header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-12-11 TRAN 126

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(0850)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I call to order this meeting of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we are doing a study assessing the impact of aircraft noise in the vicinity of major Canadian airports.

We will go to committee business for a moment on the issue of the loss of recording from our last meeting.

Perhaps we could get everybody's attention, please.

I have spoken to Mr. Fuhr's office, and he is fine with the way the clerk has suggested that we deal with it, but I will need this motion adopted. I will read it out.

It reads: That, due to a technical error that occurred during meeting no. 124 on Tuesday, December 4, 2018, which resulted in a loss of the audio recording required to prepare the evidence, the speaking notes presented by Daniel-Robert Gooch and Glenn Priestley and the written brief submitted by Darren Buss be taken as read and included in the Evidence for that meeting and that the clerk inform the witnesses of the committee’s decision.

Is there any discussion?

Hearing none, are we agreed?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: Thank you.

I'm sorry?

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

[Inaudible—Editor]

The Chair:

The motion was moved by Vance and seconded by Ron.

We go on to our witnesses for our meeting today. From Air Canada, we have Murray Strom, vice-president, flight operations; and Samuel Elfassy, vice-president, safety. Welcome to both of you. Thank you very much for being here.

We are not going to wait for Mr. Wilson. He will be here with us shortly.

Captain Scott Wilson (Vice-President, Flight Operations, WestJet Airlines Ltd.):

I'm here.

The Chair:

Isn't that terrific? He just walked right through the door. Welcome, Mr. Wilson. Mr. Wilson is from WestJet Airlines.

Okay, we're going to open it up for five minutes maximum. When I raise my hand, please do your closing remarks so that the committee has sufficient time for questions.

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC):

With all due respect, you left the impression that Mr. Wilson wasn't here. He was sitting at the table all this time. I think you need to formally introduce Mr. Wilson from WestJet.

The Chair:

All right.

Scott Wilson is here. He is vice-president of flight operations with WestJet Airlines. Thank you very much, and sorry for the mix-up.

Who would like to go first for Air Canada?

Mr. Murray Strom (Vice-President, Flight Operations, Air Canada):

I'll go first.

Good morning, Madam Chair and members of the committee. My name is Murray Strom. I'm vice-president of flight operations at Air Canada.

I have overall responsibility for all aspects of safe flying operations across Air Canada's mainline fleet. I'm the airline's designated operations manager, responsible to the Minister of Transport for the management of our air operator's certificate and liaison with the international regulatory agencies with which Air Canada operates.

I'm an active Air Canada pilot and presently a triple-7 captain. I operate to all of Air Canada's international destinations.

I'm joined today by my colleague Sam Elfassy, vice-president of safety.

We are pleased to be here today to provide context to our operations and to answer any questions related to the committee's study on the impact of aircraft noise in the vicinity of major Canadian airports.

Since 2001, Air Canada has been an advocate of the balanced approach to aircraft noise management that was developed by ICAO, based in Montreal. The balanced approach is founded on four elements for noise around airports: noise reduction at source, land use management and planning, noise abatement operational procedures, and operating restrictions.

To effectively manage the impact of aircraft noise on communities takes the concerted effort of all parties involved, including airports, Nav Canada, government, and airline communities.

The biggest impact an airline can have is by reducing noise with new aircraft and technology and by supporting the development and implementation of effective noise abatement operational procedures.

Over the years, aircraft manufacturers have made significant progress to reduce aircraft noise. Aircraft today are 75% quieter than they were 50 years ago. Since 2007, Air Canada has invested more than $15 billion to modernize its fleet with new aircraft, such as the Boeing 787 Dreamliner and the Boeing 737 MAX. Supporting many jobs in the Canadian aerospace industry, these aircraft are the quietest in their respective categories. For example, the Dreamliner is more than 60% quieter than other similar airplanes from past years.

In addition to Air Canada's fleet renewal program, we've also been modernizing our A320 jets with new cavity vortex generators since 2015. Newer A320s are in the process of being retrofitted as they undergo maintenance, while older A320s are being retired.

Maintenance schedules are planned months and years in advance, and in order to consider manufacturing schedules and commercial realities, Air Canada had planned originally to retrofit all its A320 aircraft by the end of 2020. However, due to lack of available kits from Airbus, we are now operating under the following schedule: 15% of our fleet completed by the end of 2018, 50% by the end of 2019, 80% by the end of 2020, and the remainder in 2021.

Air Canada is committed to completing this program on an expedited basis. However, we are limited by maintenance schedules and the availability of the vortex kits from the manufacturer. It is important to note that while the program is under way, Air Canada is replacing A320s with quieter, more efficient 737 MAX aircraft and the Canadian-made A220s formerly known as the Bombardier C Series.

Renewing and upgrading our fleet is also reducing greenhouse gases, an important goal for Air Canada, Canadians, and the government. Once this process is complete, our fleet will be among the most fuel-efficient in the world. By the end of 2019 we will have also completed the upgrade of our flight management and guidance systems and the satellite-based navigation systems of our Airbus narrow-body fleet.

These updates will enable the aircraft to fully participate in performance-based navigation initiatives being implemented in airports across the country. This improves fuel efficiency, reduces greenhouse gases, and also reduces noise.

Air carriers operate with the highest safety standards. Our pilots must comply with the navigation and noise abatement procedures set by Nav Canada and airports at all times. We contribute to this process, informed by the balanced approach and Transport Canada's guidelines for implementation of the new and amended abatement procedures.

We also participate in the Toronto industry noise abatement board that provides the technical forum to analyze and consider the operational impact of many of the noise mitigation techniques. We also extend technical expertise to the board and support the effort, with the use of our simulators, to test the proposed approaches.

(0855)



Another important element of the balanced approach is land use planning. Appropriate land use planning policies are critical to preserve the noise reductions achieved through this $15-billion investment in new aircraft. It is important that local governments and airport authorities work together to prevent further urban encroachment around the airports.

Finally, we must recognize that demand for air travel is on the rise worldwide. In fact, IATA predicts the global passenger demand for air travel will surge from $4 billion in 2017 to over $7.8 billion in 2036. Air travel is no longer a luxury. It is for everyone. It is the middle class that is driving this growth. It is an efficient and cost-effective way to travel; connects family, business people and communities; and promotes trade and tourism. Air travel reduces travel time from days to mere hours. It builds economies. Consider that in Toronto alone, Air Canada connects Canadians to more than 220 destinations directly and that Canada has three airports among the top 50 most connected in the world.

In closing, I'd like to say that Air Canada is proud of its role in Canadian aviation as a global champion for Canada and is proud of its contribution to the national economy. We remain committed to improving our operation in all aspects and live by our motto of “Fly the Flag”.

(0900)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Strom.

We'll move on to WestJet Airlines and Mr. Wilson for five minutes, please.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Good morning, Madam Chair and members of the committee.

My name is Captain Scott Wilson. I serve as WestJet's vice-president of flight operations and operations manager, responsible for the safety and oversight of WestJet's fleets and daily operations. I also maintain currency as a Boeing 737 pilot across our domestic and international networks.

Thank you for the opportunity to address the committee this morning.

WestJet is very proud of the positive impact we've had on Canadians by offering travellers more choice, lower airfares and the opportunity to connect families and business people, both within Canada and beyond. WestJet is extremely proud of our track record of operating safely and with respect for the environment and for the communities that we serve. This includes a commitment to operate in a way that minimizes the noise footprint from our aircraft in all phases of flight, with particular emphasis on the approach and departure phases.

As an airline, we recognize that we operate within a large and complex ecosystem made up of many partners and stakeholders, including airports and airport authorities, air traffic service providers around the world, aircraft manufacturers, all three levels of government, and of course regulators here in Canada, as well as those in the foreign jurisdictions in which we fly.

The Chair:

Could you slow it down a little bit? The translators are having difficulty keeping up with you.

Capt Scott Wilson:

I'm sorry. I'm talking like a pilot. I will slow down.

I will begin by outlining our ongoing community consultation process and the way we incorporate public feedback in our discussions and decisions. I'll provide the committee with information about our fleet, how our ongoing investment in the most modern aircraft available helps to reduce noise, and how we operate those aircraft to best minimize the noise footprint over the communities we serve.

Along with Nav Canada and the Canadian Airports Council, WestJet was a key participant in developing the Airspace Change Communications and Consultation Protocol in June of 2015. This is the document that launched an industry-wide commitment to open and transparent engagement with all stakeholders in the communities we serve.

WestJet is an active participant in regular and ongoing community consultations in Canada's four largest cities: Toronto, Montreal, Calgary and Vancouver. At the Vancouver airport, we are actively involved in the development of the five-year noise management plan.

In Calgary, we have given numerous presentations to community members on pilot noise mitigation responsibilities, today's aircraft technology, approach procedure design and the benefits of performance-based navigation. These have been very well received by the public. In fact, along with the Calgary Airport Authority and Nav Canada, we meet with a group of representatives from communities across Calgary every six to eight weeks to discuss aircraft noise and the operational means available to help reduce the impact of aircraft operations on noise in the environment.

On major airspace revisions, we attend open houses to field any operational questions on matters such as steeper approach profiles and variable dispersed lateral paths.

We are continuously engaged with the broader industry, including ICAO, IATA and the FAA, on their noise initiatives, and we attend noise conferences to ensure that we remain current with the latest procedures and technologies.

As my partner at Air Canada mentioned, it is worth mentioning that today's newer-generation aircraft have seen a 90% reduction in noise footprint compared to jet aircraft that first flew over Canada in the 1960s.

WestJet has invested heavily in new state-of-the-art aircraft, including the Boeing 737 Next Generation, or NG, as well as the Boeing 737 MAX narrow-body aircraft. In January, we'll deliver the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, which includes significant noise-reduction features.

For example, the new Boeing 737 MAX aircraft has a 40% smaller noise footprint than even its most recent 737 family member, the NG. The Boeing 787 Dreamliner will have a 60% smaller noise footprint than the Boeing 767 aircraft it will replace in the WestJet fleet.

Aircraft noise is reduced by improvements to aerodynamics and through weight-saving technologies. These improvements allow aircraft to climb higher and faster on takeoff, with less engine thrust. The addition of newer, quiet, high-bypass ratio engines with noise-reducing chevrons on the engine exhaust ensures the lowest noise footprint possible.

Low-speed devices, such as flaps on the wings, are designed to ensure minimum airframe noise during the landing phase, when aircraft are at their lowest and slowest over our communities.

Other aerodynamic and weight-saving technologies also contribute to better takeoff and landing performance. This enables lower noise footprints for the communities around the airports we serve. These investments bring dual benefits of noise pollution and lower carbon emissions, ensuring that aviation remains at the forefront of environmental innovation.

All pilots are trained to strictly adhere to Transport Canada's published noise abatement procedures at every Canadian airport. Without exception, prior to every approach or departure to be flown, pilots specifically brief considerations to help mitigate noise, including the vertical and lateral profiles to be flown.

WestJet invested early in a tailored required navigation program, or RNP. This pioneered the capability in Canada in 2004 in developing RNP procedures at 20 Canadian airports. New RNP AR approaches incorporate vertical profiles with constant descent angles that are flown at very low thrust settings, with no level segments. Laterally, they are designed to avoid noise-sensitive areas below our flight paths.

WestJet was a key contributor to Nav Canada's public RNP program, which by the end of 2020 will see 24 Canadian airports served by RNP approaches during multiple approach transitions.

In conclusion, I would like to thank the members of the committee for the opportunity to share our story today as it relates to noise mitigation. We are proud of the work we have accomplished and continue to do in this important area.

I would like to also reinforce once more that we remain committed to the safe and responsible operation of our airline, including further investment in fleet, innovation in noise reduction and fuel-efficient technologies, and ongoing consultation and collaboration with the communities we serve.

Thank you, and I look forward to your questions.

(0905)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Wilson.

We will go on to Mr. Liepert for six minutes.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Good morning, gentlemen.

We've had a number of witnesses before us who are suggesting—especially at Pearson in Toronto, but I think we need to think about all of our major airports in the country—to ban or severely curtail night flights. Frankfurt is always used as the example.

I don't think WestJet flies into Frankfurt, but feel free to comment as well.

As my first question, what would be the negative impacts of following what I'll call the “Frankfurt model” that you are aware of, Mr. Strom?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I'd like to comment. Thank you for the question.

I've been flying into Frankfurt for 25 years. Frankfurt is a very robust hub.

The one thing I wanted to start talking about is the difference between noise 25 years ago and noise today. It's completely different.

We're very fortunate that we have two robust airlines that can afford to spend, in our case, $15 billion on new aircraft. That is the key to noise abatement. You can see a 60% noise reduction, or up to a 90% noise reduction compared to the old stage 3. That's the biggest single thing we can do as an airline, and with the support of the House of Commons, we've been able to do that.

When I flew into Frankfurt 25 years ago, there was a whole section of cargo airplanes flying in Frankfurt. When I fly in there today, there are none. All the jobs associated with those cargo airplanes and the night-time flying disappeared. They have gone elsewhere.

The biggest change I've noticed is that it hasn't changed my operation, because we don't fly cargo airplanes. What has changed is the loss of thousands and thousands of jobs in Frankfurt because of this.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

There's no question there is an economic impact to recommending that type of action.

Mr. Murray Strom:

That's correct.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Okay.

I'd like to ask you about a more personal situation. I represent a Calgary riding, and I know both of you are familiar with Calgary approaches.

Since the new runway, the approaches have changed, certainly, from the west side. My riding, which is a half an hour's drive from the airport, is now under a flight path that is giving me no end of grief from my residents, despite what you're saying about reduced noise over the past few years.

One of the things that I asked Nav Canada was why they couldn't move that flight path five miles to the west, where very few people live, and if they needed to, five miles to the east, coming in on the other side, where very few people live. They maintained, if I'm correct, that there were safety issues, but there were also airline requests for those particular pathways.

Can you tell me, in each case, whether moving that approach five miles to the west and east is feasible? If not, why not? If it is, why aren't they doing it?

(0910)

Capt Scott Wilson:

Maybe I'll start with that and allow Mr. Strom to follow.

When you take a look at Calgary, obviously you see we have terrain considerations with the Rocky Mountains to the west of us. As long as we can maintain the proper separation and the proper terrain clearance on the way in, there should be no safety considerations of moving an approach path closer to the airport one way or the other.

When we do look, though, at what is optimum for allowing an approach path, which is to keep the arrival rates up and the efficiency of the airport up, obviously what we also look for is the shortest number of track miles coming into an arrival, which is basically a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. That usually becomes one of the priorities for the approach as we come into the city or the community.

I don't believe it's safety considerations, but there would be loss of an efficiency and more greenhouse gas emissions over the communities where we fly.

Mr. Murray Strom:

I agree with Scott's comments.

For us, it's about efficiency. We plan on being at idle power on approach, from the top of descent all the way to 1,000 feet, because when you're at idle, you make no noise. You make wind noise, and that's it. That's our objective.

It reduces greenhouse gases, saves money on the fuel, and gets the passengers to their destination as soon as possible.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Let's say I tell my constituents that the reason they're flying over our communities is that Nav Canada and the airlines have concluded it is the greenest and most efficient route, regardless of the impact on communities. Is that fair?

Mr. Murray Strom:

My comment to that is that we follow Nav Canada's procedures and the airports' consultations with the communities. The approach Nav Canada and the communities have decided is the best is what we're going to follow.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I know, but you would have some input into that, obviously. You're saying that the reason is not a safety issue but an efficiency issue and a greenhouse gas issue.

Mr. Murray Strom:

Yes, we're always looking for the most efficient approach.

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Go ahead. I'll pick it up later.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham is next.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I'll follow up on one of Mr. Liepert's points.

The new runway at Calgary is 14,000 feet, if I recall. At Toronto Pearson, a lot of the runways are under 10,000 feet. I don't know the answer to this, but is there any impact on airplane noise from different runway lengths and boundary zones of airports for surrounding communities? How much of a difference does that make?

Capt Scott Wilson:

One of the primary reasons for the length of the runways in Calgary is, of course, that the airport is almost 3,600 feet above sea level. Atmospheric conditions, density or altitude mean you are normally going to require more runway.

Whenever we do take off, we try to do what's called a balanced field takeoff. We try to use the minimum amount of thrust to depart a runway. The benefit of a longer runway is that it allows us to basically use more runway as we gain speed so that we can use less thrust for takeoff.

With regard to a shorter runway, the requirement would be to be closer to maximum thrust for departure.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then a shorter runway does have an impact on noise for sure.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Potentially.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

All right.

With regard to the A320 noise reduction kit—I know that WestJet isn't affected—you said that Airbus doesn't have enough of these available. I have seen a picture of this kit. It's basically a butterfly clip that you put on the wing. How long have they been available from Airbus?

Mr. Murray Strom:

It looks like a clip that you put on the wing, but in order to put that clip on, you have to secure it inside the wing. This means that generally an aircraft has to be in a major overhaul, because you have to drain the fuel tank of all the fuel and you have to open up the entire wing. Then you have to have individuals climb into the wing to secure it and hook it up.

Airbus, right now, has a shortage. We had a plan in place. Just like with everything, it takes time to get the plan in place. Unfortunately, Airbus doesn't have the kits. We've asked Airbus if we can manufacture our own kits, and they told us that we can't. It owns the patent on the kit.

We're doing everything we can—trust me—to get this installed as soon as possible. I know more about these generators now than I ever wanted to know about them. Again, it's a 3% reduction in noise, whereas a new airplane is 60%, so that's where Air Canada has really put its efforts.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How many A320s are there in the fleet?

You gave us percentages, not a raw number.

Mr. Murray Strom:

Yes, we gave percentages. What we're doing right now.... We have a combination of the 737 MAX arriving and the Airbus fleet leaving. To actually come up with a hard number every single time, I would have to take that back to our maintenance to get the hard number. We're going to eventually end up with about 50 Airbuses, and they will all be converted with this change.

The Airbus is a very quiet airplane. It just has a little whining noise just in this one section. We're going to fix it, but it's a 3% reduction. Right now, we're worried about bringing the new A220s in, and the new 737 MAX. Next year we're getting 18 of the 737 MAX. That's our number one emphasis right now.

(0915)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are retro fixes like this common on other aircraft? Is this something that has happened before, or is this new to the A320?

Mr. Murray Strom:

As far as I'm aware, it's just for the A320 problem.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, so no other aircraft.... Aircraft manufacturers don't have a habit of saying, “Here, we found this little doohickey that will reduce the noise on your airplane.”

Mr. Murray Strom:

No, they don't.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Another line I want to take on this is consumers' choice.

Do you, as airlines, do anything to inform consumers about the noise of the aircraft that they can be booking their flights on or the options that they have—a reminder, for example, that a flight is going to be at night over a community? Is there anything being done on that side of things by any airline?

Mr. Samuel Elfassy (Vice-President, Safety, Air Canada):

There is nothing that is currently accomplished to communicate that question that you just asked.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there any intention to look at that kind of thing, even as a public relations thing? You could say, “Just so you are aware, this flight costs this much, but guess what? It doesn't bother the neighbourhood, versus this flight, which does.”

Mr. Samuel Elfassy:

We provide opportunities for passengers to buy offsets to reduce their carbon footprints, but nothing as it relates to noise currently.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Wilson, you talked a lot about the RNP approaches earlier, the RNP program. In your own experience as a pilot, does that have any impact on your flight—having the straight-in approaches versus the older tradition of holds and...?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Yes, it's one of the greatest innovations, I think, that we'll see, particularly as it pertains to safety, noise and carbon footprints.

RNP approaches are unique in many ways. The first thing is, of course, that it utilizes the satellite constellation, the navigation capability of the aircraft and the training of the pilots. There are no ground-based requirements whatsoever. It allows you to basically use different separation for terrain, and Calgary is quite unique. We actually have the first approaches in the world that have been qualified to do what's called RNP on arrival, which allows us to basically do the curved approaches and have reduced separation that way.

What it also allows us to do is either avoid terrain or avoid noise-sensitive areas. The benefit, of course, is that you not only are always in constant descent, which keeps the thrust back and the noise down, but you also can basically curve the path as required. Straight-in approaches are required when you have, say, ground-based navigation systems such as an ILS, an instrument landing system. The benefit of RNP is that we can tailor it uniquely to the situation that we're working in—the airport environment, the communities, etc.—while gaining greater efficiency and safety, and the smallest noise footprint possible.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Will RNP be available for SVFR pilots anytime soon?

Capt Scott Wilson:

You'd be surprised what you can actually get in a configuration a small aircraft now to fly these approaches—so, yes.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Nantel is next. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel (Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, NDP):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

My thanks to all the witnesses for being here.

We have been talking about A320 and C Series aircraft, but I would like to know whether the new Boeing 777 is equipped with the Pratt & Whitney PurePower engine. Can anyone tell me that? [English]

Mr. Murray Strom:

The new Boeing aircraft use a consortium engine. Pratt & Whitney is involved with them. There's also a European manufacturer on it. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

I represent the constituency of Longueuil—Saint-Hubert. This is a little biased on my part, but it was Pratt & Whitney that invented the PT6 turboprop, which is man’s best friend after the dog and the horse. They also developed the PurePower engine, which, as you said, is extremely effective in reducing noise.

Are you going to be able to equip your fleet with that engine? You tell me that Boeing uses a consortium engine. Do you have PurePower engines in your housings? [English]

Mr. Murray Strom:

I'd have to go back to our maintenance division to check. The new Bombardier airplane, the A220, which is the C Series, is built in Montreal. It has a Pratt & Whitney engine. I'm going to have to check the the engine manufacturer on the 737. Unfortunately, I fly the 777, which is the big one. I've been involved with the 737, but I'll have to check back with maintenance on it. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Mr. Wilson, has Westjet Airlines acquired quieter engines, like the PurePower?

(0920)

[English]

Capt Scott Wilson:

With our fleets, particularly with the Boeing 737, there's only one engine variable. That's the LEAP-1B engine. It basically is a 40% reduction in the noise footprint compared to the aircraft that we purchased only 10 years earlier. Although not PurePower and not a product that way, it is one of the quietest engines. It's the only engine you can get on the 737 MAX, but it's a very quiet engine.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

With these engines being more quiet, either the PurePower or the other engine that you're talking about, are they also much more fuel-efficient?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Yes, they're roughly 20% more fuel-efficient than the engines they're replacing.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

That's outstanding.[Translation]

I would like to ask you a question about noise management. I am from Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, and you can be sure that I am well aware of the problems with noise from flight schools. A number of witnesses have said that Transport Canada has kind of left noise management to the communities or to the not-for-profit organizations that run the airports.

Would you like Transport Canada to better regulate those activities and establish standards for noise? I am thinking, for example, about the requests that people living near the Dorval airport made this spring. They complained that noise monitors were being installed as the airport saw fit.

If Transport Canada were to establish standards and more centralized regulation, would that help to ease those ongoing conflicts? When you live next to an airport, of course, you know that there will be noise. But would certain measures not be better enforced if Transport Canada were more involved? [English]

Mr. Murray Strom:

I have the pleasure to fly to most of the major airports in the world. I can say that the noise abatement procedures of Transport Canada, Nav Canada and the local airport authorities are some of the strictest in the world.

You have certain countries that don't have any at all, because aviation is number one to them in the Middle East, but throughout Europe and most of North America, including Canada, they have very thorough procedures. Our pilots are trained on every single departure. They brief the procedures and they follow the procedures. If they don't, we're quickly made aware of it.

Capt Scott Wilson:

I would agree with Murray's comments. When I take a look at Transport Canada's engagement, particularly with the airport authorities and Nav Canada and the airlines in Canada, I think we have a unique system here. We work together. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Okay.

So you are acknowledging that this is in fact a community organizing to solve the problems of being next to the airport, rather than waiting for the government to become involved. Right? [English]

Capt Scott Wilson:

Having lived under an airport flight path myself for many years, I certainly understand how the communities feel. Just as a starting point, one thing I will point out is that I lived under the departure end of runway 20 in Calgary, and compared to 20 years ago, the noise has almost disappeared.

