header image
The world according to David Graham

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. Trump will win in 2020 (and keep an eye on 2024)
  2. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  3. Next steps
  4. On what electoral reform reforms
  5. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  6. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  7. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  8. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  9. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  10. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  11. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  12. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  13. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  14. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  15. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  17. 2019-06-04 INDU 166
  18. 2019-06-03 SECU 166
  19. 2019 June newsletter / infolettre juin 2019
  20. 2019-05-30 RNNR 137
  21. 2019-05-30 PROC 158
  22. 2019-05-30 INDU 165
  23. 2019-05-29 SECU 165
  24. 2019-05-29 ETHI 155
  25. 2019-05-28 ETHI 154
  26. 2019-05-28 ETHI 153
  27. 2019-05-27 ETHI 151
  28. 2019-05-27 SECU 164
  29. 2019-05-17 10:59 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  30. 2019-05-16 ETHI 150
  31. older entries...

All stories filed under parlchmbr...

  1. 2015-12-07: 2015-12-07 14:06 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  2. 2016-01-28: 2016-01-28 15:02 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  3. 2016-02-03: 2016-02-03 14:21 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  4. 2016-02-04: 2016-02-04 16:49 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  5. 2016-02-04: 2016-02-04 17:49 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  6. 2016-02-17: 2016-02-17 15:05 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  7. 2016-02-19: 2016-02-19 13:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  8. 2016-02-22: 2016-02-22 13:57 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2016-02-22: 2016-02-22 17:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  10. 2016-03-09: 2016-03-09 17:17 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  11. 2016-03-21: 2016-03-21 13:07 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  12. 2016-03-21: 2016-03-21 16:23 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  13. 2016-03-21: 2016-03-21 16:52 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  14. 2016-03-21: 2016-03-21 17:53 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2016-03-22: 2016-03-22 12:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. 2016-03-22: 2016-03-22 12:53 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  17. 2016-03-22: 2016-03-22 12:55 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  18. 2016-03-22: 2016-03-22 12:55:30 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  19. 2016-03-22: 2016-03-22 12:57 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  20. 2016-03-24: 2016-03-24 13:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  21. 2016-04-11: 2016-04-11 11:56 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  22. 2016-04-11: 2016-04-11 12:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  23. 2016-04-11: 2016-04-11 13:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  24. 2016-04-11: 2016-04-11 13:26 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  25. 2016-04-11: 2016-04-11 17:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  26. 2016-04-12: 2016-04-12 13:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  27. 2016-04-12: 2016-04-12 14:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  28. 2016-04-13: 2016-04-13 17:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  29. 2016-04-13: 2016-04-13 17:15 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  30. 2016-04-13: 2016-04-13 17:17 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  31. 2016-04-13: 2016-04-13 17:19 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  32. 2016-04-14: 2016-04-14 13:36 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  33. 2016-04-15: 2016-04-15 10:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  34. 2016-04-15: 2016-04-15 10:05 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  35. 2016-04-15: 2016-04-15 10:38 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  36. 2016-04-15: 2016-04-15 12:59 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  37. 2016-04-15: 2016-04-15 13:23 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  38. 2016-04-15: 2016-04-15 13:26 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  39. 2016-04-15: 2016-04-15 13:41 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  40. 2016-04-15: 2016-04-15 14:13 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  41. 2016-04-18: 2016-04-18 12:07 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  42. 2016-04-18: 2016-04-18 12:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  43. 2016-04-18: 2016-04-18 12:21 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  44. 2016-04-18: 2016-04-18 12:22 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  45. 2016-04-18: 2016-04-18 13:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  46. 2016-04-18: 2016-04-18 15:03 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  47. 2016-04-18: 2016-04-18 15:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  48. 2016-04-18: 2016-04-18 17:03 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  49. 2016-04-19: 2016-04-19 10:35 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  50. 2016-04-19: 2016-04-19 10:51 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  51. 2016-04-19: 2016-04-19 10:53 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  52. 2016-04-19: 2016-04-19 10:54 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  53. 2016-04-19: 2016-04-19 10:56 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  54. 2016-04-19: 2016-04-19 10:59 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  55. 2016-04-19: 2016-04-19 13:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  56. 2016-04-19: 2016-04-19 17:08 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  57. 2016-04-19: 2016-04-19 17:35 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  58. 2016-04-20: 2016-04-20 14:53 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  59. 2016-04-20: 2016-04-20 16:40 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  60. 2016-04-21: 2016-04-21 17:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  61. 2016-04-22: 2016-04-22 13:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  62. 2016-04-22: 2016-04-22 14:19 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  63. 2016-05-02: 2016-05-02 11:21 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  64. 2016-05-02: 2016-05-02 11:50 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  65. 2016-05-02: 2016-05-02 21:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  66. 2016-05-02: 2016-05-02 21:44 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  67. 2016-05-02: 2016-05-02 22:26 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  68. 2016-05-02: 2016-05-02 23:50 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  69. 2016-05-03: 2016-05-03 12:37 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  70. 2016-05-03: 2016-05-03 12:49 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  71. 2016-05-05: 2016-05-05 14:48 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  72. 2016-05-05: 2016-05-05 17:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  73. 2016-05-06: 2016-05-06 10:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  74. 2016-05-06: 2016-05-06 12:34 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  75. 2016-05-09: 2016-05-09 15:54 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  76. 2016-05-09: 2016-05-09 17:48 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  77. 2016-05-09: 2016-05-09 18:24 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  78. 2016-05-10: 2016-05-10 16:06 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  79. 2016-05-11: 2016-05-11 14:07 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  80. 2016-05-16: 2016-05-16 16:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  81. 2016-05-16: 2016-05-16 16:59 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  82. 2016-05-19: 2016-05-19 16:35 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  83. 2016-05-19: 2016-05-19 16:40 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  84. 2016-05-19: 2016-05-19 16:43 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  85. 2016-05-19: 2016-05-19 16:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  86. 2016-05-19: 2016-05-19 16:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  87. 2016-05-20: 2016-05-20 10:56 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  88. 2016-05-20: 2016-05-20 11:58 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  89. 2016-05-20: 2016-05-20 13:20 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  90. 2016-05-30: 2016-05-30 12:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  91. 2016-05-30: 2016-05-30 17:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  92. 2016-05-30: 2016-05-30 17:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  93. 2016-05-31: 2016-05-31 13:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  94. 2016-06-02: 2016-06-02 12:44 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  95. 2016-06-02: 2016-06-02 12:57 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  96. 2016-06-02: 2016-06-02 13:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  97. 2016-06-02: 2016-06-02 13:13 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  98. 2016-06-02: 2016-06-02 13:19 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  99. 2016-06-02: 2016-06-02 13:29 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  100. 2016-06-02: 2016-06-02 13:31 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  101. 2016-06-02: 2016-06-02 13:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  102. 2016-06-02: 2016-06-02 15:13 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  103. 2016-06-02: 2016-06-02 17:02 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  104. 2016-06-03: 2016-06-03 12:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  105. 2016-06-06: 2016-06-06 12:55 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  106. 2016-06-06: 2016-06-06 13:22 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  107. 2016-06-06: 2016-06-06 13:54 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  108. 2016-06-07: 2016-06-07 15:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  109. 2016-06-07: 2016-06-07 16:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  110. 2016-06-07: 2016-06-07 16:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  111. 2016-06-07: 2016-06-07 17:43 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  112. 2016-06-10: 2016-06-10 11:03 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  113. 2016-06-10: 2016-06-10 12:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  114. 2016-06-10: 2016-06-10 13:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  115. 2016-06-13: 2016-06-13 17:02 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  116. 2016-06-16: 2016-06-16 17:03 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  117. 2016-09-19: 2016-09-19 16:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  118. 2016-09-19: 2016-09-19 16:16 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  119. 2016-09-19: 2016-09-19 16:17 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  120. 2016-09-19: 2016-09-19 16:19 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  121. 2016-09-19: 2016-09-19 18:06 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  122. 2016-09-20: 2016-09-20 12:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  123. 2016-09-20: 2016-09-20 13:00 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  124. 2016-09-20: 2016-09-20 13:47 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  125. 2016-09-20: 2016-09-20 15:34 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  126. 2016-09-20: 2016-09-20 16:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  127. 2016-09-22: 2016-09-22 14:57 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  128. 2016-09-22: 2016-09-22 16:21 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  129. 2016-09-22: 2016-09-22 17:36 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  130. 2016-09-26: 2016-09-26 12:52 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  131. 2016-09-26: 2016-09-26 13:09 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  132. 2016-09-26: 2016-09-26 13:15 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  133. 2016-09-26: 2016-09-26 13:17 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  134. 2016-09-26: 2016-09-26 13:19 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  135. 2016-09-26: 2016-09-26 17:17 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  136. 2016-09-26: 2016-09-26 17:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  137. 2016-09-28: 2016-09-28 15:22 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  138. 2016-09-28: 2016-09-28 15:51 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  139. 2016-09-28: 2016-09-28 19:19 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  140. 2016-09-29: 2016-09-29 15:34 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  141. 2016-09-29: 2016-09-29 15:43 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  142. 2016-09-29: 2016-09-29 15:44 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  143. 2016-09-29: 2016-09-29 15:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  144. 2016-09-29: 2016-09-29 15:47 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  145. 2016-09-30: 2016-09-30 10:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  146. 2016-09-30: 2016-09-30 11:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  147. 2016-09-30: 2016-09-30 12:21 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  148. 2016-10-03: 2016-10-03 13:30 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  149. 2016-10-06: 2016-10-06 11:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  150. 2016-10-06: 2016-10-06 11:29 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  151. 2016-10-06: 2016-10-06 12:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  152. 2016-10-06: 2016-10-06 12:24 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  153. 2016-10-06: 2016-10-06 12:49 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  154. 2016-10-06: 2016-10-06 15:59 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  155. 2016-10-06: 2016-10-06 16:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  156. 2016-10-06: 2016-10-06 16:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  157. 2016-10-06: 2016-10-06 16:13 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  158. 2016-10-06: 2016-10-06 16:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  159. 2016-10-06: 2016-10-06 16:25 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  160. 2016-10-17: 2016-10-17 11:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  161. 2016-10-17: 2016-10-17 12:55 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  162. 2016-10-17: 2016-10-17 13:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  163. 2016-10-17: 2016-10-17 13:53 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  164. 2016-10-19: 2016-10-19 16:22 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  165. 2016-10-19: 2016-10-19 16:30 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  166. 2016-10-19: 2016-10-19 16:31 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  167. 2016-10-19: 2016-10-19 16:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  168. 2016-10-19: 2016-10-19 16:33 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  169. 2016-10-19: 2016-10-19 16:35 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  170. 2016-10-19: 2016-10-19 16:35:30 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  171. 2016-10-19: 2016-10-19 16:37 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  172. 2016-10-21: 2016-10-21 11:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  173. 2016-10-21: 2016-10-21 13:31 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  174. 2016-10-24: 2016-10-24 15:18 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  175. 2016-10-24: 2016-10-24 16:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  176. 2016-10-24: 2016-10-24 16:16 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  177. 2016-10-24: 2016-10-24 16:24 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  178. 2016-10-24: 2016-10-24 16:26 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  179. 2016-10-24: 2016-10-24 16:26:30 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  180. 2016-10-24: 2016-10-24 16:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  181. 2016-10-24: 2016-10-24 17:57 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  182. 2016-10-25: 2016-10-25 15:30 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  183. 2016-10-27: 2016-10-27 17:55 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  184. 2016-10-28: 2016-10-28 12:38 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  185. 2016-10-28: 2016-10-28 13:40 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  186. 2016-10-31: 2016-10-31 12:34 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  187. 2016-10-31: 2016-10-31 16:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  188. 2016-10-31: 2016-10-31 16:39 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  189. 2016-10-31: 2016-10-31 16:40 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  190. 2016-10-31: 2016-10-31 16:41 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  191. 2016-10-31: 2016-10-31 16:42 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  192. 2016-11-01: 2016-11-01 13:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  193. 2016-11-01: 2016-11-01 13:43 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  194. 2016-11-02: 2016-11-02 15:48 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  195. 2016-11-03: 2016-11-03 12:37 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  196. 2016-11-03: 2016-11-03 12:47 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  197. 2016-11-03: 2016-11-03 12:49 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  198. 2016-11-03: 2016-11-03 12:50 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  199. 2016-11-03: 2016-11-03 16:20 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  200. 2016-11-04: 2016-11-04 10:43 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  201. 2016-11-04: 2016-11-04 11:02 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  202. 2016-11-04: 2016-11-04 13:26 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  203. 2016-11-04: 2016-11-04 13:50 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  204. 2016-11-14: 2016-11-14 13:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  205. 2016-11-14: 2016-11-14 13:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  206. 2016-11-14: 2016-11-14 17:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  207. 2016-11-14: 2016-11-14 17:43 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  208. 2016-11-14: 2016-11-14 18:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  209. 2016-11-15: 2016-11-15 13:17 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  210. 2016-11-15: 2016-11-15 13:51 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  211. 2016-11-17: 2016-11-17 15:19 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  212. 2016-11-17: 2016-11-17 16:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  213. 2016-11-17: 2016-11-17 16:22 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  214. 2016-11-17: 2016-11-17 16:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  215. 2016-11-17: 2016-11-17 16:33 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  216. 2016-11-17: 2016-11-17 16:35 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  217. 2016-11-18: 2016-11-18 11:03 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  218. 2016-11-18: 2016-11-18 14:26 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  219. 2016-11-21: 2016-11-21 12:53 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  220. 2016-11-21: 2016-11-21 16:41 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  221. 2016-11-21: 2016-11-21 17:58 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  222. 2016-11-21: 2016-11-21 18:09 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  223. 2016-11-21: 2016-11-21 18:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  224. 2016-11-21: 2016-11-21 18:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  225. 2016-11-21: 2016-11-21 18:23 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  226. 2016-11-21: 2016-11-21 18:31 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  227. 2016-11-22: 2016-11-22 15:26 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  228. 2016-11-22: 2016-11-22 18:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  229. 2016-11-28: 2016-11-28 16:38 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  230. 2016-11-28: 2016-11-28 16:54 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  231. 2016-11-29: 2016-11-29 16:18 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  232. 2016-11-29: 2016-11-29 16:29 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  233. 2016-11-30: 2016-11-30 16:43 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  234. 2016-12-01: 2016-12-01 12:31 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  235. 2016-12-01: 2016-12-01 12:42 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  236. 2016-12-01: 2016-12-01 12:44 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  237. 2016-12-01: 2016-12-01 12:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  238. 2016-12-02: 2016-12-02 11:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  239. 2016-12-02: 2016-12-02 12:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  240. 2016-12-05: 2016-12-05 14:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  241. 2016-12-05: 2016-12-05 15:52 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  242. 2016-12-05: 2016-12-05 17:09 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  243. 2016-12-05: 2016-12-05 17:18 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  244. 2016-12-05: 2016-12-05 17:20 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  245. 2016-12-05: 2016-12-05 17:22 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  246. 2016-12-06: 2016-12-06 17:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  247. 2016-12-08: 2016-12-08 15:39 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  248. 2016-12-08: 2016-12-08 16:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  249. 2016-12-08: 2016-12-08 16:13 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  250. 2016-12-08: 2016-12-08 16:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  251. 2016-12-08: 2016-12-08 16:15 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  252. 2016-12-08: 2016-12-08 16:17 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  253. 2016-12-12: 2016-12-12 11:24 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  254. 2017-01-31: 2017-01-31 12:18 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  255. 2017-01-31: 2017-01-31 16:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  256. 2017-02-02: 2017-02-02 11:58 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  257. 2017-02-02: 2017-02-02 12:40 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  258. 2017-02-02: 2017-02-02 14:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  259. 2017-02-02: 2017-02-02 16:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  260. 2017-02-06: 2017-02-06 12:06 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  261. 2017-02-07: 2017-02-07 17:31 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  262. 2017-02-09: 2017-02-09 14:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  263. 2017-02-09: 2017-02-09 15:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  264. 2017-02-09: 2017-02-09 15:38 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  265. 2017-02-09: 2017-02-09 15:41 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  266. 2017-02-10: 2017-02-10 13:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  267. 2017-02-13: 2017-02-13 12:26 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  268. 2017-02-21: 2017-02-21 17:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  269. 2017-02-21: 2017-02-21 17:58 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  270. 2017-02-21: 2017-02-21 18:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  271. 2017-02-21: 2017-02-21 18:24 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  272. 2017-03-06: 2017-03-06 18:06 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  273. 2017-03-06: 2017-03-06 18:16 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  274. 2017-03-06: 2017-03-06 18:18 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  275. 2017-03-06: 2017-03-06 18:19 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  276. 2017-03-09: 2017-03-09 13:40 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  277. 2017-03-10: 2017-03-10 10:43 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  278. 2017-03-10: 2017-03-10 12:24 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  279. 2017-03-10: 2017-03-10 12:36 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  280. 2017-03-10: 2017-03-10 12:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  281. 2017-03-10: 2017-03-10 12:59 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  282. 2017-03-10: 2017-03-10 13:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  283. 2017-03-10: 2017-03-10 13:17 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  284. 2017-03-10: 2017-03-10 13:29 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  285. 2017-03-20: 2017-03-20 13:21 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  286. 2017-03-20: 2017-03-20 13:22 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  287. 2017-04-04: 2017-04-04 11:38 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  288. 2017-04-04: 2017-04-04 11:41 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  289. 2017-04-04: 2017-04-04 11:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  290. 2017-04-04: 2017-04-04 11:48 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  291. 2017-04-04: 2017-04-04 11:49 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  292. 2017-04-07: 2017-04-07 11:09 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  293. 2017-04-12: 2017-04-12 16:06 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  294. 2017-05-01: 2017-05-01 12:49 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  295. 2017-05-01: 2017-05-01 13:26 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  296. 2017-05-01: 2017-05-01 13:38 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  297. 2017-05-02: 2017-05-02 10:17 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  298. 2017-05-02: 2017-05-02 12:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  299. 2017-05-02: 2017-05-02 15:22 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  300. 2017-05-03: 2017-05-03 16:20 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  301. 2017-05-04: 2017-05-04 15:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  302. 2017-05-04: 2017-05-04 16:19 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  303. 2017-05-04: 2017-05-04 16:51 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  304. 2017-05-09: 2017-05-09 16:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  305. 2017-05-11: 2017-05-11 18:08 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  306. 2017-05-16: 2017-05-16 13:42 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  307. 2017-05-18: 2017-05-18 17:15 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  308. 2017-05-30: 2017-05-30 21:56 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  309. 2017-05-31: 2017-05-31 22:07 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  310. 2017-06-02: 2017-06-02 11:06 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  311. 2017-06-05: 2017-06-05 17:54 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  312. 2017-06-08: 2017-06-08 16:36 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  313. 2017-06-08: 2017-06-08 17:21 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  314. 2017-06-09: 2017-06-09 12:25 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  315. 2017-06-12: 2017-06-12 16:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  316. 2017-06-12: 2017-06-12 17:31 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  317. 2017-06-12: 2017-06-12 22:47 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  318. 2017-06-13: 2017-06-13 13:13 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  319. 2017-06-13: 2017-06-13 13:24 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  320. 2017-06-13: 2017-06-13 13:25 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  321. 2017-06-13: 2017-06-13 13:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  322. 2017-06-13: 2017-06-13 22:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  323. 2017-06-14: 2017-06-14 19:13 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  324. 2017-06-14: 2017-06-14 19:47 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  325. 2017-06-15: 2017-06-15 18:24 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  326. 2017-06-16: 2017-06-16 12:52 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  327. 2017-06-16: 2017-06-16 13:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  328. 2017-06-19: 2017-06-19 12:31 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  329. 2017-06-19: 2017-06-19 13:16 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  330. 2017-06-20: 2017-06-20 12:20 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  331. 2017-06-20: 2017-06-20 12:31 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  332. 2017-06-20: 2017-06-20 12:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  333. 2017-06-20: 2017-06-20 12:34 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  334. 2017-06-20: 2017-06-20 12:36 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  335. 2017-06-20: 2017-06-20 19:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  336. 2017-06-20: 2017-06-20 21:40 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  337. 2017-06-20: 2017-06-20 21:56 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  338. 2017-06-20: 2017-06-20 21:58 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  339. 2017-06-20: 2017-06-20 21:59 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  340. 2017-06-20: 2017-06-20 22:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  341. 2017-06-20: 2017-06-20 22:02 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  342. 2017-06-20: 2017-06-20 22:03 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  343. 2017-06-21: 2017-06-21 17:03 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  344. 2017-09-18: 2017-09-18 11:23 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  345. 2017-09-18: 2017-09-18 11:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  346. 2017-09-18: 2017-09-18 11:49 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  347. 2017-09-18: 2017-09-18 12:34 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  348. 2017-09-18: 2017-09-18 13:00 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  349. 2017-09-18: 2017-09-18 13:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  350. 2017-09-18: 2017-09-18 13:38 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  351. 2017-09-18: 2017-09-18 13:49 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  352. 2017-09-18: 2017-09-18 16:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  353. 2017-09-18: 2017-09-18 17:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  354. 2017-09-29: 2017-09-29 11:13 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  355. 2017-10-05: 2017-10-05 15:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  356. 2017-10-05: 2017-10-05 17:15 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  357. 2017-10-19: 2017-10-19 17:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  358. 2017-10-23: 2017-10-23 14:09 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  359. 2017-10-31: 2017-10-31 15:05 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  360. 2017-11-06: 2017-11-06 13:34 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  361. 2017-11-07: 2017-11-07 14:08 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  362. 2017-11-21: 2017-11-21 14:05 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  363. 2017-12-06: 2017-12-06 14:15 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  364. 2017-12-07: 2017-12-07 16:34 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  365. 2017-12-07: 2017-12-07 16:40 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  366. 2018-01-30: 2018-01-30 14:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  367. 2018-02-01: 2018-02-01 13:03 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  368. 2018-02-05: 2018-02-05 15:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  369. 2018-02-09: 2018-02-09 11:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  370. 2018-03-26: 2018-03-26 14:09 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  371. 2018-03-27: 2018-03-27 18:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  372. 2018-04-26: 2018-04-26 15:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  373. 2018-05-11: 2018-05-11 11:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  374. 2018-05-11: 2018-05-11 12:42 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  375. 2018-05-11: 2018-05-11 12:53 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  376. 2018-05-11: 2018-05-11 13:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  377. 2018-05-11: 2018-05-11 13:06 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  378. 2018-05-11: 2018-05-11 13:07 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  379. 2018-05-22: 2018-05-22 17:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  380. 2018-05-29: 2018-05-29 14:03 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  381. 2018-06-05: 2018-06-05 20:23 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  382. 2018-09-20: 2018-09-20 14:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  383. 2018-09-28: 2018-09-28 11:06 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  384. 2018-10-24: 2018-10-24 15:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  385. 2018-10-29: 2018-10-29 14:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  386. 2018-11-07: 2018-11-07 14:16 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  387. 2018-11-21: 2018-11-21 17:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  388. 2018-11-26: 2018-11-26 14:05 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  389. 2018-11-29: 2018-11-29 15:19 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  390. 2018-11-29: 2018-11-29 15:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  391. 2018-11-29: 2018-11-29 16:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  392. 2018-11-29: 2018-11-29 16:21 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  393. 2018-11-29: 2018-11-29 16:24 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  394. 2018-12-07: 2018-12-07 12:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  395. 2019-02-05: 2019-02-05 14:59 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  396. 2019-02-06: 2019-02-06 14:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  397. 2019-02-20: 2019-02-20 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  398. 2019-02-20: 2019-02-20 19:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  399. 2019-03-18: 2019-03-18 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  400. 2019-04-01: 2019-04-01 14:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  401. 2019-05-02: 2019-05-02 14:00 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  402. 2019-05-03: 2019-05-03 11:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  403. 2019-05-03: 2019-05-03 12:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  404. 2019-05-17: 2019-05-17 10:59 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  405. 2019-06-05: 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  406. 2019-06-05: 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  407. 2019-06-17: 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Displaying the most recent stories under parlchmbr...

2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Broadband Internet services, Rural development, Statements by Members

Déclarations de députés, Développement rural, Services Internet à large bande

Mr. Speaker, after years of counterproductive efforts by political parties that only wanted to prove that federalism does not work, or that the federal government is the adversary, we have been an unrivalled federal partner in Laurentides—Labelle.

Half of the 43 municipalities will soon have access to modern high-speed Internet across their territory, and we are well on the way to getting full coverage throughout the riding. Les Pays-d'en-Haut, the only RCM in Quebec without an arena, will finally get its sports centre. Poverty and unemployment are declining. There are more opportunities for families to remain in the region.

In under four years, we have made a difference that has benefited the people of the Laurentians. This fall, we will have to decide whether the federal government is an adversary or a partner of our region. I believe the answer is clear. Together, we will succeed.

Monsieur le Président, après des années de contre-productivité par des formations politiques qui avaient pour seul but de démontrer que le fédéral ne fonctionne pas, ou que le fédéral est notre adversaire, nous avons offert un partenariat fédéral inégalé dans Laurentides—Labelle.

La moitié des 43 municipalités auront bientôt un accès à Internet haute vitesse moderne sur tout leur territoire, et nous sommes sur la bonne voie relativement à une couverture complète de la circonscription. Les Pays-d'en-Haut vont enfin voir leur centre sportif. C'est la seule MRC au Québec où il n'y a pas d'aréna. La pauvreté et le chômage sont à la baisse. Les familles ont plus d'occasions et de capacité de rester en région.

En moins de quatre ans, nous avons changé la donne, au bénéfice des citoyens des Laurentides. Cet automne, nous aurons un choix à faire: le fédéral est-il un adversaire ou un partenaire de notre région? Selon moi, la réponse est claire. C'est ensemble qu'on réussit.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 329 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 17, 2019

2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Third reading and adoption,

Troisième lecture et adoption

Mr. Speaker, if my friend from Provencher is so convinced that we can cut our way to growth, how is it that his government left the country completely penniless?

Monsieur le Président, si mon ami de Provencher est tellement convaincu que l'on peut exercer des compressions pour favoriser la croissance, comment se fait-il que son gouvernement ait laissé le pays sans le sou?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 84 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 05, 2019

2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Drowning, Government assistance, Information dissemination, Oral questions, Pleasure craft

Aide gouvernementale, Bateaux de plaisance, Noyades, Questions orales,

Mr. Speaker, my riding, Laurentides—Labelle, has an estimated 10,800 lakes and bodies of water, and many of them are used recreationally during the summer. We are working on a number of issues concerning the management and protection of our lakes, but we hear less about boating safety.

According to the Red Cross, every year there are about 160 boating-related fatalities in Canada.

Can the Minister of Transport talk about what is being done to raise awareness about pleasure craft safety?

Monsieur le Président, on estime que ma circonscription, Laurentides—Labelle, a environ 10 800 lacs et plans d’eau, dont beaucoup sont utilisés à des fins récréatives pendant l’été. Nous travaillons à plusieurs enjeux autour de la gestion et la protection de nos lacs, mais celui dont on parle moins est la sécurité nautique.

Selon la Croix-Rouge, il y a environ 160 morts liés aux activités nautiques chaque année au Canada.

Le ministre des Transports peut-il nous dire ce qu’on fait pour la sensibilisation de la sécurité des plaisanciers?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr qp 190 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 05, 2019

2019-05-17 10:59 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Deaths and funerals, Statements by Members,

Décès et funérailles, Déclarations de députés,

Mr. Speaker, I learned just a few hours ago that one of the most interesting people I have ever met passed away suddenly during the night. Journalist, storyteller, war correspondent, constituent and friend, Paul William Roberts is known for his coverage of the two Iraq wars for Harper's Magazine, as well as his many books, including Empire of the Soul, Journey of the Magi and A War Against Truth.

He was born in Wales, and his career spanned the world, having studied in England and taught in India before working as a producer for both the BBC and the CBC, among others. In 2005, he was the inaugural winner of the PEN Canada Paul Kidd award for courage in journalism.

A humble man, Paul suffered the effects of the many wars he had covered, and about a decade ago, he lost the ability to see. He was felled by a sudden brain hemorrhage last night and was transferred to Sacré-Coeur Hospital in Montreal early this morning to offer his organs for transplant. It should encourage all of us to know that his enormous heart will live on.

To his wife Kara and his kids, my deepest condolences.

Monsieur le Président, j'ai appris, il y a quelques heures à peine, que l'une des personnes les plus intéressantes que j'aie rencontrées est décédée subitement dans la nuit. Journaliste, conteur, correspondant de guerre, habitant de ma circonscription et ami, Paul William Roberts est connu pour avoir couvert les deux guerres en Irak pour le magazine Harper's ainsi que pour avoir écrit de nombreux livres, dont Empire of the Soul, Journey of the Magi et A War Against Truth.

Né au Pays de Galles, il a parcouru le monde au cours de sa carrière. Il a étudié en Angleterre et enseigné en Inde puis travaillé comme producteur à la BBC et à la CBC, notamment. En 2005, il a été le premier lauréat du prix Paul Kidd de PEN Canada pour le courage en journalisme.

Homme humble, Paul a subi les conséquences des nombreuses guerres qu'il avait couvertes et, il y a une dizaine d'années, il a perdu la vue. Victime hier soir d'une hémorragie cérébrale soudaine, il a été transféré tôt ce matin à l'Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur, à Montréal, afin que ses organes puissent être transplantés. Nous devrions tous être encouragés de savoir que son cœur rempli de bonté continuera de battre.

Je présente mes plus sincères condoléances à sa femme Kara et à ses enfants.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements tributes 429 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 17, 2019

2019-05-03 12:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Introduction and First reading, Parliamentary precinct, Parliamentary Protective Service, Safety,

Cité parlementaire, Dépôt et première lecture, Projets de loi émanant des députés, Sécurité publique, Service de protection parlementaire

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-445, An Act to amend the Parliament of Canada Act (management and direction of the Parliamentary Protective Service).

He said: Mr. Speaker, I rise today to introduce a bill that would change subsection 79.55(2) of the Parliament of Canada Act relating to the Parliamentary Protective Service. The act reads, in essence, that the director “must be a member of the [RCMP].” This bill would add the word “not” and mandate that the two Speakers, without outside intervention, would jointly select the director of our integrated security force.

While we appreciate the RCMP's efforts to integrate the security forces, this bill would give the Crown three years to complete the transition back to the House. Nothing in this act would prevent the RCMP from continuing to protect the Prime Minister in the House, nor from calling on the RCMP for backup should the need arise. However, all decisions going forward would belong to the House and Senate rather than to the executive. While it is not a matter for legislation, I hope that this would also allow the designated airspace known as CYR537 to be handed over to the Parliamentary Protective Service.

As I consider this to be, first and foremost, a matter of protecting parliamentary privilege, I ask that this bill be ultimately referred to the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

I thank the member for Hamilton Centre for seconding this bill, demonstrating the cross-party support it will need to move forward.

demande à présenter le projet de loi C-445, Loi modifiant la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada (gestion et direction du Service de protection parlementaire).

— Monsieur le Président, je prends la parole aujourd'hui pour présenter un projet de loi visant à modifier le paragraphe 79.55(2) de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada relativement au Service de protection parlementaire. Essentiellement, la Loi stipule que le directeur « doit être un membre [...] de la [GRC] ». Le projet de loi ajouterait les mots « ne » et « pas » pour préciser que le directeur ne doit pas être un membre de la GRC. Il prévoit également que le Président du Sénat et le Président de la Chambre des communes nomment conjointement, sans intervention extérieure, la personne devant occuper le poste de directeur du Service de protection parlementaire.

Nous remercions la GRC de tout ce qu'elle a fait pour assurer la coordination des services de sécurité. Toutefois, ce projet de loi accorderait trois ans à la Couronne pour remettre les rênes entre les mains des deux Chambres. Il n'y a rien dans ce projet de loi qui empêcherait la GRC de continuer à protéger le premier ministre à la Chambre, ou qui empêcherait la Chambre de réclamer des renforts auprès de la GRC si le besoin se présentait. Cela dit, à l'avenir, il appartiendrait à la Chambre des communes et au Sénat, plutôt qu'à l'organe exécutif, de prendre toutes les décisions. J'espère que cela permettrait également de confier l'espace aérien désigné correspondant au code CYR537 au Service de protection parlementaire, même si cette question n'est pas visée par le projet de loi.

Comme je considère que cette question vise d'abord et avant tout à protéger le privilège parlementaire, je demande que ce projet de loi soit finalement renvoyé au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Je remercie le député d'Hamilton-Centre d'avoir appuyé le projet de loi. L'appui de tous les partis sera nécessaire pour le faire aller de l'avant.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 608 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 23:42 on May 03, 2019

2019-05-03 11:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Public transit, Rural communities, Statements by Members

Communautés rurales, Déclarations de députés, Transport en commun

Mr. Speaker, the mayor of Mont-Tremblant, Luc Brisebois, just announced that, as of June 21, the local bus service will be free for everyone all the time. This measure benefits everyone: workers, employers, students, families, seniors, and even tourists.

This will help cut greenhouse gas emissions. It is a measure that shows that economic development and environmental protection can and must go hand in hand. Everything we do, individually as well as collectively, has a significant impact on the fight against climate change. Public transit is one of the best ways to help the environment.

The town of Mont-Tremblant is at the leading edge of rural public transit. By offering it for free, they are sending an even stronger message about what we can do for the future when we are bold enough to fight for it.

To the leaders of Mont-Tremblant and all the current and future bus riders, I say bravo and thank you.

Monsieur le Président, le maire de la Ville de Mont-Tremblant, Luc Brisebois, vient d’annoncer qu’à compter du 21 juin le service d’autobus sera accessible gratuitement pour tous et en tout temps. C’est une mesure qui rejoint tout le monde: les travailleurs, les employeurs, les étudiants, les familles, les personnes âgées et même les touristes.

Cette mesure permettra la réduction des gaz à effet de serre. C’est une mesure qui démontre qu’on peut et qu’on doit combiner le développement économique et la protection environnementale. Chaque geste que nous posons, seuls ou collectivement, a une incidence capitale dans la lutte contre les changements climatiques. Le transport en commun est l’une des meilleures manières d’agir pour l’environnement.

La Ville de Mont-Tremblant est à l’avant-garde des services de transport en commun en milieu rural. En l’offrant gratuitement, on lance un message encore plus fort sur ce qu’on est capable de faire pour l'avenir, quand on ose agir pour l'avenir.

Aux dirigeants de Mont-Tremblant et à tous les usagers d’autobus actuels et futurs, je dis bravo et merci!

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 350 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 03, 2019

2019-05-02 14:00 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Emergency response and emergency responders, Floods, Statements by Members

Crues, Déclarations de députés,

Mr. Speaker, people across the country are dealing with the impact of climate change. As we know, thousands of people have been hit hard by the flooding in Quebec. For the past two weeks, the riding of Laurentides—Labelles has also been dealing with floods.

We absolutely have to address the issue of cellular communication in rural areas such as Amherst, which had to declare a state of emergency along with other municipalities. Just imagine the flood victims who were isolated, the emergency services that tried to reach them and the worried families, and let us quickly take action before an even more serious crisis occurs.

I also want to tell the people and thousands of volunteers in Montcalm, Piedmont, Ferme-Neuve, Kiamika, Lac-Saguay, Rivière-Rouge, Huberdeau, Val-David, Nominingue and every one of the 43 municipalities in my riding, which have practically all been affected, that the way they have come together and the strength of our communities is remarkable. They deserve our respect, gratitude and support.

Monsieur le Président, partout au pays, les citoyens sont aux prises avec les conséquences des dérèglements climatiques. Au Québec, on le sait, les inondations ont causé des milliers de drames humains. Laurentides—Labelle n'y a pas échappé depuis deux semaines.

Nous devons impérativement régler la question de l'accès aux communications cellulaires dans les régions rurales, comme c'est le cas à Amherst, qui a dû, comme beaucoup d'autres municipalités, déclarer l'état d'urgence. Songeons aux sinistrés qui étaient isolés, aux services d'urgence qui essayaient de les joindre et aux familles inquiètes et agissons rapidement avant que ne survienne un drame encore plus grand.

Je souhaite aussi dire aux citoyens et aux milliers de bénévoles de Montcalm, de Piedmont, de Ferme-Neuve, de Kiamika, de Lac-Saguay, de Rivière-Rouge, d'Huberdeau, de Val-David, de Nominingue et de chacune des 43 municipalités de ma circonscription, qui sont pratiquement toutes affectées, qu'elles font preuve d'une entraide exceptionnelle et démontrent la force de nos communautés. Elles méritent tout notre respect, toute notre gratitude et tout notre appui.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 353 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 02, 2019

2019-04-01 14:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre

International relations, Montana, Statements by Members

Déclarations de députés, Montana, Relations internationales

Mr. Speaker, it has come to our attention that there is a petition across the United States that calls on Canada to buy Montana for a trillion dollars. While we appreciate their interest, we would like to present our counter-offer.

We will annex Washington state, Oregon, California, New England and enough of New York to get the rest of Niagara Falls and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who, with her values, would be a pretty average Canadian. We will offer, in exchange, to take over Puerto Rico and make it a province, to provide the 74 million new immigrants created by this deal universal free health care, regardless of what they believe or wear, and to take Montana.

We believe that this is a fair deal that would also help compensate for our century-old reticence to accept the Turks and Caicos, which was a grave error, we now recognize. In that spirit, if they are not intending to help make Britain great again, we could also make room for Scotland in our Confederation

Monsieur le Président, nous avons appris qu'il existe une pétition aux États-Unis qui demande au Canada d'acheter le Montana pour un billion de dollars. Nous sommes certes heureux de cet intérêt, mais nous aimerions faire une contre-offre.

Nous annexerons l'État de Washington, l'Oregon, la Californie, la Nouvelle-Angleterre et une partie suffisante de l'État de New York pour que nous puissions obtenir le reste des chutes Niagara et Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, dont les valeurs rejoindraient celles de l'ensemble des Canadiens. En échange, nous proposons de prendre Porto Rico et d'en faire une province, d'offrir aux 74 millions de nouveaux immigrants par suite de cet accord des soins de santé universels gratuits, peu importe ce en quoi ils croient ou ce qu'ils portent, et de prendre aussi le Montana.

Nous croyons qu'il s'agit d'un accord juste qui permettrait aussi de compenser notre réticence, depuis 100 ans, à accepter les îles Turques et Caïques, ce qui a été — nous le reconnaissons maintenant — une grave erreur. Dans cet esprit, si les États-Unis n'ont pas l'intention d'aider la Grande-Bretagne à retrouver sa grandeur, nous pourrions également faire de la place à l'Écosse dans la Confédération.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr satire statements 377 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on April 01, 2019

2019-03-18 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Employment opportunities, Mining industry, Oral questions

Industrie minière, Questions orales,

Mr. Speaker, Canadians know that the metal and mining industry is important for our economy and for our communities across the country, including many municipalities in Laurentides—Labelle. That is why our government is working hard to ensure that this industry continues to create jobs and generate economic growth.

Could the minister tell the House how our government is focusing on innovation, the development of clean technologies and strengthening the regulatory framework to ensure that the exploration and mining sector is prosperous, resilient and sustainable?

Monsieur le Président, les Canadiens savent que l'industrie des mines et des métaux est importante pour notre économie et pour nos communautés partout au pays, comme c'est le cas dans plusieurs municipalités de Laurentides—Labelle. C'est pourquoi notre gouvernement travaille fort pour s'assurer que cette industrie demeure une source de création d'emplois et de croissance économique.

Est-ce que le ministre peut indiquer à la Chambre de quelle façon notre gouvernement met l'accent sur l'innovation, le développement des technologies propres et le renforcement du cadre réglementaire pour assurer un secteur d'exploration et d'exploitation prospère, résilient et durable?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr qp 199 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 18, 2019

2019-02-20 19:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Digital divide, Rural communities, Rural development, Safety, Small communities

Communautés rurales, Développement rural, Fossé numérique, Motions émanant des députés, Petites collectivités, Sécurité publique,

Mr. Speaker, in 1983, my parents had an Osborne laptop with a detachable keyboard, a four-inch screen and dual five-and-a-quarter-inch floppy disk drives that could read 90-kilobyte disks.

In 1987, their company, Immeubles Doncaster in Saint-Agathe-des-Monts, got one of the first fax machines in the region. Since Bell Canada did not know quite what to do with this new technology, it gave every company nearly identical fax numbers. One company's fax number was 326-8819, ours was 326-8829, and another company's was 326-8839. I do not know what we would have done if there had been more fax machines.

Around 1988, my father had a Cantel car phone installed in his 1985 Chevette. The phone cost almost as much as the car. It had to be installed semi-permanently in the trunk with an antenna attached to the rear window. We always had the latest technology at home. We got email when it was first introduced to the market by CompuServe in the 1990s. We were able to communicate with other users through a dial-up connection. We had to make a long-distance call to Montreal to get it to work, but it worked. I still have our first family email address memorized. It was 76171.1725@compuserve.com.

Analog cell service was good enough to meet our needs. The signal dropped from time to time, but we could make calls. With our antenna, we could listen to CBC and Radio-Canada radio stations fairly well and watch a few television channels. To change the channel, my father would climb the ladder and turn the antenna with pliers, and we would use two-way radios to tell him when the signal came in.

We lived in a rural area, in Sainte-Lucie-des-Laurentides. That is where I grew up and where I still live today. My family was fully connected to the latest technology. Life was good. At the end of 1994, the digital divide had not yet affected the regions entirely.

Fast forward to 2000, the Internet was still on dial-up. The first satellite services had not yet arrived. I moved to Ontario to study computer science at the University of Guelph. I had learned Linux in high school and was involved in the freeware community. I found Rogers cable high-speed Internet readily available. Bell DSL followed a few years later, and at that time I switched over to a small reseller named Magma Communications. In 2004, I was living in a city where high-speed Internet was available, while Xplornet satellite service was starting up in the regions. My parents subscribed to the service after a year of suffering with Internet through ExpressVu, which used dial-up to send and satellite to receive. The digital divide was huge.

In 2001, my family and I visited my grandfather's childhood home in Turkey. When we arrived at Atatürk Airport, I heard cellphones around me going: dot-dot-dot-dash-dash-dot-dot-dot. I knew Morse code, so I wondered what an SMS was and why we did not have them back home. When we returned, my grandfather gave me my first cellphone, a digital analog Qualcomm through Telus.

As I am involved in the world of freeware, as an administrator of IRC networks and a journalist in the sector, I need the power to communicate with colleagues around the world. While everyone was texting internationally, my Telus phone could not send a text outside its own network. When I called customer service, I was told to use the web browser on my phone, which barely worked, and to go the website of the company that provided service to the person to whom I wanted to send a text message, and to use their form.

I did not remain a Telus customer for long. I quickly switched to Microcell, a cell company on the GSM worldwide network, which operated under the name Fido and offered the ability to send and receive texts internationally, except with its competitors in Canada. The problem with Fido was that the service was only available in cities. It was not profitable to install towers in rural areas. When I travelled, I could only communicate in the Toronto and Montreal metropolitan areas.

The digital divide also affected telephone service. In 2003, I purchased a PCMCIA card for my laptop. For $50 a month, I had unlimited Internet access on something called the GPRS platform. It was not quick, but it worked. That service also worked in the U.S. at no additional cost. With that technology, I wrote a little program connecting the maritime GPS in my server in order to create a web page tracking my movements with just a few seconds' delay.

In November 2004, Rogers bought Fido and, for an additional fee, provided service in the regions served by Rogers. After that, the Rogers-Fido GPRS system began cutting out after being connected for precisely 12 minutes, except in the Ottawa area, where it did not cut out. Was that so that the legislators in the capital would not notice? Thus began my mistrust in large telecommunications companies.

In 2006 I attended my brother Jonah and sister-in-law Tracy's wedding in Nairobi. After the wedding, our whole family went on safari. In the middle of the Maasai Mara, cellphones worked properly. That was an “a-ha” moment for me.

By 2006, after the digital shift, the cellular service we had in the Laurentians in the 1980s had almost completely disappeared. We were regressing as the digital divide grew wider.

Today, in 2019, I have boosters on both of my cars. At home, we have a booster on the roof to help us get by. What is more, our wireless Internet is expensive, slow and unreliable.

Many communities in my riding of Laurentides—Labelle still do not have any cell service. Telecommunications companies plan to do away with long-standing pager services, which will no longer exist in Canada by next summer. Dial-up, satellite and wireless Internet is available in the region, but it is slow and unreliable.

There is no obvious solution. As a result of spectrum auctions and spectrum management, small companies and local co-operatives cannot access the cell market to fill in those gaps. What is more, the large corporations do not want to see new stakeholders enter the market, even though they are not interested in resolving the issue themselves.

That is causing major problems. Our economic growth is suffering, young people are leaving and businesses and self-employed workers are reluctant to set up shop in the region. Emergency services have to find creative ways of communicating with first responders, volunteer firefighters.

The situation is critical. The study we are talking about in Motion No. 208 is so urgent that I would ask the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, of which I am a member, not to wait for this motion moved by my colleague from Pontiac to be adopted before beginning its study.

In closing, I would like to read the resolution that I received last week from one of the fire departments in my riding, which urged me to do something about the cell service in the region. They used the example of the Vendée community. Bell Canada is a company that was initially largely funded by the Crown. However, it has completely lost its social conscience. Bell offered to help the community only if the municipality covered 100% of the cost to install a telecommunication tower even though the Bell Canada Act states:

The works of the Company are hereby declared to be works for the general advantage of Canada.

Here is resolution 2019-01-256 in its entirety:

WHEREAS the Northwest Laurentians Fire Department, composed of the territories of the municipalities of the townships of Amherst, Arundel, Huberdeau, La Conception, Lac-Supérieur, La Minerve, Montcalm and Saint-Faustin-Lac—Carré, was created following the signing of an intermunicipal agreement for the organization, operation and administration of a fire service;

WHEREAS the municipality of Amherst, Vendée sector, has been experiencing various problems and deficiencies with cellphone coverage for more than two (2) years;

WHEREAS the pager technology used by firefighters and first responders will no longer be supported as of June;

WHEREAS the only technology that is supported and used by the Fire Department is cellphone technology;

WHEREAS the Vendée sector has close to 1,000 permanent and/or seasonal residents who are being deprived of adequate public safety services;

WHEREAS 80% of the population of Vendée consists of retirees and this demographic is more likely to need emergency services;

WHEREAS the Fire Department has approached Bell Canada and the federal member of Parliament [for Laurentides—Labelle] on this matter;

WHEREAS in 2017 and 2018, the municipality of Amherst approached the federal MP [for Laurentides—Labelle], the then MNA Sylvain Pagé, the department of public safety, the Sûreté du Québec, Bell Canada and the RCM of Laurentides on this matter;

WHEREAS the situation has reached a critical point for public safety for these residents;

THEREFORE it is moved by Steve Perreault, seconded by Richard Pépin, and unanimously resolved by the members present;

THAT the board of directors of the Fire Department support the actions of the municipality of Amherst.

THAT the board of directors call on the federal government, via the member for Laurentides—Labelle...to intercede with the authorities responsible for the public telephone network to require the implementation of cellular service in the Vendée sector by companies operating in this field.

ADOPTED at the meeting of January 17, 2019

We have work to do, and we cannot wait any longer. Companies are putting the lives of my constituents and rural Canadians at risk. That is unacceptable. 5G is not a magic bullet that will fix everything.

We need to take serious action, starting with this study.

Monsieur le Président, en 1983, mes parents avaient un ordinateur portatif de type Osborne, avec un clavier détachable, donnant accès à un écran de quatre pouces et à deux lecteurs de disquettes de cinq pouces et quart capables de lire des disquettes de 90 kilo-octets chacune.

En 1987, leur entreprise, les Immeubles Doncaster de Saint-Agathe-des-Monts, a eu un des premiers télécopieurs de la région. Bell Canada, ne sachant pas entièrement quoi faire avec cette nouvelle technologie, a donné à chaque entreprise un numéro de télécopieur presque identique. Une entreprise avait le numéro de télécopieur 326-8819. Nous avions le 326-8829. Le numéro de télécopieur suivant était le 326-8839. On ne sait pas ce qu'on aurait fait s'il y en avait eu plus.

Vers 1988, mon père a fait installer un téléphone cellulaire de Cantel dans sa Chevette 1985. Le téléphone avait coûté presque autant que l'automobile. Il devait être installé presque en permanence dans le coffre et une antenne était collée à la fenêtre arrière. Chez nous, nous étions toujours à l'avant-garde de la technologie. Nous avons commencé quand le premier service de courriel a été offert au grand marché, par CompuServe, dans les années 1990. Nous étions capables de communiquer avec les autres usagers par accès commuté. On devait faire un appel interurbain à Montréal pour que cela fonctionne, mais cela fonctionnait. Notre première adresse de courriel familiale demeure profondément inscrite dans ma tête. C'était 76171.1725@compuserve.com.

Le service cellulaire en mode analogique fonctionnait assez bien pour répondre à nos besoins. Il coupait de temps en temps, mais nous pouvions faire des appels. CBC et Radio-Canada entraient plus ou moins bien sur nos antennes de radios, mais nous étions capables d'écouter quelques postes de télévision. Pour changer de poste, mon père montait sur l'échelle et tournait l'antenne avec des pinces pendant qu'on lui disait par radio portable quand le signal entrait.

Nous vivions dans une région rurale, à Sainte-Lucie-des-Laurentides. C'est là où j'ai grandi et c'est là que je demeure aujourd'hui. Ma famille était pleinement branchée aux technologies du jour. La vie était belle. À la fin de 1994, la fracture numérique n'avait pas encore complètement touché les régions.

Avançons à l'an 2000. En région, Internet entrait toujours par accès commuté. Les premiers services de satellite n'étaient pas encore arrivés. Moi, j'étais parti en Ontario pour poursuivre mes études en informatique à l'Université de Guelph. J'avais appris le système d'opération Linux au secondaire et j'étais pleinement dans la communauté des logiciels libres. J'avais trouvé Internet haute vitesse par câble de Rogers facilement disponible. Le DSL de Bell a suivi quelques années plus tard et, à son arrivée, j'ai changé pour un petit revendeur qui s'appelait Magma Communications. En 2004, j'étais en ville, là où Internet haute vitesse illimité était disponible, pendant que le service de satellite Xplornet commençait en région. Mes parents s'y sont abonnés après un an de misère sur Internet par ExpressVu, qui fasait les envois par accès commuté alors que la réception se faisait par satellite. La fracture numérique frappait de plein fouet.

Revenons en 2001, quand ma famille en moi avons visité les lieux d'enfance de mon grand-père en Turquie. En arrivant à l'Aéroport Atatürk, j'ai vu que les cellulaires autour de moi émettaient ce qui suit: point-point-point-tiret-tiret-point-point-point. Connaissant déjà le code morse, je me suis demandé ce qu'était un SMS et pourquoi cela n'existait pas chez nous. À notre retour, mon grand-père m'a offert mon premier téléphone cellulaire, un Qualcomm numérique analogique, relié à Telus.

Vu mon implication dans le monde du logiciel libre, comme administrateur de réseaux IRC et journaliste dans le secteur, j'avais besoin de pouvoir communiquer avec des collègues de partout au monde. Pendant que le monde entier échangeait des textos entre les pays, mon téléphone de Telus n'était pas capable d'envoyer un texto à l'extérieur de son propre réseau. Quand j'ai appelé le service à la clientèle, on m'a dit d'utiliser le navigateur Web sur le téléphone, qui marchait à peine, pour aller sur le site Web de la compagnie à laquelle celui à qui je voulais envoyer un message texte était abonné, pour utiliser son formulaire.

Je ne suis pas resté longtemps avec Telus. J'ai vite changé pour Microcell, une compagnie cellulaire sur le réseau mondial GSM, qui opérait sous le nom de Fido et qui offrait la capacité d'échanger des textos avec le reste du monde, sauf ses concurrents au Canada. Sauf qu'avec Fido, le service fonctionnait seulement dans les villes. Installer des tours en région n'était pas rentable. Quand je voyageais, je pouvais donc seulement communiquer dans les grandes régions de Toronto et de Montréal.

La fracture numérique n'avait pas oublié la téléphonie. En 2003, j'ai acheté une carte PCMCIA pour mon ordinateur portable. Cela me donnait accès, pour 50 $ par mois, à Internet illimité sur le protocole qu'on appelait GPRS. Ce n'était pas vite, mais cela fonctionnait. Ce service fonctionnait également aux États-Unis, sans frais supplémentaires. Avec cette technologie, j'ai écrit un petit programme pour brancher le GPS maritime dans mon serveur afin de créer une page Web de mes déplacements avec un délai de quelques secondes.

En novembre 2004, Rogers a acheté Fido et nous a permis, pour des frais supplémentaires, d'avoir le service dans les régions desservies par Rogers. Ensuite, le système de GPRS de Rogers-Fido a commencé à couper après exactement 12 minutes de connexion, sauf dans la région d'Ottawa, où il n'arrêtait pas. Est-ce que c'était pour passer inaperçu auprès des législateurs de la capitale? Ma méfiance envers les grandes compagnies de télécommunications commença.

En 2006, j'ai assisté au mariage de mon frère Jonah et de sa femme Tracy à Nairobi. Après le mariage, nous avons fait un safari en famille. En plein milieu du Masai Mara, les téléphones cellulaires fonctionnaient comme il le faut. Cela a été pour moi un moment révélateur.

À la suite du virage numérique, le service cellulaire que nous avions dans les Laurentides pendant les années 1980 avait presque complètement disparu, en 2006. Nous reculions, la fracture numérique s'accélérant à toute vitesse.

Aujourd'hui, en 2019, mes deux automobiles ont des suramplificateurs. À la maison, nous avons un suramplificateur sur le toit pour nous dépanner. De plus, notre service Internet est sans fil, lent, peu fiable et cher.

Dans ma circonscription, Laurentides—Labelle, plusieurs communautés demeurent sans aucun service cellulaire. Les compagnies de télécommunications annulent et ferment les services de téléavertisseurs et, d'ici l'été prochain, ce service de longue date n'existera plus au Canada. On accède à l'Internet par accès commuté, par satellite ou par sans-fil. Il est lent et peu fiable pour la majorité de mes concitoyens.

Les solutions ne sont pas évidentes. Les encans de spectre et la gestion des ondes font en sorte que les petites compagnies et les coopératives locales ne peuvent pas accéder au marché cellulaire pour combler ces lacunes. De plus, les grandes compagnies ne sont pas enthousiastes à l'idée de voir de nouveaux acteurs, même si elles ne sont pas intéressées à régler le problème.

Cela cause des problèmes majeurs: notre croissance économique est attaquée; les jeunes sont incités à partir; et les entreprises et les travailleurs autonomes ne sont pas enclins à s'installer en région. Les services d'urgence doivent trouver des manières créatives de communiquer avec les premiers répondants, les pompiers volontaires.

La situation est critique. L'étude que nous abordons dans la motion M-208 est tellement urgente que je demanderais au Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie, auquel je siège, de ne pas attendre que cette motion de mon collègue de Pontiac soit adoptée pour commencer son étude.

En terminant, j'aimerais lire la résolution que j'ai reçue la semaine dernière d'une des régies d'incendie de ma circonscription, qui m'implorait de régler la question du service cellulaire en région. Ils ont utilisé l'exemple de la communauté de Vendée. Bell Canada est une compagnie initialement largement financée par la Couronne. Cependant, elle a complètement perdu sa conscience sociale. Bell a offert d'aider la communauté seulement si la municipalité assumait 100 % des coûts d'installation d'une tour de télécommunication, et ce, malgré cette phrase dans la Loi sur Bell Canada:

Les ouvrages de la Compagnie sont déclarés à l’avantage général du Canada.

Voici la résolution intégrale 2019-01-256:

CONSIDERANT la création de la Régie incendie Nord-Ouest Laurentides, composée des territoires des municipalités du canton d'Amherst, du canton d'Arundel, d'Huberdeau, de La Conception, de Lac-Supérieur, de La Minerve, de Montcalm et de Saint-Faustin-Lac—Carré, et ce, suite à la signature d'une entente inter municipale ayant pour objet l'organisation, l'opération et l'administration d'un service de protection contre les incendies;

CONSIDERANT QUE depuis plus de deux (2) ans, la municipalité d'Amherst secteur Vendée manifeste différentes problématiques et manquement au niveau de la téléphonie cellulaire;

CONSIDERANT QUE la technologie des téléavertisseurs utilisée par les pompiers et premiers répondants ne sera plus supportée à compter du mois de juin prochain;

CONSIDERANT QUE la seule technologie supportée et utilisée par la Régie incendie est la téléphonie cellulaire;

CONSIDERANT QUE le secteur de Vendée comporte près de 1 000 résidents et/ou villégiateurs qui sont privés de service adéquat quant à la sécurité publique;

CONSIDERANT QUE 80 % de la clientèle de Vendée sont des retraités et que ceux-ci représentent une clientèle plus à risque de devoir utiliser les services d'urgences;

CONSIDERANT QUE la Régie a fait des représentations auprès de la compagnie Bell Canada et du député fédéral [de Laurentides—Labelle];

CONSIDERANT QUE la municipalité d'Amherst a fait des représentations en 2017 et 2018 auprès du député fédéral [de Laurentides—Labelle], le député provincial de l'époque Monsieur Sylvain Pagé, le ministère de la sécurité publique, la sureté du Québec, la compagnie Bell Canada et la MRC des Laurentides;

CONSIDERANT QUE la situation est alarmante pour la sécurité publique de ces citoyens;

POUR CES MOTIFS, il est proposé par monsieur Steve Perreault, appuyé par monsieur Richard Pépin, et résolu unanimement des membres présents;

QUE le conseil d'administration de la Régie incendie appuie la municipalité d'Amherst dans ses démarches.

QUE le conseil d'administration demande au gouvernement fédéral via son député Laurentides—Labelle [...] d'intervenir auprès des responsables du réseau public de téléphonie afin d'exiger l'implantation de la téléphonie cellulaire dans le secteur de Vendée auprès des entreprises œuvrant dans le domaine.

ADOPTÉE à la séance du 17 janvier 2019

Nous avons du travail à faire et nous ne pouvons plus attendre. Ce sont les vies de mes concitoyens et celles des Canadiens des régions que les compagnies mettent en jeu. C'est inacceptable. Le 5G n'est pas une pilule magique qui va tout régler.

Nous devons agir sérieusement, et cela commence avec cette étude.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 3344 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 20, 2019

2019-02-20 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Charitable organizations, Health and social services, Laurentides, Statements by Members,

Déclarations de députés, Laurentides, Oeuvres de bienfaisance, Santé et services sociaux,

Mr. Speaker, this year marks the 30th anniversary of the Fondation médicale des Laurentides et des Pays-d'en-Haut.

The foundation serves 32 municipalities along with several establishments and resources, and has invested more than $9.5 million in medical equipment and local health care services.

An organization is only as successful as the people behind it. I want to acknowledge the commitment of the founders and the past and current presidents: Christian Gélinas, François Bertrand, Louis Tourangeau, Marc Desforges, Raymond Douillard, Pierre Forget, Marie-Pier Fournier, Peter Hamé, Lise Hétu, Laurent Tremblay, Lise Forget-Therrien, the late Marc Desjardins, Michel Frenette, Justin Racette, Nancy Wilson and Michel Rochon.

I also want to acknowledge all those who, over the years, have helped create a big family of full-time employees and volunteers who are dedicated to the community.

We can be proud of these individuals, for they have taught us that, when it comes to taking care of your health, if you want to go fast, go alone; if you want to go far, go together.

Monsieur le Président, cette année marque le 30e anniversaire de la Fondation médicale des Laurentides et des Pays-d'en-Haut.

La fondation couvre 32 municipalités, sert plusieurs établissements et ressources et a investi plus de 9,5 millions de dollars dans des équipements médicaux et dans des services de santé de proximité.

Ce sont les gens qui font le succès d'un organisme. Je salue l'engagement des membres fondateurs ainsi que des présidents passés et actuel: Christian Gélinas, François Bertrand, Louis Tourangeau, Marc Desforges, Raymond Douillard, Pierre Forget, Marie-Pier Fournier, Peter Hamé, Lise Hétu, Laurent Tremblay, Lise Forget-Therrien, feu Marc Desjardins, Michel Frenette, Justin Racette, Nancy Wilson et Michel Rochon.

Je salue aussi toutes celles et ceux qui se sont investis au fil des ans dans la formation d'une grande famille d'employés permanents et de bénévoles dévoués à la communauté.

Ces gens nous rendent fiers parce qu'ils démontrent que, lorsque vient le temps de veiller à notre santé, seul, on va vite, mais ensemble, on va loin.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 359 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 20, 2019

2019-02-06 14:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Events, Statements by Members, Winter

Déclarations de députés, Évènements, Hiver

Mr. Speaker,

Now that January has finally passed
This bitter cold just cannot last
As temperatures begin to climb
February brings winter carnival time
Head to Sainte-Marguerite-du-Lac-Masson to skate
Or to Brébeuf for a dancing date
Sainte-Adèle and Huberdeau fill with sledding squeals
While at Ferme-Neuve they race snowmobiles
In Val-Morin and Notre-Dame-du-Laus, the fishing divine
While Mont-Tremblant is the place to dine
Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts can toot its own horn
Cause that's where Bonhomme Carnaval was born
Winter is about more than clearing snow
So Laurentides—Labelle is the place to go
That is why I give three cheers
To community members and volunteers
All of them are truly key
To enjoying this great party.

Monsieur le Président,

Alors que janvier est terminé
et les grands froids presque tous passés;
Février est le mois idéal
pour célébrer l'hiver au carnaval!
En patinant sur le lac à Sainte-Marguerite-du-Lac-Masson;
en dansant à Brébeuf au rythme des rigodons;
En s'amusant à glisser à Sainte-Adèle ou Huberdeau;
en pratiquant la pêche blanche à Val-Morin ou Notre-Dame-du-Laus;
À Ferme-Neuve au Grand-Prix sur glace;
ou à Mont-Tremblant sur l'une des nombreuses terrasses;
D'un bout à l'autre de Laurentides—Labelle,
pour nous l'hiver c'est bien plus qu'user de la pelle.
Ça fait d'ailleurs longtemps que c'est une tradition:
Bonhomme Carnaval est né chez nous, à Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts.
Je lève mon chapeau aux bénévoles et membres de la communauté,
à qui l'on doit l'organisation de toutes ces activités;
Et à toutes celles et ceux qui en profitent à fond;
vivant pleinement l'hiver dans ma circonscription!

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 263 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 16:02 on February 06, 2019

2019-02-05 14:59 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Broadband Internet services, Oral questions, Rural communities

Communautés rurales, Questions orales, Services Internet à large bande

Mr. Speaker, access to high-speed Internet is still one of the most serious economic and social problems facing Canada's rural regions, and that includes Laurentides—Labelle. Our government and our team have already done a great deal of work, but we still have a long way to go.

Internet access is key for growing businesses, creating good jobs, getting our Canadian products to global markets and for opportunity in general.

The new Minister of Rural Economic Development has this issue as one of the key priorities in her mandate letter. Could she update the House and rural Canada on her plans for the Internet?

Monsieur le Président, l'accès à Internet à haute vitesse demeure l'un des problèmes économiques et sociaux les plus graves pour l'ensemble des régions rurales du Canada, autant dans la circonscription de Laurentides—Labelle qu'ailleurs. Énormément de travail a déjà été fait par notre gouvernement et par notre équipe, mais il nous reste encore beaucoup à faire.

L'accès à Internet est essentiel pour la croissance des entreprises, la création de bons emplois, l'acheminement des produits canadiens vers les marchés globaux et les occasions économiques en général.

La lettre de mandat de la nouvelle ministre du Développement économique rural établit cette question comme une priorité clé. La ministre pourrait-elle informer la Chambre et les Canadiens des régions rurales de ses plans concernant Internet?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr qp 245 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 05, 2019

2018-12-07 12:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Impaired driving, Oral questions,

Conduite avec facultés affaiblies, Questions orales,

Madam Speaker, this week, during National Safe Driving Week and in the Operation Red Nose season, the Conservatives are saying that there is nothing wrong with having a few beers and some chicken wings before getting behind the wheel of a car.

As the Christmas season is upon us, can the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety inform the House of the measures our government is taking to prevent impaired driving?

Madame la Présidente, cette semaine, durant la Semaine nationale de la sécurité routière et pendant la saison d'Opération Nez rouge, les conservateurs affirment qu'il n'y a rien de mal à consommer quelques bières en mangeant des ailes de poulet avant de prendre le volant.

Alors que le temps des Fêtes est à nos portes, la secrétaire parlementaire du ministre de la Sécurité publique peut-elle informer la Chambre des mesures que prend notre gouvernement pour prévenir la conduite avec les facultés affaiblies?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr qp 173 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 07, 2018

2018-11-29 16:24 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Aboriginal languages, House of Commons, Official languages policy

Chambre des communes, Langues autochtones, Politique des langues officielles

Mr. Speaker, I am quite privileged that the member for Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs is not, in fact, on the opposite side of me politically.

When we hear about code-talking languages being used as unbroken codes during the war, I would like to finally be able to break those codes and understand them here in this House. I think it is really important that we get there.

There is one party in the House that is opposing this change on, frankly, technical grounds. I heard two speeches that did not make any sense at all. This offers us a road map for the four speakers in this House who speak one of these languages. There are four. That is all there are. We are not talking about 60 people speaking 60 different languages every single day in this place. This would offer them the opportunity to bring their language, their culture, and the history of this country into the place that is supposed to represent each and every one of us. I think we cannot wait any longer to do this.

Monsieur le Président, je me trouve assez privilégié par le fait que le député de Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs n’est pas vraiment à mes antipodes sur le plan politique.

Lorsqu’on parle des langues cryptées utilisées comme codes inviolables pendant la guerre, cela me porte à vouloir enfin déchiffrer ces codes et les comprendre ici, à la Chambre. Je crois qu’il est vraiment important que nous en arrivions là.

Un seul parti à la Chambre s’oppose à ce changement pour, très franchement, des motifs techniques. J’ai entendu deux discours qui n’avaient aucun sens. Cela nous dessine une carte routière pour les quatre députés qui, dans cette Chambre, parlent une de ces langues. Il y en a quatre. C’est tout. Nous ne parlons pas ici de 60 personnes parlant 60 langues différentes ici même chaque jour. Cela leur offrirait l’occasion de faire pénétrer leur langue, leur culture et l’histoire de ce pays dans l’enceinte qui est censé représenter tous et chacun d’entre nous. Je crois que nous ne pouvons pas attendre plus longtemps pour le faire.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 372 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 29, 2018

2018-11-29 16:21 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Aboriginal languages, House of Commons, Official languages policy

Chambre des communes, Langues autochtones, Politique des langues officielles

Mr. Speaker, I hope so, but it is hard to say for sure.

That being said, giving people the opportunity to speak in their mother tongue or the language of their ancestors that they put the time and effort into learning can only advance the representation of indigenous people in the House. We know that indigenous people are massively under-represented here.

What my colleague from Sherbrooke said is absolutely right. It is important to give indigenous peoples, one of the founding nations of our country, the opportunity to speak their language here in order to encourage them to participate in our country's governance.

Monsieur le Président, je l'espère. On ne peut rien prédire.

Cela dit, avoir la possibilité de s'exprimer dans sa langue maternelle ou dans la langue de ses ancêtres qu'on a pris la peine d'apprendre ne pourrait que favoriser la représentation autochtone à la Chambre. On sait que les Autochtones sont massivement sous-représentés à la Chambre.

Alors, ce que mon collègue de Sherbrooke dit est tout à fait juste. Il est important d'offrir aux communautés autochtones, qui font partie des nations fondatrices de notre pays, la possibilité de parler leur langue ici pour les encourager à participer à la gouvernance du pays.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 227 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 29, 2018

2018-11-29 16:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Aboriginal languages, House of Commons, Official languages policy, Splitting speaking time,

Chambre des communes, Langues autochtones, Partage du temps de parole, Politique des langues officielles,

Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time.

It gives me particular pride to rise on the 66th report from the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, and the importance of adopting this report on time for its recommendations to be in place for our imminent move to West Block.

Growing up I was taught, as all Canadians have been at least since the Official Languages Act was brought in, that Canada has two official languages, representing the two foundational nations of the country we call Canada.

Canada, of course, we were taught was an Indian word meaning home. I say Indian deliberately and without an accurate translation of ""Canada"" in this context because that is how we were taught. It was something that never made a lot of sense and as a kid I accepted the facts as they were presented to me, but I always had a twinge of doubt.

Somehow the English and the French, two western European powers, had founded Canada. However, I asked myself questions as a kid. Why was there an Indian reserve called Doncaster number 17 almost walking distance from my house? What was being reserved? What did the Indians call it? What were these Indians we had been taught ever so vaguely about if not foundational to Canada? If there was a word Canada, what was the rest of their language? If I lived in Canada, why did I not speak Canadian?

England speaks English. France speaks French. Korea speaks Korean. Japan speaks Japanese. I did not know anything about African languages. Quite frankly, we still are not really taught about how that continent got its borders and countries or how incredibly vast Africa actually is. We were not taught anything about its numerous languages, and having that knowledge would probably only have further confused my childhood-self in my quest for understanding the missing nations in Canada, because we were never really taught about colonialism either.

My father Joseph, who has since become very learned in indigenous issues and the real history, and that is not what we were taught in school but what actually happened, told me as a child that his grandfather, Alphonse Paré, a mining engineer and later Canadian cavalry officer in the First World War, spoke four Canadian languages: French, English, Cree, and Ojibwe.

They were, my father taught me, the trading languages of his day, and acting in his capacity as a mining engineer in Timmins, itself a city named by him for his uncle Noah Timmins, he did quite a bit of trading in Northern Ontario. However, he felt no need, no obligation, to pass these additional languages on to his nine children for reasons I will never know.

Just to confuse matters, Alphonse's wife, my Welsh great-grandmother Lucy Griffith, was born in Australia, and their middle daughter, ski champion Patricia de Burgh, Pat Paré, my grandmother, was born in Ireland while her father fought on the front lines in France, directly resulting in my own middle name of de Burgh.

At the same time, I learned that on my mother Sheila's side, my Istanbul-born grandfather, Expo '67 engineer Beno Eskenazi, spoke Ladino, for which he edited the Sephardic Folk Dictionary in the 1990s precisely in order to preserve that dying language, as well as Turkish, Greek, French, and English.

My grandmother, Goldie Wolofsky, spoke Yiddish, English and French. Her own grandfather, Hirsch Wolofsky, was the publisher of der Keneder Adler, Canada's first daily Yiddish newspaper. Often I could hear my grandparents speaking to each other in Spanish and Ladino, similar enough languages to be able to communicate, but both languages I did not understand. Incidentally, my grandmother and my mother, both born and raised in Montreal, were not permitted to attend French school as they were Jewish.

These languages were not passed on to me, and I wondered why. In high school, I took German classes specifically to be able to understand Yiddish, a language related to German in the way Ladino is related to Spanish. Unfortunately, I never found anyone to practice even German with, let alone someone to convert this knowledge to Yiddish. Therefore, to this day, I speak neither German nor Yiddish, though I can exchange a few basic sentences in the former.

While three generations ago Yiddish was the third-most spoken language in Montreal, after French and English, its speakers today are small in number. Part of my own culture, part of my background, has been largely lost.

My wife Mishiel is from Mindanao, an Island fraught with civil war in the southern Philippines. Her home town of Isulan has faced two fatal bombings this summer alone. She speaks Hiligaynon, Cebuano, Aklanon, Tagalog and English.

The Philippines were occupied by the Spanish starting in the early 16th century. The country is itself named for the reigning Spanish King at that time, King Philippe the Second.

In the nearly seven years since we met for the first time at the flame in front of Parliament Hill, I have wanted to learn about her culture, their culture, prior to the arrival of the Spanish. In my efforts, I have found precious little information. While there are over 40 languages spoken today across the Philippines, most are heavily influenced by both the Spanish occupation and the subsequent American influence following their takeover of the territory at the end of the 19th century, with the 1898 Treaty of Paris.

Knowing the cultures that built who we are, who our ancestors were, who our children are is not something to be taken lightly. We are each the product of where our ancestors have been, who they were and what they have done.

Many in this place have met my daughter, Ozara, as, among her many visits to the Hill, she has been here for Halloween dressed as a parliamentary page, the Speaker of the House and, most recently, a commercial-rated pilot. Not bad for a four-year-old kid, one who I hope will grow up knowing two things: first, that there is nothing in the world that she cannot do if she chooses to; and second, where she comes from through as many generations as we can discover.

When she turned one, we tried to figure out how many languages the grandparents of her grandparents are known to have spoken, and it is very likely that there are at least some languages spoken by them of which we are not aware.

Down the Paré line, Ozara is a 14th generation Quebecker, but she comes from many lines, from many countries. We know for sure that between us, we have ancestors, at minimum, from Australia, Canada, Ireland, France, Scotland, Spain, Poland, Ukraine, Russia, Turkey, the Philippines and Wales, which is, incidentally, the same size as my riding.

Over just the past three generations, her direct ancestors spoke at minimum Aklanon, Cebuano, Cree, English, French, Greek, Hebrew, Hiligaynon, Kinaray-a, Ladino, Maguindanaon, Maranao, Ojibwe, Polish, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog, Turkish, and Yiddish. Of those 19 languages, her parents, Mishiel and I, speak six, having lost 13 others along the way, and English is the only language we have in common. In my family, we have lost an average of about four languages per generation.

All of this is to say that my clarity on the whole issue of our true original languages was lacking well into my adult life. To say I fully understand it now would be a bit of a stretch.

On June 8, 2017, my friend and colleague from Winnipeg Centre rose on a question of privilege, because he had intended to speak his own cultural language, Cree, in this place and wished to be understood. The Speaker's ruling two weeks later on the topic said that this was not a question of privilege under current procedures and practices, but three months later, he wrote a letter to PROC suggesting that we take a closer look at the matter.

As a member of PROC since my arrival in this place, I said to myself, “Damn right I want to look at this topic. Who am I to tell people from this land that they cannot speak the languages of this land in Parliament, of all places?”

We often mention that we are on unceded Anishinabek lands, but we do not talk about ignoring unceded languages or disregarding unceded cultures. They are unceded in the same way. They were not given; they were taken away.

Now, to be clear, MPs can speak any language they want any time they want in this place. There is plenty of precedent, and House of Commons Procedure and Practice even addresses the issue directly. The real practical issue is to be understood. In the record, Hansard will simply say, “The member spoke in language X” and, if provided, include a translation after the fact.

Recently, the member for Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs rose in the House and gave an entire statement in the Mohawk language, one of several indigenous languages used as unbroken code throughout the Second World War.

He said:

On this day, the eighth day of November, we will all bring our minds together and pay our respects to the indigenous peoples who enlisted in the Canadian Armed Forces.

Let us think of them and let us remember those who fought and died in the great wars.

Let us pay our respects and let us honour those who died for us so that we could live in peace.

Let our minds be that way.

Let us remember them.

I can think of no greater irony or demonstration of our failure in this regard than that a statement by a Caucasian, delivered in this place in Mohawk, thanking indigenous soldiers for their service to defend our democracy, may only be understood a day later through a written submission, as even with a text provided, our interpreters could not tell us what was being said in a very Canadian language. These languages deserve to be understood in this House, and report 66 lays out a path to start getting us there.

I probably have some small amount of indigenous blood myself. My family being documented in Quebec since 1647, it is quite likely. The fact that I do not know for sure speaks volumes about the importance we have placed on documenting such information. It is not this possibility that motivates me. It is the fact that so many Canadians and so many people in colonized countries all over the world do not know where they are from, and as a result, who they truly are.

I know that I am the product of an enormous number of languages and cultures from all over the world that I know little to nothing about, and I personally regret that. It is not right for us to not do everything we can to preserve cultures important to the people who come from them and languages important to the people who use them.

It is doubly not right to not include languages foundational to our country in the one place that is supposed to represent everyone and everything about us. We have the option here, today, to adopt PROC report 66, which gives us a road map, a plan, a beginning to start to think about solving these issues here in the House to offer indigenous-language speaking members the opportunity to both speak and be understood in this place.

We are generations late in doing so, but with the move to West Block and the technological changes already in place in that building, it is time to act, to not delay any further. For members who do not agree, I encourage them to take it up with their caucus, itself not a Latin word but rather an unceded word from the Algonquin languages.

It is not my intention to allow my daughter to grow up not knowing this history, not recognizing that this country we call Canada, as we know it, was built on top of unceded indigenous lands, unceded indigenous cultures and unceded indigenous languages.

It is said that in North American indigenous cultures, one's value is measured not by what we have but by what we give. On that basis, these cultures and the people who represent them have infinite value, for they have given everything.

We must adopt report 66, and we must do it today. Some things can wait no longer. In case some are wondering, the Mohawk call Doncaster reserve number 17 Tioweró:ton, meaning, roughly, where the wind begins.

Monsieur le Président, je vais partager mon temps de parole.

Je suis particulièrement fier de prendre la parole au sujet du 66e rapport du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre et de souligner l'importance de l'adopter afin que ses recommandations soient appliquées dans les meilleurs délais, à l'approche de notre déménagement dans l'édifice de l'Ouest.

Dans ma jeunesse, j'ai appris, comme tous les Canadiens — du moins depuis l'entrée en vigueur de la Loi sur les langues officielles — que le Canada a deux langues officielles, celles des deux peuples fondateurs du Canada.

Évidemment, on nous a enseigné que le mot « Canada » est un mot indien qui signifie « maison ». Je fais exprès pour dire « indien », et je n'ai pas de traduction exacte du mot « Canada » dans ce contexte, puisque c'est ce qu'on nous enseignait. Lorsque j'étais enfant, je trouvais que ce n'était pas très logique. Même si j'acceptais les faits tels qu'ils m'étaient présentés, j'ai toujours eu de légers doutes.

Pour une raison quelconque, les Anglais et les Français, deux puissances de l'Europe occidentale, avaient fondé le Canada. Cependant, dans mon enfance, je me posais certaines questions. Pourquoi une réserve indienne qu'on appelait la réserve no 17 de Doncaster se trouvait-elle à distance de marche de ma maison? Qu'est-ce qu'on y réservait? Comment les Indiens appelaient-ils cet endroit? Ces Indiens dont on nous parlait de façon très vague, qu'étaient-ils s'ils ne faisaient pas partie des peuples fondateurs du Canada? Ils avaient le mot « Canada », mais à quoi ressemblaient les autres mots de leur langue? Si je vivais au Canada, alors pourquoi je ne parlais pas canadien?

En Angleterre, on parle anglais. En France, on parle français. En Corée, on parle coréen. Au Japon, on parle japonais. Je n'ai rien appris au sujet des langues africaines. Bien honnêtement, on ne nous apprend toujours pas grand-chose au sujet de ce continent, de l'établissement de ses frontières, des pays qui le composent et de son incroyable étendue géographique. On ne nous apprenait rien au sujet des nombreuses langues qui y sont parlées. D'ailleurs, toutes ces connaissances m'auraient probablement rendu encore plus confus dans ma quête de compréhension des nations manquantes au Canada, parce qu'on ne nous avait pas vraiment parlé du colonialisme non plus.

Mon père, Joseph, qui possède aujourd'hui une connaissance étendue des questions autochtones et de l'histoire réelle, soit celle qui s'est réellement produite et non celle qu'on nous enseignait à l'école, m'a raconté, lorsque j'étais enfant, que son grand-père, un dénommé Alphonse Paré qui était ingénieur minier avant d'être officier de la cavalerie canadienne pendant la Première Guerre mondiale, parlait quatre langues canadiennes: le français, l'anglais, le cri et l'ojibwé.

C'étaient, mon père me l'a appris, les langues du commerce de l'époque et, en tant qu'ingénieur minier à Timmins, une ville qu'il avait nommée en l'honneur de son oncle, Noah Timmins, il commerçait très souvent dans le Nord de l'Ontario. Cependant, pour des raisons qui m'échappent, il n'a jamais cru bon ni senti le besoin de transmettre ces langues supplémentaires à ses neuf enfants.

Pour rendre les choses encore plus compliquées, la femme d'Alphonse, mon arrière-grand-mère galloise, Lucy Griffith, était née en Australie. Leur deuxième fille, Patricia de Burgh, en l'occurrence ma grand-mère qui, soit dit en passant, fut la championne de ski Pat Paré, est née en Irlande lorsque son père combattait sur le front français, ce qui explique mon deuxième prénom, de Burgh.

Au même moment, j'ai appris que du côté de ma mère, Sheila, mon grand-père, né à Istanbul, ingénieur de l'Expo 67, Beno Eskenazi, parlait ladino. Il a d'ailleurs édité le Sephardic Folk Dictionary dans les années 1990 afin de protéger cette langue qui peinait à survivre. Il parlait aussi le turc, le grec, le français et l'anglais.

Ma grand-mère, Goldie Wolofsky, parlait yiddish, anglais et français. Son grand-père, Hirsch Wolofsky, a été le fondateur du premier journal en yiddish au Canada, le Der Kender Adler. Mes grands-parents se parlaient souvent en espagnol et en ladino. Ce sont des langues qui se ressemblent, mais je ne comprenais aucune des deux. Ma grand-mère et ma mère, toutes les deux nées à Montréal, n'ont pas eu le droit d'aller à l'école en français parce qu'elles étaient juives.

Ces langues ne m'ont pas été apprises, et je me demande pourquoi. À l'école secondaire, j'ai suivi des cours d'allemand pour pouvoir comprendre le yiddish, une langue proche de l'allemand, un peu comme le ladino et l'espagnol. Malheureusement, je n'ai jamais trouvé qui que ce soit avec qui pratiquer l'allemand, encore moins pour transférer ces connaissances vers le yiddish. Ainsi, à ce jour, je ne parle ni allemand ni yiddish, même si je connais quelques phrases de bases dans la première.

Il y a trois générations, le yiddish était la troisième langue en importance à Montréal, après le français et l'anglais, mais elle ne l'est plus du tout aujourd'hui. J'ai perdu une grande partie de ma culture et de mes origines.

Ma femme Mishiel vient de Mindanao, une île dans le Sud des Philippines aux prises avec une guerre civile. Cet été seulement, il y a eu deux attentats à la bombe mortels dans sa ville natale, Isulan. Elle parle l'hiligaynon, le cebuano, l'aklanon, le tagalog et l'anglais.

Les Philippines ont été occupées par les Espagnols à compter du début du XVIe siècle. En fait, le pays porte le nom du roi qui régnait sur l'Espagne à l'époque, à savoir le roi Philippe II.

Depuis ma première rencontre avec Mishiel il y a près de sept ans devant la flamme sur la Colline du Parlement, je cherche à en apprendre davantage sur sa culture, la culture des Philippines avant l'arrivée des Espagnols. Malgré mes efforts, j'ai trouvé très peu d'information à ce sujet. Même si de nos jours plus de 40 langues sont parlées aux Philippines, la plupart d'entre elles ont été profondément influencées par les occupants espagnols et, plus tard, par les Américains auxquels le traité de Paris de 1898 a transféré le contrôle du pays.

Il ne faut pas minimiser l'importance de connaître les cultures qui ont contribué à notre identité, à celle de nos ancêtres et à celle de nos enfants. Les endroits où nos ancêtres ont vécu, le genre de personne qu'ils étaient et les gestes qu'ils ont posés font tous de nous ce que nous sommes.

Bon nombre de députés ont rencontré ma fille Ozara. Elle m'a souvent visité sur la Colline, notamment à l'Halloween où elle est venue déguisée en page parlementaire, en Présidente de la Chambre et, plus récemment, en pilote professionnelle. Ce n'est pas mal pour une petite fille de quatre ans. J'espère qu'en grandissant, elle saura qu'elle peut atteindre tous les objectifs qu'elle se fixera et qu'elle saura d'où tous ces nombreux ancêtres viennent, du moins tous ceux que nous pourrons découvrir.

Lors de son premier anniversaire, nous avons tenté de calculer le nombre de langues que nous savions que les grands-parents de ses grands-parents avaient parlé, et il est fort probable que nous ne sommes pas au courant de toutes les langues qu'ils aient parlé.

Du côté des Parés, Ozara est une Québécoise de quatorzième génération, mais son arbre généalogique a de nombreuses branches et elle compte des ancêtres de divers pays. Nous savons avec certitude que, dans nos deux familles, nous avons des ancêtres qui viennent au moins des pays suivants: Australie, Canada, Irlande, France, Écosse, Espagne, Pologne, Ukraine, Russie, Turquie, Philippines et pays de Galles qui est, soit dit en passant, de la même taille que ma circonscription.

Au cours des trois dernières générations seulement, les ancêtres directs d'Ozara ont parlé au moins l'aklanon, le cebuano, le cri, l'anglais, le français, le grec, l'hébreu, le hiligaynon, le kinaray-a, le ladino, le maguindanao, le maranao, l'ojibwé, le polonais, le russe, l'espagnol, le tagalog, le turc et le yiddish. Ses parents, c'est-à-dire Mishiel et moi, parlent six de ces 19 langues. Nous avons perdu les 13 autres en cours de route et l'anglais est la seule langue que nous avons en commun. Dans ma famille, nous avons perdu en moyenne quatre langues par générations.

Bref, bien après avoir atteint l'âge adulte, je ne comprenais toujours pas clairement la question de nos véritables langues originales. Il serait un peu exagéré de dire que je la comprends maintenant parfaitement.

Le 8 juin 2017, mon collègue de Winnipeg-Centre a soulevé une question de privilège parce qu'il avait eu l'intention de parler à la Chambre dans sa langue, le cri, et il voulait être compris. Dans la décision qu'il a rendue deux semaines plus tard, le Président a conclu qu'il ne s'agissait pas d'une question de privilège en vertu des procédures et des usages actuels. Cependant, trois mois plus tard, il a écrit une lettre au comité de la procédure pour lui suggérer d'examiner la question de plus près.

