header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-03-08 ACVA 46

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

Good afternoon, everybody. We are meeting pursuant to Standing Order 81(5) regarding supplementary estimates (C) 2016-17, votes 1c and 5c under Veterans Affairs, referred to the committee on Tuesday, February 14, 2017.

Appearing today in our first panel of witnesses is the Honourable Kent Hehr, Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence. Joining him from the Department of Veterans Affairs is Walter Natynczyk, deputy minister.

We'll start with them for 10 minutes, and then we'll go into questions.

Welcome, gentlemen. The floor is yours.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence):

Thank you very much.

Good afternoon, Chair Ellis and members of the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs.

I am pleased to present the 2016-17 supplementary estimates (C) and the 2017-18 main estimates to Parliament on behalf of Veterans Affairs Canada.

I'd like to thank the members of the committee for their dedication to veterans' issues, particularly for their recent focus on mental health and their study of service delivery.

Our government is committed to ensuring that eligible veterans, retired Royal Canadian Mounted Police members, and their families have access to the mental health support they need, when and where they need it. No doubt the work of this committee will add to our knowledge and understanding of how we can do better in this regard.

Our government continues to focus on increasing access to mental health care and expanding outreach to ensure improved supports and services for veterans at risk of suicide. That is why I am working closely with my colleague, theMinister of National Defence, to close the seam between our two departments and to ensure a smoother, easier transition for releasing military members.

Turning to the subject of this meeting, the 2016-17 supplementary estimates, I'd like to point out that the largest increases are for the earnings loss benefit and the disability award. Furthermore, the number of disability claims submitted to Veterans Affairs increased by 19% in fiscal year 2015-16. This is a good thing. It means more people are coming forward to get the help they need.

I will now turn to the main estimates for the 2017-18 fiscal year.

The Prime Minister charged me with ensuring that we honour the service of our veterans, reduce complexity, and do more to ensure the financial security of Canada's veterans. I can say with pride that we have made lots of progress. The main estimates before you today reflect many of our accomplishments to date. In fact, they reflect a net increase of $1.06 billion over 2016-17. This is nearly 30% more than that in the previous fiscal year. This demonstrates that we have dramatically increased financial security and access to services for veterans and their families, and we are not done yet.

As of April 1, the disability award will be increased from $310,000 to a maximum of $360,000 and will be indexed to inflation. We will issue a top-up payment to anyone who has already received a disability award, meaning more money in the pockets of ill and injured veterans. Furthermore, this change will be retroactive to 2006, when the disability award was first introduced. This demonstrates our commitment to “one veteran, one standard”.

Also beginning this April, changes to the permanent impairment allowance will ensure that veterans are more appropriately compensated for the impact of service-related impairments on their career. The benefit will be renamed the “career impact allowance” to better reflect its intent of assigning different gradients to adequately reflect how an individual might have moved through their career had they not become ill or injured.

Increasing the maximum of the disability award and expanding access to the permanent impairment allowance were recommendations made by the Veterans Ombudsman, Mr. Guy Parent. I always value the ombudsman's feedback, and I am proud to be implementing substantive changes that were recommended to us by the ombudsman. Our ombudsman has indicated that this move has moved the marker forward in regard to access to fair compensation. We will continue to work towards building a veteran-centric model that supports a seamless transition from military to civilian life.

One increase in the operating expenses you will note is for the reopening of Veterans Affairs offices. I am very proud to say that our government has already opened seven of the nine offices closed by the previous government. This May we will reopen the remaining two, plus an additional office in Surrey, British Columbia.

We also expanded outreach to veterans in the north. VAC staff will visit northern communities every month to meet with veterans and their families and to connect them with services and benefits.

Commemorating all the brave men and women who serve is a core responsibility of Veterans Affairs Canada. Honouring the service of our brave soldiers, sailors, and aviators is essential to ensuring that we as a nation never forget their dedication and sacrifice.

(1540)



The Canada Remembers program keeps alive and promotes an understanding of the achievements of and the sacrifices made by those who served in times of war, military conflict, peacekeeping, and beyond. Our government is investing approximately $11 million to commemorate the 100th anniversaries of the Battle of Vimy Ridge and the Battle of Passchendaele, as well as the 75th anniversary of the Dieppe raid. We will continue to pay tribute to and acknowledge those who have made Canada the country it is today.

Over the last year and a half we have accomplished a great amount for Canada's veterans. We increased the earnings loss benefit from 75% to 90% of a veteran's pre-release salary. This will be indexed to inflation. This ensures those undergoing rehabilitation have the financial support they need during their recovery.

We've simplified the approvals process for a number of disability claims, such as PTSD and hearing loss, allowing us to respond to more claims faster. In fact, compared to the year before, we made 27% more decisions in the last fiscal year.

We are well on our way to delivering on our commitment to hire 400 new employees, with 381 of them hired to date. This includes 113 new case managers. We are making great progress in reducing the average veteran-to-case-manager ratio from 40:1 to 25:1.

In October we increased the amount of the survivor's estate exemption for the funeral and burial program so that more veterans and their families have access to dignified funerals.

While we have achieved a lot, we recognize that there is much, much more to be done.

We continue to dedicate resources to finding ways to improve the mental health services and supports available to veterans and their families. I know that this is the focus of your current course of study and that there is an increased awareness of this important issue. I maintain that we can always do better, and I recognize that while the majority of veterans receive the mental health support they need, we can do more to reach those who do not. I am looking forward to hearing your recommendations as to how we can continue to improve.

There is still work to be done to develop a lifelong pension, an option for that. We will continue to consult with stakeholders and parliamentarians to develop the best approach.

A crucial area where VAC can and must do better is in delivering timely benefit decisions. We are pursuing this on a number of levels. I am working with the Minister of National Defence to close the gap between National Defence and Veterans Affairs by reducing complexity, overhauling service delivery, and strengthening partnerships.

Veterans Affairs has done an extensive review of its service delivery model with the goal of putting veterans first in programs and services, making things simpler and easier to understand, and facilitating improved access. We consulted widely with veterans, staff, external experts, and Canadians, and we'll publish a final report that outlines key recommendations. We will have a plan to put 90% of the recommendations into action within three years and the full suite of changes in five.

The physical, mental, and financial well-being of our veterans is our overarching goal. Veterans Affairs Canada has done much, and with the estimates delivered today, we will be able to fulfill many of our promises.

Thank you so much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We will begin our questioning with Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister and General, for being here today.

One of the items that is noticeably missing from the main and supplementary estimates is one of the main things, which is a campaign promise that was made by the Prime Minister as he stood in Belleville. It's part of your mandate letter as well, Minister. It's to establish lifelong pensions as an option for injured veterans. I don't see that anywhere in here, and I'm asking why.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

We remain fully committed to providing an option for a pension for life for our veterans who have been injured or have become ill as a result of their service in the military. This is part of our campaign commitment. It remains part of the to-do list. I know that we have accomplished much in terms of financial security in moving $5.6 billion last year in improving the ELB and improving the disability award, all of these things that will flow into a better system of financial compensation for our veterans.

I can say that we are committed to this. It will be delivered.

(1545)

Mr. John Brassard:

Can I ask what timeline you're committed to for this, Minister?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

We have a timeline that we are elected as a government for a four-year term. Of course, that—

Mr. John Brassard:

So when can veterans expect this promise to be kept?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Your veterans can expect this promise to be kept within the four-year term of the Liberal government. I will be proud to stand up and say we have delivered that pension option for our veterans.

Mr. John Brassard:

The next question I have is with respect to the issue you spoke about before. We're currently going through a mental health study on PTSD. One of the issues we're consistently hearing about is the transitional aspect out of the military into civilian life, and the challenges that exist with that. One of them is employment challenges.

Over the course of the last week, I've received several letters from veterans. In one case, his application to work for the public service sat in the queue for a year. There was another case in which a 26-year veteran was actually willing to move to get work. There seemingly is a vacuum right now that exists with respect to hiring veterans.

I'm asking, where is VAC today with respect to hiring veterans in the public service? I'll remind you, Minister, that in December you told the committee that VAC was focusing on hiring opportunities for veterans, not only in VAC but in other departments in the public system. Right now we see the current levels of veterans being hired at 2.2% in the public service.

What has VAC done with other departments, including Veterans Affairs, to promote priority hiring of veterans?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I'd really like to thank the member for his question. This is an area I have flagged in my department as one we would like to see better results in, both in hiring people within the public service as well as in seeing more success of our veterans once they transition out of military life. I know some of that work is starting with closing the seam with Minister Sajjan. I know we're putting an increased focus on some of his work within my department.

For more details on that, I think, General, perhaps you could enlighten us.

General (Retired) Walter Natynczyk (Deputy Minister, Department of Veterans Affairs):

Mr. Chair, ladies and gentlemen, we are certainly focused on engaging veterans and getting them into the government, and indeed finding them their new purpose. We know, as you mentioned, that as part of mental well-being, veterans need to have a purpose and a focus and they need to move on. Many of them get out of the Canadian Armed Forces at the average age of 37, so they have many years to serve.

Based on the minister's direction, I and Deputy Minister Forster from National Defence have reached out to all of the deputy ministers. We actually gave a presentation to all of the deputy ministers across government. The minister has also authorized the creation of a veterans hiring unit inside Veterans Affairs that will work with the human resources departments of all of the departments and match those veterans seeking employment with those departments.

We've also sent letters to agencies such as Parks Canada because they have special hiring rules, and we nee to ensure that veterans have access to those rules. We're ensuring that it's not only Ottawa-centric but also coast to coast, keeping in mind that we have parks across the country and Correctional Services has offices across the country and Revenue Canada has offices across the country. It has to be more than just Ottawa.

We're working with the rest of the government to enable all of that. Also, we're working with companies. We're going through Canada Company, the military employment transitions program, so that veterans have the appropriate skill sets and the right resumés to get into commercial companies.

Mr. John Brassard:

I may come back to that if I have time.

Within the supplementary estimates, there's a line item of $2.5 million for advertising—advertising what?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

As you're aware, we had a very robust year in our first year of government, opening offices, providing information about changes to benefits that were coming down, and even moving forward on giving veterans a better burial. There was much information that needed to be shared with our veterans and the people who were out there.

To get more specifics on that, I'll turn it over to General Natynczyk.

Mr. John Brassard:

Can you break down what the advertising is for, General?

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

Mr. Chair, ladies and gentlemen, we get the advertising from a central pot for the Canada Remembers program. This is something that is organized out of the Privy Council Office. We make a bid so that for Remembrance Day and so on we can get access to that.

When my chief financial officer is up here, she could probably expand on that answer.

(1550)

The Chair:

Mr. Eyolfson is next.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister, and General, for coming.

You were talking about the reopening of the Veterans Affairs offices. I had the honour of taking your place to open one of them in Brandon, Manitoba. It was quite an honour to be able to do that.

Obviously this happened before your mandate started. Was it ever made clear to you why these were closed in the first place?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

My understanding is that this was part of the deficit reduction initiative under the former government's direction. Of course, when you cut taxes, you obviously many times have to cut services. In my view, Veterans Affairs was the department that got hit, in many instances in terms of a reduction in front-line staff. At one point there was close to a one-third reduction in front-line staff in my department as a result of the directives of that initiative. As well, there was the closing of offices, and there were some things that we found didn't get moved on that in our view should have gotten moved on.

That was how that happened. Nevertheless, we've now recommitted to veterans. We've found that it's important to have these service locations for veterans and their families to have points of contact, to come in with their concerns, to share their stories, to find information, and to be able to better their lives. I'm proud to say that seven of the nine have been opened, with a view that more people are using those services. I know that when we've gone back to communities where they were closed, from Corner Brook to Brandon and everywhere in between, people have been very excited. They look at it not only as a place where people can get help but as a way we honour the men and women who have served our military, and in fact honour the 2.3 million Canadians who have served since Confederation in our armed forces.

I'm very proud of this government's achievement and of what we've all done to make this happen for our veterans and those who have served.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

Further to that, I understand that when these offices were closed, staff was laid off. Where are we in getting the staff for the ones that have opened up to get to the staffing levels we need?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

For the exact details of this, I'll kick it over to General Natynczyk.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

As the minister said in his opening remarks, sir, we have hired 381 employees across the country. Of that number, 113 are case managers. Office by office, we're staffing up in all of them. In some parts of the country, it is a challenge to find the right skill sets—the social workers, the psychologists, and so on. At the same time, we're also seeing that people do want to join the Veterans Affairs team. Our mission is noble and they want to serve our veterans, so we have great quality to choose from.

We'll continue to staff right up to the mark. At the same time, the ratio of veterans to case managers, as the minister mentioned, is declining, which is all the better for the service to our veterans.

If you wanted information office by office on who we have out there, we could have Mr. Michel Doiron, the assistant deputy minister for service delivery, give you that breakdown.

You mentioned visiting the Brandon office. When I was visiting the Kelowna office recently, I was thrilled to see these folks who are so keen there, to see veterans there, and to see a master corporal, a former medic who served in Petawawa, as a case manager in Kelowna now. I'm just thrilled to see that kind of experience and to see those skill sets applied to our mission.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

Further to the increase in services with these offices opening, can you give us a general idea of how the service is being improved for veterans who are in the northern and more isolated communities?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I have one thing to add to what we said earlier. We're also rapidly approaching our 25:1 average for case managers to veterans. This is a very important milestone that we're close to reaching. Social work best practices say we need an average of 25:1 to best serve our veterans who need that additional support, so I'm very proud of that as well.

With regard to our veterans offices in the north, of course we have many indigenous as well as other people in the north who have served in the military. We're very proud of that. We've never had a Veterans Affairs presence up there. That has entailed oftentimes long travel time to cities far away and time away from family, which we thought was unnecessary and unfair.

We acted on those concerns. We've now allowed for a mobile VAC operating unit. It's a mobile operation, because it's a vast territory to get around in. They are up there on a once-a-month basis. They travel around communities finding veterans who need to sign up for services, supporting those who are already on VAC services, and making sure that veterans get the timely help they need even in our northern and remote areas.

(1555)

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

There was a reference to our strategy in developing mental health services. In the half minute we have left, what would you say, in general terms, are the biggest challenges to improving mental health services for veterans?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

In many ways we do very well, and yet, as our Prime Minister always says, “Better is always possible.”

It's a matter of a couple of things. One is ensuring that we're keeping and adding to our expertise and our staff component when necessary in order to provide that mental health hands-on outreach that we need. We think we have a better ability to do that through the hiring of an additional 381 people to date. We think that assists us.

Also, I have other mandate letter items I need to accomplish. One concerns the centre of excellence, which will be on mental health and post-traumatic stress disorder. We believe it will allow for us to capture best practices, to go out robustly into the academic world and otherwise to make sure we're at the top of our game and that we're continuing to do the best we can with the emerging information that comes out in this field.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Ms. Mathyssen is next.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here, Minister.

I have a number of questions.

I note an increase in the estimates, but you know that there are a number of veterans who are not happy. They feel that they have not been provided with the benefits they have earned and are entitled to and that they're falling through the cracks.

What kind of funding do you anticipate you would need to rebuild that trust with veterans and to move through the backlog of veterans waiting for pensions?

The DND ombudsman crunched the numbers and came to this committee and provided us with those numbers. How prepared are you to allocate that sum of money outlined by the ombudsman to Veterans Affairs?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

We ran on a commandment to do things better for veterans and their families, full stop. I have a mandate letter from our Prime Minister that encompassed our commitments to veterans. We accomplished six of those 15 things, and two of them regarding financial security have really moved the meter a long way, and that's according to our Veterans Ombudsman. In the last budget we committed $5.6 billion to veterans and their families. That is now rolling out.

We've moved the disability award from $310,000 to a maximum of $360,000. We've moved the earnings loss benefit from 75% of a soldier's pre-release salary to 90%. These are tangible results that are putting more money in veterans' pockets. We are answering the bell on financial security and we remain committed to providing more financial security, including an option for a pension for life. That is still in our mandate letter. We are still committed to it, and of course we will be delivering on that promise.

We see that we have moved a great deal forward in terms of financial security, and we will continue to look at ways in which we can do that to have our veterans live firmly in the middle class.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay, so you've moved the disability award up, but it's not realized yet. That's still on the to-do list. It's just technically on paper. It hasn't actually happened yet. At least, that was my sense from what you said.

(1600)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

The cheque will be in the mail, I believe, by April 1, unless the general wants to correct me on that.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

You said you're going to deliver on those lifelong pensions within the term of this government. How will you make sure that veterans who receive lump sums under the new Veterans Charter and who want to transition to a lifelong pension are dealt with? How will you make sure that they receive what they should have been entitled to under the lifelong pension? As an act of good faith, would you be prepared to drop the case that you're fighting with Equitas?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

There are two separate questions here, and I'll try to separate them.

You'll note that we did make our disability award retroactive. We went back to 2006, and people who had received a disability award of only up to $310,000, if they were 100% disabled, will now get $360,000. We thought that was the right thing to do. We brought that forward because we were committed to showing a one veteran, one standard approach, and that's what we try to do in every aspect of what we bring.

We are dealing with a system right now that has been made up of a patchwork of programs slapped together from our government to other governments, and that actually makes it awfully difficult. In my department, I have injured soldiers who are 20 years old and injured soldiers who are 100. It makes it very complex. That said, we are committed to bringing in a pension option that works for veterans and families.

In terms of the court case, we are governing in terms of bringing in good public policy for veterans and their families. That's what I can do; that's in my control. Many of the things in our mandate letter are issues that were brought up by the Equitas lawsuit. In fact, many of the people who are on the Equitas lawsuit are part of my advisory team on financial security, mental health, and others. I'm very proud that they are working with us on solutions to problems facing the veterans community that were ignored for an awfully long time. They are actually very happy with many of the solutions we've brought to bear.

That said, they, like you, want us to get it done. I recognize that.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Yes, I met with some of those folks, and some of them aren't happy.

You talked about the maximum disability award. It's a lot of money, but how many veterans actually receive it?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Do you want a breakdown of who receives what range in Veterans Affairs, from 5% to 100% disability? Is that what you'd like?

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Yes. Actually, you can send that later. It's just that $360,000 sounds like a lot of money, and there is this sense that a lot of people are getting it. I wonder exactly how many are getting it.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I will get you the information, but I think it would help if I framed veterans compensation with a little more clarity for you.

One, there is an income stream. Any ill or injured soldiers who cannot work because of their service to this country will receive an income stream. That's called earnings loss benefit, or another program similar to it, whereby no injured soldier will receive less than $44,000 and change, I believe. That would be their annual income. Even if they were a senior private, which is the lowest rank on the file, they will receive that as a yearly benefit to them and their families.

Furthermore, the $360,000 is a pain and suffering payment. These two programs mirror each other. They help and augment each other to stabilize veterans and their families and allow them, if they are ill or injured and cannot work, to be fully compensated. If they can work, they are still going to get a payment through the disability award for pain and suffering, to recognize that they have suffered as a result of their military service.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Bratina, go ahead.

Mr. Bob Bratina (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Thank you.

We've been hearing a lot of testimony on a number of issues, but one thing that keeps cropping up seems to be the gap or the seam that occurs between the active service part at the Department of National Defence and the issues that we are dealing with at Veterans Affairs. What have you been working on in terms of closing the gap between the active service area and the veterans area?

