header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-12-10 INDU 143

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody.

Can you feel the excitement in the air? I'm not talking about Christmas. We should all be excited now. This is the second-to-last witness panel on copyright—

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

That you know of.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Don't do that.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I've been here for a while.

The Chair:

Welcome, everybody, to the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, meeting 143, as we continue our five-year statutory review of copyright.

Today we have with us Casey Chisick, a partner with Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP; Michael Geist, Canada research chair in Internet and e-commerce law, faculty of law, University of Ottawa; Ysolde Gendreau, a full professor, faculty of law, Université de Montréal; and then, from the Intellectual Property Institute of Canada, we have Bob Tarantino, chair, copyright policy committee and Catherine Lovrics, vice-chair, copyright policy committee.

You'll each have up to seven minutes for your presentation, and I will cut you off after seven minutes because I'm like that. Then, we'll go into questions because I'm sure we have lots of questions for you.

We're going to get started with Mr. Chisick.

I want to thank you. You were here once before, and you didn't get a chance to do your thing, so thank you for coming from Toronto to see us again.

Mr. Casey Chisick (Partner, Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP, As an Individual):

I'm happy to be here. Thank you for inviting me back.

My name is Casey Chisick. I'm a partner at Cassels Brock in Toronto. I'm certified as a specialist in copyright law and I've been practising and teaching in that area for almost 20 years. That includes many appearances before the Copyright Board and in judicial reviews of decisions of the board, including five appeals to the Supreme Court of Canada.

In my practice, I act for a wide variety of clients, including artists, copyright collectives, music publishers, universities, film and TV producers, video game developers, broadcasters, over-the-top services and many others, but the views I express here today will be mine alone.

I want to begin by thanking and congratulating the committee for its dedication to this important task. You've heard from many different stakeholders over the course of many months, and I agree with many of their views. When I was first invited to appear last month, I planned to focus on Copyright Board reform, but that train has now left the station through Bill C-86, so I'm going to comment today a bit more broadly on other aspects of the act. I will come back to the board, though, toward the end of my remarks.

On substantive matters, I'd like to touch on five specific issues.

First, it's my view that Parliament should clarify some of the many new and expanded exceptions from copyright infringement that were introduced in the 2012 amendments. Some of those have caused confusion and have led to unnecessary litigation and unintended consequences.

For example, a 2016 decision of the Copyright Board found that backup copies of music made by commercial radio stations accounted for more than 22% of the commercial value of all of the copies that radio stations make. As a result of the expansion of the backup copies exception, the Copyright Board then proceeded to discount the stations' royalty payments by an equivalent percentage of over 22%. It took that money directly out of the pockets of creators and rights holders, even though the copies were found in that case to have very significant economic value.

In my view, that can't be the kind of balance that Parliament intended when it introduced that exception in 2012.

Second, the act should be amended to ensure that statutory safe harbours for Internet intermediaries work as intended. They need to be available only to truly passive entities, not to sites or services that play more active roles in facilitating access to infringing content. I agree that intermediaries who do nothing more than offer the means of communication or storage should not be liable for copyright infringement, but too many services that are not passive, including certain cloud services and content aggregators, are resisting payment by claiming that they fall within the same exceptions. To the extent that it's a loophole in the act, it should be closed.

Third, it's important to clarify ownership of copyright in movies and television shows, mostly because the term of copyright in those works is so uncertain under the current approach, but I disagree with the suggestion that screenwriters or directors ought to be recognized as the authors. I haven't heard any persuasive explanation from their representatives as to why that should be the case or, more importantly, what they would do with the rights they're seeking if those rights were to be granted.

In my view, given the commercial realities of the industry, which has dealt with this for years under collective agreements, a better solution would be to deem the producer to be the author, or at least the first owner of copyright, and deal with the term of copyright accordingly.

Fourth, Parliament should reconsider the reversion provisions of the Copyright Act. Currently, assignments and exclusive licences terminate automatically 25 years after an author's death, with copyright then reverting to the author's estate. That was once standard in many countries, but it's now more or less unique to Canada, and it can be quite disruptive in practice.

Imagine spending millions of dollars turning a book into a movie or building a business around a logo commissioned from a graphic designer only to wake up one day and find that you no longer have the right to use that underlying material in Canada. There are better and more effective ways to protect the interests of creators, many of whom I represent, without turning legitimate businesses upside down overnight.

(1535)



Fifth, the act should provide a clear and efficient path to site blocking and website de-indexing orders on a no-fault basis to Internet intermediaries and with an appropriate eye on balance among the competing interests of the various stakeholders. Although the Supreme Court has made clear that these injunctions may be available under equitable principles, the path to obtaining them is, in my view, far too long and expensive to be helpful to most rights holders. Canada should follow the lead of many of its major trading partners, including the U.K. and Australia, by adopting a more streamlined process—one that keeps a careful eye on the balance of competing interests among the various stakeholders.

In my remaining time, I'd like to address the recent initiatives to reform the operations of the Copyright Board.

The board is vital to the creative economy. Rights holders, users and the general public all rely on it to set fair and equitable rates for the uses of protected material. For the Canadian creative market to function effectively, the board needs to do its work and render its decisions in a timely, efficient and predictable way.

I was glad to see the comprehensive reforms in Bill C-86. I'm also mindful that the bill is well on its way to becoming law, so what I say here today may not have much immediate impact. For that reason, and in the interest of time, I'll just refer you to the testimony I gave before the Senate banking committee on November 21. I'll then touch on two specific issues.

First, the introduction of mandatory rate-setting criteria, including both the public interest and what a willing buyer would pay to a willing seller, is a very positive development. Clear and explicit criteria should result in a more timely, efficient and predictable tariff process. That's important because unpredictable rates can lead to severe market disruption, especially in emerging markets, like online music.

I'm concerned that the benefits of the provision in Bill C-86 will be undermined by its language, which also empowers the board to consider “any other criterion” it deems appropriate. An open-ended approach like this will create more mandatory boxes for the parties to check, in addition to things like technological neutrality and balance, which the Supreme Court introduced in 2015, but it won't guarantee that the board won't simply discard the parties' evidence in favour of other, totally unpredictable factors. That could increase the cost of board proceedings, with no corresponding increase in efficiency or predictability.

If it's too late to delete that provision from Bill C-86, I suggest that the government move quickly to provide regulatory guidance as to how the criteria should be applied, including what to look for in the willing buyer, willing seller analysis.

Last, very briefly, I understand that some committee witnesses have suggested that rather than doing it voluntarily, as the act currently provides, collectives should be required to file their licensing agreements with the Copyright Board. I agree that having access to all relevant agreements could help the board develop a more complete portrait of the markets it regulates. That's a laudable goal.

However, there's also an important counterweight to consider: Users may be reluctant to enter into agreements with collectives if they know they're going to be filed with the Copyright Board and thus become a matter of public record. The concern would be, of course, that services in the marketplace are operating in a very competitive environment. The last thing they want to do is make the terms of their confidential agreements known to everyone, including their competitors. I can say more about this in the question and answer session to follow.

Thank you for your attention. I do look forward to your questions.

(1540)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Michael Geist.

You have seven minutes, please, sir.

Dr. Michael Geist (Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-Commerce Law, Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa, As an Individual):

Thank you.

Good afternoon. My name is Michael Geist. I am a law professor at the University of Ottawa, where I hold the Canada research chair in Internet and e-commerce law and where I am a member of the Centre for Law, Technology and Society. I appear today in a personal capacity as an independent academic, representing only my own views.

I have been closely following the committee's work, and I have much to say about copyright reform in Canada. Given the limited time, however, I'd like to quickly highlight five issues: educational copying, site blocking, the so-called value gap, the impact of the copyright provisions in the CUSMA, and potential reforms in support of Canada's innovation strategy. My written submission to the committee includes links to dozens of articles I have written on these issues.

First, on educational copying, notwithstanding the oft-heard claim that the 2012 reforms are to blame for current educational practices, the reality is that the current situation has little to do with the inclusion of education as a fair dealing purpose. You need not take my word for it. Access Copyright was asked in 2016 by the Copyright Board to describe the impact of the legal change. It told the board that the legal reform did not change the effect of the law. Rather, it said, it merely codified existing law as interpreted by the Supreme Court.

Further, the claim of 600 million uncompensated copies that lies at the heart of allegations of unfair copying is the result of outdated guesswork using decades-old data and deeply suspect assumptions. The majority of the 600 million, or 380 million, involves kindergarten to grade 12 copying data that goes back to 2005. The Copyright Board warned years ago that the survey data was so old it may not be representative. The remaining 220 million comes from a York University study, much of which is as old as the K-to-12 data. Regardless of its age, however, extrapolating some old copying data from a single university to the entire country does not provide a credible estimate.

In fact, this committee has received copious data on the state of educational copying, and I would argue that it is unequivocal. The days of printed course packs have largely disappeared in favour of digital access. As universities and colleges shift to digital course management systems, the content used changes too. An Access Copyright study at Canadian colleges found that books comprised only 35% of the materials. Moreover, the amount of copying that occurs within these course management systems is far lower than exists with print.

Perhaps most importantly, CMS allows for the incorporation of licensed e-books, open access materials and hyperlinks to other content. At the University of Ottawa, there are now 1.4 million licensed e-books, many of which involve perpetual licences that require no further payment and can be used for course instruction. Further, governments have invested tens of millions in open educational resources, and educational institutions still spend millions annually on transactional pay-per-use licences even where those schools have a collective licence.

What this means is that the shift away from the Access Copyright licence is not grounded in fair dealing. Rather, it reflects the adoption of licences that provide both access and reproduction rights. These licences provide universities with access to content and the ability to use it in their courses. The Access Copyright licence offers far less, granting only copying rights for previously acquired materials. Therefore, efforts to force the Access Copyright licence on educational institutions by either restricting fair dealing or implementing statutory damages reform should be rejected. The prospect of restricting fair dealing would represent an anti-innovation and anti-education step backwards, and run counter to the experience of the past six years of increased licensing, innovation and choice for both authors and educational users.

With respect to statutory damages, supporters argue that a massive escalation in potential statutory damage awards is needed for deterrence and to promote settlement negotiations, but there is nothing to deter. Educational institutions are investing in licensing in record amounts. Promoting settlement negotiations amounts to little more than increasing the legal risks for students and educational institutions.

Second, on site blocking, the committee has heard from several witnesses who have called for the inclusion of an explicit site-blocking provision in the Copyright Act. I believe this would be a mistake. First, the CRTC proceeding into site blocking earlier this year led to thousands of submissions that identified serious problems with the practice, including from the UN special rapporteur for freedom of expression, who raised freedom of expression concerns, and technical groups who cited risks of over-blocking and net neutrality violations. Second, even if there is support for site blocking, the reality is that it already exists under the law, as we saw with the Google v. Equustek case at the Supreme Court.

Third, on the value gap, two issues are not in dispute here. First, the music industry is garnering record revenues from Internet streaming. Second, subscription streaming services pay more to creators than ad-based ones. The question for the copyright review is whether Canadian copyright law has anything to do with this. The answer is no.

(1545)



The notion of a value gap is premised on some platforms or services taking advantage of the law to negotiate lower rates. Those rules, such as notice and take down, do not exist under Canadian copyright laws. The committee talked about this in the last meeting. That helps explain why industry demands to this committee focus instead on taxpayer handouts, such as new taxes on iPhones. I believe these demands should be rejected.

Fourth is the impact of the new CUSMA. The copyright provisions in this new trade agreement significantly alter the copyright balance by extending the term of copyright by an additional 20 years, a reform that Canada rightly long resisted. By doing so, the agreement represents a major windfall that could result in hundreds of millions for rights holders and creates the need to recalibrate Canadian copyright law to restore the balance.

Finally, there are important reforms that would help advance Canada's innovation strategy, for example, greater fair dealing flexibility. The so-called “such as” approach would make the current list of fair dealing purposes illustrative rather than exhaustive and would place Canadian innovators on a level playing field with fair use countries such as the U.S. That reform would still maintain the full fairness analysis, along with the existing jurisprudence, to minimize uncertainty. In the alternative, an exception for informational analysis or text and data mining is desperately needed by the AI sector.

Canada should also establish new exceptions for our digital lock rules, which are among the most restrictive in the world. Canadian businesses are at a disadvantage relative to the U.S., including the agriculture sector, where Canadian farmers do not have the same rights as those found in the United States.

Moreover, given this government's support for open government—including its recent funding of Creative Commons licensed local news and its support for open source software—I believe the committee should recommend addressing an open government copyright barrier by removing the Crown copyright provision from the Copyright Act.

I look forward to your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. Your timing was really good.[Translation]

Ms. Gendreau, you have seven minutes.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau (Full Professor, Faculty of Law, Université de Montréal, As an Individual):

Mr. Chair, ladies and gentlemen, thank you for agreeing to hear me.

My name is Ysolde Gendreau, and I am a full professor at the Université de Montréal's Faculty of Law.

Since my master's studies, I have specialized in copyright law—I am the first in Canada to have completed a doctorate in this field. With few exceptions, my publications have always focused on this area of law. I am appearing here in a purely personal capacity.

I would like to read an excerpt from the discussions at the Revision Conference of the Bern Convention in Rome in 1928 on the right to broadcasting, recognized in article 11bis.

Comments on that text state:

In the first paragraph, the article... strongly confirms the author's right; in the second, it leaves it to national laws to regulate the conditions under which the right in question may be exercised, while acknowledging that, in recognition of the general public interest of the State, limitations to copyright may be put in force; however it is understood that a country shall only make use of the possibility of introducing such limitations where their necessity has been established by the experience of that country itself; such limitations shall not in any case lessen the moral right of the author; nor shall they affect the author’s right to equitable remuneration, which shall be fixed, failing agreement, by the competent authorities.

The principle of the 1928 article remains today.

Were the economic players who benefited from the broadcasting of works, that is, the broadcasters, and who had liability imposed on them at the time happy with it? Of course not. Today, the economic players who benefit from the distribution of works on the Internet continue to resist the imposition of copyright liability.

We don't have to wait 90 years to reach the consensus that exists in the broadcasting world. Just 20 years later, in 1948, no one batted an eyelid to see broadcasters pay for the works they use. In the future, the resistance of today's digital communications industry will be considered just as senseless as that of broadcasters 90 years ago if we act.

(1550)

[English]

I would now like to turn your attention to enforcement issues with respect to the Internet. Because it is tied to the right to communicate, the making available right has become part of the general regime that governs this right to communicate. Additional provisions have, however, generated antinomies that sap the new right of the very consequences of its recognition. Here are examples, which I do not expect you to read as I refer to them, but that I am showing to you now because I'll refer to them generally later on.

The general ISP liability requires the actual infringement of a work in order to engage the liability of a service provider. This condition is reinforced by a provision on statutory damages. The hosting provision also requires an actual infringement of a work, this time recognized by a court decision in order to engage the liability of a hosting provider. Our famous UGC exception is very much premised on the use of a single work or very few works by a single individual for whom the copyright owner will be claiming that the exception does not apply. Within the statutory damages provisions, several subsections seriously limit the interest of a copyright owner to avail himself of this mechanism. One of them even impacts other copyright owners who would have a similar right of action. Of course, our notice and notice provisions are again premised on the issuance of a notice to a single infringer by one copyright owner.

The functional objectives of these provisions are completely at odds with the actual environment in which they are meant to operate. Faced with mass uses of works, collective management started in the 19th century precisely because winning a case against a single user was perceived as a coup d'épée dans l'eau. The Internet corresponds to a much wider phenomenon of mass use, yet our Copyright Act has retreated to the individual enforcement model. This statutory approach is totally illogical and severely undermines the credibility of any copyright policy aimed at the Internet phenomenon.

As you may have seen, the texts I refer to are fairly wordy, and many are based on conditions that are stacked against copyright owners. Just imagine how long it may take to get a judgment before using section 31.1, or how difficult it is for a copyright owner to claim that the dissemination of a new work actually has “a substantial adverse effect, financial or otherwise, on the exploitation or potential exploitation” of the work”. These provisions rely on unrealistic conditions that can only lead to abuses by their beneficiaries.

The direction that our Copyright Act has taken in 2012 goes against the very object that it was supposed to harness. The response to mass uses can only be mass management—that is, collective management—in a manner that must match the breadth of the phenomenon. The demise of the private copying regime in the 2012 amendments, by the deliberate decision not to modernize it, was in line with this misguided approach of individual enforcement of copyright on the Internet.

(1555)

[Translation]

Given the time available, I'm not able to raise the points that should logically accompany these comments, but you may want to use the period for questions to get more details. I would be pleased to provide you with that information.

Thank you for your attention.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

We're going to move to, finally, the Intellectual Property Institute of Canada.

Mr. Tarantino.

Mr. Bob Tarantino (Chair, Copyright Policy Committee, Intellectual Property Institute of Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My name is Bob Tarantino. I'm here with Catherine Lovrics. We are here in our capacities as former chair and current chair, respectively, of the Intellectual Property Institute of Canada's copyright policy committee. We are speaking in those capacities and not on behalf of the law firms with which we are associated, or on behalf of any of our respective clients.

We'd like to thank you for inviting IPIC to present to you our committee's recommendations with respect to a statutory review of the act.

IPIC is the Canadian professional association of patent agents, trademark agents and lawyers practising in intellectual property law. IPIC represents the views of Canadian IP professionals, and in our submissions to the committee we strove to represent the diversity of views among copyright law practitioners in as balanced a manner as possible.

You have our committee's written submissions, so in this speech I will be highlighting only a few of the recommendations contained therein. That being said, I'd like to provide a framing device for our comments, which I think is important for this committee to bear in mind as it deliberates, and that is the need for evidence-based policy-making. The preamble to the 2012 Copyright Modernization Act described one of the purposes of its amendments as promoting “culture and innovation, competition and investment in the Canadian economy”.

However, the extent to which any of those desired goals have been achieved because of changes to the act in 2012 remains unknown. There is little to no publicly available empirical data about the effects of copyright reform. We recommend that work commence now in anticipation of the next mandated review of the act to ensure that copyright reform proceeds in a manner informed by rigorous, transparent and valid data about the results, if any, which copyright reform has already achieved. Parliament should identify what would constitute success in copyright reform, mandate funding to enable the collection of data that speak to those identified criteria for success and ensure that the data is publicly accessible.

As noted in our written submission, we think some easy and granular fixes can be made to the act that will facilitate copyright transactions. Those changes include allowing for the assignment of copyright in future works and clarifying the rights of joint owners. The remainder of my comments will highlight four bigger picture recommendations, each of which should be implemented in a way that respects the rights and interests of copyright authors, owners, intermediaries, users and the broader public.

On data and databases, it is now trite to say that increasing commercial value is attributed to data and databases. However, the current legal basis for according copyright protection to them remains uncertain. Consideration should be given to amendments that effect a balance between the significant investments made in creating databases and avoiding inadvertently creating monopolies on the individual facts contained within those databases or deterring competition in fact-driven marketplaces. One approach to this issue that we flag for your attention is the European Union's sui generis form of protection for databases.

Regarding artificial intelligence and data mining, continuing with the theme of uncertainty, the interface between copyright and artificial intelligence remains murky. The development of machine learning and natural language processing often relies on large amounts of data to train AI systems, the process referred to as data mining. Those techniques generally require copying copyright-protected works, and can also require access to large datasets that may be protected by copyright.

We recommend that the committee consider text and data access and mining requirements in the context of AI. In particular, we refer you to amendments enacted in the United Kingdom that permit copying for the purposes of computational analysis.

Relatedly, whether works created using AI are accorded copyright protection is ambiguous, given copyright's originality requirement and the need for human authorship. A possible solution is providing copyright protection to works created without a human author in certain circumstances. Again, we refer you to provisions contained in the copyright legislation of the United Kingdom and to the approach the Canadian Copyright Act takes in respect to makers of sound recordings.

One the $1.25-million tariff exemption for radio broadcasters, the first $1.25 million of advertising revenue earned by commercial broadcasters is exempt from Copyright Board-approved tariffs in respect of performer's performances and sound recordings, other than a nominal $100 payment. In other words, of the first $1.25 million of advertising revenue earned by a commercial broadcaster, only $100 is paid to performers and sound recording owners. By contrast, songwriters and music publishers collect payments from every dollar earned by the broadcaster. The exemption is an unnecessary subsidy for broadcasters at the expense of performers and sound recording owners and should be removed.

Regarding injunctive relief against intermediaries, Internet intermediaries that facilitate access to infringing materials are best placed to reduce the harm caused by unauthorized online distribution of copyright-protected works. This principle is reflected in the EU copyright directive and has provided the foundation for copyright owners to obtain injunctive relief against intermediaries whose services are used to infringe copyright. The act should be amended to expressly allow copyright owners to obtain injunctions such as site blocking and de-indexing orders against intermediaries.

(1600)



The act should be amended to expressly allow copyright owners to obtain injunctions such as site blocking and de-indexing orders against intermediaries. This recommendation is supported by a broad range of Canadian stakeholders, including ISPs. Moreover, more than a decade of experience in over 40 countries demonstrates that site blocking is a significant, proven and effective tool to help reduce access to infringing online materials.

I'd like to thank you again for inviting IPIC to present you with our comments today.

We're happy to answer any questions you may have about our submission.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to jump right into questions, starting with Mr. David Graham.

You have seven minutes, sir.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I have enough questions to go around. It might be a bit of a game of whack-a-mole here.

We talked a bit about the need to go to basically collective enforcement rather than individual enforcement of copyright because it's no longer manageable. How can collective copyright enforcement work without just empowering larger users and owners to trample on users and small producers?

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

The difficulty I see behind your question is that people tend to see the collective administration of copyright as a big business issue. People tend to forget that behind the CMOs, collective management organizations, or the collectives, there are actual individuals. The collective management of rights for these people is actually the only solution for them to make sure that they receive some sort of remuneration in this kind of mass environment, and indeed they require getting together in order to fight off GAFA. This is the elephant in the room. We know that so much money is being siphoned off the country because not enough people who are involved in the business of making all these works available to the public are paying their fair share of this kind of material.

This kind of management is possible. There are enough safeguards in the act, and even in the Competition Act, to ensure that this is not being abused.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Talking about abuse, we certainly see the abuse. Google and Facebook were here a couple of weeks ago. They admitted they only look at larger copyright holders when they're doing their enforcement systems. They admit they don't care about Canadian exemptions under fair dealing. The abuse is already there.

I don't see how removing protections for individuals is going to improve that.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

I'm not saying that we should remove protections from individuals. I'm just saying that when all is looked at globally, everybody should be paying a fair share for the use of the works. I have trouble imagining that people who are willing to pay $500 and more for an iPhone would find it damaging to pay an extra.... I certainly don't want to be bound by whatever number we may imagine. We'd say that this is going to prevent them from having free expression or from having access to the work. Even if, on the price of an iPhone or other equipment, extra money were not added, given the profit margin on these products, this is something that will certainly not put these companies into bankruptcy.

I see the advent of a better functioning collective management system as something that actually protects the individuals.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't have a lot of time so I'll move on.

Mr. Geist, I mentioned Facebook and Google's testimony a minute ago where they identified that they don't make any effort to enforce fair dealing. You are familiar with that. Do you have any comments or thoughts on that from your sense or background?

Dr. Michael Geist:

Yes, it's been a significant source of frustration. In fact, I had a personal experience with my daughter, who created a video after she participated in a program called March of the Living, where she went to concentration camps in Europe and then on to Israel. As part of the Ottawa community, she interviewed all the various participants who were alongside her, created a video that was going to be displayed here to 500 people. There was some background music along with the interviews. They posted it to YouTube, and on the day this was to be shown the sound was entirely muted because the content ID system had identified this particular soundtrack.

They were able to fix that, but if that isn't a classic example of what non-commercial, user-generated content is supposed to protect, I'm not sure what is. The fact that Google hasn't tried to ensure that the UGC provision that Professor Gendreau mentioned, which, as this example illustrates, has tremendous freedom of expression potential for lots of Canadians, is for me not just disappointing but a real problem.

(1605)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Chisick, I have a question for you too.

You talked about 22% of the value for broadcasters' backup copies. If they're actual backup copies, where is the problem?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

The problem is this. The Copyright Board conducted an overall valuation of all of the copies used by radio broadcasters. It determined that if it were forced to allocate value among the different types of copies, some value would go to backup copies, some value would go to main automation system copies and so on and so forth, until you get to 100%.

The Copyright Board found that 22% of that value was allocable to backup copies. In other words, radio stations derive commercial value from the copies they make and 22% of that is allocable to backup copies. There is therefore significant commercial value to those backup copies, yet the Copyright Board felt compelled, under the expanded backup copies exception, to remove that value from the royalties that are paid to rights holders.

Now, if that was a correct interpretation of the backup copies exception, then the Copyright Board may have had no choice but to do what it did. My point is simply that the intention of these exceptions must not be to exempt large commercial interests from paying royalties for copies from which they themselves derive significant commercial value. That's an example to me of a system of exemptions that's out of whack in the grand scheme of balance between the interests of rights holders, users and the public interest.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have only a half a minute left here, but I'm just trying to understand the issue, because you've brought up this major point about the money that they're not spending on.... If they use the main copy or the backup copy to broadcast something, what's the difference?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I'm sorry. I didn't understand your question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We've always had the right to format shifting. If I buy something that I convert to the computer and I broadcast it, that's the backup copy, and if you add a monetary value.... This all doesn't connect very well to me.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I understand the question.

This requires a review of 20 years of Copyright Board radio broadcasting tariffs, which obviously we don't have time for here, but the point of the matter is that, until 2016, radio broadcasters paid a certain amount for all of the copies they made. It was only in 2016, after the 2012 amendments had come into force, that the Copyright Board felt that it had to go through the exercise of slicing and dicing those copies and determining what value was allocable to which. It was then that the 22% exemption was instituted.

Your point is a valid one, because nothing had changed. The approach that radio stations take to copying music hadn't changed. The value that they derived from the copies hadn't changed. The only thing that had changed was the introduction of an exception that the Copyright Board believed needed to lead inexorably to a royalty reduction.

That's what I am reacting to, and that's what I'm suggesting to the committee ought to be re-examined.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My time is up. Thanks.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Albas, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to thank all of our witnesses for their testimony here today.

