header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-02-06 ACVA 40

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

Good afternoon. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), and the motion adopted on September 29, the committee will resume its study on mental health and suicide prevention among veterans.

As members probably know, we've had a couple of cancellations today due to personal reasons. Jody Mitic and Joseph Brindle will appear at a later date.

Today we have two witnesses, Brian Harding and Marie-Claude Gagnon, founder of It's Just 700.

Today, process-wise, we'll give both witnesses up to 10 minutes for their statements. We'll do one round of questioning, and then we have a little bit of committee business after that.

We will start with Mr. Harding.

Mr. Brian Harding (As an Individual):

Good afternoon, and thank you for inviting me today.

Like most people, I have colleagues, friends, and family who have struggled with mental illness. I consider it a privilege to be invited to testify for this study.

As an introduction, I'll give a brief summary of why I am sitting here at the table today.

I've been an army reservist since 2004. I have 13 years of mixed part-time and full-time service, including a deployment to Afghanistan in 2008. For just over three years now, I've also served full time as a civilian police officer.

In December 2013, after four very public military suicides, I and other serving soldiers started an initiative called Send Up the Count. Our intent was just to push out a message to other soldiers to re-establish contact with those they had served with, try to maybe find some members who had fallen through the cracks, and drag them out with some friendly human contact. We accidentally ended up creating an online network of soldiers, veterans, and first responders with the dual purpose of suicide prevention and mental health peer support.

We've had many interventions with veterans in crisis, including a number of instances in which suicides have been stopped as they were occurring. Unfortunately, we've lost some too. This remains a right-now problem. In fact, just this morning I learned of another soldier here in Ontario lost to suicide over the weekend.

In 2015, as a result of my work, I was invited by the Minister of Veterans Affairs to join the newly formed ministerial advisory groups. Since then, I've periodically met with other veterans, researchers, and military and VAC staff to provide advice from the coal face, as it were, directly to the minister and senior levels of VAC. I presently sit on the mental health advisory group.

There is no standard for a veteran in crisis. Veterans can have the same mental health issues and face the same stressors as the civilian population: anxiety, depression, family trouble, financial or legal issues, accidents, violence, all potentially unrelated to service.

On top of that, they may struggle with traumatic experiences in their service and stressors unique to the military as well. These compound each other. When you add the normal stress that anyone faces and then throw in tours overseas, months away from home, and family disruption from moving, the stress can get considerably more burdensome and complex.

Our first suicide intervention involved a veteran who was medically released from the army after a training injury. He had no tours yet, but he went from being partway into what should have been a long career to being badly hurt, sidelined and forgotten at work, medically released, having his identity as a soldier stripped, and being punted into the bureaucracy of Veterans Affairs. He fell into deep despair.

One day he made several suicidal comments on Facebook and made reference to being armed. Several of us saw it, confirmed through family that he had access to a gun, and were able to contact police in time to intercept him. He was safely arrested in possession of a loaded handgun before he was able to carry out a plan to publicly shoot himself.

Social media let this veteran reach out to a support network that previously didn't exist and give enough warning signs for us to act. Those of us involved in the call were spread from Yukon and British Columbia to Ontario.

I will highlight a few points here.

Mental health problems and suicide don't have to be linked to operational trauma. The loss of identity that comes from release and transition is a huge risk factor. An informal peer network of veterans connected online with people awake at any hour of the day was also crucial for identifying a veteran in crisis and getting him help in an emergency. This has happened many times since.

Crisis and suicidality happen when stress or trauma surpasses a veteran's capacity to cope. While numerous resources exist, veterans face serious barriers in accessing them.

VAC is the gatekeeper to many treatments, and they insist on their own medical evaluation for disability determination. Other witnesses have brought this up as senseless and damaging, and you've acknowledged it. Add my voice to theirs, but I won't beat a dead horse.

Another major barrier is a profound shortage of veteran-specific care. A friend of mine was referred some years ago to full-time residential treatment for mental health. There this Afghanistan veteran, alongside a police officer, shared what was supposed to be a therapeutic environment with criminal gang members attending treatment on court order. This is disgustingly inappropriate, and dangerous for people expected to open up about trauma suffered in service to their country or community. The police officer, incidentally, has since died by suicide.

I'll echo my friend Debbie Lowther and the other witnesses who testified last week to the critical need for veteran-specific treatment facilities.

Stigma and discrimination against mental illness are still killing people. There is a pecking order in veterans' circles, even among the injured and ill.

Recently a veteran was going to execute a detailed and effective plan to kill herself. She has struggled with PTSD since working overseas in an intelligence role. She was responsible for identifying enemy targets, identified by unmanned aerial vehicles, and then watching them get killed on live video. She has faced scorn and skepticism from other veterans who developed their operational stress injuries from personal involvement in close-quarters combat. Neither injury is more or less legitimate than the other; they're just different. Just as a broken leg from playing football and a broken leg from slipping on the ice differ in how they happened, you have the same result. Despite this, she was hounded by other vets to the point where she became convinced she was faking her own PTSD, which had been diagnosed, and decided to kill herself. Luckily, she reached out to me in time, again through social media, and I talked her down and into accessing care.

I use this story to highlight how far we still have to go with stigma in the military, in the veteran community, and in society as a whole. External stigma from others becomes internalized. People who are simply injured come to believe that they are weak or useless. That's agonizing for anyone, never mind somebody who comes from an environment as utilitarian in attitude as the military.

A struggling or suicidal vet will often reach out to other vets first and perhaps last, reaching out to other people who they believe will “get it”. They may not survive long enough to walk into a doctor's office unless a buddy or a family member helps them through the crisis and gets them there.

I'm not a clinician or a researcher. I'm a part-time soldier and a full-time cop. Since I began to find myself intervening with veterans in crisis, I've had to get as much training as I could to catch up. I received training in mental health first aid, a course I've since helped the Mental Health Commission of Canada adapt for the veterans community. I instruct a course called “Road to Mental Readiness”, which teaches soldiers and first responders mental health resilience skills.

I've been lucky. These and other courses, plus professional experience, have given me tools for crisis intervention. Peers and first responders don't substitute for proper clinical care, but we constantly find ourselves as mental health first-aiders when we get a phone call or a text message or see a social media post at some ugly hour of the night and realize that a life is in danger right now.

The skills I learned in mental health first aid have saved lives. A slow start has been made in pushing this sort of training out to veterans and family members, but much more is desperately needed. None of us knows who is going to be awake and able to respond to the next suicidal comrade. We need to see increased mental health literacy and first aid training in the population at large and the veteran community specifically.

I want to touch very briefly on veteran suicide data.

On November 17, Mrs. Lockhart asked another witness if we have data on the suicide rate among veterans. We do not.

Every death ruled by a coroner as suicide is compiled provincially and sent to Statistics Canada for their mortality database, but the data is stripped of personally identifying information. At present, nothing causes a coroner's determination of suicide to be compared against a list of those who have served in the Canadian military. Nothing reliably and consistently flags the fact that a veteran has died by suicide.

There is, therefore, no comprehensive data available on the rates of suicide among veterans. Changing this could be straightforward if the name and date of birth of every recorded suicide were run against a database of former military members. That would get us close enough to 100% to be useful and valuable. All the necessary information exists; it just doesn't exist in the same place, so that concerned parties can turn it into data.

To sum up, veterans suffer from all the same mental health issues as the civilian population, plus unique challenges linked with service. Suicide and crisis are not always going to be linked to operational stress injuries, but may stem from depression, anxiety, or other mental health issues linked to normal life stressors that the military lifestyle adds to.

Veterans are going to their buddies first as a familiar source of support, and they're doing it using new modes of communication. Those of us providing the support need to be better trained to get that vet through the first few hours of an unexpected crisis while we guide them to appropriate professional care.

Veterans struggle to access care due to bureaucratic backlog, a massive residual problem with stigma, and a lack of dedicated residential treatment options tailored to their unique needs. The veteran suicide problem is a long way from going away and has yet to be even properly defined, but the data is within reach if the government decides to make it happen.

Canada as a whole has a lot of work to do in mental health. Injured and ill veterans are a very concentrated, high-need, high-risk target population for this work. We must learn how to save those in crisis, support them through recovery, and reintegrate them to or transition them from the workplace. Canada will advance in mental health; it's just a matter of how fast. Just as civilian paramedics learn from and use techniques developed on the battlefield, any and all effort put into helping the situation of veterans with mental health disorders will pay dividends for the rest of the Canadian population.

Thank you.

(1540)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Please go ahead, Ms. Gagnon.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon (Founder, It's Just 700):

First I would like to thank the committee for letting me present here today.

My name is Marie-Claude Gagnon. I am a former naval reservist, a military sexual trauma survivor, and founder of the group It's Just 700.

Created in 2015, our group allows men and women suffering from military sexual trauma to connect with peers. We are the only network dedicated to MST survivors in Canada.

We offer meetings; inform people about VAC and other services, such as legal and financial aid; connect victims to the Canadian Armed Forces sexual misconduct response team; provide in-person support for depositions, medicals, and meetings; provide collaboration with therapists to develop services for MST survivors; and carry out consultation and awareness projects.

I would like to start with the definition of MST. Since there is no information about military sexual trauma on the VAC website, I had to borrow the definition from the American VA website. Military sexual trauma is defined as: psychological trauma resulting from a physical assault of a sexual nature, battery of a sexual nature, or sexual harassment which occurred while the Veteran was serving on active duty, active duty for training, or inactive duty training.

Now I would like to address this topic by borrowing quotes from the 2014 “Caring for Canada's Ill and Injured Military Personnel: Report of the Standing Committee on National Defence”. It is necessary to address prevention and treatment not only of combat-based PTSD in the CAF, but to address other causes of service-related PTSD such as sexual assault.

The link between sexual assault, either in theatre or at home, and PTSD is well established, particularly for female service members. We know practically nothing about other aspects of female veterans' experiences in Canada.

Colonel Gerry Blais assured the committee that all the programs offered by the CF joint personnel support unit are for everyone; however, Colonel Blais' statement that we treat all our injured and sick members in the same way does not reflect the specific psychological and social aspects of women service members experiencing PTSD and other mental health issues, particularly those who have suffered military sexual trauma.

Regardless of these recommendations, the 2014 Surgeon General's report on suicide mortality in the Canadian Armed Forces persisted in looking only at men. This report, approved by our newly appointed Surgeon General, did not include female suicide due to the very low number of females killing themselves while in service.

Since the majority of my group was forced to medically release after reporting their sexual assault, it is fair to advance that the 2015 research on mental health did not reflect MST survivors' reality.

The 2015 “External Review into Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Harassment in the CAF” stated: a common response to allegations of sexual harassment or sexual assault seems to be to remove victims from their unit.

Doing so can potentially lead to an unanticipated and involuntary release.

Please allow me to quote members of my group who are currently going through this experience. One said, “My military doctor started pushing for a medical release at my first appointment with her, following the assault, before I had even seen a psychiatrist, started meds, started seeing a psychologist, or even wrapped my head around the fact that I had been raped.”

Another one stated, “How can I start to heal when on the one hand I am being pushed out the door, and on the other hand I am still seeking justice?”

I have another quote: “I had to take sick leave for four days this week. It is hard to cope with the demands of work and deal with the aftermath of the investigation. At times I feel that the organization is trying to break me.”

Research published in 2014 by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, however, did look into military sexual trauma and suicide mortality and found a high risk of suicide associated with military sexual trauma. It was recommended to continue assessing and considering MST in a suicide prevention strategy.

According to the Journal of Military, Veteran and Family Health, learning from the Deschamps report, female veterans tend to be underdiagnosed and undertreated. Consequently, they may face challenges accessing appropriate health services and may experience victim blaming and secondary victimization when seeking help for MST.

I have another quote: “The medical personnel told me that rape victims were not sent to see psychologists and that the priority was given to soldiers with combat-related trauma.”

Regarding the consequences of lack of care, I have other quotes from people who have had experiences. This is from a mother: “My youngest son found me unconscious in my room after a suicide attempt. In 2012, I was forced to do some terrible things to provide for my two children.”

(1545)



Approximately 85% of married female soldiers are married to military men. This is another set of specific stressors that are unique to female soldiers. When was the last time we heard a male spouse advocating on behalf of his female soldier wife?

Operational stress injury social support staff do not receive MST training and are not responsible for conducting assessments on MST survivors and their caregivers, as is done for combat-related OSIs. We all heard that OSISS includes MST, but here is what members have to say about that: “I have PTSD but was denied going to OSISS. I was told I would not fit in the program. It seems we get lumped in with all the Afghan vets when the PTSD diagnosis comes down. Not all trauma should be treated the same way. When you're constantly fighting for people to believe what happened to you, it is not beneficial.”

OSI clinic support groups are also based on goals, such as improving sleep, which does not allow people the ability to create groups for MST survivors.

My recommendations to this committee are to implement GBA+ throughout VAC policies, programs, priorities, and research; implement mandated female veterans gender representation at 15% as a minimum to all the DVA advisory committees, since right now female veterans represent only 3.5% of all the advisory groups for VAC; implement science and data collection to determine the sex-specific needs of female veterans, including on MST issues; train front-line and educator staff in gender-specific needs and treatments, including MST, ensuring that taxpayer-funded research is addressing both sexes; conduct a formal evaluation of the response process and support services available to MST survivors; post the services for veterans dealing with MST online; post online the number of medically released personnel who reported a sexual misconduct; and track how many MST claims are granted or denied every year, as acknowledged by retired General Natynczyk during the 2015 stakeholder meeting.

As an example, today I have somebody who is contemplating suicide. I'm dealing with this at the same time, so I may be looking at my phone once in a while just to make sure he's okay.

Thank you.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll start our first round with Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you both for coming today and presenting to us. It's heartfelt. We hear what you're saying and we definitely want to know more about what we can do and what we can recommend.

I recognize and I appreciate that you're caring enough to look at that phone during this trying time, so by all means do.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Thank you.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

We've heard a lot of times throughout this committee about how we build our soldiers. We take them in and, for lack of a better word, we indoctrinate them into becoming soldiers. We're finding, once we release them, as you've said, it's “Thanks for coming.” We kick them out the door and tell them not to let the door hit them on their way out.

Brian, can you comment a little more on how you see deconstructing these soldiers from that military mind? What we've heard, and I think what we're all thinking about, is that the lack of deconstruction is why we're seeing a lot of these issues, or some of them at least.

Mr. Brian Harding:

I believe that was spoken to quite eloquently by a few of your witnesses last week.

A lot of guys get in when they're 17, 18, 19. They might literally recruit into the military out of their parents' place. It's certainly not all of them, but you find people transitioning into adulthood at the same time as they transition into the military. They go into an environment where a lot of things are structured for them, provided for them. They have people to meticulously track their personal administration and make sure all their boxes are ticked for anything they need to do in life. Especially for the regular force, being a member of the military is a core part of your identity, and most of your life revolves around that.

When someone unexpectedly finds himself now needing to emerge into the civilian world, in some cases they—and I'm not trying to sound condescending in saying this—may have a lack of basic life skills. There's nobody to tell them they have a medical appointment coming up, to make sure they take care of this, that, or the other thing.

Of course, now that I'm on the spot, I struggle to think of other examples, but I think there would be merit in a structured assessment of what competencies releasing soldiers are lacking as they transition into the workplace, where those gaps may be exacerbated by medical factors, and of what specific training or development could potentially help them on the way out the door. That's not to say that it needs to be mandatory, but give them a buffet of options: here are things we can teach you how to do for yourself that we have previously been doing for you. That's just a thought.

(1555)

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Then we would put them through a boot camp as they come in and put them through a boot camp as they go out. Would that be a...?

Mr. Brian Harding:

I would not be quite that firm. When you say “boot camp”, you are taking somebody who has previously been potentially unstructured and ill-disciplined, and you are turning them into that. That's exactly what we're trying to deprogram, though. You want someone who doesn't need to be told, “You will show up at eight o'clock. At 12 o'clock you have lunch. At 12:35 you're done stuffing your face and you carry on.”

If there is to be training on the way out the door, to my mind at first glance, it should be structured in such a way that it helps to build the competency to look after your own affairs. Truthfully, though, this is not something I've really given much thought to before, so I'm a bit at a loss beyond that.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

I appreciate that. We're looking for comments coming from your heart from someone with your experience. It's worthwhile to see.... I appreciate that.

You talked about stigma and you talked about how it hounds within. Marie-Claude, I think in a way, although you didn't say it, there is that stigma as well when we're dealing with MST. I'm wondering if both of you might be able to comment on that stigma and how you see it playing in a situation dealing with mental illness.

Marie-Claude, I'll let you go first.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

I'm going to mention only MST, just because it hasn't been addressed as much, let's just say. I'm giving the example of Bell Let’s Talk. We haven't heard anything about military sexual trauma there. OSISS once had a campaign going on that had no military sexual trauma survivors. They willingly wanted to offer their testimony, and they were denied. They were not called back to put their information out there.

You see pictures on peer support and things like this, but on veterans day, we don't mention MST. We show the successes on women's day for veterans or soldiers. Women's groups usually go with the ones who have achieved success, but we neglect the ones who didn't. These are not the kinds of things we talk about.

The military itself, obviously, unless it's talking about the specific subject, doesn't integrate it. Even in the month of crime—I think it's March—we don't mention sexual trauma then either. It's never mentioned. It's not on our web page. It's not on VAC's web page.

