header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-06-06 INDU 167

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(0915)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Okay, everybody. We only have an hour today, so we'll skip the preliminaries and get right to it.

Welcome to the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology. We pursue the reference from Wednesday, May 8, on the study of M-208 on rural digital infrastructure.

Today we have with us from the CRTC, Christopher Seidl, executive director, telecommunications; Ian Baggley, director general, telecommunications; and Renée Doiron, director, broadband and network engineering.

From the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association, we have Robert Ghiz, president and chief executive officer; and Eric Smith, vice-president, regulatory affairs.

From Telesat Canada we have Daniel Goldberg, president and chief executive officer; and Michele Beck, vice-president of sales, North America.

Welcome, everybody. We have a very short agenda today so you each have five minutes for your presentation and then we'll go into our rounds of questions. We'll be starting off with the CRTC, Mr. Seidl.

Mr. Christopher Seidl (Executive Director, Telecommunications, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

We appreciate this opportunity to contribute to your committee's study of M-208. This study addresses important areas within the scope of Canada's telecommunications regulators, being Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada as a spectrum regulator, and the CRTC.

Reliable and accessible digital infrastructure is indispensable to individuals, public institutions and businesses of all sizes in today's world, regardless of where Canadians live.[Translation]

That's why, in December 2016, the commission announced that broadband Internet is now considered a basic telecommunications service.

The CRTC's universal service objective calls for all Canadians to have access to fixed broadband at download speeds of at least 50 megabits per second (Mbps) and upload speeds of 10 Mbps, as well as an unlimited data option.

As well, the latest mobile wireless technology not only needs to be available to all homes and businesses, but also along major Canadian roads. Our goal is to achieve 90% coverage by the end of 2021 and 100% as soon as possible within the following decade. We want all Canadians—in rural and remote areas as well as in urban centres—to have access to voice and broadband Internet services on fixed and mobile wireless networks so they can be connected and effectively participate in the digital economy. Reaching this goal will require the efforts of federal, provincial and territorial governments, as well as of the private sector.[English]

We're taking action on multiple fronts to realize that goal. One of our most important initiatives this year is the CRTC broadband fund. The commission established the fund to improve broadband services in rural and remote regions that lack an acceptable level of access. The broadband fund will disburse up to $750 million over the first five years to build or upgrade access in transport infrastructure by fixed and mobile wireless broadband Internet services in underserved areas.

The contributions to the broadband fund are collected from telecommunications service providers based on their revenue.

The fund is meant to be complementary to, but not a replacement for, existing and future private investment and public funding. Up to 10% of the annual amount will be provided to satellite-dependent communities. Special consideration may also be given to projects targeted to indigenous or official language minority communities.

Earlier this week, we launched the first call for applications for funding from the broadband fund for projects in Canada's three territories as well as in satellite-dependent communities. According to the latest data, no households north of 60 currently have access to a broadband Internet service that meets the CRTC's universal service objective. Only about one quarter of major roads in the territories are covered by LTE mobile wireless service.

The digital divide is also evident in satellite-dependent communities across the country where there is no terrestrial connectivity.

Canadian corporations of all sizes: provincial, territorial and municipal government organizations; band councils and indigenous governments with the necessary experience or a consortium composed of any of these parties can apply for funding.

The CRTC will announce the selected projects from the first call for applications in 2020. A second call, open to all types of projects and all regions in Canada, will be launched this fall.

The CRTC's fund is only one part of the work that must be accomplished by the public and private sectors. To this end, we noted in the most recent federal budget a commitment of $1.7 billion in new funding to provide high-speed Internet to all Canadians. The government intends to coordinate its activities with the provinces, territories and federal institutions such as the CRTC to maximize the impact of these investments.

We support the government's efforts to the extent we can under our mandate and status as an independent regulator.

Mr. Chairman, even with the financial support from the CRTC broadband fund or other public sources, some Internet service providers may still face challenges and barriers that limit their ability to improve broadband access in rural and remote areas.

(0920)

[Translation]

For this reason, we are planning a new proceeding related to rural broadband deployment. We will examine factors such as the availability of both rural transport services and access to support structures. These services are crucial to expand broadband Internet access and to foster competition, particularly in rural and remote areas. Extending broadband to underserved households, businesses and along major roads is an absolute necessity in every corner of the country—including rural and remote areas.

Extending broadband to underserved households, businesses and along major roads is an absolute necessity in every corner of the country—including rural and remote areas.

Access to digital technologies will enhance public safety and enable all Canadians to take advantage of existing and new and innovative digital services that are now central to their daily lives.[English]

I'd be pleased to answer any of your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move on to the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association.

Mr. Ghiz.

Mr. Robert Ghiz (President and Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association):

Thank you very much.[Translation]

Good morning.

Thank you for giving us the opportunity to speak here this morning.[English]

Motion M-208 asked this committee to study fiscal and regulatory approaches to encourage investment in rural wireless infrastructure.

Since Canada launched wireless services, Canada's facilities-based providers, the companies that invest capital to build networks and acquire spectrum rights, have embraced the challenge of building Canada's wireless network infrastructure across our country's vast and difficult geography.

To date, Canada's facilities-based wireless carriers have invested more than $50 billion to build our wireless networks. This is more, on a relative basis, than any other country in the G7 or Australia. They have also spent approximately $20 billion at spectrum auctions and in annual spectrum licence fees. Our members are also funding the new CRTC broadband fund.

As a result of these investments, Canadians enjoy the second-fastest networks in the world, twice as fast as those of the United States. According to the CRTC, 99% of Canadians have access to LTE wireless networks where they live.

While this is a great achievement, much work remains. In just the last few months we have seen announcements of significant investments that will bring increased coverage to rural areas.

For example, Bell announced expansion of its fixed wireless services to more than 30 small towns and rural communities in Ontario and Quebec. Rogers announced investments of $100 million to bring mobile wireless coverage for 1,000 kilometres of rural and remote highways across Canada. Similar investments are being made by regional wireless providers, such as Freedom Mobile, Vidéotron, Eastlink, Xplornet and SaskTel.

Unfortunately, investment, especially in rural areas, faces an uncertain future. As motion M-208 recognizes, regulation can encourage investment but can also have the opposite effect. [Translation]

Unfortunately, investment, especially in rural areas, faces an uncertain future. As motion 208 recognizes, regulation can encourage investment. But it can also have the opposite effect.[English]

Canada's telecommunications policy has long recognized the importance of facilities-based competition as the best way to encourage investment. Under policies supporting facilities-based competition, sustainable competition in the wireless retail market is starting to gain momentum, resulting in continuing growth in the number of wireless subscribers, increased data consumption, declining prices and more choice for consumers.

Equally important, ongoing investment by Canada's facilities-based carriers is continuing to expand the reach of Canada's wireless networks for both fixed and mobile wireless services. Yet at a time when the government is stressing the importance of continuing to invest in and expand wireless infrastructure and when they are introducing targeted fiscal measures towards this goal, government is considering measures that, if they proceed, will discourage investment and disproportionately harm rural Canadians.

Earlier this year, ISED issued a proposed policy direction that would direct the CRTC to give priority to the goals of increased competition and more affordable prices when making regulatory decisions. We support these goals, but we were surprised by the absence of any mention of investment in infrastructure by facilities-based carriers.

During the consultation period, we've asked the minister to revise the policy direction to include a reference to encourage investment in infrastructure as a key priority for the CRTC. At the same time, as part of its review of the regulatory framework for the wireless industry, the CRTC has stated its preliminary view that mobile virtual network operators or MVNOs should be given mandated wholesale access to the wireless networks of the national wireless providers.

MVNOs do not invest in wireless infrastructure or spectrum. Rather, they pay wholesale rates set by the regulator to use the facilities-based carriers' networks and use this mandated access to compete against facilities-based carriers for subscribers—the very carriers that are making the investments and expanding the networks.

In countries where this has been tried before, it has resulted in significant decreases in network investment. Those same countries are actually now trying to reverse course.

The CRTC has twice previously declined to mandate MVNO access, knowing it would undermine investments in wireless networks. It is not clear why it is now being considered, especially when both ISED and the CRTC have made connecting all Canadians such a large priority.

(0925)



If government truly believes that connecting Canadians is such a major priority, policies should be aligned with this goal. With respect, today's policy confusion will only harm rural connectivity. We want to work with government. We want to work with the CRTC to ensure that the 99% of coverage goes to 100%, and that Canadians can have access to the best wireless networks in the world.

Thank you very much. We look forward to your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Moving on to Telesat Canada, Mr. Goldberg, you have five minutes.

Mr. Daniel Goldberg (President and Chief Executive Officer, Telesat Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for inviting Telesat to participate today. Thanks also to each of the members of this committee for their commitment to improve rural broadband connectivity and to bridge the digital divide in Canada.

It would be difficult for my colleagues and me at Telesat to overstate how strongly we share your objective to deliver in a timely manner affordable, state-of-the art Internet connectivity to the millions of Canadians who lack it today. The good news is that Telesat has a concrete plan to do just that, and we can deliver. Telesat is one of the largest, most innovative and most successful satellite operators in the world. We have a proud 50-year history of delivering mission-critical satellite services to enterprises and governments operating throughout the world, including, of course, right here in Canada, where we started. We have offices and facilities across the globe, but our corporate headquarters is just down the hill on Elgin Street. That's where we fly our global satellite fleet, do all of our R and D and advanced engineering, and otherwise run our business in the highly competitive, rapidly evolving global communications services market. We invite any one of you to come down the street and visit us at our headquarters.

In addition to the millions of Canadians lacking high-quality broadband connectivity, there are another roughly four billion people in the world on the wrong side of the digital divide. Connecting them all is an enormous technical, operational and financial challenge. It's also a critical public interest objective, as well as a compelling business opportunity, for the companies that have the expertise and the ambition to take it on.

Telesat has been working intently on solving this challenge. I'm pleased to say we're on the cusp of moving forward with the most innovative, advanced, powerful and disruptive global broadband infrastructure ever conceived. That's not hyperbole. Specifically, we've designed a constellation of roughly 300 highly advanced satellites flying approximately 1,000 kilometres above the earth. The satellites, which will be connected to each other using optical laser technology, are in a patent-pending, low-earth orbit architecture—hence the term LEO. Picture a fully meshed, highly flexible, space-based Internet infrastructure capable of delivering terabits of fast, affordable, reliable and secure Internet connectivity anywhere in the world, including every square metre of Canada. It's a highly innovative design developed by Telesat's world-class engineers.

Our current satellites are in geostationary orbits nearly 36,000 kilometres above earth. Although there are many benefits from this, a big drawback is the amount of time it takes for signals to travel to and from our satellites. That signal delay is called latency. It's not a big deal when used for broadcasting TV shows to households, but it's a very big deal when trying to provide the kind of super-fast, low-latency broadband you need to surf the Internet, engage in e-commerce or use other Internet applications like e-health and distance education. Low latency is going to be even more critical in a 5G world. By moving the satellites roughly 30 times closer to earth, our LEO constellation can deliver connectivity with latency equal to, or better than, that which fibre or terrestrial wireless services can achieve.

At Telesat, we don't provide broadband service directly to consumers. Instead, we provide a broadband pipe to telephone companies, mobile network operators and ISPs, who then provide the last-mile connection to rural consumers and other users. Telesat's LEO constellation will support delivery of affordable Internet connectivity with minimum speeds matching the CRTC-mandated 50 megabits down, 10 megabits back, and it can readily reach gigabit speeds. Telesat LEO will also help wireless carriers to economically extend the boundaries of where they can provide both LTE and 5G.

We plan to select a prime contractor to build the Telesat LEO constellation in the coming months. Our objective is to start launching satellites in 2021, begin service in Canada's north in mid-2022 and commence full global service in 2023.

Although other companies—including Amazon, SpaceX and SoftBank—also have plans to develop LEO constellations, Telesat has a significant competitive advantage by virtue of our deep technical resources, strong track record of innovation and unsurpassed commercial and regulatory expertise.

(0930)



In this regard, Telesat’s LEO constellation represents not only the best opportunity to definitively bridge the digital divide, but also a unique opportunity for a Canadian company—and the Canadian space industry more broadly—to take the lead in the burgeoning new space economy. That, in turn, will promote sustainable high-tech job creation and economic growth throughout the country for years to come.

With industry and government working together, the Telesat LEO constellation will revolutionize the delivery of high-performing, affordable broadband service throughout Canada and the rest of the world. It will also place Canada at the forefront of the new space economy.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We're going to move right into questions.

We're going to start with Mr. Amos. You have seven minutes.

Mr. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Thank you. I'll be sharing my time, if there's any left, with Member Graham. I'm going to be very clipped in my questions; we only have a very short period of time.

My first question is to our hard-working public servants at the CRTC. Thank you for being here.

My 41 mayors in the Pontiac are very frustrated with the state of Internet. Our constituents are extremely dissatisfied. When I knock on doors, this is a top issue. I would be telling an untruth if I didn't say that the disappointment was palpable when I had to inform constituents that the first call for applications for the CRTC broadband fund was only open to the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Can you please explain that?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

Absolutely. We defined the first call for applications for the territories plus satellite-dependent communities—in other words, the north, where we felt the need was the greatest. That's the start of the commission's approach.

