header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-04-03 ACVA 48

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody.

I would like to call the meeting to order. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) and the motion adopted on September 29, the committee resumes its study of mental health and suicide prevention among veterans.

We'll start with a panel today. We have four witnesses. We'll start with statements of up to 10 minutes from each witness, and then we'll swing into questions and answers. We'll start first with Michael McKean by video conference from Barrie.

Good afternoon, Michael. The floor is yours.

Mr. Michael McKean (As an Individual):

Good day. I am providing key points as testimony to assist in the study of mental health and suicide prevention. I draw on 35-plus years of service to Canada with both the reserve force for 16 years and the regular force for 21 years, and with my ongoing efforts to reintegrate into civilian life since being medically released on December 15, 2013.

My views on mental health and specifically suicide prevention flow from having lost a friend who was a reserve officer; my involvement with a veteran of Bosnia who attempted suicide while I was his commanding officer; my experience on Operation Attention, roto 0, in Kabul, Afghanistan, from July 17, 2011 to February 15, 2012; and my ongoing transition struggles.

Preparation and training allows small teams to overcome even unimaginable conditions. Recovery requires similar support systems, which are not yet there for many veterans.

I enrolled as a private soldier in the 26th Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, during December 1975. My entire career in uniform has been as a gunner or gunner officer.

From my initial class in military psychology and leadership at the Royal Military College of Canada, I realized that successful leadership required a profound understanding of human desires and fears. The knowledge and experience bestowed upon me by Canada has helped me to better appreciate the words of my grandfather, a veteran of the First World War, with service at the front and in the Home Guard for World War II, and my military mentors, and it has been augmented by the study of Sun Tzu, Clausewitz, Viktor Frankl, Toffler, Roméo Dallaire, and Chris Linford.

When the call for testimony to this committee originally went out in 2016, my thoughts were that limited services were available to Canadian Armed Forces veterans from Veterans Affairs Canada to address reserve force mental health suicide prevention, and that both the CAF and VAC could and should be involving veterans in the process of change.

I am recommending the use of a systems approach to the integration of veterans, especially reserve force veterans, in a metric that leverages the existing operational stress injury social support—or OSISS—framework. This requires a modification, a change of attitude, so that we focus away from full-time OSISS coordinators, expand the volunteer opportunities, and stop the budget roller coaster.

Military theory—Sun Tzu, Clausewitz—which has been immortalized by the words of Napoleon Bonaparte, who said that “the moral is to the physical as three to one”, is a guiding principle. When I was in Afghanistan in August of 2011, I injured my right knee. While I was laying on the operating table getting seven stitches with the assistance of morphine, I knew that the injury I had was similar to ones that I had experienced over my career, which should have resulted in two weeks or more on crutches. Those were the medical orders in the past.

When they finished, I was asked if I could bear weight on my leg. I put my game face on and said yes. The reason was that if I had more than two days of light duties—forget about crutches—I would be returned to unit. My unit would have had serious problems. Shortly after I arrived in theatre they changed the operating procedures to prevent travel outside the wire with less than four personnel. Our team consisted of six. We lost one person—RTU—shortly before my injury, and we had another individual go home on compassionate leave for two weeks approximately two weeks after my injury. My team would not have been able to go outside the wire if I had been on light duties or on pain medication that would have precluded my driving.

During 2000-01 as a newly appointed commanding officer I found myself struggling to assist a reserve force officer recently returned from deployment in Bosnia. The system failed then to identify the obvious alcohol abuse symptoms he was exhibiting, and after his attempted suicide, provision of assistance only occurred through his wife's extended health care benefits. During 2012-13 on return from deployment to Afghanistan I felt like a failure and this was repeatedly reinforced as I fell into almost every conceivable crack in the system: no follow-up on a mental health recommendation for OSI assessment; limited, incomplete communication of information to the release base, the reserve unit; financial issues, eight months before pension resolved; access issues for mental health services, wait, wait, and end up bridging through the Canadian Forces member assistance program; and confusion on the medical release process.

I was actually assigned a VAC case manager and then, oops, they realized that I had to go back and wait for the Canadian Armed Forces to sort it out. I didn't get a CAF case manager until 2013. At that point, despite testimony to this committee, JPSU was not identified as an option even though it was very clear that I had recently returned from a deployment. There was confusion at every stage of the disability claim process. I actually had to go to Archives Canada and get them to provide the information because the system had not gotten around to addressing things in a timely manner and the documents went to archives.

A possible way forward is to involve veterans in change management. Warrior Rising, which is a book produced by retired Lieutenant-Colonel Chris Linford, on page 356 highlights, as has other testimony to this committee, including that of retired Lieutenant General Dallaire, that “a highly skilled ill/injured military veteran needs relevant work.”

Since 2012, I have spent a significant amount of time studying what has been done for operational stress injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder. There are lessons learned from work, both positive and negative, done by the U.K., the United States, etc. It offers more than a starting point that would entail many years of further study before action is taken, which is what I perceive to be what the Government of Canada is currently looking at doing.

There are post-traumatic stress disorder best practices and knowledge. I make these comments in the context that from 2012 to 2014, as part of my retraining, I completed my master's degree in social work and I became a registered social worker in the province of Ontario. I was able to do that because I had 20 years of experience as a drug education coordinator, and health promotion coordinator, prior to my deployment to Afghanistan. My take-away on this is that veterans have the experience to help if attitudes and full-time limitations can change.

What do I mean by attitude change? Most of the medical priority job opportunities are for full-time positions and the ones that I have looked at require that the individual obtain health provider sign-off that they are stable and will not be triggered. I do not currently satisfy these requirements. I am reading to you from a prepared script because I tend to lose focus and I get triggered by things if I'm not careful.

With the encouragement of my psychologist, I pursued part-time opportunities only to be confronted with failure as my qualifications fell short of Calian criteria for providing mental health assistance to Canadian Armed Forces members. This was despite becoming an authorized Blue Cross provider for social work and being a clinical care manager in 2014, based on my extensive experience as a military officer and a drug education coordinator, working in health promotion with all of the courses and background that I'd taken.

(1540)



I had a total of one referral over the last three years, and then they cancelled it because they decided that it was inappropriate. That was all I was told.

Over the last three years, I have successfully worked in a volunteer capacity in reserve force mental health suicide prevention. Reserve units are geographically located across Canada. They offer a simple way to connect with many veterans who move away from larger communities. Working with reserve units offers one of the few ways to more appropriately address reserve force mental health challenges.

Although far from perfect, the OSISS framework currently offers a mechanism to connect JPSU transition services to the community. That could be enhanced by the integration of veterans, especially reserve force veterans, and could also benefit by linking to ongoing efforts to help veterans, like the Royal Canadian Legion operational stress injury special section. These are not competing entities; they're part of an overall system.

One of the problems is, if we go back to the budget issues, OSISS puts limits on its coordinators. They're not allowed to take calls after hours, because that would be considered overtime. If you don't have an extended group of volunteers, the March 2017 stop travel, then restart, offers a perfect example of the kind of roller coaster that we get into. The volunteer training course for OSISS volunteers was cancelled because of budget shortfalls, and now we're having to play catch-up, which will cost months.

Thank you.

(1545)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. McKean.

Mr. Mitic.

Mr. Jody Mitic (City Councillor, City of Ottawa, As an Individual):

I'm Jody Mitic, a city councillor here in Ottawa. I was in the military for 20 years, from 1994 to 2014, and was wounded in January 2007. I am an advocate for mental health. Although I was surprisingly cleared by three different professionals to be mentally stable, I think my wife would question it.

I got into politics to advocate for my brothers and sisters. I believe the more of us that are at any table as elected officials will help. I'm lucky right now that my MP is Andrew Leslie, a former commander of the army.

Overall, mental health is as much a veterans issue as it is a military issue, two different departments with the same goal of having people with mental stability throughout a career that asks a lot of them. When we take a guy off the street or a girl off the street, and put them into basic training, we teach them RICE on day one almost.

Do you guys know RICE? Anyone? Doctor? It's rest, ice, compression, and elevation. If you sprain your ankle, we need you to know that stuff because the medics are busy. Every little scratch can't be something where you run to the doctor and get a band-aid. You have to be able to take care of yourself.

What is RICE for your mind? Anyone? Right. We don't have that in our society overall. This is also a public health issue. I can go down to the Shoppers Drug Mart with a cold, get advice from the pharmacist, and ask, “What medication or home remedy would you recommend?”, and they usually have a pretty good answer. We can't do that for mental health at any level: military, veteran, or civilian.

We have to go back to the drawing board and train our people from day one to deal with mental stress. I believe there was a colonel, he wrote On Killing. I forget his name. He was an American, a green beret. He called it stress inoculation, and a lot of the experts do.

I noticed, in my career, that it was something we didn't do a lot of, specifically to prep mentally. We did a lot of push-ups, chin-ups, running, and target practice, but we didn't really train for the day that we would see our buddy vaporized in front of us by stepping on an IED—

Mrs. Sherry Romanado (Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne, Lib.):

It was Dave Grossman.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Dave Grossman, yes, there you go—great guy. They're hard books to read, but there's a lot of great information.

The first time you see the insides of a person is when you're on the battlefield. There are ways to train for that. I always quote the show Band of Brothers, where they're crawling through pig guts. We never did anything like that in my entire career. As I said, the first time I zipped up a body bag was the first time I was putting one of my buddies in it.

At the time, you're in combat; you can deal with it. Later on, you reflect on it, but there's no buffer. There's nothing to say this is what you're going to feel, it's normal, and you should be sad. You're not a wussy if you cry because your buddy died, but the attitude at the beginning was that way.

Fast forward to when someone becomes a veteran, as cases have shown.... A friend of mine's father-in-law was a Korean War veteran in his eighties, and suddenly he had PTSD from the war. It shows you that it could take a lifetime for it to expose itself. I may one day have symptoms and have to deal with it. My wife was released medically from the forces for PTSD. She was a medic.

I feel the overall approach needs to be teamwork between DND and VAC to come up with a game plan from the day we enlist someone to the day we bring them into the veteran's house. I don't know what the answer is. I think there are a lot treatments that work for seven out of 10, and then there are those three, and then seven out of 10 of those, and seven out of 10 of those. Whether it's dogs, yoga, virtual reality, MDMA, or whatever other treatments we hear about, they all work for about seven out of 10.

The flip side of that is the support system. I can tell you that Alannah was heavily affected by the DND side, where we went in expecting certain supports, very clearly written out, only to have them either be changed or yanked away or modified without our knowledge. Also, we were made almost to feel like we were having to fight for them. I hate when I talk to my brothers and sisters and they say they're fighting back for this and fighting back for that. It should never be a fight. You should not feel like you're in a scrap when you're going to a department.

We're fortunate as Canada's veterans that we have a whole ministry dedicated to our support. A lot of us feel as though we're fighting with this ministry that's supposed to be there to help us through life. I don't know what the answer to that is either, but I know, when it comes to dealing with the system, that causes a ton of mental stress to a lot of my brothers and sisters, to the point where they just won't....

Recently one of the widows, who was also serving and has a daughter the same age as our oldest, disappeared off social media, stopped returning calls. We found out that something had happened with her Veterans Affairs file, and it had completely shut her down socially. She didn't even want to pick up the phone, because just to call her Veterans Affairs office or the 1-800 number was a trigger, frankly. She just didn't want to have to deal with it.

I don't know what the answers are. I just know that we have a ministry for our support, and we have a lot of veterans feeling that they're fighting with it. I really wish we could change the tone on how that happens.

That's it for me.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. MacKinnon.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon (As an Individual):

Good afternoon.

My name is Phil MacKinnon. I retired just under a year ago from the Canadian Forces after 26-plus years of service. I joined in 1989 as a private. As a private I was told what to do, where to go, and when to be there. I did my job and would gladly do it again.

As you work your way up through the ranks, you're given more responsibility, but your orders come from higher so you're still told where to go, what to do, and when to be there.

Now I'm retired. No one tells me where to go other than my wife, and I'm not really sure I can repeat where she tells me to go sometimes, but a lot of times, you don't know what to do. When I was in the military, I had a doctor's appointment. It was a parade. I was there. I'm not in the military anymore. I haven't even got a family doctor yet because of the wait-list. I'm in an area that is underserved, so I have no family doctor. I have to try to make appointments to visit either the emergency room or a family medical clinic that will take someone in.

It's the same thing with mental health. When I had an appointment, I was there. For me, speaking to someone like that helped a lot. When my guys went through a traumatic incident, as their supervisor, it was incumbent upon me to ensure that they sought counselling for what was required. It was mandated for us.

My trade was military police. We dealt with a lot of traumatic issues. It could be anything from a very severe domestic to a suicide, what have you. My guys would go, they would do their stuff, and then I would ensure that they saw counselling.

Now I'm that person who's in need and to try to seek counselling, I don't even know where to go. I have talked to a case manager who I recently was in contact with, and she starting to get me on the right track again, but when I was diagnosed in 2006 with PTSD, I went through a lot of counselling, two, sometimes even three times a week. Before that my solace came from a bottle. On an average weekend I would drink two, maybe three 40-ouncers, sometimes a little bit more, depending on how rough a week it was.

I deployed in 2001 to Bosnia on roto 8, where I found out I was actually in a minefield, although it was supposedly cleared by the agencies. In 2003 I ended up on roto 0 in Kabul, Afghanistan, and went back on roto 4 in Kabul, and roto 0 in Kandahar. I finished that tour in 2005.

Prior to that I was deployed on Op Recuperation. I'm sure a few people here probably remember the ice storm. During the ice storm in 1998, I was deploying back home. I was told there was HLVW that had gone off the side of the road, and we needed to do an accident report on it. Okay, not a problem.

There was a whiteout behind us. Before the OPP could get there to close down the highway, my patrol vehicle was hit by a 10-tonne truck from Toronto. I was in the driver's seat. The only thing that saved me was that I couldn't get the damn seatbelt undone. That seatbelt and the vest that I was wearing saved my life. I still have nightmares about it. I still have nightmares about Afghanistan. That's the way it is, but the counsellor who I had down in Halifax—and, God, I wish I could remember her name—was phenomenal, a psychologist. She told me one thing that has always stuck with me. She said, “You'll never get over it, but you'll learn to get through it.”

(1555)



In 2014, I was posted to Toronto. We couldn't sell our house in North Bay so I went down to Toronto in IR, that is, imposed restriction. I was down there living in a tiny apartment. It was 490 square feet, my entire apartment, and you'd have to step out onto the balcony to change your mind. I was on the 22nd floor. The pain and the mental stress of being away from the family take a toll on a body, but you have nowhere to turn because you don't know who to turn to. When I'd get back to North Bay, I'd seek out my psychologist and talk to him whenever I could. Now, though, for his own medical reasons he's had to retire.

As far as I'm concerned, there needs to be a system in place so that veterans transitioning from the military can be taken on as priority cases. When I was diagnosed I had a lot of problems. I had anger issues, and the last thing you want is a Cape Bretoner with a badge, a bad attitude, PTSD, and nothing to lose. That's just a recipe for disaster.

There needs to be something to allow you to transition from the military, where they're providing your mental health resources, to an civilian system Veterans Affairs can refer you to immediately. If you have a civilian psychologist, you should be able to keep the same individuals. I have friends who have put calls into OSISS and have not received callbacks. They've sent them emails and not received an email back, even acknowledging them. There is a big disconnect and it's a gap that needs to be bridged and needs to be bridged quickly.

Thank you.

(1600)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Brindle.

Mr. Joseph Brindle (As an Individual):

I didn't know what to put down or say, so I'm going to wing it. I have prepared a PowerPoint, which has not been translated, but I'll make it available to the committee afterwards. It goes into further detail.

I was looking for a title for this, and I called it “My 14-year Suicide Attempt”.

I grew up in Ontario housing in Markham, Eglinton, and Scarborough, quite poor, with a lot of discipline problems, such as break and enter, and theft. I failed grade 7. They thought I was a bit slow and wanted to send me to a special school, but my mom talked to them to keep me in a regular school. I was a survivor of long-term sexual abuse by a friend of the family.

When I was eight years old, I set our family apartment on fire and narrowly escaped that. I basically shut myself away from age 12 to about age 18, hiding down in the basement and working on an old car. It was my safe spot. I didn't socialize. I didn't date.

Then this thing called YTEP came up, where you could join the military for a year as a reserve and try out the system to see if you liked it and if they liked you. I applied as an aero-engine technician, to follow up on my love of mechanics. There were no openings, so they suggested I take ammunition technician, a trade I knew nothing about. I did. They said that if I did well on my course, there was a very good chance I could remuster or change trades once I had a foot in the door. This was a lie. Ammo tech is one of the few trades you cannot remuster out of. It's the smallest trade in the Canadian Armed Forces, with about 140 strong when I was in.

However, I did enjoy working with explosives. There are two aspects to ammo tech: the supply side and the operational side, the improvised explosive device disposal. I decided to go that route, just due to the interest in it. At that time, IED wasn't a word as familiar to everyone as it is now.

My first posting was at CFAD Rocky Point, out in B.C. As I mentioned, it was a very small trade, and all of a sudden it had an influx of 12 privates, which they don't normally have, so I was sent out to Rocky Point, which had no provisions for privates, no accommodations, and no junior staff. I was put on a naval base, Nelles Block, about 40 kilometres away, in transient quarters for six months, driving to a job with a bunch of old civilian ammunition workers who didn't want to work.

I hated my job. Isolation and depression set in. I arrived there in September 1986, and on December 6, 1986, I wrapped my brand new car around a pole after I had consumed a bottle of cheap navy liquor. At the time, you could drink on the ships for about 25¢ for a beer and 25¢ for a glass of whisky. I started to work on my alcoholism very strongly then.

To counteract this, the military sent me on a three-day life skills course, which is essentially a course to tell you, “Don't do this again or you'll go on a spin dry course.” It tells you to hide it. They kept me away from trouble and B.C. by tasking me and sending me on my trade qualification 5 early, and then immediately posting me to 2 Service Battalion special service force, Petawawa.

Petawawa was an absolute dream. It was all field. I loved it. I thrived in the field position, and I also became a very functional alcoholic, where you can drink until four and run in at six. That was fairly standard in the early nineties' Canadian Armed Forces. I am certain it's changed now.

I became HC improvised explosive disposal-qualified in April 1990. In this, I accomplished my initial goal. To top it off, at the age of 23, I was the youngest IED technician in Canadian history, which is yet to be matched—and it won't, because of the qualifications you need now to get it.

From there, I was posted to the Canadian Forces School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering in 1991 as an instructor. While there, I was a member of the nuclear, biological, and chemical emergency response team as their explosive engineer. In Borden, in 1991, they found mustard gas Livens containers from World War I. I heard about it, because I was actually in my IED course when they found them, and they didn't know what to do with them. In 1994, when I was a member of the team, they decided they wanted to dispose of them.

The number one was away, so I was called up and I ended up disposing of the mustard gas. Now, the only way to breach these was explosively, so you had to ensure that you used just enough explosives to crack the shell but not crack the burster and contaminate all of Borden with mustard gas. I was contaminated and had to go through full decon. Mustard gas preserves very well. I had seven bars on a CAM, too. Every time I see balsamic vinegar now, which looks identical to mustard gas, I have a panic attack.

(1605)



My time at Borden was the happiest time in my life. I met my wife. I had three children. My military career was progressing extremely well. I was promoted ahead of my peers. I was socially adjusted to family life and meeting new people. My drinking had become more social, not drink until four and run in at six. It was about family. My quality of life at that point could not have been better.

Then I was posted to Toronto in 1994. I was posted to the Canadian Forces base supply, as a 2IC of the ammo section and was meant to be the supply tech. As I was posted and the message was cut, Toronto announced that it was closing. We had two positions there: a master corporal and a sergeant. They didn't replace the sergeant because they lost the spot. In a small trade like ammo tech, you can't just take another sergeant from somewhere and put them in there.

The assumption was that if it was closing out, a master corporal could close it out. The problem is that there was an also a EOD team there. It was EOD 14, and they needed a chief. I was temporarily promoted to sergeant and sent over to the U.K. to have an advanced IED course and made the chief of EOD centre 14. During that time, notification hit the press that CFB Toronto was closing, which created concern for the community.

Various police forces announced an amnesty period for military-related artifacts. This had the unintended effect of increasing EOD teams by factors of hundreds. I was temporarily promoted to sergeant, as I mentioned. I was unaided until closure, after hundreds of emergency calls, thousands upon thousands of kilometres, often driven with hazardous cargo, such as 10 disposal IEDs, and the most horrifying event of my life, a post-blast investigation involving a young boy.

I was promoted to sergeant as I left Toronto, with an outstanding PER from the base commander, but Toronto closed and so did the fanfare. I lived in Angus, so I drove down every day.

All of a sudden, instead of going to Toronto one day, I went back to Borden, and they made me the explosives safety officer for southwestern Ontario. For the next years, I visited cadet units and militia units and gave briefings on explosives safety. I was living in hotels, driving a rental care, and had lots of money for claims, so I could hide my alcoholism. My days consisted of basically drinking until about three, waking up about noon, getting myself cleaned up, visiting a cadet unit, checking their lockers, doing an inspection, having a few beers with the senior cadet officer, telling some war stories, and then repeating if necessary the next day, until I found the courage to go home because I couldn't face my family anymore.

My drinking increased heavily. By that point, I was alcohol dependent. My weight substantially increased, from my perfect BMI in Toronto to BMI 31,and I was diagnosed with sleep apnea. In 1999, I received a medical category that wouldn't allow me to be unit tasked or operational. No one looked into the circumstances as to why I put that weight on. My symptoms of depression had set in, and my family life was deteriorating. I had worked alone for four years with no support, after an operational spot. I was nowhere near a base to be part of the unit functions and the camaraderie that a base has, be it a bowling afternoon, a beer call, or what have you. No one noticed the changes except my family, and I was away from my family.

After 15 years in, one year as reserve YTEP, I retired from the military on August 12, 2000, with a promotion PER to warrant officer. I was released in the tail end of the last force reduction plan, so there were no questions asked. It was a numbers game. They wanted to get rid of people, and they didn't care how they did it. When I asked for my release, no questions were asked. I was released in less than two weeks from my request. I received a basic physical exam and no mental health observation.

I departed from Canada for Kosovo and started my civilian career of disposing cluster bombs in Kosovo. I then went up to Kurdistan, northern Iraq, and performed humanitarian demining for the United Nations. I attempted to rejoin the Canadian Forces in 2001, and the recruitment centre did not respond. Then, a plane flew into some buildings and that changed everything. I spent the next years in Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran, Turkey, Amman, Laos, Yemen, Russia, the Balkan states, performing EOD work, mine clearance, and then later high-voltage clearance of the power lines in Iraq, Afghanistan, Tanzania, and Rwanda.

