header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-03-09 PROC 54

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1205)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good afternoon. This is the 54th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. It is being televised.

Today, we are pleased to have with us the Honourable Karina Gould, Minister of Democratic Institutions. She is accompanied by two officials from the Privy Council Office: Ian McCowan, deputy secretary to the cabinet, governance; and Natasha Kim, director of democratic reform.

Committee members will remember that Minister Gould appeared on February 7 and agreed to return to discuss the MyDemocracy.ca website and the government's planned agenda for electoral reform.

Now we'll turn the floor over to the minister for her opening statement.

Thank you very much for coming back. We appreciate your being here. It's very helpful for the committee.

Hon. Karina Gould (Minister of Democratic Institutions):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It's a pleasure to be back just a little over a month from the last time I was here. It's good to see all of you. I'm looking forward to this conversation as well.[Translation]

Thank you for inviting me to speak to the committee again. I'm pleased to have this opportunity to appear before you today, and I'm happy to contribute to your proceedings to the best of my ability.

Yesterday, we celebrated International Women's Day. I was very proud to have been invited to speak on March 7 at the Daughters of the Vote gala. The Equal Voice organization held the event to highlight the significance of the day. The Daughters of the Vote initiative brought young women aged 18 to 23 to Parliament. They came from each of our 338 federal electoral districts to represent their community and share their vision for Canada. Yesterday, these young women had the opportunity to meet with their MP and sit at their MP's place in the House of Commons.[English]

It was inspiring to see the House full of young women and to look into what the future holds. All of us who have the privilege to serve also have the duty to support and encourage young Canadians to engage in our democracy. In particular, this committee has the unique opportunity to reflect on how to ensure that all Canadians are best prepared and able to participate in civic life. Your study of the CEO report and its recommendations positions you as stewards and champions of the franchise. The Daughters of the Vote who are in Ottawa today, and all Canadians, are counting on your reflections.

This is why I would like to take this opportunity to thank you, specifically, for your work so far on the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendations report. I read with interest your interim report, which was tabled on Monday. I am going to spend more time reviewing it and reflecting on your recommendations as the government considers its response.

I am very happy to see that you have reached a consensus on the key recommendations that are the core of the Chief Electoral Officer's proposed voting services modernization efforts. In addition, you have collectively supported a range of other recommendations, including recommendations to improve the delivery of voting services to non-resident Canadians and enhanced information-sharing authorities to improve the quality of the national register of electors, the latter being something that may come before you for consideration as part of Bill C-33. These are important recommendations that will improve our electoral process.

There was also consensus on many of the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendations related to ensuring an accessible electoral system for electors and candidates with disabilities. Enhancing inclusion as a defining value of our democracy stands high among my priorities for the coming months and years.[Translation]

I look forward to your upcoming work on the recommendations set out in the Chief Electoral Officer's report.[English]

I'll highlight a few, I hope to hear your thoughts on the issue of the length of the election period and on the polling day, recommendations A21 and A22. These recommendations have implications for the political financing regime and the participation of Canadians in the voting process.

Recommendation A25 would address the question of partisan nominees for poll staff and promises improvements in Elections Canada's recruitment processes. In light of your support for recommendation A1, your view on this recommendation would be informative.

Recommendations A33 and A34 would provide additional tools for the Commissioner of Canada Elections. My mandate letter includes a commitment to enhance Canadians' trust in the integrity of our system, and I would value your thoughts on these recommendations.[Translation]

Recommendation A39 concerns adjustments to the broadcasting arbitration regime. The way that political parties communicate with Canadians and the nature of media have changed considerably over time. These provisions have hardly been modified in recent years.

Recommendation B9 has a significant impact on gender non-conforming electors. In relation to Bill C-16, I think it warrants consideration, since equality could be ensured in all aspects of the federal government.

Recommendation B15 would affect the process in place to help electors with a disability.[English]

Recommendations B12, B24, B18, B26, B27, and B43 are all related in different ways to the integrity of the process and Canadians' trust in that process. As trust is paramount to the success of any election and the peaceful transfer of power, I would welcome the committee's thoughtful input on these as well.

Finally, recommendation B44 raises the important issue of how we adapt to a fixed-date context for elections in a Westminster system. I would ask the committee, if you think it of merit, to reflect on how this and other recommendations are impacted, and what the challenges and opportunities are in relation to fixed-date elections in the Canadian experience.

All of these recommendations raise a variety of questions that would benefit from the expertise of this committee. They seek ways to keep our electoral laws up to date with the expectations of electors and political actors. Your considerate review of these matters is valuable.

As I noted during my last appearance, my mandate letter includes a commitment to enhance the transparency of fundraising activities. In meeting this commitment, I intend to introduce legislation that makes fundraising events public, and to require additional disclosure of who attends, and when.

We have heard Canadians' concerns in this regard, and we intend to act. I hope to introduce legislation this spring, and if referred to your committee by the House, I would very much appreciate your consideration of the bill and any recommendations you may have.

Of course, there's also Bill C-33. Your work so far on the recommendations report will well position you in considering this bill and its measures to reduce barriers to voting while enhancing the integrity of the electoral process. Bill C-33, I believe, complements the work that you are undertaking with the CEO recommendations.

The road to the 2019 election is getting ever shorter. I am committed, as I know all members of this committee are, to improving our electoral system before the next election to the benefit of all Canadians. To accomplish this goal, Canadians need us to work together. I hope to continue to receive your valuable input to inform the direction of improving our electoral process to make it accessible, efficient, and equitable for voters.

Elections Canada needs sufficient time to implement any changes made to the Canada Elections Act before the next election and would like to be election-ready well in advance of an expected writ. The more time Elections Canada has to prepare, the better.

(1210)

[Translation]

We must also take into consideration that other legislative changes may be necessary to implement your recommendations.

The development and preparation of this bill, and the important discussions and debates in the House of Commons and Senate, shouldn't be rushed.[English]

To give Elections Canada the time it needs, as well as to give parliamentarians the time they need, my hope would be to introduce legislation before the end of this year that would build on your hard work with respect to the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendations. It is our responsibility to take the time to get this right. It is also our responsibility to get it done. It's what Canadians expect. If the House could have your next report before the House rises for the summer, preferably by May 19, I think we would be well positioned to advance some significant reforms that would improve the electoral process for Canadians.

I am sharing my thinking with the committee because I sincerely want to work together with you. I respect this committee's independence and know the committee will set its own agenda. I hope my remarks today help provide insight to you about my thinking and perspective on the matters before this committee.[Translation]

Thank you again for inviting me here today. I look forward to working with you on these important issues.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

You left lots of time for questions, so we'll go to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister, for being here today.

I'm glad you started by talking about the Daughters of the Vote. I thought it was a particularly striking sight to sit there in the gallery yesterday and see the young lady who was taking up my seat and the other women from across this country in all 338 seats in Parliament yesterday. I had the opportunity to really get to know my Daughter of the Vote in the months working up to yesterday, and we had the opportunity to sit and have lunch yesterday as well. Her name is Meghan Bottomley. She's a fourth year political science student from McGill. She's a very intelligent and politically driven young lady.

As you know, despite Parliament's having done very well this past election by electing some more women, we're still very far from gender parity. Also, as you know, I sat on the electoral reform committee, and this discussion came up quite a bit there. I wasn't, however, always convinced that that alone was going to get us closer to having gender parity without other particular mechanisms in place and other things that need to be done to modernize Parliament.

What are you, as the Minister of Democratic Institutions, doing to make sure that we increase the chances of women who would like to run for politics? We know they succeed and do very well once they are here, but it's the decision to run that troubles so many and that is difficult to make. What suggestions do you have in mind?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you very much, Ruby, for your question. I, too, was particularly motivated and heartened to see the 338 young women who took up their seats yesterday in the House of Commons. I think it's an incredible window into the possibility that the future could hold.

I had the opportunity to address them on a couple of occasions on Tuesday 7th, one on a panel on women in politics and the other as their keynote speaker during their banquet gala on Tuesday evening.

One of the things that struck me was a question one of the young women asked about how I had the confidence as a young woman to run for office. It reminded me that so many times, when you ask young men to run, they often say, “Okay, sign me up, when do I start?” When you ask young women to run, they say, “Why me? I think I need to get some more education, or I need to do a bit more to be prepared to do it.”

I think part of it is making sure we have those positive role models that young women or women in general see, and that they are able to see themselves reflected in the House of Commons and in potential opportunities. They also need to know that they have many champions out there to ensure that when they do get here, they are successful, and that sometimes the barriers we think are there in front of us are more imagined than they are real.

There are very real barriers when it comes to finances and when it comes to systems that are in place that discriminate against women, but there are often times where those limits can be society-imposed on us, where we say that as a young woman you don't have the experience, or you don't have the ability to do it, and it's going to be detrimental to your campaign. To demonstrate real examples of the fact that when women run, they succeed—I think—is really important.

I would be really curious to hear from the committee, as you're going through your reflections, on what you think some tangible measures are that could be done, and how we as parliamentarians, we as a government, we as Canadians, can do what we can to foster greater participation, not just of women but also of diversity in Canadian politics.

(1215)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Can I get some insight from you on one of the recommendations we passed in our interim report. Recommendation 37 proposed that child care expenses that are incurred as a result of running as a candidate would be reimbursable up to 90%.

This committee all agreed to that recommendation. The recommendation also included personal expenses for those with disabled people they are taking care of as well. That can be a real challenge, I know, as a mother of a young child myself. There are other women who are taking care of other loved ones in their lives. It can be quite challenging. Running as a candidate takes a lot of time away from those responsibilities and from getting the means, financially, to provide for the children or those who are dependent on you.

How do you feel about that recommendation? Is that one your department had looked at? Are there other recommendations you can point to as being significant in changing that decision for a woman to run?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Since the House received the report on Monday, I've been going through it. I think there are a number of really important recommendations that the committee has agreed to, which I'll be considering and bringing forward for the government's response.

In a more general response, I think what's important for me personally as the Minister of Democratic Institutions is that we're doing what we can to lower those barriers so that everyone can participate in politics if they so choose. This is something that is good to consider as we move forward with that line of thinking, but I think it's incredibly important that we're reducing barriers for people with different financial means and for people with different personal or family obligations, to make sure that we do get that full breadth and that full diversity of candidates who are able to participate in elections.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do I have more time?

The Chair:

You have 45 seconds.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you for your answers. I look forward to the legislation that is to come.

I know that this committee has taken very seriously this topic of women running, and we want make to make advancements in that area. I look forward to the things that are going to be coming out of your ministry.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Minister, thanks for being here today.

You probably won't be surprised that my questions will be about foreign influence in Canadian elections with regard to third-party spending. That was the topic in some of my queries the last time you were here, which I think was on February 7. I'm hoping that you'll have had a chance in the interim to get a bit more up to speed on the file and that today we can have a conversation that is a bit more substantive than what we were able to have at that meeting.

As I'm sure you're aware, given that we've had a conversation about it previously, the former Chief Electoral Officer said in November that there was really no way to restrict or prevent foreigners or foreign organizations from trying to influence Canadian elections, and that currently there are no restrictions on third-party spending for things such as polling, phone banks, websites, or anything that's not considered under advertising.

The last time you were here, you indicated in response to one of my questions that you were committed to ensuring that there would be no foreign influence in our elections, but I've read through the transcripts of your appearance at the Senate on February 14. There, you responded to Senator Frum by saying: From the experience we have, we have found that this is not something that is currently present and so significant that it would impact the electoral system or the confidence that Canadians have during a writ period or during an election.

You also responded to Senator Batters by saying, “there's very little evidence to suggest that foreign money is influencing Canadian elections by third parties”.

Now, I would say that there's certainly no question that in the last election we did see quite an unprecedented amount of spending by third parties. Third parties are able to spend essentially unlimited amounts outside of advertising, and they are of course able to take foreign money, which can be put into those things as well. I don't think that lines up that well with the statements you made in response to questioning at the Senate.

Given those responses, and despite the previous commitment that was made to ensuring that there would be no foreign influence in our elections, it really seems to me that this issue is being brushed aside by the government. That really is quite stark in its contrast with what the former Chief Electoral Officer testified to.

I have several questions. I'll ask you to try to be as brief as you can in response, but I certainly want to make sure that you have the chance to answer them. I want to know if, in this interim period since we first heard from you, this is something that your department, your staff, or you have looked into, and is it something that you've been briefed on?

(1220)

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you, Blake, for your question, and for your due diligence. I'll answer your question, and then I have a question for you, I guess. On the first question, yes: after we had that meeting, I did request a briefing on it and we did look into it. It's important to note that we don't have.... There's not much evidence to suggest that there is third-party influence in terms of spending.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Could I interrupt you there? I'm sorry. I got the gist of what you're saying, but there certainly seems to be some dispute about this. I'm wondering if you could provide that briefing to this committee so we could be able to—

Hon. Karina Gould:

I'm wondering what evidence you have for the dispute on this or what suggestions you may have with regard to how to move this forward.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Obviously, we would be happy to have that conversation, but you received a briefing that indicates that something you believe is otherwise. I wonder if you would be willing to table that with this committee so we could have the benefit of that information as well.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes. We'll provide information with regard to that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

That's great. Thank you, Minister. We'll look forward to that, then, and hopefully we could have a further conversation at that point.