(1605)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

That's an excellent question. That's much of the work that has been taken over by our department and through our work with the Minister of National Defence and Chief of the Defence Staff Vance over the course of the last eight to nine months, understanding that we need to professionalize the release of members from our Canadian Armed Forces. It's what we essentially have to do.

We do a great job of getting people into the military and getting them through basic training, getting them on missions, and getting them places to live and everything while they're in service. We have to get that same type of attitude and structure in place so that when they are released, medically or otherwise, they're100% good to go on the day they leave. They have their pension cheque lined up and they understand what their supports look like so that if they're going to move to a community, they understand whether that community has services to help them or not. We need to do that, and that's why I'm very pleased that those conversations are happening and that the work is being done to recognize whether our soldiers are releasing with better outcomes.

Here's the real truth, guys, and I think.... “Guys”—ladies and gentlemen; it is 2017, by the way.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Yes.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Just understand that it was a euphemism. It was a slip. Chair Ellis, I apologize. You were looking at me with great scorn and disdain there for a second.

Many people in the military do their military service and transfer successfully. Still, we have a far too large number, roughly 27%, who struggle in some form or fashion, whether that be employment, education, addiction, mental health, illness, or injury, and that is why we have Veterans Affairs. That's why we need to professionalize the release. We have a lot of work to be done. This is not going to be solved overnight. I wish it were, but it's not.

We're working to ensure that we professionalize the release, and I am very happy with the commitment of the Minister of National Defence, the Chief of the Defence Staff, and our department, who are working together to solve these issues. It's a financial issue, a rehab issue, a return-to-work issue, a return-to-school issue. There are a whole host of things that are going to allow us to have more success. Those conversations are getting detailed, and I can tell you they're moving along.

Is that fair?

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Yes. I've had the honour of presenting young veterans with civic pins and commemorative materials over the past few years. These are remarkable young men and women. I'm shocked when I see the number. The number I just looked up is 75,000 Second World War veterans, one of whom in my city is a 96-year-old Dieppe veteran who's hale and hearty and looking forward, actually, to the 75th anniversary commemoration this year.

I wonder if you could comment on these individuals who have been under the care and compassion of Veterans Affairs for 70 years. Do you hear much about the cohort of the oldest veterans? The Korean War I would put in there too; I believe those men and women are in their eighties now. What about them?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

We're proud to commemorate the service and sacrifice of the men and women who have served in our military from the start of this great country to Vimy Ridge to Juno Beach to Korea to our peacekeeping missions, and then the Gulf War, Afghanistan, and all the peacekeeping missions in between our current efforts. It really is glorious, and veterans and Canadian Armed Forces members continue to keep this country safe, proud, and free.

We also know that we've been delivering our services to World War II and other veterans for a long time now. We have pretty good expertise in providing that service at various locations across this country. I know that around 6,400 people use long-term care paid for in some ways and fashions by Veterans Affairs. We work with over 1,500 locations across this country to get them the help they need to better live their lives. This is essentially through augmentation of national health care. We've gone to community care, and despite how you will sometimes hear something to the contrary, the vast majority of veterans want to live in the community where they're from, wherever it is, across this nation. That allows us to run a reasonable, pragmatic system with an eye to fiscal responsibility that allows us to deliver services in an efficient way.

One of the sad things is that many of these veterans will be moving on. Nevertheless, our government is committing to commemorating what they've done and continuing to keep their services and sacrifices alive. That's often why we do these various things, but I think it's also why we always have to look at November 11, our Remembrance Day ceremony in Ottawa and in this country. I know I was very happy with MP Fraser's private member's bill that now recognizes that we will be moving towards having a national holiday, at least federally. I think that sets the tone and sets the direction we're going as a nation.

(1610)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Go ahead, Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Minister, for being here today. General, it's nice to see you again, and thank you so much.

I'd like to ask a question regarding long-term care.

Minister, I appreciate the work you've been doing, and a lot has been accomplished in the first year. With regard to long-term care, though, there's a recurring issue within my province of Nova Scotia, and I know in many care facilities across the country, with regard to how VAC is adapting to long-term care and how we are serving non-traditional veterans within these care facilities moving forward.

I wonder if you could comment on that and give us some light about how your department is thinking on this issue and what we can expect in the future.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

That's a good question. As I said in the previous answer, we're committed to providing veterans who have taken part in various endeavours to serve this country with long-term care in appropriate places.

We must also remember that we work very closely with provincial governments that are now primarily responsible for much of the long-term care apparatus in this country. Veterans Affairs partners with them on an ongoing basis to continue having a pragmatic government that recognizes different levels of governments' responsibilities and ensures that veterans still get the help they need, when and where they need it.

Over the course of the last three months, I know we have tried to get more flexibility into our arrangements. Particularly in your province, we've had some success on that, working with your premier and your health minister to try to make some more flexible, reasonable arrangements that sometimes the line items in government documents don't allow for when the hands of the minister are tied with respect to authorities.

We're proud of the work we did in that regard. We now have more agreements out there with various places.

General, maybe you could highlight some of the work we've done to add some flexibility into what we're doing, to get more veterans the help they need in their older years.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

Mr. Chair, ladies and gentlemen, again, as the minister indicated, the federal government doesn't run hospitals. With the handover transition of Ste. Anne's Hospital last year, all hospitals are now in the possession of the provinces, yet, as the minister mentioned in an earlier question, we support veterans in approximately 1,500 long-term care facilities coast to coast, because the research shows, and our veterans are saying, that veterans want to be close to family. Some of them want to be in one of those traditional 18 hospitals.

Province by province we are working, as we did in Nova Scotia and as we are in Ontario with Parkwood in London, Ontario, and Sunnybrook and others, to ensure for that generation of post-World War II and post-Korea veterans, we can work with the provinces to get community beds for veterans in each of those facilities. I'm really pleased that we have the kind of co-operation that we have from them.

Those same community beds would be available to allied veterans, veterans who fought for other nations, who clearly are eligible, and also for modern-day veterans, those from the peacekeeping era and through the Afghanistan era. If indeed they need access to long-term care, they will have those long-term beds. We have in excess of 600 modern-day veterans in community beds coast to coast.

(1615)

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Great. Thank you.

I'd like to turn now to something you touched on earlier, which is the improvement in the case management ratio from 40:1 to 25:1. I know a lot of good work has been done in that regard already in one year.

We've heard about something, and I'm wondering if you could comment on it. It is not just the improved ratio, which is very important to ensuring that the veterans are receiving adequate service and that they're being paid attention to; it's also whether there have been improvements in training for the case managers to ensure that they have a better understanding of the needs of the veteran and that they are more sensitive to some of the situations we've seen in the past that we are trying to avoid as we go forward.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I've had the honour and privilege of being in this job for a year and almost six months, and I can tell you I'm very proud of the Veterans Affairs staff throughout this country, from our head office in P.E.I., where Veterans Affairs is located, right through this country where people are working in our various offices, our various centres, and our OSI clinics and the like. They are highly professional public servants, highly committed to veterans' outcomes, who are doing their job every day, and I'm very proud of them. I'll put our case managers and their effectiveness and their commitment to the job up against virtually anyone you can name throughout government and throughout the private sector.

People in my department are very committed to the job, and I know if they need.... We have very many programs within Veterans Affairs that allow them to skill up, to get the help they need should they wish to have more opportunities to learn. I've just been super-thrilled with the commitment of our public servants.

As politicians, we get to do some neat things. We get to set the direction and do some public policy, but it's really the people on the front lines, the public servants, who better our veterans' lives. You see that throughout government and you definitely see it in mine.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you so much.

I want to briefly acknowledge and thank the minister for the recognition of my private member's bill, which made it through the heritage committee yesterday. Just to make sure it's clear, it does modify the language in the federal Holidays Act to make it consistent and also affirms Parliament's recognition of this important day, but of course it's still up to the provinces to determine whether it is a non-working day.

We look forward to that going to the House for third reading. Thank you for mentioning that, Minister.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Thank you for the details. The devil's off them now.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Wagantall is next.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, CPC):

Thank you, Minister and Deputy Minister, for being here today.

My first question is around the whole process of getting our veterans employed. We've heard here that the public service is very much focused on hiring our veterans when they're qualified to serve. There's a priority there.

I had a veteran contact me last week who was highly qualified, having served in the forces in accounting, who applied to help with the Phoenix system, and never did have a communication of any kind with an actual human being. Is there any kind of an identifier to flag veterans applying for positions? If so, is there any kind of a tracking of applications, interviews, and placements of veterans?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

That's an excellent question, and one that I identified as a problem when I came in as a minister. We're not transitioning veterans successfully to jobs in the public service as well as I would like, nor are we having as much success in getting private sector jobs for some veterans who struggle. We are working on that, and the general filled in my answer on that.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

It's going to be a priority.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I hope you would bring us your individual case, if he'd allow us as a department to—

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Sure, I'll send it over.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

That would be good. We could possibly assist. We have to make sure that is happening with other veterans who may be finding the same thing. General, would you comment?

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

Again, we are very much focused on hiring those priority veterans, especially those who have left the Canadian Armed Forces with an injury, and all those others with the right skills. We are engaging all the departments. The minister sent a letter to all his colleagues across government—all the cabinet ministers—to engage ministers.

Rear-Admiral Elizabeth Stuart, our chief financial officer in corporate services, our retired ADM, will be at this table later. She can probably fill in a few more details on that.

(1620)

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

We'll look forward to getting actual numbers. That would be great.

Second, I am from Saskatchewan. An office has been reopened in Saskatoon. When it was opened, you weren't able to be there, and I understand that, but—

Hon. Kent Hehr:

It was in the summer, just—

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

The announcement was in the summer, before it opened in November. That's correct. It indicates approximately 2,900 veterans will be served there. If you're looking at 25 per case manager, you'd be looking at around 115 case managers to deal with things there. Right now there is one case worker, and that individual commutes from Regina. When they can't make it, there's no one else there to fill that role. What is the timeline? What are you thinking? There are a lot of veterans in rural Saskatchewan. They have to come to Saskatoon, and timing is an important issue.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

You ask an excellent question. In many jurisdictions across this country, it is easier to hire people with the unique skill set needed to serve veterans than it is in other—

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

But there are none in Saskatoon, the whole city?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I'll get to that.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

We know the importance of getting to that average ratio in terms of supporting people in their communities. That's why we reopened that office.

For more details on the specifics of Saskatoon, I'll have to turn to the general.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

We'll see how quickly this cascades to the assistant deputy minister of service delivery.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Gen Walter Natynczyk: I know that we've hired in Saskatchewan. I also know that in Regina we have an office. We have the integrated personnel support centre at CFB Moose Jaw. With regard to where the actual individuals are on these lists and how many are parked in Saskatoon, I'll have to rely on the assistant deputy minister, Michel Doiron.

Again, we are working toward finding the right folks in the area, with the right skill sets and the case management experience for these roles. In some parts of the country it's been tough. It's not a shortage of resources from a funding standpoint; it's making sure we find the right folks with the experience and skill sets for those locations.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

That would probably apply to the...I understood that when this office opened, there would also be an OSI clinic there, on the fifth floor. That's what I was told.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

I can tell you right now that we're still supporting Saskatchewan from Deer Lodge in Manitoba, which is—

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall: Not good.

Gen Walter Natynczyk: —not optimized, but I would not go into future intention like that.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay. Thanks.

The Chair:

You have one minute and 20 seconds.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

All right.

Very briefly, you heard my question in the House today in regard to mefloquine.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

You're asking it to the right person.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Good. I'm glad to hear that.

Australia just released information on what they are doing for all their soldiers, the impacts on them and what the effects are. Attempted and committed suicide are possible outcomes. They are providing treatment and care specifically for individuals identified as having taken mefloquine and needing this care.

How do we get this on the radar here so that these individuals have the care they need? They're not being treated for mefloquine toxicity, and it's not being recognized.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

First off, I'm very proud of the 4,000 people we have working from coast to coast to coast on mental health issues—

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

This isn't mental health. This is a brain stem injury. It's physical. It requires different treatment than PTSD requires. That's what's come through very clearly in the studies in Germany, Australia, the U.S., and Britain.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Any veteran who comes forward who has an illness or injury tied to military service will be served by our department with the best available technology and expertise that this country can provide.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Ms. Lockhart.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister and General, for being with us today. As you know, we've been working on a mental health study and have concluded our service delivery study. A lot of the testimony you've given today has given us some answers to some of the things we've been hearing through that testimony, so I thank you.

One thing we've heard from veterans is that their access to cannabis for medical purposes has really made a positive change in their lives. Some of them feel that the changes VAC has made are really taking away their medication. In regard to your department's decision to reassess the acceptable amounts of marijuana for medical purposes, what evidence led you to make that decision?

(1625)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I think we have to start with this at a higher level. When I came into the department, there was no policy rationale for the provision of 10 grams a day of cannabis for a veteran for their medicinal purposes, whether for mental health, physical ailments, or whatever. We searched and we searched, and lo and behold, none was found.

Because cannabis is not a drug that is regulated by Health Canada—there are no provisions on that there or otherwise—I said we needed to get together with the medical community, veterans, stakeholders, and licensed producers to try to get a policy framework. It's not a drug regulated by Health Canada. We felt we were in a policy void, in a vacuum.

Through those meetings, our searching, our consultations with the medical community and otherwise, and other expertise—people are looking at this emerging field—we came across much information. The studies go both ways. In fact, there are some medical practitioners who believe it's harmful. Some say there's a benefit. Our government is trying to do things based on evidence and science and good policy.

We even came across information from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons stating that the vast majority of people should not be taking more than three grams a day. They look at that as an upper limit for people to safely use when dealing with any medical condition. It's evidence like this that we are coming across from talking with many doctors, with veterans.

We understood that many of them were, in their situation, finding their lives improved. We get that. This was no easy decision that we made, but we felt we had to do it.

We feel we have allowed for some flexibility. Of course, we will reimburse. Remember that Veterans Affairs Canada is a reimburser of marijuana. People can get medicinal marijuana, should they choose, from various licensed producers across this country. Right now we will only pay for three grams, and only when you go to your physician.

We've understood that treating everyone the same is not always going to be effective, so we've allowed some flexibility in the program. If you go to a specialist and they affirm your diagnosis and affirm that cannabis is a valid treatment for it, and they've looked at your medical file and agree with your physician that this is where you should go, then there is that ability for us to reimburse for more.

We felt that this was necessary. You have to remember that the health and wellness of veterans and their families is at the core of what we do, and our policy decisions are driven toward that end. In our view, this policy fits with that mandate, full stop.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you, Minister.

When we've been studying mental health, one of the things we've been talking about that ties into this as well is research on marijuana use when it comes to mental health treatment and PTSD. Is that an area that you anticipate...? Is there some way that VAC can contribute to research in the future for all of these items?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I think that's an excellent question.

One thing we're going to be moving ahead on is having a centre of excellence for mental health and PTSD. We envision a large component of that being dedicated for research to understand the best practices out there and allow us to get people help in regard to mental health. There is no doubt that is a growing issue for us at Veterans Affairs Canada.

I'm also very proud of an organization called CIMVHR. I forgot the acronym. Can you help with that?

(1630)

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

The Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Very good, General.

It's where our university systems have tied into researching this area. There's a long history of funnelling in information and of getting people moving the needle forward on veterans' issues. We have a strong partnership with them. In fact, before I make some stuff up and get myself in trouble, General, would you fill in the details here?

The Chair:

Sorry, Minister. Thank you. I have to move on to the next round.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Okay, good, but it's a very good program.

The Chair:

Mr. Kitchen, you have five minutes.

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister and General, thank you both for being back with us here today.

I'd like to go back to medical marijuana. How much are you anticipating saving with the changes that you've made?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I'm frankly not sure. I didn't factor any of that into my calculations. You'd have to look at.... I don't even know if we have any calculations on that.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

Sir, if I may, from our perspective this is an issue, as the Minister said, about wellness, about well-being, about the medical professionals' advice that anything north of three grams may not be in the best interests of the veteran, so this was not costed in terms of what we foresaw with regard to cost savings because this is not about the money. This is about wellness.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

That's what we've heard from a lot of our witnesses in our studies. A lot of the witnesses have said to us something along the lines of it being in the best interests of their families and of the veterans, and we found that a lot of these witnesses have told us that the use of marijuana has actually given them back some functionality in their lives, has reduced their heavy opioid use over the years and minimized the number of medications that they have to take. Would you not agree, then, that we should be doing a study on medical marijuana?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Well, I'll talk about the policy as we implement it.

Because of the information we had from meeting with the medical experts and the veterans, we believe that we've come up with a flexible policy that allows us to keep people safe as well as allowing for flexibility if they want to go to a specialist or want to get what they believe is in their best interest.

In terms of research, I believe it's something we are looking into. It's something that people at CIMVHR and other organizations out there are doing, and I believe we have an obligation as a department to keep track of this emerging research to see where it goes.

Do you have anything to add?

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

I'd just like to add that when the minister spoke at the CIMVHR conference in Vancouver in November, he tasked the department, in partnership with the Canadian Armed Forces, to conduct the research to again look at best practices with regard to the merits and the details of using marijuana for medical purposes.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Right, but what I'm talking about is more along the lines of actually doing an efficacy study. I'm not talking about talking to people. I'm talking about doing an actual study, a good research study. Would you not agree that it should be done?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I think this is an emerging field where we need much more information—

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

We need more information on it, so do you not agree that we as a committee here should be accessing that information so that we can provide a better outcome and service to our veterans?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

It's probably something to take under advisement.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Mr. Chair, I'd like to move a motion, if I can. We have before us a notice of motion: That the committee undertake a study of no more than six meetings on the implications to Canadian veterans' mental health following the reduction of the daily limit of medical marijuana through the medical marijuana program administered by Veterans Affairs Canada.

The Chair:

It's on the floor.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Mr. Chair, I move that we now adjourn debate on that. We have the minister before us to answer our questions, and before debating this motion and taking it into consideration, I believe it would be better to adjourn debate on it and finish up with the minister.

(1635)

The Chair:

This will be a vote on adjourning the debate.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Mr. Chair, I would ask that we have a recorded vote.

The Chair:

Okay.

(Motion agreed to: yeas 6; nays 3)

The Chair:

The motion is carried.

We stopped the clock. You have about a minute and a half left.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Minister, I have a question for you on the increase of $1 billion mentioned in the report in front of us. Can you tell us how many veterans have come forward this year to access the services?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

If you look at our numbers, primarily our $1 billion.... We saw a 19% increase in the number of disability benefit claims that came into our office. That's a good thing. It means more people are coming in to get the help they need when they need it.

We've also had an increase in the number of claims that have been rolled through our department. People have actually received the services they applied for, and we're very happy with the direction we're moving on that.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Are you privy to tell us the comparison between the year before and this one?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

It's about 19%, but I'll give that to the General.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

Sorry, I don't have that particular detail. I've got year-by-year in terms of releases from the Canadian Armed Forces, but when I put it through folks who've come in after their release, I don't have that data point, so we'll have to come back to you.

The Chair:

Thank you for getting that back to us.

