header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-03-20 ACVA 47

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody. I would like to call the meeting to order.

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) and the motion adopted on September 29, the committee is resuming its study on mental health and suicide prevention among veterans.

For the first part we have, from the Department of National Defence, Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris, senior epidemiologist, Canadian Forces health services group; and Dr. Alexandra Heber, chief of psychiatry, health professionals division.

We'll start with your 10 minutes before we go into questioning.

The floor is yours. Thank you.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris (Senior Epidemiologist, Directorate of Force Health Protection, Canadian Forces Health Services Group, Department of National Defence):

Mr. Chairman and members of the House committee on veterans affairs, thank you for the opportunity to speak with you today. For the past decade I have been a senior epidemiologist for the directorate of force health protection, more colloquially known as DFHP, which is part of the CF health services group. I hold a master's degree in science in epidemiology from the University of Toronto, as well as a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the U.K. Prior to joining DFHP, I worked as an epidemiologist at the provincial and regional levels as well as in the academic sector.

As an epidemiologist my primary role, really, is to respond to the needs for statistics and data on the part of the decision-makers within CF health services and the larger Canadian Armed Forces—also known as CAF, which I'm sure you know by now. Clinicians and decision-makers who develop the policies, implement clinical practice, or work towards keeping the CAF healthy really need to know who their population is and what their needs are, and that's where I fit into the larger picture. I'm behind the scenes, providing those who “do” with the statistical information they need to proceed in an evidence-based fashion. I do so as part of a larger directorate, the directorate of force health protection.

DFHP functions similarly to how a provincial health authority would work, but does so specifically for the CAF. The key pillars of public health are surveillance and assessment of the population's health, health protection, health promotion, and disease prevention.

With respect to public health surveillance, an important part of what we do is to monitor the health of the CAF, primarily through surveys such as the health and lifestyle information survey, as well as through other health surveillance functions. These can be broader in scope, as is the case with the CF disease and injuries surveillance system, which monitors disease and injury during deployment specifically, as well as the CF health evaluations and reporting outcomes surveillance system, which can be adapted to look at a number of health-related conditions and concerns. These systems can also be a lot more specific, as is the case with the mortality database or the suicide surveillance system, the latter of which is the source of the information from which the report on annual suicide mortality in the CAF is created. The trends and the patterns that we identify through our work using these diverse sources of information are then used by policy- and decision-makers in developing and implementing evidence-based, health-related policies and programs across the CAF.

As mentioned, one of our reports that you're most likely familiar with is the “2016 Report on Suicide Mortality in the Canadian Armed Forces”, which covers suicides between 1995 and 2015. I'll refer to it from here on in as the 2016 suicide report.

We within the CAF, both civilians and military, consider every suicide a tragedy. Suicide is firmly recognized as an important public health concern. As such, this report has been produced since 1995, with annual releases since 2008, in an effort to gain greater insight into suicide in the CAF. Monitoring and analyzing suicide events of CAF members provides valuable information to guide and refine ongoing suicide prevention efforts.

(1535)

[Translation]

While we do collect and monitor data on all suicides, including males or females and regular or reserve force members, the annual reports cover only regular force male members. The reason is that reserve force and female suicide numbers are too small for us to release detailed information about the cases without running the risk of identifying the individuals and compromising their privacy. Although their experiences are included in the evidence used to drive mental health policies and suicide prevention endeavours within the Canadian Armed Forces, the information is not presented in the annual reports.

All suicides are ascertained by the coroner from the province in which they occur. The information is then provided to and tracked by the directorate of mental health, which cross-references it with the information collected by the administrative investigation support centre. The centre is part of the directorate of special examinations and inquiries.

Whenever a death is deemed to be a suicide, the deputy surgeon general orders a medical professional technical suicide review report, or MPTSR. The investigation is conducted by a team consisting of a mental health professional and a general duty medical officer. This team reviews all pertinent health records and conducts interviews with medical personnel, unit members, family members and other individuals who may be knowledgeable about the circumstances of the suicide in question. Together, all this information is used to create the findings in the annual suicide report.

Over time, the picture of suicide in the Canadian Armed Forces has changed. While the rates may vary somewhat from year to year, a consistent and clear picture has emerged over the last decade. Canadian Army personnel, more specifically those in the combat arms trades, are at a greater risk of suicide than the Royal Canadian Navy and Royal Canadian Air Force members.

There’s some emerging evidence that deployment may also be a concern. However, we need to be careful with this broad description of deployment, since it can include many types of deployments—for example, humanitarian, peacekeeping or active combat—and many different experiences, both good and bad. Further research and analysis is required in order to determine whether, on its own, deployment is really linked in some way to the risk of suicide.[English]

We're starting to get a much better understanding, through the work done by my colleagues from the directorate of mental health, as well as within DFHP, about underlying risk factors for suicide. For example, amongst the regular force males who took their own lives in 2015, over 70% of them had documented evidence of marital breakdown or distress prior to their deaths. Debt, family and friend illness, and substance abuse were identified risk factors.

These are also often seen in the general population. Most of them had more than one non-mental health risk factor at the time of their death. While troubling, this is consistent with what is being seen by other militaries, and I think it highlights the direction in which our research and surveillance efforts should be increasingly concentrated moving forward.

With this in mind, DND, as part of the Public Health Agency of Canada, led an interdepartmental working group on suicide-related surveillance data, which is one of the expected deliverables of the federal framework for suicide prevention. Membership within this working group is an excellent venue to see what work is being done by fellow federal agencies around suicide surveillance and prevention, and to share information on how to be more effective and consistent in our collaborative approaches.

We also have a long-standing relationship with VAC. We have been collaborating for a number of years on the CF cancer mortality study, which has looked at suicide risk over an individual's lifetime, both during and after service. We're currently collaborating with them and Statistics Canada on a second iteration of the study. We plan on looking at cancer and causes of death, including suicide, in still serving and released regular force and reserve class C personnel who enrolled in the CAF between 1976 and 2015.

We also sit on the steering committee for the veterans suicide mortality study, which will be looking at suicide risk amongst all former regular force and reserve class C veterans who released from the Canadian Armed Forces, also between 1972 and 2015.

In summary, surveillance is an important and integral component of understanding the risk factors and trends associated with suicide among serving and released personnel. Collaboration between departments and researchers has been ongoing, as demonstrated through the CF CAMS 2 and other research initiatives, and will prove to be extremely helpful in understanding this complex issue.

Thank you.

(1540)

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll begin with six minutes with Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, both doctors, for coming. I appreciate it. Hopefully you will help shed light on some of the issues in epidemiology and the studies that we may not know a lot about.

I'm wondering what you think about the parameters that you have available. What I'm trying to get at is that The Globe and Mail reported recently that 70 suicides have occurred in the last five years, I believe they said, which they were equating basically with our soldiers' coming out of Afghanistan.

I don't know whether you've seen or read that report. How do you see that playing into this report that we're talking about today?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

At the moment, through the annual suicide report, looking at deployment as a variable is very difficult. When we deal in epidemiology or statistics, there's a concept called “power”. In essence, you have to have a certain number of individuals to be able to parse the information. Although we've been collecting suicide information for upwards of 20 years now—and let's be clear, one suicide is one suicide too many—statistically speaking, we have very few, so we cannot parse that information. For me to be able to answer whether Afghanistan is or is not a factor, is something, from a purely mechanical point of view, I cannot do at this point.

However, if I may elaborate, through CF CAMS 2, we have a cohort of nearly 250,000 individuals. Obviously not every one was in service during the Afghanistan years—some predate those years. Nonetheless, we're able now to look at basically everyone who's been in Afghanistan and who enrolled post-1975.

We hope to be able to start looking at specific deployments, as opposed to just looking at deployment as a dichotomous yes or no.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

You've talked a bit about some of the parameters that you use. Can you expand on all the parameters you look at? For example, do you look at things such as identity loss, and whether that is an issue or not within your research?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

You need to remember that I'm only one piece of the puzzle. I am there to help analyze the information. That information is not provided to us. You would have to speak to someone who participates in the MPTSRs to get a better handle as to whether that's something they look at or not.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

If you're not getting the correct data, you can't report on—

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

I wouldn't say it's incorrect data. It's—

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Let's say widespread data. It's hard for you to analyze if you don't have the data.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

There are two factors. I'm just speculating here, but it may be that it's so rare that we can't look at it, and it may be that it isn't there. I can't speak to that.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Are you involved at all in...?

Sorry, go ahead.

Dr. Alexandra Heber (Chief of Psychiatry, Health Professionals Division, Department of Veterans Affairs):

Can I add something to that from the Veterans Affairs perspective?

First, I want to introduce myself. Although I am not making a statement, I think you should have a little bit of a sense of my background. I've worked in the mental health field for over 30 years. In 2003 I started working for the Canadian military in Ottawa as a psychiatrist, and three years later I put on the uniform. So I served, including in Afghanistan. I released in 2015 and I started the job as chief psychiatrist of Veterans Affairs Canada in September 2016.

Although I'm not here to represent the Canadian Forces, I have some knowledge of this. Regarding your question about identity, I will tell you that it is something we are very interested in at Veterans Affairs. We are looking at the period of transition of person from being a military member to a veteran and what happens to people in that period. We want to know their vulnerabilities and what we can we do for them as organizations. There's a lot of talk about closing the seam, especially for our vulnerable populations, the people we know have mental health diagnoses or physical problems that are impeding their quality of life. These are people we know we want to help through that transition period.

(1545)

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Do you have privacy challenges in collecting your data? I'm speaking about both points of view.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

It's different. We have different issues.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

It's different. To be honest, I am at the end of the chain. I get the data once it's been dealt with by the individuals from the CSEA, the individuals who deal with deaths within the Canadian Armed Forces.

The data is provided by them to the directorate of mental health. They are cross-referenced and confirmed by the directorate of mental health, and then they are passed on to us because we have the analytic expertise.

So as far as I know, the answer to your question is no.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Does VAC have challenges in getting that information?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

We have a very different system from that of the Canadian Forces, where we have a wraparound health care system. Everybody in the forces is taken care of by the Canadian Forces' health care system. That doesn't happen once somebody leaves. Once they retire, their health needs are taken care of by the provincial health authorities. If a veteran has come forward or has in some way been identified as somebody who has a condition that is service related and for which they need help, then we provide all kinds of services. For example, we will financially support—and support in many other ways—their health care. We do not, however, have a health care system in the same way that the Canadian Armed Forces has.

You ask a good question. If something happens to a veteran, for example, if a veteran commits suicide and we would like some information, the health care information is contained within the provincial health care system. We don't have access to that information. We have access to some information, because these people usually have a case manager in our system, but the case managers are there to coordinate all the different services they get. They are not the health care providers.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mrs. Lockhart.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Dr. Rolland-Harris, thank you for your testimony.

You mentioned in your testimony that some of the trends you're seeing highlight the direction in which the research and surveillance efforts should be increasingly concentrated, moving forward.

Can you expand on that a bit for us?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

In essence, if you followed the transition or how the annual reports have been progressing since 2008, there are two main trends that have appeared.

The first is that the rate of suicide in the Canadian Armed Forces in general—here I'm talking about all types of uniform—is not statistically higher. The rate of suicide in the whole Canadian Armed Forces is not higher than in the Canadian general population. That's the first trend.

The second trend that we have been seeing, since 2008 or so, maybe a little bit before, is that members of the army component of the Canadian Armed Forces have been at significantly higher risk of taking their own lives, relative to the Canadian population and the other colours of uniform.

(1550)

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Are you saying that although the number is on par with the general population, it's offset between the navy, air force, and army?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Yes, there's a balance that happens. We've been very transparent in that we look at each colour of uniform separately. We're not trying to hide what's happening by just looking at a general trend. The fact there are different things happening in the different arms of the Canadian Armed Forces is something the leadership takes very seriously.

To go back to what you were asking, in essence, those two patterns have been around for a while. Yes, obviously, the rates move a little bit from year to year, but the narrative is the same. Going forward—and this is what we're doing both within DFHP and DMH—we're continuing to monitor those trends.

Don't get me wrong; we're not going to stop. Rather than expending so much energy and always focusing just on the piece after the fact, we're also trying to take some of those resources to figure out what some of the risk factors are before, so that those who set programs, the ones who write policy, can target things that matter. Maybe down the road, with this work, we'll see those trends go down. That's what I'm suggesting.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Very good. Thank you.

Dr. Heber, have you seen any differences in how the programs required have changed over time? We've gone through many different phases with our military over the years. How are things different, and what are the needs now in comparison?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

It's a very good question. Thank you for that.

Again, I'm a psychiatrist. I work in the mental health world. Certainly, from my perspective, from the time I started working for the Canadian Armed Forces, the big change has been our participation in Afghanistan. People coming back from those deployments have been suffering from trauma-related injuries and other mental health injuries. Everyone who deploys does not necessarily develop PTSD; they can develop other mental health problems as well, and sometimes they develop several.

As those members were released from the military over time, Veterans Affairs Canada has seen a similar increase in younger veterans coming into their system with mental health problems and needing care. As I remember from when I was still in the military, Veterans Affairs Canada has been very forward-looking. In the early to mid-2000s it started setting up what are called operational stress injury clinics across the country. We now have 11 of them across Canada. We also now have satellite clinics coming out of those clinics. These are clinics where we have multidisciplinary teams, specially trained and with a great deal of experience, treating post-traumatic stress disorder and other operational stress injuries.

People were recognizing that something was happening. Because of our very good relationship with our colleagues in the CF, we were able to see what was happening and the growth in the numbers of those with PTSD coming back from deployment. We were able to say that we had better set up some services, because we're going to have these men and women coming into our system.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Okay. Thanks.

Do I have a few more seconds?

The Chair:

There's sixty left.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Okay.

I want to go back to the statistics.

Have we done any research to see how many of those who committed suicide had received mental health care? Is this a matter of their not receiving care, or are we still struggling with how we're treating them?

I don't know who will answer.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

The MPTSR, the “Medical Professional Technical Suicide Review Report”, which is an investigation of every suicide—male, female, regular, or reserve—looks at access to care. The rates of access to care are quite high, so this opens a whole Pandora's box of the underlying mechanisms of access to care, which I think are multiple, and it could be a very long conversation.

(1555)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

And thank you very much for this. It sounds very complex and that there are clearly multiple pieces to this puzzle, so please forgive me if I'm trying to sort this out.

Regarding the people coming into the CAF, I wonder if some pre-screening is possible with regard to their emotional health, because it seems to me that this is all tangled up together.

Dr. Rolland-Harris, you said that 70% had documented evidence of marital breakdown, distress, debt, family/friend illness, substance abuse, which it would seem to suggest a susceptibility to suicide rather than the other way around. Do you, then—if you can—say that this individual may be predisposed, may have a background such that we had better be very careful, and monitor and watch for potential suicide?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

I don't know the specifics of the recruitment process. However, I do know that the 2009 expert panel explicitly stipulated that they were not interested in looking at screening out individuals for mental health reasons.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Is it a matter of being fair and not prejudging an individual, or—

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Honestly, I don't know what the motivations are. You'd have to talk to the individuals who....

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

For recruitment there is screening, as people do go through a medical examination, and part of that is a history-taking where people are asked about their previous medical history, including mental health history. Yes, that does happen.

Based on that, whether someone is screened in or out would often be on a case-by-case basis. It would depend what exactly that history was about.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Yes, I can understand that you wouldn't want to have a prejudice that would keep someone out, and yet if there's a vulnerability, it is a frightening thing to do to a human being to allow them to get into this quagmire that could lead to their death.

I understand the statistical reasons and the need to protect privacy with regard to the analysis of male versus female suicides, but with that in mind, could you perhaps speculate or give some idea of the trend in female suicides, whether it is or is not comparable to the trend among males?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

I can't comment on that. The numbers are statistically quite small—

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Too small, too limited...?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

—which is a good news story, I suppose, by itself.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Yes, but you are possibly going to be able to identify some of the trends in future, or is that not possible?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

It's unlikely that we'll be able to do so with the annual suicide report. However, with the CF cancer and mortality study, the cohort is much larger and includes everyone who has ever worn a uniform since 1976, in essence. So the population is much larger, and we're not stopping looking at these individuals once they release; we're continuing to watch them, so the cohort is much larger. It is plausible that we will be able to have a better feel for what's happening with women's suicide as part of that larger study.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. Thank you.

Dr. Heber, you talked about the fact that a member of the Canadian Armed Forces has wraparound health service, and it occurred to me that sometimes when people leave they may not seek medical help or may not be able to find a doctor in the public system. I wonder if there has been any finding that an inability to access health care might have been part of the reason for suicide, or do you have any thoughts on that?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

When we look at the veteran population, it becomes complicated, because out of the 700,000 veterans in Canada—and I'm sure you know this—120,000 are clients of Veterans Affairs Canada.

When we're talking about veterans, there are many people out there who have retired, and we know nothing about them. If they haven't come forward and asked for services, we don't know about them. That's the first issue.

Because we don't provide the health care directly, there are always a lot of problems with us gaining access to information, though if somebody leaves the forces, they have a case manager. That case manager will find out what's going on with their care, because the case manager is going to help organize further care for that veteran.

We don't have perfect information on everybody, so it's much harder for us to do that.

(1600)

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I can see there are many challenges here. This may seem simplistic, but with regard to this difference in the OSIs of army veterans as opposed to those for navy and air force veterans, might it have to do with the fact that when you're on the ground in a deployment, the realities of the violence and the impacts of that hostility are greater because you're there on the ground, as opposed to being on a ship or in the air? The others are still part of the deployment but not on the ground.

The Chair:

I'm sorry, but we're out of time.

We go to Mr. Bratina.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Darn. We don't get to answer your question.

Mr. Bob Bratina (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Thank you.

Dr. Heber, you have a terrific background, one that's ideal for the job you do. Could you flesh out what you do in the day? Do you ever interview patients anymore? Tell me how you actually carry out your very important role.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Thank you. It's very much an advisory position. I work for the chief medical officer. She is in charge of the health professionals division within Veterans Affairs Canada. Also within that division is our directorate of mental health. Similar to the directorate of mental health in the Canadian Forces, we have set up a directorate of mental health. A lot of this is very new and has happened in the last couple of years. Some of the people who work in that directorate you will be interviewing next.

I will provide advice, guidance, and leadership in a clinical way to that directorate, to the director, to the chief medical officer, and to anybody else who needs my advice or my expertise, such as the ADM, the deputy minister, and so on. I'm kind of multi-tasking.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Is it a work in progress? Are we in a brave new world with regard to how we're approaching these issues that have cropped up recently?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

I'm sure part of it is in response to that. Several years ago, a look was taken at Veterans Affairs Canada, which had devolved from the time after the Second World War when we did have a robust health care system. Over the years, I guess, they felt there wasn't the same need. Then when medicare came in, people were taken care of by the provinces, so that sort of clinical role of Veterans Affairs decreased and decreased.

Certainly, in the last several years, especially with people coming out suffering from operational stress injuries and physical injuries because of some of the challenges during their career, I think very appropriately, it was seen that we needed to beef up the health professionals division within Veterans Affairs.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Dr. Rolland-Harris, epidemiology is a fascinating science. One of the issues is getting to ask the right questions, because it seems a lot of what you're doing is just collecting raw data, statistics on how many went in, how many came out, how many suicides there were, and that's all important data.

I don't know whether it's about exit interviews or the interrelationship with former soldiers, members of the armed forces, but in your work, do you do something beyond simply gathering data?

(1605)

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

I disseminate a lot of the work that we do, such as today, and at conferences, and those sorts of things but I want it to be clear that, at the end of the day, I am there to help the decision-makers, the action-takers, and so I'm behind the scenes.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Statistically, what methods are generally used by victims of suicide?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Statistically, if you look in the annual report, the two main methods specifically for regular force males, I want to clarify, are hangings and firearms. Just so we're clear, that's consistent with what we see in the general population. The top two methods are the same both in the Canadian Armed Forces and in the general population.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

In other words, the availability of means such as firearms isn't necessarily...if someone's determined—

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

No, it's very rare, if not never the case, that individuals use their military-issue firearm. They use their personal firearms. That's something that is collected very rigorously.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

You made the point, which needs to be reinforced with regard to deployment, that statistically we can't draw all the connections yet. I say so because it's common for us to think that someone who was in Afghanistan and had a bomb blow up near them is, of course, going to have...but you're saying that statistically you can't really draw all those connections yet.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

No, not at this point, and whether it's a lack of statistical power or if it's a true absence of a relationship is unclear at this point. As I said in my opening statement, you have to understand that “deployment” is a broad term.

You can have two individuals with the same military occupation code technically doing the same job in the same location on the same deployment who have entirely different experiences, or when they come back, one is scarred, and one is not. Deployment is an easy way of classifying things to look at relationships, but it's a very, very complicated concept, really, to be able to parse statistically.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Do you mind if I add something?

