header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-02-15 ACVA 43

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

(1540)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)):

I'd like to call the meeting to order, if everyone could take a seat.

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) and the motion adopted on September 29, the committee is resuming its study of mental health and suicide prevention among veterans.

Today we have a panel of three organizations, which will start with 10 minutes of questions. We have the Distress Centre of Ottawa and Region, the Mood Disorders Society of Canada, and the Vanier Institute of the Family.

We'll start with the Vanier Institute of the Family, with chief executive officer Nora Spinks and retired Colonel Russ Mann.

Ms. Nora Spinks (Chief Executive Officer, Vanier Institute of the Family):

Thank you. I'm speaking today as the CEO of the Vanier Institute. As you know, the institute was founded over 50 years ago by the late general, the Right Honourable Georges P. Vanier and his wife Pauline, mother of his five children and, at times, his caregiver. He was one of Canada's most decorated military leaders, a veteran of both world wars who lost part of his leg in the Second World War.

I'm here with my colleague, retired Colonel Russ Mann, who's working with the institute on the military and veteran families in Canada initiative and coordinates the Canadian military and veteran families leadership circle. This is a consortium of over 40 diverse community organizations committed to working together to build a solid circle of support for families of those who choose to wear the uniform for Canada.

I'm not a suicide expert. I'm here to talk about families. I'm here to talk about the role that families play in suicide prevention. I'm here to talk about the diversity of families and the complexity of family life. I'm here to share the evidence from research related to the family's role in suicide prevention, which is particularly difficult because of the inherent challenges of measuring something that didn't happen.

First, families are our first group experience, and our parents are our first group leaders. Families are unique and diverse, family dynamics can be open or guarded, emotions can be suppressed or expressed, and adults can be nurturing or distant. Families can live with abundance or scarcity. Families can be part of a supportive community, or alone and even isolated. Families experience stress together when they move, when there's a change—a birth, a death, an illness, or an injury—when money is tight, when uncertainty is high, when they are separated by circumstance, or when they reunite after time apart.

We each play a role in our families as children and as adults. Some of us are peacemakers, others are troublemakers. Some of us are followers, others are leaders. Some of us are talkers, others are listeners. Some of us are quiet observers, while others test, experiment, and innovate. Families grow tighter and grow apart. They share love, concern, pain, and anguish. They also share joy, hopes, and dreams.

Some families are under stress, some are in distress, and some are in crisis. Research shows that people who are contemplating suicide are feeling despair, anger, fear, and pain—emotional or psychic pain. They're feeling a need to escape, a need to protect others. They feel like there are no other options. Families share that despair; they often bear the brunt of the anger and witness the fear. Families often experience and feel hopelessness and helplessness. People who contemplate suicide feel hopeless and helpless.

Families provide help and hope, but they also both provide and need support. Families that are well supported, functioning, and healthy can be a significant protective factor for those contemplating suicide. Few families are naturally resilient: most need support to become or remain resilient, and some need help to become resilient. The literature shows that strong relationships with family and friends can reduce social isolation. Families can be advocates and system navigators. They can be the centre or foundation of the system of support for people in distress: we've heard some people who have lived through distress—who have come out of the darkness to the other side—report that this was the result of somebody being in their lives who didn't give up.

Families are diverse. They can be effective in supporting a family member with mental illness, depression, or PTSD, but they need support, training, and resources to do so. They need to feel competent, and they need to feel confident that their loved ones will receive the care they need. They need to feel they are not alone. When they reach out on behalf of their loved ones, they need to feel they can focus on accessing need, not scrambling to look for services and spending time on Google. They need to feel that their loved ones get well, not that they have to go on a long wait-list. They need to be able to access services and not fight to be heard.

Families need to find compassion, not confrontation. They need to feel respected, not challenged, and they need to be trusted.

Families cannot be forgotten after somebody dies by suicide. Families need to heal after that experience, that grief, that loss. They need guidance, assistance, and support. Families without support can become part of the problem, rather than a key part of the solution. Families empowered, included, and resourced can be a powerful tool.

Suicide is an extreme end to the wellness spectrum. Suicide is preventable, suicide is complex. Effective suicide prevention isn't a single event, or action, or policy, or program. It's a long-term, comprehensive approach to helping individuals and their families get well, be well, and stay well. It's about care and compassion. It's about the system of government and community supports working with families from the time they become connected to the military, throughout a military career, transitioning out of the military, and living as a veteran.

The Vanier Institute is here as a national resource. We are here to offer our assistance in the research you are doing. We are here to assist you to find the right answers to support families who are experiencing the trauma of people considering suicide.

Thank you very much.

(1545)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Next we'll have the Distress Centre of Ottawa and Region, Ms. Pizzuto, acting community relations coordinator. Welcome.

Ms. Breanna Pizzuto (Acting Community Relations Coordinator, Distress Centre of Ottawa and Region):

Thank you for having me here to speak to you today. This is a topic that I'm really grateful to have the opportunity to speak on. I'm really happy to hear that this committee exists and is looking into this topic.

I've been with the Distress Centre for three and a half years. I started as a volunteer on the phone lines, moved up into being a volunteer supervisor, and now I've been full-time staff for a year, so I have a bit of an idea of what we do from the front lines, and also now in a role supporting volunteers as well as our callers.

I'll tell you a bit about what we do at the Distress Centre. We're a 24-hour, telephone-based service offering crisis intervention, suicide prevention, emotional support, information, and referrals to those who need this. Our service area is quite large. It covers Ottawa; Gatineau; Prescott-Russell; Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry; Renfrew; Frontenac; Grey Bruce; and Nunavut and Nunavik in northern Quebec. We have over 220 active volunteers staffing our lines 24/7/365; and in 2016 we answered over 50,000 calls.

To give you an idea of where we fit in the province, Ontario has 14 distress centres, including Ottawa's, that answered over 302,000 calls in 2015, with over 1,800 active volunteers.

To tie in to why we're here today, I can tell you that in 2016, 1,118 of our calls had some mention of the caller or a family member experiencing PTSD; and 12,448 out of 50,000 mentioned a caller or family member with a mood disorder, which is the most common mental health concern we hear about next to schizophrenia and psychosis.

While we don't track military personnel or veterans specifically in our demographics, I did want to tell you a bit about a caller whom we hear from quite regularly, just to bring a face to this issue for you. In the interests of confidentiality, I'll refer to him as John.

John lives within our service area, and he's in his fifties. He is divorced and he lives alone. John has been on tours as an army captain in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Somalia. John has lost all the members of his squad, either in active duty or by suicide upon their return back to Canada. He is constantly haunted by the flashbacks of the experience he endured carrying his buddies off the battlefield in body bags. He was discharged from the army a few years ago without a pension, and is struggling financially, having blown through all his savings upon his return here. He struggles with drinking and smoking, which are his go-to coping strategies; and he often calls us when he's inebriated. He's been diagnosed with PTSD, as well as a host of other physical ailments that leave him in constant pain.

John's calls to us waver between feelings of strength and resiliency for getting through what he's experienced in his life, balanced with a constant suicidal ideation and helplessness at the fact that he very often feels discarded and left behind. John feels like he's the last man standing.

He has admitted to us that he needs counselling, but has told us many times that he doesn't want anything to do with Veterans Affairs. He's dealt with them in the past and expresses frustration at the fact that they just put him on medication when what he really wants is someone to talk to and to share his experience with. He's told us that he feels the military has thrown him on the trash heap.

John's story is one of too many veterans who are suffering, and we can learn a lot from him.

The Internet tells me that 85% of the Canadian military are men. Men's mental health is becoming an increasingly recognized area of concern in our society, with men dying by suicide at a rate four times higher than women. Given this statistic, combined with the proportion of men in the military, it would make sense then to spend some time looking into how men specifically could be supported—not to discount the women, of course, they're important, too.

It's often said that men are less likely than women to reach out for help when they need to. This is seemingly true, but our statistics at the Distress Centre show that 40% of our callers in 2016 were men, which is almost a half. From this number, we can conclude that men will reach out for help when they feel safe to do so.

Our service is confidential, judgment-free, and not directly linked to a specific workplace, the government, the military, or any other professional body. Callers know they will receive respect and an actively listening volunteer on every call and that their stories will be heard, but not shared. No matter what they've done in their lives or what's happened to them, our volunteers will extend the same kindness and support to every caller they speak to.

In preparing for this presentation, I spoke to some colleagues, as well as some current members of the reserves, who told me that there is a broad range of useful resources that currently exist within the military, and I think this is great. These resources are well promoted in the workplace and encouraged by employers. What we hear most often from our callers is that the stigma attached to getting help is the biggest barrier that prevents anyone from seeking help. It's the workplace culture: the peer pressure to be strong and unbreakable members of the military, or proud and resilient veterans.

(1550)



It was not too long ago, 2009 in fact, that the American army forced suicidal soldiers in basic training to wear a bright orange vest to identify themselves so they could have an eye kept on them. While this was intended to increase safety, it had the opposite effect of stigmatizing those who were struggling.

We often hear of the worry that people will have their job compromised at any mention of weakness, and it's the loss of identity that a person feels when they are stripped of their duties and thrown back into life without any support that's the most devastating. The dedication, strength, and willingness to sacrifice their bodies, lives, and minds for their country is something we must all honour in our vets and military members.

At the same time, we need to respect that with the loss of that ability to serve in the military comes an extreme loss of the sense of identity and self. These men and women are trained to act at peak performance on minimal amounts of rest. They have no choice but to become hypersensitive to the sights, sounds, and smells around them. Otherwise, they risk their lives and the lives of their comrades.

How can we reasonably expect our military personnel to return from such extraordinary circumstances and assimilate peacefully back into an ordinary life in Canadian society without help in doing so? We simply can't ask that of them.

Good mental health is more than just the absence of mental illness. Mental well-being or lack thereof comes from a combination of factors, and in speaking to how we can best support the transition between a career in the military and veteranhood, we must address all the factors that contribute to mental well-being, including financial stability, meaningful work, supportive personal relationships, family, and physical well-being. Alongside the obvious need for trained professionals to provide counselling or therapy comes the need for skills training, family support, income support, employment assistance, and couples counselling.

When John cannot afford more than a bowl of rice for dinner, how can we possibly expect him to obtain or maintain a job, or form meaningful relationships that will nurture and fulfill him? Human beings need safety and security above all else to survive and thrive.

A proactive approach would be helpful in transitioning military personnel into life after the military. I would put forth the recommendation that perhaps we could focus some time and energy into looking into how to better the supports that already exist, instead of creating new ones. It seems to me that there are resources out there that could be bolstered to better serve and become more accessible to the population that needs them. To break the barrier of stigma and promote safety in seeking help, perhaps partnering with a third party outside the military to provide support would be an avenue to explore.

There are over 100 distress centres across Canada, and a study reported on by Distress and Crisis Ontario has shown that volunteer-based support outperforms paid professional support on suicide phone lines. When compared, volunteers conducted more risk assessments, had more empathy, and were more respectful of callers, which in turn produced significantly better call outcome ratings than paid professionals on phone lines. It makes sense then that perhaps a partnership between Veterans Affairs and some or all of these Canada-wide distress centres would be a good idea, in the interest of saving money and building on an existing, proven, and effective source of help.

This is certainly an area that we at the Distress Centre of Ottawa are open to investigating. In fact, our board has already begun to explore the avenue of how we can better support the military personnel and vets in our existing work.

In closing, I would like to offer my respect and honour for the sacrifices made by these men and women. They might need help, but that doesn't mean they are helpless. They might be hurt, but that doesn't mean they are broken.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Next is the Mood Disorders Society of Canada, Mr. Gallson, associate national executive director; and Mr. Upshall, national executive director.

Welcome.

Mr. Philip Upshall (National Executive Director, Mood Disorders Society of Canada):

Thank you, Chair, for the opportunity to appear before you. My associate executive director is with me.

Just at the outset, I'd like to say I've appeared before a large number of standing committee meetings over the last 40 years of my activities in Ottawa, and I am so happy to see the members taking such a terrific interest in this topic. Frequently, standing committees show up with four or five members and it's rather impromptu. It's obvious you take this seriously and I'm really happy to see that.

Mood Disorders Society of Canada is a national, not-for-profit charity managed and membered by people with lived experience in their families. We are active at the national level only, and we have been around since 2011. We are active in many areas, some of which Dave will mention. We become engaged when we think there is an opportunity to do something for the people who need help. Those are the people who live with mental illnesses, whether they're on the street, whether they're veterans, whether they're first responders—whoever we can be involved with to help.

We've focused on that primarily because you can become involved in Ottawa with an awful lot of meetings and a lot of consultations, a lot of round tables, that produce not a whole lot of effective knowledge translation that will assist the people who need help. The material is important, and if you're involved in that stuff, that's fine; it's just not our bag.

One of the things we have done in the past, and we currently do, is become involved with the research community. We became involved with them initially when CIHR came into existence and with Bill C-300. We sat on their institute advisory board for many years. We're founders of the Canadian Depression Research and Intervention Network. The reason we did that is because there is a lot of research out there that I'm sure you've found is not translated into helping people who need help. We try to motivate the researchers and the community generally to pick up what we know will work and get it working, and still support research.

In 2004, we worked to help people with mental illness improve their quality of life. In 2011, we hosted a round table at the War Museum on PTSD. It was called Out of Sight, Not Out of Mind. The entire proceedings are on our website. It involved 75 people from all walks of life, including the Minister of Veterans Affairs, the military chief of staff, and a lot of people who were involved in the then-nascent discussion that PTSD is important.

Out of that came a report and many suggestions for improvement of our attention to PTSD. The recommendations presented in the report included addressing stigma; enhancing the knowledge of physicians and health care providers, which we think is number one on identification and treatment of PTSD; educating PTSD sufferers and their families on available support networks and resources; and promoting ongoing collaboration and dialogue among government and leaders in the field of mental illness specializing in PTSD.

We've looked at the presentations you've had in the last few days and they're terrific. You have a lot of really good information before you and there is no sense our repeating that information for you.

From our perspective, in order to address PTSD and prevent suicide, we would suggest you might look at early diagnosis of mental illness. Early diagnosis of mental illness will help us stop the movement into PTSD and into suicidal ideation. Early diagnosis requires the attention of the medical community to the issues of mental health, which is pathetically lacking at this time.

We would recommend that you increase mental health education among health care providers for the reason I just mentioned.

We strongly believe that peer support needs to be number one on your agenda. Whoever you talk to will tell you that it's the human touch, the human element. Research tells us that peer support needs to be there for you.

I'm going to turn it over to Dave Gallson to give you a bit of an overview of some of our programs.

(1555)

Mr. Dave Gallson (Associate National Executive Director, Mood Disorders Society of Canada):

Thank you.

About 70% of adults living with a mental illness have onset before the age of 18. We know that early intervention can reduce the severity of the illness. For chronic conditions, research indicates that many youth experience symptoms of their illness between the ages of 12 and 17 years. This is, therefore, the timeline where targeted treatment could significantly address mental illness.

Mental health problems in children and youth can, if not properly diagnosed and treated, lead to more serious adult mental health disorders, which are both more difficult and costlier to effectively address. When prior unaddressed mental health issues are compounded with PTSD later in life, then the path to wellness becomes much more difficult and lengthy. Investing in mental health services early would lead to more rapid recovery and symptom management, and would drastically reduce costs associated with chronic mental illness.

We believe strongly that investing in educational programs for Canada's health care providers to enhance their ability to better treat PTSD and other mental illnesses can significantly improve the quality of life of those suffering from PTSD, preventing suicide.

Expanding on educational programs will help train primary health care providers in urban, rural, and remote communities nationwide. In almost every case of PTSD, an associated condition is depression. Canadians are now coming to understand that depression alone is an epidemic in Canada. It is implicated in every aspect of Canadian life, from the workplace to death by suicide of over 4,000 Canadians every year.

Considering the societal, personal, and economic toll of PTSD, we believe that investing in a comprehensive program focused on Canada's primary health care providers to enhance their ability to provide early diagnosis and treatment of PTSD to their patients is a prudent use of public funds that will save significant health care and societal costs in the future, and greatly enhance the quality of life of those suffering from PTSD, their families, and caregivers.

We know working directly with veterans living with mental illness and providing supports to them is key to reducing suicide. I'd like to thank the federal government for its support in our transitions to communities program, a partnership program between MDSC, Employment and Social Development Canada, and Veterans Affairs Canada.

Through this skills development program, our goal is to assist nearly 450 veterans over three years who are experiencing obstacles within their communities. The program aims to provide the direct supports needed to address the emotional and coping strategy challenges of veterans, with a focus on employability skills, mental well-being, and peer support.

We've just opened three facilities in Montreal, Calgary, and Toronto. While we are at the beginning phase, we are looking forward to working closely with veteran organizations, community groups, and employers.

I'd also like to speak to you about the importance of peer support programs. As we've heard from veterans themselves, they are key to recovery.

For example, the national peer and trauma support training and the project trauma support programs are innovative approaches to addressing mental wellness that use a patient perspective approach. Their goals are to provide support, education, and programs for military personnel and first responders who have been impacted by PTSD and other mental health issues in order to support their healing and recovery.

Project trauma support, located in Perth, Ontario, is a week-long concentrated program for military and first responders who have had their lives ravaged by PTSD, and is delivered in a cohort of 12 of their peers. Project trauma support incorporates equine therapy, adventurous rope courses, and peer support to educate participants about their emotional environment, while creating trust and fostering help-seeking behaviour. The program allows participants to process their experiences and authentic emotions, and to improve the lives of their families and peers in the process.

As a brief example of the transformation this leads to, I offer two quick testimonials.

The first one is from an RCMP officer, who said, “I came away feeling that something had fundamentally changed in me and the way I would deal with my PTS. Not only have I noticed a difference in the way I now live my life, others around me have noticed as well. I only wish I could have had this 14 years ago.”

The wife of a military officer said, “I think the magnitude and impact of this past week can best be summed up by our nine-year-old daughter coming up to me and saying, 'It's weird, but it looks like Daddy's eyes are alive.'”

While professional help is very necessary, it's not always available at eight o'clock at night or midnight, when veterans need someone to talk to about their stresses or thoughts of suicide. With peer support programs, people have a network of peers who understand what they're going through, because they've experienced the same things and can relate on an equal level. Funding more programs like these, as well as effective research, would go a long way to supporting the mental health needs of veterans.

(1600)



In closing, our veterans have placed their lives on the line for our country. Providing care to these men and women must be a priority for all Canadians. Working as a team in training is what they know and how they have been conditioned. Healing and recovery need to use the same team approach.

We thank you for allowing us to share our thoughts.

The Chair:

That's excellent, and thank you.

We'll start the first round of questioning with Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC):

Colonel Mann, it's good to see you again. Thank you for your service. Ladies and gentlemen, thank you all for coming.

We've learned an awful lot in these short programs we've had, and there's so much we've learned that trying to condense it all into one report is going to be very difficult. There are four things we've definitely heard of. I hear it from you and I've heard it from many people that identity loss is a big issue; stigma, not only of being labelled but also the stigma within the ranks as to how it's perceived; trust is a form of treatment, and it's one of the first stepping stones we need to look for, and that's part of what we want to do. How can we provide the appropriate treatment and the appropriate programs? Then the last are the stressors, when people don't have that stress, how stress adds to that.

I appreciate your comments. I'm going to try to get some answers. Ms. Spinks, what could you tell this committee about the support program you're talking about? What would be the best way for us to start from one, two, three, in setting up that support for families?

(1605)

Ms. Nora Spinks:

There are a couple of things. Listen to the military families, those who are already in the military and those who have left the military and are now veterans. They talk with each other all the time. They're really clear on what they need. I think Phil mentioned this.

There's a ton of research out there that's not getting translated, and some knowledge mobilization, both on what's working well but also what's not working well and why it's not working well, so we're not replicating that. The family advisory committee that was set up by the minister is a good place to begin that dialogue and find ways to get that out.

We have some academic articles we were thinking of bringing to you for your background, but they're very dense. Taking that information and making it accessible and available, not only to committee but also to families themselves, is a piece that's missing from the puzzle. We have CIMVHR and all the great work the institute is doing on military veteran health research. We have all kinds of research that's being done in the mental health community; within and among the distress centre community. We're not really good at getting that on the ground.