In recent weeks we've been hearing from various witnesses favouring a change in approach in how we do copyright and moving to a more American-style fair use model. I would like to survey the group here.

What are the benefits of looking at American-style fair use? What should we take from that and what should we be very wary of?

That's for any of the panellists.

Dr. Michael Geist:

I'll start by reiterating why I think it's a good idea, although I would argue not to jump in with the U.S. fair use provision but rather to use, as I mentioned, the “such as” approach and turn the current fair dealing purposes into a group of illustrative purposes rather than an exhaustive list.

I think that both provides the benefits of being able to rely on our existing jurisprudence, as it represents an evolution of where we're at rather than starting from scratch, and makes it a far more technologically neutral approach. Rather than every five years having people coming up and saying that you need to deal with AI or with some other new issue that pops up, that kind of provision has the ability to adapt as time goes by. We're seeing many countries move in that direction.

I would lastly note that in what's critical as part of this, whether you call it fair dealing or fair use, what's important is whether or not it's fair. The analysis about whether or not it is fair remains unchanged, whether it's an illustrative group or an exhaustive group. That's what matters: to take a look at what's being copied and assess whether it's fair. The purpose is really just a very small part of that overall puzzle, yet by limiting the list we then lock ourselves into a particular point in time and aren't able to adapt as easily as technology changes.

(1610)

Mr. Casey Chisick:

If I may, I agree with Professor Geist that the most important aspect of the fair dealing analysis by far is fairness, but there's a reason that Canada is one of the vast majority of countries in the world that does maintain a fair dealing system. There are really only, last I checked, three or four jurisdictions in the world—the U.S., obviously, Israel and the Philippines—that have a fair use system.

Most of the world subscribes to fair dealing, and there is a reason why. The reason is that governments want to reserve for themselves the ability from time to time to assess what sorts of views in the grand scheme of things are eligible for a fair dealing type of exception, and if we just simply throw the categories open to everything such as X, Y and Z, the predictability of that system becomes far less, and it becomes far more difficult for stakeholders and the copyright system to order their affairs. It becomes more difficult to know what will be considered fair dealing or what's eligible to be considered fair dealing and to plan accordingly.

Overall, Canada has exhibited a fair sensitivity to these issues. The fair dealing categories, obviously, were expanded in 2012 and may well be expanded again in the future when the government sees fit, but I think that to expand it to the entire realm of potential dealings runs the risk of going too far.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

I am against the idea of having a fair use exception for several reasons.

First of all, I think that in reality what we have already is very close to the U.S. system. We have purposes that are extremely similar to the fair use purposes. We have criteria that are paraphrases of the fair use criteria, and I really don't think that there is that much of a difference in terms of what the situation is doing. What is happening, though, is that, for the examples we have, it's not just “such as”. I see a very dangerous slope. “Such as” does not mean anything that is fair. “Such as” should mean that we keep within the range of what is already enumerated as possible topics, which is what we already have with our fair dealing exception.

Second, many of these fair use exceptions in the United States have led to results that are extremely difficult to reconcile with a fair use system. They are very criticized, and lastly, I would say that, in order for a fair use system to work in the magnitude that people would want it to work, you would need an extremely litigious society. We are about a 10th of the size of the U.S. We don't have the same kind of court litigation attitude as in the U.S., and I think that this is an important factor in order not to create uncertainties.

Thank you.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Mr. Chair, I'd like to share the rest of my time with Mr. Lloyd, if that's all right.

The Chair:

You have two minutes left.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses today.

I have a couple of quick questions for Mr. Chisick. I wish all of you had been here earlier in the study. You could have helped us frame the debate a little more clearly.

One of your points was about closing the loophole about intermediaries. Could you expand on that and give us some real-life examples to help illustrate what you mean?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

Obviously, as a lawyer in private practice, I have to be careful about the examples I give, because many of them come from the real lives of my clients and the companies they deal with from day to day.

What I can tell you is that it has been my experience that certain services—and I gave a couple of examples, both services that are engaged in cloud storage with a twist, helping users to organize their cloud lockers in a way that facilitates quicker access to various types of content and potentially by others than just the locker owner, as well as services that basically operate as content aggregators by a different name—are very quick to try to rely on the hosting exception or the ISP exception, the communications exception, as currently worded to say, “Sure, somebody else might have to pay royalties, but we don't have to pay royalties because our use is exempt. So if it's all the same to you, we just won't”.

(1615)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

They're going further than just being a dumb pipe. They're facilitating.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

They are. That's right. They are, so my view is that the exception needs to be adjusted, not repealed but adjusted, to make very clear that any service that plays an active role in the communication of works or other subject matter that other people store within the digital memory doesn't qualify for the exception.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I will come back to you because I do have another question.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

Okay.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I just wanted to get a quick question to Mr. Geist.

Am I out? Okay. Never mind.

The Chair:

Sorry, but I'm glad you knew those terms that you were using.

We're going to move to Mr. Masse.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

The USMCA changes things in a couple of parameters. How does it change your presentations here?

I was just in Washington and there's no clear path for this to get passed. We could be back to the original NAFTA, and if that goes away then we're back to the original free trade, but that requires Trump to do a six-month exit and notification, and there's debate about whether or not that's on the presidential side or whether it's Congress and there will be lawyers involved and so forth. We're at a point now where we have a potential deal in place. Vegas is making the odds about whether it's going to pass or not.

Maybe we can go around the table here in terms of how you think it affects your presentations here and our review. We're going to have to report back with it basically being...and there are many with the opinion that Congress won't accept it because they don't have enough concessions from Canada.

I put that out there because it's something that changed during the process of our discussions from the beginning of this study to where we are right now, and again where we'll have to give advice to the minister.

We can start on the left side here and move to the right.

Ms. Catherine Lovrics (Vice-Chair, Copyright Policy Committee, Intellectual Property Institute of Canada):

Among our committee there was no consensus with respect to term extension, so it wouldn't have been an issue that we addressed as part of our submission.

But as a result of term extension clearly being covered in USMCA we touched upon reversionary rights, because I think if copyright term is extended it's incumbent upon the government to also consider reversionary rights within that context. This is because at present you are effectively adding those 20 years if the first owner of copyright would have been the author and the author had assigned rights, and reversionary rights under the current regime with everything except for collective works, you would be extending copyright for those who have the reversionary interest and not for the current copyright owners. That was the way that IPIC submissions were impacted.

Mr. Brian Masse:

You're pretty well split within an organization about the benefits and detractions from—

Ms. Catherine Lovrics:

For term extension, I think it's a very contentious issue and there was no consensus among our committee.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Would it be fair to say, though, it has significant consequences for opinions on both sides? It's not a minor thing. It's a significant one.

Ms. Catherine Lovrics:

I think most definitely. I think there are both very strong advocates for term extension who look to international rights as being one justification for the reason to extend term, and I think there are those who view extending the term as limiting the public domain in Canada in a way that's not appropriate. Again, there's no consensus.

With USMCA proposing it, reversionary rights should be looked at.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

Mr. Chisick.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I would agree with that. I mentioned reversionary rights in my presentation, and I don't want to be understood as necessarily suggesting that the way to deal with reversionary rights is to eliminate reversion from the copyright altogether. That's one possible solution, maybe a good solution. There are also other solutions, and certainly with the extension of the term of copyright, which I do think is a good idea, and I've been on the record saying that for some time, how you deal with copyright over that extended term is certainly an issue.

My main point, and it remains regardless of whether the term is life plus 50 or life plus 70, is where reversion is concerned we need to look at it in a way that's less disruptive to the commercial exploitation of copyright. I think the point remains either way.

(1620)

Mr. Brian Masse:

If it was not to be extended, would that change your position on other matters or is it isolated to basically the 50 and 70?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I don't think, sitting here right now—maybe I'll come up with something more intelligent when I'm done—that anything particularly turns on 50 versus 70 in my view.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

Mr. Geist.

Dr. Michael Geist:

I think there were three different types of rules within this agreement related to copyright. There are those provisions that, quite frankly, we already caved on under U.S. pressure back in 2012—

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes.

Dr. Michael Geist:

—so our anti-circumvention rules are consistent with the USMCA, but only because there was enormous U.S. pressure leading up to the 2012 reforms, and in fact, we are now more restrictive than the United States, which creates disadvantages for us.

Then there's the one area, the notice-and-notice rules, that the government clearly prioritized and took a stand on to ensure the Canadian rules could continue to exist.

The term extension has an enormous impact, and quite frankly, it's obvious that the government recognized that. It's no coincidence that when we moved from the TPP to the CPTPP, one of the key provisions that was suspended was the term extension. Economist after economist makes it very clear that it doesn't lead to any new creativity. Nobody woke up this morning thinking about writing the great Canadian novel and decided to instead sleep in, because their heirs get 50 years' worth of protection right now rather than 70 years.

For all of the other work that's already been created, that gift of an additional 20 years—quite literally locking down the public domain in Canada for an additional 20 years—comes at an enormous cost, particularly at a time when we move more and more to digital. The ability to use those works in digital ways for dissemination, for education, for new kinds of creativity will now quite literally be lost for a generation.

If there's a recommendation to come out of this committee, it would be, number one, recognize that this is a dramatic shift. When groups come in saying, “Here are all the things we want as rights holders”, they just won the lottery with the USMCA. It's a massive shift in terms of where the balance is at.

Second, the committee ought to recommend that we explore how we can best implement this to limit the damage. It isn't something we wanted. It's something we were forced into. Is there any flexibility in how we ultimately implement this that could lessen some of the harm?

Mr. Brian Masse:

Ms. Gendreau.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

I'm indifferent to whether it's 50 years or 70 years, for two reasons.

I just finished a book last month that was about literary social life in France in the 19th century. They had salons where people would go, and artists and politicians would mix. In that book there were lists of the artists and the writers who showed up there, and three-quarters of them were names we don't know.

In terms of copyright term protection, I think very few works manage to be relevant 50 years—or even less so—70 years after the death of the author. I don't know why we should be having so much difficulty over an issue that is important for only a minority of authors. That is one reason.

Second, if we are worried about the copyright term, then I think perhaps we should worry about that because of the fact that copyright covers computer programs. Do you realize that because of their nature, there is never a public domain for copyright programs, given the life of copyright programs? This is an industry that's getting absolutely no public domain.

Lastly, I would say it is possible to have a commercial life beyond term, and I think this is right. As to whether that term is 50 or 70 years, as I said, I'm indifferent. I would never walk outside or march for that one way or another, but 70 years is the term that we have for our major G7 partners; therefore, being a member of the G7 comes with a price, and the extra 20 years is a minority issue.

Mr. Brian Masse:

We all know the G7 plays with rules.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

That's interesting, though. That question gives the whole spectrum on it.

Thank you very much to the witnesses.

The Chair:

That's why we left them to the end.

We're going to jump to Mr. Longfield.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I'm going to share a couple of minutes with Mr. Lametti.

I'd like to start with the Intellectual Property Institute of Canada. First of all, thank you for helping us through the study that we had on intellectual property. It was good to see the implementation of some of the ideas we discussed.

I'm thinking of the interaction between the Intellectual Property Institute and the Copyright Board or collectives. How much engagement do you have in terms of guiding artists towards protecting their works, finding the right path forward for them?

I know you do that in other ways with intellectual property, but what about...?

(1625)

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I'm not sure I'll be able to answer the question with respect to the institutional work that IPIC does, although it maintains relationships, obviously, with those bodies.

As individual advisers, that's a significant part of our day-to-day function, to counsel our clients in terms of how best they can realize the value of the works they've created and exploit those in the marketplace.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

One of the shortfalls that we found in our previous study was with regard to the transparency—not purposely being non-transparent, but just the fact that people didn't know where to go for solutions or to protect themselves.

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

Right. I think one thing that we have to contend with as advisers, and that you have to contend with as legislators, is the fact that the copyright system is incredibly complex. It's incredibly opaque for non-experts. I think a guiding principle that everybody would be on board with would be an effort to make the Copyright Act—and the copyright system, more generally—a little more user-friendly.

There are a number of items that we've canvassed in this discussion already, such as reversionary interest, that add additional complexity to the operation of the act and that, I think, should be assessed with an eye towards making it something that you don't need to engage a lawyer for and pay x number of hundreds of dollars an hour in order to navigate.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

In fact, one of the Google representatives said that it is a “complicated and opaque web of music licensing agreements” that people face.

Now we're just talking about guiding principles. We're very late in the study. When we were working on developing an economic development program for the city of Guelph, we looked at guiding principles. When we looked at our community energy initiative, we looked at guiding principles.

In terms of our act and our study, how can we get some of these guiding principles put up at the front of our study? Do you have other guiding principles that we should look towards?

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I think, broadly speaking, you can identify a handful of guiding principles, drawn from various theoretical approaches, to justify why copyright exists. Among those are providing an incentive for the creation and dissemination of works by ensuring that authors get rewarded. However, I think it's absolutely critical to maintain or to keep in mind that this principle has to be balanced against a broader communal and cultural interest in ensuring the free flow of ideas and cultural expressive activity.

The challenge that you face, of course, is finding a way to calibrate all of the various interests and various mechanisms that you're putting at play here to achieve those quite disparate functions. There's a tension at play there. It's an ongoing tension.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Yes.

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I don't think that there is a resolution to it necessarily, but I think that it can be implemented and then assessed on an ongoing basis to identify where there have been shortfalls, overreaches and under-compensation.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

In the minute that I have left.... Ms. Gendreau, you mentioned the collectives. I am very interested in how collectives are managed or not managed, and the transparency of collectives. Were you leading towards discussing that? If so, maybe you can put that out here.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

Yes, I'd be happy to talk about that.

I understand that people may have concerns about the way that collectives are run. I think the fact that some collectives will no longer be obliged to go before the board will perhaps raise even further concerns.

However, I know that there are rules, for instance, in the European Union that look at the internal management of collective societies. I would think that such rules, even though they are probably perceived by collectives as annoying, should actually be embraced precisely because they would give greater legitimacy to their work. I would see such rules as legitimacy enhancers rather than as obstacles to working.

(1630)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

Over to you, Mr. Lametti.

Mr. David Lametti:

Thank you.

I think my challenge is more that of addressing people by their last names when I've known them for 20 years.

Mr. Tarantino, copying for the purposes of computational analysis is what you potentially suggested as an AI and data mining exception. Do you think that gets us there? Do we need to go with “such as”, or—as someone else suggested a couple of weeks ago—do we make an exception for making incidental copies apply to informational analysis? Give me your thoughts on that.

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I'd have to defer to the views of our committee. It's not a point that we specifically canvass them on, beyond what you find in our submission, which is that the U.K. approach is something to consider. What I would suggest is taking it back to our framing device. Let's examine what the result has been in the United Kingdom of implementing their exception for computational analysis.

Mr. David Lametti:

Mr. Chisick, do you want to jump in on that?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

If what you're referring to is temporary copying for technological processes, exception 30.71, that's a good example of an exception that is framed really broadly in a way that is prone to misunderstanding or abuse.

An example is broadcasters arguing that all of broadcasting, from the ingestion of content until the public performance of the work, is one technological process and, therefore, all copies need to be exempt. It may be that, properly framed, an exception like that is an appropriate mechanism to deal with data mining and artificial intelligence. We have to be very careful to frame these exceptions in such a way that really targets them toward the intended purpose and doesn't leave them prone to exploitation in other senses.

Mr. David Lametti:

I'll turn to Mr. Geist, if we have time.

The Chair:

Please answer very briefly.

Dr. Michael Geist:

As I've mentioned, my preference would be for a broad-based “such as” approach. I do think we need something. Even if we do have it, “such as” should include informational analysis.

I saw the Prime Minister on Friday speaking about the importance of AI. Quite frankly, I don't think the U.K. provision goes far enough. Almost all the data we get comes by way of contract. The ability to, in effect, contract out of an informational analysis exception represents a significant problem. We need to ensure that where you acquire those works, you have the ability.... We're not talking about republishing or commercializing these works. We're talking about using them for informational analysis purposes. You shouldn't have to negotiate those out by way of contract. It should be a policy clearly articulated in the law.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Lloyd, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I'll finish where I started.

The Chair:

Actually, you have five minutes. Sorry.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Okay. That changes everything.

Mr. Geist, there seem to be a lot of negatives to the collective model. If there weren't a collective model, it seems there would need to be a collective model because the transaction costs of an individual artist or writer are so high that they would need to band together. Is there any alternative to the collective model in your academics that you could propose as an idea?

Dr. Michael Geist:

The market is providing an alternative right now. I mentioned the 1.4 million licensed e-books that the University of Ottawa has. Those are not acquired through any collective. They're acquired through any number of different publishers or other aggregators. In fact, in many instances we will license the same book on multiple occasions, sometimes in perpetuity, because the rights holder has made it available for this basket of books and for that basket of books and for another basket of books. In fact, authors are doing it all the time, or publishers are doing it all the time right now.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

It does seem very appealing. I like that sort of free market movement idea, but from what we're hearing from the authors who have spoken to us, it doesn't seem.... I'll come back to you.

Mr. Chisick, could you comment on that? Is that a good enough alternative for an author, licensing it through e-books as a replacement for collectives?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

From what I'm seeing from authors who are struggling with developments in the market, it may not be a complete solution. There is no question that transactional licensing, particularly in the book publishing area, has made strides over the last decade or so. It doesn't seem to be capturing the full value of all the works that are in use, though. It's something that, arguably, needs to exist alongside a collective licensing model that can pick up the residue.

In other areas of licensing, market-based solutions haven't been effective yet at all—for example, in music, where the entire viability of an author's or an artist's career depends on the ability to collect millions and millions of micro-payments, fractions of pennies.

(1635)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

What about authors defending their work from copyright infringement? For the average authors, is it within the realm of their financial resources to pursue that litigation without a collective licensing model? Is that something they could do?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

No, it isn't. It's almost impossible for all but the most successful artists or frankly, the most successful rights holders, by which I mean publishers and others—the 1% or very close to it—to actually pursue remedies for copyright infringement. Ironically, that's one of the reasons, in the previous round of copyright reform in 1997, that attempts were made through policy to encourage artists and authors to pursue collective management.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I do want to give Mr. Geist a chance to rebut because it would only be fair, I think.

Dr. Michael Geist:

I appreciate that. Thank you.

It's not that I'm saying that no collectives ought to exist. I think there is a role for them. I'm saying that what we have seen, especially in the academic publishing market, is that they have been replaced, in effect, by alternatives. That is the free market at work. Together with some students, I did studies looking at major Canadian publishers, including a number that came before you, and virtually everything they were making available under licence is what our universities have been licensing.

When you get certain authors saying, “I'm getting less from Access Copyright, why is that?”, we need to recognize that a chunk of Access Copyright's revenues go outside the country, a chunk go towards administration, and then a big chunk goes to what they call a payback system, which is for a repertoire. It doesn't have anything to do with use at all. It simply has to do with the repertoire. That repertoire excludes any works that are more than 20 years old and excludes all digital works.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

What about defending people, like Mr. Chisick was talking about? It's outside the realm of 99% of authors to defend themselves, if their works are being infringed in copyright. What's your replacement for that? What's the alternative?

Dr. Michael Geist:

In many instances, where those works are being licensed, the publishers do have the wherewithal to take action, if need be. However, the notion that somehow we need collective management, largely to sue educational institutions, strikes me as a bit wrong.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Well, to protect....

Dr. Michael Geist:

With all respect, I don't think anybody is credibly making the case that educational institutions are out there trying to infringe copyright. In fact, we see some educational institutions, even in Quebec, that have a collective management licence with Copibec and are still engaged in additional transactional licences because they need to go ahead and pay them. The bad guys here or the infringers, so to speak, are not the educational institutions.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Who are they?

Dr. Michael Geist:

I'm not convinced that there are major infringers in the area of book publishing.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

To be clear, the point that I made about licensing and collective management existing alongside one another is that it's not primarily for the purpose of enforcement. I agree with Professor Geist. The purpose is to make enforcement unnecessary, by making sure that all of the uses that are capable of being licensed and that are appropriate to license are licensed in practice.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

May I also add that one aspect that is not often mentioned, I believe, is that with all these new licences that publishers are giving to universities, perhaps one of the sources of discontent is that I'm not sure the money trickles down to the authors who sign up with the publishers. You have licences between publishers and universities or any kind of group and, yes, you look at the terms. Again, licensing for having your book on the shelf in the library is different from licensing for having the book used in a classroom, but put that aside. I'm not sure the current structure actually helps the authors, who may not necessarily see the money for all these licences.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. It's nice to see all the heads go up and down at the same time.

Ms. Caesar-Chavannes, you have five minutes.

(1640)

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I want to thank all the witnesses. I have five minutes, so I'm going to try to ask as many questions as possible.

Mr. Chisick, at the opening of your statement, you said that you agreed with the views from many of the witnesses who came ahead of us. In your opinion, what didn't you agree with, as we look to consider some of the recommendations that we are going to put forward?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

That's a great question. I'm certainly concerned. I disagree with the view that Dr. Geist has expressed about term extension, for example. The example he gave about the author waking up and deciding not to write because of a 50-year term post-mortem rather than 70 years may be true, but the term of copyright is highly relevant to the decision of the publisher as to whether to invest and how much to invest in the publication and promotion of that work.

It may or may not be relevant to the writer—although I'm sure there are writers who do wake up wondering when they're going to have to get a different job—but from the commercial aspect of things, that's becoming more and more difficult every day, considering the level of investment in the dissemination of creativity, which is also a critical part of the copyright system. In my view, the extension of term from life plus 50 to life plus 70 is something that's long overdue.

Some before the committee have been suggesting that copyright in an audiovisual work ought to go to the writer or the director or some combination thereof. I disagree with that for similar reasons. It all has to do with the practical workings of the copyright system and how these ideas would work out in practice. As a lawyer in private practice dealing with all sorts of different copyright stakeholders, my primary concern is not to introduce aspects of the system that will get in the way of or perpetuate barriers to successful exploitation of commercial works. It's so important now in the digital era to make sure that there's less friction, not more.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Thank you very much.

Dr. Geist, you talked about the windfall that would be created with the life plus 70. How do you recalibrate the windfall that would be created by the USMCA? More specifically, can it be recalibrated within the confines of the act?

Dr. Michael Geist:

It's a great question. There are really two aspects.

First, is there an implementation that would meet the requirements that we have within the act that would lessen some of the harm? When Mr. Chisick says it's about a company making a decision about whether or not to invest in a book, perhaps that's fine for any books that start getting written once we have term today, but this will capture all sorts of works that haven't entered into the public domain yet. They are now going to have that additional 20 years where they already made a decision and now get that windfall.

We ought to consider if there is the possibility of putting in some sort of registration requirement for the additional 20 years. As Ms. Gendreau noted, there are a small number of works that might have economic value. Those people will go ahead and register those for that extra 20 years, because they see value. The vast majority of other works would fall into the public domain.

Moreover, when we're thinking about broader reforms and getting into that balance, recognize that the scale has already been tipped. I think that has to have an impact on the kind of recommendations and, ultimately, reforms that we have, if one of our biggest reforms has already been decided for us.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

If each of you were to make one recommendation that we should consider as part of the review, what would it be?

I'll let you start.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

The one recommendation I would make would be to make sure that digital businesses—wherever they are—that are actively making business decisions on the basis of works that are protected by copyright should become liable for some payment. Yes, if they are totally passive then they are totally passive, but I think that by now, the experience we have is that a lot of people who are claiming to be passive are not, and are therefore avoiding liability. That would be my greatest concern.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can I go over to...? No?

It's the same question. Anybody who's ready for it, go ahead.

Dr. Michael Geist:

Sure, I'll jump in.

I would say we need to ensure that the Copyright Act can continue to adjust to technological change. The way we best do that is by ensuring we have flexibility in fair dealing—that's the “such as”—and ensuring that fair dealing works both in the analogue and digital worlds. That means ensuring that there's an exception in digital lock anti-circumvention rules for fair dealing.

(1645)

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I think that introducing a provision in the Copyright Act for site blocking and de-indexing injunctions is a critical piece. I say that because so much potentially legitimate exploitation is still being diverted to offshore sites that escape the scrutiny of Canadian courts. I don't know why anybody would argue that's a good thing. Putting a balanced system in place in the Copyright Act that deals with the concerns Dr. Geist highlighted about over-blocking and freedom of expression and so on, while still making sure that Canadians can't accomplish indirectly what they can't do directly, strikes me as a very positive development in the act.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Can you pick one recommendation that you would make?

Ms. Catherine Lovrics:

We'll put in a recommendation that really is a practitioner's problem. There are some technical fixes to the act that I think would allow for a great deal of certainty, and those may not be issues that were raised generally before this committee.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

That's okay.

Ms. Catherine Lovrics:

The first relates to clarifying the rights of joint authors and joint owners under the Copyright Act. Currently, under the Copyright Act, absent an agreement, what are the rights of joint owners of a copyrighted work? Can they exploit a work? Do they need the permission of another joint owner? I think that's a problem of which we're acutely aware as practitioners, and of which our client may not be.

The other is rights in commissioned works and in future works. Particularly with respect to future works, I think that oftentimes agreements will cover a future assignment. Technically, whether or not those are valid under the act is a live question. I will put those forward on behalf of IPIC.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Thank you. I think I'm over time, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Just a wee bit. Thank you very much.

It's back to you, Mr. Lloyd.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

My apologies to the other witnesses. I'm not picking on you enough, but I'll go with Mr. Chisick.

I had some questions about the reversionary right. A Canadian artist appeared before the heritage committee to talk about his concerns with the reversionary right, and I was wondering if you could further comment on what the replacement is and what the impact of it is.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I assume you're talking about Bryan Adams—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Yes.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

—and his proposal to adopt an American-style termination regime.

That's one of the possible approaches. What the American-style termination regime has to commend it over the current system that we have in Canada is that at least it requires some positive act by the artist to reclaim those rights. There's a window within which the rights can be claimed. Notice needs to be given, and it allows people to order their affairs accordingly. I think that the timing of Mr. Adams' submission was off. I think that it would be ill conceived to allow for termination after a 35-year period, the way it is in the United States. I think that's too short, for a variety of reasons, including reasons related to incentives to invest, but that's one approach that could be looked at.