We did announce that we will be having a call in the fall for the rest of Canada, including all regions of Canada and all project types—be it transport, access or mobile—following the first call. We wanted to really address the areas where we felt the need was the greatest, which was the north, including those satellite-dependent communities. In 2016 we set aside a maximum of 10% of the fund for those satellite-dependent communities. We wanted to start there as a first step to get some decisions out quickly, and then look at the larger problem in the rest of Canada—again, including the north.

(0935)

Mr. William Amos:

I appreciate that. I have questions in the back of my mind. Perhaps this could be responded to in writing. On what basis was that determination of greatest need made? It can't have been made on a population basis. I'm just trying to channel the frustrations of so many constituents and mayors. I don't mean to direct it toward the CRTC as an institution, but to the situation.

The CRTC's “Let's Talk Broadband” report was finalized in December of 2016. At that time, it was announced that there would be a fund established—all good ideas. It's taken a very long time to get to this point right now, where my constituents and my mayors look at me and say that they still can't even apply for funding through the CRTC.

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

We do run all our proceedings through an open public process where everybody has a voice—it's very transparent—to get that decision out and get the best solution out there from everybody involved. That obviously does take some time. We had a few processes to get to where we are now. I think we've probably gone as fast as we could have on any of those activities.

We do share the desire to get broadband everywhere, but it is a shared responsibility. We are only one piece of the solution for the $750 million. In 2016, and many times, we said that it's a shared leadership from private and public sectors; all levels of government have to step up to the table to solve the digital divide.

Mr. William Amos:

To go specifically to the issue of cellular coverage, which has become a major discussion point, particularly around public safety.... This national capital region and my riding of Pontiac have gone through two tornadoes and two floods in the last three years. Your remarks this morning do not address the issue of cellular.

I wonder to what extent you think that gaps in wireless coverage...so people can use mobile telephones for any reason, including public safety.... To what extent do you feel like we're on the right path now toward addressing that, with the $750-million fund and the investments that have been made available by our government?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

In my opening remarks I did mention a few times that our basic service includes mobile. I think we're one of the first countries that includes mobile as part of our basic service where everybody should have that—not just in households, but on all major roads in Canada. We have that included in our eligible projects in both calls for applications that we have identified.

I think it's very important to get that in place. We do have fairly extensive coverage right now. There are still people without it, but we're at 99.4% coverage of mobile right now—98.5% for the latest technology—for households. About 10% of our major roads are not covered right now, so that is certainly a public safety issue that needs to be addressed. Obviously, that's where the business case is the hardest for anybody—to build out those long stretches of highway. As I mentioned, only 25% in the north carries.... That would be one of our first calls, in an area where there are long stretches where people don't have any connectivity and no other services around. It really is an issue that is exacerbated in that area.

Mr. William Amos:

I have two minutes. I don't want to completely run out the clock, so I'll pass it over to member Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you. I appreciate it.

To Mr. Ghiz, it's very rare that I'll say this, but I think I agree with everything you've said. With the [Inaudible—Editor], that doesn't happen too often. I appreciate having this opportunity.

When the CRTC mandate Minister Bains announced recently talked about competition, my concern was: what is the point of competition, if you don't have service to begin with? The biggest issue I have is this. Mr. Amos' riding and my riding are neighbouring. Together, they are much larger than Belgium. It's a very big territory. I have entire communities that have neither Internet nor cellphones. How do we get those communities connected on cellphones, so that emergency services, as Mr. Amos was talking about, don't have to meet at city hall every hour, and then go back out onto the ground? What's the fastest path to getting proper coverage of all our small towns?

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

Great question.

You heard from the CRTC, and us. It's not easy, and doesn't always make economical sense. I think government now, and in the past, has been on the right path, in terms of supporting facilities-based carriers, because they're the ones that build the networks. Has coverage increased fast enough for everyone? I like to say that when we use the number 99%, with 35 million Canadians, that means there are still 350,000 Canadians who don't have access. You don't hear from the 34 million or 32 million who have it. You hear from the ones who don't have it.

What we need to do, moving into the future, is look at regulations—and this is why this motion is important—on how that connectivity is going to happen that much faster. I've listed a couple of things, but the announcement of the capital cost allowance was extremely beneficial, and encouraged investment to happen. We have the connect fund at ISED, which is very good. We have the CRTC fund, which our members are funding. Provinces have their own funds. Some municipalities have their own funds, such as EORN.

I think the key to all of that is coordination amongst them all, and also flexibility in the funds. SaskTel is one of our members. I was talking to them the other day. They have a large province. They want to see flexibility in these funds, so that broadband includes fixed wireless as well.

(0940)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to move on to Mr. Albas.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to all our witnesses for coming and sharing your expertise with our committee today.

I'd like to start by addressing something I heard today and something that has come up recently. First of all, to the CRTC, Mr. Amos has expressed frustration with the choice of starting with many of those rural and remote northern communities. Considering that many of them have very little, if no, coverage, because of market failure or cost, I can see why you'd want to start there. People who live that far away are Canadians too, and deserve to have the benefit of those kinds of programs. We should always be mindful of putting those who have the least first.

The government has announced a clawback of 3,500 MHz spectrum currently owned by, among others, Xplornet, which we heard from on Tuesday. When I asked about the impacts, they said they would be significant. I know the government has made some slight alterations to their plan, but it's still a major clawback.

I think it's somewhat absurd to study rural connectivity and not address the fact that a government decision may have cut off the Internet connections of thousands of rural customers. I'm prepared to move a motion to study this, but I'm also aware of the lack of time to do so, with the end of session fast approaching.

I think we must engage with the fact that we're talking about ways to increase rural connectivity, but the government is reducing it. In my opinion, we should at least make reference to the decision, and its impacts, in the report, or find out from the affected companies how many people will be affected by this policy choice.

I want to ensure the witnesses who made time for the committee have a chance to answer questions, so I'm going to end there. I hope the Liberal members who are clearly concerned about rural connectivity are willing to address the fact that the government may have just put a hatchet to it.

To the CRTC, I'm hoping you'll further indulge me for a quick second. A colleague has a constituent paying an extra $2.95 administration fee on their bill. They were told by their local provider that it's a mandated CRTC charge that only applies to a specific geographic area. If you can't answer this, could you please get me in touch with someone in your organization, so we can talk about the issue?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

Do you know what the bill item is for?

Mr. Dan Albas:

It just says “admin fee” on the line item, and when the constituent phoned and asked, they said that the CRTC mandated that to their local area to collect that fee and gave no further explanation.

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

Where we have tariffed services—this is going back in time now a little bit—local calling regions were extended. There were additional costs associated with that, where we regulated the rates that the incumbent had to provide, and they were allowed to charge extra to extend that local calling to a wider region. That might be what it is.

Mr. Dan Albas:

It may be something that the CRTC may want to revisit in terms of transparency so that people can know, because it just says “admin fee” and all people are told is a government body told the local provider to put it on there. I think there should be sufficient transparency on this.

To the CWTA, Mr. Ghiz, thank you for being here.

The minister of ISED said yesterday he did not know where the tipping point is for prices and investment. At what point would the revenue from customers be too low to discourage facility investment? What is the tipping point of your members?

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

I'm not going to get into direct costs with our members, but I will say this: the tipping point is looking at the overall public policy. The overall public policy that we've had in Canada now for the last 10 or 15 years, since a policy directive came down in 2006 by the previous government that has been followed through by this government, is that investment by facilities-based carriers is extremely important. If you've looked at what's happened through this program, you have the three national providers, and now you have all these regional providers across the country. What the regional providers are doing is providing more competition, which is allowing prices to go down while also encouraging all members to expand their network so that they can gain new customers.

Just to demonstrate how well it is working right now, in the last quarter, out of all new net subscribers, Freedom and Vidéotron received 84% of those new subscribers, so it's showing that it is working.

I used this in my speech the other day at the telecom conference. It's like your doctor giving you a prescription, an antibiotic, for a cold you had. We had a cold; we had a problem with our wireless coverage and prices across the country. You're given that antibiotic, you take it for four days, and then you think the problem's gone away, even though the prescription said seven days, so you get sicker.

What I'm saying is that we're still in that process of taking our antibiotics to ensure that we can have great networks with reasonable prices in our country. It is working, and we just need more time to allow that to continue.

(0945)

Mr. Dan Albas:

We're studying rural wireless access here, and that is crucial. However, as my colleague has said, access does not mean much if it's too expensive. What kind of guarantees can we get from you and your organization, particularly your members, that expansion of service will not be met with hugely increased fees?

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

I think you have to look at it. Our members are not going to go out to build in communities if they're not going to price it at a level that people are going to pay for. I think you get markets that will dictate what will happen, and what you will see is, because you have the new entrants and the three national providers involved, competition is leading to lower prices. I like to point out that, if you look between 2014 and 2018, believe it or not, the price for a gigabit of data has gone down by approximately 54%. It is working, and our members want to continue to build out. They want to work with government, the CRTC and municipalities, but flexibility is going to be a key in that.

Mr. Dan Albas:

We certainly all want to have world-class speed and access, but it's clear that, to virtually all Canadians, prices are a barrier to that access. The best coverage in the world does not mean a lot if people can't afford the service. I certainly don't want this to be an argument over these things.

How do you think we can work, government and industry, to see where we have both affordability and access to Internet?

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

That's a great question and great point. We believe in quality coverage and affordable prices. The mechanisms that we have in place today are leading towards those lower prices, but now is not the time to pull a 180 and move in a direction that will hurt our new entrants in delivering the competition that will deliver those more affordable prices.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Masse.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here.

Under testimony at another committee, the new Minister of Rural Economic Development has said that none of this motion will be made through either legislation or regulation. That was clarified. I was quite surprised by that, but they are important discussions that we're having. Some of these matters still have time to be done, but unfortunately, the government doesn't seem prepared to support that.

Having said that, I want to clarify something. The CRTC, with regard to your submissions today, talked about download speeds of at least 50 megabits per second, Mbps, and upload speeds of 10 Mbps. The original investment is 25 and five. Can you clarify that? You presented here today the overall of 50 and 10, but my understanding is that you've allowed 25 and five. Is this not correct?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

The universal service objective is 50/10 Mbps as a minimum. We want all Canadians to have that. In 2016, we indicated that some very remote regions may require incremental steps to get there. To allow for that, we'll be accepting applications that do not meet the 50/10 initially, but would be able to get there eventually.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's going to create quite a problem, though, because obviously that service requirement of 25/5 is a lot less and has technical problems. Is that to rural and remote communities? Are they communities that are identified, for example, as more indigenous areas? Are they more remote? What are the sacrificed areas? Quite frankly, if you're not willing to live up to your own objectives, why would the private sector actually have any incentive to do that?

(0950)

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

The design of the fund is such that it's a competitive process, so projects will be evaluated and we will be selecting only the high-quality projects. It's not tied to any specific regions. Of the projects that come in, the projects that get selected will have the high quality, the meeting of the universal service objective at 50/10 and the quality of service aspects, and—very important—unlimited data option, as well. I would expect that we may not select anything below 50/10, but we'll have to see what projects we get.

Mr. Brian Masse:

If you do, at 25/5 it'll have unlimited buffering. That's what's going to be happening with the users. Quite frankly, if $750 million was announced with regard to the 2016 decision to reorient the money that's being collected, I find it hard to believe that we'd build a second-class-citizen system in place right now. What's the duration of time that an applicant will get if they can actually have their speeds right now? What's going to be the timeline to meet what the rest of Canadians are going to be delivered in terms of the 50/10?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

Our goal is to get everyone to 50/10, and the government has also indicated that, by 2030, it wants everybody at that particular target, and that's what we're working toward as well.

Mr. Brian Masse:

How long will they have from the 25/5 to the 50/10?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

There are people without broadband right now, and we're working to get them all there by 2030. That's the certain timeline right now.

Mr. Brian Masse:

This is completely outrageous. You don't even have a deadline for that. We're building a second-class-citizen system here.

I want to move to the spectrum auction coming on. Both the Conservative and Liberal governments have $20 billion of play money with regard to actually getting...and no actual cost. They have direct revenue from spectrum auction out there, and now we're going to actually build a second-class-citizen system.

I would like to move to Mr. Ghiz, with regard to the facilities-based auction. Can you outline that a little bit more? Part of this is that we've had a cash grab for the spectrum auction as a primary element, and you're suggesting a different type of auction.

I'd like you to detail that with regard to infrastructure being included as part of the bidding process.

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

In terms of the spectrum, what I was talking about with regard to the directive was around ensuring that infrastructure is involved in there. When it comes to spectrum, you're right. We believe that the fees that are being charged to our members are some of the highest in the world. That's happening in Canada. That's money that's directly going to be charged back to customers.

Mr. Brian Masse:

In other words, it affects your price.

