header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-03-07 PROC 53

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning, everyone. The Speaker's time is very valuable, and we don't want to miss the opportunity to ask questions, so we'll try to start on time.

Welcome to the 53rd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. The meeting is being televised. Today the committee is studying the supplementary estimates (C) for 2016-17 and vote 1c under Parliamentary Protective Service.

We are pleased to have with us today the Honourable Geoff Regan, Speaker of the House of Commons. He is accompanied by officials from the Parliamentary Protective Service: Superintendent Mike O'Beirne, acting director, and Robert Graham, administration and personnel officer.

Just so that committee members know, the main estimates have also been tabled. We can do those at some time soon.

Mr. Speaker, the floor is yours. I know you're a very busy man. We're delighted you're here today. Thank you.

Hon. Geoff Regan (Speaker of the House of Commons):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. I'm delighted to be back at the procedure and House affairs committee, where I spent some quality time while I was the parliamentary secretary to the government House leader between 2001 and 2003. It's nice to be back again, this time of course answering questions, or trying to, instead of asking them.

I'm pleased to be here with Superintendent Mike O'Beirne, the acting director of the Parliamentary Protective Service, and Mr. Robert Graham, the acting corporate services officer for the protective service. We're also joined by other members of the PPS management team: Superintendent Alain Laniel, the officer in charge of operational support; Inspector Marie-Claude Côté, the officer in charge of operations; and, Melissa Rusk, executive officer and senior adviser to the director.

Since its creation on June 23, 2015, the PPS has made significant progress in unifying the Parliament Hill physical security mandate and in establishing itself as a single and independent parliamentary entity. Over the course of fiscal year 2016-17, its first full financial cycle, the PPS has implemented a series of new operational and organizational initiatives while addressing the complexities of the evolving external security environment.[Translation]

In September 2016, a supplementary budget request of $7 million was approved to support ongoing costs for Parliament Hill security, one-time initial costs for the launch of resources optimization initiatives, and the requirements stemming from organizational structure developments.

In support of PPS' determination to build on the progress to date, which includes further strengthening its capacity to support an autonomous security service throughout the Parliamentary Precinct and the grounds of Parliament Hill, I am here to present PPS' supplementary estimates (C) and main estimates requests.[English]

I'll begin by providing an overview of the PPS supplementary estimates (C) request, which totals $2.39 million, including a total voted budgetary requirement of $2.3 million and a statutory budgetary component of $90,000 to fund the employee benefit plan.

The total voted budgetary requirement is related to funding for an operational contingency fund and additional administrative requirements.

The PPS is seeking an operational contingency fund in the amount of $2.1 million dollars, which will be used for operational requirements not anticipated earlier in the year, including security for the Canada 150 celebrations on December 31, 2016, and for future requirements that may occur prior to the fiscal year-end.

(1105)

[Translation]

In addition to the operational contingency fund, we are requesting a sum of $200,000 to fund administrative requirements. This includes funding for payroll, language training, and Employee Assistance Program services that the House of Commons Administration is providing to PPS on a cost-recovery basis throughout the 2016-2017 fiscal year.

Due to external labour relations factors, including delays associated with the negotiations surrounding the future collective bargaining units, PPS is requesting funds to cover the anticipated additional external legal services.[English]

I hope I'm not going too fast for the interpreters, who I know do a fabulous job, but it can be challenging with someone who speaks as quickly as I do.

Let us now turn our attention to the PPS's main estimates request for 2017-18, which totals $68.2 million. This includes a voted budget component of $62.1 million and a $6.1-million statutory budget requirement for the employee benefits plan.

This 2017-18 main estimates request represents a $6.1-million increase over the PPS's 2016-17 main estimates submission. In addition to its permanent voted budget of $56.3 million, which was approved in the 2016-17 main estimates and established as a result of Bill C-59, the PPS is seeking an additional $6.1 million in permanent funding to support the ongoing implementation of security enhancements and to further stabilize its organizational structure.

Several reviews were conducted following the events of October 22, 2014, resulting in 161 recommendations for the improvement of security on Parliament Hill. The PPS received temporary funding approval in September 2016 to launch its mobile response team, or MRT, initiative. The implementation of this initiative will address a significant number of these 161 recommendations and enhance the PPS's overall response capacity. PPS is requesting permanent funding in the amount of $1.2 million to further implement and sustain the needs of this initiative.

To support the continuation of the Senate's previously approved security enhancement initiatives, additional funding in the amount of $787,000 will be transferred to the PPS on April 1, 2017, given the direct alignment with the PPS's mandate.[Translation]

PPS is also seeking permanent funding in the amount of $3 million to stabilize the protective posture in the newly reopened Wellington Building, and to uphold pre-existing third party security agreements throughout the Precinct.

Given the anticipated increase in the number of visitors to the Precinct and grounds of Parliament Hill throughout Canada's 150th anniversary celebrations, a total of $400,000 in temporary funding is required to support the costs of the baggage screening facility at 90 Wellington through 2017-2018. This renewed temporary funding request will not only enhance the visitor experience but will enable PPS to evaluate this facility's effectiveness, feasibility and long-term sustainability.

This results in a cumulative request of $5.3 million for previously approved and new security enhancement initiatives throughout the Parliamentary Precinct and the grounds of Parliament Hill.

(1110)

[English]

In addition to the aforementioned funding request for operational enhancement initiatives, the PPS is seeking a permanent increase of $886,000 to fund a series of corporate service requirements. This includes funding for full-time communications resources to support the PPS's internal and external messaging, along with the funding that is necessary to fulfill its existing service-level agreements with the House administration for the provision of human resources, as well as information and technical services.

In closing, the PPS remains steadfast in its commitment to operational excellence through the provision of professional physical security services throughout the parliamentary precinct and the grounds of Parliament Hill, something that I think is very important. It's certainly important to me for the security of everyone who works here and all those who visit us here.

To further enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of its service delivery model, the PPS will focus on the ongoing implementation of existing and new resource optimization initiatives, the identification of opportunities to leverage innovation, and a strengthened commitment to collaboration with its various parliamentary partners.

This concludes my overview of the PPS's supplementary estimates (C) and 2017-18 main estimates request, Mr. Chair. I look forward, and we look forward, to the questions that are to come.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. You were informative, as always. You did make some comments on the main estimates, which was great as background, but today the committee has been prepared for only the supplementary estimates of the PPS, which I hope will be our topic of questioning. Hopefully, we'll have you back soon for the main estimates.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. It's a pleasure to be here, after having worked for you.

I want to understand a bit more about PPS. I was here before the merger, as were you, and I would like to understand, administratively, what were the changes. When PPS was created, it was no longer part of the House of Commons directly.

What is the administrative structure for pay and benefits, and all these things now? Is there a completely separate organization for that from the House of Commons? Has that all been recreated for the PPS?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I was speaking earlier about some of the things whereby funding will be provided to the House of Commons administration to pay for the services it provides the PPS, like human resources, for example. There are a variety of things wherein the House of Commons has existing setups and administration that deals with this kind of stuff. Rather than creating a whole new set for the PPS, it's obviously more efficient to share that.

I'll let Superintendent O'Beirne continue, and fill you in further, and be more accurate, I'm sure.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We're all about details at procedure and House affairs.

Superintendent Mike O'Beirne (Acting Director, Parliamentary Protective Service):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Certainly, the coming together of all three entities to form the PPS was of the operational resources, predominantly. That meant having to turn ourselves to look at optimizing how best to create the behind-the-scenes operational support services and/or administrative or corporate services.

As mentioned in the Speaker's opening remarks, there are some service-level agreements that are currently under way with the House of Commons to provide HR services and IT support functions. As mentioned, that's to avoid duplication and to ensure that existing services are optimized and maximized.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there anywhere in PPS where there are now officers serving where civilians had been in those positions prior to the merger?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Where civilians had been previously?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, administratively or anywhere in the structure of PPS that had been run by civilians before the merger of PPS, is there anything that is now run by uniformed officers.

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

We have personnel operating in operational units. For example, we have training units and planning units. These personnel are made up of our operational folks who came together from all three previously separate entities, but they are not in administrative roles per se. They are in operational functions, which means they are the ones who are at the range on a daily basis. They are the ones who are deploying the actual kinetic training exercises.

From a planning perspective, the integrated planning unit is also made up of our operational personnel. They are the ones who attend all of the operational meetings, the planning mechanisms, with internal and external partners. They operationalize the plan on the day of an event. They're on the ground with our operational folks and commanders.

As far as other positions are concerned, let's say you're referring to purely administrative functions like corporate functions and things like that, perhaps I'll turn it over to Mr. Graham. We don't have personnel actively involved in those administrative-only positions.

(1115)

Mr. Robert Graham (Administration and Personnel Officer, Parliamentary Protective Service):

If we're talking about finance and HR, I can't think of any instance where a constable is working in an administrative capacity right now.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do we have enough PPS officers on the floor right now? Are we fully staffed?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

The PPS will always continue to use all its existing resources, and distribute them throughout our area of operation to maximize them in accordance with our established priorities, to continue ensuring an open and accessible Parliament, and combining that with a very real need for security.

