header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-02-13 ACVA 42

Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)):

I would like to call the meeting to order, pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), to resume our study of mental health and suicide prevention among veterans.

Today we have four panel groups. Each has been notified that they can start with up to 10 minutes. Then we'll move to questions.

The four groups consist of the Mental Health Commission of Canada, Mission Butterfly Inc., the Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, and The LifeLine Canada Foundation.

Via video conference, we'll start with Liane Weber of companion paws Canada, and chief executive officer of The LifeLine Canada Foundation.

We'll turn the floor over to you, Liane. Thank you.

Ms. Liane Weber (Chief Executive Officer, Companion Paws Canada, The LifeLine Canada Foundation):

Thank you so much for inviting me to speak with all of you and for allowing me the opportunity to present to you today.

My name is Liane Weber. I am chief executive officer and founder of The LifeLine Canada Foundation, also known as TLC. TLC is a registered non-profit organization in B.C. doing work across Canada and worldwide, with its head office based in West Kelowna.

The foundation is not a crisis hotline. We work on newly developed initiatives, such as the LifeLine mobile app, the free national suicide prevention and awareness app, and companion paws Canada.

TLC was founded in 2015 as an organization committed to reducing the frequency of suicide deaths and attempts across Canada and worldwide, while developing positive mental health initiatives.

I am not a mental heath professional, nor am I a dog trainer in companion paws Canada. I was deeply affected by two suicides in 2012. After overcoming the worst part of my grief, I used my entrepreneurial mindset to create and launch the LifeLine app in 2013.

The app and website offer immediate access to guidance and support for those suffering in crisis and those who have suffered the devastating loss of a loved one from suicide, including veterans and active military personnel, and their families. They provide a wealth of information, awareness education, and prevention strategies to guide people in crisis.

TLC's newest program is called companion paws Canada, which I understand is of most interest to you. We call this CPC. The program is dedicated to supporting veterans, active military, first responders, and seniors in need, while providing a second chance for pets by rescuing, training, and pairing them with those who would benefit from a therapy-certified animal. The concept of companion pets and therapy dogs for veterans is not a new concept. There are organizations across the globe doing exactly this.

Sadly, there are alarming statistics of suicide, family abuse, and post-traumatic stress disorder facing veterans returning to civilian life after military duty. This can cause a downward spiral of apathy, unemployment, broken relationships, addiction, and depression.

It is our belief that companion animals can be the lifesaving therapy or friend that many returning servicemen and servicewomen need. Medical studies have shown that companion animals significantly improve mental and physical health, including by reducing stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms. Individuals with emotionally-based disorders in particular may find it difficult to open up and trust another human being but find this process much easier with a therapy animal.

Companion paws Canada pets are not service dogs or guide dogs. Therapy dogs are trained and tested in therapy obedience. Interaction with a therapy pet provides therapeutic, motivational, emotional, and recreational benefits to enhance quality of life, while a service dog is trained to perform specific tasks that are unusual dog behaviour.

Up until companion paws Canada's new program, a therapy dog was a dog that might only be trained to provide affection and comfort to people in hospitals, retirement homes, nursing homes, schools, hospices, and disaster areas, and to people with autism. With companion paws Canada, these types of dogs are trained and now can live permanently with a veteran in need of a therapy dog.

Through our website, individuals confidentially submit a letter from their doctor or mental heath professional, which is required, as well as a permission letter from their landlord, and proof of ability to pay for costs after placement and to take care of the animal.

The companion paws Canada team interviews each individual to ascertain what he or she is looking for in a therapy animal. We pair this with his or her personality and lifestyle to make the perfect match. We fully expect that they are already covering their bases with regard to talk therapy, medication, and reading up on their illness. By adding a very well-trained dog to their treatment plan, something profound and wonderful begins to percolate. Their ability to cope improves, because they are no longer alone on this painful journey. They have a soulmate in their dog, who is ever loyal and compassionate.

Once a suitable match is selected, the animal will spend the time required in the home of one of our trainers, who teaches the pet intensive therapy obedience and other valuable behaviours needed to live with his or her new owner. During the course of training, the new owner will be introduced to his of her new companion, which will include training sessions together.

(1535)



Companion paws Canada works with physiologists, professional trainers, and behaviourists who identify the best canine candidates. All participating dogs must meet strict guidelines relating to their temperament, health, and age. Once a suitable dog is found, he or she begins a minimum 10-week training period. During that period, the dog is matched with an individual in need and paired with their “forever companion”.

The dogs will come from rescue shelters across the country. They will be between the ages of 2 and 8 years old. Companion paws Canada dogs are common domestic animals that provide therapeutic support through companionship, non-judgmental positive regard, affection, and a focus in life. We are working with rescue dogs and retired service dogs. Certifying one's own personal pet as a companion animal is not part of our program. CPC dogs will not be certified as service animals, as the dogs will be trained as therapy companion animals. However, that may be an obtainable goal with further training.

The strict level of training needed to complete the program, which includes manners, obedience, and socialization, is to the highest standards set by Therapy Dogs International, while the certification exam is performed by accredited therapy dog evaluators.

Our trained coordinator is a professional service dog trainer with decades of experience working with many kinds of service dogs on mental health illnesses such as PTSD, severe depression, anxiety, and autism.

Upon completion and passing of the exam, the new owner will receive a Companion paws Canada therapy dog vest and certificate card for the CPC dog. They will also receive a letter from The LifeLine Canada Foundation showing the authenticity of the therapy dog. The highest standards of training will be carefully monitored to ensure the standard is met across the nation.

There are no laws regulating the term “therapy dog”. The organization responsible for the CPC dog evaluation and certification was approved with permission in a joint ruling by the departments of the solicitor general's office, the Office of Consumer Affairs, Consumer Protection, and Public Safety in Victoria, with outlined expectations.

Dogs can draw out even the most isolated personality, and having to praise the animals can help traumatized veterans overcome emotional numbness. Teaching the dogs commands develops the patient's ability to communicate, and to be assertive but not aggressive, a distinction some struggle with.

Dogs can also calm the hypervigilance that is common in veterans with PTSD. Researchers are accumulating evidence that bonding with dogs has biological effects, such as elevated levels of the hormone oxytocin, the opposite of PTSD symptoms.

With the additional benefits of the companion paws training program, and given the positive effect that this sort of therapy in similar programs across the globe has been shown to deliver, we have chosen to make Companion paws Canada one of our top initiatives.

As for examples of how dogs can help veterans with PTSD, depression, and anxiety, number one is that dogs are vigilant. Anyone who has ever had a nightmare knows that a dog in the room provides information; they immediately let you know if you are really in immediate danger or if you have just had a nightmare. This extra layer of vigilance mimics the buddy system in the military; no soldier, grunt, or sailor is ever alone in the battlefield. The same is true when you have a dog by your side: you are not alone. You can use your mind in searching for data in the environment because you know the dog is doing it for you.

Number two, dogs are protective. Just like the buddy system in the military, someone is there to have your back.

Number three, dogs respond well to authoritative relationships. Many military personnel return from their deployments and have difficulty functioning in their relationships. They are used to giving and getting orders, and this usually doesn't work well in the typical home. I've talked to many servicemen and -women who have been told to knock it off once they get home. Well, dogs love it.

Dogs love unconditionally. Many military personnel return from their deployments and have difficulty adjusting to the civilian world. Sometimes they realize that the skills they've learned and used in the service aren't transferable or respected in the civilian sector. This can be devastating when they were well respected for their position in the military. Dogs don't play any of these games. They just love.

Dogs help people relearn trust. Trust is a big issue in PTSD. It can be very difficult to feel safe in the world after certain experiences, and being able to trust the immediate environment can take time. Dogs help heal by being trustworthy.

Dogs help to remember feelings of love. The world can look pretty convoluted after war. The love of a very well-trained dog is a friendship and a partnership, but also a medical therapy.

These behaviours are intended to assist veterans with PTSD because the dogs provide support and an increased means of coping with the associated symptoms, such as hypervigilance, fear, nightmares, the fight-or-flight response, and impaired memory.

(1540)



The benefits of having a therapy dog can also include a reduction in required treatment and medication. Dogs can sense when their owner is not doing so well. There's no real command for it, but they respond to emotions and give a little more attention than they normally would.

When vets have a PTSD reaction, their body gets very excited. Their heart starts to race, and they begin breathing very quickly. Petting a dog is naturally relaxing. It slows their heart rate and lowers their blood pressure.

Therapy dogs serve as anchors for veterans and help keep them from having flashbacks to their time in war zones. They can be standing in the middle of a supermarket, but to them it can feel like a combat zone. A therapy dog can help ground the individual and bring them back into reality. Petting the dog and realizing the dog is there, they realize they aren't in a combat zone.

Many veterans are isolated and withdrawn when they return. A therapy dog is a way to reconnect without fear, judgment, or misunderstanding.

I hope I have been of some help to you on how The LifeLine Canada Foundation can be a service provider for veterans and how Companion paws Canada therapy dogs can be lifesavers.

This concludes my presentation. I look forward to answering any questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Weber.

Next we have, from the Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, Ms. Hale, the director of the operational stress injury clinic, and Mr. Merali, the president and chief executive officer of the Royal's Institute of Mental Health Research. Welcome, and thank you for coming today.

Ms. Shelley Hale (Director, Operational Stress Injury Clinic, Royal Ottawa Health Care Group):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair, members of the committee, ladies and gentlemen. Thank you for the opportunity to speak with you this afternoon.

My name is Shelley Hale. I'm the director of the Royal Ottawa's operational stress injury clinic.

Our clinic has been in operation for eight years now, and we've worked with over 1,700 clients as you can see. We belong to and work within the national network of operational stress injury clinics and are fully funded by Veterans Affairs Canada. We are one of 11 clinics and the only one situated in a specialized mental health facility. Veterans Affairs, the Department of National Defence, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police are the only agencies that can make referrals to our clinics, and we provide comprehensive assessments back to them about each referral that comes through our doors. Our clinic in Ottawa is responsible for half of the province of Ontario and western Quebec. We collaborate with seven area offices, three active bases, five integrated personnel support centres, and two RCMP divisions.

This is a snapshot of where the referrals are coming from for our catchment area. It's no surprise that Ottawa and Pembroke are our largest referral sources.

Our average client, just to paint a picture for you, is a 46-year-old male veteran who has deployed an average of two times and has served in the Canadian Armed Forces for almost 20 years. He has served on peacekeeping missions, and he has been diagnosed with both post-traumatic stress disorder and major depression. If treated at our clinic, he will stay for approximately 18 months and attend evidence-based group and individual work to process his trauma. He will leave our clinic having met his treatment goals and will feel prepared through the work he's done to carry it over into his day-to-day life. He will also recommend our clinic to his friends.

Our referrals from DND have grown at a steady pace over the last few years. What we find has been working well is a warm transfer between Veterans Affairs Canada and the Department of National Defence while the member is still serving.

We have worked with our DND colleagues in Ottawa to accept referrals for our clinic for still-serving members with up to two years left to serve so we can ensure a smooth transition of care and so no one falls into the gaps.

The feedback from clients is that this process is facilitating a smoother transition between services, and we're also beginning to see referrals from Petawawa following the same process.

In addition to services at our clinic, a few years ago we launched OSI Connect, a mobile application with self-screeners for depression, PTSD, and sleep, the three big issues for our clients, information we target to family physicians whose resources are on there for families as well. We also launched OSI Resource for Caregivers with the Department of National Defence and Veterans Affairs Canada. We filtered that with family members from across our catchment area as well, with much positive feedback from that group and our clients.

We know that not all veterans are affiliated with VAC and that the system is sometimes complicated for both veterans and service providers to navigate. What we would love to see adopted and tried is a national public awareness campaign that would cue veterans as they enter into any avenue of the health care system whether it's the emergency room, their family physician's office, or a walk-in clinic. If we could teach all health care providers to ask someone if they have served, that would open up a whole avenue for clients who aren't attached to Veterans Affairs Canada. Having all service providers educated to ask that one simple question would mean more veterans could access services that have already been established for them.

Thank you for your time.

(1545)

The Chair:

Dr. Merali, you are going to add to this?

Dr. Zul Merali (President and Chief Executive Officer, The Royal's Institute of Mental Health Research, Royal Ottawa Health Care Group):

Yes, I am. Let me introduce myself. I'm Zul Merali, the president and CEO of the Royal's Institute of Mental Health Research in Ottawa. I'm also the founding scientific director of the Canadian Depression Research and Intervention Network.

As you know, over 4,000 Canadians commit suicide every year. This is almost like a couple of planeloads crashing with no survivors every month of the year. You can imagine that if that were the situation for any other condition, what a public outcry there would be.

Suicide is one of the seven leading causes of death in Canada, and we have to take a public health approach. We also need to better understand the underlying causes or underpinnings of suicide or suicidal acts.

The biology of suicidal ideation and suicidal acts remains unknown, and this is particularly important because we need to understand what goes awry in the brain and why some people are susceptible while others are resilient under the same set of circumstances.

My objective here today is to call for research. We know that getting into care is not necessarily enough. About half the many people who are in care already will still go through suicidal acts and sometimes succeed in taking their own lives. The vast majority of the individuals who have experienced major trauma or are depressed do not necessarily kill themselves. We do not have a robust way of predicting who will attempt and who will complete suicide.

At the Royal, we are making a particular effort to understand suicide a lot better. I'll tell you a little about our approaches. One of them is that we have created a brain imaging centre in partnership with philanthropists, the Department of National Defence, universities, and the Legion, etc. This was a public effort to come together to bring in tools that can help us make the invisible visible. We need to look inside the brain because that's where the suicidal ideation and the will to commit suicide reside.

To make a point, this slide shows that the brains of people who have post-traumatic stress disorder look very different. They light up like a Christmas tree, as you can see here, using specific ligands in the brain as compared to the other two brains that are matched controls. Here's a demonstration not only of how imaging can be a very strong diagnostic tool, but also very powerful in understanding what some of the underpinnings of those conditions might be.

I'm happy to share with you some information that we have of late. As you know the development of anti-depressants has been rather slow, but of late we have had significant advances. I'm presenting data here that shows you that if you treat people with a certain new class of drugs—although the drug itself is not new, the use of this drug is very new, involving the use of an old anaesthetic at a very low dose, acting as a very powerful anti-depressant—it can alleviate symptoms of depression within hours or days, as compared to weeks or months with traditional anti-depressants. What's even more exciting with this line of treatment is that the suicidal ideation seems to be affected even more powerfully. It goes down much faster than the anti-depressant action, and even those individuals who do not respond with an anti-depressant action will have their suicidal ideation plummet within hours. This is really very exciting, because we can now intervene very quickly and very effectively in alleviating the suicidal ideation.

(1550)



What's even more interesting are the green bars in this graph, which I would like you to focus on, showing people expressing very little suicidal ideation. The blue and the red are showing high to moderate amount of suicidal ideation. As you can see, almost 90% become free of suicidal ideation within two weeks of ketamine treatment.

This is very exciting, but what's even more exciting is the fact that it gives us an opportunity to disassociate the depressive symptoms in general, on the one hand, from suicidal ideation on the other. We want to be able to image this in the brain to see if we can identify where in the brain suicidal ideation resides. In other words, what are the brain's circuits that are responsible for suicidal ideation? If we can understand that better, I think we can then begin to target treatment much more effectively in those cases.

The action plan we have is that we want to focus on depression, because very often depression is associated with suicidal ideation. We want to also focus on post-traumatic stress disorder, which is highly correlated with suicidal acts.

We have recently created a chair in military and veterans mental health research. We have created a chair in stress and trauma research. I am very proud to say that the individual studying the use of the tool I showed you earlier, which showed you very clearly the brain of someone with PTSD, we have recruited from Yale in New York. He just started last week at our organization.

We are partnered with the National Network of Depression Centers, in the U.S., and with the European Alliance Against Depression, so that we are in tune with what's going on globally. Also, we are partnering with the Mental Health Commission of Canada to test a four-pronged approach to reducing suicidal acts in Canada.

There is a strong need to create a centre of excellence that is focused on military and non-military trauma and related outcomes, including suicidal acts.

With that, I'd say thank you for giving me this opportunity to share our excitement and our concerns. I'm happy to take any questions.

(1555)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Next, we'll turn to the Mental Health Commission of Canada, Ms. Bradley, president and chief executive officer; and Mr. Mantler, vice president, programs and priorities.

Good afternoon.

Ms. Louise Bradley (President and Chief Executive Officer, Mental Health Commission of Canada):

Thank you very much.

The Mental Health Commission of Canada is delighted to be here today. Thank you for inviting us.

It's really encouraging to see government making veterans' mental health a key priority. As we all know, suicide is a devastating reality. This is not just the case for military and veterans' communities, as you've heard today, but is in many communities across Canada, each with its own unique challenges.

We will focus our remarks today specifically on the scope of the committee's study, which is to improve support for veterans' mental health and suicide prevention.

As committee members, you're no doubt aware that the population of Canadian veterans is estimated to be just over 700,000 people. Based on the limited data available, somewhere between one in five and one in ten diagnosed with mental health problems will experience suicidal thoughts within a year. As you've heard from Dr. Merali, there isn't a robust way of determining that.

It is also thought that the prevalence of mental illness amongst modern-day veterans is higher than amongst earlier era veterans, but again it is difficult to really determine if that is the case due to the whole issue of stigma, but it's certainly higher than amongst the general population.

The mental and emotional toll exacted on veterans isn't unexpected, given the intensity of the tasks that they are called upon to do. In Canada and worldwide, population studies paint a picture of a complex set of needs and determinants of health specific to veterans. These include everything from the predispositions of those who choose to serve, to the unique stressors of military service, and the complex transition from military to civilian life. There isn't a one-size-fits-all solution to the challenges that veterans face, but we know that a whole-of-community approach is a very good place to start.

That said, there are important government initiatives that are contributing to the well-being of our veterans. For example, Ed Mantler and I are fortunate to have been invited to sit on the minister of Veterans Affairs mental health advisory group, and, while supports offered to veterans in Canada are available, they really fall short of what is needed. We are increasingly hearing urgent calls for improvements, and we certainly hear this from the veterans themselves in the committee that we sit on.

This is particularly true in terms of providing adequate transition support. Current supports include a national network of approximately 4,000 registered mental health professionals who deliver services to veterans with operational stress injuries in the communities where they live. We highlight this initiative in particular because it's extremely important to have services close to the community that they live in.

Before I ask Ed Mantler to discuss some of the successful tools that we at the commission have developed to improve veterans' mental health, I want to highlight an ongoing study that may be of interest to the committee. The Australian government is currently carrying out a targeted review of suicide and self-harm prevention services available to its military members and veterans. Written by its National Mental Health Commission, this report is set to be released next month some time, and I think this report will certainly provide useful insights to the committee's study here.

Now in terms of partnerships that we at the commission have pursued with government, we recently launched a mental health first aid veteran community course for veterans, their families, and caregivers. I will ask Dr. Mantler to outline that for you.

(1600)

Mr. Ed Mantler (Vice-President, Programs and Priorities, Mental Health Commission of Canada):

Thank you, Louise.

The program Louise refers to, mental health first aid for the veterans community, improves knowledge about mental health and builds skills for recognizing and responding to mental health issues at the community level through the use of a tested, evidence-based plan of action. Through funding from Veterans Affairs Canada, this course is offered at no cost to participants.

The program improves the capacity of members of the veterans community and empowers them to address mental health problems and illnesses rather than simply directing them to government agencies. The veterans version of mental health first aid gives family members, community workers, and veterans themselves the tools to recognize a mental health problem and the skills to intervene until professional help can be engaged. These kinds of tangible programs put knowledge on the ground and in the community where it's closest to those who need it.

Last year alone, 14 courses were held across the country. Hundreds of members of the veterans community are now better prepared and better equipped to effectively address a mental health problem or crisis. Our goal for 2017 is to offer 40 veterans community training courses from coast to coast to coast.

Another program of potential interest to the committee is the commission's training called “The Working Mind”. It is an education-based program designed to address and promote mental health and reduce stigma related to mental illness in a workplace setting. It's based on the Department of National Defence's program as a foundation, the road to mental readiness, or as we call it, R2MR program. The training supports the mental health and well-being of employees and offers ways to talk about mental illness in a workplace context as well as means to combat stigma and encourage individuals to seek help when they need it.