Étant membre du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre depuis mon arrivée à la Chambre, je me suis dit: « Bien sûr que je veux étudier cette question. Qui suis-je pour dire à mes concitoyens qu'ils ne peuvent pas parler les langues de ce pays au Parlement? »

Nous mentionnons souvent que nous nous trouvons sur des terres ancestrales et non cédées des peuples algonquins, mais nous ne parlons pas du fait que nous ignorons des langues et des cultures non cédées. Elles sont toutes non cédées de la même manière: elles n'ont pas été données, mais prises de force.

Précisons que dorénavant les députés peuvent parler n'importe quelle langue à la Chambre. Il existe de nombreux précédents. Il en est même question dans La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes. Le problème, bien concret, est de se faire comprendre. Dans le hansard, il sera indiqué « Le député s'exprime en langue X », suivi de la traduction, si elle a été fournie.

Récemment, le député de Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs a pris la parole et a prononcé son discours entièrement en mohawk, l'une des nombreuses langues qui ont servi de code indécryptable durant la Deuxième Guerre mondiale.

Je le cite:

En ce [jour], rassemblons tous nos esprits et rendons hommage aux peuples autochtones qui se sont portés bénévoles pour s'engager dans les Forces armées canadiennes.

Pensons à eux et rappelons-nous ceux qui se sont battus et sont morts dans les grandes guerres.

Rendons hommage et honorons ceux qui sont morts pour nous, afin qu'aujourd'hui nous puissions tous vivre en paix.

Tel doit être notre état d'esprit.

Nous nous souvenons.

Je ne peux imaginer plus grande ironie ni plus grande preuve de notre échec dans ce domaine que le fait qu'une déclaration prononcée en mohawk, dans cette enceinte, par un homme blanc pour remercier les soldats autochtones d'avoir défendu notre démocratie ne puisse être comprise que le lendemain quand on en a produit une traduction écrite puisque, même si on leur avait fourni le texte, nos interprètes ne pouvaient nous dire ce qui était dit dans une langue pourtant tout à fait canadienne. Ces langues méritent d'être comprises à la Chambre. Le 66e rapport propose une façon d'atteindre cet objectif.

Il est probable qu'il coule un peu de sang autochtone dans mes veines. Comme les documents sur ma famille au Québec remontent jusqu'à 1647, c'est bien possible. Le fait que je n'en sois pas certain en dit long sur l'importance qui a été accordée à la conservation de ce genre de renseignements. Ce n'est pas cette possibilité qui me motive. C'est le fait que tant de Canadiens et de gens dans les pays colonisés du monde entier ne savent pas d'où ils viennent et, par conséquent, qui ils sont vraiment.

Je sais que je suis le produit d'un très grand nombre de cultures et de langues provenant du monde entier et sur lesquelles je ne sais à peu près rien, chose que je regrette. Nous ne pouvons justifier de ne pas faire tout ce que nous pouvons pour préserver les cultures importantes aux yeux des gens qui en sont issus et les langues importantes aux yeux des gens qui les parlent.

Nous aurions doublement tort de ne pas inclure les langues qui sont à la base même de notre pays à l'endroit qui est censé représenter tous les Canadiens et tout ce qui les concerne. Nous avons la possibilité, ici, aujourd'hui, d'adopter le 66e rapport du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, lequel nous donne une feuille de route, un plan, un point de départ, pour commencer à songer à résoudre ces questions ici même afin d'offrir aux députés qui parlent une langue autochtone l'occasion de s'exprimer dans cette langue à la Chambre et d'être compris.

Cela aurait dû se faire il y a des générations. Toutefois, compte tenu du déménagement dans l'édifice de l'Ouest et des changements technologiques déjà en place dans ce bâtiment, il est temps d'agir sans plus tarder. J'encourage les députés qui s'y opposent à soulever la question auprès de leur caucus, qui n'est pas un mot latin, mais plutôt un mot algonquin qui n'a jamais été cédé.

Je n'ai pas l'intention de laisser ma fille grandir sans connaître cette histoire, sans reconnaître que ce pays que nous appelons le Canada, tel que nous le connaissons, a été fondé sur des terres autochtones non cédées, des cultures autochtones non cédées et des langues autochtones non cédées.

Dans les cultures autochtones d'Amérique du Nord, on dit que la valeur d'une personne se mesure non pas par ce qu'elle possède, mais par ce qu'elle donne. Ainsi, ces cultures et les gens qui les représentent ont une valeur infinie, car ils ont tout donné.

Nous devons adopter le 66e rapport, et ce, aujourd'hui même. Certaines choses ne peuvent plus attendre. Pour ceux qui se posent la question, les Mohawks appellent la réserve no 17 de Doncaster Tioweró:ton, ce qui signifie, en gros, là où le vent se lève.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 4375 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 29, 2018

2018-11-29 15:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Aboriginal languages, House of Commons, Official languages policy

Chambre des communes, Langues autochtones, Politique des langues officielles

Mr. Speaker, I sincerely hope today is the last day we have to hear indigenous speeches in the House without the use of translation.

The opportunities are in this report. Should the member wish to speak in this way the next time, she will be able to inform the Table and interpretation will be provided. It is very sad to hear the interpreters' booth go silent when we are listening to a speech. I would have loved to have heard everything the member said in real time. This is more of a comment than a question.

I very much appreciate her pushing us to do this, to have participated in the study and to have demonstrated the importance and need for it in the House today.

Monsieur le Président, j'espère sincèrement qu'aujourd'hui est le dernier jour où l'on parle une langue autochtone à la Chambre sans avoir recours à des services d'interprétation.

Ce rapport en offre la possibilité. Si la députée souhaite parler dans sa langue la prochaine fois, elle pourra en informer le Bureau, qui lui fournira des services d'interprétation. Il est fort triste d'entendre le silence provenant de la cabine d'interprétation quand on écoute un discours. J'aurais aimé comprendre en temps réel tout ce que la députée a dit. Il s'agit davantage d'une observation que d'une question.

Je lui suis très reconnaissant de nous avoir incités à adopter cette mesure et à participer à l'étude et de nous avoir montré l'importance et la nécessité d'une telle chose à la Chambre aujourd'hui.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 275 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 29, 2018

2018-11-29 15:19 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Aboriginal languages, House of Commons, Official languages policy

Chambre des communes, Langues autochtones, Politique des langues officielles

Mr. Speaker, the recommendations in the 66th report of PROC are specifically written in a way to allow and encourage members of the House of Commons who are not indigenous to learn those languages and use them in this place. I wonder if the member has any comments on the importance of that, as we have seen from our colleague from Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs in Montreal.

Monsieur le Président, les recommandations contenues dans le 66e rapport du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre sont rédigées précisément de façon à permettre aux députés qui ne sont pas autochtones d'apprendre ces langues et de les utiliser en ce lieu, et à les encourager à le faire. Je me demande si le député a des observations sur l'importance de cela, comme nous avons pu le constater grâce au député de Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs, à Montréal.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 168 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 29, 2018

2018-11-26 14:05 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Athletes, Retirement from work, Skiing, Statements by Members,

Athlètes, Déclarations de députés, Départ à la retraite, Ski,

Mr. Speaker, world champion skier Erik Guay announced last week that he is retiring. A true class act, he made his farewell run yesterday at a World Cup downhill ski event in Lake Louise.

Throughout his two decades of dedication to the sport, he showed what it takes to become the most medalled skier in Canadian history while remaining a gentleman and inspiring an entire generation of young skiers.

Last year, at an event at Mont Tremblant to recognize his most recent world championship, he spent hours signing autographs and being photographed with fans without ever saying no, losing his smile, or doing anything but being there for everyone else. This is but one small example of who Erik is: accomplished yet humble, competitive but selfless.

Erik, on behalf of everyone in Laurentides—Labelle and across Canada, I want to congratulate you on your career. Thank you for being the athlete you are.

Safe travels home, my friend. Enjoy this time with your family. I have no doubt that we will be hearing about you again in the very near future.

Monsieur le Président, la semaine dernière, Erik Guay, un grand champion du monde, a annoncé sa retraite. Hier, il a effectué avec classe sa dernière descente sur le circuit de la Coupe du monde de ski alpin à Lake Louise.

Au terme de deux décennies de dévouement, il a démontré de quelle façon on peut devenir le skieur le plus titré de l'histoire canadienne, demeurer un gentleman et être une inspiration pour toute une génération de jeunes skieurs.

L'an dernier, lors d'une activité à Mont-Tremblant organisée en l'honneur de son plus récent championnat du monde, il a passé des heures à signer des autographes et à prendre des photos avec ses partisans. Il n'a refusé aucune demande, n'a jamais perdu son sourire et s'est contenté d'être là pour tout le monde. Ce n'est qu'un petit aperçu de qui Erik est: un athlète accompli mais humble, ainsi qu'une personne compétitive mais altruiste.

Erik, tous les citoyens de Laurentides—Labelle et tous les Canadiens se joignent à moi pour te féliciter pour ta carrière. Je te remercie d'être l'athlète que tu es.

Bon retour chez toi, mon ami. Profite bien de ce temps avec ta famille. Je suis certain qu'on entendra de nouveau parler de toi très bientôt.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 407 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 26, 2018

2018-11-21 17:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Aboriginal peoples, Air transportation, Bureaucracy, Education tax credit, Educational institutions, Flight training, Foreign students, Labour shortage, Male dominated occupations

Bruit et pollution par le bruit, Bureaucratie, Conditions et horaires de travail, Droits de scolarité, Emplois à prédominance masculine, Enseignants, Étudiants étrangers, Formation au pilotage,

Mr. Speaker, or perhaps I should say House traffic control, thank you for granting me a clearance to speak to Motion No. 177, the challenges facing flight schools, from my colleague both in the House and in the sky, the member for Kelowna—Lake Country.

The aviation industry as a whole is an important one, and the biggest challenges facing flight schools stem from wider problems in the industry, namely a shortage of qualified pilots. As many of us here know, this is not a problem unique to aviation. The worker shortage across my region is significantly affecting all sectors. Restaurants are having trouble staying open, not for a lack of clients, but for a lack of kitchen staff. The 24-hour Tim Hortons are not. Even garages have significant ad campaigns on local radio stations to hire mechanics, and the story is repeated in just about every industry across the region.

According to the International Civil Aviation Organization, the aviation industry will be short some 620,000 pilots over the next 18 years. We are in a period of feast, and there will no doubt be challenges that come along that affect this prediction over the course of that time, but the need will still be significant.

When I started flying in 2005, the industry was in a state of famine. My first flying school, which closed not long after I earned my licence, had an abundance of flight instructors, each paid by the flight instruction hour, on contract, rather than on a salary. Many, if not most, had second jobs to get by, as well as significant five-figure loans. If someone got a job offer off the instructor circuit, it was a huge victory worth celebrating.

Times were tough in aviation, and while I dreamed of being a career pilot like my grandfather, Jack Ross Graham, before me, who flew from the early 1930s until his death by pulmonary embolism in 1959, a direct consequence of his time in flight, there was no way I was giving up a good career as a news editor in the free software world for the high-risk gamble of following that passion.

The industry since that time has faced a complete reversal. Around the world, aviation is on an upswing, and rather than going overseas looking for students to keep idle fleets of training aircraft occupied, schools are struggling to find instructors to meet the demand of largely overseas students coming on their own.

That leads to another point. I cannot think of very many industries where it is the novices, rather than the seasoned veterans, who teach the beginners. For the majority of new commercial pilots, their first job is either as a bush pilot or as what is called a class 4 flight instructor. Veteran career instructors exist, but are extremely rare and are largely a dying breed.

For most new pilots, flight instruction is a job held for the minimum amount of time possible, until what they call “a real job” becomes available. Today, these instructors often serve as little as four months' time, meaning new pilots, if they are lucky enough to find an instructor, risk changing instructors several times through their training, which can slow down the process.

There are some instructors who for various reasons choose to remain instructors, and I am privileged to have one of this type as my own instructor, but that has not always been the case for me. When I started as a student at a flying school called Aviation International at Guelph Airpark, then the busiest uncontrolled airport in the country, I had someone I felt to be an exceptional instructor in Rob Moss, then both a civilian and a military instructor. Over the course of my training, Rob got an interesting job flying in northern Ontario. Then I was bounced through Andrew Gottschlich, Scott Peters, Marcia Pluim and Alex Ruiz before finally getting my licence in the summer of 2007. I had to check my logbook to make sure I did not miss anyone. While each of them was both a good pilot and a good instructor, there is no doubt that the constant change in instructors slowed down my training. That was one of the pitfalls of not training full-time.

Another of these pitfalls was that during this time when I filed my flight training receipts with my taxes as a tuition expense in view of training toward a new career, Canada Revenue Agency rejected these significant deductions because I had not yet achieved a commercial licence and therefore it did not count, though I was told by many in the industry that if I made a federal case out of it I could get that fixed.

It is little roadblocks like this that tend to cascade into larger problems for those trying to get into the industry. Some of these affect the schools themselves, which have onerous and difficult processes to be recognized as schools by provincial education departments, complicating matters further.

It is certainly a particular personal pleasure for me to talk about aviation here in the House. One day, early on in my flying career, I was learning the basics of how to land a plane. Every landing, though successful, was sloppy. Off the centre line, a bit of a bounce, a bit more of a bounce, a little long on our short runway, maybe an incorrect radio call or two, and I was getting frustrated. I was very focused, doing exactly what I had been taught in ground school and shown by the aforementioned Rob. Then, a few circuits in, Rob and I got into a long and interesting conversation about politics. At the time, it was the dying months of the Martin administration, and there was a good deal for us to talk about. We kept talking about federal politics until I had pulled off runway 32 at the far end and started taxiing back for the next circuit. It was only at that point that we realized that I had made my first perfect landing. Politics, it seems, was the solution. Indeed, we never missed opportunities to talk about politics while I was learning to fly. Now, fast forward 13 and a half years and a couple of hundred flying hours in a dozen different aircraft, and it is a complete reversal to at last be able to speak about aviation on the floor of the House.

I have, on a few occasions, travelled to events in my riding by plane rather than by car. I have landed at all five registered land aerodromes in the riding, including La Macaza/Mont-Tremblant International Airport, where I rent a Cessna 172M.

There are another five registered heliports, five registered seaplane bases, numerous unregistered runways and the occasional temporary airfield plowed into a frozen lake, several of which I have also landed at, and helipads, as well as float plane docks on many of the approximately 10,000 lakes that decorate Laurentides—Labelle. A search last year of Transport Canada's airplane registration database found about 300 aircraft that are registered to postal codes in my riding.

Aviation is, then, an important part of the Laurentians. I am a member of the Association des aviateurs de la région du Mont-Tremblant, Association des pilotes de brousse du Québec, and the Canadian Owners and Pilots Association.

The first puts up an event we call Jeunes en Vol every year at the Wheelair field in Mont-Tremblant, itself the site of Canada's first commercial airline. There have also been such events in Sainte-Anne-du-Lac and La Minerve over the past couple of years. At five of these, I have participated as a volunteer pilot, offering rides to three kids at a time aged eight to 17 in what we call “aerial baptism”. All the organizations I mentioned put on this type of event all across Canada.

At its core, it is a way for the aviation industry to tackle the problem of self-renewal. In offering 200 kids at a time the opportunity to experience flight in a small plane, for the first time in almost all cases, we are inviting interest in pursuing a career in the industry. I have taken a total of approximately 50 kids up so far in this manner, as well as my own four-year-old daughter Ozara, who now insists, depending on the day, that she will either be a member of Parliament, a pilot, or most recently, a flight attendant.

Almost every time I take a new person up in the air, I see their eyes light up. Only once has one of the kids also lit up a plastic bag, but we do try to avoid that. The interest is there. People want to fly. The challenges of learning to fly are numerous. It is expensive. A new pilot will typically incur $75,000 or more in debt before obtaining their commercial licence, and while prices have climbed steadily over the 13 years that I have been flying, schools are reticent to further raise prices. Of course, this leads to the vicious circle of instructors being few and far between.

Aviation medical examiners are rarer than they need to be, and if people do complete the courses, there are not enough flight test examiners to meet current demand. Now, I am lucky to have an extraordinarily competent instructor in Caroline Farly, the owner of Aéro Loisirs at La Macaza. For her, finding and retaining additional instructors for the three Cessna 172s used for land training at her school, and many others like hers, is a huge challenge.

A newly commercial-rated pilot with 200 hours, the minimum necessary to get a commercial license, can easily pick up a job for mines in Central Africa, for example, or obscure routes across the Far East, making decent money, and it does not take a whole lot of hours to pick up a flying job back at home.

Sticking around to be a class 4 instructor, the class that an instructor remains until they have successfully trained at least three students, at which point they become a class 3 instructor, is hardly a lucrative way to live. Generally on contract and paid by the instruction hour rather than by the duty hour, they are severely constrained by weather and aircraft availability, among numerous other factors, and there is no way to clear their $75,000 in debt in anything resembling a rational timeline.

While schools themselves face challenges with things like noise complaints from neighbours who get annoyed by the constant buzz of planes climbing out and circling over their houses and then landing, the biggest challenges are in incentivizing commercial pilots to pass on their skills.

There is, for example, zero incentive for an experienced pilot to pass their thousands, or tens of thousands, of hours of knowledge back to the next generation. It is left to the new pilots to train the newer pilots. More than that, there is little incentive for those new pilots to even take on that challenge, because their immediate concern is getting themselves out of the mountain of debt they incurred to become a pilot in the first place, a debt that many succumb to before even finishing their license, resulting in high drop-out rates, further stressing the system.

There are obvious places to look for solutions. Only about 7% of Canada's pilots are women, and indigenous communities are severely under-represented, yet are generally more reliant on aviation than most of the rest of society—though many reserves do not even have an airstrip. Ensuring that reserves have a landing strip, a plane, and a flight and mechanical instructor could kill several birds with one stone, but not before we address the financial challenges of getting into the business, for which solutions have been proposed, such as granting student loan forgiveness for instructors who serve a certain amount of time and/or in a remote location.

There are myriad other ideas, and this study would help us identify and evaluate them. The problem, of course, is wider than just pilots, and also speaks to the related problem of the death of the apprenticeship economy. Aviation mechanics, the Royal Canadian Air Force, and pretty much anyone hiring in the aviation industry has stiff competition for competent, trained workers, and so a deeper study of these challenges and how we can address them is not only warranted, but urgent.

Monsieur le Président — ou devrais-je dire « contrôleur du trafic à la Chambre » —, je vous remercie de me permettre de parler de la motion M-177 sur les difficultés que rencontrent les écoles de pilotage, présentée par mon collègue à la Chambre et dans le ciel, le député de Kelowna—Lake Country.

L'industrie de l'aviation en général est importante, et les plus grandes difficultés que les écoles de pilotage rencontrent s'expliquent par des problèmes plus vastes dans l'industrie, à savoir le manque de pilotes qualifiés. Comme beaucoup d'entre nous le savent, il ne s'agit pas d'un problème propre à l'aviation. Dans ma région, la pénurie de main-d'oeuvre touche tous les secteurs de manière non négligeable. Les restaurants ont du mal à rester ouverts, non pas par manque de clients, mais par manque de personnel de cuisine. Les Tim Hortons ouverts 24 heures sur 24 ne le sont pas. Même les garages mènent de vigoureuses campagnes publicitaires sur les chaînes de radio locales pour embaucher des mécaniciens, et l'histoire se répète dans presque toutes les industries de la région.

D'après l'Organisation de l'aviation civile internationale, l'industrie de l'aviation aura besoin de quelque 620 000 pilotes au cours des 18 prochaines années. Nous sommes dans une période faste, et il ne fait aucun doute que des difficultés apparaîtront qui influeront sur cette prédiction pendant cette période, mais les besoins resteront criants.

Quand j'ai commencé à piloter en 2005, la situation était très difficile pour les pilotes. Ma première école de pilotage, qui a fermé ses portes peu de temps après que j'aie obtenu ma licence, était loin de manquer d'instructeurs. Ces derniers travaillaient à contrat et étaient payés pour les heures d'instruction données plutôt qu'à salaire. Bon nombre d'entre eux, peut-être même la majorité, avaient un deuxième emploi pour pouvoir arriver, de même qu'un prêt à rembourser dans les cinq chiffres. Quand l'un d'entre eux se voyait offrir un emploi qui lui permettait de quitter son poste d'instructeur, c'était un exploit à célébrer.

Les temps étaient durs dans le domaine de l'aviation et, même si je rêvais de faire une carrière de pilote comme mon grand-père, Jack Ross Graham, qui a été pilote du début des années 1930 jusqu'à sa mort en 1959 d'une embolie pulmonaire, une conséquence directe du temps qu'il avait passé en avion, je n'allais absolument pas abandonner un bon emploi de rédacteur-réviseur de nouvelles dans le domaine des logiciels en libre accès et faire le pari risqué de poursuivre cette passion.

Aujourd'hui, c'est tout le contraire dans l'industrie. Partout dans le monde, l'aviation est en forte progression et, plutôt que de devoir aller recruter des élèves à l'étranger pour éviter que leurs avions-écoles restent au sol, les écoles ont de la difficulté à trouver des instructeurs pour répondre à la demande créée en grande partie par des élèves de l'étranger qui viennent s'inscrire d'eux-mêmes.

Cela m'amène à un autre facteur. À ma connaissance, il n'y a pas beaucoup d'industries où ce sont des débutants, plutôt que des vétérans, qui enseignent aux élèves. Le premier emploi de la majorité des nouveaux pilotes professionnels est un emploi soit de pilote de brousse, soit de ce qu'on appelle un instructeur de vol de classe 4. Il y a des instructeurs de carrière, des gens d'expérience, mais il y en a peu, c'est presque une espèce en voie de disparition.

La plupart des nouveaux pilotes qui donnent des cours de pilotage veulent le faire le moins longtemps possible en attendant de décrocher ce qu'ils appellent un « vrai emploi ». Aujourd'hui, ces instructeurs servent à peine quatre mois, ce qui signifie que les nouveaux pilotes, pour peu qu'ils aient la chance de trouver un instructeur, risquent d'en changer plusieurs fois tout au long de leur formation, qui peut s'en trouver ralenti.

Certains instructeurs, pour diverses raisons, choisissent de rester instructeurs et j'ai le privilège d'avoir une de ces personnes comme instructeur, mais il n'en a pas toujours été ainsi pour moi. Lorsque j'ai commencé comme étudiant à une école de pilotage qui s'appelle Aviation International, à l'aéroparc de Guelph, qui était alors l'aéroport non contrôlé le plus achalandé au pays, j'ai eu ce que j'estime être un instructeur exceptionnel en la personne de Rob Moss, qui était alors à la fois instructeur civil et instructeur militaire. Au cours de ma formation, Rob a décroché un emploi intéressant comme pilote dans le Nord de l'Ontario. Puis, on a confié mon instruction successivement à Andrew Gottschlich, Scott Peters, Marcia Pluim et Alex Ruiz avant que j'obtienne finalement ma licence, à l'été 2007. J'ai dû vérifier dans mon carnet de bord pour être certain de n'oublier personne. Même si chacun était à la fois un bon pilote et un bon instructeur, il ne fait aucun doute que le fait de changer constamment d'instructeur a ralenti ma formation. C'est l'un des inconvénients quand on ne suit pas une formation à plein temps.

Il y a un autre inconvénient à cela. Durant cette période, j'ai soumis mes reçus de paiement pour mon entraînement au vol avec ma déclaration de revenus, les déclarant comme frais de scolarité dans le cadre d'un changement de carrière, mais l'Agence du revenu du Canada a refusé de m'accorder les déductions pour ces frais, qui sont importantes, parce que je n'avais pas encore obtenu de licence de pilote professionnel. Ma formation ne comptait donc pas, quoique bien des gens du milieu m'ont dit que si j'en faisais toute une affaire, je pourrais obtenir gain de cause.

Ce sont de petites embûches comme celles-là qui tendent à prendre de l'ampleur pour ceux qui veulent intégrer ce secteur. Certaines touchent les écoles, qui doivent faire des démarches complexes et onéreuses pour être reconnues par les ministères de l'Éducation des provinces, ce qui complique encore plus les choses.

Je prends certainement un plaisir particulier à parler d'aviation à la Chambre. Une fois, lorsque je suivais des leçons de pilotage, j'apprenais comment poser un avion sur le sol. Tous mes atterrissages, bien que réussis, étaient boiteux: je n'étais pas au centre de la piste, l'appareil rebondissait un peu, il rebondissait un peu plus, il parcourait une distance un peu trop grande sur notre courte piste d'atterrissage, et j'ai peut-être fait un ou deux appels radio inexacts. Je commençais à perdre patience. Je me concentrais énormément et je faisais exactement ce qu'on m'avait enseigné à l'école de formation au sol et ce que Rob, l'instructeur dont je viens de parler, m'avait montré. Alors, après quelques atterrissages, Rob et moi avons entamé une longue conversation intéressante sur la politique. À l'époque, le gouvernement Martin en était à ses derniers mois de vie et il y avait beaucoup de sujets dont nous pouvions parler. Nous avons continué à parler de la politique fédérale jusqu'à ce que je prenne la sortie à l'extrémité de la piste 32 et que je commence à faire le tour pour pouvoir décoller de nouveau. C'est seulement à ce moment que nous avons réalisé que j'avais fait mon premier atterrissage parfait. Il semble que la politique était la solution. En effet, nous n'avons jamais raté une occasion de parler de politique pendant que j'apprenais à piloter. Maintenant, 13 ans et demi plus tard et avec 200 heures de vol dans une douzaine d'appareils différents à mon actif, la situation est complètement inversée. Je peux enfin parler d'aviation à la Chambre.

À quelques reprises, j'ai voyagé en avion plutôt qu'en voiture à des événements dans ma circonscription, Laurentides—Labelle. J'ai atterri à chacun des cinq aérodromes enregistrés, y compris à l'aéroport international de Mont-Tremblant, situé à La Macaza, où je loue un Cessna 172M.

Il se trouve également dans ma circonscription cinq hydrobases et cinq héliports enregistrés, de nombreuses pistes non enregistrées et, à l'occasion, quelques pistes temporaires, déneigées sur un lac gelé — où j'ai atterri à quelques reprises — et des aires d'atterrissage d'hélicoptère, ainsi que des quais flottants pour hydravions sur bon nombre des 10 000 lacs qui enjolivent Laurentides—Labelle. Une recherche effectuée l'an dernier dans le registre des aéronefs civils canadiens de Transports Canada a révélé qu'environ 300 aéronefs sont enregistrés à des codes postaux de ma circonscription.

Donc, l'aviation est un élément important des Laurentides. Je suis membre de l'Association des aviateurs de la région du Mont-Tremblant, de l'Association des pilotes de brousse du Québec, et de l'Association canadienne des pilotes et propriétaires d'aéronefs.

L'Association des aviateurs de la région du Mont-Tremblant organise chaque année l'événement Jeunes en Vol au terrain d'aviation Wheelair à Mont-Tremblant, qui a accueilli la première compagnie aérienne commerciale du Canada. Au cours des dernières années, on a aussi organisé des événements semblables à Sainte-Anne-du-Lac et à La Minerve. J'ai participé à cinq de ces événements comme pilote bénévole, offrant à des enfants entre 8 et 17 ans de monter en avion, trois à la fois, pour vivre ce qu'on appelle un « baptême de l'air ». Toutes les associations dont j'ai parlé organisent ce genre d'événements partout au Canada.

Au fond, c'est une façon de s'attaquer au problème de la relève dans l'industrie de l'aviation. En offrant à un groupe de 200 jeunes l'occasion de voler à bord d'un petit avion, pour la première fois dans bien des cas, nous les invitons à songer à une carrière dans l'industrie. Jusqu'à présent, environ 50 jeunes sont montés à bord avec moi, y compris ma fille de quatre ans Ozara, qui soutient qu'elle sera soit une députée, une pilote ou, plus récemment, une agente de bord — son choix varie d'une journée à une autre.

Presque chaque fois qu'une personne monte à bord pour son premier vol, je vois ses yeux pétiller. Seulement un de mes jeunes passagers a dû se servir d'un sac en plastique, mais nous essayons d'éviter cela. L'intérêt est là. Les gens veulent voler. Apprendre à piloter un avion comporte de nombreux obstacles. C'est cher. Un pilote s'endette en général de 75 000 $ ou plus avant d'obtenir une licence de pilote professionnel. Les prix ont connu une augmentation constante au cours des 13 dernières années, mais les écoles hésitent à augmenter davantage les frais d'inscription. Bien entendu, cela contribue au cercle vicieux de la rareté des instructeurs.

Les médecins examinateurs d'aviation se font plus rares qu'auparavant. Même si les gens continuent de suivre les formations, il n'y a pas suffisamment d'examinateurs d'épreuve en vol pour répondre à la demande actuelle. J'ai la chance de pouvoir compter sur une instructrice extrêmement compétente, Caroline Farly, qui est propriétaire de l'école Aéro Loisirs, à La Macaza. Il est extrêmement difficile pour elle de trouver et de maintenir en poste des instructeurs supplémentaires pour les trois appareils Cessna 172 dont son école et d'autres comme la sienne se servent pour l'instruction au sol.

Pour une personne qui vient de cumuler le minimum de 200 heures de vol nécessaire pour l'obtention de sa licence de pilote professionnel, il est facile, par exemple, de décrocher un emploi dans le secteur minier en Afrique centrale ou de faire des trajets dans des régions peu desservies de l'Extrême-Orient, et de gagner ainsi un assez bon salaire. Par ailleurs, il ne faut pas énormément d'heures de vol pour réussir à se trouver un emploi comme pilote au Canada.

Demeurer instructeur de classe 4 jusqu'à ce qu'on ait formé au moins trois apprentis pilotes, ce qui permet de devenir instructeur de classe 3, est loin d'être un mode de vie lucratif. Ces instructeurs travaillent généralement à contrat, leur salaire est fonction du nombre d'heures d'instruction qu'ils donnent et non du nombre d'heures qu'ils sont en service, et ils doivent composer avec des contraintes importantes comme les conditions météorologiques et la disponibilité des appareils, parmi de nombreux autres facteurs. Il leur est donc impossible de régler leur dette de 75 000 dollars dans un délai un tant soit peu raisonnable.

Même si les écoles doivent composer avec d'autres problèmes, notamment les plaintes de voisins agacés par le bourdonnement constant des avions qui décollent et qui tournent au-dessus de leur maison avant d'atterrir, le plus grand défi consiste à trouver des mesures incitatives pour encourager les pilotes professionnels à transmettre leur savoir-faire.

Par exemple, il n'y a rien pour encourager les pilotes chevronnés à transférer à la prochaine génération les connaissances qu'ils ont acquises lors de leurs milliers, de leurs dizaines de milliers d'heures de vol. Il revient aux nouveaux pilotes de former les nouvelles recrues. De plus, il existe peu d'incitatifs pour encourager les nouveaux pilotes à assumer cette responsabilité, car leur préoccupation immédiate est de se sortir de la montagne de dettes qu'ils ont accumulée pour devenir pilotes — une dette qui en étrangle plusieurs avant même qu'ils obtiennent leur licence, ce qui entraîne un taux élevé d'abandon et accentue le problème du système.

Il existe des pistes de solution manifestes. Environ 7 % seulement des pilotes du Canada sont des femmes. De plus, les communautés autochtones sont gravement sous-représentées. Pourtant, leurs membres dépendent généralement plus de l'aviation que la plupart des autres membres de la société, bien que de nombreuses réserves n'ont même pas de piste d'atterrissage. S'assurer que les réserves disposent d'une piste d'atterrissage, d'un avion, d'un instructeur de vol et d'un instructeur électromécanicien pourrait faire d'une pierre deux coups. Cependant, nous devons d'abord examiner les problèmes financiers qui se posent à ceux qui souhaitent se lancer dans cette industrie. Des solutions ont été proposées, telles que la radiation de la dette étudiante pour les instructeurs qui offrent leurs services pendant un certain temps ou dans une région éloignée.

Il existe une myriade d'autres idées, et cette étude nous aiderait à les trouver et à les évaluer. Le problème, bien sûr, ne se limite pas aux pilotes, mais concerne aussi le problème connexe de la fin de l'économie de l'apprentissage. Les mécaniciens d'avion, l'Aviation royale du Canada, et à peu près tous ceux qui embauchent dans l'industrie aéronautique doivent affronter une concurrence féroce pour obtenir des employés compétents et qualifiés. Une étude plus approfondie de ces défis et de la façon dont nous pouvons les surmonter est donc non seulement justifiée, mais urgente.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 4348 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 21, 2018

2018-11-07 14:16 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Germany, Judaism and Jews, Official apology, Refugees, Ship passengers, Statements by Members,

Allemagne, Antisémitisme, Déclarations de députés, Excuses officielles, Judaïsme et juifs, Passagers de navires, Réfugiés

Mr. Speaker, today, the Prime Minister will apologize on behalf of all Canadians for what happened to the passengers of the MS St. Louis in 1939, when 907 refugees, most of them Jewish, knocked at our door after being turned away by Cuba and the United States. Our response was famously recorded in the book by Irving Abella, None is Too Many. No one wanted to help them and this unfortunately helped validate the racism and anti-Semitism of that era. Following their unexpected return to European soil, more than one quarter of those refugees lost their lives in Nazi concentration camps. They died for two reasons: they were Jewish and they were turned away. The survivors and families of several survivors are here today for this historic moment. I sincerely hope that this lesson stays with us for a long, long time.

Monsieur le Président, aujourd'hui, le premier ministre présentera ses excuses au nom de tous les Canadiens pour ce qui est arrivé en 1939 aux passagers du MS Saint Louis, alors que 907 réfugiés, en grande majorité Juifs, ont cogné à notre porte, après avoir été rejetés par Cuba et par les États-Unis. À ce moment, notre réponse a été fameusement captée dans le livre d'Irving Abella, None is too many, ou « Aucun, c'est encore trop ». Puisque personne ne voulait les aider, cela a malheureusement contribué à valider le racisme et l'antisémitisme de cette époque. À la suite de leur retour imprévu en sol européen, plus du quart de ces réfugiés ont perdu la vie dans les camps de concentration nazis. Ils sont morts pour deux raisons: ils étaient Juifs et on leur a fermé la porte. Les survivants et les familles de plusieurs survivants seront présents aujourd'hui pour ce moment historique. Je garde l'espoir sincère que nous avons appris de cette leçon à long terme.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 338 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 07, 2018

2018-10-29 14:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Rail passenger transportation, Statements by Members,

Déclarations de députés, Services ferroviaires voyageurs,

Mr. Speaker, on October 29, 1978, VIA Rail launched its first transcontinental service from Montreal to Vancouver. Forty years on, I am privileged to rise in the House to celebrate this Canadian institution, and not just because I am a devoted train buff.

The last time a VIA train went through my riding, Laurentides—Labelle, was in 1981, the year of my birth. Service cuts are a problem in many regions across the country, but I cherish the dream of bringing train travel back for all Canadians.

Thanks to investments in upgrading VIA's fleet, more and more Canadians are choosing to travel by train. Rail passengers are living proof that the environment and economic development can go hand in hand.

I would like to thank VIA's 3,000 employees for working so hard for so long to keep this environmentally friendly mode of transportation alive. Train travel is essential to our Canadian identity.

Happy anniversary, VIA, and keep up the good work.

Monsieur le Président, le 29 octobre 1978, VIA Rail a lancé son premier service transcontinental, de Montréal à Vancouver. Quarante ans plus tard, c'est un privilège de me lever à la Chambre pour célébrer cette institution canadienne, et pas juste comme ferrovipathe assidu.

La dernière fois qu'un train de VIA est passé dans ma circonscription, Laurentides—Labelle, était en 1981, l'année de ma naissance. Je garde l'espoir de ramener le service ferroviaire dans les régions de tout le pays, où les abandons de service demeurent un problème.

Les investissements dans le renouvellement de la flotte de VIA font que de plus en plus de Canadiens préfèrent ce moyen de transport. Lorsqu'ils montent à bord, ils démontrent que l'on peut combiner environnement et développement économique.

Je remercie les 3 000 employés de VIA de leur travail continu et acharné pour assurer la survie de ce mode de voyage écologique et essentiel à notre identité canadienne.

Bonne fête VIA Rail et bonne continuité!

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 335 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on October 29, 2018

2018-10-24 15:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Electoral reform, Oral questions,

Questions orales, Réforme électorale,

Mr. Speaker, as a member of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, I am proud of the important work we have done on modernizing our election laws.

As part of our study of the Chief Electoral Officer's report following the 2015 election, we released a series of reports containing numerous recommendations. We are pleased to have completed our clause-by-clause study of Bill C-76 and to see that the bill will be sent back to the House of Commons this week.

Could the Prime Minister tell the House about the measures our government is taking to follow through on our commitment to strengthen the openness and fairness of Canada's democratic institutions?

Monsieur le Président, en tant que membre du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, je suis fier de l'important travail accompli sur la question de la modernisation de notre loi électorale.

Dans le cadre de l'étude sur le rapport du directeur général des élections, à la suite des élections de 2015, nous avons publié plusieurs rapports contenant énormément de recommandations. Nous sommes heureux d'avoir terminé l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 et de voir que ce dernier sera renvoyé à la Chambre des communes cette semaine.

Le premier ministre peut-il informer la Chambre des mesures que prend notre gouvernement pour donner suite à notre engagement de renforcer l'ouverture et l'équité des institutions démocratiques du Canada?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr qp 249 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on October 24, 2018

2018-09-28 11:06 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Air accidents, Anniversary, Canadian Forces, Deaths and funerals, Military aircraft, Statements by Members,

Accidents aériens, Aéronefs militaires, Anniversaire, Décès et funérailles, Déclarations de députés, Forces canadiennes,

Mr. Speaker, on Sunday, I will be at a ceremony in Saint-Donat to mark the 75th anniversary of the B-24D Liberator Harry crash.

On October 20, 1943, 24 Canadian military personnel returning home from the battlefield died on Black Mountain, which lies between my riding and Joliette. The crash site has become an important historic site in our region. It is the worst tragedy the Royal Canadian Air Force has ever experienced on Canadian soil.

I salute those who watch over the Liberator Harry, and the volunteers who have taken care of the site over the years. I congratulate André Gaudet and everyone who worked with him to organize this commemorative gathering. I am grateful to Héli-Tremblant, which volunteered to transport veterans to the mountaintop by helicopter.

I want to express my sincere respect for the families and descendants of the victims. It is our duty to remember all of the aviators and soldiers who have served our country.

Monsieur le Président, dimanche prochain, j'aurai l'occasion de participer à une cérémonie soulignant le 75e anniversaire de l'écrasement du Liberator Harry, un bombardier B24D, à Saint-Donat.

Située à la frontière de ma circonscription et de celle de Joliette, la montagne Noire a vu périr 24 militaires canadiens qui revenaient des champs de guerre, le 20 octobre 1943, devenant ainsi un lieu historique important dans notre région. Cet événement dramatique demeure la pire tragédie de l'Aviation royale canadienne à survenir en sol canadien.

Je salue les gardiens du Liberator Harry et les bénévoles qui ont entretenu le site au fil des années. Je félicite André Gaudet et ses collaborateurs pour l'organisation de ce rassemblement de commémoration, ainsi qu'Héli-Tremblant qui s'est porté volontaire pour amener des vétérans par hélicoptère au sommet de la montagne.

J'offre mon plus sincère respect aux familles et aux descendants des victimes. Nous avons un devoir de mémoire envers tous les aviateurs et soldats qui ont servi notre pays.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 349 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on September 28, 2018

2018-09-20 14:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Statements by Members

Déclarations de députés

Mr. Speaker, from Sainte-Anne-des-Lacs to the Petawaga ZEC, by way of Lantier, Huberdeau, and Notre-Dame-du-Laus, I travelled more than 10,000 kilometres this summer to meet with the residents of the 43 municipalities in my riding.

I joined hundreds of young people at an aviation open house organized as part of the young aviators program in Sainte-Anne-du-Lac and Mont Tremblant. I met with more than 100 employers, community organizations, and students who were benefiting from the Canada summer jobs program. I attended more than 100 community activities, festivals and events, where I congratulated and thanked the organizers and volunteers who get involved in our communities and without whom there could be no community events.

I often feel like I have the best job in the world, because it allows me to meet people and spend time with them. People are the heart and soul of a region. I can say without a doubt that Laurentides—Labelle is the most beautiful riding in Canada.

Monsieur le Président, de Sainte-Anne-des-Lacs à la ZEC Petawaga, en passant par Lantier, Huberdeau et Notre-Dame-du-Laus, j'ai parcouru cet été plus de 10 000 kilomètres sur la route pour rencontrer les résidants des 43 municipalités de chez nous.

J'ai participé aux découvertes de l'aviation avec des centaines de jeunes lors des journées du programme jeunes en vol de Sainte-Anne-du-Lac et de Mont-Tremblant. J'ai rencontré plus d'une centaine d'employeurs, d'organismes communautaires et d'étudiants qui ont bénéficié du programme Emplois d'été Canada. J'ai participé à plus d'une centaine d'activités communautaires, de festivals et d'événements au cours desquels j'ai pu féliciter et remercier les organisateurs et les bénévoles qui s'impliquent dans nos communautés et sans lesquels celles-ci ne fonctionneraient pas.

Je me dis souvent que j'ai le plus beau métier au monde, parce qu'il me permet de rencontrer les gens et d'être avec eux. Ce sont ces gens qui font l'unicité d'une région. Sans l'ombre d'un doute, j'affirme haut et fort que Laurentides-Labelle est la plus belle circonscription du Canada.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 340 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on September 20, 2018

2018-06-05 20:23 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Aboriginal reserves, Government bills, Quality of life, Third reading and adoption,

Qualité de la vie, Réserves autochtones, Troisième lecture et adoption

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, I had the privilege of joining my colleague from Joliette and going to the Atikamekw of Manawan First Nation.

We could see that there are desperate needs on this territory. Together with Chief Jean-Roch Ottawa and the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indigenous Services, we embarked on a day-long tour of the community. We saw that there are some serious needs and we were able to make a small announcement and start helping.

Can my colleague talk about this issue and what we can do in budget 2017-18 and what work we can do in general to improve things in these regions and these communities?

Monsieur le Président, hier, j'ai eu le privilège de me rendre avec mon collègue de Joliette à la réserve indienne des Atikamekw de Manawan.

Nous avons constaté les besoins énormes dans ce territoire. Avec le chef Jean-Roch Ottawa et le secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre des Services aux Autochtones, nous avons eu l'occasion de faire le tour de ce territoire pendant une journée entière. Nous avons constaté qu'il y avait de sérieux besoins, et nous avons pu faire une petite annonce et commencer à aider.

Mon collègue peut-il parler de cet enjeu et de ce que nous pouvons faire dans le cadre du budget de 2017-2018 et du travail que nous pouvons faire en général pour améliorer le sort de ces régions et de ces communautés?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 265 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 05, 2018

2018-05-29 14:03 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Inter Action Travail, Statements by Members, Youth employment

Déclarations de députés, Emploi des jeunes, Inter Action Travail

Mr. Speaker, last week, I was pleased to make an announcement that will greatly benefit young people in my region.

Through the “Le réemploi sous toutes ses formes, on en fait notre affaire” project developed by Inter Action Travail, an organization based in Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts, 16 young people will have the opportunity to acquire the skills and knowledge they need to better integrate into the labour market.

For 22 months, these youth will work at La Recyclerie and will help to preserve our environment by giving construction materials and other used objects a second life.

I am privileged to be part of a government that cares about young people, encourages people to integrate into the labour market, and is aware of rural realities in areas all across Canada, such as Laurentides—Labelle.

I am extremely proud to have announced a federal partnership of $365,000 under the skills link program to support Inter Action Travail's wonderful project.

Monsieur le Président, la semaine dernière, j'ai eu le plaisir de faire une annonce très bénéfique pour les jeunes de ma région.

Grâce au projet intitulé « Le réemploi sous toutes ses formes, on en fait notre affaire », Inter Action Travail, basée à Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts, permettra à 16 jeunes d'acquérir des compétences et des connaissances leur permettant de mieux intégrer le marché du travail.

Pendant 22 mois, ils travailleront à La Recyclerie et contribueront à la préservation de notre environnement en donnant une seconde vie à des matériaux de construction ou des objets usagers.

J'ai le privilège de faire partie d'un gouvernement qui se préoccupe des jeunes, qui favorise l'intégration au marché du travail et qui est conscient des réalités rurales de notre pays, comme c'est le cas chez nous, dans Laurentides—Labelle.

Je suis surtout extrêmement fier d'avoir annoncé un partenariat fédéral de 365 000 $, provenant du programme Connexion compétences, pour soutenir le merveilleux projet d'Inter Action Travail.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 327 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 29, 2018

2018-05-22 17:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Broadband Internet services, Communication control, Competition, Consumers and consumer protection, Data mining, Investment, Net neutrality, Rural communities, Technological protection measures

Communautés rurales, Concurrence, Consommateurs et protection des consommateurs, Contrôle des communications, Exploration de données, Investissement, Mesures de protection technologiques, Motions émanant des députés, Neutralité du net, Services Internet à large bande,

Madam Speaker, I appreciate the opportunity to pick up where I left off on the important issue of net neutrality.

We have all experienced the message of “This content is not available in your country” when content distributors or creators have used various technologies to figure out where a user is and limit a user's access in order to drive a user to a different provider or place for that particular content, or to block a user from it altogether. Indeed, a lot of Canadian-produced content is virtually impossible to access in Canada while being available in much of the rest of the world. Try watching Canada's Mayday, for example, without a Bell account. It cannot legally be done. It makes me wonder on what grounds vertical integration of the media market is legal. The neutrality of the net is under threat from all sides already, and it will take a concerted effort to protect it.

Removing net neutrality gives companies that control over people's Internet access and control over their Internet content. Once they do that, companies can start shaping a consumer's opinion, tune marketing, and sell access to the consumer for a much reduced cost.

With the current Cambridge Analytica controversy surrounding Facebook, themselves the king of those who control what consumers do, see, think, and feel on the Internet, we can see that this is not just some kind of vague theory. It is important to remember that if one is not paying for a product, then one is the product. This data gathering and control is not conducted just for the fun of it. People's data is not being stored in a cloud. There is no cloud, just other people's computers, and they want your data for a reason.

Without mandated net neutrality, there is nothing to stop a company from paying someone's ISP to increase access to their own services or decrease access to their competitor's services. To my point the last time I spoke on this about overselling Internet connections, I do not have much sympathy for ISPs in that situation, and so the argument that net neutrality has to go because of capacity issues is spurious. In my view, ISPs should be required to market minimum, not maximum, sustained-speed capability to their first peer outside of their network at typical peak usage times.

Xplornet, for example, markets 25-megabit satellite service, but will not tell us that for most customers, this speed only applies at 3 a.m. on a clear night with no northern lights, and even then only during the full moon. I may be exaggerating, but only a bit. It is not that the satellites and ground stations cannot handle an individual connection at that speed most of the time, but that the connections are oversold, resulting in constant, bitter complaining in my riding from rural Internet users who are stuck between the Xplornet rock and the dial-up hard place.

It is not the service that bothers me, since it is essential to have companies like Xplornet provide service to remote regions that have no other options, and we need it. Rather, it is the honesty about what the customer is getting for their money, what is advertised to them versus what they actually get, that needs to be rectified. The company justifies all this very carefully, and in my years in politics as a staffer and in this role, it is the only company I have ever encountered that only lobbies with senior counsel present. I think that speaks for itself.

The highly profitable telecommunications giant Bell, which broke $3 billion in profit in 2016 and built most of its infrastructure on public money in the first place, and Rogers, which made $1.8 billion in net profit last year, are upping their Internet connection prices by as much as $8.00 per month per customer, but are not investing significantly in deep rural Canada unless they get gifts from various levels of government to do so. These companies and the other large Internet providers will not even look at investing in a project unless they can get a return on investment in less than three years. I know of no other legal business that operates on quite such an efficient return on investment.

This brings us to another important net neutrality issue that was recently brought to my attention by a professional digital rights advocate.

Net neutrality can, and perhaps should, be expanded further to encompass investment neutrality. It is not just access to Internet service that is important. Equal, or at least equivalent, access for Internet users is also vital.

Choosing to invest in a gigabit-speed network in a city and fobbing off the regions with five megabits is not neutral. Specific users are being limited instead of specific services, but the outcome is the same.

If we tell residents in the regions that we cannot give them access, it is not Netflix that is being limited, it is the entire Internet. It is their access to services. It is their access to the economy. It is their ability to participate in modern society. That is why we cannot say that we really have net neutrality until we also have neutrality in terms of Internet access, which will surely take billions more in investment from all levels of the private sector.

Let us imagine for a moment what would happen if access to electricity were viewed in the same way as Internet access is today. The regions would not always have full power, and remote communities would have no power whatsoever unless they had access to a river they could build a dam on.

As a society and as a nation, we have a responsibility to ensure neutral access, to invest in a neutral way, and to give every Canadian a chance to get connected. We will need the participation of government organizations to achieve that equality, as we did in my riding of Laurentides—Labelle with the Antoine-Labelle telecommunications co-operative.

If members would like to know what losing net neutrality looks like, try using an iPhone or an iPad, assuming that Apple has not slowed it down yet to coax people to buy a new one. If members have ever plugged an iPhone into a non-Apple laptop or wanted to copy pictures to a USB stick or watch something paid for through iTunes on an Android, Windows, or other non-Apple device, it is very difficult to do.

If one wants to use an application not approved by Apple, forget it. It is, by its very definition and design, not neutral. By giving itself the power to censor, Apple has found itself with the obligation to censor. In the words of Richard Stallman, the father of the free software movement, either the user controls the program or the program controls the user.

Apple, like many American corporations, strives not only to sell a product but to control what is done with it after purchase, just like region-encoded DVDs and players, which in my view should not even be legal. In essence, nothing that a person buys actually becomes theirs; rather, the person is paying for the dubious privilege of becoming a part of Apple's network.

John Deere, the tractor and farm equipment maker, is jumping on this bandwagon too, claiming that it is against copyright for farmers to fix their own equipment. The copyright issue and the DMCA and our equivalent Canadian Copyright Modernization Act's effects relating to technological protection measures, are a deeply worrying symptom of a wide-ranging offensive by corporate America against individual rights for people to use what they have bought and paid for.

If members think that has nothing to do with net neutrality, they would be mistaken. It is part of the same basic principle. If I buy a tractor, an iPhone, or an Internet connection, I expect to be able to use it where, when, and how I see fit, even if it was not part of the original design of the product.

Reverse engineering something one has bought and running a gopher server off their home Internet connection, if one feels like being that retro, are, at their core, the same right. Port or service blocking by ISPs is to me a violation of net neutrality, as is refusing to sell someone a static IP address or letting someone otherwise do what they want with the connection.

Ending rather than entrenching net neutrality would end the Internet as we know it, and we need to make a strong statement supporting the principle of net neutrality by supporting this motion.

Madame la Présidente, je suis ravi de pouvoir reprendre là où je me suis arrêté au sujet de la question importante de la neutralité du Net.

Nous nous sommes tous déjà heurtés à un message indiquant qu'un contenu n'est pas offert dans notre pays parce que les distributeurs et les créateurs de contenu utilisent diverses technologies pour déterminer où se trouve un utilisateur afin de limiter son accès en vue de le forcer à utiliser un fournisseur ou un site différent pour accéder à ce contenu ou encore pour l'empêcher d'accéder à un contenu, tout simplement. En effet, beaucoup de contenu canadien est essentiellement inaccessible au Canada alors qu'il est offert dans presque tout le reste du monde. Par exemple, je mets tout le monde au défi de visionner l'émission canadienne Mayday sur Internet sans posséder de compte Bell. Légalement, c'est impossible. Je me demande donc pour quels motifs l'intégration verticale du marché des médias est légale. La neutralité du Net est déjà menacée de toutes parts, alors il faudra un effort concerté pour la protéger.

Renoncer à la neutralité du Net accorde un contrôle aux entreprises sur l'accès Internet des gens ainsi que sur le contenu Internet auquel ils ont accès. Une fois qu'elles détiendront ce contrôle, les entreprises commenceront à façonner l'opinion des consommateurs, à peaufiner leur stratégie de commercialisation et à vendre l'accès aux consommateurs à un prix beaucoup plus bas.

Étant donné le scandale Cambridge Analytica impliquant Facebook, qui est passée maître dans l'art de contrôler les activités, les sentiments et les opinions des consommateurs sur Internet, force est de constater que ce n'est pas qu'une vague théorie. Il est important de se rappeler que lorsqu'une personne ne paie pas pour un produit, c'est qu'elle est elle-même le produit. On ne recueille pas ces données pour le plaisir. Les données des utilisateurs ne sont pas stockées dans un nuage. Il n'y a pas de nuage; seulement les ordinateurs d'autres personnes qui veulent avoir accès à vos données pour une raison.

Sans une neutralité du Net obligatoire, rien n'empêche une entreprise de payer le fournisseur de services Internet d'une personne pour accroître son accès à ses propres services ou de réduire l'accès aux services de ses concurrents. Pour revenir à ce que j'ai dit la dernière fois au sujet des connexions Internet survendues, je n'ai pas beaucoup de sympathie pour les fournisseurs de services Internet dans cette situation et, par conséquent, l'argument selon lequel on doit renoncer à la neutralité du Net en raison de problèmes de capacité est fallacieux. À mon avis, ces fournisseurs de services Internet devraient être tenus de garantir une vitesse soutenue minimale, et non maximale, au premier fournisseur en dehors de leur réseau aux heures de pointe typiques.

Xplornet, par exemple, offre un service par satellite de 25 mégabits, mais cette entreprise ne dira pas que pour la plupart de ses clients, cette vitesse est garantie seulement à 3 heures du matin, par une nuit claire, sans aucune aurore boréale, et possiblement lorsque c'est la pleine lune. J'exagère à peine. Ce n'est pas parce que les satellites et les stations terrestres ne peuvent assurer une connexion à cette vitesse la plupart du temps, mais plutôt parce que les connexions sont survendues, ce qui donne lieu à de nombreuses plaintes dans ma circonscription de la part des internautes des régions rurales qui se retrouvent coincés entre l'arbre d'Xplornet et l'écorce de l'accès commuté.

Ce n'est pas tant le service qui me dérange, étant donné qu'il est essentiel d'avoir des entreprises comme Xplornet pour fournir des services dans des régions éloignées qui ne disposent d'aucune autre option, et nous en avons besoin. Toutefois, cette entreprise doit être honnête quant à ce que les clients obtiennent pour leur argent, c'est-à-dire ce qui est annoncé par rapport à ce qu'ils obtiennent vraiment. Il faut y remédier. L'entreprise justifie cela très minutieusement, et depuis que je suis en politique, soit à titre d'attaché ou de député, c'est la première fois que je vois une entreprise faire du lobbying seulement en présence de ses avocats. Je pense que cela en dit long.

Bell, un géant des télécommunications très prospère qui a affiché 3 milliards de dollars de profits en 2016 et qui a établi la plus grande partie de ses infrastructures avec l'argent des contribuables, ainsi que Rogers, qui a affiché un bnfice net de 1,8 milliard de dollars l'an dernier, font payer à chaque consommateur jusqu'à 8 $ de plus par mois pour sa connexion à Internet, mais ces entreprises ne sont pas prêtes à faire des investissements substantiels dans les collectivités rurales et éloignées du pays à moins de recevoir des cadeaux des divers ordres de gouvernement. Ces entreprises et les autres grands fournisseurs de services Internet ne songent même pas à investir dans un projet à moins de pouvoir rentabiliser leur investissement en moins de trois ans. Je ne connais aucune autre entreprise légale qui affiche un taux de rentabilité des investissements aussi élevé.

Ce qui nous amène à un autre enjeu important sur la question de la neutralité d'Internet, qui m'a été soulevée récemment par un défenseur professionnel des droits numériques.

La neutralité d'Internet peut, et devrait peut-être, aller encore plus loin, soit jusqu'à la neutralité de l'investissement. Ce n'est pas juste l'accès aux services Internet qui est important, il faut un accès égal, ou au moins équivalent, pour les utilisateurs d'Internet.

Choisir d'investir dans un réseau gigabit dans une ville et abandonner les régions à cinq mégabits n'est pas neutre. On limite des utilisateurs particuliers au lieu de limiter des services, mais le résultat est le même.

Si on dit aux résidants des régions que nous n'avons pas d'accès pour eux, ce n'est pas Netflix qui est limité, c'est Internet au complet. C'est l'accès aux services. C'est l'accès à l'économie. C'est la participation à la société moderne. Ainsi, nous ne pouvons pas dire que nous avons vraiment la neutralité d'Internet avant d'avoir aussi la neutralité de l'accès à Internet, ce qui représentera sûrement encore des milliards de dollars en investissement pour tous les paliers du secteur privé.

Imaginons pour un moment que l'accès à l'électricité soit vu à travers la même lentille qu'on utilise actuellement pour l'accès à Internet. Les régions ne seraient toujours pas branchées au complet et des collectivités éloignées ne seraient tout simplement pas branchées, si elles n'avaient pas accès à une rivière pour installer un barrage, par exemple.

En tant que société et pays, nous avons la responsabilité d'assurer un accès neutre, d'investir de manière neutre et de donner à tout Canadien la chance de se brancher. On aura besoin de la participation des organismes gouvernementaux pour assurer cette égalité, comme on a fait dans ma circonscription de Laurentides—Labelle avec la Coopérative de télécommunication d'Antoine-Labelle.

Les députés qui aimeraient savoir à quoi ressemblerait la disparition de la neutralité du Net n'ont qu'à essayer d'utiliser un iPhone ou un iPad, si on suppose qu'Apple n'a pas encore ralenti l'appareil pour encourager les gens à en acheter un autre. Les députés qui ont déjà tenté l'expérience savent qu'il est très difficile d'utiliser ces appareils dans certaines circonstances, qu'il s'agisse de brancher un iPhone dans un ordinateur portable qui n'est pas conçu par Apple, de copier des images sur une clé USB ou de regarder du contenu acheté sur iTunes au moyen d'un appareil qui fonctionne avec Android ou Windows ou d'un autre appareil qui n'est pas conçu par Apple.

Si on veut utiliser une application qui n'est pas approuvée par Apple, c'est peine perdue. Par définition, cette approche n'est pas neutre. En s'accordant le pouvoir de censure, l'entreprise Apple s'est vue obligée de l'exercer. Comme l'a dit le père du mouvement du logiciel libre, Richard Stallman, c'est soit l'utilisateur qui contrôle le programme, soit l'inverse.

Comme bien des sociétés américaines, Apple cherche non seulement à vendre un produit, mais aussi à contrôler son utilisation après l'achat, tout comme on le fait au moyen de l'encodage régional des DVD et des lecteurs de DVD, ce qui, à mon sens, ne devrait même pas être légal. En résumé, aucun produit n'appartient vraiment à l'acheteur; celui-ci doit plutôt payer pour jouir du privilège discutable de faire partie du réseau d'Apple.

Le fabricant de tracteurs et d'équipement de ferme John Deere s'est joint au mouvement, lui aussi. Selon cette société, les agriculteurs qui réparent eux-mêmes leur équipement de ferme en enfreindraient les droits d'auteur. Toute cette question des droits d'auteur, à laquelle s'ajoutent les effets de la Digital Millennium Copyright Act et de son pendant canadien, la Loi sur la modernisation du droit d'auteur, en ce qui concerne les mesures de protection technologique, constitue le symptôme extrêmement inquiétant d'une offensive générale du milieu des affaires américain contre le droit des consommateurs d'utiliser les objets qu'ils ont achetés et payés.

Si les députés pensent que cela n'a rien à voir avec la neutralité du Net, qu'ils se détrompent: le principe de base est le même. Que j'achète un tracteur, un iPhone ou une connexion Internet, je m'attends à pouvoir l'utiliser où bon me semble, quand bon me semble et de la manière qui me plaît, même s'il s'agit d'un usage pour lequel l'objet en question n'a pas été conçu.

Selon moi, démonter un objet que j'ai acheté ou exploiter un serveur gopher à partir de ma connexion Internet maison — si l'envie me prend de remonter aussi loin en arrière — participent d'un seul et même droit. Le blocage de ports ou de services par les fournisseurs de services Internet revient selon moi à violer la neutralité du Net, tout comme refuser de vendre une adresse IP statique à un client ou l'empêcher de faire ce qu'il veut avec sa connexion.

Mettre fin à la neutralité du Net au lieu de la renforcer tuerait Internet tel qu'on le connaît. Nous devons donc dire haut et fort que nous appuyons le principe de la neutralité du Net en adoptant cette motion.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 3091 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 22, 2018

2018-05-11 13:07 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Electoral system, Government bills, Second reading

Deuxième lecture, Système électoral,

Mr. Speaker, I am not too worried on that score. Most of the recommendations have already been included in the bill, which is public. It should be passed more or less as is. We already have access to the information we need to implement it on time. I think we really can make the necessary changes before the next election.

Monsieur le Président, je ne suis pas trop inquiet à ce sujet. La majorité des recommandations sont déjà dans le projet de loi qui est public. Il devrait être adopté à peu près comme il est. On a déjà accès aux informations dont on a besoin pour qu'il soit adopté à temps. Je pense qu'on peut vraiment faire les changements nécessaires avant les prochaines élections.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 143 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 11, 2018

2018-05-11 13:06 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Cyber attacks, Electoral system, Federal elections, Foreign countries, Government bills, Second reading,

Cyberattaques, Deuxième lecture, Élections fédérales, Pays étrangers, Système électoral

Mr. Speaker, any time we have an electronic system that can be compromised, it is very important the election system itself is kept to a paper system and that outside interference is blocked in every possible way.

Given the nature of the Internet, and net neutrality is a whole discussion we will have in a couple of weeks, it is very hard to block or manage different traffic from different parts of the world. Every effort we can take to achieve that is extraordinarily important for the protection of our democracy.

Monsieur le Président, l'intégrité de tout système électronique peut être compromise. Il est essentiel que le système électoral lui-même continue d'être axé sur le papier et que tout soit fait pour bloquer l'ingérence extérieure.

Compte tenu de la nature d'Internet — et nous aurons une tout autre discussion sur la neutralité du Net dans quelques semaines —, il est extrêmement difficile de bloquer ou de gérer le trafic provenant de différentes régions du monde. Tous les efforts que nous pouvons déployer pour y arriver sont d'une importance capitale pour la protection du régime démocratique canadien.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 216 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 11, 2018

2018-05-11 13:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Electoral system, Government bills, Second reading, Voter identification,

Deuxième lecture, Système électoral,

Mr. Speaker, the member was there for a lot of the discussion we had at committee on the Chief Electoral Officer's report that led to the greatest portion of the bill.

The voter information cards are the only piece of federally issued identification that has people's names and addresses on it, and it is free to everybody. People have to pay taxes to get it. There is no other federal piece of identification that does this. It is important to have a single piece of ID that everyone has access to, and it is the one and only thing that does that.

Regarding consultation, if we want to look at the bill more closely, the best place to do it is at committee. The member for Banff—Airdrie and I can look at it in much greater detail, with somewhat less noise. We can deal with the issues one line at a time and get through it properly.

Monsieur le Président, le député a suivi une bonne part des discussions que nous avons eues au comité sur le rapport du directeur général des élections, qui a inspiré la majeure partie du projet de loi.

Les cartes d’information de l’électeur sont la seule pièce d'identité délivrée par le fédéral qui inclut le nom et l'adresse des gens, et elles sont gratuites pour tous. Les électeurs doivent simplement payer de l'impôt pour la recevoir. Il n'y a aucune autre pièce d'identité fédérale qui respecte ces conditions. Il est important d'avoir une pièce d'identité qui est accessible à tous. C'est le seul et unique document qui répond à ce besoin.

En ce qui concerne les consultations, pour examiner le projet de loi plus en profondeur, la meilleure façon de procéder consiste à le soumettre à l'examen du comité. Le député de Banff—Airdrie et moi pourrons nous pencher sur les menus détails de la mesure législative dans un contexte légèrement plus calme. Nous pourrons faire un examen en bonne et due forme du projet de loi en étudiant les aspects problématiques disposition par disposition.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 358 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 11, 2018

2018-05-11 12:53 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Accountability, Allegations of fraud and fraud, Chief Electoral Officer, Elections Canada, Electoral system, Fair Elections Act, Government bills, Information dissemination, Second reading, Splitting speaking time,

Allégations de fraude et fraudes, Deuxième lecture, Directeur général des élections, Élections Canada, Jeunes gens, Obligation de rendre compte, Partage du temps de parole

Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the member for Don Valley East.

I am pleased to rise today to speak to Bill C-76, the Elections Modernization Act. I have had the privilege of being a member of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs since I first came to this place. One of the most interesting studies we have conducted so far was the one pertaining to the recommendations of the chief electoral officer.

In the previous Parliament, I was the parliamentary assistant to the critic for democratic reform, namely, the current member for Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame. I was a member of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs during its study of Bill C-23, Fair Elections Act. Under the circumstances, it was an odd name, given that the Conservatives worked harder than any other party to destroy the integrity of our elections.

Under Stephen Harper's leadership, the Conservatives won three consecutive election campaigns, specifically in 2006, 2008, and 2011. The Conservatives were found guilty of electoral fraud in the 2006, 2008, and 2011 elections. Clearly, the Conservative Party of Canada has never won an election without cheating, so when the Conservatives introduced a bill on electoral integrity, they knew exactly where the gaps were.

After letting their parliamentary secretary to the prime minister be led out in handcuffs for bypassing election laws, after pleading guilty to the illegal in and out scandal, and after sacrificing a young 22-year-old scapegoat for election crimes committed by the Conservative Party to try to steal several ridings, as part of the robocall scandal, one of the first targets of the Conservative Party was the elections commissioner. They made sure that he would never have the tools he needed to conduct a real investigation.

Bill C-76 changes all that. The elections commissioner will return to the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer, who is an officer of Parliament, instead of reporting to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, where there is no officer of Parliament. Once enacted, the act will give the commissioner the power to require testimony or a written return, a power that was eliminated by the Conservatives. Why did Stephen Harper's Conservatives not want the elections commissioner to have that kind of authority, especially since he was responsible for the integrity of our elections?

Integrity is clearly not what the Conservatives were looking for, and given their reaction to this bill, their position has obviously not changed. In the debate on this bill, we keep hearing that the Conservatives have concerns about the creation of a pre-election list of young people, which could be given to political parties. They know that this list is meant for the Chief Electoral Officer and that these names will not be provided to political parties before the individuals turn 18. However, the Conservatives do not want a tool that would help inform young future voters and help them prepare to become citizens and informed voters in our democracy.

The Conservatives are afraid that young people will not vote Conservative. Instead of modernizing their old-school values, or reassessing their attitude towards women, immigrants, minorities, indigenous peoples, the environment, and science, the Conservatives would rather do everything they can to make sure that the younger generation does not have the tools it needs to participate in the democratic process. They refuse to evolve to where society is now.

During the 2011 election campaign, advance polling stations were set up on university campuses. In Guelph, the Conservatives opposed a polling station at the student centre and a young campaign volunteer, who was also a ministerial assistant on Parliament Hill was accused of attempting to steal the ballot box. Those accusations were never proven, but the incident shows how afraid the Conservatives are that young people will get involved.

The Conservatives think that giving young people the opportunity to get involved in elections, as Bill-76 proposes, is an existential threat. For the first time, millennials will outnumber baby boomers.

The Conservatives are not adapting to the new reality. They prefer to shout out “it is not a right” here in the House when we are talking about women making their own decisions about their bodies. That is shameful. Millennials, those of my generation, have had enough of this paternalistic attitude. We find that the member for Regina—Qu'Appelle and his Conservatives have the same attitude.

Again in the 2011 federal election and again in the riding of Guelph, robocalls were made. These calls were bilingual and claimed to be on behalf of Elections Canada. The calls told thousands of voters that the location of their polling station had changed. The goal was to keep people from voting. The federal elections commissioner and his investigators did not have the authority to compel witnesses to testify, so the commissioner had to make agreements with those involved in this subterfuge. As a result, a young man who is unilingual and has no particular technical skills was put in jail for electoral fraud. He was the scapegoat that I mentioned earlier.

Because the investigators lacked authority, the legal process resulted in a completely ridiculous outcome. First of all, they overlooked the campaign's political adviser, who had all the necessary political and technical access and who had created software called “Move My Vote” to determine what to dispute in the 2013 electoral redistribution. This is not to mention the fact that the assistant campaign organizer worked at the store where the burner phone was sold, or the fact that the Conservative Party lawyer was present when the witness statements were taken, rather than the lawyer of the accused or the witness. That is the kind of situation the Fair Elections Act was designed to ensure by undermining the integrity of the investigation process.

However, that was not the only problem the Conservatives wanted to create or even exacerbate. One of Elections Canada's main tasks is to educate voters across Canada on the electoral system and their role in it, and those information campaigns should be entirely impartial to ensure fair elections. The Conservatives, however, had no interest in conducting public information campaigns in schools or newspapers. Voter participation is not in the Conservatives' partisan interest. They did everything they could to undermine it. In the end, voter participation was high, but that was because Canadians were fed up with the lack of integrity.

Because of that, the Conservatives used their integrity bill to change the law and take away Elections Canada's educational role. Going forward, its only role would be to say where, when, and how to vote. That is it. Things were even worse than we thought. On top of taking power away from the Chief Electoral Officer, the Conservatives wanted to muzzle him, just like they muzzled scientists to keep facts from interfering with their agenda.

In addition to dealing with the elections commissioner's workplace and power structure, Bill C-76 will resolve this ridiculous situation created by a government that had no interest at all in protecting democracy. To the Conservatives, electoral integrity meant staying in power.

Going forward, the Chief Electoral Officer will have the right to speak and to perform his rightful educational role. That is why the Conservatives are so afraid of this bill passing and will do everything they can to block it. Much like women's rights, the integrity of our elections is not something the Conservatives care about. Shame on them.

Speaking of shame, let me remind the House that the Conservatives use the Fair Elections Act to take away voters' right to use their voter information card as a piece of ID. That had an immediate and significant impact. An estimated 170,000 people lost the right to vote in 2015 because of that anti-democratic change.

The vast majority of approved pieces of ID are used to confirm a voter's home address and to confirm whether this person has the right to vote and is voting in the correct riding. The voter information card does both of those things. When voters receive their card, it means that they are obviously on the voter's list. This also means that the address is correct, or else they would not have received their card. However, this card is never enough on its own, and it must be used with another piece of ID. Anyone can vote with a health card, for example. Without this card, someone who does not pay the household bills and who does not have a credit card or driver's license has nothing else to confirm his or her address. Once again, this was the objective of Stephen Harper's Conservatives.

If people were not going to vote Conservative, why let them vote at all? That would not help the integrity of a Conservative victory. No one wants that, so the Conservatives prevented Canadian voters from using the best piece of ID available to a large number of them. Integrity, my foot. These people do not have much integrity at all.

I am particularly proud of Bill C-76, since it will allow mail from the Chief Electoral Officer to be used as a valid piece of ID to vote. This makes sense.

The process we embarked on was long and complex. The Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs worked hard to study each recommendation made by the former chief electoral officer. Of the 130 specific changes in Bill C-76, 109 stem directly from the recommendations in the Chief Electoral Officer's report on the 42nd general election. Furthermore, the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs studied most of the recommendations. The others were mostly technical changes requested by the Chief Electoral Officer.

I am proud to support this bill and to support a government whose vision extends beyond the next election to secure the long-term success of our country and our democracy.

Monsieur le Président, je vais partager mon temps de parole avec la députée de Don Valley-Est.

J'ai le plaisir de prendre la parole aujourd'hui sur le projet de loi C-76, Loi sur la modernisation des élections. J'ai le privilège de siéger au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre depuis mon arrivée à la Chambre. Une des études les plus intéressantes que nous avons réalisées à ce jour est celle sur les recommandations du directeur général des élections.

Durant la dernière législature, j'étais adjoint parlementaire au porte-parole en matière de la réforme démocratique, soit le député actuel de Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame. J'étais au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre pendant l'étude sur le projet de loi C-23, Loi sur l'intégrité des élections. Dans les circonstances, c'était un drôle de nom, car les conservateurs ont travaillé plus fort que tout autre parti pour détruire l'intégrité de nos élections.

Les conservateurs, sous la direction de Stephen Harper, ont gagné trois élections consécutives, soit celles de 2006, de 2008 et de 2011. Les conservateurs ont été reconnus coupables de fraude électorale dans les élections de 2006, de 2008 et de 2011. De toute évidence, le Parti conservateur du Canada n'a jamais gagné une élection sans tricher. Ainsi, quand les conservateurs ont déposé un projet de loi sur l'intégrité des élections, ils savaient exactement où se trouvaient les lacunes.

Après avoir laissé emmener la secrétaire parlementaire du premier ministre, menottes aux poignets, pour avoir contourné les lois électorales, après avoir plaidé coupable dans le scandale des transferts illégaux in and out, et après avoir sacrifié un jeune bouc émissaire de 22 ans pour des crimes électoraux commis par le Parti conservateur, afin d'essayer de voler plusieurs circonscriptions dans le cadre du scandale des appels automatisés, les robocalls, une des premières cibles du Parti conservateur a été de dégriffer le commissaire aux élections et de s'assurer qu'il n'aurait jamais les outils pour faire une véritable enquête.

Le projet de loi C-76 change tout cela. Le commissaire aux élections retournera au cabinet du directeur général des élections, un agent du Parlement, au lieu d'être au service des poursuites pénales du Canada, où il n'y a pas d'agents du Parlement. Une fois promulguée, la loi lui donnera le pouvoir de contraindre à témoigner et de présenter des accusations directement, pouvoirs que les conservateurs lui avaient retirés. Pourquoi les conservateurs de Stephen Harper ne voulaient-ils pas que le commissaire aux élections détienne ces pouvoirs, car après tout il était responsable de l'intégrité des élections?

C'est très clair que les conservateurs ne voulaient pas d'intégrité, et, compte tenu de leur réaction à ce projet de loi, il est clair que rien n'a changé. On entend constamment dire, dans le débat sur ce projet de loi que les conservateurs sont inquiets de la création d'une liste préélectorale contenant le nom de jeunes personnes, qui pourrait être remise aux partis politiques. Ils savent cependant que cette liste est destinée au bureau du directeur général des élections et que les noms ne seront pas remis aux formations politiques avant que ces personnes atteignent l'âge de 18e ans. Toutefois, les conservateurs ne veulent pas un outil qui contribuerait à informer les futurs jeunes électeurs et à les préparer à devenir des citoyens et des électeurs informés dans notre démocratie.

Les conservateurs ont peur que les jeunes ne votent pas conservateur. Au lieu de moderniser leurs valeurs d'un autre siècle, de réévaluer leur attitude envers les femmes, les immigrants, les minorités, les peuples autochtones, l'environnement et les sciences, les conservateurs préfèrent faire tout leur possible pour que la jeune génération n'ait pas les outils nécessaires pour participer à la démocratie. Ils refusent de progresser au niveau de la société actuelle.

En 2011, pendant la campagne électorale, les bureaux de vote par anticipation ont été installés sur le campus des universités. À Guelph, un bureau de vote au centre des étudiants a été contesté par les conservateurs, et un jeune bénévole de la campagne, qui était aussi un adjoint ministériel sur la Colline du Parlement, a été accusé de tentative de vol de la boîte de scrutin, ce qui n'a jamais été prouvé. Toutefois, l'incident a mis l'accent sur le fait que les conservateurs ont peur que les jeunes s'impliquent.

Offrir aux jeunes la possibilité de s'impliquer dans les élections, comme le propose le projet de loi C-76, est considéré comme une menace existentielle par les conservateurs. Pour la première fois, la génération du millénaire va dépasser en nombre celle des baby-boomers.

Les conservateurs ne s'adaptent pas à la nouvelle réalité. Ils préfèrent crier, ici à la Chambre, que ce n'est pas un droit, lorsqu'on parle du droit des femmes de prendre leurs propres décisions en ce qui concerne leur corps. C'est honteux. Les personnes de la génération du millénaire, soit ceux de ma génération, en ont assez de cette attitude paternaliste. On constate que les conservateurs du député de Regina—Qu'Appelle ont la même attitude.

Dans cette même élection fédérale de 2011, toujours dans la circonscription de Guelph, des appels téléphoniques automatisés ont été faits. Ces appels étaient bilingues et on prétendait parler au nom d'Élections Canada. Les appels ont annoncé à des milliers d'électeurs que leur bureau de vote avait changé d'endroit. L'objectif était d'empêcher les électeurs de voter. Le commissaire aux élections fédérales et ses enquêteurs n'avaient pas le pouvoir de contraindre à à quiconque témoigner. Le commissaire a dû faire des ententes avec des personnes impliquées dans ce subterfuge. Résultat: on a mis en prison pour fraude électorale un jeune homme unilingue et sans compétences techniques. Il a été le bouc émissaire dont je parlais tout à l'heure.

En raison du manque de pouvoir des enquêteurs, le processus juridique conduisait à un résultat carrément farfelu. Tout d'abord, on ignorait le conseiller politique de la campagne, qui avait tous les accès politiques et techniques nécessaires et qui a créé un logiciel du nom de « Move My Vote » pour déterminer les contestations à faire dans le redécoupage électoral de 2013. C'est sans parler du fait que l'organisateur adjoint de la campagne travaillait au magasin où avait été vendu le téléphone jetable, ou du fait que l'avocat du Parti conservateur était présent lors des déclarations des témoins plutôt que celui de l'accusé ou du témoin. C'était une situation que la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections visait à assurer, c'est-à-dire qu'elle visait à enlever toute intégrité aux enquêtes.

Toutefois, ce n'était pas le seul problème que les conservateurs voulaient créer, voire empirer. Une des tâches importantes d'Élections Canada consiste à informer les électeurs d'un bout à l'autre du Canada au sujet du système électoral et de leur rôle, et ces campagnes d'information doivent être entièrement impartiales pour assurer des élections justes. Toutefois, les conservateurs ne voulaient rien savoir de ces campagnes d'information publiques dans les écoles et dans les journaux. La participation citoyenne n'est pas dans l'intérêt partisan des conservateurs; ils ont tout fait pour l'affaiblir. En fin de compte, le taux de participation s'est avéré élevé, mais c'était parce que les Canadiens en avaient assez de ce manque d'intégrité.

Dans ce contexte, les conservateurs ont changé la loi par l'entremise de leur projet de loi sur l'intégrité afin de retirer à Élections Canada son rôle éducatif. Ce bureau n'avait plus qu'à dire où, quand et comment voter, rien de plus. C'était encore pire qu'on le croyait: les conservateurs ont voulu non seulement retirer les pouvoirs du directeur général des élections, mais aussi museler celui-ci, tout comme ils ont muselé les scientifiques pour s'assurer que des faits ne se retrouvent pas dans leur programme.

Comme pour ce qui est du lieu de travail et de la structure du pouvoir du commissaire aux élections, le projet de loi C-76 va régler cette situation ridicule créée par un gouvernement qui n'avait aucunement la protection de la démocratie en tête. Pour les conservateurs, l'intégrité des élections ne signifiait que l'intégrité du pouvoir.

Dorénavant, le directeur général des élections aura le droit de parole ainsi que le rôle éducatif qui lui revient. Voilà pourquoi les conservateurs ont si peur que ce projet de loi soit adopté et ils feront tout ce qu'ils peuvent pour le bloquer. Comme les droits des femmes, l'intégrité des élections ne fait pas partie des valeurs des conservateurs. Ils devraient avoir honte.

À propos de honte, rappelons que, dans la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, les conservateurs ont enlevé le droit des électeurs d'utiliser la carte d'information de l'électeur comme pièce d'identité. L'effet a été direct et conséquent. On estime que 170 000 personnes ont directement perdu le droit de vote en 2015 à cause de ce changement antidémocratique.

L'objectif de la grande majorité des pièces d'identité permises est de corroborer l'adresse résidentielle d'un électeur et de confirmer qu'il a le droit de vote et qu'il vote dans la bonne circonscription. La carte d'information de l'électeur fait les deux. Si un électeur la reçoit, c'est assez clair qu'il est sur la liste des électeurs. Cela signifie aussi que l'adresse est la bonne. Sinon, il ne l'aurait pas eue. Cependant, employée seule, cette carte n'est jamais suffisante. Cela prend une autre pièce d'identité. Avec une carte d'assurance-maladie, par exemple, tout électeur peut voter. Sans cette carte, quelqu'un qui n'est pas celui qui paie les factures de la maison et qui n'a pas de carte de crédit ni de permis de conduire n'a rien d'autre pour corroborer son adresse. Encore une fois, c'était l'objectif des conservateurs de Stephen Harper.

Pourquoi alors permettre à ceux qui pourraient ne pas voter pour le Parti conservateur de voter? Cela n'aiderait pas l'intégrité d'une victoire conservatrice. Qui voudrait cela? Les conservateurs ont donc banni l'utilisation de la meilleure pièce d'identité pour un grand nombre d'électeurs canadiens. L'intégrité, mon oeil! Ils n'ont pas beaucoup d'intégrité, ces gens-là.

Je suis particulièrement fier du projet de loi C-76, puisqu'il permettra l'utilisation du courrier du directeur général des élections comme pièce d'identité valide pour voter. Cela a du sens.

Le processus que nous avons amorcé était long et complexe. Nous avons travaillé fort pour étudier chaque recommandation de l'ancien directeur général des élections au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Sur les 130 changements spécifiques du projet de loi C-76, 109 proviennent directement des recommandations fournies par le directeur général des élections dans son rapport sur la 42e élection générale. De plus, nous avons étudié la majorité de ceux-ci au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Pour ce qui est des autres, il s'agissait pour la plupart de changements techniques demandés par le directeur général des élections.

Je suis fier d'appuyer ce projet de loi et un gouvernement dont la vision va au-delà de la prochaine élection pour assurer le succès de notre pays et de notre démocratie à long terme.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 3456 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 11, 2018

2018-05-11 12:42 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Electoral system, Government bills, Second reading

Deuxième lecture, Système électoral,

Mr. Speaker, I listened to my colleague from Trois-Rivières's whole speech. In his introduction and conclusion, he talked about how the House would have to give unanimous consent to change the voting system. A few years ago, the Conservatives introduced the Fair Elections Act, which made changes that undermined Canadian democracy. The Conservatives will never support our attempts to reverse those changes.

Can my colleague reconcile the need to get everyone's support before doing something with the fact that the Conservatives will never support changes that would strengthen democracy in Canada?

Monsieur le Président, j'ai écouté en entier le discours de mon collègue de Trois-Rivières. Il l'a commencé et conclu en parlant de la nécessité d'un consentement unanime de la Chambre pour faire des changements au système électoral. Il y a quelques années, les conservateurs ont introduit la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, qui comportait des changements qui affaiblissaient la démocratie canadienne. Si nous voulons renverser ces changements, les conservateurs ne nous appuieront jamais.

Alors, comment mon collègue peut-il réconcilier la nécessité de faire quelque chose avec l'appui de tout le monde et le fait que les conservateurs n'appuieront jamais des changements qui renforceraient la démocratie au Canada?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 219 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 11, 2018

2018-05-11 11:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Emergency response and emergency responders, Floods, Laurentides, Statements by Members,

Crues, Déclarations de députés, Laurentides

Mr. Speaker, spring is finally here, but its late arrival has caused many riverside residents a lot of stress.

In my riding of Laurentides—Labelle, rivers like the Rouge, Lièvre and Nord rivers have burst their banks, causing considerable damage.

My thoughts are with everyone across the country who is dealing with flooding. It is important to be ready to react in any emergency. On April 14, I got to observe an exercise involving a simulated medical emergency in Amherst. The members of the Canadian Armed Forces Reserve 51 Field Ambulance, first responders from Arundel and Amherst, firefighters from the northwest Laurentians fire department, air cadets from 716 Laurentien squadron, and municipal and regional authorities all worked together efficiently and compassionately. It was a privilege for me to see them at work.

No one ever wishes for disasters to happen, but if one does, Laurentides—Labelle is ready.

Monsieur le Président, le printemps se fait enfin sentir, mais son arrivée tardive a néanmoins causé beaucoup de soucis à de nombreux riverains.

Dans ma circonscription, Laurentides—Labelle, des rivières comme la Rouge, du Lièvre et du Nord sont sorties de leur lit en faisant beaucoup de dégâts.

J'ai une pensée pour toutes les personnes aux prises avec des inondations partout au pays. Il faut être prêt à réagir quand survient n'importe quelle situation d'urgence. Le 14 avril, j'ai assisté à un exercice d'intervention médicale à Amherst. Les membres de la 51e Ambulance de campagne de la réserve des Forces armées canadiennes, les premiers répondants d'Arundel et d'Amherst, les pompiers de la Régie incendie nord ouest Laurentides, les cadets de l'air de l'escadron 716 laurentien, les autorités municipales et régionales, tous ont oeuvré avec efficacité et humanisme. C'était un privilège pour moi de les voir aller.

Nous ne souhaitons jamais que surviennent des catastrophes, mais si c'était le cas, Laurentides—Labelle est prête.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 325 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 11, 2018

2018-04-26 15:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government assistance, Oral questions, Rail transport safety, Railway stations and tracks,

Aide gouvernementale, Gares et lignes ferroviaires, Questions orales, Sûreté du transport ferroviaire,

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are concerned about rail safety. That is why the Minister of Transport launched the rail safety improvement program.

This program improves the safety of our railways and railway crossings and promotes public awareness of rail safety.

Could the minister update Canadians on what progress has been made under this new program and what challenges the government is facing?

Monsieur le Président, la sécurité ferroviaire préoccupe les Canadiens. C'est pourquoi le ministre des Transports a lancé le Programme d'amélioration de la sécurité ferroviaire.

Ce programme a permis d'améliorer la sécurité de nos chemins de fer et de nos passages à niveau ainsi que de sensibiliser les Canadiens de partout au pays à la question de la sécurité ferroviaire.

Le ministre pourrait-il informer les Canadiens au sujet des progrès réalisés dans le cadre de ce nouveau programme et des obstacles auxquels le gouvernement fait face?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr qp 178 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on April 26, 2018

2018-03-27 18:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Communication control, Competition, Consumers and consumer protection, Data mining, Freedom of speech, Net neutrality,

Concurrence, Consommateurs et protection des consommateurs, Contrôle des communications, Exploration de données, Motions émanant des députés, Neutralité du net,

Mr. Speaker, I want to applaud the member for Oakville's initiative on bringing forward a motion to defend net neutrality, and it gives me great pride to be able to second this motion.

