent de meilleurs résultats.

Voilà la réalité mes amis, et je vous inclus mesdames; nous sommes en 2017 après tout.

M. Bob Bratina:

Oui.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Comprenez bien qu'il s'agissait d'un euphémisme. J'ai eu un écart de langage, monsieur le président, et j'en suis désolé. Vous m'avez regardé avec mépris et condescendance pendant une seconde.

Le service et la transition à la vie civile se font avec succès pour de nombreux militaires. Toutefois, un nombre beaucoup trop grand d'entre eux, soit 27 % environ, sont aux prises avec des difficultés, que ce soit au chapitre de l'emploi, de la scolarité, des dépendances, de la santé mentale, de la maladie ou des blessures, et c'est là que le ministère des Anciens Combattants trouve sa raison d'être. C'est pourquoi nous devons professionnaliser la libération. Il reste beaucoup de travail à accomplir et nous ne résoudrons pas le problème du jour au lendemain. J'aimerais bien que ce soit ainsi, mais ce n'est pas le cas.

Nous tentons de professionnaliser la libération, et je suis très satisfait de l'engagement du ministre de la Défense nationale, du chef d'état-major de la Défense et de notre ministère, qui collaborent pour trouver une solution. On parle de questions financières, de questions de réadaptation, de questions de retour au travail ou de questions de retour aux études. Notre succès repose sur un grand nombre d'éléments. Les pourparlers se précisent de plus en plus, et je peux vous dire qu'ils progressent.

Cela vous va?

M. Bob Bratina:

Oui. J'ai eu l'honneur de présenter à de jeunes vétérans des décorations civiques et des articles commémoratifs au cours des dernières années. Ces hommes et ces femmes sont remarquablement jeunes. Je suis stupéfait lorsque je vois le nombre. On parle de 75 000 vétérans de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, dont un qui vit dans ma ville, un vétéran de Dieppe âgé de 96 ans qui est en pleine forme et qui attend avec impatience la commémoration du 75e anniversaire cette année.

Je me demande si vous pouvez commenter au sujet de ces personnes qui ont profité des soins et de la compassion du ministère des Anciens Combattants depuis 70 ans. Entendez-vous beaucoup parler de la cohorte des vétérans les plus âgés? Il ne faut pas oublier la guerre de Corée non plus; je crois que les vétérans de cette guerre sont maintenant âgés de 80 ans. Qu'en est-il d'eux?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Nous sommes fiers de commémorer le service et le sacrifice des hommes et des femmes qui ont servi dans les forces armées, dès la création de ce grand pays, jusqu'à la crête de Vimy, Juno Beach et la Guerre de Corée, puis dans le cadre de nos missions de maintien de la paix, ainsi que pendant la guerre du Golfe, en Afghanistan, et dans toutes les missions de maintien de la paix qui ont entrecoupé ces conflits armés. Il s'agit réellement d'un héritage glorieux, et les vétérans ainsi que les membres des Forces armées canadiennes continuent d'assurer la sécurité, la fierté et la liberté de ce pays.

Nous savons aussi que nous fournissons des services aux vétérans de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale et à d'autres depuis longtemps maintenant. Nous avons une assez bonne expertise pour la fourniture de ces services à divers endroits au pays. Je sais que près de 6 400 personnes ont recours au soutien à long terme qui est versé d'une façon ou d'une autre par le ministère des Anciens Combattants. Nous collaborons avec plus de 1 500 emplacements au pays pour fournir à ces personnes l'aide dont elles ont besoin pour avoir une vie meilleure. Nous y parvenons essentiellement grâce à l'accroissement des soins de santé à l'échelle nationale. Nous avons eu recours aux communautés pour les soins et, en dépit des avis contraires que vous entendrez parfois, il se trouve que la grande majorité des vétérans souhaitent vivre dans la communauté d'où ils viennent, peu importe où au pays. Cela nous permet de gérer un système raisonnable et pragmatique, en ne perdant pas de vue nos responsabilités financières et en fournissant ainsi les services de façon efficiente.

Il est triste de penser que nombre de ces vétérans ne serviront plus dans l'armée. Néanmoins, notre gouvernement s'engage à commémorer ce qu'ils ont fait et à garder leurs services et leurs sacrifices vivants dans notre esprit. C'est ce qui motive de nombreuses activités, mais je crois aussi que c'est la raison pour laquelle nous nous intéressons toujours au 11 novembre, qui marque le jour du Souvenir à Ottawa et partout au pays. J'étais très heureux du projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire du député Fraser, en vue de donner au jour du Souvenir le statut de fête légale, à l'échelle fédérale à tout le moins. Je crois que cela donne le ton à nos orientations futures en tant que nation.

(1610)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Fraser.

M. Colin Fraser (Nova-Ouest, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup monsieur le ministre, de votre présence ici aujourd'hui. Général, c'est un grand plaisir de vous voir à nouveau et je vous remercie beaucoup.

J'aimerais poser une question concernant les soins de longue durée.

Monsieur le ministre, j'apprécie les travaux que vous avez menés, et les pas de géant qui ont été faits au cours de cette première année. En ce qui a trait aux soins de longue durée, toutefois, un problème se pose de façon récurrente dans ma province, la Nouvelle-Écosse, et dans de nombreux autres établissements de soins au pays, en ce qui a trait à la façon dont le ministère des Anciens Combattants aborde ces soins et à la façon dont ils seront fournis aux vétérans au parcours non traditionnel dans ces établissements à l'avenir.

Je me demande si vous pouvez commenter cela et nous éclairer sur les réflexions du ministère à ce sujet et sur ce que nous pouvons espérer pour l'avenir.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

C'est une question intéressante. Comme je l'ai dit dans ma réponse précédente, nous nous sommes engagés à offrir aux vétérans qui ont participé à diverses missions au service de notre pays des soins de longue durée dans des établissements qui leur conviennent.

Il ne faut pas oublier non plus que nous collaborons très étroitement avec les gouvernements provinciaux qui sont désormais les premiers responsables d'une bonne partie des dispositifs de soins de longue durée au pays. Anciens Combattants travaille toujours en partenariat avec eux afin que le gouvernement demeure pragmatique et continue à respecter les responsabilités des divers paliers de gouvernement, tout en veillant à ce que les anciens combattants reçoivent l'aide dont ils ont besoin, au moment et à l'endroit qui leur convient.

Ces trois derniers mois, nous avons cherché à ajouter de la flexibilité à nos ententes. Nous avons connu un certain succès à cet égard, en particulier dans votre province. En collaboration avec votre premier ministre et votre ministre de la Santé, nous avons réussi à conclure des ententes plus flexibles et plus raisonnables, ce que les documents financiers du gouvernement ne permettent pas toujours parce que le ministre a les mains liées en ce qui concerne les autorisations budgétaires.

Nous sommes fiers du travail accompli à cet égard. Nous avons conclu un plus grand nombre d'ententes là-bas avec différents établissements.

Monsieur le général, pourriez-vous décrire quelques-unes des mesures que nous avons prises pour accroître le degré de flexibilité et permettre ainsi à un plus grand nombre d'anciens combattants d'obtenir l'aide dont ils auront besoin en vieillissant.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs, comme l'a fait remarquer le ministre, ce n'est pas le gouvernement fédéral qui gère les hôpitaux. Depuis la transition de l'hôpital Sainte-Anne l'an dernier, tous les hôpitaux sont désormais sous la responsabilité des provinces; comme l'a mentionné le ministre en réponse à une question précédente, nous offrons un soutien aux anciens combattants dans près de 1 500 établissements de soins de longue durée des quatre coins du pays parce que la recherche démontre que les vétérans souhaitent vivre à proximité de leur famille; c'est ce que les vétérans eux-mêmes nous disent. Certains souhaitent être traités dans l'un de ces 18 hôpitaux conventionnels.

Nous travaillons avec chacune des provinces, comme nous l'avons fait avec la Nouvelle-Écosse et comme nous le faisons actuellement avec l'Ontario, pour Parkdale, à London, ainsi que pour Sunnybrook et d'autres établissements. Nous pouvons travailler avec les provinces afin d'offrir des lits dans chacun de ces établissements communautaires à la génération de vétérans qui ont servi après la Deuxième Guerre mondiale et la guerre de Corée.

Ces mêmes lits seront à la disposition des vétérans alliés qui ont combattu pour d'autres pays et qui sont clairement admissibles, ainsi que des vétérans de l'ère moderne, ceux qui ont participé aux missions de maintien de la paix et qui ont été déployés en Afghanistan. S'ils ont besoin de soins de longue durée, ils pourront avoir accès à ces lits dans des établissements communautaires. D'un bout à l'autre du pays, plus de 600 vétérans de l'ère moderne occupent actuellement un lit dans un établissement communautaire.

(1615)

M. Colin Fraser:

Excellent. Je vous remercie.

J'aimerais revenir à un point que vous avez brièvement abordé tout à l'heure, soit l'amélioration du ratio qui passerait de 40 à 25 vétérans par gestionnaire de cas. Je sais que depuis un an, on a accompli de l'excellent travail pour atteindre cet objectif.

Nous avons entendu un commentaire et je me demande ce que vous en pensez. Il ne s'agit pas seulement de réduire le nombre de vétérans pour chaque gestionnaire, bien que cela soit très important pour s'assurer que les anciens combattants reçoivent les services requis et l'attention dont ils ont besoin. Il faut également donner une meilleure formation aux gestionnaires de cas afin qu'ils comprennent mieux les besoins des vétérans et qu'ils soient plus sensibles à certaines situations qui se sont produites dans le passé et que nous essayons d'éviter à l'avenir.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

J'ai l'honneur et le privilège d'occuper ce poste depuis maintenant un an et demi et je peux vous affirmer que je suis très fier du travail accompli par le personnel d'Anciens Combattants des quatre coins du pays, notamment à nos bureaux de l'Administration centrale, à l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard, et à tous nos autres bureaux du pays, nos divers centres et cliniques pour TSO. Ces fonctionnaires font preuve d'un grand professionnalisme et sont déterminés à produire des résultats pour les anciens combattants dans le cadre de leur travail quotidien. Je suis très fier d'eux. Je suis convaincu que nos gestionnaires de cas, par leur efficacité et leur engagement, travaillent aussi bien que n'importe quel employé du gouvernement ou du secteur privé.

Les fonctionnaires de mon ministère sont très dévoués et je sais que s'ils ont besoin... Le ministère met à leur disposition de nombreux programmes de perfectionnement ou d'apprentissage. Je suis très très satisfait de l'engagement démontré par nos fonctionnaires.

En tant qu'élus, nous pouvons faire des choses intéressantes. Nous établissons l'orientation à suivre et lançons des politiques publiques, mais ce sont les fonctionnaires qui sont sur la ligne de front et qui améliorent la vie de nos vétérans. Nous le constatons à la grandeur du gouvernement, en particulier dans mon ministère.

M. Colin Fraser:

Je vous remercie sincèrement.

Je voudrais rappeler brièvement que le ministre a accepté mon projet de loi d'initiative privée qui a été renvoyé hier au comité du patrimoine, et je l'en remercie. Pour être certain que tout est clair, je précise que ce projet de loi modifie la Loi instituant des jours de fête légale afin de corriger une incohérence et de confirmer que le Parlement reconnaît l'importance du jour du Souvenir; bien entendu, il revient à chaque province de décider si ce jour sera férié.

Nous avons hâte qu'il franchisse l'étape de la troisième lecture à la Chambre. Merci de l'avoir mentionné, monsieur le ministre.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Merci de nous avoir donné des détails, tout est maintenant clair.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Madame Wagantall, vous avez la parole.

Mme Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, PCC):

Monsieur le ministre et monsieur le sous-ministre, je vous remercie de votre présence.

Ma première question concerne tout le processus permettant à nos vétérans de trouver un emploi. Nous avons appris que la fonction publique fait beaucoup d'efforts pour embaucher des vétérans qui possèdent les compétences requises. C'est l'une de ses priorités.

La semaine dernière, un ancien combattant hautement qualifié, qui avait servi dans les forces en tant que comptable, m'a dit qu'il avait posé sa candidature pour travailler à la résolution des problèmes liés au système Phénix. Il n'a jamais réussi à parler à une personne en chair et en os. N'existe-t-il pas une sorte d'identifiant qui permettrait de signaler les candidatures présentées par des vétérans? Le cas échéant, fait-on le suivi de leurs demandes, de leurs entrevues ou de leurs affectations?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

C'est une excellente question et j'ai d'ailleurs constaté l'existence de ce problème lorsque j'ai pris mes fonctions de ministre. Nous ne réussissons pas à faciliter la transition professionnelle des vétérans au sein de la fonction publique aussi bien que nous le souhaiterions et nous ne réussissons pas non plus à leur assurer des emplois dans le secteur privé. C'est un problème pour les vétérans. Nous y travaillons et le général a complété ma réponse à ce sujet.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Ce sera une priorité.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

J'espère que vous nous soumettrez le cas dont vous parlez, si cette personne autorise le ministère à....

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Bien sûr, je vous le ferai parvenir.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Ce serait bien. Nous pourrions probablement apporter notre aide. Nous devons vérifier si d'autres vétérans se trouvent dans la même situation. Monsieur le général, qu'en pensez-vous?

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Je répète que nous sommes fermement déterminés à recruter ces vétérans prioritaires, surtout ceux qui ont quitté les Forces armées canadiennes à la suite d'une blessure, ainsi que tous les autres qui possèdent les compétences requises. Le ministre a adressé une lettre à tous ses collègues du gouvernement — à tous les ministres du Cabinet — pour obtenir leur engagement à cet égard.

La contre-amirale Elizabeth Stuart, notre dirigeante principale des finances et des services ministériels, prendra place à cette table un peu plus tard. Elle pourra probablement vous donner plus de détails à ce sujet.

(1620)

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Nous attendons les chiffres réels avec impatience. Ce sera fantastique.

Par ailleurs, je viens de la Saskatchewan. Le ministère a ouvert un bureau à Saskatoon. Vous n'avez pas été en mesure d'assister à son ouverture, je comprends cela, mais...

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

C'était l'été, juste...

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

L'annonce a été faite durant l'été, mais l'ouverture a eu lieu en novembre. C'est correct. Ce bureau desservira quelque 2 900 anciens combattants. Si vous visez un ratio de 25 anciens combattants par gestionnaire de cas, vous devrez affecter 115 gestionnaires à ce bureau pour effectuer le travail. Pour le moment, il n'y en a qu'un seul et il doit faire la navette entre Saskatoon et Regina. Lorsqu'il ne peut venir, il n'y a personne d'autre pour le remplacer. Quel est l'échéancier? En avez-vous une idée? Un grand nombre de vétérans vivent dans les régions rurales de la Saskatchewan. Ils doivent venir à Saskatoon et cela exige beaucoup de temps.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Votre question est très pertinente. Dans bon nombre de régions du pays, il est plus facile qu'ailleurs d'embaucher des gens possédant les compétences spéciales requises pour desservir les anciens combattants...

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Mais il n'y a personne d'assez compétent dans toute la ville de Saskatoon?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Laissez-moi répondre.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Nous savons qu'il est important de respecter le ratio moyen pour soutenir les gens dans leurs communautés. C'est justement pourquoi nous avons décidé de rouvrir ce bureau.

Je vais demander au général de vous donner plus de détails au sujet de Saskatoon.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Vous verrons si cette question sera rapidement portée à l'attention du sous-ministre responsable de la prestation des services.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Gén Walter Natynczyk: Je sais que nous avons embauché du personnel en Saskatchewan. Je sais également que nous avons un bureau à Regina. Le personnel prête main-forte à la BFC de Moose Jaw. En ce qui concerne la liste des personnes inscrites à la liste et combien sont affectées à Saskatoon, je vais laisser le sous-ministre adjoint, Michel Doiron, vous répondre.

Comme je viens de le dire, nous ne ménageons aucun effort pour trouver dans la région des personnes possédant les compétences requises et de l'expérience en gestion de cas pour occuper ces postes. Dans certaines régions du pays, cette tâche n'a pas été facile. Ce n'est pas un problème de manque de ressources ni de financement. Nous essayons seulement de trouver les bonnes personnes possédant les bonnes compétences pour ces endroits.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Cela s'appliquerait probablement au... Si j'ai bien compris ce qu'on a dit à l'ouverture de ce bureau, il y aura aussi une clinique de traitement des TSO, au cinquième étage. C'est ce qu'on m'a dit.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Pour le moment, je peux vous confirmer que nous continuons à desservir la Saskatchewan à partir de Deer Lodge, au Manitoba, ce qui...

Mme Cathay Wagantall: N'est pas une bonne chose.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:... N'est pas encore optimal, mais je me garderais de présager que ce sera le cas dans le futur.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord, je vous remercie.

Le président:

Il vous reste une minute et vingt secondes.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Parfait.

Très brièvement, vous avez entendu ma question à la Chambre l'autre jour concernant la méfloquine.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Vous vous adressez à la bonne personne.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Je suis heureuse de l'entendre.

L'Australie vient de diffuser de l'information sur les mesures prises à l'égard de tous ses militaires, ainsi que sur les répercussions et les effets de ce médicament. Les tentatives de suicide et les suicides sont des conséquences possibles. Les Australiens prodiguent un traitement et des soins aux personnes qui ont pris de la méfloquine et qui ont besoin de soins.

Comment attirer l'attention ici sur ce problème afin que les personnes qui ont pris ce produit reçoivent les soins dont ils ont besoin? Actuellement, elles ne sont pas traitées pour la toxicité de la méfloquine et on ne reconnaît pas ce problème.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Premièrement, je suis très fier des 4 000 personnes des quatre coins du pays qui ont travaillé sur des problèmes de santé mentale...

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Nous ne parlons pas d'un problème de santé mentale, mais bien de lésions cérébrales. C'est un problème physique. C'est ce qui ressort clairement des études menées en Allemagne, en Australie, aux États-Unis et en Grande-Bretagne.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Notre ministère traitera tout vétéran qui se présente avec une maladie ou une lésion liée à son service militaire, à l'aide de la meilleure technologie et de la meilleure expertise disponibles dans ce pays.

La présidente suppléante (Mme Cathay Wagantall):

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

C'est à vous, madame Lockhart.

Mme Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.

Merci également à vous, monsieur le ministre et monsieur le général, d'être venus nous rencontrer aujourd'hui. Vous savez sans doute que nous avons entrepris une étude sur la santé mentale et que nous avons terminé notre étude sur la prestation des services. Les témoignages que vous avez livrés aujourd'hui nous ont donné des pistes de réponse. Je vous en remercie.

Des anciens combattants nous ont appris que l'accès au cannabis à des fins médicales a changé leur vie pour le mieux. Certains ont l'impression que les changements apportés par AAC les privent de leur médicament. Sur quelles preuves votre ministère s'est-il appuyé lorsqu'il a pris la décision de réévaluer les quantités acceptables de marijuana thérapeutique?

(1625)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je pense que nous devons remonter à un niveau supérieur pour répondre à cette question. À mon arrivée au ministère, rien ne justifiait la limite de 10 grammes de cannabis par jour établie pour les vétérans qui en consommaient à des fins thérapeutiques, que ce soit pour leur santé mentale, pour soulager leurs douleurs ou pour toute autre raison. Malgré toutes les recherches que nous avons effectuées pour trouver une justification, nous n'en avons trouvé aucune, à notre grande surprise.

Comme le cannabis n'est pas une drogue réglementée par Santé Canada — il n'existe aucune disposition législative ou autre à cet effet —, j'ai fait savoir que nous devions nous réunir avec la communauté médicale, les anciens combattants, les intervenants et les producteurs autorisés afin d'élaborer un cadre stratégique. Ce n'est pas une drogue réglementée par Santé Canada. Nous étions d'avis qu'il y avait un vide politique.

Par le biais de nos rencontres, de nos recherches et de nos consultations avec les gens du milieu médical et d'autres spécialistes — qui s'intéressent à ce domaine émergent —, nous avons recueilli beaucoup de renseignements. Les études vont dans les deux sens. En fait, certains médecins pensent que cette drogue est nocive. D'autres soutiennent qu'elle est bénéfique. Notre gouvernement cherche à fonder sa politique sur des faits probants et scientifiques.

Nous avons même obtenu des renseignements provenant du Collège royal des médecins et des chirurgiens qui démontrent que la vaste majorité des personnes ne devrait pas en consommer plus de trois grammes par jour. Le Collège considère que c'est la quantité limite que les gens peuvent consommer en toute sécurité pour traiter une maladie. C'est le genre de données que nous obtenons à force de discuter avec des médecins et des anciens combattants.

Nous avons compris que cette drogue a permis beaucoup d'anciens combattants d'améliorer leurs conditions de vie. Nous en sommes conscients. Ce n'était pas une décision facile à prendre, mais elle nous paraissait évidente.

Nous pensons avoir laissé une certaine marge de manoeuvre. Il va sans dire que nous rembourserons. Rappelez-vous qu'Anciens Combattants Canada rembourse la marijuana. Les gens peuvent se procurer de la marijuana thérapeutique, s'ils le souhaitent, auprès de divers producteurs autorisés partout au pays. Actuellement, nous ne remboursons que trois grammes et seulement sur l'avis du médecin traitant.

Nous avons compris qu'il n'est pas toujours efficace de traiter tout le monde de la même manière et nous avons donc proposé un programme qui prévoit une certaine flexibilité. Si vous consultez un spécialiste qui, après avoir confirmé votre diagnostic, est d'avis que le cannabis est un traitement efficace pour vous, s'il a consulté votre dossier médical et s'est entendu avec votre médecin traitant que c'est le traitement qu'il vous faut, il est possible alors que nous vous remboursions le coût d'une quantité supérieure de cannabis.

Nous pensions que cela était nécessaire. N'oubliez pas que la santé et le bien-être de nos vétérans et de leurs familles sont au coeur de nos préoccupations et que nos décisions politiques visent cet objectif. Nous croyons que cette politique est conforme à notre mandat, un point c'est tout.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.

Dans le cadre de notre étude sur la santé mentale, nous avons beaucoup discuté d'une question connexe, soit la recherche sur la consommation de marijuana pour traiter le syndrome de stress post-traumatique ou SSPT. Est-ce un domaine que vous avez l'intention?... Quelle pourrait être la contribution future d'AAC dans la recherche future sur toutes ces questions?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

C'est une excellente question.

Nous allons créer un centre d'excellence pour les problèmes de santé mentale et le SSPT. Nous prévoyons consacrer un important volet à ces problèmes afin de mieux comprendre les pratiques exemplaires utilisées ailleurs, ce qui nous permettra d'obtenir de l'aide en matière de santé mentale. De toute évidence, c'est un dossier qui prend de plus en plus d'importance pour nous à Anciens Combattants Canada.

Je suis également très fier de l'ICRSMV. J'ai oublié ce que signifie cet acronyme. Pouvez-vous m'aider?

(1630)

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Institut canadien de recherche sur la santé des militaires et des vétérans.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

C'est exact, monsieur le général.

Cet institut regroupe des réseaux universitaires qui font de la recherche dans ce domaine. C'est l'aboutissement d'une longue histoire de transmission de données et de recherche par des personnes capables de les canaliser sur les problèmes touchant les anciens combattants. Nous travaillons en étroit partenariat avec eux. Monsieur le général, pouvez-vous donner plus de précisions à ce sujet?

Le président:

Désolé, monsieur le ministre. Je vous remercie. Nous devons passer à la prochaine ronde de questions.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

D'accord, mais c'est un très bon programme.

Le président:

Monsieur Kitchen, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, PCC):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, monsieur le général, je vous remercie tous les deux d'être revenus nous rencontrer aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais revenir à la marijuana thérapeutique. Combien prévoyez-vous économiser grâce aux changements que vous avez apportés?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

En toute franchise, je ne le sais pas précisément. Je n'en ai pas tenu compte dans mes calculs. Vous devriez consulter... Je ne sais même pas si nous avons fait ces calculs.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Monsieur, si vous le permettez, je dirais que pour nous, comme l'a précisé le ministre, c'est une question de bien-être et les avis des médecins indiquent que toute quantité supérieure à trois grammes risque de ne pas être dans l'intérêt du vétéran; nous n'avons donc pas inclus ce coût dans le calcul des économies parce que cela n'est pas une question d'argent. C'est une question de bien-être.

M. Robert Kitchen:

C'est exactement ce que nous ont dit de nombreux témoins rencontrés dans le cadre de nos études. Ils nous ont dit que c'était en quelque sorte dans l'intérêt des familles et des vétérans; beaucoup nous ont dit que la marijuana leur avait permis de mieux gérer leur vie, de réduire leur forte dépendance de longue date aux opioïdes et de diminuer le nombre de médicaments qu'ils doivent prendre. Ne pensez-vous pas que nous devrions entreprendre une étude sur la marijuana thérapeutique?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je vais vous expliquer la politique que nous avons mise en place.

Grâce aux renseignements recueillis au cours de nos rencontres avec des experts médicaux et des vétérans, nous avons élaboré une politique souple qui nous permet d'assurer la sécurité des vétérans, tout en leur donnant la possibilité d'aller consulter un spécialiste ou de se procurer le produit qu'ils pensent être le meilleur pour eux.

Pour ce qui est de la recherche, c'est quelque chose que nous envisageons. D'ailleurs, l'Institut de recherche sur la santé des militaires et des vétérans et d'autres organismes s'y sont déjà mis. Je pense que notre ministère a l'obligation de se tenir au courant de la recherche dans des domaines émergents pour savoir dans quelle direction elle évolue.

Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

J'aimerais seulement ajouter qu'à la conférence de l'Institut qui s'est tenue à Vancouver en novembre dernier, le ministre a confié au ministère le mandat de mener une recherche, en partenariat avec les Forces armées canadiennes, sur les meilleures pratiques afin de connaître les bienfaits de la consommation de marijuana à des fins médicales et d'autres détails connexes.

M. Robert Kitchen:

D'accord, mais je parle plutôt d'une étude sur son efficacité. Je ne parle pas de consultations. Je parle de mener une véritable étude, une recherche approfondie. Ne pensez-vous pas que c'est ce que nous devrions faire?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Il s'agit d'un domaine émergent sur lequel nous avons besoin de beaucoup plus d'information...

M. Robert Kitchen:

Oui, nous avons besoin d'obtenir plus d'information. Ne pensez-vous donc pas que notre comité devrait avoir accès à cette information afin d'obtenir de meilleurs résultats et de meilleurs services pour nos vétérans?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

C'est une idée à laquelle nous devons probablement réfléchir.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais proposer une motion, si vous le permettez. Nous avons sous les yeux l'avis de motion suivant: Que le Comité mène une étude d'au plus six réunions au sujet des répercussions sur la santé mentale des anciens combattants occasionnées par la réduction de la limite quotidienne de marijuana thérapeutique autorisée dans le cadre du programme de marijuana à des fins médicales d'Anciens Combattants Canada

Le président:

La motion est proposée.

M. Colin Fraser:

Monsieur le président, je propose que nous ajournions le débat sur cette motion. Le ministre est ici pour répondre à nos questions et, avant de prendre la motion en considération, je pense qu'il vaudrait mieux reporter ce débat et poursuivre notre discussion avec le ministre.

(1635)

Le président:

Nous aurons un vote sur l'ajournement du débat.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Monsieur le président, je demanderais la tenue d'un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

D'accord.

(La motion est adoptée par 6 voix contre 3.)

Le président:

La motion est adoptée.

Nous avons interrompu la minuterie. Il vous reste encore à peu près une minute et demie.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Monsieur le ministre, j'ai une question à vous poser concernant la hausse d'un milliard de dollars mentionnée dans le rapport que nous avons devant nous. Pouvez-vous nous dire combien d'anciens combattants se sont prévalus des services cette année?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Si vous regardez les chiffres, notre milliard de dollars servira principalement... Notre bureau a enregistré une hausse de 19 % du nombre de demandes de prestations d'invalidité. C'est une bonne nouvelle. Cela veut dire que les vétérans sont plus nombreux à venir chercher l'aide dont ils ont besoin, au moment où ils en ont besoin.

Nous avons également constaté une hausse du nombre de demandes acheminées dans l'ensemble de notre ministère. Les vétérans ont reçu les services qu'ils ont demandés et nous sommes très satisfaits des progrès accomplis à cet égard.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Êtes-vous en mesure de nous dire quel est l'écart entre l'année précédente et celle-ci?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Environ 19 %, mais je vais laisser le général vous répondre.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Désolé, mais nous n'avons pas cette information. J'ai un relevé annuel des personnes libérées des Forces armées canadiennes, mais je n'ai aucune donnée indiquant combien d'entre elles se sont adressées à nous après leur libération. Je vais devoir vous revenir là-dessus.

Le président:

Merci de nous faire parvenir cette information.

Madame Mathyssen, vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

J'aimerais revenir sur les emplois pour les anciens combattants. Lorsque d'anciens combattants demeurent réservistes, sans pour autant figurer sur la feuille de paie du gouvernement, le gouvernement canadien leur retire leurs droits de propriété intellectuelle. Il leur est donc très difficile de se trouver un emploi dans leur domaine d'expertise parce que le gouvernement conserve leur expertise.

Avez-vous examiné cette politique et êtes-vous disposé à corriger ce problème?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Premièrement, les réserves sont davantage du ressort du ministère de la Défense nationale, mais nous travaillons sur une panoplie de dossiers aux fins d'harmonisation; nous travaillons également avec une foule de personnes engagées dans l'appareil militaire pour voir comment se passe leur transition à la vie civile.

Pour revenir à votre question, c'est une observation que j'ai déjà entendue. Je suis certain que cette question a été soulevée par des réservistes. Il faudra y réfléchir dans le cadre de notre projet d'harmonisation avec le général Vance si nous voulons gérer le processus de libération avec professionnalisme et offrir aux vétérans tout le soutien dont ils ont besoin.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Je n'ai rien à ajouter.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Il semble équitable que ces réservistes aient accès à leur propriété intellectuelle.

L'ombudsman du MDN a proposé la mise en place d'un service de « conciergerie » afin d'aider les militaires libérés pour des raisons médicales tout au long du processus de libération — services de pension, soins médicaux —, parce que certains vétérans nous disent que ces démarches sont parfois complexes.

Que répondez-vous à cela? Êtes-vous disposé à envisager cette solution?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je félicite l'ombudsman pour son rapport que je lis toujours rigoureusement. À l'instar de notre propre ombudsman, il est attentif à l'opinion des vétérans à ce sujet. Je sais qu'il faut combler l'écart existant entre le ministère de la Défense nationale et Anciens Combattants. Comme je viens de le dire, nous collaborons avec le ministre Sajjan et le chef de l'état-major de la Défense, le général Vance, dans le but de professionnaliser le processus de libération.

Nous voulons nous assurer que les hommes et les femmes qui quittent les Forces armées canadiennes après des années de service reçoivent leur pension, qu'ils sachent où aller et qu'ils aient un endroit où vivre. Nous voulons nous assurer qu'ils retrouveront une nouvelle vie normale et qu'ils sauront où s'adresser pour avoir accès, s'ils en ont besoin, aux services d'Anciens Combattants, et qu'ils n'attendent pas cinq ou dix ans avant de venir frapper à notre porte. Ils sauront dès leur départ que nous sommes là pour leur offrir les services dont ils ont besoin.

(1640)

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Permettez-moi d'ajouter, comme l'a indiqué le ministre dans son allocution d'ouverture, que le ministère a fait un examen de la prestation des services et qu'un volet important de cet examen a consisté à s'assurer que le ministère aide chacun de ces vétérans, au moment de leur transition hors des Forces, à amorcer ce processus avant sa libération. Actuellement, le processus de libération dure six mois. En collaboration avec les gestionnaires de cas des Forces armées canadiennes, nous essayons de commencer à l'avance à les aider à faire la transition à la vie civile, afin qu'au moment de leur départ des Forces, ils sachent déjà où ils veulent vivre et qu'ils puissent se trouver un emploi. Nous faisons notre possible pour les aider à se trouver un emploi, un médecin et ainsi de suite.

Nous faisons tout cela. Nous utilisons le mot « conciergerie » comme un but à atteindre. Nous avons du pain sur la planche parce que, je le répète, quelque 5 000 à 6 000 militaires quittent les Forces armées canadiennes bon an mal an. Nous essayons de proposer à chacun un programme sur mesure en fonction de ses besoins personnels et de ceux de sa famille.

Le président:

Merci.

Voilà qui met fin à nos témoignages pour aujourd'hui avec ce groupe. Au nom du comité, j'aimerais remercier le ministre et le sous-ministre d'être venus nous rencontrer.

Je voudrais faire un dernier commentaire au sujet de l'embauche de vétérans et j'encourage tous les membres à faire la même chose. À la baie de Quinte, dans ma circonscription, j'ai embauché un vétéran; c'est un excellent travailleur qui a reçu une bonne formation. Monsieur le général, je vous en remercie.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Merci à vous.

Le président:

Nous allons faire une pause d'une minute avant d'accueillir le prochain...

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je remercie tous les membres du Comité pour leur excellent travail, leur détermination et les efforts qu'ils déploient pour les anciens combattants canadiens. C'est très important.

Le président:

Nous ajournons pendant quelques minutes.

(1640)

(1645)

Le président:

Nous reprenons la séance.

Nous allons voter à 17 h 30 et nous devons également tenir quelques votes d'ici la fin de la réunion sur le budget principal et les budgets supplémentaires. Nous aurons probablement le temps d'avoir une seule ronde de questions.

Nos témoins sont arrivés. Du ministère des Anciens Combattants, nous recevons Elizabeth Stuart, sous-ministre adjointe, dirigeante principale, Finances et Services ministériels, Michel Doiron, sous-ministre adjoint, Prestation des services et Bernard Butler, sous-ministre adjoint, Politiques stratégiques et Commémoration.

Comme les témoins n'ont pas d'exposé officiel à présenter, nous pouvons commencer notre première ronde de questions.

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Brassard.

M. John Brassard:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

J'ai des questions qui vont vous plaire, monsieur Doiron. Je vous remercie d'être venu nous rencontrer à nouveau. Merci à vous également, madame Stuart et monsieur Butler.

Quelques-unes des questions m'ont été transmises par d'anciens combattants. J'en ai quatre à poser et, avec votre permission monsieur le président, je vais partager mon temps avec madame Wagantall.

Combien de temps ai-je à ma disposition?

(1650)

Le président:

Vous avez six minutes.

M. John Brassard:

D'accord. Pouvez-vous me faire signe au bout de quatre minutes?

Voici l'une des questions que je dois vous poser. Vous pouvez ouvrir neuf bureaux et embaucher 400 employés, mais quel est le taux d'approbation des demandes de prestations?

M. Michel Doiron (sous-ministre adjoint, Prestation des services, ministère des Anciens Combattants):

Nous atteignons un taux d'approbation autour de 85 % pour les premières demandes.

M. John Brassard:

Autour de 85...?

M. Michel Doiron:

Si vous parlez des problèmes de santé mentale et du SSPT, le taux est en fait de 94 %. Cela dépend du nombre exact..., mais la moyenne pour toutes les demandes se situe autour de 85 %.

M. John Brassard:

Ma prochaine question est la suivante. Quel est le cycle de rétroaction de la part d'anciens combattants au sujet des services et les prestations?

M. Michel Doiron:

C'est une question musclée, monsieur.

M. John Brassard:

Elle provient d'un ancien combattant, monsieur Doiron.

M. Michel Doiron:

D'accord...

M. John Brassard:

C'est normal qu'elle soit musclée.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Michel Doiron:

Oui, monsieur.

Tout dépend des services dont nous parlons. Si vous parlez de nos services d'arbitrage, les commentaires que nous recevons portent sur les longs délais et la trop grande quantité de renseignements demandés. Dans le cadre de notre examen de la prestation des services, par exemple, nous essayons de simplifier ce processus en le « démédicalisant » afin de le rendre un peu plus facile. Même si nous obtenons un taux d'approbation autour de 85 %, il n'en demeure pas moins que les formulaires et le processus sont trop complexes.

Si vous parlez de la gestion des cas, nous recevons des commentaires très positifs, mais ils proviennent en grande partie de personnes malades et blessées. Il s'agit surtout d'accompagnement et de partenariat avec le vétéran. Tout dépend des services dont vous parlez.

Cela dit, comme nous ne recevons pas beaucoup de commentaires de la part de la majorité silencieuse, nous avons commencé à mener un sondage auprès des vétérans afin de connaître leur avis sur Anciens Combattants. Nous espérons avoir les résultats dans le courant du mois d'avril.

M. John Brassard:

J'aimerais maintenant savoir pourquoi les gestionnaires de cas envoient les demandes à Charlottetown, ce qui retarde et complique encore plus le processus. A-t-on déjà pensé qu'on pourrait gagner du temps si on autorisait les gestionnaires de cas à approuver eux-mêmes les demandes de prestations?

M. Michel Doiron:

Pas les gestionnaires de cas eux-mêmes, mais nous cherchons à voir s'il serait possible de confier une partie du processus décisionnel à un autre palier, plus proche des anciens combattants. Cela ne concerne pas les gestionnaires de cas, mais certains de nos agents des services aux vétérans. Nous pourrions aussi confier cette tâche à certains agents des prestations d'invalidité qui travaillent dans les bureaux de partout au pays. Cela accélérerait grandement le processus.

M. John Brassard:

Une dernière question.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Il vous reste environ trois minutes et demie.

M. John Brassard:

Pourquoi les décisions du Tribunal d'appel des anciens combattants ne sont-elles pas communiquées à ACC afin que le ministère puisse en faire le suivi?

M. Michel Doiron:

Oui, vous parlez du TACRA, n'est-ce pas?

M. John Brassard:

Oui, du Tribunal des anciens combattants, révision et appel. Désolé, j'ai voulu abréger ma question pour gagner du temps.

M. Michel Doiron:

Pas de problème.

Nous recevons de l'information du TACRA et nous travaillons avec eux pour voir quelles sont les tendances; par exemple, si le tribunal annule une mesure que nous prenons systématiquement, nous pourrons alors nous ajuster en conséquence. Si nos décisions sont constamment annulées par le TACRA, nous ferions alors mieux de voir ce qui se passe en première ligne. Nous le faisons déjà, mais nous ne recevons pas les décisions. Elles sont envoyées aux anciens combattants concernés. Ce sont des renseignements personnels.

M. John Brassard:

Pour revenir à ma question, à l'occasion du témoignage qu'il nous a livré en décembre, le général Natynczyk a dit que vous embauchiez des employés à court terme pour faire face à l'augmentation du nombre de dossiers à traiter. Cela commence à paraître dans ce budget supplémentaire des dépenses. Combien d'employés à court terme ACC a-t-il embauchés? Combien d'entre eux sont actuellement affectés au traitement des dossiers? Avez-vous ces données en main?

M. Michel Doiron:

Je vais vous les faire parvenir.

M. John Brassard:

Très bien.

M. Michel Doiron:

Je ne les ai pas. Vous parlez des employés temporaires et occasionnels? J'ai une liste détaillée, mais pas avec moi. Je vous la ferai parvenir.

M. John Brassard:

D'accord.

Je vais céder la parole à Mme Wagantall.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais revenir à Saskatoon un moment. Je constate que 400 nouveaux emplois ont été créés; 381 ont été comblés, dont 113 postes de gestionnaires de cas. Il reste donc 19 postes à combler pour atteindre les 400. Selon les indications, en Saskatchewan, il y a 2 900 dossiers d'anciens combattants à traiter et il n'y a qu'un seul gestionnaire de cas pour le moment. Il nous en faudrait 115 de plus.

Ma question est la suivante. Comme un grand nombre de ces 400 postes étaient déjà en attente sous le ministre précédent, le gouvernement est-il prêt à embaucher 400 personnes et plus pour respecter le ratio de 25 cas par gestionnaire...

M. Michel Doiron:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais apporter une correction. C'est vrai qu'il y a 2 900 anciens combattants, mais le ratio de 1 pour 25 s'applique à la gestion des cas seulement.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord, ce sont donc les plus difficiles...

M. Michel Doiron:

Ce sont les cas les plus difficiles. À Saskatoon, le gestionnaire traite actuellement cinq cas.

(1655)

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord.

M. Michel Doiron:

C'est pour cette raison que nous n'avons pas affecté 100 gestionnaires de cas à Saskatoon. C'est la même chose dans tous nos bureaux. Ce sont nos agents de services aux anciens combattants qui gèrent les autres dossiers. Leur charge de travail est beaucoup plus lourde parce que c'est un service distinct.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Oui.

M. Michel Doiron:

Un employé affecté au PAAC peut recevoir un seul appel par année. Je parle du Programme pour l'autonomie des anciens combattants.

Par exemple, s'il y a un problème...

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord, c'est logique.

Combien de ces employés sont affectés à Saskatoon?

M. Michel Doiron:

Nous avons un gestionnaire de cas. Nous sommes prêts. Si la demande l'exige, nous en affecterons d'autres. À Saskatoon, nous avons six employés au total.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Merci.

M. Michel Doiron:

De plus, je pense que le personnel est au complet en ce moment à Saskatoon.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Merci. Vous avez répondu à ma question.

Le président:

Très bien. Monsieur Graham, vous êtes le suivant.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

J'ai plusieurs questions à poser. Je suis un membre assez nouveau de ce Comité. Le ministre Hehr a parlé d'environ 381 nouveaux employés et M. Brassard également a glissé un mot à ce sujet. Parmi ces employés, savons-nous combien il y a d'anciens combattants et avons-nous une idée du rang qu'ils occupaient au moment de leur départ à la retraite? Je suis curieux de savoir s'il y a beaucoup de simples militaires parmi le personnel ou si ce sont surtout des amiraux et des généraux qui obtiennent ces emplois.

M. Michel Doiron:

Je ne sais pas combien il y a d'anciens combattants parmi ces 381 employés. Je peux vous obtenir ce chiffre. Nous avons le nombre total d'anciens combattants à Anciens Combattants Canada. Concernant le rang, je peux vous dire que nous avons des officiers supérieurs, comme la contre-amirale et le général ici présents. Nous avons également un grand nombre de caporaux, de sergents et de sous-officiers subalternes et supérieurs possédant diverses compétences. Ils sont disséminés dans tout le ministère.

À titre d'exemple, dans mon service d'arbitrage, j'ai pas mal de caporaux et de sergents qui rendent des décisions. Il y avait des infirmiers et des médecins dans les Forces armées, bon nombre d'entre eux étaient officiers, mais pas tous. Nous embauchons des infirmiers ou des médecins lorsqu'ils possèdent les compétences requises.

Je vais essayer de vous faire parvenir le nombre exact de personnes que nous avons embauchées, mais je n'ai pas la liste détaillée des 381 nouveaux employés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour ce qui est des 381 nouveaux employés, j'aimerais savoir si une préférence est accordée à certaines compétences et certains rangs ou si tout le monde est vraiment inclus.

M. Michel Doiron:

Nous avons le nombre total d'embauches. Voulez-vous...?