The training is based on a mental health continuum model that categorizes one's mental health within a continuum. It allows individuals to identify indicators of declining or poor mental health and reinforces the reality that these indicators exist within a continuum and can move across the continuum. It contains strategies to help return to the best mental health possible. These strategies are based in cognitive behavioural theory techniques to help individuals cope with stress and improve their mental health. They're simple techniques that, once learned, any of us can do, such as purposeful diaphragmatic breathing, positive self-talk, visualization, and proper goal setting, the same kinds of techniques that Olympic athletes use to maximize their performance.

We're very excited to see that the most recent report of the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security included R2MR training, mentioned several times as a training tool that could help.

As important as training programs are, work needs to be done now to implement a bolder plan that will save veterans' lives. I thank Dr. Merali for introducing the issue of suicide. The risk of dying by suicide is 32% to 46% higher for veterans than for other Canadians of the same age. Veteran suicide happens within the context of their community.

Last year, in the commission's pre-budget submission, we talked to members of Parliament and Veterans Affairs about a national community development suicide prevention model. The commission would be ready to swiftly deploy a sophisticated suicide prevention strategy in 13 communities across the country, one in each province and territory, and to focus projects on military bases or areas where there is a high veteran population. The project would cost $40 million over five years, a rather modest price tag when one considers the life-saving potential of such a project. The model is based on proven programs in Quebec and internationally that significantly reduced suicide rates by more than 20% in two years.

The suicide prevention project would provide a base of evidence for a nationwide suicide prevention program. The project would focus on specialized supports, including a range of prevention, crisis, and postvention services, such as crisis lines, support groups, and coordinated planning and access. It would provide training to better equip community gatekeepers—family physicians, first responders, nurses, managers, teachers, and others—by providing access to training and ongoing learning opportunities.

The commission would be honoured if the committee would consider reviewing this proposal in full during the course of its study. I'd be pleased to provide the full pre-budget submission proposal, as well as a full briefing note to the committee.

(1605)



The commission is well positioned to work with all levels of government to continue to implement programs and training for veterans.

I'd like to thank you again for providing us with this opportunity to share some of our experiences with those issues, and I welcome your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now, from Mission Butterfly Inc., we'll hear from Mr. Champion, vice-chair, and Dr. Thirlwell, psychiatrist, executive health team. Welcome.

You may start with your 10 minutes.

Mr. John Champion (Vice-Chair, Mission Butterfly Inc.):

Good afternoon. It is an honour, and humbling, for me to be with you today.

My name is John Champion, and I am before you as a prior member of the Canadian Armed Forces, regular forces, a former regional police officer, a former United Nations homicide investigator, a currently serving combat engineer, a Legion branch veteran service officer and zone C-2 veteran service officer, as well as a board member of Mission Butterfly, a not-for-profit organization that provides a multimodal therapy called “healing invisible wounds”.

Throughout my work life I have witnessed the horrors that mankind can inflict, and I have seen the aftermath of destruction that political agendas can make. I have also witnessed the incredible results that Canadian peacekeepers and peacemakers have made while selflessly risking their lives for people they don't know. Unfortunately, I have also witnessed first-hand the long-lasting effects of these actions and the destruction they cause, not just to the veteran or first responder, but to their families and communities.

PTSD and suicide are running rampant within our military, veterans, and first responders. We can no longer sit on the sidelines and do little. PTSD and suicide are like a communicable disease—others around start to suffer and can be triggered.

Among the many hats I wear, the hardest is that of veteran service officer. Twenty years ago, a VSO helped vets and widows navigate the quagmire of Veterans Affairs paperwork. Now it means finding housing, employment, and treatment for vets. Having stared into the abyss myself, I can tell you that the hurdles to seeking treatment are fear of losing your job; being ostracized by your peers, family, or community; and the belief that the therapist can't relate or have knowledge of what you're feeling.

PTSD is different with each veteran. Mission Butterfly has a program with numerous models of therapy. To ensure the success of the client, we do extensive testing before the therapy begins. Veterans don't need a weekend of fly-fishing to heal. They need therapy that heals the mind, body, and soul. That means having their families involved and dealing with topics like finance and nutrition. What it doesn't require is the current medical solution of overmedication. There is a time and place for medication, make no mistake, but masking one's symptoms makes it harder to treat the real cause. Mission Butterfly offers a non-drug therapy that covers all of these.

Mission Butterfly therapists also undergo an intensive Canadian Armed Forces culture workshop so that they can bridge the barrier more quickly. Military members speak a different language. They have a different sense of ethics and respect for each other that the average civilian can't understand. Unless you know the impact of signing the oath with the string of unlimited liability attached to it, how can you relate to a veteran?

Dealing with PTSD has to be started quickly and with the individual's custom therapy in mind. Sending them to a psychiatrist for anti-depressants and time off work is not the answer. That is the current method used, and it needs to stop. Real change starts now, right here, in this room.

Dr. Celeste Thirlwell (Psychiatrist, Executive Health Team, Mission Butterfly Inc.):

My name is Dr. Celeste Thirlwell, and I'm an executive health team member of the non-profit organization Mission Butterfly. We are a caring group of Canadians dedicated to improving the quality of life of the men and women who selflessly protect, assist, and serve the Canadian public. I'm a psychiatrist and sleep medicine specialist with a background in neurosurgery, neuroscience research, and pain management. I'm grateful for the opportunity to address the committee.

It is unjust that veterans with PTSD, their families, and their communities continue to suffer without adequate assessment, treatment, and support. The imperative for optimal and innovative treatment of veterans suffering with PTSD is an issue of social justice, military priorities, and federal leadership.

PTSD has been called shell shock in World War I, combat stress reaction in World War II, and during the Vietnam War was finally coined post-traumatic stress disorder. Now, in the DSM-5, the diagnostic manual of the American Psychiatric Association, there are four components to PTSD. The first is rear-experiencing, such as flashbacks and nightmares. The second is avoidance. The third is negative mood and cognitions, which includes hostile, aggressive, and even paranoid thinking. The fourth is behavioural arousal, such as hypervigilance, hyper-arousal, and sleep disturbances.

The issue of treating and diagnosing PTSD remains an elusive opponent, both clinically to us, and to military and other services around the world. A key component that has recently been published about is the disorder of sleep. When we train our military personnel, we set them in a combat-ready mindset, which means that their sympathetic nervous system, their fight-or-flight system, is set to overdrive. They are set to “on”. Their neuronal circuitry has been set to “on”, and has been trained to be on. When they come back from combat zones, even where there was no danger, they still perceive danger. Their “off” system, which is called the parasympathetic nervous system—it's like the brakes—is nowhere to be found. What Mission Butterfly has developed is a comprehensive, integrative system to boost that “off” system, that parasympathetic nervous system, so that we can reprogram the neuronal circuitry in these military men.

When we speak about neuronal circuitry and retraining, the shame and the guilt—many of those things that keep veterans from even coming forward for treatment—get put to the sideline. This is neuronal retraining. The good news is that we can reset the neuronal circuitry. The bad news is that it takes time and it takes an integrated approach. Pharmacology alone will not work. Behavioural management alone will not work. We need a comprehensive approach, such as that designed by Mission Butterfly.

The other thing these men need, and that I've read since I presented my literature to you, is a mission. They need a new mission. These are people who were trained to protect and serve. They come home, and there's no protection goal and no service goal. The men and women who are doing the best in the U.S. now are independent veterans who have banded together to find goodwill missions, such as helping to rebuild schools and houses. These are people who are ready and willing to serve, and who need a mission. Not only do we need to calm down their nervous systems and retrain them from the mindset of combat-ready, which is the fight-or-flight, and to boost the “off”—relax and restore, you're safe now—but we also need to heal their hearts. For their hearts to heal, they need a mission.

We all need a goal in life; we all need a mission. Without that, life is not worth living. Without that, we see the suicides.

Thank you.

(1610)

The Chair:

We'll begin our first round of questioning.

Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I apologize to all of you at the onset, as seven minutes will not give me enough time to ask the questions that I need to ask. Hopefully, my colleagues can pick up on some of the direction I'm taking.

The first thing I want to talk about is the research that you're doing, Mr. Merali. What I found interesting from the slide that you put up was the distinction between the brain that apparently suffers from PTSD and some of the other brains that don't. I know you're in the research stage, but why are we not doing this right at the onset with those who are coming to us with PTSD? Why are we not putting them in a position where we can diagnose, similar to what we see here?

(1615)

Dr. Zul Merali:

That's a very good question, a very important question. That's exactly why I was showing you the slide. We now are developing tools that can be applied, but right now these are not standardized diagnostic tools.

For instance, when you have cancer, you can go for cancer diagnostics. It is a standardized tool. When you get your blood pressure taken, it's a standardized tool. Brain imaging is only coming into its own now. That's why I think we need to put time and effort into making these sorts of tools standardized, so they can become diagnostic tools available much more widely.

Mr. John Brassard:

Are other countries doing something similar to this? Have they completed the process of this research?

Dr. Zul Merali:

In the United States, for example, the biggest project right now, after the genome project, is something called the human connectome project, which is designed to understand the connections between different aspects of the brain circuits and how they get activated or deactivated under certain conditions. That's the major thrust right now, not just for PTSD, but in all walks of life where the brain circuits get dysfunctional and give rise to certain symptoms or certain illnesses. That is now the biggest ongoing project in the United States.

Mr. John Brassard:

Interesting.

You also mentioned ketamine. I hope I pronounced that properly.

Dr. Zul Merali:

Yes.

Mr. John Brassard:

Ketamine as opposed to which other prescription drugs?

Dr. Zul Merali:

In particular, I was talking about ketamine in the context of depression—which often coexists in individuals who attempt suicide or commit suicidal acts—as compared to other, traditional antidepressants such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors and monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Those are traditional classes of antidepressants.

Those take weeks or months to kick in, and they do not effectively treat everybody, as we just heard from the panel. It has to be individualized, and we need to figure out a way.

The main point I was trying to make with ketamine is that not only does it have a fast-acting antidepressant action but it is an even stronger anti-suicidal ideation medication.

Mr. John Brassard:

Is it that much more measurable?

Dr. Zul Merali:

It is. It is immediately measurable, within hours.

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay.

I don't want to miss out on you Liane. In terms of the difference between therapy dogs and other types of dogs, one of the issues that has come up recently is tax credits.

Because of the cost associated with both therapy dogs and service dogs, not just training them but the constant, ongoing upkeep of food, veterinary care, and all that stuff, would you be looking for or want tax credits for these types of animals, for veterans specifically?

The line is frozen, I think.

Ms. Liane Weber:

Can you hear me now?

Mr. John Brassard:

Yes, we can.

Ms. Liane Weber:

Okay, sorry about that. I was on mute.

Mr. John Brassard:

The issue is regarding tax credits. I'm not sure how your program is funded, but one of the things that we've heard about from others in the service dog industry and the therapy industry is the need for tax credits for veterans who have this type of service dog, because of the costs associated with the training, food, veterinary care, and so on. I'm just wondering if you can speak to that.

Ms. Liane Weber:

Well, I have to say that I never actually took that part into account. I haven't heard that aspect.

As for us, we get our funding strictly from community fundraising, and we fund all of it.

Once the veteran receives the animal, it is up to him or her from then on to afford the food and any vet costs. However, we will be working with veterans right across Canada to be able to offer—at no cost, we hope—anything that is required once the new owner has received our animal.

When it comes to tax credits, it has never actually been discussed or requested. However, I think it is something very good to look at with respect to the veterans, not for our foundation.

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay, thank you Liane.

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

You have one minute.

Mr. John Brassard:

I'll move quickly then to Louise and Ed.

One of the things that the minister has in his mandate letter is the need for specialized services for veterans. I know that Sunnybrook has issued a proposal to the government for a specialized in-patient program for PTSD. Is that something you would like to see happen? Would it be beneficial to our veterans?

(1620)

Ms. Louise Bradley:

It likely would. I'm not familiar with that piece, but what we are proposing is a community-based program. What we are proposing is one in each province and territory. It would be outside of the hospital setting.

Mr. John Brassard:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Eyolfson.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Dr. Merali, in my previous life up until a couple of years ago, I was an emergency physician. I was familiar with ketamine and its use, but in much different phases. We'd be playing anaesthetist when we used ketamine. In that life I had heard in some conversations that some literature was showing up on ketamine, and that it was looking very exciting at that point.

Is its use still in the experimental stage, or is it becoming widespread and an accepted use for ketamine?

Dr. Zul Merali:

It is getting more widespread. One of the issues with ketamine, as you know, is that it has to be injected intravenously, which is not an easily accessible modality of administration in other settings, but right now a clinical trial is ongoing for an intranasal administration of ketamine. That's being tested as we speak, but it is still an experimental venture right now. It is not a mainstay therapeutic intervention.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Is there no oral form of ketamine? I have a vague memory of patients who would come into the department very occasionally who were on that.

Dr. Zul Merali:

It's not effective.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you. That's good to know.

Ms. Hale, I agree completely with your statement on public education for health care providers. Sometimes we would see veterans or even active duty soldiers who would come into the department and we'd know our general treatments. We'd treat anyone else with mental health issues, but we'd know there was something more, and we wouldn't always know.

You talk about public education for health care providers. Has your organization reached out to date to any of the regulatory agencies like the Canadian Medical Association or the College of Physicians and Surgeons or anyone like that?

Ms. Shelley Hale:

Veterans Affairs—mostly through DND and Dr. Alex Heber—created a platform for physicians and surgeons. That's available online, and it's for CMEs.

There has been some work with the social workers in Ontario. It's more of a public awareness campaign, because I think a lot of education is already out there. It's just that people don't know where to tap into it, nor do they know to ask the questions. That was primarily the thrust of my point. If people just ask the question, then it opens up services already available to veterans. They just don't know they're there. Maybe we need more awareness of what services there are for community providers, but that would be it for me.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

Apparently, you have a self-directed tool for caregivers and there's input from DND and VAC. I may have missed this. Can you tell us what the uptake and the response has been to this?

Ms. Shelley Hale:

The caregiver resource for families?

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Yes.

Ms. Shelley Hale:

It's a mobile app and a website platform that was created by some of our clinicians with DND. We ran it by focus groups with military family services. It's a CVT-based online module that caregiver family members can walk themselves through to be educated. First responders are using it as well.

Then we have the mobile app, which is aimed more toward the guys who don't present themselves. They tend to do some self-screening to see where they rate on the scales that would help them. It doesn't diagnose them, but it will cue them whether or not they should be seeking more help. There's information on there for family members and physicians too.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

Dr. Thirlwell, how many applications would you say you've received through the contact information on your website so far?

Mr. John Champion:

I know it's six recently. I know that LFCA Meaford requested us to do a run of eight people from the base.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

With regard to the proposed treatment therapies in your submissions, what type of research has your organization collected to support the efficacy of these therapies?

(1625)

Dr. Celeste Thirlwell:

The efficacy of the therapies mainly focuses on the whole holistic approach. There isn't the hard data that's available for the drug therapies, but it's definitely showing promising results in clinical reports and data.

The most rigorous data comes from the study by Dr. Harvey Moldofsky and Dr. Richardson from OSI London. They followed 14 years' worth of veterans in sleep studies. They can predict through sleep studies who is going to be more likely to develop PTSD and show signs of PTSD.

Everyone who goes through our program has a rigorous sleep study as well.

Mr. Doug Eyolfson:

Thank you.

I have 15 seconds. I don't think I have any more questions at this point.

The Chair:

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for this incredible testimony. It's very helpful and I appreciate it very much. I want to ask everyone many questions. I'll see if I can be orderly and make sense of it all.

I'll start with you, Ms. Bradley and Mr. Mantler.

How does your program target a veteran's family? What kind of supports do you provide for spouses or children?

Ms. Louise Bradley:

Are you referring to the community approach we were talking about, or is it mental health first aid and R2MR?

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

We'll start with the community.

Ms. Louise Bradley:

Okay.

There are four different priorities that would be implemented in each of the communities. Families are very much included in that. They're a vital part of the approach and so are definitely very much included in that.

With regard to mental health first aid, that's available to....

Mr. Ed Mantler:

The mental health first aid version for veterans first and foremost was designed with veterans and their families at the table. There was very direct input from those groups into what was needed. It's designed in a way that's intended for veterans themselves as well as for their families and caregivers.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you.

Ms. Bradley, you said that you were on the minister's advisory committee. How many women are there, and how many of those women are veterans so that they can understand or at least communicate that perspective?

Do you have any programs that have been developed specifically for those living with military sexual trauma?

Ms. Louise Bradley:

I don't believe there are any female veterans on the committee. There are none. They are male veterans.

What was your second question?

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It was on programming for those living with military sexual trauma.

Ms. Louise Bradley:

In any of the meetings I've attended, and I believe the same is true for Ed, that has not been a focus of discussion.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you. I appreciate that. It's come up at this committee, and it's a very real and profoundly concerning reality for all of us.

Dr. Merali, you talked about the need for a centre of excellence. I have to tell you that this is something that my party, my colleagues, have asked for over and over again.

What kind of response are you getting from VAC in regard to that proposal? I'm thinking specifically of your call for research funding. In the information you presented, and in Dr. Thirlwell's research as well, I can see the correlation there, and it is fascinating in terms of what it reveals about what more needs to be done, and it's exciting in that it suggests that there is a great deal we can do to reduce these catastrophic suicides.

(1630)

Dr. Zul Merali:

Thank you.

I'm very delighted that you picked up on this, because I think we need to invest in research like that. I think there needs to be a centre of excellence, because this is a very important issue and it's not going to resolve itself if you don't pay attention to it.

Just recently I finished writing a paper—it's under submission right now—that talks about the investment in mental health research in Canada. To paraphrase the title, what if mental health were cancer?

I was trying to draw the analogy between the progress made in cancer due to the investments made in that field versus those in mental health. I'm sorry to say that we have less than 16% of the funding that would normally go to cancer, prorated, for mental health, despite the fact that the burden of illness is number one. I think that these areas—and post-traumatic stress disorder is one such condition—really need focused care and attention. I think having a centre of excellence would serve not only people who have served in theatre before but also people in the other walks of Canadian life, such as first responders and people who suffer from traumatic events, because the underlying mechanisms might be very similar and the treatments might be very similar.

We need to have a concerted, focused, and central place where the mission is to solve this issue and to find more effective solutions, which are few and far between right now.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It's extremely interesting and compelling, inasmuch as I think Roy Romanow was right when he said that mental health was the orphan of the health care system. There is so much need in that regard. It would seem that this research you're talking about has, as you say, implications for the broader community. We know that mental health issues are profound and significant in the general population as well, and very few ever get treatment.

How am I doing for time, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You have about 30 seconds.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

All right.

It's my understanding that in order to be served in an OSI clinic, a veteran must be referred by his or her caseworker. How long is the delay between reaching out to the caseworker and getting in to see someone at the clinic, specifically a doctor, so that help is received?

Ms. Shelley Hale:

At our clinic by the time we get the referral to the time the assessment's done is about six weeks. The referral comes to the clinic, not specific clinicians within it. We operate as an interdisciplinary team.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. I appreciate that answer. I guess the concern is that suicidal thoughts are a crisis, and six weeks is not a good response.

Ms. Shelley Hale:

They're contacted within 48 hours of receiving their referral. We do a triage and then they're contacted weekly by one of our nurses...for a wait-list management strategy we've put in place. We have contact with them and we're assessing them. We're also assessing their outcome monitoring on CROMIS, which I believe the committee has heard about before.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. So the triage involves active monitoring, because I worry about that time lag?

Ms. Shelley Hale: Yes, there is the assessment.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen: Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

The topic I want to cover might require a bit of a game of Whac-A-Mole.

I'll start with Dr. Merali. You are a doctor, or not?

Dr. Zul Merali:

Yes, I am a doctor.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

I found this very interesting. This is the chart that we saw on the presentation on brain scans. I don't know how to read this; I think most of us here don't. It looks very impressive, but I wonder if you could explain what we're actually seeing on this chart.

Dr. Zul Merali:

Okay, that's a good question.

