header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-30 TRAN 117

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(0845)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Welcome to the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities of the 42nd Parliament. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) we are doing a study on the impact of aircraft noise in the vicinity of major Canadian airports.

Welcome to the committee members and to our witnesses.

From the Department of Transport, we have Sara Wiebe, director general, air policy; Dave Dawson, director, airports and air navigation services policy; Nicholas Robinson, director, policy and regulatory services; by video conference, Joseph Szwalek, regional director, civil aviation, Ontario; and also by video conference, Clifford Frank, associate director, operations, west.

From Nav Canada, we have Neil Wilson, president and chief executive officer; Jonathan Bagg, senior manager, public affairs; and Blake Cushnie, national manager, performance-based operations.

Thank you very much to all of our witnesses for finding the time to share their knowledge with us today. I would ask that you keep it to five minutes so the committee has sufficient time for their questions.

Ms. Wiebe, go ahead.

Ms. Sara Wiebe (Director General, Air Policy, Department of Transport):

Thank you very much for inviting Transport Canada to appear before this committee. I want to take some time with you today to give you Transport Canada's perspective on this important issue. As you mentioned, Madam Chair, I am joined today by colleagues from our national headquarters, and also two colleagues from our regional office in Toronto by video conference.

As you're probably aware, Transport Canada's primary goal is ensuring that Canadians have a safe, secure, economical and environmentally responsible transport system. [Translation]

To that end, in the 1990s, the government made a series of decisions in order to improve the air transportation system. One decision was to withdraw from the day-to-day operations and business choices of the air navigation systems and airports. As a result, NAV CANADA and airport authorities such as the Greater Toronto Airport Authority, or GTAA, are all now private and not-for-profit share capital corporations. This decision has proved to be a success.

NAV CANADA and the airport authorities that run our largest airports are recognized worldwide for the quality of their services and facilities, and more importantly, for the ongoing improvement of safety levels. These entities have proved to be more agile, innovative, effective and responsive to the needs of stakeholders. They also demonstrate these strengths when it comes to the management of their affairs.

With regard to Toronto and its surrounding area, Transport Canada has observed that, over the past five years, the level of transparency, accountability and inclusion has increased significantly. NAV Canada and the GTAA have been working closely with other stakeholders to find possible ways to reduce the impact of aircraft noise in the area. The stakeholders, including the different levels of governments, the industry and citizens, must participate in these discussions, since we all have a role to play in noise abatement.

However, we think that the specific noise issues are better understood and managed by local stakeholders. NAV CANADA and the airport authorities have been working with local politicians, interest groups and citizens. They'll develop the best solutions, while taking into account trade-offs in terms of flight access, economic development and environmental impact, including aircraft noise.

(0850)

[English]

For instance, Toronto Pearson has been much discussed in the noise conversation to date. It provides direct daily service to more than 67% of the world's economies. The airport also generates or facilitates approximately 332,000 jobs in Ontario, which accounts for $42 billion or 6.3% of Ontario's GDP. By 2030, it is estimated that Toronto Pearson could generate and facilitate 542,000 jobs.

That being said, we recognize that transportation affects the daily lives of Canadians, and we understand that. While transportation serves as a backbone to Canada's economy, transportation activities must take into account the needs of communities while respecting Canadians and the natural environment. That is why our officials have been closely monitoring aviation noise issues while participating in appropriate forums and encouraging progressive action.

Overall, there are many moving parts, and ongoing collaboration among various actors is required. Transport Canada officials will always work to monitor industry, keep abreast of developments, and consider approvals and oversight as needed.

To finish, I would briefly like to review the deck that we've provided to you. I can do that in just a couple of minutes, and then we will be happy to answer any questions you may have.

As you can see on slide 2, what we wanted to do with this document was outline how aircraft noise management operates in Canada in a general sense, look at the different actors involved, and highlight Canada's balanced approach to aircraft noise management.

