header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-02-08 ACVA 41

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody. I'd like to call the meeting to order.

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) and a motion adopted on September 29, the committee is resuming its study of mental health and suicide prevention among veterans.

On our first panel, our witnesses are Laurie Ogilvie, director of family services, military family services; and Jason Feyko, senior manager, Soldier On.

Welcome, both of you.

We'll start with 10 minutes each, and we'll start with Jason.

Major Jason Feyko (Senior Manager, Soldier On, Director, Casualty Support Management, Department of National Defence):

Good morning, Mr. Chairman, and members of the committee.

I am Jason Feyko, the senior manager of Soldier On, a program of the Canadian Armed Forces.

Thank you for the opportunity to appear today to speak with you about Soldier On and how it can support ill and injured Canadian Armed Forces members and veterans.

My role is to lead and manage Soldier On and staff in order to deliver the best program possible to support ill and injured members through sport and physical recreation. Also, as a veteran member who was severely wounded while serving in Afghanistan, I can attest to the power that sport and physical activity can play in an individual's recovery, rehabilitation, and reintegration.

Soldier On became a program in the Canadian Armed Forces in 2007 and is responsible for providing support and services to military personnel, either serving or retired, who sustained a physical and/or mental health illness or injury while serving, whether attributable to service or not.

The program is a highly visible and integral component of the commitment and priority of the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces towards providing a comprehensive approach to the care of ill and injured members.

The objectives of the program include to facilitate, support, and integrate resources and opportunities for ill and injured members to fully and actively participate in physical, recreational, or sporting activities; to create awareness of Soldier On among ill and injured military personnel, other Canadian Armed Forces personnel, the general public, and corporations; and to investigate, foster, and enhance partnerships with Canadian organizations and allied nations offering relevant programs and services.

The Soldier On program has four key lines of operations to meet these objectives.

First, communications, outreach, and awareness are very important aspects of Soldier On. It is about raising awareness of available support under Soldier On through various means such as websites, articles, presentations, and social media. This awareness extends not only to the ill and injured community that is eligible for support, but also to Canadians who support Soldier On through sponsorship, fundraising, and donations.

Second, Soldier On conducts over 40 local, regional, national, and international camps annually that focus on sport and physical recreation activities. These range from fly-fishing to hockey, hiking, alpine skiing, and yoga. These camps serve as an introduction or a reintroduction to sports and opportunities, an important stepping stone for many ill and injured members. Not only do they provide a platform to learn new skills in a sport, but they also connect with ill and injured members in a safe and supportive environment. From our experience, this peer support not only endorses inspiration and motivation, but it also reinforces to ill and injured members that they are not alone in their recovery and that there are generous and dedicated Canadians who stand by them. They are not alone, as there are individuals across the country and across the world with similar situations, challenges, and circumstances.

Third, the most important focus area for Soldier On is “active for life”. This is centred on promoting a lifetime commitment to a healthy and active lifestyle. Once the member is inspired or motivated to use sport and physical recreation in his or her recovery, Soldier On has an equipment grant program to which individuals can apply for funds to offset the price of equipment and training to support that active lifestyle.

The last focus area is less populated. However, Soldier On supports those individuals who demonstrate the desire and the potential to compete at the high-performance level. This support is accomplished by working with respective national sports governing bodies to provide time and resources to optimize fitness preparation, sport-specific skill development, and performance. Typically these members transition to receive support from the national sport agencies and the teams they represent. To date Soldier On has supported a half-dozen individuals who competed at the national and international competitive levels.

Soldier On is funded through a combination of government-allocated public funding and the Soldier On fund, an official financial support program of the Canadian Armed Forces benefiting members, veterans, and their families under the support our troops program and the Canadian Forces morale and welfare services.

The Soldier On fund is the most direct way for Canadians to contribute to supporting the recovery, rehabilitation, and reintegration of ill and injured members. The fund has disbursed more than $4 million for the purchase of sporting and recreation equipment, in addition to training and travel expenses for its members to participate in those local, regional, national, and international events.

Since its inception, Soldier On has assisted over 2,200 ill and injured members to overcome adversity, build confidence, and be motivated by participating in sport and other physically challenging activities. Soldier On is delivered in synchronization with, and is complementary to, other programs of the joint personnel support unit, the organization responsible for providing support and services, and delivering programs to ill and injured military personnel and their families, as well as supporting the families of deceased military personnel.

In accordance with their records, as of fiscal year 2015-16, 62% of Soldier On participants have been serving members. However, there's a noticeable shift with more and more veterans accessing the program. This is due to an increase in outreach and awareness, participants acting as ambassadors, and increasing Veterans Affairs integration through a partnership agreement signed in December 2015 between Veterans Affair Canada and the Canadian Armed Forces. This agreement formalizes and provides governance, guiding principles, and mutually agreed-upon specifications that define and assist the interdepartmental relationship regarding Soldier On.

Soldier On is more than just sport. The sailors, soldiers, airmen and airwomen who have participated in Soldier On activities come from different walks of life and experiences. They all have one common bond—their lives have changed. The esprit de corps is evident during the activities, around the hallways, the common areas, the bus rides, and the informal chats as they share their stories amongst one another, some visibly injured, others silently suffering. They come from Newfoundland, British Columbia, Canada's north, and everywhere in between. It doesn't take long to realize that they have another common thread: a shared perseverance to go on, to honour sacrifice, and to “soldier on”.

As I conclude my opening remarks, I offer a few testimonials from past Soldier On participants. It is a wonderful experience just being out on the water, challenging myself with new skills, just being with veterans who understand mental health injuries and illnesses. After the event I now realize how important the camp was to me. The mental and physical pains I have were pushed aside with all the sports. I didn't want to slow down; it was tiring, but it put me in a happy place. Reconnecting with peers has been the best therapy I could have.

Thank you again for the opportunity to appear, Mr. Chair. I would be pleased to respond to the committee's questions in time.

(1540)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Ogilvie.

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie (Director, Family Services, Military Family Services, Department of National Defence):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chairman and members of the committee.

My name is Laurie Ogilvie, and I'm the director of family services with the Canadian Forces morale and welfare services.

I would like to thank you for this opportunity to talk to you about what we do to support the Canadian Armed Forces members, veterans, and their families.

The Canadian Armed Forces maintains a strong support network for our military families. Today I would like to talk to you about one of those, the military family services program. In my role, I oversee the program. It was formally established 25 years ago. It exists to support families in mitigating the challenges associated with service life, such as geographical relocation, operational deployments, and the inherent risk of military operations.

The program is anchored in a model that promotes coordinated services for health and well-being of military families in their community. The military family services program is accessed through three key points: military family resource centres, the family information line, and CAFconnection.ca.

The family information line is a national 1-800 service for all military families, offering bilingual information, referral, and crisis support, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Counsellors provide immediate support during a crisis and help connect families with appropriate national and local resources.

CAFconnection.ca is a national information portal that provides information and resources for military members, veterans, and their families.

Lastly, the military family recourse centres are family-governed, provincially incorporated, not-for-profit organizations that are allocated funds through the Canadian Armed Forces for the delivery of the military family services program. The philosophical framework of the military family services program is “by families for families”, and by nature of their construct, the military family resource centres are best positioned to deliver programs and services to Canadian Armed Forces personnel; their parents, spouses, children, and relatives; families of the fallen; and medically releasing members and their families.

There are 32 military family resource centres in Canada, with additional service points in Europe and the U.S. These centres are in place to help families manage the uniqueness of the Canadian military life through various programs and services, in the areas of children and youth development and parenting support; personal development; community integration; prevention, support, and intervention; and family separation and reunion.

Military family resource centres are also local community ambassadors or navigators for military families. Their governance construct and mandate provide the operational flexibility to meet the unique needs of the Canadian Armed Forces' community, and adjust quickly as demographic and operational landscapes change. Though they may have many services in common, no two resource centres are exactly alike.

To establish some consistency for military families, military family services develops and oversees the policies and services of the military family services program, provides technical advice and guidance on service delivery, and monitors and evaluates the success of the program in meeting the unique needs of military families.

It is important to note that my organization, which is military family services, does not maintain a direct management authority for the military family resource centres. Rather, we're the stewards of the military family services program, and allocate $27 million annually to the military family resource centres for their provision of, either directly or through a community partnership, services that support military family needs in the areas of child care, mental health, education, employment, special needs, health care, second language training, deployment support, personal development, and community integration.

We also work very closely with Canadian Armed Forces' partners to address the emerging needs of families. In 2011, we partnered with the director of casualty support management to formalize supports for families following the illness, injury, or death of a serving member.

Military family services funded each military family resource centre to embed a family liaison officer within the local integrated personnel support centre. The family liaison officer provides a suite of services, including counselling, respite care, caregiving support, and community integration.

Also in 2011, military family services partnered with CFMAP for the expansion of long-term bereavement counselling for loved ones of fallen Canadian Forces personnel.

In 2015, to better support medically released Canadian Armed Forces members and their families, Veterans Affairs Canada invested $10 million in a four-year pilot program. The pilot program, entitled the veteran family program, connects medically released veterans and their families to the military family services program for two years from the date of release. It's available at seven military family resource centres for the medically released veterans and their families, and at all military family resource centres for families of still-serving members preparing for medical release.

(1545)



Family awareness and accessibility of available services has always been a priority at military family services. The modern military family does not access services in person as much as it did when the program was established 25 years ago, and for that reason we have evolved in our approach.

We have expanded our online reach through programs such as My Voice, which is a secure facebook page for families to ask questions, express concerns, or connect with us. You're Not Alone is a collection of resources highlighting available mental health services and programs. The Mind's the Matter is an interactive online psycho-education program for children and caregivers of those with an operational stress injury. The operational stress injury resource for caregivers is an online self-directed resource designed for caregivers of families of Canadian Armed Forces members or veterans living with an operational stress injury. It is an expansive social media campaign.

While I've just provided a very quick overview of the military family services program, it does not begin to paint the full picture. Each family member who uses a program will have a different experience and will share different impressions of the usefulness, or not, of their interaction. This is exactly why we continually evolve and adjust based on the needs and requirements of military families and communities.

Our mandate of “by families for families” remains at the forefront of everything we do and why we do it. We continue to engage with families, listen to them, and provide them with the means to have a voice so that individual experiences can truly shape the program, which is meant to support their unique requirements.

As the chief of the defence staff noted, we know from personal experience as Canadian Armed Forces members how crucial it is to have the support of our families. Just as our families look after us, we need to take care of them.

Mr. Chairman, ladies and gentlemen, thank you again for this opportunity and I'm happy to take any questions.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll start off with a first round of questioning.

Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you both for coming today. It's much appreciated, and learning more and more about your services is a tremendous benefit for us in how we can find ways to improve the lives of our veterans and our soldiers.

Jason, your organization is very dear to me, because I found through my life that being involved in a lot of sports has managed me through a lot of issues that I've gone through in my life. I find that in rebuilding my life, it's been very important. It's important for me to see that.

You haven't been around a great deal of time, but have you done any studies to see what sort of impact you've had in situations where you've been able to help, or not help?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Yes, in 2016 we did a Canadian Forces research analysis on the impact of Soldier On, to tell us if we're meeting the mandate and to see where we can improve our services. We have done that. The communication aspect is where we can really improve our services as we reach out to more and more veterans.

(1550)

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

By “communication”, you mean communicating to our veterans to let them know more about the program?

Maj Jason Feyko:

That's correct and we've come a long ways. We're seeing more veterans come to the program. So far this year it's about 55%—more veterans than serving members. But how do we reach those other veterans who might not be connected directly with Veterans Affairs or have all those different mediums that are out there? We're investigating that.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Hopefully, through the Invictus Games we will find that your program will actually start to see a little more growth, because of that identity and that communication to veterans across Canada.

Maj Jason Feyko:

Yes, we have a team of 90 ill and injured athletes competing in this year's Invictus Games, and we see that as a great opportunity to inspire a nation of people to use sport in their recovery.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

One of the things we've heard a lot about as we look into mental illness and suicide prevention is the loss of identity. That seems to be a big issue, the loss of identity of a soldier once he leaves—whether it's because he wanted to leave, because he had to leave, or because of other circumstances. In your role, have you seen that and can you comment on where you've seen it?

Maj Jason Feyko:

I can comment, and Soldier On is a unique program in that circumstance. When a member receives an illness or injury, they're really removed from that esprit de corps that they're used to. They miss the camaraderie and being with all the troops. Soldier On, through our camps, is maybe the first opportunity where they can come back into a collective group. From day one, at that meet-and-greet dinner, there's an instant bond.

They've all served their country, even if it's an allied country. They've all served their country proudly and they've all gone through something significant that has changed their lives. They all have different challenges and issues, but that bond is something to see. It's instant, the camaraderie that happens at a Soldier On event. It's a very important aspect of what we're doing.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

I can support that, because when I go fishing in Tisdale in northern Saskatchewan, it's an experience that you cannot ever lose. It's life-changing to be in that part of the world, so it's very bonding to see that.

Maj Jason Feyko:

Right.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

I appreciate everything you do, and thank you for doing it.

Laurie, I come from a military family and grew up as an army brat, so I know a lot of the issues or have experienced those over the years. Can you tell us where you are based, the actual locations of your program?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

We have 32 military family resource centres and they're co-located with the main base wings across the country. The veteran family program is currently being offered at seven locations. Those are Esquimalt, Edmonton, Shilo, Trenton, North Bay, Valcartier, and Halifax.

The 32 we have across the country are at every service point. We also have extensive outreach, so for communities like Moose Jaw, where there are families in Southport, we have outreach services there as well.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

I come from Saskatchewan, and when I talk about rural, I'm talking about big distances to go. In Saskatchewan we're used to travelling and our veterans are used to travelling long distances. How do you see expanding that? Can you see a model to expand that into areas of Canada in the Prairies and other parts where people have to travel for five or six hours to get places?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

Our main focus is not on necessarily setting up service points for face to face. We're finding that most military families and veteran families aren't looking for the direct face-to-face service but are looking for online services or looking to make a connection with people. Those are the services that we're really trying to expand. Through our CAFconnection.ca, through our family information line, and through each of the military family resource centres with very robust outreach programming, they're able to get in contact with families that won't or cannot drive for five or six hours to get face-to-face service.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you.

I think my time is up, so I want to thank you both for coming. I appreciate that.

The Chair:

Mr. Eyolfson.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you both for coming.

Mr. Feyko, I'm very pleased to see that there is such initiative on this. I find that keeping fit is such an incredible part of maintaining not just physical health but mental health as well.

With regard to the activities that members undertake, there are expenses, equipment, travel, and this sort of thing. For veterans, are any of these expenses covered by the Veterans Affairs rehabilitation program?

(1555)

Maj Jason Feyko:

No, all the expenses are paid by donations to the Soldier On fund, which is a non-public fund.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Okay. Is there any government funding at all for the Soldier On fund?

Maj Jason Feyko:

There is government funding for the administration of the program, some salaries, but the majority of the funding for our program delivery is from donations from Canadians and the Soldier On fund. We're restricted in our use of DND public funding; it is for serving members only.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

All right. Thank you.

Can you give just a ballpark figure for the annual budget of the fund?

Maj Jason Feyko:

On the public side, the annual baseline budget is about $454,000. That's not including the military salaries and some of the other salaries that are included in that. From the Soldier On fund crown trust fund we spend approximately $1 million a year, and last year we raised $789,000.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Okay. Thank you.

Do you have any sort of formal partnership with Veterans Affairs Canada?

Maj Jason Feyko:

We do. It was signed in December of last year. It's a collaboration agreement to get more veterans to access our program. It's more about communications and how we can work together in sync to make sure the opportunities are distributed across the country to all the Veterans Affairs case managers in all the Veterans Affairs offices.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

When a Canadian Forces member can't return to work due to physical injury, if they presented to your program, what would be the first step you would take?

Maj Jason Feyko:

If they weren't available to go back to work, we would see what they're interested in. They would register with Soldier On, so they could tell us what sports they're interested in, and then we'd look at our operational calendar. If it was golf, we would say, “We have a golf camp coming up. Put your name in; apply for the golf camp.” First-timers would get selected as priority to attend that golf camp, to go to a camp. From there, hopefully they're inspired enough, and if they say “Golf is expensive; I can't afford green fees or clubs,” we would offset the cost of that equipment so they can have an active lifestyle for the rest of their life.

In addition, we set up social media groups that are private for the ill and injured community so they can still stay connected after a camp, or in a golf group so they can see who wants to go golfing on a weekend, for example, and maintain their active lifestyle through that.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Excellent. Thank you.

Ms. Ogilvie, would you be able to give us an idea of or identify any positive changes in the management of veterans and the services provided for their families? Can you think of any systematic improvements that have taken place in the past year or so?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

The veteran family program is only a year old right now. Of the people who are involved in the program, we're seeing significant increases in their capacity to be able to transition from military to civilian life. It's a short period of time, but what we're anecdotally hearing from many of the people who are involved is that it was a long time in coming and they're very happy with the services that are now available to them. They wish this had been here for years.

There are a number of collateral impacts happening: for parents of veterans or medically released veterans and their families who are receiving services, and children and youth of those medically released members, the services they hadn't been receiving before. There are some additional outputs happening versus just directly to the veteran and a spouse.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

This may be too broad a question to answer in the minute we have left, but what kind of support do these centres offer family members of a veteran who suffers a mental health problem?

(1600)

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

There is a variety of services. It really depends on what their individual needs are. An intake is done with the member or with a veteran and their spouse or their family member when they come in. Based on what their unique family characteristics are, they're either provided direct services or directed to local community services. That interview primarily will focus on what kind of counselling or what level of intervention they are going to require, both from a caregiving point of view and from what the person suffering from the injury will need.

I don't know if I did that in a minute.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

That was exactly a minute. Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP):

Thank you very much for being here. I have so many questions.

Mr. Feyko, I want to begin with you.

You talked about the second point in terms of the recreational opportunities that you provide: fly fishing, hockey, and hiking. Do many female veterans take part in this? What is the take-up in regard to these recreational opportunities?

Maj Jason Feyko:

There are a number of female participants in the Soldier On program. For example, the team for the Invictus Games that are coming up is around 30% female. We don't delineate during the camps. It's conducive to the CF population. It's the same ratio coming to the Soldier On camps.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

You provide grants for equipment so that people can continue on in recreational activities. Is there a significant take-up of those grants? Do a lot of people get hooked into this program and then take advantage of the grants?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Yes, absolutely.

So many people get inspired through one of our camps. Then they ask for the money to buy that piece of equipment so when they're in a stressful situation or they're challenged they can go out for a bike ride, or go kayaking, or go fly fishing just to be active. Over 700 people last year applied for grants.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

That's very good. That sounds very encouraging.

You talked about the budget and the fact that you have to raise funds through public donors. It always struck me that it's very difficult, and it's hard when you have to rely on the generosity or benevolence of donors.

Do you have any difficulty with regard to funding the program delivery piece?

Maj Jason Feyko:

We haven't yet. Last year was the first year that we ended up expending more money than we generated. We're having mitigating strategies being developed to figure out how we can maintain and sustain that Soldier On funding.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. That sounds very challenging when you have such great need and there's a shortfall. Have you been successful in terms of that mitigation?

Maj Jason Feyko:

We have so far. We haven't been in a deficit yet, or we haven't had any issues whatsoever with the funding on either the public or the non-public sides.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. Thank you very much.

Madam Ogilvie, thank you, too, for being here, and thank you for what you do.

You talked about the services and about the fact that no two resource centres are exactly alike. I wonder if you could describe how the services diverge in terms of one community or another. What would that look like?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

If you take a smaller community like Goose Bay, the services available in that community are much less than somewhere like Toronto. One of the principles of the military family services program is that we're not duplicating or competing with services that are available in the local community. The intent is to refer to a community service provider directly delivering a service. In Toronto, for example, they may refer families to mental health counsellors in the community, versus what happens in Goose Bay, where mental health services will be provided by a military family resource centre staff person. It depends on what the needs are of a particular community, what the families are saying their needs are, what's also available in that community, and if those services available in the community meet the direct needs of what the military family lifestyle experiences are. In large urban centres like Toronto, there may not be as many as a community like Petawawa, where it is very tailored to the military family or the veteran family life experience.

(1605)

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. Thank you.

How important are the services for CF members living with OSI? How can the provision of these services be improved? Is it a matter of training? It is a matter of monetary support? How can we make it better?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

I can't really speak directly to the services provided by the Canadian Armed Forces for someone with an operational stress injury, but I can speak to the supports that are available to families of a member who has an operational stress injury. There's a variety of different types of services that are available. Again, no one person, or their requirements, are the same as any other. It's about providing a suite of services or a catalogue of services that they're able to access in their particular community.

There's a variety of different ways that someone can get access to service. Probably one of the bigger challenges that we face, as I mentioned earlier, is awareness of the type of services that are available in a community and getting the message out to people. That remains as one of the key challenges we've been trying to address, looking at every opportunity to be able to do it.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay, thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Bratina.

Mr. Bob Bratina (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Feyko, first of all, thank you for your service. You were severely wounded in Afghanistan. Was that the reason you left the military?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Yes, sir. Eventually my injuries caught up to me, and I was medically released last summer.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

We've heard plenty of testimony from veterans that it was a difficult time for them and led to many of the problems that we're trying to get resolved. What would you say of your transition from being a soldier?

Maj Jason Feyko:

First, my injuries were in 2004, so they're a long time ago, before the creation of the joint personnel support unit and all of these programs that are available now. As one of the first in Afghanistan, I've seen full circle some of the services that are available now that weren't when I was injured. However, I have no complaints with my transition. I was very fortunate with my transition out. Losing that identity is the hardest part of leaving the Canadian Armed Forces. Some of the programs and the close integration that is starting to happen between the Canadian Forces and Veterans Affairs is really helping it along and easing that movement through.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Were you part of that reconstruction scenario? I know our Hamilton soldiers were in Kandahar as part of a reconstruction.

Maj Jason Feyko:

No, I was in Kabul in the first Roto 0 in 2003-04, in the city.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

The sports and physical education is brilliant. It seems to me it is also a side effect of the organization, the coming together of these former soldiers. That's almost the main attribute of the whole program, bringing these people together again. Is that fair to say?

Maj Jason Feyko:

It is. A lot of the participants afterwards say that it wasn't about the hockey or it wasn't about the golf. It was about coming together and sharing those stories.

We always double up people in accommodations and it's surreal when they sit across and say, “I have this challenge. I have these nightmares” and the response is, “Oh, so do I. This is what I do to help. Maybe you should try it.” They start sharing some of those tricks and it goes a long way, and they stay connected for a long time.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

The emphasis on sports and physical education is great and you can see the obvious benefit of that. Are there any thoughts of expanding it to, say, arts and culture with guys playing in a band or something that will bring people together? Maybe they're not ready to play a game of golf anymore, or whatever.

Maj Jason Feyko:

There has been some, and perhaps the future will bring that, but at the moment our mandate is strictly sports and physical recreation.

(1610)

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Okay.

For our next guest now, thank you very much for your presentation, Laurie. Are there opportunities for veterans to be involved with MFS as employees?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

Absolutely as employees, and one of the key pieces of our program is volunteerism. We rely on volunteers at the military family resource centres for the delivery of programs and services and for the peer support, so there's a camaraderie that they would have. The sense of identity extends to the families, and it's really important to be able to go somewhere familiar that they've experienced while they were still serving. So the veteran family program, the current pilot, has seen a huge increase in the number of volunteers who are coming back and giving back to the military family resource centres and the military family services program.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Are the services a work in progress? Is there a constant evaluation process?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

There is constant evaluation not only from a local program perspective, but also, we've been studied by the ombudsman in the “On the Homefront” review in 2013, and our chief review services does significant reviews. We maintain performance measures on a quarterly basis to understand what the needs are of military families. We also conduct community needs assessments in each of the local communities so that we can understand exactly what families are saying their requirements so that we can adjust programming.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Mr. Feyko, what would you say about the evaluation process for your group?