What you're actually seeing is a PET image—that's positron emission tomography. In that type of analysis you inject a radioactive ligand that traverses through the blood and ends up in the receptors in the brain. The receptors that you're seeing light up in that graph are what's known as the CB1 receptors. These are the cannabinoid receptors, the endocannabinoids. They are receptors in the brain that bind to marijuana-type molecules. The brain produces endocannabinoids, endogenous marijuana-type molecules that it uses in its circuits. What you are seeing there is an injection of a ligand that's binding to those receptors. You can see that those receptors are much more abundant than you would see in non-traumatic brains, which are the other two controls that you see on the right-hand side.

What's very interesting about this is that, as you know, of late there has been a lot of discussion about the use of marijuana by veterans, and a lot of anecdotal evidence indicates that they get relief from some of their symptoms by using these drugs.

What concerns me is that there is no large-scale clinical trial that actually shows the efficacy and safety of using marijuana and marijuana derivatives in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. I think this really needs to happen sooner than later.

(1635)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Speaking of large scale, how many people are you testing in your studies? Are you getting these results very consistently, or is this one person?

Dr. Zul Merali:

No, this is a statistically significant effect, and this was the study conducted by Dr. Alex Neumeister at Yale. He's the guy whom we have recruited right now. That's not a study that was conducted on our side per se, but we plan to really expand it much further.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is this consistent for all PTSDs? Does somebody who's been at war versus somebody who's working in the police get a different kind of result, or is this what it looks like?

Dr. Zul Merali:

That's a very good question, and I'm sorry I cannot answer that because I really didn't conduct that study myself.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If we go further back in the process, is there any effort to do before-service brain scans? When somebody enters the military service or police service, take a brain scan so you have a baseline for when they inevitably run into trauma over the course of their careers, so that you then have that comparison. Is that kind of study happening?

Dr. Zul Merali:

That's happening in Netherlands right now. It is starting to happen here in Canada, but we are behind in taking measures pre-deployment. There are a lot of concerns about that, because, if you see indicators of vulnerability to PTSD, does that mean that we do not deploy someone? The debate is, do you want people who are hypervigilant, ready to go, are able to grab somebody from a disastrous situation and carry them to safety, and things like that, or do we weed them out with early predictors?

It's a very interesting question of whether we can predict who's going to develop PTSD and who's not. The concern of the user community is that it will be used in a negative way, or with how it will be used. Those are the kind of debates that are ongoing right now. But I think we need to get to that point where we assess people before they go, during, and afterwards to have a much clearer idea of what is happening to the physiology and chemistry of the brain.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

And if you identify what you are looking for, the suicidal ideation in the brain as you describe it, what can be done about it? If you say this red dot here represents a part of the brain that's affected, clearly we know that now. What can you do about it?

Dr. Zul Merali:

Let me compare it to another condition, such as cancer. If you see a cancer and that it's responsive to a certain kinds of hormones, for example, if it's hyperactive, then what kind of treatment do we use for that particular individual? The treatment is not going to be the same, and that's exactly what we need to do for people with mental illnesses, including post-traumatic stress disorder. We need to understand the individual difference and how to treat that person rather than a category of illness. We're not there yet, but we need to get to that point of personalized intervention.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I'll go to Ms. Bradley. I have some questions for you as well.

We've heard about the whole-of-community approach. I think this is a really important step, but to tie in what I was talking about, what about a whole-of-career approach? So there's the idea of having brain scans of people in preparation before they go into battle, before they go into the service, of what they're going to be facing and how to prepare for it. In pre-treatment, are there any efforts on that side of it?

That questions open to everybody, but I'll start with Ms. Bradley.

Ms. Louise Bradley:

The proposal that we are talking about is specific to suicide prevention. It's very specific to that, so we had not contemplated looking at.... This is something that we would like to do right across the country because, as a commission, we have to look at the suicide rates in the country as a whole. As part of the proposal that we're putting forward, we thought that we would be able to choose to include communities with a higher number of veterans in them, but this proposal is meant to be an action program at the same time as a research one, using a similar structure to one we had with homelessness, At Home/Chez Soi, in the past. It's specific to suicide reduction in specific communities.

(1640)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you all very much for your presentations today. This is very helpful.

I'd like to start with you, Ms. Bradley. You talked a little bit about care for veterans. I'm wondering if you can expand on differences that you've seen between treating mental health issues within the veterans community versus the general population.

Ms. Louise Bradley:

I'm not an expert in that area, and we haven't done specific research on that within the commission. We do know that the rates are much higher within the veterans communities, but there has been nothing specific to deal with that.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

I thought you made a very good point in your testimony when you said that you'd like to see more outreach to all health care service providers across Canada so that everybody is on the same page and aware of the programs that are available to reach out to veterans' communities and service personnel. How do you see that taking shape as a national outreach to these health care providers? Is it something that should be worked on with the provinces or with medical professional bodies themselves? What are your thoughts on that?

Ms. Louise Bradley:

It's a very complex issue that you are raising. We have hopes that with the monies tied to mental health from the health accord, there would be a bringing together of some of the knowledge. What we're seeing now is that there are pockets of excellence in various provinces and territories, and yet Province A doesn't know what Province C is doing.

What we were hoping for with this funding is that there would be a small number of indicators that would be developed, so we could collect the same data in the same way in each of the provinces and territories. That is not happening right now. We would then be able to look at the issue across the country as a whole. It's very confusing when we talk to other countries. They say, “Well, this is a great program you're doing”, but it's hard to explain to them that it's really only happening in three or four different places.

It's one of the needs that we have at the commission. We have tried to close that gap with the work that's done in our knowledge exchange centre, and we've certainly made headway, but it's really only just the beginning. It's something that requires a much closer look and targeted efforts.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Mantler, I believe it was you who touched on the first aid programs for veterans and their families. It seems as though we've gone through one year of 14 courses that were delivered across the country, and this year 40 are planned. It seems to be ramping up. Can you tell us preliminarily, after the first 14 courses, about some of the results and the feedback you've received? How worthwhile is this program?

Mr. Ed Mantler:

The development phase of the mental health first aid for the veterans community and the first year of production were accompanied by an extensive evaluative research data collection component. We know early on that the user satisfaction with what they learned from those programs has been very high and very significant.

We also know that mental health first aid has many versions for various populations across the country, including seniors, youth, first nations, Inuit, etc. We know that there have now been close to 250,000 Canadians trained in mental health first aid overall. The outcomes from those many training opportunities across the country over the last six years have been consistently very good.

(1645)

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Do you think it's important that there's outreach to all communities and there's access to this program, so it's not just in large centres, but also in more rural and remote areas? I would imagine the 14 that took place were spread across the country and now there are 40 more, so they will be going into other communities that maybe weren't selected in the first cohort.

Mr. Ed Mantler:

The first 14 communities were ones in which there tended to be a significant veteran population, that were natural gathering communities for veterans, so many of them were tied closely to bases. Over the course of the next year, we have an opportunity to broaden the communities where the course is offered.

The vision for the future, much like all mental health first aid courses, is that be responsive to market demand. Having a network of trainers across the country gives us an opportunity to, in a flexible way, make that training available quite broadly.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you very much.

Do I have a little bit more time?

The Chair:

You have one minute.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Ms. Weber, thank you very much for appearing today.

I'm wondering about standards for service dogs. My understanding is that VAC has initiated some questions about whether there should be standards for service dogs. What are your thoughts on that? How could that be developed?

Ms. Liane Weber:

Well, service dogs are not my full zone of expertise. One of the reasons that we are focusing on therapy dogs and not service dogs is that it is a little confusing about the regulations going across....

There needs to be a standard. We are requesting on our end to have a special standard for therapy dogs. When it comes to service dogs, it's a little different because they are trained to perform tasks that are unusual dog behaviour. For example, a service dog could be trained to flick on a switch so the light turns on, or they could go into a room that is dark, check out the room, and let their new handler know that it is safe to go in.

With therapy dogs, we will not be teaching unusual dog tasks. However, each veteran who comes to us, or any individual for that matter, will be offered specific training that they will be able to perform at home if they choose to teach a specific task that otherwise would only be taught to a service dog.

It is quite confusing what is going on across Canada with regard to service dogs and the regulations. Here in British Columbia, the province has started an assessment, which I believe is absolutely fantastic, to make sure that all of these service dogs go through the right assessment and that we eliminate any fraud or any issues that can come along with not having a properly trained service dog.

Mr. Colin Fraser:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Ms. Wagantall.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, CPC):

Thank you.

I have a question for Dr. Merali, and then one for Dr. Thirlwell.

Dr. Merali, we've been working a lot with veterans exposed to the malaria drug mefloquine. It causes permanent damage to the brain stem and it mimics PTSD. The U.S., Britain, Australia, and Germany have all limited the use or completely removed the use of this anti-malarial drug. Health Canada has recently, this last summer, changed the label to indicate that it can cause damage to the brain stem, and depression, hallucination, nightmares, psychotic behaviour, numerous physical side effects, and suicidal ideation. There is a strong correlation that we're finding between suicide rates and mefloquine use.

We had David Bona, a veteran from Somalia, from our Canadian Airborne Regiment, saying that after 20 years he was finally able to get proper treatment and relief after a brain scan. He was previously treated for PTSD and was now able to see that he had mefloquine toxicity. It causes a physical brain stem injury.

Looking at the work that you're doing here and seeing the results of this study, has your facility been asked, or has it ever considered doing brain imaging with respect to identifying mefloquine toxicity to see the scarring on the brain?

(1650)

Dr. Zul Merali:

Yes, it's a very interesting observation and I think an area of concern.

No, we have not been asked. What we're doing right now is providing the platform, which for the first five years is strictly going to be for research. Anybody who has a research project and who is interested in studying any issue that may have an impact on brain functioning is free to do so, and we facilitate that. However, we had not had a request for that particular type of a scan on people who have been on anti-malarials.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

In light of the ongoing concerns about this, if the government were to seek out this type of a study, it would be possible to do that.

Dr. Zul Merali:

Absolutely.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Okay, thank you very much.

Dr. Thirlwell, I so appreciate what we've heard from you today. I think that around this table what we want to find is an effective way to deal with PTSD and suicide.

We talk a lot about this whole concept of building up a soldier. Can we not, then, when they come home, rebuild them, build a proud veteran? I started to write down “fight, flight” when you were talking about whether it can be...and you talked immediately about it being reset.

I would like to hear more about that, but I also want to make note of something. In your notes to us, you indicated that PTSD and depression are treatable, which means they can be prevented. So much of the cost and the pain we are seeing is due to it being dealt with in a crisis: the house is already on fire.

Could you share more on that, please?

Dr. Celeste Thirlwell:

I want to draw a bit on your questions about the civilian versus the veteran population in terms of PTSD. My background is in neuroscience. I'm a neuroscientist first, a clinician second. Much of what medicine runs on now is dogma. Wars have been won with innovation; we need medical innovation.

What's happening is that when the brain is in PTSD fight-or-flight mode, it's in the reptilian brain, the lower part of the brain, and it cannot access higher centres to use for CBT, to use to see how you connect to other people. Where the civilians might not be in the same fight-or-flight mode, a military person is in fight or flight. Until you take them out of that fight-or-flight mode, many of the treatment modalities we use for common civilians will not work. That's why I emphasize taking them out fight-or-flight mode.

Please refer to Stephen Porges' polyvagal theory. It will explain to you the fight-or-flight mode being stuck in this brain stem, the reptilian part of the brain, where the autonomic nervous system disregulates, going into the limbic system where the emotional part of the brain is and not being able to access the frontal brain, where there are societal cues. When we're stuck in fight or flight, we can't access those other parts of the brain and our executive manager can't control the emotions. It can't control the fight or flight, which is why we see these anger outbursts and physical outbursts.

Part of polyvagal theory also talks about attachment, and this is what we've done: we've detached these servicemen, through training, from their heart so they can kill. To reintegrate them back into society, you have to undo that programming to get them to reconnect with their hearts, which is why I suggested we do it through positive missions. That is why the dog therapy is so effective: they can finally attach to a trusted entity, a trusted being. Part of our therapy also uses horses, equine therapy, which has been shown to be very successful, and followed with neurofeedback. That also has to speak to attachment. When you take them out of fight or flight and they learn to reattach, they can use the executive processing again, but as long as they're stuck in fight or flight, we're not getting anywhere. That can be from physical trauma, mental trauma, emotional trauma, drug trauma, viruses, or bacterial trauma.

That's the beauty of sleep studies. We can pick that up before they go into service, while they are in service, and after service, which is why we have sleep studies as part of our program, so I can actually see just how unstable the fight or flight is. It's called the autonomic nervous system. It was believed that you couldn't control it, but you can through yoga and other modalities that we use. They've shown scientifically that we can boost the parasympathetic nervous system. That's why it's so important for us, as you were suggesting, to screen before they go into service, while they're in service, and once they come home. When they get off the plane, immediately have a sleep study, and a scan as well.

I would also suggest using SPECT-II, which isn't well regarded and necessarily in the mainstream field, but in cutting-edge neuroscience, SPECT scanning is also showing very subtle changes and different connectivity of the brain. There are subtle connectivity processes that change and aren't picked up by regular MRIs and might not even be picked up by PET.

(1655)

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

I have just one more quick question.

The Chair:

I'm sorry, but you're way over time. That was seven minutes.

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall:

Thank you.

Can we get that study as part of our research?

The Chair:

Yes, we can ask for that.

Could you send that study to us, please, or to the clerk? Thank you.

Ms. Lockhart will be splitting her time with Mr. Bratina.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Thank you.

Thank you very much. It's great for us to have so many professionals at the table today, and we have tons of questions.

I want to carry on with what you were just talking about. What benchmarks are you using now to gauge success with the type of therapy you're doing with those you're working with?

Dr. Celeste Thirlwell:

We use multiple self-report inventories, but right now I'm looking at getting a wristband from MIT that monitors the autonomic nervous system. The participants in our program can wear it for the duration of our program so we can get more objective data about how we're helping the fight-or-flight system and the relax and restore system.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

At this point we're back to the need for more research, so we're still building that body of research.

Dr. Celeste Thirlwell:

Yes, we're still building that body of research.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Okay, very good.

You also mentioned the Canadian Armed Forces cultural workshop.

Can you tell me about that? That's the first time I've heard about that.

Dr. Celeste Thirlwell:

John will speak to that.

Mr. John Champion:

In order for anybody to bridge the gap with a military member, trust is required. The military people don't trust very easily. That's why you'll always find them sitting with their back to the wall and facing the door.

Anybody who is going to do any therapy needs to understand where these people are coming from. We talk a different language. It's all TLAs, three-letter acronyms. If you don't understand what they're saying, how can you help them?

Right now we have an eight-hour immersion on “military-ese”, on rank structure, brotherhood, family, brother and sisterhood, the dynamics within units, the regiments, the military as a whole.

If you get an army person, an air force person, and a navy person in a bar, they're likely to start a fight, but if there are three of them in a bar and a civvy starts a fight with them, they're all jumping in together to help each other.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Who's offering this? Are you offering this cultural workshop?

Dr. Celeste Thirlwell:

Yes.

Mr. John Champion:

I developed it.

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

You developed it. Thank you.

Back to the research question again, I have a question about therapy dogs as well. What research were you relying on for your program?

Ms. Liane Weber:

There have been studies that have been going on all across the United States and internationally for many years. Because I'm in a position where I do my own type of research with effective programs that are out there, I am able to create them here in Canada.

For several years, I had gone across the United States and internationally to other organizations that are doing this exact same thing, which has just kept growing. It gets better. There are more studies that are being done to prove how effective dogs are. That is the reason we decided to take it on, understanding that this has been going on for so many years and has shown its effectiveness.

When we're talking about PTSD, of course, that's a bit of a different story. That is new. There are studies all over.

There are service dogs for PTSD, and they are trained in specific tasks. What we have realized is that many times a service dog is not required for PTSD; however, a very highly trained companion animal is. That's what we have surmised through the studies.

(1700)

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Bratina.

Mr. Bob Bratina (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Thank you.

I want to tell you all that we've heard a lot of testimony at our committee about the problems, and we're hearing a lot about potential solutions and studies. That's really positive. I'm sure we all agree that this is a good meeting today.

Ms. Bradley, I'm going to quote you forever, that “Province A doesn't know what Province B is doing.”

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Bob Bratina: In Hamilton 10 years ago, we had lead exceedance in our water. This week, cities across Canada are finding out that there's lead in the drinking water: “Oh, what are we going to do about it?” We already looked at this 10 years ago.

That brings me to you, Dr. Merali. I know that exposure to lead at levels generally considered safe is showing in more recent studies to be problematic, especially with regard to depression and behaviours and so on. You did the brain imaging. I know that some of the other researchers have found a decrease in the frontal lobe.

As regards our topic, are there predictors of behaviour that you could test even in recruits, as well as veterans, to see whether they might be predisposed to mental behaviours?

Dr. Zul Merali:

Yes.

I think that's a very important and loaded question, in the sense that what if you were able to detect something, then what would you do? I've had discussions with people in our military mental health centre, and one of the dialogues we have is that if you were to detect somebody who was likely to be at risk, does that mean that you don't deploy them? Would that be the right thing to do?

That's a question that needs to be answered. I don't have answers for you, but that's an issue. I think the fact that we need to be able to monitor, to see some of the risk and resiliency factors, is a given, but whether we do that prior to deployment is a separate question that's more loaded.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Kitchen.

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Champion, thank you for your service.

Thank you all for being here.

I don't have a lot of time and I've got a couple of pages of questions.

First off, to Dr. Mantler and Ms. Bradley, can you tell me what percentage of your services are given to veterans? Have you calculated that? Basically, you're the Mental Health Commission of Canada and you deal with mental health in all areas, but to what extent would it be to veterans? Maybe I missed that.

Ms. Louise Bradley:

I'll start.

We don't actually provide services as such. The mental health first aid and the R2MR are programs that are train-the-trainer based. We've recently done the one for veterans.

Do you want to add to that?

Mr. Ed Mantler:

Regarding the programming of the commission, the bulk of it is really knowledge exchange, coalescing research, and spreading that research to put it into action, and doing so in a way that is intended to address all Canadians. It's difficult to pull out specifically what proportion is going to veterans and what's not. Much of the work of the commission has been focused in workplaces.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Great, thank you.

Dr. Merali, people are very visual, and when you put something like this out, they key on to it, and they see nice red and green things. I do have a bit of a background in research, so it's nice to see this study. I'm wondering, with the PET study, what was the size of the population that came with this. This is one snapshot of one individual, but across the board, what would be the percentage that would have this type of...?

Dr. Zul Merali:

I think one of the studies was about 32 in the treatment group versus matched controls.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

When you look at this, we're looking at those with PTSD and a control group. Have you also done it with a group that might have had a long-term history of opioid use?

Dr. Zul Merali:

No. We have—

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

No?

Dr. Zul Merali:

We have not. We do have a treatment program for opioid addiction at The Royal. In terms of the imaging studies, we have not done them.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Do you have one with veterans who might have used cannabis to an extent?

Dr. Zul Merali:

In terms of the imaging studies?

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Yes.

Dr. Zul Merali:

No. The imaging facility is a multi-modal imaging set-up that does FMRI, PET, SPECT analysis, as well as EEG right in that same machine. It is highly sophisticated, and we are building capacity to bring experts who can do different modalities of imaging. The PET one you're looking at there, the person who did that study is now part of our team, and that's exactly what we plan to do.

(1705)

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

You mentioned that a lot of this is looking at cannabinoid receptors. You did bring up the issue of the limited research out there on dealing with the benefits or non-benefits of cannabinoid use and the use of cannabis by veterans for whatever reason. Do you think that would be a worthwhile study that we as a committee should be looking into, not only the use of cannabinoids, but also what effects may have occurred with changes from ten grams to five grams to three grams?

Dr. Zul Merali:

Yes, absolutely. I think that's critically important. The fact that people are using it is backed up by anecdotal data. Some people find it highly beneficial, but there is no single large-scale study that looks at the clinical efficacy to see whether it's really effective in a measurable way and, more importantly, whether safety is an issue with the use of those cannabinoids. They have other effects, cognitive effects, effects on concentration and on sleep, etc. that need to be looked at very carefully.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you.

Ms. Weber, I didn't really hear what cost you were looking at for putting into service the use of the therapy dogs.