I'm wondering if you could tell us a little more. There is certainly no question in my mind that under sections 331 and 349 of the Canada Elections Act there would be a need to introduce some changes, I think, to be able to ensure there's no foreign influence in our elections through third-party spending. I'm wondering if you might be willing to commit to looking at those sections and making the changes that are required in order to ensure that there wouldn't be this ability for unlimited spending by third parties for things like polling, phone banks, or election websites.

It sounds like there is some dispute on your part as to whether this is a problem, but whether it is a problem or not, it certainly could become one. I'm wondering if you would be willing to commit to making those changes to ensure that we don't see that kind of foreign influence in our elections. That obviously would have to be done for inside the writ period and outside of it. Is that something you could commit to looking at and introducing?

(1225)

Hon. Karina Gould:

Well, I would certainly be interested to hear your thoughts on what those suggested recommendations for consideration might be.

With regard to the information that I have and have requested, one thing that I think we should be quite clear about is that we do have very strict rules in Canada when it comes to foreign money in Canadian politics. That does already exist. Within my—

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'm sorry to interrupt again, Minister. You would be correct in saying that is true when it comes to political parties, but it certainly isn't true when it comes to third-party spending. There's clearly a huge loophole there. A very glaring loophole exists that would allow essentially unlimited foreign influence in anything outside of what's considered advertising. Given your commitment to us previously that you think it's important that we try to do everything we can to prevent foreign influence, I certainly hope this is something you would give considerable thought to. It's easy to repeat the talking point that there is no ability for that now, but in terms of third parties, there is. That's certainly different from what we're hearing, and I certainly hope you'll look at that and consider it.

I hope we'll get a chance to carry on in a future round.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Richards.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you very much, Chair.

Minister, thank you again for your attendance. I also want to thank you for the recent meet-and-greet we had in your office. It's appreciated.

I'll take a brief moment to comment on the process you're offering. I want to say publicly that I am as impressed with the change in approach with regard to the government, your ministry, and the work of this committee, as I was outraged at the way that Bill C-33 was so unceremoniously dumped on us in the House. There was a commitment made that this was going to change, and we're still in the process of getting through that, but I do want to say publicly that I've been very impressed with the attempt by the government members and you to get us back on a positive track, where we are working hand in hand, as you promised in the campaign and as is best for Parliament when we—on this committee in particular—can work that way. I want to say that I'm very impressed.

You continue, however, to load up the agenda of the committee. I want to remind you that it's going to take an even greater effort at coordinating and talking, because you're not the only source of our work. We get it from all over. Some things trump—and I refuse to stop using the word—other things, and that can slow us down on our own well-intentioned agenda. That's still going to be a struggle. There's a lot of work in front of this committee.

Again, I want to emphasize that I was incredibly outraged at what your government did with Bill C-33, and I am as impressed now with the government's recognizing they were wrong and their attempt to make it right. I hope that continues. I look forward to working on this file that is critically important for all of us.

With that, Chair, I would like to give the balance of my time to my colleague Mr. Cullen, who is also our democratic reform critic, sir.

The Chair:

Welcome, Nathan Cullen, from the second most beautiful riding in the country.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Oh, there he goes again. Point of order.

Thank you, minister, for attending.

Ostensibly, I think you're also here for MyDemocracy.ca. Do we know what the cost was for that?

Mr. Ian McCowan (Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet (Governance), Privy Council Office):

The cost in terms of the contract with Vox Pop?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, the all-in cost. We knew the contract to Vox Pop, but we were waiting for the all-in cost from the last time we talked.

Mr. Ian McCowan:

In terms of electoral reform writ large, I think it's in the order of about $3.8 million when you add in staff, contract, the mail out from Canada Post, and the minister's tour. If it would be helpful to the committee, we could provide a detailed breakdown of the costs that have been spent on electoral reform.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay, that would be very helpful.

Minister, do you think that exercise was a success? I'm referring to the MyDemocracy.ca part of the government's outreach?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Well, first of all, I want to thank David for his comments.

I am looking forward to working with this whole committee moving forward, and I hope that we do. I recognize that you have lots of work ahead of you and I know you have big tasks, but I also have confidence in the ability of all members of this committee to get through all of that. I'm looking forward to doing this together.

With regard to MyDemocracy.ca, I do think it was a worthwhile exercise. The fact there were 380,000 Canadians, roughly speaking, who participated was quite good. It's the largest participation in a consultation the government has had.

(1230)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Was there a specific answer or result you got from that survey that led to your government's conclusion to abandon the electoral reform commitment? Was there was some way that Canadians answered or didn't answer a question that led you to conclude from your consultation that we shouldn't go ahead with electoral reform?

Hon. Karina Gould:

The decision was made based on all of the many different pieces of the consultation and the work—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

But nothing in particular?

Hon. Karina Gould:

—that went into the past year of engagement with Canadians.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

When did you get your mandate letter from the Prime Minister?

Hon. Karina Gould:

My mandate letter was made public on February 1.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

When did you receive it?

Hon. Karina Gould:

My mandate letter was made public on February 1.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay, I just want to know when you received it. I know when it was made public. I was there.

Did you receive it on February 1?

Hon. Karina Gould:

My mandate letter was made public on February 1.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

Hon. Karina Gould:

You can ask it many more times. That's when it was made public.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I know, and you can not answer it many more times. That seems strange because the receipt of a letter doesn't exactly require the confidentiality of a state secret.

All I'm asking is when you received your letter. It's not a challenging question.

Hon. Karina Gould:

And I'm responding that it was made public on February 1.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Oh, oh!

There you go.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Now, regarding transparency, you watched the young women in the House, the Daughters of the Vote. Did you hear Chelsea Montgomery's question for the Prime Minister?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I heard all the questions.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'll quote it for you, just to refresh all of our memories: “Instead of waiting until 2090—that's the year it would take if we keep on the path that we're on right now to see gender parity in this House—what commitments are you making and what is the plan to go forward?”

There was some notion that we had had some great improvement, in terms of the results for women, from the last election to this election. Their representation in the House went up by 1%. The percentage of men in the House of Commons is still around 75%.

Chelsea's question for the Prime Minister was very direct. He chose not to answer it in specific terms.

We had put before the House, previously, the way parties are reimbursed for their election expenses if they nominate more women. Are you in favour of such a proposal?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I'm looking forward to hearing the committee's recommendations. I think there are many different innovative ways that we can encourage women's participation in politics.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Can you remind me? I was trying to look it up before this committee meeting. There was a bill in Parliament. Do you recall if you voted for it or not?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I would have to look at the record.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You don't recall?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I don't recall. I don't think I voted in favour of it, but I would have to double-check.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay. Some of your colleagues within the government ranks did. It was one of the recommendations.

What Chelsea was asking the Prime Minister about was his broken promise on electoral reform, particularly bringing in a fairer voting system.

We know from Equal Voice and from a lot of studies that proportional systems tend to elect more women. The Prime Minister has declared many times that he is a feminist and is interested in electing more women, but he rejected the proposal that the committee of all parties put forward to him, as you did, for a proportional system.

Here is another way of getting at it. As my colleague said, we have to find other ways. One of the ways is through the nomination process, encouraging parties to nominate women and discouraging them from nominating men and other overrepresented groups in our Parliament.

You've seen the bill. You've had a chance to vote on such a bill. You've seen the committee report recommending this. The Conservatives joined with the Green and the Bloc in recommending this. I know some liberals had some interest it as well.

Are you open to accepting such a proposal?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I'm open to receiving such a proposal and other proposals. I think it's important that we do think about innovative mechanisms to engage women in politics.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister. Time's up.

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for being here.

I want to go to Bill C-33, if I may, and focus on the substance of it. I appreciate the other parts if it, including the tabling, as Mr. Christopherson brought up. I appreciate Mr. Christopherson's comments about that, and yours as well, but I do want to talk about what this is.

To me, there are two parts to it. There are things in there that we talked about when we campaigned and in terms of what we would do as part of the mandate letter. The other part, if I can try to describe it subtly, is to “untangle the tangly bits” that were left over from the unfair elections act from the last time. I've often described it as being a solution to a problem that never existed.

One of those is the voter information card. I am a huge fan for several reasons. The median age in my riding is high. We have a lot of seniors. It's also a rural area, so a lot of people lack the identification required for addresses and so on and so forth. I'm sure a lot of the opposition would say, well, you have to have a certain amount of identification to vote. A certain amount of identification is required. That I understand. But by doing that, and by creating so many barriers, and lifting these barriers, to a point where we violated a charter right, which is your right to vote....

The voter information card was essential. Perhaps I could describe it this way. Many seniors would take this card and put it on their fridge or somewhere in the kitchen to remind them about voting. They'd rely on that so much to be able to walk into the booth and say, “I want to cast my vote”.

I appreciate that, and I'm wondering if you could comment on that.

(1235)

Hon. Karina Gould:

I also agree with that. I think it is very important. That's why in Bill C-33 we are proposing measures within that legislation to make the voter identification card one piece that could serve as a piece of identification in future elections. I think it's incredibly important.

I'm sure many of us in this room and in this Parliament have stories to tell of people who were turned away at the polls because they didn't have proper identification. We know that about 120,000 Canadians cited their reason for not voting as the lack of proper identification.

I think it's one way to ensure that people who have the right to vote are able to vote, and can do it as efficiently as possible.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you, Minister.

The second part deals with what we talked about on the campaign trail, about what we would do as a government. This is what interests me. When I first came to Parliament in 2004, there was a debate about lowering the voting age at the time. The whole point of the debate was to engage young people in voting. My colleague Ms. Sahota talked earlier about getting young people to vote, to get involved. It was about the involvement of young people, as was illustrated in Daughters of the Vote.

Registering youth from the ages of 14 to 17 is a very intriguing idea. I believe other jurisdictions around the world have tried this, to engage voters in getting involved—not voting, but getting involved—in the registration process. Can you or your officials give this committee a sense of how this will translate into more involvement for people between the ages of 14 and 17?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Certainly. Thank you.

I think this is an important issue. I know that when I go to speak to high school students, I always ask them to commit to one thing, and that's to vote when they turn 18. At that point, at least, they all raise their hands and make that commitment. I hope they do follow through with that.

One thing we know is that when young people start voting early, they end up voting often. What I mean by this is that it becomes a habit. It becomes something they do continuously throughout their lives. The more we can do to make it easier for young people to be engaged, to be registered, to already be part of that process, I think the better it bodes for the future of participation and engagement in Canadian democracy.

Do you have anything you want to add?

Mr. Ian McCowan:

I would just say that studies from Canada, Australia, and the U.S. indicate that civic education has a positive impact on subsequent civic participation and voter turnout, etc. There's clearly a body of evidence out there in this area.

Mr. Scott Simms:

The other thing too—sorry, Ms. Kim, I didn't mean to exclude you in this conversation—is that it also leads into the fact that one of the other things that Bill C-33 would do is to empower the CEO to be more involved with the educational aspect and publicizing some of the facts about voting. I guess that leads in well to allowing young people to register to vote. I commend you for that.

Ms. Kim.

Ms. Natasha Kim (Director, Democratic Reform, Privy Council Office):

I was just going to add that one of the positive aspects of the pre-registration is that it could be used as a fairly concrete call to action when Elections Canada does conduct civic education activities with youth in high schools so that there's something they can do to be part of the process.

Then other aspects of the bill would then facilitate, for example, the receiving of voter information cards once you're registered, so you would have a piece of ID that you could then take to the polls at the same time.

(1240)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Going back to the voter information card again, am I right in saying that's the only piece of federal identification—a thorough federal identification—that exists currently across the country?

Ms. Natasha Kim:

The Canada Elections Act provides a number of options to prove your identity and your residence. If it were just one piece of ID, you'd need the name, address, and photo—and really that's the driver's licence, which is provided by the provinces.

There's another option, where you can have two pieces of ID that collectively would establish your name and address. There are various federal pieces that Elections Canada has authorized for that list, but it would have to be used in conjunction with another piece of ID.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you.

Minister, earlier you mentioned that you'd like some ideas and advice on certain issues. Here is one I would like to put forward for your evaluation. You don't have to answer yes or no, because it requires a bit of investigation. I do believe this exists now in Newfoundland and Labrador, where I'm from.

For the situation of vouching, one of the problems we have in rural areas is that a person walks in but has forgotten their ID. They've just driven about 20 or 25 kilometres to get to the poll, which is common in rural Canada. They get turned away for a lack of ID, or they forgot something—they didn't realize they needed a second piece—and as they were turned away, they don't come back because they have to drive long distances. It's hard when you're in a small town and you look at someone you've known for 40 years—

The Chair:

Your time is up.

You're going to have to have a conversation with the minister at another time.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's very gracious of you, sir.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I could tell that Scott was just warming up.

First of all, I want to thank you, Minister, for meeting with me on Monday afternoon. I thought it was a very informative and fruitful meeting. Likewise, thank you for adopting what I think is a business-like approach to the legislation that is necessary in order to act upon the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendations. Again, that is much appreciated. Finally, thank you for the eight-page letter in which you responded to my questions regarding the MyDemocracy.ca survey.

I had some things I wanted to ask about on that, but I might hold off, given the exchange you had with Mr. Cullen and ask you this question instead.

Why won't you answer his question about the date on which you were given your mandate by the Prime Minister? What's the reason for not answering that?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Mandate letters are made public, and mine was made public on February 1. That's the day it was public, and that's the day it was official.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's not the date that it was official, actually; the date that it was given to you would be the date that it was official.