That said, we have to be very nimble in our approach to future demands. We're in constant consultations with internal and external partners to determine exactly that resource level. That continues every day.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I think it's invaluable to understand that it takes time. If there's a decision to add some people, for example, in view of certain circumstances, that takes time. In fact, it takes as much as 10 months from the time you start saying, okay, we have to prepare for this, to the process whereby you select people, train them, get them equipped, etc. That's a long period. The PPS is constantly adjusting as a result of that and dealing with changes. If someone gets sick or gets another job, there are changes. It's a situation of constant adjustment. Sometimes that leads to overtime, for instance, but the objective really is to try to make sure that the staff is there if necessary so you don't have to have people doing much overtime.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you have a sense of how many people are doing overtime these days?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

Well, if you are looking for an absolute numerical value, I don't have that information with me today. I could provide that at a later time.

Mr. Robert Graham:

Sorry, could you repeat the question?

A voice: How many people are doing overtime basically?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

On a daily basis.

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

Yes, we can provide that information to you in a follow-up document. But on a daily basis, we have to be responsive to the events that are occurring every single day on Parliament Hill and in various areas around the precinct. That, combined with external factors like the global threat environment, always positions us to have to be very responsive. If I can take a step back, certainly after the events of October 22, there was a posture change on Parliament Hill. We're looking at ensuring that we continue to resource those changes effectively and optimize every resource as best as possible.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there any—

The Chair:

Sorry, David, your time is up.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Thank you. I may have time to continue later.

The Chair: Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, all, for joining us here today.

Going over your report, I see that in the contingency fund there is the amount of $2.1 million to be used for operational requirements that were not anticipated earlier in the year, including security for Canada's 150th celebrations. I'm assuming, obviously, this has been planned for years and that you've been looking at all kinds of scenarios. I recognize that you can't go into too much detail, but have other challenges come up that have resulted in these additional funds being put aside?

(1120)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Well, every year is different. Things come up that you may not know in advance of that year but that you have to prepare for. Obviously last year, for example, we had the visit of President Obama, which led to additional expense.

As for what other kinds of events will happen during the course of this year, but that we don't know about yet, is a good question. But I think it's important that we prepare for that.

Is there anything else we need to add to that?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Do the funds being set aside for the baggage screening machine include staff as well or is that just for the machine requirements?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

It does include the staff as well, sir.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Just out of curiosity more than anything else, with the 150th anniversary coming up and a whole bunch of things, will overtime be used more regularly given that we're expecting, I would assume, more visitors around Parliament Hill, in the area? Will overtime be used? Obviously you can't hire more officers just for a short period—or maybe you can.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Well, it's not a plan to temporarily increase the size of the force, for instance, for the time around July 1 or during the course of the summer. However, for large events we co-operate with other police forces like the Ottawa Police Service or the RCMP who can supplement us.

I'll let Mike add to that.

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

That's correct. We have a good understanding of the events that will be taking place in our area of operation in and around Parliament Hill. However, we're always in constant discussions with the partners on this, internally and externally, to really get a good understanding of the scope and magnitude of them. This will inform our personnel requirements. As Mr. Speaker mentioned, we do call upon some partners to assist us when and as required.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Obviously, when a bunch of tourists are walking around, they're not always in the right spot when wandering and what have you, and that's going to have to be dealt with as people converge.

Something else that has come up in previous meetings is access to the building for MPs, for senators, and for staff. Is that still something you have made a priority, with regard to ensuring that access is there and privileges are met?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Absolutely.

Part of the ongoing training of members is understanding, for instance, the privileges of members of Parliament and the importance of letting them get to where they need to be, along with their staff who need to work on the Hill and within the precinct.

Do you have anything to add to that?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

There's just one final point.

That is certainly our main effort on a daily basis. We ensure that we emphasize that as part of any of our operational plans. We include contingency plans in the event that there are many visitors or there is a blockage of the lower drive so that we can try to deal with those.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

A key point that is made is to understand how important it is for members of Parliament to be able to do the things they must do in order to act on behalf of their constituents. That's what it's all about.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Building on that, has PPS encountered any challenges in its planning? Are there issues that you may not have been able to find a solution for? Is there anything at all? Is everything moving smoothly?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

If I can speak in general terms, I think as far as challenges go, one of our ongoing challenges is to ensure the seamless integration of all the previously separate entities so that we're able to provide a world-class security service.

That includes ensuring the cultural integration of all our folks. We've had some great initiatives in the last while to deal with those challenges. Since the commissioning of the 180 Wellington building, our folks are beginning to co-locate there, which has led to combined and integrated briefings and the rapid exchange of information, which is critical for entities such as ours or for any organization really.

I think another challenge is, perhaps, external pressures, or external points that we are constantly trying to be nimble in our response to. They include, as Mr. Speaker mentioned, the Canada 150 events that are coming. There are also the requirements to position ourselves to respond to LTVP pressures and to the very real global threat environment.

These are challenges that we keep at the forefront of our attention everyday.

(1125)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Did the events of this past weekend prove to be a kind of training or observation opportunity for you with Crashed Ice going on just off Parliament Hill?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Were you in it?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I was not participating in that. I would like to think that I'm smarter than that.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

You're sticking to running, right?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Exactly.

Did that provide an opportunity to see what it would look like when people are in mass numbers around Parliament Hill, trying to get various views, and what you could be facing as we get into the summer months?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

Certainly it gave us another glimpse into what we can expect moving forward as the summer months come and as we move towards Canada Day, which is promising to be a grand event.

Specifically to the Red Bull Crashed Ice event, it unfolded without any incident. That's largely due to the great co-operation between the PPS, Ottawa city police, and the RCMP. These three entities were all involved in the pre-planning phase. Certainly in the execution phase of the event, there was kind of a multi-jurisdictional effort. That's a model we continue to build on. We learn from every event. We take best practices and incorporate them into future events.

That certainly has positioned us for future successes.

The Chair:

Thank you, Jamie.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you very much, Chair.

Mr. Speaker, it's good to see you, sir, and your delegation.

If I may, I would like to touch on the new screening process. I assume it has been covered in some of this. As you know, there have been some serious concerns raised about this whole new issue.

I want to draw attention to your remarks, Speaker, in the last paragraph of page 1 at the bottom, where you refer to supporting an autonomous security service.

In camera, you and I have had discussions about just how autonomous this is, and if I get time I'll come back to that, because it's anything but. However, I would like to ask you just what the current status of the suggested new screening process is, sir.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Well, there are two kinds of screening. There's the screening of people who will arrive in buildings like this one, and there is the screening of personnel who are here on an ongoing basis. Of course, both are important and both have a role. At the same time, it's important that we respect certain institutions, such as the media, and work out arrangements that make sense from all perspectives.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If I may, sir, of the two areas that have jumped out so far, one, of course, is the media itself, through the press gallery, their organized representative body, and also people who work for members here, or may in the future. They're raising serious concerns that tie into the notion of being autonomous.

Once we start getting into anything to do with the RCMP, we see that it is not autonomous at all. Nobody suggests that the RCMP is autonomous, and yet they're responsible for security in this building.

We still have this facade of an independent security service, but at the end of the day, in a crisis, when the rubber hits the road, the Prime Minister will dictate to the RCMP commissioner, who will then issue orders that will be followed. If they have time, I'm sure they'll loop in the Speaker, but if it's a big enough emergency, sir...and we've had some of these discussions in camera, which I can't divulge.

The reason I'm raising that, sir, is that once we start bringing in the press gallery, the free press—and we see the issue of defending the right of the press in a free democracy roiling away south of us—who decides what the threshold is going to be as to who gets accredited?

Now we have linked the ability of the press to be in the building to do their job with the ultimate control of the security service that's going to decide whether or not they are entitled to a badge to work here.

Help me and others to understand why this shouldn't be a concern when it certainly seems like it is.

(1130)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Well, I've certainly had discussions on this topic. I must say, though, there are....

You referred to some of the conversations we've had during in camera meetings, and some aspects of this, of course, would have to be in camera.

I think Superintendent O'Beirne is probably better placed to make the assessment of which comments might fit into each category in that sense, so I'm going to let him respond to your questions, if I may.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It rolls downhill you know.

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

Thank you, sir.

I think you have brought up quite a few points, and if I may, I'll try to address each one.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

I do believe that while there are some linkages, there are some aspects that are completely separate.

In regard to the involvement of the RCMP in the PPS, while, again, we could probably expand on this in another forum, the amendments to the Parliament of Canada Act, and the subsequent MOU were very deliberate in ensuring that the trilateral governance was in place. This ensures that rights and privileges are absolute.

There is no conceivable environment where the director of the PPS would be asked to contravene an existing piece of legislation. If I can tie that into your comment about the press and the security clearances there, I will say that the RCMP is simply a service provider in that regard.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm sorry to interrupt. I don't mean to be rude.

But the criteria for what will be acceptable in terms of security, who will make that decision?

And by the way, I don't accept any of this, that there is this independence and all that. We've been through this. I'd love to do it in public, to go through the actual command and control and who does what. At the end of the day, I think it's very clear that King Charles would be thrilled with this kind of a set-up. Let's just put it that way. I can only hope that some day Parliament takes back it's autonomous control of security.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Let me tell you that I don't forget William Lenthall and what he said to King Charles. In fact, it's something that I very often quote because, as you may know, the face of Speaker Lenthall is in the ceiling of my office. So he looks down upon me and reminds me often of the importance of the autonomy, independence, and authority of the House of Commons in relation to the executive.

Since you mentioned King Charles, I couldn't resist.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Fair enough, but let's hope that we return to a day where Parliament actually has sovereign autonomy over its own security services, which at this second we do not.

