header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-09-20 TRAN 108

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(0845)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I'm calling to order the meeting of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. This is our first session of the 42nd Parliament. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we are continuing our study of the Canadian transportation and logistics strategy.

For the first hour this morning, from the Department of Transport, we have Christian Dea, chief economist and director general of transportation and economic analysis; Sandra LaFortune, director general of international relations and trade policy; Martin McKay, director of transportation infrastructure programs in the west; and David McNabb, director general of surface transportation policy.

Thank you so very much for joining us first thing this morning.

Good morning to all of our members. We have Chris Bittle filling in this morning. Welcome. Of course, there's David Graham, who likes to watch what transportation does all the time. Welcome to all of the members.

Who would like to go first?

Ms. Sandra LaFortune (Director General, International Relations and Trade Policy, Department of Transport):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair and members, for inviting Transport Canada to appear before you today as you move forward on your study on the establishment of a Canadian transportation and logistics strategy. This is a broad subject, and we hope the background information we have provided helps to show how Transport Canada's work aligns with and can contribute to your study. It is clear from your committee's work over the last few years that some of the subject matter will not be new to you.

My name is Sandra LaFortune. I am the director general of the international relations and trade policy branch at Transport Canada.

Before we begin, I will ask my colleagues to introduce themselves and outline briefly their own areas of responsibility within Transport Canada.

Mr. David McNabb (Director General, Surface Transportation Policy, Department of Transport):

Good morning, everyone. My name is David McNabb. I am the director general for surface transportation policy, and I am responsible for policy development in the freight and passenger rail area, as well as highways, borders and motor carriers.

Mr. Christian Dea (Director General, Transportation and Economic Analysis, Chief Economist, Department of Transport):

Good morning. My name is Christian Dea. I am the director general of transportation and economic analysis, and my responsibility is to monitor the performance of the system.

Mr. Martin McKay (Director, Transportation Infrastructure Programs (West), Department of Transport):

My name is Martin McKay. I am the director of the transportation infrastructure programs group, with the fundamental responsibility of delivery of the national trade corridors fund.

Ms. Sandra LaFortune:

I'll begin by making a few opening remarks. In the time remaining, we all would be pleased to answer any questions you may have. I should note as well that we have provided four background documents, as per your request, to support your study.

Minister Garneau's transportation 2030 vision is a good starting point for our discussion. With transportation 2030, the minister is delivering on his commitment to create a safe, secure, green, innovative and integrated transportation system that supports trade and economic growth, a cleaner environment and the well-being of Canadians and their families. Transportation 2030 sets out the government's strategic plan for the future of transportation in Canada and is a reflection of what we heard directly from Canadians during extensive cross-Canada consultations.

In moving forward with this strategic plan, we are seeking to identify opportunities to enhance the traveller experience; remain vigilant to our fundamental responsibility to ensure a safe and secure transportation system; use innovative technologies to reduce the system's environmental impacts and build the transportation system of the future; protect our waterways, coasts and northern areas and build our reputation as a world-leading maritime and Arctic nation; and ensure that the transportation system enables Canada's trade and economic objectives. You'll note in the background information circulated that these goals align with the five core themes of transportation 2030.

The government is taking action on a number of fronts to help bring the transportation 2030 vision to fruition. For example, in May 2018, the Transportation Modernization Act—formerly Bill C-49—was approved by Parliament, and the implementation of initiatives like the oceans protection plan and the port modernization review continues. Together, these and related initiatives aim to address the needs for the future of transportation in Canada. In the context of our appearance before you today, we know that these needs include cost-effective, reliable and timely transportation access to global markets so as to enhance our trade competitiveness and ultimately grow Canada's economy.

Making strategic and cost-shared investments in trade-related transportation infrastructure has been central in our efforts to achieve this goal over the last 10 years. A key distinction of Canada's approach, which has since been emulated by other countries, is that it is multimodal and based on systems rather than on the performance or capacity of individual modes of transportation separately.

This approach mirrors the way in which businesses approach the physical movement of imports and exports from their starting points to their ultimate destinations. It also recognizes that changes or improvements at one point within our integrated transportation network can have far-reaching impacts on the performance and capacity of the system overall.

Being strategic, we aim to align our investments to improve access to priority and high-growth markets. The background information concerning the Asia-Pacific gateway and corridor transportation infrastructure fund highlights some of the progress we have achieved in western Canada over the last decade. The update on the trade and transportation corridors initiative, or the TTCI, outlines how we are building on our best practices and lessons learned over the past decade to address the needs for the future of the trade-related transportation system in Canada.

Rather than repeat all the details included in the TTCI reference document that we prepared, it may be more useful to briefly provide you with a sense of where we are today. In the context of the national trade corridors fund, which is the core of the trade and transportation corridors initiative, Minister Garneau and the Government of Canada have so far announced federal investments of nearly $760 million in trade and transportation infrastructure projects across the country. These are cost-shared with other levels of government and the private sector.

The reference document provides examples of projects that support import and export flows with established and high-growth markets, recognize the need to strengthen the climate resilience of transportation infrastructure and support the unique transportation needs of Canada's territories, support safety and improved traffic flow for both cargo and residents—particularly around Canada's largest ports—and are based on collaboration with and among infrastructure owners, authorities and other levels of government to help maximize the scale, scope and impact of our investments.

(0850)



While collaboration with stakeholders provides valuable insight into where public and private infrastructure needs or bottlenecks exist, Transport Canada has also invested significantly to establish an objective evidence base to help inform and quantify trade-related transportation infrastructure issues. This past year, the department, in collaboration with Statistics Canada, established the Canadian centre on transportation data, an open portal for multimodal transportation data and performance measures. The trade and transportation corridors initiative background document provides more details on future plans in this area.

Innovation and new technologies will continue to shape transportation infrastructure needs and uses. Within the context of the TTCI, Transport Canada is undertaking targeted actions in the areas of connected and automated vehicles, and unmanned aerial vehicles or remotely piloted aircraft systems. A central goal of this work is to ensure their safe deployment and use. In the context of transportation infrastructure, for example, future uses could include long-range infrastructure inspections and, over the long term, perhaps even carrying cargo and passengers. From a road transportation perspective, the uses of connected and automated vehicles are both promising and likely disruptive.

I will conclude my remarks at this point. We would be pleased to respond to any questions you may have, and we look forward to a more interactive discussion.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We appreciate that you keep your comments brief, so that the committee gets a full opportunity to ask the many questions they have.

We'll start with Mr. Liepert, for six minutes, please.

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC):

Mr. McNabb is probably the fellow who can answer this question.

First of all, of the three of us on this side of the table, Kelly comes from Saskatchewan, and Matt and I from Alberta. Rail transportation has always been an issue in western Canada, but it was primarily our grain producers who couldn't get product to market.

In recent years, the issue of oil by rail has become increasingly.... Well, we're now up to 200,000 barrels a day by rail; you can correct me if my numbers are wrong here. To put some context around this for those who wouldn't be that familiar with it, I believe each railcar carries 1,000 barrels of oil, which means that every day there are 200 railcars full of oil on a track. It probably takes four or five days to get to the coast, so we're talking 1,000 to 2,000 railcars on tracks at any one particular time.

These railcars are going through areas of British Columbia that Mr. Hardie would be very familiar with, over the Fraser River. I am quite surprised that we haven't yet had an environmental catastrophe. The reason this is happening is obviously the delay in pipeline construction.

What are you doing to try to encourage the federal government or at least put the federal government on notice that we are on the verge of an environmental catastrophe if we don't move ahead with pipeline development and get these oil cars off the rail tracks.

Mr. David McNabb:

Thank you for the question.

From our perspective, one of the key things we are doing is monitoring the situation in terms of the statistics and the volumes. I know that Christian's group is reviewing a lot of the commodities that are on the rail network system. Part of that is monitoring what's happening going forward and being able to report in terms of how the mix of commodities is changing over time, and then thinking about what type of remedies we may need to put in place given the risks that may be coming up. In terms of safety and security, we have an area within the department that we would be providing that information to, and then they would be looking at the potential risks and what some of the potential responses to those risks would be.

(0855)

Mr. Ron Liepert:

As a department, are you getting concerned about this? Are you advising the minister that this is becoming a very serious issue, or are you just monitoring it?

Mr. David McNabb:

We're providing the information. That is not an area that I'm responsible for, but from our perspective, we provide that kind of objective information for consideration. It's not something I can comment on in terms of the safety and security side because that's not my area of responsibility.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Can somebody else comment?

I find it very disturbing that this doesn't seem to be of any priority for senior officials of the transportation department, and yet we in western Canada are getting more and more concerned every day. I just can't believe that the Department of Transport wouldn't be pushing the government to deal with this issue.

Ms. Sandra LaFortune:

In fact, as part of the safety and security sector of Transport Canada, there is a group that is dedicated to the transportation of dangerous goods, and there are also groups dedicated to rail safety. I think between those two, they are definitely keeping an eye on what's going on and coming up with potential options.

Our role is to provide that information, those options and the advice that we can to senior management and to the minister for onward transmission.

I don't think that people are not paying attention to it. I think that those groups in particular are keeping a close eye on what's going on.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Well, it's not a matter of paying attention to it. It's a matter of making—

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Okay.

It's a matter of making the case to elected officials that something has to be done about this issue, and the obvious one is to build a pipeline to get the railcars off the tracks.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Liepert.

We go on to Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I believe it was announced yesterday that the government is accelerating the replacement of tanker cars with up-to-date, safer, higher-standard tanker cars. Is that true?

Mr. David McNabb:

I don't know.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Okay, we'll leave it at that.

The Chair:

We've all seen it.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Yes, thank you, Madam Chair.

As you know, the committee is going on a tour. We're going down to Niagara to look at the infrastructure of the trade corridor, as well as the multimodal network they have available there. After those two days, we're going to move on to the Asia-Pacific to visit Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and Seattle.

My first question to you is—because you are the reason we're taking the trip to get you that information—what is some of the information? We don't want to duplicate a lot of what has already been done. What is some of the information that you'll be looking for us to bring back with us to help you in your deliberations and in your process: one, to recognize the trade corridors, the assets and the benefits of those locations, and two, to add into the overall trade corridors fund any information that will make it easier for you to make decisions about where infrastructure funds go?

Mr. Martin McKay:

I'll start, and then maybe my colleagues can jump in if I miss any details. One thing we've seen through the consultations and discussions with applicants and interested parties for the national trade corridors fund is a real demand for that infrastructure.

During your visits, any information you can develop and bring back regarding potential projects, but also both qualitative and quantitative data supporting that.... When we had our first round of funding applications under the national trade corridors fund, we saw a huge reach of projects all the way across the country. There were strengths with some. There were other projects that didn't show enough detail. They didn't provide enough numbers to really highlight the strength of those proposals. When you're out talking to stakeholders and doing your consultations and discussions, getting some concrete numbers that support their investment ideas would be very useful.

(0900)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Okay, thank you.

Sandra, go ahead.

Ms. Sandra LaFortune:

I would say that it would be really interesting to get a better sense, from the perspective of the people you'll be talking to, of where they see the priorities that are required around transportation infrastructure, where they see the bottlenecks that need to be fixed and what they consider to be the most important and biggest-bang-for-your-buck projects that could be invested in that would make the biggest difference for Canadian transportation. These are key goals we have. It would be really interesting to hear from the people you'll be talking to, because we do have, in Christian's shop and elsewhere, a lot of expertise, data analytics and even people on the ground through our regional offices, but hearing from the stakeholders and the people who use the system is always invaluable.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

That said, as you may know, in our neck of the woods we have the St. Lawrence Seaway, which is obviously an arm's-length corporation run by a separate board. Currently it's at 50% capacity. It's not working at its full potential. There are a lot of reasons for that, which I'm sure we're going to hear about, and a lot of them have to do with the infrastructure itself, with the management of the asset or the lack thereof.

Second to that is the question of other jurisdictions. You mentioned in your opening remarks that you're working with other jurisdictions and other levels of government on, for example, highways. One of the bottlenecks in Niagara is the QEW and the 401 corridor. Even this morning, it was shut down because of an accident; there's no redundancy. Are you prepared to look at working with arm's-length corporations to fix those challenges vis-à-vis the St. Lawrence Seaway, as well as with the provinces vis-à-vis the highway system?

Mr. Martin McKay:

The fund itself is applicant-driven. We would look to those organizations if they have projects that are ready to move ahead. If they have the plans in place and their share of the funding, they're more than welcome to apply.

One of the challenges we had with the first round is that we saw some projects that weren't funded. They had a federal ask, but they didn't have the supporting provincial ask or a corporation's side of the funding.

They're definitely eligible to apply. Again, it's a case of them prioritizing which projects they wish to move forward.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Would the federal government entertain the idea of stepping outside of the jurisdictional boundary and funding, for example, a highway, with the province as a partner?

Mr. Martin McKay:

If the province were to bring that forward as a proposal, and if through the evaluation it was shown to address the priorities of the national trade corridors fund, it would definitely be something that could be considered.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

That's great. Thank you, Martin.

The Chair:

Monsieur Aubin, go ahead. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome and thank you for joining us this morning. My questions will be for the whole group. You can decide who the best person to answer is.

My first question is about recent history. In 2007, Quebec and Ontario signed an agreement protocol with the Government of Canada to develop the Ontario-Quebec continental gateway and trade corridor initiative. However, it seems that there has been radio silence since. No strategy has been adopted. To my knowledge, nothing has been implemented.

Can someone explain why, although that agreement was signed more than 10 years ago, the gateway still does not exist? [English]

Ms. Sandra LaFortune:

The continental gateway you're referencing was part of the previous gateway and corridor initiative, which actually sunset. Was it in 2014?

Mr. Martin McKay:

It was in 2018.

Ms. Sandra LaFortune:

No, the last projects were done in 2018, but I think the sunset was—

A voice: It was in 2013.

Ms. Sandra LaFortune: Thank you.

It was in 2013. As a result, the national trade corridors fund is building on the regional gateways that were part of the gateway and corridor initiative. Initially, there were the Asia-Pacific gateway and corridor, the continental gateway and the Atlantic gateway. The national trade corridors fund and the trade and transportation corridors initiative are building on the lessons learned from the initial gateways and corridors experience we had for over 10 years.

They're trying to achieve a more national view rather than a regional view. There's now no regional gateway like the continental gateway, but it's about how all these pieces fit together into the overarching national system.

(0905)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Almost daily since the 2015 election, we have been hearing the government say that it wants to make the environment and economic development work hand in hand. Words aside, I am struggling to see how that wish is materializing.

In the document on the Trade and Transportation Corridors Initiative prepared by your department, I see no mention of sustainable development or clean growth. However, the breakdown of greenhouse gas emissions by economic sector shows that the transportation industry is probably the first or second source of greenhouse gaz emissions.

Could you tell me whether, for instance, the use of clean energy is among the eligibility criteria for program funding? [English]

Mr. Martin McKay:

It's an excellent question. When we look at the first round of national trade corridors funding and the priorities supporting that call, the first priority was how those projects addressed bottlenecks. The second priority and consideration in the evaluation of projects was how those projects addressed resiliency, both from a safety and security point of view and a climate change and environmental point of view.

Every project that was evaluated under the trade corridors fund, similar to the other infrastructure programs within the federal government, underwent a climate change lens evaluation that considered how it was responding to a changing climate and what steps were being taken by the project to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It was very much a piece of that first call for proposals under the national trade corridor assignment. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Can any of the 19 projects funded by the national trade corridors fund be targeted? If so, how many approved projects are directly related to the fight against climate change? [English]

Mr. Martin McKay:

It may not be a fight against climate change. A study was approved in Atlantic Canada that's looking at the Chignecto Isthmus and the implications for that project in the face of rising sea levels: what may happen and what sort of resilient infrastructure can be added to that.

In addition, for all the projects it was taken into consideration how the greenhouse gas emissions could change based on the development and construction of those projects. A highway twinning project in southern Saskatchewan will increase the capacity of the road network in that area, thus allowing for a greater free flow of vehicles with reduced stopping and starting resulting from congestion. That also impacts climate change and improves the reduction of emissions. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I have a quick question on railway safety. I am using this opportunity to applaud the announcement the minister made yesterday to accelerate the schedule for removing DOT-111s.

Out of the 141 department staff members in charge of oversight and railway safety, how many are qualified to carry out railway safety audits? [English]

Mr. David McNabb:

Again, that's an area I'm not responsible for, but I could go back and get that answer for you. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move on to Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I thank the witnesses for coming here this morning to lay out an overall vision of the Trade and Transportation Corridors Initiative. I will put my questions to all the witnesses. They can decide who would best be able to answer.

The Port of Montreal is the second largest port in Canada and the largest in Quebec. It is successful and innovative. As you say in your documents, Canada is contributing $64.3 million to two projects involving the port.

Could you briefly tell us about the projects in question and about the issues they address?

(0910)

[English]

Mr. Martin McKay:

I can certainly do that. The first project is the optimization of the intermodal network within the port. The federal contribution to that is $18.4 million. That's going to improve some of the infrastructures in the port, the underground infrastructure supporting the network, new roads within the port and the construction of some new rail assets within the port to help facilitate the movement of goods offloaded off ships onto railcars.

The second project within the port is improving access to the port. On the road network, again, a $45-million federal contribution is going to work with the City of Montreal in improving the local road network around the port to facilitate access. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.

How can the optimization of intermodality reduce bottlenecks and improve trade performance in the Port of Montreal and, on a larger scale, in Canadian ports? [English]

Mr. Martin McKay:

Improving the fluidity of the movement of goods within the port, and optimizing that by having more capacity to take the containers off a ship and load them onto a railcar, means that those goods are moving more quickly from the port onto the road or rail network. When you start improving the roads around the port and increasing that capacity, it means that trucks entering and exiting the port are able to do that more quickly, thus eliminating congestion and getting the goods to market or onto the ships more quickly. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

What would be Transport Canada's approach when it comes to smart ports? [English]

The Chair:

It probably should be part of the smart cities. [Translation]

Mr. Patrick Gosselin (Director, Port Policy, Department of Transport):

Good morning, my name is Patrick Gosselin. I am the director of the marine port group at Transport Canada.

