header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-09-19 INDU 126

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1530)

[Translation]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everyone.[English]

Welcome to meeting 126 of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology as we continue our statutory review of the Copyright Act.

Before we get into it, we just have a couple of minutes of House duty. I'd like to officially welcome Celina Caesar-Chavannes.

Welcome. You are officially a member.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

The Chair: On this side, both Michael Chong and Dan Albas are official members, too.

Welcome. Congratulations.

As such, we need to elect a vice-chair.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

Mr. Chair, I nominate Mr. Albas as vice-chair of this committee.

The Chair:

Are there any more nominations from the floor?

I declare Mr. Dan Albas acclaimed as the first vice-chair.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Now that we have that out of the way, we have with us today some really interesting witnesses. From the Professional Music Publishers Association, we have Jérôme Payette, executive director. From the Canadian Network Operators Consortium, we have Christian S. Tacit, barrister and solicitor, and Christopher Copeland, counsel. From the Société des auteurs de radio, télévision et cinéma, we have Mathieu Plante, president, and Stéphanie Hénault, executive director, and, finally, from the Movie Theatre Association of Canada, we have Michael Paris, director, legal and chief privacy officer.

Each group will have up to seven minutes to make their presentation, and after that we'll go into our rounds of questions.

We're going to start off with the Professional Music Publishers Association.[Translation]

Mr. Payette, you have the floor for seven minutes.

Mr. Jérôme Payette (Executive Director, Professional Music Publishers' Association):

Mr. Chair and members of the committee, I am very pleased to appear before you today on this major review of the Copyright Act.

The Professional Music Publishers' Association (APEM) represents francophone and Quebec music publishers in Canada. Our members run 830 publishing houses featuring 400,000 musical works.

Partnering with songwriters, music publishers support the creation of musical works, and promote and manage them. Typically, a music publishing house works with a number of songwriters to create new works and represents catalogues of existing songs. Publishers are in a way the agents of songwriters and their works. They are the professionals in copyright management.

I would like to point out that the APEM is a member of the Canadian Music Policy Coalition, which produced a 34-page document, of which you have certainly received a copy. Virtually the entire music industry supports this document.

APEM has nevertheless targeted a few points to discuss with you today.

Right away, I will tackle point 1, which proposes to amend the provisions on network services, which indiscriminately apply to a wide range of companies.

Section 31.1 of the Copyright Act is, in a way, the Canadian exemption rule. The text under “Network Services” allows a provider of “services related to the operation of the Internet” who “provides any means for the telecommunication or the reproduction” of protected content to not be held liable for infringing copyright and for not paying rights holders.

Based on how the act is drafted right now, companies providing services as diverse as Internet access, cloud storage, search engines or sharing platforms such as YouTube, Facebook or Instagram indiscriminately benefit from the exception on network services. However, those companies provide very different services: an Internet service provider provides an Internet connection; a storage service stores files and makes them available for private usage; a search engine classifies results according to keywords; sharing services such as YouTube make content available to millions of users, develop recommendation algorithms, promote, organize content, sell advertising and collect user data.

The development of the Internet may have been difficult to predict, but today we know that not all those companies provide the same services. The Copyright Act must now consider those companies' spectrum of activities and ensure that their responsibilities are not automatically the same.

Let me clarify. I think that all those companies should remunerate the rights holders, because they use copyrighted content for commercial purposes. However, Internet service providers may have different responsibilities than YouTube, for example. Internet service providers should remunerate rights holders and be more active in the fight against piracy, whereas sharing services should be required to obtain proper licences for the entire repertoire they make available.

Last week, on September 12, the European Parliament adopted a copyright directive to that effect. The directive establishes that online content sharing service providers such as YouTube must make a statement to the public and enter into fair and appropriate licencing agreements with rights holders, even for online user content.

In addition, sharing services will need to be more transparent about how they use content. As a result, users will be able to continue to put content online, but sharing services will have to sign agreements with copyright collective societies, pay for the use of the content and be transparent. I think Canada should draw inspiration from this European approach.

I will close the first point by talking about NAFTA.

We know that the U.S., at the request of major tech companies, is pushing for the intellectual property chapter to include exemption rules based on its Digital Millennium Copyright Act. If Canada were to accept this request, it would be very difficult, if not impossible, to change its own legislation to reflect today's reality.

The second point I want to address is the need to make the private copying system technologically neutral and to set up a transition fund.

Annual revenue from private copying royalties paid to music creators has gone down by 89%, from $38 million in 2004 to less than $3 million in 2016. As economist Marcel Boyer said, it is “the theft of the century”, and just because it's been going on for years doesn't make it acceptable.

The spirit of the 1997 Canadian legislation is no longer upheld, simply because of technological change. The current review of the Copyright Act should be used to make the private copying system technologically neutral and thereby allow royalties to be paid for a variety of devices, including tablets and smartphones. The levy would be charged to the manufacturers and importers of devices.

(1535)



In Europe, the average fee is $2.80 per smartphone. It would be very surprising if the average price of an iPhone X were to increase from $1,529 to $1,532 if a private copying levy is introduced. That cost would not be passed on to the consumer.

Finally, the drastic drop in private copying revenue requires a $40-million transition fund, as requested by the Canadian Private Copying Collective. The Liberals have agreed, and it is high time the fund became a reality.

The third point proposes to extend the duration of copyright protection to life plus 70 years after the author's death. In the vast majority of OECD countries, the protection lasts for 70 years, whereas in Canada, it is only 50 years after the author's death.

Canadian rights holders are at a disadvantage in terms of exports, since their works are subject to less international protection. Canadian laws should not prevent showcasing our works and creators internationally.

For the music publishers I represent, extending the term to 70 years after the author's death means more revenue to be invested in the career development of Canada's authors and composers of today.

The fourth point is about clarifying and eliminating exceptions. The number and nature of the exceptions under the Copyright Act deprive rights holders of revenue they should normally receive. Today, I don't have time to present all the exceptions that should be amended in the Copyright Act. A document from the Canadian Music Policy Coalition goes over the exceptions in detail.

I will close with a fifth point, which is the importance of having a functional copyright board.

I am well aware that work is under way to reform the Copyright Board of Canada. I applaud that, I think it is great news. I would simply like to emphasize the importance of this reform for implementing the Copyright Act.

Right now, the board takes a long time to make decisions, which does not work in today's environment. Uncertainty about the value of copyright affects publishers, songwriters and all music industry stakeholders.

Thank you.

(1540)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

We're going to jump to the Canadian Network Operators Consortium.

Mr. Tacit, you have up to seven minutes.

Mr. Christian Tacit (Barrister and Solicitor, Counsel, Canadian Network Operators Consortium Inc.):

Mr. Chair and committee members, CNOC is a not-for-profit industry association comprised of over 30 small, medium and large-sized competitive ISPs.

At the outset I want to stress that CNOC takes copyright infringement very seriously. In fact, a number of its members are now either licensed or exempt BDUs. Our core message is that the notice and notice regime continues to strike a reasonable balance between the rights of content owners and Internet users for addressing allegations of online copyright infringement and achieving related educational objectives.

However, based on CNOC member experiences, the regime does need some tweaking. More specifically, CNOC makes the following recommendations.

First, the legislation should require content owners to send notices that only contain the elements prescribed by statute. This will prevent abuse by parties who use such notices to transmit settlement demands, advertisements or other extraneous content.

Second, there should be a requirement for notices to be provided simultaneously in both text and machine-readable code. This will facilitate the choice of manual or automated processing of notices by ISPs, depending on the scale of their operations.

Third, content owners should be required to send notices exclusively to the publicly searchable abuse email addresses that ISPs register with the American Registry for Internet Numbers. This will ensure that notices are directed to the correct email addresses that ISPs wish to use for processing notices.

Fourth, the number of notices that a rights holder can send to an ISP for an alleged infringement of a work associated with a specific IP address should be limited to no more than one notice per specified period of time, for example, 48 hours. This will prevent ISPs from being deluged with multiple notices directed at the same IP addresses for the same infringement.

I will now discuss why the kind of approach advocated by the FairPlay Canada coalition, which we'll call “the coalition” in this submission, and other more severe measures, should be rejected. Our analysis is based on a proportionality framework that includes consideration of the following matters: defining the scope of the problem, assessing the benefits and costs of the proposed remedy, and fairness.

The coalition members, which include the largest vertically integrated ISPs and content providers in Canada, have spared no expense to commission and find private studies promoting the view that the financial impact of copyright infringement on content owners is so devastating that the remedy the coalition is promoting is necessary. No other entity has the resources to respond fully to all of the coalition’s submissions. Fortunately, they don’t have to. In the CRTC proceeding assessing the application brought by the coalition last year seeking to implement its administrative content blocking regime, intervenors such as Canadian media concentration research project, or CMCRP, and Public Interest Advocacy Centre used publicly available data to demonstrate that the scope of online copyright infringement and its impact on content owners is not nearly as alarming as the coalition would have us believe. It follows that the adoption of the coalition’s proposed regime is not necessary.

Turning to the issue of benefits, there is no point in instituting the kind of regime advocated by the coalition if it is largely ineffective. IP address blocking, domain name server or DNS blocking, and the use of deep packet inspection, or DPI, to block traffic can all be circumvented by various technical means, including virtual private networks, or VPNs. In addition, blocking techniques can end up blocking non-infringing websites at the same time that they block infringing ones.

When it comes to costs, there are both public and private ones. The private costs are those borne by parties such as ISPs to comply with the regime, and the risks of litigation they bear if non-infringing content is unavoidably blocked as a result of how blocking technology works. Public costs include the additional costs of instituting and maintaining the administrative regime, as well as the erosion of legal and democratic values such as freedom of expression, privacy of communications, and avoidance of unnecessary surveillance, which are currently enshrined in common carriage and net neutrality principles.

(1545)



In this regard, we caution against the slippery slope of requests made by coalition members and others. At first, most of the large, vertically integrated ISPs and content providers supported notice and notice. Then they embraced the coalition. Perhaps they will now argue like MPA, that injunctions should be available against ISPs for content blocking, and ISP safe harbours should be reduced. Then they might argue that the only way of preventing the circumvention of blocking is to outlaw VPNs altogether, which are used routinely to protect the privacy and security of data and to facilitate freedom of expression.

Content owners might even go further and argue for a notice and take down regime, without any court or administrative supervision.

The costs of all of these alternatives are much too high for Canadians to bear, and there is no need for any of this. The Copyright Act already provides a mechanism for content owners to seek injunctions for the removal of infringing content. The test of what is reasonable in a free and democratic society can be gleaned from a CMCRP analysis of 40 OECD and EU countries. Eighteen of them rarely engage in website blocking, 18 others block websites by court order, and only four block websites by way of administrative procedures.

If, despite these submissions, Parliament does adopt the type of remedy proposed by the coalition, then fairness requires that it also allow ISPs the right to recover their costs of implementing and administering blocking mechanisms. These costs can be significant and can even put small ISPs out of business if the costs are not recovered.

However, we urge this committee to recommend to Parliament the retention of the existing notice and notice regime with the minor modifications we have proposed. Other, more stringent measures should be rejected.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to the Movie Theatre Association of Canada with Mr. Michael Paris.

You have up to seven minutes.

Mr. Michael Paris (Director, Legal and Chief Privacy Officer, Movie Theatre Association of Canada):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair and honourable members.

I'm here on behalf of the Movie Theatre Association of Canada, which I might interchangeably refer to as MTAC for short today. We are the trade organization representing the interests of film exhibitors behind more than 3,000 movie screens across Canada. We are exactly what the name suggests. Our members sell the tickets, sell the popcorn and ensure that films are presented the way that creators intended—on the big screen.

Among other things, MTAC represents exhibitors in negotiations with collective societies and otherwise intervenes in proceedings such as this one. Having said that, we are not frequent flyers or by any means regular visitors to copyright proceedings, so we do thank you for the invitation. We're not a collective or an institution that is regularly involved in the business of copyright, although it certainly affects our members and we do pay tariffs to certain collectives.

I'm going to tell you some quick things that you may not know about exhibitors. The first is that exhibitors in fact rent their films from distributors, and we keep less than 50% of every ticket our members sell. They don't control the film product they show, so if you are tired of sequels, you should take that up with the producers.

As a sector of the film industry, exhibition is more than 80% Canadian owned and operated, and it includes hundreds of mom-and-pop locations in places big and small. We also employ thousands of Canadians, and we're a leading first-time employer.

We are also an industry that is experiencing a great deal of disruption. As Telefilm noted in a recent study, while theatres still attract two-thirds of Canadians from time to time, Canadians are increasingly turning to streaming options. Exhibitors are competing with a universe of entertainment options like never before.

Having said all that, MTAC has been historically involved in one single issue that has been raised before this committee, and that concerns the proposal from some of the music industry to amend the definition of sound recording in the act. This is the only issue I'll speak to this afternoon, and I'll keep it very brief.

In this review of the act, a group of stakeholders led by multinational record labels and Canadian affiliates have expended considerable resources to promote the idea of a gap in the business of copyright. This group suggests bleak prospects for creators and depicts a diminishing future where technology causes them to fall further behind if their demands aren't met with legislative amendments.

With respect to this amendment, they're proposing to amend the definition of sound recording in the act to remove the exception that exists for film soundtracks where they accompany a cinematographic work. I'm just going to say “film” from now on, if that's okay. The sole purpose of this amendment is to unlock a stream of royalties from the exhibitors that would provide this constituency with a share of box office revenue.

MTAC believes the current definition of sound recording in the act strikes the appropriate balance between creators, rights holders and exhibitors. The amendment proposed by some of the music industry will aggravate the ongoing forces of technological disruption that affect exhibitors and risks further destabilizing the role of cinema as the primary showcase for Canadian creators within the domestic and global film industry.

The proposal also isn't new. From 2009 to 2012, MTAC successfully responded to legal proceedings initiated by some in the music industry. In those proceedings, they argued that the current definition of sound recording should not be interpreted to contain the exemption for soundtracks that it obviously does contain. It wasn't until the Supreme Court of Canada weighed in in 2012 that this issue was put to rest.

Contrary to the repeated refrain from some, the definition of sound recording is not arbitrary. It's not inequitable or unjustified. As the courts found, it was quite intentional and reflects a balance struck between creators, copyright owners and exhibitors as drafted by thoughtful legislators.

These stakeholders are now asking this committee to pick up the pen where their litigation left off. However, the same problems identified by the courts continue to apply to this proposed amendment.

The first thing I would say is that this amendment is not as simple as they suggest. It will require a significant rewriting of the act to eliminate absurdities identified by the courts in their decisions and other inequities that this amendment would create. I don't have time to go through everything, but I will identify what I think is the most objectionable, and that is that this amendment would create a system of double-dipping where creators and copyright owners are paid on the front end for the inclusion of their work in a film and then also on the back end when the film is played. This is exactly why the exemption was instituted, and it's consistent with how the work of other creators is treated in the act when their work is incorporated into a film.

(1550)



It was never a subsidy. Neighbouring rights compensate for uncontrolled usage of sound recordings that can arise without the record label's involvement. However, the right to exploit music in a film is a right for which a licence is required, and for which compensation has already been provided by the filmmakers. That compensation is expressly agreed upon in a contract. The inclusion rights are negotiated directly with the copyright owner and acquired on a worldwide basis to facilitate the global distribution and exhibition rights for the film as a singular unit, not as a collection of works.

This distribution model is critical to the global box office returns, which in turn pay the costs of the filmmaker, including payment to music industry stakeholders.

That's about as far as I can go in the short time provided here today. We will be making a more detailed brief available to the committee later this week on behalf of our members. Thank you for the invitation and your time today. I am pleased to respond to any questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[Translation]

For the last presentation, we have the Société des auteurs de radio, télévision et cinéma.

The floor goes to Stéphanie Hénault and Mathieu Plante.

Ms. Stéphanie Hénault (Executive Director, Société des auteurs de radio, télévision et cinéma):

Thank you for inviting us to appear today.

We would like to talk to you about the work of authors, such as screenwriters, and how the Copyright Act could enrich Canadian culture and economy in the long term.

First of all, let me tell you about our organization, SARTEC. Its mission is to protect and defend the professional, economic and moral interests of all self-employed French-speaking authors in the audiovisual sector in Canada. It negotiates collective agreements with producers, advises authors on their contracts, collects royalties on their behalf, and helps ensure that their work is valued.

Our collective agreements prohibit the assignment of rights, but they grant producers operating licences for the text in the form of audiovisual works, they regulate the possibility of granting licences for other purposes, and they allow authors to collect royalties from producers or collecting societies, depending on the type of operation. All this is set out in the agreements.

Screenwriters are creators who devote their lives to writing and imagining the stories of Canadian heroes and values. Their scripts are the source of audiovisual works that bring people together, move them, make them laugh and reflect, promote our culture, our country and its great wealth. The benefits they generate are very positive for the economy and the well-being of Canadians. To ensure that our Canadian audiovisual production is competitive, we have a responsibility to put in place modern mechanisms in the act to ensure that creators are adequately compensated for the fruits of their labour.

It is important to remember that, in order to do their jobs, authors must be able to grant the rights for their work in return for remuneration, whether for a film, to a theatre company for a play or to a publisher in the case of a book. Authors must have the ability to monetize the rights for the adaptation of their screenplays and to reap the benefits. Self-employed workers often assume the risk of creating their work alone. The act must therefore allow them to mitigate that risk, so that they can continue to create and make a decent income in the digital economy.

In our opinion, the act must allow our children who have the desire and talent to dream of working as creators one day too.

(1555)

Mr. Mathieu Plante (President, Société des auteurs de radio, télévision et cinéma):

To do so, we are basically asking for five things. Today, the time we have forces us to present only three of them to you.

First, we call for the elimination of the unfair exceptions introduced in 2012 in the Copyright Act, which adversely affect Canadian creators. We continue to strongly denounce those exceptions. They actually compromise the ability of our writers to continue to write our stories, but Canada must ensure that they continue to do so.

Second, we ask that the private copying system be extended to audiovisual works. Canadian audiovisual creators and producers have been left out of this system, which works well in most European countries and elsewhere.

Third, we ask that a presumption of copyright co-ownership for audiovisual work be added. In accordance with Canadian case law, the act should specify that the writer and director are presumed to be copyright co-owners of the audiovisual work. The screenwriters write the text, a literary work that will guide all subsequent contributors to the audiovisual work. For their part, the directors will make creative choices to turn the text into an audiovisual work, choices that will influence the costs finances.

The script defines the film to be made as concretely as possible. By writing it, writers create the story. They describe the characters, their intentions, behaviours, dialogues and evolution. They set out the film to be made scene by scene, including its setting, time and sound environment. For their part, the directors direct the performers, designers and technicians to ensure that the screenwriter's work takes on an audiovisual form. The director's choices will influence the style, rhythm, tone and sound of the film.

We therefore invite you to acknowledge that the author of the script, the adaptation and the spoken text, as well as the director are presumed to be the copyright co-owners for the audiovisual work. We would have no objection to also taking into account the composer of any music specifically created for the work.

Finally, we are asking that the act be modernized so that the protection it grants to works is extended from 50 years to 70 years after the author's death and so that it better complies with intellectual property in the case of audiovisual works that are digitized and distributed on digital platforms. A more explicit brief on this issue will be subsequently sent to you.

(1600)

Ms. Stéphanie Hénault:

Before I conclude, I would like to remind you of the primary purpose of the Copyright Act, which is to protect the intellectual property of creators to ensure that they are paid for the use of their work.

We feel that it is your duty to encourage their long-term ability to continue to bring people together, entertain them, move them, make them laugh or reflect, promote our country and our values, and contribute to our pride. To do so, we believe that some of the provisions of the act need to be updated to bring it in line with international best practices that connect creators with the economic benefits of their works.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for all your presentations.

We will start the period for questions.[English]

We're going to go right to Mr. Longfield.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Thank you all for the concise presentations that you have prepared and delivered for us. We're here to try to find the right path forward, and your presentations are helping.

I have a few questions, starting with Mr. Payette.

You mentioned changing the Copyright Board. I met with a group of musicians in Guelph recently who talked about the Copyright Board as well. One of their points was that there should be musicians on the Copyright Board.

Would you have any opinions on who makes up the Copyright Board? Should we include musicians, publishers and the range of stakeholders?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

I'm not very familiar with the Copyright Board's procedures, because mostly it's the collective administration societies that go in front of the Copyright Board. To my understanding it's mostly like a tribunal that sets the rates, so it's very technical.

I'm not sure that musicians should be on the board, but of course people who are willing to recognize the value of the music created should be.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay. Thanks. I was just wondering how deep the comment went.

Also, staying with you on the share that a performer typically receives in a live performance versus a recorded and published performance, do you have a sense of what kind of gap there is? Some of the musicians have said that the way to get paid now is to be live, and that payments from streaming services or publishers have dropped so drastically that they've had to really rethink the way they go to market with their product.

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

There are different types of professionals in the music industry. You can be a songwriter that does not necessarily perform, but in the case of a singer-songwriter who's also a performer, yes, performing has become important to make a living.