Communities can and should have a say in the system as well, but we obviously have to find some impartial way of determining what is the right balance, looking at the efficiencies and the investment versus the requirements to keep an arrival rate up to maintain an efficiency coming into an airport and to continue to provide Canadians with the travel that they expect. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Mr. Elfassy, you told my colleague Mr. Graham that you do not provide compensation for noise caused by aircraft.

However, since you provide the opportunity of offsetting the carbon footprint, is the company that benefits from you buying its carbon credits accountable to Air Canada?

To whom is it accountable for the real use of the money invested by your customers? [English]

The Chair:

I'm sorry, gentlemen, but you've gone over time, so there's not sufficient time—

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Sorry about that.

The Chair:

—to answer. Perhaps we can get that answer back to the member through the meeting or after the meeting.

Go ahead, Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My thanks to the representatives of the airline companies here this morning.

My question goes to both companies.

In your opinion, is there a correlation between the noise pollution caused by aircraft and cardiac illness in adults, or chronic stress?

(0925)

[English]

Capt Scott Wilson:

With all due respect, based on my background as a pilot, I don't know if I'd be the appropriate one to give you an answer on that. I don't know if there's any correlation as you've described.

Mr. Murray Strom:

I echo Scott's comments. I'm very good at flying airplanes, but not good at health effects. I leave that to my doctor. I'm sorry. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Okay.

However, you are aware of all the studies that have been done on health problems, correct?

Perhaps you are not in a position to describe or confirm the correlation, but are you, or are you not, aware that there is one? [English]

Capt Scott Wilson:

I'm aware of numerous papers out there that have tried to provide correlations. I'm not sure of the validity of the science. Again, I don't think I'm a fair one to comment on such things.

Mr. Murray Strom:

I have read the World Health Organization's paper and I've read the papers that don't agree with it. I'll have to leave this up to the experts. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Have you received any comments, complaints or grievances from your pilots on this noise problem, or is it not an issue for them? [English]

Capt Scott Wilson:

Having grown up in this great country through many levels of aviation in Canada and over the years, I've certainly operated aircraft that have been a lot noisier than the ones that I operate now.

When we brought the Boeing 737 MAX into Canada a year ago, my first experience operating it was that I noticed how quiet it was on the flight deck and in the cabin, as well as the benefits that we see on the ground. The nice thing is that the new aircraft with new technologies are quieter on the ground and over the communities where they fly, and they're a much better experience on board for our passengers and guests as well as for the crew members who operate them. We see the benefits as well.

Mr. Murray Strom:

I agree with Scott and his comments. We actively monitor our aircraft inside the flight deck. If a pilot raises a concern about the noise in the flight deck, we'll do a study on the flight deck to ensure that the noise level is where it should be. If it's slightly elevated, we'll provide the pilots with noise-cancelling headsets to eliminate the noise. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.[English]

Mr. Strom, in your opening comments you made a reference to the noise being different in the last 20 or 25 years. Is that what your comments were?

Mr. Murray Strom:

Yes.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

If it's the case that the noise is different, something has changed, because I don't think 20 or 25 years ago we had so many people complaining about airplane noise. Something has changed. I see you're acknowledging my comments with a nice smile. What I would like to ask you is, what has changed?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I remember that when I was hired by Air Canada 32 years ago, I would sit outside the Dorval airport at the Hilton in Dorval and listen to all these wonderful DC-8s, 727s, DC-9s and 737s take off, and I love airplane noise. That's why I got into aviation. To hear the thrust of these engines was magnificent.

I go out there now, and you don't really hear anything. That has changed. Technology has changed the airline industry. We hear more about the noise now, and that's for various reasons, but the airplanes themselves are 90% quieter, I believe, in some cases. I miss it personally, because I like airplanes that make noise, but the airplanes are far quieter now than they were before.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Since you love noise, I invite you to come in to my riding in Laval. You can sit down with my constituents and enjoy the noise, because they hear it quite often.

Mr. Murray Strom:

No, no.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

This is what they're telling me—that there is a change.

I'd like to ask you another question. Are planes flying lower than before? Is the altitude much lower than before?

Mr. Murray Strom:

No, it's higher.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

You say it's higher.

Mr. Murray Strom:

Yes.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Can you also tell me, Mr. Wilson, how is it for you? Are planes flying at the same altitude, higher or lower?

Capt Scott Wilson:

The benefit that we see with RNP approaches—I'll go back to this—is that when you're close to an airport, for a safety perspective we fly what is a 3° gradient path, so that's roughly 300 feet per nautical mile. Regardless of what we're able to accomplish beyond that, when you're close in proximity to the airport, three miles back, you're roughly going to be a thousand feed above ground. That hasn't changed from the 1960s to where we are today.

(0930)

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.

My last question is to both of you. What is your input on flying, on flying the routes, on flying the pathways you're using, the altitude, everything? What is your input with respect to flying planes?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Are you asking what the input is from a pilot's perspective?

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

No, from an airline perspective.

Capt Scott Wilson:

From an airline....

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Who decides what route to take, at what time to take it? Who controls all that? Who dictates all that?

Capt Scott Wilson:

I think probably the best way to start with that is actually with the flying public. Basically, the flying public lets airlines know through where they purchase tickets, through their trends on what times they like to leave and on what routes, and that basically proves the viability.

It then goes to the network planner, who basically builds a network schedule and utility around that schedule to provide the best service possible to travelling Canadians and the public. Then from that point it goes to our flight dispatch systems, which try to provide the most optimum routing, and then, basically on the day that a flight is being flown, it's the pilot in command, working with Nav Canada.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Mr. Strom—

The Chair:

I'm sorry, Mr. Strom. Could you somehow get that answer to Mr. Iacono?

We move on to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

I'll give the first question to my colleague, Mr. Rogers, if he promises to make it a short one.

Mr. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

I do.

First of all, thanks, gentlemen, for being here this morning. Thank you, Chair.

My question is for Mr. Strom.

Aircraft noise is not an issue in my area of Newfoundland and Labrador, specifically Gander airport, particularly since Air Canada cancelled morning flights and night flights, which makes life very difficult for travellers and for the business community trying to get out of the province and into other parts of the country. It makes life very difficult for me as an MP. It really cut my two-day weekends down to one day, because I cannot get back on the island on a Thursday night.

I want to know, Mr. Strom, what might be the rationale for cutting these flights?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I will have to talk to our corporate planning people and I'll get back to you with the answer for the rationale. I don't have that information in front of me at this time.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

All right. It's my turn, I guess.

Thank you, Mr. Rogers.

RNP—what does that stand for?

Capt Scott Wilson:

RNP stands for required navigation performance.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you.

Have any of you had to deal directly with neighbours who are complaining about the noise of your aircraft?

Capt Scott Wilson:

I'd be happy to take that on to answer.

Yes—

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I just need a short answer, because I have a follow-up question. The answer, then, is yes. Okay.

Has there ever been any discussion with people who profess to be affected by this noise about the whole issue of active noise cancellation in their homes? There are things you can buy that are basically like noise-cancelling headphones, which could cancel the noise in a bedroom, for instance.

Capt Scott Wilson:

I'm familiar with the technology on board the aircraft. Our fleet of Bombardier Q400s has active noise cancellation capability in the cabin. I'm not aware of how it applies or of any technology that actually does it in the home. It's a good point, but I'm not aware of the technology in the home.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Somebody might want to do a pilot program.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Good thought.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Let's talk about noise itself. Maybe you're not quite the right people to ask, because you may not track this, but do you have a profile developed of the people who are most susceptible to noise—men versus women, age, etc.?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I don't have that information. I don't believe we've studied it. It was addressed in one report by the World Health Organization, but I don't have the information in front of me at this time.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Just from past experience when I used to program radio stations, I know that women handle noise or annoyance differently from men; they will react differently. As well, we've come through an era—I would call it the ear-damaged generation—when people have been subjecting themselves to very loud stereos in their cars or personal devices and everything else.

You would wonder whether perhaps part of what you're experiencing, with the level of complaints going up even with quieter planes, is with people who have somehow altered their hearing with these other devices, making them more susceptible to the noise. I'll ask you to comment on that.

Also, if you're a member of the flight crew and you're in the cabin, you're dealing with a constant level of noise throughout the whole journey, whereas if you're on the ground, it's sporadic. There's noise, then there isn't noise, and then there's noise again. Has that been examined in the course of trying to come up with an overall management plan for noise at airports?

(0935)

Mr. Murray Strom:

Again, I'm not the expert on your first question.

On the second question, the newer airplanes are considerably quieter in the cabin. I'm not aware of any studies that have been made of the effect of what the noise does to an individual. We have Health Canada guidelines for our cabin crew, our passengers, and our pilots, and we generally follow those as guidelines.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Do you participate at all in the planning of airports, particularly the alignment of runways versus what's going on in the surrounding area? It would be one thing, for instance, to have a flight path coming in over a light industrial area such as you normally see close to airports, and another to have one coming in over a new development of townhouses.

Mr. Murray Strom:

We consult with the local airport authorities to assist them wherever we can. We offer our simulators up for testing of new approaches. We work with Nav Canada also.

We're a participant, but we're not the lead group on it.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Are you ever invited to or asked to participate in zoning decisions by municipalities near airports?

Mr. Murray Strom:

We are not, so far as I'm aware. I believe that's handled by the airport authority.

The Chair:

Okay. Thank you very much, Mr. Hardie.

We move on to Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you for being here today, and for coming right before Christmastime as well. We appreciate it.

We recently had the Minister of Transport here, and he made an interesting comment along the lines of the carbon tax. He says he hasn't heard from anybody that the carbon tax has been detrimental.

Have you guys heard that the carbon tax has been detrimental? Can you perhaps comment on what the carbon tax means to your particular industry?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I'm not the right person to answer that question. We'd have to bring together three or four different departments to give you the correct answer. I can get that answer for you, but I take care of the day-to-day flight operations of the aircraft, and that information lies in other departments.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

You have no personal opinion, Mr. Strom. Is there maybe something that you've heard around the office?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I don't like offering an opinion unless I have the facts to deal with.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Do you have an opinion, Mr. Wilson?

Capt Scott Wilson:

I'd be aligned with Mr. Strom that way, in terms of offering an opinion in an area that's not my expertise.

However, I will strongly point out that we've talked about both the very strong level of capital investment in airframes and engines that produce the lowest level of noise possible and the greatest amount of efficiency. Therefore, on anything from a tax perspective, I'd also hope that it would be offset by looking at the level of investment that an airline is making.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Your companies are part of the National Airlines Council of Canada. Is that correct? There was a letter sent from your association to Minister McKenna, with a cc to Minister Garneau and Minister Morneau, highlighting the negative impact of the carbon tax.

Let me ask this a different way, then. Do you think that perhaps a study on the impacts of the carbon tax, at a committee like this, would be useful for your airline or for the association?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I believe it would be, yes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Sorry. Could you say that again?

Mr. Murray Strom:

I believe it would be, yes.

Capt Scott Wilson:

I would concur.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Okay.

I'd like to share my time with Mr. Godin.

(0940)

[Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, CPC):

Thank you.

As I listen to the testimony today and consider the cost of replacing aircraft as a solution to the noise problem, I see that the consumer always ends up paying the bill.

I would like to introduce a motion on behalf of Kelly Block, who submitted the notice of motion on October 26. The motion reads:

That the committee undertake a study on the impact of the federal carbon tax on the transportation industry as follows: meeting on the carbon tax’s impact on the aviation industry, one meeting on the carbon tax’s impact on the rail industry, one meeting on the carbon tax’s impact on the trucking industry, and that the committee report its findings to the House.

I believe that is important to have the facts and to do this exercise rigorously in order to have clear answers. We all agree about protecting our environment, but we have to measure the cost of doing so, and to find out what we are talking about. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Godin.

Go ahead, Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

I assume you're speaking to the motion.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I am speaking to the motion.

To the witnesses, I apologize. Based on your comments here today, plus the comments of the minister, I think it's important that we look into this as quickly as possible. Perhaps it could be when we come back from the break. Maybe it's even during the break that we would take the time to look at this.

Often we see on the other side that we adjourn debate and this issue is unfortunately taken off the table, so we'd like to move it today, again with regard to some of the comments that were made here and some of the comments the minister has made.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Liepert.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I would support the motion. If we took this time, I think that it would also give us an opportunity to expand on what has been made clear this morning.

Nav Canada, which in many ways tries to accommodate policies of the government at the time, is making decisions that are impacting constituents—certainly my constituents—for what I can see are efficiency reasons for airlines. That's all well and good, but once we get these efficiencies, then we layer a carbon tax on industry, which defeats the whole purpose and results in aircraft having to fly over communities that have a high density.

In addition to that, it has been made clear that a reduction in emissions is a primary reason that some of these flight paths are directed over high-density areas. I think that's something that could be explored as well, as we go through discussion on this particular motion.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Godin. Speak briefly, please. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would like to tell my colleagues that witnesses have told us this morning about the importance of renewing aircraft fleets. Reducing the noise and the environmental footprint means buying new aircraft. However, I recognize that that involves costs and repercussions for consumers. Moreover, we must be conscious of the fact that producing new aircraft implies using resources and raw materials, which is a factor in increasing the environmental footprint.

We must also remember that there are a number of aircraft graveyards, with planes that are no longer used and that have been withdrawn from service. These factors must be measured. It is important for us as parliamentarians to consider the situation as a whole so that we can make informed decisions. To do so, I suggest that we wait for answers to our questions. Our future is at stake and I feel that it is our responsibility. That is why this motion is important for us.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Godin.

Mr. Nantel is next. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Gentlemen, you may not be aware, but you will probably not be surprised to learn that I am currently making a lot of effort to bring all parties together around the problem of global warming. The Conservatives too have a point of view about it, I feel. In my opinion, we cannot deny the evidence on global warming. Before we take any measures, I would like to see the Conservative Party become involved in a serious discussion on global warming.

It is self-evident that reducing our carbon footprint comes with costs. We can clearly see that a game of political obstruction is under way. I don't think that is in anyone's interest. I will conclude simply by saying that, of course, I am going to oppose this motion. However, I am making a gesture by suggesting that the proposal be presented again once your leader has agreed to participate in the leaders' summit on global warming that I propose to hold next January.

Thank you.

(0945)

[English]

The Chair:

We'll go back to Mr. Godin again—briefly, please. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

In response to my colleague's remarks, I will say that we Conservatives are very sensitive to the environment. Our approach is perhaps different from that of my NDP colleague, but I believe that, before we take any initiative, we have to know what we are talking about. That is why I think it would be prudent to conduct a study and to organize meetings to determine what the real impact would be. We are just realizing that electric cars are not as environmentally friendly as scientists claimed in the past. We have to have those discussions before we make decisions that affect the future. So I invite the committee to accept this motion so that we can obtain answers to our questions and thereby do some excellent work as parliamentarians.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Godin.

The motion is rightfully before us. We all—

Go ahead, Mr. Nantel. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Since you have been kind enough to give me the floor again, let me make it clear that, of course, I am inviting Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to be part of the summit. Clearly, no one person is all black or all white. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Nantel.

You all have the motion in front of you. I don't see any further debate.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I request a recorded vote.

The Chair:

A recorded vote is fine.

(Motion negatived: nays 6; yeas 3)

The Chair: Thank you very much to the witnesses for being here. I'm sure we will hear more from each other as we complete this study.

We'll suspend for a few moments while our witnesses for motion 177 on flight schools come to the table.

(0945)

(0950)

The Chair:

Let us bring our meeting back to order, please.

Thank you all. I appreciate everybody's patience.

From the Canadian Owners and Pilots Association, we have Bernard Gervais, president and chief executive officer; from The Ninety-Nines, Inc., International Organization of Women Pilots, we have Robin Hadfield, a director on the international board of directors and governor of the east Canada section; and we have Judy Cameron, a retired Air Canada captain, director of Northern Lights Aero Foundation, as an individual.

They will of course be speaking to motion M-177, under which we are studying the challenges facing flight schools in Canada.

Ms. Hadfield, would you like to go first? You have five minutes. When I raise my hand, please make your closing remarks.

Ms. Robin Hadfield (Director, International Board of Directors, Governor, East Canada Section, The Ninety-Nines, Inc., International Organization of Women Pilots):

Thank you.

My personal involvement as a pilot started 39 years ago and has continued in general aviation. The Hadfield family spans over 60 years in aviation, with three generations and four captains at Air Canada and with backgrounds as flying instructors, flying surveys up in the Arctic, and flying with an indigenous-owned northern Ontario commuter, Wasaya Airways, operating into the isolated reserves. It gives one a very unique perspective on my brother-in-law, who was commander on the space station.

In my background and with my family, our daily discussions centre around aviation. They've given me a very broad understanding of many of the issues facing the aviation sector.

While the motion has to do with flying schools and I do not have an in-depth background on that, within general aviation I certainly know the problems that we're hitting. What I wanted to do today was to deal with where we see problems. The Ninety-Nines is the largest and oldest organization of women pilots in the world, with over 6,000 members in pretty much every continent now.

This is not just an issue in Canada; it's an issue everywhere. I want to go through what we see as the problem and then, very quickly, what I see as the solution. We can deal with it further with questions if you want to.

The first problem is the very high cost of flight training, as you've heard in your meetings to date. Realistically, it costs $80,000 to $90,000 for a student to go from private pilot to the commercial licence with a multi-engine instrument rating. These high costs pose a special barrier, especially for students coming from households with a low income.

A solution is to make student loans that don't require collateral and co-signing available at the flying schools that are offering a diploma program, just as we have with other colleges and universities. Right now, those flying schools that do offer college programs are taken away from colleges and universities and classified as private colleges, so student loans and OSAP do not apply for them. It's creating quite a hindrance.

A precedent does exist for funding beyond loans. As you heard just the other day from, I believe, one of the pilots here—or it could have been Stephen Fuhr—back in the fifties, when you got your pilot's licence, they actually gave you a rebate once you reached a commercial licence, in order to help with those costs. A student loan forgiveness program could work the same way.

We don't have enough flying instructors. The instructors working at flight schools traditionally make a starvation wage. One of the solutions is to forgive the student loan if, for example, a graduate stays and works for two years as an instructor. Perhaps they could get a 40% rebate on what their student loan forgiveness would be, and if they stayed for four years, it would increase. In the same way that we do this for doctors, nurses and teachers that go up into the north, the same type of program could apply for flight students.

One of the other issues is that there are not enough young people considering it as a career. To me, making aviation a high school credit course would make a lot of sense. I've talked to our Ministry of Education in Ontario. As a past school board trustee, I'm aware of what's going on in the high schools, and they're really missing the mark. They are clueless when it comes to aviation. While there is a program in Ontario that has aviation and aerospace, they focus completely on items that are outside of aviation itself.

There aren't enough females. That's simple. Again, we can facilitate this by raising awareness in high schools, raising the profiles of successful females as role models, having material in packages for the guidance departments and teachers—including examples of female pilots who have successful careers—and having career days that have female professional pilots present at them. Organizations such as the Ninety-Nines already facilitate this with our current programs, working in conjunction with provincial ministers and creating new programs such as our “Let's Fly Now!” program.

Using that model in Manitoba, the Manitoba chapter of the Ninety-Nines has an airplane and works with the University of Manitoba and the St. Andrews flight school. They bought a simulator. It cost $15,000. It's free for girls to come in and use for learning procedures. Within two years, they have had over 20 women receive their pilot's licence, which is more than most of the Ontario flight schools combined in terms of female pilots.

(0955)



There are not enough indigenous. We need to encourage flight schools into remote areas, such as Yellowknife, Thompson, or Senneterre. Although good flying weather is vital for a flight school, we have to go where they are; they're not coming down where we are.

We don't have enough flying schools. There are insufficient facilities for potentially new flight students. We can improve the business case for expansion because we are looking at enormous global shortages of pilots. A good business case exists to offer economic incentives to expand. Low-interest loans could help with the high capital cost for expansion in such areas as hangars and training aircraft.

There are a high number of foreign students who are taking up spaces in our flight schools. I believe the number right now is that 56% of all the students in the flying schools are from other countries. The country subsidizes the students to come here. The flight schools charge almost double the amount of tuition for them, so there's no incentive for our flight schools to not take them. The foreign students are good for our economy and they're good for the local areas where they come in. However, we have to recognize that these students leave immediately after they get their licence.

(1000)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Hadfield.

We'll go on to Mr. Gervais.

Mr. Bernard Gervais (President and Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Owners and Pilots Association):

Thank you. Good morning.

I will quickly tell you a little about COPA, the Canadian Owners and Pilots Association, which was founded in 1952.

It's the largest aviation organization in Canada and is based in Ottawa. We have 16,000 members across the country, mostly private pilots and commercial pilots, with some airline pilots, and Commander Hadfield is our spokesperson. We're the second-largest of about 80 members of the International Council of Aircraft Owner and Pilot Associations, with representation at ICAO. Our mission is to advance, promote and preserve the Canadian freedom to fly.

We represent general aviation in the country. General aviation is pretty much everything that is not scheduled flights and military flying; it's pilot training, agricultural flying, bush-flying operations and many others. As I said, it's anything but scheduled flights and military flying. On the civil air registry right now, out of about 36,000 aircraft, over 32,000 are general aviation aircraft. Almost 90% of the aircraft in the civil air registry are general aviation aircraft.

The impact of GA on the economy is $9.3 billion. Why am I bringing this up? It's because GA plays a niche role in pilot training.

Most flight training aircraft are also constituents of the GA fleet. The first step in any pilot's career is walking through the front door of a flight training unit, and that's most likely a general aviation flight training unit. This training takes place in smaller GA-type airports and aerodromes more suited to the training environment and the type of aircraft operations that we see in these smaller GA airports all around the country.

Also, with COPA being GA, over the last five years COPA has taken more than 18,000 youngsters aged eight to 17 up for an aircraft ride in a program called “COPA For Kids”, so right there, in the last five years, we could have solved the whole pilot shortage problem with the COPA For Kids program.

What challenges do new pilots face? First they have to get into a PPL program—“PPL” being a private pilot licence—and get through that. There is no financial aid for this available anywhere in the country, except for scholarships. It's up to them, their parents or anyone else to get that money to put up front just to walk through this first step of a PPL. Anything above that is the commercial pilot licence.

Most flight training costs are not eligible for student loans unless done as part of a college program, in which case it would only be the classroom portion. Flight training units are only available in certain areas, usually the most densely populated. There's only one flight school in Yukon and none in the Northwest Territories or Nunavut.

In terms of the availability of instructors, applications from students are actually being turned down due to lack of instructors, or there's a long waiting list and they're told to come back in a year when there may be room for them in a flight training unit. Especially if the students just want to go for a private pilot licence, this recreational and private pilot licence thing is put on the back burner. The idea is to get some foreign students, but also, if you're in the airline training program, they're looking for airline pilots. The ones who will become instructors, the ones we will need, are left out.

Challenges for the flight training units include the availability of qualified instructors. With a few exceptions, most instructors need to be employed by an FTU, a flight training unit, to use their instructor rating. Other challenges include using older aircraft.

As well, another challenge faced by the flight training units is the fact that flight training units are at aerodromes that are quite old, and there are also capacity issues because of airport size, air traffic control capabilities, and the need to balance—as was presented earlier—flight training capacity with responsible aerodrome operation, especially in certain high-density areas, such as Saint-Hubert in Longueuil.

Also, for the FTUs and these airports, the only federal funding that can help these airports to develop, sustain and look at other ways is ACAP funding, but these funds are only for airports that have passenger service, and most of the GA airports do not have that.

(1005)



As I said earlier, most people see aviation in Canada as airliners and very few smaller aircraft, when actually it's the other way around: 90% to 95% of all aircraft in the country are general aviation. Some people also see aviation in the country as the 26 big airports of the national airport system, but there are over 1,500 airports.

In conclusion, to ensure that the supply chain for pilots stays healthy, the front door of the general aviation world has to stay open. It means protecting community airports so that the flight schools have places to live and grow, ensuring that adequate talent and experience is retained at the instructor level. It means preserving the flying clubs and social networks associated with airports, including community, in terms of what goes on at their local airport so that they are connected and realize the important role that this asset is playing locally and in the big picture.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Gervais.

