header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-02-22 ACVA 44

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

(1540)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)):

Good afternoon. I'd like to call the meeting to order.

I apologize to our witnesses. We had a vote at the end of question period, so we're starting about 10 minutes late.

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), this is a study of mental health and suicide prevention among veterans. Today's witnesses are from the Department of National Defence. We have Captain Langlois, director of casualty support management; and Commodore Sean Cantelon, director general, Canadian Forces morale and welfare services.

We will start with our 10 minutes of witness statements, and then we will go to questioning.

Welcome, and thank you for coming today. The floor is yours.

Commodore Sean Cantelon (Director General, Canadian Forces Morale and Welfare Services, Department of National Defence):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Good morning, Mr. Chairman and members of the committee. I am Commodore Sean Cantelon.

In my role as director general, morale and welfare services for the Canadian Armed Forces, I am responsible for a range of programs and services in support of the operational readiness of the Canadian Armed Forces, in such areas as fitness, sports, recreation, and health promotion, both on bases and wings in Canada and on deployed operations.

This ranges from financial banking services offered through our SISIP Financial services, to mental health programs and services for Canadian Forces members and their families through “Support Our Troops” funds, including the Soldier On fund, and the military families fund.

I am also the director general and chief of military personnel organization who is responsible for casualty support and transition services on retirement. In this capacity, I worked very closely with retired Brigadier-General Dave Corbould, who developed the JPSU renewal. [Translation]

Joining me today is Captain(N) Marie- France Langlois, the Director of Casualty Support Management who is also representing the joint personnel support unit. Captain(N) Marie-France Langlois is a former commander of the joint personnel support unit and, in her current capacity, is leading the renewal of transition services for releasing Canadian Armed Forces members.[English]

I am very pleased to speak with you today on the topic of transition programs and services that are available to Canadian Forces members transitioning from military to civilian life. These services and programs are offered jointly by the Canadian Armed Forces and Veterans Affairs Canada, and are assisted by third-party, not-for-profit organizations.

The CAF approaches the topic of military to civilian transition through a holistic lens, looking at the military community as a whole, inclusive of regular and reserve force members, veterans, and their families. On average, over 10,000 regular and reserve force members transition out of the Canadian Armed Forces every year. Of that number, approximately 16% on average are medically released. This is significant because members who leave the service for medical reasons often require unique services.

There are a number of services available to our members, of which I will highlight just a few. However, before I go on, I would like to say that the majority of programs that I mention are available to all military members, regular or reserve, regardless of reason for their release from the Canadian Armed Forces. [Translation]

Since 1978, the Canadian Armed Forces have provided transitioning military personnel with a two-day second career assistance seminar, run at each military base and wing. These seminars delve into such topics as: pension and benefits, release proceedings, psychological challenges of transition, and services and benefits administered by Veterans Affairs Canada. An additional one-day seminar is provided specifically for those members medically releasing.

At all seminars, the attendance of spouses is strongly encouraged.

(1545)

[English]

The service income security insurance plan offers benefits to all CAF members leaving the military for medical reasons. These personnel receive income support for up to 24 months, and up to 64 months if they are unable to return to work. Those who leave of their own volition are also eligible for the same benefit if they are deemed totally disabled.

A component of this program is the vocational rehabilitation program, which enables participants to restore or establish their vocational capacity to prepare them for suitable gainful employment in the civilian workforce. This program focuses on releasing CAF members' abilities and veterans' abilities, interests, medical limitations, and the potential economic viability of their chosen plan to help them establish their future. The vocational rehabilitation program support can start up to six months prior to their release from the Canadian Armed Forces.

Similarly, Veterans Affairs also offers a suite of social benefit, income support, and rehabilitation programs. Considerable effort is ongoing to better align and harmonize the Canadian Armed Forces and the Veterans Affairs programs to ensure a seamless transition to civilian life for all CAF members.

Over and above the internal work that I just highlighted, the Canadian Armed Forces also works closely with third-party organizations to assist transitioning members, veterans, and their families. We continue to expand our relationships with multiple educational institutions across the country that have shown an interest in better understanding the qualifications and training of military personnel and offer them advanced standing in assorted academic programs at their institutions.

One example of our partnership is the military employment transition program, which works with more than 200 military-friendly employers to help members find meaningful employment. There are currently over 5,000 registered members and over 1,200 hires. This is in pursuit of their goal of 10,000 jobs in 10 years.

Successful transition to civilian life is a key priority of my organization and is in line with the CAF's comprehensive suicide prevention strategy, which is currently being developed and integrated across a spectrum of initiatives in order to prevent suicides. To help promote effective and efficient transitions, we work closely with Veterans Affairs Canada to remove barriers, raise awareness, provide members and their families with appropriate resources and support, promote research and evidence-based responses, and develop policy, protocols, guidance, and support programs and initiatives.[Translation]

We are also actively working with Veterans Affairs Canada on improving services to veterans offered by our organizations through a joint national career transition and employment strategy. This strategy takes a whole-of-government approach and anticipates expanding its focus to include other government agencies such as Employment and Social Development Canada, Service Canada, the Public Service Commission and others to leverage existing programs and resources in support of transitioning members and veterans.[English]

The delivery of the Canadian Armed Forces and Veterans Affairs transition services is accomplished through the joint personnel support unit, which consists of eight regional headquarters, 24 integrated personnel support centres, and seven satellite locations across the country with a headquarters here in Ottawa. The JPSU serves regular and reserve force personnel and their families, as well as the families of the fallen.

The JPSU and IPSCs are envisioned as a one-stop shop where those who are ill or injured can receive advice, support, and assistance, not only from the military staff who deliver programs and oversee the IPSC, but also from our colleagues at Veterans Affairs, personnel who are co-located with the Canadian Armed Forces at IPSCs.

The CAF is committed to providing improved service delivery for care of the ill and injured, which is why we work in close partnership with Veterans Affairs to enhance programs and services. Veterans Affairs and the CAF are intertwined in many aspects of the service delivery, and personnel from both organizations work together at all levels to provide service and assistance.

Among its other programs, the JPSU is also responsible for the operational stress injury social support program, or OSISS. It is a joint VAC-Canadian Armed Forces program that provides valued peer support to members, veterans, and their families. The goal of OSISS is to ensure that when peers enter the gateway of peer support, they will be able to reap the benefit of support based upon lived experience to help guide them to the programs and services that can assist them on their road to recovery. Since 2001, OSISS has assisted many peers in accepting their new normal.

Mr. Chairman, I would like to thank you for the opportunity to appear today. Captain Langlois and I would be pleased to respond to the committee's questions.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll start with Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Commodore and Captain, for your service and for being here to talk with us today. I appreciate that.

One of the things we've heard a lot when talking about mental illness is identity loss. I'm wondering if you could tell us.... Is there any point in time, at the JPSU, when identity loss is identified and spoken to?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

I'll ask Captain Langlois, who has commanded the JPSU and can speak best to that to answer.

Captain(N) Marie-France Langlois (Director, Casualty Support Management, Department of National Defence):

I think the key is to keep the link with the former unit of the military member, if he wishes to do so. That's something we are enhancing to ensure that the communication between the commanders of different operational units across the region is supported, with this approach by the commanding officers in the regions.

It's challenging, for sure, for people who have known physical injury. I think by creating a trust bond with the member we're supporting, we'll be better able to communicate.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

You mentioned the word “trust”. That appears to be another aspect. We've heard from a lot of our witnesses on the issue of trust.

Again, I go back to identity loss. These soldiers, seamen, and airwomen are saying that they've lost their identity. It has been taken away from them, whether because of a physical injury or a mental injury. I look at things from a health-care point of view. I look at that and say, “Well, how we can advance that? Can we not put this into the program right from the start?”

Earlier, we talked about our service delivery, and providing services right from the moment they enter the forces. Likewise here, when we're talking about treatment and trying to provide that, while looking at identity loss and trust, we must make sure that it comes from CAF and rolls into VAC.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

First, I will touch on some of the changes that Brigadier-General Dave Corbould instituted as commander of the JPSU.

They were very focused on creating that unit identity that we all grow up with in the Canadian Forces—part of the team, part of the unit. We've done that by adjusting the authorities and the sense of the unit. It is a unit in charge of people, and they have the authorities and responsibilities. That creates those bonds that we've all grown up with.

Second, to go back to the larger issue of trust, this comes back to the ongoing dialogue that we're all leading and we've had great success with. It starts at the top with mental health and that it's okay to say, “I didn't have a good day,” and then building that relationship within the culture.

Bell Let's Talk Day may be one day that we embrace in the Canadian Forces, but we are also bringing about a complete culture shift towards the ongoing care of those who are ill and injured, so that the fragility to the unit that you and others have spoken about won't be there. That culture shift is ongoing right now.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you.

I'm going to ask if you might be able to provide us with some figures.

Can you break down the percentage of people entered into the JPSU who are dealing with mental health issues? Have you done that? Do you have that category at all?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

Actually, the joint personnel support unit deals with medical employment limitations. We deal with the prognosis, not the diagnosis, so we're not aware of the actual medical condition of a member. That would be something that the health services of the Canadian Forces may be able to provide.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Do you track or keep any record of people who have gone through the JPSU who may have committed suicide?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

Again, this is tracked through the....

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

You heard previous testimony by a witness talking about the Canadian Forces' tracking of personnel on release. That process is centralized through the central registries.

Obviously, if someone's a member of that unit or under the care of that unit at the time, the unit is aware of it. It's not a responsibility of the JPSU to track those. The specifics of those would have to come from elsewhere in the department, but we track the care and feeding of people for whom we're responsible at the time.

(1555)

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you.

In your presentation, you mentioned a program that is provided to people, basically to educate them on topics of pension benefits, release procedures, and so on.

I remember when I first became a member of Parliament. I went through a two-day force-feeding of information on what goes on here. I found that it was great information—lots of stuff—but it was in one ear and out the other sometimes, and I couldn't put my finger in there fast enough to stop it.

One of my questions to them was if they could do it a second time, maybe a month or two down the road. Is that process involved in—

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Absolutely, two, three, or 10 times. We encourage people to do it a minimum of five years prior to their planned release, and then they can come back and do the next package. We are working on enhancing that package availability. It is an optional process for all members of the Canadian Armed Forces. We run it on every base across the country. I personally have done two, though I'm not releasing tomorrow.

It's exactly the point you have made. To make sure that members don't suffer from, “I thought I heard about that,” they get an opportunity to come back. There's no restriction on the number of times they can go to the SCAN, second career assistance network.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Lockhart.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I find your testimony very interesting. We've talked before in our service delivery study as well. We have conflicting views, I guess, on the JPSU and its functionality. On one hand, we're talking about the fact that it's envisioned as a one-stop shop, and that every door is the right door. We hear from other health care professionals that's the approach many mental health models are taking now. On the other hand, we have this conflicting testimony from others who are saying that it's not functioning well and that people are falling between the cracks.

What are the challenges that you see? Obviously, people are in transition and it's a difficult time for them, but are there any specific areas where we know we can do better? That's really where we see suicide happening. People are falling between the cracks and not responding to some of the services that are available.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

I think closing the seam when somebody transitions from CAF to civilian life is very important. We're working very hard with Veterans Affairs to enhance the different programs we have.

Veterans Affairs will be involved earlier in the process, probably when there's a notification of decision of release. We're working at simplifying and reducing the complexity of the paperwork. A pilot is being worked on as well as guided support. It links to the ombudsman's recommendation, where he talked about concierge services. This guided support is interesting.

For example, the JPSU is tailoring the services to the needs of the individual. With this guided support, which will be VAC's responsibility, working jointly with CAF, depending on the need of the individual. If somebody has less complex needs, for example, they'll be able to access the portal. If they need support to complete forms and know what resources are available, then a veteran's service agent would be appropriate. A case manager could be more appropriate for some people with complex transitional needs.

Right now there's a lot of.... We're working in different groups to look at the new transition model. This involves transition early in a career. When we talk about a seminar or network, we're looking at the beginning, the first posting for an individual. He will have training concerning the long-term financial responsibilities, looking at what to look for in personal development training when they eventually transition.

The My VAC Account will be available sooner. A lot of work is being done to enhance that portal.

For sure, there's always space for improvement. We take the comments of the veterans and CAF members very.... It's very important for us to apply them to policy change, programs, and services.

(1600)

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

You spoke about starting to talk about this transition earlier. One of the things we've heard that's been recurring is the loss of identity, so I think it's very important that you do that.

When do we consider earlier? Obviously, those are for planned retirements, and that sort of thing.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

In my organization I touched on SISIP financial services. One of the parts, besides managing that insurance program, is financial counselling and investing advice.