Go ahead, Ms. Mathyssen, for three minutes.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I want to get back to the issue of veterans and jobs. When veterans remain in the reserves but they're not on the government payroll, the Canadian government claims their intellectual property right. That makes it very difficult for them to find work in their field, because their particular expertise is being taken by the government.

Have you looked into this policy, and are you willing to address this problem?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

First, reserves are more under the purview of the Department of National Defence, but we are working on a whole host of issues in closing the seam and looking at the whole host of people who are involved in our military apparatus and how they transition out.

To your exact question, I've heard this from time to time. I'm certain it's been brought up by reserves. It's something to consider in the mix when we continue to go forward and close the seam with General Vance to make sure we professionalize the release service to make sure people are getting the supports they need.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

I have nothing to add.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It seems only fair that these reservists have access to their own intellectual property.

The DND ombudsman has suggested a concierge service to ensure those being medically released are helped through the process—pension services, medical needs—because we're hearing from some veterans that it can be overwhelming.

What is your response to that? Is this something you'd be prepared to look at?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I appreciate the ombudsman's report and I always review it with vigour. He and our Veterans Ombudsman are hearing what people are saying about the issue. I know the gap between National Defence and Veterans Affairs can and must be closed. We are working with Minister Sajjan and CDS Vance to ensure, as I said earlier, that release is professionalized.

We want to ensure that when men and women who have served in our Canadian Armed Forces leave, they have their pension, they're good to go, and they have a place to live. We want to ensure they're going to find their new normal and know how they're going to access, if necessary, Veterans Affairs services, so that they're not struggling for five or 10 years before they come in our door. They will know right away that we're out there, that we can help and get them the services they need.

(1640)

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

If I can just add, as the minister indicated in his opening comment, the department has gone through a service delivery review, and a key part of it is ensuring that the department is helping each and every one of those veterans, as they're transitioning out, to begin that process earlier in their release process. Currently it's at six months before they're released. We're trying to go even earlier, working side by side with the Canadian Armed Forces case managers, so that when these people leave the Canadian Armed Forces, they are settled on where they want to live, and if they can find a job, we do our utmost to find them a job, try to find a doctor, and so on and so forth.

It's all of that. Actually, we've been using the term “concierge” as a goal. We've got some ways to go, because again, we're seeing about 5,000 to 6,000 members of the Canadian Armed Forces leaving the force each and every year. We're trying to tailor a package for every one of them based upon their specific individual and family needs.

The Chair:

Thank you.

That ends our day of testimony with this panel. On behalf of the committee, I'd like to thank both the minister and the deputy minister for showing up here today.

I want to add a comment about hiring veterans, and I encourage all members to do so. I have hired one from my riding in the Bay of Quinte, and this person is a very hard worker and well trained. General, and thank you for that.

Gen Walter Natynczyk:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We will break for a minute, and we'll bring the next—

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I'd like to thank everyone on the committee for their hard work, their focus, and their efforts on behalf of Canadian veterans. It really means a lot.

The Chair:

We'll adjourn for a couple of minutes.

(1640)

(1645)

The Chair:

We'll come back to order.

We have votes at 5:30 p.m. and we need to have a couple of votes here at the end of the meeting for the main and supplementary estimates, so we're going to have to go with probably just one round of questioning.

Our witnesses are here. From the Department of Veterans Affairs, we have with us Elizabeth Stuart, assistant deputy minister, chief financial officer, corporate services branch; Michel Doiron, assistant deputy minister, service delivery; and Bernard Butler, assistant deputy minister, strategic policy and commemoration.

You guys aren't here to present formally, I guess, so we can start our first round.

Go ahead, Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I have a real treat for you, Mr. Doiron. Thanks to you for coming back, and thanks to Ms. Stuart and Mr. Butler.

I have some questions from some veterans. Specifically, I have four questions here, but if I may, Mr. Chair, I will share a bit of my time with Ms. Wagantall.

How much time do I have?

(1650)

The Chair:

You have six minutes.

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay. Can you give me notice at the four-minute mark?

Here's one of these questions that need to be asked. You can open nine offices and hire 400 staff, but what is the approval rate for the applications for benefits?

Mr. Michel Doiron (Assistant Deputy Minister, Service Delivery, Department of Veterans Affairs):

We are running in the mid-80s right now in the approval rate on first applications.

Mr. John Brassard:

The mid-80s...?

Mr. Michel Doiron:

If you're talking about mental health or PTSD, we're actually running at about 94%. It would depend on the exact...but the average for all is in the mid-80s.

Mr. John Brassard:

The next question is, what is the feedback cycle from veterans regarding services and benefits?

Mr. Michel Doiron:

That's a loaded question, sir.

Mr. John Brassard:

It's from a veteran, Mr. Doiron.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Okay—

Mr. John Brassard:

You can expect it to be loaded.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Yes, sir.

It would all depend on which services we're talking about. If you're talking about our adjudicative services, the comments we get back are that they're too long and we need too much information. As part of the service delivery review and some other things we're doing, we're trying to facilitate that, to de-medicalize the process and make it a bit easier. Notwithstanding the fact that we're doing it with an approval rate in the mid-80s, the forms are too complicated and the process is too complicated.

If you're talking about case management, we get very positive comments back, but those are mostly in terms of the ill and injured. That's more of a hand-holding, more of a partnership, with the veteran. It would depend on what services we're talking about.

That said, though, we don't hear a lot from the silent majority, so we are in the process of doing a survey with veterans to actually go out and solicit their views on Veterans Affairs. We're hoping to have the results of that at some point in April.

Mr. John Brassard:

The next question is about case managers sending the applications to Charlottetown, adding time and bureaucracy to the process. Is there any intent or thought being given to letting case managers approve benefit applications to save time?

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Not for the case managers themselves, but we are looking at whether we can move some of that decision-making closer to the veteran at a different level. That's not with the case managers themselves, but with some of our veterans service agents, or by having some disability benefit agents in the offices across the country who could do that on site much faster.

Mr. John Brassard:

This is the last question.

How much time do I have, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You have about three and a half minutes.

Mr. John Brassard:

In terms of the appeal board, why aren't the appeal board decisions communicated to VAC so that those decisions are followed at VAC?

Mr. Michel Doiron:

You mean from VRAB, right?

Mr. John Brassard:

Yes, the Veterans Review and Appeal Board. I'm sorry. I tried to shorten my question due to the time.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

That's fine.

We do receive some information from VRAB and we do work with them to see if there are trends, so that if they're reversing something that we're doing systematically, we can adjust. If it's going to go to VRAB and be overturned every time, we might as well look at what's happening at the front end. That we are doing, but we don't receive the individual rulings. They are sent to the veteran. It's personal information.

Mr. John Brassard:

To go to my question, when General Natynczyk was here back in December, he mentioned the hiring of short-term employees because of the increase in the file workload. We're starting to see that through these supplementary estimates. What number of short-term employees has VAC hired? How many are actually working on caseloads? Do you have that information in front of you?

Mr. Michel Doiron:

I'll provide you with that information.

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

I don't have that. You mean terms and casuals? I do have a breakdown, but I don't have it here. I'll provide that.

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay.

I'm going to cede my time to Ms. Wagantall.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Thank you so much.

I'd like to talk about Saskatoon again just a bit. I understand that 400 new positions have been created; 381 have been filled, and 113 of those are case managers. That means there are 19 positions left to hit 400. In Saskatchewan, the indication is that there's a potential caseload of 2,900 veterans, and to date we have one case manager. We would need 115 more.

My question is, since a significant number of those 400 were in the queue already under the previous minister, is this government prepared to continue to hire past that 400 to make sure that the 25:1—

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Mr. Chair, I think I'm going to correct something in that. Yes, there are 2,900 veterans, but the 25:1 is for case management.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay, so it's the harder and more difficult....

Mr. Michel Doiron:

It's the harder cases. Also, in Saskatoon, presently we have five case-managed veterans.

(1655)

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

That's why there are not 100 case managers in Saskatoon. It's the same thing for every office. We can pick the number. The other veterans are handled by our veterans service agents, who carry a much bigger load because it's not the same service.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Yes.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Somebody may be on VIP and get a call once a year. That's the veterans independence program.

Let's say there's an issue—

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay, that makes sense.

How many of those are situated in Saskatoon?

Mr. Michel Doiron:

We have one case manager. We're ready. If there's a demand, we will increase that. We have six employees, total, in Saskatoon.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Thank you.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Also, I think we're fully staffed at the moment in Saskatoon.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Thank you. That's my question.

The Chair:

Okay. Mr. Graham is next.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I have a variety of questions. I'm fairly new to this committee. Minister Hehr talked about 381 new hires, and Mr. Brassard broached this a little bit. Do we know how many of those are veterans, and do we have a breakdown of their rank at retirement? I'm curious to know if we have a lot of enlisted personnel, or if it's mainly admirals and generals who are getting these jobs.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

I don't have the number of the 381 who are veterans. We can get that. We have the total number of veterans in Veterans Affairs. When it comes to rank, though, we hire them at all levels. We have senior officers, like the rear admiral or the general here. We also have a lot of corporals, sergeants, and junior and senior NCOs with various skill sets. They're all over the organization.

As an example, in my adjudication unit I have a fair number of corporals and sergeants who do adjudications. They were nurses or medics in the armed forces, and often they are officers, but they're not all officers. We hire nurses or medics if they have the qualification.

I can try to get you the number of the people we've hired, because I don't have the breakdown of the 381.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As to the 381, I'm curious if there's a bias towards certain skill sets and ranks or if it really does cover everybody.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

We do have the number of total hires. Do you want to...?

Rear-Admiral (Retired) Elizabeth Stuart (Assistant Deputy Minister, Chief Financial Officer and Corporate Services, Department of Veterans Affairs):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

As a follow-on to the statement made earlier by the deputy minister regarding the veterans in the public service hiring unit, we've stood up a team in late November and early December. It's very small at the moment, but we have a phased approach to improve the hiring of veterans in the public service. The phased approach looks to Veterans Affairs Canada being a role model, first and foremost. Obviously DND is very experienced, because the Canadian Armed Forces and National Defence work in an integrated fashion.

We are seeking in the next phase to have a positive effect on hiring throughout the entire public service and then to branch out into industry. Also, we know there are a lot of not-for-profits and organizations that are already assisting in this manner.

Since the coming into force of Bill C-27, the Veterans Hiring Act, we have seen some take-up by priority veterans who have been medically released, either for reasons attributable to service or reasons not attributable to service. The Public Service Commission has a mandate to collect data on those veterans, but to date there is no mandatory reporting of hires in the public service who are veterans. For example, at Veterans Affairs Canada we have sent every new employee a voluntary survey. It's still not mandatory to self-identify as a veteran, and I would imagine that some veterans may not wish to do so, but it has improved our reporting.

I can give you some statistics. From the coming into force of the Veterans Hiring Act on July 1, 2015, we had 315 priority hires in the public service, 18 of them within Veterans Affairs Canada. The total of veterans employed at VAC who have self-identified through our survey currently is 115.

We are working with the Public Service Commission to try to improve our ability to collect data on veterans, and we have sent a letter asking to have a question regarding military service added to the public service employee survey.

We're working on several venues, and we haven't finished our work by any means as yet.

(1700)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I got into this committee right in the middle of our study on veterans' suicides. That's all we've discussed until today, so I've learned quite a lot in a very short period of time.

One of the threads that I've seen is a loss of confidence in Veterans Affairs by veterans over the past decade. I'll call it that. We've seen a lot of damage caused by huge cuts by the previous government. What we're finding is that the veterans don't care about the parties; it's that they don't have confidence in the service anymore. It's not just about money.

How do we more broadly rebuild that confidence with the veterans? What steps do we need to take, and what's the path to get there?

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Sir, we have a long way to go to rebuild that trust. We're doing a lot of stuff presently. We have stakeholder summits where we bring in veterans or our various advisory committees. We're spending a lot more time.

Some of us chair some of the advisory committees that have more interaction with veterans. It's having more open communication with veterans and trying to explain what's behind the decisions. Sometimes the right answer is no. It is unfortunate, but it is the answer. Then it's explaining why it's no and trying to make it understandable to the veteran.

We have a long way to go, because over the years—and you will excuse me if I don't get into politics, being a bureaucrat—for all kinds of reasons, when it comes to services, that trust has eroded. We're working very hard.

There was a question about training. We give a lot of training to our new employees. We're hiring. We're spending a lot of time in training those 381 new employees to bring care, compassion, and respect.

You have to remember that Veterans Affairs is not—

I'm being told to stop.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen is next.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you very much. Welcome back.

I want to begin with you, Mr. Doiron. The last time you were here I asked you about military sexual assault. You said: We've been working very closely with “It's Just 700” and we take this extremely seriously. We're talking to them so our adjudicators have a better understanding of sexual trauma. Our doctors are very well aware, and we're working with them to put something on our website.

We've heard testimony from other organizations, quite recently actually, and they said that they haven't heard anything in months. I'm wondering whether you are going to create space on the VAC website with clear links and information for veterans with military sexual trauma.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Thank you for the question, Mr. Chair.

First, we have been talking to the associations. I can't tell you if my director general of adjudications spoke in the last month, but in 2017 I was debriefed on a conversation he had with one of the associations, so there are some conversations going on.

We have trained our adjudicators on sexual trauma. We don't get a diagnostic for sexual trauma. We get a diagnostic for mental health. We get a diagnostic sometimes for a physical injury. Most times it's a mental health injury. We have trained our adjudicators to recognize it and to actually escalate it when there's any doubt, to make sure that we are properly covering it.

I think it was December when I was here, but since then I know we've overturned or actually looked at some pretty controversial and difficult cases. I don't want to get into them because they're personal, but they were very difficult cases.

As for the website, I'm not aware. I know we were working to put some stuff up, but I don't know if it's up or not. I'll have to check that, but I'm not sure.

The space we will put up will just say that it is something we are looking at or something that you can apply for, but you can't apply for military sexual trauma. It's not a condition. The condition they get is a mental health condition or a physical injury. There are a lot of different injuries. From working with the chair of It's Just 700, we have been educated quite a lot on what some of the psychologists and psychiatrists out there are actually diagnosing, which we did not know. We're actually working closely with them to address some of this.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I'd like to know exactly what is going on when you determine that, because it seems to me that a veteran knows if he or she has been sexually assaulted and understands that yes, this is an injury, but that veteran needs to find out where to get help. If that website is the conduit, then he or she needs to be able to use it in an effective way.

I'll go to my next question. I was talking to veterans over the weekend, and they talked about still feeling very vulnerable in regard to their financial needs and this whole issue of denial. Just receiving a letter from Veterans Affairs can trigger post-traumatic stress.

In terms of repairing that broken relationship, how are you improving communications in terms of those managers? We have to do better in terms of how we deal with these individuals. Is that getting down to the rank and file and those people who are directly involved with veterans?

(1705)

Mr. Michel Doiron:

We can always do better. I think I'll start there. It doesn't matter that we're approving them in the mid- to high-80s, we can always do better.

Before we say no in adjudications, we do call the individual to ask if there's anything else they can provide us. Sometimes they have the documents and they didn't send them. They didn't think it was important, but as for the “no” letter, we know about the envelope syndrome, that receiving an envelope from the Government of Canada is for some people traumatic. It's not just an envelope from Veterans Affairs, but from income tax or anywhere else, so we are working and have worked closely with the ombudsman's office to try to simplify our letters.

I have to say that although they're better, I don't think we're there. We still have to do some work on that. As I said earlier, sometimes the right answer is no, because it's not related to service. We do have to comply with the act that we are given to administer. There are some traumatic stories out there, and I see them, but the reality is that if it was not caused by your military service.... The veterans affairs act says it's supposed to....

We've changed in the last three years, giving the benefit of the doubt to the veteran now. We've changed that. When I arrived a little bit more than three years ago, you had to prove it was caused by service. You had to give us your CF 98 that said you had been injured. We've now moved on that. Do we always get it right? No, but I think we've gone a long way, so that now, if you're in certain trades, if your knees are gone and you're an infantry person and you've served 25 years and you come to us, it would be a yes. You may not have blown your knee in one jump, but over 25 years of humping who knows how many miles, the joints are gone.

We're working on that, but there are still some “no” letters that go out, and they're traumatic for the individuals.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Lockhart is next.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you all for appearing today.

In the context of looking at the main estimates, under operating expenditures there's an increase of $60.3 million. We've done a service delivery report, which I assume you've seen. Is there anything concrete that has happened from a service delivery standpoint, either resulting from that report or work that you're doing? I know you've just mentioned a few things, but are there other things that might be reflected in that dollar amount? Perhaps this isn't something that needed additional budget.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Thank you for your report. Yes, I have read your report very closely, and we're providing a government response to it, but I was quite pleased, as I said last time, with what was in the report. ACVA has always given us some good direction over the years in their reports, and we actually use them sometimes to change the rules or the laws.

We are continuously working on change. The deputy and the minister talked about the service delivery review, which we did at the same time you were doing your review. It just happened that way. We are implementing the service delivery review, which is all about improving services, improving the communication, being more veteran-centric. Those are all points that you raised in your recommendations, so we're doing the same thing.

As for the $63 million itself, maybe the admiral would like to speak.

RAdm Elizabeth Stuart:

Yes, I'd be delighted. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Our vote 1 operating expenditures, as they are contained in the main estimates for the next fiscal year, consist of the following increases: $13.5 million in regular operating expenses for the department; other health purchase services increasing by $60.9 million, for things such as glasses, nursing services, medical and dental treatment, long-term care, and prescriptions reimbursement; and new Veterans Charter support services increasing by $13.5 million, mainly for vocational and medical rehab issues. We have a decrease in Ste. Anne's Hospital, given the transfer of jurisdiction for the hospital last year from the federal government to the Province of Quebec, and a bit of a decrease, $2.6 million, in the education centre at Vimy, because we've largely completed what needed to be done. The net of all of those is a $61.4 million increase from the main estimates of last year.

(1710)

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you.

One of the other things we're hearing about is support for families. I'm wondering if you can talk to us about any changes or improvements in our service to families.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Yes, we also hear about supports for families, and unfortunately the way the act is construed is that the services for the most part come through the veteran, and we have to comply with the act. However, that said, we had the pilot on the MFRCs—

Mr. Bernard Butler (Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategic Policy and Commemoration, Department of Veterans Affairs):

Those are the military family resource centres.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

—military family resource centres, which we're piloting across the country and where veterans and their families can go and receive certain services. We have our 1-800 helpline that a family member or a veteran can call. They can receive up to 20 sessions, because we know that when the veteran suffers, the family suffers. It's okay to bring them to an OSI clinic, but some veterans will not invite—if I can use that term—the spouse. They can go, or a kid.... I was talking to one veteran not too long ago whose child had some trauma because of the parent's trauma. We do have some programming.

The family caregiver relief program is another one that was put out a couple of years ago to give a caregiver some respite. It's not a huge amount, but it gives them some respite to help them take some time off if they're always taking care of the family. I think we have a lot more to do on the family side, but it is in all our conversations because we know that if you can help the family, you're also helping the member.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

One of the other items that has come up from our testimony is the practice of reimbursing families for third party services. Is that something that's being looked at? It's been stated as being a barrier for families.

