header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-03-06 ACVA 45

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody.

I'd like to call the meeting to order. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) and the motion adopted on December 29, the committee is resuming its study of mental health and suicide prevention among veterans.

For the first hour, we have Roméo Dallaire, retired lieutenant-general and senator; Scott Maxwell, from Wounded Warriors; and retired Brigadier-General Joe Sharpe.

We'll start with a 10-minute witness statement and then go into a round of questioning.

Good afternoon, gentlemen. Thanks for appearing today. The floor is yours.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire (Founder, Roméo Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and ladies and gentlemen, for receiving me in these opulent surroundings. I could barely find my way around the place. I'm very glad for you, in fact. It was high time that it was done. So well done, for bringing you the ability to work with a certain quality of life with your staff to achieve your missions.

I will read a short statement. I hope it's short, or I'll do as my Marine Corps friends have taught me: I'll power talk through it.

I have two colleagues here.

Joe Sharpe and I were intimately involved in the writing of the Liberal Party policy on veterans and have been engaged with veterans for over 10 years in specifics and policy, and also individual cases and the like, and 10 years before that, with the deputy minister at the time, Admiral Murray. He had an advisory committee, chaired by Dr. Neary, who wrote the book on the first Veterans Charter, dated 1943. We spent 10 years working together on that multidisciplinary team. We were also classmates from RMC—but he passed.

Scott Maxwell is the executive director of Wounded Warriors Canada. I am the patron of Wounded Warriors Canada, which, by far, to me, is the body of altruism and philanthropy that is putting so much of its capabilities into the field in the hands of those who are wounded—mostly psychologically. I speak of programs such as animal assistance programs, the equine program, and the veterans training program that we run out of Dalhousie University with my child soldiers initiative, where we train veterans to go back into the field and serve by training other armies on how to handle child soldiers and reduce casualties on the sides of both the child soldiers and us. They take a formal one-month program with us at Dalhousie. We can go into that as we go into the possibility of programs.

I'm going to use as a reference, if I may, my correspondence with the commander-in-chief—that being the Governor General—when I was a senator in the post-time, when I had a number of activities going on with him—his wife was also quite involved—in regard to care and concern for injured veterans, particularly with psychological injuries, as they are quite engaged in that side. I want to use it to give you a feel from there as we move forward.

I'll start by thanking you very much for permitting me and my colleagues to join you today on this matter of suicide prevention in the Canadian Armed Forces and amongst our veterans, both those who serve in the Canadian Forces still—and a large number do—and those who have been released and are in Canadian society. I commend your commitment to the welfare of these individuals and their families, and I am honoured to share my thoughts on how we can make more progress in finding solutions to this problem of people killing themselves because they're injured.

As I mentioned at other times, both publicly and in different forums, I had assembled over the years a team of advisers from diverse backgrounds and with deep knowledge of both the forces and Veterans Affairs. This group of advisers worked to develop policy recommendations and advocacy tools that have allowed us to maintain a well-researched and well-informed outlook on the issues facing our military—especially those who have, in fact, taken the uniform off—particularly related to operational stress injuries. I emphasize that I'm not necessarily always touching on all of mental health; I'm focusing on the operational stress injury part. That is the crux of those who are injured. That is the heart of the problem. That's the operational deficiency that we are seeing right now.

(1535)



Some of those who are involved—just to get their names out there because they've been so committed—are Sergeant Tom Hoppe and Major Bruce Henwood, both retired; Dr. Victor Marshall; Mrs. Muriel Westmorland; Joe Sharpe, who is here with us; and Christian Barabé. Over the years, they have all been engaged with me in bringing forward the veterans scenario and have also helped me when I was chair of the veterans affairs subcommittee in the Senate.

Our research, thought, and work have led us to the conclusion that operational stress injuries, OSIs, in particular, can be and are too often fatal to those affected. Also, the consequences often last a lifetime for those who do not succeed in trying to kill themselves. From peer support organizations in the past, we've had statistics showing that peers have been able to prevent a suicide attempt a day, through the peer support program, let alone the more formal structures of the medical system.

Of course, this includes the devastating consequences for the families and those affected by OSIs. It is my belief that a comprehensive, whole-of-government approach that is engaged with society can bring significant solutions to this crucial problem of people destroying themselves, and bring them to meaningful progress instead, and, in the long run, give them a decent way of life.

The mental health of veterans and current members of the forces, and also with Veterans Affairs Canada, is a continuum that has been presented as a clinical matter with very little involvement of the overall command structure, that is to say, the essence of what people are used to living, their cultural framework, which is a chain of command and a very structured way of life. The clinical and therapeutic and medical dimensions have taken over the problem of OSI, but have also taken over the potential resolution of conflicts that would bring people to ultimately destroy themselves. The chain of command was left on the sidelines, so it was impossible for it to know what was going on. They would get troops coming back to their units with no information on their state of mind because of confidentiality or not being able to work around the access to information system or the individual's privacy rights in regards to the charter.

Using that to the extent of abuse has disconnected the chain of command from the injured, which is totally contrary to all the education we've received in command. I spent my life in command, from a platoon or a troop of 30, to the 1st Canadian Division of 12,000, in peace and in war. The command is like being pregnant. You are in command all the time, while you have a command function. It's day and night and then, when the baby's born, you're still there, just like in command. Whether you're in garrison or in operational theatres, you cannot divorce the chain of command from the ultimate responsibility of ensuring the well-being of the individuals and the command structure to ensure that the families are integrated within that support structure.

I repeat: the families must be integrated into that support structure. It's not about co-operating with the families or assisting the families, but about integrating them into the operational effectiveness of the forces. Why? It is because the families live the missions with us. In my case, I came back injured. I was thrown out of the forces injured. My family was injured. It wasn't the same family that I had left behind because the media make them live the missions with us.

Therefore, if you employ any of these policies that don't totally integrate families, including policies from DND or the Canadian Armed Forces, for veterans serving, veterans out of service, and through Veterans Affairs Canada, you're going to end up with some of the statistics I mentioned—though still anecdotal.

(1540)



I was at the last military mental health research forum in Vancouver presenting a paper in which we argued that the families suffering from stresses and strains, families where individuals are suffering from mental health issues, and the individuals involved are not getting the support needed. We're now seeing teenagers who are pushed to the limit in these conditions of extreme stress and who are committing suicide. We have not only the individual members, but we're also now seeing family members who can't live with what they've seen, and in fact are committing suicide.

It is essential that we identify the early warning signs of psychological distress, and that we encourage members to seek help through support programs offered by the military, by Veterans Affairs Canada, by outside agencies like Wounded Warriors Canada and the veterans transition training programs we have. These programs give them gainful employment close to, as much as possible, their background. Why try to convert a person completely when you can build on a person? Why not find gainful employment in, around, surrounding, contractually or otherwise, what veterans have grown up with, what they have given their loyalty to, namely, the armed forces? The uniform is off, but we wear it underneath, and we wear it in our hearts. Why divorce them from that? Why not find programs that bring you much closer?

I'm going to curtail this because of time. My presentation is only to indicate that there are initiatives moving forward. Certainly, the January 2017 CDS strategic directive on suicide prevention has to be the best piece of work we've seen in a long time. He makes it clear that the chain of command is the essence of prevention. However, when you start reading the nuts and bolts, you will see that the medical people have put their finger into the pie and are, I would say, watering it down. What they're supposed to be doing is supporting the chain of chain of command, not creating the chain of command.

I will leave you with the following recommendations so that there is enough time to speak. My colleagues will amplify these and they are free to respond to your questions. I hope you will feel at ease with that.

First, the Canadian Armed Forces directive on suicide prevention strategy has to be funded, implemented, and validated. If necessary, go to what we used after Somalia. Create ministerial oversight committees that report to the minister. We did that for nearly three years. I was ADM of personnel at the time. For three years we had six oversight committees that reported every two months to the minister on how we were implementing this kind of stuff. There's nothing wrong with the political oversight getting closer to the actual implementation when you have a crisis like this.

As for the Veterans Affairs suicide prevention framework and strategy, I haven't seen it. I don't know if it's written. It had better be out there. It is critical, because they have veterans who are outside of the forces, and they have a whole whack of veterans who are inside the forces. That is critical, and it should be funded and implemented.

The third leg of that strategic focus is what is called the Canadian Forces-VAC joint suicide prevention strategy. That's where we want the two departments to come together. Certainly, in the DND one, that's what they articulate. It's what the CAF wants. I haven't seen that one either. That one is going to prevent people from falling through the cracks. That's going to permit the continuum. That's where the loyalty is not lost and where people will continue to commit.

That third strategy has to be out there—implemented, evaluated, but also validated, six months, eight months down the road. That validation has to be of such a nature to hold people accountable. That's why I come forward again with the recommendation that in these oversight committees by the minister there's nothing wrong with bringing that online and helping out.

(1545)



I think the recognition of casualties caused by operational stress injuries has to be advanced at Veterans Affairs Canada to the level of the 158 who were killed overseas or any of our members who were killed in action. If we prove that an operational stress injury has caused the death an individual, that individual is part of the numbers. We didn't lose 158. We're up to 200-some-odd now. So why not use that number?

Imagine having somebody come back for four years and then losing them. After four years of striving and working hard to save them, you lose them, and you get nothing of any great significance. You don't even get recognition, apart from a medal.

Now that you've moved Veterans Affairs Canada into the military family resource centres, move the families and help the families through those centres too. Reinforce that capability. It's used to taking care of families. Let them take on that angle for both Veterans Affairs Canada and for CAF, because they're already doing it.

Finally, give them gainful employment as close as you can to their history, to their loyalty to the military or military milieu. Why try to change them at a time when they're already in crisis?

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll start off the first round of questioning.

We'll start with Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

General, thank you very much for your service and your commitment to this very important issue.

I'd like you to expand a little bit more, if you can, on the chain of command. Can you give us some suggestions as to how we can juggle the challenge the chain of command has? Really, your conversation today is probably the first time we've had someone here at our committee speak about the conflicts between the chain of command and mental illness, the actual clinical presentation. Can you give us some ideas on how we can bring these two together?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

I'll let my colleagues also intervene.

The immediate response is that the chain of command must be informed. As regards confidentiality, there's no negating that, but you can't let people be handed over to another body, even to the joint support units they were moved to, or sometimes moved back to the unit from. The unit commanding officer, who's responsible for the life of those individuals in the field, is also responsible for command back home. You can't just throw them back without giving them information. They have no idea how to handle them, because they don't know the scale of the injury the individual has.

We all have doctors in our regiments, in our units. Unless there's a means by which those doctors can provide that input, and by which that input can be moved down to the lowest level without offending, but on the contrary, reinforcing, the individual's return, you just have a bunch of walking wounded in a unit. People don't know what the hell to do with them. That isolates them more, and it pushes them more toward wanting to, maybe, end it.

A voice: I agree.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire: Joe?

(1550)

Brigadier-General (Retired) Joe Sharpe (As an Individual):

I would repeat the point that General Dallaire made earlier, that this is a leadership issue, not a medical issue. I think that is a refrain I would come back to over and over again.

Stovepipes, if I can use that term, create barriers to care. That is a major concern here. To use the 2015 numbers, 13 of the 14 suicides in 2015 were by people who had sought care within a year prior to committing suicide, 10 of them within 30 days of committing suicide.

There's a leadership message here. There was an opportunity to intervene, and I think it's an information flow that creates that barrier. Once a member transitions into Veterans Affairs, that's another stovepipe. It's another barrier. It's another obstacle to getting to the bottom of this.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

We're hearing an awful lot about barriers, and that's the biggest thing. There are a number of barriers. Here is another one that we see, or that I'm seeing at least at this point, with the chain of command. As a clinician, myself, how do I protect my Hippocratic oath in dealing with the chain of command? So I appreciate your comments.

General Dallaire, you very briefly touched on the issue of child soldiers. Obviously, that's an important issue. We were both at the CIMVHR conference together. I came away from that conference with a statement that resonates with me to this day. It's basically that what happens to soldiers oftentimes is a violent contradiction of moral expectations. As we deal with the issue of child soldiers, which potentially we could be stepping into again, we realize it's a huge conflict for a lot of our soldiers.

I'm wondering if you could comment on that. I know there's a strategy that's been presented—

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Yes.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

You've been involved with that.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

We've been working for two years with the Canadian Army, in particular, and with NATO. We've been in Africa getting research because my institute, the Roméo Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative, based at Dalhousie University, is field focused. We train armies and police forces in countries to send them—military and police forces—into conflict zones.

We were able to influence the content of the Canadian Army by being the first army in the world to formally put into its new doctrine.... Doctrine is a reference from which you deduce tactics, organization, equipment, and the training you need to do the job, the mission. By creating that doctrine, it is now leading the world in formally recognizing it. We are going start implementing the training of trainers to then bring that forward.

This doctrine is particularly important because there isn't one conflict in the world that is not using children as the primary weapon system. The children may be nine years old, 10, 12, 13, 14, or 15. Every one of those conflicts creates not only an ethical but a moral dilemma for the members. That's what blows us further....

We always thought it was the ambush or the accident that was the hardest point. The hardest one is the moral dilemma and the moral destruction of having to face children.

A sergeant came to me in Quebec City, where I live. He looked good and spoke of five missions, and things were going well. I asked him what his job in the battalion was, and he broke down right there in the middle of the shopping centre. He couldn't talk. He stammered, and he was weak-kneed and crying. I took him aside and so on, and he said, “I was in the recce platoon, and my job was to make sure the suicide bombers didn't get to the convoys”. He said, “You know, I've been back for four years, and I still haven't hugged my children”.

We are taking significant casualties because we don't know how to handle child soldiers. This doctrine will move us a long way that way, and we'll be part of the training program.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Lockhart, go ahead.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Thank you, gentlemen.

Thank you, General, for your service and for being here today to answer our questions.

I want to talk about a quote that I read from your book, Waiting for First Light. You said: No one recognized what I was doing at the time. Not even me. Nobody told me I was injured. I didn't think I was injured, though I felt the weight of having had to ask to be relieved of command. Outwardly, I was still committed, determined, stable. Inwardly, the stresses I was imposing on myself were beating me down, piling up on the stresses at work.

Is there something that Veterans Affairs can do to intervene at this point in a soldier's life and a soldier's mental state that could prevent or stop the progression from this state to suicide?

(1555)

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

With mental health—and particularly the operational stress injury side of it—you are facing an injury that gets worse with time. If you lose an arm, you know that you've lost it, so the aim is to try to build a prosthesis that will be as effective as possible. If you don't intervene with the same sense of urgency an operational stress injury by recognizing it first and then providing for it, it gets deeper and more difficult to get at and to resolve.

It took four years before I crashed. I lost one of my officers 15 years afterwards and having been treated. So there is a vacuum of how to get at them so that they don't continue to walk around as if they're not injured, without there being a stigma there.

We thought we had broken the stigma by having a veteran armed forces—and we did until not so long ago, but now have a lot more non-veterans in there. We're living what we lived in the fifties. In the fifties we had a lot of veterans, but we had a lot of non-veterans, and there was friction between the two, and they would say, “Oh, I wouldn't be injured like that”. We didn't recognize operational stress injury, so those guys simply drank themselves to death or got out. They were the rubbydubs who died on the streets because we had abandoned them. The exception was the Legion, which did help a lot, but there was also a lot of alcoholism.

We lack the ability to discern them early and to then follow it through in a progressive way.

The first time I went out for treatment, I was given eight sessions. I've been in treatment for 14 years. I still have a psychiatrist and a psychologist. I still take nine pills a day. It keeps me like this.

There are moments, though, like last week. My book was launched in French, and it was catastrophic. Writing those books is like going back to hell. There is no real value to me, but I hope it will be useful to others.

You have to find a way because you need to prevent the injury from getting worse—not just recognizing it, but preventing it from getting worse. Unless you get in there early, it's going to get worse.

Mr. Scott Maxwell (As an Individual):

I think there are two things or two competing problems we see at Wounded Warriors Canada. On the one hand, you have the frustration when you're talking to someone who has graduated from one of our programs and you talk to them about their injury.... Here, I just want to add to the general's comments that the vast majority of injuries—when they're comfortable to tell us when they occurred in their mind—happened through an interaction with children in some way, shape, or form.

Second, it commonly took them eight to 10 years after that injury, or the action that caused the injury, before they sought or receive the help they deserved. You can imagine a life like that, the impact on the family of those eight to 10 years before they attempted to deal with their injury.

On the other side of that, a further problem we see after we write about their need to come to get help, to self-identify, to reach out peer to peer, is that because it's a much more commonly understood topic to be discussed and more people are more comfortable coming to get help to address it, we are receiving more and more people seeking help. The problem now is if they do come forward, programs like ours now have wait lists of up to two years. We have a severe access problem in Canada. That is one thing and it's very nice and all well and good if they come forward to seek help, but when they don't get it, you can imagine what that can do to their mental state and overall health care and the impact on their families.

There's a lot at play here and it's extremely serious.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you.

I think that pretty much is my time, but that was great. It was wonderful.

(1600)

The Chair:

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you very much for being here. We appreciate your expertise and candour, because this is very important.

We need to get to the bottom of this. We have heard so much and got so much information from veterans that is contradicted by experts or people from VAC or DND, it's frustrating and renders our ability to do the right thing questionable. I want to get down to some brass tacks.

I was with veterans on the west coast over the weekend. They told me that of course they're masking and denying their injury because to admit it means that they're out, that they will be on the outside of a brotherhood or sisterhood, a family that they need to stay connected with.

They also told me that members within the Canadian Forces are suicidal too. It's not just when they're thrown out. They're suicidal too, but all of that information is being managed and they're transitioned out so that if they are going to commit suicide, they're not in the Canadian Forces. They're on the outside and DND doesn't have to account for those deaths.

All of this is frustrating. I'm sure there are various opinions on this, but the point is that the trust has been broken. These were angry veterans and they talked about the triggers, the mountain of paperwork, the fact that they were financially insecure. They left without pensions or financial supports and they didn't know what to do and they felt that the only way out was to end it all, that they were of no use to their families, and they were either hiding in somebody's basement or they were lashing out.

What do we do? It's a catch-22. How do we re-engage those veterans? How do we re-establish that trust?

General, you talked about this study. Is that study available to us, the CDS study, the strategy you talked about? Is that available to us?

You also talked about things that should be happening with mental health and you don't know where they are. All of this combines to make us wonder what is going on, where are the support services, and when can we expect that there will be a genuine response that meets the needs of these veterans.

I know that that's a lot and there's not really a question in there, but please respond.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Brevity is not my strength either, so don't worry about it.

Let me put it this way first. We have articulated after years of working on it that unless there is an atmosphere within Canada and the Canadian people, and within government circles—and I speak of parliamentary circles too, which seems to be there, but also within the bureaucracy, which doesn't necessarily seem to be there—such that you feel a covenant, not a social contract because that means you've negotiated stuff, just like the current Veterans Charter….

I'm the one who in a day and a half pushed it through the Senate and I've regretted it ever since, because it didn't reflect the 10 years of work we had done before. It was a bureaucratic piece to try to save cash and it hamstrung the minister with all kinds of regulations. That is a new phenomenon in legislation. Before there weren't many, but now they're throwing a whole whack of them with legislation.

That new Veterans Charter doesn't need a new one. It needs a significant reform. In there you will find in the reform a lot of the answers these guys and girls need in order to get the appropriate responses and a timely response. Until you hit that target deliberately, you're going to have a problem.

The only way you can convince people to go that far is if you actually believe that there's a cradle-to-grave responsibility, not to the age of 65, not with a reduced way of life, but an actual covenant that they have committed themselves to unlimited liability, recognizing that they've come back injured, that their families are being affected, and that some of them are dead and their families are obviously affected, and then you've got them for life.

If you don't sell that, then you will not gain their trust. I'll tell you, it started right rotten with the Gulf War syndrome. We did everything to prevent them from getting anything. Every lawyer in town, every medical staffer, gave us arguments why we couldn't take care of them. That undermines the operational commitment of individuals. Do I want to get injured? It undermines also the families, and they're the ones who are creating a vacuum of experienced people because they're pulling their spouses out.

(1605)

The Chair:

Mr. Eyolfson.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

I'm sorry, Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

No, no. Thank you. I'll come back.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you so much for your service and coming here today and talking about suicide. It's an important issue. We have something in common with that. I practised medicine for 20 years and it is a problem in my profession. My medical school had three suicides in a 15-month period while I was a resident. I'm sensitive to professions where this happens.

One of the other things we have in common is that there's a stigma involved in seeking mental help. There's a place in hell for the person who said, “Physician heal thyself”. A lot of damage has been done by that attitude. Soldiers probably deal with that as well.

We do know that there's always a hesitancy to step forward, a stigma of being seen as weak, of not having what it takes. Do you think the stigma of PTSD has been reduced in the military since when you were serving?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

I'm going to let Joe speak more about that, but I wish only to indicate to you that I consider myself in—because I have a psychiatrist and a psychologist. I'm getting care and I have some peer support. I don't hide it. If you were a doctor who took care of me because I had cancer, I'd talk about you, and I'd say he's a dummy, or he's a very good doctor, I like him, and so on, but we'd talk about those doctors. Why don't we talk about our psychiatrists and our psychologists? They used to in some of the films of the early seventies.