(1610)



I spent six years in total in Baghdad and two years in Afghanistan as a civilian working outside the wire. I'm being recognized by the United Nations for finding the largest cache of explosives ever in Afghanistan.

Do I have much time?

The Chair:

Could you wrap it up?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I'll wrap it up quickly.

I live like there's no tomorrow. I tried to get back with my family and it didn't work, which eventually led to three suicide attempts. The first was in 2010 in Iraq and another in 2013 in Tanzania, which was discovered by my work, which then fired me. I was sent home and at that point, I didn't know I was a veteran. I was in Canada. I had been out of the country for 14 years. I had no idea where to go or what to do, and eventually, I ended up in a hotel room slicing my wrists.

Obviously, I survived that third attempt and then spent a month in the mental health unit. It was there that an intern, who was a reservist, told me that I was a veteran and that's when I started getting help. I've recovered to the point now that, with the help of a service dog, I'm actually starting school in September.

My path through recovery has been long—from January 24, 2014, when I had my last drink. The road to recovery has been outstanding. I have my relationship back with my children. I can be in the same room as my ex-wife with my grandson now. I just want an opportunity to live a normal life and to volunteer and work in my community.

Quickly, these are my recommendations to the Canadian Forces.

There should be an introduction to VAC during basic training. As soon as you qualify for basic training and are released as an honourable discharge, you are a veteran and there's a good chance you may become a client of VAC. Soldiers should be made aware of this. As of 2000, as a sergeant in the Canadian Armed Forces, I didn't know I was a veteran. That's because Afghanistan happened and you only knew you were a veteran if you went to Afghanistan—even someone who was working in Afghanistan under a different uniform.

Mental health exams need to be done prior to enrolment, before selection for specialist trades, after operational task ends, prior to command of an operational team, and before release.

I also have some quick recommendations to VAC.

We don't need more case managers. Case managers need more help. They should have assistants working directly for them who can answer the vets' calls directly—a veteran 911. We have to be treated differently. If you have an episode in an office, you don't call the police and send out three police cars and a paramedic because we are suicidal. I said, “Delay, deny, hope we die and don't finish our claims” and that resulted in a suicide attempt at my house, apparently. That was last October.

Regarding service dog assistants, the studies have been done on the benefits of a service dog. I wouldn't be here today without this dog. The studies have been done. There has been enough supportive information. VAC needs to adopt a program now because dogs will save lives. I have this dog from Audeamus, and Marc Lapointe is in the area. We really need to resource this now. If I didn't have her, I would not be here. I went through some very dark days in the last three years and she's helped me through them.

The last thing is incentives for civilian medical doctors. When you are not a part of the medical community, you come out with nothing. You don't even have a health card. Doctors realize that veterans are a burden to their practice because of the documentation they require for absolutely everything we need, so they won't take us on. There have to be incentives for medical doctors to look after vets.

Thank you.

(1615)

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll start with six minutes.

Go ahead, Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and I want to thank all four of you for your service to your country.

The information you have provided to us has been just tremendous. Much of what we've heard in this committee on the issue of mental health and suicide prevention has been dealing with the issues of identity loss and stigma that arise through some of the issues that our veterans are seeing.

Mr. McKean, I think you were talking about recognition of prior learning and allowing veterans to take that aspect of what they learned in the years in the military and putting them in positions afterwards to help them. I think what you are saying is that there needs to be some recognition of what veterans have learned over their careers that will be of assistance later on. I'm just wondering if I am following you correctly on that. If so, can you expand on that?

Mr. Michael McKean:

You are following me correctly. In 2012, I had to take my uniform off because I was too emotional. I cried. I was not prepared to continue in uniform. That said, when I was retraining as a social worker, I was not allowed to do a practicum at the mental health services on the base because I knew too much about the military. Having been recognized by Blue Cross but not by the Canadian Armed Forces, specifically Calian who manages most of the contract work for social work health care services, I have been avoided because I know more than people want to know. There is concern, which is part of the testimony from other individuals, that I would become an advocate.

Many veterans have significant experience that can be used. Most people who are transitioning are not able to work full time, but if we recognize the valuable knowledge that they have and put in place a system that's robust enough, I believe we can address a lot of the issues, because veterans who have been injured and have gone through the process understand the identity loss. They have lived through the issues and they can help other individuals overcome those things and can explain to case managers and others who are not familiar with the system.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you, sir.

Mr. Mitic, you talked a lot about training. You basically talked about stress inoculation. We've heard a lot about that. We've also talked about—and Mr. Brindle talked about the same thing—how we train our soldiers from day one to be a machine, but at the very end of it, we don't decommission you. We don't “detrain” you to be a civilian.

You talked about training on day one on mental stress. How do you see that? How do you see that in those initial—

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Are you putting me in charge now? Is this blue sky? I'm in charge?

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Yes.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

When I joined, as I said, it was in 1994 and if you had any issue mentally, a different word was used. You were a “wuss”, even if it was physical. I sprained an ankle pretty badly on exercise once and I was told to suck it up. Funny, I don't have ankles anymore, so it's not really an issue. That was a joke, guys.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Jody Mitic: In centuries past—I'm a geek for history—every warrior class has had its reflective moments, its self-examining moments. If you look at samurais, they practised perfect calligraphy. If you look at the Spartans, they had their mountain where they would go and take their hallucinogenics and things like that. They also had the camaraderie of the march to and from battle.

What we've lost in the western modern military is these moments where we would reflect. Even the monk knights prayed and fasted a lot. It's basically meditation and self-reflection.

I would from day one come up with a system somehow. Maybe we would talk about best practices and we would teach our soldiers that as much as they want to bench press 300 pounds, we need them to spend 20 to 30 minutes a day thinking about how they're going to feel the first time they take a life or the first time a friend of theirs falls in battle. Also, we need to simulate these actions somehow. I know I keep talking about crawling through pig guts, but that's a very visceral training tool to prepare you.

We'd have a gentleman like Joe. Sorry, what did you say you actually go by?

A voice: Don.

Mr. Jody Mitic: Don would set up explosives to simulate artillery coming in on us. That was great. When I was under mortar attack by the Taliban, it kind of felt the same, so I kind of knew that my heart rate would go up and I was prepared for it a little bit.

I think this is where DND has to step up and start from day one with a soldier and train them to deal with mental stress. Also, tell them it's okay to feel scared. It's okay for this. It's okay for that. Rely on your training, because a lot of the tough-guy attitude comes from people saying, “Don't be such a wuss. Suck it up.” That's great in the moment when you're under attack or something, but in training, I believe the mental attitude needs to be fostered that you toughen through repetition. That's a training thing, and that's a budget thing, because that kind of training is expensive. It's also just a concept that we seem to have lost in the last seven years or so.

(1620)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, gentlemen, for joining us today and for your service to Canada.

Mr. MacKinnon, I really appreciated your testimony and some of the comments you made. With regard to counselling, you said you're not sure where to go or how that works. I know there has been an expansion of the number of counselling services you can actually take. Is there an actual problem you've identified with regard to getting counselling services? Is there a barrier for you, personally, that you see could be fixed?

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

Spilling your guts to one person is hard to do. To two people, it's a lot harder. Now you're getting into numbers of three and four, and people don't want to do it.

There needs to be somewhere.... For example, throughout my career I had one posting that was six years, one posting that was seven years, and everything else was either two or three years. I was down in Halifax and the two years I was down there I started getting the help I needed, and that put me on the right track. There was nothing in London. I got to northern Ontario after that and I was gone too much. When I was home I made contact through the military with a civilian psychologist, but as I said, that psychologist has now retired.

We're in an under-serviced area, so to start over for a third or fourth time...and in that area, there is not that wide a variety. If there are more people there who will take on military personnel.... It needs to be more open. They need to actually tell you how to go about getting in contact with these people, whether it's through Veterans Affairs or through the military. To my knowledge, there are very few there, and the ones who are there now, because this one doctor retired, are already over-booked, so you can't get in to see them.

(1625)

Mr. Colin Fraser:

It would be very helpful to have a formal structure in place for how this is going to work, and to have specialized people in the field available through VAC.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

Yes, exactly.

If you were to have a total breakdown today, do you have a doctor to go to? You're in Ottawa, and we're in North Bay, which is an under-serviced area.

VAC needs to look at some of these areas where there is a large defence community. They need to come up with some sort of plan to help these people or else they need to petition the government to give them greater incentives to move to this area so these people can be serviced.

It's not financially feasible for someone in North Bay to drive two and a half hours down the road to Petawawa, or four and a half hours to Ottawa for an hour visit once a week or twice a month. I have to stop about half a dozen times to get to Ottawa because of back injuries and knee injuries and all that. Besides the mental strain, you have the physical pain, and that takes a lot out of a person.

I'd like nothing better than to go back and to speak to a psychologist, but that's not going to happen right now.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

All right, thank you, Mr. MacKinnon.

Mr. Brindle, you mentioned a veterans 911. There is a VAC number to call 24 hours a day, 365. Are you familiar with that service?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I am.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

One of the things—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

That's not the point I'm trying to get at, though.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Okay. All right.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

When a vet is in crisis, the 911 system that works for civilians doesn't work for the military. I'll give a clear example.

I walked into the base Borden VAC office to get the disability claim I submitted in September 2015, and in fact I had a meltdown. I was angry and the woman felt threatened. I said, “Oh, typical VAC—delay, deny, wait till we die.” Two hours later, I had three OPP officers and a paramedic sitting in my driveway. That's where the 911 call should go. That person who felt threatened in the VAC office should have called the veterans 911.

Your case manager should be involved if a case manager would be of assistance, or there should be a group within the system to contact the veteran, because sometimes they just want to talk. They are just so frustrated with the system that sometimes they have a blow-up. Then they over-respond. They think you're suicidal and they send out the cavalry. Two days later, I got a registered letter banning me from that office. That's the way I was treated over a statement.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

I appreciate that, Mr. Brindle. I'm glad you clarified.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I'm not the only one.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

What do you think about having available peer support?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Peer support works great when they're not cutting budgets for OSISS clinics, because the only place I go out sometimes is for a breakfast with the group in Borden.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

I mean in a crisis situation, do you think peer support—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I don't have any peers. When I quit drinking I lost all my friends. I've been out of the military for 14 years. Most of the colleagues that I worked with on contract are.... Most of them are dead. One is Australian, so I keep in touch overseas, but I have no friends. All my ammo-tech friends were from 15 years ago. Again, keep in mind that for the last six years of my career, I worked alone.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Okay, thanks.

The Chair:

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here and bringing us this expertise. It's very important to all of us here to make sure that what we tell the government with regard to the needs of our veterans and mental health supports is documented and supported by the experiences we have heard here.

I have so many questions, but I want to start with you, Mr. Mitic. You talked about the reality of when you and your wife Alannah transitioned out. You said that fighting with VAC creates mental stress, and that Alannah would apply for benefits and then things would shift and the benefits would not be there.

Can you describe or explain that more fully? What kind of impact did that have on your family?

(1630)

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Frankly, those were my benefits. In that case, to be fair to VAC, it was the DND side, but I hear similar stories from people who are applying to Veterans Affairs as well.

Actually, Alannah had some hearing damage from a mine strike. She applied and was denied immediately, and then she had to appeal. That did its thing, so she got a settlement. Then somebody lost her file, and her case manager was reassigned and she didn't know, so there was this 14-month delay where she was constantly calling the office and not getting anywhere.

She had stressed out enough when I was being messed around with by our case manager in the military. That one was a shock to us, because these are people in uniform who we thought were there to support us. I'm not saying they didn't support us. They did, but not in the spirit in which we would have expected them to treat injured, wounded soldiers.

She is much smarter than I am, so she was able to find her way through the system and deal with the right people. She's also Irish, so when she really gets on a roll, people tend to stand to. Her biggest thing, and my biggest thing, has always been.... As I said in my opening statement, this is a ministry established to help veterans transition into normal life, but so many veterans feel that it's not even worth calling, as in the case of our friend, for fear of receiving negative news or being denied something they expect should be easy-peasy.

I am considered to have my stuff together and to be relatively successful, but any time I have to deal with Veterans Affairs, I get a little uneasy. I look for better things to do, whatever they might be, because I just don't want to deal with, “Well I thought it was this”, and they say, “Well, no, it's not that. It's this”. There are certain benefits you would think are automatic that just aren't.

I was on a committee under former Minister O'Toole when the last government was in charge, and a lot of it was about cutting the red tape and getting rid of all these forms that have to be repeated, but that's just part of it. It's also about the ease of accessing benefits. Call them entitlements for service or whatever you want to call them, but the spirit of it just doesn't seem to be what a lot of veterans feel it should be.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

It's a wise husband who admits his wife is much smarter, very wise.

I wanted to ask a bit about family supports, and we've heard they are absolutely critical, very essential.

What works successfully for families? Anyone can jump in here. Is it training? Is it marriage counselling, medical health care for spouses and children, or respite care and better access to VAC for spouses? Do those play a role in making things smoother, easier, and less stressful?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

In a short answer, yes, all of it.

I think in the last budget there was money for home care, or there's a tax break now. That's been 70 years coming. That should have been done 70 years ago. It's amazing.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Informal home health care.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It has increased up to $1,000 a month.

If you're the spouse who's giving up a career, and that's not just a career but a future pension, $1,000 a month is—

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Better than nothing.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It's better than nothing, but it's not a career.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

I understand, but this is now a benefit that people can rely on if they do decide to abandon a career.

I think of Captain Trevor Greene, who took an axe to the head. He was considered, clinically, a vegetable. He's now walking and talking. He walked down the aisle to marry his wife. The only reason he got there is that she decided that he was her full-time job. That kind of support, for her, is amazing. There are a lot of non-profits—True Patriot Love comes to mind, or Wounded Warriors—that could supplement that amount very well for home caregivers who decide to go that route.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

My next question is for everyone. You were talking about the budget, but it doesn't include recognition of the sacred obligation to veterans. It is a rather contentious issue in regard to veterans who are looking for a pension because they've been medically released. What is your feeling in regard to that sacred obligation to veterans?

(1635)

The Chair:

I'm sorry. We're at six minutes and 30 seconds, so we'll have to make that your next question.

Mr. Eyolfson.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Thank you.

Thank you all for coming and for your service.

Mr. Brindle, I'd like to refer to something that Mr. Mitic referred to: the camaraderie that people have that goes back to those ancient traditions of marching together. It sounds to me from your account that you were denied that a lot throughout your career.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

The only time I really had it was in Petawawa and at my first post in Borden, where I was with the school and when I was with a service battalion, because we were very tight. When you're constantly on exercise working with people you know, you know how they tie their shoes. Then, to go off on your own, you fall through many gaps.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Exactly.

When you were describing having to stay at this naval base and commute 40 kilometres to work every day, was there any avenue for you to address that and perhaps—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Not as a private.

As a private, you fall into a navy base where you have.... The rules are completely crazy compared to an army base. You can't wear work dress off base. If I got dropped off at the base hospital, which was off base, I had to Star Trek my ass over to the base or get yelled at by the base chief for not wearing my CFs outside the base. It's a culture shock for someone who joined the army.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

You talked about having to struggle with alcoholism, which has been, unfortunately, a very common theme among many of the accounts we've heard at this committee.

I'm a physician. I've had much experience dealing with patients who have that. It's come to our attention that when someone has a problem with any substance, it's sometimes the first indicator that there's a deeper, underlying problem.

You mentioned that it had been pointed out to you that this problem was there. At any time, did any of your superiors say to you that you may have a problem and then refer you for further evaluation as to whether this...or did they just say, “Buck up and stop drinking”?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Only after my accident.

It was a single-car accident. I was by myself. I had left the barracks. I don't even remember the accident because I have a scar here and I had a concussion. I just woke up in the hospital the next day. There were no cell phones. I had to find a bus to get back. My face was a watermelon. I was put on a three-day life skills course and basically warned that if there were any other incidents I'd end up in a spin dry course that would screw my career. That was the only threat. That taught me how to hide it.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Were you at any time offered access to any substance abuse or alcoholism treatment program?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

No. I went to Petawawa where drinking was part and parcel of showing your manliness. It is what it is. Friday afternoon was always a beer call in the MWO's office.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Yes. I wish I could say—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

That was an O group. That's where a lot more information was passed on than you could ever get out of anything. That was just part of the operation.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

For sure. I wish I could say that was the first time I've heard that kind of account on this committee. It's unfortunately not.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

It teaches you how to be a functioning alcoholic, where you can get up and be functional at 6 a.m. I turned that into a career, a career where, because I was a contractor, my drinking could go unchecked. In fact, they prefer it if you're drinking, because you don't realize what you're doing. Who in their right mind would sign up to work in Baghdad?

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Sure, okay.

You mentioned that after you were released, you had that suicide attempt that put you in the hospital, and that one intern had informed you that you were a veteran. How long after you released from the forces did this happen?

(1640)

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Fourteen years.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Fourteen years....

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Yes. I was out of the country for 14 years.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

When you were releasing, were you given any information as to the services that would be available to you should you need them?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

No. I was actually still on leave when I was in Kosovo; I was released so fast. I spent about five days going around getting my checkout list done, and my plaque was mailed to me from the base.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Were you given a VAC number when you were released?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

No.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Okay.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I received absolutely zero information on VAC services, because the force reduction plan was on, and it was all about numbers. They really didn't care about mental health.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Okay.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

It was a question they didn't want to ask.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

I understand.

When you were told this, were you able to start accessing benefits from VAC at that time?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

No. I became a client while I was in the hospital, and then I went on a voluntary rehab course in Belleville, Ontario. It wasn't the vet-sponsored one. It was a fairly tough one—a kick in the ass when I needed it. From there I started completing all the paperwork, and I was assigned a case manager.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

The was 14 years after you released.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

After 14 years I got my first case manager, yes.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

All right.

On behalf of the Government of Canada, I apologize that this happened to you. It should not have happened.

The Chair:

Ms. Lockhart.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to each of you for your testimony today. It's been very good for us.

Mr. Mitic, you mentioned that you think we need to change the tone. We've talked about that a lot in this committee. One example that we had heard about, and I'm not sure if it was in this study or the previous study, was that the time that was allocated for veterans to use training and education and the career transition program was only two years, and that this actually caused more stress.

What do you think might be a more appropriate time frame? Might that change the tone, if there weren't these tight time frames to utilize benefits?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Time frames in the context of who you're dealing with, I think, are ridiculous. A two-year time frame on someone.... Let's say everything goes perfectly, all the i's are dotted and all the t's are crossed, and they get out and they're medically unfit to do anything. Then in two, three, four, or maybe five years they're up and about, feeling good, thinking they'd like to go to school and maybe go out and get a job. It's, “Oh sorry, man. That was a two-year window.”

In my case, I lost both feet. Let's say the system had worked, and Rick Hillier hadn't said, “You're not releasing anyone wounded in combat until I say so.” That would have had me released in 2010 or maybe 2011 and still dealing with the loss of my entire career, identity, etc., and figuring out what I wanted to do or go to school for. For most of the things I asked about taking, I was told, no, I couldn't take that. I think the new budget changes what you can go to school for, which is great. In my case, as an infantry sniper, there's not a lot of transition to the civilian world unless I want to go work for certain people in Aleppo, which I don't.

The two-year window to decide what to take or even if you're healthy enough to take it, in my opinion.... It took me a solid five years just to recover physically from my injury. Mentally, as I said, ask Alannah what she thinks. These arbitrary time limits are baffling to me in some cases. You either qualify for a benefit or you don't. Especially considering you're dealing with people who are mentally or physically, or both sometimes, smashed. With someone who doesn't want to be released, to tell them to get a grip and wrap their head around going to school.... I know lots of troops that have gone to school and done something they hated, and they have no desire to go into the field or the training that they took advantage of. That's one place where I think we should just lose the time limits. Let the individual decide when they're ready.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you.

Mr. Brindle.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I just want to follow up quickly with that. I start school in September, and the day I start I have two years. I don't know what's going to happen to me in the next two years. I don't know how I'm going to react in public. I'm anxious and I want to go to school, but there shouldn't be a two-year limit on it for me to complete this course. If I need to take six months off to get my progression well.... I've haven't been in a classroom since I was 18 as a full-time student. Two years, there's no reason for it. Are you going to kick me out after two years? Possibly, because of my disability, it might take me three years. It doesn't make sense.

(1645)

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you for that.

Mr. MacKinnon, you talked about colleagues you knew who had reached out to the OSISS and then received an email back instead of a phone call.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

We never received an email or a phone call.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Excuse me, that's even worse. One of the things that I think has been really important here is that we talked about that personal contact with VAC or OSISS, and we hear you say again how important that is, and that one's quite obvious. But are there other aspects that you think are really important to help our veterans with their mental health concerns? As I said, there was the personal contact, but are there any other things like that in our delivery that you feel are really important?

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

Like I said, there may be a lot of resources out there, but you have to get the word out what those resources are and where they can be located, and how to access them. A lot of veterans don't know this. You can go to a Legion and somebody there may or may not know. Go to the Veterans Affairs' offices, and it depends on whether they're understaffed or they're even staffed at all.

I tried calling my case manager. I had to call the 1-800 number, so I had to go through about a half-hour spiel with the person on this phone who then says, “Okay, I'll transfer you. If I can't get hold of your case manager, do you want to leave a message?” No, I want to talk to the case manager. If I wanted to leave a message, I'd just go to her office. If she's not there, then I'd leave a message, but I want to talk to her.

I'm not sure if there's a big moratorium on direct lines to the VAC case managers. I don't know why everybody wants you to go through the 1-800 number. If you have a case manager, you should be able to get a direct-dial number for them. Make them available.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Okay.

I just have one other quick question. Are any of you aware that there is a handbook of benefits? We have one nod, but that's not—

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

I know that there are benefits, exactly what they are....

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Actually, you find out either by discussion...and Facebook is a good place to find out what benefits you can get. The pamphlet I'm not familiar with, but for the benefits there are so many hurdles. For example, there's a recent benefit that's out where you can claim $300 for a tablet because of apps that help with PTSD. However, the approval authority is not your doctor. It's a psychiatrist. Trying to get in to see a psychiatrist, you can spend $500 to get a $300 claim. It took me 18 months to see my psychiatrist to get my prescription sorted out.

They create things, and it sounds great in the book, but it doesn't translate into anything substantial because you just don't have the ability. You don't have a medical doctor, a family doctor. To try to see a psychiatrist is a whole other level. It's great to have a benefit, but if you can't get access to it, it's useless.

The Chair:

Ms. Wagantall.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, CPC):

Thank you.

I want to thank you all for your service. I know we say this in Canada, and I love this country as well, and your service is phenomenal, but I want to just say from my husband and myself and our children, and our grandchildren, being on this committee has brought this home to me significantly, and my grandkids are learning. I think it's really important that you understand that it's everyday Canadians who really do appreciate what you've done.