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

Yes, it does. I think that, if we could look at a way to reduce spectrum fees, reduce spectrum auction costs, that would be something that would be beneficial in the long run, or as you've pointed out—and I've read some of your comments in the past—use that money to directly help connect Canadians.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I think that is the missing part of the equation that Canadians fail to understand—the $20 billion that we've received, really, for basically selling the skies and creating toll roads in the skies for consumers versus that of actually getting the infrastructure out there. The $750 million—let's be clear on this—is going to be collected from the companies as well, so that additionally will be rolled into prices for Canadians. Basically, $21 billion is out there as a public policy to collect for government revenue and for services versus actually achieving those objectives. I find, quite frankly, the CRTC's decision to do this quite offensive, given the fact that we have these opportunities.

I do want to return to the 10%. What 10% of the country is going to be left out? You said 90% by 2021. What 10% has been identified? What are those regions? We should know specifically those regions. I want to know where that 10% is located.

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

Right now we have the information on our website; the maps indicate which regions are below the universal service objective. Part of that solution will be based on where the private sector goes; where other public funding extends the network and where—

Mr. Brian Masse:

I don't want the website. Tell Canadians, right now, what 10% of the country. Some of them can't even go on the website since they don't have service, so tell the country right now. What's that 10% that is going to be, basically, forsaken?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

Well, in a general sense, it's really in the more remote regions of Canada, in the rural regions of Canada, and we need to address that.

Mr. Brian Masse:

How can you address that, then? Is the mandate you have not strong enough? What was the decision for basically carving off the 10%? It seems ridiculous to not finish the last 10% if we're actually saying that we're going to have it for everybody. What are you missing as a mandate, then, to get the whole country under this type of an umbrella?

(0955)

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

We're a part of the solution. We are stepping up to the table to get the $750 million out. We're looking to get everybody at that level. It does take time to build these networks—

Mr. Brian Masse:

Has there been an economic analysis done to say basically what you need for that 10%? I think it's a fair question. I mean, if we want to have this goal, and we say we're going to have it as a country, what do you need to get it done?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

The estimates are $8 billion to $9 billion total of investment. The Internet will continue to grow and evolve. I expect that there will be more requirements. As we get to other technologies, there will be more investment requirements. This is something that we will continue to review and address as best we can.

We take affordability very seriously as well. We're reducing local subsidy...because we did support phone service with a contribution regime similar to what we're doing with broadband. As we reduce the local subsidy, we're increasing the broadband subsidy so that it's almost a revenue-neutral aspect to the carriers. Broadband is a big issue. We started off with universal service on voice service. We were spending a billion dollars at the start to extend the voice network out to everybody in Canada.

So we're starting to do that work now. The network will not be built in a short period of time. It is extensive and difficult. You get to the hockey stick in the more remote regions. That's why we want to start there, to get at those areas first, and then get everywhere else. All levels of government—

Mr. Brian Masse:

Well, investing in obsolescence isn't necessarily a strategy.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll move to Mr. Longfield, please, for seven minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thanks for a very good discussion. I'm glad we're able to get some additional testimony for the report we'd started.

Mr. Goldberg, I wanted to talk about the Telesat network, the constellation. Our committee went to Washington a few years back and learned about the north-south network they were launching—about 4,200 satellites, if I remember correctly. I'm wondering how that interacts with the Canadian constellation. You talked about a “fully meshed” system. Do we mesh with other countries as well?

Mr. Daniel Goldberg:

I can only imagine that the other constellation you're referring to is a constellation that SpaceX has in mind. These constellations are inherently global. There's not necessarily a Canadian one. There's not necessarily a U.S. one. They are backed by companies. Ours is a Canadian constellation in the sense that we're a Canadian company.

We'll need to coordinate our operations with theirs. We can operate on different portions of the radio frequencies of the spectrum; that's where most of the interference is. It's less an issue of the satellites physically bumping into each other—although that is an issue that we all have to be mindful of—and more an issue of us not creating interference to each other's signals.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right.

Mr. Daniel Goldberg:

A body in Geneva that's part of the UN, that's called the International Telecommunication Union, allocates spectrum. I'm happy to say that Telesat Canada has priority rights to make use of the spectrum on a global basis, which we intend to use and our friends at SpaceX intend to use. They're secondary to us. They will need to work around our operations.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

The coordination of our spectrum with their spectrum and our technology with their technology is something that we're currently engaged with.

Mr. Daniel Goldberg:

We are engaged. There will be engagement at the operator level, which is to say we are engaging with folks at SpaceX to make sure we don't interfere with one another, while recognizing that we are in the priority position. At the end of the day, it takes place at a government-to-government level. We'll need our regulator, our administration in Canada, ISED, standing up with their American counterparts to make sure this all works.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Great. A lot of the solution will be the technology that's being employed, and—

Mr. Daniel Goldberg:

We are big believers that there's a lot of opportunity to innovate. Significant capital investments are required, but we can solve this issue. We're working on it.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Great.

In terms of innovation, we had testimony on ground-based mesh technology. In my previous lifetime, we looked at nodes of intelligence on machines and at having redundancy on the machines instead of having some central control system where, if it fails, the entire plant goes down. If we look at ground-based mesh technology, is that something you're also engaged with—for example, phone-to-phone communications rather than phone-to-satellite communications?

(1000)

Mr. Daniel Goldberg:

Yes. When we're ultimately serving mobile users, it won't be directly from the satellite to those mobile handsets. We'll provide a great big broadband pipe to a wireless tower anywhere in the world and that wireless tower will then communicate with the handsets and people's households, our own constellation. We don't think of our constellation as just a space-based constellation. It's fully integrated with a very advanced ground network. It is fully meshed, fully redundant. It also relies on artificial intelligence and machine learning in terms of how it's managing the traffic and handing off the traffic. It's a very resilient network.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

How would Canadian innovators test new technology with you? What's the interaction?

Mr. Daniel Goldberg:

They just come to us. We're doing it now. We've already launched one of these. We're running tests with companies all over the world. We performed a test with Vodafone in the U.K., demonstrating how LEO constellations can support 5G connectivity.

We are working with Canadian companies as well, testing user terminals, testing compression technologies, testing all sorts of things. We're all very motivated to work with each other and to push the envelope of innovation. The good news is that a lot of that collaboration and co-operation are already taking place.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Are you part of another network? I'm thinking in terms of machine technology. There was a network created that was called the Open Device Net Vendor Association. Anybody developing technology would have to be compatible with the DeviceNet technology so that Europe and North America could be on similar standards. Asia was always a little bit different.

Is Telesat part of a network or do people just directly connect with Telesat?

Mr. Daniel Goldberg:

Our LEO constellation will be fully and, I would say, seamlessly integrated with other terrestrial networks, wireless networks and fixed-line networks all around the world. Our constellation will operate within the Metro Ethernet Forum standards. These are the standards that all tier 1 telcos use to run their traffic. Our constellation will be compatible with the same standards.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

Mr. Ghiz or Mr. Seidl, you mentioned the regulatory confusion. Is there a regulatory gap that we need to be looking at filling with the Telesat network and ground-based networks? Do we handle all of this effectively through regulations now or is this part of the confusion that you mentioned?

Mr. Eric Smith (Vice-President, Regulatory Affairs, Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association):

I can answer that.

That wasn't really part of the policy confusion we were referring to.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay.

Mr. Eric Smith:

In terms of our industry, our members, being able to utilize technology such as Telesat, absolutely there's the possibility. Technology is evolving. The laws of physics don't evolve, but technology does. Our members try to utilize the best technology for the best-use case. Canada's a huge country, so some people use wireless and some people use satellite. There are definitely opportunities.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Is the CRTC fine with what's going on or are there any changes there that we need to look at?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

No, we're very technology-neutral. We have certain levels we want to get to. We look for innovative solutions to get there.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

That's great, so it's just a matter of getting people connected?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

Yes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

That's what we're talking about.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Albas.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I'll be sharing my time with Mr. Lloyd.

This is for the CRTC and the CWTA.

A lot of people ask about the huge increases to mobile prices, and we hear that the services people are asking for have increased over time, and that the data used even five years ago is very cheap nowadays but that modern data demands have increased.

When I talk to my constituents, I have to agree with them. I think it's a bit of a cop-out answer. Technology always changes, and consumer demands increase. Other countries have data plans, sometimes unlimited, for far cheaper than we have here. Why is that?

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

I'll start off with that. I think what you're seeing now—and what I talked about—is that the model we have in Canada today, in which we're supporting facilities-based competition, is actually starting to lead towards lower prices. Are we as low as everyone would like? Probably not. But I can say this: between Q1 2014 and Q2 2018 we saw a 53.6% decrease for a gigabit of data. Between May 2017 and November 2018 we saw a 67% decrease. The price is starting to come down as competition and the growth of the regional players are taking place.

Our point is that now is not the time to divert from supporting facilities-based competition, because, quite frankly, doing so will hurt in terms of growing out in rural areas and it will most likely hurt our new entrants first and worst.

(1005)

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

The CRTC launched a proceeding in February to look at the mobile wireless market...a very broad look at the affordability, the competitiveness and barriers to deployment. I can't discuss any of the specifics on that, because it's an open proceeding, but in the call for comments we did indicate a full review. We thought it was time maybe to mandate mobile virtual network operators to help with that, but it's a very extensive review that is well under way with a hearing next January.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I'll pass my time to Mr. Lloyd.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you.

Thank you for coming.

My first question is for Mr. Seidl.

We've been talking a lot about prices and access today, but what I want to talk about is the threat of natural disasters to our communications infrastructure systems. It's an issue really close to my heart. As was noted, we had tornadoes in Ottawa that took down some power, and the generators just couldn't last long enough before these facilities were prepared. I've also had constituents bring forward to me real, possible threats from coronal mass ejections and solar flares creating electromagnetic pulses that could impact our.... These are theoretical, but they could happen.

What lessons has the CRTC learned from natural disasters, and what steps are being taken to protect our communications infrastructure from the very real threat of natural disasters?

Thank you.

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

I'll talk from what we've done in the past.

We had a review a few years ago to look at our 911 system and networks. We did an extensive review making sure that they were resilient and survivable, and we set certain requirements. We found them to be very resilient. These are the networks that deliver the calls to the public safety answering points, and they interconnect to the local networks. We have best practices that we put in place, and we have some requirements there. We had an extensive review of that.

For emergency preparedness, that's the responsibility of ISED and Public Safety. We don't get involved in that particular space, but we are aware of their other aspects. We do, obviously, regulate the emergency alerting for the broadcasters and the cellphone companies now, so that's another aspect that we're involved with, plus managing the 911 system in general.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

My concern is that if our systems are down, people won't be able to receive those emergency alerts if they're not getting any access on their phones.

I guess maybe this is a question for Mr. Ghiz. What are our facilities-based companies doing to harden their systems so that we can ensure that we have continuity of service in the case of a natural disaster?

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

I'll have Eric take that.

Mr. Eric Smith:

Thanks. It's a great question.

Obviously our members are the prime concern. They want their networks to be up and running. Natural disasters, as you mentioned, do happen, and I think you're probably referring to the time when there was a storm in Ottawa and the electrical generators blew up and cut off power for days.

There is resiliency built in the networks. Everything's theoretically possible. You can increase that resilience more and more times. It gets more expensive, and then we get into the affordability issue, so there's a balance there. I think we're confident in our members; we have some of the best carriers in the world. They're using best practices and are continually reviewing those, and I'm sure they have discussions with government about that as well.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now for the final five minutes, we have Mr. Sheehan.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much to all the presenters. That was very informative.

I represent an area that's called semi-rural. Sault Ste. Marie is a medium-sized community, and the outlying areas are combined with various sizes of communities and townships and local service boards to first nations. My area in Canada, along the Lake Superior shoreline, has different geographical topography to it. It also has a bunch of parks, both provincial and national. It's interesting. You're driving on Highway 17 and you'd think that on Highway 17 you'd get reception—well, not necessarily, for a variety of reasons.

It's like that all across Canada, where you'd think, “Oh, when we're talking about rural areas, we're talking about remote”—but not necessarily. We're talking about along our highway corridors, whether they're primary or secondary highways, where we don't have reception. In fact, I used to always pack a survival bag—just a big black bag that had everything I needed to live in case I got stuck. We still use those up in our neck of the woods.

When I was on the school board in the late 1990s, we did a lot of work putting towers up and partnering with different folks. My question is, overall, what kinds of steps are you taking, particularly with the MUSH sectors that are out there in those communities, to provide services to the areas they already serve? They're smaller. They don't quite have the big budgets. But there are a lot of people who have really innovative ideas. For instance, the CRTC just did a call for proposals. Who's applying for those kinds of things, and how are you reaching out? I might make my question more specific. How are you reaching out to rural Canada, specifically, to get uptake?

(1010)

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

For our broadband fund, part of our goal is to ensure there's community involvement. One of our criteria we'll be assessing in the projects is the level of support the projects that are put forward have from the communities. For the people who are going to be submitting applications—the service providers—their projects will be considered of a higher quality the more engaged they are with the local communities in understanding their needs. We expect that projects will come in, we'll have those conversations and we'll be looking to serve the priority for the areas.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

I'm still trying to understand it. How are you marketing and making efforts, first of all, to get the information out to rural Canada, and are there special considerations for those particular applications in trying to get money out to the communities?