On slide 3, you can see that there are a variety of actors involved in noise management, with varying roles and responsibilities. Successful aircraft noise management involves collaboration among all of these entities. Industry is responsible for day-to-day operations, business decisions and communicating with local stakeholders, while Transport Canada provides regulations, oversight and guidance.

Moving to slides 4 and 5, it is important to recognize the international guidance that's provided on this important issue. We look to the International Civil Aviation Organization, ICAO, which is housed in Montreal. ICAO guidance is centred around its balanced approach to aircraft noise management, and there are four elements that are mutually reinforcing.

The Chair:

Ms. Wiebe, could you bring your comments to a close, please?

Ms. Sara Wiebe:

Certainly.

Slide 6 emphasizes that a balanced approach can't succeed without community engagement, so this is why we turn to airport operators that operate in the community for that. Transport Canada continues to participate in noise management committees, for example.

I also want to point out that in 2015, with Transport Canada's encouragement, industry developed a clear set of standards for the development of an airspace change communications and consultation protocol.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We will give you time to get your other comments in.

Mr. Wilson, you have five minutes, please.

Mr. Neil Wilson (President and Chief Executive Officer, NAV CANADA):

Thank you, Madam Chair.[Translation]

Good morning, everyone.[English]

As the chair indicated, I'm Neil Wilson. I'm the president and chief executive officer of Nav Canada. I'm joined today by Jonathan Bagg, senior manager, public affairs, and by Blake Cushnie, national manager of performance-based operations.

I'd like to start by thanking the chair, the vice-chairs and the members of this committee for this opportunity to appear.

It's regrettable, but it's nonetheless a fact that noise from aircraft in this day and age is an unavoidable consequence of the operation of aircraft. That said, significant efforts are being made across the entire aviation industry to reduce the impact of aircraft operations on communities. We at Nav Canada are committed to this goal and to collaboration with our partners: airports, airlines, Transport Canada, and the International Civil Aviation Organization—as well as, importantly, communities—on this important issue.

As the country's private, not-for-profit provider of air navigation services, Nav Canada is responsible for the safe and efficient movement of aircraft in all Canadian-controlled airspace. This means that we are responsible for more than 18 million square kilometres of airspace from coast to coast to coast, reaching halfway across the north Atlantic, the busiest oceanic airspace in the world. We handle more than 3.3 million flights per year, and these flights are made by approximately 40,000 customers, including airlines, cargo operators, and business and general aviation.

Our mandate is achieved primarily through the delivery of air traffic control and flight information services; the maintenance, update, and publishing of aeronautical information products; the reliable provision of communications, navigation and surveillance infrastructure; and the 24-7 availability of advanced air traffic management systems, many of which we at Nav Canada develop right here in Canada and have exported around the world.

Thanks to the work of our 5,100 employees, operating out of more than 100 operational facilities throughout the country, Canada boasts one of the best air traffic management safety records in the world. We also achieve this success with a service charges model that has some of the lowest service charges and is among the most cost-effective in the world.

At its heart, simply put, our service is essential to an industry that employees hundreds of thousands of Canadians, allows millions of us to connect to each other and to the world, and propels the Canadian economy forward. That is why we have invested more than $2 billion since 1996, when we assumed responsibility for the air navigation system, to make air travel safer and more efficient.

At the same time, we are also committed to helping reduce the industry's footprint, both in terms of greenhouse gas emissions and aircraft noise, and we are also investing in that. Through technological innovation and procedural improvements, Nav Canada has helped reduce the industry's fuel consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions. We estimate that our efforts resulted in greenhouse gas savings of 1.5 million tonnes in 2017 alone.

In addition, our role as air navigation service provider requires us to ensure that our air traffic control procedures adhere to noise operating restrictions and noise abatement procedures throughout Canada. Nav Canada engages regularly in airspace modernization projects. In deploying advanced procedures, Nav Canada seeks opportunities to place approach and departure paths over non-residential areas, targeting industrial, commercial and agricultural land. In several cases, we have been able to move flight paths or portions of flight paths farther away from residential areas. Newer technologies are also increasing the use of quieter continuous descent operations, which see aircraft descending in a cleaner configuration and at a lower thrust setting.