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Please go ahead.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

I think one of our concerns always with the issue of deployment and that tight relationship being made between deployment and suicide is that it makes it possible. We always fear that those who commit suicide and never deployed get lost in that picture. It's an over-simplistic picture, because for sure there are the MPTSRs that Elizabeth talks about. I did MPTSRs when I was in the military, and we certainly did them for people who had never deployed but who committed suicide for a number of reasons, some of which we didn't always understand. It's important to remember that there are many factors leading that person onto that suicidal pathway. Deployment may be one of them, but not necessarily.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you both very much for coming and sharing this helpful information with us today.

I just want to touch on a point in response to a question by Ms. Lockhart. I believe you twice referred to the MPTSRs. Now, as I understand it, those are done in each case where there is a suicide, and that data is then collected. All of the MPTSRs are put together as findings in annual suicide report. Is that correct?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Yes, chapter 1 of the annual suicide report.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

I see, okay. I don't believe we have a copy of that before our committee. I'm wondering if you can table the latest annual suicide report.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Sure, I can give you my copy that I have here, and it's also available on the web if you just search 2016 CAF suicide report.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you very much. That would be helpful.

Dr. Heber, with regard to some of what we're talking about here, are you able to identify some of the factors that put a veteran, as you see it, at a higher risk of suicidal ideation? What are some of the actual factors?

I know we talked about transition to some extent, and we've heard a lot of different opinions about what these factors may be, but I'd be interested in hearing your thoughts.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

The first thing I'll say is that the factors that lead to what I call that “suicide pathway” are similar for veterans and for any member of the general Canadian population. The first factor is that almost all people—90% or more—likely have a mental health problem at the time they commit suicide. This finding is from international research; it's one of the most robust findings we have. It's a very important factor. It's why when we are doing work to prepare suicide prevention strategies, a lot of that work does focus on good mental health care and on getting people into care, because we know it's one of the factors that's consistently there. The other factor that is usually present right before the suicide is some stressful life event. Often it is something like a relationship breakup, or perhaps the person has run into trouble with the law or has lost their job. It's usually related: it's relational, and it's to do with a loss. This person has a mental illness—usually there's some depression in that mental health problem—and then they have this crisis, this loss, that happens. That sets them off starting to think about suicide.

There are a number of other factors that we know contribute to this. This access to lethal means is a really important factor. We know from public health research that the easier the access is.... Often people do this impulsively. Often, if people can be stopped from committing suicide today, and especially if help is provided, they will not go on to commit suicide.

(1610)

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Identifying the underlying mental health illness is the preventative way to stop the escalation from happening?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

It's certainly one of the things we know contributes. Therefore, it's something on which, if we make an effort, we know that it will be helpful.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

What can we be doing better for our veterans to help identify it and make it easier for them to come forward to get help for their underlying mental health challenges?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

In the last year, Veterans Affairs Canada has been working on updating our mental health strategy. As well, we are currently developing a joint suicide prevention strategy with the Canadian Armed Forces—we're working together on this. We are doing so in part because we want to pay special attention to that transition period to make sure that we are covering people when they need the support the most, so that they don't fall through the cracks. For many years, going back to at least 2000, there have been a number of programs and initiatives in place around suicide prevention in the veteran population, but we are now updating that information and are creating a joint strategy for our two organizations.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Are you seeing less stigmatization, though, of forces members coming forward with an underlying mental health illness? If we're trying to get them before these difficult life challenges happen—and the transition piece is a difficult time for any soldier exiting the forces—is there some way to break down that stigma that we haven't been using? If so, what might that be?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

There are a few answers to that question.

First of all, with regard to the people who we know are exiting the military with a known mental health problem for which they've been receiving treatment, we're pretty good already at making sure we do that warm handover from one organization to the other. When I was in the military, I was the head of the operational trauma and stress support centre in Ottawa. We have an OSI clinic run by Veterans Affairs Canada in Ottawa. There were a number of my patients who I handed over to the Veterans Affairs clinic before they left the military. We have a lot of that going on for people who have already been identified.

One of our concerns, of course, is people who have not been identified, people who maybe don't even realize that they have mental health issues until they leave and face extra stresses from having left the military. One of the things we have put in place is an exit interview for all members who are leaving. It is a transition interview where they meet with somebody from Veterans Affairs Canada. Even if they have never had a problem and they don't see themselves as needing our help, we've met with them face-to-face and said, “Here's who we are. Here's where we are. Here's our number; call us if you need us.”

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The veterans advisory group that the Minister of Veterans Affairs set up is hosting a meeting this week on mental health. One of the issues they are going to be discussing is suicide. Are either of you invited to that meeting?

(1615)

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Yes, I am presenting at that meeting on Wednesday. It's the mental health advisory group of the Minister of Veterans Affairs.

Mr. John Brassard:

First of all, I'm glad to hear that.

Dr. Harris, you're not going to be there?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

No, I'm not invited.

Mr. John Brassard:

Here's the thing, and you've spoken about it. As a committee, we're studying mental health issues and suicide prevention. You mentioned that Veterans Affairs and the Canadian Armed Forces are studying mental health strategies and suicide prevention strategies. We now have an advisory committee that's going to be dealing with this in a one-day summit on suicide. Do we have too many cooks in the kitchen to deal with this issue? Are there way too many people involved in this? I ask because ask because nothing is getting done.

It's frustrating on my part to hear about all these studies, advisory groups, and meetings, and yet seemingly there is not much being done in the way of implementing a strategy. It seems that a lot of people are running around justifying their existence, but nobody is really doing anything. I'm just wondering about this. When do we get to that point where stuff is actually done in order to deal with this issue?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

I don't think I'm particularly well placed to answer that question realistically.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Let me answer that question. We do a great deal.

We do a great deal in Veterans Affairs Canada. As I said, from 2000, on the whole issue of suicide, even though, as I said before, there are challenges for our knowing about suicides in the veteran population, we have worked on putting many things into place, both for suicide prevention and for getting people access to mental health care.

Again, as I said, we know that leads to.... It's one of the most important things for us to do to help prevent suicides. All of our case managers receive suicide prevention training, and that training is updated every year. Also, any front-line worker at Veterans Affairs Canada now receives suicide prevention training. If you phone and somebody answers the phone, they've received that kind of training. They have a sense of what to do if they are concerned about the person on the other end of that line.

In addition to having case management and front-line workers who, again, can coordinate care for anybody who comes in and has a service-related mental health injury, they can be referred to an OSI clinic. If they're in an area where there are no OSI clinics, we have 4,000 mental health providers in Canada who we can access from Veterans Affairs Canada to serve our population.

Mr. John Brassard:

With all of the things you're doing and all of the studies that are going on, are we ever going to get to a point where we can actually prevent this from happening?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

You know—and Elizabeth said this—we really believe that one suicide is too many, but I think that if you look at any population, you can see that suicide does occur. Will we ever be able to prevent every single suicide? I don't know, but that's what we're working towards.

Mr. John Brassard:

Dr. Harris, statistically, I want to ask you about prescription drugs and opioids as a means to treat those who are suffering from PTSD, perhaps, or from an occupational stress injury. Have you statistically kept track of how many of those who commit suicide are on these types of medications?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

The MPTSR keeps track of what medications individuals are on at the time and preceding their death, and anecdotally we haven't seen anything—

Mr. John Brassard:

Does that form part of a report?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

We don't report on opioids specifically within the MPTSR annual reports, no, but the numbers would be very small, so we probably wouldn't be able to.

Mr. John Brassard:

Recently, the Department of Veterans Affairs reduced the amount of marijuana that can be prescribed from 10 grams to three grams. Were either of you consulted in that decision at all?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

No, but I'm not a physician.

Mr. John Brassard:

I understand.

Doctor, were you consulted in that decision at all?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

I'm sorry. I need you to repeat your question about what Veterans Affairs Canada has done.

(1620)

Mr. John Brassard:

They reduced the amount of marijuana allowed for veterans from 10 grams to three grams a day.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Let me say first that Veterans Affairs Canada does not prescribe or authorize marijuana or any medications. What we do is fund treatments, and we fund marijuana to a certain extent. Before, Veterans Affairs Canada was funding up to 10 grams per day of marijuana for an individual. That amount will be cut down based on the amount that's funded—not Veterans Affairs. If a family physician, for example, is authorizing the marijuana and feels strongly that this person needs more than three grams, he or she needs to consult a specialist physician on the reason that the person is receiving the marijuana, and do another assessment and say, yes, this person needs more than three grams a day.

Mr. John Brassard:

I'm aware of the process. I'm asking whether, as the chief of psychiatry, you were consulted on this decision. Were you consulted on this decision to reduce it from 10 grams to three grams?

The reason I'm asking is that we had the minister here, who said he had consulted broadly with a wide range of professionals. As the chief of psychiatry, were you consulted on this decision?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

This decision was actually made before I started working for Veterans Affairs Canada, but I know the people who sat on the expert panel who were consulted. They included—

Mr. John Brassard:

Your predecessor?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

I had no predecessor. These were experts in using marijuana for medical purposes.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Eyolfson.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Thank you for coming.

Dr. Heber, I have a bit of a bias on this particular issue. I'm an RCMP brat.

We have been talking about the Canadian Forces members and their suicide rate. I know the numbers are probably smaller, just from the fact of the number of members who have served, but how did the suicide rates among RCMP veterans compare with Canadian Forces veterans?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

I do not know what the comparison is. I'm sorry.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

All right. Thank you.

Dr. Rolland-Harris, this has been touched on in a couple of questions so far. We talked about tracking the female suicides.

I'm a physician. I've had to learn statistics, and I know the challenges of analyzing data when the numbers are small. I think we both agree it's fortunate that the numbers are small, but it does cause that challenge.

In medicine in general we've had an issue over the years where so much medical research has been gender-based, usually towards males, right from basic science research onward. I was a medical researcher before I was a physician. We always used male rats, because if you used two genders there was too much variation. Hence, you develop medications that might not work for females. Although I understand that putting it in a report is one thing, because, as I say, the numbers are so low you might identify....

Are you looking at methods that can better analyze and maybe get more conclusions from the female population, where it's so challenging?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Yes. I mentioned the CF cancer and mortality study, CF CAMS, which is one of the big drivers behind the study. It's twofold. One is to be able to have a large enough population so we can look at more specific details, including differences in gender. But we're also, to use a term my colleague from VAC uses, trying to “close” that seam. Rather than just looking at still-serving and then released individuals as two sets of groups in two separate silos, we're looking at what we call the “life course” of the military member. We're trying to get a better picture of what's happening both during and after their service.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

You're welcome.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Dr. Heber, when you have an active patient under the care of a psychiatrist, you have the warm handover you talked about. However, as you pointed out as well, there are many veterans who present later, well after their service is concluded. Of course, these are people who will be under provincial health systems and are going to present to family physicians and emergency departments, which is where I've spent my career.

Has Veterans Affairs been putting out education for primary care medical providers in the field that is specific to the medical and psychiatric needs of veterans and what the warning signs are?

(1625)

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Yes. We've started, in the last couple of years especially, initiating relationships with the College of Family Physicians of Canada, with providers, with some organizations, such as Calian, that have clinics and are interested in accepting veterans as their patients. We're looking at all kinds of things to help us make sure veterans are in care so that every veteran has a family physician.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

To further expand on that, because again, I spent my career as an emergency physician, I wonder if there been outreach specifically to the associations that govern or train emergency physicians, let's say either the Royal College of Physicians or the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians.

I ask because this isn't just a concern with veterans, but with people in general. There are so many people who either don't have family doctors or just can't get in.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Right, and they show up in the emergency department.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Many show up in the emergency department.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Absolutely.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Has there been any specific outreach to the emergency medicine community so that they can be better informed as to where to consult and where to direct the care of these veterans who show up on their doorstep?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

I just looked over my shoulder at my medical director, and she just smiled, so I actually don't know. But if there hasn't been, that's a great suggestion, and we will look into that.

Really, we would like every front-line physician in Canada to be aware of issues that veterans may present with.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Yes, that's useful. Unlike in a family clinic, you often don't know the patient. You've never met them.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Yes, that's right.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

They say emergency medicine is the art of making correct decisions with insufficient information. When a veteran shows up on your doorstep, that is so very true.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Yes.

Even for emergency physicians to ask people if they've ever been a member.... Often that question isn't even asked of the patient who comes in.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

I have no further questions.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Clarke. [Translation]

Mr. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for giving me the floor.

I want to welcome Ms. Heber and Ms. Rolland-Harris and thank them for being here today.

My first question was provided by the person I'm replacing today, Cathy Wagantall, a very honourable woman.

Many veterans have repeatedly told us that a number of their brothers in arms committed suicide after taking mefloquine, an antimalarial drug. One of the veterans who wrote to my colleague, Ms. Wagantall, told us that he personally knew 11 veterans who committed suicide and that all 11 of them had taken mefloquine.

In the 21 years covered and of the 239 suicides recorded, how many of the brave men and women had been in malaria zones?

Do you have this information?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

I don't have it on hand.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

In other words, you don't know how many of the 239 people took this drug.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Exactly. I'm not saying that the information wasn't collected. I'm simply saying that I don't have it on hand. Therefore, I can't analyze it.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Okay. I understand.

Ms. Heber, at the Department of Veterans Affairs, could we obtain an answer by making an access to information request or by simply asking the minister?

(1630)

[English]

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

On approximately how many veterans have...?

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Of the 239 veterans who completed suicide, as the words have to be said, how many of them would have taken the medication mefloquine? Can we find this type of information through ATIP or through a question during question period?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

It's a good question. Again, it would depend where they had deployed and whether.... I mean, there should be records. I assume that those records would be within the Canadian military.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Yes, you're right.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

It would have been while they were serving that they took it.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Perfect. Thank you for that insight into National Defence.

A year ago, when I was on this committee as the Veterans Affairs critic, on May 9, 2016, I filed an Order Paper question. For the region of Quebec City, I asked what percentage of persons had financial prestations for each physical and mental illness—for example, knees, hearing, and so on.

Interestingly, for one year, 2015-16, in the Quebec region, 8% of the claims for money concerned post-traumatic syndromes, 2% deep depression, 1% anxiety, 1% lack of sleep, and 1% alcohol and drug abuse. Overall, almost 13% of the claims for money were put forward by people suffering from mental health issues that we could probably sometimes connect to suicide.

Of the 15 members, or sorry, I think it's 14, who committed suicide in 2015, how many of them were in the process of claiming?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

You're talking about— [Translation]

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

We're talking about financial benefits here.[English]

I forgot the word in English, but how many of those 14 veterans were on prestations financières or asking for one, or filling out some papers?

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Just so that we're clear, the annual suicide report is not regarding veterans but still-serving individuals.

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

I am unclear what you're talking about, because we don't actually have numbers.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

“Financial benefits”, that's the word. So those 14 persons were serving.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

They were still serving, the ones in the annual report.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

So the question still stands: of those 14 soldiers who were serving, how many of them, by any chance, filed claims for any financial benefits?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Do you mean claims once they were released?

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

During—

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Sorry, we don't have access to that information.

The Chair:

You have eight seconds remaining.

Mr. Alupa Clarke:

Do you have a system to flag people who are potentially going to commit suicide? I know it's very difficult, but is there any system such as that, perhaps?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Yes. At Veterans Affairs Canada, in the case management file, we have put in place a flag for that.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

Perhaps I can come back to the question in regard to the higher suicide rate among those who are in the army as compared to navy and air force, and any correlation or thoughts you might have.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Do you want to speak to that?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Again, I think anything I would say would really be speculation. What you said might be reasonable. Is it related to people who've had more traumatic experiences overseas during their deployments? It could be. The bottom line is that we don't really know, but certainly that increase in the army, or certain parts of the army, has coincided right with our time in Afghanistan. I think it's pretty reasonable to say there's probably a connection there.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

The reason we haven't parsed it in any more detail is that statistically we don't have sufficient power. We can only really look at one variable at a time, such as deployment, yes or no; or army or non-army, and those sorts of things. If we start looking at what's called a bivariate analysis, looking at two variables at a time, we find ourselves not being able to say anything because there's no statistical power to back it up.

(1635)

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

The numbers are so small, that's why.

Dr. Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Again, the CF CAMS is, I think, one of the pillars of our research going forward. One of the things that we may be able to do is to look at the colour of the uniform and whether it makes a difference, in concert with other risk factors that we know are frequently related to suicide.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It's interesting that the numbers tell us some things, and yet you can't infer anything concrete sometimes from those very same numbers. I understand your frustration.

Dr. Heber, you were talking about the warm handover. Obviously, we hear from veterans who do not feel very warm and fuzzy, and they talk about the frustration, the barrier, financial problems such as the pension cheque not arriving on time, and the fact that they feel abandoned, alienated, and something important has been take away from them. You talked about that, so obviously there must have been a recognition that there was a problem in terms of that warm handover. There's obviously been a conscious effort to change that. Is that ongoing? Is that something that you're going to continue, and how so?

Dr. Alexandra Heber:

Yes. Again, part of the reason we are doing a joint suicide strategy is that we want to make sure that we put special emphasis on that time. Again, with some of the research that's being done in Veterans Affairs Canada, we're really looking at these issues like identity and what happens to a person's identity, especially people who joined the military when they were very young and this is not just the only employment they've ever known, but that they've grown up in the military and this is the family they've known, because it really is. We have a fairly small military in our country. People get to know each other. I served only eight and a half years, but I knew everybody in health services in the Canadian military. There is a strong sense of shared identity.

The Chair:

Thank you. That ends our time for this panel.

I'd like to thank both of you for all the work you do helping our men and women who have served.

We'll take a quick four-minute break, and we'll start with our next panel.

(1635)

(1640)

The Chair:

Welcome, everybody. In our second hour we have, from the Department of Veterans Affairs, Dr. Courchesne, director general, health professionals division; Johanne Isabel, national manager, mental health services unit; and from the Department of Health, Chantale Malette, national manager, employee assistance services.

I don't think we're going to use the whole 10 minutes, but we'll have an introduction by our panellists, and we'll start with Ms. Isabel. [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Isabel (National Manager, Mental Health Services Unit, Directorate of Mental Health, Department of Veterans Affairs):

Good evening, everyone. My name is Johanne Isabel, and I've been working at Veterans Affairs Canada since 2001. My spouse is a retired member of the Canadian Armed Forces.

Mr. Chair and committee members, we're pleased to be talking about the Veterans Affairs Canada assistance service, a counselling and referral service offered 24 hours a day, seven days a week to our veterans and retired RCMP members and to their family members. The service is confidential. If a veteran isn't registered for a Veterans Affairs Canada service or program, the veteran can still use this program.

Here's a brief history of the program.

In 2000, Veterans Affairs Canada worked with Health Canada to provide a service that was similar to the Canadian Armed Forces member assistance program. We wanted to make sure that veterans and their families could transition more smoothly from military life to civilian life. We wanted to provide this service to serve our clients properly during the transition.

On December 1, 2014, your committee recommended that the assistance program for veterans be improved. From 2000 to 2014, veterans could receive up to eight individual counselling sessions with a health professional. As I already mentioned, based on your recommendations and since April 1, 2014, the program has been providing 20 individual counselling sessions to all our veterans and their family members and to retired RCMP members.

I'll now turn the floor over to Ms. Malette.

(1645)

Ms. Chantale Malette (National Manager, Business and Customer Relations, Employee Assistance Services, Department of Health):

Hello. My name is Chantale Malette.[English]

The services that are offered through the VAC assistance service are mainly confidential, bilingual services, accessible via a 1-800 number and through the Health Canada phone line 24 hours a day 365 days a year. Mental health professionals answer every call. All counsellors have at least a master's or a Ph.D. The veteran then has access automatically, right away, to a mental health professional.

Telephone services are also offered for the hearing impaired. There is immediate access to crisis support and counselling by a mental health professional with a minimum of a master's degree. If the person calling is in crisis, the mental health professional will take whatever time is necessary to stabilize the person before referring them for face-to-face counselling.

We refer to our national network of specialized private practitioners, according to needs, anywhere in Canada. We have face-to-face counselling. We also offer telephone counselling, especially when services are required in an isolated area or if they are required by the client. We also offer e-counselling when appropriate.

We refer to external resources or VAC if the time required to resolve the issue exceeds the coverage provided by the program. We use the sessions and the hours covered under the program to bridge the person, to support the veteran until long-term care is available.

In terms of suicide prevention, for every call the client's state is verified. We verify the level of stress. We verify the suicidal or homicidal thoughts. If the caller is identified as having suicidal ideation, the counsellor will ask for the caller's authorization to contact their VAC case manager and inform him or her of the situation.

In terms of counsellors, we have access to over 900 mental health professionals across Canada. They all have a minimum of a master's degree in a psychosocial field and at least five years' experience in private practice. They have had a government security screening. They have malpractice insurance. They're registered with a recognized professional association. Professional references are checked as well.

In terms of quality assurance, every time a veteran consults a mental health professional, we provide this person with a satisfaction survey to get more information on their satisfaction with the program. We also do yearly visits to counsellors' offices. We visit at least 5% every year. We also are accredited by EASNA, the employee assistance society of North America, and COA, the Council on Accreditation. We adhere to the highest standards in the industry.

