header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-06-13 PROC 162

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 162nd meeting of the standing committee. Although it says we're in camera, we won't be for a few minutes because we have to do just one thing first.

I'll read the notes from the clerk. They say, “The committee would like to thank the best clerk in the history of the House of Commons”—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:—“and the best researchers.”

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

The Chair: Those are good notes. Thank you.

Actually, what I'd like to do is this. We have a cake here to present which says on it, “Happy Retirement from Filibustering to the Great Parliamentarian from Hamilton Centre.”

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

The Chair: Yes, you can take pictures.

I'll take requests to speak.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Chair, I move that we put the recipe in the Hansard.

The Chair:

There are pictures.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

That is amazing. Who arranged for that? Thank you so much.

An hon. member: You're famous.

An hon. member: Is it bilingual?

The Chair: Oh, yes, we can't present this: It's not bilingual.

An hon. member: It should be in braille too.

An hon. member: Hey, David, if you want to share that cake, it has to be in two languages.

Mr. David Christopherson: I wonder how much sugar is in it.

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

You deserve it. You impress me, you know that?

Mr. David Christopherson:

You're very kind.

Listen, thank you to whoever did this. I'm blown away.

The Chair:

So it goes without saying—and I'll get a speaking list here—that obviously you're a very passionate member. I think you've been very principled. Each of us, in theory, should have one-tenth of the influence on this committee, but I think that's not true. I think you have more than your one-tenth of influence on this committee. There's making a point and there's making a point, and you can certainly make a point very passionately, and although members might often disagree, we think the points you're making are principled—I do, anyway. You believe in them and you're a great asset to this Parliament, and I know there are some people who will add to my comments.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you so much.

When I was appointed deputy House leader, they told me I was on PROC and the only thing I knew about PROC was the filibuster that had happened, and I wasn't looking forward to it.

I came to my first meeting and I had an idea about something, and immediately Mr. Christopherson said, “Oh, the parliamentary secretary came and he's imposing his will on committee,” and I thought, “Oh, my God, what have I gotten myself into accepting this position and coming down here, and how are we going to do this going forward?”

But over the past couple of years, I have been just amazed and have incredible respect for what you do for your constituents and our country. The residents of Hamilton are incredibly fortunate to have someone as passionate and with such great integrity as you. We can disagree with you, but no one can question the integrity with which you raise and bring forward your points, and that you fervently believe in what you bring forward. Without any level of bullshit, you get straight to the point. I had to use swearing in this, and Hamilton can appreciate that.

I'll speak for myself and say that I'm fortunate enough to have a mentor in Jim Bradley. He may not be as loud, but I think he brings that same level of commitment to the point that you'd better not stand between me and my constituents, because you're going to have to go through me. It's something I strive to do, and I appreciate seeing it in this place. You will be incredibly missed in this chamber by all sides of the House.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

(1105)

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

First of all, I was given seven or eight minutes' notice that I'd be doing this, which puts me in mind of Gladstone's famous comment that if he were given a month to prepare a speech, he could deliver a five-minute speech; if he were given a week, he could deliver a 20-minute speech; if he is told immediately beforehand, it could take hours for him to get to his point.

Nonetheless, I do want to say this. First of all, David is a colleague who, as we all know, gets directly to the point, but then can persist in making that point for a very long time.

It's been a pleasure, David, a real pleasure working with you. Other members won't know this, but I have been pestering him about where he is going to live in retirement, because I am hoping to have a chance to hang out, have a beer on his dock, just chat and enjoy the company of a really remarkable colleague.

I did have enough time to ask a few other colleagues about you. I mentioned to them, of course, the fact that you started in municipal politics, and after a successful elected career there, went on to provincial politics, and then from there to federal politics. I asked what people thought of that, and some of my Conservative colleagues thought that it shows you are persistent and determined. I also heard the suggestion that it shows that you are multi-talented. The one I thought was most fitting was the observation that you're just a slow learner.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: You are retiring now, which shows that you've finally learned that it's worth spending as much time as possible with family—something we'll all learn sooner or later. I do hope you get to share some of that retirement time with us, and with me in particular.

Thank you.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

I'll echo what Mr. Reid has said, but I want to say as well that it's been a privilege sitting next to you and that I've had the honour—usually Scott sits here—of sitting between two distinguished parliamentarians who actually know what they're talking about, what this committee is about and what's being done.

Being the new guy on the committee and a rookie, it's been great to hear your observations, comments and experience, as well.

I say this truthfully: You will be missed, and I hope you'll be sitting at that table from time to time, perhaps in the next Parliament, when we need some expertise from the wisdom of the past.

I wish you very well, David. We appreciate all you've done.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, John. I know that.

The Chair:

Mr. Sweet.

Mr. David Sweet (Flamborough—Glanbrook, CPC):

It's good that I am here today, being someone who has shadowed this fine gentleman in Hamilton for some 14 years now. Of course, he predates me by many years.

Let me say this. There are some things that are consistent about David Christopherson. One of them is that he usually does not need a microphone to make his point. Secondly, no one in Hamilton ever wants to follow him on the platform after he has spoken.

I'll tell you, for 14 years, there has never been a partisan word from him, publicly, about me. I hope that I have kept that end of it as well. In fact, on many occasions, Mr. Christopherson has actually stood in front of audiences and commended me, so he is a parliamentarian who understands that, yes, we have to fight vociferously over policies that we sometimes profoundly disagree about, but we're all still human. We all still go home, have issues and wish to try to be dignified and decent human beings together.

That's what is most impressive to me about David Christopherson, and I see in him at home and in his actions in that regard.

His public service has always been like that. I have talked to those who have worked with him on council and who also, apparently, profoundly disagreed with him on many issues, but are still his friends, because of the way he dealt with them personally.

Knowing that, there is one thing that David has repeated to me. He said, “When we're on the ground here, it's about supporting our community—supporting Hamilton.” He's lived by that for all the time I've known him.

(1110)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The first time I encountered David was when I was working for a guy you might have heard of, Scott Simms, on the public accounts committee, where we served very briefly. My observation, because David Christopherson was the chair at the time, was that he was the first chair I had ever encountered who could filibuster his own committee.

I have learned a lot from you, David, and it's been quite fun, because on our first day here—as I have said in the past—we had a fairly tense exchange in our very first interaction, so I thought, “Okay, that's a good start.”