Ms. Liane Weber:

We expect therapy dogs to cost anywhere between $2,500 and $3,500 maximum. It really depends on where the animal is coming from and if the animal has been spayed or neutered. We will have all the accessories and medicines that are required, and of course, we actually pay the home and training provider where the animal will stay. One of the things we do have the ability to do is to reduce these costs with veterans being able to offer their services, with manufacturers of dog food, collars, crates, and any type of accessories we require. It's between $2,500 to $3,500 maximum per animal. The recipient is then responsible for any further food or vet visits that are required.

Mr. Robert Kitchen:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Mathyssen.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Thank you very much. Again, I'd like to speak to Mission Butterfly. It sounds like an incredibly comprehensive kind of programming. I just wonder how many veterans have participated in the 12-day program. If you said that already, please forgive me but I didn't catch it. Do you know how many veterans have participated?

Mr. John Champion:

We are just starting the first program for veterans this summer. The military has been a little bit slow at getting involved. We are targeting the currently serving veterans first. We do have one program starting in March, which is for first responders. Although we are a new organization, every therapist we have has had extensive dealings with PTSD therapy, and we're bringing them all together under one roof.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. So there was a reluctance to look at your program. It that because it's different or innovative?

Mr. John Champion:

It's new.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

It's new. Okay.

How much does it cost to register in a 12-day program?

Mr. John Champion:

I believe the final cost is $43,000 per person, because they have to be billeted, and there's the equine therapy and everything else.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. That could explain the military's reluctance to become involved.

Mr. John Champion:

Yet they're spending more than that now.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

That's true, and we're back to prevention and how we can help folks.

Thank you very much.

Ms. Weber, with regard to the dogs, I was intrigued by the fact that you use rescue dogs. What's the rationale for using these animals? Are they more sensitive to the sorts of emotional needs of a veteran or someone suffering from PTSD? What is the reason for you using that specific kind of dog?

(1710)

Ms. Liane Weber:

We're using rescue dogs for the simple reason that there are many unloved and uncared for dogs across our country. We are very specific about the animals that we use, so not all rescue dogs will be approved within our program. Good behaviours and temperament are mandatory, and we have no aggressive breeds among our trained animals. So really, it's just a matter of saving an animal to help save a veteran, and the understanding that he also just saved an animal is another type of emotion that might help the veteran.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

Okay. Thank you.

Dr. Merali, reference was made to the use of marijuana as a therapy, and of course there has been lots of discussion, as you alluded to. Has VAC approached that in any way with regard to clinical trials? We know that the THC part is more recreational. Have they asked about the difference between that component and CBD in terms of what should be available?

Dr. Zul Merali:

It's an excellent question. Obviously you know the field. There are many components within the THC plant, and we need to study it very carefully. If you study the effects of marijuana, you will know that one strain is not the same as the other because there are different components. THC and CBD are the two active ingredients with different properties, and we don't really understand exactly the advantages and disadvantages of the different components. It would be very interesting to get studies that look at the different kinds of mixes in a known amount so that you would know what you were dealing with. If you open it up to its just being a marijuana study, the question is whether a marijuana species here would be the same as the one that you're going to get in Toronto or Vancouver, and the findings might not be transferrable. Therefore, it's very important to initially do a study in which you're looking at the actual components in a titrated way just as you would give a drug treatment, so that you would know what you're dealing with. Once you have clear answers, you can match up the strains of marijuana with the specific kind of profile that you want.

Ms. Irene Mathyssen:

There's a study being done at UBC on PTSD through one of the licensed producers, Tilray. I could give you the names of the people who are in charge of that study if you like.

Dr. Celeste Thirlwell:

That would be wonderful.

The Chair:

That's it for testimony today. If there's anything you would like to add to your testimony or those studies, if you can get them to the clerk, the clerk will distribute them to the committee.

On behalf of the committee I'd like to thank all four organizations for all the great things that you do for our men and women who have served.

With that, I need a motion to adjourn.

Mr. Bob Bratina:

I so move.

The Chair:

All in favour?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des anciens combattants

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Neil Ellis (Baie de Quinte, Lib.)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte. Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, nous reprenons notre étude de la santé mentale et de la prévention du suicide chez les anciens combattants.

Aujourd’hui, nous avons quatre groupes de témoins. Chacun a été avisé qu’il disposait tout d’abord de 10 minutes. Nous passerons ensuite aux questions.

Les quatre groupes avec nous aujourd’hui sont: la Commission de la santé mentale du Canada, la Mission Butterfly Inc., les Services de santé Royal Ottawa et la fondation LifeLine Canada.

Nous commencerons avec Liane Weber de Companion Paws Canada et directrice générale de la fondation LifeLine Canada, qui se joint à nous par vidéoconférence.

La parole est à vous Liane. Merci.

Mme Liane Weber (directrice générale, Companion Paws Canada, The LifeLine Canada Foundation):

Je vous suis très reconnaissante de m’avoir invitée et de me permettre de prendre la parole devant vous aujourd’hui.

Je m’appelle Liane Weber. Je suis directrice générale et fondatrice de la fondation LifeLine Canada, également appelée TLC. TLC est un organisme à but non lucratif enregistré de la Colombie-Britannique qui oeuvre partout au Canada et dans le monde entier. Son siège social est situé à West Kelowna.

La fondation n’est pas un service d’aide en cas de crise. Nous nous efforçons de concevoir de nouvelles initiatives comme l’application mobile LifeLine, l’application gratuite de prévention du suicide et de sensibilisation et Companion Paws Canada.

TLC a été créée en 2015. Sa mission consiste à réduire le nombre de suicides et de tentatives de suicide au Canada et dans le monde entier tout en créant des initiatives positives relatives à la santé mentale.

Je ne suis pas une professionnelle de la santé mentale, pas plus que je suis une dresseuse de chiens à Companion Paws Canada. J’ai été profondément touchée par deux suicides en 2012. Après que les pires moments du deuil furent derrière moi, j’ai mis à profit mon esprit d’entrepreneuse pour créer et lancer l’application LifeLine en 2013.

L’application et le site Web permettent un accès immédiat à des conseils et du soutien aux personnes en situation de crise et celles qui ont subi la perte tragique d’un être cher qui s’est suicidé, que ce soient les anciens combattants, les membres du personnel militaire ou leur famille. Ils sont une mine d’information, servent à faire de la sensibilisation et offrent des stratégies de prévention aux gens en situation de crise.

Le nouveau programme de TLC, Companion Paws Canada, est celui qui vous intéresse le plus selon ce que je comprends. Nous l’appelons également CPC. Le programme vise à aider les anciens combattants, les militaires actifs, les premiers répondants et les personnes âgées dans le besoin tout en offrant aux animaux une seconde chance. Nous leur portons secours, les entraînons et les jumelons avec une personne qui a besoin d’un animal certifié en zoothérapie. Le concept d’animal aidant et de chien de thérapie pour les anciens combattants n’est pas nouveau. Partout dans le monde, on trouve des organismes qui offrent ce service.

Malheureusement, les statistiques sur les suicides, la violence familiale et le trouble de stress post-traumatique chez les anciens combattants qui réintègrent la vie civile après leur service militaire sont inquiétantes. Ils peuvent se retrouver pris dans une spirale d’apathie, de chômage, de rupture amoureuse, de toxicomanie et de dépression.

Nous croyons que les animaux aidants peuvent constituer une thérapie ou un ami qui sauvera la vie de nombre de militaires revenant du front. Des études médicales ont prouvé que les animaux aidants peuvent améliorer considérablement la santé mentale et physique notamment en réduisant le stress, la dépression et les symptômes d’anxiété. Il peut être difficile en particulier pour les personnes qui souffrent de perturbation affective de s’ouvrir et de faire confiance à un autre être humain. Il est souvent plus facile pour elles de s’ouvrir à un animal de thérapie.

Les animaux de Companion Paws Canada ne sont pas des chiens d’assistance ni des chiens-guides. Ils sont des chiens de thérapie entraînés et certifiés pour l’obéissance dans le cadre d’une thérapie. L’interaction avec un animal de thérapie apporte des avantages thérapeutiques, motivationnels, émotionnels et récréatifs et permet d’améliorer la qualité de vie tandis qu’un chien d’assistance est entraîné pour réaliser des tâches précises qui ne relèvent pas du comportement habituel du chien.

Avant la création du programme Companion Paws Canada, un chien de thérapie pouvait être un chien dressé pour apporter de l’affection et du réconfort aux personnes dans les hôpitaux, les maisons de retraite, les centres de soins infirmiers, les écoles, les centres de soins palliatifs et les zones sinistrées ainsi qu’aux personnes autistiques. Grâce à ce programme, ces chiens sont dressés et peuvent habiter en permanence avec un ancien combattant ayant besoin d’un chien de thérapie.

Grâce à notre site Web, une personne peut présenter la lettre requise d’un médecin ou d’un professionnel de la santé mentale en toute confidentialité ainsi qu’une lettre d’autorisation de leur propriétaire, une preuve de leur capacité de payer les coûts après le placement et de prendre soin de l’animal.

L’équipe de Companion Paws Canada procède ensuite à une entrevue avec chacune des personnes pour déterminer ses attentes par rapport à l’animal de thérapie. Nous nous assurons ensuite de faire un mariage parfait entre l’animal et la personne en fonction de sa personnalité et de son mode de vie. Nous nous attendons également à ce que les bénéficiaires participent à une thérapie par le dialogue, prennent leurs médicaments et se renseignent sur leur maladie. En ajoutant un chien bien entraîné à leur plan de traitement, nous pouvons voir émerger quelque chose de profond et d’incroyable. Leur capacité de faire face à la situation s’améliore, car ces personnes ne sont plus seules pour traverser cette période difficile. Elles découvrent une âme soeur en leur chien, qui est toujours loyal et compatissant.

Lorsqu’un jumelage est effectué, l’animal passe le temps requis dans la maison d’un de nos entraîneurs, qui procède à un dressage intensif pour l’obéissance dans le cadre d’une thérapie et qui lui enseigne les autres comportements nécessaires pour vivre avec son nouveau maître. Au cours du dressage, le nouveau maître fera la rencontre de son nouveau compagnon et participera à des séances de dressage avec l’animal.

(1535)



Companion Paws Canada collabore avec des physiologues, des entraîneurs professionnels et des comportementalistes pour trouver les meilleurs chiens. Tous les chiens doivent respecter des critères stricts quant au tempérament, à la santé et à l’âge. Lorsqu’un chien qui convient est trouvé, il doit suivre une formation d’au moins 10 semaines. Pendant cette période, le chien est jumelé à une personne dans le besoin et avec leur « compagnon pour la vie ».

Les chiens proviennent de refuges de partout au pays. Ils sont âgés de deux à huit ans. Les chiens de Companion Paws Canada sont des animaux domestiques qui apportent un soutien thérapeutique par leur présence, leur regard positif sans jugement, leur affection et leur attention prioritaire. Nous travaillons avec des chiens qui ont été sauvés et des chiens d’assistance à la retraite. Dans le cadre du programme, nous ne certifions pas les animaux domestiques personnels. Les chiens de CPC ne sont pas certifiés animaux d’assistance puisqu’ils sont dressés pour être des animaux aidants de thérapie. Cependant, cet objectif est réalisable avec une formation plus poussée.

Le chien doit atteindre un niveau de formation stricte pour réussir le programme, ce qui inclut le comportement, l’obéissance et la socialisation. Le niveau à atteindre correspond aux normes les plus élevées de la Therapy Dogs International et l’examen de certification est réalisé par un évaluateur agréé pour les chiens de thérapie.

Notre coordonnateur qualifié est un dresseur professionnel de chiens d’assistance qui a travaillé pendant des dizaines d’années avec de nombreuses races de chiens d’assistance pour les soins en santé mentale comme le trouble de stress post-traumatique, la dépression grave, l’anxiété et l’autisme.

Lorsque le chien a réussi l’examen, son nouveau propriétaire recevra la veste et le certificat du chien de thérapie de Companion Paws Canada. Il recevra également une lettre de la fondation LifeLine Canada certifiant l’authenticité du chien de thérapie. Nous nous assurons que les normes de formation les plus élevées sont respectées dans tout le pays.

Aucune loi ne régit l’emploi des termes « chien de thérapie ». L’organisme responsable de l’évaluation et de la certification des chiens a été approuvé dans une décision commune du bureau du solliciteur général, du Bureau de la consommation, de la Protection du consommateur et de la Sécurité publique de Victoria. On énonce dans cette décision les attentes à l’égard de cet organisme.

Les chiens peuvent mener les personnes, même les plus isolées, à s’ouvrir. Le fait de devoir féliciter l’animal peut amener les anciens combattants qui ont vécu un traumatisme à surmonter leur engourdissement émotionnel. Par l’enseignement de commandements au chien, le patient peut améliorer sa capacité à communiquer et à s’affirmer, sans être agressif; certains ont du mal à faire la différence entre les deux.

Les chiens peuvent également calmer l’hypervigilance que présentent souvent les anciens combattants souffrant de trouble de stress post-traumatique. Les chercheurs cumulent de plus en plus de preuves selon lesquelles le lien établi avec un chien a des effets biologiques, comme l’augmentation de l’ocytocine, une hormone contraire aux symptômes du trouble de stress post-traumatique.

Compte tenu des autres avantages apportés par le programme de formation Companion Paws et des effets positifs que ce type de thérapie a entraînés dans des programmes similaires partout dans le monde, nous avons choisi de faire de Companion Paws Canada l’une de nos initiatives phares.

Le caractère vigilant des chiens est l’une des principales raisons qui expliquent pourquoi ils peuvent aider les anciens combattants qui souffrent de trouble de stress post-traumatique, de dépression, d’anxiété. Si vous avez déjà eu un cauchemar, vous savez que la présence d’un chien dans la pièce aide à vous resituer; il vous fait savoir immédiatement si vous êtes réellement exposé à un danger ou si vous venez simplement de faire un cauchemar. Le niveau supérieur de vigilance imite la camaraderie que l’on retrouve dans l’armée: aucun soldat ou marin n’est jamais seul sur le champ de bataille. Lorsque vous avez un chien à vos côtés, la même chose se produit: vous n’êtes jamais seul. Vous pouvez recueillir des données sur votre environnement en sachant que votre chien le fait lui aussi.

La deuxième raison est le caractère protecteur des chiens. Tout comme la camaraderie dans l’armée, vous savez qu’il surveille toujours vos arrières.

La troisième raison est que le chien réagit bien à une relation d’autorité. Lorsqu’ils reviennent d’un déploiement, de nombreux militaires ont de la difficulté avec leurs relations. Ils ont l’habitude de donner et de recevoir des ordres, mais cette façon de faire ne fonctionne généralement pas bien à la maison. J’ai parlé à beaucoup de militaires qui se sont fait dire d’arrêter une fois à la maison. Les chiens, quant à eux, adorent ce type de relation.

Les chiens aiment inconditionnellement. Beaucoup de militaires rentrent d’un déploiement et ont de la difficulté à s’adapter à la vie civile. Certains se rendent compte que les aptitudes qu’ils ont développées et utilisées pendant leur déploiement ne sont pas transférables et ne peuvent être respectées dans la vie civile. Cette situation peut faire des ravages si le militaire occupait un poste respecté dans la hiérarchie. Les chiens ne jouent pas à ce jeu. Ils aiment. Point.

Les chiens aident les gens à refaire confiance. Et la confiance est un gros problème chez les personnes souffrant de trouble de stress post-traumatique. Il peut être très difficile de se sentir en sécurité dans la société après avoir vécu certaines expériences. Il peut être long avant qu’une personne ait confiance en son environnement immédiat. Les chiens aident ces personnes à guérir puisqu’ils sont dignes de confiance.

Ils rappellent comment aimer. Le monde peut sembler assez tordu après la guerre. Un chien bien dressé est un ami et un partenaire qui apporte de l’amour, mais également qui participe au traitement médical.

Par leurs comportements, les chiens aident les anciens combattants atteints de trouble de stress post-traumatique en leur apportant du soutien et en leur donnant d’autres moyens de surmonter les symptômes qui sont associés à cette affection, comme l’hypervigilance, la peur, les cauchemars, la réaction de combat ou de fuite et les trous de mémoire.

(1540)



Parmi les avantages d’un chien de thérapie, citons notamment un allégement du traitement et des médicaments. Le chien peut sentir lorsque son maître ne se sent pas bien. Il n’y a pas vraiment de commandement; le chien réagit aux émotions et accordera plus d’attention à son maître qu’à la normale.

Lorsque les anciens combattants ont une réaction liée au trouble de stress post-traumatique, leur corps devient agité. Leur rythme cardiaque et leur respiration s’accélèrent. Flatter un chien est une façon naturelle de se calmer. Ainsi, le rythme cardiaque ralentit et la pression artérielle diminue.

Les chiens de thérapie aident les anciens combattants à s’ancrer et à ne plus avoir de visions du temps passé en zone de guerre. Même au milieu d’un supermarché, un ancien combattant peut se sentir comme dans une zone de guerre. Un chien de thérapie peut l’aider à s’ancrer et à le ramener à la réalité. En flattant le chien et voyant qu’il est bien là, la personne peut prendre conscience qu’elle n’est pas dans une zone de combat.

Beaucoup d’anciens combattants sont isolés et se retirent à leur retour. Un chien de thérapie est un moyen de se reconnecter sans peur, sans jugement et sans malentendu.

J’espère que j’ai pu vous éclairer sur les services que la fondation LifeLine Canada offre aux anciens combattants et sur la façon dont les chiens de thérapie de Companion Paws Canada peuvent sauver des vies.

C’est ainsi que se termine mon allocution. Je serai ravie de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci, madame Weber.

La parole est maintenant aux Services de santé Royal Ottawa. Ici présents: Mme Hale, directrice de la Clinique de traumatismes liés au stress opérationnel, et M. Merali, président-directeur général de l’Institut de recherche en santé mentale du Royal. Bienvenus et merci de vous joindre à nous aujourd’hui.

Mme Shelley Hale (directrice, Clinique de traumatismes liés au stress opérationnel, Services de santé Royal Ottawa):

Bonjour, monsieur le président, membres du Comité, mesdames et messieurs. Merci de me permettre de m’exprimer devant le Comité aujourd’hui.

Je m’appelle Shelley Hale. Je suis directrice de la Clinique de traumatismes liés au stress opérationnel des Services de santé Royal d’Ottawa.

Notre clinique est ouverte depuis huit ans et nous avons traité plus de 1 700 clients comme vous pouvez le voir. Nous faisons partie du réseau national de cliniques de traumatismes liés au stress opérationnel, nous collaborons avec le réseau et recevons du financement d’Anciens Combattants Canada. Nous sommes l’une des 11 cliniques et la seule située dans un établissement spécialisé en santé mentale. Anciens Combattants Canada, le ministère de la Défense nationale du Canada et la Gendarmerie royale du Canada sont les seuls organismes qui peuvent adresser des patients à nos cliniques. Nous leur fournissons ensuite une évaluation complète de chaque patient qu’ils nous ont envoyé. Notre clinique d’Ottawa couvre la province de l’Ontario et l’ouest du Québec. Nous collaborons avec sept bureaux de district, trois points d’attache actifs, cinq centres intégrés de soutien du personnel et deux divisions de la GRC.

Voici un aperçu de la provenance des clients qui sont dirigés vers la clinique à partir de la zone que nous couvrons. Sans surprise, la majorité de nos clients proviennent d’Ottawa et de Pembroke.

Notre client moyen — pour vous dresser un portrait — est un homme ancien combattant de 46 ans qui a été déployé environ deux fois et qui a fait partie des Forces armées canadiennes pendant près de 20 ans. Il a participé à des missions de maintien de la paix et a reçu un diagnostic de trouble de stress post-traumatique et de dépression grave. S’il est traité dans notre clinique, son séjour durera environ 18 mois et il participera à une thérapie factuelle de groupe et devra faire un travail individuel pour traiter son traumatisme. Lorsqu’il quittera la clinique, il aura rempli ses objectifs de traitement et se sentira prêt et outillé grâce au chemin parcouru pour affronter son quotidien. Il recommandera également notre clinique à ses amis.

Le nombre de clients que nous envoie le MDN a augmenté progressivement au cours des dernières années. Nous avons observé que les transferts à chaud — pendant que le militaire est encore en service — entre Anciens Combattants Canada et le ministère de la Défense nationale du Canada donnent de bons résultats.