Mr. Michel Doiron:

Do you want to take that one?

Mr. Bernard Butler:

I'm sorry; it's for reimbursement for what type of service?

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

It's for third party services. It's perhaps an equestrian camp or something like that. It's services provided by a third party.

Mr. Bernard Butler:

Mr. Chair, thank you for the question. I can speak to the issue generally around those types of ancillary support programs.

As you probably know, we have pilots going on in equine therapy, looking at dog therapy, and certain things like that as they become more robust in terms of formal decisions on where we're going with them. As Michel indicated, our whole approach right now is to try to tailor all of our programs in way that is more veteran-centric, as opposed to being program-based.

From a program point of view, it's sometimes much easier to do things with a contribution arrangement, insisting on receipts and a lot of invoices. This new approach that we're looking at is trying to convert as many programs as we can to grant-based programs, which would be beneficial both to veterans and to families. The whole idea is to try to streamline our approach, to reduce the administrative burden on veterans and families, and then to try to ensure that access to them is quicker, more effective, and less troublesome for them.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

I'm happy to hear that. Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you. That ends this round of questioning. I would like to thank you for appearing today and for all the great things you do for our men and women.

With that, I'm going to have to have some votes on the estimates. We're just going to keep going, as we're short on time.

First we'll vote on the supplementary estimates (C), 2016-17: VETERANS AFFAIRS ç Vote 1c—Operating expenditures..........$65,448,828 ç Vote 5c—Grants and contributions..........$69,400,000

(Votes 1c and 5c agreed to)

The Chair: Shall the chair report votes 1c and 5c under Veterans Affairs of supplementary estimates (C), 2016-17 to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Now we'll vote on the main estimates, 2017-18. VETERANS AFFAIRS ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$931,958,962 ç Vote 5—Grants and contributions..........$3,728,239,000

(Votes 1 and 5 agreed to) VETERANS REVIEW AND APPEAL BOARD ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$9,449,156

(Vote 1 agreed to)

The Chair: Shall the chair report votes 1 and 5 under Veterans Affairs and vote 1 under Veterans Review and Appeal Board of the main estimates, 2017-18 to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair:Thank you.

I have a motion to adjourn from Mr. Bratina. All in favour?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair:Thank you very much. The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des anciens combattants

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Neil Ellis (Baie de Quinte, Lib.)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte.

Bonjour, tout le monde. Conformément au paragraphe 81(5) du Règlement, le Comité entreprend l'examen du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) 2016-2017: crédits 1c et 5c sous la rubrique Ministère des Anciens Combattants, renvoyés au Comité le mardi 14 février 2017.

Comparaissent aujourd'hui, dans notre premier groupe de témoins, l'honorable Kent Hehr, ministre des Anciens Combattants et ministre associé de la Défense nationale, ainsi que Walter Natynczyk, sous-ministre du ministère des Anciens Combattants.

Nous leur donnerons la parole pendant 10 minutes, puis nous passerons aux questions.

Bienvenue, messieurs. La parole est à vous.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (ministre des Anciens Combattants et ministre associé de la Défense nationale):

Merci beaucoup.

Bon après-midi, monsieur le président Ellis et les membres du Comité permanent des anciens combattants.

C'est avec plaisir que je présente le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) 2016-2017 et le Budget principal des dépenses 2017-2018 au Parlement, au nom d'Anciens Combattants Canada.

J'aimerais remercier les membres du Comité pour leur dévouement en ce qui a trait aux enjeux qui touchent les vétérans, et plus particulièrement pour l'attention récente qu'ils ont accordée à la santé mentale et pour leur étude de la prestation des services.

Notre gouvernement a pris l'engagement de veiller à ce que les vétérans et les membres de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada à la retraite qui sont admissibles, ainsi que leur famille, aient accès au soutien en santé mentale dont ils ont besoin, au moment et à l'endroit où ils en ont besoin. Il ne fait aucun doute que les travaux de ce comité permettront d'élargir nos connaissances, ainsi que notre compréhension des améliorations que nous pouvons apporter à ce chapitre.

Notre gouvernement continue de mettre l'accent sur l'élargissement de l'accès aux soins de santé mentale et sur l'amélioration de la sensibilisation, afin de fournir de meilleurs soutiens et services aux vétérans qui présentent des risques de suicide. C'est pourquoi je collabore étroitement avec mon collègue, le ministre de la Défense nationale, pour rapprocher nos deux ministères et assurer une transition plus facile aux militaires qui sont libérés.

En ce qui a trait au sujet de la présente réunion, le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses 2016-2017, j'aimerais souligner que les hausses les plus marquées concernent les allocations pour perte de revenu et les indemnités d'invalidité. J'ajouterais que le nombre de demandes d'indemnités d'invalidité soumises à Anciens Combattants a augmenté de 19 % au cours de l'exercice 2015-2016. Il s'agit d'une bonne chose, et cela montre qu'un plus grand nombre de personnes font des démarches pour obtenir l'aide dont elles ont besoin.

Je vais maintenant parler du Budget principal des dépenses pour l'exercice 2017-2018.

Le premier ministre m'a chargé de veiller à ce que nous reconnaissions les services rendus par nos vétérans, réduisions la complexité des processus et fassions davantage pour assurer la sécurité financière des vétérans au Canada. Je peux affirmer avec fierté que nous avons réalisé beaucoup de progrès. Le Budget principal des dépenses qui vous est soumis aujourd'hui rend compte d'un grand nombre de nos réalisations à ce jour. Il fait état d'une augmentation nette de 1,06 milliard de dollars par rapport à 2016-2017. Il s'agit d'une hausse de près de 30 % comparativement à l'exercice précédent. Cela s'accompagne d'un accroissement marqué de la sécurité financière et de l'accès aux services pour les vétérans et leur famille, et notre tâche n'est pas terminée.

En date du 1er avril, l'indemnité d'invalidité sera majorée pour passer de 310 000 $ à un maximum de 360 000 $ et elle sera indexée en fonction de l'inflation. Nous verserons un paiement supplémentaire à quiconque a déjà touché une indemnité d'invalidité, ce qui signifie plus d'argent dans les poches des vétérans malades et blessés. Par ailleurs, ce changement sera rétroactif à 2006, année où l'indemnité d'invalidité avait été adoptée. Cela va dans le sens de notre engagement à l'égard de l'approche « un vétéran, une norme ».

En outre, à partir du mois d'avril, les modifications apportées à l'allocation pour déficience permanente feront en sorte que les vétérans recevront une compensation plus appropriée pour les répercussions sur leur carrière d'une déficience permanente attribuable à leur service. L'allocation sera renommée « allocation pour incidence sur la carrière », afin de mieux refléter son objectif d'attribuer différents gradients et de rendre compte ainsi adéquatement du cheminement professionnel qu'aurait suivi une personne si elle n'était pas malade ou n'avait pas été blessée.

L'augmentation du maximum de l'indemnité d'invalidité et l'élargissement de l'accès à l'allocation pour déficience permanente découlent de recommandations faites par l'ombudsman des vétérans, M. Guy Parent. J'accorde toujours de la valeur aux commentaires de l'ombudsman, et je suis fier de mettre en oeuvre les changements de fond qui nous ont été recommandés par lui. Notre ombudsman a indiqué que cette démarche représentait une évolution pour ce qui est de l'accès à une compensation équitable. Nous continuerons d'élaborer un modèle axé sur le vétéran, qui appuie une transition sans heurts de la vie militaire à la vie civile.

Parmi les augmentations des dépenses d'exploitation que vous noterez figure la réouverture des bureaux des Anciens Combattants. Je suis très fier de dire que notre gouvernement a déjà rouvert sept des neuf bureaux fermés par le gouvernement précédent. Le mois de mai marquera la réouverture des deux qui restent, ainsi que l'ouverture d'un nouveau, à Surrey, en Colombie-Britannique.

Nous allons aussi élargir les services offerts aux vétérans dans le Nord. Les employés d'ACC rendront visite à des collectivités du Nord tous les mois, afin d'y rencontrer des vétérans et leur famille et de leur parler des services et des avantages qui sont disponibles.

Une des responsabilités premières d'Anciens Combattants Canada est de rendre hommage à tous les braves hommes et femmes qui servent dans les forces armées. Il est essentiel de souligner les services rendus par nos braves soldats, marins et aviateurs, pour faire en sorte qu'en tant que nation, nous n'oublions jamais leur dévouement et leur sacrifice.

(1540)



Le programme Le Canada se souvient s'efforce de garder vivant le souvenir des réalisations et des sacrifices consentis par ceux et celles qui ont servi le Canada en temps de guerre, de conflits armés et de paix, notamment, ainsi que de promouvoir la compréhension de ces efforts. Notre gouvernement investit environ 11 millions de dollars pour commémorer le 100e anniversaire de la Bataille de la crête de Vimy et de la Bataille de Passchendaele, ainsi que le 75e anniversaire du Débarquement de Dieppe. Nous continuerons d'honorer et de reconnaître ceux qui ont fait du Canada le pays qu'il est aujourd'hui.

Au cours de la dernière année et demie, nous avons accompli beaucoup de choses pour les vétérans canadiens. Nous avons fait passer l'allocation pour perte de revenus de 75 à 90 % de la solde d'un vétéran avant sa libération. De plus, ce montant sera indexé pour tenir compte de l'inflation. Ainsi, nous veillons à ce que ceux qui participent à un programme de réadaptation aient le soutien financier dont ils ont besoin.

Nous avons simplifié le processus d'approbation pour un certain nombre de demandes de prestations d'invalidité, notamment pour l'ESPT et l'hypoacousie, ce qui nous permet de traiter un plus grand nombre de demandes plus rapidement. En fait, comparativement à l'année précédente, le nombre de décisions rendues a augmenté de 27 % au cours du dernier exercice.

Nous avons parcouru beaucoup de chemin en ce qui a trait à notre engagement de recruter 400 nouveaux employés, avec l'embauche de 381 personnes jusqu'à maintenant. Cela comprend 113 nouveaux gestionnaires de cas. Nous réalisons des progrès importants quant à la réduction du ratio moyen de personnes par gestionnaire de cas pour le faire passer de 40:1 à 25:1.

En octobre, nous avons rehaussé le montant de l'exemption des avoirs de succession, dans le cadre du Programme de funérailles et d'inhumation, afin qu'un plus grand nombre de vétérans et leur famille aient accès à des funérailles en toute dignité.

Même si nous avons accompli beaucoup de choses, nous reconnaissons qu'il faut en faire beaucoup, beaucoup plus.

Nous continuons de consacrer les ressources, afin de trouver des façons d'améliorer les services en santé mentale et le soutien mis à la disposition des vétérans et de leur famille. Je sais que cela est au centre de votre étude et qu'il existe une sensibilisation accrue à l'égard de cet enjeu important. Je maintiens que nous pouvons toujours faire mieux, et je reconnais que même si la majorité des vétérans reçoivent le soutien dont ils ont besoin en santé mentale, nous pouvons faire davantage pour rejoindre ceux qui ne profitent pas d'un tel soutien. J'attends avec impatience vos recommandations quant à la façon dont nous pouvons continuer à améliorer les choses.

Il reste du travail à faire en ce qui a trait au versement d'une pension à vie et aux options qui s'offrent à ce chapitre. Nous continuerons de consulter les intervenants et les parlementaires pour élaborer la meilleure approche possible.

Il existe un domaine crucial dans lequel ACC peut et doit faire davantage, à savoir l'accélération des décisions concernant les indemnités. Nous poursuivons cette démarche à divers niveaux. Je collabore avec le ministre de la Défense nationale pour combler le fossé qui existe entre nos deux ministères, grâce à une réduction de la complexité des processus, à une révision de la prestation des services et au renforcement des partenariats.

Le ministère des Anciens Combattants a procédé à un examen exhaustif de son modèle de prestation de services, avec comme objectif de mettre les vétérans à l'avant-plan des programmes et des services, de simplifier les processus, d'en faciliter la compréhension et d'améliorer l'accès. Nous avons tenu de vastes consultations avec des vétérans, des employés, des experts externes et des Canadiens, et nous publierons un rapport final comprenant des recommandations clés. Nous adopterons un plan en vue de mettre en oeuvre 90 % des recommandations sur une période de trois ans, et l'ensemble complet des changements d'ici cinq ans.

Le bien-être physique, mental et financier de nos vétérans est notre principal objectif. Anciens Combattants Canada a déjà fait beaucoup, et grâce au budget d'aujourd'hui, nous pourrons réaliser un grand nombre de nos promesses.

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons commencer notre période de questions avec M. Brassard.

M. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous, monsieur le ministre et général, de votre présence parmi nous aujourd'hui.

Un élément est manifestement absent du Budget principal des dépenses et du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses, alors qu'il figurait parmi les promesses du premier ministre à Belleville, pendant la campagne électorale, et qu'il fait partie de notre lettre de mandat, monsieur le ministre. Il s'agit de l'option d'une pension à vie pour les vétérans blessés. Je ne vois rien à ce sujet dans le budget, et je me demande pourquoi.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Nous maintenons notre engagement de fournir une option de pension à vie à nos vétérans qui ont été blessés ou sont devenus malades par suite de leur service dans les forces armées. Cela fait partie de nos engagements de campagne et figure toujours dans la liste des choses à accomplir. Je sais que nous avons fait un grand pas en avant au chapitre de la sécurité financière, grâce à l'attribution de 5,6 milliards de dollars l'an dernier pour la bonification de l'allocation pour perte de revenus et de l'indemnité d'invalidité, tout cela dans l'optique d'améliorer le système de compensation financière de nos vétérans.

Je peux dire que nous maintenons notre engagement à cet égard et que nous le réaliserons.

(1545)

M. John Brassard:

Puis-je vous demander quelle échéance vous avez prévue pour cela, monsieur le ministre?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Notre échéance correspond à celle de notre mandat de quatre ans comme gouvernement. Évidemment, cela...

M. John Brassard:

Donc, quand les vétérans peuvent-ils s'attendre à ce que cette promesse devienne réalité?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Nos vétérans peuvent s'attendre à ce que nous donnions suite à cette promesse au cours du mandat de quatre ans du gouvernement libéral. Je serai heureux lorsque je pourrai affirmer que cette option de pension est offerte à nos vétérans.

M. John Brassard:

Ma prochaine question concerne le sujet que vous avez abordé précédemment. Nous menons actuellement une étude en santé mentale sur l'ESPT. Parmi les enjeux dont nous entendons constamment parler figurent la transition de la vie militaire à la vie civile et les défis que cela pose, au chapitre de l'emploi, notamment.

Au cours de la dernière semaine, j'ai reçu plusieurs lettres de vétérans. Dans l'une d'elles, la personne mentionnait que sa demande d'emploi dans la fonction publique était demeurée en suspens pendant un an. Dans une autre, il était question d'un vétéran de 26 ans prêt à déménager pour obtenir du travail. Il semble exister des lacunes à l'heure actuelle en ce qui a trait à l'embauche des vétérans.

Je me demande où se situe le ministère des Anciens Combattants aujourd'hui pour ce qui est du recrutement des vétérans dans la fonction publique. Je vous rappellerai, monsieur le ministre, qu'en décembre, vous aviez indiqué au Comité qu'ACC mettait l'accent sur les débouchés pour les vétérans, non seulement au sein même du ministère, mais dans d'autres ministères de la fonction publique. À l'heure actuelle, nous voyons que les niveaux actuels de recrutement des vétérans dans la fonction publique se situent à 2,2 %.

Qu'a fait le ministère des Anciens Combattants avec d'autres ministères, ainsi que dans ses rangs, pour promouvoir le recrutement prioritaire des vétérans?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je remercie sincèrement le député pour sa question. Il s'agit d'un domaine où j'ai indiqué aux fonctionnaires de mon ministère que nous aimerions voir de meilleurs résultats, tant au chapitre du recrutement des personnes dans la fonction publique, que de celui de la transition réussie de nos vétérans à la vie civile. Je sais qu'une partie des travaux en ce sens ont permis de jeter les bases d'une plus grande collaboration avec le ministre Sajjan. Je sais que, dans mon ministère, nous mettons davantage l'accent sur les travaux qui se font de son côté.

Général, je crois que vous pourriez peut-être nous éclairer davantage à ce sujet.

Général (à la retraite) Walter Natynczyk (sous-ministre, ministère des Anciens Combattants):

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs, il est certain que nous mettons l'accent sur la participation et l'intégration des vétérans dans la fonction publique, afin qu'ils trouvent dans les faits un nouveau sens à leur vie. Nous savons, comme vous l'avez mentionné, que le bien-être mental des vétérans repose sur cela et qu'ils doivent aller de l'avant. Les militaires qui sont libérés des Forces armées canadiennes ont en moyenne 37 ans, ce qui fait qu'il leur reste de nombreuses années utiles.

À la demande du ministre, le sous-ministre Forster, de la Défense nationale, et moi-même avons fait des représentations auprès de l'ensemble des sous-ministres. En fait, nous avons présenté un exposé à tous les sous-ministres du gouvernement. Le ministre a en outre autorisé la création d'un service de recrutement des vétérans, au sein d'Anciens Combattants, qui collaborera avec les services des ressources humaines de tous les ministères et tentera de trouver un emploi au sein de ceux-ci pour les vétérans qui le souhaitent.

Nous avons aussi envoyé des lettres à des organismes comme Parcs Canada, qui a des règles spéciales de recrutement, afin de nous assurer que les vétérans prennent connaissance de ces règles. Nous veillons à ce que ces mesures ne se limitent pas à Ottawa, mais s'étendent à l'ensemble du pays. Il faut se rappeler qu'il y a des parcs partout au pays, et que Service correctionnel a des bureaux partout au pays, tout comme Revenu Canada. Les mesures ne doivent pas se limiter à Ottawa.

Nous collaborons avec le reste du gouvernement pour faire en sorte que tout cela se concrétise. Nous collaborons aussi avec des entreprises. Nous faisons appel à Compagnie Canada, le programme sans but lucratif d'aide à la transition de carrière des militaires, afin que les vétérans aient l'ensemble de compétences appropriées et un bon curriculum vitae pour obtenir des emplois dans des entreprises commerciales.

M. John Brassard:

Je reviendrai peut-être à cela si j'ai le temps.

Dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses, il y a un poste de 2,5 millions de dollars pour la publicité. De quelle publicité s'agit-il?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Comme vous le savez, notre première année au gouvernement a été très chargée et a été marquée par l'ouverture de bureaux, la fourniture d'information concernant les modifications apportées aux indemnités, ainsi que les mesures visant à offrir de meilleures funérailles aux vétérans. Cela a donné lieu à la communication d'une somme importante d'information à nos vétérans et au public en général.

Afin de vous donner plus de détails à ce sujet, je vais demander au général Natynczyk de répondre à votre question.

M. John Brassard:

Pouvez-vous nous donner la ventilation de ces dépenses de publicité, général?

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs, la publicité est assurée de façon centralisée dans le cadre du Programme Le Canada se souvient. L'organisation revient du Bureau du Conseil privé. Nous présentons une soumission afin d'avoir accès à ce budget, pour le jour du Souvenir, etc.

Dans son témoignage, la dirigeante principale des finances de mon ministère pourra probablement élaborer davantage.