So would you continue, please. Who sets the criteria to decide whether or not a journalist is allowed to conduct their profession here on the Hill? How will that—

Hon. Geoff Regan:

It's actually not the PPS, but the Corporate Security Office. You might want to have us come back some time when I have Mr. McDonell with me to talk about that some more.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay. How does one find out how they set these, and where is the input to decide whether or not the thresholds are fair?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

In fact, there are discussions going on right now between the Corporate Security Office and the press gallery to work out what those rules should be. I think we're moving in a good direction in that regard, as I think you'll hear.

The Chair:

Thank you, that is the time.

(1135)

Mr. David Christopherson:

It goes so fast, Chair.

Thank you for those answers.

The Chair:

Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for your presence here today.

I'm new to this committee, so I apologize if my questions are basic, but they will just help me get up to speed.

First, what I'd like to say is just to commend the security team. They're absolutely fantastic.

As a new member of Parliament, I have to tell you that I'm not only impressed with the professionalism, kindness, and compassion in how they wish to take care of us and do take care of us, but also want to commend you and all those responsible for the oversight of the security here.

In that same spirit I also want to make sure that they are at the top of their game, that they are able to do the job they are set out to do. I have had some conversations, which get back to MP Graham's questioning, with respect to overtime and fatigue levels of the security service.

Superintendent O'Beirne, we started that conversation but then I think we got sidetracked a bit. You mentioned the concept of being fully staffed and that you've done research in that regard to determine what it takes. Do you have the number of current security officers that you have and the number you would need—because my understanding is that we need more based on the overtime hours—to be satisfied that you are fully staffed?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

You're correct in that the overtime is always at the forefront of our concerns, and not only from a fiscal risk perspective, but also as a wellness concern for us. To that end, I'll mention that we've developed a multitude of initiatives geared towards employee wellness—physical and mental health initiatives. That is certainly at the forefront of our concerns.

From an overtime perspective and how that translates into our posture, as I mentioned, the coming together of the three separate entities was at a time when there were a multitude of security changes on Parliament Hill, on the grounds and in the precinct. As we've come together as a security entity, we have had the opportunity, for example, to optimize our levels at areas such as, let's say, the vehicle screening facility where we continue to employ our defensive posture strategy of multiple layers of security. As I mentioned, we've had some optimization there when it comes to resourcing pressures.

To your question about the actual number, you'll be pleased to hear that we just launched one of our training courses yesterday, which sees our brand new recruit class starting. It's a nine-week training course, so we're looking forward to having them join the force for the upcoming summer months.

I mention that because this is an ongoing effort for us as we position ourselves as well for the 2018 LTVP pressures of the decommissioning of Centre Block and also the ramping up of other areas.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I can appreciate that, but I guess, for me, it's do you have a number for the positions you are looking to fill with respect to the security? Is it 50, 20, 30? Do you have a number of people you are looking for so you will in fact be, as you refer to it, fully staffed? I am referring to vacancies, in other words, so that the overtime issue....

I appreciate the initiatives you're taking, but my question is why wouldn't you just hire people? What's happening with respect to the hiring? How many positions are you looking for to fill that gap, so you don't have to rely on overtime?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

What we're doing to come to that number.... It is constantly in flux. We have an attrition rate that we deal with as well, but also an expansion rate that we foresee as likely being temporary. Again, as I mentioned, with the West Block commissioning sometime in 2018, we're looking forward to knowing what the final timelines are going to be.

(1140)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

You don't have a number right now, but you're looking to add people. When you're adding people—you mentioned this training course—how many are you looking at? What would be ideal? How many are in the training course?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

I would be more than happy to give you some numbers, perhaps in another medium or in written form, if that could be acceptable.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

We are looking to find that optimum balance to be able to ensure that our overtime is brought to a minimum in the not-too-distant future. We're under no illusion that we'll ever get to zero because of the external unknowns that we have to be responsive to.

Again, I can provide those numbers to you—

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay, that would be great.

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

—in another form.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

How many are in the training course that's going to start?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

We have approximately 22 at this time.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Twenty-two.

Is it anticipated that they will all end up going through the training course and then be ready to serve? Do some of them get dropped because they don't pass, or—?

Mr. Robert Graham:

We hope they will all pass.

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

Our intention is to train them so they're successful. In some instances, we do have varying success rates, yes.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

What would the average success rate be—90%?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

Again, those are the types of figures I would be more than happy to provide outside of this meeting, if you don't mind.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay. I know my time is almost up, Mr. Chair.

I appreciate your attention to this matter. I think it's a matter of concern. When I'm speaking on security—and I don't want to mention any names or anything—I don't want to see personnel overtaxed. I don't want to see them exhausted, not only for their own safety and wellness, but also for the safety of those they're protecting.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Before we go on to Blake, for the record, you've committed to getting three things back to the committee. You can get them to the clerk. One is the amount of overtime that's going on. Second is the number that you need to be fully staffed. Third is the success rate in the training program. If you could get that to the clerk, then we will give it to the committee members.

Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thank you.

I have a number of questions, so we'll see how we can do here.

The first one I want to ask about is that you mentioned briefly in your opening remarks the mobile response team initiative. I wonder if you or Mr. O'Beirne could briefly give us a sense of what that team and initiative is.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Once again, I think this is an area where he has a better idea than I do of what we should tell you and what we shouldn't in open meetings.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Fair enough.

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

The mobile response team initiative is going to be a group of individuals who are trained to respond to a broad spectrum of events that can occur within our area of operation. They're going to be operating amongst the existing forces.

Mr. Blake Richards:

You seem reluctant to give us much more information than that.

Is that because of this meeting being public? Is that the idea?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

I would look very much forward to providing you further information on that, and perhaps in a different medium, yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Maybe we could set aside a couple of minutes at the very end, Mr. Chair, to do that. Would that be possible? Is there any objection to that?

The Chair:

Does anyone have any objection to doing the last five minutes in camera so we can have more discussion on that item?

No?

Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I appreciate that and we'll undertake to do it.

I'll move to some other questions I have. You mentioned also in your opening remarks the communication resources to support both internal and external messaging in the PPS. I think I can imagine what the internal messaging would be, but maybe you could focus on the external messaging and give us some sense of what type of services are being provided for that funding.

(1145)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

There are times when there are media inquiries about issues related to security on the Hill, whether incidents have occurred, or what have you, and where there is a need for a response from the PPS itself. It does that in coordination with my office and, I suppose, with the Speaker of the Senate's office.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Would someone like a media relations officer be hired? Is that what we're speaking of, then, or someone who dedicates a bit of their time to that?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

There's media relations, and sometimes you need someone doing graphics for internal communications, that kind of stuff.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Also mentioned in your opening remarks was $400,000 in temporary funding to support the baggage-screening facility at 90 Wellington for 2017-18. It was termed “temporary funding”. I'm wondering why it would be temporary? Why was it felt there was only a need for that funding for that period of time, and why would it not be permanent?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

We asked for that as a temporary measure because we're looking at re-examine that contract moving forward. We're looking forward to the commissioning of the visitor welcome centre in 2018. That's another one of those initiatives that will inform us on how best to navigate this large-baggage phenomenon we have to deal with. That's why we're asking for it as a temporary measure, and we look forward to revisiting that.

Mr. Blake Richards:

So you will be re-evaluating it after that point and determining what the permanent needs would be.

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

That's correct, sir.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Fair enough.

Along that same line, you mentioned in a response to an earlier question the decommissioning of Centre Block, which coincides with a move to West Block. In my understanding, the expectations are that this would occur in 2018. Whether that happens or not, we'll see. Regardless of when it happens, you've been doing some planning for that. I wonder if you have any sense of what it is going to look like? What kind of challenges will that present? What kind of costs will there be?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

On the question of the timing, we are operating under the expectation of being in there in February 2018, but I'm looking forward to a meeting before too long with the officials from Public Services and Procurement Canada, which has custody of the building, to determine when it will be handed over to the House of Commons administration. There are things we have to do once that happens. They hand it over to us in a certain state, and then we have to get it into the readiness state, which is a different thing. It's going to require some months to do that. I'm anxious to know what date they're going to assure us that they're going to hand it over to us.

That doesn't answer your question, I don't think. That was actually part of the preamble, not part of the question.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Would we be able to look to Mr. O'Beirne, if that is who was going to respond, for the remainder of the answer?

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes.

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

I'm sorry, your question...?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I was asking about the decommissioning of Centre Block and the move to West Block. What challenges would that present operationally? What are the planning and preparatory stages? What kind of costs do you anticipate in meeting those challenges?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

We're in consultations with our partners on this, to come to ground and get a better understanding of the timelines and what they will entail. We're not sure if we can close Centre Block down on a Friday and have West Block open on a Monday. There may be a transition period there. We're going to be looking to get some further information on that.

There's also the government conference centre, which is at the forefront of our attention. As we get closer to 2018, we'll have a better idea of what our personnel pressures will be. Will we have to maintain a fully operational Centre Block concurrently with a fully operational West Block and the government conference centre? Those are some of the unknowns we hope will become clear in the remainder of this calendar year.

(1150)

Mr. Blake Richards:

It sounds as if it might be a question for a future meeting.

The Chair:

Yes.

Ms. Sahota, and then we'll go in camera.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you for being here today. I definitely want to reiterate what my colleague said, that the PPS staff are incredible. We've all built relationships with them in the hallways over the time we've been here, and they do an outstanding job, a phenomenal job.

A couple of my main questions relate to the integration of communications. How is that going? How have you seen it change the efficiency or the effectiveness of the force? Have there been complications with that? Have there been additional costs? I know that the last time you were here we discussed it a little, that there would be added costs to integrating. How is that working out? Did the integration go smoothly? How often are the different departments communicating, Senate to the House of Commons to the RCMP?