We've got to make that just as honourable as any other injury, and making it honourable will destroy that stigma. We are now seeing friction on the stigma coming back, which we thought we had pretty well with a cultural change, which Joe speaks of, by the non-veterans who feel that, with these very Darwinian, very visible type of people the military are, or any first responders, anybody in uniform—police, fireman, and so on—there's this inability to accept what you can't see. If you can't see it, you can't accept why they can't be 100%.

That, you've got to educate and train.

BGen Joe Sharpe:

I'll just add a very quick footnote to General Dallaire's comments.

We were talking earlier today about a young soldier I was working with on Thursday last week, a young corporal, who was telling me very candidly that he suffers from PTSD and is being cared for, but he said, “Sir, you're hearing all the right words from the senior leadership in the organization.” It's an honest commitment coming from the senior leadership of the Canadian Armed Forces. This young lad is an infantry soldier in the process of being released. He said, “On the ground, the sergeants and the warrant officers do not believe a word of that. To them, it's purely BS. If you come forward in your platoon or in your company and ask for help, you are a weak link, and they don't want you there.” That's Thursday of last week that this was described.

Is the stigma gone? Absolutely not. The stigma is still there, but it's because we focus very, very strongly on changing that immediate behaviour. If we caught you, from a leadership perspective, badmouthing these guys, we're all over you. We're worried about behaviour, and we didn't really focus at the belief level that we really needed to focus at, and ultimately to the cultural level below that. It's a long, tough battle to change the culture. I think we were focusing on behaviour, not beliefs and not culture.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

The only other point I'd add is, not from those still in the Canadian Forces, but those who have released and are forming the civilian veteran population. With them, I think things have improved a little bit with regard to the stigma. They're obviously already out so there's a lot less risk, but there's more comfort in talking about their situation. They're comfortable to put themselves out there in a very, very vulnerable position, often among their own peers. It's happening all across the country. As I mentioned earlier, our problem is expanding access to programs, not trying to find ill and injured people to come into our programs. I think that certainly highlights that there is some progress being made for those who have released and for the veterans on the civilian side of the world to come forward, put their hands up, and seek help. There's a little bit of optimism there. The downside, of course, is we've have to make sure we can help them when they come forward.

(1610)

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you so much, General, Mr. Sharpe, and Mr. Maxwell for being here today.

I want to preface my comments by saying that on Friday night in my riding of West Nova, I was at an event in support of the military family resource centre at 14 Wing Greenwood. It was an excellent event to bring awareness to the issues of mental health and PTSD within our military and veteran community and to raise funds for the military family resource centre.

I was glad to hear you talk about how families can access military family resource centres and how this should be expanded to include veterans' families as well. I wonder if you can expand on that. I know the good work that they do. How do you see that actually taking place? How would it work within DND expanding those services?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

The VAC has signed an agreement now with the Canadian Forces that we can take care—I say “we”, there you go, proof—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Hon. Roméo Dallaire: —and I say that after 10 years in the Senate—of injured veterans who are no more in the service, and their families.

I would consider that family support centre is one of those pivotal bridges they can cross, and survive, into a new world. The family support resource centres have a lot of the expertise and have access both provincially and locally, let alone within the military and within VAC, to influence the battle and get people more timely support.

However, they're hurting because the money is not going there and they can't hire and veterans can't then get that special support. The horrible scenario that I think is still unresolved is that we are improving the individual members, the forces members who are still serving, and we're improving the case of the veterans who are out there with our different clinics and so on, but we're not improving the case of the families.

You have one half of the problem solved; the other half is not, and that half is hurting. It's going to drag down everything you're doing. Until you look at the family as also deploying.... I would argue that the days are now here when the family is part of the operational effectiveness of the forces, and not just in support of the operational effectiveness of the forces. They're on Skype with them an hour before they go on patrol. Come on, how is it possible to disconnect them?

If the family is intrinsic to the operational effectiveness of the forces, they should have access to the same level of care. That means, yes, more money into VAC and more money into DND to take care of the families. We're already transferring a whack of money to the provinces. We're telling the provinces that we're going to clean up our own mess. We created these injured people and we're going to take care of them. We'll buy the resources from you instead of simply dumping them and having that very serious disconnect.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Yes, Mr. Maxwell.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

I think the other part of it is that they're great hubs, they're physical locations, and they're places for people to go and have that peer-to-peer support.

I would caution, though, that like anything, the issue is so vast and the scale is so large that not one agency, not one MFRC, is ever going to be able to do this on their own. We confront this all the time at Wounded Warriors Canada. If we fund a program, if we make a $375,000 donation to a program to run the program across the country, that's wonderful. However, there are limitations on the ability to help people and get them all in. The goes for MFRC.

One of the things we're working with, and we talk a lot about in this space, is partnerships. We're working with military family services, which administer MFRCs across the country, to allow MFRCs if they identify a couple—in this case, supporting families—to attend one of our programs, to have those costs covered from the referral from the MFRC to a program administered by Wounded Warriors Canada.

You can see how fast this would multiply and duplicate on a national scale, so you don't have this regionalized framework where something is very good out there somewhere, and less so in Esquimalt or wherever the case may be. We have to focus on making sure when we're having these discussions that its implementation is national, because that's where the population is. It's in every corner of the country.

(1615)

Mr. Colin Fraser:

I think you're right. I appreciate that comment. It's really important to recognize that in smaller communities, having this vehicle can be the way to reach out in the community. A trusted facility like that is really important.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

And we wouldn't get them on our own. Let's face it, if we want to run a program, how do we identify the people who need help? We use the likes of OSISS and MFRCs, and we partner with them and military family services more broadly.

You're absolutely right: it's about partnership and linking the information and the tools and ultimately the programs together so if someone does walk into an MFRC and they could benefit from X program, which might not be administered within that MFRC, then at least the MFRC is able to get them the program they deserve to receive.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

My time is very limited.

Do you see as well, though, the importance of the family being involved and integrated into the mission is also to ensure that if there is an intervention, it will perhaps be made earlier on? You've got somebody there who can maybe spot some challenges a soldier is facing and maybe be able to identify the problem earlier.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Mr. Fraser, you've pulled one of the gems out of this.

If the family feels they are intimately engaged in the operational effectiveness of the forces, they will feel that sense of responsibility of helping the member understand that's part of the exercise of that member re-becoming operationally effective or being adjusted to some other worthy sort of employment.

Right now, you will have members fighting their families to not get support, whereas if the family were integrated into the program, they wouldn't be able to do that; they would be reinforcing each other to get that help. There's the ick; that's the crux.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Wagantall.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, CPC):

Thank you very much for being here today. This is so helpful.

I want to focus specifically on your first comment regarding the Canadian Armed Forces suicide prevention strategy and how to implement it with ministerial oversight committees. You mentioned Somalia.

I'm very involved with our veterans on the issue of mefloquine. We are still hearing from the powers that be that only one in 11,000 forces members is affected. Our own Minister of Health, as recently as February 22, has written with respect to the continuing use of mefloquine that as a malaria prophylaxis, the department considers the benefits of mefloquine to outweigh its potential risks under the conditions of use described in the CMP.

I'm hearing from veterans from Somalia, Rwanda, Uganda, Afghanistan, and Bosnia who have been taking this that they did not have freedom of choice with its use. Our allies—Germany, Britain, Australia, and the U.S.—have taken steps, and yet our government still doesn't recognize what happened in Somalia and has carried on. It's impacting suicide rates. I know this what I'm hearing directly from veterans.

Can you please talk about this?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

I was on mefloquine for a year. About five months into it, I wrote the National Defence Headquarters, and I said this thing is affecting my ability to think. This thing is blowing my stomach apart. This thing is affecting my memory, and I want to get rid of it. At the time, the Germans weren't using anything, but then when we lost two people in 48 hours to cerebral malaria, they changed their policy.

I then got a message back, which was one of the fastest ones I have ever got back, which essentially ordered me to continue, and if not, I would then be court-martialled for a self-inflicted wound because that was the only tool they had.

Mefloquine is old-think, and it does affect our ability to operate. Those statistics to me don't—

(1620)

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

They are not accurate.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

—really hold water. Even if it they do, what if it's the commander who's affected by it, which I was at the time? My executive assistant kept an eye on exactly how I was handling mefloquine. There are other prophylaxes that are much better.

Just on the command side, let alone on our ability to respond to the very complex scenarios in which we find ourselves, when you're facing children and so on, and you have nanoseconds to decide whether you are going to kill a child or not to save other people, we don't want to have any booze, and yet maybe we're still being affected by a drug.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

What do you say then? Should we be doing studies to determine—

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

I say get rid of it, and use the new stuff.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Thank you. That's the faster route I would love us to take.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Yes.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

One of the groups that is helping veterans, Veterans Helping Veterans, talked about the need for us to deprogram. We program soldiers. I understand the fight or flight, the get out there attitude, that you think of the other person before yourself, but when you come home, you don't know how to sleep in a normal pattern. Yet, they claim this could be reprogrammed, that you can recreate a proper sleep pattern, with proper food, etc. All of those things are so crucial to health.

I know you have struggled deeply with sleep. Is this something you see as an avenue that could be taken to help our soldiers?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

I was about to respond by saying, “Read my book”, but I'm not going to say that.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

I haven't done it yet. Sorry. You can tell.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

The difficulty is that when we come back, we're trying to go to sleep in a bed and in an atmosphere that is foreign to us. It's foreign to us because, and I came back and the slaughter of a million people or so didn't count. I was back as deputy commander in the army, and I was told, “Thank God, you're back. You've had your time overseas. Listen, the priority now is the budget cuts.” It was as if it didn't happen.

There is a disconnect in our ability to know that those people exist, know that we haven't finished the job, and know that there have been horrible scenarios played out. Then we come back, nobody gives a damn, and nobody really recognizes.

We have a horrible time adjusting to the opulence, to the pettiness, and to the nature of our societies. What keeps us from being able to handle it is our fatigue, our inability to reason. What does that is the lack of sleep.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Yes.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

We can't get to sleep because this stuff keeps haunting us and keeping at us. If there are programs to do that—I know there are all kinds of initiatives—fine, but I would argue that we're into two major cultural frictions that are not easy to come to an arrangement with.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Bratina.

Mr. Bob Bratina (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Thank you, and thanks, General Dallaire.

The problems we deal with on the veterans committee originated with the period of active service, so I was impressed with your notion of the joint suicide prevention strategy. Obviously, two different groups are going to have to be working together in order to solve the problems. What would you see in that joint suicide prevention strategy? Are there any guidelines that you're anticipating?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

In 1998, when I was the assistant deputy minister of personnel, or what they now call CMP or HR, I was able to work out a deal with the ADM, a chap called Dennis Wallace at Veterans Canada, to second a general to Veterans Affairs Canada and create the first joint discussions. Our computers weren't working together—nothing like that worked. We couldn't even talk to each other. So we created a simple office where people had the veterans' files on the veterans affairs side and the forces' files on the other side, and a case would come in and they'd talk to each other and solve it.

There have been a lot enhancements there, but I don't believe it has gone far enough. I don't believe people are comfortable being handed over to another department. I'm glad it's in Charlottetown. People are still very human and not as clinical as Ottawa would be, so you're not treated as a number. And I think that's okay, but the fact that it's a separate department and the fact that you're being moved away.... Take my uniform off, but don't divorce me from the family. Don't move me to somebody else who has a different culture, in maybe a different atmosphere, who's running from a different set of gears in regard to rules and regulations.

I think it is time to look at those countries that have moved their veterans departments over to their national defence departments. They have their budget lines and they have their structures, and they're not tripping over each other. The client is not handed over to somebody else. The client is still in the family. You can do a lot of informal resolution. You can bring a different angle to some of the directives. With the Minister of National Defence versus the Minister of Veterans Affairs, you can give more power to getting in-cabinet changes done, I think, because it has a direct impact on the operational effectiveness of the forces. If you don't treat the injured veteran right, the guy or girl who's going over will realize that if they come back injured they have to fight the second fight, and that's coming home and trying to live decently. If it stays within the structure, you can be very candid and far more accountable.

(1625)

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Thank you.

I wondered, going back to the issue of culture and stigma, what role does a chaplain play?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Oh, what a wonderful question. At my child soldiers initiative, we discovered that the threat is obviously to children. During the course we ran last summer for 15 veterans—and we've already deployed some of them to train in Kenya with the Somali people—two of them came forward and said they had killed children. They had never told that to a therapist, never told that to their family, never told that to anybody, but they told it to these guys around them because they were going to be involved with children. They suffered that.

I think that the ultimate pursuit you're looking for is engaging them in...here's where my memory is shot. You take over.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

Did you say it's the chaplain?

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Yes.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Oh, yes, it's the chaplains, the spiritual side of this thing. We've talked about the moral side. Our moral weaknesses come from the fact that we don't have a spiritual side left, yet in theatres of operation many of those countries still have a spiritual side. It's not purely religious. It's cultural. If you don't have a spiritual side to fall back on, then you're falling into a vacuum, and that makes your recovery that much more difficult. So the padres are very proactive and very effective, I think, in the field, and they're a second chain for resolving problems.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

Yes, our national program director has just retired after 25 years as a Canadian Forces chaplain with a combat engineer regiment in Toronto. Through working with him and with Wounded Warriors, I've interacted with a whole bunch of members of the forces he has assisted over the years. At his Depart with Dignity ceremony especially, I met dozens of them, and we were talking about just that question. What was it about Phil, in this case, that was so helpful?

It was almost, within the regimental family, a place to go if you didn't want to go up the chain of command or tell any of your superiors anything about anything, because you just weren't sure how significant the problem was, or if it was even worth mentioning. It was a safe place within the regimental family to go and at least have that first point of discussion with someone you weren't fearful of, and you didn't fear any repercussions for saying something or asking a certain question.

It had a tremendous impact on how things went for them, from there on.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

I take General Dallaire's point.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Yes.

BGen Joe Sharpe:

I'll make one very quick comment on this one.

The Chair:

Could you just make it brief, please?

BGen Joe Sharpe:

Yes. I visited a major army base to interview the padres about their role in dealing with PTSD and OSIs. Fourteen of the 16 padres on that base had been diagnosed with PTSD.

So if we're going to use padres—and we need to, as they're a critical part—we have to take care of the padres as well. It's not a “physician, heal thyself” approach.

(1630)

Mr. Bob Bratina:

They must carry a lot, absolutely.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC):

Five minutes, Mr. Chair?

Thank you. General, it's good to see you again. We saw each other in Barrie at the opening of the École secondaire Roméo-Dallaire. I know the students, staff, and board members were thrilled that you took the time to be there for the opening of a school in your name, so thank you, sir.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

I'm putting all my artifacts there too.

Mr. John Brassard:

I think I had to speak French the whole time I was there.

I want to talk about transitional issues, because we build our soldiers up to fight but we don't—for lack of a better term—break them down to re-enter civilian life. The issue of transition has come up a lot during the testimony. In fact, the DND ombudsman talked about a concierge service for those who are being medically released, to make sure that everything is in place. In fact, this committee issued a report to Parliament reaffirming what the DND ombudsman had suggested.

Scott, I know you were on CP24 three years ago, and you were asked about the issue of transition then. In the short time that we have, if I were to ask all three of you to list three priorities for what we need to do to help with the transitional stressors for those who are transitioning out of the military back into civilian life for the sake of their families, what would those three priorities be right now?

Scott, I'll start with you.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

I wholly support the DND ombudsman's report and recommendations. I have said that publicly for far too long, it feels now, going back to that time, and obviously he has since produced new recommendations.

Mr. John Brassard:

He refers to it as a low-hanging fruit opportunity.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

It really is. One of the things in talking about this—and he also references it—is that it's not necessarily a cost change. It's more of a process change. I think that's accurate. If you're going to have the two departments—if it's not going to go the way the general just suggested, despite the fact that maybe it should go that way—we ought to ensure that when forces members are leaving, when they are releasing from one department to the next, that everything we can possibly prepare in advance is done. We ought to ensure that the transition is as smooth and soft as possible, because we know in working with this population that it doesn't take much for them to stop doing things that are going to be beneficial for their well-being, to shut down, and to isolate themselves from everything, including their own well-being.

We see it and hear it far too much. We're an organization that looks at and identifies gaps and tries to fill them. One of the biggest gaps we see continuously is the release gap, the time between departments, where they lose their identity. Their identity is in constant struggle, and they just feel that they have to retell their story too many times to too many people who simply do not care enough to give them the service support and the process support that they require to help them deal with all the questions they're receiving at home from their families, like “what's next for you and us and our life?”

It's serious, and all I can say in short is: adopt the DND ombudsman's recommendations. They do represent low-hanging fruit, but I think it's a very important basis from which to start.

BGen Joe Sharpe:

There are a couple of points I would make very quickly. They're very similar to Scott's.

Close the gap. It's a big deal. We've got to bring these two departments closer together, and I think we've got to stop removing the membership from the individual who is leaving. In other words, once you're a member of the Canadian Armed Forces, you remain a member of the Canadian Armed Forces. What we do now is take the cards and cut them up, and you're on your own. You're a different thing.

We've got to remove that transition shock of being rejected from the family, if I can use that term.

Mr. John Brassard:

Right.

BGen Joe Sharpe:

Secondly, we have to reduce the bureaucracy, the complication of that process of transitioning. We're not going to another country; we're staying in Canada. We're simply transitioning to another government department, but the horrendous bureaucracy that surrounds that transition process is mind boggling—if you're healthy. If you're ill and injured, it's a barrier that's almost insurmountable.

Lastly, I would say remove all the barriers to that transition. Seriously study what constitutes barriers to the member and to the member's family, and target those barriers and get rid of them. We don't need the complication that we have now.

Mr. John Brassard:

General, the last word is to you.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Get out of the weeds and take a strategic perspective of it, meaning that if we inculcate in these people, from the day they enter, a sense of loyalty to their service.... My Dad told me I entered a service. He said, “Don't expect anybody to say thank you. Expect an interesting career. You'll never be a millionaire.” And in those days, he said, “Change your name to Dallard, because with Dallaire, you'll go nowhere.” But anyway, that's changed.

Take the high road of remembering that loyalty does not disconnect because of the extraordinary experiences we live, and our interwoven lives; it's there forever. That's the covenant, to serve. And so if it is a covenant, then get rid of these two ways of handling the same problem. I was a veteran serving. Then I was a veteran non-serving, and I went into a whole different set of circumstances—I was not needed.

Part of the strategic perspective is looking at two departments with different regulations for helping the same individual during the same lifespan, or nearly the same.

Secondly, don't build a new charter, but as I've often said in-house, build one based on the covenant of a reformed charter. Get rid of so many of the stupid rules.

And yes, it's going to cost you more. Well, look at the billions we spend in training these people; the billions we spend in equipping them, giving them the ammunition, the food, the medical supplies; the billions we use in getting them into the theatre of operations and doing everything to reduce casualties and win the war, which we do in humongous amounts of money; and then the billions we spend in rebuilding and replacing the equipment and restocking ourselves; and then look at the amount of money we are actually spending on the human beings that have gone through it. It is the most gross disconnect that you can imagine.

Veterans Affairs at $3 billion is inappropriate. It is absolutely inappropriate compared to the scale of the commitment we're putting into every other dimension except the actual human being.

That is the strategic position that should be taken.

(1635)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen, for three minutes.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

I need so much more, but I'm going to—

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

So do we.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I want to go back and underscore everything you've said, because that's exactly what we heard.

This is for you, Scott, and you, General Dallaire. You said that you were in this horrific situation, and you came back to this superficial life where there was no understanding of your experience. How do we change that? How do we make sure that when that member comes back, there is recognition of that experience and what happened out there in that deployment?

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

The crux of that, particularly with reservists, who are all over the countryside and often abandoned.... Remember, this only gets more complicated when you're talking about reservists. It shouldn't be, but it is.

I think the crux is linking them to family. That's your anchor.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

For a reservist who's single, it would be his parents. They're part of the forces. And if he's married, it's his intimate family or close family and so on, his children. Bring the human side back to these individuals so they can build on that, and then work from there. We've lost a lot of people because they lost their families and there was nothing left. It was not just losing a job. They lost their families because of that, and they killed themselves because of that.

Try to keep that fundamental element of our society with them, and help them go through the years of difficulty of living with a person like that.

It's based on family, and the tool to make the family available is the family support centres. There is no better expertise than them.

Mr. Scott Maxwell:

The one thing that General Dallaire has often talked about in relation to our work is to ensure that they never have to fight again. That is such a powerful line. If they feel as though they are fighting again when they come home in order to access everything that is available to them and their families, it's a huge problem.

When we talk about removing that feeling and how you do that, well, how about starting by making sure they don't have to fight again for everything they are entitled to upon returning from deployment in service to Canada?

(1640)

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay.

You said something very important, that they tried to save the cash. I have that feeling over and over again, whether it is with the new Veterans Charter, with mefloquine, with the Gulf War syndrome.

This committee some years ago did a study on Gulf War syndrome, and we had mountains of evidence that it was all in their minds, that it was not real, and yet we had veterans coming in without hair, with very clearly disoriented perspectives.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

We could have given them $70,000, and add to that the fact that we recognize it's an injury. Even if we can't figure out all the legality of it, and even if some of them are going to rip us off, who gives a damn?