Your question is a good one.

We are working with the country's 18 port authorities to try to understand innovation and where it is headed. We have launched a review of port modernization. We are in consultations to determine the various elements to take into consideration. There are a number of aspects. It is also a matter of determining what needs to be implemented to create an innovative port.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

How could an innovation strategy among the ports and in collaboration with the federal government guarantee the competitiveness of our Canadian sector?

Mr. Patrick Gosselin:

The ports are already working together. Certain port groups are trying to innovate and are working with companies such at Blockchain and IBM. Those are two examples of cooperation. Those in charge are in discussions to determine what the barriers to information gathering are in order to move toward common innovation technology.

In addition, it's a matter of taking the various elements into consideration. It's a matter of security and safety, as well as of information flow. The information needs to be found and distributed to various clients, so that they can perform better.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Is Transport Canada looking into the smart city concept that could apply to ports, so that ports would become increasingly smart?

Mr. Patrick Gosselin:

I would say that a port is now open to the community. On a daily basis, ports are responsible for working with the local community to determine how activities can be integrated into the movement of goods.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Hardie, go ahead.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Good morning, everybody. It's nice to be back and see all of your friendly faces—well, at least friendly so far; you know the day is young.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Wait for it.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Ms. LaFortune, you made a very interesting comment. The approach is multimodal and systems-based rather than based on the performance or capacity of individual modes. I wanted to test that a bit with you in advance of our trip to the west coast to look at the trade corridor there. That's my home territory. I had some time over the summer to have discussions about various component parts of the whole trade picture. I would intend in our questioning of the witnesses to do a bit of a deeper dive as to what they see coming in the future, what their plans are, and how well integrated those plans are. Is that not a concern? How would you contrast that with what you term a multimodal and systems-based approach?

(0915)

Mr. Christian Dea:

When we think about multimodal, it's based on the fact that when we have seen problems in the performance of the system, very often they are due to a lack of coordination between the different modes. That's why we push the conversation a bit more, to ensure that we improve the coordination and the planning of the different mode capacities and to determine how they can better work together to deliver or move people or merchandise with more fluidity.

This multimodal framework is really to push this conversation, not just to capture what is happening by mode—by rail, by port, by air, or through the trucking industry, for example—but to bring this picture together and get a better sense of how they interact. If they are facing some challenges in coordinating their activities, how can we, from an information perspective, or from a governance perspective through incentives, have the different people work together more effectively to develop an overall system that performs better?

In the context of the west coast, it's clearly an area we've been focusing on a lot. We launched a pilot with the Port of Vancouver, the industry, the railway, and the terminals, to bring these people together and gain a better understanding in terms of the visibility of their supply chain within a full system, to get a better appreciation of where the bottlenecks are happening, and to see how we can work together. It needs to be a kind of joint venture to address some of these issues.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I have further questions, but I thank you for that.

We can't forget that these trade corridors operate with neighbours. There are residential areas. There are commercial areas. One of the sticking points on the west coast, for instance, is the capacity used by the West Coast Express commuter rail, which of course significantly reduces the capacity for freight movement on CP's lines.

Looking at that combination of local needs and local relationships versus—obviously—the bigger trade picture, I'm just wondering what Transport Canada's view is of things like commuter rail and the future for commuter rail, if in fact the country starts to build to the capacity and the promise of the trade agreements and to have more trade going in and out of our ports.

David, maybe that's a question for you.

Mr. David McNabb:

Sure, I can handle that.

It is something we do assess. We're looking at both the passenger and the freight rail systems and how they work together. As you mentioned, there are issues sometimes, given that the demand for both is increasing. It is something we assess as projects come in—on passenger rail, for example—in terms of how the balance between those two works out. It is something we have to assess as we go forward on any commuter rail projects, in working with our partners.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Do you have any sense of the role of municipal planning in the overall performance of the transport system? Again, using metro Vancouver as an example, the major arterial roads and the provincial roads can be chockablock at the best of times. With the number of container movements on truck and the dispersal of the various places they're going to, do you consult with municipal authorities on their planning and where they would want to preserve industrial land, for example, or the warehousing sector, and so on? Do you have a good fix on those challenges in each of the major port areas?

(0920)

Mr. David McNabb:

I'll start, and then if anybody else wants to, they can jump in.

As projects come up, we actually develop working groups that include the different levels of government—federal, provincial and municipal. It is something we do take into consideration because every level of government has a role to play in those projects.

It's actually an important part of the process to take into account those considerations, and each level of government can bring its information and its needs into that planning process. We try to act as a facilitator on those types of projects, to bring the levels of government together in those discussions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much Mr. McNabb. The time is up.

Mr. Jeneroux, go ahead.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you, everybody, for being here today.

I'm going to split my time with my esteemed colleague Kelly Block. In the meantime, I will hopefully get a couple of questions answered.

You mentioned, Madame LaFortune, the figure of $700 million in federal investments in trade and transportation infrastructure.

Ms. Sandra LaFortune:

It's $760 million, and that was for the first round; it's not per year.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Have those projects been started? Are shovels in the ground? Have they been completed? What's the status of those projects?

Mr. Martin McKay:

I can speak to that.

A number of projects have started. They have started construction. They started this summer. In fact, we have actually paid some claims and invoices from those projects.

Some are longer-term in nature. It's an 11-year fund. We have a number of projects that go into year seven or eight. Right now, some of those projects are doing the preliminary planning and finalizing their engineering designs so they can start construction as soon as possible.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Perfect.

Is it possible to get a breakdown of which projects have and which projects haven't been started yet, and their status, under the $760-million fund?

Mr. Martin McKay:

If it's the will of the committee, we can go back and provide that information.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I'm requesting it, yes.

We're seeing a number of ports across the country. However, there has been a lot of news of late about one point of entry into the country, which is the Windsor-Detroit crossing. I'm hoping that perhaps somebody from the witnesses here can comment on the permit that was recently provided to the Ambassador Bridge, and perhaps also comment on the status of the Gordie Howe Bridge.

Mr. David McNabb:

I can take that. My understanding with regard to the Gordie Howe Bridge is that it is continuing down the path toward construction. There was an announcement earlier this summer that they were getting into the design phase. Soon there will be an announcement about the design of the Gordie Howe Bridge. That is moving forward.

In tandem is the permit for the Ambassador Bridge. They're going through their planning process and doing their due diligence in terms of the rehabilitation of the Ambassador Bridge.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Do you know off the top of your head why a permit was given to the Ambassador Bridge, when the Gordie Howe Bridge was already in place?

Mr. David McNabb:

I don't, off the top of my head. Again, I can go back and get that information.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Anything you would be able to provide us with would be helpful, to understand that further.

Thank you.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

With all due respect to my colleague across the table, I do feel the need to clarify the fact that I do not believe it is the role of parliamentary committees to support the work of the department. I think we're here to learn on our own, and to inform our own caucuses about what we've learned. While I hope that the report we submit may be taken up by the department, or even the minister himself, I think we continually get dragged back into that narrative about our being here to support the minister's work and the department's work. We're not. We are masters of our own destiny, and we study the things we want to study because we want to learn from them.

I want to ask a question building on the comments that my colleague made in his initial intervention regarding oil by rail. What, if anything, is in place that brings together departmental officials from various departments—for example, Transport, Infrastructure, and Natural Resources—to perhaps look at addressing an issue that might cross the lines of those departments? If you could define that for me, I would appreciate that.

(0925)

Mr. David McNabb:

Across departments, we do have our own working group committees on rail. There are individual committees within the departments, such as Natural Resources Canada, AgCan and Transport Canada, but we do come together as a group as well to talk, for example, about the commodity mix that's in the system and what's being forecast going forward, as well as some of the issues coming up, such as bottlenecks and planning going forward, how we can engage both the class one railways and the commodities to ensure that there's fluidity in the network, as well as issues coming up as we see things, such as oil on rail, so that we can bring those up within our respective departments, those issues that are bubbling up to the surface.

The departments with those mandates can look at the issues and decide what policy response may be coming forward, relative to the issues that we're starting to see, or that we see, on the rail system.

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Does the major projects management office still exist?

Mr. David McNabb:

The major projects management office still exists, from my understanding. Again, it's out of my mandate as it's under the Natural Resources Canada mandate.

Ms. Sandra LaFortune:

I believe it does, as does the northern projects management office.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Rogers, go ahead.

Mr. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Welcome to our witnesses this morning.

Being from Newfoundland and Labrador, I see a very different picture in terms of transportation networks from what we've seen in other parts of the country. Many of the challenges that our seafood producers and small businesses have are about getting access to markets. Getting product from Newfoundland and Labrador to foreign markets is a real challenge in many cases, as it is in other parts of Atlantic Canada.

I think this national transportation strategy provides a unique opportunity to enhance the unique advantages that we have as a country. Could you please elaborate on how this will enhance existing trade and transportation systems, particularly in Atlantic Canada?

Mr. Martin McKay:

As I mentioned earlier, in terms of Atlantic Canada and the projects that were selected in Newfoundland and Labrador, we really looked at four priorities for the first call for proposals. One of those was the resiliency, safety and security of some key transportation assets. One of the projects approved in Labrador is the Gander International Airport Authority's application for some runway upgrades to continue to keep that airport in operations and to maintain that key transportation corridor.

In addition, there were improvements to port cargo handling productivity at the St. John's Port Authority. Both of those link to international connections and getting goods, be it seafood or others, off Newfoundland shores to the international and national markets.

Mr. Churence Rogers:

Could you comment a little more on how the port modernization review fit into this overall strategy, particularly for Atlantic Canada?

Mr. Martin McKay:

Do you mean the port handling productivity? I'm not sure if I completely understand.

Mr. Churence Rogers:

How does the ports modernization renewal fit into the overall strategy?

Ms. Sandra LaFortune:

We have a port guy. [Translation]

Mr. Patrick Gosselin:

Good morning.

We are indeed in consultations with stakeholders from across the country. We have also launched a call for submissions, which is on until October 26. We are inviting various stakeholders and clients from the marine sector, for instance, but also from the fishing industry, to share their challenges in terms of optimization and competitiveness of the marine sector in trade.

(0930)

[English]

Mr. Churence Rogers:

The seafood industry faces challenges in regard to trade, not just Newfoundland and Labrador, but Atlantic Canada. One of the largest markets for seafood is Asia. How will this strategy enhance and integrate transportation systems and logistics across the entire country so that goods produced and harvested in Atlantic Canada travel seamlessly to their destinations and do not face impediments while still on Canadian soil?

Ms. Sandra LaFortune:

I'll take that one.

The goal of the trade and transportation corridors initiative is to view the transportation system from a national perspective. Even if something is going from the far eastern part of the country in Atlantic Canada to Asia, it's a question of ensuring that a change in some of the infrastructure around Montreal, Toronto or Edmonton might help with getting something from one end of the country to the other.

The goal is to ensure that the infrastructure that supports internal trade will also end up supporting international trade, because it is seen as a seamless system, especially now with so many other choices in how to get from point A to point B. There's not only air, but also shipping through the Panama Canal. Something could even leave from the Atlantic provinces and just go through the Suez Canal to get to Asia, depending on where in Asia. I think Singapore is a point of indifference. It doesn't matter if you go from the west or from the east.

All those things are under consideration in this national program.

Mr. Churence Rogers:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

There's one minute left.

Mr. Churence Rogers:

I'm done; it's good.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle has indicated that you want to share that one minute with him. It's now 45 seconds, so you'll have to be very fast.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

My biggest concern, and I'll try to sum it up as quickly as I can.... Like Vance, I'm from Niagara, and we have the St. Lawrence Seaway. Niagara residents are uniquely impacted because the seaway cuts the peninsula in half. There's a review, and I'm concerned when looking at your slide deck, which says that Transport Canada will compile and assess the review's key findings with a view to supporting the renewal of the framework. It seems like there's already a determined outcome for the review.

My biggest concern representing the residents of St. Catharines is that the seaway doesn't interact with the municipalities; it doesn't interact with the people. Though we're told that billions of dollars in trade goes by, we sit at the shoreline and wave as it goes by. We're impacted by the bridges. We're impacted by delays, and we're impacted by the seaway's failure to develop any of their economic land.

Why isn't the department consulting Niagara residents, and is the review already a determined process?

The Chair:

I realize that's a fairly lengthy question, but could you give us a short answer? You might want to send the committee a more detailed answer; that might be helpful.

I'd like a short answer if that's possible.

Mr. Patrick Gosselin:

Through the seaway review process, yes, we are under consultations. We are also having some discussions with some people in the Niagara region. So we understand the situation and we're moving through the process of the review right now.

The Chair:

Okay. If you have some further information to the question of the committee member, you could send it to the committee, please.

Mrs. Block, go ahead.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Ms. LaFortune, I quickly want to go back to a comment you made in regard to a question about the Asia-Pacific gateway and corridor initiative. I think what I heard you say was that we did not renew the mandates of that gateway and corridor strategy because we've moved toward a national strategy. I know it was a recommendation out of the Emerson report to renew the mandate for the gateway and corridor strategy. I'm wondering if you could tell us why the government, maybe on the advice of the department, decided to terminate the Asia-Pacific gateway and corridor initiative. If it's because we now have a national strategy, could you maybe describe for me why it can't be a both/and?

(0935)

Ms. Sandra LaFortune:

Actually, I think it is a both/and. I think it's actually even a both/plus. Some of the elements of the trade and transportation corridors initiative.... As I said, all of it builds on the regional strategies, but it's being looked at from a national perspective. It's not that we aren't doing anything Asia-Pacific ever again; it's just that it's been rolled into the bigger national strategy. In fact, the point of TTCI was to learn from the previous 10 years and try to improve it if we could.

One way we did that is that the Canadian port authorities are now eligible to receive funding, which they couldn't before. The small airports in the national airports system can now receive funding, which they couldn't before. As I said, the recipients list has grown as a result of some inadvertent blocks that were in the previous program.

So it isn't that we stopped this and started something entirely new. In fact, if you look at it, it's really a continuation. But what we were seeking to do was to make it a continuation that's even better and that learned from the history of the 10 years that we had.

Also, when we were doing the consultations across the country in support of transportation 2030, which is largely a response to the Emerson report, what we heard was that a national strategy was what the users of the system really wanted us to focus on, not just region by region, but how all the pieces fit together.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin, go ahead. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would quickly like to come back to the eligibility criteria for the national trade corridors fund.

The $2 billion figure may seem impressive, but don't forget that it is spread out over 11 years. Given the needs, we once again see that choices must be be made and that they are certainly not always easy to make.

For example, how to explain that a corporation as profitable as CN is receiving millions of dollars, while, according to the auditor general, infrastructure funding in the north is clearly inadequate?

Do you have any figures or a study showing the extent of infrastructural needs in the north? [English]

Mr. Martin McKay:

Thank you for your question.

The needs of the north have definitely been clearly articulated and identified in the national trade corridors fund. Northern projects were eligible under the first round of funding, and in fact there's a $400-million carve-out for transportation infrastructure projects in the north that address trade-related issues. That is going to be further developed through a call for proposals for projects only in the territorial north later this fall. We've allocated $145 million to projects already and there's an additional $255 million available.

In addition to that, through the Investing in Canada plan, there's a further $2 billion set aside for rural and northern communities that looks at specific infrastructure related to those communities' needs. We're the bigger-T transportation, and then that fund as well can support the localized transportation needs of communities. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Considering the lesson learned this summer, I would like to know whether funding has been allocated for consultations with aboriginal communities that will be affected by construction projects. [English]

Ms. Sandra LaFortune:

This summer Transport Canada had a series of consultations in the north with the users of the system, with the indigenous peoples in the north, in support not only of the northern call for proposals that, as Martin said, is going to be launched later this fall, but also in support of the development of an Arctic transportation strategy and in support of Transport Canada's contribution to the Arctic framework that the government as a whole is developing. All through the summer, from June until now—I believe they're done now—there were consultations that engaged the native peoples in the north.

(0940)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

I understand Mr. Graham has a short question before we close off.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Yes, I have. Thank you for your indulgence.

To build on Vance Badawey's question at the very beginning, we're talking about provincial highways and so forth. The Trans-Canada Highway cuts across my riding. It starts as a two-lane road. It has a half a million heavy trucks and two million vehicles a year, and regular fatalities. For political reasons, the province has never invested in it. They're finally investing in a 10-kilometre stretch in the next 10 years. Are there any options from our side?

Mr. David McNabb:

Any options...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are there any options to address these highly fatal, way over-busy highways? Highways with a quarter of the traffic are put in four lanes, and this one is not.

Mr. David McNabb:

Right. Thank you for the question.

It is something we are looking at with the provinces. We have a federal/provincial/territorial committee on trucking and highways. It is one of the issues that has been brought into that committee, and it's something that we are looking at currently.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you for all of that information. If you could follow up on various points the committee members wanted additional information on, we would appreciate that.

We will suspend for a few minutes to switch our witnesses.

(0940)

(0945)

The Chair:

Now we have with us from the Canada Border Services Agency Martin Bolduc, vice-president, programs branch; Johny Prasad, director of program compliance and outreach; Scott Taymun, director general, transformation and border infrastructure and renewal directorate; and Denis Vinette, associate vice-president, operations branch.

I think we're missing one person, but we'll start right away. Who would like to go?

Mr. Martin Bolduc (Vice-President, Programs Branch, Canada Border Services Agency):

Madam Chair, good morning. Thank you for having us this morning. We have provided a deck, and I plan to go over the deck quickly. Then we'll welcome all the questions you may have. It's a pleasure to be here.

Essentially the Canada Border Services Agency is responsible to provide integrated border services at all Canadian borders to facilitate the flow of people and goods while ensuring the safety and security of Canada.

Our daily challenge is to balance the facilitation of trade and people while ensuring the safety and security of Canada. It's a daily challenge because we're faced with increasing volumes and a changing environment.