Supt Mike O'Beirne:

This is happening on a daily basis now. With the full integration of the security forces, there are fully integrated briefings in the morning, fully integrated communication strategies where the messaging is immediate, whether it's corporate or operational. We have these on a daily basis, multiple times a day, if required. To complement this, for any kind of special events, notifications are sent to all personnel. The distinction that you had mentioned between the RCMP, the House of Commons, and the Senate does not necessarily exist anymore in the previous form that we understood it to be prior to the PPS. If I can use a crude analogy of 33%, each entity seemed to have been operating with, let's say, 33% of the plan or 33% of the information, and now, with the creation of the PPS, it's 100%. An operational plan will encompass every aspect of an operational plan, 100% of it, whether it's happening anywhere on the precinct, and all security forces are advised of that.

We are in constant communication with the corporate security office and the corporate security directorate. We work closely with them multiple times a day, or for any special event. We continue to ensure that the operational communications strategy and the corporate communications strategy are seamless. As I mentioned, the collocating of personnel at 180 Wellington has contributed to further integration and increased communication.

We continue to refine our model every time we possibly can, with learned and best practices.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

The increase that we are seeing in administrative costs, what is that a direct result of? You talked a little about HR, and different areas. Is there a key area that you're seeing the increase in?

Mr. Robert Graham:

When PPS was formed, a lot of the focus was on combining the operational individuals from the House, the Senate, and the RCMP. Some elements were perhaps not a great focus at the time, like a finance group or an HR group. To leverage the good work already being done by the House and Senate, for instance to implement a financial management system, we're leveraging the work that the House administration is doing. The payroll is being administered by a group that's been seconded to PPS, but leveraging existing systems that are already extant on the Hill. There are some areas that it makes sense for us to leverage with our partners, but in some areas, for instance a receiving warehouse, it makes no sense for PPS to build its own. So we're going to continue to leverage the partnerships we have with the House and the Senate administrations to take advantage of assets already there.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to suspend for about 30 seconds. We'll try to stay a couple of minutes later.

Everyone at the back will have to leave the room because we're going in camera.

Thank you.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Le temps du Président est très précieux et nous voulons tirer avantage de cette occasion de lui poser des questions, par conséquent nous allons essayer de commencer à temps.

Bienvenue à la 53e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Cette réunion est télévisée. Aujourd'hui, le Comité étudie le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) pour l'exercice 2016-2017: crédit 1c sous la rubrique Service de protection parlementaire.

Aujourd'hui, nous avons l'honneur de recevoir l'honorable Geoff Regan, Président de la Chambre des communes. Il est accompagné de représentants du Service de protection parlementaire: le surintendant Mike O'Beirne, directeur par intérim, et Robert Graham, officier responsable de l'administration et du personnel.

Je tiens à préciser aux membres du Comité que le Budget principal des dépenses a également été déposé. Nous pourrons nous en occuper bientôt.

Monsieur le Président, vous avez la parole. Je sais que vous avez un horaire très chargé, et je suis ravi que vous soyez des nôtres aujourd'hui. Merci.

L'hon. Geoff Regan (président de la Chambre des communes):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je suis ravi de participer encore à une réunion du Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, car je garde un très bon souvenir de mon passage à ce comité lorsque j'étais secrétaire parlementaire du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre entre 2001 et 2003. Je suis heureux d'être de retour, même si j'y suis pour répondre à des questions — ou du moins essayer de le faire — plutôt que pour en poser.

Je suis heureux d'être ici aujourd'hui, en compagnie du surintendant Mike O'Beirne, directeur par intérim du Service de protection parlementaire, et de M. Robert Graham, agent des services corporatifs par intérim du Service de protection parlementaire. D'autres membres de l'équipe de gestion du Service de protection parlementaire nous accompagnent également. Il s'agit du surintendant Alain Laniel, officier responsable des services de soutien opérationnel, de l'inspectrice Marie-Claude Côté, agente chargée des opérations, et de Melissa Rusk, cadre de direction et conseillère principale au directeur.

Depuis sa création le 23 juin 2015, le Service de protection parlementaire a réalisé d'importants progrès pour ce qui est d'uniformiser le mandat de sécurité physique sur la Colline du Parlement et de se distinguer comme entité parlementaire unique et indépendante. Au cours de l'exercice 2016-2017, soit son premier cycle financier complet, le Service de protection parlementaire a mis en oeuvre une série de nouvelles initiatives opérationnelles et organisationnelles, tout en tenant compte des complexités liées à l'environnement de sécurité extérieure en constante évolution.[Français]

En septembre 2016, une demande de budget supplémentaire de 7 millions de dollars a été approuvée pour appuyer les coûts continus liés à la sécurité sur la Colline du Parlement, les coûts initiaux uniques liés au lancement de diverses initiatives d'optimisation des ressources, ainsi que les exigences découlant du développement de la structure organisationnelle.

Puisque que le SPP est déterminé à tirer profit des progrès réalisés à ce jour et souhaite renforcer davantage sa capacité à soutenir un service de sécurité autonome dans l'ensemble de la Cité parlementaire et sur les terrains de la Colline du Parlement, je suis ici pour vous présenter les demandes relatives au Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) et au Budget principal des dépenses du SPP. [Traduction]

Tout d'abord, j'aimerais vous présenter une vue d'ensemble de la demande de Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) du Service de protection parlementaire, au montant de 2,39 millions de dollars, ce qui comprend une exigence budgétaire totale votée de 2,3 millions de dollars ainsi qu'une composante budgétaire législative de 90 000 $ pour financer le régime d'avantages sociaux des employés.

L'exigence budgétaire totale votée est liée au financement qui servira à établir un fonds de prévoyance opérationnel et à satisfaire aux exigences administratives additionnelles.

Le Service de protection parlementaire cherche a obtenir un fonds de prévoyance opérationnel au montant de 2,1 millions de dollars, qui servira à financer les besoins opérationnels qui n'ont pas été prévus plus tôt cette année, y compris les services de sécurité assurés lors des célébrations du 150e  anniversaire du Canada le 31 décembre 2016, et les besoins futurs qui pourraient survenir d'ici la fin de I'exercice.

(1105)

[Français]

En plus du fonds de prévoyance opérationnel, un montant de 200 000 $ est demandé pour financer des exigences administratives. Cela comprend un financement pour les services de paie, de formation linguistique et du Programme d'aide aux employés offerts au SPP par l'Administration de la Chambre des communes selon la formule du recouvrement des coûts au cours de l'exercice 2016-2017.

En raison de facteurs externes touchant les relations de travail, y compris les retards dans les négociations entourant les futures unités de négociation collective, le SPP demande du financement pour assumer les frais juridiques externes supplémentaires prévus. [Traduction]

J'espère ne pas aller trop vite pour les interprètes, qui font un travail fantastique, mais je sais que ce n'est pas facile quand quelqu'un parle aussi vite que je le fais.

J'aimerais maintenant porter votre attention sur la demande de Budget principal des dépenses du Service de protection parlementaire pour l'exercice 2017-2018, au montant total de 68,2 millions de dollars. Cela comporte une composante budgétaire votée de 62,1 millions de dollars et une exigence budgétaire législative de 6,1 millions de dollars pour le régime d'avantages sociaux des employés.

Cette demande de Budget principal des dépenses pour 2017-2018 représente une augmentation de 6,1 millions de dollars par rapport à la soumission concernant le Budget principal des dépenses du Service de protection parlementaire en 2016-2017. En plus de son budget permanent voté de 56,3 millions de dollars, approuvé dans le cadre du Budget principal des dépenses de 2016-2017 et établi par le projet de loi C-59, le Service de protection parlementaire souhaite obtenir une somme additionnelle de 6,1 millions de dollars en financement permanent pour soutenir la mise en oeuvre continue d'améliorations à la sécurité et pour stabiliser davantage sa structure organisationnelle.

Plusieurs examens ont été effectués par suite des événements du 22 octobre 2014, donnant lieu à 161 recommandations visant I'amélioration de la sécurité sur la Colline du Parlement. Le Service de protection parlementaire a reçu une approbation de financement temporaire en septembre 2016 pour lancer son initiative de l'Équipe mobile d'intervention. La mise en oeuvre de cette initiative permettra de donner suite à bon nombre des 161 recommandations et de rehausser la capacité d'intervention globale du Service de protection parlementaire. Le Service de protection parlementaire demande 1,2 million de dollars en financement permanent afin de poursuivre la mise en oeuvre et de satisfaire aux besoins de cette initiative.

Dans le but de soutenir la poursuite des initiatives d'amélioration de la sécurité du Sénat qui ont été préalablement approuvées, un financement supplémentaire de 787 000 $ sera transféré au Service de protection parlementaire le 1er avril 2017, en raison du lien direct avec le mandat du Service de protection parlementaire.[Français]

Le SPP demande également un financement permanent de 3 millions de dollars afin de stabiliser sa posture de protection dans l'édifice Wellington, qui vient de rouvrir ses portes, et pour garantir le respect des engagements déjà pris avec des tiers en matière de sécurité dans l'ensemble de la Cité parlementaire.

Compte tenu de l'augmentation prévue du nombre de visiteurs attendus dans la Cité parlementaire et sur les terrains de la Colline du Parlement lors des célébrations du 150e anniversaire du Canada, une somme de 400 000 $ en financement temporaire est requise pour appuyer les coûts de l'installation de contrôle des sacs au 90, rue Wellington, durant l'exercice 2017-2018. Cette demande de renouvellement du financement temporaire servira non seulement à rehausser l'expérience des visiteurs, mais elle permettra au SPP d'évaluer l'efficacité, la faisabilité et la viabilité à long terme de cette installation.