That's from the organizational, academic perspective, but I'll let Russ answer from a veteran's perspective.

Col Russ Mann (Special Advisor, Vanier Institute of the Family):

I think Nora hit perhaps the most important aspect, and that's to listen. Those who have gone through suicidal ideation who I have encountered and had the privilege of speaking with of course have come away and are in recovery, but they and I both agree that the common thread of success has always been that somebody who refused to give up on them and who had no judgment just sat there and listened to their story and listened to their perspective and tried to understand without judgment.

Listening has to be a part of the program that goes into place. I think the Distress Centre has a lot of experience with active listening. When you spoke about kindness, I thought of someone acknowledging that person, their feelings, and their position as they are in that state of distress or heightened anxiety has to be a fundamental part of any program that comes forward.

It does not have to be from Veterans Affairs. If you want to create safety, which I think is perhaps the second most important piece, then yes, peer support works, because we trust our buddies. We trust our peers. We've been through shared lived experience, so it's natural that we'll form a connection. There's a lot that doesn't have to be said, because we already have a set of ground rules that we understand.

Creating safety creates an opportunity for listening, for a dialogue, and for the next steps whether they are a referral, developing a mutual plan of action, trying to mitigate any sources of potential harm or danger by actively listening and then engaging the person about what they would like to do about the medication, or what they would like to do about the knife, the gun, or whatever form the suicidal ideation is taking at that point in time. Trying to mitigate that through peer support in a safe zone, I think, is another important element of the program.

Where I come from with the Vanier Institute of the Family, it's creating the opportunities for families to become informed, resourced, and supported. If I go back to what I said at the beginning of this, it's having somebody who doesn't give up on us. For me, it was my wife. For someone else, it might be an aunt, an uncle, a friend, or a sibling. It could be a son or a daughter. That person who doesn't give up needs the opportunity to be armed with knowledge, resources, and support.

Those are the three things that I think would be fundamental parts of any program.

(1610)

Ms. Nora Spinks:

Can I just add one quick comment? One of the things we've done with the Leadership Circle, to pick up on what Breanna said, is building on what already exists and making those programs military-welcoming and veteran-inclusive. We don't have to start from a blank slate. We just need to staff up, resource up, and support and connect those who are already there.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Bratina.

Mr. Bob Bratina (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Thank you. It's been a great panel with great comments.

Could you just flesh out a little more how the relationship and partnership work in the military and veteran families leadership circle?

Ms. Nora Spinks:

There are about 40 community-based organizations and they're not the typical military organizations that you might find at a stakeholder summit or the like. There's the College of Family Physicians Canada and the Canadian Child Care Federation. There are community-based organizations that work either exclusively or substantially with military families, but also those that may come in contact with a military or veteran family, not in a big way, and want to learn and want to be a part of it.

The circle has four purposes: to build awareness, so that's public awareness information; to build capacity, which is organizational capacity, enhancing what's already there; to build competency, which is the professional competency and making sure that every family physician has basic military literacy, and we were able to get 35,000 family physicians some material on military literacy in the last month; and then finally, to build community, so that if somebody comes to the Distress Centre or to Mood Disorders or to a child care centre and is reaching out, whoever they reach out to will know how to get them to the right place.

Now if you call 911, you may get patched over to the Distress Centre. If the Distress Centre has military literacy, then it will be able to do its job even better than it's already doing, and it's doing an amazing job. Those are the four purposes.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

What resources go from Veterans Affairs Canada to your organization?

Ms. Nora Spinks:

Right now, nothing. They are active participants in the leadership circle. We have three co-chairs for that circle: the deputy minister of veterans affairs, the chief of military personnel command, and one of our board members. They co-chair together, and the resources they offer are that they're part of the team. There are no direct dollars or cash from Veterans Affairs to the institute.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Would you suggest a bigger role?

Ms. Nora Spinks:

I think one of the things we're hearing from the leadership circle is a desire for more of the awareness. In the space of a couple of months, from an idea to a launch, we were able to get to 35,000 family physicians coast to coast to coast: 4,000 of them in their hands, and the rest got it all by mail. It begins the conversation. At the next conference there will be workshops. At the following conference, we're hoping it will be even more. We're currently working with the College of Family Physicians to create a “best advice” guide.

It doesn't take much. That's family physicians; we would love to be able to replicate that with guidance counsellors in schools, principals, the early childhood education community, occupational therapists, physical therapists, recreation therapists. They all have a role to play in making sure that people either get to the services they need or are in a position to act appropriately when somebody comes to them and is reaching out to them. Whether it's a military member or a veteran or a family member—parent, spouse, child, or sibling—that would be a huge benefit.

If we could have half the success we've had with the family physicians, in terms of giving them some military literacy, with the mental health community, with the faith community, and with all of those people who are there and who won't give up on them, it would be huge.

(1615)

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Breanna, I gather you didn't really have many of those resources, if any, in dealing with John, in the discussions you had.

Ms. Breanna Pizzuto:

No, unfortunately not. I also produce our volunteer monthly newsletter, and in January I had so many volunteers stopping by my office after they spoke to this specific caller, saying that we need to find something for him. He is sitting at home. He has no money. He's barely eating.

As part of our volunteer newsletter, I tried to find resources to put into our database above what we already have. We have maybe four that he's been referred to loads and loads of times. It's kind of like our volunteers are there to listen to him, he needs somebody to talk to, we haven't given up on him, and he continues to call us, but as far as pushing him out into something....

Mr. Bob Bratina:

You've hit on the reason for our being, and that's service delivery and awareness of the things that are in place. Many veterans, and John could be an example, maybe take a stab at something. Documents are sent back as not complete, and they're just thrown in the garbage in anger. There's a whole range of activities, and the veterans who are falling through the cracks unfortunately miss because of lack of awareness. That would be good if your group had those things.

To the Mood Disorders Society, I was really touched by your comment that if mental health problems in children and youth are not properly diagnosed and treated, they can lead to more serious mental health issues. In Hamilton in 2007 we found that we had too much lead in the water. When I was a municipal councillor and now as a parliamentarian, I'm very concerned about it because of the effects of that lead on the brains of developing children. One of the main outcomes is behaviour and depression. In addition to the work we're doing here, I think we need to look at those things and see what leads to those behaviours.

I'm also pleased that the Mood Disorders Society has attached itself to the question of veterans, because you would agree that it's unique. The veterans story is a different story.

Mr. Philip Upshall:

We would agree to a certain extent, in the sense that PTSD and depression impact people generally the same way in the brain. You probably heard this from your researchers. There's a 5% issue for veterans, and there's a 5% issue for first responders, but that 5% is very important. Early diagnosis, getting involved with the community at the very early stages of mental illness, and understanding it are not unique to veterans. It's a unique issue for all Canadians, and particularly for primary caregivers and primary care spectrums.

Coming from Hamilton, of course, you've got the leaders of the shared care model out of McMaster, who we've had the privilege to work with. In collaborative care, we were the patient leadership in that whole movement.

Early intervention is by far the best thing, but, in order to do that, people have to understand what it is they're looking for. Far too often patients, veterans, and others show up in doctors' offices, in nurses' offices, and in rural, remote, and indigenous communities expressing some issue. The health care provider does not immediately say, “Oh, given your background”—because they don't take enough background—“we'd better have a look at this and see”. It's really up to the health care provider at that stage to start the ball rolling.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP):

Thank you to all of our witnesses.

We have had an incredible array of information provided by witnesses and so many possibilities. Each of you brings a specific expertise. How do we bring this all together in terms of finding that template, finding that solution, or I guess more appropriately, finding the path that will help all of our veterans?

Mr. Dave Gallson:

I might just start the ball rolling as far as a reply is concerned.

I have the honour of sitting on the Minister of Veterans Affairs' advisory panel for mental health, and part of his mandate letter was to create a centre of excellence, one focusing on mental health, and also to address suicide within the veteran and military population.

I think we have to realize that there's no one, simple, quick fix. There's no one, simple, quick answer. When we're talking about early diagnosis and early treatment, I have a real particular feeling that we've got to remember the children of the veterans who are going through these issues because we're looking at mental health issues coming down the pipe in 15 to 20 years, if not sooner, so there are a lot of issues that have to be addressed.

When I look at a centre of excellence centred on mental health and addictions, the first question we ask ourselves is this. Is it a brick and mortar research academic institution or a service delivery institution? We now realize that it's got to be a hub and spoke model. It's got to be a centre where a veteran can go into a wellness or a treatment program with other veterans so they're not sitting there with folks who have never been in service because they don't relate to them. They can't open up and talk because somebody's dealing with other issues that don't centre around PTSD issues.

Realize that there's not one answer—I don't want to take up too much time—but it's going to be a whole plethora of different services that are all tied in together and that are all working together to address a wide array of issues.

(1620)

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

You touched on something that we heard earlier in regard to veterans being told to go into group therapy with people who have no experience in military life, and how unhelpful that was.

Mr. Dave Gallson:

It's very unhelpful, and it can set them back a long time. I've had some veterans tell me that they went to see a psychiatrist for a year, and they were being completely honest and completely open, but it was only through the peer support that they really started to understand, being in a group setting with other veterans, that they were talking about things that weren't the root of the issues. They thought they were giving the psychiatrist the right answers, what the psychiatrist was looking for, but they weren't dealing with the root cause of the PTSD, which actually happened many years before service.

It's a learning process on how to use the services out there effectively, I think.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Ms. Spinks, do you want to respond as well?

Ms. Nora Spinks:

I think there are a couple of things too. Most of the services that have been established to meet the needs of military or veteran families are close to installations, such as Petawawa or Gagetown. But when you talk about veterans, you're talking about every community from coast to coast to coast, and we're never going to have a military-specific program in every community.

What we can do is to make sure that every community organization that exists has some basic military literacy, that they understand when somebody explains that they went to Afghanistan, and that they know what that means and don't just have some reference from a movie they saw one Saturday night with their friends but really understand what that means.

I think there's enormous interest across this country by professionals of all kinds who want to be ready to reach out to help, and they want to learn. I think the way we need to manage that—we're doing the same with direct service—is to balance high tech with high touch. We want to make sure that people have the personal contact and those personal relationships, and that they get access to those services they need from human beings, but also have access to technology—perhaps to be part of a group—and the use of technology so they can participate over the computer.

There are lots of experiments and innovation and successes being had by those kinds of specialty programs, but if you're not in it, you have no idea that it exists. One of the things the leadership circle did last year was to try to pull together the beginnings of a one-stop shop for information so you don't have to Google what you need to add to your list but you can just plug and play a list of what's available. We created it as a 1.0 document.

In order for it be successful so you can plug and play for a distress centre, we need that to be accessible online, searchable, and almost like a Wikipedia, because things are happening so quickly. Right now that doesn't exist. The foundation is there but the technology isn't. It's in a book. It's like the old blue book in Toronto. You had it but it gets dog-eared after awhile. We need to make that accessible for everybody so that if you're a volunteer at a distress centre—boom—it's there, whether it's information about housing and homelessness, or whether it's information on food services or mental health supports.

(1625)

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

Mr. Upshall, you made reference to moving the research. We heard some remarkable research on Monday from scientists and folks who are looking into the brain and at what is happening with those suffering from post-traumatic stress.

The Chair:

I'll just remind you we are right at zero time. We'll have to shorten the question and make the answer short also.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay.

You talked about moving from research into the clinical domain. How do we facilitate that?

Mr. Philip Upshall:

This is very difficult to keep short.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I do it all the time.

Mr. Philip Upshall:

One of the things you do is you get patients, in our case veterans, involved in the discussion and educate the researchers as to who they're dealing with, who they're working for, and who needs that information. In the vast majority of cases, it's the health care provider.

We work with the Royal Ottawa and the Mental Health Commission, which were your witnesses on Monday, and both are excellent organizations. The Royal Ottawa is part of the Canadian Depression Research and Intervention Network that I talked about. It's about getting them to understand that there are people out there who can help them translate that information, but they have to be motivated to make the link.

In research, one key issue is that researchers far too often stop their work when they publish. It's the way they work. I've worked with post-docs and I've worked with all sorts of people who say, “If you want me to help you translate the information beyond my publication, you'll have to pay me.” I don't have the money to pay them, and I have to twist their arm to volunteer to help me work.

One of the ways we did it was that we developed a PTSD CME. It was an outcome of the Out of Sight, Not out of Mind project. Collaborating with the Canadian Medical Association, Veterans Affairs, and others, we developed a continuing medical education resource of $200,000 which came out of the 2012 budget. This is still valuable today. Unfortunately, it's a CME and we haven't been able to get the money to move it out. Nevertheless, it's there and it has been very valuable. It has great research. We have some information here if you—

The Chair:

Maybe we can get you to send that to the clerk afterwards, and we'll get it to the committee.

Thank you.

Ms. Lockhart.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Thank you all for being here today. You have provided great perspectives for us.

I want to start by saying that I'm very encouraged. Personally, whenever I've been talking to mental health professionals recently, the idea basically of “no wrong door” has been coming up. I've talked to some in New Brunswick who have had great success with this from the viewpoint of a youth mental health process and just as a general community pilot project. It's great to hear you talking about the same thing.

What we're studying, obviously, is suicide, and specifically during the transition, and the risks in that transition piece for veterans. Another big piece of it is identity.

I'm wondering, in the context of a family, whether from your experience the family experiences that sense of loss of identity as well. How much impact does this have, and how does it factor in?

Ms. Nora Spinks:

We hear from military families all the time that they identify as a military family. What they don't identify with is a military family in transition to civilian life or a “veteran family”. Once you're military, you're military for life.

Little things that we've heard affect families deeply are simple things, such as the veteran's licence plate that you can put on your car, with the veteran's poppy on it. When the veteran dies or becomes divorced, the family has to give up the licence plate. Little things make a big difference.

We don't have identifiers in most data collection intake forms. We don't have them at the distress centre, we don't have them at doctors' offices, we don't have them in schools. They have them in other jurisdictions around the globe and they find it very useful—not to pry or to get into people's lives, but to help them feel welcomed and respected and included, and then to make sure that they get information and access to support, should they ever need these things.

We have much that we can draw on from other countries. We're involved in an international consortium that's looking at translating research, because so much of this is biology, so much of it is experiential, and we share this with the U.K., Australia, and the U.S., and with our other allies. We don't have to start from scratch; there are services out there that, with very little resource, could be tweaked and Canadianized and made readily available.

(1630)

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you. I appreciate that insight.

Mr. Gallson, I have some questions for you.

From other testimony, we've heard that it's often a barrier for families to access services that are provided by third parties because there's a requirement for them to pay up front and then be reimbursed. Is that the case with your programs as well? Have your participants expressed any difficulties with that situation?

Mr. Dave Gallson:

Absolutely not. I am completely against fee-for-service services, to tell you the truth. I developed a program many years ago because of people in our community not being able to access services, just for that reason.

Our programs are funded by the federal government. We're a very collaborative organization. We believe strongly that programs, especially programs funded by the federal government, should be expandable programs that are shared across all organizations in Canada. There is too much of a silo effect out there whereby programs are developed and then an ownership issue arises: “This is my program”, and yada, yada, yada.

That hurts people. We have to make programs more available across Canada, to all organizations. That's something we do very well.

I can't say enough about the leadership circle and the networking that goes on within it. I'm having a meeting on Friday with another organization. There will probably end up being a new program in Canada for PTSD and for families. That's a direct result of the collaborative nature that this whole organization has. That's the way we have to move forward.

We've developed a PTSD program for the Canadian Bar Association for lawyers. It's been taken by more than 2,000 lawyers so far. We've developed programs with the Canadian Nurses Association for anti-stigma in hospitals, because we found that health care providers are, amongst others, one of the most stigmatizing associations around in terms of recognizing people who come into emergency rooms with potential mental health issues. They are triaged lower, there's a lot of hesitation to even recognize that there is a mental health issue, and many people have lost their lives because of this.

I'm sorry to make it a long answer.

We work with all organizations across Canada. We're fire-starters. We like taking projects, starting them, and then sharing them across Canada. We've been working with Public Safety over the last 18 months. Right now we have a proposal in front of the federal government for a national PTSD action plan. We're hoping that it gets a good look. It's a collaborative approach to doing this.

We are a meat-and-potatoes kind of organization. We like doing things, with the funds that are provided to us, that are going to make an impact on the family unit at the home.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Mr. Upshall, I have a quick question. You talked about early detection of PTSD. Have you seen any screening during military service, pre-, post-, anything like that? Do you think it would be helpful?

Mr. Philip Upshall:

There has been an effort to do some screening and particularly when members are close to discharge. Russ would be a better person than me to answer this. The reality is that a lot of PTSD doesn't show its ugly face until many months and sometimes years after a person is discharged. Men, particularly veterans, are used to saying, “I'm okay. I'm fine. There's nothing the matter with me. I've been through this.” It's only when they get home and experience all of the difficulties that come with the recollection of what happened that they feel the impact.

I would like to add on your question to Nora. One of the issues, in terms of family identity, is that kids watch dad or mom go away, and they're so happy. There are pictures in the paper and big kisses at the navy wharf or wherever, and dad or mom goes off. Then dad or mom comes home, and there's a celebration, and the kids are proud of their parents, proud of their dad and mom. They talk about it in school. Their kids are there.

All of a sudden, six months later, out of the blue—mom may have seen a little bit but the kid hasn't—dad beats the tar out of mom. Holy mackerel, what a trauma. And nothing happens. Mom has heard a little bit about military issues and decides to do some checking, and then it happens again. Then all of a sudden, dad is charged. He goes to jail. There's a divorce. All this stuff happens. That is a trauma that will drag that kid for 60 more years after dad comes home from Afghanistan. We frequently forget that that happens and the impact of that trauma, which goes untreated and unrecognized. Forty years later that kid may have a real problem, and they'll never be able to track it back to that incredible trauma. They're high one minute and right at the bottom the next.

Sorry for that, Chair.

(1635)

The Chair:

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.):

Thank you all very much for being here today and sharing your thoughts. Those excellent presentations will be very helpful. Thank you also for all the work that you do that's so important in our country.

Ms. Pizzuto, I'd like to start with you. You mentioned that you don't track military or veterans as part of a demographic that you would ask questions about or find out about in terms of numbers. I'm wondering why not. Do you think it's something that could be done in order to gain a better background about the person you're talking to and keep some statistics that might be helpful for us to make different decisions going forward?

Ms. Breanna Pizzuto:

Yes, I think it's something that could easily be done, added into our system. The reason we don't right now is because all of our statistics are provincially mandated, what they want us to keep track of reporting-wise, so we pretty much stick to what we've been asked to report back on. That's something that we've never been asked before, but it would be helpful, I agree. It's certainly doable.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

If the information is offered by the caller, for example, would you then put them in touch with VAC services and do that sort of connecting?

Ms. Breanna Pizzuto:

Absolutely, yes.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Do you know if that happens quite a lot? You mentioned some of the numbers of how many calls you receive from military personnel or veterans.

Ms. Breanna Pizzuto:

I would say it happens a fair amount but probably not as much as it should. As Nora was saying, we're perhaps not recognized as a veteran-specific service. We're not a veteran-specific service, so perhaps if there was some more training given to us, or if we could grow that partnership and be more recognized as a support for veterans, we would see that number grow.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

As I understood it, your centre is incoming phone calls. There's a hotline number, and calls come in.

Ms. Breanna Pizzuto:

Yes.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Is there any thought of online services that could be accessed for you to respond to people who may not necessarily want to pick up the phone and call?

Ms. Breanna Pizzuto:

Yes, absolutely. This year, we're going to be rolling out a text and chat function that some distress centres in Canada have already started, which will allow people to access our services online or through their mobile phones.

The other thing, which is separate from the distress line but also a program that we run out of the distress centre, is called the wellness check program. If a patient presents to an emergency department at a specific hospital and consents to a call from us, they will receive a call within 24 to 72 hours after their discharge. If they're admitted to the hospital, we'll give them a call after their discharge, however long that may be. We'll check in with them and see if the hospital left them with a discharge plan, if they're following their medication regimens, and if they're seeing who they're supposed to be seeing. That's something that could be done with veterans, following up after the fact, because these people have said that PTSD doesn't necessarily show up right away. You can do a psych assessment the minute they're discharged, and they'll say they're fine. Then six months or a year down the road, the PTSD starts to crop up.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you very much. I appreciate that answer.