I do want to express some concern that when you leave, whoever replaces you from the NDP on this committee—or if it's multiple people; we'll see—will have your values in making sure that this committee can work in a non-partisan way. There are people in this place, in all parties, who are ruthlessly partisan, in a completely inappropriate way, and you're not.

We've been able to function because I think, on all sides, we have that here. I just want to say how much I appreciate that and how much I learned from you over the last four years of working with you.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

He doesn't predate me, I can tell you that. In 2004, my friend, it was the Paul Martin minority government, and I went from government to opposition to third party and back to government. That's one thing I've got on you—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:—that I've been all around the circle.

There's an old joke in Newfoundland where a Newfoundlander and, I'll say, a Hamiltonian were in the woods one day and a big grizzly bear walked out and growled and showed his teeth. The Newfoundlander bent over and started tying up his shoe and the Hamiltonian asked, “You don't think you're going to outrun that bear, do you?” The Newfoundlander says, “No, I just just have to outrun you.”

The reason I bring up that story is that this is the type of business where we mark our own personal performance by the marching of others. On many occasions I find myself giving my interventions that, one, are at least understood by all and, two, using a cadence that will keep everyone's attention—at least for a short period, until I get my main point out.

David did that with such absolutely astonishing ease. He made it seem so easy. The best professional athletes make their profession look easy, and David does that. He makes this profession look easy, but it's not easy. I've seen him on television and in the House and certainly at committee, and it's the passion that he brings from the grassroots to here. I say “grassroots” in the strictly political sense, from the municipal level to the provincial and now federal level.

I think the past few weeks are a good way to summarize his opinion about how this place should work, because I have noticed with a great deal of angst that what has really driven him to a point of anger, which I didn't see before, was the idea of a dissenting report. Dissension was starting to get under David's skin, and it's still there perhaps. Whether or not we have a dissenting report, I think is a testament to how he wants us all to get along or, as he likes to say, “come along”.

Anyway, David, you will be missed. I had a card for you here.

A Voice: No. We're working on it.

Mr. Scott Simms: Oh, you're working on it. All right.

A Voice: A family card.

Mr. Scott Simms: We're working on a card. All the best, my friend.

I suspect you will not be with title, but certainly with opinion, and one that I hope you never extinguish. David, all the best.

The Chair:

Thank you, Scott.

Before I go to Ruby, I also appreciate the passion with which you continue to make the point that the security of Parliament shouldn't be in the hands of the government. It's a very substantial point. Thank you for that.

Now we'll go to Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I wish I could say I've had as many terms and as much history with you, Mr. Christopherson. My time with you has been short, but it has been very sweet. It has just been this one term. I really wish you would stay longer, so I could have many more terms of experience with you, because my term on this committee has definitely been very enjoyable.

I've learned a lot. You definitely scared me on the first day. I thought what am I doing here? What is happening? After that initial shock wore off, I could see that the words that you speak always come from a place of truth and with a lot of integrity. I have a lot of respect for you. I don't think you'll ever understand the impact that experienced members have on newer members. We walk in your footsteps, and it's nice to see that we can have mentors on different sides of the aisle. Thank you for helping all the junior members along the way this first term.

You'll always be remembered in this place. I hope we're able to live up to always speaking our mind no matter what the circumstances, and feeling good about ourselves at the end of the day. I'm sure you have no problem sleeping at night because you have always made your position clear. I think that's really important and people respect a politician who comes to this place and does not forget the people who brought them here and what they believe.

(1115)

[Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I'll now add a bit of French to this discussion. [English]

That's good for you. You will miss that in Hamilton, the French.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh![Translation]

You may recall that I first met you at a meeting of the Standing Committee on National Defence, when I was replacing a colleague. At that time, I was impressed by how you promoted your ideas, but above all by your understanding of the issues. Obviously, you knew how to advocate for your interests and argue.

When I joined the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs in September—I was the last member appointed—you impressed me once again. We were studying Bill C-76, and I had the impression that I was taking a course on filibustering. You certainly promote and debate your ideas with conviction, and you deserve full credit for it.

As Ms. Sahota said, we learn a great deal from observing our more experienced colleagues and from never losing sight of our objectives and the interests of our constituents.

Thank you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I wanted to ask Mr. Christopherson, and perhaps Mr. Simms if I could ask him.... We talked about your progression from the municipal level to the provincial and federal levels, which begs the question: What's next? Is it the UN or the CSA?

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's not the Senate.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: When I speak, I'll discuss that.

The Chair:

Can I have permission from the committee to go a few minutes into the bells?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you.

Mr. Scott Reid:

David, you've been to Centre Block as much as anybody. Is there not a delay?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's a delay of about one and a half to two seconds.

Mr. Scott Reid:

So it's nothing essential, okay. It's very handy having this. Now we can gauge with greater accuracy for getting up there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's always there, but it's not on.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Wasn't it in our old digs over at 112 north? There was an old TV there, wasn't there?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

There are two TVs on the top of the cabinet.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible--Editor] said that we should look at what we should do the next time.

Mr. John Nater:

We won't be there, I think. That's my understanding.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We won't, or they won't?

Mr. John Nater:

In theory the room itself won't be there.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The room itself will be disassembled and replaced with something.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It could be a supply closet.

Mr. John Nater:

Only the heritage rooms will be 100% preserved.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That somewhat, to some degree, was developing into a heritage room. In the woodwork, it had those carved insignia of the various services. It was on it's way to becoming a—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

That's why it had the hop leaves and grapes. It was the bar.

(1120)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is that right? That was the bar? Is that for real?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

That's why there were grapes and hop leaves as a border around the top of the room.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We have good conversations in this committee.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I remember grapes, for sure. I don't remember the grape leaves, but okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You had to look up a little higher.

Mr. David Sweet:

In the previous Parliament, I chaired the veterans affairs committee, and we dedicated 112 north to the Canadian veterans. That's why we had the parliamentary carver do all the symbols on the walls for all of the branches of the armed forces to honour them. There was quite the fanfare with the Speaker, etc., to dedicate that room, and our hope was that it would be retained as a memorial to our veterans.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's the kind of thing that you wouldn't be aware, David, but we passed a resolution in this committee. It was reported in the House, but it hasn't been adopted yet though, has it?

The Chair:

Which one?

Mr. Scott Reid:

On Centre Block.