Le total cumulatif de cette demande est de 5,3 millions de dollars pour les nouvelles initiatives et celles déjà approuvées en matière d'amélioration de la sécurité dans l'ensemble de la Cité parlementaire et sur les terrains de la Colline du Parlement.

(1110)

[Traduction]

En plus des demandes de financement susmentionnées visant les initiatives d'améliorations opérationnelles, le Service de protection parlementaire demande une augmentation de financement permanent de 886 000 $ pour financer une série d'exigences liées aux services organisationnels. Cela inclut le financement pour des ressources à temps plein en communications pour subvenir aux besoins du Service de protection parlementaire en matière de messages communiqués à l'interne et à l'externe, ainsi que le financement nécessaire pour respecter les accords sur les niveaux de service existants avec I'administration de la Chambre pour la prestation de services en matière de ressources humaines, de technologie et d'information.

En conclusion, le Service de protection parlementaire demeure résolu dans son engagement à assurer l'excellence opérationnelle dans la prestation de services de sécurité professionnels partout dans la Cité parlementaire et sur les terrains de la Colline du Parlement, ce qui est très important. La sécurité de tous les travailleurs et de tous les visiteurs de la colline est certainement très importante à mes yeux.

Afin de rehausser davantage l'efficience et l'efficacité de son modèle de prestation de services, le Service de protection parlementaire mettra l'accent sur la mise en oeuvre continue des initiatives d'optimisation des ressources existantes et celles à venir, sur l'identification de nouvelles possibilités pour maximiser I'innovation et sur une collaboration renforcée avec ses divers partenaires parlementaires.

Ainsi se conclut ma vue d'ensemble des demandes de Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) et de Budget principal des dépenses de 2017-2018 pour le Service de protection parlementaire, monsieur le président. Mes collaborateurs et moi répondrons volontiers à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le Président. Comme toujours, vous nous renseignez bien. Vous avez fait quelques commentaires sur le Budget principal des dépenses, ce qui nous a donné un bon contexte mais, aujourd'hui, le Comité s'est préparé à vous parler du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses du Service de protection parlementaire, ce qui devrait, je l'espère, se confirmer dans nos questions. Nous espérons vous revoir bientôt au sujet du Budget principal des dépenses.

Monsieur Graham, s'il vous plaît.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le Président. Je suis ravi d'être ici après avoir été à votre emploi.

Je veux en savoir un peu plus sur le Service de protection parlementaire. J'étais ici avant la fusion des services, comme vous-même. J'aimerais comprendre quels changements administratifs ont été opérés. Quand le Service de protection parlementaire a été créé, il ne faisait plus partie directement de la Chambre des communes.

Quelle est la structure administrative pour la rémunération et tout le reste, actuellement? Est-ce une organisation complètement séparée de celle de la Chambre des communes? Est-ce qu'il a tout fallu recréer pour le Service de protection parlementaire?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

J'ai parlé plus tôt des services fournis par l'Administration de la Chambre des communes au Service de protection parlementaire, comme les ressources humaines, pour lesquelles un financement lui est donné. Pour nombre de ces choses, la Chambre des communes a déjà les structures et les services administratifs idoines. Au lieu de créer une nouvelle structure pour le Service de protection parlementaire, il est plus efficient d'agir ainsi.

Je laisse le surintendant O'Beirne poursuivre pour vous donner davantage de détails et d'une manière plus précise, je suis sûr.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À notre comité, ce sont les détails qui nous intéressent.

Surintendant Mike O'Beirne (directeur par intérim, Service de protection parlementaire):

Merci, monsieur le Président.

La fusion de trois services pour former le Service de protection parlementaire était surtout un regroupement de ressources opérationnelles. Il nous fallait donc voir comment optimiser les services de soutien offerts aux services opérationnels, soit les services administratifs ou corporatifs en coulisses.

Comme l'a dit le Président dans ses propos liminaires, il y a des accords de service avec la Chambre des communes qui nous fournit les services de ressources humaines et de soutien informatique. On l'a déjà dit, nous voulons éviter le dédoublement d'efforts et nous assurer que les services existants sont utilisés de manière optimale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il actuellement au Service de protection parlementaire des postes occupés par des officiers qui étaient occupés par des civils avant la fusion?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Là où il y avait des civils auparavant?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, à l'administration, ou ailleurs dans la structure du Service de protection parlementaire, existe-t-il une organisation dirigée par des agents en uniforme alors qu'avant la fusion, c'était des civils qui en étaient responsables?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Nous avons du personnel dans des unités opérationnelles. Par exemple, nous avons des unités de formation et de planification. Ces employés opérationnels travaillaient auparavant dans les trois entités distinctes, mais ils n'assument pas de rôles administratifs à proprement parler. Ils occupent des fonctions opérationnelles, ce qui signifie qu'ils sont au champ chaque jour. Ce sont eux qui déploient les exercices d'entraînement cinétiques.

Du point de vue de la planification, l'unité de planification intégrée est aussi composée de notre personnel opérationnel. Ces employés assistent à toutes les réunions opérationnelles, aux mécanismes de planification, avec les partenaires internes et externes. Ils opérationnalisent le plan lors d'un événement. Ils sont sur le terrain avec nos employés opérationnels et nos commandants.

En ce qui a trait aux autres postes, disons que vous faites référence uniquement aux fonctions purement administratives comme les fonctions d'organisation, par exemple. Je céderai peut-être la parole à M. Graham. Nous n'avons pas de personnel participant activement à ces postes uniquement administratifs.

(1115)

M. Robert Graham (officier responsable de l’administration et du personnel, Service de protection parlementaire):

Si nous parlons des finances et des RH, je ne connais aucun constable qui occupe une fonction administrative à l'heure actuelle.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avons-nous suffisamment d'agents du Service de protection parlementaire sur le terrain à l'heure actuelle? Les effectifs sont-ils complets?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Le Service de protection parlementaire continuera toujours d'utiliser toutes les ressources dont il dispose et les distribuera dans tout notre secteur d'opération afin d'en faire une utilisation optimale conformément à nos priorités établies, en vue de continuer d'offrir un Parlement ouvert et accessible, en tenant compte d'un besoin très réel de sécurité.

Cela dit, notre approche à l'égard des demandes futures devra être très souple. Nous consultons constamment nos partenaires internes et externes afin de déterminer exactement le niveau de ressources. Cela se fait chaque jour.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je pense qu'il importe de comprendre que cela prend du temps. Si on prend une décision en vue d'ajouter du personnel, par exemple, à la lumière de certaines circonstances, il faut du temps. En fait, il peut falloir jusqu'à 10 mois à partir du moment où on commence à dire « d'accord, nous devons nous préparer pour ceci », jusqu'au processus permettant de choisir des employés, de les former, de les équiper, etc. C'est beaucoup de temps. Le Service de protection parlementaire s'ajuste constamment en raison de cela et pour faire face aux changements. Si quelqu'un tombe malade ou trouve un autre emploi, il y a des changements. C'est une situation d'ajustements constants. Parfois, cela peut occasionner des heures supplémentaires, par exemple, mais l'objectif consiste réellement à veiller à ce que le personnel soit là si nécessaire, de sorte que les employés ne soient pas forcés de faire beaucoup d'heures supplémentaires.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous une idée du nombre de personnes qui font des heures supplémentaires ces jours-ci?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Eh bien, si vous souhaitez obtenir une valeur numérique absolue, je ne peux pas vous la donner aujourd'hui. Je pourrais vous la communiquer plus tard.

M. Robert Graham:

Excusez-moi, pouvez-vous répéter la question?

Un député: Combien de personnes font des heures supplémentaires, en gros?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Chaque jour.

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Oui, nous pouvons vous donner cette information dans un document de suivi. Mais chaque jour, nous devons être en mesure de réagir aux activités qui se produisent sur la Colline du Parlement et à différents endroits dans la cité. Ces activités, en plus des facteurs externes comme les menaces qui planent à l'échelle mondiale, nous obligent toujours à devoir réagir très rapidement. Permettez-moi de retourner en arrière; il est certain qu'après les événements du 22 octobre, la position a changé sur la Colline du Parlement. Nous cherchons à nous assurer que nous continuons d'attribuer les ressources nécessaires à la suite de ces changements et d'optimiser chaque ressource autant que possible.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il...

Le président:

Excusez-moi, David, mais votre temps est écoulé.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Merci. J'aurai peut-être le temps de continuer plus tard.

Le président: Monsieur Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous tous d'être ici aujourd'hui.

En lisant votre rapport, j'ai constaté un fonds d'urgence au montant de 2,1 millions de dollars pour financer les exigences opérationnelles qui n'ont pas été prévues plus tôt dans l'année, y compris la sécurité des célébrations du sesqui-centenaire du Canada. Bien sûr, j'imagine que l'on planifie ces activités depuis des années et que vous avez examiné toutes sortes de scénarios. Je comprends qu'on ne peut pas connaître tous les détails, mais j'aimerais savoir si d'autres défis sont apparus et ont nécessité la mise de côté de ces fonds supplémentaires.

(1120)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Eh bien, chaque année est différente. Certaines choses se produisent sans qu'on les voit venir pendant l'année, mais il faut s'y préparer. Bien sûr, à titre d'exemple, l'an dernier, nous avons eu la visite du président Obama, ce qui a occasionné des dépenses supplémentaires.