Another approach to be looked at is the approach that's been taken almost everywhere else in the world, which is to eliminate reversion entirely and leave it to the market to deal with those longer-term interests in copyright. I don't think it's any coincidence that in literally every other jurisdiction in the world where reversion once existed—including in the United Kingdom, where it was invented—it has either been repealed or amended so that it can be dealt with by contract during the lifetime of the author. Canada is the only remaining jurisdiction, as far as I know, where that's no longer the case. That, too, should tell us something.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Mr. Geist, maybe you could comment on that briefly. You were talking about repealing or amending Crown copyright provisions. I was hoping that you could elaborate on the application of Crown copyright. It's something that has been talked about at committee but never really fully so. Then, talk about the impact of how we can improve things by possibly getting rid of it.

Dr. Michael Geist:

Sure. I'll touch on Crown copyright in just a second.

I did want to pick up on this reversion issue. It does seem to me that the U.S. is a market where there's quite a lot of investment taking place in this sector, without concern about the way their system has worked, which has given rights back to the author.

You asked earlier how individual creators handle enforcement issues, and the notion that we should take an approach that says, “You ought to handle everything. You ought to be able to negotiate every single right with large record companies or large publishers,” leaves them without much power.

If there's consistency between Professor Gendreau's comments about part of the problem being the agreement between authors and publishers as we move into the digital world and your question about what Bryan Adams is doing, it's that, in a sense, we're looking in the wrong place. Much of the problem exists between creators and the intermediaries that help facilitate the creation and bring those products to market—the publishers, the record labels and the like—where there is a significant power imbalance and these are attempts to try to remedy that.

With respect to Crown copyright, I served on the board of CanLII, the Canadian Legal Information Institute, for many years, and what we found there was that the challenge of taking legal materials—court decisions and other government documents—represented a huge problem. In fact, there were some discussions regarding that earlier today on Twitter, where people were talking specifically about the challenge that aggregators funded by lawyers across the country face in trying to ensure that the public has free and open access to the law. This represents a really significant problem. This is typified by a Crown copyright approach where the default is that the government holds it, so you have to clear the rights. You can't even try to build on and commercialize some of the works that the government may make available.

(1650)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Are there any legitimate reasons to have a Crown copyright? It seems there could be some good reasons why it should be kept.

Dr. Michael Geist:

My colleague Elizabeth Judge has written a really good piece that traces some of the history around this.

Initially, I think some of the concerns were to ensure that a government document could be relied upon, that it was credible and authoritative. I think that is far less of an issue today than it once was.

I also think that the kinds of possibilities we had to use government works didn't exist in the early days of this in the way that it does today. We think of the development of GPS services or other kinds of services built on open government or government data. The idea that we would continue to have a copyright provision that would restrict that seems anathema to the vision of a law that has adapted to the current technological environment.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Let's say the government develops something of value to the government that would lose its value if it were to be subject to open provisions. Do you think there is still some legitimacy to Crown copyright in those cases?

Dr. Michael Geist:

We are the government. The public is funding this. One of the things that I was so excited to see from Treasury Board, I believe it is, just over the last few days was taking a new position on open-source software where the priority will be to use open-source software where available. I think it recognizes that these are public dollars, and we ought to be doing that where we can. So too with funding Creative Commons licensed local journalism, which is another example of that.

Even if there are areas where we can ask, “Can't government profit?”, copyright is the wrong place to be doing it. We shouldn't be using copyright law to stop that.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to Mr. Sheehan. You have five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much for all your testimony. It is good to have you here towards the end as well because it allows us to ask you questions about what we heard. We've been coast to coast to coast, hearing from various people with great ideas.

We heard from the Fédération nationale des communications, the FNC. They proposed the creation of a new category of copyrighted works, a journalistic work. That would provide journalists a collective administration. It would oblige Google and the Facebooks of the world to compensate journalists for their works that are put on the Internet through them. Do you have any comments about that? Also, in particular, how might it compare to article 11 of the European Union's proposed directive on copyright in the digital single market?

Michael, I'll start with you.

Dr. Michael Geist:

I think article 11 is a problem. I think where we've seen that approach attempted in other jurisdictions, it doesn't work. There are a couple of European jurisdictions where it was attempted. The aggregators engaged in this simply stopped linking, and the publishers ultimately found that it hurt more than it helped.

I think we need to recognize that journalists rely on copyright and fair dealing in particular just as much as so many other players. The idea of restricting in favour of journalism really runs significant risks, given how important news reporting is.

I think it's also worth noting that I look at some of the groups that have come forward to talk about this. Some of them are the same groups that have licensed their work to educational institutions in perpetuity. To give you a perfect example, I know the publisher of the Winnipeg Free Press has been one of the people who have been outspoken on this issue. The University of Alberta has a great open access site about everything they license. They have quite literally licensed every issue of the Winnipeg Free Press in perpetuity for over a hundred years. In effect, the publishers sold the rights to be used in classrooms for research purposes, for a myriad of different purposes, on an ongoing basis.

With respect, it feels a bit rich for someone on the one hand to sell the rights through a licensing system and on the other hand ask, “How come we're not getting paid these extra ways and don't we need some sort of new copyright change?”

(1655)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Does anyone else have a comment?

Yes, Ms. Gendreau.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

What we've seen, of course, is the slow disappearance of the traditional media under the influence of online media.

It was said that in our last provincial elections in Quebec, 70% or even 80% of the advertising budget of the political parties went to service providers based outside of the country.

We're seeing closures of newspapers, and the media have difficulty keeping on giving us current news. We're now being presented with the idea that because the media are having some difficulty, because they're closing down, they should be receiving government subsidies to help them. We have people not buying newspapers or lacking access to traditional media, while the advertising revenue is going to outside companies that are not paying taxes here. The government is losing its tax base with that process and moreover is being asked to fund these newspapers and media because they need help to survive. Guess who's laughing all the way to the bank.

I think the idea of a right to remuneration for the use of newspaper articles is a way to address this kind of problem. It may not be technically the best way to do it, I'm sure, but I think there are ways to ensure that media, who have to pay journalists and want to get investigative journalism done in the country for our public good, are able to recoup the money and make sure that theirs is a real, living business, not one that is disappearing, such that people are being fed only by the lines they're getting on their phones.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

That's very interesting.

We've talked a lot about protecting indigenous knowledge and culture through copyright. We've had a lot of testimony. I was going to read some of it, but does anybody have any suggestions concerning indigenous copyright?

This can perhaps go back to you.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

This is a very sensitive issue and a very international issue. It is very difficult to deal with in a concrete manner because of many fundamental aboriginal issues with respect to copyright that differ from the basis of copyright as we know it. However, we can look for inspiration to our cousin countries. Australia and New Zealand have already attempted to set up systems that would help first nations in the protection of their works.

My only concern is that we must not forget that there are also contemporary native authors. I wouldn't want all native authors to feel that they are being pushed out of the current Copyright Act to go to a different kind of regime. I think there are different policy games at play here.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Masse is next for two minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I'm going to go back to Crown copyright.

In the United States, they don't even have it, in effect. I think people think about the academic aspect of this, but how does it affect us also with respect to film and private sector ventures?

Perhaps you can quickly weigh in. I know we only have a couple of minutes. It's more of an economic question than is given credence.

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

Trying to navigate through the thickets of whether the National Archives owns something or what form of licence a particular item might be available under poses enormous challenges for certain sectors, such as documentary filmmakers—even with legal advice.

(1700)

Mr. Casey Chisick:

It's made that much more complicated by the lack of uniformity in licensing, by the fact that in order to license certain types of works you need to figure out which department of which provincial government you need to go to to even seek a licence, let alone worry about whether your inquiry will ever get a response. It poses enormous challenges, which I think may be associated with vesting copyright in entities that aren't really that invested in the idea of managing it.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Mr. Geist.

Dr. Michael Geist:

To go even further, the Supreme Court of Canada will hear a case in February, Keatley Surveying Inc. v. Teranet Inc.—and for disclosure, I've been assisting one of the parties involved—which deals with Ontario land registry records. In fact, we have governments making the argument that the mere submission of surveys to the government as part of that process renders those cases of Crown copyright.

Not only are we not moving away from lessening Crown copyright. We have arguments before the court wherein governments are trying to argue that private sector-created works become part of Crown copyright when they are submitted subject to a regulation.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

I would think also that there's already in the Canadian system a licence scheme that allows us to reproduce statutes with the government's permission—without seeking a specific permission. However, this is a very tiny aspect of the Crown copyright.

I think that lots of countries can live without the equivalent of a Crown copyright. This is a system where they have reinforced Crown copyright in the U.K. I don't think we should follow that train. I think it makes sense, because they are government works, that they should belong to the public, because the government represents the public. I mean, the public is the fictional author of these works. I think it also creates problems with not only statutes, but also court documents and judgments. There are interesting cases of judges who copy the notes of their lawyers. There's been a case on that, which was really interesting.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

Despite all of that, I don't think we would be losing much by abrogating many issues of Crown copyright.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Government knows fiction.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Thank you.

We still have time, so we're going to do another round. I rarely ask questions, but I would like a question put on the floor here.

In regard to the five-year legislative review, we've heard different thoughts. Very quickly, I want to get your thoughts on that. Should it be a five-year legislative review? Should it be something else?

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

Of course, Parliament can do anything and decide not to have five-year review next time.

I've been thinking about that, and I think that in this instance a five-year review is important. In my eyes, the clock has gone so far on the side of giving rights that it's not even Swiss cheese anymore. It's Canadian copyright cheese. It's full of holes everywhere.

We've had a bit of an example: If you don't use the private copying exception, then perhaps we can use the incidental copying exception. I mean, it's just that if one doesn't work, let's try another.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

I think that for this kind of situation, a review now is something that we would need.

Do you want to do this exercise every five years? I'm not so sure.

The Chair:

I probably won't be the chair.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

Also, we have to give time to cases and so on.

I think now it is important, in order not to get entrenched in the view that we have in the act currently.

Dr. Michael Geist:

It's been a very interesting review. I would at the same time say that I think it is early.

If we look at it historically, there were major reforms that took place in the late eighties, major reforms again in the late nineties, and then, of course, 2012. We look at roughly a ten- to 15-year timeline historically for significant reforms.

Five years, in my view, is oftentimes too short for the market and the public to fully integrate the reforms and then to have the evidence-based analysis to make judgment calls on new reforms.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Chisick.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I agree in principle with what Professor Gendreau said, which is that this is a good window for a five-year review given what happened in 2012. However, in principle, I think there should be flexibility for Parliament in deciding when to review the act, as there is for most other pieces of legislation.

(1705)

Ms. Catherine Lovrics:

As a preliminary comment—we didn't canvass the committee on this—I think our personal views are that a five-year review is completely appropriate in this case.

If you look at artificial intelligence, it is a very simple example. In 2012, that wasn't being considered, so it's for things like that, perhaps to limit shorter reviews to emerging technology, or to respond to the evolution of the law within that period of time.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham, you have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I want to get back to Crown copyright, but I want to make a quick observation first. If the Berne convention had been written under current law, I think it would be coming out of copyright just about now. That's just food for thought.

If we wanted to, as a committee, make a point on Crown copyright, under what licence should we release our report? Anyone?

Dr. Michael Geist:

I think the government has led by example just now with its local news and Creative Commons. Quite frankly, I don't know why almost everything isn't released by government under a Creative Commons licence.

There is an open licence that it uses. However, I think for the purposes of better recognition and standardization and the ability for computers to read it, adopting a very open Creative Commons licence would be the way to go.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are there any other comments?

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

Speaking personally, I would support Professor Geist's proposal, and I would recommend either a CC0 licence or a CC BY licence.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I don't have strong opinion on a particular form of licence, but I do agree that for most government works, the more dissemination and the broader dissemination, the better.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

I concur.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I like it when it's fast. Thank you.

There's a topic we haven't discussed at all in this study, and I think we probably should have. That's software patents. I'm sure you all have positions and thoughts on that.

First of all, what are your positions, very quickly, on software patents? Are they a good thing or a bad thing? Does anybody want to discuss that?

Dr. Michael Geist:

I mean, we're not talking strictly copyright here, but I think that if we take a look at the experience we've seen in other jurisdictions, I think the over-patenting approach we often see creates patent thickets that become a burden to innovation, which isn't a good thing.

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

I'd say computer patents are the hidden story of computer programs, because initially, computer programs were not supposed to be patented and that's why they went to copyright. Copyright was quick, easy and long-lasting. I think this prevented an exercise, in order to have something much more appropriate for this kind of creative activity, which has a relatively short lifespan and is based on incremental improvements.

I don't think that nationally this is something we can do, but internationally, this is an issue that should be looked at in a much more interesting way. There are so many issues that are purely computer-oriented. It would be interesting to see to what extent these issues would go with a specific kind of protection for computer programs, as opposed to bringing everything into copyright.

To a certain extent, since we've had computer programs in a copyright law, it's been difficult.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair. I don't have time for long answers, but I appreciate your comments.

Mr. Tarantino?

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I would concur with Professor Gendreau's position.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I like the concurrence motions.

Yes, go for it.

Ms. Catherine Lovrics:

The Intellectual Property Institute of Canada has a committee that is currently collaborating with the Canadian Intellectual Property Office on this very issue.

There may be guidance that comes jointly out of CIPO and that committee's work.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was just looking at it quickly. If software was always written under current copyright law, I think that stuff written for any act would now be out of copyright. That's sort of a worrisome way of looking at it. It's kind of obsolete.

Is our copyright regime not actually strong enough to protect software, per se?

Dr. Michael Geist:

I must admit, I don't think we're.... Given the proliferation of software that runs just about every aspect of our lives, from the devices in our homes to the cars we drive to a myriad of different things, there seems to be no shortage of incentive for people to create, and no significant risks in that regard.

It highlights why always looking to stronger intellectual property rules, whether patent or copyright, as a market-incentive mechanism, misses the point of what takes place in markets. Very often, it isn't the IP laws at all that are critically important. It's first to market, the way you market and the continual innovation cycle that becomes important. IP protection is truly secondary.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

There are a lot of issues, some of which we've talked about today, and software patents is one, where if we're going to look at them in a serious way, we need to look at them in a serious way. We need to take a step back and consider what sort of behaviour we're trying to promote, what kinds of laws promote that behaviour and how we can best strike that balance in Canada, also with an eye to our international obligations under various treaties.

Software patents is one. Crown copyright is another. I think that if we want to look at whether Crown copyright is necessary or whether it's accomplishing its intended ends, we need to figure out what it's supposed to do before we can figure out whether we're doing it. Reversion is a third.

(1710)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The reason I want to ask about all this is to tie it back to a rising movement, especially in the U.S., called right to repair. I'm sure you're familiar with that as well. You're aware of the John Deere case. Are there any comments on that and how we can tie that into copyright, to make sure that when you buy a product like this BlackBerry...? If I want to service it, then I should have that right to do that.

Dr. Michael Geist:

Yes. The 2012 reforms on anti-circumvention rules established some of the most restrictive digital lock rules to be found anywhere in the world. Even the United States, which pressured us to adopt those rules, has steadily recognized that new exceptions to it are needed.

At the very top, I noted that one area. We just saw the U.S. create a specific exception around right to repair. The agricultural sector is very concerned about their ability to repair some of the devices and equipment they purchase. Our farmers don't have that. The deep restrictions we have represent a significant problem, and I would strongly recommend that this committee identify where some of the most restrictive areas are in those digital locks. We will still be complying with our international obligations by building in greater flexibility there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I had a couple of questions going back to the beginning, so it's less exciting.

The Chair:

You have about 30 seconds.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's enough for this.

Mr. Chisick, you mentioned at the very beginning that you are certified to practice copyright law, specifically. Just out of curiosity, who certifies lawyers to practice copyright law?

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I didn't say that I'm certified to practice copyright law. What I said was I'm certified as a specialist in copyright law. That's a designation that was given to me by the Law Society of Ontario.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. That's what I was curious about.

Do we have 10 seconds to get into...? No, we don't have 10 seconds.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thanks.

Mr. Albas, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It's always a mad dash to get in as many interventions as we can.

I will address this question to the Intellectual Property Institute. You support changing safe harbour provisions yet we were told by a major tech company that they simply could not operate without safe harbour. Do you think a legal framework that denies Canadian consumers access to services is acceptable?

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

Thank you for the question.

I think we recommended an assessment of whether the safe harbour provisions should operate without reference to any of the other mechanisms, such as the notice and notice regime, within the act.

I think the answer to the particular question you posed about consumers is probably no.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay.

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

We don't want consumers to be disadvantaged in that way.

I think it's an open question: How do we ensure entities and individuals don't shelter themselves under the auspices of those safe harbour provisions in a way that doesn't reflect the steps they take or the policies they put in place with respect to policing infringement on their platforms?

Mr. Dan Albas:

Yesterday on Twitter—I didn't have the opportunity, and this is outside of your role, because I don't think you were speaking on behalf of the Intellectual Property Institute—I posted a CBC article outlining the case of someone who was suing the company that makes Fortnite for allegedly using a dance that he invented.

I put it out there and we did hear from the Canadian Dance Assembly. They wanted to see choreography of specific movements that could be copyrighted by an individual artist. You seem to say that it would be under a particular provision. Could you just clarify that a bit, so it's part of the testimony?

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I'm happy to do that.

Let this be a lesson to those who willy-nilly engage on Twitter with members of Parliament.

Yes. Choreographic works are protected if they are original. They are protected as works under the Copyright Act. I would also note that performers' performances are protected under the Copyright Act without the need for originality. I'm not sure there's a current gap in the legislative scheme, which would mean that dance moves are not protected.

(1715)

Mr. Dan Albas:

I think what the Canadian Dance Assembly was pointing out was that if someone choreographs a particular dance and posts it on YouTube, then someone else uses those moves in a performance of some sort, some credit should be due or some sort of copyright owed to the original person.

I think it would be very, very difficult to say who created a particular work of choreography or a dance. I even gave the example of martial arts.

I asked indigenous groups if it might cause huge issues for a particular community if someone were suddenly to claim copyright for a very traditional dance. There were some questions as to whether copyright would even apply to indigenous knowledge.

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I think we need to separate the analytical question of whether something would qualify for protection under the act from the practical reality of enforcing any rights that might be afforded under the act. I think those are two very different inquiries.

I would like to just freelance a little bit here and pivot on the point that you've made. I think it ties into some of the other questions that have been put forward here today.

Speaking personally, I think there is a tendency in the copyright community for the ratchet to go only in a single direction, and for rights to continually expand. I think we have to be cognizant of the fact that all of us—whether as individuals, as consumers, as creators or as entities who disseminate or otherwise exploit copyright—simultaneously occupy multiple roles within the copyright ecosystem. We both benefit and—I hesitate to say we are the victims—bear the burden of those expanded rights.

It's not always the case that copyright is the proper mechanism for recognizing what are otherwise entirely justifiable claims.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I certainly agree with that.

Ms. Gendreau, in your presentation you argue that online platforms should be liable for infringing work on their platforms in the same way traditional broadcasters are.

Do you not acknowledge that a TV station where a producer determines everything on the air is different from a platform where users upload their content?

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

They are different in the sense that they are leading different activities. They're not programming the way broadcasters are programming.

What we're facing is precisely something different because we have, again, an industry that exists because there are works to showcase or to let go on and disseminate through its services. It is making money, and it will be obtaining the possibility of making business out of these works and maybe is not paying for that primary material.

It's like mining royalties. Mining companies have to pay royalties because they are extracting primary resources. I think we have to see that our creative industries, our creative works, are our new primary resources in a knowledge economy, and those who benefit from it have to pay for it.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Ms. Gendreau, you cannot create an equivalent between a physical asset that once it's mined is exclusively taken away versus an idea or a piece of work that can be transmitted where someone isn't less off. We've been told that if such a system would be in place, online platforms would have no choice but to seriously restrict what users can upload.

Do you feel severely restricting innovation is a reasonable outcome in this case?

Prof. Ysolde Gendreau:

No, I don't think it would limit innovation or dissemination. I think on the contrary it would guarantee payment to creative authors, and because creative authors would be receiving payments for the use of their works, they wouldn't be trying to sue for negligible types and silly uses that have given a very bad name to copyright enforcement.

If copyright owners knew that when their works were being used they were being remunerated, then if they saw somebody making a video with their grandchild dancing to some music, and they nevertheless receive some sort of payment, they would not sue that grandmother and make a fool of themselves.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you for that.

Mr. Geist, you have strongly argued against extending statutory damages to Access Copyright. If the worst penalty they are allowed to seek is the amount of the original tariff, then won't educational institutions just ignore the tariff because the only penalty is their having to pay what they would have to pay to begin with?

(1720)

Dr. Michael Geist:

No. First off, educational institutions are not looking to infringe anything, as I've talked about. They license more now than they ever have before. Statutory damages, by and large, are the exception rather than the rule. The way that the law typically works is that you make someone whole. You don't give them multiples beyond what they have lost.

Where we have statutory damages right now within the copyright collective system, it's part of a quid pro quo. It's used for groups like SOCAN because they have no choice but to enter into this system, and so because it's mandatory for competition-related reasons, they have that ability to get that.

Access Copyright can use the market, and as we've been talking about, it is now one of many licences that are out there. This has become so critical, as we've learned over these months, the different ways education groups license. The idea that it would specifically be entitled to massive damages strikes me as incredible market intervention that's unwarranted.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Masse, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It's good that we're talking copyright. I feel that I've been infringed in my right to have a repair bill passed. There was a voluntary agreement instead. Bill C-273 was amending the Competition Act and the Environmental Protection Act to provide aftermarket service for vehicles, for technicians, for information technology. It's an environmental thing, but also a competition issue and so forth. It is pretty germane to today, because even the United States was allowing this under their laws in terms of gaining this information. I could get a vehicle fixed in the United States at an after-service garage, but I couldn't get it done in Windsor. We spent several years getting that amended, but I see that it's been moved towards I guess the larger picture of things, which is the ability to alter and change devices.

I do want to move on a bit with regard to the Copyright Board. I know that some of the testimony today was kind of removed from that, but what was interesting about the Copyright Board coming here was that they asked for three significant changes that weren't part of Bill C-86. One of the things—and I'm interested to hear if there would be an opinion—was that they wanted a scrub of the actual act, which hadn't been done since 1985.

Are there any thoughts on the Copyright Board's presentation and the fact that they don't feel that Bill C-86 is going to solve all the problems they have? They had three major points. One of them was on that. Also, the protection of their ability to make interim decisions and not be overturned was another thing they mentioned. I don't know if there are any thoughts on that, but that's one of the things that I thought was interesting about their presentation in front of us.

Anybody...? If nobody has anything because you're happy with the way it's going to be, then it's going to be that way. It's fine.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

I've expressed in another forum certain concerns about Bill C-86 that are not necessarily the same as those that were expressed by the board. I don't think Bill C-86 is perfect by any means in terms of addressing the issues with the Copyright Board, but I do think it's a good start. That's the kind of legislation that certainly should be reviewed within a relatively short time frame—probably five years is about appropriate—to make sure that it's having its intended effect.

Perhaps I should have studied the transcript of that appearance a little more closely. Do I understand correctly that the suggestion was the act itself be scrubbed and that we start afresh?

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's their suggestion. It's to go through it and make it consistent. I think their concern is—

Mr. Casey Chisick:

Oh, I see.

Mr. Brian Masse:

—that they have changes to it again. It was interesting to have their presentation about that, because it's not a holistic approach, in their opinion, and it's going to create some inconsistencies.

I know that it's a lot to throw at you right here if you haven't seen it. They talked about transparency, access and efficiency as some of the common things to be fixed. Some of those things do happen in Bill C-86, but it still hasn't gone through a review.

Mr. Casey Chisick:

Any time you have successive incremental amendments to a statute, I think there are bound to be some unintended consequences when you look back on that approach. If there were an appetite for a really fulsome review, or a scrub, as you put it, of the Copyright Act, it would be an interesting idea for that reason alone: just to look at what the unintended consequences or the inconsistencies that have emerged might be. I don't know if that's what the board was getting at, but it's an interesting idea, to my mind.

(1725)

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's interesting.

Does anybody have any other thoughts?

Mr. Bob Tarantino:

I don't have any response in particular to the question you pose. I just want to commend to you the submissions that IPIC did make on Bill C-86 and also the submissions that were made in 2017 on Copyright Board reform.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes, I've seen some of those, sir. Thank you.

Dr. Michael Geist:

Mr. Chair, I would note that to me this actually highlights—to come back to the chair's question about a five-year review—why five-year reviews are a bit problematic. First, the fact that we're able to address things like the Copyright Board or the Marrakesh treaty in between the period of 2012 and now highlights that where there are significant issues there is the ability for the government to act.

Second, on the idea that we would have by far the biggest changes the board has seen in decades, with new money and almost an entirely new board, that's going to take time. We know that these things still do take time, so the idea we would come back in three or four years—or even five years—to judge what takes place, much less scrub the act, strikes me as crazy. We need time to see how this works. If the board is suggesting that it needs an overhaul to make sense of things, then I think that's problematic.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's kind of the trajectory. This is what worries me right now with Bill C-86 in terms of what we've done and also the USMCA. We have three significant balls in the air all at the same time. They're all going to land, and we're going to be dealing with it at that time.

I don't have any other questions. I'm done.

Thank you, witnesses.

The Chair:

Thanks.

Mr. Longfield, you have three minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you, Chair.

I'm going to go back to the right to repair. I also sit on the agriculture committee. I was also working in the innovation space in agriculture. The J1939 standard is the vehicle standard. There's an ISO standard for on-vehicle things, like steering systems, the ISO 11898, and then on the trailer for fertilizer spreaders, seeders and applicators, it's the ISO 11992. How specific do we need to go, so that innovators can get on tractors and do their work?

We could work on anything but John Deere, but I knew a guy in Regina who knew how to get around the John Deere protocols as well. People have to get around protocols and then semi-legally give you access to the equipment. How specific should the act get in terms of technology?