(1650)

[Translation]

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

Here are a few statistics.

From 2012 to 2016, the number of people who used the service went from 614 to 1,140. Therefore, there was an increase. This was mainly the result of the decision to improve the services by increasing the number of counselling sessions to 20. For a veteran or a veteran's family member who wants to address a major issue, it's worthwhile to have counselling sessions over a longer period. It's very positive.

Of the 1,143 people mentioned here, 68% are veterans, 28% are veterans' family members and 2% are retired RCMP members. The people who use the services are, on average, in their late forties or early fifties. People use the Veterans Affairs Canada assistance service mainly for psychological issues not related to military service or for couples counselling.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Great. Thank you.

Mr. Kitchen, I believe you're going to split your time with Mr. Brassard.

Mr. Kitchen, go ahead.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you all for being here.

Doctor, thank you very much for coming back to the committee.

I appreciate your presentation and your giving us some of the statistics. When you talk about 24 hours, seven days a week, 365 days, how does someone access that with this number? For example, I come from Saskatchewan. You talk about having 900 mental health professionals. If someone in Saskatchewan is phoning at midnight, who are they phoning?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

They are calling Ottawa. All the counsellors who answer the VAC assistance service are in Ottawa, so when the person dials the 1-800 number they will automatically have access to a mental health professional, who will verify the state of the client and refer them for face-to-face counselling anywhere in Canada, including in Saskatchewan if they want.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

We talked about knowledge translation. One of the things I see here is knowledge translation and getting this knowledge out to veterans.

Have you actually done a survey or a study to find out how many veterans know about this? [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

Many efforts have been made to further promote the service. The information has been posted on our website. The information is also consulted a great deal on our Facebook and Twitter platforms. The information on the service is sent to veterans on a monthly basis. Ms. Malette works extensively with the Canadian Armed Forces, the RCMP and all the Veterans Affairs Canada offices to explain and show the benefits of the program. [English]

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

How do we get this information to the homeless veteran who doesn't have a computer, doesn't tweet, doesn't use Facebook, and may be living in northern Saskatchewan or northern Ontario or wherever it may be? How do we get that information to them? [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

That's a very good question.

You're right. We can always do better. Our case managers receive information. Since 2012, the VAC assistance service has been used more often. Could it be used even more? Yes. Is it effective? Yes. Could homeless veterans benefit from it? Yes, and we're constantly working to make that happen. Could we do more? The answer is yes.

We try to vary the ways we let them know about the assistance service. We have various programs to ensure that homeless veterans also receive information about the assistance service. We distribute brochures to them to let them know about the service.

(1655)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The committee is studying mental health and suicide prevention among veterans. You're on the front lines of all that's going on here.

What sort of recommendations would you like to see the committee make in terms of dealing with the issue of suicide prevention and some of the mental health issues?

Do you want me to pick somebody? Doctor? I know you have been here before.

Dr. Cyd Courchesne (Director General, Health Professionals Division, Chief Medical Officer, Department of Veterans Affairs):

Yes I have, and we look forward to the report. As Madame Isabel mentioned, it was based on recommendations that came out of this committee that we increase the counselling sessions from eight to 20, because our numbers show that this is a service. I would like to remind you that this is a service available regardless of whether someone is in receipt of benefits from Veterans Affairs. It is for anyone who is one of those 600,000 veterans out there in Canada.

In terms of suicide prevention, you heard from my two very articulate colleagues that we continue our research to understand this very complex problem. We're working together more closely with our Canadian Forces colleagues, especially around the periods of vulnerability that are identified through epidemiology or research, so that we can strengthen our programs.

Mr. John Brassard:

Do you work with stakeholders? For example, do you work with the provinces and municipalities? Is there any of that outreach to deal with the homeless population? Municipalities, for example, do numbers, and there are other organizations, as we found out through testimony, that count homeless veterans. Do you reach out to those organizations?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

I'll start, and then I'll pass it on.

Within the Department of Veterans Affairs, we do have colleagues who are working specifically on a strategy for veterans in crisis, for the homeless. These are issues we can't work alone on, so they're very much connected with municipal and provincial organizations, with all these people out there on the beat. We wouldn't be able to do that without these important stakeholders. [Translation]

I don't know whether my colleague has something to add.

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

No. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Eyolfson.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you, and my thanks to you all for coming.

Dr. Courchesne, welcome back. Am I saying your last name correctly?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

Yes, that's very good.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Okay, thank you.

I'd like to follow up with what I was asking Dr. Heber before. It sounded like there was a communication. You might have had an answer there. In response to the outreach to primary care physicians, is there any specific communication with the emergency medicine community?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

We don't communicate with emergency medicine specifically, but we work very closely with the College of Family Physicians of Canada. They've struck a special group to produce educational material for all the family physicians in Canada, educating them on the health issues of military families. They've also expressed that they wanted to produce a best-advice guide on veterans' health.

The Occupational and Environmental Medicine Association of Canada has invited us to come and present on veterans' health issues, and I'll be presenting there with my colleague Jim Thompson on what the research has shown us about being able to educate as many doctors as possible. We're also connected with the Vanier Institute of the Family. We're very interested in families and veterans. So, yes, we do a lot of educating.

(1700)

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

We did also work with the CAMH in Toronto. They have a series of mental health modules online, and one on mental health and addiction 101 was added. It's a 20-minute bilingual online module that could be used by all health professionals.

We also are working with the Canadian Mental Health Commission and Mental Health First Aid Canada. There's a two-day training course being provided to the veterans community. What do we mean by “the veterans community”? It's being offered to all primary care providers, families members, and friends. Our goal is to have 3,000 members, or as many as we can, who will take the two-day training course before the end of 2020.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

All right. Thank you.

To expand on this, has there been outreach towards the medical schools in Canada to put these issues into the actual curriculum?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

I'm trying to think if there was an outreach when I was in the military. Through the Canadian Medical Association, the Canadian Forces were represented at the specialist and the GP levels. I sat on the GP forum, and we had representatives at the Canadian Federation of Medical Students. So there has been a start towards socializing these issues with them. Certainly the Canadian Medical Association has been very good, in making a declaration in 2014 that they were encouraging family doctors to take veterans on in their practices. We've had very good support from our medical associations in Canada.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

All right, thank you. That's good to hear.

Are there any trends in how these veterans with mental health concerns are presenting themselves? We know that in the military and in society in general, there's always a stigma with mental illness. Everyone's been working hard to reduce that stigma. With general public education to reduce that stigma, are we seeing a positive result in veterans presenting themselves earlier or presenting before they're in crisis? Is that having the effect we want it to?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

You heard from a professional statistician epidemiologist, and I would be going out on a limb if I said that we were definitely seeing positive results, because they would ask me where are the statistics to support that.

I am going to bring it back to our veterans assistance line. One of the reasons for that—because we're talking about stigma—is that it's anonymous; it's available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. You don't need to qualify for any of our programs to use it, and I think that goes a long way.

That might be the first phone call, the first step they take to talk to someone, and to realize that maybe they have a bigger problem. The professionals that work the VAC assistance line work with veterans. They know our programs. They know when to say, “Well, maybe you should connect with a case manger and explore more supports to help you with your situation”.

That's what I wanted to say about stigma, and bringing it back to the VAC assistance line. You don't have to pre-qualify for anything; you just call, and you get access immediately.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Dr. Courchesne, for coming back and filling in some of the gaps for us.

I want to go back to some specifics. You're now offering 20 face-to-face sessions plus sessions for the family. In terms of those 20 visits, is there a specific time frame you could count on? When those 20 visits end, is there a follow-up to evaluate their efficacy? What happens if there is still that need for more?

I wasn't sure if you had commented on that.

(1705)

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

I'm going to let Madame Malette answer the question with respect to the length of the sessions.

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Normally, we can provide up to 20 hours, and most of the time that is sufficient. When we have situations that require more than 20 hours, we will certainly have a conversation with VAC regarding the required services, and we will normally provide the intervention that is needed. It can be up to 25 or 30 hours, if necessary.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I was very interested in the reference made, both by Madame Malette and you, Dr. Courchesne, to interacting with practitioners, talking to the providers, talking to family doctors, and the idea of family doctors taking on veterans.

Is part of the intent to verify the quality of the service provided and to find out from those family doctors what they're discovering in the course of their interactions with veterans? Are you learning from them, I guess, is what I'm asking?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

Are you talking about the health professionals that provide the counselling to the veterans through VAC assistance?

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

You talked about educating family physicians, and I wondered if it's a two-way street.

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

That was in response to your colleague's question as to whether we were doing outreach with associations and family doctors. We're not in a position to contact those family doctors. I'm not sure—

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Perhaps Madame Isabel said that you have quality visits to practitioners' offices, and I wondered if, in that process, you're learning important things from those practitioners.

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

Those are not family physicians that provide the service through VAC assistance. It's Health Canada that monitors the quality of the services provided through the VAC assistance. Am I right?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Yes.

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

Again, this is anonymous, so none of the information is shared with us. We just know how many people use the service and perhaps whether they're satisfied with the service.

Once in a while, we do deal with some complaints and all that, which we follow up on, but the providers would never communicate with us to exchange that information.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It just seems that we're constantly in quicksand regarding how to prevent suicide and how to address the needs of people. It seems to always come back to this ambivalence and not knowing exactly what course to take. I'm trying to sort through that, not very successfully obviously, but I'm trying to sort through all of that.

Dr. Heber referred to VAC updating the mental health strategy and collaborating with DND to create this joint strategy in regard to suicide. I wonder if you could speak to that. I wanted to ask the question before about what those pieces look like. What does that strategy look like?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

I'll answer that, if you'll allow.

You have heard that suicide is not a simple issue. Many factors play into it. I know people don't always like to hear about research, but research is very important because it provides us with so much information, so we can formulate programs, services, and strategies to confront this issue.

There are several aspects to the strategy. There is prevention, intervention, and what we would call “post-vention”. That's just a fancy way of putting things in baskets and organizing our activities.

I would say that everything that you've heard here about the VAC assistance line and, I would say, all the programs that Veterans Affairs offers to the veterans, is all part of the prevention strategies or prevention actions.

We also learn from research that the transition period is an important period of vulnerability for our releasing members, so we want to concentrate on that. What more can we do besides exit interviews, getting them case managers, helping them navigate the system, and getting them the benefits and the treatments that they need. All of that exists. All of that will be improved and that's all part of the strategy that we're developing with our Canadian Forces colleagues.

(1710)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Go ahead, Mr. Fraser. [Translation]

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to thank you three for being here today to give your presentations and answer our questions.

I want to start with you, Ms. Isabel. You mentioned the 20 in-person counselling sessions. The number of counselling sessions therefore increased from 8 to 20.

Can you explain the steps a person must take to receive these 20 counselling sessions? Is it easy to obtain approval? Are there forms to fill in? Do the members encounter difficulties before obtaining approval for these sessions?

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

No. The first step for a veteran, a veteran's family member or a retired RCMP member is simply to call the 1-800 number. As Ms. Malette said, the team is in Ottawa. A staff member will ask questions and ask how things are going. The staff member will also determine the urgency of the call. If a client has suicidal thoughts, the protocol will be a bit different. However, if the client says they want to meet with a counsellor or mental health professional in person, depending on the client's region, the staff member can refer the client within a time frame ranging from 24 hours to five days. The time frame is based on the level of urgency. The veteran or the person making the request can receive the service in person, with a counsellor.

The client isn't the one who will determine the number of counselling sessions required, whether that number is 2 or 20. The decision is made after a health professional conducts an assessment. The veteran or client and the health professional will discuss the issue and the difficulties to address. This assessment will determine the number of sessions.

Earlier, it was asked whether the number of sessions ever needed to be increased to more than 20. The answer is yes, and it's important. A judgment call must be made, based on a client's needs. Sometimes, it's necessary. However, I also want to mention that this doesn't happen in the majority of cases. In a given year, Ms. Malette may call me three or four times to increase the number of sessions. In this case, we're talking about approximately five or six additional sessions.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Ms. Isabel, do you think the program steps are working well right now? Do you have any recommendations for improving the program?

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

I've been working with Health Canada since 2012. We've received very few complaints or negative comments regarding the number of counselling sessions, especially since we increased the number of sessions to 20. The service is used more often. I don't have any recommendations in this regard.

(1715)

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Okay. Thank you.

I would now like to speak to Ms. Malette.

You said the service was accessible through the 1-800 number. You also mentioned Facebook, Twitter and other similar things. Is there a way to communicate instantly with a staff member, online, by computer?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

No. At this time, there's no way to do so because it would be very difficult to assess the person's condition and to get back in touch with the person. For the moment, the safest method is for the person to call the 1-800 number. A mental health professional will respond and immediately verify the person's condition. The mental health professional can then get back in touch with the person, take note of the person's telephone number, and so on. Therefore, there's direct contact with the person. [English]

Mr. Colin Fraser:

One of the things we've heard in previous testimony is how important it is to have peer support, to have somebody who has served be a person who can talk to a veteran who may be in crisis now.

Is there somebody who can immediately be put in touch with them if they call the 1-800 number? You talked about some of the criteria for working at the contact centre. Is there somebody, a peer, who could be put in touch with them immediately?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

We would refer to existing resources, for example OSISS. We work closely with them as well. If a veteran needed to speak with a peer, then we would use the services already in place.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

But that could be quite a bit of time from that telephone call. It wouldn't be within the hour.

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Maybe not within the hour, but we would certainly make the call right away, and we would either stay on the phone with this person or we would do frequent follow-ups during the evening. We would find out the best way to support this person at that time.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Has anybody ever used the service and asked if a veteran works there? Does that question ever get asked?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

It's never happened.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Those are my questions.

The Chair:

We are running out of time. I just have one clarifying question on your pamphlet here. It says: A voluntary and confidential service to help all Veterans and their families as well as primary caregivers who have personal concerns that affect their well-being. The service is available free of charge.

As a caregiver or a family member, do you need a veteran's reference to use this service? [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

It's a service provided by Health Canada. The person simply needs to mention that they're a veteran's spouse and they can have immediate access to the service. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

That ends our round. On behalf of our committee here today, I would like to thank all three of you for coming with your testimony and for all you do to help our men and women who have served.

Mrs. Romanado, go ahead.

Mrs. Sherry Romanado (Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne, Lib.):

I know I wouldn't normally have the floor.

Would it be possible for the members of Parliament to receive a copy of this? I am not sure all members of Parliament are aware that this service exists. I would highly recommend that you make sure they have it.

The Chair:

Great. Thank you.

Mr. Fraser, go ahead.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Mr. Chair, I am just wondering why we are finishing at 5:20.

The Chair:

We could go to Mr. Bratina for six minutes, if he wishes to take that.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Thank you.

Did the increase in number from 614 to 1,143 and the extension of the 20 visits put any demands on resources? Were you able to do that within the complement of staff you had, or did it cause you to spend more money?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

We have actually hired more mental health professionals.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

These young people.... There was a reference to the military background, but what about orientation? How do you bring them into a military setting? I could see a certificate course in something like this, to add to their M.A. Is there an orientation process?

(1720)

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

It is a good question. I have to admit that right now we don't have a certificate or a specific program. We had a discussion last week, following recommendations from the family advisory committee at Veterans Affairs Canada. It was recommended that we provide more training for our mental health providers working with the VAC assistance service. Next week we'll have a call in to discuss this and try to identify how it could be done.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

I'm sure you need these very qualified people, who typically would be younger people coming out of the university setting. It would be more difficult for, say, veterans with some years of service to become qualified. They would have the natural ability to relate to a veteran, but there are specific issues that these people are trained for, which is beyond the scope of just an interested former service person.

On the question of the satisfaction survey, can you give me an indication of how that takes place?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

When the client sees one of our counsellors, the counsellor provides a voluntary survey with questions regarding the services that the client has received. They provide the person with a pre-stamped envelope as well, so the person can send us the information, which is then shared with VAC.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

It's always important, whatever we do, to review it and see whether we are making progress. So that's good to hear.

On the face-to-face counselling sessions, how long would a session typically go?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Normally, a session is one hour.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

In the satisfaction survey, is there a reflection that this is generally a good amount of time?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Yes.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Would 20 be an extreme or maximum? I gather from what you said that some people would have one or two sessions and your group would determine whether further sessions were needed, as opposed to somebody saying, “I'd like to come back next week too.”

Ms. Chantale Malette:

That's right. There needs to be an intervention that is provided to the client. Based on the intervention needed, the amount of sessions is decided.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

When someone calls the number, how do they identify themselves?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

They will identify themself as either a veteran or former military member.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

They simply say, “I'm former military and I need some help”?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Most of the time, yes, but if they can't or if they've just heard about us and don't know if they qualify for the service, we will ask questions of the person as to whether they have military life experience and if, at that point, they are regular members or former military.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

One of the things we're looking at that we've talked about many times at this committee is continuing the identity of the veteran with their service time and, therefore, maybe having a card or something so they know right away that they have a way of identifying themselves as a veteran. Would you see the use in that?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Yes. I think....

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

Yes, that would be a plus.

Having said that, as I mentioned, people don't have to justify it if they were in the military; they just have to mention it. We may believe that some people are receiving services because they've mentioned that they were veterans, but I doubt that people would do that. As for the fact that they don't have to provide any justification, the card would not really be a plus value in that specific case for that specific program.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

It would be very rare, but we've seen cases of people showing up for Remembrance Day with uniforms and medals and....

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

You're right, sir.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Thank you very much.

Those are my questions.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Quickly, I would like to follow up on Mr. Fraser's question. He commented about using peer support.

I want a little more clarification on that and whether you have ever looked at it or thought about this. It's one of the things we're hearing a lot about from our veterans. They're asking, “Isn't somebody there?” We haven't taken our veterans to actually help our veterans. There's this opportunity when you get a call like this where you might be able, on a conference call, to access someone 24-7, someone who can speak the language, because oftentimes people can't speak the language. I know a lot of psychologists and a lot of M.A. and Ph.D. students who do not know the language.

To me at least, having access for that veteran easily attainable in that crisis situation would be a valuable asset for your services. I'm wondering (a), if you have thought about it, and (b) if you haven't and this is the first time, if you see that being of some value.

(1725)

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

I'll take the first crack at this.

Based on the numbers and the calls, it's not just the veterans. There are RCMP members and there are family members and children. Most of the calls are not for service-related issues, so I would say that so far it has not been an issue. But again, the people who answer the phones are very aware of all the services we have, including OSISS, which has a very large network of peer support people who are ready to assist us. If it's not within the hour, they have a strong network of people that will jump in to assist whenever we reach out to them....

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Right, but I'm not talking about service, about someone asking for a service availability. I'm talking about a veteran in crisis with a mental health issue. No matter what that mental health problem may be—because there are many different types of mental health issues—the fact that they might actually have a veteran or someone in the military who, having been there, understands, sometimes just that comfort is enough to maybe bring them down or calm them down. As for having that in a conference call, is that not something that you would see having value?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

Well, absolutely. There's no doubt as to the value of peer support. Absolutely, it would be of value.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Is there a way that could be put into this program?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

We can certainly look at it.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Ms. Lockhart.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to talk a bit about families and the training provided to them. With other witnesses, we've talked about the first aid training that is presently happening for mental health and suicide prevention. Has there been any thought put to having similar training for family members even before military release? Has that been discussed?

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

I'm not sure.

I guess what I can say is that right now, as I mentioned, we are working with the Mental Health Commission of Canada to provide two days of mental health first aid training. Right now we have been providing close to 14 sessions across the country, and our goal is to provide at least 150. This is one way that family members can have a bit more knowledge on mental health. This is going to allow them to have a better understanding and maybe see how their husbands or spouses are reacting with different signs.

Also, Dr. Courchesne alluded to our partnership with Saint Elizabeth on a caregiver program that is going to be available in the spring.

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

Also, these programs are offered through the military family resource centre, so they are available to family members before the CF member releases.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

The only other question I had about that is whether those are paid for in advance or whether the families need to pay for those and be reimbursed.

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

When we are talking about the mental health first aid...it's free of charge.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

All right.

What about travel, though, to get there?

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

I have to admit that the travel to get there is not.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

I bring that up just because it's been identified as a barrier for some families.

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

Okay, thanks a lot for letting us know.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I just have a quick question.

When somebody calls the 1-800 number, I was wondering what the process is. What do they hear? Would the first thing they hear be that their call is important and to please stand by, or do they go straight to a person? Are there any recorded messages? Take me through the process of it.

Ms. Chantale Malette:

A mental health professional answers the phone. There is no answering machine that welcomes the client. It's a live person.

(1730)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So if somebody calls, in an immediate, “help is needed” crisis, what happens?

Ms. Chantale Malette:

The counsellor will evaluate the situation and ask questions on the level of stress, the suicidal thoughts, and ideation. Also, the counsellor will spend whatever time is necessary with the person over the phone before that person is referred to a mental health professional or other services, or even before we call 911, if necessary.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So you will do that if you need to.