Contre-amiral (à la retraite) Elizabeth Stuart (sous-ministre adjointe, Dirigeante principale des finances et services ministériels, ministère des Anciens Combattants):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Pour faire suite à la déclaration du sous-ministre ayant trait aux anciens combattants dans le centre d'embauche de la fonction publique, je dirai que nous avons formé une équipe à la fin novembre et au début décembre. Pour l'instant, elle reste très modeste, mais nous déployons une approche progressive pour favoriser l'embauche des anciens combattants dans la fonction publique. Le modèle de cette approche nous est d'abord fourni par Anciens Combattants Canada. Évidemment, le MDN a beaucoup d'expérience à ce chapitre, puisque les Forces armées canadiennes et la Défense nationale opèrent de façon conjointe.

Dans la prochaine phase de notre approche, nous visons à l'amélioration de l'embauche dans toute la fonction publique, puis à étendre nos activités au secteur industriel. Nous sommes également conscients de l'apport de nombreux organismes sans but lucratif et d'autres organisations dans ce domaine.

Depuis l'entrée en vigueur du projet de loi C-27, c'est-à-dire la Loi sur l'embauche des anciens combattants, nous avons constaté une certaine adhésion de la part d’anciens combattants prioritaires libérés pour des raisons médicales attribuables ou non au service militaire. La Commission de la fonction publique a pour mandat de recueillir des données sur ces anciens combattants, mais pour l'instant, il n'y a pas d'obligation de déclaration des embauches d'anciens combattants dans la fonction publique. Par exemple, à Anciens Combattants Canada, nous avons envoyé à chaque nouvel employé un sondage à participation volontaire. Il n'existe encore aucune obligation de s'identifier comme ancien combattant et j'imagine que certains préfèrent s'en abstenir, mais le sondage a permis d'améliorer la collecte de données.

Voici quelques statistiques. Depuis l'entrée en vigueur de la Loi sur l'embauche des anciens combattants le 1er juillet 2015, il y a eu 315 embauches prioritaires, dont 18 à Anciens Combattants Canada, où le nombre total d'anciens combattants qui se sont déclarés tels dans notre sondage s'élève à 115.

Nous travaillons en collaboration avec la Commission de la fonction publique pour tenter d'améliorer notre capacité à collecter des données sur les anciens combattants. Nous avons envoyé une lettre demandant l'ajout d'une question portant sur le service militaire au sondage des employés de la fonction publique.

Nous travaillons à différents endroits. Il reste encore beaucoup de travail à faire.

(1700)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je me suis joint au Comité au moment de notre étude du suicide chez les anciens combattants. Nous n'avons parlé que de cela jusqu'à maintenant. J'ai donc beaucoup appris en un très court laps de temps.

Un des fils conducteurs de notre étude est la perte de confiance des anciens combattants envers Anciens Combattants Canada au cours des 10 dernières années. Il faut dire ce qui est. Les énormes coupes budgétaires du gouvernement précédent ont causé beaucoup de dommages. Nous nous rendons compte que les anciens combattants ne se soucient pas des partis politiques. Ce qui se passe, c'est qu'ils ne font plus confiance au service. Ce n'est pas seulement une question d'argent.

Comment, de manière plus générale, reconstruire le lien de confiance avec les anciens combattants? Quelles sont les étapes à suivre pour y arriver? Quel chemin devons-nous emprunter?

M. Michel Doiron:

Monsieur, il y a beaucoup à faire pour reconstruire le lien de confiance. Nous faisons beaucoup de choses en ce moment. Nous organisons des réunions des parties intéressées où nous invitons des anciens combattants ou encore nos différents comités consultatifs. Nous consacrons beaucoup de temps à cela.

Certains d'entre nous président des comités consultatifs où les interactions avec les anciens combattants sont plus fréquentes. Les communications avec les anciens combattants y sont plus ouvertes et on tente d'expliquer les raisons derrière les décisions qui sont prises. Il arrive que la bonne réponse soit « non ». C'est dommage, mais c'est ainsi. Il faut alors expliquer pourquoi la réponse est non d'une manière qui permette à l'ancien combattant de comprendre.

Il y a encore beaucoup de travail à faire, parce qu'au cours des années — et vous m'excuserez de rester en dehors de la politique, étant donné que je suis un bureaucrate —, pour toutes sortes de raisons, la confiance envers les services a été minée. Nous travaillons très fort.

Il y avait une question au sujet de la formation. Nous donnons une formation intensive à nos nouveaux employés. Nous embauchons. Nous passons beaucoup de temps à former ces 381 nouveaux employés pour cultiver le sens du soin, la compassion et le respect.

Il ne faut pas oublier qu'Anciens Combattants Canada n'est pas...

On me dit de m'arrêter là.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen, c'est à vous.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci beaucoup. Heureuse de vous retrouver.

Je voudrais commencer par vous, monsieur Doiron. Lors de votre dernière apparition ici, je vous ai interrogé au sujet des agressions sexuelles dans l'armée. Vous avez dit: Nous avons travaillé en étroite collaboration avec It's Just 700. Nous prenons la situation très au sérieux. Nous discutons avec eux afin que nos arbitres comprennent mieux ce qu'est le traumatisme sexuel. Nos docteurs sont bien informés et nous travaillons avec eux pour publier quelque chose là-dessus sur notre site Web.

Récemment, nous avons entendu les témoignages d'autres organismes qui nous ont dit n'avoir eu aucune nouvelle depuis des mois. Allez-vous créer un espace sur le site Web d'Anciens Combattants Canada avec des liens et de l'information claire pour les anciens combattants aux prises avec un traumatisme sexuel?

M. Michel Doiron:

Merci de la question, monsieur le président.

Tout d'abord, nous avons discuté avec les associations. Je ne peux pas vous dire si mon directeur général de l'arbitrage a pris la parole au cours du dernier mois, mais en 2017 on m'a fait le compte rendu d'une conversation qu'il a eue avec l'une des associations. Des discussions sont donc en cours.

Nous avons donné à nos arbitres une formation sur le traumatisme sexuel. Ce que nous recevons, ce n'est pas un diagnostic de traumatisme sexuel. C'est un diagnostic de santé mentale. Il arrive que ce soit un diagnostic de blessure physique. La plupart du temps, c'est un problème de santé mentale. Nous avons formé nos arbitres pour qu'ils puissent identifier le problème et le signaler en cas de doute, afin d'offrir une réponse adéquate.

Je crois que j'étais ici en décembre. Depuis, nous avons renversé ou plutôt examiné des cas assez controversés et difficiles. Je ne veux pas entrer dans les détails puisque ce sont des cas personnels, mais ils présentaient de grandes difficultés.

En ce qui concerne le site Web, je ne suis pas au courant. Je sais que nous travaillions à y mettre quelque chose, mais je ne sais pas si c'est fait ou non. Je vais devoir vérifier cela. Je n'en suis pas sûr.

Le texte qui sera publié dans cet espace dira simplement que c'est quelque chose que nous examinons ou pour lequel on peut présenter une demande, mais qu'on ne peut présenter une demande pour agression sexuelle dans l'armée. Ce n'est pas une maladie. La maladie qu'ils ont est d'ordre mental ou physique. Il y a une panoplie de blessures, en fait. En travaillant avec le président de It's Just 700, nous en avons beaucoup appris sur les diagnostics que posent certains psychologues et psychiatres. Nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec eux pour examiner certains aspects du problème.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

J'aimerais savoir comment exactement vous établissez cela, parce qu'il me semble qu'un ancien combattant sait s'il a été agressé sexuellement et comprend que c'est effectivement une blessure, mais qu'il a besoin de savoir où trouver de l'aide. Si cela passe par l'intermédiaire du site Web, alors il doit pouvoir en faire usage de manière efficace.

Je vais passer à ma prochaine question. J'ai parlé à des anciens combattants le week-end dernier et ils m'ont dit se sentir encore très vulnérables à la fois au plan financier et en raison du problème du déni. Le simple fait de recevoir une lettre d'Anciens Combattants Canada peut déclencher une réaction de stress post-traumatique.

Que faites-vous pour recoller les pots cassés, sur le plan des communications avec les gestionnaires? Nous devons mieux traiter ces personnes. L'information se rend-elle jusqu'aux gens à la base, ceux qui travaillent directement avec les anciens combattants?

(1705)

M. Michel Doiron:

Il est toujours possible de faire mieux. Je crois que je vais commencer par là. Même si nous avons un taux d'approbation de l'ordre de 85 à 90 %, nous pouvons toujours faire mieux.

Avant que l'arbitrage se conclue par un refus, nous appelons la personne pour lui demander si elle peut nous fournir d'autres renseignements. Parfois, elle a les documents; elle ne les a simplement pas envoyés. Elle ne les croyait pas importants. Pour ce qui est de la lettre de refus, nous sommes au courant du syndrome de l'enveloppe. Recevoir un pli du gouvernement du Canada est traumatisant pour certaines personnes. Qu'il s'agisse d'Anciens Combattants Canada, d'une lettre d'impôts ou autres, l'effet est le même. Nous travaillons donc avec le bureau de l'ombudsman pour simplifier nos lettres.

Je dois dire qu'il y a encore place à l'amélioration. Nous devons continuer à travailler là-dessus. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, nous devons parfois répondre « non », quand le cas n'est pas lié au service militaire. Nous devons respecter la loi que nous sommes chargés d'appliquer. Il y a plusieurs histoires traumatiques, je le vois bien, mais en vérité, le service militaire n'est pas en cause... La Loi sur les anciens combattants stipule qu'il faut que...

Nous avons apporté des changements au cours des trois dernières années. Les anciens combattants ont maintenant le bénéfice du doute. C'est nouveau. Quand je suis arrivé, il y a un peu plus de trois ans, il fallait prouver que cela était dû au service militaire. Il fallait nous remettre un CF 98 qui disait qu'il y avait eu blessure. Nous n'en sommes plus là, maintenant. Faisons-nous toujours ce qu'il faut? Non, mais nous avons fait des progrès considérables. Aujourd'hui, selon votre métier, si vous avez des problèmes de genoux et que vous avez servi dans l'infanterie pendant 25 ans, nous répondrons favorablement à votre demande. Peut-être ne vous êtes-vous pas blessé au genou d'un seul coup en sautant, mais au bout de 25 années d'usure, l'articulation est détruite.

Nous travaillons là-dessus, mais nous envoyons encore des lettres de refus et elles ont un effet traumatique sur les personnes.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Lockhart, à vous la parole.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à tous de votre présence.

Selon le Budget principal des dépenses, il y a une augmentation des dépenses de fonctionnement de l'ordre de 60,3 millions de dollars. Nous avons produit un rapport sur les prestations de service. Je présume que vous l'avez lu. Au point de vue de la prestation de service, y a-t-il eu des actions concrètes découlant du rapport ou encore du travail que vous effectuez? Vous avez mentionné certaines choses. Y en a-t-il d'autres qui se reflètent dans ce montant? Peut-être que ce n'est pas le genre de chose qui nécessite des sommes supplémentaires.

M. Michel Doiron:

Merci de votre rapport. Oui, je l'ai lu très attentivement. Nous y apportons une réponse gouvernementale, mais comme je l'ai dit la dernière fois, j'étais plutôt content du contenu du rapport. Année après année, les rapports du comité des anciens combattants nous ont montré la voie à suivre. En fait, nous nous y référons parfois pour modifier les règles ou les lois.

Nous apportons constamment des changements. Le sous-ministre et le ministre ont discuté de l'examen des prestations de service. Il se trouve qu'il a eu lieu en même temps que votre propre examen. Nous donnons suite à cet examen qui vise à améliorer les services et la communication tout en développant une approche centrée sur les anciens combattants. Ce sont là des sujets qui font partie de vos recommandations. Nous faisons la même chose.

En ce qui concerne les 63 millions de dollars, peut-être que l'amirale souhaiterait prendre la parole.

Cam Elizabeth Stuart:

Oui, j'en serais ravie. Merci, monsieur le président.

Selon le Budget principal des dépenses pour le prochain exercice financier, les augmentations suivantes sont inscrites au crédit 1, dépenses de fonctionnement: 13,5 millions de dollars en frais d'exploitation courants pour le ministère; une augmentation de 60,9 millions de dollars dans les services et achats en soins de santé, tels que des lunettes, des soins infirmiers, des traitements médicaux et dentaires, des soins de longue durée, des remboursements de prescriptions; une augmentation de 13,5 millions de dollars dans les services de soutien de la Charte des anciens combattants, tout particulièrement pour les problèmes de réadaptation professionnelle et médicale. Nous constatons une diminution des coûts de l'Hôpital Sainte-Anne étant donné le transfert de compétences du gouvernement fédéral vers la province de Québec l'an dernier, ainsi qu'une légère diminution de 2,6 millions de dollars dans le cas du centre d'éducation de Vimy, puisque nos objectifs là-bas sont en grande partie atteints. Au total, on constate une augmentation de 61,4 millions de dollars par rapport au Budget principal des dépenses de l'an dernier.

(1710)

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci.

Nous entendons aussi parler du soutien aux familles. Pourriez-vous nous parler des changements ou des améliorations apportés à notre service aux familles?

M. Michel Doiron:

Oui, nous entendons aussi parler du soutien aux familles. Malheureusement, selon l'interprétation qui est faite de la loi, ces services passent principalement par les anciens combattants eux-mêmes. Nous devons respecter la loi. Cela dit, il y a eu le projet pilote des CRFM...

M. Bernard Butler (sous-ministre adjoint, Politiques stratégiques et Commémoration, ministère des Anciens Combattants):

Les Centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires.

M. Michel Doiron:

... les Centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires. Ils sont à l'essai à travers le pays et fournissent des services aux anciens combattants et aux membres de leur famille. Une ligne d'écoute 1-800 est aussi mise à leur disposition. Ils ont droit à 20 séances. Quand un ancien combattant souffre, c'est toute la famille qui souffre avec lui; nous en sommes bien conscients. Les cliniques de traitement du stress opérationnel sont très bien, mais souvent, les anciens combattants n'y amènent pas leur époux ou leur épouse. Les portes leur sont pourtant ouvertes, ainsi qu'aux enfants... Je discutais récemment avec un ancien combattant dont l'enfant souffrait d'un traumatisme en raison du traumatisme du parent. Nous avons des programmes.

Le programme de soutien aux aidants naturels a été créé il y a quelques années pour donner un peu de répit aux aidants. On ne parle pas d'une somme d'argent énorme, mais, à tout le moins, les aidants qui apportent des soins en continu peuvent se reposer un peu. Je crois qu'il reste beaucoup de travail à faire au plan familial. Nous en parlons beaucoup parce que nous savons qu'en aidant la famille, nous aidons aussi la personne.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Un autre point qui a été abordé en témoignage est la pratique qui consiste à rembourser les familles pour des services tiers. Est-ce là quelque chose qui est considéré? On dit qu'il s'agit d'un obstacle pour les familles.

M. Michel Doiron:

Voulez-vous répondre à cette question?

M. Bernard Butler:

Pardonnez-moi. Nous parlons de remboursement pour des services de quel type?

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Pour des services tiers. Il pourrait s'agir d'un camp d'équitation ou d'autres choses du genre. Ce sont des services fournis par une tierce partie.

M. Bernard Butler:

Monsieur le président, je vous remercie de la question. Je peux parler de ce sujet de manière générale, en abordant les programmes de soutien auxiliaire de ce type.

Comme vous le savez probablement déjà, nous menons un projet pilote de thérapie équine. Nous considérons aussi la thérapie canine, des choses du genre, au fur et à mesure que les décisions officielles nous donnent les assises nécessaires pour continuer. Comme l'a dit Michel, nous tentons actuellement de personnaliser nos programmes afin qu'ils soient davantage centrés sur les anciens combattants et non sur les programmes eux-mêmes.

Au point de vue des programmes, il est parfois beaucoup plus aisé de passer par une entente de contribution, en demandant les reçus et beaucoup de factures. La nouvelle approche que nous considérons consisterait à faire en sorte que le plus grand nombre de programmes possible reposent sur des subventions, ce qui serait à l'avantage des combattants comme des familles. Il s'agirait de rationaliser notre approche afin de diminuer le fardeau administratif qui pèse sur ces gens et de leur garantir un accès plus rapide et plus efficace aux services.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Je suis ravie d'entendre cela. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci. Voilà qui conclut notre série de questions. J'aimerais vous remercier de votre présence ici aujourd'hui et de tout ce que vous faites pour les hommes et les femmes de notre pays.

Sur ce, je dois demander que nous votions le Budget principal des dépenses. Comme nous avons peu de temps, nous allons aller de l'avant.

D'abord, nous allons voter le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) 2016-2017: ANCIENS COMBATTANTS ç Crédit 1c — Dépenses de fonctionnement..........65 448 828 $ ç Crédit 5c — Subventions et contributions..........69 400 000 $

(Les crédits 1c et 5c sont adoptés.)

Le président: Voulez-vous que le président rende compte de l'adoption des crédits 1c et 5c du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) 2016-2017 d'Anciens Combattants Canada à la Chambre des communes?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Nous voterons maintenant le Budget principal des dépenses 2017-2018. ANCIENS COMBATTANTS ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de fonctionnement..........931 958 962 $ ç Crédit 5 — Subventions et contributions..........3 728 239 000 $

(Les crédits 1 et 5 sont adoptés.) TRIBUNAL DES ANCIENS COMBATTANTS (RÉVISION ET APPEL) ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme..........9 449 156 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté.)

Le président: Voulez-vous que le président rende compte de l'adoption des crédits 1 et 5 du Budget principal des dépenses 2016-17 du Tribunal des anciens combattants (révision et appel) à la Chambre des communes?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Merci.

M. Bratina propose une motion pour que la séance soit levée. Tout le monde est en faveur?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Merci beaucoup. La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

acva committee hansard 30062 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:43 on March 08, 2017

2017-03-06 ACVA 45

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody.

I'd like to call the meeting to order. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) and the motion adopted on December 29, the committee is resuming its study of mental health and suicide prevention among veterans.

For the first hour, we have Roméo Dallaire, retired lieutenant-general and senator; Scott Maxwell, from Wounded Warriors; and retired Brigadier-General Joe Sharpe.

We'll start with a 10-minute witness statement and then go into a round of questioning.

Good afternoon, gentlemen. Thanks for appearing today. The floor is yours.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire (Founder, Roméo Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and ladies and gentlemen, for receiving me in these opulent surroundings. I could barely find my way around the place. I'm very glad for you, in fact. It was high time that it was done. So well done, for bringing you the ability to work with a certain quality of life with your staff to achieve your missions.

I will read a short statement. I hope it's short, or I'll do as my Marine Corps friends have taught me: I'll power talk through it.

I have two colleagues here.

Joe Sharpe and I were intimately involved in the writing of the Liberal Party policy on veterans and have been engaged with veterans for over 10 years in specifics and policy, and also individual cases and the like, and 10 years before that, with the deputy minister at the time, Admiral Murray. He had an advisory committee, chaired by Dr. Neary, who wrote the book on the first Veterans Charter, dated 1943. We spent 10 years working together on that multidisciplinary team. We were also classmates from RMC—but he passed.

Scott Maxwell is the executive director of Wounded Warriors Canada. I am the patron of Wounded Warriors Canada, which, by far, to me, is the body of altruism and philanthropy that is putting so much of its capabilities into the field in the hands of those who are wounded—mostly psychologically. I speak of programs such as animal assistance programs, the equine program, and the veterans training program that we run out of Dalhousie University with my child soldiers initiative, where we train veterans to go back into the field and serve by training other armies on how to handle child soldiers and reduce casualties on the sides of both the child soldiers and us. They take a formal one-month program with us at Dalhousie. We can go into that as we go into the possibility of programs.

I'm going to use as a reference, if I may, my correspondence with the commander-in-chief—that being the Governor General—when I was a senator in the post-time, when I had a number of activities going on with him—his wife was also quite involved—in regard to care and concern for injured veterans, particularly with psychological injuries, as they are quite engaged in that side. I want to use it to give you a feel from there as we move forward.

I'll start by thanking you very much for permitting me and my colleagues to join you today on this matter of suicide prevention in the Canadian Armed Forces and amongst our veterans, both those who serve in the Canadian Forces still—and a large number do—and those who have been released and are in Canadian society. I commend your commitment to the welfare of these individuals and their families, and I am honoured to share my thoughts on how we can make more progress in finding solutions to this problem of people killing themselves because they're injured.

As I mentioned at other times, both publicly and in different forums, I had assembled over the years a team of advisers from diverse backgrounds and with deep knowledge of both the forces and Veterans Affairs. This group of advisers worked to develop policy recommendations and advocacy tools that have allowed us to maintain a well-researched and well-informed outlook on the issues facing our military—especially those who have, in fact, taken the uniform off—particularly related to operational stress injuries. I emphasize that I'm not necessarily always touching on all of mental health; I'm focusing on the operational stress injury part. That is the crux of those who are injured. That is the heart of the problem. That's the operational deficiency that we are seeing right now.

(1535)



Some of those who are involved—just to get their names out there because they've been so committed—are Sergeant Tom Hoppe and Major Bruce Henwood, both retired; Dr. Victor Marshall; Mrs. Muriel Westmorland; Joe Sharpe, who is here with us; and Christian Barabé. Over the years, they have all been engaged with me in bringing forward the veterans scenario and have also helped me when I was chair of the veterans affairs subcommittee in the Senate.

Our research, thought, and work have led us to the conclusion that operational stress injuries, OSIs, in particular, can be and are too often fatal to those affected. Also, the consequences often last a lifetime for those who do not succeed in trying to kill themselves. From peer support organizations in the past, we've had statistics showing that peers have been able to prevent a suicide attempt a day, through the peer support program, let alone the more formal structures of the medical system.

Of course, this includes the devastating consequences for the families and those affected by OSIs. It is my belief that a comprehensive, whole-of-government approach that is engaged with society can bring significant solutions to this crucial problem of people destroying themselves, and bring them to meaningful progress instead, and, in the long run, give them a decent way of life.

The mental health of veterans and current members of the forces, and also with Veterans Affairs Canada, is a continuum that has been presented as a clinical matter with very little involvement of the overall command structure, that is to say, the essence of what people are used to living, their cultural framework, which is a chain of command and a very structured way of life. The clinical and therapeutic and medical dimensions have taken over the problem of OSI, but have also taken over the potential resolution of conflicts that would bring people to ultimately destroy themselves. The chain of command was left on the sidelines, so it was impossible for it to know what was going on. They would get troops coming back to their units with no information on their state of mind because of confidentiality or not being able to work around the access to information system or the individual's privacy rights in regards to the charter.

Using that to the extent of abuse has disconnected the chain of command from the injured, which is totally contrary to all the education we've received in command. I spent my life in command, from a platoon or a troop of 30, to the 1st Canadian Division of 12,000, in peace and in war. The command is like being pregnant. You are in command all the time, while you have a command function. It's day and night and then, when the baby's born, you're still there, just like in command. Whether you're in garrison or in operational theatres, you cannot divorce the chain of command from the ultimate responsibility of ensuring the well-being of the individuals and the command structure to ensure that the families are integrated within that support structure.

I repeat: the families must be integrated into that support structure. It's not about co-operating with the families or assisting the families, but about integrating them into the operational effectiveness of the forces. Why? It is because the families live the missions with us. In my case, I came back injured. I was thrown out of the forces injured. My family was injured. It wasn't the same family that I had left behind because the media make them live the missions with us.

Therefore, if you employ any of these policies that don't totally integrate families, including policies from DND or the Canadian Armed Forces, for veterans serving, veterans out of service, and through Veterans Affairs Canada, you're going to end up with some of the statistics I mentioned—though still anecdotal.

(1540)



I was at the last military mental health research forum in Vancouver presenting a paper in which we argued that the families suffering from stresses and strains, families where individuals are suffering from mental health issues, and the individuals involved are not getting the support needed. We're now seeing teenagers who are pushed to the limit in these conditions of extreme stress and who are committing suicide. We have not only the individual members, but we're also now seeing family members who can't live with what they've seen, and in fact are committing suicide.

It is essential that we identify the early warning signs of psychological distress, and that we encourage members to seek help through support programs offered by the military, by Veterans Affairs Canada, by outside agencies like Wounded Warriors Canada and the veterans transition training programs we have. These programs give them gainful employment close to, as much as possible, their background. Why try to convert a person completely when you can build on a person? Why not find gainful employment in, around, surrounding, contractually or otherwise, what veterans have grown up with, what they have given their loyalty to, namely, the armed forces? The uniform is off, but we wear it underneath, and we wear it in our hearts. Why divorce them from that? Why not find programs that bring you much closer?

I'm going to curtail this because of time. My presentation is only to indicate that there are initiatives moving forward. Certainly, the January 2017 CDS strategic directive on suicide prevention has to be the best piece of work we've seen in a long time. He makes it clear that the chain of command is the essence of prevention. However, when you start reading the nuts and bolts, you will see that the medical people have put their finger into the pie and are, I would say, watering it down. What they're supposed to be doing is supporting the chain of chain of command, not creating the chain of command.

I will leave you with the following recommendations so that there is enough time to speak. My colleagues will amplify these and they are free to respond to your questions. I hope you will feel at ease with that.

First, the Canadian Armed Forces directive on suicide prevention strategy has to be funded, implemented, and validated. If necessary, go to what we used after Somalia. Create ministerial oversight committees that report to the minister. We did that for nearly three years. I was ADM of personnel at the time. For three years we had six oversight committees that reported every two months to the minister on how we were implementing this kind of stuff. There's nothing wrong with the political oversight getting closer to the actual implementation when you have a crisis like this.

As for the Veterans Affairs suicide prevention framework and strategy, I haven't seen it. I don't know if it's written. It had better be out there. It is critical, because they have veterans who are outside of the forces, and they have a whole whack of veterans who are inside the forces. That is critical, and it should be funded and implemented.

The third leg of that strategic focus is what is called the Canadian Forces-VAC joint suicide prevention strategy. That's where we want the two departments to come together. Certainly, in the DND one, that's what they articulate. It's what the CAF wants. I haven't seen that one either. That one is going to prevent people from falling through the cracks. That's going to permit the continuum. That's where the loyalty is not lost and where people will continue to commit.

That third strategy has to be out there—implemented, evaluated, but also validated, six months, eight months down the road. That validation has to be of such a nature to hold people accountable. That's why I come forward again with the recommendation that in these oversight committees by the minister there's nothing wrong with bringing that online and helping out.

(1545)



I think the recognition of casualties caused by operational stress injuries has to be advanced at Veterans Affairs Canada to the level of the 158 who were killed overseas or any of our members who were killed in action. If we prove that an operational stress injury has caused the death an individual, that individual is part of the numbers. We didn't lose 158. We're up to 200-some-odd now. So why not use that number?

Imagine having somebody come back for four years and then losing them. After four years of striving and working hard to save them, you lose them, and you get nothing of any great significance. You don't even get recognition, apart from a medal.

Now that you've moved Veterans Affairs Canada into the military family resource centres, move the families and help the families through those centres too. Reinforce that capability. It's used to taking care of families. Let them take on that angle for both Veterans Affairs Canada and for CAF, because they're already doing it.

Finally, give them gainful employment as close as you can to their history, to their loyalty to the military or military milieu. Why try to change them at a time when they're already in crisis?

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll start off the first round of questioning.

We'll start with Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

General, thank you very much for your service and your commitment to this very important issue.

I'd like you to expand a little bit more, if you can, on the chain of command. Can you give us some suggestions as to how we can juggle the challenge the chain of command has? Really, your conversation today is probably the first time we've had someone here at our committee speak about the conflicts between the chain of command and mental illness, the actual clinical presentation. Can you give us some ideas on how we can bring these two together?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

I'll let my colleagues also intervene.

The immediate response is that the chain of command must be informed. As regards confidentiality, there's no negating that, but you can't let people be handed over to another body, even to the joint support units they were moved to, or sometimes moved back to the unit from. The unit commanding officer, who's responsible for the life of those individuals in the field, is also responsible for command back home. You can't just throw them back without giving them information. They have no idea how to handle them, because they don't know the scale of the injury the individual has.

We all have doctors in our regiments, in our units. Unless there's a means by which those doctors can provide that input, and by which that input can be moved down to the lowest level without offending, but on the contrary, reinforcing, the individual's return, you just have a bunch of walking wounded in a unit. People don't know what the hell to do with them. That isolates them more, and it pushes them more toward wanting to, maybe, end it.

A voice: I agree.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire: Joe?

(1550)

Brigadier-General (Retired) Joe Sharpe (As an Individual):

I would repeat the point that General Dallaire made earlier, that this is a leadership issue, not a medical issue. I think that is a refrain I would come back to over and over again.

Stovepipes, if I can use that term, create barriers to care. That is a major concern here. To use the 2015 numbers, 13 of the 14 suicides in 2015 were by people who had sought care within a year prior to committing suicide, 10 of them within 30 days of committing suicide.

There's a leadership message here. There was an opportunity to intervene, and I think it's an information flow that creates that barrier. Once a member transitions into Veterans Affairs, that's another stovepipe. It's another barrier. It's another obstacle to getting to the bottom of this.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

We're hearing an awful lot about barriers, and that's the biggest thing. There are a number of barriers. Here is another one that we see, or that I'm seeing at least at this point, with the chain of command. As a clinician, myself, how do I protect my Hippocratic oath in dealing with the chain of command? So I appreciate your comments.

General Dallaire, you very briefly touched on the issue of child soldiers. Obviously, that's an important issue. We were both at the CIMVHR conference together. I came away from that conference with a statement that resonates with me to this day. It's basically that what happens to soldiers oftentimes is a violent contradiction of moral expectations. As we deal with the issue of child soldiers, which potentially we could be stepping into again, we realize it's a huge conflict for a lot of our soldiers.

I'm wondering if you could comment on that. I know there's a strategy that's been presented—

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Yes.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

You've been involved with that.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

We've been working for two years with the Canadian Army, in particular, and with NATO. We've been in Africa getting research because my institute, the Roméo Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative, based at Dalhousie University, is field focused. We train armies and police forces in countries to send them—military and police forces—into conflict zones.

We were able to influence the content of the Canadian Army by being the first army in the world to formally put into its new doctrine.... Doctrine is a reference from which you deduce tactics, organization, equipment, and the training you need to do the job, the mission. By creating that doctrine, it is now leading the world in formally recognizing it. We are going start implementing the training of trainers to then bring that forward.

This doctrine is particularly important because there isn't one conflict in the world that is not using children as the primary weapon system. The children may be nine years old, 10, 12, 13, 14, or 15. Every one of those conflicts creates not only an ethical but a moral dilemma for the members. That's what blows us further....

We always thought it was the ambush or the accident that was the hardest point. The hardest one is the moral dilemma and the moral destruction of having to face children.

A sergeant came to me in Quebec City, where I live. He looked good and spoke of five missions, and things were going well. I asked him what his job in the battalion was, and he broke down right there in the middle of the shopping centre. He couldn't talk. He stammered, and he was weak-kneed and crying. I took him aside and so on, and he said, “I was in the recce platoon, and my job was to make sure the suicide bombers didn't get to the convoys”. He said, “You know, I've been back for four years, and I still haven't hugged my children”.

We are taking significant casualties because we don't know how to handle child soldiers. This doctrine will move us a long way that way, and we'll be part of the training program.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Lockhart, go ahead.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Thank you, gentlemen.

Thank you, General, for your service and for being here today to answer our questions.

I want to talk about a quote that I read from your book, Waiting for First Light. You said: No one recognized what I was doing at the time. Not even me. Nobody told me I was injured. I didn't think I was injured, though I felt the weight of having had to ask to be relieved of command. Outwardly, I was still committed, determined, stable. Inwardly, the stresses I was imposing on myself were beating me down, piling up on the stresses at work.

Is there something that Veterans Affairs can do to intervene at this point in a soldier's life and a soldier's mental state that could prevent or stop the progression from this state to suicide?

(1555)

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

With mental health—and particularly the operational stress injury side of it—you are facing an injury that gets worse with time. If you lose an arm, you know that you've lost it, so the aim is to try to build a prosthesis that will be as effective as possible. If you don't intervene with the same sense of urgency an operational stress injury by recognizing it first and then providing for it, it gets deeper and more difficult to get at and to resolve.

It took four years before I crashed. I lost one of my officers 15 years afterwards and having been treated. So there is a vacuum of how to get at them so that they don't continue to walk around as if they're not injured, without there being a stigma there.

We thought we had broken the stigma by having a veteran armed forces—and we did until not so long ago, but now have a lot more non-veterans in there. We're living what we lived in the fifties. In the fifties we had a lot of veterans, but we had a lot of non-veterans, and there was friction between the two, and they would say, “Oh, I wouldn't be injured like that”. We didn't recognize operational stress injury, so those guys simply drank themselves to death or got out. They were the rubbydubs who died on the streets because we had abandoned them. The exception was the Legion, which did help a lot, but there was also a lot of alcoholism.

We lack the ability to discern them early and to then follow it through in a progressive way.

The first time I went out for treatment, I was given eight sessions. I've been in treatment for 14 years. I still have a psychiatrist and a psychologist. I still take nine pills a day. It keeps me like this.

There are moments, though, like last week. My book was launched in French, and it was catastrophic. Writing those books is like going back to hell. There is no real value to me, but I hope it will be useful to others.

You have to find a way because you need to prevent the injury from getting worse—not just recognizing it, but preventing it from getting worse. Unless you get in there early, it's going to get worse.

Mr. Scott Maxwell (As an Individual):

I think there are two things or two competing problems we see at Wounded Warriors Canada. On the one hand, you have the frustration when you're talking to someone who has graduated from one of our programs and you talk to them about their injury.... Here, I just want to add to the general's comments that the vast majority of injuries—when they're comfortable to tell us when they occurred in their mind—happened through an interaction with children in some way, shape, or form.

Second, it commonly took them eight to 10 years after that injury, or the action that caused the injury, before they sought or receive the help they deserved. You can imagine a life like that, the impact on the family of those eight to 10 years before they attempted to deal with their injury.

On the other side of that, a further problem we see after we write about their need to come to get help, to self-identify, to reach out peer to peer, is that because it's a much more commonly understood topic to be discussed and more people are more comfortable coming to get help to address it, we are receiving more and more people seeking help. The problem now is if they do come forward, programs like ours now have wait lists of up to two years. We have a severe access problem in Canada. That is one thing and it's very nice and all well and good if they come forward to seek help, but when they don't get it, you can imagine what that can do to their mental state and overall health care and the impact on their families.

There's a lot at play here and it's extremely serious.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you.

I think that pretty much is my time, but that was great. It was wonderful.

(1600)

The Chair:

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you very much for being here. We appreciate your expertise and candour, because this is very important.

We need to get to the bottom of this. We have heard so much and got so much information from veterans that is contradicted by experts or people from VAC or DND, it's frustrating and renders our ability to do the right thing questionable. I want to get down to some brass tacks.

I was with veterans on the west coast over the weekend. They told me that of course they're masking and denying their injury because to admit it means that they're out, that they will be on the outside of a brotherhood or sisterhood, a family that they need to stay connected with.

They also told me that members within the Canadian Forces are suicidal too. It's not just when they're thrown out. They're suicidal too, but all of that information is being managed and they're transitioned out so that if they are going to commit suicide, they're not in the Canadian Forces. They're on the outside and DND doesn't have to account for those deaths.

All of this is frustrating. I'm sure there are various opinions on this, but the point is that the trust has been broken. These were angry veterans and they talked about the triggers, the mountain of paperwork, the fact that they were financially insecure. They left without pensions or financial supports and they didn't know what to do and they felt that the only way out was to end it all, that they were of no use to their families, and they were either hiding in somebody's basement or they were lashing out.

What do we do? It's a catch-22. How do we re-engage those veterans? How do we re-establish that trust?

General, you talked about this study. Is that study available to us, the CDS study, the strategy you talked about? Is that available to us?

You also talked about things that should be happening with mental health and you don't know where they are. All of this combines to make us wonder what is going on, where are the support services, and when can we expect that there will be a genuine response that meets the needs of these veterans.

I know that that's a lot and there's not really a question in there, but please respond.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Brevity is not my strength either, so don't worry about it.

Let me put it this way first. We have articulated after years of working on it that unless there is an atmosphere within Canada and the Canadian people, and within government circles—and I speak of parliamentary circles too, which seems to be there, but also within the bureaucracy, which doesn't necessarily seem to be there—such that you feel a covenant, not a social contract because that means you've negotiated stuff, just like the current Veterans Charter….

I'm the one who in a day and a half pushed it through the Senate and I've regretted it ever since, because it didn't reflect the 10 years of work we had done before. It was a bureaucratic piece to try to save cash and it hamstrung the minister with all kinds of regulations. That is a new phenomenon in legislation. Before there weren't many, but now they're throwing a whole whack of them with legislation.

That new Veterans Charter doesn't need a new one. It needs a significant reform. In there you will find in the reform a lot of the answers these guys and girls need in order to get the appropriate responses and a timely response. Until you hit that target deliberately, you're going to have a problem.

The only way you can convince people to go that far is if you actually believe that there's a cradle-to-grave responsibility, not to the age of 65, not with a reduced way of life, but an actual covenant that they have committed themselves to unlimited liability, recognizing that they've come back injured, that their families are being affected, and that some of them are dead and their families are obviously affected, and then you've got them for life.

If you don't sell that, then you will not gain their trust. I'll tell you, it started right rotten with the Gulf War syndrome. We did everything to prevent them from getting anything. Every lawyer in town, every medical staffer, gave us arguments why we couldn't take care of them. That undermines the operational commitment of individuals. Do I want to get injured? It undermines also the families, and they're the ones who are creating a vacuum of experienced people because they're pulling their spouses out.

(1605)

The Chair:

Mr. Eyolfson.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

I'm sorry, Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

No, no. Thank you. I'll come back.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you so much for your service and coming here today and talking about suicide. It's an important issue. We have something in common with that. I practised medicine for 20 years and it is a problem in my profession. My medical school had three suicides in a 15-month period while I was a resident. I'm sensitive to professions where this happens.

One of the other things we have in common is that there's a stigma involved in seeking mental help. There's a place in hell for the person who said, “Physician heal thyself”. A lot of damage has been done by that attitude. Soldiers probably deal with that as well.

We do know that there's always a hesitancy to step forward, a stigma of being seen as weak, of not having what it takes. Do you think the stigma of PTSD has been reduced in the military since when you were serving?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

I'm going to let Joe speak more about that, but I wish only to indicate to you that I consider myself in—because I have a psychiatrist and a psychologist. I'm getting care and I have some peer support. I don't hide it. If you were a doctor who took care of me because I had cancer, I'd talk about you, and I'd say he's a dummy, or he's a very good doctor, I like him, and so on, but we'd talk about those doctors. Why don't we talk about our psychiatrists and our psychologists? They used to in some of the films of the early seventies.

We've got to make that just as honourable as any other injury, and making it honourable will destroy that stigma. We are now seeing friction on the stigma coming back, which we thought we had pretty well with a cultural change, which Joe speaks of, by the non-veterans who feel that, with these very Darwinian, very visible type of people the military are, or any first responders, anybody in uniform—police, fireman, and so on—there's this inability to accept what you can't see. If you can't see it, you can't accept why they can't be 100%.

That, you've got to educate and train.

BGen Joe Sharpe:

I'll just add a very quick footnote to General Dallaire's comments.

We were talking earlier today about a young soldier I was working with on Thursday last week, a young corporal, who was telling me very candidly that he suffers from PTSD and is being cared for, but he said, “Sir, you're hearing all the right words from the senior leadership in the organization.” It's an honest commitment coming from the senior leadership of the Canadian Armed Forces. This young lad is an infantry soldier in the process of being released. He said, “On the ground, the sergeants and the warrant officers do not believe a word of that. To them, it's purely BS. If you come forward in your platoon or in your company and ask for help, you are a weak link, and they don't want you there.” That's Thursday of last week that this was described.

Is the stigma gone? Absolutely not. The stigma is still there, but it's because we focus very, very strongly on changing that immediate behaviour. If we caught you, from a leadership perspective, badmouthing these guys, we're all over you. We're worried about behaviour, and we didn't really focus at the belief level that we really needed to focus at, and ultimately to the cultural level below that. It's a long, tough battle to change the culture. I think we were focusing on behaviour, not beliefs and not culture.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

The only other point I'd add is, not from those still in the Canadian Forces, but those who have released and are forming the civilian veteran population. With them, I think things have improved a little bit with regard to the stigma. They're obviously already out so there's a lot less risk, but there's more comfort in talking about their situation. They're comfortable to put themselves out there in a very, very vulnerable position, often among their own peers. It's happening all across the country. As I mentioned earlier, our problem is expanding access to programs, not trying to find ill and injured people to come into our programs. I think that certainly highlights that there is some progress being made for those who have released and for the veterans on the civilian side of the world to come forward, put their hands up, and seek help. There's a little bit of optimism there. The downside, of course, is we've have to make sure we can help them when they come forward.

(1610)

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you so much, General, Mr. Sharpe, and Mr. Maxwell for being here today.

I want to preface my comments by saying that on Friday night in my riding of West Nova, I was at an event in support of the military family resource centre at 14 Wing Greenwood. It was an excellent event to bring awareness to the issues of mental health and PTSD within our military and veteran community and to raise funds for the military family resource centre.

I was glad to hear you talk about how families can access military family resource centres and how this should be expanded to include veterans' families as well. I wonder if you can expand on that. I know the good work that they do. How do you see that actually taking place? How would it work within DND expanding those services?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

The VAC has signed an agreement now with the Canadian Forces that we can take care—I say “we”, there you go, proof—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Hon. Roméo Dallaire: —and I say that after 10 years in the Senate—of injured veterans who are no more in the service, and their families.

I would consider that family support centre is one of those pivotal bridges they can cross, and survive, into a new world. The family support resource centres have a lot of the expertise and have access both provincially and locally, let alone within the military and within VAC, to influence the battle and get people more timely support.

However, they're hurting because the money is not going there and they can't hire and veterans can't then get that special support. The horrible scenario that I think is still unresolved is that we are improving the individual members, the forces members who are still serving, and we're improving the case of the veterans who are out there with our different clinics and so on, but we're not improving the case of the families.

You have one half of the problem solved; the other half is not, and that half is hurting. It's going to drag down everything you're doing. Until you look at the family as also deploying.... I would argue that the days are now here when the family is part of the operational effectiveness of the forces, and not just in support of the operational effectiveness of the forces. They're on Skype with them an hour before they go on patrol. Come on, how is it possible to disconnect them?

If the family is intrinsic to the operational effectiveness of the forces, they should have access to the same level of care. That means, yes, more money into VAC and more money into DND to take care of the families. We're already transferring a whack of money to the provinces. We're telling the provinces that we're going to clean up our own mess. We created these injured people and we're going to take care of them. We'll buy the resources from you instead of simply dumping them and having that very serious disconnect.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Yes, Mr. Maxwell.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

I think the other part of it is that they're great hubs, they're physical locations, and they're places for people to go and have that peer-to-peer support.