Two years ago we hired David Chilton to do the The Wealthy Barber tour. Now we have one of our executives who's retired military, quite dynamic, he calls his “Pierre's Talk”. He styled it after TED Talks. He's going across the country, educating them on finance. It's a challenge. It's never too late, but it's a heck of a challenge when you arrive 20 years later and say you should have known and done that. These are the ongoing services we're doing to enhance this.

We're very engaged with Veterans Affairs right now to figure out the appropriate times—and we have some trials, which the captain touched on—to inject the guided support to build the person's awareness so it isn't, as your colleague described, too late, too quickly. That should help address the identity piece.

Often, identity comes from a lack of understanding and knowledge. As we demystify this process, which arguably is a bit mystifying.... Many people join the military. First thing after basic training, they don't say, “When I get out”. They usually say, “When I drive my tank” or “go to sea on a ship”.

We want to help deal with all of that. A wide range of activities are ongoing now. We're working with our colleagues at Veterans Affairs to bring out enhancements that can be announced at the appropriate time, once they're through. We've touched on the pilot, and guided support is a classic one.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

I just received this. It's “The Guide to Benefits, Programs, and Services for Serving and Former Canadian Armed Forces Members and their Families”. We haven't seen this before, I don't think. I'm wondering if we can enter it as evidence. It's a relatively new document—from October. How widely is this being used and distributed? Is there an online version of this document?

The Chair:

I apologize, but you'll have to make it very short. We're running out of time on this one.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

There is an online version. That guide has been updated many times, and we'll make sure that we provide you with a copy.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

It's also provided at all the SCAN seminars. They get to see it there. They go through it, and they're given it in advance.

The Chair:

Perfect. If you could just send it to the clerk after, we'd appreciate it.

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you very much for being here and helping to support our study into issues around mental health and suicide.

Captain Langlois, you talked about working with VAC to enhance programs and simplify paperwork. I wonder if you could give an example of some of the limitations you might have run into at JPSU in regard to that goal. Is there something that is preventing you from achieving what you want, or are things going well?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

There are many fronts that CAF is working on with Veterans Affairs.

A good example of a program is the skills translator. When a CAF member is transitioning out, often the military skills are hard to translate into a civilian occupation. Right now CAF is working very closely with ESDC and Veterans Affairs to build a portal that is a translator. It's called MOC to NOC, so military occupation to national occupation. This is quite exciting, because this portal is going to grow, and we're looking at it eventually linking up into an education piece, into educational institutions. This is the work that is currently being done.

There is already skills translation on the ESDC site, but this is something we want to do. If you go on the CAF site or you go on the ESDC site or you go on VAC, they're all linked together. That's a tool that will assist the CAF member to transition, so that's a good example of the work we're doing.

(1605)

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

We heard testimony from a number of veterans that they feel as though they've been stripped of their identity, that they've literally been pushed out of the military, and they have feelings of abandonment.

Do you think this skills translator will help them to connect to a new sense of identity, or connect to a feeling of being needed again? I suppose it comes down to being needed, being valued.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

It's going to be a tool not only for transition but also for recruiting and for retention.

If somebody is in a specific occupation and knows how it translates to civilian life then he can, at the beginning of his career, maybe pursue more education in that field. So yes, with regard to identity, for sure I believe it's going to enhance it.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

Commodore, you talked about shifting the culture. Is there something more in regard to that military culture that you could talk about that is preventing it from living up to this potential to successfully help the veterans who are transitioning out?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

That's a challenging question for me to answer because I think if I had the key I'd be brilliant.

I've been in the military for 34 years and I have seen dramatic changes in culture and how we approach a wide range of activities. Our culture, as it does everywhere, reflects our society.

The chief has been very clear about the activities not in our military, and very open as well. Obviously it started with General Dallaire, but we've had serving officers at very senior levels and very senior NCOs, which is extremely critical, come out and speak about the challenges of transition and the challenges with things like mental health or physical recuperation.

That's what I mean by an open-culture shift, because previously those were private conversations involving only two or three people, and now they're becoming more open. I think that's the best thing we can do. As the leaders of today's Canadian Forces, we're taking our leadership responsibilities and trying to change that culture so we don't get to that sense of alienation and loss of identity.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

We've heard a great deal of late about opioids and addictions connected to opioids. I have the sense that a lot of our veterans are being prescribed opioids. Do you have any concerns about the prescribing of opioids? I know they're intended to be painkillers, but would other medication be preferable? They're extremely addictive, and they seem to play a role in well-being and mental health.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

I'm not a doctor, and I'm not the surgeon general, so it's not in my area of expertise. I would point out what Captain Langlois said. At the JPSU, we know the prognosis, in other words what the outcomes will be for the individual. We don't have an idea of their prescriptions or medications, or the specific medical limitations. We're focused on who they are.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

They don't talk about feeling dependent...?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

That's between them and their doctor in a medical capacity, which is how I understood the question.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Because very often there are very strong connections between how someone is adapting and preparing for life on the outside and these underlying issues, I wondered if you had a sense of any correlation. Obviously not.

(1610)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.):

Thank you both very much for coming today and sharing this information with us.

You mentioned an average of approximately 10,000 who transition out of the Canadian Armed Forces every year, and about 16% of those are medically released. Do we know how many of that number are released with mental health challenges?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

I don't think we do.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

It would be with the surgeon general.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

One of the things that was mentioned was—and I totally agree, and we've touched on this in our service delivery report, which was tabled back in December—better aligning and harmonizing the CAF and VAC programs to ensure transition to civilian life is as seamless as possible. What does that mean to you? What are the challenges right now?

Captain Langlois, you touched on closing the seam, which is important. Especially for morale and services programs, what do you see being done right now to help make that transition easier?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

That's one of the real flexibilities we have in the morale and welfare services. We operate under the non-public fund framework, which allows the CDS to provide services both to members and their families. That includes when they become veterans. Our programs, such as the Canadian Forces health identification card, which gets them discounts—we work with industry—is seamless between being a service member and a veteran. You stay in that program for life and your family stays in that. That's an example where we're closing the gap, where we can, between the day you have your uniform on and the next day you get up and it's something you used to wear to work.

There are many activities like that where we're working very hard so that, the day after, you carry forward and have a very smooth transition. We touched on that, and the JPSU's example is the vocational rehab I spoke about. That program starts prior to your release so that, as you take off your uniform and you're now a vet, you're still working with the same vocational person you started with in uniform. That's a seamless piece. That's an example where we don't have a gap.

There are other ones we're working to address with our colleagues in Veterans Affairs. Some proposals are coming forward that I can't speak about, but they will address many of those gaps.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

With regard to morale and welfare services, are you somehow currently monitoring or tracking morale on some scale within the Canadian Armed Forces? If so, how are you doing that?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

We do a community needs survey, not just of service members but their families—families in the wide definition—and veterans. We've just finished collecting the data, and are now in the process of processing the data and what it means. I don't have that version available for release, but I'll go back and we'll provide the clerk with the most recent one, which showed how we're meeting their needs.

The question of their morale is more complex. It's a bunch of services. That's how we do it. It's about how we can best meet their needs so that we can adjust our services.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Does it entail mental health services in any way, or asking questions along those lines?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

It asks questions along the lines of, what are your primary stressors? What are the quality of life factors? You could then deduce capacities in regard to programs that would address mental health.

It doesn't to my knowledge...but there may in fact be a question. I had better watch myself on that.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

That's fair enough, but if you could provide that information, that would be helpful.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Yes. We can provide the most recent survey.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

With regard to SISIP, the member can receive income support up to 24 months. If they're unable to find a job or return to work, they may apply.

Can you help me understand exactly what determination goes into how long they get that SISIP assistance for?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Absolutely.

Every member of the Canadian Forces, since 1982, has been mandated into the long-term disability plan through SISIP. This is a government-provided plan. They also have the option for other SISIP products for optional life insurance.

If they're medically released or they apply for non-medical release for a medical condition, that disability plan guarantees them two years' worth of income, up to a maximum of 75% of their previous income. It's adjusted if they have a pension, as per any disability plan in society, and the same with the rest of our federal government colleagues

In that two-year period, they go through vocational rehab through SISIP. If they stay on that plan, it's based upon whether or not they're determined to be totally and permanently incapacitated. We have individuals who've been on that plan for in excess of 20 years. That plan carries forward as long as the need is there. That's the macro piece.

Their application is once going in—you asked about that—and they're enrolled. It's kind of a one-stop shop. They'll do that at the JPSU, because once there are medical conditions, they'll apply it. It's managed administratively through SISIP Financial, and the insurer is Manulife that provides the service.

(1615)

Mr. Colin Fraser:

In your presentation, you touched on working with third-party organizations, and you gave one example.

I'm wondering about other examples, ones dealing with mental health challenges in particular, and whether you've seen more third-party organizations reach out to or building partnerships with them over the last number of years where it's become obvious that mental health challenges within the Canadian Armed Forces and veterans community have become more acute.

Can you talk about that, please?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

I'll sort of back up a bit on that.

Increasingly every year, we have organizations coming to us. Through the DCSM organization, they'll list these partnering organizations. I used MET as an example.

There's a strong interest in helping mental health, whether it's as partner organizations or research through such organizations as CIMVHR, which is dealing with both Veterans Affairs and military families.

An example of mental health that I might touch on is that there is a new organization called Team Rubicon, which has started up in Canada. This is back to that sense of belonging, and I notice a lot of nodding heads. Team Rubicon is going to allow you to leverage those military skills as a civilian with that gang doing those activities. Of course, the one directly in our line of organizations—and you had testimony from Jay Feyko, who is an employee of the staff of the non-public funds and works as part of CFMWS and we partner with organizations.

There is the direct one such as Soldier On. We would work with another organization like that, and ones that I would say are prescriptive, if I could add that, for things like Team Rubicon. They have a wide list. They would be on the website. That would be the best place for those names, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Eyolfson.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Thank you so much for coming.

I'd like to expand a little on a very good question that Dr. Kitchen across the way asked at the beginning. We talked about the identity of people in the armed forces. As the old slogan would say, it's not just a job; it actually is someone's identity. Of course when they're released, they would like to keep that identity.

We know there are members who leave due to illness or injury who might be able to serve some roles in the military, but can't due to universality of service, as they can't perform certain tasks. Is there any way to identify roles that they may take within the military as civilians?

We know there are civilian jobs within the military. Civilians are doing certain jobs in clerical positions, offices, these sorts of things. Is there a way to identify some of these veterans who might be able to serve as a civilian while still participating in the military?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

That is one of the main points of our SCAN seminars. I don't want to go too far into how the public service hires in priority for ex-military personnel. There would be better witnesses on that. However, in my purview, as the staff of the non-public funds, which is an agency that works for the Canadian Forces. I'm the CEO of that agency in my capacity as director general, Canadian Forces morale and welfare services and 40% of our employees in the agency, which is over 4,500 people, are either spouses of or former service members, one or the other. We find a great deal of wealth in hiring former service members, who then provide a variety of services.

You had Jay Feyko speak to you. Jay is an example of that. We hired an ex-major who had a unique experience and who could bring forward a program through the morale and welfare service. That is exactly what we aim to do. We look for those people where we can help them be part of the team and keep that identity.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Good.

Speaking to that, would there be a greater role for coordination between public services and the military when making hiring decisions?

I was a little surprised to know that it wasn't the military hiring these people. If they're working for the military, even if they are civilians.... That was obviously an incorrect assumption of mine that the armed forces would be hiring them.

(1620)

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

The Public Service Commission, which we spoke of in our introductory remarks, is one of our partners that we work with on that, and there are processes to allow for priority hiring for ill and injured military veterans. The exact details of that you'd need to get from the experts at the Public Service Commission. There is definitely those skills sets and that sense of identity and understanding of the military life that they bring to the public service.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Okay, thank you.

Does the Canadian Forces analyze characteristics about their lives that might help with their transition: what socio-economic level they come from, what might their financial needs be on release, also the kinds of jobs they did in the Canadian Forces that might better point them toward what to do in a civilian career? Is that information analyzed while they are actively serving?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Yes, in a slightly different manner.

That is what the service provided through SISIP Financial does on all the bases. We have the financial counsellors, the financial advisers, and investors. That's exactly what they do. They sit with the member, go through their life's goals, and ideally find them freedom 55 or whatever the slogan is, show them how they are doing, and build them a plan. We do that everywhere. For those who are in crisis...ideally we are going to get them prior to financial crisis and set them on a path so that both their military career and their retirement are successes.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

One question, changing gears a wee bit, is that I understand there are different medical systems between active serving military members and the rest of the population. Actively serving Canadian Forces members aren't covered by the Canada Health Act. They receive all their health care through the armed forces. Of course, when they are transitioned and become veterans, then Veterans Affairs will basically supervise their care but they are now under the various provincial health care systems.