Concerning mostly streaming services, I was suggesting that we might look at what the European Parliament just did last week and try to get more money from the services. I think that's very important. They said that the sharing services, for example, like YouTube, will have to pay for all the streams. Right now, that's not the case. They only pay for the streams that are being commercialized. If a user puts something online, like on YouTube, for example, there's no money coming out right now. However, if we follow what they're doing in Europe, there would be money coming to the rights holders following.... I think they call it the “communication to the public” in Europe.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

That's great. That's helpful. When we consider our trade agreements with Europe, with intellectual property agreements being part of that, and how we go to market in North America versus Europe, we can see that there could be an influence from the European decision. However, it's a recent decision, so we haven't quite got into it but it's really good to hear your first take on it.

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

I think it's a very good example to follow and gives good balance to the rights holders, ahead of big international companies. They don't always have licences and they don't always pay for the music that's being used.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thanks.

You just alluded to another issue that I was thinking of, which is the difference between a songwriter and a performer. When you think of Aretha Franklin performing Otis Redding's Respect, she didn't get paid for that. She took the meaning of the piece and she turned it on end. Instead of a man coming home and being respected by the woman, she turned it around and really changed the meaning of the song in the way that she performed it, but she really didn't get paid for that, in terms of the revenue stream.

Regarding the stream between performers and writers, is that something that has changed over the years? Is that something that we need to be looking at, in terms of legislation?

(1605)

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

I'm not familiar with the example. I know who Aretha Franklin is and I know the song. I think there's copyright on the song, but there's also remuneration coming out of the recording of the song. I think she probably made money with the recording of the song. I'm not familiar with that case, but there is remuneration for performers. I think it's normal that writers get paid as well. The people who write the songs are very important.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Yes. I guess that it's in terms of the interpretation of the song, but thank you for that. It was quite the tragic story, when we lost her this summer.

If I could pivot over to Mathieu and Stéphanie to look at how a Canadian author makes a living in 2018 and the emerging trends on authorship. There was a connection I could see between the Movie Theatre Association of Canada and the payment of music creators and music performers versus the authors who get paid for writing screenplays and scripts. Is there a difference there that you know of? Are they paid about the same or in the same types of ways?

I could maybe follow up through Michael Paris to see whether there's agreement or whether there's knowledge you can share on that. [Translation]

Ms. Stéphanie Hénault:

We have not talked about that. That being said, the role of the scriptwriter is more important than that of the music composer.

You want to know if we support the demand for additional compensation when a film is presented. We will have to think about it. In general, we always maintain that creators should be paid not only for creating, but also in proportion to the use of their work. The proposal put forward calls for additional compensation depending on use. The community of creators shares this view and considers it important. [English]

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right. What is the focus on creators? [Translation]

Mr. Mathieu Plante:

This is called being connected to the economic life of a work: if a film or television show is very successful, it should be possible to be connected with it and to benefit from that. [English]

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I'm sorry, we've run out of time.

The Chair:

I'm sure you would be able to get back to him. We're out of time on that one.

We're going to move to Mr. Lloyd.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to all the witnesses for being here today. We've spent many hours poring over this thing, and now that we're back from the summer, it's good to get a refresher on the issues here.

My first line of questioning will be for you, Monsieur Payette. You may have heard recently that the artist Bryan Adams spoke in front of the heritage committee, where he made a recommendation related to something called the reversionary right that musicians have. In Canada, you have a reversionary right 25 years after your death, and in the United States, your reversionary right is 35 years, and it doesn't have to be after your death. It can be within your lifetime.

I was hoping you would have a comment on that testimony and what the perspective of your stakeholders would be.

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

I don't think it would be necessary to be in the law. The composers don't have to sign an assignment of rights to work with a music publisher, and they don't even need to work with a music publisher because some people do their own business by themselves.

There's nothing in the law that stops what we're discussing being effective in a contract. You could say that after 35 years the copyright would go back to the composer. That's already possible to do if we wish to do it, and I think there's a difference between the ownership and the remuneration. I think what's important for copyright owners is the remuneration side, and that's what we should focus on. How much value can we give to copyright and how much money can we bring to the music industry?

I'll end by saying that music publishers have catalogues of copyright that bring in steady streams of revenue, which are used to reinvest in new talent. We have to keep that in mind. That's the business model of music publishers.

(1610)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I'm not sure if you're familiar with Mr. Adams' statement that he made at the heritage committee, but you're saying that there is no firm reversionary right in Canada, that it's a pretty open-ended free market system. You can give away your rights for as long or as short a time as you like, and it's all negotiation.

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

Yes, you can do whatever you want.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Okay, that will be very interesting for us to look into further.

You also alluded to recent European rules related to content filters. Can you elaborate on how that impacts you as an industry?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

I was not referring to content filters but what they have done in Europe, especially concerning article 13. They said that it's a communication to the public even if the work has been uploaded by a user.

Right now, if I put something online, it's protected. If it's user-generated content, the platform doesn't need to pay and they don't need to have a licence. So the change is that they will need to have a licence and to pay the right holders, even for user-generated content, and they will have to be more transparent. Those companies are not transparent about what's being used, and it's the content of the right holders and the creators that's there, and we don't know what's happening with it.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Do you think it would increase transparency if we were to adopt a European-style model?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

Yes, exactly, and there would be higher rates for the whole music industry, all the content online, and I think that's what they're going after in Europe, making YouTube and others pay more to right holders.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

My next line of questioning is for you, Mr. Tacit. There was a recent Supreme Court case related to ISP cost recovery, and I was hoping that you could elaborate on the impacts of the Supreme Court case on your stakeholders and your views going forward.

Mr. Christian Tacit:

Our views are that, if ISPs are compelled by law to provide certain services to assist in enforcing copyright or identifying copyright infringement, they should be compensated for that fairly.

The reality is that ISPs are the telephone companies of the present world. Their role is to carry content, not to question it or examine it, and I don't think in a democratic society we want to deviate from that very much. If they're compelled to basically try to perform a state function, then the state should compensate them for that, or there should be some mechanism, maybe not through the state, but through the parties who have a personal, private or commercial interest in enforcing their rights to compensate them.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

What do you estimate the cost is to an ISP to perform these functions?

Mr. Christian Tacit:

That can vary widely. You have large ISPs that have automation tools and you have mom-and-pop shops that do things very manually, so the costs can be all over. I'm not in a position to tell you that. There were some studies done previous to the notice and notice regime that tried to put a handle on the cost, at least at that particular time period.

We haven't delved into that issue very much in the last few years because it was taken off the table when the government made the choice not to compensate ISPs for processing notices. Given that no regulation was passed authorizing a fee and at that time the law was stable and the notice and notice regime was stable, we didn't, at least as an association, keep delving into that, but there's probably data out there, and we could follow up with you if you're interested.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Do you view new technology as bringing down that transaction cost? Do you think there's a lot of potential to basically minimize the costs to ISPs?

Mr. Christian Tacit:

New technology brings down the costs of everything we do.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Would your opposition to this then, if the costs were to be brought down significantly, also go down?

Mr. Christian Tacit:

The cost is what the cost is. Whether it's 10 bucks, 100 bucks or a dollar, I don't think the principle of cost recovery is any different.

Again, if you're being compelled to do something that ultimately is determining rights between private parties, enforcing rights, even if they're statutory rights, you should be compensated for that.

(1615)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Masse.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Thank you to our witnesses for being here today.

There's the European movement that we saw last week, but also yesterday the Music Modernization Act was passed in the United States, a bipartisan agreement that 80 senators signed on to.

There are those who have the theory that there is more collaboration than ever before, because some of the providers like Google, Amazon and Apple are actually moving towards production. There's more of an interest from them in terms of protection of original content because their investments are now kind of going in that direction.

The first question for the panel is on where Canada stands with regard to this. We have the European decision and we have the American decision. How do we fit into this puzzle, especially from the perspective of your organization, with international and North American connections in this? Where do you feel that you fit within the complex changes that are taking place in Europe and the United States? If you're not familiar with the United States' particulars, will that change your perspective here at the table once you actually understand that decision that was made for music copyright yesterday in Washington?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

I think Canada is lagging behind in many ways. The term of protection is 50 years everywhere. It's 70 years in the OECD countries, the U.S. and Europe. Piracy is the weakest thing. Notice and notice is the weakest we can imagine. We need, at least, notice and take down.

The rate setting for now is a good system but it's not efficient. I think we need to have a proper fix of the Copyright Act.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Does anybody else want to comment on that?

Mr. Christian Tacit:

Could I comment on the notice and notice versus notice and take down?

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes. I'm looking for an international perspective from your organization, because you're not an island into Canada in terms of what's taking place with regard to remuneration decisions about copyright and so forth.

Our European partners and also the American influence coming over here are going to have a direct correlation with your ability to actually do the work here in Canada. I'm looking for any type of input on this. Those are dramatic changes that have just taken place. They were part of our trade agreements and they were discussed privately. Some components right now are with NAFTA and some are with another trade deal.

I'm kind of curious about these moving parts. We're examining it very much in a navel-gazing way here with regard to copyright, through this process and five-year review of our legislation. The reality is that the world has already moved on from where we've had our legislation passed and even where we started the study.

If you have anything, I'm interested in hearing it.

Mr. Christian Tacit:

I want to address a specific comment. The point I made earlier was that ISPs are common carriers. They're supposed to be transmitting data. To start engaging them to fight infringement more proactively means you are now asking ISPs to inject their own economic self-interest of avoiding liability into the mix of carrying traffic. That to me is a very dangerous proposition in a free and democratic society.

Beyond the cost that ISPs bear, even if they could be compensated for that, I just think it's a very slippery slope. That's why we object to all of the types of measures from the coalition on up to notice and take down. It's not just about ISPs' interests. It's about broader democratic values for the country.

Mr. Michael Paris:

I know I said I was only going to talk about one issue, but I can respond to this just a little bit.

MTAC is a member of the FairPlay coalition, and we do support that initiative quite strongly. On the proposal, as I understand it, the comment earlier was that the Copyright Act currently provides an injunctive remedy for those seeking to respond to infringement. It won't surprise any of the lawyers in the room if I say the phrase, “There is no right without a remedy”. Injunctive relief is not a practical remedy. You don't need to look any further than to find out how many injunctions have actually been granted in connection with the Copyright Act to know that. This is why the FairPlay coalition is proposing a separate body to deal with exactly these kinds of requests.

I don't propose to speak on behalf of the ISPs on what the compliance burden might be to deal with orders to restrict access to certain infringing content as identified by that body. That's a little outside my ballpark, but we've been down this road for 20 years talking about how to effectively respond to infringement. I think a review of the act and a serious long look at what the FairPlay coalition is proposing is certainly worth doing.

I'm sorry I can't contextualize that further in terms of the U.S. development yesterday, but I do note that this exact same system exists in the United Kingdom and in other places. That's something this committee should look to.

(1620)

[Translation]

Ms. Stéphanie Hénault:

You asked how our organization reacted to the directive from the European Parliament. We were delighted. Actually, the whole world is delighted with the directive which was passed by a very large majority in the European Parliament on September 12.

We think this is a sound model that should inspire you because it would support our economy and our culture. Creators' revenues have fallen, even though the use of their works has multiplied and expanded. It is time to find a way for Canadian creators and Canada's cultural industry to recover the money that leaves the country and does not come back.

For example, the directive calls on content sharing service providers such as YouTube to conclude fair and appropriate contract licences with rights holders. That is something we should draw inspiration from.

Unfortunately, I am not aware of what you mentioned in the United States, but we will look into it. Perhaps we can provide further information in the brief we will be submitting to you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

I'm sorry, we have to move on.

Mr. Graham, you have seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Payette and Ms. Hénault, I will start with you.

Are there other examples of goods, products or some other kind of property where the duration of rights extends beyond the owner's life?

I have heard twice that copyright should be extended from life plus 50 to life plus 70 years. Are there other situations in which economic rights are retained after death?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

Property rights exist for just about everything we own. After death, ownership is transferred to one's children. If I buy a house, it is passed on to my children when I die. So property rights do not end after a certain date. That is my answer to your question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That answers my question. So the asset is transferred to the children or to someone else. It is no longer the person's property 70 years after their death. So why are you making this request?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

It is the same thing, actually. The duration of protection is usually transferred to the children. I think that, in the Bern Convention, the idea of protection for 70 years, or for two generations of descendants, was to protect the work created. That is the idea behind the 70 years of protection.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Extending protection to life plus 70 years would cover roughly four generations. What is the justification for requesting more than life plus 50 years of protection?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

It also generates revenues for companies. It is not just individuals who can hold copyright. Music publishing companies, for instance, can control copyright.

Property does not have an end date, generally speaking. It seems strange that copyright does.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, but a company does not die.

Ms. Stéphanie Hénault:

I would like to clarify something.

Let's say for example that I am a grandmother and I have created something. Seventy years is my grandchild's life expectancy. It is like saying that your house will only belong to you for two generations and, after that, anyone can live there. There is a limit.

From what we know, all countries are extending the duration of protection. The fact that the limit in Canada is 50 years leads to a loss of revenues. When Canadian works are disseminated in other countries that have 70 years of protection, the money collected by copyright collectives stays in those countries. It does not come back here because the law of the country of origin applies.

From our understanding, it is not commercially beneficial to refuse to extend this protection to 70 years.

(1625)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Payette, you mentioned earlier charging $3 to people who buy devices such as iPhones.

That brings us back to the same debate we had 25 or 30 years ago regarding compact disks. In making this request, are you assuming that all users are pirates?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

No, we do not assume anything of the sort.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Why not include those fees in the purchase price rather than charging them when the device is purchased?

For example, if I have 128 gigabytes on my device but do not listen to music on it, why should I pay for it?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

We are suggesting that these royalties be charged at the time of purchase. That is the system in Europe and it is very widespread. Here is a list of countries: Germany, Austria, Belgium, Croatia, France, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal and Switzerland have all adopted private copy regimes. There are royalties.

It is the same principle as for CDs, and we want this to continue. I think that was the intent in 1997. Perhaps the act was not drafted to be technologically neutral, but it should have been.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We were talking earlier about what is commonly known as the notice and take down system. Can that be justified without an order from a judge or a court?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

I do not know the details of how the system works. I can tell you though that the current system does not work. Several countries have adopted enhanced content protection measures, whether a notice and take down or a notice and stay down system.

Let me also say in answer to your question that if our copyright system is weaker than that of the countries around us that we compete with, whether in Europe or the United States, that hurts us. It means lower independent revenues for creative industries. It is really a detriment not to operate the same way as the countries around us. [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Tacit, you mentioned that you'd like a system of notice and notice to have limits, for example, on how many times you get a notice for the same IP address and the same offence.

How many notices are your members getting for offences? Are they practically DDoSing you on these messages?

Mr. Christian Tacit:

Mr. Copeland is well placed to answer that because he deals with this in our firm.

Mr. Christopher Copeland (Counsel, Canadian Network Operators Consortium Inc.):

It all depends of the scale of the ISP and the number of end-users they have. That can range from a few hundred to multiple thousands and to the tens of thousands and beyond. It's directly proportionate to the number of users they have. The more users they have, the more likely it is that some users may be involved in infringing activities and that drives the volume of notices they might expect.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can you enforce any kind of notice and take down system or filtering without violating that neutrality?

Mr. Christian Tacit:

I don't think so.

That's the concern. Without court supervision there is a serious risk of eroding democratic values of free speech and expression, and freedom of expression. The reason we have court safeguards is that the courts are the ultimate protectors of our Constitution and our democratic values. To do anything other than that isn't necessary. I also want to make the point that the notice and notice regime isn't just this tool that's out there that nobody cares about. We in our practice see follow-up from content owners who, when they see multiple infringements from the IP address, will start court cases to get the information on who the users are and will pursue them. Those people are in Canada and they can be sued for statutory damages and effective injunctions can be levied against them for infringement. There's no reason those remedies aren't available.

The other thing is, although there is a safe harbour for ISPs, they're also subject to the peril that if they are deliberately and repeatedly engaged in those sorts of activities, under subsection 27 (2.3) of the Copyright Act safe harbour doesn't apply. We don't need to go very far and compromise our values to deal with this problem.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have only about five seconds left, and I want to make one very quick request.

You mentioned you're getting notices that have things that are beyond the scope of the statute. Is it possible for you to share with us, at a later date, examples of these letters that are sent to your users that vastly exceed the elements prescribed by statute?

Mr. Christian Tacit:

We could provide some redacted materials.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. I appreciate that.

The Chair:

If you can send them to the clerk, that would be great. Thank you.

Mr. Albas, you have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want thank all of our witnesses for being here today. It's a fascinating subject, and I appreciate you all sharing your points of view.

I would like to start first with Mr. Tacit.

In your opening statement, you talked about vertical integration. There are a number of us who are familiar with the term, but specifically, what types of ISPs are you referring to?

(1630)

Mr. Christian Tacit:

The ones that are the biggest and have the most resources and are championing the FairPlay coalition are Bell, Rogers, Shaw, Vidéotron and so on.

Mr. Dan Albas:

So the ones that have plays in both media creation, distribution, and content—

Mr. Christian Tacit:

That's right, either directly or through affiliates.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Now you said there are a few different options. If such a program were to be put in place, such as FairPlay has suggested, there would be costs. You said that the state could possibly pay for it, which means the Canadian taxpayer or a certain subset.

Again, there's some proportionality, because obviously in some areas ISPs are much smaller and service very niche markets, particularly in rural areas, and the proportionality would certainly impact them more. Is that correct?

Mr. Christian Tacit:

It depends more on how big their scale is and what sort of technology measure is being required of them.

For example, you order an ISP to use deep packet inspection, which is a form of inspecting the headers on packets of traffic that tells you a lot about the type of traffic being carried. If that's used as a method of trying to detect infringing traffic—and we won't talk about the merits of how accurate it is or isn't, but let's assume it is—those DPI boxes can easily cost $100,000 each. For a small ISP, you could literally put an ISP that's comprised of two to four employees out of business by requiring them to do this.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Especially in rural areas, where there's a smaller network—

Mr. Christian Tacit:

Wherever they are.

Mr. Dan Albas:

—or a very expensive network to service.

Mr. Christian Tacit:

Sure.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Then, of course, the other alternative is to have the media companies that are asking for these takedowns to happen to do it, and then it would be all on their customers. Is that correct?

Mr. Christian Tacit:

That's right.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Inevitably, if we go down this path, there will be increased costs to consumers or to Canadian citizens, or some subset of either.

Mr. Christian Tacit:

Somebody should pay other than the person, the innocent party, who's being required to do the job.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Now in regard to some of these automatic tools, my colleague Mr. Lloyd had mentioned that new technology comes across....

I know a lot of younger people, and probably some older people, play video games that have music in the background. They generate their own content to share with other people for different games or whatnot. That kind of music being played in the background could trigger one of those automatic takedowns if that technology was.... Because there are protections for satire, for individual sharing and whatnot.

Those things could be put at risk as well, could they not?

Mr. Christian Tacit:

Potentially, yes, because the packet inspection, and making decisions on blocking based on that, doesn't provide you with any information about the context in which those packets are being transmitted. You're quite right that some of them may be authorized and some of them may not be.

Mr. Dan Albas:

You mentioned earlier that if we were to put in place that kind of system, ultimately ISPs would have to look at things in terms of their economic interest rather than other values.

Can you give an example where an ISP might have to make that decision? Again, we're asking to basically regulate the conduct of others. What I may suspect might be exploitive to some, other people would say, “No, that's generated content. That's their content.”

Could you maybe give us a few examples of how those two compare?

Mr. Christian Tacit:

If in the carriage of content, the issue has come up....

By the way, there are already provisions now that, again, don't allow ISPs and other Internet service ecosystem participants to take advantage of safe harbour if there's a court order that says something is infringing and they're ignoring it. Then it's pretty clear that if they are participating, they shouldn't be.

However, in a situation where there's no legal determination to say to somebody, “I think they're knowingly doing this and now I'm going to block their traffic”, that's putting a common carrier in the role of a judge of what should be carried down its pipes. That's why I'm saying that's a very.... If I were an ISP, I would tend to be conservative, and if the penalty is very large—let's say I'm opening myself up to very high statutory damages—I may be more tempted to take the risk of having the party sue me for getting it wrong, because it's a smaller amount of damages than to have to pay the large statutory damages, particularly for recurring offences, where every day is considered a new offence or whatever. I may now start meddling in that traffic because I'm worried about my liability.

We don't want common carriers to be in that situation.

(1635)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Baylis.

You have five minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I will begin with Mr. Payette.

You talked about a change in the law in Europe. From my understanding, this change will make it possible for copyright collectives to negotiate or take legal action.

Please tell us more about that.

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

Yes, of course.

This change strengthens the power of copyright collectives and enables them to enter into agreements for all content available online. At present, users put content online, and we all agree that they should be able to do that. What will change is that platforms will have to pay for user-generated content. So YouTube will have to pay for the content users put online.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

It will be negotiated.