When I became CEO in 2016, one of the first things I did was to meet certain community leaders concerned with aircraft noise in Toronto to discuss those concerns. As a result, we commissioned, and recently completed, an independent third party airspace review, which looked at noise mitigation at airports around the world, sought input from communities in the Toronto area, and resulted in a series of recommendations that I believe are both meaningful and achievable.

Some of these recommendations were the subject of a significant public consultation process undertaken jointly with the Greater Toronto Airports Authority, which took place this past spring. As a result of this effort, we will be implementing new nighttime approach and departure procedures this November. These mitigations result in as many as 221,000 fewer people being impacted by noise related to a night flight, depending on the runway and procedure being used. As we evaluate these mitigations and we gather community and stakeholder feedback, we will consider applications at other airports that can benefit from a similar approach.

When developing these airspace improvements, our accountabilities are outlined in the airspace change communications and consultation protocol, which provides guidance on when and how public consultation should occur, while promoting cross-industry collaboration.

(0855)



We remain committed to working transparently with industry stakeholders and with communities equally, to identify opportunities to reduce the impact of aircraft operations while meeting the airspace needs of this country now and in the future.

Thank you, Madam Chair. We welcome any questions you may have.

The Chair:

We'll move on to Mrs. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Thank you for joining us today and providing us with your testimony.

I have a couple of questions for Nav Canada. I understand that part of Nav Canada's mandate is to alter flight paths to improve airspace efficiency. You talked about that in your opening comments. I wonder if you could expand on what factors you consider when implementing changes to existing flight paths.

(0900)

Mr. Neil Wilson:

Thank you for the question.

When we are looking at flight paths in particular communities, we obviously care about the impact of the changes on those affected around airports. Airports in this country tend to be located in major cities, so there are going to be impacts where aircraft are flying. We take into account the fuel savings and the safety factors that are introduced by changing the air paths. We also engage quite deliberately and carefully with the communities that are affected.

We engage in a number of ways, largely guided by the airspace change communications and consultation protocol, which defines accountabilities in and among the airports, ourselves and other industry stakeholders, as this is really a joint effort that we are all engaged in. When we do so, we have briefings with residents in the affected areas, which are tailored to their concerns. We bring specific information as to how they may be impacted and what possible mitigation there may be around their area. We discuss it with them. We meet with elected officials like you—at this level or at provincial and municipal levels—who represent others who may be impacted, to make sure there's a good understanding of what the issues are. We provide a good deal of information online for those who aren't able to attend the in-person meetings that we have in communities.

We try to do it as early as we can and as consistently as we can. Going back over the years, perhaps we have not done as good a job as we should have. We learned from that and we are trying, day in and day out, to do a better job as we go forward.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much.

As the organization responsible for air traffic management across the country, how do you think Canada's aviation industry as a whole can address aircraft noise concerns without negatively impacting our country's economic competitiveness?

Mr. Neil Wilson:

I think it's a balance that we have to achieve. Aviation is a significant driver of economic activity in this country. It is worldwide. Canada is particularly impacted by aviation. We sit on the flight paths between Europe and the United States to the south, as traffic flowing between those two areas goes through our airspace. We have built a country not just on railways, but on aviation. It is essential to the economy of this country. We cannot lose sight of that.

At the same time, we have to understand and take into account the very legitimate concerns of folks in communities who are affected by noise and who live in the vicinity of major airports that have grown over time. We have to be sensitive to that and make sure that we achieve the proper balance.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I wonder if you could share with us a little about the role that you might have when looking to strike that balance by perhaps moving some air traffic from an airport like Pearson to Hamilton. We know it has been suggested that perhaps some air traffic, especially cargo air traffic, could be moved to a smaller regional airport to take the pressure off a larger centre and to accommodate the residents living in that larger centre.

Could you comment on that, please?