Mr. Christopher Seidl:

As I mentioned, we have the criteria for that, and we expect local, provincial and territorial governments to play a role in helping to bring those priorities to us. We're looking for projects from all regions. As I mentioned, one of the criteria is the community involvement.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Robert, you mentioned in your remarks that you submitted some suggestions, if you will, policy suggestions, to lay this ground. You didn't mention what feedback or what kind of response you got. Could you please comment on that?

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

Is this around the directive?

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Yes, the one you mentioned.

Mr. Robert Ghiz:

It's interesting. My understanding is that before Parliament rises the directive will be tabled in Parliament. I think the message I'm getting is that people at ISED and different officials are understanding that investment in infrastructure is extremely important. We've been going in to explain out our story.

I don't want to get too much into politics, but I will say that sometimes when you get closer to an election time, good public policy goes out the door for good politics. I will say that from everything I've seen, good public policy is about encouraging investments of our facilities-based carriers to help cover off the gaps—why we're here today. Any change in that direction, in our opinion, is going to slow down that investment we're seeing, the collaboration we're seeing and also the reduction in prices we're seeing, because the new entrants are creating that.

It's being heard. We'll wait to see what I guess ISED and the minister have to say, but I like to be optimistic, and I'm hoping that our message is being delivered.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That brings us to our time today.

Thank you to our witnesses for being here today for such an important matter.

Before we go, I just have a reminder to committee that we will likely be getting the draft report on Tuesday of next week, so we won't be meeting Tuesday, but we will be meeting on Thursday at our regular time.

Thank you, everybody, for being here today.

We are adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(0915)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Comme nous n'avons qu'une heure à notre disposition aujourd'hui, nous allons renoncer aux préliminaires pour passer directement au vif du sujet.

Bienvenue à cette séance du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Conformément à l'ordre de renvoi du mercredi 8 mai 2019, nous poursuivons notre étude des infrastructures numériques rurales faisant suite à la motion M-208.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui trois représentants du CRTC, soit M. Christopher Seidl, directeur exécutif, Télécommunications; M. Ian Baggley, directeur général, Télécommunications; et Mme Renée Doiron, directrice, Ingénierie de la large bande et des réseaux.

De l'Association canadienne des télécommunications sans fil, nous recevons M. Robert Ghiz, président et chef de la direction; et M. Eric Smith, vice-président, Affaires réglementaires.

Nous accueillons enfin, de Télésat Canada, M. Daniel Goldberg, président et chef de la direction; et Mme Michele Beck, vice-présidente des ventes, Amérique du Nord.

Bienvenue à tous. Étant donné le peu de temps dont nous disposons, nous vous laissons à chacun cinq minutes pour votre exposé après quoi nous passerons directement aux questions. Nous commençons par M. Seidl du CRTC.

M. Christopher Seidl (directeur exécutif, Télécommunications, Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Nous vous remercions de nous donner l'occasion de contribuer à votre étude faisant suite à la motion M-208. Cette étude aborde d'importants domaines relevant de la compétence des organismes de réglementation des télécommunications au Canada, soit Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada (ISDE) à titre d'organisme de réglementation du spectre et le CRTC.

Au sein du monde dans lequel nous vivons aujourd'hui, peu importe l'endroit au Canada, une infrastructure numérique fiable et accessible est indispensable tant pour les particuliers que pour les institutions publiques et les entreprises de toutes tailles.[Français]

C'est pourquoi, en décembre 2016, le Conseil a annoncé que le service Internet à large bande était désormais considéré comme un service de télécommunications de base.

L'objectif du service universel du CRTC entend que tous les Canadiens doivent avoir accès à des services d'accès Internet à large bande fixes. Ces services devraient offrir des vitesses de téléchargement d'au moins 50 mégabits par seconde, et des vitesses de téléversement d'au moins 10 mégabits par seconde, en plus d'offrir une option de données illimitées.

De plus, la technologie sans fil mobile la plus récente doit être disponible pour tous les foyers et toutes les entreprises, ainsi que le long des principales routes canadiennes. Notre objectif est d'atteindre une couverture de 90 % d'ici la fin de 2021 et de 100 % le plus tôt possible pendant la décennie suivante. Nous voulons que tous les Canadiens, qu'ils vivent en région rurale, en région éloignée ou en centre urbain, aient accès à des services de voix et d'Internet à large bande sur des réseaux sans fil fixes et mobiles de manière qu'ils puissent être branchés et participer efficacement à l'économie numérique. L'atteinte de cet objectif demandera des efforts des gouvernements fédéral, provinciaux et territoriaux, ainsi que du secteur privé.[Traduction]

Nous agissons sur tous les fronts pour atteindre cet objectif. L'une de nos plus importantes initiatives est le Fonds pour la large bande du CRTC. Le conseil a établi ce fonds pour améliorer les services à large bande dans les régions rurales et éloignées pour lesquelles le niveau d'accès n'est pas acceptable. Le Fonds pour la large bande distribuera un maximum de 750 millions de dollars au cours des cinq premières années pour appuyer des projets de construction et de mise à niveau de l'infrastructure d'accès et de transport afin d'offrir des services d'accès Internet à large bande sans fil fixes et mobiles dans les régions mal desservies.

Les contributions au Fonds pour la large bande sont recueillies auprès des fournisseurs de services de télécommunication en fonction de leurs revenus.

Le Fonds vise à compléter, et non à remplacer, le financement public et l'investissement privé actuels et futurs. Jusqu'à 10 % du montant annuel sera accordé aux collectivités dépendantes des satellites. Une considération particulière peut aussi être accordée aux projets ciblant les communautés autochtones ou les communautés de langue officielle en situation minoritaire.

Plus tôt cette semaine, nous avons lancé le premier appel de demandes de financement provenant du Fonds pour la large bande pour les projets dans trois territoires ainsi que dans des collectivités dépendantes des satellites au Canada. Selon les plus récentes données, il n'y a actuellement aucun foyer au nord du 60e parallèle qui ait accès à un service Internet à large bande satisfaisant à l'objectif du service universel du CRTC. À peine le quart des routes principales dans les territoires sont couverts par le service sans fil mobile LTE.

Le fossé numérique est également évident dans les collectivités dépendantes des satellites à l'échelle du pays qui ne sont pas connectées par voie terrestre.

Les sociétés canadiennes de toutes tailles, les organismes des administrations provinciales, territoriales et municipales, les conseils de bande et les gouvernements autochtones qui ont l'expérience nécessaire peuvent — isolément ou dans le cadre d'un consortium — présenter une demande financement.

Le CRTC annoncera en 2020 les projets sélectionnés à l'issue du premier appel de demandes. Un deuxième appel, ouvert à tous les types de projets dans toutes les régions du Canada, sera lancé cet automne.

Le fonds du CRTC ne représente qu'une partie du travail qui doit être accompli par les secteurs public et privé. À cette fin, nous avons souligné dans le plus récent budget fédéral un nouveau financement de 1,7 milliard de dollars pour fournir un accès Internet haute vitesse à l'ensemble des Canadiens. Le gouvernement prévoit coordonner ses activités avec celles des provinces, des territoires et des institutions fédérales, comme le CRTC, afin de maximiser l'incidence de ces investissements.

Nous appuyons les efforts du gouvernement dans la mesure de ce que nous permet notre mandat et notre statut d'organisme de réglementation indépendant.

Monsieur le président, même avec le soutien financier provenant du Fonds pour la large bande du CRTC ou d'autres sources publiques, des fournisseurs de services Internet peuvent toujours se heurter à des défis et à des obstacles susceptibles de limiter leur capacité à faciliter l'accès aux services à large bande dans les régions rurales et éloignées.

(0920)

[Français]

C'est pourquoi nous planifions une nouvelle instance relative au déploiement de la large bande dans les régions rurales. Nous examinerons des facteurs tels que la disponibilité des services de transport dans les régions rurales et l'accès des structures de soutien. Ces services sont essentiels pour étendre les services d'accès Internet à large bande et favoriser la concurrence, en particulier dans les régions rurales et éloignées.

Étendre les services à large bande aux ménages, aux entreprises et aux routes principales mal desservis est une nécessité absolue dans les quatre coins du pays, y compris dans les régions rurales et éloignées.

L'accès aux technologies numériques améliorera la sécurité publique et permettra à tous les Canadiens de profiter des services numériques novateurs, existants et nouveaux, qui sont maintenant un élément central de leur vie de tous les jours.[Traduction]

Nous serons ravis de répondre à toutes vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à l'Association canadienne des télécommunications sans fil.

Monsieur Ghiz.

M. Robert Ghiz (président et chef de la direction, Association canadienne des télécommunications sans fil):

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Bonjour.

Je vous remercie de nous donner l'occasion de prendre la parole ici ce matin.[Traduction]

La motion M-208 demandait à ce comité d'étudier les approches fiscales et réglementaires visant à favoriser les investissements dans l'infrastructure sans fil en milieu rural.

Depuis que les services sans fil ont été lancés au Canada, les fournisseurs dotés d'installations, soit les entreprises qui investissent des capitaux pour bâtir des réseaux et acquérir des droits d'utilisation du spectre, se sont attaqués au défi que représente la construction de l'infrastructure de réseau sans fil dans un pays aussi vaste et à la géographie aussi complexe que le nôtre.

Jusqu'à maintenant, les entreprises de services sans fil dotées d'installations ont investi plus 50 milliards de dollars pour la mise en place de nos réseaux sans fil. Toutes proportions gardées, c'est davantage que dans tout autre pays du G7 et qu'en Australie. Ces entreprises ont également dépensé quelque 20 milliards de dollars pour participer à des ventes aux enchères du spectre et payer les droits annuels associés à leur licence de spectre. Nos membres financent également le nouveau Fonds pour la large bande du CRTC.

Grâce à tous ces investissements, les Canadiens peuvent bénéficier de réseaux se situant au deuxième rang parmi les plus rapides au monde, deux fois plus rapides que ceux des États-Unis. Selon le CRTC, 99 % des Canadiens ont accès depuis leur domicile à un réseau sans fil LTE.

Bien qu'il s'agisse là d'un important accomplissement, nous avons encore beaucoup de pain sur la planche. C'est ainsi que nous avons eu droit au cours des derniers mois à des annonces au sujet d'investissements considérables visant à assurer une plus grande couverture des régions rurales.

À titre d'exemple, Bell a annoncé que ses services sans fil fixes seraient étendus à plus de 30 petites villes et collectivités rurales de l'Ontario et du Québec. Rogers a annoncé pour sa part des investissements de 100 millions de dollars pour assurer une couverture sans fil pour appareils mobiles le long de 1 000 kilomètres de routes rurales et éloignées des différentes régions du Canada. Des investissements semblables sont également consentis par des fournisseurs régionaux de services sans fil, comme Freedom Mobile, Vidéotron, Eastlink, Xplornet et SaskTel.

Malheureusement, l'avenir des investissements est plutôt incertain, surtout dans les régions rurales. Comme on le reconnaît dans la motion M-208, la réglementation peut favoriser les investissements, mais aussi avoir l'effet contraire.[Français]

Malheureusement, les investissements futurs, en particulier en zone rurale, sont incertains. Comme le reconnaît la motion M-208, la réglementation peut parfois encourager les investissements, mais elle peut aussi avoir l'effet inverse.[Traduction]

Dans l'élaboration des politiques canadiennes en matière de télécommunications, on a longtemps considéré que la concurrence fondée sur la mise à disposition d'installations est la meilleure façon d'encourager les investissements. Grâce aux politiques basées sur ce principe, une concurrence durable sur le marché au détail des services sans fil est en train de prendre de l'ampleur, avec pour résultat une croissance continue du nombre d'abonnés à ces services, une consommation accrue de données, une réduction des prix et un plus large éventail de choix pour le consommateur.

Élément tout aussi important, les investissements réguliers des fournisseurs dotés d'installations au Canada continuent d'étendre la portée des réseaux sans fil au pays, aussi bien pour les services fixes que mobiles. Pendant qu'il insiste, d'une part, sur l'importance de continuer à investir dans notre infrastructure sans fil pour en étendre la portée tout en adoptant des mesures fiscales ciblées à cette fin, le gouvernement envisage, d'autre part, des mesures qui, si l'on va de l'avant, vont dissuader les investisseurs et défavoriser de façon disproportionnée les Canadiens des régions rurales.

Plus tôt cette année, Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada (ISDE) a proposé une orientation stratégique qui obligeait le CRTC à accorder la priorité aux objectifs liés à l'accroissement de la concurrence et à la diminution des prix lorsqu'il prend des décisions de nature réglementaire. Bien que nous soyons en faveur de ces objectifs, nous avons été étonnés qu'il ne soit fait aucunement mention des investissements dans les infrastructures consentis par les fournisseurs de services dotés d'installations.