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

Yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Is it a right to negotiate or a requirement to negotiate?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

Since it is known that there is public communication, even for user-generated content, there is a right to be respected. So the platforms have no choice but to negotiate with copyright collectives.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

So it will be negotiated by the copyright collectives. Actually, it would be practically impossible to negotiate with every user. For instance, if I created a little song and put in on YouTube, I could probably not negotiate such an agreement.

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

It would be the copyright collectives that would be negotiating.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Does the law stipulate that it is the copyright collectives that negotiate?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

I think it is mentioned in the legislation adopted in Europe.

In any case, there are already certain agreements in place. For instance, YouTube has concluded agreements with SOCAN, but only for the part that is monetized through advertising. When protected content is not used in advertising, rights holders do not receive any revenue. You have to remember that YouTube benefits from this all the same because it retains data, attracts users, and organizes content. It does all kinds of things, but pays nothing for the content.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

So if YouTube wants to post a series of songs that are protected or whose rights are managed by a copyright collective, YouTube has to pay the collective or enter into negotiations with a view to determining an amount to be paid.

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

That's right. In Canada, those negotiations are usually validated by the Copyright Board.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

In order to determine the value of the content.

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

That's right.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay.

Would you like to add something, Ms. Hénault?

Ms. Stéphanie Hénault:

I agree with what Mr. Payette said. That is also my understanding.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Would that also apply to screenwriters?

Ms. Stéphanie Hénault:

Yes, because screenwriters in Europe and Canada collect royalties from certain presenters. In Quebec, that is done by SACD, a European copyright collective that also has an office in Montreal. Our screenwriters receive royalties from certain presenters through SACD. When our screenwriters' works are presented in Europe, we are very pleased with the European directive, but we have to address the gap between the European system and the Canadian system.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Very good, thank you.[English]

Mr. Paris, I'd like to then go to you to understand a bit more about this sound recording. You're making the argument opposite to what the musicians are making. You're saying they're double-dipping.

What are they asking for that you don't want to give? Let me ask you that way.

Mr. Michael Paris:

They're asking to remove from the definition of “sound recording” the exception for film soundtracks where they accompany a film. The sound recording is different from a song in the sense that a sound recording is exactly what I've suggested to you. The sound of an explosion or anything that you might find on the audio track of a film is a sound recording. What the definition of sound recording does, for section 19, where it operates the way I'm describing, is that it provides a stream of royalties where a sound recording that is not on a film soundtrack accompanying the film.... It's only where it accompanies the film that this exception operates. If the film soundtrack is played on the radio, for example, neighbouring rights exist and royalties flow.

What they want to do is remove that exception, which is to say, any time a film would be played in a theatre, it would trigger royalties for everything from a sound effect to a song. That is what we object to.

(1640)

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Is your concern the song or the sound effect? They're two different things. If you had to pay for every sound effect, it would be impossible. Let's say someone creates a beautiful song, and it's used in a movie. Do you want to pay up front but not pay ongoing royalties? Is that what you mean?

Mr. Michael Paris:

That's currently the balance that is struck.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

That's what it is right now.

Mr. Michael Paris:

That is what it is right now.

It's also the same, for example, for a dancer who choreographs a routine. For that person, the approach in the law to date has been that you can charge the rental rate up front, but you're not permitted to exercise the remuneration in the act when it's incorporated into a film. It's a recognition of the fact that a film is a unitary work. That's what we object to. What we object to is the exhibitors' paying the royalty rate for every single song, sound effect, or dance performance, should it extend to that, that is incorporated into a film. That's what we object to.

The Chair:

We'll go back to Mr. Albas for five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you. I'm going to be sharing my time, hopefully, with Mr. Lloyd.

I'm going to follow up from my colleague Mr. Baylis.

Mr. Paris, in regard to this subject, obviously, some films that were filmed close to 100 years ago are sometimes remastered and now are available, reformatted for smaller screens like phones, etc. I just wonder how you could have someone receive royalties for streaming, at least with your business, where you have exhibitors. They actually say, “I'm going to charge x amount at the door, and this is how many people saw it, so I can pay on a per basis” but for something that ends up being used in a whole bunch of different ways, essentially, what is being asked here is for the royalties to be paid every time a show is streamed or is shown online.

I watched Mr. Smith Goes to Washington on Google. I think they do that as a free service. Hopefully, Mr. Tacit won't have to take it down now. Perhaps you could just explain what some of those costs would work out to be for different platforms, such as exhibitors versus streaming.

Mr. Michael Paris:

Sure. The section I'm referring to here, just for reference, is section 19. You're going to test my memory here, but the section, as I recall, refers to any sort of public communication or communication of the work by telecommunication. I don't act for a streaming service and I'm not a copyright lawyer by trade, but my understanding is that it would apply to streaming.

In the hypothetical case you're talking about, with Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, which is a historical work, what would happen on the exhibitor's side is that we would pay a fee from the distributor who holds the rights to that film. We would kick up to that person a portion of the film rent from each per-ticket sale. That would be a public performance, when you walk into the cinema and you see it.

If you were to remove the exemption that entitles stakeholders to neighbouring rights or a royalty stream from a public performance or telecommunication of that work, our rights go beyond an obligation to the distributor and we would end up paying a royalty to, I believe, the maker or the performer of the recording that's incorporated into that film.

Our point is that the balance that's been struck in the act to date is that once you sell your rights to include your work in a film, you're prohibited, on the back end, from also assuming neighbouring rights, which are designed to provide compensation where the public communication of that work is out of your control. Think of performance on a radio station, something like that. The record label isn't involved, obviously, in granting permission every time a song is played on the radio. Neighbouring rights exist to provide a flow of royalties from that uncontrolled, perhaps unintended, use of that work, whereas in film the inclusion of a song, a dance performance, an acting monologue, whatever it is, is very intentionally included, negotiated, and compensated up front.

Putting the burden on exhibitors to pay again, we suggest, upends the balance that has served the film industry so well to date.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I'll quickly take over. I'll also keep on this line of questioning. How many people are currently employed by the people you represent, approximately?

Mr. Michael Paris:

I can speak to Cineplex. We're talking of tens of thousands.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

With that, if we go with the recommendations to include the sound royalty, there's the double-dipping you're talking about. Does that put you at a significant competitive disadvantage to Netflix, Prime Video and those companies?

(1645)

Mr. Michael Paris:

Yes, of course, and that's a great question. We have a number of competitive disadvantages, not the least of which is that Netflix doesn't pay tax here, so there's that. There is the other added cost that Netflix doesn't necessarily pay film classification fees, all the costs that go with operating a bricks-and-mortar business that streaming services don't bear. In this particular circumstance, with a royalty such as this, I suppose it would apply to exhibitors and streaming services equally—if I'm right about that—so it is one layer of additional cost. It's one thing for the large chains to deal with that cost. It's quite another thing for independent cinemas.

I'll go back to what my colleague said about ISPs. If you're running a single-screen cinema—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

But it will kill jobs in your industry.

Mr. Michael Paris:

Yes, it absolutely will kill jobs—and cinemas.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to Ms. Caesar-Chavannes. You have five minutes.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Thank you. I'll be splitting my time with Mr. Lametti.

Thank you for coming.

Mr. Paris, to continue the line of questioning from Mr. Lloyd, what are the implications to having these royalties paid, for the recordings or the tracks, once they're in the exhibitor's possession or are being played there? What are the implications further to the other components of the film? If we start off by saying that these royalties need to be paid—you mentioned choreography, you mentioned other components—and go down this road, what are the implications of that to the exhibitors and, beyond that, to many of these organizations, some of which are mom-and-pop shops, some of which are single-screen cinemas? What are the implications beyond that?

Mr. Michael Paris:

To give you a really short response, this would be an additional operating cost, a higher operating cost. I'm not in a position right now to tell you or quantify what that would be. We're responding to the proposal as it is now.

In terms of talking about what it would be for other collectives, I can only tell you that the proposal I'm speaking about today arises from the music industry. It doesn't come from those other things. But once you start treating one class of creators differently, it's obviously going to follow on. I'm forecasting a little bit here. The implications of higher operating costs will depend upon the business position of the chain or the individual cinema operator.

I can tell you very generally—one of the honourable members alluded to it earlier, and I'm sure everyone will be unanimous here—that the creative economy is undergoing a great deal of disruption. The study from Telefilm noted that exhibitors are competing with streaming services, but we also compete, I would say, with every other form of out-of-home entertainment that exists: sporting events, concerts, museums, anything on your phone. When you add additional operating costs, that's money that those independent cinema operators cannot invest into the cinema itself, including the theatre, technology, hiring young people for their first jobs, and on and on down the line.

The Chair:

Mr. Lametti, you have two and half minutes.

Mr. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

I think what you're all asking us to do is to look at the initial positions between copyright and contract in the sense that you're asking us to say whether the writer should be paid up front in a contract or get additional copyright royalties later. [Translation]

The same applies for joint ownership, which Mr. Plante and Ms. Hénault just talked about. For our part, we have to determine whether the author should be paid just once, in advance, under a contract, or later on, through copyright royalties.

Mr. Payette, I am surprised that you do not have an opinion on what Mr. Adams recommended yesterday. Subsection 14.1 of the Copyright Act currently provides a reversionary right for authors for 25 years after their death. What Mr. Adams called for yesterday is that this be the case for 25 years after the creation of work.

It is very important for you to state your position on this, don't you think?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

If I may, let me state my position. I think it is 25 years after the author's death—

Mr. David Lametti:

That is what the act currently provides.

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

Yes. He is calling for copyright to revert after 35 years, but, as I said, that can be negotiated under a contract.

Mr. David Lametti:

Yes, but that changes the basic position, the initial power, doesn't it?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

Yes, of course. My position is clear: I do not think that should be included in the act. If Mr. Adams had wanted to recover copyright after 35 years, he could have done so in a number of ways. He could for instance have negotiated that from the outset or decided not to deal with a publisher. There were a number of avenues available to him.

I do not think that is the real issue in the review of the act. It is more a question of determining how revenues can be collected for authors and creators.

(1650)

Mr. David Lametti:

That is exactly what Mr. Adams suggested, namely, that authors have to be given greater powers from the outset, specifically a reversionary right after 25 years.

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

That's right. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Masse, you have two minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Paris, just to get a summary in terms of the costs you'd be incurring—you can't quantify it, from the suggestion—what would be the administrative elements to it? Perhaps you could quantify that. I know you can't put a price on it. Regardless of where the money goes, I'm just curious about the processing or whether that's not really a factor in all of this.

Mr. Michael Paris:

In the material file by Music Canada, I think they estimated the cost of these additional royalties to both broadcasters and exhibitors would be somewhere in the order of $45 million. There's no citation provided for that number. I don't know if it's greater or less than, but that's where they ballpark it.

In terms of how it would be administered, I expect you would probably have to have a Copyright Board tariff that would be negotiated and paid. I don't know if I can speak to you on the nuts and bolts as to how that would be administered. I can tell you that I would expect them to organize it in the same way other collectives enforce or govern their mandates.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Would it be fair to say there is or is not an easy way to piggyback that new proposal on current infrastructure in terms of administration, or is that something that would require a new model?

Mr. Michael Paris:

I don't know if I can comment on the administrative burden.

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

May I comment? Actually, cinemas are already paying rights holders. They have deals with SOCAN. Tariff 6 says that cinemas have to pay a $1.50 per seat a year to SOCAN for collection and administration. My understanding for sound recordings is that it would be the other side. It would be the song and the recording of the song for which they would have to pay a collective management society like Re:Sound, for example.

Mr. Michael Paris:

As I said, it's not news to anybody that we pay tariffs to certain collectives. I'm saying that I expect it would be organized in a very similar way, but it really would depend on which collective we're dealing with and what is actually being asked of us. In this particular circumstance, of a sound recording, I'm guessing it would be a collective other than SOCAN and perhaps multiple collectives. I'm guessing it would be administered in the same way, like Re:Sound.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

The Chair:

That takes us to the end of this round. We have enough time to do a second round of three seven-minute questions.

We're going to go back to Mr. Jowhari.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Thank you to the witnesses. I'll be sharing my time with Mr. Baylis.

I have one question and that goes to Mr. Payette.

I'm going to share some statistics with you. This is a concern that I have regarding the statistic that I looked at. It has to do with the decrease in the median income of the musicians and singers. The statistic that I was looking at indicates that between 2010 and 2015, the revenue of Canadian music publishers increased from $148.3 million to about $282 million. Over the same period, the median income of an individual working full time in the Canadian music industry increased as well. Those occupations include producers, directors, choreographers, conductors, composers or engineers.

However, the median income of musicians and singers saw a decrease of about $800 between 2010 and 2015. Can you share your thoughts with me as to why that is ?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

There are different roles for authors, composers or performers. Music publishers represent the songwriters. If the music publishers make more money, the songwriters also make more money. However, in the global picture, there may have been fewer shows or the individual songwriters have made less money because there are more songwriters. The main problem is that the new digital environment pays less than the traditional environment. For individual writers, composers and musicians, this is very....

(1655)

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Are there any amendments in the Copyright Act that you think will improve the income situation of the musicians and singers?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

Of course, having more money coming from YouTube or other online services would make life easier for musicians and composers.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Okay. Thank you. [Translation]

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Ms. Hénault, you talked about screenwriters and directors becoming joint copyright holders. I would like to understand why.

Do you expect to receive more money or would you simply like to have that right? Can you explain the rationale behind this?

Ms. Stéphanie Hénault:

In terms of the royalties collected by copyright collective here and elsewhere, we are penalized in Canada because the presumption of joint copyright is not included in the Copyright Act. This weakens the ability of SAID in particular to collect directors' royalties outside the country.

We would like you to spell that out in the act. This is not revolutionary; it is consistent with case law. We are asking for this presumption to be included in the act.

We have described the work of the screenwriter and director of an audiovisual work. It is crystal clear that they are the primary owners of the audiovisual work. We would like this clarification added to give copyright collectives some leverage in collecting royalties for Canadians for works presented in other countries that have private copy regimes for audiovisual works. In some countries, in Europe for instance, there are colleges where producers, actors, and authors all collect royalties for private copies. That also includes directors.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

In this example, producers are also included. I have trouble telling a producer, who makes a lot of decisions in creating a film, that he is not an author.

Ms. Stéphanie Hénault:

The producer is not an author. The producer hires actors and creators, but does not create anything. He administers a production. He obtains permits to produce and present the film. He shares his revenues with screenwriters. Under our collective agreements, if an author has written the entire script for a television series, he negotiates a contract for the script. If there are revenues, he will receive some royalties. This is fundamental. If it is not recognized in Canada that, in addition to being paid for the work, individuals can be compensated for the work's success, no creators would be interested in doing the work.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay, thank you. [English]

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thanks for sharing your time, Mr. Baylis.

I think Mr. Masse was really onto one of the cruxes that I see as the concern: new deals being made in Europe and in the United States. We easily could have a creative drain from Canada going into markets where you can actually get paid for creating products and creating works.

The market in Canada isn't working. We have money being made, but it's not being made by musicians. It's not being made by creators. I think we need to look at this really carefully and maybe even accelerate our study to come up with some conclusions so that we can protect the creative class in Canada. We're creating middle-class jobs though this, but now we have either impoverished people or people who are very successful in the industry. There's nothing in between. The market isn't working.

Can I have just a quick comment back from any of you on whether it's the publishers making money and digital servers making money...? The digital companies are making a lot of money and performers are not sharing in the benefit. Where can we go with our study to try to drill into that a bit further?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

For example, music publishers share either 50% or 75%—or any other, but generally it's between 50% and 75%—of the revenues directly to the authors. Of course, they work for the authors. That's what they do. It's normal that they get paid. The problem is that there's not enough money getting into the system. It's not retained, because the digital companies make a lot of money using content. That's the problem. You're right. If we don't get enough copyright protection in Canada, we're at a disadvantage with our other partners.

(1700)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Albas, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for all of the testimony here today.

One of the concerns I do have...and there are a lot. There are concerns that musicians aren't able to provide for their families and to have their rights respected. That's an important thing. I'm also quite worried about innovation and how people can generate new content. I've heard anecdotal stories about how someone will actually write a song, publish it on YouTube, and because YouTube has years of content that's added every single day, it's impossible for the platform to hire enough people to be able to watch it. I've actually heard about cases in which, because of these filters, it will suddenly say, “Sorry, you're infringing upon someone else's rights” and take it down. That's new, original content. Obviously the technology isn't there yet. If we look at some of the new rules that are being talked about in Europe, I'm worried that some of these may take down content that is legitimate, in which someone is either reviewing a piece or is generating their own content, whether it is music being played for satire or for criticism, etc.

I do see that there's a balance, but I'd like to hear a little bit more about how you deal with a problem like that, where the technology.... Specifically in Europe, where the requirements are much harder, I'm worried that these content rules will require YouTube-like applications to shut down legitimate innovation or legitimate criticism or whatnot.

Mr. Payette.

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

I think the greatest threat to the Canadian creative economy is not having enough money getting into the system. YouTube already has a technology called a content ID system to identify the rights holders. They have provisions in Europe to protect smaller businesses or educational use of content online, so it's not threatening the innovation side. They just need to remunerate more the content owners. We need to go forward with this. Europe did look at that.

I need to point out that there has been a lot of misinformation around what happened in Europe. Google spent dozens of millions of dollars on lobbying, and there was a lot of misinformation being sent out. The European members of Parliament did look at that and finally accepted it , with a large majority, after they understood what the new proposed text was really going to do. It was largely adopted. I think it was 429 for and 226 against, or something like that. I think Europe does care about freedom of speech and about innovation, but they also care about the rights holders and the creative industry. That's what has been shown.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I'd like to believe that legislators always do the right thing and vote the right way. There is a balance though between trying to establish and continue the rights of the creators with the rights of everyday citizens. Who judges? The thing is, with Google and these automatic filters, we don't know that everyone is getting a fair shake. Some Canadians.... I believe Justin Bieber got his start on YouTube. I hear what you're saying.

On the flip side though, many of these rules in Europe have only come up recently. Is that correct?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

Yes, and I think things are changing and it's time that we change. You mentioned balance. When we look at digital companies and rights holders, according to SOCAN's published numbers, the average songwriter makes $30 a year. That's not enough money. How much does Google or YouTube own? There's a lot of money out there, and it's not going to creators because the balance is not fair.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I would say the two models are very different. One is set up to serve the Internet in a different way, and the other one is meant to serve people who like that kind of music.

I'm going to hand it off to Mr. Lloyd for the remaining time.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

My line of questioning is going to be for you as well, Mr. Payette. You seem to be getting the brunt of the questions today.

We talk about competitiveness issues. Right now we're dealing with NAFTA, and we have taxes and regulations. We're always trying to fight to make Canada a better place to invest. We always think about that as traditional industries, but our cultural sector is also a very important and a growing part of our economy.

Is Canada a competitive place to make music? Is it competitive culturally? If it is not, what do you think could be done to make us more competitive?

Then, Mr. Tacit, perhaps you would have some comments on that.

(1705)

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

I think that culturally, yes, we have strong creators and a system that allows culture to be vibrant.

On the copyright side and the remuneration...and we have to understand that copyright is not subsidy. It's private income that's incoming for the exploitation of the work.

This really brings down the competitiveness of Canada: not having enough money coming in from the digital services, or not having strong legislative or other kinds of things to address copyright. The rates of things should be faster. We have to really make changes to follow what's happening in Europe and the United States to be more competitive on the copyright side.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Who is benefiting from our lack of competitiveness? Who are the chief benefactors of our lack of competitiveness with copyright?

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

Those benefiting from weak copyright are the users, and mainly right now the online platforms and digital companies.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Mr. Tacit, do you have any comment about that? From the perspective of smaller ISPs, are they competitive in Canada? Is it competitive right now?

Mr. Christian Tacit:

You don't want to open that debate now. There's not enough time left.

We actually just participated in a Competition Bureau market study and discussed all of the severe anti-competitive problems that exist in Canada for the smaller ISP sector. I don't want to take us off track, but I would be happy to share that with you, or anyone else who wants it. There are significant structural barriers to competition.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Related to copyright, directly...?

Mr. Christian Tacit:

I don't know about that. I think it's related to competition, generally. I don't want to stray into other areas that I know less about and are not my domain.

All I can say is this: If there's any kind of rebalancing that needs to take place in the digital era between streamers and those who provide content on a digital platform or whatever, that's great and fine, and this committee should make those recommendations, because the times are changing. What I don't want to see compromised, because it is a fundamental part of our competitiveness as a nation, is the rule of law. We are very much a country founded on the rule of law, where we take individual rights very seriously. People do come to this country, and have come in droves recently, because of that. Anything we do to weaken that is going to adversely affect our competitiveness adversely.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Masse, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'm tempted, but I'm not going to take the bait. The parliamentary secretary, Mr. Lametti, knows my position on notice and notice, and notice and take down. I don't need my blood pressure to go up at the moment with regard to that.

I do want to make a point though. We have had several interventions about issues on YouTube. I don't want to be seen as picking on something, but I want to at least create an alternative perspective.