I would caution, though, that like anything, the issue is so vast and the scale is so large that not one agency, not one MFRC, is ever going to be able to do this on their own. We confront this all the time at Wounded Warriors Canada. If we fund a program, if we make a $375,000 donation to a program to run the program across the country, that's wonderful. However, there are limitations on the ability to help people and get them all in. The goes for MFRC.

One of the things we're working with, and we talk a lot about in this space, is partnerships. We're working with military family services, which administer MFRCs across the country, to allow MFRCs if they identify a couple—in this case, supporting families—to attend one of our programs, to have those costs covered from the referral from the MFRC to a program administered by Wounded Warriors Canada.

You can see how fast this would multiply and duplicate on a national scale, so you don't have this regionalized framework where something is very good out there somewhere, and less so in Esquimalt or wherever the case may be. We have to focus on making sure when we're having these discussions that its implementation is national, because that's where the population is. It's in every corner of the country.

(1615)

Mr. Colin Fraser:

I think you're right. I appreciate that comment. It's really important to recognize that in smaller communities, having this vehicle can be the way to reach out in the community. A trusted facility like that is really important.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

And we wouldn't get them on our own. Let's face it, if we want to run a program, how do we identify the people who need help? We use the likes of OSISS and MFRCs, and we partner with them and military family services more broadly.

You're absolutely right: it's about partnership and linking the information and the tools and ultimately the programs together so if someone does walk into an MFRC and they could benefit from X program, which might not be administered within that MFRC, then at least the MFRC is able to get them the program they deserve to receive.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

My time is very limited.

Do you see as well, though, the importance of the family being involved and integrated into the mission is also to ensure that if there is an intervention, it will perhaps be made earlier on? You've got somebody there who can maybe spot some challenges a soldier is facing and maybe be able to identify the problem earlier.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Mr. Fraser, you've pulled one of the gems out of this.

If the family feels they are intimately engaged in the operational effectiveness of the forces, they will feel that sense of responsibility of helping the member understand that's part of the exercise of that member re-becoming operationally effective or being adjusted to some other worthy sort of employment.

Right now, you will have members fighting their families to not get support, whereas if the family were integrated into the program, they wouldn't be able to do that; they would be reinforcing each other to get that help. There's the ick; that's the crux.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Wagantall.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, CPC):

Thank you very much for being here today. This is so helpful.

I want to focus specifically on your first comment regarding the Canadian Armed Forces suicide prevention strategy and how to implement it with ministerial oversight committees. You mentioned Somalia.

I'm very involved with our veterans on the issue of mefloquine. We are still hearing from the powers that be that only one in 11,000 forces members is affected. Our own Minister of Health, as recently as February 22, has written with respect to the continuing use of mefloquine that as a malaria prophylaxis, the department considers the benefits of mefloquine to outweigh its potential risks under the conditions of use described in the CMP.

I'm hearing from veterans from Somalia, Rwanda, Uganda, Afghanistan, and Bosnia who have been taking this that they did not have freedom of choice with its use. Our allies—Germany, Britain, Australia, and the U.S.—have taken steps, and yet our government still doesn't recognize what happened in Somalia and has carried on. It's impacting suicide rates. I know this what I'm hearing directly from veterans.

Can you please talk about this?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

I was on mefloquine for a year. About five months into it, I wrote the National Defence Headquarters, and I said this thing is affecting my ability to think. This thing is blowing my stomach apart. This thing is affecting my memory, and I want to get rid of it. At the time, the Germans weren't using anything, but then when we lost two people in 48 hours to cerebral malaria, they changed their policy.

I then got a message back, which was one of the fastest ones I have ever got back, which essentially ordered me to continue, and if not, I would then be court-martialled for a self-inflicted wound because that was the only tool they had.

Mefloquine is old-think, and it does affect our ability to operate. Those statistics to me don't—

(1620)

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

They are not accurate.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

—really hold water. Even if it they do, what if it's the commander who's affected by it, which I was at the time? My executive assistant kept an eye on exactly how I was handling mefloquine. There are other prophylaxes that are much better.

Just on the command side, let alone on our ability to respond to the very complex scenarios in which we find ourselves, when you're facing children and so on, and you have nanoseconds to decide whether you are going to kill a child or not to save other people, we don't want to have any booze, and yet maybe we're still being affected by a drug.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

What do you say then? Should we be doing studies to determine—

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

I say get rid of it, and use the new stuff.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Thank you. That's the faster route I would love us to take.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Yes.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

One of the groups that is helping veterans, Veterans Helping Veterans, talked about the need for us to deprogram. We program soldiers. I understand the fight or flight, the get out there attitude, that you think of the other person before yourself, but when you come home, you don't know how to sleep in a normal pattern. Yet, they claim this could be reprogrammed, that you can recreate a proper sleep pattern, with proper food, etc. All of those things are so crucial to health.

I know you have struggled deeply with sleep. Is this something you see as an avenue that could be taken to help our soldiers?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

I was about to respond by saying, “Read my book”, but I'm not going to say that.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

I haven't done it yet. Sorry. You can tell.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

The difficulty is that when we come back, we're trying to go to sleep in a bed and in an atmosphere that is foreign to us. It's foreign to us because, and I came back and the slaughter of a million people or so didn't count. I was back as deputy commander in the army, and I was told, “Thank God, you're back. You've had your time overseas. Listen, the priority now is the budget cuts.” It was as if it didn't happen.

There is a disconnect in our ability to know that those people exist, know that we haven't finished the job, and know that there have been horrible scenarios played out. Then we come back, nobody gives a damn, and nobody really recognizes.

We have a horrible time adjusting to the opulence, to the pettiness, and to the nature of our societies. What keeps us from being able to handle it is our fatigue, our inability to reason. What does that is the lack of sleep.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Yes.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

We can't get to sleep because this stuff keeps haunting us and keeping at us. If there are programs to do that—I know there are all kinds of initiatives—fine, but I would argue that we're into two major cultural frictions that are not easy to come to an arrangement with.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Bratina.

Mr. Bob Bratina (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Thank you, and thanks, General Dallaire.

The problems we deal with on the veterans committee originated with the period of active service, so I was impressed with your notion of the joint suicide prevention strategy. Obviously, two different groups are going to have to be working together in order to solve the problems. What would you see in that joint suicide prevention strategy? Are there any guidelines that you're anticipating?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

In 1998, when I was the assistant deputy minister of personnel, or what they now call CMP or HR, I was able to work out a deal with the ADM, a chap called Dennis Wallace at Veterans Canada, to second a general to Veterans Affairs Canada and create the first joint discussions. Our computers weren't working together—nothing like that worked. We couldn't even talk to each other. So we created a simple office where people had the veterans' files on the veterans affairs side and the forces' files on the other side, and a case would come in and they'd talk to each other and solve it.

There have been a lot enhancements there, but I don't believe it has gone far enough. I don't believe people are comfortable being handed over to another department. I'm glad it's in Charlottetown. People are still very human and not as clinical as Ottawa would be, so you're not treated as a number. And I think that's okay, but the fact that it's a separate department and the fact that you're being moved away.... Take my uniform off, but don't divorce me from the family. Don't move me to somebody else who has a different culture, in maybe a different atmosphere, who's running from a different set of gears in regard to rules and regulations.

I think it is time to look at those countries that have moved their veterans departments over to their national defence departments. They have their budget lines and they have their structures, and they're not tripping over each other. The client is not handed over to somebody else. The client is still in the family. You can do a lot of informal resolution. You can bring a different angle to some of the directives. With the Minister of National Defence versus the Minister of Veterans Affairs, you can give more power to getting in-cabinet changes done, I think, because it has a direct impact on the operational effectiveness of the forces. If you don't treat the injured veteran right, the guy or girl who's going over will realize that if they come back injured they have to fight the second fight, and that's coming home and trying to live decently. If it stays within the structure, you can be very candid and far more accountable.

(1625)

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Thank you.

I wondered, going back to the issue of culture and stigma, what role does a chaplain play?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Oh, what a wonderful question. At my child soldiers initiative, we discovered that the threat is obviously to children. During the course we ran last summer for 15 veterans—and we've already deployed some of them to train in Kenya with the Somali people—two of them came forward and said they had killed children. They had never told that to a therapist, never told that to their family, never told that to anybody, but they told it to these guys around them because they were going to be involved with children. They suffered that.

I think that the ultimate pursuit you're looking for is engaging them in...here's where my memory is shot. You take over.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

Did you say it's the chaplain?

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Yes.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Oh, yes, it's the chaplains, the spiritual side of this thing. We've talked about the moral side. Our moral weaknesses come from the fact that we don't have a spiritual side left, yet in theatres of operation many of those countries still have a spiritual side. It's not purely religious. It's cultural. If you don't have a spiritual side to fall back on, then you're falling into a vacuum, and that makes your recovery that much more difficult. So the padres are very proactive and very effective, I think, in the field, and they're a second chain for resolving problems.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

Yes, our national program director has just retired after 25 years as a Canadian Forces chaplain with a combat engineer regiment in Toronto. Through working with him and with Wounded Warriors, I've interacted with a whole bunch of members of the forces he has assisted over the years. At his Depart with Dignity ceremony especially, I met dozens of them, and we were talking about just that question. What was it about Phil, in this case, that was so helpful?

It was almost, within the regimental family, a place to go if you didn't want to go up the chain of command or tell any of your superiors anything about anything, because you just weren't sure how significant the problem was, or if it was even worth mentioning. It was a safe place within the regimental family to go and at least have that first point of discussion with someone you weren't fearful of, and you didn't fear any repercussions for saying something or asking a certain question.

It had a tremendous impact on how things went for them, from there on.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

I take General Dallaire's point.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Yes.

BGen Joe Sharpe:

I'll make one very quick comment on this one.

The Chair:

Could you just make it brief, please?

BGen Joe Sharpe:

Yes. I visited a major army base to interview the padres about their role in dealing with PTSD and OSIs. Fourteen of the 16 padres on that base had been diagnosed with PTSD.

So if we're going to use padres—and we need to, as they're a critical part—we have to take care of the padres as well. It's not a “physician, heal thyself” approach.

(1630)

Mr. Bob Bratina:

They must carry a lot, absolutely.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC):

Five minutes, Mr. Chair?

Thank you. General, it's good to see you again. We saw each other in Barrie at the opening of the École secondaire Roméo-Dallaire. I know the students, staff, and board members were thrilled that you took the time to be there for the opening of a school in your name, so thank you, sir.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

I'm putting all my artifacts there too.

Mr. John Brassard:

I think I had to speak French the whole time I was there.

I want to talk about transitional issues, because we build our soldiers up to fight but we don't—for lack of a better term—break them down to re-enter civilian life. The issue of transition has come up a lot during the testimony. In fact, the DND ombudsman talked about a concierge service for those who are being medically released, to make sure that everything is in place. In fact, this committee issued a report to Parliament reaffirming what the DND ombudsman had suggested.

Scott, I know you were on CP24 three years ago, and you were asked about the issue of transition then. In the short time that we have, if I were to ask all three of you to list three priorities for what we need to do to help with the transitional stressors for those who are transitioning out of the military back into civilian life for the sake of their families, what would those three priorities be right now?

Scott, I'll start with you.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

I wholly support the DND ombudsman's report and recommendations. I have said that publicly for far too long, it feels now, going back to that time, and obviously he has since produced new recommendations.

Mr. John Brassard:

He refers to it as a low-hanging fruit opportunity.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

It really is. One of the things in talking about this—and he also references it—is that it's not necessarily a cost change. It's more of a process change. I think that's accurate. If you're going to have the two departments—if it's not going to go the way the general just suggested, despite the fact that maybe it should go that way—we ought to ensure that when forces members are leaving, when they are releasing from one department to the next, that everything we can possibly prepare in advance is done. We ought to ensure that the transition is as smooth and soft as possible, because we know in working with this population that it doesn't take much for them to stop doing things that are going to be beneficial for their well-being, to shut down, and to isolate themselves from everything, including their own well-being.

We see it and hear it far too much. We're an organization that looks at and identifies gaps and tries to fill them. One of the biggest gaps we see continuously is the release gap, the time between departments, where they lose their identity. Their identity is in constant struggle, and they just feel that they have to retell their story too many times to too many people who simply do not care enough to give them the service support and the process support that they require to help them deal with all the questions they're receiving at home from their families, like “what's next for you and us and our life?”

It's serious, and all I can say in short is: adopt the DND ombudsman's recommendations. They do represent low-hanging fruit, but I think it's a very important basis from which to start.

BGen Joe Sharpe:

There are a couple of points I would make very quickly. They're very similar to Scott's.

Close the gap. It's a big deal. We've got to bring these two departments closer together, and I think we've got to stop removing the membership from the individual who is leaving. In other words, once you're a member of the Canadian Armed Forces, you remain a member of the Canadian Armed Forces. What we do now is take the cards and cut them up, and you're on your own. You're a different thing.

We've got to remove that transition shock of being rejected from the family, if I can use that term.

Mr. John Brassard:

Right.

BGen Joe Sharpe:

Secondly, we have to reduce the bureaucracy, the complication of that process of transitioning. We're not going to another country; we're staying in Canada. We're simply transitioning to another government department, but the horrendous bureaucracy that surrounds that transition process is mind boggling—if you're healthy. If you're ill and injured, it's a barrier that's almost insurmountable.

Lastly, I would say remove all the barriers to that transition. Seriously study what constitutes barriers to the member and to the member's family, and target those barriers and get rid of them. We don't need the complication that we have now.

Mr. John Brassard:

General, the last word is to you.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Get out of the weeds and take a strategic perspective of it, meaning that if we inculcate in these people, from the day they enter, a sense of loyalty to their service.... My Dad told me I entered a service. He said, “Don't expect anybody to say thank you. Expect an interesting career. You'll never be a millionaire.” And in those days, he said, “Change your name to Dallard, because with Dallaire, you'll go nowhere.” But anyway, that's changed.

Take the high road of remembering that loyalty does not disconnect because of the extraordinary experiences we live, and our interwoven lives; it's there forever. That's the covenant, to serve. And so if it is a covenant, then get rid of these two ways of handling the same problem. I was a veteran serving. Then I was a veteran non-serving, and I went into a whole different set of circumstances—I was not needed.

Part of the strategic perspective is looking at two departments with different regulations for helping the same individual during the same lifespan, or nearly the same.

Secondly, don't build a new charter, but as I've often said in-house, build one based on the covenant of a reformed charter. Get rid of so many of the stupid rules.

And yes, it's going to cost you more. Well, look at the billions we spend in training these people; the billions we spend in equipping them, giving them the ammunition, the food, the medical supplies; the billions we use in getting them into the theatre of operations and doing everything to reduce casualties and win the war, which we do in humongous amounts of money; and then the billions we spend in rebuilding and replacing the equipment and restocking ourselves; and then look at the amount of money we are actually spending on the human beings that have gone through it. It is the most gross disconnect that you can imagine.

Veterans Affairs at $3 billion is inappropriate. It is absolutely inappropriate compared to the scale of the commitment we're putting into every other dimension except the actual human being.

That is the strategic position that should be taken.

(1635)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen, for three minutes.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

I need so much more, but I'm going to—

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

So do we.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I want to go back and underscore everything you've said, because that's exactly what we heard.

This is for you, Scott, and you, General Dallaire. You said that you were in this horrific situation, and you came back to this superficial life where there was no understanding of your experience. How do we change that? How do we make sure that when that member comes back, there is recognition of that experience and what happened out there in that deployment?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

The crux of that, particularly with reservists, who are all over the countryside and often abandoned.... Remember, this only gets more complicated when you're talking about reservists. It shouldn't be, but it is.

I think the crux is linking them to family. That's your anchor.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

For a reservist who's single, it would be his parents. They're part of the forces. And if he's married, it's his intimate family or close family and so on, his children. Bring the human side back to these individuals so they can build on that, and then work from there. We've lost a lot of people because they lost their families and there was nothing left. It was not just losing a job. They lost their families because of that, and they killed themselves because of that.

Try to keep that fundamental element of our society with them, and help them go through the years of difficulty of living with a person like that.

It's based on family, and the tool to make the family available is the family support centres. There is no better expertise than them.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

The one thing that General Dallaire has often talked about in relation to our work is to ensure that they never have to fight again. That is such a powerful line. If they feel as though they are fighting again when they come home in order to access everything that is available to them and their families, it's a huge problem.

When we talk about removing that feeling and how you do that, well, how about starting by making sure they don't have to fight again for everything they are entitled to upon returning from deployment in service to Canada?

(1640)

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay.

You said something very important, that they tried to save the cash. I have that feeling over and over again, whether it is with the new Veterans Charter, with mefloquine, with the Gulf War syndrome.

This committee some years ago did a study on Gulf War syndrome, and we had mountains of evidence that it was all in their minds, that it was not real, and yet we had veterans coming in without hair, with very clearly disoriented perspectives.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

We could have given them $70,000, and add to that the fact that we recognize it's an injury. Even if we can't figure out all the legality of it, and even if some of them are going to rip us off, who gives a damn?

What it would have changed would have been the whole attitude that the troops feel regarding coming back injured. If you're undermining their getting injured, you're going to undermine their operational effectiveness and their taking the appropriate risks, and you're undermining the ability of families to handle them when they do come back.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It's the same feeling with mefloquine.

I asked directly if troops were advised, if they were monitored, and if anyone took care to know what the effects of these drugs were, and the answer was no. I asked if there were any repercussions for someone saying they choose not to take this drug, and it was, “Oh, no, it comes through the chain of command.”

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Well, the chain of command will charge you because you're doing self-inflicted wounds because you're going against medical advice that the chain of command has accepted.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Even though they were guinea pigs.

The Chair:

That ends our time for testimony today by this panel.

We will take a short break.

On behalf of the committee, I'd like to thank all three of you for your service, for what you have done for our men and women who have served.

We'll have a two-minute break and we'll come back to the second panel.

Thank you.

(1640)

(1645)

The Chair:

I call the meeting back to order.

In the second hour we're going to have to condense a bit of time on this.

We have, from the Quebec association for suicide prevention, Kim Basque, training coordinator; and Catherine Rioux, communications coordinator.

We'll start with 10 minutes of witness testimony.

Roméo Dallaire is going to stay here, probably not to answer questions. He just wants to see how the committee works together.

We'll start with our new panel.

Thank you. The floor is yours. [Translation]

Ms. Catherine Rioux (Communications Coordinator, Association québécoise de prévention du suicide):

Mr. Chair, members of the committee and Mr. Dallaire, we want to begin by thanking you for inviting us to participate in this consultation. We know that the Canadian Armed Forces and Veterans Affairs Canada are already working on mental health and suicide prevention. We thank you for your interest in going even further.

For 30 years, our association has been advocating for suicide prevention in Quebec. It brings together researchers, responders, clinicians, survivors of suicide loss, as well as private, public and community organizations.

Our main areas of activity are education, citizen engagement, and training for responders and citizens. As you can see, our association has no military expertise. Our appearance before the committee today stems from our experience in advising various community stakeholders and developing prevention strategies for a wide range of settings. We did that recently for agricultural producers and for detention centres.

How do we reduce the number of suicides among our veterans? What we all know is that there is no simple answer and that a multi-pronged approach is required. The few approaches that we could propose during this hour and that we feel are essential have to do with education, training and the services provided.

I will begin with education, or cultural and mentality changes.

Thanks to repeated awareness-raising campaigns, mentalities have started to change on the issues of suicide and mental health. Taboos are less entrenched and are starting to fade. Unlike 10, 15 or 20 years ago, suicide is no longer seen—or is less so—as inevitable and as an individual problem. People are more aware that it is a collective problem and that prevention is possible.

People talk more about their mental health issues and asking for help is more valued. We have come a long way in this area, but there is still much work to be done. That is why we are here today.

We have a few suggestions to make with regard to education. We are convinced that it should begin with proactive education of active armed forces members, especially those who belong to units at higher risk of suicide, such as combat trades.

There are all sorts of initiatives. For instance, we may be talking about strengthening the cohesion around an individual who is experiencing difficulties or is separated from their unit for health reasons. There are messages reiterating that taking care of our mental health is just as important as taking care of our physical health. There are also campaigns promoting existing help resources.

We must also work on reducing the social acceptability of suicide. That acceptability appears to be stronger among men who conform to the traditional male role. Certain therapeutic approaches are aimed at reducing that acceptability and manage to make suicide less acceptable and to highlight the fact that, by finding other ways to put an end to their suffering, they can become models for their children and models of resiliency for their community.

We firmly believe that suicide must not be an option, on an individual or a collective level. That is why we support messages to that effect inviting people to find other ways to deal with their distress and suffering.

We also believe that, as part of education, society should avoid glorifying individuals who have died by suicide, since that involves a risk of contagion. To avoid that, the media must be educated. I know that is being done already, but the message must constantly be repeated, as newsrooms and journalists are always changing.

(1650)



We must also educate people in charge of ceremonies when a death by suicide occurs, as well as grieving families. That is a very delicate thing to do, but we must pay attention to that if we want to save the lives of suffering veterans. Some practices can have consequences, such as the erection of monuments honouring military members who died by suicide. We see them as a real risk to veterans who are suffering, who are vulnerable to suicide and who have lost a tremendous amount of recognition and value. Those veterans could see suicide as a way to regain some honour and recognition. Let us be clear: appropriate funeral services must be provided for military members who have taken their lives, just like for military members who died of other causes, but attention must be paid to the potential glorification and contagion aspect.

Ms. Kim Basque (Training Coordinator, Association québécoise de prévention du suicide):

To properly evaluate the services and training to be provided, we have to understand the suicidal individual's state of mind.

All suicidal individuals, be they military members or not, believe that they are worthless, that their situation will never change and that no one can help them. In that context, it becomes extremely difficult to seek help, to find it and to take a step toward a resource. It is even more difficult for men who conform to the traditional male role, where physical strength, autonomy, independence and solving one's own problems are valued. For someone who is going through a difficult time in their life when they think that they are worthless, that no one can help them and that the situation will never change, all those obstacles make it extremely difficult and painful to seek help.

However, in spite of their suffering, the individual will always feel ambivalent. This means that a part of them wants to stop suffering, and that is why they think about ending their life, but there is always a part of them that wants to live. That is the part that must be recognized by the individual in distress, and it is the responders' and professionals' job to help that part grow. Every time a suicidal person asks for help and shows their distress, the part that wants to live is expressing itself and continuing to hope.

As for many veterans—who are generally men—the characteristics of their way to seek help must be taken into consideration. That is true for suicide in general, and it is also true in the armed forces. A call for help will not manifest in the same way, and the way services are provided to them must also be adapted.

Research shows that, when a man conforms to the traditional male role, he is five times more likely to attempt suicide than a member of the general population. In the armed forces, a medical release is a failure of the system, but it is also a failure for the man who finds himself in a vulnerable situation. As that perception is generalized within himself and within his unit, he feels shame and has difficulty seeking help, as we were saying. Therefore, going from active military service to civilian life and becoming a veteran is a critical moment when the vulnerable soldier loses the strong and unified network with which he identified and participated in. So that will be an extremely difficult moment that must be anticipated and monitored, and that is why this consultation is important.

As you know, many services are provided by Veterans Affairs Canada. However, is sufficient training provided for the professionals who work in suicide prevention, the responders to whom our veterans can turn? Are they able to recognize signs of distress and act quickly?

A training initiative for Quebec citizens has a proven track record. “Agir en sentinelle pour la prévention du suicide”—acting as sentinels to prevent suicide—is a training initiative that is intended not for professionals but for anyone who wants to play a role in their community, in their spare time, with their work colleagues and their peers. It enables people to be proactive, identify signs of distress, refer the individual to help resources and go with them. That training works. It is effective and has already become entrenched in some military communities. It promotes timely identification and proactiveness.

In civil society as in specific communities, those sentinels must be able to rely on a designated responder. They must be supported in order to play their role and then be able to quickly help the suicidal individual connect with a responder who will provide a full intervention and decide what steps should be taken next.

(1655)



Suicide prevention training is essential for responders and mental health professionals, as well as for physicians who work with military members and veterans. It should not be taken for granted that a physician, a nurse or a psychologist has received specialized training in suicide prevention. However, that type of training does exist, and it works.

The Quebec male suicide rate decreased significantly in the 2000s specifically thanks to a national strategy with training at its core. So we suggest that you make training a cornerstone of the next strategy for veterans.

Furthermore, we want to draw your attention to three major elements to consider with regard to the current services provided or with regard to what you could implement. General Dallaire referred to this earlier. I am talking about the importance of streamlining the services available to our active military members and veterans. That transition must go as smoothly as possible, so that, ultimately, the suicidal individual or military member who needs services, having successfully asked for help and found someone to help them and guide them in that endeavour, does not have to change responders or treatment teams and does not have to repeat their story, either before or after a suicide attempt.

To avoid that disconnect, we suggest that you consider a consolidation of Canadian Forces operational stress injury treatment centres and veterans centres, so that the treatment team would be the same. The therapeutic alliance is important. Veterans sometimes even go back to the same team and health professionals they dealt with when they were in active service.

We also talked about social support. General Dallaire mentioned that. We are talking about social support from families and peers, but also about support from the unit, as well as gathering around the forces and active military members. That support must be an integral part of care and of what professionals and responders propose to military members.

Men mainly turn to their spouse—sometimes exclusively—when they need emotional support. A separation occasionally occurs when they are not doing well. There may be additional problems, including mental health issues, alcoholism and substance abuse. All that puts considerable pressure on loved ones. That is why it is so important to take into account this reality in order to help military members and veterans recover.

The Canadian Armed Forces are a large and strong family. Each member can count on the others for their survival. The idea is to make sure that this strength and mutual support continue after release, whether that release has to do with medical issues or not.

In addition, we make recommendations when it comes to web-based prevention and online responses. Distress is increasingly manifesting on various platforms. People share their suicidal ideas and their distress on the web. That is especially true in the case of young people and isolated individuals, but that behaviour is becoming more prevalent among a variety of individuals. We feel that suicide prevention strategies must now take into account this reality by including a web component. That would enable people to share prevention messages, identify cases, be proactive and propose full response services online.

In closing, I want to reiterate the required elements of an effective suicide prevention strategy. First, all the stakeholders are concerned. Second, managers at various levels of the chain of command must undergo training, uphold the principle and demonstrate leadership. Third, professionals and responders must be provided with specific suicide prevention training. Fourth, the creation of sentinel networks must be supported. Fifth, strong and widespread social support must be established. Sixth, people must be provided with better education on mental health issues and be better informed on the help that may be provided. Calls for help must be encouraged to ultimately change cultures and mentalities. It is also important to pay attention to the messages and ceremonies, so that they would not increase the social acceptability of suicide. Of course, adequate funding is required to implement the proposed measures. Finally, accessible care adapted to the clientele for which it is intended is obviously required.

(1700)



Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll start our first round, and we're going to have to shorten it to five minutes each. I'm sorry about that.

We'll start with Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[Translation]

Thank you very much, Ms. Rioux and Ms. Basque.[English]

I appreciate your coming here. That's the limit of my French.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Robert Kitchen:: You both said something that caught my ears, and I've got a very short period of time because I'm going to share my time with Ms. Wagantall.

Ms. Rioux, you commented on the need to avoid glorifying death by suicide. Can you expand on that? What do you mean by that? [Translation]

Ms. Catherine Rioux:

By using suicide to put an end to their suffering, a military member may receive honours, attention and recognition. That is what I call suicide glorification. We can glorify the deceased individual or pay tribute to them, but it is important to separate that from their act of suicide. A military member must not think that committing suicide will give them more honour than another soldier who died of a heart attack or another cause would get. Contagion must be avoided, and people must not end up thinking that it's a way to get recognition from the Canadian Forces and society.

(1705)

[English]

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you.

There's that stigma. There's that challenge, that disconnect with the stigma for somebody who maybe has attempted to take their life because of depression, or situations, or whatever it might be, which often gets labelled. Someone says, okay, you're not worthy of anything. I'm trying to wrestle that with your comment about glorifying it and whether someone would actually look at glorifying that, but I appreciate your comments.

Mademoiselle Basque, you talked about suicide prevention training. How extensive is it in your organization? [Translation]

Ms. Kim Basque:

It is an extremely important aspect of our organization. The AQPS designs training products with major partners such as Quebec's Department of Health and Social Services, as well as with other organizations with data expertise. We have to be inspired and learn from the research to give our responders and fellow Canadians an opportunity to develop tangible skills that will enable them to play a role in suicide prevention.

The AQPS currently has about 20 different training products. We have trained more than 19,000 responders to use best practices and clinical tools that help them recognize proximal factors of suicide. There are 75 factors associated with suicide, and some carry more weight than others. Some factors are observed very closely when action is taken.

Thanks to the expertise we have acquired and the tools at our disposal, we are improving our responses to ambivalent suicidal individuals to help them reconnect with their reasons for living.

The sentinel training is developed based on a similar model, while of course respecting the role and responsibilities of volunteers in their community. That training will give those people the tools they need to determine if there is suicidal ideation, be aware of resources and guide the suicidal individual toward those resources, as that is often a difficult step for them.

Our training products are complementary and aim to strengthen the safety net around suicidal individuals. [English]

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you very much.

I hope I've left enough time for Ms. Wagantall to ask questions.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

As you know, we recently brought into law in Canada assisted suicide and assisted dying legislation. Since then, 800 individual Canadians have chosen that route. With its coming into play, I was very concerned about our veterans, our soldiers, who feel that life isn't worth living anymore and who might see that as an affirmation. In the work that you do, are you seeing a difference at all in response to this? [Translation]

Ms. Kim Basque:

It is too early to take stock of the situation or obtain relevant documentation on medical assistance in dying.

That said, we are extremely worried about this. When that legislation was developed, a few years ago now, we participated in the consultations of the parliamentary committee of the Quebec National Assembly to share our concerns with regard to a potential shift in the social acceptability of suicide.

A person at the end of their life feels, rightly or wrongly, that their life is no longer worth living; that is their decision. That is why they want to request medical assistance in dying, resulting in their death. Even in a medical context, we understand why people would want to use that measure.

Our concerns had to do with a way to provide a vulnerable individual who is not doing well—who feels that their suffering is intolerable, who is depressive and suicidal—the same care they should have the right to, without legitimizing a request for medical assistance in dying in a context where it would legally not apply.

We are extremely worried by that. At this time, it is too early to gauge the concrete and documented effects of medical assistance in dying.

(1710)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you for your answer.

Mr. Graham. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you for your comments.

You spoke a lot about training. In the veterans context, I would like to know whom we should train.

Ms. Kim Basque:

The health care teams should receive specialized training to be able to intervene in a complete way and properly receive the veterans, taking into account the fact that the request for help from military men does not always present in the same way. Those teams should also use precise clinical tools, as well as ensure follow-up and access to services and resources.

The networks of sentinels we referred to could also be proposed. These sentinels have to be volunteer adults who are already in a role where they have the trust of the person, who can open up and agree to talk about his troubles. The sentinels cannot be members of the health care team. They really have to be people who are involved with the veterans and can have access to them, even if they are not specialists.

If I may, I'd like to make a parallel between veterans and the agricultural milieu. We have created massive sentinel networks there, and we even set up training specifically for the agricultural environment. Agricultural producers are often isolated, and they aren't necessarily part of a network. That said, there are still people who gravitate around them and see them, because they provide services. Those are the people who are trained as sentinels to reach out to farmers.

You could think of setting up a similar system for veterans, that is to say assess where they go, who they see, who they are in contact with regularly in their daily lives. Those people can become sentinels, if they want to, of course. Indeed, that cannot be an obligation. The training of intervenors is central to all of this. The sentinel must himself have access to support and be able to direct the suicidal person to an intervenor 24/7.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So we could train family members and other military members.

Ms. Kim Basque:

Yes, if the military person is not suicidal himself and if the family itself does not need care and support.

Those close to suicidal individuals have other needs and have to obtain care. They cannot act as sentinels in these extremely difficult moments in their family life. They have to take care of themselves and the other members of the family and know how to support the spouse who is not doing well. We try to avoid training loved ones, especially when they are going through difficult times. Of course at other times, that is possible.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You also spoke about avoiding the glorification of the death by suicide of military members.

Earlier we spoke with General Dallaire about the need to include war-related suicides in war deaths.

How can we reconcile those two approaches?

Ms. Catherine Rioux:

Would you repeat the question? I want to make sure I understood.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We want to avoid glorifying suicide of course, but we also want to recognize veterans who committed suicide because of mental injuries they suffered through their participation in war. We want to acknowledge them, but not glorify suicide. How can we align that?

Ms. Catherine Rioux:

Of course they must be recognized as victims who fought. There is indeed a certain risk involved. Certain suicide prevention workers are worried about that parallel; it is a complex question.

We recommend that you take some time and speak with experts on this issue. There are several in Quebec, such as researchers like Brian Mishara. Some intervenors who work in the army are also specialized in this.

We don't have all the answers, but we think it is important to look at this question and find good potential solutions in order to avoid glorification.

Ms. Kim Basque:

A nuance needs to be made. Of course you have to collect useful information on the suicide of soldiers and veterans, in order to understand what could have been done to prevent them, and put in place proper services. However, in paying tribute to a person who committed suicide, we must not send the message that we are also paying tribute to the way in which he or she ended his suffering. Nor should we conceal the fact that services needed to be offered to that person, and that a security net needed to be placed around him in order to prevent his act.

That concern exists everywhere. Following a suicide, we talk about post-intervention. That consists in asking ourselves what can be done for the family members and friends, peers and environments who have experienced the loss of one of their members. We are always concerned by the way in which people who have lost a loved one wish to pay tribute to them. We don't want this to send a message of glorification, and we don't want the tribute to be disproportionate. We worry about the risks involved in emphasizing how the person died, that is to say the fact that they committed suicide.

(1715)

[English]

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

I was just asked to reinforce that, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

You'll have to make it very quick. We are running on gas here.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Before they commit suicide, the option is to have a system of recognizing them as being injured honourably. If you have a solid way of showing that they've been honourably injured, just like we take care of the guy or girl who has lost an arm or a leg, and they feel that they've been honourably recognized in that way, then you have an equilibrium with those who simply have gone the other route. If you only try to recognize them because they've committed suicide, I agree entirely with them. The onus is on the prior recognition of an honourable injury that they've received and that we've treated them honourably and that their regiments and so on have done the same. Then you have established a balance.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Go ahead, Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

I'm glad that you made that point, General Dallaire, because PTSD is an injury that has debilitated a veteran in some way.

You talked about people in combat suffering this injury, but we know that PTSD can strike those who are not in a combat role. I'm thinking particularly of a statistic that we received from StatsCan's 2016 survey that found that more than a quarter of all women in the military reported sexual assault at least once during their careers.

Have you looked into military sexual assault—it's not just women, but men too—as an underlying issue with regard to PTSD during combat or non-combat situations. [Translation]

Ms. Kim Basque:

To my knowledge, the cause and effect link has not been well established, as is the case for other types of difficulties. I certainly do not want to minimize the effects of sexual assaults, that are horrific both for women and for men, but we can make someone fragile who is not, and make someone who is in distress even more fragile.

Suicide is complex. The factors that make people vulnerable to suicide are also complex. There is no single cause for suicide. I don't know if there are specific data showing a link between sexual assault and the suicide of military people. [English]

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay, thank you.

I wonder if mental health workers should play a more central role during the transition of a veteran. Would a stronger presence of mental health workers make that transition easier, underscore the value of the veteran, and provide recognition that their mental problems are understood by DND and VAC and that there is compassion? [Translation]

Ms. Kim Basque:

We suggest that the same health care team follow the veteran, whether he is an active member of the military or a veteran released from the Canadian Forces because of the state of his or her health. Of course that would help the transition. Ultimately, it would in a way eliminate that transition. The same health care team would take care of the same member, whose needs would evolve. Since the request for assistance continues to be fragile among male military members, it is important that it be received with an eye to its particularities. You have to continue to build the trust that was created, rather than changing the caregivers.

(1720)

[English]

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

We know and have heard over and over again how important families are to the overall well-being of the veteran. To what degree does your organization interact with family members? I'm thinking not just about how they support and help the veteran, but also how they survive themselves.

In previous testimony, we heard there's an increase in suicide among the children of veterans, which is very troubling. How do you interact with families? [Translation]

Ms. Kim Basque:

Our association does not provide services to citizens who are not feeling well. We have suicide prevention expertise, but we work with several partners who offer clinical services, such as in the suicide prevention centres. Our expertise takes that into account.

In Quebec, the way we intervene has changed. A few years ago, for instance, we mistakenly believed that the fact that the person who was feeling troubled phoned for help himself meant that he would be easier to help. But no research has shown that recovery is easier if the person asks for help himself. What we know about suicide in fact makes that assumption all the more inappropriate.

In Quebec, we have adapted the services provided so that we can provide assistance to family members who ask for help, and of course we support them when they do so, when they express worry over someone else. The services offered by the suicide prevention centres and the integrated health centres take that reality into account. [English]

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I think this is a very important thing. In Ontario you have to reach out for help yourself. A family can't do it for you. It's extremely frustrating.

You talked about the tools and the outside agencies. We've also heard that there's a real sense of a military family. Are you finding—

The Chair:

I'm sorry, we're out of time.

We will have next, Mr. Fraser.

Thank you. [Translation]

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I thank our two witnesses for their presentation, and for having come to speak with us about this highly important topic. The information you have shared with us will be very helpful to our committee.

You spoke about the importance of families and people close to the members in these situations. Can you tell us how, when suicide is a risk, it would be possible to intervene earlier with the help of families and friends? How could we rally these people around the veteran in such situations?

Ms. Kim Basque:

Suicide prevention is everyone's business, but it is also the business of the loved ones of the suicidal person. Suicidal people always give clues about their distress. People don't always pick them up. We don't always have access to the total picture. Every individual has a piece of the puzzle, and it is when you assemble all of these pieces that you can understand what state the person is in, what needs have been expressed and what signs of distress we should recognize.

As for the care that needs to be provided to the suicidal person, the family has privileged information. The resources and care we can provide to the loved ones will also help them to get through the crisis, to play their role properly and to become a bit more solid.

(1725)

Ms. Catherine Rioux:

They have to be aware that there are dedicated suicide prevention lines that exist, for instance in Quebec. A Canadian suicide prevention line will be available soon. Pilot projects are being set up. That line will be for the civilian population, but also for military members and loved ones. Indeed, the families are sometimes grappling with enormous issues, they can be worried and in a state of extreme vigilance. So it is important to let the families know that these resources exist and that they can be supported by suicide prevention specialists.

In a suicide prevention strategy, post-intervention is extremely important. If we prepare a strategy we have to think about post-intervention mechanisms. What do you do after someone commits suicide? How do you announce things? How do you protect his environment, his colleagues and his family, among others? We can do prevention work with those people, who are in fact more likely to commit suicide themselves after someone's death.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

It is important to include such people in the process. Indeed, the sooner you intervene in a suicide situation, the better the outcome.

Is that correct?

Ms. Catherine Rioux:

Yes.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Ms. Basque, I believe you spoke about online services in connection with your organization.

Based on your experience, can you tell me whether persons in crisis use online services? Perhaps they will not communicate by any other means. This is new for some veterans, but it is a modern means of communication. Do you think some people will only use online services?

Ms. Catherine Rioux:

Yes, we do. Experiments were conducted all over the world. Some of them were in Canada, but I would say that we are not very advanced in this area. In Quebec we lag behind in this regard. Certain tests have shown that the Web allows us to reach other types of clientele, for instance people who would not go to meet caregivers or who would not use the telephone to ask for help. As we were saying earlier, that is the case for people who are more isolated. Young people today also communicate very little by telephone.

We can offer other means of interaction, such as text and online chat. In certain countries, there are online interventions. In this way we can establish a first contact and then speak on the telephone to create a therapeutic alliance. That can be done online, remotely. For some people it is less intimidating. They will open up more and can choose how often they want to be in touch.

There are all kinds of models that exist currently. In Quebec, the Centre de recherche et d'intervention sur le suicide et l'euthanasie, CRISE, is devoting a lot of effort to studying that.

In short, there are things to explore in this area but unfortunately, we are lagging behind. This lag not only pertains to the military, but also civil society.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Kim Basque:

We have to provide the services suicidal people need where they are. If it is the Web, we must be present on the Web. If it is on the phone, we have to be present on the phone. If they are in a physically isolated location, but are nevertheless in touch with someone once a week, that person has to be vigilant and encourage them to request assistance.

Ms. Catherine Rioux:

After someone commits suicide, people often discuss the death and express their distress and their disarray on social networks. This is distressing for suicide prevention workers, such as the people who work in schools. People don't know exactly what to do. There are potential solutions that can be proposed. We have to put something in place in order to allow those workers to identify the people who are the most vulnerable in these discussion forums and social networks.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Unfortunately, that ends our time for testimony today. I do apologize.

I'd like to thank your organization and both of you for all you do for our men and women who have served.

Also, if you would like to add anything to your testimony, please send it to the clerk, who can then get it to the committee.

With that, I will adjourn for one minute sharp and we will then have about five minutes of committee business. I apologize to the committee that I do have to keep you afterwards. Everybody who doesn't need to be here can leave and we'll start the committee business in one minute.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent des anciens combattants

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Neil Ellis (Baie de Quinte, Lib.)):

Bon après-midi, tout le monde.

J'aimerais déclarer la séance ouverte. Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement et à la motion adoptée le 29 décembre, le Comité reprend son étude de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide chez les vétérans.

Pendant la première heure, nous recevons Roméo Dallaire, un lieutenant-général et sénateur à la retraite, Scott Maxwell, de l'organisme Wounded Warriors, et le brigadier-général à la retraite Joe Sharpe.

Nous allons commencer par entendre une déclaration de 10 minutes, puis nous passerons à la période des questions.

Bon après-midi, messieurs. Merci de témoigner devant nous aujourd'hui. La parole est à vous.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire (fondateur, Roméo Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative):

Merci, monsieur le président, et mesdames et messieurs, de me recevoir dans ces lieux opulents. J'ai eu du mal à m'y retrouver. Je suis très content pour vous. Il était grand temps que ces travaux soient effectués. Vous avez fait du bon travail avec votre personnel pour améliorer votre qualité de vie et atteindre vos missions.

Je vais lire une courte déclaration. J'espère qu'elle sera courte, ou je vais faire ce que mes amis du Corps des Marines m'ont enseigné: je vais accélérer la cadence.

Je suis accompagné de deux collègues.