Dr. Michael Geist:

First off, they shouldn't have to semi-legally be able to work on their own equipment. In fact, the copyright law ought not to be applying to these kinds of issues. One of the very early cases around this intersection between digital locks and devices involved a company based in Burlington, Ontario, called Skylink, which made a universal garage door remote opener. It's not earth-shattering technology, but they spent years in court, as they were sued by another garage door opener company, Chamberlain, saying that they were breaking their digital lock in order for this universal remote to work.

The idea that we apply copyright to devices in this way is where the problem lies. The origins are these 2012 reforms on digital locks. The solution is to ensure that we have the right exceptions in there, so that the law isn't applied in areas where it shouldn't be applied to begin with.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Could we cover those under the “such as” clause?

Dr. Michael Geist:

No, you have to deal with this specifically under the anti-circumvention rules. I think it's section 41.25. The exception that you would be looking for, an ideal one, would be to bring in that fair dealing exception and make that an exception as part of the anti-circumvention rules, too. In other words, it shouldn't be the case that I'm entitled to exercise fair dealing where something's in paper but I lose those fair dealing rights once it becomes electronic or digital or it happens to be code on a tractor.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

In terms of our innovation agenda, section 41.25 is a section we would have to take a good look at.

Dr. Michael Geist:

We created a series of limited exceptions. In fact, they were so limited that we had to go back and fix them when we entered into the Marrakesh treaty for the visually impaired. The United States has, meanwhile, established a whole series of additional exceptions. Other countries have gone even further than the U.S. We are now stuck with one of the most restrictive rules in the world.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

But we have the most innovative farmers. They can get around these things.

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Before we adjourn for the day, I'll just remind you that, on Wednesday, in room 415, for the first hour we have witnesses and for the second hour we have drafting instructions.

Also, for those listening to these proceedings throughout Canada, here is a gentle reminder that today is the last day for online submissions, by midnight Eastern Standard Time. I suspect the word is out because today we've already received 97 online submissions.

Notice that our analysts are saying, “Oh, no.”

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: I want to thank our panel for being here today. It was a great session and a great wrap-up to where we've been going for this past year. Thank you all very much.

We are adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous.

Ressentez-vous la fébrilité dans l'air? Je ne parle pas de Noël. Nous devrions tous être fébriles en ce moment. C'est l'avant-dernier groupe de témoins sur le droit d'auteur...

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

À votre connaissance.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

Le président:

Ne faites pas ça.

M. Brian Masse:

Je suis ici depuis longtemps.

Le président:

Bienvenue à tous à la 143e séance du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie, tandis que nous poursuivons notre examen quinquennal prévu par la loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Aujourd'hui, nous recevons Casey Chisick, associé au sein de Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP; Michael Geist, titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada en droit d'Internet et du commerce électronique, faculté de droit, Université d'Ottawa; Ysolde Gendreau, professeure titulaire, faculté de droit, Université de Montréal; puis Bob Tarantino, président, Comité de la politique du droit d'auteur et Catherine Lovrics, vice-présidente, Comité de la politique du droit d'auteur, de l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada.

Vous aurez chacun jusqu'à sept minutes pour présenter votre exposé, et je vais vous interrompre après sept minutes, parce que je suis comme ça. Nous passerons ensuite aux questions, car, j'en suis sûr, nous aurons beaucoup de questions à vous poser.

Commençons par M. Chisick.

J'aimerais vous remercier. Vous êtes déjà venu ici une fois et n'avez pas eu la chance de faire ce que vous vouliez faire, donc merci d'être venu de Toronto encore une fois pour nous voir.

M. Casey Chisick (associé, Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP, à titre personnel):

Je suis heureux d'être ici. Merci de m'avoir invité de nouveau.

Je m'appelle Casey Chisick et je suis associé au sein de Cassels Brock, à Toronto. Je détiens une certification de spécialiste de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, et je pratique et j'enseigne dans ce domaine depuis près de 20 ans. J'ai notamment comparu à maintes reprises devant la Commission du droit d'auteur et dans des contrôles judiciaires de décisions de la Commission, dont cinq appels devant la Cour suprême du Canada.

Dans ma pratique, j'agis pour un grand éventail de clients, y compris des artistes, des sociétés de gestion des droits d'auteur, des éditeurs de musique, des universités, des producteurs de films et de télévision, des développeurs de jeux vidéo, des radiodiffuseurs, des services par contournement et bien d'autres clients, mais les points de vue que j'exprime ici aujourd'hui ne sont que les miens.

Tout d'abord, j'aimerais remercier et féliciter le Comité de son dévouement à l'égard de cette tâche importante. Vous avez entendu un bon nombre d'intervenants différents au cours de nombreux mois, et je souscris à une bonne partie de leurs points de vue. Lorsque j'ai été invité à comparaître pour la première fois le mois dernier, j'avais prévu de me concentrer sur la réforme de la Commission du droit d'auteur, mais le train a déjà quitté la gare dans le cadre du projet de loi C-86, donc aujourd'hui, je m'intéresserai un peu plus largement à d'autres aspects de la loi. Je reviendrai toutefois à la Commission vers la fin de ma déclaration.

Pour ce qui est des questions de fond, j'aimerais aborder cinq enjeux particuliers.

Premièrement, je suis d'avis que le Parlement devrait clarifier certaines des nombreuses exceptions, nouvelles et élargies, touchant la violation du droit d'auteur qui ont été introduites dans les amendements de 2012. Certaines de ces exceptions ont causé de la confusion et ont entraîné des litiges inutiles et des conséquences imprévues.

Par exemple, une décision de 2016 de la Commission du droit d'auteur a révélé que des copies de sauvegarde de musique faites par des stations de radio commerciales ont représenté plus de 22 % de la valeur commerciale de toutes les copies faites par les stations de radio. À la suite de l'élargissement de l'exception sur les copies de sauvegarde, la Commission du droit d'auteur a ensuite procédé à la réduction des paiements de redevances des stations d'un pourcentage équivalant à plus de 22 %. Elle a retiré cet argent directement des poches des créateurs et des titulaires de droits, même si, dans ce cas, on avait constaté que les copies avaient une très grande valeur économique.

À mon avis, ce n'est pas le genre d'équilibre que visait le Parlement quand il a présenté l'exception en 2012.

Deuxièmement, la loi devrait être modifiée de manière à ce que les règles d'exonération prévues par la loi pour les intermédiaires Internet fonctionnent comme prévu. Elles doivent n'être à la disposition que des entités réellement passives, et pas à celles de sites ou de services qui jouent des rôles actifs pour faciliter l'accès à du contenu qui viole le droit d'auteur. Je suis d'accord pour dire que les intermédiaires qui ne font rien d'autre que d'offrir les moyens de communication ou le stockage ne devraient pas être responsables de la violation du droit d'auteur, mais trop de services qui ne sont pas passifs, y compris certains services nuagiques et agrégateurs de contenu, s'opposent aux paiements, affirmant qu'ils sont visés par les mêmes exceptions. Dans la mesure où c'est une échappatoire dans la loi, celle-ci devrait être éliminée.

Troisièmement, il importe de clarifier la propriété du droit d'auteur dans des films et des émissions de télévision, surtout parce que la durée du droit d'auteur dans ces oeuvres est très incertaine dans le cadre de l'approche actuelle, mais je n'approuve pas la suggestion selon laquelle les scénaristes ou les réalisateurs devraient être reconnus au même titre que les auteurs. Je n'ai entendu aucune explication convaincante de leurs représentants quant à la raison pour laquelle ce devrait être le cas, ou fait plus important encore, quant à ce qu'ils feraient avec les droits qu'ils cherchent à obtenir si ceux-ci leur étaient accordés.

À mon avis, compte tenu des réalités commerciales de l'industrie, qui s'occupe de cette question depuis des années dans le cadre des conventions collectives, une meilleure solution serait de considérer le producteur comme l'auteur, ou, à tout le moins, le premier détenteur du droit d'auteur, et de traiter en conséquence la durée du droit d'auteur.

Quatrièmement, le Parlement devrait réexaminer les dispositions de réversion de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. En ce moment, les cessions de droits et les licences exclusives prennent fin automatiquement 25 ans après le décès d'un auteur, et le droit d'auteur revient ensuite à la succession de l'auteur. Jadis, c'était la norme dans de nombreux pays, mais c'est maintenant plus ou moins unique au Canada, et cela peut être très dérangeant dans la pratique.

Imaginez que vous dépensiez des millions de dollars pour transformer un livre en film ou pour fonder une entreprise à partir d'un logo commandé à un graphiste avant de vous réveiller un jour et de découvrir que vous n'avez plus le droit d'utiliser ce matériel sous-jacent au Canada. Il y a des moyens meilleurs, et plus efficaces, de protéger les intérêts des créateurs, dont je représente un grand nombre, sans chambouler du jour au lendemain des entreprises légitimes.

(1535)



Cinquièmement, la loi devrait fournir une avenue claire et efficace concernant les ordonnances de blocage de sites et de désindexation de sites Web sans égard à la responsabilité des intermédiaires Internet et en surveillant de façon appropriée l'équilibre entre les intérêts concurrentiels des divers intervenants. Même si la Cour suprême a exprimé clairement que ces injonctions peuvent être disponibles en vertu des principes d'équité, l'avenue pour les obtenir est, à mon avis, bien trop longue et coûteuse pour être utile à la plupart des détenteurs de droits. Le Canada devrait suivre l'exemple de bon nombre de ses partenaires commerciaux principaux, y compris le Royaume-Uni et l'Australie, en adoptant un processus plus rationalisé — qui surveille attentivement l'équilibre des intérêts concurrentiels entre les divers intervenants.

Durant le temps qu'il me reste, j'aimerais aborder les initiatives récentes visant à réformer les activités de la Commission du droit d'auteur.

La Commission est essentielle à l'économie créatrice. Les détenteurs de droits, les utilisateurs et le public général comptent tous sur elle pour établir des tarifs justes et équitables aux fins de l'utilisation de matériel protégé. Pour que le marché créatif canadien puisse fonctionner efficacement, la Commission doit faire son travail et rendre ses décisions de façon opportune, efficace et prévisible.

J'ai été heureux de voir les réformes exhaustives apportées dans le projet de loi C-86. Je garde aussi à l'esprit que le projet de loi est bien en voie de devenir une loi, donc ce que je dis ici aujourd'hui n'aura peut-être pas beaucoup d'effets immédiats. Pour cette raison, et faute de temps, je vais juste vous renvoyer au témoignage que j'ai présenté le 21 novembre devant le comité sénatorial des banques. J'aborderai ensuite deux questions particulières.

D'abord, l'introduction de critères obligatoires concernant l'établissement des tarifs, y compris tant l'intérêt public que ce qu'un acheteur consentant paierait à un vendeur consentant, est une très bonne chose. Des critères clairs et explicites devraient déboucher sur un processus tarifaire plus opportun, efficace et prévisible. C'est important, parce que les tarifs imprévisibles peuvent grandement perturber le marché, particulièrement les nouveaux marchés, comme la musique en ligne.

Je m'inquiète du fait que les avantages de la disposition figurant dans le projet de loi C-86 seront minés par son libellé, qui habilite aussi la Commission à examiner « tout autre critère » qu'elle estime approprié. Une telle approche d'ouverture fera en sorte que les parties devront respecter des critères de façon beaucoup plus obligatoire, en plus de choses comme la neutralité et l'équilibre technologiques, que la Cour suprême a introduits en 2015, mais cela ne va pas garantir que la Commission ne rejettera pas simplement les témoignages des parties au profit d'autres facteurs totalement imprévisibles. Cela pourrait augmenter le coût des instances de la Commission, sans qu'il y ait une augmentation correspondante sur les plans de l'efficacité ou de la prévisibilité.

S'il est trop tard pour retirer cette disposition du projet de loi C-86, je suggère que le gouvernement fournisse rapidement une orientation réglementaire quant à la façon dont les critères devraient être appliqués, y compris ce qu'on doit rechercher dans l'analyse des acheteurs et des vendeurs consentants.

Enfin, très brièvement, je crois savoir que certains témoins du Comité ont suggéré que, plutôt que de le faire de façon volontaire, comme la loi le prévoit actuellement, les sociétés de gestion collective devraient être tenues de déposer leurs contrats de licence auprès de la Commission du droit d'auteur. Je suis d'accord pour dire que le fait d'avoir accès à des contrats pertinents pourrait aider la Commission à brosser un tableau plus complet des marchés qu'elle réglemente. C'est un objectif louable.

Toutefois, il y a aussi un contrepoids important à prendre en considération: les utilisateurs pourraient être réticents à conclure des contrats avec des sociétés de gestion collective s'ils savent que ceux-ci seront déposés auprès de la Commission du droit d'auteur et qu'ils finiront donc par appartenir au domaine public. Bien sûr, on s'inquiéterait du fait que les services sur le marché fonctionnent dans un environnement très compétitif. La dernière chose que nous voulons, c'est communiquer à tous les modalités de leurs contrats confidentiels, y compris à leurs compétiteurs. Je peux en dire davantage à ce sujet durant la période de questions et de réponses qui suivra.

Merci de votre attention. J'ai hâte de répondre à vos questions.

(1540)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons à Michael Geist.

Vous avez sept minutes, monsieur, s'il vous plaît.

M. Michael Geist (titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada en droit d'Internet et du commerce électronique, Faculté de droit, Université d'Ottawa, à titre personnel):

Merci.

Bonjour. Je m'appelle Michael Geist et je suis professeur en droit à l'Université d'Ottawa, où je détiens la Chaire de recherche du Canada en droit d'Internet et du commerce électronique et où je suis membre du Centre de recherche en droit, technologie, et société. Je comparais aujourd'hui à titre personnel comme chercheur indépendant, représentant uniquement mes propres points de vue.

J'ai suivi de très près le travail du Comité et j'ai beaucoup de choses à dire au sujet de la réforme du droit d'auteur au Canada. Compte tenu du temps limité, j'aimerais toutefois souligner rapidement cinq enjeux: la reproduction à des fins éducatives, le blocage de sites, le prétendu écart de valeur, les effets des dispositions sur le droit d'auteur dans l'Accord Canada-États-Unis-Mexique, ou l'ACEUM, et les réformes possibles à l'appui de la Stratégie d'innovation du Canada. Mon mémoire à l'intention du Comité renferme des liens vers des dizaines d'articles que j'ai écrits sur ces enjeux.

Premièrement, par rapport à la reproduction à des fins éducatives, nonobstant l'affirmation souvent entendue selon laquelle les réformes de 2012 sont à blâmer pour les pratiques éducatives actuelles, la réalité, c'est que la situation actuelle a peu à voir avec l'inclusion de l'éducation comme fin d'utilisation équitable. Vous n'avez pas besoin de me prendre au mot. Access Copyright a été invité par la Commission du droit d'auteur en 2016 à décrire les répercussions du changement juridique. L'organisation a dit à la Commission que la réforme juridique n'avait pas changé l'effet de la loi. Elle a plutôt affirmé qu'elle n'avait que codifié la loi existante telle qu'elle est interprétée par la Cour suprême.

En outre, la prétention de 600 millions de copies non rémunérées qui repose au coeur des allégations de reproductions déloyales est le résultat d'estimations dépassées qui utilisent des données vieilles de dizaines d'années et des hypothèses profondément suspectes. La majorité des 600 millions ou 380 millions, concerne des enfants de la maternelle à la 12e année qui copient des données remontant à 2005. Il y a quelques années, la Commission du droit d'auteur a fait une mise en garde selon laquelle les données des études étaient tellement vieilles qu'elles pourraient ne pas être représentatives. Les 220 millions qui restent proviennent d'une étude de l'Université York, et une bonne partie est aussi vieille que les données des enfants de la maternelle à la 12e année. Peu importe l'âge des données, toutefois, l'extrapolation de quelques vieilles données de reproduction d'une seule université au pays entier ne fournit pas une estimation crédible.

En fait, le Comité a reçu des données abondantes sur l'état de la reproduction à des fins éducatives, et je ferais valoir que c'est sans équivoque. Les jours des notes de cours imprimées ont grandement disparu au profit de l'accès numérique. À mesure que les universités et les collèges adoptent des systèmes de gestion des cours numériques, le contenu utilisé change également. Une étude d'Access Copyright dans des collèges canadiens a révélé que les livres ne formaient que 35 % des documents. De plus, le nombre de reproductions qui sont faites au sein de ces systèmes de gestion des cours est de beaucoup inférieur à ce qui est imprimé.

Ce qui est sans doute plus important encore, c'est que le système de gestion de cours permet l'intégration des livres électroniques autorisés, de documents en libre accès et d'hyperliens vers d'autres contenus. À l'Université d'Ottawa, on retrouve maintenant 1,4 million de livres électroniques autorisés, dont bon nombre supposent des licences perpétuelles, qui n'exigent aucun autre paiement et qui peuvent être utilisés pour les cours. De plus, les gouvernements ont investi des dizaines de millions de dollars dans des ressources pédagogiques en libre accès et les établissements d'enseignement continuent de dépenser chaque année des millions de dollars pour des licences transactionnelles de paiement à l'utilisation, même quand ces écoles détiennent une licence collective.

Ce que cela veut dire, c'est que l'abandon de la licence d'Access Copyright ne repose pas sur l'utilisation équitable. Il reflète plutôt l'adoption de licences qui fournissent des droits d'accès et de reproduction. Ces licences donnent aux universités l'accès au contenu et la capacité de l'utiliser dans leurs cours. La licence d'Access Copyright offre bien moins de choses, n'accordant seulement que des droits de reproduction pour des documents déjà acquis. Par conséquent, les efforts visant à forcer la licence d'Access Copyright dans les établissements d'enseignement, en limitant l'utilisation équitable ou en mettant en oeuvre une réforme sur les dommages-intérêts préétablis, devraient être abandonnés. La perspective de limiter l'utilisation équitable représenterait un pas en arrière au chapitre de l'innovation et de l'éducation et irait à l'encontre de l'expérience acquise, au cours des six dernières années, en matière d'accroissement des licences, de l'innovation et des choix pour les auteurs et les utilisateurs à des fins éducatives.

En ce qui concerne les dommages-intérêts préétablis, les défenseurs font valoir qu'une escalade massive du coût des dommages-intérêts possibles est nécessaire pour avoir un effet dissuasif et promouvoir des négociations de règlement, mais il n'y a personne à dissuader. Les établissements d'enseignement investissent dans des licences à des niveaux record. La promotion de négociations de règlement ne représente rien de plus que l'augmentation des risques juridiques pour les étudiants et les établissements d'enseignement.

Deuxièmement, par rapport au blocage de sites, le Comité a entendu plusieurs témoins qui ont demandé l'inclusion d'une disposition explicite sur le blocage de sites dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Je crois que ce serait une erreur. D'abord, l'instance du CRTC sur le blocage de sites plus tôt cette année a entraîné des milliers de mémoires révélant de graves problèmes dans la pratique, y compris du Rapporteur spécial des Nations unies pour la liberté d'expression, qui a soulevé des préoccupations en matière de liberté d'expression, et de groupes techniques qui ont cité des risques de blocage excessif et de violation de la neutralité du Net. Ensuite, même si on appuie le blocage de sites, la réalité, c'est qu'il existe déjà en vertu de la Loi, comme nous l'avons vu dans l'arrêt Google c. Equustek de la Cour suprême.

Troisièmement, par rapport à l'écart de valeur, deux enjeux ne sont pas contestés ici. D'abord, l'industrie de la musique attire des revenus record en raison de la diffusion en continu sur Internet. Ensuite, les services d'abonnement à la diffusion en continu paient davantage les créateurs que ceux qui reposent sur les publicités. En ce qui concerne l'examen du droit d'auteur, on se demande si la Loi sur le droit d'auteur du Canada a quoi que ce soit à voir avec cela. La réponse est non.

(1545)



La notion d'un écart de valeur est fondée sur certaines plateformes ou certains services qui profitent de la Loi pour négocier des tarifs plus bas. Ces règles, comme le régime d'avis et de retrait, n'existent pas en vertu des lois sur le droit d'auteur du Canada. Le Comité en a parlé au cours de la dernière réunion. Cela aide à expliquer pourquoi l'industrie demande au Comité de miser plutôt sur l'argent des contribuables, comme les nouvelles taxes sur les iPhones. Je crois que ces demandes devraient être rejetées.

Quatrièmement, ce sont les répercussions de l'ACEUM. Les dispositions sur le droit d'auteur dans ce nouvel accord commercial modifient de façon importante l'équilibre du droit d'auteur en prolongeant de 20 ans la durée du droit d'auteur, une réforme à laquelle le Canada s'est, avec raison, opposé. Ainsi, l'Accord représente d'importantes retombées qui pourraient engendrer des centaines de millions de dollars pour les titulaires de droit et créer le besoin de recalibrer la Loi sur le droit d'auteur du Canada afin de rétablir l'équilibre.

Enfin, des réformes importantes contribueraient à faire avancer la Stratégie d'innovation du Canada, par exemple une plus grande flexibilité en ce qui a trait à l'utilisation équitable. La soi-disant approche qui consiste à donner l'exemple ferait en sorte que la liste actuelle des fins de l'utilisation équitable serait illustrative, plutôt qu'exhaustive, et mettrait les innovateurs canadiens sur un même pied d'égalité que les pays qui font une utilisation efficace, comme les États-Unis. Cette réforme maintiendrait tout de même l'analyse complète de l'équité, ainsi que la jurisprudence existante, afin de réduire au minimum l'incertitude. À titre subsidiaire, une exception concernant l'analyse de l'information ou l'extraction de textes et de données est désespérément requise par le secteur de l'intelligence artificielle.

Le Canada devrait aussi établir de nouvelles exceptions pour nos règles sur les verrous numériques, qui sont parmi les plus restrictives au monde. Les entreprises canadiennes sont désavantagées par rapport aux États-Unis, y compris le secteur agricole, où les agriculteurs canadiens ne jouissent pas des mêmes droits que ceux des États-Unis.

De plus, étant donné le soutien du présent gouvernement à un gouvernement ouvert — y compris son récent financement de nouvelles locales visées par des licences Creative Commons et son soutien d'un logiciel ouvert — je crois que le Comité devrait recommander l'examen des restrictions imposées au droit d'auteur par un gouvernement ouvert en éliminant la disposition sur le droit d'auteur de la Couronne de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Vous êtes tout à fait dans les temps. [Français]

Madame Gendreau, vous avez sept minutes.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau (professeure titulaire, Faculté de droit, Université de Montréal, à titre personnel):

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs, je vous remercie d'avoir accepté de m'entendre.

Je m'appelle Ysolde Gendreau et je suis professeure titulaire à la Faculté de droit de l'Université de Montréal.

Depuis mes études de maîtrise, je me suis spécialisée en droit d'auteur — je suis la première au Canada à avoir fait un doctorat en la matière. À de rares exceptions près, mes publications ont toujours porté sur ce domaine de droit. Je comparais ici à titre purement personnel.

Permettez-moi de vous lire un extrait des discussions de la Conférence de révision de la Convention de Berne, tenue à Rome, en 1928, qui ont porté sur le droit de radiodiffusion reconnu par l'article 11bis.

Les commentaires sur ce texte disaient:

Dans le premier alinéa, l'article [...] confirme énergiquement le droit de l'auteur; dans le second, il laisse aux lois nationales la faculté de régler les conditions d'exercice du droit en question, tout en admettant qu'en considération de l'intérêt public général de l'État, des limitations au droit d'auteur peuvent être établies; mais il est entendu qu'un Pays ne doit faire usage de la possibilité d'introduire de telles limitations que dans le cas où leur nécessité a été constatée par l'expérience de ce Pays-même; ces limitations ne peuvent en tout cas pas amoindrir le droit moral de l'auteur; elles ne peuvent non plus porter atteinte à son droit à une rémunération équitable qui serait établie soit à l'amiable, soit, faute d'accord, par les autorités compétentes.

Le principe de cet article de 1928 demeure aujourd'hui.

Les acteurs économiques qui bénéficiaient de la radiodiffusion des oeuvres, c'est-à-dire les radiodiffuseurs, et qui se voyaient imposer une responsabilité à cette époque en étaient-ils heureux? Bien sûr que non. Aujourd'hui, les acteurs économiques qui bénéficient de la diffusion des oeuvres sur Internet continuent de résister à l'imposition d'une responsabilité liée au droit d'auteur.

Il n'est pas nécessaire d'attendre 90 ans pour en arriver au consensus qui a cours dans le monde de la radiodiffusion. Même 20 ans plus tard, en 1948, on ne sourcillait plus à voir les radiodiffuseurs payer pour les oeuvres qu'ils utilisaient. Dans l'avenir, la résistance de l'industrie numérique des communications d'aujourd'hui sera jugée tout aussi insensée que celle des radiodiffuseurs il y a 90 ans, si on agit.

(1550)

[Traduction]

J'aimerais maintenant attirer votre attention sur des questions liées à l'application en ce qui concerne l'Internet. Puisqu'il est associé au droit de communiquer, le droit de mise à disposition fait désormais partie du régime général qui régit ce droit de communiquer. Toutefois, des dispositions supplémentaires ont généré des antinomies qui inhibent le nouveau droit des conséquences réelles de sa reconnaissance. Voici des exemples, que je ne m'attends pas à ce que vous lisiez à mesure que je les nomme, mais je vous les montre maintenant, parce que j'y ferai référence de façon générale plus tard.

En fonction de la responsabilité générale des fournisseurs de services Internet, pour qu'un fournisseur de services soit tenu responsable, il doit y avoir une réelle violation d'une oeuvre. Cette condition est renforcée par une disposition sur les dommages-intérêts. La disposition sur l'hébergement prévoit également une violation réelle d'une oeuvre, cette fois-ci reconnue par une décision du tribunal afin d'engager la responsabilité d'un fournisseur de solutions d'hébergement. Notre exception CGU, condition générale d'utilisation, qui est bien connue, repose fortement sur l'utilisation d'une seule oeuvre ou de très peu d'oeuvres par une seule personne à qui le titulaire de droit d'auteur va affirmer que l'exception ne s'applique pas. Dans le cadre des dispositions sur les dommages-intérêts, plusieurs paragraphes limitent grandement l'intérêt d'un titulaire de droit d'auteur de se prévaloir de ce mécanisme. Une de ces dispositions se répercute même sur d'autres titulaires de droit d'auteur qui bénéficieraient de droits de recours semblables. Bien sûr, nos dispositions relatives au régime d'avis et avis reposent encore une fois sur la délivrance d'un avis à un contrevenant unique par un titulaire de droit d'auteur.