Maj Jason Feyko:

After every event we ask for feedback from the participants and we always try to tweak the next camp to make improvements in moving forward.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Is there an equal ratio of females taking part in sports and physical education?

Maj Jason Feyko:

It's not equal for soldiers—

Mr. Bob Bratina:

It's not your 50-50, but in terms of....

Maj Jason Feyko:

It's consistent within the ratio within the Canadian Air Force, definitely.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Thanks.

Mr. Ellis, do I have any more time?

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Are there a lot of ex-military involved with your program other than the people who are coming to access it?

Maj Jason Feyko:

As volunteers?

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Like you, yes.

Maj Jason Feyko:

There are a lot of medically released members who offer their services and volunteer after the fact with the program, which we encourage.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you both very much for coming and making excellent presentations and helping us to understand the good work that you do in helping our veterans and serving personnel.

I would start with you, Ms. Ogilvie. You talked about the online suite of services and described some of the different programs that are available online for veterans and serving members to access. When you were going through that list, it seemed complicated to understand exactly what each one does and how they might interact with each other. Do you feel that is well understood among the people who are being served by your organization, and is there a way it could be better streamlined so that people understand what services you are delivering?

Do you have any comments on that so that we can maybe make some recommendations to improve the way that's delivered?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

This past month we released CAFconnection.ca to be able to do exactly what you've just mentioned, namely, to simplify and streamline member veteran and family access to online services and information.

Before last month, it was Familyforce.ca, and yes, it was convoluted, and yes, it was difficult to be able to access and understand. As I mentioned, we're just in the very beginning phases of the new website and the new online experience and are evaluating it on a daily basis to see what what can be tweaked and how we can better serve both member veterans and their families in their gathering of information.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Okay. Thank you.

With regard to the online services, I understand what you're saying that perhaps that is more convenient or more easily accessible for folks, but in areas where there isn't Internet access or high-speed Internet, that could be a challenge. I know that in the area I represent, Internet is not always available.

For these folks it would be better if they had a place to go to receive those services. I have 14 Wing Greenwood in my riding of West Nova, and I know the military family resource centre does an excellent job with the services available to them there, but they're not one of the seven centres for veterans and their families to attend.

I'm wondering if you could comment on how those folks without Internet service would be able to access the programs you're talking about.

(1615)

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

One of the mandates of the military family resource centres is outreach, and each of them has very robust outreach processes to be able to access families in different communities. For example, some will have fly-in services to remote communities. Our service centre in Yellowknife services all the north of Canada and provides those services. It really depends on the needs of the families and what they're identifying as their requirements.

Yes, many communities are without Internet access and in those communities, specifically around the veteran family program, we've been partnering with Legions for the delivery of the service. We have one of our staff go to the Legion to be able to provide that place where they can connect and have the service delivery.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Okay.

With regard to the military family resource centres on the 32 bases where they're located—I know the pilot project is only halfway through—do you see that expanding to all 32 perhaps? Have there been any preliminary discussion on expanding the services from the seven centres that are now identified?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

The intent of the pilot was to assess the efficacy of the program and the need for it with the medically released population. We've just completed the first year audit and evaluation and have just received the results this week. Those results will be the basis on which Veterans Affairs will determine if the program will be expanded beyond the seven sites, or even beyond the existing pilot locations.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Okay. Thank you very much.

Mr. Feyko, I really appreciate the great work you do with Soldier On. It sounds like a wonderful program, and I echo what Mr. Kitchen said, in that it sounds like a wonderful opportunity as well to partner with the Invictus Games and that it's great to have such participation among our veterans.

You mentioned reintegration being one of the key things that Soldier On helps to develop with a veteran so they can transition into a second or new career. Can you talk a little about how you've seen that work within the veteran community you serve, how sports and recreation help them reintegrate and move into other chapters of their life?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Yes, absolutely. That's a great question.

The camps are set up to inspire and motivate a member to adopt an active lifestyle. That's just the first step. A lot of these folks have a hard time just getting out of their basement or out of their house, so coming in and being part of that camp and seeing that camaraderie, hopefully, they can learn that camaraderie can happen not just through military personnel, but other sports organizations.

The intent is for them to go back to their home locations after they've gone to a Soldier On camp. We can help them with the equipment, but then have them participate with the local community sport and recreation on a weekly or daily basis and be social, to reintegrate with society and get out and make new friends through sports and “adapt to your new normal”, the terminology that we always use. You have to find that new normal and how you can work within it. We find that sports can really help enable that.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thanks very much.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, CPC):

Thank you both very much for being here.

It's very encouraging to hear your comments and to realize there are a lot of very good things happening for our soldiers and our veterans.

I really enjoyed the quotes that you gave us, Jason, because I think they really sum up everything that you're talking about with nature, personal physical challenges, and veterans who understand mental health injuries. The one gal talked about how after the event she realized that she needed to get there, experience it, and have that realization. She said that the best therapy was reconnecting with peers.

Are you realizing that this could be a huge advantage in that whole process as far as early intervention goes, to have this as a means of finding mental health in the midst of having to go through all the challenges of transitioning?

(1620)

Maj Jason Feyko:

That's a great question, and we have actually asked that ourselves. The second part of our study, which we're launching now, is to find out where in the recovery process Soldier On should be introduced to all the individuals as they go through. That quote said “therapeutic”. It's not like a therapy-based type of program, but we do acknowledge the therapeutic benefits of sport.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

It's a natural therapy.

Maj Jason Feyko:

Absolutely.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

That's wonderful. I would love to see the results of that. We are dealing with mental health, and the more we can do to prevent those illnesses from ballooning.... I think this would be a wonderful tool.

Do you talk about diet at all? I've been told that when you're in the service and out there, you eat a lot of the same thing and you're under the same stresses, and then you come back. There's a study going on in the States in which an individual scientist has gotten money to fund her research because they're realizing she's basically filling them with healthy natural foods when they get back, which helps their whole system to change. Along with all of this.... I was a physical education major, so, you know, for health, there is diet, rest, and all of those things together.

Maj Jason Feyko:

We do talk a little bit about diet, especially when we do the bigger initiatives, such as the Invictus Games, to make sure the team is eating properly. We do that in concert with the Canadian Forces food guide and with what the personnel support program is developing. We don't really touch on that a lot, but it is something we have done.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Do I still have time?

The Chair:

You have two and a half minutes.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Laurie, hearing about what you're doing with families and integrating that into taking care of our veterans, as part of closing that seam, is very encouraging. I'm so pleased to hear about this.

I'm just looking at your notes and the ones I received here, and they talk about funding. I don't know if this is something you can respond to or not. In our notes here it says that in November 2014 the Government of Canada announced a $15.8 million investment over four years towards that pilot project with the military family resource centre and veterans.

You mentioned that in 2015 they started this with $10 million.

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

The $10 million difference or the discrepancy between the two had to do with the establishment of the initial pilot and then the tailing off of the pilot. There are two phases at either end. The $10 million is for the actual implementation of the direct services to veterans and their families.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

So two years have been completed?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

We're just coming to the end of our second year. The first year started in October, so it was kind of a half-year.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Right. Is the evaluation still under way, or has that been...?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

It has just been concluded. I received the draft report earlier this week. It has to go through our organization and the Veterans Affairs organization to be able to determine if the results of the first part of the pilot have been successful enough to consider moving forward.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Veterans and their families were involved in that, so what's happening now? Are there no services being offered?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

Absolutely, services are still being provided and will continue to be provided right now until 2018 at a minimum. Veterans can continue to enter the program until 2018. They will still have two years, which is why there is that discrepancy in the funding. When they enter on that day, they will still have two years to conclude their participation in the pilot, even though the pilot itself may have concluded. Services will still be available.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

I know you're saying it's not done and it has to go through the organizations. Is there any good news you can give this committee on how effective it's been, and how many veterans...?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

What I can tell you is that veterans and families themselves are very encouraged and very supportive of the program.

Can I tell you where it's going to go? I don't have that information.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay.

Am I done?

The Chair:

You have 40 seconds.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay.

Jason, are you aware of the numbers, as far as how many veterans you're getting early on versus later on? I noticed you mentioned getting them out of the basement. We all know that when we're at the basement stage, that's getting more severe.

Do you see a difference between those you get earlier on and those who come in later? Are you seeing good results in both directions?

(1625)

Maj Jason Feyko:

If I understand the question, it's where they are in their recovery.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Right.

Maj Jason Feyko:

We've had people who have been on their own for years and who then finally put up their hand and say, “Yes, I need some support. What can you do for me?” We've had those who have been in a car accident, and a few weeks later they want some support. They are both beneficial, in their own way.

Hopefully, this next study will show exactly what you're looking for.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay, thanks.

The Chair:

Splitting the time now, Ms. Lockhart.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

We've heard that some military members are struggling, but they still meet the universality of service—so they're still serving—and the closest support they have is often their parent or their sibling or an in-law, or another family member.

In your work in the family resource centres, is there a possibility for those who are serving to transfer closer to that support system?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

I can't speak to that.

What I can speak to is that services at a military family resource centre aren't geographically dependent. Where a member may be in Petawawa and his parent may be struggling in London, Ontario, then the parent can go into the military family resource centre in London, Ontario to access services. It does not need to be in conjunction with their adult service member.

Having that adult child move closer to a parent or a family member is outside of my area.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

If, through the resource centre, veterans are referred for other services and there is a cost associated with that, is it paid up front, or is that something that's reimbursed to families? Or, are all of your services covered?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

It depends on the service that's being provided. For example, if it's respite child care, then those service are reimbursed. If it's access to mental health services and they're not provided provincially, then the family member can come back to the military family resource centre and ask for financial support to be able to access those services. It really depends.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Okay.

I'm wondering if you see that as a barrier sometimes, that people aren't in a position to be reimbursed?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

That is a barrier.

We're finding that one of the learnings from the veteran family program is that it is a barrier. That is why in some of the seven pilot locations we have right now, one of the major areas of interest for veterans and their families is financial stability. A lot of programming is taking place—which is not common in the military family services program—around supporting families, establishing and maintaining strong financial ability, and then connecting them to those emergency resources they may need financially to get through something that's happening now, or long term.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Okay, thank you very much.

I'll share with my colleague.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I have a number of questions, particularly for Laurie.

When I left home this morning, my wife and my daughter were sound asleep. When I get home tonight, they will be asleep again. The impact on families is obviously something that I think all of us here take very seriously.

I wonder if you could speak a bit to the mental stresses, or just the stresses in general, on a family. It might be obvious, but I think it's important to put on the record what the impact of military service and post-military service is on the immediate family.

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

The reason for the development of the military family services program 25 years ago was for exactly what you're speaking about. It's an excellent point.

Families at that time weren't acknowledged as an important contributor to operational effectiveness. Families need to support the member for their operational capacity, and vice versa. That really is the key to our program. Where our focus is around deployment, inherent risk, and geographical relocation, it's really about encouraging the family to get the supports they need when they need it. Where your wife may be feeling a sense of isolation because she doesn't get to see you, having a military family resource centre as a place to go, and to be that almost second family, is key to the program.

When it becomes more a matter of her being unable to focus or unable to do all of the caregiving responsibilities in a day because of things that are happening, that's what the military family resource centre is there for. It's to give a bit of assurance to the serving member that their family is being taken care of when they can't be there.

(1630)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Do you get involved at the point of recruitment? When somebody joins the military, do you at that point start warning them of what's going to happen and bring their family into the process, or does it only happen at the end?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

Traditionally we haven't done that, but over the last three years we have. At a lot of the recruiting ceremonies, or at the schools, we will do presentations on the type of services available through the military family services program.

I will note that a lot of that information is not something people are taking in at that particular time in their experience. Our big learning has been making sure that the information is consistently provided, at a variety of different points throughout both their career and their family's experience.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If I heard correctly, earlier on you referred to the program as giving access to families of medically released veterans.

Is the program restricted to medically released veterans?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

The veteran family program is restricted to medically releasing veterans, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Why is that?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

I can't speak to the exact reason. When Veterans Affairs asked us to be able to support the program, that's what we were provided as a parameter.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

MPs' offices provide a lot of government services. That's one of the things we do. We help facilitate them, especially in places like my riding and Mr. Kitchen's riding. We have very large ridings that are far from government offices.

Has any thought been given to going through us, or using our offices to distribute materials? You are a government department, not an external organization. Has there been anything done on that score?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

Not yet, but today now, thank you very much. That's an excellent suggestion.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How's my time?

The Chair:

That's it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have no more time.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Feyko, it's a really tremendous program that you run. The thing that struck me is that whether it's attributable to active service or not, you still take people in. That is really admirable.

I want to pick up on something in the direction that Mr. Fraser, and in some ways Ms. Wagantall, was going in. The quotes struck me, in particular the second one, “The mental and physical pains I have were pushed aside with all sports. I didn't want to slow down; it was tiring but it put me in a happy place.”

We're studying suicide and mental health issues. In how dark of a place are those people who come to your program?

Maj Jason Feyko:

That's a difficult question to answer, because only the individual would know where they are. We've seen some people in very dark places, where just getting out and doing daily chores is a struggle.

Mr. John Brassard:

On the issue particularly of suicide prevention, though, when they come to you, do they open up, or are they able to open up on suicide or suicide attempts and dealing with the effects of it?

Maj Jason Feyko:

We've had some people testify that they've tried or attempted it. They tell us that.

We're not in a position to assess or treat those individuals, from a clinical point of view. We do always try, on the bigger events, to integrate our operational stress injury peer support program as well, so there's somebody embedded in the group who can help those members if they're struggling while they are at one of our camps.

We're trying to allow them to forget those dark places and show them other things that can be done to adapt, that they are not alone and there are lots of other programs. Soldier On can be one door. There are lots of programs out there, if they put up their hand and ask for that help.

Mr. John Brassard:

Do you facilitate that through your program?

Maj Jason Feyko:

We can, through the joint personnel support unit and through Veterans Affairs. Whatever support is needed, we'll reach out. We'll never say no.

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay, thanks.

Laurie, I have a quick question as well, if you don't mind.

Of the $10 million—I know you initially talked about $15 million, $10 million—how much of that is going towards administrative costs? You said there was a large volunteer component.

How much of it goes towards actual service costs, to those families?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

I don't have that direct breakdown with me right now. I can provide that later. We have done the assessment in year one, and I can absolutely provide it.

The one thing I can say is that in the military family services program, we try very hard to ensure that overhead is insignificant in comparison to delivery of dollars to military families, and we use the same philosophy in the veteran family program. I don't have the exact breakdown with me now, though.

(1635)

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay.

Finally, one of the things we've heard consistently throughout our testimony is the issue of peer support, not just on a volunteer basis, but also in terms of VAC and hiring people who understand what the military personnel have gone through. In your opinion, should there be a priority on hiring those people who've been in the military in positions where they can help or guide people through the process?

Yes, Jason.

Maj Jason Feyko:

I agree that they do bring a certain aspect to the table. That's one of the reasons I'm in this position as an injured member being able to give something back, and they do understand the challenges. I would never say I understand everybody's challenges. At the end of the day, yes, it does. I don't know if it should be a priority or not; I can't comment on that.

Mr. John Brassard:

I think that's it. Thank you.

The Chair:

That's it pretty well? Okay.

Lastly, Ms. Mathyssen, you have three minutes.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Feyko and Ms. Ogilvie, the ombudsman for National Defence has recommended that all the benefits be in place for medically releasing personnel, things like health care providers, so the transition is less stressful and smoother. It's been called a concierge service. I wonder if you could comment on this in your experience with veterans and their families.

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

That's the model we're using with the veteran family program and with the veteran family coordinators at each of the seven locations. When I talked about the family liaison officer who's currently embedded within the integrated personnel support centres, the connection between the family liaison officer and the veteran family coordinator happens pre-release in order to be able to ease that transition for the veteran and their family before, during, and two years after their release into the community services. We're not using the term “concierge”, but “navigator”.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. How long has that been in place?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

It's since the pilot started. Before the start of the pilot, the military family services program did not have a mandate for delivery of services once the member had released. Pre-release those services were provided, but at release they were not, which is the reason for the veteran family program.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay, thank you.

Maj Jason Feyko:

The transition services are outside my mandate, so I can't comment on that.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I just wondered if you had any thoughts on that, but thank you.

Ms. Ogilvie, I wondered if MFS would have any role in tracking suicides or attempted suicides through DND, and if so have you seen any patterns that might point to gaps in the services provided?

Ms. Laurie Ogilvie:

We don't track anything related to member suicides, with the exception of anyone who's calling into the family information line. Because of its being a crisis support line, we will receive calls at times from people who are suicidal. That information we do track for our own internal purposes, but that is not shared with the Canadian Armed Forces; it's a confidential service.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay.

Mr. Feyko, when you were talking about things that are outside your purview, you said an OSI member is embedded in the group. Ms. Wagantall asked about nutrition. I'm wondering about this OSI member. Would there be any counselling for veterans who are still dependent on things like tobacco, alcohol, or prescribed medication, or is that outside of your purview?

Maj Jason Feyko:

That's why we have that person embedded in our camps. He's the subject matter expert or the peer supporter to provide those connections to those counsellors. It's outside the Soldier On mandate.

The Chair:

Thank you.

That ends our time for this first round. On behalf of the committee, I'd like to thank both of you for all you do for the men and women who have served us. If you have any questions you want to elaborate on or any information you want to give back, if you get it the clerk, the clerk will distribute it to the committee.

We will take about two-minute break. We have another witness. With that, we'll see everybody back here in two minutes.

(1640)

(1640)

The Chair:

We have a vote at 5:30 and are going to be running a little tight for time. I'm going to reduce the six-minute rounds to five minutes. That should get us through the testimony.

Welcome, Ms. Thomas. Thank you for coming, and thank you for waiting.

We'll start the round with up to a 10-minute statement from you, and then we will go into a round of questioning. The floor is all yours.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas (As an Individual):

Thank you.

My name is Stephanie Thomas, and I am a behaviour mentor for the Anglophone East School District in New Brunswick. I'm in front of you today to speak as the spouse of a veteran with 18 and a half years of service, five tours of duty, two of which were in Afghanistan.

I've typed up a narrative, because the last decade of our lives has been very emotional. I feel like I might have to read it in order to keep myself regulated enough to try to disconnect from some of this emotion.

Mr. John Brassard:

I'm sorry to interrupt, Stephanie.

Stephanie's family is with her, and they're back there.

The Chair:

If they'd like to join her at the table, we'd love that.

Mr. John Brassard:

I would like them to come up and sit beside her.

The Chair:

Yes, if you're okay with that.

Mr. John Brassard:

That's just to provide a bit of support, because I know you're nervous, Stephanie.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas: Thank you.

The Chair:

If you have to take a break, just ask.

(1645)

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I'll continue now.

We tried building a sense of community after my husband's release and so we started attending a church. I fell and got a concussion at Christmas in 2015. Then a few months later our son got injured. And Marc took our oldest to church and told the minister that our son got injured, and somebody in the congregation overheard this. But then Marc left the service in the middle, crying, because it was Easter, which is a big trigger for Marc. It was one of the worst times for him in Afghanistan. So he left crying and this person took this as a sense of guilt for his hurting our son and made a call to social services to report abuse, even though there wasn't any.

In this public forum, I'm going to share with you what I feel safe about in this situation, because there are stories that I can only share with my military family, which would get it. But the thing is that when you are released from the military, that family is gone. So you have to find your own family once again.

I'm thankful for the few people I have in my life with whom I can share these stories; and there are other families who have their struggles with PTSD.

Marc's release and care within the military left the impression that he was just another number. And sadly, this has just continued now that he is a veteran.

In 2011, when Marc asked to be posted to a joint personnel unit in New Brunswick because of his OSI, his commanding officer asked, “What's an OSI?”

A group of colleagues were talking negatively about Marc, which was only shut down by a fellow 2 RCR soldier posted to Saint-Jean at the time, who said they didn't know what Marc was like before and that he had actually won “soldier of the year”.

When I expressed my concern about my husband's mental health to his mental health team at the Saint-Jean garrison, he was so heavily medicated he would just sleep all day, shuffle to the bathroom, back to bed, to the table, and back to bed. And when I expressed my concern, I was told, “Well, he's not hurting anyone.”

Our sons would say, “Mommy, how come our daddy doesn't do anything with us? How come other daddies do things with them? Why doesn't our daddy?” That's how it was impacting our family.

Now when we hear about a suicide or another death, because a lot of deaths have happened since people have returned, after that sense of loss comes the horrible thought that, well, the government's happy because they don't have to pay anybody any money anymore.

So clearly what we're doing right now isn't working.

I want to thank you so much for allowing me the time to speak to you. If I didn't have the prior knowledge and experience of working with at-risk youth, I'm not sure that I would have had the same level of understanding and compassion for my husband. There have been many times I've had to leave for my safety and the safety of our children. I was able to see Marc's behaviour as stress behaviour. I knew it wasn't intentional, but I also had to ensure that everybody was safe.

It's really hard to watch the person you love slip away, as Marc would have never treated anybody the way he did after he was diagnosed.

The first year went fairly well. We were posted to Saint-Jean, Quebec, and then things fell apart. We lost our routine, our main support system, and what we had felt comfortable with. He already had a diagnosis that he was medicated for and was on the wait-list in New Brunswick for surgery to repair a broken ankle. We moved, and the file about his ankle went missing, and there was no psychological follow-up to his condition. He didn't get help from the mental health team until I went looking for help at the local MFRC, military family resource centre, and then they got involved. Marc finally got help from the base.

I have stopped my husband from killing himself multiple times. He may be back on Canadian soil, but the war came home with him, and it has wreaked havoc on our family. I've needed extended trauma therapy, not just from hearing his stories but also from living with someone battling this injury. And that's what it is in OSI, an injury, and it needs to be treated like it. Just prescribing medication, whichever method you choose, is not going to get anyone any better. Trauma has to be processed in order to move on. We need to remember that parts of our brain shut down in moments of stress, and our fight, flight, or freeze primal functioning takes over. Short-term memory is suppressed.

Our family has not experienced the level and frequency of violent episodes since Marc got off the heavy psychiatric drugs. He had so many negative side effects that he was prescribed more medication to try to combat those side affects. I just don't understand why it's so common to prescribe medication with side affects of rage, violent episodes, and suicidal or homicidal thoughts. Marc has not tried to kill himself once since he has been off of these drugs.

(1650)



The whole family is impacted by this trauma. We looked for help when our children were younger, and we were told that they were too young. This should never be told to anyone because there's research showing that trauma impacts even an unborn baby.

What I really want to take this time to do is speak about the hope that is out there. There are three programs that helped bring it back into our lives. The first I will speak about is Can Praxis. I found this out from the social worker I was doing my weekly trauma therapy with at the OSI clinic in Fredericton. We contacted Steve Critchley, one of the co-founders, and got on the program. It was such an easy process and it felt amazing. We didn't have to jump through hoops to get on to this program. It was eye-opening, which is kind of funny because I was blindfolded for the exercise that brought the most clarity.

I could do exercises with a stranger that I had just met that weekend, but when it came to doing the exact same exercise with my husband, the horse wouldn't move because 90% of communication is non-verbal, and that horse sensed the tension between us, and it wouldn't move. That was very eye-opening. We had been in couples therapy since 2009 and we took Can Praxis phase one in 2015, and we finally had something we needed to work on.