I have so many questions.

First of all, Mr. Brindle, you talked about your dog, and I know the Audeamus group, and I've met personally with Chris, and Marc and Katalin. They are doing amazing research at the University of Saskatchewan and B.C. on specific training for the multiplicity of concerns that challenge a veteran. Very specifically they have strong metrics and measurements, and they're veteran-centred. That's what they're all about.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

As an example, I applied to Courageous Companions at the time, in November 2014. At that time, Marc Lapointe was assigned to me.

He called me and we spent about four hours on the phone going through various symptoms. Then he decided which dog I should have—I didn't. The last thing in my imagination was a Jack Russell as a service dog. Because of my specific symptoms, they took a dog and trained her up for me. I didn't receive her until July.

(1650)

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Can I ask how much you paid for her?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Nothing.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay. Because this is a significant thing. We're always talking about money here. I know there are other groups. I'm not specifically mentioning any, but they can cost up to $30,000.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Yes.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Here we have again a situation of veterans helping veterans.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Yes. It's all run by veterans.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Exactly.

We seem to struggle here with the confidence. You talk about trust to get the care you need. It seems to me there's a lack of trust to believe that you know what you need most and can provide that in a way that would be the most beneficial.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

There's no way I could sit in front of this board without her here. I'm terrified of the public.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay.

You mentioned that service dogs need to be taken care of now and that this takes care of the needs, the mental illness, that many of our veterans are facing, and armed forces.

Now, Lieutenant-General Roméo Dallaire came before this committee. We were talking about mefloquine. I asked whether we needed to study it, and he just broke right in and said no, enough with the studies, just get rid of it.

In this case, there's so much evidence out there about what service dogs can do. Basically, what is your perspective?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

My perspective is that the studies have been done. I believe everyone goes by the bad example of the Legion who spent millions on phony dogs from the States that were not properly serviced and qualified. That just put a black mark on the service dog group as a whole.

Audeamus is a fully not-for-profit.... I didn't have to pay a penny. Her value is over $20,000, for the amount of training that was put into her. They did it all on the backs of other veterans. We do fundraisers and stuff. I'm now volunteering my time to the project.

My eventual plan is to become a trainer so I can train a dog and give it to another veteran. We have to do this ourselves because VAC doesn't want to look at the issues of dogs and the benefits.

A caregiver award was just announced, but my costs for specialty foods, veterinary services, I have to pay out of my own pocket.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay.

I'm understanding the government's perspective that this has to be done properly so that we don't have issues as in the past. But that being said, it's not that we have to study this further. We just need to get this done.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

The study is done.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

We could recommend that they come and speak to people like you. I know Audeamus has tried to get a meeting with VAC. I have to say that of all the things we're doing around this table, one of the best things we can do as a committee is to have those folks come and make a presentation to us.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I make myself open to anyone if I can save a life. I don't want anyone to travel the road I did. If there's any further discussion on it, I am happy to take the time and follow up.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

I'd recommend on our committee that within our various groups we all take the time to ask these folks to come to your office and meet as a caucus and see what they have to offer us.

I agree with you. I think it's phenomenal.

Mr. McKean, could you talk a little further about this concept of change of attitude and the use of volunteers and veterans?

Mr. Michael McKean:

Currently the OSISS system requires health care professionals to sign off that people can work full time and not be triggered. One problem with that is you significantly limit the number of people who will apply. You're basically encouraging people to put their game face on and pretend it's not an issue or to avoid situations where they will be triggered.

As I was saying, even though I was on the official list as a Blue Cross provider for social work and clinical care manager, I have been avoided. When I tried to do a clinical practicum on the base, I was told that too many people knew me and that I had too much background on this.

I successfully did a clinical practicum in a mental health facility, Waypoint psychiatric hospital, and in a high school dealing with difficult youth. They had no trouble accepting me, but with my peers, my brothers and sisters in uniform, basically the approach was, “He has PTSD. We don't want that. We don't want people like this around so let's not deal with them.”

Whereas OSISS is generally recognized, and that's one of the reasons that people are able to connect, right now we're dealing with a budget roller coaster that is limiting their ability to bring on volunteers, which is causing burnout. It's a vicious circle.

(1655)

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay, so this limiting of funding meant volunteer training was cancelled.

Mr. Michael McKean:

Cancelled. Now they're trying to sort out the French training in Quebec and whether they'll be able to put English or bilingual people on that. But then you cause more travel, and you're limiting the available people. Plus, you're making people feel like failures, because they get themselves organized to be able to attend a week-long training and then it's, “Hurry up and wait.”

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall: Thanks.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Bratina.

Mr. Bob Bratina (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Thank you.

In my previous life I was a mayor, and I had a senior adviser of military heritage and protocol, Geordie Elms. He'd been the commanding officer of the Argylls, with a good military history. I would often speak at schools and talk to kids about “team Canada”. I told them that we've seen the hockey and this and that, but the greatest team Canada is the one with the Canada flash on your shoulder, which is the Canadian Armed Forces.

I will direct this question to you first, Mr. McKean. Did you have that team Canada feeling, that feeling of self-respect and that you were on a great team? Did you lose that feeling as a result of the experiences you've talked to us about here? Do you still feel in your heart that you did a job for Canada, and that Canada is proud of you?

Mr. Michael McKean:

I absolutely had the feeling that I was part of team Canada. As I mentioned, when I was in Afghanistan I was injured. I put my game face on and continued. I went through my sleep disturbances. I went through all sorts of things because I felt a job needed to be done. I felt it was important that I do it and that I not withdraw so that other people had to carry the load.

I felt very sad when I returned to Canada. It was basically, “You're back. Focus on what you're doing. Perform or get out.” When I transferred back to the reserves.... I had been part-time reserve, regular force, part-time reserve. I was a CO with Jody when he was down with the Argylls. We had team spirit. We had the units. The reserve units in Canada are very significant creators of that perspective. They're our link to the community. That's where you will find a mechanism to get health care services in the community, especially if you start drawing on some of the T2 health from the States, because they are able to provide health care services to remote and under-serviced areas through telehealth and other things.

I couldn't continue. I felt that I was perceived to be bent or broken. I felt that many people were turning their backs on me and that I was no longer considered part of the team. I'm still trying to help other veterans, basically on a volunteer basis, because that's the only mechanism that works.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

It's interesting that you make the comment about the reserves. In my four years as mayor, there was one event that could never be surpassed in terms of bringing the community together, although it was a very sad event. It was the funeral of Nathan Cirillo. That city came together. That reserve unit and all of our reserves, the “Rileys” and so on, felt the love from the community. Obviously you've lost a little bit of that, or somewhat of that, because of the experiences you've had.

Could I ask Mr. Mitic to respond to the same point?

(1700)

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Just for clarity, as fine and historied a unit as the Argylls are, I was a Lorne Scot, sir.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Bob Bratina:

That's fine.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

I'm sorry, could you ask your question again?

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Did you feel a part of team Canada, and pride that you were working for Canada—

Mr. Jody Mitic:

In the military?

Mr. Bob Bratina:

In the military.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

I didn't stay 20 years because I thought I was wasting time.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

I understand that, but subsequently, because of the veterans issues and the problems that we're talking about, did you lose a little bit of that?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

No, you lose all of it. That's what I was saying earlier. You have a support system. I think Phil pointed it out, and I've said it before too. You're told where to go, what to wear, what to bring, we'll feed you, we'll get you there, we'll do your leave pass, blah, blah. You just have to be there. Then all of a sudden you're injured. An infantry unit looks forward, and I don't blame the CO or the RSM or anybody for worrying about the guys going out the door who are going to be going into combat and not worrying about the pieces of the machine that have fallen off.

But as I said, when you get into the system, and you realize when you're still on the DND side, these are folks in uniform with the same flash who swore the same oath to the Queen and country that you did, and you're told...you just get so much negativity. You're denied benefits. I'm convinced I'm still owed tens of thousands of dollars from the JPSU, which, for my mental health, I've just written off. I have a job that pays well and I've been lucky, but one day I might not be. That was more stressful than stepping on the land mine.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

To conclude this, what I'm getting at is that in addition to financial resources, we want to make sure that all veterans know what services are available. We're trying for as many resources as we can, but do we need to train or retrain or talk to the people in vet services and DND about the respect and self-respect and self-worth that individuals need to continue to feel?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

That has come up often. It's been 10 years since I got wounded, and that same sentence has been used at least half a dozen times that I can remember. Yes is the short answer, but at the same time I think the people who are on the front line of service need the latitude to make certain decisions that would make it a lot more timely. Sometimes it's less the language, it's more the time it can take. Two weeks to us if you're living your life and doing things don't seem like a lot, but if you're homebound and let's say you've hurt your back and you can't do any household chores, a two- or three- or six-week delay as it goes through the system and gets talked about.... Your house is a pigsty, and now you're self-conscious to invite anyone over. You feel you're disappointing yourself because you can't do the dishes. It just builds and builds. Streamlining some services would be great because—I forget who said it and I steal it all the time—when you look at the level of oversight and red tape it's almost as if for every dollar that goes out the door, you spend a buck fifty examining it and making sure it's okay.

A lot of the time, it's the time involved in getting the benefit and less about the language.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

All right. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I only have five minutes. I want to ask two questions but the first one I think is really important from your perspective, so I'm going to need some quick answers on this.

The DND ombudsman whom I respect greatly, Gary Walbourne, has made recommendations with respect to transitioning because the overwhelming information that we're receiving is that the transition is the most difficult part. He's made recommendations, as has this committee in a report to Parliament, to ensure that DND makes certain that every aspect of our CAF members' life is taken care of with respect to pensions and potential doctors, before they're handed over to VAC.

Ombudsman Walbourne refers to it as a concierge service. I'm interested from all four of you how much value you see in that system, but very quickly because I have another question.

Michael.

(1705)

Mr. Michael McKean:

I believe it would be very important. Right now, we've spoken with the Barrie family health team. They're very interested in working with the military in the IPSC and the JPSU, but Base Borden is not currently on the pilot basis. I work with veterans every week who say that kind of service is critical because the points made by their people are the only way they're going to transition to find a family physician or other support. Because if you don't get that, you're behind the eight ball.

Mr. John Brassard:

It goes beyond that, too, to ensure that your pension information and the money is there as you transition, not 16 weeks later.

Philip, I know you spoke about transition. How much value do you see in that? How would that have helped you?

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

It's a good idea but very impractical.

Mr. John Brassard:

In what sense?

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

They haven't the resources in certain areas such as mine that are underserved in civilian health care practitioners. It might be great in Ottawa, Toronto, or Halifax, but not in places such as North Bay.

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay.

Joseph.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

There's just too much of a disconnect between Veterans Affairs and the Canadian Forces. There's a Veterans Affairs office on every base. Part of your out-clearance for your release should be checking out with them and spending a day becoming a client, because in all likelihood you will become a client, possibly at 50 or 60 years of age, as military injuries start to sprout up.

It's important that Veterans Affairs be key to everyone who's being released. If it's dental work, they make sure our dental work is 100%, but for mental work, they don't care. People don't like to go to the dentist, so you have to order them to go there. That's why you have dental parade. It's the same thing with mental health and Veterans Affairs. No one is going to want to admit that they're a veteran or that they're disabled, but if it's part of an out-clearance where they must sit with Veterans Affairs and go through it, they could receive pamphlets about how to fill out documents correctly, or an introduction to My VAC Account, which can all be done within a couple of hours. Then we'd have vets who are informed and not finding out about it on Facebook.

Mr. John Brassard:

Jody, what do you feel?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Transitioning was brutal. As I said, I'm considered somebody who has their stuff together, and the transition was overwhelming. Information was being thrown at you from a firehose. An example could be something as simple as this. If you're in the military, you have a service number, K41302461. That was mine for 20 years. Ask me my VAC service number.

Mr. John Brassard:

You haven't a clue.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

I have no idea. Why do I need a whole new VAC file when I could just walk to the clerk's desk, say, “Thanks, see you guys later”, walk out as Mr. Mitic, show up at my VAC office, and say, “Here you guys go”, and we can go through my file? It could be the same number, the same file, just change the cover from blue to red or something. The transition would feel a lot smoother. It's things such as that.

Mr. John Brassard:

It would be less stressful.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

It's a duplication. Phil said it's one thing to talk to one person about your deepest, darkest fears and secrets, but then there's the next person, and the next person, and then you just finally don't want to do it. It's the same when you're transitioning. You're filling out the same form, paperwork you've already done when you were in the service. It's the same form and the same information, just a different department on the top.

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds for a question.

Mr. John Brassard:

I'm not going to get this done in 30 seconds. Briefly, as we've sat at this committee and studied mental health and suicide prevention, we've heard often that suicidal tendencies are a result of prior mental health issues. How much of an impact did your military career have on your mental health issues?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Personally, I don't know. I've accepted things such as suicide, depression, and all that as being side effects that some of us get in this gig. First responders have the same issues, and emergency room doctors and nurses. They're tough jobs, and people do them voluntarily for a reason.

Mr. John Brassard:

Mr. Chair, could I ask the witnesses to provide a synopsis of the impact from perhaps their military careers compared to what they were experiencing previously in their lives, maybe even some of the experiences of some of the people they know? I know it's a difficult question, but we hear that often, and that's why I felt that it was important to bring it up.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

The only reason I would hesitate, sir, is that I joined the military at 17, and most of my colleagues did as well, young men and young women. In my opinion, I became an adult and a man in the military. Everyone's crazy when they're 17, right? We're all looking for who we're going to be as adults. It would be tough for me to judge whether I was different or the same.

Better people to ask would be my family.

(1710)

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay. I'll leave it there. Thank you.

The Chair:

With that, if you want to answer that question, get it in to the clerk and he will get it to all the committee members—if you can.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Sure. I'll still try.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

In regard to the recognition of the sacred obligation to veterans, it feels very much as though that has been forgotten. How important is it that we remember that and make it part of how we function, how we interact, how we deal with and support our veterans?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

I think the sacred obligation would come back to the spirit of what we're dealing with. If my comrades didn't have to say things like, “I'm fighting with Veterans Affairs for this”, that would be a big step. There are a few benefits that were lost along the way without really asking us that I think should be re-implemented. There were a few things that were taken away or modified with the new Veterans Charter that I don't think were fully vetted out when they made these decisions, which could be re-implemented. That would go a long way as well, the biggest one being the lifetime medical pensions.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. That's my next question. How important is that pension for medically releasing veterans? We keep hearing it's coming. Would that make a lot of difference in terms of how veterans felt in regard to recognition for their service?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

In my case, personally, I didn't know the charter took away the lifetime pension. If you asked most combat soldiers, instead of a lifetime monetary pension, you're going to get this lump sum, and then there's going to be this patchwork of benefits that you may or may not qualify for at certain times in your life, it would have been, “No, go pound rocks”. Look, it's not like it's a ton of money. A 100% pension, maybe indexed under the price consumer chart—whatever that thing is—would be maybe five grand a month for 100% disability. It's not like we're talking a ton of money, but it's something that.... Again, right now I'm able to work and make a few bucks, but one day I might not be able to, and I'll know I have a roof over my head and food on the table at the minimum.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. Thank you.

One of the things that we've also heard is, yes, there are mental health services available for CF personnel, but once you leave, those mental health supports are not specific to the needs of veterans. For example, group therapy is one of the ways of trying to, I guess, provide veterans with help. Mixing veterans and non-veterans doesn't work, and I wonder if you could comment on that.

The Chair:

I'm going to have to let somebody in, and I'll come back that. We're just going to run a short little round around the time out.

Your three minutes are up, and I'm going to flip to Mr. Kitchen for three minutes. We'll come back to Mr. Graham, and then you to finish it.

Okay, Mr. Kitchen, you have three minutes.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Brindle—and feel free, if I'm overstepping my bounds on this question, to not answer the question, or if it makes you uncomfortable at all—I realize this may be hard, but I'm wondering if you would be able to give some suggestions on approaches that you might take when that veteran is in that crisis situation. Regarding that suicide attempt that's in that crisis position, do you have any suggestions that you might have to.... We talk about a suicide hotline. What good is a hotline if no one's going to pick up that phone? Right?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

It all comes down to the word “suicide”.

It's a scary word. I'm not afraid of it. I'm actually quite lucky. I feel like someone who has diabetes, or a heart condition, or a kidney condition and knows it. I have a certain condition where, under the exact correct circumstances, I don't want to live anymore. I avoid those circumstances, such as booze and working overseas, and I work with my therapist on meditation and yoga. That is my treatment to avoid suicide. It's no different from having a heart condition and eating a Baconator every day—you're going to shorten your life.

We have this stigma on the word “suicide”. We have to get rid of that, so that you're not afraid. If you have a suicide ideation or you're thinking about it, you're not thinking about actually doing it. It enters your mind over a long process. Your mind starts playing games with you and starts eliminating the reasons why you should live, on your own.... That fear of coming out and saying, “I just feel down”, without all the cavalry being called in all of a sudden, is the way you balance it, especially if you're doing medicine changes, you're by yourself, and you don't have anyone to talk to. You ride it out, thinking that it's going to get better, and you don't want to call and get everyone wound up again.

When you lose your temper in the Veterans Affairs office I've seen what happens, so you bite your tongue. You try not to get angry about the system, which, as we've all heard, is not just aimed at me. It's a system-wide problem when you can submit a claim in September 2015 and still argue it.... A lot of us joke that they do it on purpose to test us, to see if we actually are injured. When it comes down to that, there is no camaraderie. There is no brotherhood like we had in the forces. It becomes you and an insurance company. I don't see it as VAC; I see it as an insurance company. We all know the word “appeal”, because you're denied the first time.

To go back to the question of suicide, look at the word as not so scary. Everyone in this room is capable of suicide based on the information available to them at the moment they choose to do it. No one is above it. Let's not be scared of it. Let's get some peer support groups and start getting the word out that it's okay to speak about it.

(1715)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham, you have three minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Brindle—or Don, if you will—I really appreciate that you came in and told us about the whole story, not just the end of your career. Hearing the background I think is important.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I thought it was important because there have been recent studies saying that almost half of Canadian Forces personnel have suffered at some point from child abuse. Being a survivor of it, I thought it was important for you to realize that. As well, the depression rate is much higher in the Canadian Forces than the national average. Those items have to be addressed in the Canadian Forces.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a quick question for you. You mentioned “spin dry” a couple of times. Can you tell me more about what spin dry is?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Spin dry is a course. If you get into any trouble with alcohol, you're sent away to it. I believe it was held in Kingston or something like that. There are probably various locations.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

It's at various locations throughout—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

An MP would have much better information on spin dry, because he's—

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

I've never done it—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I'm not saying he did, but he has probably sent a lot of people there. Or he has reported—

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

Their CO did.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Yes, their CO, as based on his report. It's a course that you go on to quit alcohol. If you get into serious trouble with alcohol in the forces, you go on a spin dry. I don't know the official course name, but everyone knows it as spin dry.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

It's alcohol awareness.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

Yes, alcohol awareness.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You referred to it as effectively a career ender.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

It is. If you as a corporal get sent on a spin dry course, you're going to be a career corporal.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I get you.

You mentioned that you found out you were a veteran. I thought that was a very interesting position to be in—to find out that you're a veteran. When you left the service, what happened?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

I made very bad irrational decisions based on my injuries.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There was nobody saying, “By the way, you're a veteran now and here's where you can go.” It was just—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

No. They were so quick to get me out. I was still on leave and I was in Kosovo. I was still effectively in the Canadian Armed Forces when I was destroying cluster bombs. The problem is that it happened so fast that I didn't even realize what I had done.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

Did you get out under the first or the second plan?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

The second plan.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

Was that in 1995?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

No. It was the tail end. It was in 2000, but it was still at the tail end of the last FRP.

Mr. Philip MacKinnon:

Okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There must be a lot of people out there in the same situation who still haven't found out that they're a veteran, so—

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

There are. Actually, I can list them by name, two of the guys I've lost. One of them is Jacques Richaud, who died in Iraq. He was a Canadian ammo tech. Paul Straughn is still in Libya right now.

You're afraid to come home because you don't know what you have. I've now said, in trying to be an advocate, “Call Veterans Affairs and you can get help.” But I didn't. No one said that to me. When you're out of the country, working in a complete combat zone, you're not watching commercials on the Canadian CBC saying that there's help. You don't see pamphlets in your doctor's office, because you don't go to a doctor's office.

I was not a Canadian for 14 years. I was a resident of Russia, a resident of Tanzania, and a resident of Baghdad, but the Veterans Affairs outreach doesn't go there. The last thing on my mind.... Then, when you start talking about PTSD.... I still had doubt for 10 years, not even believing that I had PTSD. It only sunk in on my first attempt—and PTSD was out with more knowledge—that I had a problem, but I still didn't know to phone Veterans Affairs.

(1720)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How do we reach these people in Libya and Baghdad and wherever else they are who are not coming home?

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

That's a great question. You have peer outreach.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Our final three minutes go to Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I would like to come back to the question about mental health supports after a veteran is released and the fact that there isn't a whole lot available, so that veterans find themselves in group therapy. Could you give a response to that in terms of the veterans' needs?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

Sorry, you said the group...?

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I mean group therapy with non-veterans, a mix.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

I never did that for mental health, but I did it for my physical rehabilitation. Canadian Armed Forces medical centre, which we used to have here in Ottawa, would have been my preferred place to do rehab. If I were going to go and do mental health therapy I would prefer to be around my brothers and sisters. Being the young fit guy in a hospital full of older diabetic car accident victims is not good for morale, and I spiralled pretty quickly when I realized I was the only army guy there. It would be the same in any other facility. Maybe it could be with first responders. DND and VAC should get together and sponsor a place just for military and/or veterans, because there seem to be plenty of clients available, and I don't think it would be a waste of money at all.

Mr. Joseph Brindle:

And they're only getting more.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

There are probably going to be a lot more in the next decade.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you for that.

I have a quick question. I say quick, but it will probably take a great deal more than the minute and a half I have left. It has to do with the JPSU. We've had testimony about it. According to some it's working well, and according to others it's extremely limited and not working at all well. Have you had personal experience?

Mr. Jody Mitic:

When I was wounded, JPSU was a concept. It was stood up after I was wounded. I was one of the first injured soldiers posted to the JPSU as part of Soldier On, and even though I was one of the team at JPSU, my service was less than stellar. Frankly, as I said, I've written off a lot of that part of my life just for my mental health. I'd rather not revisit it. Alannah and I speak sometimes about how they owe us money for things at the house, a lot to which was to have our house modified for wheelchair use. We're convinced that we'd be looking at probably $50,000, which we paid out of pocket, that we're owed, but just the thought of going and talking to someone, or starting that process has me curled up in the fetal position. That's not a good look for a professional tough guy, so I try to stay away from that.