Essentially we're a workforce of 14,000 people that works 24 hours a day, seven days a week. We span the country and have a footprint internationally. We operate and have staff in all modes of transport: marine, cruise ships and container facilities, rail, land borders, and airports. We also have personnel in three mail centres across the country.

We manage the flow of people and goods and protect the supply chain. We protect the safety and security of Canada, essentially in three business lines: customs activities; immigration enforcement and refugee processing; and food, plant and animal, ensuring food safety and enforcing any legislation that has to do with food, plant and animal.

We do it essentially to ensure that commercial goods and conveyance are processed in an efficient manner. We ensure trade partners are compliant with applicable legislation requirements and measures. We increase the processing efficiency of low-risk, pre-approved trade partners. We have different programs whereby we pre-approve trade partners so we have an ability to have a low-touch approach when goods cross the border.

In the business line we have we process international travellers coming to our borders. We process commercial goods. We are also responsible for trade and anti-dumping activities. CBSA is the organization that's responsible for tariff classification, for the origin and valuation of goods that are imported, and for conducting anti-dumping investigations.

Our fourth business line is enforcement and intelligence, having an ability to focus on what we view as being high risk and expediting as quickly as possible what we deem to be low risk.

As I said, our daily challenge is balancing everything, but we are facing increasing volumes. Air travellers have increased in the last five years by 25%; commercial imports by 27%; postal imports by 151%—mainly due to e-commerce—and courier shipments by 10%.

We are seeing an increase in all modes. We have to deal with the complexity and facility of travel.

(0950)



We don't deal with it on our own. We have many stakeholders: the shipping industry, the truck association, airport authorities, bridge and tunnel operators. We have a panoplie, as we say in French, of stakeholders with which we have, I would say, daily conversations, to be able to keep everything in equilibrium and make sure that the service expected by the trading community is up to par and to the level they expect.

Maybe I can turn it over to Johny to cover our commercial modernization, and then I'll try to wrap it up.

Mr. Johny Prasad (Director, Program Compliance and Outreach, Programs Branch, Canada Border Services Agency):

Thank you, Mr. Bolduc. Thank you, Chair and committee. Good morning.

In regard to commercial modernization, there is a lot of information in one piece of paper in this presentation, but I'll keep it high level.

From a strategy perspective, risk-based compliance is where the CBSA is targeting and trying to focus its intent. It's broken into five different pillars, the first one being client identification. Within client identification, what we're trying to do is ensure that we have the right data at the right time and understand who our entities are that we're dealing with. Instead of having multiple disparate businesses, if we can consolidate that to one, we then can focus on whether they're compliant or non-compliant.

The second pillar is pushing the borders out. This is where we're working to get the right information in advance of the goods actually arriving in Canada. One of our key initiatives is the advance commercial information initiative, ACI, and this is where things link into the single window initiative, SWI, as well as pre-clearance and e-commerce. We're trying to make sure that the information is pre-assessed before they arrive at the border in Canada.

The third one is facilitating low risk. The key to this is the trusted trader initiative. We also work with U.S. CBP, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and their program is called CTPAT. Our program is called partners in protection, PIP.

If we can register certain high-volume companies, known traders, who are low risk, we can then give them some benefits. We can give them expedited clearance at the border; we could actually reduce their examination rates. We can, in some cases, also provide additional benefits overseas. This is through the mutual recognition arrangements. We will give equivalent authority to similar programs overseas, meaning trusted trader programs in another county. If they're validated by CBSA and then cross-validated by that country, we will then have reciprocal agreements.

From a revenue management perspective, the CBSA is working to have a brand new program called CARM. With it, we're going to be modernizing the way we work with our clients, having a single point of contact, single dashboards, where we can integrate a lot of the information that's coming in from multiple systems. That is obviously to generate revenue, and to also collect duties and taxes. This is key, especially with what Mr. Bolduc put down for e-commerce. The growth is very high. It has also increased our threat environment, with things like fentanyl and other highly toxic substances like synthetic opioids being illegally brought into the country.

The last piece is on strengthening our export compliance regime, and that's through regulation changes. We're increasing compliance through a brand new system called the Canadian automated export declaration system. That's run by Statistics Canada, but CBSA is a key partner in that.

The next slide is “Commercial Programs Overview”. I'll talk a little about the objectives.

Our objective is obviously to facilitate the import and export of commercial goods while ensuring our trusted trading partners can reach their destination with minimal interventions. We develop, maintain, and administer commercial policies, procedures, regulations, and legislation related to the movement of commercial goods into, through, and out of Canada. We also ensure that all importers and exporters understand and respect applicable Canadian trade laws and international agreements, as well as collect duties and taxes on imported goods.

In regard to the activities on the next slide, CBSA and the commercial programs focus in a couple of areas, starting with targeting intelligence collection analysis and security screening. A lot of these activities are done before the individual or the goods arrive within Canada, as mentioned. Trade facilitation compliance is also aligned with the placemat that I showed you. In it, we have things like anti-dumping and countervailing programs whereby we're trying to ensure that admissible goods, the ones that adhere to Canadian regulations—all the 90 acts and regulations that the CBSA enforces—are processed in the most efficient manner.

We can also ensure that our trade partners are compliant and processed expeditiously. From a trusted trader program perspective, it's obviously to increase the processing efficiency for low-risk, pre-approved partners. From a recourse perspective, we are trying to provide the business community with access to timely redress mechanisms. From a buildings and equipment and field technology support perspective—this is a key—we have numerous ports across our country, whether they be a land port, ocean to ocean to ocean, or the numerous airports that we service, as well as rail locations.

(0955)

The Chair:

I'm sorry to cut you off. It's just that the committee members always have a lot of questions. Whatever else you have, you can try and get it in with one of our members.

Go ahead, Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I think Ms. Block's first.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I can go first, sure. Thank you so much.

Thank you very much for being here this morning. Thank you also for providing us with the briefing in preparation for the work that we will undertake next week, part of the larger strategy to understand trade and trade corridors here in Canada and also with our trading partners to the south.

I know that back in 2013, the Government of Canada and the Government of the United States entered into an agreement to undertake a pilot project that would allow the United States Customs and Border Protection service to pre-inspect trucks or truck cargo in Canada. I haven't gone back to look at where that pilot ended up, or if in fact it actually informed and is continuing to inform the work that's done at the border today. Could you give us a bit of a lay of the land as to what's happening at the border in that regard?

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

Thank you for the question.

The pilot, as you mentioned, was run for a few months. Yes, we were able to gather valuable information, and in fact that information led to the new pre-clearance agreement whereby both the CBSA and the U.S. CBP will have the ability to pre-clear people and goods in all modes. Currently, the U.S. CBP has pre-clearance operations in eight airports in Canada, but they were solely for air travellers. The new pre-clearance agreement will give both countries the ability to pre-clear goods, having the CBSA operating in the U.S. and the U.S. CBP operating in Canada in all modes.

That information is valuable. We're looking, from a Canadian perspective, as to where we could operate in the U.S. to essentially facilitate the movement and pre-clearance, whether it is railcars or commercial shipments, so that when they show up at the border, they don't have to stop; they just have to slow down and continue. Those discussions are ongoing, and we're seeing if industry is interested. The initial feedback from industry is that there's an openness to considering these activities. Those consultations will continue to inform the CBSA and enable us to make a recommendation to the government as to where we should be located.

(1000)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

In those consultations, have you identified today what the largest barriers are to being able to implement that?

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

I would say one of the barriers is that when you conduct pre-clearance activities, you want to ensure that whatever is pre-cleared is under control until it makes it to the border so that if a shipment is deemed customs-cleared, there is no possibility of introducing contraband into it. That's one of the big challenges and that's why we're working with industry to find ways to ensure that the goods won't be infected—if I can say that—before they make it to the border.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go on to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

What handle do you have on forecasts in terms of individual ports of entry, by road and seaport particularly? What's coming at you in terms of volumes, specifically on the west coast? Do you have that information at hand?

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

We don't necessarily have forecasts. We leverage years of information to be able to forecast periods during the year when we can expect to get an increase in volumes. We don't get advance information, but based on the data we have, we are able to predict those busy periods.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Do you have the staffing flexibility to manage that? I heard you use the term “risk management”, which means you're managing risk, not necessarily the whole picture.

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

We're managing risk. When I say we're managing risk, we want to focus on what we consider to be high risk and not spend a lot of time on low risk. That's our approach. We have staffing flexibility and we ramp up ahead of those busy periods. We might expect to have a container ship arriving, but bad weather at sea might delay it, so we have to readjust based on what we have. There are many variables that keep us on our toes, but we are able to react as needed.

(1005)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

How long does it take to inspect the average truck coming over the border at the Pacific crossing, or a container arriving in downtown Vancouver or out at Deltaport? What kind of inspection time is required to be devoted to it before it goes on its way?

Mr. Johny Prasad:

It varies. As Mr. Bolduc mentioned, we follow a risk management approach. The time depends on what type of indications we have for the examination. If it's just a quick check to see if the load is sealed, it could be very quickly done, say in five to 15 minutes. If we're going to be able to leverage some of our large-scale imaging devices, which is a very large X-ray, we could run it through there in about five minutes. Then the officer tries to analyze the image to figure out if there are any indicators of non-compliance.

If there is something that seems like an anomaly, we can investigate it right then and there and have the truck keep moving down the road. The old way was that we'd have to back it up to a warehouse and unload the whole thing, which could take on average four hours and two officers, along with offload service providers. A lot of time and effort went into the manual examination.

In the marine mode, it's also quite dependent on the terminal service operator or the terminal operator. If the discharge of the vessel is delayed, first it comes off the vessel through the gantry and sits on the terminal. Through a reservation system, they have to order a drayage contractor to come and pick up that container and move it to the container examination facility. You might know that in Vancouver, the container examination facility right now is in Burnaby, over 50 kilometres away. The CBSA is moving to build a brand new one in Deltaport, only five kilometres away, which will help expedite the container examinations.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We want everybody to get an opportunity here.

Go ahead, Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Gentlemen, thank you for joining us.

My question will take us back in time a little bit. According an older Auditor General's report, an initiative led by Transport Canada was supposed to provide information in real time on wait times to help the Canada Border Services Agency better plan the use of its resources at the border. Travellers and commercial carriers could also use that information to make informed decisions on the best time and the best place to cross the border. Transport Canada and the Canada Border Services Agency had committed to implement a wait time measurement system on both sides of the border, at 20 selected high-priority border crossings.

My question is very simple. How far along is that initiative? Have the 20 border crossings implemented those measures? If so, what has been the initiative's outcome? [English]

Mr. Johny Prasad:

I'm not aware of the exact progress on it, but we are working with Transport Canada, our U.S. colleagues, and quite often the provincial road or transportation partners to ensure that the border wait time technology has been implemented. Because there are so many partners involved, it is taking some time. I can get you a follow-up response on exactly which ports have been implemented and what the status report is, but I can assure you there is work ongoing to bring in border wait time technology. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I would like to at least be provided with a report on the 20 border crossings. Knowing whether four, five or 18 of them have implemented those measures would already be significant.

In addition, I would like to know whether they are any considerable differences between Canada and the United States in terms of security standards related to the transportation of goods, or whether our rules are relatively harmonized.

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

I could talk to you about border procedures, which are highly harmonized. As for security standards in transportation, that falls more within the purview of Transport Canada than of the Canada Border Services Agency.

As we have already said about border procedures, many programs are collaborative. So there is reciprocity between programs in order to facilitate the movement of goods at the border. Our border procedures are very similar.

I could not answer you with regard to security.

(1010)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Okay.

I would like to come back to the Auditor General's report from 2012. It says that the Canada Border Services Agency was not keeping a record of the number of lookouts leading to interceptions of shipments.

Is that still the case, or is there now a registry where agency employees must report interceptions?

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

The audit you are referring to, stated that we lacked rigour when a lookout was issued, regarding a risky shipment. Following that lookout, our documentation on the inspection or on its outcome was incomplete. Therefore, we have taken steps to remedy the situation, so that our officers who conduct inspections would produce reports. Of course, making sure that the circle is complete is always a challenge. That said, the Agency has made a great deal of progress in this area since 2012.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Does the report.... [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin, I'm sorry, but your time is up.

Go ahead, Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I want to thank the witnesses for joining us this morning.

Under the beyond the border action plan, the Canadian and U.S. governments implemented, in 2013, a pilot project you probably know about.

Are there any significant differences between the two countries in terms of security standards?

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

If you want to know whether we are ensuring that security measures are in place to facilitate the movement of goods at the border, I would say that our procedures are very similar. For example, CBSA officers are posted at the targeting centre of our colleagues from the U.S. Customs and Borders Protection in a Washington suburb. Those officers are working with American colleagues to align our targeting.

Of course, there are two different sets of laws. We are talking about sovereign countries. Regarding work procedures, however, you can assume that what is considered high risk by the Canada Border Services Agency is probably considered the same by our U.S. colleagues. So it is very harmonized.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Would you agree that this type of inspection is thorough?

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

Nothing leads me to believe that inspections are not conducted thoroughly.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

What about CETA's arrival? Are there similar measures? For instance, are inspections conducted with as much rigour? This is new, as the agreement with the European Union has just come into force. For the Port of Montreal, for example, what measures have been implemented exactly? The same measures are probably not in place in Vancouver.

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

I will try to explain it to you. We're essentially talking about a free trade agreement. That helps reduce tariffs on commercial imports.

When it comes to the audit procedure, a free trade agreement changes nothing. If the CBSA has reasons to believe that a shipment could represent a risk, be it in terms of firearms smuggling or drugs, or that, for instance, fruits and vegetables could carry a health risk, having a free trade agreement does not change the way we conduct inspections. Those are two completely different things.

(1015)

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

It changes nothing, but there is still an increase.

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

There is indeed an increase in trade.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

If there is an increase in trade, there is an increase in inspections. Are you prepared for that? Are you able to do it within an appropriate time frame? Given that new markets are opening up and that there will probably be others, are you ready for this? [English]

The Chair:

Can I get a short answer to a long question? [Translation]

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

Yes. The answer is yes. [English]

The Chair:

Yes. Okay. Thank you very much.

Mr. Sikand is next.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you for being here this morning.

I represent a riding in Mississauga, so I'm very close to the Pearson airport. Could you please discuss a bit of your footprint there, your operations there, to start?

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

We have essentially two large operations at Pearson. In fact, our largest operation is the traveller operation. Pearson International Airport is by far the busiest airport in Canada.

As for the footprint at the airport, we have—not in the main terminal, a little further away—we have our commercial operation activities, which handle all cargo that is imported by aircraft into Canada. There is also a postal centre in the vicinity of Mississauga that, again, handles all international mail that's coming in.

In a nutshell, that's our footprint at Pearson.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Our committee is going to start a study on the impact of noise and other things on adjacent communities around airports. I'm coming with that angle, but the ramifications of this do relate to trade corridors. I just want to share with my colleagues.

You mentioned there's a 25% increase in air passenger traffic throughout airports. I'm assuming a lot of that is in Pearson. How does the CBSA respond to that?

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

To be able to manage the increased volume, we have introduced technology that gives an ability to process more people at once than we used to be able to in a traditional way whereby you would queue up and talk to an officer.

If you have travelled recently, you probably saw our kiosk technology. You go to a kiosk, you essentially complete your customs declaration, scan your passport, and out you go. You do a slight touch with an officer who will look at the sort of ticket you got from the kiosk to be able to confirm that the picture on the receipt is the individual in front of him.

That technology really helped the CBSA manage the increase in volumes. We were able to do that in partnership with airport authorities, which in fact invested in the technology. CBSA provided the specification, but each individual airport invested into the technology.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

I don't often like talking hypotheticals, but hypothetically if there were a Pickering airport, what would the CBSA's response be to another airport within the GTA with such high traffic coming in?

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

Well then, we would probably get a request to have resources dedicated to a new airport. That would be assessed and a decision would be made. I know for a fact that at Pearson, the airport authority is very active in trying to attract airlines offering new destinations. We work in partnership with them to have an adequate human resource footprint to be able to respond to those.

The Chair:

I'm sorry, Mr. Sikand, but your time is up. We're on a short time frame in this session. Sorry.

Go ahead, Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you for being here today, everybody.

Mr. Prasad or Mr. Bolduc—if I have it wrong, please just chime in—I think one of your slides speaks about the increase from 2012 to 2017 in air travel—commercial, postal, and courier. It doesn't indicate automobile traffic. Has automobile traffic across the borders also increased? I note that there is another slide that I don't think you got to, Mr. Prasad. It talks about the busiest commercial points of entry. I was just wondering if you could comment on that.

(1020)

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

Commercial trucks have increased at the land border. Vehicles have decreased slightly or have been sort of stable. We have noticed over the years that the traffic is very much influenced by the exchange rate. When the dollar was close to par, there was a lot more traffic.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Is the timeline on your slide the same, from 2012 to 2017?

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

I would have to confirm. Unfortunately, I don't have....

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

It's recent.

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

It is recent, the last fiscal year.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Okay, thank you.

The greatest commercial traffic is on the Windsor Ambassador Bridge again. Has that increased on the commercial truck side? Also, do you happen to know if the numbers of automobiles specific to that bridge have increased or decreased?

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

If Madam Chair is in agreement, we can follow up and provide you with that specific information, which I don't have.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Do you know anecdotally whether it has increased or decreased? Are we seeing more traffic in general on that port of entry, or less traffic than what we would have had five years ago or 10 years ago?

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

We see more commercial trucks. As for cars, I would have to get back to you. I don't have that information, unfortunately.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Okay. I would expect that to be some information that the department would be very knowledgeable on, only because we have a Windsor Ambassador Bridge that's now increasing in size plus an additional bridge also coming on board. Logic would tell me that it has increased significantly if there are 12 extra lanes—I believe that is the new number—to manage that.

I'm curious to how much it has increased. I kind of get the impression, with what you've alluded to, that the passenger traffic has actually decreased. If commercial traffic has gone up slightly, I guess that's good. It seems that we're building a heck of a lot more lanes for traffic that isn't necessarily going to be there.

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

Again, I commit to providing the committee with more detailed statistics.

Do you want to talk on the infrastructure?