Captain Cameron, welcome.

Ms. Judy Cameron (Air Canada Captain (retired), Director, Northern Lights Aero Foundation, As an Individual):

Thank you for this opportunity to speak today.

I was the first woman in Canada to fly for a major airline when I was hired by Air Canada in 1978. After 37 years and more than 23,000 flying hours, I retired from the airline as a Boeing 777 captain three years ago.

The biggest challenge for aviation in Canada today, and therefore flight schools, is the looming pilot shortage. You have heard that by 2025, Canada will need 7,000 to 10,000 new pilots. By 2036 a staggering 620,000 commercial pilots will be required worldwide. Part of the problem is that 50% of the population—women—are not engaged. I began my flying training 45 years ago, yet there's been very little progress in the number of women flying as airline pilots. Since the very first few were hired in 1973, the percentage of women flying for airlines globally has only increased to 5% today.

The main reason for this is the lack of role models. Countless times I've heard girls say they've never seen a female pilot before. Women in aviation need to be more visible, demonstrating their capability, credibility and passion for flying.

A 2018 study by Microsoft showed that women are more likely to do well and have a sense of belonging if they can see positive role models in a STEM career. They need to see other women performing a job before they will consider it. Research has also shown that this exposure needs to start when girls are young, as interest in technology begins at around age 11 but falls off at around age 16. A hands-on, engaging introduction to aviation is needed as part of the curriculum in elementary school. An aviation ground school course incorporating physics, math and meteorology could be offered to high school students.

As you heard from Bernard, an actual flight is even more successful to spark the passion to be a pilot. My first flight in a small airplane completely changed my career path. I had been pursuing an arts degree. My first flight was the catalyst that gave me the will and the determination to pursue an aviation career. Annual events like Girls Take Flight, an initiative started by the Ninety-Nines, provide this opportunity.

I'm a director with the Northern Lights Aero Foundation, which inspires women in all sectors of aviation and aerospace. Northern Lights has held an annual awards event for the last 10 years to highlight Canadian women who've made significant accomplishments in these fields. Past winners have included Dr. Roberta Bondar and Lieutenant-Colonel Maryse Carmichael, the first female Snowbird commander. We have a mentoring program, a speakers bureau and scholarships. In addition, we do outreach at aviation events. Our foundation has managed to attract strong support from industry. Companies are finally realizing that our activities assist in the recruitment of women. The Northern Lights Aero Foundation introduces girls and young women to positive role models and mentors who have been successful in their field.

You have heard about the high cost of flight training. At $75,000 to $100,000, it is a barrier to both sexes. A national funding program that provides such remedies as tax incentives to flight schools, student loans for the private pilot licence—which, as you heard, is not eligible for any loans right now and costs around $20,000—and loan forgiveness for pilots committing to work as flight instructors for a specified period of time could mitigate this.

The low pay for flight instructors is a significant challenge to flight schools. I just spoke to a young female instructor in Edmonton about this. She's been 10 years in the field. Instructors are paid between $25,000 and $40,000 a year. Their income is variable, as they're not on salary unless they're working for a university or a college. They're only paid when the weather is suitable for flight. This makes it difficult for schools to retain experienced instructors, who leave as soon as possible for more lucrative jobs, sometimes not even in aviation. Elevating this pay could also make it a viable permanent career choice for pilots who wish to remain at home each night instead of spending days away from their family. A lack of instructors will ultimately choke the pipeline that ensures a reliable supply of future pilots.

Women and the younger generation as a whole are also concerned about work-life balance. This dissuades some from entering flight schools. Junior pilots at an airline often have the most onerous schedules, which involve many consecutive days away from home during the time when they're most likely to be starting a family. Such innovative programs as Porter Airlines' “block sharing”, which means sharing a schedule of flying, eases the transition for women returning from maternity leave. This is a difficult time in a pilot's career; I can personally attest to this, as I have two daughters, and I returned to work in as little as two and a half months after having one of them.

(1010)



In closing, I will say that one of the biggest challenges to flight schools is actually attracting women to walk in through their door. With support from government and industry to increase exposure to STEM subjects in the classroom and incentives for young people to pursue flight training and remain in the industry, I believe we can turn the tide on the impending pilot shortage. I had the most amazing job in the world, and I wholeheartedly encourage other women to pursue it as well.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Captain Cameron.

Thank you to all for your excellent recommendations.

Mr. Jeneroux, you have four minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I'm sorry, Madam Chair; how many minutes did you say?

The Chair:

Given the fact that we're at 10:13 already and we're trying to divide it up, it's four minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I'm okay; I was just curious about how many minutes I had.

Thank you all for being here. It's great to have you here.

It's really an honour to have you here, Captain Cameron. Thank you for taking the time to be here.

What is the main reason we're seeing pilots leave the industry? We talk a lot about attracting new and young pilots to the industry, but why are pilots leaving the industry?

I'll start with you, Captain Cameron.

Ms. Judy Cameron:

My experience is airline. Generally, people don't leave an airline career. Once you start on the seniority pathway, the progression is pretty much assured as long as you can pass your check rides.

This is just conjecture on my part, but I'm thinking that if you're starting out, you've paid all this money, and you're having difficulty finding a job.... There's this joke that the difference between a junior pilot and a pizza is that a pizza will feed a family of four.

Those early years are tough. That's the only reason I can think of for you to leave: You've found another way to make a living that is more secure.

Again, once you're with an airline, you generally continue, because you're on a great career path.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Ms. Hadfield, would you comment?

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

That's an issue I am familiar with, because out of the graduates, only about 40% actually stay in aviation. A lot of them whom I know first-hand do not want to go up into the north, especially when they're from the large urban areas. They go up there and spend a couple of years. They don't make very much, because the third-tier commuter lines are well aware that the pilots will be leaving to go to the next level up, with the goal of Air Canada or WestJet. Very few go there and say they want to stay up in the north. Some do, but that's not the majority.

A lot of them have had scares. The northern operators had in the past been known for trying to push the limits on overweighting planes and for some maintenance issues. If they've had a scare, they'll just say, “I've had enough, and I'm not making very much money”, and they'll walk away. With females, they have problems where.... You know, they're young and the guys are young; they start dating each other and they break up, and that's it. They leave the industry.

There's a whole sort of...but pay is a huge issue. It's a tough one to get around with the way the whole industry has been structured, back from the beginning of airlines.

(1015)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Okay. Perfect. Thank you.

Mr. Gervais, maybe you'll be able to work your answer in during some of the other questions. I have only a minute left, and I want to put a notice of motion on the table.

This would be a verbal notice of motion, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

You want to give a notice of motion? Okay.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Tell me when you're ready for me to read it.

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Okay. It reads: That the committee undertake a study of the impact of the federal carbon tax related to the transportation industry as follows: Two meetings on the carbon tax's impact on air passengers; Two meetings on the carbon tax's impact on railway customers; Two meetings on the carbon tax's impact on trucking customers; and that the committee report its findings to the House.

I have it written out here, Marie-France.

The Chair:

Thank you.

You still have 45 seconds left.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Wonderful.

Mr. Gervais, maybe you could take that time to respond to my question, please.

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

Our feeling is that if the pilots are on a pathway to becoming airline pilots, there's such a demand around the world that there's no time to fill these voids and these gaps.

As to why they would be leaving, as Captain Cameron said, usually you don't leave an airline career; it's just that there's no time to get there. They get taken and brought into the business, into the airliner world around the world, because there's so much growth and so much more air traffic.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

How much time do I have left?

The Chair:

You have four seconds. We'll move to Mr. Iacono.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you, ladies and gentleman, for being here this morning.

Captain, more and more people are flying, are travelling, and therefore airlines are busier and thus making more money. Do you agree?

Ms. Judy Cameron:

It's a cyclical industry. Maybe they are for now. I've seen it go up and down.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Therefore, why not invest internally in order to fill up this void? Why aren't the airlines investing in their own personnel? You have many flight attendants on board who have that experience of being flown and serving the public, so why not invest in them taking up these courses? Why isn't there a program that exists internally whereby you give that initiative to your employees to move up the ladder, to move up to the next level and become a pilot? Since we're having this shortage, why isn't that being done?

Ms. Judy Cameron:

I wish I could answer that as an airline executive, which I am not. It's an interesting question. One of the members of the audience today works with a foundation called Elevate, and they're studying right now why women don't look at aviation as a career for economic security. They certainly would make a lot more money as a pilot than as a flight attendant. I don't have the answer to that.

There is a model in Europe, a cadet program. For example, Lufthansa has a European flight training academy. They do the ground school, and then once you've finished, you start with a feeder airline to Lufthansa. Eventually you move into Lufthansa. There's a signing bonus once you start, and you gradually repay your training once you start with a feeder.

There are pros and cons to that model, as Robin may attest. I'm not sure why Air Canada hasn't looked at it. They haven't had to because in the past people were clambering over each other to get an airline job when there was quite a lack of them. This is a complete change now.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

There's no shortage when it comes to finding flight attendants, right?

Ms. Judy Cameron:

I suppose not.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

I think that would be a positive way to look at it.

My second thing—and the other two can also respond to the questions—is why not also look internally when it comes to pilots, as to pilots giving the courses? A teacher, for example, after two or three years, is going to take a sabbatical to go do research. Why not initiate a program in which you have pilots of a certain number of years' experience initiate six months of training for new pilots, new students? This way you don't have the shortage of trainers. You're saying there's a shortage of students and there's a shortage of pilots. Why not look internally to fulfill both?

(1020)

Ms. Judy Cameron:

The shortage is at the beginner level. It's at the private pilot, the commercial pilot level.

Once you're with the airline, the airline has its own internal training program, and they've quite successfully recruited many retired pilots to come back and teach simulator. That's an entirely different skill set from the instructors that they're referring to, the instructors that are needed to get the young ones into the aviation field.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Would you like to add something to that, Ms. Hadfield?

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

I would. On the idea of flight attendants, I personally know over 15 flight attendants who have become pilots and who are working their way up, but they've had to do it totally on their own. There is no incentive for an airline to do their own training.

Concerning the shortage of pilots, there's a misconception that people don't want to become pilots. In Springbank there are two flying schools with a waiting list of over 300 students. There were 78 air cadets who did not get their power licence this summer because of lack of instructors, and at the busiest flying school in the country, at Brampton, in October they put out a notice that they are not taking any more new students.

There is a waiting list of people in Canada who want to learn to fly. The seats are taken by international students. Then they leave the country, meaning we have a shortage of instructors, meaning we can't take that waiting list of students.

It's a cycle. The schools need money, so they take the international students, and that kicks the door shut for our students.

The Chair:

I'm sorry, Mr. Iacono; your time is up.

Mr. Nantel is next. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Ms. Hadfield, as you quite rightly pointed out, there is no link between the education system in Canada and flight schools, although we have a real need for pilots. What also strikes me is when Ms. Cameron suggested that people in the north, where there is such a need for pilots, will not move to the south to take that training for any length of time. However, I am well aware of the situation in flight schools in Saint-Hubert, where there are major concerns. We have always bemoaned the fact that they are all concentrated in that location, right above the houses of ordinary folks.

However, as you explained, is quite sad to see that the schools are accepting a lot of foreign pilots who take places, not just from Canadian students, but also from Canadian pilots. That means that the pilots leave. Would you like the committee to recommend setting up a network? I am talking about the Aerospace Industries Association of Canada, the AIAC, which set up the Don't Let Go Canada program. We met Mr. Hadfield to talk about that.

Should we not have a concerted approach to establish a training program for young people, particularly young women, so that they can get started in the field? [English]

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

I think that if we can set up programs at the high school level, where students who are not that familiar with airports.... As urban areas have expanded, we've lost the small airports and general aviation. People don't see airplanes flying around, and our youth can't look up and say, “Oh, I want to do that.” They go into high schools and focus on STEM programs, but those don't include aviation.

I think it's about bringing it back into the high schools and also about having a loan and debt repayment program—making it affordable so they can go to school—to keep our own students in the flight schools. You're looking at half our population that is making under.... How is a family with a combined income of $80,000 going to afford putting their kid through these schools?

Also, the payback is slow. When our son was at a flying school, I said to him that he was going to have to go up north and be up there for years, that he was going to be pumping gas and cleaning puke out of airplanes for the pleasure of making $20,000 a year. Then, when you start making your way up there—you get married, you have kids—and you're making $100,000, you go to Air Canada and you drop to $40,000.

It's a cycle. For the flight schools, I think we have to make a definite loan repayment program. You can't stop them from accepting foreign students, but if we can have our students afford to get there.... Canada is very well known around the world for our aviation sector. That's why other countries are paying for their kids to come here.

(1025)

[Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Education is very clearly in provincial jurisdiction, which can complicate things a little. However, Mr. Gervais, I believe that you are aware of the current situation at Saint-Hubert. In my opinion, there is no doubt that one of the solutions would be to plan the distribution of flight schools better. Why not bring the CEGEPs in Quebec to chat with their local airports and see about installing a flight simulator and a few aircraft, thereby establishing a flight school?

Currently, in my constituency of Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, those schools are so thick on the ground that they have become a problem. I am the first to sing the praises of aerospace and to proclaim that Longueuil—Saint-Hubert is the birthplace of a number of wonderful technologies of which we are proud. However, when almost 25% or 30% of the places in the École nationale d'aérotechnique are vacant, I see it as a deplorable situation. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Nantel, I'm sorry, but there's just not enough time for an answer right now. Possibly it could be intertwined it with some other answer.

We'll move on to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair, and thanks to all of you for being here.

It sounds as if the free market system has really imploded in all of this. On the one hand, you have higher load factors generally, at least on the flights I take, and fares are still pretty robust, especially in the north, yet you have pilots practically lining up at food banks, a phenomenon that we've seen in the States.

You tell me that on the one hand there are a lot of people who want to go to flight schools here, but the trainers make peanuts and the tuition is really expensive. I'm sorry, but where's the money going?

Ms. Judy Cameron:

It's expensive to operate an airplane.

I was just going to say, speaking to some earlier questions, that there are low-cost solutions too. Just being able to watch an airplane take off and land, there's no place in Toronto where you can do that. Vancouver has a great observation area. In Toronto you have to park on the side of the highway to see an aircraft.

There used to be a wonderful opportunity to have people in the flight deck. We can't do that anymore. It was one of the best selling tools. It probably cost a lot of parents a lot of money over the years if they had children watching us take off and land.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Yes, but the question is that the key people—the trainers and the students and the new pilots—all tend to.... Who would want that job if it costs you a lot of money to get trained and you end up making peanuts? Heck, I started off in radio, and it was exactly like that. Then again, we really wanted to do it.

I'm just wondering if we're dealing—millennials back home, don't listen for a second—with a millennial attitude here as well: “We want it all. We want it now.”

One of you is saying yes and the other says no.

Ms. Judy Cameron:

I've heard that from some people who are training some of the newer pilots.

I can only attest to my own experience. I did do the northern experience. I flew up north for a year and I did pump gas on a DC-3. I did roll fuel drums. When Air Canada hired me, I went to my interview board, and they said, “Bring your log book and bring anything that you think might get you hired”, so I brought pictures of me—black and white—rolling fuel drums, wearing a flight suit and steel-toed boots. Maybe that helped me get the job.

The thing about flying is that unlike a lot of other occupations, it's really enjoyable. It's a lot of fun, and some people are just driven to pursue it no matter how difficult, but the costs are getting out of hand now.

I think the answer is to have forgivable loans, particularly if you're willing to work as a flight instructor or if you're willing to work in a northern community. I think there have to be some solutions.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Robin, do you want to comment on this as well?

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

Yes. I think that what you see in the difference in generations is actually not a lack of motivation. I think people still want to fly, and the waiting lists for flying schools attest to that. What the airlines find is that the skill sets they come in with are a little bit different, and that could be more from the millennial side, where they don't have the same type of leadership skills.

However, this is also very rare within the industry. As Judy already said, the airline industry is up and down and up and down, and I've seen this through all the generations of our Air Canada pilots and with—

(1030)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I have one quick question in the time I have, and I'm sorry to be so brief here.

Are we using military training to its fullest? Could the military basically make a little money on the side by training pilots?

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

Yes, but I believe the military also has a shortage of pilots for exactly the same reason—instructors. They can't get them in fast enough.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I might have a little extra time if you want to finish your other thought—

Oh, Mr. Gervais...?

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

I want to add something.

I think MP Iacono also asked why they don't train. There's a highly regulated environment for training for a private pilot licence or for a commercial airline and everything around that, and it's been around for many years. It's because there's a safety issue on this. It can't be really “I'll train you.” You have to be an instructor to train people.

There's a protocol, and you'll see this in the Canadian aviation regulations. There's a protocol and a process that's tried and true, and it's really been there very long. Maybe that could be reviewed also to accelerate the process.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

One of the peculiarities about the industry that I found out when I myself started flying in 2005 was that it's the only industry in which the new pilots trained the newer pilots. There seems to be very little of the experienced pilots passing their knowledge on down.

At the same time, you can't have a 737 pilot training a 172 pilot, because it's a completely different skill set, so how do we get experienced pilots to pass their knowledge on to brand new pilots to augment the instructor base?

I open that generally to all of you.

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

Financially, you have to give an incentive. If you have a retired airline pilot who is invited to come back to the airline to teach in simulators, they will make $70 an hour. We were talking about this earlier. If you offered to have them go into a flight school, they would make $30 an hour, so they're going to say “no way”—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's if they're lucky—

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

—but if you made that a tax-free income for them, they would all flood in. Pilots are the cheapest people you can meet in the world.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Ms. Robin Hadfield: If you offered a pilot $30 an hour and it was tax-free, it would be the same as making $70, and you would probably have a huge percentage of retiring pilots going into these flight schools. They love working with the younger kids. They like seeing them fly. They love being in airplanes. Give them a tax incentive and they'll do it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a lot of different questions, so I'll have to try to keep it brief.

We talked about the cost of flight training, as you just did, and also about mitigating the student loans for the students, but as I discussed a couple of weeks ago with respect to the Germanwings crash, we saw the risk if a student goes through their training and then loses their medical certificate. How would you mitigate this risk on loans so that you don't have people hiding illnesses and disabilities in order to pay off that loan?

Ms. Judy Cameron:

That is a concern. You spend all of this money and then find out that you are medically disabled. It's fairly stringent to get a class 1 medical, so maybe there should be some sort of a parachute clause, an insurance that you can pay into, whereby if you lose you licence medically, you don't have to pay back $75,000 to $100,000 in training.

That is a difficulty. Something that you don't face in almost any other occupation is the requirement to keep your class 1 medical.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is a different topic that we haven't discussed at all before. When you get a degree, you get “B.A.” after your name, or whatever it is. When you become an engineer, you get a “P.Eng.”

You go through years and years of school and there's no post-nominal for a pilot. Should there be one?

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

Absolutely.

A voice: There is “captain”.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There is, but not for a co-pilot or a bush pilot. When you get your four bars at Air Canada, you become a captain, but if you're flying in any other part of the industry....

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

You're still “captain”.

A voice: Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

When I was learning to fly, we learned on paper CFSes and paper VNCs. Now everyone is on ForeFlight. Are we losing confidence of the pilots by switching to digital means?

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

No, not really. It's just a different way of learning. Nowadays, if you look at how things have changed regarding technology, the younger generation is still doing...they know, and they can find as much information as we did in the paper form. Everything is still there.

No, I don't think so, not that we see.

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

I think it has increased. I believe that it has helped the safety aspect. I fly solo into Oshkosh, which for a week is the busiest airport in the world, and if my ForeFlight ever crashed as I was coming in there, I'd be lost. I'd turn around and head towards the lake.

(1035)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's exactly my point. We—

The Chair:

Thank you very much. I'm sorry, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Monsieur Godin is next. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My thanks to our fine witnesses. Their comments are really interesting.

It seems to me that we are somewhat blasé about the effect that our lack of pilots will have on the future of the aviation industry. Could you tell me about the importance of pilot training? The number of flights is increasing by 4% to 5% per year. If the aerospace industry does not find a solution, what will be the impact on that increasing number of flights?

That question is for the three of you.

Do you want to start, Mr. Gervais?

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

Yes.

The shortage of pilots is worldwide. The fact is that, if Canada does not find an answer to it, we will have to hire people from other countries.

The industry is growing around the world, but I do not believe that we should start by recruiting people from other countries. We have the capacity to train them in Canada. Most of our pilots were trained as a result of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. About 130,000 pilots were trained in its military bases. Canada's pilot training is internationally renowned. We have the ability to do it; we just have to roll up our sleeves and get going.

As Mr. Nantel said earlier, there should be a national training program, now and for the future. Canada is the home of the aerospace industry. The country was largely opened up by aviation.

We must do it, otherwise Canadian companies around Montreal, Calgary, and Vancouver, like Viking Air, will suffer as a result. Canada is the home of aviation

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you.

Do the other witnesses want to add any comments? I see that they do not.

In other professions, like medicine and accounting, firms are fighting over students.

Should we not give it some thought and encourage companies to invest in recruiting young men and young women with the potential to become pilots? The company could sponsor them, in a way. with financial assistance that would help them pay off their loans more quickly and have a promising and comfortable future.

It is important for the industry to have pilots so that it can continue to function. [English]

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

Are you referring to a cadet program? [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

No, it would come later than that. Cadets have not yet made made their decisions. But the programs could be run together.

The solution should come from the aerospace industry, which sponsors your cadets, as in the case you mentioned in your testimony, or in other circumstances. When the industry sees young, motivated people with potential, why not sponsor them and support them so that they can view the future in a positive light?

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

I really agree with you. Some companies are already doing it. Pratt & Whitney and Bombardier have air clubs. However, there is a whole other stage.

Last year, the Air Canada Pilots Association and COPA developed a career guide and established pilot scholarships to encourage people to enter the field. But that was not really sponsorship in the strict sense.

Companies would do well to have sponsorships, exactly as you say. It is perfectly possible. The costs would be minimal, but there needs to be a plan. COPA would be ready to work with people. To start programs like that, we could use airports and aerodromes located away from the problem areas we were talking about earlier. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I'm sorry, Mr. Godin, but your time is up.

Go ahead, Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'm going to share my time with Mr. Graham. I think he has a few more questions, but I do want to introduce a notice of motion, Madam Chair, that I'm hoping will be entertained at the next meeting.

On that notice of motion, Madam Chair, as you know, we've been diving into pollution-related costs and we're trying to get as much input as we can from all sides of the floor. Therefore, my notice of motion, Madam Chair, reads as follows: That the Official Opposition present to the Committee its plan to deal with transportation-related pollution costs.

I'll be presenting that at the next meeting.

With that, Mr. Graham, go ahead. The floor is yours.

(1040)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I don't have too much more, but I do have some more.

Mr. Gervais, you mentioned COPA For Kids and you used to be involved with the ABPQ, and as you know, I am as well. I've flown in at least five of these Kids in Flight events. Can you speak to the real impact of this? I know of the 50 or so kids I've taken, only one of which puked—I'm very proud of that—I'd say about half or maybe even more were girls, and it doesn't seem to be translating into an interest at the flying school.

Do you have any thoughts on why that is?

Madam Cameron, you were talking about seeing those role models. My instructor is a woman. She's an excellent instructor and an excellent pilot. She's flying at all these events. She does the ground school for all the kids, so they are seeing it. How do we convert that into an interest?

Ms. Judy Cameron:

I'd argue that they're still not seeing it enough. I think it needs to start at the elementary school level and then progress to, say, high school guidance counsellors. They need educating.

There are a lot of misconceptions out there. One is that you have to be a math whiz to be a pilot. That's not true—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's only when you're in trouble.

Ms. Judy Cameron:

You have to be able to do simple addition and subtraction.

The other is that you have to have perfect 20/20 vision. That's also not true.

I think the problem is that we're just not getting young kids interested early enough, and I'm a perfect example. I had to go back to school before I started my aviation college. I had not taken grade 12 math. I was in an arts program at university, so I had limited my options already.