Au cours de la période de consultation, nous avons demandé au ministre de revoir cette directive stratégique pour inclure une référence à la nécessité d'investir dans les infrastructures à titre de priorité clé pour le CRTC. Parallèlement à cela, dans l'un des constats préliminaires découlant de son examen du cadre réglementaire de l'industrie sans fil, le CRTC a indiqué que les exploitants de réseau mobile virtuel devraient bénéficier d'un accès garanti aux services de gros des réseaux sans fil opérés par les fournisseurs nationaux.

Ces exploitants de réseau mobile virtuel n'investissent pas dans les infrastructures sans fil ou dans les droits relatifs au spectre. Ils paient plutôt des tarifs de gros établis par l'instance réglementaire pour utiliser les réseaux des fournisseurs dotés d'installations et se servent de cet accès garanti pour accroître leur nombre d'abonnés en livrant concurrence à ces mêmes fournisseurs dotés d'installations qui investissent pour étendre leurs réseaux.

Dans les pays où l'on a fait l'essai d'une telle formule, les investissements dans les réseaux ont chuté considérablement. Ces pays s'emploient actuellement à renverser la vapeur.

Le CRTC a déjà refusé à deux reprises de rendre l'accès garanti pour les exploitants de réseau mobile virtuel, sachant très bien que cela allait réduire les investissements dans les réseaux sans fil. On ne sait pas trop exactement pourquoi on envisage maintenant une solution semblable, d'autant plus qu'ISDE et le CRTC se sont tous deux donné comme objectif prioritaire de connecter tous les Canadiens.

(0925)



Si le gouvernement estime vraiment qu'il est prioritaire à ce point de connecter tous les Canadiens, ses politiques devraient aller dans le sens de cet objectif. Ceci dit très respectueusement, la confusion qui règne actuellement à ce niveau va plutôt nuire aux efforts déployés pour étendre la connectivité en milieu rural. Nous voulons travailler de concert avec le gouvernement. Nous souhaitons collaborer avec le CRTC de telle sorte que le taux de couverture puisse passer de 99 % à 100 %, et que les Canadiens aient accès aux meilleurs réseaux sans fil au monde.

Merci beaucoup. Nous serons ravis de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant aux représentants de Télésat Canada. Monsieur Goldberg, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Daniel Goldberg (président et chef de la direction, Télésat Canada):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, d'avoir invité Télésat à participer à votre séance d'aujourd'hui. Merci également à tous les membres de ce comité pour la détermination dont ils font preuve dans leurs efforts pour améliorer la connectivité à large bande en milieu rural et combler le fossé numérique qui existe au Canada.

Mes collègues de Télésat et moi-même ne saurions dire à quel point nous souscrivons à votre objectif d'offrir rapidement et à un coût abordable une connectivité Internet à la fine pointe de la technologie aux millions de Canadiens qui en sont privés actuellement. Heureusement, Télésat a un plan bien concret pour en arriver justement à un tel résultat, et dispose de tous les moyens nécessaires pour le mener à terme. Télésat est l'un des exploitants de satellites les plus importants, novateurs et prospères de la planète. Nous sommes fiers d'offrir depuis 50 ans déjà des services par satellite essentiels à la mission d'entreprises et de gouvernements d'un peu partout dans le monde, y compris bien sûr d'ici même au Canada, là où notre histoire a commencé. Nous avons des bureaux et des installations dans différents pays, mais notre siège social est situé sur la rue Elgin, juste en bas de la Colline parlementaire. C'est à partir d'ici que nous dirigeons notre flotte planétaire de satellites, que nous menons nos activités de recherche et développement et d'ingénierie de pointe, et que nous gérons l'ensemble de nos activités sur le marché mondial hautement concurrentiel et en rapide évolution des services de communication. Vous êtes d'ailleurs tous invités à descendre la rue Elgin pour venir visiter nos bureaux.

En plus des millions de Canadiens n'ayant pas accès à une connectivité à large bande de qualité, il y a quelques milliards de personnes sur la planète qui se retrouvent du mauvais côté du fossé numérique. Connecter tous ces gens-là représente un défi énorme du point de vue technique, opérationnel et financier. Pour les entreprises qui ont l'expertise nécessaire et l'ambition voulue pour relever un tel défi, c'est aussi un objectif d'intérêt public fondamental et une incontestable occasion d'affaires.

Télésat déploie des efforts considérables pour trouver une solution. Je suis d'ailleurs heureux de pouvoir vous dire que nous sommes sur le point de mettre en place l'infrastructure mondiale à large bande la plus novatrice, avancée, puissante et renversante à avoir jamais été conçue. Je n'exagère aucunement. Nous avons ainsi créé une constellation regroupant quelque 300 satellites à la fine pointe de la technologie se déplaçant à environ 1 000 kilomètres au-dessus de la surface terrestre. Ces satellites seront reliés les uns aux autres au moyen d'une technologie de laser optique à l'intérieur d'une architecture sur orbite terrestre basse (LEO) en attente de brevet. Essayez de vous imaginer une infrastructure Internet orbitale entièrement maillée et extrêmement souple capable d'offrir à coût raisonnable partout dans le monde, y compris sur chaque mètre carré du territoire canadien, une connectivité fiable et sécuritaire à une vitesse se calculant en térabits. Cette architecture de conception tout à fait novatrice est le fruit du travail des ingénieurs de Télésat, parmi les meilleurs de leur profession dans le monde.

Nos satellites actuels sont en orbite géostationnaire à près de 36 000 kilomètres au-dessus de la surface terrestre. Bien que cette situation présente de nombreux avantages, l'inconvénient principal réside dans le temps nécessaire pour la transmission des signaux à partir de ces satellites et en leur direction. C'est ce qu'on appelle le temps de latence. Ce n'est pas tellement grave lorsque ces satellites sont utilisés pour retransmettre des émissions de télé dans les foyers, mais c'est très problématique lorsqu'on essaie d'offrir les services à large bande ultrarapide et à faible latence qui sont requis pour naviguer sur Internet, faire du commerce en ligne ou utiliser différentes applications comme les services de cybersanté et l'éducation à distance. La faible latence deviendra même encore plus dommageable lorsque nous serons passés à l'univers 5G. En misant sur des satellites environ 30 fois plus proches de la surface terrestre, notre constellation LEO pourra offrir une connectivité avec temps de latence égal, voire plus court, que ce que peuvent permettre les services par fibre et les services sans fil terrestres.

Télésat n'offre pas de services à large bande directement aux consommateurs. Nous mettons plutôt une infrastructure à large bande à la disposition des entreprises téléphoniques, des exploitants de réseau mobile et des fournisseurs de services Internet qui assurent la connexion du dernier kilomètre pour les consommateurs en milieu rural et les autres utilisateurs. La constellation LEO de Télésat permettra d'offrir à un coût abordable une connectivité Internet satisfaisant aux exigences du CRTC (50 mégabits pour le téléchargement et 10 mégabits pour le téléversement) en atteignant facilement des vitesses se calculant en gigabits. Notre constellation aidera également les entreprises de services sans fil à étendre à un coût raisonnable la portée de leurs services pour les technologies LTE et 5G.

Nous prévoyons procéder à la sélection d'un entrepreneur principal pour la construction de notre constellation LEO au cours des mois à venir. Nous souhaitons pouvoir commencer à lancer des satellites en 2021 puis à offrir le service dans le nord du Canada au milieu de 2022 et à l'échelle planétaire en 2023.

Bien que d'autres entreprises, y compris Amazon, SpaceX et SoftBank, aient également des plans pour mettre en orbite des constellations de type LEO, Télésat dispose de l'avantage concurrentiel important que lui procurent ses insondables ressources techniques, ses solides antécédents en matière d'innovation et son expertise commerciale et réglementaire inégalée.

(0930)



La constellation LEO de Télésat représente donc non seulement la meilleure solution si l'on veut combler pour de bon le fossé numérique, mais aussi une occasion unique pour une entreprise canadienne — et notre industrie spatiale dans son ensemble — de devenir un véritable chef de file au sein de la nouvelle économie spatiale en pleine émergence. Il en résultera pour les années à venir une croissance économique durable assortie de la création d'emplois de haute technologie dans toutes les régions du Canada.

Grâce aux efforts combinés de l'industrie et du gouvernement, la constellation LEO de Télésat va complètement révolutionner l'offre de services à large bande à haut rendement et à coût abordable partout au Canada et dans le reste du monde. Notre pays deviendra ainsi un fer de lance de la nouvelle économie spatiale.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Nous allons passer directement aux questions des membres du Comité.

Nous commençons par M. Amos. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Merci. S'il me reste du temps, je le laisserai à M. Graham. Comme nous avons très peu de temps à notre disposition, je vais poser des questions très succinctes.

Ma première question s'adresse à nos vaillants fonctionnaires du CRTC. Merci de votre présence aujourd'hui.

La connectivité interne cause beaucoup de frustrations aux 41 maires que je représente dans le Pontiac. Nos citoyens sont très mécontents. C'est le sujet qui revient sans cesse lorsque je fais du porte-à-porte. Je vous mentirais si je ne vous disais pas que la déception était palpable lorsque j'ai dû informer mes commettants que le premier appel de demandes de financement via le Fonds pour la large bande du CRTC était ouvert uniquement pour le Yukon, les Territoires du Nord-Ouest et le Nunavut. Pourriez-vous m'expliquer cette décision?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Certainement. Le CRTC a déterminé que le premier appel de demandes allait se limiter aux territoires en plus des collectivités dépendantes des satellites. Autrement dit, nous ciblons le nord du pays, car nous estimons que c'est là que l'on trouve les besoins les plus criants.

Nous avons annoncé qu'un nouvel appel de demandes serait lancé à l'automne pour le reste du Canada, soit pour toutes les régions et tous les types de projets, qu'il s'agisse de transport, d'accès ou de services mobiles. Nous voulions vraiment intervenir d'abord dans les régions où nous jugeons les besoins les plus importants, c'est-à-dire dans le Nord et dans les localités qui dépendent des satellites. Nous avons d'ailleurs réservé en 2016 pour ces localités un maximum de 10 % des fonds. Nous voulions cibler ces secteurs dans un premier temps pour que des décisions puissent être prises rapidement avant de nous intéresser au problème dans son ensemble dans le reste du Canada, y compris bien sûr dans le Nord.

(0935)

M. William Amos:

Je comprends. J'aurais toutes sortes de questions à vous poser. Peut-être pourriez-vous nous répondre par écrit. Sur quoi vous êtes-vous fondés pour déterminer dans quelles régions les besoins étaient les plus criants? Ce n'est sûrement pas en fonction de la population. J'essaie simplement de canaliser les frustrations ressenties par tous ces citoyens et ces maires. Je ne veux viser d'aucune manière l'institution du CRTC, mais plutôt dénoncer la situation.

Le rapport Parlons large bande du CRTC a été rendu public en décembre 2016. On a alors annoncé qu'un fonds allait être établi, ce qui était une excellente idée. Il a fallu énormément de temps pour concrétiser le tout, mais les citoyens et les maires que je représente continuent de se plaindre à moi qu'il leur est impossible de présenter une demande de financement au CRTC.

M. Christopher Seidl:

Nos audiences sont toujours publiques. Elles se déroulent en toute transparence et chacun a la chance d'exprimer son point de vue dans la recherche de la meilleure solution possible avec la contribution de tous. Il faut bien sûr un certain temps pour y parvenir. Différents processus ont dû être menés à terme pour en arriver à la situation actuelle. Je crois que nous avons sans doute procédé aussi vite que possible dans ce contexte.

Nous souhaitons nous aussi offrir le service à large bande partout au pays, mais c'est une responsabilité partagée. Nous offrons seulement une partie de la solution avec ces 750 millions de dollars. En 2016, et à plusieurs occasions par la suite, nous avons indiqué que les secteurs privé et public ont tous les deux un rôle à jouer et que tous les ordres de gouvernement doivent apporter leur contribution pour que nous puissions combler le fossé numérique.

M. William Amos:

J'aimerais aborder la question de la couverture de téléphonie cellulaire qui a été à l'origine de nombreuses discussions, surtout concernant la sécurité publique... La région de la capitale nationale et ma circonscription de Pontiac ont connu deux tornades et deux inondations au cours des trois dernières années. Vous n'avez pas traité des services de téléphonie cellulaire dans vos observations de ce matin.

Jusqu'à quel point estimez-vous possible de combler les lacunes en matière de couverture sans fil de telle sorte que les gens puissent se servir de leur téléphone toutes les fois que cela est nécessaire, y compris lorsque leur sécurité est en jeu... Dans quelle mesure croyez-vous que nous pourrons apporter les correctifs nécessaires grâce à ce fonds de 750 millions de dollars et aux investissements consentis par notre gouvernement?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Dans mes observations préliminaires, j'ai bel et bien mentionné à quelques reprises que nos services de base comprennent la téléphonie mobile. Je pense que nous sommes l'un des premiers pays à inclure ainsi la téléphonie mobile dans nos services de base en affirmant que chacun devrait y avoir accès non seulement à domicile, mais aussi sur les principales routes canadiennes. Dans les deux appels de demandes de financement que nous avons lancés, cela fait partie des éléments à inclure pour qu'un projet soit admissible.