If you look at the American VAC website, there's a whole section. I've been asking for over two years now to have one web page on our Veterans Affairs website just to tell us that, yes, we do accept MST, and these are the resources available for you. That never happened.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Brian, you talked about being hounded from within on the issue of stigma. I'm assuming that what you mean by that is someone is being labelled as having PTSD and his fellow soldiers are basically chastising him and putting him down because of that. Can you quickly comment on that?

Mr. Brian Harding:

It's an environment often dominated by alpha male mentalities. The military, of course, revolves around the ability to kill people and break their stuff in defence of the national interest. There is a certain mentality that comes around toughness, around self-resilience, and I have seen this too many damn times. If you were not outside the wire, on the ground and inflicting violence on the enemy personally, there is no way that your trauma can possibly be as legitimate as my trauma.

That comes from ignorance, it comes from ego, and it needs to be crushed.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you. Is my time up?

The Chair:

Yes, you are over. Sorry about that.

Go ahead, Ms. Lockhart.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Mr. Harding, I want to talk to you a little bit about the peer network that you talked about. We have been talking, through our service delivery study we conducted on mental health, about the importance of peer support, peer networks, and how times are changing. People are certainly reaching out online. You spoke of better training for peer support groups. How do we do that? Is part of the effectiveness of those peer support groups the informality of them, and if so, how could VAC provide more training?

(1600)

Mr. Brian Harding:

More training would be excellent. Better training would be excellent. Any training would be a splendid start.

There exists an abundance of courses out there to help laypersons with these issues. Probably just about everyone in the room at some point has learned standard first aid and CPR. There is a course called ASIST, or applied suicide intervention skills training. There is mental health first aid. There is psychological first aid. Within military and first responder circles, there is Road to Mental Readiness. There are a ton of courses that teach people how to identify that someone is struggling or in crisis. Just as you assess airways, breathing, and circulation in first aid protocols and intervene as appropriate, likewise when you detect that somebody is in crisis, there are structured approaches that guide you through how you actually interact with that person. If an infantry idiot like me can get them, anybody can.

The Mental Health Commission of Canada last year adapted mental health first aid for the veterans community. I helped review their material to give it some military flavour, as it were. That is very slowly getting pushed out now. The first batch of instructors has been qualified. The Royal Canadian Legion is helping to spread that, but it's very much a side project. It's slow.

That is just one option that's out there. There are, as I said, many different possibilities. The Royal Canadian Legion service officer training that they give to all their service officers to help guide people into the Veterans Affairs process, and to deal with crises should they emerge during that, is also excellent. That potentially could be part of a prototype for training that could be broadly offered. How they would go about doing it is probably beyond the scope of what I can answer in a brief question here.

All the necessary training exists. It just needs to be collected and packaged, and a viable delivery model determined.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

I appreciate your bringing up the Legion. I actually attended a meeting of several of the Legions in my area, and they were talking about this, about how they wanted to make sure that everybody in the Legion had it, from the bartender to the service officers. To your point, I think there is a long way to go, and it can be far-reaching. It never hurts to have more people trained than not.

On this mental health first aid and how it's been adapted, Ms. Gagnon, do you think there's an opportunity to do that for military sexual trauma as well? Is there another level of sensitivity that needs to go along with that?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

I was offered peer support training, for example, but it would have taken me away from work for four days or a week. I work full time, and you know, after redoing your career, you don't have as many days off at the start. As a military spouse, I have bounced around as well, and I've had to start from scratch all the time. I don't have time to take a week off to go for training on my own.

It would be nice if there was distance learning. Maybe over a weekend I could finish it up. That would allow many more people in my group to be able to attend. The women in my group—we have men as well, but it's mostly women—usually have a family. They won't leave them alone to go and pursue that training for a week. It would be nice to have something for distance learning.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

You said you were offered training. Which organization offered it?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

That was OSISS.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

It was OSISS, so it is something that they're starting to push out there.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

No.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart: No? Okay.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon: It was just that in my situation, because I was operational when my assault happened, they considered that an operational thing. For a lot of people that is not the case, but I was allowed to go in because of it. I was invited to take the training; I just couldn't do it.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Okay. Fair enough.

To that point, you mentioned several recommendations that I thought were very good. Some of them were very familiar to us from other testimony we've heard. As far as our front-line Veterans Affairs staff are concerned, what do they need? What do we need to do to make that first contact better?

That's actually a question for both of you.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

I would say the information needs to be online, because people need to advocate for themselves now. Then we can actually check what's going on. We call, and the information differs, depending on whoever is answering the phone. We get people who have been told they can't have VAC rehab, and they have to wait, but they were at school, so by the time they get it, they don't know that they will not reimbursed for their school.

Most of the MST people are young. The average is between 17 and 19 years old. This is when they get assaulted. When they leave, they are going back to school, and this is different process, so the information has to be there.

There are a lot of females in the reserves. We're falling through the cracks when the information comes, so we always end up in this waiting game where we get put on hold for a specialist who never calls back. Those are the kinds of things we experience. I think if it's online, we'll know what to expect and we'll be able to access care.

The forms, also, are only combat-related. I was asked to do a gynecological test 10 years afterward. I had to go. That's the process, even though I had two kids after that. What can you find? It was intrusive for no reason. It took me eight months to fight this, just to be allowed to pursue it. I was allowed to pursue this after they initially told me I couldn't. I couldn't go to the BPA because my claim wasn't denied, so here was no recourse for me. The only recourse I had was to gather 19 other people like me, and then we got reconsidered, but it took over eight months just to be allowed to proceed. That kind of stuff needs to change.

(1605)

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you very much for being here. We appreciate this testimony. It's going to help us to come up with a report that we hope will help veterans.

Madam Gagnon, I have a number of questions for you. You talked about other veterans websites, the American website specifically, as clear examples of what Veterans Affairs could be doing. What was it in the American website that gave you or American veterans better information?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

First of all, they had the definition. There was acknowledgement that it happens. They have explanations of what can be considered as proof that are different from what would apply if you went into combat. For example, if you contacted a help line and you can prove it or if you went and asked for help during that time, those can be proof.

Those are the kinds of things you can ask for to get your claim ready. Right now the people who help with claims are the Legion. By the way, 19-year-old women won't necessarily feel like going to the Legion to get help. The Legion is not well versed there in how to address those cases. They make a case just like a combat case, and then we get denied. Once it's time for an appeal, we can't bring new information. We need a proper person, or at least something online that tells us what we can do if we did or didn't report it or if our med file is gone for some reason. We need to know what can be done.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

You launched your group two years ago. What has changed in regard to the services for veterans living with military sexual trauma? Is there anything positive? Have you seen a difference in two years?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Do you mean within our group or outside it?

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I was thinking about outside, with VAC.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

I have recently seen more VAC claims being accepted. It's when people push and push and are about to come out in public that they get accepted, so I guess that's a good start.

Before, you had to almost fake another trauma. It was so hard to get a hearing for military sexual trauma that people would find another thing—a loud noise or something scary, something easier to prove. Military sexual trauma was rarely the real case. They were using other ways to get access to services.

However, they are starting to accept the fact that military sexual trauma can be a case. Also, if the act happened, let's say, after work, but you get repercussions at work and you have proof of that, these cases can also be considered. Before, if the act happened, say, at a mess dinner, then you were not covered. Now they are starting to look into whether they should cover people in mandatory mess dinners at night and people who got assaulted in the barracks. Right now they aren't. Those things are being reviewed.

(1610)

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It sounds as if it's very difficult to prove this assault happened and that it was part of being in the military.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Well, there are three filters, I would say. You have to prove it happened. You have to prove your condition is linked to what happened, because sometimes they will find childhood trauma and say you were already injured before. Then you have to also prove it was service-related.

A lot of people have been told that if they lose in court, which requires proof beyond a reasonable doubt, it technically didn't happen. Some people have been told if you lose in court, you will not get anything. That's not really fair, because if you're in combat and you have been told you have PTSD, you are allowed the benefit of the doubt, but if you're in military court or under any kind of criminal law, the burden of proof is much higher.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It sounds like you were assaulted in the first place, and then it was made even worse by the process you had to undergo.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

The BPA also treats people.... I didn't bring all the quotes, but I get people saying, “The lawyer said I would have screamed if I were you” or “If I had been raped, I wouldn't need psychological treatment.” There is a lot of victim blaming during BPA or when seeing a military doctor. There has been a lot of that going on.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

That brings me to a question about a woman seeking help for sexual trauma. Would it be easier if you were able to get help from a female support worker? Does the military or does Veterans Affairs ensure that if you are seeking that kind of help and support, there is care available from a female if it's asked for?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Actually, it's a male who brought this into my group, because he was assaulted, obviously, by another man, which often happens, and they prefer to talk to women. They would like to have the choice.

Also, it is proven—I don't have the research on that—that in peer support, women heal better when it's women alone, but if it's with other men, they tend to stay quiet and let the guys talk, so the healing process is not as good.

The Chair:

Sorry. That's your time.

Mr. Fraser is next.

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you both for coming and sharing your experiences and also for your service to Canada. It's greatly appreciated that you come and share your experience so we can hopefully make recommendations to make things better for veterans.

Mr. Harding, I would like to start with you. When you talk about peer identity and contacts within the veteran community and reaching out to those veterans who may not otherwise come forward and express their difficulties, how does that work across the country with your group in particular, in Send Up the Count? Is it focused right across Canada? Do you see any difficulties or challenges reaching out to more rural or remote areas?

Mr. Brian Harding:

My particular group does everything online. When we started this thing, we did not expect or intend to create this group. It emerged organically. A couple of us pushed out this message. Our third founder created a Facebook page, which within days in excess of 9,000 people flocked to, so we realized we had to run with it at this point.

The intent we initially set out to promote was to proactively go out. We said, “Hey, that dude who was in your platoon in Bosnia, or Croatia, or Afghanistan, the guy you haven't talked to in three years? Just call him up or shoot him an email or whatever, and just say, 'Hey, how are you doing?' ” Just open up a conversation.

We have a lot of veterans who have dropped off the radar, and they are suffering unbeknownst to anybody. Particularly in the military, and in my case the army reserve, we all scatter back to various bases and communities.

We don't have any structured, formal thing. We were never a structured or formal thing. It just seems to have helped anyway. We encourage people to just seek out the people they have been in touch with and find out how they are. That's on an ongoing basis, not one day a year—I'm not trying to pick on Bell—but every single day. When they say, “I'm doing okay”, but you don't think they are being completely forthright, you say, “No, how are you really doing?” Give them that opening to realize that okay, here's someone who is safe to talk to about the fact that this, that, or the other thing has been going on.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

In the follow-up, I believe you're suggesting that post-release there should be this ongoing engagement and follow-up and that veterans generally will have more confidence in a fellow soldier, and therefore these individuals would be the best to do that outreach.

Do you have any recommendations on how that follow-up could happen after release? Is this something you foresee in the future being structured through VAC, or is it better to leave it to individual organizations like yours to do that?

(1615)

Mr. Brian Harding:

Well, that's a doozy. “I'm from the government and I'm here to help” is not always going to play over well.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Right.

Mr. Brian Harding:

Most of these contacts just happen informally. We just talk to our friends.

After I came back from Afghanistan, some months later I began getting hounded by emails to attend a follow-up appointment with a military social worker. After long enough, they were eventually able to pin me in a room and get me talking, just to make sure things were good, and they were. When you're still serving in the military, there is at least a mechanism to compel you to do that. Once someone is out, they can't be compelled. That said, once someone is out, there is no reason, to my mind, that someone couldn't just check up and say, “Hey, you've been out for a while. Has anything emerged since your release that you think might benefit from access to supportive resources?”

When you release from the military, you do not automatically become a VAC client. There are probably privacy firewalls somewhere in policies or regulations that preclude names and contact info from getting sent from DND to VAC. I can't provide a solution to that.

Hypothetically, that wall could be knocked down and VAC could be enabled, on a proactive basis, to reach out one or two years post-release just to say, “Hey, we're following up with you. You've been out for a while. How are you adapting? Do you know we have this and that?” Frequently, I find that veterans are completely unaware of the options that are open to them.

As to how this would be done, I would need to do a lot more thinking on that.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Okay, but in your experience, having former soldiers, colleagues of these individuals, doing that outreach means that the response is much better. The credibility and the trust are there, so to speak.

Mr. Brian Harding:

I cannot speak in a comparative way. I can't say a soldier in every case will be better than a VAC employee.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Right.

Mr. Brian Harding:

I do know that proactive outreach from soldiers on an ongoing basis saves lives.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Okay.

For veteran-specific treatment, which you talked about, we have OSI clinics and other things that are available. Can you make some recommendations or give me some idea of what you mean by veteran-specific treatments that VAC could perhaps do a better job of, to ensure that veterans are getting the help they need?

Mr. Brian Harding:

I sure can. I'm speaking specifically to residential or in-patient treatments. Those two are not necessarily the same thing.

There are many facilities—places like Bellwood, Homewood, Sunshine Coast Health Centre—that provide longer-term in-patient treatments, but as I said, there are mixed populations in a lot of cases in these facilities. The researchers likely have a fair bit of familiarity with vets, but their work is not necessarily tailored to them, nor is the program delivery.

The Minister of Veterans Affairs' mandate letter actually pledges a “centre of excellence” for mental health—

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Yes.

Mr. Brian Harding:

That, in my opinion, is a weasel word. What was actually demanded by veterans' advocates was specifically a treatment facility, yet that's what it turned into in the mandate.

On the mental health advisory group that I'm a part of within VAC, we are pushing very hard for that to be a brick-and-mortar facility. We need something in a therapeutic environment filled with safe people who veterans can open up to. I'm not denigrating other people who have suffered from mental health disorders or trauma, but certain people are not compatible with each other. Vets also include former RCMP members. We need brick-and-mortar facilities that are unique to the VAC client population and have a constant ability, on a demand-driven basis, to get vets into full-time treatment.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

It could be a walk-in clinic, or it could be by appointment, servicing all these different needs. Is that how you would see it?

The Chair:

You will have to make it very short.

Mr. Brian Harding:

That could be, but the main effort has to be something for treatments of 30 days or more.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Harding.

Mr. Bratina is next.

Mr. Bob Bratina (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

Ms. Gagnon, I think all of us are concerned every time you look at your phone. I certainly hope no one has....

It's good of you to share that with us. Is that something that occurs on a weekly or a monthly basis?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

No, it's bi-weekly.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Can you tell me how you felt when you graduated into the services? Was there a golden era of becoming the sailor that you wanted to be?

(1620)

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

I actually wanted to be in the artillery initially, but at recruitment they laughed at me and said, “How about the navy?” I enjoyed the navy, but I just honestly wanted to do boot camp to see if I could make it at that point.

I ended up liking the sea. Then I went back to school and transferred to intelligence officer. I wanted to be a public affairs officer, but that got cut short, so I had to rethink my whole career. My husband is in the military, so we were following each other.

There was a plan, and now that plan has changed as well. You lose your pension and you lose the prospect of having all these things, so it's kind of a do-over. It changes a lot.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

What do you think you would say to a group of young recruits, the people that you were, as they're entering into service? Would you have a message for them with regard to the issues that we're talking about today? Is it something you could talk to young recruits about?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

I wish I could say, “If something happens, talk”, but I can see what happens when people do and I don't know if it's a good time yet. I don't think we're there yet. There are still a lot of medical releases. There are still a lot of repercussions. There are still a lot of people being penalized for talking, and the retaliation part has not been set yet. We've pushed people to report, but we haven't actually provided support when they do, so until that is installed....

Of course, I am never going to stop somebody from reporting—I think for some people it's closure—but I'm not going to push somebody to report, either. I think everybody has to go at their own pace.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Could you comment, Mr. Harding?

Mr. Brian Harding:

Yes, I'll put on my still-serving sergeant's hat for a second. It'll be a cold day in hell before somebody does something like this to one of my troops and I don't go to bat for them, but that's me. There are many who come from a different mindset—an obsolete, destructive mindset—who would perhaps be more tempted to shove these things under the rug.

Unfortunately, as Marie-Claude has alluded to, the process can be terrible for people who do come forward. I have seen people disclose these sorts of assaults in what they thought was a safe place to do so, and had the chain of command get wind of it, and three years later they're still dealing with the ramifications of a subsequent investigation that they maybe never even wanted, because they just wanted to try to move past it.

On the one hand, the military is absolutely tied by an obligation to act to the fullest extent of the law when these things do come forward, and perhaps the victims are getting lost in that, but change is not going to come from the 17-year-olds or 19-year-olds who are going through basic training. It's going to come from the more experienced senior leadership, who need to grow up, take the reins, and fix this from within.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Ms. Gagnon, is the exposure of married females any different from that of single women in terms of MST in the service?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

We also have to consider that our spouses usually face retaliation as well. Even if we're out and we do speak, there is a chance that they get retaliated against. I have five people in my group, and I know that this is what's going on. Their spouses are facing retaliation for it, and they feel bad.

It's something we have to consider when we talk. Obviously, relocating all the time, now that we're civilians we need to find new health care everywhere, new therapists and new psychiatrists, and this is not easy to find. If career transition is hard when you leave, and you get to pick where you live, imagine if you move to Gagetown. You have no purpose anymore, and a lot of times you get pushed to stay at home and take care of your kids. If you've been in the military all these years and you had a different path in life, this is not what you expected. There is nothing wrong with that, but it's just maybe not what was in your blood initially. To report is really a career killer.