The Chair:

No, and in fact maybe you should speak to your House leader, if we can get consent to do that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You should ask again, then. I think you would find you'd have consent.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Before I do I would like to expose the.... I hope you take it in a lighthearted way, but we asked our spokesperson to be the front of our presentation to you and this card. If a spokesperson would like to—

The Chair:

Kevin Lamoureux.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We thought we'd come full circle. That was the first day.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Kevin does present a challenge to the photographers of Canada.

The Chair:

Every committee member, obviously, has given commendations, which, in itself, is a testimony because everyone had great commendations.

I would give you the opportunity to respond, Mr. Christopherson. Do you have any last words for Parliament? But it's not a filibuster.

Mr. David Christopherson:

“Goodbye” would be the end of the sentence.

You almost have me speechless, which is quite the accomplishment. I'm blown away. I just confess that, for all the passion I bring to the issues, I don't handle emotional issues real good. This just overwhelms me. Nothing means more to me than words like you've given today, words from colleagues who walk in the same shoes. No matter how close you are, it's not until you've walked in those shoes and know what it's like to be a parliamentarian that you fully understand, when fellow parliamentarians compliment you, what it means, especially when they're people you respect.

I've been blessed, especially this last Parliament, with being on two committees whose mandates I thoroughly enjoy: public accounts and PROC. It's also given me an opportunity to spend time with some of the finest parliamentarians that I've met. The hardest thing for us to do is to climb past partisanship, yet it's the critical part where we actually make a difference, where we find a way to move forward for the country—that ability to set that aside. I'm guilty of not doing it all the time, too, because our passions do drive us, but at the end of the day, that ability means everything.

With the people I've been able to serve with, the two chairs that I've served under—you, Mr. Larry Bagnell, and Mr. Kevin Sorenson.... I've been blessed with fantastic chairs who were only interested in the best for Parliament and Canada.

I thank all of you.

I thank my fellow Hamiltonian, David Sweet. We know that nobody gets up every day and says, “What can I do for Hamilton”, unless they're Hamiltonians themselves. I've always believed that when we're on home turf, it's important for those of us from different parties to make their city the priority and that we, as much as possible, come here and have a united front on the issues that matter. When we disagree, we do it respectfully. If we're going to have a knock-down, drag-'em-out fight, we do it here in the context of Parliament. However, when we go home, we're home, and we treat each other with respect. That means a lot.

I can't address everyone individually, as I know that I don't have enough time, but, Mr. Reid, definitely you'll be the first invitation to that dock, and I'll have a cold one ready for you, sir.

There are a number of people who I'm looking forward to continuing to work with.

I'll just also mention that on the issue of parliament's security that matters to us, Mr. Blaney today, who was the minister at the time, just stopped by me after our public accounts committee—I don't think I'm telling tales out of school; I hope not—and said to me, “Look, you need to understand that, at the time, we were under a lot of pressure. There were a lot of crises. I think we made the wrong decision. I think we made a mistake. I want you to know that if I'm here in the next Parliament, I'm committed to changing that and putting it back to the way it should be.”

I know that people like Mr. Graham and others care about that, and that's a good sign. It means a lot because it's the way Parliament should run.

Just to end, I was asked if I'm going to still be around. Yes. It turns out that sitting around on the public accounts committee for 15 years suddenly qualifies you as an expert. There are people around the world who would like me to come and do some work with their public accounts committees and their auditor general systems, and I'm now on the board of directors of the Canadian Audit and Accountability Foundation. It's the main non-profit NGO that we use at the public accounts committee for their expertise and assistance. I'll be joining their team and travelling. So, I'll be continuing to do that. Hopefully it's not more than half time. I still want to put my feet up for the other half. I'm tired: I've been working for 50 years, and that's sufficient.

Those are my plans going forward. However, I'm also aware that plans, like war plans, change. The first thing that goes out the window when the war starts is the plan, so we'll see what actually happens.

What I would like to do, if you'll allow me, is.... This is very difficult. You guys have really, really thrown me for a loop. What's interesting is.... You mentioned the filibuster, and a lot of you have commented on the non-partisanship. I have a present that speaks to both those issues. It speaks to the filibuster, but it also speaks to non-partisanship and extends beyond us as parliamentarians.

You all know Tyler Crosby, who is without question, in my view, the most amazing staff person on the Hill, bar none. You often see me talking to him. He's my right hand. I couldn't do this job without him, at least not the way I'd like to. However, he's not always there. Sometimes he nips out to get something, and then I have nobody else. It's just me here, right?

(1125)



Yet, when we were in a filibuster, when it was time to unite and fight the good fight, those lines didn't matter, and the partisanship didn't matter.

The Hill Times actually had a picture. I'll just read the cutline that goes with it. It says, “NDP MP David Christopherson consults with an opposition staffer ahead of resuming the filibuster at the House Affairs Committee on April 5. He alone spoke eight hours in all that day, and for another four hours on April 6.” The other person in that picture is Kelly Williams.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: I want to present to Kelly a frame of that picture as an indication of the way that we can be non-partisan not only as politicians but as staffers.

I thank you for the unpaid work that you did for me. You assisted me to do what I did.

With that, colleagues, there aren't enough words to properly say what this has meant to me. This will stay with me forever. You really touched me in a way that I can't express, and I thank you very much. It means everything to me.

The Chair:

Does the committee want to do any work on the reason we're here, or do you want to go to the vote?

Scott Reid: Do we have to go to the vote if we adjourn, or can we have some cake?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: We should suspend.

The Chair: You want to suspend?

Mr. Scott Reid: Suspending is a better idea. You're right.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: We can suspend for awhile.

The Chair: Okay, we'll suspend, and then we'll come back in camera and hold our discussion. We'll have cake now.

Is that okay? Anything else? Good.

The meeting is suspended.

(1125)

(1135)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 162nd meeting. For the first time, Kevin's been allowed in the room by David Christopherson without David blasting him.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Mr. Lamoureux, every member of the committee has said nice things about David, so we invite you to add to the record before we go to vote.

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg North, Lib.):

Yes, thank you very much, Mr. Chairperson. I understand you said this was the 162th meeting. I can honestly say that I think I was there for the first three, and then I had this wonderful experience. David and I have gotten to know each other over the years, and I've always seen him to be a very strong, powerful advocate for democracy in many different ways. And, can he ever filibuster. I learned that a number of years ago, and I trust that my colleagues who are on the PROC committee were able to witness how David has that art, and he exercises it exceptionally well.