Joe Sharpe et moi avons participé activement à la rédaction de la politique du Parti libéral sur les anciens combattants et travaillons avec les anciens combattants depuis plus de 10 ans à l'élaboration de mesures précises et de politiques. Nous nous penchons également sur des cas particuliers, et 10 ans avant cela, nous avons travaillé avec le sous-ministre à l'époque, l'amiral Murray. Il avait un comité consultatif, présidé par le Dr Neary, qui a rédigé le livre sur la première Charte des anciens combattants de 1943. Nous avons passé 10 années à travailler ensemble au sein de cette équipe multidisciplinaire. Nous étions également camarades de classe au Collège militaire royal, mais il est décédé.

Scott Maxwell est le directeur exécutif de Wounded Warriors Canada. Je suis le président d'honneur de Wounded Warriors Canada, qui est de loin, à mon sens, l'entité axée sur l'altruisme et sur la philanthropie qui consacre une grande partie de ses ressources sur le terrain pour venir en aide aux blessés, et principalement à ceux qui souffrent de blessures psychologiques. Je fais allusion à des programmes comme des programmes d'aide au moyen d'animaux, des programmes équestres et le programme de formation des anciens combattants que nous offrons à l'Université Dalhousie avec mon initiative Enfants soldats, où nous formons des anciens combattants pour qu'ils puissent retourner sur le terrain et former d'autres militaires sur la façon de gérer la situation des enfants soldats et de réduire les pertes de vie. Ils suivent un programme officiel d'un mois avec nous à l'Université Dalhousie. Nous pourrons en discuter lorsque nous aborderons les programmes disponibles.

Je vais me reporter, si vous le permettez, à une correspondance que j'ai eue avec le commandant en chef — soit le gouverneur général — lorsque j'étais sénateur après mon service dans l'armée et que je menais plusieurs activités avec lui — son épouse contribuait grandement aussi — concernant les soins aux anciens combattants blessés, et surtout ceux souffrant de blessures psychologiques. Je veux me servir de cette correspondance pour vous donner une idée de la situation.

Je tiens d'abord à vous remercier de nous permettre, mes collègues et moi, d'être des vôtres aujourd'hui pour discuter de la prévention du suicide parmi les membres des Forces armées canadiennes et les anciens combattants, tant ceux qui servent toujours dans les forces — et ils sont nombreux — que ceux qui ont été libérés et sont des civils dans la société canadienne. Je vous félicite de votre engagement à l'égard du bien-être de ces individus et de leurs familles, et c'est un honneur pour moi de vous faire part de mes réflexions sur la façon dont nous pouvons réaliser des progrès pour trouver des solutions au problème des personnes qui s'enlèvent la vie parce qu'elles sont blessées.

Comme je l'ai mentionné à d'autres occasions, publiquement et à d'autres tribunes, j'ai mis sur pied au fil des ans une équipe de conseillers de divers milieux qui connaissent très bien les forces et Anciens Combattants. Ce groupe de conseillers travaille à élaborer des recommandations stratégiques et des outils de sensibilisation qui nous ont permis de maintenir une vue d'ensemble bien documentée et éclairée des problèmes auxquels sont confrontés nos militaires — plus particulièrement ceux qui ont retiré leur uniforme — , et surtout en ce qui concerne les blessures liées au stress opérationnel. Je tiens à préciser que je ne fais pas référence forcément à tous les problèmes de santé mentale; je me concentre sur les blessures liées au stress opérationnel. C'est le principal problème des blessés. C'est le noeud du problème. C'est la lacune opérationnelle que nous constatons à l'heure actuelle.

(1535)



Parmi ceux qui s'engagent dans ce dossier — je veux vous les nommer, car ils sont tellement dévoués—, il y a le sergent Tom Hoppe et le major Bruce Henwood, tous les deux à la retraite, le Dr Victor Marshall, Mme Muriel Westmorland, Joe Sharpe, qui est ici avec nous, et Christian Barabé. Au fil des ans, ils ont travaillé avec moi pour faire connaître la situation des anciens combattants et m'ont également aidé lorsque j'étais le président du Sous-comité des anciens combattants au Sénat.

Nos recherches, nos réflexions et nos travaux nous ont amenés à constater que les blessures liées au stress opérationnel, plus particulièrement, peuvent être et sont trop souvent fatales à ceux qui en souffrent. De plus, les conséquences durent souvent toute une vie pour ceux qui ne réussissent pas à s'enlever la vie. Des organismes de soutien par les pairs nous ont fourni dans le passé des statistiques démontrant que les pairs ont été en mesure de prévenir une tentative de suicide par jour, par l'entremise du programme de soutien par les pairs, sans compter les structures plus officielles du système médical.

Bien entendu, cela inclut les effets dévastateurs pour les familles et ceux souffrant de blessures liées au stress opérationnel. Je crois qu'une approche pangouvernementale exhaustive qui fait participer la société peut apporter d'importantes solutions à ce grave problème d'autodestruction chez les gens afin qu'ils fassent plutôt des progrès notables et qu'ils puissent, à long terme, avoir une vie décente.

La santé mentale des anciens combattants et des membres actuels des forces et d'Anciens Combattants Canada, est un continuum qui est présenté en tant que question clinique à laquelle la structure de commandement globale participe peu. C'est essentiellement la façon dont les gens sont habitués de vivre, leur contexte culturel, qui est une chaîne de commandement et un mode de vie très structuré. Les dimensions cliniques, thérapeutiques et médicales ont pris préséance sur le problème des blessures liées au stress opérationnel, mais aussi sur le règlement éventuel des conflits qui amènent les gens à s'auto-détruire. La chaîne de commandement a été laissée de côté, si bien qu'il était impossible de savoir ce qui se passait. Les troupes retournaient dans leurs unités sans avoir d'information sur leur état d'esprit pour des raisons de confidentialité ou d'une incapacité de contourner le système d'accès à l'information ou les droits à la protection de la vie privée relativement à la Charte.

Ce faisant, la chaîne de commandement est devenue déconnectée de la réalité des blessés, ce qui est complètement contraire à tout ce qu'on nous a enseigné. J'ai passé ma vie au commandement d'un peloton ou d'une troupe de 30 militaires, et de la 1re Division du Canada composée de 12 000 membres, en temps de paix comme en temps de guerre. Le commandement, c'est comme une grossesse. Vous êtes en charge en tout temps du commandement pendant votre mission. C'est jour et nuit et, lorsque le bébé naît, vous êtes toujours là, au commandement. Que ce soit en garnison ou dans des théâtres d'opérations, la chaîne de commandement ne peut pas divorcer de la responsabilité ultime de veiller au bien-être des membres et de la structure de commandement afin de s'assurer que les familles sont intégrées dans la structure de soutien.

Je répète que les familles doivent être intégrées à cette structure de soutien. Ce n'est pas une question de coopérer avec les familles ou de les aider; il faut les intégrer à l'efficacité opérationnelle des forces. Pourquoi? C'est parce que les familles vivent les missions avec nous. Dans mon cas, j'étais blessé à mon retour. J'ai été jeté hors des forces alors que j'étais blessé. Ma famille était blessée. Ma famille n'était plus la même que celle que j'avais laissée à mon départ parce que les médias leur font vivre les missions avec nous.

Par conséquent, si vous utilisez n'importe quelle de ces politiques qui n'intègrent pas pleinement les familles, y compris les politiques du MDN et des Forces armées canadiennes, pour les anciens combattants actifs et ceux à la retraite, et par l'entremise d'Anciens Combattants Canada, vous vous retrouverez avec certaines des statistiques que j'ai mentionnées — qui sont encore empiriques cependant.

(1540)



J'ai participé au dernier forum sur la recherche en santé mentale chez les militaires à Vancouver, où j'ai présenté un mémoire dans lequel nous soutenions que les familles qui souffrent de stress et éprouvent des difficultés, les familles dont des membres souffrent de problèmes de santé mentale et les personnes affectées ne reçoivent pas le soutien dont elles ont besoin. Nous voyons maintenant des adolescents, mis à rude épreuve dans des conditions de stress extrême, qui se suicident. Il n'y a pas que les militaires; il y a aussi des membres des familles de ces militaires qui n'arrivent pas à vivre avec ce qu'ils ont vu et qui s'enlèvent la vie.

Nous devons absolument déceler les premiers signes de détresse psychologique, et nous encourageons les membres à demander de l'aide par l'entremise des programmes de soutien offerts par l'armée, Anciens Combattants Canada, des organismes externes comme Wounded Warriors Canada et les programmes de formation sur la transition des anciens combattants que nous offrons. Ces programmes leur permettent de trouver un emploi dans un domaine qui se rapproche le plus possible de leur expérience. Pourquoi essayer de changer complètement une personne de domaine alors que nous pouvons tirer parti de son expérience? Pourquoi ne pas trouver à ces gens un emploi ou des contrats dans un secteur d'activités qu'ils connaissent et dans un milieu auquel ils ont prêté allégeance, à savoir les forces armées? Nous avons retiré l'uniforme, mais nous ne cessons pas vraiment de le porter, car nous continuons de le porter dans notre coeur. Alors pourquoi les dissocier de ce milieu? Pourquoi ne pas trouver des programmes qui leur permettront de travailler dans un domaine qui s'apparente davantage à leur expertise?

Je vais écourter mes remarques par manque de temps. Je tiens simplement à dire que des initiatives sont mises de l'avant. La directive stratégique sur la prévention du suicide du chef d'état-major de la défense de janvier 2017 est certainement le meilleur document que nous avons vu depuis longtemps. Il fait clairement état que la chaîne de commandement est la source même de la prévention. Toutefois, lorsqu'on se met à lire les tenants et aboutissants, on constate que les professionnels de la santé ont mis le doigt sur le bobo et, je dirais, en minimisent la gravité. Ils sont censés appuyer la chaîne de commandement, et non pas la créer.

Je vais terminer en vous présentant les recommandations suivantes pour que nous puissions avoir le temps de discuter. Mes collègues pourront vous donner plus de détails et répondre à vos questions. J'espère que vous n'y verrez pas d'inconvénient.

Tout d'abord, la directive de la stratégie de prévention du suicide des Forces armées canadiennes doit être financée, mise en oeuvre et validée. Au besoin, nous pouvons adopter celle que nous avons adoptée après la Somalie. Il faut créer des comités de surveillance ministérielle qui relèvent du ministre. C'est ce que nous faisons depuis près de trois ans. J'étais le sous-ministre adjoint du personnel à l'époque. Pendant trois ans, nous avons eu six comités de surveillance qui ont rendu des comptes au ministre tous les deux mois sur la mise en oeuvre de ce type d'initiatives. Il n'y a rien de mal à assurer une surveillance politique de la mise en oeuvre des initiatives en cas de crise comme celle-là.

En ce qui concerne le cadre et la stratégie de prévention du suicide d'Anciens Combattants, je ne les ai pas vus. Je ne sais pas ce qu'ils renferment. Ce cadre et cette stratégie devaient être mis en place. C'est essentiel, car le ministère compte des anciens combattants qui sont à l'extérieur des forces, mais aussi un grand nombre d'anciens combattants qui sont à l'intérieur des forces. Ce cadre et cette stratégie sont essentiels et devraient être financés et mis en oeuvre.

Le troisième volet de cette orientation stratégique est ce que l'on appelle la stratégie commune de prévention du suicide des Forces canadiennes et d'ACC. C'est là où nous voulons que les deux ministères collaborent. Au MDN, c'est ce que l'on dit. C'est ce que les FAC veulent. Je n'ai pas vu cette stratégie non plus. C'est celle qui empêchera les gens de passer entre les mailles du filet. C'est ce qui assure le continuum. C'est là où la loyauté n'est pas perdue et où les gens continuent à s'engager.

Cette troisième stratégie doit exister — et être mise en oeuvre, évaluée, mais également validée six ou huit mois plus tard. Cette validation doit obliger les gens à rendre des comptes. C'est pourquoi je vais répéter que, dans ces comités de surveillance ministérielle, il n'y a rien de mal à afficher les conclusions en ligne et à offrir de l' aide.

(1545)



Je pense qu'Anciens Combattants Canada doit reconnaître les décès causés par les blessures liées au stress opérationnel, comme il l'a fait pour les 158 militaires qui ont été tués outre-mer ou n'importe quel autre membre qui a été tué au combat. Si nous prouvons qu'une blessure liée au stress opérationnel a causé le décès d'un individu, cet individu fait partie des statistiques. Nous n'avons pas perdu 158 militaires. Nous en sommes à quelque 200 décès maintenant. Alors pourquoi n'utilise-t-on pas ce nombre?

Imaginez qu'un membre revient pendant quatre ans et qu'on le perd. Après quatre ans à s'efforcer de le sauver, on le perd et il n'y a aucune réelle reconnaissance. On ne reconnaît pas son service, autrement que par la remise d'une médaille.

Maintenant que vous avez transféré les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires au ministère des Anciens Combattants, venez en aide aux familles par l'entremise de ces centres également. Insistez sur cette ressource. Ces centres prennent soin des familles. Laissez-les s'occuper de cet aspect pour Anciens Combattants Canada et les FAC, car ils le font déjà.

Enfin, offrez aux anciens combattants des emplois rémunérateurs dans des domaines qui se rapprochent le plus à l'expérience qu'ils possèdent, à leur loyauté envers l'armée ou au milieu militaire. Pourquoi essayer de les changer pendant qu'ils sont déjà dans une situation de crise?

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons entamer la première série de questions.

Nous allons commencer avec M. Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Général, merci énormément d'avoir servi notre pays et de vous engager dans cet important dossier.

J'aimerais que vous nous en disiez un peu plus, si vous le pouvez, sur la chaîne de commandement. Pouvez-vous nous donner des suggestions quant à la façon dont nous pouvons gérer le défi de la chaîne de commandement? Avec ce dont vous nous avez fait part aujourd'hui, c'est probablement la première fois que nous recevons un témoin au Comité qui aborde les conflits existant entre la chaîne de commandement et la santé mentale, la présentation clinique. Pouvez-vous nous donner des idées sur la façon dont nous pouvons concilier les deux?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Je vais laisser mes collègues prendre la parole également.

La réponse immédiate est que la chaîne de commandement doit être informée. En ce qui concerne la confidentialité, on ne peut rien y faire, mais on ne peut pas laisser des gens être transférés sous la responsabilité d'un autre organisme, même aux unités de soutien conjointes où ils ont été transférés ou renvoyés. Le commandant de l'unité, qui est responsable de la vie des militaires sur le terrain, est également responsable du commandement des militaires de retour au pays. On ne peut pas simplement les renvoyer dans leur unité sans fournir des renseignements aux commandants. Ils n'ont aucune idée de la façon de gérer ces cas, car ils ne connaissent pas la gravité de la blessure dont souffre l'individu.

Nous avons tous des médecins dans nos régiments, dans nos unités. À moins qu'il y ait un moyen que ces médecins puissent fournir ces renseignements et que l'on puisse les communiquer au niveau le plus bas, si l'on veut favoriser le retour des individus blessés dans une unité, il faut informer les gens de leur présence. Les gens ne savent pas quoi faire avec eux. Cela les isole davantage et les pousse davantage à vouloir mettre fin à leur vie.

Une voix: Je suis d'accord.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire: Joe?

(1550)

Brigadier-général (à la retraite) Joe Sharpe (à titre personnel):

Je vais répéter le point que le général Dallaire a soulevé plus tôt, à savoir que c'est une question de leadership, et non pas une question médicale. Je pense que c'est un refrain auquel je reviendrais sans cesse.

Les cloisons, si je peux m'exprimer ainsi, créent des obstacles aux soins. C'est une grande préoccupation ici. Pour utiliser les statistiques de 2015, 13 des 14 suicides recensés en 2015 ont été commis par des gens qui avaient demandé de l'aide au cours de l'année précédant leur suicide, et 10 d'entre eux se sont enlevé la vie dans les 30 jours précédant leur suicide.

Il y a un message de leadership à faire passer ici. Il y a une occasion d'intervenir, et je pense que c'est un flux d'information qui crée cet obstacle. Lorsqu'un membre fait la transition vers Anciens Combattants, c'est une autre cloison. C'est un autre obstacle. C'est un obstacle qui nous empêche de régler le problème.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Nous entendons beaucoup parler d’obstacles et c’est là le principal problème; il existe plusieurs obstacles. À mon avis, la chaîne de commandement en est un autre exemple. En tant que clinicien, comment puis-je respecter mon serment d’Hippocrate lorsque je dois composer avec la chaîne de commandement? Donc, je vous remercie pour ces commentaires.

Général Dallaire, vous avez parlé brièvement des enfants-soldats. C’est un problème important, cela ne fait aucun doute. Nous avons tous les deux participé à la conférence de l’ICRSMV. Une déclaration faite lors de cette conférence m’est restée en mémoire: souvent, les soldats sont confrontés avec une contradiction violente de leurs attentes morales. Alors que nous tentons de lutter contre ce problème, et nous pourrions y être à nouveau confrontés, nous réalisons que, pour beaucoup de nos soldats, c’est un conflit énorme.

J’aimerais vous entendre sur le sujet. Je sais qu’une stratégie a été proposée…

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Oui.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Vous y avez participé.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Nous y travaillons depuis deux ans avec l’Armée canadienne, en particulier, et aussi avec l’OTAN. Nous avons mené des recherches en Afrique, car mon institut, la Roméo Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative, basée à l’Université Dalhousie, est axé sur le terrain. Nous formons des forces armées et policières de différents pays pour les envoyer dans des zones de conflit.

Nous avons réussi à influencer le contenu de l’Armée canadienne en faisant de celle-ci la première armée au monde à adopter officiellement une nouvelle doctrine… Une doctrine, c’est une référence à partir de laquelle on élabore des tactiques, crée des organisations, fabrique des équipements et offre la formation nécessaire pour accomplir des missions. En adoptant officiellement cette doctrine, l’Armée canadienne est devenue une chef de file mondiale à ce chapitre. Nous allons amorcer la formation des formateurs pour faire progresser cette stratégie.

Cette doctrine est particulièrement importante, car dans tous les conflits, les enfants servent de système d’arme principal. On parle d’enfants de 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 ou 15 ans. Tous ces conflits posent un dilemme éthique, mais aussi moral pour les soldats. C’est ce que nous…

Nous avons toujours cru que les embuscades et accidents étaient les plus difficiles à vivre, mais en réalité, c’est le dilemme moral et la destruction du moral d’avoir à affronter des enfants.

Un sergent m’a approché à Québec, où je vis. Il avait l’air bien. Il m’a parlé de cinq missions et la conversation allait bien. Je lui ai demandé quel était son travail au sein du bataillon et il a fondu en larmes, là, au beau milieu du centre commercial. Il était incapable de parler. Il bégayait. Il vacillait et pleurait. Je l’ai pris à part et il m’a dit: « Je faisais partie du peloton de reconnaissance. Mon travail consistait à empêcher les bombes humaines d’atteindre les convois. » Il m’a dit: « Vous savez, c’était il y a quatre ans et je n’ai toujours pas serré mes enfants dans mes bras. »

Nos pertes sont énormes, car nous ignorons comment composer avec les enfants-soldats. Cette doctrine nous permettra de faire des progrès à ce chapitre et nous participerons à ce programme de formation.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Lockhart, vous avez la parole.

Mme Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Merci, messieurs.

Merci, général, de votre service et d’avoir accepté de venir répondre à nos questions.

J’aimerais parler d’une citation tirée de votre livre Premières lueurs. Vous dites: Personne ne comprenait ce que je faisais à l’époque. Pas même moi. Personne ne m’a dit que j’étais blessé et je ne croyais pas l’être, quoique demander à être relevé de mon commandement pesait lourd sur mes épaules. Extérieurement, j’étais toujours engagé, déterminé, stable. Intérieurement, le stress que je m’imposais m’écrasait et venait s’ajouter au stress que j’éprouvais dans mon travail.

Anciens Combattants peut-il faire quelque chose pour intervenir lorsqu’un soldat se trouve dans un tel état d’âme pour prévenir ou interrompre la progression de cet état vers le suicide?

(1555)

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Dans le cas de la maladie mentale, surtout les blessures de stress opérationnel, la blessure s’aggrave au fil des ans. Si vous perdez un bras, vous le savez. Le but est ensuite de trouver une prothèse qui vous aide autant que possible. Si l’on n’affiche pas le même sentiment d’urgence dans le cas des blessures de stress opérationnel en reconnaissant ces blessures et en les traitant, celles-ci s’aggravent et deviennent plus difficiles à définir et à guérir.

Il m’a fallu quatre ans avant de toucher le fond. J’ai perdu un de mes officiers 15 ans plus tard et après avoir suivi des traitements. Il y a un vide. On ignore comment amener ces gens à cesser de vivre comme s’ils n’étaient pas blessés, à faire fi des préjudices.

Nous croyions avoir mis fin à ces préjudices en disposant de forces armées d’expérience, et ce fut le cas jusqu’à tout récemment. Maintenant, beaucoup plus de civils sont touchés. Nous revivons ce que nous avons vécu dans les années 1950. À l’époque, beaucoup de vétérans étaient touchés, mais aussi beaucoup de civils. Il y avait des frictions entre les deux groupes et les gens disaient: « Ah, je ne serais pas touché de la sorte. » Nous n’avons pas reconnu les blessures de stress opérationnel. Alors, les soldats se sont mis à consommer de l’alcool jusqu’à en mourir ou ils ont quitté les forces. Ils sont devenus des sans-abri et sont morts dans la rue, car nous les avions abandonnés. Seule exception: la Légion. La Légion a beaucoup aidé, mais il y avait beaucoup de problèmes d’alcool.

Nous n’avons pas la capacité de discerner ces problèmes tôt et de les traiter de manière progressive.

La première fois que j’ai suivi un traitement, on m’a offert huit séances. Cela fait maintenant 14 ans que je suis un traitement. Je consulte encore un psychiatre et un psychologue et je prends encore neuf pilules par jour. C’est ce qui me permet d’être qui je suis.

Cependant, il y a des moments difficiles. Par exemple, la semaine dernière, la version française de mon livre est parue et ma réaction a été catastrophique. La rédaction de ces livres nous ramène toujours en enfer. Ils sont sans valeur réelle pour moi, mais j’espère qu’ils seront utiles pour d’autres.

Il faut trouver une façon d’empêcher ces maladies de s’aggraver. Il ne suffit pas de les identifier; il faut aussi les empêcher de s’aggraver. Si nous n’intervenons pas tôt dans le processus, ces maladies s’aggraveront.

M. Scott Maxwell (à titre personnel):

Chez Wounded Warriors Canada, nous voyons deux problèmes concurrents. D’abord, il y a la frustration que l’on ressent lorsqu’on demande à un diplômé d’un de nos programmes de nous parler de ses blessures… J’aimerais simplement ajouter une chose aux propos du général. La majorité des blessures, lorsque les gens se sentent à l’aise de nous dire quand elles sont survenues, découlent d’une interaction quelconque avec des enfants.

Ensuite, ces gens mettent habituellement entre 8 et 10 ans après avoir subi leur blessure ou après l’incident qui a causé la blessure avant de demander ou de recevoir l’aide qu’ils méritent. Vous pouvez imaginer la vie qu’ils ont vécue et l’impact sur leur famille pendant cette période avant qu’ils ne prennent des mesures pour traiter leur blessure.

Un autre problème que nous avons remarqué après avoir écrit pour dire à ces gens de chercher de l’aide, de s’auto-identifier et de communiquer avec leurs pairs, c’est que, comme le problème est plus connu et abordé et que plus de gens se sentent à l’aise de demander de l’aide, nous recevons de plus en plus de demandes d’aide. Cela signifie, pour des programmes comme les nôtres, qu’il y a maintenant une liste d’attente pouvant aller jusqu’à deux ans. Il y a un grave problème d’accès au Canada. C’est bien que les gens demandent de l’aide, mais vous pouvez imaginer l’impact sur leur santé mentale et générale et sur leur famille s’ils ne peuvent pas obtenir l’aide nécessaire.

L’enjeu est gros; c’est un problème très sérieux.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci.

Je crois que mon temps est écoulé, mais c’était très bien, merveilleux, même.

(1600)

Le président:

Madame Mathyssen, vous avez la parole.

Mme Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup d’avoir accepté notre invitation. Nous vous remercions beaucoup de votre expertise et de votre franchise, car il s’agit d’un enjeu très important.

Nous devons aller au fond des choses dans ce dossier. Des vétérans nous ont fourni énormément d’information que contredisent les spécialistes ou les gens d’ACC ou du MDN. C’est frustrant et cela remet en question notre capacité à faire ce qu’il se doit. J’aimerais aller au vif du sujet.

Au cours du week-end, je me suis entretenue avec des vétérans sur la côte Ouest. Ils m’ont dit qu’évidemment, ils cachent leurs blessures et nient être blessés, car cela se traduirait par leur libération des forces. Ils se retrouveraient exclus d’une confrérie, d’une famille dont ils ont besoin.

Ils m’ont dit que des membres actifs au sein des Forces canadiennes pensent eux aussi au suicide. Cela ne se limite pas à ceux qui ont été libérés. Des membres actifs aussi pensent au suicide, mais cela est géré à l’interne et ces gens sont poussés vers la sortie de façon à ce que, s’ils se suicident alors qu’ils ne sont plus dans les Forces canadiennes, le MDN n’ait pas à rendre de comptes sur leur mort.

C’est frustrant. Je suis convaincue qu’il y a des opinions divergentes sur la question, mais un fait demeure: le lien de confiance a été brisé. Les vétérans avec qui je me suis entretenue étaient en colère et ils m’ont parlé des éléments déclencheurs, de toute la paperasse et de leur insécurité financière. Ils ont quitté les forces sans pension ou sans soutien financier, ne sachant quoi faire, et se disaient que la seule option pour eux était de mettre fin à leurs jours. Ils avaient l’impression d’être inutiles pour leurs familles. Soit ils se cachaient dans un sous-sol, soit ils s’en prenaient violemment à quelqu’un.

Que pouvons-nous faire? C’est un dilemme. Comment tendre de nouveau la main à ces vétérans? Comment rétablir la confiance?

Général, vous avez parlé de cette étude. Y avons-nous accès, à cette étude du CEMD, à cette stratégie dont vous parliez? Y avons-nous accès?

Vous avez parlé également de mesures qui devraient être prises en matière de santé mentale et vous dites ignorer où nous en sommes à ce chapitre. Tout cela nous pousse à nous demander ce qui se passe, ce qu’il advient des services de soutien et quand nous pouvons nous attendre à avoir une réponse sincère qui satisfait aux besoins de ces vétérans.

Je sais que j’ai dit beaucoup de choses et que je n’ai pas vraiment posé de questions, mais j’aimerais connaître votre opinion.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Je n'ai pas l'habitude d'être bref, moi non plus, alors, ne vous en faites pas.

Je dirai d’abord ceci. Après des années de travail sur le sujet, nous avons conclu que s’il n’y a pas une atmosphère d’engagement au pays, au sein de la population canadienne et au sein des gouvernements — et je parle aussi du milieu parlementaire, qui semble vouloir s’engager, mais aussi de la bureaucratie, qui ne semble pas nécessairement vouloir s’engager —, et non un contrat social, car cela implique une négociation, tout comme la Charte des anciens combattants actuelle…

C’est moi qui ai fait adopter cette charte au Sénat, en l’espace d’une journée et demie, et je le regrette depuis, car elle ne tient pas compte des 10 années de travail que nous avons menées. C’est un document bureaucratique pour tenter de faire des économies et qui lie les mains du ministre en raison de tous les règlements qu’il contient. Il s’agit d’un nouveau phénomène dans le domaine de la législation. Auparavant, il n’y avait rien de la sorte. Aujourd’hui, il y en a partout dans la législation.

Nous n’avons pas besoin d’une nouvelle charte. Il suffit d’effectuer une réforme importante de la charte actuelle de façon à ce que ces hommes et femmes puissent obtenir des réponses appropriées en temps opportun. D’ici là, il y aura des problèmes.

La seule façon de les convaincre, c’est de croire sincèrement que le gouvernement est responsable de ces gens du début à la fin, et non jusqu’à 65 ans et non de façon limitée, qu’il s’engage à assumer une responsabilité illimitée, qu’il reconnaît que les soldats sont revenus blessés et que certains sont morts et que, bien entendu, leurs familles ont été touchées et qu’il prendra soin d’elles jusqu’à la fin.

Sans cela, vous n’arriverez pas à faire renaître leur confiance. Tout cela a commencé avec le syndrome de la guerre du Golfe. Nous avons tout fait pour les empêcher d’obtenir quoi que ce soit. Tous les avocats et membres du personnel médical en ville ont avancé des arguments pour justifier leur décision de ne pas prendre soin de ces gens. Cela a fragilisé leur engagement opérationnel. Est-ce que je veux être blessé? Cela a aussi ébranlé les familles et, en réaction, elles ont créé un vide d’expérience en demandant à leur proche de quitter les forces.

(1605)

Le président:

Monsieur Eyolfson, vous avez la parole.

M. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Je suis désolé, madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Non, non. Merci. J’aurai une autre occasion.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup de votre service et d’avoir accepté de venir nous parler de suicide. C’est un sujet important que nous avons en commun. Je pratique la médecine depuis 20 ans et je vois aussi ce problème dans ma profession. Lorsque j’étais résident, il y a eu trois suicides à mon école de médecine en l’espace de 15 mois. Je suis sensible aux professions où le suicide est un problème.

Les préjugés contre ceux qui demandent de l’aide sont un autre problème que nous avons en commun. Il y a une place en enfer pour celui qui a dit: « Médecin, guéris-toi toi-même. » Cette attitude a causé beaucoup de dommages. Les militaires vivent probablement la même situation.

Nous savons que les gens hésitent à demander de l’aide, qu’ils craignent d’avoir l’air faibles et de ne pas avoir ce qu’il faut. Selon vous, depuis votre départ des forces, y a-t-il moins de préjugés par rapport aux TSPT?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Je vais laisser Joe vous en parler plus longuement, mais je tiens seulement à vous mentionner que je me considère... étant donné que j'ai un psychiatre et un psychologue. Je reçois des soins et du soutien par les pairs. Je ne m'en cache pas. Si vous étiez un docteur que je consultais pour mon cancer, je parlerais de vous, et je dirais que vous êtes un idiot ou un très bon docteur, que je vous adore, etc. Nous parlons de ces docteurs. Pourquoi ne parlons-nous pas de nos psychiatres et de nos psychologues? C'était le cas dans certains films au début des années 1970.

Nous devons rendre cela aussi honorable que toute autre blessure, ce qui éliminera les préjugés. Nous commençons à assister à une recrudescence des tensions au sujet des préjugés, ce que nous pensions avoir passablement réussi à éliminer grâce au changement de culture, dont Joe parle, par les non-vétérans qui sont incapables d'accepter quelque chose qu'ils ne peuvent pas voir. Ils sont très darwiniens; ce sont des types de personnes très visibles dans l'armée, parmi les premiers répondants et toute personne qui porte un uniforme: les policiers, les pompiers, etc. Si nous ne pouvons pas le voir, ils ne peuvent pas accepter qu'une personne ne soit pas à 100 %.

Pour ce faire, il faut sensibiliser les gens et les former.

Bgén Joe Sharpe:

J'aimerais seulement ajouter un très bref commentaire à l'intervention du général Dallaire.

Nous parlions plus tôt aujourd'hui d'un jeune militaire avec lequel j'ai travaillé jeudi dernier; ce jeune caporal m'a avoué très candidement être atteint d'un état de stress post-traumatique et recevoir des soins à ce sujet, mais il m'a dit: « Monsieur, la haute direction de l'organisation dit tout ce qu'il faut. » C'est un engagement honnête que prend la haute direction des Forces armées canadiennes. Ce jeune fantassin est en voie d'être libéré. Il a dit: « Sur le terrain, les sergents et les adjudants n'en croient pas un mot. Pour eux, c'est de la bouillie pour les chats. Si vous demandez de l'aide au sein de votre peloton ou de votre compagnie, vous êtes un maillon faible, et ils ne veulent pas de vous là. » Cette situation m'a été décrite jeudi dernier.

Les préjugés ont-ils disparu? Absolument pas. Les préjugés sont encore bien vivants, mais c'est parce que nous mettons très fortement l'accent sur la modification de ce comportement dans l'immédiat. Si un haut gradé vous surprend à dénigrer ces militaires, vous serez réprimandé. Nous nous inquiétons des comportements, mais nous n'avons pas vraiment mis l'accent sur les croyances, alors que nous aurions vraiment dû mettre l'accent sur cet aspect et aussi la culture. C'est un combat de longue haleine qui nous attend pour modifier la culture. Je crois que nous mettons l'accent sur les comportements plutôt que les croyances et la culture.

M. Scott Maxwell:

J'aimerais seulement faire valoir un autre point au sujet des personnes qui ont été libérées — et non celles encore au sein des Forces canadiennes — et qui forment la population de vétérans du côté civil. Dans leur cas, je crois que la situation s'est un peu améliorée en ce qui concerne les préjugés. Ils ont évidemment déjà quitté le milieu; il y a donc moins de risques, et ils sont plus à l'aise de parler de leur situation. Ils sont à l'aise de se placer dans une position très vulnérable, et ce, souvent en compagnie de leurs pairs. Nous le voyons partout au pays. Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, notre problème est d'élargir l'accès aux programmes; ce n'est pas d'essayer de trouver des personnes malades et blessées qui veulent participer à nos programmes. Je crois que cela témoigne certainement des progrès réalisés concernant les personnes libérées et les vétérans du côté civil. Ils peuvent se manifester, lever la main et obtenir de l'aide. Il y a une petite lueur d'optimisme de ce côté. Le problème, c'est évidemment que nous devons nous assurer de pouvoir leur venir en aide lorsqu'ils viennent nous voir.

(1610)

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Fraser, allez-y.

M. Colin Fraser (Nova-Ouest, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Général, monsieur Sharpe, monsieur Maxwell, merci beaucoup de votre présence ici aujourd'hui.

Je tiens tout d'abord à mentionner que vendredi dernier dans ma circonscription, Nova-Ouest, j'ai participé à une activité à l'appui du centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires à la 14e Escadre Greenwood. C'était une excellente activité pour sensibiliser les gens aux questions liées à la santé mentale et à l'état de stress post-traumatique chez les militaires et les vétérans et lever des fonds pour le Centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires.

J'ai été heureux de vous entendre parler de la manière dont les familles peuvent avoir accès aux centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires et de vous entendre dire que les familles des vétérans devraient également avoir accès aux centres. J'aimerais que vous nous en disiez un peu plus à ce sujet. Je suis au courant de l'excellent travail qui est fait dans ces centres. Comment pensez-vous que cela pourrait se faire? Comment le ministère de la Défense nationale pourrait-il élargir les services?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Anciens Combattants Canada a maintenant signé une entente avec les Forces canadiennes. Nous pouvons prendre soin — je dis « nous »; voilà; la preuve...

Des députés: Ah, ah!

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire: ... et je dis cela après avoir passé 10 ans au Sénat — des vétérans blessés qui ne font plus partie des Forces canadiennes et de leur famille.

Je considère que les centres de soutien des familles sont l'un des ponts déterminants qu'ils peuvent emprunter pour s'en sortir et se rendre dans un nouveau monde. Les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires offrent beaucoup d'expertise et ont accès aux ressources des provinces, des collectivités et surtout des Forces armées canadiennes et d'ACC pour influer sur le combat et donner plus rapidement aux gens du soutien.

Cependant, ils ont de la difficulté, parce que l'argent n'y est pas investi, qu'ils ne peuvent pas embaucher de personnel et que les vétérans ne peuvent pas obtenir ce soutien spécial. À mon avis, le grave problème que nous n'avons toujours pas réglé, c'est que nous améliorons la situation des membres des Forces canadiennes qui sont toujours en service et des vétérans qui reçoivent des soins dans nos différentes cliniques, par exemple, mais nous n’améliorons pas la situation des familles.

Seulement la moitié du problème est réglée; l'autre moitié ne l'est pas, et cette moitié souffre. Cela nuira à tout ce que vous faites. D'ici à ce que nous considérions la famille comme aussi en déploiement... J'estime que maintenant les familles sont liées à l'efficacité opérationnelle des forces, et cela ne se limite pas qu'au soutien à ce chapitre. Les membres de la famille parlent sur Skype à leurs proches une heure avant qu'ils partent en patrouille. Comment est-ce possible de les traiter ainsi?

Si les familles sont intrinsèquement liées à l'efficacité opérationnelle des forces, elles devraient avoir accès au même niveau de soins. Cela signifie qu'il faut investir davantage d'argent dans Anciens Combattants Canada et le ministère de la Défense nationale pour prendre soin des familles. Nous transférons déjà des sommes colossales aux provinces. Disons aux provinces que nous allons nous-mêmes réparer notre gâchis. Nous avons causé les blessures de ces personnes, et nous allons en prendre soin. Nous allons vous acheter les ressources au lieu de tout simplement les laisser tomber et créer une rupture très grave.

M. Colin Fraser:

Oui. Allez-y, monsieur Maxwell.

M. Scott Maxwell:

Je crois qu'il faut aussi mentionner que ces centres sont d'excellents carrefours; ce sont des lieux physiques où les gens peuvent se rendre et obtenir du soutien par les pairs.

Par contre, comme tout le reste, je vous mets en garde; le problème et l'étendue sont tellement vastes qu'un organisme ou un centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires ne sera jamais capable d'y arriver seul. Nous en sommes témoins tout le temps au sein de l'organisme Wounded Warriors Canada. Si nous finançons un programme et que nous faisons un don de 375 000 $ pour offrir un programme partout au pays, c'est merveilleux. Cependant, nous ne pouvons pas aider tout le monde, et tout le monde ne peut pas y participer. Il en va de même pour les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires.

Nous mettons notamment l'accent sur un aspect dont il est beaucoup question ici: les partenariats. Nous collaborons avec les services aux familles des militaires, qui gèrent les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires au pays. Cela permet aux centres de faire participer un couple à l'un de nos programmes — le soutien à la famille, par exemple —, et ce, sans frais, étant donné que les participants au programme géré par Wounded Warriors Canada ont été recommandés par un centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires.

Vous êtes à même de comprendre à quel point cela se multiplierait rapidement à l'échelle nationale. Nous n'avons donc pas un cadre régional qui fonctionne très bien à un endroit, mais moins bien à Esquimalt, par exemple. Lorsque nous avons de telles discussions, nous voulons nous assurer que cela sera mis en oeuvre partout au pays, parce qu'il y a des gens aux quatre coins du pays.

(1615)

M. Colin Fraser:

Je crois que vous avez raison. Je vous remercie de votre commentaire. C'est très important de reconnaître qu'un tel outil peut être la solution pour venir en aide aux gens dans les petites collectivités. Un tel établissement de confiance est très important.

M. Scott Maxwell:

Nous ne pourrions pas le faire seuls. Il faut l'avouer. Si nous voulons offrir un programme, comment trouver les personnes qui ont besoin d'aide? Nous avons recours à des partenaires comme le programme SSBSO et les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires, et nous collaborons avec eux et de façon plus générale avec les services aux familles des militaires.

Vous avez absolument raison. Cela se fonde sur des partenariats, et il faut établir des liens entre l'information, les outils et les programmes. Si une personne se rend dans un centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires et qu'elle peut tirer parti d'un certain programme, que le centre n'offre peut-être pas, le personnel du centre est au moins capable de lui donner accès au programme qu'elle mérite.

M. Colin Fraser:

Mon temps est très limité.

Par contre, convenez-vous aussi que la présence et l'intégration de la famille dans la mission sont importantes pour nous assurer que, si une intervention est nécessaire, elle se fera peut-être plus rapidement? Vous avez une personne qui peut constater qu'un militaire éprouve de la difficulté ou détecter plus rapidement le problème.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Monsieur Fraser, vous venez de mettre le doigt sur un point important.

Si la famille sent qu'elle participe étroitement à l'efficacité opérationnelle des forces, elle aura l'impression d'avoir la responsabilité d'aider le membre à comprendre que cela fait partie de son processus pour redevenir efficace sur le plan opérationnel ou s'adapter à un autre emploi valable.

Actuellement, des membres confrontent leur famille, parce qu'ils ne veulent pas demander d'aide. Si la famille était intégrée au programme, les membres ne pourraient pas le faire. Ils se renforceraient mutuellement pour obtenir cette aide. C'est le hic; c'est le noeud du problème.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Wagantall, vous avez la parole.

Mme Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, PCC):

Merci beaucoup de votre présence ici aujourd'hui. C'est très utile.

J'aimerais me concentrer en particulier sur votre premier commentaire concernant la stratégie de prévention du suicide des Forces armées canadiennes et sa mise en oeuvre avec les comités ministériels de surveillance. Vous avez mentionné la Somalie.

Je m'implique énormément auprès des vétérans concernant la question de la méfloquine. Nous entendons encore les autorités affirmer que seulement un membre des forces sur 11 000 est touché. En ce qui concerne la poursuite de l'utilisation de la méfloquine, notre propre ministre de la Santé a récemment écrit le 22 février dernier qu'à titre de prophylaxie antipaludique le ministère considère que les bienfaits de la méfloquine l'emportent sur les possibles risques lorsque le médicament est utilisé conformément aux conditions d'utilisation énoncées dans le PGPC.

Selon ce que j'entends de vétérans de la Somalie, du Rwanda, de l'Ouganda, de l'Afghanistan et de la Bosnie qui ont pris ce médicament, ils n'avaient pas le choix de l'utiliser. Nos alliés, soit l'Allemagne, la Grande-Bretagne, l'Australie et les États-Unis, ont pris des mesures; or, le gouvernement ne reconnaît toujours pas ce qui s'est passé en Somalie et poursuit sur sa lancée. Cela nuit au taux de suicide. Je sais que c'est ce que les vétérans me disent directement.

Pouvez-vous nous en parler?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

J'ai pris de la méfloquine un an. Au bout de cinq mois, j'ai écrit au Quartier général de la Défense nationale pour expliquer que ce médicament nuisait à ma capacité de penser, qu'il détruisait mon estomac, qu'il nuisait à ma mémoire et que je voulais arrêter de le prendre. À l'époque, les Allemands ne prenaient aucun médicament, mais ils ont changé leur fusil d'épaule, lorsque le paludisme cérébral a emporté deux personnes en 48 heures.

J'ai ensuite reçu une réponse, et c'était probablement l'une des réponses les plus rapides que je n'avais jamais reçues. En gros, j'ai reçu l'ordre de continuer de prendre le médicament. Si jamais je décidais de désobéir aux ordres, je serais traduit en cour martiale pour m'être infligé intentionnellement une blessure, parce que c'était le seul outil que nous avions. La méfloquine est une ancienne façon de penser, et ce médicament nuit vraiment à la capacité de fonctionner.

À mon avis, ces statistiques ne...

(1620)

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Elles ne sont pas exactes.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

... tiennent pas vraiment la route. Même si c'est le cas, que se passe-t-il si c'est le commandant qui est touché, soit le poste que j'occupais à l'époque? Mon adjointe administrative surveillait attentivement ma consommation de méfloquine. Il y a d'autres prophylaxies beaucoup plus efficaces.