Can I just say one thing about what you asked initially?

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Yes.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

I have one message. A lot of people see things going on and say nothing. The best way to stop assaults and things like that from happening is that when you're a witness and you see something going on, you say, “You know what? I see this, and it looks pretty bad. Why don't I go with you and report this?” That provides a statement. It provides a witness and makes the person much more confident to report, and the investigation would proceed, but a lot of people choose to say nothing because they themselves are afraid for their own career.

(1625)

Mr. Bob Bratina:

We're listening intently. I wonder if, in other conversations, people sometimes think you're exaggerating and things can't be that bad. Mr. Harding or Ms. Gagnon, do you think that the general public accepts what we're hearing today or not?

Mr. Brian Harding:

I'm not throwing out statistics. Some will; some won't. Those who don't can speak to me about it, and I will tell them what I have observed. Most people are okay in most circumstances, but there is still far too much going on.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mrs. Wagantall, go ahead.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, CPC):

Thank you both so much for being here. You speak so articulately and so honestly and passionately about these issues. The longer we question, the more it brings up the fact again to me that we can make all kinds of recommendations, but if the culture is the culture, those recommendations probably aren't going to get very far. I'm being very blunt and honest here.

Retaliation for reporting, the fear of the responses that you're going to receive, and the actual things that are happening clearly make it very difficult for the people to come forward. If I were the minister alone in a room with you, what would you say absolutely and honestly needs to be done before any of these other steps can truly make an impact?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

We need more women in the military, because the more we have, the more secure we feel to report. You realize that when it's a male-dominated area, women seem to be in self-preservation mode.

I did it myself. Somebody came to me once and said that something had happened, and I said, “Well, I'm not going to back you up because if I back you up, I'm going to be put in the same position as you.” I didn't want to be seen this way. However, if women are at 50% or 40%, they will feel more confident. They don't have to be in self-preservation mode and show that “she is like this, but I'm not like her, and I'm with you guys”, and that kind of thing. You're using that defence mechanism less.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Mr. Harding, would you comment?

Mr. Brian Harding:

It's hard to say.

If I were to address these issues, I would not be speaking to the Minister of Veterans Affairs but to the associate minister of National Defence, which is the capacity that could have an impact on this.

Within the serving military, values are, I believe, shifting. I think that's more a generational thing of Canadian society shifting, but again, I'm a full-time police officer, so I know how much awful stuff is happening out there too.

I don't believe there is going to be a 100% fix on this; however, I don't have one single piece of advice that I could give on this. If you're speaking specifically to military sexual trauma, I'm woefully underequipped to speak to that.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

No, I wasn't expecting you to do that.

Mr. Brian Harding:

Yes.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay. I appreciate what you're saying.

Marie, you had mentioned that there wasn't information on the VAC website. I want to get this straight. Had you made a recommendation for it to happen?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Yes, for two years.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Was that recommendation taken?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Yes. I guess I've been told that they will look into it. I was contacted by somebody about four months ago, but then that was it. I never heard back afterwards.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay. I'm just not understanding why it's not happening. There's not a huge expense involved in any way.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

What I've been told is that the services are for everybody, so we shouldn't have to....

For me, it's more like an equity-equality kind of thing, right? Equal doesn't mean equity—

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Right.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

—so I think there should be a little bit more push, especially when all the pictures and all the information out there obviously don't target a 19-year-old woman, right?

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Exactly. Okay, thank you.

Mr. Fraser talked a little bit about the dynamics of training and equipping. You mentioned lay people.

I get really excited about all these situations of veterans helping veterans and soldiers helping soldiers and that type of thing. Clearly we hear a lot about the trust issue, and that is strongest among your peers.

Would it be effective, then, for VAC to try to implement these things or for VAC to be equipping and recognizing and facilitating these groups that are out there in a more...? No. As soon as you become organized, you start to put all kinds of conditions on things, and we don't want that because clearly it's more effective without them.

How I ever got into government, I have no idea.

However, can you see a framework for this? What would work best?

(1630)

Mr. Brian Harding:

The ones who proactively care about their fellow vets will just step up and do it with the best we've got.

If you're walking down the street and you see someone get hit by a car, most people are going to run to help them in some way. Someone who knows first aid CPR is probably going to be more effective than someone who doesn't. A lot of workplaces offer first aid CPR training for free or else subsidize it. I'm not saying that VAC needs to create tiger teams of people, cells reaching out to vets that have a quota, such as cold-calling 60 vets a day to see how they're doing, or what have you. Just fund this training; those who care about it and want it will step up. Yes, a rate of return is going to be difficult to gauge, particularly because the metrics here are going to be things that don't happen, and it's tough to prove a negative. It will be hard to show vets that never do reach crisis because someone helps them in time. It's hard to count suicides that don't happen.

I don't know if that could be easily quantified, the way the government and departments like to quantify things. At the same time, this isn't particularly expensive training either. In mental health first aid, as I said, already a product has been developed for the veterans community, so push that more aggressively, assist training, and apply suicide intervention training.

Again, get that out there. We've got these things; if you want to take them, if you served or worked with vets in some capacity, come on out.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham is next. I guess you'll be splitting with Mr. Eyolfson.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I have a couple of quick questions. I just joined this committee last week, so I'm new to the file and I find it interesting, and not necessarily in a positive way. I appreciate your coming and telling your stories.

Brian, you served in Afghanistan. I'm not sure of your history in operations. Can you talk about what transition you got when you left? What did happen? When you come back from Afghanistan, is it welcome home and have a nice day, or what's the process?

Mr. Brian Harding:

I left Afghanistan on March 24, or something like that, in 2009. We flew, briefly, through a staging base in the Middle East and turned in our guns, our ammunition, and all the fighting kit that we had. A bunch of our stuff went into boxes to get shipped home. They put us on a military airbus and we flew to Cyprus, where the Canadian Forces had contracted a hotel.

In that hotel we had the day we got there, three full days, and then the day we left. The first full day was a full day of mandatory briefings on various mental health and readaptation things. The second day was a half day of that and then a half day just to go and do your own thing. The third day was a full day of do your own thing.

Every two days a new batch would arrive—a plane full of soldiers—and a new batch would leave, which turned this thing into pure anarchy. Well, it wasn't quite that bad. A bunch of soldiers who have not been able to cut loose for six or eight or nine months made it a running, constantly refreshed party. It was good times. The training was not the worst, but I don't know if the timing was great.

I'm a reservist, so when I got home I was met at the airport by a couple of people from my unit and my parents, and then after that it was about how quickly I could find several friends and get out and party with them.

There was sporadic follow-up, mostly of a medical nature, and a token meeting with a social worker. With them, if you go in and just give them the right answers, they tick their boxes, and you go off and you don't have to worry about them again. Many members just did not disclose things, and in many cases issues had not emerged at that point either. We know that the mean incidence of mental health disorders can often be as long as five years after a trauma. My longest follow-up was, I believe, six months post-tour, so perhaps there's a vulnerability there.

It really felt as if they were ticking boxes just to say that they got this done. I'm not questioning the intent of those who put this in place, but I am questioning the effectiveness of the process and the lack of longer-term follow-up a few years down the road. I felt very few of the vets in crisis are still in that immediate post-deployment phase. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you also have comments, Ms. Gagnon?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

The assessment is only for those who have been in active combat. I was in the navy, personally. You have to ask for an assessment to be done, and perhaps even insist on it. In fact, this concerns people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, and not the mission support team.

People are not always comfortable at the thought of going to their commanding officer to ask for an assessment. These assessments are part of new procedures, and I tried to make sure they would apply to everyone, but that was turned down. Only those who have served in operational forces may receive the assessment.

(1635)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a question for you, Ms. Gagnon.

Lieutenant-General Vance made a statement last year on sexual misconduct in the armed forces. Are you familiar with what he said at the end of November? What do you think of it?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Are you talking about the statement made at the end of November?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, November 28, 2016.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Do you mean the statement about the survey involving 960 people, that had just been released?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

That survey did not include recruits, or those who were taking a course for approximately the first two years. This was the highest proportion of sexual misconduct incidents ever recorded, at least according to American research, as we have no Canadian research on this.

A lot of people took part in the survey, but it excluded everyone who had left the Canadian Forces, as well as those who were in the process of being released. In my opinion, that was a bit like conducting a survey to find out if racism is an issue, and leaving out all persons of colour.

The survey does however mention that those groups were excluded. I was told that they would be heard later, but that meeting never took place, and those results are now being used in all contexts. I do not know if anyone is even planning to meet with the excluded groups anymore.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a brief question for both of you.[English]

When you're trying to talk somebody down who you know is suicidal, what do you tell him that convinces him to come back down?

Mr. Brian Harding:

There's no surefire way to do it. Sometimes I'm talking with them while I'm getting somebody else to call up 911 and get police and an ambulance to them, and that has been successful on a number of occasions. Other times, if I have a better rapport with the person, I'm able to feel a bit more secure and I'm able to keep talking without taking that choice out of their hands. There's no hard and fast answer. You have to hope you can just develop a connection with them, that they can trust you, that they can feel what you're saying, and that you can give them a reason to get through the next short time.

The more things they have around them—family, in particular—the more successful that's likely to be, but no matter what, you're kind of rolling the dice. It's not a fun situation to be in, and you're having to do an ongoing risk assessment. Every 30 seconds I'm asking myself whether the situation has changed, whether I need to call 911 now.

The biggest one is if they're alone. I try to get them not alone. Once there are other people physically present with them, normally they're a lot safer. You want to get them to open up to that. I do most of this, of course, online or by phone.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Brian. Thank you, Marie-Claude. Is there any time left to give to Doug?

The Chair:

Not really.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Thank you very much. I appreciate it.

The Chair:

But you did well.

Go ahead, Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and my thanks to you both for your service to our country and for engaging in a very thoughtful discussion today about these issues.

In the first three months of being critic for Veterans Affairs, Brian, I've done some research on you, so I know that you're very active on social media, as is Marie-Claude. One of the things I found is there seems to be a lot of fragmentation among veterans groups and organizations within Canada. There are a lot of different veterans laying out their positions through social media. We've talked, certainly on our side, about a way to consolidate the information that's out there, to consolidate the concerns among veterans into one forceful group, shall we say, to put their issues forward. I'm just wondering if you can comment on the value of one voice, one veteran, to deal with a lot of the issues that you're talking about, Brian, with respect to suicide prevention. I'd like to hear from Marie-Claude as well. I'm curious to hear what you have to say.

Mr. Brian Harding:

You might have perceived, sir, that I'm a little bit opinionated. Imagine a few thousand of me all trying to come to the same agreement.

Mr. John Brassard:

That's the challenge.

Mr. Brian Harding:

There are many groups. Some are very active advocacies. In my group, we're totally non-political. We leave that at the door quite forcefully, because it's damaging.

People see things differently. Some people can't stand each other on a personal basis and can't work well together. I don't personally believe that it would be viable to consolidate all the various veterans groups, the advocacy organizations, into one. It has been tried. I've never seen it gain any real traction. I think you are always going to have a very disparate group of voices clamouring for attention. We see that every time VAC holds another stakeholder summit, which they do twice a year. I've been to a few of them now and I'm surprised I have not seen fist fights yet.

Everyone is going to have his own perspective. Where you stand is where you sit. I'm here, and I see you one way. She's there, and she sees you from another angle. On the issue she speaks to, I buy the legitimacy of it, but I have not been able to see it the same way. Why should we all come and pretend we're going to talk to the same points when we're not necessarily equipped to do so?

(1640)

Mr. John Brassard:

Marie-Claude, would you comment?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

The Legion for a long time was trying to play that role. How many times have you heard of military sexual trauma when they were representing all of us?

Right now, the ministerial advisory groups are run by whoever they decide to put there. How many people like me have you seen there? It has never been our voices. It has always been the majority, what's common. If we always look at what's common, we never look at who falls through cracks, which is what we're trying to aim at right now.

Mr. John Brassard:

Thank you for that.

Brian, there is other one I want to ask you about. The previous committee's report on transitional aspects of getting out of DND and moving into civilian life spoke about a concierge service. The DND ombudsman also spoke about a concierge service and called it a low-hanging-fruit opportunity. Effectively what it means is that we would have a one-stop shop for those who are transitioning, so that everything is effectively taken care of for them as they exit the military.

I wonder what your thoughts are on that service, because I know you spoke about transition. You spoke about the difficulty, the loss of identity. However, a concierge service is something that has some value.

Mr. Brian Harding:

I heard it referred to as a navigator. I can't recall if that came from Minister O'Toole or Deputy Minister Natynczyk. That was two summers ago, when the ministerial advisory groups met in Charlottetown. We all thought it was a great idea, and presently we're still twiddling our thumbs and waiting to see it.

I think it's fantastic. Veterans are not necessarily going to be familiar with everything that is open to them, but most are not going to hit the threshold for active case management. Most are simply getting out because they have this, that, and the other thing, maybe a relatively minor disability. Maybe they have these transition difficulties, nothing in and of itself catastrophic, but it's still a hassle to deal with, so if we had knowledgeable people to do that, it would be great.

The Legion does provide their service officers, which actually has a very significant overlap with what you're talking about, but that's something that has been downloaded to an organization outside of the government.

If VAC could provide that and if those people were not bound by expectations of reducing costs, if their managers were not getting bonuses for cutting expenses, maybe it could work. However, VAC will have to earn trust on that one before anyone is going to believe anyone if they line up to help them with services.

Mr. John Brassard:

Thank you. That's all I have.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It's interesting. I keep hearing from both of you that it's hurry up and wait, or that you're twiddling your thumbs when there's this idea out there.

For example, Madame Gagnon, you talked about VAC saying they're going to do follow-up and pursue this issue. I take it that this doesn't ever seem to happen. What kind of information should be tracked and studied by the Canadian Forces in order to really understand the needs of veterans who are living with sexual trauma?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

How many people who have military release have been medically released or quit after reporting an assault? That would be step one. Then how many of them tried to claim from VAC, and did they get accepted or denied? That would be another one. Then, what type of services did they get? Those would probably be the first steps.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I wrote a letter to the minister. I won't say which one. The response back was that a medical release is completed with every member of the Canadian Forces before they're released and that this process includes a questionnaire about sexual health and mental health symptoms.

Can you comment on that?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Sexual health is not military sexual trauma. That's just basically where somebody could have a sexual dysfunction because of medication or PTSD and be impotent or something like that. Those are the questions they have. They actually do not have a sexual trauma screening. That's what they mean by sexual health.

(1645)

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

They're still focused on the male members of the Canadian Forces.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Yes. It has not been designed for military sexual trauma.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Are they having trouble understanding and dealing with the female members?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Yes.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

My last question is in regard to the letters that I sent and the need for assistance for people seeking mental health care. The response back was that, well, you know, we can't deal with everything and we send our members to the public system, and they have all kinds of opportunities for group therapy.

What's your response to that?

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Our group therapy is with the OSISS program, which is mostly men who were in a combat role. If we think that it's good to send men who were in combat in Afghanistan to talk together and find support, then sure, that will be fair. I'm just saying that people who are in a combat-related role think there's a difference between them and, let's say, a policeman. They feel there's a different need. However, for us it's good enough: we need to go to the civilians, and we don't need our own group. By doing this, we're making sure that we can't regroup, we can't talk to each other. We can't bond and find our common issues. That's kind of a way to ensure that we can't connect with each other and find our strength together.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

This sounds very much like this burden of proof that you spoke of before. You have to prove it happened. You have to prove the situation and come up with all kinds of extraneous things to even be heard.

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Take OSISS, for example. I know you talked with Frédéric Doucette a while ago, and he said he only had five cases in 15 years. I had 200 within two years, so obviously the system that they have, which is supposed to apply to everybody, is not working for us.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Mr. Harding, have you anything to add?

Mr. Brian Harding:

I do. The question of burden of proof is interesting. I am stunned to hear Marie-Claude say that they will not process VAC disability claims without a conviction resultant from an alleged assault. I've seen a lot of criminal investigations in which a conviction did not result, but it's manifestly clear what happened.

In any case, the burden of proof for a conviction is beyond a reasonable doubt, and that's because there is going to be a penal consequence: somebody is going to lose their liberty, have a criminal record, or go to jail because of this. That is not an appropriate burden of proof to impose on somebody who is simply looking for treatment and benefits as a result of some sort of trauma or victimization.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you. That ends our time for testimony today.

I'd like to thank both of you for all you've done today in coming and testifying, and for what you've done for our men and women who have served. If there's anything that you want to add to expand on your answers, please email it to the clerk and he will get it to the committee.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Marie-Claude made some recommendations. I would just like to ask if we could get those in writing.

The Chair:

Yes. If you would do that for us, or we could pull them up....

Ms. Marie-Claude Gagnon:

I'll email them to the....

The Chair:

Perfect. Thank you.

We need to come back to do committee business, so we'll just recess for five minutes and come back.

Thank you.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent des anciens combattants

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Neil Ellis (Baie de Quinte, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Bonjour. Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement et à la motion adoptée le 29 septembre, le Comité reprend son étude de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide chez les anciens combattants.