Mr. Scott Taymun (Director General, Transformation and Border Infrastructure and Renewal Directorate, Canada Border Services Agency):

I'd like to talk a little bit to that.

We would have the volume data going backwards in time. We'd be able to get you that number. Going forward in time, there's the Transport Canada traffic study from 2014, which is projecting forward. We are trying to get a read from Transport Canada regarding what the volume forecast is going to be. We don't have solid data on that volume forecast.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move on to Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Gentlemen, your president, John Ossowski, just stated at the Detroit conference that a 1% increase in border delay negatively impacts GDP by 1%. Can you give us some comments with respect to what steps CBSA has taken to facilitate cross-border commerce?

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

As we mentioned in our opening remarks, leveraging advance information is key. That means having the ability to assess and make a predetermination before the cargo shows up at the border; promoting our trusted trader programs; knowing who the truck company is, who the importer is, and who the truck driver is; and, leveraging technology and having the ability to pick up information through RFID readers.

Instead of having a commercial trucker show up at the border, turn off the engine, provide information to a border services officer, and then start the engine again and be on his way, we're looking at having technology to be able to remotely have the truck essentially slow down, stop, and be on its way. Our initial analysis tells us—don't quote me on the number—that we'll probably be able to shave about 30 seconds off each transaction.

Those things are being considered. We believe that they will expedite cargo at the border.

(1025)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Exports and imports account for 60% of Canada's GDP, and with that, progressive free trade agreements that we're now working on now, that we've established now.... I'm going to get a bit more specific to my area, because we are, as you know, going on to travel and we're going to hear from a lot of stakeholders. Unlike the member opposite, I feel that to strengthen our international trade performance, we must all be in this together—all members of the House as well as parts of our teams within the departments. We're all in this to ensure that we do in fact get the job done.

Specific to the Peace Bridge, and of course the Niagara region where it belongs with our partners on the opposite side of the border in western New York, they'll be having a lane closure between October 15 and May 15 to complete a $100-million rehab project. Their need is to have CBSA ensure that the lanes are in fact staffed in regard to gridlock, which would negatively impact our GDP and the region within that specific economic cluster. Can CBSA assure me that the Peace Bridge will be adequately resourced during this time so that there are in fact no delays and—once again—GDP is not affected? As your president stated, a 1% increase in border delay negatively impacts the GDP by 1%.

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

I saw in your travel itinerary that you will be meeting with local CBSA executives. I can tell you that we are working hand in hand with bridge authorities. Can I give you a guarantee? Nothing is guaranteed in life. Are we making every effort to be able to respond and adequately provide the services that importers expect of us? Yes, we are. I know that there has been planning going on, and we'll adjust as needed, but our objective is to have a minimal impact. I'm sure that you will hear the same from my colleagues when you visit Niagara.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, gentlemen.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I have a very simple question. In this study, we want to be able to measure the way to improve our efficiency because that has a direct impact on the economy. According to the World Bank's report titled “Connecting to Compete 2018”, Canada has slipped to the 20th rank internationally when it comes to its logistic performance index. I have a two-part question.

Can you talk to me about that index? What does it consist of? What are the measured elements?

Should we be concerned about Canada slipping to the 20th rank?

Mr. Martin Bolduc:

I cannot talk to you specifically about that study.

In the logistical chain, the Canada Border Services Agency is one link out of many. What we are trying to focus on is bringing facilities in certain ports together, like my colleague mentioned. It's about working with the industry to ensure adequate infrastructure that enables us to do our job as quickly as possible. Of course, in some locations, we are limited by road infrastructure. In other locations, natural elements limit us.

The CBSA operates in a certain way in the facilities it owns. In other circumstances, that is provided to us under section 6 of the Customs Act. As for bridges and tunnels, their operators must provide us with facilities. That is sort of how we deal with these issues.

(1030)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you to our witnesses. We appreciate the information.

We are going to suspend briefly while the witnesses leave, before we go to our committee business.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

[Énregistrement électronique]

(0845)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

La séance du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités est ouverte. Nous en sommes à la première session de la 42e législature. Conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement, nous poursuivons notre étude de la stratégie canadienne sur les transports et la logistique.

Pendant la première heure ce matin, nous entendrons les représentants du ministère des Transports, soit: Christian Dea, directeur général de l'Analyse économique des transports et économiste en chef; Sandra LaFortune, directrice générale, Relations internationales et Politique de commerce; Martin McKay, directeur, Programmes d'infrastructure de transport de l'Ouest; David McNabb, directeur général, Politique des transports terrestres.

Merci beaucoup d'être venus ce matin.

Je souhaite la bienvenue aux membres du comité. Nous avons parmi nous Chris Bittle qui remplace son collègue ce matin. Il y a également David Graham, qui aime bien observer tout ce qui se passe dans le domaine des transports. Bienvenue à tous.

Qui aimerait commencer?

Mme Sandra LaFortune (directrice générale, Relations internationales et la politique de commerce, ministère des Transports):

Nous tenons à remercier la présidente et les membres du Comité d'avoir invité Transports Canada à comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui, alors que vous poursuivez votre étude sur l'établissement d'une stratégie canadienne de transport et de logistique. Il s'agit d'un vaste sujet, et nous espérons que les renseignements généraux que nous avons fournis aident à montrer comment le travail de Transports Canada s'harmonise avec votre étude et peut y contribuer. Il ressort clairement des travaux de votre comité des dernières années que certains sujets ne seront pas nouveaux pour vous.

Je m'appelle Sandra LaFortune et je suis la directrice générale de la Direction générale des relations internationales et de la politique commerciale de Transports Canada.

Avant de commencer, je demanderai d'abord à mes collègues de se présenter et de décrire brièvement leurs secteurs de responsabilité au sein de Transports Canada.

M. David McNabb (directeur général, Politique des transports terrestres, ministère des Transports):

Bonjour à tous. Je m'appelle David McNabb. Je suis le directeur général de la Politique des transports terrestres, et je suis responsable de l'élaboration des politiques pour le transport ferroviaire des marchandises et des passagers, ainsi que les autoroutes, les frontières et les transporteurs routiers.

M. Christian Dea (directeur général, Analyse économique des transports, chef économiste, ministère des Transports):

Bonjour. Christian Dea, directeur général de l'Analyse économique des transports, chargé de surveiller le rendement du système.

M. Martin McKay (directeur, Programmes d'Infrastructure de Transport (Ouest), ministère des Transports):

Je suis Martin McKay, directeur général du groupe chargé des Programmes d'infrastructure de transport, et j'ai comme responsabilité principale le Fonds national des corridors commerciaux.

Mme Sandra LaFortune:

Je commencerai par quelques remarques préliminaires et nous serons heureux de répondre à vos questions une fois cette présentation terminée. Je dois également souligner que nous avons fourni quatre documents d'information, conformément à votre demande, pour appuyer votre étude.

La vision Transports 2030 du ministre Garneau est un bon point de départ de notre discussion. Avec Transports 2030, le ministre donne suite à son engagement visant à créer un réseau de transport sécuritaire, sûr, écologique, novateur et intégré, qui appuie la croissance commerciale et économique, un environnement sain et le mieux-être des Canadiens et de leurs familles. Transports 2030 énonce le plan stratégique du gouvernement pour l'avenir des transports au Canada et reflète ce que nous avons entendu directement des Canadiens au cours de vastes consultations pancanadiennes.

En allant de l'avant avec ce plan stratégique, nous cherchons à: déterminer les possibilités d'améliorer l'expérience du voyageur; demeurer vigilants à l'égard de notre responsabilité fondamentale d'offrir un réseau de transport sûr et sécuritaire; utiliser des technologies novatrices pour réduire des répercussions environnementales du réseau et mettre en place un réseau pour l'avenir; protéger nos voies navigables, nos côtes et nos régions nordiques et établir notre réputation en tant que nation maritime et arctique de classe mondiale; garantir que le réseau de transport permet d'atteindre des objectifs commerciaux et économiques du Canada. Vous remarquerez dans les renseignements généraux que nous vous avons fournis que ces objectifs s'harmonisent avec les cinq thèmes centraux de Transports 2030.

Le gouvernement prend des mesures sur un certain nombre de fronts pour aider à concrétiser la vision de Transports 2030. Par exemple, en mai 2018, la Loi sur la modernisation des transports, soit le projet de loi C-49, a été approuvée par le Parlement, et la mise en oeuvre d'initiatives comme le Plan de protection des océans et l'Examen visant la modernisation des ports se poursuit. Ensemble, ces initiatives et d'autres initiatives connexes visent à répondre aux besoins de l'avenir des transports au Canada. Dans le contexte de notre comparution aujourd'hui, nous savons que ces besoins comprennent un accès rentable, fiable et rapide aux marchés mondiaux, afin d'améliorer notre compétitivité commerciale et, en fin de compte, de faire croître l'économie du Canada.

La réalisation d'investissements stratégiques et à frais partagés dans l'infrastructure de transport commercial a été au coeur de nos efforts pour atteindre cet objectif au cours des 10 dernières années. Une distinction clé de l'approche du Canada, une approche qui a depuis été imitée par d'autres pays, est qu'elle est multimodale et fondée sur des systèmes, plutôt que sur le rendement ou la capacité de chaque mode de transport pris de façon distincte.

Cette approche reflète la façon dont les entreprises abordent le mouvement physique des importations et des exportations de leur point de départ à leur destination finale, et reconnaît que les changements ou les améliorations à un point du réseau de transport intégré peuvent avoir des répercussions profondes sur le rendement et la capacité du réseau dans son ensemble.

Puisque nous sommes stratégiques, nous visons à harmoniser nos investissements pour améliorer l'accès aux marchés prioritaires et à forte croissance. Les renseignements généraux concernant le Fonds d'infrastructure de transport de La Porte et le Corridor de l'Asie-Pacifique mettent en lumière certains des progrès que nous avons réalisés dans l'Ouest canadien au cours de la dernière décennie. La mise à jour sur l'Initiative des corridors de commerce et de transport, soit l'ICCT décrit comment nous nous appuyons sur nos pratiques exemplaires et les leçons apprises au cours de la dernière décennie pour répondre aux besoins futurs du transport commercial au Canada.

Plutôt que de répéter tous les détails inclus dans le document d'information sur l'ICCT que nous avons préparé, je pense qu'il serait plus utile de vous donner un aperçu de la situation actuelle. Dans le contexte du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux, qui est au coeur de l'Initiative des corridors de commerce et de transport, le ministre Garneau a annoncé jusqu'à présent des investissements fédéraux de près de 700 millions de dollars dans des projets d'infrastructure de commerce et de transport partout au pays, dont les coûts sont partagés avec d'autres ordres de gouvernement et de secteur privé.

Le document de référence fournit des exemples de projets qui soutiennent les flux d'importation et d'exportation grâce à des marchés établis et à forte croissance, reconnaissent la nécessité de renforcer la résilience climatique de l'infrastructure de transport et de soutenir les besoins uniques en matière de transport dans les territoires du Canada, soutiennent la sécurité et l'amélioration de la circulation, tant pour les marchandises que pour les résidants, en particulier dans les plus grands ports du Canada, sont fondés sur la collaboration avec et entre des propriétaires d'infrastructures, des autorités et d'autres ordres de gouvernement, afin de maximiser l'ampleur, la portée et l'incidence de nos investissements.

(0850)



Bien que la collaboration avec les intervenants donne un aperçu précieux des secteurs où il existe des besoins ou des goulots d'étranglement en matière d'infrastructure publique ou privée, Transports Canada a également investi de façon importante pour établir une base de données probantes et objectives afin d'aider à éclairer et à quantifier les questions d'infrastructure de transport liées au commerce. Au cours de la dernière année, le ministère, en collaboration avec Statistique Canada, a mis sur pied le Centre canadien de données sur les transports, un portail ouvert pour les données sur le transport multimodal et les mesures de rendement. Le document d'information sur l'Initiative des corridors de commerce et de transport fournit plus de détails sur les plans futurs dans ce domaine.

L'innovation et les nouvelles technologies continueront de façonner les besoins et les utilisations de l'infrastructure de transport. Dans le contexte de l'ICCT, Transports Canada entreprend des actions ciblées dans les domaines des véhicules connectés et automatisés et des véhicules aériens sans pilote ou systèmes d'aéronefs télépilotés. L'un des principaux objectifs de ce travail est d'assurer leur déploiement et leur utilisation en toute sécurité. Dans le contexte de l'infrastructure de transport, par exemple, les utilisations futures pourraient inclure des inspections de l'infrastructure à longue portée et à long terme, peut-être pour le transport de marchandises et de passagers. Du point de vue du transport routier, l'utilisation de véhicules connectés et automatisés est à la fois prometteuse et probablement perturbatrice.

Je conclurai mes remarques maintenant. C'est avec plaisir que nous répondrons à vos questions et nous nous réjouissons à l'avance d'une discussion plus interactive.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup. Nous vous remercions d'avoir été aussi brève, ce qui permettra aux membres du Comité de poser leurs nombreuses questions.

Nous commencerons par M. Liepert, qui aura six minutes.

M. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, PCC):

C'est probablement M. McNabb qui sera le mieux placé pour répondre à ma question.

Tout d'abord, de ce côté de la table, il y a Kelly qui vient de la Saskatchewan et Matt et moi-même qui sommes de l'Alberta. Le transport ferroviaire a toujours été un problème dans l'Ouest canadien, mais c'était surtout pour les producteurs de grain qui n'arrivaient pas à acheminer leur marchandise aux marchés.

Au cours des dernières années, le transport du pétrole par voie ferroviaire devient de plus en plus... Eh bien, nous en sommes maintenant à 200 000 barils par jour transportés par ce mode; vous me corrigerez si mes chiffres sont erronés. Pour donner un certain contexte à ceux qui connaissent moins le domaine, il me semble que chaque wagon peut être chargé de 1 000 barils de pétrole, ce qui veut dire que tous les jours, nous avons 200 wagons chargés de pétrole qui circulent sur les voies. Il faut mettre de quatre à cinq jours pour se rendre jusqu'à la côte, ce qui veut dire que de 1 000 à 2 000 wagons roulent sur les voies à tout moment.

Ces wagons circulent dans des zones de la Colombie-Britannique que connaît très bien M. Hardie, et traversent la rivière Fraser. Je suis très étonné qu'il n'y ait pas encore eu de catastrophe écologique. La raison pour cet état de choses, c'est bien évidemment le retard dans la construction du pipeline.

Que faites-vous pour encourager le gouvernement fédéral ou du moins l'avertir que nous sommes au bord de la catastrophe écologique si nous ne construisons pas le pipeline et enlevons ces wagons chargés de pétrole des voies ferrées?

M. David McNabb:

Merci pour votre question.

De notre côté, l'une de nos tâches principales c'est de surveiller la situation pour ce qui est des statistiques et des volumes. Je sais que le groupe de Christian examine bon nombre des marchandises qui circulent sur le réseau ferroviaire. Il faut également penser aux besoins dans l'avenir et être en mesure d'établir des rapports sur l'évolution du type des marchandises avec le temps, et ensuite songer aux solutions qui doivent être apportées compte tenu des risques qui se présenteront. En ce qui concerne la sécurité, notre ministère a un service qui recevra ces informations, et ce service se chargera alors de se pencher sur les risques potentiels et les mesures d'atténuation possibles.

(0855)

M. Ron Liepert:

Cela commence-t-il à inquiéter votre ministère? Dites-vous au ministre que le problème devient très grave ou vous ne faites que surveiller la situation?

M. David McNabb:

Nous fournissons l'information. Je ne suis pas responsable de ce volet, mais de notre côté, nous donnons ce type de renseignements objectifs pour qu'ils soient examinés. Je ne peux pas faire de commentaires sur le volet de la sécurité et de la sûreté, car je n'en suis pas responsable.

M. Ron Liepert:

Quelqu'un d'autre peut intervenir?

Je trouve très préoccupant que cette question ne semble pas être prioritaire pour les cadres supérieurs du ministère des Transports. Pourtant, dans l'Ouest canadien, la situation nous préoccupe de plus en plus chaque jour. Je ne peux tout simplement pas croire que le ministère n'exerce pas de pressions sur le gouvernement pour qu'il agisse à cet égard.

Mme Sandra LaFortune:

En fait, dans le secteur de la sécurité et de la sûreté, à Transports Canada, il y a un groupe qui s'occupe du volet du transport de marchandises dangereuses et aussi des groupes qui s'occupent du volet de la sécurité ferroviaire. Je crois que, dans les deux cas, on surveille ce qui se passe et on propose des options.

Notre rôle consiste à fournir aux cadres supérieurs et au ministre l'information, les options et les conseils qu'il nous est possible de leur donner.

À mon avis, ce n'est pas que les gens n'y prêtent pas attention. Je crois que ces groupes surveillent de près ce qui se passe.

M. Ron Liepert:

Eh bien, il ne s'agit pas ici d'y prêter attention. Il s'agit de...

La présidente:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

M. Ron Liepert:

D'accord.

Il s'agit de faire comprendre aux représentants élus que des mesures doivent être prises à cet égard, dont la plus évidente consiste à construire un pipeline pour retirer ces wagons des voies ferroviaires.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Liepert.

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je crois que c'est hier qu'on a annoncé que le gouvernement accélère le processus de remplacement des wagons-citernes par des wagons-citernes modernes, plus sécuritaires et de meilleure qualité. Est-ce exact?

M. David McNabb:

Je l'ignore.

M. Vance Badawey:

D'accord. Nous n'irons pas plus loin.

La présidente:

Nous l'avons tous vu. C'était dans un épisode de PrimeTime Politics.

M. Vance Badawey:

Oui. Merci, madame la présidente.

Comme vous le savez, le Comité entreprendra une tournée. Nous nous rendrons à Niagara pour voir l'infrastructure du corridor commercial, de même que le réseau de transport. Après cette visite de deux jours, nous nous rendrons dans l'Asie-Pacifique et irons à Vancouver, à Prince Rupert et à Seattle.