I think you need to get them younger.

I can't answer your question as to why that first flight wasn't absolutely motivational for them. It certainly was for me, and there are a lot of programs like this. The Ninety-Nines has Girls Take Flight. One of our directors at Northern Lights does this. They had 1,000 people this year at Oshawa, where 221 girls and women were taken flying. I'm sure a number of them were interested in pursuing a career after this.

I think it is exposure, having more things like Elevate. Again I'm referring to a lady in the audience. She runs an organization, and they are going to be going to 20 cities across Canada and promoting various aviation careers. She's an air traffic controller, so it's not just pilots; it's air traffic control, maintenance, and different areas. I think kids need to be exposed to this, and the more hands-on experience, the better. It shouldn't just be someone speaking in a classroom.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I want to build on that a little bit. When I was a kid, whenever I flew, I always went into the cockpit. It was fun. Then 9/11 happened, and that obviously changed a lot of this.

You're an experienced pilot. Do you see a safety issue? Is there a way of perhaps pre-clearing people who have an interest to get into the cockpit before a flight so that we can bring this experience back? Is that possible?

Ms. Judy Cameron:

One of the biggest burning desires for any airline pilot was to be able to have their family back in the flight deck again. If you can't trust your children or your spouse, really who can you trust?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There was that Airbus crash in Russia....

Ms. Judy Cameron:

It's really a pity that this can't be addressed. We have NEXUS cards. We have various security things. I'd like to see that change.

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

Could I speak on that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Of course.

Ms. Robin Hadfield:

I think with the thousands and thousands of kids we've taken up for flights, they see it as a free flight. We have found with our program that it's the parents who are the hindrance. When the child says they want to become a pilot, their natural reaction is, “You're going to crash and die. No. You can't do that. Nobody in our family has ever done that.”

We changed, and this year in the program you have to already be of flying age. We had seven events where we took them up. If they were in high school, the parent had to come for the flight as well. At every single one of the events, we had anywhere from one to three people sign up, with the flying school that was there talking to them on the spot. I think we have to look at the older kids, not the little ones.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Gervais, would you comment?

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

To add to what Robin was saying, last year COPA started giving anyone of flying age, 14 to 17, free online ground school and a logbook to go into flight school. If you're 14 to 17, your next step is to open that door to the flight school. We're pushing for that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

On the point about danger, when I was in flying school we liked to say that the most dangerous time in a pilot's day was driving to the airport. If people could understand that....

I think the Southwest incident a year ago, when a passenger was sucked out of the window and killed, was the first death on a commercial flight in the U.S. in something like nine years. There's this whole myth of an airplane not being safe. How do we share the fact that it is by far the safest means of travel in the world?

Mr. Bernard Gervais:

Last year we, COPA and Transport, started the general aviation safety campaign. They asked us to help them with it. This is a communication tool we're using to show to the general public that flying is safe, extremely safe, so there will be some more publicity and communication out there.

(1045)

The Chair:

Thank you very much to our witnesses. This was very informative. You certainly gave our analysts lots of possible recommendations that the committee might want to put forward. I thank you very much for taking the time today.

I wish everyone here a Merry Christmas.

I have one thought for the committee. I did not plan a meeting for Thursday; we had that discussion. Given the fact that it looks like we will be here, is it the desire of the committee to have a meeting on Thursday? We could try to pull together a meeting on Thursday. If so, I'd like to see overwhelming support for that.

I don't see any overwhelming enthusiasm for trying to schedule for Thursday. Thank you very much.

Again, Merry Christmas. Thank you all very much for your co-operation.

We are adjourned.

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(0850)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte la séance du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités. Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, nous procédons à une évaluation de l'incidence du bruit des avions près des grands aéroports canadiens.

Nous allons nous pencher un instant sur les travaux du Comité, concernant la perte d'enregistrement survenue lors de notre dernière séance.

Nous pourrions peut-être obtenir l'attention de tout le monde, s'il vous plaît.

J'ai parlé aux gens du bureau de M. Fuhr, et la façon dont la greffière a proposé que nous réglions le problème leur convient, mais j'aurais besoin de faire adopter cette motion. Je vais la lire.

Elle est ainsi libellée: Que, vu l'erreur technique survenue lors de la réunion no 124, du mardi 4 décembre 2018, et la perte des enregistrements audio nécessaires à la transcription des Témoignages, les notes d'allocution de Daniel-Robert Gooch et de Glen Priestley, de même que le mémoire écrit soumis par Darren Buss, soient considérés comme ayant été lus et qu'ils soient inclus aux Témoignages de la réunion en question, et que la greffière informe les témoins de la décision du Comité.

Voulez-vous en discuter?

Puisque personne ne se manifeste, sommes-nous d'accord?

(La motion et adoptée.)

La présidente: Merci.

Pardon?

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

[Inaudible]

La présidente:

La motion a été proposée par Vance et appuyée par Ron.

Nous passons à nos témoins pour la séance d'aujourd'hui. Nous accueillons Murray Strom, vice-président, Opérations de vol, et Samuel Elfassy, vice-président, Sécurité, d'Air Canada. Bienvenue à vous deux. Je vous remercie infiniment de votre présence.

Nous n'attendrons pas M. Wilson. Il se joindra à nous sous peu.

Capitaine Scott Wilson (vice-président, Opérations de vol, WestJet Airlines Ltd.):

Je suis là.

La présidente:

N'est-ce pas merveilleux? Il vient tout juste de franchir la porte. Bienvenue, monsieur Wilson. M. Wilson représente WestJet Airlines.

D'accord, nous allons vous accorder une période allant jusqu'à cinq minutes. Quand je lèverai la main, veuillez prononcer votre mot de la fin afin qu'il reste suffisamment de temps au Comité pour poser des questions.

M. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, PCC):

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, vous avez donné l'impression que M. Wilson n'était pas là. Il était assis à la table pendant tout ce temps. Je pense que vous devez présenter officiellement M. Wilson, de WestJet.

La présidente:

Très bien.

Scott Wilson est là. Il est le vice-président des opérations de vol à WestJet Airlines. Merci beaucoup, et désolée pour la confusion.

Qui voudrait commencer, pour Air Canada?

M. Murray Strom (vice-président, Opérations de vol, Air Canada):

Je vais commencer.

Bonjour, madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les députés. Je m'appelle Murray Strom. Je suis le vice-président des Opérations de vol chez Air Canada.

J'assume la responsabilité générale à l'égard de tous les aspects de la sécurité des opérations de vol pour l'ensemble de la flotte principale d'Air Canada. Je suis le gestionnaire des opérations désigné de la compagnie aérienne, je rends des comptes au ministre des Transports concernant la gestion de notre permis d'exploitation aérienne et j'agis en tant qu'intermédiaire pour les organismes de réglementation internationaux avec lesquels Air Canada collabore.

Je suis un pilote actif d'Air Canada et actuellement capitaine de Boeing 777. J'effectue des vols vers toutes les destinations internationales d'Air Canada.

Mon collègue Sam Elfassy, vice-président de la Sécurité, m'accompagne aujourd'hui.

Nous sommes heureux d'être là pour présenter le contexte de nos activités et répondre à toute question liée à l'étude du Comité concernant l'incidence du bruit des avions près des grands aéroports canadiens.

Depuis 2001, Air Canada préconise l'approche équilibrée de la gestion du bruit des aéronefs élaborée par l'Organisation de l'aviation civile internationale, l'OACI, à Montréal. L'approche équilibrée est fondée sur quatre éléments pour la gestion du bruit émis près des aéroports: la réduction du bruit à la source, la gestion et la planification de l'utilisation des terrains, les procédures opérationnelles relatives à l'atténuation du bruit et les restrictions d'utilisation.

Afin de gérer efficacement l'incidence du bruit des aéronefs sur les collectivités, il faut que toutes les parties concernées déploient un effort commun, y compris les aéroports, Nav Canada, le gouvernement et les compagnies aériennes.

La principale façon dont une compagnie aérienne peut avoir une incidence, c'est en réduisant le bruit grâce à de nouveaux aéronefs et à de nouvelles technologies et en soutenant l'élaboration et la mise en oeuvre de procédures opérationnelles efficaces en matière d'atténuation du bruit.

Au fil des ans, les fabricants d'aéronefs ont réalisé des progrès importants dans le but de réduire le bruit émis par leurs appareils. Aujourd'hui, les aéronefs font 75 % moins de bruit qu'il y a 50 ans. Depuis 2007, Air Canada a investi plus de 15 milliards de dollars pour moderniser sa flotte en achetant de nouveaux aéronefs, comme le Boeing 787 Dreamliner et le Boeing 737 MAX. Ces aéronefs, qui soutiennent de nombreux emplois dans l'industrie de l'aérospatiale canadienne, sont les plus silencieux de leur catégorie respective. Par exemple, le Dreamliner fait 60 % moins de bruit que d'autres avions semblables des années passées.

En plus du programme de renouvellement de la flotte d'Air Canada, nous modernisons également depuis 2015 nos aéronefs à réaction A320 par l'installation de générateurs de tourbillons à cavité. Les nouveaux modèles d'A320 sont en train d'être modernisés dans le cadre de leur entretien, alors que les anciens modèles sont retirés de la flotte.

Les calendriers d'entretien sont planifiés des mois et des années à l'avance et, dans le but de tenir compte des calendriers de fabrication et des réalités commerciales, Air Canada avait prévu au départ de moderniser tous ses aéronefs A320 d'ici la fin de 2020. Toutefois, en raison du manque d'accessibilité de trousses d'Airbus, nous menons maintenant nos activités en fonction de l'échéancier suivant: 15 % de notre flotte mise à niveau d'ici la fin de 2018, 50 % d'ici la fin de 2019, 80 % d'ici la fin de 2020, et le reste, en 2021.

Air Canada est déterminée à achever ce programme de façon accélérée. Cependant, nous sommes limités par les calendriers d'entretien et l'accessibilité des générateurs de tourbillons auprès du fabricant. Il importe de souligner que, même si le programme est en cours, Air Canada remplace des aéronefs A320 par des 737 MAX plus silencieux et plus efficients et par des aéronefs A220 faits au Canada, qu'on appelait autrefois les C Series de Bombardier.

Le renouvellement et la mise à niveau de notre flotte entraînent également une réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre, un objectif important pour Air Canada, pour les Canadiens et pour le gouvernement. Une fois que ce processus sera terminé, notre flotte comptera parmi les plus écoénergétiques au monde. D'ici la fin de 2019, nous aurons également terminé la mise à niveau de nos systèmes de gestion de vol et de guidage automatique et des systèmes de navigation par satellite de notre flotte d'avions à fuselage étroit d'Airbus.

Ces mises à jour permettront aux aéronefs de contribuer pleinement aux initiatives de navigation fondée sur les performances mises en oeuvre dans les aéroports de l'ensemble du pays. On améliore ainsi l'efficience énergétique et on réduit les émissions de gaz à effet de serre ainsi que le bruit.

Les transporteurs aériens mènent leurs activités dans le respect des normes les plus élevées en matière de sécurité. Nos pilotes doivent se conformer en tout temps aux procédures de navigation et d'atténuation du bruit établies par Nav Canada et par les aéroports. Nous contribuons à ce processus, qui est étayé par l'approche équilibrée et par les lignes directrices de Transports Canada concernant la mise en oeuvre des procédures nouvelles et modifiées en matière d'atténuation.

Nous participons également aux réunions du conseil d'atténuation du bruit industriel de Toronto, qui fournit la tribune technique nécessaire pour analyser et examiner les conséquences opérationnelles d'un grand nombre des techniques d'atténuation du bruit. Nous offrons également une expertise technique au conseil et appuyons l'effort déployé, au moyen de nos simulateurs, pour mettre à l'essai les approches proposées.

(0855)



La planification de l'utilisation des terrains est un autre élément important de l'approche équilibrée. Les politiques relatives à la planification d'une utilisation appropriée des terrains sont essentielles pour ce qui est de préserver les réductions du bruit obtenues grâce à cet investissement de 15 milliards de dollars dans de nouveaux aéronefs. Il importe que les administrations locales et les autorités aéroportuaires travaillent ensemble dans le but de prévenir d'autres proliférations urbaines à proximité des aéroports.

Enfin, nous devons reconnaître que la demande de transport aérien augmente partout dans le monde. De fait, l'Association du Transport Aérien International, l'IATA prévoit que la demande mondiale à cet égard augmentera subitement pour passer de 4 milliards de dollars en 2017 à plus de 7,8 milliards de dollars en 2036. Le transport aérien n'est plus un luxe. Il est accessible à tous. C'est la classe moyenne qui stimule cette croissance. Il s'agit d'un moyen efficient et rentable de voyager; il relie les familles, les gens d'affaires et les collectivités, et il encourage le commerce et le tourisme. Le transport aérien réduit la durée des déplacements en la faisant passer de jours à de simples heures. Il renforce les économies. Songez que, à Toronto seulement, Air Canada relie les Canadiens à plus de 220 destinations directement et que le Canada compte 3 aéroports parmi les 50 premiers en importance au monde en ce qui a trait aux liaisons.

En conclusion, je voudrais dire qu'Air Canada est fière de son rôle dans l'aviation canadienne en tant que champion mondial pour le Canada, ainsi que de sa contribution à l'économie nationale. Nous restons résolus à améliorer nos activités à tous les égards et vivons selon notre devise en portant « haut le drapeau ».

(0900)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Strom.

Nous allons passer à M. Wilson, de WestJet Airlines, pour cinq minutes; vous avez la parole.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Bonjour, madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les députés.

Je suis le capitaine Scott Wilson. J'occupe les postes de vice-président des Opérations de vol et de gestionnaire des opérations chez WestJet; je suis responsable de la sécurité et de la surveillance des flottes et des activités quotidiennes de la compagnie. Je tiens également mes compétences à jour en tant que pilote de Boeing 737 dans l'ensemble de nos réseaux national et international.

Merci de me donner la possibilité de m'adresser au Comité ce matin.

WestJet est très fière de l'incidence positive qu'elle a eue sur les Canadiens en offrant aux voyageurs un plus grand choix et des tarifs réduits, ainsi qu'en reliant les familles et les gens d'affaires, au Canada et à l'étranger. À WestJet, nous sommes extrêmement fiers de notre bilan concernant la sécurité opérationnelle et le respect de l'environnement et des collectivités que nous servons. Il s'agit notamment d'un engagement à mener nos activités d'une manière qui réduit au minimum l'empreinte sonore de nos aéronefs à toutes les phases du vol, en mettant particulièrement l'accent sur celles de l'approche et du départ.

En tant que compagnie aérienne, nous reconnaissons que nous fonctionnons dans un écosystème vaste et complexe composé de nombreux partenaires et intervenants, y compris les aéroports et les autorités aéroportuaires, les fournisseurs de services de la circulation aérienne de partout dans le monde, les fabricants d'aéronefs, les trois ordres de gouvernement et, bien entendu, les organismes de réglementation du Canada et des administrations étrangères vers lesquelles nous offrons des vols.

La présidente:

Pourriez-vous ralentir un peu? Les interprètes ont de la difficulté à vous suivre.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Je suis désolé. Je parle comme un pilote. Je vais ralentir.

Je commencerai par décrire notre processus continu de consultation communautaire et la façon dont nous intégrons la rétroaction du public dans nos discussions et décisions. Je fournirai au Comité des renseignements au sujet de notre flotte, de la façon dont notre investissement continuel dans les aéronefs les plus modernes sur le marché contribue à la réduction du bruit et de la manière dont nous faisons fonctionner ces aéronefs afin de réduire au minimum l'empreinte sonore pour les collectivités que nous desservons.

Aux côtés de Nav Canada et du Conseil des aéroports du Canada, WestJet a été un participant clé à l'élaboration du Protocole de communications et de consultation sur les modifications à l'espace aérien, en juin 2015. Il s'agit du document à l'origine de l'engagement de l'industrie tout entière à l'égard de la tenue d'une discussion ouverte et transparente avec tous les intervenants des collectivités que nous desservons.

WestJet participe activement à des consultations communautaires régulières et continuelles tenues dans les quatre plus grandes villes du Canada: Toronto, Montréal, Calgary et Vancouver. À l'aéroport de Vancouver, nous participons activement à l'élaboration du plan quinquennal de gestion du bruit.

À Calgary, nous avons présenté aux membres de la collectivité de nombreux exposés sur les responsabilités des pilotes en matière d'atténuation du bruit, la technologie des aéronefs d'aujourd'hui, la conception de la procédure d'approche et les avantages que présente la navigation fondée sur les performances. Ces exposés ont été très bien reçus par le public. De fait, en plus de l'autorité aéroportuaire de Calgary et de Nav Canada, nous rencontrons tous les six à huit semaines un groupe de représentants de collectivités de partout dans la ville afin de discuter du bruit des aéronefs et des moyens opérationnels dont nous disposons pour mieux réduire l'incidence du pilotage des aéronefs sur le bruit dans l'environnement.

Concernant les modifications majeures apportées à l'espace aérien, nous assistons à des assemblées publiques dans le but de répondre à toutes les questions opérationnelles sur des affaires comme les profils d'approche à forte pente et les trajectoires latérales dispersées variables.

Nous échangeons continuellement avec l'industrie dans son ensemble, y compris l'OACI, l'IATA et la Federal Aviation Administration, la FAA, concernant les initiatives relatives au bruit, et nous assistons à des conférences à ce sujet pour nous assurer que nous restons à jour en ce qui a trait aux dernières procédures et technologies.

Comme l'a mentionné mon partenaire d'Air Canada, il vaut la peine de préciser que les aéronefs de nouvelle génération affichent une réduction de l'empreinte sonore de l'ordre de 90 % comparativement aux premiers aéronefs à réaction qui ont survolé le Canada dans les années 1960.

WestJet a investi considérablement dans de nouveaux aéronefs à la fine pointe de la technologie, notamment le Boeing 737 Next Generation — ou NG — ainsi que l'aéronef à fuselage étroit Boeing 737 MAX. En janvier, nous commencerons à utiliser le Boeing 787 Dreamliner, qui comprend d'importantes caractéristiques de réduction du bruit.

Par exemple, le nouvel aéronef Boeing 737 MAX possède une empreinte sonore inférieure de 40 % même à celle du plus récent membre de la famille 737, le NG. Le Boeing 787 Dreamliner aura une empreinte sonore inférieure de 60 % à celle du Boeing 767 qu'il remplacera dans la flotte de WestJet.

Le bruit des aéronefs est réduit par des améliorations apportées à l'aérodynamique et grâce à des technologies de réduction du poids. Ces améliorations permettent aux aéronefs de monter plus haut et plus rapidement au décollage, avec une poussée moins importante du réacteur. L'ajout de nouveaux propulseurs silencieux à taux de dilution élevé et de chevrons réducteurs de bruit dans l'échappement du moteur garantit la plus faible empreinte sonore possible.

Les dispositifs à faible vitesse, comme les volets sur les ailes, sont conçus pour assurer un bruit de cellule minimal durant la phase d'atterrissage, quand les aéronefs survolent nos collectivités le plus lentement et à l'altitude la plus basse.

D'autres technologies d'aérodynamisme et de réduction du poids contribuent également à l'amélioration des performances au décollage et à l'atterrissage. On réduit ainsi les empreintes sonores pour les collectivités situées près des aéroports que nous desservons. Ces investissements apportent des avantages doubles en ce qui a trait à la pollution sonore et à la réduction des émissions de carbone; ils permettent de s'assurer que l'aviation demeure à l'avant-plan de l'innovation environnementale.

Tous les pilotes reçoivent une formation leur permettant de respecter rigoureusement les procédures d'atténuation du bruit publiées par Transports Canada dans tous les aéroports canadiens. Avant toutes les approches ou tous les départs de vol, sans exception, les pilotes tiennent expressément compte de diverses considérations pour mieux atténuer le bruit, notamment les profils vertical et latéral de la trajectoire.

WestJet a investi tôt dans un programme de qualité de navigation requise — ou RNP — adapté sur mesure. Ce programme a implanté cette capacité au Canada en 2004, et a permis à WestJet d'appliquer les procédures RNP dans 20 aéroports canadiens. Les nouvelles approches RNP AR intègrent les profils verticaux avec des angles de descente constants effectués à des réglages de très faible poussée, sans segments de vol en palier. D'un point de vue latéral, elles sont conçues pour éviter les zones sensibles au bruit situées sous la trajectoire de nos vols.

WestJet a apporté une contribution clé au programme public de qualité de navigation requise de Nav Canada, grâce auquel, d'ici la fin de 2020, des approches RNP seront appliquées dans 24 aéroports canadiens dans le cadre de plusieurs transitions d'approche.

En conclusion, je voudrais remercier les membres du Comité de m'avoir donné la possibilité de leur communiquer notre bilan aujourd'hui en ce qui a trait à l'atténuation du bruit. Nous sommes fiers du travail que nous avons accompli et continuons de travailler dans cet important domaine.

Je voudrais également insister une fois de plus sur le fait que nous demeurons engagés à l'égard de l'exploitation sécuritaire et responsable de notre compagnie aérienne, y compris en faisant d'autres investissements dans la flotte, en innovant en matière de réduction du bruit et de technologies écoénergétiques et en assurant des consultations et une collaboration continuelles avec les collectivités que nous desservons.

Merci, et j'ai hâte de répondre à vos questions.

(0905)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Wilson.

Nous allons passer à M. Liepert, pour six minutes.

M. Ron Liepert:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Bonjour, messieurs.

Un certain nombre de témoins qui ont comparu devant nous proposent — surtout à l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto, mais je pense que nous devons penser à tous nos grands aéroports du pays — que l'on interdise ou que l'on limite sérieusement les vols de nuit. On utilise toujours Francfort en guise d'exemple.

Je ne pense pas que WestJet ait des vols à destination de cette ville, mais sentez-vous à l'aise de formuler un commentaire également.

Ma première question serait la suivante: quelles seraient, à votre connaissance, les conséquences négatives du fait de suivre ce que j'appellerai le « modèle de Francfort », monsieur Strom?

M. Murray Strom:

Je voudrais formuler un commentaire. Je vous remercie de la question.

Je pilote des avions à destination de Francfort depuis 25 ans. Cette ville est un centre très solide.

La seule chose dont je voulais commencer à parler, c'est la différence entre le bruit d'il y a 25 ans et celui d'aujourd'hui. Il est complètement différent.

Nous avons beaucoup de chances d'avoir deux compagnies aériennes solides qui ont les moyens de dépenser, dans notre cas, 15 milliards de dollars pour acheter de nouveaux aéronefs. C'est la clé de l'atténuation du bruit. On peut observer une réduction du bruit de l'ordre de 60 %, ou même allant jusqu'à 90 % comparativement aux vieux avions du chapitre 3. Il s'agit de la mesure la plus importante que nous puissions prendre en tant que compagnie aérienne et, grâce au soutien de la Chambre des communes, nous avons été en mesure de le faire.

Quand j'arrivais à Francfort, il y a 25 ans, il y avait toute une section d'avions-cargos qui s'y rendaient également. Quand j'arrive là-bas de nos jours, il n'y en a aucun. Tous les emplois associés à ces avions-cargos et aux vols de nuit ont disparu. Ils sont partis ailleurs.

Le changement le plus important que j'ai remarqué... Cette situation n'a pas modifié mes activités, car nous ne pilotons pas d'avions-cargos. Ce qui a changé, c'est la perte de plusieurs milliers d'emplois à Francfort pour cette raison.

M. Ron Liepert:

Il ne fait aucun doute que le type de mesures recommandées a des conséquences économiques.

M. Murray Strom:

C'est exact.

M. Ron Liepert:

D'accord.

Je voudrais poser une question au sujet d'une situation personnelle. Je représente une circonscription de Calgary, et je sais que vous connaissez bien tous les deux les approches de cette ville.

Depuis l'inauguration de la nouvelle piste, les approches ont changé, certes, du côté ouest. Ma circonscription, qui se situe à une demi-heure de route de l'aéroport, se trouve maintenant sous une trajectoire de vol qui amène mes résidants à me faire part de problèmes sans fin, et ce, malgré que vous affirmiez que le bruit a été réduit au cours des dernières années.