Here's the theme that I see though, even with the Veterans Affairs stuff. About 70% to 75% are okay with things, and things seem to go smoothly, and then there's the 25% of us who are maybe 70% or more injured. We need the most care, and that seems to be on the JPSU and the Veterans Affairs side. For the simpler cases, of course there are a couple of forms, a couple of stamps, and you're good to go. The complex cases seem to be where things really start to have issues. I found that with JPSU and with Veterans Affairs.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

The reality is that from this point on, cases are going to be more and more complex.

Mr. Jody Mitic:

That's true, but also as I age, I'll become more and more complex myself. I was 30 when I was wounded. I'm 40 now and even right now I'm having issues just walking around, just to come here today. There was a question as to whether I would show up because of my mobility issues. I'll be 50 and then 60 and I'm going to need more services, and sometimes I wonder how things are going to go when I'm that age and when I really need someone to support me.

(1725)

The Chair:

Thank you. That ends our time for today. If there's anything you'd like to add to your testimony, you can email it to our clerk and he will get it to the committee.

On behalf of the committee today, I want to thank all of you for what you've done for our country, and I want to thank all of you for taking time out of today. I know it's tough to come and relate your stories to our committee. Without people like you, we wouldn't be sitting here today, and I hope your testimony will help us to make decisions that will help the men and women who serve.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des anciens combattants

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Neil Ellis (Baie de Quinte, Lib.)):

Bonjour tout le monde.

Je vais ouvrir la séance. Conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement et de la motion adoptée le 29 septembre, le Comité reprend son étude de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide chez les vétérans.

Nous allons débuter par un premier groupe de quatre témoins qui auront 10 minutes chacun pour leur déclaration, après quoi nous passerons à la période des questions. Nous allons débuter par Michael McKean, qui est parmi nous par vidéoconférence depuis Barrie.

Bonjour, Michael. Vous avez la parole.

M. Michael McKean (à titre personnel):

Bonjour. Je vais soulever des points importants pour contribuer à l'étude de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide. Je m'appuie sur plus de 35 années de service militaire au Canada, dans la réserve pendant 16 ans et dans la force régulière pendant 21 ans, ainsi que sur les efforts que je continue de déployer pour réintégrer la vie civile après avoir été libéré de l'armée, le 15 décembre 2013, pour raisons médicales.

Mon point de vue sur la santé mentale, et plus précisément sur la prévention du suicide, s'appuie sur d'autres éléments: sur le fait que j'ai perdu un ami, un officier de réserve; sur mon intervention auprès d'un vétéran de la Bosnie qui avait tenté de se suicider quand il était sous mon commandement; sur mon expérience dans le cadre de l'opération Attention, lors de Roto 0, à Kaboul, en Afghanistan, du 17 juillet 2011 au 15 février 2012 et, enfin, sur les difficultés que j'ai éprouvées dans mon passage à la vie civile.

La préparation et l'instruction permettent à de petites équipes de résister aux conditions les plus inimaginables. Cependant, le rétablissement exige des systèmes de soutien semblables à la préparation qui ne sont encore pas mis à la disposition de la plupart des vétérans.

Je suis entré dans l'armée en tant que simple soldat, dans le 26e Régiment d'artillerie de campagne de l'Artillerie royale canadienne, en décembre 1975. Durant toute ma carrière, j'ai été artilleur ou officier artilleur.

Après avoir étudié la psychologie militaire et l'art du commandement au Collège militaire royal du Canada, je me suis rendu compte que l'art du commandement exige une profonde compréhension des peurs et des désirs humains. La connaissance et l'expérience que le Canada m'a permis d'acquérir m'ont permis de mieux apprécier ce que j'ai appris de mon grand-père, un ancien combattant de la Première Guerre mondiale ayant servi sur le front de même que dans une unité territoriale lors de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, de mes mentors militaires, ainsi que de la lecture des écrits de Souen Tseu, de Clausewitz, de Viktor Frankl, de Toffler, de Roméo Dallaire et de Chris Linford.

Quand le Comité a lancé sa première invitation à venir témoigner devant lui, en 2016, je m'étais dit que les anciens combattants des Forces armées canadiennes ne bénéficient que de services limités de la part d'Anciens Combattants Canada pour ce qui est de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide dans la réserve, et que les FAC et ACC pouvaient et devaient faire participer les vétérans au processus de changement.

Je recommande l'application d'une approche systémique pour intégrer les vétérans, surtout ceux de la réserve, selon des modèles s'appuyant sur le cadre actuel de soutien social aux blessés de stress opérationnel, le SSBSO. Pour cela, il convient de changer les choses, de changer d'attitude pour ne plus uniquement compter sur les coordonnateurs du SSBSO à temps plein, mais sur un effectif complémentaire de bénévoles, et de stabiliser les budgets dans la durée.

Le principe directeur qu'il convient de retenir découle d'une théorie militaire — celle de Souen Tseu et de Clausewitz — qui a été immortalisée par les mots de Napoléon Bonaparte qui a dit: « Le moral est au physique dans un rapport de un à trois. » Pendant mon tour en Afghanistan, en août 2011, j'ai été blessé au genou droit. Tandis qu'on me faisait sept points de suture, sous morphine, sur la table d'opération, je me suis dit que cette blessure n'était pas différente de celles que j'avais déjà eues durant ma carrière, mais qu'avant, j'aurais eu droit à deux semaines de convalescence, voire plus. C'était la consigne médicale à l'époque.

Quand le médecin eut terminé de me recoudre, il m'a demandé si je pouvais appuyer tout mon poids sur ma jambe. Pour lui donner le change, je lui ai répondu par l'affirmative. Je m'étais dit que, si l'on m'accordait deux jours de tâches allégées — et pas question d'utiliser des béquilles — on me renverrait ensuite dans mon unité. Sinon, celle-ci allait avoir de sérieux problèmes. Peu après mon arrivée sur le théâtre des opérations, les procédures opérationnelles avaient été modifiées et le commandement avait imposé que les sorties en dehors du périmètre de sécurité ne se fassent plus à moins de quatre. Nous, nous étions six dans mon groupe, mais l'un des nôtres avait été renvoyé à l'unité, peu après ma blessure, et un autre avait été envoyé chez lui, en permission pour raisons familiales de deux semaines, et cela une quinzaine de jours après que je me fus blessé. Mon équipe n'aurait donc pas pu sortir du périmètre de sécurité si j'avais été affecté à des tâches allégées ou si j'avais dû prendre des médicaments m'empêchant de me mettre au volant.

En 2000-2001, tout juste après avoir été nommé chef d'unité, j'ai fait des pieds et des mains pour aider un officier de la réserve, récemment rentré d'un déploiement en Bosnie. Personne n'avait détecté ses syndromes d'alcoolisme, pourtant évidents, et, après sa tentative de suicide, ce n'est que grâce à l'assurance maladie complémentaire de son épouse qu'il a pu recevoir des soins. En 2012-2013, de retour de mon déploiement en Afghanistan, j'ai eu l'impression de vivre un échec à répétition, d'autant que je suis passé à travers toutes les mailles possibles et imaginables du filet: pas suivi d'une recommandation qui m'avait été faite en santé mentale pour subir une évaluation TSO; communication limitée, incomplète de renseignements aux responsables de la base, une unité de réserve, chargés d'administrer ma libération; problèmes financiers dus à un délai de huit mois avant que mes problèmes de pension soient résolus; problèmes d'accès à des services de santé mentale; mises en attente à répétition pour, en fin de compte, finir par déprendre du programme d'Aide aux membres des Forces canadiennes pour la transition, et série de confusions dans le processus de libération pour raisons médicales.

Après qu'on eut confié mon dossier à un gestionnaire de cas d'ACC, on s'est soudainement rendu compte qu'il fallait que j'attende que les Forces armées canadiennes aient réglé le dossier de leur côté. Il a fallu ensuite que j'attende 2013 pour relever, de nouveau, d'un gestionnaire de cas d'ACC. Malgré les témoignages que ce comité a entendus, à l'époque, l'UISP n'était pas une option envisageable, même s'il était évident que je venais tout juste de rentrer de déploiement. La confusion a régné à chaque étape du traitement de ma demande de prestation. Il a d'ailleurs fallu que je me rende à Archives Canada pour obtenir les renseignements nécessaires parce que les services habilités n'étaient pas parvenus à faire ce qu'il fallait à temps et que les documents avaient été envoyés aux archives.

Dans l'avenir, une solution consisterait à faire participer les vétérans à la gestion du changement. À la page 356 du livre du lieutenant-colonel à la retraite, Chris Linford, intitulé « Warrior Rising », on peut lire que tout vétéran ayant été grièvement blessé ou gravement malade doit avoir l'occasion d'occuper des fonctions véritables, ce qu'ont confirmé d'autres témoins que vous avez entendus, y compris le lieutenant-général à la retraite Dallaire.

Depuis 2012, je consacre énormément de temps à étudier tout ce qui s'est fait pour traiter les blessures de stress opérationnel et le trouble de stress post-traumatique. Nous avons tiré des enseignements, à la fois positifs et négatifs, des travaux effectués au Royaume-Uni, aux États-Unis et ailleurs. Ces travaux sont le point de départ de très nombreuses années d'études complémentaires qui précéderont l'adoption de mesures, ce que me semble vouloir faire le gouvernement du Canada.

En matière de trouble de stress post-traumatique, il y a tout ce que l'on sait et les pratiques exemplaires. Je vous parle de cela parce que, entre 2012 et 2014, dans le cadre de ma reconversion, j'ai obtenu une maîtrise en travail social et je suis devenu travailleur social inscrit en Ontario. J'y suis parvenu parce que j'ai pu m'appuyer sur 20 années d'expérience de coordonnateur du Programme d'éducation antidrogues et de coordonnateur de promotion de la santé, avant d'être déployé en Afghanistan. Je retiens de tout cela que les vétérans possèdent l'expérience nécessaire pour apporter un coup de main, à condition que l'on change les attitudes et les limitations permanentes.

Que veut dire changer d'attitude? Eh bien, la plupart des emplois prioritaires pour raisons médicales correspondent à des postes à temps plein et ceux qui ont retenu mon attention exigent que le postulant obtienne d'abord un certificat signé par un professionnel de la santé attestant qu'il est stable et qu'il ne risque pas de rechuter. Je ne réponds actuellement pas à ce genre d'exigence. Je vous lis un texte préparé d'avance parce que j'ai tendance à divaguer et, si je ne fais pas attention, je risque de rechuter à cause de cela.

Encouragé par mon psychologue, j'ai exploré la possibilité de travailler à temps partiel pour me rendre compte, malheureusement, que mes qualifications ne répondaient pas aux critères du groupe Calian en matière d'assistance en santé mentale aux militaires canadiens. Et cela bien que j'étais devenu fournisseur autorisé de la Croix bleue en travail social et gestionnaire de soins cliniques en 2014, grâce à ma vaste expérience d'officier et de coordonnateur du Programme d'éducation antidrogues, expérience qui m'avait amené à faire de la promotion de la santé, notamment grâce à tous les cours que j'ai suivis.

(1540)



En trois ans, on ne m'a fixé qu'un seul rendez-vous qui a d'ailleurs été annulé parce que les responsables ont décidé que ça ne convenait pas, un point c'est tout.

Depuis trois ans, je suis bénévole au programme de santé mentale et de prévention du suicide de la réserve. Les unités de la réserve sont réparties un peu partout au Canada. Elles représentent une façon simple d'établir un lien avec de nombreux vétérans qui ont déménagé des grands centres urbains. Le travail effectué en collaboration avec les unités de la réserve représente une des façons de s'attaquer plus efficacement aux problèmes de la santé mentale au sein de la réserve.

Même s'il est loin d'être parfait, le cadre du SSBSO offre un mécanisme permettant d'établir un lien entre les services de transition de l'UISP et les collectivités. Il serait possible d'améliorer cette formule en intégrant les vétérans, surtout ceux de la réserve, et en tissant un réseau pour aider les vétérans, un peu comme le fait la Section spéciale des blessures de stress opérationnel de la Légion royale canadienne. Il ne s'agit pas d'organismes qui se font concurrence, mais plutôt d'organismes qui se complètent au sein du système.

Pour en revenir à la question du budget, l'un des problèmes qui se pose tient au fait que le SSBSO impose des limites à ses coordonnateurs. Ceux-ci n'ont pas le droit de prendre des appels après les heures de bureau, parce que cela serait considéré comme du temps supplémentaire. Or, il faut pouvoir compter sur un groupe de bénévoles important, sans quoi on risque de vivre le genre de montagnes russes qu'illustre l'interdiction temporaire de voyager de mars 2017. En effet, le cours de formation des bénévoles du SSBSO a dû être annulé à cause d'un manque de fonds et il faut maintenant faire du rattrapage qui va s'échelonner sur plusieurs mois.

Merci.

(1545)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur McKean.

Monsieur Mitic.

M. Jody Mitic (conseiller municipal, Ville d'Ottawa, à titre personnel):

Je m'appelle Jody Mitic et je suis conseiller municipal, ici, à Ottawa. J'ai servi dans les forces armées pendant 20 ans, de 1994 à 2014, et j'ai été blessé en janvier 2007. Je plaide pour la santé mentale. À ma plus grande surprise, trois professionnels m'ont déclaré mentalement stable, et je pense que ma femme ne serait pas d'accord avec ce diagnostic.

Je me suis lancé en politique pour m'exprimer au nom de mes frères et de mes soeurs d'armes. Je crois que, plus nous serons nombreux à faire partie du groupe des élus et mieux nous pourrons contribuer à la cause. J'ai la chance que mon député, Andrew Leslie, soit un ancien commandant de l'armée.

En règle générale, la santé mentale est tout autant un problème de vétérans que de militaires actifs et il concerne donc deux ministères partageant un même objectif: compter sur des gens mentalement stables pendant toute une carrière qui est très exigeante. Dans les premiers temps de l'instruction des jeunes gens et des jeunes filles qui entrent à l'armée, on leur apprend le terme mnémotechnique RICE ou RGCE en français.

Savez-vous ce que signifie RICE ou RGCE? Quelqu'un? Docteur? Eh bien, ça veut dire repos, glace, compression et élévation. Quand on se tord la cheville, il faut pouvoir se débrouiller tout seul parce que les infirmiers sont occupés ailleurs. On ne peut pas se précipiter chez un médecin pour se faire panser la moindre égratignure. Il faut pouvoir se débrouiller tout seul.

Quel est l'équivalent du RGCE pour le mental? Quelqu'un? C'est ça. Pour l'instant, il n'y a pas d'équivalent dans notre société. Voilà un autre problème de santé publique. Si j'ai un rhume, je peux toujours aller au Shoppers Drug Mart du coin pour me faire conseiller par le pharmacien à qui j'aurai demandé quel médicament ou potion maison il me recommande. En général, les pharmaciens ont de bonnes réponses. Or, cela est impossible dans le cas de la santé mentale, autant pour les militaires actifs que pour les vétérans ou pour les civils.

Il faut donc tout reprendre à zéro et former nos gens, dès le premier jour, pour qu'ils puissent faire face au stress mental. C'est un colonel américain, je crois, un Béret vert, qui a écrit le livre « On Killing ». Je ne me souviens plus de son nom. Il parle de l'inoculation du stress, comme beaucoup d'autres experts.

Tout au cours de ma carrière, j'ai remarqué qu'on ne fait pas grand-chose pour préparer les gens à faire face au stress mental. Certes, nous faisions beaucoup de pompes, de tractions, de la course et de tir sur cible, mais nous n'étions pas vraiment préparés au jour où nous verrions un copain se faire éclater devant nous pour avoir marché sur un engin improvisé...

Mme Sherry Romanado (Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne, Lib.):

C'était Dave Grossman.

M. Jody Mitic:

C'est cela, Dave Grossman, vous avez raison... un type super. Ce ne sont pas des ouvrages faciles à lire, mais ils sont très instructifs.

La première fois qu'on voit les tripes d'un être humain, c'est sur un champ de bataille. Il y a des façons de se former à cela. Je cite toujours l'épisode de la mini-série « Frères d'armes » où les protagonistes doivent ramper dans des tripes de porc. Je n'ai jamais rien fait de tel de toute ma carrière. Comme je le disais, la première fois où j'ai fermé la fermeture éclair d'un sac à dépouille, c'est quand il y avait un de mes camarades dedans.

Quand on est dans le feu de l'action, on n'y pense pas, mais on y réfléchit après coup et c'est brutal. On ne sait pas comment on va réagir, on ne sait pas que c'est normal et qu'il faut être triste. On n'est pas une fillette si on pleure parce qu'on a perdu un copain, mais avant, c'est ainsi qu'on voyait les choses.

Passons à la situation du vétéran, comme nous avons pu le constater dans certains cas... Un ami de mon beau-père, qui avait fait la guerre de Corée, a soudainement reçu un diagnostic de TSPT lié à la guerre, alors qu'il avait plus de 80 ans. Cela montre que cette maladie peut mettre très longtemps avant de se manifester. Un jour, les symptômes peuvent apparaître et il faut composer avec. Mon épouse a été libérée pour raisons médicales des forces armées, pour TSPT. Elle était infirmière.

Selon moi, il faut favoriser le travail d'équipe entre le MDN et ACC et s'appuyer sur une stratégie établie dès le moment de l'enrôlement de la recrue jusqu'au jour où celle-ci deviendra vétéran. Je n'ai pas la réponse. Je sais qu'il existe de nombreux traitements qui fonctionnent, dans sept cas sur dix, et puis il y a les trois autres cas, et les sept cas sur dix et les sept cas sur dix du premier pourcentage. Il existe donc d'autres traitements, comme les chiens thérapeutiques, le yoga, la réalité virtuelle ou le MDMA qui fonctionnent tous dans environ sept cas sur dix.

D'un autre côté, il y a le système de soutien. Je peux vous dire qu'Alannah a été très perturbée par ce qui s'est passé au MDN, parce que nous nous attendions à recevoir un certain soutien, qui était clairement prévu, et que nous avons découvert que les choses avaient changé, qu'elles avaient été modifiées, bousculées, sans que nous le sachions. Et puis, on nous a presque fait sentir que nous devions nous battre pour obtenir ce genre de service. Je déteste entendre mes frères et mes sœurs d'armes me dire qu'ils doivent se battre pour obtenir ceci ou cela. On ne devrait jamais avoir à se battre pour ce genre de chose. On ne devrait jamais se sentir comme un moins que rien quand on s'adresse à un ministère.

Les vétérans canadiens ont la chance de pouvoir compter sur tout un ministère. Cependant, beaucoup d'entre nous doivent se battre contre ce ministère qui est pourtant censé être là pour nous aider toute la vie durant. Je n'ai pas la réponse à ce problème, mais je sais, pour avoir traité avec le système, que cela occasionne énormément de stress mental à bien des frères et des soeurs d'armes, au point où ils ne...

Récemment, la veuve d'un des nôtres, qui avait elle-même servi dans les forces armées et qui a une fille du même âge que notre aînée, a complètement disparu des médias sociaux et a cessé de répondre aux appels téléphoniques. Nous avons constaté qu'elle s'était entièrement coupée du reste de la société à cause d'un problème dans son dossier d'Anciens Combattants Canada. Elle ne voulait même pas répondre au téléphone à la simple idée de devoir composer le numéro de son bureau d'Anciens Combattants ou le 1-800. Elle n'était plus capable de faire face à cette situation.

Je ne connais pas la réponse. Tout ce que je sais, c'est que nous avons un ministère qui est là pour nous appuyer et qu'un grand nombre de vétérans trouvent qu'ils doivent se battre avec ce ministère. J'aimerais que l'on puisse changer de ton.

Voilà, j'ai terminé.

(1550)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur MacKinnon.

M. Philip MacKinnon (à titre personnel):

Bonjour.

Je m'appelle Phil MacKinnon. J'ai pris ma retraite des Forces canadiennes, il y a un an, après plus de 26 années de service. Je m'étais engagé comme simple soldat en 1989. À ce titre, on me disait tout ce que je devais faire, où je devais aller et quand. Je me suis acquitté de mes tâches et je recommencerais avec plaisir.

Dans l'armée, au fur et à mesure qu'on grimpe les échelons, on se voit confier de plus en plus de responsabilités, mais on continue de recevoir des ordres d'en haut, de se faire dire où il faut aller, ce qu'il faut faire et quand.

Je suis maintenant à la retraite. Plus personne ne me dit où aller, à part ma femme, et je ne suis pas vraiment certain de pouvoir vous répéter où elle m'expédie parfois. Quoi qu'il en soit, dans le civil, il arrive très souvent qu'on ne sache pas vraiment ce qu'il faut faire. Dans l'armée, quand c'était le moment de la visite médicale et qu'on me donnait un rendez-vous, je m'y présentais. Mais je ne suis plus dans l'armée et je n'ai pas encore de médecin de famille, parce que je suis sur une liste d'attente. Comme je réside dans une région mal desservie, je n'ai pas de médecin de famille. Je dois chercher la salle d'urgence ou la clinique médicale familiale qui accepte des patients.

C'est la même chose dans le cas de la santé mentale. Avant, je me rendais aux rendez-vous qu'on me fixait. Ça m'aidait beaucoup de parler avec un psy. Quand un de mes gars subissait un accident dramatique, j'estimais qu'il m'incombait, puisque j'étais le supérieur, de réclamer un service de counseling en son nom. C'est ce qu'on attendait de nous.

J'ai été policier militaire, dans ce métier, j'ai dû faire face à bien des situations traumatisantes qui pouvaient aller de l'incident domestique grave au suicide, et à bien d'autres choses. Mes gars se rendaient sur place pour faire leur boulot, après quoi, je devais m'assurer qu'ils voient un psy.

C'est maintenant à mon tour d'avoir besoin de services de counseling, mais je ne sais même pas vers qui me tourner. Toutefois, j'ai récemment été mis en contact avec une gestionnaire de cas qui a commencé à me remettre sur les rails, mais quand on m'a diagnostiqué un TSPT en 2006, j'ai suivi beaucoup de séances de counseling, à raison de deux, parfois même trois fois par semaine. Avant, je trouvais mon réconfort dans la dive bouteille. Dans un week-end normal, il m'arrivait de boire deux, voire trois 40 onces, parfois un petit peu plus, si la semaine avait été éprouvante.

En 2001, pendant mon déploiement en Bosnie, lors de la Roto 8, je me suis un jour retrouvé en plein champ miné, bien que celui-ci aurait dû être déminé par les organismes chargés de cette tâche. En 2003, j'ai fait partie de la Roto 0 à Kaboul, en Afghanistan, où je suis retourné avec la Roto 4 et, avec la Roto 0, je suis allé à Kandahar. J'ai fini ce tour en 2005.