Is there a way of coordinating between the armed forces and Veterans Affairs, particularly for veterans who might have complicated medical needs? You might have someone who leaves the military and is healthy and uninjured and just needs a family doctor, the way everyone does, and can wait. Whereas you might have someone discharged with complex injuries or complex medical problems, and they need to be very quickly hooked up with someone to coordinate their care. Is that kind of coordination done between VAC and Canadian Forces?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

It is, and it's done through the surgeon general. It's in his purview.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

That's part of what the JPSU is enabling, that conversation through OSISS, or through that process.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

All right.

With that, I'm about done.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Captain Langlois, I want to pick up on a couple of things you talked about. You mentioned the DND ombudsman's report. You also mentioned guided support. When you mention guided support, are you referring to the concierge-type service that the DND ombudsman referred to in his report?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

Yes.

Mr. John Brassard:

You also said that would be a VAC responsibility. Can you clarify that as accurate?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

It's interesting because the transition for a member is a joint effort between CAF and Veterans Affairs. Specific pieces fall under CAF, specific pieces fall under VAC, but the guided supports will be led by VAC in coordination with CAF.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

While we're not VAC experts, they have a current pilot going on with the term “guided support” and as we work to close the seam, we're going to leverage those results going forward.

Mr. John Brassard:

As you know the DND ombudsman referred to it in his report as a game-changer, the fact that the Canadian Armed Forces would retain medically released members until all benefits from all sources, including Veterans Affairs, have been finalized. He also talked about the concierge service and that the Canadian Forces offer a tool that's capable of providing members with information so that they can understand their potential benefit suite prior to release. Is there difficulty on the forces' or DND's side to implement these changes?

If the ombudsman and quite frankly the Veterans Affairs committee recommended this to Parliament, to the government, are there difficulties on your side to do this, to make sure that all these things are in place prior to the hand-off, if you will, to VAC? Are there logistical problems within DND to do that?

(1625)

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Going back to the macro points of what the ombudsman has spoken about is exactly what we're focused on, bringing that simplified process through the JPSU, the IPSCs, and the whole transition. General Corbould led that and brought forward a proposal to the chief on a reorganization that will affect those types of recommendations, so it is simpler for the member, it is guided concierge—

Mr. John Brassard:

Is that recent?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

That's very recent. That was done just prior to his retirement.

Those changes will be forthcoming soonish, I hope. In the interim, we are working behind the scenes to do that every day. While I can't provide the exact announcements at this time, we're not waiting for those announcements to close those seams and enhance that capacity. It is a clear part of this dual mandate that you are a member of the Canadian Forces until the day you're released. The chief takes that very seriously and I take that very seriously as his officer charged to do so. We will take care of them and when they're ready to take off the uniform and then transition the next day, they'll be in Veterans Affairs' care. But we don't want that next day to be their first day to meet Veterans Affairs. That's what the captain is touching on. We need them to meet as they are now with complex cases at the IPSC, with the veteran service agent, or the other appropriate levels of care.

That's what we're focused on achieving, so we're aiming to get to all of that which the ombudsman has described.

Mr. John Brassard:

That's good to hear.

The other issue I want to touch on is the issue of re-employment. Obviously there's a priority within the public service. But one of the things that we've heard through testimony and through some of our own research is that the actual percentage of those who are either medically released or retiring from the Canadian Armed Forces and are able to get employment within the Public Service of Canada or within DND itself is abysmally low. What can you attribute that to? Why aren't we hiring more veterans? Why aren't we hiring more DND Canadian Forces people to work within our public service?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

I can't answer that question. It's not within my lines of how the federal government hires.

Mr. John Brassard:

Is it a qualification issue? You can certainly speak to the back end of it. Are we preparing our Canadian Forces members, our veterans coming—

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

We can absolutely speak to that. That's the point that Captain Langlois was talking about, the ability to take that unique military jargon and turn it into what a civilian is, how to go from describing repairing a tank in the battlefield to using it in the vernacular of renovating a house, because most Canadians understand renovating a house. Those are the tools we're aiming to create.

Resumé writing, all these programs are offered through the second career assistance network that I touched on in my introductory remarks. We need to enhance and professionalize that, and we're doing that now. We're going to do more and more and better and better, bringing better tools and working with partners like MET Canada that does an online webinar about how to do an interview, how to explain yourself. The cases of application often aren't a lack of capability, it's often how to express yourself as in any job interview and to be the successful candidate. We're addressing that inside the Canadian Forces.

Mr. John Brassard:

I think it's a critical element of it, Commodore, because we're in the pursuit of understanding mental health and suicide issues amongst veterans. That transitional aspect, the sense of belonging, is not just within the military but outside of the military, and employment plays an important role in that part of it.

Thank you, sir.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Commodore and Captain. I note your ribbons and that you have a couple of service medals from the Middle East.

I have a number of questions. I think we have to tie back to one of my favourite books, Catch-22. In Catch-22, Yossarian cannot get his section 8, in the American parlance, because if he says he's crazy, they know he's not crazy, but if he doesn't say it, they know he is. Either way, he's stuck there.

If I'm a member of the armed forces and I think I'm suffering from mental illness, what kinds of barriers are there to my dealing with it, in terms of a catch-22?

(1630)

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

This goes back to the stigmatism piece. The barriers ultimately, I think, in all of our society are how you seek help. That's the culture piece we're working very hard on. There are no physical barriers. There are no barriers to going into the hospital, identifying that you're having difficulties, and getting those services. The surgeon general would be able to explain to you the whole program there.

There's no one saying you can't go. All you need to say is, “Sergeant, PO, Commodore, I need to drop into the hospital tomorrow.” That's it. No one asks why. If you have a close work relationship, someone might ask that, but at the end of the day, it's up to the individual. Once they're in, they have the programs and services that our health care system provides. That goes back to us, as a leadership team and as the Canadian Forces, to work hard on this culture, just as we're doing throughout the nation through the idea that a bandage that's invisible around your head is equal to a bandage around a broken arm from tobogganing on the weekend.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair, but my point is that if somebody is feeling mentally ill, and they know that if they go and get treatment, they'll be identified by the military structure as having mental illness and therefore not being fit to serve, they continue to serve in order to avoid being kicked out because they have an illness. The closest metaphor in civilian life is a whistle-blower. If you come forward, you have to be protected. Is there any protection for that kind of person?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

The OSISS program, which is a peer support program, is a confidential program, and the chain of command is not aware of the interaction between peers and the people who are supported. Often, this is the first step towards moving forward and seeking some medical help because these are people who have lived the same experience. Those kinds of programs, the same as Soldier On, are peer building and spirit building, and sometimes it takes that first step to be able to be referred or to accept to move forward and see that it's going to improve well-being.

For sure, those programs are beneficial.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

There's a connection in your question that I would break up a bit on the assumption that, just because I go and get mental health in uniform.... I was involved, when I worked in the Arctic, in the crash of First Air 6560, which was the 737 that, unfortunately, missed the runway and impacted into the hill in the middle of Operation Nanook, and we lost a number of people. I was the on-scene responder. I've had, personally, over the years, some issues with that, and I've dealt with that through medical assistance. That has not precluded me in my ability to proceed. In fact, it's no different than someone who may have had an alcohol difficulty or has recovered from a physiological musculoskeletal injury if they do their rehab, if they are able to function.

A mental health illness does not automatically mean a release from the Canadian Armed Forces. We've had other generals who have spoken and other chief warrant officers who have spoken about their own individual.... You manage and move forward. That's the key, so I want to break that assumption that, just because you go to see the psychologist or social worker with a problem, that automatically leads to release. I think the more we have those cases, the more we talk about the fact that you can move forward in your life and you can be a functioning member, and there's no restriction in regard to promotion, etc., the better off.... That's the culture piece I talked about earlier.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You talked earlier about when somebody is ready to take off the uniform. How do you know when somebody is ready to take off the uniform, medically? If somebody is in a medical position where the military feels they have to take it off and they're not ready to do that, how do you deal with that?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

You've asked a medical question. Neither of us are medical officers, so we can't speak to that. We could speak to the process.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

Yes. If somebody has a medical employment limitation that will breach universality of service, at that time they will likely have to transition out. The process of transition can take between six months and up to three years, depending on the complexity of the needs of the individual. For sure, with the work and efforts that we're doing with the transition piece right now at CAF and at Veterans Affairs, we want to make sure that the member is ready to transition out.

You have to meet the universality of service. Sometimes people don't meet the universality of service but can be employed in the CAF, can be retained for up to three years as well, and be employed in that capacity. It can vary between six months and three years.

(1635)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We've talked a lot in the last few weeks—I've only been on this committee for a few weeks—about how a new soldier, a new person coming into the military, goes through basic training, which breaks them down into a military person, but there's no similar process where they're intensively brought back into civilian life. Would you agree with that assessment?

The Chair:

I'll just have to limit that to a quick answer, if you could, please.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

No, I wouldn't agree with that assessment.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Wagantall.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, CPC):

That was a quick answer. I might give you more time on that one.

I'm trying to understand JPSU. It's a combination. If an individual comes in who cannot serve at that time, their goal is probably to be restored to a full career and go back, or there's a chance, if they're going to recognize that they cannot continue on with that universality, that they become a veteran.

VAC and CAF are working together on this. How is that decision made? Who is the one who makes the final decision that you have to go this way or that way? In my mind, I'm thinking that, if it looks like they're being restored, it would be through the Canadian Armed Forces that the final decision is made. If the decision is being made that they have to leave, it should be VAC that makes the final decision that they're ready to make that move.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

The decision to transition out or to remain in the forces is an administrative decision that's made by the director, military career administration, and it's based on whether the medical employment limitation meets the universality of service or not.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

So it's CAF that makes that decision.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

That's CAF.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay. We're dealing here with mental illness and suicide, and there are clearly dynamics of mental illness connected to circumstances like what you went through. That is a situation where you hit a crisis, and it's part of your life now. We also hear a lot about the frustrations of the release process that you're trying to fix with the seamless move. Then I'm thinking, why are we releasing them into the veteran world before they have a family doctor, before their house is retrofitted, without any money, and they have to wait months before they get paid? This has increased their stress levels.

Then also, there is the part of it that my friend was mentioning where, in speaking to some of those who are helping vets in transition programs, we prepare them, we condition them to a fight-flight mentality and a change in their sleep patterns, but then we expect them to somehow transition back into what the rest of us do, like stay up late because we want to. They're not prepared, yet they can be. There are ways that they can be reprogrammed—that's a bad term—to be able to sleep without that sense of fight or flight. Why are we releasing them without giving them that gift, which I think would change a lot of their mental stress around trying to recondition into normal civilian life?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

It's a big question. I'll start at the top. The chief has been very clear. We're going to professionalize the transition services. Part of that answer speaks exactly to your question about the right time to go. Captain Langlois explained the current processes and the rationale behind breach of universality of service. We are working with our VAC colleagues to enhance it so that, as they go through that transition process, they become, for lack of a better term, more civilianized where they need to be civilianized, but keep enough of the military so that they don't have that identity piece that has been asked about before.

Depending upon their career, where they live, and where they are in the country, there are various challenges with that. If you live in a very large military base in a very isolated location, such as Petawawa—well, Petawawa's not isolated—or Wainwright, it's fundamentally different than if you live here in Ottawa, where you blend in.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Saskatchewan.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Yes, Saskatchewan and Moose Jaw. That's part of that professionalization program and process where we're working hard to close the seam and the gaps. I can't speak to the specific time of when to release. There are options under consideration to address how long you stay.

Can I address one minor point on the income?

(1640)

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Yes.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

If they've done their application for LTD, which they would do under a medical that they've started at vocational rehabilitation, their income flows in a vast majority of cases, within 16 days after their last paycheque. That's run through their private insurer program. Other income pieces that are often quoted in stories, I can't speak to because I'm not accountable for pensions or veterans benefits.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Yes, I think it's a VAC issue there. I have one more quick question then. We also heard about the frustration of when they have to take that uniform off and it's just “goodbye”. Is there something in the works to say, “We need to give these guys a parade, a recognition of their service in spite of the fact that it may not have ended up being what they envisioned or what the armed forces envisioned for them in the long term?” Because they leave without that sense of being valued by the armed forces that they gave their life to.

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

There is an existing program, the depart with dignity program. This is where people will be presented with letters from the Prime Minister, the mayor, their certificate of service. They will have their friends surrounding them, their families, often a gift from the unit, many comments from their peers. But it's really tailored to what the individual wants. Sometimes somebody wants to leave with something smaller. Some others want to have something[Translation]

bigger.[English]The program is in existence and it's working well.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

But it is their choice.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to come back to an earlier question about the challenges that the JPSU faces. I wonder, do you have enough staff? We've heard from some veterans that there is just not enough people available to do all of the work that you have to do.