En ce qui concerne tout simplement le commandement et à plus forte raison notre capacité d'intervenir lorsque nous nous trouvons dans des situations très complexes ou lorsque nous sommes en présence d'enfants, par exemple, et que nous avons des nanosecondes pour décider de tuer ou non un enfant pour sauver d'autres personnes, nous ne voulons pas que notre jugement soit altéré. Or, il se peut qu'un médicament continue d'avoir des effets secondaires sur nous.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Que répondez-vous à cela? Devrions-nous réaliser des études pour déterminer...

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Je dis que nous devrions nous en débarrasser et utiliser le nouveau médicament.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Merci. C'est la solution la plus rapide que j'aimerais nous voir prendre.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Oui.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Veterans Helping Veterans, soit l'un des groupes qui viennent en aide aux vétérans, a parlé de la nécessité de veiller à la transition des militaires, parce que nous leur inculquons un mode de vie. Je comprends la réponse combat-fuite et l'attitude qui les pousse à y aller et à penser aux autres en premier. Cependant, lorsque le militaire retourne chez lui, il a oublié comment dormir normalement. Certains prétendent qu'il est possible de les reprogrammer pour les réhabituer à une structure du sommeil adéquate, à des aliments réguliers, etc. Tous ces éléments sont très importants pour la santé.

Je sais que votre sommeil vous a causé énormément de problèmes. Voyez-vous cela comme une mesure que nous pourrions prendre pour aider nos militaires?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

J'allais vous répondre de lire mon livre, mais je vais m'abstenir.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Je ne l'ai pas encore fait. J'en suis désolée. Vous l'avez sans doute deviné.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

La difficulté, c'est qu'à notre retour, nous essayons de dormir dans un lit et dans un environnement qui nous sont étrangers. Voici pourquoi. Je suis revenu, et le massacre d'environ un million de personnes ne comptait pas. J'étais de retour à titre de commandant adjoint de l'armée, et je me suis fait dire: « Dieu merci, vous êtes rentré. Vous n'aurez plus d'affectations à l'étranger. Écoutez, la priorité maintenant, ce sont les compressions budgétaires. » C'est comme si cela ne s'était jamais produit.

Il y a une rupture parce que nous savons que ces gens existent, que nous n'avons pas terminé notre travail et que des choses horribles se sont passées. Ensuite, nous rentrons au pays, et tout le monde s'en fiche; personne ne reconnaît réellement la situation.

Nous avons beaucoup de difficulté à nous ajuster à l'opulence, à l'insignifiance et à la nature de notre société. Ce qui nous empêche d'y arriver, c'est notre fatigue, notre incapacité de raisonner. C'est dû au manque de sommeil.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Oui.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Nous avons de la difficulté à trouver le sommeil parce ces choses nous hantent sans cesse. S'il existe des programmes d'aide — je sais qu'il y a toutes sortes d'initiatives —, tant mieux, mais je dirais que nous sommes aux prises avec deux grandes frictions culturelles qui ne sont pas faciles à concilier.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Bratina.

M. Bob Bratina (Hamilton-Est—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, et merci à vous, général Dallaire.

Les problèmes que nous étudions au sein du comité des anciens combattants découlent de la période de service actif. Je suis donc impressionné par votre notion de stratégie commune de prévention du suicide. Bien entendu, deux groupes différents vont devoir travailler ensemble pour résoudre les problèmes. Comment entrevoyez-vous cette stratégie commune de prévention du suicide? Prévoyez-vous des lignes directrices?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

En 1998, lorsque j'étais sous-ministre adjoint du personnel — ce que l'on appelle aujourd'hui chef du personnel militaire, ou CPM-RH —, je me suis entendu avec le SMA d'Anciens Combattants Canada, un certain Dennis Wallace, pour prêter un général à Anciens Combattants Canada et lancer les premières discussions conjointes. Nos systèmes informatiques n'étaient pas interopérables — rien n'était compatible. Nous ne pouvions même pas nous parler. Nous avons donc créé un simple bureau où les employés tenaient, d'un côté, les dossiers des anciens combattants et, de l'autre, ceux des militaires; dès qu'un cas était consigné, ils discutaient entre eux pour le régler.

Il y a eu beaucoup d'améliorations depuis, mais je ne crois pas qu'on soit allé assez loin. Je ne pense pas que les gens se sentent à l'aise d'être transférés vers un autre ministère. Je suis content que ce soit à Charlottetown. Les employés là-bas ont gardé leur humanisme et ils sont moins froids que ceux du bureau d'Ottawa; la personne n'est donc pas traitée comme un numéro. Je trouve cela acceptable, mais le fait que ce soit un ministère distinct et qu'on soit transféré ailleurs... Prenez mon uniforme, mais ne me retirez pas de la famille. Ne me transférez pas vers quelqu'un d'autre qui a une culture organisationnelle différente, qui travaille peut-être dans un contexte différent et qui doit suivre une réglementation différente.

Je pense qu'il est temps d'examiner le cas des pays qui ont intégré leur ministère des Anciens Combattants à leur ministère de la Défense nationale. Ces organismes ont leurs budgets et leurs structures, sans que leurs tâches ne se chevauchent. Le client n'est pas refilé à quelqu'un d'autre. Il reste dans la famille. On peut régler beaucoup de cas à l'amiable. On peut apporter une perspective différente à certaines des directives. En relevant du ministre de la Défense nationale, plutôt que du ministre des Anciens Combattants, on peut exercer plus de pouvoir au sein du Cabinet pour apporter des modifications, je crois, parce que cela a un impact direct sur l'efficacité opérationnelle des forces. Si vous ne traitez pas les anciens combattants blessés comme il se doit, les militaires qui sont dépêchés à l'étranger se rendront compte que s'ils reviennent blessés, ils auront à mener un deuxième combat, c'est-à-dire rentrer chez eux et essayer de vivre décemment. Si cela reste dans la même structure, la personne pourra être très honnête et se sentir beaucoup plus responsabilisée.

(1625)

M. Bob Bratina:

Merci.

Pour en revenir à la question de la culture et des préjugés, en quoi consiste le rôle de l'aumônier?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Ah, quelle excellente question. Dans le cadre de mon Initiative Enfants Soldats, nous avons découvert que les enfants ne sont évidemment pas épargnés par la menace. L'été dernier, nous avons donné un cours à 15 anciens combattants — certains desquels sont déjà déployés au Kenya pour s'entraîner avec des Somaliens —, et deux d'entre eux ont avoué avoir tué des enfants. Ils ne l'avaient jamais dit à qui que ce soit — ni à un thérapeute ni à leurs proches —, mais ils l'ont raconté à ces gars parce qu'ils allaient travailler auprès d'enfants. Ils en souffraient.

Je crois que l'objectif, au bout du compte, c'est de les faire participer... voilà, ma mémoire me fait défaut. Je vous laisse prendre la relève.

M. Scott Maxwell:

Vouliez-vous qu'on parle des aumôniers?

M. Bob Bratina:

Oui.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Ah, oui, on parle des aumôniers, du côté spirituel de la chose. Nous avons déjà abordé l'aspect moral. Nos faiblesses morales découlent de notre perte de spiritualité; pourtant, dans les théâtres d'opérations, bon nombre de ces pays ont toujours un côté spirituel. Ce n'est pas purement religieux. C'est culturel. Si vous n'avez pas de valeurs spirituelles sur lesquelles vous rabattre, alors vous sombrez dans le néant, et il vous est d'autant plus difficile de vous rétablir. Par conséquent, les aumôniers jouent, selon moi, un rôle très proactif et très efficace sur le terrain, et ils représentent une autre option pour la résolution de problèmes.

M. Scott Maxwell:

Oui, notre directeur de programme national vient de prendre sa retraite après 25 ans de service en tant qu'aumônier des Forces canadiennes auprès d'un régiment du génie de combat à Toronto. En travaillant avec lui et avec l'organisme Wounded Warriors, j'ai interagi avec une foule de militaires qu'il avait aidés au fil des ans. Durant la cérémonie du Départ dans la dignité organisée en son honneur, j'ai rencontré une dizaine d'entre eux, et nous avons justement parlé de cette question. Que faisait Phil, en l'espèce, pour être d'un si grand secours?

Au sein de la famille régimentaire, c'était presque un endroit où aller si on ne tenait pas à passer par la chaîne de commandement ou à en parler à ses supérieurs, parce qu'on n'était pas sûr de la gravité du problème ou même si cela valait la peine d'en parler. C'était comme un refuge dans la famille régimentaire, un endroit où aller pour au moins amorcer une discussion avec quelqu'un de rassurant, sans craindre de subir des conséquences pour avoir dit quelque chose ou pour avoir posé une question.

Cela a eu un impact énorme sur la suite des choses pour ces militaires, à partir de là.

M. Bob Bratina:

J'appuie le point soulevé par le général Dallaire.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Oui.

Bgén Joe Sharpe:

Permettez-moi de faire une petite observation là-dessus.

Le président:

Pourriez-vous être bref, je vous prie?

Bgén Joe Sharpe:

Oui. J'ai visité une importante base militaire afin d'interroger les aumôniers sur leur rôle concernant l'état de stress post-traumatique et les blessures liées au stress opérationnel. Parmi les 16 aumôniers sur cette base, 14 avaient reçu le diagnostic d'état de stress post-traumatique.

Donc, si nous allons recourir à des aumôniers — et nous le devons, car ils jouent un rôle crucial —, il faut prendre soin d'eux également. Ce n'est pas une approche de type « médecin, guéris-toi toi-même ».

(1630)

M. Bob Bratina:

Ils doivent porter un lourd fardeau, en effet.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Brassard.

M. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, PCC):

Cinq minutes, monsieur le président?

Merci. Général, je suis content de vous revoir. Nous nous sommes croisés à Barrie, à l'occasion de l'ouverture de l'École secondaire Roméo-Dallaire. Je sais que les élèves, le personnel et les membres du conseil étaient enchantés de voir que vous aviez pris le temps d'être là pour l'ouverture d'une école baptisée en votre nom. Alors, merci, monsieur.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

J'y expose également tous mes artéfacts.

M. John Brassard:

Je crois que j'ai dû parler français pendant tout le temps que j'étais là.

J'aimerais parler des problèmes liés à la transition, parce que nous préparons nos soldats à se battre, mais nous ne leur montrons pas comment réintégrer la vie civile. La question de la transition a été soulevée à maintes reprises durant les témoignages. En fait, l'ombudsman du ministère de la Défense nationale a parlé d'un service de conciergerie destiné aux militaires qui sont libérés pour des raisons médicales afin de veiller à ce que tout soit en place. D'ailleurs, notre comité a présenté un rapport au Parlement, qui réaffirme la proposition de l'ombudsman.

Scott, je sais que vous étiez sur les ondes de CP24 il y a trois ans, et on vous avait alors interrogé sur la question de la transition. Dans le peu de temps dont nous disposons, si je demandais à tous les trois d'énumérer trois mesures prioritaires que nous devons prendre pour aider à diminuer les facteurs de stress pour ceux qui font la transition de la vie militaire à la vie civile, par égard à leur famille, en quoi consisteraient-elles?

Scott, je vais commencer par vous.

M. Scott Maxwell:

J'appuie sans réserve le rapport et les recommandations de l'ombudsman du ministère de la Défense nationale. Je l'ai dit publiquement il y a bien longtemps, me semble-t-il, maintenant que j'y repense, et l'ombudsman a évidemment formulé de nouvelles recommandations depuis.

M. John Brassard:

Il qualifie cela de tâches faciles à accomplir.

M. Scott Maxwell:

C'est tout à fait le cas. Une des particularités — et il en parle aussi —, c'est que ce n'est pas nécessairement un changement de coût. Il s'agit plutôt d'un changement de procédure. Je crois que c'est exact. Si nous allons avoir affaire aux deux ministères — sachant que les choses ne se passeront pas comme le général vient de le proposer, même si elles le devraient —, nous devrons nous assurer de faire tous les préparatifs nécessaires, dans la mesure du possible, lorsqu'un militaire quitte les forces, c'est-à-dire lorsque son dossier est transféré d'un ministère à l'autre. Nous devons veiller à ce que la transition se déroule le plus en douceur possible parce que nous savons, ayant travaillé avec ces gens, qu'il suffit de peu pour qu'ils cessent de prendre soin d'eux-mêmes, se laissent abattre et s'isolent de tout, y compris des activités propices à leur bien-être.

Nous en entendons parler beaucoup trop souvent. Notre organisation se penche là-dessus et cerne les lacunes pour ensuite essayer de les combler. Une des plus importantes lacunes que nous observons, c'est le délai d'attente après la libération pour passer d'un ministère à l'autre. C'est là que ces gens perdent leur identité. Il s'agit d'une lutte constante, et ils ont l'impression qu'ils doivent raconter de nouveau leur histoire, trop de fois à trop de personnes, qui ne s'en soucient pas assez pour leur donner les services de soutien dont ils ont besoin et pour les aider à répondre à toutes les questions qu'ils se font poser par leurs proches, comme: « Que comptes-tu faire maintenant? Quelle est la prochaine étape pour nous et notre famille? »

C'est sérieux, et tout ce que je peux dire en quelques mots, c'est ceci: adoptez les recommandations de l'ombudsman du ministère de la Défense nationale. Il s'agit de mesures faciles à accomplir, mais je crois qu'elles constituent un point de départ très important.

Bgén Joe Sharpe:

Il y a quelques points que j'aimerais souligner très rapidement. Ils sont semblables à ceux soulevés par Scott.

Tout d'abord, comblez l'écart. C'est un gros problème. Nous devons rapprocher ces deux ministères, et je crois que nous devons cesser de retirer le statut de membre à la personne qui quitte l'armée. Autrement dit, une fois que vous êtes membre des Forces armées canadiennes, vous le restez. Ce que nous faisons à l'heure actuelle, c'est que nous découpons les cartes, et vous devez vous débrouiller seul. Vous êtes classé dans une autre catégorie.

Nous devons éliminer le choc provoqué par la transition, lorsque la personne est rejetée de la famille, si je puis m'exprimer ainsi.

M. John Brassard:

C'est juste.

Bgén Joe Sharpe:

Ensuite, nous devons réduire la bureaucratie, c'est-à-dire la complexité de la procédure de transition. Ce n'est pas comme si nous allions dans un autre pays; nous restons au Canada. Nous ne faisons qu'une simple transition vers un autre ministère gouvernemental, mais l'horrible bureaucratie qui entoure cette démarche dépasse l'entendement — même lorsque vous êtes en santé. Si vous êtes malade ou blessé, c'est un obstacle qui est presque insurmontable.

Enfin, je dirais qu'il faut éliminer tous les obstacles à la transition. Étudiez sérieusement ce qui pose problème aux membres et à leur famille, et adoptez une approche ciblée pour faire disparaître ces obstacles. Nous ne pouvons nous passer des complications qui existent actuellement.

M. John Brassard:

Général, vous avez le dernier mot.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Ne vous perdez pas dans les détails et adoptez plutôt une perspective stratégique; autrement dit, si nous inculquons un sentiment de loyauté à ces gens, dès leur premier jour de service... Lorsque je me suis enrôlé, mon père m'a dit: « Ne t'attends pas à des remerciements. Attends-toi à une carrière intéressante, mais tu ne seras jamais un millionnaire. » À l'époque, il m'avait aussi dit: « Change ton nom pour Dallard, parce qu'avec Dallaire, tu n'iras nulle part. » En tout cas, les temps ont changé.

Faites ce qui s'impose en gardant à l'esprit que la loyauté perdure en raison des expériences extraordinaires qui nous unissent. Ce qui compte, c'est le fait de servir le pays. Par conséquent, débarrassez-vous de cette approche qui consiste à traiter le même problème de deux façons. J'étais un ancien combattant en service. Toutefois, une fois que je n'étais plus en service, j'ai connu une kyrielle de circonstances différentes — on n'avait plus besoin de moi.

Adopter une perspective stratégique consiste, en partie, à faire en sorte que les deux ministères, aux règlements différents, aident la même personne de façon continue ou presque.

Deuxièmement, ne créez pas une nouvelle charte, mais comme je l'ai souvent dit à la Chambre, réformez la version actuelle. Débarrassez-vous des nombreuses règles stupides.

Oui, cela vous coûtera plus cher. Eh bien, pensez aux milliards de dollars que nous dépensons pour former ces gens, pour les équiper, pour leur donner des munitions, de la nourriture, des fournitures médicales, pour les déployer dans le théâtre d'opérations et faire tout en notre pouvoir afin de réduire le nombre de victimes et de gagner la guerre, ce qui exige des sommes faramineuses. Songez aussi aux milliards de dollars que nous devons dépenser après coup pour reconstruire et remplacer l'équipement et pour reconstituer nos stocks. Ensuite, comparez cela au montant réel que nous consacrons aux êtres humains qui ont subi de telles épreuves. C'est le décalage le plus flagrant qu'on puisse imaginer.

Le ministère des Anciens Combattants a un budget de 3 milliards de dollars, ce qui est tout à fait insuffisant par rapport à l'ampleur de l'engagement que nous prenons dans toutes les autres dimensions, sauf celle qui concerne l'être humain proprement dit.

Voilà donc la position stratégique qu'il faudrait adopter.

(1635)

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen, vous avez trois minutes.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

J'ai besoin de tellement plus de temps, mais je vais...

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Nous aussi.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je veux revenir en arrière et souligner tout ce que vous avez dit, car c'est exactement ce que nous avons compris.

Ma question s'adresse à vous, Scott, et à vous, Général Dallaire. Vous avez dit que vous étiez dans une situation horrible et que vous êtes revenus à une vie superficielle où les gens ne comprenaient pas votre expérience. Comment pouvons-nous changer cela? Comment faire pour nous assurer que lorsqu'un membre des Forces revient, on reconnaît son expérience et ce qui lui est arrivé pendant son déploiement?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

L'élément central de cette question, en particulier avec les réservistes, qui sont partout en région et souvent abandonnés... Rappelez-vous que la situation se complique quand on parle des réservistes. Ce ne devrait pas être le cas, mais ce l'est.

Je pense que l'élément central de cette question est de les mettre en relation avec leur famille. C'est leur ancrage.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Pour un réserviste célibataire, ce serait ses parents. Ils font partie des Forces. S'il est marié, ce serait sa famille proche ou ses intimes, ses enfants. Faites fond sur l'aspect humain de ces personnes pour qu'elles puissent s'en servir comme point de départ. Nous avons perdu beaucoup de personnes parce qu'elles avaient perdu leur famille et qu'il ne leur restait rien. Elles n'ont pas seulement perdu leur travail. Elles ont perdu leur famille à cause de cela et ont fini par s'enlever la vie.

Essayez de garder cet élément fondamental de notre société avec elles et aidez-les à traverser les années difficiles à vivre avec des personnes comme cela.

L'approche est fondée sur les familles. Le mieux pour faire en sorte qu'elles soient disponibles est de passer par les centres de soutien aux familles. Personne n'est plus qualifié que leurs intervenants.

M. Scott Maxwell:

La chose dont le Général Dallaire a souvent parlé en ce qui concerne notre travail est celle de s'assurer qu'ils n'aient plus jamais à se battre. C'est une affirmation tellement percutante. Si, à leur retour au pays, ils sentent qu'ils se battent toujours pour accéder aux services qui leur sont offerts ainsi qu'à leur famille, cela pose un problème énorme.

Lorsqu'on parle de chasser ce sentiment et de la façon de le faire, pourquoi ne pas commencer par s'assurer qu'ils n'aient pas à se battre encore une fois pour recevoir les services auxquels ils ont droit lorsqu'ils rentrent au Canada après un déploiement?

(1640)

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord.

Vous avez dit quelque chose de très important, qu'on avait essayé d'économiser. C'est l'impression que j'ai constamment, qu'il soit question de la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants, de la méfloquine ou du syndrome de la guerre du Golfe.

Il y a quelques années, le comité a mené une étude sur le syndrome de la guerre du Golfe. Nous avions des montagnes de preuves selon lesquelles il s'agissait d'un mal psychologique, imaginaire, alors que nous recevions des anciens combattants chauves et clairement très désorientés.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Nous aurions pu leur donner 70 000 $ et leur dire qu'on reconnaissait qu'il s'agit d'une blessure. Même si nous n'arrivons pas à comprendre tous les aspects légaux de la question, et même si certains d'entre eux nous arnaqueront, on s'en fout.

Cela aurait eu pour effet de changer l'attitude des troupes pour ce qui est de rentrer au pays blessé. Si vous amoindrissez le fait qu'ils sont blessés, vous amoindrissez leur efficacité opérationnelle et le fait qu'ils prennent les risques appropriés, ainsi que la capacité des familles de composer avec eux à leur retour.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

C'est la même chose en ce qui concerne la méfloquine.

J'ai demandé directement si les soldats étaient avertis, s'ils étaient surveillés et si quelqu'un prenait la peine de se renseigner sur les effets de ce médicament, et on m'a répondu que non. J'ai demandé s'il y avait des conséquences pour quelqu'un qui affirme choisir de ne pas prendre ce médicament, et on m'a répondu: « Oh, non, cela passe par la chaîne de commandement. »

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

La chaîne de commandement vous imposera des sanctions parce que vous vous infligez des blessures à vous-mêmes en rejetant les conseils médicaux qu'elle a elle-même approuvés.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Même s'ils servaient de cobayes.

Le président:

Nous en avons terminé avec les témoignages des membres de ce groupe.

Nous allons faire une courte pause.

Au nom du Comité, je tiens à vous remercier tous les trois d'avoir été au service du Canada et de ce que vous avez fait pour les hommes et les femmes des forces armées.

Nous allons faire une pause de deux minutes et nous reviendrons ensuite avec le deuxième groupe.

Merci.

(1640)

(1645)

Le président:

Reprenons nos travaux.

Au cours de la deuxième heure, nous allons devoir abréger un peu le temps que nous consacrons à la question.

De l'Association québécoise de prévention du suicide, nous accueillons Kim Basque, coordonnatrice de la formation, et Catherine Rioux, coordonnatrice des communications.

Nous allons commencer par 10 minutes de témoignages.

Roméo Dallaire va rester avec nous, mais probablement pas pour répondre à des questions. Il veut seulement voir comment le Comité travaille.

Nous allons commencer nos travaux avec notre nouveau groupe.

Merci. La parole est à vous. [Français]

Mme Catherine Rioux (coordonnatrice des communications, Association québécoise de prévention du suicide):

Monsieur le président, membres du Comité et monsieur Dallaire, nous vous remercions tout d'abord de nous avoir invités à participer à cette consultation. Nous savons que les Forces armées canadiennes et Anciens Combattants Canada agissent déjà en faveur de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide. Nous vous remercions de votre intérêt à aller encore plus loin.

Depuis 30 ans, notre association développe la prévention du suicide sur le territoire québécois. Elle rassemble des chercheurs, des intervenants, des cliniciens, des endeuillés par suicide ainsi que des organisations privées, publiques et communautaires.

Nos champs d'action sont la sensibilisation, la mobilisation citoyenne ainsi que la formation des intervenants et des citoyens. Vous aurez compris que notre association n'est pas experte dans le domaine militaire. La pertinence de notre comparution devant le Comité aujourd'hui réside dans notre expérience à conseiller des acteurs variés de la société et à élaborer des stratégies de prévention pour des milieux très variés. Nous l'avons fait récemment pour des producteurs agricoles et pour des centres de détention.

Comment réduire le nombre de suicides chez nos vétérans? Ce que nous savons tous, c'est qu'il n'y a pas de réponse simple et que nous devons agir sur plusieurs fronts. Les quelques pistes que nous pourrons proposer pendant cette heure et qui nous apparaissent incontournables touchent la sensibilisation, la formation et l'offre de services.

Je vais commencer par la sensibilisation, ou le changement de culture et de mentalité.

Grâce à des campagnes de sensibilisation répétées, les mentalités ont commencé à changer au sujet du suicide et de la santé mentale. Les tabous sont moins tenaces et commencent à s'estomper. Le suicide n'est plus perçu ou est moins perçu comme une fatalité et un problème individuel comme c'était le cas il y a 10, 15 ou 20 ans. On sait davantage que c'est un problème collectif et qu'il est possible de le prévenir.

Des gens parlent davantage de leurs problèmes de santé mentale et la demande d'aide est davantage valorisée. Nous avons fait beaucoup de chemin à ce chapitre, mais beaucoup de travail reste à accomplir. C'est pourquoi nous sommes ici aujourd'hui.

Nous avons quelques propositions à faire en ce qui concerne la sensibilisation. Nous sommes persuadés qu'il faut d'abord travailler en amont en sensibilisant les militaires actifs au sein des forces armées, particulièrement ceux faisant partie d'unités plus à risque de suicide, comme les métiers de combat.

Il y a toutes sortes d'initiatives. Il peut s'agir, par exemple, de renforcer la cohésion autour d'une personne qui vit des difficultés ou qui est mise à l'écart de son unité pour des raisons de santé. On peut penser à des messages qui répètent que s'occuper de sa santé mentale est aussi important que prendre soin de sa santé physique. Il y a aussi des campagnes visant à faire connaître les ressources d'aide existantes.

Il faut aussi travailler à réduire l'acceptabilité sociale du suicide. Chez certains hommes qui adhèrent au rôle traditionnel masculin, il semble que cette acceptabilité soit plus forte. Certaines approches thérapeutiques visent à réduire cette acceptabilité et réussissent à rendre moins acceptable le suicide et à valoriser le fait qu'en trouvant d'autres façons de mettre fin à ses souffrances, on peut devenir un modèle pour ses enfants et un modèle de résilience pour sa communauté.

Nous sommes profondément convaincus que le suicide ne doit pas être une option, individuellement et collectivement. C'est pourquoi nous appuyons des messages qui vont dans ce sens et qui invitent à trouver d'autres avenues à la détresse et à la souffrance.

Nous croyons aussi que, dans la sphère de la sensibilisation, il faut poser des gestes pour éviter de glorifier les personnes décédées par suicide, étant donné que cela comporte un risque de contagion. Pour éviter cela, il est nécessaire de sensibiliser les médias. Je sais que cela se fait déjà, mais il faut répéter sans cesse ce message, parce que les salles de presse et les journalistes changent constamment.

(1650)



Il faut aussi sensibiliser les gens responsables des rituels lorsque survient un décès par suicide ainsi que les familles endeuillées. C'est une chose très délicate à faire, mais si l'on veut préserver la vie des vétérans qui souffrent, il faut prêter attention à cela. Il y a certaines pratiques qui peuvent avoir des conséquences, par exemple ériger des monuments honorifiques à la mémoire de militaires décédés par suicide. Nous y voyons un risque réel pour les vétérans qui souffrent, qui sont vulnérables au suicide et qui ont perdu énormément de reconnaissance et de valorisation. Ces vétérans pourraient voir le suicide comme une façon de retrouver un certain honneur et une certaine reconnaissance. Entendons-nous bien: il faut des services funèbres appropriés pour les militaires qui se sont enlevé la vie, tout comme pour les militaires décédés d'autres causes, toutefois il faut bien mesurer l'aspect de la glorification et de la contagion possible.

Mme Kim Basque (coordonnatrice de la formation, Association québécoise de prévention du suicide):

Pour bien évaluer les services et les formations à offrir, il faut comprendre dans quel état se trouve la personne suicidaire.

Toutes les personnes suicidaires, militaires ou non, croient qu'elles ne valent rien, que leur situation ne changera jamais et que personne ne peut les aider. Dans ce contexte, il devient extrêmement difficile d'aller chercher de l'aide, de la trouver et de faire un pas vers une ressource. C'est d'autant plus difficile quand on est un homme qui adhère au rôle traditionnel masculin, alors que la force physique, l'autonomie, l'indépendance, la résolution de ses problèmes par soi-même sont valorisées. Quand une personne se trouve dans une période plus difficile de sa vie où elle pense qu'elle ne vaut rien, que personne ne peut l'aider et que la situation ne changera jamais, tous ces obstacles font en sorte qu'il devienne extrêmement difficile et douloureux pour elle d'aller chercher de l'aide.

Par contre, en dépit de sa souffrance, la personne vivra toujours de l'ambivalence. Cela veut dire qu'une partie d'elle veut arrêter de souffrir, et c'est pour cela qu'elle pense mettre fin à ses jours, cependant il y a toujours une partie d'elle qui veut vivre. C'est cette partie qui doit être reconnue par la personne en détresse et c'est le travail des intervenants et des professionnels de faire grandir cette partie d'elle-même. Chaque fois que la personne suicidaire demande de l'aide, qu'elle manifeste sa détresse, c'est la partie d'elle qui veut vivre qui s'exprime et qui continue d'avoir de l'espoir.

Pour ce qui est de nombreux anciens combattants — il s'agit généralement d'hommes —, les caractéristiques de leur manière de demander de l'aide doivent être prises en considération. C'est vrai pour le suicide en général, c'est vrai également dans les forces armées. La demande d'aide ne se manifestera pas de la même façon, et la manière de leur offrir des services doit également être adaptée.

La recherche nous démontre que quand un homme adhère au rôle traditionnel masculin, il est cinq fois plus à risque de commettre une tentative de suicide que quelqu'un d'autre dans la population générale. Au sein des forces armées, une libération pour des raisons médicales constitue un échec du système, mais c'est aussi un échec pour cet homme qui vit une situation de vulnérabilité. Comme cette perception est généralisée à l'intérieur de lui et au sein de son unité, il ressent de la honte et il a de la difficulté à aller chercher de l'aide, comme on vous le mentionnait. Le fait de passer du service militaire actif à la vie civile et de devenir un ancien combattant représente alors un moment critique pendant lequel le soldat vulnérable va perdre le réseau fort et uni auquel il s'identifiait et dont il était partie prenante. Cela va donc représenter un moment extrêmement difficile qu'on doit prévoir et encadrer, d'où l'importance de la consultation actuelle.

De nombreux services sont offerts par Anciens Combattants Canada, comme on le sait. Cependant, les professionnels qui agissent en prévention du suicide, les intervenants vers lesquels nos anciens combattants vont pouvoir se tourner, sont-ils suffisamment formés? Sont-ils en mesure de reconnaître les indices de détresse et d'agir rapidement?

Une formation pour les citoyens du Québec a fait ses preuves. « Agir en sentinelle pour la prévention du suicide » est une formation qui ne s'adresse pas à des professionnels, mais à toute personne qui souhaite jouer un rôle dans sa communauté, au cours de ses loisirs, auprès de ses collègues de travail et de ses pairs. Cela permet d'agir proactivement, de repérer les indices de détresse, de diriger la personne vers les ressources d'aide et de l'y accompagner. La formation de réseaux de sentinelles fonctionne. C'est efficace et c'est déjà implanté dans certaines communautés militaires. Cela favorise le repérage rapide et la proactivité.

Dans la société civile comme dans différentes communautés particulières, ces sentinelles doivent pouvoir se référer à un intervenant désigné. Elles doivent être soutenues pour jouer leur rôle et pouvoir ensuite aider rapidement la personne suicidaire à avoir accès à un intervenant qui va faire une intervention complète et déterminer les démarches à entreprendre par la suite.

(1655)



Une formation en prévention du suicide est fondamentale pour les intervenants et les professionnels en santé mentale ainsi que pour les médecins qui travaillent auprès des militaires et des anciens combattants. Il ne faut pas tenir pour acquis qu'un médecin, une infirmière ou un psychologue ont reçu une formation spécialisée en prévention du suicide. Cependant, ces formations existent et elles fonctionnent.

Si le taux de suicide chez les hommes a grandement diminué au Québec au cours des années 2000, c'est précisément grâce à une stratégie nationale dans le cadre de laquelle la formation était au coeur des actions. Nous vous proposons donc d'en faire la pierre angulaire de la prochaine stratégie destinée aux anciens combattants.

Par ailleurs, nous attirons votre attention sur trois éléments majeurs à considérer relativement à l'actuelle offre de services ou à l'égard de ce que vous pourriez mettre en oeuvre. Le général Dallaire y a fait allusion plus tôt. Il s'agit de l'importance d'harmoniser les services proposés à nos militaires actifs et à nos anciens combattants. Cette transition doit être vécue le mieux possible pour que, ultimement, la personne ou le militaire suicidaire ayant besoin de services, ayant réussi à demander de l'aide et ayant trouvé quelqu'un pour l'aider et l'accompagner dans cette démarche n'ait pas à changer d'intervenant ou d'équipe traitante et n'ait pas à répéter son histoire, que ce soit avant ou après une tentative de suicide.

Pour éviter cette cassure, nous proposons que l'unification des centres de traitement des blessures de stress opérationnel des Forces canadiennes et des centres des anciens combattants soit considérée, de façon à ce l'équipe traitante soit la même. L'alliance thérapeutique est importante. Parfois, les anciens combattants reviennent même à l'équipe et aux professionnels de la santé qui étaient les leurs lorsqu'ils étaient en fonction.

Nous avons également parlé de soutien social. Le général Dallaire a abordé ce sujet. Il s'agit du soutien social des familles et des pairs, mais aussi du soutien provenant de l'unité ainsi que du rassemblement autour des Forces et des militaires actifs. Ce soutien doit être partie intégrante des soins et de ce que les professionnels et les intervenants proposent aux militaires.

Les hommes sollicitent principalement leur conjointe, parfois même uniquement celle-ci, lorsqu'ils veulent obtenir du soutien émotif. Quand ils ne vont pas bien, une séparation survient parfois. D'autres problèmes peuvent s'ajouter, notamment des problèmes de santé mentale, d'alcoolisme et de toxicomanie. Tout cela exerce une pression considérable sur les proches. Il est d'autant plus important de tenir compte de cette réalité pour favoriser le rétablissement du militaire et de l'ancien combattant.

Les Forces armées canadiennes sont une grande et solide famille. Chaque membre peut compter sur l'autre pour sa survie. Il s'agit maintenant de faire en sorte que cette force et cette entraide se poursuivent après la libération, que cette dernière soit ou non pour des causes médicales.

Par ailleurs, nous faisons des recommandation en ce qui touche la prévention sur le Web et l'intervention en ligne. La détresse se manifeste de plus en plus sur les diverses plateformes. Les personnes communiquent sur le Web leurs idées suicidaires et leur détresse. C'est notamment le cas des jeunes et des personnes isolées, mais ce comportement est de plus en plus répandu chez diverses personnes. Nous croyons que les stratégies de prévention du suicide doivent désormais tenir compte de cette réalité en incluant un volet Web. Cela permettrait aux gens de diffuser des messages de prévention, de faire du repérage, d'être proactifs et de proposer des services complets d'intervention en ligne.

En conclusion, je rappelle les éléments que doit comprendre une stratégie efficace en matière de prévention du suicide. Tout d'abord, tous les acteurs sont concernés. Ensuite, les gestionnaires des divers niveaux de la chaîne de commandement doivent suivre une formation, adhérer au principe et faire preuve de leadership. Également, une formation particulière en prévention du suicide doit être offerte aux professionnels et aux intervenants. De plus, il faut soutenir la création de réseaux de sentinelles. Il faut aussi avoir un soutien social fort et répandu. En outre, il faut que les gens soient davantage sensibilisés aux problèmes de santé mentale et qu'ils soient mieux informés sur l'aide qui peut être offerte; il faut favoriser la demande d'aide pour changer, ultimement, les cultures et les mentalités. Il est important aussi de porter attention aux messages et aux rituels, de façon à ce qu'ils n'augmentent pas l'acceptabilité sociale du suicide. Bien sûr, il faut un financement adéquat pour mettre en vigueur les mesures proposées. Enfin, il faut évidemment des soins accessibles et adaptés à la clientèle à laquelle ils s'adressent.

(1700)



Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons commencer notre première série de questions, que nous allons devoir écourter à cinq minutes par personne. Je suis désolé.

Nous allons commencer par M. Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci, monsieur le président.[Français]

Merci beaucoup, mesdames Rioux et Basque.[Traduction]

Je vous sais gré d'être venues. Malheureusement, c'est tout ce que je peux vous dire sans l'aide d'un interprète.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Robert Kitchen: Vous avez toutes les deux dit quelque chose qui a retenu mon attention, et je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps vu que je partagerai mon temps avec Mme Wagantall.

Madame Rioux, vous avez parlé du besoin d'éviter de glorifier la mort par suicide. Pouvez-vous expliquer ce que vous vouliez dire par cela? [Français]

Mme Catherine Rioux:

En utilisant le suicide comme moyen de mettre fin à ses souffrances, un militaire risque de recevoir des honneurs, de l'attention et de la reconnaissance. C'est ce que j'appelle la glorification du suicide. On peut glorifier la personne décédée ou lui rendre hommage, mais il est important de dissocier cela de son geste, de son suicide. Il ne faut pas qu'un militaire considère qu'en posant un tel geste il va recevoir plus d'honneur qu'un autre soldat décédé d'une crise cardiaque ou d'une autre cause. Il faut éviter qu'il y ait un phénomène de contagion et que les gens pensent que c'est une façon de retrouver de la reconnaissance de la part des Forces canadiennes et de la société.

(1705)

[Traduction]

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci.

Quelqu'un qui tente de s'enlever la vie parce qu'il souffre peut-être de dépression ou qu'il vit d'autres situations difficiles se fait souvent accoler une étiquette. C'est une tare. Quelqu'un se dit qu'il ne vaut rien. J'essaie de concilier cette perspective avec votre commentaire concernant la glorification du suicide et la question de savoir si une personne chercherait vraiment à passer à l'acte, mais je vous sais gré de vos commentaires.

Mademoiselle Basque, vous avez parlé de formation sur la prévention du suicide. Dans quelle mesure est-elle importante au sein de votre organisation? [Français]

Mme Kim Basque:

C'est un volet extrêmement important de notre organisation. L'AQPS conçoit des produits de formation avec des partenaires majeurs comme le ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec, de même qu'avec d'autres organisations ayant une expertise en données probantes. Nous devons nous inspirer et apprendre de la recherche pour offrir à nos intervenants et à nos concitoyens l'occasion d'acquérir des compétences concrètes qui leur permettront de jouer un rôle en prévention du suicide.

L'AQPS a actuellement une vingtaine de produits de formation différents. Nous avons formé au-delà de 19 000 intervenants pour qu'ils utilisent les bonnes pratiques et les outils cliniques leur permettant de reconnaître les facteurs proximaux du suicide. Il y a 75 facteurs associés au suicide, et certains ont plus de poids que d'autres. On observe certains facteurs de façon très rapprochée lors d'un passage à l'acte.

Grâce à l'expertise que nous avons acquise et aux outils dont nous disposons, nous améliorons nos interventions auprès des personnes suicidaires ambivalentes afin qu'elles renouent avec leurs raisons de vivre.

La formation pour les sentinelles est élaborée selon un modèle similaire, en tout respect, bien sûr, du rôle et des responsabilités qui appartiennent à des citoyens volontaires dans leur milieu. Cette formation va outiller ces gens afin qu'ils soient en mesure de vérifier la présence d'idées suicidaires, de connaître les ressources et d'accompagner la personne suicidaire vers ces ressources, car c'est souvent un pas difficile à franchir pour cette personne.

Nos produits de formation sont complémentaires et visent à resserrer le filet de sécurité autour des personnes suicidaires. [Traduction]

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci beaucoup.

J'espère que j'ai laissé suffisamment de temps à Mme Wagantall pour poser des questions.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Comme vous le savez, au Canada, nous avons récemment légalisé le suicide assisté et l'aide médicale à mourir. Depuis ce temps, 800 Canadiens ont choisi cette option. Avec l'entrée en vigueur de ces mesures législatives, je me suis beaucoup préoccupée de nos anciens combattants, de nos soldats, qui estiment que la vie ne vaut plus la peine d'être vécue et qui pourraient voir cela comme une affirmation. Dans le cadre de votre travail, remarquez-vous la moindre différence depuis l'adoption de ces mesures législatives? [Français]

Mme Kim Basque:

Il est trop tôt pour faire l'état de la situation ou obtenir une documentation pertinente concernant l'aide médicale à mourir — c'est comme cela que nous l'appelons au Québec.

Cela dit, nous sommes extrêmement préoccupés par ce sujet. Au moment de l'élaboration de cette loi, il y a déjà quelques années, nous avons participé aux consultations de la commission parlementaire de l'Assemblée nationale du Québec pour faire part de nos préoccupations quant à un possible glissement en matière d'acceptabilité sociale du suicide.

Une personne en fin de vie a l'impression, à tort ou à raison, que sa vie ne vaut plus la peine d'être vécue; c'est le jugement qu'elle porte. C'est pour cela qu'elle souhaite demander l'aide médicale à mourir, pour provoquer sa mort. Même dans un contexte médical, on comprend bien les raisons qui poussent les gens à vouloir se prévaloir de cette mesure.

Nos préoccupations portaient sur la manière d'offrir à une personne vulnérable, qui ne va pas bien, qui a l'impression que sa souffrance est intolérable, qui est dépressive et suicidaire, les mêmes soins auxquels elle devrait avoir droit, sans légitimer une demande d'aide médicale à mourir dans un contexte où légalement cela ne s'appliquerait pas.

Nous sommes extrêmement préoccupés par cette question. Pour l'instant, il est trop tôt pour mesurer les effets concrets et documentés de l'aide médicale à mourir.

(1710)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci de votre réponse.

Monsieur Graham. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci de vos commentaires.

Vous avez beaucoup parlé de formation. Dans le contexte des anciens combattants, j'aimerais savoir qui on devrait former.

Mme Kim Basque:

Les équipes soignantes devraient recevoir une formation spécialisée pour faire une intervention complète et accueillir adéquatement les anciens combattants en tenant compte de la demande d'aide des hommes militaires qui ne se présente pas toujours de la même façon. Ces équipes devraient aussi utiliser des outils cliniques précis ainsi qu'assurer le suivi et l'accès aux services et aux ressources.

Les réseaux de sentinelles auxquels nous faisions référence peuvent aussi être proposés. Les sentinelles doivent être des adultes volontaires qui sont déjà dans un rôle où ils ont la confiance de la personne qui pourrait se confier et accepter de s'ouvrir sur sa difficulté. Cela ne peut pas être l'équipe soignante. Il faut vraiment que ce soit des personnes qui gravitent autour des anciens combattants et qui sont capables d'avoir accès à eux même si elles ne sont pas des spécialistes.

Permettez-moi de faire un parallèle entre les anciens combattants et le milieu agricole. Nous avons formé des réseaux de sentinelles de façon massive et nous avons même mis sur pied une formation propre au milieu agricole. Les producteurs agricoles sont souvent isolés. Ils ne font pas nécessairement partie d'un réseau. Cela dit, il y a quand même des gens qui gravitent autour d'eux et qui les côtoient, parce qu'ils leur offrent des services. Ce sont ces gens qui ont été formés à titre de sentinelles pour rejoindre les producteurs agricoles.