Avant cela, j'avais été déployé dans le cadre de l'opération Récupération. Je suis sûr que quelques-uns d'entre vous se rappellent la tempête de verglas de 1998, lors de laquelle j'ai été déployé sur place. On m'avait annoncé qu'un VLLR avait fait une sortie de route et que nous devions aller remplir un rapport d'accident. Jusque-là, pas de problème.

Avant que la PPO n'ait fermé la route, un camion de 10 tonnes, venant de Toronto, est entré dans mon véhicule de patrouille, le chauffeur ayant été aveuglé par la poudrerie. J'étais au volant. J'ai été sauvé parce que je ne suis pas parvenu à déboucler cette foutue ceinture de sécurité. C'est elle et mon gilet pare-balles qui m'ont sauvé. J'en ai encore des cauchemars. J'ai aussi des cauchemars sur l'Afghanistan. C'est ainsi, mais ma conseillère, à Halifax — et j'aimerais bien me rappeler son nom — était une psychologue extraordinaire. C'est elle qui m'a dit quelque chose qui m'a frappé et que je retiendrai toujours. Elle m'a dit: « Vous ne vous en remettrez jamais, mais vous apprendrez à vivre avec. »

(1555)



En 2014, j'ai été posté à Toronto. Comme nous n'étions pas arrivés à vendre notre maison de North Bay, je suis allé à Toronto en vertu d'une restriction imposée, ou RI. J'occupais un réduit de 490 pieds carrés, si petit que, pour me changer les idées, je devais aller sur le balcon. J'étais au 22e étage. La douleur et le stress mental occasionnés par le fait que j'étais éloigné de ma famille ont eu des effets sur mon physique, mais je n'avais personne vers qui me tourner, parce que je ne savais pas. Cela étant, chaque fois que je rentrais à North Bay, j'allais voir mon psychologue pour lui parler à la première occasion. Mais voilà que lui-même a dû prendre sa retraite pour des raisons médicales.

Personnellement, j'estime qu'il faudrait mettre en place un système permettant aux vétérans, lors de leur passage à la vie civile, d'être vus en priorité. À l'époque où j'ai reçu mon diagnostic, j'avais beaucoup de problèmes. J'avais un problème de maîtrise de la colère et on ne veut surtout pas d'un Cap-Bretonnais, porteur d'un insigne, qui ait un sale caractère, qui souffre de TSPT et qui n'a rien à perdre. Ce serait la recette pour la catastrophe.

Il faut disposer d'un mécanisme permettant aux militaires de passer à la vie civile, de pouvoir compter sur des ressources en santé mentale et sur une orientation immédiate assurée par Anciens Combattants Canada. Celui ou celle qui a un psychologue dans le civil devrait pouvoir garder la même personne. Je connais des amis qui ont appelé en vain le SSBSO. Ils ont envoyé des courriels restés sans réponse, sans même un accusé de réception. Il y a lieu de combler au plus vite cet énorme déficit.

Merci.

(1600)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Brindle.

M. Joseph Brindle (à titre personnel):

Comme je ne vois pas ce que je devrais sauter ou garder de mon exposé, je vais improviser. J'ai préparé un document détaillé en PowerPoint qui n'a pas été traduit, mais que je vous ferai remettre tout de suite après.

Après m'être posé la question, j'ai décidé d'intituler mon exposé: « Mes 14 années de tentative de suicide ».

J'ai grandi dans des coopératives d'habitation de l'Ontario très pauvres à Markham, à Eglinton et à Scarborough, où il y avait beaucoup de problèmes d'incivilité comme des entrées par effraction et des vols. J'ai raté ma 7e année. On pensait que j'avais un léger retard d'apprentissage et on a alors songé à m'envoyer dans une école spéciale, mais ma mère est parvenue à convaincre tout le monde de me maintenir dans le système régulier. Et puis, j'ai été longtemps victime d'un ami de la famille qui m'a agressé sexuellement.

Quand j'avais 8 ans, j'ai mis le feu à l'appartement familial et m'en suis tiré de peu. De l'âge de 12 ans à l'âge de 18 ans, je me suis cantonné à mon sous-sol et j'ai passé le plus clair de mon temps à retaper une vieille guimbarde. C'était mon refuge où je me sentais en sécurité. Je ne socialisais pas, je ne fréquentais personne.

Et puis, je suis tombé sur le PIEJ, le Programme d'instruction et d'emploi pour les jeunes, grâce auquel on pouvait entrer dans l'armée à titre de réserviste pendant un an pour essayer le système, pour voir si l'on aimait ça et si l'on était aimé. J'avais demandé à être technicien de moteurs d'avion parce que j'adorais la mécanique. Comme il n'y avait pas de place, on m'a invité à devenir technicien en munitions, métier dont j'ignorais tout. J'ai accepté. On m'avait dit que si j'obtenais de bons résultats, j'aurais de bonnes chances de pouvoir me faire reclasser plus tard ou de changer de métier, puisque j'aurais déjà un pied dans la porte. C'était un mensonge. Ce métier de technicien en munitions est l'un des rares dont on ne peut sortir. C'est celui où l'on compte le moins de spécialistes au sein des Forces armées canadiennes, puisqu'il n'y en a que 140 environ.

Toutefois, j'ai aimé travailler au contact des explosifs, dans les deux volets que comporte ce métier: l'approvisionnement et le côté opérationnel, soit la neutralisation des engins explosifs. J'ai décidé de continuer parce que cela m'intéressait. À l'époque, l'expression engin explosif improvisé, ou EEI, n'était pas aussi fréquente qu'aujourd'hui.

J'ai d'abord été affecté au Dépôt de munitions des Forces canadiennes de Rocky Point, le DMFC, en Colombie-Britannique. Comme je le disais, nous n'étions pas nombreux dans cette spécialité, mais voilà que d'un seul coup, le DMFC a dû accueillir 12 soldats, tandis que rien n'était prévu pour les loger ni pour loger le personnel subalterne. J'ai donc été envoyé à Nelles Block, une base navale située à une quarantaine de kilomètres de Rocky Point, pour occuper un logement réservé aux gens de passage. J'y ai passé six mois à faire la navette en compagnie d'un groupe de travailleurs âgés, spécialistes du domaine, qui n'avaient pas envie de travailler.

J'ai détesté mon boulot et j'ai commencé à me sentir isolé et déprimé. J'étais arrivé sur place en septembre 1986 et, le 6 décembre, je pliais ma voiture flambant neuve contre un poteau après avoir ingurgité de la robine de marin. À l'époque, on pouvait encore avoir de l'alcool à bord des bateaux et il en coûtait environ 25 ¢ pour une bière ou pour un verre de whisky. C'est alors que j'ai commencé à vraiment sombrer dans l'alcool.

Comme pour contrecarrer cette tendance chez moi, l'armée m'a envoyé suivre un cours de dynamique de la vie où l'on se faisait essentiellement dire: « Ne continuez pas, sans quoi vous allez partir en vrille. » On m'a appris à camoufler mon problème. On m'a d'ailleurs éloigné de ce problème en Colombie-Britannique en me demandant de faire tout de suite mon niveau 5 de qualification et en m'affectant immédiatement au 2e Bataillon du service spécial du Détachement du service, à Petawawa.

Là, ce fut un véritable rêve. Nous étions toujours sur le terrain et j'adorais ça. Je m'épanouissais dans mes fonctions et j'en ai profité pour devenir un parfait alcoolique, parce qu'on pouvait boire jusqu'à 4 heures du matin et aller courir à 6 heures. Au début des années 1990, c'était la norme dans les Forces armées canadiennes. Je suis certain que les choses ont changé depuis.

J'ai obtenu ma qualification de technicien en neutralisation d'engins explosifs improvisés, ou NEEI, en avril 1990. Cela étant, je venais de réaliser mon objectif initial, soit de devenir, à 23 ans, le plus jeune technicien en NEEI de l'histoire canadienne, record encore inégalé — et qui ne le sera jamais, à cause des qualifications maintenant nécessaires.

Sur ce, j'ai été affecté comme instructeur à l'École du génie électrique et mécanique des Forces canadiennes, en 1991. Là, je faisais partie de l'équipe d'intervention en cas d'urgence nucléaire, biologique et chimique, en qualité de spécialiste en explosifs. La même année, on avait découvert à Borden des contenants de gaz moutarde encore actif datant de la Première Guerre mondiale. J'en avais entendu parler parce que cette découverte avait été faite tandis que je suivais mon cours de NEEI. Personne ne savait alors comment en disposer. Puis, en 1994, tandis que j'étais membre de l'équipe NBC, l'armée a décidé de neutraliser ces obus.

Mon patron étant absent, c'est moi qu'on a appelé et qui ai fini par éliminer le gaz moutarde. À l'époque, la seule technique consistait à faire sauter une charge assez forte pour fissurer l'enveloppe de l'obus, sans toutefois faire exploser la charge de dispersion, ce qui aurait entraîné la contamination de tout Borden au gaz moutarde. Dans le courant de l'opération, j'ai été contaminé et j'ai dû passer au travers de toute la procédure de décontamination. Le gaz moutarde est un gaz qui se conserve très bien. Mon détecteur affichait sept barres. Désormais, chaque fois que je vois du vinaigre balsamique, qui ressemble au gaz moutarde, je suis pris de panique.

(1605)



C'est à Borden que j'ai été le plus heureux. J'y ai rencontré mon épouse avec qui j'ai eu trois enfants. Tout allait très bien dans ma carrière militaire et je passais devant tout le monde pour les promotions. Je m'étais bien adapté à la vie de famille et je faisais des connaissances sur le plan social. J'étais devenu un simple buveur mondain qui ne consommait plus jusqu'à 4 heures du matin pour aller courir à 6 heures. Ma vie tournait autour de ma famille. Je ne pouvais rêver mieux comme qualité de vie.

Puis, en 1994, on m'a affecté à Toronto, à la base d'approvisionnement des Forces canadiennes, en qualité de commandant adjoint de la section des munitions où j'étais censé être le technicien en approvisionnement. Peu après, on m'annonçait que la base de Toronto allait fermer. Il y avait alors deux postes: celui de caporal-chef et celui de sergent. Le poste de sergent n'a pas été remplacé parce qu'il avait été éliminé. Dans un métier comportant aussi peu d'effectifs, on ne peut pas simplement aller chercher un sergent ailleurs pour le placer là où on en a besoin.

Le commandement s'était dit que, tant qu'à fermer Toronto, autant laisser un caporal-chef s'en occuper. Le problème, c'est qu'il fallait également un chef à l'équipe anti-EEI sur place, la EEI 14. On m'a donc temporairement promu sergent et on m'a expédié au Royaume-Uni pour y suivre un cours supérieur d'anti-EEI avant de me nommer chef de la 14e équipe anti-EEI. C'est à ce moment-là que la nouvelle de la fermeture de la base de Toronto s'est répandue dans la presse, alarmant du même coup la collectivité.

Divers corps policiers avaient accordé une amnistie aux propriétaires d'articles militaires, ce qui avait eu pour effet imprévu d'augmenter de plusieurs centaines le nombre d'équipes anti-EEI nécessaires. Comme je l'ai dit, j'avais été temporairement promu au grade de sergent. Jusqu'à la fermeture complète de la base, je n'ai reçu aucun coup de main, malgré des appels d'urgence, malgré aussi des centaines de milliers de kilomètres parcourus au volant, le plus souvent pour transporter des marchandises dangereuses, comme dix engins explosifs improvisés qu'il fallait détruire. J'ai aussi vécu l'événement le plus horrible de ma vie, une enquête post-explosion concernant un jeune garçon.

À mon départ de Toronto, on m'a promu sergent avec, à la clé, une cote « exceptionnelle » dans mon évaluation du rendement signée par le commandant de la base. Cependant, la fermeture de Toronto allait aussi marquer la fin des beaux jours. Je vivais à Angus et je devais faire la navette tous les jours.

Du jour au lendemain, plutôt que d'aller à Toronto, j'ai été renvoyé à Borden où je me suis retrouvé officier de sécurité des explosifs pour le sud-ouest de l'Ontario. Dans les années qui suivirent, j'ai visité des unités de cadets et de la milice et j'ai donné des exposés sur la sécurité des explosifs. Je vivais dans des chambres d'hôtel, je conduisais une voiture de location et je pouvais me faire rembourser une fortune en dépenses courantes, ce qui me permettait de camoufler mon alcoolisme. Je passais mes journées à boire jusqu'aux environs de 3 heures du matin; je me levais aux alentours de midi, je me douchais, j'allais visiter une unité de cadets. Je vérifiais les casiers, j'effectuais une inspection, je prenais quelques bières en compagnie de l'élève-officier supérieur à qui je racontais mes récits de guerre, et je recommençais le lendemain si besoin était jusqu'à ce que je trouve le courage nécessaire pour rentrer à la maison, parce que je ne me sentais plus capable de faire face à ma famille.

Je me suis mis à boire de plus en plus, au point de devenir complètement dépendant. J'ai pris beaucoup de poids et je suis passé du parfait indice de masse corporelle que j'avais à Toronto à un IMC de 31, avec en prime, un diagnostic d'apnée du sommeil. En 1999, les médecins ont considéré que je n'étais plus apte à travailler en unité ou à être envoyé en opération. Personne n'a cherché à savoir pourquoi j'avais pris autant de poids. Je présentais des symptômes de dépression et ma vie familiale se détériorait. Je venais de passer quatre années à travailler seul, sans aucun soutien, après un tour en opération. Je me retrouvais loin de toute base où j'aurais pu faire partie d'une unité et ressentir les bienfaits de l'esprit de corps, que ce soit à la faveur d'une après-midi à jouer aux quilles, d'une tournée de bière ou que sais-je encore. Personne n'avait remarqué de changement chez moi, sauf les membres de ma famille et j'étais loin d'eux.

Après 15 années dans les forces régulières et une année dans la réserve, dans le cadre du PIEJ, j'ai pris ma retraite le 12 août 2000 avec le grade d'adjudant. Comme j'ai été libéré dans les derniers jours du plan de réduction des forces, on ne m'a posé aucune question. Il fallait simplement réduire les effectifs, les Forces canadiennes voulaient se débarrasser d'une partie du personnel et personne ne se préoccupait de savoir qui partait. Quand j'ai demandé à être libéré de mes obligations militaires, on ne m'a posé aucune question. Je me suis retrouvé dans le civil moins de deux semaines après en avoir fait la demande. On m'a fait passer un examen physique de base, mais aucune évaluation psychologique.

Je suis alors parti pour le Kosovo où j'ai commencé mon nouveau métier dans le civil qui consistait à désamorcer des bombes à fragmentation. Après, je suis allé au Kurdistan, dans le nord de l'Iraq, où j'ai fait du travail de déminage dans le cadre des programmes humanitaires de l'ONU. J'ai tenté de réintégrer les Forces canadiennes en 2001, mais le centre de recrutement n'a pas donné suite. Puis est arrivé le jour où des avions se sont écrasés contre les tours jumelles, ce qui a tout changé. Dans les années qui suivirent, je me suis retrouvé en Afghanistan, en Iraq, en Iran, en Turquie, à Amman, au Laos, au Yémen, en Russie et dans les États baltes à neutraliser et à détruire des explosifs, puis à faire de la dépose de câbles à haute tension en Iraq, en Afghanistan, en Tanzanie et au Rwanda.

(1610)



En tout, j'ai passé six ans à Bagdad et deux ans en Afghanistan en qualité de civil travaillant en dehors du périmètre de sécurité. J'ai été reconnu par l'ONU pour avoir découvert la plus importante cache d'explosifs en Afghanistan.

Me reste-t-il beaucoup de temps?

Le président:

Pourriez-vous conclure?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je vais conclure rapidement.

Je vivais comme s'il n'y avait pas de lendemain. J'ai tenté de renouer avec ma famille, mais cela n'a pas fonctionné et a abouti à trois tentatives de suicide. La première était en 2010, en Irak, puis à nouveau, en 2013, en Tanzanie. Ce sont mes collègues qui m'ont trouvé, puis j'ai été congédié. J'ai été renvoyé à la maison et, à ce moment-là, je ne savais pas que j'étais un vétéran. Je me suis retrouvé au Canada. J'avais été à l'extérieur du pays pendant 14 ans. Je ne savais pas où aller ni quoi faire, et j'ai fini par aboutir dans une chambre d'hôtel et me trancher les veines des poignets.

De toute évidence, j'ai survécu à cette troisième tentative, puis j'ai passé un mois dans une unité de santé mentale. C'est là qu'un interne, qui était un réserviste, m'a dit que j'étais un vétéran, et c'est là que j'ai commencé à obtenir de l'aide. J'ai récupéré au point que maintenant, avec l'aide d'un chien d'assistance, je dois commencer l'école en septembre.

Mon parcours vers la guérison a été long et a commencé le 24 janvier 2014, au moment où j'ai pris mon dernier verre d'alcool. Ce cheminement vers la guérison a été extraordinaire. J'ai repris contact avec mes enfants. Je peux maintenant me trouver dans la même pièce que mon ex-conjointe et mon petit-fils. Je veux juste avoir la possibilité de vivre une vie normale et de faire du bénévolat et de travailler dans ma communauté.

Brièvement, voici mes recommandations aux Forces canadiennes.

Il devrait y avoir une présentation d'ACC pendant l'entraînement de base. Dès que vous avez réussi votre entraînement de base et que vous êtes libéré avec mention honorable, vous êtes un vétéran, et il y a de bonnes chances que vous deveniez un client d'ACC. Les soldats devraient être informés de cela. En 2000, en tant que sergent des Forces armées canadiennes, je ne savais pas que j'étais un vétéran. Tout ça à cause de l'Afghanistan. Seuls les soldats ayant servi en Afghanistan savaient qu'ils étaient des vétérans, même ceux qui y avaient travaillé sous un autre uniforme.

Des examens de la santé mentale devraient être effectués avant l'enrôlement, avant la sélection pour des métiers spécialisés, après une tâche opérationnelle, avant le commandement d'une équipe opérationnelle et avant la libération.

J'ai aussi quelques brèves recommandations pour ACC.

Nous n'avons pas besoin d'un plus grand nombre de gestionnaires de cas. Ce sont les gestionnaires de cas qui ont besoin de plus d'aide. Ils devraient avoir des adjoints travaillant pour eux, qui pourraient répondre aux appels des vétérans directement, un genre de ligne 911 pour les vétérans. Nous devons être traités différemment. Lorsqu'une personne fait une crise dans un bureau, vous ne devriez pas appeler la police et une ambulance en pensant que cette personne est suicidaire. Tout ce que j'ai dit c'est: « Ils nous font attendre, ils nient, ils souhaitent que nous mourions et qu'ils n'aient pas à donner suite à nos demandes », et cela a apparemment été considéré comme une tentative de suicide. C'était en octobre dernier.

En ce qui a trait aux chiens d'assistance, des études ont été menées au sujet des bienfaits qu'ils peuvent apporter. Je ne serais pas ici aujourd'hui sans ce genre de chien. Des études ont été menées. Il existe suffisamment de documentation à ce sujet. ACC doit adopter un programme maintenant, parce que ces chiens sauvent des vies. J'ai eu cette chienne grâce à Audeamus, et à Marc Lapointe, qui travaille dans ce domaine. Il faut réellement consacrer des ressources à ce genre de service. Si je n'avais pas ma chienne, je ne serais pas ici. J'ai connu des heures très sombres au cours des trois dernières années, et sans elle, je n'aurais pas pu passer au travers.

Le dernier élément que je voudrais mentionner est celui des incitatifs pour les médecins civils. Lorsque vous ne faites pas partie du système de santé, vous n'avez droit à rien. Vous n'avez même pas de carte santé. Les médecins se rendent compte que les vétérans sont un fardeau pour leur pratique, notamment en raison de la documentation qui doit être fournie pour à peu près tout ce dont nous avons besoin. Ils ne nous prennent donc pas comme patients. Il devrait y avoir des incitatifs pour que les médecins prennent en charge les vétérans.

Merci.

(1615)

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Nous allons commencer les interventions de six minutes.

Allez-y, monsieur Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à vous quatre pour les services que vous avez rendus au pays.

Vous nous avez fourni énormément d'information. Une grande partie des témoignages que nous avons entendus dans ce comité concernant les questions de santé mentale et de prévention du suicide mentionnaient des problèmes de perte d'identité et de stigmates associés aux situations qu'ont vécues nos vétérans.

Monsieur McKean, je crois que vous avez parlé de la reconnaissance des acquis et du fait de permettre aux vétérans de mettre à profit ce qu'ils ont appris pendant leur carrière militaire et de leur offrir des postes par la suite, pour les aider. Je crois que ce que vous dites c'est qu'il faut reconnaître le savoir accumulé par les vétérans pendant leur carrière et qui leur sera utile plus tard. Je me demande seulement si je vous ai bien compris. Si oui, pouvez-vous expliquer davantage?

M. Michael McKean:

Vous m'avez très bien compris. En 2012, j'ai dû abandonner l'uniforme parce que j'étais trop émotif. Je pleurais sans arrêt et je n'étais pas prêt à poursuivre ma carrière militaire. Ceci étant dit, lorsque je me suis recyclé en travail social, on ne m'a pas autorisé à faire de stage dans les services de santé mentale sous prétexte que j'en savais trop au sujet de la vie militaire. J'ai été reconnu par la Croix-Bleue, mais pas par les Forces armées canadiennes, et plus particulièrement Calian, qui gère la plupart des services à contrat dans le domaine des soins de santé et du travail social. On m'a laissé de côté parce que j'en savais trop. On craignait que je joue le rôle de défenseur, ce qui est ressorti aussi dans d'autres témoignages.

De nombreux vétérans ont une expérience considérable, qui peut être mise à profit. La plupart des gens en transition ne peuvent pas travailler à temps plein, mais si nous reconnaissons les connaissances précieuses qu'ils ont, et si nous mettons en place un système suffisamment robuste, je crois que nous pourrons régler un grand nombre de problèmes, parce que les vétérans qui ont été blessés et qui sont passés par là comprennent la perte d'identité. Ils ont traversé des épreuves et ils peuvent en aider d'autres à faire de même, ainsi qu'informer les gestionnaires de cas et les autres intervenants qui ne sont pas familiers avec le système.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Je vous remercie, monsieur.

Monsieur Mitic, vous avez beaucoup parlé de l'entraînement. Vous avez notamment mentionné l'inoculation du stress. Nous avons entendu beaucoup de choses à ce sujet. Il a en outre été question, et M. Brindle l'a mentionné aussi, de la façon dont nous formons nos soldats, dès le premier jour, pour qu'ils deviennent des machines, sans les déprogrammer lorsqu'ils terminent leur service. Nous ne les « déformons » pas pour qu'ils deviennent des civils.