Let me turn now to the Vanier Institute. You talked about the leadership circle a couple of different times, but once in response to Mr. Bratina's question. I'm just a little unclear. How does this look across the country, as far as rollout in towns and cities is concerned? Is it available to all people across the country?

Ms. Nora Spinks:

The leadership circle is primarily national, so we work with the national partners. Having said that, we recently co-hosted a regional leadership circle in Newfoundland for Atlantic Canada to ensure that everybody from the regional organizations also had the necessary military literacy that they needed to do their job well. We were able to address some of the provincial issues.

This subject comes up often, particularly with veteran families. Because they've moved around a lot and because of the nature of our health care system, provinces need to be connected. Right now, the leadership circle is not well connected to the provinces, but it's a priority for the leadership circle. The leadership circle meets every January, and the job we've been tasked with by the members for this coming year is to find a way to engage the provinces and the regions, because we can't do what we want to do without their involvement.

(1640)

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Are there any recommendations we could make that would assist in this?

You could think about it and email us.

Ms. Nora Spinks:

There could be an identifier on the medical record, absolutely, which would then allow us to track and to connect.

Right now, Ontario has some data that we can mine, but not enough. Certainly, we could have the provinces understand the veteran data in their own provinces. If you're a provincial person, you're going to think of Gagetown, or Petawawa; you're not necessarily going to think of downtown Hamilton.

Col Russ Mann:

I think it's also important to realize that we attack nationally because....

I'll give you one specific example, of the Canadian Paediatric Society. We talked about the impact on children. They came up with a position paper and recommendations for pediatricians across the country. By dealing with a national association, they push it to their provincial and regional chapters and to clinics and offices that are going to encounter people, not unlike the way we do with a distress centre that isn't built for veterans or veteran families but that is, in their practice in providing service and support, encountering veteran families amongst other Canadian families.

This is a problem that has to be attacked right down to the local level, but of course we can't do so with every single pediatrician. The Paediatric Society owns that network of informing and educating, so we engage them.

There are impacts being felt very locally, however. One of the more recent ones dealing with mental health that is pertinent to this committee concerns Broadmind, in Kingston, where one of the members of the leadership circle is helping to bring mental health first aid to the Kingston community with what I'll call mental health first aid on steroids, because they've taken the national programming for mental health first aid and put in local resources and local support to boost the effect in that specific area.

Those are the kinds of things that need to happen. The provincial side could have an amplifier effect for getting it to local communities.

Ms. Nora Spinks:

Can I just give one quick example?

The Chair:

Can you make it quick, please?

Thank you.

Ms. Nora Spinks:

Pediatricians, as a result of this, now have a program whereby they do a warm handover. Instead of your being a patient of a pediatrician and then moving across the country and going to the bottom of the waiting list and working your way up, there is now a warm handover. That military family, that veteran family now, as a result of the work that they've been doing, doesn't have to go back on a wait-list and doesn't have to start over. It's a great model that we can replicate for a whole host of other services.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Wagantall.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, CPC):

Thank you so much for being here today and for the amazing work that's being done.

Clearly we have a crisis across our country, and we're focused on our veterans and our armed forces. It seems to me there are two areas of mental health that we look at: the crisis situation they experience, and then the other, which is the ongoing building of frustrations in transition. These are two very different sources for dealing with your mental health.

I heard a lot of conversation about peer support, and we've heard that over and over again, about veterans helping veterans. I've never been in the armed forces, but I had a girlfriend try to tell me how to take care of my two year old before she had one. That peer support is so important. And we're hearing from all kinds of veterans organizations that are popping up and doing really good work and are very organized with top-notch therapists, psychiatrists, doctors, researchers connected with them, and then I see that we need to be funding more programs like this.

What are you thinking as far as funding is concerned? I like to think of them as innovative start-ups in a lot of ways. They don't have the money to do what they could do really well and mitigate a lot of these issues, even prevent them from happening.

(1645)

Mr. Philip Upshall:

A very brief response would be we should encourage them, we should identify those that are out there that are doing a good job and replicate it and provide the funding. It's very cheap to provide peer support, provided it's recognized. And again as a patient community, one of the issues we've had with the research and medical community is that they have absolutely refused to accept the validity of peer support as an evidence-based medical intervention.

We had to twist the shared care community's arm. We refused to become involved with the collaborative care, insured care, until they recognized that on the continuum of support, shared peer support should be there. So the issue is if Veterans Affairs wants to do something, funding peer support community that provides valuable peer support. Project trauma support is very inexpensive compared to other models, and it really does work. And we know of others. The issue is whether the Government of Canada's Veterans Affairs has the desire to reach out and do this. Part of the reaction you will get is that this isn't evidence-based. We need to put more money into research.

Could I tell you a very quick story? Last year when Fantino was Minister of Veterans Affairs, he called me and Alice Aiken who was then the head of CIMVHR into the office and said we needed to do something about PTSD, particularly service dogs. I told him service dogs are really important. They work. I know they work, if he gave us the dough, we could get more service dogs, we only have a limited number of training facilities so we have to build that up...blah, blah, blah. Alice, and she was right in a certain context, told the minister we weren't sure yet. There wasn't a really good evidence base, and so he should give her the money and she should do the research and then let him know. We went back and forth. Minister Fantino said we were going to go the research route. We went the research route. The research proved what we knew worked. Common sense told us it worked. A hundred veterans told us it worked. I said now we've got evidence, would he give us some money to start working this out. And he said no, they were right out of money.

It's so discouraging to get involved in that kind of a process, and my apologies for being so long about it.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

No, I appreciate that.

Mr. Dave Gallson:

Can I add to that really quickly?

In the last few months, we brought people from across Canada to Perth to take this project trauma support, and they've already gone back to their communities and created four different peer support programs.

Right now I'm working with True Patriot Love. I'm trying to raise $350,000 to expand this program with the research component over the next 12 months. I was at Queen's yesterday. Heather Stuart is happy to do the research on this for free, so there we'll have the evidence base, but I need $350,000. We're going out fundraising with our hat in hand.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

I know of a group from Saskatchewan with all the research done. They are functioning as a charity to create exactly that, service dogs that would be provided to our veterans, not at $20,000 or $30,000 a piece, but free of charge. This is where I get really frustrated in looking at the dynamics of what should be done because it can be done, and the bureaucracy slows everything down.

Mr. Dave Gallson:

I'd be happy to send you our PTSD ask, so there you go. There's a good answer. There's some meat in the oven for supper.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Yes.

Mr. Dave Gallson:

It's a start. It's bringing everything together and it's starting the ball forward. We can sit around and talk about this, but I wouldn't be doing my job if I wasn't sitting here saying that we need to throw some money at this right now. People are losing their lives.

(1650)

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Exactly.

Mr. Dave Gallson:

There's a program in the United States; twenty-two veterans a day are taking their own lives. We have to change this and we have to do it with some concrete steps.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

We have to deal with the crisis we're in, but I would like to see us cut the head off the dragon. Right off the bat there are so many ways that people are saying they could help if DND would keep these people in service, paid, until they are truly ready to be released with all of the supports they need. I think that's a direction we need to go in as well.

I've probably used my time.

The Chair:

In fairness, I'm going to give you an extra minute, because I think everybody else has had at least that much today.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Where do I go?

Col Russ Mann:

If you like, I could add something.

You talked about transition and the loss of identity, but I think it's important to also, perhaps, reframe that. It's the loss of sense of purpose that puts people like me in crisis. If you want to compound that with the stresses Mr. Kitchen referred to, all you have to do is break our circle of support. Right now, the government has structured transition to break the circle of support. DND and Veterans Affairs do not act as a continuum in the transition spectrum. They act as two separate entities, with separate frameworks and separate operating methods. To the family and the veteran in transition, that feels like it is breaking their circle of support.

We don't lose everyone. The question came up about how we screen for post-traumatic stress. An example of the circle of support is actually outside the establishment, but connected by the establishment. My own case of mental health diagnosis, post-traumatic stress, was done by a civilian psychiatrist who I was referred to by my GP at the base. My military doctor said, “I'm not sure what's going on. Let's refer you to someone who might be able to explore further.” The reason I showed up at my GP's was because of my circle of support, my family and friends. My wife said, “There's something wrong.” My friend said, “What's going on?” when I broke down one day at work for no good reason.

There's an important element there of continuity of care even if you're not case-managed. Continuity of care means you feel supported during transition. That's the effect that government should be an active partner in delivering.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Eyolfson is going to split with Mr. Graham, I believe.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, everyone, for coming.

I'm a physician. I've practised emergency medicine for 17 years, so of course, we would often see the different aspects of mood disorders either previously diagnosed presenting or sometimes we would see a first diagnosis. Mr. Upshall and then Mr. Gallson, in reference to mood disorders, one of the things we have always known about is the link—in young people, particularly, but in all groups—between substance abuse and mental illness. The link is clear; the causality isn't as clear as a chicken-and-egg thing. We do know, and I've diagnosed this on more than one occasion, that when a young person is brought in with a drug problem, it turns out their symptoms of mental illness actually predated the drug use.

Mr. Philip Upshall:

They're self-medicating.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

They're self-medicating, exactly.

We suspect that there are many people walking around who are in the justice system because of their substance abuse. They have been drunk driving, and have been fired from their jobs for their substance.

Is there a concerted effort, as part of your education of health care providers, to say that if there's a substance problem of any sort, one of the first things you should look for, in addition to treating the substance abuse, is an underlying mental illness?

Mr. Philip Upshall:

It comes up, but it's not a principal goal of ours, to be frank. It would be if we had more money to provide the services. Then, we could. One of the issues with emergency physicians, who I love dearly.... However, with the triage pyramid, the difficulty was, unless you were suicidal, you were down with slight abdominal pain. Very few people going into emergency could wait the eight to 10 to 12 hours that slight abdominal pain required.

On our website is Jenny's story. Jenny is the daughter of one of Canada's past assistant chief public health officers. She was what we call a cutter—you would have seen a number of them. The effort it took us working collaboratively with her to get her help was beyond belief. This was a senior public health officer in Canada, and it was in Ottawa.

We met with the emergency physicians. The willingness to accept mental health issues as important when they appear in emergency room settings has not been what I would call receptive. I would hope, over time, that the recognition, as we continue to educate, will indicate that it doesn't have to bleed to be an emergency. Psychosis is just as much an emergency as a heart attack. We would argue that if you like, but my opinion—

(1655)

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

No, I couldn't agree more. Psychosis and depression kill the same way heart attacks do.

Mr. Philip Upshall:

Yes, exactly. We're on the same page.

We support the federal government in its efforts to push the provinces to put more effort and money into mental health resources. What we're hoping, with the minister of Health and her efforts on mental health issues, is that the minister herself will start to say, “Look, addictions and mental health are too closely aligned to be separate.”

We need all the provinces to bring mental health and addictions together, and then we can work with community groups that are combined in the provinces. Federally, addictions are here, and mental health is over there. I'm sure I'm not telling you anything, but the silos in addictions and mental health, particularly in research and in clinicians, are beyond belief. It's incredible.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham, you have a couple minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Ms. Pizzuto, I have a quick question for you.

I come from a large rural riding. It's a little smaller than the state of Vermont, and so I'm always concerned how somebody who needs services like yours can find them. How does someone who needs to call the crisis line find the crisis line to call in the first place?

Ms. Breanna Pizzuto:

That's a good question.

It's on the Internet, if they have it. If they don't, we try to get our cards and pamphlets out to as many doctors' offices, libraries, lawyers' officers, and counsellors' offices as we can so that the number is there. We try to spread the word from mouth to mouth so, if they happen to disclose to a friend or family member, that friend or family member might know of our service and refer them to it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the case of John, have you reached out to Veterans Affairs yourself to see how they can help from the other side, or do privacy laws block that?

Ms. Breanna Pizzuto:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

At what point does the urgency of a situation trump the privacy laws to allow you to intervene in some other way besides—

Ms. Breanna Pizzuto:

When there's a life immediately on the line. John's life is, to some extent, always on the line, but if his life were immediately at risk, we would have to overstep confidentiality. In this case, it would be outside of our service mandate to reach out to Veterans Affairs on his behalf.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can you do it in a non-specific way? Like, we have this situation, what can you do for us? Or not even that?

Ms. Breanna Pizzuto:

I suppose. It goes back to John's willingness to even deal with Veterans Affairs. At the end of the day, if he's had it with them, he's not going to seek out their support no matter what we do.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's a good point.

If we get to the point where Veterans Affairs does have the confidence of some veterans, and we want to rebuild John's confidence, how do we bring him back in? I'm not sure how to phrase this. Veterans Affairs is going to have to change over time to accommodate people like John. How do you bring them back in? How do you convince them that it's okay now, you can trust them now?

Ms. Breanna Pizzuto:

Don't let them leave in the first place.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That ship may have sailed. I'm trying to figure out how to....

Col Russ Mann:

Peers.

Ms. Breanna Pizzuto:

Yes.

Col Russ Mann:

Peers bring more of us out of basements than anybody else. It's peers who get us to understand that we can go somewhere and seek help. The service offered here, if it connects people to another peer or makes them aware of other peer services, could become a potential referral that eventually leads to a referral to seek professional help.

I'm not scientific, but the best case I know of with people I have commended and people I have worked with is peer referral.

(1700)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Kitchen. I believe you're splitting your time with Mr. Shipley.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Very quickly, Ms. Spinks, you tweaked my interest when you made a comment about support for families after a crisis. Can you expand on that?

Ms. Nora Spinks:

One of the things we've heard from families is they identify as a military family. They're a military family forever. Oftentimes what happens is the care that's available, as limited as it might be in some locations, is focused on the individual. It's partly silos, partly privacy, but an individual is going to get care. But it's the family affected by that crisis that also may need care. So it's those kids who Phil was talking about. It's those classroom teachers who see this little 10-year-old crying at his desk and need to reach out.

We haven't yet come up with a good way to provide comprehensive, family-based support, whether it's health care community services or the like. Yet we know that if families are there, they're the ones who are going to provide the linkages. They're the ones who are going to provide the connection. They're the ones who are going to be there in that basement at three o'clock in the morning to call the crisis line. We need to think more holistically.

In most provinces now all their health care services are patient first. What about the family first, the circle of support that is going to make that treatment a success, that is going to provide the continuity, the navigation, that's going to be there when they need to reach out for support?

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Do you perceive that families after a crisis, in particular a suicide, are abandoned by that?

Ms. Nora Spinks:

I can't speak specifically for VAC, but by and large families are neglected after a crisis.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Would having some of those services provided by VAC be a valid service?

Ms. Nora Spinks:

We're certainly hearing from spouses and family members that they too have a need for peer support. It's being able to chat with another spouse at three o'clock in the morning because they finally got their partner back into bed, calmed down, asleep and resting. Now they're wired and so they need somebody to talk to as well. Having peer support for the spouses or the parents who are managing the situation on a day-to-day basis has been seen to be really important.

As Phil mentioned, to connect that back to the data building, the knowledge sharing, is critically important. We talk a lot about evidence-based programs. We also had evidence-inspired and evidence-informed. A lot of that happens among families. It's not just evidence-based experience, but it's experience-based evidence. When listening to those families, it doesn't take much to get them talking. It does take much to trust them to talk a second time if you don't listen to them in the first round.

How do you support those veterans? You start talking to them from the day they enter the military, and you continue that all the way through and try not to pass the buck. It doesn't work.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you.

Mr. Upshall, you talked about knowledge translation. I appreciate your comments on that because it's very important. Being a primary care practitioner myself, I've always gone to seminars, etc. What's my take-away from this seminar? What can I do the next day in my office?

This is an issue that I think a lot of primary care practitioners do not know about. Would you agree that it would be worthwhile that all regulatory bodies mandated that their primary care practitioners had a CME program such as you're suggesting, such that every practitioner might be able to have an understanding of what to do the moment someone who has a veteran's experience walks into their office?

Mr. Philip Upshall:

I agree absolutely. We go further than that, however. We've approached the Royal Society; we hit a brick wall on that. But it's important for the entire spectrum of health care providers to understand mental health issues.

I'm outside the veterans side of things now, but we've moved back also to trying to get the medical educational community, particularly at universities, to understand doctors and to get new doctors trained in mental health, just as they're trained in cardiovascular and other issues. Unfortunately, up until very recently they spent hours on cardiovascular issues or on cancer and maybe half an hour or two hours on mental health issues.

As I'm sure you all know by now, mental health issues are comorbid with cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, PTSD—you name it. Depression particularly is almost always present in all those chronic illnesses.

We would be entirely supportive, but it's a major project, because we have these historical silos. We have organizations that insist, and this is true in Health Canada and in Ontario Health as well, that, “We've always done it this way. For years we've done it this way, and this is the way we're going to do it.” We have to beat our heads: we continue to do that.

We support it. That's the short answer.

(1705)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Shipley, Mr. Kitchen has left you a minute.

Mr. Bev Shipley (Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you all for coming out and being so forthright.

I was on the veterans committee a few years ago, and the unfortunate part is that we were talking about the same sorts of things. This is not to say that things haven't changed; it's just that the situation seems to multiply on top of itself a little bit. DND and veterans constitute a big problem. It has been big, and it seems it hasn't resolved itself yet.

One thing I wanted to ask, though, concerning mental health and PTSD, is about the psychological effects and then about what professionals they are referred to. At one time it was a concern—and you mentioned it—that 95% of PTSD is attributable to the experiences shared by all Canadians, and so when they go to a psychiatrist or psychologist, 5% is attributable uniquely to the military, either to combat or to specific causes.

Is it true, though, that this percentage may be higher than that, if the professional has never walked in their boots, has never shared that same experience of combat and the sorts of things they have to deal with when they get back?

Are there enough professionals to meet the demand? I guess that's really my question.

Mr. Philip Upshall:

No, there aren't enough.

The Chair:

You'll have to keep your answer in the minute also.

Mr. Philip Upshall:

These demands are very difficult.

The issue is that you're talking about a specific veteran's trauma activity that the professional may not have been involved in and may not have had boots on the ground for or whatever.

If the professional is properly trained they will be able to ask, “What's your background?” and in their discussion get issues of trauma coming out. The trauma could be early childhood abuse; it could be residential schools; it could be whatever. In this instance, it's a military activity.

The doctor should then be able to say that there is somebody to refer you to who has specific experience in this, but it would be focused on that 5% or maybe 10%. That to me is the way to go, again from the community point of view.

Mr. Bev Shipley:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Ms. Mathyssen, we'll end with you now.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses.

I wanted to say to you, Mr. Upshall, it's interesting that you talked about the research that had to happen before the service dogs could be utilized, and the research took up all the money, so there were no service dogs. That question was asked early on of the assistant deputy minister, who said, “Well, the research is not conclusive with regard to how effective these dogs are.” I sympathize and understand your concern about this never-ending circle.

We're going to be writing a report here, and I want to underscore some of the things that I think should be in the report.

I'll start with you, Nora.

We're talking about the importance of the family. It's a critical part of a veteran's wellness. You talked about them dealing with the issues and the need to have the tools to deal with them. We've heard from spouses that they need training, specific training. How do I deal with and cope with and help this veteran, who is a different person from the one I met and married 10 years ago? We need marriage counselling, because marriages are unravelling, relationships are unravelling. We need mental health care for the spouses and the children, and that comes back to what you said about respite care, because you can't do this 24/7. Finally, we need access to VAC for better care with regard to the family's and spouse's needs. That should be in the report, yes.

The second thing—and it goes back to what Ms. Wagantall was talking about—is making sure, as the military ombudsman recommended, that everything is in place before that veteran leaves the military—the pension and the health care. Would more active involvement by mental health workers be an important thing to add in there? That's so that they're not financially vulnerable, so that they have these coping mechanisms for what is going to be a remarkably stressful, difficult change in life because they are, and always will be, military. They just don't have the accolades.

If we include those things, are we on the right track?

(1710)

Mr. Philip Upshall:

I'll shut up because I've had too many lately—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Philip Upshall: —but I have some views on the matter, if I can have a minute later on.

A voice: Oh, sure.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

That's up to the chair, and you know he's brutal.

The Chair:

Go ahead, and we'll wind this up.