Mr. Neil Wilson:

Sure. We facilitate the movement of aircraft. We don't decide where the aircraft should go. We don't operate airports. Airports operate airports. Airlines operate airlines. Cargo operators determine their base of operations.

They all have interests in where they should operate from and how they should operate, and we facilitate the movement around that. We make sure that movement can be safe, first and foremost, and we make sure those movements can be efficient.

As those policy decisions are worked through by all the various stakeholders, we are interested, obviously. We want to make sure that this can happen as they see fit. We want to make sure it can happen in a safe way. We want to make sure we are as efficient as possible. As we look at the flight paths that we are called upon to design and to assist with, we want to make sure that if there are going to be communities that are impacted in a negative way, we're there to work to minimize that as much as possible and to provide suggestions on how that might happen.

We are part of this infrastructure. We don't drive those kinds of decisions, but we want to make sure that we are part of the conversation and that we can be as helpful as possible to all the stakeholders and to the communities that might be affected.

(0905)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

We move now to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you, everybody, for being here.

Ms. Wiebe, I have a question for you. The ultimate accountability for how this all works inevitably comes back to government, because everybody will look to government if things aren't working properly. Within government, where will issues like this ultimately land?

Ms. Sara Wiebe:

As I mentioned in my opening remarks, the department, the government, is committed to having a transportation system that is safe, secure and environmentally sound, and that also contributes to our economy.

I think at the end of the day, Transport Canada continues to watch very closely those elements of the air transportation sector that have been deregulated, such as Nav Canada and the management of our airport authorities.

We work very closely with these entities. I think Neil gets kind of tired of seeing us, sometimes, but we do work very closely with them to monitor the activities they are undertaking, from the perspective of the policy framework around this but also from the very important perspective of the regulatory framework that we manage and have oversight over with regard to not only noise but also various elements of the safety and security of our air sector.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you for that.

Mr. Wilson, you mentioned that you had done a study with the community on the air traffic noise issues around Pearson airport. Could we get a copy of that report and the recommendations?

Mr. Neil Wilson:

Certainly. There have been a couple of pieces of work done around Pearson in the greater Toronto area. Jointly with Pearson—

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I'm sorry, but I'll need a very short answer, sir, because I have other questions.

Mr. Neil Wilson:

Yes.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

That's a good answer. Thank you.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Ken Hardie: I noted with interest the comments of one of our previous panellists, who said that Pearson is surrounded, totally surrounded. I don't know if it was totally surrounded when it was first built, but it certainly is now.

In today's regime, would Nav Canada be at the table, let's say, if a municipality wanted to rezone and redevelop an area close to the airport? Would you be part of the public consultation?

Mr. Neil Wilson:

I'm going to defer to Mr. Bagg. We want to be as helpful and as collaborative as we can. I can't tell you that we're going to have notice of every single incident where that happens, but Mr. Bagg can assist with that.

Mr. Jonathan Bagg (Senior Manager, Public Affairs, NAV CANADA):

When you look at zoning as it relates to development, airport authorities are responsible for producing something called a noise exposure forecast. That's something they receive guidance on from Transport Canada. That exposure forecast provides guidance in terms of what kind of development is suitable in the vicinity of an airport. There is onus on the municipality to be aware of that guidance.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

If you become aware of a development and nobody has approached you for this work, would you proactively offer it?

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

The exposure forecast work is done by the airports, specifically developed by airport authorities, not by Nav Canada per se.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

We'll have to ask them if they're proactively involved, because as we've noticed in some of the other testimony, this development can happen and then the next call that goes to somebody is complaining about noise.

I notice with interest that there are usually quite a large number of hotels near airports, where people go to sleep either after coming off a long flight or before commencing one. Having stayed in a few of those hotels, I notice that they're remarkably soundproof. Are there construction techniques, particularly when there's a new development going in, a residential development, that should be considered by developers and the municipality for cities or communities that are going to find themselves on a flight path?