As has been noted a number of times already, the core concept of net neutrality already exists strongly in Canadian law without being specifically named. It is an important principle.

Net neutrality is a significantly bigger issue than limiting the speed of Netflix, and I am somebody who is quite sensitive to being asked to slow down. It is also a far broader discussion than we give it credit for. I will dive into all of that over the next few minutes and into next month.

At its core, net neutrality means that Internet service providers and the backbone providers that ISPs are connected to do not judge, limit, or control the content, speed, or nature of Internet traffic. Any packet, the basic unit of an Internet connection, coming in is relayed to its destination provided it meets basic security requirements. Net neutrality need not extend to blindly permitting distributed denial of service attacks, for example, nor the forwarding of packets with spoofed headers. Indeed, a DDoS is a third-party attack on neutrality by negatively affecting another service, but I digress.

The point is that if we take away net neutrality, what we take away is the network provider's obligation to pass on a packet without judging it. At its simplest, not having net neutrality means that any ISP can rate-limit, which means selectively slow down a bandwidth-intensive service like Netflix, without affecting the rest of the connection. That is how the big Internet service providers will sell this to us, as a fundamental question of fairness.

It sounds reasonable. Netflix alone represents about 35% of Internet traffic in North America today. It is not, of course, actually reasonable. If an ISP is not capable of sustaining the capacity it has sold someone, it has oversold it. I will come back to that the next time this is up for debate in a few weeks.

Unfortunately, this position by net neutrality-opposing ISPs means that providers are given the right to look at the traffic of individuals, a right they do not currently have except in aggregate. Once they have this right, this right also comes with obligations. ISPs, for example, will no longer be able to claim neutrality if a customer is looking at illegal content. Good, one might say, but no, not necessarily good, and here is why.

Once the ISPs are required to monitor the traffic of individuals, because without neutrality they become effectively required to, because they can no longer claim they could not should they be sued or charged and are also no longer required to be neutral about the transmission of this traffic, the door is wide open for ISPs to decide what we can and cannot do on the Internet. This then becomes a fundamental rights issue.

Without net neutrality, there is nothing stopping, for example, Bell Canada, the country's largest Internet provider, one of three roughly equally large-sized cellphone providers, and the plurality owner of Canada's domestic content creation market, from limiting people's Internet access on their Bell Canada connection or phone to Bell Canada content, which includes CTV news, The Movie Network, Crave TV, the sports network, and so forth, nor preventing them from accessing, say, CBC content. In fact, Bell already does this to an extent. People cannot watch Discovery channel online without a login to either a Bell service or a television provider that subscribes to it. It is clearly keen to have this power.

I am looking forward to finishing this in a few weeks.

Monsieur le Président, je félicite le député d'Oakville d'avoir présenté une motion visant à défendre la neutralité du Net. Je suis très fier de pouvoir appuyer la motion.

Comme on l'a déjà fait remarquer à maintes reprises, la neutralité du Net est un concept fondamental qui est déjà fortement présent dans la loi canadienne même s'il n'est pas expressément mentionné. Il s'agit d'un principe important.

La neutralité du Net est une question vraiment très large qui ne se limite pas à la réduction du débit de Netflix — et je suis une personne qui n'aime vraiment pas se faire demander de ralentir. Il s'agit aussi d'une discussion beaucoup plus vaste que l'on veut le reconnaître. Je vais me pencher plus en détail sur le sujet au cours des prochaines minutes et du prochain mois.

Essentiellement, la neutralité du Net signifie que les fournisseurs de services Internet, ou FSI, et les fournisseurs de réseaux de base auxquels ils sont liés ne jugent pas, ne limitent pas et ne contrôlent pas le contenu, la vitesse ou la nature du trafic sur Internet. Tout paquet — c'est-à-dire l'unité de base d'une connexion Internet — qui est transmis est relayé jusqu'à sa destination, à condition qu'il satisfasse aux exigences de base en matière de sécurité. La neutralité du Net ne signifie pas qu'il faut nécessairement, par exemple, permettre aveuglément la distribution d'attaques par déni de service ou la transmission de paquets avec des en-têtes usurpés. Au contraire, une attaque par déni de service est une forme d'atteinte à la neutralité par une tierce partie qui vise à entraver un autre service, mais je m'éloigne du sujet.

Ce qu'il faut retenir, c'est que si nous nous débarrassons de la neutralité du Net, les fournisseurs de réseau ne seront plus tenus de transmettre un paquet sans l'évaluer. Au fond, l'absence de neutralité du Net signifie que tout FSI peut limiter le débit, c'est-à-dire ralentir de manière sélective un service exigeant une grande bande passante, comme Netflix, sans avoir d'incidence sur le reste de la connexion. Voilà sous quel angle les grands fournisseurs de services Internet présenteront les choses, comme une question fondamentale d'équité.

Cela semble raisonnable. À lui seul, Netflix représente aujourd'hui environ 35 % du trafic Internet en Amérique du Nord. Évidemment, ce n'est pas véritablement raisonnable. Si un FSI n'est pas en mesure de maintenir la capacité qu'il a vendue à une personne, il l'a survendue. J'y reviendrai la prochaine fois que nous débattrons de la motion, dans quelques semaines.

Malheureusement, la position que font valoir les FSI s'opposant à la neutralité du Net les autoriserait à examiner le trafic des gens, un droit qui ne leur est actuellement pas accordé, sauf de façon groupée. Une fois que ce droit leur aura été conféré, les FSI auront de nouvelles obligations. Par exemple, ils ne pourront plus revendiquer leur neutralité si un client visionne du contenu illégal. On pourrait penser que c'est une bonne chose, mais non, ce ne l'est pas nécessairement. Voici pourquoi.

À partir du moment où les FSI seront tenus de surveiller ce que font les usagers — car je rappelle que, sans neutralité, ils n'auront plus le choix —, dans la mesure où ils ne pourront plus clamer qu'ils ne peuvent pas être poursuivis ou accusés et où il ne seront plus tenus à la neutralité quant à la transmission du trafic, ils auront beau jeu de décider ce que nous pouvons faire, ou pas, sur Internet. Il s'agit donc d'un enjeu touchant les droits fondamentaux.

Sans neutralité du Net, il n'y aurait par exemple plus rien pour empêcher Bell Canada, qui est le plus gros fournisseur de services Internet du pays, l'un des trois fournisseurs de services de téléphonie cellulaire de taille à peu près semblable et l'un des grands détenteurs du marché canadien de création de contenu, de restreindre l'accès des personnes qui utilisent une connexion ou un téléphone Bell au seul contenu appartenant à l'empire Bell, qui comprend CTV News, Super Écran, Crave TV, le Réseau des sports et j'en passe, ou de les empêcher d'avoir accès au contenu produit par, disons, Radio-Canada. En fait, Bell tend déjà vers là, puisqu'à l'heure où on se parle, les gens ne peuvent pas regarder le canal Discovery en ligne s'ils ne passent pas par Bell ou par un fournisseur affilié. De toute évidence, c'est exactement le genre de pouvoir que Bell rêve de posséder.

Je terminerai mon allocution dans quelques semaines, lorsque nous reprendrons le débat.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 1387 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 27, 2018

2018-03-26 14:09 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Householders, Statements by Members,

Déclarations de députés, Envois collectifs,

Mr. Speaker, I am very proud to announce that the most recent edition of my newsletter was sent to over 69,000 households in Laurentides—Labelle last week. When the House announced that we would soon be able to have our householders printed in colour, I immediately signed up for the pilot project. The newsletter is a way to initiate conversations with constituents, acknowledge the contributions of those who make a difference in the riding, and build a better partnership between my region and the federal government.

I humbly acknowledge the work of my team and the Hill's Printing and Mailing Services. I would particularly like to recognize Samuel St-Amand, Kim Lanctot, and Sara Drouin. Thanks to them, my riding is once again leading the way. The people of Laurentides—Labelle are the first in Canada to receive an improved householder printed in colour. I have already received very positive feedback about this.

Monsieur le Président, c'est avec beaucoup de fierté que je souligne l'envoi de la plus récente édition de mon infolettre, la semaine dernière à plus de 69 000 foyers des Laurentides—Labelle. Lorsque la Chambre a annoncé que les envois collectifs seraient bientôt disponibles dans de nouveaux formats en couleur, j'ai immédiatement embarqué dans le projet pilote. L'infolettre est avant tout un moyen d'engager la conversation avec les citoyens, de souligner l'implication de nombreux concitoyens qui font la différence et de construire un meilleur partenariat entre ma région et le fédéral.

Je salue humblement le travail de mon équipe ainsi que des Services d’impression et d’expédition de la Colline et surtout le travail de Samuel St-Amand, Kim Lanctot et Sara Drouin. Grâce à eux, ma circonscription est, une fois de plus, un précurseur au pays. Les citoyens de Laurentides—Labelle sont les premiers au Canada à bénéficier d'un envoi collectif amélioré et en couleur. Les échos sont déjà très positifs.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 319 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 26, 2018

2018-02-09 11:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Province of Quebec, Recreational paths, Statements by Members, Trans Canada Trail,

Déclarations de députés, Province de Québec, Sentier Transcanadien, Sentiers récréatifs,

Mr. Speaker, I recently had the pleasure of celebrating the 100% connection of Quebec's section of the Trans Canada Trail. Le P'tit Train du Nord is the section of the trail that crosses the riding of Laurentides—Labelle. It is a roughly 200-km linear park and a source of pride for everyone in my region. Thanks to the Government of Canada's financial contribution to maintaining and improving this essential infrastructure, tens of thousands of locals and tourists enjoy direct access to the largest recreational pathway in the world.

The P'tit train du Nord, its scenery, mountains, rivers, and farms showcase the history of development in the Laurentides region. Today, this section of the Trans Canada Trail is used by hikers, cyclists, cross-country skiers, and snowmobilers, and is another reason why the Laurentides—Labelle region shines in Quebec, Canada, and the entire world.

Monsieur le Président, dernièrement, j'ai eu le plaisir de célébrer le raccordement à 100 % de la portion québécoise du Grand Sentier transcanadien. La portion qui sillonne la circonscription de Laurentides—Labelle fait près de 200 kilomètres, c'est le parc linéaire Le P'tit Train du Nord. C'est une source de fierté pour tous les citoyens de ma région. Grâce à la participation financière du gouvernement du Canada pour le maintien et l'amélioration de cette infrastructure essentielle, des dizaines de milliers de résidants et de visiteurs bénéficient d'un accès direct au plus grand sentier récréatif au monde.

Le P'tit train du Nord, ses paysages, ses montagnes, ses rivières et ses fermes régionales nous rappellent l'histoire du développement des Laurentides. Aujourd'hui, utilisé par les marcheurs, les cyclistes, les fondeurs et les motoneigistes, cette portion du Grand Sentier transcanadien est une autre raison qui explique pourquoi la région des Laurentides—Labelle rayonne au Québec, au Canada et dans le monde entier.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 323 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 09, 2018

2018-02-05 15:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government assistance, Museums and galleries, Oral questions

Aide gouvernementale, Questions orales,

Mr. Speaker, I am very proud of the outstanding creators in my riding of Laurentides—Labelle. They deserve assistance to present their works professionally, and our government has made historic investments in arts and culture.

Our government recently made an important announcement about the Centre d'exposition de Mont-Laurier.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage tell the House what is being done to help this important centre continue its work in my riding?

Monsieur le Président, je suis très fier du talent exceptionnel des créateurs de ma circonscription, Laurentides—Labelle. Ils méritent un appui pour présenter leurs oeuvres de manière professionnelle, et notre gouvernement a fait des investissements historiques en art et en culture.

Récemment, notre gouvernement a annoncé des nouvelles importantes concernant le Centre d'exposition de Mont-Laurier.

Est-ce que le secrétaire parlementaire de la ministre du Patrimoine peut informer la Chambre de ce qui se fait pour soutenir la poursuite des travaux de cet important centre de ma circonscription?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr qp 183 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 05, 2018

2018-02-01 13:03 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Labour relations, Members of Parliament staff, New Democratic Party Caucus, Second reading, Union certification,

Accréditation syndicale, Caucus Nouveau Parti démocratique, Deuxième lecture, Personnel des députés, Relations de travail

Madam Speaker, the member talked at length about the NDP's own habit of union organizing on the Hill for a long time, which I think is a very laudable goal. I wonder if the member could tell us about the kind of effect having unionized political staff has. Can he confirm that the NDP has never engaged in union busting?

Madame la Présidente, le député a longuement parlé de la tradition néo-démocrate de syndicalisation sur la Colline du Parlement, qui est très louable selon moi. Quelle incidence le fait d'avoir un personnel politique syndiqué a-t-il, selon lui? Peut-il confirmer que le NPD ne s'est jamais livré à des pratiques antisyndicales?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 150 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 01, 2018

2018-01-30 14:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Deaths and funerals, Sports, Statements by Members

Décès et funérailles, Déclarations de députés, Sports

Mr. Speaker, it is with a heavy heart that I pay tribute to Marc Cormier, a resident of my riding who died suddenly on January 19 at the age of 48.

Marc was dedicated to promoting physical activity and opportunities for youth to flourish. The day after the federal election, Marc, a triathlete and coach, talked to me about how important an arena was to the community. The Pays-d'en-Haut RCM had been trying to get a sportsplex for decades. Last summer, we announced a $32-million project funded by equal contributions from all three levels of government. The community's proposal was a success thanks in large part to Marc's involvement.

In recognition of his leadership, he was selected as a recipient of the Canada 150 pin. Sadly, he passed away before I could give him that honour. On behalf of the entire community, we would like to express our deepest condolences to his wife, Patricia, and their children, Alexandre, Simon, and Sandrine.

Thank you, Marc. We will miss you so much.

Monsieur le Président, c'est le coeur gros que je rends hommage à Marc Cormier, un résidant de ma circonscription, décédé subitement à l'âge de 48 ans, le 19 janvier dernier.

Marc se dévouait pour la promotion d'activités physiques et l'épanouissement des jeunes. Dès le lendemain de l'élection fédérale, Marc, triathlète et entraîneur, m'a expliqué l'importance de l'aréna pour la collectivité, puisque la MRC des Pays-d'en-Haut revendique un complexe sportif depuis des décennies. L'été dernier, nous annoncions un projet de 32 millions de dollars, financé à parts égales par les trois paliers de gouvernement. Le travail de Marc a grandement contribué à cette réussite pour notre région.

Pour honorer son leadership, on l'a choisi pour recevoir l'épinglette Canada 150. Il est malheureusement parti avant que je n'aie pu lui remettre cette distinction. C'est au nom de toute la communauté que nous offrons nos plus sincères condoléances à sa femme, Patricia, et à leurs enfants, Alexandre, Simon et Sandrine.

Merci, Marc, tu nous manqueras beaucoup.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 350 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on January 30, 2018

2017-12-07 16:40 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Constituencies, Electoral system, Fundraising and fundraisers, Government assistance, Income and wages, Income tax returns, Political parties, Preferential voting system, Second reading

Aide gouvernementale, Circonscriptions électorales, Deuxième lecture, Mode de scrutin préférentiel, Partis politiques, Projets de loi émanant des députés, Revenus et salaires

Madam Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to rise on Bill C-364 to discuss election financing law.

To start with, I will not be supporting this bill. That is not because I do not believe in a stronger role for public financing; I do believe that. It is because the alternative is a stronger role for private financing.

The key question I want to address in our democracy is a complete re-evaluation of political fundraising itself. Is fundraising necessary, and if so, what should it look like? Conventional wisdom is that it is. However, I want us to ask the question honestly and objectively.

Political parties need funds to operate and campaign. That is a given. However, what is a fair way to achieve that funding?

First, parties and riding associations should not have to fundraise in competition with each other. The fundraising should come from the riding, with a share sent to the party in order for it to remain a part of the party, with the specific details left up to each party or riding association to figure out. A party is not a party, after all, without ridings and representatives. The parties themselves are only meant to exist as a vehicle for like-minded members to work together, not as a means for members to become like-minded. That is a discussion for another day.

I disagree with the current fundraising model of 100% private funds, coupled with non-refundable tax credits and expense reimbursements that do not give equal ability to all members of society to participate, which is a fundamental tenet of any democracy. Those who have money can participate and get tax credits. Those who do not have money to participate are not eligible for the tax incentive to do so. Therefore, having less means that each dollar costs less fortunate individuals more in absolute terms, and prohibitively more in relative terms. Once again, those who need are at a disadvantage compared to those who do not, and politicians, with their insatiable need for funds, must necessarily gravitate toward those who have.

Many donors donate because they believe in the cause. However, I think it is naive to believe that all donors do. I am sure most of us have received an angry email or phone call at some point from someone who has given money to either our riding or our party saying, “I am a donor and I am angry.” Personally, I do not take well to this kind of message. I want people to donate because they believe in what we are doing and want us to continue, not in order to tell us what we need to do. If they are angry, I want to know that, not because they are donors but because they are citizens. I want that fact detached from the comment, and I want people who did not donate to express themselves with equal fervour. I am here to represent and work for all of my people to the best of my ability, not just those who supported me or may do so in the future.

I also disagree with the concept of annual per-vote funding, the primary objective of Bill C-364, for the simple reason that how people voted in 2015 may not reflect where they want their financial support to go. At that, it may not be the same in 2016, 2017, 2018, or 2019. If people vote for a Liberal candidate to block a Conservative candidate when they actually support the Green Party, why should the money go to the Liberals and not the Green Party in that circumstance? It does not make sense. If we do have per-vote funding, we should also have a preferential ballot so that the money we assign goes to our first pick, even if we have specified additional choices in order to prevent the unfavourable results that can sometimes come from not voting strategically.

On the other hand, I also do not believe that just because one has registered a political party it is automatically entitled to some funding or an equal level of funding as all the others. It must be tied to that party's actual support in some way. Giving the Rhinoceros Party $18 million simply because it is registered may not necessarily serve the interests of democracy, and providing per-party financing may motivate some people to register political parties for the purpose of simply collecting the money without any actual interest in the electoral process. I think these risks are fairly self-evident.

While I know I am very much in the minority on this, my preferred model for addressing all these concerns is to put a question on the tax returns of Canadians that would go something like this, with the numbers being completely arbitrary for the sake of demonstration here today.

With respect to let us say tax return line number 500, an answer to this section is required for my tax return to be accepted as complete. Therefore, the questions might be, “Question 1, I am entitled to direct $25 to a party registered in my riding or to be held in escrow for an independent candidate to be returned or forfeited if the candidate I name does not register to run in the next election: a) Yes, I would like to exercise this right, or b) No, I do not wish to contribute to any political party or independent candidate at this time.” If we check off no, then we are finished and have met our obligations under this section of the return. If we answer yes, that we do wish to direct $25 to a political party, we have three more questions to answer.

The first question would be, “The party or independent candidate I wish to support in my riding is”, then there would be a blank space or drop-down menu with data provided by Elections Canada for electronic filers. The second question would be, “I would like this money to: a) come from general revenues, or b) be added to my own tax assessment.” The final question would be, “I would like the origin of this contribution to be: a) disclosed to the party or independent candidate receiving it, or b) kept anonymous and confidential.”

Splitting up the questions like this allows those who believe it must be their own funds that contribute to political parties to put their money where their mouth is. However, more importantly, it means that someone who does not have two cents, and someone who is a millionaire, have the same weight in the fundraising process.

Everybody has the option but not the requirement to do so anonymously, so the data cannot be automatically used by political parties. Allowing people to say no to donating at all, and not knowing who, should help force all parties to retain a more positive message. Divisive dog-whistle fundraising will not work on an anonymous tax-assessment-based fundraising model. Being negative would serve to discourage people from contributing to political parties overall, with them answering no to the question of whether to give before seeing the options of who to give to.

The pie can be pretty big if Canadians all have a positive view of political parties, rather than the negative views promulgated today by some elements of our political system to sew division and make people hate, rather than to want to work together.

While the Canada Revenue Agency will no doubt be less than excited to get involved in this manner, and there must be careful and specific controls to protect the privacy of the responses to this question, in my view it is the fairest possible way to ensure that political financing is put on an equal basis by all citizens for those they support here and now, at all times, in all parts of the country.

There are no doubt other models and solutions that could be looked at, but I firmly believe that the question must be asked, and I thank the member for Terrebonne for bringing public financing reform forward for us to discuss.

This legislation also reduces the fundraising limits significantly in conjunction with the reintroduction of per-vote funding. The amount of the donation cap is largely irrelevant if there is still an inequity between donors who have means and donors who do not, and so the cap at $500 or $1,500 is largely immaterial to me. Someone who makes enough to pay taxes giving $400 is still out of pocket only $100, while someone who does not make enough to pay taxes giving $400 is out of pocket the full amount, not to mention possibly out of a home or a few meals. Therefore, I find the particular change proposed in the bill to be fairly meaningless. It would not solve any existing problem.

Finally, the member for Terrebonne's bill has an absolute rather than relative coming into force provision. Given that the bill is only at second reading here in the House and has yet to get through the Commons committee, report stage, third reading and referral to the Senate, second reading at the Senate, Senate committee, Senate report stage, Senate third reading, and royal assent, it is not realistic to suggest that the bill could be in force 24 days from now.

Over the past two years, we have made strides forward on these matters. I do not believe my views on fundraising reflect those of very many of my colleagues on any side of the House, but we are seeing changes both here and in several provinces.

Conservative Bill C-23, the so-called Fair Elections Act, reformed fundraising in a whole lot of ways that were detrimental to democratic society, including removing fundraising costs from capped expenses in an election campaign, and upping the donation limit by 25%, and then indexing it by $25 per year instead of by an an inflation-based formula.

I do not wish to re-litigate that particular bill. As the assistant at the time to the Liberal critic for democratic reform, I had more than enough sleepless nights trying to grok every word of that act once, and it certainly contributed to my motivation to seek a seat in this place so that this kind of abuse of democracy could not happen again.

Our own government's Bill C-50 brought in strict reporting requirements for fundraising events involving the key power brokers of government, and those working hard to replace them, which I think is genuinely important.

The thing about fundraising, and public financing of political parties, of course, is that there is no such thing as a perfect answer, only a balance of imperfect solutions. What I am sure of, though, is that Bill C-364 does not address the fundamental inequalities within our existing fundraising and public financing structure for our political system.

Madame la Présidente, c'est un grand plaisir pour moi d'intervenir pour parler du projet de loi C-364 et de la loi sur le financement électoral.

Pour commencer, je dirai que je n'appuierai pas ce projet de loi, et ce, non pas parce que je ne pense pas que les fonds publics doivent jouer un plus grand rôle dans le financement électoral — je le pense —, mais parce que l'autre possibilité est de faire plus de place aux fonds privés.

L'enjeu essentiel dans notre démocratie que je veux aborder est la remise en question totale du système de financement des partis politiques. Ce financement est-il nécessaire, et s'il l'est, quelle forme devrait-il prendre? Selon la sagesse populaire, il l'est. Je veux néanmoins que nous nous posions la question en faisant montre d'honnêteté et d'objectivité.

Les partis politiques ont besoin d'argent pour fonctionner et faire campagne, c'est certain. Cependant, comment peut-on faire pour leur financement soit équitable?

D'abord, les partis et les associations de circonscription ne devraient pas être en compétition pour les mêmes fonds. La collecte de fonds devrait se faire dans la circonscription et une partie de ces fonds devraient être envoyés au parti pour qu'ils restent associés au parti: aux partis et aux associations de circonscription de décider ensuite des détails. Après tout, un parti n'existe pas sans circonscription ni représentant. Les partis ne servent qu'à rallier des députés aux vues similaires pour qu'ils travaillent ensemble. Ils ne sont pas censés servir à produire des députés aux vues similaires. C'est une discussion pour un autre jour.

Je ne suis pas d'accord avec le modèle de financement actuel, soit 100 % de fonds privés combinés à des crédits d'impôt non remboursables et à des remboursements de dépenses, puisque cela ne permet pas une participation égale de tous les membres de la société, ce qui est un principe de base de toute démocratie. Les personnes qui ont de l'argent peuvent participer au financement et obtenir des crédits d'impôt. Celles qui n'ont pas l'argent pour le faire n'ont pas droit à l'incitatif fiscal connexe. Ainsi, le fait d'avoir moins d'argent signifie que chaque dollar coûte plus aux moins bien nantis en termes absolus et extrêmement plus en termes relatifs. Encore une fois, les déshérités sont désavantagés par rapport aux plus fortunés, et les politiciens, dont les besoins en fonds sont infinis, doivent nécessairement aller vers les nantis.

Dans bien des cas, les personnes qui font des dons le font pour la cause. Cela dit, à mon avis, il serait naïf de penser qu'il en est toujours ainsi. Je suis certain qu'il nous est tous arrivé de recevoir un courriel ou un appel d'une personne qui avait fait un don à l'association de circonscription ou au parti nous disant: « Je suis un donateur et je suis en colère. » Personnellement, je n'aime pas ce genre de message. À mes yeux, les gens doivent donner parce qu'ils sont d'accord avec ce que nous faisons et qu'ils veulent que nous poursuivions sur la même voie et non pour pouvoir nous dire quoi faire. Si quelqu'un est en colère, je veux le savoir, mais je veux le point de vue d'un citoyen, pas celui d'un donateur. Les commentaires doivent être indépendants des dons qui ont été faits, et les personnes qui n'ont rien donné doivent pouvoir s'exprimer avec la même vigueur. Je suis ici pour représenter tous les habitants de ma circonscription et faire de mon mieux pour eux tous et non pas seulement les personnes qui m'ont appuyé ou qui pourraient un jour le faire.

Je ne souscris pas davantage au concept du financement annuel par vote reçu, qui est le principal objectif du projet de loi C-364, pour la simple raison que le parti qu'un électeur a appuyé au cours des élections de 2015 ne correspond pas nécessairement à celui qu'il voudrait appuyer financièrement. De surcroît, le choix de cet électeur pourrait ne pas être le même en 2016, en 2017, en 2018 ou en 2019. Lorsque des partisans du Parti vert votent pour un candidat libéral afin de faire obstacle à un candidat conservateur, pourquoi l'argent devrait-il être versé au Parti libéral plutôt qu'au Parti vert? Cela n'a aucun sens. Si nous rétablissons le financement par vote reçu, nous devrions aussi mettre en place un scrutin préférentiel afin que l'argent soit attribué au premier choix des électeurs, quels que soient les autres candidats pour qui ils choisissent ensuite de voter au ballottage afin de prévenir les effets indésirables qu'on observe parfois lorsque les Canadiens ne votent pas de façon stratégique.

Cependant, j'estime aussi que ce n'est pas parce qu'un parti politique est enregistré qu'il a automatiquement droit à du financement ou au même niveau de financement que les autres partis enregistrés. Le financement doit être lié d'une certaine façon à l'appui réel dont jouit le parti. Il n'est pas nécessairement dans l'intérêt de la démocratie de verser 18 millions de dollars au Parti rhinocéros simplement parce qu'il est un parti enregistré. De plus, le financement par vote reçu pourrait inciter certaines personnes qui ne s'intéressent pas réellement au processus électoral à enregistrer des partis politiques strictement afin de recueillir l'argent. Je pense que les risques sont assez évidents.

Je sais que je suis l'un des seuls à penser ainsi, mais la méthode que je privilégie pour remédier à toutes ces préoccupations, c'est d'ajouter une question dans la déclaration de revenus des Canadiens. Cette question ressemblerait à quelque chose comme ce qui suit — je précise que j'ai choisi les chiffres de façon totalement arbitraire.

Par exemple, en ce qui concerne, disons, la ligne 500 de la déclaration de revenus, il faudrait donner une réponse pour que la déclaration soit considérée comme complète. La question pourrait être la suivante: « Question 1. J'ai le droit de verser 25 $ à un parti enregistré dans ma circonscription ou de laisser cette somme en dépôt fiduciaire pour un candidat indépendant, qui devra les rembourser ou qui les perdra s'il ne se présente aux prochaines élections: a) Oui, je souhaite exercer ce droit; b) Non, je ne souhaite pas pour l'instant participer au financement d'un parti politique ou d'un candidat indépendant. » Si la personne répond « non », ce sera tout; elle aura ainsi respecté ses obligations relativement à cette ligne de la déclaration. Autrement, elle devrait ensuite répondre à trois autres questions.

La première question serait: « Le parti ou le candidat indépendant que je souhaite appuyer dans ma circonscription est », puis il y aurait un espace blanc à remplir ou, pour les déclarants par voie électronique, un menu déroulant contenant les données fournies par Élections Canada. La deuxième question serait: « J'aimerais que cet argent: a) provienne des recettes générales; b) soit ajouté à ma propre cotisation. » La dernière question serait: « J'aimerais que la provenance de cette contribution: a) soit communiquée au parti ou au candidat indépendant qui la reçoit; b) reste anonyme et confidentielle. »

Séparer ainsi les questions permet à ceux qui croient que ce sont leurs propres fonds qui doivent servir à financer les partis politiques de joindre le geste à la parole. Par contre, ce qui est encore plus important, c'est qu'une personne qui est sans le sou et un millionnaire ont alors le même poids dans le système de financement des partis.

Tout le monde a le choix de faire une contribution de façon anonyme, mais personne n'y est tenu, alors les partis politiques ne peuvent pas se servir d'emblée des données. Permettre aux gens de refuser de faire une contribution, qui plus est, de façon anonyme, devrait forcer tous les partis à adopter un message plus positif. Les activités de financement tendancieuses qui sèment la discorde ne fonctionneront pas dans un système de financement anonyme et fondé sur les cotisations fiscales. La négativité ne ferait que dissuader les gens de contribuer aux partis politiques dans leur ensemble, car, avant même de voir les options qui leur permettent de choisir le bénéficiaire du don, ils répondraient non à la question qui leur demande s'ils veulent donner de l'argent.

La part du gâteau peut être très grosse si les Canadiens ont tous une bonne opinion des partis politiques plutôt que d'avoir la mauvaise opinion promulguée aujourd'hui par certains des éléments de notre système politique visant à encourager la division et la haine plutôt que la collaboration.

Bien que l'Agence du revenu du Canada sera probablement très peu enthousiaste à l'idée de jouer un rôle dans ce dossier — il doit y avoir des contrôles minutieux et précis en vue de protéger la confidentialité des réponses à cette question —, je pense qu'il s'agit de la façon la plus juste possible de nous assurer du caractère équitable du financement politique par l'ensemble des citoyens pour ceux qu'ils soutiennent ici et maintenant, en tout temps, dans toutes les régions du pays.

Il ne fait aucun doute que d'autres modèles et solutions pourraient être étudiés, mais je crois fermement que la question doit être posée, et je remercie le député de Terrebonne d'avoir soulevé la question de la réforme du financement public pour que nous puissions en discuter.

Le projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis réduit aussi considérablement les limites en matière de financement tout en réintroduisant le financement par vote. Le montant du plafond de don est pratiquement inutile s'il existe toujours une iniquité entre les donateurs qui ont les moyens et ceux qui n'en ont pas. Par conséquent, en ce qui me concerne, le plafond de 500 $ ou de 1 500 $ est sans importance. Quelqu'un qui gagne suffisamment pour payer des impôts et qui fait un don de 400 $ paie seulement 100 $ de ses poches, tandis que quelqu'un qui ne gagne pas suffisamment pour payer des impôts et qui fait un don de 400 $ paie le montant total de ses poches, sans parler du fait qu'il se retrouvera peut-être dans la rue ou sans rien à manger. Ainsi, je pense que la modification proposée dans le projet de loi est assez inutile. Elle ne règlerait aucun problème existant.

Enfin, le projet de loi du député de Terrebonne contient une disposition d'entrée en vigueur absolue plutôt que relative. Étant donné que le projet de loi n'en est qu'à l'étape de la deuxième lecture ici à la Chambre et qu'il doit passer par les étapes de l'étude par le comité, du rapport et de la troisième lecture à la Chambre des communes, du renvoi au Sénat et de la deuxième lecture, de l'étude par le comité, du rapport et de la troisième lecture au Sénat, puis de la sanction royale, il n'est pas réaliste de laisser penser qu'il pourrait être en vigueur d'ici 24 jours.

Au cours des deux dernières années, nous avons progressé énormément sur ces questions. Je ne crois pas que mes opinions sur le financement reflètent celles d'un grand nombre de mes collègues de quelque parti que ce soit à la Chambre, mais nous voyons des changements ici et dans plusieurs provinces.

Le projet de loi conservateur C-23, la prétendue Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, a modifié le financement de maintes façons nuisibles pour une société démocratique, y compris en excluant les dépenses consacrées aux collectes de fonds des dépenses plafonnées pour les campagnes électorales et en haussant la limite des dons de 25 % puis en l'indexant de 25 $ par année plutôt qu'en fonction de l'inflation.

Je ne vais pas contester encore ce projet de loi. Comme adjoint du porte-parole libéral en matière de réforme démocratique à l'époque, j'ai passé bien des nuits blanches à essayer de saisir chaque mot de cette mesure législative et cela a certainement contribué à me motiver à briguer un siège ici pour qu'il n'y ait plus ce genre d'abus de la démocratie.

Le projet de loi du gouvernement, le projet de loi C-50, propose des exigences strictes en matière de rapports sur les activités de financement auxquelles participent les détenteurs du pouvoir au gouvernement et ceux qui travaillent fort pour les remplacer, ce qui est, je pense, réellement important.

Le problème que posent la collecte de fonds et le financement public des partis politiques, bien entendu, est qu'il n'y a pas de réponse parfaite, mais seulement un ensemble équilibré de solutions imparfaites. Ce dont je suis certain, cependant, c'est que le projet de loi C-364 ne règle pas les inégalités fondamentales dans la structure actuelle des collectes de fonds et du financement public de notre système politique.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 3859 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 07, 2017

2017-12-07 16:34 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Electoral system, Fundraising and fundraisers, Political parties, Second reading,

Deuxième lecture, Partis politiques, Projets de loi émanant des députés, Système électoral,

Madam Speaker, I want to thank my colleague from Terrebonne for introducing this bill and for his intervention.

At the beginning of his speech, he suggested that all politicians are for sale, because they request contributions.

My question is simple: why is he proposing lowering the contribution limit from $1,500 to $500, instead of eliminating it completely and prohibiting all private fundraising?

Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue de Terrebonne d'avoir déposé ce projet de loi et de son discours.

Selon ce qu'il a dit au début de son discours, tous les politiciens sont à vendre, parce qu'ils demandent des contributions.

Ma question est simple: pourquoi propose-t-il de baisser le taux de contribution de 1 500 $ à 500 $, au lieu de le supprimer complètement et de dire que personne n'a le droit de recourir au financement privé?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 167 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 07, 2017

2017-12-06 14:15 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Athletes, China, Hockey, Statements by Members,

Athlètes, Chine, Déclarations de députés, Hockey,

Mr. Speaker, China will be hosting the Winter Olympics in 2022. To encourage its citizens to play winter sports, China is seeking advice from the best.

Canada is a world leader in winter sports. I have often mentioned the influence that my riding of Laurentides—Labelle has had on our country in that regard. Our expertise is also world renowned.

Today, we have the pleasure of welcoming to Ottawa a group of young hockey players from the Polyvalente des Monts de Sainte-Agathe, who are real stars in China. On July 30, 10 players and four coaches inaugurated the Zhengding Olympic facility in a game that was broadcast live to more than 150 million viewers.

The partnership is still going strong. In collaboration with the Laurentians school board and the Sainte-Adèle chamber of commerce, a new delegation of Sainte-Agathe players will represent Canada in a game scheduled for late January. Several delegates from China are also set to visit us in the next few years.

In 2022, we will win Olympic gold. As our national anthem begins to play, no place will be prouder than the Laurentians.

Monsieur le Président, en 2022, la Chine accueillera les Jeux olympiques d'hiver. Pour motiver ses citoyens à la pratique des sports d'hiver, elle veut s'inspirer de l'expertise des meilleurs.

Le Canada est un leader mondial dans le domaine des sports d'hiver. J'ai souvent mentionné à quel point ma circonscription, Laurentides—Labelle, a influencé notre pays dans cette sphère. Notre expertise est aussi mondialement reconnue.

Nous avons aujourd'hui le plaisir d'accueillir ici, à Ottawa, des jeunes hockeyeurs de la Polyvalente des Monts de Sainte-Agathe, qui sont des véritables stars en Chine. Le 30 juillet, 10 joueurs et quatre entraîneurs ont inauguré l'installation olympique de Zhengding, et la partie a été transmise en direct devant plus de 150 millions de téléspectateurs.

Le partenariat se poursuit. En collaboration avec la Commission scolaire des Laurentides et la chambre de commerce de Sainte-Adèle, une nouvelle délégation de joueurs de Sainte-Agathe représentera le Canada lors d'une partie à la fin janvier. Il est aussi prévu que plusieurs délégués de la Chine viennent chez nous au cours des prochaines années.

En 2022, nous gagnerons l'or aux Olympiques. Notre hymne national retentira et nulle part la fierté ne sera-t-elle plus ressentie que dans les Laurentides.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 391 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 06, 2017

2017-11-21 14:05 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Conseil de la culture des Laurentides, Culture and creativity, Statements by Members

Conseil de la culture des Laurentides, Culture et créativité, Déclarations de députés

Mr. Speaker, on November 9, the Conseil de la culture des Laurentides hosted the 28th annual Grands prix de la culture des Laurentides. More than half of the finalists were from my riding, Laurentides—Labelle, and I am very proud to say today that seven out of the eight winners are people and organizations from back home.

I congratulate Jessica Viau, winner of the Jeune relève award, Lortie et Martin, winner of the Art-Affaires award, Théâtre le Patriote, recipient of the Ambassadeur award, Polyvalente Saint-Joseph, winner of the Art-Éducation award, Caroline Dusseault, recipient of the Passion award, Michel Robichaud, winner of the Excellence award, and Jean-François Beauchemin, who was crowned Créateur de l'année dans les Laurentides.

All these recipients, as well as the hundreds of people involved in my riding, are proof that culture is essential for regions like mine to grow and prosper. Whether it is through dance, theatre, music, literature, or other forms of art, they give the very best of themselves to the people of Laurentides—Labelle, and for that, I thank them.

Monsieur le Président, le 9 novembre, le Conseil de la culture des Laurentides donnait la 28e édition des Grands Prix de la culture des Laurentides. Plus de la moitié des finalistes provenaient de ma circonscription, Laurentides—Labelle, et je suis fier de dire aujourd'hui que les gagnants de sept des huit catégories sont des gens et des organismes de chez nous.

Je félicite Jessica Viau, gagnante du prix Jeune relève, Lortie et Martin, gagnant du prix Art-Affaires, le Théâtre le Patriote, lauréat du prix Ambassadeur, la Polyvalente Saint-Joseph, qui a remporté le prix Art-Éducation, Caroline Dusseault, lauréate du prix Passion, Michel Robichaud, gagnant du prix Excellence, et Jean-François Beauchemin, sacré Créateur de l'année dans les Laurentides.

Tous ces récipiendaires, ainsi que les centaines de gens impliqués dans ma circonscription, sont la preuve que la culture est essentielle au développement et au rayonnement des régions comme la mienne. Que ce soit par la danse, le théâtre, la musique, la littérature ou bien d'autres formes d'art, ils transmettent le meilleur d'eux-mêmes aux citoyens de Laurentides—Labelle, et pour cela, je les remercie.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 385 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 21, 2017

2017-11-07 14:08 House intervention / intervention en chambre

City councillors, Mayors, Municipal elections, Statements by Members,

Conseillers municipaux, Déclarations de députés, Élections municipales, Maires,

Mr. Speaker, I would like to acknowledge the service of the 99 municipal councillors and mayors in my riding, many of whom served for a very long time, who did not run for re-election on November 5. I would also like to thank the 213 candidates who ran for the 304 municipal positions but were not elected. Lastly, I would like to congratulate the 146 newly elected and 153 re-elected officials who are returning to or changing their positions, whether as municipal councillors, mayors, or reeves, in the 43 municipalities and three RCMs in Laurentides—Labelle, as well as the five people who will eventually join them to fill the vacant positions.

These 611 people who got involved in the process of municipal governance are indisputable proof of the civic and community engagement that epitomizes the Laurentian region.

Although there are almost as many elected officials in my riding as there are members in the House, my team and I will offer them our full co-operation in advancing the issues that matter to the entire region. By working together, we will move forward on the many issues that are important to the well-being of our citizens.

Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais souligner le service, de longue date dans plusieurs cas, des 99 conseillers municipaux et maires de ma circonscription qui n'ont pas sollicité un nouveau mandat lors de l'élection du 5 novembre dernier. Je veux aussi remercier les 213 candidats aux 304 postes municipaux qui se sont présentés mais qui n'ont pas été retenus par leur électorat. Enfin, je veux féliciter les 146 nouveaux élus et les 153 élus qui reprennent ou changent leur poste de conseiller municipal, de maire ou de préfet dans les 43 municipalités et les trois MRC de Laurentides—Labelle, ainsi que les cinq personnes qui vont éventuellement les rejoindre pour occuper les postes qui demeurent non comblés.

Ces 611 personnes qui se sont directement engagées dans le processus de gouvernance municipale sont la preuve incontestable de l'engagement civique et communautaire typique des Laurentides.

Alors qu'il y a presque autant d'élus municipaux dans ma circonscription qu'il y a de députés à la Chambre, mon équipe et moi allons leur offrir notre entière collaboration pour faire avancer les enjeux de toute la région. C'est en travaillant ensemble que nous ferons progresser de nombreux dossiers d'importance pour le mieux-être de nos concitoyens.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 409 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 07, 2017

2017-11-06 13:34 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Province of Quebec, Second reading

Deuxième lecture, Province de Québec,

Mr. Speaker, for decades, separatist MPs in my region worked hard to prove that the federal government could not work. They worked hard to prove that the federal government was not interested in the riding. Those MPs did not actually do anything. All they did was obstruct the role of the federal government.

Since I have been here, we have managed to bring more than $100 million in extra funding to the riding, mostly through the Canada child benefit, as well as through a number of other programs. Nearly $30 million has been invested in other programs.

People are starting to see that the federal government has a role to play in the regions in Quebec.

I would like to know whether my colleague from Hull—Aylmer has had a similar experience.

Monsieur le Président, depuis une génération, plusieurs députés indépendantistes de ma région ont travaillé fort pour démontrer que le gouvernement fédéral ne pouvait pas fonctionner. Ils ont travaillé fort aussi pour démontrer que le gouvernement fédéral ne s'intéressait pas à la circonscription. Ces députés ne faisaient rien. Tout ce qu'ils faisaient, c'était bloquer le rôle du fédéral.

Depuis mon arrivée, nous avons réussi à amener plus de 100 millions de dollars supplémentaires dans la circonscription, surtout grâce à l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants, ainsi qu'à plusieurs autres programmes. Presque 30 millions de dollars ont été investis dans d'autres programmes.

Les gens commencent à voir que le fédéral a un rôle à jouer dans les régions du Québec.

J'aimerais savoir si mon collègue de Hull—Aylmer a vécu une expérience similaire.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 273 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 06, 2017

2017-10-31 15:05 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Athlete Assistance Program, Athletes, Oral questions

Athlètes, Questions orales,

Mr. Speaker, I was very pleased to hear that our government is going to increase funding for the athlete assistance program. It is especially important in light of the fact that the Olympic Games and the Paralympic Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea, will open in 100 and 128 days, respectively. We hope that our athletes will do their very best.

Can the minister tell us what impact increased funding for the athlete assistance program has on Canada's high level athletes, many of whom are from Laurentides—Labelle?

Monsieur le Président, j'ai été très heureux d'apprendre que notre gouvernement augmentera le financement du Programme d'aide aux athlètes. C'est particulièrement important, alors que nous sommes à 100 jours de l'ouverture des Jeux olympiques et à 128 jours des Jeux paralympiques de PyeongChang en Corée du Sud, où nous espérons que nos athlètes pourront donner le meilleur d'eux-mêmes.

Est-ce que le ministre peut nous dire comment l'augmentation des fonds du Programme d'aide aux athlètes a un impact sur les athlètes canadiens de haut niveau, dont plusieurs viennent de Laurentides—Labelle?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr qp 191 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on October 31, 2017

2017-10-23 14:09 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Constituencies, Skiing, Statements by Members

Circonscriptions électorales, Déclarations de députés, Ski

Mr. Speaker, ski season is just a few weeks away, and the people of Laurentides—Labelle cannot wait for it to start.

The Laurentian mountains are the birthplace of skiing in Canada. Thanks to pioneers like “Jackrabbit” Johannsen, Émile Cochand, Lucile Wheeler, and even my own grandmother, Pat Paré, skiing has become an industry.

Alpine skiing, snowboarding, telemark skiing, and cross-country skiing are made possible through the efforts of thousands of men and women across my riding, and I want to pay tribute to them today.

I applaud all of the ski instructors and trainers, customer service workers, administrative staff, cooks, ski patrollers, trail groomers, maintenance workers, mechanics and technicians, lift operators, parking attendants, rental technicians, and food service and accommodation workers who work hard every winter to make our region the ultimate skiing destination.

I want to thank them and wish them a great ski season.

Monsieur le Président, les citoyens de Laurentides—Labelle sont fébriles, puisqu'une nouvelle saison de ski débutera dans quelques semaines.

Les Laurentides sont le berceau du ski au Canada, et c'est grâce à nos pionniers, comme « Jackrabbit » Johannsen, Émile Cochand, Lucile Wheeler et même ma grand-mère, Pat Paré, que le ski est devenu une véritable industrie.

La pratique du ski alpin, de la planche à neige, du télémark ou du ski de fond est rendue possible grâce aux milliers de femmes et d'hommes qui s'activent d'un bout à l'autre de ma circonscription, et c'est à eux que je veux rendre hommage aujourd'hui.

Je félicite tous ceux qui oeuvrent, lors de chaque saison hivernale, à faire de notre région la destination de ski par excellence: les moniteurs, les entraîneurs, les responsables du service à la clientèle, le personnel administratif, les cuisiniers, les patrouilleurs, les traceurs de pistes, les employés d'entretien, les mécaniciens et les techniciens, les responsables des remontées et des stationnements, les conseillers à la location, ainsi que les travailleurs de la restauration et de l'hébergement.

Je les remercie et je leur souhaite une excellente saison de ski.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 347 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on October 23, 2017

2017-10-19 17:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Forest products industry, Forestry, Opposition motions, Softwood lumber industry, Trade agreements

Accords commerciaux, Foresterie, Industrie des produits forestiers

Madam Speaker, my friend from Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa has given an excellent summary of the forestry industry and how it works. He talked about his 300 acres, which I assume used to be 600 acres before it was worked on. With all this great understanding of the forestry industry, which is a huge part of my riding as well in the Laurentians, as we have tens of thousands of kilometres of forested lands, why is he supporting a motion that calls for an agreement now instead of a good agreement when we can get one?

Madame la Présidente, mon collègue de Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa a présenté un excellent sommaire de l'industrie forestière et de son fonctionnement. Il a parlé de ses 300 acres — qui j'imagine étaient 600 acres avant la coupe. Il comprend très bien l'industrie forestière qui occupe aussi une énorme partie de ma circonscription dans les Laurentides, puisque nous avons des dizaines de milliers de kilomètres de terres forestières. Pourquoi donc appuie-t-il une motion qui demande un accord maintenant s'il est possible de demander un bon accord?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 204 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on October 19, 2017

2017-10-05 17:15 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Proceeding to next item early

Affaires émanant des députés

Mr. Speaker, I wonder if we could have the consent of the House to see the clock at 5:30 p.m.

Monsieur le Président, pourrions-nous demander le consentement de la Chambre pour dire qu'il est 17 h 30?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 55 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on October 05, 2017

2017-10-05 15:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Committee studies and activities, Opposition motions, Pharmacare, Prescription drugs, Standing Committee on Health

Activités et études des comités, Comité permanent de la santé, Médicaments sur ordonnance

Mr. Speaker, this spring, at the procedure and House affairs committee, there was a fairly large blow-up when a bill arrived in our lap that apparently was related to a study that was under way at that time. I am sure the member from Hamilton remembers that quite well.

The member for Vancouver Kingsway, whose name this motion stands under, has brought forward this motion on the pharmacare program, which in its own right is not a bad thing. However, there is a study under way at the health committee, which has seen 89 witnesses over 20 meetings, to study this very issue. It has not finished that study. It is ongoing.

Therefore, I wonder if the New Democrats have respect for the process here after the biggest part of the blow-up came from that side on that bill, or if they are not really interested in the study actually considering it and just want the credit for the results.

Monsieur le Président, une crise a éclaté au comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre au printemps dernier quand un projet de loi apparemment lié à une étude en cours à ce moment-là nous a été renvoyé. Je suis sûr que le député d'Hamilton s'en souvient très bien.

Le député de Vancouver Kingsway a présenté la motion sur le programme d'assurance-médicaments en son nom. Ce n'est pas une mauvaise chose en soi. Toutefois, il y a déjà une étude en cours au comité sur la santé exactement sur le même sujet; 89 personnes ont témoigné au cours de 20 réunions. L'étude n'est pas terminée. Elle se poursuit.

Les néo-démocrates n'ont-ils donc aucun respect pour le processus parlementaire? Après tout, c'est surtout eux qui avaient été dérangés par le projet de loi. Est-ce que, au fond, ils se fichent que l'étude explore vraiment la question parce qu'ils veulent simplement s'attribuer le mérite des résultats?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 349 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on October 05, 2017

2017-09-29 11:13 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Deaths and funerals, Parliamentarians, Statements by Members

Décès et funérailles, Déclarations de députés, Parlementaires

Madam Speaker, it is with a heavy heart that I rise to pay tribute to my friend Arnold Chan. While I did not know him long enough to sign his passport application, he had a profound impact on my life and on my understanding of this job.

A year and a half ago, he asked me to join him for a walk in the frigid weather. He needed to talk to me in private. He told me that his cancer had returned. He had just told his sons, saying, ""They know what this means."" His eyes were open.

Arnold always made sure that everyone else was okay before himself, that his responsibilities would never be shirked, that nothing and nobody would be forgotten.

He asked me that night to take on his duties of deputy House leader during his treatment, and after a year of believing I was doing him a favour, I learned that it really was the other way around. He had, as he had for so many others, mentored me.

I wish I could thank Arnold for his friendship, his confidence, his mentorship, and his contribution to making this a better place for me and me a better person.

I would like to thank Jean and the boys for sharing this amazing person with us.

Madame la Présidente, c'est le coeur lourd que je prends la parole pour rendre hommage à mon ami Arnold Chan. Même si je ne le connaissais pas depuis assez longtemps pour servir de répondant pour sa demande de passeport, il a eu une incidence profonde sur ma vie et sur la façon dont je conçois notre travail.

Il y a un an et demi, il m'a demandé de sortir marcher avec lui dans le froid. Il voulait me parler en privé. Il m'a annoncé que son cancer était réapparu. Il venait tout juste de l'annoncer à ses fils et il m'a dit: « Ils savent ce que cela signifie. » Il avait les yeux bien ouverts.

Arnold plaçait toujours le bien-être de tout le monde avant le sien. Il ne se défilait jamais devant ses responsabilités. Il veillait toujours à ce que rien ni personne ne soit oublié.

Cette soirée-là, il m'a demandé d'assumer ses tâches à titre de leader adjoint à la Chambre pendant son traitement. Après avoir pensé pendant un an que je lui rendais service, j'ai compris que c'était plutôt l'inverse. Il m'a servi, comme pour beaucoup d'autres, de mentor.

Je voudrais pouvoir remercier Arnold de son amitié, de la confiance qu'il m'a témoignée, de son encadrement et de sa contribution à faire de la Chambre un meilleur endroit pour moi et à faire de moi une meilleure personne.

Je remercie Jean et les garçons d'avoir partagé cette personne exceptionnelle avec nous.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 479 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on September 29, 2017

2017-09-18 17:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Madam Speaker, I want to revisit an issue I brought up with the member's colleagues. Privacy concerns have come up quite a bit. I share these concerns generally, but I do not see them arising in the bill. I see the bill as about sharing information that already exists and, principally, getting information into the country that other countries have, which I think would be useful for our purposes.

My concern struck home a few days ago with an Amber Alert in my riding. I want to ensure that had that person gone south instead of north, we would have had the opportunity to catch him. I wonder if the member would comment on that.

Madame la Présidente, j’aimerais revenir sur le sujet que j’ai porté à l’attention des collègues du député. De nombreuses préoccupations ont été exprimées en matière de protection de la vie privée. De façon générale, je les partage, mais je pense qu’elles ne découlent pas de ce projet de loi, qui porte sur le partage d’informations qui existent déjà et sur l’obtention de celles dont d’autres pays disposent et qui nous seraient utiles.

Je pense à l’alerte Amber qui a été donnée il y a quelques jours dans la circonscription que je représente. Je veux m’assurer que si la personne en cause s’était enfuie vers le sud plutôt que vers le nord, nous aurions pu l’attraper. Le député aurait-il un commentaire à ce sujet?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 247 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on September 18, 2017

2017-09-18 16:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Borders, Canada Border Services Agency, Crime and criminality, Government bills, Information collection, Second reading, Security

Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, Crime et criminalité, Deuxième lecture, Frontières, Sécurité

Madam Speaker, I am always happy to ask questions of my colleague, the member for Louis-Saint-Laurent, on any subject.

I find this one very interesting. We spoke not too long ago with many of his colleagues about the issue of Bill C-21 and why it is essential that it be put in place in case situations arise like the Amber Alert that was issued in the Lachute area, for instance. There has been a lot of talk about privacy concerns, but no more data is being given. The bill simply allows us to obtain information already available abroad precisely so that we can better protect our own in cases like the one that happened last week.

Does my colleague agree this bill needs to pass with some urgency so that we can, in emergency cases, prevent someone from crossing the border without anyone knowing?

Madame la Présidente, je suis toujours heureux d'interpeller mon collègue le député de Louis-Saint-Laurent sur n'importe quel sujet.

Celui-ci, je le trouve très intéressant. Nous avons parlé tout à l'heure, avec plusieurs de ses collègues, de l'enjeu du projet de loi C-21 et de l'importance de le mettre en place pour des cas comme celui de l'alerte Amber qu'il y a eue dans la région de Lachute. Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler d'inquiétudes quant à la vie privée des gens, mais cela n'a créé aucune nouvelle donnée. Ce projet de loi nous donne l'occasion d'avoir une copie des données qui existent à l'étranger, ce que je trouve intéressant et important, justement pour protéger notre population dans les circonstances comme celle de la semaine dernière.

Mon collègue est-il d'accord qu'il y a urgence de mettre ce projet de loi en place justement pour empêcher que quelqu'un traverse la frontière lors d'une situation urgente sans qu'on le sache?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 335 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on September 18, 2017

2017-09-18 13:49 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Borders, Canada Border Services Agency, Crime and criminality, Government bills, Information collection, Second reading, Security

Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, Crime et criminalité, Deuxième lecture, Frontières, Sécurité

Mr. Speaker, I want to congratulate the member for Beauport—Côte-de-Beaupré—Île d'Orléans—Charlevoix on her new role as critic for rural affairs. I am happy to see that the Conservatives have a critic for rural affairs. They love to talk up the regions, but the fact is that, when push comes to shove, they always end up taking them for granted. I represent a vast and rural riding for which the Conservatives have never done a single thing, and that is why I would like to congratulate my colleague.

I would like to get back to the bill itself. We talked earlier about its importance in the context of cases like the Amber Alert in the Lachute area last Thursday. We believe it is essential to realize that we would have had no way of knowing if Mr. Fredette had left the country. I think it is crucial that we bring in a bill like this to fix this kind of problem.

Does my colleague have any comments on that point?

Monsieur le Président, je veux féliciter la députée de Beauport—Côte-de-Beaupré—Île d'Orléans—Charlevoix pour son nouveau rôle de porte-parole en matière d'affaires rurales. C'est très bien de voir que les conservateurs ont une porte-parole en matière d'affaires rurales. En effet, les conservateurs ont toujours parlé en bien des régions, mais quand venait le temps de poser des gestes concrets, ils tenaient toujours les régions pour acquises. Ma région est grande et rurale, et les conservateurs n'ont jamais rien fait pour nous. Je félicite donc ma collègue.

Je veux revenir sur le projet de loi en tant que tel. Nous avons parlé tout à l'heure de l'importance de ce projet de loi dans le contexte d'une affaire comme celle de l'alerte Amber dans la région de Lachute, jeudi dernier. Nous trouvons très important de noter que si M. Fredette était sorti du pays, nous ne l'aurions pas su. Je pense que c'est très important d'avoir un projet de loi comme celui-ci qui règle ce genre de problème.

Ma collègue a-t-elle des commentaires à faire là-dessus?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 376 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on September 18, 2017

2017-09-18 13:38 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Borders, Canada Border Services Agency, Crime and criminality, Deaths and funerals, Government bills, Information collection, Parliamentarians, Privacy and data protection, Safety

Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, Crime et criminalité, Décès et funérailles, Deuxième lecture, Frontières, Parlementaires,

Mr. Speaker, I was getting concerned toward the end of the speech that I had not yet heard a Yiddish proverb, so I want to thank the member for filling in that gap before invited him to do so.

I want to thank the member for his very kind comments with regard to our colleague, Arnold Chan. We had an interesting time in that very long procedure and House affairs committee meeting, so I wanted to thank the member for his presence at that 80-hour meeting on March 21.

The member referred a couple of times to exit control systems and I would like to take exception to that one perspective. I do not see it as an exit control system so much as an exit information system. It does not stop people from exiting the country. This is not a country that does that. We do not say people cannot leave, that they need an exit visa to depart. That is why I wanted to change that wording a little bit.

The bill does not create any new data. The data already exists, as the member knows. It improves our usage of the data and our access to that data. While I sympathize with the privacy concerns I am hearing from the other party, I do not agree with them because the bill does not create new data or new floppy disks. It improves our access to information, our public safety, and the situation for Amber Alerts, as we talked about earlier. I think overall it is a good bill. I wonder if the member has any further comments.

Monsieur le Président, vers la fin du discours du député je commençais à m'inquiéter de ne pas encore avoir entendu de proverbe yiddish. Je tiens donc à le remercier d'avoir comblé cette lacune avant que je ne l'invite à le faire.

Je remercie le député de ses commentaires très aimables en ce qui concerne notre regretté collègue, Arnold Chan. Nous avons passé des moments très intéressants durant cette très longue réunion du Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, et c'est pourquoi je le remercie d'avoir été présent à cette séance de 80 heures, qui a commencé le 21 mars dernier.

Le député a mentionné à quelques reprises les systèmes de contrôle des sorties, mais je ne suis pas d'accord avec cette désignation. À mon avis, il ne s'agit pas d'un système de contrôle des sorties, mais d'un système de renseignements sur les sorties. Le système n'empêche pas les gens de sortir du pays. Le Canada n'est pas un pays qui procède ainsi. On ne dit pas que les gens ne peuvent pas quitter le pays ou qu'ils ont besoin d'un visa de sortie pour ce faire. Voilà pourquoi je souhaitais modifier légèrement le terme employé.

Le projet de loi ne produit pas de nouvelles données. Comme le député le sait, les données existent déjà. Le projet de loi améliore notre utilisation des données et notre accès à celles-ci. Bien que je comprenne les préoccupations en matière de protection des renseignements personnels qui ont été soulevées par l'autre parti, je ne les partage pas parce que le projet de loi ne produit ni nouvelles données, ni nouveaux enregistrements de données. Il améliore l'accès à l'information et la sécurité publique et s'avère utile dans le cadre d'alertes Amber comme on l'a mentionné plus tôt. Dans l'ensemble, je pense qu'il s'agit d'un projet de loi valable. Je me demande si le député a d'autres commentaires.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 624 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on September 18, 2017

2017-09-18 13:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Borders, Canada Border Services Agency, Crime and criminality, Government bills, Information collection, Second reading, Security

Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, Crime et criminalité, Deuxième lecture, Frontières, Sécurité

Mr. Speaker, I have heard a number of concerns from members of another party that the bill is all about giving data to the United States, but the bill is really about finding out who is leaving the country not about giving information to other people.

Would the member like to expand on how this legislation would be a good thing for our country?

Monsieur le Président, certains députés d'un autre parti ont dit craindre que le projet de loi vise principalement la communication de données aux États-Unis. Pourtant, le projet de loi vise en fait à déterminer qui quitte le pays, et non à donner de l'information à des tiers.

Le député pourrait-il expliquer davantage comment la mesure législative serait avantageuse pour le pays?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 161 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on September 18, 2017

2017-09-18 13:00 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Borders, Canada Border Services Agency, Crime and criminality, Government bills, Information collection, Second reading, Security

Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, Crime et criminalité, Deuxième lecture, Frontières, Sécurité

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the member for Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner for his remarks and for his support of this bill.

As I mentioned to my colleague earlier, I believe that this bill is important, in light of the Amber Alert that took place just outside of my riding a few days ago. Had that person gone across the border, we would still be looking for that person. I wonder if the member has any comments on how important this information is in that context.

Monsieur le Président, je remercie le député de Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner de ses commentaires et de son appui au projet de loi.

Comme je l'ai mentionné à mon collègue un peu plus tôt, je crois que ce projet de loi est important, particulièrement à la lumière de l'alerte Amber déclenchée tout juste à côté de ma circonscription il y a quelques jours. Si la personne en question avait traversé la frontière, nous serions toujours à sa recherche. Le député peut-il nous donner son opinion au sujet de l'importance de ces renseignements dans un tel contexte?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 215 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on September 18, 2017

2017-09-18 12:34 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Borders, Canada Border Services Agency, Crime and criminality, Government bills, Information collection, Second reading, Security

Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, Crime et criminalité, Deuxième lecture, Frontières, Sécurité

This past weekend, Mr. Speaker, an Amber Alert was issued in the Laurentian region when Louka Fredette and his father went missing.

If they had crossed the American border, we would never have known. If the bill before us was law, however, we would have that information.

Does my colleague believe that to be an important change?

Monsieur le Président, cette fin de semaine, une alerte Amber a été émise dans la région des Laurentides quand Louka Fredette et son père ont disparu.

S'ils avaient traversé la frontière des États-Unis, on n'aurait eu aucune information. Toutefois, on aurait eu cette information si ce projet de loi était en vigueur.

Mon collègue trouve-t-il qu'il s'agit d'un changement important?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 156 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on September 18, 2017

2017-09-18 11:49 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Borders, Canada Border Services Agency, Government bills, Information collection, Privacy and data protection, Second reading,

Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, Deuxième lecture, Frontières

Mr. Speaker, I would like to follow up on what our colleague from Beloeil—Chambly was saying about giving information to the United States. Our bill is very clear: it will make it possible to get information from the United States, but it does not allow sending information to the United States.

I would just like to know if my colleague agrees with that statement.

Monsieur le Président, je vais poursuivre dans la veine des commentaires de notre collègue de Beloeil—Chambly, qui parle de donner des informations aux États-Unis. Notre projet de loi est très clair, il permettra de prendre des informations des États-Unis et non d'envoyer des informations vers les États-Unis.

Je veux juste savoir si mon collègue est d'accord avec cette déclaration.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 158 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on September 18, 2017

2017-09-18 11:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Borders, Canada Border Services Agency, Government bills, Information collection, Second reading

Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, Deuxième lecture, Frontières

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate some of what my colleague has said, but I want to confirm that the Conservative Party is indeed fully supporting this bill. If so, we are very pleased to hear that.

Monsieur le Président, j'apprécie quelques-uns des commentaires de mon collègue, mais je veux m'assurer d'avoir bien compris que le Parti conservateur appuie carrément ce projet de loi. Si c'est le cas, nous sommes très contents d'entendre cela.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 103 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on September 18, 2017

2017-09-18 11:23 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Borders, Canada Border Services Agency, Deaths and funerals, Government bills, Information collection, Parliamentarians, Second reading, Security,

Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, Décès et funérailles, Deuxième lecture, Frontières, Parlementaires, Sécurité,

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the minister for his kind words with respect to the passing of our friend and colleague Arnold Chan, who I very much miss already. However, that is not the topic of today's debate. Could the minister tell us what current systems exist today to find out who is leaving the country? What information do we have today, if anything?

Monsieur le Président, je tiens à remercier le ministre de ses bons mots concernant le décès de notre ami et collègue Arnold Chan, qui me manque déjà beaucoup. Cependant, ce n'est pas là le sujet du débat d'aujourd'hui. Le ministre pourrait-il nous dire quels systèmes actuels nous permettent de savoir qui quitte le pays? Quels renseignements avons-nous aujourd'hui, le cas échéant?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 166 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on September 18, 2017

2017-06-21 17:03 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Borders, Government bills, Mont Tremblant International Airport, Third reading and adoption, United States of America

Frontières, Prédédouanement, Troisième lecture et adoption

Madam Speaker, luckily I am already wearing a tie.

One of the major federal issues in my riding concerns the Mont-Tremblant international airport, in La Macaza. This airport is a port of entry with no customs service on site.

In 2008, a motion to concur in a committee report on the matter was unanimously agreed to by the House; it concerned the airport in the community of La Macaza. The motion, moved by my predecessor, Johanne Deschamps, on June 17, 2008, sought to waive the customs charges at the airport. These charges, which do not apply to the largest international airport, can run over $1,000 per airplane, because officers have to come in from Mirabel for each flight.

Bill C-23 finally provides a solution that will allow more international flights to land in our region, which is supported just as much by tourism as by the forestry industry. By eventually having Canadian preclearance services throughout the United States, we will have the opportunity to have a port of entry that we will really be able to use.

I would like my colleague, the member for Ajax, to give us an idea of the process and the time frames involved in reaching agreements that will allow tourists to visit the Upper Laurentians by having international flights service the Mont-Tremblant international airport in La Macaza directly. This would also be a boon for the Aéro Loisirs flight school and aviation as a whole.

This is also a great help to a region such as ours that relies so heavily on the airline industry, like other similar airports and communities across the country.

Madame la Présidente, heureusement, je porte déjà une cravate.

Un des grands enjeux fédéraux dans ma circonscription concerne l'aéroport international de Mont-Tremblant, situé à La Macaza. Cet aéroport est un point d'entrée qui n'a aucun service de douane sur place.

En 2008, une motion d'adoption d'un rapport de comité sur la question a été acceptée à l'unanimité à la Chambre, et elle concernait l'aéroport situé dans la communauté de La Macaza. Cette motion avait été déposée par mon prédécesseur la députée Johanne Deschamps, le 17 juin 2008, et elle visait à éliminer les frais de douane à l'aéroport. En effet, ces frais peuvent s'élever à plus de 1 000 $ par avion, car les agents doivent venir de Mirabel pour chaque vol, et ils ne sont pas présents dans le plus grand aéroport international.

Le projet de loi C-23 nous offre enfin une solution pour qu'un plus grand nombre de vols internationaux atterrissent dans notre région, qui est soutenue autant par le tourisme que par l'industrie forestière. En ayant un jour ou l'autre des services de dédouanement canadiens partout aux les États-Unis, nous aurons la possibilité d'avoir un point d'entrée que nous pourrons vraiment utiliser.

J'aimerais que mon collègue le député d'Ajax nous donne une idée des processus et des délais nécessaires pour conclure des accords, afin que les avions et, par ricochet, les touristes, viennent directement dans la région des Hautes-Laurentides, à l'aéroport international de Mont-Tremblant, situé à La Macaza. Cela aiderait aussi l'aviation générale et l'école de pilotage Aéro Loisirs.

C'est une aide importante pour une région comme la nôtre qui se fie fortement à l'industrie aérienne, tout comme les autres aéroports et communautés semblables partout au pays.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 567 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 21, 2017

2017-06-20 22:03 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Chief Statistician of Canada, Computer systems, Government bills, Government shared services, Statistics, Statistics Canada, Third reading and adoption

Services gouvernementaux partagés, Statisticien en chef du Canada, Statistique Canada, Statistiques, Systèmes informatiques, Troisième lecture et adoption,

Madam Speaker, I think it defeats the purpose of Shared Services Canada if we start getting all the departments back in their own systems.

We went from 460-odd data centres to seven for a reason. If we start undoing that work, we will not be making progress. It will make things more complicated, take longer to fix, cost more money, and make no meaningful progress. As I said before, if we really want to fix the issues that are being brought up, proper firewalling and proper administration of the systems will address the problems.

Madame la Présidente, je crois que, si on commence redonner leur propre réseau à tous les ministères, Services partagés Canada n'aura plus de raison d'être.

Nous sommes passés d'environ 460 centres de données à sept, et ce n'est pas pour rien. Si nous commençons à défaire ce travail, nous ne progresserons pas. Les problèmes seront plus complexes, ils prendront plus de temps à régler et ils coûteront plus cher, et nous ne réaliserons aucun progrès notable. Comme je l'ai dit auparavant, si nous souhaitons vraiment régler les problèmes qui sont soulevés, il faut un coupe-feu adéquat et une bonne gestion des systèmes.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 237 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 20, 2017

2017-06-20 22:02 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canadian Statistics Advisory Council, Chief Statistician of Canada, Government bills, Political appointments, Statistics, Third reading and adoption,

Nominations politiques, Statisticien en chef du Canada, Statistiques, Troisième lecture et adoption,

Madam Speaker, perhaps if the member does not want to see it as an improvement, he could just follow the trend line to see where it is going.

It does help move things forward. When we make changes and put the same people back and continue with the work, progress is important.

Madame la Présidente, si le député ne veut pas considérer cette mesure comme une amélioration, il n'a qu'à observer la tendance qui se dessine.

Lorsque nous apportons des modifications, remettons en place les mêmes personnes et poursuivons le travail, cela fait avancer les choses. Le progrès est important.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 140 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 20, 2017

2017-06-20 22:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Chief Statistician of Canada, Governance, Government bills, Statistics, Third reading and adoption

Gouvernance, Statisticien en chef du Canada, Statistiques, Troisième lecture et adoption,

Madam Speaker, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is always appropriate at this hour in this place.

The member will know that I recently learned that the reason Douglas Adams picked 42 as the answer to life, the universe, and everything is that 42 is the ASCII code for an asterisk, which is a wild card, which means it can represent anything one wants it to. However, if that is used in statistics, the end result is a whole lot of bad data.

Making sure that we are using good data for everything we do is critically important lest we end up in the improbability drive and have no idea where we land.

Madame la Présidente, le Guide du voyageur galactique est toujours approprié à cette heure de la journée à la Chambre.

Le député saura que, récemment, j'ai appris que la raison pour laquelle Douglas Adams a choisi le numéro 42 comme réponse à la vie, à l'univers et à tout, c'est que dans le code américain normalisé pour l'échange d'information, ou l'ASCII, 42 est le code de l'astérisque, l'inconnu, ce qui veut dire qu'on peut lui assigner n'importe quelle valeur. Cependant, si on l'utilise en statistique, le résultat est une grande quantité de mauvaises données.

Il est essentiel de nous assurer que nous utilisons toujours des données de qualité pour ne pas que nous nous retrouvions dans le générateur d'improbabilité, sans savoir où nous allons aboutir.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 266 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 20, 2017

2017-06-20 21:59 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Chief Statistician of Canada, Computer systems, Government bills, Government shared services, Shared Services Canada, Statistics, Statistics Canada, Third reading and adoption,

Services gouvernementaux partagés, Services partagés Canada, Statisticien en chef du Canada, Statistique Canada, Statistiques, Systèmes informatiques, Troisième lecture et adoption

Madam Speaker, I am not entirely sure how to respond. I do not know the details of how the networks are set up, but a properly run IT system will provide the appropriate firewalls within their systems to prevent data from going where it is not supposed to go. That is the whole purpose of having a high-security system. If security is the issue, then we need to address that issue properly, but Shared Services has an obligation to provide every department with the properly protected systems they need.

Madame la Présidente, je ne sais pas exactement ce que je devrais répondre. Je ne connais pas les réseaux concernés en détail, mais un système informatique bien géré est muni de coupe-feu qui empêchent les données de se retrouver là où elles ne le devraient pas. C'est pour cette raison que les systèmes sont équipés de dispositifs de haute sécurité. S'il y a un problème de sécurité, nous devons le régler, mais Services partagés a l'obligation de fournir aux ministères et aux organismes fédéraux les systèmes adéquatement protégés dont ils ont besoin.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 233 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 20, 2017

2017-06-20 21:58 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Chief Statistician of Canada, Computer systems, Government bills, Government shared services, Shared Services Canada, Statistics, Statistics Canada, Third reading and adoption,

Services gouvernementaux partagés, Services partagés Canada, Statisticien en chef du Canada, Statistique Canada, Statistiques, Systèmes informatiques, Troisième lecture et adoption

Madam Speaker, Shared Services Canada, as the member knows, is of particular interest to me, as I served briefly with him on the government operations and estimates committee. The idea of consolidating our databases and systems and so forth was, in principle, a good one. I do not think it was particularly well implemented by the previous government, and it had quite a few problems, as we have seen, going forward.

Personally, I think it should be using a whole lot more open source offers. That is my personal opinion. I think this issue needs to be addressed.

While Shared Services Canada got off to a bad start, it will improve with time. It has no choice but to improve with time to properly address the issues of Statistics Canada and every other department that depends on it. There is always room for improvement. As the Prime Minister always says, better is always possible.

Madame la Présidente, le député sait que j'ai un intérêt particulier pour Services partagés Canada puisque j'ai siégé brièvement avec lui au comité des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires. L'idée de regrouper nos bases de données et nos systèmes et ainsi de suite était, en principe, une bonne idée. Je ne pense pas qu'elle a été mise en application particulièrement bien par le précédent gouvernement et il a eu pas mal de problèmes, comme nous l'avons vu.

Personnellement, je pense qu'il faudrait recourir beaucoup plus souvent à des appels d'offres ouverts. C'est mon avis personnel. Je pense qu'il faut remédier à ce problème.

Bien que Services partagés Canada ait connu un mauvais départ, il s'améliorera avec le temps. Il n'a d'autre choix que de s'améliorer avec le temps pour régler convenablement les problèmes de Statistique Canada et de tous les autres ministère qui comptent sur ses services. Il y a toujours de la place pour l'amélioration. Comme le premier ministre dit toujours, il est toujours possible de faire mieux.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 374 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 20, 2017

2017-06-20 21:56 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canadian Statistics Advisory Council, Chief Statistician of Canada, Government bills, Political appointments, Statistics, Third reading and adoption,

Nominations politiques, Statisticien en chef du Canada, Statistiques, Troisième lecture et adoption,

Madam Speaker, I do not see a problem. When a system is modernized or upgraded and there is continuity of people, it seems perfectly reasonable to continue using them. If the processes need to be modernized, which was a good part of the speeches, how do we make sure the whole system is flexible enough to keep up with the times? It seems perfectly appropriate. I do not see the issue that the member is bringing forward.

Madame la Présidente, je ne vois pas ce qui pose problème. Quand on modernise ou améliore un système et qu'on peut assurer la continuité sur le plan de l'équipe, il me semble parfaitement raisonnable de continuer à faire appel à ces personnes. Si le processus doit être modernisé, ce sur quoi a porté une bonne partie des discours, comment s'assurer que, globalement, le système est assez souple pour évoluer selon les besoins? Cela me semble parfaitement judicieux. Le problème dont parle le député, je ne le vois pas.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 203 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 20, 2017

2017-06-20 21:40 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Censuses, Chief Statistician of Canada, Companies, Data sharing, Government bills, Government policy, Income and wages, Information collection, Interdepartmental relations, Labour Force Survey,

Application de la loi, Compagnies, Enquête sur la population active, Enquêtes statistiques, Partage des données, Pénalités, Politique gouvernementale, Questionnaire long du recensement,

Madam Speaker, it would be good to have a bit more French in the House. Therefore I will be giving my speech on Bill C-36, an act to amend the Statistics Act, in French.

The main purpose of this bill is to strengthen the independence of Statistics Canada. At the same time, it proposes to modernize certain key provisions of the Statistics Act, in accordance with the expectations of Canadians. One of these provisions is the part of the act that deals with imprisonment.

The government recognizes the importance of high-quality statistical data and the need to ensure that appropriate measures are taken to encourage Canadians to provide information to Statistics Canada. However, the government also recognizes that Canadians should not be threatened with jail time if they fail to complete a mandatory survey, including the census.

We are not alone in thinking that this is excessive in the current context. Generally, Canadians agree that prison time for refusing to complete a mandatory survey or grant access to information is a penalty disproportionate to the offence. This is excessively heavy handed and inappropriate. That is why Bill C-36 would abolish imprisonment as a penalty for those who refuse or fail to provide the information requested as part of a mandatory survey.

The bill also abolishes imprisonment as a penalty for those who wilfully obstruct the collection of this information. In other words, once this legislation is passed, no Canadian citizen will be threatened with jail under the Statistics Act for failing to complete a mandatory survey. As a general rule, people complete the census questionnaire and all other mandatory survey questionnaires well before legal action is taken.

Statistics Canada has a thorough process that it follows before sending cases to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada. First, Statistics Canada sends a letter to the individual and has someone visit their home. Statistics Canada does everything in its power to remind people of their civic duty before referring their case to the justice system.

Typically, with each census, approximately 50 cases are referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada and the Department of Justice. Of those cases that proceed to court, the majority are resolved with the person agreeing to complete their census form when ordered by the judge. Among those cases that go to trial and where the accused is found guilty, the vast majority result in a fine.

Only once has a person ever been sentenced to jail; this occurred in 2013, after one individual refused to complete the 2011 census of population and refused other offered penalties such as community service.

The only household survey that Statistics Canada conducts on a mandatory basis is the monthly labour force survey. Statistics Canada has never referred a case to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada for this survey.

All of Statistics Canada's core business surveys are conducted on a mandatory basis. Since the 1970s, Statistics Canada has not referred a single case to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada for a business that has refused to comply with the act. The only time a census of agriculture case was referred to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada was in conjunction with failure to comply on the census of population.

Since 2010, a number of bills have been introduced in Parliament to remove imprisonment for such offences. Some may argue that removing the threat of imprisonment would increase the risk that more Canadians would choose not to respond to an information request from Statistics Canada, thereby affecting the quality of the data. However, it is important to note that the current fines will remain. The fines are fully consistent with the provisions of the Act. Also, Canadians are aware of the importance of the data produced by Statistics Canada.

We are of the view that the threat of imprisonment is not required to convince Canadians of the importance of providing information for mandatory surveys. Canadians also know and understand that Statistics Canada is a highly regarded institution, one of the best in the world, and that it values and protects the confidentiality of all data collected. With the changes we are proposing to the legislation to strengthen the agency’s independence, Canadians can be further reassured that their data will continue to be treated with the highest levels of professionalism, integrity, and confidentiality.

That brings me to another point. In the past, some people have said that, since we rarely use the provisions regarding imprisonment, it does not matter if they are removed from the act or not. We disagree. It is important that the penalties set out in the Statistics Act are in keeping with the collective vision of Canadians. Prison sentences should be reserved for more serious crimes. I think the House will agree with me on that. Let us be responsible, fair, and reasonable and eliminate that threat. That is what Bill C-36 seeks to do.

I would also like to talk a little about the rest of the bill. In 2010, the government's decision to replace the mandatory long form census with the voluntary national household survey gave rise to public criticism. Concerns were raised about the quality of the national household survey data and about Statistics Canada's independence.

In reaction to this decision, a number of private members' bills were introduced in the House that would require the collection of information by means of a mandatory long form census questionnaire that was equal in length and scope to the 1971 census.

We seriously considered that option. Instead of focusing only on protecting the census, we chose to amend the Statistics Act in order to give Statistics Canada more independence over its statistical activities. To that end, we gave the chief statistician decision-making power over statistical operations and methods. The bill also seeks to add provisions on transparency to ensure greater accountability on decisions.

This approach aligns with the United Nations’ Fundamental Principles of Official Statistics and the recommendation of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development on best practices. Some might still be wondering why we would not enshrine the content of the census in law to prevent future governments from replacing the mandatory long form census with a voluntary questionnaire, as was the case during the 2011 campaign. The answer is simple: no legal provision can prevent a government from changing the content of the census.

Governments have the power to make and change laws, but more importantly, we must remember that official statistics are a public good and that Statistics Canada is a publicly funded institution. It is ultimately the government's responsibility to determine the scope of the statistical system, specifically, the country's data priorities, or in other words, the data that is collected. This responsibility ensures that the statistical information collected is sensitive to the burdens placed on citizens as respondents, that it is sensitive to the costs they bear as taxpayers, and that the information that is produced is responsive to their needs as data users.

Stastitical data must also be responsive to the government's need to make evidence-based decisions about the programs and services that affect the daily lives of Canadians, such as affordable housing, public transportation, and skills training for employment. Rather than entrench the content of the long form census questionnaire in the Statistics Act, Bill C-36 addresses the fundamental issues of Statistics Canada's independence. Let me explain why.

First, the previous government's decision about the 2011 census was not about the questions to be asked, but rather about removing the mandatory requirement to respond. The voluntary national household survey, as it was called, asked the same questions that would have been asked in the planned mandatory long form questionnaire that it replaced.

Consistent with our government's commitment to evidence-based decision-making, one of our first acts as a government was to reinstate the mandatory long form census in time for the 2016 census of population to ensure that the census produces high-quality data. We also committed to strengthening Statistics Canada's independence and ensuring that the methods of operations are based on professional principles. Bill C-36 meets this commitment.

Second, entrenching the content of the census in law could reduce the government's flexibility to ensure that the data collected continuously meets the needs of an ever-evolving Canadian society and economy. We just have to look at the history of census content.

It has changed numerous times to reflect emerging issues, evolving data needs, and the development of alternative ways of collecting the information.

The first national census of Canada was taken in 1871 and contained 211 questions, including those regarding age, sex, religion, education, race, occupation, and ancestral origins.

Subject matter and questions have been added and dropped ever since. In 1931, questions on unemployment were added. In 1941, questions on fertility and housing were introduced. In 1986, questions were introduced on functional limitations. In 1991, questions about common-law relationships were introduced, and questions on same-sex couples were added in 2006. In 1996, questions on unpaid work were introduced. These were removed in 2011.

These examples signal the need for flexibility and prioritization in determining the content of a census. Entrenching census content in legislation would limit this flexibility. Amending the act every time the census needs to change would be highly impractical.

Our current approach to determining census content works. It is based on extensive user consultations and the testing of potential questions to reflect the changing needs of society and to ensure the census is the appropriate vehicle to respond to them.

Then Statistics Canada makes a recommendation to the government on the content that should be included in the upcoming census. General questions are then prescribed by order by the Governor in Council and published in the Canada Gazette for transparency purposes.

Lastly, defining the long form census content in law could potentially reduce the incentives to find alternative means to gathering census information at a lower cost and with less respondent burden.

Statistical agencies must also think about the burden that they impose on citizens and businesses to provide information, and they must do so within the fiscal resources allocated by the government.

The data world is evolving rapidly. We read and hear the words “big data”, “open data”, and “administrative data” every day.

More and more statistical offices around the world are integrating these alternative and complementary sources of information into their statistical programs.

They offer the potential to collect and publish high quality statistical information more frequently, at lower cost, and at lower response burden.

For example, for the 2016 census, Statistics Canada obtained detailed income information for all census respondents from administrative records provided by the Canada Revenue Agency. This approach will ensure that higher quality income data will be produced at a lower cost and with reduced burden on Canadians.

Entrenching the scope and content of the census in the Statistics Act may not serve Canadians well moving forward. It would tie us to one way of doing business that may not be the way of the future.

The act should remain flexible to meet the evolving data needs of Canadians and their governments. It should retain the flexibility to encourage innovation so as to take advantage of the evolving means of collecting statistical information.

Some have suggested that the census content should be the same as it was over 40 years ago and that the sample size for the long form should be entrenched in law.

The rapidly evolving world of data suggests that we should retain the flexibility to build the foundation of a statistical system of the future rather than restricting ourselves to continue to do what has been done in the past.

We think our approach to Bill C-36 strikes the right balance and will stand the test of time.

Madame la Présidente, ce serait bon qu'il y ait un peu plus de français à la Chambre. C'est donc en français que je ferai mon discours sur le projet de loi C-36, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la statistique.

L'objectif principal de ce projet de loi consiste à renforcer l'indépendance de Statistique Canada. Parallèlement, il propose de moderniser certains éléments clés de la Loi sur la statistique, conformément aux attentes de la population canadienne. L'un de ces éléments est la partie de la Loi qui traite des peines d'emprisonnement.

Le gouvernement reconnaît l'importance des données statistiques de grande qualité et la nécessité de veiller à ce que des mesures adéquates soient mises en place pour encourager les Canadiens à fournir des renseignements à Statistique Canada. Cependant, le gouvernement reconnaît également que les Canadiens ne devraient pas être menacés d'emprisonnement s'ils omettent de répondre à une enquête obligatoire, y compris le recensement.

Nous ne sommes pas les seuls à penser que le contexte actuel rend cette mesure excessive. En général, les Canadiens s'entendent pour dire que l'emprisonnement pour refus de répondre à une enquête obligatoire ou d'accorder l'accès à des renseignements est une peine disproportionnée par rapport à l'infraction. Cette façon de faire est indûment coercitive et inappropriée. C'est pourquoi le projet de loi C-36 abolirait la peine d'emprisonnement imposée à ceux qui refusent ou négligent de fournir les renseignements demandés dans le cadre d'une enquête obligatoire.

Le projet de loi abolit aussi la peine d'emprisonnement imposée à ceux qui entravent délibérément la collecte de ces renseignements. En d'autres mots, une fois que ce projet de loi aura été adopté, aucun citoyen canadien ne sera menacé d'emprisonnement en vertu de la Loi sur la statistique pour avoir omis de répondre à une enquête obligatoire. En règle générale, les gens remplissent le questionnaire du recensement et tous les autres questionnaires d'enquête obligatoires bien avant qu'un recours juridique soit intenté.