On pourrait penser à mettre sur pied un système similaire pour les anciens combattants, c'est-à-dire évaluer dans quels lieux ils se retrouvent, qui ils voient, avec qui ils sont en contact régulièrement dans leur vie quotidienne. Ces gens peuvent devenir des sentinelles, s'ils le désirent, bien sûr. En effet, cela ne peut pas être une obligation. Tout cela est intimement lié à la formation d'intervenants. La sentinelle doit avoir accès à du soutien pour elle-même et pour être en mesure d'accompagner la personne suicidaire vers un intervenant 24 heures sur 24.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On pourrait donc former les familles et les militaires eux-mêmes.

Mme Kim Basque:

Oui, si le militaire n'est pas lui-même suicidaire et si la famille n'a pas elle-même besoin de soins et d'accompagnement.

Les proches des personnes suicidaires ont d'autres besoins et doivent obtenir des soins. Ils ne peuvent pas agir à titre de sentinelles dans un moment plus difficile de leur vie familiale. Ils ont besoin de prendre soin d'eux-mêmes et de leurs proches et de savoir comment accompagner et soutenir le conjoint ou la conjointe qui ne va pas bien. Nous essayons d'éviter de former les proches, précisément quand ils vivent un moment difficile. Bien sûr, à d'autres moments, c'est possible de le faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez aussi parlé d'éviter la glorification des militaires morts par suicide.

Un peu plus tôt, nous avons parlé avec le général Dallaire du besoin de compter les suicides de guerre comme des morts de guerre.

Comment peut-on réconcilier ces deux approches?

Mme Catherine Rioux:

Pouvez-vous répéter la question? Je veux être certaine d'avoir bien compris.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On veut éviter de glorifier le suicide, bien sûr, mais on veut aussi reconnaître les vétérans qui se sont suicidés à cause de blessures mentales subies à la suite de leur participation à la guerre. On doit les reconnaître, mais sans les glorifier. Comment peut-on concilier cela?

Mme Catherine Rioux:

C'est sûr qu'il faut reconnaître comme des victimes les gens qui ont combattu. Évidemment, cela pose un certain risque. Certains intervenants en prévention du suicide s'inquiètent de faire ce parallèle. C'est une question complexe.

Nous vous recommandons de prendre un certain temps et d'en parler avec des spécialistes de la question. Il y en a plusieurs au Québec, notamment des chercheurs comme Brian Mishara. Certains intervenants qui travaillent au sein de l'armée ont aussi une spécialisation en la matière.

Nous n'avons pas toutes les réponses, mais nous croyons qu'il est important de s'attarder à cette question et de trouver les bonnes pistes afin d'éviter une telle glorification.

Mme Kim Basque:

Voici la nuance qu'il convient de faire. Bien sûr, il faut recueillir des renseignements utiles sur les suicides de militaires et d'anciens combattants afin de comprendre ce qu'on aurait pu faire pour les éviter et pour mettre en place des services adéquats. Cependant, en rendant hommage à une personne décédée par suicide, il ne faut pas envoyer le message qu'on rend aussi hommage à la manière dont elle a mis fin à ses souffrances. Il ne faut pas non plus occulter le fait qu'il fallait offrir des services à cette personne et placer un filet de sécurité autour d'elle afin d'éviter qu'elle ne passe à l'acte.

C'est une préoccupation qu'il y a dans tous les milieux. À la suite d'un décès par suicide, on parle de postvention. Cela consiste à se demander quelles interventions on peut faire auprès des proches, des pairs et des milieux qui ont vécu la perte de quelqu'un. On est toujours préoccupé par la manière dont les gens ayant perdu quelqu'un qu'ils aimaient souhaitent lui rendre hommage. On ne veut pas que cela envoie un message de glorification ou qu'on lui rende un hommage démesuré. On s'inquiète des risques que pose le fait de mettre l'accent sur la manière dont une personne est décédée, c'est-à-dire sur le fait qu'elle s'est enlevé la vie.

(1715)

[Traduction]

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

On vient juste de me demander de renforcer cette affirmation, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Vous devrez être bref. Nous manquons de temps.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Avant que les personnes se suicident, l'option est d'avoir un système qui reconnaisse qu'elles ont été blessées de façon honorable. Si vous avez une façon fiable de montrer qu'elles l'ont été, et si elles estiment que cela a été reconnu — comme dans le cas des personnes qui ont perdu un bras ou une jambe — vous avez ensuite un équilibre entre ces personnes et celles qui ont seulement choisi l'autre option. Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec les témoins pour dire qu'il ne faut pas essayer de leur rendre hommage simplement parce qu'elles se sont suicidées. Il faut reconnaître au préalable que les militaires ont subi une blessure de façon honorable et les traiter honorablement comme l'ont fait leurs régiments et d'autres. On réussira alors à trouver un équilibre.

Le président:

Merci.

Allez-y, madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Je suis ravie que vous ayez soulevé cet argument, général Dallaire, car le trouble de stress post-traumatique est une blessure qui a affaibli un ancien combattant d'une certaine façon.

Vous avez parlé des personnes au combat qui souffrent de cette blessure, mais nous savons que le trouble de stress post-traumatique peut frapper les personnes qui ne sont pas au combat. Je pense notamment à une statistique tirée du sondage de 2016 de Statistique Canada qui révèle que plus du quart des femmes dans les forces armées ont dit avoir été agressées sexuellement au moins une fois dans leur carrière.

Vous êtes-vous demandées si les agressions sexuelles dans l'armée — pas seulement contre les femmes, mais aussi contre les hommes — sous-tendaient les cas de trouble de stress post-traumatique en situation de combat ou de non-combat? [Français]

Mme Kim Basque:

À ma connaissance, le lien de cause à effet n'a pas été très bien démontré, comme c'est le cas pour d'autres types de difficultés. Je ne veux en rien diminuer les effets des agressions sexuelles, qui sont épouvantables tant sur les femmes comme sur les hommes, mais je veux seulement préciser qu'on peut fragiliser quelqu'un qui ne l'est pas et fragiliser davantage quelqu'un qui est déjà en détresse.

Le suicide est complexe. Les facteurs de vulnérabilité au suicide sont également complexes. Il n'y a pas de cause unique qu'on puisse associer directement au suicide. Je ne sais pas si des données particulières ont permis de démontrer le lien entre le suicide chez les militaires et les agressions sexuelles. [Traduction]

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord, merci.

Je me demande si les professionnels de la santé mentale devraient jouer un rôle plus central pendant la transition d'un ancien combattant. Est-ce qu'une présence plus marquée de ces professionnels faciliterait cette transition, soulignerait la valeur de l'ancien combattant et montrerait que les fonctionnaires du MDN et d'AAC comprennent ses problèmes de santé mentale et éprouvent de la compassion pour lui? [Français]

Mme Kim Basque:

Nous proposons que la même équipe de soins suive le militaire, qu'il soit un militaire actif ou un ancien combattant qui a été libéré des Forces canadiennes en raison de son état de santé. Bien sûr, cela favoriserait la transition. Ultimement, cela ferait en sorte d'éliminer cette transition. Il s'agirait de la même équipe de soins qui s'occuperait d'un même militaire dont les besoins évolueraient. Comme la demande d'aide continue d'être fragile chez les hommes militaires, il est important de l'accueillir dans sa particularité. Il faut continuer de construire le lien de confiance qui s'est créé plutôt que de changer d'intervenant.

(1720)

[Traduction]

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Nous savons et avons entendu dire à maintes reprises à quel point les familles sont importantes pour le bien-être général de l'ancien combattant. Dans quelle mesure votre organisme intervient-il auprès des membres de la famille? Je ne pense pas seulement à la façon dont il soutient et aide les anciens combattants, mais aussi comment il aide les membres de la famille à survivre.

Dans un témoignage précédent, nous avons entendu dire que le nombre de suicides chez les enfants d'anciens combattants était à la hausse, ce qui est très troublant. Comment intervenez-vous auprès des familles? [Français]

Mme Kim Basque:

Notre association n'est pas un organisme qui offre des services aux citoyens qui ne vont pas bien. Nous avons une expertise en prévention du suicide, mais nous travaillons avec plusieurs partenaires qui offrent des services cliniques, dont les centres de prévention du suicide. Notre expertise tient compte de cela.

Au Québec, la façon d'intervenir a changé. Il y a quelques années, par exemple, on croyait à tort que le fait que la personne qui n'allait pas bien téléphone elle-même favorisait sa prise en charge. Or aucune recherche ne démontre que le rétablissement est plus efficace si la personne demande elle-même de l'aide. Ce que nous savons sur le suicide rend cette présupposition d'autant plus inappropriée.

Au Québec, on a adapté les services offerts afin qu'on accueille la demande d'aide provenant des proches et, bien sûr, pour qu'on soutienne ces derniers quand ils font cette demande, quand ils manifestent de l'inquiétude pour quelqu'un d'autre. Les services offerts par les centres de prévention du suicide et les centres intégrés de santé tiennent compte de cette réalité. [Traduction]

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je pense que c'est très important. En Ontario, il faut demander de l'aide soi-même. Votre famille ne peut pas le faire à votre place. C'est extrêmement frustrant.

Vous avez parlé des outils et des organismes externes. Nous avons aussi entendu dire qu'il y a un véritable esprit de famille au sein des forces armées. Trouvez-vous...

Le président:

Je suis désolé, votre temps est écoulé.

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Fraser.

Merci. [Français]

M. Colin Fraser:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je remercie nos deux invités de nous avoir livré leur présentation et d'être venus discuter d'un sujet aussi important. L'information dont vous nous faites part sera très utile à notre comité.

Vous avez déjà parlé de l'importance des familles et des proches dans ces situations. Pourriez-vous nous dire comment, dans les cas de suicide, il serait possible d'intervenir plus tôt avec l'aide des familles et des proches? Comment serait-il possible de rallier ces personnes autour du vétéran dans de telles situations?

Mme Kim Basque:

La prévention du suicide est l'affaire de tous, mais c'est aussi l'affaire des proches des personnes suicidaires. Ces dernières laissent des indices de détresse. On ne les voit pas toujours. On n'a pas toujours accès à l'ensemble du portrait. Chaque individu possède un morceau du casse-tête, et c'est quand on assemble tous ces morceaux qu'on arrive à comprendre dans quel état se trouve la personne, quels besoins ont été précisés et quels indices de détresse devraient nous mettre la puce à l'oreille.

Pour ce qui est des soins à offrir à la personne suicidaire, les proches ont de l'information privilégiée. Les ressources et les soins que nous pourrons offrir aux proches aideront ceux-ci à traverser la crise, à bien jouer leur rôle et à devenir un peu plus solides.

(1725)

Mme Catherine Rioux:

Il faut qu'ils sachent que des lignes spécialisées en prévention du suicide existent, notamment au Québec. Une ligne canadienne pour la prévention du suicide sera mise en oeuvre prochainement. Des projets pilotes sont mis sur pied. Cette ligne s'adressera à la population civile, mais aussi aux militaires et à leurs proches. En effet, ceux-ci peuvent se poser d'énormes questions, être inquiets et se trouver dans un état d'extrême vigilance. Il est donc important de faire savoir aux proches que ces ressources existent et qu'ils peuvent être guidés par des spécialistes en prévention du suicide.

Dans le cadre d'une stratégie sur la prévention du suicide, la postvention est extrêmement importante. Si on élabore une stratégie, il faut penser à des mécanismes de postvention. Que fait-on après le suicide de quelqu'un? Comment annonce-t-on les choses? Comment protège-t-on son environnement, ses collègues et sa famille, notamment? On peut faire de la prévention auprès de ces gens, qui sont plus susceptibles de commettre un suicide après le décès de quelqu'un.

M. Colin Fraser:

Il est important d'inclure de telles personnes dans le processus. En effet, plus on intervient tôt dans une situation de suicide, meilleur est le résultat.

Est-ce bien cela?

Mme Catherine Rioux:

Oui.

M. Colin Fraser:

Madame Basque, vous avez parlé, je crois, de services en ligne associés à votre organisation.

En vous basant sur votre expérience, me diriez-vous si les personnes en crise utiliseront les services en ligne? Peut-être qu'elles n'utiliseront aucun autre moyen de communication. C'est nouveau pour certains vétérans, mais c'est un mode de communication moderne. Pensez-vous que certaines personnes n'utiliseront que les services en ligne?

Mme Catherine Rioux:

Oui, nous le pensons. Des expériences ont été menées un peu partout dans le monde. Quelques-unes ont été faites au Canada, mais je dirais que nous sommes très peu avancés dans ce domaine. Au Québec, notamment, nous accusons du retard à cet égard. Certaines expériences démontrent que le Web permet de rejoindre d'autres types de clientèle, par exemple des gens qui n'iraient pas rencontrer des intervenants ou qui n'utiliseraient pas le téléphone pour demander de l'aide. Comme nous le disions un peu plus tôt, c'est le cas des personnes plus isolées. Les jeunes, aussi, communiquent très peu par téléphone maintenant.

On peut offrir d'autres façons d'interagir, notamment les textos et le clavardage. Dans certains pays, il y a de l'intervention en ligne. Il ne s'agit pas seulement d'établir un premier contact et d'intervenir par la suite au téléphone pour créer une alliance thérapeutique. Cela peut se faire en ligne, à distance. Pour certaines personnes, c'est moins intimidant. Elles se livrent davantage et peuvent choisir la fréquence des contacts.

Toutes sortes de modèles existent actuellement. Au Québec, le Centre de recherche et d'intervention sur le suicide et l'euthanasie, le CRISE, étudie beaucoup la question.

Bref, il y a des choses à explorer dans ce domaine, mais nous accusons du retard, malheureusement. Ce retard touche non seulement les militaires, mais la société civile également.

M. Colin Fraser:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Mme Kim Basque:

Cela signifie qu'il faut mettre en oeuvre les services dont les personnes suicidaires ont besoin là où elles se trouvent. Si c'est sur le Web, il faut être présent sur le Web. Si c'est au bout du fil, il faut être présent au bout du fil. Si elles se trouvent dans un lieu physique plus isolé, mais sont tout de même en contact avec une personne une fois par semaine, il faut que cette personne assure la vigilance et favorise cette demande d'aide.

Mme Catherine Rioux:

Après le décès par suicide d'une personne, il n'est pas rare que, sur les réseaux sociaux, les gens discutent du décès et expriment leur détresse et leur désarroi. Cela créé du désarroi parmi les intervenants en prévention du suicide, notamment les intervenants scolaires. Les gens ne savent pas trop quoi faire. Il y a des pistes de solution à proposer. Il faut mettre quelque chose en oeuvre pour que ces gens puissent repérer, dans les forums de discussion et les réseaux sociaux, les personnes qui sont les plus vulnérables.

M. Colin Fraser:

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Malheureusement, c'est tout le temps que nous avions pour les témoignages aujourd'hui. Je m'en excuse.

Je tiens à remercier votre organisme et à vous remercier toutes les deux du soutien que vous offrez aux hommes et aux femmes qui ont servi dans les forces armées.

De plus, si vous souhaitez ajouter quelque chose à votre témoignage, prière de l'envoyer au greffier, qui pourra ensuite le transmettre au Comité.

Sur ce, je vais suspendre la séance pendant une minute exactement, et nous nous occuperons ensuite d'affaires du Comité pendant environ cinq minutes. Je m'excuse auprès des membres du Comité d'avoir à vous garder un peu plus longtemps. Toutes les personnes qui n'ont pas besoin d'être ici peuvent partir. Nous allons commencer à étudier les affaires du Comité dans une minute.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

acva committee hansard 33606 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:43 on March 06, 2017

2017-02-22 ACVA 44

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

(1540)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)):

Good afternoon. I'd like to call the meeting to order.

I apologize to our witnesses. We had a vote at the end of question period, so we're starting about 10 minutes late.

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), this is a study of mental health and suicide prevention among veterans. Today's witnesses are from the Department of National Defence. We have Captain Langlois, director of casualty support management; and Commodore Sean Cantelon, director general, Canadian Forces morale and welfare services.

We will start with our 10 minutes of witness statements, and then we will go to questioning.

Welcome, and thank you for coming today. The floor is yours.

Commodore Sean Cantelon (Director General, Canadian Forces Morale and Welfare Services, Department of National Defence):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Good morning, Mr. Chairman and members of the committee. I am Commodore Sean Cantelon.

In my role as director general, morale and welfare services for the Canadian Armed Forces, I am responsible for a range of programs and services in support of the operational readiness of the Canadian Armed Forces, in such areas as fitness, sports, recreation, and health promotion, both on bases and wings in Canada and on deployed operations.

This ranges from financial banking services offered through our SISIP Financial services, to mental health programs and services for Canadian Forces members and their families through “Support Our Troops” funds, including the Soldier On fund, and the military families fund.

I am also the director general and chief of military personnel organization who is responsible for casualty support and transition services on retirement. In this capacity, I worked very closely with retired Brigadier-General Dave Corbould, who developed the JPSU renewal. [Translation]

Joining me today is Captain(N) Marie- France Langlois, the Director of Casualty Support Management who is also representing the joint personnel support unit. Captain(N) Marie-France Langlois is a former commander of the joint personnel support unit and, in her current capacity, is leading the renewal of transition services for releasing Canadian Armed Forces members.[English]

I am very pleased to speak with you today on the topic of transition programs and services that are available to Canadian Forces members transitioning from military to civilian life. These services and programs are offered jointly by the Canadian Armed Forces and Veterans Affairs Canada, and are assisted by third-party, not-for-profit organizations.

The CAF approaches the topic of military to civilian transition through a holistic lens, looking at the military community as a whole, inclusive of regular and reserve force members, veterans, and their families. On average, over 10,000 regular and reserve force members transition out of the Canadian Armed Forces every year. Of that number, approximately 16% on average are medically released. This is significant because members who leave the service for medical reasons often require unique services.

There are a number of services available to our members, of which I will highlight just a few. However, before I go on, I would like to say that the majority of programs that I mention are available to all military members, regular or reserve, regardless of reason for their release from the Canadian Armed Forces. [Translation]

Since 1978, the Canadian Armed Forces have provided transitioning military personnel with a two-day second career assistance seminar, run at each military base and wing. These seminars delve into such topics as: pension and benefits, release proceedings, psychological challenges of transition, and services and benefits administered by Veterans Affairs Canada. An additional one-day seminar is provided specifically for those members medically releasing.

At all seminars, the attendance of spouses is strongly encouraged.

(1545)

[English]

The service income security insurance plan offers benefits to all CAF members leaving the military for medical reasons. These personnel receive income support for up to 24 months, and up to 64 months if they are unable to return to work. Those who leave of their own volition are also eligible for the same benefit if they are deemed totally disabled.

A component of this program is the vocational rehabilitation program, which enables participants to restore or establish their vocational capacity to prepare them for suitable gainful employment in the civilian workforce. This program focuses on releasing CAF members' abilities and veterans' abilities, interests, medical limitations, and the potential economic viability of their chosen plan to help them establish their future. The vocational rehabilitation program support can start up to six months prior to their release from the Canadian Armed Forces.

Similarly, Veterans Affairs also offers a suite of social benefit, income support, and rehabilitation programs. Considerable effort is ongoing to better align and harmonize the Canadian Armed Forces and the Veterans Affairs programs to ensure a seamless transition to civilian life for all CAF members.

Over and above the internal work that I just highlighted, the Canadian Armed Forces also works closely with third-party organizations to assist transitioning members, veterans, and their families. We continue to expand our relationships with multiple educational institutions across the country that have shown an interest in better understanding the qualifications and training of military personnel and offer them advanced standing in assorted academic programs at their institutions.

One example of our partnership is the military employment transition program, which works with more than 200 military-friendly employers to help members find meaningful employment. There are currently over 5,000 registered members and over 1,200 hires. This is in pursuit of their goal of 10,000 jobs in 10 years.

Successful transition to civilian life is a key priority of my organization and is in line with the CAF's comprehensive suicide prevention strategy, which is currently being developed and integrated across a spectrum of initiatives in order to prevent suicides. To help promote effective and efficient transitions, we work closely with Veterans Affairs Canada to remove barriers, raise awareness, provide members and their families with appropriate resources and support, promote research and evidence-based responses, and develop policy, protocols, guidance, and support programs and initiatives.[Translation]

We are also actively working with Veterans Affairs Canada on improving services to veterans offered by our organizations through a joint national career transition and employment strategy. This strategy takes a whole-of-government approach and anticipates expanding its focus to include other government agencies such as Employment and Social Development Canada, Service Canada, the Public Service Commission and others to leverage existing programs and resources in support of transitioning members and veterans.[English]

The delivery of the Canadian Armed Forces and Veterans Affairs transition services is accomplished through the joint personnel support unit, which consists of eight regional headquarters, 24 integrated personnel support centres, and seven satellite locations across the country with a headquarters here in Ottawa. The JPSU serves regular and reserve force personnel and their families, as well as the families of the fallen.

The JPSU and IPSCs are envisioned as a one-stop shop where those who are ill or injured can receive advice, support, and assistance, not only from the military staff who deliver programs and oversee the IPSC, but also from our colleagues at Veterans Affairs, personnel who are co-located with the Canadian Armed Forces at IPSCs.

The CAF is committed to providing improved service delivery for care of the ill and injured, which is why we work in close partnership with Veterans Affairs to enhance programs and services. Veterans Affairs and the CAF are intertwined in many aspects of the service delivery, and personnel from both organizations work together at all levels to provide service and assistance.

Among its other programs, the JPSU is also responsible for the operational stress injury social support program, or OSISS. It is a joint VAC-Canadian Armed Forces program that provides valued peer support to members, veterans, and their families. The goal of OSISS is to ensure that when peers enter the gateway of peer support, they will be able to reap the benefit of support based upon lived experience to help guide them to the programs and services that can assist them on their road to recovery. Since 2001, OSISS has assisted many peers in accepting their new normal.

Mr. Chairman, I would like to thank you for the opportunity to appear today. Captain Langlois and I would be pleased to respond to the committee's questions.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll start with Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Commodore and Captain, for your service and for being here to talk with us today. I appreciate that.

One of the things we've heard a lot when talking about mental illness is identity loss. I'm wondering if you could tell us.... Is there any point in time, at the JPSU, when identity loss is identified and spoken to?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

I'll ask Captain Langlois, who has commanded the JPSU and can speak best to that to answer.

Captain(N) Marie-France Langlois (Director, Casualty Support Management, Department of National Defence):

I think the key is to keep the link with the former unit of the military member, if he wishes to do so. That's something we are enhancing to ensure that the communication between the commanders of different operational units across the region is supported, with this approach by the commanding officers in the regions.

It's challenging, for sure, for people who have known physical injury. I think by creating a trust bond with the member we're supporting, we'll be better able to communicate.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

You mentioned the word “trust”. That appears to be another aspect. We've heard from a lot of our witnesses on the issue of trust.

Again, I go back to identity loss. These soldiers, seamen, and airwomen are saying that they've lost their identity. It has been taken away from them, whether because of a physical injury or a mental injury. I look at things from a health-care point of view. I look at that and say, “Well, how we can advance that? Can we not put this into the program right from the start?”

Earlier, we talked about our service delivery, and providing services right from the moment they enter the forces. Likewise here, when we're talking about treatment and trying to provide that, while looking at identity loss and trust, we must make sure that it comes from CAF and rolls into VAC.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

First, I will touch on some of the changes that Brigadier-General Dave Corbould instituted as commander of the JPSU.

They were very focused on creating that unit identity that we all grow up with in the Canadian Forces—part of the team, part of the unit. We've done that by adjusting the authorities and the sense of the unit. It is a unit in charge of people, and they have the authorities and responsibilities. That creates those bonds that we've all grown up with.

Second, to go back to the larger issue of trust, this comes back to the ongoing dialogue that we're all leading and we've had great success with. It starts at the top with mental health and that it's okay to say, “I didn't have a good day,” and then building that relationship within the culture.

Bell Let's Talk Day may be one day that we embrace in the Canadian Forces, but we are also bringing about a complete culture shift towards the ongoing care of those who are ill and injured, so that the fragility to the unit that you and others have spoken about won't be there. That culture shift is ongoing right now.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you.

I'm going to ask if you might be able to provide us with some figures.

Can you break down the percentage of people entered into the JPSU who are dealing with mental health issues? Have you done that? Do you have that category at all?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

Actually, the joint personnel support unit deals with medical employment limitations. We deal with the prognosis, not the diagnosis, so we're not aware of the actual medical condition of a member. That would be something that the health services of the Canadian Forces may be able to provide.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Do you track or keep any record of people who have gone through the JPSU who may have committed suicide?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

Again, this is tracked through the....

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

You heard previous testimony by a witness talking about the Canadian Forces' tracking of personnel on release. That process is centralized through the central registries.

Obviously, if someone's a member of that unit or under the care of that unit at the time, the unit is aware of it. It's not a responsibility of the JPSU to track those. The specifics of those would have to come from elsewhere in the department, but we track the care and feeding of people for whom we're responsible at the time.

(1555)

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you.

In your presentation, you mentioned a program that is provided to people, basically to educate them on topics of pension benefits, release procedures, and so on.

I remember when I first became a member of Parliament. I went through a two-day force-feeding of information on what goes on here. I found that it was great information—lots of stuff—but it was in one ear and out the other sometimes, and I couldn't put my finger in there fast enough to stop it.

One of my questions to them was if they could do it a second time, maybe a month or two down the road. Is that process involved in—

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Absolutely, two, three, or 10 times. We encourage people to do it a minimum of five years prior to their planned release, and then they can come back and do the next package. We are working on enhancing that package availability. It is an optional process for all members of the Canadian Armed Forces. We run it on every base across the country. I personally have done two, though I'm not releasing tomorrow.

It's exactly the point you have made. To make sure that members don't suffer from, “I thought I heard about that,” they get an opportunity to come back. There's no restriction on the number of times they can go to the SCAN, second career assistance network.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Lockhart.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I find your testimony very interesting. We've talked before in our service delivery study as well. We have conflicting views, I guess, on the JPSU and its functionality. On one hand, we're talking about the fact that it's envisioned as a one-stop shop, and that every door is the right door. We hear from other health care professionals that's the approach many mental health models are taking now. On the other hand, we have this conflicting testimony from others who are saying that it's not functioning well and that people are falling between the cracks.

What are the challenges that you see? Obviously, people are in transition and it's a difficult time for them, but are there any specific areas where we know we can do better? That's really where we see suicide happening. People are falling between the cracks and not responding to some of the services that are available.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

I think closing the seam when somebody transitions from CAF to civilian life is very important. We're working very hard with Veterans Affairs to enhance the different programs we have.

Veterans Affairs will be involved earlier in the process, probably when there's a notification of decision of release. We're working at simplifying and reducing the complexity of the paperwork. A pilot is being worked on as well as guided support. It links to the ombudsman's recommendation, where he talked about concierge services. This guided support is interesting.

For example, the JPSU is tailoring the services to the needs of the individual. With this guided support, which will be VAC's responsibility, working jointly with CAF, depending on the need of the individual. If somebody has less complex needs, for example, they'll be able to access the portal. If they need support to complete forms and know what resources are available, then a veteran's service agent would be appropriate. A case manager could be more appropriate for some people with complex transitional needs.

Right now there's a lot of.... We're working in different groups to look at the new transition model. This involves transition early in a career. When we talk about a seminar or network, we're looking at the beginning, the first posting for an individual. He will have training concerning the long-term financial responsibilities, looking at what to look for in personal development training when they eventually transition.

The My VAC Account will be available sooner. A lot of work is being done to enhance that portal.

For sure, there's always space for improvement. We take the comments of the veterans and CAF members very.... It's very important for us to apply them to policy change, programs, and services.

(1600)

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

You spoke about starting to talk about this transition earlier. One of the things we've heard that's been recurring is the loss of identity, so I think it's very important that you do that.

When do we consider earlier? Obviously, those are for planned retirements, and that sort of thing.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

In my organization I touched on SISIP financial services. One of the parts, besides managing that insurance program, is financial counselling and investing advice.

Two years ago we hired David Chilton to do the The Wealthy Barber tour. Now we have one of our executives who's retired military, quite dynamic, he calls his “Pierre's Talk”. He styled it after TED Talks. He's going across the country, educating them on finance. It's a challenge. It's never too late, but it's a heck of a challenge when you arrive 20 years later and say you should have known and done that. These are the ongoing services we're doing to enhance this.

We're very engaged with Veterans Affairs right now to figure out the appropriate times—and we have some trials, which the captain touched on—to inject the guided support to build the person's awareness so it isn't, as your colleague described, too late, too quickly. That should help address the identity piece.

Often, identity comes from a lack of understanding and knowledge. As we demystify this process, which arguably is a bit mystifying.... Many people join the military. First thing after basic training, they don't say, “When I get out”. They usually say, “When I drive my tank” or “go to sea on a ship”.

We want to help deal with all of that. A wide range of activities are ongoing now. We're working with our colleagues at Veterans Affairs to bring out enhancements that can be announced at the appropriate time, once they're through. We've touched on the pilot, and guided support is a classic one.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

I just received this. It's “The Guide to Benefits, Programs, and Services for Serving and Former Canadian Armed Forces Members and their Families”. We haven't seen this before, I don't think. I'm wondering if we can enter it as evidence. It's a relatively new document—from October. How widely is this being used and distributed? Is there an online version of this document?

The Chair:

I apologize, but you'll have to make it very short. We're running out of time on this one.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

There is an online version. That guide has been updated many times, and we'll make sure that we provide you with a copy.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

It's also provided at all the SCAN seminars. They get to see it there. They go through it, and they're given it in advance.

The Chair:

Perfect. If you could just send it to the clerk after, we'd appreciate it.

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you very much for being here and helping to support our study into issues around mental health and suicide.

Captain Langlois, you talked about working with VAC to enhance programs and simplify paperwork. I wonder if you could give an example of some of the limitations you might have run into at JPSU in regard to that goal. Is there something that is preventing you from achieving what you want, or are things going well?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

There are many fronts that CAF is working on with Veterans Affairs.

A good example of a program is the skills translator. When a CAF member is transitioning out, often the military skills are hard to translate into a civilian occupation. Right now CAF is working very closely with ESDC and Veterans Affairs to build a portal that is a translator. It's called MOC to NOC, so military occupation to national occupation. This is quite exciting, because this portal is going to grow, and we're looking at it eventually linking up into an education piece, into educational institutions. This is the work that is currently being done.

There is already skills translation on the ESDC site, but this is something we want to do. If you go on the CAF site or you go on the ESDC site or you go on VAC, they're all linked together. That's a tool that will assist the CAF member to transition, so that's a good example of the work we're doing.

(1605)

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

We heard testimony from a number of veterans that they feel as though they've been stripped of their identity, that they've literally been pushed out of the military, and they have feelings of abandonment.

Do you think this skills translator will help them to connect to a new sense of identity, or connect to a feeling of being needed again? I suppose it comes down to being needed, being valued.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

It's going to be a tool not only for transition but also for recruiting and for retention.

If somebody is in a specific occupation and knows how it translates to civilian life then he can, at the beginning of his career, maybe pursue more education in that field. So yes, with regard to identity, for sure I believe it's going to enhance it.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

Commodore, you talked about shifting the culture. Is there something more in regard to that military culture that you could talk about that is preventing it from living up to this potential to successfully help the veterans who are transitioning out?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

That's a challenging question for me to answer because I think if I had the key I'd be brilliant.

I've been in the military for 34 years and I have seen dramatic changes in culture and how we approach a wide range of activities. Our culture, as it does everywhere, reflects our society.

The chief has been very clear about the activities not in our military, and very open as well. Obviously it started with General Dallaire, but we've had serving officers at very senior levels and very senior NCOs, which is extremely critical, come out and speak about the challenges of transition and the challenges with things like mental health or physical recuperation.

That's what I mean by an open-culture shift, because previously those were private conversations involving only two or three people, and now they're becoming more open. I think that's the best thing we can do. As the leaders of today's Canadian Forces, we're taking our leadership responsibilities and trying to change that culture so we don't get to that sense of alienation and loss of identity.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

We've heard a great deal of late about opioids and addictions connected to opioids. I have the sense that a lot of our veterans are being prescribed opioids. Do you have any concerns about the prescribing of opioids? I know they're intended to be painkillers, but would other medication be preferable? They're extremely addictive, and they seem to play a role in well-being and mental health.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

I'm not a doctor, and I'm not the surgeon general, so it's not in my area of expertise. I would point out what Captain Langlois said. At the JPSU, we know the prognosis, in other words what the outcomes will be for the individual. We don't have an idea of their prescriptions or medications, or the specific medical limitations. We're focused on who they are.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

They don't talk about feeling dependent...?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

That's between them and their doctor in a medical capacity, which is how I understood the question.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Because very often there are very strong connections between how someone is adapting and preparing for life on the outside and these underlying issues, I wondered if you had a sense of any correlation. Obviously not.

(1610)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.):

Thank you both very much for coming today and sharing this information with us.

You mentioned an average of approximately 10,000 who transition out of the Canadian Armed Forces every year, and about 16% of those are medically released. Do we know how many of that number are released with mental health challenges?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

I don't think we do.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

It would be with the surgeon general.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

One of the things that was mentioned was—and I totally agree, and we've touched on this in our service delivery report, which was tabled back in December—better aligning and harmonizing the CAF and VAC programs to ensure transition to civilian life is as seamless as possible. What does that mean to you? What are the challenges right now?

Captain Langlois, you touched on closing the seam, which is important. Especially for morale and services programs, what do you see being done right now to help make that transition easier?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

That's one of the real flexibilities we have in the morale and welfare services. We operate under the non-public fund framework, which allows the CDS to provide services both to members and their families. That includes when they become veterans. Our programs, such as the Canadian Forces health identification card, which gets them discounts—we work with industry—is seamless between being a service member and a veteran. You stay in that program for life and your family stays in that. That's an example where we're closing the gap, where we can, between the day you have your uniform on and the next day you get up and it's something you used to wear to work.

There are many activities like that where we're working very hard so that, the day after, you carry forward and have a very smooth transition. We touched on that, and the JPSU's example is the vocational rehab I spoke about. That program starts prior to your release so that, as you take off your uniform and you're now a vet, you're still working with the same vocational person you started with in uniform. That's a seamless piece. That's an example where we don't have a gap.

There are other ones we're working to address with our colleagues in Veterans Affairs. Some proposals are coming forward that I can't speak about, but they will address many of those gaps.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

With regard to morale and welfare services, are you somehow currently monitoring or tracking morale on some scale within the Canadian Armed Forces? If so, how are you doing that?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

We do a community needs survey, not just of service members but their families—families in the wide definition—and veterans. We've just finished collecting the data, and are now in the process of processing the data and what it means. I don't have that version available for release, but I'll go back and we'll provide the clerk with the most recent one, which showed how we're meeting their needs.

The question of their morale is more complex. It's a bunch of services. That's how we do it. It's about how we can best meet their needs so that we can adjust our services.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Does it entail mental health services in any way, or asking questions along those lines?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

It asks questions along the lines of, what are your primary stressors? What are the quality of life factors? You could then deduce capacities in regard to programs that would address mental health.

It doesn't to my knowledge...but there may in fact be a question. I had better watch myself on that.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

That's fair enough, but if you could provide that information, that would be helpful.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Yes. We can provide the most recent survey.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

With regard to SISIP, the member can receive income support up to 24 months. If they're unable to find a job or return to work, they may apply.

Can you help me understand exactly what determination goes into how long they get that SISIP assistance for?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Absolutely.

Every member of the Canadian Forces, since 1982, has been mandated into the long-term disability plan through SISIP. This is a government-provided plan. They also have the option for other SISIP products for optional life insurance.

If they're medically released or they apply for non-medical release for a medical condition, that disability plan guarantees them two years' worth of income, up to a maximum of 75% of their previous income. It's adjusted if they have a pension, as per any disability plan in society, and the same with the rest of our federal government colleagues

In that two-year period, they go through vocational rehab through SISIP. If they stay on that plan, it's based upon whether or not they're determined to be totally and permanently incapacitated. We have individuals who've been on that plan for in excess of 20 years. That plan carries forward as long as the need is there. That's the macro piece.

Their application is once going in—you asked about that—and they're enrolled. It's kind of a one-stop shop. They'll do that at the JPSU, because once there are medical conditions, they'll apply it. It's managed administratively through SISIP Financial, and the insurer is Manulife that provides the service.

(1615)

Mr. Colin Fraser:

In your presentation, you touched on working with third-party organizations, and you gave one example.

I'm wondering about other examples, ones dealing with mental health challenges in particular, and whether you've seen more third-party organizations reach out to or building partnerships with them over the last number of years where it's become obvious that mental health challenges within the Canadian Armed Forces and veterans community have become more acute.

Can you talk about that, please?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

I'll sort of back up a bit on that.

Increasingly every year, we have organizations coming to us. Through the DCSM organization, they'll list these partnering organizations. I used MET as an example.

There's a strong interest in helping mental health, whether it's as partner organizations or research through such organizations as CIMVHR, which is dealing with both Veterans Affairs and military families.

An example of mental health that I might touch on is that there is a new organization called Team Rubicon, which has started up in Canada. This is back to that sense of belonging, and I notice a lot of nodding heads. Team Rubicon is going to allow you to leverage those military skills as a civilian with that gang doing those activities. Of course, the one directly in our line of organizations—and you had testimony from Jay Feyko, who is an employee of the staff of the non-public funds and works as part of CFMWS and we partner with organizations.

There is the direct one such as Soldier On. We would work with another organization like that, and ones that I would say are prescriptive, if I could add that, for things like Team Rubicon. They have a wide list. They would be on the website. That would be the best place for those names, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Eyolfson.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Thank you so much for coming.

I'd like to expand a little on a very good question that Dr. Kitchen across the way asked at the beginning. We talked about the identity of people in the armed forces. As the old slogan would say, it's not just a job; it actually is someone's identity. Of course when they're released, they would like to keep that identity.

We know there are members who leave due to illness or injury who might be able to serve some roles in the military, but can't due to universality of service, as they can't perform certain tasks. Is there any way to identify roles that they may take within the military as civilians?

We know there are civilian jobs within the military. Civilians are doing certain jobs in clerical positions, offices, these sorts of things. Is there a way to identify some of these veterans who might be able to serve as a civilian while still participating in the military?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

That is one of the main points of our SCAN seminars. I don't want to go too far into how the public service hires in priority for ex-military personnel. There would be better witnesses on that. However, in my purview, as the staff of the non-public funds, which is an agency that works for the Canadian Forces. I'm the CEO of that agency in my capacity as director general, Canadian Forces morale and welfare services and 40% of our employees in the agency, which is over 4,500 people, are either spouses of or former service members, one or the other. We find a great deal of wealth in hiring former service members, who then provide a variety of services.

You had Jay Feyko speak to you. Jay is an example of that. We hired an ex-major who had a unique experience and who could bring forward a program through the morale and welfare service. That is exactly what we aim to do. We look for those people where we can help them be part of the team and keep that identity.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Good.

Speaking to that, would there be a greater role for coordination between public services and the military when making hiring decisions?

I was a little surprised to know that it wasn't the military hiring these people. If they're working for the military, even if they are civilians.... That was obviously an incorrect assumption of mine that the armed forces would be hiring them.

(1620)

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

The Public Service Commission, which we spoke of in our introductory remarks, is one of our partners that we work with on that, and there are processes to allow for priority hiring for ill and injured military veterans. The exact details of that you'd need to get from the experts at the Public Service Commission. There is definitely those skills sets and that sense of identity and understanding of the military life that they bring to the public service.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Okay, thank you.

Does the Canadian Forces analyze characteristics about their lives that might help with their transition: what socio-economic level they come from, what might their financial needs be on release, also the kinds of jobs they did in the Canadian Forces that might better point them toward what to do in a civilian career? Is that information analyzed while they are actively serving?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Yes, in a slightly different manner.

That is what the service provided through SISIP Financial does on all the bases. We have the financial counsellors, the financial advisers, and investors. That's exactly what they do. They sit with the member, go through their life's goals, and ideally find them freedom 55 or whatever the slogan is, show them how they are doing, and build them a plan. We do that everywhere. For those who are in crisis...ideally we are going to get them prior to financial crisis and set them on a path so that both their military career and their retirement are successes.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

One question, changing gears a wee bit, is that I understand there are different medical systems between active serving military members and the rest of the population. Actively serving Canadian Forces members aren't covered by the Canada Health Act. They receive all their health care through the armed forces. Of course, when they are transitioned and become veterans, then Veterans Affairs will basically supervise their care but they are now under the various provincial health care systems.

Is there a way of coordinating between the armed forces and Veterans Affairs, particularly for veterans who might have complicated medical needs? You might have someone who leaves the military and is healthy and uninjured and just needs a family doctor, the way everyone does, and can wait. Whereas you might have someone discharged with complex injuries or complex medical problems, and they need to be very quickly hooked up with someone to coordinate their care. Is that kind of coordination done between VAC and Canadian Forces?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

It is, and it's done through the surgeon general. It's in his purview.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

That's part of what the JPSU is enabling, that conversation through OSISS, or through that process.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

All right.

With that, I'm about done.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Captain Langlois, I want to pick up on a couple of things you talked about. You mentioned the DND ombudsman's report. You also mentioned guided support. When you mention guided support, are you referring to the concierge-type service that the DND ombudsman referred to in his report?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

Yes.

Mr. John Brassard:

You also said that would be a VAC responsibility. Can you clarify that as accurate?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

It's interesting because the transition for a member is a joint effort between CAF and Veterans Affairs. Specific pieces fall under CAF, specific pieces fall under VAC, but the guided supports will be led by VAC in coordination with CAF.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

While we're not VAC experts, they have a current pilot going on with the term “guided support” and as we work to close the seam, we're going to leverage those results going forward.

Mr. John Brassard:

As you know the DND ombudsman referred to it in his report as a game-changer, the fact that the Canadian Armed Forces would retain medically released members until all benefits from all sources, including Veterans Affairs, have been finalized. He also talked about the concierge service and that the Canadian Forces offer a tool that's capable of providing members with information so that they can understand their potential benefit suite prior to release. Is there difficulty on the forces' or DND's side to implement these changes?

If the ombudsman and quite frankly the Veterans Affairs committee recommended this to Parliament, to the government, are there difficulties on your side to do this, to make sure that all these things are in place prior to the hand-off, if you will, to VAC? Are there logistical problems within DND to do that?

(1625)

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Going back to the macro points of what the ombudsman has spoken about is exactly what we're focused on, bringing that simplified process through the JPSU, the IPSCs, and the whole transition. General Corbould led that and brought forward a proposal to the chief on a reorganization that will affect those types of recommendations, so it is simpler for the member, it is guided concierge—

Mr. John Brassard:

Is that recent?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

That's very recent. That was done just prior to his retirement.