En ce qui concerne les autres types d'événements qui se produiront au cours de l'année, mais dont nous ne sommes pas encore au courant, c'est une bonne question. Je pense qu'il est important que nous nous y préparions.

Doit-on ajouter autre chose?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Les fonds prévus pour l'appareil d'inspection des bagages comprennent-ils aussi le personnel ou seulement l'appareil?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Les fonds comprennent le personnel également.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Par curiosité surtout, j'aimerais savoir si les employés feront plus d'heures supplémentaires à l'occasion du sesqui-centenaire et de toutes sortes d'activités puisque, j'imagine, nous attendons davantage de visiteurs autour de la Colline du Parlement et dans la région? Aurons-nous recours aux heures supplémentaires? Bien sûr, on ne peut pas embaucher plus d'agents seulement pour une courte période — ou peut-être que c'est possible.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Eh bien, on ne prévoit pas d'accroître temporairement la taille de l'effectif, par exemple autour du 1er juillet ou pendant l'été. Toutefois, lors des grands événements, nous collaborons avec d'autres forces policières, comme le service de police d'Ottawa ou la GRC, qui peuvent nous aider.

Mike pourra peut-être compléter la réponse.

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Merci, monsieur le Président.

C'est exact. Nous comprenons bien les activités qui auront lieu dans notre zone d'opération, autour de la Colline du Parlement. Toutefois, nous discutons constamment de cela avec nos partenaires, à l'interne et à l'externe, afin de très bien comprendre leur portée et leur ampleur. Ainsi, nous pourrons déterminer nos exigences en matière de personnel. Comme l'a mentionné M. le Président, nous pouvons faire appel à certains partenaires pour nous aider au besoin

M. Jamie Schmale:

Bien sûr, lorsqu'un groupe de touristes se promènent, ils ne sont pas toujours au bon endroit lorsqu'ils déambulent, par exemple, et il faudra rétablir la situation lorsque les gens se rassembleront.

L'autre question qui a été soulevée lors des réunions précédentes est l'accès des députés, des sénateurs et du personnel à l'édifice. S'agit-il toujours d'une priorité, afin de veiller à ce que l'accès soit possible et les privilèges, respectés?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Absolument.

Une partie de la formation offerte aux députés porte, par exemple, sur les privilèges des députés et l'importance de permettre aux députés et à leur personnel de se déplacer sur la Colline et dans la Cité parlementaire.

Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Juste une dernière chose.

C'est certainement ce sur quoi nous nous concentrons au quotidien. Nous nous assurons de mettre l'accent sur ce point dans tous nos plans opérationnels. Nous avons des plans d'urgence s'il y a trop visiteurs ou si la voie inférieure est bloquée de façon à pouvoir gérer ces situations.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Il faut bien comprendre l'importance de permettre aux députés de faire ce qu'ils ont à faire pour représenter leurs commettants. C'est notre objectif.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Le Service de protection parlementaire a-t-il eu des problèmes en matière de planification? Y a-t-il des problèmes auxquels vous n'avez pas trouvé de solution? Y a-t-il des problèmes quelconques ou est-ce que tout se déroule rondement?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

De façon générale, l'un des défis constants est l'intégration harmonieuse d'entités qui étaient préalablement séparées de façon à offrir des services de sécurité de calibre mondial.

L'intégration culturelle de tout notre personnel fait partie de ce défi. Pour surmonter ces difficultés, nous avons récemment mis en place d'excellentes initiatives. Depuis la mise en service de l'édifice au 180, rue Wellington, notre personnel se retrouve au même endroit, ce qui a permis d'avoir des réunions intégrées et de rapidement partager l'information. Ces éléments sont essentiels pour une organisation comme la nôtre. Ils le sont pour toute organisation, en fait.

Il y a également des pressions de l'extérieur ou des choses de l'extérieur auxquelles il nous faut répondre avec agilité, notamment, comme M. le Président l'a mentionné, les événements entourant le 150e anniversaire du Canada qui s'en viennent. Nous devons aussi répondre aux exigences qui découlent de la vision et du plan à long terme pour la Cité parlementaire et nous adapter à l'environnement bien réel des menaces mondiales.

Ce sont des enjeux auxquels nous portons attention tous les jours.

(1125)

M. Jamie Schmale:

Dites-moi, le Red Bull Crashed Ice qui a eu lieu à deux pas de la Colline du Parlement la fin de semaine dernière vous a-t-il permis de faire de la formation ou de l'observation?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Y avez-vous participé?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Non, je n'y ai pas participé. Je connais mes limites.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Vous vous en tenez à la course?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Exactement.

Cet événement vous a-t-il permis de constater ce qui se produit lorsqu'il y a une grande foule sur la Colline du Parlement? Vous a-t-il donné une idée de ce à quoi vous pourriez faire face l'été prochain?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Il est clair qu'il nous a donné un aperçu de ce à quoi nous pouvons nous attendre au cours des prochains mois. La Fête du Canada sera sans doute un événement grandiose.

En ce qui a trait au Red Bull Crashed Ice, l'événement s'est déroulé sans incident. Cette réussite est surtout le résultat d'une excellente coopération entre le Service de protection parlementaire, la police municipale d'Ottawa et la GRC. Nous avons tous participé à l'étape de la planification. Puis, pendant l'événement, les différents services de protection ont encore une fois collaboré. Nous cherchons continuellement à améliorer notre modèle. Chaque événement nous enseigne des leçons que nous incorporons ensuite dans la planification des prochains événements.

L'approche nous permettra sans doute de continuer à avoir du succès à l'avenir.

Le président:

Merci, Jamie.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le Président, je suis heureux de vous voir, vous et votre délégation.

Si vous le voulez bien, j'aimerais parler du nouveau processus de vérification. Je tiens pour acquis que ce dernier point a déjà fait l'objet de discussions. Comme vous le savez, certains ont soulevé de sérieux doutes à propos de ce nouveau processus.

Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais revenir à quelque chose que vous avez dit dans vos remarques liminaires. Au dernier paragraphe, au bas de la page 1, vous affirmez que vous soutenez un service de sécurité autonome.

À huis clos, vous et moi avons discuté du degré d'autonomie réelle du service de sécurité. J'y reviendrai plus tard si j'ai le temps, mais le service est tout sauf autonome. Pour l'instant, j'aimerais savoir où en est le nouveau processus de vérification suggéré.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Eh bien, il y a deux types de vérification. Il y a un processus de vérification pour ceux qui visitent les édifices et un autre pour le personnel qui y travaille. Bien sûr, ces deux processus sont importants et ont chacun un rôle à jouer. Parallèlement, nous devons respecter certaines institutions, comme les médias, et prévoir des arrangements qui conviennent à tous.

M. David Christopherson:

Si vous me le permettez, monsieur, les deux groupes qui sont ressortis jusqu'à présent sont, bien sûr, les médias et la tribune de la presse — son organe de représentation — ainsi que les personnes qui travaillent pour les députés ou qui pourraient être appelées à le faire. Ces deux groupes soulèvent de sérieuses préoccupations par rapport à cette notion d'autonomie.

Tout ce qui a trait à la GRC n'est pas autonome du tout. Personne ne dit que la GRC est une organisation autonome. Pourtant, c'est elle qui est responsable de la sécurité à l'intérieur de cet édifice.

En apparence, nous avons encore un service de sécurité indépendant. Par contre, en situation de crise, ce sera le premier ministre qui dira au commissaire de la GRC quoi faire, et ce dernier donnera des ordres qui devront être suivis. Si le temps le permet, je suis certain que le Président de la Chambre sera informé, mais tout dépendra de la nature de l'urgence. Nous en avons déjà parlé, mais comme ces conversations étaient à huis clos, je ne peux en dévoiler la teneur.

La question est importante puisqu'elle touche directement la tribune de la presse et la liberté de presse. Il n'y a qu'à regarder au sud de la frontière pour voir à quel point il est important de défendre la liberté de presse dans une démocratie libre. J'aimerais savoir qui détermine les critères d'accréditation des médias?

Nous avons maintenant établi un lien entre la capacité de la presse de se trouver dans l'édifice pour faire son travail et le contrôle que peut exercer, au bout du compte, le service de sécurité en décidant qui a le droit d'entrer.

Aidez-nous à comprendre pourquoi nous ne devrions pas nous inquiéter alors qu'il semble que nous devions le faire.

(1130)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Bien, j'ai certainement discuté de ce sujet. Je dois dire, toutefois, qu'il y a...

Vous avez fait référence à certaines conversations tenues lors de réunions à huis clos et bien sûr, certains aspects de la question doivent être discutés à huis clos.

Je pense que le surintendant O'Beirne est probablement mieux placé que moi pour évaluer les commentaires qui pourraient cadrer dans les différentes catégories, je vais donc le laisser répondre à vos questions.

M. David Christopherson:

La question vous est adressée.

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Merci, monsieur.

Vous avez soulevé quelques points différents et, si vous permettez, j'essaierai de tous les aborder.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

J'estime que, bien que l'on puisse faire des liens, certains aspects sont complètement distincts.

Sur la question de la participation de la GRC au sein du Service de protection parlementaire, il serait probablement possible d'en parler plus longuement dans un autre forum. Toutefois, les modifications apportées à la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada et le protocole d'entente ultérieur visaient délibérément à garantir l'établissement d'une gouvernance trilatérale. Ceci permet d'assurer que les droits et privilèges demeurent entiers.