(1550)

Le président:

Monsieur Eyolfson, vous avez la parole.

M. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur le ministre et général, de votre présence parmi nous aujourd'hui.

Vous parlez de la réouverture de bureaux d'Anciens Combattants. J'ai eu le plaisir de vous remplacer pour l'ouverture de l'un d'entre eux, à Brandon, au Manitoba. J'ai été très honoré de pouvoir participer à cela.

De toute évidence, les fermetures ont commencé avant le début de votre mandat. Vous a-t-on déjà expliqué clairement pourquoi ces bureaux ont été fermés au départ?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Selon ce que je comprends, cela faisait partie de l'initiative de réduction du déficit de l'ancien gouvernement. Évidemment, lorsque vous réduisez les impôts, cela vous amène souvent à réduire les services. À mon avis, le ministère des Anciens Combattants est celui qui a été le plus touché; les compressions ayant porté dans de nombreux cas sur son personnel de première ligne. À un moment donné, on a procédé à une réduction de près du tiers du personnel de première ligne de mon ministère, par suite des directives comprises dans cette initiative. Par ailleurs, outre la fermeture des bureaux, certains dossiers n'ont pas progressé, selon nous, alors qu'ils auraient dû.

C'est cela qui s'est produit. Néanmoins, nous avons renouvelé notre engagement à l'égard des vétérans. Nous avons déterminé qu'il est important de mettre ces points de service à la disposition des vétérans et de leur famille, pour qu'ils sachent où s'adresser, où soumettre leurs préoccupations, où partager leurs histoires, où trouver de l'information pour avoir une vie meilleure. Je suis fier de dire que sept des neuf bureaux ont ouvert leurs portes, afin qu'un plus grand nombre de personnes puissent utiliser ces services. Je sais que lorsque nous sommes allés dans les collectivités concernées, de Corner Brook à Brandon, et partout ailleurs, les gens étaient très enthousiastes. Ils voient ces bureaux non seulement comme des endroits où les gens peuvent obtenir de l'aide, mais aussi comme une façon d'honorer les hommes et les femmes qui ont servi dans les forces armées et, en fait, de souligner l'apport des 2,3 millions de Canadiens qui ont servi dans nos forces armées depuis la Confédération.

Je suis très fier de cette réalisation de notre gouvernement et de tout ce que nous avons fait pour nos vétérans et ceux qui ont servi dans les forces canadiennes.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Par ailleurs, si je ne me trompe pas, lorsque ces bureaux ont été fermés, des employés ont été mis à pied. Où en sommes-nous en ce qui a trait au recrutement de personnel pour ceux qui ont ouvert leurs portes, afin d'atteindre les niveaux d'effectif dont nous avons besoin?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Pour les détails exacts à ce sujet, je vais passer la parole au général Natynczyk.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Monsieur, comme le ministre l'a dit dans son allocution d'ouverture, nous avons recruté 381 employés au pays. De ce nombre, 113 sont des gestionnaires de cas. Nous procédons à la dotation des postes bureau par bureau. Dans certaines régions du pays, il est difficile de trouver les bons agencements de connaissances, des travailleurs sociaux, des psychologues, etc. En même temps, nous voyons que les gens ont le goût de se joindre à l'équipe d'Anciens Combattants. Notre mission est noble et ils veulent servir nos vétérans, ce qui fait que nous disposons d'un bassin de candidats très qualifiés.

Nous poursuivrons la dotation jusqu'à l'atteinte de notre objectif. Parallèlement, le ratio vétérans-gestionnaire de cas est en baisse, comme l'a mentionné le ministre, ce qui est synonyme d'amélioration de nos services.

Si vous souhaitez des renseignements bureau par bureau concernant l'effectif, nous pourrions demander à M. Michel Doiron, sous-ministre adjoint de la Prestation des services, de nous fournir une ventilation.

Vous avez mentionné votre visite au bureau de Brandon. Lorsque je me suis rendu au bureau de Kelowna, récemment, j'ai été impressionné de voir le dévouement des gens là-bas, de rencontrer des vétérans, un caporal-chef, un ambulancier paramédical qui a servi à Petawawa et qui travaille maintenant comme gestionnaire de cas à Kelowna. Je suis impressionné de voir ce genre d'expérience et ces ensembles de compétences mis à contribution pour réaliser notre mission.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Par suite de l'augmentation des services, en raison de l'ouverture de ces bureaux, pouvez-vous nous donner une idée générale de la façon dont les services seront améliorés pour les vétérans qui se trouvent dans les collectivités du Nord et les collectivités éloignées?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

J'aimerais ajouter une chose à ce que j'ai dit précédemment. Nous progressons rapidement vers notre objectif moyen de 25 vétérans par gestionnaire de cas. Il s'agit d'une étape très importante, que nous sommes sur le point de franchir. Selon les pratiques éprouvées dans le domaine du travail social, nous avons besoin d'un ratio moyen de 25:1 pour servir le mieux nos vétérans qui ont besoin de soutien additionnel. Je suis donc très fier de cela aussi.

En ce qui a trait à nos bureaux dans le Nord, il y a évidemment de nombreux Autochtones et de nombreux autres habitants du Nord qui ont servi dans les forces armées. Nous sommes très fiers de cela. Il n'y a jamais eu de présence du ministère des Anciens Combattants là-bas. Cela faisait en sorte que les gens devaient souvent faire de longs trajets vers des villes éloignées et passer du temps loin de leur famille, ce qui nous croyons était inutile et injuste.

Nous nous sommes occupés de ce problème. Nous avons prévu un service mobile d'AAC. Ce service est mobile parce que le territoire à couvrir est vaste. Les visites sur place se font sur une base mensuelle. Les employés se rendent dans les différentes communautés pour rencontrer les vétérans qui veulent soumettre des demandes de services, pour appuyer ceux qui reçoivent déjà des services, et pour s'assurer que les vétérans obtiennent l'aide dont ils ont besoin, même dans les régions du Nord et les régions éloignées.

(1555)

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Il a été fait mention de notre stratégie pour offrir des services en santé mentale. Dans la demi-minute qui reste, comment décririez-vous, en termes généraux, les plus grands défis que présente l'amélioration des services en santé mentale pour les vétérans?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Nous fournissons de très bons services, à de nombreux égards; toutefois, comme le dit souvent notre premier ministre, il est toujours possible de faire mieux.

Il ne suffit que de quelques améliorations. Tout d'abord, nous devons veiller à maintenir et à augmenter notre expertise et notre effectif, lorsque cela est nécessaire, afin de fournir les services concrets en santé mentale qui sont nécessaires. Nous croyons que nous serons mieux en mesure d'y arriver par suite du recrutement de 381 nouveaux employés jusqu'à maintenant. Je crois que cela nous aidera.

Il reste aussi du travail à faire pour d'autres éléments compris dans la lettre de mandat. L'un d'eux a trait au centre d'excellence, qui s'occupera de santé mentale et de stress post-traumatique. Nous croyons que ce centre nous permettra de tirer parti de pratiques éprouvées, de faire des percées robustes dans le secteur de la recherche universitaire et de nous assurer autrement que nous poursuivons notre recherche d'excellence et que nous continuons de tirer parti le mieux possible des connaissances émergentes.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Madame Mathyssen, c'est à vous.

Mme Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NPD):

Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci d'être présent parmi nous aujourd'hui, monsieur le ministre.

J'ai un certain nombre de questions.

Je note que le budget comporte des augmentations, mais vous savez qu'il y a un certain nombre de vétérans qui sont mécontents. Ils sont d'avis qu'ils ne reçoivent pas les indemnités auxquelles ils ont droit et qu'ils ont gagnées, et qu'ils sont laissés pour compte.

De quel type de financement auriez-vous besoin pour rétablir cette confiance chez les vétérans et pour venir à bout de cet arriéré de cas de vétérans en attente de pensions?

L'ombudsman du ministère de la Défense nationale a mis des chiffres sur papier et les a soumis à ce comité. Dans quelle mesure êtes-vous prêt à affecter les sommes mentionnées par l'ombudsman des Anciens Combattants?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Nous avons été chargés d'améliorer les choses pour les vétérans et leur famille, point à la ligne. J'ai une lettre de mandat de notre premier ministre, dans laquelle il est fait état de nos engagements à l'égard des vétérans. Nous avons mené à bien six de ces 15 engagements, et pour deux d'entre eux concernant la sécurité financière, nous avons parcouru beaucoup de chemin, selon notre ombudsman des vétérans. Dans le dernier budget, nous avons prévu 5,6 milliards de dollars pour les vétérans et leur famille. Les mesures prévues se concrétisent.

Nous avons fait passer l'indemnité d'invalidité de 310 000 $ à un maximum de 360 000 $. Nous avons rehaussé l'allocation pour perte de revenus, qui représentait 75 % de la solde d'un soldat avant sa libération, pour la faire passer à 90 %. Il s'agit là de mesures concrètes qui mettent plus d'argent dans les poches des vétérans. Nous répondons à l'appel en ce qui a trait à la sécurité financière et nous maintenons notre engagement de l'accroître, y compris grâce à une option de pension à vie. Cela figure toujours dans notre lettre de mandat. Nous maintenons notre engagement à cet égard et, évidemment, nous respecterons cette promesse.

Il ne fait aucun doute que nous avons parcouru beaucoup de chemin en ce qui a trait à la sécurité financière, et nous continuerons d'examiner des façons de faire, afin de permettre à nos vétérans de joindre de façon définitive les rangs de la classe moyenne.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord, vous avez prévu une augmentation de l'indemnité d'invalidité, mais cela ne s'est pas encore concrétisé. La démarche reste à faire et la mesure n'est là que techniquement, sur papier. Rien ne s'est encore produit. C'est à tout le moins l'impression que j'ai, compte tenu de ce que vous avez dit.

(1600)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Les chèques seront envoyés, je crois, d'ici le 1er avril, à moins que le général veuille me corriger.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Vous avez dit que vous alliez respecter cette promesse de pension à vie pendant votre mandat. Comment veillerez-vous à ce que les vétérans qui reçoivent des montants forfaitaires en vertu de la nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants et qui veulent faire la transition à une pension à vie ne soient pas laissés de côté? Comment vous assurerez-vous qu'ils reçoivent le montant auquel ils auraient eu droit grâce à une pension à vie? Pour prouver votre bonne foi, seriez-vous prêt à abandonner votre bataille contre Equitas?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Il s'agit là de deux questions distinctes, et je vais tenter de les aborder séparément.

Vous remarquerez que notre indemnité d'invalidité sera rétroactive. Nous remonterons à 2006, et les personnes qui ont reçu une indemnité maximum de 310 000 $ seulement, alors que leur invalidité a été établie à 100 %, toucheront maintenant 360 000 $. Nous pensions qu'il s'agissait de la bonne façon de faire. Nous avons mis cela de l'avant parce que nous souhaitions faire la démonstration de notre approche un vétéran, une norme, et c'est ce que nous tentons de faire pour tous les aspects des mesures que nous prenons.

À l'heure actuelle, nous sommes aux prises avec un système constitué de programmes disparates mis en oeuvre par les gouvernements successifs, ce qui rend les choses extrêmement difficiles. Dans mon ministère, nous avons des soldats blessés âgés de 20 ans et des soldats blessés âgés de 100 ans. Cela rend les choses très complexes. Ceci étant dit, nous nous sommes engagés à offrir une option de pension répondant aux besoins des vétérans et de leur famille.

En ce qui a trait à l'affaire devant les tribunaux, nous gouvernons en ayant comme objectif d'élaborer de bonnes politiques publiques pour les vétérans et leur famille. J'ai le pouvoir de le faire et cela relève de mon contrôle. Nombre des enjeux compris dans notre lettre de mandat font suite à la poursuite d'Equitas. En fait, nombre des personnes concernées par la poursuite d'Equitas font partie de mon équipe consultative concernant la sécurité financière, la santé mentale et d'autres questions. Je suis très fier qu'ils collaborent avec nous pour trouver des solutions aux problèmes auxquels font face les vétérans, qui ont été laissés de côté pendant très longtemps. Ils sont en fait très satisfaits d'un grand nombre des solutions que nous proposons.

Ceci étant dit, tout comme vous, ils souhaitent que nous agissions. Je le reconnais.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

C'est vrai. J'ai rencontré certaines de ces personnes, et certaines d'entre elles sont mécontentes.

Vous avez parlé de l'indemnité d'invalidité maximale. Il s'agit d'une grosse somme d'argent, mais à combien de vétérans est-elle versée dans les faits?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Voulez-vous une ventilation des personnes qui touchent l'indemnité prévue, selon le pourcentage d'invalidité, qui va de 5 % à 100 %? Est-ce que c'est ce que vous souhaitez?

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Oui. En fait, vous pourrez nous faire parvenir cela plus tard. Une indemnité de 360 000 $ représente toute une somme, et on a l'impression qu'un grand nombre de gens y ont droit. Je me demande combien de personnes exactement en profitent.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je vais vous trouver les renseignements, mais je crois qu'il serait utile que je vous décrive un peu plus précisément les compensations versées aux vétérans.

Il y a d'abord un flux de revenus, dont profitent tous les soldats malades ou blessés qui ne peuvent pas travailler en raison des services qu'ils ont rendus à leur pays. Il s'agit de l'allocation pour perte de revenus, ou d'une autre indemnité similaire, grâce à laquelle aucun soldat blessé ne peut recevoir moins de 44 000 $, je crois. Il s'agit là de son revenu annuel. Cela s'applique même aux simples soldats, le grade militaire le plus bas, qui touchent ce montant sous forme de prestation annuelle pour eux et leur famille.

Par ailleurs, le montant de 360 000 $ représente une indemnité pour les souffrances endurées. Ces deux programmes se complètent l'un et l'autre. Ils contribuent l'un et l'autre à assurer une vie stable aux vétérans et à leur famille et leur permettent, s'ils sont malades ou blessés et ne peuvent travailler, de recevoir une compensation complète. S'ils peuvent travailler, un paiement leur est quand même versé, grâce à l'indemnité d'invalidité pour les souffrances endurées, afin de reconnaître ce qu'ils ont souffert en raison de leur service militaire.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Bratina, c'est à vous.

M. Bob Bratina (Hamilton-Est—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Merci.

Nous avons entendu de nombreux témoignages sur un certain nombre de questions, mais l'élément qui revient sans cesse semble être le fossé ou l'écart qui sépare le service actif au sein du ministère de la Défense nationale et les problèmes dont s'occupe le ministère des Anciens Combattants. Qu'avez-vous réussi à faire pour combler l'écart entre le service actif et la vie après le service?

(1605)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Il s'agit là d'une excellente question. Cela fait partie dans une large mesure des travaux qui ont été menés par notre ministère et de notre collaboration avec le ministre de la Défense nationale et le chef d'état-major de la Défense Vance, au cours des huit ou neuf derniers mois, dans l'optique de la nécessité de professionnaliser la libération des membres de nos forces armées canadiennes. C'est essentiellement ce que nous devons faire.

Nous réussissons à recruter des gens dans l'armée, à leur faire suivre la formation de base, à les envoyer en mission, à leur donner un endroit où vivre, et tout le reste, pendant qu'ils servent. Nous devons mettre en place le même genre d'attitude et de structure, afin que lorsqu'ils sont libérés, pour des raisons médicales ou autres, ils soient prêts à passer à autre chose dès le jour de leur libération. Ils doivent connaître le montant de leur pension et comprendre les soutiens qui leur sont offerts, afin que lorsqu'ils s'installent dans une collectivité, ils sachent si cette collectivité a les services dont ils ont besoin ou non. Nous devons faire cela, et c'est pourquoi je suis très content que ce débat ait lieu et que des travaux soient menés pour faire en sorte que nos soldats libérés obtiennent de meilleurs résultats.

Voilà la réalité mes amis, et je vous inclus mesdames; nous sommes en 2017 après tout.

M. Bob Bratina:

Oui.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Comprenez bien qu'il s'agissait d'un euphémisme. J'ai eu un écart de langage, monsieur le président, et j'en suis désolé. Vous m'avez regardé avec mépris et condescendance pendant une seconde.

Le service et la transition à la vie civile se font avec succès pour de nombreux militaires. Toutefois, un nombre beaucoup trop grand d'entre eux, soit 27 % environ, sont aux prises avec des difficultés, que ce soit au chapitre de l'emploi, de la scolarité, des dépendances, de la santé mentale, de la maladie ou des blessures, et c'est là que le ministère des Anciens Combattants trouve sa raison d'être. C'est pourquoi nous devons professionnaliser la libération. Il reste beaucoup de travail à accomplir et nous ne résoudrons pas le problème du jour au lendemain. J'aimerais bien que ce soit ainsi, mais ce n'est pas le cas.

Nous tentons de professionnaliser la libération, et je suis très satisfait de l'engagement du ministre de la Défense nationale, du chef d'état-major de la Défense et de notre ministère, qui collaborent pour trouver une solution. On parle de questions financières, de questions de réadaptation, de questions de retour au travail ou de questions de retour aux études. Notre succès repose sur un grand nombre d'éléments. Les pourparlers se précisent de plus en plus, et je peux vous dire qu'ils progressent.

Cela vous va?

M. Bob Bratina:

Oui. J'ai eu l'honneur de présenter à de jeunes vétérans des décorations civiques et des articles commémoratifs au cours des dernières années. Ces hommes et ces femmes sont remarquablement jeunes. Je suis stupéfait lorsque je vois le nombre. On parle de 75 000 vétérans de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, dont un qui vit dans ma ville, un vétéran de Dieppe âgé de 96 ans qui est en pleine forme et qui attend avec impatience la commémoration du 75e anniversaire cette année.

Je me demande si vous pouvez commenter au sujet de ces personnes qui ont profité des soins et de la compassion du ministère des Anciens Combattants depuis 70 ans. Entendez-vous beaucoup parler de la cohorte des vétérans les plus âgés? Il ne faut pas oublier la guerre de Corée non plus; je crois que les vétérans de cette guerre sont maintenant âgés de 80 ans. Qu'en est-il d'eux?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Nous sommes fiers de commémorer le service et le sacrifice des hommes et des femmes qui ont servi dans les forces armées, dès la création de ce grand pays, jusqu'à la crête de Vimy, Juno Beach et la Guerre de Corée, puis dans le cadre de nos missions de maintien de la paix, ainsi que pendant la guerre du Golfe, en Afghanistan, et dans toutes les missions de maintien de la paix qui ont entrecoupé ces conflits armés. Il s'agit réellement d'un héritage glorieux, et les vétérans ainsi que les membres des Forces armées canadiennes continuent d'assurer la sécurité, la fierté et la liberté de ce pays.

Nous savons aussi que nous fournissons des services aux vétérans de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale et à d'autres depuis longtemps maintenant. Nous avons une assez bonne expertise pour la fourniture de ces services à divers endroits au pays. Je sais que près de 6 400 personnes ont recours au soutien à long terme qui est versé d'une façon ou d'une autre par le ministère des Anciens Combattants. Nous collaborons avec plus de 1 500 emplacements au pays pour fournir à ces personnes l'aide dont elles ont besoin pour avoir une vie meilleure. Nous y parvenons essentiellement grâce à l'accroissement des soins de santé à l'échelle nationale. Nous avons eu recours aux communautés pour les soins et, en dépit des avis contraires que vous entendrez parfois, il se trouve que la grande majorité des vétérans souhaitent vivre dans la communauté d'où ils viennent, peu importe où au pays. Cela nous permet de gérer un système raisonnable et pragmatique, en ne perdant pas de vue nos responsabilités financières et en fournissant ainsi les services de façon efficiente.