Those changes will be forthcoming soonish, I hope. In the interim, we are working behind the scenes to do that every day. While I can't provide the exact announcements at this time, we're not waiting for those announcements to close those seams and enhance that capacity. It is a clear part of this dual mandate that you are a member of the Canadian Forces until the day you're released. The chief takes that very seriously and I take that very seriously as his officer charged to do so. We will take care of them and when they're ready to take off the uniform and then transition the next day, they'll be in Veterans Affairs' care. But we don't want that next day to be their first day to meet Veterans Affairs. That's what the captain is touching on. We need them to meet as they are now with complex cases at the IPSC, with the veteran service agent, or the other appropriate levels of care.

That's what we're focused on achieving, so we're aiming to get to all of that which the ombudsman has described.

Mr. John Brassard:

That's good to hear.

The other issue I want to touch on is the issue of re-employment. Obviously there's a priority within the public service. But one of the things that we've heard through testimony and through some of our own research is that the actual percentage of those who are either medically released or retiring from the Canadian Armed Forces and are able to get employment within the Public Service of Canada or within DND itself is abysmally low. What can you attribute that to? Why aren't we hiring more veterans? Why aren't we hiring more DND Canadian Forces people to work within our public service?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

I can't answer that question. It's not within my lines of how the federal government hires.

Mr. John Brassard:

Is it a qualification issue? You can certainly speak to the back end of it. Are we preparing our Canadian Forces members, our veterans coming—

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

We can absolutely speak to that. That's the point that Captain Langlois was talking about, the ability to take that unique military jargon and turn it into what a civilian is, how to go from describing repairing a tank in the battlefield to using it in the vernacular of renovating a house, because most Canadians understand renovating a house. Those are the tools we're aiming to create.

Resumé writing, all these programs are offered through the second career assistance network that I touched on in my introductory remarks. We need to enhance and professionalize that, and we're doing that now. We're going to do more and more and better and better, bringing better tools and working with partners like MET Canada that does an online webinar about how to do an interview, how to explain yourself. The cases of application often aren't a lack of capability, it's often how to express yourself as in any job interview and to be the successful candidate. We're addressing that inside the Canadian Forces.

Mr. John Brassard:

I think it's a critical element of it, Commodore, because we're in the pursuit of understanding mental health and suicide issues amongst veterans. That transitional aspect, the sense of belonging, is not just within the military but outside of the military, and employment plays an important role in that part of it.

Thank you, sir.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Commodore and Captain. I note your ribbons and that you have a couple of service medals from the Middle East.

I have a number of questions. I think we have to tie back to one of my favourite books, Catch-22. In Catch-22, Yossarian cannot get his section 8, in the American parlance, because if he says he's crazy, they know he's not crazy, but if he doesn't say it, they know he is. Either way, he's stuck there.

If I'm a member of the armed forces and I think I'm suffering from mental illness, what kinds of barriers are there to my dealing with it, in terms of a catch-22?

(1630)

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

This goes back to the stigmatism piece. The barriers ultimately, I think, in all of our society are how you seek help. That's the culture piece we're working very hard on. There are no physical barriers. There are no barriers to going into the hospital, identifying that you're having difficulties, and getting those services. The surgeon general would be able to explain to you the whole program there.

There's no one saying you can't go. All you need to say is, “Sergeant, PO, Commodore, I need to drop into the hospital tomorrow.” That's it. No one asks why. If you have a close work relationship, someone might ask that, but at the end of the day, it's up to the individual. Once they're in, they have the programs and services that our health care system provides. That goes back to us, as a leadership team and as the Canadian Forces, to work hard on this culture, just as we're doing throughout the nation through the idea that a bandage that's invisible around your head is equal to a bandage around a broken arm from tobogganing on the weekend.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair, but my point is that if somebody is feeling mentally ill, and they know that if they go and get treatment, they'll be identified by the military structure as having mental illness and therefore not being fit to serve, they continue to serve in order to avoid being kicked out because they have an illness. The closest metaphor in civilian life is a whistle-blower. If you come forward, you have to be protected. Is there any protection for that kind of person?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

The OSISS program, which is a peer support program, is a confidential program, and the chain of command is not aware of the interaction between peers and the people who are supported. Often, this is the first step towards moving forward and seeking some medical help because these are people who have lived the same experience. Those kinds of programs, the same as Soldier On, are peer building and spirit building, and sometimes it takes that first step to be able to be referred or to accept to move forward and see that it's going to improve well-being.

For sure, those programs are beneficial.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

There's a connection in your question that I would break up a bit on the assumption that, just because I go and get mental health in uniform.... I was involved, when I worked in the Arctic, in the crash of First Air 6560, which was the 737 that, unfortunately, missed the runway and impacted into the hill in the middle of Operation Nanook, and we lost a number of people. I was the on-scene responder. I've had, personally, over the years, some issues with that, and I've dealt with that through medical assistance. That has not precluded me in my ability to proceed. In fact, it's no different than someone who may have had an alcohol difficulty or has recovered from a physiological musculoskeletal injury if they do their rehab, if they are able to function.

A mental health illness does not automatically mean a release from the Canadian Armed Forces. We've had other generals who have spoken and other chief warrant officers who have spoken about their own individual.... You manage and move forward. That's the key, so I want to break that assumption that, just because you go to see the psychologist or social worker with a problem, that automatically leads to release. I think the more we have those cases, the more we talk about the fact that you can move forward in your life and you can be a functioning member, and there's no restriction in regard to promotion, etc., the better off.... That's the culture piece I talked about earlier.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You talked earlier about when somebody is ready to take off the uniform. How do you know when somebody is ready to take off the uniform, medically? If somebody is in a medical position where the military feels they have to take it off and they're not ready to do that, how do you deal with that?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

You've asked a medical question. Neither of us are medical officers, so we can't speak to that. We could speak to the process.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

Yes. If somebody has a medical employment limitation that will breach universality of service, at that time they will likely have to transition out. The process of transition can take between six months and up to three years, depending on the complexity of the needs of the individual. For sure, with the work and efforts that we're doing with the transition piece right now at CAF and at Veterans Affairs, we want to make sure that the member is ready to transition out.

You have to meet the universality of service. Sometimes people don't meet the universality of service but can be employed in the CAF, can be retained for up to three years as well, and be employed in that capacity. It can vary between six months and three years.

(1635)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We've talked a lot in the last few weeks—I've only been on this committee for a few weeks—about how a new soldier, a new person coming into the military, goes through basic training, which breaks them down into a military person, but there's no similar process where they're intensively brought back into civilian life. Would you agree with that assessment?

The Chair:

I'll just have to limit that to a quick answer, if you could, please.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

No, I wouldn't agree with that assessment.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Wagantall.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, CPC):

That was a quick answer. I might give you more time on that one.

I'm trying to understand JPSU. It's a combination. If an individual comes in who cannot serve at that time, their goal is probably to be restored to a full career and go back, or there's a chance, if they're going to recognize that they cannot continue on with that universality, that they become a veteran.

VAC and CAF are working together on this. How is that decision made? Who is the one who makes the final decision that you have to go this way or that way? In my mind, I'm thinking that, if it looks like they're being restored, it would be through the Canadian Armed Forces that the final decision is made. If the decision is being made that they have to leave, it should be VAC that makes the final decision that they're ready to make that move.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

The decision to transition out or to remain in the forces is an administrative decision that's made by the director, military career administration, and it's based on whether the medical employment limitation meets the universality of service or not.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

So it's CAF that makes that decision.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

That's CAF.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay. We're dealing here with mental illness and suicide, and there are clearly dynamics of mental illness connected to circumstances like what you went through. That is a situation where you hit a crisis, and it's part of your life now. We also hear a lot about the frustrations of the release process that you're trying to fix with the seamless move. Then I'm thinking, why are we releasing them into the veteran world before they have a family doctor, before their house is retrofitted, without any money, and they have to wait months before they get paid? This has increased their stress levels.

Then also, there is the part of it that my friend was mentioning where, in speaking to some of those who are helping vets in transition programs, we prepare them, we condition them to a fight-flight mentality and a change in their sleep patterns, but then we expect them to somehow transition back into what the rest of us do, like stay up late because we want to. They're not prepared, yet they can be. There are ways that they can be reprogrammed—that's a bad term—to be able to sleep without that sense of fight or flight. Why are we releasing them without giving them that gift, which I think would change a lot of their mental stress around trying to recondition into normal civilian life?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

It's a big question. I'll start at the top. The chief has been very clear. We're going to professionalize the transition services. Part of that answer speaks exactly to your question about the right time to go. Captain Langlois explained the current processes and the rationale behind breach of universality of service. We are working with our VAC colleagues to enhance it so that, as they go through that transition process, they become, for lack of a better term, more civilianized where they need to be civilianized, but keep enough of the military so that they don't have that identity piece that has been asked about before.

Depending upon their career, where they live, and where they are in the country, there are various challenges with that. If you live in a very large military base in a very isolated location, such as Petawawa—well, Petawawa's not isolated—or Wainwright, it's fundamentally different than if you live here in Ottawa, where you blend in.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Saskatchewan.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Yes, Saskatchewan and Moose Jaw. That's part of that professionalization program and process where we're working hard to close the seam and the gaps. I can't speak to the specific time of when to release. There are options under consideration to address how long you stay.

Can I address one minor point on the income?

(1640)

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Yes.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

If they've done their application for LTD, which they would do under a medical that they've started at vocational rehabilitation, their income flows in a vast majority of cases, within 16 days after their last paycheque. That's run through their private insurer program. Other income pieces that are often quoted in stories, I can't speak to because I'm not accountable for pensions or veterans benefits.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Yes, I think it's a VAC issue there. I have one more quick question then. We also heard about the frustration of when they have to take that uniform off and it's just “goodbye”. Is there something in the works to say, “We need to give these guys a parade, a recognition of their service in spite of the fact that it may not have ended up being what they envisioned or what the armed forces envisioned for them in the long term?” Because they leave without that sense of being valued by the armed forces that they gave their life to.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

There is an existing program, the depart with dignity program. This is where people will be presented with letters from the Prime Minister, the mayor, their certificate of service. They will have their friends surrounding them, their families, often a gift from the unit, many comments from their peers. But it's really tailored to what the individual wants. Sometimes somebody wants to leave with something smaller. Some others want to have something[Translation]

bigger.[English]The program is in existence and it's working well.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

But it is their choice.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to come back to an earlier question about the challenges that the JPSU faces. I wonder, do you have enough staff? We've heard from some veterans that there is just not enough people available to do all of the work that you have to do.

Is there enough staff? If not, do you have trouble finding qualified people in order to do that very sensitive and important work? What would you be looking for in terms of a staff person? Do you have enough funding? Very often it comes down to the resources available. Is there enough in terms of funding?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

We are meeting the mission, but, for sure, the number of medical releases has recently increased so it puts more pressure on the staff. With the renewed structure of JPSU that General Corbould worked on and presented and that was supported by the chief, we're looking at enhancing the structure of the JPSU to make sure that the services provided remain at a high level and remain the standard so that we can meet our mandate with fewer challenges.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

What kind of person are you looking for to provide that very important support, in terms of your staff?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

In JPSU we have a lot of former military as civilians because they bring with them the expertise, the lived experience, that they can share with the individuals. For the military personnel, it varies. They're from all different backgrounds. It's really based on the quality of the individual—compassionate, ability to listen. Pretty much the staff are there because they want to give back to the forces. They have either been in operations or they have people in their family who have been challenged with some of these life experiences, and they want to be there to assist the CAF members. That's what we're looking at.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I don't know whether you will be able to answer this or if it fits within your role. Obviously as members of Parliament, we hear from those people who have not had a successful transition. They're very public in some instances.

Do you keep track of those people, and is there any way to go back to them? Do you have any mechanism whereby you can go back and try to close that gap or get them through what is obviously a very difficult time out there in the civilian world?

(1645)

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

Every time somebody asks a question to the minister or to the chief or to the unit, we always make sure that we reply, that we follow up and that we close the loop with the individual.

Are we tracking them? No. We have a tracking system in the JPSU but the tracking system is to make sure that nobody falls through the cracks. The people coming in are entered in the system and we make sure that we have follow-ups.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

That's just until they're released. In these cases, when they're released, I can assure you that when we see the headline, we check and if we find an error in our process, we fix it.

The engagement with the individual, she already touched on.

The Chair:

Thank you. That ends our time for today's panel.

On behalf of the committee, I'd like to thank both of you, Captain and Commodore, for taking time out of your busy schedules to testify today, and thank you for all you do for our men and women.

We are going to recess for a few minutes and then we're going to go back into committee business with the steering committee.

Thank you. This meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des anciens combattants

(1540)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Neil Ellis (Baie de Quinte, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Je déclare la séance ouverte.

Je m'excuse auprès de nos témoins. Nous avions un vote à la fin de la période des questions, alors nous commençons une dizaine de minutes en retard.

Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, le Comité étudie la santé mentale et la prévention du suicide chez les vétérans. Les témoins d'aujourd'hui sont du ministère de la Défense nationale. Nous accueillons la capitaine Langlois, directrice, Gestion du soutien aux blessés, et le commodore Sean Cantelon, directeur général, Services de bien-être et moral des Forces canadiennes.

Nous allons commencer avec la déclaration liminaire de 10 minutes, puis nous passerons aux questions.

Bienvenue, et merci de votre présence ici aujourd'hui. La parole est à vous.

Commodore Sean Cantelon (directeur général, Services de bien-être et moral des Forces canadiennes, ministère de la Défense nationale):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bonjour, monsieur le président et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité. Je suis le commodore Sean Cantelon.

À titre de directeur général des Services de bien-être et moral pour les Forces armées canadiennes, je suis responsable d'un éventail de programmes et de services visant à appuyer la préparation opérationnelle des FAC dans des domaines tels que la condition physique, les sports, la promotion des loisirs et de la santé, à la fois dans les bases et les escadres du Canada et durant les opérations de déploiement.

Cela va des services financiers et bancaires offerts par la Financière SISIP aux programmes et services de santé mentale pour les membres des FAC et leur famille par l'entremise de divers Fonds « Appuyons nos troupes », y compris le Fonds Sans limites et le Fonds pour les familles des militaires.

Je suis aussi le directeur général en chef du personnel militaire qui est responsable des services de soutien aux blessés et des services de transition à la retraite et, à ce titre, j'ai travaillé en étroite collaboration avec le brigadier-général Dave Corbould à la retraite qui a mis au point le renouvellement de l'Unité interarmées de soutien du personnel, ou l'UISP.[Français]

Je suis accompagné aujourd'hui de la capitaine de vaisseau Marie-France Langlois, directrice de la Gestion du soutien aux blessés, laquelle représente également l'Unité interarmées de soutien du personnel. La capitaine de vaisseau Marie-France Langlois est une ancienne commandante de l'Unité interarmées de soutien du personnel. En sa qualité actuelle, elle dirige le renouvellement des services de transition pour la libération des membres des Forces armées canadiennes.[Traduction]

Je suis très heureux de parler aujourd'hui des programmes et services de transition offerts aux militaires des Forces armées canadiennes qui font la transition à la vie civile. Ces programmes et services sont souvent offerts conjointement par les Forces armées canadiennes et Anciens Combattants Canada, à l'aide d'organisations tierces sans but lucratif.

Les FAC abordent le sujet de la transition de la vie militaire à la vie civile selon un point de vue général qui englobe l'ensemble de la collectivité militaire, dont les militaires de la Force régulière et de la Force de réserve, les anciens combattants et leur famille. En moyenne, 10 000 membres de la Force régulière et de la Force de réserve quittent chaque année les Forces armées canadiennes. De ce nombre, 16 % en moyenne sont libérés pour des raisons médicales. II s'agit d'une donnée importante, puisque les membres qui quittent les Forces armées canadiennes ou qui obtiennent leur libération pour des raisons médicales ont souvent besoin de services uniques.

Un certain nombre de services est offert à nos membres et je vais vous en présenter quelques-uns. Avant de continuer, toutefois, j'aimerais préciser que la majorité des programmes que je présenterai aujourd'hui sont offerts à tous les membres de la Force régulière et de la Force de réserve, peu importe la raison de leur libération des Forces armées canadiennes.[Français]

Depuis 1978, les Forces armées canadiennes offrent au personnel militaire en transition un séminaire de deux jours sur le Service de préparation à une seconde carrière, qui est organisé dans chaque base et chaque escadre militaire. Ces séminaires se penchent sur des sujets tels que les pensions, les avantages sociaux, les procédures de libération, les défis psychologiques liés à la transition et les services et avantages administrés par Anciens Combattants Canada. Un séminaire d'une journée supplémentaire est fourni précisément aux membres libérés pour des raisons médicales.

Dans tous les séminaires, la présence des conjoints est vivement encouragée.

(1545)

[Traduction]

Le Régime d'assurance-revenu militaire offre des avantages à tous les membres des FAC qui quittent l'armée pour des raisons médicales. Ils peuvent recevoir une aide au revenu pendant un maximum de 24 mois, et jusqu'à 64 mois s'ils ne sont pas en mesure de retourner au travail. Les militaires qui quittent l'armée de leur propre gré sont aussi admissibles aux mêmes avantages que s'ils avaient été jugés totalement invalides.

Un volet de ce programme est le Programme de réadaptation professionnelle qui permet aux participants de restaurer ou d'établir leur capacité professionnelle pour les préparer à gagner leur vie adéquatement au sein de l'effectif civil. Ce programme met l'accent sur les compétences des membres des FAC ou des anciens combattants qui sont libérés, leurs intérêts, leurs restrictions médicales, et la viabilité économique du régime qu'ils ont choisi pour les aider à préparer leur avenir. Le soutien au Programme de réadaptation professionnelle peut commencer jusqu'à six mois avant leur libération des Forces armées canadiennes.

De la même façon, Anciens Combattants offre également une série de programmes d'aide au revenu et de réadaptation sociale. Des efforts considérables sont actuellement déployés pour mieux aligner et harmoniser les programmes des Forces armées canadiennes et d'Anciens Combattants afin d'assurer une transition en douceur vers la vie civile pour tous les membres des FAC.

Au-delà de ce travail interne dont j'ai fait mention, les Forces armées canadiennes collaborent aussi étroitement avec des organismes tiers pour aider les militaires en transition, les anciens combattants et leur famille. Nous continuons à élargir nos relations avec plusieurs établissements d'enseignement partout au pays qui souhaitent mieux comprendre les compétences et la formation du personnel militaire en vue d'offrir des équivalences dans un éventail de programmes d'études dans leur établissement.

Un exemple est le Programme d'aide à la transition qui travaille avec plus de 200 employeurs qui appuient les militaires afin de les aider à trouver un emploi valorisant. II y a actuellement plus de 5 000 membres inscrits et plus de 1 200 employés. C'est en vue d'atteindre l'objectif de 10 000 emplois en 10 ans.

La réussite de la transition à la vie civile est une priorité de mon organisation et s'inscrit également dans la stratégie globale de prévention du suicide des FAC, qui est actuellement élaborée et intégrée dans un éventail d'initiatives visant à prévenir les suicides. Pour aider à promouvoir des transitions efficaces et efficientes, nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec Anciens Combattants Canada afin d'éliminer les obstacles, de sensibiliser les militaires et leur famille aux ressources et à l'appui appropriés, de promouvoir la recherche et les réponses factuelles et d'élaborer des programmes et des initiatives de soutien aux politiques, aux protocoles et à l'orientation.[Français]

Nous travaillons aussi activement avec Anciens Combattants Canada pour améliorer les services aux anciens combattants offerts par nos organisations grâce à une stratégie nationale conjointe de transition de carrière et d'emploi. Cette stratégie repose sur une approche pangouvernementale et compte élargir sa portée de façon à inclure d'autres organismes gouvernementaux, notamment Emploi et Développement social Canada, Service Canada, la Commission de la fonction publique et bien d'autres, dans le but de miser sur les ressources et les programmes existants pour appuyer les militaires et les anciens combattants en transition.[Traduction]

La prestation des services de transition des Forces armées canadiennes et d'Anciens Combattants se fait par l'entremise de l'Unité interarmées de soutien du personnel, qui comprend huit quartiers généraux régionaux, 24 centres intégrés de soutien du personnel et sept emplacements satellites un peu partout au pays et un quartier général à Ottawa. L'UISP dessert le personnel de la Force régulière et de la Force de réserve, ainsi que leur famille et les familles des militaires tombés au champ d'honneur.

L'UISP et les CISP sont considérés comme un guichet unique où les personnes malades ou blessées peuvent recevoir des conseils, du soutien et de l'assistance non seulement du personnel militaire qui assure la prestation des programmes et supervise les CISP, mais aussi du personnel d'Anciens Combattants qui est situé au même endroit que les FAC dans les CISP.

Les FAC se sont engagées à continuer d'améliorer la prestation des services et les soins aux malades et aux blessés, et c'est pourquoi nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec Anciens Combattants pour améliorer les programmes et les services. De nombreux aspects de la prestation des services d'Anciens Combattants et des FAC sont étroitement interreliés, et le personnel des deux organisations travaille ensemble à tous les niveaux afin de fournir des conseils et de l'assistance.

Parmi ses autres programmes, l'UISP est également responsable du Programme de soutien social aux victimes de stress opérationnel, ou SSVSO, un programme conjoint d'ACC et des FAC qui offre un soutien précieux aux militaires, aux anciens combattants et aux familles. L'objectif du programme de SSVSO est de s'assurer que les pairs, dès qu'ils font appel au système de soutien par les pairs, bénéficient du soutien reposant sur I'expérience vécue pour les guider vers les programmes et les services qui peuvent les aider à se rétablir. Depuis 2001, le programme de SSVSO a aidé de nombreux pairs à accepter leur nouvelle réalité.

Monsieur le président, merci de m'avoir donné l'occasion de prendre la parole aujourd'hui. La capitaine Langlois et moi répondrons avec plaisir aux questions du Comité.

(1550)

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons commencer avec M. Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, commodore et capitaine, de servir notre pays et d'être ici aujourd'hui. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler de la perte d'identité dans le cadre de nos discussions sur la maladie mentale. Je me demande si vous pourriez nous dire... Y a-t-il un moment quelconque, au sein de l'UISP, où la perte d'identité est relevée et où l'on aborde le problème?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Je vais demander à la capitaine Langlois de répondre à la question, car elle a assumé le commandement de l'UISP et pourra mieux vous répondre.

Capitaine de vaisseau Marie-France Langlois (directrice, Gestion du soutien aux blessés, ministère de la Défense nationale):

Je pense que l'important, c'est de maintenir les rapports entre l'ancienne unité et le militaire, s'il le souhaite. C'est quelque chose que nous encourageons pour nous assurer que la communication entre les commandants des différentes unités opérationnelles dans la région reçoit du soutien, par l'entremise de cette approche.

C'est évidemment difficile pour ceux qui ont des blessures physiques connues. Je pense qu'en instaurant un lien de confiance avec le membre à qui nous venons en aide, nous pourrons mieux communiquer.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Vous avez parlé de « confiance ». Cela semble être un autre aspect. Les témoins nous ont beaucoup parlé de la confiance.

Je reviens encore une fois à la perte d'identité. Ces soldats, marins et aviatrices disent avoir perdu leur identité. On leur a enlevé leur identité, que ce soit en raison d'une blessure physique ou mentale. J'évalue la situation du point de vue des soins de santé. Je regarde la situation et je me dis ceci: « Eh bien, comment pouvons-nous améliorer ces soins? Ne pouvons-nous pas intégrer ces soins d'entrée de jeu dans le cadre du programme? »

Plus tôt, nous avons discuté de la prestation des services et de la possibilité d'offrir des services dès que les gens entrent dans les forces armées. Lorsque nous parlons d'essayer d'offrir des traitements à nos militaires, tout en tenant compte de la perte d'identité et de la confiance, nous devons nous assurer que ces services sont assurés par les FAC, conjointement avec ACC.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Premièrement, je vais parler de quelques-uns des changements que le brigadier-général Dave Corbould a apportés lorsqu'il était le commandant de l'UISP.

L'équipe était fermement déterminée à instaurer un sentiment d'appartenance à l'unité au sein des Forces canadiennes, où les membres sentent qu'ils font partie intégrante de l'équipe, de l'unité. Nous avons réussi à créer ce sentiment d'appartenance en apportant des ajustements aux pouvoirs et à l'unité. C'est une unité qui est responsable de ses membres et qui a des pouvoirs et des responsabilités. Cela crée des liens.

Deuxièmement, pour revenir à la question plus générale, à savoir la confiance, cela nous ramène au dialogue soutenu que nous tenons et qui a donné d'excellents résultats. Tout commence avec la santé mentale, et il n'y a rien de mal à dire, « j'ai eu une mauvaise journée », car il faut ensuite établir cette relation au sein de la culture.

La journée Bell Cause pour la cause est peut-être une journée que nous appuyons au sein des Forces canadiennes, mais nous favorisons également un changement complet de culture en vue d'offrir des soins continus aux malades ou aux blessés afin que la fragilité dans l'unité dont certains témoins et vous avez parlé n'existe plus. Ce changement de culture est en train de se faire en ce moment.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci.

Je vais vous demander si vous pouvez nous fournir des chiffres.

Pouvez-vous nous dire quel est le pourcentage de personnes qui ont intégré l'UISP qui sont aux prises avec des problèmes de santé mentale?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

En fait, l'Unité interarmées de soutien du personnel doit gérer des contraintes à l'emploi pour raisons médicales. Nous gérons le pronostic, et non pas le diagnostic, si bien que nous ne connaissons pas l'état de santé d'un membre. Ce sont des renseignements que les services de santé des Forces canadiennes peuvent peut-être fournir.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Assurez-vous un suivi ou conservez-vous des données concernant les gens qui ont fait appel à l'UISP et qui se sont suicidés?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Là encore, on assure le suivi par l'entremise...

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Vous avez entendu le témoignage d'une personne qui a parlé du suivi assuré par les Forces canadiennes des membres du personnel qui ont été libérés. Ce processus est centralisé par l'entremise de registres centraux.

De toute évidence, si quelqu'un est membre de cette unité ou est sous la responsabilité de cette unité, l'unité est au courant. Il n'incombe pas à l'UISP d'assurer ce suivi. Les renseignements concernant ces membres proviennent d'un autre secteur au ministère, mais nous assurons le suivi des soins et de l'alimentation des personnes sous notre responsabilité.

(1555)

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez mentionné un programme qui est offert aux gens pour les éduquer sur les prestations de retraite, les procédures de libération, etc.

Je me rappelle lorsque j'ai été élu député pour la première fois. J'ai dû assister à une séance d'information obligatoire de deux jours. J'ai trouvé les renseignements très utiles — et il y en avait beaucoup —, mais cela semblait entrer par une oreille et sortir par l'autre parfois, et je ne pouvais rien y faire.

L'une des questions que j'ai posées est si c'était possible d'offrir cette séance d'information à nouveau, un mois ou deux plus tard. Ce processus est-il...

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Absolument, 2, 3 ou 10 fois. Nous encourageons les gens à suivre ces séances au moins cinq ans avant leur libération prévue, puis ils peuvent en suivre d'autres plus tard. Nous travaillons à améliorer la disponibilité de ces séances. C'est un processus optionnel pour tous les membres des Forces armées canadiennes. Nous les offrons à toutes les bases au pays. J'en ai moi-même suivi deux, même si je n'entends pas quitter les forces demain.

C'est exactement l'argument que vous avez fait valoir. Pour veiller à ce que les membres ne souffrent pas et disent, « je n'ai pas entendu parler de cela », ils ont l'occasion de suivre d'autres séances. Il n'y a pas de limite imposée au nombre de séances auxquelles ils peuvent assister qui sont offertes par le Service de préparation à une seconde carrière, ou SPSC.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Lockhart.

Mme Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je trouve votre témoignage très intéressant. Nous avons déjà discuté ensemble dans le cadre de notre étude sur la prestation des services également. Nous avons des points de vue contradictoires concernant l'UISP et sa fonctionnalité. D'une part, nous parlons du fait que l'unité est considérée comme étant un guichet unique et que chaque porte est la bonne. Nous entendons d'autres professionnels de la santé dire que c'est l'approche qu'adoptent de nombreux modèles en matière de santé mentale à l'heure actuelle. Et d'autre part, nous avons des témoignages contradictoires de personnes qui disent que cette approche ne fonctionne pas bien et que des gens glissent entre les mailles du système.

Quels sont les défis qu'il faut relever? De toute évidence, les gens sont en transition et c'est une période difficile pour eux, mais y a-t-il des secteurs précis où nous savons que nous pouvons nous améliorer? C'est là où les suicides surviennent. Les gens glissent entre les mailles du système et ne sont pas réceptifs à certains services à leur disposition.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Je pense qu'il est très important de régler les problèmes relativement à la transition des membres des FAC vers la vie civile. Nous travaillons très fort avec Anciens Combattants pour améliorer nos différents programmes.

Anciens Combattants jouera un rôle tôt dans le processus, probablement lorsqu'un avis est émis selon laquelle une décision de libération a été prise. Nous nous employons à simplifier et à réduire les formalités administratives. Nous travaillons à élaborer un projet pilote et à offrir du soutien encadré. C'est pour donner suite à la recommandation de l'ombudsman, où il parle de services de conciergerie. Ce soutien encadré est intéressant.

Par exemple, l'UISP adapte les services aux besoins des gens. Grâce à ce soutien encadré, qui relèvera d'ACC, conjointement avec les FAC, on tiendra compte des besoins des gens. Si quelqu'un a des besoins moins complexes, par exemple, il pourra avoir accès au portail. Si une personne a besoin d'aide pour remplir les formulaires et connaître les ressources disponibles, alors il serait approprié de lui offrir le soutien d'un agent. Il pourrait être préférable de faire appel à un gestionnaire de cas pour certains membres qui ont des besoins plus complexes durant leur transition.

À l'heure actuelle, il y a beaucoup... Nous faisons partie de différents groupes pour examiner le nouveau modèle de transition. Cela inclut les transitions qui se font en début de carrière. Lorsque nous parlons de séminaire ou de réseau, nous parlons des débuts, de la première affectation d'un membre. Il recevra de la formation concernant les responsabilités financières à long terme, pour qu'il soit au courant des formations en matière d'épanouissement personnel lorsqu'ils feront leur transition.

L'application Mon dossier ACC sera disponible plus tôt. Beaucoup d'efforts seront déployés pour améliorer ce portail.

De toute évidence, il y a toujours place à l'amélioration. Nous prenons les commentaires des anciens combattants et des membres des FAC très... Il est très important pour nous de les informer des changements de politiques, des programmes et des services.

(1600)

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Vous avez parlé de discuter plus tôt avec les membres de la transition. On nous a dit que ce qui revient constamment entre autres, c'est la perte d'identité, alors je pense qu'il est très important que vous parliez avec les membres de cette transition.

Qu'entend-on par plus tôt? C'est évidemment pour les retraites planifiées et ce genre de choses.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Une partie des activités de mon organisation est liée aux Services financiers du RARM. L'un des aspects, outre la gestion de ce programme d'assurance, est l'offre de conseils en matière de finances et d'investissement.

Il y a deux ans, nous avons embauché M. David Chilton, auteur du livre Un barbier riche, pour la tenue d'une campagne d'éducation. Un de nos anciens cadres supérieurs, un militaire à la retraite très dynamique, organise ce qu'il appelle les « discussions de Pierre » selon le format des conférences TED. Il parcourt le pays pour offrir de l'éducation financière aux gens. C'est tout un défi. Il n'est jamais trop tard, mais il est plutôt difficile d'apprendre, 20 ans plus tard, qu'il aurait été bon de savoir ou de faire certaines choses. Ce sont des services continus que nous offrons pour améliorer les connaissances à cet égard.

Nous collaborons étroitement avec Anciens Combattants Canada pour trouver le moment idéal d'offrir un soutien encadré pour accroître la sensibilisation des gens afin d'éviter que ces services soient offerts trop tard ou trop tôt, comme votre collègue l'a indiqué. Nous avons d'ailleurs mené des projets pilotes, dont la capitaine a parlé. Cela devrait aider à régler les problèmes liés à l'identité.

Souvent, la perte d'identité découle d'un manque de compréhension et de connaissances. Tandis que nous cherchons à démystifier ce processus, qui peut être plutôt déconcertant... Beaucoup de gens s'enrôlent dans les Forces. On constate qu'après leur instruction élémentaire, ils n'ont pas tendance à penser à leur libération, mais plutôt au moment où ils seront aux commandes d'un char d'assaut ou à leur déploiement en mer à bord d'un navire.

Nous voulons les aider à composer avec cela. Nous offrons actuellement un large éventail d'activités. Nous collaborons avec nos collègues d'Anciens Combattants Canada pour apporter des améliorations qui seront annoncées lorsque ce sera terminé. Nous avons traité du projet pilote, et le soutien encadré est un exemple parfait.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Je viens de recevoir ce document, Le Guide sur les prestations, les programmes et les services à l’intention des membres actifs et retraités des Forces canadiennes et de leur famille. Je crois que nous ne l'avions jamais vu auparavant. Je me demande s'il peut être intégré aux témoignages. C'est un document relativement nouveau; il date du mois d'octobre. Est-il distribué et utilisé à grande échelle? Est-il accessible en ligne?

Le président:

Je suis désolé, mais je vous demanderais d'être brefs. Le temps alloué pour cette intervention sera bientôt écoulé.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Ce guide, qui est disponible en ligne, a été mis à jour plusieurs fois. Nous veillerons à vous en fournir un exemplaire.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Nous en fournissons également des exemplaires à l'occasion de chacun des séminaires du SPSC. Les gens peuvent alors le consulter; nous leur donnons un exemplaire d'avance.

Le président:

Parfait. Si vous pouviez l'envoyer au greffier, nous vous en serions reconnaissants.

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup d'être ici et de nous aider dans notre étude des enjeux liés à la santé mentale et au suicide.

Capitaine Langlois, vous avez parlé de la collaboration avec ACC pour l'amélioration des programmes de la simplification des formalités. Je me demande si vous pouviez donner un exemple des contraintes que vous pourriez avoir observées à l'UISP quant à l'atteinte de cet objectif. Y a-t-il quelque chose qui vous empêche d'atteindre vos objectifs, ou est-ce que tout se passe bien?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Les FAC et Anciens Combattants Canada collaborent sur plusieurs fronts.

Le programme de conversion des compétences est un excellent exemple. Lorsqu'un membre des FAC entreprend la transition de la vie militaire à la vie civile, on constate souvent que les compétences militaires se transposent difficilement dans une profession civile. Actuellement, les FAC travaillent en étroite collaboration avec EDSC et Anciens Combattants Canada à la création d'un portail de conversion des compétences appelé « GPM à CNP », c'est-à-dire Groupe professionnel militaire à Code national des professions. Cela suscite beaucoup d'enthousiasme, car ce portail est appelé à croître. Notre objectif à long terme est d'y intégrer un volet de formation, de le lier aux établissements d'enseignement. Nous y travaillons déjà.

Le site d'EDSC comprend déjà un outil de conversion des compétences, mais c'est une chose à laquelle nous tenons. Les sites Web des FAC, d'EDSC et d'ACC sont tous liés. Cet outil aidera les membres des FAC à effectuer la transition. C'est un excellent exemple du travail que nous faisons.

(1605)

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Dans leurs témoignages, plusieurs anciens combattants ont indiqué qu'ils ont le sentiment d'avoir été dépouillés de leur identité et d'avoir été poussés à quitter la vie militaire et qu'ils se sentent abandonnés.

Selon vous, cet outil de conversion des compétences les aidera-t-il à retrouver un nouveau sentiment d'identité ou le sentiment d'être de nouveau utiles? Je suppose que l'essentiel est de se sentir utile et valorisé.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

L'outil ne sera pas uniquement utilisé pour la transition; il servira également au recrutement et au maintien en poste.

Une personne ayant un métier quelconque peut, lorsqu'elle sait comment ses compétences se traduisent dans la vie civile, décider en début de carrière de perfectionner ses connaissances dans ce domaine. Donc, en ce qui concerne l'identité, je suis certaine que ce sera avantageux.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Commodore, vous avez parlé d'un changement de culture. Pourriez-vous aborder d'autres aspects de la culture militaire qui empêchent d'optimiser l'aide offerte aux anciens combattants qui entreprennent la transition?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

C'est une question à laquelle il est difficile de répondre. Si j'avais la solution, je passerais pour un génie.

Je suis dans les Forces armées depuis 34 ans. Notre culture et notre approche à l'égard d'un vaste éventail d'activités ont considérablement évolué. Comme partout ailleurs, notre culture est le reflet de la société.

Le chef a été très clair et très ouvert quant aux activités offertes à l'extérieur des Forces. Le général Dallaire a été le premier, évidemment, mais depuis, des officiers des plus hauts échelons et des sous-officiers supérieurs ont parlé ouvertement des difficultés liées à la transition et des problèmes de santé mentale et de réadaptation physique.

Voilà ce que j'entends par une évolution vers une culture ouverte. Auparavant, ces questions faisaient l'objet de discussions privées entre deux ou trois personnes, tandis que maintenant, elles ont lieu de façon plus ouverte. À mon avis, c'est la meilleure chose à faire. En tant que dirigeants des Forces armées canadiennes, nous assumons le rôle de chef de file qui nous incombe et nous essayons de modifier cette culture pour que nos membres n'aient pas ce sentiment d'aliénation et de perte d'identité.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Récemment, nous avons beaucoup entendu parler des opioïdes et de la dépendance qui y est associée. J'ai l'impression que beaucoup d'anciens combattants s'en font prescrire. Avez-vous des préoccupations à cet égard? Je sais qu'ils sont censés être utilisés comme analgésiques, mais serait-il préférable d'avoir recours à d'autres médicaments? Ils sont extrêmement toxicomanogènes, et ils semblent avoir une incidence sur le bien-être et la santé mentale.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Je ne suis pas médecin — ni Médecin général —; ce n'est pas mon domaine d'expertise. Je reviens au propos de la capitaine Langlois. L'UISP connaît le pronostic, c'est-à-dire les résultats escomptés pour une personne donnée, mais nous ne savons pas quels médicaments sont prescrits ni quelles sont les restrictions médicales. Nous nous concentrons sur la personne elle-même.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Les gens n'évoquent pas une certaine dépendance?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Cela relève du secret médical entre ces gens et leur médecin, si j'ai bien compris la question.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Il y a très souvent un rapprochement à faire entre ces problèmes sous-jacents et l'état de préparation et l'adaptation à la vie civile. Je me demandais simplement si vous aviez une idée de cette corrélation. De toute évidence, non.

(1610)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Colin Fraser (Nova-Ouest, Lib.):

Je vous remercie tous les deux d'être venus aujourd'hui et de nous avoir transmis ces renseignements.

Vous avez mentionné qu'en moyenne, 10 000 membres quittent les Forces armées canadiennes chaque année, dont 16 % pour des raisons médicales. De ce nombre, sait-on combien de personnes libérées souffrent de problèmes de maladie mentale?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Je ne crois pas.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Le Médecin général a peut-être ces renseignements.

M. Colin Fraser:

Un des aspects qui a été mentionné — je suis tout à fait d'accord là-dessus; nous avons abordé le sujet dans le rapport sur la prestation de services que nous avons présenté en décembre dernier — était la nécessité d'améliorer l'harmonisation entre les programmes des FAC et ceux d'ACC pour faciliter le plus possible la transition vers la vie civile. Qu'est-ce que cela signifie pour vous? Quels sont les problèmes actuels à cet égard?

Capitaine Langlois, vous avez évoqué la nécessité de combler les écarts, qui est un aspect important. Quelles mesures sont prises actuellement, en particulier pour les programmes des Services de bien-être et moral, pour rendre cette transition plus facile?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

C'est un des aspects pour lesquels les Services de bien-être et moral ont beaucoup de latitude. Nos activités sont financées par des fonds non publics, ce qui permet au CEMD d'offrir des services tant aux militaires qu'aux membres de leur famille, même lorsque les militaires deviennent des anciens combattants. Nos programmes sont offerts indifféremment aux membres en service et aux anciens combattants. À titre d'exemple, prenons la carte d'identité de santé des Forces canadiennes, un programme à vie qui est offert aux membres et à leur famille, en collaboration avec l'industrie, et qui leur permet d'obtenir des rabais. C'est un exemple d'une situation où nous cherchons à éliminer les disparités entre les membres qui portent l'uniforme tous les jours et ceux qui, du jour au lendemain, cessent de le porter.

Nous consacrons des efforts considérables à de nombreuses activités de ce genre pour qu'à leur libération, les gens puissent aller de l'avant et effectuer une transition en douceur. Nous avons abordé cet aspect. J'ai donné l'exemple du programme de réadaptation professionnelle de l'UISP. Ce programme commence avant la libération pour que le militaire qui range son uniforme et devient un ancien combattant travaille avec le même intervenant en réadaptation professionnelle que lorsqu'il était un membre actif, ce qui permet une transition harmonieuse. C'est un des aspects pour lesquels nous avons éliminé l'écart.

Nous collaborons avec nos collègues d'Anciens Combattants Canada pour régler d'autres lacunes. Je ne peux vous parler des propositions qui ont été faites, mais elles visent à corriger ces lacunes.

M. Colin Fraser:

En ce qui concerne les Services de bien-être et moral, avez-vous fait une étude quelconque sur le moral au sein des Forces armées canadiennes? Si oui, comment?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Nous avons fait une étude des besoins communautaires, non seulement auprès des membres en service, mais aussi auprès de leur famille — dans le sens large du terme —, et auprès des anciens combattants. Nous venons de terminer la collecte de données. Nous en sommes actuellement à l'analyse et à l'interprétation des données. Je ne peux vous fournir ces renseignements pour le moment, mais nous fournirons au greffier le plus récent sondage, qui démontre que nous satisfaisons aux besoins.

La question du moral est plus complexe. Il s'agit d'un ensemble de services; c'est ainsi que nous procédons. La question est de savoir comment nous pouvons répondre le mieux à leurs besoins de façon à pouvoir adapter la prestation de nos services.

M. Colin Fraser:

Cela comprend-il les services en santé mentale? Y a-t-il des questions à ce sujet?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Certaines questions portent sur les principaux facteurs de stress, tandis que d'autres portent sur la qualité de vie. Cela permet d'évaluer les besoins pour la prestation de programmes liés à la santé mentale.

À ma connaissance, cela ne... Il pourrait y avoir une question à ce sujet. Je me dois d'être prudent.

M. Colin Fraser:

Très bien. Toutefois, si vous pouviez nous fournir ces renseignements, cela nous serait utile.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

D'accord. Nous pouvons vous fournir le plus récent sondage.

M. Colin Fraser:

En ce qui concerne le RARM, le membre peut recevoir une aide au revenu pour un maximum de 24 mois s'il ne peut trouver un emploi ou retourner au travail.

Pouvez-vous m'aider à comprendre les critères précis utilisés pour déterminer la durée des prestations du RARM?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Avec plaisir.