Comme les membres du Comité le savent probablement, nous avons eu deux personnes qui se sont désistées aujourd'hui pour des raisons personnelles. Mme Jody Mitic et M. Joseph Brindle témoigneront à une date ultérieure.

Aujourd'hui, nous entendrons deux témoins, M. Brian Harding et Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon, la fondatrice de C'est Juste 700.

En ce qui concerne le déroulement de la présente séance, nous allons donner 10 minutes à chacun de nos témoins pour qu'ils nous livrent leur déclaration préliminaire. Nous allons ensuite procéder à une série de questions, puis nous nous occuperons un peu des affaires du Comité.

Commençons par M. Harding.

M. Brian Harding (à titre personnel):

Bonjour, et merci de m'avoir invité aujourd'hui.

Comme la plupart des gens, j'ai des collègues, des amis et des proches qui ont eu des problèmes de santé mentale. Je considère que c'est un privilège pour moi d'avoir été invité à témoigner dans le cadre de cette étude.

En guise d'introduction, je vais expliquer brièvement pourquoi je suis ici aujourd'hui.

Je suis un réserviste de l'armée depuis 2004. J'ai 13 ans de service — un mélange de temps plein et de temps partiel —, ce qui comprend un déploiement en Afghanistan, en 2008. Je travaille à plein temps comme agent pour la police civile depuis un peu plus de trois ans.

En décembre 2013, après quatre suicides de militaires hautement médiatisés, d'autres militaires en service et moi avons mis sur pied une initiative que nous avons baptisée Envoyez le compte. Notre intention était essentiellement d'inciter les militaires à reprendre contact avec ceux avec qui ils avaient servi, à retracer certains membres qui sont peut-être passés à travers les mailles du filet et à inviter ces derniers à sortir de l'ombre pour fraterniser avec leurs semblables. Bien malgré nous, Envoyez le compte a mené à la création d'un réseau de contacts en ligne regroupant des militaires, des anciens combattants et des premiers intervenants, réseau qui a pour double objectif de prévenir le suicide et d'offrir une aide par les pairs en matière de santé mentale.

Il y a eu de nombreuses interventions à l'égard d'anciens combattants qui vivaient un état de crise, dont certaines ont permis de court-circuiter des suicides en devenir. Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas pu les empêcher tous. Le suicide reste un problème avec lequel il faut traiter immédiatement. En fait, j'apprenais tout juste ce matin qu'un autre militaire s'est suicidé durant le week-end, ici, en Ontario.

En 2015, à cause des résultats de mon travail, le ministre des Anciens Combattants m'a invité à me joindre aux groupes consultatifs ministériels nouvellement formés. Depuis, je rencontre périodiquement d'autres anciens combattants, des chercheurs, des militaires et des membres du personnel d'Anciens Combattants Canada afin de prodiguer des conseils du point de vue de la première ligne directement au ministre et aux cadres du ministère. Je siège actuellement au groupe consultatif sur la santé mentale.

Lorsqu'un vétéran est en crise, il n'y a pas de norme. Les anciens combattants peuvent avoir les mêmes problèmes de santé mentale et connaître les mêmes facteurs de stress que les civils: l'anxiété, la dépression, des troubles familiaux, des problèmes financiers ou juridiques, des accidents, de la violence, autant de choses qui, somme toute, ne sont pas nécessairement liées au service.

Un plus de cela, les anciens combattants ont peut-être de la difficulté à se remettre d'expériences traumatisantes vécues dans le cadre du service et ils sont peut-être aux prises avec des facteurs de stress particuliers au monde militaire. Tous ces facteurs finissent par s'additionner. Si vous partez du stress ordinaire que tout le monde ressent et que vous y ajoutez des missions outre-mer, des mois passés loin de la maison et les bouleversements familiaux causés par les déménagements, le stress résultant peut s'avérer beaucoup plus accablant et beaucoup plus complexe que la normale.

Notre première intervention pour prévenir un suicide visait un vétéran qui avait été libéré de l'armée pour des raisons médicales — il s'était blessé durant un entraînement. Il n'avait pas encore été envoyé en mission, mais, d'une situation où il était à mi-chemin de ce qui aurait dû être une longue carrière, il a été gravement blessé, puis mis de côté, oublié au travail et libéré pour raisons médicales. Il s'est vu dépouillé de son identité de militaire et relégué à un rôle de gratte-papier au ministère des Anciens Combattants. Il a sombré dans un profond désespoir.

Un jour, il a exprimé à plusieurs reprises des pensées suicidaires sur Facebook et il a mentionné le fait qu'il était armé. Plusieurs d'entre nous l'ont vu. Nous avons contacté sa famille pour vérifier s'il avait effectivement une arme à feu, et nous sommes parvenus à avertir la police à temps pour qu'elle l'empêche de passer à l'acte. Il a été arrêté de façon sécuritaire en possession d'un pistolet chargé avant d'avoir pu mettre à exécution son plan de se donner la mort publiquement.

Les médias sociaux ont permis à ce vétéran de joindre un réseau de soutien qui n'existait pas auparavant, et le vétéran en question nous a donné suffisamment de signaux pour que nous intervenions. Les gens du réseau qui sont intervenus étaient éparpillés entre le Yukon, la Colombie-Britannique et l'Ontario.

J'aimerais maintenant souligner certains points.

Les problèmes de santé mentale et les suicides ne sont pas nécessairement liés à des traumatismes opérationnels. La perte d'identité qui accompagne la libération et la transition à la vie civile est un énorme facteur de risque. La présence d'un réseau en ligne informel de pairs regroupant des anciens combattants présents à toute heure du jour et de la nuit a aussi été déterminante pour repérer ce vétéran en crise et lui fournir de l'aide de toute urgence. Cela s'est reproduit de nombreuses fois depuis.

Les états de crise et les propensions au suicide se cristallisent lorsque le vétéran n'arrive plus à supporter la virulence de son stress ou de son trauma. De nombreuses ressources sont offertes, mais les anciens combattants doivent surmonter de sérieux obstacles pour y accéder.

Le ministère des Anciens Combattants est l'administrateur de nombreux traitements, et il insiste pour que les invalidités soient déterminées par ses propres évaluations médicales. D'autres témoins ont souligné que cette façon de faire était insensée et dommageable, et vous l'avez reconnu. Vous pouvez ajouter ma voix à la leur, mais je ne vais pas m'acharner sur une cause perdue.

Une autre barrière de taille est la pénurie aiguë de soins spécifiques aux anciens combattants. Il y a quelques années, un de mes amis s'est fait dire d'aller suivre un traitement en santé mentale à temps complet dans un établissement. Mon ami, un vétéran de l'Afghanistan, s'est donc retrouvé flanqué d'un agent de police dans ce milieu dit « thérapeutique », en compagnie des membres d'un gang criminel à qui la cour avait imposé de suivre un traitement. C'est une situation tout à fait inacceptable et dangereuse pour des personnes qui sont censées parler des traumas qu'ils ont subis alors qu'ils servaient leur pays ou leur collectivité. Soit dit en passant, l'agent de police a fini par se suicider.

Permettez-moi de reprendre les propos de mon amie Debbie Lowther et d'autres témoins qui ont comparu la semaine passée: il y a un besoin criant d'établissements axés sur le traitement des anciens combattants.

Les préjugés et la discrimination à l'égard de la maladie mentale tuent encore des gens. Il y a une hiérarchie dans les milieux d'anciens combattants, même parmi ceux qui sont blessés ou malades.

Récemment, une ancienne combattante s'est mis en tête d'exécuter le plan détaillé qu'elle avait conçu pour s'enlever la vie. Elle avait travaillé outre-mer dans le domaine du renseignement et elle avait eu des difficultés avec le trouble de stress post-traumatique. Elle était chargée de repérer les cibles ennemies et les véhicules aériens sans pilote. Elle devait ensuite les regarder se faire détruire en direct sur vidéo. Elle a dû essuyer le mépris et le scepticisme des autres anciens combattants qui avaient subi leurs blessures liées au stress opérationnel en participant directement à des combats rapprochés. Aucune des deux façons de se blesser n'est plus légitime que l'autre; elles sont tout simplement différentes. C'est comme le fait de se casser la jambe en jouant au football ou de se casser la jambe en perdant pied sur une plaque de glace. Les façons diffèrent, mais le résultat est le même. Malgré cela, elle a été harcelée par les autres anciens combattants à un point tel qu'elle est devenue convaincue qu'elle simulait son propre trouble de stress post-traumatique. Pourtant, le trouble avait bel et bien été diagnostiqué. Elle a donc décidé de se suicider. Heureusement, elle a tenté juste à temps de me joindre sur les médias sociaux, et j'ai pu la convaincre de renoncer à son plan et d'obtenir des soins.

Je me sers de cette histoire pour illustrer l'ampleur des préjugés qu'il nous reste à surmonter dans le milieu militaire, dans la communauté des anciens combattants et dans la société en général. Une personne en arrive à intérioriser les préjugés des autres à son égard. Certaines personnes qui n'ont rien d'autre qu'une blessure finissent par croire qu'elles sont faibles et inutiles. C'est une situation angoissante pour n'importe qui, et à plus forte raison si l'on vient d'un milieu où l'attitude utilitariste est prononcée, comme c'est le cas dans l'armée.

Souvent, un ancien combattant en difficulté ou suicidaire essaiera dans un premier temps de parler à d'autres anciens combattants, puis, peut-être en dernier recours, à d'autres personnes qu'il croit en mesure de le comprendre. L’ancien combattant ne survivra peut-être pas assez longtemps pour aller consulter un médecin à moins qu'un camarade ou un membre de sa famille l'aide à surmonter sa crise et l'emmène lui-même chez le médecin.

Je ne suis pas un clinicien ou un chercheur. Je suis un soldat à temps partiel et un policier à temps plein. Depuis que j'ai commencé à intervenir auprès des anciens combattants en difficulté, j'ai dû suivre toutes les formations que je pouvais afin de me mettre au niveau. J'ai reçu une formation sur les premiers soins en santé mentale. J'ai par la suite aidé la Commission de la santé mentale du Canada à adapter ce cours à la communauté des anciens combattants. J'ai donné le cours « En route vers la préparation mentale », qui enseigne aux soldats et aux premiers intervenants à développer leur résilience en matière de santé mentale.

J'ai été chanceux. Ces cours, d'autres cours ainsi que mon expérience sur le plan professionnel m'ont donné des outils pour intervenir en cas de crise. Les pairs et les premiers intervenants ne peuvent pas remplacer des soins cliniques appropriés. Toutefois, pour nous, les prestataires de premiers soins en santé mentale, les occasions ne manquent pas où nous recevons un appel téléphonique, un texto ou un message sur les médias sociaux aux heures les plus sombres de la nuit et où nous réalisons qu'une vie est en danger à ce moment même.

Les choses que j'ai apprises dans le domaine des premiers soins en santé mentale m'ont permis de sauver des vies. On a tenté timidement d'encourager ce type de formation chez les anciens combattants et les membres de leurs familles, mais il faudrait faire beaucoup mieux que cela. Personne ne sait s'il sera debout et en mesure d'intervenir lorsque le prochain camarade menacera de se suicider. Nous devons étendre la formation en matière de santé mentale et de premiers soins à la population en général et à la communauté des anciens combattants en particulier.

J'aimerais dire un mot à propos des données sur le suicide chez les anciens combattants.

Le 17 novembre, Mme Lockhart a demandé à un autre témoin si nous avions des données sur le taux de suicide chez les anciens combattants. Nous n'en avons pas.

Tous les décès qu’un médecin légiste attribue à un suicide sont compilés par province. Ces données sont ensuite envoyées à Statistique Canada et saisies dans sa base de données sur la mortalité, mais elles sont dépouillées des renseignements susceptibles d’identifier les personnes qu’elles concernent. À l’heure actuelle, rien ne justifie qu’un rapprochement soit fait entre les verdicts de suicide des médecins légistes et la liste des personnes qui ont servi dans l’Armée canadienne. Rien ne permet d’établir de façon fiable et cohérente qu’un ancien combattant serait mort de suicide.

C’est pour cette raison qu’il n’y a pas de données exhaustives sur le taux de suicide chez les anciens combattants. Il serait possible de remédier à cela assez facilement en faisant des rapprochements entre, d’une part, les noms et les dates de naissance de tous les suicidés répertoriés et, d’autre part, une base de données sur les ex-membres des forces armées. Cela nous donnerait des résultats précieux suffisamment précis pour qu’on puisse s’en servir. Tous les renseignements nécessaires existent, mais ils ne sont pas au même endroit; les parties concernées ne peuvent donc pas les transformer en données pertinentes.

En conclusion, les anciens combattants souffrent des mêmes problèmes de santé mentale que les civils, mais ils doivent aussi composer avec les problèmes particuliers de la vie militaire. Les suicides et les crises ne sont pas toujours liés aux blessures de stress opérationnel, mais ils peuvent découler de la dépression, de l’anxiété et d’autres problèmes de santé mentale attribuables à une combinaison des facteurs de stress de la vie de tous les jours et des particularités du style de vie des militaires.

Les anciens combattants se tournent en premier lieu vers leurs camarades pour chercher le soutien familier dont ils ont besoin, et ils le font désormais au moyen des nouveaux modes de communication. Ceux d’entre nous qui fournissent ce soutien doivent être mieux formés pour être en mesure d’aider l’ancien combattant en détresse à tenir pendant les quelques premières heures d’une crise inattendue tout en l’incitant à recourir à des soins professionnels appropriés.

Les retards dans l’administration des dossiers, la perpétuation tenace des préjugés et l’absence d’établissements conçus pour traiter les problèmes particuliers de cette clientèle font en sorte que les anciens combattants peinent à obtenir l’aide dont ils ont besoin. Le problème du suicide chez les anciens combattants n’est pas près de disparaître et il reste encore à définir correctement, mais les données sont à notre portée, pour peu que le gouvernement se décide à faire ce qu’il faut.

Le Canada dans son ensemble a beaucoup de travail à faire dans le domaine de la santé mentale. À ce chapitre, les anciens combattants blessés et malades constituent une population très concentrée et très vulnérable dont les besoins sont énormes. Nous devons apprendre comment faire pour secourir ceux qui sont en crise. Nous devons apprendre à les aider à se rétablir et à réintégrer le marché du travail ou à faire la transition vers le marché du travail. Il ne fait aucun doute que le Canada fera des progrès dans ce domaine, mais à quelle vitesse? Au même titre que les auxiliaires médicaux du monde civil apprennent et utilisent des techniques mises au point sur les champs de bataille, tous les efforts déployés pour améliorer le sort des anciens combattants aux prises avec des problèmes de santé mentale profiteront de même au reste de la population canadienne.

Merci.

(1540)

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Gagnon, nous vous écoutons.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon (fondatrice, C'est Juste 700):

Tout d'abord, je veux remercier le Comité de m'avoir invitée à témoigner aujourd'hui.

Je m'appelle Marie-Claude Gagnon. Je suis une ex-membre de la réserve navale. J'ai survécu à un traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire et j'ai fondé le groupe C'est Juste 700.

Créé en 2015, notre groupe permet aux hommes et aux femmes qui souffrent d'un traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire de nouer des liens avec leurs pairs. Nous sommes le seul réseau au Canada pour les survivants de traumatismes sexuels en milieu militaire.

Nous organisons des rencontres; nous informons nos membres au sujet d'Anciens Combattants Canada et d'autres services, comme l'aide juridique et les possibilités d'aide financière; nous mettons les victimes en communication avec l'équipe d’intervention en cas d’inconduite sexuelle des Forces armées canadiennes; nous fournissons un soutien en personne aux victimes pour les aider à faire leur déposition, à subir des examens médicaux et à assister aux réunions; nous travaillons avec des thérapeutes pour mettre au point des services pour les survivants de traumatismes sexuels en milieu militaire; et nous réalisons des initiatives de consultation et de sensibilisation.

J'aimerais commencer avec une définition de ce qu'est un traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire. Comme il n'y a pas d'information à ce sujet sur le site Web d'Anciens Combattants Canada, j'ai dû emprunter la définition du site des anciens combattants des États-Unis. Le traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire se définit comme suit: [...] traumatisme psychologique attribuable à une agression physique à caractère sexuel, à des violences à caractère sexuel ou à une agression sexuelle s'étant produites alors que l'ancien combattant était en service actif, en entraînement en service actif ou en entraînement en période de disponibilité.

J'aimerais aborder le sujet en me servant de citations tirées du rapport produit par le Comité permanent de la défense nationale en 2014 intitulé « Soins offerts aux militaires canadiens malades ou blessés ». [...] il est nécessaire de viser la prévention et le traitement du TSPT causé par l’expérience du combat, mais aussi de cibler les autres causes de ce trouble chez les militaires, dont les agressions sexuelles.

Le lien entre l'agression sexuelle — que ce soit dans le théâtre des opérations ou au pays — et les troubles de stress post-traumatique est bien établi, surtout pour les militaires de sexe féminin. Or, nous ne savons à peu près rien sur ce que vivent les anciennes combattantes des Forces canadiennes à cet égard.