The second program that came into our lives was in the winter of 2016 was the veterans transition program. The VTP changed our lives for the better. It was 100 hours of therapy over 10 days, and this was the first time Marc got to work on his trauma within a therapeutic circle of all men—and to think he was almost talked out of going by his case manager because of the cost involved. The money for the VTP is a lot less than some of the other programs that aren't as effective.

Out of the VTP came COPE, Couples Overcoming PTSD Everyday. The same psychologist working on the VTP also led the COPE program that we were on. It was so much therapy within just a few months of each other, and COPE has a similar model to the VTP where you sit in therapeutic circles, this time as couples, all with the diagnosis of PTSD.

COPE saw the need for continued intervention past the five-day course, and that's why there are six months of life coaching that follows for their phase two. Wounded Warriors Canada pays for these programs. The level of connectedness, understanding, and compassion from other couples has helped build lifelong friends and bring back that sense of community that gets shattered when you're released from the military.

This is why I say there needs to be a plan. All of these programs have structure and a well-thought-out, designed plan. Every specialist appointment is expensive. Without a plan, where are they going? What are they accomplishing? We need to be working as teams to better service our veterans and their families. We need more programs like Can Praxis, VTP, and COPE, and we need them to continue until the processes taught become habits and a regular part of everyday life. Therapy needs to continue until the trauma has been processed. For any intervention to be successful, there needs to be a plan. It needs to be case managed, evaluated, and adjusted.

If it were not for Can Praxis, the veterans transition program, and COPE, Marc and I wouldn't be together, and if we weren't together, he wouldn't be alive.

I'm going to conclude with a few bullets. I'm going to ask you to remember what the “s” stands for in PTSD. People are already living with an excess of stress. What can we do to relieve or reduce some of the stress?

Also, please consider the financial struggles that add more stress. Families have to become caregivers. I have six years of post-secondary education and I was not able to work. When considering the earning loss, it's not only the veteran's income that is impacted. The spouse sometimes has to give up their career to become a full-time caregiver, which only adds to the financial hardships.

If I hadn't taken a job in December, I wouldn't be able to speak in front of you today because we couldn't have afforded up-front costs to get me here.

This is the same for many who take part in these charity-paid-for programs. Veterans shouldn't have to pass up an opportunity to get better because they financially can't afford it. It rings especially deep and gets me a little bit angry when I think that they're being run by Veterans Affairs certified providers, and Veterans Affairs will not pay for travel.

New veterans have different needs, and mental health injuries need to be taken just as seriously as a physical ones because both are debilitating. The shame of being diagnosed and released before your contract is up, think about what that does to a person.

We need to work on finding veterans' strengths because they are already aware of what they can't do.

Another consideration needs to be the wording when formulating letters to veterans. A letter from VAC can trigger more trauma for families. Marc was injured in a LAV in Afghanistan on patrol. We have a letter from VAC that says that, while they recognize he sustained injuries on tour, it's not related to regular service duty. I don't understand how these sentences can be formed.

(1655)



Veterans should never have to be told they need to be stabilized before treatment can start. We need to be helping people in their moments of crisis, when they need us most. Why wait for someone to get better before we'll help them? VAC only looks at where you are when the assessment takes place. There are lots of ups and downs that come with mental health diagnoses, and all of the struggles that have brought someone to today need to be taken into account. Listen to families and spouses more. A more accurate picture will be provided than when only relying on time spent in offices with professionals.

I want to say thank you once again, and I urge you to take 10 minutes of your time to watch psychologist Hector Garcia's TED talk, “We train soldiers for war. Let's train them to come home, too”. Think about all the time, money, effort, and resources that Canada has put into our serving Canadian Forces members. What have we done for them since they've been home?

The Chair:

Thank you, Stephanie, for your excellent testimony. Time-wise, I'm probably going to have to make it about four minutes each so that we'll get through this. We'll start with Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you, Ms. Thomas, for coming today and having the courage to talk to us. I could take up this whole conversation, so I'm going to lose time here. I don't know where to start but I'm going to ask a couple of quick questions. If you feel at any time that you can't answer, then by all means please say so.

Your husband served in Afghanistan. One of the things we've talked about here is the issue of an antimalarial medication. Was your husband prescribed that, and did he take it?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

He was, and he took it sometimes.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Did he have side effects when using it?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

He had side effects initially while he was on tour. It was affecting his sleep while he was on tour. Am I not allowed to say that?

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Yes you can.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I know, but he's released now, right? They kicked him out.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Again, if you feel you're breaching any privacy, please.... When he was taking the medications you said he was on, how many was he taking?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I'm not sure of the amount he was taking, but I know he said his dreams were horrible and it was impacting his sleep while he was tour. So it felt like he was getting even less sleep. He was in the infantry, so it's not like they get nice sleeping arrangements when they're away.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

No, and they don't sleep in the nicest, most comfortable places either.

You were here earlier today for our earlier presentations, and you saw two programs that we've learned about and a couple of others. I hadn't heard of Can Praxis. It was new to me. I'm just wondering if you would expand on that a little for us.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Can Praxis is equine therapy. There are three phases to the program. In the first, you go with your spouse and meet.... I can't remember the number of other couples, but on the first day, all the spouses get together and the veterans work separately. You're working with horses. They have obstacle courses laid out.

Steve Critchley is a mediator and Jim Marland is a psychologist. They work with us through these obstacle courses and build on the communication. What's amazing is that you're there and it gets driven home to you that you are not broken—you are injured, you are wounded, but you are not broken—and that you're worth it. I can't even tell you how many times we heard, “you're worth it”.

Another thing they explained is that if you're a person who is injured and you're jumping in a pile of poo, you're not the only one who is going to be covered in it. That's why they said they wanted to bring the families into it as well, because it's not just the veteran who is impacted by this.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

There's a hashtag #SickNotWeak, which basically expands on what you talked about. A couple of things we've heard and that I mentioned earlier were the issue of identity and his loss of identity. I heard you say earlier that he was stigmatized earlier on, which is another thing that we've learned about in some of our testimony. I'm just wondering if you could expand—quickly, because I don't think I have much time—on the identity loss and the impact on that.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

It's a family, and you get kicked out of your family. It's gone. Your life has been peachy, you're serving your country, and then all of a sudden you're just not good enough any more. So it's like, who is he? He can't work out any more because of his physical injuries. He feels he can't provide anything for our family. That's why he would try to end his life, because he thought that we would be better off without him. He didn't serve a purpose any more. He was in the military for eighteen and a half years, and it bugs him to no end that he didn't get to finish his contract.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Ms. Lockhart.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you, Ms. Thomas, for coming today. You and I first met at a veterans' round table in Hampton. You had heard about it and reached out to us to see if you could come. I think it has been probably a very valuable thing that you did, not only for the course of that round table but also for today.

You mentioned the military resource family centre, and you heard the testimony here as well. Have you seen improvements? How did you access those services? Could you tell us about that?

(1700)

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I accessed the service while my husband was still serving. Marc was released in 2012, and it was not available once you were released. I was on the board of directors at the MFRC in Montreal at that time. I had to step down from that, and we no longer could continue with services from there.

While he was serving and we were accessing that service, it was amazing. I used the family liaison officer—I was going to speak to that—and she helped me so much. It was nice to go to a place where there was a culture of people who understood. I've seen civilian psychologists who just didn't get it. Having that level of understanding and compassion was helpful for our family. We used child care services. There were a lot of things we used while he was serving within that unit.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Was it part of of your recommendation or your work that those services are now extended to veterans? Are you pleased with that?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I am very pleased that it has been extended to families.

I don't know rank very well. It's something that I never.... There was someone who came to speak at our board of directors meeting, and I got up, crying, because that was the first time I heard that I was no longer going to be able to access the services I was using. The meeting couldn't continue, because we didn't meet quorum anymore after I left. I got too emotional. It was just too overwhelming for me to stay.

I'm very happy that it's now....

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Good.

One of the things you talked about was the upfront cost to accessing some of the services, and how that has been a barrier. We heard that from military family resource centre as well.

Can you expand on that and give us some examples of how that's been a barrier for your family?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Yes. I wasn't able to continue working. My husband got his diagnosis after 2006. He is a newer veteran. He's under the lump sum payout. When he received his, he was working full time, and I was also still able to work. After we had only his pension, every time I would go back to work in order to increase our family income, he would try to hurt himself, so I had to stop that. We were living on just his pension. We had to sell our house in Quebec because we could no longer afford it. We wanted to be closer to family in New Brunswick, but we also couldn't afford our house in Quebec.

If we didn't have the money for accessing services such as COPE or Can Praxis, people lent us money to pay the upfront cost and we reimbursed them when we were reimbursed.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

That's even though they're approved services through Veterans Affairs.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

They're not approved services through Veterans Affairs but are providers. They're both going through studies. That's what's happening right now, from my understanding. The psychologists and social workers running them are all certified providers for Veterans Affairs.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Have things changed as far as the service for your children is concerned? Have you been able to access adequate services for your children?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Our case manager now is approving psychological services for our children. Yes. They are now six and seven. When I first started looking, they were younger. It's been two years now that they've had services.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Unfortunately, that's my time.

The Chair:

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you very much, Ms. Thomas. I'm grateful for your testimony. I think that what you had to say pulls things together. It sheds light and brings clarity.

First, I want to say thank you to your husband for his service, but thank you for loving him.

You said some things that disturbed me very much. I wonder if you could comment. I went to a mental health conference, and they talked about the fact that we want to pigeonhole people and provide labels for their injuries and mental health instead of addressing the trauma. You talked about addressing the trauma rather than giving all kinds of medicines that have a debilitating effect on the individual. Obviously it's important.

Can you underscore what difference it would have made to you and your family had that basic understanding been there?

(1705)

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I think it would have had a tremendous impact on us. Once the trauma has been processed, the triggers aren't as severe. He would have had time.... I feel that if he had had trauma therapy, we wouldn't have had the experiences we had. I might not have needed therapy for as long as I did, because he wouldn't have been traumatizing all of us had he dealt with his trauma.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

I found your statement about the commanding officer asking what an OSI is absolutely mind-boggling. It seems to be a very destructive kind of response. Do you think, based on your experience, that there's a lack of awareness among those in the chain of command about what this injury means?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

We were posted to St-Jean, so we were at the school in St-Jean, and I believe the same level of understanding was not there. If we had still been at Gagetown, I think there would have been a different level of understanding. There may also have been a language barrier. I'm not sure. If French had been used—I think it's TSO. Maybe if he had said that...I'm not sure if it was a language barrier or not.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

But still, there is a gap there.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

There is a gap, for sure.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

We've heard from some spouses that they come face to face with an injured spouse and they don't know what to expect or how to deal with the injury. They asked for training and support. Would that training and support be something that you would support? Do you think it would help?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Definitely. I have accessed an OSI 101 course from the OSI clinic in Fredericton. I have been on a few different courses. I also have a psychology background. I have a degree in psychology, so that has definitely helped with my level of understanding.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. You said that the case manager tried to discourage your husband from taking the veterans transition program because of the cost. Is cost and money getting in the way of helping our veterans and their families?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Yes. When something would come up and we would call, trying to see if my husband could get approved for a service, the comment given was, “Oh, so you're just looking for more money.”

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Instead of acknowledging the reality of his injury?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Yes. My husband was in the treatment centre at Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue. He did go through that stabilization and residential program. He had done a lot of programming and he kept trying to injure himself. He was seeing different psychologists and kept changing because they didn't seem to get the right perspective. Instead of maybe working as a team, everybody said, “Oh, let's blame this on Marc. Why is nothing working for you? What's wrong with you? Let's create a different diagnosis for you.”

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

And the self-injury should have been a signal, shouldn't it?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Yes.

The Chair:

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Stephanie, thank you so much for being here today and sharing your story. I know we're all very grateful for your courage in attending today. This is going to be very helpful so that we can make recommendations to the department and, I hope, fix some of these problems.

I want to touch on something that we've heard from various witnesses while we were doing this study, regarding peer support. Other veterans or former service members have been matched up to assist veterans to feel better about themselves and their situations, explaining things that maybe only somebody who's been through it themselves can understand.

You touched on that yourself when you talked about other military families that you talked to. Do you have any recommendations or thoughts on what could have been done during the transition phase through peer support that might have assisted your husband or your family, if you had been identified and matched up with people who had had similar experiences?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I think...if the follow through were actually to happen. It took a while for my husband to realize that people with the OSISS program were peers who also had issues. He tried to access the service, and people never got back to him. I think the follow-though probably would have helped a lot.

There also has to be an interpersonal connection, because not everyone is going to get along with everybody. That's just human nature, and that's okay. Sometimes you're going to be more connected to another person, but the peer support would be very helpful. What works for me isn't going to work for my aunt here. We're all different people.

(1710)

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Okay. And are there peer supports for family members that are formally arranged? Is there an organization that does that? Help me understand how that would work for family members too.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

There is OSISS, which is operational stress injury social support, for both families and veterans. It has finally worked out for me now in New Brunswick. I tried accessing it in Quebec, but I was an anglophone living in Quebec and it just didn't work out.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

With respect to access to services, we heard from a previous presenter today with military family services, who talked about a suite of online services that are available. Do you access online services and do you have any comment on what services online could be improved upon to make things easier for families?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

The services that I access online would be the private groups through COPE and Can Praxis. There are private chat rooms and groups there. It's people I've done some trauma stuff with, built a deep connection with. I wasn't aware of the ones that she spoke about today.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

When you put the emphasis on the “s” in PTSD, I think you've identified the stress that happens when members are transitioning upon being released. I think you hit the nail on the head there.

With the stress in their lives and the impact that can have on the family, can you make any further recommendations that we could identify in a report that would help alleviate some of the stress at the first instance of a service member's release? It seems to me that the stress is overwhelming at the beginning, and it only gets worse from there. You have somebody who is losing their identity perhaps, and, obviously, there are mental health issues involved, and perhaps medication. All of these things are perhaps compounded by financial difficulties as well. Is there some way we can get in there before these stressors compound?

The Chair:

I apologize, but you will have to give a short answer.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I think people need to know when they're being released that they're not going to get paid for a while. That would help. Also, it's having psychological services for everybody.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Right away.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Yes. right away.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Bratina.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Thank you.

Are there better or best days? Is it ever like the old times, or are they gone forever?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

It is more common now that he has done VTP twice. He did it once as a first-time veteran and once as a para-professional to liaise between the new veterans and the professionals. He's also done COPE and Can Praxis. Since then he has got off the medication, and you can see it in his eyes. People comment on it. So, there are some days.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Some of the old Marc is still there.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

It's starting to come back.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

That must be very touching for you. Can you anticipate bad sessions?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Usually it's a letter from Veterans Affairs, hearing about another suicide. We've had to figure out his triggers. The shower in our house is a trigger. If he has to have a shower, that is a stressor. We can't have ceiling fans because that's like a helicopter. There are things that we have had to identify and then get rid of in our house.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Do you think there is any way you could have been helped to anticipate these things? Did you have to learn all of this as it happened?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

It can be done with the help of the psychological team that's involved and if someone is doing a good trauma history and actually working on that trauma, instead of just doing talk therapy, which can take a very long time. It wasn't until people did a deeper history that we were able to identify some of the issues.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

How often would you say you're able to sit with another woman or other women who are experiencing this and just exchanging things?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

In the community I live in, I have two great girlfriends who also have husbands who served in the military and have PTSD. The three of us try to get together and walk as often as we can with our dogs. Sometimes it's once a week and sometimes we go a month without it. It depends on life and scheduling.

(1715)

Mr. Bob Bratina:

We hear about this from the veterans themselves. We hear about the sports and the physical education, how they're getting the teams together, and just the getting together. So, that's as important for you.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Yes, because other people just don't get it. It's nice to have people who listen without that judgment.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Are your children transitioning into a better understanding? What's it like for them now?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

It's getting better now that Marc has identified where he needs to change. The veterans transition program initially is 10 days but over three different weekends. On the first weekend, things instantly changed with our children, but for us, not so much; it was worse. Then, the second week it was so much better between us, and then our children. It helped him identify that he's not alone and that he can still be a good dad. It is getting better, but it's hard. We talk about daddy having an empty head and you can't see all the injuries you have.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Because they should be aware that their father is a hero. He served his country.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I find that Marc and a lot of the newer veterans have a hard time with that word. That's a hard one to swallow for them. He doesn't even have veterans plates, because he's not there yet for himself.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Isn't that part of the problem—

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Yes.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

—the self-esteem that's no longer there that should be there?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

They're focusing on all the bad things and saying, “Oh well, I could have done this differently; and what if I would have done this, and what if, what if...?”

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Thanks.

The Chair:

Ms. Wagantall.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Thanks so much, Stephanie. I appreciate this beyond words.

I just have to ask a couple more questions about mefloquine. It has become quite an issue that has come to me with our veterans.

Did he have a choice as to what anti-malarial drug he could take?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

No, I don't believe so.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay.

I got the sense, and we've heard this other places too, that you take it or you're reprimanded. So the choice was to disobey without their knowing and to keep the appearance up. Is that correct?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

That's correct.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

From what you talked about, I underlined the words, “meds don't heal trauma.” We have an issue in this country with overmedication, let alone what has happened with our soldiers and our veterans. How did he get off his meds? I know psychiatrists don't want to....

I've had scenarios where they're given and given, but they do not want to help you come off. So how did that happen?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

We found a psychiatrist who believes in alternative medicine.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

What's the alternative?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

He is on an anti-anxiety medication. It's his one prescribed medication. However, he was in support. We saw a naturopathic doctor and was hospitalized during this transition time of getting off it. He tried nabilone for a while to help transition off that, and then he got off that as well. He didn't like that; he doesn't want to have anything to do with it.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

That was a very brave psychiatrist to take that on.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Yes.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Representatives of the veterans transition program testified here. It's an amazing service. When I asked, the witness commented that his professionals are expensive—

Ms. Stephanie Thomas: Yes, they're amazing. Yes.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall: —but that they're worth it. Could you comment at all about that?

Obviously, I'm over-conservative a lot times. I'll save money and end up having to spend more money. I really sense that's what we're doing with our veterans, to invest upfront versus the ongoing costs, which probably have fallen without even the cost of the meds.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas: Yes, exactly.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall: Do you have anything you'd like to say in that regard?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

It would be wonderful to have psychologists all over the country who have this belief system, so you don't have to pay for them to travel across country to deliver a program. I say this because they're only allowed to practise out of province so many times. So that fantastic psychologist can only come once or twice in a calendar year. It would be wonderful to have that training into veteran-specific psychologists or a mental health team.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

That certainly applies in our case. We have rural ridings where our veterans cannot get the help they need and they have to travel to get it.

Thank you so much. We really appreciate it.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Eyolfson, I guess you're splitting your time. You have about a minute and a half each.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you for coming. I can't imagine what you've been going through. Thank you for the courage to step forward to tell this story. I know that watching a loved one go through something such as this must be just horrendous.

You talked about the VTP, the veterans transition program. How long after Marc's release did he get involved with that?

(1720)

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Marc was released in August 2012. He got in the VTP in the winter, so it was January 2016. This is brand new for us; we're in it one year.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Had you been made aware of that at the time?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

No.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

How did you first become aware of it?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

My husband found it himself. This is something that I think even gave him a bit more. I had to leave due to a safety thing and he was looking for help for himself and somehow stumbled upon it and got into the program.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

He just somehow stumbled upon it. It doesn't sound as though anyone went out of their way to make him aware this was available to him.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

No, definitely not.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Please tell me if you are not comfortable answering this. This might be borderline personal, too personal. When someone goes into the military, their whole family goes into the military, and so I ask in regard to your mental health, have you personally ended up receiving any psychological support or treatment through this process?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Yes, I might have been talking too fast. I had extended trauma therapy at the OSI clinic in Fredericton.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Okay. I apologize; I missed that.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Yes, that was me going for myself.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Okay, good.

Was that service helpful to you?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

It was extremely helpful, yes.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Good. Thank you.

I will pass on.

The Chair: Okay, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I do have a few somewhat unrelated questions to each other perhaps.

For the first one, I have the same preamble that you should feel free not to answer. You say your husband's name is Marc. What's his thought of your being here today, and what's his reaction to that?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

He's proud of me and he told me to say whatever I need to say.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's a very good answer.

I only joined the committee about a week ago, so I am learning a lot about this very quickly. We heard quite a bit of testimony about how boot camp breaks you down into a soldier, and when you leave there's nothing to build you back up into a civilian.

In your view, when Marc came back from the war, what would have been the perfect process? He would still have had the trauma; he would still have had the experiences. What is the correct process, which in a perfect world we would do so that we could then pass it on? I know it's a difficult one.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

In my opinion, it would have been initial help. He got psychiatric drugs pretty soon after I urged him to get help, because instantly I knew there was an issue. But it was a lot of fear. They've been trained. They know how to pass those tests that they've been given about their psychological well-being. They know what they need to say in order to...say, “Oh, you need help.” But he went and got the help right away, so initially he got medication.

I think it's initially dealing with the trauma right away, instead of something happening, and “Oh, here's some beer and we'll get together.” That isn't going to solve anything.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right. You also mentioned the cost of the VTP. Can you give a sense of what your out-of-pocket costs have been over the past four years in taking care of him? I know that's a difficult one. I think it's important to put it on the record.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I don't think I could put a ballpark figure because we paid for a naturopathic doctor. That's not covered. The things for his neurotransmitters, the supplements, aren't covered. I wouldn't even be able to put a figure. I'm sorry.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It would be a big number.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas: Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Thank you. I appreciate it.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard:

Stephanie, thank you, and thank you to your family for being here. I get a sense that you and Marc are a very good team together, and I suspect he's probably listening at home. So I am going to say, “Thank you for your service, Marc.”

But I want to talk again about mefloquine. First, was he ever told that there were any potential side effects from mefloquine?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I can't answer that. I'm not sure.

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay.

You don't know anything about informed consent, whether he signed it or not?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I don't know anything.

Mr. John Brassard:

Maybe that's information he can pass on to us subsequent to this.

With the concoction of drugs, the pharmaceuticals that he was on, was medicinal marijuana ever an option for him?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Yes.

Mr. John Brassard:

How did you find the difference between being on the concoction of drugs he was on and the medicinal marijuana?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Medicinal marijuana was better, but that also had to leave our house. Just recently, he's tried the medicinal oil, and I don't know why, but I see a difference with the oil than with....

Mr. John Brassard:

Right. Because there are different methods. There are creams; there are oils. Do you know how many grams he would have been prescribed in that?

(1725)

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I don't know. He didn't use it very often because of the stigma of that. He didn't want that. We volunteer in the community. He did not want anybody.... Here's the public forum, gosh. Sorry, Marc.

Mr. John Brassard:

It's important because we're talking again, Stephanie, about dealing with PTSD, dealing with occupational stress injuries. One of the things we've found over the course of the past several years is that a lot of those who are suffering are trying to get off the opioids. They're trying to get off the concoction of medications because they're finding that medicinal marijuana, in whatever form, whether it's smoking it, oils, cannabutter, or whatever, is giving them their lives back.

I love the walking the dog.... You're involved, I suspect, with a lot of other spouses as well. What's your sense, from the others you're talking to, on that experience of being on the concoction of pills versus other treatments, whether naturopathy or otherwise?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I'm not sure I understand the question. Are you wondering if they're taking the same method that we're taking?

Mr. John Brassard:

Right. Are they taking the same path that you're taking? Do you know if they're engaged in medicinal marijuana, etc.?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Some have tried. Other people are totally against it. It's something that was never part of their lives. They never experimented with it.

Mr. John Brassard:

Right.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

It's getting over that bridge to look at it as a medication. Once you're in the military, that's very much a no-no, so it's getting over that mindset as well.