Mr. Philip Upshall:

Well, first of all, you haven't mentioned this, and I meant to mention it earlier. One of the things that you can do—and I'm sure everyone would agree—is recommend the provision of system navigators. It's really important, and a trusted system navigator—not a guy like me, but a guy like Russ—who knows his stuff can take a person by the hand. When you're in crisis, you don't know who to call, you don't what to do, and you don't know where to go. Even before you're in crisis, when you're in the discharge phase, if there's someone who says, “I will take your hand and I will work with you”.... We found it terrific in hospitals. If you have a system navigator, you can get somebody discharged and get them the help they need as opposed to saying, “Look it up on Google”. System navigators would be very helpful, and I'd certainly recommend that.

I'd recommend funding peer support for family caregivers as well as for veterans. Mood Disorders Canada is a peer-support community for both patients and families.

Those would be the key things. I'm going to leave it to everybody else, because otherwise I'll keep going.

Mr. Dave Gallson:

I'll just add one thing to it. Speaking of family physicians, you have to remember that family physicians have a business to run as well, and they've only got a limited amount of time to see a patient. We have found that there are a lot of family physicians who don't know all of the resources that are available in the community and therefore cannot take a patient and say, “Hey, listen, you have to go down to this group over here and go meet with them because they have some services down there that would really support you.” It's not just all about a pill, a prescription, and stuff. A whole wealth of resources needs to be implemented, too, for wellness.

The Chair:

Thank you, all. This ends today's panel. Bells are going to ring in a minute here.

I'm sure I speak for all of us in that we could probably do another round. The information and testimony you've given us today have overall been excellent. On behalf of the committee, I want to thank all of you and your organizations, not only for your testimony today, but for what you do for the men and women who have served.

If there's any other information—and I know, Mr. Gallson, you said you had some to send to us—you could send it to the clerk, and he'll get it distributed throughout the committee.

Can I have a motion to adjourn?

This meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des anciens combattants

(1540)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Neil Ellis (Baie de Quinte, Lib.)):

Je voudrais déclarer la séance ouverte, si tout le monde veut bien s'asseoir.

Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) et de la motion adoptée le 29 septembre, le Comité reprend son étude de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide chez les vétérans.

Aujourd'hui, nous recevons trois organismes et nous commencerons par 10 minutes de questions. Il y a le Centre de détresse d'Ottawa et la région, la Société pour les troubles de l'humeur du Canada et l'Institut Vanier de la famille.

Nous allons commencer par l'Institut Vanier de la famille avec Nora Spinks, directrice générale, et le colonel à la retraite Russ Mann.

Mme Nora Spinks (directrice générale, Institut Vanier de la famille):

Merci. Je m'adresse à vous aujourd'hui en tant que directrice générale de l'Institut Vanier. Comme vous le savez, l'Institut a été fondé voici plus de 50 ans par feu le très honorable général Georges P. Vanier et sa femme Pauline, mère de ses cinq enfants et, par moments, sa soignante. Il était l'un des chefs militaires les plus décorés du Canada, un vétéran des deux guerres mondiales ayant perdu une partie de sa jambe lors de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale.

Je suis ici avec mon collègue, le colonel à la retraite Russ Mann, qui travaille à l'Institut sur l'Initiative pour les familles des militaires et des vétérans du Canada et coordonne le Cercle canadien du leadership pour les familles des militaires et des vétérans. Il s'agit d'un consortium de plus de 40 organismes communautaires qui s'engagent à travailler ensemble pour construire un cercle de soutien fort pour les familles de ceux qui choisissent de porter l'uniforme pour le Canada.

Je ne suis pas experte du suicide. Je suis ici pour parler des familles. Je suis ici pour parler du rôle que jouent les familles dans la prévention du suicide, pour parler de la diversité des familles et de la complexité de la vie de famille. Je suis ici pour vous montrer les preuves issues de la recherche en ce qui concerne le rôle de la famille dans la prévention des suicides, ce qui est très difficile à cause du défi que représente la mesure de quelque chose qui n'a pas eu lieu.

Tout d'abord, la famille est notre première expérience de groupe et nos parents sont nos premiers chefs de groupe. Les familles sont uniques et diverses, les dynamiques familiales peuvent être ouvertes ou fermées, les émotions peuvent être contenues ou exprimées et les adultes peuvent être encourageants ou distants. Les familles peuvent vivre dans l'abondance ou la pénurie. Les familles peuvent faire partie d'une communauté qui les soutient ou peuvent être seules, voire isolées. Les membres d'une famille font face ensemble au stress d'un déménagement ou d'un changement — une naissance, un décès, une maladie ou une blessure — lorsque l'argent vient à manquer, lorsque les incertitudes sont nombreuses, lorsqu'une famille se retrouve séparée par les circonstances ou réunie après une période de séparation.

Nous jouons chacun un rôle dans notre famille que nous soyons enfants ou adultes. Certains sont des pacificateurs, d'autres sont des fauteurs de trouble. Certains sont des suiveurs et d'autres sont des meneurs. Certains parlent, d'autres écoutent. Certains sont des observateurs silencieux tandis que d'autres testent, expérimentent et innovent. Les familles se resserrent et se distendent. Elles partagent l'amour, les préoccupations, la douleur et l'angoisse. Elles partagent aussi la joie, les espoirs et les rêves.

Certaines familles sont stressées, certaines sont en détresse et certaines sont en crise. Les recherches montrent que les gens qui envisagent le suicide ressentent du désespoir, de la colère, de la peur et de la douleur — une douleur émotionnelle ou psychique. Elles ressentent le besoin de s'échapper, de protéger les autres. Elles ont l'impression qu'elles n'ont pas d'autre choix. Les familles partagent ce désespoir, elles subissent souvent le fardeau de la colère et sont témoin de la peur. Les familles se sentent souvent impuissantes et dans l'incapacité d'aider. Les gens qui envisagent le suicide ressentent la même chose.

Les familles procurent de l'aide et de l'espoir, mais elles procurent aussi du soutien et elles en ont besoin à leur tour. Les familles correctement soutenues, qui fonctionnent et qui sont en bonne santé, peuvent constituer un facteur de protection considérable pour ceux qui envisagent le suicide. Peu de familles sont naturellement résilientes: la plupart ont besoin d'être soutenues pour le rester ou le devenir et certaines ont besoin d'aide pour devenir résilientes. La littérature montre que des relations fortes avec la famille et les amis peuvent réduire l'isolement social. Les familles peuvent être des défenseurs et des intervenants-pivots. Elles peuvent constituer le centre ou le fondement du système de soutien des personnes en détresse: nous avons entendu des personnes ayant vécu la détresse — qui ont traversé l'obscurité et qui sont ressorties de l'autre côté — dire que c'était grâce à quelqu'un dans leur vie qui n'a pas baissé les bras.

Les familles sont diverses. Elles peuvent efficacement soutenir un membre de leur famille qui souffre de maladie mentale, de dépression ou de TSPT, mais elles ont besoin de soutien, de formation et de ressources pour le faire. Elles ont besoin de se sentir compétentes et elles ont besoin de savoir que les personnes qu'elles aiment recevront les soins nécessaires. Elles ont besoin de sentir qu'elles ne sont pas seules. Lorsqu'elles cherchent de l'aide au nom des personnes qu'elles aiment, elles ont besoin de sentir qu'elles peuvent se concentrer sur la réponse aux besoins plutôt que de se battre pour chercher ces services et de passer du temps sur Google. Elles ont besoin de sentir que leurs proches vont mieux, pas qu'ils doivent s'inscrire sur une longue liste d'attente. Elles ont besoin d'avoir accès aux services sans avoir à se battre pour être entendues.

Les familles ont besoin de compassion, pas de confrontation. Elles ont besoin de se sentir respectées, pas défiées et elles ont besoin qu'on leur fasse confiance.

Les familles ne peuvent pas être oubliées après le décès d'une personne par suicide. Elles ont besoin de guérir après cette expérience, ce deuil, cette perte. Elles ont besoin de conseils, d'assistance et de soutien. Les familles sans soutien peuvent devenir une partie du problème au lieu d'être une partie cruciale de la solution. Les familles auxquelles on donne du pouvoir, des ressources et qui sont parties prenantes peuvent constituer un outil puissant.

Le suicide est une extrémité du spectre du bien-être. On peut prévenir le suicide; le suicide est une chose complexe. La prévention efficace du suicide n'est pas un événement, une action, une politique ou un programme isolé. C'est une approche globale pour aider les individus et leurs familles à aller mieux, à être en bonne santé et à le rester. Il s'agit de soin et de compassion. Cela tient à ce que le système du gouvernement et des soutiens communautaires travaille avec les familles dès qu'elles sont liées à l'armée, tout au long de la carrière militaire, lors de la sortie de l'armée et au cours de la vie d'ancien combattant.

L'Institut Vannier est ici en tant que ressource nationale. Nous sommes ici pour apporter notre aide dans la recherche que vous menez. Nous sommes ici pour vous aider à trouver les réponses appropriées pour soutenir les familles qui sont confrontées au traumatisme des personnes qui envisagent le suicide.

Merci beaucoup.

(1545)

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant entendre le Centre de détresse d'Ottawa et la région, représenté par Mme Pizzuto, coordinatrice intérimaire des relations communautaires. Bienvenue.

Mme Breanna Pizzuto (coordinatrice intérimaire des relations communautaires, Centre de Détresse d'Ottawa et la région):

Merci de m'avoir invitée à venir m'exprimer devant vous aujourd'hui. Je vous suis très reconnaissante de me donner l'occasion de parler de ce sujet. Je suis très heureuse de savoir que ce comité existe et se penche sur cette question.

Cela fait trois ans et demi que je travaille au Centre de détresse. J'ai commencé comme bénévole au standard téléphonique, puis je suis devenue superviseure bénévole et cela fait maintenant un an que je suis employée à plein temps alors j'ai une bonne idée de ce qui se fait en première ligne et aussi en quoi consiste le soutien aux bénévoles ainsi qu'aux personnes qui nous appellent.

Je vais vous parler un peu de ce que nous faisons au Centre de détresse. Nous sommes un service téléphonique fonctionnant 24 heures sur 24 qui propose des interventions de crise, un soutien émotionnel, des informations et des orientations à ceux qui en ont besoin. Notre secteur d'intervention est assez étendu. Il couvre Ottawa, Gatineau, Prescott-Russell, Stormont, Dundas et Glengarry, Renfrew, Frontenac, Grey Bruce, et le Nunavut et le Nunavik dans le Nord du Québec. Nous avons plus de 220 bénévoles actifs qui répondent au téléphone 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7, 365 jours par an. En 2016 nous avons répondu à plus de 50 000 appels.

Pour vous donner une idée de notre place dans la province, l'Ontario dispose de 14 centres de détresse, y compris celui d'Ottawa, qui ont répondu à plus de 302 000 appels en 2015, grâce à plus de 1 800 bénévoles actifs.

Pour en venir à la raison de notre présence ici aujourd'hui, je peux vous dire qu'en 2016, dans 1 118 de nos appels, il a été fait mention d'un TSPT touchant la personne qui appelait ou un membre de sa famille et 12 448 appels sur 50 000 concernaient des troubles de l'humeur chez la personne qui appelait ou dans sa famille; ce sont les problèmes de santé mentale dont nous entendons le plus fréquemment parler, avec la schizophrénie et la psychose.

Bien que nous ne tenions pas spécifiquement les comptes du nombre de militaires ou d'anciens combattants dans nos statistiques, je voudrais vous parler d'une personne qui nous appelle assez régulièrement, juste pour que vous puissiez personnifier cette question. À des fins de confidentialité, je vais l'appeler John.

John vit dans notre secteur d'activité. Il a la cinquantaine. Il est divorcé et vit seul. John a effectué des missions en tant que capitaine dans l'armée en Afghanistan, en Irak et en Somalie. John a perdu tous les membres de son escouade, soit durant le service, soit par suicide à leur retour au Canada. Il est constamment hanté par des flash-back de l'expérience qu'il a subie en évacuant ses compagnons du champ de bataille dans des sacs mortuaires. Il a été libéré de l'armée il y a quelques années sans pension et il est en difficulté financière, il a épuisé toutes ses économies depuis son retour ici. Il se débat avec l'alcool et le tabac qui sont ses stratégies d'adaptation et il nous appelle souvent lorsqu'il est en état d'ébriété. Il a reçu un diagnostic de TSPT et est également atteint de toute une série d'autres maladies physiques qui le font souffrir en permanence.

Lorsqu'il nous appelle, John oscille entre des sentiments de force et de résilience parce qu'il a réussi à traverser ce qu'il a vécu et des idées suicidaires constantes ainsi qu'un sentiment d'impuissance parce qu'il se sent très souvent rejeté et laissé à l'écart. John a le sentiment d'être le dernier homme vivant.

Il nous a avoué qu'il avait besoin de conseils, mais il nous a souvent dit qu'il ne voulait rien avoir affaire avec le ministère des Anciens Combattants. Il a déjà eu affaire à eux par le passé et se sent frustré parce qu'on lui a simplement donné des médicaments alors que ce qu'il veut vraiment c'est quelqu'un à qui parler, quelqu'un à qui raconter son expérience. Il nous a dit qu'il a le sentiment que l'armée l'a mis au rebut.

L'histoire de John est une histoire d'ancien combattant en souffrance parmi tant d'autres et nous avons beaucoup à en apprendre.

J'ai lu sur Internet que 85 % des effectifs de l'armée canadienne sont constitués d'hommes. La santé mentale des hommes est de plus en plus reconnue comme étant un sujet de préoccupation dans notre société et les hommes meurent quatre fois plus par suicide que les femmes. Au vu de cette statistique et de la proportion d'hommes dans l'armée, il serait logique de s'intéresser à la manière dont on peut spécifiquement aider les hommes — sans négliger les femmes bien entendu, elles sont importantes aussi.

On dit souvent que les hommes sont moins susceptibles que les femmes d'aller chercher de l'aide lorsqu'ils en ont besoin. Cela semble être vrai, mais les statistiques de notre centre de détresse indiquent qu'en 2016, 40 % des appels provenaient d'hommes, ce qui fait presque la moitié. Ce chiffre nous indique que les hommes demandent de l'aide lorsqu'ils se sentent en sécurité pour le faire.

Notre service est confidentiel, il n'y a pas de jugement et il n'est pas directement lié à un lieu de travail en particulier, que cela soit le gouvernement, l'armée ou un autre organisme professionnel. Les personnes qui appellent savent qu'elles seront respectées et qu'elles seront activement écoutées par un bénévole lors de chaque appel et que leurs histoires seront entendues mais pas répétées. Quoi qu'ils aient fait dans leur vie, quoi qu'il leur soit arrivé, nos bénévoles feront preuve de la même gentillesse et du même soutien envers toutes les personnes auxquelles ils parlent.

En préparant cet exposé, j'ai discuté avec des collègues ainsi qu'avec des réservistes qui m'ont dit qu'il existait dans l'armée une large gamme de ressources utiles et je trouve que c'est très bien. Ces ressources font l'objet d'une bonne promotion sur les lieux de travail et sont encouragées par les employeurs. Ce que nous disent le plus souvent les personnes qui nous appellent, c'est que la stigmatisation liée au fait de demander de l'aide constitue le plus grand obstacle. C'est la culture du milieu de travail: la pression des collègues pousse à être des membres forts et indestructibles de l'armée, ou des anciens combattants fiers et résilients.

(1550)



Il n'y a pas si longtemps, en 2009, l'armée américaine a obligé les soldats suicidaires qui suivaient l'entraînement de base à porter une veste orange vif afin de les identifier et de les surveiller. Alors que cette mesure était censée améliorer la sécurité, elle a eu l'effet opposé en stigmatisant ceux qui étaient en difficulté.

Nous entendons souvent les gens dire qu'ils craignent pour leur emploi s'ils expriment la moindre faiblesse et c'est la perte d'identité qu'éprouve une personne lorsqu'elle est dépouillée de ses fonctions et jetée dans la vie sans aucune aide qui est la plus éprouvante. Le dévouement, la force et le consentement au sacrifice de leurs corps, de leurs vies et de leurs esprits au nom de leur pays sont des choses que nous devons tous honorer chez nos anciens combattants et chez les membres de l'armée.

En même temps, nos devons respecter le sentiment d'une extrême perte de sens de l'identité et de perte de soi qui accompagne la perte de cette capacité à servir dans l'armée. Ces hommes et ces femmes sont entraînés pour agir au maximum de leurs performances avec des temps de repos réduits au minimum. Ils n'ont pas d'autre choix que de devenir hypersensibles à ce qu'ils voient, entendent et sentent autour d'eux. Autrement, ils risquent leur vie et celle de leurs camarades.

Comment pouvons-nous raisonnablement attendre de nos personnels militaires qu'ils reviennent de circonstances si exceptionnelles et s'intègrent paisiblement dans la vie ordinaire au sein de la société canadienne sans aide pour le faire? Nous ne pouvons tout simplement pas leur demander cela.

Une bonne santé mentale ce n'est pas juste l'absence de maladie mentale. Le bien-être mental ou son absence résulte d'une combinaison de facteurs et lorsque l'on parle de la meilleure manière d'apporter notre soutien lors de cette transition entre une carrière militaire et le statut d'ancien combattant, nous devons prendre en compte tous les facteurs qui contribuent au bien-être mental, y compris la stabilité financière, un travail qui ait du sens, des relations personnelles solidaires, la famille et le bien-être physique. Au-delà du besoin évident de professionnels formés qui procurent des conseils ou des thérapies, il faut aussi de la formation professionnelle, des soutiens aux familles, des aides financières, de l'aide à l'emploi et des thérapies de couple.

Lorsque John ne peut pas s'acheter plus qu'un bol de riz pour le souper, comment pouvons-nous attendre de lui qu'il obtienne et conserve un emploi ou qu'il développe des relations significatives qui vont le nourrir et l'aider à s'accomplir? Les êtres humains ont besoin de sécurité et c'est la condition première pour survivre et se développer.

Une approche proactive serait utile pour aider le personnel militaire à revenir à la vie civile. Je ferais la recommandation suivante: nous pourrions peut-être consacrer du temps et de l'énergie pour voir comment nous pourrions améliorer les aides qui existent déjà, au lieu d'en créer de nouvelles. Il me semble qu'il y a des ressources disponibles qui pourraient être renforcées pour être plus efficaces et plus accessibles aux personnes qui en ont besoin. Pour casser l'obstacle de la stigmatisation et pour promouvoir la sécurité au moment de la demande d'aide, peut-être pourrions-nous explorer l'idée d'établir un partenariat avec une tierce partie qui pourrait proposer de l'aide en dehors de l'armée.

Il y a plus de 100 centres de détresse au Canada et une étude qui a fait l'objet d'un rapport de Distress and Crisis Ontario a montré que les bénévoles obtiennent de meilleurs résultats que les professionnels rémunérés dans la gestion des appels téléphoniques de candidats au suicide. Il semble donc logique qu'un partenariat entre le ministère des Anciens Combattants et une partie ou l'ensemble de ces centres de détresse présents dans tout le Canada soit une bonne idée, cela permettrait de faire des économies tout en s'appuyant sur une source d'aide existante, efficace et ayant fait ses preuves.

Le Centre de détresse d'Ottawa est tout à fait ouvert à l'exploration de ce champ d'action. D'ailleurs, notre conseil d'administration a déjà commencé à réfléchir sur la manière dont nous pouvons davantage aider le personnel militaire et les anciens combattants dans notre travail actuel.

Pour terminer, je voudrais présenter mes respects et dire que je suis honorée par les sacrifices que font ces hommes et ces femmes. Ils ont peut-être besoin d'aide, mais cela ne veut pas dire qu'ils sont impuissants. Ce n'est pas parce qu'ils souffrent qu'ils sont brisés.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant entendre la Société pour les troubles de l'humeur du Canada représentée par M. Gallson, directeur général national associé et M. Upshall, directeur général national.

Soyez les bienvenus.

M. Philip Upshall (directeur général national, Société pour les troubles de l'humeur du Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président, de me donner l'occasion de m'exprimer devant vous. Je suis accompagné par le directeur général associé.

Pour commencer, je voudrais dire que j'ai témoigné devant un grand nombre de comités permanents au cours de mes 40 années d'activité à Ottawa et je suis ravi de voir que les membres de ce comité s'intéressent tant à ce sujet. Souvent les comités permanents se présentent avec quatre ou cinq membres et c'est assez impromptu. Il est clair que vous prenez cela au sérieux et cela me réjouit.