It was raised that Justin Bieber got his start on YouTube, but the reality is that YouTube also did very well financially from that relationship. In fact, you go to YouTube right now, and it has a burger on it from a food chain that's advertising on it. They have Fortnite and other things. YouTube has done very well through its relationship with those who have had some success with the platform, by posting your stuff.... In many places it's a public risk, putting some of your stuff up on YouTube. People should think about that.

Where we're at now is that this committee is reviewing a five-year change. We are going to make recommendations to the minister, if we can agree as a committee. That hasn't been decided yet.

That's the extent of what's happening, here. No legislation has been proposed. That would take the minister coming back and, first of all, answering this committee, if he so chooses. There is a statutory time frame for that. There can also be an extension that could run us quite late. Then on top of that, there would have to be perhaps specific instructions to Parliament, if the act would be amended, by tabling in the House of Commons, and it would have to go through a series of legislative processes to eventually get to the Senate and then passed.

There is quite a distance here, and there are different ways to get to that distance.

If you have comments, about what takes place, priorities.... What do you think if say, for example, we do nothing? That could be the end result for the 2019 or 2020. It's a reality that is out there with regard to the current act that's in place. I'd like your thoughts on that, if you have any. I think it needs to be something that's stated, especially given that we've seen what's happening in Europe and the United States, as of yesterday

(1710)

Mr. Michael Paris:

I'll get it out of the way very quickly. On the sole issue that I'm talking about, which is the definition of sound recording, we're quite content and in favour of the committee leaving it undisturbed.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's fair. That's what I'm looking for.

Mr. Christian Tacit:

I have one comment. Motion isn't always progress. Just because things are being done, it doesn't mean that they're the right things. As a country, I think we have to figure out what's right for our country to do overall. We have to balance a whole bunch of rights and work within the framework that we have. [Translation]

Mr. Jérôme Payette:

As I said, I think the provisions regarding network services should be reviewed.[English]

The Canadian safe harbours need to be looked at because they're very wide and there are different companies operating under the Canadian safe harbours right now. The digital platforms are some of them and Europe has moved on this. That's one.

I think private copying is something important. There was a system that was bringing in $40 million every year, but because the law was not technologically neutral, now we have only a few million remaining. Those are two related points to focus on. [Translation]

Ms. Stéphanie Hénault:

To encourage innovation, people have to be compensated. Our most talented screenwriters who write television series, who work from 6 am to 10 pm to create audiovisual works that have very high ratings in French-speaking Canada are increasingly poorly paid, even though their television series are being more widely shown. Things have to change to encourage them to continue their work. Otherwise, in a very short time, screenwriters will no longer want to do this kind of work, and neither will their children when they grow up. In sectors where people are not compensated, the talent will dry up.

As Mr. Payette said, value has been transferred not to our local presenters but to foreign presenters, to the GAFAs that monetize a great deal of cultural content. We have to restore the balance; otherwise there will be no incentive for creativity and cultural innovation, for the economic activity it generates, for the tourists it attracts or for Canadian values.

Culture definitely has an economic component, but it also has to be preserved because it is essential. We have a duty economically speaking to ensure that talented creators stay here and can earn a living from their work. [English]

Mr. Brian Masse:

I did make a reference to Fortnite. If there are members of Parliament who aren't familiar with it, please let me know when you're going online, so that I can teach you.

The Chair:

On that note, I would like to thank our guests for coming in today and sharing with us their experiences and their knowledge. Obviously, this is a large and complex file. We still have a lot of work ahead of us.

These are good, hard questions because we need to be able to get information out. That's what's going to help us write this report.

As they say in the movie industry, that's a wrap. We're adjourned for the day.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

[Énregistrement électronique]

(1530)

[Français]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous.[Traduction]

Bienvenue à la 126e séance du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Nous allons poursuivre notre examen prévu par la loi de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Avant de commencer, nous devons prendre quelques minutes pour régler quelques questions d'ordre administratif. Je souhaite officiellement la bienvenue à Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes.

Bienvenue. Vous êtes officiellement membre du Comité.

Des députés: Bravo!

Le président: De ce côté-ci, MM. Michael Chong et Dan Albas sont aussi membres officiels.

Bienvenue et félicitations.

Nous devons donc élire un vice-président.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

Monsieur le président, je propose M. Albas comme vice-président du Comité.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres propositions?

Je déclare M. Dan Albas élu premier vice-président par acclamation.

Des députés: Bravo!

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Maintenant que c'est réglé, permettez-moi de vous présenter les témoins très intéressants que nous recevons aujourd'hui. Nous accueillons M. Jérôme Payette, directeur général de l'Association des professionnels de l'édition musicale; M. Christian S. Tacit, procureur et avocat-conseil, et M. Christopher Copeland, avocat-conseil, tous deux du Consortium des opérateurs de réseaux canadiens inc.; M. Mathieu Plante, président, et Mme Stéphanie Hénault, directrice générale, de la Société des auteurs de radio, télévision et cinéma; et enfin, M. Michael Paris, directeur des Affaires juridiques et chef de la Protection des renseignements personnels, de l'Association des cinémas au Canada.

Chaque groupe aura droit à un maximum de sept minutes pour présenter un exposé. Nous passerons ensuite à la période de questions.

Nous allons commencer par l'Association des professionnels de l'édition musicale.[Français]

Monsieur Payette, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. Jérôme Payette (directeur général, Association des professionnels de l’édition musicale):

Monsieur le président et chers membres du Comité, c'est avec grand plaisir que je m'exprime devant vous aujourd'hui à propos de cette très importante révision de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

L'Association des professionnels de l'édition musicale, ou APEM, représente les éditeurs musicaux québécois et francophones du Canada. Nos membres contrôlent 830 maisons d'édition comportant 400 000 oeuvres musicales.

Partenaires des auteurs-compositeurs, les éditeurs musicaux soutiennent la création d'oeuvres musicales, les valorisent et les administrent. Typiquement, une maison d'édition musicale travaille avec plusieurs auteurs-compositeurs pour la création de nouvelles oeuvres et représente des catalogues de chansons existantes. Les éditeurs sont en quelque sorte les agents des auteurs-compositeurs et de leurs oeuvres. Ils sont les professionnels de la gestion du droit d'auteur.

J'aimerais souligner que l'APEM est membre de la Coalition pour une politique musicale canadienne, qui a produit un document de 34 pages, dont vous avez certainement eu copie. Pratiquement toute l'industrie de la musique appuie ce document.

L'APEM a tout de même ciblé quelques points à aborder avec vous aujourd'hui.

Je vais passer tout de suite au point 1, qui propose de modifier les dispositions sur les services réseau, qui s'appliquent de manière indifférenciée à un large éventail d'entreprises.

L'article 31.1 de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur est en quelque sorte la règle canadienne d'exonération. Le texte sous « Services réseau » permet à un prestataire de « services liés à l'exploitation d'Internet » qui « fournit des moyens permettant la télécommunication ou la reproduction » du contenu protégé de ne pas être tenu responsable de la violation du droit d'auteur et de ne pas payer les détenteurs de droits.

Selon la manière dont la Loi est rédigée actuellement, des entreprises offrant des services aussi divers que l'accès à Internet, le stockage d'information dans le nuage, les moteurs de recherche ou les plateformes de partage telles que YouTube, Facebook ou Instagram bénéficient de manière indifférenciée de l'exception sur les services réseau. Pourtant, ces entreprises fournissent des services bien différents: un fournisseur d'accès Internet fournit une connexion à Internet; un service de stockage permet d'entreposer des fichiers et de les rendre disponibles pour un usage privé; un moteur de recherche classe les résultats en fonction de mots clés; les services de partage comme YouTube rendent disponibles des contenus à des millions d'utilisateurs, élaborent des algorithmes de recommandation, font de la promotion, organisent les contenus, vendent de la publicité et récoltent les données des utilisateurs.

Le développement d'Internet peut avoir été difficile à prévoir, mais aujourd'hui, on sait que ces entreprises n'offrent pas tous les mêmes services. La Loi sur le droit d'auteur doit dorénavant prendre en considération le spectre d'activités de ces entreprises et faire en sorte que leurs responsabilités ne soient pas nécessairement les mêmes.

Je vais être clair. Je crois que toutes ces entreprises devraient rémunérer les ayants droit, car elles utilisent du contenu protégé par le droit d'auteur à des fins commerciales. Toutefois, les fournisseurs d'accès Internet pourraient avoir des responsabilités différentes de celles de YouTube, par exemple. Les fournisseurs d'accès Internet devraient rémunérer les détenteurs de droits tout en participant à la lutte contre le piratage de manière plus active, tandis que les services de partage devraient être tenus d'obtenir des licences en bonne et due forme pour l'ensemble du répertoire qu'ils rendent disponible.

Le 12 septembre, soit la semaine dernière, le Parlement européen a adopté une directive sur le droit d'auteur qui va en ce sens. Cette directive établit que les fournisseurs de services de partage de contenu en ligne tels que YouTube réalisent un acte de communication au public et doivent conclure des contrats de licence équitables et appropriés avec les détenteurs de droits, et ce, même pour les contenus mis en ligne par les utilisateurs.

De plus, les services de partage devront faire preuve d'une plus grande transparence quant aux utilisations qu'ils font du contenu. Donc, les utilisateurs vont pouvoir continuer de mettre en ligne des contenus, mais les services de partage vont devoir signer des accords avec les sociétés de gestion collective, payer pour l'utilisation qu'ils font des contenus et faire preuve de transparence. Je crois que le Canada devrait s'inspirer de cette approche européenne.

Je vais clore le premier point en parlant de l'ALENA.

Nous savons que les États-Unis, à la demande des grandes entreprises technologiques, font pression pour que le chapitre sur la propriété intellectuelle comporte des règles d'exonération inspirées de leur Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Si le Canada acceptait cette demande, il serait très difficile, voire impossible, de changer sa propre loi afin qu'elle corresponde à la réalité d'aujourd'hui.

Le deuxième point que je veux aborder est la nécessité de rendre le régime de copie privée technologiquement neutre et de mettre en place un fonds de transition.

Les revenus annuels découlant des redevances pour copie privée remis aux créateurs de musique ont baissé de 89 %, passant de 38 millions de dollars en 2004 à moins de 3 millions de dollars en 2016. Comme l'a dit l'économiste Marcel Boyer, c'est « le vol du siècle », et ce n'est pas parce que cela dure depuis des années que c'est devenu acceptable.

L'esprit de la loi canadienne de 1997 n'est plus respecté, simplement en raison de l'évolution technologique. Il faut profiter de l'actuel réexamen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur pour rendre le régime de copie privée technologiquement neutre et ainsi permettre que des redevances soient exigibles pour une variété d'appareils, dont les tablettes et les téléphones intelligents. On exigerait cette redevance des fabricants et des importateurs d'appareils.

(1535)



En Europe, la redevance moyenne équivaut à 2,80 $ par téléphone intelligent. Il serait très surprenant que le prix moyen d'un iPhone X passe de 1 529 $ à 1 532 $ à la suite de l'instauration d'une redevance pour copie privée. Ce coût ne serait pas transféré au consommateur.

Enfin, la chute spectaculaire des revenus de copie privée nécessite la mise en place d'un fonds de transition de 40 millions de dollars, comme l'a demandé la Société canadienne de perception de la copie privée. Les libéraux étaient d'accord, et il est plus que temps que ce fonds se concrétise.

Le troisième point propose d'étendre la durée de protection du droit d'auteur à 70 ans après la mort de l'auteur. Dans la vaste majorité des pays de l'OCDE, la durée de protection est de 70 ans, alors qu'au Canada, elle n'est que de 50 ans après la mort de l'auteur.

En matière d'exportation, les détenteurs de droits canadiens sont désavantagés, puisque leurs oeuvres sont assujetties à une protection moindre à l'international. Les lois canadiennes ne devraient pas agir comme un frein à la valorisation internationale de nos oeuvres et de nos créateurs.

Pour les éditeurs de musique, que je représente, porter la durée à 70 ans après la mort de l'auteur signifie davantage de revenus à être investis dans le développement de la carrière des auteurs et des compositeurs canadiens d'aujourd'hui.

Au quatrième point, il est question de préciser et d'éliminer des exceptions. Le nombre d'exceptions contenues dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur et la nature celles-ci privent les détenteurs de droits de revenus qu'ils devraient normalement toucher. Je n'ai pas le temps de vous présenter aujourd'hui toutes les exceptions qu'on devrait modifier dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Un document de la Coalition pour une politique musicale canadienne revoit en détail ces exceptions.

Je vais terminer par le cinquième point, soit l'importance d'avoir une commission du droit d'auteur fonctionnelle.

Je suis bien au fait que des travaux sont en cours dans le but de réformer la Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada. Je m'en réjouis, je trouve que c'est une excellente nouvelle. J'aimerais simplement souligner l'importance de cette réforme pour l'application de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Actuellement, cette commission prend beaucoup de temps pour rendre des décisions, ce qui est incompatible avec l'environnement d'aujourd'hui. L'incertitude entourant la valeur des droits d'auteur nuit aux éditeurs, aux auteurs-compositeurs et à l'ensemble des intervenants de l'industrie de la musique.

Je vous remercie.

(1540)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Nous allons maintenant passer au Consortium des opérateurs de réseaux canadiens.

Monsieur Tacit, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. Christian Tacit (procureur et avocat-conseil, Consortium des opérateurs de réseaux canadiens inc.):

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, le Consortium des opérateurs de réseaux canadiens est une association industrielle sans but lucratif formée de plus de 30 fournisseurs de services Internet concurrents de toutes tailles.

Je tiens à souligner d'emblée que le Consortium prend la violation du droit d'auteur très au sérieux. De fait, aujourd'hui, un certain nombre de ses membres sont des entreprises de distribution de radiodiffusion qui sont soit titulaires d'une licence, soit exploitées en vertu d'une ordonnance d'exemption. Notre message principal est que le régime d'avis et avis continue à établir un équilibre raisonnable entre les droits des propriétaires de contenu et les internautes pour répondre aux allégations de violation en ligne du droit d'auteur et pour atteindre les objectifs éducatifs connexes.

Toutefois, les expériences vécues par les membres du Consortium montrent qu'il faudrait apporter quelques modifications légères au régime. Plus précisément, le Consortium propose les recommandations suivantes.

Premièrement, la Loi devrait obliger les propriétaires de contenu à envoyer des avis qui contiennent uniquement les éléments prescrits par la Loi. Une telle disposition empêcherait les parties d'abuser de ces avis et de les utiliser pour transmettre des demandes de règlement, des annonces publicitaires ou d'autres formes de contenu non pertinent.

Deuxièmement, il faudrait exiger que les avis soient fournis simultanément en format texte et en code lisible par machine. Ainsi, les FSI pourraient plus facilement choisir comment les traiter, soit manuellement ou automatiquement, selon l'envergure de leurs activités.

Troisièmement, les propriétaires de contenu devraient être obligés d'envoyer les avis exclusivement aux adresses électroniques réservées aux violations et accessibles au public que les FSI enregistrent auprès de l'American Registry for Internet Numbers. Ainsi, les avis seraient toujours envoyés aux adresses électroniques que les FSI souhaitent utiliser pour les traiter.

Quatrièmement, il faudrait limiter le nombre d'avis qu'un titulaire du droit d'auteur peut envoyer à un FSI concernant une violation alléguée liée à une adresse IP précise à un avis par période donnée, par exemple, 48 heures. Une telle disposition éviterait que les FSI soient inondés d'avis multiples visant les mêmes adresses IP et la même violation.

J'aimerais maintenant vous présenter les raisons pour lesquelles l'approche recommandée par la coalition FairPlay Canada, que j'appellerai simplement « la coalition », et d'autres mesures plus strictes devraient être rejetées. Notre analyse est fondée sur un cadre de proportionnalité qui prend en considération la détermination de l'envergure du problème, l'évaluation des avantages et des coûts de la solution proposée, ainsi que l'équité.

Les membres de la coalition, qui comprennent les fournisseurs de contenu et les FSI verticalement intégrés les plus importants au Canada, n'ont pas lésiné pour commanditer et trouver des études privées qui montrent que les répercussions financières des violations du droit d'auteur sur les propriétaires de contenu sont tellement désastreuses que la solution proposée par la coalition est nécessaire. Aucun autre organisme ne dispose des ressources requises pour bien répondre à l'ensemble des propositions présentées par la coalition. Heureusement, ce n'est pas nécessaire. L'an dernier, durant l'instance du CRTC ayant pour objet l'évaluation de la demande déposée par la coalition de mettre en oeuvre son régime administratif de blocage de contenu, des intervenants tels que le Canadian Media Concentration Research Project (le CMCRP) et le Centre pour la défense de l'intérêt public ont utilisé des données publiques pour montrer que l'envergure des violations du droit d'auteur en ligne et leurs répercussions sur les propriétaires de contenu sont loin d'être aussi inquiétantes que la coalition souhaite nous le faire croire. Conséquemment, il n'est pas nécessaire d'adopter le régime proposé par la coalition.

En ce qui concerne les avantages, rien ne sert d'instaurer le genre de régime recommandé par la coalition si un tel régime est en grande partie inefficace. Le blocage d'adresses IP, le blocage de serveurs de noms de domaines ou de DNS et le recours à l'inspection approfondie des paquets ou à l'IAP sont toutes des méthodes qui peuvent être contournées par divers moyens techniques, y compris les réseaux privés virtuels ou les RPV. En outre, les techniques de blocage finissent parfois par bloquer tant les sites Web qui respectent le droit d'auteur que ceux qui le violent.

Quant aux coûts, il y en a à la fois pour le secteur public et le secteur privé. Du côté du secteur privé, les parties comme les FSI doivent débourser de l'argent pour respecter le régime. De plus, comme il est inévitable que du contenu non interdit soit bloqué à cause de la façon dont les techniques de blocage fonctionnent, ces parties s'exposent à des litiges. Du côté du secteur public, les coûts comprennent les frais supplémentaires liés à l'établissement et au maintien du régime administratif, ainsi que l'érosion de valeurs juridiques et démocratiques comme la liberté d'expression, la confidentialité des communications et la prévention de la surveillance inutile, valeurs qui font actuellement partie des principes du transport commun et de la neutralité du Net.

(1545)



C'est pour cette raison que nous vous recommandons de faire preuve de prudence face à la pente glissante vers laquelle nous mènent les demandes des membres de la coalition et d'autres. Au début, la majorité des grands fournisseurs de contenu et des FSI verticalement intégrés appuyaient le régime d'avis et avis. Puis, ils se sont ralliés à la coalition. Peut-être qu'ils déclareront maintenant, comme la MPA, qu'on devrait pouvoir déposer des injonctions contre les FSI pour bloquer du contenu et qu'on devrait limiter les règles refuges visant les FSI. Ensuite, ils affirmeront peut-être que la seule façon d'empêcher le contournement du blocage est en interdisant complètement les RPV, qui sont utilisés couramment pour protéger les données privées et pour permettre la liberté d'expression.

Les propriétaires de contenu pourraient aller encore plus loin; ils pourraient préconiser un régime d'avis et retrait, sans la moindre supervision judiciaire ou administrative.

Les Canadiens ne devraient pas avoir à payer les coûts exorbitants associés à ces solutions, et rien de tout cela n'est nécessaire. La Loi sur le droit d'auteur prévoit déjà un mécanisme qui permet aux propriétaires de contenu de demander des injonctions pour faire retirer du contenu violant le droit d'auteur. On peut trouver le critère de ce qui constitue une approche raisonnable au sein d'une société libre et démocratique dans une analyse faite par le CMCRP de 40 pays de l'OCDE et de l'Union européenne: 18 d'entre eux bloquent rarement des sites Web, 18 les bloquent sur ordonnance d'un tribunal et seulement 4 les bloquent au moyen de procédures administratives.

Si, malgré ces arguments, le Parlement adopte une solution comme celle proposée par la coalition, pour des questions d'équité, il devra aussi autoriser les FSI à recouvrer les frais d'instauration et de gestion des mécanismes de blocage. Ces frais peuvent être considérables; ils peuvent même forcer les petits FSI à fermer leurs portes s'ils ne sont pas recouvrés.

Toutefois, nous exhortons le Comité à recommander au Parlement de maintenir le régime actuel d'avis et avis, en y apportant les modifications mineures que nous vous avons proposées. D'autres mesures plus strictes devraient être rejetées.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je donne maintenant la parole à M. Michael Paris, de l'Association des cinémas au Canada.

Vous avez droit à sept minutes.

M. Michael Paris (directeur, Affaires juridiques et chef de la Protection des renseignements personnels, Association des cinémas au Canada):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Bonjour, monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs.

Je suis ici au nom de l'Association des cinémas au Canada; par souci de concision, je l'appellerai aussi aujourd'hui par son sigle: la MTAC. Nous sommes l'organisation commerciale qui représente les intérêts des exploitants de plus de 3 000 écrans de cinéma partout au Canada. Nous sommes exactement ce que notre nom laisse entendre. Nos membres vendent les billets et le maïs soufflé, et ils font en sorte que les films soient présentés de la façon prévue par les créateurs: au grand écran.