Depuis 1982, tous les membres des Forces armées canadiennes participent obligatoirement au régime d'invalidité de longue durée par l'intermédiaire du RARM, un régime offert par le gouvernement. Ils peuvent aussi obtenir d'autres produits offerts par le RARM, notamment une assurance-vie facultative.

S'ils sont libérés pour raisons médicales s'ils font une demande de libération pour des raisons non médicales liées à un problème de santé, le régime d'assurance-invalidité leur donne droit à deux années de salaire, au taux maximal de 75 % du salaire antérieur. La prestation est ajustée s'ils reçoivent une pension, comme pour tout autre régime d'assurance-invalidité, y compris celui de leurs collègues de la fonction publique fédérale.

Pendant ces deux ans, les militaires participent au programme de réadaptation professionnelle offert par l'UISP. Pour être admissible au régime, le demandeur doit être considéré comme souffrant d'une incapacité totale et permanente. Certaines personnes reçoivent des prestations du régime depuis plus de 20 ans; ils y sont admissibles aussi longtemps que nécessaire. C'est l'aspect général.

L'inscription au régime — puisque vous l'avez demandé — se fait dès l'enrôlement, par l'intermédiaire de l'UISP. C'est en quelque sorte un guichet unique. L'accès au régime se fait automatiquement, en cas de problème médical. Les Services financiers du RARM gèrent le régime, et l'assureur est Manuvie.

(1615)

M. Colin Fraser:

Dans votre exposé, vous avez parlé de votre collaboration avec des organismes tiers et vous avez donné un exemple.

Je me demande si vous avez d'autres exemples, en particulier dans le domaine de la santé mentale. J'aimerais savoir si vous avez constaté une augmentation du nombre d'organismes tiers qui communiquent avec vous ou si vous avez établi plus de partenariats avec ces organismes ces dernières années, où l'on a pleinement pris conscience de la gravité des problèmes de santé mentale chez les membres des Forces armées canadiennes et les anciens combattants.

Pourriez-vous parler de cet aspect, s'il vous plaît?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Permettez-moi de revenir un peu en arrière.

De plus en plus d'organismes se manifestent chaque année. L'organisation du directeur de la gestion du soutien aux blessés établit la liste des organismes partenaires. J'ai donné l'exemple du PAT.

Les services d'aide en santé mentale suscitent beaucoup d'intérêt, que ce soit chez les organismes partenaires ou à l'ICRSMV, un organisme de recherche qui traite avec Anciens Combattants Canada et les familles des militaires.

Dans le domaine de la santé mentale, je pourrais vous donner l'exemple d'un nouvel organisme appelé Team Rubicon, qui a été fondé au Canada. Cela nous ramène au sentiment d'appartenance, et je vois que beaucoup acquiescent. Team Rubicon permet aux gens de mettre à profit en tant que civils leurs compétences militaires dans le cadre de diverses interventions, en collaboration avec d'autres personnes. Évidemment, celui qui fait partie intégrante de notre groupe d'organismes... Vous avez obtenu le témoignage de Jay Feyko, un membre du « Personnel des fonds non publics » qui travaille au sein des SBMFC. Donc, nous avons des partenariats avec des organismes.

Il y a des organismes de soutien direct, comme Sans limites. Nous travaillerions avec un autre organisme du genre et avec des organismes que je qualifierais de normatifs — si vous me permettez d'ajouter cela — pour des organismes comme Team Rubicon. Il y a une longue liste, qui figure sûrement sur le site Web. Ce serait le meilleur endroit pour trouver ces noms, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Eyolfson.

M. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Nous vous remercions de votre présence ici aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais approfondir une très bonne question posée par M. Kitchen au début de la séance. Nous avons parlé de l'identité des membres des forces armées. Comme le dit le vieux slogan, ce n'est pas seulement un travail; c'est l'identité d'une personne. Bien sûr, lorsqu'elles sont libérées, ces personnes souhaitent garder leur identité.

Nous savons que certains membres quittent les forces armées à cause d'une maladie ou d'une blessure. Ils seraient capables d'assurer d'autres rôles dans les forces armées, mais ne peuvent le faire en raison de l'universalité des services, parce qu'ils ne peuvent s'acquitter de certaines tâches. Y a-t-il une façon de désigner les rôles qu'ils pourraient jouer en tant que civils au sein de l'armée?

Nous savons qu'il y a des emplois civils dans l'armée. Il y a des civils qui s'acquittent de certaines tâches; les commis de bureau, notamment. Est-ce qu'il y a une façon de désigner les anciens combattants qui pourraient travailler à titre de civils tout en continuant de participer aux activités de l'armée?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

C'est l'un des principaux points des séminaires du SPSC. Je ne veux pas aller trop dans les détails sur la priorité accordée aux anciens militaires par la fonction publique. D'autres témoins seraient mieux placés que moi pour en parler. Je peux toutefois vous parler du personnel des Fonds non publics, un organisme qui travaille pour les Forces armées canadiennes. Je suis responsable de cet organisme en ma capacité de directeur général des Services de bien-être et moral des Forces canadiennes, et 40 % des employés de l'organisme — soit plus de 4 500 personnes — sont d'anciens membres des forces armées ou sont mariés à un membre des forces armées. Les anciens militaires, qui peuvent offrir divers services, représentent pour nous une grande source de richesse.

Jay Feyko, qui a témoigné devant vous, est un bon exemple à cet égard. Nous avons embauché un ancien major qui avait une expérience unique et qui a pu mettre en oeuvre un programme par l'entremise du Service de bien-être et moral. C'est exactement ce que nous voulons faire. Nous voulons aider ces gens à faire partie de l'équipe et à préserver leur identité.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

C'est bien.

À ce sujet, est-ce qu'il faudrait une meilleure coordination entre la fonction publique et l'armée, pour les décisions relatives à l'embauche?

J'ai été quelque peu surpris d'apprendre que ce n'était pas l'armée qui embauchait ces personnes. Si elles travaillent pour l'armée, même si ce sont des civils... J'ai présumé à tort que les forces armées seraient responsables de leur embauche.

(1620)

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

La Commission de la fonction publique, dont nous avons parlé dans nos déclarations préliminaires, est l'un de nos partenaires. Il y a des processus qui permettent d'embaucher les anciens combattants malades ou blessés de façon prioritaire. Les experts de la Commission de la fonction publique pourraient vous expliquer cela en détail. Ces anciens combattants ont un ensemble de compétences, une identité et une compréhension de la vie militaire, qui sont un atout dans la fonction publique.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord, merci.

Est-ce que les Forces canadiennes analysent les circonstances de vie de ces personnes afin de les aider dans leur transition? Quel est leur niveau socio-économique? Quels sont leurs besoins financiers au moment de leur libération? Quelles sont les tâches effectuées dans les Forces canadiennes qui pourraient leur servir dans une carrière civile? Est-ce que vous analysez ces renseignements pendant leur service actif?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Oui, nous le faisons un peu différemment.

C'est ce que font les Services financiers du RARM sur toutes les bases. Nous avons des conseillers financiers et des investisseurs. C'est exactement ce qu'ils font. Ils s'assoient avec les membres, désignent avec eux leurs objectifs de vie et leur permettent idéalement de réaliser leur « liberté 55 », si l'on veut; ils leur montrent ce qui est possible et établissent un plan. Nous le faisons partout. Pour les personnes en crise... idéalement, il faut les voir avant qu'ils ne vivent une crise financière et nous les orientons afin que leur carrière militaire et leur retraite soient réussies.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

J'ai une question sur un autre sujet. Je comprends que les systèmes médicaux ne sont pas les mêmes pour les militaires actifs que pour le reste de la population. Les membres actifs des Forces armées canadiennes ne sont pas visés par la Loi canadienne sur la santé. Ils reçoivent tous leurs soins médicaux par l'entremise des forces armées. Bien sûr, lorsqu'ils deviennent d'anciens combattants, le ministère des Anciens Combattants supervise les soins qui leur sont offerts, mais ils sont visés par les divers systèmes de soins de santé provinciaux.

Y a-t-il une façon de coordonner les services des forces armées et du ministère des Anciens Combattants, surtout pour les anciens combattants qui ont des besoins médicaux complexes? Certains militaires qui quittent l'armée sont en santé et ne sont pas blessés; ils ont seulement besoin d'un médecin de famille comme tout le monde et peuvent attendre. D'autres militaires ont toutefois des blessures ou des problèmes médicaux complexes et ont besoin d'être pris en charge rapidement. Y a-t-il une forme de coordination entre Anciens Combattants Canada et les Forces canadiennes?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Oui, par l'entremise du Médecin général. Cela relève de son mandat.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

C'est un des services offerts par l'UISP; cette conversation par l'entremise du SSBSO ou par l'entremise de ce processus.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Très bien.

Sur ce, j'ai terminé.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Brassard, vous avez la parole.

M. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Capitaine Langlois, je veux revenir sur certains sujets que vous avez abordés. Vous avez parlé du rapport de l'ombudsman du MDN. Vous avez aussi parlé de soutien guidé. Est-ce que vous parlez du service de type « conciergerie » auquel fait référence l'ombudsman du MDN dans son rapport?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Oui.

M. John Brassard:

Vous avez aussi dit que ce serait une responsabilité d'Anciens Combattants Canada. Pouvez-vous confirmer que c'est bien le cas?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

C'est intéressant, parce que la transition des membres se veut un effort conjoint des Forces armées canadiennes et du ministère des Anciens Combattants. Certains volets relèvent des forces armées et d'autres du ministère des Anciens Combattants, mais le soutien guidé est géré par le ministère des Anciens Combattants, en collaboration avec les Forces armées canadiennes.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Nous ne sommes pas des experts du ministère des Anciens Combattants; ils ont un projet pilote en matière de soutien guidé et nous allons miser sur ces résultats pour combler les écarts et aller de l'avant.

M. John Brassard:

Comme vous le savez, l'ombudsman du MDN a dit que cela allait changer les règles du jeu; les Forces armées canadiennes garderont les membres libérés pour des raisons médicales jusqu'à ce que toutes les prestations, y compris celles du ministère des Anciens Combattants, soient réglées. Il a également parlé du service de conciergerie et de l'outil qui permettait aux membres des Forces armées canadiennes de comprendre la gamme d'avantages auxquels ils pourraient avoir droit. Est-ce que les Forces canadiennes ou le MDN ont de la difficulté à mettre en oeuvre ces changements?

Si l'ombudsman et, bien franchement, le comité des anciens combattants l'ont recommandé au Parlement, au gouvernement, est-ce que vous éprouvez des difficultés de votre côté? Avez-vous du mal à mettre tout en place avant le transfert au ministère des Anciens Combattants? Est-ce que le MDN fait face à des problèmes de logistique?

(1625)

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Pour revenir aux points abordés par l'ombudsman, c'est exactement ce que nous faisons; nous offrons ce processus simplifié par l'entremise de l'UISP, du CISP et nous assurons toute la transition. Le général Corbould en était responsable et il a présenté une proposition au chef pour une réorganisation qui répondra à ces recommandations de sorte que ce soit plus simple pour les membres, avec un service de conciergerie guidé...

M. John Brassard:

Est-ce que c'est récent?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

C'est très récent. Il s'en est occupé tout juste avant sa retraite.

Ces changements seront mis en oeuvre bientôt, je l'espère. Entretemps, nous faisons ce travail en coulisse tous les jours. Bien que je ne puisse pas vous faire d'annonce exacte pour le moment, nous n'attendons pas ces annonces pour combler les lacunes et pour accroître cette capacité. Elle fait clairement partie du double mandat des membres des Forces armées canadiennes, qui restent membres jusqu'au jour où ils sont libérés. Le chef prend la chose très au sérieux, tout comme moi à titre d'officier responsable. Nous allons nous occuper de ces gens jusqu'à ce qu'ils soient prêts à retirer leur uniforme; puis, le jour suivant, le ministère des Anciens Combattants les prendra en charge. Nous ne voulons pas toutefois que ce jour-là constitue la première rencontre avec les représentants d'Anciens Combattants Canada. C'est ce que fait valoir la capitaine. Il faut qu'il y ait des rencontres comme c'est le cas présentement pour les cas complexes au CISP, avec un agent des services aux vétérans, ou avec les autres niveaux de soin appropriés.

C'est l'objectif que nous voulons atteindre; nous voulons donc aborder toutes les questions décrites par l'ombudsman.

M. John Brassard:

Je suis heureux d'entendre cela.

Je voulais aussi aborder la question de la réembauche. Bien sûr, on accorde la priorité à ces personnes dans la fonction publique, mais ce qui se dégage de votre témoignage et de notre recherche, c'est que le pourcentage de personnes qui sont libérées pour des raisons médicales ou qui prennent leur retraite des Forces armées canadiennes et qui peuvent obtenir un emploi au sein de la Fonction publique du Canada ou du MDN est extrêmement faible. À quoi attribuez-vous cela? Pourquoi n'embauchons-nous pas plus d'anciens combattants? Pourquoi n'embauchons-nous pas plus de membres des Forces armées canadiennes au sein de la fonction publique?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Je ne peux pas répondre à cette question. Je ne sais pas quelles sont les mesures d'embauche du gouvernement fédéral.

M. John Brassard:

Est-ce une question de qualifications? Vous pouvez certainement nous parler de ce qui se passe en arrière-plan. Est-ce que nous préparons les membres des Forces armées canadiennes, nos anciens combattants à...

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Nous pouvons certainement parler de cela. C'est le point soulevé par la capitaine Langlois: la capacité de transformer le jargon militaire unique en des capacités civiles, de passer de la capacité de décrire la réparation d'un char d'assaut sur le terrain à la capacité de rénover une maison, par exemple, parce que la plupart des Canadiens comprennent comment on rénove une maison. Ce sont les outils que nous voulons créer.

Nous offrons une formation sur la préparation d'un curriculum vitae et d'autres programmes par l'entremise du Service de préparation à une seconde carrière dont j'ai parlé pendant ma déclaration préliminaire. Il faut l'améliorer et le rendre plus professionnel, et c'est ce que nous faisons. Nous allons en faire de plus en plus et toujours faire mieux; offrir de meilleurs outils et travailler avec des partenaires comme le Programme d'aide à la transition, qui offre un webinaire sur la façon de passer une entrevue et de s'exprimer. Souvent, le problème n'est pas un manque de compétences, mais plutôt la façon de s'exprimer en entrevue. C'est ce qui fait la différence. Nous abordons cette question dans les Forces canadiennes.

M. John Brassard:

Je crois que c'est un élément essentiel, commodore, parce que nous voulons comprendre les questions relatives à la santé mentale et au suicide des anciens combattants. La transition, le sentiment d'appartenance, ne se limitent pas à l'armée, et l'emploi joue un rôle important dans la vie de ces gens.

Merci, monsieur.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, commodore et capitaine. Je remarque vos rubans et aussi quelques médailles pour votre service au Moyen-Orient.

J'ai plusieurs questions à vous poser. Je crois que je dois faire référence à l'un de mes romans préférés, Catch-22, où le personnage de Yossarian ne peut obtenir une libération en vertu de l'article 8 parce que s'il dit qu'il est fou, on saura qu'il ne l'est pas; s'il ne le dit pas, on saura qu'il l'est. D'une façon ou d'une autre, il est pris là.

Si je suis membre des forces armées et que je pense souffrir d'une maladie mentale, quels sont les obstacles qui m'empêcheront de faire face à ce problème et me placeront en situation d'impasse?

(1630)

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Cela revient au stigmatisme. Au bout du compte, les obstacles ont trait à la façon dont on demande de l'aide, dans l'armée comme dans le reste de la société. Nous travaillons très fort à faire changer la culture. Il n'y a pas d'obstacle physique. Il n'y a rien qui vous empêche d'aller à l'hôpital, de dire que vous vivez des difficultés et d'obtenir ces services. Le Médecin général pourrait vous expliquer l'ensemble du programme.

Rien ne vous empêche d'y aller. Tout ce que vous avez à faire, c'est de dire à votre sergent, à votre agent de programme ou à votre commodore que vous devez vous rendre à l'hôpital. C'est tout. Personne ne vous demandera pourquoi. Les gens avec qui vous avez une relation de travail étroite vous poseront peut-être la question, mais au bout du compte, c'est votre choix d'en parler ou non. Une fois que vous êtes entré à l'hôpital, vous avez accès aux programmes et services offerts dans notre système de soins de santé. Il revient à nous, à l'équipe de direction et aux Forces canadiennes, de travailler à changer cette culture, tout comme nous le faisons dans l'ensemble du pays, pour faire comprendre qu'un pansement invisible autour de la tête, c'est la même chose qu'un pansement sur un bras cassé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est juste, mais ce que je veux dire, c'est que si une personne ne se sent pas bien mentalement et sait que si elle se fait traiter, elle sera désignée par la structure militaire comme étant une personne souffrant de maladie mentale qui n'est donc pas apte à servir, alors elle continuera de servir pour éviter de se faire mettre à la porte parce qu'elle souffre d'une maladie. La plus proche comparaison dans la vie civile serait celle d'un sonneur d'alarme. Si vous dénoncez, vous devez être protégé. Est-ce qu'on offre une certaine protection à ces personnes?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Le programme de SSBSO, un programme de soutien par les pairs, est confidentiel, et la chaîne de commandement n'est pas au courant des interactions entre les pairs et les gens qui obtiennent leur appui. C'est souvent la première étape à franchir avant de demander de l'aide médicale, parce que ces pairs ont vécu la même expérience. Ces programmes, comme Sans limites, visent l'aide entre les pairs et le bien-être, et parfois il faut passer par cette première étape pour obtenir des références ou pour accepter d'aller de l'avant et comprendre que cela améliorera notre bien-être.

Il ne fait aucun doute que ces programmes sont bénéfiques.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Il y a un lien dans votre question que j'aimerais défaire un peu; c'est cette supposition que, parce que je reçois des services d'aide en santé mentale et que je suis en uniforme... Lorsque je travaillais dans l'Arctique, j'ai été impliqué dans l'écrasement du vol 6560 de la First Air, ce 737 qui a malheureusement manqué la piste et s'est écrasé contre une montagne en plein milieu de l'opération Nanook. Nous avons perdu plusieurs membres. J'étais le répondant sur les lieux. Au fil des ans, j'ai eu des problèmes à cause de cela, et j'ai pu les surmonter grâce à l'aide médicale. Cela ne m'a pas empêché de continuer à faire mon travail. En fait, ce n'est pas différent d'une personne qui a des problèmes d'alcool ou qui se remet d'une blessure musculosquelettique. Ces personnes peuvent se rétablir et être fonctionnelles.

La maladie mentale n'entraîne pas automatiquement une libération des Forces armées canadiennes. D'autres généraux et adjudants-chefs ont parlé de leurs propres... On peut gérer la situation et avancer. C'est la clé; je voulais donc défaire cette hypothèse selon laquelle on était automatiquement libéré des forces armées simplement parce qu'on consultait un psychologue ou un travailleur social à propos d'un quelconque problème. Je crois que plus il y aura de cas, plus on parlera de la possibilité d'aller de l'avant et de continuer d'être un membre fonctionnel des forces armées, sans restriction à l'égard des promotions, etc. mieux on se portera... C'est la culture dont je parlais plus tôt.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez parlé plus tôt du moment où une personne est prête à retirer son uniforme. Comment savez-vous qu'une personne est prête, sur le plan médical? Si l'on se retrouve dans une situation où l'armée est d'avis que la personne doit quitter les forces armées, mais que la personne ne veut pas le faire, comment gérez-vous cela?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Vous avez posé une question médicale. Nous ne sommes pas des médecins militaires, alors nous ne pouvons pas répondre à cette question. Nous pourrions vous parler du processus.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Oui. Si une personne a des contraintes à l'emploi pour des raisons médicales qui enfreignent l'universalité du service, alors elle devra probablement faire une transition. Le processus de transition s'échelonne sur une période de six mois à trois ans, selon la complexité des besoins de la personne. Bien sûr, étant donné notre travail et les efforts que nous déployons en matière de transition au sein des Forces armées canadiennes et du ministère des Anciens Combattants, nous voulons être certains que les membres sont prêts à faire la transition.

Il faut satisfaire aux critères de l'universalité du service. Parfois, les personnes ne répondent pas à ces exigences, mais peuvent demeurer à l'emploi des Forces armées canadiennes, peuvent être maintenues en poste jusqu'à trois ans et peuvent être employées à ce titre. Cela peut varier de six mois à trois ans.

(1635)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Au cours des dernières semaines — je suis membre du Comité depuis quelques semaines seulement —, nous avons beaucoup parlé de la formation de base que doit suivre un nouveau soldat, un nouveau membre de l'armée, pour entrer dans le monde militaire, mais il n'existe aucun processus similaire lorsque les militaires doivent effectuer un retour à la vie civile. Êtes-vous d'accord avec cela?

Le président:

Veuillez répondre rapidement s'il vous plaît.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Non, je ne suis pas d'accord avec cela.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Wagantall, vous avez la parole.

Mme Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, PCC):

C'était une réponse rapide. Je vais peut-être vous donner plus de temps pour y répondre.

J'essaie de comprendre ce qu'est l'UISP. Si un militaire n'est pas apte à servir les forces armées à un certain moment, son objectif est probablement de reprendre sa carrière et de retourner au travail ou, s'il reconnaît qu'il ne peut plus respecter les normes relatives à l'universalité, alors il deviendra un ancien combattant.

Le ministère des Anciens Combattants et les Forces armées canadiennes travaillent en collaboration à ce dossier. Comment les décisions sont-elles prises? Qui est responsable de la décision finale, dans un sens ou dans l'autre? À mon sens, si une personne doit être restituée, la décision finale revient aux Forces armées canadiennes. Si on détermine que la personne doit quitter les forces armées, alors il reviendrait à Anciens Combattants Canada de décider quand la personne est prête à faire la transition.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

La décision de quitter les forces armées ou d'y rester est une décision administrative prise par le directeur de l'administration des carrières militaires, qui détermine si les contraintes à l'emploi pour des raisons médicales répondent aux exigences liées à l'universalité du service.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Ce sont donc les Forces armées canadiennes qui prennent la décision.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Oui.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord. On parle ici de maladie mentale et de suicide; le lien entre la maladie mentale et les expériences comme la vôtre est clair. Vous avez vécu une crise, et cela fait partie de votre vie maintenant. On entend aussi souvent parler des frustrations relatives au processus de libération; vous tentez de régler ce problème pour une transition sans heurt. Je me demande pourquoi on libère ces gens dans le monde des anciens combattants avant qu'ils n'aient accès à un médecin de famille, avant que leur maison ne soit rénovée; on les laisse sans argent alors qu'ils doivent attendre des mois avant d'être payés. Cela augmente leur niveau de stress.

Aussi, comme l'a constaté mon collègue après avoir parlé aux personnes qui aident les anciens combattants par l'entremise des programmes de transition, nous les préparons et les conditionnons à la mentalité de combat ou de fuite et à un changement dans leurs habitudes de sommeil, mais ensuite nous nous attendons à ce qu'ils fassent sans aide la transition vers la vie civile, à ce qu'ils fassent comme tout le monde, à ce qu'ils se couchent plus tard parce que c'est ce que nous voulons. Ils ne sont pas préparés à cela, mais ils pourraient l'être. Il existe des façons de reprogrammer les gens  — c'est un mauvais choix de mot — pour qu'ils puissent à nouveau dormir sans avoir cette réaction de combat ou de fuite. Pourquoi libérons-nous ces personnes sans leur faire ce cadeau qui, je crois, diminuerait beaucoup leur niveau de stress mental lorsqu'ils tentent de se réhabituer à la vie civile normale?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

C'est une grande question. Je vais commencer par le début. Le chef a été très clair. Nous allons professionnaliser les services de transition. Une partie de cette réponse est directement liée à votre question au sujet du bon moment pour partir. La capitaine Langlois a expliqué les processus actuels et la justification relative au manquement à l'universalité des services. Nous travaillons avec nos collègues d'ACC pour améliorer le processus de sorte qu'au fil de la transition, ils deviennent plus « civilisés » — faute d'un terme plus approprié —, mais qu'ils gardent quand même leur identité militaire, pour faire référence à ce dont vous avez parlé plus tôt.

Selon leur carrière, leur lieu de résidence et la région du pays dans laquelle ils se trouvent, les militaires sont confrontés à divers défis. Si vous vivez sur une très grande base militaire dans une ville très éloignée, comme Petawawa — en fait, Petawawa n'est pas une ville éloignée — ou Wainwright, votre situation diffère grandement de celle d'un militaire qui vit ici à Ottawa et qui peut se fondre dans la population.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

En Saskatchewan.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Oui, en Saskatchewan et à Moose Jaw. Cela fait partie d'un programme de professionnalisation et d'un processus visant à combler les lacunes. Nous y travaillons très fort. Je ne peux pas vous parler du moment exact de la libération. Il faut tenir compte de plusieurs options afin de déterminer cela.

Est-ce que je peux aborder un point au sujet du revenu, rapidement?

(1640)

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Oui.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Si les militaires ont fait leur demande de prestations d'invalidité de longue durée, ce qu'ils font lorsqu'ils entreprennent un programme de réhabilitation professionnelle, dans la grande majorité des cas, ils commencent à recevoir leur argent dans les 16 jours suivant leur dernier chèque de paye. C'est leur assureur privé qui gère ce programme. Je ne peux pas parler des autres sources de revenus citées dans les histoires que l'on entend, parce que je ne suis pas responsable des pensions ou des prestations pour les anciens combattants.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Oui, je crois que c'est ACC qui est responsable de cette question. J'ai une dernière question, rapidement. Nous avons aussi entendu la frustration des militaires qui doivent retirer leur uniforme. On leur dit au revoir, et c'est terminé. Avez-vous pensé à une façon de reconnaître le service de ces personnes, même si leur cheminement ne correspond pas à celui qu'elles avaient envisagé ou que les forces armées avaient envisagé pour elles à long terme? Parce que ces militaires quittent l'armée sans se sentir valorisés par les Forces canadiennes, à qui ils ont donné leur vie.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Nous avons un programme, Départ dans la dignité. Les militaires reçoivent une lettre du premier ministre et du maire, et un certificat de service. On organise des événements où les amis et la famille des militaires se réunissent; ils reçoivent souvent un cadeau de leur unité et leurs pairs leur rendent hommage. Tout est fait selon le souhait de la personne. Parfois, les gens veulent quitter l'armée de façon plus discrète; d'autres veulent quelque chose de plus grand. [Français] d'une plus grande envergure.[Traduction]

Le programme existe et il fonctionne bien.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Mais c'est leur choix.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen, vous avez la parole.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je voulais revenir à une question posée plus tôt au sujet des défis auxquels est confrontée l'UISP. Avez-vous suffisamment de personnel? Certains anciens combattants nous ont dit qu'il n'y avait pas assez de ressources pour effectuer le travail.

Est-ce que vous avez suffisamment de personnel? Dans la négative, avez-vous de la difficulté à trouver des personnes qualifiées pour faire ce travail très sensible et important? Que recherchez-vous? Recevez-vous assez de financement? Souvent, les problèmes émanent d'un manque de ressources. Avez-vous suffisamment de fonds?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Nous nous acquittons de notre mission, mais comme le nombre de libérations pour des raisons médicales a augmenté récemment, le personnel subit plus de pression. Le renouvellement de la structure de l'UISP pensé et présenté par le général Corbould avec l'appui du chef permettra d'accroître la structure de l'UISP afin de veiller à offrir des services de haut niveau pour que nous puissions nous acquitter de notre mandat sans trop de problèmes.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Quel type de personne peut offrir ce soutien très important?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

L'UISP compte de nombreux anciens militaires, devenus civils, parce qu'ils ont une expertise et une expérience qu'ils peuvent partager avec les autres. Pour les membres du personnel militaire, cela varie. Ils proviennent de divers milieux. Nous misons surtout sur la qualité des personnes, sur leur compassion et leur capacité d'écoute. Presque tous les membres du personnel sont là parce qu'ils veulent redonner aux forces armées. Certains ont pris part aux opérations, tandis que d'autres ont un proche qui a vécu ces expériences de vie, et ils veulent tous être là pour aider les membres des Forces armées canadiennes. C'est ce que nous cherchons.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je ne sais pas si vous allez pouvoir répondre à ma prochaine question ou si elle correspond à votre rôle. Bien sûr, en tant que députés, nous entendons surtout parler les personnes qui n'ont pas réussi leur transition. Elles s'expriment parfois très ouvertement.

Est-ce que vous faites le suivi de ces personnes? Avez-vous un moyen de rétablir le contact avec elles? Avez-vous un mécanisme qui vous permet de renouer avec ces personnes pour tenter de combler les lacunes ou de les aider à passer à travers une période très difficile dans le monde civil?

(1645)

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Chaque fois qu'une personne pose une question au ministre, au chef ou à l'unité, nous prenons le temps de répondre, d'effectuer un suivi et de boucler la boucle avec la personne touchée.

Est-ce que nous suivons tout le monde? Non. L'UISP a un système de suivi, mais il sert à veiller à ce que personne ne soit laissé pour compte. Les gens qui viennent à nous sont inscrits dans le système et nous nous assurons de faire un suivi auprès d'eux.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

C'est seulement jusqu'à ce que les personnes soient libérées. Une fois qu'elles le sont, je peux vous assurer que lorsque nous voyons les manchettes, nous effectuons une vérification et si nous trouvons des erreurs dans notre processus, nous les corrigeons.

Ma collègue vous a déjà parlé de l'engagement auprès des personnes.

Le président:

Merci. Voilà qui met fin à la discussion d'aujourd'hui.

Au nom du Comité, je vous remercie tous les deux, capitaine et commodore, d'avoir pris le temps de venir témoigner ici aujourd'hui malgré votre horaire chargé, et merci pour tout ce que vous faites pour nos militaires.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant quelques minutes, puis nous passerons aux travaux du Comité, avec le comité directeur.

Merci. La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

acva committee hansard 20196 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 17:43 on February 22, 2017

2017-02-15 ACVA 43

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

(1540)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)):

I'd like to call the meeting to order, if everyone could take a seat.

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) and the motion adopted on September 29, the committee is resuming its study of mental health and suicide prevention among veterans.

Today we have a panel of three organizations, which will start with 10 minutes of questions. We have the Distress Centre of Ottawa and Region, the Mood Disorders Society of Canada, and the Vanier Institute of the Family.

We'll start with the Vanier Institute of the Family, with chief executive officer Nora Spinks and retired Colonel Russ Mann.

Ms. Nora Spinks (Chief Executive Officer, Vanier Institute of the Family):

Thank you. I'm speaking today as the CEO of the Vanier Institute. As you know, the institute was founded over 50 years ago by the late general, the Right Honourable Georges P. Vanier and his wife Pauline, mother of his five children and, at times, his caregiver. He was one of Canada's most decorated military leaders, a veteran of both world wars who lost part of his leg in the Second World War.

I'm here with my colleague, retired Colonel Russ Mann, who's working with the institute on the military and veteran families in Canada initiative and coordinates the Canadian military and veteran families leadership circle. This is a consortium of over 40 diverse community organizations committed to working together to build a solid circle of support for families of those who choose to wear the uniform for Canada.

I'm not a suicide expert. I'm here to talk about families. I'm here to talk about the role that families play in suicide prevention. I'm here to talk about the diversity of families and the complexity of family life. I'm here to share the evidence from research related to the family's role in suicide prevention, which is particularly difficult because of the inherent challenges of measuring something that didn't happen.

First, families are our first group experience, and our parents are our first group leaders. Families are unique and diverse, family dynamics can be open or guarded, emotions can be suppressed or expressed, and adults can be nurturing or distant. Families can live with abundance or scarcity. Families can be part of a supportive community, or alone and even isolated. Families experience stress together when they move, when there's a change—a birth, a death, an illness, or an injury—when money is tight, when uncertainty is high, when they are separated by circumstance, or when they reunite after time apart.

We each play a role in our families as children and as adults. Some of us are peacemakers, others are troublemakers. Some of us are followers, others are leaders. Some of us are talkers, others are listeners. Some of us are quiet observers, while others test, experiment, and innovate. Families grow tighter and grow apart. They share love, concern, pain, and anguish. They also share joy, hopes, and dreams.

Some families are under stress, some are in distress, and some are in crisis. Research shows that people who are contemplating suicide are feeling despair, anger, fear, and pain—emotional or psychic pain. They're feeling a need to escape, a need to protect others. They feel like there are no other options. Families share that despair; they often bear the brunt of the anger and witness the fear. Families often experience and feel hopelessness and helplessness. People who contemplate suicide feel hopeless and helpless.

Families provide help and hope, but they also both provide and need support. Families that are well supported, functioning, and healthy can be a significant protective factor for those contemplating suicide. Few families are naturally resilient: most need support to become or remain resilient, and some need help to become resilient. The literature shows that strong relationships with family and friends can reduce social isolation. Families can be advocates and system navigators. They can be the centre or foundation of the system of support for people in distress: we've heard some people who have lived through distress—who have come out of the darkness to the other side—report that this was the result of somebody being in their lives who didn't give up.

Families are diverse. They can be effective in supporting a family member with mental illness, depression, or PTSD, but they need support, training, and resources to do so. They need to feel competent, and they need to feel confident that their loved ones will receive the care they need. They need to feel they are not alone. When they reach out on behalf of their loved ones, they need to feel they can focus on accessing need, not scrambling to look for services and spending time on Google. They need to feel that their loved ones get well, not that they have to go on a long wait-list. They need to be able to access services and not fight to be heard.

Families need to find compassion, not confrontation. They need to feel respected, not challenged, and they need to be trusted.

Families cannot be forgotten after somebody dies by suicide. Families need to heal after that experience, that grief, that loss. They need guidance, assistance, and support. Families without support can become part of the problem, rather than a key part of the solution. Families empowered, included, and resourced can be a powerful tool.

Suicide is an extreme end to the wellness spectrum. Suicide is preventable, suicide is complex. Effective suicide prevention isn't a single event, or action, or policy, or program. It's a long-term, comprehensive approach to helping individuals and their families get well, be well, and stay well. It's about care and compassion. It's about the system of government and community supports working with families from the time they become connected to the military, throughout a military career, transitioning out of the military, and living as a veteran.

The Vanier Institute is here as a national resource. We are here to offer our assistance in the research you are doing. We are here to assist you to find the right answers to support families who are experiencing the trauma of people considering suicide.

Thank you very much.

(1545)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Next we'll have the Distress Centre of Ottawa and Region, Ms. Pizzuto, acting community relations coordinator. Welcome.

Ms. Breanna Pizzuto (Acting Community Relations Coordinator, Distress Centre of Ottawa and Region):

Thank you for having me here to speak to you today. This is a topic that I'm really grateful to have the opportunity to speak on. I'm really happy to hear that this committee exists and is looking into this topic.

I've been with the Distress Centre for three and a half years. I started as a volunteer on the phone lines, moved up into being a volunteer supervisor, and now I've been full-time staff for a year, so I have a bit of an idea of what we do from the front lines, and also now in a role supporting volunteers as well as our callers.

I'll tell you a bit about what we do at the Distress Centre. We're a 24-hour, telephone-based service offering crisis intervention, suicide prevention, emotional support, information, and referrals to those who need this. Our service area is quite large. It covers Ottawa; Gatineau; Prescott-Russell; Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry; Renfrew; Frontenac; Grey Bruce; and Nunavut and Nunavik in northern Quebec. We have over 220 active volunteers staffing our lines 24/7/365; and in 2016 we answered over 50,000 calls.

To give you an idea of where we fit in the province, Ontario has 14 distress centres, including Ottawa's, that answered over 302,000 calls in 2015, with over 1,800 active volunteers.

To tie in to why we're here today, I can tell you that in 2016, 1,118 of our calls had some mention of the caller or a family member experiencing PTSD; and 12,448 out of 50,000 mentioned a caller or family member with a mood disorder, which is the most common mental health concern we hear about next to schizophrenia and psychosis.

While we don't track military personnel or veterans specifically in our demographics, I did want to tell you a bit about a caller whom we hear from quite regularly, just to bring a face to this issue for you. In the interests of confidentiality, I'll refer to him as John.

John lives within our service area, and he's in his fifties. He is divorced and he lives alone. John has been on tours as an army captain in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Somalia. John has lost all the members of his squad, either in active duty or by suicide upon their return back to Canada. He is constantly haunted by the flashbacks of the experience he endured carrying his buddies off the battlefield in body bags. He was discharged from the army a few years ago without a pension, and is struggling financially, having blown through all his savings upon his return here. He struggles with drinking and smoking, which are his go-to coping strategies; and he often calls us when he's inebriated. He's been diagnosed with PTSD, as well as a host of other physical ailments that leave him in constant pain.

John's calls to us waver between feelings of strength and resiliency for getting through what he's experienced in his life, balanced with a constant suicidal ideation and helplessness at the fact that he very often feels discarded and left behind. John feels like he's the last man standing.

He has admitted to us that he needs counselling, but has told us many times that he doesn't want anything to do with Veterans Affairs. He's dealt with them in the past and expresses frustration at the fact that they just put him on medication when what he really wants is someone to talk to and to share his experience with. He's told us that he feels the military has thrown him on the trash heap.

John's story is one of too many veterans who are suffering, and we can learn a lot from him.

The Internet tells me that 85% of the Canadian military are men. Men's mental health is becoming an increasingly recognized area of concern in our society, with men dying by suicide at a rate four times higher than women. Given this statistic, combined with the proportion of men in the military, it would make sense then to spend some time looking into how men specifically could be supported—not to discount the women, of course, they're important, too.

It's often said that men are less likely than women to reach out for help when they need to. This is seemingly true, but our statistics at the Distress Centre show that 40% of our callers in 2016 were men, which is almost a half. From this number, we can conclude that men will reach out for help when they feel safe to do so.

Our service is confidential, judgment-free, and not directly linked to a specific workplace, the government, the military, or any other professional body. Callers know they will receive respect and an actively listening volunteer on every call and that their stories will be heard, but not shared. No matter what they've done in their lives or what's happened to them, our volunteers will extend the same kindness and support to every caller they speak to.

In preparing for this presentation, I spoke to some colleagues, as well as some current members of the reserves, who told me that there is a broad range of useful resources that currently exist within the military, and I think this is great. These resources are well promoted in the workplace and encouraged by employers. What we hear most often from our callers is that the stigma attached to getting help is the biggest barrier that prevents anyone from seeking help. It's the workplace culture: the peer pressure to be strong and unbreakable members of the military, or proud and resilient veterans.

(1550)



It was not too long ago, 2009 in fact, that the American army forced suicidal soldiers in basic training to wear a bright orange vest to identify themselves so they could have an eye kept on them. While this was intended to increase safety, it had the opposite effect of stigmatizing those who were struggling.

We often hear of the worry that people will have their job compromised at any mention of weakness, and it's the loss of identity that a person feels when they are stripped of their duties and thrown back into life without any support that's the most devastating. The dedication, strength, and willingness to sacrifice their bodies, lives, and minds for their country is something we must all honour in our vets and military members.

At the same time, we need to respect that with the loss of that ability to serve in the military comes an extreme loss of the sense of identity and self. These men and women are trained to act at peak performance on minimal amounts of rest. They have no choice but to become hypersensitive to the sights, sounds, and smells around them. Otherwise, they risk their lives and the lives of their comrades.

How can we reasonably expect our military personnel to return from such extraordinary circumstances and assimilate peacefully back into an ordinary life in Canadian society without help in doing so? We simply can't ask that of them.

Good mental health is more than just the absence of mental illness. Mental well-being or lack thereof comes from a combination of factors, and in speaking to how we can best support the transition between a career in the military and veteranhood, we must address all the factors that contribute to mental well-being, including financial stability, meaningful work, supportive personal relationships, family, and physical well-being. Alongside the obvious need for trained professionals to provide counselling or therapy comes the need for skills training, family support, income support, employment assistance, and couples counselling.

When John cannot afford more than a bowl of rice for dinner, how can we possibly expect him to obtain or maintain a job, or form meaningful relationships that will nurture and fulfill him? Human beings need safety and security above all else to survive and thrive.

A proactive approach would be helpful in transitioning military personnel into life after the military. I would put forth the recommendation that perhaps we could focus some time and energy into looking into how to better the supports that already exist, instead of creating new ones. It seems to me that there are resources out there that could be bolstered to better serve and become more accessible to the population that needs them. To break the barrier of stigma and promote safety in seeking help, perhaps partnering with a third party outside the military to provide support would be an avenue to explore.

There are over 100 distress centres across Canada, and a study reported on by Distress and Crisis Ontario has shown that volunteer-based support outperforms paid professional support on suicide phone lines. When compared, volunteers conducted more risk assessments, had more empathy, and were more respectful of callers, which in turn produced significantly better call outcome ratings than paid professionals on phone lines. It makes sense then that perhaps a partnership between Veterans Affairs and some or all of these Canada-wide distress centres would be a good idea, in the interest of saving money and building on an existing, proven, and effective source of help.

This is certainly an area that we at the Distress Centre of Ottawa are open to investigating. In fact, our board has already begun to explore the avenue of how we can better support the military personnel and vets in our existing work.

In closing, I would like to offer my respect and honour for the sacrifices made by these men and women. They might need help, but that doesn't mean they are helpless. They might be hurt, but that doesn't mean they are broken.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Next is the Mood Disorders Society of Canada, Mr. Gallson, associate national executive director; and Mr. Upshall, national executive director.

Welcome.

Mr. Philip Upshall (National Executive Director, Mood Disorders Society of Canada):

Thank you, Chair, for the opportunity to appear before you. My associate executive director is with me.

Just at the outset, I'd like to say I've appeared before a large number of standing committee meetings over the last 40 years of my activities in Ottawa, and I am so happy to see the members taking such a terrific interest in this topic. Frequently, standing committees show up with four or five members and it's rather impromptu. It's obvious you take this seriously and I'm really happy to see that.

Mood Disorders Society of Canada is a national, not-for-profit charity managed and membered by people with lived experience in their families. We are active at the national level only, and we have been around since 2011. We are active in many areas, some of which Dave will mention. We become engaged when we think there is an opportunity to do something for the people who need help. Those are the people who live with mental illnesses, whether they're on the street, whether they're veterans, whether they're first responders—whoever we can be involved with to help.

We've focused on that primarily because you can become involved in Ottawa with an awful lot of meetings and a lot of consultations, a lot of round tables, that produce not a whole lot of effective knowledge translation that will assist the people who need help. The material is important, and if you're involved in that stuff, that's fine; it's just not our bag.

One of the things we have done in the past, and we currently do, is become involved with the research community. We became involved with them initially when CIHR came into existence and with Bill C-300. We sat on their institute advisory board for many years. We're founders of the Canadian Depression Research and Intervention Network. The reason we did that is because there is a lot of research out there that I'm sure you've found is not translated into helping people who need help. We try to motivate the researchers and the community generally to pick up what we know will work and get it working, and still support research.

In 2004, we worked to help people with mental illnes