What it would have changed would have been the whole attitude that the troops feel regarding coming back injured. If you're undermining their getting injured, you're going to undermine their operational effectiveness and their taking the appropriate risks, and you're undermining the ability of families to handle them when they do come back.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It's the same feeling with mefloquine.

I asked directly if troops were advised, if they were monitored, and if anyone took care to know what the effects of these drugs were, and the answer was no. I asked if there were any repercussions for someone saying they choose not to take this drug, and it was, “Oh, no, it comes through the chain of command.”

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Well, the chain of command will charge you because you're doing self-inflicted wounds because you're going against medical advice that the chain of command has accepted.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Even though they were guinea pigs.

The Chair:

That ends our time for testimony today by this panel.

We will take a short break.

On behalf of the committee, I'd like to thank all three of you for your service, for what you have done for our men and women who have served.

We'll have a two-minute break and we'll come back to the second panel.

Thank you.

(1640)

(1645)

The Chair:

I call the meeting back to order.

In the second hour we're going to have to condense a bit of time on this.

We have, from the Quebec association for suicide prevention, Kim Basque, training coordinator; and Catherine Rioux, communications coordinator.

We'll start with 10 minutes of witness testimony.

Roméo Dallaire is going to stay here, probably not to answer questions. He just wants to see how the committee works together.

We'll start with our new panel.

Thank you. The floor is yours. [Translation]

Ms. Catherine Rioux (Communications Coordinator, Association québécoise de prévention du suicide):

Mr. Chair, members of the committee and Mr. Dallaire, we want to begin by thanking you for inviting us to participate in this consultation. We know that the Canadian Armed Forces and Veterans Affairs Canada are already working on mental health and suicide prevention. We thank you for your interest in going even further.

For 30 years, our association has been advocating for suicide prevention in Quebec. It brings together researchers, responders, clinicians, survivors of suicide loss, as well as private, public and community organizations.

Our main areas of activity are education, citizen engagement, and training for responders and citizens. As you can see, our association has no military expertise. Our appearance before the committee today stems from our experience in advising various community stakeholders and developing prevention strategies for a wide range of settings. We did that recently for agricultural producers and for detention centres.

How do we reduce the number of suicides among our veterans? What we all know is that there is no simple answer and that a multi-pronged approach is required. The few approaches that we could propose during this hour and that we feel are essential have to do with education, training and the services provided.

I will begin with education, or cultural and mentality changes.

Thanks to repeated awareness-raising campaigns, mentalities have started to change on the issues of suicide and mental health. Taboos are less entrenched and are starting to fade. Unlike 10, 15 or 20 years ago, suicide is no longer seen—or is less so—as inevitable and as an individual problem. People are more aware that it is a collective problem and that prevention is possible.

People talk more about their mental health issues and asking for help is more valued. We have come a long way in this area, but there is still much work to be done. That is why we are here today.

We have a few suggestions to make with regard to education. We are convinced that it should begin with proactive education of active armed forces members, especially those who belong to units at higher risk of suicide, such as combat trades.

There are all sorts of initiatives. For instance, we may be talking about strengthening the cohesion around an individual who is experiencing difficulties or is separated from their unit for health reasons. There are messages reiterating that taking care of our mental health is just as important as taking care of our physical health. There are also campaigns promoting existing help resources.

We must also work on reducing the social acceptability of suicide. That acceptability appears to be stronger among men who conform to the traditional male role. Certain therapeutic approaches are aimed at reducing that acceptability and manage to make suicide less acceptable and to highlight the fact that, by finding other ways to put an end to their suffering, they can become models for their children and models of resiliency for their community.

We firmly believe that suicide must not be an option, on an individual or a collective level. That is why we support messages to that effect inviting people to find other ways to deal with their distress and suffering.

We also believe that, as part of education, society should avoid glorifying individuals who have died by suicide, since that involves a risk of contagion. To avoid that, the media must be educated. I know that is being done already, but the message must constantly be repeated, as newsrooms and journalists are always changing.

(1650)



We must also educate people in charge of ceremonies when a death by suicide occurs, as well as grieving families. That is a very delicate thing to do, but we must pay attention to that if we want to save the lives of suffering veterans. Some practices can have consequences, such as the erection of monuments honouring military members who died by suicide. We see them as a real risk to veterans who are suffering, who are vulnerable to suicide and who have lost a tremendous amount of recognition and value. Those veterans could see suicide as a way to regain some honour and recognition. Let us be clear: appropriate funeral services must be provided for military members who have taken their lives, just like for military members who died of other causes, but attention must be paid to the potential glorification and contagion aspect.

Ms. Kim Basque (Training Coordinator, Association québécoise de prévention du suicide):

To properly evaluate the services and training to be provided, we have to understand the suicidal individual's state of mind.

All suicidal individuals, be they military members or not, believe that they are worthless, that their situation will never change and that no one can help them. In that context, it becomes extremely difficult to seek help, to find it and to take a step toward a resource. It is even more difficult for men who conform to the traditional male role, where physical strength, autonomy, independence and solving one's own problems are valued. For someone who is going through a difficult time in their life when they think that they are worthless, that no one can help them and that the situation will never change, all those obstacles make it extremely difficult and painful to seek help.

However, in spite of their suffering, the individual will always feel ambivalent. This means that a part of them wants to stop suffering, and that is why they think about ending their life, but there is always a part of them that wants to live. That is the part that must be recognized by the individual in distress, and it is the responders' and professionals' job to help that part grow. Every time a suicidal person asks for help and shows their distress, the part that wants to live is expressing itself and continuing to hope.

As for many veterans—who are generally men—the characteristics of their way to seek help must be taken into consideration. That is true for suicide in general, and it is also true in the armed forces. A call for help will not manifest in the same way, and the way services are provided to them must also be adapted.

Research shows that, when a man conforms to the traditional male role, he is five times more likely to attempt suicide than a member of the general population. In the armed forces, a medical release is a failure of the system, but it is also a failure for the man who finds himself in a vulnerable situation. As that perception is generalized within himself and within his unit, he feels shame and has difficulty seeking help, as we were saying. Therefore, going from active military service to civilian life and becoming a veteran is a critical moment when the vulnerable soldier loses the strong and unified network with which he identified and participated in. So that will be an extremely difficult moment that must be anticipated and monitored, and that is why this consultation is important.

As you know, many services are provided by Veterans Affairs Canada. However, is sufficient training provided for the professionals who work in suicide prevention, the responders to whom our veterans can turn? Are they able to recognize signs of distress and act quickly?

A training initiative for Quebec citizens has a proven track record. “Agir en sentinelle pour la prévention du suicide”—acting as sentinels to prevent suicide—is a training initiative that is intended not for professionals but for anyone who wants to play a role in their community, in their spare time, with their work colleagues and their peers. It enables people to be proactive, identify signs of distress, refer the individual to help resources and go with them. That training works. It is effective and has already become entrenched in some military communities. It promotes timely identification and proactiveness.

In civil society as in specific communities, those sentinels must be able to rely on a designated responder. They must be supported in order to play their role and then be able to quickly help the suicidal individual connect with a responder who will provide a full intervention and decide what steps should be taken next.

(1655)



Suicide prevention training is essential for responders and mental health professionals, as well as for physicians who work with military members and veterans. It should not be taken for granted that a physician, a nurse or a psychologist has received specialized training in suicide prevention. However, that type of training does exist, and it works.

The Quebec male suicide rate decreased significantly in the 2000s specifically thanks to a national strategy with training at its core. So we suggest that you make training a cornerstone of the next strategy for veterans.

Furthermore, we want to draw your attention to three major elements to consider with regard to the current services provided or with regard to what you could implement. General Dallaire referred to this earlier. I am talking about the importance of streamlining the services available to our active military members and veterans. That transition must go as smoothly as possible, so that, ultimately, the suicidal individual or military member who needs services, having successfully asked for help and found someone to help them and guide them in that endeavour, does not have to change responders or treatment teams and does not have to repeat their story, either before or after a suicide attempt.

To avoid that disconnect, we suggest that you consider a consolidation of Canadian Forces operational stress injury treatment centres and veterans centres, so that the treatment team would be the same. The therapeutic alliance is important. Veterans sometimes even go back to the same team and health professionals they dealt with when they were in active service.

We also talked about social support. General Dallaire mentioned that. We are talking about social support from families and peers, but also about support from the unit, as well as gathering around the forces and active military members. That support must be an integral part of care and of what professionals and responders propose to military members.

Men mainly turn to their spouse—sometimes exclusively—when they need emotional support. A separation occasionally occurs when they are not doing well. There may be additional problems, including mental health issues, alcoholism and substance abuse. All that puts considerable pressure on loved ones. That is why it is so important to take into account this reality in order to help military members and veterans recover.

The Canadian Armed Forces are a large and strong family. Each member can count on the others for their survival. The idea is to make sure that this strength and mutual support continue after release, whether that release has to do with medical issues or not.

In addition, we make recommendations when it comes to web-based prevention and online responses. Distress is increasingly manifesting on various platforms. People share their suicidal ideas and their distress on the web. That is especially true in the case of young people and isolated individuals, but that behaviour is becoming more prevalent among a variety of individuals. We feel that suicide prevention strategies must now take into account this reality by including a web component. That would enable people to share prevention messages, identify cases, be proactive and propose full response services online.

In closing, I want to reiterate the required elements of an effective suicide prevention strategy. First, all the stakeholders are concerned. Second, managers at various levels of the chain of command must undergo training, uphold the principle and demonstrate leadership. Third, professionals and responders must be provided with specific suicide prevention training. Fourth, the creation of sentinel networks must be supported. Fifth, strong and widespread social support must be established. Sixth, people must be provided with better education on mental health issues and be better informed on the help that may be provided. Calls for help must be encouraged to ultimately change cultures and mentalities. It is also important to pay attention to the messages and ceremonies, so that they would not increase the social acceptability of suicide. Of course, adequate funding is required to implement the proposed measures. Finally, accessible care adapted to the clientele for which it is intended is obviously required.

(1700)



Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll start our first round, and we're going to have to shorten it to five minutes each. I'm sorry about that.

We'll start with Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[Translation]

Thank you very much, Ms. Rioux and Ms. Basque.[English]

I appreciate your coming here. That's the limit of my French.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Robert Kitchen:: You both said something that caught my ears, and I've got a very short period of time because I'm going to share my time with Ms. Wagantall.

Ms. Rioux, you commented on the need to avoid glorifying death by suicide. Can you expand on that? What do you mean by that? [Translation]

Ms. Catherine Rioux:

By using suicide to put an end to their suffering, a military member may receive honours, attention and recognition. That is what I call suicide glorification. We can glorify the deceased individual or pay tribute to them, but it is important to separate that from their act of suicide. A military member must not think that committing suicide will give them more honour than another soldier who died of a heart attack or another cause would get. Contagion must be avoided, and people must not end up thinking that it's a way to get recognition from the Canadian Forces and society.

(1705)

[English]

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you.

There's that stigma. There's that challenge, that disconnect with the stigma for somebody who maybe has attempted to take their life because of depression, or situations, or whatever it might be, which often gets labelled. Someone says, okay, you're not worthy of anything. I'm trying to wrestle that with your comment about glorifying it and whether someone would actually look at glorifying that, but I appreciate your comments.

Mademoiselle Basque, you talked about suicide prevention training. How extensive is it in your organization? [Translation]

Ms. Kim Basque:

It is an extremely important aspect of our organization. The AQPS designs training products with major partners such as Quebec's Department of Health and Social Services, as well as with other organizations with data expertise. We have to be inspired and learn from the research to give our responders and fellow Canadians an opportunity to develop tangible skills that will enable them to play a role in suicide prevention.

The AQPS currently has about 20 different training products. We have trained more than 19,000 responders to use best practices and clinical tools that help them recognize proximal factors of suicide. There are 75 factors associated with suicide, and some carry more weight than others. Some factors are observed very closely when action is taken.

Thanks to the expertise we have acquired and the tools at our disposal, we are improving our responses to ambivalent suicidal individuals to help them reconnect with their reasons for living.

The sentinel training is developed based on a similar model, while of course respecting the role and responsibilities of volunteers in their community. That training will give those people the tools they need to determine if there is suicidal ideation, be aware of resources and guide the suicidal individual toward those resources, as that is often a difficult step for them.

Our training products are complementary and aim to strengthen the safety net around suicidal individuals. [English]

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you very much.

I hope I've left enough time for Ms. Wagantall to ask questions.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

As you know, we recently brought into law in Canada assisted suicide and assisted dying legislation. Since then, 800 individual Canadians have chosen that route. With its coming into play, I was very concerned about our veterans, our soldiers, who feel that life isn't worth living anymore and who might see that as an affirmation. In the work that you do, are you seeing a difference at all in response to this? [Translation]

Ms. Kim Basque:

It is too early to take stock of the situation or obtain relevant documentation on medical assistance in dying.

That said, we are extremely worried about this. When that legislation was developed, a few years ago now, we participated in the consultations of the parliamentary committee of the Quebec National Assembly to share our concerns with regard to a potential shift in the social acceptability of suicide.

A person at the end of their life feels, rightly or wrongly, that their life is no longer worth living; that is their decision. That is why they want to request medical assistance in dying, resulting in their death. Even in a medical context, we understand why people would want to use that measure.

Our concerns had to do with a way to provide a vulnerable individual who is not doing well—who feels that their suffering is intolerable, who is depressive and suicidal—the same care they should have the right to, without legitimizing a request for medical assistance in dying in a context where it would legally not apply.

We are extremely worried by that. At this time, it is too early to gauge the concrete and documented effects of medical assistance in dying.

(1710)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you for your answer.

Mr. Graham. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you for your comments.

You spoke a lot about training. In the veterans context, I would like to know whom we should train.

Ms. Kim Basque:

The health care teams should receive specialized training to be able to intervene in a complete way and properly receive the veterans, taking into account the fact that the request for help from military men does not always present in the same way. Those teams should also use precise clinical tools, as well as ensure follow-up and access to services and resources.

The networks of sentinels we referred to could also be proposed. These sentinels have to be volunteer adults who are already in a role where they have the trust of the person, who can open up and agree to talk about his troubles. The sentinels cannot be members of the health care team. They really have to be people who are involved with the veterans and can have access to them, even if they are not specialists.

If I may, I'd like to make a parallel between veterans and the agricultural milieu. We have created massive sentinel networks there, and we even set up training specifically for the agricultural environment. Agricultural producers are often isolated, and they aren't necessarily part of a network. That said, there are still people who gravitate around them and see them, because they provide services. Those are the people who are trained as sentinels to reach out to farmers.

You could think of setting up a similar system for veterans, that is to say assess where they go, who they see, who they are in contact with regularly in their daily lives. Those people can become sentinels, if they want to, of course. Indeed, that cannot be an obligation. The training of intervenors is central to all of this. The sentinel must himself have access to support and be able to direct the suicidal person to an intervenor 24/7.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So we could train family members and other military members.

Ms. Kim Basque:

Yes, if the military person is not suicidal himself and if the family itself does not need care and support.

Those close to suicidal individuals have other needs and have to obtain care. They cannot act as sentinels in these extremely difficult moments in their family life. They have to take care of themselves and the other members of the family and know how to support the spouse who is not doing well. We try to avoid training loved ones, especially when they are going through difficult times. Of course at other times, that is possible.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You also spoke about avoiding the glorification of the death by suicide of military members.

Earlier we spoke with General Dallaire about the need to include war-related suicides in war deaths.

How can we reconcile those two approaches?

Ms. Catherine Rioux:

Would you repeat the question? I want to make sure I understood.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We want to avoid glorifying suicide of course, but we also want to recognize veterans who committed suicide because of mental injuries they suffered through their participation in war. We want to acknowledge them, but not glorify suicide. How can we align that?

Ms. Catherine Rioux:

Of course they must be recognized as victims who fought. There is indeed a certain risk involved. Certain suicide prevention workers are worried about that parallel; it is a complex question.

We recommend that you take some time and speak with experts on this issue. There are several in Quebec, such as researchers like Brian Mishara. Some intervenors who work in the army are also specialized in this.

We don't have all the answers, but we think it is important to look at this question and find good potential solutions in order to avoid glorification.

Ms. Kim Basque:

A nuance needs to be made. Of course you have to collect useful information on the suicide of soldiers and veterans, in order to understand what could have been done to prevent them, and put in place proper services. However, in paying tribute to a person who committed suicide, we must not send the message that we are also paying tribute to the way in which he or she ended his suffering. Nor should we conceal the fact that services needed to be offered to that person, and that a security net needed to be placed around him in order to prevent his act.

That concern exists everywhere. Following a suicide, we talk about post-intervention. That consists in asking ourselves what can be done for the family members and friends, peers and environments who have experienced the loss of one of their members. We are always concerned by the way in which people who have lost a loved one wish to pay tribute to them. We don't want this to send a message of glorification, and we don't want the tribute to be disproportionate. We worry about the risks involved in emphasizing how the person died, that is to say the fact that they committed suicide.

(1715)

[English]

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

I was just asked to reinforce that, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

You'll have to make it very quick. We are running on gas here.

Hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Before they commit suicide, the option is to have a system of recognizing them as being injured honourably. If you have a solid way of showing that they've been honourably injured, just like we take care of the guy or girl who has lost an arm or a leg, and they feel that they've been honourably recognized in that way, then you have an equilibrium with those who simply have gone the other route. If you only try to recognize them because they've committed suicide, I agree entirely with them. The onus is on the prior recognition of an honourable injury that they've received and that we've treated them honourably and that their regiments and so on have done the same. Then you have established a balance.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Go ahead, Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

I'm glad that you made that point, General Dallaire, because PTSD is an injury that has debilitated a veteran in some way.

You talked about people in combat suffering this injury, but we know that PTSD can strike those who are not in a combat role. I'm thinking particularly of a statistic that we received from StatsCan's 2016 survey that found that more than a quarter of all women in the military reported sexual assault at least once during their careers.

Have you looked into military sexual assault—it's not just women, but men too—as an underlying issue with regard to PTSD during combat or non-combat situations. [Translation]

Ms. Kim Basque:

To my knowledge, the cause and effect link has not been well established, as is the case for other types of difficulties. I certainly do not want to minimize the effects of sexual assaults, that are horrific both for women and for men, but we can make someone fragile who is not, and make someone who is in distress even more fragile.

Suicide is complex. The factors that make people vulnerable to suicide are also complex. There is no single cause for suicide. I don't know if there are specific data showing a link between sexual assault and the suicide of military people. [English]

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay, thank you.

I wonder if mental health workers should play a more central role during the transition of a veteran. Would a stronger presence of mental health workers make that transition easier, underscore the value of the veteran, and provide recognition that their mental problems are understood by DND and VAC and that there is compassion? [Translation]

Ms. Kim Basque:

We suggest that the same health care team follow the veteran, whether he is an active member of the military or a veteran released from the Canadian Forces because of the state of his or her health. Of course that would help the transition. Ultimately, it would in a way eliminate that transition. The same health care team would take care of the same member, whose needs would evolve. Since the request for assistance continues to be fragile among male military members, it is important that it be received with an eye to its particularities. You have to continue to build the trust that was created, rather than changing the caregivers.

(1720)

[English]

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

We know and have heard over and over again how important families are to the overall well-being of the veteran. To what degree does your organization interact with family members? I'm thinking not just about how they support and help the veteran, but also how they survive themselves.

In previous testimony, we heard there's an increase in suicide among the children of veterans, which is very troubling. How do you interact with families? [Translation]

Ms. Kim Basque:

Our association does not provide services to citizens who are not feeling well. We have suicide prevention expertise, but we work with several partners who offer clinical services, such as in the suicide prevention centres. Our expertise takes that into account.

In Quebec, the way we intervene has changed. A few years ago, for instance, we mistakenly believed that the fact that the person who was feeling troubled phoned for help himself meant that he would be easier to help. But no research has shown that recovery is easier if the person asks for help himself. What we know about suicide in fact makes that assumption all the more inappropriate.

In Quebec, we have adapted the services provided so that we can provide assistance to family members who ask for help, and of course we support them when they do so, when they express worry over someone else. The services offered by the suicide prevention centres and the integrated health centres take that reality into account. [English]

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I think this is a very important thing. In Ontario you have to reach out for help yourself. A family can't do it for you. It's extremely frustrating.

You talked about the tools and the outside agencies. We've also heard that there's a real sense of a military family. Are you finding—

The Chair:

I'm sorry, we're out of time.

We will have next, Mr. Fraser.

Thank you. [Translation]

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I thank our two witnesses for their presentation, and for having come to speak with us about this highly important topic. The information you have shared with us will be very helpful to our committee.

You spoke about the importance of families and people close to the members in these situations. Can you tell us how, when suicide is a risk, it would be possible to intervene earlier with the help of families and friends? How could we rally these people around the veteran in such situations?

Ms. Kim Basque:

Suicide prevention is everyone's business, but it is also the business of the loved ones of the suicidal person. Suicidal people always give clues about their distress. People don't always pick them up. We don't always have access to the total picture. Every individual has a piece of the puzzle, and it is when you assemble all of these pieces that you can understand what state the person is in, what needs have been expressed and what signs of distress we should recognize.

As for the care that needs to be provided to the suicidal person, the family has privileged information. The resources and care we can provide to the loved ones will also help them to get through the crisis, to play their role properly and to become a bit more solid.