J'ai notamment demandé aux représentants de Nav Canada pourquoi ils ne pouvaient pas déplacer cette trajectoire de vol de huit kilomètres vers l'ouest, où très peu de gens vivent, et, s'il le fallait, de huit kilomètres vers l'est, de sorte qu'on arrive de l'autre côté, où très peu de gens vivent. Ils ont soutenu, si je ne me trompe pas, que des problèmes de sécurité se posaient, mais des compagnies aériennes avaient également demandé à emprunter ces trajectoires particulières.

Pouvez-vous me dire, dans chaque cas, si le déplacement de cette approche de cinq kilomètres vers l'ouest et vers l'est est faisable? Si non, pourquoi? Si oui, pourquoi ne le fait-on pas?

(0910)

Capt Scott Wilson:

Je vais peut-être commencer par cette question et permettre à M. Strom de poursuivre.

Quand on jette un coup d'oeil à Calgary, évidemment, on voit que nous devons prendre le terrain en considération, compte tenu des montagnes Rocheuses situées à l'ouest de la ville. Si nous pouvons maintenir le bon espacement et la marge d'affranchissement du relief appropriée à l'arrivée, il ne devrait y avoir aucun problème de sécurité lié au rapprochement d'une trajectoire dans un sens ou dans l'autre.

Toutefois, si nous regardons ce qui est optimal afin de permettre une trajectoire d'approche, c'est-à-dire préserver les taux d'arrivée et l'efficience de l'aéroport, bien entendu, ce que nous recherchons également, c'est la distance la plus courte en milles de parcours pour l'arrivée, ce qui entraîne essentiellement une réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre. Cette considération devient habituellement l'une des priorités en matière d'approche, au moment où nous entrons dans la ville ou dans la collectivité.

Je ne crois pas qu'il s'agisse de problèmes de sécurité, mais il y aurait une perte d'efficience, et davantage de gaz à effet de serre serait émis sur les collectivités que nous survolons.

M. Murray Strom:

Je souscris aux commentaires formulés par Scott.

À nos yeux, c'est une question d'efficience. Nous prévoyons être au régime de ralenti au moment de l'approche, du haut de la descente jusqu'à 1 000 pieds, car, quand on est au ralenti, on ne fait pas de bruit. On fait un bruit de vent, et c'est tout. Voilà notre objectif.

Ainsi, on réduit les gaz à effet de serre, on économise sur les carburants et on amène les passagers à leur destination le plus tôt possible.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je pourrais donc dire à mes électeurs que la raison pour laquelle des aéronefs survolent nos collectivités, c'est que Nav Canada et les compagnies aériennes ont conclu qu'il s'agit de l'itinéraire le plus écologique et le plus sûr, sans égard aux conséquences sur les collectivités. Est-ce juste?

M. Murray Strom:

Mon commentaire à ce sujet est que nous suivons les procédures de Nav Canada et les consultations des aéroports auprès des collectivités. Nous suivons l'approche que Nav Canada et les collectivités ont désignée comme étant la meilleure.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je sais, mais vous auriez votre mot à dire là-dessus, évidemment. Vous affirmez que la raison est une question non pas de sécurité, mais d'efficience et de gaz à effet de serre.

M. Murray Strom:

Oui, nous recherchons toujours l'approche la plus efficiente.

La présidente:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

M. Ron Liepert:

Allez-y. J'y reviendrai plus tard.

La présidente:

M. Graham est le prochain intervenant.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vais donner suite à l'une des questions posées par M. Liepert.

La nouvelle piste de Calgary fait 14 000 pieds de long, si je me souviens bien. À l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto, beaucoup de pistes font moins de 10 000 pieds. Je ne connais pas la réponse à cette question, mais les diverses longueurs de pistes et les zones limites des aéroports ont-elles une quelconque incidence sur le bruit des avions pour les collectivités avoisinantes? Dans quelle mesure y changent-elles quelque chose?

Capt Scott Wilson:

L'une des premières raisons de la longueur des pistes à Calgary tient, bien entendu, au fait que l'aéroport est situé à près de 3 600 pieds au-dessus du niveau de la mer. Les conditions atmosphériques, la densité ou l'altitude signifient qu'on a habituellement besoin d'une piste plus longue.

Lorsque nous décollons, nous tentons de procéder à ce qu'on appelle un décollage à longueur de piste équivalente. Nous tentons d'utiliser une poussée minimale pour décoller d'une piste. L'avantage d'une piste plus longue tient au fait qu'elle nous permet essentiellement de prendre de la vitesse afin que nous puissions utiliser moins de poussée pour le décollage.

Dans le cas d'une piste courte, il faudrait se rapprocher de la poussée maximale pour le décollage.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans ce cas, il est certain qu'une piste plus courte a une incidence sur le bruit.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Elle le pourrait.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

En ce qui concerne le kit de réduction du bruit produit des A320 — je sais que WestJet n'est pas touchée —, vous affirmez qu'Airbus ne suffit pas à la demande. J'ai vu une photographie de ce dispositif. Il s'agit essentiellement d'une attache croisée que l'on place sur l'aile. Depuis combien de temps Airbus offre-t-elle cette pièce d'équipement?

M. Murray Strom:

On dirait une attache; elle se fixe à l'aile, mais, pour l'installer, il faut la verrouiller à l'intérieur de l'aile. Généralement, elle est installée pendant une opération majeure d'entretien, parce qu'il faut vider complètement les réserves de combustible, puis ouvrir l'aile au complet. Ensuite, des gens peuvent grimper dans l'aile pour installer l'attache et la verrouiller.

Présentement, il y a une pénurie chez Airbus. Nous avions un plan. Comme toute chose, on ne peut pas mettre en oeuvre un plan du jour au lendemain, et malheureusement, Airbus n'a plus de kits. Nous avons demandé à Airbus si nous pouvions en fabriquer nous-mêmes, mais on nous a répondu que non. Airbus détient le brevet du kit.

Nous faisons tout en notre pouvoir — vous avez ma parole — pour que ce soit installé le plus tôt possible. J'en sais davantage maintenant sur ces générateurs que je ne l'aurais voulu. Encore une fois, on parle d'une réduction sonore de 3 %, mais avec les nouveaux appareils, elle est de 60 %, alors c'est surtout de ce côté que Air Canada a déployé des efforts.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de A320 y a-t-il dans votre flotte aérienne?

Vous nous avez donné les pourcentages au lieu d'un nombre.

M. Murray Strom:

Oui, nous avons donné des pourcentages. Ce que nous faisons présentement... D'un côté, les 737 MAX arrivent, et de l'autre, les Airbus partent. Pour être en mesure de connaître le chiffre exact, je vais devoir poser la question à notre équipe d'entretien. Au bout du compte, nous devrions avoir environ 50 Airbus, et chaque appareil sera modifié avec cette technologie.

L'Airbus est un avion très silencieux. Il n'y a que cette section qui émet un genre de petit sifflement. Nous allons régler cela, mais on parle d'une réduction de 3 %. Pour l'instant, nous mettons l'accent sur l'arrivée des nouveaux A220 et des nouveaux 737 MAX. L'année prochaine, nous allons recevoir 18 nouveaux 737 MAX. C'est notre priorité présentement.

(0915)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les réparations rétroactives de ce genre sont-elles fréquentes avec les autres aéronefs? Quelque chose du genre s'est-il déjà passé avant, ou est-ce que cela concerne seulement le A320?

M. Murray Strom:

Pour autant que je sache, le problème concerne seulement les A320.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, donc, aucun autre aéronef... Les fabricants d'aéronefs n'ont pas l'habitude de dire: « Regardez, nous avons mis au point un petit machin pour réduire le bruit émis par l'avion. »

M. Murray Strom:

Non, effectivement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans un autre ordre d'idées, j'aimerais parler des options offertes aux consommateurs.

Les compagnies aériennes — comme la vôtre — prennent-elles des mesures pour informer les consommateurs du bruit émis par les aéronefs dans lesquels ils embarqueront, lorsqu'ils réservent leur vol, ou des options qui leur sont offertes? Par exemple, leur dit-on qu'un vol de nuit va passer au-dessus d'une collectivité? Les compagnies aériennes font-elles quoi que ce soit à ce sujet?

M. Samuel Elfassy (vice-président, Sécurité, Air Canada):

Nous ne donnons aucune information par rapport à ce que vous venez de demander.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce quelque chose que vous envisagez, par exemple dans le cadre d'activités de relations publiques? Vous pourriez dire: « À titre indicatif, voici le prix du vol, mais ce vol ne dérangera aucune collectivité. Cet autre vol, si. »

M. Samuel Elfassy:

Nous offrons aux passagers la possibilité d'acheter des crédits compensatoires pour atténuer leur empreinte carbone, mais il n'y a rien relativement au bruit présentement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Wilson, vous avez beaucoup parlé des approches de RNP, du programme de RNP. D'après votre expérience de pilote, cela a-t-il une incidence sur les vols? Je veux dire, si l'on compare l'approche directe et les entrées traditionnelles de circuit d'attente...?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Oui. Selon moi, c'est l'une des plus belles innovations que nous allons voir, en particulier en ce qui concerne la sécurité, le bruit et les empreintes carbone.

À bien des égards, les approches de RNP sont uniques. Pour commencer, il y a bien sûr le fait qu'elles tirent parti de la constellation de satellites, des capacités de navigation de l'aéronef ainsi que de la formation des pilotes. Elles n'ont besoin d'absolument rien au sol. Essentiellement, cela permet aux pilotes d'adapter l'espacement au terrain. À cet égard, Calgary est unique. À dire vrai, c'est la première fois dans le monde où ce qu'on pourrait appeler des approches de RNP à l'arrivée sont autorisées. Cela nous permet, en résumé, d'avoir une approche courbe et de réduire l'espacement de cette façon.

Cela nous permet également d'éviter certains espaces ou des zones sensibles au bruit. L'avantage, donc, c'est que vous pouvez non seulement conserver un angle de descente constant et ainsi diminuer la poussée et le bruit, mais également courber la trajectoire lorsque c'est nécessaire, essentiellement. Les approches directes sont nécessaires lorsqu'on utilise, par exemple, un système de navigation au sol comme le LIS, le système d'atterrissage aux instruments. L'avantage, avec les approches de RNP, c'est que nous pouvons adapter les approches aux conditions uniques où nous nous trouvons — l'aéroport, les collectivités, etc. —, tout en étant encore plus efficaces et sécuritaires et en réduisant autant que possible notre empreinte sonore du même coup.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les pilotes de vol VFR spéciaux pourront-ils faire des approches de RNP bientôt?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Vous seriez surpris d'apprendre ce que peut supposer la configuration des petits aéronefs, alors, oui, ils peuvent maintenant effectuer ce genre d'approche.

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Nantel, vous avez la parole. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel (Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je remercie tous les témoins de leur présence.

On a parlé des avions A320 et C Series, mais j'aimerais savoir si le nouveau Boeing 777 est équipé d'un moteur PurePower de Pratt & Whitney. Quelqu'un peut-il me répondre? [Traduction]

M. Murray Strom:

Le nouveau Boeing est muni d'un moteur fabriqué par un consortium dont Pratt & Whitney fait partie. Il y a aussi un fabricant européen. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Je représente la circonscription de Longueuil—Saint-Hubert. C'est un peu chauvin de ma part, mais ce sont les gens de Pratt & Whitney qui ont inventé le turbopropulseur PT6, qui est le meilleur ami de l'homme après le chien et le cheval. Ils ont aussi mis au point le moteur PurePower qui, comme vous l'avez dit, diminue beaucoup le bruit et de façon extrêmement efficace.

Allez-vous pouvoir doter votre flotte de ce moteur? Vous me dites que ce moteur de Boeing est issu d'un consortium. Est-ce le moteur PurePower qui est à l'intérieur des nacelles? [Traduction]

M. Murray Strom:

Je vais devoir vérifier auprès de la division d'entretien. Le nouvel avion Bombardier, le A220 — de la C Series — est construit à Montréal et est équipé d'un moteur Pratt & Whitney. Je vais devoir vérifier qui est le fabricant du moteur du 737. Malheureusement, mon avion est le 777, le gros aéronef. Je connais aussi le 737, mais je vais devoir vérifier auprès de l'équipe d'entretien. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Monsieur Wilson, WestJet Airlines a-t-elle fait l'acquisition de moteurs plus silencieux, comme le PurePower?

(0920)

[Traduction]

Capt Scott Wilson:

Dans notre flotte, en particulier les Boeing 737, il n'y a qu'un type de moteur possible, le LEAP-1B. Son empreinte sonore est inférieure de 40 %, essentiellement, à celle des aéronefs que nous achetions il y a 10 ans seulement. Même si ce n'est pas un moteur PurePower — que ce n'est pas le même type de produit —, c'est tout de même l'un des moteurs les plus silencieux. C'est le seul moteur qu'on peut installer dans le 737 MAX, mais c'est un moteur très silencieux.

M. Pierre Nantel:

Ces moteurs plus silencieux — que ce soit le PurePower ou l'autre moteur dont vous avez parlé — consomment-ils moins de combustible?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Oui, ils consomment environ 20 % moins de combustible que ceux qu'ils remplacent.

M. Pierre Nantel:

C'est impressionnant. [Français]

J'aimerais vous poser une question sur la gestion du bruit. Je suis de Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, et vous pouvez être certain que je suis bien au fait des problèmes liés au bruit des écoles de pilotage. Plusieurs témoins ont dit que Transports Canada a un peu laissé la gestion du bruit aux communautés ou aux organismes sans but non lucratif qui gèrent les aéroports.

Souhaiteriez-vous que Transports Canada encadre mieux ces activités et établisse des normes en matière de bruit? Je pense, entre autres, aux requêtes que les personnes habitant dans le voisinage de l'aéroport de Dorval ont faites au printemps. Ces gens se sont plaints que l'installation de capteurs de bruit se faisait selon la bonne volonté de l'aéroport.

L'établissement de normes et un encadrement plus centralisé par Transports Canada aideraient-ils à apaiser ces conflits qui perdurent? Quand on habite à côté d'un aéroport, bien sûr qu'on sait qu'il y aura du bruit, mais certaines mesures ne seraient-elles pas davantage respectées si Transports Canada s'engageait davantage en ce sens? [Traduction]

M. Murray Strom:

J'ai la chance de voler dans la plupart des grands aéroports du monde, et je peux dire que les procédures de réduction du bruit de Transports Canada, de Nav Canada et des autorités aéroportuaires locales sont parmi les plus strictes au monde.

Dans certains pays, il n'y en a pas du tout. Par exemple, au Moyen-Orient, on accorde la priorité au secteur de l'aviation, tandis qu'en Europe et dans la plupart d'Amérique du Nord, y compris le Canada, on impose des procédures très rigoureuses. Nos pilotes reçoivent une formation pour chaque départ. Ils sont mis au courant des procédures et doivent les suivre. S'ils ne suivent pas les procédures, on les ramène rapidement à l'ordre.

Capt Scott Wilson:

J'approuve les commentaires de Murray. Selon moi, nous avons un système unique au Canada, où Transports Canada collabore avec les organisations, en particulier les autorités aéroportuaires, Nav Canada et les compagnies aériennes. Nous travaillons ensemble. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

D'accord.

Vous reconnaissez donc que, justement, c'est une communauté qui s'organise pour régler les problèmes liés au voisinage de l'aéroport, plutôt que d'attendre que le gouvernement intervienne. N'est-ce pas? [Traduction]

Capt Scott Wilson:

J'ai vécu pendant de nombreuses années en dessous d'un corridor aérien, alors je comprends le point de vue des collectivités. Pour commencer, j'aimerais souligner que j'ai vécu près de l'extrémité de départ de la piste 20, à Calgary, et, en comparaison d'il y a 20 ans, le bruit a quasiment disparu.

Les collectivités peuvent et devraient avoir leur mot à dire sur le système, mais il faut évidemment trouver de façon objective un juste équilibre entre la rentabilité et les investissements, d'une part, et, d'autre part, la nécessité de maintenir une fréquence d'arrivée adéquate pour utiliser efficacement l'aéroport et continuer de fournir aux Canadiens les vols auxquels ils s'attendent. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Monsieur Elfassy, vous avez mentionné à mon collègue M. Graham que vous n'offriez pas de compensation pour ce qui est du bruit causé par les avions.

Par contre, quand vous évoquez la possibilité de compenser l'empreinte carbone, l'entreprise qui est bénéficiaire de votre lien pour acheter son crédit carbone rend-elle des comptes à Air Canada?

À qui rend-elle des comptes quant à la réelle application des sommes investies par les consommateurs? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, messieurs, mais vous avez dépassé votre temps, alors vous n'aurez pas le temps...

M. Pierre Nantel:

Toutes mes excuses.

La présidente:

... de répondre. Peut-être que la réponse sera fournie au député à un autre moment pendant la séance ou après la séance.

Allez-y, monsieur Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les représentants des compagnies aériennes d'être ici, ce matin.

Ma question s'adresse aux deux compagnies.

Selon vous, existe-t-il une corrélation entre la pollution sonore causée par les aéronefs et la maladie cardiaque chez les adultes ou le stress chronique?

(0925)

[Traduction]

Capt Scott Wilson:

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, vu ma profession de pilote, je doute être la bonne personne pour vous répondre. Je ne sais pas s'il y a une corrélation comme vous le dites.

M. Murray Strom:

Je vais me faire l'écho de ce que Scott a dit. Je suis très doué pour piloter un avion, mais je ne connais pas grand-chose de leurs effets sur la santé. Je laisse cela à mon médecin. Désolé. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

D'accord.

Toutefois, vous êtes au courant de toutes les études qui ont été menées sur les problèmes de santé. N'est-ce pas?

Peut-être que vous n'êtes pas en mesure de décrire ou de confirmer la corrélation, mais savez-vous s'il y en a une ou pas? [Traduction]

Capt Scott Wilson:

Je sais que plusieurs articles ont essayé d'établir une corrélation, mais je ne suis pas convaincu de la validité des données. Mais, encore une fois, je ne crois pas être la meilleure personne pour faire des commentaires à propos de ce genre de choses.

M. Murray Strom:

J'ai lu l'article de l'Organisation mondiale de la santé ainsi que d'autre articles qui le contredisent. Je laisse les experts statuer sur cette question. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Concernant ce problème de bruit, avez-vous reçu des commentaires, des plaintes ou des griefs de la part de vos pilotes ou est-ce que, pour eux, le phénomène n'existe pas? [Traduction]

Capt Scott Wilson:

J'ai grandi ici, dans notre beau pays, et j'ai vu l'évolution du monde de l'aviation au fil des ans. Je peux vous dire que j'ai piloté des aéronefs beaucoup plus bruyants que ceux que je pilote aujourd'hui.

Quand nous avons fait l'acquisition du Boeing 737 MAX il y a un an, et, la première fois que je l'ai piloté, j'ai remarqué à quel point c'était silencieux dans le poste de pilotage, en plus des autres avantages au sol qu'offre cet appareil. La bonne chose, avec les nouveaux aéronefs et les nouvelles technologies, c'est qu'ils sont moins bruyants pour les gens au sol et les collectivités que l'on survole. Les passagers et les invités ainsi que les membres d'équipage vivent aussi une bien meilleure expérience à bord. Nous reconnaissons les avantages.

M. Murray Strom:

Je suis d'accord avec ce que Scott dit. Nous effectuons une surveillance active de l'aéronef dans le poste de pilotage. Si un pilote remarque quelque chose d'anormal par rapport au bruit dans le poste de pilotage, nous allons faire des vérifications pour nous assurer que le niveau de bruit est normal. Si le niveau de bruit est un peu trop élevé, nous allons fournir aux pilotes des casques pour supprimer le bruit ambiant. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.[Traduction]

Monsieur Strom, dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez mentionné que le bruit a changé au cours des 20 ou 25 dernières années. Est-ce bien ce que vous avez dit?

M. Murray Strom:

Oui.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Si le bruit est différent, c'est que quelque chose a changé, parce que je ne crois pas qu'autant de personnes se plaignaient du bruit des avions il y a 20 ou 25 ans. Quelque chose a changé. Je vois que vous souriez par rapport à mon commentaire. J'aimerais vous demander: « Qu'est-ce qui a changé? »

M. Murray Strom:

Je me souviens que, quand j'ai été embauché par Air Canada il y a 32 ans, j'avais l'habitude de m'asseoir à l'extérieur, à l'hôtel Hilton de Dorval, près de l'aéroport, pour écouter le bruit des DC-8, des 727, des DC-9 et des 737 qui décollaient. C'était un son merveilleux. J'adore le bruit des aéronefs. C'est pourquoi j'ai décidé de devenir pilote. C'est extraordinaire d'entendre le bruit de la poussée des moteurs.

Maintenant, quand je vais à l'extérieur, je n'entends pas grand-chose. Les choses ont changé. La technologie a changé l'industrie aérienne. Les gens se plaignent davantage du bruit maintenant, pour toutes sortes de raisons, mais les aéronefs eux-mêmes émettent 90 % moins de bruit, je crois, dans certains cas. Personnellement, cela me manque, parce que j'aime le son des aéronefs, mais ils font moins de bruit maintenant qu'avant.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Puisque vous adorez ce son, je vous invite à venir dans ma circonscription de Laval. Vous pourrez vous asseoir avec mes électeurs et l'écouter, parce qu'ils l'entendent très souvent.

M. Murray Strom:

Non, non.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Ce qu'ils me disent, c'est que les choses ont changé.

J'ai une autre question. Les avions volent-ils plus bas qu'avant? Leur altitude est-elle beaucoup plus basse qu'avant?

M. Murray Strom:

Non, ils volent plus haut.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Vous dites qu'ils volent plus haut.

M. Murray Strom:

Oui.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Pouvez-vous aussi répondre à la question, monsieur Wilson? Les avions volent-ils à la même altitude, plus haut ou plus bas?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Pour en revenir aux approches de RNP, l'avantage est que nous sommes beaucoup plus près de l'aéroport. Par mesure de sécurité, l'angle d'inclinaison est de 3°, ce qui donne environ 300 pieds par mille marin. Si on fait abstraction du reste que l'on peut faire par ailleurs, quand un avion est à proximité de l'aéroport, disons à trois milles, il se trouvera environ à mille pieds dans les airs. Cela n'a pas vraiment changé entre les années 1960 à aujourd'hui.

(0930)

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.

Ma dernière question s'adresse à vous deux. Dans quelle mesure participez-vous aux décisions concernant les vols, par exemple les trajectoires de vol, les corridors aériens et l'altitude? De quelle façon intervenez-vous dans les décisions sur les vols?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Vous voulez savoir quelles décisions le pilote peut prendre?

M. Angelo Iacono:

Non, plutôt la compagnie aérienne.

Capt Scott Wilson:

La compagnie aérienne...

M. Angelo Iacono:

Qui décide de l'itinéraire et de l'heure du départ? Qui contrôle tout cela? Qui donne les ordres?

Capt Scott Wilson:

À dire vrai, je crois que les décisions viennent surtout du public voyageur. Essentiellement, c'est le public voyageur qui dit ce qu'il veut aux compagnies aériennes par l'intermédiaire des billets qu'il achète. Nous pouvons voir quelles heures de départ et quels itinéraires sont les plus populaires. C'est de cette façon que nous évaluons la durabilité.

L'information est ensuite fournie à un planificateur de réseau qui, en gros, montera un horaire pour le réseau et les services connexes, et cet horaire est censé fournir le meilleur service possible au public et aux voyageurs canadiens. Ensuite, l'information est transmise à nos systèmes de régulation des vols, qui permettent d'établir les meilleurs itinéraires. En dernier lieu, le jour du vol, le pilote prend les commandes de l'appareil et il travaille avec Nav Canada.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Monsieur Strom...

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, monsieur Strom. Pouvez-vous faire parvenir la réponse d'une façon ou d'une autre à M. Iacono?