Ms. Chantale Malette:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

Also, I should follow up on the point Sherry made earlier. She suggested giving this information out to MPs. As an MP, what information and resources are available to me to get out there? We have 338 MPs who have offices in every riding. A lot of places they're very far from any kind of veterans services office. What can we do to help your mission, basically?

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

All this information is also available on our website also.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, I haven't heard about the Internet in my riding, but there you go.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Dr. Cyd Courchesne:

We also publish every week through Twitter and social media. We have repeat tweets that go out advertising all of the services available at the department. [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

We care about our veterans. You're all invited, in one way or another, to promote the service and to provide brochures in your offices. I would be very pleased to prepare boxes of information for you. That way, you can distribute them in your respective regions. Our veterans are important. We want to improve their situation.

Is everything in place to do so?

Maybe not, but with your support and recommendations,[English]this is what we are striving for. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Could you be proactive by sending those documents to our offices?

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

Absolutely. I'll do that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate it.[English]

We're past that pass.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

I just have a question on that. We all do householders, and I just wonder if you could make something that might go in a householder and send it to my staff, and maybe we could promote it through this committee in a householder. That's just an idea.

Ms. Johanne Isabel:

Okay.

The Chair:

With that, on behalf of the committee I'd like to thank you for your testimony today and everything you do for our men and women who serve. If there's any information you didn't get to us, send it to our clerk and he'll distribute it to the committee. Again, I'd like to take you up on the householder idea.

I need a motion to adjourn.

Mr. Robert Kitchen: I so move.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: Thank you.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des anciens combattants

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Neil Ellis (Baie de Quinte, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. La séance est ouverte.

Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement et à la motion adoptée le 29 septembre, le Comité reprend son étude de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide chez les vétérans.

Pour la première partie, nous accueillons la Dre Elizabeth Rolland-Harris, épidémiologiste principale, Groupe des Services de santé des Forces canadiennes, du ministère de la Défense nationale, ainsi que la Dre Alexandra Heber, chef de la psychiatrie, Division des professionnels de la santé.

Nous allons commencer par vos déclarations de 10 minutes avant de passer aux questions.

La parole est à vous. Merci.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris (épidémiologiste principale, Direction – Protection de la santé de la Force, Groupe des Services de santé des Forces canadiennes, ministère de la Défense nationale):

Monsieur le président et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité des anciens combattants de la Chambre, je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de discuter avec vous aujourd'hui. Depuis dix ans, je suis épidémiologiste principale pour la Direction de la protection de la santé de la Force, plus communément appelée la DPSF, laquelle fait partie du Groupe des Services de santé des Forces. Je suis titulaire d'une maîtrise ès sciences en épidémiologie de l'Université de Toronto ainsi que d'un doctorat en épidémiologie de l'École d'hygiène et de médecine tropicale de Londres, au Royaume-Uni. Avant de me joindre à la DPSF, j'ai travaillé à titre d'épidémiologiste aux échelons provincial et régional ainsi que dans le secteur universitaire.

En tant qu'épidémiologiste, mon premier rôle, — en réalité —, c'est de répondre aux besoins des décideurs des services de santé des FC et de l'ensemble des Forces armées canadiennes — aussi appelées les FAC, et je suis certaine que vous le savez déjà — en matière de statistiques et de données. Les cliniciens et les décideurs qui élaborent les politiques, mettent en oeuvre la pratique clinique ou travaillent dans le but de garder les FAC en santé ont vraiment besoin de savoir qui est leur population et quels sont ses besoins, et c'est là que j'interviens. Je suis en coulisse, à fournir aux « faiseurs » les renseignements statistiques dont ils ont besoin pour agir en se fondant sur des données probantes. Je le fais dans le cadre d'une grande direction, celle de la protection de la santé de la Force.

La DPSF fonctionne de la même manière qu'une autorité provinciale de santé publique, mais elle ne sert que les FAC. Les principaux piliers de la santé publique sont la surveillance et l'évaluation de la santé de la population, la protection de la santé, la promotion de la santé et la prévention de la maladie.

En ce qui concerne la surveillance de la santé publique, une partie importante de ce que nous faisons consiste à suivre la santé des membres des FAC, principalement au moyen de sondages comme celui du Système d'information sur la santé et les habitudes de vie et grâce à d'autres fonctions de surveillance de la santé. Ces fonctions peuvent avoir une portée plus large, comme c'est le cas du Système de surveillance des maladies et les blessures dans les FC, qui surveille les cas de maladie et de blessures durant les déploiements, en particulier, ainsi que du système de suivi nommé évaluations de la santé et signalement des résultats de santé des Forces canadiennes, qu'il est possible d'adapter afin d'observer un certain nombre d'états et de problèmes de santé. Ces systèmes peuvent également être un peu plus précis, comme c'est le cas de la base de données sur la mortalité ou du système de surveillance du suicide, lequel est la source d'information à partir de laquelle est produit le rapport annuel sur le suicide dans les FAC. Les décideurs et les responsables des politiques utilisent ensuite les tendances et les modèles que nous dégageons dans le cadre de notre travail à l'aide de ces diverses sources de renseignements pour élaborer et mettre en oeuvre des politiques et des programmes fondés sur des données probantes et relatifs à la santé à l'échelle des FAC.

Comme je l'ai mentionné, le « Rapport de 2016 sur la mortalité par suicide dans les Forces armées canadiennes » est un de nos rapports que vous connaissez fort probablement; il porte sur les cas de suicide entre 1995 et 2015. Je l'appellerai à partir de maintenant le rapport de 2016 sur le suicide.

Au sein des FAC, nous — les civils et les militaires — considérons tous les suicides comme des tragédies. Le suicide est fermement reconnu comme un problème de santé publique important. Ainsi, ce rapport est produit depuis 1995, et des versions annuelles sont publiées depuis 2008 afin que l'on apprenne à mieux connaître le phénomène du suicide dans les FAC. La surveillance et l'analyse des événements de suicide de membres des FAC fournissent des renseignements précieux qui orientent et perfectionnent les efforts déployés de façon continue afin de prévenir le suicide.

(1535)

[Français]

Bien que nous recueillions et suivions les données sur tous les suicides, qu'il s'agisse d'hommes ou de femmes, de membres de la Force régulière ou de la Force de réserve, les rapports annuels ne portent que sur les militaires de sexe masculin membres de la Force régulière. C'est ainsi parce que le nombre de suicides de femmes et de réservistes est trop modeste pour que nous puissions divulguer des détails sur ces cas sans risquer d'identifier des personnes et de compromettre leur droit à la confidentialité. Par conséquent, même si l'expérience de ces gens est versée dans les preuves qui servent à orienter les politiques en matière de santé mentale et les efforts de prévention du suicide au sein des Forces armées canadiennes, les renseignements qui les concernent ne figurent pas dans les rapports annuels.

Tous les suicides sont confirmés par le coroner de la province dans laquelle ils ont eu lieu. Ce renseignement est fourni à la Direction de la santé mentale, qui en assure le suivi et le recoupe avec les renseignements recueillis par le Centre de soutien pour les enquêtes administratives, qui fait partie de la Direction des enquêtes et examens spéciaux.

Chaque fois qu'un décès est jugé constituer un suicide, le médecin-chef adjoint ordonne la production d'un rapport d'examen technique du suicide par des professionnels de la santé, ou ETSPS; en anglais, c'est MPTSR. Cette enquête est menée par une équipe formée d'un professionnel de la santé mentale et d'un médecin militaire généraliste. Ensemble, ils examinent tous les dossiers de santé pertinents et réalisent des entrevues avec le personnel médical, les membres de l'unité, les membres de la famille et d'autres personnes pouvant avoir des connaissances sur les circonstances du suicide en question. Pris de concert, ces renseignements servent à la formulation des constatations que l'on trouve dans le rapport annuel sur le suicide.

Le visage du suicide dans les Forces armées canadiennes a changé au fil du temps. Bien que les taux puissent varier quelque peu d'une année à l'autre, une image claire et constante a fini par émerger au cours de la dernière décennie. Les militaires rattachés à l'Armée canadienne, plus précisément ceux qui appartiennent aux groupes professionnels des armées de combat, courent un risque plus marqué de suicide que les membres de la Marine royale canadienne ou de l'Aviation royale canadienne.

Certaines preuves commencent à se faire jour quant au rôle possiblement joué par les déploiements. Nous devons néanmoins user de prudence en ce qui a trait à cette vaste désignation, car elle peut englober plusieurs types de déploiement, par exemple les déploiements humanitaires, de maintien de la paix ou de combat actif, et plusieurs expériences différentes, tant bénéfiques que nuisibles. Il faudra procéder à davantage de recherche et d'analyse avant de déterminer si, en soi, le déploiement est, de quelque manière que se soit, vraiment lié au risque de suicide.[Traduction]

Nous commençons à acquérir une bien meilleure compréhension, grâce au travail effectué par mes collègues de la Direction de la santé mentale et au sein de la DPSF, au sujet des facteurs de risque qui sous-tendent le suicide. Par exemple, plus de 70 % des hommes de la Force régulière qui se sont enlevé la vie en 2015 avaient des preuves documentées de rupture conjugale ou de détresse avant leur décès. L'endettement, la maladie de membres de la famille et d'amis et la toxicomanie ont été désignés comme des facteurs de risque.

On les observe aussi souvent au sein de la population en général. La plupart de ces hommes avaient plus d'un facteur de risque non lié à la santé mentale au moment de leur décès. Même si cette situation est troublante, elle correspond à celle qui est observée par d'autres forces militaires, et je pense qu'elle fait ressortir la direction dans laquelle nos efforts de recherche et de surveillance devraient être de plus en plus concentrés dans l'avenir.

Dans cette optique, le MDN — en tant que ministère faisant partie de l'Agence de la santé publique du Canada — a dirigé un groupe de travail interministériel sur les données de surveillance relatives au suicide, qui fait partie des résultats attendus du Cadre fédéral de prévention du suicide. L'appartenance à ce groupe de travail constitue une excellente fenêtre pour observer le travail que font les autres organismes fédéraux en matière de surveillance et de prévention du suicide et pour échanger des renseignements sur la façon de rendre nos approches de collaboration plus efficaces et cohérentes.

Nous entretenons également une relation de longue date avec Anciens Combattants Canada. Nous collaborons avec ce ministère depuis des années dans le cadre de l'Étude sur la mortalité et l'incidence du cancer au sein des FC, qui porte sur le risque de suicide au cours de la vie d'une personne, durant et après le service. Nous collaborons actuellement avec ce ministère et Statistique Canada relativement à une deuxième édition de l'étude. Nous prévoyons nous pencher sur le cancer et sur les causes de décès — y compris le suicide — chez les membres du personnel actifs et libérés de la Force régulière et du service en classe C de la Réserve qui se sont enrôlés dans les FAC entre 1976 et 2015.

Nous siégeons également au comité directeur de l'Étude sur la mortalité par suicide chez les anciens combattants, qui étudiera les risques de suicide chez tous les anciens combattants de la Force régulière et les anciens réservistes en service de classe C libérés des Forces armées canadiennes, aussi entre 1972 et 2015.

En résumé, la surveillance est un élément important et fait partie intégrante de la compréhension des facteurs de risque et des tendances associés au suicide chez les membres du personnel actifs et libérés. La collaboration entre les ministères et les chercheurs se poursuit, comme en témoigne la deuxième édition de l'Étude du cancer et de la mortalité chez les membres des FC et d'autres initiatives de recherche, et elle s'avérera extrêmement utile pour ce qui est de comprendre ce problème complexe.

Merci.

(1540)

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons commencer par des questions de six minutes, avec M. Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les deux médecins de leur présence. Je l'apprécie. J'espère que vous allez nous aider à faire la lumière sur certains des problèmes liés à l'épidémiologie et sur les études au sujet desquelles nous n'en savons peut-être pas beaucoup.

Je me demande ce que vous pensez des paramètres auxquels vous avez accès. Là où je veux en venir, c'est que le Globe and Mail a récemment déclaré que 70 suicides avaient eu lieu au cours des cinq dernières années — je crois que c'est ce qui a été dit —, et que les rédacteurs attribuaient essentiellement ces suicides au retour de nos soldats de l'Afghanistan.

Je ne sais pas si vous avez vu ou lu cet article. Comment voyez-vous cette situation se jouer dans le rapport dont nous discutons aujourd'hui?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Pour l'instant, au moyen du rapport annuel sur le suicide, il est très difficile de considérer le déploiement comme une variable. Lorsque nous avons affaire à de l'épidémiologie ou à des statistiques, il y a une notion appelée le « pouvoir ». Essentiellement, il faut disposer d'un certain nombre de personnes pour pouvoir analyser l'information. Même si nous recueillons de l'information sur le suicide depuis maintenant plus de 20 ans — et, disons-le clairement: un seul suicide en est un de trop —, d'un point de vue statistique, nous en avons très peu, alors nous ne pouvons pas analyser cette information. Pour que je puisse répondre en disant si l'Afghanistan est un facteur ou non... d'un point de vue purement mécanique, c'est quelque chose que je ne peux pas faire pour l'instant.

Toutefois, si je puis donner des détails, dans le cadre de la deuxième édition de l'Étude sur la mortalité et l'incidence du cancer au sein des FC, nous disposons d'une cohorte de près de 250 000 personnes. Manifestement, elles n'étaient pas toutes en service durant les années de l'Afghanistan; certaines l'ont été avant cette période. Néanmoins, nous pouvons maintenant examiner essentiellement toutes les personnes qui sont allées en Afghanistan et qui se sont enrôlées après 1975.

Nous espérons être en mesure de commencer à étudier des déploiements précis, au lieu de simplement étudier le déploiement en tant que variable dichotomique correspondant à un oui ou à un non.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Vous avez un peu abordé certains des paramètres que vous utilisez. Pouvez-vous nous donner des détails sur l'ensemble des paramètres que vous examinez? Par exemple, examinez-vous des éléments comme la perte d'identité et le fait qu'il s'agit d'un problème ou non dans vos recherches?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Vous devez vous rappeler que je ne suis qu'une pièce du casse-tête. Je suis là pour aider à analyser les renseignements. Ces renseignements ne nous sont pas fournis. Vous devriez vous adresser à quelqu'un qui participe à l'ETSPS afin de vous faire une meilleure idée du fait qu'il s'agit de quelque chose qu'on examine ou pas.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Si vous n'obtenez pas les bonnes données, vous ne pouvez pas rendre compte de...

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je ne dirais pas que ce sont des données inexactes. C'est...

M. Robert Kitchen:

Disons, des données étendues. Il est difficile pour vous de procéder à une analyse si vous ne disposez pas des données nécessaires.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Il y a deux facteurs. Je ne fais que formuler une hypothèse, mais il se pourrait que les données soient si rares que nous ne puissions pas les examiner, et il se pourrait qu'elles n'existent pas. Je ne pourrais pas dire.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Participez-vous d'une manière ou d'une autre à...?

Désolé, allez-y.

Dre Alexandra Heber (chef de la psychiatrie, Division des Professionnels de la santé, ministère des Anciens Combattants):

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose à cela, du point de vue d'Anciens Combattants?

Tout d'abord, je veux me présenter. Même si je ne fais pas de déclaration, je pense que vous devriez avoir une petite idée de mes antécédents. Je travaille dans le domaine de la santé mentale depuis plus de 30 ans. En 2003, j'ai commencé à travailler pour l'armée canadienne, à Ottawa, en tant que psychiatre, et, trois ans plus tard, j'ai revêtu l'uniforme. Alors, j'ai servi, y compris en Afghanistan. J'ai été libérée en 2015, et j'ai commencé à occuper le poste de chef de la psychiatrie d'Anciens Combattants en septembre 2016.

Même si je ne suis pas là pour représenter les Forces canadiennes, je possède certaines compétences à ce sujet. Concernant votre question au sujet de l'identité, je vous dirai que c'est une chose à quoi nous nous intéressons beaucoup, à Anciens Combattants. Nous examinons la période de transition de la personne du statut de militaire à celui d'ancien combattant et ce qui arrive aux gens durant cette période. Nous voulons connaître leurs vulnérabilités et savoir ce que nous pouvons faire pour eux, en tant qu'organisation. Il est beaucoup question de combler les lacunes, surtout pour nos populations vulnérables, les gens qui, nous le savons, ont reçu des diagnostics en santé mentale ou qui ont des problèmes physiques nuisant à leur qualité de vie. Ce sont les gens que nous voulons aider — nous le savons — tout au long de cette période de transition.

(1545)

M. Robert Kitchen:

Rencontrez-vous des problèmes liés à la protection des renseignements personnels dans le cadre de la collecte de vos données? Je parle des deux points de vue.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

C'est différent. Nos problèmes sont différents.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

C'est différent. Pour être honnête, je suis au bout de la chaîne. Je reçois les données une fois que les gens du CSEA s'en sont occupées, les personnes qui s'occupent des décès au sein des Forces armées canadiennes.

Ce sont ces personnes qui fournissent les données à la Direction de la santé mentale. Elles sont comparées et confirmées par la Direction de la santé mentale, puis elles nous sont transmises parce que nous possédons l'expertise en matière d'analyse.

Alors, pour autant que je sache, la réponse à votre question est non.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Est-ce qu'AAC a de la difficulté à obtenir ces renseignements?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Notre système est très différent de celui des Forces canadiennes, c'est-à-dire que notre système de soins de santé est holistique. Tous les militaires sont pris en charge par le système de soins de santé des Forces canadiennes. Cette prise en charge n'a pas lieu une fois que la personne part. Une fois qu'elle a pris sa retraite, ses besoins en santé sont pris en charge par les autorités sanitaires provinciales. Si un ancien combattant se présente ou a été désigné d'une manière ou d'une autre comme une personne ayant un problème de santé qui est lié au service et à l'égard duquel il a besoin d'aide, nous fournissons toutes sortes de services. Par exemple, nous appuyons financièrement et de bien d'autres manières, ces soins de santé. Toutefois, nous ne sommes pas dotés d'un système de soins de santé de la même manière que les Forces armées canadiennes.

Vous posez une bonne question. Si quelque chose arrive à un ancien combattant... Par exemple, si un ancien combattant se suicide et que nous voudrions obtenir des renseignements, les renseignements sur les soins de santé sont contenus dans le système de soins de santé provincial. Nous n'avons pas accès à ces renseignements. Nous avons accès à certains d'entre eux, car ces personnes ont habituellement un gestionnaire de cas dans notre système, mais les gestionnaires de cas sont là pour coordonner tous les services différents qu'ils reçoivent. Ce ne sont pas des fournisseurs de soins de santé.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Lockhart.

Mme Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame Rolland-Harris, je vous remercie de votre témoignage.

Vous avez mentionné que certaines des tendances que vous observez font ressortir la direction dans laquelle les efforts de recherche de surveillance devraient de plus en plus être concentrés, dans l'avenir.

Pouvez-vous nous donner un peu de détails à ce sujet?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Essentiellement, si vous avez suivi la transition ou la progression des rapports annuels depuis 2008, deux tendances principales se sont dégagées.

La première, c'est que le taux de suicide au sein des Forces armées canadiennes en général — je veux dire par là tous les types d'uniforme — n'est pas statistiquement plus élevé. Le taux de suicide dans l'ensemble des Forces armées canadiennes n'est pas plus élevé qu'au sein de la population canadienne en général. Voilà la première tendance.

La deuxième tendance, que nous observons depuis environ 2008 — peut-être un peu avant —, c'est que les membres de l'élément armée des Forces armées canadiennes présentent un risque significativement plus élevé de s'enlever la vie par rapport à la population canadienne et aux autres couleurs d'uniforme.

(1550)

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Êtes-vous en train de dire que, même si le nombre équivaut à celui de la population en général, il est compensé entre la Marine, la force aérienne et l'armée?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Oui, un équilibre s'établit. Nous sommes très transparents à l'égard du fait que nous étudions chaque couleur d'uniforme séparément. Nous ne tentons pas d'occulter ce qui se passe en nous contentant d'étudier une tendance générale. Le fait que des choses différentes se produisent dans les diverses branches des Forces armées canadiennes, c'est quelque chose que les dirigeants prennent très au sérieux.

Pour revenir à la question que vous posiez, essentiellement, ces deux tendances prévalent depuis un certain temps. Oui, évidemment, les taux changent un peu d'année en année, mais le discours est le même. Pour l'avenir — et c'est ce que nous faisons au sein de la DPSF et de la DSM —, nous continuons à surveiller ces tendances.

Ne vous méprenez pas; nous n'allons pas arrêter. Au lieu de dépenser beaucoup d'énergie et de toujours nous concentrer seulement sur la situation après coup, nous essayons également d'utiliser quelques-unes de ces ressources pour découvrir quels sont certains des facteurs de risque préalables, de sorte que les personnes qui établissent les programmes, celles qui rédigent les politiques, puissent cibler les choses qui comptent. Peut-être que, plus tard, grâce à ce travail, nous verrons ces tendances diminuer. Voilà ce que je pense.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Très bien. Merci.