Nous collaborons avec nos collègues du MDN à Ottawa pour accepter les clients dirigés vers la clinique pendant qu’ils sont encore actifs et qu’il leur reste jusqu’à deux ans de service afin d’assurer une transition en douceur vers des soins. Nous pouvons ainsi nous assurer que personne ne passe entre les mailles du filet.

Nos clients nous ont indiqué que cette façon de faire facilite une transition en douceur entre les services. Nous commençons également à voir des clients qui nous sont envoyés de Pembroke par ce même processus.

En plus des services offerts dans notre clinique, nous avons lancé il y a quelques années l’application mobile Connexion TSO qui permet à l’utilisateur de faire une autoévaluation de la dépression, du trouble de stress post-traumatique et des troubles du sommeil, les trois principaux problèmes dont souffrent nos clients. Cette application renferme également des renseignements à l’intention des médecins de famille ainsi que les coordonnées de ces derniers pour les familles. Nous avons aussi lancé une Ressource pour aidants naturels sur les blessures liées au stress opérationnel en collaboration avec le ministère de la Défense nationale du Canada et Anciens Combattants Canada. Nous avons testé l’application auprès des membres de la famille des militaires dans la zone que nous couvrons et avons reçu beaucoup de commentaires positifs de ceux-ci et de nos clients.

Nous savons que ce ne sont pas tous les vétérans qui sont affiliés à Anciens Combattants Canada et qu’il est parfois difficile pour les vétérans et les fournisseurs de service de se retrouver dans ce système. Nous souhaiterions qu’une campagne de sensibilisation nationale soit mise en branle pour que les vétérans soient aiguillés dès leur entrée dans le système de santé, que ce soit à l’urgence, dans le bureau de leur médecin de famille ou dans une clinique sans rendez-vous. Il faudrait que tous les fournisseurs de service de santé demandent à leurs patients s’ils ont fait partie des forces. Nous pourrions ainsi offrir une toute nouvelle avenue aux clients qui ne sont pas associés à Anciens Combattants Canada. Si nous parvenons à sensibiliser tous les fournisseurs de service et à les inviter à poser une seule question simple, plus de vétérans qu’auparavant pourraient avoir accès aux services qui ont été créés pour eux.

Je vous remercie pour votre temps.

(1545)

Le président:

Monsieur Merali, souhaitez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Zul Merali (président-directeur général, L'Institut de recherche en santé mentale du Royal, Services de santé Royal Ottawa):

Oui. Permettez-moi de me présenter. Je m’appelle Zul Merali et je suis président-directeur général de l’Institut de recherche en santé mentale du Royal. Je suis également directeur scientifique fondateur du Réseau canadien de recherche et intervention sur la dépression.

Comme vous le savez, 4 000 Canadiens se suicident tous les ans. C’est un peu comme si deux avions remplis à pleine capacité s’écrasaient tous les mois et qu’il n’y avait aucun survivant. Vous pouvez vous imaginer si une autre situation faisait autant de victimes à quel point le public serait indigné.

Le suicide est l’une des sept principales causes de décès au Canada et nous devons prendre des mesures de santé publique. Nous devons également mieux comprendre les causes sous-jacentes aux suicides ou aux gestes suicidaires.

Les mécanismes biologiques des idées et des gestes suicidaires sont encore méconnus. Ils sont toutefois particulièrement importants puisque nous devons comprendre ce qui ne fonctionne pas dans le cerveau et pourquoi certaines personnes y sont prédisposées tandis que d’autres font preuve de résilience dans les mêmes circonstances.

Mon objectif aujourd’hui est de demander que des recherches soient menées. Nous savons que le fait d’obtenir des soins ne suffit pas nécessairement. Près de la moitié des nombreuses personnes qui reçoivent déjà des soins feront tout de même des gestes suicidaires et, parfois, parviendront à s’enlever la vie. La grande majorité des personnes qui ont subi un traumatisme grave ou qui souffrent d’une dépression ne se suicideront pas nécessairement. Nous n’avons aucun moyen fiable de prédire qui fera une tentative et qui se suicidera.

Aux Services de santé Royal, nous nous efforçons de mieux comprendre le suicide. Permettez-moi de vous expliquer brièvement notre approche. Nous avons par exemple créé un centre d’imagerie cérébrale en partenariat avec des philanthropes, le ministère de la Défense nationale du Canada, des universités et la Légion, etc. Cette initiative publique visait à joindre nos efforts afin de nous doter d’outils pour rendre l’invisible visible. Nous devons regarder à l’intérieur du cerveau, car c’est de là que proviennent les idées suicidaires et la volonté de se suicider.

Pour appuyer mes dires, je vous invite à regarder la diapositive. Nous y voyons que le cerveau d’une personne qui souffre de trouble de stress post-traumatique est très différent. Comme vous pouvez le voir, on dirait un arbre de Noël. Différents ligands du cerveau sont sollicités comparativement aux deux autres cerveaux qui proviennent des groupes de contrôle. Cet exemple montre non seulement à quel point l’imagerie peut être utile pour poser des diagnostics, mais également pour comprendre quelles sont les causes sous-jacentes de ces affections.

Je suis heureux de pouvoir vous communiquer quelques-unes de nos découvertes récentes. Comme vous le savez, le développement des antidépresseurs a été plutôt lent. Nous avons toutefois observé des percées récemment. Les données que je vous présente ici montrent qu’il est possible de traiter les patients avec une nouvelle catégorie de médicaments. Même si le médicament n’est pas nouveau en tant que tel, cette application est nouvelle. On utilise une très faible dose d’un vieil anesthésique qui agit comme un antidépresseur très puissant et qui peut soulager les symptômes de la dépression en l’espace de quelques heures ou de quelques jours comparativement à des semaines ou des mois pour les antidépresseurs traditionnels. Ce traitement est formidable puisqu’il semble agir encore plus sur les idées suicidaires. Il agit beaucoup plus rapidement que les antidépresseurs. Même les personnes chez qui les antidépresseurs n’avaient aucun effet verront leurs idées suicidaires décliner en quelques heures. Cette découverte est très prometteuse puisque nous pouvons maintenant intervenir très rapidement et soulager les idées suicidaires très efficacement.

(1550)



J’aimerais attirer votre attention sur les barres vertes du graphique; elles montrent que les gens n’ont exprimé que très peu d’idées suicidaires. Les barres bleues et rouges montrent un nombre élevé à modéré d’idées suicidaires. Comme vous le voyez, près de 90 % des patients sont libérés de leurs idées suicidaires dans les deux semaines suivant le début du traitement à la kétamine.

Il s’agit d’une grande nouvelle, mais ce qui est encore plus formidable est que ce traitement nous permet de dissocier les symptômes de la dépression en général des idées suicidaires. Nous souhaitons ainsi pouvoir obtenir une image du cerveau où nous pourrions voir dans quelles zones les idées suicidaires se trouvent. Autrement dit, nous pourrions déterminer quels sont les circuits du cerveau qui sont responsables des idées suicidaires. Si nous pouvions mieux comprendre le phénomène, nous pourrions, selon moi, commencer à cibler un traitement beaucoup plus efficace pour ces cas.

Notre plan d’action consiste à nous concentrer sur la dépression, parce qu'elle est souvent associée aux idées suicidaires. Nous souhaitons également canaliser nos efforts vers le trouble de stress post-traumatique qui est étroitement lié aux idées suicidaires.

D’ailleurs, nous avons créé récemment une chaire de recherche sur la santé mentale des militaires et des vétérans ainsi qu’une chaire de recherche sur le stress et le traumatisme. Je suis très fier d’annoncer que nous avons recruté une personne de Yale, à New York, pour l’étude de l’outil que je vous ai montré un peu plus tôt et qui présentait très clairement le cerveau d’une personne atteinte de trouble de stress post-traumatique. Le chercheur a commencé la semaine dernière à travailler avec notre organisme.

Nous travaillons en partenariat avec le réseau national des centres de dépression aux États-Unis et avec l’Alliance européenne contre la dépression pour être au diapason des recherches à l’étranger. De plus, nous collaborons également avec la Commission de la santé mentale du Canada afin de tester un modèle à quatre volets visant à réduire les gestes suicidaires au Canada.

II est absolument nécessaire de créer un centre d’excellence sur les traumatismes militaires et non militaires, y compris le suicide, ainsi que sur les résultats qui y sont associés.

Sur ce, je vous remercie de m’avoir permis d’être ici aujourd’hui pour vous parler de nos projets passionnants et de nos inquiétudes. Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

(1555)

Le président:

Merci.

Passons maintenant à Mme Bradley, présidente-directrice générale, et M. Mantler, vice-président, Programmes et priorités, de la Commission de la santé mentale du Canada.

Bonjour.

Mme Louise Bradley (présidente-directrice générale, Commission de la santé mentale du Canada):

Merci beaucoup.

La Commission de la santé mentale du Canada est heureuse d’être ici aujourd’hui. Merci de nous avoir invités.

C’est très encourageant de voir que le gouvernement fait de la santé mentale des anciens combattants une priorité. Comme nous le savons tous, le suicide est une réalité dévastatrice, et ce, non seulement chez les militaires et les anciens combattants — comme nous l’avons entendu aujourd’hui —, mais également dans de nombreuses collectivités au Canada, qui font chacune face à des difficultés différentes.

Aujourd’hui, nous parlerons principalement des aspects qui touchent à l’étude du Comité, soit l’amélioration du soutien aux anciens combattants pour la santé mentale et la prévention du suicide.

En tant que membres du Comité, vous savez sans doute que la population d’anciens combattants au Canada est estimée à un peu plus de 700 000 personnes. Selon le peu de données accessibles, entre une personne sur cinq et une personne sur dix ayant reçu un diagnostic de trouble de santé mentale aura des idées suicidaires pendant une année donnée. Comme M. Merali l’a mentionné, il n’y a aucun moyen fiable de déterminer ce nombre.

Il semble également que l’incidence des troubles de santé mentale soit plus élevée chez les vétérans des conflits modernes que chez les anciens combattants des autres époques. Il est cependant difficile de déterminer avec certitude si c’est réellement le cas en raison de la stigmatisation. Toutefois, il est sûr que l’incidence est plus élevée chez les anciens combattants que dans la population générale.

La gravité des conséquences mentales et émotionnelles sur les anciens combattants n’est toutefois pas étonnante compte tenu de l’intensité des tâches qu’ils sont appelés à effectuer. Au Canada et dans le monde entier, les études démographiques permettent de brosser un portrait de l’ensemble complexe des besoins et des déterminants de la santé propres aux anciens combattants. Cet ensemble comprend tous les aspects allant des prédispositions observées chez les personnes qui choisissent de servir leur pays, aux facteurs de stress propres au service militaire et à la transition complexe de la vie militaire à la vie civile. Il n’existe pas de solution unique qui permettrait aux anciens combattants de surmonter toutes les difficultés auxquelles ils font face. Nous savons toutefois qu’une approche axée sur ce groupe est un très bon point de départ.

Cela dit, le gouvernement a pris des initiatives importantes pour améliorer le bien-être des anciens combattants. À titre d’exemple, Ed Mantler et moi avons la chance d’avoir été invités à siéger au groupe consultatif sur la santé mentale du ministre des Anciens Combattants. Bien que du soutien soit déjà offert aux anciens combattants au Canada, il ne suffit pas à répondre aux besoins. Nous entendons de plus en plus de demandes urgentes pour que ces services soient améliorés. Ces appels viennent aussi des vétérans qui siègent au même comité que nous.

Le manque de service est particulièrement criant pour ce qui est des mesures adéquates de soutien à la transition. Parmi les services de soutien actuels, mentionnons un réseau national d’environ 4 000 professionnels qualifiés en santé mentale qui offrent des services aux anciens combattants ayant subi des blessures de stress opérationnel dans la collectivité où ils habitent. Nous souhaitons attirer votre attention sur cette initiative puisqu’il est extrêmement important d’avoir des services de proximité là où habitent les vétérans.

Avant de laisser Ed Mantler vous parler des outils efficaces qu’a mis au point la Commission pour améliorer la santé mentale des anciens combattants, je souhaite souligner une étude actuellement menée qui pourrait intéresser le Comité. Le gouvernement de l’Australie procède actuellement à une étude ciblée sur les services de prévention du suicide et de l’automutilation offerts aux militaires et aux vétérans. Rédigé par la National Mental Health Commission, ce rapport devrait être publié le mois prochain. Je crois qu’il pourrait être utile au Comité.

En ce qui a trait aux partenariats de la Commission avec le gouvernement, nous avons récemment lancé l’Initiative des Premiers soins en santé mentale pour les vétérans, leur famille et le personnel soignant. Je vais laisser M. Mantler vous expliquer.

(1600)

M. Ed Mantler (vice-président, Programmes et priorités, Commission de la santé mentale du Canada):

Merci Louise.

Le programme dont parle Louise, Premiers soins en santé mentale pour les vétérans, permet d’approfondir les connaissances sur la santé mentale et de développer des compétences dans la collectivité pour reconnaître et traiter les troubles de santé mentale. Cette initiative est fondée sur un plan d’action éprouvé et factuel. Grâce au financement d’Anciens Combattants Canada, ce cours est offert gratuitement aux participants.

Le programme permet de renforcer les capacités des vétérans et de leur donner les moyens de faire face à leurs troubles de santé mentale et à leurs maladies plutôt que de les diriger simplement aux organismes gouvernementaux. Grâce au cours Premiers soins en santé mentale pour les vétérans, les familles, les travailleurs communautaires et les anciens combattants peuvent acquérir les outils requis pour reconnaître les troubles de santé mentale et les aptitudes nécessaires pour intervenir jusqu’à ce qu’un professionnel puisse apporter son aide. Ce type de programmes concrets permet d’inculquer les connaissances sur le terrain et dans la collectivité, où elles sont le plus près de ceux qui en ont besoin.

L’an dernier seulement, 14 cours ont été donnés partout au pays. Des centaines de vétérans sont maintenant mieux préparés et outillés pour agir efficacement en cas de troubles de santé mentale ou de crise. Notre objectif en 2017 est d’offrir 40 cours aux vétérans d’un océan à l’autre.

Le Comité sera peut-être intéressé également par l’initiative L’Esprit au travail de la Commission. Ce programme éducatif vise à promouvoir la santé mentale et à lutter contre la stigmatisation associée à la maladie mentale en milieu de travail. Ce programme est issu d’un programme du ministère de la Défense nationale intitulé En route vers la préparation mentale. Ce programme de formation favorise la santé mentale et le bien-être des employés et présente différentes façons d’aborder la question de la maladie mentale en milieu de travail, offre des moyens de lutter contre la stigmatisation et encourage les employés à demander de l’aide lorsqu’ils en ont besoin.

La formation porte sur le modèle du continuum de la santé mentale dans lequel la santé mentale est divisée entre des catégories à l’intérieur d’un continuum. Elle permet aux participants de repérer les signes du déclin de la santé mentale et de bien se rendre compte que ces signes s’inscrivent dans un continuum et peuvent se déplacer dans celui-ci. Elle présente des stratégies pour que les participants retrouvent le meilleur état de santé mentale possible. Ces stratégies s’inspirent des théories cognitivocomportementales qui favorisent la gestion du stress et l’amélioration de la santé mentale. Il s’agit de techniques simples que tout le monde peut apprendre, comme la respiration abdominale, le monologue intérieur positif, la visualisation et l’établissement d’objectifs adéquats. Ces mêmes techniques sont utilisées par les athlètes olympiques pour maximiser leurs performances.

Nous étions ravis de constater que le dernier rapport du Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale mentionne à plusieurs reprises que la formation En route vers la préparation mentale peut être un outil utile.

Tout aussi importants que soient les programmes de formation, il faudra s’efforcer dès maintenant pour mettre en oeuvre un plan plus audacieux pour sauver la vie des anciens combattants. Je remercie M. Merali d’avoir abordé la question du suicide. Le risque de mort par suicide est de 32 % à 46 % plus élevé chez les anciens combattants que chez les Canadiens du même âge. Le suicide chez les anciens combattants se produit dans la collectivité.

L’an dernier, dans le mémoire prébudgétaire de la Commission, nous avons présenté aux députés et à Anciens Combattants notre modèle national de prévention du suicide dans les collectivités. La Commission serait prête à déployer rapidement une stratégie de prévention du suicide perfectionnée dans 13 collectivités partout au pays, soit une dans chaque province et chaque territoire. Elle pourrait également cibler les projets dans les bases militaires ou les collectivités où la population d’anciens combattants est élevée. Le coût du projet s’élèverait à 40 millions de dollars sur cinq ans; un prix bien peu élevé si l’on considère le nombre de vies que ce projet pourrait sauver. Le modèle s’inspire de programmes éprouvés au Québec et dans d’autres pays qui ont permis de réduire considérablement le taux de suicide de 20 % en deux ans.

Le projet de prévention du suicide permettrait de constituer une base de connaissances sur laquelle pourrait prendre appui un programme de prévention du suicide. Il viserait particulièrement les mesures de soutien spécialisées, y compris les services de prévention, de crise et de postvention comme les lignes d’écoute téléphonique, les groupes de soutien et la planification ainsi que l’accès coordonnés. Il comprendrait également une formation et des possibilités d’apprentissage continu visant à mieux outiller les gardiens dans la collectivité, notamment les médecins de famille, les premiers répondants, les infirmières, les gestionnaires et les enseignants.

La Commission serait honorée que le Comité examine cette proposition dans son ensemble au cours de ses travaux. Je serai heureux de vous remettre le mémoire prébudgétaire complet ainsi que la note d’information.

(1605)



La Commission est à même de collaborer avec tous les paliers de gouvernement pour continuer à offrir des programmes et de la formation aux anciens combattants.

Je tiens à vous remercier encore une fois de nous avoir permis de partager quelques-unes de nos expériences dans ce dossier. Je serai ravi de répondre aux questions.

Le président:

Merci.

Passons maintenant à la Mission Butterfly inc. La parole est à M. Champion, vice-président, et à Mme Thirlwell, psychiatre de l’Équipe soignante exécutive. Bienvenus.

Vous pouvez y aller. Vous disposez de 10 minutes.

M. John Champion (vice-président, Mission Butterfly Inc.):

Bonjour. Je suis honoré d’être ici aujourd’hui. Je me présente en toute humilité.

Je m’appelle John Champion. Je suis ici en ma qualité d’ancien militaire des Forces armées canadiennes, au sein des forces régulières, ancien policier régional et ancien enquêteur des homicides pour les Nations unies. Je suis actuellement sapeur de combat, agent du service des anciens combattants de la Légion royale canadienne et de la zone C2 ainsi que membre du Conseil d’administration de Mission Butterfly, un organisme à but non lucratif qui offre des services de thérapie multimodale appelés « guérir des blessures invisibles ».

Tout au long de ma vie professionnelle, j’ai été témoin des horreurs que peut infliger l’homme. J’ai observé les conséquences de la destruction entraînée par des priorités politiques. J’ai également été témoin des résultats incroyables que les soldats du maintien de la paix et les artisans de la paix peuvent obtenir en risquant leur vie avec altruisme pour sauver celle de gens qu’ils ne connaissent pas. Malheureusement, j’ai également vu directement les effets à long terme de ces missions et la destruction qu’elles peuvent entraîner non seulement chez les vétérans ou les premiers répondants, mais également chez les membres de leur famille et dans la collectivité.

Le trouble de stress post-traumatique et le suicide sont endémiques parmi les militaires, les anciens combattants et les premiers répondants. Nous ne pouvons plus rester à l’écart presque immobiles. Le trouble de stress post-traumatique et le suicide sont comme une maladie contagieuse; l’entourage en souffre et peut y songer.

Parmi tous les rôles que je joue, le plus ardu est celui d’agent du service des anciens combattants. Il y a 20 ans, l’agent du service des anciens combattants aidait les anciens combattants et les veuves à se retrouver dans le bourbier des formalités administratives d’Anciens Combattants. Aujourd’hui, il doit trouver un logement, un emploi et un traitement pour les anciens combattants. Ayant été moi-même au bord du gouffre, je peux vous confirmer que les facteurs qui empêchent les anciens combattants d’obtenir un traitement sont la peur de perdre leur emploi et d’être ostracisés par leurs paires, leur famille ou leur collectivité et la croyance que le thérapeute ne peut comprendre ce qu’ils vivent ou qu’il n’a pas les connaissances requises.