Mr. John Brassard:

Yes.

One of the things, again, is that there is a big difference between recreational and medicinal.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I know. That's exactly what I had to say to my husband.

Mr. John Brassard:

Also, one of the things we're finding is that it's not as is soldiers who are suffering from PTSD or OSIs are sitting around a campfire smoking joints. They are using it because they are finding symptomatic relief as a result of it.

Thank you so much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen, you have the remaining two minutes.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you very much. I appreciate that.

I have a couple of questions. One of the things I have discovered from talking to veterans is that a veteran has to go to a psychiatrist in order to get the benefits of the treatment and the support, and that psychiatrists always resort to the opioids, the heavy drugs. A veteran who doesn't go to the psychiatrist is in trouble. The psychiatrist who doesn't believe in alternative therapies is a problem. Was that part of your experience and Marc's experience?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

It was until we found a different psychiatrist. We were in the hospital because he had tried to injure himself, and we met a different psychiatrist who had a different perspective and was willing to try this. I was very adamant. I had printouts of every medication he was on, with the side effects. I said, “I don't want my husband on this anymore.”

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

With regard to the medical marijuana, when it was prescribed, did anyone talk about the different components? There is the medicinal part, and I can't recall the initials.

Mr. John Brassard:

It's THC.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Yes, and then there's the hallucinogenic. It's well known that the medicinal or therapeutic part is available. Did anyone ever talk to you about that?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

That's the nabilone. That's what the psychiatrist tried. That's a prescription form.

It took a process in order to get that approved, because it's not approved for this. There was the whole step by the psychiatrist, which took a lot of his time. The pharmacy was working filling out paperwork after paperwork for Veterans Affairs and Blue Cross to actually get it approved.

Also, while it was approved for Marc, that's not going to help another person get it approved, which is another frustrating component.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay.

You said that Marc did take mefloquine, and he experienced some negative side effects. Was there anyone on the ground monitoring, keeping track, or making sure that they were watching out for the safety and health of men and women on the ground who were taking or were compelled to take mefloquine, or do you know?

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

I'm not sure. I don't know.

The Chair:

That ends the round of questioning.

I had just one clarifying question. I think somebody asked you about the amount of money you had spent out of your pocket, and you didn't have a total amount. Could you just give us an idea of what programs cost? Are they $20 or $50 or $1,000 out of your pocket? Could you just give us a base figure so we have an idea of what some of the costs are?

(1730)

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

The cost of our plane ticket out west—I live in New Brunswick—could range from $700 to over $1,000. Also, every time you'd see a naturopathic doctor for supplements, it would be $300 or $400 a month.

The Chair:

Okay. That gives us an idea. If you want to add that up and send it or anything to the clerk after, we can add it to your testimony.

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Okay.

The Chair:

You did very well today, Stephanie.

Voices: Hear, hear!

Ms. Stephanie Thomas:

Thank you.

The Chair:

On behalf of the committee, I want to say that was just amazing. Thank you and your family for all you've done to testify here today.

With that, the meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des anciens combattants

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Neil Ellis (Baie de Quinte, Lib.)):

Bonjour tout le monde, je déclare la séance ouverte.

Conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement et à la motion adoptée le 29 septembre, le Comité reprend son étude de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide chez les vétérans.

Nos deux premiers témoins sont Laurie Ogilvie, directrice, Services aux familles, Services aux familles des militaires, et Jason Feyko, gestionnaire supérieur, Sans limites.

Bienvenue à vous deux.

Vous disposez de 10 minutes chacun et c'est Jason qui commencera.

Major Jason Feyko (gestionnaire supérieur, Sans limites, Directeur, gestion du soutien aux blessés, ministère de la Défense nationale):

Bonjour, monsieur le président, et bonjour aux membres du Comité.

Je m'appelle Jason Feyko et je suis le gestionnaire principal du programme des Forces armées canadiennes Sans limites.

Je vous remercie de me donner l’occasion de comparaître aujourd'hui pour vous parler de ce programme et de la façon dont il peut soutenir les membres des Forces armées canadiennes et les anciens combattants qui ont été blessés ou qui sont aux prises avec la maladie.

Mon rôle est de diriger et de gérer le programme Sans limites et son personnel afin d'offrir le meilleur soutien qui soit aux membres malades ou blessés par le biais du sport et de l'activité physique récréative. En tant qu'ancien combattant ayant été grièvement blessé pendant mon service en Afghanistan, je peux témoigner de l'apport que le sport et l'activité physique peuvent jouer dans le rétablissement, la réadaptation et la réinsertion des militaires.

Sans limites est un programme des Forces armées canadiennes qui a été conçu en 2007 pour apporter un soutien et offrir des services aux militaires — en service ou à la retraite — qui sont aux prises avec des problèmes physiques ou mentaux, attribuables au service ou non, ou encore qui ont été blessés en service.

Le programme est une composante très visible de l’engagement pris par le ministère de la Défense nationale et les Forces armées canadiennes pour fournir des soins intégraux aux militaires malades ou aux blessés.

Les principaux objectifs visés par ce programme consistent à faciliter, à soutenir et à intégrer, au profit du personnel militaire malade ou blessé, des ressources et des occasions de participer pleinement et activement à des activités physiques, récréatives ou sportives; à faire connaître Sans limites aux militaires malades ou blessés, aux autres membres des Forces armées canadiennes, au grand public et aux grandes entreprises; et à établir, à favoriser et à renforcer des partenariats avec des pays alliés et des organisations nationales offrant des programmes et des services pertinents.

Le programme Sans limites comporte quatre volets clés pour atteindre ces objectifs.

Premièrement, la communication, les présentations et la sensibilisation sont un aspect très important de Sans limites. Il s'agit de faire connaître le soutien disponible dans le cadre du programme par divers moyens comme des sites Web, des articles, des présentations ainsi que les médias sociaux. Cette sensibilisation s'étend non seulement au groupe des militaires malades ou blessés qui sont admissibles au soutien, mais aussi aux Canadiens qui appuient Sans limites par des commandites ou des collectes de fonds ou encore des dons.

Deuxièmement, Sans limites organise annuellement plus de 40 camps locaux, régionaux, nationaux et internationaux qui mettent l'accent sur les activités sportives et physiques récréatives. Celles-ci vont de la pêche à la mouche au hockey, en passant par la randonnée, le ski alpin et le yoga. Ces camps servent d'introduction ou de réintroduction aux sports et aux possibilités qui constituent un tremplin important pour beaucoup de militaires malades ou blessés. Non seulement ils servent de plateforme pour apprendre de nouvelles compétences dans un sport, mais ils permettent également aux militaires malades ou blessés d'être en contact avec d'autres militaires comme eux dans un environnement sécuritaire et de soutien. D'après notre expérience, ce soutien par les pairs, non seulement inspire et motive, mais il renforce également les militaires malades ou blessés qui comprennent qu'ils ne sont pas seuls dans leur rétablissement. Ces militaires voient qu'il y a des Canadiens généreux et dévoués à leurs côtés et qu'ils ne sont pas seuls, car il y a des gens partout au pays et dans le monde qui vivent des situations, des défis et des circonstances semblables.

Troisièmement, le domaine d'intérêt le plus important pour Sans limites est d'être actif pour la vie. Il s'agit de promouvoir un engagement à vie pour un mode de vie sain et actif. Lorsqu'un militaire est inspiré ou motivé à recourir au sport ou aux loisirs physiques dans son rétablissement, il peut faire appel au programme de subvention d'équipement mis sur pied par Sans limites pour compenser le prix de l'équipement et de l'entraînement pour soutenir un mode de vie actif.

Le dernier volet sur lequel portent nos efforts est moins utilisé: Sans limites soutient les militaires qui ont le désir et le potentiel de participer à des compétitions de haut niveau. Ce soutien repose sur la collaboration avec les organismes responsables de chacun des sports nationaux afin de fournir le temps et les ressources nécessaires pour optimiser la préparation physique, le développement d'habiletés propres à un sport et le rendement. En règle générale, ces militaires reçoivent le soutien d'organismes sportifs nationaux et d'équipes qu'ils représentent. À ce jour, Sans limites a soutenu une demi-douzaine de militaires qui ont participé à des épreuves de niveaux national ou international.

Le programme Sans limites est financé par la combinaison de fonds publics du gouvernement et du Fonds Sans limites, un programme officiel de soutien financier des Forces armées canadiennes pour les militaires, pour les anciens combattants et pour leurs familles soutenus par les programmes Appuyons nos troupes et Services de bien-être et moral des Forces canadiennes.

Le Fonds Sans limites est, pour les Canadiens, le moyen le plus direct de contribuer au soutien, à la réadaptation et à la réinsertion des militaires malades ou blessés. Le Fonds a versé plus de 4 millions de dollars pour l'achat d'équipement sportif et récréatif, ainsi que pour de la formation et les frais de déplacement des militaires afin qu'ils puissent participer à des activités locales, régionales et nationales.

Depuis sa création, Sans limites a ainsi aidé plus de 2 200 militaires malades ou blessés à surmonter l'adversité, à reprendre confiance en eux et à se motiver en participant à des activités sportives et autres activités physiquement exigeantes. Sans limites est fourni en même temps et en complément des autres programmes de l'Unité interarmées de soutien du personnel, l'organisme chargé de fournir des services et des programmes aux militaires malades ou blessés et à leurs familles, ainsi que de soutenir les familles des militaires décédés.

Selon nos dossiers pour l'année financière 2015-2016, 62 % des participants au programme Sans limites étaient des militaires en service. Mais on assiste à un changement notable, puisque de plus en plus d'anciens combattants accèdent au programme. Cela s'explique par l'accroissement de la communication et de la sensibilisation, par les participants qui agissent en tant qu'ambassadeurs et par l’intégration croissante d'Anciens Combattants Canada grâce à un accord de partenariat, signé en décembre 2015 entre ce ministère et les Forces armées canadiennes, qui est venu officialiser et implanter une gouvernance, des principes directeurs et un cahier des charges convenus mutuellement qui définissent et aident les relations interministérielles concernant le programme Sans limites.

Sans limites est beaucoup plus que des activités sportives. Les marins, soldats et aviateurs qui participent aux activités de Sans limites proviennent de différents milieux et ont vécu des expériences différentes, mais un lien commun les unit tous: leur vie a changé. L'esprit de corps est évident dans les activités, dans les couloirs et les espaces communs, pendant les trajets en autocar et les causeries informelles alors qu'ils échangent sur ce qu'ils ont vécu. Certains sont visiblement blessés, d'autres souffrent en silence. Ils viennent de Terre-Neuve, de la Colombie-Britannique, du Grand Nord canadien et de partout ailleurs, et il ne leur faut pas grand temps pour qu'ils se rendent compte qu'ils ont autre chose en commun: une persévérance commune de tenir bon, d'honorer le sacrifice et de poursuivre leur vie militaire.

En guise de conclusion à ce mot d'ouverture, j'aimerais vous faire partager quelques témoignages d'anciens participants au programme Sans limites: C'est une merveilleuse expérience que d'être sur l'eau, de me mettre au défi tout en acquérant de nouvelles compétences et de me retrouver avec des anciens combattants qui comprennent ce que c'est que de vivre avec des blessures ou des problèmes de santé mentale. C'est après l'activité que je me rends compte de l’importance qu'a eue le camp pour moi. Mes douleurs mentales et physiques ont toutes été réglées grâce aux sports. Je ne voulais pas ralentir. Oui c'était fatigant, mais cela me faisait sentir mieux. Reconnecter avec mes semblables a été la meilleure thérapie que je pouvais avoir.

Je vous remercie une fois de plus, monsieur le président, de m'avoir offert cette occasion de m'adresser à vous. Je répondrai maintenant avec plaisir aux questions du Comité.

(1540)

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Ogilvie.

Mme Laurie Ogilvie (directrice, Services aux familles, Services aux familles des militaires, ministère de la Défense nationale):

Bon après-midi, monsieur le président et membres du Comité.

Je m'appelle Laurie Ogilvie et je suis la directrice des Services aux familles militaires au sein des Services de bien-être et moral des Forces canadiennes.

Je vous remercie de me donner l’occasion de comparaître devant vous afin de discuter des efforts que nous déployons pour soutenir les membres des Forces canadiennes, les anciens combattants et leurs familles.

Les Forces armées canadiennes disposent d'un solide réseau de soutien pour les familles de nos militaires. Je prendrai quelques minutes pour vous donner un bref aperçu d'un de ces systèmes de soutien, le Programme de services aux familles des militaires. Dans le cadre de mes fonctions, je supervise la gestion et la prestation de ce programme. Le Programme de services aux familles des militaires a été officiellement établi il y a 25 ans. Il a été conçu pour aider les familles à atténuer les difficultés qui sont souvent associées à la vie militaire, notamment les réinstallations géographiques, les déploiements opérationnels et les risques inhérents aux opérations militaires.

Le programme prend appui sur un modèle qui favorise la coordination des services visant la santé et le bien-être des familles militaires dans leur collectivité. Trois principaux points d'accès permettent de s'en prévaloir: les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires, la ligne d'information à l’intention des familles et le site Web www.connexionFAC.ca.

La ligne d'information à l’intention des familles est un service téléphonique national 1-800 destiné à toutes les familles de militaires; on y offre des renseignements bilingues, un service d'orientation et un soutien en cas de crise, tous les jours, 24 heures sur 24. Les conseillers prodiguent un soutien immédiat en période de crise et orientent les familles vers les ressources nationales et locales appropriées.

Le site www.connexionFAC.ca est un portail d'information national qui fournit des renseignements et des ressources aux militaires, aux anciens combattants et à leurs familles.

Enfin, les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires sont des organismes sans but lucratif qui sont incorporés par les provinces et administrés par des familles, et qui reçoivent des fonds des Forces armées canadiennes aux fins de la prestation du Programme de services aux familles des militaires. Le cadre philosophique du programme est fondé sur la gestion « par les familles, pour les familles » et, par leur nature même, les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires sont les mieux placés pour offrir des programmes et des services aux membres du personnel des Forces armées canadiennes et à leurs parents, époux et enfants, aux familles des défunts, ainsi qu'aux membres libérés pour raisons médicales et à leurs familles.

Il existe 32 centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires partout au Canada, et d'autres points de service aux États-Unis et en Europe. Ces centres ont été mis en place pour aider les familles à composer avec le caractère unique de la vie militaire canadienne grâce à divers programmes et services dans les domaines du développement des enfants et des jeunes et du soutien aux parents; de la prévention, du soutien et de l’intervention; du développement personnel et de l’intégration communautaire; et de la séparation et de la réunion des familles.

Les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires sont également des ambassadeurs ou orienteurs pour les familles de militaires, dans les collectivités locales. Leur structure de gouvernance et leur mandat leur donnent la souplesse opérationnelle nécessaire pour répondre aux besoins uniques des membres de leur communauté des Forces armées canadiennes et pour s'adapter rapidement aux changements démographiques ou opérationnels. Les centres offrent tous une même gamme de services, mais aucun d'eux n'est tout à fait identique aux autres.

Afin d'assurer une certaine cohérence pour les familles, les Services aux familles militaires élaborent et supervisent les politiques et les services du Programme de services aux familles des militaires, ils offrent des conseils techniques et une orientation pour la prestation des services et ils surveillent et évaluent la mesure dans laquelle le programme répond aux besoins uniques des familles des militaires.

Il convient de noter que mon organisation, soit les Services aux familles militaires, n'a aucun pouvoir de gestion directe sur les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires. Nous agissons plutôt à titre d'intendants du Programme de services aux familles des militaires. Nous versons 27 millions de dollars par année à ces centres pour qu'ils assurent la prestation, directement ou par l'intermédiaire d'un partenaire communautaire, de services répondant aux besoins des familles de militaires dans les domaines des soins aux enfants, de la santé mentale, de l’éducation, de l'emploi, des besoins spéciaux, des soins de santé, de la formation en langue seconde, du soutien au déploiement, du développement personnel et de l’intégration communautaire.

En outre, les Services aux familles militaires travaillent étroitement avec des partenaires des Forces armées canadiennes afin de satisfaire aux nouveaux besoins des familles. En 2011, nous avons collaboré avec le directeur de la gestion du soutien aux blessés afin d'officialiser le soutien offert aux familles à la suite d'une maladie, d'une blessure ou du décès d'un membre des Forces armées canadiennes.

Les Services aux familles militaires ont financé chacun des centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires en vue d'intégrer un officier de liaison avec les familles dans le centre local intégré de soutien du personnel. L'officier de liaison avec les familles offre une gamme de services, notamment de counseling, de soins de répit, de soutien aux aidants naturels et d'intégration communautaire.

Toujours en 2011, les Services aux familles militaires ont collaboré avec le Programme d'aide aux membres des Forces canadiennes à l'élargissement des services d'accompagnement à long terme des proches de membres des Forces armées canadiennes en deuil.

En 2015, pour mieux soutenir les membres des Forces armées canadiennes libérés pour raisons médicales et leurs familles, Anciens Combattants Canada a investi 10 millions de dollars dans un projet pilote de quatre ans. Le projet pilote, intitulé Programme pour les familles des vétérans, offre aux vétérans et à leurs familles un accès au Programme de services aux familles des militaires pendant deux ans à compter de la date de libération. Le Programme pour les familles des vétérans est offert aux vétérans libérés pour raisons médicales et à leurs familles dans sept centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires, ainsi qu'aux familles de militaires toujours en service, mais en voie d'être libérés pour raisons médicales, et cela, dans tous les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires.

(1545)



La sensibilisation des familles et leur accès aux services offerts ont toujours représenté une priorité au sein des Services aux familles militaires. La famille militaire moderne n'a pas autant recours aux services en personne que lors de la mise sur pied du programme il y a 25 ans, et c'est pourquoi nous avons modifié notre approche au fil des ans.

Nous avons accru notre présence en ligne grâce à des programmes comme: MaVoix, offert sur une page Facebook sécurisée qui permet aux familles de poser des questions, d'exprimer leurs inquiétudes et de communiquer avec nous; « Vous n'êtes pas seul », qui est un ensemble de ressources portant sur les services et les programmes offerts en matière de santé mentale; « Le pouvoir de l'esprit », qui est un programme de psychoéducation interactif en ligne destiné aux enfants et aux aidants naturels de membres souffrant d'une blessure de stress opérationnel; la Ressource, qui porte sur les blessures de stress opérationnel pour les aidants naturels, est un outil en ligne autodirigé conçu pour les aidants naturels et les familles des membres ou des vétérans des Forces armées canadiennes qui vivent avec une blessure liée au stress opérationnel. Nous misons également sur une vaste campagne dans les médias sociaux.

Le très bref aperçu du Programme de services aux familles des militaires que je viens de vous donner ne dresse qu'une infime partie du tableau. Chaque membre d'une famille qui fera appel à notre programme vivra une expérience différente et exprimera un point de vue différent quant à l'utilité ou à l'inutilité de son interaction. C'est précisément la raison pour laquelle nous évoluons et nous adaptons continuellement en fonction des besoins et des exigences des familles et communautés militaires.

Notre mandat de gestion « par les familles pour les familles » demeure au premier plan de toutes nos activités et des raisons qui les sous-tendent. À cette fin, nous devons continuer de discuter avec les familles, de les écouter et de leur donner les moyens de s'exprimer, de manière à ce que chaque expérience puisse réellement façonner ce programme, qui vise à répondre à leurs besoins uniques.

Comme le chef d'état-major de la Défense l'a mentionné: « Par notre expérience de militaires des Forces armées canadiennes, nous savons à quel point il est crucial d'avoir le soutien des familles. Les familles veillent sur nous, et nous avons le devoir de prendre soin d'elles. »

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs, je vous remercie encore de m'avoir donné l’occasion de m'entretenir avec vous. Si vous avez des questions, je me ferai un plaisir d'y répondre.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons passer aux questions.

Monsieur Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à vous deux de vous être déplacés aujourd'hui. Nous l'apprécions beaucoup, d'autant plus qu'il est très intéressant pour nous d'en apprendre davantage sur vos services et sur la façon dont nous pouvons trouver des manières d'améliorer la vie de nos vétérans et de nos soldats.

Jason, j'ai un faible pour votre organisation parce que j'ai personnellement constaté que, grâce aux nombreux sports que j'ai pratiqués, je suis parvenu à passer au travers de situations difficiles. Le sport m'a grandement aidé à me reconstruire et ce que je constate ici m'apparaît très important.

Vous occupez ces fonctions depuis peu, mais avez-vous eu l'occasion d'étudier les répercussions de votre programme dans les cas où vous êtes parvenus à aider les vétérans et dans ceux où vous n'y êtes pas arrivés?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Oui, en 2016, nous avons effectué une analyse sous l'égide des Forces canadiennes sur les résultats de Sans limites, afin de déterminer si nous respections notre mandat et de voir si nous pouvions améliorer nos services. Nous avons fait cela. C'est sur le plan des communications que nous pouvons véritablement améliorer nos services, puisque nous essayons d'attirer de plus en plus de vétérans.

(1550)

M. Robert Kitchen:

Par « communications », entendez-vous le fait de communiquer avec nos vétérans pour les renseigner sur l'existence du programme?

Maj Jason Feyko:

C'est exact et nous avons fait beaucoup de progrès. De plus en plus de vétérans s'inscrivent au programme. Depuis le début cette année, nous comptons 55 % de plus de vétérans que de militaires en service actif. La question est de savoir comment atteindre les autres vétérans qui ne sont peut-être pas en contact direct avec Anciens Combattants Canada ou qui sont présents sur des médiums différents. C'est la question que nous nous posons.

M. Robert Kitchen:

On peut espérer que, grâce aux Jeux Invictus, votre programme connaîtra un véritable élan, compte tenu de son aspect identitaire et de vos communications adressées à tous les anciens combattants au Canada.

Maj Jason Feyko:

Effectivement. Nous avons une équipe de 90 athlètes blessés ou malades qui, cette année, vont participer aux Jeux Invictus. Selon nous, l'événement représente une occasion extraordinaire d'inspirer toute une nation quant à l'intégration du sport durant la phase de rétablissement.

M. Robert Kitchen:

À propos de la maladie mentale et de la prévention du suicide, nous avons, entre autres, beaucoup entendu parler du problème de la perte d'identité. Il semble que ce soit assez sérieux chez les militaires qui quittent le service, que ce soit de leur propre fait ou parce qu'ils y sont obligés ou encore, pour des circonstances particulières. Est-ce que, dans votre rôle, vous avez constaté ce phénomène de perte d'identité et pourriez-vous dire dans quelles situations vous l'avez constaté?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Je peux effectivement vous en parler, car Sans limites est un programme tout à fait adapté à ce genre de situations. Un soldat retiré du service pour blessure ou pour maladie se trouve coupé de l'esprit de corps auquel il était habitué. L'esprit de camaraderie et la présence d'autres militaires lui manquent. Grâce aux camps que nous organisons, Sans limites est peut-être pour eux la première occasion de réintégrer un groupe. Dès le premier jour, à l'occasion du dîner de bienvenue, les militaires présents créent instantanément des liens entre eux.

Tous ont servi leur pays ou un pays allié. Tous ont servi fièrement leur pays et tous ont accompli quelque chose d'important qui a changé leur vie. Ils sont tous confrontés à des défis et à des problèmes qui leur sont propres, mais il est extraordinaire de voir les liens qui se créent entre eux. Lors de tout événement de Sans limites, l'esprit de camaraderie renaît spontanément. C'est un aspect très important de ce que nous faisons.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Je suis tout à fait d'accord, parce que lorsque je vais à la pêche à Tisdale, dans le Nord de la Saskatchewan, je vis une expérience inoubliable. Le milieu même transforme notre vie; cette expérience nous unit profondément.