La première question que je veux vous poser — car si nous faisons ce voyage, c'est pour vous fournir cette information — est la suivante: quels renseignements voulez-vous obtenir? Nous ne voulons pas refaire ce qui a été déjà fait en grande partie. Quels renseignements espérez-vous que nous vous rapportions qui vous seraient utiles dans le cadre de vos délibérations et de votre processus, premièrement pour ce qui est des corridors commerciaux, des biens et des avantages de ces lieux et, deuxièmement, pour ce qui vous aidera à décider où ira l'argent du Fonds des corridors commerciaux ?

M. Martin McKay:

Je vais commencer, et mes collègues pourraient intervenir si j'oublie des détails. Ce que nous avons constaté, entre autres, au cours de nos consultations et de nos discussions avec les requérants et les parties intéressées pour le Fonds national des corridors commerciaux, c'est qu'il y avait une demande réelle pour cette infrastructure.

Durant vos visites, tout renseignement que vous pouvez obtenir et nous fournir sur des projets, mais aussi toutes données qualitatives et quantitatives qui les appuient... Lors de notre première série de demandes de financement dans le cadre du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux, nous avons constaté qu'il y avait beaucoup d'idées de projets partout au pays. Certains projets présentaient des atouts. Dans d'autres cas, on ne fournissait pas assez de détails. Il n'y avait pas assez de chiffres mettant vraiment en valeur les points forts de ces propositions. Dans le cadre de vos discussions avec des intervenants et de vos consultations, il serait très utile que vous obteniez des chiffres à l'appui de leurs idées d'investissements.

(0900)

M. Vance Badawey:

D'accord. Merci.

Allez-y, Sandra.

Mme Sandra LaFortune:

Je dirais qu'il serait vraiment intéressant que les gens avec qui vous discuterez donnent une meilleure idée de ce qui constitue, à leur avis, les priorités concernant l'infrastructure de transport, les entraves à supprimer et les projets les plus importants dans lesquels il vaudrait la peine d'investir qui changeraient le plus la donne pour le transport canadien. Ce sont certains de nos objectifs clés. Il serait vraiment intéressant d'obtenir le point de vue des gens avec qui vous vous entretiendrez, car nous avons, dans le secteur de Christian, et ailleurs, beaucoup d'expertise, d'analyses de données et même des gens sur le terrain dans nos bureaux régionaux. Or, il est toujours extrêmement utile d'obtenir le point de vue des intervenants et des gens au sujet du système.

M. Vance Badawey:

Cela dit, comme vous le savez peut-être, dans notre coin, nous avons la Corporation de gestion de la Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent, qui est, évidemment, une corporation indépendante dirigée par un conseil d'administration. À l'heure actuelle, les choses ne fonctionnent qu'à la moitié de leurs capacités. Elles ne fonctionnent pas à leur plein potentiel. De nombreuses raisons expliquent cette réalité, et je suis certain qu'on nous en parlera, et bon nombre d'entre elles concernent l'infrastructure en tant que telle, de même que la gestion du bien.

Ensuite, il y a la question des autres administrations. Dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez dit que vous collaboriez avec d'autres administrations pour ce qui est, par exemple, des routes. L'un des endroits où il y a des embouteillages à Niagara, c'est sur le corridor de l'autoroute Queen Elizabeth et l'autoroute 401. Encore ce matin, il y a eu une fermeture en raison d'un accident; il n'y a pas d'autres options. Êtes-vous prêts à collaborer avec des sociétés indépendantes pour régler ces problèmes relatifs à la Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent, de même qu'avec les provinces concernant le réseau routier?

M. Martin McKay:

Le financement se fonde sur la demande. Nous examinons les organismes s'ils ont des projets prêts à être lancés. Si leurs plans sont prêts et qu'ils ont une part du financement, ils peuvent très bien faire une demande.

L'un des problèmes qui s'est posé au cours de la première série de demandes, c'est que certains projets n'étaient pas financés. On demandait des fonds fédéraux, mais on n'avait pas demandé des fonds aux provinces ou du côté des sociétés.

Ils peuvent certainement faire une demande. Encore une fois, il s'agit pour eux de déterminer quels projets ils souhaitent voir mis de l'avant.

M. Vance Badawey:

Est-ce que le gouvernement fédéral pourrait envisager de dépasser la frontière des champs de compétence et de financer une route, en partenariat avec la province?

M. Martin McKay:

Si la province en faisait la proposition et si, dans le cadre de l'évaluation, on constatait que cela répond aux priorités du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux, c'est une chose qui pourrait certainement être envisagée.

M. Vance Badawey:

Très bien. Merci, Martin.

La présidente:

Allez-y, monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Mesdames et messieurs, je vous souhaite la bienvenue et vous remercie d'être parmi nous ce matin. Je vais adresser mes questions à l'ensemble du groupe. Ce sera à vous de déterminer qui est la personne la mieux placée pour y répondre.

Ma première question est associée à l'histoire récente. En 2007, le Québec et l'Ontario ont signé un protocole d'entente avec le gouvernement du Canada pour élaborer l'initiative de la Porte continentale et du Corridor de commerce Ontario-Québec. Or depuis, il semble que ce soit le silence radio. Aucune stratégie n'a été conclue. À ma connaissance, rien n'a été mis en oeuvre.

Quelqu'un peut-il m'expliquer pourquoi, alors que cette entente a été signée il y a plus de 10 ans, cette porte n'existe toujours pas? [Traduction]

Mme Sandra LaFortune:

La porte continentale dont vous parlez faisait partie de l'initiative de la porte d'entrée et du corridor précédente qui, en fait, a pris fin en 2014, je crois. Était-ce en 2014?

M. Martin McKay:

C'était en 2018.

Mme Sandra LaFortune:

Non, les derniers projets ont été réalisés en 2018, mais je crois que l'initiative a pris fin...

Une voix: C'était en 2013.

Mme Sandra LaFortune: Merci.

C'était en 2013. Par conséquent, le Fonds national des corridors commerciaux repose sur les portes d'entrée régionales qui faisaient partie de l'initiative de la porte d'entrée et du corridor. Au départ, il y avait la porte d'entrée et le corridor de l'Asie-Pacifique, la porte continentale et la porte de l'Atlantique. Le Fonds national des corridors commerciaux et l'Initiative des corridors de commerce et de transport se fondent sur l'expérience que nous avons acquise pendant plus de 10 ans dans le cadre des initiatives des portes d'entrée et des corridors.

C'est axé davantage sur un point de vue national plutôt que régional. Il n'existe pas présentement de porte d'entrée régionale comparable à la porte continentale, mais il s'agit de la façon dont tous ces éléments peuvent s'intégrer dans le réseau national.

(0905)

[Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Presque quotidiennement depuis l'élection de 2015, nous entendons le gouvernement dire qu'il souhaite faire marcher l'environnement et le développement économique main dans la main. Au-delà des mots, je n'arrive guère à voir comment ce souhait se matérialise.

Dans le document sur l'Initiative des corridors de commerce et de transport que votre ministère a préparé, je ne trouve aucune mention de développement durable ou de croissance propre. Pourtant, la répartition des émissions de gaz à effet de serre par secteur économique démontre bien que le secteur des transports constitue probablement la première ou la seconde source d'émissions de GES.

Pourriez-vous m'indiquer si, par exemple, l'utilisation d'énergie propre figure parmi les critères d'admissibilité au financement des programmes? [Traduction]

M. Martin McKay:

C'est une excellente question. En ce qui concerne la première série de demandes présentées dans le cadre du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux et les priorités à cet égard, la priorité était de déterminer comment les projets réglaient le problème des goulets d'étranglement. Une autre priorité et l'aspect à prendre en considération dans le cadre de l'évaluation des projets, c'était de déterminer de quelle façon ces projets contribuaient à améliorer la résistance, tant sur le plan de la sécurité et de la sûreté que sur celui des changements climatiques et de l'environnement.

Chaque projet qui a été évalué dans le cadre du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux, de façon comparable aux autres programmes d'infrastructure du gouvernement fédéral, a fait l'objet d'une évaluation axée sur les changements climatiques. Il s'agissait de déterminer en quoi le projet permettait de répondre à un climat changeant et quelles mesures étaient prises pour réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre. C'était un élément très important du premier appel de propositions. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Sur les 18 projets financés par le Fonds national des corridors commerciaux, y en a-t-il qu'on peut cibler? Si oui, combien de projets approuvés ont un lien direct avec la lutte contre les changements climatiques? [Traduction]

M. Martin McKay:

Il ne s'agit peut-être pas directement d'une lutte contre les changements climatiques. Dans le Canada atlantique, on a approuvé une étude portant sur l'isthme de Chignecto et les répercussions du projet compte tenu de l'élévation du niveau de la mer: ce qui peut se produire et quel type d'infrastructure résistante peut être ajoutée.

En outre, pour tous les projets, on tenait compte de la mesure dans laquelle des changements sur le plan des émissions de gaz à effet de serre pourraient résulter de l'élaboration et de la construction de ces projets. Un projet d'élargissement dans le Sud de la Saskatchewan améliorera la capacité du réseau routier dans cette région, ce qui permettra aux véhicules de circuler plus librement et fera réduire le nombre de fois où ils doivent s'arrêter et repartir à cause de la congestion. Cela aura également des répercussions sur les changements climatiques et contribuera à la réduction des émissions. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

J'ai une question rapide sur la sécurité ferroviaire. J'en profite pour saluer l'annonce qu'a faite le ministre, hier, de devancer le calendrier de retrait des DOT-111.

Parmi les 141 membres du personnel du ministère responsables de la surveillance et de la sécurité ferroviaire, combien sont qualifiés pour effectuer des vérifications en matière de sécurité ferroviaire? [Traduction]

M. David McNabb:

Une fois de plus, je ne suis pas responsable de ce dossier, mais je pourrais obtenir une réponse pour vous. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins de s'être déplacés ce matin pour nous exposer une vision d'ensemble de l'Initiative des corridors de commerce et de transport. Je vais adresser mes questions à l'ensemble des témoins et ce sera à eux de déterminer qui pourra le mieux y répondre.

Le port de Montréal est le deuxième en importance au Canada et le premier au Québec. C'est un port performant et innovant. Comme vous le mentionnez dans votre documentation, le Canada contribue, à hauteur de 64,3 millions de dollars, à deux projets concernant le port.

Pouvez-vous nous présenter brièvement les projets en question et nous dire à quels enjeux ils répondent?

(0910)

[Traduction]

M. Martin McKay:

Certainement. Le premier projet vise à optimiser le réseau intermodal du port. La contribution fédérale au projet est de 18,4 millions de dollars. Il s'agit d'améliorer une partie des infrastructures portuaires et l'infrastructure souterraine qui soutient le réseau ainsi que de construire de nouvelles routes et des biens ferroviaires dans le port pour faciliter le transport de marchandises qui sont transférées des navires aux wagons.

Le second projet vise à améliorer l'accès au port. Sur le réseau routier, encore une fois, il y a une contribution fédérale de 45 millions de dollars qui aidera la Ville de Montréal à améliorer le réseau routier local près du port afin de faciliter l'accès. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.

Comment l'optimisation de l'intermodalité peut-elle réduire les goulots d'étranglement et améliorer la performance commerciale au port de Montréal et, à plus grande échelle, dans les ports canadiens? [Traduction]

M. Martin McKay:

En améliorant la fluidité du mouvement des marchandises dans le port et en optimisant cela grâce à une capacité accrue de retirer les conteneurs d'un navire pour les transférer dans un wagon, on fait en sorte que ces marchandises quittent plus rapidement le port et sont transportées plus vite sur le réseau routier ou ferroviaire. Quand on commence à améliorer les routes qui se trouvent près du port et à accroître cette capacité, cela signifie que les camions peuvent arriver au port ou quitter le port plus rapidement. Par conséquent, on élimine les problèmes de congestion et les marchandises arrivent dans les marchés ou sur les bateaux plus rapidement. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Quelle serait l'approche de Transports Canada en matière de port intelligent? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Cela doit probablement faire partie des villes intelligentes. [Français]

M. Patrick Gosselin (directeur, Politique des ports, ministère des Transports):

Bonjour. Je m'appelle Patrick Gosselin. Je suis le directeur du groupe portuaire de la voie maritime à Transports Canada.

Vous avez posé une bonne question.

Nous travaillons avec les 18 administrations portuaires du pays pour essayer de comprendre l'innovation et vers quoi elle se dirige. Nous avons lancé une revue sur la modernisation des ports. Nous sommes en consultation afin de déterminer les différents éléments à considérer. Il y a plusieurs volets. Il s'agit de savoir ce qu'il faut mettre en oeuvre pour créer un port innovant, aussi.

M. Angelo Iacono:

De quelle façon une stratégie d'innovation entre les ports et en collaboration avec le gouvernement fédéral pourrait-elle garantir la compétitivité de notre secteur canadien?

M. Patrick Gosselin:

Les ports travaillent déjà entre eux. Il y a certains groupes portuaires qui essaient d'innover et qui travaillent avec des compagnies, par exemple Blockchain et IBM. Ce sont là deux exemples de coopération. Les responsables sont en discussion pour déterminer quelles sont les barrières à la collecte d'information, en vue d'avancer vers une technologie commune d'innovation.

Ensuite, il s'agit de prendre tous les différents éléments en considération. Il est question de sécurité et de sûreté, de même que de flux d'information. Il faut chercher à recueillir l'information et à la distribuer aux différents clients, pour qu'ils puissent être plus performants de leur côté.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Transports Canada est-il en train d'étudier le concept de ville intelligente qui pourrait s'appliquer aux ports, de manière à ce que les ports deviennent de plus en plus intelligents?

M. Patrick Gosselin:

Je répondrais en vous disant qu'un port est maintenant ouvert sur la communauté. Les ports sont responsables, de façon quotidienne, de travailler avec la communauté locale pour voir comment les activités peuvent s'intégrer au mouvement des marchandises.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci.

Allez-y, monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Bonjour à tous. Je suis ravi d'être de retour et de revoir vos visages amicaux — ils sont amicaux pour l'instant, du moins; la journée commence à peine.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Attendez un peu.

M. Ken Hardie:

Madame LaFortune, vous avez fait une observation très intéressante. L'approche est multimodale et fondée sur des systèmes, plutôt que sur le rendement ou la capacité de chaque mode de transport pris de façon distincte. Je voulais examiner cela un peu avec vous avant que nous nous rendions sur la côte Ouest pour examiner le corridor commercial qui s'y trouve. C'est ma région. Au cours de l'été, j'ai eu le temps de discuter de diverses composantes du paysage commercial. Lorsque nous poserons des questions aux témoins, je vais vouloir aller un peu plus en profondeur et savoir comment ils entrevoient l'avenir, quels sont leurs plans et dans quelle mesure ces plans sont bien intégrés. N'est-ce pas préoccupant? Comment comparez-vous cela à ce que vous appelez une approche multimodale et fondée sur des systèmes?

(0915)

M. Christian Dea:

En ce qui concerne l'aspect multimodal, c'est fondé sur le fait que des problèmes de rendement du système se présentent, bien souvent, ils résultent d'un manque de coordination entre les différents modes. C'est pourquoi nous poussons la conversation un peu plus loin, pour nous assurer que nous améliorons la coordination et la planification des différentes capacités des modes et déterminer comment ils peuvent être mieux coordonnés pour que le transport de personnes ou de marchandises soit plus fluide.

Ce cadre multimodal nous permettra vraiment d'aller plus loin. Il ne s'agit pas seulement de faire ressortir ce qui se passe dans chaque secteur — transport ferroviaire, ports, transport aérien, ou transport routier, par exemple —, mais d'avoir une vue d'ensemble et une meilleure idée de la façon dont les modes interagissent. S'ils ont de la difficulté à coordonner leurs activités, comment pouvons-nous, sur le plan de l'information ou de la gouvernance au moyen d'incitatifs, amener les gens à collaborer de façon plus efficace pour élaborer un système qui fonctionne mieux?

En ce qui concerne la côte Ouest, c'est clairement un volet sur lequel nous concentrons beaucoup d'efforts. Nous avons lancé un projet pilote avec le Port de Vancouver, l'industrie, le secteur ferroviaire et les terminaux. Il s'agit de rassembler ces gens et d'avoir une meilleure compréhension quant à la visibilité de leur chaîne d'approvisionnement dans tout un système; de mieux comprendre où sont les goulets d'étranglement; et de déterminer comment nous pouvons collaborer. Pour régler certains de ces problèmes, il faut qu'il y ait une action concertée en quelque sorte.

M. Ken Hardie:

J'ai d'autres questions, mais je vous remercie de la réponse.

Nous ne pouvons pas oublier les voisins des corridors commerciaux; il y a des zones résidentielles et des zones commerciales. L'un des points de friction, sur la côte Ouest, par exemple, c'est la capacité utilisée par le train de banlieue West Coast Express qui, bien entendu, réduit considérablement la capacité du transport de marchandises sur les lignes du CP.

En examinant les besoins locaux et les relations à l'échelle locale par rapport — évidemment — au paysage commercial général, je me demande seulement quel est le point de vue de Transports Canada sur certaines choses, comme le train de banlieue et l'avenir du train de banlieue si, en fait, le pays commence à agir quant à la promesse des accords commerciaux et qu'il y a plus d'échanges commerciaux dans nos ports.

David, la question s'adresse peut-être à vous.

M. David McNabb:

Oui, je peux répondre.

C'est quelque chose que nous évaluons. Nous examinons les réseaux de transport ferroviaire de passagers et de marchandises, ainsi que la façon dont ils fonctionnent ensemble. Comme vous l'avez mentionné, il y a parfois des problèmes, étant donné que la demande augmente dans le cas des deux réseaux. Nous procédons à une évaluation à mesure que des projets sont présentés — pour le réseau de transport ferroviaire de passagers, par exemple — pour voir l'équilibre qui existe entre les deux réseaux. Nous devons faire cette évaluation chaque fois qu'il y a un projet qui vise le réseau ferroviaire de banlieue. Nous le faisons en collaboration avec nos partenaires.