Let me ask you this way. You became minister on January 11 I think.

Hon. Karina Gould:

January 10.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

Were you given your mandate letter at that time?

Hon. Karina Gould:

At that time, I was sworn into cabinet and began to have briefings and to engage on the file.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Did you get your mandate letter on the date you became minister, or were you operating for some time as a minister without a mandate letter?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I was operating with the public mandate letter that was available until then.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I think you just lost me.

You're saying that you were operating under the mandate letter that had been issued to Minister Monsef.

Hon. Karina Gould:

There's a mandate letter. It's made public, and I was operating under what was public at the time.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, there was a mandate letter that was made public on February 1.

Was that the mandate letter you were operating under? Alternatively, were you operating under the mandate letter that had been issued to Minister Monsef a year and a bit earlier, or were you operating under some third thing? I'm now totally lost here.

Hon. Karina Gould:

The mandate is public, and whatever was public is the mandate I was operating under at the time.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The mandate is what's in the mandate letter. Is there some other mandate?

Hon. Karina Gould:

No, that's....

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right, so you were operating under the letter that had been issued to Minister Monsef, and not under the one that became public on February 1.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Whatever was public was the mandate I was operating under at the time for that minister.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That means you did receive your mandate letter, the one that became public on February 1, on the date on which you became minister, January 10. That's the mandate you received on January 10, the mandate letter that became public on February 1, correct?

Hon. Karina Gould:

The mandate letter that was public at the time of January 10 was the mandate I was operating under.

Mr. Scott Reid:

So it was Minister Monsef's? All right. That's helpful. You did not receive your mandate letter on January 10, then.

Let me ask you this question now that we've established that you got a new mandate letter after January 10.

Around January 24 or thereabouts, the cabinet met in Calgary. There has been a leak about what happened in that meeting. We are told that you argued passionately in favour of moving away from a referendum on electoral reform, and that your arguments persuaded everybody in cabinet except one. There was one dissenting vote.

Did you have your mandate letter at that time, or were you operating under Minister Monsef's old mandate letter when that argument was being made to the cabinet?

(1245)

Hon. Karina Gould:

I was operating under the mandate that was public at the time of those discussions, but I can't comment on cabinet conversations.

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, you can't, and neither can the person who leaked it, which raises the question of why there were two separate Liberal sources, according to the stories in which it was leaked.

I asked the House leader why there wasn't an investigation, and she just said, well, there isn't one. Of course, the answer is that the Prime Minister authorized this, which is a really unprofessional thing to do. It's not actually illegal, but it's certainly a breach of convention.

However, that doesn't answer my question. I think we've established, then, that you were issued your mandate letter—the one that was made public on February 1—sometime between January 24 or 25, whenever it was, and February 1. That now appears to be what you're saying. Is that correct? That's when you got the new mandate letter, not the previous one...?

Hon. Karina Gould:

You're putting—

The Chair:

You only have 10 seconds, Minister.

Hon. Karina Gould:

You're putting words in here, and what I'm saying is that the mandate letter was made public on February 1, and I was operating under the mandate that was public at the time.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Which must have been Minister Monsef's mandate letter—

Hon. Karina Gould:

Which is.... Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

—because there is no other.... I have the public information, too, and there's only that letter and the February 1 letter, so it has to be one or the other. I think you've just told us it was the Monsef letter, which I accept at face value. Am I wrong on that?

The Chair:

Your time is up.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I want to start by responding to a point that Mr. Cullen made earlier about gender balance. There's more to it than that. There's the commitment to gender, and at this table, there are three women members at this table, and they are all Liberals. On the electoral reform committee, there were only two parties that provided women for that committee: the Liberals and the Green Party. I just wanted to put that out there, but that's not the line I want to go down.

In your opening remarks, you said that you would like our report on the electoral officer's report by the end of June, or preferably by May 19, which I can understand. For the benefit of those watching—this is a televised meeting—can you explain the process of what happens after that? Can you explain how we get to a bill, why it's important to do it then in terms of the process, both with you and with cabinet, and also with Elections Canada, to get this ready for an election, and, therefore, why a deadline like that is actually important to us?

Hon. Karina Gould:

It's not a hard deadline, of course. The committee is going to set the timeline for the work they're going to do. It's just that I do value the input of committee. I think you provide valuable contributions on these items and these issues. Therefore, to have that in its fullness feeding into the legislative process moving forward would be very helpful to me, and I think it would be helpful to Canadians to hear from the committee and to hear their reflections within that time period.

In October 2019 there is going to be an election. Elections Canada needs time to implement any potential recommendations or amendments to the Canada Elections Act in time to deliver them for the 2019 election. Though we don't have a set time frame, we know that it's likely a number of months, if not more. The more time available, the better it is for Elections Canada and the dedicated officials there to ensure they get that done right.

Moving back, that means legislation would have to be passed sometime within the next year or year and a half in order for this to be accomplished. For that to happen, legislation would have to be presented in the fall, perhaps, or by the end of the year at the very latest, in order for that to go through the whole legislative process and to have the time for the committee to study it and for it to be debated in Parliament. In order to do so, legislation would need to be drafted and would need to go to cabinet ahead of that.

All of that puts us within that two-and-a-half-year time frame. I know that this is important legislation. There are important elements of this—for all members of this committee—that we want to get done in time for the next election to ensure that all Canadians have a fair, accessible, and equitable chance to vote.

(1250)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So it's clear that if we're still doing this study a year from now it will be a little late to act on it.

Hon. Karina Gould:

The committee is in charge of its own affairs, but I think it's valuable input. I think it would be worthwhile to have that as part of the considerations moving forward, so I hope to be able to receive that so it can feed into my thoughts and recommendations to the government.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's great.

There is one more quick point I want to make: You listed quite a number of clauses in the report on which you are looking forward to our feedback. I very much appreciate that. I think it's a really good approach for our going forward, to know where the priorities are, because I think there's quite a lot left to get through in that report. There are more answers coming that we've already discussed, and I can't get into more details about that, but I really appreciate the conversation and the fact you came here.

I know that Scott Simms has been getting warmed up, and I want to know if he wants to finish one last minute of his question.

The Chair:

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Someone else is gracious.

Thank you, David.

I was going to suggest that in smaller areas—and again, I'm not looking for an answer right now—you'll find that the poll supervisor has the power to vouch for individuals. It's bizarre when somebody walks up and says, “I'm sorry. Even though I've known you for 40 years, I can't vouch for you. I don't know you.” That becomes a common thing throughout rural areas.

If someone in that position—supervisor or someone at that level—had the power to vouch multiple times and signed for it and swore to it by whatever legal measures are needed, that would go a long way, especially in rural areas.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you, Scott. You finished on time.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I have another opportunity so we can carry on. I went off on a mini-rant at the end of the last round and you didn't have a chance to respond, so I wanted to be fair, obviously, and give you that opportunity.

To refresh where we were at, in the interim I again looked at the transcript from when you appeared before the Senate. I think this summarizes quite well what I was referring to, and I can then let you respond. It was in response to a question from Senator Frum.

As I think I mentioned earlier, you had said that with regard to foreign money in the Canadian political process, it's very important to know that in Canada we do have very strict financing laws. It was the same point you used earlier when I was asking you questions as well about who can donate to a political party, a third party, or a candidate during a writ period. During a writ period is obviously the key there.

Then in response to that, Minister, Senator Frum put the concern I have here quite succinctly when she said to you: Minister, would you agree that it is possible for foreign entities to make donations to third-party organizations outside of the writ period; that that money ends up getting used during the writ period; that this is the loophole I'm referring to; and that this is a very serious threat to our political sovereignty?

You then thanked her for her questions and said that from your experience you found it wasn't currently present or that was significant, that it would impact the election. But then you did go on to say, “However, I take your point and I appreciate it. It's something that I will definitely consider.”

Later on in that same meeting, in response to Senator Batters about the same topic, you also indicated the following: I will continue to work with my staff and colleagues in this place and in the other place to ensure that we put reasonable spending limits for third parties between elections.

So it seemed, on the one hand, as if you were brushing it off, saying that this isn't something that there is any concern about, but then, on the other hand, you were saying that you'll consider it and you think we need to look at putting some reasonable spending limits in place for third parties between elections. I'm trying to get a sense as to which one it is. Do you have concerns, and do you think this needs to be addressed, or not? And if yes or no, why or why not?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you again, Blake, for your question.

Addressing your first question with regard to the possibility of foreign money being used in advertising during an election, as it stands currently, third parties are required to report to Elections Canada all donations they have received in the six months prior to a writ's being announced. This is a mechanism that's in place at the moment. Of course, I am always interested to see if we think this is an issue and is of concern. At this point in time, it's not something we have vast evidence to be concerned about, but I welcome your concerns and any evidence you would have to suggest otherwise.

(1255)

Mr. Blake Richards:

In the briefing that you have committed to giving to this committee, was that something that was looked at? Was this something that you were briefed on in that briefing? You said you'll consider it and look at it. Obviously, that would imply that there was some intention to look at it. Now, this briefing, I suppose, could have occurred since those February 7 and February 14 meetings. Was it looked at in those briefings, and were you briefed fully on this and now feel that there's no need, or is this something you'll continue to look at now?

Hon. Karina Gould:

It was part of the briefings, but from the advice we were given, we do not think it is something that is imminent right now in Canada. That doesn't mean we won't stop considering it, because I think it is important, but it's not of grave concern.

Do you want to add onto that?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'll let your respond, but I want to follow up on that quickly.

There certainly seems to be a dispute. There are certainly those out there who would say this is a problem. There are organizations that have—

Hon. Karina Gould:

I would welcome your examples or suggestions that you have of this.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Let me just finish, because there is the possibility that it's actually a problem. You may have information to the contrary, and that's why we're asking for your briefing, obviously. But would you not concede that there is a chance that this could certainly be a problem? If it isn't already a problem, do you not see how it might be a problem in our elections? If a foreign entity could, in fact, give unlimited amounts to a third party prior to an election, that money could then be spent during an election. So do you not see—

Hon. Karina Gould:

But there are limits on third-party spending within a writ period itself that apply to all third parties in Canada. I think it's important to look at it within the wider regulatory and legislative framework as well. That being said, I think it's always important for a democracy, for a government, for a country, and for a citizenry to be constantly reflecting and monitoring situations.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister. That's it for time.

We'll go on to Mr. Chan.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Thank you, Minister.

I really want to express my appreciation for your being here today.

I want to follow up on the line of questioning that my colleague David Graham had started with respect to timelines. You specifically mentioned a May 19 deadline. The committee has received some information that there may be other substantive work that we need to consider as well. I'm following this line of questioning simply because I'm trying to figure out a process for dealing with what might suddenly be a very heavy workload for all of us. I want to understand. Is your deadline of May 19 when you want us to have completed the review of the Chief Electoral Officer's report and to report that back to the House?

That is my first line of questioning. My second piece is with respect to Bill C-33. Of course, we have not yet received that piece of legislation from the House for review. Would it be helpful for us to potentially prereview it on the assumption that it will come to us fairly intact?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you for both of your questions.

I will reiterate that the committee is in charge of and responsible for its own work plan. It would be very helpful for me to have another interim report, because I found the first one very useful in my thinking. Moving forward, it would be particularly useful for the committee to reflect and focus on the recommendations I specifically outlined in my opening remarks. I recognize that there are over 130 recommendations, so that is quite the task. Maybe you won't be able to get to all of them by that date, but if you're able to provide some reflection and guidance and thoughts with regard to some of them, I would be appreciative. You may not get to all of the ones that I mentioned, although all of them would be welcome. I hope to receive as much as you're able to do in due course, because that will help as I move forward.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

With respect to the first interim report, we asked for a response, obviously, from your office or from you regarding our recommendations going back to the House. It would be my assumption that we would probably go down the same line as we work through the rest of the report and report it back. Could you commit to providing us that reply as expeditiously as possible, and certainly before the deadline of May 19? I mean, obviously, it depends on when we, for example, submit our report to the House. I recognize that we have to give you a reasonable amount of time to respond, but, obviously, your comprehensive response to that would be helpful for us in terms of figuring out how to sequence our work. I suspect that at the pace we're going right now, we're not going to get there, and we might need to reconsider how we work as a committee to get as much as possible in front of you. The question I'm really leading to is whether you are anticipating further legislation coming from you, regardless of whether or not this committee reports to you.

(1300)

Hon. Karina Gould:

I will endeavour to report back to you as soon as I can. I think this is a priority. I think it would be possible, depending on the recommendations coming out of subsequent reports with regard to the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendations. Obviously, this would be something that I would have to bring to cabinet and report back on.

Also, I think there are elements within the Chief Electoral Officer's report that would require legislative changes, and if we're favourable to that, that would be the process we would be looking to pursue.

Mr. Arnold Chan:

Okay. I think we're out of time.

The Chair:

We have one more round of three minutes for Mr. Christopherson, and that will end the session.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Very good, thank you, Chair. I appreciate your ensuring our last spot. I will turn my time over to my colleague, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, David.

Thank you, Chair.

Minister, forgive me if I'm a bit confused. Let's circle back.

At committee, whenever a minister pleads the Canadian equivalent of the fifth amendment, we all sort of perk up a little bit and wonder what's going on.

There were two mandates. The first mandate, the previous one, said that your government was committed to electoral reform and to bringing in a new voting system before the next election. The second mandate says, “Not so much. We're going to break that commitment. We're doing something else.”