Maj Jason Feyko:

C'est vrai.

M. Robert Kitchen:

J'aime beaucoup tout ce que vous faites, et je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Laurie, je suis né dans une famille de militaires, je suis un enfant de militaires, alors j'ai observé et même vécu bon nombre de problèmes au cours des années. Pourriez-vous nous dire où vous êtes basés, à quels endroits se trouve votre programme?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Nous avons 32 centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires dans les bases principales un peu partout au pays. À l'heure actuelle, nous offrons le Programme pour les familles des vétérans dans sept bases: à Esquimalt, à Edmonton, à Shilo, à Trenton, à North Bay, à Valcartier et à Halifax.

Nos 32 centres se trouvent à tous les points de service. Nous offrons aussi beaucoup de services d'extension dans les villes comme Moose Jaw, car nous y avons des familles à Southport.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Je viens de la Saskatchewan, alors quand je parle de régions rurales, il s'agit de régions très éloignées. Dans ma province, nous sommes habitués à nous déplacer, et nos anciens combattants ont l'habitude des longues distances. Comment envisagez-vous d'étendre ces programmes? Avez-vous établi un modèle d'extension dans les régions des Prairies et d'autres régions du Canada où il faut aux gens cinq ou six heures pour se rendre à un centre?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Nous ne visons pas nécessairement à établir des points de service en personne. Nous avons constaté que la plupart des familles de militaires et d'anciens combattants cherchent non pas des services en personne, mais des services en ligne. Elles désirent communiquer avec des gens. Ce sont les services que nous cherchons avant tout à étendre. Grâce à connexionfac.ca, à notre Ligne d'information pour les familles et à chaque centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires qui applique un programme d'extension active de ses services, nous pouvons communiquer avec les familles qui ne veulent pas ou qui ne peuvent pas faire cinq ou six heures de route pour obtenir des services en personne.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci.

Je crois que j'ai utilisé tout mon temps de parole. Je vous remercie tous deux d'être venus; je vous en suis vraiment reconnaissant.

Le président:

Monsieur Eyolfson.

M. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie tous deux d'être venus.

Monsieur Feyko, je suis vraiment heureux de savoir que vous avez lancé ce genre d'initiative. J'ai remarqué que le conditionnement physique est crucial pour se maintenir non seulement en bon état physique, mais en bonne santé mentale.

Ces activités sont assez coûteuses pour les membres; ils doivent payer l'équipement, leurs déplacements et toutes sortes de choses. Dans le cas des anciens combattants, est-ce que le programme de réadaptation d'Anciens Combattants Canada assume certains de ces frais?

(1555)

Maj Jason Feyko:

Non, tous ces frais sont payés à l'aide des dons que reçoit le Fonds Sans limites, qui n'est pas un fonds public.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord. Est-ce que le gouvernement fournit un financement quelconque au Fonds Sans limites?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Le gouvernement offre un financement pour l'administration de ce programme, pour certains salaires, mais la plus grande partie de la prestation de ce programme est soutenue par les dons des Canadiens et par le Fonds Sans limites. Nous devons utiliser les fonds publics de la Défense nationale pour les militaires actifs.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Je comprends. Merci.

Pourriez-vous nous dire plus ou moins à combien s'élève le budget de ce Fonds?

Maj Jason Feyko:

La base budgétaire annuelle venant du gouvernement s'élève à environ 454 000 $, à l'exclusion des soldes et des autres types de rémunération. Nous dépensons environ 1 million de dollars par année du fonds de fiducie de Sans limites, et l'année dernière, nous avons recueilli 798 000 $.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Très bien. Merci.

Avez-vous établi une sorte de partenariat officiel avec Anciens Combattants Canada?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Oui. Nous l'avons signé en décembre dernier. C'est une entente de collaboration qui offre notre programme à un plus grand nombre d'anciens combattants. Elle porte principalement sur la communication et sur la synchronisation de notre collaboration afin que tous les gestionnaires de cas de tous les bureaux d'Anciens Combattants Canada soient au courant des occasions que nous offrons.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Si un membre des Forces armées qui ne peut pas retourner au travail à cause d'une blessure physique se présente à votre programme, quelle est la première mesure que vous prenez?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Si ce membre ne peut pas retourner au travail, nous lui demandons ce qui l'intéresse. Il s'inscrit à Sans limites, il nous dit à quels sports il aime participer, et nous consultons notre calendrier opérationnel. Si le golf l'intéresse, nous lui disons par exemple qu'un camp de golf commence bientôt et nous lui suggérons de s'y inscrire. Nous plaçons les nouveaux en priorité dans les camps. Nous espérons ainsi les accrocher; s'ils nous disent que les droits de jeu ou le coût des bâtons de golf sont trop élevés, nous les aidons à payer ces frais pour qu'ils puissent rester actifs pendant le reste de leur vie.

Nous créons aussi des groupes dans les médias sociaux pour les membres malades ou blessés afin qu'ils puissent rester en contact avec leurs amis après les camps. Nous créons par exemple un groupe de golfeurs pour qu'ils puissent organiser entre eux des sorties de golf pendant les week-ends, ce qui leur permet de continuer à mener une vie active.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

C'est excellent, merci.

Madame Ogilvie, pourriez-vous nous donner une idée des changements positifs que ce programme a apportés à la gestion de cas des anciens combattants et aux services que leurs familles reçoivent? A-t-il amélioré le système au cours de l'année qui vient de s'écouler?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Le Programme pour les familles des vétérans a été lancé il y a un an seulement. Ceux qui y participent passent beaucoup mieux leur transition de la vie militaire à la vie civile. Le programme ne dure pas longtemps, mais un grand nombre de participants nous disent qu'ils attendaient cela depuis longtemps et qu'ils sont très heureux de recevoir ces services maintenant. Ils ajoutent qu'il est dommage que ce programme n'ait pas été créé il y a des années.

Ce programme profite à bien d'autres personnes, comme aux parents et aux familles d'anciens combattants et de membres libérés pour des raisons médicales qui reçoivent ces services. Les enfants et les adolescents de ces membres libérés pour des raisons médicales profitent de services qu'ils n'avaient jamais reçus auparavant. Notre programme ne profite pas uniquement aux anciens combattants et à leurs époux ou épouses.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Ma question a peut-être une trop vaste portée pour que vous puissiez y répondre pendant la minute qui me reste, mais quel type de soutien ces centres offrent-ils aux membres de la famille des anciens combattants atteints d'un trouble de santé mentale?

(1600)

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Nous leur offrons divers services selon leurs besoins personnels. Nous menons une évaluation initiale quand un membre ou un ancien combattant se présente avec son époux ou son épouse ou avec des membres de sa famille. Suivant leur situation familiale, nous leur fournissons directement nos services, ou nous les aiguillons vers des services communautaires locaux. Cette entrevue initiale vise avant tout à évaluer le type de counseling et le degré d'intervention nécessaire autant pour les aidants naturels que pour la personne souffrant du trouble de santé mentale.

Je ne sais pas si j'ai réussi à répondre en une minute.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Vous l'avez fait en une minute exactement. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NPD):

Merci beaucoup d'être venus. J'ai tellement de questions à poser!

Monsieur Feyko, je vais d'abord m'adresser à vous.

Vous avez parlé du Volet 2, pêche à la mouche, hockey, randonnée. Est-ce qu'un grand nombre d'anciennes combattantes y participent? Quels sont les taux de participation à ces activités de loisir?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Un bon nombre de femmes participent au programme Sans limites. Par exemple, l'équipe qui se présente aux Jeux Invictus compte 30 % de femmes. Nous ne composons pas ces groupes nous-mêmes; les taux hommes-femmes dépendent de ceux de la population des Forces armées. Ce sont les mêmes taux que ceux des camps de Sans limites.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Vous subventionnez l'équipement pour que les participants puissent continuer à mener les activités de loisir. Est-ce qu'un grand nombre d'entre eux se prévalent de ces subventions? Est-ce qu'un grand nombre de participants s'attachent à ce programme et profitent de ces subventions?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Oh oui, c'est sûr!

Énormément de participants se laissent inspirer par les camps. Ils demandent alors l'argent nécessaire pour acheter de l'équipement afin que quand ils se sentent stressés ou qu'ils font face à de grands défis, ils puissent faire une promenade à bicyclette ou en kayak, ou aller faire de la pêche à la mouche pour demeurer actifs. L'année dernière, nous avons reçu plus de 700 demandes de subvention.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

C'est excellent. C'est vraiment encourageant.

Vous avez parlé du budget en ajoutant que vous étiez obligés de faire de la collecte de fonds auprès de donateurs publics. J'ai toujours trouvé très difficile de dépendre de la générosité ou de la compassion des donateurs.

Avez-vous de la peine à financer la prestation des services de ce programme?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Pas jusqu'à présent. L'année dernière, pour la première fois, nous avons dépensé plus que les dons que nous avions recueillis. Nous cherchons maintenant des stratégies d'atténuation des risques pour maintenir et soutenir le financement de Sans limites.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je comprends. Il doit être extrêmement difficile de faire face à de tels besoins et de manquer d'argent. Est-ce que ces stratégies d'atténuation vous ont réussi?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Jusqu'à présent, oui. Nous ne sommes pas encore en déficit, et nous n'avons pas eu de problèmes grâce à notre financement public et non public.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord. Merci beaucoup.

Madame Ogilvie, je vous remercie aussi d'être venue et du travail que vous accomplissez.

Vous avez parlé des services, en ajoutant que tous les centres de ressources diffèrent un peu les uns des autres. Pourriez-vous nous décrire quelques facteurs qui distinguent les centres des diverses collectivités?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Dans une petite ville comme Goose Bay, nous offrons bien moins de services que les centres de Toronto, par exemple. L'un des principes fondamentaux du Programme des services aux familles des militaires est de ne pas dédoubler les services que la collectivité locale offre déjà. À ce moment-là, nous aiguillons les gens vers le fournisseur communautaire qui livre directement le service nécessaire. Par exemple, à Toronto le centre aiguille les familles vers des conseillers communautaires en santé mentale, alors qu'à Goose Bay les services de santé mentale sont fournis par un membre du personnel du centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires. Tout dépend des besoins de chaque collectivité et des services qui y sont déjà offerts directement; chaque famille de militaire peut alors s'en prévaloir en fonction de son style de vie. On ne trouve probablement pas autant de services communautaires à Toronto qu'à Petawawa, par exemple, où les services visent avant tout l'expérience de vie des familles de militaires et d'anciens combattants.

(1605)

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je comprends. Merci.

Quel degré d'importance ont ces services pour les membres des Forces armées qui souffrent d'une blessure de stress opérationnel? Quelles améliorations pourrait-on apporter à ces services? S'agit-il de donner plus de formation? de soutien financier? Que faire pour les améliorer?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Je ne peux pas vous parler directement des services que fournissent les Forces armées canadiennes aux personnes souffrant de blessure de stress opérationnel, mais on trouve toutes sortes de services disponibles. Je le répète, chaque personne a des besoins qui lui sont particuliers. Nous devons fournir un ensemble de services, un catalogue de services, auxquels ils devraient avoir accès là où ils vivent.

Il y a bien des façons d'accéder à un service. L'un de nos plus grands défis, comme je l'ai dit tout à l'heure, est de nous tenir au courant des types de services disponibles dans chaque collectivité et d'en informer les gens. Cela demeure l'un de nos plus grands défis; nous devons examiner chaque occasion offerte, et nous saisissons toutes les occasions de le faire.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

C'est très bien, merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Bratina.

M. Bob Bratina (Hamilton-Est—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Feyko, je tiens d'abord à vous remercier pour le service que vous fournissez. Vous avez été gravement blessé en Afghanistan. Est-ce la raison pour laquelle vous avez quitté les Forces armées?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Oui, monsieur. Mes blessures ont fini par me submerger, et j'ai été libéré pour des raisons médicales l'été dernier.

M. Bob Bratina:

De nombreux anciens combattants nous ont dit qu'ils avaient eu beaucoup de peine à traverser cette période, qui leur a causé une bonne partie des problèmes que nous cherchons à résoudre. Quelle a été votre transition de la vie de soldat à celle de civil?

Maj Jason Feyko:

D'abord, mes blessures dataient de 2004; il y a longtemps de cela, et l'Unité interarmées de soutien du personnel ainsi que tous les programmes offerts aujourd'hui n'existaient pas encore. Étant arrivé parmi les premiers en Afghanistan, j'ai fait le tour complet des services offerts aujourd'hui, qui n'existaient pas quand j'ai été blessé. Mais je n'ai pas à me plaindre de ma transition. J'ai eu beaucoup de chance. La perte d'identité de membre des Forces armées canadiennes est très difficile à accepter quand nous quittons l'armée. Certains des programmes et le lien étroit qui commence à se développer entre les Forces armées et Anciens Combattants Canada nous aident beaucoup et facilitent cette transition.

M. Bob Bratina:

Avez-vous participé à la reconstruction? Je sais que nos soldats de Hamilton y ont participé à Kandahar.

Maj Jason Feyko:

Non, j'étais à Kabul lors de la première ROTO 0 en 2003-2004; j'étais dans la ville.

M. Bob Bratina:

Le programme de sports et d'éducation physique est extraordinaire. J'ai aussi l'impression qu'il découle de l'organisation des réunions des anciens soldats. On y voit presque la caractéristique principale de ce programme, celle de réunir tous ces gens, n'est-ce pas?

Maj Jason Feyko:

En effet. À la fin des camps, bien des participants disent avoir eu un peu moins de plaisir à jouer au hockey ou au golf que de revoir leurs camarades et d'échanger des anecdotes.

Nous les plaçons dans des chambres à deux lits, et c'est incroyable d'en entendre un parler de ses cauchemars, et l'autre s'exclamer qu'il en a aussi et lui recommander une solution qui l'a aidé. Ils échangent des conseils, ils développent une amitié profonde et ils restent en contact pendant longtemps.

M. Bob Bratina:

Il est excellent de mettre l'accent sur les sports et sur l'éducation physique. Les bienfaits en sont évidents. Avez-vous pensé à étendre ces activités à, disons, les arts et la culture, à créer de petits orchestres ou d'autres activités qui leur donnent des occasions de se réunir? Peut-être qu'ils ne sont pas prêts à faire un autre tour de golf, par exemple.

Maj Jason Feyko:

Nous avons organisé quelques-unes de ces activités, et il y en aura peut-être d'autres à l'avenir, mais pour le moment, notre mandat ne comprend que les sports et les loisirs physiques.

(1610)

M. Bob Bratina:

Je comprends.

Je vais m'adresser à notre autre invitée maintenant. Merci beaucoup d'avoir fait cette présentation, Laurie. Est-ce possible pour les anciens combattants de devenir des employés des Services aux familles des militaires?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Tout à fait, ils peuvent devenir employés. D'ailleurs, l'un des principaux éléments de notre programme est le bénévolat. Les centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires ont besoin de bénévoles qui assurent la prestation des programmes et des services et qui fournissent du soutien à leurs camarades. Ce sentiment d'identité s'étend aux familles. Il leur est très important de se retrouver dans le milieu qu'ils connaissaient quand ils étaient membres actifs. C'est pourquoi le nombre de participants qui offrent en retour leurs services de bénévoles au programme pilote actuel pour les familles des vétérans a augmenté de manière exponentielle; ces membres veulent apporter leur contribution aux centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires et au Programme des services aux familles des militaires.

M. Bob Bratina:

Améliorez-vous continuellement les services? Menez-vous un processus d'évaluation continuel?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

L'évaluation est continuelle. Non seulement nous évaluons les programmes au niveau local, mais l'ombudsman a publié le rapport de son examen intitulé Sur le front intérieur en 2013. De plus, notre chef des services d'examen mène des études approfondies. Nous mesurons le rendement quatre fois par année afin de définir les besoins des familles de militaires. Nous menons aussi des évaluations des besoins de toutes les collectivités afin de comprendre avec précision les besoins que les familles nous décrivent et d'y adapter nos programmes.

M. Bob Bratina:

Monsieur Feyko, qu'avez-vous à dire sur le processus d'évaluation de votre groupe?

Maj Jason Feyko:

À la fin de chaque événement, nous demandons aux participants de nous présenter leur opinion, et nous essayons toujours de perfectionner le camp suivant en fonction de ces commentaires.

M. Bob Bratina:

Le taux de femmes participant aux sports et à l'éducation physique est-il égal à celui des hommes?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Dans le cas des soldats, non...

M. Bob Bratina:

Ce n'est pas moitié-moitié, mais en ce qui concerne...

Maj Jason Feyko:

Il correspond à celui de la population des Forces aériennes canadiennes, c'est sûr.

M. Bob Bratina:

Merci.

Monsieur Ellis, me reste-t-il du temps?

Le président:

Vous avez 30 secondes.

M. Bob Bratina:

Avez-vous beaucoup d'anciens militaires dans votre programme, autres que ceux qui viennent y participer?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Comme bénévoles?

M. Bob Bratina:

Comme vous, oui.

Maj Jason Feyko:

Nous avons beaucoup de membres libérés pour des raisons médicales qui offrent leurs services de bénévolat après avoir participé au programme. Nous les encourageons à le faire.

M. Bob Bratina:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Colin Fraser (Nova-Ouest, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie beaucoup tous les deux d'être venus et de nous avoir présenté d'excellentes allocutions qui nous aideront à comprendre l'excellence du travail que vous accomplissez pour aider nos anciens combattants et nos membres actifs.

Ma première question s'adressera à vous, madame Ogilvie. Vous avez parlé des services que vous offrez en ligne aux anciens combattants et aux membres actifs. Quand vous avez présenté cette liste, j'ai eu de la peine à comprendre ce qu'offre chaque service et de quelle façon ces services se complètent. Pensez-vous que les personnes que votre organisme sert les comprennent bien? Y aurait-il moyen de mieux rationaliser ces services pour que les gens comprennent lesquels vous fournissez?

Auriez-vous des observations à nous présenter à ce sujet pour que nous puissions peut-être recommander des améliorations à apporter à la prestation de ces services?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Le mois dernier, nous avons lancé connexionfac.ca pour accomplir justement ce dont vous parlez, pour simplifier et rationaliser l'accès des membres, des anciens combattants et de leurs familles aux services et aux renseignements que nous offrons en ligne.

Avant cela, ce site s'appelait forcedelafamille.ca. Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec vous, il était vraiment compliqué. Il était difficile de comprendre les services et d'y accéder. Comme je l'ai dit, nous venons à peine de lancer ce site Web et d'offrir cette expérience en ligne. Nous l'évaluons jour après jour pour le peaufiner et pour mieux aider les membres, les anciens combattants et leurs familles à obtenir des renseignements.

M. Colin Fraser:

Parfait. Merci.

Je comprends que les services en ligne sont plus pratiques et plus faciles d'accès, mais il doit être difficile d'y accéder dans les régions où il n'y a pas de service Internet ou haute vitesse. Dans ma circonscription, le Net n'est pas toujours disponible.

Ces gens auraient avantage à ce qu'on établisse un centre où ils puissent recevoir ces services. J'ai la 14e Escadre Greenwood dans ma circonscription de West Nova. Je sais que le centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires fait un excellent travail en y offrant les services disponibles dans cette région, mais il ne fait pas partie des sept centres qui offrent des services aux anciens combattants et à leurs familles.

Pourriez-vous suggérer des façons dont ces personnes, qui n'ont pas de service Internet, pourraient accéder aux programmes dont vous parlez?

(1615)

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Le mandat des centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires comprend l'extension des services. Chacun de ces centres a établi des processus d'extension très solides pour atteindre les familles des différentes collectivités. Par exemple, certains centres envoient des fournisseurs de services par avion dans les régions éloignées. Notre centre de Yellowknife fournit ces services dans tout le Nord du Canada. Tout dépend des besoins que les familles nous décrivent dans leurs demandes.

Il est vrai que de nombreuses collectivités n'ont pas accès à Internet. Nous avons conclu — surtout dans le cadre du Programme pour les familles des vétérans — un partenariat avec la Légion pour fournir ce service. Un de nos employés se tient dans les locaux de la Légion pour aider les gens à se brancher et à obtenir les services.

M. Colin Fraser:

D'accord.

Je sais que le projet pilote n'est qu'à mi-chemin, mais pensez-vous pouvoir étendre le programme des centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires aux 32 bases? A-t-on déjà discuté de l'expansion des services des sept centres actuels?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Ce projet pilote vise à évaluer l'efficacité et le besoin de ses services chez les membres libérés pour des raisons médicales. Nous venons de terminer l'audit et l'évaluation de la première année; nous en avons reçu les résultats cette semaine. À partir de ces résultats, Anciens Combattants Canada décidera s'il convient d'étendre le programme ailleurs que dans ces sept centres ou même d'ajouter des centres à ceux du projet pilote.

M. Colin Fraser:

D'accord. Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Feyko, je vous félicite de l'excellent travail que vous accomplissez par le programme Sans limites. Ce programme semble merveilleux, et je suis d'accord avec M. Kitchen, c'est fantastique d'avoir pu conclure un partenariat avec les Jeux Invictus pour que nos anciens combattants y participent.

Vous avez dit que la réintégration est l'un des objectifs premiers de ce programme, qui encourage les anciens combattants à se lancer dans une deuxième carrière. Pourriez-vous nous décrire un peu ce que vous avez observé dans la communauté des anciens combattants que vous servez? Pourriez-vous nous dire de quelles manières les sports et les activités de loisirs les aident à se réintégrer et à développer cette nouvelle phase de leur vie?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Bien sûr. C'est une excellente question.

Les camps sont conçus de manière à inspirer et à motiver les membres à adopter un style de vie actif. Mais ce n'est que la première étape. Bon nombre des participants ont de la peine à sortir de leur sous-sol ou de leur maison; alors nous espérons qu'en venant aux camps où ils retrouvent la camaraderie de leurs collègues, ils comprendront qu'ils trouveront cette même camaraderie dans des équipes de sport.

Nous visons à ce qu'ils continuent à pratiquer ces sports là où ils habitent quand ils sortent d'un camp Sans limites. Nous pouvons les aider non seulement à acheter l'équipement nécessaire, mais à participer aux activités sportives et sociales hebdomadaires ou quotidiennes de leur collectivité. Ils pourront ainsi se réintégrer, se faire de nouveaux amis en participant à des activités sportives, s'adapter à leurs nouvelles normes, comme nous le répétons souvent. Ils doivent définir leurs nouvelles normes et la façon de s'y adapter. Nous avons découvert que les sports sont très efficaces pour cela.

M. Colin Fraser:

Merci beaucoup.

Mme Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, PCC):

Je vous remercie tous deux d'être venus.

Vos observations sont très encourageantes. Je vois que l'on offre beaucoup d'excellents services à nos soldats et à nos anciens combattants.

J'ai beaucoup aimé les témoignages que vous nous avez présentés, Jason, parce que je trouve qu'ils résument tout ce que vous nous avez dit sur la nature, sur les défis physiques des anciens combattants et sur les moyens de comprendre leurs blessures de santé mentale. Une des filles disait qu'à la fin du camp, elle avait compris qu'elle devait sortir, vivre, faire l'expérience de ces choses. Elle disait que la meilleure thérapie avait été de retrouver ses camarades.

Comprenez-vous que cela pourrait grandement aider la première phase d'intervention et leur permettre de retrouver la santé mentale tout en traversant les processus complexes de la transition?