(1725)

Ms. Catherine Rioux:

They have to be aware that there are dedicated suicide prevention lines that exist, for instance in Quebec. A Canadian suicide prevention line will be available soon. Pilot projects are being set up. That line will be for the civilian population, but also for military members and loved ones. Indeed, the families are sometimes grappling with enormous issues, they can be worried and in a state of extreme vigilance. So it is important to let the families know that these resources exist and that they can be supported by suicide prevention specialists.

In a suicide prevention strategy, post-intervention is extremely important. If we prepare a strategy we have to think about post-intervention mechanisms. What do you do after someone commits suicide? How do you announce things? How do you protect his environment, his colleagues and his family, among others? We can do prevention work with those people, who are in fact more likely to commit suicide themselves after someone's death.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

It is important to include such people in the process. Indeed, the sooner you intervene in a suicide situation, the better the outcome.

Is that correct?

Ms. Catherine Rioux:

Yes.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Ms. Basque, I believe you spoke about online services in connection with your organization.

Based on your experience, can you tell me whether persons in crisis use online services? Perhaps they will not communicate by any other means. This is new for some veterans, but it is a modern means of communication. Do you think some people will only use online services?

Ms. Catherine Rioux:

Yes, we do. Experiments were conducted all over the world. Some of them were in Canada, but I would say that we are not very advanced in this area. In Quebec we lag behind in this regard. Certain tests have shown that the Web allows us to reach other types of clientele, for instance people who would not go to meet caregivers or who would not use the telephone to ask for help. As we were saying earlier, that is the case for people who are more isolated. Young people today also communicate very little by telephone.

We can offer other means of interaction, such as text and online chat. In certain countries, there are online interventions. In this way we can establish a first contact and then speak on the telephone to create a therapeutic alliance. That can be done online, remotely. For some people it is less intimidating. They will open up more and can choose how often they want to be in touch.

There are all kinds of models that exist currently. In Quebec, the Centre de recherche et d'intervention sur le suicide et l'euthanasie, CRISE, is devoting a lot of effort to studying that.

In short, there are things to explore in this area but unfortunately, we are lagging behind. This lag not only pertains to the military, but also civil society.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Kim Basque:

We have to provide the services suicidal people need where they are. If it is the Web, we must be present on the Web. If it is on the phone, we have to be present on the phone. If they are in a physically isolated location, but are nevertheless in touch with someone once a week, that person has to be vigilant and encourage them to request assistance.

Ms. Catherine Rioux:

After someone commits suicide, people often discuss the death and express their distress and their disarray on social networks. This is distressing for suicide prevention workers, such as the people who work in schools. People don't know exactly what to do. There are potential solutions that can be proposed. We have to put something in place in order to allow those workers to identify the people who are the most vulnerable in these discussion forums and social networks.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Unfortunately, that ends our time for testimony today. I do apologize.

I'd like to thank your organization and both of you for all you do for our men and women who have served.

Also, if you would like to add anything to your testimony, please send it to the clerk, who can then get it to the committee.

With that, I will adjourn for one minute sharp and we will then have about five minutes of committee business. I apologize to the committee that I do have to keep you afterwards. Everybody who doesn't need to be here can leave and we'll start the committee business in one minute.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent des anciens combattants

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Neil Ellis (Baie de Quinte, Lib.)):

Bon après-midi, tout le monde.

J'aimerais déclarer la séance ouverte. Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement et à la motion adoptée le 29 décembre, le Comité reprend son étude de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide chez les vétérans.

Pendant la première heure, nous recevons Roméo Dallaire, un lieutenant-général et sénateur à la retraite, Scott Maxwell, de l'organisme Wounded Warriors, et le brigadier-général à la retraite Joe Sharpe.

Nous allons commencer par entendre une déclaration de 10 minutes, puis nous passerons à la période des questions.

Bon après-midi, messieurs. Merci de témoigner devant nous aujourd'hui. La parole est à vous.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire (fondateur, Roméo Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative):

Merci, monsieur le président, et mesdames et messieurs, de me recevoir dans ces lieux opulents. J'ai eu du mal à m'y retrouver. Je suis très content pour vous. Il était grand temps que ces travaux soient effectués. Vous avez fait du bon travail avec votre personnel pour améliorer votre qualité de vie et atteindre vos missions.

Je vais lire une courte déclaration. J'espère qu'elle sera courte, ou je vais faire ce que mes amis du Corps des Marines m'ont enseigné: je vais accélérer la cadence.

Je suis accompagné de deux collègues.

Joe Sharpe et moi avons participé activement à la rédaction de la politique du Parti libéral sur les anciens combattants et travaillons avec les anciens combattants depuis plus de 10 ans à l'élaboration de mesures précises et de politiques. Nous nous penchons également sur des cas particuliers, et 10 ans avant cela, nous avons travaillé avec le sous-ministre à l'époque, l'amiral Murray. Il avait un comité consultatif, présidé par le Dr Neary, qui a rédigé le livre sur la première Charte des anciens combattants de 1943. Nous avons passé 10 années à travailler ensemble au sein de cette équipe multidisciplinaire. Nous étions également camarades de classe au Collège militaire royal, mais il est décédé.

Scott Maxwell est le directeur exécutif de Wounded Warriors Canada. Je suis le président d'honneur de Wounded Warriors Canada, qui est de loin, à mon sens, l'entité axée sur l'altruisme et sur la philanthropie qui consacre une grande partie de ses ressources sur le terrain pour venir en aide aux blessés, et principalement à ceux qui souffrent de blessures psychologiques. Je fais allusion à des programmes comme des programmes d'aide au moyen d'animaux, des programmes équestres et le programme de formation des anciens combattants que nous offrons à l'Université Dalhousie avec mon initiative Enfants soldats, où nous formons des anciens combattants pour qu'ils puissent retourner sur le terrain et former d'autres militaires sur la façon de gérer la situation des enfants soldats et de réduire les pertes de vie. Ils suivent un programme officiel d'un mois avec nous à l'Université Dalhousie. Nous pourrons en discuter lorsque nous aborderons les programmes disponibles.

Je vais me reporter, si vous le permettez, à une correspondance que j'ai eue avec le commandant en chef — soit le gouverneur général — lorsque j'étais sénateur après mon service dans l'armée et que je menais plusieurs activités avec lui — son épouse contribuait grandement aussi — concernant les soins aux anciens combattants blessés, et surtout ceux souffrant de blessures psychologiques. Je veux me servir de cette correspondance pour vous donner une idée de la situation.

Je tiens d'abord à vous remercier de nous permettre, mes collègues et moi, d'être des vôtres aujourd'hui pour discuter de la prévention du suicide parmi les membres des Forces armées canadiennes et les anciens combattants, tant ceux qui servent toujours dans les forces — et ils sont nombreux — que ceux qui ont été libérés et sont des civils dans la société canadienne. Je vous félicite de votre engagement à l'égard du bien-être de ces individus et de leurs familles, et c'est un honneur pour moi de vous faire part de mes réflexions sur la façon dont nous pouvons réaliser des progrès pour trouver des solutions au problème des personnes qui s'enlèvent la vie parce qu'elles sont blessées.

Comme je l'ai mentionné à d'autres occasions, publiquement et à d'autres tribunes, j'ai mis sur pied au fil des ans une équipe de conseillers de divers milieux qui connaissent très bien les forces et Anciens Combattants. Ce groupe de conseillers travaille à élaborer des recommandations stratégiques et des outils de sensibilisation qui nous ont permis de maintenir une vue d'ensemble bien documentée et éclairée des problèmes auxquels sont confrontés nos militaires — plus particulièrement ceux qui ont retiré leur uniforme — , et surtout en ce qui concerne les blessures liées au stress opérationnel. Je tiens à préciser que je ne fais pas référence forcément à tous les problèmes de santé mentale; je me concentre sur les blessures liées au stress opérationnel. C'est le principal problème des blessés. C'est le noeud du problème. C'est la lacune opérationnelle que nous constatons à l'heure actuelle.

(1535)



Parmi ceux qui s'engagent dans ce dossier — je veux vous les nommer, car ils sont tellement dévoués—, il y a le sergent Tom Hoppe et le major Bruce Henwood, tous les deux à la retraite, le Dr Victor Marshall, Mme Muriel Westmorland, Joe Sharpe, qui est ici avec nous, et Christian Barabé. Au fil des ans, ils ont travaillé avec moi pour faire connaître la situation des anciens combattants et m'ont également aidé lorsque j'étais le président du Sous-comité des anciens combattants au Sénat.

Nos recherches, nos réflexions et nos travaux nous ont amenés à constater que les blessures liées au stress opérationnel, plus particulièrement, peuvent être et sont trop souvent fatales à ceux qui en souffrent. De plus, les conséquences durent souvent toute une vie pour ceux qui ne réussissent pas à s'enlever la vie. Des organismes de soutien par les pairs nous ont fourni dans le passé des statistiques démontrant que les pairs ont été en mesure de prévenir une tentative de suicide par jour, par l'entremise du programme de soutien par les pairs, sans compter les structures plus officielles du système médical.

Bien entendu, cela inclut les effets dévastateurs pour les familles et ceux souffrant de blessures liées au stress opérationnel. Je crois qu'une approche pangouvernementale exhaustive qui fait participer la société peut apporter d'importantes solutions à ce grave problème d'autodestruction chez les gens afin qu'ils fassent plutôt des progrès notables et qu'ils puissent, à long terme, avoir une vie décente.

La santé mentale des anciens combattants et des membres actuels des forces et d'Anciens Combattants Canada, est un continuum qui est présenté en tant que question clinique à laquelle la structure de commandement globale participe peu. C'est essentiellement la façon dont les gens sont habitués de vivre, leur contexte culturel, qui est une chaîne de commandement et un mode de vie très structuré. Les dimensions cliniques, thérapeutiques et médicales ont pris préséance sur le problème des blessures liées au stress opérationnel, mais aussi sur le règlement éventuel des conflits qui amènent les gens à s'auto-détruire. La chaîne de commandement a été laissée de côté, si bien qu'il était impossible de savoir ce qui se passait. Les troupes retournaient dans leurs unités sans avoir d'information sur leur état d'esprit pour des raisons de confidentialité ou d'une incapacité de contourner le système d'accès à l'information ou les droits à la protection de la vie privée relativement à la Charte.

Ce faisant, la chaîne de commandement est devenue déconnectée de la réalité des blessés, ce qui est complètement contraire à tout ce qu'on nous a enseigné. J'ai passé ma vie au commandement d'un peloton ou d'une troupe de 30 militaires, et de la 1re Division du Canada composée de 12 000 membres, en temps de paix comme en temps de guerre. Le commandement, c'est comme une grossesse. Vous êtes en charge en tout temps du commandement pendant votre mission. C'est jour et nuit et, lorsque le bébé naît, vous êtes toujours là, au commandement. Que ce soit en garnison ou dans des théâtres d'opérations, la chaîne de commandement ne peut pas divorcer de la responsabilité ultime de veiller au bien-être des membres et de la structure de commandement afin de s'assurer que les familles sont intégrées dans la structure de soutien.

Je répète que les familles doivent être intégrées à cette structure de soutien. Ce n'est pas une question de coopérer avec les familles ou de les aider; il faut les intégrer à l'efficacité opérationnelle des forces. Pourquoi? C'est parce que les familles vivent les missions avec nous. Dans mon cas, j'étais blessé à mon retour. J'ai été jeté hors des forces alors que j'étais blessé. Ma famille était blessée. Ma famille n'était plus la même que celle que j'avais laissée à mon départ parce que les médias leur font vivre les missions avec nous.

Par conséquent, si vous utilisez n'importe quelle de ces politiques qui n'intègrent pas pleinement les familles, y compris les politiques du MDN et des Forces armées canadiennes, pour les anciens combattants actifs et ceux à la retraite, et par l'entremise d'Anciens Combattants Canada, vous vous retrouverez avec certaines des statistiques que j'ai mentionnées — qui sont encore empiriques cependant.

(1540)



J'ai participé au dernier forum sur la recherche en santé mentale chez les militaires à Vancouver, où j'ai présenté un mémoire dans lequel nous soutenions que les familles qui souffrent de stress et éprouvent des difficultés, les familles dont des membres souffrent de problèmes de santé mentale et les personnes affectées ne reçoivent pas le soutien dont elles ont besoin. Nous voyons maintenant des adolescents, mis à rude épreuve dans des conditions de stress extrême, qui se suicident. Il n'y a pas que les militaires; il y a aussi des membres des familles de ces militaires qui n'arrivent pas à vivre avec ce qu'ils ont vu et qui s'enlèvent la vie.

Nous devons absolument déceler les premiers signes de détresse psychologique, et nous encourageons les membres à demander de l'aide par l'entremise des programmes de soutien offerts par l'armée, Anciens Combattants Canada, des organismes externes comme Wounded Warriors Canada et les programmes de formation sur la transition des anciens combattants que nous offrons. Ces programmes leur permettent de trouver un emploi dans un domaine qui se rapproche le plus possible de leur expérience. Pourquoi essayer de changer complètement une personne de domaine alors que nous pouvons tirer parti de son expérience? Pourquoi ne pas trouver à ces gens un emploi ou des contrats dans un secteur d'activités qu'ils connaissent et dans un milieu auquel ils ont prêté allégeance, à savoir les forces armées? Nous avons retiré l'uniforme, mais nous ne cessons pas vraiment de le porter, car nous continuons de le porter dans notre coeur. Alors pourquoi les dissocier de ce milieu? Pourquoi ne pas trouver des programmes qui leur permettront de travailler dans un domaine qui s'apparente davantage à leur expertise?

Je vais écourter mes remarques par manque de temps. Je tiens simplement à dire que des initiatives sont mises de l'avant. La directive stratégique sur la prévention du suicide du chef d'état-major de la défense de janvier 2017 est certainement le meilleur document que nous avons vu depuis longtemps. Il fait clairement état que la chaîne de commandement est la source même de la prévention. Toutefois, lorsqu'on se met à lire les tenants et aboutissants, on constate que les professionnels de la santé ont mis le doigt sur le bobo et, je dirais, en minimisent la gravité. Ils sont censés appuyer la chaîne de commandement, et non pas la créer.

Je vais terminer en vous présentant les recommandations suivantes pour que nous puissions avoir le temps de discuter. Mes collègues pourront vous donner plus de détails et répondre à vos questions. J'espère que vous n'y verrez pas d'inconvénient.

Tout d'abord, la directive de la stratégie de prévention du suicide des Forces armées canadiennes doit être financée, mise en oeuvre et validée. Au besoin, nous pouvons adopter celle que nous avons adoptée après la Somalie. Il faut créer des comités de surveillance ministérielle qui relèvent du ministre. C'est ce que nous faisons depuis près de trois ans. J'étais le sous-ministre adjoint du personnel à l'époque. Pendant trois ans, nous avons eu six comités de surveillance qui ont rendu des comptes au ministre tous les deux mois sur la mise en oeuvre de ce type d'initiatives. Il n'y a rien de mal à assurer une surveillance politique de la mise en oeuvre des initiatives en cas de crise comme celle-là.

En ce qui concerne le cadre et la stratégie de prévention du suicide d'Anciens Combattants, je ne les ai pas vus. Je ne sais pas ce qu'ils renferment. Ce cadre et cette stratégie devaient être mis en place. C'est essentiel, car le ministère compte des anciens combattants qui sont à l'extérieur des forces, mais aussi un grand nombre d'anciens combattants qui sont à l'intérieur des forces. Ce cadre et cette stratégie sont essentiels et devraient être financés et mis en oeuvre.

Le troisième volet de cette orientation stratégique est ce que l'on appelle la stratégie commune de prévention du suicide des Forces canadiennes et d'ACC. C'est là où nous voulons que les deux ministères collaborent. Au MDN, c'est ce que l'on dit. C'est ce que les FAC veulent. Je n'ai pas vu cette stratégie non plus. C'est celle qui empêchera les gens de passer entre les mailles du filet. C'est ce qui assure le continuum. C'est là où la loyauté n'est pas perdue et où les gens continuent à s'engager.

Cette troisième stratégie doit exister — et être mise en oeuvre, évaluée, mais également validée six ou huit mois plus tard. Cette validation doit obliger les gens à rendre des comptes. C'est pourquoi je vais répéter que, dans ces comités de surveillance ministérielle, il n'y a rien de mal à afficher les conclusions en ligne et à offrir de l' aide.

(1545)



Je pense qu'Anciens Combattants Canada doit reconnaître les décès causés par les blessures liées au stress opérationnel, comme il l'a fait pour les 158 militaires qui ont été tués outre-mer ou n'importe quel autre membre qui a été tué au combat. Si nous prouvons qu'une blessure liée au stress opérationnel a causé le décès d'un individu, cet individu fait partie des statistiques. Nous n'avons pas perdu 158 militaires. Nous en sommes à quelque 200 décès maintenant. Alors pourquoi n'utilise-t-on pas ce nombre?

Imaginez qu'un membre revient pendant quatre ans et qu'on le perd. Après quatre ans à s'efforcer de le sauver, on le perd et il n'y a aucune réelle reconnaissance. On ne reconnaît pas son service, autrement que par la remise d'une médaille.

Maintenant que vous avez transféré les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires au ministère des Anciens Combattants, venez en aide aux familles par l'entremise de ces centres également. Insistez sur cette ressource. Ces centres prennent soin des familles. Laissez-les s'occuper de cet aspect pour Anciens Combattants Canada et les FAC, car ils le font déjà.

Enfin, offrez aux anciens combattants des emplois rémunérateurs dans des domaines qui se rapprochent le plus à l'expérience qu'ils possèdent, à leur loyauté envers l'armée ou au milieu militaire. Pourquoi essayer de les changer pendant qu'ils sont déjà dans une situation de crise?

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons entamer la première série de questions.

Nous allons commencer avec M. Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Général, merci énormément d'avoir servi notre pays et de vous engager dans cet important dossier.

J'aimerais que vous nous en disiez un peu plus, si vous le pouvez, sur la chaîne de commandement. Pouvez-vous nous donner des suggestions quant à la façon dont nous pouvons gérer le défi de la chaîne de commandement? Avec ce dont vous nous avez fait part aujourd'hui, c'est probablement la première fois que nous recevons un témoin au Comité qui aborde les conflits existant entre la chaîne de commandement et la santé mentale, la présentation clinique. Pouvez-vous nous donner des idées sur la façon dont nous pouvons concilier les deux?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Je vais laisser mes collègues prendre la parole également.

La réponse immédiate est que la chaîne de commandement doit être informée. En ce qui concerne la confidentialité, on ne peut rien y faire, mais on ne peut pas laisser des gens être transférés sous la responsabilité d'un autre organisme, même aux unités de soutien conjointes où ils ont été transférés ou renvoyés. Le commandant de l'unité, qui est responsable de la vie des militaires sur le terrain, est également responsable du commandement des militaires de retour au pays. On ne peut pas simplement les renvoyer dans leur unité sans fournir des renseignements aux commandants. Ils n'ont aucune idée de la façon de gérer ces cas, car ils ne connaissent pas la gravité de la blessure dont souffre l'individu.

Nous avons tous des médecins dans nos régiments, dans nos unités. À moins qu'il y ait un moyen que ces médecins puissent fournir ces renseignements et que l'on puisse les communiquer au niveau le plus bas, si l'on veut favoriser le retour des individus blessés dans une unité, il faut informer les gens de leur présence. Les gens ne savent pas quoi faire avec eux. Cela les isole davantage et les pousse davantage à vouloir mettre fin à leur vie.

Une voix: Je suis d'accord.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire: Joe?

(1550)

Brigadier-général (à la retraite) Joe Sharpe (à titre personnel):

Je vais répéter le point que le général Dallaire a soulevé plus tôt, à savoir que c'est une question de leadership, et non pas une question médicale. Je pense que c'est un refrain auquel je reviendrais sans cesse.

Les cloisons, si je peux m'exprimer ainsi, créent des obstacles aux soins. C'est une grande préoccupation ici. Pour utiliser les statistiques de 2015, 13 des 14 suicides recensés en 2015 ont été commis par des gens qui avaient demandé de l'aide au cours de l'année précédant leur suicide, et 10 d'entre eux se sont enlevé la vie dans les 30 jours précédant leur suicide.

Il y a un message de leadership à faire passer ici. Il y a une occasion d'intervenir, et je pense que c'est un flux d'information qui crée cet obstacle. Lorsqu'un membre fait la transition vers Anciens Combattants, c'est une autre cloison. C'est un autre obstacle. C'est un obstacle qui nous empêche de régler le problème.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Nous entendons beaucoup parler d’obstacles et c’est là le principal problème; il existe plusieurs obstacles. À mon avis, la chaîne de commandement en est un autre exemple. En tant que clinicien, comment puis-je respecter mon serment d’Hippocrate lorsque je dois composer avec la chaîne de commandement? Donc, je vous remercie pour ces commentaires.

Général Dallaire, vous avez parlé brièvement des enfants-soldats. C’est un problème important, cela ne fait aucun doute. Nous avons tous les deux participé à la conférence de l’ICRSMV. Une déclaration faite lors de cette conférence m’est restée en mémoire: souvent, les soldats sont confrontés avec une contradiction violente de leurs attentes morales. Alors que nous tentons de lutter contre ce problème, et nous pourrions y être à nouveau confrontés, nous réalisons que, pour beaucoup de nos soldats, c’est un conflit énorme.