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

There are different construction techniques that mitigate noise in terms of the quality of insulation, window panes, and so on. In Canada, we have some natural noise mitigation factors because of our winters—we have a lot of insulation in our homes—but that is not something that Nav Canada would provide guidance on specifically.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Who would?

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

I'm not 100% sure which organization would be responsible for that. I think that goes back to the zoning requirements with respect to what's an appropriate development in an area.

(0910)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Who makes the decision on the number of night flights that are allowed into a given facility?

Mr. Neil Wilson:

Airports determine what they're going to have coming in, based upon the demand at a particular airport. We don't determine demand at airports. We handle what happens when folks are flying in and out of airports. We don't say who flies in or doesn't fly in. Airports make those decisions.

That said, when traffic is lighter, as it is at night, we can do different things. If we are able and if safety permits, we can arrange our procedures to move traffic in different ways. One of the things we're looking to do at Pearson is precisely that.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay.

Ms. Wiebe, is Transport Canada consulted? Who has to give approval for an airport's plan to increase the number of night flights?

Ms. Sara Wiebe:

Perhaps I could ask our colleagues in the Ontario region to talk specifically about the circumstances with regard to Pearson airport, as an example.

Joe and Cliff, I'd like to pass it over to you.

Mr. Joseph Szwalek (Regional Director, Civil Aviation - Ontario, Department of Transport):

Okay. Thank you for the question.

With regard to movement at night, that is all predicated on passengers going in and out of the airport. In 2013, there was a request for a bump-up on movements at night. Again, this is in the quiet time, from 12:30 until 6:30 in the morning. To this day, they have not used that bump-up. The land lease agreement specifies that they have to maintain the airport in the same way as when they took it over in 1996.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Who was the request made to?

Mr. Joseph Szwalek:

Do you mean the request for the bump-up?

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Yes.

Mr. Joseph Szwalek:

That was made to the minister for Transport Canada.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're now on to Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I also want to thank our many witnesses for being here this morning.

My questions are for Ms. Wiebe and Mr. Wilson, but the questions can be directed at other people as needed. I want brief answers since I have many questions and only a short amount of time.

Mr. Wilson, you said in your opening remarks that you've been doing everything in your power to achieve the noise abatement objective. However, this seems a little vague to me. Is there a numerical standard?

For example, I remember reading that the ICAO says that the noise levels shouldn't exceed 55 decibels. Is there a numerical objective for noise? [English]

Mr. Neil Wilson:

I'm going to ask Mr. Bagg to respond to that.

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

There isn't specific guidance in terms of a noise requirement for aircraft operating over residential areas. We use things like noise modelling when we're developing flight paths to understand the noise impact of changes, and we communicate those changes. We also identify ways to increase benefits. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I guess that it's the same thing when you talk about compliance with acoustic standards. Again, there's no scientific numerical standard that would give everyone a common understanding. Is that correct? [English]

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

There are some metrics. You had some folks here earlier—at the previous hearing with Colin Novak, for instance—who talked about metrics and how they can understand annoyance, but there isn't a specific requirement to meet a decibel level. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

You talked about the gradual descent—I don't remember the exact term—of aircraft that fly mainly over industrial and agricultural areas. However, the problem isn't really in those areas, although those areas may also have an issue.

Is this a common practice among all flights, or can another technique for landing in residential areas be used that may result in faster approaches but less noise? [English]

Mr. Neil Wilson:

I'm going to ask Mr. Cushnie to answer some of the specifics, but generally, we prefer and favour continuous descent operations, regardless of what land is being flown over, because they're quite a bit quieter.

Mr. Cushnie can provide more detail on that.

Mr. Blake Cushnie:

Thank you for the question.

To address the question about industrial areas, I can tell you that one of the goals we've been working toward recently, which we're rolling out in November in Toronto, is to use new technology to try to move the night flights away from as many people as possible.

During the day, our goal is continuous descent—essentially, to use the new technology to guide the airplanes to the runways by the quietest means possible. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

My next question is primarily for the witnesses from Transport Canada.