Il est triste de penser que nombre de ces vétérans ne serviront plus dans l'armée. Néanmoins, notre gouvernement s'engage à commémorer ce qu'ils ont fait et à garder leurs services et leurs sacrifices vivants dans notre esprit. C'est ce qui motive de nombreuses activités, mais je crois aussi que c'est la raison pour laquelle nous nous intéressons toujours au 11 novembre, qui marque le jour du Souvenir à Ottawa et partout au pays. J'étais très heureux du projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire du député Fraser, en vue de donner au jour du Souvenir le statut de fête légale, à l'échelle fédérale à tout le moins. Je crois que cela donne le ton à nos orientations futures en tant que nation.

(1610)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Fraser.

M. Colin Fraser (Nova-Ouest, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup monsieur le ministre, de votre présence ici aujourd'hui. Général, c'est un grand plaisir de vous voir à nouveau et je vous remercie beaucoup.

J'aimerais poser une question concernant les soins de longue durée.

Monsieur le ministre, j'apprécie les travaux que vous avez menés, et les pas de géant qui ont été faits au cours de cette première année. En ce qui a trait aux soins de longue durée, toutefois, un problème se pose de façon récurrente dans ma province, la Nouvelle-Écosse, et dans de nombreux autres établissements de soins au pays, en ce qui a trait à la façon dont le ministère des Anciens Combattants aborde ces soins et à la façon dont ils seront fournis aux vétérans au parcours non traditionnel dans ces établissements à l'avenir.

Je me demande si vous pouvez commenter cela et nous éclairer sur les réflexions du ministère à ce sujet et sur ce que nous pouvons espérer pour l'avenir.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

C'est une question intéressante. Comme je l'ai dit dans ma réponse précédente, nous nous sommes engagés à offrir aux vétérans qui ont participé à diverses missions au service de notre pays des soins de longue durée dans des établissements qui leur conviennent.

Il ne faut pas oublier non plus que nous collaborons très étroitement avec les gouvernements provinciaux qui sont désormais les premiers responsables d'une bonne partie des dispositifs de soins de longue durée au pays. Anciens Combattants travaille toujours en partenariat avec eux afin que le gouvernement demeure pragmatique et continue à respecter les responsabilités des divers paliers de gouvernement, tout en veillant à ce que les anciens combattants reçoivent l'aide dont ils ont besoin, au moment et à l'endroit qui leur convient.

Ces trois derniers mois, nous avons cherché à ajouter de la flexibilité à nos ententes. Nous avons connu un certain succès à cet égard, en particulier dans votre province. En collaboration avec votre premier ministre et votre ministre de la Santé, nous avons réussi à conclure des ententes plus flexibles et plus raisonnables, ce que les documents financiers du gouvernement ne permettent pas toujours parce que le ministre a les mains liées en ce qui concerne les autorisations budgétaires.

Nous sommes fiers du travail accompli à cet égard. Nous avons conclu un plus grand nombre d'ententes là-bas avec différents établissements.

Monsieur le général, pourriez-vous décrire quelques-unes des mesures que nous avons prises pour accroître le degré de flexibilité et permettre ainsi à un plus grand nombre d'anciens combattants d'obtenir l'aide dont ils auront besoin en vieillissant.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs, comme l'a fait remarquer le ministre, ce n'est pas le gouvernement fédéral qui gère les hôpitaux. Depuis la transition de l'hôpital Sainte-Anne l'an dernier, tous les hôpitaux sont désormais sous la responsabilité des provinces; comme l'a mentionné le ministre en réponse à une question précédente, nous offrons un soutien aux anciens combattants dans près de 1 500 établissements de soins de longue durée des quatre coins du pays parce que la recherche démontre que les vétérans souhaitent vivre à proximité de leur famille; c'est ce que les vétérans eux-mêmes nous disent. Certains souhaitent être traités dans l'un de ces 18 hôpitaux conventionnels.

Nous travaillons avec chacune des provinces, comme nous l'avons fait avec la Nouvelle-Écosse et comme nous le faisons actuellement avec l'Ontario, pour Parkdale, à London, ainsi que pour Sunnybrook et d'autres établissements. Nous pouvons travailler avec les provinces afin d'offrir des lits dans chacun de ces établissements communautaires à la génération de vétérans qui ont servi après la Deuxième Guerre mondiale et la guerre de Corée.

Ces mêmes lits seront à la disposition des vétérans alliés qui ont combattu pour d'autres pays et qui sont clairement admissibles, ainsi que des vétérans de l'ère moderne, ceux qui ont participé aux missions de maintien de la paix et qui ont été déployés en Afghanistan. S'ils ont besoin de soins de longue durée, ils pourront avoir accès à ces lits dans des établissements communautaires. D'un bout à l'autre du pays, plus de 600 vétérans de l'ère moderne occupent actuellement un lit dans un établissement communautaire.

(1615)

M. Colin Fraser:

Excellent. Je vous remercie.

J'aimerais revenir à un point que vous avez brièvement abordé tout à l'heure, soit l'amélioration du ratio qui passerait de 40 à 25 vétérans par gestionnaire de cas. Je sais que depuis un an, on a accompli de l'excellent travail pour atteindre cet objectif.

Nous avons entendu un commentaire et je me demande ce que vous en pensez. Il ne s'agit pas seulement de réduire le nombre de vétérans pour chaque gestionnaire, bien que cela soit très important pour s'assurer que les anciens combattants reçoivent les services requis et l'attention dont ils ont besoin. Il faut également donner une meilleure formation aux gestionnaires de cas afin qu'ils comprennent mieux les besoins des vétérans et qu'ils soient plus sensibles à certaines situations qui se sont produites dans le passé et que nous essayons d'éviter à l'avenir.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

J'ai l'honneur et le privilège d'occuper ce poste depuis maintenant un an et demi et je peux vous affirmer que je suis très fier du travail accompli par le personnel d'Anciens Combattants des quatre coins du pays, notamment à nos bureaux de l'Administration centrale, à l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard, et à tous nos autres bureaux du pays, nos divers centres et cliniques pour TSO. Ces fonctionnaires font preuve d'un grand professionnalisme et sont déterminés à produire des résultats pour les anciens combattants dans le cadre de leur travail quotidien. Je suis très fier d'eux. Je suis convaincu que nos gestionnaires de cas, par leur efficacité et leur engagement, travaillent aussi bien que n'importe quel employé du gouvernement ou du secteur privé.

Les fonctionnaires de mon ministère sont très dévoués et je sais que s'ils ont besoin... Le ministère met à leur disposition de nombreux programmes de perfectionnement ou d'apprentissage. Je suis très très satisfait de l'engagement démontré par nos fonctionnaires.

En tant qu'élus, nous pouvons faire des choses intéressantes. Nous établissons l'orientation à suivre et lançons des politiques publiques, mais ce sont les fonctionnaires qui sont sur la ligne de front et qui améliorent la vie de nos vétérans. Nous le constatons à la grandeur du gouvernement, en particulier dans mon ministère.

M. Colin Fraser:

Je vous remercie sincèrement.

Je voudrais rappeler brièvement que le ministre a accepté mon projet de loi d'initiative privée qui a été renvoyé hier au comité du patrimoine, et je l'en remercie. Pour être certain que tout est clair, je précise que ce projet de loi modifie la Loi instituant des jours de fête légale afin de corriger une incohérence et de confirmer que le Parlement reconnaît l'importance du jour du Souvenir; bien entendu, il revient à chaque province de décider si ce jour sera férié.

Nous avons hâte qu'il franchisse l'étape de la troisième lecture à la Chambre. Merci de l'avoir mentionné, monsieur le ministre.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Merci de nous avoir donné des détails, tout est maintenant clair.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Madame Wagantall, vous avez la parole.

Mme Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, PCC):

Monsieur le ministre et monsieur le sous-ministre, je vous remercie de votre présence.

Ma première question concerne tout le processus permettant à nos vétérans de trouver un emploi. Nous avons appris que la fonction publique fait beaucoup d'efforts pour embaucher des vétérans qui possèdent les compétences requises. C'est l'une de ses priorités.

La semaine dernière, un ancien combattant hautement qualifié, qui avait servi dans les forces en tant que comptable, m'a dit qu'il avait posé sa candidature pour travailler à la résolution des problèmes liés au système Phénix. Il n'a jamais réussi à parler à une personne en chair et en os. N'existe-t-il pas une sorte d'identifiant qui permettrait de signaler les candidatures présentées par des vétérans? Le cas échéant, fait-on le suivi de leurs demandes, de leurs entrevues ou de leurs affectations?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

C'est une excellente question et j'ai d'ailleurs constaté l'existence de ce problème lorsque j'ai pris mes fonctions de ministre. Nous ne réussissons pas à faciliter la transition professionnelle des vétérans au sein de la fonction publique aussi bien que nous le souhaiterions et nous ne réussissons pas non plus à leur assurer des emplois dans le secteur privé. C'est un problème pour les vétérans. Nous y travaillons et le général a complété ma réponse à ce sujet.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Ce sera une priorité.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

J'espère que vous nous soumettrez le cas dont vous parlez, si cette personne autorise le ministère à....

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Bien sûr, je vous le ferai parvenir.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Ce serait bien. Nous pourrions probablement apporter notre aide. Nous devons vérifier si d'autres vétérans se trouvent dans la même situation. Monsieur le général, qu'en pensez-vous?

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Je répète que nous sommes fermement déterminés à recruter ces vétérans prioritaires, surtout ceux qui ont quitté les Forces armées canadiennes à la suite d'une blessure, ainsi que tous les autres qui possèdent les compétences requises. Le ministre a adressé une lettre à tous ses collègues du gouvernement — à tous les ministres du Cabinet — pour obtenir leur engagement à cet égard.

La contre-amirale Elizabeth Stuart, notre dirigeante principale des finances et des services ministériels, prendra place à cette table un peu plus tard. Elle pourra probablement vous donner plus de détails à ce sujet.

(1620)

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Nous attendons les chiffres réels avec impatience. Ce sera fantastique.

Par ailleurs, je viens de la Saskatchewan. Le ministère a ouvert un bureau à Saskatoon. Vous n'avez pas été en mesure d'assister à son ouverture, je comprends cela, mais...

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

C'était l'été, juste...

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

L'annonce a été faite durant l'été, mais l'ouverture a eu lieu en novembre. C'est correct. Ce bureau desservira quelque 2 900 anciens combattants. Si vous visez un ratio de 25 anciens combattants par gestionnaire de cas, vous devrez affecter 115 gestionnaires à ce bureau pour effectuer le travail. Pour le moment, il n'y en a qu'un seul et il doit faire la navette entre Saskatoon et Regina. Lorsqu'il ne peut venir, il n'y a personne d'autre pour le remplacer. Quel est l'échéancier? En avez-vous une idée? Un grand nombre de vétérans vivent dans les régions rurales de la Saskatchewan. Ils doivent venir à Saskatoon et cela exige beaucoup de temps.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Votre question est très pertinente. Dans bon nombre de régions du pays, il est plus facile qu'ailleurs d'embaucher des gens possédant les compétences spéciales requises pour desservir les anciens combattants...

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Mais il n'y a personne d'assez compétent dans toute la ville de Saskatoon?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Laissez-moi répondre.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Nous savons qu'il est important de respecter le ratio moyen pour soutenir les gens dans leurs communautés. C'est justement pourquoi nous avons décidé de rouvrir ce bureau.

Je vais demander au général de vous donner plus de détails au sujet de Saskatoon.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Vous verrons si cette question sera rapidement portée à l'attention du sous-ministre responsable de la prestation des services.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Gén Walter Natynczyk: Je sais que nous avons embauché du personnel en Saskatchewan. Je sais également que nous avons un bureau à Regina. Le personnel prête main-forte à la BFC de Moose Jaw. En ce qui concerne la liste des personnes inscrites à la liste et combien sont affectées à Saskatoon, je vais laisser le sous-ministre adjoint, Michel Doiron, vous répondre.

Comme je viens de le dire, nous ne ménageons aucun effort pour trouver dans la région des personnes possédant les compétences requises et de l'expérience en gestion de cas pour occuper ces postes. Dans certaines régions du pays, cette tâche n'a pas été facile. Ce n'est pas un problème de manque de ressources ni de financement. Nous essayons seulement de trouver les bonnes personnes possédant les bonnes compétences pour ces endroits.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Cela s'appliquerait probablement au... Si j'ai bien compris ce qu'on a dit à l'ouverture de ce bureau, il y aura aussi une clinique de traitement des TSO, au cinquième étage. C'est ce qu'on m'a dit.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Pour le moment, je peux vous confirmer que nous continuons à desservir la Saskatchewan à partir de Deer Lodge, au Manitoba, ce qui...

Mme Cathay Wagantall: N'est pas une bonne chose.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:... N'est pas encore optimal, mais je me garderais de présager que ce sera le cas dans le futur.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord, je vous remercie.

Le président:

Il vous reste une minute et vingt secondes.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Parfait.

Très brièvement, vous avez entendu ma question à la Chambre l'autre jour concernant la méfloquine.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Vous vous adressez à la bonne personne.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Je suis heureuse de l'entendre.

L'Australie vient de diffuser de l'information sur les mesures prises à l'égard de tous ses militaires, ainsi que sur les répercussions et les effets de ce médicament. Les tentatives de suicide et les suicides sont des conséquences possibles. Les Australiens prodiguent un traitement et des soins aux personnes qui ont pris de la méfloquine et qui ont besoin de soins.

Comment attirer l'attention ici sur ce problème afin que les personnes qui ont pris ce produit reçoivent les soins dont ils ont besoin? Actuellement, elles ne sont pas traitées pour la toxicité de la méfloquine et on ne reconnaît pas ce problème.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Premièrement, je suis très fier des 4 000 personnes des quatre coins du pays qui ont travaillé sur des problèmes de santé mentale...

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Nous ne parlons pas d'un problème de santé mentale, mais bien de lésions cérébrales. C'est un problème physique. C'est ce qui ressort clairement des études menées en Allemagne, en Australie, aux États-Unis et en Grande-Bretagne.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Notre ministère traitera tout vétéran qui se présente avec une maladie ou une lésion liée à son service militaire, à l'aide de la meilleure technologie et de la meilleure expertise disponibles dans ce pays.

La présidente suppléante (Mme Cathay Wagantall):

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

C'est à vous, madame Lockhart.

Mme Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.

Merci également à vous, monsieur le ministre et monsieur le général, d'être venus nous rencontrer aujourd'hui. Vous savez sans doute que nous avons entrepris une étude sur la santé mentale et que nous avons terminé notre étude sur la prestation des services. Les témoignages que vous avez livrés aujourd'hui nous ont donné des pistes de réponse. Je vous en remercie.

Des anciens combattants nous ont appris que l'accès au cannabis à des fins médicales a changé leur vie pour le mieux. Certains ont l'impression que les changements apportés par AAC les privent de leur médicament. Sur quelles preuves votre ministère s'est-il appuyé lorsqu'il a pris la décision de réévaluer les quantités acceptables de marijuana thérapeutique?

(1625)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je pense que nous devons remonter à un niveau supérieur pour répondre à cette question. À mon arrivée au ministère, rien ne justifiait la limite de 10 grammes de cannabis par jour établie pour les vétérans qui en consommaient à des fins thérapeutiques, que ce soit pour leur santé mentale, pour soulager leurs douleurs ou pour toute autre raison. Malgré toutes les recherches que nous avons effectuées pour trouver une justification, nous n'en avons trouvé aucune, à notre grande surprise.

Comme le cannabis n'est pas une drogue réglementée par Santé Canada — il n'existe aucune disposition législative ou autre à cet effet —, j'ai fait savoir que nous devions nous réunir avec la communauté médicale, les anciens combattants, les intervenants et les producteurs autorisés afin d'élaborer un cadre stratégique. Ce n'est pas une drogue réglementée par Santé Canada. Nous étions d'avis qu'il y avait un vide politique.

Par le biais de nos rencontres, de nos recherches et de nos consultations avec les gens du milieu médical et d'autres spécialistes — qui s'intéressent à ce domaine émergent —, nous avons recueilli beaucoup de renseignements. Les études vont dans les deux sens. En fait, certains médecins pensent que cette drogue est nocive. D'autres soutiennent qu'elle est bénéfique. Notre gouvernement cherche à fonder sa politique sur des faits probants et scientifiques.

Nous avons même obtenu des renseignements provenant du Collège royal des médecins et des chirurgiens qui démontrent que la vaste majorité des personnes ne devrait pas en consommer plus de trois grammes par jour. Le Collège considère que c'est la quantité limite que les gens peuvent consommer en toute sécurité pour traiter une maladie. C'est le genre de données que nous obtenons à force de discuter avec des médecins et des anciens combattants.

Nous avons compris que cette drogue a permis beaucoup d'anciens combattants d'améliorer leurs conditions de vie. Nous en sommes conscients. Ce n'était pas une décision facile à prendre, mais elle nous paraissait évidente.

Nous pensons avoir laissé une certaine marge de manoeuvre. Il va sans dire que nous rembourserons. Rappelez-vous qu'Anciens Combattants Canada rembourse la marijuana. Les gens peuvent se procurer de la marijuana thérapeutique, s'ils le souhaitent, auprès de divers producteurs autorisés partout au pays. Actuellement, nous ne remboursons que trois grammes et seulement sur l'avis du médecin traitant.

Nous avons compris qu'il n'est pas toujours efficace de traiter tout le monde de la même manière et nous avons donc proposé un programme qui prévoit une certaine flexibilité. Si vous consultez un spécialiste qui, après avoir confirmé votre diagnostic, est d'avis que le cannabis est un traitement efficace pour vous, s'il a consulté votre dossier médical et s'est entendu avec votre médecin traitant que c'est le traitement qu'il vous faut, il est possible alors que nous vous remboursions le coût d'une quantité supérieure de cannabis.

Nous pensions que cela était nécessaire. N'oubliez pas que la santé et le bien-être de nos vétérans et de leurs familles sont au coeur de nos préoccupations et que nos décisions politiques visent cet objectif. Nous croyons que cette politique est conforme à notre mandat, un point c'est tout.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.

Dans le cadre de notre étude sur la santé mentale, nous avons beaucoup discuté d'une question connexe, soit la recherche sur la consommation de marijuana pour traiter le syndrome de stress post-traumatique ou SSPT. Est-ce un domaine que vous avez l'intention?... Quelle pourrait être la contribution future d'AAC dans la recherche future sur toutes ces questions?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

C'est une excellente question.

Nous allons créer un centre d'excellence pour les problèmes de santé mentale et le SSPT. Nous prévoyons consacrer un important volet à ces problèmes afin de mieux comprendre les pratiques exemplaires utilisées ailleurs, ce qui nous permettra d'obtenir de l'aide en matière de santé mentale. De toute évidence, c'est un dossier qui prend de plus en plus d'importance pour nous à Anciens Combattants Canada.