Je pense qu'il est primordial de mettre en place un tel service. Nous offrons d'ores et déjà une couverture très étendue. Il y a encore des gens qui n'y ont pas accès, mais le taux de couverture dans les foyers se situe à 99,4 % pour les services mobiles — 98,5 % pour la technologie la plus récente. Il n'y a actuellement aucune couverture pour environ 10 % de nos routes principales, ce qui crée certes un problème de sécurité publique qu'il nous faut régler. C'est bien sûr à ce dernier niveau que l'analyse de rentabilisation est la moins convaincante pour n'importe quelle entreprise. Il faut construire une infrastructure longeant ces routes sur de très longues distances. Comme je l'indiquais, la couverture n'est assurée qu'à 25 % dans le Nord... Ce serait pour nous l'un des premiers besoins à combler. Il faut agir dans ces secteurs où il y a de longues distances à parcourir alors que les gens n'ont accès à aucune connectivité et aucun autre service aux alentours. C'est la région où la problématique est la plus criante.

M. William Amos:

Il me reste deux minutes. Je vais céder la parole à M. Graham avant d'avoir épuisé tout le temps à ma disposition.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Ghiz, c'est très rare que je dise cela, mais je crois que je suis d'accord avec vous au sujet de tout ce que vous avez dit. Avec [Inaudible], cela n'arrive pas très souvent. Je suis ravi d'avoir cette possibilité.

Le mandat du CRTC que le ministre Bains a annoncé récemment parlait de concurrence, et je me suis demandé à quoi sert la concurrence s'il n'y a pas de service en premier lieu? Je vous explique ce qui me pose le plus problème. La circonscription de M. Amos et la mienne sont voisines. Ensemble, leur superficie est bien plus grande que celle de la Belgique. Elles couvrent un très grand territoire. Des communautés entières de ma circonscription n'ont ni Internet ni de cellulaires. Comment connecter ces communautés au réseau cellulaire, de sorte que les services d'urgence, comme le disait M. Amos, n'ont pas à se rencontrer à l'hôtel de ville chaque heure pour ensuite retourner sur le terrain? Quel est le moyen le plus rapide d'obtenir une bonne couverture pour toutes nos petites villes?

M. Robert Ghiz:

Excellente question.

Le CRTC et nous le disons. Ce n'est pas facile et ce n'est pas toujours sensé d'un point de vue économique. Je crois que le gouvernement est sur la bonne voie, comme il l'était dans le passé, pour ce qui est de soutenir les entreprises dotées d'installations, car ce sont elles qui bâtissent les réseaux. La couverture a-t-elle augmenté assez rapidement pour chacun? J'aime dire que lorsque nous parlons de 99 %, avec 35 millions de Canadiens, cela veut dire que 350 000 Canadiens n'ont toujours pas accès aux réseaux. On n'entend pas parler des 34 ou 32 millions de Canadiens qui y ont accès, mais de ceux qui n'ont pas d'accès.

Ce que nous devons faire, à l'avenir, c'est examiner la réglementation — et c'est pourquoi la motion est importante — quant à la façon d'accélérer grandement les choses pour la connectivité. J'ai énuméré deux ou trois choses, mais l'annonce de la déduction pour amortissement a été extrêmement bénéfique et a favorisé les investissements. Il y a le fonds à Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada, ce qui est très bien. Il y a le fonds du CRTC, que nos membres financent. Les provinces ont leurs propres fonds. Certaines municipalités ont leurs fonds également, comme le RREO.

Je crois que la clé de tout cela, c'est la coordination entre tous ces acteurs, de même qu'une certaine souplesse pour les fonds. SaskTel est l'un de nos membres. Je leur ai parlé l'autre jour. Ils ont une grande province. Ils veulent de la souplesse pour ces fonds, de sorte que la large bande inclut également le sans-fil fixe.

(0940)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci

Le président:

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Albas.

Vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie tous les témoins de leur présence et des connaissances qu'ils communiquent à notre comité aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais commencer par parler d'une chose que j'ai entendue aujourd'hui et de quelque chose qui a été soulevé récemment. Tout d'abord, concernant le CRTC, M. Amos a exprimé sa frustration à l'égard du choix de commencer avec bon nombre de ces communautés rurales et du Nord. Étant donné que bon nombre d'entre elles ont très peu de couverture, sinon aucune, en raison de l'échec du marché ou des coûts, je peux comprendre pourquoi vous voulez commencer là. Les gens qui vivent si loin sont aussi des Canadiens et méritent de bénéficier de ce type de programmes. Nous devrions toujours nous soucier en premier lieu des gens qui en ont le moins.

Le gouvernement a annoncé une récupération de la bande de 3 500 MHz qui est détenue, entre autres, par Xplornet, dont une représentante a comparu devant notre comité mardi. Lorsque je l'ai interrogée au sujet des répercussions, elle a dit qu'elles seraient importantes. Je sais que le gouvernement a modifié son plan légèrement, mais il s'agit d'une récupération majeure.

Je pense qu'il est quelque peu absurde d'étudier la connectivité rurale sans tenir compte du fait qu'une décision gouvernementale peut avoir coupé les connexions Internet de milliers de clients ruraux. Je suis prêt à présenter une motion pour étudier cette question, mais je sais bien que nous manquons de temps pour le faire, étant donné que la fin de la session approche à grands pas.

Je pense que nous devons tenir compte du fait que nous parlons des moyens d'accroître la connectivité en milieu rural, mais que le gouvernement la réduit. À mon avis, nous devrions au moins faire référence à la décision et à ses répercussions dans le rapport ou demander aux entreprises concernées combien de personnes seront touchées par ce choix politique.

Je veux m'assurer que les témoins qui ont pris le temps de comparaître devant le Comité ont l'occasion de répondre aux questions, alors je vais m'arrêter ici. J'espère que les députés libéraux qui se soucient clairement de la connectivité en milieu rural sont prêts à se pencher sur le fait que le gouvernement vient peut-être de mettre un terme à cela.

Pour ce qui est du CRTC, j'espère que vous m'accorderez une petite seconde de plus. Un collègue a un électeur qui paie des frais d'administration supplémentaires de 2,95 $. Son fournisseur local lui a dit qu'il s'agit de frais du CRTC qui ne s'appliquent qu'à une région géographique précise. Si vous n'avez pas de réponse, pourriez-vous me mettre en contact avec quelqu'un de votre organisation pour que nous puissions en parler?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Savez-vous à quoi fait référence cet élément inscrit sur la facture?

M. Dan Albas:

Il est simplement indiqué qu'il s'agit de frais d'administration, et lorsque l'électeur a téléphoné au fournisseur, on lui a dit que le CRTC avait demandé à ce que ces frais soient perçus dans la région sans lui donner aucune autre explication.

M. Christopher Seidl:

Dans les localités où nos services sont tarifés — depuis un certain temps — nous avons agrandi les régions d'appel local. L'opération a entraîné des coûts supplémentaires, auquel cas nous avons réglementé les tarifs que le titulaire devait communiquer, et il a été autorisé à facturer des coûts supplémentaires pour élargir la région d'appel local. Ça pourrait être l'explication.

M. Dan Albas:

Le CRTC pourrait réviser ses normes de transparence, pour que les clients sachent ce qui se range sous cette rubrique non précisée. Tous se font dire que ça découle d'une consigne d'un organisme de l'État au fournisseur local. Ça devrait être transparent.

Je remercie M. Ghiz d'être ici.

Le ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement a dit, hier, qu'il ne savait pas où se trouvait le point de bascule des prix et de l'investissement. À quel point les revenus des clients deviendraient-ils trop faibles et décourageraient-ils l'investissement dans des installations? Quel est le point de bascule de vos membres?

M. Robert Ghiz:

Sans aborder les coûts directs pour nos membres, je me contenterai de dire que le point de bascule tient compte de l'ensemble de la politique publique du Canada. En vigueur depuis maintenant 10 ou 15 ans, elle remonte à une directive stratégique publiée en 2006 par le gouvernement antérieur et suivie par le gouvernement actuel et elle affirme l'importance extrême des investissements des entreprises de télécommunication propriétaires des installations. Ce programme a conduit à l'existence de trois fournisseurs nationaux et à celle de tous les fournisseurs régionaux de l'ensemble du pays. Ces fournisseurs régionaux intensifient la concurrence, ce qui permet aux prix de diminuer, tout en encourageant tous les membres à agrandir leur réseau pour gagner des clients.

Preuve du bon fonctionnement de ce système, Freedom et Vidéotron, au dernier trimestre, ont recruté 84 % des nouveaux abonnés nets.

L'autre jour, à la conférence sur les télécommunications, j'ai comparé la mesure à la prescription d'un antibiotique contre le rhume. Nous avions un problème avec notre couverture sans fil et les prix pratiqués dans l'ensemble du pays. Nous avons pris l'antibiotique pendant un certain temps, en pensant que le problème était réglé, mais pas pendant la durée prescrite. Voilà pourquoi notre rhume s'est aggravé.

Il faut continuer à prendre l'antibiotique, pour doter notre pays d'excellents réseaux à prix raisonnables. Ça donne des résultats. Il faut seulement être patient, pour que ça dure.

(0945)

M. Dan Albas:

Nous étudions ici l'accès sans fil en milieu rural, et c'est capital. Mais, comme mon collègue l'a dit, l'accès perd presque tout son sens si le service est trop cher. Quelles sortes de garanties pouvons-nous obtenir de votre organisation et de vous, particulièrement de vos membres, pour que l'extension du service ne se traduise pas par des hausses énormes de tarifs?

M. Robert Ghiz:

Il faut savoir que nos membres n'iront pas construire d'infrastructures dans les communautés s'ils ne peuvent pas fixer le prix à un niveau que la clientèle est prête à payer. Je pense que les marchés dicteront la suite des choses, et vous verrez que, grâce à de nouveaux joueurs et aux trois fournisseurs nationaux, la concurrence conduit à une baisse des prix. J'aime faire remarquer que, de 2014 à 2018, croyez-le ou non, le prix du gigabit de données a diminué d'environ 54 %. Ça marche, et nos membres veulent continuer à agrandir leurs réseaux. Ils veulent collaborer avec le gouvernement, le CRTC et les municipalités, mais le facteur décisif sera la flexibilité.

M. Dan Albas:

Nous voulons tous certainement profiter d'une vitesse et d'un accès de premier ordre, mais il est évident que, pour presque tous les Canadiens, les prix sont un obstacle. La meilleure couverture du monde ne signifie pas grand-chose si le service est inabordable. Je ne veux certainement pas que ce soit un sujet de dispute.

Comment croyez-vous que nous, l'État et l'industrie, nous pouvons collaborer pour instaurer l'accès à Internet à un prix abordable?

M. Robert Ghiz:

Excellente question, excellente remarque. Nous croyons dans la couverture de qualité et dans les prix abordables. Les mécanismes actuels conduisent à une baisse des prix, mais ce n'est pas le temps de rebrousser chemin et de nous donner des orientations nuisibles aux nouveaux joueurs dans la concurrence qui rendra les prix plus abordables.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Masse.

Vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci d'être ici.

Dans un témoignage livré devant un autre comité, la nouvelle ministre du Développement économique rural a déclaré que rien de ce qui fait partie de cette motion ne se fera par voie législative ou réglementaire. Cette clarification m'a beaucoup étonné, mais nos discussions sont importantes. Pour certaines de ces questions, nous avons encore du temps, mais, malheureusement, le gouvernement ne semble pas prêt à se rallier à ce point de vue.

Cela étant dit, j'ai besoin d'éclaircissements. Le CRTC a parlé de débits descendants d'au moins 50 mégabits par seconde et de débits ascendants de 10 mégabits par seconde. Les investissements originels en visaient 25 et 5 par seconde. Pouvez-vous m'éclairer? Dans vos exposés d'aujourd'hui, vous avez dit que, globalement, c'était 50 et 10, mais, si j'ai bien compris, n'est-ce pas qu'on vous en a autorisé 25 et 5?

M. Christopher Seidl:

L'objectif du service universel, que nous voulons pour tous les Canadiens, est d'au moins 50 et 10 mégabits par seconde. En 2016, nous avons fait savoir que, pour certaines régions très éloignées, on pourrait y arriver par étape. Pour l'autoriser, nous accepterons des demandes qui ne satisfont pas d'abord à l'objectif de 50 et de 10 mégabits, mais qui permettraient finalement d'y arriver.

M. Brian Masse:

Ça créera beaucoup de problèmes, parce que, visiblement, cette exigence du service de 25 et de 5 mégabits par seconde est très loin du compte et elle comporte des problèmes techniques. Est-ce l'objectif pour les régions rurales et les communautés éloignées? Ces communautés sont-elles désignées, par exemple, comme étant davantage autochtones? Sont-elles plus éloignées? Quelles sont les régions sacrifiées? Très honnêtement, si vous n'êtes pas disposés à respecter vos propres objectifs, pourquoi le secteur privé serait-il effectivement encouragé à le faire?