You were brought into cabinet on the 10th of January. Correct?

Okay.

Cabinet got together later in January, on the 24th and 25th, and you made public your new mandate letter on the 1st of February.

Do I have everything right so far?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay. I just want to make sure I have the facts straight.

You can understand why some of us are a bit confused about why you can't just tell us when you received the new mandate letter.

Was there any point when you had an old mandate letter, previously Minister Monsef's directions to keep the promise on electoral reform, and were given a second one that was not yet made public?

Hon. Karina Gould:

The mandate letter was made public on February 1, which was when the Prime Minister and I announced the new direction in the mandate letter, and that is how things have proceeded—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

Hon. Karina Gould:

—since then, and I'm looking forward to working on this mandate and to delivering for Canadians, and I'm looking forward to working with this committee to make sure that we get the—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We've heard that before.

Hon. Karina Gould:

—the Canada Elections Act updated and repeal the unfair elements of the—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So here's the point.

Hon. Karina Gould:

—so called Fair Elections Act, and I'm looking forward to getting that good work done because we need to work together—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm limited in time, Minister.

At the end of your statement, you said to this committee, “I sincerely want to work together with you.” That pinged for me because those were almost exactly the words you said to me the night before you backtracked on your government's promise. In our conversation you said, “I sincerely want to work with you and go ahead with this.”

At the time, when you were consulting with me and the Conservatives in the official opposition, and when you were phoning folks like Fair Vote and Lead Now, saying that you sincerely wanted to work with them, did you have in your possession the knowledge that you were going to be breaking this commitment on electoral reform?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I still sincerely want to work with you, because I think there are lots of things we can do together to improve the electoral system in Canada. I think that's precisely what I hope to be able to do with this committee.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

But sincerity also implies integrity and honesty—

Hon. Karina Gould:

I have a mandate to deliver. I have a mandate to work on, and I think that the valuable input from this committee is going to be really important to make sure that we get this right.

(1305)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You must see the irony, though, of being the Minister of Democratic Institutions and not being transparent.

If in fact you had a second, contrary, conflicting mandate in your possession when you were speaking to me or to others who are involved with this issue, or while you defended a position at the cabinet table, that would be entirely contradictory to the spirit on which your government was elected.

The Chair:

Thank you, Nathan. Sorry, but our time is up.

We would like to thank the minister for coming here and the staff members who accompanied her.

We look forward to our next meeting, moving on with our report on electoral reform.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1205)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Il s'agit de la 54e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Les délibérations sont télévisées.

Aujourd'hui, nous avons le plaisir d'accueillir l'honorable Karina Gould, ministre des Institutions démocratiques. Elle est accompagnée de deux fonctionnaires du Bureau du Conseil privé: Ian McCowan, sous-secrétaire du Cabinet (Gouvernance); et Natasha Kim, directrice de la réforme démocratique.

Les membres du Comité se souviendront que, lors de sa comparution du 7 février, la ministre Gould a accepté de revenir nous parler du site Web MaDémocratie.ca et du programme de réforme électorale que le gouvernement envisage.

Nous allons maintenant céder la parole à la ministre pour qu'elle fasse sa déclaration préliminaire.

Merci beaucoup d'être revenue nous voir. Nous vous en sommes reconnaissants. C'est très utile pour le Comité.

L'hon. Karina Gould (ministre des Institutions démocratiques):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis ravie d'être de retour un peu plus d'un mois après ma dernière comparution ici. Quel bonheur de vous revoir tous. J'ai hâte, moi aussi, à la discussion d'aujourd'hui. [Français]

Je vous remercie de m'avoir invitée de nouveau à prendre la parole devant le Comité. Je me réjouis de cette occasion de comparaître aujourd'hui devant vous et je suis heureuse de contribuer à vos délibérations du mieux que je le peux.

Hier, nous avons célébré la Journée internationale de la femme. J'étais très fière d'avoir été invitée à prendre la parole le 7 mars au gala tenu dans le cadre de l'initiative Héritières du suffrage. L'événement était organisé par le groupe À voix égales et visait à marquer l'importance de cette journée. L'initiative Héritières du suffrage a fait venir au Parlement des jeunes femmes âgées de 18 à 23 ans. Chacune d'entre elles venait de l'une de nos 338 circonscriptions électorales fédérales pour représenter sa collectivité et communiquer sa vision du Canada. Hier, ces jeunes femmes ont pu rencontrer leur député et se sont assises à leur place à la Chambre des communes.[Traduction]

Il était inspirant de voir la Chambre remplie de jeunes femmes et d'examiner ce que l'avenir leur réserve. Nous tous qui avons le privilège de servir nos concitoyens avons aussi le devoir d'appuyer les jeunes Canadiens et de les encourager à s'investir au profit de notre démocratie. Plus particulièrement, le Comité a l'occasion unique de réfléchir aux mesures à prendre pour faire en sorte que tous les Canadiens soient les mieux préparés à la vie civique et en mesure d'y participer. Votre étude du rapport du directeur général des élections et de ses recommandations vous confère la position de défenseurs du droit de vote. Les Héritières du suffrage, qui sont à Ottawa aujourd'hui, et tous les Canadiens, comptent sur vos réflexions.

Voilà pourquoi je tiens à profiter de l'occasion pour vous remercier tout particulièrement du travail que vous avez réalisé jusqu'à présent sur le rapport traitant des recommandations du directeur général des élections. J'ai lu avec intérêt votre rapport provisoire, qui a été déposé lundi. Je ne manquerai pas de l'examiner plus en profondeur et de méditer sur vos recommandations pendant que le gouvernement songe à sa réponse.

Je suis très heureuse de voir que vous êtes parvenus à un consensus sur les principales recommandations qui sont au coeur de la modernisation des services électoraux proposée par le directeur général des élections. De plus, vous avez soutenu collectivement d’autres recommandations, dont celles visant à améliorer la prestation des services électoraux aux Canadiens non résidents et les pouvoirs de transmission de l’information qui amélioreront la qualité du Registre national des électeurs, registre que vous aurez à examiner dans le cadre du projet de loi C-33. Il s’agit de recommandations importantes qui permettront de parfaire notre système électoral.

Un consensus s’est dégagé également sur de nombreuses recommandations du directeur général des élections concernant l’accessibilité du système électoral pour les électeurs et les candidats handicapés. Faire en sorte que l’inclusion soit une valeur essentielle de notre démocratie est une de mes priorités dans les mois et les années qui viennent.[Français]

Je me réjouis à l'avance des travaux que vous réaliserez sur les recommandations énoncées dans le Rapport du directeur général des élections.[Traduction]

Pour en citer quelques-unes, j’aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez de la durée de la période électorale et de celle du jour du scrutin, c’est-à-dire les recommandations A21 et A22. Elles ont des incidences sur le régime de financement politique, et la participation des Canadiens au scrutin.

La recommandation A25 est une recommandation qui porterait sur la question des nominations partisanes pour le personnel des bureaux de scrutin; elle laisse espérer une amélioration du recrutement à Élections Canada. Comme vous appuyez la recommandation A1, il serait instructif de connaître votre opinion sur cette recommandation.

Les recommandations A33 et A34 concernent les outils supplémentaires dont pourrait disposer le commissaire aux élections fédérales. Conformément à ma lettre de mandat, je me suis engagée à rétablir la confiance qu’ont les Canadiens dans l’intégrité de notre système, et je serais ravie de savoir ce que vous pensez de ces recommandations. [Français]

La recommandation A39 concerne des rajustements au régime d'arbitrage en matière de radiodiffusion. La manière dont les partis politiques communiquent avec les Canadiens et la nature des médias ont changé considérablement au fil du temps. Il y a eu peu de modifications à ces dispositions au cours des dernières années.

La recommandation B9 a des conséquences importantes sur les électeurs non conformistes sexuels. En lien avec le projet de loi C-16, je crois que cela mérite considération, puisqu'on pourrait assurer l'égalité dans tous les éléments du gouvernement fédéral.

La recommandation B15 aurait une incidence sur le processus en place pour aider les électeurs handicapés.[Traduction]

Les recommandations B12, B24, B18, B26, B27 et B43 sont toutes liées de manières différentes à l’intégrité du processus et à la confiance des Canadiens dans ce processus. La confiance étant essentielle au succès de toute élection et au transfert de pouvoir pacifique, j'invite le Comité à réfléchir mûrement à ces questions aussi.

Enfin, la recommandation B44 soulève la question importante suivante: comment s’adapter à un contexte d’élections à date fixe dans un système de gouvernement britannique? Je demanderais au Comité, si vous le jugez pertinent, de réfléchir aux conséquences de cette recommandation ainsi que des autres et de déterminer les défis et les possibilités que présentent les élections à date fixe, selon l'expérience canadienne.

Toutes ces recommandations suscitent diverses interrogations pour lesquelles l’expertise du Comité pourrait être utile. Elles visent à trouver des moyens de maintenir nos lois électorales à jour dans un contexte d’évolution et en tenant compte des attentes changeantes des électeurs et des acteurs politiques. Votre examen minutieux de ces questions compte beaucoup.

Comme je l’ai indiqué lors de mon dernier passage, conformément à ma lettre de mandat, je me suis aussi engagée à rendre les activités de financement plus transparentes. Pour honorer cet engagement, j’ai l’intention de présenter un projet de loi visant à ce que les activités de financement soient des activités publiques, en plus d'exiger que l’on divulgue l'identité des personnes qui y participent et la date des activités.

Nous connaissons les préoccupations des Canadiens à cet égard et nous avons l’intention d’agir. J’espère présenter le projet de loi au printemps et, si la Chambre le renvoie à votre Comité, je vous serais très reconnaissante de bien vouloir le considérer et de faire toute recommandation éventuelle.

Naturellement, il y a aussi le projet de loi C-33. Le travail que vous avez accompli jusqu’à présent sur le rapport des recommandations vous préparera bien à l’examen du projet de loi et des mesures qu’il contient pour réduire les obstacles au vote, tout en renforçant l’intégrité du processus électoral. À mon avis, le projet de loi C-33 sert de complément au travail que vous entreprenez relativement aux recommandations du directeur général des élections.

La période qui mène aux élections de 2019 diminue rapidement. Je suis déterminée à améliorer notre système électoral avant les prochaines élections pour que tous les Canadiens puissent en profiter. Pour atteindre cet objectif, les Canadiens ont besoin que nous travaillions ensemble. J'espère continuer à recevoir vos précieux commentaires sur la façon d'améliorer notre processus électoral afin de le rendre accessible, efficace et équitable pour les électeurs.

Élections Canada doit avoir assez de temps pour mettre en oeuvre les changements apportés à la Loi électorale du Canada avant les prochaines élections et voudra probablement, comme on peut s’y attendre, être prêt bien avant la délivrance d’un décret d’élection. Plus Élections Canada aura du temps pour se préparer, mieux ce sera.

(1210)

[Français]

Nous devons également prendre en considération que d'autres modifications législatives peuvent potentiellement être nécessaires pour mettre en oeuvre des recommandations que vous faites.

L'élaboration et la rédaction de ce projet de loi, ainsi que des discussions et débats importants à la Chambre des communes et au Sénat, ne devraient pas être précipités.[Traduction]

Pour qu’Élections Canada ait le temps qu’il lui faut et pour donner aux parlementaires le temps dont ils ont besoin, j’espère pouvoir présenter avant la fin de l’année le projet de loi qui tirera parti de l’excellent travail que vous aurez accompli au sujet des recommandations du directeur général des élections. Il nous incombe de prendre le temps de mener la tâche à bien. C'est ce que les Canadiens attendent de nous. Si la Chambre pouvait avoir votre prochain rapport avant l'ajournement d'été, de préférence d'ici le 19 mai, je pense que nous serions bien placés pour faire progresser d’importantes réformes qui permettront d’améliorer le processus électoral pour les Canadiens.

Si je vous fais part de mes pensées, c'est parce que je veux sincèrement collaborer avec vous. Je respecte I'indépendance du Comité et je sais qu'il établira son propre programme. J'espère que mes observations d'aujourd'hui vous permettront de mieux comprendre ma réflexion et mon point de vue sur les questions dont le Comité est saisi. [Français]

Je vous remercie encore une fois de m'avoir invitée aujourd'hui. J'ai hâte de travailler avec vous à ces dossiers importants.

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Vous nous avez laissé beaucoup de temps pour les questions, alors commençons par Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, madame la ministre, d'être des nôtres aujourd'hui.

Je suis contente que vous ayez commencé par parler de l'initiative Héritières du suffrage. Alors que j'étais assise dans la tribune hier, j'ai trouvé frappant de voir la jeune demoiselle qui occupait mon siège ainsi que les autres femmes de tout le pays, installées dans les 338 sièges du Parlement. J'ai appris à bien connaître la déléguée de ma circonscription dans les mois qui ont précédé l'événement d'hier, et nous avons également eu l'occasion de déjeuner ensemble hier. Elle s'appelle Meghan Bottomley. Elle est une étudiante de quatrième année en sciences politiques à l'Université McGill. C'est une jeune fille très brillante qui s'intéresse à la politique.

Comme vous le savez, même si nous avons réussi à faire élire un plus grand nombre femmes au Parlement aux dernières élections, nous sommes encore bien loin de la parité hommes-femmes. Vous n'êtes pas sans savoir non plus que j'ai siégé au Comité sur la réforme électorale, et cette question est revenue sur le tapis à maintes reprises. Cependant, je n'étais pas toujours convaincue que ce serait la seule façon de nous rapprocher de la parité hommes-femmes, sans recourir à d'autres mécanismes déjà en place et sans prendre d'autres mesures qui s'imposent pour moderniser le Parlement.