Impossible d'envisager un environnement où le directeur du Service de protection parlementaire recevrait une demande qui contreviendrait à la loi actuelle. Et si je peux faire le lien avec votre commentaire sur les médias et les vérifications de sécurité, je dirais que la GRC y assume simplement un rôle de fournisseur de services.

M. David Christopherson:

Désolé de vous interrompre. Je ne veux pas être impoli.

Qui décidera des critères acceptables en matière de sécurité?

Et en passant, selon moi il n'y a pas d'indépendance. Nous en avons déjà parlé. Je serais ravi de passer en revue, en public, le commandement et le contrôle, ainsi que les responsabilités de chacun. Au final, disons que le roi Charles serait clairement enchanté par cette organisation. En tout cas, j'espère simplement que le Parlement reprendra un jour les rênes de la sécurité.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Laissez-moi vous dire que je n'oublie pas William Lenthall et ce qu'il a dit au roi Charles. C'est un événement auquel je fais souvent référence parce que, comme vous le savez peut-être, le portrait du président Lenthall est intégré au plafond de mon bureau. Il veille sur moi et me rappelle souvent l'importance de l'autonomie, de l'indépendance et de l'autorité de la Chambre des communes par rapport à l'exécutif.

Puisque vous avez parlé du roi Charles, je n'ai pas pu résister.

M. David Christopherson:

Je comprends, mais j'espère que nous reverrons le jour où le Parlement dispose d'une pleine autonomie sur ses propres services de sécurité, ce qui n'est pas le cas en ce moment.

Alors s'il vous plaît poursuivez. Qui établit les critères visant à déterminer si un journaliste peut exercer sa profession ici sur la Colline? Comment est-ce que...

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

C'est en fait le rôle du Bureau de la sécurité institutionnelle, et non celui du Service de protection parlementaire. Vous voudrez peut-être nous réinviter pour que je sois accompagné de M. McDonell qui pourrait vous en dire plus.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord. Comment peut-on connaître la méthode d'établissement des critères, et comment en obtient-on les justifications pour décider s'ils sont équitables ou non?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Des discussions sont en cours entre le Bureau de la sécurité institutionnelle et la Tribune de la presse afin d'établir ces règles. Je pense que vous entendrez dire que les discussions vont bon train.

Le président:

Merci, votre temps est écoulé.

(1135)

M. David Christopherson:

Le temps passe tellement vite, monsieur le président.

Merci pour les réponses.

Le président:

Madame Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci pour votre présence ici aujourd'hui.

Je siège depuis peu au Comité, alors vous m'excuserez si mes questions sont élémentaires, mais elles m'aideront à mettre mes connaissances à niveau.

D'abord, j'aimerais féliciter l'équipe de la sécurité. Elle est absolument remarquable.

En tant que nouvelle députée, je dois dire que je suis impressionnée par le professionnalisme, la gentillesse et la compassion dans la manière dont la sécurité veille sur nous. Je vous félicite et je félicite tous ceux et celles qui sont responsables de la surveillance des opérations de sécurité ici.

Je souhaite aussi m'assurer que l'équipe soit la plus efficace possible, et qu'elle soit en mesure de faire son travail. Pour revenir sur ce que le député Graham a dit, j'ai tenu quelques conversations concernant le temps supplémentaire et les niveaux de fatigue des membres du service de sécurité.

Monsieur O'Beirne, nous avons abordé le sujet, mais nous avons digressé. Vous avez parlé de disposer d'une équipe complète et des recherches que vous avez faites sur le sujet pour déterminer les ressources nécessaires. Connaissez-vous le nombre d'agents de sécurité à votre emploi et le nombre dont vous auriez besoin pour avoir une équipe complète — parce que si je comprends bien, si on en juge par les heures supplémentaires, il faudrait plus d'effectifs?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Vous avez raison de dire que les heures supplémentaires sont toujours au coeur de nos préoccupations, et pas seulement d'un point de vue lié au risque budgétaire. C'est aussi une préoccupation liée au bien-être. À cette fin, nous avons mis sur pied toute une gamme d'initiatives visant le bien-être des employés — des initiatives pour la santé physique et mentale. C'est certainement au coeur de nos préoccupations.

Pour ce qui est des heures supplémentaires et comment cela se traduit dans notre position, comme je l'ai dit, les trois organismes distincts ont été fusionnés au moment où bon nombre de changements liés à la sécurité ont eu lieu sur la Colline du Parlement et dans l'enceinte parlementaire. Alors que nous sommes devenus un organisme de sécurité, nous avons eu la chance, par exemple, d'améliorer nos niveaux dans des domaines comme le contrôle des véhicules où nous employons toujours une stratégie de défensive ayant de multiples niveaux de sécurité. Comme je l'ai dit, il y a eu des améliorations quant aux pressions exercées sur l'affectation des ressources.

Par rapport à votre question sur les effectifs, vous serez heureuse d'apprendre que nous venons de lancer une de nos formations hier. Nos nouvelles recrues la suivront. Il s'agit d'une formation de neuf semaines, alors nous avons hâte que nos nouvelles recrues se joignent aux forces au cours de l'été.

J'en parle, car nous faisons des efforts constants alors que nous nous positionnons également pour composer avec les pressions qui seront exercées par la vision et le plan à long terme de 2018 avec le démantèlement de l'édifice du Centre et l'accroissement d'autres zones.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Je peux comprendre, mais je me demande si vous avez le nombre de postes que vous voulez pourvoir en matière de sécurité? Est-ce 50, 20, 30? Êtes-vous à la recherche d'un nombre précis de gens pour avoir, comme vous le dites, tout le personnel dont vous avez besoin? Je fais référence aux postes vacants, autrement dit, pour que le problème d'heures supplémentaires...

Je comprends les initiatives que vous mettez sur pied, mais je me demande pourquoi ne pas simplement embaucher des gens? Qu'est-ce qui se passe avec l'embauche? Combien de postes voulez-vous pour combler cet écart et ainsi ne plus avoir à compter sur les heures supplémentaires?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Ce que nous faisons par rapport à ce nombre... Cela change constamment. Nous faisons aussi face à un taux d'attrition, et à un rythme de croissance qui sera probablement temporaire. Une fois de plus, comme je l'ai dit, nous avons hâte de connaître l'échéancier final par rapport à la mise en service de l'édifice de l'Ouest à un moment donné en 2018.

(1140)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord.

Vous n'avez pas de chiffre en ce moment, mais vous vouliez ajouter des gens. Lorsque vous ajoutez des gens — vous avez parlé de cette formation — combien de personnes participeraient? Quel serait le nombre idéal? Combien de gens suivent cette formation?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Je serais heureux de vous donner quelques chiffres, sous une autre forme, peut-être par écrit, si cela est convenable.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord.

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Nous voulons atteindre l'équilibre optimal afin de nous assurer de réduire les heures supplémentaires au minimum dans un avenir pas très éloigné. Nous savons bien que nous n'arriverons pas à zéro en raison des impondérables externes auxquels nous devons répondre.

Encore une fois, je peux vous donner ces chiffres...

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord, ce serait génial.

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

... sous une autre forme.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Combien de gens suivront la formation qui est sur le point de commencer?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

En ce moment, il y en a à peu près 22.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Vingt-deux.

Vous attendez-vous à ce qu'ils soient prêts à servir une fois qu'ils auront terminé la formation? Y en a-t-il qui sont retirés, car ils ne réussissent pas, ou...?

M. Robert Graham:

Nous espérons qu'ils vont tous réussir.

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Nous voulons les former pour qu'ils réussissent. Il arrive parfois que les taux de réussite varient, oui.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Quel est le taux de réussite moyen, 90 %?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Si vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient, je serais heureux de vous fournir ce genre de chiffres en dehors de la présente réunion.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord. Monsieur le président, je sais que mon temps de parole est presque écoulé.

Je vous suis reconnaissante de l'attention que vous portez à cette question. Je crois que c'est une question qui nous préoccupe. Lorsque je parle de sécurité — et je ne nommerai personne — je ne veux pas que les membres du personnel soient débordés. Je ne veux pas qu'ils soient épuisés, non seulement pour leur propre sécurité et bien-être, mais aussi pour la sécurité de ceux et celles qu'ils protègent.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Avant de donner la parole à Blake, pour le mémoire, vous vous êtes engagé à remettre trois choses au Comité. Vous pouvez les donner au greffier. La première est le nombre d'heures supplémentaires en ce moment. La deuxième est le nombre de personnes dont vous avez besoin pour avoir des effectifs complets. La troisième est le taux de réussite dans le programme de formation. Si vous pouviez donner cette information au greffier, nous la donnerons ensuite aux membres du Comité.

Monsieur Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci.

J'ai plusieurs questions, alors voyons voir ce que nous pouvons faire.

Ma première question est à propos de l'initiative de l'équipe mobile d'intervention dont vous avez parlé brièvement dans vos remarques liminaires. Je me demandais si vous, ou M. O'Beirne, pouviez nous expliquer un peu en quoi consistent cette équipe et cette initiative.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Une fois de plus, je pense qu'il s'agit là d'une situation où il sait mieux que moi ce que nous devrions vous dire ou non durant les réunions ouvertes au public.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord.

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

L'initiative de l'équipe mobile d'intervention sera composée d'un groupe de personnes formées pour répondre à un large éventail d'événements qui surviennent dans notre secteur d'activité. L'équipe oeuvrera au sein des forces existantes.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous semblez réticent à l'idée de nous donner plus d'information.