Le colonel Gerry Blais a confirmé au Comité que tous les programmes offerts par l'Unité interarmées de soutien du personnel des Forces canadiennes s'adressent à tous. Cependant, l'affirmation du colonel Blais voulant que tous les militaires blessés ou malades soient traités de la même façon ne tient pas compte des aspects psychologiques et sociaux particuliers des femmes du service qui sont aux prises avec un trouble de stress post-traumatique et d'autres problèmes de santé mentale, notamment de celles qui ont subi un traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire.

Indépendamment de ces recommandations, le rapport du médecin-chef de 2014 sur la mortalité par suicide dans les Forces armées canadiennes a continué à ne s'intéresser qu'aux hommes. Approuvé par le médecin-chef qui venait d'être nommé, ce rapport ne dit rien sur les suicides commis par des femmes, ce qui s'explique par le très petit nombre de femmes qui se sont enlevé la vie alors qu'elles étaient en service.

Comme la majorité des femmes de mon groupe sont des personnes qui ont été libérées pour raisons médicales après avoir rapporté l'agression sexuelle dont elles avaient été victimes, on peut présumer que la recherche sur la santé mentale effectuée en 2015 n'a pas tenu compte du traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire vécu par ces survivantes.

Le rapport de l'Examen externe sur l'inconduite sexuelle et le harcèlement sexuel dans les Forces armées canadiennes de 2015 affirmait que: [...] l’une des réponses communes à des allégations de harcèlement sexuel ou d’agression sexuelle est de muter la victime hors de son unité [...]

Le fait de procéder de la sorte peut donner lieu à une libération inattendue et non voulue.

Permettez-moi de citer certains membres de mon groupe qui vivent présentement une telle chose. L'une d'elles a dit: « Après l'agression, dès mon premier rendez-vous, mon médecin militaire a commencé à insister pour qu'on me libère pour raisons médicales, et ce, avant même que j'aie pu voir un psychiatre ou un psychologue, avant même que j'aie commencé à prendre des médicaments ou avant même que j'aie pu me faire à l'idée que j'avais été violée. »

Une autre a dit: « Comment puis-je guérir si l'on me pousse vers la sortie alors que j'essaie encore d'obtenir justice? »

Une autre encore: « J'ai dû prendre un congé de maladie de quatre jours cette semaine. C'est difficile de répondre aux demandes que j'ai au travail et de composer avec les suites de l'enquête en même temps. J'ai parfois l'impression que l'organisation essaie de me briser. »

Toutefois, l'American Journal of Preventive Medicine a publié en 2014 une recherche sur le traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire et la mortalité par suicide qui reconnaît le risque élevé de commettre un suicide chez les victimes d'un traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire. Le rapport recommandait de poursuivre l'évaluation du phénomène et de tenir compte du traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire pour l'élaboration d'une stratégie de prévention du suicide.

S'appuyant sur le rapport Deschamps, le Journal of Military, Veteran and Family Health affirme que, de façon générale, les anciennes combattantes sont insuffisamment diagnostiquées et insuffisamment traitées. Par conséquent, il est possible qu'elles aient de la difficulté à accéder à des services de santé appropriés; leurs proches pourraient avoir tendance à les blâmer en tant que victimes et elles pourraient faire l'objet d'une victimisation secondaire en essayant d'obtenir de l'aide pour le traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire qu'elles ont vécu.

Voici une autre observation que j'ai retenue: « Les membres du personnel médical m'ont dit qu'on n'envoyait pas les victimes de viol consulter un psychologue et que la priorité était donnée aux soldats qui ont vécu un traumatisme lié au combat. »

En ce qui concerne les conséquences du manque de soins, j'ai d'autres observations de personnes qui ont vécu certaines choses. Voici ce qu'une mère a dit: « Mon plus jeune fils m'a trouvée inconsciente dans ma chambre, alors que je venais d'essayer de me suicider. En 2012, j'ai été forcée de faire des choses terribles pour subvenir aux besoins de mes deux enfants. »

(1545)



Environ 85 % des femmes militaires mariées le sont à des hommes qui sont aussi des militaires. C'est une autre série de facteurs de stress particuliers aux femmes militaires. À quand remonte la dernière fois où l'on a vu un époux prendre la défense de sa femme militaire?

Le personnel de soutien social aux victimes de blessures de stress opérationnel ne reçoit pas de formation en matière de traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire et ce n'est pas à lui que l'on confie les évaluations des victimes de traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire et de leurs donneurs de soins, alors que c'est le cas pour les blessures de stress opérationnel liées au combat. Nous avons tous entendu dire que le soutien social aux blessés de stress opérationnel s'appliquait aussi au traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire, mais voici ce que certains membres ont à dire à ce sujet: « J'ai un trouble de stress post-traumatique, mais on m'a refusé de profiter du soutien social aux blessés de stress opérationnel. On m'a dit que je ne n'avais pas ma place dans ce programme. Lorsqu'un diagnostic de trouble de stress post-traumatique est confirmé, j'ai l'impression qu'on nous met dans le lot avec tous les anciens combattants d'Afghanistan. Tous les traumatismes ne se traitent pas de la même façon. Lorsque vous devez constamment vous battre pour que les gens croient à ce qui vous est arrivé, cela ne vous fait pas avancer. »

Les groupes de soutien clinique pour les blessures de stress opérationnel sont aussi axés sur des objectifs, comme améliorer le sommeil. C'est une dynamique qui ne permet pas aux gens de mettre sur pied des groupes pour les victimes de traumatismes sexuels en milieu militaire.

Voici mes recommandations au Comité: intégrer l'analyse comparative entre les sexes à toutes les politiques, tous les programmes, toutes les priorités et toutes les recherches d'Anciens Combattants Canada; exiger que les anciennes combattantes comptent pour au moins 15 % de la composition de tous les comités consultatifs du ministère des Anciens combattants, attendu que cette représentation ne compte que pour 3,5 % de tous ces groupes à l'heure actuelle; recourir à la science et à la collecte de données pour déterminer les besoins sexospécifiques des anciennes combattantes, y compris en ce qui concerne les questions relatives au traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire; former le personnel de première ligne et les formateurs au sujet des besoins et des traitements sexospécifiques, dont le traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire, et veiller à ce que la recherche financée par les contribuables porte sur les deux sexes; faire une évaluation en bonne et due forme du processus d'intervention et des services de soutien offerts aux personnes qui ont subi un traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire; afficher en ligne les services offerts aux anciens combattants qui doivent composer avec un traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire; afficher en ligne le nombre de membres libérés pour raisons médicales qui ont rapporté une inconduite sexuelle; et faire le suivi du nombre d'allégations de traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire qui sont accueillies favorablement ou rejetées chaque année, un état de fait dont le général à la retraite Natynczyk a reconnu l'existence lors de la Réunion des intervenants de 2015.

Soit dit en passant, au moment où je vous parle, il y a quelqu'un qui envisage de se suicider, alors je dois m'occuper de cela en même temps. Il se peut donc que je jette un coup d'oeil de temps à autre à mon téléphone cellulaire, juste pour m'assurer qu'il tient toujours bon.

Merci.

(1550)

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons commencer la première série de questions par M. Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous deux de vous être déplacés aujourd'hui pour venir témoigner. Je le dis sincèrement. Nous vous avons écouté et nous voulons assurément en savoir plus sur ce que nous pouvons faire et sur ce que nous pouvons recommander.

Je comprends votre position et je vous suis reconnaissant de vous soucier à ce point du sort d'autrui en cette période difficile. Alors, si vous avez à jeter un coup d'oeil à votre téléphone cellulaire, ne vous gênez pas.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Merci.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Ici, au Comité, on nous a très souvent parlé de la façon dont nous formons nos soldats. Nous prenons les gens en charge et, à défaut d'autres termes, nous les endoctrinons pour qu'ils deviennent des soldats. Nous nous sommes aperçus que lorsque nous les libérons, c'est, comme vous le dites, « merci d'être venus ». Nous les mettons dehors en leur disant de faire attention de ne pas se faire frapper par la porte en sortant.

Brian, pouvez-vous nous dire comment nous pourrions déconstruire cet esprit militaire qu'ont nos soldats? Ce que nous avons entendu — et je crois que c'est ce à quoi nous pensons tous — c'est que l'absence de déconstruction est la raison pour laquelle nous avons une bonne partie de ces problèmes, ou du moins, certains d'entre eux.

M. Brian Harding:

Je crois que c'est un sujet sur lequel quelques-uns de vos témoins de la semaine dernière se sont prononcés de façon fort éloquente.

Beaucoup de garçons entrent dans l'armée alors qu'ils ont 17, 18 ou 19 ans. Certains quittent littéralement le nid familial pour s'enrôler. Bien sûr, ce n'est pas toujours le cas, mais certains passent à l'âge adulte au moment même où ils deviennent des militaires. Ils arrivent dans un environnement où tout est structuré pour eux et où presque tout leur est fourni. Des gens s'occupent de suivre à la trace leur « administration personnelle » et s'assurent que toutes les cases sont cochées en ce qui concerne ce qu'ils doivent faire dans la vie. Cela est particulièrement vrai pour la force régulière. Le fait d'être un militaire est un aspect central de votre identité et votre vie gravite presque essentiellement autour de cette appartenance.

Lorsque quelqu'un ressent tout à coup le besoin de prendre une place dans la vie civile, il se peut — et loin de moi l'idée d'être condescendant en disant cela —, il se peut, donc, qu'il n'ait pas les aptitudes sociales élémentaires pour y arriver. Il n'y aura personne pour lui rappeler qu'il a bientôt rendez-vous chez le médecin, pour s'assurer qu'il prend soin de ceci, de cela et du reste.

Bien entendu, comme je suis le centre d'attraction, je peine à trouver d'autres exemples. Je crois toutefois qu'il vaudrait la peine de faire une évaluation structurée des aptitudes qui manquent aux soldats qui sont libérés et qui passent dans le monde du travail, de chercher à voir si ces manques ont été exacerbés par des facteurs médicaux et de cerner quelle formation ou quel apprentissage pourrait les aider lorsqu'ils quittent le service. Je ne dis pas qu'il faudrait que ce soit obligatoire, mais il serait bon de leur donner une pluralité d'options: voici certaines choses que nous pouvons vous apprendre à faire pour vous-mêmes et que nous avions l'habitude de faire pour vous. Ce n'est qu'une idée.

(1555)

M. Robert Kitchen:

Nous nous retrouverions donc à les faire passer par un camp d'entraînement en entrant et par un autre camp d'entraînement en sortant. Est-ce que ce serait une...

M. Brian Harding:

Je ne serais pas aussi ferme. Un camp d'entraînement consiste à prendre quelqu'un dont la vie n'est pas structurée et qui manque de discipline, et de le transformer en son contraire. Or, c'est exactement ce que nous essayons de déprogrammer. Nous voulons quelqu'un qui n'aura pas à se faire dire « tu dois être debout à 8 heures; le dîner est à midi; à 12 h 35, tu arrêtes de t'empiffrer et tu reprends ton travail ».

Selon moi et à première vue, s'il faut un entraînement à la sortie, il doit être structuré de manière à aider la personne à développer l'aptitude de s'occuper de ses propres affaires, mais pour dire vrai, c'est quelque chose à laquelle je n'ai jamais vraiment réfléchi, alors je ne peux pas vous en dire plus que cela.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Je comprends. Nous recherchons des observations qui vous viennent du coeur, car nous savons que vous avez beaucoup d'expérience en la matière. C'est un exercice qui a son bien-fondé, et je vous remercie de vous prêter au jeu.

Vous avez parlé des préjugés et de la façon dont ces préjugés peuvent vous tourmenter intérieurement. Marie-Claude, même si vous n'en avez pas parlé, je crois que ces préjugés existent aussi d'une certaine façon lorsque vous souffrez d'un traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire. J'aimerais entendre chacun de vous à propos de ces préjugés et de l'incidence que ces préjugés peuvent avoir dans des cas de maladie mentale.

Marie-Claude, je vous laisse commencer.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Je vais m'en tenir au traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire, parce que l'on n'en a pas parlé autant. Je vais prendre l'exemple de Bell Cause pour la cause. Nous n'avons rien entendu au sujet du traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire dans le cadre de cette initiative. Les responsables du soutien social aux blessés de stress opérationnel ont déjà organisé une campagne qui ne laissait aucune place aux survivantes de ces traumatismes sexuels. Elles avaient spontanément offert de raconter ce qu'elles avaient vécu, mais on leur a refusé de le faire. On ne les a pas rappelées pour les inviter à faire part au monde de cette information.

On voit des photos qui illustrent le soutien par les pairs et des choses semblables, mais le jour du Souvenir, personne ne dit rien à propos du traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire. La Journée internationale de la femme, on nous montre les réussites des anciennes combattantes ou des soldates. Les groupes de femmes optent pour celles qui ont réussi, mais nous laissons de côté celles qui ont échoué. Ce ne sont pas des choses dont on parle.

De toute évidence, l'armée elle-même n'intègre pas cet aspect des choses, sauf lorsqu'elle parle précisément de cela. Même durant le Mois de la prévention du crime — je crois que c'est en mars —, on ne dit rien à propos du traumatisme sexuel. On n'en parle jamais. Ce n'est pas sur notre page Web; ce n'est pas sur la page Web d'Anciens Combattants Canada.

Le site Web des anciens combattants aux États-Unis a une section complète là-dessus. Depuis deux ans, je demande que notre site Web d'Anciens Combattants Canada consacre une page à ce sujet. Le ministère nous répond systématiquement qu'il est d'accord, qu'il reconnaît le traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire et qu'il va mettre des ressources à notre disposition, mais ces réponses sont toujours restées sans lendemain.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Brian, vous avez parlé du fait que les gens intériorisent les préjugés que les autres ont à leur égard. Je présume que ce que vous vouliez dire, c'est que quelqu'un qui a un trouble de stress post-traumatique est étiqueté comme tel et que ses camarades le persécutent et l'abaissent à cause de cela. Pouvez-vous nous dire un mot à ce sujet?

M. Brian Harding:

C'est un environnement qui est dominé par la mentalité du mâle alpha. Bien entendu, la vie des militaires est axée sur la capacité de tuer des gens et de donner son maximum pour défendre l'intérêt national. Il y a une certaine mentalité qui met l'accent sur le fait d'être impitoyable, d'être endurci, et c'est quelque chose que j'ai constaté bien trop souvent. Si vous n'étiez pas à l'extérieur du périmètre, sur le terrain, en train de vous en prendre personnellement à l'ennemi pour lui infliger des violences, c'est impossible que votre traumatisme soit aussi légitime que le mien.

C'est une attitude qui découle de l'ignorance, de l'ego, et elle doit être réprimée.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci. Est-ce que mon temps de parole est écoulé?

Le président:

Oui, votre temps de parole est écoulé. Désolé.

Madame Lockhart, nous vous écoutons.

Mme Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Monsieur Harding, j'aimerais vous parler un peu du réseau de pairs que vous avez mentionné. Lorsque nous avons fait notre étude sur la prestation des services en santé mentale, nous avons parlé de l'importance du soutien par les pairs, des réseaux de pairs et du fait que les temps ont bien changé. Il ne fait aucun doute que les gens recherchent maintenant de l'aide en ligne. Vous avez dit que les groupes de soutien par les pairs devraient être mieux formés. Comment devons-nous faire cela? Est-ce que l'efficacité des groupes de soutien par les pairs est attribuable en partie à leur caractère informel? Si c'est effectivement le cas, comment Anciens Combattants Canada peut-il bonifier l'offre de formation?

(1600)

M. Brian Harding:

Si on offrait des séances de formation en plus grande quantité et de meilleure qualité, ce serait excellent. Toute formation serait un point de départ formidable.

Il existe une foule de cours pour aider les profanes à régler ce genre de questions. Presque tout le monde ici présent a probablement suivi, à un moment donné, des cours de secourisme et de réanimation cardiopulmonaire. Il y a un cours appelé ASIST, ou formation appliquée en techniques d’intervention face au suicide. Il y a aussi des cours de premiers soins en santé mentale et de premiers soins psychologiques. Dans le milieu militaire et le milieu des premiers intervenants, on trouve le programme En route vers la préparation mentale. Il existe un tas de cours qui montrent comment repérer une personne en difficulté ou en crise. Tout comme dans les protocoles de secourisme, lorsqu'on évalue les voies respiratoires, la respiration et la circulation en vue d'une intervention, au besoin, il en va de même lorsqu'on constate qu'une personne est en situation de crise. Il existe des approches structurées qui vous guident dans vos démarches pour interagir avec la personne. Si un simple fantassin comme moi arrive à comprendre cela, alors n'importe qui le peut aussi.

L'année dernière, la Commission de la santé mentale du Canada a adapté le cours des premiers soins en santé mentale au groupe des anciens combattants. J'ai aidé à la révision du matériel afin de lui donner une saveur militaire, pour ainsi dire. On commence à offrir le cours petit à petit. Le premier groupe d'instructeurs a obtenu les accréditations nécessaires. La Légion royale canadienne aide à en faire la promotion, mais il s'agit surtout d'un projet secondaire. Cela se fait lentement.