(1620)

Maj Jason Feyko:

C'est une excellente question que nous nous sommes posée également. Nous lançons la deuxième partie de notre étude, qui consiste à définir le processus de réadaptation à présenter à tous les participants du programme Sans limites. Cette femme a utilisé le terme « thérapeutique ». Notre programme ne repose pas sur une thérapie, mais nous reconnaissons les effets thérapeutiques du sport.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

C'est une thérapie naturelle.

Maj Jason Feyko:

Exactement.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

C'est merveilleux. Je voudrais vraiment en voir les résultats. Nous nous occupons de santé mentale. Nous cherchons avant tout à éviter que ces troubles ne s'intensifient... je crois que ce serait un outil merveilleux.

Parlez-vous de régimes alimentaires? On m'a dit que pendant leurs tours à l'étranger, les soldats mangent toujours un peu la même chose et qu'ils subissent le même type de stress. Une chercheuse américaine a reçu des fonds pour mener une étude parce qu'elle nourrit littéralement les soldats qui reviennent au pays d'aliments sains et naturels, ce qui transforme leur corps. En outre... je suis spécialisée en éducation physique, alors voyez, la bonne santé dépend de l'alimentation, du repos, de tous ces facteurs qui se complètent.

Maj Jason Feyko:

Nous parlons un peu de régime alimentaire, surtout dans le cas des initiatives de grande envergure comme les Jeux Invictus. Nous tenons à ce que les membres de notre équipe se nourrissent bien. Nous leur présentons le guide alimentaire des Forces canadiennes et la documentation du Programme de soutien du personnel. Nous n'en parlons pas énormément, mais nous l'avons fait.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Me reste-t-il du temps?

Le président:

Il vous reste deux minutes et demie.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Laurie, il est très encourageant de vous entendre décrire ce que vous faites pour les familles en les intégrant dans les services à nos anciens combattants afin de fermer la boucle. Je suis vraiment heureuse de vous entendre parler de ces choses.

Je regarde votre mémoire et les documents que j'ai reçus ici, et vous y mentionnez le financement. Je ne sais pas si vous pouvez répondre à cette question. Dans les documents que nous avons ici, on mentionne qu'en novembre 2014, le gouvernement du Canada a annoncé qu'il allait injecter 15,8 millions de dollars sur quatre ans dans un projet pilote de centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires et pour les anciens combattants.

Vous nous avez dit qu'en 2015, vous aviez lancé ce projet avec 10 millions de dollars.

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Cet écart de 10 millions de dollars — cette différence — était dû à l'établissement du projet pilote initial, puis à l'élimination graduelle de ce projet. Le projet comprend deux phases. Cette somme de 10 millions de dollars sert à la mise en oeuvre des services fournis directement aux anciens combattants et à leurs familles.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Alors le projet a maintenant deux ans?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Il arrive à la fin de sa deuxième année. La première année a débuté en octobre, alors elle n'a duré en fait qu'une demi-année.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

C'est vrai. L'évaluation est-elle encore en cours, ou est-ce qu'elle a...

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Elle vient de se terminer. J'ai reçu la version préliminaire du rapport au début de cette semaine. Notre organisme et Anciens Combattants Canada vont l'examiner afin de décider si la première partie du projet pilote s'est avérée assez efficace pour qu'on poursuive le projet.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Ce projet servait les anciens combattants et leurs familles, alors que se passe-t-il maintenant? Leur offre-t-on encore des services?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Bien sûr! Nous continuons à leur fournir ces services, et ceci au moins jusqu'à 2018. Les anciens combattants peuvent s'inscrire au programme jusqu'en 2018. Ils ont encore deux ans, et cela explique l'écart de financement. À partir de leur adhésion, ils seront servis pendant encore deux ans. Même quand le projet arrivera à échéance, nous continuerons à en offrir les services.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Je sais que vous nous avez dit que le rapport n'est pas définitif et que les deux organismes doivent encore l'examiner. Pouvez-vous quand même indiquer au Comité s'il annonce de bonnes nouvelles, s'il s'est avéré efficace, et combien d'anciens combattants...?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Je peux seulement vous dire que les anciens combattants et leurs familles sont très encouragés et qu'ils appuient le programme de tout coeur.

Puis-je vous dire si le projet se poursuivra? Je n'en ai aucune idée.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Je comprends.

Mon temps est écoulé?

Le président:

Il vous reste 40 secondes.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Merci.

Jason, sauriez-vous combien d'anciens combattants se sont inscrits au début du programme, puis plus tard? Vous avez dit qu'il fallait les encourager à émerger de leurs sous-sols. Nous savons tous que le stade du sous-sol indique que le trouble s'est aggravé.

Avez-vous constaté une différence entre ceux qui se sont inscrits au début et les autres? Avez-vous obtenu de bons résultats dans les deux groupes?

(1625)

Maj Jason Feyko:

Si je comprends bien votre question, vous voudriez savoir à quel stade de leur rétablissement ils se trouvaient quand ils se sont inscrits.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

C'est cela.

Maj Jason Feyko:

Nous avons eu des gens qui étaient restés seuls pendant des années, qui ont finalement reconnu qu'ils avaient besoin de soutien et qui nous ont demandé ce que nous pouvions faire pour eux. Nous en avons eu d'autres qui sortaient d'un accident d'auto et qui, quelques semaines plus tard, ont demandé du soutien.

Je crois que cette étude répondra exactement à votre question.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Ah bon, merci.

Le président:

Madame Lockhart partage son temps de parole.

Mme Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Nous avons entendu dire que certains membres actifs font face à de graves problèmes, mais qu'ils sont encore en mesure d'assumer l'universalité du service — alors ils continuent à servir —, mais qu'ils n'ont de soutien que celui d'un parent, de frères et soeurs, d'un beau-parent ou d'un autre membre de sa famille.

Vos centres de ressources pour les familles des militaires sont-ils en mesure de faire transférer ces membres actifs plus près de leur système de soutien?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Je ne sais pas.

Mais je peux vous dire que les services que fournissent nos centres ne se limitent pas à leur région géographique. Si le membre se trouve à Petawawa et qu'il a un parent en difficulté à London, en Ontario, ce parent peut obtenir les services du centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires de London. Ces services ne sont pas reliés au membre actif de la famille.

Le transfert d'un enfant adulte plus près de là où se trouve un parent ou un membre de sa famille ne relève pas de mes fonctions.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Si le centre de ressources aiguille un ancien combattant à des services communautaires pour lesquels il y a des frais, est-ce que vous payez ces frais tout de suite, ou est-ce que vous les remboursez plus tard à la famille? Assumez-vous les frais de tous vos services?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Cela dépend des services. Par exemple, nous remboursons tous les frais de service de relève pour les soins d'un enfant. Si les services de santé mentale ne sont pas fournis dans la province, le membre de la famille peut revenir à notre centre de ressources et demander un soutien financier pour accéder à nos services. Cela dépend de la situation.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Je comprends.

Je me demande si le fait que vous ne puissiez pas rembourser certains services empêche parfois les gens de s'en prévaloir.

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Cela crée certainement un obstacle.

Nous avons constaté, en menant le Programme pour les familles des vétérans, que cela constitue un obstacle. C'est pourquoi certains des sept centres du projet pilote se concentrent beaucoup sur la stabilité financière des anciens combattants et de leurs familles. On établit de nombreux programmes — ce qui ne se fait habituellement pas dans le cadre du Programme pour les familles des vétérans — pour aider les familles, pour établir et maintenir de bonnes capacités financières, puis pour leur permettre d'obtenir les ressources financières dont ils ont un urgent besoin pour traverser une épreuve passagère ou à plus long terme.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Très bien, merci beaucoup.

Je vais passer la deuxième partie de mon temps à mon collègue.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

J'ai plusieurs questions à poser, surtout à Laurie.

Quand j'ai quitté mon domicile ce matin, mon épouse et ma fille dormaient encore. Quand j'arriverai chez moi ce soir, elles seront déjà endormies. Les répercussions que subissent les familles nous préoccupent tous profondément ici.

Pourriez-vous nous parler un peu du stress mental, ou du stress en général que subissent les familles? Il s'agit peut-être d'une chose évidente, mais je crois qu'il est important que nous mentionnions au dossier les répercussions du service militaire et post-militaire sur la famille immédiate des soldats.

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

C'est exactement pour cette raison que l'on a créé, il y a 25 ans, le Programme des services aux familles des militaires. Vous soulevez une question excellente.

À cette époque, on ne reconnaissait pas la contribution des familles à l'efficacité opérationnelle. Pour soutenir leur capacité opérationnelle, les membres doivent se sentir soutenus par leurs familles, et vice-versa. C'est l'élément clé de notre programme. Dans les cas de déploiement, des risques qui en découlent et de la réinstallation géographique, nous visons avant tout à encourager la famille à se prévaloir des soutiens qu'il lui faut en temps opportun. L'élément du centre de ressources où les épouses et les époux qui se sentent seuls lorsque le membre est absent peuvent se sentir entourés comme dans une seconde famille est primordial dans ce programme.

Le centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires aidera l'épouse submergée par les circonstances à se concentrer sur son travail et à accomplir toutes ses tâches quotidiennes de mère seule. Cela rassure le membre pendant son tour de service, parce qu'il sait que sa famille reçoit du soutien pendant son absence.

(1630)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Agissez-vous aussi au moment du recrutement? Expliquez-vous aux recrues et à leurs familles ce qui va se passer, ou faites-vous cela uniquement à la fin?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Nous ne le faisions pas auparavant, mais ces trois dernières années nous l'avons fait. Nous présentons des exposés à l'occasion des cérémonies de recrutement et dans les écoles pour décrire les services qu'offre le Programme de ressources pour les familles des militaires.

Soulignons que ceux qui nous écoutent à ces événements ne s'intéressent pas particulièrement à ce que nous leur présentons. Nous veillons avant tout à fournir ces renseignements constamment dans diverses circonstances de la carrière des membres et de l'expérience des familles.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si j'ai bien entendu, vous avez dit plus tôt que le programme était accessible aux familles des anciens combattants libérés pour raisons médicales.

Le programme est-il réservé aux anciens combattants libérés pour raisons médicales?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Le programme des services aux familles des anciens combattants est effectivement restreint aux anciens combattants libérés pour raisons médicales.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Et pourquoi cela?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Je ne peux pas vous donner la raison exacte. Lorsque le ministère des Anciens Combattants nous a demandé d’appuyer le programme, c'est ce paramètre qui nous a été fourni.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Les bureaux des députés offrent bon nombre de services gouvernementaux. C'est un des services que nous offrons. Nous les facilitons, surtout dans des endroits comme ma circonscription et celle de M. Kitchen. Nos circonscriptions sont très grandes et elles sont éloignées des bureaux du gouvernement.

A-t-on pensé à passer par nous, ou à utiliser nos bureaux pour distribuer du matériel? Vous êtes un ministère, et non un organisme externe. A-t-on fait quelque chose à ce sujet?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Pas encore, mais nous le ferons à partir d’aujourd'hui, merci beaucoup. C'est une excellente suggestion.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il ne vous en reste plus.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mon temps est écoulé.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Brassard.

M. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Feyko, vous dirigez un programme vraiment remarquable. Ce qui m'étonne particulièrement, c'est que vous acceptez des gens, que leur situation soit attribuable ou non au service actif, et je trouve cela vraiment admirable.

Je voudrais revenir sur un point qui va un peu dans la même direction que l’intervention de M. Fraser et, d'une certaine façon, de Mme Wagantall. Les citations m'ont étonné, en particulier la deuxième: « Les douleurs mentales et physiques que je ressens ont toutes été repoussées grâce aux sports. Je ne voulais pas ralentir. Oui c'était fatigant, mais cela me faisait sentir mieux ».

Nous étudions les questions du suicide et de la santé mentale. Quelle est la mesure du désespoir des personnes qui font appel à votre programme?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Il est difficile de répondre à cette question, puisque la personne concernée est la seule à le savoir vraiment. Nous avons vu des personnes très désemparées, pour qui le simple fait de sortir ou d’accomplir des tâches quotidiennes représente un défi.

M. John Brassard:

En ce qui concerne plus particulièrement la prévention du suicide cependant, les personnes s'ouvrent-elles ou sont-elles capables de s'ouvrir devant vous sur la question du suicide ou de la tentative de suicide, et de composer avec ses répercussions?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Certaines personnes ont témoigné qu'elles avaient essayé de mettre fin à leurs jours. Elles nous le disent.

Nous ne sommes pas en mesure d'évaluer ou de traiter ces personnes, d'un point de vue clinique. Cependant, nous essayons toujours, pour les événements plus importants, d'intégrer notre programme de soutien par les pairs en cas de traumatisme dû au stress opérationnel. Il y a donc quelqu'un dans le groupe qui peut aider ces membres s'ils ont des difficultés pendant qu'ils participent à un de nos camps.

Nous essayons de leur permettre de chasser ces idées noires et de leur montrer d'autres façons de s'adapter, de leur dire qu'ils ne sont pas seuls et qu'il existe de nombreux autres programmes. Sans limites est l’une des portes à ouvrir. Il existe de nombreux autres programmes disponibles pour ceux qui demandent de l’aide.

M. John Brassard:

Facilitez-vous cela dans le cadre de votre programme?

Maj Jason Feyko:

Nous pouvons le faire, par l'entremise de l'unité interarmées de soutien au personnel et d'Anciens Combattants Canada. Quelle que soit l’aide requise, nous allons tendre la main. Nous ne refuserons jamais.

M. John Brassard:

D'accord, merci.

Laurie, rapidement, j'ai une question pour vous aussi, si vous n’y voyez pas d’inconvénient.

Sur les 10 millions de dollars — je sais que vous avez d'abord parlé de 15 millions de dollars, de 10 millions de dollars — combien vont aux coûts administratifs? Vous avez parlé d’un important volet bénévole.

Combien vont aux coûts réels des services, et à ces familles?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Je ne peux vous fournir les chiffres exacts en ce moment, mais je pourrai le faire plus tard. Comme nous avons fait une évaluation la première année, ce sont des chiffres que nous connaissons avec exactitude.

Tout ce que je peux dire, c'est que dans le cadre du programme de services aux familles des militaires, nous essayons très fort de faire en sorte que les frais généraux soient minimes en comparaison de la prestation de services aux familles des militaires. Comme je viens de le dire, je n'ai toutefois pas les chiffres exacts pour l’instant.

(1635)

M. John Brassard:

D'accord.

Enfin, l'une des choses qui est constamment revenue tout au long des témoignages est la question du soutien par les pairs, non seulement à titre bénévole, mais aussi en ce qui concerne Anciens Combattants Canada et l'embauche de personnes qui comprennent la situation du personnel militaire. À votre avis, devrait-on accorder la priorité à l'embauche de personnes qui ont fait partie des forces armées à des postes où elles peuvent aider ou guider les participants dans le processus?

Oui, Jason.

Maj Jason Feyko:

Je conviens qu'elles ont beaucoup à offrir. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles je suis dans cette position, en tant que membre blessé en mesure de donner quelque chose en retour, et de comprendre les difficultés des participants. Je ne dirais jamais que je comprends les difficultés de tout le monde. En fin de compte, cela fait effectivement une différence. De là à dire que cela devrait être prioritaire, il y a un pas à franchir, et ce n’est pas à moi de le faire.

M. John Brassard:

C’est tout pour moi. Merci.

Le président:

C'est tout, oui? D'accord.

Enfin, madame Mathyssen, vous avez trois minutes.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Feyko et madame Ogilvie, l'ombudsman de la Défense nationale a recommandé que tous les avantages, comme les fournisseurs de soins de santé, soient mis en place pour les membres du personnel libérés pour raisons médicales, de façon à assurer une transition moins stressante et plus facile. On appelle cela un service de conciergerie. Pourriez-vous nous en parler à partir de votre expérience personnelle avec les anciens combattants et leurs familles.

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

C'est le modèle que nous utilisons pour les coordonnateurs du programme des services aux familles des anciens combattants à chacun des sept emplacements. Lorsque j'ai parlé du modèle de l'agent de liaison avec les familles, qui est actuellement appliqué dans les centres intégrés de soutien du personnel, le contact entre l'agent de liaison avec les familles et le coordonnateur des services aux familles des anciens combattants se fait avant la libération, de façon à faciliter cette transition, pour le vétéran et sa famille, avant, pendant et dans les deux années suivant leur libération au profit des services communautaires. Nous n'utilisons pas le terme « concierge », mais plutôt « orienteur ».

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D’accord. À quand remonte la mise en place de ce modèle?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Au début du projet pilote. Avant le début du projet pilote, le programme des services aux familles des militaires n'avait pas le mandat de fournir des services une fois que le membre avait été libéré. Ces services étaient fournis avant la libération, mais s’arrêtaient à la libération, ce qui a donné lieu à la mise sur pied du programme des services aux familles des anciens combattants.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D’accord. Je vous remercie.

Maj Jason Feyko:

Comme les services de transition ne relèvent pas de mon mandat, je ne peux pas en parler.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je me demandais simplement si vous aviez des choses à dire à ce sujet, mais je comprends. Merci.

Madame Ogilvie, le programme des services aux familles a-t-il un rôle à jouer dans le dépistage des tentatives de suicide et la prévention des suicides par l'entremise du ministère de la Défense nationale et, dans l'affirmative, observez-vous des tendances qui pourraient dénoter des lacunes dans les services offerts?

Mme Laurie Ogilvie:

Nous ne faisons aucun suivi en ce qui a trait aux suicides des membres, à l'exception de ceux qui font appel à la ligne de renseignements à l’intention des familles. Étant donné qu'il s'agit d'une ligne de soutien en cas de crise, nous recevons parfois des appels de personnes suicidaires. Nous assurons donc le suivi de ces renseignements à nos propres fins internes, mais nous ne les partageons pas avec les Forces armées canadiennes. C'est un service confidentiel.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord.

Monsieur Feyko, lorsque vous parliez de ce qui ne relève pas de votre mandat, vous avez dit qu'un membre ayant un TSO fait partie du groupe. Mme Wagantall a posé des questions sur la nutrition. Je m'interroge au sujet de ce membre ayant un TSO. Existe-t-il des services d’orientation pour les anciens combattants ayant encore une dépendance au tabac, à l'alcool ou à des médicaments d’ordonnance, ou est-ce là un aspect qui ne relève pas de votre compétence?

Maj Jason Feyko:

C'est la raison pour laquelle cette personne participe à nos camps. Il s’agit de l'expert en la matière ou l’expert du soutien par les pairs qui assure la liaison avec ces conseillers. C'est un aspect qui ne relève pas du mandat de Sans limites.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Cela met fin à notre première série de témoignages. Au nom du Comité, j'aimerais vous remercier tous les deux pour tout ce que vous faites pour les hommes et les femmes qui nous ont servi. Si vous avez des questions à poser ou des précisions à fournir, transmettez-les au greffier, qui les distribuera aux membres du Comité.

Nous allons faire une pause d’environ deux minutes. Nous entendrons ensuite un autre témoin. Tout le monde doit donc être de retour ici dans deux minutes.

(1640)

(1640)

Le président:

Comme nous avons un vote à 17 h 30, le temps commence à presser. Je vais donc ramener le temps de parole de six à cinq minutes. Cela devrait nous permettre d’entendre le témoignage en entier.

Bienvenue, madame Thomas. Merci de votre présence et de votre patience.

Nous allons commencer par une déclaration de 10 minutes de votre part, et nous allons ensuite vous poser des questions. La parole est à vous.

Mme Stephanie Thomas (à titre personnel):

Merci.

Je m’appelle Stephanie Thomas, et je suis mentor en comportement pour l’Anglophone East School District au Nouveau-Brunswick. Je suis ici aujourd'hui à titre de conjointe d'un vétéran ayant 18 ans et demi de service, cinq périodes de service, dont deux en Afghanistan.

J'ai mis mon histoire par écrit, étant donné que la dernière décennie de notre vie a été très chargée en émotions. J'ai l'impression que je vais devoir vous la lire, afin de pouvoir me détacher de toutes les émotions qu’elle soulève en moi.

M. John Brassard:

Je suis désolé de vous interrompre, Stephanie.

La famille de Stephanie est avec nous, au fond de la salle.

Le président:

S'ils voulaient se joindre à elle, nous en serions ravis.

M. John Brassard:

J’aimerais qu'ils puissent s'asseoir près d'elle.

Le président:

Si vous n’y voyez pas d’inconvénient.

M. John Brassard:

Simplement pour aider Stephanie à chasser un peu la nervosité.

Mme Stephanie Thomas: Merci.

Le président:

Si vous souhaitez faire une pause, vous n’avez qu’à le demander.

(1645)

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je vais poursuivre.

Afin de bâtir un sentiment d’appartenance à une communauté après la libération de mon mari, nous avons commencé à fréquenter une église. À Noël 2015, j’ai subi une commotion cérébrale en raison d’une chute. Puis, quelques mois plus tard, notre fils s'est blessé, et Marc a emmené notre plus vieux à l'église et a dit au ministre que notre fils s’était blessé, et un membre de la congrégation l’a entendu. Ensuite, Marc a quitté l’église en pleurant en plein milieu du service, parce que c'était Pâques, et que cette période déclenche de douloureux souvenirs chez Marc. Cette période a été l'une des pires de sa vie quand il était en Afghanistan. Il a donc quitté le service religieux en pleurs, et la personne qui l’avait entendu parler au ministre, interprétant cela comme un aveu de culpabilité pour la blessure de notre fils, a appelé les services sociaux pour signaler un cas de mauvais traitement, même si ce n’était pas du tout le cas.

Dans le cadre de la tribune qui m’est offerte aujourd’hui, je vais vous révéler ce que je me sens à l’aise de révéler dans ma situation, car il y a des histoires que je ne peux partager qu’avec ma famille des militaires, qui est la seule à pouvoir comprendre. Ce qu’il faut comprendre, c’est que lorsque vous êtes libéré de l'armée, cette famille n’existe plus, et vous devez vous refaire une nouvelle famille.

Je suis reconnaissante aux quelques personnes que j'ai dans ma vie avec qui je peux partager ces histoires; et d'autres familles sont aussi aux prises avec l’état de stress post-traumatique.

La libération de Marc et les soins qu’il a reçus dans l'armée nous ont donné l'impression qu'il n'était qu'un numéro. Malheureusement, cette impression demeure la même, maintenant qu'il est un vétéran.

En 2011, lorsque Marc a demandé d’être affecté à une unité interarmées de soutien au personnel au Nouveau-Brunswick en raison de son TSO, ou OSI en anglais, son commandant a demandé: « Qu'est-ce qu'un OSI? »

Un groupe de collègues parlait en mal de Marc, jusqu’à ce qu’un autre soldat du 2e Bataillon du Royal Canadian Regiment, qui avait aussi été détaché à Saint-Jean à l'époque, leur dise qu’ils ne savaient pas comment Marc était vraiment avant, et qu'il avait même reçu le titre de « soldat de l'année ».

Quand j'ai exprimé mes inquiétudes à l'égard de la santé mentale de mon mari à son équipe de santé mentale à la garnison de Saint-Jean, il prenait tellement de médicaments qu'il dormait toute la journée, et qu’il ne faisait que se traîner, de la salle de bains à la table de la cuisine, puis à son lit. Et quand j'ai exprimé mon inquiétude, on m'a répondu qu’il ne faisait de mal à personne dans cet état.

Nos fils disaient: « Maman, pourquoi notre papa ne fait rien avec nous? Pourquoi les autres papas jouent-ils avec leurs enfants? Pourquoi notre papa est différent? ». C'est la meilleure façon de décrire l’impact de cette situation sur notre famille.