Les objectifs fonctionnels de ces dispositions sont tout à fait contraires à l'environnement actuel dans lequel ils sont censés fonctionner. Confrontée à des utilisations massives des oeuvres, la gestion collective a démarré au XIXe siècle précisément parce que le fait d'avoir gain de cause contre un utilisateur unique était perçu comme un coup d'épée dans l'eau. L'Internet correspond à un phénomène beaucoup plus vaste de l'utilisation de masse, et pourtant, notre Loi sur le droit d'auteur s'est repliée sur le modèle de l'application individuelle. Cette approche prévue par la loi est tout à fait illogique et mine grandement la crédibilité de toute politique du droit d'auteur axée sur le phénomène Internet.

Comme vous l'avez peut-être vu, les textes auxquels je fais allusion sont très volumineux, et bon nombre d'entre eux reposent sur des conditions qui défavorisent les titulaires de droit d'auteur. Imaginez seulement combien de temps il faut attendre pour obtenir un jugement avant d'utiliser l'article 31.1 ou à quel point il est difficile pour un titulaire de droit d'auteur d'affirmer que la diffusion d'une nouvelle oeuvre a, en réalité, « un effet négatif important, pécuniaire ou autre, sur l'exploitation — actuelle ou éventuelle — » de l'oeuvre. Ces dispositions s'appuient sur des conditions irréalistes qui ne peuvent entraîner que des abus par leurs bénéficiaires.

La direction qu'a empruntée notre Loi sur le droit d'auteur en 2012 va à l'encontre de l'objet même qu'elle était censée exploiter. La réponse à l'utilisation de masse ne peut être que la gestion de masse — c'est-à-dire la gestion collective — d'une façon qui doit correspondre à l'ampleur du phénomène. La disparition du régime de copie privée dans les amendements de 2012, par la décision délibérée de ne pas le moderniser, allait dans le sens de cette approche malavisée de l'application individuelle du droit d'auteur sur Internet.

(1555)

[Français]

Dans le temps qui m'est imparti, il m'est impossible de soulever des points qui devraient logiquement accompagner ces commentaires, mais vous voudrez peut-être profiter de la période de questions pour obtenir plus de détails. Il me fera plaisir de vous les fournir.

Je vous remercie de votre attention.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Enfin, passons à l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada.

Monsieur Tarantino.

M. Bob Tarantino (président, Comité de la politique du droit d'auteur, Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je m'appelle Bob Tarantino et je suis accompagné de Catherine Lovrics. Nous sommes ici en notre capacité d'ancien président et de présidente actuelle, respectivement, du Comité de la politique du droit d'auteur de l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada. C'est en cette qualité que nous prenons la parole aujourd'hui, et non au nom des cabinets d'avocats auxquels nous sommes associés ni au nom de l'un de nos clients.

Nous vous remercions d'avoir invité l'IPIC à présenter les recommandations de notre comité en ce qui concerne l'examen obligatoire de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

L'IPIC est l'association professionnelle canadienne des agents de brevets, des agents de marques de commerce et des avocats en droit de propriété intellectuelle. L'IPIC représente le point de vue des professionnels canadiens de la PI, et, dans les mémoires que nous avons transmis au Comité, nous nous sommes efforcés de représenter, de la façon la plus équilibrée possible, la diversité des points de vue qui existe parmi les juristes spécialisés dans le droit d'auteur.

Vous avez reçu les mémoires de notre comité, de sorte que dans cette présentation, je mettrai l'accent uniquement sur quelques recommandations qu'ils contiennent. Cela dit, j'aimerais fournir un cadre pour nos commentaires qu'il me semble important de garder à l'esprit pendant les délibérations du Comité, à savoir la nécessité d'élaborer des politiques fondées sur des données probantes. Le préambule de la Loi sur la modernisation du droit d'auteur de 2012 décrivait comme suit l'un des buts de sa modification: « favorise[r] la culture ainsi que l'innovation, la concurrence et l'investissement dans l'économie canadienne ».

Il reste cependant à déterminer dans quelle mesure les buts visés — quels qu'ils soient — ont été atteints grâce aux changements apportés à la Loi en 2012. Il y a peu de données empiriques accessibles au public sur les effets de la réforme du droit d'auteur, voire aucune. Nous recommandons que ce travail commence maintenant, en prévision du projet d'examen obligatoire de la Loi, de façon à nous assurer que la réforme du droit d'auteur se base sur des données rigoureuses, transparentes et valides sur les résultats que la réforme a déjà permis d'obtenir, le cas échéant. Le Parlement doit définir ce qui constituerait une réussite de la réforme, imposer un financement aux fins de la collecte de données qui satisfont aux critères de la réussite et veiller à ce que les données soient accessibles au public.

Comme nous l'avons indiqué dans notre mémoire, nous pensons que certaines retouches faciles et précises peuvent être apportées à la Loi, lesquelles faciliteront les transactions de droit d'auteur, notamment le fait de permettre la cession de droit d'auteur sur les oeuvre futures et la clarification des droits des cotitulaires. Dans le reste de mes observations, je soulignerai les recommandations d'ordre plus général, dont chacune devrait être mise en oeuvre de façon à respecter les droits et les intérêts des auteurs et des titulaires du droit d'auteur, des intermédiaires, des utilisateurs et du grand public.

En ce qui concerne les données et les bases de données, il est maintenant banal de dire qu'une valeur commerciale croissante est attribuée aux données et aux bases de données. Toutefois, le fondement juridique actuel pour leur accorder la protection du droit d'auteur demeure incertain. Il faut envisager des modifications qui établissent un équilibre entre les investissements importants consacrés à la création des bases de données, tout en évitant de créer involontairement des monopoles sur les faits particuliers qu'elles contiennent ou de fausser la concurrence sur des marchés basés sur des faits. Une manière d'aborder cette question sur laquelle nous attirons votre attention est la forme de protection sui generis prévue par l'Union européenne pour les bases de données.

En ce qui concerne l'intelligence artificielle et l'exploration de données, poursuivant sur le thème de l'incertitude, nous dirons que le rapport entre droit d'auteur et intelligence artificielle (IA) demeure obscur. Le développement de l'apprentissage machine et du traitement du langage naturel repose souvent sur les grandes quantités de données requises pour former les systèmes d'IA, un processus que l'on appelle « exploration de données ». En général, ces techniques nécessitent la copie d'oeuvres protégées par le droit d'auteur et elles peuvent nécessiter l'accès à de vastes ensembles de données qui peuvent également être protégés par le droit d'auteur.

Nous recommandons que le Comité étudie les exigences en matière d'exploration de textes et de données dans le contexte de l'IA. Nous vous invitons en particulier à lire les modifications adoptées au Royaume-Uni qui permettent la copie aux fins de l'analyse informatique.

Corollairement, il n'est pas évident de décider d'octroyer la protection au titre du droit d'auteur à des oeuvres créées à l'aide de l'IA compte tenu de l'exigence d'originalité et de la nécessité de rattachement de l'oeuvre à une personne humaine. Une solution possible consisterait à accorder une protection au titre du droit d'auteur aux oeuvres créées sans auteur humain dans certaines circonstances, et là encore, nous vous renvoyons vers les dispositions continues dans la loi sur le droit d'auteur mise en oeuvre au Royaume-Uni et vers l'approche adoptée par la Loi pour les créateurs en ce qui concerne les enregistrements sonores.

Pour ce qui est de l'exemption tarifaire de 1,25 million de dollars pour les radiodiffuseurs, la première tranche de 1,25 million de dollars de revenus publicitaires gagnés par les radiodiffuseurs commerciaux est exemptée des tarifs approuvés par la Commission du droit d'auteur à l'égard des prestations et des enregistrements sonores des artistes-interprètes, sauf un paiement nominal de 100 $. Autrement dit, sur la première tranche de 1,25 million de dollars de revenus publicitaires gagnés par un radiodiffuseur commercial, seulement 100 $ sont versés aux interprètes et aux propriétaires d'enregistrements sonores. En revanche, les auteurs-compositeurs et les éditeurs de musique perçoivent des paiements pour chaque dollar gagné par le radiodiffuseur. L'exemption est une subvention inutile aux radiodiffuseurs aux dépens des artistes-interprètes et des propriétaires d'enregistrements sonores, et elle devrait être supprimée.

Par rapport aux mesures injonctives contre les intermédiaires, les intermédiaires de l'Internet qui facilitent l'accès aux documents contrefaits sont les mieux placés pour réduire les dommages causés par la distribution en ligne non autorisée d'oeuvres protégées par le droit d'auteur. Ce principe, qui figure dans la directive européenne sur le droit d'auteur, a permis aux titulaires de droit d'auteur d'obtenir une injonction contre les intermédiaires dont les services sont utilisés pour violer le droit d'auteur.

(1600)



La Loi devrait être modifiée pour permettre expressément aux titulaires de droit d'auteur d'obtenir des injonctions telles que des ordonnances de blocage et de désindexation de sites contre des intermédiaires. Cette recommandation est soutenue par un large éventail d'intervenants canadiens, y compris les FSI. En outre, plus d'une décennie d'expériences dans plus de 40 pays démontre que le blocage de sites est un outil important, éprouvé et efficace pour aider à réduire l'accès aux contenus en ligne portant atteinte au droit d'auteur.

Je tiens à vous remercier une fois de plus d'avoir invité l'IPIC à vous présenter ces observations aujourd'hui.

Nous serons ravis de répondre à vos questions au sujet de notre mémoire.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer directement aux questions, en commençant par M. David Graham.

Vous avez sept minutes, monsieur.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

J'ai assez de questions pour faire le tour. Ça ressemblera peut-être un peu au jeu de la taupe.

Nous avons un peu parlé de la nécessité d'adopter essentiellement l'application collective, plutôt que l'application individuelle du droit d'auteur, parce que ce n'est plus gérable. Comment l'application collective du droit d'auteur peut-elle fonctionner sans juste donner les moyens aux grands utilisateurs et aux détenteurs de piétiner les utilisateurs et les petits producteurs?

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

La difficulté que sous-tend votre question, c'est que les gens ont tendance à voir l'administration collective du droit d'auteur comme une affaire de grandes sociétés. Ils ont tendance à oublier que derrière les organisations de gestion collective, ou les sociétés collectives, se trouvent des personnes réelles. La gestion collective des droits pour ces personnes n'est en fait que la seule solution pour qu'elles puissent s'assurer de recevoir une certaine forme de rémunération dans ce type d'environnement de masse, et elles ont en fait besoin de se réunir pour se défendre contre les GAFA. C'est la question dont personne ne parle. Nous savons qu'énormément d'argent est détourné du pays, parce qu'il n'y a pas assez de gens participant aux activités qui consistent à rendre toutes ces oeuvres accessibles au public et payant leur juste part de ce type de matériel.

Ce type de gestion est possible. La Loi comporte assez de mesures de protection, tout comme la Loi sur la concurrence, pour faire en sorte qu'il n'y ait pas d'abus.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Parlant d'abus, nous le voyons certainement. Des représentants de Google et de Facebook étaient ici il y a quelques semaines et ils ont avoué n'avoir examiné que les grands détenteurs de droit d'auteurs lorsqu'ils ont créé leur système d'application de la loi. Ils avouent ne pas se soucier des exemptions canadiennes dans le cadre de l'utilisation équitable. L'abus est déjà présent.

Je ne vois pas comment l'élimination des mesures de protection pour les personnes va permettre d'améliorer cette situation.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Je ne dis pas que nous devrions éliminer les mesures de protection des personnes. Je dis juste que, quand on regarde tout cela à l'échelle mondiale, tout le monde devrait payer sa juste part de l'utilisation des oeuvres. J'ai du mal à imaginer que des gens qui sont prêts à payer 500 $ et plus pour un iPhone trouveraient nuisible de payer en plus... Je ne veux certainement pas être liée par le chiffre que nous pourrions imaginer, quel qu'il soit. Nous dirions que cela va les empêcher de s'exprimer librement ou d'accéder à l'oeuvre. Même si on n'ajoutait aucune somme au prix d'un iPhone ou d'un autre équipement, étant donné la marge bénéficiaire sur ces produits, c'est quelque chose qui ne mènera certainement pas ces entreprises à la faillite.

Je vois l'avènement d'un meilleur fonctionnement du système de gestion collective comme quelque chose qui pourrait en fait protéger les personnes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps, donc je vais passer à autre chose.

Monsieur Geist, j'ai mentionné le témoignage de Facebook et de Google il y a une minute, quand ces sociétés ont souligné qu'elles ne font pas d'efforts pour faire appliquer l'utilisation équitable. Vous connaissez bien cette situation. Avez-vous des commentaires ou des opinions à ce sujet issus de votre expérience?

M. Michael Geist:

Oui, c'est une source de frustration importante. En fait, j'ai vécu une expérience personnelle avec ma fille, qui a créé une vidéo après avoir participé à un programme qui s'appelle la Marche des vivants, dans le cadre duquel elle est allée dans des camps de concentration en Europe, puis en Israël. Puisqu'elle fait partie de la collectivité d'Ottawa, elle a interrogé tous les divers participants qui l'accompagnaient et a créé une vidéo qui allait être présentée ici à 500 personnes. Une musique de fond accompagnait les entrevues. La vidéo a été mise en ligne sur YouTube, et le jour où elle devait être présentée, le son a été entièrement mis en sourdine, parce que le contenu du système d'identification avait repéré cette bande sonore particulière.

On a été en mesure de régler le problème, mais si ce n'est pas un exemple classique de ce que le contenu non commercial généré par les utilisateurs est censé protéger, je ne sais pas ce que c'est. Le fait que Google n'ait pas essayé de veiller à ce que la disposition sur le CGU que Mme Gendreau a mentionnée, qui, comme cet exemple l'illustre, offre une énorme possibilité de liberté d'expression pour beaucoup de Canadiens, est pour moi non seulement décevant, mais c'est aussi un réel problème.

(1605)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Chisick, j'ai aussi une question pour vous.

Vous avez mentionné la proportion de 22 % de la valeur des copies de sauvegarde pour les radiodiffuseurs. Si ce sont de réelles copies de sauvegarde, quel est le problème?

M. Casey Chisick:

Le problème est le suivant. La Commission du droit d'auteur a effectué une évaluation globale de toutes les copies utilisées par les radiodiffuseurs. Elle a déterminé que si elle était forcée d'attribuer une valeur aux différents types de copies, une certaine valeur serait attribuée aux copies de sauvegarde, une certaine valeur serait accordée aux principales copies du système d'automatisation, et ainsi de suite, jusqu'à ce que vous obteniez 100 %.

La Commission du droit d'auteur a conclu que 22 % de cette valeur était attribuée aux copies de sauvegarde. Autrement dit, les stations de radio tirent une valeur commerciale des copies qu'elles produisent, et 22 % de cette valeur est attribuée aux copies de sauvegarde. Par conséquent, ces copies de sauvegarde ont une grande valeur commerciale; pourtant, la Commission du droit d'auteur s'est sentie obligée, en vertu de l'exception élargie touchant les copies de sauvegarde, de retirer cette valeur des redevances versées aux titulaires de droit d'auteur.

Maintenant, si c'était une interprétation correcte de l'exception sur les copies de sauvegarde, la Commission du droit d'auteur pourrait n'avoir aucun autre choix que de faire ce qu'elle a fait. Mon argument, c'est simplement que l'intention de ces exceptions ne doit pas être d'exempter les grands intérêts commerciaux de payer des redevances pour des copies dont ils tirent eux-mêmes une valeur commerciale importante. C'est pour moi un exemple d'un système d'exemptions qui est détraqué dans le grand système d'équilibre entre les intérêts des titulaires de droit d'auteur, les utilisateurs et l'intérêt public.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il me reste seulement 30 secondes, mais j'essaie de comprendre ce dont on parle, parce que vous avez soulevé un point important au sujet de l'argent qui n'est pas dépensé sur... Si on n'utilise pas la copie principale ou la copie de sauvegarde pour diffuser quelque chose, quelle est la différence?

M. Casey Chisick:

Je suis désolé. Je n'ai pas compris votre question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avons toujours eu le droit de modifier le format. Si j'achète quelque chose que je convertis pour mon ordinateur pour ensuite le diffuser, c'est une copie de sauvegarde, et si on ajoute une valeur pécuniaire... Je ne réussis pas vraiment à comprendre tous les rouages.

M. Casey Chisick:

Je comprends la question.

Il faudrait réaliser un examen des tarifs de radiodiffusion de la Commission du droit d'auteur sur les 20 dernières années, ce que, évidemment, nous n'avons pas le temps de faire ici, mais ce qui est important, c'est que, jusqu'en 2016, les radiodiffuseurs payaient un certain montant pour toutes les copies qui étaient faites. C'est seulement en 2016, après l'entrée en vigueur des modifications de 2012, que la Commission du droit d'auteur a décidé qu'elle devait examiner de près ces copies afin de déterminer la valeur de chacune. C'est à ce moment-là que l'exception des 22 % a été mise en place.

Votre point est valide, parce que rien n'a changé. L'approche des stations de radio en matière de copie de la musique n'a pas changé. La valeur qu'elles tirent des copies n'a pas changé. La seule chose qui a changé, c'est l'introduction d'une exception, qui, selon la Commission du droit d'auteur, devait mener inexorablement à une réduction des redevances.

C'est ce à quoi je réagis, et ma suggestion au Comité, c'est qu'il faudrait revoir ça.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mon temps est écoulé. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Albas, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je tiens à remercier nos témoins de leur témoignage aujourd'hui.

Au cours des dernières semaines, nous avons rencontré divers témoins favorables à une modification de notre approche en matière de droit d'auteur, de façon à adopter un modèle plus américain, un système d'usage équitable. J'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez.

Quels sont les avantages liés au fait de se tourner vers le modèle américain d'usage équitable? Que devrait-on retenir et à quoi devrait-on faire très attention?

Ma question est destinée à n'importe quel témoin.

M. Michael Geist:

Je vais commencer par répéter les raisons pour lesquelles je crois que c'est une bonne idée, même si, selon moi, il faut non pas tout simplement adopter la disposition américaine en matière d'usage équitable, mais plutôt utiliser, comme je l'ai mentionné, une approche misant sur l'expression « tels que » et faire des fins d'utilisation équitable actuelles une liste à des fins d'illustration plutôt qu'une liste exhaustive.

Selon moi, on aurait ici l'avantage de pouvoir s'appuyer sur notre propre jurisprudence — puisqu'elle tient compte de la façon dont on s'est rendu à la situation actuelle — plutôt que d'avoir à tout recommencer à zéro, tout en constituant une approche beaucoup plus neutre sur le plan technologique. Plutôt que de prévoir un processus quinquennal en vertu duquel les gens se présenteraient pour dire qu'il faut tenir compte de l'intelligence artificielle ou d'un autre nouvel enjeu, ce genre de dispositions a la capacité de s'adapter au fil du temps. Nous constatons que beaucoup de pays procèdent de cette façon.

Pour terminer, j'aimerais souligner que, ce qui est important, ici, qu'on parle d'utilisation équitable ou d'usage équitable, c'est le caractère équitable. L'analyse qui permet de déterminer si une utilisation est équitable ou non ne change pas, qu'on mise sur une liste à titre d'illustration ou une liste exhaustive. C'est ça, l'important: examiner ce qui est copié et évaluer si c'est équitable. Les fins visées ne sont qu'un petit aspect du tout, mais, en limitant la liste, on se fige dans le temps, à un moment précis, et on ne peut pas s'adapter aussi facilement aux changements technologiques.

(1610)

M. Casey Chisick:

Si vous me permettez, je suis d'accord avec M. Geist: l'aspect le plus important de l'analyse de l'utilisation équitable, c'est de loin la détermination du caractère équitable, mais il y a une raison pour laquelle le Canada et la vaste majorité des pays à l'échelle internationale maintiennent un système fondé sur l'utilisation équitable. Il y a seulement — la dernière fois que j'ai vérifié — trois ou quatre administrations dans le monde — les États-Unis, évidemment, Israël et les Philippines — qui misent plutôt sur un système d'usage équitable.

La plupart des administrations à l'échelle internationale ont adopté la notion d'utilisation équitable, et ce n'est pas pour rien. C'est parce que les gouvernements veulent se réserver le droit, de temps en temps, d'évaluer le genre de choses qui, lorsqu'on regarde la situation dans son ensemble, peuvent constituer des exceptions accordées dans les cas d'utilisation équitable. Si on ouvre tout simplement les catégories à un peu tout et n'importe quoi, la prévisibilité d'un tel système est grandement réduite, et il devient beaucoup plus difficile pour les intervenants et les responsables du système de droit d'auteur de gérer tout ça. Il devient plus difficile de savoir ce qui sera considéré comme une utilisation équitable et ce qui sera jugé admissible à cet égard et de prévoir en conséquence.

De façon générale, le Canada a fait preuve d'une bonne sensibilité à l'égard de ces enjeux. Les catégories liées à l'utilisation équitable, évidemment, ont été élargies en 2012 et elles le seront peut-être à nouveau à l'avenir lorsque le gouvernement le jugera bon, mais je crois que le fait de les élargir pour inclure à peu près toutes les utilisations potentielles risque d'aller trop loin.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Je suis contre l'idée d'adopter une exception dans les cas d'usage équitable, et ce, pour diverses raisons.

Premièrement, je crois que, en réalité, ce qu'on a à l'heure actuelle se rapproche déjà beaucoup du système américain. Nous avons des fins qui sont extrêmement similaires aux fins d'usage équitable. Nous avons des critères qui paraphrasent les critères liés à l'usage équitable, et je ne crois pas qu'il y a une grande différence du point de vue des résultats. Ce qui se produit, cependant, c'est que, pour ce qui est des exemples que nous avons, ils ne sont pas assortis de la mention « tels que ». Je vois là une pente très glissante. « Tels que » ne signifie pas que tout est équitable et devrait vouloir dire qu'il faut s'en tenir aux choses énumérées en tant qu'utilisations possibles, et c'est déjà ce que propose notre système grâce à l'exception pour l'utilisation équitable.

Deuxièmement, bon nombre des exceptions pour usage équitable aux États-Unis ont mené à des résultats qui sont extrêmement difficiles à concilier avec un tel système d'usage équitable. Il y a beaucoup de critiques, et, pour terminer, pour qu'un système d'usage équitable fonctionne à la hauteur de ce que les gens envisagent, il faudrait avoir une société très portée sur les litiges. Nous représentons environ le dixième de la population américaine. Nous n'avons pas le même genre d'attitude procédurière qu'aux États-Unis, et je crois que c'est un facteur important dont il faut tenir compte afin de ne pas créer d'incertitude.

Merci.

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais donner le temps qu'il me reste à M. Lloyd, si vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient.

Le président:

Il vous reste deux minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aux témoins aujourd'hui.

J'ai deux ou trois questions rapides pour M. Chisick. J'aurais aimé que vous participiez tous plus tôt à l'étude. Vous nous auriez aidés à circonscrire le débat de façon un peu plus précise.

L'un des points que vous avez soulevés concernait l'élimination de l'échappatoire liée aux intermédiaires. Pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet et nous fournir des exemples concrets pour illustrer ce que vous voulez dire?

M. Casey Chisick:

Évidemment, en tant qu'avocat en pratique privée, je dois faire attention lorsque je fournis des exemples, parce que bon nombre d'entre eux viennent des situations réelles vécues par mes clients et les entreprises avec lesquelles ils interagissent au quotidien.

Ce que je peux vous dire, c'est que, à la lumière de mon expérience, certains services — et j'ai donné quelques exemples déjà, tant des services d'infonuagique qui offrent un petit quelque chose de plus et qui aident leurs utilisateurs à organiser leur contenu en ligne de façon à ce qu'ils aient plus facilement accès aux divers types de contenu et, possiblement, de façon à ce qu'ils puissent permettre à d'autres personnes d'y avoir aussi accès, que des services qui, essentiellement, sont des agrégateurs de contenu, mais qui utilisent un nom différent — n'hésitent pas à essayer de s'appuyer sur l'exception concernant l'hébergement ou l'exception visant les FSI, l'exception liée aux communications, telle qu'elle est libellée actuellement, pour dire: « Bien sûr, quelqu'un d'autre devra peut-être payer des redevances, mais pas nous, parce que notre utilisation est exemptée. Et donc, si vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient, nous n'en paierons pas ».

(1615)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Ils ne servent pas seulement de simple canal, ils jouent un rôle de facilitation.

M. Casey Chisick:

Effectivement. C'est vrai. C'est ce qu'ils font, et c'est la raison pour laquelle je crois que l'exception doit être rajustée, pas éliminée, mais rajustée, pour que ce soit très clair que tout service qui joue un rôle actif dans la communication d'oeuvres ou d'autres contenus que les gens stockent de façon numérique ne sont pas admissibles à l'exception.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je reviendrai à vous, parce que j'ai une autre question.

M. Casey Chisick:

D'accord.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je voulais poser rapidement une question à M. Geist.

Je n'ai plus de temps? D'accord. Laissez faire.

Le président:

Je suis désolé, mais je suis heureux de voir que vous connaissiez les termes que vous utilisiez.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Masse.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

L'AEUMC a changé la donne relativement à deux ou trois paramètres. En quoi a-t-il modifié ce que vous nous avez présenté ici?

Je reviens tout juste de Washington, et il n'y a pas de voie claire pour que ce soit adopté. Nous pourrions être de retour à l'ALENA original, et, si cet accord aussi est éliminé, à l'accord initial sur le libre-échange, mais Trump devrait alors mettre en branle un processus de sortie et d'avis de six mois, et il y a un débat quant à savoir si c'est quelque chose qui relève du président ou du Congrès. En outre, tout ça ferait intervenir des avocats et ainsi de suite. À l'heure actuelle, nous avons un accord potentiel en place. Vegas a ouvert les paris sur son adoption ou son échec.