J’aimerais vous entendre sur le sujet. Je sais qu’une stratégie a été proposée…

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Oui.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Vous y avez participé.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Nous y travaillons depuis deux ans avec l’Armée canadienne, en particulier, et aussi avec l’OTAN. Nous avons mené des recherches en Afrique, car mon institut, la Roméo Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative, basée à l’Université Dalhousie, est axé sur le terrain. Nous formons des forces armées et policières de différents pays pour les envoyer dans des zones de conflit.

Nous avons réussi à influencer le contenu de l’Armée canadienne en faisant de celle-ci la première armée au monde à adopter officiellement une nouvelle doctrine… Une doctrine, c’est une référence à partir de laquelle on élabore des tactiques, crée des organisations, fabrique des équipements et offre la formation nécessaire pour accomplir des missions. En adoptant officiellement cette doctrine, l’Armée canadienne est devenue une chef de file mondiale à ce chapitre. Nous allons amorcer la formation des formateurs pour faire progresser cette stratégie.

Cette doctrine est particulièrement importante, car dans tous les conflits, les enfants servent de système d’arme principal. On parle d’enfants de 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 ou 15 ans. Tous ces conflits posent un dilemme éthique, mais aussi moral pour les soldats. C’est ce que nous…

Nous avons toujours cru que les embuscades et accidents étaient les plus difficiles à vivre, mais en réalité, c’est le dilemme moral et la destruction du moral d’avoir à affronter des enfants.

Un sergent m’a approché à Québec, où je vis. Il avait l’air bien. Il m’a parlé de cinq missions et la conversation allait bien. Je lui ai demandé quel était son travail au sein du bataillon et il a fondu en larmes, là, au beau milieu du centre commercial. Il était incapable de parler. Il bégayait. Il vacillait et pleurait. Je l’ai pris à part et il m’a dit: « Je faisais partie du peloton de reconnaissance. Mon travail consistait à empêcher les bombes humaines d’atteindre les convois. » Il m’a dit: « Vous savez, c’était il y a quatre ans et je n’ai toujours pas serré mes enfants dans mes bras. »

Nos pertes sont énormes, car nous ignorons comment composer avec les enfants-soldats. Cette doctrine nous permettra de faire des progrès à ce chapitre et nous participerons à ce programme de formation.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Lockhart, vous avez la parole.

Mme Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Merci, messieurs.

Merci, général, de votre service et d’avoir accepté de venir répondre à nos questions.

J’aimerais parler d’une citation tirée de votre livre Premières lueurs. Vous dites: Personne ne comprenait ce que je faisais à l’époque. Pas même moi. Personne ne m’a dit que j’étais blessé et je ne croyais pas l’être, quoique demander à être relevé de mon commandement pesait lourd sur mes épaules. Extérieurement, j’étais toujours engagé, déterminé, stable. Intérieurement, le stress que je m’imposais m’écrasait et venait s’ajouter au stress que j’éprouvais dans mon travail.

Anciens Combattants peut-il faire quelque chose pour intervenir lorsqu’un soldat se trouve dans un tel état d’âme pour prévenir ou interrompre la progression de cet état vers le suicide?

(1555)

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Dans le cas de la maladie mentale, surtout les blessures de stress opérationnel, la blessure s’aggrave au fil des ans. Si vous perdez un bras, vous le savez. Le but est ensuite de trouver une prothèse qui vous aide autant que possible. Si l’on n’affiche pas le même sentiment d’urgence dans le cas des blessures de stress opérationnel en reconnaissant ces blessures et en les traitant, celles-ci s’aggravent et deviennent plus difficiles à définir et à guérir.

Il m’a fallu quatre ans avant de toucher le fond. J’ai perdu un de mes officiers 15 ans plus tard et après avoir suivi des traitements. Il y a un vide. On ignore comment amener ces gens à cesser de vivre comme s’ils n’étaient pas blessés, à faire fi des préjudices.

Nous croyions avoir mis fin à ces préjudices en disposant de forces armées d’expérience, et ce fut le cas jusqu’à tout récemment. Maintenant, beaucoup plus de civils sont touchés. Nous revivons ce que nous avons vécu dans les années 1950. À l’époque, beaucoup de vétérans étaient touchés, mais aussi beaucoup de civils. Il y avait des frictions entre les deux groupes et les gens disaient: « Ah, je ne serais pas touché de la sorte. » Nous n’avons pas reconnu les blessures de stress opérationnel. Alors, les soldats se sont mis à consommer de l’alcool jusqu’à en mourir ou ils ont quitté les forces. Ils sont devenus des sans-abri et sont morts dans la rue, car nous les avions abandonnés. Seule exception: la Légion. La Légion a beaucoup aidé, mais il y avait beaucoup de problèmes d’alcool.

Nous n’avons pas la capacité de discerner ces problèmes tôt et de les traiter de manière progressive.

La première fois que j’ai suivi un traitement, on m’a offert huit séances. Cela fait maintenant 14 ans que je suis un traitement. Je consulte encore un psychiatre et un psychologue et je prends encore neuf pilules par jour. C’est ce qui me permet d’être qui je suis.

Cependant, il y a des moments difficiles. Par exemple, la semaine dernière, la version française de mon livre est parue et ma réaction a été catastrophique. La rédaction de ces livres nous ramène toujours en enfer. Ils sont sans valeur réelle pour moi, mais j’espère qu’ils seront utiles pour d’autres.

Il faut trouver une façon d’empêcher ces maladies de s’aggraver. Il ne suffit pas de les identifier; il faut aussi les empêcher de s’aggraver. Si nous n’intervenons pas tôt dans le processus, ces maladies s’aggraveront.

M. Scott Maxwell (à titre personnel):

Chez Wounded Warriors Canada, nous voyons deux problèmes concurrents. D’abord, il y a la frustration que l’on ressent lorsqu’on demande à un diplômé d’un de nos programmes de nous parler de ses blessures… J’aimerais simplement ajouter une chose aux propos du général. La majorité des blessures, lorsque les gens se sentent à l’aise de nous dire quand elles sont survenues, découlent d’une interaction quelconque avec des enfants.

Ensuite, ces gens mettent habituellement entre 8 et 10 ans après avoir subi leur blessure ou après l’incident qui a causé la blessure avant de demander ou de recevoir l’aide qu’ils méritent. Vous pouvez imaginer la vie qu’ils ont vécue et l’impact sur leur famille pendant cette période avant qu’ils ne prennent des mesures pour traiter leur blessure.

Un autre problème que nous avons remarqué après avoir écrit pour dire à ces gens de chercher de l’aide, de s’auto-identifier et de communiquer avec leurs pairs, c’est que, comme le problème est plus connu et abordé et que plus de gens se sentent à l’aise de demander de l’aide, nous recevons de plus en plus de demandes d’aide. Cela signifie, pour des programmes comme les nôtres, qu’il y a maintenant une liste d’attente pouvant aller jusqu’à deux ans. Il y a un grave problème d’accès au Canada. C’est bien que les gens demandent de l’aide, mais vous pouvez imaginer l’impact sur leur santé mentale et générale et sur leur famille s’ils ne peuvent pas obtenir l’aide nécessaire.

L’enjeu est gros; c’est un problème très sérieux.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci.

Je crois que mon temps est écoulé, mais c’était très bien, merveilleux, même.

(1600)

Le président:

Madame Mathyssen, vous avez la parole.

Mme Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup d’avoir accepté notre invitation. Nous vous remercions beaucoup de votre expertise et de votre franchise, car il s’agit d’un enjeu très important.

Nous devons aller au fond des choses dans ce dossier. Des vétérans nous ont fourni énormément d’information que contredisent les spécialistes ou les gens d’ACC ou du MDN. C’est frustrant et cela remet en question notre capacité à faire ce qu’il se doit. J’aimerais aller au vif du sujet.

Au cours du week-end, je me suis entretenue avec des vétérans sur la côte Ouest. Ils m’ont dit qu’évidemment, ils cachent leurs blessures et nient être blessés, car cela se traduirait par leur libération des forces. Ils se retrouveraient exclus d’une confrérie, d’une famille dont ils ont besoin.

Ils m’ont dit que des membres actifs au sein des Forces canadiennes pensent eux aussi au suicide. Cela ne se limite pas à ceux qui ont été libérés. Des membres actifs aussi pensent au suicide, mais cela est géré à l’interne et ces gens sont poussés vers la sortie de façon à ce que, s’ils se suicident alors qu’ils ne sont plus dans les Forces canadiennes, le MDN n’ait pas à rendre de comptes sur leur mort.

C’est frustrant. Je suis convaincue qu’il y a des opinions divergentes sur la question, mais un fait demeure: le lien de confiance a été brisé. Les vétérans avec qui je me suis entretenue étaient en colère et ils m’ont parlé des éléments déclencheurs, de toute la paperasse et de leur insécurité financière. Ils ont quitté les forces sans pension ou sans soutien financier, ne sachant quoi faire, et se disaient que la seule option pour eux était de mettre fin à leurs jours. Ils avaient l’impression d’être inutiles pour leurs familles. Soit ils se cachaient dans un sous-sol, soit ils s’en prenaient violemment à quelqu’un.

Que pouvons-nous faire? C’est un dilemme. Comment tendre de nouveau la main à ces vétérans? Comment rétablir la confiance?

Général, vous avez parlé de cette étude. Y avons-nous accès, à cette étude du CEMD, à cette stratégie dont vous parliez? Y avons-nous accès?

Vous avez parlé également de mesures qui devraient être prises en matière de santé mentale et vous dites ignorer où nous en sommes à ce chapitre. Tout cela nous pousse à nous demander ce qui se passe, ce qu’il advient des services de soutien et quand nous pouvons nous attendre à avoir une réponse sincère qui satisfait aux besoins de ces vétérans.

Je sais que j’ai dit beaucoup de choses et que je n’ai pas vraiment posé de questions, mais j’aimerais connaître votre opinion.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Je n'ai pas l'habitude d'être bref, moi non plus, alors, ne vous en faites pas.

Je dirai d’abord ceci. Après des années de travail sur le sujet, nous avons conclu que s’il n’y a pas une atmosphère d’engagement au pays, au sein de la population canadienne et au sein des gouvernements — et je parle aussi du milieu parlementaire, qui semble vouloir s’engager, mais aussi de la bureaucratie, qui ne semble pas nécessairement vouloir s’engager —, et non un contrat social, car cela implique une négociation, tout comme la Charte des anciens combattants actuelle…

C’est moi qui ai fait adopter cette charte au Sénat, en l’espace d’une journée et demie, et je le regrette depuis, car elle ne tient pas compte des 10 années de travail que nous avons menées. C’est un document bureaucratique pour tenter de faire des économies et qui lie les mains du ministre en raison de tous les règlements qu’il contient. Il s’agit d’un nouveau phénomène dans le domaine de la législation. Auparavant, il n’y avait rien de la sorte. Aujourd’hui, il y en a partout dans la législation.

Nous n’avons pas besoin d’une nouvelle charte. Il suffit d’effectuer une réforme importante de la charte actuelle de façon à ce que ces hommes et femmes puissent obtenir des réponses appropriées en temps opportun. D’ici là, il y aura des problèmes.

La seule façon de les convaincre, c’est de croire sincèrement que le gouvernement est responsable de ces gens du début à la fin, et non jusqu’à 65 ans et non de façon limitée, qu’il s’engage à assumer une responsabilité illimitée, qu’il reconnaît que les soldats sont revenus blessés et que certains sont morts et que, bien entendu, leurs familles ont été touchées et qu’il prendra soin d’elles jusqu’à la fin.

Sans cela, vous n’arriverez pas à faire renaître leur confiance. Tout cela a commencé avec le syndrome de la guerre du Golfe. Nous avons tout fait pour les empêcher d’obtenir quoi que ce soit. Tous les avocats et membres du personnel médical en ville ont avancé des arguments pour justifier leur décision de ne pas prendre soin de ces gens. Cela a fragilisé leur engagement opérationnel. Est-ce que je veux être blessé? Cela a aussi ébranlé les familles et, en réaction, elles ont créé un vide d’expérience en demandant à leur proche de quitter les forces.

(1605)

Le président:

Monsieur Eyolfson, vous avez la parole.

M. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Je suis désolé, madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Non, non. Merci. J’aurai une autre occasion.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup de votre service et d’avoir accepté de venir nous parler de suicide. C’est un sujet important que nous avons en commun. Je pratique la médecine depuis 20 ans et je vois aussi ce problème dans ma profession. Lorsque j’étais résident, il y a eu trois suicides à mon école de médecine en l’espace de 15 mois. Je suis sensible aux professions où le suicide est un problème.

Les préjugés contre ceux qui demandent de l’aide sont un autre problème que nous avons en commun. Il y a une place en enfer pour celui qui a dit: « Médecin, guéris-toi toi-même. » Cette attitude a causé beaucoup de dommages. Les militaires vivent probablement la même situation.

Nous savons que les gens hésitent à demander de l’aide, qu’ils craignent d’avoir l’air faibles et de ne pas avoir ce qu’il faut. Selon vous, depuis votre départ des forces, y a-t-il moins de préjugés par rapport aux TSPT?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Je vais laisser Joe vous en parler plus longuement, mais je tiens seulement à vous mentionner que je me considère... étant donné que j'ai un psychiatre et un psychologue. Je reçois des soins et du soutien par les pairs. Je ne m'en cache pas. Si vous étiez un docteur que je consultais pour mon cancer, je parlerais de vous, et je dirais que vous êtes un idiot ou un très bon docteur, que je vous adore, etc. Nous parlons de ces docteurs. Pourquoi ne parlons-nous pas de nos psychiatres et de nos psychologues? C'était le cas dans certains films au début des années 1970.

Nous devons rendre cela aussi honorable que toute autre blessure, ce qui éliminera les préjugés. Nous commençons à assister à une recrudescence des tensions au sujet des préjugés, ce que nous pensions avoir passablement réussi à éliminer grâce au changement de culture, dont Joe parle, par les non-vétérans qui sont incapables d'accepter quelque chose qu'ils ne peuvent pas voir. Ils sont très darwiniens; ce sont des types de personnes très visibles dans l'armée, parmi les premiers répondants et toute personne qui porte un uniforme: les policiers, les pompiers, etc. Si nous ne pouvons pas le voir, ils ne peuvent pas accepter qu'une personne ne soit pas à 100 %.

Pour ce faire, il faut sensibiliser les gens et les former.

Bgén Joe Sharpe:

J'aimerais seulement ajouter un très bref commentaire à l'intervention du général Dallaire.

Nous parlions plus tôt aujourd'hui d'un jeune militaire avec lequel j'ai travaillé jeudi dernier; ce jeune caporal m'a avoué très candidement être atteint d'un état de stress post-traumatique et recevoir des soins à ce sujet, mais il m'a dit: « Monsieur, la haute direction de l'organisation dit tout ce qu'il faut. » C'est un engagement honnête que prend la haute direction des Forces armées canadiennes. Ce jeune fantassin est en voie d'être libéré. Il a dit: « Sur le terrain, les sergents et les adjudants n'en croient pas un mot. Pour eux, c'est de la bouillie pour les chats. Si vous demandez de l'aide au sein de votre peloton ou de votre compagnie, vous êtes un maillon faible, et ils ne veulent pas de vous là. » Cette situation m'a été décrite jeudi dernier.

Les préjugés ont-ils disparu? Absolument pas. Les préjugés sont encore bien vivants, mais c'est parce que nous mettons très fortement l'accent sur la modification de ce comportement dans l'immédiat. Si un haut gradé vous surprend à dénigrer ces militaires, vous serez réprimandé. Nous nous inquiétons des comportements, mais nous n'avons pas vraiment mis l'accent sur les croyances, alors que nous aurions vraiment dû mettre l'accent sur cet aspect et aussi la culture. C'est un combat de longue haleine qui nous attend pour modifier la culture. Je crois que nous mettons l'accent sur les comportements plutôt que les croyances et la culture.

M. Scott Maxwell:

J'aimerais seulement faire valoir un autre point au sujet des personnes qui ont été libérées — et non celles encore au sein des Forces canadiennes — et qui forment la population de vétérans du côté civil. Dans leur cas, je crois que la situation s'est un peu améliorée en ce qui concerne les préjugés. Ils ont évidemment déjà quitté le milieu; il y a donc moins de risques, et ils sont plus à l'aise de parler de leur situation. Ils sont à l'aise de se placer dans une position très vulnérable, et ce, souvent en compagnie de leurs pairs. Nous le voyons partout au pays. Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, notre problème est d'élargir l'accès aux programmes; ce n'est pas d'essayer de trouver des personnes malades et blessées qui veulent participer à nos programmes. Je crois que cela témoigne certainement des progrès réalisés concernant les personnes libérées et les vétérans du côté civil. Ils peuvent se manifester, lever la main et obtenir de l'aide. Il y a une petite lueur d'optimisme de ce côté. Le problème, c'est évidemment que nous devons nous assurer de pouvoir leur venir en aide lorsqu'ils viennent nous voir.

(1610)

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Fraser, allez-y.

M. Colin Fraser (Nova-Ouest, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Général, monsieur Sharpe, monsieur Maxwell, merci beaucoup de votre présence ici aujourd'hui.

Je tiens tout d'abord à mentionner que vendredi dernier dans ma circonscription, Nova-Ouest, j'ai participé à une activité à l'appui du centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires à la 14e Escadre Greenwood. C'était une excellente activité pour sensibiliser les gens aux questions liées à la santé mentale et à l'état de stress post-traumatique chez les militaires et les vétérans et lever des fonds pour le Centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires.

J'ai été heureux de vous entendre parler de la manière dont les familles peuvent avoir accès aux centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires et de vous entendre dire que les familles des vétérans devraient également avoir accès aux centres. J'aimerais que vous nous en disiez un peu plus à ce sujet. Je suis au courant de l'excellent travail qui est fait dans ces centres. Comment pensez-vous que cela pourrait se faire? Comment le ministère de la Défense nationale pourrait-il élargir les services?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Anciens Combattants Canada a maintenant signé une entente avec les Forces canadiennes. Nous pouvons prendre soin — je dis « nous »; voilà; la preuve...

Des députés: Ah, ah!

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire: ... et je dis cela après avoir passé 10 ans au Sénat — des vétérans blessés qui ne font plus partie des Forces canadiennes et de leur famille.

Je considère que les centres de soutien des familles sont l'un des ponts déterminants qu'ils peuvent emprunter pour s'en sortir et se rendre dans un nouveau monde. Les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires offrent beaucoup d'expertise et ont accès aux ressources des provinces, des collectivités et surtout des Forces armées canadiennes et d'ACC pour influer sur le combat et donner plus rapidement aux gens du soutien.

Cependant, ils ont de la difficulté, parce que l'argent n'y est pas investi, qu'ils ne peuvent pas embaucher de personnel et que les vétérans ne peuvent pas obtenir ce soutien spécial. À mon avis, le grave problème que nous n'avons toujours pas réglé, c'est que nous améliorons la situation des membres des Forces canadiennes qui sont toujours en service et des vétérans qui reçoivent des soins dans nos différentes cliniques, par exemple, mais nous n’améliorons pas la situation des familles.

Seulement la moitié du problème est réglée; l'autre moitié ne l'est pas, et cette moitié souffre. Cela nuira à tout ce que vous faites. D'ici à ce que nous considérions la famille comme aussi en déploiement... J'estime que maintenant les familles sont liées à l'efficacité opérationnelle des forces, et cela ne se limite pas qu'au soutien à ce chapitre. Les membres de la famille parlent sur Skype à leurs proches une heure avant qu'ils partent en patrouille. Comment est-ce possible de les traiter ainsi?

Si les familles sont intrinsèquement liées à l'efficacité opérationnelle des forces, elles devraient avoir accès au même niveau de soins. Cela signifie qu'il faut investir davantage d'argent dans Anciens Combattants Canada et le ministère de la Défense nationale pour prendre soin des familles. Nous transférons déjà des sommes colossales aux provinces. Disons aux provinces que nous allons nous-mêmes réparer notre gâchis. Nous avons causé les blessures de ces personnes, et nous allons en prendre soin. Nous allons vous acheter les ressources au lieu de tout simplement les laisser tomber et créer une rupture très grave.

M. Colin Fraser:

Oui. Allez-y, monsieur Maxwell.

M. Scott Maxwell:

Je crois qu'il faut aussi mentionner que ces centres sont d'excellents carrefours; ce sont des lieux physiques où les gens peuvent se rendre et obtenir du soutien par les pairs.

Par contre, comme tout le reste, je vous mets en garde; le problème et l'étendue sont tellement vastes qu'un organisme ou un centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires ne sera jamais capable d'y arriver seul. Nous en sommes témoins tout le temps au sein de l'organisme Wounded Warriors Canada. Si nous finançons un programme et que nous faisons un don de 375 000 $ pour offrir un programme partout au pays, c'est merveilleux. Cependant, nous ne pouvons pas aider tout le monde, et tout le monde ne peut pas y participer. Il en va de même pour les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires.

Nous mettons notamment l'accent sur un aspect dont il est beaucoup question ici: les partenariats. Nous collaborons avec les services aux familles des militaires, qui gèrent les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires au pays. Cela permet aux centres de faire participer un couple à l'un de nos programmes — le soutien à la famille, par exemple —, et ce, sans frais, étant donné que les participants au programme géré par Wounded Warriors Canada ont été recommandés par un centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires.