Docteure Heber, avez-vous observé des différences dans la façon dont les programmes requis ont changé au fil du temps? Nous avons franchi de nombreuses étapes différentes en ce qui concerne notre armée, au fil des ans. En quoi la situation est-elle différente, et quels sont les besoins actuels, en comparaison?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

C'est une très bonne question. Merci de la poser.

Encore une fois, je suis psychiatre. Je travaille dans le monde de la santé mentale. Certes, de mon point de vue, depuis le moment où j'ai commencé à travailler pour les Forces armées canadiennes, le grand changement a été notre participation à la guerre en Afghanistan. Les personnes qui sont revenues de ces déploiements présentaient des troubles liés à un traumatisme et d'autres troubles de santé mentale. Les personnes déployées ne souffrent pas toutes nécessairement d'un TSPT; elles peuvent aussi présenter d'autres problèmes de santé mentale, parfois plusieurs à la fois.

À mesure que ces militaires ont été libérés de l'armée, au fil du temps, Anciens Combattants Canada a observé une augmentation semblable des jeunes anciens combattant qui entraient dans son système, souffraient de problèmes de santé mentale et avaient besoin de soins. Selon mes souvenirs de l'époque où j'étais encore dans l'armée, Anciens Combattants Canada a été très prévoyant. Durant la première moitié des années 2000, le ministère a commencé à établir ce qu'on appelle des cliniques de traitement des blessures de stress opérationnel dans l'ensemble du pays. Nous en avons maintenant 11 réparties dans tout le Canada. En outre, nous sommes maintenant dotés de cliniques satellites découlant de ces cliniques. Il s'agit d'endroits où nous affectons des équipes multidisciplinaires spécialement qualifiées et possédant beaucoup d'expérience liée au traitement des troubles de stress post-traumatique et des blessures de stress opérationnel.

Les gens reconnaissaient qu'il se passait quelque chose. Grâce à notre très bonne relation avec nos collègues des FC, nous avons été en mesure de voir ce qui arrivait et d'observer la croissance du nombre de militaires atteints de TSPT au retour de leur déploiement. Nous avons été en mesure d'affirmer qu'il valait mieux que nous organisions la prestation de certains services, car ces hommes et ces femmes allaient entrer dans notre système.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

D'accord. Merci.

Me reste-t-il encore quelques secondes?

Le président:

Il en reste soixante.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

D'accord.

Je veux revenir aux statistiques.

Avons-nous effectué des recherches afin de voir combien des personnes qui se sont suicidées avaient reçu des soins en santé mentale? L'affaire tient-elle au fait qu'ils n'ont pas reçu de soins, ou bien avons-nous encore de la difficulté à déterminer comment les traiter?

Je ne sais pas qui va répondre.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Le rapport d'ETSPS — d'examen technique des suicides par des professionnels de la santé — qui est une enquête sur tous les cas de suicide — hommes, femmes, Forces régulières ou Réserve — tient compte de l'accès aux soins. Les taux d'accès aux soins sont très élevés, alors ce fait ouvre toute une boîte de Pandore relativement aux mécanismes sous-jacents d'accès aux soins, lesquels — selon moi — sont multiples, et la conversation pourrait être très longue.

(1555)

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Et merci beaucoup de cette information. La situation semble très complexe, et on dirait que ce casse-tête compte clairement un grand nombre de morceaux, alors veuillez m'excuser si j'essaie de démêler tout cela.

Concernant les gens qui entrent dans les FAC, je me demande si un dépistage préalable est possible en ce qui a trait à leur santé émotionnelle, car il me semble que tout est interrelié.

Madame Rolland-Harris, vous avez affirmé que, dans 70 % des cas, il y avait des preuves documentées de rupture conjugale, de détresse, d'endettement, de maladie de membres de la famille ou d'amis, de toxicomanie, ce qui semblerait indiquer une susceptibilité au suicide plutôt que l'inverse. Affirmez-vous, dans ce cas — si vous le pouvez —, que telle personne pourrait être prédisposée, pourrait avoir des antécédents qui font en sorte qu'il vaudrait mieux que nous fassions très attention en surveillant et en observant les possibilités de suicide?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je ne connais pas les particularités du processus de recrutement. Toutefois, je sais que le groupe d'expert de 2009 a déclaré expressément qu'il ne souhaitait pas envisager le dépistage des gens pour des motifs liés à la santé mentale.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Est-ce une question d'être juste et de ne pas avoir de préjugés envers une personne, ou bien...

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Honnêtement, je ne connais pas les motivations. Il faudrait que vous parliez aux personnes qui...

Dre Alexandra Heber:

On procède à un dépistage aux fins du recrutement, car les gens subissent un examen médical, et une partie de cet examen est une anamnèse où les gens se font poser des questions au sujet de leurs antécédents médicaux, y compris leurs antécédents de santé mentale. Oui, ce dépistage a lieu.

Dans ce contexte, la décision de dépister ou non une personne est souvent prise au cas par cas. Elle dépendrait du genre d'anamnèse dont il s'agissait, exactement.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Oui, je peux comprendre que vous ne voudriez pas qu'un préjugé tienne une personne à l'écart; pourtant, s'il y a une vulnérabilité, il est effrayant de permettre à un être humain de mettre les pieds dans ce bourbier qui pourrait mener à son décès.

Je comprends les motifs d'ordre statistique et le besoin de protéger les renseignements personnels en ce qui a trait à l'analyse des cas de suicide d'hommes par rapport aux femmes, mais, dans cette optique, vous pourriez peut-être formuler des hypothèses ou nous donner une certaine idée des tendances au chapitre des suicides commis par des femmes... nous dire si elles sont comparables ou non aux tendances chez les hommes?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je ne peux pas formuler de commentaires à ce sujet. Les chiffres sont statistiquement très petits...

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Trop petits, trop limités...?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

... ce qui est une bonne nouvelle, je suppose, en soi.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Oui, mais vous allez peut-être pouvoir cerner certaines des tendances dans l'avenir, ou est-ce impossible?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Il est peu probable que nous soyons en mesure de le faire au moyen du rapport annuel sur le suicide. Toutefois, grâce à l'Étude sur la mortalité et l'incidence du cancer au sein des FC, la cohorte est bien plus grande et comprend quiconque a déjà porté un uniforme depuis 1976, essentiellement. Ainsi, la population est bien plus grande, et nous n'arrêtons pas d'observer ces personnes une fois qu'elles sont libérées; nous continuons à les surveiller, alors la cohorte est bien plus grande. Il est possible que nous puissions nous faire une meilleure idée de la situation du suicide chez les femmes dans le cadre de cette vaste étude.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord. Merci.

Docteure Heber, vous avez évoqué le fait qu'un membre des Forces armées canadiennes reçoit des services de santé holistiques, et je me suis rendu compte que, parfois, quand les gens partent, ils ne demandent peut-être pas d'aide médicale ou pourraient ne pas être en mesure de trouver un médecin dans le système public. Je me demande s'il y a eu des conclusions selon lesquelles l'incapacité d'accéder à des soins de santé pourrait avoir motivé en partie le suicide, ou bien avez-vous des réflexions à formuler à ce sujet?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Lorsque nous regardons la population d'anciens combattants, cela devient compliqué, car, des 700 000 anciens combattants du Canada — et je suis certaine que vous le savez —, 120 000 sont des clients d'Anciens Combattants Canada.

Lorsqu'il est question d'anciens combattants, bien d'autres gens ont pris leur retraite, et nous ne savons rien d'eux. S'ils ne se sont pas présentés pour demander des services, nous ne connaissons pas leur situation. Voilà le premier problème.

Comme nous ne fournissons pas les soins de santé directement, nous avons toujours beaucoup de difficulté à obtenir l'accès à l'information, quoique, si une personne quitte les forces, un gestionnaire de cas lui est attribué. Ce gestionnaire de cas découvrira ce qui se passe du point de vue des soins que reçoit l'ancien combattant en question, car il va l'aider à organiser la prestation d'autres soins.

Nous ne disposons pas de renseignements parfaits sur tout le monde, alors il est beaucoup plus difficile pour nous de faire cela.

(1600)

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je peux voir qu'il y a là de nombreux défis. Cela pourrait sembler simpliste, mais, en ce qui a trait à la distinction entre les BSO des anciens combattants de l'armée et celles des anciens combattants de la Marine et de la force aérienne, ne pourrait-elle pas être liée au fait que, quand on est déployé au sol, les réalités de la violence et les répercussions de cette hostilité sont plus grandes parce qu'on est sur le terrain, au lieu d'être à bord d'un navire ou dans les airs? Les autres font tout de même partie du déploiement, mais pas sur le terrain.

Le président:

Je suis désolé, mais notre temps est écoulé.

Nous allons passer à M. Bratina.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Zut. Nous n'avons pas l'occasion de répondre à votre question.

M. Bob Bratina (Hamilton-Est—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Merci.

Docteure Heber, vous avez une expérience formidable, qui est idéale compte tenu du travail que vous faites. Pourriez-vous préciser ce que vous faites durant la journée? Vous arrive-t-il encore d'interroger des patients? Dites-moi comment vous jouez votre rôle très important.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Merci. Il s'agit pas mal d'un poste consultatif. Je travaille avec la médecin-chef. Elle est responsable de la Division des professionnels de la santé d'Anciens Combattants Canada. Notre Direction de la santé mentale se trouve également à l'intérieur de cette division. Un peu comme les Forces canadiennes, nous avons établi une direction de la santé mentale. Une grande part de cette initiative est très nouvelle et a eu lieu au cours des deux ou trois dernières années. Certaines des personnes qui travaillent dans cette direction font partie des prochains témoins que vous allez interroger.

Je fournis des conseils, des consignes et des directives, d'une manière clinique, à cette direction, au directeur, à la médecin-chef et à toute autre personne qui a besoin de mes conseils ou de mon expertise, comme le SMA, le sous-ministre, et ainsi de suite. Je suis polyvalente, en quelque sorte.

M. Bob Bratina:

S'agit-il d'un travail en cours? Sommes-nous dans une ère nouvelle en ce qui a trait à la façon dont nous abordons les problèmes qui sont apparus récemment?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Je suis certaine qu'une partie de l'initiative a été établie en réaction à ces problèmes. Il y a plusieurs années, Anciens Combattants Canada, qui avait régressé par rapport à l'époque de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, quand nous avions un système de soins de santé solide, a fait l'objet d'un examen. Au fil des ans — je suppose —, on a estimé que le besoin n'était plus le même. Ensuite, quand l'assurance-maladie a été instaurée, les gens ont été pris en charge par les provinces, alors ce genre de rôle clinique d'Anciens Combattants n'a cessé de diminuer.

Certes, au cours des dernières années, surtout compte tenu des gens qui déclarent avoir subi des blessures de stress opérationnel et des blessures physiques en raison de certaines des difficultés rencontrées durant leur carrière — à très juste titre, selon moi —, on a considéré que nous devions renforcer la Division des professionnels de la santé d'Anciens Combattants.

M. Bob Bratina:

Madame Rolland-Harris, l'épidémiologie est une science fascinante. L'un des problèmes consiste à arriver à poser les bonnes questions, car il semble qu'une grande part de ce que vous faites consiste tout simplement à recueillir des données brutes, des statistiques concernant le nombre de personnes qui ont été admises, le nombre qui sont sorties et le nombre de suicides qui ont eu lieu, et ce sont toutes des données importantes.

Je ne sais pas s'il s'agit des entrevues de sortie ou des liens entre les anciens soldats, les membres des forces armées, mais, dans le cadre de votre travail, faites-vous quelque chose au-delà de la simple collecte de données?

(1605)

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je parle beaucoup du travail que nous faisons, comme aujourd'hui, et à l'occasion de conférences, et ce genre de choses, mais je veux expliquer clairement qu'au bout du compte, je suis là pour aider les décideurs, les personnes qui prennent des mesures, alors je travaille en coulisse.

M. Bob Bratina:

D'un point de vue statistique, quelles méthodes sont généralement utilisées par les victimes du suicide?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

D'un point de vue statistique, si vous regardez dans le rapport annuel, les deux principales méthodes employées, plus particulièrement dans le cas des hommes de la Force régulière — je veux le préciser — ce sont la pendaison et les armes à feu. Simplement pour que ce soit clair: cela correspond à ce que nous observons au sein de la population en général. Les deux principales méthodes sont les mêmes dans les Forces armées canadiennes et au sein de la population en général.

M. Bob Bratina:

Autrement dit, l'accessibilité de moyens tels que les armes à feu n'est pas nécessairement... si une personne est déterminée...

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Non, c'est très rare, il n'arrive pratiquement jamais qu'une personne utilise son arme à feu militaire. Elle utilise son arme à feu personnelle. Les armes à feu militaires sont récupérées très rigoureusement.

M. Bob Bratina:

Vous avez formulé l'argument, qui doit être renforcé en ce qui a trait au déploiement, selon lequel, d'un point de vue statistique, nous ne pouvons pas encore établir les liens. Je dis cela parce qu'il est fréquent pour nous de penser qu'une personne qui est allée en Afghanistan et auprès de qui une bombe a explosé... il est certain qu'elle va avoir... mais vous affirmez que, d'un point de vue statistique, vous ne pouvez pas encore établir tous ces liens.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Non, pas pour l'instant, et nous n'arrivons pas encore à déterminer s'il s'agit d'un manque de données statistiques ou d'une véritable absence de liens. Comme je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire, vous devez comprendre que le terme « déploiement » est vaste.

Deux personnes ayant le même code de profession militaire, qui font techniquement le même travail au même endroit, dans le cadre du même déploiement, peuvent avoir une expérience entièrement différente, ou bien, à leur retour, la première est traumatisée, et l'autre ne l'est pas. Le déploiement est un moyen facile de classer les choses pour étudier les liens, mais il s'agit d'une notion très, très complexe, en réalité... pour qu'on puisse l'analyser statistiquement.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Voyez-vous un inconvénient si j'ajoute quelque chose?

M. Bob Bratina:

Allez-y, s'il vous plaît.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Je pense que l'une des préoccupations que nous avons toujours à l'égard de la question du déploiement et de ce lien étroit qui est établi entre le déploiement et le suicide tient au fait qu'il le rend possible. Nous craignons toujours que les personnes qui se suicident et qui ne sont jamais déployées soient perdues dans ce portrait. Il s'agit d'un portrait trop simpliste, car il est certain qu'il y a les ETSPS dont parle Elizabeth. J'ai effectué de tels examens quand j'étais dans l'armée, et nous les faisions certainement dans le cas de personnes qui n'avaient jamais été déployées, mais qui s'étaient suicidées pour un certain nombre de raisons, que nous ne comprenions pas toujours. Il importe de se rappeler que de nombreux facteurs entraînent la personne sur la voie du suicide. Le déploiement pourrait être l'un d'entre eux, mais pas nécessairement.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Colin Fraser (Nova-Ouest, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie toutes les deux infiniment de vous êtes présentées et de nous faire part de ces renseignements utiles aujourd'hui.

Je veux simplement aborder un élément en réponse à une question posée par Mme Lockhart. Je crois que vous avez mentionné deux fois les ETSPS. À ce que je crois comprendre, ces examens sont effectués dans chaque cas où un suicide est commis, et ces données sont ensuite recueillies. Tous les ETSPS sont réunis en tant que constatations dans le rapport annuel sur le suicide. Est-ce exact?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Oui, le chapitre 1 du rapport annuel sur le suicide.

M. Colin Fraser:

Je vois, d'accord. Je ne crois pas qu'une copie de ce rapport ait été soumise à notre comité. Je me demande si vous pouvez déposer la dernière version du rapport annuel sur le suicide.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Bien sûr, je peux vous donner la copie que j'ai apportée, et le rapport est également accessible sur le Web; vous n'avez qu'à chercher « rapport de 2016 sur le suicide au sein des FAC ».

M. Colin Fraser:

Merci beaucoup. Ce serait utile.

Docteure Heber, en ce qui concerne certains éléments dont il est question, êtes-vous en mesure de nommer quelques facteurs qui font qu'un vétéran, selon vous, présente un risque plus élevé d'avoir des idées suicidaires? Quels sont certains des facteurs en cause?

Je sais que nous avons parlé de la transition dans une certaine mesure, et nous avons entendu beaucoup d'opinions diverses au sujet de ce que pourraient être ces facteurs, mais je souhaiterais entendre vos réflexions.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

La première chose que je dirai, c'est que les facteurs qui mènent à ce que j'appelle la « voie du suicide » sont semblables dans le cas des anciens combattants et dans celui de tout membre de la population canadienne en général. Le premier facteur, c'est que presque toutes les personnes — au moins 90 % — ont probablement un problème de santé mentale au moment où elles se suicident. Cette conclusion est tirée d'un rapport de recherche internationale; il s'agit de l'une des conclusions les plus solides dont nous disposons. Il s'agit d'un facteur très important. C'est pourquoi, lorsque nous travaillons à la préparation de stratégies de prévention du suicide, une grande partie de ce travail est axée sur la prestation de bons soins en santé mentale et sur le fait de permettre aux gens d'accéder aux soins, car nous savons qu'il s'agit de l'un des facteurs que l'on retrouve constamment. L'autre facteur qui est habituellement présent juste avant le suicide, c'est un événement stressant dans la vie. Souvent, c'est quelque chose comme la rupture d'une relation ou bien peut-être que la personne a eu des démêlés avec les forces de l'ordre ou a perdu son emploi. C'est habituellement lié: c'est relationnel, et cela a à voir avec une perte. La personne a une maladie mentale — il y a habituellement une certaine dépression dans ce problème de santé mentale — puis elle vit une crise, une perte, qui se produit. C'est l'élément déclencheur qui fait qu'elle commence à penser au suicide.

Nous savons qu'un certain nombre d'autres facteurs contribuent à ces pensées. L'accès à des moyens mortels est un facteur très important. Grâce à la recherche en santé publique, nous savons que plus l'accès est facile... Souvent, les gens le font impulsivement. Souvent, s'il est possible d'empêcher la personne de se suicider aujourd'hui, et surtout si de l'aide lui est fournie, elle ne se suicidera pas par la suite.

(1610)

M. Colin Fraser:

Le fait de cerner la maladie mentale sous-jacente est la façon préventive d'empêcher la situation de dégénérer?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Nous savons qu'il s'agit certainement de l'un des éléments qui y contribuent. Par conséquent, c'est quelque chose sur quoi, si nous faisons un effort... Nous savons que ce sera utile.

M. Colin Fraser:

Que pouvons-nous faire mieux pour nos anciens combattants dans le but d'aider à cerner la maladie mentale et de leur faciliter la tâche afin qu'ils se présentent et qu'ils obtiennent de l'aide pour régler leurs problèmes de santé mentale sous-jacents?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Au cours de la dernière année, Anciens Combattants Canada a travaillé sur la mise à jour de notre stratégie relative à la santé mentale. En outre, nous élaborons actuellement une stratégie mixte de prévention du suicide avec les Forces armées canadiennes... nous collaborons à cet égard. Nous le faisons en partie parce que nous voulons prêter une attention particulière à la période de transition pour nous assurer que nous protégeons les gens lorsqu'ils ont le plus besoin de soutien, afin qu'ils ne passent pas entre les mailles du filet. Pendant de nombreuses années — si on remonte au moins à l'an 2000, un certain nombre de programmes et d'initiatives ont été en place relativement à la prévention du suicide au sein de la population d'Anciens Combattants, mais nous mettons maintenant à jour ces renseignements et créons une stratégie mixte pour nos deux organisations.

M. Colin Fraser:

Observez-vous moins de stigmatisation, par contre, chez les membres des forces qui se présentent avec une maladie mentale sous-jacente? Si nous tentons d'intervenir auprès d'eux avant que ces problèmes difficiles aient lieu dans leur vie — et la transition est une période difficile pour tout soldat sortant des forces —, y a-t-il un certain moyen d'éliminer cette stigmatisation, que nous n'employons pas? Le cas échéant, de quoi pourrait-il s'agir?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Il y a quelques réponses à cette question.

Tout d'abord, en ce qui concerne les personnes qui, nous le savons, quittent l'armée en étant atteintes d'un problème de santé mentale connu, pour lequel elles reçoivent un traitement, nous sommes déjà assez bons pour ce qui est de nous assurer que nous effectuons un transfert avec accompagnement d'une organisation à l'autre. Quand j'étais dans l'armée, j'étais la chef du centre de soins pour trauma et stress opérationnels, à Ottawa. Nous disposons dans cette ville d'une clinique de traitement des BSO dirigée par Anciens Combattants Canada. Il y avait un certain nombre de mes patients que j'avais transférés à la clinique d'Anciens Combattants avant leur départ de l'armée. Nous effectuons beaucoup de ces transferts dans le cas des personnes qui ont déjà été désignées.