David, I think, partisanship aside, that you will indeed be missed, as you are a great parliamentarian. I always like to consider myself first and foremost a parliamentarian, and I see you as a peer, as someone who has contributed immensely not only to this committee but also on the floor of the House of Commons. I just want to wish you and your wife the very best in the years ahead. For some reason I don't think we've heard or seen the last of you, but now that David is leaving the House, who knows? Maybe if am the PS next go-round, I might actually return. I haven't missed my absence, I must say that. I rather enjoyed the proceedings of the House. But I do wish you, on a personal note, the very best in the years to come.

Thank you very much, and thank you for allowing me to be here.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Before we go back in there, I have a motion.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

With respect to Mr. Christopherson, be it resolved that he's a jolly good fellow, which nobody can deny.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

All in favour?

A voice: I don't know if David heard the motion.

The Chair: Did you hear the motion, David?

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, I didn't. No.

The Chair:

Oh, you didn't vote for it yet.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's just resolved, with regard to Mr. Christopherson, that he's a jolly good fellow, which nobody can deny.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Oh, wow. I've now achieved it. There's the phone call.

The Chair:

Passed unanimously.

We are suspended again.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 162e séance du comité permanent. L'ordre du jour indique que nous sommes à huis clos, mais nous ne le serons pas avant quelques minutes, car nous avons d'abord quelque chose à faire.

Je vais lire les notes du greffier. Elles se lisent comme suit: « Le Comité aimerait remercier le meilleur greffier de l'histoire de la Chambre des communes »...

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président:...« et les meilleurs analystes. »

Des députés: Bravo!

Le président: Ce sont de bonnes notes. Merci.

En fait, voici ce que j'aimerais faire. Nous avons ici un gâteau à offrir, sur lequel il est écrit: « Happy Retirement from Filibustering to the Great Parliamentarian from Hamilton Centre ».

Des députés: Bravo!

Le président: Oui, vous pouvez prendre des photos.

Je vais prendre les demandes d'intervention.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, je propose que la recette soit publiée dans le hansard.

Le président:

Il y a des photos.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

C'est extraordinaire. Qui a organisé cela? Merci beaucoup.

Un député: Vous êtes célèbre.

Un député: L'inscription est-elle bilingue?

Le président: Ah c'est vrai, nous ne pouvons pas en offrir: l'inscription n'est pas bilingue.

Un député : Elle devrait aussi être en braille.

Un député : David, si vous voulez partager ce gâteau, l'inscription doit être dans les deux langues.

M. David Christopherson : Je me demande quelle est sa teneur en sucre.

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Vous le méritez. Vous m'impressionnez, est-ce que vous le saviez?

M. David Christopherson:

C'est très gentil.

Écoutez, merci à la personne qui a organisé cela. Je suis époustouflé.

Le président:

Il va donc sans dire — et j'aurai une liste d'intervenants — que vous êtes de toute évidence un député très passionné. Je pense que vous êtes un homme de principes. En théorie, chacun d'entre nous devrait avoir un dixième de l'influence sur ce comité, mais je crois que ce n'est pas le cas. Je crois que vous comptez pour plus d'un dixième de l'influence au sein de ce comité. Il y a différentes façons de faire valoir un point de vue. Vous pouvez certainement le faire avec beaucoup de passion. Même si les membres du Comité sont souvent en désaccord, nous pensons que les points que vous soulevez sont fondés sur des principes — du moins, c'est ce que je crois. Vous croyez en vos principes et vous êtes un grand atout pour le Parlement, et je sais que d'autres voudront renchérir.

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Lorsque j'ai été nommé leader parlementaire adjoint, on m'a dit que je siégerais au comité de la procédure. La seule chose que je savais au sujet de ce comité avait trait à l'obstruction qui s'y était produite, et je n'avais pas hâte d'y siéger.

Je suis venu à ma première séance et j'avais une idée à proposer. Immédiatement, M. Christopherson a dit: « Oh, le secrétaire parlementaire est venu et il impose sa volonté au Comité ». Je me suis dit: « Mon Dieu, pourquoi ai-je accepté ce poste et comment allons-nous faire pour aller de l'avant? »

Toutefois, au cours des dernières années, j'ai été tout simplement épaté et j'ai un respect incroyable pour ce que vous faites pour vos électeurs et pour notre pays. Les résidants de Hamilton ont une chance incroyable d'avoir quelqu'un de si passionné et d'aussi intègre que vous. Nous pouvons ne pas être d'accord avec vous, mais personne ne peut remettre en question l'intégrité avec laquelle vous soulevez vos arguments, et le fait que vous croyez fermement en ce que vous avancez. Sans aucune « bullshit », vous allez droit au but. J'ai dû dire un gros mot ici, et je crois que Hamilton peut le comprendre.

Je vais parler en mon nom et dire que j'ai la chance d'avoir Jim Bradley comme mentor. Il n'est peut-être pas aussi bruyant, mais je pense qu'il apporte le même niveau d'engagement au point qu'il vaut mieux ne pas vous mettre entre moi et mes électeurs, parce que vous allez devoir me passer sur le corps. C'est quelque chose que je m'efforce de faire, et je suis heureux de le voir au Parlement. Vous nous manquerez énormément en Chambre, peu importe le parti.

Des députés: Bravo!

(1105)

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Tout d'abord, on m'a donné un préavis de sept ou huit minutes, ce qui me rappelle le fameux commentaire de Gladstone selon lequel s'il avait un mois pour préparer un discours, il pouvait en faire un de cinq minutes; s'il avait une semaine pour le préparer, il pouvait en faire un de 20 minutes; mais si on l'informait à la dernière minute qu'il devait faire un discours, il pouvait mettre des heures pour en arriver au fait.

Néanmoins, je tiens à dire ceci. Tout d'abord, David est un collègue qui, nous le savons tous, va droit au but, mais qui peut ensuite s'obstiner à le dire pendant très longtemps.

David, cela a été un plaisir, un vrai plaisir, de travailler avec vous. Les autres membres ne le savent pas, mais je l'ai talonné à propos de l'endroit où il va passer sa retraite, parce que j'espère avoir l'occasion de passer du temps avec lui, de prendre une bière sur son quai, de bavarder et de profiter de la compagnie d'un collègue vraiment remarquable.