(0950)

M. Christopher Seidl:

Le fonds est conçu de manière à rendre le processus concurrentiel, ce qui permettra l'évaluation des projets et la sélection de seulement ceux qui sont de grande qualité. Ce n'est lié à aucune région particulière. Parmi les projets qui arrivent, ceux qui seront sélectionnés seront de grande qualité, ils satisferont à l'objectif de service universel de 50 et de 10 mégabits par seconde, ils répondront à des critères de qualité de service et, ce qui est très important, il y aura l'option de données illimitées. Je m'attendrais à ce que nous ne choisissions rien d'inférieur à 50 et à 10 mégabits, mais il faudra voir quels projets nous seront présentés.

M. Brian Masse:

Si vous optez pour 25 et 5 mégabits, il y aura tamponnage illimité chez les utilisateurs. Franchement, si on a annoncé 750 millions de dollars, relativement à la décision de 2016, pour réorienter le financement recueilli, il m'est difficile de croire que nous construirions un système pour citoyens de seconde zone actuellement en place. Quelle durée le demandeur obtiendra-t-il s'il peut obtenir dès maintenant ses débits? Quel sera l'échéancier pour donner aux autres Canadiens les débits de 50 et de 10 mégabits par seconde?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Notre objectif, pour tous, est de 50 et de 10 mégabits par seconde, et le gouvernement a également annoncé que, d'ici 2030, il tient à ce que cet objectif soit atteint pour tous, et nous y travaillons aussi.

M. Brian Masse:

De combien de temps disposera-t-on pour passer de 25 et 5 mégabits à 50 et 10 mégabits par seconde?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Actuellement, des gens n'ont pas accès à la large bande, et nous travaillons à la procurer à tous d'ici 2030. C'est, actuellement, l'échéancier certain.

M. Brian Masse:

C'est scandaleux. Vous n'avez même pas de délai. Nous construisons un système pour citoyens de seconde zone.

Parlons maintenant des prochaines enchères du spectre de fréquences. Les gouvernements conservateurs et libéraux peuvent jouer avec 20 milliards de dollars pour effectivement obtenir... mais aucun coût réellement engagé. Ils obtiendront des revenus directs des prochaines enchères des spectres de fréquences et, maintenant, nous nous préparons à construire un système pour citoyens de seconde zone.

Je veux questionner M. Ghiz sur les enchères fondées sur la mise à disposition d'installations. Pouvez-vous les décrire un peu plus? C'est que, en partie, les enchères sur les spectres de fréquences ont, comme principal élément, permis de rafler beaucoup d'argent, et vous proposez un différent type d'enchères.

Je voudrais que vous nous exposiez en détail les infrastructures incluses dans le processus d'offre.

M. Robert Ghiz:

Relativement aux fréquences, ce à quoi je faisais allusion dans la directive était d'assurer la prise en considération des infrastructures. Sur le spectre de fréquences, vous avez raison. Nous croyons que les droits imposés à nos membres sont parmi les plus élevés du monde. C'est au Canada que ça arrive. C'est de l'argent qui sera directement facturé aux consommateurs.

M. Brian Masse:

Autrement dit, ça influe sur vos prix.

M. Robert Ghiz:

Effectivement. Je pense que si nous pouvions trouver une façon de réduire les droits d'accès aux fréquences, de comprimer les coûts des enchères du spectre de fréquences, ce serait bénéfique à long terme ou, comme vous l'avez fait remarquer— et j'ai lu certaines de vos observations dans le passé — on pourrait employer l'argent économisé pour aider directement les Canadiens à se connecter.

M. Brian Masse:

Je pense que c'est l'élément qui échappe à la compréhension des Canadiens— les 20 milliards que nous avons reçus, vraiment, pour essentiellement vendre le ciel et créer, dans le ciel, des routes à péage pour les consommateurs, par rapport à l'extension des infrastructures. Les 750 millions, disons-le clairement, seront également obtenus des compagnies. Ils s'ajouteront donc à la facture des Canadiens. Essentiellement, la politique publique rapporte 21 milliards à l'État, pour des services plutôt que pour l'atteinte de ces objectifs. Je trouve la décision du CRTC d'agir en ce sens franchement choquante, compte tenu des occasions qui nous sont offertes.

Revenons aux 10 %. Quels 10 % du pays exclura-t-on? Vous avez dit 90 % d'ici 2021. Quels sont les 10 % sélectionnés? Quelles sont ces régions? Nous devrions en connaître précisément les noms. Je tiens à savoir où ces 10 % sont situés.

M. Christopher Seidl:

Actuellement, l'information est publiée sur notre site Web; les cartes montrent les régions qui se trouvent sous l'objectif de service universel. Une partie de la solution se fondera sur les régions où ira le secteur privé; ce sera les régions où le financement public permettra d'étendre le réseau et où...

M. Brian Masse:

Je ne veux pas du site Web. Dites aux Canadiens, dès maintenant, quels sont les 10 % du pays. Certains d'entre eux ne peuvent même pas accéder au site Web, faute de service. Dites-le dès maintenant au pays. Quels seront les 10 % essentiellement abandonnés à leur sort?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Eh bien, dans un sens général, c'est vraiment les régions les plus éloignées du Canada, les régions rurales, et nous devons corriger cette situation.

M. Brian Masse:

Comment ferez-vous alors? Est-ce que le mandat qui vous est confié n'est pas assez fort? Quelle a été la décision pour essentiellement retrancher les 10 %? Ça semble ridicule de ne pas parachever les 10 derniers pour cent si, en fait, nous disons que tous pourront en profiter. Que manque-t-il à votre mandat pour englober tout le pays dans ce service?

(0955)

M. Christopher Seidl:

Nous faisons partie de la solution. Nous réclamons le versement des 750 millions. Nous cherchons à ramener tout le monde à ce niveau. Il faut du temps pour construire ces réseaux...

M. Brian Masse:

Une analyse économique a-t-elle été faite pour essentiellement déterminer vos besoins pour ces 10 %? La question est légitime. Je veux dire que si nous voulons nous donner cet objectif, en précisant qu'il est national, que vous faut-il pour que ça se fasse?

M. Christopher Seidl:

On estime le total des investissements à 8 à 9 milliards de dollars. Internet continuera de croître et d'évoluer. Je m'attends à ce que les exigences augmentent. L'accès à d'autres technologies exigera plus d'investissements. Nous continuerons d'y veiller et d'y répondre du mieux que nous pourrons.

Nous prenons aussi au sérieux la question des prix abordables. Nous réduisons la subvention locale... parce que nous avons appuyé le service téléphonique par un régime de contributions semblable à celui avec lequel nous appuyons la large bande. En réduisant la subvention locale, nous augmentons la subvention à la large bande, ce qui en fait presque un aspect neutre, sur le plan des revenus, pour les entreprises de télécommunications. La large bande est un enjeu important. Nous avons débuté avec le service universel téléphonique. Nous dépensons un milliard de dollars en partant pour élargir le service téléphonique et rejoindre tous les Canadiens.

Nous commençons donc ce travail maintenant. Le réseau ne se construira pas rapidement. Il est vaste, et la tâche est difficile. On parvient à une croissance constante et importante dans les régions les plus éloignées. Voilà pourquoi nous voulons débuter à ce niveau, pour arriver les premiers dans ces régions, puis nous étendre partout ailleurs. Tous les niveaux de gouvernement...

M. Brian Masse:

L'investissement dans l'obsolescence n'est pas nécessairement une stratégie.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Longfield, vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup pour cette discussion très intéressante. Je me réjouis que nous ayons pu obtenir des témoignages supplémentaires pour le rapport que nous avons commencé.

Monsieur Goldberg, parlons du réseau Télésat, la constellation. Notre comité est allé à Washington, il y a quelques années, et a pris connaissance du réseau nord-sud qu'on se destinait à y lancer, c'est-à-dire environ 4 200 satellites, si je me souviens bien. Je me demande comment cela interagit avec la constellation canadienne. Vous avez parlé d'un réseau entièrement maillé. Avons-nous aussi un maillage avec d'autres pays?

M. Daniel Goldberg:

Je peux seulement imaginer que l'autre constellation à laquelle vous faites allusion est une constellation que SpaceX a à l'esprit. Ces constellations sont en soi mondiales. Il n'y en a pas nécessairement une canadienne ni une autre nécessairement américaine. Elles s'appuient sur des compagnies. La nôtre est canadienne en ce sens que nous sommes une entreprise canadienne.

Nous avons besoin de coordonner nos opérations avec les leurs. Nous pouvons exploiter différentes plages de radiofréquences; on y observe le plus d'interférence. Au lieu d'un problème de collision entre satellites — bien que nous devions tous y être attentifs — c'est plutôt celui d'éviter de créer l'interférence des signaux de chacun.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui.

M. Daniel Goldberg:

Un organisme genevois de l'ONU, l'Union internationale des télécommunications, attribue les fréquences. Je suis heureux de dire que Télésat Canada a des droits de priorité d'utilisation des fréquences à l'échelle mondiale, dont nous avons l'intention de nous prévaloir, et nos amis de SpaceX ont la même intention, mais nous avons préséance sur eux. Ils devront s'arranger pour ne pas nous nuire.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Actuellement, nous travaillons à la coordination mutuelle de nos fréquences et des leurs ainsi que de nos technologies et des leurs.

M. Daniel Goldberg:

Nous sommes en contact. Au niveau des exploitants, nous veillerons, avec le personnel de SpaceX, à ne pas nous nuire mutuellement, tout en affirmant notre position prioritaire. En fin de compte, ça se passe au niveau intergouvernemental. Notre régie, notre administration au Canada, le ministère de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique, devra veiller, au côté de ses homologues américains, au bon fonctionnement de l'ensemble.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Excellent! La solution proviendra en grande partie des technologies employées, et...

M. Daniel Goldberg:

Nous sommes persuadés que les occasions d'innovation sont nombreuses. Il faut des investissements considérables, mais nous pouvons résoudre ce problème. Nous y oeuvrons.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Formidable.

Pour ce qui est de l'innovation, nous avons entendu des témoignages sur la technologie de maillage au sol. Au cours de ma vie antérieure, d'autres personnes et moi nous sommes penchés sur les nœuds d'intelligence artificielle et sur la redondance des machines comme moyens de remplacer les systèmes de contrôle centraux, systèmes qui, lorsqu'ils ont une défaillance, entraînent l'arrêt de l'usine au grand complet. La technologie de maillage au sol est-elle aussi un domaine sur lequel vous travaillez, par exemple, pour favoriser les communications de téléphone à téléphone plutôt que de téléphone à satellite?

(1000)

M. Daniel Goldberg:

Oui. En fin de compte, lorsque nous servirons les utilisateurs mobiles, ce ne sera pas directement à partir du satellite jusqu'à ces combinés mobiles. Nous fournirons un support à large bande de grande capacité à une tour sans fil n'importe où dans le monde et cette tour sans fil communiquera ensuite avec les combinés et les foyers des gens, notre propre constellation. Nous ne considérons pas notre constellation comme une simple constellation spatiale. Elle est entièrement intégrée à un réseau terrestre très développé. Elle est entièrement maillée, entièrement redondante. Elle s'appuie également sur l'intelligence artificielle et l'apprentissage machine pour gérer le trafic et le relayer. C'est un réseau très résilient.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Comment les innovateurs canadiens pourraient-ils tester les nouvelles technologies en passant par vous? Comment interagissez-vous avec eux?

M. Daniel Goldberg:

Ce sont eux qui viennent nous voir. C'est ce qui se passe présentement. Nous en avons déjà lancé un. Nous faisons des tests avec des entreprises du monde entier. Nous en avons réalisé un avec Vodafone, au Royaume-Uni, pour démontrer comment les constellations LEO peuvent prendre en charge la connectivité 5G.

Nous travaillons également avec des entreprises canadiennes pour tester les terminaux utilisateurs, les technologies de compression et toutes sortes d'autres choses. Nous sommes tous très motivés à travailler ensemble et à repousser les limites de l'innovation. La bonne nouvelle, c'est que cette collaboration et cette coopération sont déjà bien amorcées.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Faites-vous partie d'un autre réseau? Je pense à la technologie des machines. Un réseau appelé Open Device Net Vendor Association a été mis sur pied. Toute personne qui développe une technologie doit s'assurer qu'elle est compatible avec DeviceNet. On cherche à faire en sorte que l'Europe et l'Amérique du Nord se conforment à des normes similaires. Les choses ont toujours été un peu différentes avec l'Asie.

Télésat fait-elle partie d'un réseau ou a-t-elle son propre réseau auquel les gens se branchent directement?