M. Ken Hardie:

Savez-vous dans quelle mesure la planification municipale a une incidence sur l'efficacité globale du réseau de transport? Dans la région métropolitaine de Vancouver, si nous prenons encore cette région comme exemple, les principales artères et les routes provinciales peuvent être engorgées. Compte tenu du nombre de camions qui transportent des conteneurs jusqu'à différents endroits, consultez-vous les municipalités à propos de leur planification pour savoir où elles veulent conserver des terrains industriels, par exemple, ou des entrepôts, etc.? Connaissez-vous bien les défis dans chacune des principales régions qui comptent un port?

(0920)

M. David McNabb:

Je vais répondre en premier, et si quelqu'un d'autre veut ajouter quelque chose, il pourra le faire.

À mesure que les projets sont présentés, nous mettons sur pied des groupes de travail composés de représentants des différents ordres de gouvernement — fédéral, provincial et municipal. Nous prenons cela en considération, car chaque ordre de gouvernement a un rôle à jouer dans le cadre des projets.

C'est une partie importante du processus, et chaque niveau de gouvernement peut communiquer ses propres renseignements et ses besoins dans le cadre du processus de planification. Nous essayons de jouer un rôle de facilitateur pour ce genre de projets en vue d'amener tous les ordres de gouvernement à participer aux discussions.

La présidente:

Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur McNabb. Votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Jeneroux, allez-y.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.

Je remercie tous les témoins de leur présence aujourd'hui.

Je vais partager mon temps de parole avec mon estimée collègue Kelly Block. J'espère que j'aurai le temps d'obtenir des réponses à quelques questions.

Madame LaFortune, vous avez mentionné un investissement de 700 millions de dollars de la part du gouvernement fédéral dans les infrastructures pour le commerce et le transport.

Mme Sandra LaFortune:

Il s'agit de 760 millions de dollars. C'est pour le premier cycle de financement; ce n'est pas par année.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Est-ce que les projets ont démarré? A-t-on commencé les travaux? Sont-ils terminés? Quel est l'état d'avancement de ces projets?

M. Martin McKay:

Je peux répondre.

Un certain nombre de projets ont débuté. Les travaux de construction ont commencé cet été. Nous avons en fait déjà remboursé des dépenses et payé des factures liées à ces projets.

Certains projets sont de longue durée. Ils comportent un financement qui s'échelonne sur 11 ans. Pour quelques projets, on est rendu à la septième ou à la huitième année. En ce moment, on est en train de procéder à la planification préliminaire et de finaliser la conception technique afin que la construction commence le plus tôt possible.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

C'est parfait.

Pour ces projets visés par cet investissement de 760 millions de dollars, est-il possible d'obtenir une liste de ceux qui ont été commencés et de ceux qui ne l'ont pas encore été ainsi que leur état d'avancement?

M. Martin McKay:

Si le Comité souhaite obtenir cette information, nous pouvons la fournir.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Oui nous voudrions obtenir cette information.

Il y a un certain nombre de ports au pays. Dernièrement, on a beaucoup entendu parler d'un point d'entrée en particulier, c'est-à-dire le passage frontalier Windsor-Détroit. J'aimerais qu'un des témoins nous parle du permis qui a été octroyé récemment pour le pont Ambassador, et peut-être aussi de la situation concernant le pont Gordie-Howe.

M. David McNabb:

Je peux répondre. Au sujet du pont Gordie-Howe, je crois savoir que ce projet continue d'avancer jusqu'à l'étape de la construction. On a annoncé cet été qu'on en était à l'étape de la conception. On fera également bientôt une annonce à propos de cette conception, donc, je peux vous dire que ce projet avance.

Il y a également le permis pour le pont Ambassador. On procède actuellement à la planification avec toute la diligence voulue en ce qui concerne la réfection du pont Ambassador.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Savez-vous, de mémoire, pourquoi un permis a été octroyé pour le pont Ambassador, alors que le projet de construction du pont Gordie-Howe était déjà en branle?

M. David McNabb:

Je ne le sais pas, de mémoire. Encore une fois, je pourrais vous transmettre cette information ultérieurement.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Tous les renseignements que vous pourriez nous fournir nous seraient utiles, afin de mieux comprendre.

Je vous remercie.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je vous remercie beaucoup, madame la présidente.

J'ai beaucoup de respect pour mon collègue d'en face, mais j'estime devoir préciser que je ne crois pas que les comités parlementaires ont pour rôle d'appuyer le travail du ministère. Je pense que nous sommes ici pour nous renseigner et pour informer nos propres caucus de ce que nous avons appris. Même si j'espère que le ministère, ou même le ministre lui-même, tiendra compte du rapport que nous allons présenter, je constate qu'on revient continuellement sur l'idée que nous sommes là pour appuyer le travail du ministre et celui du ministère. Ce n'est pas le cas. Nous sommes maîtres de notre propre destinée et nous étudions certains sujets, car nous voulons en savoir davantage à cet égard.

J'aimerais poser une question qui fait suite aux commentaires de mon collègue lors de sa première intervention à propos du transport ferroviaire du pétrole. A-t-on mis certaines choses en place pour réunir des représentants de divers ministères — par exemple, Transports, Infrastructure et Ressources naturelles — afin qu'ils se penchent sur les questions qui touchent tous ces ministères? Si vous pouviez m'expliquer ce qui existe, je vous en serais reconnaissante.

(0925)

M. David McNabb:

Les ministères ont leurs propres groupes de travail sur le transport ferroviaire. Il existe des comités au sein des ministères, comme Ressources naturelles, Agriculture Canada et Transports Canada, mais des représentants de chaque ministère se réunissent également pour discuter, par exemple, des types de produits transportés, de ce qui est prévu pour l'avenir, de certains des problèmes qui surgissent, comme les engorgements, de la planification, de la façon dont nous pouvons mettre à contribution les compagnies de chemin de fer de la catégorie 1 et de marchandises pour assurer une fluidité au sein du réseau, ainsi que des enjeux qui surviennent, comme le transport ferroviaire du pétrole, pour qu'ils puissent en discuter au sein de leurs ministères respectifs, car il faut discuter des enjeux émergents.

Les ministères peuvent examiner les enjeux émergents ou actuels dans le secteur ferroviaire et déterminer quelle politique pourrait être élaborée.

La présidente:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

Mme Kelly Block:

Est-ce que le Bureau de gestion des grands projets existe encore?

M. David McNabb:

Le Bureau de gestion des grands projets existe encore, à ma connaissance. Je le répète, il ne fait pas partie de mes responsabilités puisqu'il relève de Ressources naturelles Canada.

Mme Sandra LaFortune:

Je crois qu'il existe encore, tout comme le Bureau de gestion des projets nordiques.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je vous remercie.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Rogers, allez-y.

M. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à nos témoins ce matin.

Je viens de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador, où les réseaux de transport sont très différents de ce qui existe ailleurs au pays. Un grand nombre des difficultés que vivent nos producteurs de fruits de mer et nos petites entreprises sont liées à l'accès aux marchés. Acheminer des produits de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador à des marchés étrangers constitue un véritable défi dans bien des cas, et il en va de même dans d'autres régions du Canada atlantique.

Je crois que cette stratégie nationale sur les transports offre une occasion unique de renforcer les avantages particuliers que nous avons au Canada. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer comment cette stratégie nous permettra d'améliorer les systèmes actuels de commerce et de transport, particulièrement au Canada atlantique?

M. Martin McKay:

Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, en ce qui concerne le Canada atlantique et les projets qui ont été choisis à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador, nous avons examiné quatre priorités lors du premier appel de propositions. L'une de ces priorités était la résilience et la sécurité des principaux actifs dans le secteur des transports. L'un des projets approuvés au Labrador est celui d'amélioration de certaines pistes de l'aéroport international de Gander, afin de maintenir cet aéroport en exploitation et de conserver ce service de transport important.

En outre, il y a le projet d'amélioration de la manutention du fret au port de St. John's. Ces deux installations permettent d'acheminer des marchandises à l'étranger et ailleurs au Canada, qu'il s'agisse de fruits de mer ou d'autres produits, à partir des côtes de Terre-Neuve.

M. Churence Rogers:

Pouvez-vous nous expliquer plus en détail comment s'inscrit l'examen de la modernisation des ports dans la stratégie globale, particulièrement au Canada atlantique?

M. Martin McKay:

Parlez-vous de l'amélioration de la manutention dans les ports? Je ne suis pas certain de bien comprendre.

M. Churence Rogers:

Comment s'inscrit la modernisation des ports dans la stratégie globale?

Mme Sandra LaFortune:

Nous avons quelqu'un qui s'occupe des ports. [Français]

M. Patrick Gosselin:

Bonjour.

Justement, nous sommes en consultation avec des intervenants de tout le pays. Nous avons aussi lancé un appel en vue de recueillir des mémoires, jusqu'au 26 octobre. Nous invitons les différents intervenants ainsi que les clients du secteur maritime, par exemple, mais aussi de celui des pêches, à nous faire part de leurs défis relativement à l'optimisation et à la compétitivité du secteur maritime dans le domaine des échanges commerciaux.

(0930)

[Traduction]

M. Churence Rogers:

L'industrie des fruits de mer est confrontée à des difficultés en ce qui concerne le commerce, non seulement à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador mais aussi ailleurs au Canada atlantique. L'un des plus importants marchés pour les fruits de mer est l'Asie. De quelle façon cette stratégie contribuera-t-elle à améliorer et à intégrer les réseaux de transport et la logistique dans l'ensemble du pays afin que les marchandises qui proviennent du Canada atlantique puissent être acheminées sans difficulté à leur destination et qu'il n'y ait pas d'obstacle pendant le transport des marchandises au Canada?

Mme Sandra LaFortune:

Je vais répondre.

L'objectif de l'Initiative des corridors de commerce et de transport est d'envisager le réseau de transport d'un point de vue national. Dans le cas des marchandises expédiées depuis l'est du pays, le Canada atlantique, jusqu'en Asie, il faut voir si une modification des infrastructures à Montréal, Toronto ou Edmonton pourrait faciliter leur expédition d'un bout à l'autre du pays.

L'objectif est de s'assurer que les infrastructures qui soutiennent le commerce intérieur permettront également d'appuyer le commerce international, étant donné qu'elles font partie d'un réseau intégré, d'autant plus qu'il existe maintenant bien d'autres solutions pour acheminer des marchandises du point A au point B. Il n'y a pas seulement le transport aérien, il y a aussi le transport maritime via le canal de Panama. Des marchandises pourraient même être acheminées des provinces de l'Atlantique à l'Asie, simplement en passant par le canal de Suez, selon l'endroit où elles doivent être acheminées en Asie. Je crois que dans le cas de Singapour, il n'y a pas de différence, qu'on parte de l'ouest ou de l'est.

Tous ces éléments sont pris en considération dans le cadre de cette stratégie nationale.

M. Churence Rogers:

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Il reste une minute.

M. Churence Rogers:

J'ai terminé; c'est bon.

La présidente:

M. Bittle a fait savoir que vous souhaitiez lui laisser une minute de votre temps de parole. Il reste 45 secondes, alors vous devez faire vite.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Ma principale préoccupation, et je vais essayer de la résumer le plus rapidement possible... À l'instar de Vance, je viens de Niagara, où se trouve la Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent. Les habitants de Niagara sont touchés d'une façon particulière parce que la Voie maritime sépare la péninsule en deux. Je suis préoccupé lorsque j'examine votre document, qui indique que Transports Canada compilera et étudiera les principales conclusions tirées de l'examen en cours dans le but d'appuyer le renouvellement de l'entente-cadre. Il semble que cet examen a un résultat prédéterminé.

Comme je représente les habitants de St. Catharines, ce qui me préoccupe principalement, c'est le fait que la Corporation de gestion de la Voie maritime ne consulte pas les municipalités ni les habitants. On nous dit que cette voie maritime représente des milliards de dollars en échanges commerciaux, mais nous n'avons aucun mot à dire. Nous sommes touchés par les ponts, les retards et l'incapacité de la Corporation de gestion de développer l'économie dans la région.

Pourquoi est-ce que le ministère ne consulte-t-il pas les habitants de Niagara, et est-ce que l'examen en question a un résultat prédéterminé?

La présidente:

C'est une question assez longue, mais pouvez-vous donner une réponse courte? Vous pourrez peut-être envoyer au Comité une réponse plus détaillée; cela pourrait être utile.

J'aimerais une réponse brève si c'est possible.

M. Patrick Gosselin:

Dans le cadre du processus d'examen de la Voie maritime, nous menons des consultations. Nous discutons également avec certaines personnes dans la région de Niagara. Nous comprenons la situation, et je peux vous dire que l'examen suit son cours.

La présidente:

D'accord. Si vous avez d'autres renseignements à fournir en réponse à la question du député, vous pourrez les transmettre au Comité.

Madame Block, allez-y.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je vous remercie beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Madame LaFortune, j'aimerais revenir rapidement sur un commentaire que vous avez fait en réponse à une question à propos de l'Initiative de la Porte et du Corridor de l'Asie-Pacifique. Je pense vous avoir entendue dire que nous n'avons pas renouvelé le mandat lié à cette initiative, car nous avons mis en place une stratégie nationale. Je sais que dans le rapport Emerson, on recommandait de renouveler le mandat lié à cette initiative. Pouvez-vous nous dire pourquoi le gouvernement, peut-être parce qu'il a suivi les conseils du ministère, a décidé de mettre fin à l'Initiative de la Porte et du Corridor de l'Asie-Pacifique. Si c'est parce que nous avons maintenant une stratégie nationale, pouvez-vous expliquer pourquoi on ne peut pas avoir les deux?

(0935)

Mme Sandra LaFortune:

En fait, je crois que nous avons les deux, et même plus. Certains éléments de l'Initiative des corridors de commerce et de transport... Comme je l'ai dit, tout cela s'appuie sur les stratégies régionales, mais en adoptant un point de vue national. Nous n'avons pas mis de côté la région de l'Asie-Pacifique; nous l'avons incluse dans la stratégie nationale globale. En fait, l'Initiative des corridors de commerce et de transport visait à apporter des améliorations en fonction des leçons apprises au cours des 10 dernières années.

Ainsi, les autorités portuaires canadiennes peuvent maintenant recevoir du financement, ce qui n'était pas le cas auparavant. Les petits aéroports canadiens peuvent également recevoir du financement, alors qu'ils ne pouvaient pas en obtenir auparavant. Comme je l'ai dit, la liste des bénéficiaires s'est allongée en raison de certains obstacles qui existaient.

Nous n'avons donc pas mis fin à cela pour commencer quelque chose de tout à fait nouveau. En fait, on voit que c'est une continuité. Ce que nous voulions faire, c'était continuer en améliorant les choses en fonction des leçons tirées au cours des 10 dernières années.

En outre, lorsque nous menions des consultations à l'échelle du pays dans le cadre de l'initiative Transports 2030, qui visait essentiellement à donner suite au rapport Emerson, les utilisateurs du réseau ont dit souhaiter vraiment une stratégie nationale, et pas seulement des stratégies régionales, afin que tous les éléments s'imbriquent.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je vous remercie.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin, allez-y. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais revenir rapidement sur les critères d'admissibilité au Fonds national des corridors commerciaux.

Deux milliards de dollars, voilà un chiffre qui semble ronflant, mais il ne faut pas oublier que c'est réparti sur 11 ans. Compte tenu des besoins, on voit bien, encore une fois, qu'il faut faire des choix et que ceux-ci ne sont sûrement pas toujours faciles à faire.

Par exemple, comment peut-on expliquer qu'une société hautement profitable comme le CN reçoive des millions de dollars, alors que, selon ce que nous dit le vérificateur général, le financement des infrastructures dans le Nord est nettement insuffisant?

Disposez-vous de chiffres ou d'une étude qui démontrent l'ampleur des besoins en matière d'infrastructures dans le Nord? [Traduction]

M. Martin McKay:

Je vous remercie pour votre question.

Les besoins dans le Nord ont été très clairement expliqués et ciblés dans le contexte du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux. Des projets nordiques étaient admissibles au cours du premier cycle de financement. En fait, un montant de 400 millions de dollars a été réservé pour des projets d'infrastructure en matière de transport dans le Nord qui visent à régler certains problèmes en matière de commerce. Il y aura aussi un appel de propositions de projets dans les territoires du Nord plus tard cet automne. Nous avons attribué 145 millions de dollars à des projets jusqu'à maintenant et une autre somme de 255 millions de dollars a aussi été prévue.

En plus, dans le cadre du plan Investir dans le Canada, une somme supplémentaire de 2 milliards de dollars est réservée pour des communautés rurales et nordiques qui ont des besoins précis en matière d'infrastructure. Nous voulons utiliser ce fonds pour répondre aux besoins en matière de transport propres à ces communautés. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Compte tenu de la leçon apprise cet été, j'aimerais savoir si des sommes ont été allouées pour mener des consultations auprès des communautés autochtones qui seront touchées par les projets de construction. [Traduction]

Mme Sandra LaFortune:

Cet été, Transports Canada a mené des consultations dans le Nord avec des utilisateurs du réseau, ainsi qu'avec des Autochtones dans cette région, non seulement dans le contexte de l'appel de propositions qui sera lancé plus tard cet automne, comme Martin vient de le mentionner, mais aussi dans le contexte de l'élaboration d'une stratégie en matière de transport dans l'Arctique et de la contribution de Transports Canada au cadre pour l'Arctique que le gouvernement est en train d'élaborer. Durant l'été, de juin jusqu'à maintenant — je crois que c'est terminé — les Autochtones du Nord ont pu prendre part aux consultations.

(0940)

[Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Je crois savoir que M. Graham a une brève question à poser avant que nous terminions.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Oui, en effet. Je vous remercie de me donner la parole.

Pour faire suite à la question qu'a posée au tout début Vance Badawey, j'aimerais notamment parler des autoroutes provinciales. La Transcanadienne passe dans ma circonscription. Au début, c'est une route à deux voies. Chaque année, un demi-million de camions lourds et deux millions de véhicules y circulent, et il y a régulièrement des accidents mortels. Pour des raisons politiques, la province n'a jamais investi dans cette autoroute. Elle investira finalement des fonds sur une portion de 10 kilomètres au cours des 10 prochaines années. Y a-t-il des solutions que nous pourrions appliquer de notre côté?