J'ai eu le temps d'interroger quelques collègues à votre sujet. Je leur ai mentionné, bien sûr, le fait que vous avez commencé en politique municipale, et qu'après une carrière d'élu réussie, vous êtes passé à la politique provinciale, puis à la politique fédérale. J'ai demandé aux gens ce qu'ils en pensaient, et certains de mes collègues conservateurs pensent que cela montre que vous êtes persévérant et déterminé. J'ai également entendu dire que cela démontre que vous avez de multiples talents. L'observation la plus juste est à mon avis celle suggérant que vous apprenez lentement.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: Vous prenez maintenant votre retraite, ce qui indique que vous avez enfin compris qu'il vaut la peine de passer le plus de temps possible en famille, ce que nous comprendrons tous tôt ou tard. J'espère que vous aurez l'occasion de passer une partie de votre temps à la retraite avec nous, et avec moi en particulier.

Merci.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je me ferai l'écho des propos tenus par M. Reid, mais je tiens aussi à dire que cela a été un privilège de siéger à vos côtés et que j'ai eu l'honneur — habituellement, Scott siège ici — de siéger entre deux éminents parlementaires qui savent de quoi ils parlent, qui comprennent le mandat de ce comité et ce qu'on y accomplit.

En tant que nouveau membre du Comité et recrue, j'ai été ravi d'entendre vos observations et vos commentaires et de vous entendre parler de votre expérience.

Je le dis en toute sincérité: vous nous manquerez, et j'espère que vous siégerez à cette table de temps en temps, peut-être au cours de la prochaine législature, lorsque nous aurons besoin de l'expertise et de la sagesse du passé.

David, je vous souhaite bonne chance. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants pour tout ce que vous avez fait.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, John. Je le sais.

Le président:

Monsieur Sweet.

M. David Sweet (Flamborough—Glanbrook, PCC):

Je suis ravi d'être ici aujourd'hui. J'ai moi-même suivi cet homme à Hamilton pendant environ 14 ans. Bien entendu, il me précède de beaucoup d'années.

Bon, voici ce que je voulais vous dire. Certaines choses ne changent pas chez David Christopherson. D'abord, il n'a pas souvent besoin de microphone pour faire valoir son point de vue. De plus, personne à Hamilton ne veut prendre la parole après qu'il a eu son tour au micro.

Je peux vous assurer qu'au cours des 14 dernières années, il n'a jamais fait un seul commentaire partisan à mon sujet en public. Je crois que cela a été réciproque de ma part. En fait, à plusieurs reprises, M. Christopherson m'a félicité devant des auditoires. C'est un parlementaire qui comprend que bien que nous ayons des prises de bec au sujet de politiques qui nous divisent profondément, nous sommes tous humains. Nous rentrons tous à la maison à la fin de la journée, nous avons chacun nos problèmes et nous tentons tous de faire preuve de bonté et de dignité.

C'est ce que j'admire le plus chez David Christopherson. Ce sont des qualités qui le caractérisent ici et dans sa circonscription.

Son service public est étayé par ces mêmes qualités. J'ai parlé à des gens qui ont siégé avec lui au conseil et qui, apparemment, étaient parfois en profond désaccord avec lui sur de nombreuses questions, mais qui sont tout de même demeurés bons amis en raison des bonnes relations interpersonnelles qu'il entretenait.

Cela étant dit, David Christopherson m'a souvent répété une chose. Il me disait: « Lorsque nous nous trouvons sur le terrain, nous devons appuyer notre collectivité, nous devons appuyer Hamilton. » Depuis que je le connais, il a toujours appliqué ce principe.

(1110)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La première fois que j'ai rencontré David Christopherson, je travaillais pour le comité des comptes publics avec un certain Scott Simms, vous le connaissez peut-être. Nous y avons travaillé très brièvement. David Christopherson était le président du comité à l'époque, et il est le seul président que j'ai rencontré qui pouvait faire de l'obstruction à son propre comité.

Vous m'avez beaucoup appris, monsieur Christopherson. Cela a été vraiment agréable. Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, lors de votre première journée ici, nous avons eu un débat assez houleux et je me suis dit: « Bon, c'est un bon début. »

J'aimerais toutefois vous faire part de l'une de mes inquiétudes. J'espère que la personne qui vous remplacera à ce comité pour représenter le NPD, ou les personnes, on verra bien, partagera vos valeurs et veillera à ce que le comité soit non partisan. Certains députés, tous partis confondus, sont des partisans implacables, de façon tout à fait inappropriée, mais vous n'êtes pas l'un d'entre eux.

Je crois que ce comité fonctionne bien parce que tous les partis arrivent à faire fi de toute partisanerie. Je tenais à souligner que j'en suis très heureux et que j'ai beaucoup appris de vous au cours des quatre dernières années.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Il ne me précède pas, je peux vous l'assurer. En 2004, alors qu'il y avait un gouvernement minoritaire sous la tutelle de Paul Martin, je suis passé du gouvernement, à l'opposition, au troisième parti, pour enfin revenir au gouvernement. Sur ce, je vous ai damé le pion...

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms:... et j'ai bouclé la boucle.

Il y a une blague terre-neuvienne qui va comme suit. Un Terre-Neuvien et, disons, un Hamiltonien se promènent dans les bois un beau matin lorsqu'un grizzly sort de la brousse et se met à grogner et à montrer les dents. Le Terre-Neuvien se penche et se met à attacher ses chaussures. Le Hamiltonien lui demande: « Tu ne penses pas pouvoir courir plus vite que l'ours quand même? » Le Terre-Neuvien lui répond: « Non, je dois seulement courir plus vite que toi. »

Je vous raconte cette blague parce que l'environnement dans lequel nous travaillons nous oblige à comparer notre rendement à celui des autres. À maintes reprises, je me suis surpris à faire des discours qui sont, premièrement, compris par tous et qui, deuxièmement, sont assez bien rendus pour retenir l'attention de tout le monde, du moins, pendant un certain temps, soit jusqu'à ce que je fasse valoir mon argument.

David Christopherson le fait avec une aise absolue. Cela semble être si facile. Les meilleurs athlètes professionnels nous donnent l'impression que leur travail est facile, et c'est exactement ce qu'il fait. Il nous donne l'impression que cette profession est facile à faire, bien qu'on sache que ce n'est pas le cas. Je l'ai vu à la télévision, à la Chambre et, bien sûr, au Comité. Partout, il fait preuve d'une passion qui se transpose de la base jusqu'ici. Je peux bien dire « base » au sens strictement politique, soit du municipal au provincial et maintenant au fédéral.