La parole va à M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Je vais laisser mon collègue, M. Rogers , poser la première question, pourvu qu'il me promette de faire vite.

M. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Je vous le promets.

Avant tout, merci, messieurs, d'être ici ce matin. Merci, madame la présidente.

Ma question s'adresse à M. Strom.

La pollution sonore des avions n'est pas un problème dans ma région à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador, en particulier, à l'aéroport de Gander, depuis qu'Air Canada a annulé ses vols du matin et de la nuit, ce qui cause bien des désagréments aux voyageurs et aux gens d'affaires qui veulent sortir de la province pour aller ailleurs au pays. Cela me cause bien des désagréments à moi dans mon rôle de député. Mes fins de semaine ne comptent plus qu'un jour, puisque je ne peux pas retourner sur l'île un jeudi soir.

Monsieur Strom, pour quelles raisons a-t-on décidé d'annuler ces vols?

M. Murray Strom:

Je vais devoir poser la question aux responsables de la planification opérationnelle pour vous fournir une justification. Je n'ai pas l'information sous la main présentement.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'accord. Je crois que c'est mon tour.

Merci, monsieur Rogers.

Pouvez-vous me dire ce que signifie le sigle RNP?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Required navigation performance, ou qualité de navigation requise.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

Est-ce que l'un ou l'autre d'entre vous avez eu affaire personnellement avec des gens de la collectivité qui se plaignent du bruit de vos aéronefs?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Je serais heureux de répondre à cette question.

Oui...

M. Ken Hardie:

J'ai seulement besoin d'une réponse courte, parce que j'ai une question complémentaire à poser ensuite. Donc, vous avez dit oui. D'accord.

Avez-vous déjà discuté avec des gens qui se disent importunés par le bruit des dispositifs d'annulation active du bruit dans leur maison? Il se vend des choses qui fonctionnent essentiellement comme des casques de réduction de bruit et qui pourraient éliminer le bruit dans une chambre, par exemple.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Je connais la technologie utilisée à bord des aéronefs. Les Bombardier Q400 de notre flotte utilisent une technologie d'annulation active du bruit, dans le poste de pilotage, mais je ne sais pas comment cela fonctionnerait ou si cela pourrait être utilisé dans une résidence. C'est une bonne question, mais je ne suis au courant d'aucune technologie pour les maisons.

M. Ken Hardie:

Peut-être que quelqu'un devrait lancer un projet pilote.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Bonne idée.

M. Ken Hardie:

Parlons du bruit lui-même. Vous n'êtes peut-être pas les meilleures personnes à qui poser la question, étant donné que vous ne recueillez probablement pas ce genre d'information, mais y a-t-il un profil établi des personnes les plus sensibles au bruit? Par exemple, y a-t-il une différence entre les hommes et les femmes ou entre les tranches d'âge?

M. Murray Strom:

Je n'ai pas ce genre d'information, et je ne crois pas que nous nous sommes penchés là-dessus. On en parlait dans l'un des rapports de l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé, mais je n'ai pas l'information sous la main présentement.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'après mon expérience de l'époque où je travaillais à la programmation de stations de radio, je sais que les hommes et les femmes réagissent différemment au bruit ou aux irritants. En outre, nous sommes à une époque — ce que j'appellerais la génération qui s'abîme les tympans — où les gens montent au maximum le volume de leur chaîne stéréo, dans la voiture, ou de leurs autres appareils.

Je me demandais si une partie du problème — le nombre de plaintes qui augmente même si les avions sont plus silencieux que jamais — tient d'une façon ou d'une autre au fait que les gens ont abîmé leur audition avec ces appareils, ce qui les rend plus sensibles aux bruits. Pouvez-vous faire des commentaires là-dessus?

Il y a aussi le fait que, comme membre d'équipage dans le poste de pilotage, vous êtes en présence constante d'un certain niveau de bruit pendant la durée du voyage, alors qu'au sol, le bruit est sporadique. Il y a du bruit, puis du silence, puis encore du bruit. Est-ce que ce genre de chose a été pris en considération pour élaborer un plan global de gestion du bruit dans les aéroports?

(0935)

M. Murray Strom:

Encore une fois, je ne suis pas un expert et je ne peux pas répondre à votre première question.

Pour répondre à votre deuxième question, le poste de pilotage des nouveaux avions est beaucoup plus silencieux. Je ne suis pas au courant d'études qui auraient été menées sur l'effet du bruit sur les personnes. Dans l'ensemble, nous suivons les lignes directrices de Santé Canada applicables au personnel de bord, aux passagers et aux pilotes.

M. Ken Hardie:

Participez-vous d'une façon ou d'une autre à la planification dans les aéroports, en particulier en ce qui concerne l'alignement des pistes par rapport à tout ce qui se passe aux alentours? Une trajectoire de vol qui passe, par exemple, au-dessus d'une petite zone industrielle comme on en voit souvent près des aéroports, ce n'est pas la même chose que si elle passe au-dessus d'un nouveau quartier résidentiel.

M. Murray Strom:

Nous consultons les autorités aéroportuaires locales pour les aider lorsque nous le pouvons. Nous leur offrons d'utiliser nos simulateurs pour tester de nouvelles approches. Nous travaillons aussi avec Nav Canada.

Nous participons aux efforts, mais nous ne les dirigeons pas.

M. Ken Hardie:

Est-ce que des municipalités situées près des aéroports vous ont déjà invité à participer aux décisions de zonage? Vous l'a-t-on déjà demandé?

M. Murray Strom:

Non, pour autant que je le sache. Je crois que c'est l'autorité aéroportuaire qui s'en charge.

La présidente:

D'accord. Merci beaucoup, monsieur Hardie.

La parole va à M. Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci d'être venus ici aujourd'hui, si près de Noël. Nous vous en sommes reconnaissants.

Récemment, le ministre des Transports est venu témoigner devant nous et il a dit quelque chose d'intéressant à propos de la taxe sur le carbone. Il a affirmé que personne ne lui a parlé d'effets défavorables de la taxe sur le carbone.

Avez-vous entendu un autre son de cloche? La taxe sur le carbone a-t-elle eu des effets défavorables? Peut-être pourriez-vous nous dire quel a été l'effet de la taxe sur le carbone sur votre industrie?

M. Murray Strom:

Je ne suis pas la bonne personne à qui poser cette question. Il faudrait réunir les représentants de trois ou quatre services différents pour vous donner une réponse exacte. Je pourrais m'informer pour vous, mais, en ce qui me concerne, je m'occupe des opérations aériennes au quotidien. Ce genre d'information relève d'autres services.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Donc, monsieur Strom, vous n'avez pas d'opinion personnelle à ce sujet. Peut-être avez-vous entendu quelque chose au travail?

M. Murray Strom:

Je préfère ne pas formuler d'opinion quand je ne connais pas les faits.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Et vous, monsieur Wilson, avez-vous une opinion?

Capt Scott Wilson:

Je suis d'accord avec M. Strom à ce sujet. Je ne veux pas dire mon opinion sur un sujet que je ne connais pas bien.

Cependant, je veux insister sur le fait qu'il y a eu un très haut niveau d'investissement de capitaux dans les cellules d'aéronef et dans les moteurs, afin de réduire au minimum le niveau de bruit et d'augmenter au maximum l'efficience. Donc, j'ose espérer que le niveau d'investissement de la compagnie aérienne compensera n'importe quelle taxe.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Vos entreprises font partie du Conseil national des lignes aériennes du Canada. Est-ce exact? Votre association a envoyé à la ministre McKenna une lettre qui mettait en relief les conséquences défavorables de la taxe sur le carbone. Une copie de la lettre a aussi été envoyée au ministre Garneau et au ministre Morneau.

Laissez-moi poser la question en d'autres termes. Croyez-vous qu'il serait utile, pour votre compagnie aérienne ou votre association, qu'un comité comme le nôtre songe à entreprendre une étude sur les répercussions de la taxe sur le carbone?

M. Murray Strom:

Je crois que oui.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Pardon. Pouvez-vous répéter?

M. Murray Strom:

Je crois que oui.

Capt Scott Wilson:

Je suis d'accord.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

D'accord.

Je vais partager mon temps avec M. Godin.

(0940)

[Français]

M. Joël Godin (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, PCC):

Merci.

À l'écoute des témoignages aujourd'hui et considérant le coût que représenterait le remplacement des appareils comme solution au problème de bruit, je constate que c'est toujours le consommateur qui, au bout du compte, paie la note.

J'aimerais déposer une motion au nom de Mme Kelly Block, qui a présenté l'avis de motion le 26 octobre dernier. La motion est ainsi rédigée: Que le Comité entame une étude sur les répercussions de la taxe fédérale sur le carbone sur l'industrie du transport, comme suit: une réunion sur les répercussions de la taxe carbone sur le secteur de l'aviation; une réunion sur les répercussions de la taxe carbone sur le secteur ferroviaire; une réunion sur les répercussions de la taxe carbone sur le secteur du camionnage; et que le Comité fasse rapport de ses conclusions à la Chambre.

Je crois qu'il est important d'avoir des faits et de faire l'exercice de façon rigoureuse afin d'avoir des réponses claires. Nous sommes tous d'accord pour protéger notre environnement, mais il faut en mesurer le coût et il faut savoir de quoi nous parlons. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Godin.

Allez-y, monsieur Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Je tiens pour acquis que vous prenez la parole à propos de la motion.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Effectivement.

Je tiens à m'excuser auprès des témoins, mais, à la lumière de vos commentaires d'aujourd'hui ainsi que du témoignage de la ministre, je crois qu'il est important que nous entamions une étude le plus tôt possible. Peut-être pourrions-nous commencer tout de suite après le congé. Peut-être pourrions-nous même étudier la question pendant le congé.

Il arrive souvent que l'autre côté balaye la question sous le tapis lorsque le débat est ajourné, et c'est pourquoi nous voulions le proposer aujourd'hui, encore une fois, à la lumière des témoignages qui ont été faits ici et des commentaires de la ministre.

Merci.

La présidente:

Allez-y, monsieur Liepert.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je soutiens cette motion. Si nous pouvions y consacrer du temps, je crois que cela nous permettra d'approfondir tout ce que nous avons appris aujourd'hui.

Nav Canada essaie à de nombreux égards de se conformer aux politiques du gouvernement au pouvoir, mais ses décisions ont des répercussions sur les électeurs — c'est surtout vrai pour les miens —, parce qu'il cherche à accroître l'efficience des compagnies aériennes. C'est très bien, mais, malgré que les décisions donnent des résultats, nous imposons quand même à l'industrie une taxe sur le carbone, ce qui va à l'encontre de l'objectif et force les compagnies aériennes à faire voler leurs appareils au-dessus des collectivités peuplées.

De plus, il a clairement été dit que c'est principalement pour réduire les émissions que certaines trajectoires de vol passent au-dessus de zones très peuplées. Je crois que l'on devrait creuser un peu plus de ce côté, pendant que nous débattons de la motion.

La présidente:

Allez-y monsieur Godin. Soyez bref, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais mentionner à mes collègues que des témoins nous ont parlé ce matin de l'importance de renouveler la flotte d'aéronefs. La diminution du bruit et l'empreinte environnementale passent par l'achat de nouveaux appareils. Je conviens cependant que cela entraîne des coûts et des répercussions sur les consommateurs. En outre, il faut être conscient que la production d'un nouvel appareil suppose une utilisation de ressources et de matières premières, et que cela contribue à augmenter l'empreinte environnementale.

Il faut aussi se rappeler qu'il existe plusieurs cimetières de vieux avions, où se trouvent des avions qui ne sont plus utilisés, qui sont retirés de la circulation. Il faut mesurer ces éléments. Il serait important, comme parlementaires, que nous considérions la situation dans son ensemble pour pouvoir prendre des décisions éclairées. Pour ce faire, je suggère que nous attendions d'obtenir des réponses à nos questions. C'est notre avenir qui est en cause et je pense que c'est notre responsabilité. C'est pourquoi la motion est importante pour nous.

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Godin.

M. Nantel est le prochain sur la liste. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Peut-être n'êtes-vous pas au courant, messieurs, mais vous ne serez sans doute pas surpris d'apprendre que je déploie présentement beaucoup d'efforts pour réunir tous les partis autour du problème lié au réchauffement climatique. Je pense que les conservateurs ont, eux aussi, un point de vue là-dessus. À mon avis, on ne peut pas nier l'évidence du réchauffement climatique. Avant d'en arriver à de telles mesures, j'aimerais voir le Parti conservateur s'engager dans une sérieuse discussion sur le réchauffement climatique.

Il va de soi que des coûts sont associés à la réduction de notre empreinte de carbone. Nous voyons bien qu'un jeu d'obstruction sur le plan politique est en cours. Je ne crois pas que ce soit dans l'intérêt de qui que ce soit. Je vais conclure simplement en disant que, bien entendu, je vais m'opposer à cette motion. Cependant, je tends la main en suggérant que cette proposition soit présentée à nouveau une fois que votre chef aura accepté de participer au sommet des chefs sur le réchauffement climatique, que je propose de tenir en janvier prochain.

Merci.

(0945)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Nous allons revenir à M. Godin une fois encore; brièvement, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

En réponse aux propos de mon collègue, je dirai que nous, les conservateurs, sommes très sensibles à l'environnement. Notre approche est peut-être différente de celle de mon collègue du NPD, mais je crois que, avant d'entreprendre des initiatives, il faut savoir de quoi on parle. C'est pourquoi je pense qu'il serait judicieux de faire une étude et d'organiser des rencontres pour déterminer ce que serait l'incidence réelle. Nous sommes en train de réaliser que les voitures électriques ne sont pas si bénéfiques, sur le plan environnemental, que le prétendaient les scientifiques dans le passé. Il faut s'interroger avant de prendre des décisions qui touchent l'avenir. J'invite donc le Comité à accepter cette motion pour que nous puissions obtenir des réponses à nos questions et faire ainsi de l'excellent travail en tant que parlementaires.

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Godin.

La motion nous est soumise à juste titre. Nous allons tous...

Allez-y, monsieur Nantel. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Puisque vous avez la gentillesse de me redonner la parole, je précise que j'invite le premier ministre Justin Trudeau à participer à ce sommet, bien sûr. En effet, il est évident qu'aucun individu n'est tout noir ou tout blanc. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Nantel.

Vous avez tous la motion sous les yeux. Je ne vois pas d'autre intervention.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je demande un vote par appel nominal.

La présidente:

Un vote par appel nominal me va.

(La motion est rejetée par 6 voix contre 3.)

La présidente: Je remercie beaucoup les témoins d'être venus ici. Je suis certaine que nous allons en apprendre davantage les uns sur les autres d'ici la fin de cette étude.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour quelques instants pendant que les témoins qui sont venus parler de la motion 177 sur les écoles de pilotes s'installent.

(0945)

(0950)

La présidente:

Reprenons nos travaux, s'il vous plaît.

Merci à tous. Merci à tous pour votre patience.

Nous accueillons M. Bernard Gervais, président et chef de la direction de la Canadian Owners and Pilots Association; Mme Robin Hadfield, administratrice du Conseil d'administration international, gouverneure de la Section de l'Est du Canada, de The Ninety-Nines, Inc., International Organization of Women Pilots; et Mme Judy Cameron, ancienne pilote d'Air Canada, directrice de la Northern Lights Aero Foundation, qui témoigne à titre personnel.

Ils parleront bien sûr de la motion M-177 dans le cadre de l'étude des défis que doivent relever les écoles de pilotage au Canada.

Madame Hadfield, voulez-vous prendre la parole en premier? Vous avez cinq minutes. Quand je lèverai la main, c'est pour vous prier de conclure.

Mme Robin Hadfield (administratrice, Conseil d'administration international, gouverneure, Section de l'Est du Canada, The Ninety-Nines, Inc., International Organization of Women Pilots):

Merci.

Mon engagement personnel en tant que pilote a commencé il y a 39 ans et s'est poursuivi dans le secteur de l'aviation générale. La famille Hadfield se consacre à l'aviation depuis plus de 60 ans; trois générations et quatre pilotes ont travaillé à Air Canada; des membres de la famille ont été instructeurs de vol, d'autres ont effectué des relevés aériens dans l'Arctique et d'autres encore ont volé pour Wasaya Airways, compagnie qui appartient à des Autochtones et fait la navette, dans le Nord de l'Ontario, entre les réserves isolées. Cela nous donne une perspective unique sur mon beau-frère, qui a commandé dans la station spatiale.

Quand j'étais jeune, nos discussions quotidiennes en famille portaient sur l'aviation. Elles m'ont permis d'avoir une compréhension très large de bon nombre des enjeux liés au secteur de l'aviation.

Bien que la motion concerne les écoles de pilotage et que je n'aie pas de connaissances approfondies sur la question, je connais certainement les problèmes auxquels nous faisons face dans le secteur de l'aviation générale. Aujourd'hui, je voulais qu'on règle les problèmes que nous observons. The Ninety-Nines est la plus ancienne et la plus grande organisation de femmes pilotes au monde; elle compte plus de 6 000 membres, maintenant, sur presque tous les continents.

Il ne s'agit pas d'un problème propre au Canada, c'est un problème qu'on observe partout. J'aimerais exposer les problèmes tel que nous les voyons et ensuite, très rapidement, présenter ce que je considère comme étant la solution. Nous pouvons en parler plus tard, pendant la séance des questions, si vous le voulez.

Le premier problème concerne les coûts très élevés de la formation au pilotage, comme vous l'avez déjà entendu dire pendant vos séances. En réalité, cela coûte de 80 000 à 90 000 $ à un étudiant qui veut passer du statut de pilote privé à celui de détenteur d'une licence de pilote professionnel avec qualification de vol aux instruments pour avions multimoteurs. Ces coûts élevés sont un obstacle particulier, surtout pour les étudiants des ménages à faible revenu.

La solution serait d'offrir des prêts étudiants, n'exigeant ni garanties ni cosignataires, dans les écoles de pilotage qui offrent un programme menant à un diplôme, comme nous le faisons dans d'autres collèges et universités. En ce moment, les écoles de pilotage qui offrent des programmes de niveau collégial sont séparées des collèges et des universités et considérées comme des collèges privés; les prêts étudiants et le Régime d'aide financière aux étudiantes et étudiants de l'Ontario ne s'appliquent donc pas à elles, c'est un obstacle important.

Il existe un exemple de financement qui va au-delà des prêts. Comme vous avez entendu l'autre jour un pilote, je crois, dire ici — mais c'était peut-être Stephen Fuhr — dans les années 1950, quand vous obteniez votre licence de pilote, vous aviez droit à un rabais une fois que vous obteniez votre licence de pilote professionnel, pour vous aider avec les coûts. Un programme d'exonération de remboursement de prêts étudiants pourrait fonctionner de la même façon.

Nous n'avons pas suffisamment d'instructeurs de vols. Les instructeurs qui travaillent dans des écoles de pilotage gagnent généralement un salaire de misère. Une des solutions, c'est d'alléger le prêt à rembourser quand, par exemple, un diplômé travaille pendant deux ans en tant qu'instructeur. Peut-être qu'il aurait droit à une exonération de 40 % de son prêt étudiant, et, s'il travaille pendant quatre ans, à un pourcentage supérieur d'exonération. Nous pourrions appliquer aux élèves pilotes le même type de programme que nous avons appliqué aux médecins, au personnel infirmier et au personnel enseignant qui vont travailler dans le Nord.

L'un des autres problèmes, c'est qu'il n'y a pas assez de jeunes qui envisagent une carrière de pilote. Selon moi, il serait tout à fait logique que l'aviation et les cours de pilotage donnent droit à des crédits d'études secondaires. J'ai parlé au ministre de l'Éducation de l'Ontario. En tant qu'ancien conseiller scolaire, je suis au courant de ce qui se passe dans les écoles secondaires, et elles ne sont pas vraiment à la hauteur. Elles n'ont aucune idée de ce qu'est l'aviation. Il existe en Ontario un programme en aviation et aérospatiale, mais il se concentre exclusivement sur des aspects qui ne concernent pas l'aviation elle-même.

Il n'y a pas assez de femmes. C'est simple. Une fois encore, nous pouvons faciliter les choses en sensibilisant davantage les élèves des écoles secondaires, en mettant en lumière des femmes qui ont réussi et qui pourraient servir de modèle, en préparant des trousses à l'intention des services d'orientation et des enseignants — y compris avec des exemples de femmes pilotes qui ont de brillantes carrières — et en organisant des journées d'orientation présentées par des femmes pilotes professionnelles. Les organisations comme la nôtre facilitent déjà cela avec leurs programmes actuels, en travaillant de concert avec les ministres provinciaux et en créant de nouveaux programmes comme notre programme « Let's Fly Now! ».

En utilisant ce modèle, la section de The Ninety-Nines du Manitoba, avec son avion, travaille avec l'Université du Manitoba et l'école de pilotage de St. Andrews. Elle a acheté un simulateur de 15 000 $. Les filles peuvent l'utiliser gratuitement pour apprendre les procédures. En deux ans, plus de 20 femmes ont reçu leur licence de pilote, ce qui est plus que la plupart des écoles de pilotage de l'Ontario réunies.

(0955)



Il n'y a pas assez d'Autochtones. Nous devons encourager les écoles de pilotages des régions éloignées, comme Yellowknife, Thompson ou Senneterre. Même si de bonnes conditions météorologiques sont essentielles pour voler, nous devons nous déplacer là où se trouvent les écoles de pilotage; elles ne viendront pas à nous.

Nous n'avons pas assez d'écoles de pilotage. Les installations pour les nouveaux étudiants en pilotage sont insuffisantes. Nous pouvons améliorer les analyses de rentabilisation pour justifier un agrandissement de ces installations, car nous constatons qu'il y a une pénurie mondiale de pilotes. Nous avons déjà une bonne analyse de rentabilisation qui énonce les incitatifs économiques de ces agrandissements. Des prêts à faible taux d'intérêt pourraient aider à couvrir les coûts d'immobilisations élevés liés à l'expansion, par exemple pour les hangars et les avions d'entraînement.

Un nombre élevé d'étudiants étrangers s'inscrivent dans nos écoles de pilotage. Je crois qu'actuellement, 56 % des étudiants des écoles de pilotage viennent de l'étranger. Ces pays offrent des subventions aux étudiants pour qu'ils viennent étudier ici. Les écoles de pilotage leur facturent près du double des frais de scolarité; elles sont donc encouragées à les admettre. Les étudiants étrangers sont bénéfiques pour notre économie et pour les régions où ils s'installent. Toutefois, nous devons reconnaître que ces étudiants partent immédiatement après l'obtention de leur licence.

(1000)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Hadfield.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Gervais.

M. Bernard Gervais (président et chef de la direction, Canadian Owners and Pilots Association):

Merci. Bonjour.

Je vais rapidement vous parler de l'Association canadienne des propriétaires et pilotes d'aéronefs, qui a été fondée en 1952.

C'est la plus grande organisation d'aviation du Canada; son siège social est à Ottawa. Nous comptons 16 000 membres dans tout le pays; la plupart sont des pilotes privés et des pilotes professionnels, mais il y a aussi quelques pilotes de ligne, et le commandant Hadfield est notre porte-parole. Nous sommes la deuxième organisation en importance sur les 80 organisations membres du conseil international des associations de propriétaires et pilotes d'aéronefs, et nous avons des représentants à l'Organisation de l'aviation civile internationale. Notre mission est de faire avancer, de promouvoir et de préserver la liberté de voler du Canada.

Nous sommes les représentants de l'aviation générale au Canada. À l'exception des vols réguliers et des activités militaires aériennes, l'aviation générale englobe à peu près tout: la formation au pilotage, l'aviation agricole, l'aviation de brousse et bien d'autres choses encore. Comme je l'ai dit, c'est tout, sauf les vols réguliers et les vols militaires. Actuellement, parmi les 36 000 aéronefs inscrits au registre des aéronefs civils, plus de 32 000 sont des aéronefs d'aviation générale, ce qui représente près de 90 % des aéronefs.