Entre autres, la MTAC représente les exploitants de salles dans les négociations avec les sociétés de gestion et elle intervient dans des séances comme celle-ci. Cela étant dit, nous ne participons pas souvent à des délibérations sur le droit d'auteur et nous vous remercions de nous avoir invités. Nous ne sommes pas une société ou un organisme qui intervient régulièrement dans les questions de droit d'auteur, bien que ces questions aient certainement une incidence sur nos membres et que nous payions des redevances à certaines sociétés de gestion.

Je vais vous présenter rapidement quelques faits que vous ne connaissez peut-être pas sur les exploitants de salles. D'abord, les exploitants louent les films aux distributeurs, et nous gardons moins de 50 % de chaque billet que nos membres vendent. Ils n'ont aucune influence sur le contenu des films qu'ils présentent, alors si vous en avez assez de voir des suites, je vous recommande d'en parler aux producteurs.

Nous formons un secteur de l'industrie cinématographique, et plus de 80 % des exploitants de salles sont des entreprises détenues et gérées par des Canadiens. Des centaines d'exploitants sont des entreprises familiales situées à des endroits de toutes tailles. De plus, nous employons des milliers de Canadiens et nous sommes un des plus grands pourvoyeurs de premiers emplois.

Nous sommes aussi une industrie en proie à des perturbations importantes. Comme l'indique une étude récente menée par Téléfilm, bien que les cinémas attirent encore occasionnellement deux tiers des Canadiens, les Canadiens se tournent de plus en plus vers la diffusion continue. Les choix de divertissement prolifèrent, et les exploitants de salles n'ont jamais été soumis à une si grande concurrence.

Tout cela étant dit, il y a un dossier qui a été soulevé devant le Comité et qui intéresse la MTAC depuis toujours; il s'agit de la proposition, faite par des membres de l'industrie de la musique, de modifier la définition du terme « enregistrement sonore » contenue dans la Loi. C'est le seul sujet dont je vais parler aujourd'hui, et je serai très bref.

Dans le contexte de l'examen de la Loi, un groupe d'intervenants dirigé par des maisons de disques multinationales et des filiales canadiennes a investi des ressources considérables dans la promotion de l'idée qu'il existe une faille dans le domaine du droit d'auteur. Ce groupe prédit un avenir sombre pour les créateurs, un avenir menacé où la technologie leur fera perdre encore plus de terrain si l'on ne répond pas aux demandes du groupe en modifiant la Loi.

Ce que le groupe propose, c'est de modifier la définition d'un enregistrement sonore contenue dans la Loi en retirant l'exclusion des bandes sonores d'oeuvres cinématographiques lorsqu'elles accompagnent celles-ci. À partir de maintenant, je vais employer simplement le terme « film », si vous le voulez bien. Le seul but de cette modification est d'ouvrir un flux de redevances que les exploitants de salles auraient à payer, ce qui fournirait à ce groupe une part des recettes des salles de cinéma.

La MTAC est d'avis que la définition actuelle du terme « enregistrement sonore » prévue par la Loi établit un juste équilibre entre les créateurs, les titulaires des droits et les exploitants. La modification proposée par certains membres de l'industrie de la musique aggravera les perturbations technologiques que les exploitants subissent déjà. Elle risque aussi de miner encore davantage le rôle des salles de cinéma comme vitrine principale pour les créateurs canadiens au sein des industries cinématographiques nationale et mondiale.

Aussi, la proposition n'est pas nouvelle. De 2009 à 2012, la MTAC s'est défendue avec succès lors de poursuites judiciaires engagées par des membres de l'industrie de la musique, qui soutenaient que la définition actuelle d'un enregistrement sonore devrait être interprétée comme n'excluant pas les trames sonores, alors qu'elle les exclut expressément. Il a fallu attendre la décision de la Cour suprême du Canada en 2012 pour clore le dossier.

Contrairement à ce que certains continuent de répéter, la définition d'un enregistrement sonore n'est ni arbitraire, ni inéquitable, ni injustifiée. Comme les tribunaux l'ont conclu, l'exclusion est tout à fait intentionnelle et elle reflète l'équilibre établi par de sages législateurs entre les créateurs, les titulaires de droit d'auteur et les exploitants.

Aujourd'hui, ces intervenants demandent au Comité de reprendre le travail là où leurs litiges se sont arrêtés. Or, la modification proposée continue de poser les mêmes problèmes qui ont été relevés par les tribunaux.

La première chose que je dirais, c'est que la modification n'est pas aussi simple qu'ils le prétendent. Elle demanderait de remanier considérablement la Loi pour éliminer les absurdités que les tribunaux ont soulevées dans leurs décisions et d'autres iniquités qui seraient créées par la modification. Je n'ai pas le temps de toutes les présenter, mais je vais mentionner celle que je trouve la plus critiquable: la modification créerait un système de doubles redevances, car les créateurs et les titulaires de droit d'auteur recevraient de l'argent au début, lorsque leurs oeuvres sont incluses dans un film, et à la fin, lorsque le film est présenté. C'est exactement pour cette raison que l'exclusion a été établie, et la Loi traite les oeuvres d'autres créateurs de la même manière lorsque ces oeuvres sont incluses dans un film.

(1550)



Cela n'a jamais été une subvention. Les droits voisins compensent l'utilisation non contrôlée des enregistrements sonores qui peut être faite sans la participation de la maison de disques. Toutefois, pour avoir le droit d'utiliser de la musique dans un film, il faut obtenir une licence, pour laquelle les cinéastes ont déjà versé une compensation. Cette compensation est établie expressément dans un contrat. Les droits d'inclusion sont négociés directement avec le titulaire de droit d'auteur et ils sont acquis à l'échelle mondiale pour permettre la distribution mondiale et la présentation du film comme un seul produit, et non comme une collection d'oeuvres.

Les recettes mondiales des salles de cinéma dépendent de ce modèle de distribution, et ce sont ces recettes qui paient les frais des cinéastes, y compris les paiements versés aux intervenants de l'industrie de la musique.

C'est à peu près tout ce que je peux dire dans le peu de temps qui m'est accordé. Nous soumettrons un mémoire détaillé au Comité plus tard cette semaine, au nom de nos membres. Merci de l'invitation et de votre attention. Je serai ravi de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Pour la dernière présentation, nous avons la Société des auteurs de radio, télévision et cinéma.

La parole est à Mme Stéphanie Hénault et à M. Mathieu Plante.

Mme Stéphanie Hénault (directrice générale, Société des auteurs de radio, télévision et cinéma):

Merci de nous avoir invités à comparaître aujourd'hui.

Nous aimerions vous parler du travail des auteurs comme scénaristes et de la façon dont la Loi sur le droit d'auteur pourrait enrichir à long terme la culture et l'économie canadiennes.

Tout d'abord, permettez-moi de vous parler de notre organisme, la SARTEC. Sa mission est de protéger et de défendre les intérêts professionnels, économiques et moraux de tous les auteurs de langue française qui sont des travailleurs autonomes dans le domaine de l'audiovisuel au Canada. Elle négocie des ententes collectives avec les producteurs, conseille les auteurs quant à leurs contrats, perçoit en leur nom des redevances et contribue au respect de leur travail.

Nos ententes collectives interdisent la cession de droits, mais elles accordent aux producteurs des licences d'exploitation du texte sous forme d'oeuvres audiovisuelles, elles encadrent la possibilité d'octroyer des licences à d'autres fins et elles permettent aux auteurs de percevoir des redevances des producteurs ou des sociétés de gestion collective, selon le type d'exploitation. Tout cela est précisé dans les ententes.

Les scénaristes sont des créateurs qui consacrent leur vie à écrire et à imaginer les récits des héros et des valeurs canadiennes. Leurs scénarios sont la source d'oeuvres audiovisuelles qui rassemblent, émeuvent, font rire et réfléchir, font rayonner notre culture, notre pays, et font la promotion de sa grande richesse. Les retombées qu'ils génèrent sont des plus positives pour l'économie et le mieux-être des Canadiens. Pour que notre production audiovisuelle canadienne soit compétitive, nous avons la responsabilité de mettre en place dans la Loi des mécanismes modernes permettant aux créateurs d'être adéquatement rémunérés pour le fruit de leur travail.

Il ne faut pas oublier que, pour faire son travail, l'auteur doit pouvoir accorder les droits liés à son oeuvre moyennant rémunération, que ce soit en vue d'un film, à une compagnie de théâtre pour une pièce ou à un éditeur dans le cas d'un livre. L'auteur doit avoir la capacité de monnayer les droits d'adaptation de son scénario et de bénéficier de ses retombées. Il s'agit d'un travailleur autonome qui assume souvent seul le risque de la création de son oeuvre. La Loi doit donc lui permettre d'atténuer ce risque, pour qu'il continue de créer et soit assuré de revenus décents dans l'économie numérique.

Selon nous, la Loi doit permettre à nos enfants qui en ont le désir et le talent de rêver, eux aussi, de travailler un jour comme créateurs.

(1555)

M. Mathieu Plante (président, Société des auteurs de radio, télévision et cinéma):

Pour ce faire, nous vous demandons essentiellement cinq choses. Aujourd'hui, le temps dont nous disposons nous oblige à vous présenter seulement trois d'entre elles.

Premièrement, nous demandons que soient éliminées les exceptions injustes introduites en 2012 dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur et dont souffrent les créateurs canadiens. Nous continuons vivement à dénoncer ces exceptions. En effet, elles compromettent la capacité de nos scénaristes à continuer d'écrire nos histoires, ce dont le Canada doit pourtant s'assurer.

Deuxièmement, nous demandons que soit étendu aux oeuvres audiovisuelles le régime de copie pour usage privé. Les créateurs et les producteurs canadiens de l'audiovisuel sont les grands oubliés de ce régime, lequel fonctionne pourtant bien dans la majorité des pays d'Europe et ailleurs.

Troisièmement, nous demandons que soit ajoutée une présomption de cotitularité du droit d'auteur de l'oeuvre audiovisuelle. Conformément à la jurisprudence canadienne, la Loi devrait préciser que le scénariste et le réalisateur sont présumés être les cotitulaires du droit d'auteur de l'oeuvre audiovisuelle. Le scénariste écrit le texte, une oeuvre littéraire qui guidera l'ensemble des collaborateurs subséquents vers l'oeuvre audiovisuelle. Pour sa part, le réalisateur fera des choix créatifs permettant de transformer le texte en une oeuvre audiovisuelle, choix qui en influenceront la facture.

Le scénario décrit le plus concrètement possible le film à faire. En l'écrivant, le scénariste crée le récit. Il en décrit les personnages, leurs intentions, leurs comportements, leurs dialogues et leur évolution. Il énonce le film à faire scène par scène, incluant ses lieux, sa temporalité et son environnement sonore. De son côté, le réalisateur dirige les interprètes, les concepteurs et les techniciens pour que le travail du scénariste prenne sa forme audiovisuelle. Les choix de sa direction influenceront le style, le rythme, le ton et le son du film.

Nous vous invitons donc à reconnaître que l'auteur du scénario, de l'adaptation et du texte parlé ainsi que le réalisateur sont présumés être les cotitulaires du droit d'auteur lié à l'oeuvre audiovisuelle. Nous n'aurions pas d'objection à ce que l'on tienne compte également de l'auteur des compositions musicales spécialement créées pour l'oeuvre.

Finalement, nous demandons que la Loi soit modernisée pour que la protection qu'elle accorde aux oeuvres passe de 50 ans à 70 ans après la mort de l'auteur et pour qu'elle respecte mieux la propriété intellectuelle dans le cas d'oeuvres audiovisuelles numérisées et diffusées sur des plateformes numériques. Un mémoire plus explicite à ce sujet vous sera transmis ultérieurement.

(1600)

Mme Stéphanie Hénault:

Avant de terminer, je me permets de vous rappeler la fonction première de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, qui est de protéger la propriété intellectuelle des créateurs pour leur permettre d'être rémunérés pour l'utilisation de leur travail.

Nous croyons que vous avez le devoir d'encourager leur capacité à long terme de continuer à rassembler, à divertir, à émouvoir, à faire rire ou réfléchir, à faire rayonner notre pays, à promouvoir nos valeurs et à contribuer à notre fierté. Pour ce faire, nous croyons qu'il faut actualiser certaines des dispositions de la Loi pour la mettre au diapason des meilleures pratiques internationales associant les créateurs aux retombées économiques de leurs oeuvres.

Nous vous remercions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup de toutes vos présentations.

Nous allons commencer la période de questions.[Traduction]

Nous allons passer directement à M. Longfield.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci pour les exposés concis que vous avez préparés pour nous et que vous nous avez présentés. Nous sommes ici pour trouver la bonne voie à suivre, et vos exposés nous aideront à y arriver.

J'ai quelques questions; je vais m'adresser d'abord à M. Payette.

Vous avez parlé d'apporter des changements à la Commission du droit d'auteur. J'ai rencontré un groupe de musiciens à Guelph récemment, et ils m'ont aussi parlé de la Commission. Ils étaient d'avis, entre autres, que la Commission du droit d'auteur devrait compter des musiciens.

Avez-vous une opinion sur la composition de la Commission du droit d'auteur? Devrions-nous inclure des musiciens, des éditeurs et toute la gamme de parties prenantes?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Je ne connais pas très bien les procédures de la Commission du droit d'auteur parce que ce sont surtout les sociétés de gestion qui se présentent devant elle. Je crois comprendre qu'il s'agit, grosso modo, d'un tribunal qui fixe les tarifs; c'est donc très technique.

Je ne sais pas si la Commission devrait compter des musiciens, mais bien sûr, elle devrait comprendre des gens qui sont prêts à reconnaître la valeur de la musique créée.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D'accord. Merci. Je m'interrogeais simplement sur la pleine mesure de l'observation.

De plus, pour poursuivre sur la part qu'un artiste reçoit habituellement pour une interprétation en direct par rapport à une interprétation enregistrée ou publiée, avez-vous une idée de l'écart entre les deux? Certains musiciens ont dit que la façon de pouvoir être payés de nos jours, c'est de donner des concerts en direct, que les paiements pour les services de diffusion en continu ou les éditeurs ont baissé si radicalement qu'ils ont dû repenser la façon de commercialiser leur produit.

M. Jérôme Payette:

Il existe différents types de professionnels dans l'industrie de la musique. On peut être un auteur-compositeur qui ne fait pas de prestations sur scène, mais dans le cas d'un auteur-compositeur qui est également un interprète, les spectacles sur scène sont devenus importants pour gagner sa vie.

En ce qui concerne principalement les services de diffusion en continu, je dirais que nous devrions examiner ce que le Parlement européen a fait la semaine dernière et essayer d'obtenir plus d'argent des services. Je pense que c'est très important. Ils ont dit que les services de partage, par exemple, comme YouTube, devront payer pour toutes les diffusions. Ce n'est pas le cas à l'heure actuelle. Ils ne paient que pour les diffusions qui sont commercialisées. Si un utilisateur publie quelque chose en ligne, sur YouTube, par exemple, aucun versement de fonds n'est effectué à l'heure actuelle. Cependant, si nous suivons ce qui se fait en Europe, des fonds seraient versés aux détenteurs de droits selon... Je pense que l'on parle de « communication au public » en Europe.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

C'est merveilleux. C'est utile. Lorsque nous examinons nos accords commerciaux avec l'Europe, ce qui comprend les ententes sur la propriété intellectuelle, et la façon de commercialiser en Amérique du Nord et en Europe, nous pouvons constater que la décision européenne pourrait avoir une influence. Cependant, c'est une décision récente, alors nous n'avons pas vraiment étudié la question, mais c'est très utile d'entendre vos premières impressions.

M. Jérôme Payette:

Je pense que c'est un excellent exemple à suivre qui offre un bon équilibre pour les détenteurs de droits plutôt que d'avantager les grandes sociétés internationales. Elles n'ont pas toujours les licences et ne paient pas toujours pour la musique utilisée.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Vous venez d'aborder une autre question à laquelle je pensais, à savoir la différence entre un auteur-compositeur et un interprète. Lorsque l'on pense à Aretha Franklin qui interprète la chanson Respect d'Otis Redding, elle n'a pas été payée pour cela. Elle a changé la signification de la chanson. Plutôt que ce soit un homme qui se fasse respecter par la femme à son retour à la maison, elle a vraiment changé la signification de la chanson dans son interprétation, mais elle n'a pas été payée pour cela.

En ce qui concerne les revenus entre les interprètes et les auteurs, est-ce que c'est quelque chose qui a changé au fil des ans? Devrions-nous nous pencher sur cette question, du point de vue de la loi?

(1605)

M. Jérôme Payette:

Je ne connais pas l'exemple. Je sais qui est Aretha Franklin, et je connais la chanson. Je pense qu'il y a un droit d'auteur sur la chanson, mais il y a également eu rémunération pour l'enregistrement de la chanson. Je pense qu'elle a touché de l'argent avec l'enregistrement de la chanson. Je ne connais pas le cas, mais il y a une rémunération prévue pour les interprètes. Je pense qu'il est normal que les auteurs soient rémunérés également. Les gens qui écrivent les chansons sont importants.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui. J'imagine que c'est en lien avec l'interprétation de la chanson, alors merci de cette remarque. Il est bien triste que nous l'ayons perdue cet été.

Permettez-moi de m'adresser à Mathieu et à Stéphanie pour examiner la façon dont un auteur canadien gagne sa vie en 2018 et les nouvelles tendances en matière de droit d'auteur. Je pouvais voir un lien entre l'Association des cinémas du Canada et le paiement des créateurs de musique et des interprètes par rapport aux auteurs qui sont rémunérés pour écrire des scénarios et des scripts. Savez-vous s'il y a une différence? Sont-ils payés à peu près les mêmes montants ou de la même façon?

Je pourrais peut-être me renseigner auprès de Michael Paris pour savoir s'il y a un consensus ou s'il y a des connaissances dont vous pourriez nous faire part. [Français]

Mme Stéphanie Hénault:

Nous n'avons pas discuté de ces questions. Cela étant dit, l'apport du scénariste au film est plus fondamental que celui du compositeur de musique.

Vous cherchez à savoir si nous appuyons la revendication d'une rémunération additionnelle lors de la diffusion du film. Nous devrions y réfléchir. En principe, nous sommes toujours d'avis que les créateurs devraient être rémunérés non seulement lorsqu'ils créent, mais aussi proportionnellement aux utilisations qui sont faites de leur oeuvre. La proposition qui est faite vise une rémunération additionnelle en fonction de l'utilisation. La communauté des créateurs partage ce point de vue et juge que c'est important. [Traduction]

M. Lloyd Longfield:

C'est exact. Quel accent met-on sur les créateurs? [Français]

M. Mathieu Plante:

On appelle cela être associé à la vie économique de l'oeuvre: si un film ou une émission de télévision connaît un très grand succès, il devrait être possible d'y être associé et d'en retirer des bénéfices. [Traduction]

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je suis désolé, mais nous n'avons plus de temps.

Le président:

Je suis certain que vous pourrez vous adresser à lui à nouveau. Nous n'avons plus de temps pour l'instant.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Lloyd.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à tous les témoins d'être venus aujourd'hui. Nous avons passé de nombreuses heures à examiner cette question, et maintenant que nous sommes de retour de la pause estivale, il est bien de nous rafraîchir la mémoire.

Je vais adresser mes premières questions à vous, monsieur Payette. Vous avez peut-être entendu parler récemment que l'artiste Bryan Adams a pris la parole devant le comité du patrimoine, où il a formulé une recommandation liée à ce que nous appelons le droit réversif des musiciens. Au Canada, vous avez un droit réversif 25 ans après votre décès, et aux États-Unis, il est de 35 ans, et pas forcément après votre décès. Ce peut être durant votre vie.

J'espérais que vous auriez une observation à faire sur ce témoignage et que vous nous fassiez part du point de vue de vos intervenants.

M. Jérôme Payette:

Je ne pense pas qu'il serait nécessaire de l'inclure dans la loi. Les compositeurs doivent signer une cession de droits pour travailler avec un éditeur de musique, et ils ne le font même pas, car ils font leurs propres affaires.

Il n'existe aucune disposition dans la loi qui empêche que ce dont nous discutons soit appliqué dans un contrat. Vous pourriez dire qu'après 35 ans, le droit d'auteur revient au compositeur. Il est déjà possible de le faire si nous voulons le faire, et je pense qu'il y a une différence entre la propriété et la rémunération. Je pense que ce qui est important pour les détenteurs de droits d'auteur, c'est la rémunération, et nous devrions nous concentrer là-dessus. Quelle importance devrions-nous accorder au droit d'auteur et combien d'argent pouvons-nous donner à l'industrie de la musique?

Je conclurai en disant que les éditeurs de musique ont des listes de droits d'auteur qui génèrent des sources de revenus constantes, qui sont utilisées pour réinvestir dans les nouveaux talents. Il ne faut pas l'oublier. C'est le modèle d'affaires des éditeurs de musique.