Vous avez aussi parlé de formation, dès le premier jour, concernant le stress mental. Comment percevez-vous cela? Comment voyez-vous cela dans ces premières...

M. Jody Mitic:

Est-ce que vous me posez vraiment la question? Vous êtes sérieux?

M. Robert Kitchen:

Oui.

M. Jody Mitic:

Comme je l'ai dit, je me suis enrôlé en 1994 et, à ce moment-là, si vous aviez un problème mental, on utilisait un terme différent. Vous étiez considéré comme une « femmelette », même si votre problème était physique. Un jour, pendant un exercice, je me suis fait une vilaine foulure à la cheville, et on m'a dit d'endurer. Ironiquement, je n'ai plus de chevilles, donc ce n'est plus un problème. C'était une blague mes amis.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Jody Mitic: Au cours des siècles passés — je suis un maniaque d'histoire — chaque classe de guerrier avait ses moments de réflexion, ses moments d'auto-examen. Les samouraïs excellaient à la calligraphie. Les Spartiates avaient leur montagne où ils se retiraient pour prendre des hallucinogènes, et ainsi de suite. Ils faisaient aussi preuve d'un grand esprit de camaraderie pendant le déplacement des troupes.

Ces moments de réflexion ont disparu dans le monde militaire moderne occidental. Même les moines soldats priaient et jeûnaient beaucoup. Il s'agissait essentiellement de méditation et d'autoréflexion.

Dès le départ, j'instaurerais un genre de système. Il serait question des meilleures pratiques et on enseignerait à nos soldats que, même s'ils préfèrent lever des poids de 300 livres, ils devraient consacrer de 20 à 30 minutes par jour à réfléchir à comment ils se sentiront la première fois qu'ils tueront quelqu'un, ou la première fois qu'un de leurs amis tombera au combat. Nous devons aussi simuler ces situations, dans une certaine mesure. Je sais que je parle sans arrêt de ramper dans des viscères de porc, mais il s'agit d'une méthode d'entraînement très efficace.

Puis, il y a des hommes comme Joe. Désolé, comment vous appelez-vous déjà?

Une voix: Don.

M. Jody Mitic: Don utilisait des explosifs pour simuler des attaques d'artillerie. C'est très bien. Lors d'une attaque au mortier par les talibans, j'ai eu un peu la même impression, et j'avais une petite idée que mon rythme cardiaque augmenterait, mais j'y étais préparé un peu.

Je crois que le MDN doit intervenir et apprendre aux soldats dès le premier jour à gérer leur stress mental. Il faut aussi leur dire qu'ils ont le droit d'avoir peur. Il faut leur dire qu'ils ont le droit d'éprouver toutes sortes de sentiments. Il faut leur dire de mettre à profit leur entraînement, parce qu'une part importante de cette attitude de dur à cuire vient de ceux qui disent: « Ne sois pas aussi femmelette. Endure. » Cette attitude est bonne au combat, mais pendant l'entraînement, je crois qu'il faut mettre l'accent sur l'attitude mentale qui permet de reconnaître que l'on s'endurcit avec le temps. C'est une question d'entraînement, une question de budget, parce que ce genre d'entraînement est coûteux. Il s'agit aussi d'un concept qui semble s'être perdu au cours des sept dernières années.

(1620)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Colin Fraser (Nova-Ouest, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Merci, messieurs, de vous joindre à nous aujourd'hui et merci aussi pour les services que vous avez rendus au Canada.

Monsieur MacKinnon, j'ai réellement apprécié votre témoignage et certaines des observations que vous avez faites. En ce qui a trait au counseling, vous aviez dit que vous ne saviez pas vraiment où aller et comment cela fonctionnait. Je sais qu'on a élargi le nombre de services de counseling qui sont offerts. Avez-vous fait face à un problème concret lorsque vous avez voulu obtenir des services de counseling? Un obstacle particulier s'est-il posé pour vous, qui pourrait être supprimé?

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Il est difficile d'exposer ses états d'âme devant quelqu'un. Devant deux personnes, c'est encore pire. Et lorsqu'il y en a trois ou quatre, les gens refusent carrément de le faire.

Il doit y avoir un endroit... Par exemple, pendant ma carrière, j'ai eu une affectation de six ans, une affectation de sept ans, et toutes les autres, de deux ou trois ans. J'ai été basé à Halifax, et pendant les deux années que j'ai passées là, j'ai commencé à obtenir l'aide dont j'avais besoin et cela m'a remis dans le droit chemin. Il n'y avait rien à London. Puis, je suis allé dans le Nord de l'Ontario, mais j'étais absent trop souvent. Lorsque j'étais à la maison, j'ai pris contact avec un psychologue civil, par l'entremise de l'armée, mais comme je l'ai dit, il est maintenant à la retraite.

Nous sommes dans une région où il manque de services, et lorsqu'il faut recommencer pour la troisième ou la quatrième fois... et dans une région où la variété des services offerts n'est pas grande. Si on était davantage prêt à accepter le personnel militaire... Il faut plus d'ouverture. Il faut dire aux gens comment entrer en contact avec ces services, que ce soit par l'entremise d'Anciens Combattants ou de l'armée. À ma connaissance, les ressources sont très peu nombreuses là-bas, et celles qui restent, depuis qu'un médecin a pris sa retraite, sont déjà débordées, ce qui fait qu'il est impossible d'obtenir un rendez-vous.

(1625)

M. Colin Fraser:

Il serait très utile de mettre en place une structure de fonctionnement définie et de disposer de personnel spécialisé sur le terrain, par l'entremise d'ACC.

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Oui, exactement.

Si vous étiez sur le point de sombrer aujourd'hui, auriez-vous la possibilité de voir un médecin? Vous êtes à Ottawa, et nous sommes à North Bay, où il y a pénurie de services.

ACC doit se préoccuper davantage des régions où l'on retrouve de nombreux militaires. Un plan doit être mis au point pour aider ces personnes, ou encore, il faut réclamer du gouvernement qu'il verse davantage d'incitatifs pour que des spécialistes s'installent dans cette région, afin d'offrir des services.

Il n'est pas financièrement abordable pour quelqu'un de North Bay de faire deux heures et demie de route pour se rendre à Petawawa, ou quatre heures et demie de route pour se rendre à Ottawa, pour un rendez-vous d'une heure, une fois par semaine ou deux fois par mois. Lorsque je me rends à Ottawa, je dois m'arrêter cinq ou six fois en raison de mes douleurs au dos et au genou, notamment. En plus de la tension mentale, il y a la douleur physique, qui est très pénible à supporter.

Il n'y a rien que j'aimerais autant que de pouvoir rencontrer à nouveau un psychologue, mais ce n'est pas pour tout de suite.

M. Colin Fraser:

D'accord, merci, monsieur MacKinnon.

Monsieur Brindle, vous avez mentionné une ligne 911 pour les vétérans. Il y a un numéro d'ACC que vous pouvez appeler 24 heures par jour, 365 jours par année. Êtes-vous familier avec ce service?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Oui, je le connais.

M. Colin Fraser:

Parmi les choses...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Ce n'est pas de cela que je veux parler, toutefois.

M. Colin Fraser:

D'accord.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Lorsqu'un vétéran est en crise, le système 911 que les civils utilisent ne fonctionne pas pour les militaires. Je vais vous donner un exemple concret.

Je me suis rendu au bureau d'ACC de la base de Borden au sujet de la demande de prestations d'invalidité que j'avais faite en septembre 2015, et j'ai craqué. J'étais en colère et la femme qui était là s'est sentie menacée. J'ai dit: « Oh, typique d'ACC — retarder les choses, nier les faits et attendre que les gens meurent. » Deux heures plus tard, il y avait trois agents de la Police provinciale de l'Ontario et une ambulance dans mon entrée. C'est à ça que servirait la ligne 911 pour les vétérans. Cette personne qui s'est sentie menacée au bureau d'ACC aurait pu appeler le 911 des vétérans.

Le gestionnaire de cas pourrait intervenir, si cela pouvait être utile, ou il pourrait y avoir un groupe organisé qui pourrait contacter le vétéran, parce que parfois, tout ce que ces gens veulent, c'est de parler. Ils sont parfois tellement frustrés par le système qu'ils éclatent. Cela entraîne une trop grande réaction. Ces personnes s'imaginent que vous êtes suicidaire et elles envoient la cavalerie. Deux jours plus tard, j'ai reçu une lettre recommandée pour me dire que j'étais banni de ce bureau. C'est le traitement que j'ai reçu, juste pour cette remarque.

M. Colin Fraser:

Je comprends, monsieur Brindle. Je suis content que vous ayez précisé.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je ne suis pas le seul.

M. Colin Fraser:

Que pensez-vous d'un soutien par les pairs?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Le soutien par les pairs fonctionne bien lorsque les budgets des cliniques du SSBSO ne sont pas réduits. Il arrive parfois que ma seule sortie soit pour déjeuner avec le groupe à Borden.

M. Colin Fraser:

Je veux dire, en situation de crise, croyez-vous que le soutien des pairs...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je n'ai pas accès à cela. Lorsque j'ai arrêté de boire, j'ai perdu tous mes amis. J'ai quitté l'armée il y a 14 ans. La plupart des collègues avec qui je travaillais à contrat sont... La plupart d'entre eux sont décédés. L'un d'eux est australien, et j'ai encore des contacts avec lui, mais je n'ai pas d'amis. Mes amitiés avec les techniciens de munitions remontent à 15 ans. N'oubliez pas que, pendant les six dernières années de ma carrière, je travaillais seul.

M. Colin Fraser:

D'accord, merci.

Le président:

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci d'être présents parmi nous et de nous faire profiter de votre expertise. Il est très important pour nous tous ici de nous assurer que les recommandations que nous faisons au gouvernement au sujet des besoins de nos vétérans et des soutiens en santé mentale sont documentées et étayées par les expériences dont nous avons pris connaissance dans ce comité.

J'ai beaucoup de questions, mais je veux commencer par vous, monsieur Mitic. Vous nous avez parlé de ce qui vous est arrivé lorsque vous et votre femme Alannah avez quitté les forces armées. Vous avez mentionné qu'il est difficile mentalement de traiter avec ACC, et qu'Alannah avait demandé des indemnités, mais qu'en raison de certains événements, elle n'en a pas reçu.

Pouvez-vous nous décrire ou nous expliquer la situation plus clairement? Quel genre d'impact cela a-t-il eu sur votre famille?

(1630)

M. Jody Mitic:

En fait, il s'agissait de mes indemnités. Dans ce cas, pour être plus juste à l'endroit d'ACC, c'est le MDN qui était en cause. Toutefois, j'entends des histoires similaires de la part de gens qui demandent des indemnités à Anciens Combattants aussi.

En fait, Alannah a subi une altération de l'ouïe par suite de l'explosion d'une mine. Elle a soumis une demande, qui a été refusée immédiatement, puis elle est allée en appel. Cela a été efficace, et elle a obtenu règlement. Puis, quelqu'un a perdu son dossier et son gestionnaire de cas a été réaffecté sans qu'elle le sache. Pendant 14 mois, donc, elle a dû appeler constamment le bureau, sans jamais obtenir de réponse.

Elle a subi énormément de stress par suite des difficultés que j'ai connues avec notre gestionnaire de cas de l'armée. Cela nous a réellement ébranlés, parce qu'il s'agit de gens en uniforme et que nous pensions qu'ils étaient là pour nous appuyer. Je ne dis pas qu'ils ne nous ont pas aidés. Ils l'ont fait, mais pas de la façon dont on s'y attendait pour des soldats blessés.

Ma femme est beaucoup plus intelligente que moi, ce qui fait qu'elle a pu s'orienter dans le système et traiter avec les bonnes personnes. Elle est aussi d'origine irlandaise, ce qui fait qu'elle réussit toujours à obtenir ce qu'elle veut. Pour elle, et pour moi, la chose la plus importante a toujours été... Comme je l'ai dit en commençant, il existe un ministère qui a été créé pour aider les vétérans à faire la transition à une vie normale, mais ces derniers sont nombreux à croire qu'il ne vaut même pas la peine de faire des démarches, comme dans le cas de notre ami, parce qu'ils craignent d'avoir de mauvaises nouvelles ou de se voir refuser quelque chose qui semblait facile à obtenir.

On peut dire que je suis organisé et que j'obtiens assez de succès, mais chaque fois que je dois traiter avec Anciens Combattants, je suis un peu mal à l'aise. J'essaie toujours de remettre cela à plus tard, parce que je ne veux tout simplement pas me retrouver dans la situation où je me dis: « Je pensais que c'était cela », et qu'on me répond « Non, ce n'est pas cela. C'est ceci. » Certaines indemnités qu'on croirait automatiques ne le sont tout simplement pas.

J'ai fait partie d'un comité relevant du ministre O'Toole, dans l'ancien gouvernement, dont le mandat était principalement de réduire les formalités et d'éliminer tous ces formulaires qu'il faut remplir sans cesse. Mais cela n'était qu'une partie du mandat. On voulait aussi faciliter l'accès aux indemnités. Peu importe qu'on les appelle indemnités liées au service ou autrement, cela ne semble pas être ce à quoi de nombreux vétérans s'attendent.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Vous êtes un mari très avisé, qui admet que sa femme est beaucoup plus intelligente que lui. Très avisé, en effet.

J'aimerais que vous nous parliez davantage des soutiens à la famille, dont on nous a dit qu'ils étaient absolument essentiels, très utiles.

Qu'est-ce qui fonctionne bien pour les familles? Est-ce que quelqu'un peut répondre? Faut-il de la formation? Des conseils matrimoniaux, des soins de santé pour les conjoints et les enfants, ou des soins de relève et un meilleur accès à ACC pour les conjoints? Qu'est-ce qui pourrait faciliter les choses et rendre la situation moins stressante?

M. Jody Mitic:

Pour faire une réponse courte, tout cela.

Je crois que dans le dernier budget, on a prévu de l'argent pour les soins à domicile, ou un allègement fiscal. Il a fallu 70 ans avant que cela ne se réalise. Cela aurait dû être fait il y a 70 ans. C'est incroyable.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Les soins de santé à domicile informels.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Le montant a augmenté pour passer à 1 000 $ par mois.

Pour le conjoint qui renonce à sa carrière, et on ne parle pas seulement de carrière, mais aussi de pension, 1 000 $ par mois, c'est...

M. Jody Mitic:

Mieux que rien.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Effectivement, c'est mieux que rien, mais cela ne remplace pas une carrière.

M. Jody Mitic:

Je comprends, mais il y a maintenant une indemnité pour les gens qui renoncent à leur carrière.

Je pense au capitaine Trevor Greene, qui a subi une attaque à la hache. Cliniquement, il était considéré comme un légume. Aujourd'hui, il peut marcher et parler. Il a même pu remonter l'allée vers l'autel lorsqu'il s'est marié. La seule raison pour laquelle il a pu le faire, c'est que sa femme a décidé de s'occuper de lui à temps plein. Ce genre de soutien, de sa part, est extraordinaire. Il existe de nombreux organismes sans but lucratif, je pense à True Patriot Love, ou à Wounded Warriors, dont les fonds pourraient très bien compléter cette somme pour les personnes qui décident de s'engager dans cette voie.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à tous. Vous avez parlé du budget, mais celui-ci ne reconnaît pas l'obligation sacrée envers les vétérans. Il s'agit d'une question très litigieuse dans le cas des vétérans qui souhaitent obtenir une pension après avoir été libérés pour des raisons de santé. Quelles sont vos impressions au sujet de cette obligation sacrée envers les vétérans?

(1635)

Le président:

Je suis désolé. Nous en sommes à six minutes 30 secondes. Il devra donc s'agir de votre prochaine question.

Monsieur Eyolfson.

M. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Merci.

Je vous remercie tous de votre présence ici et des services rendus.

Monsieur Brindle, j'aimerais parler d'un sujet que M. Mitic a abordé, à savoir la camaraderie entre les militaires, qui remonte à cette tradition ancienne de marcher ensemble vers le champ de bataille. J'ai l'impression, selon ce que vous avez dit, que vous n'avez pas beaucoup profité de cela pendant votre carrière.

M. Joseph Brindle:

La seule fois que j'ai connu réellement cela, c'était à Petawawa, et lors de ma première affectation à Borden, à l'école et dans un bataillon des services, parce que nous étions très près les uns des autres. Lorsque vous êtes constamment en exercice avec des personnes, vous finissez par tout savoir d'elles. Lorsque vous vous retrouvez seul, ensuite, vous connaissez des passages à vide.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Exactement.

Lorsque vous décriviez votre séjour à cette base navale et les 40 kilomètres que vous deviez parcourir chaque jour pour vous rendre au travail, y avait-il une solution qui s'offrait à vous et peut-être...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Pas comme simple soldat.

Comme simple soldat, lorsque vous vous retrouvez dans une base navale où vous avez... Les règles sont complètement différentes de celles d'une base de l'armée de terre. Il est interdit de porter la tenue de travail à l'extérieur de la base. Si on me déposait à l'hôpital de la base, qui était situé à l'extérieur de celle-ci, je devais me téléporter à la base, sous peine de me faire réprimander par le chef pour ne pas avoir porté mon uniforme à l'extérieur de la base. C'est tout un choc culturel pour quelqu'un qui vient d'entrer dans l'armée.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Vous avez parlé de votre lutte contre l'alcoolisme, un thème qui, malheureusement, est revenu très fréquemment dans les présentations que nous avons entendues à ce comité.

Je suis médecin. J'ai beaucoup d'expérience de patients qui ont connu ce problème. Il semble bien que lorsque quelqu'un a un problème de toxicomanie, quel qu'il soit, il s'agit parfois du premier indicateur d'un problème sous-jacent beaucoup plus profond.

Vous avez mentionné qu'on vous avait dit que vous aviez ce problème. Est-ce que jamais aucun de vos superviseurs ne vous a dit que vous aviez un problème et vous a envoyé pour une évaluation plus poussée, afin de savoir s'il s'agissait... ou vous ont-ils seulement dit: « Prends-toi en main et arrête de boire? »

M. Joseph Brindle:

Seulement après mon accident.

Ma voiture était la seule impliquée dans l'accident. Je suis parti seul de la caserne. Je ne me rappelle même pas de l'accident, mais j'ai une cicatrice ici et j'ai fait une commotion cérébrale. Je me suis réveillé le jour suivant à l'hôpital. Il n'y avait pas de téléphone cellulaire. J'ai dû trouver un autobus pour rentrer. Mon visage était comme un melon d'eau. On m'a fait suivre un cours d'aptitudes de vie et on m'a essentiellement averti que si un autre incident se produisait, je devrais suivre une thérapie et que cela nuirait à ma carrière. C'est la seule menace que l'on m'ait faite. C'est ainsi que j'ai appris à cacher mon problème.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Vous a-t-on, à un moment donné, offert de participer à un programme de traitement de la toxicomanie ou de l'alcoolisme?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Non. Je me suis retrouvé à Petawawa, où la consommation d'alcool était une façon de démontrer sa virilité. Disons les choses comme elles sont, le vendredi après-midi, il y avait toujours une possibilité de consommer de la bière dans le bureau de l'adjudant-maître.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Oui. J'aimerais pouvoir dire...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Il s'agissait d'un groupe des ordres. On y avait accès à beaucoup plus d'information que n'importe où ailleurs. Cela faisait partie des opérations.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Évidemment, j'aimerais pouvoir dire que c'est la première fois que j'entends ce genre de choses à ce comité. Malheureusement non.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Cela vous apprend comment devenir un alcoolique fonctionnel; à vous lever à 6 h et à être fonctionnel. J'en ai fait ma carrière, une carrière qui, parce que j'étais un entrepreneur, m'a permis de cacher mon alcoolisme. En fait, on préfère vous voir boire, parce qu'ainsi, vous ne vous rendez pas compte de ce que vous faites. Sinon, quelle personne en pleine possession de ses moyens accepterait de s'engager pour aller à Bagdad?

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Évidemment, d'accord.

Vous avez mentionné qu'après avoir été libéré, vous avez fait une tentative de suicide qui vous a mené à l'hôpital, et que là-bas, un interne vous a informé que vous étiez un vétéran. Combien de temps après votre libération des forces cela s'est-il produit?

(1640)

M. Joseph Brindle:

Quatorze ans.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Quatorze ans...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Oui. J'ai été à l'extérieur du pays pendant 14 ans.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Lorsqu'on vous a libéré, vous a-t-on donné de l'information concernant les services dont vous pouviez vous prévaloir au besoin?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Non. Lorsque j'étais au Kosovo, j'étais toujours en congé. J'ai été libéré si rapidement. J'ai pris environ cinq jours pour compléter ma liste de vérification de départ, et ma plaque m'a été envoyée par la poste à partir de la base.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Vous a-t-on donné un numéro d'ACC lorsqu'on vous a libéré?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Non.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je n'ai absolument reçu aucun renseignement concernant les services d'ACC, parce que nous étions au beau milieu du plan de réduction des forces et qu'on pensait uniquement aux chiffres. La santé mentale ne faisait pas partie des préoccupations.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord.

M. Joseph Brindle:

On ne voulait pas poser la question.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Je comprends.

Lorsque vous avez appris cela, avez-vous pu commencer à avoir accès aux indemnités d'ACC?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Non. Je suis devenu client lorsque j'étais à l'hôpital, puis j'ai suivi volontairement un cours de réadaptation à Belleville, en Ontario. Il s'agissait d'un programme parrainé par les vétérans, assez difficile, un coup de pied au derrière alors que j'en avais besoin. C'est à ce moment-là que j'ai commencé à remplir tous les formulaires et qu'on m'a affecté un gestionnaire de cas.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

C'était 14 ans après votre libération?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Après 14 ans, j'ai eu accès à mon premier gestionnaire de cas, oui.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord.

Au nom du gouvernement du Canada, je voudrais m'excuser pour ce qui vous est arrivé. Cela n'aurait pas dû se produire.

Le président:

Madame Lockhart.

Mme Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à chacun d'entre vous pour votre témoignage aujourd'hui. Cela a été très enrichissant pour nous.

Monsieur Mitic, vous avez mentionné que, selon vous, le ton devrait changer. Nous en avons beaucoup parlé au sein de ce comité. On nous a mentionné le fait, et je ne sais pas si c'était dans le cadre de la présente étude ou de l'étude précédente, que l'on donnait uniquement deux ans aux vétérans pour se prévaloir d'un programme de formation, d'études et de transition de carrière, ce qui entraînait beaucoup plus de stress.

Quelle serait selon vous l'échéance idéale? Si les échéances pour se prévaloir des indemnités n'étaient pas aussi serrées, est-ce que cela changerait le ton?