Nous pourrions peut-être faire un tour de table, afin que vous nous disiez de quelle façon, selon vous, tout ça influe sur ce que vous avez présenté, ici, et notre examen. Nous allons devoir produire un rapport alors que, essentiellement, c'est... Et beaucoup croient que le Congrès n'acceptera pas, parce qu'il n'y a pas eu assez de concessions canadiennes.

Je pose la question, parce que c'est quelque chose qui a changé dans le cadre de nos discussions depuis le début de l'étude comparativement au point où nous en sommes à l'heure actuelle, et, encore une fois, nous allons devoir prodiguer des conseils au ministre.

Nous pouvons commencer du côté gauche, là, puis aller vers la droite.

Mme Catherine Lovrics (vice-présidente, Comité de la politique du droit d'auteur, Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada):

Au sein de notre comité, il n'y a pas de consensus en ce qui concerne la prolongation de la durée, alors ce n'est pas quelque chose que nous avons abordé dans le cadre de notre mémoire.

Cependant, puisqu'il est évident que la prolongation de la durée est un thème abordé dans l'AEUMC, nous avons abordé la question du droit réversif, parce que je crois que si la durée du droit d'auteur est prolongée, il revient au gouvernement d'aussi tenir compte des droits réversifs dans un tel contexte. C'est parce que, actuellement, on ajoute effectivement ces 20 ans si le premier détenteur du droit d'auteur est l'auteur et qu'il a cédé ses droits, et les droits réversifs en vertu du régime actuel pour tout, sauf les oeuvres collectives... eh bien, on prolongerait la durée des droits d'auteur de ceux qui ont l'intérêt réversif et pas des détenteurs actuels des droits. C'est de cette façon que le mémoire de l'IPIC a été touché.

M. Brian Masse:

Les avis sont assez partagés au sein de votre organisation, quant aux avantages et aux détracteurs de...

Mme Catherine Lovrics:

En ce qui concerne la prolongation de la durée, je crois que c'est un enjeu très litigieux et qu'il n'y a pas eu de consensus au sein de notre comité.

M. Brian Masse:

Aurais-je cependant raison de dire que cela a d'importantes conséquences quant aux avis des deux parties? Ce n'est pas quelque chose de mineur. C'est important.

Mme Catherine Lovrics:

Tout à fait. Selon moi, il y a de très bons défenseurs de la prolongation de la durée des droits pour qui les droits internationaux sont une justification d'une telle prolongation, mais je crois qu'il y a ceux qui considèrent que la prolongation limite de façon inappropriée ce qui relève du domaine public au Canada. Encore une fois, il n'y a pas de consensus.

Puisque l'AEUMC le propose, il faudrait se pencher sur la question des droits réversifs.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Monsieur Chisick.

M. Casey Chisick:

Je suis d'accord. J'ai mentionné les droits réversifs dans mon exposé, et je ne veux pas que vous pensiez que, selon moi, la façon de composer avec les droits réversifs, c'est nécessairement d'éliminer complètement cette notion du système du droit d'auteur. C'est une des solutions, et elle est peut-être bonne, mais il y a aussi d'autres solutions, et, assurément lorsqu'on parle de la prolongation de la durée des droits d'auteur — ce qui selon moi, est une bonne idée, et je le dis publiquement depuis un certain temps —, la façon dont on composera avec les droits d'auteur durant cette plus longue période est de toute évidence un enjeu qu'il faut aborder.

Mon point principal, et ce, que la durée soit la vie de l'auteur plus 50 ans ou la vie de l'auteur plus 70 ans, c'est que, lorsqu'il est question des droits réversifs, il faut aborder cette question de la façon la moins perturbatrice pour l'exploitation commerciale des droits d'auteur. Selon moi, ce point reste valide dans les deux cas.

(1620)

M. Brian Masse:

Le fait qu'on ne procède pas à la prolongation changerait-il votre position sur d'autres enjeux ou est-ce que tout ça concerne essentiellement l'enjeu des 50 ans ou des 70 ans?

M. Casey Chisick:

Je ne crois pas — pas en ce moment en tout cas, je penserai peut-être à quelque chose de plus intelligent à dire quand ce sera fini — qu'il y ait quoi que ce soit qui tienne particulièrement à la question de savoir si la durée est de 50 ans ou de 70 ans.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Monsieur Geist.

M. Michael Geist:

Si je ne m'abuse, il y avait trois types de règles différents dans l'accord lié au droit d'auteur. Il y a les dispositions relativement auxquelles, franchement, nous avons déjà cédé sous les pressions américaines en 2012...

M. Brian Masse:

Oui.

M. Michael Geist:

... et donc, nos dispositions anticontournement sont conformes à l'AEUMC, mais on l'a fait seulement en raison de l'énorme pression américaine avant les réformes de 2012 et, en fait, notre système est maintenant plus restrictif que celui des États-Unis, ce qui nous désavantage.

Puis, il y a un domaine — les règles d'avis et avis — que le gouvernement a clairement jugé prioritaire et qu'il a défendu pour permettre le maintien des règles canadiennes.

La prolongation de la durée a une incidence énorme, et, franchement, il est évident que le gouvernement le reconnaît. Ce n'est pas une coïncidence si, lorsque nous sommes passés du PTP au PTPGP, l'une des dispositions clés qui ont été suspendues, c'était la prolongation de la durée. De nombreux économistes ont très bien montré clairement que cela n'entraînait pas une augmentation de la créativité. Personne ne s'est réveillé avec l'intention d'écrire un grand roman canadien pour ensuite décider de se rendormir, parce que ses descendants bénéficieront d'une protection des droits durant 50 ans plutôt que 70 ans.

Pour toutes les autres oeuvres déjà créées, ce cadeau de 20 années supplémentaires — qui verrouillera littéralement le domaine public au Canada pour 20 ans de plus — se fera à un coût énorme, particulièrement à une époque où l'on passe de plus en plus au numérique. La capacité d'utiliser ces oeuvres de façon numérique à des fins de communication ou d'éducation ou pour permettre de nouveaux types de créativité sera littéralement retirée à toute une génération.

Si le Comité doit formuler une recommandation, ce doit être, dans un premier temps, de reconnaître qu'il s'agit là d'un changement majeur. Lorsque des groupes viennent et disent: « Voici toutes les choses que nous voulons en tant que détenteurs de droits », avec l'AEUMC, ils viennent de gagner à la loterie. C'est un changement majeur dans l'équilibre des forces.

Ensuite, le Comité devrait recommander la détermination de la meilleure façon d'appliquer tout ça pour limiter les dommages. Ce n'est pas quelque chose que nous voulions; ça nous a été imposé. Y a-t-il une certaine souplesse quant à la façon dont, au bout du compte, on mettra tout ça en oeuvre afin d'atténuer une partie des préjudices?

M. Brian Masse:

Madame Gendreau.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

La question de savoir si la durée sera de 50 ou de 70 ans m'indiffère, et ce, pour deux raisons.

Je viens de terminer le mois passé la lecture d'un livre sur la vie sociale en France au XIXe siècle. Il y avait, à l'époque, des salons où les gens se rendaient, et les artistes et les politiciens se côtoyaient. Le livre contenait des listes des artistes et des écrivains qui se rendaient dans ces salons, et je ne connaissais par le nom des trois quarts d'entre eux.

Lorsqu'on parle de protection du droit d'auteur, je crois que très peu d'oeuvres sont encore pertinentes 50 ans — et encore moins — 70 ans après le décès de l'auteur. Je ne sais pas pourquoi nous faisons tout un plat d'un enjeu qui sera important seulement pour une minorité d'auteurs. Voilà pour la première raison.

Ensuite, si nous sommes préoccupés par la durée de la protection du droit d'auteur, alors, selon moi, nous devrions peut-être nous en inquiéter parce que le droit d'auteur couvre les programmes informatiques. Vous rendez-vous compte que, de par leur nature, les programmes de droit d'auteur ne seront jamais du domaine public, en raison de leur cycle de vie? Il s'agit d'une industrie où jamais rien ne relèvera du domaine public.

Pour terminer, je tiens à souligner qu'il est possible pour des oeuvres de continuer d'avoir une vie commerciale après le décès de l'auteur. Je pense que c'est juste. Quant à savoir si ce devrait être 50 ou 70 ans, comme je l'ai dit, ça m'est indifférent. Je ne participerais jamais à une manifestation ou une marche à ce sujet, ni pour une position ni pour l'autre, mais 70 ans est la durée choisie par nos principaux partenaires du G7. Par conséquent, être membre du G7 a un prix, et les 20 années supplémentaires constituent un enjeu de peu d'importance.

M. Brian Masse:

Nous savons tous que le G7 joue avec les règles.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

C'est intéressant, cependant. Cette question nous permet de voir l'enjeu dans son ensemble.

Merci beaucoup aux témoins.

Le président:

C'est la raison pour laquelle on les a gardés pour la fin.

Nous allons passer à M. Longfield.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais céder deux ou trois minutes à M. Lametti.

J'aimerais commencer par l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada. Pour commencer, je vous remercie de nous aider dans le cadre de l'étude que nous avons réalisée sur la propriété intellectuelle. C'était bien de voir certaines des idées dont nous avons discuté être mises en oeuvre.

Je pense à l'interaction entre l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle et la Commission du droit d'auteur ou des sociétés de gestion collective connexes. Dans quelle mesure participez-vous pour encadrer les artistes afin qu'ils protègent leurs oeuvres, qu'ils trouvent le bon chemin à suivre?

Je sais que vous le faites d'autres façons en ce qui a trait à la propriété intellectuelle, mais qu'en est-il de...?

(1625)

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je ne suis pas sûr de pouvoir répondre à cette question du point de vue du travail institutionnel réalisé par l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada, l'IPIC, même s'il maintient des relations, évidemment, avec ces organismes.

En tant que conseillers pour les particuliers, c'est là une composante importante de nos activités quotidiennes, soit de conseiller nos clients sur la meilleure façon de tirer profit des oeuvres qu'ils ont créées et de les exploiter au sein du marché.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

L'une des limites que nous avons constatées dans notre étude précédente concernait la transparence, pas le fait que ce n'était pas transparent, mais simplement le fait que les gens ne savaient pas où se tourner pour obtenir des solutions ou se protéger.

M. Bob Tarantino:

Oui. Je crois que l'une des choses avec lesquelles nous devons composer en tant que conseillers, tout comme vous, en tant que législateurs, c'est que le système de droit d'auteur est extrêmement complexe. C'est extrêmement opaque pour le commun des mortels. Je crois qu'un principe directeur que tout le monde devrait se rappeler, c'est qu'il faudrait rendre la Loi sur le droit d'auteur — et le système, aussi, de façon plus générale — un peu plus convivial.

Il y a un certain nombre de choses qu'on a abordées dans le cadre de la discussion, déjà, comme l'intérêt réversif, qui rendent l'application de la loi encore plus complexe et qui, selon moi, devraient faire l'objet d'un examen afin qu'on puisse en faire un processus dans le cadre duquel on n'a pas nécessairement à retenir les services d'un avocat ou payer telle ou telle personne des centaines de dollars l'heure pour s'y retrouver.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

En fait, l'un des représentants de Google a dit qu'il s'agissait d'un « système très complexe et opaque de licences conventionnelles de musique ». C'est ce à quoi les gens sont confrontés.

Et là, on parle seulement de principes directeurs. L'étude est déjà très avancée. Lorsque nous avons travaillé en vue de l'élaboration d'un programme de développement économique pour la Ville de Guelph, nous nous sommes tournés vers des principes directeurs. Lorsque nous avons examiné notre Initiative d'énergie communautaire, nous nous sommes appuyés sur des principes directeurs.

En ce qui concerne la loi et notre étude, de quelle façon pouvons-nous définir certains de ces principes directeurs d'entrée de jeu, dans notre étude? Avez-vous d'autres principes directeurs que nous devrions avoir en tête?

M. Bob Tarantino:

Selon moi, de façon générale, vous pouvez cerner un ensemble de principes directeurs, tirés de diverses approches théoriques, pour justifier pourquoi le droit d'auteur existe. Parmi ces principes, il y a le fait d'inciter la création et la communication d'oeuvres en s'assurant que les auteurs sont récompensés. Cependant, je crois qu'il est absolument crucial d'affirmer ou de ne pas oublier que ce principe doit être contrebalancé par un intérêt communautaire et culturel plus global pour permettre la libre circulation des idées et des activités d'expression culturelle.

Le défi auquel vous êtes confronté, bien sûr, c'est de trouver une façon de trouver un juste équilibre entre les divers intérêts et les divers mécanismes que vous mettez en place, ici, pour réaliser ces fonctions très distinctes. Il y a une tension, ici. C'est une tension permanente.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui.

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je ne crois pas nécessairement qu'il y a une façon de régler ça, mais je crois qu'on peut mettre en place un système, puis l'évaluer de façon continue pour cerner ses limites, là où il va trop loin et là où l'indemnisation est déficiente.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Dans la minute qu'il me reste... Madame Gendreau, vous avez mentionné les sociétés de gestion collective. J'aimerais vraiment savoir de quelle façon ces sociétés sont gérées, et savoir dans quelle mesure elles sont transparentes. Aviez-vous l'intention d'en discuter? Dans l'affirmative, ce serait peut-être le temps de nous le dire.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Oui. Je serai heureuse d'en parler.

Je comprends que les gens peuvent être préoccupés par la façon dont les sociétés sont gérées. Je crois que le fait que certaines sociétés ne seront plus obligées de se présenter devant la Commission suscitera peut-être encore plus de préoccupations.

Cependant, je sais qu'il y a des règles, par exemple, au sein de l'Union européenne, qui concernent la gestion interne de ces sociétés. Selon moi, de telles règles, même si les sociétés les trouvent probablement embêtantes, devraient être bien vues, précisément parce qu'elles donneraient à ces sociétés plus de légitimité dans le cadre de leur travail. Je vois de telles règles comme des façons d'améliorer la légitimité, plutôt que comme des obstacles au travail.

(1630)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Je vous cède la parole, monsieur Lametti.

M. David Lametti:

Merci.

Je pense que mon principal problème, c'est plus d'appeler les gens par leur nom de famille alors que je les connais depuis 20 ans.

Monsieur Tarantino, vous avez suggéré que les copies aux fins d'analyse computationnelle pourraient faire l'objet d'une exception liée à l'intelligence artificielle, l'IA, et à l'exploration de données. Vous croyez qu'une telle mesure nous permettrait d'atteindre nos objectifs? Faut-il y aller avec des « tels que » ou — comme quelqu'un d'autre l'a suggéré il y a deux ou trois semaines — faut-il prévoir une exception dans le cas des copies accessoires utilisées pour réaliser des analyses d'information? J'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez.

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je dois m'en remettre aux vues de notre comité. Ce n'est pas un point que nous avons abordé précisément auprès des membres, à part ce qui figure dans notre mémoire, soit que l'approche britannique pourrait être envisagée. Ce que je suggérerais, c'est d'en revenir à notre dispositif d'encadrement structurel. Regardons quel a été le résultat de la mise en place d'une exception pour l'analyse computationnelle au Royaume-Uni.

M. David Lametti:

Monsieur Chisick, avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter à ce sujet?

M. Casey Chisick:

Si ce à quoi vous faites référence concerne les reproductions temporaires pour les processus technologiques, l'exception 30.71, c'est un bon exemple d'une exception qui est décrite de façon vraiment générale, ce qui la rend vulnérable aux malentendus ou à l'abus.

Mentionnons par exemple la situation des diffuseurs qui affirment que tout le domaine de la diffusion, de l'intégration du contenu jusqu'à la prestation en public de l'oeuvre, mise sur des processus technologiques et que, par conséquent, il convient d'exempter toutes les copies. Il est possible que, si elle est bien définie, une telle exception pourrait être un mécanisme approprié pour composer avec les enjeux de l'exploration de données et de l'intelligence artificielle, mais il faut faire très attention à la façon dont on définit ces exceptions, de façon à vraiment cibler les fins escomptées et de façon, aussi, à ce qu'il ne soit pas possible de les exploiter à d'autres fins.

M. David Lametti:

Je vais m'adresser à M. Geist, si nous avons le temps.

Le président:

Veuillez répondre très rapidement.

M. Michael Geist:

Comme je l'ai mentionné, ma préférence serait une approche globale qui s'appuie sur l'expression « tels que ». Je crois vraiment qu'il faut quelque chose. Même si c'est prévu, les choses visées par l'expression « tels que » devraient inclure l'analyse informationnelle.

J'ai vu le premier ministre parler vendredi de l'importance de l'IA. Franchement, je ne crois pas que la disposition britannique va assez loin. Presque toutes les données que nous obtenons nous parviennent en raison de contrats. La capacité de conclure des contrats pour bénéficier de l'exception touchant l'analyse informationnelle représente un problème important. Il faut s'assurer que, lorsqu'on acquiert ces oeuvres, on a la capacité... On ne parle pas de republier ou de commercialiser de telles oeuvres: on parle de les utiliser à des fins d'analyse informationnelle. On ne devrait pas avoir à négocier ce droit dans le cadre de contrats. Il devrait s'agir d'une politique clairement définie dans la loi.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Lloyd, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je vais poursuivre là où j'étais rendu.

Le président:

En fait, vous avez cinq minutes. Désolé.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Ça change tout.

Monsieur Geist, il semble y avoir beaucoup de problèmes liés au modèle de gestion collective. Si un tel modèle n'existait pas, j'ai l'impression qu'on en aurait besoin d'un, parce que les coûts de transaction pour un artiste ou un écrivain sont tellement élevés qu'un regroupement est nécessaire. Y a-t-il une solution de rechange au modèle de gestion collective mentionnée dans vos recherches, une idée que vous pourriez proposer?

M. Michael Geist:

Actuellement, le marché offre une solution de rechange. J'ai mentionné les 1,4 million de livres électroniques que possède sous licence l'Université d'Ottawa. Ces livres ont été acquis par l'intermédiaire non pas d'une société de gestion collective, mais d'un certain nombre d'éditeurs et d'autres agrégateurs. En fait, dans bon nombre de cas, on offre sous différentes licences un même livre — parfois à perpétuité — parce que le détenteur du droit d'auteur offre le livre en question dans plusieurs ensembles de livres, différents forfaits. En fait, c'est quelque chose que les auteurs ou les éditeurs font tout le temps de nos jours.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Ça semble vraiment très intéressant. J'aime cette idée d'une mouvance vers le libre-marché, en quelque sorte, mais, d'après ce que nous ont dit les auteurs à qui nous avons parlé, ça ne semble pas... Je reviendrai à vous.

Monsieur Chisick, pouvez-vous formuler un commentaire à ce sujet? Est-ce que la possibilité pour les auteurs d'accorder des licences pour des livres numériques est une solution de remplacement appropriée aux sociétés de gestion collective?

M. Casey Chisick:

De ce que j'ai vu des auteurs qui ont de la difficulté à suivre ce qui se passe au sein du marché, ce n'était pas une solution complète. Il ne fait aucun doute que les licences transactionnelles — particulièrement dans le domaine de l'édition des livres — ont fait de grands pas au cours de la dernière décennie, environ. Cependant, ce modèle ne semble pas tenir compte de la pleine valeur de toutes les oeuvres qui sont utilisées. On pourrait dire que c'est quelque chose qui doit exister parallèlement à un modèle de licences collectives pouvant ramasser les restes.

Dans d'autres domaines où des licences sont accordées, les solutions axées sur le marché n'ont pas été efficaces du tout, comme, par exemple, dans le domaine de la musique, où la viabilité en tant que telle de la carrière d'un auteur ou d'un artiste dépend de sa capacité de recueillir des millions et des millions de micropaiements, des fractions de sous.

(1635)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Qu'en est-il des auteurs qui défendent leurs oeuvres contre la violation du droit d'auteur? Les auteurs moyens ont-ils les ressources financières pour intenter des poursuites sans modèle de licence collective? Pourraient-ils le faire?

M. Casey Chisick:

Non, ils ne pourraient pas. C'est quasiment impossible pour la grande majorité d'entre eux, sauf pour les artistes qui ont le plus de succès ou, franchement, les détenteurs de droits d'auteur qui ont plus de succès, et je parle ici des éditeurs et des autres intervenants — le 1 % ou très près de ça — qui peuvent demander réparation en cas de violation du droit d'auteur. Ironiquement, dans le cadre de la ronde précédente de réforme du droit d'auteur, en 1997, c'était l'une des raisons pour lesquelles on avait tenté, par l'intermédiaire de politiques, d'encourager les artistes et les auteurs à miser sur la gestion collective.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je veux permettre à M. Geist d'avoir la possibilité de répliquer. Selon moi, ça ne serait que juste.

M. Michael Geist:

Je vous en suis reconnaissant. Merci.

Je ne dis pas qu'il ne devrait y avoir aucune société de gestion collective; je crois qu'elles ont un rôle à jouer. Ce que je dis, c'est que nous avons vu, surtout dans le marché de la publication universitaire, qu'elles ont été remplacées, dans les faits, par des solutions de rechange. C'est le libre-marché à l'oeuvre. Avec certains étudiants, j'ai réalisé des études sur les principaux éditeurs canadiens, y compris un certain nombre de ceux qui ont comparu devant le Comité, et quasiment tout ce qu'ils ont rendu accessible sous licence est ce pour quoi nos universités ont obtenu des licences.

Lorsque certains auteurs demandent: « Pourquoi est-ce que j'obtiens moins d'Access Copyright? » il faut reconnaître qu'une partie des revenus d'Accès Copyright sortent du pays. Il y a aussi une part destinée à l'administration, puis il y en a une grosse partie destinée à ce que les responsables appellent le système de remboursement, pour un répertoire. Ça n'a absolument rien à voir avec l'utilisation. C'est tout simplement lié au répertoire. Le répertoire exclut toutes les oeuvres qui ont plus de 20 ans et toutes les oeuvres numériques.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Et que dites-vous de la défense des gens, comme M. Chisick en a parlé? Au total, 99 % des auteurs ne peuvent pas se défendre eux-mêmes en cas de violation du droit d'auteur de leurs oeuvres. De quelle façon remplacez-vous ça? Quelle est la solution de rechange?

M. Michael Geist:

Dans de nombreux cas, lorsque ces oeuvres sont octroyées par licence, les éditeurs ont les ressources nécessaires pour passer à l'action, le cas échéant. Cependant, la notion que, pour une raison quelconque, nous ayons surtout besoin de sociétés de gestion collective pour intenter des poursuites contre des établissements d'enseignement me semble un peu erronée.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Eh bien, pour protéger...

M. Michael Geist:

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, je ne crois pas que quiconque propose de façon crédible que les établissements d'enseignement essaient de violer les droits d'auteur. En fait, nous voyons certains établissements d'enseignement — même au Québec — qui se dotent de licences de gestion collective auprès de Copibec et qui obtiennent, en plus, des licences transactionnelles supplémentaires parce qu'ils doivent le faire et les payer. Les méchants, ici, ce ne sont pas les établissements d'enseignement.

M. Dane Lloyd:

De qui parlez-vous?

M. Michael Geist:

Je ne crois pas qu'il y a des contrefacteurs majeurs dans le domaine de l'édition de livres.

M. Casey Chisick:

Pour que ce soit clair, le point que j'ai formulé au sujet du fait que les licences et la gestion collective pourraient exister parallèlement ne consistait pas à dire que c'était principalement à des fins d'application de la loi. Je suis d'accord avec M. Geist: l'objectif, c'est de rendre inutile la prise de mesures d'application de la loi en s'assurant que toutes les utilisations pour lesquelles on peut accorder des licences et relativement auxquelles des licences sont appropriées font l'objet de licences dans la pratique.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Puis-je ajouter qu'un des aspects qu'on ne mentionne pas souvent, selon moi, c'est que, avec toutes les nouvelles licences que les éditeurs fournissent aux universités, eh bien, peut-être qu'une des sources de mécontentement tient au fait que je ne suis pas sûre que l'argent se rende jusqu'aux auteurs qui ont signé un contrat avec les éditeurs. Il y a des licences entre des éditeurs et des universités ou n'importe quel autre genre de groupe et, oui, on regarde les modalités. Encore une fois, le fait d'accorder une licence pour qu'un de nos livres se retrouve dans une bibliothèque est différent du fait d'accorder une licence pour qu'un livre soit utilisé dans une salle de classe, mais oublions cette différence pour l'instant. Je ne suis pas sûr que la situation actuelle soit vraiment bénéfique pour les auteurs, qui ne reçoivent peut-être pas nécessairement d'argent malgré toutes ces licences octroyées.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. C'est bien de voir toutes les têtes qui se lèvent et qui se baissent en même temps.

Madame Ceasar-Chavannes, vous avez cinq minutes.

(1640)

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je tiens à remercier tous les témoins. J'ai cinq minutes, alors je vais essayer de poser le plus de questions possible.

Monsieur Chisick, au début de votre déclaration, vous avez dit être d'accord avec les points de vue de nombreux témoins qui ont comparu ici avant vous. Selon vous, quelles sont les choses avec lesquelles vous n'étiez pas d'accord tandis que nous évaluons certaines des recommandations que nous allons formuler?

M. Casey Chisick:

C'est une excellente question. Il est évident que je suis préoccupé. Je suis en désaccord avec le point de vue que M. Geist a exprimé au sujet de la prolongation de la durée, par exemple. L'exemple qu'il a donné de l'auteur qui se réveille et décide de ne pas écrire de livre en raison de la durée du droit d'auteur de 50 ans après son décès, plutôt que de 70 ans est peut-être approprié, mais la durée du droit d'auteur est extrêmement pertinente à la décision des éditeurs d'investir ou non, et à quel niveau, dans la publication et la promotion de l'oeuvre.

C'est peut-être pertinent ou non pour la personne qui écrit — même si je suis sûr que des écrivains se réveillent le matin en se demandant s'ils vont devoir se trouver un autre emploi —, mais du point de vue commercial, c'est quelque chose qui devient de plus en plus difficile chaque jour, lorsqu'on regarde le niveau d'investissement dans la communication de la créativité, qui est aussi une composante cruciale du système de droit d'auteur. Selon moi, la prolongation de la durée de la vie plus 50 ans à la durée de la vie plus 70 ans est quelque chose qu'on attend depuis longtemps.