Is there enough staff? If not, do you have trouble finding qualified people in order to do that very sensitive and important work? What would you be looking for in terms of a staff person? Do you have enough funding? Very often it comes down to the resources available. Is there enough in terms of funding?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

We are meeting the mission, but, for sure, the number of medical releases has recently increased so it puts more pressure on the staff. With the renewed structure of JPSU that General Corbould worked on and presented and that was supported by the chief, we're looking at enhancing the structure of the JPSU to make sure that the services provided remain at a high level and remain the standard so that we can meet our mandate with fewer challenges.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

What kind of person are you looking for to provide that very important support, in terms of your staff?

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

In JPSU we have a lot of former military as civilians because they bring with them the expertise, the lived experience, that they can share with the individuals. For the military personnel, it varies. They're from all different backgrounds. It's really based on the quality of the individual—compassionate, ability to listen. Pretty much the staff are there because they want to give back to the forces. They have either been in operations or they have people in their family who have been challenged with some of these life experiences, and they want to be there to assist the CAF members. That's what we're looking at.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I don't know whether you will be able to answer this or if it fits within your role. Obviously as members of Parliament, we hear from those people who have not had a successful transition. They're very public in some instances.

Do you keep track of those people, and is there any way to go back to them? Do you have any mechanism whereby you can go back and try to close that gap or get them through what is obviously a very difficult time out there in the civilian world?

(1645)

Capt(N) Marie-France Langlois:

Every time somebody asks a question to the minister or to the chief or to the unit, we always make sure that we reply, that we follow up and that we close the loop with the individual.

Are we tracking them? No. We have a tracking system in the JPSU but the tracking system is to make sure that nobody falls through the cracks. The people coming in are entered in the system and we make sure that we have follow-ups.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

That's just until they're released. In these cases, when they're released, I can assure you that when we see the headline, we check and if we find an error in our process, we fix it.

The engagement with the individual, she already touched on.

The Chair:

Thank you. That ends our time for today's panel.

On behalf of the committee, I'd like to thank both of you, Captain and Commodore, for taking time out of your busy schedules to testify today, and thank you for all you do for our men and women.

We are going to recess for a few minutes and then we're going to go back into committee business with the steering committee.

Thank you. This meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des anciens combattants

(1540)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Neil Ellis (Baie de Quinte, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Je déclare la séance ouverte.

Je m'excuse auprès de nos témoins. Nous avions un vote à la fin de la période des questions, alors nous commençons une dizaine de minutes en retard.

Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, le Comité étudie la santé mentale et la prévention du suicide chez les vétérans. Les témoins d'aujourd'hui sont du ministère de la Défense nationale. Nous accueillons la capitaine Langlois, directrice, Gestion du soutien aux blessés, et le commodore Sean Cantelon, directeur général, Services de bien-être et moral des Forces canadiennes.

Nous allons commencer avec la déclaration liminaire de 10 minutes, puis nous passerons aux questions.

Bienvenue, et merci de votre présence ici aujourd'hui. La parole est à vous.

Commodore Sean Cantelon (directeur général, Services de bien-être et moral des Forces canadiennes, ministère de la Défense nationale):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bonjour, monsieur le président et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité. Je suis le commodore Sean Cantelon.

À titre de directeur général des Services de bien-être et moral pour les Forces armées canadiennes, je suis responsable d'un éventail de programmes et de services visant à appuyer la préparation opérationnelle des FAC dans des domaines tels que la condition physique, les sports, la promotion des loisirs et de la santé, à la fois dans les bases et les escadres du Canada et durant les opérations de déploiement.

Cela va des services financiers et bancaires offerts par la Financière SISIP aux programmes et services de santé mentale pour les membres des FAC et leur famille par l'entremise de divers Fonds « Appuyons nos troupes », y compris le Fonds Sans limites et le Fonds pour les familles des militaires.

Je suis aussi le directeur général en chef du personnel militaire qui est responsable des services de soutien aux blessés et des services de transition à la retraite et, à ce titre, j'ai travaillé en étroite collaboration avec le brigadier-général Dave Corbould à la retraite qui a mis au point le renouvellement de l'Unité interarmées de soutien du personnel, ou l'UISP.[Français]

Je suis accompagné aujourd'hui de la capitaine de vaisseau Marie-France Langlois, directrice de la Gestion du soutien aux blessés, laquelle représente également l'Unité interarmées de soutien du personnel. La capitaine de vaisseau Marie-France Langlois est une ancienne commandante de l'Unité interarmées de soutien du personnel. En sa qualité actuelle, elle dirige le renouvellement des services de transition pour la libération des membres des Forces armées canadiennes.[Traduction]

Je suis très heureux de parler aujourd'hui des programmes et services de transition offerts aux militaires des Forces armées canadiennes qui font la transition à la vie civile. Ces programmes et services sont souvent offerts conjointement par les Forces armées canadiennes et Anciens Combattants Canada, à l'aide d'organisations tierces sans but lucratif.

Les FAC abordent le sujet de la transition de la vie militaire à la vie civile selon un point de vue général qui englobe l'ensemble de la collectivité militaire, dont les militaires de la Force régulière et de la Force de réserve, les anciens combattants et leur famille. En moyenne, 10 000 membres de la Force régulière et de la Force de réserve quittent chaque année les Forces armées canadiennes. De ce nombre, 16 % en moyenne sont libérés pour des raisons médicales. II s'agit d'une donnée importante, puisque les membres qui quittent les Forces armées canadiennes ou qui obtiennent leur libération pour des raisons médicales ont souvent besoin de services uniques.

Un certain nombre de services est offert à nos membres et je vais vous en présenter quelques-uns. Avant de continuer, toutefois, j'aimerais préciser que la majorité des programmes que je présenterai aujourd'hui sont offerts à tous les membres de la Force régulière et de la Force de réserve, peu importe la raison de leur libération des Forces armées canadiennes.[Français]

Depuis 1978, les Forces armées canadiennes offrent au personnel militaire en transition un séminaire de deux jours sur le Service de préparation à une seconde carrière, qui est organisé dans chaque base et chaque escadre militaire. Ces séminaires se penchent sur des sujets tels que les pensions, les avantages sociaux, les procédures de libération, les défis psychologiques liés à la transition et les services et avantages administrés par Anciens Combattants Canada. Un séminaire d'une journée supplémentaire est fourni précisément aux membres libérés pour des raisons médicales.

Dans tous les séminaires, la présence des conjoints est vivement encouragée.

(1545)

[Traduction]

Le Régime d'assurance-revenu militaire offre des avantages à tous les membres des FAC qui quittent l'armée pour des raisons médicales. Ils peuvent recevoir une aide au revenu pendant un maximum de 24 mois, et jusqu'à 64 mois s'ils ne sont pas en mesure de retourner au travail. Les militaires qui quittent l'armée de leur propre gré sont aussi admissibles aux mêmes avantages que s'ils avaient été jugés totalement invalides.

Un volet de ce programme est le Programme de réadaptation professionnelle qui permet aux participants de restaurer ou d'établir leur capacité professionnelle pour les préparer à gagner leur vie adéquatement au sein de l'effectif civil. Ce programme met l'accent sur les compétences des membres des FAC ou des anciens combattants qui sont libérés, leurs intérêts, leurs restrictions médicales, et la viabilité économique du régime qu'ils ont choisi pour les aider à préparer leur avenir. Le soutien au Programme de réadaptation professionnelle peut commencer jusqu'à six mois avant leur libération des Forces armées canadiennes.

De la même façon, Anciens Combattants offre également une série de programmes d'aide au revenu et de réadaptation sociale. Des efforts considérables sont actuellement déployés pour mieux aligner et harmoniser les programmes des Forces armées canadiennes et d'Anciens Combattants afin d'assurer une transition en douceur vers la vie civile pour tous les membres des FAC.

Au-delà de ce travail interne dont j'ai fait mention, les Forces armées canadiennes collaborent aussi étroitement avec des organismes tiers pour aider les militaires en transition, les anciens combattants et leur famille. Nous continuons à élargir nos relations avec plusieurs établissements d'enseignement partout au pays qui souhaitent mieux comprendre les compétences et la formation du personnel militaire en vue d'offrir des équivalences dans un éventail de programmes d'études dans leur établissement.

Un exemple est le Programme d'aide à la transition qui travaille avec plus de 200 employeurs qui appuient les militaires afin de les aider à trouver un emploi valorisant. II y a actuellement plus de 5 000 membres inscrits et plus de 1 200 employés. C'est en vue d'atteindre l'objectif de 10 000 emplois en 10 ans.

La réussite de la transition à la vie civile est une priorité de mon organisation et s'inscrit également dans la stratégie globale de prévention du suicide des FAC, qui est actuellement élaborée et intégrée dans un éventail d'initiatives visant à prévenir les suicides. Pour aider à promouvoir des transitions efficaces et efficientes, nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec Anciens Combattants Canada afin d'éliminer les obstacles, de sensibiliser les militaires et leur famille aux ressources et à l'appui appropriés, de promouvoir la recherche et les réponses factuelles et d'élaborer des programmes et des initiatives de soutien aux politiques, aux protocoles et à l'orientation.[Français]

Nous travaillons aussi activement avec Anciens Combattants Canada pour améliorer les services aux anciens combattants offerts par nos organisations grâce à une stratégie nationale conjointe de transition de carrière et d'emploi. Cette stratégie repose sur une approche pangouvernementale et compte élargir sa portée de façon à inclure d'autres organismes gouvernementaux, notamment Emploi et Développement social Canada, Service Canada, la Commission de la fonction publique et bien d'autres, dans le but de miser sur les ressources et les programmes existants pour appuyer les militaires et les anciens combattants en transition.[Traduction]

La prestation des services de transition des Forces armées canadiennes et d'Anciens Combattants se fait par l'entremise de l'Unité interarmées de soutien du personnel, qui comprend huit quartiers généraux régionaux, 24 centres intégrés de soutien du personnel et sept emplacements satellites un peu partout au pays et un quartier général à Ottawa. L'UISP dessert le personnel de la Force régulière et de la Force de réserve, ainsi que leur famille et les familles des militaires tombés au champ d'honneur.

L'UISP et les CISP sont considérés comme un guichet unique où les personnes malades ou blessées peuvent recevoir des conseils, du soutien et de l'assistance non seulement du personnel militaire qui assure la prestation des programmes et supervise les CISP, mais aussi du personnel d'Anciens Combattants qui est situé au même endroit que les FAC dans les CISP.

Les FAC se sont engagées à continuer d'améliorer la prestation des services et les soins aux malades et aux blessés, et c'est pourquoi nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec Anciens Combattants pour améliorer les programmes et les services. De nombreux aspects de la prestation des services d'Anciens Combattants et des FAC sont étroitement interreliés, et le personnel des deux organisations travaille ensemble à tous les niveaux afin de fournir des conseils et de l'assistance.

Parmi ses autres programmes, l'UISP est également responsable du Programme de soutien social aux victimes de stress opérationnel, ou SSVSO, un programme conjoint d'ACC et des FAC qui offre un soutien précieux aux militaires, aux anciens combattants et aux familles. L'objectif du programme de SSVSO est de s'assurer que les pairs, dès qu'ils font appel au système de soutien par les pairs, bénéficient du soutien reposant sur I'expérience vécue pour les guider vers les programmes et les services qui peuvent les aider à se rétablir. Depuis 2001, le programme de SSVSO a aidé de nombreux pairs à accepter leur nouvelle réalité.

Monsieur le président, merci de m'avoir donné l'occasion de prendre la parole aujourd'hui. La capitaine Langlois et moi répondrons avec plaisir aux questions du Comité.

(1550)

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons commencer avec M. Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, commodore et capitaine, de servir notre pays et d'être ici aujourd'hui. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler de la perte d'identité dans le cadre de nos discussions sur la maladie mentale. Je me demande si vous pourriez nous dire... Y a-t-il un moment quelconque, au sein de l'UISP, où la perte d'identité est relevée et où l'on aborde le problème?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Je vais demander à la capitaine Langlois de répondre à la question, car elle a assumé le commandement de l'UISP et pourra mieux vous répondre.

Capitaine de vaisseau Marie-France Langlois (directrice, Gestion du soutien aux blessés, ministère de la Défense nationale):

Je pense que l'important, c'est de maintenir les rapports entre l'ancienne unité et le militaire, s'il le souhaite. C'est quelque chose que nous encourageons pour nous assurer que la communication entre les commandants des différentes unités opérationnelles dans la région reçoit du soutien, par l'entremise de cette approche.