Je suis également très fier de l'ICRSMV. J'ai oublié ce que signifie cet acronyme. Pouvez-vous m'aider?

(1630)

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Institut canadien de recherche sur la santé des militaires et des vétérans.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

C'est exact, monsieur le général.

Cet institut regroupe des réseaux universitaires qui font de la recherche dans ce domaine. C'est l'aboutissement d'une longue histoire de transmission de données et de recherche par des personnes capables de les canaliser sur les problèmes touchant les anciens combattants. Nous travaillons en étroit partenariat avec eux. Monsieur le général, pouvez-vous donner plus de précisions à ce sujet?

Le président:

Désolé, monsieur le ministre. Je vous remercie. Nous devons passer à la prochaine ronde de questions.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

D'accord, mais c'est un très bon programme.

Le président:

Monsieur Kitchen, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, PCC):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, monsieur le général, je vous remercie tous les deux d'être revenus nous rencontrer aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais revenir à la marijuana thérapeutique. Combien prévoyez-vous économiser grâce aux changements que vous avez apportés?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

En toute franchise, je ne le sais pas précisément. Je n'en ai pas tenu compte dans mes calculs. Vous devriez consulter... Je ne sais même pas si nous avons fait ces calculs.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Monsieur, si vous le permettez, je dirais que pour nous, comme l'a précisé le ministre, c'est une question de bien-être et les avis des médecins indiquent que toute quantité supérieure à trois grammes risque de ne pas être dans l'intérêt du vétéran; nous n'avons donc pas inclus ce coût dans le calcul des économies parce que cela n'est pas une question d'argent. C'est une question de bien-être.

M. Robert Kitchen:

C'est exactement ce que nous ont dit de nombreux témoins rencontrés dans le cadre de nos études. Ils nous ont dit que c'était en quelque sorte dans l'intérêt des familles et des vétérans; beaucoup nous ont dit que la marijuana leur avait permis de mieux gérer leur vie, de réduire leur forte dépendance de longue date aux opioïdes et de diminuer le nombre de médicaments qu'ils doivent prendre. Ne pensez-vous pas que nous devrions entreprendre une étude sur la marijuana thérapeutique?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je vais vous expliquer la politique que nous avons mise en place.

Grâce aux renseignements recueillis au cours de nos rencontres avec des experts médicaux et des vétérans, nous avons élaboré une politique souple qui nous permet d'assurer la sécurité des vétérans, tout en leur donnant la possibilité d'aller consulter un spécialiste ou de se procurer le produit qu'ils pensent être le meilleur pour eux.

Pour ce qui est de la recherche, c'est quelque chose que nous envisageons. D'ailleurs, l'Institut de recherche sur la santé des militaires et des vétérans et d'autres organismes s'y sont déjà mis. Je pense que notre ministère a l'obligation de se tenir au courant de la recherche dans des domaines émergents pour savoir dans quelle direction elle évolue.

Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

J'aimerais seulement ajouter qu'à la conférence de l'Institut qui s'est tenue à Vancouver en novembre dernier, le ministre a confié au ministère le mandat de mener une recherche, en partenariat avec les Forces armées canadiennes, sur les meilleures pratiques afin de connaître les bienfaits de la consommation de marijuana à des fins médicales et d'autres détails connexes.

M. Robert Kitchen:

D'accord, mais je parle plutôt d'une étude sur son efficacité. Je ne parle pas de consultations. Je parle de mener une véritable étude, une recherche approfondie. Ne pensez-vous pas que c'est ce que nous devrions faire?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Il s'agit d'un domaine émergent sur lequel nous avons besoin de beaucoup plus d'information...

M. Robert Kitchen:

Oui, nous avons besoin d'obtenir plus d'information. Ne pensez-vous donc pas que notre comité devrait avoir accès à cette information afin d'obtenir de meilleurs résultats et de meilleurs services pour nos vétérans?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

C'est une idée à laquelle nous devons probablement réfléchir.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais proposer une motion, si vous le permettez. Nous avons sous les yeux l'avis de motion suivant: Que le Comité mène une étude d'au plus six réunions au sujet des répercussions sur la santé mentale des anciens combattants occasionnées par la réduction de la limite quotidienne de marijuana thérapeutique autorisée dans le cadre du programme de marijuana à des fins médicales d'Anciens Combattants Canada

Le président:

La motion est proposée.

M. Colin Fraser:

Monsieur le président, je propose que nous ajournions le débat sur cette motion. Le ministre est ici pour répondre à nos questions et, avant de prendre la motion en considération, je pense qu'il vaudrait mieux reporter ce débat et poursuivre notre discussion avec le ministre.

(1635)

Le président:

Nous aurons un vote sur l'ajournement du débat.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Monsieur le président, je demanderais la tenue d'un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

D'accord.

(La motion est adoptée par 6 voix contre 3.)

Le président:

La motion est adoptée.

Nous avons interrompu la minuterie. Il vous reste encore à peu près une minute et demie.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Monsieur le ministre, j'ai une question à vous poser concernant la hausse d'un milliard de dollars mentionnée dans le rapport que nous avons devant nous. Pouvez-vous nous dire combien d'anciens combattants se sont prévalus des services cette année?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Si vous regardez les chiffres, notre milliard de dollars servira principalement... Notre bureau a enregistré une hausse de 19 % du nombre de demandes de prestations d'invalidité. C'est une bonne nouvelle. Cela veut dire que les vétérans sont plus nombreux à venir chercher l'aide dont ils ont besoin, au moment où ils en ont besoin.

Nous avons également constaté une hausse du nombre de demandes acheminées dans l'ensemble de notre ministère. Les vétérans ont reçu les services qu'ils ont demandés et nous sommes très satisfaits des progrès accomplis à cet égard.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Êtes-vous en mesure de nous dire quel est l'écart entre l'année précédente et celle-ci?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Environ 19 %, mais je vais laisser le général vous répondre.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Désolé, mais nous n'avons pas cette information. J'ai un relevé annuel des personnes libérées des Forces armées canadiennes, mais je n'ai aucune donnée indiquant combien d'entre elles se sont adressées à nous après leur libération. Je vais devoir vous revenir là-dessus.

Le président:

Merci de nous faire parvenir cette information.

Madame Mathyssen, vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

J'aimerais revenir sur les emplois pour les anciens combattants. Lorsque d'anciens combattants demeurent réservistes, sans pour autant figurer sur la feuille de paie du gouvernement, le gouvernement canadien leur retire leurs droits de propriété intellectuelle. Il leur est donc très difficile de se trouver un emploi dans leur domaine d'expertise parce que le gouvernement conserve leur expertise.

Avez-vous examiné cette politique et êtes-vous disposé à corriger ce problème?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Premièrement, les réserves sont davantage du ressort du ministère de la Défense nationale, mais nous travaillons sur une panoplie de dossiers aux fins d'harmonisation; nous travaillons également avec une foule de personnes engagées dans l'appareil militaire pour voir comment se passe leur transition à la vie civile.

Pour revenir à votre question, c'est une observation que j'ai déjà entendue. Je suis certain que cette question a été soulevée par des réservistes. Il faudra y réfléchir dans le cadre de notre projet d'harmonisation avec le général Vance si nous voulons gérer le processus de libération avec professionnalisme et offrir aux vétérans tout le soutien dont ils ont besoin.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Je n'ai rien à ajouter.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Il semble équitable que ces réservistes aient accès à leur propriété intellectuelle.

L'ombudsman du MDN a proposé la mise en place d'un service de « conciergerie » afin d'aider les militaires libérés pour des raisons médicales tout au long du processus de libération — services de pension, soins médicaux —, parce que certains vétérans nous disent que ces démarches sont parfois complexes.

Que répondez-vous à cela? Êtes-vous disposé à envisager cette solution?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je félicite l'ombudsman pour son rapport que je lis toujours rigoureusement. À l'instar de notre propre ombudsman, il est attentif à l'opinion des vétérans à ce sujet. Je sais qu'il faut combler l'écart existant entre le ministère de la Défense nationale et Anciens Combattants. Comme je viens de le dire, nous collaborons avec le ministre Sajjan et le chef de l'état-major de la Défense, le général Vance, dans le but de professionnaliser le processus de libération.

Nous voulons nous assurer que les hommes et les femmes qui quittent les Forces armées canadiennes après des années de service reçoivent leur pension, qu'ils sachent où aller et qu'ils aient un endroit où vivre. Nous voulons nous assurer qu'ils retrouveront une nouvelle vie normale et qu'ils sauront où s'adresser pour avoir accès, s'ils en ont besoin, aux services d'Anciens Combattants, et qu'ils n'attendent pas cinq ou dix ans avant de venir frapper à notre porte. Ils sauront dès leur départ que nous sommes là pour leur offrir les services dont ils ont besoin.

(1640)

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Permettez-moi d'ajouter, comme l'a indiqué le ministre dans son allocution d'ouverture, que le ministère a fait un examen de la prestation des services et qu'un volet important de cet examen a consisté à s'assurer que le ministère aide chacun de ces vétérans, au moment de leur transition hors des Forces, à amorcer ce processus avant sa libération. Actuellement, le processus de libération dure six mois. En collaboration avec les gestionnaires de cas des Forces armées canadiennes, nous essayons de commencer à l'avance à les aider à faire la transition à la vie civile, afin qu'au moment de leur départ des Forces, ils sachent déjà où ils veulent vivre et qu'ils puissent se trouver un emploi. Nous faisons notre possible pour les aider à se trouver un emploi, un médecin et ainsi de suite.

Nous faisons tout cela. Nous utilisons le mot « conciergerie » comme un but à atteindre. Nous avons du pain sur la planche parce que, je le répète, quelque 5 000 à 6 000 militaires quittent les Forces armées canadiennes bon an mal an. Nous essayons de proposer à chacun un programme sur mesure en fonction de ses besoins personnels et de ceux de sa famille.

Le président:

Merci.

Voilà qui met fin à nos témoignages pour aujourd'hui avec ce groupe. Au nom du comité, j'aimerais remercier le ministre et le sous-ministre d'être venus nous rencontrer.

Je voudrais faire un dernier commentaire au sujet de l'embauche de vétérans et j'encourage tous les membres à faire la même chose. À la baie de Quinte, dans ma circonscription, j'ai embauché un vétéran; c'est un excellent travailleur qui a reçu une bonne formation. Monsieur le général, je vous en remercie.

Gén Walter Natynczyk:

Merci à vous.

Le président:

Nous allons faire une pause d'une minute avant d'accueillir le prochain...

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je remercie tous les membres du Comité pour leur excellent travail, leur détermination et les efforts qu'ils déploient pour les anciens combattants canadiens. C'est très important.

Le président:

Nous ajournons pendant quelques minutes.

(1640)

(1645)

Le président:

Nous reprenons la séance.

Nous allons voter à 17 h 30 et nous devons également tenir quelques votes d'ici la fin de la réunion sur le budget principal et les budgets supplémentaires. Nous aurons probablement le temps d'avoir une seule ronde de questions.

Nos témoins sont arrivés. Du ministère des Anciens Combattants, nous recevons Elizabeth Stuart, sous-ministre adjointe, dirigeante principale, Finances et Services ministériels, Michel Doiron, sous-ministre adjoint, Prestation des services et Bernard Butler, sous-ministre adjoint, Politiques stratégiques et Commémoration.

Comme les témoins n'ont pas d'exposé officiel à présenter, nous pouvons commencer notre première ronde de questions.

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Brassard.

M. John Brassard:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

J'ai des questions qui vont vous plaire, monsieur Doiron. Je vous remercie d'être venu nous rencontrer à nouveau. Merci à vous également, madame Stuart et monsieur Butler.

Quelques-unes des questions m'ont été transmises par d'anciens combattants. J'en ai quatre à poser et, avec votre permission monsieur le président, je vais partager mon temps avec madame Wagantall.

Combien de temps ai-je à ma disposition?

(1650)

Le président:

Vous avez six minutes.

M. John Brassard:

D'accord. Pouvez-vous me faire signe au bout de quatre minutes?

Voici l'une des questions que je dois vous poser. Vous pouvez ouvrir neuf bureaux et embaucher 400 employés, mais quel est le taux d'approbation des demandes de prestations?

M. Michel Doiron (sous-ministre adjoint, Prestation des services, ministère des Anciens Combattants):

Nous atteignons un taux d'approbation autour de 85 % pour les premières demandes.

M. John Brassard:

Autour de 85...?

M. Michel Doiron:

Si vous parlez des problèmes de santé mentale et du SSPT, le taux est en fait de 94 %. Cela dépend du nombre exact..., mais la moyenne pour toutes les demandes se situe autour de 85 %.

M. John Brassard:

Ma prochaine question est la suivante. Quel est le cycle de rétroaction de la part d'anciens combattants au sujet des services et les prestations?

M. Michel Doiron:

C'est une question musclée, monsieur.

M. John Brassard:

Elle provient d'un ancien combattant, monsieur Doiron.

M. Michel Doiron:

D'accord...

M. John Brassard:

C'est normal qu'elle soit musclée.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Michel Doiron:

Oui, monsieur.

Tout dépend des services dont nous parlons. Si vous parlez de nos services d'arbitrage, les commentaires que nous recevons portent sur les longs délais et la trop grande quantité de renseignements demandés. Dans le cadre de notre examen de la prestation des services, par exemple, nous essayons de simplifier ce processus en le « démédicalisant » afin de le rendre un peu plus facile. Même si nous obtenons un taux d'approbation autour de 85 %, il n'en demeure pas moins que les formulaires et le processus sont trop complexes.

Si vous parlez de la gestion des cas, nous recevons des commentaires très positifs, mais ils proviennent en grande partie de personnes malades et blessées. Il s'agit surtout d'accompagnement et de partenariat avec le vétéran. Tout dépend des services dont vous parlez.

Cela dit, comme nous ne recevons pas beaucoup de commentaires de la part de la majorité silencieuse, nous avons commencé à mener un sondage auprès des vétérans afin de connaître leur avis sur Anciens Combattants. Nous espérons avoir les résultats dans le courant du mois d'avril.

M. John Brassard:

J'aimerais maintenant savoir pourquoi les gestionnaires de cas envoient les demandes à Charlottetown, ce qui retarde et complique encore plus le processus. A-t-on déjà pensé qu'on pourrait gagner du temps si on autorisait les gestionnaires de cas à approuver eux-mêmes les demandes de prestations?

M. Michel Doiron:

Pas les gestionnaires de cas eux-mêmes, mais nous cherchons à voir s'il serait possible de confier une partie du processus décisionnel à un autre palier, plus proche des anciens combattants. Cela ne concerne pas les gestionnaires de cas, mais certains de nos agents des services aux vétérans. Nous pourrions aussi confier cette tâche à certains agents des prestations d'invalidité qui travaillent dans les bureaux de partout au pays. Cela accélérerait grandement le processus.

M. John Brassard:

Une dernière question.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Il vous reste environ trois minutes et demie.

M. John Brassard:

Pourquoi les décisions du Tribunal d'appel des anciens combattants ne sont-elles pas communiquées à ACC afin que le ministère puisse en faire le suivi?

M. Michel Doiron:

Oui, vous parlez du TACRA, n'est-ce pas?

M. John Brassard:

Oui, du Tribunal des anciens combattants, révision et appel. Désolé, j'ai voulu abréger ma question pour gagner du temps.

M. Michel Doiron:

Pas de problème.

Nous recevons de l'information du TACRA et nous travaillons avec eux pour voir quelles sont les tendances; par exemple, si le tribunal annule une mesure que nous prenons systématiquement, nous pourrons alors nous ajuster en conséquence. Si nos décisions sont constamment annulées par le TACRA, nous ferions alors mieux de voir ce qui se passe en première ligne. Nous le faisons déjà, mais nous ne recevons pas les décisions. Elles sont envoyées aux anciens combattants concernés. Ce sont des renseignements personnels.

M. John Brassard:

Pour revenir à ma question, à l'occasion du témoignage qu'il nous a livré en décembre, le général Natynczyk a dit que vous embauchiez des employés à court terme pour faire face à l'augmentation du nombre de dossiers à traiter. Cela commence à paraître dans ce budget supplémentaire des dépenses. Combien d'employés à court terme ACC a-t-il embauchés? Combien d'entre eux sont actuellement affectés au traitement des dossiers? Avez-vous ces données en main?

M. Michel Doiron:

Je vais vous les faire parvenir.

M. John Brassard:

Très bien.

M. Michel Doiron:

Je ne les ai pas. Vous parlez des employés temporaires et occasionnels? J'ai une liste détaillée, mais pas avec moi. Je vous la ferai parvenir.

M. John Brassard:

D'accord.

Je vais céder la parole à Mme Wagantall.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais revenir à Saskatoon un moment. Je constate que 400 nouveaux emplois ont été créés; 381 ont été comblés, dont 113 postes de gestionnaires de cas. Il reste donc 19 postes à combler pour atteindre les 400. Selon les indications, en Saskatchewan, il y a 2 900 dossiers d'anciens combattants à traiter et il n'y a qu'un seul gestionnaire de cas pour le moment. Il nous en faudrait 115 de plus.

Ma question est la suivante. Comme un grand nombre de ces 400 postes étaient déjà en attente sous le ministre précédent, le gouvernement est-il prêt à embaucher 400 personnes et plus pour respecter le ratio de 25 cas par gestionnaire...

M. Michel Doiron:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais apporter une correction. C'est vrai qu'il y a 2 900 anciens combattants, mais le ratio de 1 pour 25 s'applique à la gestion des cas seulement.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord, ce sont donc les plus difficiles...

M. Michel Doiron:

Ce sont les cas les plus difficiles. À Saskatoon, le gestionnaire traite actuellement cinq cas.

(1655)

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord.

M. Michel Doiron:

C'est pour cette raison que nous n'avons pas affecté 100 gestionnaires de cas à Saskatoon. C'est la même chose dans tous nos bureaux. Ce sont nos agents de services aux anciens combattants qui gèrent les autres dossiers. Leur charge de travail est beaucoup plus lourde parce que c'est un service distinct.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Oui.

M. Michel Doiron:

Un employé affecté au PAAC peut recevoir un seul appel par année. Je parle du Programme pour l'autonomie des anciens combattants.

Par exemple, s'il y a un problème...

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord, c'est logique.

Combien de ces employés sont affectés à Saskatoon?

M. Michel Doiron:

Nous avons un gestionnaire de cas. Nous sommes prêts. Si la demande l'exige, nous en affecterons d'autres. À Saskatoon, nous avons six employés au total.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Merci.

M. Michel Doiron:

De plus, je pense que le personnel est au complet en ce moment à Saskatoon.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Merci. Vous avez répondu à ma question.

Le président:

Très bien. Monsieur Graham, vous êtes le suivant.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

J'ai plusieurs questions à poser. Je suis un membre assez nouveau de ce Comité. Le ministre Hehr a parlé d'environ 381 nouveaux employés et M. Brassard également a glissé un mot à ce sujet. Parmi ces employés, savons-nous combien il y a d'anciens combattants et avons-nous une idée du rang qu'ils occupaient au moment de leur départ à la retraite? Je suis curieux de savoir s'il y a beaucoup de simples militaires parmi le personnel ou si ce sont surtout des amiraux et des généraux qui obtiennent ces emplois.