Le trouble de stress post-traumatique est différent pour chacun des anciens combattants. Mission Butterfly offre un programme qui est assorti de nombreux modèles de thérapie. Pour nous assurer que la thérapie soit efficace pour le client, nous faisons des tests exhaustifs avant de la commencer. Un week-end de pêche à la mouche ne suffit pas pour guérir un ancien combattant. Ce dernier a besoin d’une thérapie pour guérir son esprit, son corps et son âme. Cette thérapie doit englober sa famille et aborder des thèmes comme les finances et la nutrition. Elle ne nécessite pas cependant la surconsommation de médicaments qui est la solution médicale actuelle. Ne vous méprenez pas, les médicaments ont leur utilité, mais si les symptômes sont masqués, il est plus difficile de traiter la cause réelle. Mission Butterfly offre une thérapie sans médicament qui couvre tous ces aspects.

Les thérapeutes de l’organisme doivent suivre un atelier intensif sur la culture des Forces armées canadiennes afin qu’ils puissent surmonter rapidement les barrières. Les militaires ont leur propre langue. Ils ont un sens de l’éthique et un respect les uns envers les autres qui leur sont propres et que le citoyen moyen ne peut comprendre. À moins d’avoir prêté le serment militaire et accepté le chapelet sans fin de responsabilités qui y sont associées, vous ne pouvez comprendre ce que vit un ancien combattant.

Il faut commencer rapidement à traiter le trouble de stress post-traumatique et garder en tête qu’il faut adapter la thérapie à la personne. La solution n’est pas de l’envoyer voir un psychiatre pour qu’elle se fasse prescrire des antidépresseurs et un congé du travail. Cette méthode est utilisée actuellement et elle doit cesser. Le vrai changement commence ici, maintenant dans cette salle.

Dre Celeste Thirlwell (psychiatre, Équipe soignante exécutive, Mission Butterfly Inc.):

Je m’appelle Celeste Thirlwell et je suis membre de l’Équipe soignante exécutive de l’organisme à but non lucratif Mission Butterfly. Nous sommes un groupe de Canadiens bienveillants qui se consacrent à améliorer la qualité de vie des hommes et des femmes qui protègent, assistent et servent avec altruisme le public canadien. Je suis psychiatre et spécialiste de la médecine du sommeil. J’ai également de l’expérience en neurochirurgie, en recherche en neuroscience et en gestion de la douleur. Je suis heureuse de pouvoir m’adresser au Comité aujourd’hui.

Il est injuste que les anciens combattants atteints de trouble de stress post-traumatique, leur famille et leur collectivité continuent de souffrir en raison du manque d’évaluation, de traitement et soutien. Pour un traitement optimal et novateur des anciens combattants atteints de trouble de stress post-traumatique, la justice sociale, les priorités militaires et le leadership fédéral seront essentiels.

Le trouble de stress post-traumatique était appelé traumatisme dû au bombardement au cours de la Première Guerre mondiale, réaction de stress de combat lors de la Seconde Guerre mondiale et, finalement, trouble de stress post-traumatique au cours de la guerre du Vietnam. Aujourd’hui, selon le DSM-5, le manuel de diagnostic de l’American Psychiatric Association, il existe quatre composantes au trouble de stress post-traumatique. La première est la reviviscence, comme les souvenirs des événements et les cauchemars. La deuxième est l’évitement. La troisième est les altérations négatives persistantes dans les cognitions et l’humeur, qui comprennent les pensées hostiles, agressives et même paranoïaques. La quatrième est l’hyperréactivité, comme l’hypervigilance, la surexcitation et les troubles du sommeil.

Le traitement et le diagnostic de trouble de stress post-traumatique demeurent un adversaire complexe tant pour nous en clinique que pour les militaires et les autres services dans le monde entier. Une des composantes clés du trouble qui a fait l’objet de publications récemment est le trouble du sommeil. Les militaires sont entraînés pour avoir un état d’esprit prêt au combat, de sorte que leur système nerveux sympathique — leur système de combat ou de fuite — est en suractivité. Ce système est actif en permanence. Leur circuit neuronal est activé et entraîné pour le demeurer. Lorsque les militaires reviennent du combat, ils perçoivent du danger même s’il n’y en a pas. Leur système qui sert à désactiver l’autre — appelé système nerveux parasympathique — et qui doit agir comme un frein n’existe pas. Mission Butterfly a mis au point un système exhaustif et intégré qui permet de stimuler le système nerveux parasympathique et de reprogrammer le circuit neuronal chez ces militaires.

Lorsque nous parlons de circuit neuronal et de reconversion, la honte et la culpabilité — qui souvent empêchent les anciens combattants de chercher de l’aide — sont mises de côté. Il s’agit de reconversion neuronale. La bonne nouvelle est que nous pouvons réinitialiser le circuit neuronal. La mauvaise est que ce traitement prend du temps et nécessite une approche intégrée. La pharmacologie ne peut à elle seule y arriver, pas plus que la gestion comportementale. Nous avons besoin d’une approche globale comme celle proposée par Mission Butterfly.

L’autre chose dont ces hommes ont besoin — j’ai lu sur le sujet depuis que je vous ai présenté la littérature — est une mission. Ils ont besoin d’une mission. Ces gens sont entraînés pour protéger et servir leur pays. Ils reviennent à la maison et n’ont aucun objectif de protection ni de service. Les militaires pour qui on a obtenu les meilleurs résultats aux États-Unis sont des anciens combattants indépendants qui se sont regroupés et ont trouvé une mission de bonne volonté, comme la reconstruction d’écoles et de maisons. Ces gens sont prêts à aider, ils veulent aider et ils ont besoin d’une mission. D’une part, nous devons calmer et reconvertir leur système nerveux pour changer leur état d’esprit de préparation au combat, ou leur réaction de combat ou de fuite, et désactiver, calmer et reconvertir ce système. Ils doivent savoir qu’ils sont en sécurité. D’autre part, nous devons guérir leur coeur et, pour ce faire, ils ont besoin d’une mission.

Nous avons tous besoin d’un but dans la vie; nous avons tous besoin d’une mission. Sans cette mission, la vie est inutile. Sans cette mission, nous voyons des suicides.

Merci.

(1610)

Le président:

Nous procéderons maintenant à la première ronde de question.

Monsieur Brassard.

M. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous demande pardon à tous dès le départ, parce qu’en sept minutes, je n’aurai pas le temps de poser les questions auxquelles j'ai besoin de réponses. J'espère que mes collègues reprendront un peu le sujet dont je vais traiter.

Tout d'abord, parlons de la recherche que vous menez, monsieur Merali. La diapo qui démontre la différence entre le cerveau d'une personne qui souffre du trouble de stress post-traumatique et ceux de personnes qui n'en sont pas atteintes m'a intéressé. Évidemment, vous n'en êtes qu'au stade de la recherche, mais pourquoi ne faisons-nous pas passer cet examen aux personnes qui ont ce trouble dès qu'elles viennent nous consulter?

(1615)

M. Zul Merali:

Votre question est excellente et très importante. C'est justement pour cela que je vous ai montré cette diapo. Nous élaborons des outils qui pourraient servir, mais ce ne sont pas encore des outils de diagnostic normalisés.

Par exemple, il existe un outil de diagnostic normalisé pour le cancer, tout comme pour l'hypertension artérielle. L'imagerie du cerveau est toute nouvelle. C'est pourquoi, à mon avis, il est important de consacrer le temps et les efforts nécessaires pour normaliser ces outils de diagnostic afin de les utiliser pour un plus vaste éventail de troubles de santé.

M. John Brassard:

Est-ce que d'autres pays font un peu la même chose? Ont-ils terminé ce processus de recherche?

M. Zul Merali:

Aux États-Unis, par exemple, le projet le plus courant, après celui du génome, est ce qu'on appelle le projet connectome humain. Il vise à étudier les connexions entre différents aspects des circuits cérébraux et ce qui les active ou les désactive sous certaines conditions. Les chercheurs se penchent là-dessus à l'heure actuelle pour comprendre non seulement le trouble de stress post-traumatique, mais toutes les dysfonctions des circuits cérébraux qui produisent des symptômes ou des maladies. Il s'agit maintenant du projet de recherche le plus courant aux États-Unis.

M. John Brassard:

C'est intéressant.

Vous avez aussi parlé de la kétamine. J'espère avoir bien prononcé ce mot.

M. Zul Merali:

Oui.

M. John Brassard:

La kétamine par rapport à quels autres médicaments d'ordonnance?

M. Zul Merali:

Je parlais surtout de la kétamine dans le contexte de la dépression, qui est un trouble concomitant chez les personnes qui font une tentative de suicide ou qui commettent des actes suicidaires. Je la comparais aux autres antidépresseurs habituels comme les inhibiteurs sélectifs du recaptage de la sérotonine et les inhibiteurs de la monoamine-oxydase. Ce sont les antidépresseurs que l'on prescrit généralement.

Il faut des semaines ou même des mois avant que ces antidépresseurs ne commencent à faire de l'effet, et ils n'aident pas tous les patients, comme les témoins nous l'ont dit. Il faut personnaliser ces médications, et il faut que nous trouvions un moyen de le faire.

Je soulignais justement que non seulement la kétamine est un antidépresseur qui agit rapidement, mais elle élimine très efficacement les idées suicidaires.

M. John Brassard:

Est-ce plus facile à mesurer?

M. Zul Merali:

Oui, on peut le mesurer immédiatement, en quelques heures.

M. John Brassard:

C'est bien.

Je ne veux pas manquer l'occasion de vous poser une question, Liane. Dans le cas de la différence entre les chiens de thérapie et les autres chiens, un problème s'est récemment manifesté, celui des crédits d'impôt.

Les chiens de thérapie et les chiens de service coûtent cher, non seulement à cause du dressage, mais à cause de la nourriture, des soins vétérinaires et tout cela. Voudriez-vous que le gouvernement offre un crédit d'impôt pour ces types d'animaux, particulièrement dans le cas des vétérans?

La ligne a été coupée, je crois.

Mme Liane Weber:

M'entendez-vous, maintenant?

M. John Brassard:

Oui, nous vous entendons.

Mme Liane Weber:

Ah bon, désolée, j'avais appuyé sur le bouton Muet.

M. John Brassard:

La question porte sur les crédits d'impôt. Je ne sais pas vraiment quel financement votre programme reçoit, mais d'autres témoins du secteur des chiens de service et de thérapie nous ont parlé de la nécessité d'offrir un crédit d'impôt aux vétérans qui ont ce type de chien de service. En effet, il est très dispendieux de dresser ces chiens, de les nourrir, de leur payer des soins vétérinaires, etc. Je me demandais ce que vous en pensez.

Mme Liane Weber:

Je dois vous dire que je n'avais jamais vraiment pensé à cela. Je n'en avais jamais entendu parler.

Nous finançons notre organisme uniquement par la collecte de fonds dans la collectivité, et cela nous suffit.

Une fois que les vétérans reçoivent l'animal, ils doivent assumer les coûts de la nourriture et des soins vétérinaires. Toutefois, nous collaborerons avec des vétérans partout au Canada pour essayer d'offrir — sans frais, ou tout au moins, nous l'espérons — tout ce qu'il faut au nouveau propriétaire de l'animal.

Quant aux crédits d'impôt, nous n'en avons jamais vraiment discuté, et personne ne l'a demandé. Mais je pense que c'est une excellente offre à envisager — pour les vétérans, pas pour notre fondation.

M. John Brassard:

Je comprends. Merci, Liane.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il vous reste une minute.

M. John Brassard:

Alors je vais rapidement passer à Louise et à Ed.

La lettre de mandat du ministre lui demande d'établir des services spécialisés pour les vétérans. Je sais que la fondation Sunnybrook a proposé au gouvernement un nouveau programme de traitement spécialisé du trouble de stress post-traumatique pour les patients hospitalisés. Voudriez-vous que ce programme se concrétise? Serait-il bon pour nos vétérans?

(1620)

Mme Louise Bradley:

Oui, très probablement. Je n'en connais pas les détails, mais nous proposons un programme communautaire. Nous proposons d'en lancer un dans toutes les provinces et dans tous les territoires. On l'offrirait en consultation externe.

M. John Brassard:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Eyolfson.

M. Doug Eyolfson (Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Merali, dans une vie antérieure, jusqu'à il y a deux ou trois ans, j'étais urgentologue. Je connaissais la kétamine et son usage, mais pour des phases très différentes. Nous anesthésions les patients en leur donnant de la kétamine. À cette époque, j'avais entendu dire que les revues commençaient à publier des articles sur la kétamine et que ce médicament semblait extrêmement prometteur.

Son usage est-il encore en phase expérimentale, ou devient-il très courant et bien accepté?

M. Zul Merali:

Son usage devient toujours plus courant. Le problème, comme vous le savez, est qu'il faut administrer la kétamine par intraveineuse. Il est donc difficile de la prescrire dans d'autres conditions, mais un essai clinique est en cours pour voir s'il est possible de l'administrer par voie nasale. Cette méthode est en phase d'essai, mais elle est encore expérimentale. Ce n'est pas une intervention thérapeutique établie.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Il n'existe pas une forme de kétamine que l'on peut prendre par voie buccale? Je me souviens vaguement de rares patients de l'urgence qui en prenaient.

M. Zul Merali:

Elle n'est pas efficace.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci. C'est bon à savoir.

Madame Hale, je suis tout à fait d'accord avec ce que vous avez dit sur la sensibilisation des fournisseurs de soins de santé. Parfois, des vétérans ou même des membres actifs venaient à l'urgence, et nous savions que nos traitements habituels... nous traitions tous les autres patients qui avaient des troubles de santé mentale, mais nous savions que ces membres avaient un autre problème, et nous ne savions pas toujours de quoi il s'agissait.

Vous recommandez que l'on éduque les fournisseurs de soins. Est-ce que votre organisme en a parlé à des organismes de réglementation comme l'Association médicale canadienne ou l'Ordre des médecins et chirurgiens, ou à un organisme de ce genre?

Mme Shelley Hale:

Anciens Combattants Canada — principalement par l'intermédiaire du MDN et de la Dre Alex Heber — a créé une plateforme en ligne pour les médecins et les chirurgiens et aussi pour la formation médicale continue.

Nous avons aussi collaboré avec les travailleurs sociaux de l'Ontario. Il s'agit plutôt d'une campagne de sensibilisation du public, parce que je pense qu'il existe déjà beaucoup d'enseignement à ce sujet. Les gens ne savent tout simplement pas où le trouver et ne savent pas poser de questions. C'est justement ce que j'essayais de souligner. Si les gens posent les bonnes questions, ils accèdent à des services déjà offerts aux vétérans. Ils ne savent tout simplement pas que ces services existent. Nous devrions peut-être mieux montrer aux fournisseurs communautaires quels services existent. À mon avis, cela réglerait le problème.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Apparemment, vous avez un outil d'autoformation pour les soignants qui comprend des renseignements du MDN et d'Anciens Combattants Canada. Je l'ai peut-être manqué. Pouvez-vous nous dire combien de personnes s'en sont servies et quelle a été leur réaction?

Mme Shelley Hale:

La ressource pour les aidants familiaux?

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Oui.

Mme Shelley Hale:

C'est une appli pour cellulaire et une plateforme sur le Net créée par quelques-uns de nos cliniciens avec l'aide de spécialistes du MDN. Nous l'avons mise à l'essai en organisant des groupes de discussion dans le cadre du Programme des services aux familles des militaires. C'est un module d'autoformation professionnelle continue offert en ligne aux aidants familiaux. Les premiers intervenants s'en servent eux aussi.

Nous avons également une appli pour cellulaire pour les gars qui ne viennent pas consulter. Ils effectuent une sorte d'autoévaluation pour voir où ils se placent sur l'échelle des personnes qui reçoivent de l'aide. Ils ne reçoivent pas de diagnostic, mais l'appli leur indique s'ils devraient chercher plus d'aide. Cette appli fournit des renseignements aussi aux aidants familiaux et aux médecins.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Dre Thirlwell, combien de demandes d'admission pensez-vous avoir reçues jusqu'à présent par les coordonnées que vous affichez dans votre site Web?

M. John Champion:

Je sais que nous en avons reçu six dernièrement. Je sais que la 4e Division Meaford nous a demandé d'examiner huit personnes de la base.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Dans le cas des traitements que vous proposez dans vos mémoires, quels types de résultats de recherche avez-vous réunis pour appuyer ces traitements?

(1625)

Dre Celeste Thirlwell:

Leur efficacité provient avant tout du fait que ce sont des thérapies holistiques. Nous ne disposons pas de données précises sur les thérapies médicamenteuses, mais les rapports et les données cliniques indiquent qu'elles sont prometteuses.

Les données les plus solides proviennent de l'étude menée par les Drs Harvey Moldofsky et Richardson à la clinique pour traumatisme lié au stress opérationnel de London. Ils ont étudié les cycles de sommeil des vétérans pendant 14 ans. Grâce aux résultats de ces études, ils peuvent prévoir quels vétérans sont les plus vulnérables au trouble de stress post-traumatique et lesquels en affichent déjà les symptômes.

Tous les participants à notre programme subissent aussi une étude rigoureuse du sommeil.

M. Doug Eyolfson:

Merci.

Il me reste 15 secondes, mais je ne pense pas avoir d'autres questions à poser pour le moment.

Le président:

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie pour vos témoignages extraordinaires. Ils nous aident beaucoup, et j'en suis très reconnaissante. J'aurais beaucoup de questions à vous poser à tous. Je vais essayer d'ordonner mes pensées et de comprendre tout cela.

Je vais d'abord m'adresser à vous deux, madame Bradley et monsieur Mantler.

Qu'apporte votre programme aux familles des vétérans? Quels types de soutiens offrez-vous à leurs époux ou épouses et à leurs enfants?

Mme Louise Bradley:

Vous demandez ce qu'apporte le programme communautaire dont nous parlions, ou Premiers Soins en Santé Mentale et En route vers la préparation mentale, RVPM?

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Commençons par votre programme communautaire.

Mme Louise Bradley:

Très bien.

Nous avons quatre priorités dans toutes les collectivités, et nous visons beaucoup les familles. Elles constituent un élément crucial de notre programme, alors elles sont certainement incluses dans ces priorités.

Quant à Premiers Soins en Santé Mentale, ce programme est offert...

M. Ed Mantler:

La version du programme Premiers Soins en Santé Mentale conçue avant tout pour les vétérans a été élaborée avec la collaboration des vétérans et de leurs familles. Nous leur avons demandé directement ce dont ils ont besoin. Cette version vise les vétérans et leurs familles ainsi que leurs soignants.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci.

Madame Bradley, vous nous avez dit que vous siégez au comité consultatif du ministre. Combien de femmes s'y trouvent-elles, et combien d'entre elles sont des vétérantes? Nous voudrions comprendre leur point de vue, ou tout au moins transmettre.

Offrez-vous des programmes conçus tout particulièrement pour celles qui souffrent d'un traumatisme sexuel subi à l'armée?

Mme Louise Bradley:

Je ne crois pas qu'il y ait de vétérante dans ce comité... non, il n'y en a aucune. Tous les membres sont des vétérans.

Quelle était votre deuxième question?

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Les programmes offerts à ceux qui souffrent d'un traumatisme sexuel subi à l'armée.

Mme Louise Bradley:

À toutes les réunions auxquelles j'ai participé — et je crois qu'Ed vous répondra la même chose — il n'y a jamais eu de discussion à ce sujet.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci. Je vous remercie. La question a été soulevée devant notre comité. Nous considérons cela comme une réalité profondément inquiétante.

Monsieur Merali, vous avez mentionné le besoin de créer un centre d'excellence. Je vous dirai que mon parti et mes collègues demandent cela continuellement.

Quelle réponse obtenez-vous d'Anciens Combattants Canada quand vous proposez cela? Je pense surtout à votre demande de fonds de recherche. Je vois le lien entre ce que vous nous avez présenté et la recherche de la Dre Thirlwell. Il est fascinant de constater tout ce qu'il y a encore à faire et merveilleux qu'il nous reste de nombreux moyens de réduire ce taux catastrophique de suicides.

(1630)

M. Zul Merali:

Merci.