La Société pour les troubles de l'humeur du Canada est un organisme de bienfaisance national sans but lucratif composé de personnes ayant vécu des expériences au sein de leur famille. Nous n'agissons qu'au niveau national et nous existons depuis 2011. Nous sommes actifs dans de nombreux domaines, certains d'entre eux seront évoqués par Dave. Nous nous engageons lorsque nous pensons qu'il est possible de faire quelque chose pour les gens qui ont besoin d'aide. En l'occurrence les personnes souffrant de maladies mentales, qu'elles soient sans-abri, qu'il s'agisse d'anciens combattants ou de premiers intervenants — peu importe du moment que nous pouvons les aider.

Nous nous sommes concentrés là-dessus essentiellement parce qu'à Ottawa vous pouvez participer à un grand nombre de réunions et de consultations, de tables rondes, qui ne vont pas produire tellement de connaissances effectives permettant de soutenir les gens qui ont besoin d'aide. L'aspect concret des choses est important et si vous participez à ce genre de chose c'est très bien, ce n'est simplement pas notre façon de faire.

Ce que nous avons fait et que nous continuons à faire, c'est de participer à la communauté des chercheurs. Nous avons commencé à faire cela lors de la création de l'IRSC et avec le projet de loi C-300. Nous avons siégé au conseil consultatif de l'Institut pendant de nombreuses années. Nous faisons partie des fondateurs du Réseau canadien de recherche et intervention sur la dépression. Nous avons fait cela, car de nombreux résultats de recherche sont disponibles et je suis sûr que vous avez constaté qu'ils ne se traduisent pas par des soutiens aux gens qui ont besoin d'aide. Nous essayons de motiver les chercheurs et la communauté en général à s'intéresser à ce que nous savons être efficace et à le mettre en oeuvre tout en continuant à soutenir la recherche.

En 2004, nous avons travaillé à aider les personnes souffrant de maladies mentales à améliorer leur qualité de vie. En 2011, nous avons organisé une table ronde sur le TSPT au Musée canadien de la guerre, à Ottawa, qui s'intitulait Loin des yeux, non loin du coeur. L'intégralité des actes est disponible sur notre site Web. Cet événement a réuni 75 personnes de tous horizons, y compris le ministre des Anciens Combattants, le chef de l'état-major militaire et de nombreux intervenants qui participaient au débat alors naissant autour de l'importance du TSPT.

Un rapport a été publié à l'issue de la table ronde avec de nombreuses recommandations pour améliorer la prise en compte du TSPT. Le rapport recommandait en outre d'aborder la stigmatisation, d'améliorer les connaissances des médecins et des fournisseurs de soins de santé — nous pensons que c'est primordial pour l'identification et le traitement du TSPT — d'éduquer les personnes touchées par le TSPT et leurs familles à propos des réseaux et des ressources à leur disposition, de promouvoir la collaboration continue et un dialogue entre le gouvernement et les dirigeants dans le domaine de la maladie mentale axé sur le TSPT et de promouvoir la collaboration continue et le dialogue entre le gouvernement et les principaux acteurs dans le domaine des maladies mentales et en particulier ceux qui sont spécialisés dans le TSPT.

Nous avons examiné les témoignages que vous avez reçus ces derniers jours et ils sont excellents. Vous disposez d'une grande quantité d'informations de bonne qualité et il est inutile d'y revenir.

Nous pensons que, pour prendre en charge le TSPT et prévenir le suicide, vous devriez envisager un diagnostic précoce de la maladie mentale. Le diagnostic précoce de la maladie mentale nous aidera à arrêter le processus qui conduit du TSPT aux idées suicidaires. Le diagnostic précoce nécessite l'attention de la communauté médicale sur les questions de maladies mentales et cette attention fait cruellement défaut pour le moment.

Nous vous recommandons une éducation accrue en santé mentale auprès des fournisseurs de soins de santé pour les raisons que je viens de donner.

Nous sommes fermement convaincus que le soutien par les pairs doit être une de vos priorités. Tous ceux à qui vous parlerez vous diront que c'est la touche d'humanité, l'élément humain. La recherche nous indique que le soutien par les pairs est nécessaire.

Je vais passer la parole à Dave Gallson pour qu'il vous parle un peu de certains de nos programmes.

(1555)

M. Dave Gallson (directeur général national associé, Société pour les troubles de l'humeur du Canada):

Merci.

La maladie mentale se manifeste avant l'âge de 18 ans chez 70 % des adultes touchés. Nous savons qu'une intervention précoce peut réduire la gravité de la maladie. Au sujet des maladies chroniques, la recherche révèle que bon nombre de jeunes en ressentent des symptômes dès l'âge de 12 à 17 ans. Par conséquent, l'administration d'un traitement ciblé de la maladie mentale à cet âge pourrait donner des résultats significatifs.

Les problèmes de santé mentale chez les enfants et les jeunes peuvent, s'ils ne sont pas diagnostiqués et traités de manière appropriée, mener à des troubles de santé mentale plus graves à I'âge adulte, qui sont à la fois plus difficiles et plus coûteux à traiter efficacement. Dans les cas où des problèmes de santé mentale non traités sont ultérieurement aggravés par un TSPT, la voie du rétablissement devient plus longue et difficile. Le fait d'investir tôt dans des services de santé mentale contribuerait à une gestion plus rapide des symptômes et du rétablissement, et réduirait considérablement les coûts associés à la maladie mentale chronique.

La STHC croit que d'investir dans des programmes éducatifs à l'intention des fournisseurs de soins de santé au Canada afin d'améliorer leur capacité à mieux traiter le TSPT et d'autres maladies mentales peut grandement améliorer la qualité de vie des personnes touchées par le TSPT et prévenir le suicide.

Élargir la portée des programmes éducatifs aidera à former des fournisseurs de soins de santé primaires dans les communautés urbaines, rurales et éloignées dans tout le pays. Dans presque tous les cas de TSPT, la dépression est également présente. Les Canadiens et les Canadiennes comprennent maintenant qu'à elle seule, la dépression est une épidémie dans leur pays. Elle s'immisce dans tous les aspects de la vie canadienne, en milieu de travail et mène au suicide de plus de 4 000 Canadiens et Canadiennes chaque année.

Étant donné les conséquences sociétales, personnelles et économiques du TSPT, la STHC croit que l'investissement dans un vaste programme axé sur les fournisseurs de soins de santé primaires au Canada en vue d'améliorer leur capacité de poser un diagnostic précoce et d'offrir des traitements du TSPT à leurs patients constitue une utilisation prudente des fonds publics qui permettra à la société et au système de soins de santé de réaliser d'importantes économies à l'avenir et qui améliorera grandement la qualité de vie des personnes souffrant de TSPT, de leurs familles et de leurs aidants.

Nous savons que le fait de travailler directement avec les anciens combattants souffrant de maladie mentale et de leur assurer un soutien est la clé pour réduire les cas de suicide. J'aimerais remercier le gouvernement fédéral pour son soutien au programme Transition vers la communauté, un partenariat entre la STHC, Emploi et Développement social Canada et Anciens Combattants Canada.

Grâce à ce programme de développement des compétences, notre objectif est d'aider, au cours des trois prochaines années, près de 450 anciens combattants vivant des obstacles au sein de leur communauté. Le programme a pour but de fournir un soutien direct pour aborder les difficultés d'ordre émotionnel et d'adaptation vécues par les anciens combattants, avec un accent sur les compétences favorisant l'employabilité, le bien-être mental et le soutien par les pairs.

Nous venons tout juste d'ouvrir trois emplacements à Montréal, à Calgary et à Toronto. Même si nous n'en sommes qu'au début, nous avons hâte de travailler de près avec des organismes pour anciens combattants, des groupes communautaires et des employeurs.

J'aimerais également vous parler de l'importance des programmes de soutien par les pairs qui, selon les anciens combattants, sont la clé du rétablissement.

Par exemple, les programmes de formation nationale pour les pairs et de soutien en cas de traumatisme, et le Project Trauma Support sont des démarches novatrices pour aborder le bien-être mental reposant sur une approche axée sur le point de vue du patient. Leurs objectifs sont de fournir du soutien, de l'éducation et des programmes pour le personnel militaire et les premiers intervenants qui ont été touchés par un TSPT et d'autres problèmes de santé mentale afin d'appuyer leur guérison et leur rétablissement.

Le Project Trauma Support, situé à Perth, en Ontario, est un programme concentré d'une semaine offert à des cohortes de 12 militaires et premiers intervenants dont la vie a été ravagée par le TSPT. Le Project Trauma Support inclut une thérapie équine, des parcours de ponts de corde aventureux et un soutien par les pairs pour éduquer les participants sur leur environnement émotionnel, tout en établissant des liens de confiance et en favorisant un comportement de recherche d'aide. Le programme permet aux participants d'assimiler leurs expériences et leurs émotions authentiques et d'améliorer la vie de leurs familles et de leurs pairs au cours du processus.

Voici deux courts témoignages en guise d'exemple de ce à quoi mène cette transformation:

Celui d'un agent de la GRC: « J'en suis sorti avec le sentiment que quelque chose de fondamental avait changé en moi et dans la façon dont j'abordais mon trouble de stress post-traumatique. Non seulement ai-je noté une différence dans la façon dont je vis maintenant ma vie, mais les autres autour de moi l'ont noté également. J'aurais vraiment aimé pouvoir le faire il y a 14 ans. »

Celui de l'épouse d'un militaire: « Je crois que l'ampleur et les répercussions de cette dernière semaine peuvent être résumées par notre fille de neuf ans, qui est venue me dire: “C'est bizarre, mais on dirait que les yeux de papa sont vivants.” »

Même si l'aide professionnelle est essentielle, elle n'est pas toujours disponible à 20 heures ou à minuit, lorsque l'ancien combattant a besoin de parler à quelqu'un de son stress ou de ses idées suicidaires. Grâce aux programmes de soutien par les pairs, les gens ont un réseau composé de pairs qui comprennent ce qu'ils vivent, car ils ont vécu la même chose et peuvent établir des liens à un même niveau. Le financement d'un plus grand nombre de programmes comme ceux-là et une recherche efficace contribueraient grandement à répondre aux besoins des anciens combattants en matière de santé mentale.

(1600)



Pour conclure, nos anciens combattants ont mis leur vie en jeu pour notre pays. Fournir des soins à ces hommes et à ces femmes doit être une priorité pour tous les Canadiens et Canadiennes. Le travail d'équipe au cours d'une formation est un principe qui leur est bien connu et c'est ainsi qu'ils ont été conditionnés. La guérison et le rétablissement doivent reposer sur cette même approche axée sur l'équipe.

Nous vous remercions de nous avoir permis de vous transmettre nos réflexions.

Le président:

C'est excellent, merci beaucoup.

Nous allons commencer la première série de questions avec M. Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, PCC):

Colonel Mann, je suis ravi de vous revoir. Merci pour votre engagement. Mesdames et messieurs, merci à tous d'être venus.

Ces courts programmes nous ont permis d'apprendre beaucoup de choses, tellement de choses qu'il va être très difficile de résumer cela dans un unique rapport. Il y a quatre choses que nous allons clairement retenir. Vous-même et beaucoup d'autres nous avez dit que la perte d'identité est un gros problème; la stigmatisation, pas seulement le fait d'être montré du doigt, mais aussi la stigmatisation dans les rangs et la manière dont elle est perçue; la confiance est une forme de traitement et c'est l'un des premiers points d'appui qu'il nous faut chercher et cela fait partie de ce que nous voulons faire. Comment pouvons-nous proposer les traitements et les programmes appropriés? Viennent enfin les facteurs de stress qui s'ajoutent aux tensions existantes et la différence qu'on remarque en l'absence de tels facteurs.

Merci pour vos remarques. J'essaie d'obtenir des réponses. Madame Spinks, pouvez-vous nous parler du programme de soutien que vous évoquiez? Quelle serait la meilleure manière pour nous de commencer en partant de rien et de mettre cela en place pour aider les familles?

(1605)

Mme Nora Spinks:

Il y a plusieurs choses. Écoutez les familles des militaires, de ceux qui sont dans l'armée et de ceux qui l'ont quittée et qui sont désormais d'anciens combattants. Elles se parlent tout le temps et sont très claires quant à leurs besoins. Je crois que Phil en a parlé.

Il y a énormément de résultats de recherche disponibles qui ne sont pas traduits dans les faits ainsi qu'une mobilisation des connaissances, à la fois sur ce qui fonctionne bien mais aussi sur ce qui ne fonctionne pas bien et la raison de ces dysfonctionnements, afin de ne pas les reproduire. Le conseil consultatif des familles qui a été mis en place par le ministre constitue un bon point de départ pour entreprendre le dialogue et trouver des moyens de mettre cela en place.

Nous avons des articles universitaires que nous pensions vous apporter pour vous donner des éléments de contexte, mais ils sont très denses. La pièce manquante du puzzle c'est une vulgarisation de ces informations afin de les rendre accessibles et disponibles, pas seulement pour le Comité, mais aussi pour les familles elles-mêmes. Nous avons l'ICRSMV et tout l'excellent travail que fait l'Institut en matière de recherche sur la santé des anciens combattants. La communauté des personnes qui travaillent sur les questions de santé mentale mène toutes sortes de recherches au sein de la communauté des centres de détresse. Nous ne sommes pas très bons lorsqu'il s'agit de traduire cela sur le terrain.

Voilà pour le point de vue organisationnel et universitaire, je vais laisser Russ répondre du point de vue des anciens combattants.

Col Russ Mann (conseiller spécial, Institut Vanier de la famille):

Je crois que Nora a mis le doigt sur ce qui constitue peut-être l'aspect le plus important. Les personnes que j'ai rencontrées qui sont passées par les idées suicidaires et avec lesquelles j'ai eu la chance de parler ont bien entendu réussi à s'en sortir et sont en voie de guérison, mais nous sommes d'accord pour dire que le point commun de ces réussites c'est toujours la présence de quelqu'un qui a refusé de les abandonner, qui ne les a pas jugés, qui s'est contenté d'écouter leur histoire et d'entendre leur point de vue en essayant de les comprendre sans jugement.

L'écoute doit faire partie du programme qui sera mis en place. Je crois que le Centre de détresse a une grande expérience d'écoute active. Lorsque vous avez parlé de gentillesse, cela m'a évoqué quelqu'un qui reconnaîtrait l'existence de ces personnes, de leurs sentiments et de leur point de vue lorsqu'elles sont en situation de détresse ou de grande anxiété. Il me semble que cela doit constituer une part fondamentale de tout programme à venir.

Cela ne doit pas nécessairement venir du ministère des Anciens Combattants. Si vous voulez créer un sentiment de sécurité, ce qui je crois est la deuxième chose la plus importante, alors oui, le soutien par les pairs fonctionne, parce que nous avons confiance en nos amis. Nous faisons confiance à nos pairs. Nous avons un vécu commun, alors il est naturel d'établir des liens. Il y a beaucoup de choses qui n'ont pas besoin d'être dites, car nous avons un ensemble de règles communes que nous comprenons.

Instaurer la sécurité rend possible l'écoute, le dialogue et permet de passer aux étapes suivantes, qu'il s'agisse d'une orientation, du développement d'un plan d'action mutuel, d'essayer de réduire toutes les sources de dommages ou de danger potentiel en écoutant activement puis en consultant la personne sur ce qu'elle aimerait faire au sujet de ses médicaments, du couteau ou de l'arme à feu, quelle que soit la forme que prennent ses idées suicidaires à ce moment-là. Essayer d'atténuer ces dangers au moyen d'un soutien par les pairs dans une zone de sécurité constitue, je crois, un autre élément important du programme.

D'après mon expérience à l'Institut Vanier de la famille, cela crée des occasions pour les familles d'avoir accès à des informations, à des ressources et à de l'aide. Pour revenir à ce que je disais au début, c'est d'avoir quelqu'un qui ne vous laisse pas tomber. Pour moi, il s'est agi de ma femme. Pour quelqu'un d'autre, cela peut être une tante, un oncle, un ami, un frère ou une soeur. Cette personne qui n'abandonne pas a besoin qu'on lui donne la possibilité de recevoir des connaissances, des ressources et de l'aide.

Voilà les trois choses que je considère comme étant fondamentales pour le programme.

(1610)

Mme Nora Spinks:

Puis-je ajouter une petite remarque? Une des choses que nous avons faites avec le Cercle canadien du leadership, pour rebondir sur ce qu'a dit Breanna, c'est de partir de ce qui existait déjà et de rendre ces programmes accueillants pour les militaires et les anciens combattants. Nous n'avons pas besoin de reprendre depuis le début. Il nous suffit d'augmenter nos effectifs, nos ressources et de soutenir et de mettre en relation ceux qui sont déjà présents.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Bratina.

M. Bob Bratina (Hamilton-Est—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Merci. C'est un très bon groupe de témoins avec d'excellentes remarques.

Pourriez-vous développer un peu plus le fonctionnement des relations et des partenariats au sein du Cercle canadien du leadership pour les familles des militaires et des vétérans?

Mme Nora Spinks:

Il existe environ 40 organismes communautaires et il ne s'agit pas des organismes militaires typiques que vous pourriez rencontrer lors d'un sommet de parties intéressées ou ce genre de choses. Il y a le Collège des médecins de famille du Canada et la Fédération canadienne des services de garde à l'enfance. Il y a des organismes communautaires qui travaillent soit exclusivement soit principalement avec des familles de militaires, mais aussi les organismes qui sont susceptibles d'entrer en contact avec la famille d'un militaire ou d'un ancien combattant, pas de façon très conséquente, mais qui veulent se former et faire partie de l'ensemble.

Le Cercle a quatre objectifs: sensibiliser, donc de faire de la sensibilisation du public; développer la capacité, c'est-à-dire la capacité organisationnelle, améliorer ce qui existe déjà; développer les compétences, c'est-à-dire les compétences processionnelles et s'assurer que chaque médecin de famille a des connaissances de base sur l'armée, nous avons pu transmettre des documents en ce sens à 35 000 médecins de famille le mois dernier; et enfin de développer la communauté pour que si quelqu'un se rend au Centre de détresse ou à la Société pour les troubles de l'humeur ou dans une garderie pour chercher de l'aide, la personne qu'ils auront en face d'eux saura comment les orienter vers le service approprié.

Si vous appelez le 911, il se peut que vous soyez mis en relation avec le Centre de détresse. Si le Centre de détresse a des connaissances sur l'armée, alors il sera en mesure de faire son travail encore mieux qu'il ne le fait déjà, il le fait de façon remarquable. Voilà les quatre objectifs.

M. Bob Bratina:

Quelles sont les ressources que reçoit votre organisme de la part du ministère des Anciens Combattants?

Mme Nora Spinks:

À l'heure actuelle, aucune. Le ministère participe activement au Cercle du Leadership. Le Cercle a trois vice-présidents: le sous-ministre des Anciens Combattants, le chef du personnel militaire et un membre de notre conseil d'administration. Ils coprésident ensemble. La contribution du ministère, c'est sa participation à l'équipe. Le Cercle ne reçoit pas de ressources financières directes du ministère des Anciens Combattants.

M. Bob Bratina:

Pensez-vous que son rôle devrait être plus important?

Mme Nora Spinks:

Je pense que l'une des choses qui ressort du cercle du leadership est que l'on souhaite une plus grande sensibilisation. En l'espace de quelques mois, depuis le lancement d'une idée jusqu'à sa mise en place, nous avons pu rejoindre 35 000 médecins de famille d'un océan à l'autre: 4 000 d'entre eux directement dans leurs mains, et les autres par la poste. La conversation est engagée. À la prochaine conférence, il y aura des ateliers. À la conférence suivante, nous espérons qu'il y aura encore davantage. Nous collaborons avec le Collège des médecins de famille afin de créer un guide « des conseils pratiques ».

Il faut peu de choses. Nous parlons de médecins de famille; nous aimerions pouvoir reproduire le modèle avec les conseillers en orientation dans les écoles, les directeurs, l'éducation de la petite enfance, les ergothérapeutes, les physiothérapeutes, les récréothérapeutes. Ils ont tous un rôle à jouer pour s'assurer que les gens obtiennent les services dont ils ont besoin ou qu'ils soient en mesure d'agir de façon adéquate lorsque quelqu'un vient les consulter et prend contact avec eux. Qu'il s'agisse d'un militaire, d'un vétéran ou d'un membre de la famille — parent, conjoint, enfant ou frère ou sœur —, l'avantage serait énorme.