Je crois que les dernières semaines résument bien son point de vue au sujet de la façon dont cet endroit devrait fonctionner. J'ai remarqué chez lui beaucoup d'angoisse qui a entraîné une véritable colère, chose que je n'avais jamais vue, et ce en raison du rapport dissident. La dissension lui puait au nez, et c'est peut-être toujours le cas d'ailleurs. Que nous ayons un rapport dissident ou non, cela témoigne de la collaboration qu'il souhaite voir, ou comme il le dit « faire front commun ».

Bref, monsieur Christopherson, vous allez nous manquer. J'avais une carte pour vous.

Une voix: Non. On y travaille.

M. Scott Simms: Ah, on y travaille. Très bien.

Une voix: Une carte de famille.

M. Scott Simms: On prépare une carte. Je vous souhaite tout le bonheur possible, mon ami.

Vous n'aurez probablement plus de titre, mais vous aurez certainement encore des opinions, qui, je l'espère, seront toujours tout aussi enflammées. Je vous souhaite tout le bonheur du monde, monsieur Christopherson.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Simms.

Avant de céder la parole à Mme Sahota, je comprends la passion avec laquelle vous défendez la sécurité du Parlement, à savoir qu'elle ne devrait pas se retrouver entre les mains du gouvernement. C'est une question importante. Merci de la souligner.

Passons maintenant à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aurais aimé pouvoir dire que j'ai eu beaucoup de mandats et une longue histoire avec vous, monsieur Christopherson. Le temps que j'ai passé avec vous a été court, mais cela a été un véritable plaisir. Il n'y a eu qu'un seul mandat. J'aimerais vraiment que vous restiez plus longtemps, afin que je puisse travailler à vos côtés longtemps encore, car mon mandat au sein de ce comité a été très agréable.

J'ai beaucoup appris. Vous m'avez vraiment fait peur le premier jour. Je me suis dit, mais qu'est-ce que je fais ici? Que se passe-t-il? Après que ce choc initial se soit dissipé, j'ai compris que vous parlez toujours avec beaucoup de sincérité et d'intégrité. J'ai beaucoup de respect pour vous. Vous ne comprendrez sûrement jamais l'impression que des députés chevronnés peuvent avoir sur les nouveaux venus. Nous marchons sur vos traces, et c'est agréable de voir que nous pouvons avoir des mentors de tous les partis. Merci d'avoir aidé tous les nouveaux membres au long de ce premier mandat.

On se souviendra toujours de vous ici. J'espère que nous serons à la hauteur de vos attentes: que nous serons toujours capables d'exprimer notre pensée, quelles que soient les circonstances, et que nous pourrons nous sentir bien dans notre peau à la fin de la journée. Je suis certaine que vous dormez toujours sur vos deux oreilles parce que vous dites toujours ce que vous avez sur le coeur. C'est très important selon moi, et les Canadiens respectent un politicien qui vient ici sans toutefois oublier les gens qui l'ont élu et ce en quoi ils croient.

(1115)

[Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Je vais maintenant rajouter un petit peu de français à cette discussion. [Traduction]

C'est bien pour vous. Cela vous manquera à Hamilton, le français.

Des députés: Oh, oh![Français]

La première fois que je vous ai rencontré, si vous vous rappelez, c'était lors d'une réunion du Comité permanent de la défense nationale, alors que je remplaçais un collègue. À cette occasion, vous m'aviez impressionnée par la façon dont vous défendiez vos idées, mais surtout par la maîtrise de vos dossiers. De toute évidence, vous saviez défendre vos intérêts et argumenter.

À mon arrivée en septembre dernier au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre — la dernière à y être nommée —, vous m'avez de nouveau impressionnée. Nous étions en train d'étudier le projet de loi C-76 et j'ai eu l'impression de suivre un cours sur comment faire de l'obstruction systématique. Il ne fait aucun doute que vous défendez et débattez vos idées avec conviction, ce qui est tout à votre honneur.

Comme le dirait Mme Sahota, nous en apprenons effectivement beaucoup à observer nos collègues plus expérimentés et à ne jamais perdre de vue nos objectifs et les intérêts de nos citoyens.

Je vous remercie.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aurais une question pour M. Christopherson, et peut-être M. Simms, si je peux... Nous avons parlé de votre progression du municipal au provincial et ensuite au fédéral, ce qui soulève la question suivante: quelle est la suite? Est-ce l'ONU ou les services secrets?

M. David Christopherson:

Ce n'est pas le Sénat.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson: Je vais en parler lorsque j'aurai la parole. 

Le président:

Est-ce que le Comité me donne la permission de poursuivre la séance quelques minutes pendant que la sonnerie retentit?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président : Merci.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur de Burgh Graham, vous vous êtes rendu à l'édifice du Centre autant que quiconque. N'y a-t-il pas un décalage?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a un décalage d'environ une seconde et demie, ou de deux secondes.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce n'est rien d'essentiel alors. C'est très pratique. On peut mieux juger du temps qu'il nous faut pour monter à la Chambre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est toujours là, mais ce n'est pas allumé.

M. Scott Reid:

On avait cela dans notre vieille salle de réunion 112 nord, non? Il y avait une vieille télévision, n'est-ce pas?

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Il y a deux télévisions au-dessus du classeur.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible] que nous devrions nous pencher sur la procédure pour la prochaine fois.

M. John Nater:

Nous ne serons plus ici, je crois. C'est ce que j'ai compris.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous, ou eux?

M. John Nater:

En théorie, la salle même ne sera plus là.

M. Scott Reid:

La salle sera complètement démantelée et remplacée par quelque chose d'autre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela pourrait être un placard à fournitures.

M. John Nater:

Seules les salles patrimoniales seront préservées à 100 %.

M. Scott Reid:

Cette salle devenait en quelque sorte une salle patrimoniale, on y trouvait des emblèmes gravés de divers services. Elle allait devenir une...

M. Chris Bittle:

C'est pourquoi il y avait des feuilles de houblon et des raisins. C'était le bar.

(1120)

M. Scott Reid:

Ah oui? C'était le bar? Est-ce la vérité?