M. Jody Mitic:

Les échéances dans ce contexte sont, je crois, ridicules. Imposer une échéance de deux ans à quelqu'un... Même si tout allait parfaitement bien, si tous les points étaient mis sur les i et les barres sur les t, et que la personne était libérée, mais était incapable médicalement de faire quoi que ce soit. Puis, deux, trois, quatre ou peut-être cinq ans plus tard, la personne pourrait se sentir bien à nouveau et décider d'aller à l'école et de se trouver un emploi, pour se faire dire: « Désolé, vous aviez deux ans. »

J'ai perdu mes deux pieds. Si le système avait fonctionné et que Rick Hillier n'avait pas dit: « Vous ne devez libérer personne blessé au combat tant que je ne le dirai pas », j'aurais été libéré en 2010, ou peut-être 2011, j'aurais dû faire face à la perte de toutes mes possibilités de carrière, de mon identité, etc., et j'aurais été obligé de décider ce que je voulais faire ou quel cours je voulais suivre. La plupart des cours que j'ai demandé de suivre m'ont été refusés. Je crois que dans le nouveau budget, les règles à ce sujet ont changé, ce qui est très bien. Dans mon cas, en tant que soldat d'infanterie, les possibilités de transition au monde civil sont peu nombreuses, à moins de vouloir aller travailler pour certaines personnes, à Alep, ce que je ne veux pas faire.

La fenêtre de deux ans pour décider des cours à suivre ou même pour déterminer si vous êtes suffisamment en santé pour suivre des cours est à mon avis... Il m'a fallu cinq bonnes années uniquement pour récupérer physiquement de ma blessure. Mentalement, comme je l'ai dit, demandez à Alannah ce qu'elle en pense. Ces échéances arbitraires sont déroutantes pour moi, dans certains cas. Vous êtes admissible à une indemnité ou non. Particulièrement si l'on tient compte du fait qu'il s'agit de personnes qui sont amochées mentalement ou physiquement, ou les deux parfois. Lorsque l'on dit à quelqu'un qui ne veut pas être libéré de se ressaisir et de se faire à l'idée d'aller à l'école... Je connais de nombreux membres des troupes qui ont fréquenté l'école et qui ont fait quelque chose qu'ils détestaient; qui n'avaient aucun désir d'aller dans le domaine ou de suivre la formation qui leur était offert. Il s'agit d'un aspect pour lequel, je crois, on devrait éliminer ces échéances. Laissons les personnes décider lorsqu'elles sont prêtes.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci.

Monsieur Brindle.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je veux simplement compléter cela rapidement. Je vais commencer l'école en septembre, et à partir de cette date, j'ai deux ans. Je ne sais pas ce qui va m'arriver au cours des deux prochaines années. Je ne sais pas comment je vais réagir en public. Je suis anxieux et je veux aller à l'école, mais on ne devrait pas m'imposer une limite de deux ans pour terminer ce cours. Si j'ai besoin de m'absenter pendant six mois pour progresser, eh bien... Je ne suis pas allé à l'école depuis l'âge de 18 ans comme étudiant à temps plein. Il n'y a pas de raison d'imposer une échéance de deux ans. Allez-vous me jeter dehors après deux ans? Peut-être qu'en raison de mon invalidité, il me faudra trois ans. Cela n'a pas de sens.

(1645)

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci de votre témoignage.

Monsieur MacKinnon, vous avez parlé de collègues que vous connaissiez qui ont communiqué avec le SSBSO et qui ont reçu un courriel, plutôt qu'un appel téléphonique.

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Nous n'avons jamais reçu de courriel, ni d'appel téléphonique.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Excusez-moi, c'est encore pire. Parmi les choses qui, selon moi, sont très importantes figurent ces contacts personnels avec ACC ou le SSBSO, et nous vous avons entendu répéter combien cela est important et évident. Y a-t-il d'autres aspects qui, à votre avis, sont réellement importants pour aider nos vétérans à résoudre leurs problèmes de santé mentale? Comme je l'ai dit, il y a les contacts personnels, mais y a-t-il autre chose, dans le même genre, que vous considérez comme réellement utile?

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Comme je l'ai dit, il y a peut-être beaucoup de ressources disponibles, mais il faut en parler et indiquer où elles sont offertes et comment y accéder. Beaucoup de vétérans ne sont pas au courant de cela. Une personne peut se rendre à un bureau de la Légion et rencontrer là quelqu'un qui a de l'information ou non. Elle peut se présenter aux bureaux des Anciens Combattants, mais la réponse qu'elle recevra dépendra de l'effectif présent, si effectif il y a.

J'ai tenté d'appeler mon gestionnaire de cas. J'ai dû composer le numéro 1-800, pour me faire dire après une demi-heure « D'accord, je vais vous transférer. Si je ne peux pas joindre votre gestionnaire de cas, voulez-vous laisser un message? » Non, je veux parler au gestionnaire de cas. Si j'avais voulu laisser un message, je me serais rendu à son bureau. Si elle n'avait pas été là, j'aurais laissé un message, mais ce que je veux, c'est lui parler.

Je ne suis pas certain qu'il y ait un grand moratoire concernant les lignes directes avec les gestionnaires de cas d'ACC. Je ne sais pas pourquoi il faut nécessairement passer par le numéro 1-800. Si vous avez un gestionnaire de cas, il devrait être possible d'avoir un numéro direct pour l'appeler. Ces gens devraient être plus disponibles.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

D'accord.

J'ai une autre question rapide. Savez-vous qu'il existe un guide des indemnités? Quelqu'un fait signe que oui, mais ce n'est pas...

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Je sais qu'il existe des indemnités, mais exactement où les trouver...

M. Joseph Brindle:

En fait, on finit par le savoir après en avoir discuté... et Facebook est un bon endroit pour avoir une idée des indemnités qu'il est possible d'obtenir. Je ne suis pas familier avec le guide, mais pour les indemnités, il existe tellement d'obstacles. Par exemple, une nouvelle indemnité est disponible et vous permet de réclamer 300 $ pour l'achat d'une tablette, afin de vous donner accès aux applications utiles pour les gens qui ont un trouble de stress post-traumatique. Toutefois, ce n'est pas le médecin qui approuve. Il faut un psychiatre. Pour voir un psychiatre, il faut parfois dépenser jusqu'à 500 $; tout ça pour un remboursement de 300 $. Il m'a fallu 18 mois pour avoir un rendez-vous avec mon psychiatre et mettre de l'ordre dans mes ordonnances.

On crée des choses, qui semblent extraordinaires sur papier, mais cela n'aboutit à rien de concret, en raison du manque de capacité. Les gens n'ont pas de médecin de famille, et pour un psychiatre, on parle d'un autre niveau complètement. Les indemnités sont intéressantes, mais s'il n'est pas possible d'y avoir accès, elles sont inutiles.

Le président:

Madame Wagantall.

Mme Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, PCC):

Merci.

J'aimerais vous remercier pour tous les services que vous avez rendus. Je sais que nous disons cela au Canada, et j'aime mon pays aussi, mais les services que vous rendez sont phénoménaux, mais je veux le dire aussi de la part de mon mari, de moi-même et de nos enfants, ainsi que de nos petits-enfants, ce comité m'ayant ouvert les yeux à de nombreux égards et permis de les sensibiliser à ce sujet. Je crois qu'il est réellement important que vous compreniez que ce sont les Canadiens ordinaires qui apprécient réellement ce que vous avez fait.

J'ai tellement de questions.

Tout d'abord, monsieur Brindle, vous avez parlé de votre chienne, et je connais le groupe Audeamus, en plus d'avoir rencontré personnellement Chris, Marc et Katalin. Ils font des recherches extraordinaires à l'Université de la Saskatchewan et en Colombie-Britannique sur de la formation particulière concernant la multitude de problèmes auxquels font face les vétérans. De façon plus précise, ils disposent de toutes sortes de mesures solides, et leur démarche est axée sur les vétérans. C'est là leur tâche.

M. Joseph Brindle:

À titre d'exemple, j'ai fait une demande à Courageous Companions, à cette époque, en novembre 2014. À ce moment-là, on m'a confié à Marc Lapointe.

Il m'a appelé et nous avons passé environ quatre heures au téléphone pour parler de mes divers symptômes. Puis, il a décidé quel chien me conviendrait le mieux. Je n'en avais aucune idée. Le dernier chien auquel j'aurais pensé comme chien d'assistance est un Jack Russell. Compte tenu de mes symptômes particuliers, ils ont entraîné une chienne juste pour moi. Ce n'est qu'en juillet qu'on me l'a donnée.

(1650)

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Puis-je vous demander combien vous avez payé pour cette chienne?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Rien du tout.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord. Parce que je trouve que cela est important. Nous parlons toujours d'argent ici. Je sais qu'il existe d'autres groupes. Je ne mentionne personne en particulier, mais je sais que ces chiens peuvent coûter jusqu'à 30 000 $.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Oui.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Nous sommes ici devant un cas de vétéran qui aide des vétérans.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Oui. Cet organisme est géré entièrement par des vétérans.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Exactement.

Il semble y avoir ici un problème de confiance. Vous parliez de la confiance nécessaire pour obtenir les soins dont vous avez besoin. Il me semble y avoir un manque de confiance en votre capacité de déterminer ce dont vous avez le plus besoin, en vue de vous fournir cela de la façon la plus profitable.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je ne pourrais absolument pas m'asseoir à cette table sans elle. Je suis terrifié à l'idée de parler en public.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord.

Vous avez mentionné qu'il faut s'occuper des chiens de service dès aujourd'hui et que cela permettrait de satisfaire aux besoins, comme les maladies mentales qui affectent un grand nombre de nos anciens combattants et des militaires des forces armées.

Le lieutenant-général Roméo Dallaire est venu témoigner devant ce comité. Nous avons parlé de la méfloquine. Je lui ai demandé s'il fallait l'étudier et il m'a interrompu pour dire que non, qu'il y avait eu assez d'études et qu'il fallait s'en débarrasser.

Dans le cas présent, il y a peu de preuves de ce que les chiens de services peuvent faire. Quel est votre point de vue général?

M. Joseph Brindle:

À mon avis, les études ont déjà été faites. Je pense que tout le monde se base sur l'expérience ratée de la Légion, qui a dépensé des millions sur de faux chiens de service en provenance des États-Unis qui n'étaient pas suffisamment dressés pour être fonctionnels. Cela a fait du tort à la catégorie entière des chiens de service.

Audeamus vient d'un organisme sans but lucratif... Je n'ai pas payé un sou. Elle a coûté plus de 20 000 $ en dressage. Tout ça s'est fait au détriment d'autres anciens combattants. Nous faisons des collectes de fonds, ce genre de choses. Je contribue bénévolement à ce projet maintenant.

Mon projet est de devenir dresseur pour pouvoir dresser un chien et le donner à un autre ancien combattant. Nous devons le faire nous-mêmes parce que l'ACC ne veut entendre parler ni des chiens ni de leurs bienfaits.

Un prix de fournisseur de soins vient d'être décerné, mais je dois toujours payer de ma poche la nourriture spéciale et les soins vétérinaires.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord.

Je comprends le point de vue du gouvernement: il faut faire ça correctement pour ne pas rencontrer les mêmes problèmes que par le passé. Cela étant dit, il n'est pas nécessaire de continuer à étudier le sujet, il faut passer à l'action.

M. Joseph Brindle:

L'étude a déjà été faite.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

On pourrait leur recommander de se présenter pour parler à des gens comme vous. Je sais qu'Audeamus a essayé de rencontrer l'ACC. Je dois dire que, de tout ce que nous faisons à cette table, l'une des meilleures choses à faire est de faire venir ces personnes pour nous faire une présentation.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je me tiens généralement prêt à aider si cela peut sauver des vies. Je veux que personne n'ait à suivre le même cheminement que moi. S'il y a de nouvelles discussions sur le sujet, c'est avec plaisir que je prendrai le temps nécessaire pour aller de l'avant.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Je recommanderais aux divers groupes de notre comité de prendre le temps de demander à ces gens de venir dans leur bureau, pour se rassembler en tant que caucus afin d'étudier ce qu'ils peuvent contribuer.

Je suis d'accord avec vous. Je pense que c'est une excellente idée.

Monsieur McKean, pouvez-vous nous parler un peu plus du concept de changement d'attitude et du recours aux bénévoles et aux vétérans?

M. Michael McKean:

Dans le système SSBSO, les professionnels de la santé doivent déclarer que leurs patients peuvent continuer de travailler à temps plein et qu'il n'y a pas de déclencheur de crise. Un des problèmes avec cette façon de faire, c'est qu'elle limite de façon importante le nombre de personnes qui vont s'inscrire. En gros, on encourage les gens à faire semblant d'aller bien, comme s'il n'y avait pas de problème, et à éviter les situations comprenant un élément déclencheur.

Comme je le disais, bien que j'étais sur la liste comme fournisseur de services de travail social et gestionnaire de soins cliniques de Croix-Bleue, on m'a évité. Quand j'ai voulu faire un stage clinique sur la base, on m'a dit que trop de personnes me connaissaient et que j'en savais trop sur le sujet.

J'ai fait un stage réussi dans un institut psychiatrique, Waypoint psychiatric hospital, et dans une école secondaire avec des jeunes difficiles. Ils m'ont accepté sans aucun problème, mais l'approche de mes pairs, de mes frères et soeurs en uniforme, c'était de dire: « Elle a le trouble de stress post-traumatique. On n'en veut pas ici. On n'aime pas avoir ces gens-là dans le coin, alors on ne s'en occupe pas. »

Par contre, le SSBSO, lui, est en général connu et c'est une des façons permettant aux gens d'établir une relation avec nous. En ce moment le budget augmente et diminue sans arrêt; cela diminue notre capacité à recruter des bénévoles, ce qui entraîne des épuisements professionnels. C'est un cercle vicieux.

(1655)

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord. Les limites de financement signifient donc que la formation des bénévoles a été annulée.

M. Michael McKean:

C'est ça, annulée. Ils essayent maintenant d'organiser la formation en français au Québec et tentent de voir s'ils pourront former des anglophones ou des personnes bilingues. Mais cela signifie plus de déplacements et moins de personnes disponibles. De plus, les gens ont l'impression de ne pas être au niveau parce qu'ils s'organisent pour suivre une formation d'une semaine, qu'il faut se dépêcher, puis on leur dit d'attendre.

Mme Cathay Wagantall: Merci.

Le président:

Merci

Monsieur Bratina.

M. Bob Bratina (Hamilton-Est—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Merci.

Il y a longtemps de cela, j'ai été maire et j'avais un conseiller en chef du patrimoine et du protocole militaire, Geordie Elms, qui a été commandant de Argylls et qui possédait de bons antécédents militaires. Je faisais souvent des allocutions dans les écoles et je parlais souvent de l'Équipe Canada de hockey. Je disais aux élèves que nous avions rencontré l'Équipe et que nous avions fait ceci et cela, mais je leur disais aussi que la meilleure Équipe Canada, c'est celle dont les joueurs portent leur symbole sur l'épaule: les membres des Forces armées canadiennes.

Je vais poser cette question à M. McKean: Aviez-vous le sentiment de faire partie de l'Équipe Canada, aviez-vous cette estime de soi? Aviez-vous le sentiment de faire partie d'une excellente équipe? Avez-vous perdu ce sentiment en raison des expériences dont vous venez de nous parler? Avez-vous toujours dans le coeur le sentiment d'avoir accompli quelque chose pour le Canada et que le pays est fier de vous?

M. Michael McKean:

Oui, j'avais vraiment ce sentiment de faire partie de l'Équipe Canada. Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, j'ai été blessé en Afghanistan. J'ai continué sans ne rien laisser paraître. J'ai continué malgré mon trouble du sommeil. J'ai fait face à tout un tas de problèmes parce que j'avais un travail à accomplir. Je pensais qu'il était important que je le fasse et que je ne me retire pas, car autrement, j'aurais laissé le fardeau aux autres.

Je me suis senti très triste à mon retour au Canada. En gros, on me disait: « Tu es de retour. Concentre-toi sur ta tâche. Fais ton travail correctement ou va-t'en. » J'ai été dans la Réserve, dans la Force régulière, puis de nouveau dans la Réserve. J'ai été commandant avec Jody quand il était dans les Argylls. Nous avions l'esprit d'équipe. Nous avions les unités. Les unités de la Réserve contribuent fortement à générer cet état d'esprit. Ses membres sont le lien avec la communauté. C'est là qu'il existe un mécanisme pour trouver des soins de santé, en particulier si vous commencez à utiliser la formule T2 Health américaine, parce que ce système permet d'offrir des services de soins de santé dans les régions éloignées ou là où il y a un manque de services, cela grâce à la télésanté et à d'autres moyens.

Je ne pouvais pas continuer. J'avais l'impression d'être « endommagé, cassé ». J'avais le sentiment que de nombreuses personnes me tournaient le dos et qu'on ne me considérait plus comme faisant partie de l'équipe. Je continue d'essayer d'aider des anciens combattants comme bénévole parce que le bénévolat est le seul mécanisme qui fonctionne.

M. Bob Bratina:

C'est intéressant que vous fassiez ce commentaire sur la Réserve. Durant mes quatre années en tant que maire, un événement s'est produit qui a rassemblé la communauté plus que n'importe quel autre, même s'il était triste. Il s'agit des funérailles de Nathan Cirillo. La ville s'est mobilisée. L'unité de Réserve et toutes nos Réserves, les Rileys et d'autres encore, ont ressenti l'affection de la communauté à leur égard. Évidemment, vous avez perdu un peu de ce sentiment à cause des expériences que vous avez vécues.

Puis-je demander à M. Mitic de répondre à la même question?

(1700)

M. Jody Mitic:

Je voudrais préciser que bien que les Argylls soient une unité excellente et à la riche histoire, je faisais partie des Lorne Scots, monsieur.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Bob Bratina:

Bien.

M. Jody Mitic:

Pardon, pourriez-vous répéter la question s'il vous plaît?

M. Bob Bratina:

Sentiez-vous que vous faisiez partie de l'Équipe Canada et ressentiez-vous de la fierté à travailler pour le pays?

M. Jody Mitic:

Dans l'armée?

M. Bob Bratina:

Oui, dans l'armée.

M. Jody Mitic:

Je n'y suis pas resté 20 ans parce que j'avais l'impression d'y perdre mon temps.

M. Bob Bratina:

Je comprends bien, mais avez-vous plus tard perdu un peu de cette fierté en raison des problèmes d'Anciens combattants Canada et des problèmes dont nous sommes en train de parler?

M. Jody Mitic:

Non, on la perd toute. C'est ce que je disais tout à l'heure. Il existe un système de soutien. Je pense que Phil l'a déjà fait remarquer et moi aussi. On vous dit où aller, quels vêtements porter, quoi amener, on vous nourrit, on vous dit qu'on y arrivera ensemble, on vous donne votre titre de permission et bla bla bla. Tout ce qu'il faut faire, c'est être présent. Et puis d'un seul coup, vous êtes blessé. Les unités d'infanterie regardent devant elles, et je ne blâme ni le commandant ni le sergent-major régimentaire de ne pas se soucier des soldats qui s'en iront bientôt. Au combat, on ne se soucie pas de ceux qui tombent.

Cependant, comme je l'ai dit, quand vous entrez dans le système et que vous réalisez que vous êtes toujours du côté Défense nationale, vous avez des gens en uniforme du même grade, qui ont fait le même serment à la Reine et à leur pays que vous, et on vous dit… Il y a tant de négativité. On vous refuse vos avantages sociaux. Je suis convaincu que l'Unité interarmées de soutien du personnel me doit encore des dizaines de milliers de dollars auxquels j'ai tout simplement renoncé pour protéger ma santé mentale. J'ai un travail qui paye bien, j'ai eu de la chance, mais je n'en aurai peut-être pas toujours. Cette expérience m'a causé plus de stress que la mine sur laquelle j'ai marché.

M. Bob Bratina:

Pour conclure, je veux en venir au fait qu'au delà des ressources financières, nous voulons que les anciens combattants soient au courant des services qui leur sont offerts. Nous voulons trouver autant de ressources que possible, mais est-il nécessaire de former ou de former de nouveau le personnel d'Anciens Combattants Canada et de la Défense nationale sur le respect, l'estime de soi et la conscience de sa propre valeur que doivent ressentir leurs clients? Faut-il en parler avec eux?

M. Jody Mitic:

Cela revient souvent. Je me suis blessé il y a 10 ans et cette même phrase a été utilisée au moins cinq ou six fois, si ma mémoire ne me fait pas défaut. La réponse courte est « oui ». Mais en même temps, les personnes offrant le service de première ligne doivent, d'après moi, avoir plus de latitude pour prendre certaines décisions qui rendraient la prestation des services plus rapide. Parfois, la difficulté n'est pas tant la façon de parler des gens, mais le temps. Deux semaines, ça semble peu si on vit une vie normale et qu'on fait des choses. Mais si vous ne pouvez pas sortir de chez vous, disons parce que vous vous êtes fait une blessure au dos et que vous ne pouvez pas du tout faire vos tâches ménagères, une attente de deux, ou trois ou six semaines pendant que votre dossier progresse dans le système et qu'on en parle… Votre maison est une porcherie, si bien que vous êtes trop gêné pour inviter qui que ce soit chez vous. Vous vous décevez vous-même parce que vous ne pouvez pas faire la vaisselle. Ces choses s'accumulent constamment. Ce serait vraiment bien de rationaliser les services parce que vous l'avez dit, et je vous vole souvent cette formule, quand on regarde le poids du contrôle et de la bureaucratie, c'est comme si, pour chaque dollar payé, on dépensait un dollar cinquante à l'examiner pour être sûr que tout va bien.

Très souvent, c'est plus une question de temps qu'il faut pour recevoir les avantages que le langage utilisé.

M. Bob Bratina:

D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Brassard.

M. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je n'ai que cinq minutes. J'aimerais poser deux questions. Je pense que la première est importante de votre point de vue, alors il me faut des réponses courtes.

L'ombudsman de la Défense nationale, Gary Walbourne, pour qui j'ai un profond respect, a émis des recommandations sur la transition parce que la très grande quantité d'informations que nous recevons indique que la transition est la partie la plus difficile. Il a fait des recommandations, comme l'a fait ce comité, dans un rapport au Parlement pour faire en sorte que la Défense nationale s'assure que tous les aspects de la vie des membres de nos forces armées sont couverts pour ce qui est des pensions et des médecins potentiels, avant qu'ils soient envoyés à l'ACC.

Monsieur l'ombudsman Walbourne appelle cela le service de « conciergerie ». Cela m'intéresse de connaître la valeur que chacun d'entre vous trouve dans ce système, mais très rapidement s'il vous plaît parce que j'ai une autre question.

Michael.