Ce n'est là qu'une des options. Il y a, comme je l'ai dit, de nombreuses possibilités. La Légion royale canadienne offre également une excellente formation à ses agents d'entraide pour guider les gens durant toutes les étapes du processus d'Anciens Combattants Canada et pour gérer les crises éventuelles durant cette période. Cela pourrait faire partie d'un prototype de formation à plus grande échelle. Pour ce qui est de savoir comment s'y prendre, c'est peut-être une question qui dépasse la portée de la réponse que je peux vous donner ici, en si peu de temps.

Bref, toute la formation nécessaire est déjà là. Il reste à rassembler le tout et à établir un modèle de prestation viable.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Je vous remercie d'avoir mentionné la Légion. J'ai assisté à une réunion des représentants de plusieurs Légions dans ma région, et ils ont justement parlé de la question de savoir comment s'assurer que tout le monde dans la Légion avait accès à une telle formation, depuis le barman jusqu'à l'agent d'entraide. Pour revenir sur ce que vous disiez, je crois qu'il reste encore beaucoup à faire, et ce travail peut avoir une grande portée. Cela ne fait jamais de tort de former plus de gens.

En ce qui a trait aux premiers soins en santé mentale et à la façon de les adapter, madame Gagnon, pensez-vous qu'il y a lieu d'y intégrer également le traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire? Y a-t-il un autre degré de sensibilité qui doit entrer en ligne de compte?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

On m'avait proposé, par exemple une formation en matière de soutien par les pairs, mais il aurait fallu que je m'absente du travail pendant quatre jours ou une semaine. Je travaille à temps plein et, vous savez, quand on recommence sa carrière, on n'a pas beaucoup de jours de congé au début. En tant qu'épouse de militaire, je dois également déménager sans cesse, ce qui signifie que je dois toujours partir de zéro. Je n'ai pas le temps de prendre une semaine de congé pour aller suivre une formation toute seule.

Ce serait bien si on nous offrait une formation à distance. Je pourrais ainsi la compléter en une fin de semaine. Cela permettrait à beaucoup de gens dans mon groupe d'y assister. Les femmes de mon groupe — il y a des hommes aussi, mais ils sont beaucoup moins nombreux — ont habituellement une famille. Elles ne peuvent pas laisser leur famille et partir en formation pendant une semaine. Ce serait bien d'avoir quelque chose pour l'apprentissage à distance.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Vous avez dit qu'on vous avait proposé une formation. De quelle organisation s'agissait-il?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

C'était le SSVO, soit le Soutien social aux victimes de stress opérationnel.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

C'est donc dire que le SSVSO a commencé à déployer des efforts en ce sens.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Non.

Mme Alaina Lockhart: Non? D'accord.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon: C'était seulement dans ma situation, parce que j'étais en service lorsque mon agression a eu lieu; on l'a considérée comme un incident opérationnel. Ce n'est pas le cas pour beaucoup de gens, mais on m'a permis de suivre une formation pour cette raison. J'ai été invitée à y assister, mais je ne pouvais tout simplement pas y aller.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

D'accord. Je comprends.

À ce sujet, vous avez mentionné plusieurs recommandations qui me paraissent excellentes. Nous connaissons bien certaines d'entre elles pour les avoir entendues dans d'autres témoignages. En ce qui concerne les employés de première ligne d'Anciens Combattants Canada, de quoi ont-ils besoin? Que devons-nous faire pour améliorer ce premier contact?

En fait, cette question s'adresse à tous les deux.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Je dirais que l'information doit être accessible en ligne, car les gens doivent désormais se défendre eux-mêmes. Ainsi, nous pouvons aller vérifier ce qui se passe. Quand nous appelons, l'information varie selon la personne à l'autre bout du fil. Certains individus se sont fait dire qu'ils n'étaient pas admissibles au programme de réadaptation d'ACC et qu'ils devaient attendre, mais comme ils sont aux études, ils ne savent pas que leurs frais de scolarité ne seront pas remboursés une fois qu'ils auront droit à ces prestations.

La plupart des gens ayant vécu un traumatise sexuel en milieu militaire sont jeunes. L'âge moyen se situe entre 17 et 19 ans. C'est dans cette tranche d'âge qu'ils se font agresser. Lorsqu'ils quittent l'armée, ils retournent aux études, et il s'agit d'un processus différent. Voilà pourquoi l'information doit être accessible.

Il y a beaucoup de femmes dans les réserves. Nous sommes laissées pour compte sur le plan de l'information, si bien que nous retrouvons toujours en situation d'attente; nous devons attendre le coup de fil d'un spécialiste qui ne nous rappelle jamais. Voilà le genre d'expériences que nous vivons. Si l'information est en ligne, nous saurons à quoi nous attendre et nous pourrons accéder aux soins.

Par ailleurs, les formulaires ne portent que sur des situations liées au combat. On m'a demandé de me soumettre à un examen gynécologique 10 ans après l'incident. Je n'avais pas le choix. C'est la procédure à suivre, même si j'ai eu deux enfants après l'incident. Que peut-on bien trouver? J'ai dû subir un examen invasif pour rien. Il m'a fallu huit mois pour mener ce combat, ne serait-ce que pour obtenir l'autorisation d'aller de l'avant. J'ai eu le droit de continuer cette démarche après m'être fait dire le contraire. Je ne pouvais pas m'adresser au BSJP parce que ma demande n'avait pas été refusée; je n'avais donc pas de recours. La seule solution, c'était de rassembler 19 autres personnes comme moi. C'est seulement alors que nos dossiers ont été réexaminés, mais il a fallu huit mois rien que pour obtenir le droit de procéder. Il faut que cela change.

(1605)

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci.

Mme Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à vous, chers témoins, de votre présence. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants de votre témoignage. Cela nous aidera à rédiger un rapport qui, nous l'espérons, permettra d'améliorer le sort des anciens combattants.

Madame Gagnon, j'ai un certain nombre de questions à vous poser. Vous avez parlé d'autres sites Web pour les anciens combattants, notamment de celui des États-Unis, et vous avez dit qu'Anciens Combattants Canada pourrait clairement s'inspirer de ces exemples. Comment le site Web américain parvient-il à vous fournir, à vous ou aux anciens combattants américains, de meilleurs renseignements?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Tout d'abord, le site Web américain contient une définition. Ensuite, on y reconnaît que ce genre d'incidents se produisent. On y trouve aussi des explications sur les éléments qui peuvent être considérés comme des preuves et qui se distinguent des preuves applicables aux incidents liés au combat. Par exemple, si vous avez appelé une ligne d'aide et que vous pouvez le prouver ou si vous êtes allé chercher de l'aide durant cette période, cela pourrait constituer des éléments de preuve.

Voilà le genre de renseignements qu'on peut obtenir pour préparer sa demande. À l'heure actuelle, ce sont les membres de la Légion qui aident à la préparation des demandes. En passant, les femmes de 19 ans ne voudront pas nécessairement s'adresser à la Légion pour obtenir de l'aide. Les membres de la Légion ne s'y connaissent pas trop en la matière pour s'occuper de ces cas. Ils préparent des demandes comme s'il s'agissait de cas liés au combat et, au final, nous essuyons un refus. À l'étape de l'appel, nous ne pouvons pas présenter de nouveaux renseignements. Il nous faut une personne qualifiée, ou du moins, une ressource en ligne qui nous dit ce que nous pouvons faire si nous avons dénoncé ou non un incident ou si notre dossier médical a disparu pour une raison quelconque. Nous devons savoir ce qui peut être fait.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Vous avez lancé votre groupe il y a deux ans. Qu'est-ce qui a changé sur le plan des services offerts aux anciens combattants ayant vécu un traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire? Y a-t-il eu quelque chose de positif? Avez-vous observé une différence en deux ans?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Voulez-vous dire à l'intérieur ou à l'extérieur de notre groupe?

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je voulais dire à l'extérieur, au sein d'ACC.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

J'ai remarqué récemment qu'ACC s'est mis à accepter un plus grand nombre de demandes. C'est lorsque les gens exercent de grandes pressions et qu'ils s'apprêtent à s'exprimer publiquement que leur demande est acceptée. Je crois donc que c'est un bon début.

Auparavant, il fallait presque feindre un autre traumatisme. Il était si difficile d'obtenir une audience pour un traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire que les gens trouvaient un autre problème — quelque chose de plus facile à prouver, comme l'exposition à un bruit puissant ou à un événement épeurant. Le traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire faisait rarement l'objet de la cause. Les gens utilisaient d'autres moyens pour avoir accès aux services.

Toutefois, le ministère commence à accepter que le traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire puisse être un cas valable. Par ailleurs, si l'acte s'est produit, disons, après le travail, mais qu'on a subi des répercussions au travail, preuves à l'appui, alors ces cas pourront également être pris en considération. Avant, si l'acte se produisait, disons, lors d'un dîner régimentaire, alors on n'était pas couvert. Aujourd'hui, le ministère cherche à déterminer s'il faut dédommager les gens qui ont été agressés dans les casernes ou au cours de dîners régimentaires obligatoires tenus le soir. Pour l'instant, ce n'est pas le cas. Ces questions sont en cours d'examen.

(1610)

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

J'ai l'impression qu'il est très difficile de prouver que l'agression a eu lieu et qu'elle s'est produite dans un milieu militaire.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Eh bien, je dirais qu'il y a trois étapes. Vous devez d'abord prouver que l'agression a eu lieu. Ensuite, vous devez prouver que votre état de santé est lié à ce qui s'est produit parce que, parfois, on va dire que vous aviez déjà un problème en raison d'un traumatisme survenu durant l'enfance. Enfin, vous devez prouver que c'est lié au service.

Beaucoup de gens se sont fait dire que si le tribunal ne leur donne pas gain de cause, ce qui exige une preuve hors de tout doute raisonnable, l'agression n'a techniquement pas eu lieu. D'autres se sont fait dire que s'ils perdent la cause, ils n'auront rien. Ce n'est vraiment pas juste, parce que si vous êtes au combat et que vous avez reçu un diagnostic de trouble de stress post-traumatique, on vous accordera le bénéfice du doute, mais si vous êtes devant un tribunal militaire ou devant n'importe quelle cour de justice pénale, le fardeau de la preuve est beaucoup plus important.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

On dirait que l'expérience de l'agression initiale est rendue encore plus difficile à cause du processus qu'il faut suivre.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

De plus, le BSJP traite les gens... Je n'ai pas apporté avec moi toutes les citations, mais d'après ce qu'on me dit, les avocats tiennent des propos comme: « J'aurais crié si j'étais à votre place » ou « Si je me faisais violer, je n'aurais pas besoin de traitement psychologique ». On blâme beaucoup la victime durant une audience devant le BSJP ou lors d'une consultation auprès d'un médecin militaire. Cela arrive souvent.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Voilà qui m'amène à mon autre question. Supposons qu'une femme demande de l'aide en raison d'un traumatisme sexuel. Serait-il plus facile si l'aide provenait d'une agente d'entraide? Les forces armées ou le ministère des Anciens Combattants assurent-ils la disponibilité de soins prodigués par des femmes, si c'est ce que demande la personne qui cherche à obtenir ce genre d'aide et de soutien?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

En fait, c'est un homme qui a soulevé cette question au sein de mon groupe, parce qu'il avait été agressé, évidemment, par un autre homme. Les hommes qui sont victimes d'agression sexuelle préfèrent parler à des femmes. Ils aimeraient avoir le choix.

D'ailleurs, il est prouvé — et je n'ai pas avec moi la recherche pertinente — que, dans le cadre des groupes de soutien par les pairs, les femmes guérissent mieux lorsqu'elles sont entourées uniquement par d'autres femmes; s'il y a des hommes dans le groupe, elles ont tendance à se taire et à laisser les hommes parler, ce qui explique pourquoi le processus de guérison n'est pas aussi efficace.

Le président:

Je regrette, mais votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Colin Fraser (Nova-Ouest, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous deux d'être venus nous faire part de votre expérience, et merci aussi d'avoir servi le Canada. Nous sommes très heureux que vous soyez ici pour nous parler de votre vécu. Nous espérons ainsi formuler des recommandations en vue d'améliorer la situation des anciens combattants.

Monsieur Harding, j'aimerais commencer par vous. Quand vous parlez de l'identité du groupe de pairs et des contacts au sein de la collectivité des anciens combattants, c'est-à-dire de l'importance de communiquer avec les anciens combattants qui, autrement, ne prendraient pas l'initiative de parler de leurs difficultés, comment cela fonctionne-t-il à l'échelle du pays parmi les membres de votre groupe en particulier, soit le groupe Envoyez le compte? S'agit-il d'une initiative pancanadienne? Observez-vous des difficultés ou des défis quand vient le temps de rejoindre les gens des régions rurales ou éloignées?

M. Brian Harding:

Mon groupe fait tout en ligne. Quand nous avons lancé ce projet, nous n'avions ni prévu ni envisagé de créer un tel groupe. C'est venu naturellement. Quelques-uns d'entre nous ont fait passer le message. Notre troisième fondateur a créé une page Facebook, qui a attiré, en l'espace de quelques jours, plus de 9 000 personnes. Nous avons alors compris qu'il fallait aller de l'avant.

Ce que nous voulions promouvoir au début, c'était l'intention d'établir un dialogue de façon proactive. Nous disions: « Hé, que se passe-t-il avec ce type qui faisait partie de ton peloton en Bosnie, en Croatie ou en Afghanistan, le gars à qui tu n'as pas parlé depuis trois ans? Appelle-le ou envoie-lui un courriel ou peu importe, et demande-lui de ses nouvelles. » Il suffit de lancer une conversation.

Beaucoup d'anciens combattants tombent dans l'oubli, et ils souffrent, à l'insu de tout le monde. Dans les forces armées en particulier et, dans mon cas, la réserve militaire, nous sommes tous dispersés, car nous retournons dans nos bases et nos collectivités respectives.

Nous n'avons pas quelque chose de structuré ou d'officiel. Nous n'en avons jamais eu. En tout cas, cela semble avoir été utile. Nous encourageons les gens à reprendre contact avec ceux avec qui ils ont servi et à demander de leurs nouvelles. Cela se fait constamment, tous les jours, et non une fois par année — je ne cherche pas à critiquer Bell. Quand les gens disent qu'ils vont bien, mais qu'on trouve qu'ils ne sont pas tout à fait honnêtes, on peut leur demander: « Comment ça va réellement? » Donnez-leur cette ouverture pour qu'ils sachent qu'il y a quelqu'un à qui ils peuvent parler, en toute confiance, de tout et de rien.

M. Colin Fraser:

Si je comprends bien, vous proposez un engagement continu et un suivi après la libération, parce que les anciens combattants feront généralement davantage confiance à un compagnon d'armes. Par conséquent, ces gens seraient les mieux placés pour faire cette prise de contact.

Avez-vous des recommandations à faire sur la façon d'assurer un tel suivi après la libération? Entrevoyez-vous la possibilité qu'à l'avenir, ce travail fasse partie intégrante des efforts structurés d'ACC, ou est-il préférable de laisser aux organismes comme le vôtre le soin de s'en occuper?

(1615)

M. Brian Harding:

Eh bien, c'en est une bonne: « Je viens du gouvernement et je suis ici pour vous aider. » Voilà un message qui ne sera pas toujours bien reçu.

M. Colin Fraser:

J'en conviens.

M. Brian Harding:

La plupart de ces contacts s'effectuent sans formalisme. Nous ne faisons que parler à des amis.

Quelques mois après mon retour de l'Afghanistan, j'ai commencé à recevoir une foule de courriels m'invitant à assister à un rendez-vous de suivi avec un travailleur social militaire. Après une longue période, on a finalement réussi à me faire asseoir dans une salle et à me faire parler, histoire de s'assurer que tout allait bien, et c'était le cas. Quand on est toujours en service, il y a au moins un mécanisme par lequel on est obligé d'assister à ces rendez-vous. Or, une fois libéré, on ne peut plus y être contraint. Cela dit, une fois qu'un militaire est libéré, rien n'empêche quelqu'un de faire un suivi en disant: « Hé, cela fait un certain temps que vous êtes libéré. Y a-t-il quelque chose qui a refait surface depuis et qui, selon vous, pourrait nécessiter un accès à des ressources de soutien? »

Quand un militaire est libéré des forces armées, il ne devient pas automatiquement un client d'ACC. Il existe sans doute des règles de confidentialité, quelque part dans les politiques ou les règlements, qui empêchent le transfert des noms et des coordonnées du MDN à ACC. Je ne peux pas fournir de solution à cela.

Hypothétiquement, il serait possible d'abattre ce mur, de sorte qu'ACC puisse agir en amont et établir une prise de contact un an ou deux après la libération pour dire: « Hé, nous voulons avoir de vos nouvelles. Vous n'êtes plus en service depuis un certain temps. Comment vous adaptez-vous? Savez-vous que nous offrons tel ou tel service? » Bien souvent, je trouve que les anciens combattants ignorent complètement les options qui s'offrent à eux.

Pour ce qui est de savoir comment s'y prendre, il faudrait que j'y réfléchisse beaucoup plus longuement.

M. Colin Fraser:

D'accord, mais d'après votre expérience, le fait que la prise de contact soit effectuée par des anciens soldats, c'est-à-dire des collègues, signifie que la réponse est bien meilleure. La crédibilité et la confiance sont là, pour ainsi dire.

M. Brian Harding:

Je ne peux pas faire de comparaison. Je ne peux pas dire qu'un soldat serait, dans tous les cas, mieux placé qu'un employé d'ACC.