M. Daniel Goldberg:

Notre constellation LEO sera entièrement et, je dirais, parfaitement intégrée aux autres réseaux terrestres, réseaux sans fil et réseaux fixes du monde entier. Notre constellation fonctionnera selon les normes du Metro Ethernet Forum. Ce sont les normes que toutes les sociétés de télécommunications de niveau 1 utilisent pour gérer leur trafic. Notre constellation sera compatible avec ces normes.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Ghiz ou monsieur Seidl, vous avez parlé de confusion en matière de réglementation. Y a-t-il une lacune réglementaire qu'il faut combler avec le réseau de Télésat et les réseaux au sol? Les règlements que nous avons actuellement nous permettent-ils de gérer tout cela efficacement ou est-ce que cet aspect fait partie de la confusion que vous évoquiez?

M. Eric Smith (vice-président, Affaires réglementaires, Association canadienne des télécommunications sans fil):

Je peux répondre à cette question.

Cela ne faisait pas vraiment partie de la confusion politique à laquelle nous faisions allusion.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D'accord.

M. Eric Smith:

En ce qui concerne notre industrie, nos membres, l'utilisation d'une technologie comme celle de Télésat est assurément une possibilité. La technologie évolue. Les lois de la physique n'évoluent pas, mais la technologie, oui. Nos membres essaient d'utiliser la technologie qui répondra le mieux à leurs besoins. Le Canada est un vaste pays, alors certaines personnes utilisent le sans-fil et d'autres, le satellite. Il y a certainement des possibilités.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Le CRTC est-il d'accord avec ce qui se passe ou y a-t-il des changements que nous devrions envisager?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Non, nous sommes très neutres sur le plan technologique. Il y a certains niveaux que nous voulons atteindre et nous cherchons des solutions novatrices pour y arriver.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Très bien. Alors, c'est juste une question de brancher les gens.

M. Christopher Seidl:

Oui, ce n'est que cela.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Et c'est ce dont nous parlons.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Albas.

Monsieur Albas, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vais partager mon temps de parole avec M. Lloyd.

Ceci s'adresse au CRTC et à l'ACTS.

Beaucoup de gens s'interrogent sur l'augmentation énorme des prix des services mobiles, et nous entendons dire que les services que les gens demandent ont augmenté au fil du temps. On dit que les données utilisées il y a cinq ans à peine sont très bon marché de nos jours, mais que les demandes de données modernes ont augmenté.

Quand je parle aux gens de ma circonscription, j'avoue que je dois me ranger de leur côté. Je pense que la réponse qu'on leur donne est un peu une façon de noyer le poisson. La technologie évolue sans cesse et les besoins des consommateurs augmentent. D'autres pays ont des forfaits de données — parfois illimités — beaucoup moins chers que ceux que nous avons ici. Pourquoi est-ce le cas?

M. Robert Ghiz:

Je vais commencer là. Je pense que ce que l'on voit aujourd'hui — et en ce qui a trait à ce que je disais tantôt —, c'est que notre modèle qui appuie la concurrence fondée sur les installations commence à faire baisser les prix. Sommes-nous aussi bas que tout le monde le voudrait? Probablement pas. Mais je peux dire ceci: entre le premier trimestre 2014 et le deuxième trimestre 2018, nous avons enregistré une baisse de 53,6 % pour un gigabit de données. Entre mai 2017 et novembre 2018, nous avons enregistré une baisse de 67 %. Le prix commence à baisser au fur et à mesure que la concurrence augmente et que les acteurs régionaux se multiplient.

Ce que nous voulons dire, c'est que ce n'est pas le moment de se détourner de la concurrence fondée sur les installations, car cela nuira assurément à la croissance dans les régions rurales, et parce que cela nuira très probablement d'abord et avant tout à nos nouveaux venus.

(1005)

M. Christopher Seidl:

En février, le CRTC a lancé une instance pour examiner le marché du sans-fil mobile. L'objectif était de faire un très vaste examen de l'abordabilité, de la compétitivité et des obstacles au déploiement. Je ne peux pas vous donner de détails à ce sujet, car il s'agit d'une instance publique, mais dans l'appel aux observations, nous avons bel et bien parlé d'un examen complet. Nous avons pensé qu'il était peut-être temps d'obliger les exploitants de réseaux virtuels mobiles à nous aider à cet égard, mais il s'agit d'un examen très exhaustif qui est déjà bien amorcé. Une audience aura lieu en janvier prochain.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vais céder la parole à M. Lloyd.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci.

Merci de votre présence.

Ma première question s'adresse à M. Seidl.

Nous avons beaucoup parlé aujourd'hui des prix et de l'accès, mais ce dont je veux parler, c'est de la menace que représentent les catastrophes naturelles pour nos infrastructures de communication. C'est une question qui me tient vraiment à cœur. Comme on l'a dit, il y a eu des tornades à Ottawa qui ont entraîné une panne d'électricité, et les génératrices ne pouvaient tout simplement pas maintenir le service jusqu'à ce que ces installations soient prêtes. Des gens de ma circonscription m'ont également fait part de menaces réelles et possibles d'éjections de matière coronale et d'éruptions solaires créant des impulsions électromagnétiques qui pourraient avoir une incidence sur notre... Bien qu'elles soient théoriques, ces choses pourraient se produire.

Quelles leçons le CRTC a-t-il tirées des catastrophes naturelles et quelles sont les mesures prises pour protéger nos infrastructures de communication face à la menace bien réelle de ces phénomènes?

Merci.

M. Christopher Seidl:

Je vais parler de ce que nous avons fait dans le passé.

Il y a quelques années, nous avons fait un examen de notre système 911 et de nos réseaux. Nous avons procédé à un examen approfondi pour nous assurer qu'ils étaient résilients et qu'ils pouvaient « survivre », et nous avons établi certaines exigences. Nous les avons trouvés très résistants. Il s'agit des réseaux qui acheminent les appels aux points de réponse de la sécurité publique et qui s'interconnectent aux réseaux locaux. Nous avons mis en place certaines pratiques exemplaires, et nous avons fixé certaines exigences en la matière. Nous avons examiné cette question en profondeur.

La préparation aux situations d'urgence relève d'Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada et de Sécurité publique Canada. Nous ne nous immisçons pas dans cet espace particulier, mais nous sommes conscients des autres aspects. De toute évidence, nous réglementons maintenant les alertes d'urgence pour les radiodiffuseurs et les compagnies de téléphonie cellulaire, en plus de voir à la gestion du système 911 en général.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Ce qui m'inquiète, c'est que si nos systèmes sont en panne, les gens ne pourront pas recevoir ces alertes d'urgence s'ils n'ont aucun accès à leur téléphone.

Je pense que ma prochaine question s'adresse surtout à M. Ghiz. Que font nos entreprises dotées d'installations pour renforcer leurs systèmes afin d'assurer le maintien du service en cas de catastrophe naturelle?

M. Robert Ghiz:

Je vais demander à Eric de répondre à cela.

M. Eric Smith:

Merci. C'est une excellente question.

De toute évidence, nos membres sont la principale préoccupation. Ils veulent que leurs réseaux soient opérationnels. Comme vous l'avez mentionné, des catastrophes naturelles se produisent, et je pense que vous faites probablement référence à cette fois où il y a eu cette tempête à Ottawa qui a fait sauter les génératrices et coupé l'électricité pendant quelques jours.

Les réseaux sont conçus pour être résilients. Théoriquement, tout est possible. Vous pouvez toujours augmenter cette résilience, sauf que cela entraîne des coûts additionnels. La question qui survient alors, c'est celle de l'abordabilité, de sorte qu'il faut chercher un certain équilibre. Je pense que nous avons confiance en nos membres. Nous avons certains des meilleurs transporteurs au monde. Ils utilisent les meilleures pratiques et ils les revoient continuellement. Je suis du reste convaincu qu'ils ont aussi des discussions avec le gouvernement à ce sujet.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant au dernier segment de cinq minutes, avec M. Sheehan.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup à tous les témoins. C'était très instructif.

Je représente une région que l'on appelle semi-rurale. Sault Ste. Marie est une collectivité de taille moyenne, et les régions périphériques sont combinées avec des collectivités et des comtés de diverses tailles. Il y a aussi des conseils de services locaux pour les Premières Nations. La topographie géographique de ma région — qui est située sur les rives du lac Supérieur — est différente de celle d'autres régions du Canada. Il y a aussi un tas de parcs, tant provinciaux que nationaux. C'est un endroit intéressant. Lorsque l'on roule sur la 17, on pourrait s'attendre à avoir une bonne réception — après tout, c'est la route 17 —, mais ce n'est pas nécessairement le cas, et ce, pour diverses raisons.

C'est comme ça partout au Canada. On pourrait croire que lorsqu'il est question de régions rurales, on fait référence aux régions éloignées, mais ce n'est pas nécessairement le cas. Le long de certains de nos grands axes routiers — qu'il s'agisse de routes principales ou secondaires —, il n'y a pas de réception. En fait, j'avais l'habitude de toujours emporter un sac de survie, c'est-à-dire un gros sac noir contenant tout ce dont j'avais besoin pour survivre au cas où je resterais coincé quelque part. Ces précautions sont encore de mise dans notre coin de pays.

À la fin des années 1990, lorsque j'étais membre du conseil scolaire, nous avons fait beaucoup de travail en construisant des tours et en établissant des partenariats avec différents intervenants. Ma question est la suivante: dans l'ensemble, quels genres de mesures prenez-vous — particulièrement en ce qui concerne les secteurs des municipalités, universités, écoles et hôpitaux de ces collectivités — pour fournir des services dans les régions que ces secteurs desservent déjà? Ils sont plus modestes et ils ne disposent pas vraiment de gros budgets. Il y a cependant beaucoup de gens qui ont des idées vraiment novatrices. Par exemple, le CRTC vient de lancer un appel de propositions. Qui fait une demande pour ce genre de choses, et que faites-vous pour attirer des candidatures? Je pourrais rendre ma question plus précise. Comment vous adressez-vous au Canada rural, en particulier, pour stimuler la participation?

(1010)

M. Christopher Seidl:

En ce qui concerne notre fonds pour les services à large bande, une partie de notre objectif est d'assurer la participation de la collectivité. L'un des critères que nous évaluons est l'ampleur du soutien que les projets mis de l'avant reçoivent des collectivités. Les projets soumis par les fournisseurs de services seront évalués en partie en fonction de l'engagement investi pour comprendre les besoins des communautés locales. Plus cet engagement sera profond, plus grande sera la qualité du projet. Voici comment nous voyons les choses: les projets seront soumis, nous aurons des discussions à ce sujet et nous chercherons à répondre aux priorités des régions visées.

M. Terry Sheehan:

J'essaie encore de comprendre. Que faites-vous pour, tout d'abord, faire parvenir l'information aux régions rurales du Canada et, dans vos efforts pour faire en sorte que l'argent se rende aux collectivités, y a-t-il des considérations spéciales pour ces applications particulières?

M. Christopher Seidl:

Comme je l'ai mentionné, nous avons des critères pour cela, et nous nous attendons à ce que les gouvernements locaux, provinciaux et territoriaux jouent un rôle dans la réalisation de ces priorités. Nous recherchons des projets dans toutes les régions. Comme je l'ai mentionné, l'un des critères est l'engagement communautaire.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Monsieur Ghiz, dans votre déclaration liminaire, vous avez dit avoir proposé des politiques pour jeter les bases de cela, mais vous ne nous avez pas dit comment vos propositions ont été reçues. Pouvez-vous nous dire ce qu'il en est?

M. Robert Ghiz:

Est-ce que vous parlez de la ligne directrice?

M. Terry Sheehan:

Oui, celle dont vous avez parlé.

M. Robert Ghiz:

C'est intéressant. Je crois comprendre que la ligne directrice sera déposée au Parlement avant qu'il ne mette fin à ses travaux. Je pense que le message que je reçois, c'est que les gens du ministère de l'Industrie et différents agents de l'État comprennent à quel point il est important d'investir dans l'infrastructure. Nous sommes allés y expliquer notre histoire.

Je ne veux pas m'engager outre mesure du côté de la politique, mais je dirais que parfois, à l'approche d'une élection, une bonne politique publique fait figure de ce que l'on appelle « de la bonne politique ». D'après ce que j'ai vu, une bonne politique publique viserait à encourager nos transporteurs dotés d'installations à investir pour aider à combler les lacunes — c'est la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici aujourd'hui. À notre avis, tout changement de direction à cet égard ralentira l'investissement que nous constatons, la collaboration que nous constatons et la réduction des prix que nous constatons, parce que ce sont les nouveaux venus qui créent cela.

C'est ce que l'on entend. Nous allons attendre de voir ce qu'en disent le ministère de l'Industrie et le ministre, mais j'aime être optimiste, et j'espère que notre message est entendu.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup. C'est tout le temps que nous avions aujourd'hui.

Merci à nos témoins d'avoir été là pour discuter de cette question extrêmement importante.

Avant de partir, j'aimerais simplement rappeler aux membres du Comité que nous recevrons probablement l'ébauche du rapport mardi prochain, de sorte que nous ne nous réunirons pas mardi, mais jeudi, à notre heure habituelle.

Merci à tous d'avoir été là.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 06, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.