Statistique Canada dispose d'un processus rigoureux qu'il respecte avant de renvoyer des cas au Service des poursuites pénales du Canada. Avant toute chose, Statistique Canada enverra une lettre à la personne et enverra quelqu'un chez elle. Statistique Canada fera tout ce qui est en son pouvoir pour rappeler aux gens leur devoir civique avant de renvoyer leur cas au système de justice.

En règle générale, pour chaque recensement, environ 50 cas sont renvoyés au Service des poursuites pénales du Canada et au ministère de la Justice. La majorité des causes portées devant les tribunaux se règlent lorsque le juge ordonne à l'accusé de remplir le questionnaire du recensement. La grande majorité des causes ayant fait l'objet d'un procès et où l'accusé a été reconnu coupable ont donné lieu à une amende.

Il n'y a eu qu'un seul cas où l'accusé a été condamné à la prison. Cela est arrivé en 2013, après que l'accusé ait refusé de remplir le questionnaire du recensement de la population de 2011 et qu'il ait refusé les autres peines proposées, comme le travail communautaire.

La seule enquête que Statistique Canada mène obligatoirement auprès des ménages est l'Enquête sur la population active mensuelle. Statistique Canada n'a jamais renvoyé de cas au Service des poursuites pénales du Canada relativement à cette enquête.

Toutes les enquêtes de base de Statistique Canada menées auprès des entreprises sont obligatoires. Depuis les années 1970, Statistique Canada n'a pas renvoyé un seul cas au Service des poursuites pénales du Canada où une entreprise aurait refusé de se conformer à la loi. La seule fois où un cas relatif au Recensement de l'agriculture a été renvoyé au Service des poursuites pénales du Canada, c'était en raison d'un refus de se conformer aux exigences du recensement de la population.

Depuis 2010, un certain nombre de projets de loi ont été déposés au Parlement pour abolir la peine d'emprisonnement liée à de telles infractions. Certains pourraient prétendre qu'abolir la menace d'emprisonnement pourrait accroître le risque qu'un plus grand nombre de Canadiens choisissent de ne pas répondre à une demande d'information de Statistique Canada, affectant ainsi la qualité des données recueillies. Cependant, il est important de mentionner que les amendes actuelles seront maintenues. Les amendes sont entièrement conformes aux dispositions de la loi. En outre, les Canadiens sont conscients de l'importance des données produites par Statistique Canada.

Nous sommes d'avis qu'il n'est pas nécessaire de menacer les Canadiens d'emprisonnement pour les convaincre de l'importance de fournir des renseignements lors d'enquêtes obligatoires. Les Canadiens savent et comprennent que Statistique Canada est une institution très respectée, l'une des meilleures au monde, qui valorise et protège la confidentialité de toutes les données recueillies. Avec les changements que nous proposons d'apporter à la loi pour renforcer l'indépendance de l'organisme, les Canadiens peuvent être certains que leurs données continueront d'être traitées avec le plus haut niveau de professionnalisme, d'intégrité et de confidentialité.

J'aimerais aborder un autre point. Par le passé, certains ont semblé dire que, puisqu'on avait eu rarement eu recours aux dispositions relatives à l'emprisonnement, il n'était pas important de les supprimer de la Loi. Nous ne sommes pas d'accord. Il est important que les peines prévues dans la Loi sur la statistique soient conformes à la vision collective des Canadiens. Les peines d'emprisonnement devraient être réservées à des crimes plus grave que cela. Je suis convaincu que la Chambre sera d'accord avec moi sur ce point. Soyons responsables, justes et raisonnables et abolissons cette menace. C'est ce que propose le projet de loi C-36.

J'aimerais aussi parler un peu plus du reste du projet de loi. En 2010, la décision du gouvernement de remplacer le questionnaire détaillé obligatoire du recensement par l'Enquête nationale auprès des ménages, qui était volontaire, a donné lieu à des critiques publiques. Des préoccupations ont été soulevées quant à la qualité des données de l'Enquête nationale auprès des ménages et à l'indépendance de Statistique Canada.

En réaction à cette décision, un certain nombre de projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire ont été présentés à la Chambre. Ils demandaient que la collecte de renseignements à partir d'un questionnaire détaillé de recensement soit obligatoire et que sa longueur et sa portée soient comme celles du questionnaire utilisé pour le recensement de 1971.

Nous avons sérieusement envisagé cette option. Au lieu de nous concentrer seulement sur la protection du recensement, nous avons choisi de modifier la Loi sur la statistique afin d'accorder à Statistique Canada une plus grande indépendance pour l'ensemble de ses activités statistiques. Pour ce faire, nous avons attribué au statisticien en chef le pouvoir décisionnel en ce qui a trait aux opérations et aux méthodes statistiques. Le projet de loi prévoit aussi l'ajout de dispositions sur la transparence pour assurer une plus grande responsabilisation liée aux décisions.

Cette approche s'harmonise aux Principes fondamentaux de la statistique officielle des Nations unies et à la recommandation de l'Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques sur les pratiques exemplaires. Certains peuvent encore se demander pourquoi on n'enchâsserait pas le contenu du recensement dans la législation pour ainsi empêcher les prochains gouvernements de remplacer le questionnaire détaillé obligatoire du recensement par une enquête à participation volontaire, comme ce fut le cas lors de la campagne de 2011. La réponse est simple: aucune disposition légale ne peut empêcher un gouvernement de modifier le contenu du recensement.

Les gouvernements ont le pouvoir de créer et de modifier les lois. Plus important encore, il ne faut pas oublier que les données statistiques officielles constituent un bien public et que Statistique Canada est un organisme financé par l'État. Au bout du de compte, il incombe au gouvernement de déterminer la portée du système statistique, plus précisément, les priorités en matière de données du Canada, c'est-à-dire, les données qui seront recueillies. Cela permet d'assurer que les renseignements statistiques recueillis tiennent compte du fardeau imposé aux citoyens en tant que répondants, que les renseignements statistiques recueillis rendent compte des coûts qui incombent aux citoyens en tant que contribuables et que l'information produite répond à leurs besoins en tant qu'utilisateurs de ces données.

Les données statistiques doivent aussi tenir compte de la nécessité que le gouvernement prenne des décisions fondées sur des données probantes au sujet des programmes et des services qui ont une incidence sur le quotidien des Canadiens, comme le logement abordable, le transport collectif et la formation axée sur les compétences pour l'emploi. Plutôt que d'enchâsser le contenu du questionnaire détaillé obligatoire du recensement dans la Loi sur la statistique, le projet de loi C-36 aborde l'enjeu fondamental de l'indépendance de Statistique Canada. Voici pourquoi.

Premièrement, la décision du précédent gouvernement concernant le recensement de 2011 ne portait pas sur les questions à poser mais sur le besoin de supprimer l'obligation de répondre au questionnaire. On retrouve dans l'Enquête nationale auprès des ménages à participation volontaire les mêmes questions que celles qui auraient figuré dans le questionnaire détaillé obligatoire qu'elle remplace.

Conformément à l'engagement de notre gouvernement à prendre des décisions fondées sur des données probantes, l'une des premières mesures prises par notre gouvernement a été de rétablir le questionnaire détaillé obligatoire du recensement à temps pour le recensement de la population de 2016 et de s'assurer de la grande qualité des données recueillies par le questionnaire. Nous nous sommes aussi engagés à renforcer l'indépendance de Statistique Canada et les méthodes statistiques reposant sur des principes professionnels. Le projet de loi C-36 respecte cet engagement.

Deuxièmement, enchâsser le contenu du recensement dans la loi réduirait la souplesse dont dispose le gouvernement pour s'assurer que les données recueillies continuent de satisfaire aux besoins en constate évolution de l'économie et de la société canadienne. Pour mieux comprendre, il suffit de se pencher sur l'historique du contenu du recensement.

Le contenu a été changé à de nombreuses reprises pour mieux refléter les questions émergentes, les besoins grandissants en données et l'élaboration de nouvelles façons de recueillir des renseignements.

Le premier recensement national du Canada a été réalisé en 1871, et il contenait 211 questions, entre autres, sur l'âge, le sexe, la religion, l'éducation, la race, l'occupation et les origines ancestrales.

Depuis lors, des sujets et des questions ont été ajoutés et d'autres supprimés. En 1931, on a ajouté des questions sur le chômage. En 1941, on a ajouté des questions sur la fertilité et l'hébergement. En 1986, on a ajouté des questions sur les limitations fonctionnelles. En 1991, on a ajouté des questions sur les unions de fait, et des questions sur les couples homosexuels ont été ajoutés en 2006. En 1996, on a ajouté des questions sur le travail non rémunéré. Ces questions ont été supprimées en 2011.

Ces exemples illustrent le besoin de souplesse et d'établissement de priorités pour déterminer le contenu du recensement. Le fait d'enchâsser le contenu du recensement dans une mesure législative limiterait cette souplesse. En effet, ce ne serait pas pratique de modifier la loi chaque fois que le recensement doit changer.

L'approche actuelle que nous utilisons pour déterminer le contenu du recensement fonctionne. Cette approche se fonde sur des consultations approfondies menées auprès des utilisateurs et sur la mise à l'essai de questions potentielles pour rendre compte des besoins changeants de la société et s'assurer que le recensement est le véhicule approprié pour répondre à ces besoins.

Par la suite, Statistique Canada fait une recommandation au gouvernement sur le contenu qui devrait faire partie du prochain recensement. Les questions du recensement sont ensuite prescrites par décret par le gouverneur en conseil et publiées dans la Gazette du Canada, aux fins de transparence.

Finalement, le fait de définir le contenu du questionnaire détaillé dans la loi pourrait potentiellement réduire la motivation de trouver d'autres façons de recueillir des renseignements à un coût moindre, ce qui permettrait aussi d'alléger le fardeau qui incombe aux répondants.

Les bureaux de statistique doivent également songer au fardeau qu'ils imposent aux citoyens et aux entreprises qui fournissent des renseignements. Ils doivent y songer en tenant compte des ressources financières qui leur sont attribuées par le gouvernement.

Le monde des données évolue rapidement. Les mots mégadonnées, données ouvertes et données administratives font maintenant partie de notre quotidien.

De plus en plus de bureaux de statistique dans le monde intègrent ces sources d'information alternative et complémentaire dans leurs programmes statistiques.

Ils offrent la possibilité de recueillir et de publier plus fréquemment des renseignements statistiques de grande qualité à un coût moindre, tout en allégeant le fardeau imposé aux répondants.

Par exemple, pour le recensement de 2016, Statistique Canada a obtenu des renseignements détaillés sur le revenu de tous les répondants à partir des dossiers administratifs fournis par l'Agence du revenu du Canada. L'approche utilisée permettra de produire à un coût moindre des données de meilleure qualité sur le revenu, tout en allégeant le fardeau qui incombe aux Canadiens.

Enchâsser la portée et le contenu du recensement dans la Loi sur la statistique pourrait, à long terme, ne pas servir les intérêts des Canadiens. Cela nous obligerait à faire les choses d'une certaine façon qui pourrait ne pas être la voie de l'avenir.

La loi devrait demeurer flexible pour s'adapter aux besoins changeants des Canadiens et de leurs gouvernements en matière de données. Elle devrait conserver la flexibilité nécessaire pour encourager l'innovation et ainsi tirer profit des façons évolutives de recueillir les renseignements statistiques.

Certains ont suggéré que le contenu du recensement devrait être le même qu'il y a plus de 40 ans et que la taille de l'échantillonnage devrait figurer dans la loi.

L'évolution rapide du monde des données laisse supposer que nous devrions conserver la souplesse nécessaire pour établir les bases d'un futur système statistique, plutôt que de nous limiter à faire ce qui a déjà été fait dans le passé.

L'approche adoptée pour le projet de loi C-36 permet d'atteindre un juste équilibre et de résister à l'épreuve du temps.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 4226 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 20, 2017

2017-06-20 19:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Companies, Corporate governance, Deferred divisions, Government bills, Report stage, Report stage motions,

Compagnies, Étape du rapport, Votes différés

Resuming debate.

Is the House ready for the question?

Some hon. members: Question.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. David de Burgh Graham): The question is on Motion No. 1. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

Some hon. members: No.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. David de Burgh Graham): All those in favour of the motion will please say yea.

Some hon. members: Yea.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. David de Burgh Graham): All those opposed will please say nay.

Some hon. members: Nay.

The Acting Speaker (Mr. David de Burgh Graham): In my opinion the nays have it.

And five or more members having risen:

The Acting Speaker (Mr. David de Burgh Graham): Pursuant to order made on Tuesday, May 30, 2017, the division stands deferred until Wednesday, June 21, 2017, at the expiry of the time provided for oral questions.

Nous reprenons le débat.

La Chambre est-elle prête à se prononcer?

Des voix: Le vote.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham): Le vote porte sur la motion no 1. Plaît-il à la Chambre d'adopter la motion?

Des voix: D'accord.

Des voix: Non.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham): Que tous ceux qui sont en faveur de la motion veuillent bien dire oui.

Des voix: Oui.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham): Que tous ceux qui s'y opposent veuillent bien dire non.

Des voix: Non.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham): À mon avis, les non l'emportent.

Et cinq députés ou plus s'étant levés:

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham): Conformément à l'ordre adopté le mardi 30 mai 2017, le vote est reporté au mercredi 21 juin 2017, à la fin de la période prévue pour les questions orales.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 307 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 20, 2017

2017-06-20 12:36 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Committee meetings, Filibuster, Parliamentary reform, Process of debate, Standing Orders of the House of Commons

Obstruction systématique, Processus du débat, Réforme parlementaire, Règlement de la Chambre des communes, Réunions des comités

Mr. Speaker, that is an easy one. If the opposition came to the table as honest brokers and came to the government to discuss this, which is what we were looking for, we would have had a much more productive discussion and it would have resulted in a motion. If they did not agree with it, they could have filibustered at that point. However, at least we would have had the discussion.

The best way of going forward is by having everybody come to the table and being honest with their opinions.

Monsieur le Président, la réponse est facile. Si les députés de l’opposition avaient agi en intermédiaires honnêtes et qu'ils s’étaient adressés au gouvernement pour discuter, ce qui était ce que nous voulions, le débat aurait été bien plus productif et il aurait produit une motion. S’ils n’étaient pas d’accord avec celle-ci, ils auraient pu faire obstruction à ce stade. Cependant, nous aurions au moins eu le débat.

La meilleure façon d’avancer, c’est d’avoir tout le monde à la table, honnête dans l’expression de ses opinions.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 217 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 20, 2017

2017-06-20 12:34 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Infrastructure Bank, Financing, Infrastructure, Omnibus bills, Parliamentary reform, Private sector, Standing Orders of the House of Commons

Financement, Infrastructure, Projets de loi omnibus, Réforme parlementaire, Règlement de la Chambre des communes, Secteur privé,

Mr. Speaker, I do not know what pals he is talking about.

Bill C-44 was introduced as part of the budget. We made it very clear in the budget that we were going to create the infrastructure bank. Our plans to do that were clear. The infrastructure bank is a way of investing and creating a good fund that will make it possible to invest in infrastructure across the country.

In my riding of Laurentides—Labelle, there is a significant need for infrastructure. In many cases, the money for infrastructure just is not there. The infrastructure bank will help in such cases, and that is why it is extremely important for the development of infrastructure and of the country.

Monsieur le Président, je ne sais pas de quels petits copains il parle.

Le projet de loi C-44 a été proposé dans le cadre du budget. Il était clair dans le budget que nous allions créer la Banque de l'infrastructure. Nos plans pour le faire sont clairs. Il s'agit d'une manière d'investir et de créer un très bon fonds qui permettra d'investir dans les infrastructures partout au pays.

Dans ma circonscription de Laurentides—Labelle, les besoins en infrastructure sont très importants. Dans plusieurs cas, l'argent fait défaut pour les infrastructures. C'est pour des cas de ce genre que la Banque de l'infrastructure est très importante pour le développement du pays et des infrastructures.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 273 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 20, 2017

2017-06-20 12:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Parliamentary reform, Standing Orders of the House of Commons,

Réforme parlementaire, Règlement de la Chambre des communes,

Mr. Speaker, as I said, we hoped to have a discussion to build on the ideas, to perhaps invite witnesses to discuss how it was done in other countries, and to see what other people did.

What ended up coming out of this was a few things committed to in the platform, rather than the very wide range of things coming out of Standing Order 51 debate. There were things the opposition members themselves wanted to discuss but did not actually want to discuss.

The process did not work as I would have liked. However, this is where we are. We have a motion that will improve the rights of members in the House. It is very worthwhile and very important to proceed with this.

Monsieur le Président, comme je l’ai dit, nous espérions avoir un débat sur les idées pour, peut-être, inviter des témoins à parler de la façon dont on a procédé dans d’autres pays.

Tout cela a abouti à quelques-unes des choses promises dans la plate-forme, plutôt que la vaste gamme de choses découlant du débat sur l'article 51 du Règlement. Il y avait des choses dont les députés de l’opposition voulaient eux-mêmes débattre, mais dont ils n’ont pas débattu, en effet.

Le processus n’a pas fonctionné comme je l’aurais souhaité. Cependant, nous en sommes là. Nous sommes saisis d'une motion qui améliorera les droits des députés à la Chambre. Elle est très valable et il est très important que nous l’adoptions.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 269 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 20, 2017

2017-06-20 12:31 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Parliamentary reform, Standing Orders of the House of Commons,

Réforme parlementaire, Règlement de la Chambre des communes,

Mr. Speaker, they were in our platform and we committed to do them.

I would like to discuss the other items, and we did in fact propose a discussion. The motion was to create a discussion. I was there for it. I co-wrote the motion with the member for Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame. It was very important to have a discussion on how to do these very things, but we never did get to that. We had a filibuster.

Monsieur le Président, ils faisaient partie de notre plate-forme et nous nous sommes engagés à les concrétiser.

J’aimerais parler des autres éléments, et nous avons de fait proposé une discussion. La motion visait à créer une discussion. J’étais là pour ça. J’étais corédacteur de la motion avec le député de Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame. Il était très important d’avoir un débat sur la façon dont ces choses devaient être faites, mais nous n'y sommes jamais parvenus. Il y a eu de l’obstruction.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 187 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 20, 2017

2017-06-20 12:20 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Budget process, Committee meetings, Committee members, Confidence in government, Filibuster, Government accountability, Omnibus bills, Parliamentary reform,

Confiance dans le gouvernement, Imputabilité du gouvernement, Membres des comités, Obstruction systématique, Partage du temps de parole, Processus budgétaire, Processus du débat, Projets de loi omnibus,

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for Scarborough—Agincourt for sharing his time with me. It is emblematic of the duties we have been sharing over the past year as I have been working with him to back him up in his deputy House leadership duties.

While my dream of fixing the clocks in this place to be digital remains unfulfilled, there are a number of more serious Standing Order issues that need to be addressed. While the opposition has often accused Liberal members in this place of wanting to change the Standing Orders to government advantage, I would argue that the opposite is true.

Many of us on this side were here when we were in opposition. A few of us survived the decimation to third party. I started as a staffer, working for Frank Valeriote, the previous member for Guelph, in his constituency office early in the 40th Parliament. I eventually found myself working here for the member for Ottawa South, where I worked when the government was found to be in contempt of Parliament and an election was forced in early 2011. I subsequently worked for both those members as well as the current members for Halifax West, whom I take great pride in calling Mr. Speaker today, and the member for Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, all, for a short period, at the same time.

Working for four excellent members of Parliament, with different personalities and areas of interest, I gained a great breadth of experience and perspective, which has been a key part of learning how to do this job. It also gave me an up-close perspective on the abuses of power, on a daily basis, by the previous government. That is the perspective from which this motion has been written, that of the third party. To make the point, I want to go over Motion No. 18 one piece at a time.

In 2008, most of us will remember that the Liberals, NDP, and Bloc got together in an effort to take down the freshly re-elected Harper government. Whatever one thinks of the details of that agreement, a majority of members intended to vote no confidence in a sitting minority government. To avoid this, Harper visited then governor general Michaëlle Jean and asked her to prorogue Parliament, a request she granted after a couple of hours of deliberation.

Parliament is often prorogued between dissolutions. Of the past seven Parliaments, only one did not have at least one prorogation, that being Paul Martin's minority 38th Parliament. Proroguing itself is definitely legitimate. In the 2008 instance, however, it was used as a tool to avoid a confidence vote. We all know how history played out after that, and it was a tactical success for Prime Minister Harper.

The first clause of Motion No. 18 would not prevent a prime minister from proroguing, but it would require the executive to explain why they felt it was necessary and would mandate the procedure and House affairs committee to revisit the matter. It would not prevent abuse, but it would raise the bar on prorogation.

It is a bit of a marvel to me that, in my experience, no one has tried to do a massive private member's bill that rethinks the role of government from one end to the other. It would be a pretty interesting two-hour debate and is only currently prevented by convention, not rule.

In the last Parliament, the government had some impressively scattered omnibus bills. The standard here is not about how many laws a bill amends but rather if those various and sundry changes all serve the overall purpose of the bill. For example, Bill C-49, which passed at second reading here only yesterday, was cited by many in the opposition as an omnibus bill because it intends to modify 13 existing acts. However, this is spurious, because all the changes legitimately and clearly fall under the concept of the name of the act, the transportation modernization act, and some of those 13 existing-act changes are both relevant and miniscule.

For example, clause 91 of Bill C-49 is the section that would amend the Budget Implementation Act, 2009. This change reads, in whole, “Parts 14 and 15 of the Budget Implementation Act, 2009 are repealed.” A quick investigation will reveal that Part 14 is amendments to the Canada Transportation Act and Part 15 is amendments to the Air Canada Public Participation Act, both well within the purview of the Minister of Transport to modernize within his mandate. Both sets of amendments from that Budget Implementation Act, 2009, which was called Bill C-10 in the second session of the 40th Parliament, came with a coming into force clause that read, in part, “come into force on a day to be fixed by order of the Governor in Council made on the recommendation of the Minister”. The most remarkable part of this eight-year-old piece of legislation is that the Governor in Council never brought these changes into force.

Getting rid of obsolete, never implemented bits of transportation law is clearly within the frame of transportation modernization.

In 2012, the Conservative government brought in a wide-ranging budget bill that implemented much of what it called Canada's economic action plan, but it also went after environmental legislation that had nothing to do with the budget. Among other things, it stripped legal protection for Canada's millions of lakes and waterways. This was slowed down, but not stopped, by more than 1,000 amendments to the bill at the finance committee, resulting in an around-the-clock filibuster-by-vote at clause-by-clause study. I was there as staff for the final shift of that marathon vote.

The second section of Motion No. 18 would attempt to address these problems. Any bill presented in the House that did not focus on a single theme or overarching purpose could be split by the Speaker. While there would be an exception for budgets, the phrasing of that section, which would be standing order 69.1(2), would only seek to clarify that the objectives outlined in the budget would in their own right define the purpose. Attempting to change environmental law in a budget implementation act, without having defined it in the budget itself, for example, would permit a point of order to be raised and accepted by the Speaker to carve that section out of the BIA. This change is important and is something we committed to doing.

The third change is a little more arcane.

I was a staff member on the public accounts committee for a short period in the 41st Parliament and was a member of government operation and estimates early on in the 42nd Parliament for about the same length of time. I do not pretend to have any great understanding of the minutiae of the estimates process and defer to those who do. That is a big part of the point here. I welcome anything that can help bring clarity to the estimates process.

The fourth change in the Standing Orders in this motion is a particularly interesting one, covering sections 4 to 6 of Motion No. 18.

In the last Parliament, I believe most of us who were around had the same experience. Committees were run by parliamentary secretaries. They sat next to the chair, moved motions, voted, and otherwise controlled the committees. This utterly and totally defeats the point of parliamentary committees. The parliamentary secretary is, by definition, the representative of the minister. In this capacity, parliamentary secretaries serve a critical role in liaising between the committee and the department the committee oversees.

Being able to answer questions about intent and plans from the committee on a timely basis or bringing concerns or issues for study that ministers would like feedback on in the course of their duties are completely appropriate. However, when parliamentary secretaries run the committees, these oversight bodies cease to oversee much of anything and simply become extensions of the executive branch of government. If that is what we are to have, the committees serve little purpose. Including parliamentary secretaries on committees as liaisons with their departments instead of as the planners and executors of the work of those committees is the right balance.

This is really important. During the Reform Act debate in the last Parliament, the member for Wellington—Halton Hills, for whom I have great respect and have for many years, commented to me that as a backbencher, he was not government. “Like you,” he said to me, “my role is to keep the government to account. The difference is”, he concluded, “I have confidence in the government.”

This critical bit of political philosophy has stuck with me since that day. Our role as backbenchers is indeed to keep government to account whether we are on the government or opposition benches. One of the most critical tools to achieve that is committees, and when this government talks about restoring independence to committees, it is not a meaningless catchphrase or sound bite; it is legitimate. I have seen the transition on committee function from last Parliament to this Parliament and it is truly something. Keeping parliamentary secretaries in a participatory, but not controlling, role on committees is a critical element of this.

The last change, section 7 of the motion, is particularly interesting. The one place where the opposition has immense power, even in a majority government, is in the power of the filibuster at committee. An opposition member determined to prevent a vote from taking place or a report from being written at a committee has the absolute power to do so, as long as he or she is willing to talk out the clock and stay reasonably on point. Our colleague from Hamilton Centre is an expert at this task, often joking that after half an hour of talking he has not yet finished clearing his throat.

When we had the debate on reforming the Standing Orders that went sideways at PROC a few weeks ago, we were accused of trying to kill the filibuster. This could not be further from the truth.

In that debate, we sought to have a conversation about how to change the Standing Orders. The government House Leader had written a letter with her ideas of what changes she hoped we would discuss on top of the numerous ideas already before us on account of the Standing Order 51 debate from last fall. However, but if we refer back to the previous elements of this speech, where we landed was up to us as a committee. An idea floated was that members at committee be limited to an unlimited number of 10-minute speaking slots rather than a single slot with no end.

The way I understand this would work in practice is that any member can speak for as long as he or she wishes at committee, but when another member signals his or her interest in speaking, the member would have 10 minutes to cede the floor before the other member would take over, before giving it back again if the first member so chose. The effect of this would be to ensure that every member on a committee would have an opportunity to speak in any debate, but would not limit anyone from tying up committee and would not kill the filibuster either in the instance or in principle. It certainly would make it easier to negotiate our way out of one by giving others a chance to get a word in edgewise.

However, the change proposed here is not about that. It is about getting rid of one of the most absurd abuses of committee procedure we saw in previous parliaments: that a member of the committee majority would take the floor, even on a point of order, and say to the chair something like, “I move that we call the question.” The chair would correctly say that it was out of order and reject the request for the vote. The member would then move to challenge the chair, the majority would vote that the chair was wrong and the question could be called, and the motion to debate, study, report draft, or whatever was happening, would come to an abrupt, unceremonious, and totally acrimonious end. That was the only effective, if not exactly legitimate, way of ending a filibuster.

In Motion No. 18, we are defending the right to filibuster.

As I said, Motion No. 18 is about defending the rights of the opposition, informed by our experience in the third party. Not one line of this motion benefits a majority government. All, however, benefit the improved functioning of this place. I look forward to its passage.

Monsieur le Président, je tiens à remercier le député de Scarborough—Agincourt d’avoir partagé son temps de parole avec moi. C’est représentatif des fonctions que nous avons partagées au cours de l’année écoulée tandis que je l'assistais dans ses fonctions de leader parlementaire adjoint.

Malgré le fait que mon rêve de voir remplacer les horloges ici par des montres numériques ne se soit pas concrétisé, il y a un certain nombre de questions plus graves se rapportant au Règlement qui doivent être réglées. Bien que l’opposition accuse souvent les députés libéraux de vouloir changer le Règlement pour avantager le gouvernement, j’affirme que c’est tout à fait le contraire.

Beaucoup d’entre nous, de ce côté-ci de la Chambre, étaient ici quand le Parti libéral faisait partie de l’opposition. Quelques-uns ont survécu à l'époque où le Parti libéral a été relégué au rôle de tiers parti. Pour ma part, j'ai commencé mon parcours comme employé au bureau de circonscription de Frank Valeriote, l’ancien député de Guelph, au début de la 40e législature. J’ai fini par travailler ici pour le député d’Ottawa-Sud; c'est à cette époque qu'il a fallu tenir des élections parce que le gouvernement avait été reconnu coupable d’outrage au Parlement, au début de 2011. Par la suite, pendant une courte période, j’ai travaillé à la fois pour ces deux députés et pour les députés actuels d'Halifax-Ouest, que je suis très fier d’appeler monsieur le Président aujourd’hui, et de Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, tous en même temps.

En travaillant avec quatre excellents députés, aux personnalités et centres d’intérêt différents, j’ai acquis une vaste expérience et élargi mes horizons, ce qui est essentiel quand on apprend les rouages de ce travail. Cela m’a aussi permis de voir de près les abus de pouvoir, au quotidien, du gouvernement précédent. C’est de cette perspective, celle du troisième parti, que cette motion a été rédigée. Pour que ce soit bien clair, j’aimerais parcourir la motion no 18 point par point.

La plupart d’entre nous se rappellent que, en 2008, les libéraux, le NPD et le Bloc se sont réunis afin de faire tomber le gouvernement Harper fraîchement réélu. Quoi qu’on pense des détails de cette entente, une majorité de députés comptaient ne pas accorder leur confiance à un gouvernement minoritaire au pouvoir. Pour éviter cela, M. Harper s’est rendu chez la gouverneure générale de l’époque, Michaëlle Jean, pour lui demander de proroger le Parlement, ce qu’elle lui a accordé après quelques heures de réflexion.

Il y a souvent prorogation du Parlement entre des dissolutions. Sur les sept dernières législatures, seule une n’a pas connu au moins une prorogation, et il s’agit de la 38e législature. Paul Martin dirigeait un gouvernement minoritaire. Proroger est en soi tout à fait légitime. Dans le cas de 2008, cependant, on y a recouru pour éviter un vote de défiance. Nous savons tous ce qui est arrivé ensuite; le premier ministre a remporté une victoire tactique.

Le premier point de la motion no 18 n’empêcherait pas un premier ministre de proroger, mais l’exécutif devrait expliquer pourquoi il juge la mesure nécessaire et le comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre devrait revoir la question. Cela n’éviterait pas des abus, mais la barre serait placée plus haut pour qui veut recourir à la prorogation.

Je trouve un peu étonnant, personnellement, que personne n’ait essayé de déposer un projet de loi massif d’initiative parlementaire qui repense le rôle du gouvernement de bout en bout. Nous aurions deux heures de débat très intéressant et si cela n’arrive pas à l’heure actuelle, c’est seulement par convention, pas parce que le Règlement l’empêche.

Pendant la dernière législature, le gouvernement a présenté des projets de loi omnibus très éparpillés. La norme, en l’espèce, n’est pas le nombre de lois qu’un projet de loi modifie, mais si ces changements divers et variés servent tous l’objectif général du projet de loi. Ainsi, le projet de loi C-49, adopté hier à l'étape de la deuxième lecture à la Chambre, a été qualifié par beaucoup dans l’opposition de projet de loi omnibus parce qu’il vise à modifier 13 lois en vigueur. Or, c’est fallacieux, car tous les changements relèvent légitimement et clairement du concept du nom de la loi, la Loi sur la modernisation des transports, et certains des changements apportés à ces 13 lois existantes sont à la fois pertinents et minuscules.

Par exemple, l’article 91 du projet de loi C-49 modifie la Loi d’exécution du budget de 2009. Cette modification est ainsi libellée, dans son intégralité: « Les parties 14 et 15 de la Loi d’exécution du budget de 2009 sont abrogées. » Une vérification rapide révélera que la partie 14 modifie la Loi sur les transports au Canada et la partie 15, la Loi sur la participation publique au capital d'Air Canada, deux lois que le ministre des Transports est tout à fait habilité, de par son mandat, à moderniser. Les deux séries de modifications qui découlent de la Loi d’exécution du budget de 2009, qui s’appelait projet de loi C-10 à la deuxième session de la 40e législature, s’accompagnaient d’une disposition d’entrée en vigueur ainsi libellée, en partie: « entrent en vigueur à la date fixée par décret pris sur la recommandation du ministre. » Le plus remarquable à propos de cette loi vieille de huit ans, c’est qu’aucun décret n’a jamais été pris pour que ces modifications entrent en vigueur.

Se débarrasser d’aspects des lois relatives au transport qui sont dépassés et qui n’ont jamais servi fait assurément partie de la modernisation des transports.

En 2012, le gouvernement conservateur a présenté un vaste projet de loi d’exécution du budget qui mettait en œuvre la majeure partie de ce qu’il appelait le Plan d’action économique du Canada, mais il s’attaquait aussi à des dispositions environnementales qui n’avaient rien à voir avec le budget. Entre autres choses, il annulait la protection juridique de millions de lacs et de cours d’eau de ce pays. L'adoption de ces mesures a été ralentie, mais pas arrêtée, par plus d'un millier d'amendements au projet de loi déposés au comité des finances, ce qui a entraîné une manœuvre d’obstruction par un vote article par article, 24 heures sur 24. J’ai assisté en tant que collaborateur à la dernière partie de ce vote marathon.

Le deuxième point de la motion no 18 vise à régler ces problèmes. Tout projet de loi présenté à la Chambre qui ne porte pas sur un thème unique ou un objet général pourrait être scindé par le Président de la Chambre. Les budgets feraient exception, mais le libellé de cet article, qui serait le paragraphe 69.1(2) du Règlement, viserait uniquement à préciser que les objectifs exposés dans le budget définiraient à eux seuls l’objet. Si on cherchait à modifier le droit de l’environnement dans une loi d’exécution du budget, sans qu’il en soit question dans le budget lui-même, par exemple, il serait possible d’invoquer le Règlement, et le Président de la Chambre pourrait accepter de retirer cet article de la loi d’exécution du budget. Ce changement est important, et nous nous étions engagés à l’apporter.

Le troisième changement est un peu plus obscur.

J’ai fait partie brièvement des collaborateurs du comité des comptes publics, pendant la 41e législature, et j'ai siégé au comité des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires au début de la 42e législature pendant peu de temps aussi. Je ne prétends pas comprendre les menus détails du processus budgétaire et je m’en remets à ceux qui les connaissent. C’est très important en l’occurrence. Je me réjouis de tout ce qui peut aider à clarifier le processus budgétaire.

Le quatrième changement au Règlement proposé dans cette motion est particulièrement intéressant. Il s’agit des points 4 à 6 de la motion no 18.

Je pense que la plupart de ceux qui étaient là à la dernière législature ont vécu la même chose. Les comités étaient dirigés par les secrétaires parlementaires. Ils prenaient place près du président, proposaient des motions, votaient et contrôlaient par ailleurs les comités. Cela va totalement à l’encontre du but recherché en ce qui concerne les comités parlementaires. Le secrétaire parlementaire est, par définition, le représentant du ministre. À ce titre, les secrétaires parlementaires jouent un rôle essentiel en assurant la liaison entre le comité et le ministère qu’il surveille.

Pouvoir répondre rapidement aux questions du comité sur les intentions et les plans ou soumettre à l’étude des préoccupations ou des questions sur lesquelles les ministres souhaitent avoir des commentaires dans l’exercice de leurs fonctions est tout à fait approprié. Cependant, lorsque des secrétaires parlementaires dirigent les comités, ces organes de surveillance cessent de surveiller pratiquement quoi que ce soit et deviennent tout simplement des prolongements de l’exécutif. Si c’est ce que nous devons avoir, les comités ne servent pas à grand-chose. Le bon équilibre consiste à inclure les secrétaires parlementaires dans les comités en qualité d’agents de liaison avec leur ministère, au lieu de planificateurs et d’exécuteurs du travail des comités.

C’est très important. Au cours du débat au sujet de la Loi sur la réforme, lors de la dernière législature, le député de Wellington—Halton Hills, pour qui j’ai beaucoup de respect depuis bien des années, m’a dit qu’en qualité de député d’arrière-ban, il ne faisait pas partie du gouvernement. « Comme vous, m’a-t-il dit, mon rôle est de demander des comptes au gouvernement, la différence étant que j’ai confiance dans le gouvernement. »

Cet important exemple de philosophie politique m’est resté en tête depuis ce jour. Notre rôle, en qualité de députés d’arrière-ban, est en effet de demander des comptes au gouvernement, que nous soyons du côté des banquettes ministérielles ou du côté de l’opposition. Les comités sont un des outils les plus importants, et quand le gouvernement propose de rétablir l’indépendance des comités, il ne s’agit pas de paroles en l’air ou d'un vague slogan; c’est légitime. J’ai vu le changement dans la façon dont fonctionnent les comités, entre la dernière législature et celle-ci, et c’est très impressionnant. Maintenir les secrétaires parlementaires dans un rôle de participation, mais non de contrôle, au sein des comités est un élément essentiel de cette évolution.

La dernière modification, à l’article 7 de la motion, est particulièrement intéressante. Le seul moment où l’opposition a un immense pouvoir, même dans le cas d’un gouvernement majoritaire, c’est quand elle fait de l’obstruction systématique dans un comité. Un député de l’opposition déterminé à empêcher un vote ou la rédaction d’un rapport au comité peut le faire de façon absolue, pourvu qu’il soit prêt à prolonger le débat et à demeurer raisonnablement pertinent. Notre collègue d'Hamilton-Centre est un expert en la matière, plaisantant souvent sur le fait qu’après avoir eu la parole pendant une demi-heure, il n’a pas encore terminé de s’éclaircir la voix.

Quand notre débat concernant la réforme du Règlement de la Chambre des communes a dérapé au comité de la procédure il y a quelques semaines, on nous a accusés d’avoir tenté d’éliminer l’obstruction systématique. Rien n’est plus faux.

Au cours de ce débat, nous avons tenté d’avoir une discussion sur la façon dont nous pourrions modifier le Règlement. La leader du gouvernement a écrit une lettre dans laquelle elle nous a fait part de ses idées au sujet des modifications dont elle espérait nous voir discuter, en plus des nombreuses idées qui nous avaient déjà été présentées à la suite du débat de l’automne dernier au sujet de l’article 51 du Règlement. Cependant, si l’on se réfère aux éléments précédents de ce discours, la conclusion ne dépendait que de nous, en comité. Une des idées envisagées était que les membres d’un comité bénéficieraient d’un nombre illimité de périodes d'intervention de 10 minutes, plutôt que d’un seul temps de parole sans limite.

Si je comprends bien, en pratique, n’importe quel député peut parler aussi longtemps qu’il le désire au comité, mais, dès qu'un autre député signale qu’il souhaite prendre la parole, il a 10 minutes pour la lui céder; le second député doit ensuite la lui rendre si le premier le désire. Ainsi, tous les membres d'un comité auraient l’occasion d'intervenir dans un débat, mais cela n’empêcherait personne de paralyser le comité ni de faire de l’obstruction systématique, en l'espèce ou en principe. Ainsi, il deviendrait assurément plus facile de négocier la fin de telles manoeuvres tout en donnant aux autres la possibilité de placer un mot.

Cependant, le changement proposé ici ne concerne pas cela. Il vise à mettre fin à une des façons les plus absurdes d’exploiter la procédure des comité que l'on ait pu voir lors des législatures précédentes: un membre du comité appartenant à la majorité prend la parole, parfois même en invoquant le Règlement, et dit au président quelque chose comme: « Je propose que nous mettions la question aux voix. » Le président répond, à juste titre, que la motion n’est pas recevable et il la rejette. Le député conteste alors la décision du président, la majorité vote contre la décision du président, la question est mise aux voix, puis la motion demandant le débat, l’étude, la rédaction du rapport, peu importe ce qui était en cause, se conclut de façon brusque, cavalière et on ne peut plus acrimonieuse. C'est le seul moyen efficace, quoique peut-être pas tout à fait légitime, de mettre fin aux manoeuvres d'obstruction systématique.

Dans la motion no 18, nous défendons le droit d'employer des manoeuvres d’obstruction systématique.

Comme je l’ai dit, la motion no 18 vise à défendre les droits de l’opposition, à la lumière de notre expérience à l'époque ou nous formions le tiers parti. Pas une ligne de cette motion n’est à l’avantage d’un gouvernement majoritaire. Tout le monde, cependant, bénéficie d’un fonctionnement amélioré ici. J’appuie l'adoption de la motion.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 4355 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 20, 2017

2017-06-19 13:16 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Opposition parties, Parliamentary reform, Standing Orders of the House of Commons

Réforme parlementaire, Règlement de la Chambre des communes,

Mr. Speaker, the member for Victoria and the opposition House leader have talked a great deal about the need for consensus to change the Standing Orders. However, only six days ago, the NDP opposition day motion sought to change the Standing Orders on a majority vote.

In the last Parliament, Motion No. 489, the member for Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, did change the Standing Orders of the House on about 58% of the vote.

There is a bit of sanctimony and hypocrisy in what the opposition members say on an ongoing basis. I was at PROC for almost the entire 80 hours of that rather long meeting on March 21. What happened was we brought forward a motion to have a discussion on the Standing Orders. It was a request for discussion. There were no changes to the Standing Orders. The motion did not even refer to the minister's letter. It was a request for an ongoing conversation with the opposition. I was hoping we would all have this conversation. If the opposition members did not like what came out of it, they could have filibustered at that point and stopped the report. It still would not have come back to the House.

Why are opposition members not interested in having any kind of actual meaningful discussion on changing the rules of this place?

Monsieur le Président, le député de Victoria et la leader de l’opposition à la Chambre des communes ont longuement parlé de la nécessité d’avoir un consensus pour modifier le Règlement. Or, il y a à peine six jours, la motion que le NPD a présentée pendant la journée de l’opposition visait à modifier le Règlement par un vote à la majorité.

Pendant la dernière législature, le député de Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston a proposé la motion M-489, qui a permis de modifier le Règlement de la Chambre avec à peu près 58 % des voix.

Le discours des députés de l’opposition est empreint d’un ton moralisateur qui fleure l’hypocrisie. J’ai siégé au comité de la procédure pendant la quasi-totalité des 80 heures de débat qu’a duré la réunion du 21 mars. Nous avions présenté une motion dont l’objectif était de demander la tenue d'une discussion au sujet du Règlement. Il n’était alors pas question de proposer des changements au Règlement. La motion ne mentionnait même pas la lettre de la ministre. Il s’agissait de demander une discussion avec l’opposition. J’espérais que nous aurions cette discussion. Si les députés de l’opposition n’avaient pas apprécié ce qui en aurait résulté, ils auraient pu faire de l’obstruction à ce moment-là et empêcher la publication du rapport, qui n’aurait alors pas été soumis à la Chambre.

Pourquoi les députés de l’opposition ne veulent-ils pas participer à une discussion constructive sur les changements à apporter aux règles qui gouvernent cette institution?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 482 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 19, 2017

2017-06-19 12:31 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Opposition parties, Parliamentary democracy, Parliamentary reform, Standing Orders of the House of Commons,

Démocratie parlementaire, Réforme parlementaire, Règlement de la Chambre des communes

Mr. Speaker, the minister and I both served as staff in previous parliaments and I think we have all been around to see some of the very interesting things that have happened here over the years. When I read this motion, I see a whole lot of things that would have helped us when we were in opposition and not a lot that would help us here in government. I wonder if the minister would agree with that assessment: this would help this place function by empowering opposition parties to do their jobs better.

Monsieur le Président, la ministre et moi-même avons tous deux travaillé au sein du personnel dans des législatures précédentes, et nous avons tous deux observé de très intéressants développements ici au fil des ans. Lorsque je lis cette motion, je vois beaucoup de choses qui nous auraient aidés lorsque nous formions l’opposition, mais peu de choses susceptibles de nous aider à l’heure actuelle au gouvernement. La ministre serait elle d'accord avec moi pour dire que la motion qui nous est soumise aiderait la Chambre à fonctionner en permettant aux partis d'opposition de mieux faire leur travail.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 222 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 19, 2017

2017-06-16 13:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Decisions of the House, Proceeding to next item early,

Affaires émanant des députés, Décisions de la Chambre,

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I am wondering if you might find the consent of the House to see the clock at 1:30.

The Deputy Speaker: Is it the pleasure of the House to see the clock at 1:30 p.m.?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

Monsieur le Président, j'invoque le Règlement. Auriez-vous l'obligeance de demander s'il y a consentement unanime pour considérer qu'il est 13 h 30?

Le vice-président: La Chambre est-elle d'accord pour dire qu'il est 13 h 30?

Des voix: D'accord.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 114 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 16, 2017

2017-06-16 12:52 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Interswitching services, Monopolies, Second reading, Transportation

Deuxième lecture, Monopoles, Transports

Mr. Speaker, I am proud of the bill, for a couple of reasons. As a licensed pilot and a long-time trainspotter, it has all my interests in one place.

The railways in this country were built around the concept of building local monopolies. They are spaced out by certain distances for a reason. They were set up that way so that each company would have their territory.

I think it is very important for us to be modernizing it in the way we are doing here, and allowing these interchanging rules to be far improved to increase the competition.

I wonder if the member would agree with that general sentiment.

Monsieur le Président, je suis fier du projet de loi pour plusieurs raisons. À titre de pilote breveté et de passionné de trains depuis longtemps, j'y retrouve tous mes champs d'intérêt.

Les chemins de fer du Canada ont été construits de façon à créer des monopoles locaux. Ils ne sont pas placés à certains intervalles par hasard. Ils ont été installés ainsi pour permettre à chaque entreprise d'avoir son territoire.

Il est extrêmement important que nous modernisions les chemins de fer comme nous le faisons avec cette mesure législative. Les règles sur l'interconnexion seront grandement améliorées, ce qui accroîtra la concurrence.

Je me demande si le député partage ce sentiment général.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 240 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 16, 2017

2017-06-15 18:24 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government business, Proceeding to next item early,

Affaires émanant du gouvernement

Madam Speaker, I would seek the consent of the House to see the clock as 6:30 p.m.

Madame la Présidente, je demande le consentement unanime de la Chambre pour dire qu'il est 18 h 30.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 55 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 15, 2017

2017-06-14 19:47 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Budget deficit, Privy Council Office,

Bureau du Conseil privé, Déficit budgétaire,

Mr. Speaker, the only thing rich about the record of the Conservatives is their description of it.

In over a century, the Conservatives have never managed to take us from a deficit to a surplus. I am getting tired of hearing that lecture. Virtually all the debt we have in the country, by percentage, is from them. They cannot manage their way out of a Tim Hortons.

Monsieur le Président, en ce qui concerne le bilan des conservateurs, il n'y a que leur description de celui-ci qui soit riche.

En plus de 100 ans, les conservateurs ne sont jamais arrivés à transformer un déficit en excédent. Leur sermon devient lassant. Les conservateurs sont responsables de la plus grande partie de la dette du pays. Ils seraient incapables de gérer un Tim Hortons.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 152 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 14, 2017

2017-06-14 19:13 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Partisanship, Privy Council Office, Selection process, Senate and senators,

Bureau du Conseil privé, Partisanerie, Processus de sélection, Sénat et sénateurs,

Madam Speaker, I enjoy talking about the Senate, because I think the Senate has an incredible value in our country, especially in its current form, where members are there as members who provide sober second thought. Sobriety does not refer to alcohol. The sober caucus, on that basis, may not have official party status. It is about not having to worry about what they are going to do at the end of their careers, so their decisions can be objective. Therefore, being elected or having their terms limited would completely eliminate any value of the Senate, in my opinion. I wonder if the member agrees with that assessment.

Madame la Présidente, j'aime parler du Sénat, car j'estime qu'il joue un rôle extrêmement utile dans notre pays, surtout dans sa forme actuelle, où ses membres sont là pour effectuer un second examen objectif. Ils ne sont pas nécessairement associés officiellement à un parti. L'idée est que, n'ayant pas à se demander ce qu'ils feront après leur mandat, ils peuvent prendre des décisions objectives. Par conséquent, leur élection ou la limitation de leur mandat auraient pour effet d'enlever toute utilité au Sénat, à mon avis. Je me demande si le député voit les choses de la même façon.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 234 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 14, 2017

2017-06-13 22:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Adjournment, Government bills, Second reading, Senate bills, Sexual discrimination, Status Indians,

Ajournement, Deuxième lecture, Discrimination sexuelle, Indiens inscrits, Projets de loi du Sénat

Mr. Speaker, I would seek the consent of the House to see the clock at midnight.

Monsieur le Président, je demande le consentement de la Chambre pour dire qu'il est minuit.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 65 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 13, 2017

2017-06-13 13:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Commissioner of Official Languages, Conflict of interest, Establishment of a committee, Officers of Parliament, Opposition motions, Political appointments, Selection process, Standing Orders of the House of Commons, Subcommittees

Commissaire aux langues officielles, Hauts fonctionnaires du Parlement, Nominations politiques, Processus de sélection, Règlement de la Chambre des communes

Mr. Speaker, I did not say the appointment went well; I said the process worked. We saw what happened.

There are always possibilities of changing processes, but the process we have will produce very good results for all appointments going forward.

Monsieur le Président, je n’ai pas dit que la nomination s’est bien passée, mais que le processus a fonctionné. Nous avons vu ce qui est arrivé.

Il est toujours possible de modifier les processus, mais le processus que nous avons produira de très bons résultats pour toutes les nominations à venir.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 149 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 13, 2017

2017-06-13 13:25 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Commissioner of Official Languages, Conflict of interest, Establishment of a committee, Officers of Parliament, Opposition motions, Patronage appointments, Political appointments, Standing Orders of the House of Commons, Subcommittees

Commissaire aux langues officielles, Hauts fonctionnaires du Parlement, Nominations partisanes, Nominations politiques, Règlement de la Chambre des communes

Mr. Speaker, in the case of the process the member is discussing, it went to a committee of the House of Commons and the other place. It obviously did not go quite according to plan and that person is not going to be the commissioner, so the process worked quite well.

Monsieur le Président, dans le cas du processus de nomination dont le député parle, la question a été renvoyée à un comité de la Chambre des communes et de l'autre endroit. Il est évident que cela ne s’est pas déroulé comme prévu et que cette personne n'occupera pas le poste de commissaire; le processus a donc très bien fonctionné.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 166 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 13, 2017

2017-06-13 13:24 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Establishment of a committee, Officers of Parliament, Opposition motions, Political appointments, Standing Orders of the House of Commons, Subcommittees,

Hauts fonctionnaires du Parlement, Nominations politiques, Règlement de la Chambre des communes

Mr. Speaker, I agree with the opposition because a second standard already exists.

Not every appointment requires the approval of the House of Commons. Only officer of Parliament appointments do. To me that is a very important standard. The appointment of an officer of Parliament is approved by Parliament.

Monsieur le Président, je suis d'accord avec l'opposition parce qu'il y a déjà un deuxième standard.

Toutes les nominations ne requièrent pas l'approbation de la Chambre des communes. Ce sont celles des agents du Parlement qui le sont. Selon moi, il s'agit d'un standard très important. Pour un agent du Parlement, l'approbation provient du Parlement.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 146 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 13, 2017

2017-06-13 13:13 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Accountability, Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, Establishment of a committee, Officers of Parliament, Opposition motions, Political appointments, Selection process, Splitting speaking time, Standing Orders of the House of Commons, Subcommittees, Veto rights

Droit de veto, Hauts fonctionnaires du Parlement, Nominations politiques, Obligation de rendre compte, Partage du temps de parole, Processus de sélection, Règlement de la Chambre des communes

Mr. Speaker, I will be splitting my time with my colleague from Sudbury.

I am pleased to participate in this debate today on a motion to change the rules of the House introduced by a political party that recently fought tooth and nail in defence of the position that the rules of the House should not be amended by way of a motion.

Even though this motion is fundamentally flawed, it gives the House an opportunity to address the question of the role played by officers of Parliament in our system. These individuals must perform crucial and important functions. I want to point out to the House that the expression “officer of Parliament” is also used to refer to the people who report to parliamentarians, which means that they are responsible for the work of Parliament, and that this is what distinguishes them from other senior public servants and officials of Parliament in particular.

In addition, it is useful to ensure that everyone here clearly understands certain fundamental concepts that underlie our discussions today. We must make sure that everyone has the same understanding of the essential facts. For that purpose, I want to put this debate in the relevant broader context it deserves. I want to focus on one very specific aspect, that is, the place held by officers of Parliament in our system of government.

Let me use one example with the conflict of interest and ethics commissioner. It is important to take this big-picture-view because the conflict of interest and ethics commissioner does not operate in a unique legal or procedural environment, nor does the commissioner operate in a vacuum.

The conflict of interest and ethics commissioner is appointed and then performs his or her important role under many of the same conditions as the other agents of Parliament. While each agent of Parliament has a unique mandate, every one of them plays an important role in our democracy. Every one of them has some elements in common that are worth keeping in mind today. They have become important vehicles in support of Parliament's accountability and oversight function. These roles have been established to oversee the exercise of authority by the executive, in other words the Prime Minister, cabinet, and government institutions. It is very clear that they all do precisely that.

For the longest time, there was only one such agent of Parliament, that is, the auditor general, which was established just after Confederation, in 1868. In 1920, Parliament put in place the role of chief electoral officer to ensure an independent body was in place to oversee our elections. It was not until 1970 that the third agent of Parliament was created when the commissioner of official languages was established under the terms of the Official Languages Act of 1969.

To recognize the changing role of information in the government and among citizens, the positions of Privacy Commissioner and Information Commissioner were created in 1983. In 2007, we witnessed the creation of two other positions, that of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner and the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner. The Commissioner of Lobbying is the most recent addition to the list of officers of Parliament, having been established in 2008.

While each has a unique set of responsibilities, I have heard this entire group described as “guardians of values.” Each of them is independent from the government of the day. Each of them is mandated to carry out duties assigned by legislation and report to one or both of the Senate and the House of Commons.

Our government recognizes the importance of the work that agents of Parliament do. We recognize the need that they reflect the high standards that Canadians rightly expect.

One key way that our government has demonstrated that recognition is by bringing in a new and rigorous selection process for these positions. We have taken the same approach as we have across other Governor in Council appointments. These appointments are being made through open, transparent, and merit-based approaches.

What does this mean in real terms for officers of Parliament? First of all, there is the application process itself. Notices are posted on the Governor in Council appointments website. The government also publishes a link to that notice in the Canada Gazette while the application period is open. Under the new process, everyone who feels qualified to fill the responsibilities of positions, whether for the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner or any other vacant appointed position, can let their names stand by registering online.

The government is very mindful that we want the best people possible for these important roles. This is why each selection process has its own recruitment strategy. Sometimes an executive search firm may get a contract to help identify a strong pool of potential candidates.

We also sometimes announce the vacancy of a given position to the target communities, such as professional and stakeholder associations, or establish a dialogue with them.

That process eventually helps find a highly competent candidate. However, for the position of Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, after finding a candidate, the government is required to consult with the leader of each recognized party in the house, and the appointment must clearly be approved by a resolution of the House.

We know that, in practice, the person appointed is invited to appear before the appropriate committee, which reviews that person’s qualifications. Parliamentarians therefore have public opportunities to have a say on these important roles.

Only after that, after the appointment is approved by the House of Commons and the Senate, is the officer of Parliament officially appointed by decree.

The government's appointment process for officers of Parliament is open, transparent and merit-based, and the same is true for other Governor in Council appointees.

The Prime Minister personally committed to bringing a new style of leadership and a new tone to Ottawa. He committed to raising the standards of openness and transparency within the government. He committed to adopting a new style of leadership.

Those commitments are very clear in the new processes. They aim to give the most qualified Canadians the opportunity to serve their country by being appointed by the Governor in Council or otherwise.

Those commitments are proof that strict rules increase the trust Canadians have in elected officials and appointees and in the integrity of policies and decisions made in the public interest.

Officers of Parliament are pillars of our democracy. Their role is essential, as they help us, as parliamentarians, to hold the government to account. I think that we have a system that works well, and I think that Canadians can see that it works well.

That is one of the reasons why I feel that this motion is not needed. The proof is there. Public institutions that are more solid, more open, more transparent, and more accountable help the government remain focused on the people that it should be serving. That means better government for Canadians. That is something that I am very proud to defend and to pass on to future generations.

There is something else as well, and I referred to it at the very beginning. We recently proposed an open discussion on modernizing the rules of the House in the Standing Committee on Procedures and House Affairs. We were blocked for more than 80 hours over several weeks, because the opposition was not interested in having that discussion. Now they present a change to the rules through a motion requiring a majority vote, when they said very loudly and clearly that this was not admissible.

What exactly is the purpose of the motion before us? It begins by replacing Standing Order 111.1. I will quickly read Standing Order 111.1 to show what we would lose:

111.1

Officers of Parliament. Referral of the name of the proposed appointee to committee.

(1) Where the government intends to appoint an Officer of Parliament, the Clerk of the House, the Parliamentary Librarian or the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, the name of the proposed appointee shall be deemed referred to the appropriate standing committee, which may consider the appointment during a period of not more than thirty days following the tabling of a document concerning the proposed appointment.

Ratification motion.

(2) Not later than the expiry of the thirty-day period provided for in the present Standing Order, a notice of motion to ratify the appointment shall be put under Routine Proceedings, to be decided without debate or amendment.

The opposition members want to scrap a system in which candidates are referred to appropriate committees with the expertise to assess each candidate as part of their duties and in favour of referral to a small subcommittee made up of just four members, which is itself a subcommittee of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This subcommittee will not have the expertise to deal with issues involved in appointing officers, but it will have a veto, which will be undemocratic, unlike Parliament's veto power. It will also deprive the other 334 MPs of the right and opportunity to have their say about a particular candidate.

It is easy to see that this motion was not thought through, that it is contrary to the values the NDP champions with respect to the role of this kind of motion, and that it will not improve our appointment system.

Monsieur le Président, je vais partager mon temps de parole avec mon collègue de Sudbury.

Il me fait plaisir de participer à ce débat aujourd'hui sur une motion visant à changer les règles de la Chambre provenant d'une formation politique qui est récemment entrée en guerre en argumentant que nous ne pouvons pas changer les règles de la Chambre par une motion.

Même si, fondamentalement, cette motion comporte des lacunes, elle donne à la Chambre la possibilité d'aborder l'importante question du rôle joué par les agents du Parlement dans notre système. Ces personnes doivent s'acquitter de fonctions cruciales importantes. Je veux faire remarquer à la Chambre que l'expression « agent du Parlement » sert aussi à désigner des personnes qui relèvent des parlementaires, ce qui signifie qu'elles sont chargées des travaux du Parlement et que c'est ce qui les distingue notamment des autres hauts fonctionnaires et officiels du Parlement.

Par ailleurs, il est utile de s'assurer que tous ici comprennent bien certains éléments fondamentaux qui sous-tendent nos discussions aujourd'hui. il faut s'assurer que tous ont la même compréhension des faits essentiels. À cette fin, je veux situer ce débat dans le contexte élargi pertinent qu'il mérite. Je veux me concentrer sur un aspect bien précis, c'est-à-dire, la place qu'occupent les agents du Parlement dans notre système de gouvernement.

Je vais donner un exemple, soit celui du poste de commissaire aux conflits d'intérêt et à l'éthique. Il est important d'avoir un portrait global de la question parce que le commissaire aux conflits d'intérêt et à l'éthique ne travaille pas dans un environnement juridique ou de procédures uniques et ne travaille pas en vase clos non plus.

Le ou la commissaire est nommé, puis s'acquitte de son rôle important dans des conditions en grande partie semblables à celles des autres agents du Parlement. Même si le mandat de chaque agent du Parlement est unique, chacun joue un rôle important dans notre système démocratique. Ils partagent tous certains points qu'il ne faudrait pas oublier aujourd'hui. Ces postes sont devenus des éléments importants du processus de responsabilisation et de surveillance du Parlement. Ils ont été créés pour superviser l'exercice du pouvoir par l'exécutif, c'est-à-dire, le premier ministre, le Cabinet et les institutions gouvernementales. Il est très clair que c'est exactement ce qu'ils font.

Pendant bien longtemps, il n'y a eu qu'un seul agent du Parlement, soit le vérificateur général, dont la création du poste remonte à 1868, juste après la Confédération. Puis, en 1920, le Parlement a créé le poste de directeur général des élections afin qu'une entité indépendante supervise les élections. Il a fallu attendre jusqu'à 1970 pour l'arrivée du troisième poste d'agent du Parlement, soit celui de commissaire aux langues officielles, créé par la Loi sur les langues officielles de 1969.

Pour reconnaître le rôle en constante évolution de l'information au sein du gouvernement et dans la population, les postes de commissaire à la protection de la vie privée et de commissaire à l'information ont tous les deux été créés en 1983. En 2007, nous a avons été témoins de la création de deux autres postes, soit celui de commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique et celui de commissaire à l'intégrité du secteur public. Établi en 2008, le poste de commissaire au lobbying est le plus récent à avoir été ajouté à ceux d'agents du Parlement.

Bien que chacune de ces personnes ait des responsabilités très précises, le groupe qu'elles forment a déjà été qualifié de « gardiens de nos valeurs ». Chacune de ces personnes est indépendante du gouvernement au pouvoir. Chacune a pour mandat de réaliser les tâches que la loi lui a assignées et de rendre compte au Sénat, à la Chambre des communes ou au deux.

Notre gouvernement actuel reconnaît l'importance des travaux que les agents du Parlement accomplissent. Nous sommes conscients du fait qu'ils doivent tenir compte des normes élevées que les Canadiens s'attendent qu'ils respectent, et ce, avec raison.

L'une des mesures très importantes que notre gouvernement a prises pour démontrer cette reconnaissance a été d'établir un nouveau processus de sélection rigoureux pour ces postes. Nous avons adopté la même approche que lors de toutes les autres nominations par le gouverneur en conseil. Ces nominations s'appuient sur des démarches ouvertes, transparentes et fondées sur le mérite.

Qu'est-ce que cela signifie concrètement pour les agents du Parlement? D'abord, il y a le processus de demande lui-même. L'avis est affiché sur le site Web du gouverneur en conseil, et le gouvernement publie un lien vers cet avis dans la Gazette du Canada pendant toute la période de présentation des demandes. Dans le cadre du nouveau processus, toute personne qui se sent capable d'assumer des responsabilités associées à un poste, que ce soit celui de commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique ou tout autre poste ouvert et devant faire l'objet d'une nomination peut poser sa candidature en ligne.

Le gouvernement est très conscient qu'il veut que ce soit les meilleurs candidats possible qui assument ces rôles importants. C'est pourquoi chaque processus de sélection a sa propre stratégie de recrutement. Ainsi, il arrive parfois qu'il retienne les services d'une agence de recrutement pour qu'elle l'aide à établir un bassin d'excellents candidats potentiels.

Il arrive aussi que nous annoncions la vacance d'un poste donné à des collectivités ciblées, comme des associations professionnelles et des intervenants, ou que nous établissions un dialogue avec celles-ci.

Ce processus permet éventuellement de trouver un candidat très compétent. Toutefois, en ce qui concerne le poste de commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique, le gouvernement est tenu, après voir trouvé un candidat, de consulter le chef de chaque parti reconnu à la Chambre des communes, et il est évident que la nomination doit être approuvée par une résolution de la Chambre.

Nous savons que, dans la pratique des choses, la personne nommée est invitée à comparaître devant le comité approprié qui examine ses compétences. Les parlementaires ont donc des occasions publiques de se prononcer sur ces rôles importants.

Ce n'est qu'après cela, après l'approbation de la nomination par la Chambre des communes et le Sénat, que l'agent du Parlement est officiellement nommé par décret.

Ce processus de nomination des agents du Parlement par le gouvernement est ouvert, transparent et fondé sur le mérite, et il en est de même pour les autres personnes nommées par le gouverneur en conseil.

Le premier ministre s'est engagé personnellement à amener un nouveau style de leadership et un nouveau ton à Ottawa. Il a pris l'engagement de rehausser les normes d'ouverture et de transparence au gouvernement. Il a pris l'engagement d'adopter un nouveau style de leadership.

Ces engagements sont tout à fait clairs dans les nouveaux processus. Ils visent à ce que les Canadiens les plus compétents aient la possibilité de servir leur pays en étant nommés par le gouverneur en conseil ou autrement.

Ces engagements sont la preuve que des règles rigoureuses accroissent la confiance des Canadiens envers les élus et les personnes nommées, et envers l'intégrité des politiques et des décisions prises dans l'intérêt public.

Les agents du Parlement jouent un rôle de pilier dans notre démocratie. Leur rôle est essentiel, car ils nous aident, nous les parlementaires, à tenir le gouvernement responsable. Je pense que nous avons un système qui fonctionne bien, et je pense que les Canadiens voient qu'il fonctionne bien.

C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles je pense que cette motion est inutile. La preuve en est faite. Des institutions publiques plus solides, plus ouvertes, plus transparentes et plus responsables aident le gouvernement à rester concentré sur les personnes qu'il est censé servir. Cela veut dire un meilleur gouvernement pour les Canadiens. Voilà une chose que je suis très fier de défendre et de transmettre aux générations futures.

Il y a encore autre chose, et j'y ai fait référence au tout début. Nous venons de proposer une discussion ouverte sur la modernisation des règles de la Chambre au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Nous avons fait face à une obstruction qui a duré plus de 80 heures sur plusieurs semaines, parce que l'opposition n'était pas intéressée à tenir cette discussion. Or voilà qu'elle présente un changement aux règles au moyen d'une motion devant faire l'objet d'un vote majoritaire, alors qu'elle disait haut et fort que cela n'était pas admissible.

Que fait donc exactement la motion qui est devant nous? Elle commence par le remplacement de l'article 111.1 du Règlement. Je vais lire rapidement l'article 111.1 pour montrer ce que nous perdrions:

111.1

Hauts fonctionnaires du Parlement. Renvoi du nom du candidat à un comité.

(1) Lorsque le gouvernement a l’intention de nommer un haut fonctionnaire du Parlement, le Greffier de la Chambre, le Bibliothécaire parlementaire ou le Commissaire aux conflits d’intérêts et à l’éthique, le nom du candidat est réputé avoir été renvoyé au comité permanent compétent qui peut examiner la nomination pendant au plus trente jours après le dépôt d’un document concernant la nomination du candidat.

Motion de ratification.

(2) Au plus tard à l’expiration du délai de trente jours prévu par le présent article, un avis de motion ratifiant la nomination est porté à l’ordre des Affaires courantes pour mise aux voix sans débat ni amendement.

Les députés de l'opposition veulent remplacer un système où les candidats sont référés aux comités appropriés qui ont l'expertise de juger chaque candidat dans le cadre de leurs fonctions, par une référence à un petit sous-comité composé de quatre membres seulement, qui est lui-même un sous-comité du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Ce sous-comité n'aurait pas l'expertise nécessaire pour traiter les sujets concernant ces hauts fonctionnaires, mais il aurait un veto, qui serait non démocratique contrairement à celui de la Chambre au complet. De plus, cela enlèverait aux 334 autres députés le droit et la possibilité de se prononcer sur le ou la candidate.

On peut facilement voir que cette motion n'a pas été bien pensée, qu'elle va à l'encontre des valeurs défendues par le NPD sur le rôle de ce genre de motion et qu'elle n'ajoutera pas de valeur à notre système de nomination.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 3259 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 13, 2017

2017-06-12 22:47 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Adjournment

Ajournement

Madam Speaker, I believe you will find great pleasure in the House to see the clock at midnight at this time.

Madame la Présidente, je pense que vous constaterez qu'il y a consentement unanime et enthousiaste pour considérer qu'il est minuit.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 55 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 12, 2017

2017-06-12 17:31 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Economic policy, Government performance, Opposition motions, Softwood lumber industry, Trade agreements

Accords commerciaux, Politique économique, Rendement du gouvernement

Madam Speaker, I keep hearing all these Conservatives get up and talk about how great their softwood lumber agreement was in 2006. The problem with it was that it was not great. Virtually everybody at the time was opposed to it. They gave $1 billion to the American industry and not to the Canadian industry, and it directly resulted in the lumber crisis of 2008.

I was wondering what planet he was on with respect to this topic.

Madame la Présidente, les conservateurs viennent nous dire les uns après les autres à quel point leur entente sur le bois d'oeuvre de 2006 était extraordinaire. La réalité, c'est qu'elle ne l'était pas. Presque tout le monde, à l'époque, s'opposait à cette entente. Ils ont donné un milliard de dollars à l'industrie américaine plutôt qu'à l'industrie canadienne, ce qui a mené à la crise du bois d'oeuvre de 2008.

Je me demande sur quelle planète ils vivent pour affirmer de telles choses.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 183 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 12, 2017

2017-06-12 16:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Economic policy, Government performance, Job creation, Opposition motions, Softwood lumber industry, Trade agreements,

Accords commerciaux, Politique économique, Rendement du gouvernement

Mr. Speaker, I would like to offer a little reminder about the softwood lumber crisis.

The Conservatives put the agreement in place in 2006, and in 2008 we had the forestry crisis. That crisis happened after the Conservatives’ agreement with the Americans was implemented. It was a bad agreement that they signed in a hurry to get rid of the issue without solving the problem. That is what has brought us to where we are today.

In addition, the member said we have not created jobs. In fact, over 300,000 new jobs have been created in the last year. That may be why the Conservatives were unsuccessful as a government: they do not see the difference between 300,000 and a negative number.

Monsieur le Président, je veux faire un petit rappel concernant la crise du bois d'oeuvre.

En 2006, les conservateurs ont mis l'accord en place, et en 2008, il y a eu la crise forestière. Celle-ci a donc eu lieu après la mise en oeuvre de l'accord des conservateurs avec les Américains. C'était un mauvais accord qu'ils ont fait rapidement pour se débarrasser du dossier sans régler le problème. C'est ce qui nous a menés où nous en sommes aujourd'hui.

Par ailleurs, le député a dit que nous n'avons pas créé d'emplois. Or, depuis un an, plus de 300 000 nouveaux emplois ont été créés. C'est peut-être pour cela que les conservateurs n'ont pas réussi en tant que gouvernement: ils ne voient pas de différence entre 300 000 et un nombre négatif.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 277 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 12, 2017

2017-06-09 12:25 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Budget deficit, Government bills, Third reading and adoption

Déficit budgétaire, Troisième lecture et adoption,

Madam Speaker, I congratulate you on your temporary role.

I would like to thank my colleague from Beauport—Limoilou for his speech.

At the end of his speech he said that his party is a good manager of taxpayer dollars.

I find this is not entirely accurate. During the 10 years that the Conservatives were in office, we had $150-billion deficits. We also have deficits, this is true. We will get back to that a little later.

What did we get for all that?

Nothing. Under the Conservatives, economic growth ranged from 1% to 1.5%. With the Liberals, economic growth was stronger in 18 months than it was during the 10 years the Conservatives were in power.

If we look at the deficits from a historical standpoint, for over a century, the Conservatives have never been able to get out of deficit, although they inherited surpluses from the Liberals twice, namely in 1912 and in 2006.

The Conservatives have never been able to balance the budget without selling off government assets.

Madame la Présidente, je vous félicite pour votre rôle temporaire.

J'aimerais remercier mon collègue de Beauport—Limoilou de son discours.

Il a dit à la fin de son discours que son parti est un bon gestionnaire de l'argent des contribuables.

Je trouve que ce n'est pas entièrement exact. On a vu, pendant les 10 ans que les conservateurs ont été au pouvoir, des déficits de 150 milliards de dollars. Nous avons aussi des déficits, c'est vrai. Nous en reparlerons tout à l'heure.

Qu'est-ce qu'on a vu avec tout cela?

Rien. Sous les conservateurs, il y a eu une croissance économique de 1 % à 1,5 %. Avec les libéraux, la croissance économique a été plus forte en 18 mois que ce qu'elle a été pendant les 10 années que les conservateurs ont été au pouvoir.

Si on regarde les déficits d'un point de vue historique, depuis plus d'un siècle, les conservateurs n'ont jamais réussi à se sortir des déficits, alors qu'ils avaient hérité de surplus des libéraux à deux reprises: en 1912 et en 2006.

Les conservateurs n'ont jamais réussi à équilibrer leur budget sans vendre des biens du gouvernement.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 372 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 09, 2017

2017-06-08 17:21 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Agreements and contracts, Disarmament, Nuclear weapons, Opposition motions,

Armes nucléaires, Désarmement, Ententes et contrats

Mr. Speaker, as is often the case, I find myself stuck between the fissile motion of the NDP and the facile position of the Conservatives. The last time the Conservatives ran a fighter procurement program, we largely lost our aviation industry, which took a long time to recover and we ended up with the Bomarc missile, which made us a temporary and not very effective nuclear power. I find it very consistent with the position we are hearing today, that nuclear weapons are essential for world peace, which is a position I do not necessarily agree with.

I am wondering what my colleague in the NDP thinks of that position and if he thinks the obvious logical conclusion we are hearing from the Conservatives is that, if every country had nuclear weapons, there would be world peace.

Monsieur le Président, comme c'est souvent le cas, je me retrouve entre la motion fissile du NPD et la position facile des conservateurs. La dernière fois que les conservateurs ont lancé un programme d’acquisition d’avions de chasse, nous avons perdu une grande partie de notre industrie de l’aviation. Il nous a fallu bien de temps pour nous en remettre, et nous nous sommes retrouvés avec le missile Bomarc, grâce auquel nous avons temporairement joui d’une puissance nucléaire, quoique pas très efficace. Je trouve que cela illustre bien ce que nous entendons aujourd’hui, soit que les armes nucléaires sont essentielles pour maintenir la paix dans le monde. Je ne suis pas tout à fait d’accord avec cette façon de voir.

Je me demande ce que mon collègue du NPD pense de cette position. Croit-il que la conclusion logique et évidente de ce que nous disent les conservateurs est que si tous les pays avaient des armes nucléaires, la paix régnerait dans le monde entier?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 324 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 08, 2017

2017-06-08 16:36 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Agreements and contracts, Disarmament, Foreign countries, Foreign policy, Nuclear weapons, Opposition motions,

Armes nucléaires, Désarmement, Ententes et contrats, Pays étrangers, Politique étrangère

Mr. Speaker, as my colleague from Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie knows, I come from the riding of Laurentides—Labelle. In the northern part of the riding is a former nuclear base with silos for Tomahawk missiles. The nuclear issue is real. Canada was a nuclear nation in a sense because it housed U.S. missiles. I completely agree that the world should get rid of nuclear weapons.

I have a question for my colleague: how does he plan to force North Korea, Russia, and the United States to get rid of their nuclear weapons?

Monsieur le Président, comme le sait mon collègue de Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, je viens de la circonscription de Laurentides—Labelle. Au Nord de la circonscription se trouve une ancienne base nucléaire où il y a des silos pour missiles Tomahawk. L'enjeu nucléaire est réel. Le Canada était un pays nucléaire, en quelque sorte, parce qu'il abritait des missiles américains. Je suis entièrement d'accord sur le fait que le monde entier devrait se débarrasser des armes nucléaires,

J'aimerais poser une question à mon collègue: quel est son plan pour forcer la Corée du Nord, la Russie et les États-Unis à se débarrasser de leurs armes nucléaires?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 224 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 08, 2017

2017-06-05 17:54 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Public transit, Public transit tax credit, Report stage,

Étape du rapport, Transport en commun,

Madam Speaker, early in his speech my colleague from Kitchener—Conestoga talked about the public transit tax credit, which is an interesting topic because the idea of the credit was to increase ridership, yet the net result was that it did not increase ridership and it did not help those who needed it most because it was not a refundable tax credit. Between that and the comments on deficits and backloading, the Conservatives have not balanced a budget in over a century in real terms. I am wondering if the member has some clarity of thought on this that makes any sense.

Madame la Présidente, au début de son intervention, mon collègue de Kitchener–Conestoga a parlé du crédit d'impôt pour le transport en commun. C’est un sujet intéressant parce que le crédit visait au départ à augmenter l'achalandage; or, ce résultat net n’a pas été obtenu, et le crédit n'a pas permis d’aider les gens qui en avaient le plus besoin, puisque ce n'était pas un crédit d'impôt remboursable. Les conservateurs peuvent bien parler de déficit et de report des dépenses, sauf qu'ils n'ont pas réellement équilibré un budget depuis plus d'un siècle. Je me demande si le député peut offrir une réponse sensée à ce sujet.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 231 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 05, 2017

2017-06-02 11:06 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Environmental protection, Laurentides, Statements by Members, Tourism, Water resources

Déclarations de députés, Laurentides, Ressources en eau, Tourisme,

Mr. Speaker, as the summer season approaches, I want to emphasize the importance of tourism in the Laurentian region.

The millions of tourists and vacationers who visit our region create jobs for thousands of people who can then work close to home, from Sainte-Anne-des-Lacs to Sainte-Anne-du-Lac, and from Notre-Dame-du-Laus to Estérel.

With its thousands of lakes and rivers, my region is the ideal playground for the tourism industry. It is crucial that we all work together to preserve this major asset. That is why I applaud the dedication of all those contributing to the protection of our lakes and watersheds, such as the members of the Coalition for Responsible and Sustainable Navigation and many other organizations working to protect our waters. With Eurasian watermilfoil currently in dozens of our lakes, there is no time to lose.

With awareness and prevention measures, we can preserve our lakes and rivers so that they may be enjoyed by future generations and everyone who wants to come and visit the beautiful Laurentian region.

Monsieur le Président, à l'approche de la saison estivale, je veux souligner l'importance du tourisme pour la région des Laurentides.

Des millions de touristes et de villégiateurs qui visitent notre région permettent à des milliers de citoyens de travailler dans leur région, de Sainte-Anne-des-Lacs à Sainte-Anne-du-Lac, et de Notre-Dame-du-Laus à Estérel.

Avec ses milliers de lacs et de rivières, ma région est un terrain de jeu idéal pour l'industrie touristique. Il est essentiel de travailler tous ensemble pour préserver cet atout majeur. C'est pourquoi je salue le dévouement de tous ceux qui s'impliquent dans la protection de l'environnement des lacs et des bassins versants, comme les membres de la Coalition pour une navigation responsable et durable, ainsi que plusieurs autres organismes qui travaillent pour la protection de nos eaux. Avec le myriophylle à épi dans des dizaines de nos lacs, nous n'avons pas de temps à perdre.

Avec des mesures de sensibilisation et de prévention, nous pourrons préserver nos lacs et nos rivières au profit des générations futures et de tous les touristes qui visiteront nos belles Laurentides.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 369 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on June 02, 2017

2017-05-31 22:07 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Adjournment

Ajournement

Mr. Speaker, with the consent of the House, could we see the clock at 12 o'clock high so we can all go off and address our munchies?

Monsieur le Président, si la Chambre y consent, nous pourrions faire comme s'il était minuit afin que nous puissions tous partir pour combler nos fringales.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 65 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 31, 2017

2017-05-30 21:56 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Cannabis, Government bills, Second reading

Cannabis, Deuxième lecture,

Mr. Speaker, when I visit my riding, I ask young people whether it is easier to get marijuana or beer. They always say marijuana.

An hon. member: That is not true.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: In my riding, it is true, Mr. Speaker.

Therefore, I want to ask my colleague whether he believes that the current system works well. If not, why did he do nothing about it in his 10 years in cabinet?

Monsieur le Président, quand je fais le tour de mon comté, je demande aux jeunes s'ils ont un meilleur accès à la marijuana ou à la bière, ils répondent toujours « la marijuana ».

Une voix: Ce n'est pas vrai.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Dans mon comté, c'est vrai, monsieur le Président.

Je veux donc demander à mon collègue s'il croit que le régime actuel fonctionne bien? Sinon, pourquoi en 10 ans au Conseil des ministres, il n'a rien fait pour le corriger?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 172 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 30, 2017

2017-05-18 17:15 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Adjournment

Ajournement

Mr. Speaker, I believe if you were to seek it, you would find unanimous consent to see the clock as 5:30 p.m.

Monsieur le Président, je crois que vous constaterez qu'il y a consentement unanime pour dire qu'il est 17 h 30.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 53 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 18, 2017

2017-05-16 13:42 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Consideration of Senate amendments, Government bills, Labour relations, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Secret ballots, Union certification,

Accréditation syndicale, Gendarmerie royale du Canada, Relations de travail, Scrutins secrets,

Mr. Speaker, I am just wondering about the Conservatives' push for a secret ballot and if they believe there is ever a circumstance where that is not appropriate.

Monsieur le Président, je m'interroge simplement sur l'insistance des conservateurs pour qu'il y ait des scrutins secrets et je me demande si, d'après eux, il existe ne serait-ce qu'une situation où ce ne serait pas indiqué.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 102 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 16, 2017

2017-05-11 18:08 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Evidence gathering, Journalistic sources, Second reading, Senate bills,

Deuxième lecture, Projets de loi du Sénat, Projets de loi émanant des députés, Rassemblement de preuves, Sources journalistiques

Mr. Speaker, this is a fascinating topic. Like many of my colleagues here, I spent a long time as a journalist, but in somewhat more in the tech field than most. I spent nine years as an editor and freelance journalist with an online technology publication, so I was way ahead of the curve. I started writing in 2000, entirely online. We had no print publication. By the end of 2008, we were up to about two million monthly readers on the website. It was called linux.com at the time. The company was sold, without the staff, and that is how I ended up leaving journalism, which is another whole story.

The subject in front of us is protecting sources. I cannot say how important that is to journalism, no matter what an individual is covering, no matter where he or she is. It is a very important topic to discuss. I have not had a chance to read the bill closely, but I look forward to doing that when I have the chance.

Writers have to go out and network. It is really important to know the sources, the companies, and the people who working in the trenches. When they need information, they feel comfortable talking to us and telling us what they know. They use that information to write stories without revealing who it is. This is a really important topic. I thank both the senator and the member for Louis-Saint-Laurent for bringing this before us.

When I was writing, one of my favourite things to do was to write satire pieces. Around 2003, the state of California, where my company was based but I was not and had not been there at the time, was going through an entertaining state election. It had removed the governor and some 100-plus candidates were running for governor, including Arnold Schwarzenegger who went on to become the governor of the state of California. I am sure many remember that particular moment in time.

I wrote a satire piece declaring that Linus Torvalds, who was the creator of Linux, was getting into the race. The article was fairly popular in the technical community. I invented a number of quotes for him in this satire piece. What amazed me was a couple of other publications took my clearly marked satire piece, ripped my quotes, and used them as their own in an article about the same thing, making it a real story. It certainly was not the intention, but it made for a good laugh.

Protecting sources has another side to it. Journalists need to have sources. They need to have legitimate research. Real journalism truly requires it. The topic before us is very important and I am certainly enjoying listening to this debate.

I just wanted to get a few quick words on the record.

Monsieur le Président, c'est un sujet fascinant. Comme bon nombre de mes collègues, j'ai fait une longue carrière journalistique, quoique davantage dans le domaine technologique que la plupart des autres. J'ai passé neuf ans en tant que rédacteur en chef et journaliste pigiste pour un site d'information en ligne. J'étais donc à l'avant-garde. J'ai commencé à écrire en 2000. Tous mes textes étaient en ligne. Nous n'avions pas de publication imprimée. À la fin de 2008, notre site Web comptait environ deux millions de lecteurs par mois. À l'époque, il s'appelait linux.com. L'entreprise a été vendue, sans le personnel, et c'est ainsi que j'ai quitté le journalisme, mais ça, c'est une tout autre histoire.

La question dont nous sommes saisis porte sur la protection des sources. Je ne saurais trop insister sur l'importance de cet enjeu pour le journalisme, peu importe le domaine qu'on couvre ou l'endroit où on travaille. Il s'agit d'un sujet crucial. Je n'ai pas eu l'occasion de lire le projet de loi en détail, mais je suis impatient de le faire.

Les reporters doivent aller à la rencontre des gens et établir un réseau de contacts. Il faut faire connaissance avec les sources, les entreprises et les individus qui travaillent sur le terrain pour que ceux-ci soient à l'aise de parler et communiquer ce qu'ils savent lorsque les reporters ont besoin de renseignements. Ces derniers rédigent leurs articles à partir de ces informations, sans révéler leurs sources. Il s'agit d'une question très importante. Je remercie le sénateur et le député de Louis-Saint-Laurent de l'avoir présenté.

À l'époque où j'étais journaliste, j'aimais beaucoup écrire des textes satiriques. Vers 2003, l'État de la Californie — où se trouvait l'entreprise qui m'employait, mais pas moi — traversait une période électorale pour le moins divertissante. Le gouverneur avait été démis de ses fonctions et plus de 100 personnes avaient présenté leur candidature, dont Arnold Schwarzenegger, qui a finalement été élu. Je suis certain qu'on est nombreux à s'en souvenir.

J'ai écrit un texte tenant de la satire, qui annonçait que Linus Torvalds, le créateur de Linux, se lançait dans la course. L'article a connu une certaine popularité dans le milieu de la technologie. J'avais truffé mon article de quelques citations de mon cru. À mon grand étonnement, quelques sites d'information ont cité mon texte pourtant clairement humoristique, ont copié mes citations et les ont utilisées comme les leurs dans un article sur le même sujet. Au bout du compte, ils ont traité l'histoire comme si elle était réelle. Ce n'était certainement pas mon intention, mais l'affaire m'a tout de même bien fait rire.

On peut aborder la protection des sources sous un autre angle. Les journalistes doivent avoir des sources et mener des recherches authentiques. Le véritable journalisme en dépend. Le sujet à l'étude est très important et j'ai beaucoup de plaisir à suivre le débat.

Je voulais juste exposer brièvement mon point de vue.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 978 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 11, 2017

2017-05-09 16:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Broadband Internet services, Government bills, Infrastructure, Rural communities, Second reading

Communautés rurales, Deuxième lecture, Infrastructure, Services Internet à large bande,

Madam Speaker, I will not spend too much time addressing the rather spurious statement from my friend across the way about the Conservatives' support for veterans, given the massive lack of investment and reduction in services for veterans by the previous government of the past decade.

I want to go back to earlier in the member's speech, when he talked about rural issues. I think this budget would help rural areas. I am from a rural riding about half the size of his, and the biggest issue we have in our riding is Internet access. I wonder if the member has similar problems in his riding. Our government has already put in $2.5 billion for Internet through the $500-million connect to innovate program and a $2-billion rural infrastructure program, which has Internet as an eligible component. I think it is really important that the Internet has been called “infrastructure” for the first time.