Que faites-vous, en tant que ministre des Institutions démocratiques, pour augmenter les chances des femmes qui souhaitent se lancer en politique? Nous savons qu'elles s'en tirent très bien une fois qu'elles siègent ici, mais c'est la décision de briguer les suffrages qui préoccupe beaucoup d'entre elles et qui rend la tâche difficile. Quelles sont vos suggestions?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci beaucoup, Ruby, de votre question. J'ai, moi aussi, été particulièrement motivée et encouragée de voir les 338 jeunes femmes occuper leur siège hier à la Chambre des communes. Je crois qu'il s'agit d'une occasion incroyable qui nous laisse entrevoir ce que l'avenir pourrait nous réserver.

J'ai eu la possibilité de m'adresser à elles à deux reprises, le mardi 7 février: d'abord, dans le cadre d'une discussion de groupe sur le thème des femmes en politique et ensuite, en tant que conférencière principale pendant le gala de mardi soir.

J'ai été notamment frappée par une question qu'une des jeunes femmes m'a posée. Elle voulait savoir ce qui m'avait donné la confiance, en tant que jeune femme, de me présenter aux élections. Cela m'a rappelé une situation qui se produit trop souvent. Lorsqu'on demande à de jeunes hommes de se présenter aux élections, ils disent souvent: « D'accord, j'accepte. Quand est-ce que je commence? » Par contre, lorsqu'on demande à de jeunes femmes de le faire, elles réagissent en disant: « Pourquoi moi? Je crois que je dois faire d'autres études ou m'y préparer davantage. »

Je pense qu'il s'agit, en partie, de nous assurer que les jeunes femmes ou les femmes en général ont des modèles inspirants à suivre et qu'elles peuvent s'imaginer à la Chambre des communes ou dans d'autres carrières éventuelles. Elles doivent aussi savoir qu'elles peuvent compter sur de nombreuses personnes prêtes à les soutenir dans leurs démarches, de sorte qu'elles puissent réussir; parfois, les obstacles sont plus imaginaires que réels.

Certes, il existe des obstacles bien réels sur le plan des finances et des systèmes en place qui pénalisent les femmes de façon discriminatoire, mais il arrive souvent que ces limites nous soient imposées par la société; par exemple, les jeunes femmes se font dire qu'elles n'ont pas l'expérience ou la capacité nécessaire pour y arriver et que cela nuira à la campagne. Selon moi, il est vraiment important de démontrer, à partir de cas réels, que lorsque les femmes se présentent aux élections, elles réussissent.

Je serais bien curieuse d'entendre les réflexions des membres du Comité sur certaines des mesures tangibles que nous pourrions prendre et sur la façon dont nous pouvons tout mettre en oeuvre, à titre de parlementaires, de ministériels et de Canadiens, pour favoriser une plus grande participation, non seulement des femmes, mais aussi des groupes ethnoculturels à la vie politique canadienne.

(1215)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Puis-je avoir votre avis sur une des recommandations que nous avons adoptées dans notre rapport provisoire? La recommandation 37 proposait que les dépenses au titre de la garde d'un enfant qu'un candidat a engagées en raison de sa mise en candidature soient remboursées jusqu'à 90 %.

Les membres du Comité ont tous été d'accord à cet égard. La recommandation visait également les dépenses personnelles engagées par un candidat pour prendre soin d'une personne ayant un handicap. Étant moi-même mère d'un jeune enfant, je sais que cela peut être très difficile. Certaines femmes prennent aussi soin d'autres proches. C'est parfois tout un défi. Briguer les suffrages demande beaucoup de temps que l'on aurait pu consacrer à ces responsabilités ou aux moyens permettant de s'occuper financièrement de ses enfants ou d'autres personnes à charge.

Que pensez-vous de cette recommandation? Votre ministère s'était-il penché là-dessus? Avez-vous d'autres recommandations qui pourraient considérablement changer la donne pour les femmes et les encourager à se présenter aux élections?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Comme le rapport a été déposé à la Chambre lundi, j'ai eu l'occasion de le passer en revue. Je crois que le Comité s'est entendu sur un certain nombre de recommandations vraiment importantes, dont je tiendrais compte et que je mettrais de l'avant en vue de la réponse du gouvernement.

De façon plus générale, ce qui est important pour moi personnellement, en ma qualité de ministre des Institutions démocratiques, c'est que nous prenons les mesures nécessaires pour réduire ces obstacles, de sorte que tous les citoyens puissent participer à la vie politique, si tel est leur choix. Voilà un aspect qui mérite d'être considéré, mais je pense qu'il est extrêmement important que nous réduisions les barrières auxquelles se heurtent les personnes ayant différents moyens financiers ou différentes obligations personnelles ou familiales pour nous assurer qu'une grande diversité de candidats peuvent participer aux élections.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Est-ce qu'il me reste du temps?

Le président:

Il vous reste 45 secondes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci de vos réponses. J'attends avec impatience que le projet de loi soit présenté.

Je sais que le Comité prend très au sérieux le sujet des femmes qui se portent candidates aux élections, et nous tenons à réaliser des progrès dans ce dossier. J'ai hâte de voir les mesures qui seront prises par votre ministère.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, merci de votre présence.

Vous ne serez probablement pas surprise du fait que mes questions vont porter sur l’influence étrangère en ce qui concerne les dépenses des tierces parties lors des élections canadiennes. C’était le sujet de certaines des questions que j’ai posées la dernière fois que vous étiez ici, le 7 février dernier, si je ne m’abuse. J’espère que vous avez eu la chance d’en apprendre un peu plus à cet égard dans l’intervalle, et que nous pourrons tenir une conversation un peu plus étoffée que celle que nous avons eue à ce moment-là.

Comme vous le savez sans doute — étant donné que nous en avons parlé plus tôt —, l'ancien directeur général des élections a dit en novembre qu'il n'y avait vraiment aucun moyen de contenir ou d'empêcher l'intervention d'étrangers ou d'organismes étrangers qui tenteraient d'avoir une influence sur les élections canadiennes. Il a aussi dit qu'il n'y a à l'heure actuelle aucune limite concernant ce que les tierces parties peuvent dépenser pour des choses comme les sondages, la télésollicitation, les sites Web ou pour toute autre chose qui n'est pas considérée comme de la publicité.

En répondant à l'une de mes questions lors de votre dernier passage ici, vous avez dit que vous vous engagiez à faire en sorte qu'il n'y ait pas d'influence de l'étranger dans nos élections. Or, lors de votre comparution au Sénat, le 14 février dernier, vous avez répondu ceci à la sénatrice Frum: D'après notre expérience, ce n'est pas un problème qui existe en ce moment, ou il n'est pas important au point d'avoir un impact sur le système électoral ou la confiance que les Canadiens peuvent avoir pendant une période électorale.

À la sénatrice Batters, vous avez répondu que « rien ne prouve que des fonds provenant de tiers étrangers influencent les élections canadiennes ».

Maintenant, je dirais qu'il ne fait aucun doute que les tierces parties ont dépensé des sommes sans précédent lors de la dernière élection. En fin de compte, les tiers sont en mesure de dépenser des sommes illimitées en dehors de la publicité, et ils sont bien entendu en mesure d'accepter des fonds de l'étranger et de les utiliser à ces fins. Je crois que cette possibilité va un peu dans le sens contraire des réponses que vous avez données lors de votre passage au Sénat.

Étant donné la teneur de ces réponses et l'engagement pris antérieurement d'assurer qu'il n'y ait pas d'influence étrangère dans nos élections, j'ai vraiment l'impression que le gouvernement a décidé d'ignorer ce problème. Cette attitude va vraiment dans le sens inverse des propos tenus par le directeur général des élections.

J'ai plusieurs questions à vous poser. Je vais vous demander de répondre aussi brièvement que possible, mais je veux tout de même m'assurer que vous aurez la chance de répondre. J'aimerais savoir si, depuis votre premier témoignage ici, cette question est quelque chose que vous, votre personnel ou votre ministère avez examiné, et si c'est un enjeu qu'on vous a expliqué.

(1220)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci, monsieur Blake, de cette question et de la diligence dont vous faites preuve. Je vais répondre à votre question et ensuite, je pense que j'en aurai une pour vous. À propos de votre première question, la réponse est oui. Après cette séance, j'ai demandé qu'on me brosse un portrait de la situation à cet égard, et c'est une question que nous avons effectivement examinée. Il est important de noter qu'il n'y a pas beaucoup d'éléments de preuve qui porteraient à croire que des tiers ont eu une incidence sur les dépenses.

M. Blake Richards:

Permettez-moi de vous interrompe, je suis désolé. J'ai compris l'essentiel de vos propos, mais on dirait bien que ce que vous affirmez pourrait être débattu. Pourriez-vous nous faire part de l'information que vous avez reçue afin que nous soyons en mesure de...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

J'aimerais bien savoir quelles preuves vous avez pour remettre ces propos en question ou quelles propositions vous formuleriez pour faire avancer les choses.

M. Blake Richards:

De toute évidence, nous serions heureux d'avoir cette conversation, mais vous avez reçu de l'information contraire à ce que vous croyiez. J'aimerais savoir si vous seriez disposée à communiquer cette information au Comité pour que nous puissions nous aussi en profiter.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui. Nous allons vous fournir de l'information à ce sujet.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est formidable. Merci, madame la ministre. Nous allons attendre cette information avec impatience. Ensuite, espérons que nous serons en mesure de poursuivre la conversation à ce sujet.

J'aimerais savoir si vous pourriez nous en dire un peu plus. Il ne fait aucun doute pour moi que les articles 331 et 349 de la Loi électorale du Canada doivent être modifiés afin d'assurer qu'il n'y ait pas d'influence de l'étranger en ce qui concerne les dépenses de tierces parties. Vous serait-il possible de vous engager à revoir ces articles et à apporter les modifications nécessaires pour empêcher les tierces parties d'être en mesure de dépenser sans limites pour des choses comme les sondages, la télésollictiation ou les sites Web consacrés aux élections?

J'ai l'impression que vous ne reconnaissez pas qu'il y a vraiment un problème à cet égard. Or, que ce soit actuellement un problème ou non, le fait demeure que cela pourrait bel et bien en devenir un. J'aimerais savoir si vous êtes disposée à vous engager à apporter ces modifications afin d'assurer que ce type d'influence étrangère ne s'immisce pas dans nos élections. Bien entendu, ces modifications devront s'appliquer tant durant la période électorale qu'en dehors de cette période. Seriez-vous disposée à vous engager à examiner ces modifications et à les proposer?

(1225)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Eh bien, j'aimerais assurément entendre vos réflexions quant à la teneur des recommandations qui devraient être formulées en ce sens.

Pour ce qui est de l'information que j'ai et que j'ai demandée, l'une des choses qu'il est nécessaire d'affirmer avec aplomb, c'est que notre pays dispose de règles très strictes en ce qui concerne la place qu'occupent les fonds étrangers dans la politique canadienne. C'est quelque chose qui n'existe pas vraiment. Selon mon...

M. Blake Richards:

Je m'excuse de vous interrompre de nouveau, madame la ministre. Vous avez raison de dire cela en ce qui concerne les partis politiques, mais ce n'est assurément pas vrai lorsqu'il est question des dépenses des tierces parties. C'est une brèche énorme dans notre système. Il y a là une lacune flagrante qui permet à une influence étrangère de s'exercer pratiquement sans limites dans tout ce qui n'est pas perçu comme étant de la publicité. Étant donné l'engagement que vous avez pris selon lequel il est important d'essayer de faire tout ce que nous pouvons pour empêcher les influences étrangères de s'exercer, j'ose espérer que vous allez examiner ces modifications avec tout le sérieux qui s'impose. C'est facile de répéter la réponse préfabriquée selon laquelle il n'y a pas de possibilité de faire cela à l'heure actuelle, mais en ce qui concerne les tierces parties, l'argument ne tient pas. La situation est assurément différente de ce que l'on rapporte, et j'espère que vous allez vous pencher là-dessus et envisager la possibilité de faire quelque chose.

J'espère aussi que nous aurons la chance de poursuivre cette discussion lors d'une prochaine série de questions.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Richards.

La parole est maintenant à M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, merci de votre présence. Je vous remercie aussi de la récente rencontre que vous avez organisée dans votre bureau. C'est un geste apprécié.

Je vais prendre un instant pour parler du processus que vous proposez. Je tiens à dire publiquement que je suis autant impressionné par le changement d'approche qui caractérise votre gouvernement, votre ministère et le travail du Comité que j'ai été choqué par la façon cavalière avec laquelle le projet de loi C-33 a été largué à la Chambre des communes. Depuis, le gouvernement a pris l'engagement de changer les choses — et nous travaillons toujours à cela —, mais je tiens à dire publiquement que je suis très impressionné par les efforts déployés par vous et les députés ministériels pour tenter de nous remettre sur la bonne voie, cette voie où nous travaillons en collaboration les uns avec les autres comme vous l'avez promis durant la campagne. Lorsque nous sommes en mesure de travailler de cette façon — et, tout particulièrement, au sein de notre comité —, c'est vraiment ce qu'il y a de mieux pour le Parlement. Je le répète: tout cela m'impressionne beaucoup.