(1610)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je ne suis pas certain si vous avez entendu la déclaration que M. Adams a faite au comité du patrimoine, mais vous dites qu'il n'y a aucun droit réversif ferme au Canada, que c'est un système de marché assez libre et ouvert. On peut céder ses droits pour une période aussi longue ou brève que l'on veut, et tout est une question de négociation.

M. Jérôme Payette:

Oui, vous pouvez faire ce que vous voulez.

M. Dane Lloyd:

D'accord, il sera très intéressant pour nous d'examiner la question plus à fond.

Vous avez également évoqué les règles européennes récentes relatives aux filtres de contenu. Pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur la façon dont ces règles ont une incidence sur l'industrie?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Je ne faisais pas référence aux filtres de contenu, mais plutôt à ce qu'on a fait en Europe, et plus particulièrement en ce qui concerne l'article 13. Les Européens ont dit que c'est une communication au public même si l'oeuvre a été téléchargée par un utilisateur.

À l'heure actuelle, si j'affiche du contenu en ligne, c'est protégé. Si c'est du contenu généré par l'utilisateur, la plateforme n'est pas tenue de payer et n'est même pas tenue d'avoir une licence. Le changement fera en sorte que les plateformes seront obligées d'avoir une licence et de payer les détenteurs de droits, même pour du contenu généré par l'utilisateur, et elles devront faire preuve d'une plus grande transparence. Ces entreprises ne sont pas transparentes à propos de ce qui est utilisé, et c'est le contenu des détenteurs de droits et des créateurs qui est affiché, et on ne sait pas ce que l'on en fait.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Pensez-vous que si nous adoptons un modèle comme celui des Européens, nous améliorerons la transparence?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Oui, exactement, et il y aurait des taux plus élevés pour l'ensemble de l'industrie de la musique, tout le contenu en ligne, et je pense que ce qu'ils cherchent à faire en Europe, c'est d'obliger YouTube et d'autres à payer davantage les détenteurs de droits.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Mes prochaines questions s'adressent à vous, monsieur Tacit. La Cour suprême a été récemment saisie d'une affaire liée au recouvrement des coûts pour les fournisseurs de services Internet, et j'aimerais que vous nous en disiez un peu plus sur les répercussions de cette affaire sur vos intervenants et que vous nous fassiez part de vos idées pour l'avenir.

M. Christian Tacit:

Nous sommes d'avis que si les fournisseurs de services Internet sont tenus par la loi d'offrir certains services pour aider à faire respecter le droit d'auteur ou à relever les atteintes au droit d'auteur, ils devraient être indemnisés.

En fait, les fournisseurs de services Internet sont les compagnies de téléphone du monde actuel. Leur rôle consiste à offrir du contenu, et non pas à le remettre en question ou à l'examiner, et je ne pense pas que dans une société démocratique, nous voulons changer cela. S'ils sont tenus de s'acquitter d'une fonction exigée par l'État, alors l'État devrait les indemniser, ou un mécanisme devrait être en place, peut-être pas par l'entremise de l'État, mais par l'entremise des parties qui ont un intérêt personnel ou commercial à faire valoir leurs droits d'être rémunérées.

M. Dane Lloyd:

À combien estimez-vous le coût pour qu'un fournisseur de services Internet s'acquitte de ces fonctions?

M. Christian Tacit:

Les coûts peuvent varier considérablement. On a des fournisseurs de services Internet importants qui ont des outils d'automatisation et des entreprises familiales qui procèdent manuellement, si bien que les coûts varient énormément. Je ne suis pas en mesure de vous fournir une réponse. Des études ont été menées dans le passé sur le régime d'avis dans le cadre desquelles on essayait de maîtriser les coûts, à tout le moins durant cette période particulière.

Nous ne nous sommes pas attardés sur cette question au cours des dernières années, car elle a été mise de côté quand le gouvernement a décidé de ne pas indemniser les fournisseurs de services Internet pour le traitement des avis. Étant donné qu'aucun règlement n'a été adopté pour autoriser un frais et que la loi et le régime d'avis à l'époque étaient stables, nous ne nous sommes pas attardés sur le sujet, à tout le moins pas en tant qu'association, mais il existe probablement des données, et nous pourrions assurer un suivi si vous le souhaitez.

M. Dane Lloyd:

D'après vous, les technologies font-elles baisser les coûts de transaction? Pensez-vous qu'il y a de nombreuses possibilités de réduire les coûts pour les fournisseurs de services Internet?

M. Christian Tacit:

Les nouvelles technologies diminuent les coûts de tout ce que nous faisons.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Seriez-vous moins contre l'idée alors, si les coûts diminuaient considérablement?

M. Christian Tacit:

Le coût, c'est le coût. Que ce soit 1, 10 ou 100 dollars, je ne pense pas que le principe de recouvrement des coûts soit différent.

Là encore, si vous êtes tenus de faire quelque chose qui établit les coûts entre des intérêts privés, si les droits sont appliqués, même si ce sont des droits légaux, vous devriez être rémunérés.

(1615)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant céder la parole à M. Masse.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à nos témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui.

C'est le mouvement européen que nous avons vu la semaine dernière, mais la Music Modernization Act a aussi été adoptée la semaine dernière aux États-Unis, un accord bipartisan que 80 sénateurs ont signé.

Certains soutiennent que la collaboration est plus élevée que jamais car des fournisseurs comme Google, Amazon et Apple s'orientent vers la production. Ils s'intéressent davantage à la protection du contenu original car leurs investissements vont dans cette direction en quelque sorte.

Comme première question aux témoins, je veux connaître la position du Canada. Il y a la décision européenne et la décision américaine. Où nous situons-nous, surtout du point de vue de votre organisation, dans les liens internationaux et nord-américains? D'après vous, quelle est votre position à la lumière des changements complexes qui sont apportés en Europe et aux États-Unis? Si vous ne connaissez pas la situation aux États-Unis, votre opinion changera-t-elle lorsque vous comprendrez cette décision qui a été prise concernant les droits d'auteur en musique hier à Washington?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Je pense que le Canada accuse un retard à bien des égards. La durée de protection est de 50 ans partout. Elle est de 70 ans dans les pays de l'OCDE, aux États-Unis et en Europe. Le piratage est le pire problème. Le régime d'avis est extrêmement faible. Nous devons à tout le moins pouvoir donner un préavis et supprimer le contenu.

La fixation du prix est un bon système pour l'instant, mais il n'est pas efficace. Je pense que nous devons corriger adéquatement la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

M. Brian Masse:

Quelqu'un d'autre veut-il intervenir à ce sujet?

M. Christian Tacit:

Pourrais-je faire une observation sur le régime d'avis et le régime d'avis et de retrait?

M. Brian Masse:

Oui. J'aimerais entendre le point de vue international de votre organisation, car vous n'êtes pas un cas isolé au Canada en ce qui concerne les décisions en matière de rémunération en lien avec le droit d'auteur notamment.

Nos partenaires européens et l'influence des Américains qui viennent ici auront une incidence directe sur votre capacité de faire le travail ici au Canada. J'aimerais entendre ce que vous avez à dire là-dessus. Ce sont des changements radicaux qui viennent d'être mis en place. Ils faisaient partie de nos accords commerciaux et ont été discutés dans le cadre d'échanges privés. Certains éléments se trouvent actuellement dans l'ALENA et d'autres dans un autre accord commercial.

Je suis curieux à propos de ces éléments en évolution. On se regarde le nombril en ce qui concerne les droits d'auteurs, par l'entremise de ce processus et d'un examen quinquennal de notre loi. La réalité est que le monde a évolué depuis que nous avons adopté notre loi et entamé l'étude.

Si vous avez quelque chose à dire, je serais intéressé de l'entendre.

M. Christian Tacit:

Je veux aborder un point précis. L'argument que j'ai fait valoir plus tôt était que les fournisseurs de services Internet sont des fournisseurs publics. Ils sont censés transmettre les données. Pour les amener à lutter contre la contrefaçon de manière plus proactive, vous demandez maintenant aux fournisseurs de services Internet de faire fi de leur intérêt économique personnel de se dégager de leur responsabilité relativement au contenu. C'est, à mon sens, une proposition très dangereuse dans une société libre et démocratique.

Outre les coûts que les fournisseurs de services Internet assument, même s'ils pouvaient être indemnisés, je pense que c'est une pente glissante. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous nous opposons à toutes les mesures proposées par la coalition sur le régime d'avis et de retrait. Il n'y a pas que les intérêts des fournisseurs de services Internet. C'est une question de valeurs démocratiques globales pour le pays.

M. Michael Paris:

Je sais que j'ai dit que j'allais seulement parler d'un point, mais je peux aborder ce sujet brièvement.

La MTAC est membre de la coalition FrancJeu, et nous appuyons vivement cette initiative. D'après ce que je comprends, en ce qui concerne la proposition, l'observation qui a été formulée plus tôt était que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur offre actuellement un redressement par injonction pour ceux qui veulent donner suite à une violation. Aucun avocat dans la salle ne sera étonné si je dis, « Il n'existe pas de droit sans recours ». Le redressement par injonction est un recours pratique. On n'a pas à chercher plus loin pour voir combien d'injonctions ont été accordées en lien avec la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. C'est la raison pour laquelle la coalition FrancJeu propose une entité distincte pour traiter ces types de demandes.

Je ne propose pas de parler au nom des fournisseurs de services Internet sur le fardeau en matière d'observation des règles en lien avec les ordonnances pour limiter l'accès à du contenu qui viole le droit d'auteur relevé par l'entité. C'est un peu au-delà de mes compétences, mais nous discutons depuis 20 ans de la façon d'intervenir efficacement dans les cas de violation. Je pense qu'un examen de la loi et une étude attentive et sérieuse des propositions de la coalition FrancJeu s'imposent.

Je suis désolé de ne pas pouvoir fournir plus de contexte sur les changements qui ont été mis en place aux États-Unis hier, mais je signale que ce même système existe au Royaume-Uni et ailleurs. Le Comité devrait se pencher là-dessus.

(1620)

[Français]

Mme Stéphanie Hénault:

Vous demandiez quelle avait été la réaction de notre organisme à la suite de la directive du Parlement européen. Nous nous en sommes réjouis. D'ailleurs, le monde entier se réjouit de la directive qui a été adoptée par une très grande majorité des députés du Parlement européen, le 12 septembre.

À notre avis, c'est un modèle de sagesse dont vous devriez vous inspirer, car il agirait en faveur de notre économie et de notre culture. Les revenus des créateurs ont diminué. Pourtant, l'utilisation de leurs oeuvres a été multipliée et s'est élargie. Il est temps de trouver un moyen de permettre aux créateurs canadiens et à l'industrie culturelle canadienne de récupérer l'argent qui sort du pays et qui n'y revient pas.

Par exemple, la directive demande que les fournisseurs de services de partage de contenu, comme YouTube, concluent des contrats de licences équitables et appropriés avec les ayants droit. C'est quelque chose dont nous devrions nous inspirer.

Malheureusement, je n'ai pas pris connaissance de ce que vous évoquiez aux États-Unis, mais nous allons nous y intéresser. Peut-être pourrons-nous vous fournir des indications additionnelles dans le mémoire que nous vous soumettrons.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Je suis désolé, nous devons passer à un autre intervenant.

Monsieur Graham, vous disposez de sept minutes. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Payette et madame Hénault, je vais commencer par vous.

Existe-t-il d'autres cas, qu'il s'agisse d'un bien, d'un produit ou d'autre chose que l'on possède, où la durée des droits dépasse la durée de vie de la personne qui en a la possession?

J'ai entendu dire à deux reprises qu'on devrait augmenter la durée du droit d'auteur de 50 ans à 70 ans après la mort de l'auteur. Y a-t-il d'autres situations où, sur le plan économique, on conserve quelque chose après sa mort?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Pour à peu près tout ce qu'on possède, il existe un droit de propriété. Après la mort, on le transfère à ses enfants. Si j'achète une maison, à ma mort, elle sera donnée à mes enfants. Le droit de propriété ne prend pas fin après une date précise. Voilà ce que je peux dire pour répondre à votre question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela répond à ma question. Le bien est donc transféré aux enfants ou à quelqu'un d'autre. Cela ne demeure pas la propriété de la personne, 70 ans après sa mort. Alors, pourquoi faites-vous cette demande?

M. Jérôme Payette:

En fait, c'est la même chose. La durée de protection est transférée aux enfants, d'habitude. Je crois que la Convention de Berne disait que l'idée de la durée de protection de 70 ans était d'avoir, pour deux générations de descendants, une protection de l'oeuvre qui avait été créée. C'était l'esprit derrière la protection de 70 ans.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Prolonger la durée de protection jusqu'à 70 ans après la mort équivaut à couvrir près de quatre générations. Pourquoi est-ce justifiable de demander une durée supérieure à 50 ans?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Cela génère aussi des revenus pour les entreprises. Il n'y a pas que des particuliers qui peuvent être titulaires du droit d'auteur. Par exemple, des entreprises d'édition musicale peuvent le contrôler.

Généralement, les liens de propriété n'ont pas de date de fin. C'est étrange qu'il y en ait une pour le droit d'auteur.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, mais une entreprise n'est pas quelque chose qui meurt.

Mme Stéphanie Hénault:

Permettez-moi d'ajouter une précision.

Prenons le cas où je suis grand-mère et que je crée une oeuvre. La durée de 70 ans correspond à l'espérance de vie de mon petit-enfant. C'est comme si on vous disait que votre maison ne serait à vous que durant deux générations et que, après cela, tout le monde pourrait y habiter. Il y a une limite.

À notre connaissance, l'ensemble des pays élargissent la durée de protection. Au Canada, le fait que la durée soit de 50 ans entraîne une perte de revenus. Lorsque les oeuvres canadiennes sont exploitées dans d'autres pays où la durée de protection est de 70 ans, l'argent perçu par les sociétés de gestion collective reste là-bas. Il ne revient pas ici, puisque c'est la loi du pays d'origine qui s'applique.

Selon notre compréhension, ce n'est pas commercialement avantageux de refuser d'étendre cette protection à 70 ans.

(1625)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Payette, plus tôt, vous avez parlé d'imposer des frais de 3 $ lors de l'achat d'appareils comme les iPhone.

Cela nous ramène à ce même débat que nous avons tenu, il y a 25 ou 30 ans, en ce qui concerne les disques compacts. En faisant pareille demande, présume-t-on que tous les utilisateurs sont des pirates?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Non, nous ne présumons rien de ce genre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pourquoi ne pas inclure ces frais dans le prix d'achat des oeuvres, au lieu de l'imposer lors de l'achat d'appareils?

Par exemple, si j'ai 128 gigaoctets dans mon appareil, mais que je ne l'utilise pas pour écouter de la musique, pourquoi devrais-je payer pour cela?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Ce que nous proposons, c'est que des redevances soient prélevées à l'achat. C'est un système qui existe en Europe et qui est très répandu. J'ai ici une liste de pays que je peux vous nommer: l'Allemagne, l'Autriche, la Belgique, la Croatie, la France, la Hongrie, l'Italie, les Pays-Bas, le Portugal et la Suisse ont adopté des régimes de copie privée. Il s'agit de redevances.

C'est le même principe qui existait pour le CD, et nous voulons que cela continue. Je crois que c'était l'intention, en 1997. La Loi n'a peut-être pas été écrite de manière à être technologiquement neutre, mais cela aurait dû être le cas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous parlions tout à l'heure du système de notification et de retrait, ce qu'on appelle communément le système « notice and take down ». Est-ce justifiable sans l'ordre d'un juge ou de la cour?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Je ne connais pas les détails de fonctionnement de ce système. Je peux cependant vous dire que le système actuel ne fonctionne pas. Plusieurs pays ont adopté des mesures plus importantes pour protéger le contenu, que ce soit le système de notification et de retrait ou le système de notification et de non-réitération des infractions, ce qu'on appelle le système « notice and stay down ».

J'en profite pour dire, en réponse à la question, que si notre régime de droit d'auteur est plus faible que celui de tous les pays qui nous entourent et avec lesquels nous sommes en concurrence, que ce soit les pays d'Europe ou les États-Unis, cela nous désavantage. Cela apporte moins de revenus autonomes aux industries créatives. C'est vraiment à notre désavantage de ne pas fonctionner comme les pays qui nous entourent. [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Tacit, vous avez dit que vous aimeriez voir un système d'avis et qu'il y ait des limites, par exemple quant au nombre d'avis pour une même adresse IP et une même infraction.

Combien d'avis reçoivent vos membres pour des infractions? Est-ce que ces messages font l'objet d'un DDoS?

M. Christian Tacit:

M. Copeland est bien placé pour répondre à cette question parce que c'est lui qui gère cela pour notre entreprise.

M. Christopher Copeland (avocat-conseil, Consortium des opérateurs de réseaux canadiens inc.):

Tout dépend de la taille du fournisseur de services Internet et du nombre d'utilisateurs finaux. Il peut y en avoir quelques centaines ou des milliers, même des dizaines de milliers et plus. C'est directement proportionnel au nombre d'utilisateurs. Plus ils sont nombreux, plus le risque que certains d'entre eux commettent des infractions est grand et le volume d'avis augmente.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvez-vous appliquer un avis et fermer le système ou procéder à un filtrage sans violer cette neutralité?

M. Christian Tacit:

Je ne le crois pas.

C'est ce qui nous préoccupe. Sans la supervision des tribunaux, on risque fort de fragiliser les valeurs démocratiques de la liberté de parole et d'expression. Nous avons ces mesures de protection parce que les tribunaux sont les protecteurs ultimes de notre Constitution et de nos valeurs démocratiques. Il n'est pas nécessaire de faire autre chose. Je veux aussi souligner que les avis et le régime d'avis ne sont pas simplement un outil dont personne ne se soucie. Dans notre pratique, nous voyons des propriétaires de contenu qui vont devant les tribunaux pour obtenir des renseignements sur les utilisateurs afin de les poursuivre lorsqu'ils remarquent des infractions multiples à partir d'une adresse IP. Ces gens sont au Canada et peuvent se faire poursuivre pour dommages-intérêts d'origine législative. Ils peuvent recevoir une ordonnance d'injonction pour violation du droit d'auteur. Il n'y a aucune raison pour que ces recours ne soient pas disponibles.

L'autre chose, c'est que bien que les fournisseurs de services Internet soient protégés, s'ils s'engagent de manière délibérée et répétée dans ce genre d'activités, la protection ne s'applique plus en vertu du paragraphe 27(2.3) de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Nous n'avons pas à aller très loin ni à compromettre nos valeurs pour régler ce problème.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il ne me reste que cinq secondes environ, et j'aimerais vous faire une demande, rapidement.

Vous avez dit que vous receviez des avis dont la portée dépassait celle de la loi. Est-il possible pour vous de nous transmettre, plus tard, des exemplaires de ces lettres que reçoivent vos utilisateurs et dont le contenu dépasse largement ce qui est prévu dans la loi?

M. Christian Tacit:

Nous pourrions vous transmettre des documents caviardés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Le président:

Si vous pouviez les transmettre au greffier, ce serait très bien. Merci.

Monsieur Albas, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie tous les témoins de leur présence ici aujourd'hui. C'est un sujet fascinant et je vous remercie de nous faire part de votre point de vue.

J'aimerais commencer avec M. Tacit.

Dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez parlé d'intégration verticale. Bon nombre d'entre nous connaissent bien ce concept, mais j'aimerais savoir à quels types de fournisseurs de services Internet vous faites référence.

(1630)

M. Christian Tacit:

Les plus importants, ceux qui ont le plus de ressources et qui mènent la coalition FrancJeu, sont Bell, Rogers, Shaw, Vidéotron, etc.

M. Dan Albas:

Ce sont donc ceux qui participent à la création, à la distribution et au contenu...

M. Christian Tacit:

Oui. Soit directement ou par l'entremise de groupes affiliés.

M. Dan Albas:

Vous dites qu'il y a quelques options. Si l'on mettait en place un programme comme celui proposé par FrancJeu, il y aurait des coûts rattachés à cela. Vous avez dit que l'État pourrait s'en charger, ce qui veut dire les contribuables canadiens, ou une partie d'entre eux.

Encore une fois, il est question de proportionnalité, parce que dans certaines régions, bien sûr, les fournisseurs de services Internet sont beaucoup plus petits et visent des marchés à créneaux, surtout dans les régions rurales, et cette proportionnalité aurait une plus grande incidence sur eux. Est-ce exact?

M. Christian Tacit:

Cela dépend de leur taille et des mesures technologiques exigées.

Par exemple, vous ordonnez à un fournisseur de services Internet de réaliser une inspection approfondie des paquets, qui vise à inspecter les en-têtes de paquet qui en disent beaucoup sur le type de trafic. Si l'on utilise cette méthode pour détecter les infractions — et nous ne parlerons pas de l'efficacité de cette méthode, mais disons qu'elle est efficace —, alors il en coûtera facilement 100 000 $ pour chaque boîte d'IAP. Pour un petit fournisseur de services Internet, qui a deux à quatre employés, cela peut entraîner la fermeture de l'entreprise.