I wonder if the member has any comments on that in particular?

Madame la Présidente, je ne parlerai pas longtemps de la déclaration plutôt trompeuse de mon collège d'en face, au sujet de l'aide des conservateurs aux anciens combattants, compte tenu du manque d'investissement massif et de la réduction des services destinés aux anciens combattants qui ont eu lieu sous le gouvernement précédent, pendant la décennie où il a été au pouvoir.

Je souhaite revenir à ce qu'a dit le député concernant les enjeux dans les régions rurales. Je pense que ce budget aidera ces régions. Je représente une circonscription rurale dont la taille est la moitié de celle du député. Le plus gros problème que nous avons est l'accès à Internet. Je me demande si le député vit des problèmes semblables dans sa circonscription. Le gouvernement a déjà investi 2,5 milliards de dollars pour l'Internet grâce au 500 millions de dollars du programme Brancher pour innover et aux 2 milliards de dollars d'un programme d'infrastructure rurale pour lequel l'accès à Internet constitue un critère d'admissibilité. Je pense qu'il est fort important qu'Internet soit désormais un élément de l'infrastructure.

Le député a-t-il des observations à faire à ce sujet?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 374 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 09, 2017

2017-05-04 16:51 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Second reading,

Deuxième lecture

Mr. Speaker, if we are going to talk fiction, the absurdity of the speech would really do Douglas Adams proud.

The real fiction is that that Conservatives are good fiscal managers. If we want to look for a time that Conservatives brought us from a deficit to a surplus, we would have to go back to the late 19th century. In the early 20th century, they managed to balance a budget. It was inherited from a Liberal government, and it was in full deficit by 1913, ahead of the First World War. Stephen Harper managed to balance a budget inherited from good Liberal fiscal management. There is one budget they claim to have balanced, and it is a spurious argument, and they ended up selling a whole lot of house to pay off the mortgage.

On what basis do the Conservatives believe they have any capacity in fiscal management?

Monsieur le Président, puisqu'on parle de fiction, l'absurdité du discours du député aurait rendu Douglas Adams très fier.

La vraie fiction, c'est l'idée que les conservateurs savent gérer les finances. Si on devait trouver une période où les conservateurs nous ont fait passer d'une situation déficitaire à une situation excédentaire, il faudrait remonter à la fin du XIXe siècle. Au début du XXe siècle, ils ont réussi à présenter un budget équilibré grâce au gouvernement libéral précédent, avant de plonger le pays dans une situation carrément déficitaire en 1913, avant la Première Guerre mondiale. Stephen Harper a réussi à présenter un budget équilibré grâce à la bonne gestion financière du gouvernement libéral précédent. Il y a un budget où les conservateurs affirment avoir atteint l'équilibre, mais cette affirmation est non fondée, car le gouvernement conservateur a fini par vendre une grande partie de la maison pour payer l'hypothèque.

Sur quels arguments les conservateurs se fondent-ils pour affirmer qu'ils sont le moindrement capables de gérer les finances?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 325 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 04, 2017

2017-05-04 16:19 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Infrastructure, Second reading

Deuxième lecture, Infrastructure,

Mr. Speaker, as an example, when we have a bridge that requires annual maintenance and we do not do maintenance for a year, the bridge will be fine. If we do not do it for two years, it will not be doing so well. We will start to see the cracks. After a few years though, we have to rebuild the bridge. If we want to have proper infrastructure in the country, it takes that annual investment, that constant improvement in infrastructure, that constant investment.

The deficit we have in the country exists all across the country, in our physical and social infrastructure. It is everywhere. If the member does not want to have any kind of investment, that is fine. She can get up and say that. However, I believe if we want to improve our country, improve our investments in infrastructure, and prepare for the future, we have to invest. The best way to do that right now is through the deficit spending that we are doing.

I wonder if the member would like to assert her lack of desire to invest in our infrastructure.

Monsieur le Président, supposons que nous devons une fois l’an procéder à l’entretien d’un pont et qu’une année, nous ne le faisons pas; le pont restera dans un bon état. Si nous ne procédons pas aux travaux annuels pendant deux ans, l’état du pont se détériorera. Nous commencerons à voir des fissures. Après quelques années, nous devrons rebâtir le pont. Si nous voulons que l’infrastructure du pays soit adéquate, il est primordial de faire cet investissement annuel, d’améliorer sans cesse l’infrastructure et d’investir constamment à ce chapitre.

Le déficit du pays touche l’ensemble du territoire, notre infrastructure physique et sociale. Il se fait sentir partout. Si la députée ne veut pas qu’un investissement quelconque soit fait, parfait. Elle peut le dire. Cependant, à mon avis, si nous voulons améliorer notre pays, renforcer nos investissements dans l’infrastructure et nous préparer pour l’avenir, nous devons investir. La meilleure façon de le faire dans l’immédiat, c’est sous forme de dépenses déficitaires.

Je me demande si la députée aimerait affirmer clairement son manque de désir d’investir dans notre infrastructure.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 377 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 04, 2017

2017-05-04 15:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Oral questions, Rail transport safety, Railway Safety Act

Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire, Questions orales, Sûreté du transport ferroviaire

Mr. Speaker, rail transportation is crucial to our economy, and provides us with an efficient system of moving people and goods through this great and vast country of ours.

Nothing is more important than rail safety, which is paramount to users, to railway workers, and most of all, to all the communities across Canada that have rail lines passing through them.

Can the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport tell us what our government is doing to ensure that Canada has the strictest rail safety standards?

Monsieur le Président, l'infrastructure ferroviaire est essentielle à notre économie et nous offre un système efficace pour déplacer les voyageurs et les biens au sein de notre beau et grand pays.

Rien n'est plus important que la sécurité ferroviaire, qui est primordiale pour les usagers, les travailleurs ferroviaires et, surtout, pour les communautés où passent les chemins de fer partout au Canada.

La secrétaire parlementaire du ministre des Transports peut-elle nous dire ce que nous faisons pour nous assurer que le Canada possède les normes de sécurité ferroviaire les plus élevées?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr qp 207 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 04, 2017

2017-05-03 16:20 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Second reading,

Deuxième lecture

Madam Speaker, I enjoyed my colleague from Louis-Saint-Laurent's speech, but maybe he needs better glasses. He said that the former government lived within its means. We know the Conservatives managed to balance the budget one time because they sold so many government assets that they were able to hide their deficit. The last time the Conservative government balanced a budget was over a century ago. I do not know where people get the idea that the Conservatives are good money managers. That is a total fantasy.

There are deficits in our communities and in society. Personally, I would rather have deficits in the budget than in our communities.

I have a question for my colleague. Why does he think communities are not important? Why should we care only about dollars, not about communities, cities, regions, and the Canadian people?

Madame la Présidente, j'ai apprécié le discours de mon ami de Louis-Saint-Laurent. Toutefois, peut-être a-t-il besoin de meilleures lunettes. En effet, il dit que l'ancien gouvernement travaillait en respectant ses moyens. On sait que les conservateurs ont réussi à équilibrer le budget une fois, parce qu'ils ont vendu tellement de biens appartenant au gouvernement qu'ils pouvaient cacher leur déficit. La dernière fois que le gouvernement conservateur a équilibré un budget, c'était il y a plus d'un siècle. Je ne sais pas d'où vient l'idée que les conservateurs sont capables de gérer un budget. Cela relève complètement de l'imagination.

Les déficits existent dans nos communautés et dans la société. Personnellement, je préfère les laisser au budget plutôt qu'à nos communautés.

J'aimerais poser une question à mon collègue. Comment se fait-il que les communautés ne sont pas importantes? Pourquoi devrait-on compter seulement sur le dollar, et non pas sur les communautés, sur les villes, sur les régions et sur le peuple canadien?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 314 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 03, 2017

2017-05-02 15:22 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Dilatory motions, Motion to proceed to the Orders of the Day, Parliamentary privilege, Prima facie breach of privilege, Putting the question, Rights of the House as a Collectivity,

Atteinte au privilège de prime abord, Droits collectifs de la Chambre, Mise aux voix, Motions dilatoires, Privilège parlementaire

Mr. Speaker, I listened to the speech by my colleague and friend from Mégantic—L'Érable. He spoke for about twenty minutes, but I heard him say little about the actual subject, which is the lack of access to the House of Commons in order to vote. This is a very important matter that we must consider, a problem that we must solve. This happens in almost every Parliament.

I would like to know whether my colleague wishes to send this matter to the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs as quickly as possible to study this problem in order to find a solution and ensure that it never happens again. Or does he want to continue speaking in this place for a very long time and prevent us from working on solving the problem?

Monsieur le Président, j'ai écouté le discours de mon collègue et ami de Mégantic—L'Érable. Pendant une vingtaine de minutes, je ne l'ai entendu parler qu'un peu du sujet actuel, qui est le manque d'accès à la Chambre des communes pour aller voter. C'est un enjeu très important que nous devons considérer, un problème que nous devons régler. Cela se produit dans presque tous les Parlements.

J'aimerais savoir si mon collègue veut renvoyer cette question au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre le plus vite possible pour s'assurer qu'on enquête afin de régler ce problème et que cela ne se produise plus jamais, ou s'il veut continuer à parler ici, très longtemps, et nous empêcher de travailler à régler ce problème?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 313 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 02, 2017

2017-05-02 12:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Dilatory motions, Motion to proceed to the Orders of the Day, Parliamentary privilege, Prima facie breach of privilege, Putting the question, Rights of the House as a Collectivity,

Atteinte au privilège de prime abord, Droits collectifs de la Chambre, Mise aux voix, Motions dilatoires, Privilège parlementaire

Mr. Speaker, I congratulate my colleague from Jonquière for her very good speech. I pretty much agree with her with respect to this matter and also the good comments by the member for Essex.

I would like to speak briefly about the issue before us. We want to study why access to the Hill was blocked once again. This should not have happened. I was here when Mr. Godin, the former NDP member for Acadie-Bathurst, was prevented from entering the chamber. I saw him through the window and I heard the entire conversation. It was ridiculous. Why was he prevented from accessing the Hill for pretty much the same reasons as in the most recent incident?

The procedure and House affairs committee made recommendations to address the problem, but they have yet to be implemented. I would like to ask those who were to fix the problem why that has not yet happened. It makes no sense. I agree with what the member said.

Why must we wait to submit the matter to the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs? Why not do it now?

Monsieur le Président, je félicite ma collègue de Jonquière pour son très bon discours. On est pas mal d'accord sur le sujet, y compris en ce qui concerne les bons commentaires de la députée d'Essex.

J'aimerais parler brièvement de l'enjeu auquel nous sommes confrontés. Nous voulons étudier pourquoi l'accès à la Colline a encore une fois été interdit. Cela n'aurait pas dû se produire. J'étais ici quand M. Godin, le député néo-démocrate d'Acadie-Bathurst à l'époque, n'a pas pu avoir accès à la Chambre. Je l'ai vu par la fenêtre, et j'ai entendu toute la conversation. Cela n'a pas d'allure! Comment se fait-il qu'on lui a interdit l'accès à la Colline pour à peu près les mêmes raisons que cette fois-ci?

Le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre a proposé des recommandations pour régler le problème, mais elles n'ont pas encore été mises en place. J'aimerais demander aux gens qui devaient régler le problème pourquoi ce n'est pas encore fait. Cela n'a pas de sens. Je suis d'accord avec les commentaires de la députée.

Pourquoi doit-il y avoir un délai avant de soumettre la question au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre? Pourquoi ne pas le faire dès maintenant?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 443 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 02, 2017

2017-05-02 10:17 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Closure, Dilatory motions, Motion to proceed to the Orders of the Day, Motions, Parliamentary privilege, Prima facie breach of privilege, Putting the question, Rights of the House as a Collectivity,

Atteinte au privilège de prime abord, Clôture, Droits collectifs de la Chambre, Mise aux voix, Motions, Motions dilatoires, Privilège parlementaire

Mr. Speaker, it is very important to remember what the debate is about, which is access to the Hill. I was a staffer when I watched Yvon Godin get stopped from crossing the road to get to a vote a few years ago. It is really important that this gets to PROC to have a discussion and figure out how to solve the problems so this stops happening.

How important does the minister consider it to be to get this thing out of here and into the committee where we can study and resolve the problem?

Monsieur le Président, il est très important de se rappeler ce sur quoi porte le débat, soit l'accès à la Colline du Parlement. J'étais membre du personnel lorsque j'ai vu Yvon Godin empêché de traverser la rue pour aller voter il y a quelques années. Il est vraiment important que la question soit renvoyée au comité de la procédure pour que nous en discutions et déterminions comment résoudre les problèmes pour que cela ne se reproduise plus.

Selon la ministre, à quel point est-il important que la Chambre renvoie la question au comité où nous pourrons étudier et résoudre le problème?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 256 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 02, 2017

2017-05-01 13:38 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Dilatory motions, Motion to proceed to the Orders of the Day, Parliamentary privilege, Prima facie breach of privilege, Putting the question, Rights of the House as a Collectivity,

Atteinte au privilège de prime abord, Droits collectifs de la Chambre, Mise aux voix, Motions dilatoires, Privilège parlementaire

Mr. Speaker, as the member for Pierre-Boucher—Les Patriotes—Verchères knows, I represent the riding of Laurentides—Labelle, which is north of Montreal. It is a large rural riding that was represented by the Bloc Québécois for a long time and then by the NDP for a few years.

Since becoming an MP, I have noticed, when travelling around the riding, that people often say that a federal MP can really get things done. For nearly 20 years, my constituents had MPs who worked very hard to convince them that the federal government was absolutely useless, that it could not help communities, and that it was not there for people. As a result, it makes me a little bit angry to hear the member talk about the need to stand up for voters' interests, when his party worked against those people's interests for decades.

Can my colleague tell us what the purpose of the Bloc Québécois is?

Monsieur le Président, comme le député de Pierre-Boucher—Les Patriotes—Verchères le sait, je représente la circonscription de Laurentides—Labelle au nord de Montréal. C'est une grande circonscription rurale qui a été longtemps représentée par le Bloc québécois et ensuite par le NPD pendant quelques années.

En faisant le tour de la circonscription, j'ai constaté, depuis mon arrivée, que les gens disent souvent qu'un député fédéral peut vraiment faire quelque chose. En effet, pendant presque 20 ans, les citoyens ont eu des députés qui travaillaient fort pour démontrer que le gouvernement fédéral ne servait absolument à rien, qu'il ne pouvait pas aider les communautés et qu'il n'était pas là pour les citoyens. Or lorsque le député nous parle de la nécessité de défendre les intérêts des électeurs, quand son parti a travaillé pendant plusieurs décennies contre les intérêts de la population, cela me fâche un peu.

Mon collègue peut-il nous dire à quoi sert le Bloc québécois?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 361 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 01, 2017

2017-05-01 13:26 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Dilatory motions, Motion to proceed to the Orders of the Day, Parliamentary privilege, Prima facie breach of privilege, Putting the question, Rights of the House as a Collectivity,

Atteinte au privilège de prime abord, Droits collectifs de la Chambre, Mise aux voix, Motions dilatoires, Privilège parlementaire

Mr. Speaker, this is a quick follow-up on the question from the member for Saanich—Gulf Islands. I rather appreciated it. I think the point of it was after the attacks of October 2014 the rules changed to take the parliamentary protective service away from Parliament and give it to the RCMP and change the chain of command. I think that is a concern for many members. It has come up at PROC many times.

I wonder if the member is aware of that change and what he thinks of it. I think it was a very fair question from the member for Saanich—Gulf Islands.

Monsieur le Président, je reviens rapidement sur la question de la députée de Saanich—Gulf Islands. Je suis bien content qu'elle l'ait posée. Je crois qu'elle dit en gros que le Règlement a été modifié après les attentats d'octobre 2014 pour que le Service de protection parlementaire ne relève plus du Parlement. La direction en a été confiée à la GRC, ce qui a modifié la chaîne de commandement. Je crois que cette question suscite des inquiétudes chez bien des députés. Elle a été soulevée à maintes reprises au comité de la procédure.

Le député est-il au courant de ce changement? Qu'en pense-t-il? Selon moi, la députée de Saanich—Gulf Islands lui a posé une très bonne question.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 274 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 01, 2017

2017-05-01 12:49 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Dilatory motions, Motion to proceed to the Orders of the Day, Parliamentary privilege, Prima facie breach of privilege, Putting the question, Rights of the House as a Collectivity,

Atteinte au privilège de prime abord, Droits collectifs de la Chambre, Mise aux voix, Motions dilatoires, Privilège parlementaire

Mr. Speaker, my colleague talked about the process for bringing electronic petitions, and he recognized that consensus did not exist until the end of the process. I think there is a very important point there. Consensus came at the end, at the very end, at the implementation point rather than at the discussion point. I think that is a very worthwhile point.

He also made the point that the electoral reform committee had consensus, which I think is a totally spurious argument. I do not know in what world a whole lot of members not agreeing and having four supplementary reports constitutes consensus.

I wonder if the member could tell me how he sees consensus being important and how it actually exists in the context he describes, because I do not think it does.

Monsieur le Président, mon collègue a abordé la question du processus de présentation des pétitions électroniques et il a reconnu qu'il n'y a eu consensus à ce sujet qu'à la toute fin. Je crois qu'il faut retenir cet élément, car il est crucial: le consensus est arrivé à la fin, à la toute fin, au moment de la mise en oeuvre plutôt que lors des discussions. Selon moi, c'est un point très important.

Mon collègue a également fait valoir que le comité sur la réforme électorale en était arrivé à un consensus, ce qui est on ne peut plus fallacieux. Je ne sais pas dans quelle dimension le fait qu'un tas de députés soient en désaccord et qu'il y ait quatre rapports supplémentaires constitue un consensus.

Je me demande si le député pourrait m'indiquer pourquoi il considère que l'obtention d'un consensus est importante et s'il pourrait me dire à quel consensus il faisait référence dans la situation qu'il a décrite, car je n'en vois aucun.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 351 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on May 01, 2017

2017-04-12 16:06 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Broadband Internet services, Connect to Innovate, Government assistance, Oral questions, Remote communities, Rural communities,

Aide gouvernementale, Brancher pour innover, Communautés isolées, Communautés rurales, Questions orales, Services Internet à large bande,

Mr. Speaker, access to reliable broadband Internet service is very important in today's economy. Rural and remote regions, like certain areas in my riding of Laurentides-Labelle, do not have the necessary infrastructure to support broadband services. I cannot wait for the “connect to innovate” program to be implemented to fix this problem.

Would the Prime Minister like to update the House on this, one of the most important issues to Canadians living in rural areas all across the country?

Monsieur le Président, l'accès aux services Internet fiables et à large bande est très important pour l'économie d'aujourd'hui. Les zones rurales et éloignées, telles que celles qu'on retrouve dans ma circonscription, Laurentides—Labelle, n'ont pas les infrastructures nécessaires pour soutenir des services à large bande adéquats. Je suis très enthousiasmé à l'idée que le programme Brancher pour innover soit mis en oeuvre pour corriger cette situation.

J'invite le premier ministre à donner des nouvelles à ce sujet, un sujet parmi les plus importants pour les Canadiens vivant en milieu rural partout au Canada.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr qp 206 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on April 12, 2017

2017-04-07 11:09 House intervention / intervention en chambre

National Volunteer Week, Statements by Members, Volunteering and volunteers

Bénévolat et bénévoles, Déclarations de députés,

Mr. Speaker, April 23 to 29 is National Volunteer Week. Thousands of Canadians in my region volunteer, and I want to thank them for their gift of self and their altruism in helping their communities.

Last Saturday, the Lieutenant-Governor of Quebec awarded medals to 15 people in my riding. I was at the ceremony to express my appreciation for these young people and seniors and their continuing commitment to serving their communities.

On behalf of all my constituents, I want to congratulate Jacques Larivière and Thérèse Gobeil from Nominingue, Marie-Andrée Clermont and Gilles Pilon from Sainte-Anne-des-Lacs, Carmelle Huppé and Marguerite Paquette from Saint-Sauveur, Lucie Lanthier from my home town of Sainte-Lucie, Viviane Courte-Rathwell from Arundel, Renée Deschênes-Dubé from Mont-Laurier, Émilie Gauthier from Mont-Tremblant, Simon Gratton-Laplante from Mont-Laurier, Laurence Latour-Laitre from Sainte-Marguerite-du-Lac-Masson, Catherine Mainville form Lac-Saguay, Nicolas Gaudreau from Saint-Sauveur, and Guiliana Desrochers from Sainte-Anne-des-Lacs.

The development of our communities depends on volunteers, and we can never thank them enough.

Monsieur le Président, du 23 au 29 avril, ce sera la Semaine de l'action bénévole. Des milliers de citoyens se dévouent dans ma région et je veux les remercier de leur don de soi et leur altruisme dans le milieu.

Samedi dernier, le lieutenant-gouverneur du Québec a procédé à la remise de médailles à 15 récipiendiaires de ma circonscription. J'étais présent pour témoigner ma reconnaissance envers ces jeunes et ces aînés qui font preuve d'un engagement communautaire soutenu.

Au nom de tous mes concitoyens, je félicite Jacques Larivière et Thérèse Gobeil, de Nominingue; Marie-Andrée Clermont et Gilles Pilon, de Sainte-Anne-des-Lacs; Carmelle Huppé et Marguerite Paquette, de Saint-Sauveur; Lucie Lanthier, de ma ville natale, Sainte-Lucie; Viviane Courte-Rathwell, d'Arundel; Renée Deschênes-Dubé, de Mont-Laurier; Émilie Gauthier, de Mont-Tremblant; Simon Gratton-Laplante, de Mont-Laurier; Laurence Latour-Laitre, de Sainte-Marguerite-du-Lac-Masson; Catherine Mainville, de Lac-Saguay; Nicolas Gaudreau, de Saint-Sauveur; et Guiliana Desrochers, de Sainte-Anne-des-Lacs.

Les bénévoles sont indispensables au développement de nos communautés et on ne pourra jamais assez les remercier.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 327 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on April 07, 2017

2017-04-04 11:49 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Budget debates, Public transit, Public transit tax credit

Débats sur le budget, Transport en commun,

Madam Speaker, obviously, it is important to look at all of the policies surrounding tax credits. I do not fully agree with my colleague.

Madame la Présidente, il est clair qu'il est important de se pencher sur toutes les politiques relatives aux crédits d'impôts. Je ne partage pas entièrement le point de vue de ma collègue.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 82 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on April 04, 2017

2017-04-04 11:48 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Broadband Internet services, Budget debates, Rural communities

Communautés rurales, Débats sur le budget, Services Internet à large bande

It is true, Madam Speaker. Had I stayed at the end of school in the town where I grew up and which I now represent, I would not have the career that I had. I found really interesting work, on contract, working on the Internet from 2000, for almost a decade, as an editor for an online high-tech news website. With all my education, all my experiences having been the same, had I stayed at home I simply could not have done that.

The economic opportunity loss for our youth in rural areas is very serious. The Internet file is the number one issue that people speak to me about in my riding. There are so many other issues that come up, but there are none that come up more often or more firmly than the lack of Internet access in our region.

When I toured the 43 municipalities in my riding, all 43 of them, every one of them, said that their number one priority in the community was Internet. A town of 400 people spent $100,000 of their municipal budget on getting Internet access when it had a boil water advisory in its small aqueduct downtown for more than 10 years.

If that does not tell members how important this file is for us, there is no way of expressing it well enough.

Madame la Présidente, c’est vrai: si j’étais resté après mes études dans la ville où j’ai grandi et que je représente maintenant, je n’aurais pas eu la carrière que j’ai eue. En 2000, j’ai trouvé un poste contractuel réellement intéressant où j’ai travaillé sur Internet pendant près d’une décennie comme rédacteur pour un site de nouvelles haute technologie. Avec tout mon bagage éducatif et professionnel, si j’étais resté dans ma ville, je n’aurais tout simplement pas pu faire cela.

L’absence de débouchés économiques pour les jeunes dans nos régions rurales est très grave. Le dossier Internet est la principale préoccupation que soulèvent les citoyens de ma circonscription quand je m’entretiens avec eux. Beaucoup d’autres questions sont également soulevées, mais aucune n’est mentionnée aussi souvent ni avec autant de conviction que l’absence d’Internet dans notre région.

Quand j’ai visité les 43 municipalités de ma circonscription, toutes sans exception m’ont dit que leur première priorité était Internet. Un village de 400 habitants a dépensé 100 000 $ de son budget municipal pour avoir accès à Internet alors qu’il y a un avis de faire bouillir l’eau provenant de la petite conduite d’eau du centre-ville depuis plus de 10 ans.

Si cela ne communique pas aux députés à quel point ce dossier est important pour nous, il n’y a pas moyen de l’exprimer plus éloquemment.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 468 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on April 04, 2017

2017-04-04 11:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Budget debates, Public transit, Public transit tax credit, Rural communities,

Communautés rurales, Débats sur le budget, Transport en commun

Madam Speaker, I am not sure that the public transit credit did a whole lot in my community, where public transit is essentially non-existent. We have a system that I believe uses six retired school buses on a one-off fare system with no passes, so there is nothing that worked for the actual credit. Those six buses try to service 35 communities about four times a day. It is not a realistic system, so we need to figure out ways to move this forward and to better invest in rural areas. Rural is a rather large portion of this country, as my colleagues will definitely relate to. Rural needs are really important, and I always look forward to new investment in rural areas.

Madame la Présidente, je ne pense pas que le crédit d’impôt pour le transport en commun ait été très bénéfique dans ma localité, où il n’y a pratiquement pas de transport en commun. Je crois que nous avons un système à tarif unique qui utilise six anciens autobus scolaires, donc le crédit d’impôt n’a été d’aucune utilité. Ces six autobus tentent de desservir 35 communautés environ quatre fois par jour. Ce n’est pas un système réaliste; nous devons donc trouver des moyens de faire avancer ce dossier et de mieux investir dans les régions rurales. Ces communautés forment une grande partie de ce pays, comme mes collègues peuvent certainement en témoigner. Les besoins des régions rurales sont réellement importants, et je suis toujours à l’affût de nouveaux investissements dans ces régions.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 282 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on April 04, 2017

2017-04-04 11:41 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Broadband Internet services, Budget debates, Public transit, Rural communities, Transportation infrastructure, Wireless communication,

Communautés rurales, Communication sans fil, Débats sur le budget, Infrastructure des transports, Services Internet à large bande, Transport en commun,

Madam Speaker, I do not remember exactly what I was saying, but I was talking about the need for Internet in rural areas. Very often I see people who come to the riding, want to buy houses or set up businesses, look at beautiful properties, look at their phones, and see the famous red X because there is no signal. They ask the real estate agent if they can get online, and the answer is that they cannot get online here unless they want to use satellite, which has high latency and low reliability. People are looking for solutions, and I am really looking to solve these issues. The billions of dollars available for Internet will help that region.

My riding in the north has the MRC county of Antoine-Labelle with a population of approximately 35,000. It has 17 municipalities. It is a large and not very wealthy region. We did a study last year to find out who had access to Internet, and fewer than one in three households had theoretical access to 10-megabit service. Even fewer than that are actually connected.

What happens is that the kids finish high school, and they want to get online. They want to participate in the modern economy. They go to to the city and they simply do not come back. Then the parents want family to come visit, but they will not even come to visit as much as they used to. The cottage owners are having their grandchildren come less often than they used to because of this very serious problem.

Related to this is cellphone service. If people do not have both Internet and cellphone service, we are not going to solve the communications issues we have.

What do we do about all this? We have to invest. The federal government, provincial government, municipalities, and the CRTC have all committed large sums of money to grow the Internet, so I am very happy with that progress. The CRTC's statement just before Christmas that broadband has to be defined as 15-megabit service with unlimited data is a critical new threshold, because, quite frankly, nobody in my riding has that access.

I am really hoping we can build on the huge progress in our budget, which moves a whole lot of things forward very well, and move this file forward as quickly as possible. Internet is critical, and I would like to make sure we get there.

Another issue is public transit funding, which I think is terrific. I spent years, when I was living in Guelph, as a transit advocate. I believe that if we invest a lot of money in our transit systems, then we can get enough people out of their cars that we do not have to expand the highways infinitely.

I always wanted to know if there is a line beyond which we do not need to pave any further. I have always been curious if we can find that line. We can build highways and roads in every direction as far we want, as long we want, as often as we want, but at some point we have to ask if we have enough, if there is a better way of getting around. Our budget and platform have committed large quantities of money over a long period of time to improving our public transit infrastructure. I really believe this is the direction we need to be going as a country.

Madame la Présidente, je ne me souviens pas exactement de ce que je disais, mais je parlais de la nécessité d’avoir une connexion Internet dans les régions rurales. Je vois très souvent des gens qui veulent acheter des maisons ou créer des entreprises venir dans ma circonscription, regarder de belles propriétés, puis regarder leur téléphone et voir le fameux X rouge parce qu'il n'y a pas de signal. Ils demandent à l'agent immobilier s’il y a un accès à cet endroit, et la réponse est qu'il n'y en a pas, à moins d’utiliser une connexion par satellite, qui a une latence élevée et est peu fiable. Les gens recherchent des solutions, et je souhaite vraiment résoudre ces problèmes. Les milliards de dollars prévus pour Internet aideront cette région.

Dans ma circonscription, dans le Nord, nous avons la MRC d'Antoine-Labelle, qui a une population d'environ 35 000 habitants. Elle compte 17 municipalités. C’est une grande région qui n’est pas très riche. L'an dernier, nous avons mené une étude pour savoir qui avait accès à Internet, et moins d'un ménage sur trois avait théoriquement accès à un service de 10 mégabits. Les ménages qui sont branchés à Internet sont encore moins nombreux.

Ce qui arrive, c’est que les enfants terminent leurs études secondaires et veulent aller en ligne. Ils veulent participer à l'économie moderne. Ils s'en vont en ville et ne reviennent tout simplement pas. Ensuite, les parents veulent que les membres de leur famille leur rendent visite, mais ils ne le feront pas autant qu'ils avaient l’habitude de le faire. Les propriétaires de chalet voient leurs petits-enfants venir leur rendre visite moins souvent que par le passé à cause de ce problème très grave.

L’accès à la téléphonie cellulaire est un problème connexe. Si les gens n’ont pas accès à la fois à Internet et aux services de téléphonie cellulaire, nous ne résoudrons pas les problèmes de communications que nous avons.

Que devons-nous faire à ce sujet? Nous devons investir. Le gouvernement fédéral, le gouvernement provincial, les municipalités et le CRTC ont tous réservé d'importantes sommes au développement d'Internet. Je suis donc très satisfait de ces progrès. La déclaration émise par le CRTC, juste avant Noël, selon laquelle l’accès au service à large bande doit être défini comme étant un service de 15 mégabits qui offre un accès illimité aux données est un nouveau seuil essentiel, parce que, très franchement, personne dans ma circonscription n’a ce genre d’accès.

J’espère vraiment que nous pourrons bâtir sur les énormes progrès réalisés dans le cadre de notre budget, qui fait progresser beaucoup de choses, et que nous pourrons faire avancer ce dossier le plus rapidement possible. Internet est essentiel, et je voudrais m’assurer que nous atteindrons notre objectif.

Une autre question est celle du financement du transport en commun, qui selon moi est une très bonne chose. Quand j’habitais à Guelph, j’ai passé des années à défendre la cause du transport en commun. Je crois que, si nous investissons de grosses sommes d’argent dans nos systèmes de transport en commun, nous pourrons persuader suffisamment de gens de laisser leur voiture à la maison et nous n’aurons pas à constamment élargir nos autoroutes.

J’ai toujours voulu savoir s’il y a une ligne au-delà de laquelle nous ne pourrons plus asphalter. J’ai toujours été curieux de savoir si on peut repérer cette ligne. Nous pouvons construire des routes et des autoroutes dans toutes les directions, aussi loin et aussi longtemps que nous le voulons, mais à un moment, nous devrons nous demander si c’est assez, s’il y a un meilleur moyen de se déplacer. Dans le budget et la plateforme, nous avons promis d’affecter de grosses sommes sur une longue période pour améliorer nos infrastructures de transport en commun. Je crois réellement que c’est la voie dans laquelle nous devons nous engager en tant que pays.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 1236 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on April 04, 2017

2017-04-04 11:38 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Broadband Internet services, Budget debates, Infrastructure, Migration and migrants, Rural communities, Young people,

Communautés rurales, Débats sur le budget, Infrastructure, Jeunes gens, Migration et migrants, Services Internet à large bande,

Madam Speaker, I grew up in a rural area, and like the member for Avalon, rural issues are very important for me.

The town I grew up in has about 1,000 people. It is about an hour from Montreal. It is not a large town, and it lost its school more than 40 years ago. The school, of course, is the anchor of a small town. The school was lost before I was born, and with it went a small number of economically critical good jobs, as well as the social and cultural focal point of our community. A few years ago, we got a gas station. Life, it seemed, was starting to look up.

However, my hometown is one of the lucky ones in rural Canada. Our population is stable. Today I am a member of Parliament for my hometown and 42 other municipalities in the riding of Laurentides—Labelle. The riding is some 40 times the size of the Island of Montreal.

The trouble with big ridings like mine is to understand the different needs we have in rural areas, so I really appreciate that the budget is putting billions of dollars into rural needs, very specifically, especially into our biggest issue, which is Internet access. For me, Internet access is the core of all of our issues. We can invest billions and billions of dollars into rural infrastructure, but if we do not have the Internet to back it up, it is not going to help with the bigger problems that we have. We need to ensure that families can bring their kids back.

In my riding, we have people who finish high school and leave to go to college or CEGEP, because we do not have very much in our riding. They do not come back, ever, or they come back to retire many years later. When I ask the students at the end of high school who is planning to stay, none of them are. The issues, they say, are the lack of public transit in rural areas, the lack of post-secondary education, and the lack of Internet and cellphone service.

Therefore, for me, the addition of $2 billion in the fall economic update for infrastructure is very important. That was just for deep rural needs. The budget made this money available for rural Internet projects.

This is a really critical infrastructure program when added on top of the $500 million Connect to Innovate program from last year.

Madame la Présidente, j'ai grandi dans une région rurale et les questions qui touchent les régions rurales sont chères à mon coeur, comme elles le sont pour le député d'Avalon.

La ville dans laquelle j'ai grandi compte environ 1 000 habitants. Elle se trouve à environ une heure de Montréal. Ce n'est pas une grande ville et elle a perdu son école il y a plus de 40 ans. L'école, bien sûr, est l'ancre d'une petite ville. L'école a été fermée avant ma naissance et avec elle ont été perdus un petit nombre de bons emplois vitaux pour l’économie ainsi que le point central social et culturel de notre communauté. Il y a quelques années, nous avons vu s’ouvrir une station-service. La vie paraissait commencer à s’améliorer.

Cependant, ma ville natale est l'une de celles du Canada rural qui ont eu de la chance. Notre population est stable. Aujourd'hui, je suis le député de ma ville natale et de 42 autres municipalités de la circonscription de Laurentides—Labelle. La circonscription est environ 40 fois plus grande que l'île de Montréal.

Ce qui est difficile avec les grandes circonscriptions comme la mienne, c’est de comprendre les besoins différents que nous avons dans les régions rurales. Je me réjouis donc du fait que le budget consacre des milliards de dollars aux besoins des milieux ruraux, en particulier pour résoudre notre plus gros problème, qui est l’accès à Internet. Pour moi, l'accès à Internet est le cœur de tous nos problèmes. Nous pouvons investir des milliards et des milliards de dollars dans les infrastructures rurales, mais si nous n'avons pas aussi l’accès à Internet, ces investissements ne vont pas nous aider à résoudre les plus gros problèmes que nous avons. Nous devons faire en sorte que les familles puissent ramener leurs enfants.

Dans ma circonscription, nous avons des gens qui terminent leurs études secondaires et qui s’en vont poursuivre leurs études au collège ou dans un cégep ailleurs parce que nous n'avons pas grand-chose dans notre circonscription. Ils ne reviennent jamais, ou ils reviennent pour prendre leur retraite plusieurs années plus tard. Quand je demande aux élèves à la fin des études secondaires qui envisage de rester, tous me disent qu’ils s’en vont. Les problèmes, disent-ils, ce sont le manque de transports en commun dans les régions rurales, le manque de possibilités de faire des études postsecondaires et l'absence d'Internet et de service de téléphonie cellulaire.

Par conséquent, pour moi, l'ajout de 2 milliards de dollars dans la mise à jour économique de l’automne pour les infrastructures est très importante. C'était seulement pour les besoins des régions rurales profondes. Le budget a mis cet argent à la disposition des projets Internet dans les régions rurales.

Combiné aux 500 millions de dollars du programme Brancher pour innover de l'année dernière, c’est un programme d'infrastructures vraiment essentiel.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 906 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on April 04, 2017

2017-03-20 13:22 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Committee Chairs, Government bills, National security, Oversight mechanism, Political appointments, Report stage,

Étape du rapport, Mécanisme de surveillance, Nominations politiques, Présidents de comité, Sécurité nationale

Yes, Madam Speaker, I do.

Oui, madame la Présidente, cela m'apparaît raisonnable.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 48 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 20, 2017

2017-03-20 13:21 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, National security, Oversight mechanism, Report stage, Security intelligence

Étape du rapport, Mécanisme de surveillance, Renseignement de sécurité, Sécurité nationale,

Madam Speaker, it is always a pleasure to take a question from the member for Winnipeg North. I agree with him completely.

It is very important to have a robust system. Bill C-22 offers a very robust system. There are immense challenges. Our intelligence agencies do very interesting things all over the world and somebody needs to oversee them, see what they are doing, ensure they make sense, are within the rules, and have the power to do that without putting any of the operations into jeopardy. What they are doing is a very good, and I am very much supporting this.

Madame la Présidente, je réponds toujours avec plaisir aux questions du député de Winnipeg-Nord. Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec lui.

Il est essentiel de pouvoir compter sur un système robuste. Le projet de loi C-22 propose un système d'une grande robustesse. Les défis sont considérables. Les agences canadiennes du renseignement font un travail très intéressant partout sur la planète. Quelqu'un doit les superviser, regarder ce qu'elles font et s'assurer que les gestes qu'elles posent sont logiques et respectent les règles; il doit avoir le pouvoir d'assurer cette supervision sans mettre aucune activité en péril. Tout cela est très important et a tout mon appui.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 239 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 20, 2017

2017-03-10 13:29 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Access to information, Classified documents, Government bills, National security, Oversight mechanism, Report stage, Security intelligence

Documents classifiés, Étape du rapport, Mécanisme de surveillance, Renseignement de sécurité, Sécurité nationale

Mr. Speaker, there is virtually no information the committee cannot have access to. If access is not granted, that has to be justified in writing by the affected minister, and I cannot see that being used particularly often.

More importantly, the members should be covered by secrecy laws, because it does not make sense for a member to have access to state secrets at this level and then be able to come into the House and spew them and be protected by parliamentary privilege.

Monsieur le Président, le comité aura accès à pratiquement tous les renseignements. Dans les situations où l'accès est refusé, les motifs doivent être présentés par écrit, par le ministre responsable. Ce cas de figure serait plutôt rare.

Il est crucial que les membres soient tenus au secret par la loi. Il serait illogique qu'un membre du comité ait accès à des secrets d'État, puis soit en mesure de les révéler à la Chambre parce qu'il est protégé par le privilège parlementaire.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 201 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 10, 2017

2017-03-10 13:17 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Access to information, Classified documents, Committee members, Federal institutions, Five Eyes, Foreign countries, Government bills, Inquiries and public inquiries, International cooperation, National security,

Coopération internationale, Documents classifiés, Enquêtes et enquêtes publiques, Étape du rapport, Groupe des cinq, Institutions fédérales, Mécanisme de surveillance, Membres des comités,

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to speak to Bill C-22 as reported to the House of Commons by the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security.

We have been discussing the need for such a committee of parliamentarians for more than a decade, so this is an idea whose time has come. We lost 10 years. In fact, Canada has some catching up to do with our closest allies.

We, along with Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States, have an intelligence-sharing arrangement that dates back to the early days of the Cold War. Our alliance is known as the “Five Eyes”.

Every other member of the “Five Eyes” alliance has a body of legislators with special access to classified information relating to national security and intelligence matters. Further, I submit that the broad scope of the Canadian committee’s mandate will make it an even stronger body than many equivalents elsewhere.

I would like to explain to the House how the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, or NSICOP, as proposed in Bill C-22, will compare to frameworks that our allies have established to provide parliamentary oversight of security and intelligence activities.

I will limit my comparison to models in the other Westminster parliamentary tradition in the Five Eyes, namely Australia’s Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security, or PJCIS, and the U.K. and New Zealand, which have each established an Intelligence and Security Committee, known respectively as ISC-UK and ISC-NZ.

There are several similarities between the proposed Canadian committee, called NSICOP, and the parliamentary review committees of those three countries.

The membership of these three committees ranges from 5 to 11 members, appointed by the Prime Minister in consultation with opposition parties. We currently have before us a motion from the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons to increase the size of the NSICOP under Bill C-22 from 9 to 11, which will allow for one additional member from each House of Parliament.

I support this amendment, as it provides the additional flexibility to ensure that the NSICOP’s membership reflects a diversity of views within Parliament. Canada’s NSICOP will be similar to our allies' committees in that committee members will be bound to secrecy.

The mandates of our allies’ committees include the authority to examine matters related to the administration, policy, legislation, and expenditures of national security departments and agencies, but they differ markedly in the examination of operations. I will come back to that shortly.

Each country imposes similar restrictions on the public reports of their committees to ensure that no classified information is disclosed.

In the other Westminster systems, as in Canada, the work of the committee is supported by staff that is required to have the appropriate security clearances.

When it comes to access to classified information, the other Westminster democracies also define the scope of that power by legislation. Generally, there are limits on the power to access certain information.

For example, details about sources, methods, and operations, or whether the information was provided by a foreign government may not be disclosed to the committees.

Each of the Westminster countries authorizes the executive branch, namely the minister responsible for the department or agency under review, with powers to withhold sensitive information to ensure that the national interest and security are not harmed.

The standing committee has made some significant changes to this area of Bill C-22. In particular, it deleted almost all of the provisions in clauses 14 and 16 of the bill. This includes provisions that protect important types of information such as the identities of sources and persons in the witness protection program.

I am pleased to see that the government has carefully considered the spirit and intent of the standing committee's changes, and is suggesting a compromise approach. We have before us a motion by the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons to restore clause 16 and partially restore clause 14.

Under this approach, the national security intelligence committee of parliamentarians would be provided with access to as much information relevant to its mandate as possible, with restrictions applied only where necessary to prevent harm to individuals, ongoing police investigations, or national security.

I believe this is a responsible, balanced approach, and I urge all members to join me in supporting these amendments.

I have, until now, described similarities between what is proposed in Bill C-22 and what is already in place among our Five Eyes allies, but the proposed national security and intelligence committee of parliamentarians will be different from parliamentary review elsewhere in some significant ways.

The differences among the Five Eyes allies relate to the scope of the committees’ mandates, that is to say, the extent to which each committee can examine various institutions involved in national security. The other three Westminster models limit the jurisdiction of their committee to the main national security agencies. The UK and New Zealand allow for additional agencies or programs to be added, but only if the government agrees.

Bill C-22 will give Canada’s committee of parliamentarians a broader mandate. Committee members will be able to examine any national security and intelligence activity conducted by the Government of Canada, regardless of which department or agency is conducting this activity. This will include the main security and intelligence agencies, that is to say, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the Communications Security Establishment, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, as well as the other 17 or so other federal organizations that have national security responsibilities, such as the Canadian Border Services Agency.

One of the amendments reported to us by the Standing Committee will make it clear that the committee of parliamentarians' mandate and access to information includes crown corporations. I support this amendment, which is entirely consistent with the committee’s government-wide mandate.

As mentioned earlier, when it comes to the mandate that the committees have over operations, the Five Eyes countries differ considerably in their approaches. The committees in Australia and New Zealand have no mandate to consider operational matters. In the U.K., the committee may review operations, but only if it meets certain conditions, namely, that the Prime Minister has agreed that it is not part of an ongoing operation and that the matter is of significant national interest.

The U.K. committee may only review an ongoing operation if the matter is referred by the British government. Under the bill before us, the Canadian committee would have a broader mandate to review national security and intelligence activities. It would, for example, be able to examine ongoing operations on its own initiative, with the proviso that the minister could stop a review for reasons of national security.

I am pleased to see that the standing committee has strengthened this aspect of the bill by clarifying that operational reviews may only be stopped for national security reasons during the period that the operation in question is ongoing, and that once the operation is complete the parliamentary committee may resume its review. Furthermore, the instances in which this authority is used will be part of the committee’s annual reporting to Parliament, ensuring government accountability in this area.

Another unique feature of this bill is the ability of the committee to engage with the three existing Canadian review bodies that are dedicated to reviewing particular agencies, that is to say, the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP, the Security Intelligence Review Committee for CSIS, and the Commissioner of the Communications Security Establishment. This ensures that the committee’s work can be informed by the work of these highly focused and expert review bodies.

I have outlined the similarities and differences between what is included in Bill C-22 and how our allies among the Five Eyes implement similar oversight and review of security and intelligence matters. We have taken some of the best practices from our allies and gone further to establish a strong, accountable, and transparent review of Canada’s security and intelligence community’s activities.

This is truly a made-in-Canada approach to parliamentary review of security and intelligence. Our country may be late in creating a parliamentary review committee, but Canadians will now have a bold and forward-looking framework for this committee of parliamentarians. Establishing the committee underscores our commitment to be more open and transparent and keep our country safe.

I commend the government for engaging with the standing committee in a constructive and thoughtful manner to improve Bill C-22. I urge honourable members to join me in supporting the amendments proposed by the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and the passage of this important bill.

Monsieur le Président, je prends la parole aujourd'hui pour parler du projet de loi C-22 dans sa forme présentée à la Chambre des communes par le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale.

Cela fait maintenant plus de 10 ans que nous discutons de la nécessité d'établir ce comité des parlementaires, et le temps est venu d'agir. Ces 10 années ont vraiment été perdues. De fait, le Canada a du rattrapage à faire par rapport à nos plus proches alliés.

Connus sous le nom de « Groupe des cinq », le Canada, l'Australie, la Nouvelle-Zélande, le Royaume-Uni et les États-Unis ont une entente de partage de renseignements datant du début de la guerre froide.

Tous les membres du Groupe des cinq, sauf le Canada, possèdent un organisme de parlementaires ayant un accès privilégié à des renseignements classifiés en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement. De plus, j'estime que la portée étendue du mandat du comité canadien en fera un organisme encore plus robuste que ses équivalents à l'étranger.

J'aimerais prendre le temps d'expliquer à la Chambre des communes où se situerait le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, ou le CPSNR tel que proposé par le projet de loi C-22, par rapport aux cadres qu'ont établis nos alliés pour permettre aux parlementaires de surveiller des activités de sécurité et de renseignement.

Je me limiterai au modèle des pays s'inscrivant dans la tradition parlementaire de Westminster au sein du Groupe des cinq, plus précisément le Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security, le PJCIS d'Australie, ainsi que les Intelligence and Security Committee du Royaume-Uni et de la Nouvelle-Zélande, soit le ISC-UK et le ISC-NZ.

On remarque plusieurs similarités entre le comité canadien proposé, le CPSNR, et les organismes d'examen parlementaire de ces trois pays.

La taille de ces trois comités varie de 5 à 11 membres, qui sont nommés par le premier ministre en consultation avec les partis de l'opposition. À l'heure actuelle, la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes a déposé une motion visant à faire passer de 9 à 11 le nombre de membres du CPSNR au titre du projet de loi C-22, ce qui permettrait l'ajout d'un membre de chaque Chambre du Parlement.

J'appuie cet amendement, car il apportera la flexibilité nécessaire pour veiller à ce que les membres du comité soient représentatifs de la diversité des opinions au Parlement. Le CPSNR du Canada sera comparable à celui de nos alliés, c'est-à-dire que ses membres seront astreints au secret.

Les mandats des comités de nos alliés prévoient l'autorité d'examiner les questions liées à l'administration, aux politiques, à la législation et aux dépenses relatives aux ministères et aux agences chargées de la sécurité nationale. Ils diffèrent toutefois substantiellement en ce qui a trait à l'évaluation des opérations. Je me pencherai sur cette question sous peu.

Chaque pays impose des restrictions similaires relativement à la divulgation publique des activités de son comité, et ce, en vue de veiller à ce qu'aucun renseignement classifié ne soit divulgué.

Dans les autres gouvernements fondés sur le régime de Westminster, comme celui du Canada, le personnel qui appuie les travaux des comités se doit d'obtenir les attestations de sécurité appropriées.

En ce qui concerne l'accès aux renseignements classifiés, les autres démocraties fondées sur le régime britannique définissent également de façon législative l'étendue de ce pouvoir. Généralement, les autorisations d'accès à certaines informations sont limitées.

À titre d'exemple, les comités ne peuvent pas divulguer des détails concernant les sources, les méthodes et les opérations, ou encore des détails indiquant si les renseignements ont été fournis par un gouvernement étranger.

Chacun des pays dont le système est fondé sur le modèle de Westminster confère au département du pouvoir exécutif, plus précisément au ministre responsable du ministère ou de l'agence faisant l'objet d'un examen, le pouvoir de ne pas divulguer des renseignements sensibles en vue de s'assurer qu'on ne porte pas atteinte aux intérêts nationaux ni à la sécurité de l'État.

Le comité permanent a apporté certains changements importants à cet égard dans le projet de loi C-22. Plus précisément, ce comité a supprimé presque toutes les dispositions des articles 14 et 16 du projet de loi, ce qui inclut les dispositions qui protègent des types d'informations importantes, comme l'identité des sources et des personnes dans le Programme de la protection des témoins.

Je me réjouis de constater que le gouvernement a soigneusement considéré l'esprit et l'intention des changements du comité permanent et qu'il propose un compromis. Nous avons devant nous une motion de la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes visant à rétablir l'article 16 et une partie de l'article 14.

En vertu de cette approche, le comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement aura accès à tous les renseignements pertinents qui lui permettront de mener à bien son mandat, sous réserve de certaines restrictions applicables seulement lorsque cela sera nécessaire, notamment pour protéger des tiers, pour éviter de nuire à des enquêtes policières actives ou pour ne pas nuire à la sécurité nationale.

Je considère qu'il s'agit là d'une approche responsable et équilibrée, et je recommande avec insistance à tous les députés de se joindre à moi et d'appuyer ces amendements.

Jusqu'ici, j'ai décrit les similarités entre ce qui est proposé dans le projet de loi C-22 et ce qui est déjà en place chez nos alliés du Groupe des cinq. Toutefois, le comité dont nous proposons la création différera grandement, à certains égards, des autres comités d'examen parlementaire.

Les différences entre les comités du Groupe des cinq concernent la portée de leurs mandats respectifs, c'est-à-dire la mesure dans laquelle chacun d'entre eux peut mener des examens portant sur diverses organisations participant à la sécurité nationale. Les trois autres régimes de Westminster limitent les domaines de compétence de leurs comités aux principaux organismes de sécurité nationale. Le Royaume-Uni et la Nouvelle-Zélande permettent d'ajouter des organismes ou des programmes nationaux aux domaines de compétence de leurs comités, mais seulement si le gouvernement y consent.

Le projet de loi C-22 accordera un mandat plus étendu au comité des parlementaires. Ainsi, ses membres pourront examiner toutes les opérations ayant trait à la sécurité nationale et au renseignement qui sont menées par le gouvernement du Canada, peu importe le ministère ou l'organisme responsable de celles-ci. Cela comprendra les principaux organismes de sécurité et de renseignement, c'est-à-dire le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité, le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications et la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, ainsi que les quelque 17 autres organisations fédérales dont les responsabilités concernent la sécurité nationale, comme l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada.

L'un des amendements présentés par le comité permanent fera en sorte que le mandat du comité des parlementaires et les pouvoirs de celui-ci en matière d'accès à l'information incluront les sociétés de la Couronne. J'appuie cet amendement, qui est entièrement conforme au mandat pangouvernemental du comité.

Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, les pays du Groupe des cinq ont des approches très différentes en ce qui concerne les mandats d'examen de leurs comités respectifs. En effet, les mandats des comités de l'Australie et de la Nouvelle-Zélande ne leur permettent pas d'examiner des questions opérationnelles. Au Royaume-Uni, le comité peut examiner des opérations, mais uniquement si cet examen répond à certaines conditions, à savoir que le premier ministre est d'accord sur le fait qu'il n'est pas réalisé dans le cadre d'une opération courante et que la question est d'un grand intérêt pour le pays.

De plus, le comité du Royaume-Uni peut uniquement examiner une opération courante si la question a été soumise par le gouvernement britannique. En vertu du projet de loi qui est devant nous, le comité canadien disposerait d'un mandat plus étendu et permettant d'examiner des opérations ayant trait à la sécurité nationale et au renseignement. Il serait, par exemple, habilité à effectuer les examens des opérations courantes de son propre chef, mais un ministre pourrait mettre un terme à un tel examen pour des raisons de sécurité nationale.

Je me réjouis de constater que le comité permanent a renforcé cet aspect du projet de loi, en précisant que les examens des opérations peuvent seulement être interrompus pour des raisons de sécurité nationale durant le déroulement de l'opération en question, et qu'une fois l'opération terminée, le comité des parlementaires peut poursuivre son examen. De plus, les cas où ce pouvoir sera utilisé seront consignés dans le rapport que le comité présentera chaque année au Parlement afin de veiller à la responsabilité gouvernementale.

Une autre caractéristique unique de ce projet de loi est la capacité du comité à collaborer avec les trois organismes d'examen qui se penchent sur les activités de certaines organisations et de certains organismes, à savoir la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC, le Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité du SCRS et le Bureau du commissaire du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. Cela permettra au comité de s'inspirer des travaux réalisés par ces organismes d'examen hautement spécialisés.

J'ai souligné certaines ressemblances et différences entre le contenu du projet de loi C-22 et les caractéristiques des organismes d'examen et de surveillance des activités liées à la sécurité et au renseignement qui ont été mis sur pied par nos alliés du Groupe des cinq. Nous nous sommes inspirés de certaines pratiques exemplaires de nos alliés et sommes allés plus loin afin d'établir un organisme solide, responsable et transparent chargé d'examiner les opérations de la communauté canadienne de la sécurité et du renseignement.

Il s'agit donc d'une approche purement canadienne en matière d'examen parlementaire de la sécurité et du renseignement. Notre pays a peut-être agi tardivement pour établir ce comité, mais les Canadiennes et les Canadiens disposeront dorénavant d'une structure d'examen robuste et progressiste. La création de ce comité témoigne de notre volonté de faire preuve d'une plus grande ouverture et d'une plus grande transparence et de protéger notre pays.

Je remercie le gouvernement d'avoir collaboré avec le comité permanent de façon constructive et rigoureuse, afin d'améliorer le projet de loi C-22. Je recommande avec insistance à Mmes et MM. les députés de se joindre à moi pour appuyer les amendements proposés par la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes, ainsi que l'adoption de ce projet de loi.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 3136 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 10, 2017

2017-03-10 13:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, National security, Oversight mechanism, Report stage,

Étape du rapport, Mécanisme de surveillance, Sécurité nationale

Mr. Speaker, I am wondering if the member is aware that when the Speaker says “questions or comments”, one can ask a question or make a comment?

Monsieur le Président, je me demande si la députée est au courant que, lorsque le Président dit « questions et observations », on peut poser une question ou faire une observation.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 83 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 10, 2017

2017-03-10 12:59 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Committee members, Government bills, National security, Oversight mechanism, Report stage

Étape du rapport, Mécanisme de surveillance, Membres des comités, Sécurité nationale,

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek for acknowledging that this is a Liberal platform commitment that we are indeed fulfilling.

As the member knows, coming out of committee, Bill C-22 firmly enshrines in the legislation that government MPs cannot form a majority on this committee. Also, this committee would have powers to report to Parliament, including on obstruction by a minister, which the majority of the committee, which does not need to include the support of a single government member, have decided is undue. The member describes this as somehow giving the power of the committee to the Prime Minister, and speaks of it as “laughable”.

The government caucus contains no senators. If a future Conservative government wants to continue to appoint partisan senators, that is something the Conservatives can take up with the electorate.

Monsieur le Président, je remercie la députée de Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek de reconnaître qu'il s'agit d'une promesse qui se trouvait dans la plateforme libérale et que nous la respectons.

Comme le sait la députée, le projet de loi C-22, après son passage au comité, prévoit que les députés ministériels ne pourront être majoritaires au sein du comité. De plus, le comité pourra faire rapport au Parlement, notamment en cas d'obstruction, par un ministre, que la majorité des membres du comité jugent injustifiée, même si aucun des députés ministériels au sein du comité n'est de cet avis. La députée interprète cette situation comme une preuve de la mainmise du premier ministre sur le comité et la qualifie de « ridicule ».

Le caucus ministériel ne compte aucun sénateur. Si un prochain gouvernement conservateur choisit de nommer des sénateurs affiliés à son parti, ce sera aux conservateurs d'en répondre devant la population.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 319 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 10, 2017

2017-03-10 12:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, National security, Oversight mechanism, Report stage,

Étape du rapport, Mécanisme de surveillance, Sécurité nationale

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the member's speech. I want to say that the committee did a lot of really good work. I wonder if the member could expand a bit more on the importance of having accepted some of the amendments that came forward from the opposition, ensuring that their committee work at the security committee here in Parliament will improve the overall process here.

Monsieur le Président, je remercie la députée de son discours. Je tiens à dire que le comité a accompli beaucoup d'excellent travail. La députée pourrait-elle en dire plus long sur l'importance d'avoir accepté certains amendements proposés par l'opposition, ce qui fait en sorte que les travaux du comité de la sécurité, ici, au Parlement, bonifient le processus dans son ensemble?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 151 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 10, 2017

2017-03-10 12:36 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Access to information, Government bills, National security, Oversight mechanism, Report stage, Security intelligence, Withholding of information

Étape du rapport, Mécanisme de surveillance, Renseignement de sécurité, Sécurité nationale,

Mr. Speaker, I find it a little rich hearing about muzzling, coming from the Conservatives, who muzzled every federal scientist in the country for an extended period of time. It is an odd comment to make.

I have been hearing the Conservatives talk today about not being able to oversee operations going on in the community, which is clearly not the case, if they read the bill. The bill says that the committee will have the power to oversee anything operational unless there is a rejection by the minister, with an explanation for that particular operation. Generally, the committee will have the power to do the job it needs to do at all times. If it is blocked at any point, it would have to be clearly and expressly explained by the minister.

I wonder if the member has any comments on that.

Monsieur le Président, les conservateurs ne manquent pas de culot pour parler de musellement: ils ont eux-mêmes muselé les scientifiques fédéraux pendant je ne sais plus combien de temps. Quel drôle de commentaire.

Les conservateurs ont soutenu aujourd'hui qu'il serait impossible de surveiller réellement les activités des services de renseignement, mais il suffit de lire le projet de loi pour constater que c'est faux. Le texte dit clairement que le comité pourra surveiller toutes les opérations qu'il veut, à moins que le ministre s'y oppose, justification à l'appui. Bref, il aura tous les pouvoirs nécessaires pour faire son travail, quelle que soit l'occasion. Si jamais on lui interdit quoi que ce soit, le ministre devra expliquer clairement pourquoi.

Que répond le député à cela?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 302 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 10, 2017

2017-03-10 12:24 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, National security, Oversight mechanism, Report stage,

Étape du rapport, Mécanisme de surveillance, Sécurité nationale

Mr. Speaker, whether we think he was a traitor or we think he was a hero, Edward Snowden exposed a lot of what was happening in the United States in the process.

I do not know if my colleague believes that is a good way of keeping accountability, or if it is a lot better to have a multipartisan committee of parliamentarians overseeing our intelligence agencies to make sure that what is going on is the right thing.

Monsieur le Président, que l'on pense qu'Edward Snowden était un traître ou un héros, cela ne change pas le fait qu'il a dévoilé au grand jour ce qui se passait aux États-Unis.

Mon collègue croit-il que c'est la meilleure façon de faire en sorte que les responsables rendent des comptes? Ne serait-il pas préférable d'avoir un comité formé de parlementaires de divers partis qui surveillent nos organismes de renseignement dans le but de s'assurer qu'ils agissent comme il se doit?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 185 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 10, 2017

2017-03-10 10:43 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Ethics and ethical issues, Five Eyes, Government bills, National security, Oversight mechanism, Report stage,

Étape du rapport, Éthique et questions éthiques, Groupe des cinq, Mécanisme de surveillance, Sécurité nationale

Mr. Speaker, in an era when the Five Eyes have been accused of doing things like the Stuxnet worm and creating the Equation Group, which created hacks for hard drives, and otherwise doing things which are varying levels of creative, I am wondering what my colleague from Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame thinks of the importance of having a committee of this type to oversee and make sure that whenever these kinds of actions are taken by any member of the Five Eyes, those actions are legal and ethical and are kept within the bounds of what we should and can be doing.

Monsieur le Président, alors que le Groupe des cinq a été accusé d'avoir créé le ver Stuxnet et d'avoir mis en place le groupe Équation, créateur de logiciels exploitant les vulnérabilités des disques durs, sans oublier d'autres gestes faiblement ou grandement créatifs, j'aimerais avoir les impressions du député de Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame: serait-il important, selon lui, qu'un comité comme celui qu'on propose puisse exercer une surveillance et s'assurer que lorsqu'un membre du Groupe des cinq pose un geste de ce genre, son geste est légal, éthique et ne dépasse pas les bornes?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 235 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 10, 2017

2017-03-09 13:40 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canadian Forces, Income and wages, Kuwait, Military personnel, Operation Impact, Opposition motions, Tax relief, Veterans,

Allègement fiscal, Anciens combattants, Forces canadiennes, Koweït, Opération Impact, Personnel militaire, Revenus et salaires

Mr. Speaker, I want to congratulate my colleague for his bill yesterday. It gave me a good deal of pride to vote for that bill. I serve on the veterans affairs committee and I have been watching a very interesting subject on veterans' suicide. It is meta-traumatizing, if I can call it that, to see what is happening.

From what I understand, the government is committed to providing the retroactive payment today's motion calls for. I am looking to get more information as to what my colleague's concerns are with respect to the motion considering that we are doing what it says.

I want to draw attention to the fact that the Minister of Veterans Affairs was at the veterans affairs committee yesterday talking about how all but two of the veterans offices that had been closed in the last few years have been reopened and the last two are going to be opened in the near future.

I wonder if the member could express his impression of the importance of taking care of our veterans after being in operation as well as while they are in operation.

Monsieur le Président, je tiens à féliciter mon collègue pour son projet de loi, hier. J’étais très fier de voter pour. J’ai siégé au comité des anciens combattants et j’ai assisté à une étude très intéressante sur le suicide chez les anciens combattants. C’est excessivement traumatisant de voir ce qui se produit.

Si je comprends bien, le gouvernement s’est engagé à verser rétroactivement la prime demandée dans la motion d'aujourd’hui. Je souhaiterais en savoir plus sur les inquiétudes de mon collègue concernant la motion puisque nous faisons exactement ce qui y est stipulé.

Je souhaite attirer l’attention sur le fait que le ministre des Anciens Combattants a témoigné hier devant le comité des anciens combattants. Il a parlé des bureaux de services aux anciens combattants qui avaient été fermés ces dernières années et qui ont tous été rouverts, à l’exception de deux qui le seront bientôt.

Je me demande si le député pourrait dire ce qu’il pense de l’importance des services offerts à nos anciens combattants, autant après leur retour de mission que pendant leur déploiement.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 399 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 09, 2017

2017-03-06 18:19 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Airports, Borders, Customs controlled areas, Government bills, Second reading, United States of America,

Aéroports, Deuxième lecture, Frontières, Prédédouanement, Zones de contrôle des douanes

Mr. Speaker, the fact that there is only a handful of airports that have this and it only goes in one direction does not really benefit us nearly as much as it possibly could. If we have pre-clearance in the U.S. to come to Canada, that is a huge advantage for Canada, a huge advantage for regions like mine in the Laurentians where we have an international airport without international flights because it is too difficult to offer customs. It is very important we have this system expanded a little everywhere for rail, for goods, for people, and flights. This is a terrific expansion of this service. I am very much looking forward to it being implemented.

Monsieur le Président, seulement une poignée d'aéroports offrent le précontrôle, et encore, comme ce mécanisme est offert seulement dans une direction, nous n'en tirons pas tous les avantages que nous pourrions. Si les voyageurs américains venant au Canada pouvaient eux aussi profiter du précontrôle, ce serait extraordinaire pour les régions comme la mienne, les Laurentides, dont l'aéroport international n'offre aucun vol international parce que c'est trop compliqué d'y installer des contrôles douaniers. Le précontrôle doit absolument être offert un peu partout, y compris dans les gares, et pas seulement aux voyageurs. Il doit aussi être offert pour les biens. L'expansion de service qu'amènera le projet de loi constitue une excellente nouvelle. Je suis très impatient de la voir se réaliser.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 271 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 06, 2017

2017-03-06 18:18 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Borders, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Customs controlled areas, Government bills, Second reading, United States of America,

Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, Deuxième lecture, Frontières, Prédédouanement, Zones de contrôle des douanes

Mr. Speaker, I understand the question. To me, this is not a major departure from what is currently happening. If someone currently travelling to the United States gets off the plane and changes their mind, what are they going to do? Get back on the plane and leave? That does not work. Clearing customs in Canada is more efficient. Rights are protected under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, but nothing really changes. When someone arrives in the United States, they will be subject to the same restrictions as they are right now.

Monsieur le Président, je comprends la question. Pour moi, ce n'est pas un grand changement par rapport au fonctionnement actuel. Si une personne va aux États-Unis maintenant, qu'elle descend de l'avion et qu'elle change d'idée, que va-t-elle faire? Remonter dans l'avion et repartir? Cela ne fonctionne pas. C'est efficace de mettre les douanes au Canada. Les droits sont protégés par la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, mais la réalité des choses n'a pas vraiment changé. Quand la personne arrivera aux États-Unis, elle sera soumise aux mêmes restrictions que celles auxquelles elle est soumise actuellement.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 233 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 06, 2017

2017-03-06 18:16 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Body searches, Border officials, Borders, Government bills, Second reading, United States of America,

Autorités frontalières, Deuxième lecture, Fouilles corporelles, Frontières, Prédédouanement

Mr. Speaker, we have heard this many times today.

Clearly, this right is something new. The difference is that if there is an unreasonable delay, the search may proceed. I do not think this is unreasonable. If someone travels to the U.S. without pre-clearance, and they arrive without Canadian protections, the same thing will happen. Accordingly, it is much more efficient to go ahead with the system proposed in Bill C-23. That does not really bother me.

Monsieur le Président, on a entendu cela à plusieurs reprises aujourd'hui.

C'est clair que ce droit est nouveau. Le changement, c'est que s'il y a un délai déraisonnable, ils peuvent procéder. Je pense que ce n'est pas déraisonnable de le faire. Si une personne voyage aux États-Unis sans précontrôle, et qu'elle y arrive sans la protection canadienne, les mêmes choses vont se passer. Par conséquent, c'est beaucoup plus efficace de le faire avec le système proposé dans le projet de loi C-23. Cela ne me dérange pas trop.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 194 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 06, 2017

2017-03-06 18:06 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Airports, Border officials, Borders, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Government bills, Rail passenger transportation, Second reading, United States of America,

Aéroports, Autorités frontalières, Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, Deuxième lecture, Frontières, Prédédouanement, Services ferroviaires voyageurs

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today to discuss Bill C-23, which would provide the necessary authority under Canadian law to implement the land, rail, marine, and air transport preclearance agreement, thereby expanding U.S. pre-clearance operations in Canada and, for the first time, enabling pre-clearance of cargo and Canadian pre-clearance operations in the United States.

Pre-clearance makes travel faster and easier for tourists and business travellers alike, and makes it faster and easier for Canadian companies to do business with Americans. It also allows Canadian travellers to undergo U.S. border procedures while under the protection of Canadian law and our Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

The proposed expansion of pre-clearance enabled by Bill C-23 has been greeted with enthusiasm by chambers of commerce across the country, by the tourism industry, which is in fact extremely important in Laurentides—Labelle, by the trucking industry, and by government partners, among others. For example, the mayor of Quebec City has called it a great victory for his city.

Pre-clearance operations for passengers have been a success story for more than 60 years, but they currently exist in only eight Canadian airports, and they do not exist for cargo at all. It is time to build on that success.

The proposed expansion to new locations and modes of travel requires an agreement with the United States. That agreement has been reached, and the United States has passed the legislation needed for implementation in their country with unanimous support in both houses of Congress. However, if we do not pass Bill C-23, the agreement will come to naught, and the benefits of pre-clearance will remain limited to those Canadians who already enjoy them.

Nevertheless, throughout this debate, the NDP members have been advocating in favour of the existing legislative framework. According to the member for Vancouver East, the current pre-clearance system is working well. The member for Beloeil—Chambly has said that the current pre-clearance system works just fine. The member for Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke said that pre-clearance is working very well already. In addition, the member for Windsor—Tecumseh said that she understood that pre-clearance is a process that exists today and it works.

Yes, it does, and I agree that the current legal framework, which has been in place since 1999, has served Canada well, but the NDP support for it is interesting because, in 1999, when this legal framework was proposed, the NDP had a very different take.

At the time, the member for Winnipeg—Transcona, Bill Blaikie, said that the bill raised questions about privacy protection. Mr. Blaikie stated reservations concerning the power of U.S. authorities to detain people, in particular, and he was afraid that U.S. law would be applied on Canadian soil. This sounds somewhat familiar.

The then member for Winnipeg Centre, Pat Martin, said he had serious reservations about the bill. He said it was too “intrusive” and “a breach of Canadian sovereignty”. He was worried that foreign officers would have the right to hold people and stop people from leaving. He argued that by passing the bill, the House was granting foreigners powers on our soil, which the NDP did not think was necessary. He went on to declare that the NDP remained firmly opposed to the creation of Canadian offences for resisting or misleading a foreign pre-clearance officer. He accused proponents of the bill, a group that now seems to include the NDP caucus, of being ready to trample on Canadian sovereignty. The best part is that he said that the bill opened up such a can of worms that it should be sent back to the other place for them to try again and take into consideration such basic things as national pride.

Clearly, a couple of decades later, the NDP realizes that its concerns back then were overblown, not to say unfounded, but here we are again. A new legal pre-clearance framework is again being proposed and the NDP is again sounding the alarm about perceived threats to Canadian sovereignty and perceived powers granted to foreign officers. It will not surprise me if 20 years from now New Democrats leap to the defence of Bill C-23 while insisting that any changes to it would mark the demise of the sovereignty of Canada.

Let us be reasonable. In many respects, Bill C-23 is very similar to the current framework. As concerns authorities to detain, question, search travellers, and seize goods, Bill C-23 is either identical to the existing law or very nearly so.

The same is true regarding penalties for obstructing or lying to an officer, and the right to withdraw from a pre-clearance area is maintained. A traveller just has to say who they are and why they are leaving.

The totality of U.S. pre-clearance operations in Canada would be subject to Canadian law, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Canadian Bill of Rights and the Canadian Human Rights Act. That is an improvement over the present situation, where travellers arrive in the United States and clear customs without any of those protections.

The motion put forward by the member for Beloeil—Chambly asks us to reject Bill C-23 because of what he referred to as the climate of uncertainty at the U.S. border, but it is precisely with legislation like this that we are best able to reduce uncertainty for Canadian travellers.

The bill provides a clear legal framework governing the actions of U.S. officers on Canadian soil and requires U.S. officers in Canada to adhere to Canadian legal and constitutional standards.

Today, for instance, a Canadian taking the train from Montreal to New York has to disembark after crossing the border and submit to U.S. customs and immigration processes without any Canadian legal protection. With Bill C-23 in place, that traveller could be processed at the train station in Montreal with Canadian constitutional safeguards in force and with Canadian authorities on site.

In other words, not only would the legislation bring about substantial economic benefits and make trips to the United States quicker and more convenient for Canadian travellers, it would also enhance constitutional and legal protection for those very travellers.

That helps regions like mine. In my riding, we have the Mont Tremblant International Airport at La Macaza, where flights coming from outside Canada land. At present, it is very difficult to get customs services at that airport, even though it is a port of entry, since it is very costly to bring customs officers from Mirabel.

In the long term, it would help us if U.S. airports already had Canadian customs officers, since they would be able to go to any airport in Canada. That would save a lot of time and improve the economy in the Laurentians. It would solve a problem that has existed for a very long time: the fact that La Macaza is unable to accommodate enough flights from outside Canada, since the costs associated with customs services are too high.

I therefore think this bill is very important for the Laurentians region. I hope it will pass and we will see a number of U.S. airports offering Canadian services. I think that will benefit our entire economy. I know of a number of situations where it will save a lot of time.

When I was younger, I often travelled to the United States. I attended secondary school there, and I took the train or drove to get there. If I had had the option of clearing customs before getting on the train, I would have saved a lot of time. The train left Toronto at 7:00 a.m. and arrived in Buffalo at 2:00 p.m., when the trip by car took less than two hours. That enormous waste of time was caused by customs procedures.

Often, when the train gets to the border as it leaves the country, whichever direction it is going, customs officers check exports, and that takes an hour and a half. Then, when the train gets to the other side of the border, customs officers check imports, and that takes another hour and a half. That means that, altogether, passengers spend three hours at the border, something that simply would not happen if that checking were done at the outset.

Bill C-23 is an improvement over the existing situation. It gives Canadian officers on American soil the same rights as American officers on Canadian soil. It will also improve the economy in all of Canada’s tourist regions.

I am very eager to see this bill come into force.

Monsieur le Président, je suis heureux de prendre la parole aujourd'hui pour discuter du projet de loi C-23 qui confère les pouvoirs nécessaires, en vertu du droit canadien, pour mettre en oeuvre l'Accord relatif au précontrôle dans le domaine du transport terrestre, ferroviaire, maritime et aérien, élargissant ainsi les activités de précontrôle américaines au Canada et, pour la première fois, permettant le contrôle des biens et les activités de précontrôle canadiennes aux États-Unis.

Le précontrôle rend les déplacements plus rapides et faciles, y compris pour les touristes et les voyageurs d'affaires. Il fait en sorte qu'il soit plus rapide et facile pour les entreprises canadiennes de faire affaire avec les Américains. Il permet également aux voyageurs canadiens de se soumettre aux procédures frontalières américaines pendant qu'ils sont protégés par le droit canadien et notre Charte canadienne des droits et libertés.

L'élargissement proposé du précontrôle habilité par le projet de loi C-23 a été accueilli avec enthousiasme par les chambres de commerce de partout au pays, par l'industrie du tourisme qui, d'ailleurs, est extrêmement importante dans Laurentides—Labelle, par l'industrie du camionnage et par les partenaires gouvernementaux, entre autres. Par exemple, le maire de Québec l'appelle une grande victoire pour sa ville.

Les activités de précontrôle des passagers constituent une réussite depuis plus de 60 ans, mais elles n'existent actuellement que dans huit aéroports canadiens. Elles n'existent pas du tout pour les biens. Il est temps de renforcer ce succès.

L'élargissement à de nouveaux endroits et moyens de déplacement exige un accord avec les États-Unis. Cet accord a été conclu et les États-Unis ont adopté les mesures législatives nécessaires pour le mettre en oeuvre dans leur pays, avec le soutien unanime des deux chambres du Congrès. Cependant, si nous n'adoptons pas le projet de loi C-23, l'accord deviendra caduc et les avantages de précontrôle demeureront limités aux Canadiens qui en profitent déjà.

Toutefois, tout au long de ce débat, le NPD préconise le maintien du cadre législatif actuel. Selon la députée de Vancouver-Est, le système de précontrôle actuel fonctionne bien. Le député de Beloeil—Chambly a dit que le système actuel de prédédouanement fonctionnait bien. Le député d'Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke a dit que le précontrôle fonctionnait déjà très bien. De plus, la députée de Windsor—Tecumseh a dit comprendre que le précontrôle est un processus qui existe déjà et qu'il fonctionne.

Effectivement, je suis d'accord que le cadre juridique actuel, en vigueur depuis 1999, a bien servi le Canada, mais le fait que le NPD l'appuie avec tant d'enthousiasme est intéressant, parce qu'en 1999, lorsque ce cadre juridique a été proposé, l'avis du NPD était tout à fait différent.

À l'époque, le député de Winnipeg—Transcona, Bill Blaikie, disait que le projet de loi soulevait des interrogations au sujet de la protection de la vie privée. M. Blaikie a exprimé des réserves concernant notamment le pouvoir des autorités américaines de détenir des personnes, et il craignait que la loi américaine ne s'applique en sol canadien. Cela semble un peu familier.

L'ancien député de Winnipeg-Centre, Pat Martin, disait avoir lui aussi de grandes réserves au sujet du projet de loi. Il l'a qualifié d'« importun » et « d'une atteinte réelle à la souveraineté du Canada ». Il s'est dit inquiet que des agents étrangers auraient le droit de détenir des personnes et de les empêcher de partir. Il a affirmé qu'en adoptant le projet de loi, la Chambre conférait à des étrangers des pouvoirs à exercer sur notre territoire, que le NPD ne jugeait pas nécessaires. Il a poursuivi en déclarant que le NPD demeurait fermement opposé à ce que le fait de résister ou de fournir de faux renseignements à un contrôleur étranger constituait une infraction canadienne. Il a accusé les députés qui appuyaient le projet de loi — un groupe qui semble maintenant comprendre le caucus néo-démocrate — d'être prêts à fouler aux pieds la souveraineté canadienne. La pièce de résistance est qu'il a dit que le projet de loi ouvrait une boîte de Pandore qu'il faudrait renvoyer à l'autre endroit en leur demandant de tenir compte de facteurs aussi fondamentaux que la fierté nationale.

Clairement, quelques décennies plus tard, le NPD reconnaît lui-même que ses préoccupations étaient exagérées, pour ne pas dire non fondées. Or nous voici encore une fois avec un nouveau cadre juridique pour le précontrôle qui est proposé et le NPD sonne de nouveau l'alarme au sujet de soi-disant menaces à la souveraineté du Canada et aux pouvoirs qui seraient conférés à des agents étrangers. Cela ne me surprendra pas si dans 20 ans, les néo-démocrates prennent la défense du projet de loi C-23, en insistant que tout changement à ce dernier occasionnerait le trépas de la souveraineté canadienne.

Soyons raisonnables. À bien des égards, le projet de loi C-23 est très semblable au cadre actuel. En ce qui concerne les pouvoirs de détenir, d'interroger, de fouiller les voyageurs et de saisir les biens, le projet de loi C-23 est identique ou presque identique aux mesures existantes.

Il en est de même en ce qui concerne les sanctions pour entrave ou pour avoir menti à un agent. De plus, le droit de se retirer d'une zone de précontrôle est maintenu. Un voyageur n'a qu'à s'identifier et à indiquer la raison pour laquelle il se retire.

L'ensemble des activités de précontrôle américain au Canada sera également assujetti au droit canadien, à la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, à la Déclaration canadienne des droits et à la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne. Cela est une amélioration de la situation actuelle, où les voyageurs arrivent aux États-Unis et passent la douane sans bénéficier de ces protections.

La motion présentée par le député de Beloeil—Chambly nous demande de rejeter le projet de loi C-23 en invoquant un état d'incertitude à la frontière américaine. Toutefois, c'est exactement à l'aide d'une mesure législative comme celle-ci que nous serons mieux en mesure de réduire l'incertitude pour les voyageurs canadiens.

Ce projet de loi offre un cadre juridique clair régissant les mesures prises par les agents américains en sol canadien, et il oblige les agent américains au Canada à respecter les normes canadiennes juridiques et constitutionnelles.

Par exemple, à l'heure actuelle, un Canadien qui prend le train de Montréal à New York doit débarquer après avoir traversé la frontière et se soumettre aux procédures douanières et d'immigration américaines sans aucune des protections juridiques canadiennes. Si le projet de loi C-23 est adopté, ce voyageur pourra être traité à la gare ferroviaire à Montréal, bénéficiant ainsi des protections constitutionnelles canadiennes en vigueur, en présence d'autorités canadiennes sur place.

En d'autres mots, non seulement cette mesure législative confère des avantages économiques considérables et rend plus rapides et conviviaux les voyages aux États-Unis, elle bonifie également les protections constitutionnelles et juridiques à l'égard des voyageurs canadiens.

Cela aide des régions comme la mienne. Dans ma circonscription, il y a l'Aéroport international de Mont-Tremblant, à La Macaza, qui reçoit des avions de l'étranger. Présentement, il est très difficile d'avoir des services douaniers à cet aéroport, même s'il s'agit d'un aéroport d'entrée, car cela coûte très cher de déplacer les douaniers de Mirabel.

À long terme, cela nous aiderait si des aéroports américains avaient déjà des agents douaniers canadiens, car ceux-ci pourraient aller à n'importe quel aéroport au Canada. Cela permettrait de gagner beaucoup de temps et d'améliorer l'économie des Laurentides. Cela réglerait un problème qui existe depuis très longtemps, soit le fait que La Macaza ne peut pas accueillir suffisamment d'avions de l'étranger, puisque les coûts liés aux services douaniers sont trop élevés.

Alors, j'estime que ce projet de loi est très important pour la région des Laurentides. J'espère qu'il sera adopté et qu'on verra plusieurs aéroports américains offrir des services canadiens. Je crois que cela avantagera notre économie entière. Je connais plusieurs situations où cela permettra de gagner beaucoup de temps.

Lorsque j'étais plus jeune, j'ai souvent voyagé aux États-Unis. J'ai fait mes études secondaires aux États-Unis, et je prenais le train ou la voiture pour m'y rendre. Si j'avais eu l'option de passer la douane avant de prendre le train, j'aurais gagné beaucoup de temps. Le train quitte Toronto à 7 heures et arrive à Buffalo à 14 heures, alors que le trajet en voiture ne dure même pas deux heures. Cette énorme perte de temps est causée par les procédures douanières.

Souvent, lorsque le train arrive à la frontière en quittant le pays, que ce soit dans une direction ou dans l'autre, les douaniers procèdent à une vérification des exportations, ce qui prend environ une heure et demie. Puis, lorsque le train se rend de l'autre côté de la frontière, les douaniers procèdent à une vérification des importations, ce qui prend encore une heure et demie. Ainsi, en tout, les passagers passent trois heures à la frontière, alors que cela n'aurait tout simplement pas lieu si ces vérifications étaient faites au départ.

Le projet de loi C-23 constitue une amélioration de la situation actuelle. Il accorde aux agents canadiens en sol américain les mêmes droits qu'ont les agents américains en sol canadien. De plus, il améliorera l'économie de toutes les régions touristiques du Canada.

J'ai vraiment hâte que ce projet de loi entre en vigueur.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 2931 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on March 06, 2017

2017-02-21 18:24 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Borders, Government bills, Rail transportation and railways, Second reading, United States of America

Deuxième lecture, Frontières, Prédédouanement, Transport ferroviaire et chemins de fer,

Mr. Speaker, I think that the current Bill C-23 is much better than Bill C-23 from the previous Parliament, but let us forget about that for now.

The last time I checked the schedule for the train from Toronto to New York, there was a delay at the U.S. border of between an hour and half to three hours. Expanding this train service is very important, and that is what this bill proposes. We see this in Europe. When I travelled from London to Brussels by train, I cleared customs on the England side, before going through the tunnel. It is very efficient.

I want to know what my colleague from Mégantic—L'Érable thinks of the importance of also expanding this customs service to rail service.

Monsieur le Président, je trouve que le projet de loi C-23 actuel est bien meilleur que le projet de loi C-23 de la dernière législature, mais mettons cela de côté.

La dernière fois que j'ai consulté l'horaire du train qui va de Toronto à New York, il y avait un délai à la frontière américaine variant entre une heure et demie et trois heures. C'est très important d'étendre ce service aux trains, comme le propose le projet de loi. On le voit en Europe. Quand je suis passé de Londres à Bruxelles en train, le dédouanement s'est fait du côté de l'Angleterre, avant de traverser le tunnel. C'est très efficace.

J'aimerais savoir ce que mon collègue de Mégantic—L'Érable pense de l'importance d'étendre également ce service de douane aux services ferroviaires.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 282 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 21, 2017

2017-02-21 18:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Border officials, Borders, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Government bills, Law enforcement, Second reading, United States of America

Application de la loi, Autorités frontalières, Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, Deuxième lecture, Frontières, Prédédouanement,

Mr. Speaker, I have a rather simple question for my colleague.

I would like to know his opinion on the importance of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and its enforcement in the context of foreign border services officers on Canadian soil.

Monsieur le Président, la question que j'aimerais poser à mon collègue est assez simple.

J'aimerais qu'il nous donne son opinion sur l'importance de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés et de son application dans le contexte des douaniers étrangers sur le territoire canadien.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 132 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 21, 2017

2017-02-21 17:58 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Border officials, Borders, Government bills, Human resources, Second reading, United States of America, Workplaces

Autorités frontalières, Deuxième lecture, Frontières, Lieux de travail, Prédédouanement, Ressources humaines,

Mr. Speaker, I have a very brief question for my colleague from Montarville.

Does he know, or can he explain to the House, how customs officers on both sides of the border choose their place of work in the other country?

Monsieur le Président, j'ai une question très brève pour mon collègue de Montarville.

Est-ce qu'il sait, ou peut-il nous expliquer, comment les douaniers des deux côtés de la frontière vont choisir leur lieu de travail dans l'autre pays?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 115 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 21, 2017

2017-02-21 17:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Borders, Government bills, Rail transportation and railways, Second reading, United States of America

Deuxième lecture, Frontières, Prédédouanement, Transport ferroviaire et chemins de fer,

Mr. Speaker, I would quickly say that this is a much better Bill C-23 than the last Bill C-23 we had, which was the Fair Elections Act, so I thank him for that.