M. Colin Fraser:

En effet.

M. Brian Harding:

Par contre, je sais que la prise de contact effectuée de façon proactive et continue par des soldats permet de sauver des vies.

M. Colin Fraser:

D'accord.

En ce qui concerne les traitements propres aux anciens combattants, dont vous avez parlé, il existe entre autres des cliniques pour traumatismes liés au stress opérationnel. Pouvez-vous faire des recommandations ou me donner une idée de ce que vous entendez par traitements propres aux anciens combattants, un domaine dans lequel ACC pourrait peut-être accomplir un meilleur travail pour s'assurer que les anciens combattants obtiennent l'aide dont ils ont besoin?

M. Brian Harding:

Bien sûr. Je parle plus précisément des traitements en établissement ou en milieu hospitalier. Les deux ne désignent pas nécessairement la même chose.

De nombreux établissements — comme Bellwood, Homewood, Sunshine Coast Health Centre — offrent des traitements à long terme en milieu hospitalier, mais comme je l'ai dit, ces établissements ont une clientèle mixte dans bien des cas. Les chercheurs connaissent probablement assez bien les besoins des anciens combattants, mais leur travail n'est pas forcément adapté à eux, et la prestation de programmes non plus.

La lettre de mandat du ministre des Anciens Combattants renferme la promesse de créer un « centre d'excellence » pour la santé mentale...

M. Colin Fraser:

Oui.

M. Brian Harding:

C'est, selon moi, une expression ambiguë. Les défenseurs des anciens combattants avaient plutôt réclamé une installation de traitement; pourtant, ce n'est pas ce qui a été retenu dans le mandat.

Au sein du Groupe consultatif sur la santé mentale, dont je fais partie à ACC, nous insistons beaucoup sur l'accès à un établissement physique. Nous avons besoin d'un environnement thérapeutique, rempli de gens rassurants à qui les anciens combattants peuvent s'ouvrir. Je ne dénigre pas les autres personnes qui souffrent de problèmes de santé mentale ou de traumatismes, mais il y a des gens qui ne sont pas compatibles entre eux. N'oublions pas que les anciens membres de la GRC font aussi partie des anciens combattants. Nous avons besoin d'installations physiques propres à la clientèle d'ACC et dotées d'une capacité permanente, en fonction de la demande, pour fournir aux anciens combattants des traitements à temps plein.

M. Colin Fraser:

Ce serait donc une clinique, sur ou sans rendez-vous, qui répondrait à toutes sortes de besoins. Est-ce ainsi que vous l'envisagez?

Le président:

Très brièvement, je vous prie.

M. Brian Harding:

C'est possible, mais il faudrait surtout viser des traitements de 30 jours ou plus.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Harding.

Monsieur Bratina, à vous la parole.

M. Bob Bratina (Hamilton-Est—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Gagnon, je pense que nous retenons tous notre souffle chaque fois que vous jeter un coup d'oeil à votre téléphone. J'espère que personne n'a...

Nous vous remercions de nous faire part de votre expérience. Votre groupe se réunit-il une fois par semaine ou une fois par mois?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Non, c'est aux deux semaines.

M. Bob Bratina:

Pouvez-vous me dire ce que vous avez ressenti le jour de votre enrôlement dans les services? Y a-t-il eu un âge d'or, c'est-à-dire une période où vous rêviez de devenir matelot?

(1620)

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

À vrai dire, je voulais, au départ, faire partie de l'artillerie, mais lors du recrutement, on s'est moqué de moi et on m'a plutôt proposé la marine. J'aimais bien la marine, mais, en toute sincérité, je voulais participer au camp de recrues pour voir si j'étais à la hauteur.

J'ai fini par aimer la mer. Ensuite, je suis retournée aux études et j'ai été transférée au poste d'officier du renseignement. Je voulais devenir officier des affaires publiques, mais mon projet a été interrompu, si bien que j'ai dû réorienter ma carrière tout entière. Mon mari est dans l'armée, alors nous nous déplaçons ensemble.

J'avais un plan, qui n'est plus le même aujourd'hui. Quand on perd la possibilité de toucher sa pension et d'avoir toutes ces choses, on repart un peu à zéro. C'est un gros changement.

M. Bob Bratina:

Que diriez-vous à un groupe de jeunes recrues qui, comme vous à une époque, s'apprêtent à entrer en service? Auriez-vous un message à leur transmettre à propos des questions dont nous discutons aujourd'hui? Est-ce un sujet dont vous pourriez parler aux jeunes recrues?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

J'aimerais pouvoir leur dire: « S'il arrive quelque chose, parlez-en ». Toutefois, à voir ce qui se passe quand les gens décident de briser le mur du silence, j'ignore si c'est le moment propice pour agir ainsi. Je ne crois pas que nous en soyons là. Il y a encore beaucoup de répercussions, comme en témoignent les nombreux cas de militaires qui sont libérés pour raisons médicales ou de gens qui sont pénalisés pour avoir signalé des incidents. C'est sans compter les représailles, qui n'ont pas encore été établies. Nous avons poussé les gens à dénoncer de tels incidents, mais nous ne les avons pas soutenus après coup. Donc, tant que nous n'aurons pas mis en place...

Bien entendu, je n'empêcherai jamais quelqu'un de signaler un incident — je crois que, pour certains, c'est une façon de tourner la page —, mais je ne me mettrai pas non plus à pousser quelqu'un à agir. Je crois que chacun doit le faire à son rythme.

M. Bob Bratina:

Qu'en pensez-vous, monsieur Harding?

M. Brian Harding:

Oui, je vais mettre mon chapeau de sergent encore en service pour un instant. Il neigera en enfer le jour où je ne me porterai pas à la défense d'un de mes soldats qui s'est fait agresser, mais ça, c'est moi. Beaucoup de gens voient les choses différemment — selon une mentalité désuète et destructrice —, et ils seraient peut-être plus tentés de passer ces choses sous silence.

Malheureusement, comme Marie-Claude l'a laissé entendre, le processus peut s'avérer terrible pour les gens qui décident signaler de tels actes. J'ai vu des gens dénoncer ce genre d'agressions, pensant qu'ils se trouvaient dans un lieu sûr, et la chaîne de commandement en a eu vent, mais trois ans plus tard, ils font toujours face aux répercussions d'une enquête ultérieure, chose qu'ils n'ont peut-être jamais demandée parce qu'ils voulaient tout simplement essayer de tourner la page.

D'un autre côté, les forces armées sont absolument liées par l'obligation d'agir avec toute la rigueur de la loi lorsque pareils incidents sont signalés; il se peut que les victimes soient laissées pour compte à cet égard, mais le changement ne viendra pas des jeunes de 17 ou 19 ans qui suivent l'instruction de base. Il viendra des dirigeants plus expérimentés, qui doivent assumer leurs responsabilités, prendre les rênes et régler le problème à l'interne.

M. Bob Bratina:

Madame Gagnon, l'expérience des femmes mariées diffère-t-elle de celle des femmes célibataires en ce qui concerne leur exposition au traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

N'oublions pas non plus que nos conjoints s'exposent habituellement, eux aussi, à des représailles. Même si nous ne sommes plus dans l'armée et que nous en parlons, il y a un risque qu'ils subissent des représailles. C'est le cas de cinq personnes dans mon groupe, et je sais que c'est ce qui se passe. Leurs conjoints font face à des représailles, et elles se sentent mal.

C'est une conséquence dont nous devons tenir compte lorsque nous décidons de parler. Bien entendu, maintenant que nous avons réintégré la vie civile, nous devons constamment déménager, et il faut alors trouver de nouveaux services de santé, de nouveaux thérapeutes et de nouveaux psychiatres, ce qui n'est pas facile. Si une transition de carrière est difficile après la libération, même lorsque vous pouvez choisir votre lieu de résidence, imaginez si vous deviez déménager à Gagetown. Vous n'avez plus aucun but et, souvent, vous n'avez pas le choix de rester à la maison et de prendre soin de vos enfants. Si vous avez été militaire pendant toutes ces années et que vous vous étiez fixé d'autres objectifs dans la vie, ce n'est pas ce à quoi vous vous attendiez. Il n'y a rien de mal à cela, mais vous n'aviez peut-être pas cela dans le sang au début. La dénonciation tue vraiment une carrière.

Puis-je ajouter une chose en réponse à votre question initiale?

M. Bob Bratina:

Oui.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Je voudrais transmettre un message. Beaucoup de gens voient des incidents et ne disent rien. La meilleure façon de mettre fin aux agressions et aux choses de ce genre, c'est de dire, dans les cas où on est témoin d'un incident: « Tu sais quoi? J'ai vu ce qui s'est passé, et ça me paraît très grave. Je vais t'accompagner et signaler cet incident. » C'est là une déclaration. Avoir le soutien d'un témoin encourage la personne à dénoncer l'incident, et on pourrait alors lancer l'enquête, mais beaucoup de gens choisissent de ne rien dire parce qu'ils ont peur pour leur carrière.

(1625)

M. Bob Bratina:

Nous vous écoutons avec attention. Je me demande si, dans le cadre d'autres conversations, les gens pensent parfois que vous exagérez et que la situation ne peut pas être si terrible que cela. Monsieur Harding ou madame Gagnon, pensez-vous que le grand public accepte, oui ou non, ce que nous entendons aujourd'hui?

M. Brian Harding:

Je ne lance pas de statistiques. Certains accepteront notre message, d'autres pas. Ceux qui ne nous croient pas pourront venir m'en parler, et je leur expliquerai ce que j'ai observé. La plupart des gens semblent bien se porter dans la plupart des circonstances, mais il y a encore beaucoup de choses qui se trament.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Wagantall, la parole est à vous.

Mme Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, PCC):

Merci à tous les deux d'être des nôtres. Vous parlez de ces questions avec beaucoup d'éloquence, d'honnêteté et de passion. Plus nous vous interrogeons, plus je me rends compte que nous avons beau formuler toutes sortes de recommandations, si la culture militaire ne change pas, ces recommandations n'iront probablement pas trop loin. Je le dis très crûment et en toute honnêteté.

Les représailles à la dénonciation, la crainte des réactions et d'autres conséquences réelles font qu'il est difficile pour les gens de signaler de tels incidents. Si j'étais ministre et que j'étais seule avec vous dans une salle, que me proposeriez-vous, en toute franchise, comme mesures à prendre à tout prix avant que toutes ces autres démarches puissent vraiment avoir un effet?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Nous avons besoin de plus de femmes au sein des forces armées, car plus nous sommes nombreuses, plus nous nous sentons à l'aise de dénoncer de tels incidents. Vous comprendrez que, dans un milieu dominé par les hommes, les femmes semblent agir par instinct de conservation.

Je l'ai fait moi-même. Un jour, quelqu'un est venu me dire que quelque chose de grave s'était produit, et je lui ai répondu: « Eh bien, je ne peux pas venir à ta défense parce que, sinon, je vais me retrouver dans la même situation que toi. » Je ne voulais pas qu'on me considère de la sorte. Toutefois, si les femmes représentent 50 ou 40 % de l'effectif, elles se sentiront plus en confiance. Elles n'auront plus besoin d'être en mode de conservation de soi pour montrer qu'elles sont plus fortes qu'une autre et qu'elles sont du côté des gars. On a alors moins besoin de recourir à ce mécanisme de défense.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Monsieur Harding, qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Brian Harding:

C'est difficile à dire.

Si je devais parler de ces questions, je ne m'adresserais pas au ministre d'Anciens Combattants, mais plutôt au ministre associé de la Défense nationale, qui est le mieux placé pour exercer une influence dans ce dossier.

Parmi les militaires en service, je crois que les valeurs sont en train de changer. Selon moi, c'est surtout un phénomène générationnel attribuable à la transformation de la société canadienne. Cela dit, comme je suis un agent de police à temps plein, je suis au courant de toutes les choses atroces qui se produisent.

Je ne pense pas qu'il existe une solution à 100 %; par ailleurs, je n'ai aucun conseil à donner à ce sujet. Si vous faites allusion plus précisément au traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire, je suis très mal placé pour en parler.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Non, je ne m'y attendais pas non plus.

M. Brian Harding:

C'est cela.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord. Je comprends ce que vous voulez dire.

Marie, vous avez dit qu'il n'y avait pas de renseignements sur le site Web d'ACC. Je veux m'assurer de bien comprendre. Aviez-vous fait une recommandation à cet égard?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Oui, pendant deux ans.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Votre recommandation a-t-elle été retenue?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Oui. Je me suis fait dire que le ministère allait en tenir compte. Quelqu'un a communiqué avec moi il y a quatre mois, mais c'est tout. Je n'ai plus eu de nouvelles.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord. Je ne comprends tout simplement pas pourquoi cela n'a pas été fait. Ce n'est tout de même pas une grosse dépense.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

D'après ce qu'on m'a dit, les services s'adressent à tout le monde, alors nous ne devrions pas...

Pour moi, c'est surtout une question d'équité et d'égalité, n'est-ce pas? L'égalité ne signifie pas nécessairement l'équité...

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

C'est juste.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

... alors, je crois qu'on devrait déployer un peu plus d'efforts en ce sens, d'autant plus que rien dans les photos et les renseignements disponibles ne cible les jeunes femmes de 19 ans, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Exactement. D'accord, merci.

M. Fraser a traité brièvement de la dynamique des démarches visant à former et à équiper les gens. Vous avez parlé des profanes.

Je suis vraiment fascinée par ces situations où des anciens combattants aident des anciens combattants et où des soldats aident d'autres soldats, et par ce genre d'initiative. De toute évidence, nous entendons beaucoup parler de la question de la confiance, particulièrement de la part de vos pairs.

ACC pourrait-il tenter de mettre en oeuvre de telles initiatives ou reconnaître et équiper ces groupes afin de leur faciliter la tâche d'une manière plus...? Non. Dès qu'on est reconnu, on commence à imposer toutes sortes de conditions, et ce n'est pas ce qu'on veut, puisqu'on est de toute évidence plus efficace sans elles.

Comment en suis-je venue à entrer au gouvernement? Je n'en ai pas la moindre idée.

Cependant, envisageriez-vous un cadre à cet égard? Qu'est-ce qui fonctionnerait le mieux?

(1630)

M. Brian Harding:

Ceux qui se préoccupent de manière plus proactive des autres anciens combattants interviendront tout simplement de leur mieux.

Si quelqu'un se fait heurter par une voiture en marchant sur la rue, la plupart des gens s'empresseront de l'aider. Une personne qui connaît les manoeuvres de réanimation cardio-respiratoire sera probablement plus efficace qu'une qui ne les connaît pas. Un grand nombre d'employeurs offrent une formation gratuite ou subventionnée à ce sujet. Je ne dis pas qu'ACC doit mettre sur pied des équipes d'intervention qui ont un quota d'appels à effectuer auprès des anciens combattants et qui doivent en appeler 60 par jour pour voir comment ils se portent, par exemple. Mais il pourrait simplement financer cette formation. Les intéressés se manifesteront. Oui, le taux de rendement sera difficile à déterminer, d'autant plus qu'on cherchera à évaluer quelque chose qui ne se produit pas et qu'il est ardu de prouver un incident qui n'est pas arrivé. Il sera difficile de montrer que les anciens combattants évitent d'en arriver à un état de crise parce que quelqu'un leur vient en aide à temps. Il n'est pas facile de dénombrer les suicides qui ne surviennent pas.

Je ne sais pas si cela pourrait aisément être évalué, vu la manière dont le gouvernement et les ministères aiment quantifier les choses. Par contre, cette formation n'est pas particulièrement onéreuse. Comme je l'ai fait remarquer, des services de premiers soins en santé mentale ont déjà été élaborés à l'intention des anciens combattants. Il faut donc agir de manière plus dynamique, appuyer la formation et appliquer la formation en prévention du suicide.

Je le répète: il faut offrir du soutien. Nous avons des outils: si vous voulez vous en servir, si vous avez servi ou travaillé avec des anciens combattants de quelconque manière, alors manifestez-vous.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est maintenant à M. Graham. Je suppose que vous partagerez votre temps avec M. Eyolfson.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J'ai deux ou trois brèves questions. Je me suis joint au Comité la semaine dernière seulement. Le dossier est donc nouveau pour moi, et je le trouve intéressant, mais pas nécessairement de manière positive. Je vous suis reconnaissant de témoigner pour relater vos histoires.

Brian, vous avez servi en Afghanistan. Je ne suis pas certain de savoir ce que vous avez vécu dans le cadre des opérations. Pouvez-vous nous dire comment la transition s'est effectuée quand vous avez quitté l'Afghanistan? Que s'est-il passé? Quand vous êtes revenu de ce pays, vous a-t-on souhaité la bienvenue, puis dit au revoir? Comment le processus s'est-il déroulé?

M. Brian Harding:

J'ai quitté l'Afghanistan le 24 mars 2009 environ. Nous avons effectué un court vol jusqu'à une base d'étape située au Moyen-Orient où nous avons remis nos fusils, nos munitions et tout l'équipement de combat que nous avions. Une partie de nos effets a été emballée pour être envoyée à la maison. À bord d'un Airbus militaire, nous nous sommes rendus à Chypre, où les Forces canadiennes avaient réservé un hôtel.