Cependant, vous continuez à saturer l'agenda du Comité. Je veux vous rappeler qu'il faudra mettre les bouchées doubles en ce qui a trait à la coordination et aux échanges, car vous n'êtes pas la seule à nous donner du travail. Nous en recevons de partout. Certaines choses ont préséance sur d'autres et elles nous font prendre du retard par rapport au programme bien intentionné que nous nous sommes donné. Cette dynamique continuera d'être difficile à gérer. Le Comité a beaucoup de pain sur la planche.

Encore une fois, je veux souligner que j'ai été extrêmement contrarié par ce que le gouvernement a fait avec le projet de loi C-33, et que je suis tout autant impressionné par le fait que le gouvernement reconnaisse maintenant qu'il a eu tort et qu'il s'engage à rectifier le tir. J'espère que cela va continuer. J'ai hâte de travailler sur ce dossier d'une importance névralgique pour nous tous.

Cela dit, monsieur le président, je veux laisser le reste de mon temps de parole à mon collègue, M. Cullen, qui est aussi notre porte-parole en matière de réforme démocratique.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, je vous souhaite la bienvenue, vous qui représentez la circonscription qui arrive deuxième sur la liste des plus belles circonscriptions du pays.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Oh, le voilà reparti. J'invoque le Règlement.

Merci, madame la ministre, d'être ici.

Apparemment, vous êtes aussi ici pour parler de MaDémocratie.ca. Savons-nous combien cette initiative a coûté?

M. Ian McCowan (sous-secrétaire du Cabinet (Gouvernance), Bureau du Conseil privé):

Vous voulez dire, combien a coûté le marché avec Vox Pop?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, le coût de l'ensemble de la démarche. Nous étions au courant du contrat accordé à Vox Pop, mais nous aimerions savoir où en est le coût total par rapport à la dernière fois que nous en avons parlé.

M. Ian McCowan:

En ce qui concerne le mandat de la réforme électorale dans son ensemble, je crois que le montant est aux alentours de 3,8 millions de dollars, ce qui comprend le personnel, le contrat, les envois par Postes Canada et la tournée de la ministre. Si cela peut être utile au Comité, nous pouvons lui fournir une ventilation des coûts associés à la réforme.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, cela serait très utile.

Madame la ministre, diriez-vous que cet exercice a été un succès? Je veux parler de la démarche « MaDémocratie.ca » que le gouvernement a entreprise dans le cadre de ses efforts de sensibilisation.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Eh bien, pour commencer, je veux remercier David de ses observations.

Je me fais une joie à l'idée de travailler avec le Comité, et j'espère que nous allons faire de grandes choses ensemble. Je sais que vous avez beaucoup de pain sur la planche et je sais qu'on vous a confié des tâches d'envergure, mais j'ai aussi confiance dans la capacité que vous avez collectivement de mener tout cela à bien. J'ai hâte de travailler avec vous.

Je crois que MaDémocratie.ca est un exercice qui en valait la peine. Le fait qu'environ 380 000 Canadiens y aient participé est éloquent. C'est la plus grande participation que le gouvernement ait obtenue pour une démarche de consultation.

(1230)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce sondage a-t-il donné lieu à une réponse particulière ou à un résultat particulier qui aurait amené le gouvernement à décider de renoncer à son engagement de réforme électorale? Y a-t-il une orientation particulière que votre consultation a permis de dégager dans la façon dont les Canadiens ont répondu ou n'ont pas répondu à telle ou telle question et qui vous aurait convaincus qu'il ne fallait pas aller de l'avant avec la réforme électorale?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

La décision a été prise en fonction des nombreuses composantes de la consultation et du travail...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Mais sur rien en particulier.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... qui s'est fait au cours de la dernière année auprès des Canadiens.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quand avez-vous reçu votre lettre de mandat du premier ministre?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Ma lettre de mandat a été rendue publique le 1er février.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quand l'avez-vous reçue?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Ma lettre de mandat a été rendue publique le 1er février.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. J'aimerais simplement savoir quand vous l'avez reçue. Je sais quand elle a été rendue publique; j'étais là.

L'avez-vous reçue le 1er février?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Ma lettre de mandat a été rendue publique le 1er février.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Vous pouvez me poser la question encore et encore. C'est à cette date qu'elle a été rendue publique.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je sais, et vous pouvez continuer longtemps à ne pas me répondre. Cela semble étrange, puisque la réception d'une lettre n'exige pas exactement la même confidentialité qu'un secret d'État.

Tout ce que je cherche à savoir, c'est quand vous avez reçu votre lettre. Ce n'est pas une question difficile.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Et ce que je réponds, c'est qu'elle a été rendue publique le 1er février.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord.

M. David Christopherson:

Oh, oh!

Vous voilà fixé.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Maintenant, en ce qui concerne la transparence, vous avez regardé les jeunes femmes à la Chambre des communes, les Héritières du suffrage. Avez-vous entendu la question que Chelsea Montgomery a posée au premier ministre?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

J'ai entendu toutes les questions.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vais vous la citer, ce qui nous permettra à tous de nous rafraîchir la mémoire: « Plutôt que d'attendre jusqu'en 2090 — au rythme où vont les choses, c'est l'année où l'on atteindra la parité hommes-femmes à la Chambre des communes —, quels engagements prenez-vous et quel est votre plan pour la suite des choses? »

Nous avons eu la vague impression que les résultats pour les femmes s'étaient beaucoup améliorés entre l'avant-dernière élection et la dernière élection. La représentation des femmes à la Chambre des communes a cru de 1 %. Le pourcentage d'hommes y est toujours aux alentours de 75 %.

La question de Chelsea était très directe. Il a choisi de ne pas répondre de façon précise.

Antérieurement, nous avons proposé en Chambre de modifier la façon de rembourser les dépenses électorales des partis de manière à inciter ces derniers à présenter un plus grand nombre de femmes comme candidates. Êtes-vous en faveur d'une telle proposition?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

J'ai hâte de prendre connaissance des recommandations du Comité. Je crois qu'il y a de nombreuses façons innovatrices d'encourager les femmes à participer à la chose politique.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pouvez-vous me rafraîchir la mémoire? J'essayais de trouver cette information avant la présente séance du Comité. Il y a eu un projet de loi à ce sujet. Vous souvenez-vous si vous avez voté pour ce projet de loi ou non?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il faudra que je consulte le compte-rendu.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous ne vous en souvenez pas?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je ne m'en souviens pas. Je ne crois pas avoir voté en faveur de ce projet de loi, mais il faudrait que je vérifie.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Certains de vos collègues du gouvernement l'ont fait. Cela faisait partie des recommandations.

Chelsea a interrogé de premier ministre au sujet de la promesse qu'il a rompue à propos de la réforme électorale, en ce qui concerne particulièrement l'adoption d'un système électoral plus équitable.

Nous savons, grâce au groupe À voix égales et à de nombreuses études, que la représentation proportionnelle est un système qui tend à favoriser l'élection d'un nombre accru de femmes. Le premier ministre a déclaré à maintes reprises être féministe et souhaiter l'élection d'un plus grand nombre de femmes, mais il a rejeté la proposition du comité représentant tous les partis, qui suggérait, tout comme vous, un système de représentation proportionnelle.

Mais on peut procéder autrement. Comme mon collègue l'a indiqué, nous devons trouver d'autres moyens, en passant notamment par le processus de candidature afin d'inciter les partis à proposer des candidates et de les décourager de proposer des hommes ou des représentants d'autres groupes surreprésentés au sein du Parlement.

Vous avez vu le projet de loi et eu l'occasion de voter à ce sujet. Vous avez vu le rapport du Comité qui recommande de telles mesures. Les conservateurs se sont joints au Parti vert et au Bloc pour recommander cette approche qui, je le sais, intéresse certains libéraux.

Êtes-vous disposée à accepter cette proposition?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je suis disposée à recevoir une telle proposition, ainsi que d'autres suggestions. Il importe, selon moi, de réfléchir à des mécanismes novateurs pour encourager les femmes à entrer en politique.

Le président:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre, de témoigner.

Je veux traiter du projet de loi C-33, si vous me le permettez, afin d'en étudier la substance. Je connais les autres aspects du dossier, y compris la manière dont le projet de loi a été déposé, que M. Chrisopherson a mentionnée. Je suis sensible aux observations qu'il a formulées à ce sujet et à vos propos également, mais je veux discuter de la substance du projet de loi.

Je veux aborder deux questions. D'une part, ce projet de loi comprend des mesures dont nous avons discuté au cours de la campagne en parlant de ce que nous ferions en vertu de la lettre de mandat. D'autre part, il nous faut, si je peux tenter de m'exprimer subtilement, résoudre les problèmes découlant de la loi électorale inéquitable adoptée la dernière fois. J'ai souvent indiqué qu'elle apportait une solution à un problème qui n'a jamais existé.

Cela touche notamment la carte d'information de l'électeur, à laquelle je suis très favorable pour plusieurs raisons. L'âge médian est élevé dans ma circonscription, où la population compte de nombreux aînés. Comme il s'agit en outre d'une région rurale, bien des gens n'ont pas les documents requis pour prouver leur adresse et satisfaire à d'autres exigences. Je suis certain qu'un grand nombre de membres de l'opposition répliqueraient que les électeurs doivent présenter un certain nombre de pièces d'identité pour voter. Je le comprends. Mais en exigeant ces documents et en érigeant des obstacles au point où cela viole un droit constitutionnel, c'est-à-dire le droit de vote...

La carte d'information de l'électeur était essentielle. Je pourrais peut-être expliquer la situation comme suit: nombre d'aînés disposaient ces cartes sur le réfrigérateur ou ailleurs dans la cuisine afin de rappeler d'aller voter. Ils s'y fiaient énormément pour pouvoir se présenter au bureau de scrutin et dire « Je veux voter ».

Je les comprends et je me demande si vous pourriez nous dire ce que vous en pensez.

(1235)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je partage votre avis. Je pense que c'est très important. Voilà pourquoi, dans le projet de loi C-33, nous proposons des mesures pour pouvoir utiliser la carte d'information de l'électeur comme pièce d'identité au cours d'élections futures. Je considère que c'est extrêmement important.

Je suis certaine que nous sommes nombreux, dans cette pièce et au Parlement, à pouvoir raconter des histoires à propos de gens qui n'ont pu voter parce qu'ils n'avaient pas de pièce d'identité valide. Nous savons que quelque 120 000 Canadiens ont indiqué qu'ils n'avaient pas pu voter parce qu'ils n'avaient pas de pièce d'identité adéquate.

Je pense que c'est une manière de nous assurer que les gens qui ont le droit de vote puissent voter, et ce, de la manière la plus efficace possible.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci, madame la ministre.

La deuxième question concerne les mesures que le gouvernement prendrait, dont nous avons parlé pendant la campagne. Voilà qui m'intéresse. Quand j'ai été élu au Parlement en 2004, on envisageait d'abaisser l'âge auquel on peut voter. Ce débat visait essentiellement à intéresser les jeunes au vote. Ma collègue, Mme Sahota, a indiqué plus tôt qu'il fallait mobiliser les jeunes pour les inciter à participer. Cela concernait la mobilisation des jeunes dans le cadre d'initiatives comme celle des Héritières du suffrage.

L'inscription des jeunes de 14 à 17 ans est une idée fort intéressante. Je pense que d'autres pays ont tenté d'agir en ce sens afin d'encourager les électeurs non pas à voter, mais à participer au processus d'inscription. Est-ce que vous ou un des fonctionnaires qui vous accompagnent pouvez nous expliquer comment cette mesure se traduira par une participation accrue des jeunes de 14 à 17 ans?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Certainement. Merci.

Je considère qu'il s'agit d'une question importante. Je sais que quand je prends la parole devant des jeunes qui fréquentent l'école secondaire, je leur demande toujours de s'engager à faire une chose: voter quand ils auront atteint 18 ans. À ce moment, du moins, ils lèvent tous la main et s'engagent à le faire. J'espère qu'ils honorent cet engagement.

Nous savons que lorsque les jeunes commencent à voter précocement, ils finissent par voter souvent. J'entends par là que cela devient une habitude, quelque chose qu'ils font tout au long de leur vie. Plus nous pouvons faciliter les choses pour que les jeunes s'impliquent et s'inscrivent afin de faire déjà partie du processus, plus c'est de bon augure pour la participation et la mobilisation futures des citoyens au sein de la démocratie canadienne.

Souhaitez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Ian McCowan:

J'indiquerais seulement que des études effectuées au Canada, en Australie et aux États-Unis montrent que l'éducation civique a une incidence favorable sur la participation civique et électorale subséquente. Il existe certainement des données probantes à cet égard.

M. Scott Simms:

Ce qui est également intéressant — veuillez m'excuser, madame Kim, je n'avais pas l'intention de vous exclure de la discussion —, c'est que cela a un lien avec le fait que le projet de loi C-33 permettrait aussi au directeur général des élections de participer davantage aux démarches d'éducation et à la diffusion d'information sur le vote. Je suppose que cela cadre bien avec le fait d'autoriser les jeunes à s'inscrire sur la liste électorale. Je vous félicite de cette initiative.

Madame Kim.

Mme Natasha Kim (directrice, Réforme démocratique, Bureau du Conseil privé):

J'allais simplement ajouter que l'inscription préalable a notamment l'avantage de pouvoir servir d'appel à l'action très concret quand Élections Canada mène des activités d'éducation civique auprès des jeunes des écoles secondaires pour leur permettre de participer au processus.