M. Chris Bittle:

C'est pourquoi il y avait des raisins et des feuilles de houblon qui ceinturaient le plafond.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous avons de bonnes discussions à ce comité.

M. Scott Reid:

Je me souviens des raisins. Je ne me souviens pas des feuilles de vigne, mais bon.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il fallait lever les yeux un peu plus haut.

M. David Sweet:

Lors de la dernière législature, j'étais le président du comité des anciens combattants et nous avons dédié la salle 112 nord aux anciens combattants canadiens. C'est pourquoi nous avons demandé au sculpteur du Parlement de graver ces symboles sur les murs qui représentaient les branches des Forces armées canadiennes, nous voulions leur rendre hommage. Il y a eu toute une célébration avec le Président de la Chambre, etc. Nous voulions leur dédier cette salle et nous espérions pouvoir en faire un espace commémoratif pour nos anciens combattants.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous n'êtes certainement pas au courant, monsieur Christopherson, mais nous avons adopté une résolution à ce comité. La résolution a été déposée en Chambre, mais elle n'a pas encore été adoptée, pas vrai?

Le président:

Laquelle?

M. Scott Reid:

Sur l'édifice du Centre.

Le président:

Non. En fait, vous devriez peut-être en parler à votre leader à la Chambre, à savoir si nous pouvons obtenir le consentement pour le faire.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous devriez alors poser la question à nouveau. Je crois que vous obtiendrez le consentement.

M. Scott Simms:

Avant de le faire, j'aimerais parler d'autre chose. J'espère que vous ne le prendrez pas mal, mais nous avons demandé à notre porte-parole de livrer notre discours et cette carte. Si un porte-parole veut bien...

Le président:

Kevin Lamoureux.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous pensions avoir bouclé la boucle. C'était le premier jour.

M. Scott Reid:

M. Kevin Lamoureux représente un défi pour les photographes au Canada.

Le président:

De toute évidence, tous les membres du Comité ont fait des éloges, ce qui, en soi, est un témoignage. Tout le monde avait de grands éloges à faire.

J'aimerais vous donner l'occasion de répondre à vos collègues, monsieur Christopherson. Avez-vous un dernier mot à dire au Parlement? Sachez que ce n'est pas de l'obstruction.

M. David Christopherson:

Au revoir sera la fin de ma phrase.

Je suis presque sans mot, ce qui est tout un exploit. Je suis estomaqué. Je dois vous avouer que, même si je suis passionné sur bien des enjeux, je ne gère pas très bien mes émotions. Je suis dépassé par les événements. Rien ne m'importe plus que ce que vous m'avez dit aujourd'hui, à titre de collègues qui vivent les mêmes choses que moi. Peu importe à quel point vous êtes près d'une autre personne, tant que vous ne vous êtes pas mis dans les souliers d'un parlementaire et que vous ne savez pas ce que c'est que d'être un parlementaire, vous ne pouvez pas comprendre entièrement la portée des compliments de vos collègues parlementaires, et ce que cela signifie, surtout lorsque les compliments viennent de collègues que vous respectez.

Au cours de la dernière législature en particulier, j'ai eu la chance de siéger à deux comités dont les mandats me plaisent énormément: celui des comptes publics et celui de la procédure. Siéger à ces comités m'a également donné l'occasion de passer du temps avec certains des meilleurs parlementaires que j'aie rencontrés. La chose la plus difficile à faire pour nous, c'est de passer outre la partisanerie. Or, cela est essentiel pour changer les choses et pour envisager l'avenir de notre pays. Moi-même je n'ai pas toujours réussi à le faire, parce que nos passions nous mènent, mais, au bout du compte, cette capacité à passer outre la partisanerie fait toute la différence.

J'ai servi avec des collègues et sous l'égide de deux présidents, à savoir vous, monsieur Bagnell, et M. Kevin Sorenson. J'ai eu la chance d'avoir des présidents de comités fantastiques qui ne désirent que ce qu'il y a de mieux pour le Parlement et le Canada.

Je vous remercie tous.

Je remercie David Sweet, mon collègue d'Hamilton. Nous savons que personne ne se lève tous les jours en se disant: « Que puis-je faire pour Hamilton? », à moins de vivre à Hamilton. J'ai toujours cru que lorsque nous sommes à la maison, tous les députés, peu importe leur parti, devraient faire de leur ville leur priorité, afin que, si possible, nous revenions ensuite ici au Parlement, unis, pour parler des enjeux qui importent. Lorsque nous ne sommes pas d'accord, nous nous traitons quand même avec respect. Si nous devons mener une lutte acharnée, nous le ferons ici, au Parlement. Cependant, lorsque nous rentrons à la maison, nous sommes chez nous et nous nous traitons avec respect. Cela signifie beaucoup pour moi.

Je ne peux m'adresser à tout le monde individuellement, car le temps me manque. Par contre, monsieur Reid, vous serez certainement le premier que j'inviterai à venir me rejoindre sur mon quai, et j'aurai une bière fraîche qui n'attendra que vous.

Il y a un certain nombre de personnes avec qui j'ai hâte de continuer à travailler.

J'aimerais également parler d'un enjeu qui me préoccupe, à savoir la sécurité au Parlement. Aujourd'hui, M. Blaney, qui était ministre à l'époque, est passé me voir après notre séance du comité des comptes publics — je ne crois pas trahir de grands secrets, du moins je l'espère — il m'a dit: « Écoutez, vous devez comprendre qu'à l'époque, nous avions beaucoup de pression sur les épaules. Nous faisions face à beaucoup de crises. Je crois que nous avons pris la mauvaise décision. Je crois que nous avons fait une erreur. Je veux que vous sachiez que si je siège à la prochaine législature, je désire changer cela et remanier le système, afin de faire les choses comme il se doit. »

Je sais que des collègues tels que M. Graham et d'autres s'en préoccupent. C'est un bon signe. C'est très important, car c'est ainsi que le Parlement devrait fonctionner.

Pour conclure, on m'a demandé si j'allais rester dans les parages. Oui. Il s'avère que siéger au comité des comptes publics pendant 15 ans vous qualifie tout d'un coup d'expert. Il y a des gens partout dans le monde qui aimeraient que je vienne travailler avec leur comité des comptes publics et leur bureau de vérification générale. D'ailleurs, je siège désormais au conseil d'administration de la Fondation canadienne pour l'audit et la responsabilisation. Il s'agit de la principale ONG sans but lucratif à laquelle le comité des comptes publics fait appel pour son expertise et son aide. Je vais me joindre à leur équipe et voyager avec elle. Je continuerai donc à m'impliquer dans le domaine. J'espère que ce ne sera pas plus qu'un travail à temps partiel, car j'aimerais bien me reposer le reste du temps. Je suis fatigué. Je travaille depuis 50 ans, et cela est suffisant.