Vous êtes à même de comprendre à quel point cela se multiplierait rapidement à l'échelle nationale. Nous n'avons donc pas un cadre régional qui fonctionne très bien à un endroit, mais moins bien à Esquimalt, par exemple. Lorsque nous avons de telles discussions, nous voulons nous assurer que cela sera mis en oeuvre partout au pays, parce qu'il y a des gens aux quatre coins du pays.

(1615)

M. Colin Fraser:

Je crois que vous avez raison. Je vous remercie de votre commentaire. C'est très important de reconnaître qu'un tel outil peut être la solution pour venir en aide aux gens dans les petites collectivités. Un tel établissement de confiance est très important.

M. Scott Maxwell:

Nous ne pourrions pas le faire seuls. Il faut l'avouer. Si nous voulons offrir un programme, comment trouver les personnes qui ont besoin d'aide? Nous avons recours à des partenaires comme le programme SSBSO et les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires, et nous collaborons avec eux et de façon plus générale avec les services aux familles des militaires.

Vous avez absolument raison. Cela se fonde sur des partenariats, et il faut établir des liens entre l'information, les outils et les programmes. Si une personne se rend dans un centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires et qu'elle peut tirer parti d'un certain programme, que le centre n'offre peut-être pas, le personnel du centre est au moins capable de lui donner accès au programme qu'elle mérite.

M. Colin Fraser:

Mon temps est très limité.

Par contre, convenez-vous aussi que la présence et l'intégration de la famille dans la mission sont importantes pour nous assurer que, si une intervention est nécessaire, elle se fera peut-être plus rapidement? Vous avez une personne qui peut constater qu'un militaire éprouve de la difficulté ou détecter plus rapidement le problème.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Monsieur Fraser, vous venez de mettre le doigt sur un point important.

Si la famille sent qu'elle participe étroitement à l'efficacité opérationnelle des forces, elle aura l'impression d'avoir la responsabilité d'aider le membre à comprendre que cela fait partie de son processus pour redevenir efficace sur le plan opérationnel ou s'adapter à un autre emploi valable.

Actuellement, des membres confrontent leur famille, parce qu'ils ne veulent pas demander d'aide. Si la famille était intégrée au programme, les membres ne pourraient pas le faire. Ils se renforceraient mutuellement pour obtenir cette aide. C'est le hic; c'est le noeud du problème.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Wagantall, vous avez la parole.

Mme Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, PCC):

Merci beaucoup de votre présence ici aujourd'hui. C'est très utile.

J'aimerais me concentrer en particulier sur votre premier commentaire concernant la stratégie de prévention du suicide des Forces armées canadiennes et sa mise en oeuvre avec les comités ministériels de surveillance. Vous avez mentionné la Somalie.

Je m'implique énormément auprès des vétérans concernant la question de la méfloquine. Nous entendons encore les autorités affirmer que seulement un membre des forces sur 11 000 est touché. En ce qui concerne la poursuite de l'utilisation de la méfloquine, notre propre ministre de la Santé a récemment écrit le 22 février dernier qu'à titre de prophylaxie antipaludique le ministère considère que les bienfaits de la méfloquine l'emportent sur les possibles risques lorsque le médicament est utilisé conformément aux conditions d'utilisation énoncées dans le PGPC.

Selon ce que j'entends de vétérans de la Somalie, du Rwanda, de l'Ouganda, de l'Afghanistan et de la Bosnie qui ont pris ce médicament, ils n'avaient pas le choix de l'utiliser. Nos alliés, soit l'Allemagne, la Grande-Bretagne, l'Australie et les États-Unis, ont pris des mesures; or, le gouvernement ne reconnaît toujours pas ce qui s'est passé en Somalie et poursuit sur sa lancée. Cela nuit au taux de suicide. Je sais que c'est ce que les vétérans me disent directement.

Pouvez-vous nous en parler?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

J'ai pris de la méfloquine un an. Au bout de cinq mois, j'ai écrit au Quartier général de la Défense nationale pour expliquer que ce médicament nuisait à ma capacité de penser, qu'il détruisait mon estomac, qu'il nuisait à ma mémoire et que je voulais arrêter de le prendre. À l'époque, les Allemands ne prenaient aucun médicament, mais ils ont changé leur fusil d'épaule, lorsque le paludisme cérébral a emporté deux personnes en 48 heures.

J'ai ensuite reçu une réponse, et c'était probablement l'une des réponses les plus rapides que je n'avais jamais reçues. En gros, j'ai reçu l'ordre de continuer de prendre le médicament. Si jamais je décidais de désobéir aux ordres, je serais traduit en cour martiale pour m'être infligé intentionnellement une blessure, parce que c'était le seul outil que nous avions. La méfloquine est une ancienne façon de penser, et ce médicament nuit vraiment à la capacité de fonctionner.

À mon avis, ces statistiques ne...

(1620)

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Elles ne sont pas exactes.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

... tiennent pas vraiment la route. Même si c'est le cas, que se passe-t-il si c'est le commandant qui est touché, soit le poste que j'occupais à l'époque? Mon adjointe administrative surveillait attentivement ma consommation de méfloquine. Il y a d'autres prophylaxies beaucoup plus efficaces.

En ce qui concerne tout simplement le commandement et à plus forte raison notre capacité d'intervenir lorsque nous nous trouvons dans des situations très complexes ou lorsque nous sommes en présence d'enfants, par exemple, et que nous avons des nanosecondes pour décider de tuer ou non un enfant pour sauver d'autres personnes, nous ne voulons pas que notre jugement soit altéré. Or, il se peut qu'un médicament continue d'avoir des effets secondaires sur nous.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Que répondez-vous à cela? Devrions-nous réaliser des études pour déterminer...

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Je dis que nous devrions nous en débarrasser et utiliser le nouveau médicament.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Merci. C'est la solution la plus rapide que j'aimerais nous voir prendre.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Oui.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Veterans Helping Veterans, soit l'un des groupes qui viennent en aide aux vétérans, a parlé de la nécessité de veiller à la transition des militaires, parce que nous leur inculquons un mode de vie. Je comprends la réponse combat-fuite et l'attitude qui les pousse à y aller et à penser aux autres en premier. Cependant, lorsque le militaire retourne chez lui, il a oublié comment dormir normalement. Certains prétendent qu'il est possible de les reprogrammer pour les réhabituer à une structure du sommeil adéquate, à des aliments réguliers, etc. Tous ces éléments sont très importants pour la santé.

Je sais que votre sommeil vous a causé énormément de problèmes. Voyez-vous cela comme une mesure que nous pourrions prendre pour aider nos militaires?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

J'allais vous répondre de lire mon livre, mais je vais m'abstenir.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Je ne l'ai pas encore fait. J'en suis désolée. Vous l'avez sans doute deviné.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

La difficulté, c'est qu'à notre retour, nous essayons de dormir dans un lit et dans un environnement qui nous sont étrangers. Voici pourquoi. Je suis revenu, et le massacre d'environ un million de personnes ne comptait pas. J'étais de retour à titre de commandant adjoint de l'armée, et je me suis fait dire: « Dieu merci, vous êtes rentré. Vous n'aurez plus d'affectations à l'étranger. Écoutez, la priorité maintenant, ce sont les compressions budgétaires. » C'est comme si cela ne s'était jamais produit.

Il y a une rupture parce que nous savons que ces gens existent, que nous n'avons pas terminé notre travail et que des choses horribles se sont passées. Ensuite, nous rentrons au pays, et tout le monde s'en fiche; personne ne reconnaît réellement la situation.

Nous avons beaucoup de difficulté à nous ajuster à l'opulence, à l'insignifiance et à la nature de notre société. Ce qui nous empêche d'y arriver, c'est notre fatigue, notre incapacité de raisonner. C'est dû au manque de sommeil.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Oui.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Nous avons de la difficulté à trouver le sommeil parce ces choses nous hantent sans cesse. S'il existe des programmes d'aide — je sais qu'il y a toutes sortes d'initiatives —, tant mieux, mais je dirais que nous sommes aux prises avec deux grandes frictions culturelles qui ne sont pas faciles à concilier.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Bratina.

M. Bob Bratina (Hamilton-Est—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, et merci à vous, général Dallaire.

Les problèmes que nous étudions au sein du comité des anciens combattants découlent de la période de service actif. Je suis donc impressionné par votre notion de stratégie commune de prévention du suicide. Bien entendu, deux groupes différents vont devoir travailler ensemble pour résoudre les problèmes. Comment entrevoyez-vous cette stratégie commune de prévention du suicide? Prévoyez-vous des lignes directrices?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

En 1998, lorsque j'étais sous-ministre adjoint du personnel — ce que l'on appelle aujourd'hui chef du personnel militaire, ou CPM-RH —, je me suis entendu avec le SMA d'Anciens Combattants Canada, un certain Dennis Wallace, pour prêter un général à Anciens Combattants Canada et lancer les premières discussions conjointes. Nos systèmes informatiques n'étaient pas interopérables — rien n'était compatible. Nous ne pouvions même pas nous parler. Nous avons donc créé un simple bureau où les employés tenaient, d'un côté, les dossiers des anciens combattants et, de l'autre, ceux des militaires; dès qu'un cas était consigné, ils discutaient entre eux pour le régler.

Il y a eu beaucoup d'améliorations depuis, mais je ne crois pas qu'on soit allé assez loin. Je ne pense pas que les gens se sentent à l'aise d'être transférés vers un autre ministère. Je suis content que ce soit à Charlottetown. Les employés là-bas ont gardé leur humanisme et ils sont moins froids que ceux du bureau d'Ottawa; la personne n'est donc pas traitée comme un numéro. Je trouve cela acceptable, mais le fait que ce soit un ministère distinct et qu'on soit transféré ailleurs... Prenez mon uniforme, mais ne me retirez pas de la famille. Ne me transférez pas vers quelqu'un d'autre qui a une culture organisationnelle différente, qui travaille peut-être dans un contexte différent et qui doit suivre une réglementation différente.

Je pense qu'il est temps d'examiner le cas des pays qui ont intégré leur ministère des Anciens Combattants à leur ministère de la Défense nationale. Ces organismes ont leurs budgets et leurs structures, sans que leurs tâches ne se chevauchent. Le client n'est pas refilé à quelqu'un d'autre. Il reste dans la famille. On peut régler beaucoup de cas à l'amiable. On peut apporter une perspective différente à certaines des directives. En relevant du ministre de la Défense nationale, plutôt que du ministre des Anciens Combattants, on peut exercer plus de pouvoir au sein du Cabinet pour apporter des modifications, je crois, parce que cela a un impact direct sur l'efficacité opérationnelle des forces. Si vous ne traitez pas les anciens combattants blessés comme il se doit, les militaires qui sont dépêchés à l'étranger se rendront compte que s'ils reviennent blessés, ils auront à mener un deuxième combat, c'est-à-dire rentrer chez eux et essayer de vivre décemment. Si cela reste dans la même structure, la personne pourra être très honnête et se sentir beaucoup plus responsabilisée.

(1625)

M. Bob Bratina:

Merci.

Pour en revenir à la question de la culture et des préjugés, en quoi consiste le rôle de l'aumônier?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Ah, quelle excellente question. Dans le cadre de mon Initiative Enfants Soldats, nous avons découvert que les enfants ne sont évidemment pas épargnés par la menace. L'été dernier, nous avons donné un cours à 15 anciens combattants — certains desquels sont déjà déployés au Kenya pour s'entraîner avec des Somaliens —, et deux d'entre eux ont avoué avoir tué des enfants. Ils ne l'avaient jamais dit à qui que ce soit — ni à un thérapeute ni à leurs proches —, mais ils l'ont raconté à ces gars parce qu'ils allaient travailler auprès d'enfants. Ils en souffraient.

Je crois que l'objectif, au bout du compte, c'est de les faire participer... voilà, ma mémoire me fait défaut. Je vous laisse prendre la relève.

M. Scott Maxwell:

Vouliez-vous qu'on parle des aumôniers?

M. Bob Bratina:

Oui.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Ah, oui, on parle des aumôniers, du côté spirituel de la chose. Nous avons déjà abordé l'aspect moral. Nos faiblesses morales découlent de notre perte de spiritualité; pourtant, dans les théâtres d'opérations, bon nombre de ces pays ont toujours un côté spirituel. Ce n'est pas purement religieux. C'est culturel. Si vous n'avez pas de valeurs spirituelles sur lesquelles vous rabattre, alors vous sombrez dans le néant, et il vous est d'autant plus difficile de vous rétablir. Par conséquent, les aumôniers jouent, selon moi, un rôle très proactif et très efficace sur le terrain, et ils représentent une autre option pour la résolution de problèmes.

M. Scott Maxwell:

Oui, notre directeur de programme national vient de prendre sa retraite après 25 ans de service en tant qu'aumônier des Forces canadiennes auprès d'un régiment du génie de combat à Toronto. En travaillant avec lui et avec l'organisme Wounded Warriors, j'ai interagi avec une foule de militaires qu'il avait aidés au fil des ans. Durant la cérémonie du Départ dans la dignité organisée en son honneur, j'ai rencontré une dizaine d'entre eux, et nous avons justement parlé de cette question. Que faisait Phil, en l'espèce, pour être d'un si grand secours?

Au sein de la famille régimentaire, c'était presque un endroit où aller si on ne tenait pas à passer par la chaîne de commandement ou à en parler à ses supérieurs, parce qu'on n'était pas sûr de la gravité du problème ou même si cela valait la peine d'en parler. C'était comme un refuge dans la famille régimentaire, un endroit où aller pour au moins amorcer une discussion avec quelqu'un de rassurant, sans craindre de subir des conséquences pour avoir dit quelque chose ou pour avoir posé une question.

Cela a eu un impact énorme sur la suite des choses pour ces militaires, à partir de là.

M. Bob Bratina:

J'appuie le point soulevé par le général Dallaire.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Oui.

Bgén Joe Sharpe:

Permettez-moi de faire une petite observation là-dessus.

Le président:

Pourriez-vous être bref, je vous prie?

Bgén Joe Sharpe:

Oui. J'ai visité une importante base militaire afin d'interroger les aumôniers sur leur rôle concernant l'état de stress post-traumatique et les blessures liées au stress opérationnel. Parmi les 16 aumôniers sur cette base, 14 avaient reçu le diagnostic d'état de stress post-traumatique.

Donc, si nous allons recourir à des aumôniers — et nous le devons, car ils jouent un rôle crucial —, il faut prendre soin d'eux également. Ce n'est pas une approche de type « médecin, guéris-toi toi-même ».

(1630)

M. Bob Bratina:

Ils doivent porter un lourd fardeau, en effet.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Brassard.

M. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, PCC):

Cinq minutes, monsieur le président?

Merci. Général, je suis content de vous revoir. Nous nous sommes croisés à Barrie, à l'occasion de l'ouverture de l'École secondaire Roméo-Dallaire. Je sais que les élèves, le personnel et les membres du conseil étaient enchantés de voir que vous aviez pris le temps d'être là pour l'ouverture d'une école baptisée en votre nom. Alors, merci, monsieur.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

J'y expose également tous mes artéfacts.

M. John Brassard:

Je crois que j'ai dû parler français pendant tout le temps que j'étais là.

J'aimerais parler des problèmes liés à la transition, parce que nous préparons nos soldats à se battre, mais nous ne leur montrons pas comment réintégrer la vie civile. La question de la transition a été soulevée à maintes reprises durant les témoignages. En fait, l'ombudsman du ministère de la Défense nationale a parlé d'un service de conciergerie destiné aux militaires qui sont libérés pour des raisons médicales afin de veiller à ce que tout soit en place. D'ailleurs, notre comité a présenté un rapport au Parlement, qui réaffirme la proposition de l'ombudsman.

Scott, je sais que vous étiez sur les ondes de CP24 il y a trois ans, et on vous avait alors interrogé sur la question de la transition. Dans le peu de temps dont nous disposons, si je demandais à tous les trois d'énumérer trois mesures prioritaires que nous devons prendre pour aider à diminuer les facteurs de stress pour ceux qui font la transition de la vie militaire à la vie civile, par égard à leur famille, en quoi consisteraient-elles?

Scott, je vais commencer par vous.

M. Scott Maxwell:

J'appuie sans réserve le rapport et les recommandations de l'ombudsman du ministère de la Défense nationale. Je l'ai dit publiquement il y a bien longtemps, me semble-t-il, maintenant que j'y repense, et l'ombudsman a évidemment formulé de nouvelles recommandations depuis.

M. John Brassard:

Il qualifie cela de tâches faciles à accomplir.

M. Scott Maxwell:

C'est tout à fait le cas. Une des particularités — et il en parle aussi —, c'est que ce n'est pas nécessairement un changement de coût. Il s'agit plutôt d'un changement de procédure. Je crois que c'est exact. Si nous allons avoir affaire aux deux ministères — sachant que les choses ne se passeront pas comme le général vient de le proposer, même si elles le devraient —, nous devrons nous assurer de faire tous les préparatifs nécessaires, dans la mesure du possible, lorsqu'un militaire quitte les forces, c'est-à-dire lorsque son dossier est transféré d'un ministère à l'autre. Nous devons veiller à ce que la transition se déroule le plus en douceur possible parce que nous savons, ayant travaillé avec ces gens, qu'il suffit de peu pour qu'ils cessent de prendre soin d'eux-mêmes, se laissent abattre et s'isolent de tout, y compris des activités propices à leur bien-être.

Nous en entendons parler beaucoup trop souvent. Notre organisation se penche là-dessus et cerne les lacunes pour ensuite essayer de les combler. Une des plus importantes lacunes que nous observons, c'est le délai d'attente après la libération pour passer d'un ministère à l'autre. C'est là que ces gens perdent leur identité. Il s'agit d'une lutte constante, et ils ont l'impression qu'ils doivent raconter de nouveau leur histoire, trop de fois à trop de personnes, qui ne s'en soucient pas assez pour leur donner les services de soutien dont ils ont besoin et pour les aider à répondre à toutes les questions qu'ils se font poser par leurs proches, comme: « Que comptes-tu faire maintenant? Quelle est la prochaine étape pour nous et notre famille? »

C'est sérieux, et tout ce que je peux dire en quelques mots, c'est ceci: adoptez les recommandations de l'ombudsman du ministère de la Défense nationale. Il s'agit de mesures faciles à accomplir, mais je crois qu'elles constituent un point de départ très important.

Bgén Joe Sharpe:

Il y a quelques points que j'aimerais souligner très rapidement. Ils sont semblables à ceux soulevés par Scott.

Tout d'abord, comblez l'écart. C'est un gros problème. Nous devons rapprocher ces deux ministères, et je crois que nous devons cesser de retirer le statut de membre à la personne qui quitte l'armée. Autrement dit, une fois que vous êtes membre des Forces armées canadiennes, vous le restez. Ce que nous faisons à l'heure actuelle, c'est que nous découpons les cartes, et vous devez vous débrouiller seul. Vous êtes classé dans une autre catégorie.

Nous devons éliminer le choc provoqué par la transition, lorsque la personne est rejetée de la famille, si je puis m'exprimer ainsi.

M. John Brassard:

C'est juste.

Bgén Joe Sharpe:

Ensuite, nous devons réduire la bureaucratie, c'est-à-dire la complexité de la procédure de transition. Ce n'est pas comme si nous allions dans un autre pays; nous restons au Canada. Nous ne faisons qu'une simple transition vers un autre ministère gouvernemental, mais l'horrible bureaucratie qui entoure cette démarche dépasse l'entendement — même lorsque vous êtes en santé. Si vous êtes malade ou blessé, c'est un obstacle qui est presque insurmontable.

Enfin, je dirais qu'il faut éliminer tous les obstacles à la transition. Étudiez sérieusement ce qui pose problème aux membres et à leur famille, et adoptez une approche ciblée pour faire disparaître ces obstacles. Nous ne pouvons nous passer des complications qui existent actuellement.

M. John Brassard:

Général, vous avez le dernier mot.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Ne vous perdez pas dans les détails et adoptez plutôt une perspective stratégique; autrement dit, si nous inculquons un sentiment de loyauté à ces gens, dès leur premier jour de service... Lorsque je me suis enrôlé, mon père m'a dit: « Ne t'attends pas à des remerciements. Attends-toi à une carrière intéressante, mais tu ne seras jamais un millionnaire. » À l'époque, il m'avait aussi dit: « Change ton nom pour Dallard, parce qu'avec Dallaire, tu n'iras nulle part. » En tout cas, les temps ont changé.

Faites ce qui s'impose en gardant à l'esprit que la loyauté perdure en raison des expériences extraordinaires qui nous unissent. Ce qui compte, c'est le fait de servir le pays. Par conséquent, débarrassez-vous de cette approche qui consiste à traiter le même problème de deux façons. J'étais un ancien combattant en service. Toutefois, une fois que je n'étais plus en service, j'ai connu une kyrielle de circonstances différentes — on n'avait plus besoin de moi.

Adopter une perspective stratégique consiste, en partie, à faire en sorte que les deux ministères, aux règlements différents, aident la même personne de façon continue ou presque.