M. David McNabb:

Des solutions...?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il des solutions que nous pourrions mettre en place pour réduire le nombre d'accidents mortels sur cette autoroute très fréquentée? Certaines autoroutes dont le trafic représente le quart de celui de la Transcanadienne ont quatre voies, mais ce n'est pas le cas pour celle-là.

M. David McNabb:

Je vous remercie pour votre question.

Nous nous penchons là-dessus en ce moment avec les provinces. Nous avons un comité fédéral-provincial-territorial qui examine les questions liées au transport par camion et aux autoroutes. C'est l'un des problèmes qui a été porté à l'attention du Comité et que nous examinons en ce moment.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous remercie pour votre réponse.

La présidente:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Je remercie les témoins pour toute cette information. Si vous pouviez nous transmettre les renseignements supplémentaires demandés par les membres du Comité, nous en serions reconnaissants.

Nous allons faire une pause de quelques minutes pour passer au prochain groupe de témoins.

(0940)

(0945)

La présidente:

Nous accueillons maintenant, de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, Martin Bolduc, vice-président, Direction générale des programmes; Johnny Prasad, directeur, Conformité de programme et sensibilisation; Scott Taymun; directeur général, Direction de la transformation et du renouvellement des infrastructures frontalières; et Denis Vinette, vice-président associé, Direction générale des opérations.

Je crois qu'il manque une personne, mais nous allons tout de même commencer maintenant. Qui veut débuter?

M. Martin Bolduc (vice-président, Direction générale des programmes, Agence des services frontaliers du Canada):

Madame la présidente, bonjour. Merci de nous accueillir. Nous avons remis un dossier, et j'ai l'intention de le passer rapidement en revue. Nous serons alors ravis de répondre aux questions que vous pourriez avoir. Je suis heureux d'être ici.

Essentiellement, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada est responsable de fournir des services frontaliers intégrés à toutes les frontières du pays pour faciliter la circulation des personnes et des marchandises en assurant la sécurité du Canada.

Notre défi quotidien est de trouver un équilibre en vue de faciliter l'entrée des marchandises et des gens tout en assurant la sécurité du Canada. C'est un défi quotidien puisque nous composons avec des volumes croissants et un environnement changeant.

Notre effectif compte essentiellement 14 000 employés qui travaillent 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7. Nous sommes présents aux quatre coins du pays ainsi qu'à l'échelle internationale. Les activités de notre personnel touchent tous les modes de transport, que ce soit dans le domaine maritime, y compris auprès des navires de croisière, aux installations pour conteneurs, aux voies ferrées, aux frontières terrestres ainsi que dans les aéroports. Nous avons également du personnel à trois centres postaux du pays.

Nous gérons la circulation des personnes et des marchandises et nous protégeons la chaîne d'approvisionnement. Nous assurons la sécurité du Canada, essentiellement dans trois secteurs d'activité: les activités douanières; l'exécution de la loi sur l'immigration et le traitement des réfugiés; ainsi que l'inspection des aliments, des végétaux et des animaux, pour assurer la salubrité des aliments, de même que l'exécution des lois qui portent sur les aliments, les végétaux et les animaux.

Nous le faisons essentiellement pour veiller à ce que le contrôle des marchandises transportées se fasse de façon efficace. Nous confirmons que les partenaires commerciaux se conforment aux lois, aux exigences et aux mesures applicables, et nous améliorons l'efficacité du traitement des produits des partenaires commerciaux préapprouvés à faible risque. Nous avons différents programmes pour préapprouver les produits des partenaires commerciaux afin de pouvoir adopter une approche à faible intervention lorsque les marchandises traversent la frontière.

Dans ce secteur d'activités, nous traitons le dossier des voyageurs internationaux qui se présentent à nos frontières. Nous traitons les marchandises commerciales. Nous sommes également responsables des activités commerciales et d'antidumping. L'ASFC est l'organisme responsable de la classification douanière, de l'établissement de l'origine et de la valeur des marchandises importées et de la réalisation d'enquêtes antidumping.

Notre quatrième secteur d'activités est celui de l'exécution de la loi et du renseignement, pour être en mesure de mettre l'accent sur ce que nous considérons comme très risqué et pour régler le plus rapidement possible ce qui présente un faible risque selon nous.

Comme je l'ai dit, notre défi quotidien consiste à tout équilibrer, mais nous faisons face à des volumes croissants. En effet, au cours des cinq dernières années, le volume de voyageurs aériens a augmenté de 25 %; les importations commerciales, de 27 %; les importations postales, de 151 % — principalement à cause du commerce électronique —; et les expéditions par messagerie, de 10 %.

Nous observons une hausse dans tous ces modes de transport et nous devons composer avec la complexité et la facilité des déplacements.

(0950)



Nous ne faisons pas tout cela seuls. Nous avons de nombreux intervenants: l'industrie du transport maritime, l'association des camionneurs, les administrations portuaires ainsi que les exploitants de ponts et de tunnels. Nous avons une panoplie d'intervenants avec qui nous avons, je dirais, des échanges quotidiens, pour être en mesure de maintenir l'équilibre et de garantir que le service auquel on s'attend dans les milieux commerciaux est à la hauteur des attentes.

Je peux peut-être céder la parole à Johny, qui parlera de la modernisation de notre secteur commercial. Je vais ensuite tenter de conclure.

M. Johny Prasad (directeur, Conformité de programme et sensibilisation, Direction générale des programmes, Agence des services frontaliers du Canada):

Merci, monsieur Bolduc. Merci, madame la présidente, chers membres du Comité. Bonjour.

La diapositive de cet exposé qui porte sur la modernisation du secteur commercial contient beaucoup d'information, mais je me contenterai de faire un survol.

D'un point de vue stratégique, l'ASFC tente de mettre l'accent sur la conformité axée sur les risques. Elle comporte cinq piliers distincts, dont le premier consiste à identifier le client. Ce que nous tentons de faire de cette façon, c'est nous assurer d'avoir les bonnes données au bon moment et savoir quelles sont les entités avec qui nous faisons affaire. En regroupant de multiples entreprises disparates, nous pouvons plutôt mettre l'accent sur la vérification de la conformité.

Le deuxième pilier consiste à repousser la frontière. C'est ici que nous nous efforçons de trouver la bonne information avant l'arrivée des biens au Canada. L'un des programmes est d'ailleurs celui de l'information préalable sur les expéditions commerciales, et c'est là qu'il existe un lien avec l'initiative du guichet unique, ainsi que l'autorisation préalable et le commerce électronique. Nous tentons de faire en sorte que l'information soit évaluée avant l'arrivée des marchandises à la frontière canadienne.

Le troisième pilier consiste à faciliter le passage des biens à faible risque. L'essentiel à cette fin, c'est le programme des négociants dignes de confiance. Nous travaillons également avec le Service des douanes et de la protection des frontières des États-Unis, notamment dans le cadre de son programme appelé le CTPAT. Notre programme s'appelle Partenaires en protection (PEP).

Si nous pouvons enregistrer certaines entreprises à volume élevé, des négociants connus et qui présentent un faible risque, nous pouvons alors leur offrir des avantages. Nous pouvons accélérer le dédouanement à la frontière; nous pourrions réduire leur taux d'examen. Dans certains cas, nous pouvons aussi offrir des avantages supplémentaires à l'étranger, grâce aux accords de reconnaissance mutuelle. Nous accorderons une autorité équivalente à des programmes similaires à l'étranger, c'est-à-dire des programmes de négociants dignes de confiance d'un autre pays. S'ils sont validés par l'ASFC et ensuite contrevalidés par ce pays, nous aurons alors des ententes de réciprocité.

Du point de vue de la gestion des recettes, l'ASFC travaille pour avoir un tout nouveau programme, la GCRA. Grâce à ce programme, nous allons moderniser notre façon de travailler avec nos clients, en ayant un point de contact unique, des tableaux de bord uniques, dans lesquels nous pouvons intégrer une grande partie de l'information provenant de multiples systèmes. De toute évidence, l'objectif est de générer des recettes, et aussi de recueillir des droits et des taxes. C'est essentiel, surtout compte tenu de ce qu'a dit M. Bolduc au sujet du commerce électronique. La croissance est très forte, et la menace est également accrue, à cause de produits comme le fentanyl et d'autres substances hautement toxiques comme les opioïdes synthétiques qui entrent au pays illégalement.

Le dernier élément vise à renforcer notre régime de conformité des exportations, en modifiant la réglementation. Nous améliorons la conformité à l'aide du tout nouveau système de Déclaration d'exportation canadienne automatisée, qui est géré par Statistique Canada, mais l'ASFC est un partenaire clé.

La prochaine diapositive est intitulée « Survol des programmes du secteur commercial ». Je vais parler un peu des objectifs.

De toute évidence, notre objectif est de faciliter l'importation et l'exportation des marchandises commerciales tout en veillant à ce que nos négociants fiables atteignent leur destination en faisant l'objet d'interventions minimales. Nous élaborons, mettons à jour et appliquons des politiques, des procédures, des règlements et des lois de nature commerciale liés à la circulation des marchandises commerciales qui arrivent au Canada, qui y transitent et qui en sortent. De plus, nous faisons en sorte que tous les importateurs et exportateurs comprennent et respectent les accords internationaux et les lois commerciales applicables au Canada, et nous percevons les droits et taxes sur les marchandises importées.

Pour ce qui est des activités sur l'autre diapositive, l'ASFC et les programmes commerciaux mettent l'accent sur quelques domaines, en commençant par le ciblage, la collecte et l'analyse des renseignements, ainsi que les enquêtes de sécurité. Une grande partie de ces activités sont menées avant l'arrivée au Canada de la personne ou des marchandises, comme je l'ai mentionné. La facilitation ainsi que la conformité du secteur commercial et des échanges sont également alignées sur le cadre que je vous ai montré. Parmi ces activités, nous avons des choses comme les droits antidumping et compensateurs grâce auxquels nous tentons de nous assurer que les biens admissibles, ceux qui se conforment à la législation canadienne — l'ensemble des 90 lois et règlements que l'ASFC met en application — sont traités de la manière la plus efficace possible.

Nous pouvons aussi nous assurer que les marchandises de nos partenaires commerciaux sont conformes et traitées rapidement. En ce qui a trait au programme des négociants dignes de confiance, ils ont évidemment pour but d'accroître l'efficacité du traitement des produits provenant de partenaires préapprouvés qui présentent un faible risque. Pour ce qui est des recours, nous essayons de fournir au milieu des affaires l'accès en temps opportun à des mécanismes de recours. Quant aux installations et à l'équipement ainsi qu'au soutien technologique sur le terrain — ce qui est essentiel —, nous avons beaucoup de bureaux d'entrée partout au pays, qu'il s'agisse des bureaux terrestres ou portuaires ou des nombreux aéroports que nous desservons, ainsi que des bureaux ferroviaires.

(0955)

La présidente:

Je suis désolé de vous interrompre, mais les membres du Comité ont toujours beaucoup de questions. Vous pouvez tenter de nous faire part de ce qu'il vous restait à dire en répondant à un de nos membres.

Allez-y, monsieur Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je crois que Mme Block est la première.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je peux sans aucun doute commencer. Merci beaucoup.

Merci beaucoup d'être ici ce matin. Merci également des renseignements que vous nous avez fournis en vue du travail que nous commencerons la semaine prochaine, qui fait partie de la stratégie visant à comprendre le commerce et les corridors commerciaux du Canada ainsi que nos partenaires commerciaux du Sud.

Je sais qu'en 2013, le gouvernement du Canada et celui des États-Unis ont conclu une entente pour entreprendre un projet pilote visant à permettre au Service des douanes et de la protection des frontières des États-Unis d'effectuer une inspection préalable des camions ou du fret routier au Canada. Je n'ai pas fait de suivi pour voir ce que le projet pilote a donné, ou s'il a contribué ou continue de contribuer au travail fait à la frontière de nos jours. Pouvez-vous nous présenter un survol de la situation à la frontière à cet égard?

M. Martin Bolduc:

Merci de poser la question.

Le projet pilote, comme vous l'avez mentionné, s'est déroulé sur quelques mois. Nous avons effectivement pu recueillir de précieux renseignements, qui ont à vrai dire mené au nouvel accord de précontrôle qui permettra à l'ASFC et au SDPF des États-Unis de précontrôler les gens et les marchandises pour tous les modes de transport. À l'heure actuelle, le SDPF des États-Unis mène des activités de précontrôle dans huit aéroports au Canada, mais elles se limitent aux voyageurs aériens. Le nouvel accord de précontrôle permettra aux deux pays de précontrôler les marchandises, puisque l'ASFC sera présente au sud de la frontière et que le SDPF des États-Unis le sera au Canada, et ce, pour tous les modes de transport.

Ces renseignements sont précieux. Au Canada, nous cherchons à quel endroit nous devons assurer une présence aux États-Unis pour essentiellement faciliter la circulation et le précontrôle, que ce soit dans les wagons ou les expéditions commerciales, afin qu'ils ne doivent pas arrêter à la frontière; ils n'ont qu'à ralentir et à continuer. Ces discussions se poursuivent, et nous voyons si l'industrie s'y intéresse. Les premières réactions de l'industrie témoignent d'une disposition à tenir compte de ces activités. Les consultations continueront d'informer l'ASFC et nous permettront de présenter une recommandation au gouvernement quant à l'endroit où nous devrions assurer une présence.

(1000)

Mme Kelly Block:

Dans le cadre de ces consultations, avez-vous maintenant cerné quels sont les principaux obstacles à la mise en oeuvre de cet accord?

M. Martin Bolduc:

Je dirais qu'un des obstacles, c'est que lorsqu'on mène des activités de précontrôle, on veut s'assurer que tout ce qui est précontrôlé est surveillé jusqu'à la frontière, pour qu'il soit impossible d'ajouter de la contrebande à une cargaison après son dédouanement. C'est un des grands défis et la raison pour laquelle nous travaillons avec l'industrie pour trouver des moyens d'assurer la non-contamination des marchandises — si je peux m'exprimer ainsi — avant qu'elles atteignent la frontière.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Quel contrôle avez-vous sur les prévisions concernant les points d'entrée, notamment routiers et portuaires? Que savez-vous au sujet des volumes, surtout sur la côte Ouest? Avez-vous cette information en main?

M. Martin Bolduc:

Nous n'avons pas nécessairement de prévisions. Nous mettons à profit des années de renseignements pour prévoir les périodes de l'année pendant lesquelles nous pouvons nous attendre à observer une hausse des volumes. Nous ne recevons pas d'information à l'avance, mais en fonction des données à notre disposition, nous sommes en mesure de prévoir ces périodes occupées.

M. Ken Hardie:

Avez-vous la souplesse nécessaire en matière d'effectifs pour gérer ces périodes? Je vous ai entendu parler de gestion des risques, ce qui signifie que vous ne gérez pas nécessairement la situation dans son ensemble.

M. Martin Bolduc:

Nous gérons les risques. Ce que je veux dire par là, c'est que nous voulons mettre l'accent sur ce que nous considérons comme très risqué et ne pas perdre beaucoup de temps sur ce qui l'est moins. C'est notre approche. Nous avons la souplesse nécessaire en matière de personnel et nous multiplions les effectifs avant ces périodes occupées. Nous pouvons nous attendre à l'arrivée d'un porte-conteneurs, mais le mauvais temps en mer peut le retarder, ce qui signifie que nous devons nous adapter selon nos ressources. De nombreuses variables nous obligent à demeurer vigilants, mais nous sommes capables de réagir en fonction des besoins.

(1005)

M. Ken Hardie:

Combien de temps faut-il pour inspecter un camion de taille moyenne au point de passage Pacific, ou un conteneur qui arrive au centre-ville de Vancouver au terminal Deltaport? Quel est le temps d'inspection nécessaire avant la poursuite du trajet?

M. Johny Prasad:

Cela dépend. Comme l'a mentionné M. Bolduc, nous adoptons une approche de gestion des risques. Le temps nécessaire varie selon le type d'indications à notre disposition pour l'examen. Si ce n'est qu'une vérification rapide pour voir si le chargement est scellé, il faut très peu de temps, disons de 5 à 15 minutes. Si nous pouvons mettre à profit l'un de nos appareils d'imagerie à grande échelle, c'est-à-dire une très grande machine à rayons X, il faut environ cinq minutes pour obtenir l'image, qui est ensuite analysée pour déterminer s'il y a des indicateurs de non-observation.

S'il semble y avoir une anomalie, nous pouvons vérifier sur-le-champ, et le camion sera ensuite mis à l'écart. Auparavant, nous devions le reculer dans un entrepôt et tout décharger, ce qui demandait en moyenne quatre heures à deux agents, ainsi que des services de déchargement. Beaucoup de temps et d'efforts étaient consacrés à l'examen manuel.

Pour ce qui est du mode de transport maritime, cela dépend aussi beaucoup du fournisseur de services ou de l'exploitant du terminal. Si le navire n'obtient pas le feu vert, le cargo sera d'abord déchargé en passant par le portique et se retrouvera sur le terminal. À l'aide d'un système de réservation, on doit demander à un factage de venir pour déplacer le conteneur dans l'installation d'examen des conteneurs. Vous savez peut-être qu'à Vancouver, l'installation se trouve actuellement à Burnaby, plus de 50 kilomètres plus loin. L'ASFC prend des mesures pour en construire un flambant neuf au terminal Deltaport, à cinq kilomètres, ce qui aidera à accélérer l'examen des conteneurs.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous voulons que tout le monde ait l'occasion d'intervenir.

Allez-y, monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vous remercie, messieurs, d'être parmi nous.