C'est évidemment difficile pour ceux qui ont des blessures physiques connues. Je pense qu'en instaurant un lien de confiance avec le membre à qui nous venons en aide, nous pourrons mieux communiquer.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Vous avez parlé de « confiance ». Cela semble être un autre aspect. Les témoins nous ont beaucoup parlé de la confiance.

Je reviens encore une fois à la perte d'identité. Ces soldats, marins et aviatrices disent avoir perdu leur identité. On leur a enlevé leur identité, que ce soit en raison d'une blessure physique ou mentale. J'évalue la situation du point de vue des soins de santé. Je regarde la situation et je me dis ceci: « Eh bien, comment pouvons-nous améliorer ces soins? Ne pouvons-nous pas intégrer ces soins d'entrée de jeu dans le cadre du programme? »

Plus tôt, nous avons discuté de la prestation des services et de la possibilité d'offrir des services dès que les gens entrent dans les forces armées. Lorsque nous parlons d'essayer d'offrir des traitements à nos militaires, tout en tenant compte de la perte d'identité et de la confiance, nous devons nous assurer que ces services sont assurés par les FAC, conjointement avec ACC.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Premièrement, je vais parler de quelques-uns des changements que le brigadier-général Dave Corbould a apportés lorsqu'il était le commandant de l'UISP.

L'équipe était fermement déterminée à instaurer un sentiment d'appartenance à l'unité au sein des Forces canadiennes, où les membres sentent qu'ils font partie intégrante de l'équipe, de l'unité. Nous avons réussi à créer ce sentiment d'appartenance en apportant des ajustements aux pouvoirs et à l'unité. C'est une unité qui est responsable de ses membres et qui a des pouvoirs et des responsabilités. Cela crée des liens.

Deuxièmement, pour revenir à la question plus générale, à savoir la confiance, cela nous ramène au dialogue soutenu que nous tenons et qui a donné d'excellents résultats. Tout commence avec la santé mentale, et il n'y a rien de mal à dire, « j'ai eu une mauvaise journée », car il faut ensuite établir cette relation au sein de la culture.

La journée Bell Cause pour la cause est peut-être une journée que nous appuyons au sein des Forces canadiennes, mais nous favorisons également un changement complet de culture en vue d'offrir des soins continus aux malades ou aux blessés afin que la fragilité dans l'unité dont certains témoins et vous avez parlé n'existe plus. Ce changement de culture est en train de se faire en ce moment.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci.

Je vais vous demander si vous pouvez nous fournir des chiffres.

Pouvez-vous nous dire quel est le pourcentage de personnes qui ont intégré l'UISP qui sont aux prises avec des problèmes de santé mentale?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

En fait, l'Unité interarmées de soutien du personnel doit gérer des contraintes à l'emploi pour raisons médicales. Nous gérons le pronostic, et non pas le diagnostic, si bien que nous ne connaissons pas l'état de santé d'un membre. Ce sont des renseignements que les services de santé des Forces canadiennes peuvent peut-être fournir.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Assurez-vous un suivi ou conservez-vous des données concernant les gens qui ont fait appel à l'UISP et qui se sont suicidés?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Là encore, on assure le suivi par l'entremise...

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Vous avez entendu le témoignage d'une personne qui a parlé du suivi assuré par les Forces canadiennes des membres du personnel qui ont été libérés. Ce processus est centralisé par l'entremise de registres centraux.

De toute évidence, si quelqu'un est membre de cette unité ou est sous la responsabilité de cette unité, l'unité est au courant. Il n'incombe pas à l'UISP d'assurer ce suivi. Les renseignements concernant ces membres proviennent d'un autre secteur au ministère, mais nous assurons le suivi des soins et de l'alimentation des personnes sous notre responsabilité.

(1555)

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez mentionné un programme qui est offert aux gens pour les éduquer sur les prestations de retraite, les procédures de libération, etc.

Je me rappelle lorsque j'ai été élu député pour la première fois. J'ai dû assister à une séance d'information obligatoire de deux jours. J'ai trouvé les renseignements très utiles — et il y en avait beaucoup —, mais cela semblait entrer par une oreille et sortir par l'autre parfois, et je ne pouvais rien y faire.

L'une des questions que j'ai posées est si c'était possible d'offrir cette séance d'information à nouveau, un mois ou deux plus tard. Ce processus est-il...

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Absolument, 2, 3 ou 10 fois. Nous encourageons les gens à suivre ces séances au moins cinq ans avant leur libération prévue, puis ils peuvent en suivre d'autres plus tard. Nous travaillons à améliorer la disponibilité de ces séances. C'est un processus optionnel pour tous les membres des Forces armées canadiennes. Nous les offrons à toutes les bases au pays. J'en ai moi-même suivi deux, même si je n'entends pas quitter les forces demain.

C'est exactement l'argument que vous avez fait valoir. Pour veiller à ce que les membres ne souffrent pas et disent, « je n'ai pas entendu parler de cela », ils ont l'occasion de suivre d'autres séances. Il n'y a pas de limite imposée au nombre de séances auxquelles ils peuvent assister qui sont offertes par le Service de préparation à une seconde carrière, ou SPSC.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Lockhart.

Mme Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je trouve votre témoignage très intéressant. Nous avons déjà discuté ensemble dans le cadre de notre étude sur la prestation des services également. Nous avons des points de vue contradictoires concernant l'UISP et sa fonctionnalité. D'une part, nous parlons du fait que l'unité est considérée comme étant un guichet unique et que chaque porte est la bonne. Nous entendons d'autres professionnels de la santé dire que c'est l'approche qu'adoptent de nombreux modèles en matière de santé mentale à l'heure actuelle. Et d'autre part, nous avons des témoignages contradictoires de personnes qui disent que cette approche ne fonctionne pas bien et que des gens glissent entre les mailles du système.

Quels sont les défis qu'il faut relever? De toute évidence, les gens sont en transition et c'est une période difficile pour eux, mais y a-t-il des secteurs précis où nous savons que nous pouvons nous améliorer? C'est là où les suicides surviennent. Les gens glissent entre les mailles du système et ne sont pas réceptifs à certains services à leur disposition.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Je pense qu'il est très important de régler les problèmes relativement à la transition des membres des FAC vers la vie civile. Nous travaillons très fort avec Anciens Combattants pour améliorer nos différents programmes.

Anciens Combattants jouera un rôle tôt dans le processus, probablement lorsqu'un avis est émis selon laquelle une décision de libération a été prise. Nous nous employons à simplifier et à réduire les formalités administratives. Nous travaillons à élaborer un projet pilote et à offrir du soutien encadré. C'est pour donner suite à la recommandation de l'ombudsman, où il parle de services de conciergerie. Ce soutien encadré est intéressant.

Par exemple, l'UISP adapte les services aux besoins des gens. Grâce à ce soutien encadré, qui relèvera d'ACC, conjointement avec les FAC, on tiendra compte des besoins des gens. Si quelqu'un a des besoins moins complexes, par exemple, il pourra avoir accès au portail. Si une personne a besoin d'aide pour remplir les formulaires et connaître les ressources disponibles, alors il serait approprié de lui offrir le soutien d'un agent. Il pourrait être préférable de faire appel à un gestionnaire de cas pour certains membres qui ont des besoins plus complexes durant leur transition.

À l'heure actuelle, il y a beaucoup... Nous faisons partie de différents groupes pour examiner le nouveau modèle de transition. Cela inclut les transitions qui se font en début de carrière. Lorsque nous parlons de séminaire ou de réseau, nous parlons des débuts, de la première affectation d'un membre. Il recevra de la formation concernant les responsabilités financières à long terme, pour qu'il soit au courant des formations en matière d'épanouissement personnel lorsqu'ils feront leur transition.

L'application Mon dossier ACC sera disponible plus tôt. Beaucoup d'efforts seront déployés pour améliorer ce portail.

De toute évidence, il y a toujours place à l'amélioration. Nous prenons les commentaires des anciens combattants et des membres des FAC très... Il est très important pour nous de les informer des changements de politiques, des programmes et des services.

(1600)

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Vous avez parlé de discuter plus tôt avec les membres de la transition. On nous a dit que ce qui revient constamment entre autres, c'est la perte d'identité, alors je pense qu'il est très important que vous parliez avec les membres de cette transition.

Qu'entend-on par plus tôt? C'est évidemment pour les retraites planifiées et ce genre de choses.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Une partie des activités de mon organisation est liée aux Services financiers du RARM. L'un des aspects, outre la gestion de ce programme d'assurance, est l'offre de conseils en matière de finances et d'investissement.

Il y a deux ans, nous avons embauché M. David Chilton, auteur du livre Un barbier riche, pour la tenue d'une campagne d'éducation. Un de nos anciens cadres supérieurs, un militaire à la retraite très dynamique, organise ce qu'il appelle les « discussions de Pierre » selon le format des conférences TED. Il parcourt le pays pour offrir de l'éducation financière aux gens. C'est tout un défi. Il n'est jamais trop tard, mais il est plutôt difficile d'apprendre, 20 ans plus tard, qu'il aurait été bon de savoir ou de faire certaines choses. Ce sont des services continus que nous offrons pour améliorer les connaissances à cet égard.

Nous collaborons étroitement avec Anciens Combattants Canada pour trouver le moment idéal d'offrir un soutien encadré pour accroître la sensibilisation des gens afin d'éviter que ces services soient offerts trop tard ou trop tôt, comme votre collègue l'a indiqué. Nous avons d'ailleurs mené des projets pilotes, dont la capitaine a parlé. Cela devrait aider à régler les problèmes liés à l'identité.

Souvent, la perte d'identité découle d'un manque de compréhension et de connaissances. Tandis que nous cherchons à démystifier ce processus, qui peut être plutôt déconcertant... Beaucoup de gens s'enrôlent dans les Forces. On constate qu'après leur instruction élémentaire, ils n'ont pas tendance à penser à leur libération, mais plutôt au moment où ils seront aux commandes d'un char d'assaut ou à leur déploiement en mer à bord d'un navire.

Nous voulons les aider à composer avec cela. Nous offrons actuellement un large éventail d'activités. Nous collaborons avec nos collègues d'Anciens Combattants Canada pour apporter des améliorations qui seront annoncées lorsque ce sera terminé. Nous avons traité du projet pilote, et le soutien encadré est un exemple parfait.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Je viens de recevoir ce document, Le Guide sur les prestations, les programmes et les services à l’intention des membres actifs et retraités des Forces canadiennes et de leur famille. Je crois que nous ne l'avions jamais vu auparavant. Je me demande s'il peut être intégré aux témoignages. C'est un document relativement nouveau; il date du mois d'octobre. Est-il distribué et utilisé à grande échelle? Est-il accessible en ligne?

Le président:

Je suis désolé, mais je vous demanderais d'être brefs. Le temps alloué pour cette intervention sera bientôt écoulé.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Ce guide, qui est disponible en ligne, a été mis à jour plusieurs fois. Nous veillerons à vous en fournir un exemplaire.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Nous en fournissons également des exemplaires à l'occasion de chacun des séminaires du SPSC. Les gens peuvent alors le consulter; nous leur donnons un exemplaire d'avance.

Le président:

Parfait. Si vous pouviez l'envoyer au greffier, nous vous en serions reconnaissants.

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup d'être ici et de nous aider dans notre étude des enjeux liés à la santé mentale et au suicide.

Capitaine Langlois, vous avez parlé de la collaboration avec ACC pour l'amélioration des programmes de la simplification des formalités. Je me demande si vous pouviez donner un exemple des contraintes que vous pourriez avoir observées à l'UISP quant à l'atteinte de cet objectif. Y a-t-il quelque chose qui vous empêche d'atteindre vos objectifs, ou est-ce que tout se passe bien?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Les FAC et Anciens Combattants Canada collaborent sur plusieurs fronts.

Le programme de conversion des compétences est un excellent exemple. Lorsqu'un membre des FAC entreprend la transition de la vie militaire à la vie civile, on constate souvent que les compétences militaires se transposent difficilement dans une profession civile. Actuellement, les FAC travaillent en étroite collaboration avec EDSC et Anciens Combattants Canada à la création d'un portail de conversion des compétences appelé « GPM à CNP », c'est-à-dire Groupe professionnel militaire à Code national des professions. Cela suscite beaucoup d'enthousiasme, car ce portail est appelé à croître. Notre objectif à long terme est d'y intégrer un volet de formation, de le lier aux établissements d'enseignement. Nous y travaillons déjà.

Le site d'EDSC comprend déjà un outil de conversion des compétences, mais c'est une chose à laquelle nous tenons. Les sites Web des FAC, d'EDSC et d'ACC sont tous liés. Cet outil aidera les membres des FAC à effectuer la transition. C'est un excellent exemple du travail que nous faisons.