Si, pour ce qui est de les aider à mieux comprendre la réalité militaire, nous pouvions connaître auprès des spécialistes en santé mentale, auprès des groupes confessionnels et auprès de toutes les personnes qui sont là et qui ne les abandonneront pas, ne serait-ce que la moitié du succès que nous avons remporté auprès des médecins de famille, ce serait considérable.

(1615)

M. Bob Bratina:

Breanna, je crois comprendre que vous n'aviez pas vraiment beaucoup de ces ressources, voire aucune, lors de vos discussions avec John.

Mme Breanna Pizzuto:

Non, malheureusement. Je produis également notre bulletin mensuel à l'intention des bénévoles et, en janvier, de nombreux bénévoles sont venus me voir à mon bureau après avoir parlé à cet appelant précis et m'ont dit qu'il fallait trouver quelque chose pour lui. Il est chez lui. Il n'a pas d'argent. C'est à peine s'il mange.

Dans le cadre de notre bulletin des bénévoles, j'ai essayé de trouver des ressources à entrer dans notre base de données, en plus de ce qui s'y trouve déjà. Nous en avons peut-être quatre auxquelles il a été renvoyé à de très nombreuses reprises. C'est un peu comme si nos bénévoles sont là pour l'écouter, il a besoin de parler à quelqu'un, nous n'avons pas renoncé dans son cas, et il continue de nous appeler, mais pour ce qui est de l'amener à...

M. Bob Bratina:

Vous avez touché à notre raison d'être, la prestation de services et la sensibilisation à ce qui est en place. De nombreux vétérans, dont John pourrait être un exemple, essaient peut-être quelque chose. Les documents sont retournés non remplis et sont jetés à la poubelle sous le coup de la colère. Il existe toute une gamme d'activités, et les vétérans qui passent entre les mailles du filet les ratent en raison d'un manque de sensibilisation. Ce serait bien si votre groupe avait ces choses.

Pour ce qui est de la Société pour les troubles de l'humeur, cela m'a vraiment touché quand vous avez dit que si les problèmes de santé mentale chez les enfants et les jeunes ne sont pas diagnostiqués et traités adéquatement, ils peuvent entraîner des problèmes de santé mentale plus graves. En 2007, à Hamilton, nous nous sommes rendu compte qu'il y avait trop de plomb dans l'eau. Quand j'étais conseiller municipal, et aujourd'hui en tant que parlementaire, je m'inquiétais et cela m'inquiète toujours beaucoup à cause des effets de ce plomb sur le cerveau des enfants en plein développement. Le comportement et la dépression forment l'un des principaux résultats. En plus du travail que nous faisons, je pense que nous devons examiner ces choses et voir ce qui entraîne ces comportements.

Je me réjouis également que la Société pour les troubles de l'humeur se soit jointe d'elle-même à la question des vétérans, parce que c'est unique, vous en conviendrez. L'histoire des vétérans est vraiment différente.

M. Philip Upshall:

Nous en conviendrions dans une certaine mesure, en ce sens que le TSPT et la dépression se répercutent chez les gens de la même façon que dans le cerveau. Vous l'avez probablement entendu de la part de vos chercheurs. On parle de 5 % chez les vétérans, de 5 % chez les premiers répondants, et ce 5 % est très important. Le diagnostic précoce, l'implication avec le milieu au tout début de la maladie mentale et sa compréhension ne sont pas réservés aux vétérans. Il s'agit d'une question unique pour tous les Canadiens, et en particulier pour les dispensateurs de soins primaires et les gammes de soins primaires.

Bien entendu, si je reviens à l'exemple de Hamilton, vous avez les chefs de file du modèle de soins partagés à l'Université McMaster, avec lesquels nous avons eu le privilège de collaborer. Dans le domaine des soins en collaboration, nous avons été le leadership patient de tout ce mouvement.

L'intervention précoce est de loin la meilleure solution, mais, pour y parvenir, il faut que les gens comprennent ce qu'ils recherchent. Trop souvent, des patients, des vétérans et d'autres se présentent dans les cabinets de médecins, dans les locaux de services infirmiers, ainsi que dans des communautés autochtones, éloignées et rurales aux prises avec un problème ou un autre. Le fournisseur de soins de santé ne dit pas immédiatement « compte tenu de vos antécédents — parce qu'il ne dispose pas de suffisamment d'antécédents —, voyons ce qui se passe ». Il incombe vraiment au fournisseur de soins de santé à ce stade de mettre les choses en branle.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NPD):

Je remercie tous nos témoins.

Les témoins que nous avons entendus jusqu'à maintenant nous ont donné un éventail incroyable de renseignements et tellement de possibilités. Chacun et chacune de vous nous présente une expertise précise. Comment faisons-nous pour mettre tout cela ensemble et trouver un modèle, une solution, ou ce qui serait peut-être plus approprié, ce qui aidera la totalité de nos vétérans?

M. Dave Gallson:

Je vais peut-être mettre les choses en branle, du moins pour ce qui est de la réponse.

J'ai l'honneur de faire partie du comité consultatif sur la santé mentale du ministre des Anciens Combattants, et une partie de sa lettre de mandat mentionnait la création d'un centre d'excellence se spécialisant en santé mentale, et l'élaboration d'une stratégie de prévention du suicide chez les militaires et les anciens combattants.

Je pense qu'il faut savoir qu'il n'existe pas une solution rapide, simple. Il n'y a pas de réponse rapide, simple. Lorsque nous parlons de diagnostic précoce et de traitement précoce, j'ai vraiment l'impression que nous ne devons pas oublier les enfants des vétérans qui vivent ces situations, parce que nous nous penchons sur des problèmes de santé mentale qui remontent à 15 ou 20 ans, sinon davantage, de sorte qu'il y a beaucoup de questions auxquelles il faut répondre.

Lorsque je pense à un centre d'excellence axé sur la santé mentale et la lutte contre les toxicomanies, la première question que nous devons nous poser est la suivante. Parlons-nous d'une institution universitaire traditionnelle de recherches ou d'une institution de prestation de services? Nous nous rendons maintenant compte qu'il faut que ce soit un modèle de réseau en étoile. Il faut que ce soit un centre où un vétéran peut aller suivre un programme de traitement ou de mieux-être avec d'autres vétérans, de sorte qu'il ne se trouve pas parmi des gens qui n'ont jamais fait partie des militaires, parce qu'ils ne vivent pas les mêmes choses. Ils ne peuvent pas s'ouvrir et parler parce que quelqu'un vit d'autres problèmes qui ne concernent pas des problèmes liés au TSPT.

Il faut savoir qu'il n'y a pas une réponse — je ne veux pas prendre trop de votre temps —, mais il va falloir toute une gamme de services qui sont tous reliés et qui visent tous à trouver une solution à un large éventail de problèmes.

(1620)

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Vous avez abordé un aspect dont nous avons entendu parler plus tôt, à savoir que les vétérans participent à une thérapie de groupe avec des gens qui n'ont aucune expérience de la vie militaire et à quel point cela était inutile.

M. Dave Gallson:

En plus d'être très inutile, cela peut les ramener en arrière pendant longtemps. Des vétérans m'ont dit qu'ils avaient consulté un psychiatre pendant un an, qu'ils ont été totalement francs et ouverts, mais que c'est uniquement grâce au soutien entre les pairs qu'ils ont vraiment commencé à comprendre, étant avec d'autres vétérans, qu'ils parlaient de choses qui n'étaient pas à la source des problèmes. Ils pensaient qu'ils donnaient les bonnes réponses au psychiatre, ce que le psychiatre recherchait, mais ils n'abordaient pas la cause profonde du TSPT, qui se trouvait en fait bien avant leur arrivée chez les militaires.

Il s'agit d'un processus d'apprentissage sur la façon d'utiliser les services offerts de manière efficace, je pense.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Madame Spinks, avez-vous aussi des observations?

Mme Nora Spinks:

J'aurais quelques points. La plupart des services mis sur pied pour répondre aux besoins des familles de militaires ou de vétérans se trouvent près d'installations, comme Petawawa ou Gagetown. Mais lorsque vous parlez de vétérans, vous parlez de toutes les collectivités d'un océan à l'autre, et il est impossible que l'on puisse avoir un programme propre aux militaires dans chaque collectivité.

Par contre, nous pouvons nous assurer que chaque organisme communautaire possède une connaissance de base de la réalité militaire, qu'il comprend lorsque quelqu'un parle de ce qu'il a vécu en Afghanistan, et qu'il sait ce que cela signifie et ne s'appuie pas seulement sur une référence quelconque provenant d'un film visionné un samedi soir avec des amis, mais qu'il comprend vraiment ce que cela signifie.

Je pense que l'on trouve un intérêt considérable partout au pays de la part de professionnels de toutes les catégories qui veulent être prêts à tendre la main, et ils veulent apprendre. Pour nous, je pense que la façon de gérer cela — nous faisons la même chose dans le cas du service direct —, c'est d'équilibrer la haute technologie avec le contenu humain. Nous voulons nous assurer que les gens ont un contact personnel et des rapports personnels, et qu'ils ont accès aux services dont ils ont besoin de la part d'êtres humains, mais qu'ils ont aussi accès à la technologie — peut-être dans le cadre d'un groupe — et à l'utilisation de la technologie de façon à pouvoir participer par le truchement de l'ordinateur.

De tels programmes offrent énormément d'expériences, d'innovation et de succès, mais si vous n'en faites pas partie, vous n'avez aucune idée que cela existe. L'an dernier, le cercle du leadership a essayé de jeter les bases d'un guichet unique de renseignements pour que vous n'ayez pas à chercher dans Google ce dont vous avez besoin afin de l'ajouter à votre liste, mais vous n'avez qu'à vous brancher et à afficher une liste de ce qui est offert. Nous l'avons créé sous la forme d'un document 1.0.

Pour que cette solution connaisse du succès, c'est-à-dire vous brancher et rechercher un centre de détresse, il faut que cela soit accessible en ligne, consultable, et pratiquement comme un Wikipédia, parce que les choses se passent tellement vite. En ce moment, cela n'existe pas. L'assise est là, mais pas la technologie. C'est dans un livre. C'est comme le bon vieux répertoire bleu de Toronto. Vous l'aviez, mais il devient hors d'usage après un certain temps. Il faut que ce soit accessible à tous de sorte que si vous êtes un bénévole dans un centre de détresse — voilà — il est là, qu'il s'agisse de renseignements au sujet du logement et des sans-abri, ou de renseignements sur les services alimentaires ou les soutiens en santé mentale.

(1625)

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Monsieur Upshall, vous avez parlé de déplacer la recherche. Lundi, nous avons entendu parler de recherches formidables de la part de scientifiques et de personnes qui se spécialisent dans le cerveau et qui cherchent à savoir ce qui se passe lorsqu'une personne souffre de stress post-traumatique.

Le président:

Je tiens à vous rappeler que nous n'avons plus de temps. Nous devrons abréger la question et fournir aussi une réponse brève.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord.

Vous avez parlé de faire passer la recherche dans le domaine clinique. Comment pouvons-nous faciliter cela?

M. Philip Upshall:

Il est très difficile de donner une réponse brève.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je le fais tout le temps.

M. Philip Upshall:

Une chose que vous faites, c'est d'amener les patients, en l'occurrence des vétérans, à s'impliquer dans la discussion et à renseigner les chercheurs sur les personnes avec lesquelles ils traitent, pour qui ils travaillent, et qui a besoin de cette information. Dans la très grande majorité des cas, c'est le fournisseur des soins de santé.

Nous collaborons avec l'Hôpital Royal Ottawa et la Commission de la santé mentale, témoins que vous avez entendus lundi, et les deux sont d'excellents organismes. L'Hôpital Royal Ottawa fait partie du Réseau canadien de recherche et intervention sur la dépression dont j'ai parlé. Le but est de les amener à comprendre qu'il y a des gens qui peuvent les aider à traduire cette information, mais il faut les motiver pour qu'ils fassent le lien.

En recherche, un enjeu clé est que trop souvent les chercheurs cessent leurs travaux une fois qu'ils les publient. C'est ainsi que cela fonctionne. J'ai travaillé avec des gens au niveau postdoctoral et j'ai travaillé avec toutes sortes de gens qui disent « Si vous voulez que je vous aide à traduire cette information après ma publication, vous devrez me payer. » Je n'ai pas l'argent pour les payer, et je dois leur tordre le bras pour m'aider bénévolement dans mon travail.

Ce que nous avons fait, c'est de mettre sur pied une FMC (formation médicale continue) sur le TSPT. Elle a été l'aboutissement du projet Loin des yeux, non loin du cœur. En collaboration avec l'Association médicale canadienne, Anciens Combattants, et d'autres, nous avons élaboré une ressource de formation médicale continue d'une valeur de 200 000 $ à même le budget de 2012. Cette ressource est encore précieuse aujourd'hui. Malheureusement, il s'agit d'une FMC et nous n'avons pas été en mesure d'obtenir l'argent nécessaire pour la diffuser. Quoi qu'il en soit, elle est là et elle a été d'une très grande valeur. Elle comporte d'excellentes recherches. Nous avons avec nous des renseignements si vous...

Le président:

Peut-être que vous pourriez l'envoyer au greffier après coup, et nous la remettrons aux membres du Comité.

Merci.

Madame Lockhart.

Mme Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Je remercie tous les témoins de leur présence aujourd'hui. Vous nous avez fait part d'excellents points de vue.

Je voudrais commencer par dire que cela m'encourage beaucoup. Personnellement, chaque fois que j'ai parlé à des professionnels en santé mentale dernièrement, l'idée d'une approche « ouverte » faisait surface. J'ai parlé à certains d'entre eux au Nouveau-Brunswick qui ont connu énormément de succès avec cette approche du point de vue d'un processus de santé mentale pour les jeunes, et seulement en tant que projet pilote communautaire général. Cela fait beaucoup de bien de vous entendre parler de la même chose.

De toute évidence, ce que nous étudions, c'est le suicide, et plus précisément pendant la transition, ainsi que les risques au cours de cette transition pour les vétérans. Un autre élément important est celui de l'identité.

Dans le contexte d'une famille, je me demande si, d'après votre expérience, la famille vit ce sentiment de perte d'identité aussi. Quelle est l'incidence de tout cela, et comment en tient-on compte?

Mme Nora Spinks:

Nous entendons tout le temps des familles de militaires dire qu'elles s'identifient en tant que famille de militaire. Ce à quoi elles ne s'identifient pas, c'est une famille militaire en transition vers la vie civile ou une « famille de vétéran ». Militaire un jour, militaire toujours.

Les petites choses dont nous avons entendu parler et qui touchent profondément les familles sont simples, comme la plaque d'immatriculation du vétéran que vous pouvez mettre sur votre voiture, avec le coquelicot. Lorsque le vétéran meurt ou divorce, la famille doit se départir de la plaque d'immatriculation. De petites choses font une grosse différence.

Nous n'avons pas d'identificateurs sur la plupart des formulaires de cueillette de données. Nous ne les avons pas au centre de détresse, nous ne les avons pas dans les cabinets de médecins, nous ne les avons pas dans les écoles. D'autres pays un peu partout dans le monde les ont et ils trouvent cela très utile — pas pour fouiner ou pour s'immiscer dans la vie des gens, mais pour les aider à se sentir les bienvenus et respectés et inclus, puis à s'assurer qu'ils obtiennent les renseignements et l'accès concernant le soutien si jamais ils ont besoin de ces choses.

Nous avons beaucoup de choses dont nous pouvons nous inspirer d'autres pays. Nous faisons partie d'un consortium international qui cherche à traduire la recherche, parce qu'une très grande partie de tout cela est de la biologie, est expérientiel, et nous le partageons avec le Royaume-Uni, l'Australie et les États-Unis, et nos autres alliés. Nous n'avons pas besoin de commencer à zéro; il existe des services qui, avec très peu de ressources, pourraient être modifiés et canadianisés et mis à disposition.

(1630)

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci beaucoup. Je vous suis reconnaissante de ce point de vue.

Monsieur Gallson, j'ai quelques questions à vous poser.

D'autres témoins nous ont dit que cela constitue souvent un obstacle pour les familles d'avoir accès à des services fournis par des tierces parties, parce que les services doivent être payés d'abord, puis être remboursés. Est-ce aussi le cas de vos programmes? Est-ce que vos participants ont fait part de difficultés à cet égard?

M. Dave Gallson:

Absolument pas. À vrai dire, je suis totalement contre les services rémunérés à l'acte. Il y a de nombreuses années, j'ai mis au point un programme parce que des gens de notre collectivité ne pouvaient pas accéder aux services, précisément pour cette raison.

Nos programmes sont financés par le gouvernement fédéral. Notre organisme collabore en tout point. Nous croyons fermement que les programmes, en particulier ceux financés par le gouvernement fédéral, devraient être des programmes évolutifs partagés par tous les organismes au Canada. Il y a déjà un trop grand effet de silo en vertu duquel des programmes sont mis au point, puis font l'objet d'une question de propriété: « C'est mon programme, blablabla. »

Cela fait mal aux gens. Nous devons rendre les programmes plus disponibles d'un bout à l'autre du Canada, et ce, à tous les organismes. C'est d'ailleurs quelque chose que nous faisons très bien.

Je ne parlerai jamais assez du cercle du leadership et du réseautage qui se fait dans ce contexte. Vendredi, j'ai une réunion avec un autre organisme. Elle se conclura probablement par un nouveau programme au Canada concernant le TSPT et les familles. C'est un résultat direct de la nature collaboratrice de tout notre organisme. C'est ainsi que nous devons avancer.

Nous avons élaboré un programme sur le TSPT pour l'Association du Barreau canadien à l'intention des avocats. Plus de 2 000 avocats l'ont adopté jusqu'à maintenant. Nous avons élaboré des programmes avec l'Association des infirmières et infirmiers du Canada pour la lutte contre la stigmatisation dans les hôpitaux, parce que nous avons constaté que les fournisseurs de soins de santé comptent, entre autres, parmi les associations les plus stigmatisantes pour ce qui est de reconnaître les gens qui se présentent aux urgences avec des problèmes possibles de santé mentale. Au triage, ils ressortent à un niveau inférieur, il y a beaucoup d'hésitation à même reconnaître qu'il y a un problème de santé mentale, et beaucoup de personnes ont perdu la vie à cause de cela.

Je m'excuse de vous donner une réponse aussi longue.

Nous travaillons avec tous les organismes d'un bout à l'autre du pays. Nous sommes le premier engrenage. Nous aimons adopter des projets, les mettre en marche, puis les partager partout au Canada. Nous travaillons avec Sécurité publique depuis 18 mois. Nous espérons que notre projet sera analysé attentivement. Il s'agit d'une approche de collaboration à cet égard.

Nous sommes un organisme bien ordinaire. Nous aimons faire des choses, avec les fonds qui nous sont fournis, qui vont avoir une incidence sur l'unité familiale dans le domicile.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Monsieur Upshall, j'ai une petite question. Vous avez parlé de la détection précoce du TSPT. Avez-vous vu du dépistage pendant le service militaire, avant, après, quoi que ce soit du genre? Pensez-vous que ce serait utile?

M. Philip Upshall:

Des efforts ont été déployés pour faire du dépistage, en particulier lorsque les membres approchent du moment de la libération. Russ pourrait mieux répondre à cette question que moi. La réalité est qu'une grande partie des cas du TSPT se pointent uniquement des mois et parfois des années après la libération d'une personne. Les hommes, plus particulièrement les vétérans, ont l'habitude de dire « Pas de problème, tout va bien. Rien à signaler. J'ai passé au travers. » Ce n'est que lorsqu'ils arrivent à la maison et qu'ils rencontrent toutes les difficultés qui accompagnent le souvenir de ce qui s'est passé qu'ils en ressentent l'impact.