D'autres passages du projet de loi faciliteraient, par exemple, la réception des cartes d'information de l'électeur une fois que les gens sont inscrits pour qu'ils disposent d'une pièce d'identité qu'ils peuvent présenter au bureau de scrutin.

(1240)

M. Scott Simms:

Pour en revenir une fois encore à la carte d'information de l'électeur, ai-je raison de dire qu'il s'agit de la seule pièce d'identité fédérale complète qui existe actuellement au pays?

Mme Natasha Kim:

La Loi électorale du Canada offre aux électeurs un certain nombre de possibilités pour prouver leur identité et leur lieu de résidence. S'ils ne présentent qu'une pièce d'identité, elle doit comprendre le nom, l'adresse et une photo, et le seul document comprenant ces trois éléments est le permis de conduire, qui est délivré par les provinces.

Ils peuvent également présenter deux pièces d'identité pour prouver leur nom et leur adresse. Élections Canada a autorisé diverses pièces d'identité fédérales à cette fin, mais elles doivent être présentées avec une autre pièce d'identité.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci.

Madame la ministre, vous avez indiqué précédemment que vous aimeriez recevoir des idées et des conseils à certains égards. Voici une suggestion que je voudrais vous présenter pour que vous l'évaluiez. Vous n'avez pas à répondre « oui » ou « non », parce que cette idée exige quelques recherches. Je pense qu'il s'agit de quelque chose qui se fait à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador, ma province d'origine.

En ce qui concerne les répondants, un des problèmes qui se posent en région rurale, c'est que des gens se présentent au bureau de scrutin, mais ont oublié leurs pièces d'identité. Or, ils ont parcouru 20 ou 25 kilomètres pour venir, ce qui est courant dans les zones rurales du pays. Parce qu'ils n'ont pas de pièce d'identité ou qu'ils n'ont pas compris qu'ils devaient en présenter une deuxième, ils ne peuvent voter, et ils ne reviennent pas parce qu'ils ont dû venir de loin. C'est difficile, quand on réside dans une petite ville, de voir quelqu'un qu'on connaît depuis 40 ans...

Le président:

Votre temps est écoulé.

Vous allez devoir discuter avec la ministre à un autre moment.

M. Scott Simms:

Voilà qui est très courtois de votre part, monsieur.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je peux dire que Scott commençait juste à se réchauffer.

Je tiens tout d'abord à vous remercier, madame la ministre, de m'avoir rencontré lundi après-midi. Je pense que nous avons eu une rencontre fort instructive et très fructueuse. Je vous remercie aussi d'adopter ce que je considère comme une approche digne du domaine des affaires en ce qui concerne la loi qu'il faut adopter pour suivre les recommandations du directeur général des élections. Nous vous savons gré d'agir de la sorte. Je vous remercie enfin du document de huit pages dans lequel vous avez répondu à mes questions sur le sondage MaDémocratie.ca.

Je voulais vous interroger à ce sujet, mais je m'en abstiendrai peut-être, compte tenu des échanges que vous avez eus avec M. Cullen, et vous poserai plutôt la question suivante.

Pourquoi ne répondez-vous pas à la question sur la date à laquelle le premier ministre vous a confié votre mandat? Pour quelle raison n'y répondez-vous pas?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Les lettres de mandat sont rendues publiques, et la mienne a été publiée le 1er février. C'est le jour où elle a été rendue publique, le jour où mon mandat est devenu officiel.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce n'est pas à cette date qu'il est devenu officiel, mais à celle à laquelle la lettre vous a été remise.

Permettez-moi de vous poser la question ainsi. Vous êtes devenue ministre le 11 janvier, il me semble.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le 10 janvier.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Est-ce à ce moment que vous avez reçu votre lettre de mandat?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

À ce moment-là, j'ai prêté serment au Cabinet, et j'ai commencé à recevoir des séances d'information et à m'occuper du dossier.

M. Scott Reid:

Avez-vous reçu votre lettre de mandat le jour où vous êtes devenue ministre ou avez-vous occupé vos fonctions de ministre sans lettre de mandat pendant un certain temps?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je travaillais en vertu de la lettre de mandat publique qui existait jusque-là.

M. Scott Reid:

Je pense que vous venez de me perdre.

Vous dites que vous travailliez en vertu de la lettre de mandat délivrée à la ministre Monsef.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il y a une lettre de mandat, qui est rendue publique. Je travaillais en vertu de la lettre qui était publique à ce moment-là.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Une lettre de mandat a été publiée le 1er février.

Est-ce la lettre de mandat en vertu de laquelle vous travailliez, ou étiez-vous assujettie à la lettre de mandat délivrée à la ministre Monsef un peu plus d'un an auparavant ou d'une troisième lettre? Je suis complètement perdu maintenant.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le mandat est public, et je travaillais en vertu du mandat figurant dans la lettre de mandat qui était publique à ce moment-là.

M. Scott Reid:

Le mandat est énoncé dans la lettre de mandat. Existe-t-il un autre mandat?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Non, c'est...

M. Scott Reid:

Vous travailliez donc en vertu de la lettre de mandat délivrée à la ministre Monsef et non de celle qui a été publiée le 1er février.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je travaillais en vertu de la lettre de mandat publiée pour le ministre concerné.

M. Scott Reid:

Cela signifie que vous avez reçu votre lettre de mandat, celle qui a été publiée le 1er février, le jour où vous êtes devenue ministre, c'est-à-dire le 10 janvier. Le mandat que vous avez reçu le 10 janvier est énoncé dans la lettre de mandat publiée le 1er février, n'est-ce pas?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le 10 janvier, je travaillais en vertu de la lettre de mandat publiée à ce moment-là.

M. Scott Reid:

Il s'agissait donc de celle de la ministre Monsef? D'accord. Voilà une information utile. Vous n'avez pas reçu votre lettre de mandat le 10 janvier, alors.

Permettez-moi de vous poser la question suivante, maintenant que nous avons établi que vous avez reçu une nouvelle lettre de mandat après le10 janvier.

Le Cabinet s'est réuni à Calgary vers le 24 janvier. Cette réunion a fait l'objet d'une fuite de renseignements. On nous a indiqué que vous avez préconisé avec ferveur de ne pas tenir de référendum sur la réforme électorale et que vos arguments ont convaincu tous les membres du Cabinet à l'exception d'un seul. Il y a eu un seul vote dissident.

Aviez-vous votre lettre de mandat à ce moment-là ou travailliez-vous en vertu de l'ancienne lettre de mandat de la ministre Monsef quand vous avez présenté vos arguments au Cabinet?

(1245)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je travaillais en vertu de la lettre de mandat qui était publique au moment où ces échanges ont eu lieu, mais je ne peux formuler de commentaires sur les discussions du Cabinet.

M. Scott Reid:

Non, vous ne le pouvez pas, pas plus que ne le peut la personne responsable de la fuite. Voilà qui soulève des questions à savoir pourquoi il y avait deux sources libérales distinctes, selon l'information rapportée.

J'ai demandé à la leader à la Chambre pourquoi il n'y avait pas d'enquête, ce à quoi elle m'a répondu qu'on n'en menait pas. Bien entendu, la réponse, c'est que le premier ministre a autorisé cette manoeuvre, ce qui est un manque total de professionnalisme. Sans être vraiment illégal, cela enfreint certainement les conventions.

Cela ne répond toutefois pas à ma question. Je pense que nous avons établi que vous avez reçu votre lettre de mandat — celle publiée le 1er février — quelque part entre le 24 ou le 25 janvier et le 1er février. C'est ce que vous semblez indiquer. Est-ce exact? C'est à ce moment-là que vous avez reçu le nouvelle lettre de mandat, pas l'ancienne...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Vous me...

Le président:

Vous ne disposez que de 10 secondes, madame la ministre.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Vous me prêtez des propos que je n'ai pas prononcés. Ce que je dis, c'est que la lettre de mandat a été publiée le 1er février et que je travaillais en vertu de la lettre de mandat qui était publique à l'époque.

M. Scott Reid:

Il devait donc s'agit de celle de la ministre Monsef...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C'est... oui.

M. Scott Reid:

... parce qu'il n'en existe pas d'autres. J'ai l'information publique moi aussi, et il n'existe que cette lettre et celle publiée le 1er février. C'est donc l'une ou l'autre. Je pense que vous venez de nous indiquer que c'était la lettre de la ministre Monsef, ce que j'accepte d'emblée. Est-ce que je fais erreur?

Le président:

Votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je veux commencer en réagissant à une observation que M. Cullen a formulée au sujet de l'équilibre entre les sexes. La question ne se limite pas à cela. Le gouvernement a promis d'assurer l'équilibre entre les sexes, et ici même, trois membres du Comité sont des femmes, toutes d'allégeance libérale. Au sein du Comité de réforme électorale, seulement deux partis ont fourni des femmes: le Parti libéral et le Parti vert. Je tenais à le souligner, mais ce n'est pas dans cette voie que je veux m'engager.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez indiqué que vous voudriez recevoir notre rapport sur le rapport du directeur général des élections d'ici la fin de juin ou, de préférence, d'ici le 19 mai, ce que je peux comprendre. Comme la présente séance est télévisée, pourriez-vous expliquer, à l'intention de ceux qui nous regardent, comment le processus se déroule par la suite? Comment en arrive-t-on à l'étape du projet de loi, pourquoi il est important de procéder ainsi dans le cadre du processus, pour vous, le Cabinet et Élections Canada, afin d'être prêts pour des élections, et pourquoi un délai comme celui-ci est par conséquent important pour nous?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il ne s'agit pas d'un délai ferme, bien entendu. C'est au Comité qu'il revient d'établir l'échéancier de ses travaux. Simplement, j'accorde de l'importance à ses observations, car je considère qu'il apporte de précieuses contributions à ce sujet. Le fait qu'il puisse contribuer pleinement au processus législatif me serait donc d'une aide précieuse, et je pense qu'il serait utile que les Canadiens entendent l'opinion du Comité et ses réflexions au cours de cette période.

Des élections se tiendront en octobre 2019. Élections Canada a besoin de temps pour mettre en oeuvre des recommandations ou des modifications potentielles à la Loi électorale du Canada à temps pour ces élections. Même si nous n'avons pas établi d'échéancier, nous savons qu'il lui faudra probablement un certain nombre de mois, voire davantage. Plus Élections Canada disposera de temps, plus l'organisme et ses fonctionnaires dévoués pourront s'assurer de faire un travail adéquat.

Mais auparavant, il faut qu'un projet de loi ait été adopté au cours de la prochaine année ou année et demie. Il faut donc que ce projet de loi soit déposé à l'automne, peut-être, ou d'ici la fin de l'année au plus tard pour qu'il puisse passer par tout le processus législatif, dans le cadre duquel il sera notamment soumis à l'examen d'un comité et débattu au Parlement. Il faut qu'il ait préalablement été rédigé et examiné par le Cabinet.

Nous disposons donc d'un délai de deux ans et demi. Je sais que ce projet de loi est important. Il comprend des éléments, cruciaux pour tous les membres du Comité, que nous voulons régler à temps pour les prochaines élections afin de nous assurer que tous les citoyens canadiens bénéficient d'un accès juste et d'une possibilité équitable afin de voter.

(1250)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il est donc évident que si nous sommes encore en train de mener cette étude dans un an, il sera un peu trop tard pour y donner suite.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le Comité est responsable de ses propres travaux, mais je pense que sa contribution est importante. Il vaudrait la peine, selon moi, de connaître ses opinions afin de les prendre en compte dans le cadre des prochaines démarches. J'espère donc pouvoir les recevoir afin d'étayer les réflexions et les recommandations que je présenterai au gouvernement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est excellent.

J'aimerais faire brièvement une autre remarque. Vous avez énuméré de nombreuses clauses du rapport au sujet desquelles vous souhaitez connaître notre opinion. Je vous en remercie. Il nous sera fort utile dans l'avenir de connaître les priorités, car je pense qu'il nous reste encore beaucoup de pain sur la planche dans le cadre de l'examen de ce rapport. Nous attendons encore des réponses sur des sujets dont nous avons déjà discuté. Je ne peux entrer davantage dans les détails, mais je vous remercie vraiment de comparaître pour discuter avec nous.

Je sais que Scott Simms commençait à se réchauffer, et je veux savoir s'il veut disposer d'une dernière minute pour terminer son intervention.

Le président:

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Quelqu'un d'autre fait preuve de courtoisie.

Merci, David.

J'allais faire remarquer que dans les petites régions — et ici encore, je ne cherche pas à obtenir une réponse immédiatement —, vous vous apercevrez que le superviseur du centre de scrutin a le pouvoir d'agir à titre de répondant. Il est bizarre qu'une personne qui en connaît une autre depuis 40 ans ne puisse répondre d'elle, comme si elle ne la connaissait pas. C'est quelque chose qui est devenu courant dans les régions rurales.

Mais si un superviseur ou un titulaire d'un poste équivalent était autorisé à agir à titre de répondant à maintes reprises en prêtant serment et en apposant sa signature en vertu des mesures juridiques nécessaires, cela serait fort utile, particulièrement en région rurale.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci, Scott. Votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai une autre occasion d'intervenir; nous pouvons donc poursuivre. Au cours du dernier tour, je me suis lancé dans une petite diatribe à laquelle vous n'avez pas eu l'occasion de répondre. Je voulais me montrer juste, bien entendu, et vous donner la possibilité de le faire.