One of the worst experiences I have had was going through Washington's Dulles International Airport and having a three-hour delay. Had there been pre-clearance to get into the U.S. from Europe, I would not have missed my flight while my bags made it to Canada, which was an entertaining experience.

I would like to know this. Bill C-23 would expands this to all modes of transportation. Does that mean that the very long delays crossing a border by train would soon be addressed or that there would at least be the potential to do so?

Monsieur le Président, je prends quelques secondes pour rappeler que le projet de loi C-23 dont la Chambre est actuellement saisie est bien mieux que le dernier projet de loi à avoir porté ce numéro — la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections —, et j'en remercie le secrétaire parlementaire.

C'est à l'aéroport international Dulles, de Washington, que j'ai vécu une des pires expériences de ma vie. Mon vol avait été retardé de trois heures. Si les États-Unis et l'Union européenne avaient eu une entente de précontrôle, je n'aurais pas manqué mon vol tandis que mes bagages prenaient le chemin du Canada. Ce que je me suis amusé, cette fois-là.

J'aimerais savoir une chose. Le projet de loi C-23 étendra le précontrôle à tous les moyens de transport. Puis-je en conclure que nous pourrons enfin dire adieu aux interminables attentes lorsque nous traversons la frontière par train? Peut-on au moins l'espérer?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 305 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 21, 2017

2017-02-13 12:26 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Economic impact, European Union, Free trade, Government bills, Middle class, Third reading and adoption, Trade agreements

Accords commerciaux, Classe moyenne, Retombées économiques, Troisième lecture et adoption, Union européenne

Mr. Speaker, my riding is built on trade, as most of our ridings are. However, a lot of people in my riding have expressed doubt to me about the value of free trade, which is something I do not necessarily agree with them on, but their perspective is not completely unreasonable. My riding's main industry is forestry, and it has had a pretty rough ride with respect to trade.

I wonder if my colleague from York—Simcoe could tell us how free trade helps the middle class in this country.

Monsieur le Président, ma circonscription s'est bâtie grâce aux échanges commerciaux, tout comme la plupart des autres circonscriptions. Cependant, de nombreux habitants de ma circonscription ont dit douter de la valeur du libre-échange. Je ne suis pas nécessairement d'accord avec leur point de vue, mais celui-ci n'est pas entièrement déraisonnable. La principale industrie de ma circonscription, c'est l'industrie forestière, et elle a connu des moments assez difficiles sur le plan des échanges commerciaux.

J'aimerais que mon collègue d'York—Simcoe nous dise de quelle façon le libre-échange aide la classe moyenne au pays.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 219 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 13, 2017

2017-02-10 13:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canadian Register of Historic Places, Costs, Discretionary powers, Heritage sites and buildings, Housing repairs and renovation, Parks Canada Agency, Second reading, Tax credits,

Agence Parcs Canada, Coûts, Deuxième lecture, Pouvoir discrétionnaire, Projets de loi émanant des députés, Rénovations domiciliaires, Répertoire des lieux patrimoniaux du Canada, Sites et édifices patrimoniaux,

Mr. Speaker, I am definitely sympathetic to this bill. I have received a lot of calls from areas in my riding about it. My riding is built on a huge amount of heritage. We have several historic railway stations. The line was built in the 1890s, and we spent all of 2016 celebrating the founder of our region, Antoine Labelle.

When I was growing up, my father spent a lot of time with a bunch of people creating heritage committees and saving the stations. In 2008, on election night, the train station in my hometown burned to the ground. I think it is really important that we do preserve our heritage.

I have a couple of quick questions for my colleague. There is no upper cost limit in this bill. I am curious to know if my colleague thinks there should or should not be one.

I know that the United States has a tax credit for heritage buildings. What does my colleague know about the return on investment for that cost for the government?

Also, and I do not mean this in a partisan way, why did this not happen in the last 10 years?

Monsieur le Président, je suis tout à fait favorable au projet de loi à l'étude. J'ai reçu beaucoup d'appels de résidants de différents coins de ma circonscription à ce sujet. Ma circonscription regorge de richesses patrimoniales. On y trouve plusieurs gares ferroviaires historiques. La voie ferrée a été construite dans les années 1890, et nous avons célébré la mémoire du fondateur de la région, Antoine Labelle, tout au long de 2016.

Quand j'étais jeune, mon père et une multitude de gens passaient beaucoup de temps à mettre sur pied des comités de protection du patrimoine et à sauvegarder les gares. Un incendie a détruit la gare de ma ville en 2008, le soir des élections. Nous devons vraiment nous efforcer de préserver notre patrimoine, selon moi.

J'aurais quelques questions rapides à l'intention du député. Le projet de loi ne prévoit aucun coût maximal. Je me demande si le député jugerait pertinent d'en fixer un.

Par ailleurs, je sais qu'il existe, aux États-Unis, un crédit d'impôt pour les bâtiments patrimoniaux. Le député sait-il quel est le rendement sur investissement de cette mesure pour le gouvernement?

Je me demande aussi, sans partisanerie aucune, pourquoi la mesure à l'étude n'a pas été présentée au cours des 10 dernières années.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 453 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 10, 2017

2017-02-09 15:41 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Electoral reform, Opposition motions, Referenda

Référendums, Réforme électorale,

Madam Speaker, in 2007, I was very involved in the referendum in Ontario. I have seen the electoral reform debate up close and personal. Referendums do serve a purpose. I do not object to them philosophically. They have a role, but here is the thing.

On an electoral reform referendum, if 55% of the population votes for a change and 45% does not, on the basis that 45% of the people's votes did not count, what have we really accomplished? Are we not being extraordinarily ironic in saying a little over half the country agrees with this change, therefore the ones who do not agree, whom we are trying to protect in the first place, do not matter yet again? It seems a great contradiction to me.

Madame la Présidente, en 2007, j'ai participé très activement au référendum en Ontario. J'ai vu le débat sur la réforme électorale de près. Les référendums ont un but. Je n’y vois pas d’objection de principe. Ils ont un rôle à jouer, mais le problème est le suivant.

Si, lors d’un référendum sur la réforme électorale, 55 % de la population vote pour un changement et que 45 % ne le fait pas, compte tenu du fait que 45 % des votes du peuple n’ont pas compté, qu'avons-nous réellement accompli? N’y a-t-il pas un paradoxe extraordinaire à dire qu'un peu plus de la moitié du pays est d'accord avec ce changement, et que ceux qui ne sont pas d'accord, c’est-à-dire justement ceux que nous essayons de protéger, n'ont donc encore une fois pas d'importance? Cela me paraît être une sérieuse contradiction.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 282 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 09, 2017

2017-02-09 15:38 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Electoral reform, Government accountability, Opposition motions, Political programs,

Imputabilité du gouvernement, Programmes politiques, Réforme électorale

Madam Speaker, in principle, most of the time in a parliamentary democracy, there is no need for a consensus in order to make a decision, since one can always backtrack in a future Parliament. When it comes to changing the electoral system, however, the whole game has to be changed. That requires a consensus verging on unanimity in the House.

When the unanimous consent of the House is sought and half the members say yea while the other half say nay, the NDP says that consensus has been achieved. That makes no sense.

Madame la Présidente, en principe, dans une démocratie parlementaire, la plupart du temps, on n'a pas besoin d'un consensus pour prendre une décision, puisqu'on peut toujours faire marche arrière dans une future législature. Par contre, quand il s'agit de changer le système électoral, on change le jeu au complet. Cela prend un consensus se rapprochant de l'unanimité à la Chambre.

Quand on demande le consentement unanime de la Chambre et que la moitié des députés disent oui, alors que l'autre moitié dit non, le NPD dit qu'il y a un consensus. Cela n'a pas d'allure.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 213 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 09, 2017

2017-02-09 15:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Australia, Belgium, Compulsory voting, Electoral boundaries, Electoral reform, Fair Elections Act, Foreign countries, France, Ireland

Australie, Belgique, Comité spécial sur la réforme électorale, Communautés rurales, Comportement politique, Consultation du public, France, Irlande, Limites des circonscriptions électorales

Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time with my colleague from Hull—Aylmer.

I strongly believe that every Liberal MP came to the House in 2015 believing that that year's election results really would be the last time first past the post would be used in a general election. We believed, naively perhaps, that we could have an honest conversation across the country about an incremental change that everyone would accept, knowing that the system we have has significant failings.

In a spirit of compromise and to see what the electoral reform would look like, we agreed to strike a committee along proportional rather than representative lines, giving the majority to the combined opposition, a committee mandated to talk to the country’s population and propose a real path forward. The solution that the committee finally arrived at consisted in bartering a referendum that would be contrary to proportional representation.

I am first and foremost a rural member of Parliament. I grew up in a rural community and I live in a rural community. My family largely lives off the bounty of the land. Anyone looking for my house on Google Maps—which cannot really be done from my house because we don’t have much in terms of Internet connection—has to zoom far out to find any roads. It goes without saying that, over my lifetime, not a lot of politicians have come knocking at my door, although we are only two hours from here.

My riding is large, but not the largest. There are 45 ridings larger than mine, and even under the most elementary proportional models, my riding would have to be partially or totally merged with the neighbouring ridings. There are many communities of 400 or even only 40 people in my riding, and they are already having trouble getting adequate representation. I visit all of them as often as I can. It is a lot of work, representing over 60,000 kilometres a year in travel for my wife and me, not to mention for my staff in the riding.

To merge my riding with an adjacent riding, will we be merging with the one that is a suburb of Montréal, will we be going north to Rouyn-Noranda, or maybe east to Trois-Rivières or west to Gatineau? If the bordering ridings are merged and I am asked to share representation with four MPs, where do you think the MPs are going to go? To the towns with populations of 400 or 40, or to the big urban centres?

Proportional representation is inevitably bad for rural Canada, whether we are talking about merged ridings, lists or additional seats. One sometimes sees a drawing of three persons of different heights trying to look over a fence, and there are three boxes. That which is equal is not equitable. Let us ask ourselves: do we want equal representation or equitable representation?

Everywhere in the world electoral reform is a fight between those who tend to win and those who tend not to. It is not a left-versus-right issue, it is not a progressive issue. In this country, progressives would be more likely to be upset. In another country having a similar debate, it may be the conservatives. In proportional countries, the parties that perform poorly want single member plurality; in single member plurality countries, the parties that perform poorly want proportional. The demand for reform the world over has less to do with democratic principles than it does pursuing an advantage on the path to power.

Princeton political scientist Carles Boix has shown that, historically, political parties, whether of the left or the right, almost always support the electoral system that most benefits them. That the NDP has governed six provinces and a territory under single member plurality and never once brought forward electoral reform is proof positive of this paradox.

We hear sometimes that first past the post resulted in the current situation south of the border and, therefore, we must switch to proportional. We can look at France, that has had two-round elections since the 1950s, except for a single election in 1986, where the socialists thought they would benefit from a proportional system. Those who benefited most were the Holocaust-denying Front National, that went from zero seats to 35 and gained the credibility it needed to become a real contender for power.

The point is that every system can be manipulated. Mixed member proportional is a very rare system, and for good reason. Albania, Italy, Venezuela, Lesotho, and Romania have all experimented with it and then abandoned it because it is the easiest system of all electoral systems to manipulate.

By using two votes, one for the candidate and one for the party, particularly manipulative parties split into two registered parties. Sub-party A focuses its efforts on the candidate ballot and sub-party B focuses its efforts on the list ballot. The two parties, respectively, win, say, 40% of the constituency seats, with 30% of the popular vote, and because the list party in the partnership did not win any constituency seats, it is granted 30% of the seats through the top-up system. The two together now have around 60% of the seats, with only 30% of the vote. Of all of the systems available, mixed member proportional takes all that is bad about the two leading electoral systems and combines them.

We are often directed to other countries for examples, so let us take a quick look at a few more of them. Australia is the only country to use both mandatory voting and a preferential ballot, but nobody can tell me with a straight face that this has resulted in a permanent, stable, centrist government. It has a government that alternates between a left-wing party and a right-wing coalition, with no centrist party ever doing well. Finland and Israel use very similar pure proportional systems and these produce very different outcomes. The political culture is more important than the electoral system.

Belgium is credited with creating proportional and is principally known in this respect for its inability to get anything done, setting a world record of 589 days without a government just a few years ago as the parties could not reach a compromise to even form a government.

Ireland uses multi-member STV similar to what was proposed in B.C., but its reality is vastly different from Canada's. The whole country is only three times the size of my riding.

If our problem is that our local representatives are too often elected on the basis of a strategic or split vote, then let us tackle that problem. If voting for a candidate who has our tepid support in order to prevent a candidate we cannot accept at the expense of the candidate who best reflects our actual views is the normal situation in Canada today, then let us solve that issue.

A preferential vote would do that. It would give us the option to vote for who we legitimately want, without benefiting the candidate we cannot accept to see as our representative. It would empower voters to empower their MPs, because they would have a genuine representative. Giving voters the right to specify second, third and fourth choices takes away the horse race narrative and makes the conversation about who will actually represent us as electors.

It is also most ironic that a movement to change the electoral system should arise from a belief that votes cast for everyone but the winner do not really count. As soon as a threshold is established beneath which no seat is awarded, the same fallacious argument suggests that those votes are wasted. Consider how hypocritical that is. Why should his vote count but not mine?

At the national level, according to MyDemocracy.ca, two thirds of Canadians are satisfied with our democracy, and of all the priorities presented, increasing the presence of small parties in Parliament garnered the least votes by far.

Out of the 70,000 or so surveys sent to all the households in my riding, we received about 100 responses to the question on electoral reform: 46.5% of respondents preferred the current system or a preferential system, 37.9% of them wanted a partially or totally proportional system, and 43% of respondents would like voting to be made compulsory.

Clearly, there is no more of a consensus in my riding than there is anywhere else, and the low response rate is a clear indication that this is simply not a priority for the people in my constituency. They are faced with far more important issues, and they are certainly making me aware of that fact.

In their daily lives, Internet access, lake management and related environmental concerns, and the infrastructure investment rate are much more important to them than checking a box on their ballot.

I personally believe that voting should be nominally mandatory; that is, a symbolic enforcement mechanism such as a $20 tax credit for voting or tax penalty for not doing so. Our campaign strategies now, across party lines, are to identify our voters and ensure they go out and vote. Low turnout advantages one candidate and high turnout advantages another.

Elections should be concerned with choosing among philosophies, ideas and the planning of our future, rather than with tactics and strategy. It is said that politics is war using different weapons, and that is true.

When political parties spend money defining and attacking other parties' leaders instead of debating the direction of our country, that is when the system moves away from democracy and enters a state of conflict, a war waged with different weapons.

When I was very young, I read an article which said that, if Wendy's announced that McDonald's hamburgers are made of mouse meat and if McDonald's responded that Wendy’s hamburgers are made of worms, in the end, people just would stop eating hamburgers. That is an excellent metaphor, and one that accurately represents our current political process.

In a post-truth, strategy-driven era rather than one guided by facts and philosophy, those whose ideas are the least saleable are working hard to suppress the vote. This is not a uniquely Canadian phenomenon, in spite of the unmitigated attack on our democracy that was deliberately and ironically called the “fair elections act”.

Making voting mandatory puts the onus on the state to ensure every citizen has the ability to do so. It is one of Canada's great democratic ironies that, of all the pieces of identification available for Canadian citizens to identify themselves at a voting booth in a federal election, it is virtually impossible to use only documentation issued, without charge, by the federal government in order to vote.

That there is no consensus on electoral reform is clear for all to see and I will strongly and unequivocally defend the decision of our government to abandon it unless and until all parties put their narrow partisan interests aside and figure out what is genuinely best for the voters rather than the party leaders of our country.

Indeed, there is tremendous irony to telling Canadians that we need to change our electoral system because some votes cast do not, in some ways of measuring, count, and that we therefore need to change the electoral system to accommodate these votes without the consent of the near unanimity of Canadians. Why would an election reform advocate's vote count more than one who is satisfied with the status quo?

If the problem is that some voters' opinions are seen not to count, it must be the case that any change not leave anyone's opinions out. That is the very essence of consensus.

Monsieur le Président, je partagerai mon temps de parole avec mon collègue de Hull—Aylmer.

Je suis convaincu que tous les députés libéraux sont arrivés à la Chambre en 2015 en croyant que cette année-là serait réellement la dernière où le système majoritaire uninominal à un tour serait employé dans le cadre d'une élection générale. Nous croyions, naïvement peut-être, que nous pourrions avoir une conversation honnête dans l'ensemble du pays en vue d’un changement graduel que tout le monde accepterait en sachant que le système actuel a des défauts non négligeables.

Dans un esprit de compromis et afin de voir à quoi ressemblerait la réforme électorale, nous avons accepté de constituer un comité selon des lignes proportionnelles plutôt que représentatives, donnant la majorité à l'opposition réunie, un comité ayant pour mandat de parler à la population du pays et de proposer un véritable chemin à parcourir. La solution que le comité a fini par trouver consistait au troc d'un référendum qui allait contre la représentation proportionnelle.

Je suis d'abord et avant tout un député rural. J'ai grandi en milieu rural et je vis dans un milieu rural. Ma famille se nourrit largement des produits de la terre. Si on regarde ma maison sur Google Maps — ce qu'on ne peut pas vraiment faire à partir de chez-moi parce que nous n'avons pas beaucoup de connexions Internet —, on doit faire un gros plan pour trouver des routes. Il va sans dire qu'il n'y a pas beaucoup de politiciens qui sont venus frapper à ma porte au cours de ma vie. Nous sommes pourtant à seulement deux heures d'ici.

Ma circonscription est grande, mais ce n'est pas la plus grande. Il y a 45 circonscriptions plus grandes que la mienne, et même sous les modèles proportionnels les plus élémentaires, ma circonscription devrait être partiellement ou totalement fusionnée avec les circonscriptions voisines. Dans ma circonscription, il y a beaucoup de collectivités de 400 personnes ou même de seulement 40 personnes, et elles ont déjà du mal à se faire représenter correctement. Je les visite toutes aussi souvent que possible. C'est beaucoup de travail et cela représente plus de 60 000 kilomètres par an en déplacements pour ma femme et moi, sans compter les déplacements de mon personnel dans la circonscription.

Pour fusionner ma circonscription avec une circonscription voisine, est-ce que nous fusionnerons avec celle qui est une banlieue de Montréal, irons-nous au nord jusqu'à Rouyn-Noranda, ou peut-être à l'est vers Trois-Rivières, ou à l'ouest jusqu'à Gatineau? Si on fusionne les circonscriptions limitrophes et qu'on me demande de partager la représentation avec quatre députés, vers qui pense-t-on que les députés vont se diriger? Vers les villes de 400 ou de 40 personnes ou vers les grands centres urbains?

La représentation proportionnelle est nécessairement mauvaise pour le Canada rural, qu'il s'agisse de circonscriptions fusionnées, de listes ou de sièges complémentaires. On voit parfois une dessin où trois personnes de tailles différentes veulent regarder par-dessus une clôture et il y a trois caisses. Ce qui est égal n'est pas équitable. Posons la question: veut-on une représentation égale ou une représentation équitable?

Partout dans le monde, la réforme électorale est une lutte entre ceux qui ont tendance à gagner et ceux qui ont tendance à ne pas gagner. Ce n’est pas une question inhérente au clivage entre la gauche et la droite; ce n’est pas un enjeu propre aux progressistes. Au Canada, les progressistes auraient davantage tendance à être contrariés. Si un débat similaire devait se tenir dans un autre pays, cela pourrait être les conservateurs. Dans les pays qui appliquent la représentation proportionnelle, les partis qui obtiennent peu de votes veulent un système majoritaire uninominal à un tour; dans les pays où le système majoritaire uninominal à un tour est d’application, les partis qui obtiennent peu de votes veulent la représentation proportionnelle. Les appels à la réforme dans le monde entier ont moins à voir avec les principes démocratiques qu’avec la recherche d’un avantage sur le chemin qui mène au pouvoir.

Carles Boix, un politologue de Princeton, a montré que, dans l’histoire, les partis politiques, qu’ils soient de gauche ou de droite, sont presque toujours partisans du système électoral le plus avantageux pour eux. Le fait que le NPD a été porté à la tête de six provinces et d’un territoire par un système majoritaire uninominal à un tour et n’a jamais introduit de réforme électorale est la preuve s’il en est de ce paradoxe.

On entend parfois dire que le scrutin majoritaire uninominal à un tour est à l’origine de la situation actuelle au sud de la frontière et que, donc, nous devons passer à la proportionnelle. On peut se tourner vers la France, qui a des élections à deux tours depuis les années 1950, sauf une fois, en 1986, quand les socialistes ont cru qu’un système proportionnel les avantagerait. Ceux qui en ont le plus tiré profit, ce sont les négationnistes du Front national, qui sont passés de 0 à 35 sièges et ont gagné la crédibilité dont ils avaient besoin pour devenir de véritables candidats au pouvoir.

Le fait est que tous les systèmes peuvent être manipulés. La représentation proportionnelle mixte est un système très rare, et pour cause. L’Albanie, l’Italie, le Venezuela, le Lesotho et la Roumanie l’ont mis à l’essai puis abandonné, parce que, de tous les systèmes électoraux, c’est celui qui est le plus facile à manipuler.

Les deux votes exprimés, un pour le candidat et un pour le parti, permettent aux partis particulièrement enclins à la manipulation de se scinder en deux partis enregistrés. Le sous-parti A concentre ses efforts sur le scrutin des candidats et le sous-parti B concentre les siens sur le scrutin de liste. Les deux partis, respectivement, remportent, disons, 40 % des sièges de circonscription et 30 % du vote populaire et, puisque le parti qui cherche à remporter le scrutin de liste dans le partenariat n’a remporté aucun siège de circonscription, le système de compensation lui attribue 30 % des sièges. Les deux, ensemble, ont maintenant environ 60 % des sièges, avec seulement 30 % des votes. De tous les systèmes qui existent, la représentation proportionnelle mixte est celui qui rassemble et combine tous les défauts des deux principaux systèmes électoraux.

On nous invite souvent à nous tourner vers d’autres pays pour y trouver des exemples. Passons-en rapidement quelques autres en revue. L’Australie est le seul qui a à la fois le vote obligatoire et le scrutin préférentiel, mais personne ne me dira sans rire que ce système lui a donné un gouvernement permanent, stable et centriste. Le gouvernement de l’Australie passe d’un parti de gauche à une coalition de droite, sans qu’aucun parti au centre n’obtienne jamais de bons résultats. La Finlande et Israël ont des systèmes purement proportionnels très similaires et qui donnent des résultats très dissemblables. La culture politique compte plus que le système électoral.

La création de la proportionnelle est attribuée à la Belgique, un pays surtout connu dans ce domaine pour son incapacité à faire quoi que ce soit et qui a établi il y a quelques années un record mondial en restant 589 jours sans gouvernement, les partis ne parvenant pas à trouver un compromis pour en former un.

L’Irlande a un système de vote unique transférable dans des circonscriptions plurinominales, comme celui qui a été proposé en Colombie-Britannique, mais la réalité de l’Irlande est bien différente de celle du Canada. Le pays dans son ensemble fait seulement trois fois la taille de ma circonscription.

Si notre problème est que nos représentants locaux sont trop souvent élus sur la base d’un vote stratégique ou d’un partage des suffrages, attaquons-nous à ce problème. Si la situation normale au Canada aujourd’hui est qu’on vote pour un candidat qu’on approuve tièdement pour barrer la route à un candidat qu’on ne peut pas accepter au détriment du candidat qui reflète le mieux nos véritables opinions, réglons ce problème.

Un scrutin préférentiel le réglerait. Il donnerait la possibilité de voter pour la personne qu’on veut vraiment sans donner d’avantage au candidat qu’on ne peut pas accepter comme représentant. Il donnerait aux électeurs des moyens de donner des moyens à leurs députés, parce qu’ils auraient un véritable représentant. Donner aux électeurs le droit d’indiquer un deuxième, un troisième et un quatrième choix tire un trait sur l’image de la course de chevaux et fait porter la conversation sur la personne qui va réellement représenter les électeurs.

Il est également très ironique qu'il y ait un mouvement pour modifier le système électoral parce que certains votes sont considérés comme ne comptant pas, puisqu'ils ne choisissent pas de gagnant. Du moment où on établit un seuil au-dessous duquel aucun siège n'est attribué, le même argument fallacieux suggère que les votes sont gaspillés. Voilà l'ampleur de l'hypocrisie. Pourquoi son vote compterait mais pas le mien?

Au niveau national, selon MaDémocratie.ca, les deux tiers des Canadiens sont satisfaits de notre démocratie, et de toutes les priorités présentées, l'augmentation de la présence des petits partis au Parlement était de loin la moins élevée.

Sur quelque 70 000 sondages envoyés à tous les ménages de ma circonscription, nous avons reçu environ une centaine de réponses à la question de la réforme électorale; 46,5 % des répondants préféraient le système actuel ou un mode préférentiel, tandis que 37,9 % d'entre eux souhaitaient un système partiellement ou entièrement proportionnel et que 43 % des répondants aimeraient que le vote devienne obligatoire.

Il est évident qu'il n'y a pas plus de consensus dans ma circonscription que partout ailleurs et que le faible taux de réponse est une indication claire, nette et précise que ce n'est tout simplement pas une priorité pour les gens de ma circonscription. Ils font face à des questions beaucoup plus importantes et ils me le font certainement savoir.

Dans leur vie quotidienne, l'accès à Internet, la gestion des lacs et les préoccupations environnementales connexes ainsi que le taux d'investissement dans les infrastructures sont bien plus importants que le fait de cocher une case sur leur bulletin de vote.

Je crois personnellement que voter devrait, en principe, être obligatoire. On pourrait créer un mécanisme d’exécution symbolique comme le versement d’un crédit d’impôt de 20 $ à ceux qui ont voté ou l’imposition d’une pénalité fiscale à ceux qui ne l'ont pas fait. Nos stratégies de campagne consistent maintenant, dans tous les partis, à identifier nos électeurs et à s’assurer qu’ils se rendent aux urnes. Un faible taux de participation avantage un candidat et un taux élevé en avantage un autre.

Les élections doivent viser à choisir des philosophies, des idées et la planification de notre avenir plutôt que la tactique et la stratégie. On dit que la politique est une guerre par d'autres moyens, et c'est vrai.

Ainsi, lorsque les partis politiques dépensent des sommes d'argent à s'attaquer et à définir les dirigeants des uns et des autres au lieu de débattre de la direction de notre pays, c'est que le système a laissé un état de démocratie et est entré dans un état de conflit qui est vraiment une guerre par d'autres moyens.

Quand j'étais tout jeune, j'avais lu un article qui disait que, si Wendy's annonçait que McDonald's vend vraiment de la viande de souris et si McDonald's répondait que les hamburgers de Wendy's sont fabriqués à partir de vers de terre, le résultat en serait que, finalement, les gens cesseraient de manger des hamburgers. Cette métaphore est excellente et représente exactement notre processus politique actuel.

En cette ère d'après-vérité axée sur la stratégie plutôt que sur les faits et l'idéologie, ceux dont les idées sont le moins vendables travaillent fort pour supprimer le vote. Ce phénomène n’est pas uniquement canadien, malgré l’attaque parfaite perpétrée sur notre démocratie qui a été délibérément et ironiquement appelée Loi sur l'intégrité des élections.

Le fait de rendre le vote obligatoire impose une responsabilité à l’État; celle de s’assurer de la capacité de chaque citoyen à voter. C’est d’ailleurs l’une des plus grandes ironies de la démocratie canadienne: malgré tout l'éventail de pièces d’identité qu'un Canadien peut présenter pour s’identifier avant de voter, il lui est pratiquement impossible d’utiliser seulement la documentation émise, sans frais, par le gouvernement fédéral.

Il n’y a pas de consensus sur la réforme électorale, cela est clair aux yeux de tous et je vais défendre, becs et ongles, la décision de notre gouvernement de l’abandonner, et ce, tant et aussi longtemps que tous les partis n’auront pas mis de côté leurs intérêts partisans étroits afin de trouver ce qui est véritablement le mieux pour les électeurs plutôt que pour les chefs de parti de notre pays.

Par ailleurs, il est drôlement paradoxal de dire aux Canadiens que nous devons changer notre système électoral parce que, dans un sens, certains des suffrages exprimés ne comptent pas, et que nous devons donc changer le système électoral même si ce changement ne fait pas consensus au sein de la population. Pourquoi est-ce que le vote d'un défenseur de la réforme électorale compterait plus que celui d'un électeur satisfait de la situation actuelle?

Si le problème réside dans le fait que l’opinion de certains électeurs est perçue comme ne comptant pas, alors aucun changement ne devrait faire fi de l'opinion d'une partie de l'électorat. Voilà la véritable essence du consensus.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 4116 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 09, 2017

2017-02-09 14:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre

FIS Alpine Ski World Cup, Skiing, Statements by Members

Coupe du monde de ski alpin FIS, Déclarations de députés, Ski

Mr. Speaker, today I want to celebrate and congratulate the new super G world champion in alpine skiing.

Erik Guay continues to make history. Yesterday, in Saint-Moritz, he became the first Canadian skier to win this title. Erik is originally from the Laurentians and was a classmate of mine. Once again, he put his ambition and leadership on display for all the world to see.

The heart of the Laurentians is known as the birthplace of skiing in Canada. This reputation was established when my grandmother, Pat Paré, became the first female alpine skiing champion in Canada and the first female ski instructor in Canada, at Tremblant, in 1940.

Erik Guay's tremendous success today only solidifies this reputation. Erik's victory message on Facebook speaks volumes about his character.

“I'd just like to take a moment to thank my behind the scenes team, coaches, therapists, trainers, ski technician, family, and friends. This is our victory!!!”

Erik Guay, our champion, our role model.

Monsieur le Président, je veux aujourd'hui saluer, et surtout féliciter, le nouveau champion du monde du super-G en ski alpin.

Érik Guay continue de laisser sa marque dans l'histoire. Il est devenu hier, à Saint-Moritz, le premier skieur canadien à remporter cet honneur. Originaire des Laurentides, ayant été mon camarade de classe à quelques reprises, Érik a encore une fois démontré ses ambitions et son leadership dans le monde entier.

Le coeur des Laurentides est reconnu pour être le berceau du ski au Canada. Cette reconnaissance a été démontrée notamment lorsque ma grand-mère, Pat Paré, est devenue la première étoile féminine de ski alpin au pays, ainsi que la première professeure de ski alpin au Canada, à Tremblant, en 1940.

Cette reconnaissance continue d'être démontrée aujourd'hui avec le grand succès d'Érik Guay. Nous pouvons distinguer le caractère d'Érik dans son message de victoire publié sur Facebook:

« J'aimerais remercier tous ceux qui m'ont soutenu en coulisses, mes entraîneurs, les thérapeutes, les personnes chargées de mon entraînement physique, les préposés à l'entretien, ma famille et mes amis. Cette victoire nous appartient tous!!! »

Érik Guay est notre champion, notre exemple!

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 374 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 09, 2017

2017-02-07 17:31 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Third reading and adoption, Trade agreements, Ukraine,

Accords commerciaux, Troisième lecture et adoption, Ukraine

Madam Speaker, I really admire the work of the member for Etobicoke Centre on the Ukraine file over the years. I have learned a great deal from him. I have some Ukrainian ancestry of my own.

As we heard in the last question, there is a common misparlance in referring to the country as “the Ukraine” versus “Ukraine”. I wonder if the member could please explain to us why there is a difference and why it is important.

Madame la Présidente, j'ai beaucoup d'admiration pour le travail accompli par le député d'Etobicoke-Centre dans le dossier de l'Ukraine au fil des ans. J'ai beaucoup appris de lui. Je suis d'ailleurs aussi d'ascendance ukrainienne.

Comme nous l'avons entendu dans la question précédente, c'est une erreur fréquente en anglais de parler de l'Ukraine en disant « the Ukraine ». Le député pourrait-il nous expliquer en quoi consiste cette erreur et pourquoi il est important de la corriger?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 179 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 07, 2017

2017-02-06 12:06 House intervention / intervention en chambre

European Union, Government bills, Report stage, Trade agreements,

Accords commerciaux, Étape du rapport, Union européenne

Madam Speaker, in my riding of Laurentides—Labelle, many people often tell me about their concerns with free trade. They believe free trade helps the rich and not those who work the hardest in our society.

I would like my colleague from Winnipeg North to tell us how free trade helps everyone.

Madame la Présidente, dans ma circonscription, Laurentides—Labelle, beaucoup de gens me parlent souvent de leurs inquiétudes concernant le libre-échange. Ils voient cela comme un enjeu qui aident les plus riches et qui n'aident pas ceux qui travaillent le plus fort dans notre société.

J'aimerais que mon collègue de Winnipeg-Nord nous parle de la façon dont le libre-échange aide tout le monde.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 138 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 06, 2017

2017-02-02 16:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Blogs and microblogs, False or misleading statements, Office space, Parliamentary precinct, Parliamentary privilege

Blogues et microblogues, Cité parlementaire, Induire en erreur, Locaux à bureaux, Organisations non gouvernementales, Privilège parlementaire,

Mr. Speaker. In response to the question of privilege brought up by the member for Red Deer—Lacombe, I would like to keep my comments brief.

It is not for the government to comment on the veracity of Tweets emanating from private organizations. Moreover, it is our understanding that the building to which the member refers is privately owned and, while it does exist in downtown, it does not form part of what is officially the parliamentary precinct.

Monsieur le Président, la réponse que je vais donner à la question de privilège soulevée par le député de Red Deer—Lacombe sera brève.

Ce n'est pas au gouvernement de commenter la véracité des gazouillis provenant d'organisations privées. De plus, d'après ce que nous avons compris, l'édifice en question est une propriété privée. Bien qu'il se trouve au centre-ville, il ne fait pas partie de la Cité parlementaire.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 182 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 02, 2017

2017-02-02 14:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Broadband Internet services, Oral questions, Rural communities

Communautés rurales, Questions orales, Services Internet à large bande

Mr. Speaker, access to reliable broadband Internet is crucial to participating in today's economy.

Rural and remote areas, like my region of Laurentides—Labelle, do not have the necessary infrastructure to support broadband services. My constituents were therefore happy to hear about the government's budget 2016 promise regarding broadband Internet access.

Can the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development provide the House with an update on this critical issue for all of rural Canada?

Monsieur le Président, l'accès à un service Internet à large bande fiable est primordial pour pouvoir participer à l'économie d'aujourd'hui.

Les zones rurales et éloignées, comme chez nous, dans Laurentides—Labelle, n'ont pas les infrastructures nécessaires pour soutenir les services à large bande adéquats. Par ailleurs, mes concitoyens ont été heureux d'entendre la promesse du gouvernement qui se trouve dans le budget de 2016 au sujet de l'accès aux services Internet à large bande.

Le ministre de l’Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique peut-il faire le point sur cette question cruciale pour tout le Canada rural?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr qp 190 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 02, 2017

2017-02-02 12:40 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Dental insurance, Employment benefits, Income splitting, Opposition motions, Private health insurance, Tax policy, Taxation

Assurance dentaire, Assurance médicale privée, Fiscalité, Fractionnement du revenu, Politique fiscale

Mr. Speaker, a couple of years ago, my wife and I made a fairly different amount of money. I was a parliamentary staffer, and she was not making a lot of money. We could not take advantage of the income splitting the member for Barrie—Innisfil defends so strongly, but he could take advantage of the full $2,000 as a member of Parliament. I wonder if that is his idea of tax fairness for the middle class.

Monsieur le Président, il y a quelques années, mon épouse et moi avions des revenus assez différents. J'étais membre du personnel parlementaire et elle ne gagnait pas beaucoup d'argent. Nous ne pouvions pas profiter du fractionnement du revenu que le député de Barrie-Innisfil défend avec tant de vigueur, mais il pourrait en profiter pleinement à hauteur de 2 000 $ en tant que député. Je me demande si c'est là ce qu’il entend par équité fiscale pour la classe moyenne.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 189 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 02, 2017

2017-02-02 11:58 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Dental insurance, Employment benefits, Opposition motions, Private health insurance, Tax policy, Taxation,

Assurance dentaire, Assurance médicale privée, Fiscalité, Politique fiscale,

Mr. Speaker, it seems fairness is allowing the member to present her alternative reality.

We were quite clear yesterday that the tax on the health plans would not be coming through. I wonder what other ideas she has of what we are going to do that we have no intention of doing.

Monsieur le Président, il semble que le souci d'équité permette à la députée de présenter la réalité parallèle où elle semble évoluer.

Nous avons indiqué très clairement hier que l'imposition des régimes de soins de santé n'aura pas lieu. Je me demande s'il y a d'autres choses que la députée croit que nous avons l'intention de faire alors que ce n'est aucunement le cas.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 146 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on February 02, 2017

2017-01-31 16:46 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Drug use and abuse, Government bills, Safe injection sites, Second reading,

Consommation et abus de drogues, Deuxième lecture,

Madam Speaker, I listened intently to the speech by the member for Markham—Unionville. I am wondering if the member could explain to us how he expects to put drug users back on their feet by putting them in jail and giving them a criminal record. Maybe we should think about treating this as a medical issue. Maybe using controlled injection sites as a medical environment to encourage safe use and get people away from drugs might be better.

Does my colleague find it important to act on the opioid crisis or does he think the status quo works? It is really important. I would like to hear the member's support for real action going forward quickly.

On December 12, the member for Vancouver Kingsway asked for consent to have this legislation advance at all stages and I think that would be a good avenue for us to follow.

Madame la Présidente, j'ai écouté attentivement le discours du député de Markham—Unionville. Je me demande si le député peut nous expliquer comment il compte permettre aux toxicomanes de se reprendre en main en les emprisonnant et en faisant en sorte qu'ils se retrouvent avec un casier judiciaire. Nous devrions peut-être envisager de traiter cela comme une maladie. Nous ferions peut-être mieux d'utiliser des centres d'injection supervisée comme cadre médical pour encourager la consommation sécuritaire et aider les gens à sortir de l'enfer de la drogue.

Mon collègue considère-t-il qu'il est important de s'attaquer à la crise des opioïdes ou croit-il que le statu quo fonctionne? C'est très important. J'aimerais qu'il appuie l'adoption de mesures concrètes permettant d'agir très rapidement.

Le 12 décembre, le député de Vancouver Kingsway a demandé le consentement de la Chambre pour que le projet de loi soit réputé adopté à toutes les étapes, et je crois que ce serait une bonne option à considérer.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 330 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on January 31, 2017

2017-01-31 12:18 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Drug use and abuse, Government bills, Second reading

Consommation et abus de drogues, Deuxième lecture,

Mr. Speaker, I listened to the speech from the member for Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo with great interest. I heard her talk at length about the need to do this quickly. I agree with her. I wonder, if the member is so excited to get this done quickly, if she is willing to pass this through at all stages immediately.

Monsieur le Président, j'ai écouté avec grand intérêt le discours de la députée de Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo. Elle a parlé en détail du besoin d'agir rapidement. Je suis d'accord avec elle. Je me demande si son enthousiasme est tel qu'elle serait prête à ce que le projet de loi franchisse dès maintenant toutes les étapes du processus.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 137 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on January 31, 2017

2016-12-12 11:24 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, Costs, Economic policy, Employment benefits, Equal opportunities, Families and children, Federal government, Financial management, Government policy,

Biens de la personne décédée, Coûts, Départ à la retraite, Deuxième lecture, Égalité des chances, Épargne, Équité intergénérationnelle, Évitement fiscal, Familles et enfants

Mr. Speaker, Bill C-301 is incompatible with the government's strategy to revitalize the economy, breathe life into the middle class, and help all Canadians save for retirement.

I am sympathetic to the intention of the bill, which my NDP colleague just explained. However, I would like to take a little time to go over some tax rules and the reality here.

Canadians who have a registered retirement savings plan, an RRSP, have to convert it into a registered retirement income fund, a RRIF, by the end of the year they turn 71. Beginning the following year, they must withdraw a minimum amount from their RRIF every year. By requiring individuals to withdraw increasing percentages of the funds in their RRIFs, the government ensures that tax deferral on amounts accumulated in RRSPs and RRIFs is in line with the purpose of these accounts, which is to supply retirement income, and prevents the undue hoarding of retirement savings for their estate.

Retirees are not forced to spend the money, but the idea is to defer tax, not eliminate it entirely. If this bill were to pass, there would be no mandatory minimum withdrawal. That would benefit mainly the wealthy, who would be able to save the money for their children without paying tax.

Bill C-301 is not consistent with the basic objectives of RRSPs and RRIFs since it allows seniors to postpone paying tax on the full amount of those savings until they are much older, well beyond retirement and well beyond age 71. An investor could even postpone it until death. The implementation of this legislation would also result in considerable fiscal costs.

It is estimated that eliminating the RRIF minimum withdrawal requirements would reduce federal tax revenue by at least $500 million a year in the short term. The bill would also reduce provincial tax revenues.

Furthermore, the bill will create significant inequities between different segments of the population when it comes to tax deferral opportunities. Indeed, it will increase tax deferral opportunities for those who have savings in RRSPs compared to those who contribute to RPPs. It would also create a major intergenerational disparity because younger seniors would not be obligated to withdraw a portion of the savings in their RRIFs every year while older seniors were forced to begin doing so at age 71.

I would add that this bill would favour seniors who do not need the savings accumulated in their RRIFs, in other words high-income seniors, instead of supporting those who could use a bit of help.

We know that there are better ways to enhance retirement income security for Canadians. Let us look at young people. At times they feel like they are worse off than their parents. Far fewer of them will have workplace pension plans than the previous generation did. It is worrisome. They wonder whether they will have saved enough for a decent retirement.

Those are legitimate questions and concerns since one in four families approaching retirement age, or 1.1 million families, will likely not save enough for retirement. Together with the provinces and territories, we have come up with concrete solutions for all those families.

The answer is to enhance the Canada pension plan, the CPP, which will benefit Canadians in a variety of ways. For example, the maximum benefit will be increased by almost half once the enhanced CPP is fully operational. Also, CPP provides secure and predictable benefits. In other words, Canadians will know how much money they will get and will not have to worry about their savings dwindling or being affected by the markets. CPP benefits will be fully indexed to prices, so inflation will not reduce the purchase power of their retirement savings.

An enhanced CPP is the perfect response to a changing labour market. It fills in part the void left by the steady reduction in employer pension plans. It also follows workers from province to province, which facilitates professional mobility. The CPP has several million contributors. That is vitally important because it allows the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board to benefit from economies of scale and returns on significant investments.

I would like to summarize the main concerns about the bill introduced by my opposition colleague. The implementation of this bill would reduce the federal and provincial governments' tax revenues. It would not be consistent with the basic objective of tax-deferred retirement income provided by RRSPs or RRIFs.

Contributors to RRSPs and RPPs, and also older and younger seniors would be treated differently under the bill.

On the one hand, we have all the disadvantages of Bill C-301, which we just listed. On the other, we have all the advantages of the enhanced Canada Pension Plan, especially higher benefits.

We could also discuss the government's middle class tax cut. However, I think we have identified enough flaws to realize that we must vote against this bill.

Monsieur le Président, le projet de loi C-301 va à l'encontre de la stratégie du gouvernement pour dynamiser l'économie, redonner du souffle à la classe moyenne et favoriser l'épargne pour la retraite de tous les Canadiens.

Je suis sympathique à l'intention de ce projet de loi, comme vient de l'expliquer mon collègue du NPD. Toutefois, j'aimerais prendre le temps de rappeler quelques règles fiscales et la réalité des choses.

Les Canadiens qui détiennent un Régime enregistré d'épargne-retraite, un REER, doivent le convertir en un Fonds enregistré de revenu de retraite, un FERR, avant la fin de l'année où ils atteignent 71 ans. Dès l'année suivante, ils sont tenus de retirer chaque année un montant minimal de leur FERR. En exigeant le retrait progressif des épargnes dans le FERR, on s'assure que le report d'impôt sur les sommes accumulées dans les REER et les FERR est conforme à son objectif fondamental de revenu de retraite, et on empêche la préservation indue de l'épargne-retraite à des fins de succession.

Les retraités ne sont pas forcés de dépenser ces fonds, mais l'intention est de reporter les impôts, et non de les annuler. Si ce projet de loi était adopté, aucun retrait minimal ne serait requis, ce qui bénéficierait principalement aux mieux nantis qui pourraient garder ces sommes pour leurs enfants, sans payer d'impôt.

Le projet de loi C-301 détourne les REER et les FERR de leur intention en permettant de reporter l'impôt sur le plein montant de cette épargne jusqu'à un âge très avancé, bien au-delà de la retraite et bien au-delà de 71 ans. Un épargnant pourrait même ne jamais retirer d'argent avant son décès. De plus, il y aurait un coût budgétaire important si le projet de loi était mis en oeuvre.

Il est estimé que l'élimination des exigences de retrait minimum du FERR réduirait les recettes fiscales fédérales d'au moins 500 millions de dollars par année, à court terme. Le projet de loi réduirait également les recettes fiscales des provinces.

De plus, le projet de loi créerait des disparités importantes entre différents groupes de la population en ce qui concerne les possibilités de report d'impôt. En effet, il augmenterait les possibilités de report d'impôt pour ceux qui ont des épargnes dans des REER par rapport aux participants aux RPA. Il créerait également une disparité intergénérationnelle importante, puisque les aînés plus jeunes ne seraient pas du tout tenus de niveler les épargnes dans leur FERR, tandis que les aînés plus âgés ont été tenus de niveler les épargnes dans leur FERR depuis l'âge de 71 ans.

J'ajouterais que ce projet de loi favoriserait les aînés qui n'ont pas besoin de l'épargne accumulée dans leur FERR, comme les aînés à revenu élevé, au lieu de soutenir ceux qui ont besoin d'un coup de pouce.

Nous savons qu'il y a de meilleures façons de renforcer la sécurité du revenu de retraite des Canadiens. Regardons les jeunes. Ils ont parfois l'impression que leur situation est moins bonne que celle de leurs parents. Ils ont moins souvent accès à des régimes de retraite de leur employeur que la génération qui les a précédés. C'est inquiétant. Ils se demandent s'ils auront épargné suffisamment pour vivre décemment une fois à la retraite.

Ce sont des questions légitimes puisqu'une famille sur quatre qui approche de l'âge de la retraite, soit 1,1 million de familles, risque de ne pas épargner suffisamment en prévision de la retraite. À toutes ces familles, nous apportons des solutions concrètes, des solutions auxquelles nous sommes parvenus en obtenant la collaboration des provinces et des territoires du pays.

Cette réponse, c'est la bonification du Régime de pensions du Canada, le RPC. Voici un aperçu des avantages qu'il procurera aux Canadiens. La prestation maximale sera augmentée de pratiquement 50 %, lorsque le RPC bonifié sera pleinement opérationnel. Le RPC offre des prestations sûres et prévisibles, c'est-à-dire que les Canadiens connaîtront le montant de leur pension et qu'ils auront moins à craindre de voir leurs économies fondre ou être affectées par les aléas du marché. Les prestations du RPC seront complètement indexées aux prix. Cela permet de réduire le risque que l'inflation érode le pouvoir d'achat de leur épargne-retraite.

Le RPC bonifié est une réponse qui convient parfaitement à un marché du travail en pleine mutation. Il remplace en partie le vide laissé par la diminution progressive des régimes de retraite des employeurs. De plus, il suit les travailleurs d'une province à l'autre, ce qui facilite la mobilité professionnelle. Le RPC est un régime qui compte plusieurs millions de cotisants. C'est une donnée primordiale, car cela permet à l'Office d'investissement du Régime de pensions du Canada de profiter d'économies d'échelle et de retours sur investissements intéressants.

J'aimerais résumer les principales inquiétudes soulevées par le projet de loi de mon collègue de l'opposition. La mise en oeuvre de ce projet de loi réduirait les recettes fiscales du gouvernement fédéral et celles des provinces. Il ne serait pas conforme à l'objectif fondamental de revenu de retraite du report d'impôt offert sur les épargnes dans les REER ou les FERR.

Le projet de loi créerait des inégalités de traitement entre les cotisants au REER et les cotisants au RPA, mais aussi entre les aînés les plus jeunes et les aînés les plus âgés.

Nous avons, d'un côté, tous les inconvénients du projet de loi C-301, que je viens d'énumérer. De l'autre côté, nous avons tous les avantages apportés par l'amélioration du Régime de pensions du Canada, notamment des prestations plus élevées.

Nous pourrions aussi discuter de la baisse d'impôt pour la classe moyenne, mise en place par le gouvernement. Toutefois, je crois que nous avons déjà suffisamment d'éléments pour comprendre que l'on doit voter contre le projet de loi.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 1792 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 12, 2016

2016-12-08 16:17 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Agreements and contracts, Double taxation, Government bills, Income and wages, Income tax, International cooperation, Pensions and pensioners, Second reading, Senate bills, Tax policy,

Coopération internationale, Deuxième lecture, Double imposition, Ententes et contrats, Fiscalité, Impôt sur le revenu, Pensions et pensionnés, Politique fiscale, Projets de loi du Sénat, Revenus et salaires,

Madam Speaker, I do not know the answer to that question. I read through what I could, and I know that pensions were specifically addressed, but I do not know the specific details and cannot answer in a helpful way.

However, I know that Bill S-4 will be a positive bill for us in working with these other countries.

Madame la Présidente, je n'ai pas la réponse à cette question. J'ai lu tout ce que j'ai pu et je sais qu'on a traité expressément des pensions, mais je ne connais pas les détails précis du dossier et je ne peux fournir au député de réponse utile.

Par contre, je sais que le projet de loi S-4 sera avantageux pour nous dans le cadre de notre collaboration avec ces pays.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 188 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 08, 2016

2016-12-08 16:15 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Agreements and contracts, Double taxation, Government bills, Israel, Second reading, Senate bills, Taxation, Trade barriers, Venture capital

Barrières commerciales, Capital de risque, Deuxième lecture, Double imposition, Ententes et contrats, Fiscalité, Israël, Projets de loi du Sénat,

Madam Speaker, any time we have a new treaty to help our relations on fiscal policy and investment policy, it does help, with our relationship with those countries, to build out our economy and theirs.

We are one planet, and I think we should see it that way. We should work as best we can to work as a team within the bounds of what we find acceptable in each place.

Madame la Présidente, chaque fois qu'une nouvelle convention est créée pour faciliter nos relations avec d'autres pays sur le plan des politiques relatives à la fiscalité et aux investissements, cela permet d'améliorer notre relation avec ces pays et contribue à consolider notre économie et la leur.

Nous vivons tous sur la même planète, et je pense que nous devrions considérer la situation dans cette optique. Nous devrions faire de notre mieux pour travailler en équipe dans les limites de ce que nous jugeons acceptable à chaque endroit.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 202 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 08, 2016

2016-12-08 16:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Agreements and contracts, Double taxation, Government bills, Second reading, Senate bills, Taxation,

Deuxième lecture, Double imposition, Ententes et contrats, Fiscalité, Projets de loi du Sénat

Madam Speaker, Bill S-4 implements two treaties. For reasons unknown to me, those treaties are being implemented by a bill, which is perfectly fine.

In that regard, I do not see how Bill S-4 is problematic.

Madame la Présidente, le projet de loi S-4 met en place deux traités. Pour des raisons que je ne connais pas, ces traités sont mis en place au moyen d'un projet de loi, ce qui est tout à fait normal.

À cet égard, je ne vois pas en quoi le projet de loi S-4 est problématique.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 122 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 08, 2016

2016-12-08 16:13 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Agreements and contracts, Data sharing, Double taxation, Government bills, Income tax, Information collection, International cooperation, Oversight mechanism, Second reading, Senate bills,

Coopération internationale, Deuxième lecture, Double imposition, Ententes et contrats, Évasion fiscale, Fiscalité, Impôt sur le revenu, Mécanisme de surveillance, Paradis fiscaux, Partage des données,

Madam Speaker, certainly, every time we reach an agreement with any country, we need to consider the current status of both countries. We cannot conclude a single agreement with the rest of the world and think that it would always work the same way.

I think we have tax agreements because they allow us to exchange information so we can determine who is tryring to evade the local tax laws. It is important to do this. I agree completely that it might not always be perfect.

However, the goal is to find those who are abusing the system, not to destroy the system because people are abusing it, and I think we need to look at it from that perspective going forward.

Madame la Présidente, il est sûr que chaque fois que nous arrivons à un accord avec un pays quelconque, il faut considérer l'état actuel des deux pays. Nous ne pouvons pas faire un seul accord avec le reste du monde et penser que cela fonctionnera toujours de la même façon.

À mon avis, si nous avons ces accords fiscaux, c'est parce qu'il nous permettent de faire des échanges de données pour savoir qui essaie d'échapper aux lois locales. C'est important de le faire. Ce n'est peut-être pas toujours parfait, je suis d'accord.

Toutefois, le but est de trouver ceux qui abusent du système et non pas de détruire le système parce que des gens en abusent, et je pense qu'il est important de regarder à travers ces lentilles pour l'avenir.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 305 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 08, 2016

2016-12-08 16:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Agreements and contracts, Canada Revenue Agency, Competition, Data sharing, Dividends, Double taxation, Economic prosperity, Foreign investments in Canada, Foreign persons, Foreign policy, Government bills

Agence du revenu du Canada, Application de la loi, Commerce international, Concurrence, Coopération internationale, Deuxième lecture, Dividendes, Double imposition, Ententes et contrats, Évasion fiscale,

Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague from Vaughan—Woodbridge for sharing his time with me.

I am pleased to rise in the House to address the important matter of Bill S-4. As members will know, this bill implements a convention and an arrangement on double taxation that were recently signed and announced. The convention was concluded with the State of Israel, and the arrangement with Taiwan.

Canada now has 92 tax treaties in force, and it continues to work on developing other such treaties with other jurisdictions. Bill S-4 builds on Canada's ongoing efforts to update and modernize its network of tax treaties, which helps prevent double taxation and tax evasion.

Indeed, Canada currently has one of the world’s largest networks of tax treaties. This is an important feature of Canada’s international tax system, a feature that is key to promoting our ability to compete. At the same time, the system needs to ensure that everyone pays their fair share of taxes. We do not want certain foreign and domestic firms to be able to take advantage of Canadian tax rules to evade taxes, or for certain wealthy individuals to turn to foreign countries to hide their income and avoid paying taxes.

Every time that happens, workers and small businesses in Canada end up having to pay more taxes than they should have to. It is not right. The Canada Revenue Agency needs information from foreign countries in order to identify and discourage the hiding of income.

To that end, the convention and the arrangement on double taxation in Bill S-4 implement the current international standard on tax information exchange on request established by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, thus enabling Canadian tax authorities to obtain the necessary information for the administration and enforcement of Canadian tax laws, while helping them prevent international tax evasion.

Here at home, the Government of Canada continues to work to keep our tax system up to date and competitive, so that Canada can remain a leading player in the global economy. It is essential to take measures in support of a more competitive tax system in order to foster conditions that allow Canada's entrepreneurs and industries to excel, thus clearing their path to success.

Clearly, having modern tax conventions, such as those contained in Bill S-4, is a key component of that goal. Canada remains committed to maintaining a tax system that will continue to help Canadian businesses in their drive to be world leaders, while ensuring that everyone pays their fair share of taxes.

The tax conventions complement our government's broader commitment to implementing a more competitive tax system that will raise the standard of living of all Canadians. The convention and arrangement for the avoidance of double taxation set out in Bill S-4 directly support and encourage cross-border trade in goods and services, which in turn helps Canada's domestic economic performance.

Moreover, every year, Canada's economic wealth depends on foreign direct investment, as well as the entry of information, capital, and technology. In short, the convention and arrangement for the avoidance of double taxation set out in Bill S-4 provide individuals and businesses in Canada and the other countries involved with predictable and equitable tax results in their cross-border dealings.

I would now like to talk about two things that this bill proposes to do, namely reduce withholding taxes and prevent double taxation. Withholding taxes are a common feature of the international taxation system. They are levied by a country on certain items of income earned in that country and paid to the residents of the other country. The types of income normally subjected to withholding taxes would include, for example, interest, dividends, and royalties.

Without tax treaties, Canada usually taxes this income at the rate of 25%, which is a set rate under our own legislation for income tax, more specifically, the Income Tax Act. Withholding tax rates in other countries are often as high or even higher.

Since one of the main functions of a tax convention is to divide the powers of taxation among the signatory partners, the conventions contain provisions that reduce and, in some cases, eliminate withholding taxes that could be applied by the jurisdiction where certain payments originate.

For example, the convention and the arrangement for the avoidance of double taxation in Bill S-4 provides for a maximum withholding tax rate of 15% on portfolio dividends paid to non-residents in the case of the State of Israel and Taiwan. The maximum withholding tax rate for dividends paid by subsidiaries to their parent companies is reduced to a rate of 5% for the State of Israel and 10% for Taiwan.

Withholding rate reductions also apply to royalty, interest, and pension payments. The convention and the arrangement for the avoidance of double taxation covered by this bill caps the maximum withholding tax rate on interest and royalty payments to 10%, and the maximum withholding tax rate for periodic pension payments to 15%.

The other issue I want to talk about is double taxation. Double taxation at the international level happens when taxes are collected on the same taxable income for the same period in at least two jurisdictions. The convention and arrangement regarding double taxation in Bill S-4 will help prevent double taxation so that any given income is taxed only once.

Generally speaking, the Canadian tax system applies to the income earned by Canadian residents anywhere in the world. However, foreign authorities can also invoke their right to tax any income earned in their jurisdiction by Canadian residents. Canada usually gives a credit for foreign tax paid on that income. This duplication of taxes paid in the jurisdiction where the income was earned and in the taxpayer's country of residence can have unfair negative consequences for taxpayers. No one should have to pay taxes twice on the same income.

Without any convention or arrangement for the avoidance of double taxation such as the ones provided for in Bill S-4, that is exactly what happens. Both countries could claim taxes on the income without providing the taxpayer with any measures of relief for the tax paid in the other country.

In closing, the convention and arrangement for the avoidance of double taxation proposed in the bill will provide certainty and stability and create a favourable climate for trade, to the benefit of taxpayers and businesses in Canada and in the partner countries.

What is more, the convention and arrangement for the avoidance of double taxation proposed in the bill will strengthen Canada's position in an increasingly competitive global trade and investment environment.

Those are the reasons why I ask my colleagues to vote in favour of the bill.

Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue de Vaughan—Woodbridge de partager son temps de parole avec moi.

Je suis heureux de prendre la parole à la Chambre afin d'aborder la question importante du projet de loi S-4. Comme la Chambre le sait déjà pertinemment, ce projet de loi propose de mettre en application une convention et un arrangement en matière de double imposition qui ont récemment été signés et annoncés. Cette convention a été conclue avec l'État d'Israël et l'arrangement, avec Taiwan.

À l'heure actuelle, le Canada a 92 conventions fiscales en vigueur et il continue d'oeuvrer à l'élaboration de telles ententes avec d'autres territoires. Le projet de loi S-4 s'inscrit dans les efforts continus du Canada pour mettre à jour et moderniser son réseau de conventions fiscales, ce qui contribue à prévenir les doubles impositions et l'évasion fiscale.

En fait, le Canada maintient l'un des plus vastes réseaux de conventions fiscales au monde. Il s'agit là d'une caractéristique importante du régime de fiscalité international du Canada, caractéristique qui est essentielle à la promotion de notre capacité à être compétitifs. Parallèlement, le régime doit faire en sorte que chacun paie sa juste part d'impôt. Il n'est pas souhaitable que certaines sociétés étrangères et canadiennes profitent des règles fiscales canadiennes pour se soustraire à l'impôt ou que certains particuliers fortunés se tournent vers des pays étrangers pour cacher leur revenu, et éviter de payer de l'impôt.

Chaque fois que cela se produit, les travailleurs et les petites entreprises du Canada, entre autres, sont obligés de payer plus d'impôts qu'ils ne le devraient. C'est tout simplement injuste. Pour déceler et décourager la dissimulation des revenus, l'Agence du revenu du Canada a besoin de renseignements de territoires étrangers.

À cette fin, la convention et l'arrangement en vue d'éviter les doubles impositions inscrits dans le projet de loi S-4 mettent en oeuvre la norme actuelle convenue à l'échelle internationale relativement à l'échange de renseignements fiscaux sur demande, établie par l'Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques, permettant ainsi aux autorités fiscales canadiennes d'obtenir des renseignements nécessaires à l'administration et à l'application des lois fiscales canadiennes, tout en les aidant à prévenir l'évasion fiscale internationale.

Ici, au pays, le gouvernement du Canada poursuit ses efforts pour maintenir le régime fiscal à jour et concurrentiel afin que le Canada demeure à l'avant-garde de l'économie mondiale. Il est essentiel de prendre des mesures en appui à un régime fiscal plus concurrentiel pour favoriser un contexte qui permet aux entrepreneurs et aux industries du Canada d'exceller, évitant ainsi d'entraver leur réussite.

Manifestement, le fait de pouvoir compter sur les conventions fiscales modernes, comme celles qui sont visées par le projet de loi S-4, constitue une composante clé de cet objectif. Le Canada demeure déterminé à maintenir un régime fiscal qui continuera d'aider les entreprises canadiennes à devenir des chefs de file mondiaux tout en veillant à ce que chacun paie sa juste part d'impôt.

Les conventions fiscales servent de complément à l'engagement global de notre gouvernement à mettre en place un régime fiscal plus compétitif qui rehausse le niveau de vie de l'ensemble des Canadiennes et des Canadiens. La convention et l'arrangement en vue d'éviter les doubles imposition inscrits dans le projet de loi S-4 soutiennent directement le commerce transfrontalier de biens et de services, ce qui contribue à la performance économique nationale du Canada.

En outre, chaque année, la richesse économique du Canada dépend de l'investissement direct étranger, de même que de l'entrée d'information, de capitaux et de technologies. Bref, la convention et l'arrangement en vue d'éviter les doubles impositions inscrits dans le projet de loi S-4 produiront, pour les particuliers, les entreprises du Canada et les autres pays visés, des résultats fiscaux prévisibles et équitables lors de leurs transactions transfrontalières.

J'aimerais maintenant parler de ce que propose ce projet de loi dans deux domaines, à savoir, la réduction de retenues d'impôt et l'évitement des doubles impositions. Les retenues d'impôt constituent une caractéristique courante de la fiscalité internationale. Les retenues d'impôt sont des droits imposés par un territoire à l'égard de certains revenus gagnés dans ce territoire qui sont versés aux résidants d'un autre territoire. Les revenus habituellement assujettis à des revenus d'impôt comprennent par exemple l'intérêt, les dividendes et les redevances.

En l'absence d'une convention fiscale, le Canada impose habituellement ce revenu autour de 25 %, ce qui représente le taux prévu par notre droit interne, plus précisément la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu. D'autres territoires étrangers imposent des retenues d'impôt dont les taux sont semblables ou supérieurs.

Étant donné que l'une des fonctions principales d'une convention fiscale consiste à répartir des pouvoirs d'imposition entre les partenaires signataires, ces conventions comportent des dispositions qui réduisent, et dans certains cas éliminent, les retenues d'impôt que peut appliquer le territoire d'où proviennent certains paiements.

Par exemple, la convention et l'arrangement en vue d'éviter les doubles impositions inscrits dans le projet de loi S-4 prévoit un taux maximal de retenue d'impôt de 15 % pour les dividendes de portefeuille versés à des non-résidants dans les cas de l'État d'Israël et de Taiwan. Pour les dividendes que versent les filiales à leurs sociétés mères, le taux maximal de la retenue d'impôt est réduite à 5 % dans le cas l'État d'Israël et à 10 % pour ce qui est de Taiwan.

La réduction des retenues d'impôt vise également les redevances, les intérêts et les pensions. La convention et l'arrangement en vue d'éviter des doubles impositions inscrits dans ce projet de loi limitent à 10 % le taux maximal de la retenue sur les paiements d'intérêt et les redevances, et à 15 % le taux maximal de la retenue pour les paiements périodiques de régimes de pensions.

Le deuxième domaine que je vais aborder est la double imposition. Il y a double imposition internationale lorsque des impôts sont prévus dans au moins deux territoires à l'égard du même revenu imposable pour la même période. La convention et l'arrangement en matière de double imposition qui sont prévus dans le projet de loi S-4 contribueront à éviter la double imposition et à faire en sorte que les contribuables paient l'impôt une seule fois sur un revenu donné.

De façon générale, le régime fiscal canadien s'applique au revenu mondial des résidants du Canada. Toutefois, sachant que les autorités étrangères peuvent aussi faire valoir leur droit d'imposer le revenu gagné sur leur territoire par un résidant canadien, le Canada accorde généralement un crédit au titre de l'impôt étranger payé sur ce revenu. Ce chevauchement de l'impôt du territoire dans lequel le revenu est gagné et de celui où réside le contribuable peut avoir des conséquences négatives et injustes évidentes pour les contribuables. Personne ne devrait voir son revenu imposé deux fois.

Cependant, en l'absence d'une convention ou d'un arrangement en vue d'éviter les doubles impositions, comme ceux qui sont inscrits dans le projet de loi S-4, c'est exactement ce qui se produirait. En effet, les deux territoires pourraient appliquer leur impôt sans accorder au contribuable un allégement relativement à l'impôt payé à l'autre autorité.

En conclusion, la convention et l'arrangement en vue d'éviter des doubles impositions visés par ce projet de loi contribueront à la certitude, à la stabilité et à l'instauration d'un climat plus propice aux affaires, au profit des contribuables et à des entreprises du Canada, ainsi que des territoires partenaires.

En outre, la convention et l'arrangement en vue d'éviter les doubles impositions inscrits dans ce projet de loi permettront de raffermir davantage la position du Canada dans le cercle de plus en plus concurrentiel du commerce et de l'investissement sur la scène internationale.

C'est pour ces raisons que j'invite mes collègues à voter en faveur de ce projet de loi.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 2384 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 08, 2016

2016-12-08 15:39 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Agreements and contracts, Double taxation, Government bills, International relations, Second reading, Senate bills, Tax evasion, Tax havens, Taxation

Deuxième lecture, Double imposition, Ententes et contrats, Évasion fiscale, Fiscalité, Paradis fiscaux, Projets de loi du Sénat, Relations internationales,

Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague from Sherbrooke for his rather interesting speech.

During the debate and in his speech, he talked about risk a number of times. Bill S-4 applies to current treaties that have already been signed. I believe that if we intend to sign treaties with other countries we will.

I question the sincerity of his concern since he is looking at this bill through the lens of countries with which we have no agreement.

Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue de Sherbrooke de son discours assez intéressant.

Au cours du débat et dans son discours, il a parlé de danger à plusieurs reprises. Or le projet de loi S-4 s'applique à des traités actuels, déjà signés. Je crois que si nous avons l'intention de signer des traités avec d'autres pays, nous le ferons.

Je me demande si son inquiétude est sincère étant donné qu'il examine ce projet de loi à travers la lentille de pays avec lesquels nous n'avons pas d'accord.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 210 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 08, 2016

2016-12-06 17:10 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Infrastructure, Third reading and adoption

Infrastructure, Troisième lecture et adoption,

Mr. Speaker, over the nine years from 2006 to 2015, the Conservatives managed to balance two budgets that they inherited from the Liberals, then threw us into deficit in 2008, and then spent $160 billion in new debt without having anything to show for it.

When we buy a car, the value of the car drops over time. The Conservatives spent $160 billion. When we buy a house, it generally retains its value. It is an investment.

I wonder if the member could speak to the value of the gazebos we acquired, the fake lakes, and so forth, and whether they could have done a bit better with that investment over those nine years.

Monsieur le Président, en neuf ans, de 2006 à 2015, les conservateurs ont réussi à équilibrer deux budgets légués par les libéraux, puis nous ont mis en situation de déficit en 2008 pour ensuite alourdir la dette de 160 milliards de dollars sans avoir le moindre résultat à offrir en retour.

Lorsque nous achetons une voiture, la valeur de la voiture baisse avec le temps. Les conservateurs ont dépensé 160 milliards de dollars. Lorsque nous achetons une maison, elle conserve généralement sa valeur. C'est un investissement.

Je me demande si le député pourrait parler de la valeur des kiosques de jardin que nous avons acquis, des faux lacs, et ainsi de suite, et indiquer s'ils auraient pu faire un peu mieux avec cet investissement au cours de ces neuf années.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 262 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 06, 2016

2016-12-05 17:22 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Report stage,

Étape du rapport

Mr. Speaker, I do not need 30 seconds. The question was already asked, and I answered it.

Monsieur le Président, je n'aurai pas besoin de 30 secondes. Cette question a déjà été posée et j'y ai répondu.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 54 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 05, 2016

2016-12-05 17:20 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Banks and banking, Consumers and consumer protection, Government bills, Province of Quebec, Report stage

Banques et services bancaires, Consommateurs et protection des consommateurs, Étape du rapport, Province de Québec,

Mr. Speaker, I have heard that question several times today.

The Marcotte decision asked us to clarify things, and that is exactly what we are doing with this bill. It is important to heed court rulings, and I do not see how this can be a bad thing.

Monsieur le Président, j'ai entendu cette question à plusieurs reprises au cours de la journée.

L'arrêt dans l'affaire Marcotte nous a demandé d'apporter des clarifications, et c'est exactement ce que nous offrons dans ce projet de loi. C'est important de suivre les jugements des cours et je ne vois pas en quoi cela peut être négatif.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 143 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 05, 2016

2016-12-05 17:18 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Budget deficit, Government bills, Infrastructure, Report stage,

Déficit budgétaire, Étape du rapport, Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, with nine days of debate, we are not facing a major debate deficit.

If the Conservatives want to go after us on deficits, they have quite a record. The Conservatives have passed maybe four budgets since 1900 that actually had a surplus. I am not going to take any great lectures from the Conservatives.

There is a huge deficit in our infrastructure. There is so much work that needs to be done. The member wants to put the deficit in our infrastructure and in our communities instead of in our line items.

It is important that we do this correctly. We need to invest in our country, in our communities, to build for the future.

Monsieur le Président, avec neuf jours de débat, on peut difficilement parler d'un gros déficit.

En matière de déficit, les conservateurs sont mal placés pour s'en prendre à nous. Depuis 1990, ils ont adopté peut-être quatre budgets enregistrant un surplus. Je n'ai pas de leçon à recevoir des conservateurs.

Nous avons un immense déficit en matière d'infrastructure. Le travail à faire est énorme. Le député préfère que le déficit soit au niveau des infrastructures et de nos collectivités plutôt que dans le budget.

Il est important que nous fassions bien les choses. Nous devons investir dans notre pays, dans nos collectivités, pour bâtir en prévision de l'avenir.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 245 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 05, 2016

2016-12-05 17:09 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Benefits for children, Broadband Internet services, Computer software, Government bills, Innovation, Report stage, Rural communities, Scientific research and scientists, Senior citizens

Communautés rurales, Étape du rapport, Innovations, Logiciels, Personnes âgées, Prestations pour enfants, Services Internet à large bande

Mr. Speaker, I once again have the great pleasure of rising to talk about how successful the Liberal 2016 budget has been, along with Bill C-29 to implement it. It is a budget that plans for the future, invests where investments are needed, helps our seniors, returns science and innovation to its rightful place, lays the groundwork for our youth, and addresses the priorities of our regions.

At 19,694 square kilometres, my riding, Laurentides—Labelle, is the 46th largest riding in Canada. Our smallest municipality has 41 permanent residents; our largest has about 13,000. My home town of Sainte-Lucie-des-Laurentides, where I still live, is the median of our 43 municipalities with 1,024 residents.

Our communities are aging. In 2011, the average age was 49.5. This year's census data will be released shortly, and I can only imagine that the average age will be over 50, so this budget and the initiatives that will affect our region are important.

In this bill, we are making it easy for senior couples no longer able to live together to receive greater old age security benefits. We are helping seniors in the short term, and we are planning for future issues involving seniors through the changes we have already rolled out for a significant 10% increase to the guaranteed income supplement for single seniors; through lowering the eligibility age for old age security from 67 to 65; and also through Bill C-26 on the future of the CPP.

We have been here for only a year and we did all that. The three budgets remaining in this mandate can only be even better.

Speaking of the future, I want to take this opportunity to talk about our innovation agenda. Our budget puts billions of dollars into social, transport, and green infrastructure. Our investments in scientific research are finally back on, after years of having a creationist minister of science. We understand the importance of research, of science, and of being truly progressive. Progressive comes from progress. Progress is a forward or onward movement. Moving forward is what we do.

While the official opposition objects to even the most basic progress, when even the notion of switching to digital clocks in this chamber was pooh-poohed by the Conservatives when we had a debate on Standing Order 51, the rest of society moves ever forward.

Mr. Speaker, 2016 marks the 25th anniversary of Linux, the open source operating system started by Linus Torvalds and developed into a world powerhouse by tens if not hundreds of thousands of contributors from all walks of life and all corners of the globe.

I have been involved in the Linux and open source community for most of that time, mainly through the open and free technology community SourceForge and its predecessor organizations, Software in the Public Interest and the Debian community. It symbolizes to me what a community can do when it works together. Indeed, DebConf17 will take place next year in Montreal, and it is an excellent and concrete example of what that looks like.

We in rural Canada are still trying to figure out how to reduce packet loss on our TCP-over-smoke signal Internet connectivity and our UDP-over-carrier pigeon cell phone service. The rest of the world is not waiting.

Amazon, Google, and Facebook built their empires on Linux. Linux now runs 498 of the world's 500 fastest supercomputers, only one of which is in Canada. Even Microsoft recently finally joined the Linux Foundation this fall.

I believe it is very important to understand the lessons of the open source community.

In 25 years, Linux went from a university student's hobby to the software backbone of the Internet. Many people became very wealthy because of it, with it, and through it, yet all the while, the software, the product, was free for anyone and everyone to use, to modify, to take apart, and to understand.

While some people refuse to use a web browser other than Internet Explorer because its proprietary nature is seen as the only possible avenue to being secure, I see it as the other way around. Open source software, with its peer-reviewed scientific approach to development, tends to be the most secure option available. Getting open source logic into government can only see innovation improve.

With our innovation agenda, the options are there, but to get there, we need communications infrastructure. That we only have one of the world's top 500 supercomputers, and that it is 196 on the list, speaks to the need for infrastructure and investment in innovation. After a decade of the previous government dismissing science as an inconvenience, unhelpful facts in the way of an ideological agenda, the government we have today clearly believes in researching and preparing our way into the future.

In rural Canada, as I mentioned, Internet is our big file. Of the 43 municipalities I mentioned earlier, all 43 see the lack of proper, competitive, high speed Internet as among the top priorities. Without it, our average age will continue heading north. When our average age reaches retirement age, the social structure of our region will necessarily change.

To address this, we need to address the issues that are keeping youth away.

When I asked high school seniors who among them will stay in the region after they graduate, it was rare to hear one of them say yes.

When I ask them why they leave, the answers are always the same. They say that there is no post-secondary education, that there is not a lot of public transit, that the regional service covers 35 municipalities with a couple of retired school buses, and that there is substandard Internet and cellular service. Without these, not much is going on. When newcomers see that their cellphones do not work, they do not think about buying a house in our region, moving there or making their lives there.

Internet access is only through slow and unreliable satellite service or by telephone. Surely members can remember that noise old modems used to make. Unfortunately, it is still the case for many of our residents. For the luckiest, it is a blurry image at the end of a Skype call with their grandchildren.

Our budget is beginning to tackle these problems. We are investing $500 million in digital infrastructure to help bridge this technical gap. The lack of internet means fewer young people, less immigration and fewer opportunities for those who stay.

In investing a half a billion dollars in digital infrastructure to begin with, we are creating opportunities for those who stay and some appeal for newcomers. We are also helping to keep young people in the region.

The bill also aims to improve the lives of our seniors and to even out the average age of our regions over the long term. It is a budget that plans for the future, that invests where investment is needed, that helps our seniors, that reinstates science and innovation to their rightful place, that paves the way for our young people, and that examines the priorities of our regions. I am proud to support it.

What I am most proud of in this budget is the Canada child benefit. It helps thousands of people in the country. Over 300,000 people will find more money in their pockets.

When I tour my riding, people will often stop me and say they have never been interested in politics, but they really appreciate what we have done for families.

Last Friday evening, someone told me that she became a single parent just before the change in policy, and that it has helped her directly. It also provides concrete assistance to the region’s youth and families. I am proud of everything we have done. We have be proud of this budget. I am proud to support it.

Monsieur le Président, j'ai encore une fois le très grand plaisir de me lever pour parler de la grande réussite qu'est le budget libéral de 2016, ainsi que le projet de loi C-29 pour le mettre en oeuvre. C'est un budget qui planifie l'avenir, qui investit là où on a besoin de le faire, qui aide nos aînés, qui remet en place la science et l'innovation, qui prépare le terrain pour nos jeunes et qui s'occupe des priorités de nos régions.

À 19 694 kilomètres carrés, ma circonscription, Laurentides—Labelle, est la 46e plus grande circonscription au Canada. Notre plus petite municipalité a une population de 41 résidants permanents; notre plus grande, environ 13 000. Mon village natal de Sainte-Lucie-des-Laurentides, où je demeure toujours, est la médiane de nos 43 municipalités, avec 1 024 habitants.

Nos communautés sont vieillissantes. En 2011, l'âge moyen était de 49,5 ans. Le recensement de cette année sortira bientôt, et je ne peux qu'imaginer que l'âge moyen va dépasser les 50 ans. Alors ce budget et les projets associés à notre région sont importants.

Dans ce projet de loi, nous facilitons la possibilité pour les couples aînés, qui ne peuvent plus vivre ensemble, d'avoir de meilleures prestations de la Sécurité de la vieillesse. Nous aidons les aînés à court terme, et nous planifions les enjeux futurs par rapport aux aînés grâce aux changements que nous avons déjà mis en place pour une augmentation importante de 10 % du Supplément de revenu garanti pour les aînés vivant seuls; grâce à la diminution de l'âge d'admissibilité à la Sécurité de la vieillesse, la faisant passer de 67 ans à 65 ans; et grâce aussi au projet de loi C-26 sur l'avenir RPC.

Nous sommes en poste depuis seulement un an et nous avons fait tout cela. Les trois budgets qui restent dans ce mandat ne peuvent être que meilleurs encore.

Puisqu'il est question de l'avenir, je profite de l'occasion pour parler de notre programme d'innovation. Le budget prévoit d'investir des milliards de dollars dans les infrastructures sociales, les infrastructures de transport et les infrastructures vertes. Les investissements dans la recherche scientifique sont enfin rétablis après des années passées sous un gouvernement qui avait un créationniste comme ministre des Sciences. Nous comprenons l'importance de la recherche, de la science et des véritables mesures progressistes. Être progressiste, c'est être pour le progrès. Le progrès, c'est avancer, et c'est ce que nous faisons.

Tandis que l'opposition officielle s'oppose au moindre progrès — puisque même l'idée de remplacer l'horloge de la Chambre par des horloges numériques a été dénigrée par les conservateurs lors d'un débat prévu par l'article 51 du Règlement —, le reste de la société continue d'avancer.

Monsieur le Président, l'année 2016 marque le 25e anniversaire de Linux, le système d'exploitation à code source ouvert qui a été lancé par Linus Torvalds et qui est devenu un puissant outil utilisé dans le monde entier grâce au travail de dizaines — voire de centaines — de milliers de contributeurs provenant de tous les milieux et de toutes les régions du monde.

J'ai fait partie des contributeurs de Linux et du milieu des codes sources ouverts pendant la majeure partie de cette période, principalement en tant que membre de SourceForge, une communauté axée sur la technologie ouverte et gratuite, et des organisations qui l'ont précédée, y compris la communauté Software in the Public Interest et la communauté Debian. À mon avis, c'est là un exemple de ce que les membres d'une communauté peuvent faire en unissant leurs forces. D'ailleurs, la conférence DebConf17, qui se tiendra à Montréal l'an prochain, sera une excellente occasion de montrer ce que j'avance de façon concrète.

Nous, qui habitons en région rurale, nous demandons encore comment éviter de perdre trop de paquets de données avec nos connexions Internet par signaux de fumée et nos services de téléphonie cellulaire par pigeons voyageurs. Or, le reste du monde n'attend pas, lui.

Amazon, Google et Facebook ont bâti leur empire grâce à Linux. Ce système d'exploitation permet aujourd'hui de faire fonctionner 498 des 500 superordinateurs les plus puissants du monde, dont 1 seul est au Canada. Même Microsoft a fini par voir la lumière et se joindre, l'automne dernier, à la fondation Linux.

Il faut absolument, selon moi, tirer des leçons de l'expérience du code source libre.

En 25 ans, Linux est passé d'un simple passe-temps pour un étudiant d'université au logiciel sur lequel repose la structure même d'Internet. Bien des gens sont devenus riches grâce à ce système d'exploitation — ou à cause de lui —, mais il est toujours demeuré gratuit et libre d'accès pour quiconque souhaitait l'utiliser, le modifier, le décortiquer ou en comprendre le fonctionnement.

Même si certaines personnes refusent encore d'utiliser autre chose qu'Internet Explorer comme navigateur Web parce qu'elles considèrent que les droits de propriété par lesquels il est visé constituent la seule garantie de sécurité valable, je vois les choses tout autrement. Linux étant un graticiel, son développement est scruté à la loupe par une pléthore d'informaticiens, ce qui tend à en faire la plus sûre de toutes les options imaginables. Si on réussissait à faire entrer le code source libre au gouvernement, l'innovation ferait des bonds de géant.

Grâce à notre programme d'innovation, toutes les options sont sur la table, mais pour arriver à destination, nous avons besoin d'infrastructures de communication. Que le Canada n'ait qu'un seul des 500 superordinateurs les plus puissants du monde et que l'ordinateur en question n'arrive qu'au 196e rang sur 500 en dit long sur les besoins du pays en matière d'infrastructures et d'investissements. Durant 10 ans, le gouvernement précédent a considéré les sciences comme une nuisance et balayé du revers de la main tous les faits susceptibles de nuire à son programme idéologique; le gouvernement actuel, lui, croit profondément aux vertus de la recherche et il est convaincu que nous devons nous préparer aux défis de demain.

Comme je le disais, pour les régions rurales du Canada, Internet demeure le dossier de l'heure. La totalité des 43 municipalités dont je parlais tout à l'heure considèrent l'accès à une connexion Internet haute vitesse adéquate et à prix concurrentiel comme une de leurs principales priorités. Autrement, l'âge moyen dans ma circonscription continuera de grimper. Quand il correspondra à l'âge de la retraite, c'est la structure sociale même de notre région qui se transformera; c'est inévitable.

Pour éviter d'en arriver là, nous devons nous attaquer aux problèmes qui empêchent les jeunes de revenir.

Quand j'ai demandé aux étudiants de cinquième secondaire lesquels parmi eux resteront dans la région après l'obtention de leur diplôme, les réponses positives étaient rares.

Quand je leur demande pourquoi ils partent, les réponses sont toujours les mêmes. Ils disent qu'il n'y a pas d'éducation postsecondaire, qu'il y a peu de transport en commun, que le service régional dessert 35 municipalités avec quelques autobus scolaires à la retraite, qu'il n'y a pas de service Internet ni de service cellulaire adéquats. Sans ces derniers, peu de choses avancent. Quand les nouveaux arrivants s'aperçoivent que leur cellulaire ne fonctionne pas, ils ne songent pas à acheter une maison dans notre région, à y déménager ou à s'y établir.

L'accès Internet ne se fait que par un service satellite lent qui n'est pas fiable ou par ligne téléphonique. On se souvient sûrement du son particulier que produisaient les anciens modems. Malheureusement, c'est toujours le cas pour beaucoup de nos résidants. Pour les plus chanceux, c'est une image brouillée à la fin d'une session Skype avec leurs petits-enfants.

Notre budget commence à aborder ces problèmes. Nous investissons 500 millions de dollars dans l'infrastructure numérique pour contribuer à combler cette lacune technique. En raison du manque d'Internet, il y a moins de jeunes, moins d'immigration et moins de possibilités pour ceux qui restent.

En investissant un demi-milliard de dollars dans l'infrastructure numérique pour commencer, nous créons des possibilités pour ceux qui restent et de l'attrait pour les nouveaux arrivants. De même, nous améliorons ainsi la rétention des jeunes dans la région.

Le projet de loi vise aussi à améliorer la vie de nos aînés et à équilibrer l'âge moyen de nos régions à long terme. C'est un budget qui planifie pour l'avenir, qui investit là où on en a besoin, qui aide nos aînés, qui remet en place la science et l'innovation, qui prépare le terrain pour nos jeunes, et qui examine les priorités de nos régions. Je suis fier de l'appuyer.

L'Allocation canadienne pour enfants est ce dont je suis le plus fier dans ce budget. Elle aide des milliers de personnes dans le pays. Plus de 300 000 personnes vont avoir plus d'argent dans leur poche.

Quand je fais le tour de ma circonscription, il m'arrive souvent que quelqu'un m'arrête et me dise qu'il ne s'est jamais intéressé à la politique, mais qu'il apprécie beaucoup ce que nous avons fait pour les familles.

Vendredi soir dernier, une personne m'a dit qu'elle était devenue mère monoparentale juste avant le changement de la politique et que cela l'aide directement. C'est une aide concrète pour les jeunes et pour les familles de la région. Je suis fier de tout ce que nous avons fait. Nous devons être fiers de ce budget. Je suis fier de l'appuyer.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 2814 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 05, 2016

2016-12-05 15:52 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Report stage,

Étape du rapport

Mr. Speaker, I was amused to listen to the member's comments about how much the government has done in a short period. I wonder if the member could remind the House how many years it took for the Conservatives to cause all the damage they caused to this country. They caused quite a bit of damage and, after 10 years, they still had not finished everything they wanted to do.