Aujourd’hui, quand on entend parler d'un suicide ou d'un autre décès, parce que de nombreux décès sont survenus depuis que des militaires sont revenus, outre ce sentiment de perte, nous vient l'horrible pensée que le gouvernement est heureux après tout, parce qu'il économise ainsi de l’argent.

Il est donc clair que ce que nous faisons à l’heure actuelle ne fonctionne pas.

Je tiens à vous remercier beaucoup de m'avoir donné la parole. Si je n'avais pas eu les connaissances et l'expérience préalables du travail auprès de jeunes à risque, je suis loin d’être sûre que j'aurais eu autant de compréhension et de compassion pour mon mari. Il m’est souvent arrivé de devoir quitter la maison, pour ma sécurité et celle de nos enfants. J'ai pu comprendre que le comportement de Marc était lié au stress. Je savais qu’il ne le faisait pas intentionnellement, mais je devais aussi assurer la sécurité des miens.

C'est vraiment difficile de voir la personne que vous aimez s’enliser, car Marc n'aurait jamais traité personne comme il l'a fait après son diagnostic.

La première année s'est bien passée. Nous avons ensuite été détachés à Saint-Jean, au Québec, et les choses se sont détériorées. Nous avons perdu notre routine, notre principal système de soutien, et le contexte dans lequel nous nous sentions à l'aise. Il avait déjà reçu un diagnostic pour lequel il avait été soigné et il était sur la liste d'attente au Nouveau-Brunswick pour une intervention chirurgicale visant à soigner une cheville fracturée. Nous avons déménagé, et le dossier relatif à sa cheville a disparu, et aucun suivi psychologique de son état n’a été fait. Il n'a pas obtenu d'aide de l'équipe de santé mentale avant que je décide de demander l'aide du Programme de soutien aux familles des militaires, et ce n’est qu’à ce moment que l’équipe a commencé à s’impliquer dans le dossier. Marc a finalement obtenu de l'aide de la base.

J'ai empêché mon mari de s'enlever la vie de nombreuses fois. Il est peut-être de retour en terre canadienne, mais la guerre est revenue avec lui, et elle a causé des ravages dans notre famille. J'ai dû suivre une thérapie prolongée pour le traitement d’un traumatisme, non seulement du fait d'entendre ses histoires mais aussi de vivre avec quelqu'un luttant contre cette blessure, parce qu’un TSO est une blessure, et qu’il doit être traité comme tel. Le simple fait de prescrire des médicaments, selon la méthode que vous choisissez, n’aidera pas quelqu’un à se sentir mieux. Un traumatisme doit être traité pour que la personne qui en est atteinte puisse continuer d’avancer. Il ne faut pas oublier que certaines parties de notre cerveau s'arrêtent en période de stress, et que nos fonctions de base prennent alors le relais. La mémoire à court terme est supprimée.

Notre famille n'a pas connu autant d’épisodes violents, que ce soit en intensité ou en fréquence, depuis que Marc a cessé de prendre les puissants psychotropes qui lui avaient été prescrits. Il subissait tant d'effets secondaires négatifs qu'on lui a prescrit d’autres médicaments pour essayer de contrer ces effets secondaires. Je ne comprends pas pourquoi on prescrit si facilement des médicaments qui ont des effets secondaires de rage, d’épisodes violents et de pensées suicidaires ou meurtrières. Marc n'a pas essayé une seule fois de s’enlever la vie depuis qu'il a cessé de prendre ces médicaments.

(1650)



Toute la famille est touchée par ce traumatisme. Nous avons demandé de l'aide quand nos enfants étaient plus jeunes, et on nous a répondu qu'ils étaient trop jeunes. On ne devrait jamais dire cela, parce que des recherches ont permis d’établir qu’un traumatisme peut même toucher un fœtus.

Aujourd’hui, devant vous, j’aimerais d’abord parler de l'espoir qui existe grâce aux programmes offerts, et de trois d’entre eux en particulier qui ont ramené cet espoir dans nos vies. Le premier est Can Praxis. C’est le travailleur social avec lequel je suivais ma thérapie hebdomadaire pour traumatisme, à la clinique du TSO de Fredericton, qui m’en a d’abord parlé. Nous avons communiqué avec Steve Critchley, l'un des cofondateurs du programme, et nous nous sommes inscrits au programme. Le processus a été si facile, et les résultats ont été étonnants. Nous n'avons pas eu à faire d’interminables démarches pour participer à ce programme. C’est un exercice qui m’a ouvert les yeux, et c’est un peu drôle de dire cela, parce que j'avais les yeux bandés pendant l'exercice qui a été le plus révélateur pour moi.

Je pouvais faire des exercices avec un inconnu que je venais de rencontrer ce week-end là, mais quand venait le temps de faire exactement le même exercice avec mon mari, le cheval ne bougeait pas, étant donné que 90 % de la communication est non verbale, et que le cheval sentait la tension qui existait entre nous, et ne bougeait donc pas. C'était très révélateur. Nous suivions une thérapie de couple depuis 2009 quand nous avons débuté la phase un de Can Praxis en 2015, et nous avons finalement obtenu une solide base d’éléments à travailler.

Le deuxième programme, entré dans nos vies à l'hiver de 2016, a été le programme de transition des anciens combattants. Ce programme a changé nos vies pour le mieux. Il consiste en 100 heures de thérapie étalées sur une période de 10 jours, et c'était la première fois que Marc travaillait à son traumatisme dans le cadre d'un cercle thérapeutique entièrement formé d’hommes. Dire que son gestionnaire de cas l’a presque convaincu de ne pas y aller en raison du coût qu’il jugeait trop élevé. Le programme de transition coûte beaucoup moins cher que d’autres programmes qui ne sont pas aussi efficaces.

Le programme de transition a ensuite mené au programme COPE, conçu pour aider les couples à surmonter tous les jours le TSPT. Le psychologue du programme de transition dirigeait également le programme COPE auquel nous étions inscrits. Cela nous a fait beaucoup de thérapie à seulement quelques mois d’intervalle, et le programme COPE est fondé sur un modèle semblable à celui du programme de transition, c’est-à-dire qu’il faut s’asseoir en cercles thérapeutiques, en tant que couple cette fois, tous ayant reçu un diagnostic de TSPT.

Le programme COPE a révélé la nécessité d'une intervention continue après le cours de cinq jours, et c'est la raison pour laquelle une période de six mois d’accompagnement par un coach de vie fait suite à la phase deux du programme. C’est l’organisme Wounded Warriors Canada qui paie ces programmes. Le niveau de liens sociaux, de compréhension et de compassion entre les couples permet de nouer des amitiés pour la vie et de retrouver ce sentiment d’appartenance à une communauté qui se perd à la libération de l'armée.

C'est pourquoi je dis qu'il doit y avoir un plan. Tous ces programmes ont une structure et un plan mûrement réfléchi et bien conçu. Chaque rendez-vous avec un spécialiste coûte cher. Si aucun plan n’est établi, où nous mènent-ils? Que permettent-ils d’accomplir? Nous devons travailler en équipe pour mieux servir nos anciens combattants et leurs familles. Nous avons besoin d’autres programmes comme Can Praxis, le programme de transition et le programme COPE, et ils doivent se poursuivre jusqu'à ce que les mécanismes enseignés deviennent des habitudes et une composante régulière de la vie quotidienne. La thérapie doit se poursuivre jusqu'à ce que le traumatisme ait été traité. Pour qu'une intervention soit couronnée de succès, il faut un plan. Elle doit être gérée selon le cas, évaluée et rajustée au besoin.

Sans Can Praxis, le programme de transition des anciens combattants et le programme COPE, Marc et moi ne serions pas ensemble, et si nous n'étions pas ensemble, il ne serait pas vivant.

J’aimerais vous laisser sur certains points bien précis. Je vais vous demander de vous rappeler ce que le « s » du TSPT représente. Les gens vivent déjà avec un excès de stress. Que pouvons-nous faire pour soulager ou réduire une partie de ce stress?

Aussi, je vous demande de tenir compte des contraintes financières qui s’ajoutent au stress. Les membres de la famille doivent devenir des aidants. J'ai fait six années d'études postsecondaires, et je ne pouvais pas travailler. Lorsqu'on calcule la perte de revenu qui y est associée, il ne suffit pas de tenir compte du revenu du vétéran. Le conjoint doit parfois renoncer à sa carrière pour devenir un aidant à temps plein, ce qui ne fait qu'aggraver les difficultés financières.

Si je n'avais pas accepté un emploi en décembre, je n’aurais pas été en mesure de venir vous parler aujourd'hui, parce que nous n'aurions tout simplement pas pu assumer les coûts initiaux de ce déplacement.

C'est la même chose pour bon nombre de participants aux programmes payés par des organismes de bienfaisance. Les vétérans ne devraient pas avoir à laisser passer une occasion d’améliorer leur état de santé parce qu'ils ne peuvent pas se le permettre financièrement. Cela me dérange particulièrement et me met un peu en colère quand on pense qu'ils sont gérés par des fournisseurs d’Anciens Combattants, et qu’Anciens Combattants ne paie pas les déplacements.

Les nouveaux vétérans ont des besoins différents, et leurs blessures mentales doivent être prises au sérieux autant que les blessures physiques, parce que les deux sont débilitantes. Pensez seulement à la honte qu’éprouve quelqu’un qui est diagnostiqué et libéré avant la fin de son contrat.

Nous devons travailler à mettre en relief les forces des vétérans, étant donné qu'ils sont déjà pleinement conscients de ce qu'ils ne peuvent pas faire.

Il faut aussi repenser à la façon de formuler les lettres envoyées aux vétérans. Une lettre d'Anciens Combattants Canada peut déclencher d’autres traumatismes pour les familles. Marc a été blessé à bord d’un véhicule blindé léger dans le cadre d’une patrouille en Afghanistan. Nous avons reçu une lettre d'Anciens Combattants Canada dans laquelle nous avons appris que, même s’ils reconnaissent qu'il a subi des blessures en période de service, celle-ci n'est pas liée au service régulier. Je ne comprends pas comment de telles phrases peuvent être formulées.

(1655)



Les vétérans ne devraient jamais se faire dire qu'ils doivent être stabilisés avant le début de leur traitement. Nous devons aider les gens dans leurs périodes de crise, quand ils ont le plus besoin de nous. Pourquoi attendre que l’état de quelqu'un s'améliore avant de l’aider? Anciens Combattants Canada ne tient compte que de l’état du vétéran au moment de l'évaluation. Toute personne qui reçoit un diagnostic de problème de santé mentale a des hauts et des bas, mais il faut tenir compte de la situation globale de la personne. Il faut écouter davantage la famille et les conjoints, pour se faire un portrait plus précis, plutôt que de se fier au temps passé dans des bureaux avec des professionnels.

Je tiens à vous remercier encore une fois et je vous invite à prendre 10 minutes pour écouter l’allocution du psychologue Hector Garcia, sur TED, au sujet de la nécessité, si l’on entraîne des soldats pour la guerre, de les préparer aussi à rentrer au pays. Pensez à tout le temps, à l'argent, aux efforts et aux ressources que le Canada consacre aux membres des Forces canadiennes en service. Qu'avons-nous fait pour eux depuis qu'ils sont rentrés au pays?

Le président:

Merci Stephanie de nous avoir livré cet excellent témoignage. Comme le temps presse, je dois restreindre les interventions à environ quatre minutes chacun, pour que nous puissions terminer à temps. Nous allons commencer par M. Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci monsieur le président, et merci madame Thomas, d'être venue aujourd'hui et d'avoir eu le courage de nous parler. Sans plus tarder, je ne sais pas par où commencer, mais je vais vous poser rapidement quelques questions. Si vous ne vous sentez pas capable d’y répondre, n’hésitez pas à le dire.

Votre mari a servi en Afghanistan. Au sein de ce comité, nous avons notamment parlé d’un médicament antipaludique. Ce médicament a-t-il été prescrit à votre mari, et l’a-t-il pris?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

On lui a prescrit, et il lui est arrivé de le prendre.

M. Robert Kitchen:

A-t-il ressenti des effets secondaires?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Il en a ressenti initialement en période de service. Le médicament l’empêchait de bien dormir en période de service. Ai-je le droit de dire cela?

M. Robert Kitchen:

Tout à fait.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je sais, mais il a été libéré depuis, vous savez? On l'a remercié.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Encore une fois, si vous estimez être en violation de la protection du droit à la vie privée, n’hésitez pas à le signaler. Quand il prenait les médicaments qui lui avaient été prescrits selon vous, combien en prenait-il?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je ne suis pas sûre de la quantité qu'il prenait, mais je sais qu'il disait faire des cauchemars horribles et qu’il avait de la difficulté à dormir en période de service. Il avait donc l’impression de manquer davantage de sommeil. Comme il était dans l'infanterie, il ne dormait pas toujours dans les meilleures conditions.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Non, ils ne dorment pas dans les endroits les plus beaux et les plus confortables, comme on le sait.

Vous étiez ici plus tôt aujourd'hui pour nos présentations précédentes, et vous avez entendu parler de deux programmes et de quelques autres. Je n'avais pas entendu parler de Can Praxis. C'était donc nouveau pour moi. Pourriez-vous nous en dire plus à ce sujet?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Can Praxis est une méthode d’hippothérapie. Le programme comporte trois phases. Dans la première phase, votre conjoint et vous devez rencontrer je ne me souviens pas combien d'autres couples, mais le premier jour, tous les conjoints se réunissent et les vétérans travaillent séparément. Vous travaillez avec des chevaux et des parcours d'obstacles.

Steve Critchley est médiateur et Jim Marland est psychologue. Ils travaillent avec nous à travers ces parcours d'obstacles et insistent sur la communication. Ce qui est étonnant, c'est que vous êtes là et qu’on vous répète que vous n’avez rien de brisé, mais que vous êtes simplement blessé, et que vos efforts en valent la peine. Je ne saurais même pas vous dire le nombre de fois où on nous a dit qu’on en valait la peine.

On nous explique aussi que si une personne blessée saute à pieds joints dans un tas de fumier, elle ne sera pas la seule à se faire éclabousser. C'est la raison pour laquelle le programme fait appel à la participation de la famille en entier, puisque le vétéran n’est pas le seul à être touché par cette situation.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Le mot-clic #SickNotWeak concerne essentiellement ce dont vous venez de parler. Les questions d'identité et de perte d'identité sont deux des choses dont nous avons entendu parler et dont j’ai aussi parlé plus tôt. Je vous ai entendu dire qu'il avait été initialement ostracisé, et c’est un autre aspect qui est souvent revenu dans certains des témoignages. Pourriez-vous nous parler rapidement, puisque le temps nous presse, de la perte d'identité et de ses répercussions?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Une journée, vous faites partie d’une famille, et du jour au lendemain, vous en êtes expulsé. C'est terminé. Tout va bien dans votre vie, vous êtes au service de votre pays, puis tout d'un coup, vous n’êtes tout simplement plus assez bon. Vous vous remettez alors en question. Vous ne pouvez plus travailler à cause de vos blessures physiques. Vous vous sentez inutile pour votre famille. Vous tentez de mettre fin à vos jours, en vous disant que votre famille sera mieux sans vous. Vous perdez votre raison d’être. Vous avez servi dans l'armée pendant dix-huit ans et demi, et vous n’arrivez pas à croire que vous n’avez pas réussi à terminer votre contrat.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Madame Lockhart.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci, madame Thomas, d'être venue aujourd'hui. Nous nous sommes rencontrés pour la première fois à une table ronde des anciens combattants à Hampton. Vous en aviez entendu parler et vous aviez communiqué avec nous pour voir si vous pouviez venir. Je pense que ce fut probablement une très bonne chose, non seulement pour notre table ronde, mais aussi pour la journée d’aujourd'hui.

Vous avez parlé du centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires, et vous avez également entendu les témoignages d’aujourd’hui. Avez-vous observé des améliorations? Comment avez-vous eu accès à ces services? Pourriez-vous nous en parler?

(1700)

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

J'ai eu accès aux services pendant que mon mari était toujours en service. Marc a été libéré en 2012, et les services ne sont plus offerts une fois que vous avez été libéré. Je siégeais au conseil d'administration du CRFM à Montréal à cette époque. J'ai dû démissionner du conseil, et nous ne pouvions plus recevoir les services du centre.

Pendant qu’il était en service, les services offerts étaient formidables. J'ai eu recours aux services de l'agente de liaison avec les familles, j'allais d’ailleurs en parler, et elle m'a beaucoup aidée. C'était agréable de pouvoir rencontrer des gens qui comprenaient notre situation. J'ai consulté des psychologues civils qui ne comprenaient tout simplement pas. Pouvoir profiter d’un tel niveau de compréhension et de compassion a été précieux pour notre famille. Nous avons utilisé les services de garde d'enfants. Nous avons utilisé de nombreux services pendant qu'il servait dans cette unité.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Est-ce que cela faisait partie de votre recommandation ou de votre travail que ces services soient maintenant offerts aux anciens combattants? En êtes-vous satisfaite?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je suis très heureuse que cette mesure ait été élargie aux familles.

Je ne connais pas très bien la hiérarchie militaire. C'est quelque chose que je n'ai jamais... Quelqu'un est venu parler pendant une réunion de notre conseil d'administration et je me suis levée en pleurant, parce que c'était la première fois qu’on me disait que je n’aurais plus accès à tous les services que j’utilisais. La réunion n’a pu se poursuivre, parce qu’il n’y avait plus quorum après mon départ. J’ai été trop émotive. Je ne pouvais plus rester.

Je suis très heureuse que ce soit maintenant...

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Bien.

Vous avez parlé notamment du coût initial d’accès à certains services, qui font obstacle à cet accès. C’est également ce qu’on nous a dit au sujet du centre de ressources pour les familles des militaires.

Pouvez-vous nous donner des exemples des obstacles auxquels votre famille a été confrontée?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Oui. Je n'ai pas pu continuer à travailler. Mon mari a eu son diagnostic après 2006. Il est l’un des nouveaux vétérans. Il a eu le paiement forfaitaire. Quand il a reçu le sien, il travaillait à temps plein, et je pouvais encore travailler. Quand il a commencé à ne recevoir que sa pension, chaque fois que je retournais au travail pour augmenter notre revenu familial, il essayait de se blesser. J'ai donc dû demeurer à la maison pour m’occuper de lui. Nous ne vivions que de sa pension. Nous avons dû vendre notre maison au Québec parce que nous ne pouvions plus la payer. Nous voulions nous rapprocher de la famille au Nouveau-Brunswick, mais nous ne pouvions plus payer notre maison au Québec.

Quand nous n'avions pas l'argent nécessaire pour accéder à des programmes comme COPE ou Can Praxis, les gens nous en prêtaient pour nous permettre de payer le coût initial et nous les remboursions quand nous avions l’argent.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Même si ce sont des services approuvés par l'entremise d'Anciens Combattants Canada.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Ce ne sont pas des services approuvés par le ministère des Anciens Combattants, mais les fournisseurs le sont. Ils font tous deux l’objet d’études. C'est ce qui se passe en ce moment, si j’ai bien compris. Les psychologues et les travailleurs sociaux qui les dirigent sont tous des fournisseurs certifiés d’Anciens Combattants Canada.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Les choses ont-elles changé en ce qui concerne les services pour vos enfants? Avez-vous pu avoir accès à des services suffisants pour vos enfants?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Notre gestionnaire de cas approuve désormais les services d’aide psychologique pour nos enfants, oui. Ils ont maintenant six et sept ans. Quand j'ai commencé à chercher, ils étaient plus jeunes. Cela fait maintenant deux ans qu'ils reçoivent des services.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Malheureusement, mon temps est écoulé.

Le président:

Madame Mathyssen

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci beaucoup, madame Thomas. Je vous remercie de votre témoignage. Je pense que ce que vous aviez à dire permet de comprendre bien des choses. Votre témoignage a été clair et révélateur.

Je tiens tout d’abord à remercier votre mari pour son service, et je vous remercie aussi de l'aimer.

Vous avez dit des choses très troublantes. Vous pourriez sûrement nous en dire plus long à ce sujet. J’ai assisté à une conférence sur la santé mentale, et on y a parlé du fait que nous insistons pour classer les gens et qualifier leurs blessures et leurs problèmes de santé mentale, plutôt que de nous attaquer à leur traumatisme. Vous avez parlé de l’importance de traiter le traumatisme, plutôt que de prescrire toutes sortes de médicaments qui ont un effet débilitant sur la personne. Évidemment, c'est un aspect très important.

Pouvez-vous parler de la différence que cela aurait fait pour vous et votre famille de pouvoir compter sur cette compréhension de base?

(1705)

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je pense que cela aurait eu un impact énorme sur nous. Une fois le traumatisme traité, les déclencheurs n’ont pas un effet aussi grave. Il aurait eu le temps... J’ai l’impression que s'il avait suivi une thérapie qui traite le traumatisme, nous n'aurions pas vécu la même expérience. Je n'aurais peut-être pas eu besoin d’une thérapie aussi longue, parce qu'il n'aurait pas été aussi traumatisant pour nous tous si son traumatisme avait été traité en premier lieu.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

J'ai trouvé absolument ahurissant qu'un commandant vous demande ce qu’était un OSI. Cela me semble être une réaction très destructrice. Estimez-vous, selon votre expérience, qu'il y a un manque de sensibilisation de la part des membres de la chaîne de commandement?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Nous étions postés à Saint-Jean, donc nous étions à l'école de Saint-Jean, et je crois que le même niveau de compréhension n'était pas là. Si nous avions été encore à Gagetown, je pense qu'il y aurait eu un autre niveau de compréhension. C’était peut-être aussi un problème de langue. Je ne suis pas sûre. Si l’expression française avait été utilisée, je crois que c'est TSO, cela aurait peut-être été différent... Je ne sais pas si c'était un problème de langue ou non.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Il y a tout de même des lacunes.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Il y en a, c’est sûr.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Certains conjoints nous ont dit qu'ils ne savaient pas comment réagir face à un conjoint blessé, qu'ils ne savaient pas à quoi s'attendre ni comment composer avec la blessure. Ils ont demandé une formation et un soutien. Seriez-vous en faveur d’une formation et d’un soutien? Pensez-vous que cela serait utile?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Tout à fait, j'ai pu bénéficier d'un cours 101 à la clinique pour TSO de Fredericton. J'ai suivi quelques cours. J'ai également des connaissances en psychologie. J'ai un diplôme en psychologie, donc cela m'a vraiment aidée à comprendre.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord. Vous avez dit que la gestionnaire de cas essayait de décourager votre mari de suivre le programme de transition des vétérans en raison du coût. Est-ce que les coûts et l'argent sont un frein à l'aide aux anciens combattants et à leurs familles?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Oui, quand quelque chose se produisait et qu'on téléphonait pour savoir si mon mari pouvait être autorisé à faire appel à un service, le commentaire qu'on obtenait était qu'on ne cherchait qu'à obtenir plus d'argent.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Au lieu d'admettre la réalité de sa blessure?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Oui. Mon mari était au centre de traitement de Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue. Il a suivi ce programme de stabilisation et de réadaptation en résidence. Il avait suivi beaucoup de programmes et cela ne l'empêchait pas d'essayer de se blesser lui-même. Il voyait différents psychologues et en changeait sans cesse parce que ces derniers ne semblaient pas adopter la bonne perspective. Au lieu de travailler en équipe, chacun blâmait mon mari: « Pourquoi rien ne marche avec vous? Qu'est-ce qui ne va pas chez vous? Posons un nouveau diagnostic. »

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

L'automutilation aurait dû être un signal, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Oui.

Le président:

Monsieur Fraser, c'est à vous.