Deuxièmement, ne créez pas une nouvelle charte, mais comme je l'ai souvent dit à la Chambre, réformez la version actuelle. Débarrassez-vous des nombreuses règles stupides.

Oui, cela vous coûtera plus cher. Eh bien, pensez aux milliards de dollars que nous dépensons pour former ces gens, pour les équiper, pour leur donner des munitions, de la nourriture, des fournitures médicales, pour les déployer dans le théâtre d'opérations et faire tout en notre pouvoir afin de réduire le nombre de victimes et de gagner la guerre, ce qui exige des sommes faramineuses. Songez aussi aux milliards de dollars que nous devons dépenser après coup pour reconstruire et remplacer l'équipement et pour reconstituer nos stocks. Ensuite, comparez cela au montant réel que nous consacrons aux êtres humains qui ont subi de telles épreuves. C'est le décalage le plus flagrant qu'on puisse imaginer.

Le ministère des Anciens Combattants a un budget de 3 milliards de dollars, ce qui est tout à fait insuffisant par rapport à l'ampleur de l'engagement que nous prenons dans toutes les autres dimensions, sauf celle qui concerne l'être humain proprement dit.

Voilà donc la position stratégique qu'il faudrait adopter.

(1635)

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen, vous avez trois minutes.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

J'ai besoin de tellement plus de temps, mais je vais...

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Nous aussi.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je veux revenir en arrière et souligner tout ce que vous avez dit, car c'est exactement ce que nous avons compris.

Ma question s'adresse à vous, Scott, et à vous, Général Dallaire. Vous avez dit que vous étiez dans une situation horrible et que vous êtes revenus à une vie superficielle où les gens ne comprenaient pas votre expérience. Comment pouvons-nous changer cela? Comment faire pour nous assurer que lorsqu'un membre des Forces revient, on reconnaît son expérience et ce qui lui est arrivé pendant son déploiement?

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

L'élément central de cette question, en particulier avec les réservistes, qui sont partout en région et souvent abandonnés... Rappelez-vous que la situation se complique quand on parle des réservistes. Ce ne devrait pas être le cas, mais ce l'est.

Je pense que l'élément central de cette question est de les mettre en relation avec leur famille. C'est leur ancrage.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Pour un réserviste célibataire, ce serait ses parents. Ils font partie des Forces. S'il est marié, ce serait sa famille proche ou ses intimes, ses enfants. Faites fond sur l'aspect humain de ces personnes pour qu'elles puissent s'en servir comme point de départ. Nous avons perdu beaucoup de personnes parce qu'elles avaient perdu leur famille et qu'il ne leur restait rien. Elles n'ont pas seulement perdu leur travail. Elles ont perdu leur famille à cause de cela et ont fini par s'enlever la vie.

Essayez de garder cet élément fondamental de notre société avec elles et aidez-les à traverser les années difficiles à vivre avec des personnes comme cela.

L'approche est fondée sur les familles. Le mieux pour faire en sorte qu'elles soient disponibles est de passer par les centres de soutien aux familles. Personne n'est plus qualifié que leurs intervenants.

M. Scott Maxwell:

La chose dont le Général Dallaire a souvent parlé en ce qui concerne notre travail est celle de s'assurer qu'ils n'aient plus jamais à se battre. C'est une affirmation tellement percutante. Si, à leur retour au pays, ils sentent qu'ils se battent toujours pour accéder aux services qui leur sont offerts ainsi qu'à leur famille, cela pose un problème énorme.

Lorsqu'on parle de chasser ce sentiment et de la façon de le faire, pourquoi ne pas commencer par s'assurer qu'ils n'aient pas à se battre encore une fois pour recevoir les services auxquels ils ont droit lorsqu'ils rentrent au Canada après un déploiement?

(1640)

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord.

Vous avez dit quelque chose de très important, qu'on avait essayé d'économiser. C'est l'impression que j'ai constamment, qu'il soit question de la Nouvelle Charte des anciens combattants, de la méfloquine ou du syndrome de la guerre du Golfe.

Il y a quelques années, le comité a mené une étude sur le syndrome de la guerre du Golfe. Nous avions des montagnes de preuves selon lesquelles il s'agissait d'un mal psychologique, imaginaire, alors que nous recevions des anciens combattants chauves et clairement très désorientés.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Nous aurions pu leur donner 70 000 $ et leur dire qu'on reconnaissait qu'il s'agit d'une blessure. Même si nous n'arrivons pas à comprendre tous les aspects légaux de la question, et même si certains d'entre eux nous arnaqueront, on s'en fout.

Cela aurait eu pour effet de changer l'attitude des troupes pour ce qui est de rentrer au pays blessé. Si vous amoindrissez le fait qu'ils sont blessés, vous amoindrissez leur efficacité opérationnelle et le fait qu'ils prennent les risques appropriés, ainsi que la capacité des familles de composer avec eux à leur retour.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

C'est la même chose en ce qui concerne la méfloquine.

J'ai demandé directement si les soldats étaient avertis, s'ils étaient surveillés et si quelqu'un prenait la peine de se renseigner sur les effets de ce médicament, et on m'a répondu que non. J'ai demandé s'il y avait des conséquences pour quelqu'un qui affirme choisir de ne pas prendre ce médicament, et on m'a répondu: « Oh, non, cela passe par la chaîne de commandement. »

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

La chaîne de commandement vous imposera des sanctions parce que vous vous infligez des blessures à vous-mêmes en rejetant les conseils médicaux qu'elle a elle-même approuvés.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Même s'ils servaient de cobayes.

Le président:

Nous en avons terminé avec les témoignages des membres de ce groupe.

Nous allons faire une courte pause.

Au nom du Comité, je tiens à vous remercier tous les trois d'avoir été au service du Canada et de ce que vous avez fait pour les hommes et les femmes des forces armées.

Nous allons faire une pause de deux minutes et nous reviendrons ensuite avec le deuxième groupe.

Merci.

(1640)

(1645)

Le président:

Reprenons nos travaux.

Au cours de la deuxième heure, nous allons devoir abréger un peu le temps que nous consacrons à la question.

De l'Association québécoise de prévention du suicide, nous accueillons Kim Basque, coordonnatrice de la formation, et Catherine Rioux, coordonnatrice des communications.

Nous allons commencer par 10 minutes de témoignages.

Roméo Dallaire va rester avec nous, mais probablement pas pour répondre à des questions. Il veut seulement voir comment le Comité travaille.

Nous allons commencer nos travaux avec notre nouveau groupe.

Merci. La parole est à vous. [Français]

Mme Catherine Rioux (coordonnatrice des communications, Association québécoise de prévention du suicide):

Monsieur le président, membres du Comité et monsieur Dallaire, nous vous remercions tout d'abord de nous avoir invités à participer à cette consultation. Nous savons que les Forces armées canadiennes et Anciens Combattants Canada agissent déjà en faveur de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide. Nous vous remercions de votre intérêt à aller encore plus loin.

Depuis 30 ans, notre association développe la prévention du suicide sur le territoire québécois. Elle rassemble des chercheurs, des intervenants, des cliniciens, des endeuillés par suicide ainsi que des organisations privées, publiques et communautaires.

Nos champs d'action sont la sensibilisation, la mobilisation citoyenne ainsi que la formation des intervenants et des citoyens. Vous aurez compris que notre association n'est pas experte dans le domaine militaire. La pertinence de notre comparution devant le Comité aujourd'hui réside dans notre expérience à conseiller des acteurs variés de la société et à élaborer des stratégies de prévention pour des milieux très variés. Nous l'avons fait récemment pour des producteurs agricoles et pour des centres de détention.

Comment réduire le nombre de suicides chez nos vétérans? Ce que nous savons tous, c'est qu'il n'y a pas de réponse simple et que nous devons agir sur plusieurs fronts. Les quelques pistes que nous pourrons proposer pendant cette heure et qui nous apparaissent incontournables touchent la sensibilisation, la formation et l'offre de services.

Je vais commencer par la sensibilisation, ou le changement de culture et de mentalité.

Grâce à des campagnes de sensibilisation répétées, les mentalités ont commencé à changer au sujet du suicide et de la santé mentale. Les tabous sont moins tenaces et commencent à s'estomper. Le suicide n'est plus perçu ou est moins perçu comme une fatalité et un problème individuel comme c'était le cas il y a 10, 15 ou 20 ans. On sait davantage que c'est un problème collectif et qu'il est possible de le prévenir.

Des gens parlent davantage de leurs problèmes de santé mentale et la demande d'aide est davantage valorisée. Nous avons fait beaucoup de chemin à ce chapitre, mais beaucoup de travail reste à accomplir. C'est pourquoi nous sommes ici aujourd'hui.

Nous avons quelques propositions à faire en ce qui concerne la sensibilisation. Nous sommes persuadés qu'il faut d'abord travailler en amont en sensibilisant les militaires actifs au sein des forces armées, particulièrement ceux faisant partie d'unités plus à risque de suicide, comme les métiers de combat.

Il y a toutes sortes d'initiatives. Il peut s'agir, par exemple, de renforcer la cohésion autour d'une personne qui vit des difficultés ou qui est mise à l'écart de son unité pour des raisons de santé. On peut penser à des messages qui répètent que s'occuper de sa santé mentale est aussi important que prendre soin de sa santé physique. Il y a aussi des campagnes visant à faire connaître les ressources d'aide existantes.

Il faut aussi travailler à réduire l'acceptabilité sociale du suicide. Chez certains hommes qui adhèrent au rôle traditionnel masculin, il semble que cette acceptabilité soit plus forte. Certaines approches thérapeutiques visent à réduire cette acceptabilité et réussissent à rendre moins acceptable le suicide et à valoriser le fait qu'en trouvant d'autres façons de mettre fin à ses souffrances, on peut devenir un modèle pour ses enfants et un modèle de résilience pour sa communauté.

Nous sommes profondément convaincus que le suicide ne doit pas être une option, individuellement et collectivement. C'est pourquoi nous appuyons des messages qui vont dans ce sens et qui invitent à trouver d'autres avenues à la détresse et à la souffrance.

Nous croyons aussi que, dans la sphère de la sensibilisation, il faut poser des gestes pour éviter de glorifier les personnes décédées par suicide, étant donné que cela comporte un risque de contagion. Pour éviter cela, il est nécessaire de sensibiliser les médias. Je sais que cela se fait déjà, mais il faut répéter sans cesse ce message, parce que les salles de presse et les journalistes changent constamment.

(1650)



Il faut aussi sensibiliser les gens responsables des rituels lorsque survient un décès par suicide ainsi que les familles endeuillées. C'est une chose très délicate à faire, mais si l'on veut préserver la vie des vétérans qui souffrent, il faut prêter attention à cela. Il y a certaines pratiques qui peuvent avoir des conséquences, par exemple ériger des monuments honorifiques à la mémoire de militaires décédés par suicide. Nous y voyons un risque réel pour les vétérans qui souffrent, qui sont vulnérables au suicide et qui ont perdu énormément de reconnaissance et de valorisation. Ces vétérans pourraient voir le suicide comme une façon de retrouver un certain honneur et une certaine reconnaissance. Entendons-nous bien: il faut des services funèbres appropriés pour les militaires qui se sont enlevé la vie, tout comme pour les militaires décédés d'autres causes, toutefois il faut bien mesurer l'aspect de la glorification et de la contagion possible.

Mme Kim Basque (coordonnatrice de la formation, Association québécoise de prévention du suicide):

Pour bien évaluer les services et les formations à offrir, il faut comprendre dans quel état se trouve la personne suicidaire.

Toutes les personnes suicidaires, militaires ou non, croient qu'elles ne valent rien, que leur situation ne changera jamais et que personne ne peut les aider. Dans ce contexte, il devient extrêmement difficile d'aller chercher de l'aide, de la trouver et de faire un pas vers une ressource. C'est d'autant plus difficile quand on est un homme qui adhère au rôle traditionnel masculin, alors que la force physique, l'autonomie, l'indépendance, la résolution de ses problèmes par soi-même sont valorisées. Quand une personne se trouve dans une période plus difficile de sa vie où elle pense qu'elle ne vaut rien, que personne ne peut l'aider et que la situation ne changera jamais, tous ces obstacles font en sorte qu'il devienne extrêmement difficile et douloureux pour elle d'aller chercher de l'aide.

Par contre, en dépit de sa souffrance, la personne vivra toujours de l'ambivalence. Cela veut dire qu'une partie d'elle veut arrêter de souffrir, et c'est pour cela qu'elle pense mettre fin à ses jours, cependant il y a toujours une partie d'elle qui veut vivre. C'est cette partie qui doit être reconnue par la personne en détresse et c'est le travail des intervenants et des professionnels de faire grandir cette partie d'elle-même. Chaque fois que la personne suicidaire demande de l'aide, qu'elle manifeste sa détresse, c'est la partie d'elle qui veut vivre qui s'exprime et qui continue d'avoir de l'espoir.

Pour ce qui est de nombreux anciens combattants — il s'agit généralement d'hommes —, les caractéristiques de leur manière de demander de l'aide doivent être prises en considération. C'est vrai pour le suicide en général, c'est vrai également dans les forces armées. La demande d'aide ne se manifestera pas de la même façon, et la manière de leur offrir des services doit également être adaptée.

La recherche nous démontre que quand un homme adhère au rôle traditionnel masculin, il est cinq fois plus à risque de commettre une tentative de suicide que quelqu'un d'autre dans la population générale. Au sein des forces armées, une libération pour des raisons médicales constitue un échec du système, mais c'est aussi un échec pour cet homme qui vit une situation de vulnérabilité. Comme cette perception est généralisée à l'intérieur de lui et au sein de son unité, il ressent de la honte et il a de la difficulté à aller chercher de l'aide, comme on vous le mentionnait. Le fait de passer du service militaire actif à la vie civile et de devenir un ancien combattant représente alors un moment critique pendant lequel le soldat vulnérable va perdre le réseau fort et uni auquel il s'identifiait et dont il était partie prenante. Cela va donc représenter un moment extrêmement difficile qu'on doit prévoir et encadrer, d'où l'importance de la consultation actuelle.

De nombreux services sont offerts par Anciens Combattants Canada, comme on le sait. Cependant, les professionnels qui agissent en prévention du suicide, les intervenants vers lesquels nos anciens combattants vont pouvoir se tourner, sont-ils suffisamment formés? Sont-ils en mesure de reconnaître les indices de détresse et d'agir rapidement?

Une formation pour les citoyens du Québec a fait ses preuves. « Agir en sentinelle pour la prévention du suicide » est une formation qui ne s'adresse pas à des professionnels, mais à toute personne qui souhaite jouer un rôle dans sa communauté, au cours de ses loisirs, auprès de ses collègues de travail et de ses pairs. Cela permet d'agir proactivement, de repérer les indices de détresse, de diriger la personne vers les ressources d'aide et de l'y accompagner. La formation de réseaux de sentinelles fonctionne. C'est efficace et c'est déjà implanté dans certaines communautés militaires. Cela favorise le repérage rapide et la proactivité.

Dans la société civile comme dans différentes communautés particulières, ces sentinelles doivent pouvoir se référer à un intervenant désigné. Elles doivent être soutenues pour jouer leur rôle et pouvoir ensuite aider rapidement la personne suicidaire à avoir accès à un intervenant qui va faire une intervention complète et déterminer les démarches à entreprendre par la suite.

(1655)



Une formation en prévention du suicide est fondamentale pour les intervenants et les professionnels en santé mentale ainsi que pour les médecins qui travaillent auprès des militaires et des anciens combattants. Il ne faut pas tenir pour acquis qu'un médecin, une infirmière ou un psychologue ont reçu une formation spécialisée en prévention du suicide. Cependant, ces formations existent et elles fonctionnent.

Si le taux de suicide chez les hommes a grandement diminué au Québec au cours des années 2000, c'est précisément grâce à une stratégie nationale dans le cadre de laquelle la formation était au coeur des actions. Nous vous proposons donc d'en faire la pierre angulaire de la prochaine stratégie destinée aux anciens combattants.

Par ailleurs, nous attirons votre attention sur trois éléments majeurs à considérer relativement à l'actuelle offre de services ou à l'égard de ce que vous pourriez mettre en oeuvre. Le général Dallaire y a fait allusion plus tôt. Il s'agit de l'importance d'harmoniser les services proposés à nos militaires actifs et à nos anciens combattants. Cette transition doit être vécue le mieux possible pour que, ultimement, la personne ou le militaire suicidaire ayant besoin de services, ayant réussi à demander de l'aide et ayant trouvé quelqu'un pour l'aider et l'accompagner dans cette démarche n'ait pas à changer d'intervenant ou d'équipe traitante et n'ait pas à répéter son histoire, que ce soit avant ou après une tentative de suicide.

Pour éviter cette cassure, nous proposons que l'unification des centres de traitement des blessures de stress opérationnel des Forces canadiennes et des centres des anciens combattants soit considérée, de façon à ce l'équipe traitante soit la même. L'alliance thérapeutique est importante. Parfois, les anciens combattants reviennent même à l'équipe et aux professionnels de la santé qui étaient les leurs lorsqu'ils étaient en fonction.

Nous avons également parlé de soutien social. Le général Dallaire a abordé ce sujet. Il s'agit du soutien social des familles et des pairs, mais aussi du soutien provenant de l'unité ainsi que du rassemblement autour des Forces et des militaires actifs. Ce soutien doit être partie intégrante des soins et de ce que les professionnels et les intervenants proposent aux militaires.

Les hommes sollicitent principalement leur conjointe, parfois même uniquement celle-ci, lorsqu'ils veulent obtenir du soutien émotif. Quand ils ne vont pas bien, une séparation survient parfois. D'autres problèmes peuvent s'ajouter, notamment des problèmes de santé mentale, d'alcoolisme et de toxicomanie. Tout cela exerce une pression considérable sur les proches. Il est d'autant plus important de tenir compte de cette réalité pour favoriser le rétablissement du militaire et de l'ancien combattant.

Les Forces armées canadiennes sont une grande et solide famille. Chaque membre peut compter sur l'autre pour sa survie. Il s'agit maintenant de faire en sorte que cette force et cette entraide se poursuivent après la libération, que cette dernière soit ou non pour des causes médicales.

Par ailleurs, nous faisons des recommandation en ce qui touche la prévention sur le Web et l'intervention en ligne. La détresse se manifeste de plus en plus sur les diverses plateformes. Les personnes communiquent sur le Web leurs idées suicidaires et leur détresse. C'est notamment le cas des jeunes et des personnes isolées, mais ce comportement est de plus en plus répandu chez diverses personnes. Nous croyons que les stratégies de prévention du suicide doivent désormais tenir compte de cette réalité en incluant un volet Web. Cela permettrait aux gens de diffuser des messages de prévention, de faire du repérage, d'être proactifs et de proposer des services complets d'intervention en ligne.

En conclusion, je rappelle les éléments que doit comprendre une stratégie efficace en matière de prévention du suicide. Tout d'abord, tous les acteurs sont concernés. Ensuite, les gestionnaires des divers niveaux de la chaîne de commandement doivent suivre une formation, adhérer au principe et faire preuve de leadership. Également, une formation particulière en prévention du suicide doit être offerte aux professionnels et aux intervenants. De plus, il faut soutenir la création de réseaux de sentinelles. Il faut aussi avoir un soutien social fort et répandu. En outre, il faut que les gens soient davantage sensibilisés aux problèmes de santé mentale et qu'ils soient mieux informés sur l'aide qui peut être offerte; il faut favoriser la demande d'aide pour changer, ultimement, les cultures et les mentalités. Il est important aussi de porter attention aux messages et aux rituels, de façon à ce qu'ils n'augmentent pas l'acceptabilité sociale du suicide. Bien sûr, il faut un financement adéquat pour mettre en vigueur les mesures proposées. Enfin, il faut évidemment des soins accessibles et adaptés à la clientèle à laquelle ils s'adressent.

(1700)



Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons commencer notre première série de questions, que nous allons devoir écourter à cinq minutes par personne. Je suis désolé.

Nous allons commencer par M. Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci, monsieur le président.[Français]

Merci beaucoup, mesdames Rioux et Basque.[Traduction]

Je vous sais gré d'être venues. Malheureusement, c'est tout ce que je peux vous dire sans l'aide d'un interprète.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Robert Kitchen: Vous avez toutes les deux dit quelque chose qui a retenu mon attention, et je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps vu que je partagerai mon temps avec Mme Wagantall.

Madame Rioux, vous avez parlé du besoin d'éviter de glorifier la mort par suicide. Pouvez-vous expliquer ce que vous vouliez dire par cela? [Français]

Mme Catherine Rioux:

En utilisant le suicide comme moyen de mettre fin à ses souffrances, un militaire risque de recevoir des honneurs, de l'attention et de la reconnaissance. C'est ce que j'appelle la glorification du suicide. On peut glorifier la personne décédée ou lui rendre hommage, mais il est important de dissocier cela de son geste, de son suicide. Il ne faut pas qu'un militaire considère qu'en posant un tel geste il va recevoir plus d'honneur qu'un autre soldat décédé d'une crise cardiaque ou d'une autre cause. Il faut éviter qu'il y ait un phénomène de contagion et que les gens pensent que c'est une façon de retrouver de la reconnaissance de la part des Forces canadiennes et de la société.

(1705)

[Traduction]

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci.