Est-ce parce que cette réunion est ouverte au public? Est-ce cela?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Je suis tout à fait prêt à vous donner plus d'information, peut-être sous une forme différente, oui.

M. Blake Richards:

Peut-être qu'on pourrait se réserver quelques minutes à la toute fin pour cela, monsieur le président. Serait-ce possible? Y a-t-il une objection?

Le président:

Y a-t-il des objections à ce que les cinq dernières minutes se fassent à huis clos pour que nous puissions discuter davantage de ce point?

Non?

D'accord.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vous en suis reconnaissant, et c'est ce que nous allons faire.

Je vais maintenant passer à mes autres questions. Au début de votre exposé, vous avez aussi parlé des ressources en communications pour soutenir la messagerie interne et externe au sein du Service de protection parlementaire. Je crois comprendre ce que pourrait être la messagerie interne. Alors peut-être pourriez-vous vous concentrer sur la messagerie externe et nous donner une idée du genre de services qui sont offerts pour ce financement.

(1145)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Il arrive que les médias nous posent des questions à propos d'enjeux liés à la sécurité sur la Colline, si des incidents ou autres choses sont survenus, et le Service de protection parlementaire doit répondre. Il le fait en collaboration avec mon bureau et, je crois, avec le Bureau du Président du Sénat.

M. Blake Richards:

Embaucherait-on un agent des relations avec les médias? Est-ce ce dont nous sommes en train de parler? Ou bien pourrait-il y avoir quelqu'un qui y consacrerait un peu de son temps?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Il y a les relations avec les médias, et parfois, vous avez besoin d'une personne qui fait des graphiques pour les communications internes, ce genre de choses.

M. Blake Richards:

Au début de votre exposé, vous avez également parlé d'un financement temporaire de 400 000 $ pour soutenir l'installation du contrôle des bagages au 90, rue Wellington pour l'exercice 2017-2018. Vous avez utilisé le terme « financement temporaire ». Je me demande pourquoi il serait temporaire? Pourquoi a t-on pensé que ce financement ne serait nécessaire que durant cette période et non de façon permanente?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Nous avons fait la demande en tant que mesure temporaire, car nous pensons réexaminer le contrat ultérieurement. Nous avons hâte que le centre d'accueil des visiteurs soit mis en service en 2018. Il s'agit d'une autre initiative qui nous donnera plus d'information, à savoir comment faire face à ce phénomène où nous voyons plus de bagages encombrants. Voilà pourquoi nous voulons que ce soit une mesure temporaire, qui sera ensuite réexaminée.

M. Blake Richards:

Vous allez donc la réévaluer après ce moment-là, et voir quels seraient les besoins permanents.

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

C'est juste, monsieur.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord.

Dans le même ordre d'idées, vous avez parlé, en répondant à une autre question plus tôt, du démantèlement de l'édifice du Centre, qui correspond au déménagement vers l'édifice de l'Ouest. Si je comprends bien, on s'attend à ce que cela se fasse en 2018. Il faudra toutefois voir si cela se matérialisera. Peu importe quand cela aura lieu, vous avez un plan. Savez-vous de quoi cela aura l'air? Quels seront les défis? Quels seront les coûts?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Au sujet de l'échéancier, nous nous attendons d'emménager en février 2018. Toutefois, je prévois avoir une réunion prochainement avec les fonctionnaires de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada, le ministère qui est responsable de l'immeuble, pour déterminer quand celui-ci sera remis à l'Administration de la Chambre des communes. Nous aurons des choses à faire lorsque cela se produira. Le ministère nous le remet dans un certain état, et ensuite, nous devons nous assurer que l'immeuble est prêt à nous recevoir, ce qui n'est pas la même chose. Ces travaux nécessiteront quelques mois. J'ai bien hâte de connaître la date à laquelle il devrait nous remettre la responsabilité de l'immeuble.

Je ne crois pas que cela réponde à votre question. Cela faisait partie du préambule, non pas de la question.

M. Blake Richards:

Pouvons-nous espérer une réponse de M. O'Beirne, si c'est lui qui allait répondre au reste de la question?

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui.

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Je suis désolé, quelle était votre question?

M. Blake Richards:

Je posais une question au sujet de la mise hors service de l'édifice du Centre et du déménagement à l'édifice de l'Ouest. Quels seront les défis du côté des opérations? Quelles sont les étapes de la planification et des préparatifs? Selon vous, quel sera le coût de ces défis?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Nous consultons nos partenaires à ce sujet afin de nous faire une idée d'ensemble et de bien comprendre les échéanciers et les ressources qui seront nécessaires. Nous ne sommes pas certains que nous pourrons fermer l'édifice du Centre un vendredi et ouvrir l'édifice de l'Ouest le lundi suivant. Il pourrait y avoir une période de transition. Nous tenterons d'obtenir de plus amples renseignements à ce sujet.

Il y a aussi le Centre de conférences du gouvernement, qui retient actuellement notre attention. À mesure que nous nous approchons de 2018, nous aurons une meilleure idée des répercussions sur notre personnel. Devrons-nous assurer une présence complète à l'édifice du Centre, à l'édifice de l'Ouest et au Centre de conférences du gouvernement? Ce sont là quelques-unes des questions auxquelles nous espérons répondre au cours de l'année.

(1150)

M. Blake Richards:

Il me semble que cela pourrait faire l'objet d'une prochaine réunion.

Le président:

Oui.

Mme Sahota, puis nous passerons à huis clos.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je vous remercie d'être là aujourd'hui. Je tiens à réitérer ce que ma collègue a dit, à savoir que les employés du Service de protection parlementaire sont fantastiques. Nous avons tous appris à les connaître dans les couloirs depuis que nous sommes ici, et ils font un travail exceptionnel, un travail phénoménal.

Quelques-unes de mes questions principales portent sur l'intégration des communications. Comment cela se passe-t-il? Cela a-t-il eu des répercussions sur l'efficience ou l'efficacité de vos agents? Cela a-t-il entraîné des complications? Des coûts supplémentaires? La dernière fois que vous étiez ici, nous en avons discuté un peu. Quelqu'un avait dit que cette intégration entraînerait des coûts supplémentaires. Comment se passe l'intégration? S'est-elle déroulée sans anicroche? À quelle fréquence les différents services — le Sénat, la Chambre des communes et la GRC — communiquent-ils?

Surint. Mike O'Beirne:

Ces communications se produisent quotidiennement maintenant. Depuis que les forces de sécurité ont été complètement intégrées, nous avons des séances d'information entièrement intégrées le matin, des stratégies de communication entièrement intégrées grâce auxquelles la communication est immédiate, que ce soit à l'échelle de l'institution ou des opérations. Ces communications ont lieu chaque jour, plusieurs fois par jour s'il le faut. Qui plus est, en cas d'événement spécial, les avis sont envoyés à tous les employés. La distinction que vous faisiez entre la GRC, la Chambre des communes et le Sénat n'est pas plus celle qui existait auparavant, avant la création du Service de protection parlementaire. Pour vous l'expliquer sommairement, auparavant, chaque entité semblait fonctionner avec, disons, 33 % du plan ou 33 % de l'information. Aujourd'hui, grâce à la création du Service de protection parlementaire, chaque entité fonctionne avec 100 %. Un plan opérationnel touche tous les aspects qu'on retrouve habituellement dans un plan opérationnel, 100 %, peu importe quelle partie de la Cité est touchée. Tous les agents de sécurité en sont informés.

Nos communications avec le Bureau de la sécurité institutionnelle et la Direction de la sécurité institutionnelle se font en continu. Nous travaillons étroitement avec eux plusieurs fois par jour, ou dans le cadre d'un événement spécial. Nous nous assurons constamment que notre stratégie de communication opérationnelle et la stratégie de communication institutionnelle sont appliquées sans aucun incident. Comme je le mentionnais, le rassemblement de nos agents au 180, rue Wellington a permis de pousser encore plus loin l'intégration et d'accroître la communication.

Nous continuons de peaufiner notre modèle chaque fois que nous le pouvons en nous inspirant des pratiques exemplaires et des leçons retenues.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

De quoi dépend l'augmentation des coûts administratifs? Vous avez parlé un peu des ressources humaines et d'autres secteurs. Un secteur clé est-il responsable de la majorité de cette augmentation?

M. Robert Graham:

Lorsque le Service de protection parlementaire a été créé, on s'est surtout attardé au regroupement des agents de la Chambre, du Sénat et de la GRC. Certains éléments n'ont peut-être pas attiré autant l'attention à l'époque, comme un groupe pour les finances ou les ressources humaines. Pour tirer profit du bon travail déjà fait par la Chambre et le Sénat, par exemple pour mettre en place un système de gestion financière, nous nous inspirons du travail que l'Administration de la Chambre fait. L'administration de la paie est faite par un groupe qui a été affecté au Service de protection parlementaire, mais nous employons des systèmes qui existaient déjà sur la Colline. Pour certains secteurs, il est tout à fait logique que nous fassions appel à nos partenaires, mais pour d'autres, par exemple, un lieu d'entreposage, il est tout à fait inutile que le Service de protection parlementaire construise son propre entrepôt. Cela signifie que nous continuerons de faire appel à nos partenaires, les administrations de la Chambre et du Sénat, pour utiliser les services qui existent déjà.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons faire une pause d'une trentaine de secondes. Nous tenterons de prolonger notre rencontre de quelques minutes.

Tous les gens qui se trouvent dans le fond de la salle devront partir, car nous passons à huis clos.

Merci.

[Les travaux se poursuivent à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on March 07, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.