Nous y avons séjourné le jour de notre arrivée, trois journées entières et le jour de notre départ. Au cours de la première journée complète, nous avons suivi des séances d'information obligatoires sur diverses questions de santé mentale et de réadaptation. Le lendemain, nous avons poursuivi sur le même sujet pendant une demi-journée, puis nous avons eu quartier libre le reste de la journée et le troisième jour.

Tous les deux jours, un avion plein de nouveaux soldats arrivait et un nouveau groupe partait; c'était donc l'anarchie totale. En fait, ce n'était pas si pire. Avec une bande de soldats qui n'ont pas eu l'occasion de se défouler pendant six, huit ou neuf mois, c'était une fête constante et sans cesse renouvelée. On s'est bien amusés. La formation n'était pas si mal, mais je ne suis pas certain que c'était le moment propice pour l'offrir.

Étant réserviste, quand je suis arrivé à l'aéroport, j'ai été accueilli par quelques membres de mon unité et par mes parents, après quoi je me suis empressé de trouver plusieurs amis pour faire la fête.

J'ai fait l'objet d'un suivi sporadique, principalement de nature médicale, et j'ai eu une rencontre symbolique avec un travailleur social. Si on donne les bonnes réponses aux travailleurs sociaux, ils cochent leurs cases, et on peut partir sans plus avoir à se soucier d'eux. De nombreux membres ne divulguaient rien, et dans bien des cas, ils n'ont pas dévoilé leurs problèmes aux travailleurs sociaux non plus. Nous savons que les troubles de santé mentale peuvent souvent mettre jusqu'à cinq ans pour se manifester après un traumatisme. Je pense que le suivi le plus long dont j'aie bénéficié s'est fait six mois après ma période d'affectation. Il y a peut-être une vulnérabilité à cet égard.

J'ai vraiment eu l'impression que les travailleurs sociaux se contentaient de cocher des cases pour dire qu'ils avaient fait le travail. Ce n'est pas l'intention de ceux qui ont instauré le processus que je remets en question, mais l'efficacité de ce processus et l'absence de suivi sur plusieurs années. Il m'a semblé que très peu d'anciens combattants en crise se trouvent encore dans la phase qui suit immédiatement la période d'affectation. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous aussi des commentaires, madame Gagnon?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

L'évaluation vise seulement les personnes qui prennent part à un combat. Quant à moi, j'étais dans la marine. Il faut demander qu'une évaluation soit faite, voire insister pour l'obtenir. En fait, cela concerne les personnes souffrant d'un trouble de stress post-traumatique en général, et non le personnel de l'équipe de soutien de mission.

Les personnes ne sont pas toutes à l'aise à l'idée de s'adresser à leur commandant pour faire une demande d'évaluation. Ces évaluations font partie des nouvelles procédures, et j'ai tenté de m'assurer qu'elles étaient appliquées à tous, mais cela a été refusé. Seules les personnes ayant déjà servi dans la force opérationnelle peuvent s'en prévaloir.

(1635)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une question pour vous, madame Gagnon.

Le lieutenant-général Vance a fait une déclaration l'année dernière sur les inconduites sexuelles dans les Forces armées. Êtes-vous au courant de ce qu'il a dit à la fin de novembre? Qu'en pensez-vous?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

S'agit-il de la déclaration faite à la fin de novembre?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est celle du 28 novembre 2016.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Parlez-vous de celle concernant le sondage qui venait d'être publié et qui a été mené auprès de 960 personnes?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Ce sondage n'incluait pas les recrues ni les gens qui suivaient un cours pendant environ les deux premières années. Cela représente le pourcentage d'agressions le plus élevé jamais établi, du moins selon les recherches américaines, puisque nous ne disposons pas de telles recherches au Canada.

Bon nombre de personnes ont participé au sondage, mais celui-ci excluait toutes les personnes sorties des forces et celles qui étaient en processus de libération. À mon avis, c'est un peu comme si on menait un sondage pour établir s'il existe un problème de racisme et que l'on retirait de ce sondage toutes les personnes de couleur.

L'exclusion de ces groupes est toutefois mentionnée dans le sondage. On m'a dit que ceux-ci devaient être entendus plus tard, mais cette rencontre n'a jamais eu lieu et on utilise actuellement ce standard dans tous les contextes. Je ne sais même pas si, au bout du compte, on envisage de les rencontrer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une brève question pour vous deux.[Traduction]

Quand vous tentez de parler à une personne dont vous connaissez les intentions suicidaires, que lui dites-vous pour la convaincre de ne pas passer à l'acte?

M. Brian Harding:

Il n'existe pas de recette infaillible. Parfois, je leur parle pendant que quelqu'un d'autre appelle le 911 afin de faire venir la police et une ambulance, et cela a fonctionné en un certain nombre d'occasions. D'autres fois, si j'ai un meilleur rapport avec la personne, je peux me sentir un peu plus confiant et je peux continuer de lui parler en lui laissant le choix. Il n'y a pas de réponse unique. Il faut espérer être en mesure d'établir un rapport avec la personne, de lui inspirer confiance, de lui faire comprendre ce qu'on lui dit et de lui donner une raison de vivre encore un peu.

Mieux ils sont entourés — par leur famille, en particulier —, plus on a de chance de réussir. Mais c'est toujours un coup de dés. Ce n'est pas une situation agréable, et il faut continuellement soupeser le risque. Toutes les 30 secondes, je me demande si la situation a évolué et si je dois maintenant composer le 911.

C'est plus difficile s'ils sont seuls. J'essaie de faire en sorte qu'ils ne soient pas seuls. Une fois qu'ils sont en compagnie d'autres personnes, ils sont normalement en bien plus grande sécurité. Il faut chercher à les ouvrir à l'idée. Bien entendu, j'interviens principalement en ligne ou au téléphone.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci, Brian. Merci. Marie-Claude. Reste-t-il du temps pour Doug?

Le président:

Pas vraiment.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Merci. Je comprends.

Le président:

Mais vous avez posé de bonnes questions.

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Brassard.

M. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vous remercie tous les deux des services que vous avez rendus à notre pays et de votre participation à une discussion très profonde sur les questions que nous abordons aujourd'hui.

Les trois premiers mois au cours desquels j'ai été porte-parole de l'opposition officielle pour les anciens combattants, j'ai effectué des recherches sur vous, Brian. Je sais donc que vous êtes fort actif sur les médias sociaux, tout comme Marie-Claude, d'ailleurs. J'ai remarqué que les groupes et les organisations d'anciens combattants semblent très fragmentés au pays. Un grand nombre d'anciens combattants différents expriment leurs positions sur les médias sociaux. Pour notre part, nous avons discuté de la manière dont nous pourrions réunir l'information qui circule et les préoccupations des anciens combattants dans un seul groupe, si l'on peut dire, afin de faire connaître leurs problèmes. Je me demande si vous pouvez parler de la valeur qu'aurait une seule voix, un seul ancien combattant quand vient le temps de résoudre les nombreux problèmes que vous évoquez, Brian, au chapitre de la prévention du suicide. J'aimerais aussi entendre l'avis de Marie-Claude. Je suis curieux d'entendre ce que vous avez à dire.

M. Brian Harding:

Vous vous êtes peut-être aperçu, monsieur, que j'ai des opinions assez arrêtées. Imaginez un millier de personnes comme moi tentant toutes de s'entendre.

M. John Brassard:

Voilà le défi.

M. Brian Harding:

Il existe de nombreux groupes, dont certains défendent très activement les droits des anciens combattants. Pour sa part, mon groupe est complètement apolitique. Nous ne nous occupons absolument pas de politique, car c'est très dommageable.

Les gens voient les choses différemment. Certains ne peuvent pas se supporter du point de vue personnel, alors que d'autres ne peuvent travailler ensemble. Personnellement, je ne pense pas qu'on puisse fusionner tous les groupes d'anciens combattants et les organisations de défense des droits en une seule entité. On a déjà tenté de le faire, mais cela n'a jamais vraiment fonctionné. Je pense qu'il existera toujours un groupe très disparate de voix cherchant à attirer l'attention. On peut le constater chaque fois qu'ACC tient un sommet des parties prenantes deux fois l'an. J'ai pris part à certains d'entre eux et je m'étonne de ne pas avoir encore assisté à des bagarres.

Tout le monde aura son point de vue. Vous êtes assis là. D'ici, je vous vois d'une certaine manière. D'où elle se trouve, elle vous voit sous un autre angle. En ce qui concerne les questions qu'elle aborde, je conviens que son avis est légitime, mais je ne peux voir les choses de la même manière qu'elle. Pourquoi devrions-nous tous prétendre que nous allons dire la même chose alors que nous ne sommes pas nécessairement équipés pour le faire?

(1640)

M. John Brassard:

Marie-Claude, souhaitez-vous intervenir?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

La Légion a tenté pendant longtemps de jouer ce rôle. Combien de fois avez-vous entendu parler de traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire quand elle nous représentait tous?

À l'heure actuelle, les groupes consultatifs ministériels sont dirigés par quiconque le ministère juge bon de nommer. Combien de personnes comme moi avez-vous vues à la tête de ces comités? Ce n'est jamais notre voix qui se fait entendre. C'est toujours la voix de la majorité et les problèmes communs qui l'emportent. Si on examine toujours les problèmes communs, on ne porte jamais attention à ceux qui passent entre les mailles du système, et ce sont ces personnes que nous tentons d'aider actuellement.

M. John Brassard:

Merci de cette observation.

Brian, il y a un autre sujet à propos duquel je veux vous interroger. Le rapport précédent du Comité sur les aspects de la transition entre le MDN et la vie civile portait sur un service de concierge. L'ombudsman du MDN a également parlé de ce service en soulignant que c'était une mesure facile à réaliser. Concrètement, on proposerait un guichet unique aux membres qui retournent à la vie civile pour qu'on s'occupe de tout pour eux quand ils sont libérés de l'armée.

Je me demande ce que vous pensez de ce service, car je sais que vous avez parlé de la transition en en soulignant les difficultés et en parlant de la perte d'identité. Un service de concierge a toutefois une certaine utilité.

M. Brian Harding:

J'en ai entendu parler sous le nom de service de navigateur. Je ne me souviens pas si c'est le ministre O'Toole ou le sous-ministre Natynczyk qui en a parlé, il y a deux ans, quand les groupes consultatifs ministériels se sont réunis à Charlottetown. Nous avons tous trouvé que c'était une excellente idée, mais pour l'instant, nous nous tournons les pouces en attendant de la voir se concrétiser.

Je pense que c'est une idée formidable. Les anciens combattants ne sont pas nécessairement tous familiers avec tout ce qui s'offre à eux, mais la plupart n'atteindront pas le seuil nécessaire pour faire l'objet d'une gestion de cas active. La plupart quittent l'armée pour telle ou telle raison, peut-être pour une incapacité relativement mineure. Ils peuvent éprouver des difficultés à effectuer la transition; ce n'est rien de catastrophique en soi, mais c'est quand même compliqué à régler. S'ils pouvaient s'adresser à des gens qui s'y connaissent, ce serait formidable.

La Légion offre les services d'officiers d'entraide, ce qui s'apparente beaucoup à ce dont vous parlez, mais cette initiative a été confiée à une organisation de l'extérieur du gouvernement.

Si ACC pouvait offrir de tels services, si on n'attendait pas des employés qu'ils réduisent les coûts, et si les gestionnaires ne recevaient pas de prime quand ils diminuent les dépenses, cela pourrait peut-être fonctionner. ACC devra toutefois bâtir la confiance dans ce dossier avant que les gens se croient les uns les autres s'ils comptent apporter de l'aide au chapitre des services.

M. John Brassard:

Merci. Je n'ai plus rien à ajouter.

Le président:

Vous avez la parole, madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

C'est intéressant. Je continue de vous entendre dire qu'on doit se hâter pour ensuite attendre, ou que vous vous tournez les pouces alors que cette idée est sur la table.

Par exemple, madame Gagnon, vous avez indiqué qu'ACC devra assurer le suivi à ce sujet. Je présume que ce suivi ne semble jamais être effectué. Quel genre de renseignements les Forces canadiennes devraient-elles surveiller et étudier pour réellement comprendre les besoins des anciens combattants qui vivent avec un traumatisme sexuel?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Il lui faudrait d'abord savoir combien d'anciens membres ont été libérés pour des raisons médicales ou sont partis après avoir signalé une agression. Il devrait ensuite déterminer combien d'entre eux ont tenté de présenter une demande à ACC, et combien de demandes ont été acceptées ou rejetées. Il devrait enfin s'informer sur le type de services que les gens ont obtenus. Ce serait là les trois premières étapes.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

J'ai écrit une lettre au ministre. Je ne vous dirai pas lequel. On m'a répondu que chaque membre des Forces canadiennes libéré pour des raisons médicales fait, avant son départ, l'objet d'un processus qui comprend un questionnaire sur les symptômes relatifs à la santé sexuelle et mentale.

Pourriez-vous traiter de la question?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

La santé sexuelle n'est pas un traumatisme sexuel en milieu militaire. Ce questionnaire vise essentiellement à déterminer si une personne peut avoir une dysfonction sexuelle en raison d'un médicament ou d'un TSPT causant une impuissance ou quelque chose comme cela. Voilà ce sur quoi portent les questions. On ne cherche pas vraiment à détecter les traumatismes sexuels. C'est ce qu'on entend par santé sexuelle.

(1645)

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

On met encore l'accent sur les membres des Forces canadiennes de sexe masculin.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Oui. Le questionnaire n'est pas conçu pour déceler les traumatismes sexuels en milieu militaire.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

A-t-on de la difficulté à comprendre et à aider les membres de sexe féminin?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Oui.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Ma dernière question concerne les lettres que j'ai envoyées et le besoin d'aide des personnes à la recherche de soins de santé mentale. On m'a répondu qu'on ne pouvait s'occuper de tout et qu'on dirige les membres vers le système public, ajoutant qu'ils ont toutes sortes d'occasions de suivre une thérapie de groupe.

Que répondez-vous à cela?

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

C'est le Programme de soutien social aux blessés de stress opérationnel qui offre de la thérapie de groupe, à laquelle participent surtout des hommes ayant pris part à des missions de combat. Si on juge bénéfique d'envoyer des hommes qui ont combattu en Afghanistan pour parler ensemble et trouver du soutien, alors c'est équitable, bien entendu. Tout ce que je dis, c'est que ceux qui jouent un rôle au cours des combats pensent qu'il existe une différence entre eux et un policier, par exemple. Ils considèrent leur besoin différent. Mais pour nous, ces services conviennent; nous devons nous joindre à des civils et nous n'avons pas besoin de notre propre groupe. En agissant de la sorte, on s'assure que nous ne pouvons nous réunir et parler. Nous ne pouvons pas tisser de liens et trouver les problèmes que nous avons en commun. C'est en quelque sorte une manière de veiller à ce que nous ne puissions pas établir de rapports entre nous et trouver notre force ensemble.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Cela ressemble beaucoup au fardeau de la preuve que vous avez évoqué plus tôt. Vous devez prouver que c'est arrivé. Vous devez prouver la situation et présenter une panoplie d'éléments extérieurs pour être seulement entendus.

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Prenez le Programme de soutien social aux blessés de stress opérationnel, par exemple. Je sais que vous avez parlé avec Frédéric Doucette il y a un certain temps, et il a indiqué qu'il avait reçu cinq dossiers en 15 ans. J'en ai reçu 200 en deux ans. Il est donc évident que le système en place, qui est censé s'appliquer à tous, ne fonctionne pas pour nous.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Monsieur Harding, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Brian Harding:

Oui. La question du fardeau de la preuve est intéressante. Je suis stupéfait d'entendre Marie-Claude affirmer que les demandes de prestations d'invalidité d'ACC ne seront pas traitées en l'absence de déclaration de culpabilité dans une affaire d'agression alléguée. J'ai vu bien des enquêtes qui n'ont pas donné lieu à une déclaration de culpabilité, mais ce qu'il s'était passé était manifestement clair.

Quoi qu'il en soit, il faut prouver les faits hors de tout doute raisonnable pour qu'il y ait déclaration de culpabilité, et ce, parce qu'une personne subira une conséquence pénale: elle perdra sa liberté, elle aura un casier judiciaire ou elle ira en prison pour les actes posés. Ce n'est pas un fardeau de la preuve qu'il convient d'imposer à quelqu'un qui cherche simplement à obtenir un traitement et des prestations en raison d'un traumatisme ou de victimisation.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci. Voilà qui met fin aux témoignages pour aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais vous remercier tous les deux pour tout ce que vous avez fait aujourd'hui en venant témoigner et pour ce que vous avez accompli pour les hommes et les femmes qui ont servi notre pays. Si vous souhaitez ajouter quoi que ce soit pour étayer vos réponses, faites parvenir vos observations par courrier électronique au greffier pour qu'il nous les transmette.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Marie-Claude a formulé quelques recommandations. J'aimerais savoir si nous pourrions les avoir par écrit.

Le président:

Si vous pouviez nous les envoyer par écrit, à moins que nous ne les extrayions de...

Mme Marie-Claude Gagnon:

Je les enverrai par courrier électronique au...

Le président:

Parfait. Merci.

Nous devons revenir pour examiner les travaux du Comité. Nous prendrons donc une pause de cinq minutes avant de nous réunir de nouveau.

Merci.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on February 06, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.