Ma question demande que nous reculions un peu dans le temps. Selon un rapport du vérificateur général qui date déjà, une initiative dirigée par Transports Canada visait à fournir des informations en temps réel sur les temps d'attente afin de permettre à l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada de mieux planifier l'utilisation de ses ressources à la frontière. Les voyageurs et les transporteurs commerciaux pouvaient aussi se servir de ces renseignements pour prendre des décisions éclairées sur le meilleur moment et le meilleur endroit pour traverser la frontière. Transports Canada et l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada s'étaient engagés à mettre en oeuvre un système de mesure du temps d'attente des deux côtés de la frontière, dans 20 postes frontaliers jugés prioritaires.

Ma question est toute simple. Où en est cette initiative? Les 20 postes frontaliers ont-ils effectivement mis en place ces mesures? Le cas échéant, quels résultats cela donne-t-il? [Traduction]

M. Johny Prasad:

Je ne sais pas exactement où en sont les progrès, mais nous travaillons avec Transports Canada, nos collègues américains et, assez souvent, avec nos partenaires provinciaux du secteur du transport pour veiller au déploiement du système de mesure des temps d'attente à la frontière. Cela prend du temps, étant donné le grand nombre de partenaires en cause. Je pourrai vous fournir ultérieurement la liste précise des ports où la mise en oeuvre est terminée et présenter le rapport d'étape, mais je peux vous assurer que l'implantation de la technologie de mesure des temps d'attente se poursuit. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

J'aimerais qu'on me fournisse au moins un rapport sur les 20 postes frontaliers. Le fait de savoir si l'on en est à quatre, cinq ou dix-huit serait déjà considérable.

Par ailleurs, j'aimerais savoir s'il y a des différences importantes entre le Canada et les États-Unis pour ce qui est des normes de sécurité relatives au transport de marchandise, ou si nos règles sont relativement harmonisées.

M. Martin Bolduc:

Je pourrais vous parler des procédures douanières, qui sont hautement harmonisées. En ce qui a trait aux normes de sécurité relatives au transport, cette question relève davantage de Transports Canada que de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada.

Comme nous l'avons déjà mentionné à propos des procédures douanières, beaucoup de programmes sont conjoints. Il y a donc une réciprocité entre les programmes, de façon à faciliter le mouvement des marchandises à la frontière. Nos procédures douanières sont vraiment très similaires.

En ce qui a trait à la sécurité, je ne pourrais pas vous répondre.

(1010)

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord.

J'aimerais revenir sur un autre rapport du vérificateur général, celui-ci datant de 2012. On y dit que l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada ne tenait pas de registre sur le nombre d'avis de surveillance donnant lieu à l'interception d'expéditions.

Est-ce toujours le cas, ou dispose-t-on maintenant d'un registre où les travailleurs de l'Agence doivent rapporter les interceptions?

M. Martin Bolduc:

Dans le cadre de la vérification à laquelle vous faites allusion, on soulevait que nous manquions de rigueur lorsqu'un avis de surveillance était émis concernant une expédition à risque. À la suite à cet avis de surveillance, notre documentation sur l'inspection ou sur le résultat de celle-ci n'était pas complète. Nous avons donc pris des mesures pour corriger la situation, de sorte que nos agents qui effectuent les inspections produisent des rapports. Évidemment, s'assurer de pouvoir boucler la boucle est toujours un défi. Cela dit, l'Agence a fait énormément de progrès dans ce domaine depuis 2012.

M. Robert Aubin:

Est-ce que le rapport... [Traduction]

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, monsieur Aubin, mais votre temps est écoulé.

Allez-y, monsieur Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins d'être parmi nous ce matin.

Dans le cadre du plan d'action Par-delà la frontière, le gouvernement du Canada et celui des États-Unis ont mis en oeuvre, en 2013, un projet pilote dont vous êtes sûrement au courant.

Y a-t-il d'importantes différences entre les deux pays en matière de normes de sécurité?

M. Martin Bolduc:

Si, en matière de sécurité, vous voulez savoir si nous nous assurons que des mesures sont en vigueur pour faciliter le mouvement des marchandises à la frontière, je dirai que nos procédures sont vraiment très semblables. À titre d'exemple, des agents de l'ASFC sont en poste au centre de ciblage de nos collègues de la U.S. Customs and Border Protection en banlieue de Washington. Ces agents travaillent de pair avec des collègues américains justement pour aligner notre ciblage.

Évidemment, nous avons chacun nos lois. Nous parlons ici de pays souverains. Concernant les procédures de travail, toutefois, vous pouvez tenir pour acquis que ce qui est considéré comme étant à haut risque par l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada est probablement considéré de la même façon par nos collègues américains. C'est donc très harmonisé.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Êtes-vous d'accord pour dire que ce type d'inspection est de rigueur?

M. Martin Bolduc:

Rien ne me porte à croire que ce n'est pas fait de façon rigoureuse.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Qu'en est-il de la venue de l'AECG? Y a-t-il des mesures similaires? Par exemple, les inspections sont-elles réalisées avec autant de rigueur? C'est nouveau; cet accord avec l'Union européenne vient d'être mis en vigueur. Pour le port de Montréal, par exemple, quelles mesures ont été mises en oeuvre, exactement? On ne retrouve probablement pas ces mêmes mesures à Vancouver.

M. Martin Bolduc:

Je vais tenter de vous expliquer. C'est un accord de libre-échange, essentiellement. Cela permet de réduire les pourcentages de droits qui sont perçus sur des importations commerciales.

En ce qui a trait à la procédure d'examen, un accord de libre-échange ne change rien. Si l'ASFC a des raisons de croire qu'une expédition pourrait représenter un risque, que ce soit en matière de contrebande d'armes à feu ou de drogues, ou si nous avons des raisons de croire que, par exemple, des fruits et légumes pourraient représenter un risque pour la santé, le fait d'avoir un accord de libre-échange ne change en rien notre façon de réaliser les inspections. Ce sont deux choses complètement différentes.

(1015)

M. Angelo Iacono:

Cela ne change rien, mais il y a quand même une augmentation.

M. Martin Bolduc:

Il y a une augmentation du commerce, tout à fait.

M. Angelo Iacono:

S'il y a une augmentation du commerce, il y a aussi une augmentation des inspections. Êtes-vous préparés à cela? Arrivez-vous à accomplir cela dans un délai approprié? Étant donné que de nouveaux marchés s'ouvrent et qu'il y en aura probablement d'autres, êtes-vous prêts pour cela? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Pouvez-vous donner une réponse brève à cette longue question? [Français]

M. Martin Bolduc:

Oui. La réponse est oui. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Oui. Excellent. Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons à M. Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci d'être ici ce matin.

Je représente une circonscription de Mississauga; je suis donc très près de l'aéroport Pearson. Pour commencer, pourriez-vous parler brièvement de votre empreinte, de vos opérations à cet endroit?

M. Martin Bolduc:

Essentiellement, nous avons deux importants volets d'activité à Pearson, le plus important est celui des opérations de traitement des voyageurs. L'Aéroport international Pearson est de loin l'aéroport le plus achalandé au Canada.

Quant à nos installations à l'aéroport, nous avons — un peu à l'écart du terminal principal — nos opérations relatives au secteur commercial, qui traite toutes les marchandises importées par avion au Canada. Nous avons en outre un centre postal, près de Mississauga, pour le traitement du courrier qui arrive au Canada en provenance de l'étranger.

Voilà en gros en quoi consiste notre empreinte à l'aéroport Pearson.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Notre comité entreprendra une étude sur l'impact du bruit et d'autres aspects sur les communautés voisines des aéroports. J'aborde les choses sous cet angle, mais cela touche aussi les corridors commerciaux. Je tenais à le préciser pour mes collègues.

Vous avez indiqué que le trafic aérien de passagers aux aéroports canadiens a augmenté de 25 %. Je suppose qu'une bonne partie de cette augmentation est à l'aéroport Pearson. Comment l'ASFC répond-elle à cette augmentation?

M. Martin Bolduc:

Pour gérer l'augmentation du volume, nous avons déployé une technologie permettant le traitement simultané d'un plus grand nombre de voyageurs comparativement à la façon de faire habituelle, où les gens faisaient la file pour passer par un agent.

Si vous avez voyagé récemment, vous avez probablement vu nos bornes. Essentiellement, les gens se présentent à une borne, remplissent la déclaration douanière, balayent leur passeport et passent à l'étape suivante. Vient ensuite une brève rencontre avec un agent qui vérifie si la photo sur le billet obtenu à la borne est bien celle de la personne qu'il a devant lui.

Cette technologie a vraiment aidé l'ASFC à gérer la hausse du volume. Nous l'avons fait en partenariat avec les autorités aéroportuaires. En fait, ce sont elles qui ont investi dans la technologie. L'ASFC a établi les spécifications, mais ce sont les aéroports qui ont acquis la technologie.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Je n'ai pas l'habitude de discuter d'hypothèses, mais s'il y avait un aéroport à Pickering, comment l'ASFC réagirait-elle à la présence d'un autre aéroport dans la région du Grand Toronto, avec un volume si élevé?

M. Martin Bolduc:

À ce moment-là, il y aurait probablement une demande pour l'affectation de ressources dédiées pour un nouvel aéroport. Ce serait évalué, puis une décision serait prise. Je sais pertinemment que les autorités aéroportuaires de Pearson cherchent activement à attirer les transporteurs aériens offrant de nouvelles liaisons. Nous travaillons en partenariat avec eux pour avoir l'effectif nécessaire.

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, monsieur Sikand, mais votre temps est écoulé. Nous avons un horaire très serré pour cette séance. Je suis désolée.

Allez-y, monsieur Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci à tous d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Monsieur Prasad ou monsieur Bolduc, corrigez-moi si je me trompe, mais une de vos diapositives porte sur l'augmentation du volume de voyageurs aériens, du secteur commercial, des opérations postales et des messageries entre 2012 et 2017. La circulation automobile n'y figure pas. A-t-on aussi observé une augmentation à cet égard à la frontière? Monsieur Prasad, je constate qu'il y a une autre diapositive dont vous n'avez pas parlé, et qui traite des points d'entrée les plus achalandés. Je me demande si vous pourriez faire des commentaires à ce sujet.

(1020)

M. Martin Bolduc:

On observe une augmentation du volume de camions commerciaux à la frontière terrestre. Quant aux véhicules, il y a eu une légère baisse ou c'est resté plutôt stable. Au fil des ans, nous avons remarqué que le taux de change a une grande influence sur le volume, qui était beaucoup plus élevé lorsque les devises étaient presque à parité.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Les données sur la diapositive visent-elles la même période, soit 2012 à 2017?

M. Martin Bolduc:

Il faudrait que je vérifie. Malheureusement, je n'ai pas...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

C'est récent.

M. Martin Bolduc:

Oui; c'était pour le dernier exercice.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Très bien, merci.

Encore une fois, c'est au pont Ambassador de Windsor que le volume commercial est le plus élevé. L'augmentation touche-t-elle les camions commerciaux? En outre, savez-vous si le volume d'automobiles a augmenté ou baissé sur ce pont?

M. Martin Bolduc:

Si la présidente est d'accord, nous pourrons vous revenir là-dessus et vous fournir des informations précises, que je n'ai pas actuellement.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Avez-vous une idée quant à savoir si cela a augmenté ou diminué? Observe-t-on une augmentation de la circulation à ce point d'entrée, ou voit-on une diminution par rapport à ce que c'était il y a 5 ou 10 ans?

M. Martin Bolduc:

Nous voyons plus de camions commerciaux. Pour ce qui est des automobiles, je devrai vous revenir là-dessus, car je n'ai pas ces renseignements, malheureusement.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Très bien. Je m'attends à ce que le ministère soit très au fait de ces renseignements, ne serait-ce que parce que le pont Ambassador de Windsor sera élargi et qu'un autre pont sera construit. Je conclus, en toute logique, qu'il y a une augmentation significative si l'on ajoute 12 voies, si je ne me trompe pas, pour gérer ce volume.

J'aimerais connaître l'ampleur de l'augmentation. J'ai l'impression, d'après vos propos, qu'il y a eu une baisse du volume de véhicules de promenade. Je suppose que la légère augmentation du volume de véhicules commerciaux est une bonne chose. Il me semble que nous aménageons beaucoup de voies de circulation alors que la demande ne le justifie pas nécessairement.

M. Martin Bolduc:

Encore une fois, je m'engage à fournir des statistiques plus détaillées au Comité.

Voulez-vous répondre à la question sur les infrastructures?

M. Scott Taymun (directeur général, Direction de la transformation et du renouvellement des infrastructures frontalières, Agence des services frontaliers du Canada):

Je veux bien en parler brièvement.

Nous avons les données sur les volumes pour les années antérieures. Nous pourrons vous les transmettre. Quant à l'avenir, Transports Canada a fait des projections dans son étude sur la circulation de 2014. Nous tentons d'obtenir des renseignements de Transports Canada au sujet de ces prévisions, mais nous n'avons pas de données concrètes à cet égard.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons à M. Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Messieurs, à la conférence de Detroit, votre président, M. John Ossowski, a déclaré qu'une augmentation de 1 % du temps d'attente à la frontière faisait chuter le PIB de 1 %. Pouvez-vous nous parler des mesures prises par l'ASFC pour faciliter le commerce transfrontalier?

M. Martin Bolduc:

Comme nous l'avons mentionné dans notre exposé, il est essentiel de tirer parti des renseignements préalables. Cela signifie que nous devons avoir la capacité d'évaluer la situation et de prendre des décisions avant l'arrivée des marchandises à la frontière, de promouvoir nos programmes des négociants dignes de confiance, de connaître l'identité de l'entreprise de camionnage, de l'importateur et du chauffeur. Nous devons aussi tirer parti de la technologie et avoir la capacité de collecter des renseignements à l'aide de lecteurs RFID.

Au lieu d'obliger les camionneurs à s'arrêter complètement à la frontière et à éteindre le moteur pour ensuite fournir des renseignements à un agent des services frontaliers avant de reprendre la route, nous voulons utiliser un lecteur à distance. Ainsi, le camionneur ralentirait, ferait un arrêt, puis poursuivrait son chemin. Selon notre analyse initiale — ne répétez pas le chiffre que j'avance —, nous réussirons probablement à réduire de 30 secondes le temps de chaque passage.

Voilà les solutions que nous étudions. Nous pensons que cela permettra d'accélérer le traitement des marchandises à la frontière.

(1025)

M. Vance Badawey:

Les exportations et les importations représentent plus de 60 % du PIB du Canada. À cela s'ajoutent les accords de libre-échange progressistes que nous négocions actuellement ou que nous avons mis en oeuvre... Je vais m'attarder davantage à ma région, car comme vous le savez, le Comité entreprendra une tournée pour rencontrer une multitude d'intervenants. Contrairement au député de l'opposition, je pense que nous devons tous travailler ensemble — tous les députés de la Chambre et les membres de nos équipes au sein des ministères — si nous voulons améliorer le rendement du Canada en matière de commerce international. Notre rôle à tous est de veiller à l'atteinte de cet objectif.

Parlons du pont Peace et de la région du Niagara, où ce pont permet la liaison avec nos partenaires de l'ouest de l'État de New York, de l'autre côté de la frontière. Une voie sera fermée du 15 octobre au 15 mai pour l'achèvement du projet de remise en état d'une valeur de 100 millions de dollars. Il faut que l'ASFC ait l'effectif nécessaire pour gérer la congestion routière qui pourrait avoir des répercussions sur notre PIB et sur la région, un pôle économique. Pouvez-vous m'assurer que l'ASFC aura l'effectif nécessaire au pont Peace pendant cette période pour éviter tout retard et, encore une fois, pour ne pas nuire au PIB? Comme votre président l'a indiqué, une augmentation de 1 % du temps d'attente à la frontière entraîne une baisse de 1 % du PIB.

M. Martin Bolduc:

Je constate que vous avez prévu, dans votre itinéraire de voyage, une rencontre avec les dirigeants locaux de l'ASFC. Je peux vous dire que nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec les responsables du pont. Puis-je vous donner une garantie? Il n'y a rien de garanti dans la vie. Faisons-nous tous les efforts possibles pour nous adapter à la situation et assurer efficacement la prestation des services que les importateurs attendent de nous? Oui, absolument. Je sais qu'il y a un plan et que nous ferons les ajustements au besoin. Notre objectif est de minimiser les répercussions. Je suis certain que mes collègues tiendront le même discours lors de votre visite à Niagara.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, messieurs.

La présidente:

Allez-y, monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'ai une question toute simple. Dans le cadre de cette étude, nous voulons pouvoir mesurer la façon d'améliorer notre efficience, parce que cela a une incidence directe sur l'économie. Selon le rapport « Connecting to Compete 2018 » de la Banque mondiale, le Canada a glissé au 20e rang à l'échelle internationale pour ce qui est de son indice de performance logistique. J'ai une question en deux parties.

Pouvez-vous me parler de cet indice? Que comporte-t-il? Quels sont les éléments mesurés?

Doit-on s'inquiéter de ce glissement du Canada en 20e position?

M. Martin Bolduc:

Je ne peux pas vous parler précisément de cette étude.

Dans la chaîne logistique, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada est un élément parmi une série. Ce à quoi nous essayons de prêter attention, c'est le fait de rapprocher les installations dans certains ports, comme l'a mentionné mon collègue. Il s'agit de travailler avec l'industrie pour avoir des infrastructures adéquates qui nous permettent d'effectuer notre travail de la façon la plus rapide possible. Évidemment, à des endroits, nous sommes limités par l'infrastructure routière. À d'autre endroits, ce sont les éléments naturels qui nous limitent.

L'ASFC fonctionne d'une certaine façon dans les installations dont elle est propriétaire. Dans d'autres circonstances, cela nous est fourni en fonction de l'article 6 de la Loi sur les douanes. Pour ce qui est des ponts et tunnels, les exploitants de ceux-ci se doivent de nous fournir les installations. C'est un peu comme cela que nous abordons les choses.

(1030)

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Je tiens à remercier nos témoins. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants des renseignements fournis.

Nous allons suspendre la séance brièvement pour permettre aux témoins de quitter la salle, puis nous passerons aux travaux du Comité.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on September 20, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.