Voilà mes plans pour l'avenir. Cependant, je sais aussi que les plans changent, tels les plans de guerre. Lorsque la guerre commence, le plan est la première chose qui est jetée aux oubliettes. Nous verrons donc ce qui se passera réellement.

Si vous me le permettez, ce que j'aimerais faire, c'est... C'est très difficile. Vous m'avez réellement décontenancé. Ce qui est intéressant, c'est que... Vous avez parlé de l'obstruction et nombre d'entre vous ont parlé de la non-partisanerie. J'ai un cadeau qui traite de ces deux enjeux. Ils nous ramènent à l'obstruction, mais aussi à la non-partisanerie et va au-delà des parlementaires.

Vous connaissez tous Tyler Crosby. Il est selon moi sans contredit, le membre du personnel le plus extraordinaire de la Colline, sans exception. Vous me voyez souvent lui parler. C'est mon bras droit. Je ne pourrais pas faire ce travail sans lui, du moins pas comme j'aimerais le faire. Toutefois, il n'est pas toujours à mes côtés. Parfois, il sort pour aller chercher quelque chose, et je me retrouve alors seul. Il n'y a que moi ici, n'est-ce pas?

(1125)



Malgré cela, lorsque nous étions dans une période d'obstruction, qu'il était temps de s'unir et de se battre, les lignes de parti et la partisanerie n'avaient plus d'importance.

Le Hill Times avait une photo. Je vais vous lire la légende qui accompagnait cette photo. On peut y lire: « Le député néo-démocrate David Christopherson consulte un employé de l'opposition avant de reprendre l'obstruction au comité des affaires de la Chambre, le 5 avril. Lui seul a parlé huit heures ce jour-là, et encore quatre heures le 6 avril. » L'autre personne sur cette photo est Kelly Williams.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson: Je tiens à offrir un exemplaire encadré de cette photo à Mme Williams, afin de prouver que nous pouvons parfois passer outre la partisanerie, pas seulement comme politicien, mais aussi comme membre du personnel.

Je tiens à vous remercier pour le travail non rémunéré que vous avez accompli pour moi. Vous m'avez aidé à faire mon travail.

Cela dit, chers collègues, les mots me manquent pour exprimer correctement ce que vos paroles représentent pour moi. Elles resteront gravées dans ma mémoire pour toujours. Vous m'avez réellement touché d'une façon que je ne peux pas expliquer. Merci beaucoup. Cela signifie tout pour moi.

Le président:

Les membres du Comité désirent-ils se pencher sur la raison de notre présence ici aujourd'hui, ou souhaitez-vous aller voter?

M. Scott Reid: Devons-nous aller voter si nous ajournons la séance ou pouvons-nous manger du gâteau?

M. David de Burgh Graham: Nous devrions suspendre la séance.

Le président: Vous désirez suspendre la séance?

M. Scott Reid: Il est préférable de suspendre la séance. Vous avez raison.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Nous pouvons suspendre la séance un court instant.

Le président: D'accord, nous allons suspendre la séance, avant de revenir à huis clos pour poursuivre notre discussion. Nous pouvons manger du gâteau maintenant.

Cela vous sied-il? Quelqu'un désire-t-il prendre la parole? Bien.

La séance est suspendue.

(1125)

(1135)

Le président:

Soyez à nouveau les bienvenus à la 162e séance. Pour la première fois, M. Christopherson a permis à M. Lamoureux d'être dans la pièce sans l'attaquer.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président: Monsieur Lamoureux, tous les membres du Comité ont eu des éloges à propos de M. Christopherson. Nous vous invitons à ajouter votre grain de sel avant d'aller voter.

M. Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg-Nord, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je vous ai entendu dire que cette séance est la 162e. Pour être franc, je crois avoir siégé aux trois premières, et c'était une expérience formidable. Au fil des ans, M. Christopherson et moi avons appris à nous connaître. J'ai toujours vu en lui un ardent et un fervent défenseur de la démocratie, et ce, à maints égards. C'est sans parler de cette capacité à faire de l'obstruction. Je l'ai appris il y a quelques années. Je suis certain que mes collègues du Comité ont été témoins de sa maîtrise de l'art de l'obstruction. Il y excelle.

Cela dit, je pense, sans égard à la partisanerie, que vous nous manquerez en effet, car vous êtes un excellent parlementaire. Je me considère toujours comme un parlementaire avant tout, et je vous vois comme un pair, comme quelqu'un qui a grandement contribué non seulement aux travaux de ce comité, mais aussi aux débats de la Chambre des communes. Je vous offre à vous et à votre femme mes meilleurs vœux pour les années à venir. J'ai l'impression toutefois que ce n'est pas la dernière fois qu'on vous verra ou qu'on vous entendra, mais maintenant que M. Christopherson quitte le Parlement, qui sait? Si je suis nommé à nouveau secrétaire parlementaire lors de la prochaine législature, je reviendrai peut-être. Je dois dire que cela ne m'a pas manqué. J'ai beaucoup aimé participer aux procédures de la Chambre. Cela dit, sur une note personnelle, je vous souhaite le meilleur pour les années à venir.

Merci beaucoup, et merci de me permettre d'être ici parmi vous.

M. Scott Reid:

Avant de retourner à la Chambre, j'aimerais déposer une motion.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

À propos de M. Christopherson, qu'il soit résolu qu'il est un bon camarade, ce que personne ne peut nier.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Tout le monde est en faveur de la motion?

Une voix: Je ne sais pas si M. Christopherson a entendu la motion?

Le président: Avez-vous entendu la motion, monsieur Christopherson?

M. David Christopherson:

Non.

Le président:

Oh, la motion n'a pas encore été mise aux voix.

M. Scott Reid:

À propos de M. Christopherson, qu'il soit résolu qu'il est un bon camarade, ce que personne ne peut nier.

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, j'ai tout accompli. J'entends l'appel.

Le président:

La motion est adoptée à l'unanimité.

La séance est suspendue à nouveau.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 13, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.