Certains témoins devant le Comité ont laissé entendre que le droit d'auteur lié à une oeuvre audiovisuelle devrait revenir à l'écrivain ou au directeur ou aux deux. Je suis en désaccord là aussi pour des raisons similaires. Tout est lié au fonctionnement pratique du système de droit d'auteur et à la façon dont ces idées peuvent être appliquées en pratique. En tant qu'avocat d'un cabinet privé qui interagit avec toutes sortes d'intervenants différents du milieu du droit d'auteur, ma principale préoccupation est de ne pas mettre en place des composantes du système qui nuiront ou constitueront les obstacles perpétuels à l'exploitation couronnée de succès des oeuvres commerciales. Il est très important, maintenant, à l'ère numérique, de s'assurer qu'il y a moins de friction, pas plus.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Geist, vous avez parlé de la manne associée au fait qu'on prolonge la protection à la durée à la durée de vie plus 70 ans. De quelle façon réévalueriez-vous la « manne » qui découlerait de l'adoption de l'AEUMC. Plus précisément, de quelle façon tout ça pourrait-il être recalibré dans les limites de la loi?

M. Michael Geist:

C'est une excellente question. Il y a vraiment, en fait, deux aspects.

Premièrement, y a-t-il une application qui respecterait les exigences prévues dans la loi tout en permettant de réduire un peu les préjudices? Lorsque M. Chisick dit que, ce dont il est question ici, c'est une entreprise qui prend une décision d'investir ou non dans un livre, c'est peut-être très bien pour tous les livres qui commenceront à être écrits une fois la durée définie, à partir d'aujourd'hui, mais la durée s'appliquera à toutes sortes d'oeuvres qui ne relèvent pas encore du domaine public. Les maisons d'édition bénéficieront maintenant de 20 années de plus puisqu'une décision avait déjà été prise et auront droit à des revenus supplémentaires.

Il faudrait envisager la mise en place d'un genre d'exigence d'enregistrement pour ces 20 années supplémentaires. Comme Mme Gendreau l'a souligné, il y a un petit nombre d'oeuvres qui peuvent avoir une valeur économique. Les propriétaires des droits décideront d'inscrire ces oeuvres pour les 20 années de plus, parce qu'ils peuvent en tirer quelque chose, mais la vaste majorité des autres oeuvres pourraient relever du domaine public.

De plus, lorsqu'on envisage des réformes plus générales et qu'on parle du besoin de trouver un juste équilibre, il ne faut pas oublier que la balance penche déjà d'un côté. Je crois que cette situation doit avoir une incidence sur le genre de recommandations et, au bout du compte, de réforme pour lesquelles nous opterons, si l'une des principales réformes nous a déjà été imposée.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Si vous aviez chacun de vous une recommandation à formuler, par rapport à ce que nous devrions étudier dans le cadre de notre examen, qu'est-ce que ce serait?

Allez-y.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Je vous recommanderais de veiller à ce que les entreprises numériques — au Canada ou à l'étranger — qui prennent activement des décisions d'affaires où il est question d'oeuvres protégées par le droit d'auteur aient une responsabilité et paient quelque chose. D'accord, si elles sont entièrement passives, alors elles sont entièrement passives, mais, d'après ce que nous savons aujourd'hui, il semble que la plupart des entités qui se déclarent passives ne le sont pas vraiment; elles essaient seulement de se soustraire à leur responsabilité. C'est ma plus grande préoccupation.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Est-ce que je pourrais...? Non?

Je pose la même question à quiconque voudrait y répondre.

M. Michael Geist:

D'accord, je vais me lancer.

Je dirais qu'il faut s'assurer que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur puisse continuer à s'adapter à l'évolution de la technologie. La meilleure façon de le faire, c'est de s'assurer que l'utilisation équitable offre une certaine souplesse — ce qui revient à donner l'exemple — et que l'utilisation équitable s'applique autant au monde numérique qu'au monde analogique. Cela supposerait de prévoir une exception aux règles interdisant le contournement des mesures de protection technologiques lorsqu'il s'agit d'utilisation équitable.

(1645)

M. Casey Chisick:

Je crois qu'il serait crucial d'ajouter dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur une disposition concernant les injonctions de blocage de sites et de désindexation. Je dis cela parce que énormément de gens se tournent vers des sites à l'étranger pour échapper à la surveillance des tribunaux canadiens, alors que ce qu'ils font est potentiellement légitime. Je ne comprends pas comment quiconque pourrait affirmer que c'est une bonne chose. Selon moi, il faudrait intégrer un système équilibré à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur de façon à régler les problèmes soulignés par M. Geist relativement au blocage excessif, à la liberté d'expression, etc., tout en faisant en sorte que les Canadiens ne puissent pas faire indirectement ce qui leur est interdit de faire directement. Je crois que ce serait une modification de la loi dans le bon sens.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Pourriez-vous choisir une recommandation que vous aimeriez faire?

Mme Catherine Lovrics:

La recommandation que nous voulons faire concerne surtout les professionnels. Il y a des détails techniques dans la loi qui, une fois réglés, permettraient d'augmenter de beaucoup la certitude, mais ce n'est probablement pas le genre de détails qui ont été communiqués au Comité jusqu'ici.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

D'accord.

Mme Catherine Lovrics:

Premièrement, il faut des éclaircissements en ce qui concerne les droits des auteurs sur les oeuvres créées en collaboration et les droits des copropriétaires en vertu de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Présentement, sous le régime de la loi, qui peut dire quels sont les droits des copropriéaires d'une oeuvre protégée s'il n'y a pas d'entente? Peuvent-ils exploiter l'oeuvre? Un copropriétaire a-t-il besoin de la permission de l'autre? Pour nous, à titre de professionnels, c'est un problème très évident, mais ce ne l'est pas nécessairement pour nos clients.

Deuxièmement, il y a les droits d'une oeuvre commandée ou d'une oeuvre future. En ce qui concerne les oeuvres futures, je crois que la plupart du temps, les ententes couvrent la cession à venir. Néanmoins, sur le plan technique, le débat n'est pas réglé quant à la question de savoir si cela est valide sous le régime de la loi. Voilà les recommandations que je fais au nom de l'IPIC.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Merci, je crois que j'ai un peu dépassé mon temps, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Juste un tout petit peu. Merci beaucoup.

Vous avez à nouveau la parole, monsieur Lloyd.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Je tiens à présenter mes excuses aux autres témoins. Je sais que je ne m'adresse pas assez à vous, mais j'ai encore une question à poser à M. Chisick.

Je m'interroge à propos du droit réversif. Un artiste canadien a témoigné devant le comité du patrimoine à propos du droit réversif. Il avait des préoccupations à ce sujet, et je me demandais si vous pouviez nous parler d'une solution de rechange et des répercussions.

M. Casey Chisick:

Vous parlez sans doute de Bryan Adams...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Oui.

M. Casey Chisick:

... et de sa proposition d'adopter un modèle de résiliation de certains droits, similaire à celui des Américains.

C'est effectivement une approche possible. L'un des avantages du modèle américain sur le modèle canadien de résiliation des droits, c'est qu'il exige au moins que l'artiste se manifeste pour réclamer ses droits. Il y a une période définie durant laquelle les droits peuvent être réclamés. Il faut qu'un avis soit présenté, ce qui permet aux gens de mettre leurs affaires en ordre en conséquence. Je crois que la proposition de M. Adams n'arrive pas au bon moment. Je crois qu'il serait malavisé de permettre la résiliation des droits après une période de 35 ans, comme cela se fait aux États-Unis. Selon moi, c'est trop rapide, et ce, pour toutes sortes de raisons. Par exemple, il y a les incitatifs à l'investissement. Malgré tout, c'est une approche que l'on pourrait prendre en considération.

Une autre approche qu'il faudrait étudier et qui a été adoptée pratiquement partout dans le monde serait d'éliminer entièrement le droit réversif et de laisser au marché le soin des intérêts à long terme en matière de droits d'auteur. Je doute que ce soit par coïncidence que, dans littéralement tous les pays du monde où il y a déjà eu un droit réversif — y compris au Royaume-Uni, où ce droit a été inventé —, il a été abrogé ou modifié de façon à être géré par contrat pendant la vie de l'auteur. D'après ce que j'en sais, il n'y a qu'au Canada où ce n'est plus le cas. Cela aussi en dit long.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Monsieur Geist, peut-être pourriez-vous faire un commentaire rapide: vous avez parlé d'abroger ou de modifier les dispositions relatives au droit d'auteur de la Couronne. Je me demandais si vous pouviez fournir plus de détails sur l'application du droit d'auteur de la Couronne. Le sujet a déjà été abordé ici au Comité, mais jamais en profondeur. Ensuite, pourriez-vous parler des avantages que l'on pourrait obtenir si on l'éliminait?

M. Michael Geist:

Bien sûr. Je vais parler du droit d'auteur de la Couronne dans un instant.

Avant, je voulais faire un commentaire sur le droit réversif. J'ai l'impression qu'il y a eu énormément d'investissements dans ce secteur aux États-Unis, sans qu'on se préoccupe de la façon dont le système fonctionne, pour redonner leurs droits aux auteurs.

Vous avez demandé plus tôt comment chaque créateur s'y prenait pour faire appliquer le droit d'auteur. Selon moi, le concept d'une approche qui reviendrait à dire: « Vous devez vous occuper de tout. Vous devriez être en mesure de négocier l'ensemble des droits avec les grandes maisons de disque et les grands éditeurs », désavantage clairement les créateurs.

Mme Gendreau a mentionné que les ententes entre les auteurs et les éditeurs dans un monde de plus en plus numérique faisaient partie du problème, et vous avez posé une question sur ce que fait Bryan Adams. Cela m'amène à dire que nous n'avons pas choisi la bonne cible. Le gros du problème, entre les créateurs et les intermédiaires qui aident à faciliter la création et qui acheminent les produits jusqu'au marché — les éditeurs, les maisons de disque, etc. —, c'est que le déséquilibre des forces est important. C'est ce qu'on veut corriger avec ces solutions.

En ce qui concerne le droit d'auteur de la Couronne, j'ai siégé pendant de nombreuses années au conseil de CanLII, l'Institut canadien d'information juridique, et nous avons constaté qu'il est extrêmement difficile d'utiliser des documents juridiques comme des décisions du tribunal ou d'autres documents gouvernementaux. D'ailleurs, il y a eu des discussions sur Twitter à ce sujet aujourd'hui: il était question précisément des problèmes auxquels font face les agrégateurs financés par les avocats du pays lorsqu'ils essaient de s'assurer que le public a un accès libre et gratuit aux documents juridiques. C'est un problème très important. C'est un exemple typique du modèle de droit d'auteur de la Couronne où le gouvernement est le propriétaire par défaut, ce qui fait qu'une autorisation d'utilisation est requise. Vous ne pouvez même pas essayer de regrouper à des fins commerciales certains des documents publiés par le gouvernement.

(1650)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Y a-t-il des raisons légitimes d'avoir un droit d'auteur de la Couronne? Il me semble qu'il y a de bonnes raisons pour lesquelles on devrait le conserver.

M. Michael Geist:

Ma collègue, Mme Elizabeth Judge, a écrit un excellent article qui aborde l'histoire du droit d'auteur de la Couronne.

Au départ, je crois qu'on voulait s'assurer que les documents du gouvernement étaient fiables et crédibles et qu'ils fassent autorité. De nos jours, je crois que cet enjeu est beaucoup moins important.

J'imagine aussi que toutes les façons que nous avons aujourd'hui d'utiliser les documents gouvernementaux n'existaient pas, lorsque cela a été adopté. Il suffit de penser à l'évolution des systèmes GPS et à d'autres types de services s'appuyant sur le gouvernement ouvert ou les données ouvertes du gouvernement. L'idée de conserver une disposition sur le droit d'auteur qui restreint cela me semble aux antipodes de la conception d'une loi adaptée au contexte technologique actuel.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Disons que le gouvernement crée une chose qui a de la valeur pour lui, mais qui perdrait cette valeur si elle devait être libre en vertu de la loi. Croyez-vous que le droit d'auteur de la Couronne est légitime dans ce genre de cas?

M. Michael Geist:

Nous sommes le gouvernement. C'est nous qui finançons ce genre de choses. J'étais ravi d'apprendre que le Conseil du Trésor — je crois — a annoncé il y a quelques jours qu'il allait changer sa position sur les logiciels ouverts: lorsque c'est possible, il priorisera l'utilisation des logiciels ouverts. Je crois que cette approche tient compte du fait qu'il s'agit de l'argent des contribuables, et que c'est la chose à faire lorsque c'est possible. Un autre exemple serait l'octroi de licences aux journaux locaux par Creative Commons.

Dans certains domaines, on peut se demander pourquoi le gouvernement ne pourrait pas réaliser un profit, mais le droit d'auteur n'est pas un de ces domaines. La Loi sur le droit d'auteur ne devrait pas être utilisée pour empêcher cela.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Le président:

La parole va à M. Sheehan. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci à tous de votre témoignage. Nous en arrivons à la fin de notre étude, alors c'est une bonne chose que vous soyez ici. Nous pouvons vous poser des questions sur ce que nous avons entendu. Le Comité a parcouru le pays d'une côte à l'autre, et nous avons entendu le témoignage de toutes sortes de personnes qui avaient de très bonnes idées.

Les représentants de la Fédération nationale des communications, la FNC, ont proposé de créer une nouvelle catégorie d'oeuvres assujetties au droit d'auteur: les oeuvres journalistiques, qui seraient gérées collectivement. Ainsi, les Google et les Facebook de ce monde devraient rémunérer les journalistes pour les articles publiés sur Internet, sur leurs sites. Avez-vous des commentaires à ce sujet? J'aimerais aussi surtout savoir comment cela se distingue de l'article 11 de la proposition de Directive sur le droit d'auteur dans le marché unique numérique de l'Union européenne.

Michael, vous pouvez commencer.

M. Michael Geist:

Je crois que l'article 11 est un problème. Je crois que cette approche a déjà été tentée dans d'autres pays, et elle ne fonctionne pas. Il y a deux ou trois pays en Europe où cela a été tenté. Les agrégateurs assujettis à cette disposition ont simplement arrêté de partager les liens, et les éditeurs ont conclu, au bout du compte, que cela créait plus de problèmes que cela n'en réglait.

Je crois que nous devons prendre conscience du fait que les journalistes ont besoin du droit d'auteur et des dispositions sur l'utilisation équitable, tout autant que nombre d'autres acteurs. La mise en place des restrictions qui favorisent les journalistes entraîne des risques considérables, surtout vu l'importance de la presse.

Je me suis aussi intéressé aux groupes qui sont venus témoigner à ce sujet, et je crois qu'il faut souligner que certains d'entre eux ont octroyé des licences à titre perpétuel pour leurs oeuvres à des établissements d'enseignement. J'ai un exemple parfait à vous donner. Je sais que l'éditeur du Winnipeg Free Press a beaucoup parlé de cet enjeu. L'Université de l'Alberta a un excellent site Web où toutes ses oeuvres sous licence sont accessibles au public. Des licences ont été octroyées à titre perpétuel pour tous les numéros, littéralement, du Winnipeg Free Press pour plus d'une centaine d'années. Les éditeurs ont effectivement vendu les droits pour utilisation dans les salles de classe à des fins d'études ou pour une foule d'utilisations, et de façon permanente.

Respectueusement, je trouve un peu inconvenant qu'une personne, d'un côté, vende des droits grâce à un système de licence et demande, d'autre part, pourquoi elle ne serait pas rémunérée pour ces nouvelles utilisations et pourquoi on ne modifierait pas le régime du droit d'auteur en conséquence.

(1655)

M. Terry Sheehan:

Quelqu'un d'autre veut-il faire des commentaires?

Oui, madame Gendreau.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Il est clair que nous sommes en train d'assister à la disparition des médias traditionnels devant les médias en ligne.

Certains affirment que, aux dernières élections provinciales au Québec, 70 ou même 80 % du budget publicitaire des partis politiques est allé à des fournisseurs de services de l'étranger.

Il y a des journaux qui ferment, et les médias ont de la difficulté à nous tenir au courant des dernières nouvelles. À présent que les médias sont en difficulté et qu'il y a des fermetures, certains avancent l'idée que le gouvernement devrait les subventionner. D'un côté, il y a des gens qui n'achètent pas de journaux ou qui ne peuvent même pas accéder aux médias traditionnels, et de l'autre, les recettes publicitaires vont à des entreprises étrangères qui ne paient pas d'impôt ici. Le gouvernement perd une part de l'assiette fiscale à cause de cela, et, en plus, on lui demande de subventionner les journaux et les médias parce qu'ils ont besoin d'aide pour survivre. Devinez qui s'en met plein les poches.

Je crois que la solution à ce genre de problème est d'offrir une rémunération adéquate aux journalistes lorsque leurs articles sont utilisés. Ce n'est peut-être pas, d'un point de vue technique, la meilleure façon de procéder — j'en suis consciente —, mais je crois qu'il y a moyen de veiller à ce que les médias, qui doivent payer leurs journalistes et qui veulent que des enquêtes journalistiques soient menées au Canada, pour le bien du pays, puissent récupérer leur argent et s'assurer que leur secteur est dynamique et utile. Ils ne veulent pas disparaître et que les gens ne reçoivent plus que les gros titres sur leur téléphone.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Ce vous dites est très intéressant.

Nous avons beaucoup parlé de la protection du savoir et de la culture autochtones par le droit d'auteur. Nous avons eu beaucoup de témoignages à ce sujet. J'allais en lire quelques-uns, mais peut-être que l'un d'entre vous aurait des recommandations à formuler à propos du droit d'auteur autochtone.

Peut-être voudriez-vous poursuivre.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

C'est une question très délicate, ainsi qu'une question de portée internationale. C'est très difficile de prendre des mesures concrètes par rapport aux droits d'auteur autochtones, étant donné qu'ils diffèrent fondamentalement à de nombreux égards des droits d'auteur habituels. Malgré tout, nous pouvons prendre exemple sur d'autres pays qui nous ressemblent. L'Australie et la Nouvelle-Zélande ont essayé de mettre en place des systèmes pour aider les Aborigènes à défendre leurs oeuvres.

J'ai tout de même une préoccupation: il ne faut pas oublier qu'il y a aussi des auteurs autochtones contemporains. Je voudrais éviter que tous les auteurs autochtones aient l'impression d'être exclus de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur actuelle, au profit d'un autre type de régime. Je crois qu'il y a différents enjeux stratégiques ici.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Masse a la parole pour deux minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Je vais revenir au sujet du droit d'auteur de la Couronne.

Aux États-Unis, cela n'existe pas, essentiellement. Je crois que les gens tiennent surtout compte de l'aspect théorique, mais j'aimerais aussi savoir quelle incidence cela aura ici sur les projets cinématographiques dans le secteur privé?

Peut-être pourriez-vous répondre rapidement. Je sais que j'ai seulement deux minutes. Il y a des considérations d'ordre économique plus grandes qu'on le croit.

M. Bob Tarantino:

Dans certains secteurs, par exemple de celui des documentaristes, il peut être extrêmement ardu — même avec les conseils d'un expert juridique — de déterminer si une oeuvre appartient aux Archives nationales ou s'il existe un type de licence donnée pour une oeuvre en particulier.

(1700)

M. Casey Chisick:

Le manque d'uniformité dans le processus d'octroi de licence vient compliquer encore plus la tâche. Pour obtenir la licence de certaines oeuvres, vous devez d'abord déterminer à quel ministère de quelle province vous devez présenter votre demande, et vous n'êtes même pas certain d'obtenir une réponse. Cela rend les choses extrêmement compliquées, et je crois que cela tient au fait qu'on confie la gestion du droit d'auteur à des organisations qui n'en voient pas vraiment l'intérêt.

M. Brian Masse:

Monsieur Geist.

M. Michael Geist:

En outre, la Cour suprême du Canada entendra en février l'affaire Keatley Surveying Inc. c. Teranet Inc. Pour être parfaitement transparent, je dois dire que j'ai fourni des services à l'une des parties en cause. L'affaire concerne les dossiers de registres fonciers de l'Ontario. Dans les faits, les gouvernements avancent que le simple fait que des documents d'arpentage ont été présentés au gouvernement dans le cadre du processus fait que ces documents sont assujettis aux droits d'auteur de la Couronne.

On s'éloigne donc d'une application moins restrictive du droit d'auteur de la Couronne. En outre, des gouvernements soutiennent devant les tribunaux que des créations du secteur privé sont assujetties aux droits d'auteur de la Couronne lorsqu'elles ont été présentées sous le régime de la loi.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Je crois aussi qu'il existe déjà dans le système canadien un mécanisme d'octroi de licence qui autorise la reproduction de lois avec l'autorisation générale du gouvernement, sans autorisation particulière. Ce n'est cependant qu'une toute petite partie du droit d'auteur de la Couronne.

Il y a beaucoup de pays qui vivent très bien sans droit d'auteur de la Couronne. D'un autre côté, nous avons repris le régime du droit d'auteur de la Couronne britannique et l'avons renforcé, mais je ne crois pas que nous devrions continuer sur cette voie. Je crois que cela tombe sous le sens que les documents gouvernementaux devraient être publics, étant donné que le gouvernement représente le public. Ce que je veux dire, c'est que le public est théoriquement l'auteur des oeuvres. Je crois que cela cause des problèmes non seulement pour les lois, mais également pour les documents et les décisions juridiques. Un fait intéressant, il arrive que des juges reproduisent les notes de leurs avocats. Il y a eu une affaire là-dessus, et c'était très intéressant.

Le président:

Merci.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Malgré tout, je doute que nous perdions beaucoup en abrogeant la plupart des dispositions relatives au droit de la Couronne.

M. Brian Masse:

Le gouvernement s'y connaît dans la fiction.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

Le président:

Merci.

Il nous reste encore du temps, alors nous allons faire un autre tour. J'interviens rarement, mais il y a une question que j'aimerais poser aux témoins.

Nous avons entendu des opinions divergentes à propos de l'examen quinquennal prévu par la loi. Très rapidement, pourriez-vous nous donner votre opinion là-dessus? Devrait-il y avoir un examen quinquennal prévu par la loi ou devrait-il y avoir autre chose?

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Évidemment, le Parlement peut faire ce qu'il veut et décider de ne pas entreprendre d'examen quinquennal la prochaine fois.

J'ai réfléchi à la question, et je crois que, dans ce cas-ci, l'examen quinquennal est important. À mon sens, nous avons tellement tardé à accorder des droits que le régime des droits d'auteur canadien est maintenant rempli de lacunes. Si c'était un fromage suisse, il aurait plus de trous que de fromage.

Un exemple a déjà été effleuré: si on n'utilise pas l'exception de copie pour usage privé, alors peut-être qu'on pourrait utiliser l'exception pour la reproduction accessoire. Essentiellement, si l'une ne fonctionne pas, alors essayons l'autre.

Le président:

Merci.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Je crois que dans ce contexte, un examen serait maintenant nécessaire.

Avons-nous besoin d'un examen tous les cinq ans? Selon moi, peut-être pas.

Le président:

Je ne serai probablement plus président.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Nous devons aussi laisser aux tribunaux le temps de trancher les affaires et tout le reste.

Je crois que c'est important maintenant, si nous voulons éviter de demeurer ancrés dans ce qu'il y a dans la loi présentement.

M. Michael Geist:

L'examen s'est avéré très intéressant. J'ajouterais aussi qu'il est peut-être un peu tôt.

Revenons en arrière. Les grandes modifications de la loi ont été faites vers la fin des années 1980, puis vers la fin des années 1990, puis à nouveau, bien sûr, en 2012. Il s'écoule habituellement de 10 à 15 ans entre chaque modification importante.

À mon avis, cinq ans, c'est habituellement trop peu pour que le marché et le public intègrent pleinement les modifications, et ça ne nous donne pas le temps de procéder à des analyses fondées sur des données probantes pour savoir s'il faut de nouvelles réformes.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Chisick.

M. Casey Chisick:

Je suis d'accord sur le fond avec ce que Mme Gendreau a dit, soit qu'un examen quinquennal était approprié, vu ce qui s'est passé en 2012. Cependant, en principe, je crois que le Parlement devrait avoir une certaine marge de manoeuvre pour décider du moment où examiner la loi, comme c'est le cas pour d'autres lois.

(1705)

Mme Catherine Lovrics:

Nous n'avons pas soumis la question à notre comité, alors prenez ce que je dis comme une sorte de commentaire préliminaire: je crois, personnellement, qu'un examen quinquennal est tout à fait approprié dans ces circonstances.

Un exemple très simple serait l'intelligence artificielle. En 2012, cela n'avait pas été pris en considération, alors c'est surtout pour ce genre de choses. Il faudrait penser à des examens plus courts, qui portent seulement sur les technologies émergentes ou sur l'évolution du droit pendant la période.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

J'aimerais revenir au droit d'auteur de la Couronne, mais avant, j'ai un commentaire rapide à faire. Si la Convention de Berne avait été rédigée sous le régime de la loi en vigueur, je crois que son droit d'auteur serait sur le point de s'éteindre. C'était juste pour vous faire réfléchir.

Disons que le Comité voulait attirer l'attention sur le droit d'auteur de la Couronne, quelle devrait être la licence de publication de notre rapport? Quelqu'un le sait-il?

M. Michael Geist:

Je crois que le gouvernement a montré l'exemple jusqu'ici avec ses nouvelles locales et Creative Commons. Pour être parfaitement honnête, je ne sais pas pourquoi tout ce que le gouvernement produit n'est pas publié en vertu d'une licence Creative Commons.

Le gouvernement utilise effectivement une licence ouverte. Cependant, pour avoir une meilleure visibilité et aux fins de l'uniformisation et de la prise en charge informatique, je crois qu'il faudrait utiliser une licence Creative Commons très ouverte.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

M. Bob Tarantino:

Personnellement, je soutiens la proposition de M. Geist. Je recommanderais soit une licence CC0, soit une licence CC BY.