L'aviation générale injecte 9,3 milliards de dollars dans notre économie. Pourquoi est-ce que je parle de cela? Parce que l'aviation générale occupe un créneau particulier dans le secteur de la formation au pilotage.

La plupart des aéronefs d'entraînement au pilotage font également partie de la flotte de l'aviation générale. La première étape dans la carrière de tout pilote, c'est d'entrer dans une unité de formation au pilotage, et il est très probable que ce soit une unité de formation à l'aviation générale. Cette formation a lieu dans de petits aéroports conçus pour l'aviation générale et dans des aérodromes plus adaptés à l'environnement de formation et aux activités aériennes des petits aéroports de tout le pays.

Puisque la COPA oeuvre dans le secteur de l'aviation générale, au cours des cinq dernières années, elle a offert un petit tour d'avion à plus de 18 000 enfants âgés de 8 à 17 ans, dans le cadre d'un programme appelé « COPA pour les jeunes ». Dès ce moment-là, en cinq ans, nous aurions pu régler le problème de la pénurie de pilotes grâce à ce programme.

Quels sont les nouveaux défis auxquels les nouveaux pilotes font face? Tout d'abord, ils doivent s'inscrire au programme de licence de pilote privé. Il n'y a aucune aide financière pour ce programme dans tout le pays, il n'y a que des bourses. C'est aux élèves, à leurs parents ou à n'importe qui d'autre de trouver l'argent pour simplement passer à la première étape du programme de licence de pilote privé. Tout ce qui vient après concerne la licence de pilote professionnel.

La plupart des cours de pilotage ne donnent pas droit aux prêts étudiants, à moins qu'ils fassent partie d'un programme d'études collégiales, auquel cas il s'agirait que d'une formation théorique en classe. Les unités de formation au pilotage sont seulement accessibles dans certaines régions, généralement les régions à forte densité de population. Il y a seulement une école de pilotage au Yukon, et il n'y en a aucune dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest ni au Nunavut.

En ce qui concerne la disponibilité des instructeurs... On refuse des étudiants, en fait, en raison du manque d'instructeurs, ou en raison de la longue liste d'attente. On demande donc aux candidats de revenir un an plus tard, quand il y aura, peut-être, de la place pour eux dans une unité de formation au pilotage. Quant aux étudiants qui veulent seulement obtenir la licence de pilote privé... Le pilotage récréatif ainsi que la licence de pilote privé ont été mis de côté. L'idée, c'est d'avoir quelques étudiants étrangers, mais également des pilotes de ligne, pour ceux du programme de formation de pilote en ligne. On laisse pour compte ceux qui deviendront instructeurs, ceux dont nous aurons besoin.

Les défis auxquels les unités de formation en pilotage font face comprennent la disponibilité d'instructeurs qualifiés. À quelques exceptions près, la plupart des instructeurs doivent être employés par une unité de formation au pilotage pour obtenir leur qualification d'instructeur de vol. Les autres défis comprennent l'utilisation des vieux aéronefs.

De plus, un autre défi auquel les unités de formation au pilotage font face est le fait qu'elles se trouvent dans des aérodromes assez vieux; il y a également des problèmes de capacité liés à la taille de l'aéroport et aux capacités de contrôle du trafic aérien et le besoin d'établir un équilibre — comme je l'ai expliqué tout à l'heure — entre la capacité de formation au pilotage et l'exploitation responsable des aérodromes, surtout dans certaines régions à forte densité, comme l'aéroport Saint-Hubert à Longueuil.

De plus, le seul financement fédéral qui pourrait aider ces unités de formation au pilotage et ces aéroports à se développer, à se maintenir et à explorer d'autres voies viendrait du PAIA, mais ces fonds sont destinés uniquement aux aéroports qui ont des services de transport de passagers, et la plupart des aéroports d'aviation générale n'en ont pas.

(1005)



Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, la plupart des gens voient l'aviation au Canada comme les transporteurs aériens et quelques petits aéronefs alors que, en réalité, c'est le contraire: de 90 à 95 % de tous les aéronefs au pays font partie de l'aviation générale. Certaines personnes considèrent également que l'aviation au pays correspond aux 26 aéroports importants du réseau aéroportuaire national, mais il y a plus de 1 500 aéroports.

En conclusion, pour que l'on puisse s'assurer que la chaîne d'approvisionnement des pilotes demeure solide, la porte du monde de l'aviation générale doit demeurer ouverte. On doit protéger les aéroports locaux afin que les écoles de pilotage aient un endroit où mener leurs activités et croître et qu'elles s'assurent de conserver des instructeurs expérimentés et talentueux. Cela signifie qu'on doit préserver les aéroclubs et les réseaux sociaux associés aux aéroports, y compris la communauté, du point de vue de ce qui se passe à l'aéroport local de sorte que les intervenants soient en relation et comprennent le rôle important que cette installation joue à l'échelle locale et de façon générale.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Gervais.

Capitaine Cameron, je vous souhaite la bienvenue.

Mme Judy Cameron (capitaine (à la retraite), Air Canada, directrice, Northern Lights Aero Foundation, à titre personnel):

Merci de m'offrir l'occasion de parler aujourd'hui.

J'ai été la première femme au Canada à piloter pour une compagnie aérienne importante lorsque j'ai été embauchée par Air Canada en 1978. Après 37 ans et plus de 23 000 heures de vol, j'ai pris ma retraite comme capitaine de boeing 777 il y a trois ans.

Le plus grand défi auquel fait face aujourd'hui l'aviation au Canada, et, par conséquent, les écoles de pilotage, c'est la pénurie imminente de pilotes. Vous avez entendu que, d'ici 2025, le Canada aura besoin de 7 000 à 10 000 nouveaux pilotes. En 2036, il faudra 620 000 pilotes professionnels à l'échelle mondiale, ce qui est un nombre ahurissant. Le problème, en partie, c'est que 50 % de la population — les femmes — ne sont pas embauchés. J'ai commencé ma formation au pilotage il y a 45 ans, mais très peu de progrès ont été réalisés au chapitre du recrutement de femmes comme pilotes de ligne. Depuis 1973, année où les quelques premières femmes ont été embauchées, le pourcentage de femmes pilotes de ligne à l'échelle mondiale n'a augmenté qu'à 5 %.

Cela s'explique principalement par le manque de modèles. D'innombrables filles m'ont dit qu'elles n'avaient jamais vu une femme pilote auparavant. Les femmes dans l'aviation doivent être plus visibles et démontrer leur capacité, leur crédibilité et leur passion pour le pilotage.

Une étude de 2018 réalisée par Microsoft montre que les femmes sont plus susceptibles de connaître du succès et d'avoir un sentiment d'appartenance si elles ont des modèles positifs dans une carrière en STIM. Elles ont besoin de voir d'autres femmes qui occupent un emploi avant d'envisager cette carrière. La recherche montre également que l'exposition doit se faire lorsque les filles sont jeunes, puisque l'intérêt pour la technologie commence vers l'âge de 11 ans, mais disparaît vers l'âge de 16 ans. Une introduction manuelle et participative à l'aviation est nécessaire dans le cadre du programme de l'école primaire. Un cours de formation au sol en aviation intégrant des notions de physique, de mathématiques et de météorologie pourrait être offert aux étudiants du secondaire.

Comme l'a affirmé Bernard, un véritable vol est encore plus efficace pour susciter la passion de devenir pilote. Mon premier vol dans un petit avion a complètement changé mon parcours de carrière. Je faisais des études en arts. Mon premier vol a été l'élément déclencheur qui m'a donné la volonté et la détermination d'entamer une carrière en aviation. Des événements annuels comme Les filles prennent vol, une initiative lancée par les Ninety-Nines, offrent cette occasion.

Je suis directrice de la Northern Lights Aero Foundation, qui inspire les femmes de tous les secteurs de l'aviation et de l'aérospatial. Northern Lights organise un événement annuel de remise de prix depuis 10 ans pour souligner les femmes canadiennes qui ont réalisé de grandes choses dans ces domaines. Parmi les gagnantes antérieures, on compte la Dre Roberta Bondar et la lieutenante-colonel Maryse Carmichael, la première femme à commander les Snowbird. Nous avons un programme de mentorat, un bureau des conférenciers et des bourses. En outre, nous faisons de le sensibilisation lors d'événements d'aviation. Notre fondation a réussi à obtenir un soutien solide de l'industrie. Les entreprises comprennent enfin que nos activités favorisent le recrutement des femmes. La Northern Lights Aero Foundation présente aux filles et aux jeunes femmes des mentors et des modèles positifs qui ont réussi dans leur domaine.

Vous avez entendu parler du coût élevé de la formation au pilotage: de 75 000 $ à 100 000 $; il s'agit d'un obstacle tant pour les hommes que pour les femmes. On pourrait atténuer ce programme national de financement qui offre des recours comme des incitatifs fiscaux pour les écoles de pilotage, des prêts étudiants pour la licence de pilote privé — qui, comme vous l'avez entendu, n'est pas admissible aux prêts étudiants à l'heure actuelle et coûte environ 20 000 $ — et une exonération de prêts pour les pilotes qui s'engagent à travailler en tant qu'instructeur de vol pour une période déterminée.

Le faible salaire des instructeurs de vol est un défi important auquel font face les écoles de pilotage. Je viens de parler à une jeune femme instructrice d'Edmonton à ce sujet. Elle est dans le domaine depuis 10 ans. Les instructeurs sont rémunérés entre 25 000 et 40 000 $ par année. Leur revenu est variable, car ils ne sont pas salariés à moins de travailler pour une université ou un collège. Ils ne sont rémunérés que lorsque les conditions météorologiques sont propices au vol. Cela complique la tâche des écoles de maintenir en poste les instructeurs expérimentés, qui quittent leur emploi dès qu'ils s'en trouvent un autre plus payant, parfois dans un autre domaine que l'aviation. L'augmentation du salaire pourrait faire en sorte qu'il s'agisse d'un choix de carrière permanent viable pour les pilotes qui désirent être à la maison tous les soirs au lieu de passer des journées loin de leur famille. Un manque d'instructeurs finira par contribuer à la pénurie de futurs pilotes.

Les femmes et l'ensemble de la jeune génération s'inquiètent également de la conciliation travail-famille. C'est un aspect qui dissuade certaines femmes de s'inscrire à l'école de pilotage. Les jeunes pilotes d'une compagnie aérienne ont souvent les horaires les plus chargés, ce qui suppose nombre de journées consécutives loin de la maison au cours de la période où ils sont les plus susceptibles de fonder une famille. Des programmes novateurs comme le « partage de blocs » de Porter Airlines, qui consiste à partager un horaire de vol, facilitent la transition des femmes qui reviennent d'un congé de maternité. C'est une période difficile dans la carrière d'une pilote; je peux en témoigner personnellement, car j'ai eu deux filles et je suis retournée au travail seulement deux mois et demi après la naissance de l'une d'elles.

(1010)



En terminant, je dirai qu'un des plus grands défis auxquels se heurtent les écoles de pilotage, c'est en réalité d'attirer des femmes. Avec le soutien du gouvernement et de l'industrie pour accroître l'initiation aux disciplines de STIM en salle de classe et offrir des incitatifs destinés aux jeunes qui veulent entamer une formation au pilotage et demeurer dans l'industrie, je crois que nous pouvons renverser la vapeur et remédier à la pénurie imminente de pilotes. J'ai eu le travail le plus extraordinaire au monde et j'encourage de tout mon coeur d'autres femmes à en faire autant.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, capitaine Cameron.

Merci à tous les témoins de leurs excellentes recommandations.

Monsieur Jeneroux, vous avez quatre minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je suis désolé, madame la présidente, combien de minutes avez-vous dit?

La présidente:

Compte tenu du fait qu'il est déjà 10 h 13 et que nous essayons de diviser le temps qu'il reste, vous avez quatre minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Cela me convient; j'étais seulement curieux de savoir de combien de minutes je disposais.

Merci à vous tous de votre présence ici. Il est bon de vous recevoir au Comité.

C'est un véritable honneur de vous avoir avec nous, capitaine Cameron. Je vous suis reconnaissant d'avoir pris le temps de venir témoigner.

Quelle est la raison principale pour laquelle les pilotes quittent l'industrie? Nous parlons beaucoup d'attirer de nouveaux et de jeunes pilotes dans l'industrie, mais pourquoi les pilotes abandonnent-ils le domaine?

Je vais commencer par vous, capitaine Cameron.

Mme Judy Cameron:

J'ai acquis mon expérience dans une compagnie aérienne. En règle générale, personne n'abandonne une carrière avec un transporteur aérien. Une fois qu'on a une certaine ancienneté, la progression est en quelque sorte assurée tant et aussi longtemps qu'on réussit ses vols de vérification compétence.

C'est seulement une hypothèse de ma part, mais je crois que, au début de sa carrière, si on a payé tout cet argent et qu'on a de la difficulté à trouver un emploi... On raconte à la blague que la différence entre un pilote débutant et une pizza, c'est que, contrairement au pilote, la pizza peut nourrir une famille de quatre.

Les premières années sont difficiles. C'est la seule raison, à mon avis, pour laquelle on peut penser à abandonner cette carrière. On trouve une autre façon plus sûre de gagner sa vie.

Encore une fois, lorsqu'on devient pilote d'une compagnie aérienne, on continue en général dans cette voie parce qu'il s'agit d'une excellente carrière.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame Hadfield, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

Mme Robin Hadfield:

C'est une question que je connais bien parce que seulement environ 40 % des diplômés demeurent en réalité dans le domaine de l'aviation. Nombre d'entre eux que je connais personnellement ne veulent pas aller travailler dans le Nord, particulièrement lorsqu'ils sont issus de grands centres urbains. Ils vont dans le Nord deux ou trois ans. Ils ne gagnent pas beaucoup d'argent parce que les transporteurs régionaux de troisième palier savent très bien que les pilotes quitteront bientôt leur emploi pour monter d'échelon dans le but de travailler pour Air Canada ou WestJet. Très peu de pilotes vont dans le Nord et disent vouloir y demeurer. Certains le font, mais ce n'est pas la majorité.

Nombre de ces pilotes ont été effrayés. Par le passé, les exploitants nordiques étaient connus pour essayer de repousser les limites des avions en les surchargeant et pour ne pas bien les entretenir. S'ils ont peur, ils diront simplement: « J'en ai assez et je ne gagne pas beaucoup d'argent » et quitteront leur emploi. Quant aux femmes, elles éprouvent des problèmes lorsque... Vous savez, il s'agit de jeunes femmes et de jeunes hommes; ils commencent à se fréquenter et ensuite ils se séparent, et c'est fini. Elles quittent l'industrie.

Il y a un éventail de... Mais le salaire est un énorme problème. Il est difficile à régler en raison de la façon dont l'ensemble de l'industrie a été structuré, au début des compagnies aériennes.

(1015)

M. Matt Jeneroux:

D'accord. Parfait, merci.

Monsieur Gervais, vous aurez peut-être l'occasion de répondre à la suite d'autres questions. Il ne me reste qu'une minute et je veux présenter un avis de motion.

Il s'agit d'un avis de motion verbal, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Vous voulez déposer un avis de motion? D'accord.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Dites-moi lorsque vous serez prête pour que je le lise.

La présidente:

Allez-y.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

D'accord. La motion se lit ainsi: Que le Comité entreprenne une étude sur les répercussions de la taxe fédérale sur le carbone sur l'industrie des transports, comme suit: Deux réunions sur les répercussions de la taxe carbone sur les passagers aériens; Deux réunions sur les répercussions de la taxe carbone sur les passagers ferroviaires; Deux réunions sur les répercussions de la taxe carbone sur les clients du secteur du camionnage; et que le Comité fasse rapport de ses conclusions à la Chambre.

Je l'ai ici par écrit, Marie-France.

La présidente:

Merci.

Il vous reste encore 45 secondes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merveilleux.

Monsieur Gervais, vous pouvez prendre le temps qu'il reste pour répondre à la question que j'ai posée.

M. Bernard Gervais:

Nous pensons que, si des pilotes sont en voie de devenir des pilotes de ligne, il y a une telle demande partout dans le monde que nous n'aurons pas le temps de combler les vides et les lacunes.

Quant à savoir pourquoi les pilotes quittent le domaine, comme la capitaine Cameron l'a dit, on ne laisse habituellement pas une carrière de pilote de ligne; c'est juste qu'on n'a pas le temps d'y parvenir. Les pilotes décrochent un emploi dans le domaine de l'aviation et des transporteurs aériens partout dans le monde en raison de la croissance accrue et de la circulation aérienne beaucoup plus importante.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

La présidente:

Vous avez quatre secondes. Nous allons passer à M. Iacono.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci, mesdames et messieurs, d'être ici ce matin.

Capitaine, de plus en plus de gens prennent l'avion et voyagent, et, par conséquent, les compagnies aériennes sont plus occupées et font ainsi plus d'argent. Êtes-vous d'accord avec moi?

Mme Judy Cameron:

C'est une industrie cyclique. C'est peut-être le cas pour le moment. J'ai vu qu'elle a connu des hauts et des bas.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Par conséquent, pourquoi ne pas investir à l'interne pour combler ce vide? Pourquoi les compagnies aériennes n'investissent-elles pas dans leur propre personnel? Nombre d'agents de bord possèdent de l'expérience de vol et de service au public, alors pourquoi ne pas investir en eux afin qu'ils suivent ces cours? Pourquoi n'existe-t-il pas un programme à l'interne dans le cadre duquel on offre la possibilité aux employés de grimper dans la hiérarchie, de passer au prochain échelon et de devenir pilotes? Puisqu'une pénurie sévit, pourquoi ne fait-on pas cela?

Mme Judy Cameron:

J'aimerais pouvoir répondre comme si j'étais cadre d'une compagnie aérienne, mais ce n'est pas le cas. C'est une question intéressante. Un des membres du public aujourd'hui travaille avec une fondation appelée Elevate; elle étudie à l'heure actuelle la raison pour laquelle les femmes n'envisagent pas une carrière de pilote compte tenu de la sécurité financière. Elles gagneraient certainement beaucoup plus d'argent si elles étaient pilotes au lieu d'être agentes de bord. Je n'ai pas de réponse à cela.

Il existe un modèle en Europe, un programme de cadets. Par exemple, Lufthansa a l'académie European Flight Training. Cette dernière s'occupe de la formation au sol, et, lorsqu'on a terminé cette formation, on peut commencer à piloter pour un transporteur aérien d'apport avec Lufthansa. On finit par piloter pour Lufthansa. Une prime à la signature est offerte au début, et les pilotes remboursent graduellement leur formation lorsqu'ils travaillent pour le transporteur d'apport.

Ce modèle présente des avantages et des inconvénients, comme peut en témoigner Robin. Je ne sais pas pourquoi Air Canada ne l'a pas examiné. Elle n'a pas eu à le faire parce que, par le passé, les gens se battaient pour obtenir un emploi chez Air Canada alors que les postes vacants étaient rares. La situation a complètement changé.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Il n'y a aucune pénurie d'agents de bord, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Judy Cameron:

J'imagine que non.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Je crois que ce serait une façon positive d'examiner les choses.

Ma deuxième question — et les deux autres témoins peuvent également y répondre —, c'est pourquoi ne pas rester à l'interne et demander aux pilotes de donner des cours? Un professeur, par exemple, après deux ou trois ans, prendra une année sabbatique pour faire de la recherche. Pourquoi ne pas lancer un programme dans le cadre duquel des pilotes possédant un certain nombre d'années d'expérience donnent six mois de formation aux nouveaux pilotes et aux nouveaux étudiants? On éviterait ainsi la pénurie de formateurs. Vous dites que nous faisons face à une pénurie d'étudiants et de pilotes. Pourquoi ne pas la combler de l'interne?

(1020)

Mme Judy Cameron:

La pénurie touche les débutants, les pilotes privés et les pilotes de ligne.

Une fois embauché par la compagnie aérienne, on suit son programme de formation interne; les transporteurs aériens ont réussi à recruter nombre de pilotes à la retraite pour donner des cours de simulateur. Ce sont des compétences complètement différentes de celles des instructeurs dont on parle, qui sont nécessaires pour amener les jeunes pilotes à travailler dans le domaine de l'aviation.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Aimeriez-vous ajouter quelque chose à cela, Mme Hadfield?

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Oui. Pour ce qui est de l'idée des agents de bord, j'en connais personnellement plus de 15 qui sont devenus pilotes et qui ont gravi les échelons, mais ils ont dû le faire par leurs propres moyens. Aucun incitatif n'est offert aux compagnies aériennes pour qu'elles donnent leur propre formation.

À propos de la pénurie de pilotes, on croit à tort que les gens ne veulent pas devenir pilotes. À Springbank, il existe deux écoles de pilotage qui ont une liste d'attente de plus de 300 étudiants. Au total, 78 cadets de l'air n'ont pas obtenu leur permis pour piloter un avion à moteur cet été en raison du manque d'instructeurs, et l'école de pilotage la plus achalandée au pays, à Brampton, a publié un avis en octobre qui indiquait qu'elle n'acceptait plus de nouveaux étudiants.

Il y a une liste d'attente pour les gens au Canada qui désirent apprendre à piloter. Les places sont occupées par des étudiants étrangers. Ces derniers quittent ensuite le pays, ce qui veut dire que nous avons une pénurie d'instructeurs; c'est pourquoi nous avons une liste d'attente d'étudiants.

C'est un cercle vicieux. Les écoles ont besoin d'argent, alors elles acceptent les étudiants étrangers, ce qui ferme la porte à nos étudiants.

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, monsieur Iacono, votre temps est écoulé.

M. Nantel est le prochain. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Madame Hadfield, vous soulignez avec beaucoup de justesse qu'il n'y a pas de relais dans le système d'éducation au Canada quant aux écoles de pilotage, alors que nous avons un besoin criant de pilotes. Ce qui me frappe aussi, c'est ce que Mme Cameron évoquait quand elle disait que les gens du Nord, qui ont tant besoin de pilotes, ne déménageront pas dans le Sud pour suivre une formation pendant une période plus ou moins longue. Par ailleurs, je suis bien au courant du phénomène des écoles de pilotage à Saint-Hubert, lesquelles soulèvent de grandes préoccupations. Nous avons toujours déploré le fait qu'elles soient toutes concentrées à cet endroit, au-dessus des résidences de gens ordinaires.

Cependant, comme vous l'avez expliqué, il est assez triste de voir que les écoles acceptent beaucoup d'étudiants étrangers qui viennent prendre la place, non seulement d'étudiants canadiens, mais aussi de pilotes canadiens. Cela veut dire que ces pilotes s'en vont. Souhaitez-vous que le Comité recommande la création d'un réseau? Je pense ici à l'Association des industries aérospatiales du Canada, ou AIAC, qui a lancé le programme Tiens bon Canada et au sujet duquel nous avons voulu rencontré M. Hadfield.

Ne devrions-nous pas adopter une approche concertée pour établir un programme de formation à l'intention des jeunes, particulièrement des jeunes femmes, afin qu'ils se lancent dans ce domaine? [Traduction]

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Je crois que, si nous mettions en place des programmes dans les écoles secondaires, où les étudiants qui ne connaissent pas les aéroports... À mesure que les centres urbains ont pris de l'ampleur, nous avons perdu de petits aéroports et de l'aviation générale. Les gens ne voient pas les avions voler, alors les jeunes ne peuvent pas regarder dans le ciel et dire: « Oh, c'est ce que je veux faire dans la vie. » Ils fréquentent l'école secondaire et se concentrent sur des programmes de STIM, mais ceux-ci n'englobent pas l'aviation.

Je crois qu'il est temps de ramener l'aviation dans les écoles secondaires et également de mettre en place un programme de prêts étudiants et de remboursement de ces prêts — et le rendre abordable afin que les étudiants puissent fréquenter l'école — pour conserver nos étudiants canadiens dans les écoles de pilotage. La moitié de la population gagne moins de... Comment une famille ayant un revenu combiné de 80 000 $ peut-elle avoir les moyens de payer la formation de leur enfant dans ces écoles?