M. Dan Albas:

Surtout dans les régions rurales où le réseau est plus petit...

M. Christian Tacit:

Peu importe où ces fournisseurs se trouvent.

M. Dan Albas:

... ou un réseau qui coûte très cher à alimenter.

M. Christian Tacit:

Oui.

M. Dan Albas:

Donc, l'autre solution consiste à demander aux entreprises médiatiques qui exigent le retrait de s'en charger, et elles refileraient la facture à leurs clients. Est-ce exact?

M. Christian Tacit:

C'est exact.

M. Dan Albas:

Si nous empruntons cette voie, les consommateurs ou les citoyens canadiens — ou une partie d'entre eux — devront inévitablement régler la note.

M. Christian Tacit:

Il faut que quelqu'un d'autre que cette personne — la partie innocente qui doit faire le travail — le fasse.

M. Dan Albas:

En ce qui a trait à ces outils automatiques, mon collègue M. Lloyd a fait valoir que la nouvelle technologie semblait...

Je sais que bon nombre de jeunes — et des moins jeunes aussi, probablement — jouent à des jeux vidéo avec une musique en arrière-plan. Ils génèrent leur propre contenu et le partage avec d'autres pour divers jeux. Cette musique qui joue en arrière-plan pourrait déclencher l'un de ces retraits automatiques si la technologie était... parce qu'il y a des protections associées à la satire, au partage individuel et à d'autres.

On risquerait de cibler ces gens, non?

M. Christian Tacit:

Possiblement, oui, parce que l'inspection des paquets — qui mène au blocage — ne fournit pas suffisamment d'information sur le contexte de transmission de ces paquets. Vous avez raison: certains pourraient être autorisés et d'autres non.

M. Dan Albas:

Vous avez dit plus tôt que si nous mettions en place un tel système, les fournisseurs de services Internet songeraient à leurs intérêts économiques plutôt qu'à d'autres valeurs.

Pouvez-vous nous parler d'un cas où un fournisseur de services Internet aurait à prendre une telle décision? Encore une fois, nous leur demandons de réglementer le comportement des autres, ni plus ni moins. Il se peut qu'il s'agisse d'exploitation pour moi, mais que pour d'autres, ce soit du contenu généré par l'utilisateur, qui leur appartient.

Pourriez-vous nous donner quelques exemples à titre comparatif?

M. Christian Tacit:

Si dans la diffusion du contenu, la question a été soulevée...

En passant, il y a déjà des dispositions qui empêchent les fournisseurs de services Internet et d'autres participants de cet écosystème de profiter de la protection si une ordonnance de la cour fait état d'une infraction et qu'ils décident de l'ignorer. Il est assez clair qu'ils ne doivent pas procéder ainsi.

Toutefois, lorsqu'il n'y a aucune détermination juridique permettant de dire « je crois qu'ils font cela de façon délibérée et je vais bloquer leur trafic », alors l'entreprise de télécommunications prend le rôle du juge pour déterminer ce qui doit passer dans ses fils. C'est pourquoi je dis que c'est très... Si j'étais fournisseur de services Internet, j'aurais tendance à me montrer conservateur et si la sanction est très importante — disons que je risque de subir d'importants dommages-intérêts d'origine législative —, je serai peut-être plus tenté de courir le risque de me faire poursuivre par la partie si je me trompe, parce que ces dommages-intérêts seront moins importants que les dommages-intérêts d'origine législative, surtout pour les infractions récurrentes, où chaque jour est considéré comme étant une nouvelle infraction, ou peu importe. Je m'immiscerais peut-être dans ce trafic parce que je me préoccuperais de ma responsabilité.

Nous ne voulons pas que les entreprises de télécommunications se retrouvent dans cette situation.

(1635)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Baylis.

Vous disposez de cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais commencer par m'adresser à M. Payette.

Vous avez décrit un changement dans la loi en Europe. Selon ce que j'ai compris, ce changement donne aux sociétés de gestion collective la possibilité de négocier ou de lancer des poursuites.

Pouvez-vous nous en parler un peu plus, s'il vous plaît?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Oui, bien sûr.

Ce changement renforce le pouvoir des sociétés de gestion collective et leur donne le droit d'établir des accords pour tout le contenu mis en ligne. Actuellement, du contenu est mis en ligne par les utilisateurs, et nous sommes tous d'accord pour que les utilisateurs puissent mettre du contenu en ligne. Ce qui va changer, c'est que les plateformes vont devoir payer pour le contenu mis en ligne par les utilisateurs. Donc, YouTube devra payer pour ce que les utilisateurs mettent en ligne.

M. Frank Baylis:

Ce sera négocié.

M. Jérôme Payette:

Oui.

M. Frank Baylis:

Est-ce qu'on donne le droit de négocier ou est-ce qu'on force la négociation?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Comme il est établi qu'il y a une communication publique, même quand c'est du contenu généré par les utilisateurs, il y a un droit à respecter. Les plateformes n'ont donc pas le choix de négocier avec les sociétés de gestion collective.

M. Frank Baylis:

Ce sera donc négocié par les sociétés de gestion collective. En effet, il serait quasi impossible de négocier avec chaque utilisateur. Par exemple, si je créais une petite chanson et que je la mettais sur YouTube, j'imagine que je ne pourrais pas négocier un tel accord.

M. Jérôme Payette:

Ce serait les sociétés de gestion collective qui négocieraient.

M. Frank Baylis:

La loi précise-t-elle que ce sont ces sociétés qui négocient?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Je pense que c'est mentionné dans le texte qui a été adopté en Europe.

De toute façon, dans certains cas, il y a déjà des ententes. Par exemple, YouTube a conclu des ententes avec la SOCAN, mais seulement pour la partie qui est monétisée au moyen de la publicité. Quand le contenu protégé n'est pas lié à une publicité, aucun revenu n'est versé aux ayants droit. Il faut comprendre que YouTube en profite quand même, parce que cette plateforme retire les données, attire des utilisateurs et organise le contenu. Elle fait toutes sortes de choses, mais elle ne paie rien pour le contenu.

M. Frank Baylis:

Donc, si YouTube veut mettre sur Internet une série de chansons qui sont protégées ou dont les droits sont gérés par une société de gestion collective, YouTube doit payer cette société de gestion collective ou entamer des négociations en vue de déterminer un certain montant à payer.

M. Jérôme Payette:

C'est cela. Au Canada, les négociations sont généralement validées par la Commission du droit d'auteur.

M. Frank Baylis:

C'est en vue de déterminer la valeur du contenu.

M. Jérôme Payette:

C'est cela.

M. Frank Baylis:

D'accord.

Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter, madame Hénault?

Mme Stéphanie Hénault:

Je suis d'accord sur ce qu'a dit M. Payette. C'est aussi la compréhension que j'en ai.

M. Frank Baylis:

Cela toucherait-il aussi les scénaristes?

Mme Stéphanie Hénault:

Oui, parce que les scénaristes perçoivent, en Europe et au Canada, des redevances de certains diffuseurs. Au Québec, cela se fait plus particulièrement par l'entremise de la SACD, une société de gestion collective européenne qui a aussi un bureau à Montréal. Nos scénaristes reçoivent des redevances de certains diffuseurs par l'entremise de la SACD. Lorsque les oeuvres de nos scénaristes sont diffusées en Europe, la directive européenne nous réjouit, mais il faut quand même régler le décalage qu'il y a entre le système européen et le système canadien.

M. Frank Baylis:

Très bien, merci.[Traduction]

Monsieur Paris, je m'adresse à vous pour en savoir plus au sujet des enregistrements sonores. Votre argument s'oppose à celui des musiciens. Vous dites qu'ils sont payés deux fois.

Qu'est-ce qu'ils demandent que vous ne voulez pas leur donner? Si je peux poser la question ainsi.

M. Michael Paris:

Ils demandent de retirer de la définition d'enregistrement sonore l'exception relative aux bandes sonores des oeuvres cinématographiques lorsqu'elles accompagnent celles-ci. L'enregistrement sonore n'est pas comme une chanson; le son d'une explosion ou tout ce que vous entendez sur la piste audio d'un film est un enregistrement sonore. La définition d'un enregistrement sonore aux fins de l'article 19, lorsqu'elle correspond à ce que je vous décris, donne lieu à un flux de redevances, tandis qu'un enregistrement sonore qui n'accompagne pas la bande sonore d'une oeuvre cinématographique... C'est seulement lorsqu'elle accompagne le film que l'exception s'applique. Si la bande sonore du film joue à la radio, par exemple, les droits voisins s'appliquent et des redevances sont payées.

Ce que les musiciens veulent, c'est d'éliminer cette exception, ce qui voudrait dire qu'à chaque fois qu'un film est projeté dans un cinéma, il y aurait des redevances pour tous les effets sonores et toutes les chansons. C'est à cela que nous nous opposons.

(1640)

M. Frank Baylis:

Ce qui vous préoccupe, ce sont les chansons ou les effets sonores? Ce sont deux choses différentes. Il serait impossible de payer pour chaque effet sonore. Disons qu'une personne compose une belle chanson, qui est utilisée dans un film. Vous voulez faire un paiement au départ, mais ne pas à payer des redevances courantes. C'est bien cela?

M. Michael Paris:

C'est l'équilibre que l'on maintient actuellement.

M. Frank Baylis:

C'est ce qui se passe en ce moment.

M. Michael Paris:

Oui.

Il en va de même pour un danseur qui crée une chorégraphie. À l'heure actuelle, cette personne peut exiger un taux au départ, mais ne peut pas ensuite être rémunérée en vertu de la loi lorsque la chorégraphie est utilisée dans un film. On reconnaît que le film forme un tout. C'est à cela que nous nous opposons: le paiement, par les exploitants, de redevances pour chaque chanson, chaque effet sonore ou chaque numéro de danse qui se trouve dans un film. Nous sommes en désaccord avec cela.

Le président:

Nous revenons à M. Albas. Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci. Je vais partager mon temps de parole avec M. Lloyd; je l'espère.

Je veux faire suite aux questions de mon collègue M. Baylis.

Monsieur Paris, à ce sujet, certains films ont été tournés il y a près de 100 ans et sont parfois remastérisés; ils ont été reformatés pour de plus petits écrans comme ceux des téléphones, par exemple. Je me demande comment on pourrait percevoir des redevances pour la diffusion continue. Au moins, dans votre domaine, il y a des exploitants. Ils peuvent dire: « Je vais charger x dollars à la porte; voici combien de personnes ont vu le film, alors je peux payer en fonction de cela. » Or, pour une oeuvre qui est utilisée de toutes sortes de façons, ce qu'on demande ici c'est de verser des redevances chaque fois qu'elle est diffusée en continu ou en ligne.

J'ai regardé Monsieur Smith au Sénat sur Google, qui offre un service gratuit. J'espère que M. Tacit ne devra pas le retirer du Web. Vous pourriez peut-être nous expliquer comment fonctionneraient ces coûts pour les diverses plateformes; pour les exploitants et pour la diffusion en continu.

M. Michael Paris:

Bien sûr. La disposition à laquelle je fais référence ici, c'est l'article 19. Vous mettez ma mémoire à l'épreuve, mais selon mon souvenir, l'article fait référence à toute forme de communication publique ou à la communication de l'oeuvre par l'entremise des télécommunications. Je ne suis pas ici au nom d'un service de diffusion en continu et je ne suis pas un avocat spécialiste du droit d'auteur, mais selon ce que je comprends cela s'appliquerait à la diffusion en continu.

Dans le cas hypothétique auquel vous faites référence, Monsieur Smith au Sénat est une oeuvre historique et l'exploitant paierait le distributeur qui détient les droits de ce film. Nous prendrions une partie des ventes de billets au cinéma, puisqu'il s'agit d'une représentation publique. Les gens entrent au cinéma et regardent le film.

Si vous supprimez l'exemption qui donne aux détenteurs des droits voisins ou qui permet d'associer des redevances à une représentation publique ou à la télécommunication de l'oeuvre, alors nos droits dépasseraient l'obligation du distributeur et nous devrions payer des redevances au créateur ou à l'interprète de l'enregistrement qui a été intégré à un film.

À notre avis, nous avons atteint un équilibre parce que lorsque vous vendez vos droits afin que votre travail fasse partie d'un film, vous ne pouvez pas vous prévaloir aussi de vos droits voisins, qui visent à rémunérer l'artiste lorsque la communication publique de son travail est hors de son contrôle. Pensons par exemple aux chansons diffusées à la radio. La maison de disques ne donne pas sa permission chaque fois qu'une chanson tourne à la radio. Les droits voisins existent pour permettre que des redevances émanent de l'utilisation incontrôlée et peut-être involontaire de l'oeuvre, tandis que dans un film, l'utilisation d'une chanson, d'un numéro de danse, d'un monologue ou peu importe est tout à fait intentionnelle, négociée et rémunérée dès le départ.

À notre avis, en demandant aux exploitants de payer une autre fois, on bouleverse l'équilibre qui a si bien servi l'industrie cinématographique jusqu'à présent.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je vais prendre la parole, rapidement. Ma question porte sur le même sujet. Combien de personnes ont à leur emploi les gens que vous représentez, environ?

M. Michael Paris:

Je peux vous parler de Cineplex. C'est de l'ordre de dizaines de milliers de personnes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Donc, si nous adoptons la recommandation d'inclure les redevances sur le son, il y a le double prélèvement dont vous parlez. Est-ce que cela vous désavantage nettement par rapport aux entreprises comme Netflix et Prime Video?

(1645)

M. Michael Paris:

Oui, bien sûr, et vous posez une excellente question. Nous avons divers désavantages concurrentiels, et que Netflix ne paie pas de taxes ici n'est pas le moindre de ces désavantages. Il y a d'autres coûts que Netflix ne paie pas nécessairement, comme les frais de classification des films, et les services de diffusion sont épargnés de tous les coûts qu'une entreprise traditionnelle doit assumer. Dans la situation qui nous intéresse, je suppose que de telles redevances s'appliqueraient aussi bien aux exploitants qu'aux services de diffusion — si je ne me trompe pas —, et c'est donc une couche supplémentaire de coûts. Ce que cela représente pour les grandes chaînes est une chose, mais c'est une tout autre chose pour les cinémas indépendants.

Je reviens à ce que mon collègue a dit des FSI. Si vous exploitez un cinéma doté d'un seul écran...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Mais cela va faire disparaître des emplois dans votre industrie.

M. Michael Paris:

Oui, tout à fait. Cela va faire disparaître des emplois, ainsi que des cinémas.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

C'est à vous, madame Caesar-Chavannes. Vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Merci. Je vais partager mon temps avec M. Lametti.

Je vous remercie de votre présence.

Je vais continuer dans la même veine que M. Lloyd. Monsieur Paris, quelles sont les incidences des redevances qu'on exigerait pour les enregistrements ou les trames sonores, une fois qu'ils sont en possession de l'exploitant ou utilisés dans son établissement? Quelles sont les incidences, outre les autres éléments du film? Si nous commençons par dire que ces redevances doivent être payées — vous avez mentionné la chorégraphie, ainsi que d'autres éléments —, et que nous nous engageons dans cette voie, quelles sont les incidences pour les exploitants et, en plus, pour bon nombre de ces commerces, dont certains sont des commerces familiaux et d'autres n'ont qu'un écran? Quelles sont les incidences, au-delà de cela?

M. Michael Paris:

Pour répondre très brièvement à cela, je dirais que ce serait un coût d'exploitation supplémentaire, un coût d'exploitation plus élevé. Je ne suis pas en mesure maintenant de vous dire ce que cela représente ou de quantifier cela. Nous réagissons à la proposition telle qu'elle se présente maintenant.

Quant à parler de ce que cela représenterait pour d'autres sociétés de gestion collective, je peux seulement vous dire que la proposition dont je parle aujourd'hui provient de l'industrie de la musique. Elle ne vient pas d'ailleurs. Mais quand vous vous mettez à traiter une catégorie de créateurs différemment, il est évident qu'il y aura un effet d'entraînement. Je pense qu'on risque de voir un peu cela. Les incidences des coûts d'exploitation supérieurs dépendront de la position commerciale de la chaîne ou de l'exploitant du cinéma particulier.

Je peux vous dire très généralement — un des honorables membres du Comité y a fait allusion précédemment, et je suis sûr que tout le monde sera d'accord — que l'économie créative vit d'importantes perturbations. L'étude de Téléfilm indique que les exploitants doivent faire concurrence aux services de diffusion, mais je dirais que nous devons aussi faire concurrence à toutes les autres formes de divertissements extérieurs qui existent: les activités sportives, les concerts, les musées, tout ce qu'il y a sur votre téléphone. Les coûts d'exploitation qui s'ajoutent, c'est de l'argent que les exploitants de cinémas indépendants ne peuvent pas investir dans le cinéma, ce qui comprend les salles, la technologie, l'embauche de jeunes pour leur premier emploi, et ainsi de suite.

Le président:

Monsieur Lametti, vous avez deux minutes et demie.

M. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

Je pense que ce que vous nous demandez tous de faire, c'est de nous pencher sur les positions initiales entre le droit d'auteur et le contrat, dans le sens que vous voulez que nous disions si l'auteur doit être payé à l'avance en vertu d'un contrat ou s'il doit obtenir des redevances additionnelles par la suite.[Français]

C'est la même chose en ce qui concerne la cotitularité, dont M. Plante et Mme Hénault viennent de parler. Pour nous, il s'agit de déterminer si l'auteur doit être payé une seule fois, à l'avance, en vertu d'un contrat, ou par la suite, au moyen de redevances liées au droit d'auteur.

Monsieur Payette, il est surprenant que vous n'ayez pas de point de vue sur ce que M. Adams a proposé hier. À l'heure actuelle, le paragraphe 14(1) de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur prévoit, pour les auteurs, la réversibilité du droit d'auteur 25 ans après leur mort. Ce que M. Adams a demandé hier, c'est que ce soit établi à 25 ans après la création de l'oeuvre.

Il est très important pour vous de prendre position là-dessus, n'est-ce pas?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Si vous me le permettez, je vais préciser mon point de vue à ce sujet. Je crois que c'est 25 ans après la mort de l'auteur...

M. David Lametti:

C'est ce que dit la Loi actuelle.

M. Jérôme Payette:

Oui. Il demande que le droit d'auteur soit redonné 35 ans après, mais, comme je l'ai dit, cela peut être négocié dans le cadre d'un contrat.

M. David Lametti:

Oui, mais cela change la position de base, le pouvoir qu'on a au début, n'est-ce pas?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Oui, bien sûr. Ma position est claire: je ne crois pas que cela devrait être incorporé à la Loi. Si M. Adams avait voulu récupérer ses droits d'auteur après 35 ans, il aurait pu le faire de nombreuses façons. Il aurait pu notamment négocier cela à la base ou décider ne pas faire affaire avec un éditeur. Plusieurs possibilités s'offraient à lui.

Je ne pense pas que ce soit là que se situe le débat autour de la révision de la Loi. Il s'agit en réalité de déterminer comment on peut aller chercher des revenus pour les auteurs et les créateurs.

(1650)

M. David Lametti:

C'est exactement ce que M. Adams proposait, à savoir qu'il faut donner plus de pouvoir aux auteurs dès le début, précisément au moyen d'un droit de réversibilité après 25 ans.

M. Jérôme Payette:

En effet. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Masse, vous avez deux minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Paris, pour avoir une idée des coûts que vous devriez subir — vous ne pouvez pas les quantifier, compte tenu de ce qui est proposé —, quels seraient les éléments administratifs de cela? Vous êtes peut-être en mesure de quantifier cela. Je sais que vous ne pouvez pas préciser ce que cela coûte. Peu importe où va l'argent, je suis simplement curieux à propos du traitement, à moins que ce ne soit pas un facteur du tout.

M. Michael Paris:

Dans la documentation de Music Canada, je pense qu'ils estiment que le coût des redevances additionnelles qui seraient exigées des diffuseurs et des exploitants s'élèverait à environ 45 millions de dollars. Ce montant n'est cité nulle part. Je ne sais pas si c'est plus ou moins que cela, mais c'est leur estimation approximative.

En ce qui concerne la façon dont cela serait administré, j'imagine qu'il faudrait avoir un tarif de la Commission du droit d'auteur qui serait négocié et payé. Je ne suis pas sûr de pouvoir vous parler en détail de la façon dont cela serait administré. Je peux vous dire que, d'après moi, ils organiseraient cela comme le font les autres sociétés de gestion collective pour la réalisation de leur mandat.

M. Brian Masse:

Est-ce qu'on peut dire qu'il y a une façon facile d'intégrer cette nouvelle proposition à l'infrastructure existante, sur le plan de l'administration, ou qu'il n'y a pas de façon facile? Ou est-ce plutôt quelque chose qui exigerait un nouveau modèle?

M. Michael Paris:

Je ne pense pas pouvoir parler du fardeau administratif.