(1605)

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Dans leurs témoignages, plusieurs anciens combattants ont indiqué qu'ils ont le sentiment d'avoir été dépouillés de leur identité et d'avoir été poussés à quitter la vie militaire et qu'ils se sentent abandonnés.

Selon vous, cet outil de conversion des compétences les aidera-t-il à retrouver un nouveau sentiment d'identité ou le sentiment d'être de nouveau utiles? Je suppose que l'essentiel est de se sentir utile et valorisé.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

L'outil ne sera pas uniquement utilisé pour la transition; il servira également au recrutement et au maintien en poste.

Une personne ayant un métier quelconque peut, lorsqu'elle sait comment ses compétences se traduisent dans la vie civile, décider en début de carrière de perfectionner ses connaissances dans ce domaine. Donc, en ce qui concerne l'identité, je suis certaine que ce sera avantageux.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Commodore, vous avez parlé d'un changement de culture. Pourriez-vous aborder d'autres aspects de la culture militaire qui empêchent d'optimiser l'aide offerte aux anciens combattants qui entreprennent la transition?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

C'est une question à laquelle il est difficile de répondre. Si j'avais la solution, je passerais pour un génie.

Je suis dans les Forces armées depuis 34 ans. Notre culture et notre approche à l'égard d'un vaste éventail d'activités ont considérablement évolué. Comme partout ailleurs, notre culture est le reflet de la société.

Le chef a été très clair et très ouvert quant aux activités offertes à l'extérieur des Forces. Le général Dallaire a été le premier, évidemment, mais depuis, des officiers des plus hauts échelons et des sous-officiers supérieurs ont parlé ouvertement des difficultés liées à la transition et des problèmes de santé mentale et de réadaptation physique.

Voilà ce que j'entends par une évolution vers une culture ouverte. Auparavant, ces questions faisaient l'objet de discussions privées entre deux ou trois personnes, tandis que maintenant, elles ont lieu de façon plus ouverte. À mon avis, c'est la meilleure chose à faire. En tant que dirigeants des Forces armées canadiennes, nous assumons le rôle de chef de file qui nous incombe et nous essayons de modifier cette culture pour que nos membres n'aient pas ce sentiment d'aliénation et de perte d'identité.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Récemment, nous avons beaucoup entendu parler des opioïdes et de la dépendance qui y est associée. J'ai l'impression que beaucoup d'anciens combattants s'en font prescrire. Avez-vous des préoccupations à cet égard? Je sais qu'ils sont censés être utilisés comme analgésiques, mais serait-il préférable d'avoir recours à d'autres médicaments? Ils sont extrêmement toxicomanogènes, et ils semblent avoir une incidence sur le bien-être et la santé mentale.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Je ne suis pas médecin — ni Médecin général —; ce n'est pas mon domaine d'expertise. Je reviens au propos de la capitaine Langlois. L'UISP connaît le pronostic, c'est-à-dire les résultats escomptés pour une personne donnée, mais nous ne savons pas quels médicaments sont prescrits ni quelles sont les restrictions médicales. Nous nous concentrons sur la personne elle-même.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Les gens n'évoquent pas une certaine dépendance?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Cela relève du secret médical entre ces gens et leur médecin, si j'ai bien compris la question.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Il y a très souvent un rapprochement à faire entre ces problèmes sous-jacents et l'état de préparation et l'adaptation à la vie civile. Je me demandais simplement si vous aviez une idée de cette corrélation. De toute évidence, non.

(1610)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Colin Fraser (Nova-Ouest, Lib.):

Je vous remercie tous les deux d'être venus aujourd'hui et de nous avoir transmis ces renseignements.

Vous avez mentionné qu'en moyenne, 10 000 membres quittent les Forces armées canadiennes chaque année, dont 16 % pour des raisons médicales. De ce nombre, sait-on combien de personnes libérées souffrent de problèmes de maladie mentale?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Je ne crois pas.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Le Médecin général a peut-être ces renseignements.

M. Colin Fraser:

Un des aspects qui a été mentionné — je suis tout à fait d'accord là-dessus; nous avons abordé le sujet dans le rapport sur la prestation de services que nous avons présenté en décembre dernier — était la nécessité d'améliorer l'harmonisation entre les programmes des FAC et ceux d'ACC pour faciliter le plus possible la transition vers la vie civile. Qu'est-ce que cela signifie pour vous? Quels sont les problèmes actuels à cet égard?

Capitaine Langlois, vous avez évoqué la nécessité de combler les écarts, qui est un aspect important. Quelles mesures sont prises actuellement, en particulier pour les programmes des Services de bien-être et moral, pour rendre cette transition plus facile?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

C'est un des aspects pour lesquels les Services de bien-être et moral ont beaucoup de latitude. Nos activités sont financées par des fonds non publics, ce qui permet au CEMD d'offrir des services tant aux militaires qu'aux membres de leur famille, même lorsque les militaires deviennent des anciens combattants. Nos programmes sont offerts indifféremment aux membres en service et aux anciens combattants. À titre d'exemple, prenons la carte d'identité de santé des Forces canadiennes, un programme à vie qui est offert aux membres et à leur famille, en collaboration avec l'industrie, et qui leur permet d'obtenir des rabais. C'est un exemple d'une situation où nous cherchons à éliminer les disparités entre les membres qui portent l'uniforme tous les jours et ceux qui, du jour au lendemain, cessent de le porter.

Nous consacrons des efforts considérables à de nombreuses activités de ce genre pour qu'à leur libération, les gens puissent aller de l'avant et effectuer une transition en douceur. Nous avons abordé cet aspect. J'ai donné l'exemple du programme de réadaptation professionnelle de l'UISP. Ce programme commence avant la libération pour que le militaire qui range son uniforme et devient un ancien combattant travaille avec le même intervenant en réadaptation professionnelle que lorsqu'il était un membre actif, ce qui permet une transition harmonieuse. C'est un des aspects pour lesquels nous avons éliminé l'écart.

Nous collaborons avec nos collègues d'Anciens Combattants Canada pour régler d'autres lacunes. Je ne peux vous parler des propositions qui ont été faites, mais elles visent à corriger ces lacunes.

M. Colin Fraser:

En ce qui concerne les Services de bien-être et moral, avez-vous fait une étude quelconque sur le moral au sein des Forces armées canadiennes? Si oui, comment?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Nous avons fait une étude des besoins communautaires, non seulement auprès des membres en service, mais aussi auprès de leur famille — dans le sens large du terme —, et auprès des anciens combattants. Nous venons de terminer la collecte de données. Nous en sommes actuellement à l'analyse et à l'interprétation des données. Je ne peux vous fournir ces renseignements pour le moment, mais nous fournirons au greffier le plus récent sondage, qui démontre que nous satisfaisons aux besoins.

La question du moral est plus complexe. Il s'agit d'un ensemble de services; c'est ainsi que nous procédons. La question est de savoir comment nous pouvons répondre le mieux à leurs besoins de façon à pouvoir adapter la prestation de nos services.

M. Colin Fraser:

Cela comprend-il les services en santé mentale? Y a-t-il des questions à ce sujet?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Certaines questions portent sur les principaux facteurs de stress, tandis que d'autres portent sur la qualité de vie. Cela permet d'évaluer les besoins pour la prestation de programmes liés à la santé mentale.

À ma connaissance, cela ne... Il pourrait y avoir une question à ce sujet. Je me dois d'être prudent.

M. Colin Fraser:

Très bien. Toutefois, si vous pouviez nous fournir ces renseignements, cela nous serait utile.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

D'accord. Nous pouvons vous fournir le plus récent sondage.

M. Colin Fraser:

En ce qui concerne le RARM, le membre peut recevoir une aide au revenu pour un maximum de 24 mois s'il ne peut trouver un emploi ou retourner au travail.

Pouvez-vous m'aider à comprendre les critères précis utilisés pour déterminer la durée des prestations du RARM?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Avec plaisir.

Depuis 1982, tous les membres des Forces armées canadiennes participent obligatoirement au régime d'invalidité de longue durée par l'intermédiaire du RARM, un régime offert par le gouvernement. Ils peuvent aussi obtenir d'autres produits offerts par le RARM, notamment une assurance-vie facultative.

S'ils sont libérés pour raisons médicales s'ils font une demande de libération pour des raisons non médicales liées à un problème de santé, le régime d'assurance-invalidité leur donne droit à deux années de salaire, au taux maximal de 75 % du salaire antérieur. La prestation est ajustée s'ils reçoivent une pension, comme pour tout autre régime d'assurance-invalidité, y compris celui de leurs collègues de la fonction publique fédérale.

Pendant ces deux ans, les militaires participent au programme de réadaptation professionnelle offert par l'UISP. Pour être admissible au régime, le demandeur doit être considéré comme souffrant d'une incapacité totale et permanente. Certaines personnes reçoivent des prestations du régime depuis plus de 20 ans; ils y sont admissibles aussi longtemps que nécessaire. C'est l'aspect général.

L'inscription au régime — puisque vous l'avez demandé — se fait dès l'enrôlement, par l'intermédiaire de l'UISP. C'est en quelque sorte un guichet unique. L'accès au régime se fait automatiquement, en cas de problème médical. Les Services financiers du RARM gèrent le régime, et l'assureur est Manuvie.

(1615)

M. Colin Fraser:

Dans votre exposé, vous avez parlé de votre collaboration avec des organismes tiers et vous avez donné un exemple.

Je me demande si vous avez d'autres exemples, en particulier dans le domaine de la santé mentale. J'aimerais savoir si vous avez constaté une augmentation du nombre d'organismes tiers qui communiquent avec vous ou si vous avez établi plus de partenariats avec ces organismes ces dernières années, où l'on a pleinement pris conscience de la gravité des problèmes de santé mentale chez les membres des Forces armées canadiennes et les anciens combattants.

Pourriez-vous parler de cet aspect, s'il vous plaît?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Permettez-moi de revenir un peu en arrière.

De plus en plus d'organismes se manifestent chaque année. L'organisation du directeur de la gestion du soutien aux blessés établit la liste des organismes partenaires. J'ai donné l'exemple du PAT.

Les services d'aide en santé mentale suscitent beaucoup d'intérêt, que ce soit chez les organismes partenaires ou à l'ICRSMV, un organisme de recherche qui traite avec Anciens Combattants Canada et les familles des militaires.

Dans le domaine de la santé mentale, je pourrais vous donner l'exemple d'un nouvel organisme appelé Team Rubicon, qui a été fondé au Canada. Cela nous ramène au sentiment d'appartenance, et je vois que beaucoup acquiescent. Team Rubicon permet aux gens de mettre à profit en tant que civils leurs compétences militaires dans le cadre de diverses interventions, en collaboration avec d'autres personnes. Évidemment, celui qui fait partie intégrante de notre groupe d'organismes... Vous avez obtenu le témoignage de Jay Feyko, un membre du « Personnel des fonds non publics » qui travaille au sein des SBMFC. Donc, nous avons des partenariats avec des organismes.

Il y a des organismes de soutien direct, comme Sans limites. Nous travaillerions avec un autre organisme du genre et avec des organismes que je qualifierais de normatifs — si vous me permettez d'ajouter cela — pour des organismes comme Team Rubicon. Il y a une longue liste, qui figure sûrement sur le site Web. Ce serait le meilleur endroit pour trouver ces noms, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Eyolfson.

M. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Nous vous remercions de votre présence ici aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais approfondir une très bonne question posée par M. Kitchen au début de la séance. Nous avons parlé de l'identité des membres des forces armées. Comme le dit le vieux slogan, ce n'est pas seulement un travail; c'est l'identité d'une personne. Bien sûr, lorsqu'elles sont libérées, ces personnes souhaitent garder leur identité.

Nous savons que certains membres quittent les forces armées à cause d'une maladie ou d'une blessure. Ils seraient capables d'assurer d'autres rôles dans les forces armées, mais ne peuvent le faire en raison de l'universalité des services, parce qu'ils ne peuvent s'acquitter de certaines tâches. Y a-t-il une façon de désigner les rôles qu'ils pourraient jouer en tant que civils au sein de l'armée?

Nous savons qu'il y a des emplois civils dans l'armée. Il y a des civils qui s'acquittent de certaines tâches; les commis de bureau, notamment. Est-ce qu'il y a une façon de désigner les anciens combattants qui pourraient travailler à titre de civils tout en continuant de participer aux activités de l'armée?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

C'est l'un des principaux points des séminaires du SPSC. Je ne veux pas aller trop dans les détails sur la priorité accordée aux anciens militaires par la fonction publique. D'autres témoins seraient mieux placés que moi pour en parler. Je peux toutefois vous parler du personnel des Fonds non publics, un organisme qui travaille pour les Forces armées canadiennes. Je suis responsable de cet organisme en ma capacité de directeur général des Services de bien-être et moral des Forces canadiennes, et 40 % des employés de l'organisme — soit plus de 4 500 personnes — sont d'anciens membres des forces armées ou sont mariés à un membre des forces armées. Les anciens militaires, qui peuvent offrir divers services, représentent pour nous une grande source de richesse.