Également, le remboursement est lent. Lorsque notre fils fréquentait l'école de pilotage, je lui ai dit qu'il allait devoir aller dans le Nord, y travailler pendant des années, pomper de l'essence et nettoyer du vomi dans les avions pour le fabuleux salaire de 20 000 $ par année. Ensuite, lorsqu'on gravit les échelons — on se marie, on a des enfants — et qu'on gagne 100 000 $, on passe à Air Canada et le salaire baisse à 40 000 $.

C'est un cycle. Pour les écoles de pilotage, je crois qu'on doit assurément mettre en place un programme de remboursement des prêts. On ne peut pas empêcher les écoles de pilotage d'accepter des étudiants étrangers, mais si on peut faire en sorte que nos étudiants aient les moyens de suivre cette formation... Le Canada est très reconnu partout dans le monde pour son secteur de l'aviation. C'est la raison pour laquelle, dans d'autres pays, on paie pour que les enfants suivent une formation au Canada.

(1025)

[Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Bien évidemment, l'éducation est de compétence provinciale, ce qui peut rendre les choses un peu complexes. Cependant, monsieur Gervais, je crois que vous êtes au courant de la situation qui existe à Saint-Hubert. Il n'y a aucun doute à mon avis qu'une des solutions serait de mieux planifier la répartition des écoles de pilotage. Pourquoi ne pas amener les cégeps du Québec à fraterniser avec leur aéroport local et à veiller à l'installation d'un simulateur de vol et de quelques avions dans le cadre d'une école de pilotage?

Actuellement, dans ma circonscription de Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, la concentration de ces écoles est tellement grande qu'elle en est devenue problématique. Je suis le premier à vanter les mérites de l'aérospatiale et à affirmer que Longueuil-Saint-Hubert est le berceau de plusieurs technologies merveilleuses qui font notre fierté. Cependant, lorsque je constate qu'à peine 25 à 30 % des places à l'École nationale d'aérotechnique sont libres, je trouve la situation déplorable. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Monsieur Nantel, je suis désolée, mais il ne reste pas assez de temps pour une réponse à votre question maintenant. Elle pourrait peut-être être intégrée à celle d'une autre question.

Nous allons passer à M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente, et merci à vous tous d'être ici.

On dirait que le système de marché libre a vraiment implosé dans tout ça. Il y a des facteurs de charge plus élevés, du moins à bord des vols que je prends, et les coûts sont quand même assez élevés, particulièrement dans le Nord. Pourtant, des pilotes font pratiquement la file dans les banques alimentaires, un phénomène que nous avons observé aux États-Unis.

Vous me dites que, d'un côté, nombre de personnes veulent fréquenter les écoles de pilotage ici, mais, de l'autre, les formateurs gagnent un très faible salaire, et les frais de scolarité sont très élevés. Je suis désolé, mais où va l'argent?

Mme Judy Cameron:

L'exploitation d'un avion est coûteuse.

J'allais justement dire, relativement à certaines questions précédentes, qu'il existe également des solutions à faible coût. Il n'y a aucun endroit à Toronto où on peut seulement regarder un avion décoller et atterrir. Vancouver possède une excellente zone d'observation. À Toronto, on doit se stationner sur le bord de l'autoroute pour observer les aéronefs.

Auparavant, nous pouvions offrir aux gens une merveilleuse occasion de visiter le poste de pilotage. Nous ne pouvons plus faire cela. C'était un des meilleurs outils de vente. Il a probablement été très coûteux pour beaucoup de parents au fil des ans de permettre à leurs enfants de nous regarder décoller et atterrir.

M. Ken Hardie:

Oui, mais le fait est que les gens clés — les formateurs, les étudiants et les nouveaux pilotes — ont tous tendance à... Qui voudrait faire ce travail si la formation très coûteuse conduit à un faible salaire? Bon dieu, j'ai commencé en radio, et c'était exactement comme ça. Mais, encore une fois, nous voulions vraiment travailler dans ce domaine.

Je me demande si nous avons affaire — les milléniaux à la maison, bouchez-vous les oreilles pendant un moment — à l'attitude des millénaires ici également: « Nous voulons tout, et nous le voulons tout de suite. »

Un de vous dit oui, et l'autre dit non.

Mme Judy Cameron:

J'ai entendu cela de personnes qui forment certains des nouveaux pilotes.

Je peux seulement témoigner de ma propre expérience. J'ai travaillé dans le Nord. J'y ai piloté pendant un an et j'ai pompé de l'essence dans un DC-3. J'ai manipulé des fûts de carburant. Lorsqu'Air Canada m'a embauchée, les gens de mon comité d'entrevue m'ont dit: « Apportez votre carnet de vol et tout ce qui peut favoriser votre embauche. » J'ai donc apporté des photographies de moi-même — en noir et blanc — en train de manipuler des fûts de carburant en combinaison de vol avec des bottes à embout d'acier. C'est peut-être ce qui m'a aidée à décrocher l'emploi.

Le fait est que le pilotage, contrairement à beaucoup d'autres occupations, c'est très plaisant. On s'amuse beaucoup, et certaines personnes sont motivées à devenir pilotes peu importe les difficultés, mais les coûts sont en train de devenir exorbitants.

Je crois que la solution, c'est d'avoir des prêts-subventions, particulièrement si on est disposé à travailler comme instructeur de vol ou dans une collectivité nordique. Je crois qu'on peut trouver des solutions.

M. Ken Hardie:

Robin, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose à cela?

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Oui. Je pense que la différence entre les générations n'est pas le manque de motivation en réalité. À mon avis, les gens veulent encore devenir pilotes, et les listes d'attente des écoles de pilotage en font foi. Ce que les compagnies aériennes constatent, c'est que l'ensemble de compétences des candidats est un peu différent du côté des milléniaux, qui n'ont pas le même type de compétences de leadership.

Toutefois, c'est également très rare au sein de l'industrie. Comme l'a déjà dit Judy, l'industrie aérienne connaît des hauts et des bas, et j'ai observé cela dans toutes les générations de pilotes d'Air Canada et avec...

(1030)

M. Ken Hardie:

J'ai une petite question pour le temps qu'il me reste et je suis désolé d'être très bref ici.

Utilisons-nous pleinement la formation militaire? Est-ce que des militaires pourraient essentiellement gagner un peu d'argent supplémentaire en formant des pilotes?

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Oui, mais je crois que l'armée fait également face à une pénurie de pilotes pour exactement la même raison: le manque d'instructeurs. Elle ne peut pas les embaucher assez rapidement.

M. Ken Hardie:

Il me reste peut-être encore un peu de temps si vous voulez terminer votre réponse précédente...

Oh, monsieur Gervais...?

M. Bernard Gervais:

J'aimerais ajouter quelque chose.

Je crois que monsieur le député Ianono a également demandé pourquoi on n'offre pas de formation. L'environnement de formation pour l'obtention d'une licence de pilote privé ou de pilote de ligne et tout ce qui l'entoure est très réglementé, et c'est comme ça depuis nombre d'années. C'est une question de sécurité. On ne peut pas seulement décider de former quelqu'un. On doit être instructeur pour former les gens.

Il y a un protocole, lequel est prévu dans le Règlement de l'aviation canadien. Il s'agit d'un protocole et d'un processus éprouvés, et ils existent depuis très longtemps. On pourrait peut-être également examiner cela afin d'accélérer le processus.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Une des particularités que j'ai constatées lorsque je suis devenu pilote en 2005, c'est que c'est la seule industrie dans laquelle les nouveaux pilotes forment d'autres nouveaux pilotes. Il semble que très peu de pilotes expérimentés transmettent leurs connaissances aux débutants.

En même temps, un pilote de 737 ne peut pas former un pilote de Cesna 172 parce qu'il s'agit d'un ensemble de connaissances complètement différent, alors comment pouvons-nous faire en sorte que les pilotes expérimentés transmettent leurs connaissances aux nouveaux pilotes afin d'augmenter le bassin d'instructeurs?

Vous pouvez tous répondre à la question.

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Sur le plan financier, il faut donner un incitatif. Si on invite un pilote de ligne à la retraite à revenir à la compagnie aérienne pour enseigner dans des simulateurs, il gagnera 70 $ l'heure. On en parlait plus tôt. Si vous lui proposez d'aller dans une école de pilotage, il gagnera 30 $ l'heure; il répondra donc que c'est hors de question...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

S'il a de la chance...

Mme Robin Hadfield:

... mais si vous faisiez en sorte que ce revenu soit exempt d'impôt, tous les pilotes accourraient. Ils sont les plus radins que vous puissiez rencontrer dans le monde.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

Mme Robin Hadfield: Si vous offriez 30 $ l'heure à un pilote et que ce revenu était exempt d'impôt, cela reviendrait au même que de gagner 70 $ l'heure, et vous auriez probablement un pourcentage énorme de pilotes à la retraite qui iraient dans ces écoles de pilotage. Ils adorent travailler avec les jeunes. Ils aiment les voir voler. Ils adorent être dans des avions. Donnez-leur un incitatif fiscal et ils le feront.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai beaucoup de questions différentes, alors je vais devoir être bref.

Nous avons parlé du coût de la formation de pilotage, comme vous venez tout juste de le faire, et également de la réduction des prêts étudiants, mais, comme je l'ai dit il y a quelques semaines au sujet de l'écrasement de l'avion de Germanwings, nous avons vu quel était le risque si un étudiant suit la formation et égare ensuite son certificat médical. Comment atténueriez-vous ce risque à l'égard des prêts de manière à ce que personne ne dissimule de maladie et de handicap afin de rembourser ce prêt?

Mme Judy Cameron:

C'est préoccupant. Vous dépensez tout cet argent et découvrez ensuite que vous êtes médicalement invalide. Les exigences pour obtenir un certificat médical de classe 1 sont assez strictes, alors peut-être qu'il devrait y avoir une sorte de clause de protection, une assurance à laquelle vous pourriez souscrire, grâce à laquelle, si vous perdez votre licence pour des raisons médicales, vous n'aurez pas à rembourser de 75 000 à 100 000 $ en frais de formation.

C'est une situation difficile. Presque aucune autre profession n'exige que l'on conserve un certificat médical valable de classe 1.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il s'agit d'un sujet différent dont nous n'avons pas du tout discuté auparavant. Quand vous obtenez un diplôme universitaire, vous obtenez les initiales « B.A. » après votre nom, ou peu importe quoi d'autre. Quand vous devenez ingénieur, vous obtenez l'abréviation « ing. »

Vous passez des années et des années à l'école, et il n'y a pas d'initiales honorifiques pour les pilotes. Ne devrait-il pas y en avoir?

M. Bernard Gervais:

Absolument.

Une voix: Il y a « capitaine ».

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, mais pas pour un copilote ou un pilote de brousse. Quand vous obtenez vos quatre barrettes à Air Canada, vous devenez capitaine, mais, si vous êtes pilote dans un autre secteur de l'industrie...

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Vous êtes tout de même « capitaine ».

Une voix: En effet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est juste.

Quand j'apprenais à piloter, nous avons appris à l'aide de documents CFS et VNC en version papier. À présent, tout le monde utilise l'application ForeFlight. Sommes-nous en train de perdre la confiance des pilotes en passant au numérique?

M. Bernard Gervais:

Non, pas vraiment. C'est juste une autre façon d'apprendre. De nos jours, si vous regardez comment les choses ont changé en ce qui concerne la technologie, la jeune génération continue... les jeunes ont des connaissances et peuvent trouver autant d'information que nous l'avons fait sur papier. Tout est encore là.

Non, je ne crois pas, pas selon ce que nous constatons.

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Je pense que cela a amélioré l'apprentissage. Je crois que cela a contribué à améliorer la sécurité. Je me rends seule à Oshkosh, l'aéroport le plus fréquenté du monde, pendant une semaine, et, si mon application ForeFlight cessait de fonctionner comme j'arrivais là-bas, je serais perdue. Je ferais demi-tour et me dirigerais vers le lac.

(1035)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est exactement ce que je veux dire. Nous...

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup. Je suis désolée, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous remercie.

La présidente:

M. Godin est le prochain. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie nos chers témoins. Leurs propos sont très intéressants.

Il semble y avoir une certaine banalisation de l'incidence du manque de pilotes sur l'avenir de l'industrie de l'aviation. J'aimerais que vous me parliez de l'importance de la formation des pilotes. Le nombre de vols augmente de 4 % à 5 % par année. Si on ne trouve pas de solution dans l'industrie aérospatiale, quelle sera l'incidence de cette augmentation de vols?

Ma question s'adresse à vous trois.

Voulez-vous commencer, monsieur Gervais?

M. Bernard Gervais:

Oui.

Il y a un manque de pilotes à l'échelle mondiale. Il demeure que si le Canada ne trouve pas de réponse à cela, il faudra embaucher des gens d'autres pays.

L'industrie est en croissance partout dans le monde, mais je ne crois pas qu'il faille commencer à recruter des gens d'autres pays. Nous avons la capacité de les former au Canada. La plupart de nos pilotes ont été formés grâce au Plan d'entraînement aérien du Commonwealth britannique. Dans ces bases militaires, on a formé environ 130 000 pilotes. La formation des pilotes au Canada est de notoriété internationale. Nous avons la capacité de le faire et il faudrait se retrousser les manches et aller de l'avant.

Comme M. Nantel l'a mentionné tantôt, il devrait y avoir un programme national de formation et de relève. Le Canada est le berceau de l'aérospatiale. Le pays s'est développé notamment grâce à l'aéronautique.

Nous devons le faire, sinon, ce sont les entreprises canadiennes autour de Montréal, de Calgary et de Vancouver, notamment Viking Air, qui en souffriront. Le Canada est le berceau de l'aéronautique.

M. Joël Godin:

Merci.

Les autres témoins veulent-ils ajouter des commentaires? Je vois que non.

Dans d'autres professions, comme la médecine et la comptabilité, les firmes s'arrachent les étudiants.

N'y aurait-il pas lieu de réfléchir et d'inciter les entreprises à investir dans le recrutement de jeunes hommes et de jeunes femmes ayant le potentiel de devenir des pilotes? L'entreprise pourrait les parrainer, en quelque sorte, en les aidant financièrement, ce qui leur permettrait de rembourser leurs prêts plus rapidement et d'avoir un avenir prometteur et confortable.

Il est important, pour l'industrie, d'avoir des pilotes pour pouvoir continuer à fonctionner. [Traduction]

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Faites-vous référence à un programme des cadets? [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Non, ce serait pour plus tard, en fait. Il n'y a pas de décision prise quant aux cadets, mais les programmes pourraient être jumelés.

La solution devrait venir de l'industrie aérospatiale, qui parraine vos cadets, comme dans le cas dont vous avez parlé dans votre témoignage ou dans d'autres circonstances. Quand, dans l'industrie, on voit des jeunes qui sont motivés et qui ont du potentiel, pourquoi ne pas les parrainer et les accompagner pour qu'ils voient l'avenir positivement?

M. Bernard Gervais:

Je suis bien d'accord avec vous. D'ailleurs, certaines entreprises le font déjà. Pratt & Whitney et Bombardier ont des aéroclubs. Cependant, il y a une tout autre étape à entreprendre.

L'an dernier, l'Association des pilotes d'Air Canada et la COPA ont élaboré un guide des carrières et mis sur pied des bourses de pilotage pour inciter les gens à se lancer dans ce domaine, mais ce n'est pas nécessairement du parrainage à proprement parler.

Il y aurait lieu que les compagnies fassent du parrainage, exactement comme vous le dites, et c'est très possible. Les coûts seraient minimes, mais il faut avoir un plan. La COPA serait prête à travailler avec ces gens. On pourrait utiliser les aéroports et les aérodromes situés ailleurs que dans les points névralgiques dont on parlait plus tôt pour démarrer de tels programmes. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Je suis désolée, monsieur Godin, mais votre temps est écoulé.

Allez-y, monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.

Je vais partager mon temps de parole avec M. Graham. Je pense qu'il a encore quelques questions à poser, mais j'aimerais présenter un avis de motion, madame la présidente, qui, je l'espère, sera examiné à la prochaine séance.

En ce qui concerne cet avis de motion, madame la présidente, comme vous le savez, nous nous sommes penchés sur les coûts liés à la pollution et nous essayons d'obtenir autant de commentaires que possible de part et d'autre de la Chambre. Par conséquent, mon avis de motion, madame la présidente, se lit comme suit: Que l'Opposition officielle présente au Comité son plan pour gérer les coûts de la pollution liée aux transports.

C'est ce que je présenterai à la prochaine réunion.

Sur ce, monsieur Graham, allez-y. Vous avez la parole.

(1040)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous remercie.

Je n'en ai pas beaucoup d'autres, mais j'en ai encore quelques-unes.

Monsieur Gervais, vous avez mentionné le programme COPA pour les jeunes et vous avez déjà fait partie de l'APBQ, et, comme vous le savez, j'en fais également partie. J'ai participé à au moins cinq de ces événements Kids in Flight. Pouvez-vous nous parler des répercussions réelles de tout cela? Je sais que, de la cinquantaine d'enfants que j'ai pris avec moi, dont un seul a vomi — j'en suis très fier —, je dirais qu'environ la moitié ou peut-être même plus étaient des filles, mais cela ne semble pas se traduire par un intérêt pour l'école de pilotage.

Avez-vous une idée de la raison pour laquelle c'est ainsi?

Madame Cameron, vous parliez de voir des modèles. Mon instructrice est une femme. C'est une excellente instructrice et une excellente pilote. Elle vole lors de tous ces événements. Elle s'occupe de la formation au sol de tous les enfants, ils voient ce modèle. Comment convertir cela en intérêt?

Mme Judy Cameron:

Je dirais qu'ils ne le voient toujours pas assez. Je pense que cela doit commencer à l'école primaire, puis être abordé, disons, par des conseillers d'orientation du secondaire. On doit les éduquer.

Il y a beaucoup de fausses idées. La première est qu'il faut être un génie des mathématiques pour être pilote. Ce n'est pas vrai.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est seulement lorsqu'on a des ennuis.

Mme Judy Cameron:

Il faut pouvoir faire des additions et des soustractions simples.

L'autre idée fausse est qu'il faut avoir une vision parfaite de 20/20. Ce n'est pas vrai non plus.

Je pense que le problème, c'est que nous ne suscitons pas l'intérêt des jeunes assez tôt, et j'en suis un parfait exemple. J'ai dû retourner à l'école avant de commencer le collège d'aviation. Je n'avais pas fait de mathématiques en douzième année. J'étais dans un programme d'arts à l'université, de sorte que j'avais déjà limité mes options.

Je pense que vous devez les recruter plus jeunes.

Je ne peux pas vous dire pourquoi ce premier vol n'a pas été totalement motivant pour eux. C'était certainement le cas pour moi, et il y a beaucoup de programmes comme celui-là. L'organisation The Ninety-Nines présente l'événement Girls Take Flight. Un de nos directeurs de Northern Lights en est responsable. Il y avait 1 000 personnes cette année à Oshawa, où 221 filles et femmes ont volé. Je suis sûre qu'un certain nombre d'entre elles étaient intéressées à poursuivre une carrière après cela.

Je pense que c'est une question d'exposition, d'avoir plus de choses comme Elevate. Encore une fois, je parle d'une dame dans l'auditoire. Elle dirige une organisation qui se rendra dans 20 villes du Canada et fera la promotion de diverses carrières dans le domaine de l'aviation. Elle est contrôleuse aérienne, donc il ne s'agit pas seulement des pilotes; il s'agit du contrôle aérien, de l'entretien et de différents domaines. Je pense que les enfants ont besoin d'être exposés à cela, et, plus l'expérience pratique est grande, mieux c'est. Ce ne devrait pas être seulement quelqu'un qui parle dans une salle de classe.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais poursuivre un peu sur cette voie. Enfant, quand je prenais l'avion, j'allais toujours dans le poste de pilotage. C'était amusant. Puis, le 11 septembre est arrivé, et cela a évidemment changé beaucoup de choses.

Vous êtes une pilote expérimentée. Voyez-vous un problème de sécurité? Existe-t-il un moyen de préautoriser les personnes qui sont intéressées à entrer dans le poste de pilotage avant un vol afin que nous puissions ramener cette expérience? Est-ce possible?

Mme Judy Cameron:

L'un des plus grands désirs ardents de tout pilote de ligne était de pouvoir avoir de nouveau sa famille dans le poste de pilotage. Si vous ne pouvez pas faire confiance à vos enfants ou à votre conjoint, vraiment, à qui pouvez-vous faire confiance?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a eu l'écrasement de l'Airbus en Russie...

Mme Judy Cameron:

C'est vraiment déplorable que cela ne puisse être réglé. Nous avons des cartes NEXUS. Nous avons diverses mesures de sécurité. J'aimerais voir des changements.

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Pourrais-je intervenir à ce sujet?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bien sûr.

Mme Robin Hadfield:

Je pense que les milliers et les milliers d'enfants que nous avons embarqués pour des vols voient cela comme un vol libre. Dans le cadre de notre programme, nous avons constaté que ce sont les parents qui font obstacle. Quand l'enfant dit qu'il veut devenir pilote, leur réaction naturelle est: « Tu vas t'écraser et mourir. Pas question. Tu ne peux pas faire ça. Personne dans notre famille n'a jamais fait ça. »

Nous avons apporté des changements, et dans le programme cette année, vous devez déjà être en âge de voler. Nous avons eu sept événements où nous avons amené des jeunes. S'ils étaient à l'école secondaire, le parent devait également participer au vol. À chacun des événements, de une à trois personnes se sont inscrites, et l'école de pilotage qui était présente leur a parlé sur place. Je pense qu'il faut se concentrer sur les enfants plus âgés, pas les petits.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Gervais, aimeriez-vous faire un commentaire?

M. Bernard Gervais:

Pour ajouter à ce que Robin disait, l'an dernier, la COPA a commencé à offrir gratuitement à tous ceux qui ont l'âge de voler, de 14 à 17 ans, un cours théorique en ligne et un carnet de bord pour entrer à l'école de pilotage. Si vous avez entre 14 et 17 ans, votre prochaine étape est de vous rendre à l'école de pilotage. Nous déployons des efforts dans ce sens.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

En ce qui concerne le danger, lorsque j'étais à l'école de pilotage, nous aimions dire que la période la plus dangereuse de la journée d'un pilote était de se rendre en voiture à l'aéroport. Si les gens pouvaient comprendre cela...

Je pense que l'incident survenu dans le Sud-Ouest il y a un an, lorsqu'un passager a été aspiré par la fenêtre et tué, était le premier décès à bord d'un vol commercial aux États-Unis en quelque chose comme neuf ans. Il y a un mythe persistant selon lequel un avion n'est pas sûr. Comment pouvons-nous faire valoir le fait qu'il s'agit de loin du moyen de transport le plus sûr au monde?

M. Bernard Gervais:

L'année dernière, la COPA et Transports Canada ont lancé la campagne de sécurité de l'aviation générale. Le ministère nous a demandé de l'aider. Il s'agit d'un outil de communication que nous utilisons pour montrer au grand public que les vols sont sûrs au plus haut point; par conséquent, il y aura davantage de publicité et de communication à cet égard.

(1045)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup à nos témoins. C'était très instructif. Vous avez certainement donné à nos analystes un grand nombre de recommandations que le Comité pourrait vouloir présenter. Je vous remercie beaucoup du temps que vous nous avez consacré aujourd'hui.

Je vous souhaite à tous un joyeux Noël.

J'ai une pensée pour le Comité. Je n'avais pas prévu de réunion pour jeudi; nous avons eu cette discussion. Étant donné qu'il semble que nous serons ici, le Comité souhaite-t-il tenir une réunion jeudi? On pourrait essayer d'organiser une réunion à ce moment. Le cas échéant, j'aimerais que ce soit appuyé massivement.

Je ne constate pas de grand enthousiasme pour ce qui est d'essayer de planifier une réunion jeudi. Merci beaucoup.

Encore une fois, joyeux Noël. Merci beaucoup à tous de votre coopération.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on December 11, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.