(1705)

M. Michael McKean:

Je pense que ce serait très important. À l'heure actuelle, nous avons parlé à l'équipe de santé de la famille Barrie. Ils aimeraient beaucoup travailler avec l'armée dans le CISP et l'UISP, mais la base Borden ne fait pas partie du programme-pilote pour l'instant. Les anciens combattants avec qui je travaille me disent chaque semaine que ce type de services est essentiel parce que ce n'est qu'avec les informations que leur communiquent les personnes qui s'occupent d'eux qu'ils vont faire une bonne transition, en trouvant un médecin de famille ou d'autres formes de soutien, parce que s'ils n'ont pas ça, ils sont désavantagés.

M. John Brassard:

Ça va au-delà de ça. Il s'agit aussi de faire en sorte que les renseignements sur la pension et l'argent soient disponibles pendant la transition, pas 16 semaines plus tard.

Philip, vous avez parlé de la transition. Quelle valeur voyez-vous en ces services? Est-ce que ça vous aurait aidé?

M. Philip MacKinnon:

C'est une bonne idée, mais peu pratique.

M. John Brassard:

En quel sens?

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Dans certaines régions comme la mienne, ils n'ont pas assez de ressources et il manque de professionnels de soins de santé civils. La situation est peut-être excellente à Ottawa, à Toronto ou à Halifax, mais pas dans les régions comme North Bay.

M. John Brassard:

D'accord.

Joseph.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Il y a un trop gros fossé entre Anciens combattants Canada et les Forces canadiennes. Chaque base compte un bureau d'Anciens combattants. Dans le cadre des formalités de libération, il faudrait y passer une journée pour devenir client, parce que vous deviendrez très probablement un de leurs clients vers 50 ou 60 ans, à l'âge où les blessures faites à l'armée commencent à se manifester.

Anciens combattants Canada doit être l'élément clé pour toutes les personnes libérées. Si on a un problème de dents, ils s'assurent que toutes les interventions de soins dentaires nécessaires sont faites, mais ils n'ont rien à faire de la santé mentale. Les gens n'aiment pas aller chez le dentiste, alors il faut les obliger à y aller. C'est pourquoi nous avons une inspection dentaire. C'est la même chose pour la santé mentale à l'ACC. Personne ne voudra admettre qu'il est ancien combattant ou qu'il a un handicap, mais si un entretien avec l'ACC fait partie du processus de libération, les gens pourraient recevoir des brochures sur la façon correcte de remplir les documents ou une présentation de Mon dossier ACC. Cela peut se faire en quelques heures. Les vétérans seraient alors informés et ne trouveraient pas les informations sur Facebook.

M. John Brassard:

Jody, qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Jody Mitic:

Ma transition à la vie civile a été un choc. Comme je l'ai dit, on me considère comme quelqu'un de stable, mais je me suis senti dépassé lors de ma transition. On m'envoyait des tonnes d'informations à la fois. Voici un exemple simple: si vous êtes dans l'armée de terre, vous avez un numéro matricule. K41302461 a été mon numéro pendant 20 ans. Demandez-moi mon numéro ACC.

M. John Brassard:

Vous n'en avez aucune idée.

M. Jody Mitic:

Je n'en ai aucune idée. Pourquoi ai-je besoin d'un nouveau dossier CAA alors que je pourrais simplement aller vers le préposé et lui dire: « Merci, au revoir », puis aller à mon bureau ACC et dire: « Voilà mon dossier »? On le passerait ensuite en revue. On pourrait conserver le même numéro, le même dossier. Il suffirait de changer la couleur de la couverture, du rouge au bleu par exemple. La transition serait beaucoup plus facile. C'est de ce genre de choses que je parle.

M. John Brassard:

Ça serait moins stressant.

M. Jody Mitic:

Il y a duplication. Phil a dit que c'était une chose de parler à une personne de ses peurs et de ses secrets les plus profonds, mais on doit le répéter à la personne suivante, puis à une autre encore. Au final, on n'a plus envie d'en parler. La même chose se produit pendant la transition. On remplit les mêmes formulaires, les mêmes papiers que ceux qu'on a déjà remplis quand on était en service actif. C'est le même formulaire, les mêmes informations. Tout ce qui change, c'est l'organisation indiquée en haut de page.

Le président:

Vous avez 30 secondes pour une question.

M. John Brassard:

Je ne vais pas y arriver en 30 secondes. Brièvement, pendant les discussions de ce comité, nous avons examiné la santé mentale et la prévention du suicide. Nous avons appris que les tendances suicidaires sont le résultat de problèmes de santé mentale préexistants. Dans quelle mesure votre carrière dans l'armée a-t-elle eu un impact sur vos problèmes de santé mentale?

M. Jody Mitic:

Pour moi, je ne sais pas. J'ai accepté que des choses comme le suicide et la dépression soient des effets secondaires pour certains d'entre nous qui faisons ce travail. Les premiers intervenants ont les mêmes problèmes, comme les médecins et le personnel infirmier urgentiste. C'est un travail difficile et les gens le font volontairement et ont une bonne raison de le faire.

M. John Brassard:

Monsieur le président, puis-je demander aux témoins de fournir un synopsis de l’impact sur leur carrière militaire, par exemple, en comparaison de ce qu’ils ont connu dans la vie civile, et même des témoignages de personnes qu’ils connaissent? Je comprends qu’il s’agit là d’une question difficile, mais puisqu’on la pose fréquemment, je me suis permis de la soulever.

M. Jody Mitic:

Le seul facteur qui me ferait hésiter, monsieur, c’est que j’ai commencé ma carrière militaire à 17 ans, comme la plupart de mes collègues, hommes ou femmes. Je dirais volontiers que c'est en tant que militaire que je suis devenu adulte et homme. On est tous un peu fous à 17 ans, n'est-ce pas? Nous nous demandons bien ce que nous allons devenir une fois adultes. Il me serait difficile de juger si j’étais alors différent ou la même personne.

C’est aux membres de ma famille qu’il faudrait poser cette question.

(1710)

M. John Brassard:

D'accord. Tenons-nous-en à cela. Merci.

Le président:

Dans ce cas, si vous désirez répondre à cette question, faites-en part au greffier, qui se chargera de transmettre votre réponse à tous les membres du Comité — si cela vous convient.

M. Jody Mitic:

Certainement. Je vais continuer à essayer.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Quant à la reconnaissance de l’obligation sacrée due aux anciens combattants, j’ai fortement l'impression qu’il y a eu là un oubli. N’est-il pas important que nous nous souvenions de cela et que nous l’intégrions dans notre mode de fonctionnement, dans nos interactions avec les vétérans, dans notre façon de traiter avec eux et de les soutenir?

M. Jody Mitic:

Je crois que cette obligation sacrée correspond à l’esprit de ce qui nous occupe. Si mes camarades n'avaient pas eu à émettre de commentaires, tels que « Je cherche à faire valoir ceci ou cela auprès des anciens combattants », ce serait un grand pas de franchi. Il y a quelques avantages qui ont été perdus en cours de route et qui ne valent pas vraiment la peine d’être revendiqués. Il y a certaines choses qui ont été enlevées ou modifiées dans la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants et qui, à mon avis, n'ont pas été pleinement écartées lorsque ces décisions ont été prises. On pourrait les restaurer. Cela pourrait aussi concourir à améliorer la situation, qu’il suffise de mentionner les prestations de soins médicaux à vie.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D’accord. C'est là ma prochaine question. Quelle importance représente cette pension aux yeux des anciens combattants obtenant leur congé médical? Nous entendons dire que c'est pour bientôt. Est-ce que les anciens combattants verraient une grande différence en ce qui concerne la reconnaissance de leur service?

M. Jody Mitic:

Quant à moi, personnellement, je ne savais pas que la Charte avait aboli la pension à vie. Si vous proposiez à la plupart des soldats combattants une somme forfaitaire au lieu d’une pension à vie, somme qui serait assortie d'un ensemble de bénéfices auxquels ils auraient — peut-être — droit à un moment de leur vie, ils vous répondraient sans doute quelque chose comme: « Non, allez vous faire voir ailleurs. » Remarquez que ce n’est pas comme s’il s’agissait d’une somme mirobolante. Une pleine pension, éventuellement indexée à l’indice des prix à la consommation — vous voyez ce que je veux dire — représenterait peut-être 5 000 $ par mois dans le cas d'une invalidité totale. Encore là, ce n'est pas le Pérou, mais ça pourrait... Quoi qu’il en soit, en ce moment, je peux travailler et faire un peu d’argent. Même s’il n’en sera peut-être pas toujours ainsi, j’aurai l’assurance d’avoir un toit pour me couvrir et un minimum de nourriture sur ma table.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord. Merci.

Nous avons également entendu dire qu’il existait des services de santé mentale offerts au personnel des Forces canadiennes. Cependant, une fois que vous avez quitté votre emploi, ce soutien psychologique n’est plus adapté aux besoins des anciens combattants. Par exemple, la thérapie de groupe est l’un des moyens d’apporter de l’aide aux vétérans. Cette aide ne saurait cibler à la fois les membres des Forces et les anciens combattants. Auriez-vous, par hasard, un commentaire à formuler à ce sujet?

Le président:

Je vais revenir là-dessus, mais je dois maintenant céder la parole à quelqu’un d’autre. Nous allons juste devoir étirer un tout petit peu le temps prévu.

Vous avez terminé vos trois minutes, et je dois passer à M. Kitchen pour trois minutes. Nous reviendrons à M. Graham, et puis à vous, pour le mot de la fin.

D’accord, monsieur Kitchen, vous disposez de trois minutes.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Brindle — sentez-vous libre de ne pas répondre du tout à cette question si j’outrepasse ici mes limites ou si elle vous met dans une situation inconfortable —, je comprends que cela pourra vous paraître dur, mais je me demande si vous pourriez fournir quelques suggestions quant aux approches auxquelles vous seriez prêt à recourir si l’ancien combattant se retrouvait dans une telle situation de crise. Pour ce qui est de la tentative de suicide qui se rattache à cet état de crise, auriez-vous des suggestions qui pourraient... Nous parlons d'une ligne de prévention de suicide. À quoi bon avoir une telle ligne s’il n’y a personne pour répondre? Non?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Tout tourne autour du mot « suicide ».

Même s’il glace le sang dans les veines, ce mot ne me fait pas peur. Je me sens comme quelqu’un qui a le diabète ou un problème cardiaque ou encore rénal, et qui le sait. Je souffre d'un certain état où dans des circonstances précises, je n’ai plus du tout envie de vivre. J’évite donc ces circonstances, je me tiens loin de l’alcool et du travail outre-mer, et je travaille avec mon thérapeute à faire de la méditation et du yoga. C’est ma façon à moi d’éviter le suicide. Ce n’est guère différent d’avoir un problème cardiaque et de manger un Baconator tous les jours — il n’y a rien de tel pour écourter sa vie.

Nous sommes tous angoissés par le mot « suicide ». Il nous faut surmonter cette peur. Si vous avez des idées suicidaires et y pensez régulièrement, ça ne veut pas dire que vous allez passer à l’action. L’idée s’infiltre dans votre esprit au terme d’un long processus. Votre esprit commence à vous jouer des tours en éliminant les raisons pour lesquelles vous devriez continuer à vivre par vous-même... Cette peur de tout révéler et de dire « Je me sens déprimé », sans faire intervenir toute la cavalerie d’un seul coup, est votre façon de composer avec le problème, surtout si vous avez des changements de médication. Vous ne dépendez que de vous-même et n’avez personne vers qui vous tourner. Vous prenez votre mal en patience, pensant que tout va s’arranger. Vous n’avez pas envie d’appeler et d’ameuter tout le monde encore une fois.

Rien ne sert de perdre son sang-froid au ministère des Anciens Combattants. Ayant vu comment ça se passe, je sais qu’il vaut mieux mettre sa langue dans sa poche. Ça ne vaut pas la peine de se fâcher contre un système qui n’est pas dirigé contre soi. Le problème se trouve à l’échelle du système. Vous pouvez faire une réclamation en septembre 2015 et être encore en train d’en débattre... Beaucoup prétendent en blaguant qu’ils le font exprès pour nous tester, pour voir si nous sommes vraiment blessés. Rendus là, il n’y a plus de camaraderie, plus de fraternité comme dans les Forces. C’est vous contre une compagnie d’assurance. Je ne vois plus d’ACC, je vois une compagnie d'assurance. Nous connaissons tous le mot « appel », puisqu’on a dû essuyer un refus la première fois.

Pour en revenir à la question du suicide, il faut tenter de la dédramatiser. Quiconque dans cette salle est capable de se suicider en se basant sur l'information dont il dispose au moment qu’il aura choisi pour passer à l’acte. N’ayons pas peur d’en parler. Organisons des groupes de soutien et faisons savoir à tous que ce n’est pas un sujet tabou.

(1715)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham, vous disposez de trois minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Brindle — ou Don, si vous le permettez —, j’apprécie beaucoup que vous ayez pris le temps de venir nous exposer toute l’histoire, plutôt que simplement la fin de votre carrière. À mon avis, il est important de pouvoir mettre le tout en contexte.

M. Joseph Brindle:

J’ai cru qu’il était important de le faire, depuis que des études récentes ont indiqué que près de la moitié des membres des Forces canadiennes avaient été victimes d’abus, à un moment ou l’autre, pendant leur jeunesse. Ayant survécu à ce fléau, j’ai estimé qu’il fallait vous sensibiliser à la situation. De même, le taux de dépression est beaucoup plus élevé dans les Forces canadiennes que la moyenne nationale. Il faut aborder de front cette situation propre aux Forces canadiennes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une question rapide à vous poser. À deux reprises, vous avez parlé de sevrage. Pourriez-vous préciser à quoi vous faisiez allusion?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Le sevrage s’effectue dans le cadre d’un cours. Si vous avez des problèmes d’alcool, c’est là qu’on vous envoie. Je crois que ce cours est donné à Kingston, entre autres. Il y a probablement d’autres endroits aussi.

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Le cours est offert à divers endroits, un peu partout...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Un député devrait être beaucoup mieux informé sur le sevrage, du fait que...

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Je n’y ai jamais assisté...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Je ne prétends pas qu’il y est allé, mais il y a probablement envoyé un bon nombre de personnes. Ou il en a fait rapport...

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Leur supérieur l’aura fait.

M. Joseph Brindle:

En effet, c’est leur supérieur, selon le rapport. Il s’agit d’un cours destiné à ceux qui veulent décrocher de l’alcool. Lorsqu’on a de sérieux problèmes d’alcool dans les Forces canadiennes, la solution c’est le sevrage. Je ne connais pas le nom officiel du cours, mais c’est comme ça qu’on l’appelle.

M. Philip MacKinnon:

C'est la « sensibilisation à l’alcool ».

M. Joseph Brindle:

Exact, la sensibilisation à l’alcool.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous en avez parlé comme d’une véritable fin de carrière.

M. Joseph Brindle:

C’en est une. Si vous êtes caporal et qu’on vous envoie en cure de sevrage, cela veut dire que vous allez faire carrière en tant que caporal.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous suis.

Vous avez mentionné que vous vous étiez rendu compte d’être désormais devenu un vétéran. Lorsque vous avez quitté l’armée, que s’est-il passé?

M. Joseph Brindle:

J’ai pris des décisions fort mal avisées en raison de mes blessures.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il n’y avait personne pour me dire: « Au fait, en tant qu'ancien combattant, voici où vous pourriez vous adresser. » C’était simplement...

M. Joseph Brindle:

Non. Ils étaient tellement pressés de me voir partir. J’étais encore en congé alors que je me trouvais au Kosovo. J’étais toujours au service des Forces canadiennes lorsque je détruisais des bombes à fragmentation. Le problème est que ça s’est produit tellement vite que je n’ai même pas eu le temps de me rendre compte de ce que j’avais fait.

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Avez-vous été couvert par le premier ou le deuxième plan?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Le deuxième plan.

M. Philip MacKinnon:

Était-ce en 1995?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Non, c’était à la toute fin. C’était en 2000, mais c'était encore à la toute fin du dernier Programme de réduction des forces.

M. Philip MacKinnon:

D’accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il doit y avoir plein de gens dans la même situation qui n’ont pas encore compris qu’ils sont devenus vétérans, alors...

M. Joseph Brindle:

C’est sûr qu’il y en a. Je peux vous en nommer deux, parmi les camarades que j’ai perdus. Le premier s’appelle Jacques Richaud, qui est mort en Irak. Il était technicien en munitions pour les Forces canadiennes. Le second, Paul Straughn, se trouve encore en Libye en ce moment.

On a peur de rentrer au pays parce qu’on ne sait pas ce qu’on a. Dans un esprit d’encouragement, je me souviens d’avoir dit: « Appelez au ministère des Anciens Combattants, ils sont là pour vous aider. » Mais ça n’a pas été le cas. Personne ne me l’a d’ailleurs jamais dit. Lorsqu’on est à l’étranger, en pleine zone de combat, on n’a pas le temps de regarder les publicités sur CBC ou Radio-Canada nous disant qu’il existe de l’aide. Vous n’avez pas la chance de tomber sur un dépliant dans le bureau du médecin, tout simplement parce que vous n’allez pas chez le médecin.

J’ai été pendant 14 ans à l'extérieur du pays. J’ai vécu en Russie, en Tanzanie et à Bagdad, mais le ministère des Anciens Combattants ne pousse pas ses antennes jusque-là. C’est la dernière chose que j’avais en tête... Puis, lorsqu’on commence à parler de TSPT... J’en ai douté pendant 10 ans, ne pouvant croire que j’avais le TSPT. Je n’ai vraiment compris qu’à ma première tentative — et le TSPT était alors mieux connu — que j’avais un problème, mais je ne savais pas encore comment joindre par téléphone le ministère des Anciens Combattants.

(1720)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comment faire pour communiquer avec ceux qui se trouvent en Libye, à Bagdad, ou n’importe où, et qui ne sont pas encore rentrés au pays?

M. Joseph Brindle:

Très bonne question. Il y a toujours les travailleurs de proximité.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen, vous disposez des trois minutes de la fin.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J’aimerais revenir sur la question du soutien en matière de santé mentale après qu’un vétéran a été libéré et sur le fait que le soutien n’est pas très présent, ce qui fait que les vétérans se retrouvent en thérapie de groupe. Pourriez-vous répondre à cela en tenant compte des besoins des vétérans?

M. Jody Mitic:

Pardon, vous avez parlé de groupe...?

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je veux parler de thérapie de groupe avec des non-vétérans. Une situation mixte.

M. Jody Mitic:

Je n’y suis jamais allé pour une question de santé mentale, mais bien pour une réadaptation physique. Le centre médical des Forces armées canadiennes, qui se trouve ici à Ottawa, aurait été mon endroit de prédilection pour cette réadaptation. Si j’avais besoin de thérapie en santé mentale, je préférerais être entouré de mes frères et soeurs. Ce n’est pas trop bon pour le moral d’un jeune homme en forme de se retrouver dans un hôpital rempli de victimes d'accidents de la route, plutôt âgées et souvent diabétiques. J’ai sursauté quand j’ai compris que j’étais le seul militaire dans le lot. Ce serait la même chose n’importe où ailleurs. Peut-être faudrait-il voir avec les intervenants de première ligne. Le MDN et ACC devraient conjuguer leurs efforts pour aménager des cliniques exclusivement pour les militaires ou les vétérans, parce qu’il semble y avoir là une clientèle abondante. Je ne crois pas qu’il s’agirait là d’une perte d’argent.

M. Joseph Brindle:

Et il y en a de plus en plus.

M. Jody Mitic:

Il y en aura probablement beaucoup plus dans la décennie à venir.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci pour cette intervention.

Une question rapide. Je dis rapide, mais il faudra sans doute beaucoup plus que la minute et demie qui vous reste pour y répondre. Cela concerne l’UISP. Nous avons eu un témoignage là-dessus. Selon certains, cela fonctionne bien, selon d’autres, c’est extrêmement limité et ça ne fonctionne pas bien du tout. En avez-vous fait personnellement l’expérience?

M. Jody Mitic:

Lorsque j’ai été blessé, l'UISP n’était qu’un concept. Cela a été mis sur pied après ma blessure. J’ai été l’un des premiers soldats blessés à être affectés à l'UISP dans le cadre du programme Sans limites, et même si je faisais partie de l’équipe à l’UISP, mon service était loin d’être reluisant. En toute vérité, comme je l’ai déjà dit, j’ai effacé de ma mémoire une bonne partie de ce moment de ma vie pour préserver ma santé mentale. Je préfère ne pas revenir là-dessus. Alannah et moi discutons parfois de l’argent qu’ils nous doivent pour certaines choses à la maison, notamment pour procéder à des modifications pour le déplacement en fauteuil roulant. Nous croyons qu’il serait juste que nous nous fassions rembourser les 50 000 $ que nous avons dû payer de notre poche, mais à la seule idée d’avoir à entreprendre des démarches et à parlementer avec des gens, je me crispe en position foetale. Puisque ce n’est pas le profil qu’on attend d'un professionnel aguerri, j’essaie de ne pas trop y penser.

Voici ce que j’entrevois, même avec la bureaucratie d'Anciens Combattants. Entre 70 et 75 % semblent bien s’en tirer. Mais il reste 25 % qui sont handicapés à 70 % ou plus. C’est nous qui avons besoin d’un maximum de soins, et cela semble être du côté de l'UISP et d'Anciens Combattants. Pour les cas les plus simples, il suffit bien sûr de quelques formulaires et d’un timbre ou deux, et le tour est joué. J’ai découvert ça avec l’UISP et Anciens Combattants.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

En réalité, à partir de maintenant, les cas deviendront de plus en plus complexes.

M. Jody Mitic:

C’est vrai. En vieillissant, je constate que je deviendrai moi-même de plus en plus complexe. J’avais 30 ans lorsque j’ai été blessé. J’en ai maintenant 40, et cela m’est de plus en plus difficile de me déplacer, juste de venir ici aujourd’hui, par exemple. Je me suis demandé si j’allais me présenter en raison de mon problème de mobilité. Quand j’aurai 50 ou 60 ans, j’aurai besoin de plus de services. Parfois, je me demande comment les choses vont se dérouler quand je serai plus vieux et que j’aurai vraiment besoin que quelqu’un s’occupe de moi.

(1725)

Le président:

Merci. C’était tout pour aujourd’hui. Si vous désirez ajouter quoi que ce soit à votre témoignage, n’hésitez pas à le faire parvenir par courriel à notre greffier, qui le transmettra au Comité.

Au nom du Comité d’aujourd'hui, je tiens à vous remercier, tous et chacun, de ce que vous avez fait pour notre pays, et également de vous être déplacés aujourd’hui. Je sais qu’il est difficile de venir raconter ses expériences devant notre comité. Sans des gens comme vous, nous ne serions pas là aujourd’hui. J’espère que votre témoignage contribuera à la prise de décisions qui sauront aider les hommes et les femmes qui servent dans les Forces.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on April 03, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.