Bien entendu, l'une de nos préoccupations, ce sont les gens qui n'ont pas été désignés, ceux qui ne se rendent peut-être même pas compte du fait qu'ils ont des problèmes de santé mentale avant leur départ et qui font face à des situations de stress supplémentaires liées au fait d'avoir quitté l'armée. L'un des éléments que nous avons mis en place, c'est une entrevue de sortie pour tous les membres qui partent. Il s'agit d'une entrevue de transition, où ils rencontrent un représentant d'Anciens Combattants Canada. Même s'ils n'ont jamais eu de problèmes et qu'ils ne se considèrent pas comme une personne ayant besoin de notre aide, nous les avons rencontrés en personne et leur avons dit: « Voici qui nous sommes. Voici où nous en sommes. Voici notre numéro; appelez-nous si vous avez besoin de nous. »

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Brassard.

M. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le groupe consultatif des anciens combattants mis sur pied par le ministère des Anciens Combattants tient une rencontre cette semaine au sujet de la santé mentale. L'un des sujets qui y sera abordé est le suicide. L'un de vous a-t-il été invité à cette rencontre?

(1615)

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Oui, j'y présenterai un exposé mercredi. Il s'agit du groupe consultatif sur la santé mentale du ministère des Anciens Combattants.

M. John Brassard:

Tout d'abord, je suis heureux d'entendre cela.

Madame Harris, vous n'y serez pas?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Non, on ne m'a pas invitée.

M. John Brassard:

Voici le problème, et vous en avez parlé. En tant que Comité, nous étudions les problèmes de santé mentale et la prévention du suicide. Vous avez dit qu'Anciens Combattants et les Forces armées canadiennes étudient des stratégies liées à la santé mentale et à la prévention du suicide. Nous disposons maintenant d'un comité consultatif qui va aborder la question à l'occasion d'un sommet d'une journée sur le suicide. Y a-t-il trop de gens pour régler cette question? Trop de cuisiniers gâtent la sauce. Je pose la question parce que rien ne se fait.

Pour ma part, je suis exaspéré d'entendre parler de toutes ces études, de tous ces groupes consultatifs et de toutes ces rencontres et de constater qu'en apparence, on ne prend aucune mesure pour mettre en oeuvre une stratégie. Je vois beaucoup de gens tenter de justifier leur existence à qui veut bien l'entendre, mais personne ne fait réellement quelque chose. Je me pose seulement la question. Quand en arriverons-nous à prendre de réelles mesures pour régler cette question?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je pense que je ne suis pas particulièrement bien placée pour répondre à la question de façon réaliste.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Laissez-moi répondre à la question. Nous faisons énormément de choses.

Nous sommes très actifs à Anciens Combattants Canada. En ce qui a trait à la question du suicide, même si, comme je l'ai déjà dit, il nous est difficile de savoir ce qui en est pour le suicide chez les vétérans, depuis 2000, nous avons travaillé pour mettre en place de nombreuses mesures, pour prévenir le suicide et aussi pour permettre aux gens d'avoir accès à des soins de santé mentale.

Encore une fois, comme je l'ai dit, nous savons que cela mène à... C'est l'une des choses les plus importantes que nous devons faire pour aider à prévenir les suicides. Tous nos gestionnaires de cas reçoivent une formation sur la prévention du suicide, et cette formation est mise à jour chaque année. De plus, tous les travailleurs de première ligne d'Anciens Combattants Canada suivent maintenant une formation sur la prévention du suicide. Ils ont reçu une formation pour répondre à ceux qui téléphonent. Ils savent quoi faire s'ils sont inquiets au sujet de la personne au bout du fil.

En plus de pouvoir compter sur des gestionnaires de cas et des travailleurs de première ligne qui, je le répète, peuvent coordonner des soins, quiconque se présente avec un problème de santé mentale lié au service peut être aiguillé vers une clinique pour TSO. Si cette personne se trouve dans une région où il n'y a pas de clinique de TSO, nous disposons de 4 000 fournisseurs de services de santé mentale au Canada auxquels nous pouvons faire appel par l'entremise d'Anciens Combattants Canada pour servir notre population.

M. John Brassard:

Avec toutes les choses que vous faites et toutes les études qui sont en cours, allons-nous réellement réussir un jour à éviter que cela se produise?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Vous savez — et Elizabeth l'a dit — que nous croyons réellement qu'un suicide en est un de trop, mais je pense que si on regarde n'importe quelle population, on constate qu'il y a des suicides. Serons-nous jamais capables de prévenir chaque suicide? Je ne le sais pas, mais c'est ce que nous essayons de faire.

M. John Brassard:

Madame Harris, j'aimerais que vous me parliez des médicaments sur ordonnance et des opioïdes comme moyen de traiter ceux qui souffrent d'un TSPT, peut-être, ou d'une blessure de stress opérationnel, du point de vue statistique. Avez-vous fait un suivi statistique du nombre de personnes qui se suicident alors qu'elles étaient soignées à l'aide de ces types de médicaments?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

L'ETSPS permet de faire un suivi des médicaments que prenait la personne au moment de son décès et avant son décès, et, soit dit en passant, nous n'avons rien vu...

M. John Brassard:

Cela fait-il partie d'un rapport?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Aucun rapport annuel d'ETSPS ne traite expressément des opioïdes non, mais les chiffres seraient si peu importants que ce serait probablement impossible d'en publier un.

M. John Brassard:

Récemment, le ministère des Anciens Combattants a fait passer de 10 à 3 grammes la quantité de marijuana qui pouvait être prescrite. L'une d'entre vous a-t-elle été consultée au sujet de cette décision?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Non, mais je ne suis pas médecin.

M. John Brassard:

Je comprends.

Madame, avez-vous été consultée à l'égard de cette décision?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Je suis désolée. J'aimerais que vous répétiez votre question au sujet de ce qu'a fait Anciens Combattants Canada.

(1620)

M. John Brassard:

Le ministère a diminué la quantité de marijuana pouvant être prescrite à un vétéran; elle est passée de 10 à 3 grammes par jour.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Tout d'abord, j'aimerais dire qu'Anciens Combattants Canada ne prescrit pas ni n'autorise la consommation de marijuana ou la prise de tout autre médicament. Ce que nous faisons, c'est financer des traitements, et nous finançons la marijuana dans une certaine mesure. Auparavant, Anciens Combattants Canada finançait jusqu'à 10 grammes de marijuana par jour par personne. Cette quantité sera réduite en fonction de la quantité financée — cela ne tient pas à Anciens Combattants. Si un médecin de famille, par exemple, autorise la consommation de marijuana et croit fermement que la personne a besoin de plus de trois grammes, il doit consulter un médecin spécialiste pour discuter de la raison pour laquelle cette personne se voit prescrire de la marijuana, et procéder à une autre évaluation et préciser qu'effectivement cette personne a besoin de plus de trois grammes par jour.

M. John Brassard:

Je suis au courant du processus. Je me demande si, en tant que chef du service de psychiatrie, vous avez été consultée au sujet de la décision. Vous a-t-on consultée au sujet de la décision de faire passer la quantité de 10 grammes à 3 grammes?

Si je pose la question, c'est parce que nous avons reçu le ministre, et il nous a dit avoir mené une consultation élargie auprès d'un grand éventail de professionnels. Donc, à titre de chef du service de psychiatrie, avez-vous été consultée au sujet de cette décision?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

En fait, la décision a été prise avant que je commence à travailler pour Anciens Combattants Canada, mais je connais des gens ayant fait partie du comité d'experts qui ont été consultés. Il y a notamment...

M. John Brassard:

Votre prédécesseur?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Je n'ai pas de prédécesseur. Il s'agissait d'experts en consommation de marijuana thérapeutique.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Eyolfson.

M. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Merci d'être ici.

Docteure Heber, j'ai un certain parti pris à l'égard de cette question particulière. Mes parents étaient membres de la GRC.

Nous avons parlé des membres des Forces canadiennes et de leur taux de suicide. Je sais que les chiffres sont probablement moins importants, simplement à cause du nombre de membres qui ont servi, mais comment le taux de suicide chez les vétérans de la GRC se compare-t-il à celui des anciens combattants des Forces canadiennes?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Je ne le sais pas. Je suis désolée.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord. Merci.

Madame Rolland-Harris, quelques questions posées jusqu'à maintenant ont effleuré le sujet. Nous avons discuté du suivi des suicides chez les femmes.

Je suis médecin. J'ai dû suivre des cours de statistique et je sais à quel point il est difficile d'analyser des données lorsque les chiffres sont peu importants. Je pense que nous sommes tous les deux d'accord pour dire que c'est une bonne chose que les chiffres soient bas, mais cela représente tout de même un défi.

De façon générale, nous observons un problème depuis des années en médecine. Une très grande proportion des recherches sont sexospécifiques — elles concernent habituellement les hommes — , qu'il s'agisse de recherche fondamentale ou d'un tout autre ordre. J'étais un chercheur en médecine avant d'être médecin. Nous nous servions toujours de rats de sexe masculin, parce que si on utilisait les deux sexes, la variation était trop importante. Par conséquent, on met au point des médicaments qui ne sont peut-être pas adaptés aux femmes. Même si je comprends que c'est une chose d'en faire part dans un rapport, parce que comme je l'ai dit, les chiffres sont si bas que vous pourriez relever...

Cherchez-vous des méthodes qui permettraient de mieux analyser la population féminine et peut-être d'obtenir plus de conclusions à son sujet, parce qu'il est si difficile d'en obtenir?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Oui. J'ai parlé de l'étude du cancer et de la mortalité chez les membres des FC, l'ECM FC, qui est l'un des grands moteurs derrière l'étude. Il y a deux objectifs. L'un consiste à être en mesure d'obtenir une population assez grande pour nous permettre d'examiner des détails plus précis, y compris les différences sexospécifiques. Mais nous, pour reprendre l'expression de mon collègue d'ACC, tentons de combler les écarts. Au lieu de simplement considérer ceux qui servent toujours et ceux qui ont été libérés comme deux groupes distincts, nous examinons ce que nous appelons le « parcours » d'un militaire. Nous essayons d'obtenir un meilleur portrait de ce qui se passe pendant et après le service.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je vous en prie.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Docteure Heber, lorsqu'un de vos patients en cours de traitement est pris en charge par un psychiatre, il bénéficie du transfert avec accompagnement dont vous parliez. Toutefois, comme vous l'avez souligné également, de nombreux vétérans se présentent plus tard, bien après la fin de leur service. Bien sûr, ces gens vont relever des systèmes de santé provinciaux et se tourneront vers leur médecin de famille ou se présenteront au service des urgences, où j'ai travaillé toute ma carrière.

Est-ce qu'Anciens Combattants a donné aux fournisseurs de soins médicaux primaires sur le terrain de la formation propre aux besoins médicaux et psychiatriques des vétérans et présentant les signes avant-coureurs?

(1625)

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Oui. Nous avons commencé, il y a quelques années plus précisément, à tisser des relations avec le Collège des médecins de famille du Canada, les fournisseurs et certaines organisations, comme Calian, qui ont des cliniques et qui sont intéressés à prendre des vétérans comme patients. Nous examinons toutes les possibilités pour faire en sorte que les vétérans soient pris en charge et qu'ils aient tous un médecin de famille.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Pour revenir sur la question, parce que, encore une fois, j'ai passé ma carrière comme urgentologue, je me demande si on fait des efforts de sensibilisation visant précisément les associations qui régissent ou qui forment les urgentologues, disons soit le Collège royal des médecins ou l'Association canadienne des médecins d'urgence.

Je pose la question parce qu'il s'agit d'une préoccupation qui concerne non seulement les vétérans, mais aussi les gens en général. De nombreuses personnes n'ont pas de médecin de famille ou n'arrivent pas à en obtenir un.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

C'est exact, et ces gens se présentent au service des urgences.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Nombre d'entre eux se présentent au service des urgences.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Absolument.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Y a-t-il eu une forme quelconque de sensibilisation auprès de la communauté d'urgentologie pour lui permettre d'être mieux informée et de savoir qui consulter et vers qui aiguiller ces vétérans qui se présentent pour obtenir des soins?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Je viens tout juste de regarder ma directrice médicale derrière moi, et elle m'a tout simplement souri, donc je ne le sais pas, en fait. Mais s'il n'y en a pas eu, c'est une excellente suggestion, et nous allons nous pencher sur la question.

En fait, nous aimerions que chaque médecin de première ligne au Canada soit au courant des troubles dont peuvent souffrir les vétérans.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Oui, c'est utile. Contrairement à une clinique familiale, bien souvent, on ne connaît pas les patients. On ne les a jamais rencontrés.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Oui, c'est exact.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

On dit que l'urgentologie est l'art de prendre les bonnes décisions sans avoir suffisamment de renseignements. C'est réellement le cas lorsqu'on pense à un vétéran qui vient cogner à notre porte.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Oui.

Même les urgentologues ne vont pas demander aux gens s'ils ont déjà été membres... Souvent, cette question n'est même pas posée au patient qui se présente.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Je n'ai pas d'autre question.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Clarke. [Français]

M. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, PCC):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, de me céder la parole.

Je vous souhaite la bienvenue, mesdames Heber et Rolland-Harris. Je vous remercie d'être parmi nous aujourd'hui.

La première question que je vais vous poser m'a été fournie par la personne que je remplace ici aujourd'hui, soit Mme Cathy Wagantall, une femme très honorable.

Bon nombre de vétérans nous disent, de façon répétée, que plusieurs de leurs frères d'armes se sont suicidés après avoir pris un médicament antipaludique, soit la méfloquine. Un des vétérans, qui a écrit à ma collègue Mme Wagantall, nous a dit qu'il connaissait personnellement 11 vétérans qui s'étaient suicidés et que, selon lui, les 11 avaient pris de la méfloquine.

Sur la période de 21 ans que vous avez couverte et les 239 suicides que vous avez répertoriés, dans combien de cas ces valeureux militaires s'étaient-ils trouvés dans des zones où il y avait de la malaria?

Disposez-vous de cette information?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je ne l'ai pas sous la main.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Autrement dit, vous ne savez pas combien de ces 239 personnes auraient pris ce médicament.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

En effet. Je ne dis pas que cette donnée n'a pas été recueillie, mais simplement que je ne l'ai pas sous la main. Je ne peux donc pas l'analyser.

M. Alupa Clarke:

D'accord. Je comprends.

Madame Heber, au ministère des Anciens Combattants, pourrait-on obtenir cette réponse en se prévalant de l'accès à l'information ou en posant simplement la question au ministre?

(1630)

[Traduction]

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Au sujet du nombre approximatif de vétérans qui ont...?

M. Alupa Clarke:

Des 239 vétérans qui ont commis un suicide, puisqu'il faut le dire, combien d'entre eux ont pris de la méfloquine? Est-il possible de trouver ce genre d'information en présentant une demande d'accès à l'information ou en posant une question durant la période de questions?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

C'est une bonne question. Encore une fois, cela dépend de l'endroit où ils ont été déployés et de si... Je veux dire, il devrait y avoir des dossiers. Je présume que ce sont les Forces armées qui les possèdent.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Oui, vous avez raison.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Les militaires en auraient pris durant leur service.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Parfait. Merci de cette perspective sur la Défense nationale.

Il y a un an, lorsque je siégeais au Comité à titre de porte-parole en matière d'Anciens Combattants, j'ai déposé, le 9 mai 2016, une question à inscrire au feuilleton. Pour la région de Québec, j'ai demandé quel pourcentage de gens touchaient des prestations pour chaque maladie physique et mentale, touchant par exemple pour des problèmes de genoux, d'audition, et ainsi de suite.

Fait intéressant, pour une année, soit 2015-2016, dans la région de Québec, 8 % des demandes de prestation étaient liées au syndrome de stress post-traumatique, 2 % à la dépression profonde, 1 % à l'anxiété, 1 % au manque de sommeil et 1 % à l'alcoolisme et à la toxicomanie. Dans l'ensemble, près de 13 % des demandes de prestation ont été présentées par des personnes souffrant de troubles de santé mentale que nous pourrions probablement parfois associer au suicide.

Des 15 membres, ou excusez-moi, je pense que c'est 14, qui se sont suicidés en 2015, combien d'entre eux étaient en processus de demande?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Vous parlez de... [Français]

M. Alupa Clarke:

On parle ici de prestations financières.[Traduction]

Combien de ces 14 vétérans touchaient des prestations financières — j'oublie le terme en anglais —, ou en ont fait la demande ou ont rempli des papiers à cet égard?

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Juste pour que les choses soient claires, le rapport annuel sur le suicide concerne non pas les vétérans, mais les militaires qui sont toujours en service.

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Je ne sais pas exactement de quoi vous parlez, parce que nous n'avons pas les chiffres en fait.

M. Alupa Clarke:

« Financial benefits », c'est le terme que je cherchais. Donc, ces 14 personnes étaient en service.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Ceux qui figurent dans le rapport annuel étaient toujours en service.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Donc, la question est la même: de ces 14 soldats qui étaient en service, savez-vous à tout hasard combien d'entre eux ont déposé une demande de prestation?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Voulez-vous dire qui ont présenté une demande après avoir été libérés de leur service?

M. Alupa Clarke:

Durant...

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Je m'excuse, mais nous n'avons pas accès à ces renseignements.

Le président:

Il vous reste huit secondes.

M. Alupa Clarke:

Disposez-vous d'un système pour signaler les personnes qui sont susceptibles de commettre un suicide? Je sais que c'est très complexe, mais peut-être existe-t-il un système semblable?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Oui. À Anciens Combattants Canada, dans le dossier de gestion de cas, nous avons mis en place une alerte à cet égard.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Je peux peut-être revenir sur la question concernant le taux de suicide plus élevé chez les membres des Forces armées que chez les membres de la Marine et de la Force aérienne et vous demander de partager toute corrélation remarquée ou pensée que vous pourriez avoir.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Voulez-vous en parler?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Encore une fois, je pense que tout ce que je dirais serait de la pure spéculation. Ce que vous avez dit pourrait être raisonnable. Est-ce lié aux gens qui ont vécu des expériences outre-mer plus traumatisantes durant leur déploiement? Ce pourrait être le cas. En fin de compte, nous ne le savons pas vraiment, mais chose certaine, cette augmentation du taux de suicide dans les Forces armées, ou dans certaines parties des Forces armées, a coïncidé avec notre mission en Afghanistan. Je pense qu'il est très raisonnable de dire qu'il y a ici un lien.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Si nous n'avons pas analysé la question plus en profondeur, c'est parce que nous ne disposons pas de statistiques suffisantes. Nous ne pouvons examiner qu'une seule variable à la fois, comme s'il y a eu un déploiement ou non, s'il s'agit d'un militaire ou non, et ce genre de choses. Si nous commençons à examiner ce qu'on appelle une analyse bidimensionnelle, qui consiste à analyser deux variables à la fois, nous ne serons pas en mesure de dire quoi que ce soit parce que nous de disposons pas de statistiques suffisantes pour appuyer nos dires.

(1635)

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Les chiffres sont si peu élevés, voilà pourquoi.

Mme Elizabeth Rolland-Harris:

Encore une fois, je pense que l'ECM FC est l'un des piliers de notre recherche pour l'avenir. L'une des choses que nous pourrions faire consiste à regarder la couleur de l'uniforme et à se demander si cela fait une différence, tout en examinant d'autres facteurs de risque que nous savons être fréquemment liés au suicide.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Il est intéressant de voir que les chiffres nous disent certaines choses et qu'il est pourtant impossible de tirer des conclusions concrètes à partir de ces mêmes chiffres. Je comprends votre mécontentement.

Madame Heber, vous parliez de transfert avec accompagnement. D'après ce que nous entendons, il y a manifestement des vétérans qui ne se sentent pas accompagnés et qui parlent de leur frustration, des obstacles rencontrés, de leurs problèmes financiers, comme l'arrivée tardive du chèque de pension, du fait qu'ils se sentent abandonnés et aliénés et qu'ils ont le sentiment que quelque chose d'important leur a été enlevé. Vous avez parlé de cette réalité; on a donc manifestement reconnu qu'il y avait un problème en ce qui a trait au transfert avec accompagnement. Certes, on a déployé un effort délibéré pour changer la situation. Est-ce toujours le cas? Est-ce quelque chose que vous allez poursuivre? Si oui, comment?

Dre Alexandra Heber:

Oui. Je le répète: l'une des raisons pour lesquelles nous mettons en place une stratégie conjointe de prévention du suicide tient au fait que nous voulons nous assurer d'accorder une attention particulière à cette période. Encore une fois, avec certaines des recherches qui sont en cours à Anciens Combattants Canada, nous nous penchons réellement sur ces questions, comme celle de l'identité d'une personne et de ce qu'elle devient, particulièrement pour celles qui se sont enrôlées alors qu'elles étaient très jeunes et pour qui c'est plus que le seul emploi qu'elles ont connu: elles ont grandi parmi des militaires, et c'est la famille qu'elles connaissent. Notre armée est assez petite. Les gens se connaissent tous. J'ai servi seulement huit ans et demi, mais je connaissais tous les intervenants des services de santé des Forces canadiennes. Il y règne un fort sentiment d'identité commune.

Le président:

Merci. C'est tout le temps que nous avions pour ce groupe de témoins.

J'aimerais vous remercier toutes les deux du travail que vous faites pour aider les hommes et les femmes qui ont servi notre pays.