J'aimerais formuler des observations au sujet de la question que vous avez posée à Nora. L'un des problèmes, pour ce qui est de l'identité familiale, c'est que les enfants assistent au départ de leur père ou de leur mère, et ils sont tellement heureux. On voit des photos dans le journal et les grands baisers sur le quai ou peu importe, puis le père ou la mère part. Ensuite, le père ou la mère revient à la maison, il y a une célébration, et les enfants sont fiers de leurs parents, fiers de leur père et de leur mère. Ils en parlent à l'école. Leurs enfants sont là.

Soudainement, six mois plus tard, sans signe avertisseur — peut-être que la mère en a vu un peu, mais pas l'enfant —, le père donne une raclée à la mère. Quel traumatisme. Et rien ne se produit. La mère a entendu un peu parler des problèmes militaires et décide de vérifier, puis cela se produit de nouveau. Tout d'un coup, le père est accusé. Il se retrouve en prison. Il y a divorce. Tout cela arrive. Voilà un traumatisme qui suivra l'enfant pendant encore 60 ans après le retour du père de l'Afghanistan. Nous oublions souvent que cela s'est produit et l'incidence de ce traumatisme, qui n'est pas traité et n'est pas reconnu. Quarante ans plus tard, l'enfant peut avoir un réel problème, et il ne sera jamais en mesure de le retracer jusqu'à ce traumatisme incroyable. Ils sont au sommet à un moment donné, et au fond le moment suivant.

Je m'excuse, monsieur le président.

(1635)

Le président:

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Colin Fraser (Nova-Ouest, Lib.):

Je remercie tous les témoins de leur présence et je partage vos réflexions. Vos exposés ont été excellents et ils seront très utiles. Je vous remercie aussi de tout ce que vous faites, de ce travail si important au Canada.

Madame Pizzuto, j'aimerais commencer par vous. Vous avez mentionné que vous n'effectuez pas de suivi des militaires ou vétérans dans le cadre d'une étude démographique, que vous poseriez des questions ou chercheriez à connaître le nombre. Je me demande pourquoi pas. Pensez-vous qu'il s'agit de quelque chose qui pourrait être fait afin de mieux comprendre les antécédents de la personne à qui vous parlez et de tenir des statistiques qui pourraient nous être utiles pour prendre des décisions différentes à l'avenir?

Mme Breanna Pizzuto:

Oui, je pense que c'est quelque chose qui pourrait être facilement fait, ajouté dans notre système. La raison pour laquelle nous ne le faisons pas en ce moment, c'est que toutes nos statistiques relèvent des provinces, ce sur quoi elles veulent que nous assurions un suivi (établissement de rapports), de sorte que nous nous en tenons passablement aux rapports que l'on nous a demandés. Il s'agit de quelque chose que l'on ne nous a jamais demandé auparavant, mais qui serait utile, j'en conviens. C'est certainement faisable.

M. Colin Fraser:

Par exemple, si les renseignements sont fournis par l'appelant, le mettriez-vous en contact avec des services d'ACC?

Mme Breanna Pizzuto:

Oui, tout à fait.

M. Colin Fraser:

Savez-vous si cela se produit souvent? Vous avez parlé du nombre d'appels que vous recevez de vétérans ou de militaires.

Mme Breanna Pizzuto:

Je dirais que cela se produit assez souvent, mais probablement pas autant qu'il le devrait. Comme le disait Nora, nous ne sommes peut-être pas reconnus comme un service axé sur les vétérans. Nous ne sommes pas un tel service. Peut-être que si nous recevions davantage de formation, ou si nous pouvions développer ce partenariat et être davantage reconnus comme soutien pour les vétérans, ce nombre augmenterait.

M. Colin Fraser:

D'après ce que j'ai compris, vous êtes un centre d'appels entrants. Il y a un numéro sans frais, et les appels vous parviennent.

Mme Breanna Pizzuto:

Oui.

M. Colin Fraser:

Avez-vous songé à des services en ligne auxquels vous pourriez accéder pour répondre aux personnes qui ne veulent peut-être pas nécessairement prendre le téléphone et appeler?

Mme Breanna Pizzuto:

Oui, tout à fait. Cette année, nous allons mettre en oeuvre une fonction texte et clavardage que certains centres de détresse au Canada ont déjà mise en place, ce qui permettra aux gens d'accéder à nos services en ligne ou au moyen de leurs téléphones cellulaires.

L'autre chose, qui est distincte de la ligne de détresse, mais aussi un programme que nous exécutons à partir du centre de détresse, ce que nous appelons le programme de vérification du bien-être. Si un patient se présente à un service d'urgence dans un hôpital précis et consent à recevoir un appel de notre part, il recevra l'appel entre 24 et 72 heures après son congé. S'il est admis à l'hôpital, nous l'appellerons après son congé, peu importe la durée de l'hospitalisation. Nous l'appellerons et nous verrons si l'hôpital lui a laissé un plan de soins, s'il prend ses médicaments et s'il rencontre les personnes qu'il est censé rencontrer. C'est une chose que l'on pourrait faire avec les vétérans, un suivi après coup, parce que ces gens ont dit que le TSPT ne se manifeste pas nécessairement tout de suite. Vous pouvez effectuer une évaluation psychologique dès qu'ils obtiennent leur libération, et ils diront que tout va bien. Ensuite, six mois ou un an plus tard, le TSPT commence à se manifester.

M. Colin Fraser:

Merci beaucoup. Je vous remercie de cette réponse.

Je me tourne maintenant vers l'Institut Vanier. Vous avez parlé du cercle de leadership à quelques reprises, mais une fois en réponse à une question de M. Bratina. J'ai besoin de quelques précisions. Comment se passe-t-il d'un bout à l'autre du pays pour ce qui est du déploiement dans les villes? Est-ce que tout le monde y a accès d'un bout à l'autre du pays?

Mme Nora Spinks:

Le cercle de leadership est principalement national, de sorte que nous travaillons avec des partenaires nationaux. Cela dit, nous avons récemment organisé conjointement un cercle de leadership régional à Terre-Neuve pour le Canada atlantique afin de nous assurer que tous ceux et celles qui font partie des organismes régionaux possédaient aussi les mêmes renseignements sur la réalité militaire dont ils ont besoin pour faire leur travail. Nous avons été en mesure de régler quelques problèmes provinciaux.

Ce sujet revient souvent, en particulier avec les familles de vétérans. Parce que ces familles ont beaucoup déménagé et non en raison de la nature de notre système de soins de santé, les provinces doivent être branchées. En ce moment, le cercle de leadership n'a pas beaucoup de liens avec les provinces, mais il s'agit d'une priorité pour le cercle de leadership. Le cercle se réunit tous les mois de janvier, et ce que les membres nous ont demandé pour l'année qui vient, c'est de trouver une façon d'engager les provinces et les régions, parce que nous ne pouvons pas faire ce que nous voulons sans leur participation.

(1640)

M. Colin Fraser:

Y a-t-il des recommandations que nous pourrions faire pour vous aider?

Vous pouvez y songer et nous le faire savoir par courriel.

Mme Nora Spinks:

Il pourrait y avoir un identificateur sur le dossier médical, tout à fait, ce qui nous permettrait de faire le suivi et le lien.

En ce moment, l'Ontario a des données que nous pouvons explorer, mais pas suffisamment. Bien sûr, nous pourrions faire en sorte que les provinces comprennent les données sur les vétérans dans leur propre province. Si vous êtes un représentant provincial, vous allez penser à Gagetown, ou à Petawawa; vous ne penserez pas nécessairement au centre-ville de Hamilton.

Col Russ Mann:

Je pense qu'il est important de se rendre compte que nous attaquons à l'échelle nationale, parce que...

Je vais vous donner un exemple précis, celui de la Société canadienne de pédiatrie. Nous avons parlé de l'incidence sur les enfants. La Société a présenté un exposé de principes et des recommandations à l'intention des pédiatres d'un bout à l'autre du pays. Comme il s'agit d'une association nationale, elle a communiqué son document à ses chapitres provinciaux et régionaux ainsi qu'aux cliniques et bureaux où les gens vont se présenter, contrairement à ce que nous faisons dans un centre de détresse qui n'est pas établi pour les vétérans ou les familles de vétérans, mais qui, dans le cadre de sa prestation de services et de soutien, rencontre des familles de vétérans et d'autres familles canadiennes.

Voilà un problème auquel il faut s'attaquer dès maintenant au niveau local, mais, bien entendu, nous ne pouvons pas le faire avec chaque pédiatre. La Société de pédiatrie possède ce réseau pour informer et éduquer, de sorte que nous l'avons pressentie.

Cependant, on ressent des répercussions très localement. Une des plus récentes au sujet de la santé mentale et qui est pertinente pour votre comité concerne Broadmind, à Kingston, où l'un des membres du cercle de leadership aide à instaurer dans la collectivité de Kingston une trousse de premiers soins en santé mentale, ce que j'appellerai un service de premiers soins en santé mentale dopé aux stéroïdes, parce que cette entreprise a adopté la programmation nationale concernant les premiers soins en santé mentale et y a ajouté des ressources locales et un soutien local pour renforcer l'effet dans ce domaine précis.

Voilà le genre de choses qui doivent se produire. Le côté provincial pourrait avoir un effet d'amplification pour l'amener dans les collectivités locales.

Mme Nora Spinks:

Puis-je donner un exemple, rapidement?

Le président:

Pouvez-vous le faire rapidement?

Merci.

Mme Nora Spinks:

Suite à cela, les pédiatres comptent désormais sur un programme par lequel ils effectuent un transfert avec accompagnement. Au lieu que vous soyez le patient d'un pédiatre, si vous déménagez à l'autre bout du pays et vous vous retrouvez au bas de la liste d'attente que vous devez remonter graduellement, il y a maintenant un transfert avec accompagnement. Cette famille de militaire, cette famille de vétéran, suite au travail qui a été fait, n'a plus maintenant à se retrouver sur une liste d'attente et n'est plus obligée de recommencer. Il s'agit d'un excellent modèle que nous pouvons reproduire pour une foule d'autres services.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Wagantall.

Mme Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, PCC):

Je vous remercie de votre présence aujourd'hui, ainsi que du travail fantastique que vous faites.

Nous avons de toute évidence une crise partout au pays, et nous nous concentrons sur nos vétérans et nos forces armées. Il me semble que nous examinons deux domaines de santé mentale: la situation de crise qu'ils vivent et l'autre, l'accumulation continue de frustrations pendant la transition. Il s'agit de deux sources très différentes quand il est question de votre santé mentale.

J'ai beaucoup entendu parler du soutien par les pairs, et nous l'avons entendu à de très nombreuses reprises, au sujet de vétérans qui aident des vétérans. Je n'ai jamais fait partie des forces armées, mais j'ai une amie qui a essayé de me dire comment m'occuper de mon enfant de deux ans avant qu'elle en ait un. Ce soutien par les pairs est tellement important. Et nous entendons parler de toutes sortes d'organisations de vétérans qui se créent et qui font un excellent travail, en plus d'être très organisées et aidées de thérapeutes, psychiatres, médecins, chercheurs de premier plan qui en font partie, et ensuite je constate que nous avons besoin de financer plus de programmes comme celui-ci.

Que pensez-vous pour ce qui est du financement? Je me plais à les considérer comme de jeunes entreprises novatrices, et cela à bien des égards. Elles n'ont pas l'argent pour faire ce qu'elles pourraient faire vraiment bien et atténuer beaucoup de problèmes, même les empêcher de survenir.

(1645)

M. Philip Upshall:

Une réponse très brève serait que nous devrions les encourager, nous devrions identifier ceux et celles qui font un excellent travail et le reproduire, et offrir le financement. Il ne coûte pratiquement rien d'offrir un soutien par les pairs, à la condition qu'il soit reconnu. Je le répète, en tant que communauté de patients, l'un des problèmes que nous avons eus avec le milieu de la recherche et le milieu médical, c'est qu'ils ont catégoriquement refusé d'accepter la validité du soutien par les pairs au titre d'intervention médicale fondée sur des données probantes.

Il nous a fallu tordre le bras de la communauté des soins partagés. Nous avons refusé de nous impliquer dans les soins en collaboration, les soins assurés, jusqu'à ce qu'ils reconnaissent qu'en fonction du continuum de soutien, le soutien partagé par les pairs devrait être présent. Donc, la question est de savoir si Anciens Combattants veut faire quelque chose, financer la communauté de soutien par les pairs qui offre un précieux soutien par les pairs. Project Trauma Support est un programme très peu dispendieux comparativement à d'autres modèles, et il donne vraiment de bons résultats. Et nous en connaissons d'autres. La question est de savoir si le gouvernement du Canada, c'est-à-dire Anciens Combattants, souhaite tendre la main et le faire. Une partie de la réaction que vous obtiendrez est que ce projet ne se fonde pas sur des données probantes. Nous devons consacrer encore plus d'argent à la recherche.

Me permettez-vous de vous raconter très rapidement une histoire? L'an dernier, lorsque M. Fantino était ministre des Anciens Combattants, il m'a fait venir dans son bureau, ainsi qu'Alice Aiken, alors la responsable de l'Institut canadien de recherche sur la santé des militaires et des vétérans, ou ICRSMV, et nous a dit qu'il nous fallait faire quelque chose au sujet du TSPT, en particulier les chiens d'assistance. Je lui ai dit que les chiens d'assistance sont un élément réellement important. Ils donnent des résultats. Je sais qu'ils donnent des résultats, et s'il nous donnait l'argent nécessaire, nous pourrions obtenir plus de chiens d'assistance, nous ne disposons que d'un nombre limité d'installations d'entraînement de sorte qu'il nous faut construire cela... blablabla. Alice, et elle était directement dans un certain contexte, a dit au ministre que nous n'en étions pas encore certains. Il n'y avait pas vraiment de bonnes données probantes et il devrait donc lui donner l'argent et elle effectuerait la recherche et le lui ferait savoir. Nous avons fait le va-et-vient. M. Fantino a dit que nous allions emprunter la voie de la recherche. Nous l'avons donc fait. La recherche a établi que ce que nous savions donnait des résultats. Le bon sens nous disait que cela fonctionnait. Une centaine de vétérans nous ont dit que cela fonctionnait. J'ai dit que maintenant que nous avions des preuves, est-ce qu'il nous donnerait de l'argent pour commencer à mettre le tout sur pied. Et il nous a répondu par la négative, ils n'avaient plus d'argent.

C'est tellement décourageant de s'impliquer dans ce genre de processus, et je m'excuse d'avoir pris tout ce temps.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Nous, je vous en remercie.

M. Dave Gallson:

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose, très rapidement?

Au cours des derniers mois, nous avons réuni à Perth des gens qui viennent de partout au Canada pour participer au programme Project trauma support, et ils sont déjà retournés dans leurs collectivités et ont créé quatre différents programmes de soutien par les pairs.

En ce moment, je fais partie du programme La patrie gravée sur le cœur. J'essaie d'amasser 350 000 $ afin d'élargir ce programme avec le volet de recherche au cours des 12 prochains mois. Hier, j'étais à l'Université Queen's. Heather Stuart est heureuse de faire cette recherche gratuitement, afin que nous ayons la base de données probantes, mais il me faut 350 000 $. Nous quémandons pour amasser des fonds.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

J'ai entendu parler d'un groupe en Saskatchewan qui a fait toute la recherche. Il s'agit d'une œuvre de bienfaisance visant à créer exactement cela, des chiens d'assistance qui seraient fournis à nos vétérans, pas à 20 000 ou 30 000 $ l'unité, mais sans frais. C'est ce qui me frustre vraiment en regardant la dynamique de ce qui devrait être fait, parce que cela peut être fait, et la bureaucratie ralentit tout.

M. Dave Gallson:

Je serais heureux de vous faire parvenir notre demande concernant le TSPT, et c'est parti. Il y a une bonne réponse. Le repas est déjà au four pour ce soir.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Oui.

M. Dave Gallson:

C'est un départ. Tout se met en place et les choses se mettent en branle. Nous pouvons nous asseoir et en discuter, mais je ne ferais pas mon travail si je n'étais pas ici à vous dire que nous avons besoin d'argent pour ce projet dès maintenant. Des gens meurent.

(1650)

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Exactement.

M. Dave Gallson:

Aux États-Unis, il y a un programme; 22 vétérans par jour s'enlèvent la vie. Il faut changer tout cela et nous devons prendre des mesures concrètes.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Nous devons régler la crise actuelle, mais j'aimerais que nous décapitions le dragon. Dès le départ, il y a tellement de façons que les gens disent qu'ils pourraient aider si le MDN gardait ces gens à son service, rémunérés, jusqu'à ce qu'ils soient vraiment prêts à être libérés avec tous les soutiens dont ils ont besoin. Je pense qu'il s'agit d'une direction que nous devons prendre également.

J'ai probablement utilisé tout le temps qui m'était imparti.

Le président:

En toute équité, je vais vous donner une minute de plus, parce que je pense que tout le monde a eu droit à au moins cela aujourd'hui.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Vers qui est-ce que je me tourne?

Col Russ Mann:

Si vous le voulez, je pourrais ajouter quelques observations.

Vous avez parlé de la transition et de la perte d'identité, mais je pense qu'il est aussi important, peut-être, de recadrer le tout. C'est l'absence d'une raison d'être qui met des gens comme moi en situation de crise. Si vous voulez rajouter les stress dont M. Kitchen a parlé, tout ce que vous avez à faire, c'est de briser notre cercle de soutien. En ce moment, le gouvernement a structuré la transition de façon à briser le cercle de soutien. Le MDN et Anciens Combattants ne présentent pas un continuum dans le spectre de transition. Ils agissent comme deux entités distinctes, avec des cadres distincts et des méthodes de fonctionnement distinctes. Pour la famille et le vétéran en transition, c'est comme si l'on brisait leur cercle de soutien.

Ce n'est pas tout le monde qui nous échappe. La question a été posée pour savoir comment nous faisons le dépistage pour le stress post-traumatique. Un exemple du cercle de soutien est en fait à l'extérieur de l'établissement, mais relié par l'établissement. Mon propre cas de diagnostic de santé mentale, de stress post-traumatique, a été fait par un psychiatre civil à qui mon médecin de famille m'avait référé à la base. Mon médecin militaire a dit « Je ne suis pas certain de ce qui se passe. Allons consulter quelqu'un qui serait peut-être capable d'aller plus loin. » La raison pour laquelle j'ai consulté mon médecin de famille, c'était en raison de mon cercle de soutien, ma famille et mes amis. Ma femme a dit « Il y a quelque chose qui ne va pas. » Mon ami a dit « Qu'est-ce qui se passe? » lorsque j'ai éclaté un jour au travail pour aucune raison.

Il y a un élément important de continuité des soins, même si vous ne faites pas partie d'une gestion de cas. La continuité des soins signifie que vous avez l'impression d'être soutenu pendant la transition. C'est l'effet que le gouvernement devrait livrer en tant que partenaire actif.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Eyolfson va partager son temps avec M. Graham, je crois.

M. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins d'être venus.

Je suis un médecin. J'ai pratiqué la médecine d'urgence pendant 17 ans. Bien entendu, il nous arrivait souvent de voir les différents aspects des troubles de l'humeur, diagnostiqués auparavant, ou parfois il s'agissait d'un premier diagnostic. Monsieur Upshall, puis monsieur Gallson, relativement aux troubles de l'humeur, l'une des choses que nous avons toujours sues à ce sujet, c'est le lien — chez les jeunes, plus particulièrement, mais au sein de tous les groupes — entre l'abus d'alcool ou d'autres drogues et la maladie mentale. Le lien est clair; par contre, la causalité ne l'est pas autant que le dilemme de la poule et de l'œuf. Nous savons effectivement, et je l'ai diagnostiqué à plus d'une occasion, que lorsqu'une jeune personne est amenée avec un problème de drogue, il s'avère que ses symptômes de maladie mentale étaient en réalité plus anciens que la consommation de drogue.

M. Philip Upshall:

Ils ont recours à une automédication.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Exactement, c'est une automédication.

Beaucoup de gens se retrouvent sans doute dans le système judiciaire à cause de leur toxicomanie. Ils peuvent avoir été accusés de conduite en état d’ivresse et ont été renvoyés par leur employeur à cause de cela.

Dans le cadre de votre formation des fournisseurs de soins de santé, vous efforcez-vous de souligner que devant des cas d’abus de substances toxiques, l’une des premières choses à faire, mis à part le traitement de la toxicomanie elle-même, est de vérifier qu’il n’y a pas de maladie mentale sous-jacente?