Jay Feyko, qui a témoigné devant vous, est un bon exemple à cet égard. Nous avons embauché un ancien major qui avait une expérience unique et qui a pu mettre en oeuvre un programme par l'entremise du Service de bien-être et moral. C'est exactement ce que nous voulons faire. Nous voulons aider ces gens à faire partie de l'équipe et à préserver leur identité.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

C'est bien.

À ce sujet, est-ce qu'il faudrait une meilleure coordination entre la fonction publique et l'armée, pour les décisions relatives à l'embauche?

J'ai été quelque peu surpris d'apprendre que ce n'était pas l'armée qui embauchait ces personnes. Si elles travaillent pour l'armée, même si ce sont des civils... J'ai présumé à tort que les forces armées seraient responsables de leur embauche.

(1620)

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

La Commission de la fonction publique, dont nous avons parlé dans nos déclarations préliminaires, est l'un de nos partenaires. Il y a des processus qui permettent d'embaucher les anciens combattants malades ou blessés de façon prioritaire. Les experts de la Commission de la fonction publique pourraient vous expliquer cela en détail. Ces anciens combattants ont un ensemble de compétences, une identité et une compréhension de la vie militaire, qui sont un atout dans la fonction publique.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord, merci.

Est-ce que les Forces canadiennes analysent les circonstances de vie de ces personnes afin de les aider dans leur transition? Quel est leur niveau socio-économique? Quels sont leurs besoins financiers au moment de leur libération? Quelles sont les tâches effectuées dans les Forces canadiennes qui pourraient leur servir dans une carrière civile? Est-ce que vous analysez ces renseignements pendant leur service actif?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Oui, nous le faisons un peu différemment.

C'est ce que font les Services financiers du RARM sur toutes les bases. Nous avons des conseillers financiers et des investisseurs. C'est exactement ce qu'ils font. Ils s'assoient avec les membres, désignent avec eux leurs objectifs de vie et leur permettent idéalement de réaliser leur « liberté 55 », si l'on veut; ils leur montrent ce qui est possible et établissent un plan. Nous le faisons partout. Pour les personnes en crise... idéalement, il faut les voir avant qu'ils ne vivent une crise financière et nous les orientons afin que leur carrière militaire et leur retraite soient réussies.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

J'ai une question sur un autre sujet. Je comprends que les systèmes médicaux ne sont pas les mêmes pour les militaires actifs que pour le reste de la population. Les membres actifs des Forces armées canadiennes ne sont pas visés par la Loi canadienne sur la santé. Ils reçoivent tous leurs soins médicaux par l'entremise des forces armées. Bien sûr, lorsqu'ils deviennent d'anciens combattants, le ministère des Anciens Combattants supervise les soins qui leur sont offerts, mais ils sont visés par les divers systèmes de soins de santé provinciaux.

Y a-t-il une façon de coordonner les services des forces armées et du ministère des Anciens Combattants, surtout pour les anciens combattants qui ont des besoins médicaux complexes? Certains militaires qui quittent l'armée sont en santé et ne sont pas blessés; ils ont seulement besoin d'un médecin de famille comme tout le monde et peuvent attendre. D'autres militaires ont toutefois des blessures ou des problèmes médicaux complexes et ont besoin d'être pris en charge rapidement. Y a-t-il une forme de coordination entre Anciens Combattants Canada et les Forces canadiennes?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Oui, par l'entremise du Médecin général. Cela relève de son mandat.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

C'est un des services offerts par l'UISP; cette conversation par l'entremise du SSBSO ou par l'entremise de ce processus.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Très bien.

Sur ce, j'ai terminé.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Brassard, vous avez la parole.

M. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Capitaine Langlois, je veux revenir sur certains sujets que vous avez abordés. Vous avez parlé du rapport de l'ombudsman du MDN. Vous avez aussi parlé de soutien guidé. Est-ce que vous parlez du service de type « conciergerie » auquel fait référence l'ombudsman du MDN dans son rapport?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Oui.

M. John Brassard:

Vous avez aussi dit que ce serait une responsabilité d'Anciens Combattants Canada. Pouvez-vous confirmer que c'est bien le cas?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

C'est intéressant, parce que la transition des membres se veut un effort conjoint des Forces armées canadiennes et du ministère des Anciens Combattants. Certains volets relèvent des forces armées et d'autres du ministère des Anciens Combattants, mais le soutien guidé est géré par le ministère des Anciens Combattants, en collaboration avec les Forces armées canadiennes.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Nous ne sommes pas des experts du ministère des Anciens Combattants; ils ont un projet pilote en matière de soutien guidé et nous allons miser sur ces résultats pour combler les écarts et aller de l'avant.

M. John Brassard:

Comme vous le savez, l'ombudsman du MDN a dit que cela allait changer les règles du jeu; les Forces armées canadiennes garderont les membres libérés pour des raisons médicales jusqu'à ce que toutes les prestations, y compris celles du ministère des Anciens Combattants, soient réglées. Il a également parlé du service de conciergerie et de l'outil qui permettait aux membres des Forces armées canadiennes de comprendre la gamme d'avantages auxquels ils pourraient avoir droit. Est-ce que les Forces canadiennes ou le MDN ont de la difficulté à mettre en oeuvre ces changements?

Si l'ombudsman et, bien franchement, le comité des anciens combattants l'ont recommandé au Parlement, au gouvernement, est-ce que vous éprouvez des difficultés de votre côté? Avez-vous du mal à mettre tout en place avant le transfert au ministère des Anciens Combattants? Est-ce que le MDN fait face à des problèmes de logistique?

(1625)

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Pour revenir aux points abordés par l'ombudsman, c'est exactement ce que nous faisons; nous offrons ce processus simplifié par l'entremise de l'UISP, du CISP et nous assurons toute la transition. Le général Corbould en était responsable et il a présenté une proposition au chef pour une réorganisation qui répondra à ces recommandations de sorte que ce soit plus simple pour les membres, avec un service de conciergerie guidé...

M. John Brassard:

Est-ce que c'est récent?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

C'est très récent. Il s'en est occupé tout juste avant sa retraite.

Ces changements seront mis en oeuvre bientôt, je l'espère. Entretemps, nous faisons ce travail en coulisse tous les jours. Bien que je ne puisse pas vous faire d'annonce exacte pour le moment, nous n'attendons pas ces annonces pour combler les lacunes et pour accroître cette capacité. Elle fait clairement partie du double mandat des membres des Forces armées canadiennes, qui restent membres jusqu'au jour où ils sont libérés. Le chef prend la chose très au sérieux, tout comme moi à titre d'officier responsable. Nous allons nous occuper de ces gens jusqu'à ce qu'ils soient prêts à retirer leur uniforme; puis, le jour suivant, le ministère des Anciens Combattants les prendra en charge. Nous ne voulons pas toutefois que ce jour-là constitue la première rencontre avec les représentants d'Anciens Combattants Canada. C'est ce que fait valoir la capitaine. Il faut qu'il y ait des rencontres comme c'est le cas présentement pour les cas complexes au CISP, avec un agent des services aux vétérans, ou avec les autres niveaux de soin appropriés.

C'est l'objectif que nous voulons atteindre; nous voulons donc aborder toutes les questions décrites par l'ombudsman.

M. John Brassard:

Je suis heureux d'entendre cela.

Je voulais aussi aborder la question de la réembauche. Bien sûr, on accorde la priorité à ces personnes dans la fonction publique, mais ce qui se dégage de votre témoignage et de notre recherche, c'est que le pourcentage de personnes qui sont libérées pour des raisons médicales ou qui prennent leur retraite des Forces armées canadiennes et qui peuvent obtenir un emploi au sein de la Fonction publique du Canada ou du MDN est extrêmement faible. À quoi attribuez-vous cela? Pourquoi n'embauchons-nous pas plus d'anciens combattants? Pourquoi n'embauchons-nous pas plus de membres des Forces armées canadiennes au sein de la fonction publique?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Je ne peux pas répondre à cette question. Je ne sais pas quelles sont les mesures d'embauche du gouvernement fédéral.

M. John Brassard:

Est-ce une question de qualifications? Vous pouvez certainement nous parler de ce qui se passe en arrière-plan. Est-ce que nous préparons les membres des Forces armées canadiennes, nos anciens combattants à...

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Nous pouvons certainement parler de cela. C'est le point soulevé par la capitaine Langlois: la capacité de transformer le jargon militaire unique en des capacités civiles, de passer de la capacité de décrire la réparation d'un char d'assaut sur le terrain à la capacité de rénover une maison, par exemple, parce que la plupart des Canadiens comprennent comment on rénove une maison. Ce sont les outils que nous voulons créer.

Nous offrons une formation sur la préparation d'un curriculum vitae et d'autres programmes par l'entremise du Service de préparation à une seconde carrière dont j'ai parlé pendant ma déclaration préliminaire. Il faut l'améliorer et le rendre plus professionnel, et c'est ce que nous faisons. Nous allons en faire de plus en plus et toujours faire mieux; offrir de meilleurs outils et travailler avec des partenaires comme le Programme d'aide à la transition, qui offre un webinaire sur la façon de passer une entrevue et de s'exprimer. Souvent, le problème n'est pas un manque de compétences, mais plutôt la façon de s'exprimer en entrevue. C'est ce qui fait la différence. Nous abordons cette question dans les Forces canadiennes.

M. John Brassard:

Je crois que c'est un élément essentiel, commodore, parce que nous voulons comprendre les questions relatives à la santé mentale et au suicide des anciens combattants. La transition, le sentiment d'appartenance, ne se limitent pas à l'armée, et l'emploi joue un rôle important dans la vie de ces gens.

Merci, monsieur.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, commodore et capitaine. Je remarque vos rubans et aussi quelques médailles pour votre service au Moyen-Orient.

J'ai plusieurs questions à vous poser. Je crois que je dois faire référence à l'un de mes romans préférés, Catch-22, où le personnage de Yossarian ne peut obtenir une libération en vertu de l'article 8 parce que s'il dit qu'il est fou, on saura qu'il ne l'est pas; s'il ne le dit pas, on saura qu'il l'est. D'une façon ou d'une autre, il est pris là.

Si je suis membre des forces armées et que je pense souffrir d'une maladie mentale, quels sont les obstacles qui m'empêcheront de faire face à ce problème et me placeront en situation d'impasse?

(1630)

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Cela revient au stigmatisme. Au bout du compte, les obstacles ont trait à la façon dont on demande de l'aide, dans l'armée comme dans le reste de la société. Nous travaillons très fort à faire changer la culture. Il n'y a pas d'obstacle physique. Il n'y a rien qui vous empêche d'aller à l'hôpital, de dire que vous vivez des difficultés et d'obtenir ces services. Le Médecin général pourrait vous expliquer l'ensemble du programme.

Rien ne vous empêche d'y aller. Tout ce que vous avez à faire, c'est de dire à votre sergent, à votre agent de programme ou à votre commodore que vous devez vous rendre à l'hôpital. C'est tout. Personne ne vous demandera pourquoi. Les gens avec qui vous avez une relation de travail étroite vous poseront peut-être la question, mais au bout du compte, c'est votre choix d'en parler ou non. Une fois que vous êtes entré à l'hôpital, vous avez accès aux programmes et services offerts dans notre système de soins de santé. Il revient à nous, à l'équipe de direction et aux Forces canadiennes, de travailler à changer cette culture, tout comme nous le faisons dans l'ensemble du pays, pour faire comprendre qu'un pansement invisible autour de la tête, c'est la même chose qu'un pansement sur un bras cassé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est juste, mais ce que je veux dire, c'est que si une personne ne se sent pas bien mentalement et sait que si elle se fait traiter, elle sera désignée par la structure militaire comme étant une personne souffrant de maladie mentale qui n'est donc pas apte à servir, alors elle continuera de servir pour éviter de se faire mettre à la porte parce qu'elle souffre d'une maladie. La plus proche comparaison dans la vie civile serait celle d'un sonneur d'alarme. Si vous dénoncez, vous devez être protégé. Est-ce qu'on offre une certaine protection à ces personnes?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Le programme de SSBSO, un programme de soutien par les pairs, est confidentiel, et la chaîne de commandement n'est pas au courant des interactions entre les pairs et les gens qui obtiennent leur appui. C'est souvent la première étape à franchir avant de demander de l'aide médicale, parce que ces pairs ont vécu la même expérience. Ces programmes, comme Sans limites, visent l'aide entre les pairs et le bien-être, et parfois il faut passer par cette première étape pour obtenir des références ou pour accepter d'aller de l'avant et comprendre que cela améliorera notre bien-être.