Nous allons prendre une courte pause de quatre minutes, puis nous commencerons avec le prochain groupe de témoins.

(1635)

(1640)

Le président:

Bienvenue à tous. Pour notre deuxième heure, nous avons avec nous la docteure Courchesne, directrice générale, Direction générale des Professionnels de la santé; et Johanne Isabel, gestionnaire nationale, Services de santé mentale, toutes les deux du ministère des Anciens Combattants. Nous accueillons également Chantale Malette, gestionnaire nationale, Services d'aide aux employés, du ministère de la Santé.

Je ne pense pas que nous utiliserons les dix minutes, mais nos témoins feront une déclaration liminaire et nous allons commencer par Mme Isabel. [Français]

Mme Johanne Isabel (gestionnaire nationale, Services de santé mentale, Direction de la santé mentale, ministère des Anciens Combattants):

Bonsoir à tous. Je m'appelle Johanne Isabel et je travaille à Anciens Combattants Canada depuis 2001. Mon conjoint, pour sa part, est un retraité des Forces armées canadiennes.

Monsieur le président, membres du Comité, c'est pour nous un plaisir de faire une présentation sur le Service d'aide d'Anciens Combattants Canada. Il s'agit d'un service de consultation et d'aiguillage qui est offert 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours par semaine, à nos vétérans, à nos membres retraités de la GRC ainsi qu'aux membres de la famille de ces personnes. Ce service est confidentiel. Si un vétérans n'est pas inscrit à un service ou à un programme d'Anciens Combattants Canada, il peut tout de même recourir à ce programme.

Voici un bref historique du programme.

En 2000, Anciens Combattants Canada a travaillé en collaboration avec Santé Canada dans le but d'offrir un service similaire au Programme d'aide aux membres des Forces armées canadiennes. Nous voulions nous assurer que les vétérans et leur famille pourraient passer de la vie militaire à la vie civile de façon plus fluide. C'est pour bien servir notre clientèle lors de la transition que nous voulions offrir ce même service.

Le 1er décembre 2014, votre comité a recommandé que le programme d'aide destiné aux anciens combattants soit bonifié. Entre 2000 et 2014, les anciens combattants pouvaient recevoir jusqu'à huit séances individuelles de counselling avec un professionnel de la santé. Comme je l'ai mentionné déjà, à la suite de vos recommandations et depuis le 1er avril 2014, le programme offre 20 séances individuelles de consultation à tous nos vétérans, aux membres de leur famille et aux membres retraités de la GRC.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à Mme Malette.

(1645)

Mme Chantale Malette (gestionnaire nationale, Relations opérationnelles et des clients, Services d’aide aux employés, ministère de la Santé):

Bonjour. Je m'appelle Chantale Malette.[Traduction]

Les services qui sont offerts par le truchement du Service d'aide d'ACC sont principalement confidentiels, bilingues et accessibles en tout temps à partir d'un numéro 1-800 et sur la ligne téléphonique de Santé Canada. Des professionnels en santé mentale répondent à chaque appel. Tous les conseillers ont à tout le moins une maîtrise ou un doctorat. Le vétéran peut donc accéder automatiquement et sur-le-champ à un professionnel en santé mentale.

Les services téléphoniques sont aussi offerts aux personnes malentendantes. Une personne peut obtenir un soutien immédiat en cas de crise et du counseling de la part d'un professionnel en santé mentale qui détient au moins une maîtrise. Si la personne qui appelle est en crise, le professionnel en santé mentale prendra tout le temps nécessaire pour la calmer avant de l'aiguiller vers un service de counseling en personne.

Nous faisons appel à notre réseau national de praticiens spécialisés du secteur privé selon nos besoins, partout au Canada. Nous offrons du counseling en personne et par téléphone, particulièrement lorsque des services sont requis dans une zone éloignée ou que le client en fait la demande. Nous offrons aussi du counseling en ligne au besoin.

Nous avons recours à des ressources externes ou à ACC si le temps nécessaire pour résoudre le problème excède la période couverte par le programme. Nous utilisons les séances et les heures offertes dans le cadre du programme pour assurer la transition de la personne, pour soutenir le vétéran jusqu'à ce que des soins de longue durée soient disponibles.

En ce qui concerne la prévention du suicide, on vérifie l'état du client pour chaque appel. Nous vérifions le niveau de stress et s'il y a des pensées suicidaires ou meurtrières. Si le conseiller considère que l'appelant a des pensées suicidaires, il lui demandera son autorisation pour communiquer avec son gestionnaire de cas à ACC et l'informer de la situation.

En ce qui a trait aux conseillers, nous avons accès à plus de 900 professionnels en santé mentale à l'échelle du Canada. Ils ont tous au moins une maîtrise dans un domaine psychosocial et cinq années d'expérience en pratique privée. Ils ont fait l'objet d'un contrôle de sécurité par le gouvernement, ont une assurance contre la faute professionnelle et sont membres d'une association professionnelle reconnue. Les références professionnelles sont également vérifiées.

Au sujet de l'assurance qualité, chaque fois qu'un vétéran consulte un professionnel en santé mentale, nous invitons la personne à répondre à un sondage sur la satisfaction afin d'obtenir plus de renseignements quant à sa satisfaction à l'égard du programme. Nous procédons aussi à des visites annuelles des bureaux des conseillers. Nous en visitons au moins 5 % chaque année. Nous sommes également accrédités par l'EASNA, la Employee assistance society of North America, et le COA, le Council on Accreditation. Nous respectons les normes les plus élevées de l'industrie.

(1650)

[Français]

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Voici maintenant quelques statistiques.

Entre 2012 et 2016, le nombre de personnes ayant utilisé le Service est passé de 614 à 1 140. Il y a donc eu une augmentation. Celle-ci est due principalement à la décision de bonifier les services en faisant passer à 20 le nombre de consultations. Pour un vétéran ou un membre de sa famille qui veut traiter d'un problème important, il est intéressant de bénéficier de consultations sur une plus longue période. C'est très positif.

Pour ce qui est des 1 143 personnes indiquées ici, 68 % d'entre elles sont des vétérans, 28 % sont des membres de leur famille et 2 % sont des personnes retraitées de la GRC. Les gens qui utilisent les services sont, en moyenne, dans la fin de la quarantaine ou au début de la cinquantaine. Les gens utilisent le Service d'aide d'Anciens Combattants Canada principalement pour des problèmes psychologiques non liés au service militaire ou pour du counseling destiné aux couples.

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Excellent. Merci.

Monsieur Kitchen, je pense que vous allez diviser votre temps avec M. Brassard.

Allez-y monsieur Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous tous d'être ici.

Je vous remercie d'être venue témoigner de nouveau devant le Comité.

Je vous remercie de votre exposé et de nous avoir donné quelques statistiques. Lorsque vous parlez d'un numéro accessible en tout temps, pouvez-vous me dire de quelle manière une personne peut accéder à ce numéro? Par exemple, je viens de la Saskatchewan. Vous dites avoir 900 professionnels en santé mentale à votre disposition. Si une personne de la Saskatchewan compose le numéro à minuit, à qui téléphone-t-elle?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Elle appelle à Ottawa. Tous les conseillers qui répondent pour le Service d'aide d'ACC sont à Ottawa, donc lorsque la personne compose le numéro 1-800, elle a automatiquement accès à un professionnel en santé mentale qui vérifiera son état et qui l'aiguillera vers un service de counseling en personne n'importe où au Canada, y compris en Saskatchewan si elle le veut.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Nous avons parlé de transfert des connaissances. D'après ce que je vois, il est question de transfert des connaissances et de transmission de ces connaissances à nos vétérans.

Avez-vous réalisé un sondage ou une étude pour savoir combien de vétérans connaissent l'existence de ce service? [Français]

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Beaucoup d'efforts ont été faits afin de promouvoir davantage le Service. L'information a été mise sur notre site Web. Elle est également beaucoup consultée sur nos plateformes Facebook et Twitter. De façon mensuelle, l'information sur ce service est transmise aux anciens combattants. Mme Malette intervient beaucoup auprès des Forces canadiennes, de la GRC et de tous les bureaux d'Anciens Combattants Canada, afin de bien expliquer et de présenter les avantages de ce programme. [Traduction]

M. Robert Kitchen:

De quelle manière pouvons-nous acheminer cette information aux vétérans sans abri qui n'ont pas d'ordinateur, qui ne gazouillent pas, qui n'utilisent pas Facebook et qui vivent peut-être dans le Nord de la Saskatchewan ou de l'Ontario ou peu importe? Comment pouvons-nous leur transmettre cette information? [Français]

Mme Johanne Isabel:

C'est une très bonne question.

Vous avez raison: nous pouvons toujours faire mieux. Nos gestionnaires de cas reçoivent de l'information. Depuis 2012, le Service d'aide d'ACC est plus utilisé. Pourrait-il l'être davantage? Oui. Est-il efficace? Oui. Les anciens combattants sans abri pourraient-ils en bénéficier? Oui, et nous travaillons constamment en ce sens. Pourrions-nous en faire davantage? La réponse est oui.

Nous veillons à diversifier les moyens de leur faire connaître le Service d'aide. Nous avons divers programmes qui visent à ce que les anciens combattants sans abri reçoivent aussi de l'information sur le Service d'aide. Nous leur distribuons des dépliants afin de leur faire connaître ce service.

(1655)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Brassard.

M. John Brassard:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le Comité étudie la santé mentale et la prévention du suicide chez les vétérans. Vous êtes en première ligne de tout ce qui se passe ici.

Quelle sorte de recommandations aimeriez-vous voir le Comité formuler en ce qui a trait à la gestion de la prévention du suicide et de certains problèmes de santé mentale?

Voulez-vous que je choisisse quelqu'un? Docteure? Je sais que vous êtes déjà venue ici.

Dre Cyd Courchesne (directrice générale, Direction Générale des Professionnels de la santé, médecin-chef, ministère des Anciens Combattants):

Oui, c'est le cas,et nous attendons avec impatience le rapport. Comme l'a mentionné Mme Isabel, c'est à la suite des recommandations formulées par votre Comité que nous avons fait passer de huit à vingt le nombre de séances de counseling, parce que nos chiffres montrent qu'il s'agit d'un service nécessaire. J'aimerais vous rappeler que ce service est offert peu importe si la personne touche des prestations d'Anciens Combattants. Il s'adresse aux 600 000 vétérans vivant au Canada.

En ce qui a trait à la prévention du suicide, comme l'ont dit mes deux collègues qui ont été très éloquentes, nous poursuivons nos recherches afin de comprendre ce problème très complexe. Nous travaillons en plus étroite collaboration avec nos collègues des Forces canadiennes, particulièrement durant les périodes de vulnérabilité qui sont définies à l'aide d'une étude épidémiologique ou de recherche, afin de renforcer nos programmes.

M. John Brassard:

Travaillez-vous avec des intervenants? Par exemple, travaillez-vous avec les provinces ou les municipalités? Avez-vous essayé d'une façon ou d'une autre d'établir des liens avec d'autres organisations afin d'aider la population de sans-abri? Les municipalités, par exemple, recueillent des statistiques, et il y a d'autres organisations, comme nous l'avons appris dans d'autres témoignages, qui vérifient combien il y a d'anciens combattants sans abri. Essayez-vous d'établir des liens avec ces organisations?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Je vais me lancer, puis ma collègue pourra terminer.

Effectivement, certains de nos collègues au ministère des Anciens Combattants travaillent sur une stratégie visant précisement les vétérans en état de crise, les vétérans sans abri. Il s'agit de problèmes que nous ne pouvons pas affronter sans aide. C'est pourquoi on entretient des liens étroits avec des organisations municipales et provinciales, avec toutes ces personnes sur le terrain. Nous n’arriverions à rien sans l'aide importante fournie par ces intervenants.[Français]

Je ne sais pas si ma collègue a quelque chose à ajouter.

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Non. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Eyolfson.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci, et merci à tous d'être venus.

Bienvenue, docteure Courchesne. Ai-je bien prononcé votre nom de famille?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Oui, c'est très bien.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord, merci.

J'aimerais pousser plus loin les questions que j'ai posées à la Dre Heber plus tôt. D'après ce que j'ai compris, il y a une communication qui est établie. Vous auriez peut-être su répondre à ma question. Je voulais savoir, relativement à l'aide demandée aux médecins de premier recours, s'il y a une communication particulière établie avec le milieu de la médecine d'urgence?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Nous ne communiquons pas avec des urgentologues précisément, mais nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec le Collège de médecins de famille du Canada. Cette organisation a créé un groupe spécialisé afin de produire du matériel didactique pour tous les médecins de famille du Canada; le but étant de leur fournir de l'information sur les questions de santé concernant les familles de militaires. Elle a aussi fait savoir qu'elle avait l'intention de produire un guide de conseils pratiques sur la santé des anciens combattants.

L'Association canadienne de la médecine du travail et de l'environnement nous a invités à venir présenter un exposé sur les questions de santé qui touchent les anciens combattants. Mon collègue Jim Thompson et moi-même avons l'intention de présenter un exposé sur les résultats de diverses études; nous voulons informer le plus grand nombre de médecins possible. Nous avons également des liens avec l'Institut Vanier de la famille. Nous nous intéressons de près aux familles et aux anciens combattants. Donc, oui, nous menons beaucoup d'activités informatives.

(1700)

Mme Johanne Isabel:

En outre, nous avons aussi travaillé avec le Centre de toxicomanie et de santé mentale à Toronto, ou CAMH. Le CAMH a mis en ligne une série de modules sur la santé mentale, dont un comprend de l'information de base sur la santé mentale et la toxicomanie. C'est un module bilingue de 20 minutes, et tous les professionnels de la santé peuvent y accéder en ligne.

Nous travaillons également avec la Commission de la santé mentale du Canada ainsi qu'avec Premiers soins en santé mentale Canada. La communauté des anciens combattants peut suivre un cours de formation de deux jours. Par « communauté des anciens combattants », je veux dire que la formation est offerte à tous les fournisseurs de soins primaires, aux membres de la famille et aux amis. Notre objectif est que 3 000 membres, ou le plus possible, suivent ce cours de formation de deux jours d'ici la fin de 2020.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord, merci.

J'aimerais approfondir les choses un peu. Avez-vous communiqué avec les écoles de médecine du Canada afin que ces questions soient traitées dans le cadre du programme de cours actuel?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

J'essaie de me rappeler s'il y a eu ce genre d'effort de sensibilisation pendant mon temps dans les Forces armées. Par l'intermédiaire de l'Association médicale canadienne, les Forces canadiennes étaient représentées à l'échelon des médecins spécialistes et à celui des médecins généralistes. J'ai siégé au Forum des omnipraticiens, et nous avions des représentants dans la Fédération d'étudiants en médecine du Canada. Donc, ces questions ont commencé à être traitées sur le plan social. L'Association médicale canadienne a sans aucun doute fait du très bon travail: en 2014, elle a déclaré qu'elle allait encourager les médecins de famille à traiter les anciens combattants dans le cadre de leur pratique. Les associations médicales du Canada nous sont d'un très précieux soutien.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord, merci. Je suis content de l'apprendre.

Avez-vous remarqué des tendances relativement à la façon dont les anciens combattants souffrant de problèmes de santé mentale cherchent de l'aide? Nous savons que, dans les Forces armées et dans la société en général, les gens souffrant de troubles de santé mentaux ont toujours été stigmatisés. Tout le monde travaille dur pour réduire cette stigmatisation. Les campagnes de sensibilisation du public visant à réduire la stigmatisation ont-elles eu des effets positifs? Les anciens combattants se présentent-ils par eux-mêmes plus tôt? Se présentent-ils avant d'être en crise? L'effet est-il celui escompté?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Vous avez déjà entendu l'avis d'un statiscien professionnel spécialiste en épidémiologie, et je ne prendrai pas le risque de dire qu'il y a incontestablement eu des résultats favorables, parce que je n'ai pas de statistiques à l'appui si on m'en demandait.

Je pourrais vous reparler de notre ligne téléphonique d'aide pour les anciens combattants. Un de ses avantages est que — en ce qui concerne la stigmatisation — elle est anonyme. On peut appeler 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7. Vous n'avez pas à être admissible à l'un de nos programmes ou à un autre pour l'utiliser, et je crois que c'est ce qui la rend si pratique.

Dès que la personne fait son premier appel — franchit cette première étape où elle décide de parler à quelqu'un — elle va peut-être se rendre compte qu'elle a un problème plus grave. Les professionnels à l'autre bout de la ligne téléphonique d'aide d'ACC travaillent avec des anciens combattants. Ils connaissent nos programmes. Ils savent quand ils doivent dire: « Eh bien, peut-être devriez-vous parler avec un de nos gestionnaires de cas afin d'obtenir davantage de soutien pour vous aider avec votre situation ».

Voilà ce que je voulais dire à propos de la stigmatisation; je voulais faire un lien avec la ligne d'aide téléphonique d'ACC. Il n'y a aucun critère d'admission préalable: vous n'avez qu'à appeler, et on vous connecte immédiatement.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, docteure Courchesne, d'être revenue éclaircir certains points pour nous.

Je veux revenir sur certains points précis. Vous offrez actuellement 20 consultations en personne en plus des séances pour la famille. Y a-t-il un calendrier précis d'établi pour ces 20 consultations? Une fois les 20 séances terminées, fait-on un suivi pour évaluer leur efficacité? Que se passe-t-il si d'autres séances sont nécessaires?

Je ne sais pas si vous en avez parlé.

(1705)

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Je vais laisser Mme Malette répondre à la question sur la durée des séances.

Mme Chantale Malette:

Habituellement, nous sommes en mesure d'offrir 20 heures de séances, et la plupart du temps, c'est suffisant. Pour les cas où nous avons besoin de plus de 20 heures, nous allons, bien sûr, communiquer avec ACC à propos des services requis, et, habituellement, nous allons fournir l'intervention nécessaire. S'il le faut, nous pouvons aller jusqu'à 25 ou 30 heures.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

J'ai été très intéressée par ce que vous avez mentionné, madame Malette et vous, docteure Courchesne, à propos de l'interaction avec les praticiens et de la communication avec les fournisseurs et les médecins de famille. J'ai aussi été intriguée par l'idée de demander aux médecins de famille de prendre en charge des anciens combattants.

Votre intention est-elle, en partie, de vérifier la qualité des services offerts à la lumière de ce que ces médecins de famille vont découvrir pendant leurs interactions avec les anciens combattants? Ce que je veux savoir, j'imagine, c'est si vous en tirez des leçons?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Voulez-vous dire les professionnels de la santé qui fournissent des services de counseling aux anciens combattants avec l'aide d'ACC?

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Vous avez mentionné informer les médecins de famille, et je voulais savoir s'ils vous rendent la pareille.

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Quand j'ai dit cela, je répondais à la question de votre collègue sur les activités de sensibilisation que nous menons auprès des associations et des médecins de famille. Nous ne sommes pas en mesure de communiquer avec ces médecins de famille. Je ne sais pas si...

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Mme Isabel, je crois, a dit que vous meniez des visites constructives à des bureaux de praticiens, et je voulais savoir si vous en profitiez pour en tirer des leçons importantes.

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Ce ne sont pas des médecins de famille qui s'occupent du Service d'aide d'ACC. C'est Santé Canada qui surveille la qualité du Service d'aide d'ACC. Ai-je raison?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Oui.

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Je me répète: ce service est anonyme. C'est pourquoi aucune partie de l'information ne nous est communiquée. Nous savons uniquement combien de personnes utilisent le service, et peut-être si elles en sont satisfaites ou non.

De temps en temps, il nous arrive de traiter des plaintes, et nous faisons le suivi dans ce cas, mais les fournisseurs ne communiquent jamais avec nous pour nous fournir ce genre d'informations.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

On dirait seulement que nous courons toujours contre la montre pour essayer de prévenir les suicides et de répondre aux besoins des gens. On dirait qu'on est toujours pris dans cette ambivalence où on ne sait pas quel chemin prendre. J'essaie de démêler tout cela, et, apparemment, je n'y arrive pas très bien, mais j'essaie tout de même de démêler les choses.

La Dre Heber a mentionné que ACC a mis à jour sa stratégie relative à la santé mentale. Le ministère collabore aussi avec la Défense nationale afin de mettre au point une stratégie conjointe sur le suicide. Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus à ce sujet? Je voulais poser cette question plus tôt à propos de la forme de ces composantes. En quoi consiste cette stratégie?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Je vais répondre à cette question, si vous me le permettez.

Vous savez que le suicide n'est pas un problème simple. Il y a un grand nombre de facteurs sous-jacents. Je sais que les gens en ont parfois assez d'entendre parler d'études, mais les études sont très importantes, puisqu'elles nous fournissent une très grande partie de l'information dont nous avons besoin pour élaborer les programmes, les services et les stratégies que nous utilisons pour affronter ce problème.

La stratégie comprend plusieurs aspects. Il y a la prévention, les interventions ainsi que ce qu'on pourrait appeler la « postvention ». Essentiellement, c'est une façon élaborée de dire qu'on délimite et qu'on organise nos activités.