Monsieur le Président, les commentaires du député sur tout ce qu'a fait le gouvernement en si peu de temps m’ont beaucoup amusé. Je me demande s’il se souvient du nombre d’années qu’ont mis les conservateurs pour provoquer tous les dommages qu’ils ont causés à notre pays. Ces dommages sont incalculables, et après 10 ans, ils n’avaient pas encore terminé de démolir tout ce qu’ils voulaient démolir.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 152 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 05, 2016

2016-12-05 14:01 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Impaired driving, Operation Red Nose, Statements by Members, Volunteering and volunteers,

Bénévolat et bénévoles, Conduite avec facultés affaiblies, Déclarations de députés, Opération Nez rouge,

Mr. Speaker, Friday night, two members of my team and I volunteered for Operation Red Nose through the Maison des jeunes de Sainte-Adèle. Last week we did the same thing with the Maison des jeunes de Mont-Laurier. Next week we will help the Fondation de l'école du Méandre de Rivière-Rouge, and on December 23, we will volunteer with the Maison des jeunes de Mont-Tremblant.

I have been volunteering for Operation Red Nose for the past four years because I believe in the cause. Since 1984, all across the country, volunteers have been giving their time until the wee hours of the morning to help get people and their vehicles home safely during the festive season.

I am so proud to count my team members and myself among the 50,000 volunteers who help save lives thanks to this wonderful driving service.

I wish to commend the founders of Operation Red Nose and those who keep it rolling today.

Monsieur le Président, vendredi soir, deux adjoints de mon équipe et moi-même avons participé à l'Opération Nez rouge de la Maison des jeunes de Sainte-Adèle. La semaine passée, nous l'avons fait avec la Maison des jeunes de Mont-Laurier. La semaine prochaine, on le fera avec les organisateurs de la Fondation de l'école du Méandre de Rivière-Rouge. Le 23 décembre, on le fera avec la Maison des jeunes de Mont-Tremblant.

Depuis quatre ans, je participe à l'Opération Nez rouge, parce que j'y crois. Depuis 1984, partout au pays, des bénévoles se dévouent jusqu'aux petites heures du matin, afin d'assurer la rentrée sécuritaire à la maison, des conducteurs et de leurs véhicules pendant les festivités du temps des Fêtes.

Je suis fier que mon équipe d'adjoints et moi-même comptions parmi les plus de 50 000 bénévoles qui contribuent à sauver des vies grâce à ce merveilleux service de raccompagnement.

Chapeau à ceux qui ont lancé l'Opération Nez Rouge, et à ceux qui la perpétuent.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 344 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 05, 2016

2016-12-02 12:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Guaranteed Income Supplement, Income security, Pensions and pensioners, Report stage, Senior citizens,

Étape du rapport, Pensions et pensionnés, Personnes âgées, Sécurité du revenu, Supplément de revenu garanti

Mr. Speaker, I want to congratulate my colleague on his speech. He talked about numerous positive measures in the budget.

I want to come back to one specific point. He touched on the benefits for seniors. Under Bill C-29, couples who are receiving the guaranteed income supplement and the spouse's allowance but have to live apart for reasons beyond their control, such as the need for long-term care, will each receive benefits based on their individual income.

For the benefit of those watching us, can the member elaborate on this and paint a clearer picture of what this really means for many senior couples?

Monsieur le Président, je veux féliciter mon collègue de son discours. Il a parlé de nombreuses mesures bénéfiques du budget.

Je veux revenir sur un aspect précis. En effet, il a parlé un peu des avantages pour les aînés. Le projet de loi C-29 prévoit que les couples recevant des prestations du Supplément de revenu garanti et des allocations, et dont les membres vivent séparés pour des raisons échappant à leur contrôle, comme le besoin de soins de longue durée, reçoivent des prestations plus élevées en fonction du revenu individuel des membres du couple.

Le député peut-il expliquer plus en détail et de façon concrète, au profit de ceux qui nous écoutent, ce que cela signifie pour les nombreux couples d'aînés?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 262 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 02, 2016

2016-12-02 11:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government assistance, Oral questions, Research chairs

Aide gouvernementale, Chaires de recherche, Questions orales

Mr. Speaker, this government understands that investments in science can help us attract and retain some of the best talent in order to continue our proud tradition of research excellence in Canada.

This morning the Minister of Science announced the latest results of the Canada research chairs competition. Can the Parliamentary Secretary for Science update the House on what the government is doing to support Canadian researchers?

Monsieur le Président, le gouvernement comprend qu'investir dans les sciences peut nous aider à attirer et à retenir certains des meilleurs talents afin de perpétuer notre fière tradition d'excellence en matière de recherche au Canada.

Ce matin, la ministre des Sciences a annoncé les résultats du plus récent concours des chaires de recherche du Canada. Le secrétaire parlementaire pour les Sciences pourrait-il informer la Chambre de ce que fait le gouvernement pour appuyer les chercheurs canadiens?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr qp 165 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 02, 2016

2016-12-01 12:45 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Civil and human rights, Cuba, Deaths and funerals, Democracy, International relations, Opposition motions, Prime Minister, References to members,

Allusions aux députés, Cuba, Décès et funérailles, Démocratie, Droits de la personne, Premier ministre, Relations internationales

Mr. Speaker, it really hearkens back to when the Conservatives dropped the word “progressive” from the party name, they dropped all essence of progress. This is very good evidence of that.

Monsieur le Président, cela nous ramène vraiment à l'époque où les conservateurs ont laissé tomber le terme « progressiste » du nom de leur parti et où ils ont vraiment abandonné la notion de progrès. Cela en est la preuve.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 113 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 01, 2016

2016-12-01 12:44 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Civil and human rights, Cuba, Deaths and funerals, Democracy, Embargoes, Opposition motions, Prime Minister, References to members,

Allusions aux députés, Cuba, Décès et funérailles, Démocratie, Droits de la personne, Embargo, Premier ministre, Remarques des députés,

Mr. Speaker, there are obviously many questions about how things will play out in the United States over the next few years. We do not know yet.

As Canadians, our job is to engage with the people of Cuba and to work with them to help as much as we can. We have always done that, ever since the Cuban missile crisis, which lasted 13 days.

I do not know what the Americans will do. Our job is to do what is best for Canada and Cuba.

Monsieur le Président, on a évidemment beaucoup de questions à propos de la façon dont se dérouleront les choses aux États-Unis au cours des prochaines années. On ne le sait pas encore.

En tant que Canadiens, notre travail est de s'engager auprès du peuple de Cuba et de travailler avec lui pour l'aider autant qu'on le peut. On l'a toujours fait, et ce, depuis la crise des missiles de Cuba, qui a duré 13 jours.

Je ne sais pas ce que feront les Américains. Notre travail, c'est de faire ce qu'il y a de mieux pour le Canada et pour Cuba.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 232 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 01, 2016

2016-12-01 12:42 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Civil and human rights, Cuba, Deaths and funerals, Democracy, Opposition motions, Prime Minister, References to members

Allusions aux députés, Cuba, Décès et funérailles, Démocratie, Droits de la personne, Premier ministre, Remarques des députés

Mr. Speaker, leave it to the Conservatives to filibuster themselves. It is always entertaining.

The member is completely missed what I said. The Conservative prime minister talked about how he joined the people of Saudi Arabia in mourning the passing of King Abdullah. I can assure the member that not everybody in Saudi Arabia felt the same way. Not everybody in Canada felt the same way. However, that is the appropriate thing for a prime minister to say, whether it is theirs or ours, when a foreign leader passes away, regardless of what is going on.

It is very important that we respect our foreign leaders and their own systems. We do not interfere with how other governments run themselves. That is not our position. Our position is to help the people as best we can.

Monsieur le Président, il n'y a que les conservateurs pour se chahuter eux-mêmes. Comme c'est divertissant.

La députée n'a rien compris de ce que j'ai dit. Le premier ministre conservateur a affirmé que nous étions de tout coeur avec le peuple saoudien et que nous pleurions le départ du roi Abdullah. Je peux garantir à la députée que tous les Saoudiens ne partageaient pas ce sentiment, pas plus que l'ensemble des Canadiens. Cependant, lorsqu'un dirigeant étranger s'éteint, il est approprié que le premier ministre, quelle que soit son affiliation politique, formule ce type de déclarations, peu importe la situation du pays.

Il est très important que nous respections les dirigeants étrangers et leur système. Nous n'interférons pas dans la gestion des autres gouvernements; ce n'est pas notre rôle. Nous devons plutôt aider les gens du mieux que nous pouvons.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 318 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 01, 2016

2016-12-01 12:31 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Air transportation, Bureaucracy, Canadian companies, Canadian investments abroad, Civil and human rights, Competition, Credit rating, Cuba,

Accès aux marchés, Accords commerciaux, Allusions aux députés, Arabie saoudite, Barrières commerciales, Bureaucratie, Commerce international, Concurrence,

Mr. Speaker, I will say a few words concerning Canada’s trading relationship with Cuba.

Cuba is a market with over 11 million people. It is the largest market for Canadian exporters in Central America and the Caribbean.

In fact, Canadian exports to Cuba are roughly equivalent to our exports throughout Central America. Despite the current liquidity crisis in Cuba, these exports have remained stable.

As the second mostly densely populated market in Central America and the Caribbean and as the largest island in the Caribbean, Cuba has the potential to become an attractive export market as its economy recovers, particularly if the American embargo is lifted.

In actual numbers, bilateral merchandise trade in 2015 totalled over $1 billion.

Canadian exports totalled close to $495 million, covering a wide range of products such as grain, machinery, meats, vegetables, vehicles, and electrical equipment.

In 2015, Cuban imports to Canada were valued at $520.1 million. The top import was unwrought nickel ore, from a Canadian joint venture’s mining operations. The nickel ore was imported so it could be refined in northern Alberta.

Canada is Cuba's second-largest export market, after Venezuela, and its fourth-largest trading partner.

When it comes to trade in services, there is no doubt that Canadians love visiting Cuba. Although Statistics Canada does not track Canadian service exports, Cuban figures suggest that Canadian tourists make up over one-third of all visitors to Cuba. In 2015, 1.3 million of Cuba's 3.5 million international visitors were Canadian tourists.

Every major Canadian airline flies to Cuba, and a Canadian company operates 13 hotels on the island. According to Cuban statistics from 2008, Canada is Cuba's second-largest source of direct foreign investment after Spain.

Sherritt International, which is active in the mining, oil and gas, and hydro development sectors, is Cuba's second-largest foreign investor, with an estimated total investment of $3 billion. We do not have official figures on non-mining-related Canadian investments, but Canadian firms are also known for investing heavily in food production.

Ever since the Obama administration announced its intention to restore relations between the United States and Cuba, Canadian interest in the market has grown significantly. The Canadian Trade Commissioner Service has received 160% more requests for information from Canadian companies. Cuban government representatives are excited about Canadian investment and trade and have always sought to boost Canadian companies' participation in the Cuban market.

Everyone knows that getting into the Cuban market is not without its challenges. Operations and market approvals still get bogged down by excessive red tape in Cuba. The U.S. embargo is still an obstacle for Canadian companies wishing to do business in Cuba, particularly those whose products have American components or that have major interests in the United States.

The embargo, along with Cuba's poor credit risk assessment, makes financing tricky to arrange with Cuba. Canada has always been and will continue to be outspoken about its opposition to the American embargo. Another obstacle to increased Canadian investment and trade with Cuba is the lack of access to insurance and financing products.

Despite these obstacles, Canada has a number of competitors on the Cuban market, including Brazil, China, Spain, and Mexico, who recognize the market's obvious potential.

In an effort to attract inward foreign direct investment, Cuba undertook major economic reforms over the past two years. Cuba decided that these reforms would help spur the economy, create wealth among the population, and provide and improve key social services for Cubans.

While progress has been rather slow, these economic reforms are far-reaching. They have led to the establishment of a small private sector, enhanced the role of co-operatives in the economy, allowed banks to provide credit to individuals and private companies, attracted more foreign investment, and made public corporations more accountable.

At the same time, Cuba tried to improve its international credit rating by meeting its financial obligations with respect to payments and outstanding debt. The December 2015 agreement that Cuba concluded with international lenders, through the Paris club, will further contribute to rebuilding its financial image.

Even though we do not anticipate that Cuba will fully engage in liberal reforms in the short term, these measures are positive signs for the future of the country's economic growth. They illustrate an understanding of the fact that economic reform to stimulate growth requires thinking outside the box.

Along with the regulatory changes in the U.S. that have been reducing the scope of the U.S. embargo over the past two years, the reforms will make things a little easier for foreign companies that want to set up in Cuba and could introduce more cash flow. As such, the reform process could also present new opportunities for Canadian exporters. In the short term, we are taking steps to better prepare Canada to engage with Cuba in a post-reform and post-embargo era.

Since December 2014, the world seems to have taken notice of Cuba and of its potential. Not a week goes by without a foreign delegation together with a commercial delegation, a list of bilateral agreements, and a credit facility arriving in Cuba. These missions have become a symbol of the world's interest in Cuba. Competition is heating up on this market.

Canada has programs to help Canadian businesses penetrate the Cuban market. Even though Export Development Canada, EDC, considers Cuba to be a high-risk market, it has established stable relations with the Cuban government and several Cuban financial institutions, and it has helped Canadian exporters do business in Cuba through Canadian banks with a presence in Cuba.

The Canadian Commercial Corporation, the CCC, has had success in Cuba. Since 1991, it has facilitated export sales of almost $1 billion in Cuba.

With respect to bilateral agreements in support of our trade commitments, Canadian and Cuban negotiators managed to reach an agreement in May 2015 to expand the Canada-Cuba air transport agreement. Cuba is Canada's third largest international air travel market and all major airlines fly there. Canadian and Cuban spokespersons are talking about ways to reduce obstacles to foreign investment.

Canada's trade relationship with Cuba is obviously important. A closer bilateral trade and investment relationship is in the best interests of Canadians and Cubans. Many Canadians depend on that relationship to earn a living. Similarly, Canadian investments in Cuba have made a significant contribution to the country's development and have helped to improve the livelihoods of countless Cubans.

Although there are still many obstacles to the robust growth of trade and investments, there is no question that the future looks bright. The measures that we are currently taking to position Canada are important. That is why the Prime Minister raised the issue of improving trade and investment when he visited Cuba earlier this month, and our representatives will continue to work with Cubans to strengthen these important ties.

Our goal was to encourage the Cuban government in its economic reform efforts and to ensure that Canadian businesses are well positioned when those economic reforms are implemented. That is what we are going to continue to do.

Before I wrap up, I want to come back to something the member for Calgary Nose Hill said earlier. She went into a long speech about the what the Prime Minister has said with regard to human rights, and how it was totally inappropriate.

I want to read something that I think all members will find quite interesting:

Prime Minister Stephen Harper today issued the following statement on the death of King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz of Saudi Arabia:

On behalf of all Canadians, Laureen and I offer our sincere condolences to the family of King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz and the people of Saudi Arabia. King Abdullah was recognized as a strong proponent of peace in the Middle East. He also undertook a range of important economic, social, education, health, and infrastructure initiatives in his country. I had the pleasure of meeting King Abdullah in Toronto when Canada hosted the G-20 and found him to be passionate about his country, development and the global economy.

We join the people of Saudi Arabia in mourning his passing.

I am curious if the members on the other side believe that was an appropriate statement for a prime minister to make on the passing of a dictator.

Monsieur le Président, je vais dire quelques mots sur les relations commerciales qu'entretient le Canada avec Cuba.

Cuba est un marché qui compte plus de 11 millions de personnes. Il s'agit du marché le plus important pour les exportateurs canadiens en Amérique centrale et dans les Caraïbes.

En fait, les exportations canadiennes à Cuba équivalent à peu près à nos exportations dans l'ensemble de l'Amérique centrale. En dépit de la crise de liquidité qui sévit actuellement à Cuba, ces exportations sont demeurées stables.

En tant que deuxième marché le plus densément peuplé en Amérique centrale et dans les Caraïbes et comme plus grande île des Caraïbes, Cuba a le potentiel de devenir un marché d'exportation attrayant avec la reprise de l'économie, notamment si l'embargo américain vient à prendre fin.

En termes de chiffres, le commerce bilatéral de marchandises en 2015 a atteint plus de 1 milliard de dollars.

Les exportations canadiennes ont totalisé près de 495 millions de dollars et englobaient un large éventail de produits, comme les céréales, la machinerie, la viande, les légumes, les véhicules et le matériel électrique.

En 2015, la valeur des importations cubaines au Canada a été estimée à 520,1 millions de dollars. Le principal produit importé était le minerai de nickel brut, provenant de travaux d'exploitation minière d'une coentreprise canadienne. Le minerai de nickel était importé aux fins d'affinement dans le Nord de l'Alberta.

Le Canada se classe au deuxième rang parmi les marchés d'exportation de marchandises de Cuba après le Venezuela, et il est son quatrième partenaire commercial en importance.

Lorsque nous examinons le commerce du point de vue des services, il est clair que les Canadiens aiment visiter Cuba. Alors que Statistique Canada ne suit pas l'exportation des services canadiens, les chiffres cubains révèlent que les touristes canadiens représentent plus du tiers de tous les visiteurs touristiques à Cuba. En 2015, 1,3 million sur les 3,5 millions de visiteurs internationaux à Cuba étaient des touristes canadiens.

Tous les grands transporteurs aériens canadiens se rendent à Cuba et une entreprise canadienne exploite 13 hôtels sur l'île. D'après les statistiques cubaines de 2008, le Canada est la deuxième plus importante source d'investissement étranger direct de Cuba après l'Espagne.

Sherritt International, qui évolue dans le domaine des opérations minières, pétrolières et gazières et de l'exploitation hydroélectrique, est le deuxième investisseur étranger en importance à Cuba. Son investissement total est évalué à 3 milliards de dollars. On ne possède pas de chiffres officiels concernant les investissements non miniers canadiens, mais des sociétés canadiennes sont aussi reconnues pour investir de façon importante dans la production alimentaire.

Depuis l'annonce d'un rapprochement entre les États-Unis et Cuba par l'administration Obama, on a observé une augmentation considérable de l'intérêt canadien sur le marché. Les demandes de renseignements émanant d'entreprises canadiennes à notre Service des délégués commerciaux du Canada ont augmenté de plus de 160 %. Les porte-parole du gouvernement cubain se sont réjouis des échanges et des investissements du Canada et ont toujours sollicité une participation accrue des entreprises canadiennes sur le marché cubain.

Il est bien connu que l'entrée sur le marché cubain a donné lieu à son lot de défis. Des lourdeurs administratives indues persistent en ce qui a trait aux opérations et approbations commerciales à Cuba. L'embargo américain continue aussi de représenter un obstacle pour les entreprises canadiennes désireuses de faire des affaires à Cuba, notamment celles qui présentent des composants américains dans leurs produits ou qui ont des intérêts importants aux États-Unis.

L'embargo, associé à la cote d'évaluation des risques de crédit élevée de Cuba, rendent difficiles les opérations de financement avec Cuba. En outre, le Canada a toujours affirmé clairement son opposition à l'embargo américain et il continuera de le faire. Un autre obstacle à l'accroissement des échanges et des investissements canadiens avec Cuba réside dans le manque d'accès aux produits d'assurance et de financement.

Or malgré ces obstacles, le Canada fait face à de nombreux compétiteurs sur le marché cubain, comme le Brésil, la Chine, l'Espagne et le Mexique, qui perçoivent tout le potentiel de marché évident.

Dans le but d'attirer l'investissement direct étranger entrant, Cuba a entrepris des réformes économiques importantes au cours des deux dernières années. Cuba a décidé que ces réformes contribueront à l'essor de l'économie, à enrichir la population et à faire en sorte de fournir et d'améliorer les services sociaux clés pour les Cubains.

Quoique les progrès aient été relativement lents, la portée de ces réformes économiques est vaste, celles-ci ayant permis de mettre en place un petit secteur privé, de renforcer le rôle des coopératives dans l'économie, de permettre aux banques d'offrir du crédit aux particuliers et aux entreprises privées, d'attirer davantage l'investissement étranger et de responsabiliser davantage les sociétés publiques.

Parallèlement, Cuba s'est efforcé d'améliorer sa cote de crédit à l'international en respectant ses obligations financières en matière de paiements et d'encours de la dette. L'accord de décembre 2015 que Cuba a conclu avec les créanciers internationaux, par l'entremise du Club de Paris, contribuera encore davantage à reconstruire son image financière.

Même si on ne s'attend pas à ce que Cuba s'engage pleinement dans des réformes libérales à court terme, ces mesures sont des signes positifs pour l'avenir de la croissance économique du pays. Elles montrent une compréhension selon laquelle la réforme de l'économie pour stimuler la croissance exige de nouvelles façons de penser.

Associées aux modifications réglementaires américaines des deux dernières années réduisant la portée de l'embargo américain, les réformes faciliteront un peu plus les choses pour les entreprises étrangères qui veulent s'implanter à Cuba et pourraient donner lieu à de nouveaux apports de liquidités. À ce titre, le processus de réforme pourrait aussi présenter de nouveaux débouchés pour les exportateurs canadiens. À court terme, les perspectives consistent donc à positionner le Canada à Cuba dans une optique postréforme et postembargo.

Depuis décembre 2014, le monde semble avoir pris conscience de Cuba et du potentiel futur que ce pays recèle. Il ne se passe pas une semaine sans qu'une délégation étrangère accompagnée d'une délégation commerciale, d'une liste d'accords bilatéraux et d'une facilité de financement par le crédit arrive à Cuba. Ces missions sont devenues un symbole d'intérêt mondial envers Cuba. La concurrence se fait de plus en plus vive sur ce marché.

Le Canada a en place des programmes d'appui pour aider les entreprises canadiennes à pénétrer le marché cubain. Tandis qu'Exportation et développement Canada, EDC, considère Cuba comme un marché à risque élevé, il a établi des relations stables avec le gouvernement cubain et plusieurs institutions financières cubaines et a aidé des exportateurs canadiens faisant des affaires à Cuba au moyen des banques canadiennes ayant une présence à Cuba.

La Corporation commerciale canadienne, la CCC, a connu un parcours fructueux à Cuba qui remonte à 1991 et a depuis lors facilité des ventes d'exportation atteignant près de 1 milliard de dollars à Cuba.

En ce qui a trait aux accords bilatéraux pour appuyer notre engagement commercial, les négociateurs canadiens et cubains sont parvenus à une entente, en mai 2015, pour élargir l'accord de transport aérien en cours entre le Canada et Cuba. Cuba représente le troisième marché de transport aérien en importance pour le Canada, et tous les grands transporteurs canadiens y sont implantés. Des porte-parole canadiens et cubains discutent des façons de réduire les obstacles à l'investissement étranger.

La relation commerciale du Canada avec Cuba est manifestement importante. Une relation plus étroite dans le domaine des échanges bilatéraux et des investissements est dans l'intérêt des Canadiens et des Cubains. Beaucoup de Canadiens dépendent de cette relation pour assurer leurs moyens de subsistance. De même, à Cuba, les investissements canadiens ont contribué de façon notable au développement de leur pays et ont aidé à améliorer les moyens de subsistance d'innombrables Cubains.

Alors qu'il subsiste des obstacles à la croissance robuste des échanges et des investissements, il ne fait guère de doute que l'avenir est prometteur. Les mesures que nous prenons maintenant pour positionner le Canada sont importantes. Voilà pourquoi le premier ministre a soulevé la question d'améliorer les échanges et les investissements lorsqu'il s'est rendu à Cuba, plus tôt ce mois-ci, et nos représentants continueront de travailler avec les Cubains pour renforcer ces liens importants.

Notre objectif a été à la fois d'encourager le gouvernement cubain dans les efforts de réforme économique qu'il déploie et de positionner les entreprises canadiennes alors que se concrétisent ces réformes économiques. C'est ce que nous allons continuer de faire.

Avant de conclure, j'aimerais revenir sur une chose qu'a dite la députée de Calgary Nose Hill tout à l'heure. Elle s'est lancée dans une longue tirade sur les propos du premier ministre concernant les droits de la personne, propos qui, à l'entendre, seraient carrément déplacés.

J'aimerais que les députés écoutent les quelques mots qui suivent, car ils risquent de les intéresser au plus haut point:

Le premier ministre Stephen Harper a fait aujourd'hui la déclaration suivante à la suite du décès du roi Abdullah bin Abdulaziz de l'Arabie saoudite:

Au nom de tous les Canadiens, Laureen et moi offrons nos sincères condoléances à la famille du roi Abdullah bin Abdulaziz et au peuple saoudien. Le roi Abdullah était reconnu comme un ardent défenseur de la paix au Moyen-Orient. Il a aussi entrepris une vaste gamme d'importantes initiatives liées à l'économie, à la société, à l'éducation, à la santé et à l'infrastructure dans son pays. J'ai eu le plaisir de rencontrer le roi Abdullah à Toronto lorsque le Canada a accueilli le Sommet du G-20, et j'ai trouvé qu'il était très passionné au sujet de son pays, du développement et de l'économie mondiale.

Nous sommes de tout cœur avec le peuple saoudien et nous pleurons le départ de cet homme.

Je suis curieux de savoir si les députés d'en face trouvent que cette déclaration, faite par un premier ministre à l'occasion de la mort d'un dictateur, avait sa place, elle.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 2970 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on December 01, 2016

2016-11-30 16:43 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Government bills, Pensions and pensioners, Third reading and adoption,

Pensions et pensionnés, Régime de pensions du Canada, Troisième lecture et adoption

Madam Speaker, the member for Flamborough—Glanbrook talks a lot about the negative aspects in the bill as he sees it. I see this is as a very positive investment in the future. Minister LaMarsh actually funded for the future, and we have to do the same thing again. We have done a lot of things for seniors in the last year with the reduction of the retirement age back to 65 and the increase in the GIS. However, if the member does not want to improve the CPP for the future, would he rather get rid of the CPP altogether? Which is it? Do you think it is sustainable, or do we improve it for the future? Why does he want to keep it at all?

Madame la Présidente, le député de Flamborough—Glanbrook parle beaucoup des aspects négatifs qu’il attribue au projet de loi. J’y vois un investissement très avantageux pour l’avenir. La ministre LaMarsh a en fait jeté les fondements de l’avenir et nous devons faire de même aujourd’hui. L’an dernier, nous avons fait beaucoup pour les aînés en faisant revenir à 65 ans l’âge de la retraite et en augmentant la Sécurité de la vieillesse. Si toutefois le député ne veut pas perfectionner le Régime de pensions du Canada pour l’avenir, préférerait-il qu’on s’en débarrasse? Quel est son choix? Pensez-vous qu’il est viable ou devons-nous l’améliorer pour l’avenir? Pourquoi veut-il le conserver?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 267 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 30, 2016

2016-11-29 16:29 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Government bills, Pensions and pensioners, Report stage,

Étape du rapport, Pensions et pensionnés, Régime de pensions du Canada

Madam Speaker, after listening to the speech by my colleague from Lakeland there is a question that I feel I need to ask. In my opinion, the government has an obligation toward its citizens, toward the short term and for the long term to ensure the well-being of the population going forward.

I am wondering if the member for Lakeland believes the government has an obligation directly to its citizens and if so, what exactly that obligation is.

Madame la Présidente, après avoir écouté le discours de ma collègue de Lakeland, j'ai une question à lui poser. À mon avis, le gouvernement a un devoir envers les citoyens, celui de veiller sur leur bien-être à court et à long terme.

Je me demande si la députée de Lakeland croit que le gouvernement a un devoir direct envers les citoyens. Dans l'affirmative, quel est exactement ce devoir?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 174 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 29, 2016

2016-11-29 16:18 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Government bills, Pensions and pensioners, Report stage,

Étape du rapport, Pensions et pensionnés, Régime de pensions du Canada

Madam Speaker, I thank the hon. member for Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, but I would like to follow up on a question from my colleague from Sherbrooke.

I would simply like to know if the member for Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles believes that the CPP, like all government programs, has to exist, or if he would rather they were abolished entirely.

Madame la Présidente, je remercie le député de Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, mais je veux faire le suivi d'une question de mon collègue de Sherbrooke.

J'aimerais tout simplement savoir si le député de Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles croit que le RPC doit exister, tout comme les programmes du gouvernement. Préférerait-il, au contraire, les abolir complètement?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 136 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 29, 2016

2016-11-28 16:54 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Government bills, Order and decorum, Pensions and pensioners, Photographs, Points of order,

Ordre et décorum, Pensions et pensionnés, Photographies, Rappels au Règlement, Régime de pensions du Canada

Mr. Speaker, on a point of order, during the speech by the member for Kingston and the Islands, I saw the member for Calgary Nose Hill come in, under the camera over there, and use her cellphone, appearing to take a picture in this general direction. Could the Speaker address that?

Monsieur le Président, j'invoque le Règlement. Pendant le discours du député de Kingston et les Îles, j'ai vu la députée de Calgary Nose Hill entrer, sous la caméra, là-bas. Elle avait son téléphone à la main et a semblé photographier cette zone-ci. La présidence pourrait-elle se pencher sur cette question?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 141 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 28, 2016

2016-11-28 16:38 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Cost of living, Government bills, Income security, Pensions and pensioners, Report stage, Retirement from work

Coût de la vie, Départ à la retraite, Étape du rapport, Pensions et pensionnés, Régime de pensions du Canada, Sécurité du revenu,

Mr. Speaker, my question for the member for Saskatoon—University is this. If the member wants things to be more affordable, should they not ensure that people actually have money available to them in the future? Does the member not believe that planning for the future through OAS, GIS, and through CPP is a worthwhile venture? Does he believe the CPP should be planned for the future, prepared for generations to come? Or does he believe it should be scrapped altogether?

Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais poser la question suivante au député de Saskatoon—University. Si le député souhaite que la vie soit moins chère, ne faudrait-il pas veiller à ce que les gens aient de l'argent à l'avenir? Le député ne croit-il pas que planifier l'avenir au moyen de la Sécurité de la vieillesse, du Supplément de revenu garanti et du Régime de pensions du Canada constitue un projet louable? Croit-il que le RPC doit être prêt pour l'avenir, pour les générations à venir, ou pense-t-il plutôt qu'il faut l'éliminer, tout simplement?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 217 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 28, 2016

2016-11-22 18:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Gender identity and gender expression, Hate crimes, Mischief, Religious buildings, Second reading, Sexual minorities, Vandalism

Crimes haineux, Deuxième lecture, Établissements religieux, Identité de genre et expression de genre, Méfait, Minorités sexuelles, Projets de loi émanant des députés, Vandalisme,

Madam Speaker, Canada is a nation that is proud of its multiculturalism. We thrive when we all grow together. As the Prime Minister has always said, we are strong, not in spite of our differences, but because of them.

However, Canada is not immune to the issue of hate crimes. It is an issue that affects us from coast to coast to coast. As the country continues to become more diverse, hate crimes against individuals and groups are an ongoing issue.

The most common form of hate crime is that of mischief, damage to property, most often in a form of vandalism. These cowardly acts, targeted at people and groups in our neighbourhoods, are hurtful, not only to their intended targets, but to our communities as a whole.

It is for this reason that the member for Nepean proposed Bill C-305. This bill seeks to amend section 430 (4.1) of the Criminal Code of Canada that to date only includes places of worship such as churches, temples, synagogues, and mosques as protected places against hate crimes.

In its current form, Bill C-305 seeks to expand this to include schools, day care centres, colleges or universities, community centres, and playgrounds.

The LGBTQ community is one of the most targeted groups when it comes to hate crimes. While Parliament has previously passed legislation to protect these groups, section 430 (4.1) currently does not recognize hate-based mischief against one's sexual orientation or gender identity. The current law only recognizes bias, prejudice, or hate based on religion, race, colour, or national or ethnic origin.

Bill C-305 seeks to include these two groups. It is the sponsor's hope that with the passage of Bill C-305, our neighbourhoods will be a safer place for the LGBTQ community.

I believe the bill is very important for making progress in fighting hatred and hate crimes, and I really congratulate the member for Nepean for his hard work on this, for bringing this forward. When we look at the results of the bill, we see a wide number of stakeholders have come out in support of this. We have heard from the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs, the World Sikh Organization, the Coalition of Progressive Canadian Muslim Organizations, the Canada-Indian Foundation, the Canadian Rabbinic Caucus, and so on and so forth. This is a wide breadth of support for a very important bill to address hate.

Where I grew up in rural Quebec, there used to be signs on places that said, “No dogs, no Jews”. Hatred is a real thing. It is a thing that has to be fought. It has to be fought against and protected from. I think this is a really nice step and I really encourage the member for Nepean to go forward with this, and I am looking forward to the second hour of debate.

Madame la Présidente, le Canada est fier de son multiculturalisme. Nous prospérons lorsque nous cheminons ensemble. Comme le premier ministre l'a toujours dit, nous sommes forts non pas en dépit de nos différences, mais bien grâce à elles.

Néanmoins, le Canada n'est pas à l'abri du problème des crimes haineux. C'est un problème qui concerne tout le monde au pays. La population du pays se diversifie, et les crimes haineux contre des personnes et des groupes continuent de poser problème.

La forme la plus courante de crime haineux est le méfait, c'est-à-dire les dommages contre les biens. La plupart du temps, il s'agit d'une forme de vandalisme. Ces actes lâches visent des personnes ou des groupes de nos voisinages et causent un préjudice non seulement à ceux qu'ils visent, mais à la société en général.

C'est la raison pour laquelle le député de Nepean a présenté le projet de loi C-305, qui vise à modifier le paragraphe 430(4.1) du Code criminel du Canada. Ce paragraphe ne protège pour l'instant que les lieux de culte comme les églises, les temples, les synagogues et les mosquées contre les crimes haineux.

Dans sa forme actuelle, le projet de loi C-305 vise à étendre l'application du paragraphe en question aux écoles, garderies, collèges, universités, centres communautaires et terrains de jeu.

La communauté LGBTQ est l'un des groupes les plus touchés par les crimes haineux. Le Parlement a déjà adopté une mesure législative pour protéger ces groupes, mais, à l'heure actuelle, le paragraphe 430(4.1) du Code criminel ne reconnaît pas le méfait motivé par la haine fondée sur l'orientation sexuelle ou l'identité de genre. Dans sa forme actuelle, la loi ne reconnaît que les méfaits motivés par les préjugés ou la haine fondés sur la religion, la race, la couleur ou l'origine ethnique ou raciale.

Le projet de loi C-305 vise à inclure ces deux groupes. Le parrain du projet de loi C-305 espère que, une fois que celui-ci aura été adopté, les quartiers partout au pays seront plus sûrs pour les membres de la communauté LGBTQ.

Je crois que le projet de loi nous permettra de faire des progrès importants dans la lutte contre la haine et les crimes haineux. Je tiens à féliciter sincèrement le député de Nepean de son travail acharné dans ce dossier et d'avoir présenté le projet de loi. Nous pouvons constater qu'un grand nombre d'intervenants appuient cette mesure législative, dont le Centre consultatif des relations juives et israéliennes, l'organisation mondiale des sikhs, la coalition canadienne des organismes musulmans progressistes, la Fondation Canada-Inde et le Caucus rabbinique du Canada. Il s'agit donc d'un large éventail de soutiens à l'égard d'un projet de loi très important, qui vise à lutter contre la haine.

J'ai grandi dans une région rurale du Québec où, à une certaine époque, des pancartes indiquaient « Pas de Juifs ni de chiens ». La haine est une chose bien réelle contre laquelle il faut lutter. Il faut la combattre et s'en protéger. Selon moi, il s'agit d'un pas important, et j'encourage sincèrement le député de Nepean à aller de l'avant. J'ai hâte à la deuxième heure du débat.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 1022 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 22, 2016

2016-11-22 15:26 House intervention / intervention en chambre

European Union, Government bills, Negotiations and negotiators, North American Free Trade Agreement, Second reading, Trade agreements,

Accords commerciaux, Deuxième lecture, Négociations et négociateurs, Union européenne,

Mr. Speaker, when the member refers to the reopening of NAFTA, NAFTA has already been modified something like 11 times. There is nothing wrong with this, bringing it up to date is part of the process.

There is also a chapter of NAFTA called 22, which allows the outright withdrawal of a country. If a country wants to have a discussion, it is probably a good idea to actually sit down and hear what they have to say. There is nothing wrong with that.

The really interesting thing about CETA to me is that we brought 28 countries together, we brought Liberals and Conservatives together, and we brought 10 provinces together. These are countries and provinces that are the far left, the far right, or the middle. They are from all walks of life, all spectrums.

I wonder if the member could address how difficult it is to bring that many people together on one single issue like this?

Monsieur le Président, le député parle de la réouverture de l’ALENA, mais l’accord a déjà été modifié à peu près 11 fois. Il n’y a rien de mal là-dedans; la mise à jour de l’accord fait partie du processus.

Il y a un chapitre de l’ALENA, appelé le chapitre 22, qui permet à un pays de s’en retirer purement et simplement. Si un pays veut discuter, c’est probablement une bonne idée de prendre le temps d’écouter ce qu’il a à dire. Il n’y a rien de mal à cela.

Ce que je trouve vraiment intéressant avec l’AECG, c’est que nous avons réuni 28 pays, nous avons réuni les libéraux et les conservateurs et nous avons réuni 10 provinces. Certains pays et certaines provinces sont très à gauche, très à droite ou au centre. Tous les horizons, toutes les couches de la société y sont représentés.

Le député ne pourrait-il pas songer à la difficulté que cela représente d’amener tant de gens à s’entendre sur un sujet comme celui-ci?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 350 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 22, 2016

2016-11-21 18:31 House intervention / intervention en chambre

European Union, Government bills, Points of order, Second reading, Splitting speaking time, Trade agreements,

Accords commerciaux, Deuxième lecture, Partage du temps de parole, Rappels au Règlement, Union européenne

Madam Speaker, I rise on a point of order. The member for Cowichan—Malahat—Langford brought up an interesting point in mentioning the splitting of his time. The clocks have wound up more and more out of sync in the chamber. I wonder if the Chair could undertake to have the clocks brought back to the real world time. It is now more than two minutes out.

Madame la Présidente, j'invoque le Règlement. Le député de Cowichan—Malahat—Langford a soulevé un point intéressant quand il a mentionné le partage de son temps de parole. Les horloges de la Chambre sont de plus en plus décalées. Je me demande si la présidence pourrait les faire remettre à l'heure juste. Il y a maintenant un décalage de plus de deux minutes.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 164 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 21, 2016

2016-11-21 18:23 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Committee witnesses, European Union, Government bills, Second reading, Standing Committee on International Trade, Trade agreements,

Accords commerciaux, Comité permanent du commerce international, Deuxième lecture, Union européenne,

Madam Speaker, earlier today in debate several members of the NDP referred to something that happened at the international trade committee.

I want to quote the member for Essex, who stated, “Today, the Liberal-dominated trade committee has made it clear that it only wants to hear from groups that will benefit from CETA. It has gone to extraordinary lengths to restrict its brief study of CETA from receiving input from Canadians, by passing a motion that restricts the committee from accepting written submissions except for those from the handful of witnesses who are selected to appear.”

There are a number of problems with this statement.

The first is that the committee did not meet today.

The second is that the relevant motion was put forward by the member for Essex, not by a Liberal.

Further, the member for Salaberry—Suroît commented:

In committee, the Liberals recently moved a motion in camera...

If we are discussing that, it would be a privilege issue because we would be discussing something that was discussed in camera.

Therefore, I am wondering if the member knows what on earth her colleagues are talking about on this file.

Madame la Présidente, plus tôt aujourd'hui, durant le débat, plusieurs députés néo-démocrates ont mentionné une chose qui s'était produite au comité du commerce international.

Je vais citer la députée d'Essex, qui a dit: « Aujourd’hui, le Comité, à majorité libérale, a indiqué clairement qu’il souhaite uniquement entendre des groupes qui profiteront de l’AECG. Il a fait l’impossible pour restreindre les interventions des Canadiens dans le cadre de sa brève étude de l’AECG en adoptant une motion qui limite les mémoires pouvant être soumis au Comité à la poignée de témoins qui ont été sélectionnés pour comparaître. »

Il y a plusieurs choses qui clochent dans cette affirmation.

La première est que le comité ne s'est pas réuni aujourd'hui.

La deuxième est que la motion en question a été présentée par la députée d'Essex et non par un libéral.

De plus, la députée de Salaberry—Suroît a fait le commentaire suivant:

En comité, les libéraux ont récemment déposé une motion, à huis clos [...]

Si nous en discutions, ce serait dans le cadre d'une question de privilège, car nous parlerions d'une chose dont il a été question à huis clos.

Je me demande donc si la députée sait de quoi diable ses collègues parlent dans ce dossier.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 427 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 21, 2016

2016-11-21 18:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre

European Union, Government bills, Second reading, Trade agreements,

Accords commerciaux, Deuxième lecture, Union européenne

Madam Speaker, I certainly appreciate the concerns that have been brought up about the investor-state dispute resolution systems that are being proposed.

As the member for Fleetwood—Port Kells said earlier, it is really important that we have some kind of mechanism in place. We cannot have a situation where people come to invest, the rules change mid-game, and there is no option to continue. It is important that there is something, and I think this is one of the more progressive things I have seen in this type of thing.

If we read the text of CETA, it talks a great deal about finding compromise and mediation, and looking for solutions before getting to a court process. That is a good model to follow.

Madame la Présidente, je comprends les préoccupations qui ont été soulevées concernant les dispositions relatives au règlement des différends entre investisseurs et États qui sont proposées.

Comme le député de Fleetwood—Port Kells l'a dit plus tôt, il est très important de mettre en place un mécanisme à cet effet. La situation serait intenable si les investisseurs risquaient de voir les règles changer en cours de route, sans possibilité de continuer. Il est important de prévoir des dispositions. Celles qui ont été incluses comptent parmi les plus progressistes que j'ai vues dans ce genre d'accord.

À la lecture du texte de l'Accord économique et commercial global, on constate qu'on y préconise le compromis, la médiation et la recherche de solutions avant de recourir au tribunal. C'est un bon modèle à suivre.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 276 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 21, 2016

2016-11-21 18:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Dairy farming, European Union, Government bills, Government compensation, Second reading, Trade agreements,

Accords commerciaux, Compensation du gouvernement, Deuxième lecture, Élevage laitier, Union européenne

Madam Speaker, I think there is another issue here. If the NDP had been elected to office, it would not have signed CETA. The question would not have been asked. Since they promised to balance the budget, they would not have signed this agreement, so that issue is not relevant to the debate.

Madame la Présidente, je pense qu'il y aurait un autre enjeu ici. Si le NPD avait pris le pouvoir, il n'aurait pas accepté l'AECG. La question ne se serait pas posée. Comme ils ont promis de faire des budgets équilibrés, ils n'auraient pas fait cet accord. Ce ne serait pas pertinent à ce débat.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 140 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 21, 2016

2016-11-21 18:09 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Cheese, Dairy farming, European Union, Government bills, Government compensation, Second reading, Trade agreements

Accords commerciaux, Compensation du gouvernement, Deuxième lecture, Élevage laitier, Fromage, Union européenne,

Madam Speaker, I believe that I have 37 dairy producers in the riding of Laurentides—Labelle. This is therefore a very important issue for us because we must look after our dairy producers.

In my view, the plan is a good first step. We need something to keep us competitive in the future and to ensure that we can operate in foreign markets where we currently do not have a solid presence. We have a lot of work to do. With a perfect agreement, all trade would flow both ways, but there would be no protections for our industry, supply management, and our culture. I believe that our plan strikes a good balance, but there is always much more to be done.

Madame la Présidente, dans la circonscription de Laurentides—Labelle, je pense avoir 37 producteurs laitiers. C'est donc un enjeu très important pour nous, car il importe de prendre soin de nos producteurs laitiers.

Selon moi, le programme est un bon départ. Il nous faut quelque chose qui puisse assurer notre compétitivité à l'avenir et notre capacité de vendre dans les marchés étrangers où nous nous ne sommes pas assez présents actuellement. Nous avons beaucoup à faire. Dans un accord parfait, on dirait qu'on échange tout dans les deux sens, mais rien ne protégerait nos industries, notre gestion de l'offre et notre culture. Je crois que notre programme établit un bon équilibre dans tout cela, mais il y a toujours beaucoup plus à faire.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 275 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 21, 2016

2016-11-21 17:58 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Climate change and global warming, Employee rights, Environmental protection, European Union, Government bills, Legislation, Public administration, Public Service and public servants, Second reading

Accords commerciaux, Administration publique, Approvisionnement en eau, Bassins hydrographiques, Deuxième lecture, Fonction publique et fonctionnaires, Législation

Madam Speaker, I would like to first thank my colleagues for participating in this important debate.

I am delighted to rise in the House today to speak about the protections and guarantees of the Canada-European Union comprehensive economic and trade agreement, or CETA, and how this agreement will protect hard-won social progress and guarantee the prosperity of all Canadians.

When our government came to power, there were many obstacles in the way of finalizing CETA. Support for CETA from centre-left parties in Europe, which was necessary for CETA's ratification by the European Parliament, and also by countries such as Germany and France, was in doubt. Therefore, from the outset, one of the most important things our government did was to listen to the criticism, both in Canada and in Europe, to ensure that the agreement addressed legitimate concerns.

We worked with industry and civil society to ensure that economic gains would not hinder essential social progress and to address the issues that really matter to Canadians and Europeans: environmental protection, workers' rights, consumer health and safety, and the right of governments to regulate.

In co-operation with our European counterparts, our government made improvements to the agreement in order to strengthen it and make it the most progressive trade agreement negotiated by Canada and the European Union. Now that those changes have been made, countries like Germany and France strongly support it.

Making sure that trade and labour support each other is a priority for our government. The provisions of CETA on workers strengthen this principle since they include commitments to facilitate the sound governance of the workforce.

Under CETA, Canada and the European Union committed to adding their respective obligations with respect to international labour standards to their labour laws. More specifically, both parties committed to ensuring that their national laws and policies protect the fundamental principles and rights at work, including the right to freedom of association, the right to bargain collectively, the abolition of child labour, the elimination of forced labour, and the elimination of discrimination.

Canada and the European Union also committed to seeking high levels of labour protection, enforcing labour laws, and not waiving or derogating from these laws in order to promote trade or attract investment. CETA provides for the establishment of civil society advisory groups responsible for providing their opinions and advice on any issues related to the agreement's labour provisions, as well as for the creation of a mechanism that will allow the public to share its concerns about the labour issues associated with these provisions. What is more, CETA encourages co-operation on labour files, especially through the exchange of information on best practices and co-operation in international forums.

The environment is another priority area for Canadians and Europeans.

In the CETA chapter on trade and the environment, Canada and the European Union reaffirmed their mutual commitment to ensure that strict environmental standards are met as part of the trade liberalization process.

Under CETA, Canada and the EU maintain the right to set their own priorities on the environment and to adopt or amend their own related legislation and policies accordingly. Canada and the EU are committed to ensuring high levels of environmental protection, effectively enforcing domestic environmental laws rather than weakening or deviating from these laws in favour of trade or attracting investment.

CETA includes a commitment to work together on shared environmental concerns. This might include issues such as climate change, conservation, and the sustainable use of natural resources.

Under CETA, environmental protection and economic growth go hand in hand. For example, the chapter on trade and the environment includes a commitment to facilitate and promote the trade of products and services associated with environmental protection. Among other things, this means paying special attention to products and services that may contribute to mitigating climate change and stimulating renewable energy production. Clean technologies represent a key aspect of the government's approach to promoting sustainable economic growth and play a key role in allowing us to keep our commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to achieve our objectives under the Paris agreement.

CETA's preamble recognizes that the agreement's provisions reaffirm the parties’ right to regulate within their respective territories to achieve legitimate policy objectives, such as the protection of public health, safety, the environment, public morals, and the promotion and protection of cultural diversity.

The chapter on investment includes further clarifications on the right to regulate and reaffirms this right to achieve legitimate policy objectives.

Nothing in this agreement prevents governments from making regulations for the public good in areas like the environment, culture, safety, health, and conservation, from providing preferences to indigenous peoples, or from adopting measures to protect or promote Canadian culture.

Canadian and foreign investors alike must comply with all Canadian laws and regulations regarding the environment, labour standards, health care, and all building and safety codes. Nothing in CETA permits anyone who is selling a good, providing a service, or investing in Canada to be exempted from Canadian laws and regulations.

In all trade agreements, including CETA, Canada explicitly protects the environment, security, and social services, such as health care and education.

Under CETA, obligations regarding services and investments are fulfilled using a negative list approach. The use of this approach in CETA does not jeopardize the governments' ability to provide public services. In fact, the negative list approach provides Canada and the member states a more transparent way of targeting sectors or measures, such as those related to public health, education, and social services, where the parties want to maintain full control over policies.

Canada has been using the negative list approach for a very long time and is satisfied that CETA will continue to allow us the political flexibility to protect public services. What is more, no provision of CETA requires governments to privatize, subcontract, or deregulate their public services. Decisions regarding the delivery of public services are guided exclusively by domestic policy decisions.

As a result, CETA will compromise neither Canada's water quality standards, nor its regulations pertaining to water systems. Nothing in the free trade agreements that Canada has signed prevents the government from establishing standards to ensure that Canadians have access to safe drinking water.

No provision of any free trade agreement, including CETA, to which Canada is a party requires a government to privatize, resort to sub-contracting, or deregulate its water services. All businesses conducting these activities in Canada, whether Canadian or foreign, must comply with the laws and regulations in effect in Canada.

There is a major myth concerning CETA that we must dispel. I would like to set the record straight. None of the free trade agreements, including CETA, to which Canada is a party covers water in its natural state, that is, water in natural basins of water such as rivers, lakes, and streams, as a good or product for export.

The federal government has passed legislation and regulations to prohibit bulk water removal from water basins in boundary waters, no matter the reason, including export. Free trade agreements to which Canada is a party, including CETA, in no way compromise measures implemented by Canadian provinces to protect bodies of water within their jurisdiction.

Our government listened to people in the industry and civil society and worked with them to ensure that economic gains will not hinder essential social progress. Thanks to close collaboration with our European Union counterparts and a shared commitment to making CETA a progressive agreement, we addressed issues that really matter to Canadians and Europeans: the environment, workers' rights, consumer health and safety, and the right of governments to regulate.

To sum up, the CETA commitments that I just described are perfectly aligned with our existing progressive trade program and will ensure that economic gains do not come at the expense of the environment, workers, or matters of public interest, such as health and culture.

I support this bill and all of the benefits that it will bring to Canadians and the people of the European Union and its 28 member states.

I ask all hon. members to support this bill so that Canada can do its part to implement the agreement and continue to advance its progressive trade agenda.

Madame la Présidente, je remercie d'abord mes collègues de leur participation à cet important débat.

Je me réjouis de prendre la parole à la Chambre, aujourd'hui, pour parler des protections et des garanties offertes par l'Accord économique et commercial global entre le Canada et l'Union européenne, l'AECG, ainsi que de la façon dont cet accord protégera nos gains durement acquis sur le plan social et garantira la prospérité de l'ensemble des Canadiennes et Canadiens.

Lorsque notre gouvernement est arrivé au pouvoir, le chemin vers la mise en oeuvre de l'AECG était parsemé d'embûches. L'appui à l'AECG dans les partis de centre-gauche en Europe, essentiel à la ratification de l'AECG au Parlement européen, ainsi que dans des pays comme l'Allemagne et la France, était incertain. Par conséquent, l'une des plus importantes mesures prises par notre gouvernement, dès le début de son mandat, a été d'écouter les critiques, tant au Canada qu'en Europe, afin de s'assurer que l'accord donne suite à leurs préoccupations légitimes.

Nous avons travaillé avec l'industrie et la société civile pour faire en sorte que les gains économiques ne se fassent pas au détriment du progrès social indispensable et pour traiter les enjeux importants qui sont chers aux Canadiens et aux Européens, comme la protection de l'environnement, les droits des travailleurs, la santé et la sécurité des consommateurs, ainsi que le droit de réglementer du gouvernement.

En collaboration avec nos homologues européens, notre gouvernement a apporté des améliorations à l'accord en vue de le renforcer et d'en faire l'accord commercial le plus progressiste négocié par le Canada et l'Union européenne. Maintenant que ces changements ont été apportés, des pays comme l'Allemagne et la France l'appuient fermement.

Faire en sorte que le commerce et la main-d'oeuvre se soutiennent mutuellement est une priorité pour notre gouvernement. Les dispositions de l'AECG portant sur les travailleurs renforcent ce principe, puisqu'elles prévoient des engagements visant à faciliter la saine gouvernance de la main-d'oeuvre.

Dans l'AECG, le Canada et l'Union européenne se sont engagés à garantir l'ajout de leurs obligations respectives concernant les normes internationales du travail dans leurs lois sur le travail. Plus particulièrement, les parties s'engagent à ce que les lois et les politiques nationales protègent les principes et les droits fondamentaux au travail, y compris le droit à la liberté d'association et le droit de négocier collectivement, ainsi que l'abolition du travail des enfants, du travail forcé ou obligatoire et l'élimination de la discrimination.

Le Canada et l'Union européenne se sont en outre engagés à assurer un niveau élevé de protection des travailleurs, à appliquer les lois sur le travail et à ne pas les assouplir ni à y déroger dans le but de promouvoir le commerce ou d'attirer des investissements. L'AECG prévoit l'établissement de groupes consultatifs de la société civile chargés de fournir leurs points de vue et des conseils sur toutes les questions liées aux dispositions de l'accord sur la main-d'oeuvre, ainsi que la création d'un mécanisme permettant au public de faire part de ses préoccupations au sujet des enjeux liés au travail dans ces dispositions. De plus, l'AECG encourage la collaboration dans les dossiers liés au travail, notamment grâce à l'échange de renseignements sur les pratiques exemplaires et la coopération au sein des forums internationaux.

L'environnement est un autre domaine prioritaire tant pour les Canadiens que pour les Européens.

Dans le chapitre sur le commerce et l'environnement de l'AECG, le Canada et l'Union européenne ont réaffirmé leur engagement mutuel à garantir le respect de normes environnementales rigoureuses dans le cadre de la libéralisation des échanges.

L'AECG maintient le droit du Canada et de l'UE de fixer leurs propres priorités en matière d'environnement et d'adopter ou de modifier leurs lois et politiques connexes en conséquence. De même, le Canada et l'UE s'engagent à assurer des niveaux élevés de protection de l'environnement, à appliquer efficacement leurs lois environnementales nationales, ainsi qu'à ne pas assouplir ces lois ni à en déroger dans le but de favoriser le commerce ou d'attirer des investissements.

De même, l'AECG comporte un engagement visant la collaboration sur des enjeux environnementaux d'intérêt commun. Il pourrait s'agir d'enjeux comme les changements climatiques, la conservation et l'utilisation durable des ressources naturelles.

Dans l'AECG, la protection de l'environnement et la croissance économique vont de pair. Par exemple, le chapitre sur le commerce et l'environnement prévoit un engagement visant à faciliter et à promouvoir le commerce de produits et de services associés à la protection de l'environnement. Cela consiste notamment à porter une attention spéciale aux produits et services pouvant contribuer à atténuer les changements climatiques et à stimuler la production d'énergie renouvelable. Les technologies propres représentent un élément clé de l'approche du gouvernement pour favoriser une croissance économique durable et elles joueront un rôle déterminant dans le respect de nos engagements en matière de réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre, y compris dans l'atteinte de nos objectifs énoncés dans l'Accord de Paris.

Le préambule de l'AECG reconnaît que les dispositions de l'accord n'éliminent pas le droit des parties d'adopter des règlements sur leur territoire pour réaliser les objectifs légitimes de leur politique, tels que la sécurité, la protection de la santé publique, de l'environnement et des bonnes moeurs, ainsi que la promotion et la protection de la diversité culturelle.

Le chapitre sur l'investissement fournit d'autres précisions sur le droit d'adopter des règlements et réaffirme ce droit pour réaliser des objectifs légitimes en matière de politique.

Aucune disposition de l'accord n'empêche les gouvernements d'adopter des règlements dans l'intérêt public dans les domaines de l'environnement, de la culture, de la sécurité, de la santé et de la conservation, d'octroyer des préférences aux peuples autochtones ou d'adopter des mesures visant à protéger ou à promouvoir la culture canadienne.

Les investisseurs, tant canadiens qu'étrangers, doivent respecter les lois et règlements du Canada ayant trait à l'environnement, aux normes du travail, aux soins de santé ainsi qu'aux codes du bâtiment et de sécurité. Aucune disposition de l'AECG ne permet à une personne vendant un bien, fournissant un service ou effectuant un investissement au Canada d'être exemptée de l'application des lois et règlements du Canada.

Dans tous les accords commerciaux, y compris l'AECG, le Canada protège explicitement l'environnement, la sécurité et les services sociaux, notamment les soins de santé et l'éducation.

Dans l'AECG, les obligations relatives aux services et investissements sont remplies au moyen de l'approche dite des listes négatives. L'adoption de cette approche dans l'AECG ne menace pas la capacité des gouvernements de fournir des services publics. En fait, l'approche des listes négatives offre au Canada et aux États membres une façon plus transparente de cibler les secteurs ou mesures, comme ceux liés à la santé publique, à l'éducation et aux services sociaux, dans lesquels les parties souhaitent garder la pleine maîtrise des politiques.

Le Canada utilise depuis très longtemps l'approche des listes négatives et est convaincu que l'AECG continuera d'accorder toute la latitude requise sur le plan politique pour protéger les services publics. De plus, aucune disposition de l'AECG n'oblige les gouvernements à privatiser, à sous-traiter ou à déréglementer leurs services publics. Les décisions relatives à la prestation des services du secteur public sont guidées uniquement par des décisions de politique intérieure.

De même, l'AECG ne compromettra pas les normes relatives à la qualité de l'eau ni les règlements relatifs aux réseaux d'alimentation en eau du Canada. Aucune disposition des accords de libre-échange auxquels le Canada est partie n'empêche le gouvernement d'établir des normes pour garantir que les Canadiens ont accès à de l'eau potable sûre.

Aucune disposition des accords de libre-échange, y compris l'AECG, auxquels le Canada est partie n'impose à un gouvernement de privatiser, de recourir à la sous-traitance ou de déréglementer ses services liés à l'eau. Toutes les entreprises qui exercent des activités au Canada, qu'elles soient canadiennes ou étrangères, doivent respecter les lois et les règlements en vigueur au Canada.

Il faut que nos dissipions un mythe important au sujet de l'AECG. J'aimerais rétablir les faits. Aucun des accords de libre-échange, y compris l'AECG, auxquels le Canada est partie ne considère l'eau à l'état naturel, c'est-à-dire l'eau dans les bassins naturels comme les rivières, les lacs et les ruisseaux, comme étant un bien ou un produit pouvant être exporté.

Le gouvernement fédéral a adopté des lois et des règlements pour interdire le prélèvement massif des eaux limitrophes de leurs bassins naturels, et ce, quelle que soit la raison invoquée, y compris l'exportation. Les accords de libre-échange auxquels le Canada est partie, y compris l'AECG, ne compromettent aucunement les mesures mises en oeuvre par les provinces canadiennes pour protéger les eaux relevant de leur compétence.

Notre gouvernement a écouté les membres de l'industrie et la société civile, et a travaillé avec eux pour garantir que les gains économiques ne nuisent pas au progrès social si essentiel. Grâce à une collaboration étroite avec nos homologues de l'Union européenne et à un engagement commun à faire de l'AECG un accord progressiste, nous avons traité des dossiers si chers aux Canadiens et aux Européens se rapportant à l'environnement, aux droits des travailleurs, à la santé et à la sécurité des consommateurs et au droit du gouvernement d'adopter des règlements.

Pour résumer, les engagements figurant dans l'AECG que je viens de décrire cadrent parfaitement avec notre programme commercial progressiste actuel et garantissent que des gains économiques ne sont pas réalisés au détriment de l'environnement, des travailleurs ou de l'intérêt public, y compris la santé et la culture.

J'appuie ce projet de loi et tous les avantages qu'il apporterait aux Canadiennes et Canadiens ainsi qu'aux citoyens de l'Union européenne et de ses 28 États membres.

Je demande à tous les honorables députés d'appuyer ce projet de loi, afin de permettre au Canada de contribuer à la mise en vigueur de cet accord et de continuer à promouvoir un programme commercial progressiste.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 2990 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 21, 2016

2016-11-21 16:41 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Dairy farming, European Union, Government bills, Milk protein, Second reading, Supply management, Trade agreements

Accords commerciaux, Deuxième lecture, Élevage laitier, Protéines laitières, Union européenne

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the support of the member from Mégantic—L'Érable for CETA.

This morning, members spoke about how important it was to make sure that every country in Europe was on board, whether they are left- or right-leaning, and about how we did that.

The question that I want to ask my colleague pertains more specifically to the diafiltered milk issue, which he mentioned in his speech. We agree that this is an important issue. The Conservatives say that they support supply management, but I would like to remind them that they are the ones who dismantled the Canadian Wheat Board.

Monsieur le Président, j'apprécie l'appui du député de Mégantic—L'Érable concernant l'AECG.

Ce matin, on a parlé de l'importance d'obtenir l'accord de tous les pays d'Europe, qu'ils soient de gauche ou de droite, et du fait que nous l'avons obtenu.

La question que je veux lui poser concerne plus spécifiquement le dossier du lait diafiltré, dont il a parlé dans son discours. Nous nous entendons sur l'importance de cet enjeu. Les conservateurs disent appuyer la gestion de l'offre, mais je rappelle que ce sont eux qui ont démantelé la Commission canadienne du blé.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 229 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 21, 2016

2016-11-21 12:53 House intervention / intervention en chambre

European Union, Government bills, Second reading, Trade agreements,

Accords commerciaux, Deuxième lecture, Union européenne

Mr. Speaker, I want to congratulate my colleague, who was a minister for a long time and is well aware of these issues. As he knows, NAFTA has been updated numerous times since it was brought in 20 years ago. There have been something like 11 updates. Therefore, I do not think it is unfair for the Prime Minister to say that we are willing to hear what the issues are and discuss them. There is nothing wrong with that.

Another point I have is this. The member referred to the beaver as currency. As an aside, we have traded the pelts, but everybody hid the fact that beaver is really good meat.

With respect to CETA, every country in Europe has agreed on this. It is extraordinarily difficult to get Europe to agree on anything across every country. I wonder if the member can speak to the importance of that and what it really means for this agreement.

Monsieur le Président, je tiens à féliciter mon collègue, qui a été ministre pendant longtemps et qui connaît bien les dossiers comme celui-ci. Comme il le sait, l'ALENA a été actualisé à maintes reprises depuis son adoption, il y a 20 ans. Il a dû y avoir 11 mises à jour. Par conséquent, je crois que le premier ministre n’a pas tort de dire que nous sommes prêts à prendre connaissance des réserves et à en discuter. Il n'y a rien de mal à cela.

Je veux également ajouter ceci. Le député a parlé du castor utilisé comme monnaie d’échange. Or, nous avons vendu les peaux, mais sans dire que la viande du castor est très savoureuse.

En ce qui concerne l'AECG, tous les pays d'Europe l’ont accepté. Il est extraordinairement difficile de convaincre l'ensemble des pays d'Europe de se mettre d’accord sur quoi que ce soit. Je me demande si le député peut parler de l'importance de ce fait et de ce que cela signifie vraiment pour l'Accord.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 345 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 21, 2016

2016-11-18 14:26 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Country food, Cultural heritage, Italian Canadians, Italian Heritage Month,

Aliments traditionnels, Mois du patrimoine italien, Patrimoine culturel

Mr. Speaker, I am certainly looking forward to that moment, thank you.

As members of the House know, I am of a Jewish heritage and I think that Jews and Italians have a good deal in common, so it gives me great pleasure to stand here and talk about food culture. Anyone who has been around either culture will know that everything we do has to do with food. I used to say as a joke that I am in politics for the food because every campaign has a lot of interesting meals.

It gives me great pleasure to support the motion and I do not see a lot of opposition to it. I think it is really wonderful that the member for King—Vaughan has brought forward this piece of legislation for Italian heritage month. I am looking forward to passing the motion when it comes back for debate in a few weeks and celebrating the various heritages that we have.

We had had a number of bills that have come forward before discussing specific heritage months and it is really important to us to do that.

I am thankful for the chance to talk about this and I know my time is at an end.

Monsieur le Président, je m'en réjouis d'avance.

Comme les députés le savent, je suis de descendance juive. Je crois que les Juifs et les Italiens ont beaucoup en commun. Je suis très heureux d'aborder le sujet de la culture culinaire. Tous ceux qui ont été en contact avec la culture italienne et la culture juive savent que tout ce que nous faisons est lié à la nourriture. J'ai déjà dit à la blague que je m'étais lancé en politique pour la bouffe, parce que chaque campagne électorale est ponctuée de délicieux repas.

J'appuie la motion avec enthousiasme, et je doute que bien des députés s'y opposent. Je trouve que c'est une idée formidable de la part de la députée de King—Vaughan que de proposer l'établissement d'un mois du patrimoine italien. Il me tarde que la motion soit adoptée lorsqu'elle sera de nouveau débattue à la Chambre dans quelques semaines. Il est important de célébrer nos multiples patrimoines.

Par le passé, il y a eu plusieurs projets de loi qui visaient à instituer un mois célébrant un certain patrimoine culturel. J'estime que c'est une bonne chose à faire.

Je suis heureux d'avoir l'occasion d'en parler et je vois que mon temps est écoulé.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 431 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 18, 2016

2016-11-18 11:03 House intervention / intervention en chambre

House of Commons staff, Statements by Members,

Déclarations de députés, Personnel de la Chambre des communes,

Mr. Speaker, I would like to acknowledge the work of the people who keep this institution running. Without them, we would not be able to do our work as parliamentarians.

Their work sometimes goes unnoticed. They pick up the trash, do housekeeping, move our furniture, get rooms ready, deliver and manage our mail. The Parliamentary Protective Service and the House of Commons Corporate Security Office protect us. We have pages, guides, analysts, clerks, the Hansard team, translators, interpreters, the maintenance team, carpenters, and financial services and materials management people. We have locksmiths, photographers and multimedia services, drivers, caterers, and food service staff, and probably many other members of teams we are not even aware of. I take my hat off to our many assistants here and in our ridings.

There are 338 MPs and 105 senators, but more than 4,000 people work here. Without them, Parliament would simply cease to operate.

Mr. Speaker, I thank you and your team.

Monsieur le Président, je tiens à souligner le travail des gens qui font fonctionner cette institution, et sans lesquels nous ne serions pas en mesure de siéger comme parlementaires.

Ces travailleurs oeuvrent parfois dans l'ombre. Ils ramassent les déchets, font le ménage, déplacent nos meubles, préparent les salles, et ils livrent et gèrent notre courrier. Le Service de protection parlementaire et le Bureau de la sécurité institutionnelle de la Chambre des communes nous protègent. Il y a les pages, les guides, les analystes, les greffiers, l'équipe du hansard, les traducteurs, les interprètes, l'équipe d'entretien, les menuisiers et les agents des services des finances et de gestion des matériaux. Il y a aussi les serruriers, les photographes et les services multimédias, les chauffeurs, les traiteurs et les services alimentaires et sans doute plusieurs autres membres d'équipes que nous ne connaissons même pas. Je lève mon chapeau à chacun de nos nombreux adjoints, ici et dans nos circonscriptions.

Nous ne sommes que 338 députés et 105 sénateurs, et plus de 4 000 personnes travaillent ici. Sans elles, le Parlement ne pourrait tout simplement pas fonctionner.

Monsieur le Président, je vous remercie, vous et votre équipe.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 373 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 18, 2016

2016-11-17 16:35 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Government bills, Parents, Pensions and pensioners, Persons with disabilities, Second reading,

Deuxième lecture, Parents, Pensions et pensionnés, Régime de pensions du Canada,

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the member's support for this very important bill. I am also pleased to note that the Speaker himself wrote the bill, I am very impressed with the Speaker's ability.

I would in turn encourage the member to take this up at committee. That is the best place to take it up, at committee. It is too late for here. I think it is really important that we study every aspect of the bill, and the best possible bill comes out of it.

Monsieur le Président, je remercie le député pour son appui à ce très important projet de loi. Je suis fier que ce projet de loi ait été rédigé par le Président lui-même. Les compétences du Président ne cessent de m'impressionner.

Je suggère toutefois au député de soumettre sa question au comité. C’est au comité qu’il incombe de se pencher là-dessus. Il est trop tard pour en débattre ici. J’estime qu’il est très important que nous examinions toutes les conséquences du projet de loi, afin que nous adoptions le meilleur projet de loi qui soit.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 215 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 17, 2016

2016-11-17 16:33 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Government bills, Parents, Pensions and pensioners, Second reading

Deuxième lecture, Parents, Pensions et pensionnés, Régime de pensions du Canada,

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the question from the member for Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie.

I am not a member of the committee that will decide what amendments to make. I would not discourage that, and I think it is important to look at all questions raised in committee to ensure that the best possible bill is introduced at third reading. That is what we will work towards.

Monsieur le Président, j'apprécie la question du député de Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie.

Je ne siège pas au comité, et c'est celui-ci qui décidera des modifications. Je ne découragerais pas cela et je pense qu'il est important de regarder toutes les questions soulevées pendant le débat au comité pour s'assurer que le projet de loi qui sera présenté en troisième lecture sera le meilleur possible. C'est ce à quoi nous allons travailler.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 167 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 17, 2016

2016-11-17 16:32 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Government bills, Pensions and pensioners, Second reading, Tax Free Savings Account

Deuxième lecture, Pensions et pensionnés, Régime de pensions du Canada

Mr. Speaker, we did not eliminate the program. We rolled it back to where it was shortly before the election.

The Conservatives increased the contribution ceiling in order to help those who had too much money and needed a place to park it. The program is available to anyone who needs it. It increases every year. It is cumulative. The maximum contribution of $5,500 is the annual not the lifetime amount. It is a tool that is available to retirees. However, it is not the only savings vehicle. It is of no benefit to society when those who have the means to save $10,000 a year can do so tax-free. In fact, TFSAs only help those who have an extra $10,000 every year.

Personally, I believe that it is very important to focus on programs that help all members of society and not just those with the most resources.

Monsieur le Président, on n'a pas éliminé le programme. En fait, on l'a remis dans l'état où il était un peu avant l'élection.

Les conservateurs ont augmenté le plafond de contribution afin d'aider ceux qui avaient trop d'argent et qui avait besoin d'un endroit pour le garder. Le programme est disponible pour ceux qui en ont besoin. Cela augmente chaque année. C'est cumulatif; ce n'est pas 5 500 $ à vie, mais bien 5 500 $ par année. Il s'agit d'un outil disponible pour les retraités. Toutefois, il ne s'agit pas là du seul moyen d'épargner. Ceux qui ont les moyens d'épargner 10 000 $ par année sans qu'aucun montant ne soit prélevé pour l'impôt, cela n'aide pas la société. En effet, cela n'aide que ceux qui ont 10 000 $ de surplus chaque année.

Personnellement, je pense qu'il est très important de cibler les programmes qui aident l'ensemble de la société, et non pas seulement les individus qui ont le plus de ressources.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 339 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 17, 2016

2016-11-17 16:22 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Government bills, Maximum pensionable earnings, Pensions and pensioners, Second reading

Deuxième lecture, Maximum des gains admissibles, Pensions et pensionnés, Régime de pensions du Canada,

Mr. Speaker, I am especially pleased to speak again to an issue that is so important to the future of our seniors, our country, and retirees.

I am referring to Bill C-26, an act to amend the Canada Pension Plan, the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board Act and the Income Tax Act. There are several reasons for that. This bill is the promise of a better future. It also reflects the government's commitment to help Canadians achieve their dream of a more secure retirement.

It is a project for the future and for young people who are currently preparing to enter the labour force. This next generation will also be assured of a dignified retirement. We are acting for a future that goes beyond any election cycle to help those who will come after us.

We are building on what was accomplished by the decision-makers of the 1960s who created the Canada pension plan, enhanced old age security by creating the guaranteed income supplement, and implemented measures that, in the long term, would significantly reduce poverty among seniors. What is more, we are here in a true spirit of federalism because the agreement to enhance the Canada pension plan, or CPP, comes from a real spirit of co-operation with the provinces, who approved the approach.

Do we need to enhance the CPP? Absolutely. It is essential and I will explain why. Middle-class Canadians work hard, but they still do not feel as though they are getting ahead. One in four families who are approaching the age of retirement, or about 1.1 million families, may not be able to save enough money to maintain their current lifestyle when they retire. We have to take action.

We also have to accept the fact that fewer companies are offering defined benefit pension plans and that fewer Canadians have such a plan. It is a major challenge for Canadian families and it is time we dealt with this. The agreement we reached with the provinces will increase the retirement income of Canadians who are in this difficult situation, and also promote economic growth and create jobs.

How will the CPP expansion work? There are two key things to keep in mind. First, the CPP currently replaces a quarter of Canadians' average annual earnings. The new CPP will replace a third. Future retirees will therefore have more money in their pockets. Take Mila for example. She is a mother who has earned on average $50,000 a year during her working life. Under the current plan, she will get $12,000 when she retires. Under the new plan, Mila could get a little more than $16,000.

Second, there is a limit on pensionable earnings. The maximum level of pensionable earnings will go up 14% by 2025. That means that the maximum annual CPP benefit, which is currently $13,110, would go up to $20,000 in today's dollars. Under the enhanced CPP, the maximum benefit will go up by almost 50%. It is clear that these changes to the CPP will make life better for retired Canadian workers and will help them achieve their goal of a strong, secure, and stable retirement.

How much will this cost? For most Canadians, the contribution rate will rise by just 1%. Take Kevin, for example, who earns about $55,000 a year. His contributions will increase by $6 per month in 2019. Once the progressive implementation is complete in 2025, Kevin's contribution will have gone up by about $43 per month.

That minor increase will be largely offset by his higher retirement income. With the enhancement, Kevin will collect approximately $17,500 per year in today's dollars in CPP benefits, which is about $4,400 more than under the current plan.

I should also mention that contributions to the enhanced portion of the CPP for wage earners like Kevin will be tax deductible and that a tax credit will continue to apply to employees' current CPP contributions.

We can therefore proudly say that Canadians will have more money in retirement thanks to the new CPP. Furthermore, the budgets of low-income workers will not be affected, because the working income tax benefit will also be increased to offset the premium increases.

I would like to add that our government has decided to give everyone time to prepare for the new provisions. The changes will implemented gradually over seven years, from 2019 to 2025. This is the responsible way to go, to make sure that businesses and workers have time to adapt. We are taking into account the problems that exist at the provincial and national levels. We have engaged with each province to discuss their particular situation, and we will continue to do so.

We took steps to ensure that we could implement these measures in a way that will not hurt businesses, because we want the owners of businesses of all sizes to be assured that the government will implement these changes to the CPP without harming the functioning of the Canadian economy.

As I said in my introduction, the government is creating a better future for Canadians, especially the middle class. This will have a much broader impact on all Canadians, because it is important to have a long-term vision. Higher CPP benefits will lead to greater domestic demand, which will stimulate the Canadian economy.

Since savings will grow, more money will be available for investment, also thanks to the new CPP. As a result, we expect the gross domestic product to increase by 0.05% to 0.09%, which represents approximately 6,000 to 11,000 new jobs. Quite simply, an enhanced CPP means more savings and a better retirement.

Middle-class Canadians will then be able to focus on what matters most, such as spending quality time with their family and friends, rather than worrying about not being able to make ends meet.

Proportionally, my riding, Laurentides—Labelle, has more seniors than almost every other riding in this country. In 2011, the average age was 49.5 years. Seniors' issues are therefore extremely important in my riding. I am acutely aware of retirees' needs. People think my riding is rich because of Mont-Tremblant, but it is not. Workers in my region do not have much money. We need every tool in the toolbox so we can help seniors and future generations and plan for the long term, not just up to the next election.

Personally, I am sick of the government doing all the planning for future generations in just four years. Life does not end in four years. Life goes on. The country and society continue to advance. We will never fix our problems by always thinking only about the next four years. As the indigenous peoples say, we must think of the next seven generations. If we do not, then society will never improve.

I strongly support Bill C-26, because it is an important step in the right direction. It is not a solution to all the problems. A lot of work remains to be done. However, this is one aspect of a plan for the future, for our seniors, and for society in general.

Monsieur le Président, je suis particulièrement heureux de prendre à nouveau la parole sur un enjeu si important pour l'avenir de nos aînés, de notre pays et des retraités.

Il s'agit du projet de loi C-26, Loi modifiant le Régime de pensions du Canada, la Loi sur l'Office d'investissement du régime de pensions du Canada et la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu. Il y a plusieurs raisons à cela. Ce projet de loi est la promesse d'un avenir meilleur. Il répond à un engagement du gouvernement, celui d'aider les Canadiens à réaliser leur rêve d'une retraite plus sûre.

Il s'agit d'un projet pour l'avenir et les jeunes qui s'apprêtent à débuter leur vie professionnelle. Cette prochaine génération aura elle aussi l'assurance de pouvoir prendre une retraite dans la dignité. Nous agissons ici au-delà de tout cycle électoral de manière à aider ceux qui viendront après nous.

Nous nous inscrivons dans la lignée des décideurs des années 1960 qui ont instauré le Régime de pensions du Canada, bonifié la Sécurité de la vieillesse en instaurant le Supplément de revenu garanti et pris des mesures qui, à long terme, allaient avoir une incidence substantielle pour réduire la pauvreté chez les aînés. De plus, nous sommes ici dans un véritable fédéralisme, car l'accord de bonification du Régime de pensions du Canada, le RPC, émane d'un véritable esprit de collaboration avec les provinces qui l'ont approuvé.

La bonification du RPC est-elle nécessaire? Absolument, elle est indispensable. Je vais expliquer pourquoi. Les Canadiens et les Canadiennes de la classe moyenne travaillent fort, mais ils n'ont pas toujours le sentiment qu'ils réalisent des progrès. Une famille sur quatre qui approche l'âge de la retraite, c'est-à-dire environ 1,1 million de familles, risque de ne pas épargner suffisamment en prévision de la retraite pour pouvoir maintenir son train de vie. Cette situation commande que nous agissions.

Il faut également admettre que de moins en moins d'entreprises offrent des régimes de pension à prestations déterminées et que de moins en moins de Canadiens participent à ces régimes. C'est donc un réel défi pour les familles canadiennes, et il est temps d'y faire face. L'accord auquel nous sommes parvenus avec les provinces augmentera les revenus de retraite des Canadiens qui vivent cette situation difficile, tout en favorisant la croissance économique et la création d'emplois.

Dans les faits, comment fonctionnera la bonification du RPC? Il y a deux éléments principaux à retenir. Premièrement, le RPC actuel remplace un quart des gains annuels moyens admissibles. Le nouveau RPC en remplacera le tiers. C'est donc plus d'argent dans les poches des futurs retraités. Si je prends l'exemple de Mila, une mère de famille qui a gagné en moyenne 50 000 $ par année dans sa vie professionnelle, elle obtiendra 12 000 $ au moment de sa retraite, selon le régime actuel. En vertu du nouveau régime, Mila pourra obtenir un peu plus de 16 000 $.

Deuxièmement, il y a un plafond aux gains admissibles. Ce plafond augmentera de 14 % d'ici 2025. Cela signifie que la prestation annuelle maximale du RPC, qui est actuellement de 13 110 $, passera à 20 000 $ en dollars actuels. Le RPC bonifié représente donc une augmentation de près de 50 % de la prestation maximale. Il est très clair que les modifications apportées au RPC vont améliorer le sort des travailleurs canadiens à leur retraite et les aideront à atteindre leur objectif d'une retraite solide, sûre et stable.

On se demande sans doute combien cela va coûter. Pour la plupart des Canadiens, le taux de cotisation augmentera de seulement 1 %. Prenons l'exemple d'un homme appelé Kevin qui gagne près de 55 000 $ par année. Ses cotisations augmenteront de 6 $ par mois en 2019. À la fin de la période de mise en oeuvre progressive, en 2025, les cotisations additionnelles de Kevin seront d'environ 43 $ par mois.

C'est une légère hausse qui sera largement compensée par l'augmentation de son revenu de retraite. Grâce à la bonification, Kevin recevra approximativement 17 500 $ par année en prestations de retraite au titre du RPC en dollars actuels, soit environ 4 400 $ de plus que dans l'état actuel des choses.

Il faut aussi savoir que les cotisations des salariés, comme Kevin, à la partie bonifiée du RPC seront déductibles d'impôt et qu'un crédit d'impôt continuera de s'appliquer aux cotisations des employés au RPC actuel.

Nous pouvons donc dire fièrement que les Canadiens auront plus d'argent à la retraite grâce à la mise en oeuvre du nouveau RPC. De plus, le budget des travailleurs à faible revenu ne sera pas affecté, car la Prestation fiscale pour le revenu de travail sera augmentée pour compenser les hausses des cotisations.

J'ajoute que le gouvernement a décidé de donner à tous le temps de se préparer aux nouvelles dispositions. Le régime sera mis en oeuvre progressivement, sur une période de sept ans, soit de 2019 à 2025. Il s'agit d'une façon de faire responsable pour s'assurer que les entreprises et les travailleurs s'y adaptent. Nous tenons compte des difficultés qui se posent à l'échelle provinciale et à l'échelle nationale. Nous avons discuté avec les provinces des situations particulières de chacune, et nous continuons de le faire.

Nous nous sommes assurés que nous pourrons mettre en oeuvre les mesures de manière à ne pas nuire aux entreprises. Nous voulons que les propriétaires d'entreprise de toute taille aient confiance que le gouvernement mettra en oeuvre les changements au Régime de pensions du Canada sans nuire au bon fonctionnement de l'économie canadienne.

Comme je le disais dans mon introduction, le gouvernement dessine un avenir meilleur pour les Canadiens, particulièrement pour ceux de la classe moyenne, et cela aura des répercussions bien plus grandes sur toute la population. Il faut voir à long terme. Les prestations plus élevées du RPC mèneront à une hausse de la demande domestique, ce qui stimulera l'économie canadienne.

Comme l'épargne sera plus importante, toujours grâce au nouveau RPC, les fonds disponibles pour l'investissement seront plus élevés. Par conséquent, on s'attend à ce qu'à long terme, le produit intérieur brut augmente de 0,05 % à 0,09 %, ce qui représente la création de 6 000 à 11 000 emplois. C'est cela, la bonification du Régime de pensions du Canada: plus d'épargne et une meilleure retraite.

Les Canadiens de la classe moyenne pourront mettre l'accent sur ce qui compte vraiment, comme passer du temps de qualité avec leurs proches, plutôt que de s'inquiéter de ne pas pouvoir joindre les deux bouts.

Dans ma circonscription, Laurentides—Labelle, le taux d'aînés est plus élevé que dans presque toutes les autres circonscription du pays. En 2011, l'âge moyen était de 49,5 ans. C'est donc un comté dans lequel les enjeux liés aux aînés sont extrêmement importants. Je suis très conscient des besoins des retraités. Même si le Mont-Tremblant donne une apparence de richesse, ma circonscription n'est pas riche. Les travailleurs de ma région n'ont pas beaucoup d'argent. On a besoin de tous les outils disponibles pour nous permettre d'aider les aînés et les générations futures et de faire une planification à long terme, plutôt que seulement jusqu'aux prochaines élections.

Personnellement, je suis agacé que le gouvernement fasse toute la planification des générations futures pendant seulement quatre ans. La vie ne finira pas dans quatre ans. La vie continue. Le pays et la société continuent d'avancer. Si on pense toujours seulement aux quatre prochaines années, on ne réglera jamais les problèmes. Il faut planifier 40 ans à l'avance. Comme le disent les Autochtones, il faut penser aux sept générations futures. Si on ne le fait pas de cette manière, on n'arrivera jamais à améliorer la société.

J'appuie fortement le projet de loi C-26, car il s'agit d'un pas important dans la bonne direction. Ce n'est pas la solution à tous les problèmes, car beaucoup de travail reste à faire. Cependant, il s'agit d'un élément faisant partie d'un plan pour l'avenir, pour nos aînés et pour la société en général.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 2472 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 17, 2016

2016-11-17 16:04 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Government bills, Pensions and pensioners, Second reading,

Deuxième lecture, Pensions et pensionnés, Régime de pensions du Canada

Mr. Speaker, in listening to my colleague's speech, I am reminded of the work that we have had to do in the past year to fix and improve the retirement system for Canadians, who were abandoned by the Conservatives over the past decade. In the first months, we had to restore the age of retirement from 67 back to 65, where it rightfully belongs; we had to increase the GIS by 10% for those who need it the most; and now we are trying to fix the CPP, which is a long-term plan. We need to fix it.

The Conservatives have opposed this with more vigour than anything else we have brought forward. What could the Conservatives have against retired people?

Monsieur le Président, en écoutant mon collègue, je me suis rappelé tout le travail que nous avons dû faire au cours de la dernière année pour corriger et améliorer le système de retraite pour les Canadiens, qui ont été abandonnés par les conservateurs durant la dernière décennie. Au cours des premiers mois, nous avons dû ramener l’âge de la retraite de 67 à 65 ans, là où il doit être; nous avons dû augmenter le Supplément de revenu garanti de 10 % pour les personnes les plus démunies; et voilà que nous essayons de bonifier le RPC, un régime à long terme. Cela s'impose.

Les conservateurs se sont opposés plus vigoureusement à cette mesure qu’à toutes les autres que nous avons proposées. Que peuvent-ils bien avoir contre les retraités?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 276 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 17, 2016

2016-11-17 15:19 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Government bills, Pensions and pensioners, Second reading,

Deuxième lecture, Pensions et pensionnés, Régime de pensions du Canada

Mr. Speaker, I can tell my colleague from Mégantic—L'Érable that for 10 years, the middle class felt forgotten by the Government of Canada, and that this change will ensure that people will no longer be forgotten, that the government will help them and it will plan for the future.

I have a question specifically for the hon. member for Mégantic—L'Érable. If he is so concerned that his colleagues will not have the chance to speak to Bill C-26, then why is he speaking to it for the second time? He already spoke to it on October 21. Why is he speaking for the second time if he is concerned that the others will not have the opportunity to speak?

Monsieur le Président, je peux dire à mon collègue de Mégantic—L'Érable que, depuis 10 ans, la classe moyenne se sent oubliée par le gouvernement du Canada, et que ce changement fera en sorte qu'on arrêtera d'oublier les gens, qu'on les aidera et qu'on planifiera l'avenir.