Il ne fait aucun doute que ces programmes sont bénéfiques.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Il y a un lien dans votre question que j'aimerais défaire un peu; c'est cette supposition que, parce que je reçois des services d'aide en santé mentale et que je suis en uniforme... Lorsque je travaillais dans l'Arctique, j'ai été impliqué dans l'écrasement du vol 6560 de la First Air, ce 737 qui a malheureusement manqué la piste et s'est écrasé contre une montagne en plein milieu de l'opération Nanook. Nous avons perdu plusieurs membres. J'étais le répondant sur les lieux. Au fil des ans, j'ai eu des problèmes à cause de cela, et j'ai pu les surmonter grâce à l'aide médicale. Cela ne m'a pas empêché de continuer à faire mon travail. En fait, ce n'est pas différent d'une personne qui a des problèmes d'alcool ou qui se remet d'une blessure musculosquelettique. Ces personnes peuvent se rétablir et être fonctionnelles.

La maladie mentale n'entraîne pas automatiquement une libération des Forces armées canadiennes. D'autres généraux et adjudants-chefs ont parlé de leurs propres... On peut gérer la situation et avancer. C'est la clé; je voulais donc défaire cette hypothèse selon laquelle on était automatiquement libéré des forces armées simplement parce qu'on consultait un psychologue ou un travailleur social à propos d'un quelconque problème. Je crois que plus il y aura de cas, plus on parlera de la possibilité d'aller de l'avant et de continuer d'être un membre fonctionnel des forces armées, sans restriction à l'égard des promotions, etc. mieux on se portera... C'est la culture dont je parlais plus tôt.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez parlé plus tôt du moment où une personne est prête à retirer son uniforme. Comment savez-vous qu'une personne est prête, sur le plan médical? Si l'on se retrouve dans une situation où l'armée est d'avis que la personne doit quitter les forces armées, mais que la personne ne veut pas le faire, comment gérez-vous cela?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Vous avez posé une question médicale. Nous ne sommes pas des médecins militaires, alors nous ne pouvons pas répondre à cette question. Nous pourrions vous parler du processus.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Oui. Si une personne a des contraintes à l'emploi pour des raisons médicales qui enfreignent l'universalité du service, alors elle devra probablement faire une transition. Le processus de transition s'échelonne sur une période de six mois à trois ans, selon la complexité des besoins de la personne. Bien sûr, étant donné notre travail et les efforts que nous déployons en matière de transition au sein des Forces armées canadiennes et du ministère des Anciens Combattants, nous voulons être certains que les membres sont prêts à faire la transition.

Il faut satisfaire aux critères de l'universalité du service. Parfois, les personnes ne répondent pas à ces exigences, mais peuvent demeurer à l'emploi des Forces armées canadiennes, peuvent être maintenues en poste jusqu'à trois ans et peuvent être employées à ce titre. Cela peut varier de six mois à trois ans.

(1635)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Au cours des dernières semaines — je suis membre du Comité depuis quelques semaines seulement —, nous avons beaucoup parlé de la formation de base que doit suivre un nouveau soldat, un nouveau membre de l'armée, pour entrer dans le monde militaire, mais il n'existe aucun processus similaire lorsque les militaires doivent effectuer un retour à la vie civile. Êtes-vous d'accord avec cela?

Le président:

Veuillez répondre rapidement s'il vous plaît.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Non, je ne suis pas d'accord avec cela.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Wagantall, vous avez la parole.

Mme Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, PCC):

C'était une réponse rapide. Je vais peut-être vous donner plus de temps pour y répondre.

J'essaie de comprendre ce qu'est l'UISP. Si un militaire n'est pas apte à servir les forces armées à un certain moment, son objectif est probablement de reprendre sa carrière et de retourner au travail ou, s'il reconnaît qu'il ne peut plus respecter les normes relatives à l'universalité, alors il deviendra un ancien combattant.

Le ministère des Anciens Combattants et les Forces armées canadiennes travaillent en collaboration à ce dossier. Comment les décisions sont-elles prises? Qui est responsable de la décision finale, dans un sens ou dans l'autre? À mon sens, si une personne doit être restituée, la décision finale revient aux Forces armées canadiennes. Si on détermine que la personne doit quitter les forces armées, alors il reviendrait à Anciens Combattants Canada de décider quand la personne est prête à faire la transition.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

La décision de quitter les forces armées ou d'y rester est une décision administrative prise par le directeur de l'administration des carrières militaires, qui détermine si les contraintes à l'emploi pour des raisons médicales répondent aux exigences liées à l'universalité du service.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Ce sont donc les Forces armées canadiennes qui prennent la décision.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Oui.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord. On parle ici de maladie mentale et de suicide; le lien entre la maladie mentale et les expériences comme la vôtre est clair. Vous avez vécu une crise, et cela fait partie de votre vie maintenant. On entend aussi souvent parler des frustrations relatives au processus de libération; vous tentez de régler ce problème pour une transition sans heurt. Je me demande pourquoi on libère ces gens dans le monde des anciens combattants avant qu'ils n'aient accès à un médecin de famille, avant que leur maison ne soit rénovée; on les laisse sans argent alors qu'ils doivent attendre des mois avant d'être payés. Cela augmente leur niveau de stress.

Aussi, comme l'a constaté mon collègue après avoir parlé aux personnes qui aident les anciens combattants par l'entremise des programmes de transition, nous les préparons et les conditionnons à la mentalité de combat ou de fuite et à un changement dans leurs habitudes de sommeil, mais ensuite nous nous attendons à ce qu'ils fassent sans aide la transition vers la vie civile, à ce qu'ils fassent comme tout le monde, à ce qu'ils se couchent plus tard parce que c'est ce que nous voulons. Ils ne sont pas préparés à cela, mais ils pourraient l'être. Il existe des façons de reprogrammer les gens  — c'est un mauvais choix de mot — pour qu'ils puissent à nouveau dormir sans avoir cette réaction de combat ou de fuite. Pourquoi libérons-nous ces personnes sans leur faire ce cadeau qui, je crois, diminuerait beaucoup leur niveau de stress mental lorsqu'ils tentent de se réhabituer à la vie civile normale?

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

C'est une grande question. Je vais commencer par le début. Le chef a été très clair. Nous allons professionnaliser les services de transition. Une partie de cette réponse est directement liée à votre question au sujet du bon moment pour partir. La capitaine Langlois a expliqué les processus actuels et la justification relative au manquement à l'universalité des services. Nous travaillons avec nos collègues d'ACC pour améliorer le processus de sorte qu'au fil de la transition, ils deviennent plus « civilisés » — faute d'un terme plus approprié —, mais qu'ils gardent quand même leur identité militaire, pour faire référence à ce dont vous avez parlé plus tôt.

Selon leur carrière, leur lieu de résidence et la région du pays dans laquelle ils se trouvent, les militaires sont confrontés à divers défis. Si vous vivez sur une très grande base militaire dans une ville très éloignée, comme Petawawa — en fait, Petawawa n'est pas une ville éloignée — ou Wainwright, votre situation diffère grandement de celle d'un militaire qui vit ici à Ottawa et qui peut se fondre dans la population.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

En Saskatchewan.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Oui, en Saskatchewan et à Moose Jaw. Cela fait partie d'un programme de professionnalisation et d'un processus visant à combler les lacunes. Nous y travaillons très fort. Je ne peux pas vous parler du moment exact de la libération. Il faut tenir compte de plusieurs options afin de déterminer cela.

Est-ce que je peux aborder un point au sujet du revenu, rapidement?

(1640)

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Oui.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Si les militaires ont fait leur demande de prestations d'invalidité de longue durée, ce qu'ils font lorsqu'ils entreprennent un programme de réhabilitation professionnelle, dans la grande majorité des cas, ils commencent à recevoir leur argent dans les 16 jours suivant leur dernier chèque de paye. C'est leur assureur privé qui gère ce programme. Je ne peux pas parler des autres sources de revenus citées dans les histoires que l'on entend, parce que je ne suis pas responsable des pensions ou des prestations pour les anciens combattants.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Oui, je crois que c'est ACC qui est responsable de cette question. J'ai une dernière question, rapidement. Nous avons aussi entendu la frustration des militaires qui doivent retirer leur uniforme. On leur dit au revoir, et c'est terminé. Avez-vous pensé à une façon de reconnaître le service de ces personnes, même si leur cheminement ne correspond pas à celui qu'elles avaient envisagé ou que les forces armées avaient envisagé pour elles à long terme? Parce que ces militaires quittent l'armée sans se sentir valorisés par les Forces canadiennes, à qui ils ont donné leur vie.

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Nous avons un programme, Départ dans la dignité. Les militaires reçoivent une lettre du premier ministre et du maire, et un certificat de service. On organise des événements où les amis et la famille des militaires se réunissent; ils reçoivent souvent un cadeau de leur unité et leurs pairs leur rendent hommage. Tout est fait selon le souhait de la personne. Parfois, les gens veulent quitter l'armée de façon plus discrète; d'autres veulent quelque chose de plus grand. [Français] d'une plus grande envergure.[Traduction]

Le programme existe et il fonctionne bien.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

Mais c'est leur choix.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen, vous avez la parole.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je voulais revenir à une question posée plus tôt au sujet des défis auxquels est confrontée l'UISP. Avez-vous suffisamment de personnel? Certains anciens combattants nous ont dit qu'il n'y avait pas assez de ressources pour effectuer le travail.

Est-ce que vous avez suffisamment de personnel? Dans la négative, avez-vous de la difficulté à trouver des personnes qualifiées pour faire ce travail très sensible et important? Que recherchez-vous? Recevez-vous assez de financement? Souvent, les problèmes émanent d'un manque de ressources. Avez-vous suffisamment de fonds?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Nous nous acquittons de notre mission, mais comme le nombre de libérations pour des raisons médicales a augmenté récemment, le personnel subit plus de pression. Le renouvellement de la structure de l'UISP pensé et présenté par le général Corbould avec l'appui du chef permettra d'accroître la structure de l'UISP afin de veiller à offrir des services de haut niveau pour que nous puissions nous acquitter de notre mandat sans trop de problèmes.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Quel type de personne peut offrir ce soutien très important?

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

L'UISP compte de nombreux anciens militaires, devenus civils, parce qu'ils ont une expertise et une expérience qu'ils peuvent partager avec les autres. Pour les membres du personnel militaire, cela varie. Ils proviennent de divers milieux. Nous misons surtout sur la qualité des personnes, sur leur compassion et leur capacité d'écoute. Presque tous les membres du personnel sont là parce qu'ils veulent redonner aux forces armées. Certains ont pris part aux opérations, tandis que d'autres ont un proche qui a vécu ces expériences de vie, et ils veulent tous être là pour aider les membres des Forces armées canadiennes. C'est ce que nous cherchons.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je ne sais pas si vous allez pouvoir répondre à ma prochaine question ou si elle correspond à votre rôle. Bien sûr, en tant que députés, nous entendons surtout parler les personnes qui n'ont pas réussi leur transition. Elles s'expriment parfois très ouvertement.

Est-ce que vous faites le suivi de ces personnes? Avez-vous un moyen de rétablir le contact avec elles? Avez-vous un mécanisme qui vous permet de renouer avec ces personnes pour tenter de combler les lacunes ou de les aider à passer à travers une période très difficile dans le monde civil?

(1645)

Captv Marie-France Langlois:

Chaque fois qu'une personne pose une question au ministre, au chef ou à l'unité, nous prenons le temps de répondre, d'effectuer un suivi et de boucler la boucle avec la personne touchée.

Est-ce que nous suivons tout le monde? Non. L'UISP a un système de suivi, mais il sert à veiller à ce que personne ne soit laissé pour compte. Les gens qui viennent à nous sont inscrits dans le système et nous nous assurons de faire un suivi auprès d'eux.

Cmdre Sean Cantelon:

C'est seulement jusqu'à ce que les personnes soient libérées. Une fois qu'elles le sont, je peux vous assurer que lorsque nous voyons les manchettes, nous effectuons une vérification et si nous trouvons des erreurs dans notre processus, nous les corrigeons.

Ma collègue vous a déjà parlé de l'engagement auprès des personnes.

Le président:

Merci. Voilà qui met fin à la discussion d'aujourd'hui.

Au nom du Comité, je vous remercie tous les deux, capitaine et commodore, d'avoir pris le temps de venir témoigner ici aujourd'hui malgré votre horaire chargé, et merci pour tout ce que vous faites pour nos militaires.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant quelques minutes, puis nous passerons aux travaux du Comité, avec le comité directeur.

Merci. La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on February 22, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.