M. Colin Fraser:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Madame Thomas, je vous remercie infiniment d'être venue aujourd'hui pour nous faire part de votre histoire. Je sais que nous vous sommes tous reconnaissants de votre courage à vous présenter aujourd'hui. Cela nous aidera beaucoup à formuler des recommandations au ministère et, je l'espère, à régler certains de ces problèmes.

Je veux aborder un sujet dont divers témoins nous ont parlé au cours de notre étude, soit le soutien par les pairs. Des anciens combattants ou d'anciens membres ont été mis en rapport avec des anciens combattants pour aider ces derniers à se sentir mieux face à eux-mêmes et à leur situation; ils leur expliquaient des choses que peut-être seule une personne qui en avait fait l'expérience était en mesure de comprendre.

Vous en avez parlé un peu quand il a été question des autres familles de militaire à qui vous avez parlé. Avez-vous des recommandations ou des réflexions quant à ce que le soutien par les pairs aurait permis d'accomplir à l'étape de transition, qui aurait pu aider votre mari ou votre famille, si vous aviez été repérés et appariés à des gens qui avaient vécu des expériences similaires?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je pense... si le suivi devait vraiment être assuré. Il a fallu un peu de temps à mon mari pour se rendre compte que les gens du programme SSBSO étaient des pairs qui avaient eu eux aussi des problèmes. Il avait essayé de bénéficier du service, mais personne ne l'avait rappelé. Je crois que le suivi aurait sans doute beaucoup aidé.

Il doit également y avoir une relation interpersonnelle, parce que tout le monde n'est pas fait pour s'entendre. C'est dans la nature humaine, et c'est correct. Parfois, vous vous liez plus facilement avec une personne en particulier, mais le soutien par les pairs serait très utile. Ce qui fonctionne pour moi ne fonctionnera pas nécessairement pour ma tante. Nous sommes tous différents.

(1710)

M. Colin Fraser:

Bien. Est-ce qu'il y a du soutien par les pairs qui est organisé de manière formelle pour les membres de la famille? Existe-t-il une organisation qui fait cela? Aidez-moi à comprendre comment cela pourrait fonctionner pour les membres de la famille également.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Il y a le SSBSO, qui est un soutien social aux personnes qui ont une blessure liée au stress opérationnel, offert tant aux familles qu'aux anciens combattants. Cela a finalement marché pour moi au Nouveau-Brunswick. J'ai essayé d'en bénéficier à Québec, mais une anglophone qui vit à Québec n'y trouve pas son compte.

M. Colin Fraser:

En ce qui concerne l'accès aux services, plus tôt dans la journée, nous avons eu une présentation des Services aux familles des militaires sur une série de services en ligne qui sont disponibles. Avez-vous accès à des services en ligne et avez-vous un commentaire sur ces services qui permettraient de les améliorer afin de faciliter les choses pour les familles?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Les services auxquels j'ai accès en ligne sont les groupes privés organisés par COPE et Can Praxis. On y trouve des forums et des groupes de discussion privés. Ce sont des gens avec qui j'ai fait un peu de traumatologie, avec qui j'ai noué une relation profonde. Je ne connais pas ceux dont elle a parlé aujourd'hui.

M. Colin Fraser:

Quand on met l'accent sur le s dans ESPT, je crois qu'on met le doigt sur le stress vécu par les membres qui sont en transition du service actif à une libération. Je pense que vous êtes tombée juste.

Étant donné le stress subi et l'incidence que cela peut avoir sur la famille, avez-vous d'autres recommandations à formuler que nous pourrions présenter dans un rapport afin d'aider à soulager une partie du stress dès le début de la libération d'un membre en service? Il me semble que le stress est immense au début et que ça ne fait qu'empirer par la suite. Vous êtes en présence d'une personne qui perd son identité peut-être et, évidemment, il y a les questions de santé mentale qui entrent en jeu et, peut-être, la médication. Toutes ces choses sont aggravées par les problèmes financiers également. Y a-t-il une façon pour nous d'intervenir avant que toutes ces sources de stress ne se combinent?

Le président:

Je m'excuse, mais vous allez devoir donner une réponse rapide.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je pense que les gens doivent savoir au moment de leur libération qu'ils ne recevront pas de paie pendant un bout de temps. Ça aiderait. Également, ce serait bien d'avoir des services psychologiques pour tout le monde.

M. Colin Fraser:

Immédiatement.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Oui, immédiatement.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Bratina, c'est à vous.

M. Bob Bratina:

Je vous remercie.

Y a-t-il des jours où ça va mieux? Est-ce que le bon vieux temps réapparaît, ou tout cela est-il disparu pour de bon?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

C'est plus fréquent maintenant qu'il a suivi deux fois le programme de transition des vétérans. Il l'a suivi une première fois en tant que vétéran et la seconde fois, ce fut en tant que paraprofessionnel mettant en relation les anciens combattants récents et les professionnels de la santé. Il a également suivi COPE et Can Praxis. Depuis, il a cessé la médication, et vous le constatez dans son regard. Les gens en font la remarque. Donc, certains jours sont mieux que d'autres.

M. Bob Bratina:

Une partie du vieux Marc est encore là.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Ça commence à revenir.

M. Bob Bratina:

Ça doit beaucoup vous toucher. Est-ce que vous êtes en mesure de prévoir les mauvaises séances?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Habituellement, c'est déclenché par l'arrivée d'une lettre des Anciens Combattants, l'annonce d'un nouveau suicide. Nous avons dû découvrir quels sont ces déclics. La douche à la maison est un déclic. S'il doit prendre sa douche, c'est un élément de stress. On ne peut faire fonctionner les éventails de plafond parce que ça lui rappelle les hélicoptères. Il y a des choses que nous avons dû découvrir pour ensuite s'en débarrasser dans la maison.

M. Bob Bratina:

Pensez-vous qu'on aurait pu vous aider d'une manière ou d'une autre pour prévoir ces choses? Est-ce que vous avez eu à apprendre tout cela au fur et à mesure?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

C'est possible d'y arriver avec l'aide d'une équipe de psychologues motivés et si quelqu'un établit un bon historique de son trauma et travaille vraiment sur ce traumatisme, au lieu de simplement offrir une psychothérapie, laquelle peut prendre beaucoup de temps. C'est seulement lorsque les gens ont fouillé son histoire que nous avons été en mesure de cerner quelques-uns des problèmes.

M. Bob Bratina:

À quelle fréquence diriez-vous que vous réussissez à vous asseoir avec une autre épouse ou d'autres femmes qui vivent cette expérience afin de simplement avoir des échanges sur le sujet?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Là où j'habite, j'ai deux grandes amies dont le mari a servi dans l'armée et qui souffre de l'ESPT. Nous essayons de nous retrouver le plus souvent possible pour promener nos chiens. Il arrive que ce soit une fois par semaine et d'autres fois, nous passons tout un mois sans nous voir. Ça dépend des circonstances et de nos horaires.

(1715)

M. Bob Bratina:

Nous entendons la même chose de la part des anciens combattants. On nous parle de sports et d'éducation physique, du fait qu'ils forment des équipes et de simplement se réunir. Donc, c'est aussi important pour vous.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Oui, parce que d'autres ne comprennent tout simplement pas. C'est bon d'avoir des gens qui écoutent sans porter de jugement.

M. Bob Bratina:

Est-ce que vos enfants commencent à mieux comprendre? Comment ça se passe pour eux maintenant?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Ça va mieux maintenant que Marc a mis le doigt sur ce qu'il doit changer. Le programme de transition des vétérans est d'une durée initiale de 10 jours étalés sur trois fins de semaine. La première fin de semaine, les choses ont tout de suite changé avec nos enfants, mais pour nous, pas vraiment; c'était pire. La deuxième semaine, ça allait vraiment mieux entre nous, et ensuite avec les enfants. Ça lui a permis de constater qu'il n'est pas seul et qu'il est toujours un bon père. Les choses s'améliorent, mais c'est difficile. Nous disons que papa a une tête vide et que l'on ne peut voir toutes les blessures qui s'y trouvent.

M. Bob Bratina:

Parce qu'ils devraient être conscients que leur père est un héros. Il a servi son pays.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je trouve que Marc et beaucoup d'anciens combattants de la dernière heure ont beaucoup de difficulté à accepter ce mot. Il est dur à avaler, pour eux. Il n'a pas encore ses plaques d'immatriculation de vétéran parce qu'il n'en est pas encore là.

M. Bob Bratina:

N'est-ce pas là une partie du problème...

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

En effet.

M. Bob Bratina:

... l'estime de soi qui n'est plus là?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Ils mettent l'accent sur toutes les mauvaises choses et disent qu'ils auraient pu faire les choses de manière différente et que s'ils avaient fait ceci, si, si, si...

M. Bob Bratina:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Madame Wagantall, c'est à vous.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Je vous remercie beaucoup, madame Thomas. Rien de ce que je pourrais dire ne saurait exprimer ma reconnaissance.

Je dois poser une ou deux questions de plus sur la méfloquine. C'est devenu un assez gros problème chez les anciens combattants.

Avez-vous eu le choix quant au médicament antipaludique qu'il pouvait prendre?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Non, je ne crois pas.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

D'accord.

J'ai l'impression, et je l'ai déjà entendu ailleurs, que vous devez le prendre si vous ne voulez pas être réprimandé. Donc, le choix consiste à désobéir à leur insu et à sauver les apparences. Est-ce exact?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

C'est exact.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

De ce que vous avez dit, je retiens la phrase où vous dites que les médicaments ne guérissent pas les traumas. Nous avons un problème avec la surmédication dans notre pays, sans parler de ce qui est arrivé à nos soldats et aux anciens combattants. Comment a-t-il mis un terme à sa médication? Je sais que les psychiatres ne veulent pas...

On m'a parlé de cas où on ne cessait de donner des médicaments, sans vouloir aider à arrêter. Donc, comment ça s'est fait?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Nous avons trouvé un psychiatre qui croit en la médecine douce.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Quelle est l'alternative?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Il prend un anxiolytique. C'est le seul médicament d'ordonnance qu'il prend. Cependant, il a eu du soutien. Nous avons consulté un naturopathe et il a été hospitalisé le temps de cesser sa médication. Il a essayé le nabilone pendant un certain temps pour l'aider à s'arrêter, et ensuite il a cessé cela aussi. Il n'aimait pas cela; il ne veut rien avoir à faire avec ça.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Ce psychiatre était très brave de s'atteler à la tâche.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Oui.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Des représentants du programme de transition des vétérans ont témoigné devant nous. C'est un service incroyable. Interrogé sur la question, le témoin a fait observer que les professionnels coûtent cher...

Mme Stéphanie Thomas: En effet, c'est étonnant. Oui.

Mme Cathay Wagantall: ... mais ils en valent la peine. Avez-vous des observations au sujet de tout cela?

Il est évident que je suis plus que conservatrice bien souvent. Je vais mettre de l'argent de côté et me retrouver à devoir dépenser encore plus. J'ai vraiment l'impression que c'est ce que l'on fait avec nos anciens combattants: le budget de départ par rapport aux coûts constants ne cesse de diminuer et ne tient pas compte du coût des médicaments.

Mme Stéphanie Thomas: Oui, exactement.

Mme Cathay Wagantall: Aimeriez-vous dire quelque chose à ce sujet?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Ce serait merveilleux qu'il y ait des psychologues partout au pays qui aient ce système de croyances, ce qui ne nous obligerait pas à payer leurs déplacements partout au pays pour offrir un programme. Je dis cela parce qu'ils ne sont autorisés à exercer à l'extérieur de leur province de pratique qu'un certain nombre de fois. Donc, ce fantastique psychologue ne peut venir qu'une ou deux fois par année. Ce serait merveilleux que les psychologues et les équipes de soins en santé mentale qui s'occupent des anciens combattants reçoivent cette formation.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Cela s'applique sûrement dans notre cas. Nous avons des circonscriptions rurales où les anciens combattants ne sont pas en mesure d'obtenir l'aide dont ils ont besoin et doivent se déplacer pour l'obtenir.

Je vous remercie infiniment. Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Eyolfson, je suppose que vous partagez le temps qui vous est alloué. Vous avez donc une minute et demie à votre disposition.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Je vous remercie de votre présence. Je ne peux m'imaginer ce que vous avez traversé. Je salue votre courage de vous présenter pour raconter votre histoire. Je sais que de voir l'être aimé vivre une telle expérience doit être tout simplement épouvantable.

Vous avez parlé du programme de transition des vétérans. Combien de temps après sa libération Marc a-t-il commencé à y prendre part?

(1720)

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Marc a été libéré en août 2012. Il a débuté le programme à l'hiver, donc en janvier 2016. C'est tout nouveau pour nous; nous y participons depuis un an.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Est-ce qu'on vous avait mis au courant à l'époque?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Non.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Comment l'avez-vous appris?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

C'est mon mari qui l'a trouvé. C'est quelque chose qui, je pense, lui a aidé un peu plus. J'avais dû quitter pour des raisons de sécurité et il cherchait de l'aide pour lui et il est tombé là-dessus par hasard et s'est inscrit au programme.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Il a simplement découvert cela par hasard. On dirait que personne ne s'est donné la peine de l'informer que c'était disponible.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Non, en effet.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Dites-moi si ma question vous met mal à l'aise. Elle est quelque peu personnelle, peut-être trop personnelle. Quand quelqu'un s'engage dans l'armée, toute sa famille va dans l'armée et, par conséquent, je vous demande si, pour votre propre santé mentale, vous avez personnellement fini par recevoir un soutien psychologique ou un traitement pendant toute cette démarche?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Oui, j'ai peut-être parlé trop vite. J'ai suivi une longue thérapie à la clinique pour TSO à Fredericton.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Bien, pardonnez-moi; je n'avais pas compris cela.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Oui, c'est moi qui y allais pour moi-même.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

D'accord, bien.

Est-ce que ce service vous a aidée?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Ça m'a beaucoup aidée, oui en effet.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Bien, je vous remercie.

Je passe le micro à mon collègue.

Le président: Bien, monsieur Graham, c'est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai quelques questions qui n'ont pas vraiment de liens entre elles.

Pour la première, je vous dis moi aussi que vous devez vous sentir libre de répondre, ou non. Vous dites que le nom de votre mari est Marc. Que pense-t-il de votre présence ici, aujourd'hui, et comment réagit-il?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Il est fier de moi et il m'a dit de déclarer tout ce que je voulais dire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Votre réponse est très bonne.

Je siège au Comité depuis une semaine à peine, donc j'en apprends beaucoup à ce sujet très rapidement. Beaucoup de témoins ont parlé du fait que le camp d'entraînement vous transforme en soldat et que, quand vous quittez l'armée, rien n'est prévu pour vous rendre à la société civile.

À votre avis, quand Marc est rentré de la guerre, quel aurait été le processus parfait? Il aurait eu le traumatisme; il aurait eu ces expériences. Quel est le bon moyen que, dans un monde parfait, nous adopterions afin de le transmettre? Je sais que la question est difficile.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

À mon avis, l'aide initiale aurait été importante. Il a obtenu des médicaments psychiatriques assez vite après que je l'aie pressé de trouver de l'aide, parce que tout de suite j'ai su qu'il y avait un problème. Mais, c'était beaucoup de peur. Ils ont été entraînés. Ils savent comment réussir ces tests qu'on leur fait subir pour connaître leur état de santé psychologique. Ils savent quoi dire pour, disons, obtenir de l'aide. Mais il est allé chercher de l'aide tout de suite, donc, au départ, il a obtenu une médication.

Je crois qu'il faut s'occuper du traumatisme immédiatement, au lieu d'attendre que quelque chose arrive, qu'on lui propose de prendre un verre et de se réunir entre eux. Ça ne va rien régler.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bien. Vous avez également mentionné le coût du programme de transition des vétérans. Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée des dépenses que vous avez vous-même engagées au cours des quatre dernières années pour prendre soin de lui? Je sais que la question n'est pas facile. Je crois que c'est important de le porter au procès-verbal.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je ne pense pas être en mesure de vous donner un chiffre approximatif, parce que nous avons payé un naturopathe. Ce n'est pas assuré. Les coûts pour les neurotransmetteurs, les suppléments, ne sont pas assurés. Je ne serais même pas en mesure de mettre un chiffre. Je m'excuse.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce serait un gros chiffre.

Mme Stephanie Thomas: Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Je vous remercie, je vous suis reconnaissant.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Brassard, c'est à vous.

M. John Brassard:

Madame Thomas, je vous remercie, vous et votre famille, d'être là. J'ai l'impression que vous et Marc formez une très bonne équipe et je soupçonne qu'il nous écoute à la maison. Je vais donc vous remercier pour le service rendu à votre pays, Marc.

Je veux parler de nouveau de la méfloquine. D'abord, est-ce qu'on lui a dit quels étaient les effets secondaires de la méfloquine?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je ne peux pas vous répondre, je ne sais pas.

M. John Brassard:

D'accord.

Vous ne savez rien au sujet du consentement éclairé, du fait qu'il l'ait signé ou non?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je ne sais rien.

M. John Brassard:

Peut-être que c'est une information qu'il pourrait nous communiquer à une date ultérieure.

Avec les médicaments concoctés, les produits pharmaceutiques qu'il prenait, est-ce que la marihuana médicinale a été une option dans son cas?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Oui.

M. John Brassard:

Quelle différence avez-vous constaté entre le mélange de médicaments qu'il prenait et la marihuana médicinale?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

La marihuana médicinale était meilleure, mais cela aussi a dû sortir de la maison. Tout récemment, il a essayé la vaseline liquide et je ne sais pas pourquoi, mais je vois une différence plus grande avec la vaseline liquide qu'avec...

M. John Brassard:

Bien. Parce qu'il y a des méthodes différentes. Il y a des crèmes et il y a des huiles. Est-ce que vous savez combien de grammes on lui aurait prescrits?

(1725)

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je ne sais pas. Il ne l'a pas utilisée très souvent parce que cette pratique est stigmatisée. Il ne voulait pas cela. Nous avons fait du bénévolat dans la communauté. Il ne voulait pas que quelqu'un..., que ce soit sur la place publique, et qu'on lui dise « mince alors, désolé, Marc. »

M. John Brassard:

C'est important, parce que nous parlons de nouveau, madame Thomas, de l'ESPT, des traumatismes liés au stress. Une des choses que nous avons découvertes au cours des dernières années, c'est que plusieurs des personnes en souffrance essaient d'arrêter les opioïdes. Elles essaient d'arrêter le mélange de médicaments, parce qu'elles trouvent que la marihuana médicinale, sous quelque forme que ce soit, qu'on la fume, sous forme liquide, sous forme de beurre, ou peu importe, leur redonne le goût de vivre.

J'aime aller promener le chien... Vous êtes en relation, je soupçonne, avec beaucoup d'autres épouses. Que pensez-vous, après avoir parlé à ces autres personnes, de l'expérience d'un mélange de pilules, par opposition à d'autres traitements, que ce soit la naturopathie ou autre chose?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je ne sais pas si je comprends bien la question. Est-ce que vous vous demandez s'ils adoptent la même méthode que nous?

M. John Brassard:

En effet. Est-ce qu'ils suivent la même voie que vous? Savez-vous s'ils prennent de la marihuana médicinale, etc.?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Certains l'ont essayée, d'autres sont tout à fait contre. C'est quelque chose qui n'a jamais fait partie de leur vie. Ils n'en ont jamais fait l'expérience.

M. John Brassard:

Bien.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

C'est de franchir le pas que de la considérer comme un médicament. Une fois que vous êtes dans l'armée, c'est tout à fait interdit, donc il s'agit de modifier sa structure mentale.

M. John Brassard:

En effet.

Une des choses, encore une fois, c'est qu'il y a une grosse différence entre le récréatif et le médicinal.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je sais, c'est ce que j'ai dit à mon mari.

M. John Brassard:

Également, une des choses que l'on constate, ce n'est pas comme si les soldats souffrant de stress post-traumatique ou de traumatisme lié au stress opérationnel s'asseyaient autour du feu pour fumer un joint. Ils l'utilisent parce qu'ils y trouvent une forme de soulagement de leurs symptômes par la suite.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Madame Mathyssen, vous avez les deux dernières minutes.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je vous remercie beaucoup. Je vous en sais gré.

J'ai une une ou deux questions. Des choses que j'ai découvertes en parlant aux anciens combattants, c'est qu'un vétéran doit consulter un psychiatre pour tirer profit du traitement et du soutien et que les psychiatres ont toujours recours aux opioïdes, les drogues fortes. Un vétéran qui ne consulte pas un psychiatre a des ennuis. Le psychiatre qui ne croit pas dans les thérapies douces est un problème. Est-ce que cela a été votre expérience et celle de Marc?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

En effet, jusqu'à ce qu'on trouve un psychiatre hors du commun. Nous étions à l'hôpital parce qu'il avait tenté de se mutiler et nous avons rencontré un psychiatre différent qui avait une perspective autre et qui était prêt à l'essayer. J'ai été très inflexible. J'avais imprimé tout ce qui concernait chacun de ses médicaments, avec leurs effets secondaires. Je disais que je ne voulais plus que mon mari prenne cela.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

En ce qui concerne la marihuana médicinale, quand elle est prescrite, est-ce qu'on vous parle de ses constituants? C'est la partie médicinale, et je ne me rappelle pas de l'acronyme.

M. John Brassard:

C'est le THC.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Oui, et alors il y a l'hallucinogène. On sait que le composant médicinal ou thérapeutique est disponible. Est-ce que quelqu'un vous en a déjà parlé?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

C'est le nabilone. C'est ce qu'a essayé le psychiatre. C'est une formule sous ordonnance.

On a dû enclencher une démarche pour le faire approuver, parce que ça ne l'était pas. Il y a eu toute la démarche par le psychiatre, ce qui a pris beaucoup de son temps. La pharmacie était occupée à remplir formule après formule pour les Anciens Combattants et la Croix Bleue afin d'obtenir leur approbation.

Également, bien que ça ait été approuvé pour Marc, cela ne va pas aider quelqu'un d'autre, ce qui est un aspect frustrant.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord.

Vous dites que Marc a pris de la méfloquine, et qu'il y a eu des effets secondaires négatifs. Est-ce qu'il y avait quelqu'un qui assurait le suivi, qui surveillait le processus ou qui s'assurait de la santé et la sécurité des hommes et des femmes sur le terrain qui prenaient ou qui étaient obligés de prendre la méfloquine; le savez-vous?

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je ne suis pas certaine, je ne sais pas.

Le président:

La ronde des questions est terminée.

J'ai une seule question pour obtenir des éclaircissements. Je pense que quelqu'un vous a demandé la somme d'argent que vous avez payée de votre poche, mais vous n'aviez pas le total. Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée du coût des programmes? Est-ce que c'est 20, 50 ou 1 000 $ de votre poche? Pouvez-vous nous donner un ordre de grandeur afin qu'on ait une idée de ce que représentent les coûts.

(1730)

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Le prix de notre billet d'avion pour aller dans l'Ouest — je vis au Nouveau-Brunswick — variait de 700 à plus de 1 000 $. Également, chaque fois que nous consultions un naturopathe pour obtenir des suppléments, cela nous coûtait de 300 à 400 $ par mois.

Le président:

D'accord, cela nous donne une idée. Si vous pouviez additionner tout cela et nous communiquer le total ou quelque chose au greffier par la suite, nous pourrions l'ajouter à votre témoignage.

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

D'accord.

Le président:

Vous vous êtes très bien débrouillée aujourd'hui, madame Thomas.

Des voix: Bravo!

Mme Stephanie Thomas:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Au nom des membres du Comité, je tiens à vous dire que la séance a été sensationnelle. Je vous remercie, vous et votre famille, pour tout ce que vous avez fait en vue de votre témoignage ici, aujourd'hui.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on February 08, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.