M. Philip Upshall:

Parfois mais, à vrai dire, ce n’est pas un de nos objectifs prioritaires. Ce le serait si nous avions plus d'argent pour offrir ce genre de service. Alors, oui, ce serait possible. Un des problèmes avec les médecins d’urgence, que j’admire beaucoup, soit dit en passant... Bref, compte tenu de l’échelle de priorité des services d’urgence, le patient, à moins d’être suicidaire, risque de se retrouver tout en bas de l’échelle, avec ceux qui souffrent de simples douleurs abdominales. Peu de gens pourraient supporter les huit à 10 ou 12 heures d’attente qu'il faut passer à l'urgence pour de légères douleurs abdominales.

Nous rapportons, sur notre site Web, l’histoire de Jenny. Jenny est la fille d’un ancien adjoint de l'administrateur en chef de la santé publique. Elle s’automutilait — vous avez sans doute entendu parler de pareils cas. Vous n’avez pas idée des efforts que nous avons dû déployer, avec elle, pour lui trouver de l'aide. Et on parle d’un cadre supérieur de la santé publique du Canada, et cela se passait à Ottawa.

Nous avons rencontré les médecins d’urgence. Disons que l’accueil réservé à l'idée d'accorder de l'importance aux problèmes de santé mentale détectés dans une salle d'urgence ne peut pas être qualifié d’empressé. J’ose espérer qu’avec le temps, nos efforts en matière d’éducation finiront par payer, et que l’on reconnaîtra que les patients en sang ne sont pas les seuls cas urgents. La psychose est tout aussi urgente qu’une crise cardiaque. On pourrait bien sûr en discuter, mais selon moi...

(1655)

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Non, je suis tout à fait d’accord. La psychose ou la dépression tuent tout comme les crises cardiaques.

M. Philip Upshall:

Tout à fait. Nous sommes sur la même longueur d’onde.

Nous soutenons les initiatives du gouvernement fédéral incitant les provinces à faire plus et à investir plus dans les ressources en santé mentale. Nous espérons, vu les efforts de la ministre de la Santé en faveur de la santé mentale, qu'elle dise elle-même: « Écoutez, la toxicomanie et la santé mentale sont trop étroitement liées pour qu’on les traite séparément. »

Il faut que toutes les provinces intègrent les services en charge de la santé mentale et de la toxicomanie, et nous pourrons alors travailler au niveau provincial avec des organisations communautaires regroupant ces services. Au niveau fédéral, il y a, d'un côté, les toxicomanies, et de l'autre, la santé mentale. Je suis sûr que je ne vous apprends rien, mais les cloisonnements, dans les domaines de la toxicomanie et de la santé mentale, notamment dans la recherche et chez les cliniciens, sont inimaginables. C'est tout simplement incroyable.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez deux ou trois minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Madame Pizzuto, j'aimerais vous poser une petite question.

Je représente une grande circonscription rurale. Elle est un peu plus petite que l’État du Vermont. Je me demande toujours comment quelqu'un qui aurait besoin de services comme ceux que vous offrez peut les trouver. Comment quelqu'un qui a besoin d’appeler la ligne d'écoute téléphonique s'y prend, d'abord, pour la trouver?

Mme Breanna Pizzuto:

Bonne question.

C’est sur Internet, pour les gens qui y ont accès. Pour les autres, nous essayons de placer nos cartes et nos dépliants dans un maximum de cabinets médicaux, de bibliothèques, de cabinets d’avocats, de bureaux de conseillers, de manière à ce que notre numéro soit connu. Le bouche à oreille nous sert aussi à faire passer le message si bien que, si quelqu'un se confie à un ami ou un membre de sa famille, ce parent ou cet ami pourrait nous connaître et diriger la personne en question vers nos services.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans le cas de John, avez-vous personnellement fait appel au ministère des Anciens Combattants pour voir quelle aide pourrait être offerte de ce côté-là? Ou est-ce que les lois sur la protection de la vie privée vous en empêchent?

Mme Breanna Pizzuto:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À quel point l'urgence d'une situation prévaut-elle sur les lois sur la protection de la vie privée et vous permet-elle d’intervenir d’une autre manière à part...

Mme Breanna Pizzuto:

Lorsqu’il s’agit de sauver quelqu'un en danger de mort. John est, dans une certaine mesure, toujours en danger de mort, mais si sa survie était vraiment menacée, il nous faudrait passer outre au respect de la vie privée. Dans son cas toutefois, ce serait outrepasser nos prérogatives que d’approcher Anciens Combattants Canada en son nom.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvez-vous le faire de manière générale? Par exemple, en disant que vous faites face à une situation urgente, et en demandant ce qu’ils peuvent faire pour vous venir en aide? Ou ne pouvez-vous même pas faire cela?

Mme Breanna Pizzuto:

Je suppose. Cela dépend de John, s’il veut ou non avoir affaire à Anciens Combattants. Quand tout est dit, s’il n’est plus en bons termes avec eux, il ne va pas aller leur demander de l'aide, peu importe ce que nous faisons.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est vrai.

Mais si nous parvenons à faire en sorte qu'Anciens Combattants gagne la confiance de certains vétérans, et que nous souhaitons redonner cette confiance à John, comment peut-on le réintégrer? Je ne sais pas trop comment formuler ma pensée. Il va falloir qu'Anciens Combattants évolue au fil du temps pour réintégrer des gens comme John. Comment peut-on s'y prendre pour les faire rentrer au bercail? Comment peut-on les convaincre que c’est OK maintenant, qu’ils peuvent avoir confiance?

Mme Breanna Pizzuto:

En commençant par ne pas les laisser partir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le train est sans doute déjà passé. J’essaie de trouver une solution...

Col Russ Mann:

Les camarades.

Mme Breanna Pizzuto:

Oui.

Col Russ Mann:

Les camarades tirent d’affaire un plus grand nombre d’entre nous que n’importe qui d’autre. Ce sont eux qui nous convainquent qu'on peut aller chercher de l'aide quelque part. Un tel service, s’il permet de connecter des camarades à d'autres ou de leur fait prendre conscience qu’il existe d'autres services d'entraide, pourrait s’avérer un outil de référence pour finalement aiguiller les intéressés vers de l’aide professionnelle.

Je ne suis pas un scientifique, mais la méthode qui a le mieux marché avec des gens que j'ai recommandés et des gens avec qui j’ai travaillé est celle de l'aiguillage par l'intermédiaire de camarades.

(1700)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Kitchen. Je crois que vous partagez votre temps de parole avec M. Shipley.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Quelques mots, madame Spinks. Vous avez suscité mon intérêt lorsque vous avez parlé de soutien pour les familles en crise. Pouvez-vous élaborer?

Mme Nora Spinks:

Un des commentaires que nous ont fait les familles est qu’elles se considèrent comme des familles de militaires, pour toujours. Souvent, les soins disponibles, aussi limités soient-ils dans certains endroits, sont centrés sur le patient. C’est dû, en partie, aux cloisonnements, en partie, à la protection des renseignements personnels; mais un patient va recevoir des soins. Toutefois, la famille affectée par la crise peut aussi avoir besoin de soins. Par exemple, ces enfants dont parlait Phil. Ce petit de 10 ans que l'enseignant voit en larmes derrière son pupitre et à qui il faudrait tendre la main.

Nous n’avons pas encore trouvé le bon moyen pour fournir une aide globale et axée sur la famille, que ce soit sur le plan des services de santé communautaires ou similaires. Pourtant, nous savons que si les familles sont incluses, ce sont elles qui serviront de lien. Ce sont elles qui vont assurer la liaison. C’est un membre de la famille qui sera là, au sous-sol, à trois heures du matin, pour appeler la ligne d’écoute téléphonique. Nous devons penser de façon plus globale.

À l'heure actuelle, dans la plupart des provinces, les services de soins de santé suivent le principe du « patient d'abord ». Pourquoi pas la « famille d'abord », le cercle de soutiens qui va assurer la réussite du traitement, la continuité des soins, qui va naviguer dans le système, qui va être là quand le patient aura besoin d'aller chercher de l'aide?

M. Robert Kitchen:

Avez-vous le sentiment qu'après une crise, en particulier un suicide, les familles sont abandonnées à elles-mêmes?

Mme Nora Spinks:

Je ne peux pas parler précisément d'ACC, mais en général, après une crise, les familles sont laissées pour compte.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Serait-il utile qu'ACC fournisse certains de ces services?

Mme Nora Spinks:

Nous entendons certainement des conjoints et autres membres de la famille dire qu'eux aussi, ont besoin de soutien par des pairs. Par exemple, pour une femme, cela veut dire pouvoir parler avec une autre, à trois heures du matin, parce qu'enfin, elle a réussi à convaincre son mari de retourner se coucher et que, maintenant, il dort et se repose. Elle est elle-même sur les nerfs et elle a besoin de parler à quelqu'un. On s'est rendu compte que c'était vraiment important pour les conjoints et les parents qui gèrent les choses au quotidien d'avoir un soutien de la part de gens qui sont dans la même situation.

Comme l'a dit Phil, il est absolument essentiel de lier cela à la compilation des données et au partage des connaissances. On parle beaucoup de programmes fondés sur des faits ou, comme on l'a aussi entendu dire, inspirés ou éclairés par des faits. En grande partie, cela réfère à ce qui se passe au sein des familles. Ce n'est pas seulement une expérience basée sur des faits, mais ce sont des faits qui se fondent sur leur vécu. Quand on se met à l'écoute de membres de ces familles, il suffit de peu de chose pour qu'ils se mettent à parler. Ce qui est difficile, c'est de compter sur eux pour se confier une deuxième fois si on ne les a pas écoutés au départ.

Comment soutenir ces vétérans? Il faut commencer à dialoguer avec eux le jour où ils entrent dans l'armée et continuer à le faire jusqu'au bout, et puis, ne pas rejeter cette responsabilité sur d'autres. Cela ne marche pas.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci.

Monsieur Upshall, vous avez parlé de transfert des connaissances. Vos commentaires à ce sujet ont retenu mon attention, car c'est très important. Étant moi-même fournisseur de soins primaires, je suis toujours allé à des séminaires, etc. Qu'est-ce que j'ai retiré de ce séminaire? Que puis-je faire demain dans mon cabinet?

Ce sont des questions qu'à mon avis, beaucoup de praticiens de soins primaires ne se posent pas. Selon vous, serait-il utile que tous les organismes de réglementation imposent à leurs fournisseurs de soins primaires de suivre un programme de formation continue en médecine, comme vous l'avez suggéré, de façon à ce que chacun d'entre eux ait une idée de ce qu'il doit faire au moment où quelqu'un qui a un passé d'ancien combattant entre dans son cabinet?

M. Philip Upshall:

Absolument d'accord. Toutefois, nous allons plus loin. Nous avons eu des contacts avec la Société royale; nous nous sommes heurtés à un mur. Mais il est important que l'ensemble des fournisseurs de soins de santé comprennent ce que sont les troubles de santé mentale.

Je m'éloigne maintenant de ce qui concerne les vétérans, mais nous tentons à nouveau également d'amener le milieu de l'enseignement médical, notamment dans les universités, à comprendre les médecins et à faire en sorte qu'on dispense aux nouveaux une formation sur la santé mentale, comme c'est le cas pour les maladies cardiovasculaires et autres. Malheureusement, jusqu'à tout récemment, des heures étaient consacrées aux maladies cardiovasculaires ou au cancer, mais seulement une ou deux aux problèmes de santé mentale.

Comme vous le savez tous certainement désormais, il existe une comorbidité entre les troubles de santé mentale et le cancer, les maladies cardiovasculaires, le diabète, le TSPT ou trouble de stress post-traumatique — et bien d'autres affections. En particulier, la dépression est presque toujours associée à toutes ces maladies chroniques.

Nous serions totalement en faveur d'une telle mesure, mais c'est un gros projet à cause de ces cloisonnements en place depuis longtemps. Il y a des organisations, comme à Santé Canada et au ministère ontarien de la Santé, qui insistent en disant: « Nous avons toujours fait cela comme ça. Pendant des années, c'est comme cela que nous avons procédé, et nous allons continuer à faire de cette façon. » C'est à se taper la tête contre les murs, continuellement.

Bref, nous appuyons un tel projet.

(1705)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Shipley, M. Kitchen vous a laissé une minute.

M. Bev Shipley (Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

À vous tous, merci pour votre présence et votre franchise.

J'ai siégé au Comité des anciens combattants il y a quelques années, et, malheureusement, nos discussions portaient déjà sur les mêmes sujets. Cela ne veut pas dire que rien n'a changé; c'est juste que la situation semble un peu faire tache d'huile. Le MDN et les Anciens Combattants posent un gros problème. Il était sérieux avant, et il semble qu'il n'a pas encore été résolu.

Il y a toutefois une question que j'aimerais poser, à propos de la santé mentale et du TSPT. Cela concerne les effets psychologiques et les professionnels vers qui les gens qui en souffrent sont dirigés. À un moment, comme vous l'avez d'ailleurs mentionné, on a fait planer le doute sur les statistiques selon lesquelles le TSPT détecté chez les patients qui consultent un psychiatre ou un psychologue est lié, dans 95 % des cas, à des faits vécus par l'ensemble de la population, et dans 5 % des cas uniquement à des expériences s'inscrivant dans un contexte militaire, que ce soit au combat ou dans des circonstances particulières.

Est-il vrai que ce pourcentage est peut-être plus élevé, parce que le spécialiste en question n'a jamais été à la place d'un soldat, n'a jamais été au combat comme lui et n'a jamais vécu ce qu'il vit quand il revient.

Y a-t-il suffisamment de spécialistes pour répondre à la demande? Bref, voilà en fait ce que je voudrais savoir.

M. Philip Upshall:

Non, il n'y en a pas assez.

Le président:

Vous aussi, vous n'avez qu'une minute pour répondre.

M. Philip Upshall:

C'est très difficile d'observer ces consignes.

La question que vous soulevez a trait à une expérience traumatisante particulière vécue par un vétéran, une situation dans laquelle le spécialiste n'a sans doute jamais été, une quelconque expérience de terrain qu'il n'a sans doute pas.

Si le spécialiste en question a reçu une formation adéquate, il pourra demander: « Quels sont vos antécédents? » et en discutant avec le patient, lui faire révéler un traumatisme qui pourrait être lié à la maltraitance dans la petite enfance, aux pensionnats ou à d'autres situations. Mais dans le cas qui nous occupe, cela est lié à une activité militaire.

Le médecin devrait alors pouvoir dire: « Il y a quelqu'un vers qui je peux vous diriger, car il a des connaissances spécialisées sur ce sujet. », mais ce serait ciblé sur ces 5 ou 10 %. Selon moi, encore une fois, du point de vue communautaire, c'est ainsi qu'on devrait procéder,

M. Bev Shipley:

Merci.

Le président:

Madame Mathyssen, nous allons terminer par vous.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, mesdames et messieurs les témoins.

Monsieur Upshall, j'ai trouvé intéressant ce que vous avez dit à propos des recherches qui ont dû être faites avant de pouvoir utiliser des chiens de thérapie, si bien que ces recherches ont épuisé le budget et qu'il n'y a pas eu de chiens de thérapie. On a posé une question là-dessus il y a quelque temps au sous-ministre adjoint, et il a répondu: « En fait, les recherches sur l'utilité de ces chiens ne sont pas concluantes. » Je comprends votre préoccupation et je sympathise avec vous quand vous parlez de ce cercle vicieux.

Nous allons rédiger un rapport, et je veux souligner certains points qui, à mon avis, devraient y être inclus.

Je vais commencer par vous, Nora.

Nous parlons de l'importance de la famille. C'est un facteur crucial pour le bien-être d'un vétéran. Vous avez parlé des problèmes auxquels ils font face et de la nécessité d'avoir les outils voulus pour s'y attaquer. Des conjoints nous ont dit qu'ils avaient besoin de formation, d'une formation spécialisée. Comment dois-je agir, m'adapter et aider ce vétéran qui est une personne différente de celle que j'ai rencontrée et épousée il y a 10 ans? Nous avons besoin de services de thérapie conjugale, parce que les couples se désunissent, les relations se distendent. Nous avons besoin de soins de santé mentale pour les conjoints et les enfants, et cela rejoint ce que vous avez dit à propos des services de relève, parce qu'on ne peut pas assumer la tâche 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7.

Deuxièmement — et cela reprend ce dont parlait Mme Wagantall — nous devons, comme l'a recommandé l'ombudsman des forces armées, faire en sorte que tout soit en place avant que le vétéran quitte l'armée: la pension et les soins de santé. Serait-il important ici d'ajouter une plus forte participation de spécialistes en santé mentale? Tout cela pour que les vétérans ne soient pas exposés à des problèmes financiers, qu'ils aient ces béquilles en quelque sorte pour faire face à ce qui va être un changement de vie particulièrement stressant et difficile, parce qu'ils sont, et seront toujours, des militaires. On ne leur montre tout simplement pas de reconnaissance.

Si nous incluons ces points-là, est-ce que nous allons dans le bon sens?

(1710)

M. Philip Upshall:

Je vais me taire parce que dernièrement, j'ai eu trop...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Philip Upshall: ... mais je vous donnerai mon avis si je peux avoir la parole une minute, un peu plus tard.

Une voix: Oh, bien sûr.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

C'est au président de décider, et vous savez qu'il est sévère.

Le président:

Allez-y, avant que nous closions cette séance.

M. Philip Upshall:

Eh bien, il y a une chose dont vous n'avez pas parlé et que j'avais l'intention de mentionner auparavant. Vous pouvez recommander, et je pense que tout le monde serait d'accord, que l'on offre des services de navigateurs de système. C'est très important, et un navigateur de système à qui on fait confiance, pas quelqu'un comme moi, mais plutôt comme Russ, et qui connaît son métier peut servir de guide. Quand on est en crise, on ne sait pas qui appeler, on ne sait pas quoi faire, ni où aller. Même avant qu'une crise se produise, quand vous en êtes sur le point d'être libéré, si quelqu'un vous dit: « Je vais vous guider et collaborer avec vous »... nous avons trouvé que cela avait d'excellents résultats dans les hôpitaux. Avec un navigateur de système, on peut libérer quelqu'un et lui trouver l'aide dont il a besoin au lieu de lui dire: « Cherchez cela sur Google ». Des navigateurs de système seraient très utiles, et je recommanderais certainement cela.

Je recommanderais de financer le soutien par des camarades pour les aidants familiaux comme pour les vétérans. La Société pour les troubles de l'humeur offre un tel réseau de soutien aux patients et à leur famille.

Ce serait là deux éléments clés. Je vais laisser la parole aux autres témoins, parce qu'autrement, je n'en finirais pas.

M. Dave Gallson:

J'ajoute seulement un point. À propos des médecins de famille, il ne faut pas oublier qu'ils ont aussi une entreprise à gérer et que le temps qu'ils peuvent consacrer à chaque patient est limité. Nous avons découvert que beaucoup de médecins de famille ne connaissent pas les ressources disponibles dans la collectivité et ne peuvent donc pas dire à un patient: « Écoutez, il faut vous adresser à cet organisme et rencontrer les responsables parce qu'ils offrent certains services qui vous aideraient vraiment beaucoup ». Une pilule, une ordonnance, ce n'est pas suffisant. Il y a une mine de ressources auxquelles il faut faire appel pour assurer le bien-être de quelqu'un.

Le président:

Merci à tous. Cela conclut le débat d'aujourd'hui. La sonnerie d'appel va retentir d'une minute à l'autre.

Je suis sûr que tout le monde serait d'accord pour dire que nous pourrions probablement faire un deuxième tour de table. Les renseignements que vous nous avez donnés aujourd'hui, ainsi que vos témoignages ont tous été précieux. Au nom des membres du Comité, je tiens à vous remercier tous, ainsi que les organismes que vous représentez, non seulement pour les témoignages que vous avez livrés, mais aussi pour ce que vous faites pour les femmes et les hommes qui ont servi notre pays.

Si vous avez d'autres informations — comme vous, monsieur Gallson, qui avez dit que vous en aviez à nous transmettre — vous pouvez les envoyer au greffier, et il nous les distribuera.

Puis-je avoir une motion d'ajournement?

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on February 15, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.