M. Michel Doiron:

Je ne sais pas combien il y a d'anciens combattants parmi ces 381 employés. Je peux vous obtenir ce chiffre. Nous avons le nombre total d'anciens combattants à Anciens Combattants Canada. Concernant le rang, je peux vous dire que nous avons des officiers supérieurs, comme la contre-amirale et le général ici présents. Nous avons également un grand nombre de caporaux, de sergents et de sous-officiers subalternes et supérieurs possédant diverses compétences. Ils sont disséminés dans tout le ministère.

À titre d'exemple, dans mon service d'arbitrage, j'ai pas mal de caporaux et de sergents qui rendent des décisions. Il y avait des infirmiers et des médecins dans les Forces armées, bon nombre d'entre eux étaient officiers, mais pas tous. Nous embauchons des infirmiers ou des médecins lorsqu'ils possèdent les compétences requises.

Je vais essayer de vous faire parvenir le nombre exact de personnes que nous avons embauchées, mais je n'ai pas la liste détaillée des 381 nouveaux employés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour ce qui est des 381 nouveaux employés, j'aimerais savoir si une préférence est accordée à certaines compétences et certains rangs ou si tout le monde est vraiment inclus.

M. Michel Doiron:

Nous avons le nombre total d'embauches. Voulez-vous...?

Contre-amiral (à la retraite) Elizabeth Stuart (sous-ministre adjointe, Dirigeante principale des finances et services ministériels, ministère des Anciens Combattants):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Pour faire suite à la déclaration du sous-ministre ayant trait aux anciens combattants dans le centre d'embauche de la fonction publique, je dirai que nous avons formé une équipe à la fin novembre et au début décembre. Pour l'instant, elle reste très modeste, mais nous déployons une approche progressive pour favoriser l'embauche des anciens combattants dans la fonction publique. Le modèle de cette approche nous est d'abord fourni par Anciens Combattants Canada. Évidemment, le MDN a beaucoup d'expérience à ce chapitre, puisque les Forces armées canadiennes et la Défense nationale opèrent de façon conjointe.

Dans la prochaine phase de notre approche, nous visons à l'amélioration de l'embauche dans toute la fonction publique, puis à étendre nos activités au secteur industriel. Nous sommes également conscients de l'apport de nombreux organismes sans but lucratif et d'autres organisations dans ce domaine.

Depuis l'entrée en vigueur du projet de loi C-27, c'est-à-dire la Loi sur l'embauche des anciens combattants, nous avons constaté une certaine adhésion de la part d’anciens combattants prioritaires libérés pour des raisons médicales attribuables ou non au service militaire. La Commission de la fonction publique a pour mandat de recueillir des données sur ces anciens combattants, mais pour l'instant, il n'y a pas d'obligation de déclaration des embauches d'anciens combattants dans la fonction publique. Par exemple, à Anciens Combattants Canada, nous avons envoyé à chaque nouvel employé un sondage à participation volontaire. Il n'existe encore aucune obligation de s'identifier comme ancien combattant et j'imagine que certains préfèrent s'en abstenir, mais le sondage a permis d'améliorer la collecte de données.

Voici quelques statistiques. Depuis l'entrée en vigueur de la Loi sur l'embauche des anciens combattants le 1er juillet 2015, il y a eu 315 embauches prioritaires, dont 18 à Anciens Combattants Canada, où le nombre total d'anciens combattants qui se sont déclarés tels dans notre sondage s'élève à 115.

Nous travaillons en collaboration avec la Commission de la fonction publique pour tenter d'améliorer notre capacité à collecter des données sur les anciens combattants. Nous avons envoyé une lettre demandant l'ajout d'une question portant sur le service militaire au sondage des employés de la fonction publique.

Nous travaillons à différents endroits. Il reste encore beaucoup de travail à faire.

(1700)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je me suis joint au Comité au moment de notre étude du suicide chez les anciens combattants. Nous n'avons parlé que de cela jusqu'à maintenant. J'ai donc beaucoup appris en un très court laps de temps.

Un des fils conducteurs de notre étude est la perte de confiance des anciens combattants envers Anciens Combattants Canada au cours des 10 dernières années. Il faut dire ce qui est. Les énormes coupes budgétaires du gouvernement précédent ont causé beaucoup de dommages. Nous nous rendons compte que les anciens combattants ne se soucient pas des partis politiques. Ce qui se passe, c'est qu'ils ne font plus confiance au service. Ce n'est pas seulement une question d'argent.

Comment, de manière plus générale, reconstruire le lien de confiance avec les anciens combattants? Quelles sont les étapes à suivre pour y arriver? Quel chemin devons-nous emprunter?

M. Michel Doiron:

Monsieur, il y a beaucoup à faire pour reconstruire le lien de confiance. Nous faisons beaucoup de choses en ce moment. Nous organisons des réunions des parties intéressées où nous invitons des anciens combattants ou encore nos différents comités consultatifs. Nous consacrons beaucoup de temps à cela.

Certains d'entre nous président des comités consultatifs où les interactions avec les anciens combattants sont plus fréquentes. Les communications avec les anciens combattants y sont plus ouvertes et on tente d'expliquer les raisons derrière les décisions qui sont prises. Il arrive que la bonne réponse soit « non ». C'est dommage, mais c'est ainsi. Il faut alors expliquer pourquoi la réponse est non d'une manière qui permette à l'ancien combattant de comprendre.

Il y a encore beaucoup de travail à faire, parce qu'au cours des années — et vous m'excuserez de rester en dehors de la politique, étant donné que je suis un bureaucrate —, pour toutes sortes de raisons, la confiance envers les services a été minée. Nous travaillons très fort.

Il y avait une question au sujet de la formation. Nous donnons une formation intensive à nos nouveaux employés. Nous embauchons. Nous passons beaucoup de temps à former ces 381 nouveaux employés pour cultiver le sens du soin, la compassion et le respect.

Il ne faut pas oublier qu'Anciens Combattants Canada n'est pas...

On me dit de m'arrêter là.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen, c'est à vous.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci beaucoup. Heureuse de vous retrouver.

Je voudrais commencer par vous, monsieur Doiron. Lors de votre dernière apparition ici, je vous ai interrogé au sujet des agressions sexuelles dans l'armée. Vous avez dit: Nous avons travaillé en étroite collaboration avec It's Just 700. Nous prenons la situation très au sérieux. Nous discutons avec eux afin que nos arbitres comprennent mieux ce qu'est le traumatisme sexuel. Nos docteurs sont bien informés et nous travaillons avec eux pour publier quelque chose là-dessus sur notre site Web.

Récemment, nous avons entendu les témoignages d'autres organismes qui nous ont dit n'avoir eu aucune nouvelle depuis des mois. Allez-vous créer un espace sur le site Web d'Anciens Combattants Canada avec des liens et de l'information claire pour les anciens combattants aux prises avec un traumatisme sexuel?

M. Michel Doiron:

Merci de la question, monsieur le président.

Tout d'abord, nous avons discuté avec les associations. Je ne peux pas vous dire si mon directeur général de l'arbitrage a pris la parole au cours du dernier mois, mais en 2017 on m'a fait le compte rendu d'une conversation qu'il a eue avec l'une des associations. Des discussions sont donc en cours.

Nous avons donné à nos arbitres une formation sur le traumatisme sexuel. Ce que nous recevons, ce n'est pas un diagnostic de traumatisme sexuel. C'est un diagnostic de santé mentale. Il arrive que ce soit un diagnostic de blessure physique. La plupart du temps, c'est un problème de santé mentale. Nous avons formé nos arbitres pour qu'ils puissent identifier le problème et le signaler en cas de doute, afin d'offrir une réponse adéquate.

Je crois que j'étais ici en décembre. Depuis, nous avons renversé ou plutôt examiné des cas assez controversés et difficiles. Je ne veux pas entrer dans les détails puisque ce sont des cas personnels, mais ils présentaient de grandes difficultés.

En ce qui concerne le site Web, je ne suis pas au courant. Je sais que nous travaillions à y mettre quelque chose, mais je ne sais pas si c'est fait ou non. Je vais devoir vérifier cela. Je n'en suis pas sûr.

Le texte qui sera publié dans cet espace dira simplement que c'est quelque chose que nous examinons ou pour lequel on peut présenter une demande, mais qu'on ne peut présenter une demande pour agression sexuelle dans l'armée. Ce n'est pas une maladie. La maladie qu'ils ont est d'ordre mental ou physique. Il y a une panoplie de blessures, en fait. En travaillant avec le président de It's Just 700, nous en avons beaucoup appris sur les diagnostics que posent certains psychologues et psychiatres. Nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec eux pour examiner certains aspects du problème.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

J'aimerais savoir comment exactement vous établissez cela, parce qu'il me semble qu'un ancien combattant sait s'il a été agressé sexuellement et comprend que c'est effectivement une blessure, mais qu'il a besoin de savoir où trouver de l'aide. Si cela passe par l'intermédiaire du site Web, alors il doit pouvoir en faire usage de manière efficace.

Je vais passer à ma prochaine question. J'ai parlé à des anciens combattants le week-end dernier et ils m'ont dit se sentir encore très vulnérables à la fois au plan financier et en raison du problème du déni. Le simple fait de recevoir une lettre d'Anciens Combattants Canada peut déclencher une réaction de stress post-traumatique.

Que faites-vous pour recoller les pots cassés, sur le plan des communications avec les gestionnaires? Nous devons mieux traiter ces personnes. L'information se rend-elle jusqu'aux gens à la base, ceux qui travaillent directement avec les anciens combattants?

(1705)

M. Michel Doiron:

Il est toujours possible de faire mieux. Je crois que je vais commencer par là. Même si nous avons un taux d'approbation de l'ordre de 85 à 90 %, nous pouvons toujours faire mieux.

Avant que l'arbitrage se conclue par un refus, nous appelons la personne pour lui demander si elle peut nous fournir d'autres renseignements. Parfois, elle a les documents; elle ne les a simplement pas envoyés. Elle ne les croyait pas importants. Pour ce qui est de la lettre de refus, nous sommes au courant du syndrome de l'enveloppe. Recevoir un pli du gouvernement du Canada est traumatisant pour certaines personnes. Qu'il s'agisse d'Anciens Combattants Canada, d'une lettre d'impôts ou autres, l'effet est le même. Nous travaillons donc avec le bureau de l'ombudsman pour simplifier nos lettres.

Je dois dire qu'il y a encore place à l'amélioration. Nous devons continuer à travailler là-dessus. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, nous devons parfois répondre « non », quand le cas n'est pas lié au service militaire. Nous devons respecter la loi que nous sommes chargés d'appliquer. Il y a plusieurs histoires traumatiques, je le vois bien, mais en vérité, le service militaire n'est pas en cause... La Loi sur les anciens combattants stipule qu'il faut que...

Nous avons apporté des changements au cours des trois dernières années. Les anciens combattants ont maintenant le bénéfice du doute. C'est nouveau. Quand je suis arrivé, il y a un peu plus de trois ans, il fallait prouver que cela était dû au service militaire. Il fallait nous remettre un CF 98 qui disait qu'il y avait eu blessure. Nous n'en sommes plus là, maintenant. Faisons-nous toujours ce qu'il faut? Non, mais nous avons fait des progrès considérables. Aujourd'hui, selon votre métier, si vous avez des problèmes de genoux et que vous avez servi dans l'infanterie pendant 25 ans, nous répondrons favorablement à votre demande. Peut-être ne vous êtes-vous pas blessé au genou d'un seul coup en sautant, mais au bout de 25 années d'usure, l'articulation est détruite.

Nous travaillons là-dessus, mais nous envoyons encore des lettres de refus et elles ont un effet traumatique sur les personnes.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Lockhart, à vous la parole.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à tous de votre présence.

Selon le Budget principal des dépenses, il y a une augmentation des dépenses de fonctionnement de l'ordre de 60,3 millions de dollars. Nous avons produit un rapport sur les prestations de service. Je présume que vous l'avez lu. Au point de vue de la prestation de service, y a-t-il eu des actions concrètes découlant du rapport ou encore du travail que vous effectuez? Vous avez mentionné certaines choses. Y en a-t-il d'autres qui se reflètent dans ce montant? Peut-être que ce n'est pas le genre de chose qui nécessite des sommes supplémentaires.

M. Michel Doiron:

Merci de votre rapport. Oui, je l'ai lu très attentivement. Nous y apportons une réponse gouvernementale, mais comme je l'ai dit la dernière fois, j'étais plutôt content du contenu du rapport. Année après année, les rapports du comité des anciens combattants nous ont montré la voie à suivre. En fait, nous nous y référons parfois pour modifier les règles ou les lois.

Nous apportons constamment des changements. Le sous-ministre et le ministre ont discuté de l'examen des prestations de service. Il se trouve qu'il a eu lieu en même temps que votre propre examen. Nous donnons suite à cet examen qui vise à améliorer les services et la communication tout en développant une approche centrée sur les anciens combattants. Ce sont là des sujets qui font partie de vos recommandations. Nous faisons la même chose.

En ce qui concerne les 63 millions de dollars, peut-être que l'amirale souhaiterait prendre la parole.

Cam Elizabeth Stuart:

Oui, j'en serais ravie. Merci, monsieur le président.

Selon le Budget principal des dépenses pour le prochain exercice financier, les augmentations suivantes sont inscrites au crédit 1, dépenses de fonctionnement: 13,5 millions de dollars en frais d'exploitation courants pour le ministère; une augmentation de 60,9 millions de dollars dans les services et achats en soins de santé, tels que des lunettes, des soins infirmiers, des traitements médicaux et dentaires, des soins de longue durée, des remboursements de prescriptions; une augmentation de 13,5 millions de dollars dans les services de soutien de la Charte des anciens combattants, tout particulièrement pour les problèmes de réadaptation professionnelle et médicale. Nous constatons une diminution des coûts de l'Hôpital Sainte-Anne étant donné le transfert de compétences du gouvernement fédéral vers la province de Québec l'an dernier, ainsi qu'une légère diminution de 2,6 millions de dollars dans le cas du centre d'éducation de Vimy, puisque nos objectifs là-bas sont en grande partie atteints. Au total, on constate une augmentation de 61,4 millions de dollars par rapport au Budget principal des dépenses de l'an dernier.

(1710)

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci.

Nous entendons aussi parler du soutien aux familles. Pourriez-vous nous parler des changements ou des améliorations apportés à notre service aux familles?

M. Michel Doiron:

Oui, nous entendons aussi parler du soutien aux familles. Malheureusement, selon l'interprétation qui est faite de la loi, ces services passent principalement par les anciens combattants eux-mêmes. Nous devons respecter la loi. Cela dit, il y a eu le projet pilote des CRFM...

M. Bernard Butler (sous-ministre adjoint, Politiques stratégiques et Commémoration, ministère des Anciens Combattants):

Les Centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires.

M. Michel Doiron:

... les Centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires. Ils sont à l'essai à travers le pays et fournissent des services aux anciens combattants et aux membres de leur famille. Une ligne d'écoute 1-800 est aussi mise à leur disposition. Ils ont droit à 20 séances. Quand un ancien combattant souffre, c'est toute la famille qui souffre avec lui; nous en sommes bien conscients. Les cliniques de traitement du stress opérationnel sont très bien, mais souvent, les anciens combattants n'y amènent pas leur époux ou leur épouse. Les portes leur sont pourtant ouvertes, ainsi qu'aux enfants... Je discutais récemment avec un ancien combattant dont l'enfant souffrait d'un traumatisme en raison du traumatisme du parent. Nous avons des programmes.

Le programme de soutien aux aidants naturels a été créé il y a quelques années pour donner un peu de répit aux aidants. On ne parle pas d'une somme d'argent énorme, mais, à tout le moins, les aidants qui apportent des soins en continu peuvent se reposer un peu. Je crois qu'il reste beaucoup de travail à faire au plan familial. Nous en parlons beaucoup parce que nous savons qu'en aidant la famille, nous aidons aussi la personne.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Un autre point qui a été abordé en témoignage est la pratique qui consiste à rembourser les familles pour des services tiers. Est-ce là quelque chose qui est considéré? On dit qu'il s'agit d'un obstacle pour les familles.

M. Michel Doiron:

Voulez-vous répondre à cette question?

M. Bernard Butler:

Pardonnez-moi. Nous parlons de remboursement pour des services de quel type?

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Pour des services tiers. Il pourrait s'agir d'un camp d'équitation ou d'autres choses du genre. Ce sont des services fournis par une tierce partie.

M. Bernard Butler:

Monsieur le président, je vous remercie de la question. Je peux parler de ce sujet de manière générale, en abordant les programmes de soutien auxiliaire de ce type.

Comme vous le savez probablement déjà, nous menons un projet pilote de thérapie équine. Nous considérons aussi la thérapie canine, des choses du genre, au fur et à mesure que les décisions officielles nous donnent les assises nécessaires pour continuer. Comme l'a dit Michel, nous tentons actuellement de personnaliser nos programmes afin qu'ils soient davantage centrés sur les anciens combattants et non sur les programmes eux-mêmes.

Au point de vue des programmes, il est parfois beaucoup plus aisé de passer par une entente de contribution, en demandant les reçus et beaucoup de factures. La nouvelle approche que nous considérons consisterait à faire en sorte que le plus grand nombre de programmes possible reposent sur des subventions, ce qui serait à l'avantage des combattants comme des familles. Il s'agirait de rationaliser notre approche afin de diminuer le fardeau administratif qui pèse sur ces gens et de leur garantir un accès plus rapide et plus efficace aux services.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Je suis ravie d'entendre cela. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci. Voilà qui conclut notre série de questions. J'aimerais vous remercier de votre présence ici aujourd'hui et de tout ce que vous faites pour les hommes et les femmes de notre pays.

Sur ce, je dois demander que nous votions le Budget principal des dépenses. Comme nous avons peu de temps, nous allons aller de l'avant.

D'abord, nous allons voter le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) 2016-2017: ANCIENS COMBATTANTS ç Crédit 1c — Dépenses de fonctionnement..........65 448 828 $ ç Crédit 5c — Subventions et contributions..........69 400 000 $

(Les crédits 1c et 5c sont adoptés.)

Le président: Voulez-vous que le président rende compte de l'adoption des crédits 1c et 5c du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) 2016-2017 d'Anciens Combattants Canada à la Chambre des communes?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Nous voterons maintenant le Budget principal des dépenses 2017-2018. ANCIENS COMBATTANTS ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de fonctionnement..........931 958 962 $ ç Crédit 5 — Subventions et contributions..........3 728 239 000 $

(Les crédits 1 et 5 sont adoptés.) TRIBUNAL DES ANCIENS COMBATTANTS (RÉVISION ET APPEL) ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme..........9 449 156 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté.)

Le président: Voulez-vous que le président rende compte de l'adoption des crédits 1 et 5 du Budget principal des dépenses 2016-17 du Tribunal des anciens combattants (révision et appel) à la Chambre des communes?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Merci.

M. Bratina propose une motion pour que la séance soit levée. Tout le monde est en faveur?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Merci beaucoup. La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on March 08, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.