J'ai une question très particulière pour le député de Mégantic—L'Érable. S'il est si inquiet que ses collègues n'aient pas la chance de parler du projet de loi C-26, pourquoi en parle-t-il lui-même pour la deuxième fois? Il en a déjà parlé le 21 octobre. Pourquoi en parle-t-il deux fois s'il est inquiet que les autres n'aient pas l'occasion de parler?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 250 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 17, 2016

2016-11-15 13:51 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Benefits for children, Broadband Internet services, Budget deficit, Canada Infrastructure Bank, Children, Economic stimulus, Government bills, Government expenditures, Guaranteed annual income

Communautés rurales, Déficit budgétaire, Dépenses publiques, Deuxième lecture, Enfants, Fiscalité, Infrastructure, Nouvelles technologies,

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise to speak about Bill C-29, which implements a number of important elements of the 2016 budget. I proudly support this budget, because it represents the best that this country has to offer its citizens.

I have been following Canadian federal politics closely for more than 20 years, especially during the more than seven years that I worked as a constituency assistant, a parliamentary assistant and now as a member of Parliament. As a result, I have seen many budgets and changes, many attempts to try out new ideas, and numerous mistakes.

The bill before us is not just an annual budget intended to stay the course with policies that did not work before, in hopes that they will work this time. On the contrary, it is a budget that focuses on our future. It lays the groundwork for years of even better budgets, investments and innovations.

In the economic update presented a few weeks ago, new investments were announced. As the MP for a very rural riding, I am pleased to see a new $2-billion investment, as a first step, for rural infrastructure priorities.

We need to make up for the decades of negligence the regions have suffered. That money, along with $180 billion for infrastructure in many categories that are not specific to the regions, demonstrates the government's interest and its plans to deliver on that.

Where I come from, high-speed Internet access is a very important issue. As far as we are concerned, all socio-economic issues can be linked to high-speed Internet access. The government allocated $500 million for this in the budget. That money cannot come quickly enough. However, we are not so naive as to believe that this small amount is going to solve the problem of rural Internet access after 20 years of failures in digital communication. That money is merely a first step. I am very proud to finally see a forward-looking budget that focuses on long-term planning after 10 years of mismanagement.

I know the Conservatives will ask me how we can plan anything with such large deficits. It does not surprise me that they keep asking that question. For years, they looked at their own deficits and had no idea what to do about them or where they came from, even as they cut taxes and investment in our economy. They actually increased the national debt by more than $150 billion. Year after year, the Conservatives never stopped to think about how future generations would pay off the debt they accumulated.

The Conservatives eliminated government revenue sources and spent willy-nilly. They did not have an infrastructure plan to build the country and our future. They fixed potholes and built gazebos. They spent, but they did not invest, with the possible exception being economic action plan posters, which sprouted up all over the country like mushrooms.

During this debate, the Conservatives have repeatedly questioned whether paying taxes is the way to go. They do not believe that taxes are society's best tool for sharing common costs. They do not agree that it is the government's responsibility to manage that money and spend it in the country's best interest.

Clearly, our job is to improve the lives of all Canadians. However, I can assure the House that we are not going to change things just by listening to the Conservatives. It will take concrete action by the government, and that means spending money in almost every case.

As far as I am concerned, it is obvious that the government has an important role to play in the economy. As I said during yesterday's debate, taxes allow us to pool our resources in order to pay for the expenses shared by our society. The role of government is to improve citizens' lives and it does that by managing these pooled resources, in short, taxes.

We should be talking more about citizens rather than taxpayers. We often do not consider the goal of the institution we work for and the reason why we are here. When the Conservatives imply that the government has no useful role or function, or that taxes are nothing more than a burden for citizens and business, they have completely missed the point.

I find it amusing that the Conservatives are complaining about the government moving forward with enhancements to the Canada pension plan when they have a parliamentary pension plan. They complain about the fact that the government collects taxes and decides how to spend them to improve people's lives, but they do not turn down their own salaries, benefits, or their parliamentary budget.

They know that, as members of the government and members of Parliament, we have the vital role of managing common resources and expenditures and of debating the best ways to improve the lives of our fellow Canadians.

Accordingly, I believe that, eventually, we should consider the possibility of ensuring that all Canadians have a guaranteed minimum income. This idea has been debated in many countries by many generations and may have been around for as long as the debate on whether to annex Turks and Caicos, a measure that I am also not likely to oppose.

Because so many aspects of our society are becoming automated, one day, there may not be enough work for all Canadians. However, I may be wrong, but I believe that that day is still a long way off.

One of my favourite movies is The Gods Must be Crazy. The beginning of this South African and Botswanan movie from the 1980s explains how society becomes more modernized. We have created technology to simplify our lives, but the more simplified our lives become, the more complex the technology becomes. We need more education to understand our simplified lives, which are in fact becoming more complicated.

To come back to what I was saying, the Canada child benefit, which provides parents with up to $6,400 a year per child, is a type of guaranteed minimum income. We already have a guaranteed minimum income for seniors in the form of the guaranteed income supplement, which we increased by 10% in the budget for those who need it most. The idea is already present in our social structures because one of the shared commitments we made as a society was to take care of those who do not have the means or ability to take care of themselves.

Our budget therefore includes a number of components that focus on improving our future. Investments in infrastructure are essential, but we have to run a deficit to make those investments because our infrastructure is already in a deficit situation.

For example, Internet access in our regions is often so unreliable that it is having a significant harmful effect on our economy. Many of our roads are in disrepair. It is estimated that only 400,000 km of Canada's one million kilometres of roads are paved. The investment needs of indigenous communities are so great that I cannot even begin to describe them here. It costs money to make all of these changes and fix these long-standing problems. However, all these investments will improve the quality of life of Canadians in the short term and strengthen our economy in the long term.

Yes, we must go into debt to get there, but our society is already in debt, whether we are talking about our roads, our communities, or our basic infrastructure. By investing, we are simply quantifying this deficit.

With a stronger economy, improved infrastructure, and essential investments, government revenues will increase without hurting the economy and the deficits will start to go down. We have the record to prove it. There has not been a Liberal Prime Minister since confederation who has not managed to balance at least one budget. The only exception was when no budget was tabled. As for the Conservatives' record, the opposite is true.

The good news about infrastructure in the budget does not stop there. I initially had concerns about the idea of an infrastructure bank that the private sector would contribute to, as I consider myself more left-leaning. However, I now understand how we might benefit from it and I see the tremendous potential. I am by no means an expert on this, but if it is done correctly the possibilities are immense.

Private-public funding of infrastructure gives us the chance to finally address the issue of high-speed Internet access in the regions, seriously address the issue of affordable housing, and build other green, social, and traditional infrastructure where traditionally user-pay models are used, without giving up on the idea that infrastructure should belong to the public sector. It is quite interesting and I look forward to following this project.

I am proud of our budget, Bill C-29 and of our government's plans and I am not afraid to say so.

Monsieur le Président, j'ai le plaisir de me lever pour parler du projet de loi C-29, qui met en place plusieurs éléments importants du budget de 2016. J'appuie avec fierté ce budget, car il représente le meilleur que ce pays peut offrir à sa population.

Je suis la politique fédérale canadienne de près depuis plus de 20 ans, et notamment pendant les plus de 7 ans que j'ai travaillées comme adjoint de circonscription, adjoint parlementaire et maintenant comme député. J'ai donc été témoin de nombreux budgets et changements, ainsi que de nombreuses mises à l'essai de nouvelles idées et de beaucoup d'erreurs.

Le projet de loi devant nous n'est pas seulement un budget annuel qui vise à poursuivre la route avec des politiques qui n'ont pas fonctionné auparavant, en espérant qu'elles fonctionneront cette fois. Au contraire, c'est un budget axé sur notre avenir. Il prépare le terrain pour des années de budgets, d'investissements et d'innovations encore meilleurs.

Lors de la mise à jour économique présentée il y a quelques semaines, on a appris que de nouveaux investissements seront faits. En tant que député d'une circonscription très rurale, je suis content de voir, comme premier pas, un nouvel investissement de 2 milliards de dollars pour les priorités en infrastructures rurales.

Nous devons corriger des décennies de négligence envers les régions. Cet argent, en plus des 180 milliards de dollars pour les infrastructures dans plusieurs catégories qui ne sont pas strictement liées aux régions, démontre un intérêt et annonce un projet pour y arriver.

Chez nous, l'accès à Internet haute vitesse est le plus grand enjeu. En ce qui nous concerne, toute question socioéconomique passe par l'accès à Internet haute vitesse. Le gouvernement a mis 500 millions de dollars à cet effet dans le budget. Ce montant ne peut pas être alloué assez vite pour nous. Toutefois, nous ne sommes pas assez naïfs pour croire que cette petite somme va régler le problème d'Internet en région après 20 ans d'échecs en communications numériques. Cet argent ne fait qu'ouvrir la porte. Je suis très fier, après 10 ans de mauvaise gestion, de voir enfin un budget tourné vers l'avenir et axé sur la planification à long terme.

Je sais que les conservateurs vont me demander comment il est possible de planifier avec des déficits aussi grands. Ce n'est pas surprenant qu'ils nous posent cette question si souvent, car pendant des années, ils ont examiné leurs propres déficits sans savoir quoi en faire ni ce qui les avait causés, tout en réduisant les taxes et les investissements dans notre économie. Ils ont effectivement augmenté la dette nationale de plus de 150 milliards de dollars. Les conservateurs ne se sont jamais demandés, année après année, comment les générations futures paieraient les dettes qu'ils avaient accumulées.

Les conservateurs éliminaient des sources de revenus pour le gouvernement et dépensaient sans avoir de plan de match. Ils n'avaient pas de plan pour l'infrastructure afin de bâtir un pays et de construire l'avenir. Ils réparaient des nids-de-poule et construisaient des pavillons de jardin. Ils dépensaient mais n'investissaient pas, sauf peut-être dans les affiches pour le Plan d'action économique, qui poussaient comme des champignons un peu partout au pays.

Dans le cadre de ce débat, nous avons entendu à plusieurs reprises des conservateurs émettre des doutes sur la pertinence de payer des taxes. Ils doutent que les taxes soient le bon moyen à utiliser en tant que société pour partager les coûts communs. Ils ne sont pas d'accord avec le fait qu'il est de la responsabilité du gouvernement de gérer ces revenus pour les dépenser dans le meilleur intérêt du pays.

De toute évidence, notre responsabilité est d'améliorer la vie de tous les Canadiens. Toutefois, je peux assurer la Chambre que ce n'est pas simplement en écoutant les propos des conservateurs que nous allons changer quelque chose. Il faut des actions concrètes de la part du gouvernement, et cela implique des dépenses dans presque tous les cas.

En ce qui me concerne, il est clair que le gouvernement a un rôle important à jouer dans l'économie. Comme je l'ai dit lors du débat hier, le rôle des taxes est de mettre en commun nos ressources pour les dépenses communes de notre société. Le rôle du gouvernement est d'améliorer la vie de ses citoyens et l'outil principal que nous avons pour y arriver est la gestion de ces ressources communes, en bref, les taxes.

Nous devons parler davantage de citoyens que de contribuables. Souvent, notre discours ne tient pas compte de l'objectif de l'institution pour laquelle nous travaillons et de la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici. Quand les conservateurs laissent entendre que le gouvernement n'a aucune utilité, aucune fonction ou que les impôts et les taxes ne sont rien de plus qu'un fardeau pour les citoyens et les entreprises, ils passent complètement à côté de l'objectif.

Je trouvent carrément amusant que les conservateurs se plaignent du fait que le gouvernement va de l'avant avec des améliorations au Régime de pensions du Canada, alors qu'ils acceptent leur programme de pensions parlementaire. Ils se plaignent du fait que le gouvernement perçoive des taxes et décide comment les dépenser pour améliorer la vie des gens, mais ils ne rejettent ni leur salaire, ni leurs avantages sociaux, ni leur budget parlementaire.

Ils savent que nous avons, en tant que députés du gouvernement et du Parlement, le rôle essentiel de gérer les ressources et les dépenses communes et de débattre des meilleures façons d'améliorer la vie de nos concitoyens.

En ce sens, je crois que nous devrions considérer éventuellement la possibilité d'assurer un revenu minimum garanti à tous les citoyens. Cette idée a souvent été débattue dans plusieurs pays et par plusieurs générations, et elle est peut-être aussi vieille que celle d'annexer les îles Turques-et-Caïques, à laquelle je ne m'opposerais probablement pas non plus.

En raison de l'automatisation de tant d'aspects de notre société, il se peut qu'un jour, il n'y ait pas assez de travail pour tous nos concitoyens. Toutefois, ce jour est encore loin, et j'ai peut-être tort.

Un des mes films préférés est Les dieux sont tombés sur la tête. Au début de ce film sud-africain et botswanais de 1980, on explique comment la société se modernise. Nous avons créé des technologies pour simplifier notre vie, mais plus notre vie est simplifiée, plus la technologie devient complexe. Ainsi, on a besoin de plus d'éducation pour comprendre notre vie simplifiée au point d'être plus compliquée.

Pour revenir à ce que je disais, l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants, qui offre aux parents jusqu'à 6 400 $ par année par enfant, constitue une sorte de revenu minimum garanti. Celui-ci existe déjà pour les aînés, grâce au Supplément de revenu garanti, que nous avons bonifié de 10 %, dans le budget, pour ceux qui en ont le plus besoin. L'idée est déjà présente dans nos structures, précisément parce que l'un des devoirs communs que nous avons accepté, en tant que société, est celui de prendre soin de ceux qui n'ont pas les moyens ou la capacité de prendre soin d'eux-mêmes.

Notre budget comporte donc plusieurs volets qui se réunissent tous autour de l'idée d'améliorer notre avenir. Les investissements dans nos infrastructures sont essentiels, mais ils nous mettent en déficit budgétaire, puisque nos infrastructures sont déjà déficitaires.

Par exemple, l'accès à Internet dans les régions est souvent tellement épouvantable que cela nuit à notre économie de façon extrêmement importante. Quant à nos routes, elles ne sont souvent pas en bon état. On estime qu'il y a 1 million de kilomètres de routes au Canada, dont 400 000 sont pavés. Les besoins des communautés autochtones en matière d'investissement, eux, sont si grands que je ne pourrais en démontrer l'ampleur ici. Tous ces changements et tous ces reculs concernant les lacunes de longue date en matière d'investissement coûtent de l'argent. Toutefois, tous ces investissements améliorent la qualité de vie de nos concitoyens à court terme et la force de notre économie à long terme.

Oui, il faudra s'endetter pour y arriver, mais la dette existe déjà dans notre société, que ce soit par rapport à nos chemins, nos communautés ou nos infrastructures de base. En investissant, nous quantifions tout simplement ce déficit.

Avec une économie plus forte, une infrastructure améliorée et des investissements essentiels, les revenus gouvernementaux augmenteront sans nuire à l'économie, et les déficits commenceront à diminuer. C'est nous qui avons le bilan pour le prouver. Il n'existe pas un premier ministre libéral, depuis la Confédération, qui n'a pas réussi à équilibrer au moins un budget. La seule exception, c'était lorsqu'on n'avait déposé aucun budget. Quant au bilan des conservateurs, c'est l'inverse.

Les bonnes nouvelles qu'apporte ce budget au sujet des infrastructures ne s'arrêtent pas là. L'idée d'une banque de l'infrastructure à laquelle contribuerait le secteur privé me semblait inquiétante à première vue, puisque je me considère plutôt à gauche. Toutefois, j'ai compris les bénéfices que nous pourrions en tirer et je vois son potentiel énorme. Je ne suis pas du tout un expert dans ce domaine, mais si cela est fait correctement, les possibilités sont énormes.

Le cofinancement privé et public des infrastructures nous donne la chance de régler enfin la question de l'accès à Internet haute vitesse en région, d'aborder sérieusement la question du logement abordable et de construire d'autres infrastructures vertes, sociales et traditionnelles là où il y a traditionnellement un modèle utilisateur-payeur, sans abandonner l'idée selon laquelle l'infrastructure devrait appartenir au secteur public. C'est assez intéressant, et j'ai hâte de suivre ce projet.

Je suis donc fier de notre budget, du projet de loi C-29 et de la planification de notre gouvernement, et je ne suis pas gêné de le dire.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 3076 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 15, 2016

2016-11-15 13:17 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Budget deficit, Government bills, Second reading

Déficit budgétaire, Deuxième lecture,

Mr. Speaker, I always find it a little ironic to hear the Conservatives talk about deficits.

If we look back to the turn of the 20th century, back to 1900, the Conservatives managed to balance one budget in the 20th century, which was in 1912, and they inherited it from the Liberals. The next year they were in deficit. In 1914, we went into the First World War already in a deficit position. The next time the Conservatives balanced a budget was in 2006, when they inherited it from the Liberals. However, if we go back to Confederation, there was only one Liberal prime minister who did not post at least one balanced budget, and that one had no budgets tabled at all as he was only there for four months.

Does the member have any comments on that?

Monsieur le Président, quand j’entends les conservateurs parler de déficit, je trouve toujours leurs propos un peu ironiques.

Si nous regardons en arrière jusqu’au début du XXe siècle, jusqu’en 1900, nous remarquons que les conservateurs n’ont réussi à équilibrer qu’un seul budget au cours du XXe siècle. C’était le budget de 1912, qu’ils avaient hérité des libéraux. L’année suivante, ils accusaient un déficit. En 1914, nous sommes entrés dans la Première Guerre mondiale dans une position de déficit budgétaire. Le budget suivant que les conservateurs ont réussi à équilibrer fut le budget de 2006, qu’ils avaient hérité des libéraux. À l'inverse, si nous remontons jusqu’à la Confédération, nous ne trouvons qu’un premier ministre libéral qui n’a pas équilibré au moins un budget, pour la simple et bonne raison qu’il n’avait pas eu l’occasion d’en déposer un puisqu’il n’est resté au pouvoir que pendant quatre mois.

Que pense mon collègue de tout cela?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 307 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 15, 2016

2016-11-14 18:12 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Benefits for children, Child care allowance, Government bills, Second reading,

Allocation de frais de garde, Deuxième lecture, Prestations pour enfants

Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague from Beauport—Limoilou for his speech. I would like to ask him a fairly simple question. He talked about the Canada child benefit in a negative way. He said that it is terrible because it is not going to help every family.

If I recall correctly, the Conservative program handed out $160 a month to billionaires. Did that make sense?

Madame la Présidente, je remercie mon collègue de Beauport—Limoilou de son discours. J'aimerais lui poser une question assez simple. Il a parlé de l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants de façon négative. Il a dit que c'était terrible parce que cela n'aiderait pas toutes les familles.

Si je me rappelle bien, le programme conservateur donnait 160 $ par mois à des milliardaires. Est-ce que cela relève du bon sens?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 161 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 14, 2016

2016-11-14 17:43 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Second reading,

Deuxième lecture

Madam Speaker, the only thing rich about the Conservatives' legacy is the their description of it.

The member for Brantford—Brant started his speech by rejecting the premise that taxes are how we share our common costs and that government is how we manage those common costs. I wonder if the member for Brantford—Brant could explain to us what purpose he sees government having if not to manage common costs and common services.

Madame la Présidente, le seul élément positif de l'héritage des conservateurs, c'est la description qu'ils en font.

Au début de son discours, le député de Brantford—Brant a rejeté la prémisse voulant que les taxes et les impôts soient le moyen par lequel nous partageons nos coûts communs et que le gouvernement décide de la façon de gérer ces coûts. Je saurais gré au député de Brantford—Brant de nous expliquer ce qu'est la raison d'être du gouvernement si, selon lui, il ne sert pas à gérer les coûts et les services communs.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 179 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 14, 2016

2016-11-14 17:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Economic prosperity, Government bills, Second reading, Tax relief,

Allègement fiscal, Deuxième lecture, Prospérité économique

Madam Speaker, to my friend and colleague from Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, he may have finally convinced the member for Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, but for me taxes are not about spending people's money, but about sharing common costs.

It is not about being taxpayers, but about being citizenry. Elections are about deciding our priorities in broad strokes and what those common costs are. We exist as a legislative body to decide on those finer details, thus this budget.

Does my friend and colleague believe, as he has hinted, that tax cuts are the only possible way to grow the economy? If so, if we eliminated taxes altogether, would we then as a country become infinitely prosperous? It is simple calculus, according to his pitch. In a limit formula according to Conservatives, as taxes approach zero, prosperity is infinite. Does he really believe in trickle-down economics?

Madame la Présidente, mon ami et collègue d'Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock a peut-être fini par convaincre le député de Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, mais, pour moi, si l'on perçoit de l'impôt, ce n'est pas pour dépenser l'argent des autres, mais pour partager des coûts communs.

Nous ne sommes pas que des contribuables, mais aussi des citoyens. Aux élections, nous définissons les grandes lignes de nos priorités et les coûts communs. Puis, le corps législatif que nous formons en précise les détails, d'où le budget.

Est-ce que mon ami et collègue pense, comme il l'a laissé entendre, que la seule façon de créer de la croissance économique est de réduire l'impôt? Dans l'affirmative, si nous abolissions carrément l'impôt, est-ce que le pays deviendrait infiniment prospère? C'est une simple question de calcul, selon son discours. Selon une formule limite, à en croire les conservateurs, lorsque l'impôt approche de zéro, la prospérité est infinie. Croit-il vraiment à la théorie économique des effets de retombées?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 320 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 14, 2016

2016-11-14 13:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Government bills, Second reading

Deuxième lecture, Régime de pensions du Canada,

Madam Speaker, Liberals do trust Canadians to do what is in their own best interests. Indeed, Canadians did what was in their own best interests when they elected a Liberal government to prepare the country for the future.

On a longer-term outlook, 40 years from now, if that is what it takes, as opposed to just the next election cycle, expanding the CPP, increasing the GIS, and restoring OAS eligibility to 65 years old are all ways we are doing that. Not all Canadians have the means to save for their retirement and they are not so detached from reality as to believe that hoping people have money to save will make it so. Not everyone has money to manage. We, as a society, have a responsibility to do everything in our power and capacity to help our fellow citizens, and that is exactly what we are doing.

I will ask the member for Edmonton Manning this question. Does he believe the CPP program should exist at all? If so, how does he justify the cognitive dissonance of opposing this bill? If not, will he now tell Canadians that he believes we should scrap the CPP?

Madame la Présidente, les libéraux croient bel et bien que les Canadiens sont en mesure d'agir dans leur intérêt. Les Canadiens ont d'ailleurs agi dans leur intérêt en élisant un gouvernement libéral qui aidera le pays à se préparer pour l'avenir.

À long terme — soit d'ici 40 ans, s'il le faut, plutôt que simplement au cours du prochain cycle électoral —, le gouvernement fera cela notamment en bonifiant le RPC et le SRG et en ramenant à 65 ans l'âge d'admissibilité à la Sécurité de la vieillesse. Les Canadiens n'ont pas tous les moyens d'épargner en vue de la retraite et nous ne sommes pas déconnectés de la réalité au point de penser qu'il leur suffira d'entretenir l'espoir d'avoir assez d'argent pour pouvoir en mettre de côté. Les Canadiens n'ont pas tous assez d'argent pour avoir une marge de manoeuvre. En tant que membres de la société, nous avons la responsabilité de tout mettre en oeuvre pour venir en aide à nos concitoyens, et c'est en plein ce que nous sommes en train de faire.

J'aimerais poser une question au député d'Edmonton Manning. Pense-t-il que le RPC a sa raison d'être? Si oui, comment peut-il justifier son opposition au projet de loi, ce qui constitue une véritable dissonance cognitive? Si non, va-t-il dire aux Canadiens que, selon lui, nous devrions abolir le RPC?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 436 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 14, 2016

2016-11-14 13:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Government bills, Second reading

Deuxième lecture, Régime de pensions du Canada,

Madam Speaker, it was the future calling, asking why the Conservatives were not there for us in expanding CPP.

My question is very simple. Does the member believe that the CPP should be expanded to prepare for the future or abolished? Or does he really think that the way it is now sustainable for long term?

C’est un interlocuteur du futur qui appelle, madame la Présidente, et qui demande pourquoi les conservateurs ne nous ont pas appuyés lorsque nous avons bonifié le Régime de pensions du Canada.

Ma question est très simple. Est-ce que le député estime que le régime doit être bonifié pour préparer l'avenir ou bien qu’il doit être aboli? Ou encore pense-t-il vraiment que la façon dont il fonctionne aujourd’hui est durable et à long terme?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 153 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 14, 2016

2016-11-04 13:50 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Capital punishment, Civil and human rights, Crimean Tatars, Genocide, Government assistance, Humanitarian assistance and workers, Invasions and raids, Iraq

Aide gouvernementale, Aide humanitaire et travailleurs humanitaires, Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, Condition de la femme, Deuxième lecture, Droits de la personne, État islamique en Iraq et au Levant, Génocide, Invasions et raids

Mr. Speaker, today I want to speak to private members' Bill C-306, Crimean Tatar deportation, or “Sürgünlik”, memorial day act.

Let us take a moment to remember this tragedy. In 1944, Soviet authorities forced the deportation of a vast number of minorities throughout the Soviet Union. This bill seeks to acknowledge the staggering number of deaths and the suffering of hundreds of thousands of Crimean Tatars, forcibly removed from their homes on the Crimean Peninsula. This tragedy continues to haunt the collective memory of Crimean Tatars and further strengthens the attachment they still feel for their peninsula.

Canada strongly condemns the terrible discrimination and mass deportation of the Crimean Tatars in 1944 under the Soviet regime of Joseph Stalin. The Soviet regime committed an affront to Canadians by committing an affront to the common human values that we all share, namely the fundamental right to live free from persecution and to forge one's own path in the world.

These fundamental rights and freedoms have been denied to a great many people, but rarely as brutally as to the Crimean Tatars. A day to commemorate the massive deportations of Tatars from the Crimean Peninsula to central Asia would raise awareness of a dark chapter in the history of humanity and give a voice to those who were killed during this terrible tragedy. That is why our government commemorated this day on May 19, 2016. We fully support designating a memorial day in honour of the Crimean Tatars.

History can guide our future endeavours. The tragedy of the Crimean Tatars underscores an important principle articulated by Lord Acton, who said, “A nation's greatness is measured by how it treats its minorities.”

Canada is a great nation, a free nation, and its greatness is due in part to its Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which enshrines in law the protection of minority rights. As stated in subsection 15(1) of the charter:

Every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability.

This principle of equality and protection for all, or human rights, seems so obvious to Canadians. Unfortunately, that principle has been violated in the past, and is still being violated in parts of the world today.

We are gathered here today as parliamentarians because we want to make our communities, Canadian society, and the entire world a better place. When we look around the globe, we see that too many tragedies are still taking place, and it seems that the universal protection of human rights and recognition of the inalienable nature of each individual's rights are distant notions in some cases.

At any given moment, countless human beings around the world are being punished and tortured simply for their religious beliefs. They are discriminated against because of their sexual orientation. They are abused because of their gender and killed because of the colour of their skin. Too many governments commit acts of hatred and refuse to acknowledge the humanity they share with others.

Here in Canada, we know that we are stronger because of our differences and not in spite of them. We know that we are all equal and that we have basic human rights. In light of that, it is up to all of us to make Canada a strong advocate for human rights.

This government is known for its strong, unwavering commitment to human rights. Now more than ever, there is a need for human rights advocates, and Canada is in a better position than most countries to lead this fight. This government is being proactive and working hard to defend and solidify Canada's position on international human rights. We are building a safer world that is more stable and prosperous by interacting with it rather than withdrawing from the fight.

I would like to give a few examples. Canada now seeks clemency for all Canadians facing execution abroad. If Canada does not fight to protect the lives of each of its citizens, then the government has failed in its basic duty to protect them.

We announced our intention to ratify the United Nations Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment. Torture is a scourge that must be eliminated. It has been shown time and time again that this barbaric practice is not effective and produces false information. It serves no purpose except to inflict suffering.

We also created the Office of Human Rights, Freedoms and Inclusion, because human rights requires a comprehensive approach and because our outreach efforts produce better results when we stand up for all rights abroad by combining all of our voices and skills.

We gave all of our heads of missions abroad the objective of defending human rights and the tools to achieve it. Their mandate letters also reflect the need to promote and defend human rights. Their actions will inspire many people throughout the world.

We are putting in place a new government-wide strategy to address the crisis in Iraq and Syria, which includes tripling the number of members in our training mission and investing $1.6 billion over three years in Iraq and the surrounding region. It should be noted that we have pledged $158 million of this amount to humanitarian work and support for stabilization in Iraq.

Daesh is a perversion of Islam, a vessel brimming with hate, and an affront to the entire world; together with our allies, we will fight this monstrosity. We are supporting the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights with new base funding of $15 million a year over the next three years.

We also reaffirmed our commitment to the empowerment of women by providing $16.3 million to women in the Middle East and North Africa. The world cannot be a just place when half the population does not have equal opportunity.

Thanks to the concerted efforts it is making right now, our government is getting results. We are making an important contribution. By focusing on promoting human rights and ensuring the rule of law and justice, Canada is paying tribute to the legacy of Crimean Tatars, a brave and resilient people whose strength of character is an example for everyone.

We must never forget their suffering and we must continue to commemorate May 18. However, it is not good enough just to reflect on this tragedy; we must take action. By promoting human rights, Canada is trying to prevent another tragedy such as this one from taking place in the future.

Monsieur le Président, je souhaite parler aujourd'hui du projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire C-306, Loi sur le Jour commémoratif de la déportation des Tatars de Crimée, le « Sürgünlik ».

Prenons quelques instants pour nous remémorer cette tragédie. En 1944, les autorités soviétiques ont forcé la déportation d'un grand nombre de minorités dans toute l'Union soviétique. Ce projet de loi vise à rappeler le nombre effarant de morts, et les souffrances qu'ont subies des centaines de milliers de Tatars de Crimée, expulsés de force de leur lieu de résidence, soit la péninsule de Crimée. Cette tragédie continue de hanter la mémoire collective des Tatars de Crimée et renforce l'attachement profond qu'ils portent toujours à leur péninsule.

Le Canada condamne fortement la terrible discrimination et la déportation massive subie par les Tatars de Crimée en 1944, sous le régime soviétique de Joseph Staline. Le régime soviétique a commis un affront à l'endroit des Canadiens, parce qu'il s'agit d'un affront aux valeurs humaines communes que nous partageons tous, soit le droit fondamental de vivre à l'abri de la persécution et de tracer sa propre voie dans le monde.

Ces libertés et droits fondamentaux ont été refusés à un grand nombre de personnes, mais rarement de façon aussi brutale qu'ils le furent aux Tatars de Crimée. Une journée soulignant les déportations massives, auxquels ont dû faire face les Tatars ayant été déportés de la péninsule de Crimée vers l'Asie centrale, rendrait compte d'un chapitre sombre de l'histoire de l'humanité et donnerait une voix à ceux qui ont trouvé la mort lors de cette terrible tragédie. C'est pour cette raison que ce gouvernement a souligné cette journée le 19 mai 2016. Nous appuyons totalement la création d'un jour commémoratif en l'honneur des Tatars de Crimée.

L'histoire peut également servir de guide pour les entreprises futures. La tragédie des Tatars de Crimée fait ressortir un important principe formulé par Lord Acton qui a dit: « La grandeur d'un État se mesure au traitement qu'il ménage à ses minorités. »

Le Canada est un grand pays, un pays libre, et sa grandeur tient en partie à sa Charte canadienne des droits et libertés qui enchâsse dans la loi la protection des droits des minorités. Le paragraphe 15(1) de la Charte établit que:

La loi ne fait acception de personne et s'applique également à tous, et tous ont droit à la même protection et au même bénéfice de la loi, indépendamment de toute discrimination, notamment des discriminations fondées sur la race, l'origine nationale ou ethnique, la couleur, la religion, le sexe, l'âge ou les déficiences mentales ou physiques.

Ce principe d'égalité et de protection pour tous, ou des droits de la personne, semble si évident pour les Canadiens. Malheureusement, il a toutefois été bafoué historiquement, et il l'est toujours dans notre monde actuel.

Nous sommes réunis ici, en tant que parlementaires, parce que nous voulons apporter des améliorations dans nos communautés, dans la société canadienne et dans le monde. Lorsque nous portons attention au monde, nous voyons qu'il y a encore trop de situations tragiques, et il semble que la protection universelle des droits de la personne et la reconnaissance du caractère inaliénable de chaque être humain représentent des notions très éloignées.

Nous constatons continuellement, partout dans le monde, que de nombreux êtres humains sont réprimés et torturés eu égard à leur foi religieuse, qu'ils subissent des préjudices du fait de leur orientation sexuelle, qu'ils sont abusés en raison de leur sexe et tués en raison de la couleur de leur peau. Trop nombreux sont les gouvernements qui pratiquent la haine et refusent d'admettre l'humanité qu'ils partagent avec les autres.

Ici, au Canada, nous savons que nous sommes plus forts en raison de nos différences, et non malgré elles. Nous savons que nous sommes tous nés égaux et que nous jouissons tous des droits de la personne. De ce fait, il revient à notre pays de faire du Canada un défenseur des droits de la personne.

Ce gouvernement est caractérisé par un engagement solide et inébranlable à l'égard des droits de la personne. Plus que jamais, les droits de la personne ont besoin de défenseurs, et le Canada est en meilleure posture que la majorité des nations pour être à l'avant-garde dans cette lutte. Ce gouvernement s'affaire de façon proactive et sans relâche à défendre et à concrétiser la position du Canada en ce qui a trait aux droits de la personne à l'échelle internationale. Nous façonnons un monde plus stable, sécuritaire et prospère, en interagissant avec ce dernier plutôt que de nous retirer de la mêlée.

Je vais citer quelques exemples. Le Canada demande maintenant que l'on fasse preuve de clémence à l'égard de tous les Canadiens qui font face à une exécution à l'étranger. Si le Canada ne lutte pas pour protéger la vie de chacun de ses citoyens, il manque, à titre d'État, à son devoir fondamental qui consiste à protéger ses citoyens.

Nous avons annoncé notre intention de ratifier le Protocole facultatif se rapportant à la Convention contre la torture et autres peines ou traitements cruels, inhumains ou dégradants des Nations unies. La torture est un fléau qui doit être éliminé. On a maintes fois démontré que cette pratique barbare n'était pas efficace et produisait des renseignements erronés. Elle ne sert à rien, sauf à infliger de la souffrance.

En outre, nous avons créé le Bureau des droits de la personne, des libertés et de l'inclusion, car les droits de la personne doivent être traités en bloc, et parce que nos efforts de sensibilisation portent de meilleurs fruits quand nous défendons tous les droits à l'étranger en combinant toutes nos voix et toutes nos capacités.

Nous avons donné à tous nos chefs de mission à l'étranger l'objectif d'agir à titre de défenseurs des droits de la personne, ainsi que les outils pour le mener à bien. Leurs lettres de mandat soulignent le besoin de faire la promotion des droits de la personne et de les défendre. Les gestes qu'ils vont poser ne manqueront pas d'inspirer de nombreuses personnes aux quatre coins du monde.

D'autre part, nous mettons en place une nouvelle stratégie dans l'ensemble du gouvernement pour aborder la crise en Irak et en Syrie, notamment en triplant les forces de notre mission de formation et grâce à un engagement envers l'Irak et la région de 1,6 milliard de dollars sur une période de trois ans. Il convient de souligner que nous avons promis d'affecter 158 millions de dollars de ce montant au travail humanitaire et au soutien à la stabilisation en Irak.

Daech est une perversion de l'Islam, une accumulation de haine et un affront à tout le monde, et nous travaillerons de concert avec nos alliés à lutter contre cette monstruosité. Nous appuyons le Haut-Commissariat des Nations unies aux droits de l'homme au moyen d'un nouveau financement de base de 15 millions de dollars au cours des trois prochaines années.

Par ailleurs, nous avons réaffirmé notre engagement à l'égard de l'autonomisation des femmes en octroyant 16,3 millions de dollars aux femmes au Moyen-Orient et en Afrique du Nord. Le monde ne peut pas être juste lorsque la moitié de sa population n'a pas droit à l'égalité des chances.

Grâce à ses efforts concertés dans le présent, notre gouvernement obtient des résultats. Notre contribution est importante. Grâce à la promotion des droits de la personne, à la primauté du droit et à la justice, le Canada rend hommage à l'héritage des Tatars de Crimée, brave peuple résilient dont la force de caractère sert à tous d'exemple.

Nous ne devons jamais oublier leurs souffrances et nous devons continuer à commémorer le 18 mai. Toutefois, il ne suffit pas de réfléchir, il faut passer à l'action. En faisant la promotion des droits de la personne, le Canada s'évertue à éviter qu'une tragédie de ce genre se reproduise un jour.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 2428 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 04, 2016

2016-11-04 13:26 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Government bills, Pensions and pensioners, Second reading,

Deuxième lecture, Pensions et pensionnés, Régime de pensions du Canada

Mr. Speaker, I am curious if my colleague from Peace River—Westlock believes the CPP itself is important and if it is, should we make it sustainable for 100 years like the logging industry? If he does not think it is, should we get rid of it?

Monsieur le Président, je suis curieux. Le député de Peace River—Westlock croit-il que le RPC est important? S'il est important, devrait-on voir à ce qu'il soit viable pendant 100 ans, comme l'exploitation forestière? S'il n'est pas important, devrait-on l'éliminer?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 115 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 04, 2016

2016-11-04 11:02 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Deaths and funerals, Second World War, Statements by Members, Veterans,

Anciens combattants, Décès et funérailles, Déclarations de députés, Seconde Guerre mondiale,

Mr. Speaker, Remembrance Day is next week.

I rise to pay tribute to three veterans from my region who passed away in 2016. These inspiring Canadians fought for our country and to defend the values we uphold.

I wish to salute the memory of Jacques Viger of Nominingue, who passed away on October 17 at the age of 93. In 1944, Mr. Viger was 19 years old and a soldier with the Royal 22nd Regiment when he suffered serious injuries to both legs in Italy.

I want to pay homage to John Dubeau of Arundel, who fought across western Europe in the Second World War. He was decorated by both Canada and France. Always a personality, he left us on August 17, at the ripe young age of 101.

I also salute the memory of Roméo Rock of Saint-Faustin—Lac-Carré, who passed away on July 23 at the age of 89. He gave two years of his life to military service in 1944 and 1945.

I want to pay homage to all veterans from the Laurentian region and across the country. Lest we forget.

Monsieur le Président, ce sera bientôt le jour du Souvenir.

J'aimerais rendre hommage à trois vétérans de ma région qui nous ont quittés en 2016. Ces hommes inspirants ont combattu pour notre pays et défendu les valeurs que nous protégeons.

Je salue la mémoire de Jacques Viger, de Nominingue, décédé le 17 octobre à l'âge de 93 ans. En 1944, à l'âge de 19 ans, militaire dans le Royal 22e Régiment, M. Viger a été gravement blessé aux jambes, en Italie.

Je souhaite rendre hommage à John Dubeau, d'Arundel, qui a combattu d'un bout à l'autre de l'Europe de l'Ouest durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Il a été décoré par le Canada et la France. Cet homme plus grand que nature nous a quittés le 17 août dernier, au tout jeune âge de 101 ans.

Je salue également la mémoire de Roméo Rock, de Saint-Faustin—Lac-Carré, décédé le 23 juillet à l'âge de 89 ans, qui a donné deux ans de sa vie au service militaire, en 1944 et 1945.

Hommage à tous nos vétérans des Laurentides et de partout au pays! Nous n'oublierons jamais.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr statements 379 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 04, 2016

2016-11-04 10:43 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Canada Pension Plan, Government bills, Pensions and pensioners, Second reading,

Deuxième lecture, Pensions et pensionnés, Régime de pensions du Canada

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member gave a very good speech. The NDP is always very good at bringing forward interesting ideas, and I like hearing about them.

However, I know that the Liberals have reached a good balance when the Conservatives say we have gone way too far and the NDP say we are not going far enough. It is the perfect happy medium, yet again.

Would the member like to comment on that?

Monsieur le Président, la députée a prononcé une excellente allocution. Les néo-démocrates ont toujours des idées intéressantes à présenter, et j'aime bien les entendre.

Cependant, je sais que les libéraux sont parvenus à un bon équilibre quand les conservateurs disent que nous sommes allés beaucoup trop loin et les néo-démocrates affirment que nous n'allons pas assez loin. Encore une fois, il faut garder en tout un juste milieu.

La députée voudrait-elle dire quelque chose à ce sujet?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 179 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 04, 2016

2016-11-03 16:20 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Cabinet Ministers, Conflict of interest, Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, Fundraising and fundraisers, Government accountability, Inquiries and public inquiries, Lobbying and lobbyists, Opposition motions, Oversight mechanism

Enquêtes et enquêtes publiques, Imputabilité du gouvernement, Lobbying et lobbyistes, Mécanisme de surveillance, Membres du cabinet

Mr. Speaker, if the opposition wants to talk about the content of the opposition motion, we can do that.

There are two key elements to it. One is that the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner has the power to investigate. She already has that power. She already has the power to investigate conflict of interest and ethics. That is why she has the title she has.

I reject the premise of the opposition day motion, and the second half of it is to end the current practice of cash for access. I reject the premise of that too. There is no cash for access. There is fundraising by members and there is government business. They are separate things.

I wonder if the member would like to comment on that.

Monsieur le Président, si l’opposition veut parler du contenu de la motion de l’opposition, nous pouvons le faire.

Elle comprend deux éléments principaux. L’un est que la commissaire aux conflits d’intérêts et à l’éthique devrait avoir le pouvoir d’enquêter. Elle a déjà ce pouvoir. Elle a déjà le pouvoir d’enquêter sur les conflits d’intérêts et les questions d’éthique, d’où son titre.

Je rejette la prémisse de la motion de l’opposition. Sa seconde partie consiste à mettre fin à la pratique actuelle de l’accès payant. Je rejette également cette prémisse. Il n’y a pas d’accès payant. Il y a la collecte de fonds par les députés et il y a les affaires du gouvernement. Ce sont des choses distinctes.

Je me demande si le député voudrait commenter ce point.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 309 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 03, 2016

2016-11-03 12:50 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Cabinet Ministers, Compliance, Conflict of interest, Fundraising and fundraisers, Government accountability, Lobbying and lobbyists, Opposition motions, Rule of law,

Conformité, Imputabilité du gouvernement, Lobbying et lobbyistes, Membres du cabinet, Primauté du droit

Mr. Speaker, we are a country of laws, first and foremost. It is either a country of men or a country of laws. This is a country of laws. We follow the rules. We make the rules as fair as humanly possible. We do our very best to stick with that.

Monsieur le Président, notre pays est un pays où règne le droit, d'abord et avant tout. Les pays sont régis par les hommes ou par les lois. Ici, c'est par les lois. Nous nous conformons aux règles. Nous établissons des règles aussi justes qu'il est humainement possible. Nous faisons de notre mieux pour nous en tenir à cela.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 151 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 03, 2016

2016-11-03 12:49 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Cabinet Ministers, Compliance, Conflict of interest, Ethics and ethical issues, Fundraising and fundraisers, Government accountability, Lobbying and lobbyists, Opposition motions,

Conformité, Éthique et questions éthiques, Imputabilité du gouvernement, Lobbying et lobbyistes, Membres du cabinet

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister's mandate letter is a very good letter. I think our ministers are following it to the letter, to the spirit, to the intent, and are doing a very good job of it.

Monsieur le Président, la lettre de mandat du premier ministre est une excellente lettre. Je pense que les ministres en respectent parfaitement bien la lettre, l’esprit et l’intention.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 110 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 03, 2016

2016-11-03 12:47 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Allegations of fraud and fraud, Cabinet Ministers, Canada Elections Act, Compliance, Conflict of interest, Conservative Party of Canada, Fundraising and fundraisers, Government accountability, Imprisonment and prisoners, Lobbying and lobbyists,

Allégations de fraude et fraudes, Conformité, Imputabilité du gouvernement, Incarcération et prisonniers, Lobbying et lobbyistes, Loi électorale du Canada, Membres du cabinet

Mr. Speaker, the way it works is that people donate to parties. The government follows the rules, not just to the letter but in spirit. Every member of the House has to follow the rules. There are so many mechanisms that ensure this. We need only ask Mr. Del Mastro and we will find out how the system actually works.

Monsieur le Président, le fait est que les gens font des dons aux partis et que les choses fonctionnent ainsi. Le gouvernement se conforme tant à la lettre qu'à l'esprit des règles. Tous les députés doivent faire de même et il existe de multiples mécanismes pour y veiller. Il suffit de s'adresser à M. Del Mastro. Il pourra nous dire que le système fonctionne.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 182 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 03, 2016

2016-11-03 12:37 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Accountability, Cabinet Ministers, Canada Elections Act, Code of ethics, Commissioner of Lobbying, Companies, Compliance, Conflict of interest, Conflict of Interest Act, Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, Conservative Party of Canada

Cadeaux, Code de déontologie, Code de déontologie des lobbyistes, Commissaire au lobbying, Compagnies, Conformité, Consultation du public, Démocratie,

Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the member for Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe.

I welcome this opportunity to rise in the House to discuss this motion.

The motion, at its heart, speaks to issues of integrity and accountability. I think we can all agree that engagement with Canadians is a key part of the democratic process. The unfortunate reality is that under the previous government, Canadians were not engaged, their concerns were not heard, and that is why Canadians chose a new government to represent them.

In short, as much as my opposition colleagues would like us all to believe, fundraising is not a dirty word. Fundraising is one component of every party's engagement in outreach work. I am proud to say that Canadians have a government that is not only following the rules, but believes in hearing the concerns of all Canadians from all walks of life and making their concerns a major priority.

All parties fundraise. It is a way citizens can express their views in a free and fair democracy. That said, we need to ensure we preserve the level playing field that is the foundation of our democratic culture.

Fundraising and election spending need to be regulated, and they are. The federal fundraising rules are some of the strictest in the country, and donations and contributions are made open and transparent. For instance, in some provinces, individuals can donate in the tens of thousands of dollars, and others do not have any limits on contributions whatsoever. Additionally, it is important to note that some provinces accept donations from unions, trade associations, and corporations. This is not the case in the federal system

While members on that side of the House are trying to create a narrative that our government is not being open and transparent, I can say with full confidence that this is not the case here. Canadians know that, federally, we have some of the strictest rules governing political fundraising, and our members follow these rules in every case. Canadians have trust in our system, because they know we have measures in place to ensure our public institutions operate in a transparent fashion and that decision-makers are held to account for their actions.

One of the central pillars of our integrity regime is the Conflict of Interest Act. It is important that members of the House understand how the extremely rigorous regime set out by the statute works.

First, the act has broad coverage. When it talks about public office holders, the net is cast widely to include ministers, parliamentary secretaries, Governor in Council appointees, and even exempt staff. Compliance with the Conflict of Interest Act is not something that is taken lightly. It is not a suggestion. It is a term and condition of appointment for all public office holders.

At its core, the act requires public office holders to avoid conflict between private interests and their official duties. This means that ministers, staffers, and others may not take part in any decision-making that could further their own private interests or that of their friends or relatives.

We all know that this is not a universal principle embraced around the world. There are countries where people seek high office as a means to obtain wealth and prosperity. Fortunately, in Canada, we view things differently. Public service is exactly that: serving the public and not oneself.

The rules are some of the strictest in the country regarding donations, and contributions must be made openly and transparently. Some provinces allow individuals to make donations of tens of thousands of dollars, while others have no limits on donations, and some of them also allow donations from unions, business associations and corporations. None of that is permitted under the federal regime, which requires donations of more than $200 to be reported online. That being said, there is no question that the current government is obeying the rules and the laws on political fundraising campaigns in Canada.

I will now turn to a few concrete examples of activities and practices that are not permitted under our current regime. Federal public office holders are not permitted to participate in making decisions that will affect the value of their children’s business or would increase the value of their own stock portfolios. They may not issue a permit that would increase the value of their property holdings. They are not permitted to accept extravagant gifts, either.

The definition of these gifts includes a wide variety of items. It can include a gift bag from a business, a low-interest mortgage or anything in between. The law also contains provisions concerning the post-employment period. For example, federal public office holders cannot resign and immediately use the confidential information to which they had access for their own purposes. They cannot suddenly resign and join the other side in a transaction or negotiation with the government.

Overseeing this regime is the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner. She interprets and administers the act. This includes providing public office holders with confidential advice, investigating and reporting on alleged breaches, and levying penalties for public office holders who have failed to report as required. It is tough.

I know that everyone in the House can agree that the current commissioner is doing an admirable job and has earned our collective respect and appreciation. When I say it is a tough job, I mean it. Things are rarely entirely black and white. Context matters and perception matters. That is why there are mechanisms to ensure public reporting and mechanisms to allow ministers, staffers, and others covered by the act to check in with the commissioner when questions arise.

Canadians expect governments and ministers to act to the highest ethical standards. That is exactly what every minister of this government has done, and continues to do. The commissioner is the authoritative source for interpreting the act. She has issued a number of guidelines and information notices to assist public office holders, which are available on her website. In short, when in doubt, she is the fount of wisdom.

Another pillar of the federal ethics regime is the Lobbying Act. This act is based on the principle that it is legitimate and necessary for the government to communicate with interest groups. Canadians have the right to know who is involved in paid lobbying for the purpose of influencing the government’s decisions.

Under the act, all paid lobbyists are required to register with the Lobbying Commissioner before they can communicate with ministers, exempt staff, government officers and parliamentarians. That includes consultants working for law firms and lobbying companies, as well as employees of corporations, unions, industrial associations and interest groups.

Lobbyists are required to enter information about their clients, their lobbying activities and the departments and officers with whom they meet in a public data bank. They also have to make public the details of any meetings or telephone calls with government decision-makers, which includes ministers, exempt staff and even senior public servants. Any member of the public may consult the data bank online to obtain that information.

In addition, all lobbyists must respect the lobbyists' code of conduct issued by the Commissioner of Lobbying. Like the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, the Commissioner of Lobbying is an independent officer who reports directly to Parliament, not the government. Under their code of conduct, lobbyists must act honestly and with integrity, and they must not do anything that places a designated public office holder in a conflict of interest.

The Ethics Commissioner has the power to investigate any alleged breaches of both the Lobbying Act and the lobbyists’ code of conduct. The commissioner must also report all violations to Parliament. If the commissioner believes that a violation has occurred, he can also refer the matter to the RCMP for criminal investigation and, where appropriate, prosecution.

The Lobbying Act ensures that senior government officials cannot leave their position and immediately begin lobbying their former government colleagues. It is prohibited for ministers, exempt staff, and senior officials to be a paid lobbyist of the federal government for a period of five years after they leave their position.

Taken together, the Conflict of Interest Act and the Lobbying Act represent one of the most rigorous statutory transparency and ethics regimes in the world. I am proud that our government has set the bar so high. Providing open and accountable government for Canadians is all about that.

Monsieur le Président, je vais partager mon temps de parole avec la députée de Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe.

Je suis content de pouvoir parler de la motion d'aujourd'hui.

Il y est d'abord et avant tout question d'intégrité et de responsabilité. Nous nous entendons tous, je crois bien, pour dire que les échanges avec les Canadiens constituent un pan essentiel du processus démocratique. Hélas, lorsque les conservateurs étaient aux commandes, les Canadiens n'étaient jamais sollicités, et leurs doléances ne se rendaient jamais jusqu'aux oreilles de leurs dirigeants. C'est pour cette raison qu'ils ont choisi un autre gouvernement pour les représenter.

Bref, quoi qu'en disent mes collègues de l'opposition, les activités de financement n'ont rien de tabou. Elles font au contraire partie des moyens mis à la disposition de chacun des partis pour échanger avec la population. Je suis fier de dire aux Canadiens de tous les horizons qu'ils peuvent avoir l'assurance non seulement que leur gouvernement suit les règles, mais qu'il juge primordial de solliciter leur opinion et de faire de leurs priorités sa priorité.

Tous les partis recueillent des fonds. Il s'agit en fait d'un moyen, pour les citoyens, d'exprimer leur point de vue dans un contexte démocratique juste et libre. Cela étant dit, nous devons tout faire pour préserver les règles du jeu équitables qui sont à la base de notre culture démocratique.

Les collectes de fonds et les dépenses électorales doivent être réglementées, et elles le sont. Les règles de financement fédérales sont parmi les plus strictes au pays et veillent à la transparence des dons et des contributions. Par exemple, dans certaines provinces, les particuliers peuvent faire des dons de dizaines de milliers de dollars et, dans d'autres, il n'y a aucune limite. Il est aussi important de noter que, dans certaines provinces, il est permis d'accepter les dons provenant de syndicats, d'associations professionnelles et d'entreprises. Au niveau fédéral, il n'est pas permis d'accepter de tels dons.

Les députés d'en face essaient de faire croire que notre gouvernement ne fait pas preuve d'ouverture et de transparence, mais je peux dire en toute confiance qu'ils ont tort. Les Canadiens savent que les règles fédérales régissant le financement politique figurent parmi les plus strictes au pays, et que nos députés les respectent à la lettre. Les Canadiens ont confiance dans notre système parce qu'ils savent que des mesures sont en place pour assurer la transparence des institutions publiques et exiger que les décideurs rendent des comptes.

La Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts constitue l'un des fondements de notre régime d'intégrité. Il est important que les députés comprennent le fonctionnement du régime extrêmement rigoureux énoncé dans cette loi.

Tout d'abord, cette loi a une vaste portée. Lorsqu'elle parle des titulaires de charge publique, elle inclut les ministres, les secrétaires parlementaires, les personnes nommées par le gouverneur en conseil et même le personnel exonéré. Le respect de la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts n'est pas quelque chose que nous prenons à la légère. Il ne s'agit pas d'une suggestion, mais d'une condition de nomination à laquelle tous titulaires de charge publique sont assujettis.

Essentiellement, la loi exige que les titulaires de charge publique évitent tout conflit entre leurs intérêts privés et leurs attributions officielles. Cela signifie que les ministres, les membres de leur personnel et les autres intervenants doivent s'abstenir de prendre part à toute décision pouvant favoriser leurs intérêts personnels ou ceux de leurs parents ou amis.

Nous savons tous que ce principe n'est pas reconnu partout dans le monde. Dans certains pays, des gens briguent de hautes charges publiques pour s'enrichir. Heureusement, au Canada, nous voyons les choses différemment. La fonction publique a pour objet de servir le public, non les intérêts personnels.

Les règles sont parmi les plus strictes au pays en ce qui concerne les dons, et les contributions doivent être effectuées de manière ouverte et transparente. Certaines provinces acceptent que des individus fassent des dons de plusieurs dizaines de milliers de dollars, tandis que d'autres n'ont même pas de limite en ce sens, et certaines d'entre elles acceptent aussi des dons de syndicats, d'associations commerciales et de sociétés. Tout cela n'est pas admissible selon le régime fédéral, en vertu duquel un don de plus de 200 $ doit être indiqué en ligne. Cela dit, il est indéniable que le gouvernement actuel suit les règles et les lois sur les campagnes de financement des partis politiques au pays.

Parlons maintenant de quelques exemples concrets d'activités et de pratiques qui ne sont pas admises selon le régime que nous suivons. Le titulaire d'une charge publique fédérale ne peut prendre part à des décisions qui affecteront la valeur de l'entreprise de ses enfants ou qui causeraient une hausse de la valeur de son portefeuille d'actions. Il ne peut délivrer un permis qui hausserait la valeur foncière entourant ses propriétés. Il ne peut non plus accepter de cadeaux extravagants.

La définition de ces cadeaux inclut un éventail large et varié d'items. Cela peut inclure un sac de cadeaux d'une entreprise, une hypothèque à faible taux d'intérêt et tout ce qu'on peut trouver entre les deux. Des dispositions de la loi prévoient aussi la période suivant la fin de l'emploi. Le titulaire d'une charge publique fédérale ne peut, par exemple, démissionner et utiliser immédiatement l'information confidentielle à laquelle il a eu accès à ses propres fins. Il ne peut pas démissionner subitement et changer d'équipe dans une transaction ou une négociation avec le gouvernement.

La commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique surveille ce régime. Elle interprète et applique la loi. Son travail consiste à offrir des conseils confidentiels aux titulaires de charge publique, à enquêter et à faire rapport sur les manquements présumés, et à imposer des pénalités aux titulaires de charge publique qui omettent de déclarer un conflit d'intérêts. C'est un travail difficile.

Je sais que tous les députés sont d'accord pour dire que la commissaire actuelle fait un travail admirable et mérite notre respect et notre reconnaissance collectifs. Quand je dis que c'est un travail difficile, je suis sérieux. Tout est rarement noir ou blanc. Le contexte est important et la perception est importante. Voilà pourquoi il existe des mécanismes de reddition de comptes et des mécanismes permettant aux ministres, aux membres du personnel et aux autres personnes régies par la loi de vérifier auprès de la commissaire lorsque des doutes surviennent.

Les Canadiens s'attendent à ce que les gouvernements et les ministres agissent selon les normes éthiques les plus élevées. C'est exactement ce que tous les ministres du gouvernement actuel font et continuent de faire. La commissaire est l'autorité qui interprète la loi. Elle publie sur son site Web des lignes directrices et des avis d'information pour aider les titulaires de charge publique. Bref, dans le doute, elle est la source de la sagesse.

La Loi sur le lobbying est un autre pilier du régime d'éthique fédéral. Cette loi est basée sur le principe selon lequel il est légitime et nécessaire pour le gouvernement de communiquer avec les groupes d'intérêts. Les Canadiens ont le droit de savoir qui s'implique dans le lobbying rémunéré ayant pour but d'influencer les décisions du gouvernement.

La loi prévoit que tout lobbyiste rémunéré doit s'enregistrer auprès du commissaire au lobbying pour pouvoir communiquer avec les ministres, le personnel exonéré, les agents du gouvernement et les parlementaires. Cela inclut les consultants qui travaillent pour les cabinets d'avocats ou de lobbying, de même que les employés de sociétés, de syndicats, d'associations industrielles et de groupes de défense d'intérêts.

Les lobbyistes doivent entrer l'information à propos de leurs clients, du sujet de leur lobbying et des ministères et agents qu'ils rencontrent dans une banque de données publique. Ils doivent aussi rendre publics les détails de toute rencontre ou de tout appel téléphonique avec des décideurs gouvernementaux, qu'ils soient des ministres, du personnel exonéré, ou même des fonctionnaires supérieurs. Tous les membres du public peuvent consulter la banque de données en ligne pour y trouver ces informations.

De plus, tous les lobbyistes doivent respecter le Code de déontologie des lobbyistes émis par le commissaire au lobbying. Comme le commissaire aux conflits d'intérêts et à l'éthique, le commissaire au lobbying est un agent indépendant qui se rapporte directement au Parlement et non au gouvernement. En vertu de leur code de déontologie, les lobbyistes doivent agir avec honnêteté, intégrité et ils ne doivent pas agir de manière à ce qu'un titulaire d'une charge publique soit placé en situation de conflit d'intérêts.

Le commissaire à l'éthique a le pouvoir d'enquêter sur toute possible violation de la Loi sur le lobbying et du code de déontologie. Il doit aussi en rapporter toutes les violations au Parlement. Il peut aussi, lorsqu'il croit qu'une violation de la loi a pu être commise, transmettre le dossier à la GRC pour enquête criminelle et, le cas échéant, pour poursuite.

La Loi sur le lobbying fait en sorte que les agents de haut niveau du gouvernement ne puissent pas quitter leur poste et immédiatement faire du lobbying auprès de leurs anciens collègues au gouvernement. Il est prohibé pour les ministres, le personnel exonéré et les fonctionnaires supérieurs d'être un lobbyiste rémunéré auprès du gouvernement fédéral au cours des cinq ans suivant la fin de leurs fonctions.

Ensemble, la Loi sur les conflits d'intérêts et la Loi sur le lobbying représentent l'un des régimes de transparence et d'éthique les plus rigoureux au monde. Je suis fier que le gouvernement place la barre aussi haut. C'est ça, offrir aux Canadiens un gouvernement ouvert et responsable.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 3014 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 03, 2016

2016-11-02 15:48 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Private consultations, Public consultation, Second reading,

Consultation du public, Consultations particulières, Deuxième lecture

Mr. Speaker, I wanted to congratulate the member for Chilliwack—Hope for his omnibus speech he gave before question period yesterday. A big part of the problem with Conservative omnibus bills was that they were also ominous bills. Whatever the title, the actual result was often the opposite. The Fair Elections Act, for example, was about how to interfere with, not promote, fair elections.

In the last Parliament, the member whom I worked for as a staffer was critic for, among other things, citizen services. The Auditor General's report, the year that we got that portfolio, dealt with the websites of the Canadian government and their focus on citizen services. What we learned was that the Conservatives had, immediately upon taking power in 2006, stopped all research into how people actually used government websites. Heaven forbid they cater to the needs of the people rather than to the desires of the government.

Our government consults extensively. We do policy on the basis of evidence and on the wants and needs of the country. There is nothing ominous about that.

Does the member for Chilliwack—Hope accept the evidence of evidence-based policy, or does he continue to believe that dogma is the most important factor in policymaking?

Monsieur le Président, je tiens à féliciter le député de Chilliwack—Hope du discours sur les projets de loi omnibus qu'il a prononcé hier avant la période des questions. Le principal problème des projets de loi omnibus des conservateurs est ce qui leur a valu le surnom de « projets de loi de mauvais augure ». En effet, ces projets de loi visaient souvent un objectif contraire à leur titre. La Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, par exemple, visait beaucoup plus à interférer avec le processus électoral qu'à en promouvoir l'intégrité.

Pendant la dernière législature, le député pour lequel je travaillais était notamment porte-parole en matière de services aux citoyens. L'année où ce dossier nous a été confié, le rapport du vérificateur général faisait mention des sites Web du gouvernement du Canada et de l'importance accordée aux services aux citoyens. Or, nous avons appris que, immédiatement après leur arrivée au pouvoir en 2006, les conservateurs ont mis fin à toutes les recherches visant à savoir comment les gens utilisaient réellement les sites Web du gouvernement. Loin d'eux l'idée de tenir compte des besoins de la population; ils n'en ont fait qu'à leur tête.

Notre gouvernement mène beaucoup de consultations. Nos politiques sont fondées sur les faits, et sur ce que les Canadiens veulent et ce dont ils ont besoin. Elles ne comportent aucune intention cachée.

Le député de Chilliwack—Hope reconnaît-il l'importance de fonder les politiques sur des faits, ou continue-t-il de croire que le respect des dogmes constitue le facteur le plus important?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 474 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 02, 2016

2016-11-01 13:43 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Second reading,

Deuxième lecture

Mr. Speaker, the member for Oshawa referred to the lack of an industry minister for the first time in a long time. I would like to point out that the industry minister still exists and is now called the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development. He has the same department and a broader mandate to look to the future. Therefore, I am wondering if the member objects to innovation, science, or economic development.

Monsieur le Président, le député d'Oshawa a mentionné que, pour la première fois depuis longtemps, il n'y a pas de ministre de l’Industrie. Je tiens toutefois à souligner que le ministre de l’Industrie existe toujours, sauf qu’il s’appelle maintenant ministre de l’Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique. Il dirige le même ministère, mais il a un mandat plus large en ce qui a trait aux perspectives d’avenir. Par conséquent, je me demande si le député s'oppose à l'innovation, aux sciences ou au développement économique.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 174 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 01, 2016

2016-11-01 13:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, National security, Second reading, Terrorism and terrorists,

Deuxième lecture, Sécurité nationale, Terrorisme et terroristes

Mr. Speaker, sincerely, I am trying to understand what my colleague said at the beginning of his speech about CSIS and the committee of parliamentarians overseeing it.

Can the member comment further on that issue and help us understand exactly what he sees as being the problem?

Monsieur le Président, en toute sincérité, j'essaie de comprendre ce que mon collègue a dit au début de son discours à propos du SCRS et de l'enjeu du comité des parlementaires qui le supervise.

Le député pourrait-il approfondir sa pensée sur cet enjeu et expliquer ce qui lui pose exactement problème à cet égard?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 126 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on November 01, 2016

2016-10-31 16:42 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Public consultation, Second reading

Consultation du public, Deuxième lecture,

Madam Speaker, for just over a year now we have consulted. My riding is a huge riding. I have 43 municipalities and 300-and-something city councillors. In my office, we met with all of my city councillors, my seven chambers of commerce, my four regional development agencies, every organization we could find to get their input, and that consultation is what fed our ability to contribute to this process.

Madame la Présidente, nous menons des consultations depuis un peu plus d'un an. Ma circonscription est très grande: elle compte 43 municipalités et plus de 300 conseillers municipaux. À mon bureau, nous avons rencontré tous les conseillers municipaux de même que les représentants des sept chambres de commerce, des quatre agences de développement régional et de tous les organismes que nous avons pu trouver afin d'obtenir leur point de vue. Ces consultations nous ont permis de contribuer à ce processus.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 168 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on October 31, 2016

2016-10-31 16:41 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Budget deficit, Government bills, Government expenditures, Infrastructure, Programs, Second reading,

Déficit budgétaire, Dépenses publiques, Deuxième lecture, Infrastructure, Programmes

Madam Speaker, I have no problem explaining that. I believe that the deficit exists everywhere you go: it exists in our infrastructure, in our society, and in our government. Personally, I want us to invest in the future of our country, in our infrastructure, in all the programs that we need to implement. I do not want to ignore those things in order to achieve a certain number. I want to invest, and that is what our government is doing.

Madame la Présidente, je n'ai aucune difficulté à expliquer cet enjeu. Pour moi, le déficit existe peu importe où: il existe dans notre infrastructure, dans notre société ou dans le gouvernement. Moi, je veux qu'on investisse dans l'avenir de notre pays, dans nos infrastructures, dans tous les programmes que nous avons besoin de faire. Je ne veux pas tout laisser tomber pour avoir un chiffre en particulier. Je veux investir, et c'est cela que nous faisons comme gouvernement.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 186 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on October 31, 2016

2016-10-31 16:40 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Benefits for children, Benefits indexation, Government bills, Second reading,

Deuxième lecture, Indexation des prestations sociales, Prestations pour enfants

Madam Speaker, I thank the member for drawing our attention to this very good program that, at least in my riding, is expected to help about 4,000 people out of poverty. It is an incredibly important program. It is an incredibly progressive program. I am really proud to support it. I am looking forward to the future changes that we make as we go forward.

Madame la Présidente, je remercie la députée d'attirer notre attention sur cet excellent programme qui, du moins dans ma circonscription, devrait aider environ 4 000 personnes à sortir de la pauvreté. Il s'agit d'un programme incroyablement important que je suis très fier d'appuyer, et je suis impatient de voir les changements que nous apporterons à mesure que nous progressons.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 150 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on October 31, 2016

2016-10-31 16:39 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Guaranteed Income Supplement, Pensions and pensioners, Second reading, Senior citizens

Deuxième lecture, Pensions et pensionnés, Personnes âgées, Supplément de revenu garanti,

Madam Speaker, my own family was affected by this. My grandparents lived in adjacent units in Lac Saint-Louis, I think it was that riding, for the last couple of years of their lives.

We see the reality of the situation. It is very important that we take care of our seniors in every possible way that we can.

Madame la Présidente, ma famille a vécu une situation de ce genre. Mes grands-parents ont vécu les deux dernières années de leur vie dans des habitations adjacentes se trouvant, je crois bien, dans la circonscription de Lac-Saint-Louis.

Nous voyons que les situations de ce genre sont bien réelles. Il est important que nous prenions soin le mieux possible des personnes âgées du pays.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 155 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on October 31, 2016

2016-10-31 16:28 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Aging population, Benefits for children, Canada Pension Plan, Child tax benefit, Cost of living, Demographics, Government assistance, Government bills,

Aide gouvernementale, Conditions de mise à la retraite, Coût de la vie, Deuxième lecture, Données démographiques, Faible revenu, Femmes, Indice de pauvreté,

Madam Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the member for Mount Royal.

I am pleased to have the opportunity to speak to two aspects of budget implementation act, 2016, No. 2. This bill makes significant amendments to the Canada Disability Savings Act and the old age security program.

At first glance, these two programs seem to be different. However, they have the same goal, namely to ensure that the most vulnerable Canadians enjoy a good quality of life and live with the dignity they deserve.

First of all, I would like to remind the House that the Canada Disability Savings Act governs how the grants and bonds provided by the government are paid into registered disability savings plans, or RDSPs.

RDSPs were created in 2008 in order to help people with disabilities and their families save in order to provide long-term financial security. Canadian residents who are entitled to the disability tax credit can open an RDSP until the end of the year in which the recipient turns 59. Parents or guardians can open an RDSP on behalf of a minor. There is no annual contribution limit, but the lifetime limit is $200,000.

The gains accumulated are tax-free until withdrawn from the RDSP. The government contributes to the RDSPs of eligible recipients by providing grants or bonds, or both, up to a maximum amount.

The bill being debated today would amend the Canada Disability Savings Act. These changes are required because the act refers to the Canada child tax benefit. As all members know, that benefit was replaced by the new Canada child benefit last June. Every year, the amount of the grant or bond that the recipient is entitled to is calculated on the basis of adjusted family income.

With regard to RDSP benefits for youth under the age of 18, this adjusted income, the amount used to determine the government's contribution in the form of a grant or bond, was also used by the government to calculate the amount of the Canada child tax benefit. Since that benefit no longer exists, we need to amend the provisions of the Canada Disability Savings Act that mention that benefit. We also need to amend the provisions that mention “phase-out income”.

As members know, the amount of the bonds decrease for those with higher incomes. The threshold at which the bonds start to decrease is called the “phase-out income”. It is important to understand this concept because the formula used to calculate the phase-out income includes the Canada child tax benefit.

As a result, the following three consequential amendments will be made to the Canada Disability Savings Act. First, the references to the Canada child tax benefit in five provisions of the Canada Disability Savings Act will be replaced by references to the new Canada child benefit. Second, the definition of “phase-out income” will be changed to include the Canada child benefit income threshold in the formula. Third, the definition of “child tax benefit” in the definitions section of the Canada Disability Savings Act will be removed since it will no longer be necessary.

Thanks to these amendments, the income thresholds for eligibility for the Canada child benefit and the Canada disability savings bond will be harmonized. The increase in the income threshold will produce a slight increase in total payments made for the bond in the RDSP of persons with disabilities. Persons with disabilities are not the only group that needs additional government assistance. The income security of our country’s seniors is another government priority.

That is why we will be formulating provisions to help Canada’s seniors enjoy a good quality of life. Seniors are important members of our society, who contribute actively to the well-being of their families and of our community, as well as to the growth of our economy. We have one of the lowest rates of senior poverty in the world.

In 2013-14, the most recent year for which data were collected, the Government of Canada paid Canadians over $79 billion under the Canada pension plan and old age security. These programs have contributed greatly to reducing the low-income rate for seniors over the last 30 years. However there still remains a great deal of work to do.

In 2014, the most recent year for which data were collected, 3.9% of the country’s seniors were living below the low-income cut-off established by Statistics Canada, representing some 200,000 people. Nearly 80% of these low-income seniors, or the vast majority, are single, and most of them are women.

That is why we have also increased by $947 per year the amount paid as the guaranteed income supplement to low-income single seniors. This measure will support the most vulnerable seniors who depend almost exclusively on their old age security pension and guaranteed income supplement, and who are thus at risk of experiencing financial difficulties.

Similarly, this measure will improve the financial security of some 900,000 seniors all across Canada, and we estimate that it will help lift nearly 13,000 of the most vulnerable seniors in Canada out of poverty.

We already support senior couples, in cases where the two members of the couple are receiving the guaranteed income supplement, have high living expenses, and are at high risk of poverty due to the necessity of living apart, for example, when one of the spouses is forced to live in a nursing home.

In some senior couples, one partner receives the guaranteed income supplement and the other the spousal allowance, but they have to live apart for reasons beyond their control, such as one of them needing long-term care. We are in the process of amending the Old Age Security Act to ensure that such couples receive higher benefits based on each individual's income.

I would like to point out that the allowance is paid to people 60 to 64 years of age with low income whose spouse or common-law partner receives the guaranteed income supplement.

Our government also reversed the decision to increase the age of eligibility for old age security from 65 to 67, which should come into effect in 2023. That change will give low-income seniors up to $17,000 per year. With these key measures, we will provide essential support to the most vulnerable Canadians.

The Government of Canada cares about seniors. Canadians work tirelessly their whole lives. We should all have a chance to live into old age without worrying about making ends meet. That is why our minister was given a mandate to improve income security for low-income seniors. These measures are how we are keeping that promise.

We promised to help more Canadians escape poverty. To me it is unimaginable that in a country like Canada there are still people who are unable to meet their basic needs. This is unacceptable and we are doing something tangible to correct this situation.

I believe we all agree that no one should grow old in poverty or isolation. I cannot emphasize enough how important this issue is to our government.

I would also like to take a moment to discuss the Canada pension plan, another important pillar in our retirement income system. Retirement income security has to start with solid and stable public retirement plans such as the Canada pension plan.

We are also working with the provinces and territories to strengthen the plan. Earlier in October, we introduced a bill to amend the plan in order to help middle-class Canadians achieve their goal of living a dignified life in retirement with guaranteed income security.

We are making a considerable investment in the well-being of seniors. Canadians who work hard contribute to our society throughout their lives and our government believes that every Canadian deserves to grow old with respect and dignity.

Laurentides-Labelle has more of an aging population than most other ridings. The 2011 census found that the average age in the riding was 49.5. I look forward to the results of the 2016 census, but I would be surprised if the average age had not risen considerably.

Seniors' issues are crucial; we must improve their quality of life without delay. We can always do more, but I think we are on the right track with this bill and with this budget. Canada has always been a leader when it comes to delivering services to seniors. Our retirement income system is considered one of the best in the world.

I strongly urge my colleagues to help make sure it stays that way by supporting this bill.

Madame la Présidente, je vais partager mon temps de parole avec le député de Mont-Royal.

Je suis heureux d'avoir l'occasion de parler aujourd'hui de deux aspects de la Loi no 2 d'exécution du budget de 2016. Ce projet de loi apporte de modifications importantes à la Loi canadienne sur l'épargne-invalidité et au programme de la Sécurité de la vieillesse.

À première vue, ces deux programmes semblent différents. Cependant, ils ont un objectif commun, celui de veiller à ce que les Canadiens les plus vulnérables puissent jouir d'une bonne qualité de vie et vivre dans la dignité qu'ils méritent.

Avant tout, je voudrais rappeler à la Chambre des communes que la Loi canadienne sur l'épargne-invalidité réglemente la manière dont les subventions et les bons offerts par le gouvernement sont versés dans les Régimes enregistrés d'épargne-invalidité, les REEI.

Les REEI ont été mis en place en 2008 dans le but d'aider les personnes handicapées et leur famille à épargner en vue d'assurer leur sécurité financière à long terme. Les résidants canadiens qui ont droit au crédit d'impôt pour les personnes handicapées peuvent ouvrir un REEI jusqu'à la fin de l'année civile où elles atteignent l'âge de 59 ans. Les parents ou les tuteurs peuvent ouvrir un REEI au nom d'un mineur. Il n'y a pas de limite annuelle de cotisation, mais la limite cumulative de cotisation est de 200 000 $.

Par ailleurs, les gains accumulés sont libres d'impôt jusqu'au retrait des fonds du REEI. Le gouvernement cotise au REEI des bénéficiaires admissibles en y versant des subventions ou des bons, ou les deux, jusqu'à concurrence d'un montant maximal.

Le projet de loi faisant l'objet de notre discussion aujourd'hui comprend l'apport des modifications à la Loi canadienne sur l'épargne-invalidité. Ces modifications sont nécessaires parce que la loi fait référence à la Prestation fiscale canadienne pour enfants. Or, comme tous les députés le savent, cette prestation a été remplacée par la nouvelle Allocation canadienne pour enfants en juin dernier. Chaque année, le montant de la subvention ou du bon auquel le bénéficiaire a droit est déterminé en fonction du revenu familial rajusté.

En ce qui concerne les prestations du REEI des moins de 18 ans, ce revenu rajusté — le montant utilisé pour déterminer la cotisation du gouvernement sous forme de subvention ou de bon — était également utilisé par le gouvernement pour calculer le montant de la prestation fiscale canadienne pour enfants. Vu que cette prestation a été éliminée, nous devons modifier les articles à la Loi canadienne sur l'épargne-invalidité où il est fait mention de cette prestation. Nous devons également modifier les articles où il est fait mention de revenu de transition.

Comme on le sait, le montant des bons diminue pour ceux qui ont un revenu plus élevé. Le seuil auquel les montants des bons commencent à diminuer est appelé « revenu de transition ». Il est important de connaître cette notion, puisque la formule utilisée pour calculer le revenu de transition comprend la Prestation fiscale canadienne pour enfants.

Par conséquent, les trois modifications corrélatives suivantes seront apportées à la Loi canadienne sur l'épargne-invalidité: d'abord, les mentions de la Prestation fiscale canadienne pour enfants dans cinq articles de la Loi canadienne sur l'épargne-invalidité seront remplacées par des mentions de la nouvelle Allocation canadienne pour enfants; ensuite, la définition de « revenu de transition » sera redéfinie pour inclure le seuil de revenu de l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants dans la formule de calcul; enfin, la définition de « prestation fiscale pour enfants » de la section « Définitions » de la Loi canadienne sur l'épargne-invalidité sera supprimée, puisqu'elle ne sera plus nécessaire.

Grâce à ces modifications, les seuils de revenu pour l'admissibilité à l'Allocation canadienne pour enfants et au Bon canadien pour l'épargne-invalidité seront harmonisés. L'augmentation du seuil de revenu entraînera une faible augmentation des paiements totaux versés au titre du bon dans le REEI des personnes handicapées. Les personnes handicapées ne sont pas le seul groupe de personnes ayant besoin d'une aide supplémentaire de la part du gouvernement. La sécurité du revenu des aînés de notre pays est également une des priorités du gouvernement.

C'est pourquoi nous élaborons des dispositions visant à aider les aînés du Canada à jouir d'une bonne qualité de vie. Les aînés sont des membres importants de notre société, et ils contribuent activement au bien-être de leur famille et de notre collectivité, ainsi qu'à la croissance de notre économie. Nous détenons l'un des plus faibles taux de pauvreté des aînés du monde.

En 2013-2014, soit l'année la plus récente pour laquelle des données ont été recueillies, le gouvernement du Canada a versé aux Canadiens plus de 79 milliards de dollars au titre du Régime de pensions du Canada et de la Sécurité de la vieillesse. Ces programmes ont grandement contribué à réduire le taux de faible revenu chez les aînés au cours des 30 dernières années. Cependant, il reste encore beaucoup de travail à faire.

En 2014, soit l'année la plus récente pour laquelle des données ont été recueillies, 3,9 % des aînés du pays vivaient sous le seuil de faible revenu établi par Statistique Canada, ce qui représente environ 200 000 aînés. Près de 80 % de ces aînés à faible revenu, soit la grande majorité, sont célibataires, et la plupart sont des femmes.

C'est pourquoi nous avons également augmenté de 947 $ par année le montant versé au titre du Supplément de revenu garanti aux aînés célibataires à faible revenu. Cette mesure soutiendra les aînés les plus vulnérables qui dépendent presque exclusivement de la pension de la Sécurité de la vieillesse et du Supplément de revenu garanti et qui risquent donc de connaître des difficultés financières.

De même, cette mesure améliorera la sécurité financière d'environ 900 000 aînés de partout au Canada, et l'on estime qu'elle permettra de sortir de la pauvreté près de 13 000 aînés parmi les plus vulnérables au Canada.

Nous soutenons déjà les aînés en couple, dans les cas où les deux membres du couple reçoivent le Supplément de revenu garanti, qui ont des frais de subsistance élevés et qui ont un risque élevé de pauvreté du fait qu'ils doivent vivre séparément, par exemple, lorsque l'un des époux doit vivre dans un centre de soins infirmiers.

Nous sommes en voie de modifier la Loi sur la sécurité de la vieillesse pour faire en sorte que les autres couples d'aînés, ceux dont l'un des conjoints reçoit le Supplément de revenu garanti et l'autre l'allocation, et dont les deux conjoints doivent vivre séparément pour des raisons échappant à leur volonté — par exemple, quand l'un d'entre eux doit recevoir des soins de longue durée —, reçoivent des prestations plus élevées en fonction du revenu individuel des membres du couple.

J'aimerais d'ailleurs mentionner que l'allocation est versée aux personnes à faible revenu âgées de 60 à 64 ans et dont l'époux ou le conjoint de fait reçoit le Supplément de revenu garanti.

Notre gouvernement a également annulé la décision de faire passer de 65 à 67 ans l'âge d'admissibilité aux prestations de la Sécurité de la vieillesse, ce qui devrait être mis en oeuvre en 2023. Cette modification mettra chaque année jusqu'à 17 000 $ dans les poches des aînés à faible revenu. Ces mesures clés nous permettront d'offrir un soutien essentiel aux Canadiens les plus vulnérables.

Le gouvernement du Canada se soucie des aînés. Les Canadiens travaillent sans relâche toute leur vie. Nous devrions tous avoir l'occasion de vivre jusqu'à un âge avancé sans nous soucier de pouvoir joindre les deux bouts. C'est pourquoi notre ministre a été chargé d'améliorer la sécurité du revenu pour les aînés à faible revenu. Grâce à ces mesures, nous réalisons cet engagement.

Nous avons fait la promesse d'aider un plus grand nombre de Canadiens à se sortir de la pauvreté. J'estime qu'il est inconcevable que, dans un pays comme le Canada, il y ait encore des personnes qui ne sont pas en mesure de satisfaire leurs besoins les plus essentiels. Cette situation est inacceptable et nous prenons des mesures concrètes pour y remédier.

Je crois que nous sommes tous d'accord pour dire que personne ne devrait vieillir dans la pauvreté ou l'isolement. Je ne peux insister suffisamment sur l'importance de cette question pour notre gouvernement.

J'aimerais également prendre un moment pour discuter du Régime de pensions du Canada, un autre pilier important de notre système de revenu de retraite. La sécurité du revenu de retraite doit commencer par des régimes de retraite publics solides et stables, dont le Régime de pensions du Canada.

Nous collaborons donc également avec les provinces et les territoires pour renforcer le régime. Plus tôt en octobre, nous avons déposé un projet de loi visant à modifier le régime afin d'aider les Canadiens de la classe moyenne à atteindre leur objectif d'une retraite dans la dignité dont la sécurité du revenu est garantie.

Nous réalisons un investissement considérable dans le bien-être des aînés. Les Canadiens qui travaillent sans relâche contribuent à notre société tout au long de leur vie, et notre gouvernement croit que chaque Canadien mérite de vivre jusqu'à un âge avancé dans le respect et la dignité.

La circonscription de Laurentides—Labelle a une population vieillissante comme peu d'autres. En 2011, le recensement a établi l'âge moyen de notre comté à 49,5 ans. J'attends avec impatience les résultats du recensement de 2016, mais je serais étonné que l'âge moyen n'ait pas augmenté considérablement.

Les enjeux des aînés sont critiques et l'amélioration de leur qualité de vie ne peut plus tarder. Il y en a toujours plus que nous pourrions faire, et à mon avis, nous sommes sur la bonne piste avec ce projet de loi et ce budget. Ce pays a toujours été un chef de file en ce qui a trait à la prestation de services aux aînés. Notre système de revenu de retraite est considéré comme étant l'un des meilleurs du monde.

Je recommande vivement à mes collègues de s'assurer qu'il le demeure et d'appuyer ce projet de loi.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 3059 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on October 31, 2016

2016-10-31 12:34 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Banks and banking, Financial crisis, Foreign countries, Government bills, Regulation, Second reading,

Banques et services bancaires, Crise financière, Deuxième lecture, Pays étrangers, Réglementation

Madam Speaker, in his speech the member referred to his experience in the banking sector and the strength of our rules and regulations over the last while. Could the member tell us a little about the impacts of weaker regulatory structures in other countries throughout the financial crisis in the last decade?

Madame la Présidente, au cours de son intervention, le député a parlé de son expérience dans le secteur bancaire et de la solidité de notre système de réglementation. Le député pourrait-il nous entretenir brièvement des conséquences que des dispositifs réglementaires moins solides ont pu avoir dans d’autres pays, pendant la dernière crise financière de la dernière décennie?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 143 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on October 31, 2016

2016-10-28 13:40 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Drug use and abuse, Duty to provide assistance, Third reading and adoption

Consommation et abus de drogues, Obligation de porter secours, Projets de loi émanant des députés, Troisième lecture et adoption,

Madam Speaker, I just want to congratulate my colleague on the excellent work he did on this bill and on the support he has received in the House.

Madame la Présidente, je veux simplement féliciter mon collègue pour le travail incroyable qu'il a fait dans le cadre de ce projet de loi et pour l'appui qu'il a reçu de la Chambre.

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 103 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on October 28, 2016

2016-10-28 12:38 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Government bills, Second reading,

Deuxième lecture

Madam Speaker, I have a quick question.

I always like hearing what the member for Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques has to say. We often hear the official opposition oppose things, and we know that the member rarely opposes the same things.

In the interest of finding common ground, can the member tell us what he likes about this bill?

Madame la Présidente, ma question sera assez brève.

J'aime toujours écouter le député de Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques. Nous entendons souvent l'opposition officielle faire opposition et nous savons que le député s'oppose rarement aux mêmes choses.

Pour trouver un terrain commun, le député peut-il nous parler de ce qu'il trouve bon dans ce projet de loi?

Watch | HansardEcoutez | Hansard

hansard parlchmbr 128 words - permanent link - comments: 0. Posted at 15:26 on October 28, 2016

2016-10-27 17:55 House intervention / intervention en chambre

Meat, National Seal Products Day, Prejudice, Seal hunt, Seal products, Senate bills,

Chasse au phoque, Journée nationale des produits du phoque, Préjugé, Produits du phoque, Projets de loi du Sénat, Projets de loi émanant des députés, Viande

Madam Speaker, it gives me a great deal of pleasure to rise today to defend Senate Bill