Pour vous rappeler où nous en étions, j'ai, entre-temps, examiné de nouveau la transcription de votre comparution devant le Sénat. Je pense que les extraits suivants résument fort bien ce à quoi je faisais référence; je peux vous laisser réagir par la suite. Vous répondiez à une question de la sénatrice Frum.

Comme je pense l'avoir souligné précédemment, vous avez indiqué qu'en ce qui concerne l'apport de fonds étrangers dans le processus politique canadien, il est crucial de savoir que le Canada dispose de lois très strictes en matière de financement. Vous avez présenté le même argument plus tôt quand je vous ai demandé qui peut faire un don à un parti politique, un tiers ou un candidat en période des brefs. Le fait qu'il s'agisse de la période des brefs est, de toute évidence, primordiale ici.

En réaction à ces propos, madame la ministre, la sénatrice Frum a exprimé très succinctement la préoccupation que j'ai à ce sujet quand elle vous a posé la question suivante: Madame la ministre, conviendriez-vous qu'il soit possible, pour des entités étrangères, de faire des dons à des organisations de tierce partie en dehors de la période des brefs, que cet argent peut être utilisé pendant la période des brefs, qu'il s'agit là de l'échappatoire à laquelle je faisais référence et que cela constitue une menace très grave à notre souveraineté politique?

Vous l'avez alors remerciée de sa question et indiqué que d'après votre expérience, vous considériez que de telles pratiques n'avaient pas actuellement cours, mais que c'était une question importante, car cela pourrait avoir une influence sur les élections. Vous avez ensuite ajouté que vous preniez bonne note de sa remarque, que vous la remerciiez de l'avoir formulée et que c'était une question sur laquelle vous vous pencheriez certainement.

Plus tard au cours de la même séance, vous avez répondu ce qui suit à la sénatrice Batters sur le même sujet: Je continuerai de travailler avec mon personnel et mes collègues des deux chambres pour que nous imposions des limites raisonnables aux dépenses des tiers entre les élections.

Il semble donc que d'un côté, vous fassiez peu de cas de la question en affirmant qu'il n'y a pas lieu de s'inquiéter, alors que de l'autre, vous indiquez que vous en tiendrez compte et que vous considérez qu'il faut instaurer des limites raisonnables aux dépenses des tiers entre les élections. Je tente de comprendre votre position à ce sujet. Avez-vous ou non des préoccupations à cet égard et pensez-vous ou non qu'il faille intervenir? Que vous répondiez par oui ou par non, expliquez-nous pourquoi.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci une fois encore de votre question, monsieur Blake.

Pour répondre à votre première question sur la possibilité que des fonds étrangers servent à des fins publicitaires en période électorale, à l'heure actuelle, les tiers doivent signaler à Élections Canada tous les dons qu'ils reçoivent six mois avant l'annonce du bref. C'est le mécanisme en place actuellement. Bien entendu, je cherche toujours à voir si nous pensons qu'il y a là un problème qui soulève des préoccupations. Pour l'heure, rien n'indique qu'il y a lieu de s'inquiéter à ce sujet, mais je serais ravie d'entendre vos préoccupations et de recevoir les preuves que vous pourriez avoir et qui laisseraient penser qu'il y a un problème à cet égard.

(1255)

M. Blake Richards:

Traite-t-on de la question dans l'information que vous avez promis de remettre au Comité? Est-ce un point qui y est abordé? Vous dites que vous examinerez la question. De toute évidence, cela signifie que vous avez l'intention de vous pencher sur le sujet. La séance d'information a peut-être eu lieu depuis les réunions du 7 et du 14 février. Est-ce une question qui a été abordée dans l'information? Vous a-t-on pleinement informée à ce sujet? Considérez-vous maintenant qu'il n'y a pas lieu d'intervenir ou est-ce une question que vous continuerez d'examiner?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il en était question dans l'information, mais d'après les conseils que nous avons reçus, nous ne pensons pas qu'il y ait là une menace imminente au Canada. Cela ne signifie pas que nous cesserons de nous intéresser à la question, car je crois qu'elle est importante. Il ne s'agit toutefois pas d'un problème grave.

Voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Blake Richards:

Je vous laisserai répondre, mais je veux ajouter brièvement quelque chose.

Les avis semblent certainement diverger à ce sujet. Certains affirmeraient que c'est un problème. Certaines organisations ont...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je serais heureuse de recevoir les exemples ou les propositions que vous avez à ce sujet.

M. Blake Richards:

Laissez-moi terminer, car il se peut qu'il y ait vraiment un problème. Les informations dont vous disposez indiquent peut-être le contraire, et c'est, à l'évidence, la raison pour laquelle nous vous demandons de nous communiquer votre information. Ne conviendriez-vous pas qu'il se peut qu'il y ait certainement un problème à cet égard? Si ce n'en est pas déjà un, ne voyez-vous pas comment cela pourrait être un problème au cours de nos élections? Si une entité étrangère pouvait, de fait, donner des sommes illimitées d'argent à un tiers avant des élections, ces fonds pourraient être dépensés pendant une période électorale. Ne voyez-vous pas alors...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Mais il existe des plafonds aux dépenses que les tiers peuvent effectuer pendant une période des brefs, lesquels s'appliquent à tous les partis au Canada. Je pense qu'il importe d'examiner la question en tenant compte également du cadre réglementaire et législatif dans son ensemble. Cela étant dit, je considère qu'il est toujours important, pour une démocratie, un gouvernement, un pays et des citoyens de constamment réfléchir à certaines situations et de les avoir à l'oeil.

Le président:

Merci, madame la ministre. Le temps est écoulé.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Chan.

M. Arnold Chan:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Je tiens vraiment à vous dire que je vous suis reconnaissant de témoigner aujourd'hui.

Je veux faire suite aux questions que mon collègue David Graham avait commencé à vous poser sur les délais. Vous avez donné un délai précis, celui du 19 mai. Or, le Comité a reçu des informations indiquant qu'il pourrait devoir entreprendre d'autres travaux d'envergure également. Si j'aborde le sujet, c'est simplement parce que j'essaie de voir comment nous pourrions faire face à ce qui pourrait subitement s'avérer être une charge de travail considérable. Je veux comprendre. Voulez-vous que nous ayons achevé l'examen du rapport du directeur général des élections et fait rapport à la Chambre d'ici le 19 mai?

C'est ma première question. La deuxième concerne le projet de loi C-33, que la Chambre ne nous a, bien sûr, pas encore renvoyé aux fins d'examen. Vaudrait-il la peine que nous en fassions un examen préalable en présumant qu'il nous arrivera presque intact?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci de me poser ces deux questions.

Je le répète, le Comité est responsable de son propre plan de travail. Il me serait toutefois très utile de recevoir un autre rapport provisoire, puisque je considère le premier fort utile. Dans l'avenir, il serait particulièrement utile que le Comité mette l'accent sur les recommandations que j'ai mises en exergue pendant mon exposé. Comme le rapport contient 130 recommandations, j'admets que c'est une tâche colossale. Vous ne les aurez peut-être pas toutes étudiées d'ici la date butoir, mais si vous pouviez fournir quelques réflexions et des conseils à propos de certaines d'entre elles, je vous en serais reconnaissante. Vous n'examinerez peut-être pas toutes celles que j'ai énumérées, même si j'aimerais que vous les étudiiez toutes. J'espère recevoir autant de conseils que vous êtes capables d'en formuler d'ici la date butoir, car cela m'aidera dans l'avenir.

M. Arnold Chan:

En ce qui concerne le premier rapport provisoire, nous avons, de toute évidence, demandé une réponse de votre cabinet ou de votre part au sujet des recommandations que nous voulons présenter à la Chambre. Je suppose que nous poursuivrons dans la même voie à mesure que nous examinons le reste du rapport afin d'en faire rapport. Pourriez-vous vous engager à nous répondre aussi rapidement que possible, certainement avant le 19 mai? Tout dépend, bien entendu, de la date à laquelle nous déposons notre rapport à la Chambre, par exemple. J'admets que nous devons vous accorder un délai raisonnable pour nous répondre, mais le fait que vous nous donniez une réponse exhaustive nous aiderait, de toute évidence, à planifier notre travail. J'ai l'impression qu'au rythme auquel nous allons maintenant, nous ne respecterons pas le délai; nous devrons donc peut-être revoir la manière dont nous travaillions pour vous remettre le rapport le plus complet possible. La question à laquelle je veux en venir est la suivante: prévoyez-vous prendre d'autres mesures législatives, que notre comité vous remette un rapport ou non?

(1300)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je m'efforcerai de vous répondre dans les plus brefs délais. Je pense que c'est une priorité. C'est possible, selon les recommandations que comprendront les rapports subséquents sur les recommandations du directeur général des élections. Il s'agit, bien entendu, d'un sujet que je devrais soumettre au Cabinet, pour ensuite en faire rapport.

Je pense en outre que certains éléments du rapport du directeur général des élections exigeraient des modifications législatives; si nous sommes favorables à cette approche, nous envisagerions d'entamer un processus en ce sens.

M. Arnold Chan:

D'accord. Je pense que mon temps est écoulé.

Le président:

Il nous reste une dernière intervention de trois minutes, que fera M. Christopherson, puis la séance prendra fin.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. Merci, monsieur le président, de vous être assuré que nous puissions nous prévaloir de notre dernière intervention. Je céderai mon temps à mon collègue, monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, David.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, pardonnez-moi d'être quelque peu mêlé. Revenons en arrière.

Au sein du Comité, chaque fois d'un ministre invoque l'équivalent canadien du cinquième amendement, nous sourcillons un peu et nous nous demandons ce qu'il se passe.

Il y a eu deux mandats. Le premier, l'ancien, indiquait que le gouvernement s'engageait à entreprendre une réforme électorale et à instaurer un nouveau système électoral avant les prochaines élections, alors que le second annonçait que le gouvernement, faisant machine arrière, rompait sa promesse et faisait autre chose.

Vous avez été nommée au Cabinet le 10 janvier, n'est-ce pas?

D'accord.

Le Cabinet s'est ensuite réuni les 24 et 25 janvier, et vous avez reçu votre nouvelle lettre de mandat le 1er février.

Est-ce que j'ai tout bien compris jusqu'à présent?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Je veux simplement m'assurer que je comprends bien les faits.

Vous pouvez comprendre pourquoi certains d'entre nous se demandent pourquoi vous ne pouvez tout simplement pas nous dire quand vous avez reçu la nouvelle lettre de mandat.

À un moment donné, aviez-vous une ancienne lettre de mandat, celle qui indiquait à la ministre Monsef de respecter la promesse de réforme électorale? Avez-vous reçu une deuxième lettre qui n'était pas encore rendue publique?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

La lettre de mandat a été rendue publique le 1er février, date à laquelle le premier ministre et moi-même avons annoncé la nouvelle orientation de la lettre de mandat. Les choses se déroulent en conséquence...

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... depuis, et je suis impatiente d'honorer cette lettre de mandat, de servir la population canadienne et de travailler avec votre comité pour m'assurer que nous...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous avons déjà entendu cela.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... modifions la Loi électorale du Canada pour abroger les éléments inéquitables...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous y voilà.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... de la soi-disant Loi sur l'intégrité des élections. Je suis impatiente d'accomplir ce bon travail, car nous devons travailler ensemble...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Madame la ministre, le temps m'est compté.

À la fin de votre exposé, vous avez exprimé le souhait sincère de travailler avec nous. Cela m'a fait sourciller, car ce sont presque exactement les propos que vous m'avez tenus le soir précédant la date où vous êtes revenue sur la promesse de votre gouvernement. Vous m'aviez affirmé alors que vous souhaitiez sincèrement travailler avec nous afin d'entreprendre la réforme électorale.

À l'époque, quand vous meniez des consultations auprès de moi et des conservateurs de l'opposition officielle, quand vous appeliez des groupes comme le Mouvement pour la représentation équitable au Canada et À l'action en disant sincèrement vouloir travailler avec eux, saviez-vous que vous alliez rompre la promesse de réforme électorale?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je souhaite toujours sincèrement travailler avec vous, car je pense que nous pouvons faire bien des choses pour améliorer le système électoral du Canada. C'est précisément ce que j'espère pouvoir accomplir avec votre comité.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Mais sincérité va aussi de pair avec intégrité et honnêteté...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

J'ai un mandat à exécuter. Je dois travailler à cette fin, et je pense qu'il sera vraiment important de bénéficier de l'apport précieux de votre comité pour bien faire les choses.

(1305)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous devez comprendre qu'il est ironique d'être ministre des Institutions démocratiques et de ne pas faire preuve de transparence.

Si, en fait, vous aviez un deuxième mandat conflictuel en votre possession quand vous vous adressiez à moi ou à d'autres personnes qui s'intéressent à la question, ou quand vous défendiez une position au sein du Cabinet, ce serait en contradiction totale avec l'esprit dans lequel votre gouvernement a été élu.

Le président:

Merci, Nathan. Je suis désolé, mais votre temps est écoulé.

Nous voudrions remercier la ministre d'avoir comparu. Nous remercions également les membres de son personnel qui l'accompagnaient.

Nous sommes impatients de tenir notre prochaine séance afin de nous attaquer à notre rapport sur la réforme électorale.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on March 09, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.