Je suis vraiment heureux que vous ayez remarqué cela, parce qu'à mon avis, il est important d'investir dans ce type de recherche. Je crois qu'il serait crucial de créer un centre d'excellence, parce que ce problème est extrêmement grave, et il ne se réglera pas tant que nous n'y porterons pas attention.

Je viens de terminer un article — que j'ai soumis pour publication — sur le financement de la recherche en santé mentale au Canada. Le titre se résume de la façon suivante: et si les troubles de santé mentale étaient cancéreux?

Je cherchais à présenter une analogie entre les progrès qu'a faits le traitement du cancer grâce aux fonds qui lui sont injectés et le financement que reçoit la recherche en santé mentale. J'ai le grand regret de souligner que nous recevons au pro rata moins de 16 % des fonds investis habituellement dans la recherche sur le cancer, même si les maladies mentales constituent le plus grand fardeau de notre système de santé. Je suis convaincu que nous devrions porter beaucoup plus d'attention à ces domaines — et le trouble de stress post-traumatique fait partie de ces problèmes de santé. À mon avis, un centre d'excellence servirait non seulement les vétérans, mais les Canadiens d'autres milieux de la société, comme les premiers intervenants et les personnes qui ont vécu des événements traumatiques. En fait, les mécanismes et les traitements de ces troubles sont probablement très similaires.

Il nous faut un centre de concertation où l'on se concentre sur la résolution de ce problème et sur des solutions plus efficaces, car nous n'en avons que très, très peu à l'heure actuelle.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Ce que vous dites est très intéressant et absolument incontestable. Je crois que Roy Romanow avait raison de dire que la santé mentale est le parent pauvre du système de santé. Il y a tellement de besoins dans ce domaine! Il est bien évident que la recherche dont vous parlez apportera des bienfaits à toute la population. Nous savons que le grand public souffre aussi de troubles de santé mentale profonds et graves et que très peu de gens obtiennent un traitement.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Vous avez à peu près 30 secondes.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Très bien.

Si j'ai bien compris, pour obtenir un traitement dans une clinique pour traumatisme lié au stress opérationnel, les vétérans doivent avoir un renvoi de leur gestionnaire de cas. Combien de temps se passe-t-il entre le moment où un vétéran demande l'aide de son gestionnaire de cas et celui où il entre dans la clinique pour consulter un médecin afin de recevoir de l'aide?

Mme Shelley Hale:

Dans notre clinique, il se passe environ six semaines entre la date du renvoi et la fin de l'évaluation. Les vétérans sont aiguillés vers la clinique, et non vers un clinicien particulier; nous travaillons en équipe multidisciplinaire.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord. Je comprends votre réponse. Malheureusement, les pensées suicidaires créent des crises, et l'on ne peut pas attendre six semaines pour intervenir.

Mme Shelley Hale:

Nous communiquons dans les 48 heures qui suivent réception du renvoi. Nous effectuons un triage, puis une de nos infirmières communique avec eux une fois par semaine, en fonction d'une stratégie de liste d'attente que nous avons établie. Nous communiquons avec eux et nous les évaluons. Nous évaluons aussi leurs résultats en surveillant les données de CROMIS. Je crois que le Comité a déjà entendu parler de ce logiciel.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Je comprends. Alors votre triage comprend une surveillance active. Ce délai d'intervention m'inquiète.

Mme Shelley Hale: Oui, nous effectuons une évaluation.

Mme Irene Mathyssen: Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Le sujet que je voudrais traiter nécessitera une petite partie de jeu de la taupe.

Je vais m'adresser d'abord à M. Merali. Vous détenez un doctorat, n'est-ce pas?

M. Zul Merali:

Oui, j'ai un doctorat.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

J'ai trouvé ce graphique très intéressant. Nous l'avons vu dans le cadre de la présentation sur les scintigraphies du cerveau. Je ne suis pas en mesure de l'interpréter; la plupart des personnes qui sont ici en sont incapables. C'est très impressionnant, mais je me demande si vous pourriez nous expliquer ce que nous voyons vraiment dans ce graphique.

M. Zul Merali:

Oui, c'est une bonne question.

Vous avez ici une image TEP — tomographie par émission de positrons. Pour effectuer cette analyse, on injecte un ligand radioactif que le sang amène dans les récepteurs cérébraux. Dans ce graphique, ce sont les récepteurs éclairés, des récepteurs CB1. Vous avez ici des récepteurs cannabinoïdes, les endocannabinoïdes; ils s'attachent aux molécules qui sont du même type que le cannabis. Le cerveau produit ces endocannabinoïdes, ces molécules endogènes de type cannabis, qu'il utilise dans ses circuits. Vous voyez ici l'injection d'un ligand qui s'attache à ces récepteurs. Comme vous pouvez le constater, ces récepteurs sont beaucoup plus abondants que dans le cerveau des personnes qui n'ont pas le trouble de stress post-traumatique, dont vous voyez les images à droite.

Tout cela est intéressant parce que, comme vous l'aurez entendu dire ces derniers temps, on parle beaucoup du fait que les vétérans consomment du cannabis et qu'il semblerait que le cannabis soulage certains de leurs symptômes.

Malheureusement, personne n'a effectué d'essais cliniques à grande échelle pour démontrer l'efficacité et la sûreté de la consommation de cannabis et de ses dérivés pour traiter le trouble de stress post-traumatique. À mon avis, il va falloir le faire un de ces jours.

(1635)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À propos de grande échelle, combien de sujets participent à vos études? Obtenez-vous ces résultats régulièrement, ou voyons-nous ici le cerveau d'une seule personne?

M. Zul Merali:

Non, vous voyez ici un effet statistique significatif; il provient d'une étude menée par le Dr Alex Neumeister, de Yale. C'est le gars que nous avons embauché; cette étude n'a pas été effectuée de notre côté, mais nous envisageons d'en étendre considérablement la portée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Observe-t-on cela dans le cerveau de toutes les personnes atteintes du trouble de stress post-traumatique? Obtenez-vous des résultats de soldats qui reviennent de la guerre et de policiers, ou leurs cerveaux ont-ils tous l'aspect que nous voyons ici?

M. Zul Merali:

C'est une très bonne question, et je suis désolé de ne pas pouvoir y répondre, parce que je n'ai pas mené cette étude moi-même.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour approfondir ce processus, est-ce que quelqu'un a effectué de ces scintigraphies du cerveau sur des soldats avant leur déploiement? Ne serait-il pas utile de le faire quand quelqu'un entre dans les forces armées ou dans les services de police pour avoir une image de référence? Comme cela, puisqu'ils vont inévitablement développer le trouble de stress post-traumatique pendant leur carrière, vous aurez une image de comparaison. Est-ce que quelqu'un mène une étude de ce genre?

M. Zul Merali:

Oui, quelqu'un le fait aux Pays-Bas à l'heure actuelle. On commence à le faire au Canada, mais nous tardons à prendre ces mesures avant le déploiement. Ce type de mesure cause beaucoup d'inquiétude, parce que si l'on découvre des indicateurs de vulnérabilité au trouble de stress post-traumatique chez quelqu'un, faut-il ne pas déployer cette personne? Voulons-nous garder ceux qui sont extrêmement vigilants, prêts à se lancer, capables d'attraper un camarade pour le tirer d'une situation catastrophique et de le transporter en lieu sûr, de faire des choses comme cela, ou allons-nous les écarter du front parce qu'ils affichent ces indicateurs?

Il serait très intéressant de savoir s'il est possible de prédire qui va développer ce trouble et qui y échappera. Certains craignent que l'on utilise ces résultats à des fins négatives ou qu'on ne sache pas comment les utiliser. Ce sont les débats qui entourent ce sujet à l'heure actuelle. Cependant, je crois que nous devrions évaluer les gens avant qu'ils partent, pendant leur mission et quand ils en reviennent, pour nous faire une idée plus précise de l'évolution physiologique et chimique de leur cerveau.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais si vous découvrez des indices d'idées suicidaires dans le cerveau, comme vous le décrivez, que pouvons-nous faire pour intervenir? Si vous dites que ce point rouge ici représente la section du cerveau qui est touchée — et nous le savons clairement maintenant —, que pouvez-vous faire pour y remédier?

M. Zul Merali:

Je vais comparer cela à un autre trouble, comme le cancer. Si vous découvrez un cancer qui réagit à certains types d'hormones, par exemple... si ce cancer est hyperactif, quel type de traitement appliquerons-nous à cette personne? Le traitement ne sera pas le même pour tous. C'est exactement la façon d'intervenir auprès des gens qui ont une maladie mentale, notamment le trouble de stress post-traumatique. Nous devons définir les différences de chaque personne et traiter ces gens en fonction de ces différences, et non en fonction d'une catégorie de maladies. Nous n'en sommes pas encore là, mais il est crucial de personnaliser les interventions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Je vais m'adresser à Mme Bradley. J'ai des questions à vous poser aussi.

Vous nous avez mentionné une approche axée sur les anciens combattants. C'est une étape que je trouve très importante, mais pour relier cela à ce que je disais, serait-il possible d'axer cette approche sur la carrière? On pourrait ainsi faire subir des scintigraphies avant de déployer les soldats, avant qu'ils n'entrent à l'armée, afin de les préparer aux expériences qu'ils vont vivre en mission. Savez-vous si quelqu'un se penche sur la possibilité de donner ce genre de prétraitement?

Cette question s'adresse à vous tous, mais je voudrais savoir d'abord ce que Mme Bradley en pense.

Mme Louise Bradley:

L'approche que nous proposons vise uniquement la prévention du suicide, alors nous n'avions pas pensé à l'appliquer à... Nous voudrions l'appliquer partout au pays, parce que le rôle de notre commission est d'aborder les taux de suicide dans tout le pays. Dans le cadre de notre proposition, nous pensions pouvoir aussi choisir d'y inclure des collectivités où vit un plus grand nombre de vétérans. Cependant, cette initiative a été conçue comme un programme d'intervention et en même temps comme une étude de recherche. Nous envisageons d'y appliquer une structure similaire à celle que nous avons menée il y a quelque temps auprès des sans-abri, At Home/Chez soi. Notre initiative vise uniquement à réduire les taux de suicide dans des collectivités particulières.

(1640)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Colin Fraser (Nova-Ouest, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie beaucoup de nous avoir présenté ces exposés aujourd'hui. Ils nous aident énormément.

Ma première question s'adresse à vous, madame Bradley. Vous avez parlé un peu de la prestation des soins aux vétérans. Pourriez-vous nous décrire les différences que vous observez entre le traitement de troubles de santé mentale chez les vétérans et celui de patients du grand public?

Mme Louise Bradley:

Je ne suis pas experte dans ce domaine, et la Commission n'a pas mené de recherche à ce sujet. Nous savons que les taux sont plus élevés dans les communautés de vétérans, mais nous n'avons pas pris de mesures spéciales pour y faire face.

M. Colin Fraser:

J'ai trouvé que vous aviez vraiment raison de dire dans votre témoignage que vous voudriez une meilleure sensibilisation des fournisseurs de soins partout au Canada afin qu'ils soient tous au courant des programmes offerts aux anciens combattants et aux militaires. Comment voyez-vous la mise en oeuvre de ce genre d'initiative auprès des fournisseurs de soins partout au pays? Pensez-vous qu'il faudrait engager la collaboration des provinces, ou des ordres professionnels? Qu'en pensez-vous?

Mme Louise Bradley:

C'est une question extrêmement complexe. Nous espérons que grâce au financement prévu dans l'accord sur la santé, nous pourrions réunir les connaissances. À l'heure actuelle, nous avons certaines régions des provinces et territoires qui recueillent d'excellentes données, et pourtant la province A n'a aucune idée de ce que fait la province C.

À l'aide de ces fonds, nous espérions créer quelques indicateurs afin que toutes les provinces et tous les territoires recueillent les mêmes données de la même façon. Les choses ne se passent pas ainsi à l'heure actuelle. Nous pourrions alors aborder les problèmes à l'échelle nationale. Il est difficile de discuter avec des représentants d'autres nations. Ils nous félicitent de mener tel programme, mais nous devons leur expliquer qu'il n'est offert qu'à trois ou quatre endroits.

Je vous décris là l'un des besoins de la Commission. Nous avons essayé de combler cette lacune avec les données de notre centre d'échange du savoir — et nous avons fait de bons progrès —, mais ce n'est qu'un début. Nous devrions nous concentrer sur ce problème et fixer des objectifs.

M. Colin Fraser:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Mantler, je crois que c'est vous qui nous avez parlé des programmes de premiers soins pour les vétérans et leurs familles. Il semble que de 14 cours offerts en une année partout au pays, vous passez à 40 cours que vous préparez maintenant. C'est une augmentation énorme. Pourriez-vous nous donner une idée des résultats et des commentaires que vous avez reçus à la fin de ces 14 premiers cours? Quel succès a ce programme?

M. Ed Mantler:

En élaborant ces cours de premiers soins en santé mentale pour les vétérans et pendant cette première année de mise en oeuvre, nous avons effectué une vaste collecte de données de recherche. Nous savons déjà que les participants sont très heureux de ce qu'ils y ont appris.

Nous savons aussi que ces cours de premiers soins en santé mentale ont été adaptés aux diverses populations du pays, comme les aînés, les jeunes, les Premières Nations, les Inuits, etc. Nous savons d'ores et déjà que près de 250 000 Canadiens ont reçu cette formation de premiers soins en santé mentale. Tous les résultats de ces nombreuses occasions de formation offertes partout au pays se sont avérés positifs.

(1645)

M. Colin Fraser:

Selon vous, est-il important d'offrir ce programme dans toutes les collectivités rurales et éloignées, et non uniquement dans les grands centres? Je suppose que les 14 premiers cours ont eu lieu un peu partout au pays et que les 40 nouveaux cours seront offerts dans des collectivités qui n'avaient peut-être pas été choisies la première fois.

M. Ed Mantler:

Nous avions choisi les 14 premières collectivités parce qu'on y trouve une population importante de vétérans. Ceux-ci s'y regroupent tout naturellement, alors plusieurs de ces collectivités se situent près d'une base. L'année prochaine, nous pourrons élargir le choix des endroits où nous offrirons ce cours.

Comme dans le cas de tous les cours de premiers soins en santé mentale, nous visons à répondre aux besoins du marché. En établissant un réseau de formateurs partout au pays, nous aurons la souplesse d'offrir cette formation partout où elle s'avérera nécessaire.

M. Colin Fraser:

Merci beaucoup.

Me reste-t-il un peu de temps?

Le président:

Il vous reste une minute.

M. Colin Fraser:

Madame Weber, je vous remercie d'être venue témoigner aujourd'hui.

J'ai une question au sujet des normes appliquées aux chiens de service. Si j'ai bien compris, on se demande, au ministère des Anciens Combattants, s'il faudrait fixer des normes pour les chiens de service. Qu'en pensez-vous? Comment s'y prendrait-on pour le faire?

Mme Liane Weber:

Je vous dirai que je ne suis pas experte en chiens de service. Nous nous concentrons sur des chiens de thérapie et non sur des chiens de service, parce que les règlements ne sont pas très clairs entre...

Il faut établir une norme. Nous demandons une norme spéciale pour les chiens de thérapie. Le cas des chiens de service est un peu différent, parce que ces chiens apprennent à accomplir des tâches qui ne correspondent pas à leur comportement naturel. Par exemple, on peut enseigner à un chien de service à pousser sur un interrupteur pour mettre de la lumière dans une salle, ou alors à entrer dans la salle sombre pour en examiner tous les recoins et à revenir indiquer à son nouveau maître qu'il peut y entrer en toute sécurité.

Nous n'aurons pas de tâches inhabituelles à enseigner aux chiens de thérapie. Mais nous offrirons à tous les vétérans — et en fait à toutes les personnes qui viendront demander notre aide — une formation spéciale qu'ils pourront reproduire chez eux s'ils désirent enseigner une tâche particulière à leur chien.

Les règlements sur les chiens de service ne sont pas clairs du tout d'une région à une autre au Canada. Ici, en Colombie-Britannique, la province a lancé une évaluation fantastique. On évalue tous les chiens de service pour éliminer les possibilités de fraude et les problèmes qu'un dressage inadéquat pourra causer.

M. Colin Fraser:

Merci.

Le président:

Madame Wagantall.

Mme Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, PCC):

Merci.

J'ai une question pour M. Merali, puis une autre pour la Dre Thirlwell.

Monsieur Merali, nous avons traité de nombreux vétérans qui avaient pris le médicament antipaludique méfloquine, qui provoque des lésions permanentes dans le tronc cérébral ainsi que des symptômes similaires à ceux du trouble de stress post-traumatique. Les États-Unis, l'Angleterre, l'Australie et l'Allemagne ont restreint ou même interdit la prescription de médicaments antipaludiques. L'été dernier, Santé Canada a modifié l'étiquette de la méfloquine pour indiquer qu'elle peut causer des lésions cérébrales, de la dépression, des hallucinations, des cauchemars, un comportement psychotique ainsi que de nombreux autres effets secondaires comme des idées suicidaires. Nous avons observé un lien très étroit entre les taux de suicide et la consommation de méfloquine.

Nous avons traité David Bona, un vétéran du Régiment aéroporté en Somalie. Il nous a dit qu'après 20 ans de traitements du trouble de stress post-traumatique, il a passé une scintigraphie et qu'il reçoit enfin un traitement qui le soulage. Il comprend maintenant qu'il était intoxiqué par la méfloquine, qui provoque des lésions dans le tronc cérébral.

Dans le travail que vous accomplissez dans ce domaine et après avoir examiné les résultats de votre étude, est-ce que votre organisme a envisagé d'effectuer des imageries cérébrales pour détecter la toxicité de la méfloquine et les lésions qu'elle provoque?

(1650)

M. Zul Merali:

Oui, votre observation est très intéressante, et ce problème est inquiétant.

Non, personne ne nous a demandé de faire cela. Nous fournissons une plateforme qui, au cours des cinq années à venir, ne servira qu'à faire de la recherche. Quiconque mène un projet de recherche sur un trouble qui influe sur le fonctionnement du cerveau peut s'en servir, et nous aidons les utilisateurs. Cependant, personne ne nous a demandé d'effectuer des scintigraphies des cerveaux de gens qui ont pris des médicaments antipaludiques.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Vu les préoccupations que cause ce médicament, si le gouvernement commandait ce type d'étude, il serait possible de le faire.

M. Zul Merali:

Mais bien sûr.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Parfait, merci beaucoup.

Docteure Thirlwell, ce que vous nous avez présenté aujourd'hui m'a beaucoup intéressée. Je crois que notre comité cherche principalement un moyen efficace de traiter le trouble de stress post-traumatique et le suicide.

On parle beaucoup de la notion d'endurcir les soldats. Ne pourrions-nous donc pas les « reconstruire » quand ils reviennent, en faire de fiers vétérans? Pendant que vous parliez de la possibilité de... j'étais en train de griffonner « attaque ou fuite », et tout de suite après vous avez parlé de faire sortir les patients de ce figement.

Je voudrais que vous nous donniez plus de détails à ce sujet. Cependant, je voudrais aussi souligner une chose. Dans vos notes d'allocution, vous indiquez qu'il est possible de traiter le trouble de stress post-traumatique et la dépression; autrement dit, on peut aussi les prévenir. Par conséquent, une grande partie de la souffrance provient des crises qu'ils provoquent, puisque ces troubles font déjà leurs ravages au fond de la personne.

Pourriez-vous approfondir cette notion?

Dre Celeste Thirlwell:

Je vais revenir à vos questions sur les différences du traitement du trouble de stress post-traumatique chez les vétérans et chez les membres du public. Je me spécialise en neuroscience; je suis avant tout neuroscientifique, et non clinicienne. La médecine fonctionne à partir de dogmes. Nous avons gagné des guerres grâce à l'innovation; il nous faut de l'innovation en médecine.

Lorsque le cerveau se fige sur l'attaque ou la fuite, ce figement se manifeste dans la partie reptilienne du cerveau, qui n'est pas reliée aux centres plus développés qu'influence la thérapie cognitivocomportementale et qui permettent de communiquer avec autrui. Les civils n'ont pas ce figement d'attaque ou de fuite, mais les militaires l'ont. Tant que nous ne faisons pas sortir les militaires de ce figement, les traitements qui soulagent les civils n'ont aucun effet sur eux. C'est pourquoi j'insiste sur la nécessité de les libérer de ce figement.