Quelqu'un qui tente de s'enlever la vie parce qu'il souffre peut-être de dépression ou qu'il vit d'autres situations difficiles se fait souvent accoler une étiquette. C'est une tare. Quelqu'un se dit qu'il ne vaut rien. J'essaie de concilier cette perspective avec votre commentaire concernant la glorification du suicide et la question de savoir si une personne chercherait vraiment à passer à l'acte, mais je vous sais gré de vos commentaires.

Mademoiselle Basque, vous avez parlé de formation sur la prévention du suicide. Dans quelle mesure est-elle importante au sein de votre organisation? [Français]

Mme Kim Basque:

C'est un volet extrêmement important de notre organisation. L'AQPS conçoit des produits de formation avec des partenaires majeurs comme le ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec, de même qu'avec d'autres organisations ayant une expertise en données probantes. Nous devons nous inspirer et apprendre de la recherche pour offrir à nos intervenants et à nos concitoyens l'occasion d'acquérir des compétences concrètes qui leur permettront de jouer un rôle en prévention du suicide.

L'AQPS a actuellement une vingtaine de produits de formation différents. Nous avons formé au-delà de 19 000 intervenants pour qu'ils utilisent les bonnes pratiques et les outils cliniques leur permettant de reconnaître les facteurs proximaux du suicide. Il y a 75 facteurs associés au suicide, et certains ont plus de poids que d'autres. On observe certains facteurs de façon très rapprochée lors d'un passage à l'acte.

Grâce à l'expertise que nous avons acquise et aux outils dont nous disposons, nous améliorons nos interventions auprès des personnes suicidaires ambivalentes afin qu'elles renouent avec leurs raisons de vivre.

La formation pour les sentinelles est élaborée selon un modèle similaire, en tout respect, bien sûr, du rôle et des responsabilités qui appartiennent à des citoyens volontaires dans leur milieu. Cette formation va outiller ces gens afin qu'ils soient en mesure de vérifier la présence d'idées suicidaires, de connaître les ressources et d'accompagner la personne suicidaire vers ces ressources, car c'est souvent un pas difficile à franchir pour cette personne.

Nos produits de formation sont complémentaires et visent à resserrer le filet de sécurité autour des personnes suicidaires. [Traduction]

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci beaucoup.

J'espère que j'ai laissé suffisamment de temps à Mme Wagantall pour poser des questions.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Comme vous le savez, au Canada, nous avons récemment légalisé le suicide assisté et l'aide médicale à mourir. Depuis ce temps, 800 Canadiens ont choisi cette option. Avec l'entrée en vigueur de ces mesures législatives, je me suis beaucoup préoccupée de nos anciens combattants, de nos soldats, qui estiment que la vie ne vaut plus la peine d'être vécue et qui pourraient voir cela comme une affirmation. Dans le cadre de votre travail, remarquez-vous la moindre différence depuis l'adoption de ces mesures législatives? [Français]

Mme Kim Basque:

Il est trop tôt pour faire l'état de la situation ou obtenir une documentation pertinente concernant l'aide médicale à mourir — c'est comme cela que nous l'appelons au Québec.

Cela dit, nous sommes extrêmement préoccupés par ce sujet. Au moment de l'élaboration de cette loi, il y a déjà quelques années, nous avons participé aux consultations de la commission parlementaire de l'Assemblée nationale du Québec pour faire part de nos préoccupations quant à un possible glissement en matière d'acceptabilité sociale du suicide.

Une personne en fin de vie a l'impression, à tort ou à raison, que sa vie ne vaut plus la peine d'être vécue; c'est le jugement qu'elle porte. C'est pour cela qu'elle souhaite demander l'aide médicale à mourir, pour provoquer sa mort. Même dans un contexte médical, on comprend bien les raisons qui poussent les gens à vouloir se prévaloir de cette mesure.

Nos préoccupations portaient sur la manière d'offrir à une personne vulnérable, qui ne va pas bien, qui a l'impression que sa souffrance est intolérable, qui est dépressive et suicidaire, les mêmes soins auxquels elle devrait avoir droit, sans légitimer une demande d'aide médicale à mourir dans un contexte où légalement cela ne s'appliquerait pas.

Nous sommes extrêmement préoccupés par cette question. Pour l'instant, il est trop tôt pour mesurer les effets concrets et documentés de l'aide médicale à mourir.

(1710)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci de votre réponse.

Monsieur Graham. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci de vos commentaires.

Vous avez beaucoup parlé de formation. Dans le contexte des anciens combattants, j'aimerais savoir qui on devrait former.

Mme Kim Basque:

Les équipes soignantes devraient recevoir une formation spécialisée pour faire une intervention complète et accueillir adéquatement les anciens combattants en tenant compte de la demande d'aide des hommes militaires qui ne se présente pas toujours de la même façon. Ces équipes devraient aussi utiliser des outils cliniques précis ainsi qu'assurer le suivi et l'accès aux services et aux ressources.

Les réseaux de sentinelles auxquels nous faisions référence peuvent aussi être proposés. Les sentinelles doivent être des adultes volontaires qui sont déjà dans un rôle où ils ont la confiance de la personne qui pourrait se confier et accepter de s'ouvrir sur sa difficulté. Cela ne peut pas être l'équipe soignante. Il faut vraiment que ce soit des personnes qui gravitent autour des anciens combattants et qui sont capables d'avoir accès à eux même si elles ne sont pas des spécialistes.

Permettez-moi de faire un parallèle entre les anciens combattants et le milieu agricole. Nous avons formé des réseaux de sentinelles de façon massive et nous avons même mis sur pied une formation propre au milieu agricole. Les producteurs agricoles sont souvent isolés. Ils ne font pas nécessairement partie d'un réseau. Cela dit, il y a quand même des gens qui gravitent autour d'eux et qui les côtoient, parce qu'ils leur offrent des services. Ce sont ces gens qui ont été formés à titre de sentinelles pour rejoindre les producteurs agricoles.

On pourrait penser à mettre sur pied un système similaire pour les anciens combattants, c'est-à-dire évaluer dans quels lieux ils se retrouvent, qui ils voient, avec qui ils sont en contact régulièrement dans leur vie quotidienne. Ces gens peuvent devenir des sentinelles, s'ils le désirent, bien sûr. En effet, cela ne peut pas être une obligation. Tout cela est intimement lié à la formation d'intervenants. La sentinelle doit avoir accès à du soutien pour elle-même et pour être en mesure d'accompagner la personne suicidaire vers un intervenant 24 heures sur 24.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On pourrait donc former les familles et les militaires eux-mêmes.

Mme Kim Basque:

Oui, si le militaire n'est pas lui-même suicidaire et si la famille n'a pas elle-même besoin de soins et d'accompagnement.

Les proches des personnes suicidaires ont d'autres besoins et doivent obtenir des soins. Ils ne peuvent pas agir à titre de sentinelles dans un moment plus difficile de leur vie familiale. Ils ont besoin de prendre soin d'eux-mêmes et de leurs proches et de savoir comment accompagner et soutenir le conjoint ou la conjointe qui ne va pas bien. Nous essayons d'éviter de former les proches, précisément quand ils vivent un moment difficile. Bien sûr, à d'autres moments, c'est possible de le faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez aussi parlé d'éviter la glorification des militaires morts par suicide.

Un peu plus tôt, nous avons parlé avec le général Dallaire du besoin de compter les suicides de guerre comme des morts de guerre.

Comment peut-on réconcilier ces deux approches?

Mme Catherine Rioux:

Pouvez-vous répéter la question? Je veux être certaine d'avoir bien compris.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On veut éviter de glorifier le suicide, bien sûr, mais on veut aussi reconnaître les vétérans qui se sont suicidés à cause de blessures mentales subies à la suite de leur participation à la guerre. On doit les reconnaître, mais sans les glorifier. Comment peut-on concilier cela?

Mme Catherine Rioux:

C'est sûr qu'il faut reconnaître comme des victimes les gens qui ont combattu. Évidemment, cela pose un certain risque. Certains intervenants en prévention du suicide s'inquiètent de faire ce parallèle. C'est une question complexe.

Nous vous recommandons de prendre un certain temps et d'en parler avec des spécialistes de la question. Il y en a plusieurs au Québec, notamment des chercheurs comme Brian Mishara. Certains intervenants qui travaillent au sein de l'armée ont aussi une spécialisation en la matière.

Nous n'avons pas toutes les réponses, mais nous croyons qu'il est important de s'attarder à cette question et de trouver les bonnes pistes afin d'éviter une telle glorification.

Mme Kim Basque:

Voici la nuance qu'il convient de faire. Bien sûr, il faut recueillir des renseignements utiles sur les suicides de militaires et d'anciens combattants afin de comprendre ce qu'on aurait pu faire pour les éviter et pour mettre en place des services adéquats. Cependant, en rendant hommage à une personne décédée par suicide, il ne faut pas envoyer le message qu'on rend aussi hommage à la manière dont elle a mis fin à ses souffrances. Il ne faut pas non plus occulter le fait qu'il fallait offrir des services à cette personne et placer un filet de sécurité autour d'elle afin d'éviter qu'elle ne passe à l'acte.

C'est une préoccupation qu'il y a dans tous les milieux. À la suite d'un décès par suicide, on parle de postvention. Cela consiste à se demander quelles interventions on peut faire auprès des proches, des pairs et des milieux qui ont vécu la perte de quelqu'un. On est toujours préoccupé par la manière dont les gens ayant perdu quelqu'un qu'ils aimaient souhaitent lui rendre hommage. On ne veut pas que cela envoie un message de glorification ou qu'on lui rende un hommage démesuré. On s'inquiète des risques que pose le fait de mettre l'accent sur la manière dont une personne est décédée, c'est-à-dire sur le fait qu'elle s'est enlevé la vie.

(1715)

[Traduction]

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

On vient juste de me demander de renforcer cette affirmation, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Vous devrez être bref. Nous manquons de temps.

L'hon. Roméo Dallaire:

Avant que les personnes se suicident, l'option est d'avoir un système qui reconnaisse qu'elles ont été blessées de façon honorable. Si vous avez une façon fiable de montrer qu'elles l'ont été, et si elles estiment que cela a été reconnu — comme dans le cas des personnes qui ont perdu un bras ou une jambe — vous avez ensuite un équilibre entre ces personnes et celles qui ont seulement choisi l'autre option. Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec les témoins pour dire qu'il ne faut pas essayer de leur rendre hommage simplement parce qu'elles se sont suicidées. Il faut reconnaître au préalable que les militaires ont subi une blessure de façon honorable et les traiter honorablement comme l'ont fait leurs régiments et d'autres. On réussira alors à trouver un équilibre.

Le président:

Merci.

Allez-y, madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Je suis ravie que vous ayez soulevé cet argument, général Dallaire, car le trouble de stress post-traumatique est une blessure qui a affaibli un ancien combattant d'une certaine façon.

Vous avez parlé des personnes au combat qui souffrent de cette blessure, mais nous savons que le trouble de stress post-traumatique peut frapper les personnes qui ne sont pas au combat. Je pense notamment à une statistique tirée du sondage de 2016 de Statistique Canada qui révèle que plus du quart des femmes dans les forces armées ont dit avoir été agressées sexuellement au moins une fois dans leur carrière.

Vous êtes-vous demandées si les agressions sexuelles dans l'armée — pas seulement contre les femmes, mais aussi contre les hommes — sous-tendaient les cas de trouble de stress post-traumatique en situation de combat ou de non-combat? [Français]

Mme Kim Basque:

À ma connaissance, le lien de cause à effet n'a pas été très bien démontré, comme c'est le cas pour d'autres types de difficultés. Je ne veux en rien diminuer les effets des agressions sexuelles, qui sont épouvantables tant sur les femmes comme sur les hommes, mais je veux seulement préciser qu'on peut fragiliser quelqu'un qui ne l'est pas et fragiliser davantage quelqu'un qui est déjà en détresse.

Le suicide est complexe. Les facteurs de vulnérabilité au suicide sont également complexes. Il n'y a pas de cause unique qu'on puisse associer directement au suicide. Je ne sais pas si des données particulières ont permis de démontrer le lien entre le suicide chez les militaires et les agressions sexuelles. [Traduction]

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord, merci.

Je me demande si les professionnels de la santé mentale devraient jouer un rôle plus central pendant la transition d'un ancien combattant. Est-ce qu'une présence plus marquée de ces professionnels faciliterait cette transition, soulignerait la valeur de l'ancien combattant et montrerait que les fonctionnaires du MDN et d'AAC comprennent ses problèmes de santé mentale et éprouvent de la compassion pour lui? [Français]

Mme Kim Basque:

Nous proposons que la même équipe de soins suive le militaire, qu'il soit un militaire actif ou un ancien combattant qui a été libéré des Forces canadiennes en raison de son état de santé. Bien sûr, cela favoriserait la transition. Ultimement, cela ferait en sorte d'éliminer cette transition. Il s'agirait de la même équipe de soins qui s'occuperait d'un même militaire dont les besoins évolueraient. Comme la demande d'aide continue d'être fragile chez les hommes militaires, il est important de l'accueillir dans sa particularité. Il faut continuer de construire le lien de confiance qui s'est créé plutôt que de changer d'intervenant.

(1720)

[Traduction]

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Nous savons et avons entendu dire à maintes reprises à quel point les familles sont importantes pour le bien-être général de l'ancien combattant. Dans quelle mesure votre organisme intervient-il auprès des membres de la famille? Je ne pense pas seulement à la façon dont il soutient et aide les anciens combattants, mais aussi comment il aide les membres de la famille à survivre.

Dans un témoignage précédent, nous avons entendu dire que le nombre de suicides chez les enfants d'anciens combattants était à la hausse, ce qui est très troublant. Comment intervenez-vous auprès des familles? [Français]

Mme Kim Basque:

Notre association n'est pas un organisme qui offre des services aux citoyens qui ne vont pas bien. Nous avons une expertise en prévention du suicide, mais nous travaillons avec plusieurs partenaires qui offrent des services cliniques, dont les centres de prévention du suicide. Notre expertise tient compte de cela.

Au Québec, la façon d'intervenir a changé. Il y a quelques années, par exemple, on croyait à tort que le fait que la personne qui n'allait pas bien téléphone elle-même favorisait sa prise en charge. Or aucune recherche ne démontre que le rétablissement est plus efficace si la personne demande elle-même de l'aide. Ce que nous savons sur le suicide rend cette présupposition d'autant plus inappropriée.

Au Québec, on a adapté les services offerts afin qu'on accueille la demande d'aide provenant des proches et, bien sûr, pour qu'on soutienne ces derniers quand ils font cette demande, quand ils manifestent de l'inquiétude pour quelqu'un d'autre. Les services offerts par les centres de prévention du suicide et les centres intégrés de santé tiennent compte de cette réalité. [Traduction]

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je pense que c'est très important. En Ontario, il faut demander de l'aide soi-même. Votre famille ne peut pas le faire à votre place. C'est extrêmement frustrant.

Vous avez parlé des outils et des organismes externes. Nous avons aussi entendu dire qu'il y a un véritable esprit de famille au sein des forces armées. Trouvez-vous...

Le président:

Je suis désolé, votre temps est écoulé.

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Fraser.

Merci. [Français]

M. Colin Fraser:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je remercie nos deux invités de nous avoir livré leur présentation et d'être venus discuter d'un sujet aussi important. L'information dont vous nous faites part sera très utile à notre comité.

Vous avez déjà parlé de l'importance des familles et des proches dans ces situations. Pourriez-vous nous dire comment, dans les cas de suicide, il serait possible d'intervenir plus tôt avec l'aide des familles et des proches? Comment serait-il possible de rallier ces personnes autour du vétéran dans de telles situations?

Mme Kim Basque:

La prévention du suicide est l'affaire de tous, mais c'est aussi l'affaire des proches des personnes suicidaires. Ces dernières laissent des indices de détresse. On ne les voit pas toujours. On n'a pas toujours accès à l'ensemble du portrait. Chaque individu possède un morceau du casse-tête, et c'est quand on assemble tous ces morceaux qu'on arrive à comprendre dans quel état se trouve la personne, quels besoins ont été précisés et quels indices de détresse devraient nous mettre la puce à l'oreille.

Pour ce qui est des soins à offrir à la personne suicidaire, les proches ont de l'information privilégiée. Les ressources et les soins que nous pourrons offrir aux proches aideront ceux-ci à traverser la crise, à bien jouer leur rôle et à devenir un peu plus solides.

(1725)

Mme Catherine Rioux:

Il faut qu'ils sachent que des lignes spécialisées en prévention du suicide existent, notamment au Québec. Une ligne canadienne pour la prévention du suicide sera mise en oeuvre prochainement. Des projets pilotes sont mis sur pied. Cette ligne s'adressera à la population civile, mais aussi aux militaires et à leurs proches. En effet, ceux-ci peuvent se poser d'énormes questions, être inquiets et se trouver dans un état d'extrême vigilance. Il est donc important de faire savoir aux proches que ces ressources existent et qu'ils peuvent être guidés par des spécialistes en prévention du suicide.

Dans le cadre d'une stratégie sur la prévention du suicide, la postvention est extrêmement importante. Si on élabore une stratégie, il faut penser à des mécanismes de postvention. Que fait-on après le suicide de quelqu'un? Comment annonce-t-on les choses? Comment protège-t-on son environnement, ses collègues et sa famille, notamment? On peut faire de la prévention auprès de ces gens, qui sont plus susceptibles de commettre un suicide après le décès de quelqu'un.

M. Colin Fraser:

Il est important d'inclure de telles personnes dans le processus. En effet, plus on intervient tôt dans une situation de suicide, meilleur est le résultat.

Est-ce bien cela?

Mme Catherine Rioux:

Oui.

M. Colin Fraser:

Madame Basque, vous avez parlé, je crois, de services en ligne associés à votre organisation.

En vous basant sur votre expérience, me diriez-vous si les personnes en crise utiliseront les services en ligne? Peut-être qu'elles n'utiliseront aucun autre moyen de communication. C'est nouveau pour certains vétérans, mais c'est un mode de communication moderne. Pensez-vous que certaines personnes n'utiliseront que les services en ligne?

Mme Catherine Rioux:

Oui, nous le pensons. Des expériences ont été menées un peu partout dans le monde. Quelques-unes ont été faites au Canada, mais je dirais que nous sommes très peu avancés dans ce domaine. Au Québec, notamment, nous accusons du retard à cet égard. Certaines expériences démontrent que le Web permet de rejoindre d'autres types de clientèle, par exemple des gens qui n'iraient pas rencontrer des intervenants ou qui n'utiliseraient pas le téléphone pour demander de l'aide. Comme nous le disions un peu plus tôt, c'est le cas des personnes plus isolées. Les jeunes, aussi, communiquent très peu par téléphone maintenant.

On peut offrir d'autres façons d'interagir, notamment les textos et le clavardage. Dans certains pays, il y a de l'intervention en ligne. Il ne s'agit pas seulement d'établir un premier contact et d'intervenir par la suite au téléphone pour créer une alliance thérapeutique. Cela peut se faire en ligne, à distance. Pour certaines personnes, c'est moins intimidant. Elles se livrent davantage et peuvent choisir la fréquence des contacts.

Toutes sortes de modèles existent actuellement. Au Québec, le Centre de recherche et d'intervention sur le suicide et l'euthanasie, le CRISE, étudie beaucoup la question.

Bref, il y a des choses à explorer dans ce domaine, mais nous accusons du retard, malheureusement. Ce retard touche non seulement les militaires, mais la société civile également.

M. Colin Fraser:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Mme Kim Basque:

Cela signifie qu'il faut mettre en oeuvre les services dont les personnes suicidaires ont besoin là où elles se trouvent. Si c'est sur le Web, il faut être présent sur le Web. Si c'est au bout du fil, il faut être présent au bout du fil. Si elles se trouvent dans un lieu physique plus isolé, mais sont tout de même en contact avec une personne une fois par semaine, il faut que cette personne assure la vigilance et favorise cette demande d'aide.

Mme Catherine Rioux:

Après le décès par suicide d'une personne, il n'est pas rare que, sur les réseaux sociaux, les gens discutent du décès et expriment leur détresse et leur désarroi. Cela créé du désarroi parmi les intervenants en prévention du suicide, notamment les intervenants scolaires. Les gens ne savent pas trop quoi faire. Il y a des pistes de solution à proposer. Il faut mettre quelque chose en oeuvre pour que ces gens puissent repérer, dans les forums de discussion et les réseaux sociaux, les personnes qui sont les plus vulnérables.

M. Colin Fraser:

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Malheureusement, c'est tout le temps que nous avions pour les témoignages aujourd'hui. Je m'en excuse.

Je tiens à remercier votre organisme et à vous remercier toutes les deux du soutien que vous offrez aux hommes et aux femmes qui ont servi dans les forces armées.

De plus, si vous souhaitez ajouter quelque chose à votre témoignage, prière de l'envoyer au greffier, qui pourra ensuite le transmettre au Comité.

Sur ce, je vais suspendre la séance pendant une minute exactement, et nous nous occuperons ensuite d'affaires du Comité pendant environ cinq minutes. Je m'excuse auprès des membres du Comité d'avoir à vous garder un peu plus longtemps. Toutes les personnes qui n'ont pas besoin d'être ici peuvent partir. Nous allons commencer à étudier les affaires du Comité dans une minute.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on March 06, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.