Je dirais que tout ce que vous avez entendu à propos de la ligne d'aide téléphonique d'ACC et même tous les programmes offerts par ACC aux anciens combattants s'inscrivent dans les stratégies ou mesures de prévention.

D'après les études, nous savons que les membres libérés des Forces armées sont particulièrement vulnérables pendant la période de transition; c'est pourquoi nous voulons axer des efforts dessus. Pouvons-nous faire autre chose que leur faire subir une entrevue de fin de service, leur assigner un gestionnaire de cas, les aider à s'y retrouver dans le système et s'assurer qu'ils ont accès aux avantages et aux traitements dont ils ont besoin? Tout cela, c'est déjà fait. Nous allons améliorer tout ce que je viens de mentionner dans le cadre de la stratégie que nous élaborons avec nos collègues des Forces canadiennes.

(1710)

Le président:

Merci.

Allez-y, monsieur Fraser. [Français]

M. Colin Fraser:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous trois d'être ici aujourd'hui pour livrer votre présentation et répondre à nos questions.

J'aimerais commencer par vous, madame Isabel. Vous avez mentionné les 20 consultations qui se font en personne. Le nombre de consultations est donc passé de 8 à 20.

Pouvez-vous nous expliquer les étapes que doit suivre une personne pour qu'on lui accorde ces 20 consultations? Est-ce facile de recevoir cette approbation? Y a-t-il des formulaires à remplir? Les membres font-ils face à des difficultés avant de recevoir l'approbation pour ces consultations?

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Non. La première étape, que ce soit pour un vétéran, un membre de sa famille ou un membre retraité de la GRC, est simplement de composer le numéro 1 800. Comme Mme Malette le mentionnait, l'équipe est à Ottawa. Un membre du personnel va poser des questions, demander comment ça va. Il va aussi déterminer l'urgence de l'appel. Si un client a des idées suicidaires, le protocole sera un peu différent. Cependant, lorsque le client mentionne qu'il veut rencontrer en personne un conseiller ou un professionnel de la santé mentale, dépendamment de la région où il se trouve, le membre du personnel pourra le recommander dans un délai pouvant aller de 24 heures à un maximum de cinq jours, selon l'urgence. Le vétéran ou la personne qui fait la demande pourra recevoir ce service en personne, avec un conseiller.

Concernant le nombre de séances de consultation nécessaires, à savoir si ce sera deux ou vingt, ce n'est pas le client qui va le déterminer. Cela se fait à la suite d'une évaluation effectuée par un professionnel de la santé. Le vétéran ou le client ainsi que le professionnel de la santé vont discuter ensemble du problème et et des difficultés à traiter. Cette évaluation va déterminer le nombre de séances.

Tout à l'heure, on a demandé s'il arrivait que l'on doive augmenter le nombre de séances à plus de 20. La réponse est oui et c'est important. Il faut faire preuve de jugement, en fonction des besoins d'un client. Parfois, c'est nécessaire. Cependant, j'aimerais également mentionner que ce n'est pas la majorité des cas. Dans une année, Mme Malette peut m'appeler trois ou quatre fois pour augmenter le nombre de consultations. Dans ce cas, on parle d'environ cinq à six séances supplémentaires.

M. Colin Fraser:

Madame Isabel, à votre avis, les étapes du programme fonctionnent-elles bien maintenant? Auriez-vous des recommandations à formuler afin d'améliorer le programme?

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Je travaille avec Santé Canada depuis 2012. Nous avons eu très peu de plaintes ou de commentaires négatifs par rapport au nombre de séances, d'autant plus que nous avons augmenté le nombre de consultations à 20. Il s'agit d'un service qui est plus utilisé. À cet égard, je n'ai pas de recommandations à faire.

(1715)

M. Colin Fraser:

D'accord. Merci.

J'aimerais maintenant m'adresser à Mme Malette.

Vous avez mentionné que l'accès au service se faisait par la ligne téléphonique 1 800. Vous avez aussi parlé de Facebook, Twitter et autres choses semblables. Y a-t-il une manière de communiquer instantanément avec un membre du personnel, en ligne, par ordinateur?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Non. En ce moment, il n'y a aucune façon de le faire parce que cela deviendrait très difficile d'évaluer l'état de la personne et de pouvoir recommuniquer avec elle. En ce moment, la façon la plus sûre de le faire, c'est par la ligne 1 800 où un professionnel de la santé mentale répond et vérifie tout de suite l'état de la personne. Ensuite, il peut recommuniquer avec cette personne, noter son numéro de téléphone et ainsi de suite. Il y a donc un contact direct avec la personne. [Traduction]

M. Colin Fraser:

Une chose qui est ressortie des témoignages précédents est l'importance du soutien des pairs, c'est-à-dire le fait qu'un ancien combattant qui est peut-être en état de crise actuellement puisse parler avec quelqu'un qui a aussi fait partie des Forces armées.

Si un ancien combattant appelle la ligne 1-800, pourra-t-il parler immédiatement à quelqu'un? Vous avez mentionné certains des critères d'embauche au centre d'appels. Est-ce qu'il est possible de mettre la personne qui appelle en communication avec quelqu'un — un pair — immédiatement?

Mme Chantale Malette:

La personne serait aiguillée vers des ressources existantes, par exemple, le SSBSO. Nous travaillons également en étroite collaboration avec eux. Si un ancien combattant a besoin de parler avec un pair, nous utiliserions les services déjà en place.

M. Colin Fraser:

Mais cela prendrait un assez long moment après l'appel, plus d'une heure.

Mme Chantale Malette:

Cela prendrait peut-être plus d'une heure, mais il va sans dire que l'appel serait fait immédiatement, et on resterait avec la personne au téléphone ou on ferait le suivi à de nombreuses reprises au cours de la soirée. On trouverait la meilleure façon d'aider la personne à ce moment.

M. Colin Fraser:

Est-il déjà arrivé qu'une personne appelle et demande si elle peut parler à un ancien combattant? A-t-on déjà posé ce genre de questions?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Ce n'est jamais arrivé.

M. Colin Fraser:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je n'ai pas d'autres questions.

Le président:

Il ne nous reste plus beaucoup de temps. J'aimerais vous demander un éclaircissement, à propos de votre dépliant. Je cite: C'est un service volontaire et confidentiel, pour aider tous les anciens combattants, leurs familles ainsi que les principaux dispensateurs de soins qui vivent des préoccupations personnelles qui peuvent affecter leur bien-être. Le service vous est offert sans aucuns frais.

Les fournisseurs de soins ou les membres de la famille ont-ils besoin d'être référés par un ancien combattant pour utiliser ces services? [Français]

Mme Johanne Isabel:

En fait, c'est un service qui est offert par Santé Canada. La personne a tout simplement besoin de mentionner qu'elle est la conjointe d'un vétéran et puis elle peut avoir accès immédiatement au service. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Voilà qui met fin à la période de questions. Au nom du Comité, j'aimerais vous remercier toutes les trois d'être venues témoigner ici aujourd'hui. Je tiens aussi à vous remercier de tout ce que vous faites pour aider les hommes et les femmes qui ont servi leur pays.

Madame Romanado, allez-y.

Mme Sherry Romanado (Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne, Lib.):

Je suis consciente du fait que je n'aurais pas la parole en temps normal.

Serait-il possible de faire parvenir une copie de ceci à tous les députés fédéraux? Je ne crois pas que tous les députés savent que ce service existe. Je vous recommande fortement de vous assurer qu'ils en reçoivent une copie.

Le président:

Parfait. Merci.

Monsieur Fraser, allez-y.

M. Colin Fraser:

Monsieur le président, je voulais savoir pourquoi nous finissons à 17 h 20.

Le président:

Nous pouvons donner six minutes à M. Bratina, s'il le souhaite.

M. Bob Bratina:

Merci.

L'augmentation de 614 à 1 143 et le temps supplémentaire pour les 20 consultations ont-ils exigé davantage de ressources? Êtes-vous parvenus à répondre à la demande avec le personnel à votre disposition, ou avez-vous eu à mobiliser d'autres fonds?

Mme Chantale Malette:

À dire vrai, nous avons eu à embaucher davantage de professionnels en santé mentale.

M. Bob Bratina:

Ces jeunes gens... On a mentionné des personnes avec des antécédents dans les Forces armées, mais qu'en est-il de l'orientation? Comment les formez-vous par rapport au contexte militaire? J'imagine qu'il faut une certification ou quelque chose du genre, en plus de leur maîtrise. Est-ce qu'il y a un processus d'orientation?

(1720)

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Vous posez une bonne question. Je dois admettre qu'actuellement il n'y a pas de certification ou de programme précis. Nous avons tenu une discussion à ce sujet la semaine dernière, à la suite des recommandations du conseil consultatif des familles d'Anciens Combattants Canada. On nous a recommandé d'allonger la formation pour nos fournisseurs de services en santé mentale qui travaillent au Service d'aide d'ACC. La semaine prochaine, nous allons tenir une téléconférence pour en discuter et trouver les solutions.

M. Bob Bratina:

Je suis sûr que vous avez besoin de personnes hautement qualifiées, et il s'agit probablement des jeunes qui sortent de l'université. Ce serait plus difficile, disons, pour un vétéran qui a passé quelques années en service d'être certifié. Un vétéran pourrait naturellement comprendre ce que vit un autre ancien combattant, mais les gens sont formés pour réagir à des problèmes précis qui dépassent les capacités d'un ancien combattant, malgré son intérêt pour la chose.

En ce qui concerne le sondage de satisfaction, pouvez-vous me parler un peu de la façon dont c'est fait?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Lorsqu'un client consulte l'un de nos conseillers, le conseiller va lui remettre un sondage à remplir volontairement. Les questions portent sur les services que le client a reçus. On fournit également à la personne une enveloppe affranchie pour que la personne puisse nous faire parvenir l'information. Ensuite, nous la communiquons à ACC.

M. Bob Bratina:

Peu importe ce que nous faisons, c'est toujours important d'examiner la situation et de voir comment les choses progressent. Je suis heureux de l'apprendre.

Habituellement, combien de temps dure une séance de counseling en personne?

Mme Chantale Malette:

D'ordinaire, une séance dure une heure.

M. Bob Bratina:

Est-ce une bonne durée, dans l'ensemble? Cela est-il reflété dans le sondage de satisfaction?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Oui.

M. Bob Bratina:

Vingt séances, est-ce extrême ou un nombre maximum? D'après ce que vous avez dit, les gens vont aller à une ou deux séances, puis votre groupe décide si d'autres séances sont nécessaires. Ce n'est pas la personne qui décide et dit: « J'aimerais revenir la semaine prochaine. »

Mme Chantale Malette:

C'est exact. On doit intervenir auprès du client, et c'est en fonction de l'intervention nécessaire que nous décidons du nombre de séances.

M. Bob Bratina:

Quand une personne téléphone à la ligne d'aide, comment fait-elle pour s'identifier?

Mme Chantale Malette:

La personne peut s'identifier soit comme un vétéran ou ancien combattant.

M. Bob Bratina:

On a qu'à dire: « Je suis un ancien combattant et j'ai besoin d'aide », c'est ça?

Mme Chantale Malette:

La plupart du temps, oui. Mais dans le cas contraire, ou dans les cas où la personne vient seulement d'apprendre l'existence du service et ne sait pas si elle y est admissible, nous allons lui poser des questions pour savoir si elle a déjà fait partie des Forces armées et, le cas échéant, si elle est membre de la Force régulière ou un ancien combattant.

M. Bob Bratina:

L'un des sujets d'étude du Comité, et nous en avons parlé souvent, est la continuité de l'identité des vétérans une fois leur service terminé. Il vaudrait peut-être mieux qu'ils aient une carte ou quelque chose du genre afin de leur permettre de s'identifier d'emblée comme anciens combattants. Croyez-vous que cela serait pratique?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Oui, je crois...

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Oui, ce serait un avantage.

Cela dit, comme je l'ai mentionné, les gens n'ont pas à prouver qu'ils ont déjà fait partie des Forces armées, ils n'ont qu'à le dire. Même si on peut croire que des gens peuvent recevoir des services simplement en prétendant être des vétérans, je serais surprise que cela arrive réellement. Puisqu'ils n'ont pas à fournir de preuve, une carte n'ajouterait pas vraiment de valeur dans ce cas précis, dans le cadre de ce programme en particulier.

M. Bob Bratina:

Il y a des cas très rares, mais on a déjà vu des gens se pointer au jour du Souvenir en uniforme avec des médailles et...

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Vous avez raison, monsieur.

M. Bob Bratina:

Merci beaucoup.

Je n'ai plus d'autres questions.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Rapidement, j'aimerais approfondir la question de M. Fraser à propos du soutien des pairs.

Pouvez-vous nous fournir un peu plus de précisions à ce sujet? Je voulais savoir si c'est quelque chose que vous aviez examiné ou même seulement si vous y aviez réfléchi. Les vétérans en parlent souvent, entre autres choses. Ils disent: « Est-ce qu'il y a quelqu'un qui écoute? » Nous ne demandons pas à nos vétérans d'aider réellement nos autres vétérans. Nous avons l'occasion de faire en sorte que les gens qui appellent pourraient parler, par téléconférence, 24 h sur 24, 7 jours sur 7, à quelqu'un qui les comprend, parce que la plupart du temps, les gens ne les comprennent pas. Je connais un grand nombre de psychologues et d'étudiants à la maîtrise et au doctorat qui ne comprennent pas ce que les vétérans disent.

À mon avis, cela ajouterait de la valeur à vos services si les vétérans pouvaient avoir ce genre d'accès facile lorsqu'ils sont en état de crise. Je voulais savoir, premièrement, si vous y aviez réfléchi, et deuxièmement, si ce n'est pas le cas et que c'est la première fois qu'on vous présente l'idée, si vous croyez qu'elle a une certaine valeur.

(1725)

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Je vais me lancer.

D'après les statistiques et les appels, ce ne sont pas seulement les vétérans qui utilisent ce service. Il y a aussi des membres de la GRC, des membres de la famille et des enfants. La plupart des appels ne concernent pas des questions liées au service dans les Forces armées. C'est pourquoi, jusqu'ici, je dirais que ce n'a pas été un problème. De toute façon, à nouveau, les gens qui répondent aux appels sont parfaitement au courant de tous les services que nous offrons, y compris le SSBSO, lequel dispose d'un très grand réseau de pairs qui sont prêts à soutenir les gens et à nous aider. Si ce n'est pas possible en moins d'une heure, il y a un réseau bien établi de gens qui sont prêts à prendre la relève dès qu'on leur demande.

M. Robert Kitchen:

D'accord, mais ma question ne concernait pas le service ou une personne qui demande d'accéder à un service. Je parle des anciens combattants en crise qui souffrent de problèmes de santé mentale, peu importe de quel type de problème il s'agit, parce qu'on sait qu'il y a de nombreux types différents de troubles de santé mentale. Un vétéran ou un membre des Forces armées qui comprend la personne en crise pourra peut-être suffire à la réconforter, à l'apaiser ou à la calmer. En ce qui concerne les téléconférences, ne croyez-vous pas que cela pourrait ajouter de la valeur?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Oui, absolument. Personne ne remet en question la valeur du soutien par les pairs. Absolument, cela ajouterait de la valeur.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Serait-il possible de l'intégrer au programme?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Nous allons certainement examiner cette possibilité.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Madame Lockhart.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais qu'on parle un peu des familles et de la formation qu'ils reçoivent. Avec les autres témoins, nous avons parlé de la formation en premiers soins présentement offerte dans le cadre des programmes de santé mentale et de prévention du suicide. Avez-vous déjà songé à offrir une formation similaire aux membres de la famille avant même la libération des Forces? En avez-vous discuté?

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Je n'en suis pas sûre.

J'imagine que ce que je pourrais dire, actuellement, c'est que, comme je l'ai mentionné, nous travaillons avec la Commission de la santé mentale du Canada afin de fournir deux journées de formation en premiers soins relativement à la santé mentale. Jusqu'ici, nous avons fourni près de 14 séances d'un bout à l'autre du pays, et notre objectif est d'en fournir au moins 150. C'est l'une des façons dont les membres d'une famille peuvent s'informer un peu plus à propos de la santé mentale. Ainsi, ils vont avoir une meilleure compréhension de ce qui se passe et reconnaître les différents signes dans les réactions de leur époux ou épouse.

La Dre Courchesne a également fait mention de notre partenariat avec Saint Elizabeth relativement au programme mis en oeuvre au printemps.

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Tous ces programmes sont également offerts par l'intermédiaire du Centre de ressources pour les familles de militaires. Ainsi, les membres de la famille y ont accès avant la libération du membre des Forces canadiennes.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Je n'ai qu'une seule autre question: ces services sont-ils payés à l'avance, ou alors les familles doivent-elles payer elles-mêmes et demander d'être remboursées?

Mme Johanne Isabel:

En ce qui concerne les premiers soins de santé mentale... c'est gratuit.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

D'accord.

Mais qu'en est-il du déplacement?

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Je dois l'admettre, le déplacement ne l'est pas.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

C'est un point que je veux soulever, parce que certaines familles ont mentionné cela comme étant un obstacle.

Mme Johanne Isabel:

D'accord, merci de nous le laisser savoir.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

D'accord, merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je n'ai qu'une question rapide.

Quand une personne appelle la ligne 1-800, quel est le processus? Qu'est-ce qu'elle entend? Dès qu'elle compose le numéro, est-ce qu'elle entend que son appel est important et qu'elle doit demeurer en ligne, ou est-ce qu'elle s'adresse directement à une personne? Est-ce qu'il y a des messages préenregistrés? Pouvez-vous me donner une idée du processus?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Un professionnel de la santé mentale répond au téléphone. Ce n'est pas une machine qui répond au client. C'est une vraie personne.

(1730)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Disons que quelqu'un appelle parce qu'il y a un état de crise et que de l'aide est nécessaire immédiatement, qu'est-ce qui se passe?

Mme Chantale Malette:

Le conseiller va évaluer la situation et poser des questions sur le niveau de stress, les idées suicidaires et l'idéation suicidaire. Le conseiller va également passer tout le temps nécessaire avec la personne au téléphone avant de l'aiguiller vers un professionnel de la santé mentale ou d'autres services. Au besoin, on peut aussi appeler le 911 avant tout cela.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, vous faites ce qui est nécessaire.

Mme Chantale Malette:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Je devrais aussi faire suite à un point que Sherry a soulevé plus tôt. Elle a recommandé de faire parvenir cette information aux députés fédéraux. En tant que député, quels renseignements et quelles ressources sont à ma disposition? Nous sommes 338 députés, avec des bureaux dans chaque circonscription. Souvent, ils sont très loin de tout bureau du Service d'aide d'ACC. Que pouvons-nous faire pour vous aider dans votre mission, en gros?

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Toute cette information est également publiée sur notre site Internet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Eh bien, l'Internet n'est pas encore arrivé dans ma circonscription, voyez-vous.

Des voix: Ah! Ah!

Dre Cyd Courchesne:

Nous publions également chaque semaine des messages sur Twitter et dans les médias sociaux. Nous avons des gazouillis récurrents qui informent le public de tous les services offerts par le ministère. [Français]

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Nos anciens combattants nous tiennent à coeur. Vous êtes tous invités, d'une façon ou d'une autre, à promouvoir le Service et à offrir des dépliants dans vos bureaux. Ce sera pour moi un immense plaisir que de préparer des boîtes d'information à votre intention. Cela vous permettra de les distribuer dans vos régions respectives. Nos vétérans sont importants. Nous voulons améliorer leur situation.

Est-ce que, pour ce faire, tout est en place?

Peut-être pas, mais avec votre soutien et vos recommandations,[Traduction]c'est ce que nous cherchons à accomplir. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous est-il possible d'être proactifs en faisant parvenir ces documents à nos bureaux?

Mme Johanne Isabel:

Absolument. Je vais le faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je l'apprécie.[Traduction]

La balle est dans votre camp.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

J'ai une question à ce sujet. Nous préparons tous des bulletins parlementaires, et je voulais savoir s'il serait possible de nous faire parvenir quelque chose que nous pourrions utiliser dans nos bulletins parlementaires. Pourriez-vous l'envoyer à mon personnel? Peut-être que le Comité pourrait en faire la promotion auprès du public dans un bulletin parlementaire. C'est juste une idée.

Mme Johanne Isabel:

D'accord.

Le président:

Sur ce, au nom du Comité, je tiens à vous remercier d'être venus témoigner aujourd'hui et de tout ce que vous faites pour aider les hommes et les femmes qui servent notre pays. Si vous avez d'autres renseignements à nous faire parvenir, envoyez-les au greffier, et il se chargera de les faire parvenir au Comité. Également, j'aimerais aussi que vous réfléchissiez à mon idée pour les bulletins parlementaires.

Quelqu'un veut-il présenter la motion d'ajournement?

M. Robert Kitchen: J'en fais la proposition.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: Merci.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on March 20, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.