M. Jérôme Payette:

Puis-je en parler? En ce moment, les cinémas paient déjà les détenteurs de droits. Ils ont des ententes avec la SOCAN. Selon le tarif 6, les cinémas doivent payer 1,50 $ par siège, par année, à la SOCAN, pour la perception et l'administration. D'après ce que je comprends, pour les enregistrements sonores, ce serait l'autre côté. Ce serait pour la chanson et l'enregistrement de la chanson qu'ils auraient à payer une société de gestion collective, comme Re:Sound.

M. Michael Paris:

Comme je l'ai dit. Ce n'est nouveau pour personne. Nous payons des tarifs à certaines sociétés de gestion collective. Je dis que je m'attends à ce que ce soit organisé d'une façon très semblable, mais cela dépendrait vraiment de la société de gestion collective avec laquelle nous traitons et de ce qu'on nous demande en réalité. Dans la situation qui nous intéresse, pour les enregistrements sonores, je pense que ce serait une autre société de gestion collective que la SOCAN, peut-être plusieurs sociétés de gestion collectives. J'imagine que ce serait administré de la même façon, comme avec Re:Sound.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous en sommes à la fin de ce tour. Il nous reste assez de temps pour faire un deuxième tour de trois questions de sept minutes.

Nous revenons à M. Jowhari.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Merci aux témoins. Je vais partager mon temps avec M. Baylis.

J'ai une question à poser à M. Payette.

Je vais vous faire part de certaines données. C'est une préoccupation que j'ai, à propos des données que j'ai regardées. C'est lié à la baisse du revenu médian des musiciens et des chanteurs. Selon les données que j'ai vues, entre 2010 et 2015, les revenus des éditeurs de musique canadiens ont augmenté pour passer de 148,3 millions de dollars à environ 282 millions de dollars. Au cours de la même période, le revenu médian d'un particulier qui travaille à temps plein dans l'industrie canadienne de la musique a également augmenté. Il s'agit de producteurs, de réalisateurs, de chorégraphes, de chefs d'orchestre, de compositeurs et d'ingénieurs.

Cependant, le revenu médian des musiciens et chanteurs a baissé d'environ 800 $, entre 2010 et 2015. Pouvez-vous me dire ce qui expliquerait cela, d'après vous?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Il y a des rôles différents, pour les auteurs, les compositeurs ou les artistes. Les éditeurs de musique représentent les auteurs-compositeurs. Si les éditeurs de musique font plus d'argent, les auteurs-compositeurs en font plus aussi. Cependant, de manière générale, il y a peut-être eu moins de spectacles, ou les auteurs-compositeurs particuliers ont fait moins d'argent parce qu'il y a plus d'auteurs-compositeurs. Le principal problème, c'est que le nouvel environnement numérique paie moins que l'environnement traditionnel. Pour les auteurs-compositeurs, les compositeurs et les musiciens, c'est très...

(1655)

M. Majid Jowhari:

D'après vous, est-ce que des modifications pourraient être apportées à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur pour améliorer la situation des musiciens et des chanteurs, sur le plan des revenus?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Bien entendu, si les musiciens et compositeurs recevaient plus d'argent de YouTube ou d'autres services en ligne, cela leur faciliterait la vie.

M. Majid Jowhari:

D'accord. Merci. [Français]

M. Frank Baylis:

Madame Hénault, vous avez parlé de l'idée voulant que les scénaristes et les réalisateurs deviennent cotitulaires des droits d'auteur. Je veux comprendre pourquoi.

Vous attendez-vous à recevoir plus d'argent ou désirez-vous simplement disposer de ce droit? Pourriez-vous m'expliquer le raisonnement sur lequel repose cette idée?

Mme Stéphanie Hénault:

En ce qui concerne les redevances perçues par les sociétés de gestion collective ici et à l'extérieur, au Canada nous sommes pénalisés du fait que la présomption de cotitularité n'est pas inscrite dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Cela affaiblit la capacité de la SACD, notamment, de percevoir des redevances pour les réalisateurs à l'extérieur du pays.

Nous vous demandons de le préciser dans la Loi. Cette précision ne représente pas une révolution; c'est conforme à la jurisprudence. Nous demandons que cette présomption soit incluse dans la Loi.

Nous vous avons décrit le travail du scénariste et du réalisateur sur l'oeuvre audiovisuelle. Il coule de source que ce sont les premiers titulaires de l'oeuvre audiovisuelle en soi. C'est une précision que nous cherchons à apporter afin de donner à des sociétés de gestion collective étrangères un levier pour percevoir ces droits au nom de Canadiens pour des diffusions à l'étranger, là où il y a des régimes de copie privée en audiovisuel, par exemple. Dans certains pays, par exemple en Europe, il y a des collèges où les producteurs, les interprètes et les auteurs sont ensemble pour percevoir les droits de la copie privée. Des réalisateurs y sont aussi.

M. Frank Baylis:

Selon cet exemple, cela inclut aussi les producteurs. J'ai de la difficulté à dire que le producteur, qui va choisir beaucoup de choses dans la fabrication d'un film, n'est pas un auteur.

Mme Stéphanie Hénault:

Le producteur n'est pas un auteur. Le producteur engage des auteurs et des créateurs, mais il ne crée rien; il administre une production. Il va chercher des licences pour produire et exploiter le film. Il va partager ses revenus avec les scénaristes. Dans nos ententes collectives, si un auteur a écrit tout seul un scénario de série télévisée, il va négocier un contrat d'écriture. S'il y a des revenus, il touchera des redevances. Cet élément est fondamental. Si, au Canada, on ne reconnaît pas que, en plus de la rémunération pour le travail, on puisse bénéficier de la rémunération pour le succès remporté, aucun créateur ne voudra faire ce travail.

M. Frank Baylis:

D'accord, merci. [Traduction]

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vous remercie de partager votre temps, monsieur Baylis.

Je crois que M. Masse a vraiment cerné un des points cruciaux que je vois comme étant la source des préoccupations: les nouveaux accords conclus en Europe et aux États-Unis. Nous pourrions facilement voir nos ressources créatives quitter le Canada pour aller sur les marchés où vous pouvez en fait vous faire payer pour la création de produits et d'oeuvres.

Le marché au Canada ne fonctionne pas. Quelqu'un fait de l'argent, mais pas les musiciens ni les créateurs. Je crois que nous devons examiner cela très soigneusement et peut-être même accélérer notre étude pour présenter des conclusions, de sorte que nous puissions protéger les créateurs au Canada. Nous créons des emplois de classe moyenne, grâce à cela, mais ce que nous avons maintenant, c'est soit des personnes appauvries, soit des personnes très prospères, dans l'industrie. Il n'y a pas de milieu. Le marché ne fonctionne pas.

Est-ce qu'un de vous pourrait me dire rapidement si ce sont les éditeurs qui font de l'argent, et les services numériques...? Les entreprises numériques font énormément d'argent, et les artistes ne profitent pas d'une partie des profits. Comment pouvons-nous orienter notre étude pour être en mesure d'approfondir encore plus cette question?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Par exemple, les éditeurs de musique partagent soit 50 % ou 75 % — ou un autre pourcentage, mais c'est en général entre 50 % et 75 % — avec les auteurs. Bien entendu, ils travaillent pour les auteurs. C'est ce qu'ils font. Il est normal qu'ils se fassent payer. Le problème, c'est qu'il n'entre pas assez d'argent dans le système. L'argent n'y est pas, parce que les entreprises numériques font beaucoup d'argent avec le contenu. C'est là le problème. Vous avez raison. Si nous n'avons pas une protection suffisante du droit d'auteur au Canada, nous sommes désavantagés par rapport à nos autres partenaires.

(1700)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Albas, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci pour tous vos témoignages.

L'une des préoccupations que j'ai... J'en ai beaucoup. Je me préoccupe de l'incapacité des musiciens de subvenir aux besoins de leur famille et de faire respecter leurs droits. C'est important. Je m'inquiète aussi beaucoup de l'innovation et de la façon dont les gens peuvent produire du nouveau contenu. J'ai entendu des histoires, comme celle de la façon dont une personne va écrire une chanson et la publier sur YouTube. Mais parce que chaque jour, il s'ajoute des années de contenu sur YouTube, la plateforme ne peut absolument pas retenir les services d'assez de personnes pour tout regarder. J'ai entendu parler de cas où, à cause de ces filtres, vous aurez tout à coup le message: « Nous sommes désolés, mais vous portez atteinte aux droits de quelqu'un d'autre. » Et le contenu est alors retiré. C'est du contenu nouveau et original. De toute évidence, la technologie n'est pas encore au point. Je pense à certaines nouvelles règles dont on parle en Europe, et je m'inquiète de ce qu'elles entraînent le retrait de contenu légitime, que ce soit le cas d'une personne qui critique une pièce ou qui produit du nouveau contenu, qu'il s'agisse de musique utilisée à des fins satiriques ou pour faire une critique, etc.

Je vois qu'il y a un équilibre, mais j'aimerais en entendre un peu plus sur la façon dont vous abordez un problème comme celui-là, où la technologie... En particulier en Europe, où les exigences sont beaucoup plus sévères, je m'inquiète de ce que ces règles visant le contenu obligent les applications du même genre que YouTube à exclure des innovations légitimes, ou des critiques légitimes, et ainsi de suite.

Monsieur Payette.

M. Jérôme Payette:

Je ne crois pas que la plus grande menace à l'économie créative du Canada soit le manque d'argent qui entre dans le système. YouTube a déjà une technologie — le système Content ID — pour identifier les détenteurs de droits. Ils ont des dispositions en Europe pour protéger les petites entreprises ou l'utilisation de contenu en ligne à des fins éducatives, alors cela ne représente pas une menace pour l'innovation. Il faut juste qu'ils rémunèrent mieux les propriétaires du contenu. Nous devons aller de l'avant avec cela. L'Europe a effectivement envisagé cela.

Il faut que je souligne qu'il y a eu beaucoup de mésinformation sur ce qui s'est passé en Europe. Google a consacré des dizaines de millions de dollars au lobbying, et il y a eu beaucoup de mésinformation. Les membres du Parlement européen ont examiné cela et ont finalement donné leur accord, avec une forte majorité, après avoir compris ce que le nouveau texte proposé allait accomplir. Le texte a été largement accepté. Je pense que c'était à 429 voix contre 226, ou quelque chose de ce genre. Je crois que l'Europe se soucie de la liberté d'expression et de l'innovation, mais elle se soucie aussi des détenteurs de droits et de l'industrie créative. C'est ce qui a été démontré.

M. Dan Albas:

J'aimerais croire que les législateurs font toujours la bonne chose et votent toujours dans le bon sens. Il y a toutefois un équilibre à trouver entre l'établissement et le maintien des droits des créateurs, et de ceux des citoyens. Qui juge de cela? Ce qui se produit, c'est qu'avec Google et les filtres automatiques, nous n'avons pas la certitude que tout le monde est traité justement. Certains Canadiens... Je pense que Justin Bieber a fait ses débuts sur YouTube. Je comprends ce que vous dites.

Cependant, de l'autre côté, bon nombre de ces règles ne sont apparues que récemment, en Europe. Est-ce bien le cas?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Oui, et je crois que les choses changent, et qu'il est temps que nous changions. Vous avez parlé d'équilibre. Si nous regardons les entreprises numériques et les titulaires de droits, selon les données publiées par la SOCAN, l'auteur-compositeur moyen fait 30 $ par année. Ce n'est pas assez d'argent. Combien font Google ou YouTube? Il y a beaucoup d'argent là-dedans, et il ne va pas aux créateurs, car il n'y a pas de juste équilibre.

M. Dan Albas:

Je dirais que les deux modèles sont très différents. L'un est conçu pour servir Internet d'une façon différente, et l'autre est conçu pour servir les gens qui aiment ce genre de musique.

Je vais laisser le reste de mon temps à M. Lloyd.

M. Dane Lloyd:

C'est à vous aussi que je vais poser mes questions, monsieur Payette. On dirait que les questions d'aujourd'hui s'adressent surtout à vous.

Nous avons parlé des problèmes de compétitivité. En ce moment, nous nous occupons de l'ALENA, et nous avons des taxes et des règlements. Nous nous battons toujours pour que le Canada soit un meilleur endroit où investir. Nous pensons toujours à cela dans l'optique des industries traditionnelles, mais notre secteur culturel est aussi un élément très important, et croissant, de notre économie.

Le Canada est-il un endroit concurrentiel pour faire de la musique? Est-il concurrentiel sur le plan culturel? Sinon, que pourrions-nous faire d'après vous pour rendre le Canada plus concurrentiel?

Monsieur Tacit, vous aurez peut-être après quelques observations à faire à ce sujet.

(1705)

M. Jérôme Payette:

Je crois que sur le plan culturel, oui, nous avons de solides créateurs et un système qui permet une culture pleine de vitalité.

En ce qui concerne le droit d'auteur et la rémunération... Il faut comprendre que le droit d'auteur, ce n'est pas une subvention. C'est un revenu privé qui vient de l'exploitation de l'oeuvre.

Cela revient vraiment à la compétitivité du Canada: le manque d'argent qui vient des services numériques, ou l'absence de solutions robustes, législatives ou autres, concernant la question du droit d'auteur. Les choses devraient se produire plus vite. Nous devons vraiment apporter des changements pour suivre la cadence de ce qui se passe en Europe et aux États-Unis, afin d'être plus concurrentiels sur le plan du droit d'auteur.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Qui profite de notre manque de compétitivité? Qui sont les principaux bénéficiaires de notre manque de compétitivité concernant le droit d'auteur?

M. Jérôme Payette:

Ceux qui profitent de la faiblesse de nos règles visant le droit d'auteur sont les utilisateurs et, principalement en ce moment, les plateformes en ligne et les entreprises numériques.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Monsieur Tacit, avez-vous une opinion là-dessus? Les plus petits FSI sont-ils concurrentiels au Canada? Existe-t-il de la concurrence actuellement?

M. Christian Tacit:

Vous ne voulez pas lancer ce débat maintenant. Il ne reste pas suffisamment de temps.

Nous venons tout juste de participer à une étude de marché organisée par le Bureau de la concurrence et nous avons discuté de tous les problèmes anticoncurrentiels graves qui existent au Canada pour le secteur des plus petits FSI. Je ne voudrais pas nous détourner du sujet qui nous concerne, mais je transmettrai volontiers, à vous-même et à quiconque le désire, les résultats de cette étude. Il existe des barrières structurelles importantes en matière de compétitivité.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Est-ce que cela concerne directement les droits d'auteur... ?

M. Christian Tacit:

Je ne crois pas. Il en va de la concurrence en général. Je ne voudrais pas m'aventurer dans des domaines que je connais moins et qui ne relèvent pas de mon expertise.

Cependant, s'il faut recadrer les choses en l'ère du numérique entre les fournisseurs de services de diffusion et ceux qui affichent leur contenu sur une plateforme numérique et ainsi de suite, qu'on le fasse, et le Comité fera des recommandations dans ce sens, parce que la donne évolue. Ce que je ne voudrais pas compromettre, parce qu'il s'agit d'un élément fondamental de la compétitivité de notre pays, c'est la primauté du droit. Nous sommes essentiellement un État de droit, et nous défendons les droits de la personne. Les gens viennent ici, et sont venus en grand nombre récemment, justement pour cette raison. Si nous nuisons à cette structure, nous allons également porter un coup à notre compétitivité.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Masse, vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis bien tenté, mais je ne mordrai pas à l'hameçon. Le secrétaire parlementaire, M. Lametti, connaît bien ma position en ce qui concerne le régime d'avis simple, ainsi que de notification et de retrait. Je ne veux nullement faire monter ma tension artérielle en abordant le sujet.

J'aimerais dire une seule chose, cependant. Nous avons recueilli plusieurs témoignages sur les problèmes liés à YouTube. Loin de moi d'être critique, mais j'aimerais tout au moins présenter une perspective différente.

Quelqu'un a dit que Justin Bieber a lancé sa carrière sur YouTube, mais il reste que YouTube a énormément profité de cette relation. En fait, si vous allez sur YouTube maintenant, vous y verrez une annonce pour les hamburgers d'une chaîne de restauration. YouTube héberge, entre autres, des vidéos de Fortnite. La plateforme YouTube profite énormément de ses relations avec les auteurs de vidéos à succès... Dans bien des endroits, on court des risques dans la sphère publique en publiant des vidéos sur YouTube. Les gens devraient y réfléchir.

Or, notre comité participe à un examen quinquennal. Nous allons faire des recommandations au ministre si nous arrivons à nous entendre en comité. Les décisions n'ont pas encore été prises.

Voilà ce qui se passe ici. Aucun projet de loi n'a été déposé. Pour ce faire, il faudrait tout d'abord que le ministre accepte de revenir et de répondre aux questions du Comité, et ce, dans les délais impartis par la loi. Il pourrait ensuite y avoir une prolongation, ce qui nous occasionnerait beaucoup de retard. À cela s'ajouteraient d'éventuelles instructions spécifiques pour le Parlement si nous voulions modifier la loi, auquel cas nous présenterions des modifications à la Chambre des communes. Ensuite il faudrait suivre une série d'étapes législatives pour acheminer les modifications au Sénat et les faire adopter.

C'est toute une tâche à accomplir, et il y a différentes façons de procéder.

Avez-vous des commentaires sur ce que nous devrions faire, les priorités... Que diriez-vous si, par exemple, nous ne faisions rien? Il se peut que rien ne se produise d'ici 2019 ou 2020. Compte tenu de la loi actuelle, c'est une réalité. J'aimerais bien savoir ce que vous en pensez. Cela nous sera fort utile, notamment en raison de ce qui se passe en Europe et aux États-Unis depuis hier.

(1710)

M. Michael Paris:

Je vais répondre très brièvement. En ce qui concerne l'unique question qui m'intéresse, à savoir la définition des enregistrements sonores, nous sommes très satisfaits du statu quo et nous ne souhaitons pas que le Comité y touche.

M. Brian Masse:

D'accord. C'est ce que je voulais savoir.

M. Christian Tacit:

J'ai une observation. Le fait de faire avancer un dossier ne correspond pas toujours au progrès. Ce n'est pas parce que les choses se font que ce sont forcément de bonnes choses. Nous devons décider ce qu'il convient de faire à l'échelle du pays. Nous devons trouver le juste équilibre compte tenu de tous les droits et du cadre actuel. [Français]

M. Jérôme Payette:

Comme je l'ai dit, je crois que les dispositions sur les services réseau doivent être revues.[Traduction]

Le régime d'exonération canadien doit être examiné, parce que pour l'instant le champ est vaste et diverses entreprises sont exploitées en vertu du régime actuel. Il y a notamment les plateformes numériques, et l'Europe a pris des mesures à l'égard de ce secteur. Voilà un constat.

La reproduction à des fins personnelles est un dossier important. Il existait un système qui rapportait 40 millions de dollars par année, mais parce que la loi n'était pas neutre sur le plan technologique, maintenant il ne génère que quelques millions. Ce sont deux dossiers connexes sur lesquels il faudra se pencher. [Français]

Mme Stéphanie Hénault:

Pour encourager l'innovation, il est fondamental que la rémunération suive. Nos scénaristes les plus talentueux qui écrivent des séries télévisées, qui se lèvent à 6 heures et qui finissent à 22 heures pour créer des oeuvres audiovisuelles ayant de très grandes cotes d'écoute au Canada français, sont de moins en moins bien rémunérés, malgré le fait que leurs séries télévisées soient davantage diffusées. Pour les encourager à continuer leur travail, il faut changer les choses. Sinon, dans très peu de temps, les scénaristes ne voudront plus faire ce métier, et leurs enfants non plus, une fois adultes. Dans les secteurs où la rémunération ne suit pas, le talent ne suit pas non plus.

Comme l'a mentionné M. Payette, il s'est effectué un transfert de valeur non pas vers nos diffuseurs locaux, mais vers des diffuseurs étrangers, vers les GAFA qui monétisent énormément le contenu culturel. Il faut rétablir un équilibre, sinon ce ne sera pas intéressant pour notre créativité et notre innovation culturelle, pour l'économie que cela génère, pour le tourisme que cela amène ni pour les valeurs canadiennes.

Certes, la culture a un aspect économique, mais il faut aussi la préserver, car c'est fondamental. Nous avons la responsabilité économique de nous assurer que des créateurs talentueux restent ici et peuvent vivre de leur travail. [Traduction]

M. Brian Masse:

J'ai mentionné Fortnite. Si certains députés ne connaissent pas le jeu, dites-le-moi la prochaine fois que vous irez en ligne, et je vous le montrerai.

Le président:

Sur ce, j'aimerais remercier nos témoins d'être venus et d'avoir fait part de leurs expériences et de leurs connaissances. De toute évidence, nous sommes saisis d'un énorme dossier complexe. Il nous reste beaucoup de pain sur la planche.

Ce sont des questions difficiles qui valent la peine d'être posées parce que nous avons besoin de renseignements. Voilà ce qui nous aidera à rédiger notre rapport.

Et comme on le dit bien dans l'industrie du cinéma, c'est le clap de fin. Nous avons terminé.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on September 19, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.