Je vous prie de vous renseigner sur la Théorie polyvagale de Stephen Porges. Vous comprendrez que le figement d'attaque ou de fuite se trouve dans le tronc cérébral, la section reptilienne du cerveau. Dans cette partie du cerveau, le système nerveux autonome est déréglé, il passe dans la section limbique du cerveau qui régit les émotions et ne peut pas accéder à la section frontale où se trouvent les indices sociaux. Si nous sommes figés en mode d'attaque ou de fuite, nous ne pouvons pas accéder à ces autres parties du cerveau, et nos fonctions d'exécution ne peuvent pas contrôler ces émotions; elles ne peuvent pas maîtriser ce mode d'attaque ou de fuite, ce qui explique les explosions de colère et les agressions physiques.

La Théorie polyvagale des émotions porte aussi sur le traumatisme d'attachement. Pendant leur formation, nous avons détaché ces militaires de leur coeur pour qu'ils soient capables de tuer. Pour les réinsérer dans la société, il faut les déprogrammer afin qu'ils communiquent à nouveau avec leur coeur. C'est pourquoi je suggère que nous les affections à des missions positives. Cela explique aussi l'incroyable efficacité de la thérapie par les chiens; les militaires peuvent enfin s'attacher à un être auquel ils font confiance. Nous utilisons aussi les chevaux, la thérapie équine, qui est très efficace. Ensuite, nous appliquons une thérapie de « neurofeedback », qui vise aussi l'attachement. Lorsque les militaires sortent du figement d'attaque ou de fuite et qu'ils réapprennent à s'attacher, ils réussissent de nouveau à utiliser leurs fonctions d'exécution. Mais tant qu'ils restent figés en mode attaque ou fuite, ils ne peuvent pas se rétablir. Ce figement peut découler d'un traumatisme physique, mental, émotionnel, ou avoir été causé par un médicament, par des virus ou par des bactéries.

Voilà pourquoi les études du sommeil sont si utiles. Nous pouvons détecter cela avant, pendant et après le déploiement des soldats. C'est pourquoi notre programme comprend des études du sommeil. Nous pouvons déterminer le degré d'instabilité du figement d'attaque ou de fuite, qui est régi par le système nerveux autonome. On a toujours pensé qu'il était impossible de contrôler ce système, mais il est possible de le contrôler en pratiquant le yoga et d'autres types de thérapies. Les résultats d'études scientifiques ont prouvé que ces thérapies réussissent à activer notre système nerveux parasympathique. C'est pourquoi, comme vous l'avez suggéré, il est si important de détecter ces facteurs avant de déployer les soldats et quand ils rentrent de mission. Ils devraient subir une étude du sommeil et une scintigraphie dès qu'ils sortent de l'avion.

Je suggère aussi qu'ils subissent une imagerie par SPECT-II. Cette technique n'a pas très bonne réputation, mais elle est à l'avant-garde de la neuroscience. Elle signale les changements de connectivité les plus subtils qui surviennent dans le cerveau et que les imageries par résonance magnétique — et même les tomographies par émission de positrons — ne détectent souvent pas.

(1655)

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

J'ai juste une autre petite question.

Le président:

Je suis désolé, mais vous avez nettement dépassé le temps alloué de sept minutes.

Mme Cathay Wagantall:

Merci.

Pouvons-nous obtenir cette étude dans le cadre de notre recherche?

Le président:

Oui, nous pouvons en faire la demande.

Pourriez-vous nous faire parvenir cette étude ou la transmettre au greffier, je vous prie? Merci.

Mme Lockhart partagera son temps de parole avec M. Bratina.

Mme Alaina Lockhart (Fundy Royal, Lib.):

Merci.

Merci beaucoup. Nous avons le plaisir d'accueillir de nombreux professionnels ici, aujourd'hui, qui pourront répondre à une foule de questions.

Je veux enchaîner sur ce que vous venez de dire. De quelles balises de référence vous servez-vous maintenant pour évaluer la réussite du genre de thérapie que vous utilisez pour traiter les participants?

Dre Celeste Thirlwell:

Nous avons recours à de multiples tests d'auto-évaluation, mais j'envisage maintenant d'utiliser un bracelet du MIT qui permet de surveiller le système nerveux autonome. Les participants à notre programme pourraient le porter pendant la durée du programme pour nous permettre d'obtenir des données plus objectives sur notre contribution aux réflexes « lutte ou fuite » et « repos et reprise ».

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

À ce moment-ci, il faut revenir à la nécessité de mener d'autres travaux de recherche, alors nous nous employons toujours à approfondir ce corpus de recherche.

Dre Celeste Thirlwell:

Oui, les travaux sur le corpus de recherche se poursuivent.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

D'accord, très bien.

Vous avez également mentionné l'atelier axé sur la culture des Forces armées canadiennes.

Pouvez-vous préciser? C'est la première fois que j'en entends parler.

Dre Celeste Thirlwell:

John se penchera sur ce sujet.

M. John Champion:

Afin de favoriser le rapprochement avec un militaire, il faut instaurer un climat de confiance. Or, on ne gagne pas si facilement cette confiance. Voilà pourquoi nos patients font toujours dos au mur, le regard tourné vers la porte.

Un thérapeute doit comprendre le milieu d'où viennent les militaires. Le langage que nous employons est différent. Ils s'expriment par des acronymes de trois lettres. Si on ne comprend pas leurs propos, comment peut-on leur venir en aide?

À l'heure actuelle, nous offrons un programme d'immersion de huit heures sur le jargon militaire, la structure des grades, la confrérie, la famille, la fraternité et la sororité, la dynamique au sein des unités, les régiments et le milieu militaire dans son ensemble.

Si vous mettez en présence dans un bar un fantassin, un aviateur et un marin, il y a des chances qu'ils se battent entre eux, mais si un péquin, un civil, s'en prend à l'un d'eux, les autres se porteront à son aide.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Qui offre ce programme? Est-ce que vous offrez cet atelier axé sur la culture?

Dre Celeste Thirlwell:

Oui.

M. John Champion:

Je l'ai conçu.

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Vous l'avez conçu; eh bien, on tient à vous en remercier.

Si l'on revient à la question sur les travaux de recherche, j'ai également une question sur le recours à un chien de thérapie. À quelle étude avez-vous eu recours pour élaborer votre programme?

Mme Liane Weber:

Des travaux de recherche ont cours depuis de nombreuses années partout aux États-Unis et ailleurs. Puisque mon rôle consiste à effectuer ma propre recherche à l'aide de divers programmes éprouvés qui sont diffusés, je suis en mesure de m'en inspirer pour les utiliser ici au Canada.

Pendant plusieurs années, je me suis rendue partout aux États-Unis et ailleurs et j'ai consulté d'autres organismes qui déploient exactement les mêmes efforts et le travail ne cesse d'évoluer. Les choses s'améliorent. D'autres études sont menées afin de confirmer l'efficacité des chiens. Voilà pourquoi nous avons décidé de poursuivre dans cette voie et nous savons que des efforts sont menés depuis de nombreuses années et qui en démontrent l'efficacité.

Au sujet du TSPT, le trouble de stress post-traumatique, la question est bien entendu un peu différente. C'est un nouvel enjeu. Les études abondent.

On a recours à des chiens de service pour le traitement du TSPT et les chiens sont dressés pour exécuter des tâches précises. Nous nous sommes rendu compte qu'à de nombreuses reprises le chien de service n'est pas nécessaire pour traiter les cas de TSPT, mais la présence d'un animal aidant très bien dressé est de mise. C'est ce que nous avons présumé en consultant les études.

(1700)

Mme Alaina Lockhart:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Bratina.

M. Bob Bratina (Hamilton-Est—Stoney Creek, Lib.):

Merci.

Je tiens à préciser que de nombreux témoignages que nous avons recueillis ont porté sur des problèmes et sur des études et des solutions potentielles. Cela est très positif. Je suis persuadé que nous sommes tous d'accord pour dire que la rencontre d'aujourd'hui est fructueuse.

Madame Bradley, je reprendrai souvent ce que vous nous avez dit: « La province A ne sait pas ce que fait la province B. »

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Bob Bratina: À Hamilton, il y a 10 ans, on a constaté un excès de plomb dans l'eau. Cette semaine, des municipalités partout au Canada ont été informées que l'eau potable contient du plomb: « Eh bien, comment allons-nous régler ce problème? » Nous nous sommes déjà penchés sur cette question il y a 10 ans.

Je vais maintenant m'adresser à M. Merali. Je sais que l'exposition au plomb à des niveaux généralement considérés comme sans danger fait l'objet d'études plus récentes qui démontrent que cette situation est problématique, en particulier dans des cas de dépression et de dérèglement du comportement. Vous avez travaillé sur l'imagerie du cerveau. Je sais que certains des autres chercheurs ont constaté une atrophie du lobe frontal.

Dans le cas qui nous intéresse, existe-t-il des prédicteurs du comportement que vous pourriez tester, même chez les recrues ainsi que chez les vétérans pour savoir s'ils risquent d'être prédisposés à des troubles mentaux?

M. Zul Merali:

Oui.

Je crois qu'il s'agit là d'une question très importante et tendancieuse, en ce sens que, si l'on est en mesure de détecter un problème, alors que pourrait-on faire? J'ai discuté avec le personnel de notre centre militaire en santé mentale et l'un des échanges visait à savoir si une personne est susceptible d'être à risque, est-ce que cela signifie que celle-ci ne sera pas déployée? S'agirait-il de la bonne chose à faire?

C'est une question à laquelle il faut répondre. Je n'ai pas de réponse pour vous, mais cet enjeu porte à réflexion. Je crois que nous devons être en mesure d'assurer une surveillance, d'examiner les facteurs de risque et de résilience, et cela va de soi, mais à savoir si nous appliquons cette mesure avant un déploiement est une autre question plus tendancieuse.

M. Bob Bratina:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Kitchen.

M. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Champion, merci pour vos états de service.

Je vous remercie tous de votre présence ici.

Le temps est compté et j'ai toute une liste de questions de quelques pages.

Tout d'abord, ma question s'adresse à M. Mantler et à Mme Bradley. Pouvez-vous me dire quel est le pourcentage des services que vous offrez aux vétérans? En avez-vous fait le calcul? Grosso modo, vous représentez la Commission de la santé mentale du Canada et vous vous intéressez à la question de la santé mentale dans tous les domaines, mais dans quelle mesure viserait-on les vétérans? Peut-être que ce sujet m'a échappé.

Mme Louise Bradley:

Je vais commencer.

Nous n'offrons pas de services comme tels. Les programmes Premiers soins en santé mentale et RVPM consistent à former les formateurs. Nous venons de créer un programme pour les vétérans.

Voulez-vous nous en dire plus?

M. Ed Mantler:

Au sujet des programmes de la Commission, une grande partie du travail vise l'échange de données, le regroupement des travaux de recherche et la diffusion des résultats de recherche pour en assurer la mise en application et, dans ce contexte, toute la population canadienne est visée. Il est difficile de préciser quel pourcentage est destiné aux vétérans ou non. Une grande partie des efforts déployés par la Commission est axée sur les milieux de travail.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Très bien, merci.

Monsieur Merali, les gens sont très visuels et, quand vous présentez des données comme celles-là, ils en découvrent toute l'importance et admirent vos beaux tableaux aux couleurs rouge et verte. Je possède une brève formation en recherche et je m'intéresse à cette étude. Je me demande, au sujet de l'étude de TEP, quelle était la taille démographique de l'étude? Il s'agit d'un instantané d'un individu, mais, de manière généralisée, quel serait le pourcentage de personnes qui aurait ce genre de...?

M. Zul Merali:

Je crois que l'une des études a porté sur quelque 32 participants dans le groupe de traitement par rapport aux témoins appariés.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Ces données sont les résultats d'études sur des personnes ayant un trouble de stress post-traumatique et sur un groupe témoin. Avez-vous déjà mené des travaux auprès d'un groupe de personnes ayant un lourd passé de consommation d'opiacés?

M. Zul Merali:

Non. Nous avons...

M. Robert Kitchen:

Non?

M. Zul Merali:

Nous n'avons pas effectué d'étude. Au Royal, il existe un programme de traitement contre la dépendance aux opiacés. En ce qui concerne les études par imagerie, nous n'avons pas mené de recherche.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Avez-vous une étude sur des vétérans qui auraient pu consommer du cannabis dans une certaine mesure?

M. Zul Merali:

Concernant les études par imagerie?

M. Robert Kitchen:

Oui.

M. Zul Merali:

Non. Le centre d'imagerie dispose d'un équipement d'imagerie multimodal permettant, grâce à un même appareil, de faire des IRMf, des TEP, des analyses SPECT ainsi que des EEG. Il s'agit d'équipement très perfectionné et nous nous affairons à renforcer la capacité pour accueillir des spécialistes qui peuvent effectuer différentes modalités d'imagerie. Dans le cas de l'imagerie TEP que vous voyez là, la personne qui a mené cette étude fait maintenant partie de notre équipe, et c'est exactement ce que nous envisageons de faire.

(1705)

M. Robert Kitchen:

Vous avez mentionné que les travaux portent largement sur les récepteurs cannabinoïdes. Vous avez soulevé la question selon laquelle la recherche existante est limitée dans le cas des avantages ou de l'absence d'avantages liés à la consommation de cannabinoïdes et à l'utilisation de cannabis par les vétérans, et ce, quelle qu'en soit la raison. Selon vous, serait-il valable de mener cette étude que les membres de ce comité pourraient consulter et qui porterait non seulement sur la consommation de cannabinoïdes, mais également sur les effets pouvant être attribuables à une modification de la consommation, passant de 10 grammes, à 5 grammes et à 3 grammes?

M. Zul Merali:

Oui, tout à fait. Je crois que c'est crucial. La consommation chez les personnes est étayée par diverses anecdotes. Certaines personnes estiment que cela est très bénéfique, mais il n'existe aucune étude à large échelle qui examine l'efficacité clinique, à savoir si le produit est vraiment efficace de façon mesurable et, surtout, si la sécurité pose problème à la suite de la consommation de cannabinoïdes. On a observé d'autres effets, notamment des effets cognitifs et des effets sur la concentration ainsi que le sommeil, et ces questions méritent que l'on s'y attarde.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci.

Madame Weber, je n'ai pas vraiment saisi à quels coûts vous faisiez allusion pour assurer la mise en service des chiens de thérapie.

Mme Liane Weber:

Selon les prévisions établies, les coûts liés aux chiens de thérapie vont de 2 500 $ à un montant maximal de 3 500 $. Les coûts varient selon la provenance du chien et selon que l'animal a été stérilisé ou pas. Nous aurons tous les accessoires et médicaments nécessaires et, bien entendu, nous assumerons les frais d'hébergement et du dresseur où l'animal sera hébergé. Fait à mentionner, nous pouvons réduire ces coûts dans les cas où des vétérans peuvent offrir leurs services et auprès des fabricants d'aliments pour chiens, de colliers, de cages et de tout genre d'accessoires dont nous avons besoin. Les coûts vont de 2 500 $ à un montant maximal de 3 500 $ par animal. Le bénéficiaire est ensuite responsable d'assumer les frais pour l'achat d'autres aliments ou les visites chez le vétérinaire qui s'imposent.

M. Robert Kitchen:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Mathyssen.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

Merci beaucoup. Encore une fois, j'aimerais m'adresser à Mission Butterfly. J'ai l'impression qu'il s'agit d'un ensemble global de programmes. Je me demande seulement combien de vétérans ont participé au programme de 12 jours? Si vous l'avez déjà mentionné, je vous prie de m'excuser, mais je n'ai pas saisi l'information. Savez-vous combien de vétérans y ont participé?

M. John Champion:

Nous entamons à peine le premier programme destiné aux vétérans cet été. Les militaires ont un peu tardé à manifester leur intérêt. Actuellement, nous ciblons en premier les vétérans en service. Un programme sera lancé en mars et il est destiné aux premiers intervenants. Bien que notre organisation soit nouvelle, tous les thérapeutes comptent une vaste expérience en thérapie pour traiter le trouble de stress post-traumatique et nous veillons à les réunir sous un même toit.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord. Il y a eu une hésitation à envisager votre programme. Est-ce parce qu'il est différent ou novateur?

M. John Champion:

C'est nouveau.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

C'est nouveau. D'accord.

Quels sont les frais d'inscription à un programme de 12 jours?

M. John Champion:

Je crois que le coût total s'élève à 43 000 $ par participant, car il doit être logé et puis il y a la thérapie équine, sans compter tous les autres frais.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord. Ces coûts pourraient expliquer l'hésitation sur la participation des militaires.

M. John Champion:

Or, les dépenses sont plus élevées maintenant.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

C'est vrai et nous revenons aux mesures de prévention et à la façon dont nous pouvons venir en aide aux gens.

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Weber, sur la question des chiens, le recours à des chiens de refuge a piqué ma curiosité. Pourquoi vous servez-vous de ces animaux? Sont-ils plus sensibles aux besoins émotionnels d'un vétéran ou d'une victime d'un trouble de stress post-traumatique? Comment pouvez-vous expliquer que vous utilisez ce genre particulier de chiens?

(1710)

Mme Liane Weber:

Nous nous servons des chiens de refuge pour la simple et bonne raison qu'il existe de nombreux chiens non désirés et négligés partout au pays. Nous respectons un protocole très précis relativement aux animaux que nous utilisons et donc ce ne sont pas tous les chiens de refuge qui seront approuvés pour notre programme. De bons comportements et un bon tempérament s'imposent et aucune race agressive n'a été retenue pour le dressage des animaux. Alors, ce n'est qu'une question de sauver un animal qui viendra en aide à un vétéran. Le fait de savoir qu'il a également sauvé un animal représente un autre type d'émotion qui peut aider le vétéran.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

D'accord. Merci.

Monsieur Merali, il a été question du recours à la marijuana à des fins thérapeutiques et, bien entendu, la discussion a été vive comme vous l'avez mentionné. À ACC, a-t-on abordé cette question d'une quelconque façon dans des essais cliniques? Nous savons que le THC est utilisé davantage à des fins récréatives. A-t-on demandé quelle est la différence entre ce composant et le CBD, pour déterminer ce qui devrait être disponible?

M. Zul Merali:

Il s'agit là d'une excellente question. Vous connaissez évidemment bien le domaine. On compte divers composants dans la plante à teneur en THC et nous devons en faire l'étude avec une grande attention. À la lumière des études sur les effets de la marijuana, on apprend que toutes les souches ne sont pas les mêmes, car il existe différents composants. Le THC et le CBD constituent les deux ingrédients actifs dotés de propriétés différentes et nous ne comprenons pas exactement les avantages et les inconvénients des différents composants. Il serait très intéressant d'étudier les différents types de mélanges dans une quantité donnée afin de savoir de quoi il retourne. Si l'on décide de s'en tenir seulement à une étude sur la marijuana, la question revient à savoir si une variété de marijuana ici serait pareille à celle que l'on retrouvera à Toronto ou à Vancouver et les résultats pourraient donc ne pas être transférables. Il faut donc étudier au départ les composants réels de façon dosée comme dans le cas d'un traitement médicamenteux afin de savoir ce à quoi on a affaire. Après avoir obtenu des réponses claires, on peut jumeler les souches de la marijuana au profil particulier recherché.

Mme Irene Mathyssen:

L'Université de la Colombie-Britannique est en train de conduire une étude par l'entremise d'un des producteurs agrées, soit Tilray. Je pourrais vous fournir le nom des responsables de l'étude si vous le désirez.

Dre Celeste Thirlwell:

Nous vous en serions reconnaissants.

Le président:

Cela conclut les témoignages pour aujourd'hui. Si vous voulez apporter des précisions à votre témoignage ou à ces études, vous pourrez transmettre ces renseignements au greffier qui les remettra aux membres du Comité.

Au nom des membres du Comité, je tiens à remercier tous les participants des quatre organismes pour leur grande contribution qui profite aux femmes et aux hommes qui servent notre pays.

Sur ces paroles, une motion doit être proposée pour lever la séance.

M. Bob Bratina:

Je propose la levée de la séance.

Le président:

Sommes-nous en faveur de la motion?

Des voix: Oui.

Le président: Merci.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on February 13, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.