M. Casey Chisick:

Je n'ai pas vraiment de préférence pour un type de licence ou un autre, mais je suis d'accord pour dire que la majeure partie des documents gouvernementaux devraient être diffusés en plus grande quantité et plus largement. C'est pour le mieux.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Je suis d'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aime quand cela va vite. Merci.

Il y a un sujet que nous n'avons pas abordé du tout au cours de l'étude, et je le regrette. Je parle des brevets de logiciel. J'imagine que vous avez tous une opinion sur le sujet.

Pour commencer, très rapidement, quelle est votre position quant aux brevets de logiciel? Est-ce une bonne chose ou une mauvaise chose? Quelqu'un voudrait-il en parler?

M. Michael Geist:

Eh bien, on ne parle pas ici de droit d'auteur au sens propre, mais je crois que, si nous nous fions à ce qui s'est fait dans d'autres pays, le brevetage à l'excès qu'on voit souvent finit par créer un enchevêtrement de brevets qui fait obstacle à l'innovation. Ce n'est pas une bonne chose.

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Je dirais que les brevets informatiques sont la face cachée des programmes informatiques. Au départ, les programmes informatiques n'étaient pas censés être brevetés, alors c'est pourquoi on a commencé à utiliser le droit d'auteur. Le droit d'auteur était une solution simple, rapide et à long terme. Je crois que cela a empêché d'examiner la question et de trouver quelque chose de beaucoup plus approprié pour ce genre d'activité créatrice qui, généralement, a une durée de vie plutôt courte et qui évolue par paliers.

Je ne crois pas que c'est quelque chose que nous pourrions faire au Canada, mais, à l'échelle internationale, c'est une question que l'on devrait étudier, parce qu'elle offre des possibilités très intéressantes. Il y a une foule de problèmes qui tiennent uniquement aux ordinateurs. Ce serait intéressant de chercher à régler ces problèmes à l'aide de mesures de protection adaptées spécifiquement aux logiciels, au lieu de tout assujettir aux droits d'auteur.

Dans une certaine mesure, depuis que les logiciels sont assujettis à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, la situation est difficile.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends. Je n'ai pas suffisamment de temps pour de longues réponses, mais je vous suis reconnaissant de vos commentaires.

Monsieur Tarantino?

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je suis de l'avis de Mme Gendreau.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aime les motions d'adoption.

Oui, allez-y.

Mme Catherine Lovrics:

L'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada a un comité qui collabore actuellement avec l'Office de la propriété intellectuelle du Canada sur cette même question.

Il se peut que des conseils viennent conjointement de l'OPIC et du travail de ce comité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne faisais que jeter un coup d'oeil rapide. Si les logiciels étaient toujours conçus en vertu de la loi actuelle sur le droit d'auteur, je pense que ce qui est élaboré pour n'importe quelle loi ne s'appliquerait pas au droit d'auteur. C'est une manière inquiétante de voir les choses. C'est un peu dépassé.

Notre régime de droit d'auteur n'est-il pas assez solide en soi pour protéger les logiciels?

M. Michael Geist:

Je dois admettre que je ne pense pas que nous... Étant donné la prolifération des logiciels qui s'appliquent à presque tous les aspects de notre vie, des appareils dans nos maisons aux voitures que nous conduisons en passant par une myriade de choses différentes, il semble que les gens ne manquent pas de motivation pour créer et que les risques à cet égard ne sont pas importants.

Cela met en évidence la raison pour laquelle le fait de toujours chercher à renforcer les règles de propriété intellectuelle, qu'il s'agisse de brevets ou de droits d'auteur, en tant que mécanisme de stimulation du marché, ne tient pas compte de ce qui se passe sur les marchés. Très souvent, ce ne sont pas du tout les lois sur la PI qui sont essentiellement importantes. Ce qui devient important, c'est le fait d'être le premier à mettre son produit sur le marché, la façon de le faire et le cycle continuel d'innovation. La protection de la PI est vraiment secondaire.

M. Casey Chisick:

Il y a beaucoup de problèmes, dont nous avons abordé certains aujourd'hui, et les brevets de logiciel en sont un, et si nous sommes pour les examiner sérieusement, nous devons le faire ainsi. Nous devons prendre du recul et examiner le genre de comportement que nous essayons de promouvoir, les types de lois qui favorisent ce comportement et la meilleure façon d'atteindre cet équilibre au Canada, tout en tenant compte de nos obligations internationales en vertu de divers traités.

Les brevets de logiciel sont un problème. Le droit d'auteur de la Couronne en est un autre. Je pense que, si nous voulons déterminer si le droit d'auteur de la Couronne est nécessaire ou s'il atteint ses objectifs, nous devons comprendre ce qu'il est censé faire avant de pouvoir déterminer si nous le faisons. La réversibilité en est un troisième.

(1710)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La raison pour laquelle je pose des questions au sujet de tout cela, c'est pour établir un lien avec un mouvement émergent, surtout aux États-Unis, appelé le droit de réparer. Je suis certain que vous connaissez cela également. Vous êtes au courant de l'affaire John Deere. Y a-t-il des commentaires à ce sujet et sur la façon dont nous pouvons lier cela au droit d'auteur, afin que l'on puisse s'assurer que, lorsqu'on achète un produit comme un BlackBerry...? Si je veux en faire l'entretien, je devrais avoir le droit de le faire.

M. Michael Geist:

En effet. Les réformes de 2012 sur les règles anti-contournement ont établi certaines des règles de verrouillage numérique les plus restrictives au monde. Même les États-Unis, qui ont fait pression sur nous pour que nous adoptions ces règles, ont reconnu de façon soutenue que de nouvelles exceptions doivent s'y appliquer.

Selon moi, ce point figure tout en haut de la liste. Nous venons de voir les États-Unis créer une exception précise concernant le droit de réparer. Le secteur agricole est très préoccupé par sa capacité de réparer certains des appareils et équipements qu'il achète. Nos agriculteurs n'ont pas ce droit. Les restrictions sévères que nous avons présentent un problème important, et je recommande fortement au Comité de déterminer où se trouvent certaines des zones les plus restrictives dans ces verrous numériques. Nous continuerons de respecter nos obligations internationales en renforçant la flexibilité à cet égard.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une ou deux questions qui reviennent sur ce dont nous discutions au début, c'est moins stimulant.

Le président:

Vous avez environ 30 secondes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est suffisant.

Monsieur Chisick, vous avez mentionné au tout début que vous êtes autorisé à pratiquer le droit en matière de droits d'auteur, en particulier. Juste par curiosité, qui autorise les avocats à pratiquer le droit en matière de droits d'auteur?

M. Casey Chisick:

Je n'ai pas dit que j'étais autorisé à pratiquer le droit en matière de droits d'auteur. Ce que j'ai dit, c'est que je suis accrédité en tant que spécialiste en droits d'auteur. C'est un titre qui m'a été donné par le Barreau de l'Ontario.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. C'est ce qui m'intriguait.

Avons-nous 10 secondes pour aborder...? Non, nous n'avons pas 10 secondes.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Albas, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

C'est toujours une course folle pour faire le plus d'interventions possible.

J'adresserai cette question à l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle. Vous êtes en faveur de la modification des dispositions d'exonération, mais une grande entreprise technologique nous a dit qu'elle ne pourrait tout simplement pas fonctionner sans exonération. Pensez-vous qu'un cadre juridique qui empêche les consommateurs canadiens d'avoir accès aux services est acceptable?

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Je pense que nous avons recommandé d'évaluer si les dispositions d'exonération devraient s'appliquer sans tenir compte des autres mécanismes prévus dans la loi, comme le régime d'avis et avis.

Je pense que la réponse à la question que vous avez posée au sujet des consommateurs est probablement non.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord.

M. Bob Tarantino:

Nous ne voulons pas que les consommateurs soient désavantagés de cette façon.

Je pense que c'est une question ouverte: comment peut-on s'assurer que les entités et les particuliers ne s'abritent pas sous les auspices de ces dispositions d'exonération d'une manière qui ne reflète pas les mesures qu'ils prennent ou les politiques qu'ils mettent en place sur leurs plateformes en ce qui concerne la surveillance de la violation du droit d'auteur?

M. Dan Albas:

Hier, sur Twitter — je n'en ai pas eu l'occasion, et ça ne relève pas de vous, parce que je ne pense pas que vous parliez au nom de l'Institut de la propriété intellectuelle —, j'ai publié un article de CBC qui décrivait le cas d'une personne qui poursuivait l'entreprise qui a créé Fortnite pour avoir prétendument utilisé une danse qu'il aurait inventée.

J'en ai parlé, et nous avons entendu l'Assemblée canadienne de la danse. Ses représentants voulaient que des chorégraphies de mouvements particuliers réalisées par un artiste individuel puissent être protégées par le droit d'auteur. Vous semblez dire que cela se ferait en vertu d'une disposition particulière. Pourriez-vous éclaircir un peu cette question, afin que cela fasse partie du témoignage?

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je suis heureux de le faire.

Que cela serve de leçon à ceux qui, bon gré mal gré, communiquent sur Twitter avec des députés.

Oui. Les oeuvres chorégraphiques sont protégées si elles sont originales. Elles sont protégées en tant qu'oeuvres en vertu de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Je signale également que les prestations d'artistes-interprètes sont protégées en vertu de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur sans qu'elles aient besoin d'être originales. Je ne suis pas certain qu'il y ait actuellement une lacune dans le régime législatif, ce qui voudrait dire que les mouvements de danse ne sont pas protégés.

(1715)

M. Dan Albas:

Je pense que ce que l'Assemblée canadienne de la danse soulignait, c'est que, si quelqu'un fait une chorégraphie d'une danse particulière et la publie sur YouTube et qu'ensuite quelqu'un d'autre utilise ces mouvements dans une prestation quelconque, la personne à l'origine de la chorégraphie devrait se voir accorder un certain mérite ou un genre de droit d'auteur.

Je pense qu'il serait vraiment très difficile de dire qui a créé une chorégraphie ou une danse en particulier. J'ai même donné l'exemple des arts martiaux.

J'ai demandé aux groupes autochtones si cela pouvait causer de très gros problèmes à une collectivité en particulier si quelqu'un revendiquait soudainement le droit d'auteur pour une danse très traditionnelle. On s'est demandé si le droit d'auteur s'appliquerait même aux connaissances autochtones.

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je pense qu'il faut séparer la question analytique de savoir si quelque chose serait admissible à la protection en vertu de la loi de la réalité pratique de l'application des droits qui pourraient être accordés en vertu de la loi. Je pense que ce sont deux questions très différentes.

J'aimerais travailler un peu pour moi-même et revenir sur ce que vous avez dit. Je pense que c'est lié à certaines des autres questions qui ont été soulevées ici aujourd'hui.

Personnellement, je pense que la communauté du droit d'auteur a tendance à n'aller que dans une seule direction et à faire en sorte que les droits s'élargissent continuellement. Je pense que nous devons être conscients du fait que nous — en tant que particuliers, consommateurs, créateurs ou entités qui diffusent ou exploitent autrement le droit d'auteur — jouons tous de multiples rôles simultanés dans l'écosystème du droit d'auteur. Nous bénéficions et — j'hésite à dire que nous sommes les victimes — portons à la fois le fardeau de ces droits élargis.

Il n'est pas toujours vrai que le droit d'auteur est le mécanisme approprié pour reconnaître ce qui constitue par ailleurs des revendications tout à fait justifiables.

M. Dan Albas:

Je souscris certainement à cette idée.

Madame Gendreau, dans votre exposé, vous soutenez que les plateformes en ligne devraient être responsables des oeuvres contrefaites publiées sur leurs plateformes au même titre que les radiodiffuseurs traditionnels.

Ne reconnaissez-vous pas qu'une station de télévision pour laquelle un producteur détermine tout ce qui passe à l'antenne est différente d'une plateforme sur laquelle les utilisateurs téléchargent leur contenu?

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Elles sont différentes en ce sens qu'elles mènent des activités différentes. Elles ne font pas de programmation comme le font les radiodiffuseurs.

Ce à quoi nous faisons face, c'est précisément quelque chose de différent, parce que nous avons, encore une fois, une industrie qui existe parce qu'il y a des oeuvres à mettre en valeur ou à exposer et à diffuser par l'intermédiaire de ses services. Elle fait de l'argent et elle aura la possibilité de faire des affaires grâce à ces oeuvres, et elle ne paie peut-être pas pour ces matières premières.

C'est comme les redevances minières. Les sociétés minières doivent payer des redevances parce qu'elles exploitent des ressources primaires. Je pense que nous devons réaliser que nos industries créatives, nos oeuvres créatives, sont nos nouvelles ressources primaires dans une économie du savoir, et que ceux qui en bénéficient doivent payer pour cela.

M. Dan Albas:

Madame Gendreau, vous ne pouvez pas considérer comme équivalents un bien matériel qui, une fois extrait, est exclusivement envoyé ailleurs et une idée ou une oeuvre qui peuvent être transmises sans que quelqu'un soit laissé pour compte. On nous a dit que, si un tel système était en place, les plateformes en ligne n'auraient pas d'autres choix que de restreindre sérieusement ce que les utilisateurs peuvent télécharger.

Pensez-vous que le fait de restreindre de façon importante l'innovation est une solution raisonnable dans ce cas?

Mme Ysolde Gendreau:

Non, je ne pense pas que cela limiterait l'innovation ou la diffusion. Je pense que, au contraire, cela garantirait la rémunération des auteurs créatifs, et, parce que ceux-ci recevraient des paiements pour l'utilisation de leurs oeuvres, ils n'intenteraient pas de poursuites pour des utilisations négligeables ou stupides qui ont donné une très mauvaise réputation à l'application du droit d'auteur.

Si les titulaires de droits d'auteur savaient qu'ils seraient rémunérés lorsque leurs oeuvres seraient utilisées, et si, ensuite, ils voyaient une grand-mère faire une vidéo dans laquelle ses petits-enfants dansent sur une certaine musique et qu'ils recevaient néanmoins un paiement quelconque, ils ne poursuivraient pas cette grand-mère et ne se rendraient pas ridicules.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Geist, vous avez fortement plaidé contre l'octroi de dommage-intérêts à Access Copyright. Si la pire pénalité qu'il est autorisé à demander est le montant du tarif initial, les établissements d'enseignement ne vont-ils pas seulement faire fi de ce tarif parce que la seule pénalité qu'ils doivent payer est celle qu'ils auraient à payer au départ?

(1720)

M. Michael Geist:

Non. Tout d'abord, les établissements d'enseignement ne cherchent pas à enfreindre quoi que ce soit, comme je l'ai dit. Ils ont plus de licences maintenant qu'ils n'en ont jamais eu auparavant. Dans l'ensemble, les dommages-intérêts sont l'exception plutôt que la règle. La façon dont le droit fonctionne généralement, c'est que l'on préserve l'intégrité de la personne. On ne lui donne pas plus que ce qu'elle a perdu.

Lorsque nous avons des dommages-intérêts préétablis dans le cadre du système des sociétés collectives de gestion, cela fait partie d'une contrepartie. On l'utilise pour des groupes comme la SOCAN, parce que des responsables n'ont pas d'autre choix que d'adhérer à ce système et parce que c'est obligatoire pour des raisons liées à la concurrence, ils ont la capacité de le faire.

Access Copyright peut se servir du marché et, comme nous en avons parlé, il s'agit maintenant de l'une des nombreuses licences qui existent. Comme nous l'avons appris au cours de ces derniers mois, la situation est devenue vraiment critique en ce qui concerne les différentes façons dont les groupes d'éducation accordent des licences. L'idée que la société aurait spécifiquement droit à des dommages-intérêts massifs me semble être une intervention incroyable et injustifiée sur le marché.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Masse, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

C'est une bonne chose que nous parlions du droit d'auteur. J'estime qu'il y a eu atteinte à mon droit qu'un projet de loi de réparation soit adopté. Il y a plutôt eu un accord volontaire. Le projet de loi C-273 modifiait la Loi canadienne sur la concurrence et la Loi sur la protection de l'environnement pour qu'un service de marché secondaire soit offert pour les véhicules, les techniciens et les technologies de l'information. Il s'agit d'une question environnementale, mais qui porte également sur la concurrence et ainsi de suite. C'est tout à fait pertinent aujourd'hui, puisque même les États-Unis permettaient l'obtention de ces renseignements sous le régime de leurs lois. Je pouvais faire réparer un véhicule aux États-Unis dans un garage offrant un service de marché secondaire, mais je ne pouvais pas le faire à Windsor. Nous avons passé plusieurs années à tenter d'obtenir cet amendement, mais je remarque que cela a évolué vers quelque chose de plus large, c'est-à-dire la possibilité de modifier et de changer les appareils.

J'aimerais parler un peu de la Commission du droit d'auteur. Je sais qu'une partie des témoignages d'aujourd'hui se sont quelque peu éloignés de ce point, mais ce qui était intéressant avec la comparution des représentants de la Commission du droit d'auteur est qu'ils ont demandé trois modifications importantes qui ne faisaient pas partie du projet de loi C-86. L'une des modifications — et je serais curieux d'entendre votre avis à ce sujet —, c'est qu'ils souhaitaient voir une refonte de la Loi, puisque la dernière refonte date de 1985.

Y a-t-il un commentaire sur l'exposé des représentants de la Commission du droit d'auteur et sur le fait qu'ils ne pensent pas que le projet de loi C-86 réussira à régler tous les problèmes auxquels ils font face? Ils ont présenté trois points importants. L'un d'entre eux portait là-dessus. Également, ils ont abordé la protection de leur capacité de rendre des décisions intérimaires qui ne peuvent être renversées. Je ne sais pas s'il y a des observations à ce sujet, mais c'est l'une des choses que j'estimais intéressantes dans l'exposé qu'ils ont présenté.

Quelqu'un... Si personne n'a quoi que ce soit à dire et que vous êtes satisfaits de la façon dont vont les choses, alors nous nous en tiendrons à cela. C'est très bien.

M. Casey Chisick:

J'ai exprimé, dans un autre forum, certaines de mes préoccupations concernant le projet de loi C-86, lesquelles ne sont pas nécessairement les mêmes que celles qui ont été soulevées par la Commission. Je ne pense pas que le projet de loi C-86 corrige parfaitement les problèmes soulevés par la Commission du droit d'auteur, mais j'estime qu'il s'agit d'un bon départ. C'est le genre de mesure législative qui devrait certainement faire l'objet d'un examen très rapide — une période de cinq ans serait probablement adéquate — afin que l'on puisse s'assurer qu'elle a l'effet escompté.

Peut-être aurais-je dû étudier la transcription des témoignages d'un peu plus près. Est-ce que j'ai bien compris que la proposition était que l'on fasse une refonte de la Loi et que l'on reparte à zéro?

M. Brian Masse:

C'est leur proposition. Il s'agit d'examiner la Loi et de la rendre cohérente. Je crois que leur préoccupation est...

M. Casey Chisick:

D'accord, je vois.

M. Brian Masse:

... que des modifications y soient apportées une fois de plus. Leur exposé à ce sujet était intéressant, car, selon eux, il ne s'agit pas d'une approche globale, et cela donnerait lieu à des incohérences.

Je sais que cela vous en fait beaucoup à absorber si vous n'aviez pas pu y jeter un coup d'oeil. Ils ont mentionné la transparence, l'accès et l'efficacité comme étant des aspects à être corrigés. Certains d'entre eux figurent dans le projet de loi C-86, mais n'ont toujours pas fait l'objet d'un examen.

M. Casey Chisick:

Chaque fois qu'il y a une série de modifications progressives apportées à une loi, j'estime qu'il y a forcément des conséquences imprévues lorsqu'on jette un regard rétrospectif sur cette approche. S'il y avait une volonté d'effectuer un examen très approfondi, ou une refonte, comme vous l'avez mentionné, de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, il s'agirait d'une idée intéressante pour cette seule raison: se pencher sur les conséquences imprévues ou sur les incohérences qui en ont découlé. Je ne sais pas si c'est là où la Commission voulait en venir, mais il s'agit d'une idée intéressante, selon moi.

(1725)

M. Brian Masse:

Voilà qui est intéressant.

Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre souhaite faire une observation?

M. Bob Tarantino:

Je n'ai pas de réponse particulière à la question que vous avez posée. Je veux simplement vous recommander les observations que l'IPIC a faites en ce qui a trait au projet de loi C-86 et également les observations qui ont été faites en 2017 sur le remaniement de la Commission du droit d'auteur.

M. Brian Masse:

Oui, j'en ai vu quelques-unes, monsieur. Merci.

M. Michael Geist:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais préciser que, selon moi, cela met en lumière — pour en revenir à la question du président à propos d'un examen quinquennal — pourquoi les examens quinquennaux sont en quelque sorte problématiques. Premièrement, le fait que nous soyons en mesure de nous pencher sur des choses telles que la Commission du droit d'auteur ou le traité de Marrakech entre 2012 et maintenant montre que, lorsqu'il y a des problèmes importants, le gouvernement a la possibilité d'agir.

Deuxièmement, puisqu'il s'agirait, de loin, des plus gros changements que la Commission a vus depuis des décennies, avec de nouveaux fonds et une Commission presque entièrement nouvelle, cela va prendre du temps. Nous savons que ce type de choses prend encore du temps, donc il me semble insensé que nous revenions dans trois ou quatre ans — ou même cinq ans — afin de juger ce qui est en place, et encore moins que nous effectuions une refonte de la Loi. Nous avons besoin de temps pour voir comment vont les choses. Si la Commission dit avoir besoin d'une refonte pour trouver un sens à tout cela, j'estime alors qu'il y a un problème.

M. Brian Masse:

C'est en quelque sorte la trajectoire. Ce qui me préoccupe actuellement avec le projet de loi C-86, c'est ce que nous avons effectué et également l'AEUMC. Trois points importants ont été soulevés en même temps. Ils finiront par se concrétiser, et nous devrons nous en occuper à ce moment-là.

Je n'ai pas d'autres questions. J'ai terminé.

Je remercie les témoins.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Longfield, vous avez trois minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais revenir sur le droit de réparer. Je fais également partie du comité de l'agriculture. J'ai travaillé également dans le domaine de l'innovation en agriculture. La norme J1939 est la norme en matière de véhicule. Il y a une norme ISO pour les composantes des véhicules, comme la direction, soit la norme ISO 11898, et puis pour la remorque, c'est-à-dire les distributeurs d'engrais, les épandeurs et les pulvérisateurs, c'est la norme ISO 11992 qui s'applique. À quel point devons-nous être précis pour faire en sorte que les innovateurs puissent monter à bord des tracteurs et faire leur travail?

Nous pourrions travailler sur tout sauf John Deere, bien que je connaisse une personne à Regina qui sait comment contourner les protocoles de John Deere également. Les gens doivent contourner les protocoles et puis, de façon presque illégale, vous donner accès à l'équipement. Quel degré de précision la loi devrait-elle atteindre au chapitre de la technologie?

M. Michael Geist:

Tout d'abord, les gens ne devraient pas avoir à travailler de façon presque illégale sur leur propre équipement. En fait, la Loi sur le droit d'auteur ne devrait pas s'appliquer à ce type de questions. L'un des premiers cas d'intersection entre des serrures numériques et des appareils concernait une entreprise située à Burlington, en Ontario, du nom de Skylink, qui avait conçu une télécommande universelle qui permettait d'ouvrir les portes de garage. Il ne s'agit pas d'une technologie exceptionnelle, mais l'entreprise a passé bon nombre d'années devant les tribunaux, après avoir été poursuivie par une autre entreprise d'ouvre-porte de garage, Chamberlain, laquelle affirmait que l'entreprise en question contournait sa serrure numérique afin que cette télécommande universelle puisse fonctionner.

Le problème vient du fait que l'on applique le droit d'auteur à des appareils de cette façon. Cela tire son origine des réformes de 2012 sur les serrures numériques. La solution est de nous assurer que nous avons en place les bonnes exceptions, afin que la loi ne s'applique pas dans les secteurs où elle ne devrait pas être appliquée.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Pourrions-nous utiliser l'expression « tel que » à cet égard?

M. Michael Geist:

Non, il faut l'aborder spécifiquement en vertu des dispositions anticontournement. Il me semble que c'est à l'article 41.25. Idéalement, il s'agirait d'intégrer l'exception relative à l'utilisation équitable et de l'appliquer également aux dispositions anticontournement. En d'autres mots, je ne devrais pas avoir le droit de faire une utilisation équitable si quelque chose est sur papier, mais perdre ce droit lorsque c'est électronique ou numérique ou s'il s'agit d'un code sur un tracteur.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

En ce qui a trait à notre programme en matière d'innovation, il nous faudrait examiner attentivement l'article 41.25.

M. Michael Geist:

Nous avons mis en place une série d'exceptions limitées. En fait, elles étaient si limitées que nous avons dû revenir les modifier lorsque nous avons signé le traité de Marrakech visant à faciliter l'accès aux personnes ayant des déficiences visuelles. Les États-Unis ont, pendant ce temps, établi une série d'exceptions supplémentaires. D'autres pays sont allés bien plus loin que les États-Unis. Nous sommes maintenant aux prises avec des dispositions parmi les plus restrictives au monde.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Cependant, nous avons les agriculteurs les plus innovateurs. Ils peuvent s'adapter à ce genre de choses.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Avant que nous levions la séance, j'aimerais juste vous rappeler que, mercredi, dans la pièce 415, nous entendrons des témoins pendant la première heure, et pour la deuxième heure, nous recevrons des instructions de rédaction.

Également, pour ceux qui suivent les séances partout au Canada, je vous rappelle qu'aujourd'hui est le dernier jour pour les mémoires présentés en ligne, au plus tard à minuit, heure normale de l'Est. Je pense que le mot s'est donné, car aujourd'hui, nous en avons déjà reçu 97.

Veuillez noter que nos analystes viennent de dire: « Oh, non. »

Des voix: Ha, ha!

Le président: Je tiens à remercier les témoins de leur présence ici aujourd'hui. C'était une excellente session et une bonne récapitulation du travail effectué au cours de la dernière année. Merci à tous.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on December 10, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.