The department has been conducting a number of noise studies, which are called the NEFs. My question is very simple. Has this data been released to the public? If not, why?

(0915)

[English]

Ms. Sara Wiebe:

When we're talking about the different studies that have been done with regard to noise reduction, I would primarily point to the studies that have been done by Nav Canada and by the GTAA, for example. We work with them on the development of those reports, as well as on the assessment and the monitoring of the implementation of some of the recommendations. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I may have worded my question incorrectly. When Transport Canada uses the noise exposure forecast system, does it post the results on its site? [English]

Ms. Sara Wiebe:

Thank you for the question.

I'm looking at my colleague in civil aviation but I don't believe we're familiar with the reports to which you're referring. We can certainly take that question back, but I'm not familiar with that kind of report. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Okay.

I'll send you my question in writing to be more specific and to not waste too much time on the question this morning.

One issue has been bothering me. You said that Transport Canada's main concern is safety and that it works with organizations that I respect, such as NAV CANADA. By carrying out a number of deregulations and transferring its responsibilities in this area to other organizations, how has Transport Canada increased safety in Canada? [English]

Ms. Sara Wiebe:

Again, thank you for the question.

I mentioned that in the late 1980s, we deregulated our air sector through initiatives such as the privatization of Air Canada. In the mid-1990s, we further deregulated the air sector in the creation of airport authorities, actions that resulted in the creation of Nav Canada.

I want to be clear that final responsibility for the safety of Canada's air sector remains with the minister, in that it's largely achieved through the regulatory oversight that my colleagues in civil aviation undertake. Responsibility for safety remains with the minister. However, the implementation of it is done through entities such as Nav Canada and the airport authorities. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

For many years—and this started before the current Liberal government came to power—Transport Canada has been carrying out a series of deregulations and giving more and more power to large companies or other organizations.

Isn't there reason to reinstate a number of regulations to ensure that national standards are established and met? [English]

Ms. Sara Wiebe:

In response to your question, as I mentioned in my opening remarks, I would suggest that we consider the deregulation of Canada's air sector a success. We consider that it is a sector that is now more economically competitive globally in some contexts, but we also believe that Canada's air sector is more safe and secure as a result of the actions taken in the late 1980s and mid-1990s.

Again, I emphasize that the ultimate accountability for the safety and security of Canada's air sector rests with the minister, and that rests on the regulatory oversight undertaken by the department and my colleagues in civil aviation.

The Chair:

Mr. Iacono, go ahead. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I want to thank the witnesses for being here this morning.

When we met with NAV CANADA representatives in May, they pointed out that there had been no significant changes in perspective over the past 20 years. However, clearly the urban realities in the greater Montreal and Laval areas have changed in the past 20 years.

Has NAV CANADA adapted the different flight paths to urban development in the greater Montreal and Laval areas? [English]

Mr. Neil Wilson:

The city of Montreal certainly has changed over the past 20 years. I'm gong to ask Mr. Bagg to address the specifics of flight path changes. [Translation]

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

There haven't been any recent significant changes concerning the approaches. Certainly the traffic at the Montreal airport has increased and more planes are landing at the airport. However, there have been no changes in air routes to take into account the population increase in these areas.

(0920)

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.

Is population density a criterion in the establishment of new transportation corridors?

What are the criteria? When was the last update of the criteria?

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

Of course we use noise modelling to understand the impact of air routes. When we work specifically on modernizing the airspace and we consider changing the airspace, we use modelling and census information to establish the number of people who are likely to be affected by the noise and to determine how to lower that number.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Has there been a recent update? If so, can you give us the specific date?

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

The last major update of Montreal's airspace took place in 2012.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

NAV CANADA is authorized to unilaterally alter air routes to improve airspace efficiency.

Can you describe the process of altering air routes and explain the main reasons for these changes, in particular when it comes to night flights? [English]

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

In terms of looking at the airspace change, we're guided by the airspace change communications and consultation protocol. It has some robust requirements and accountabilities for Nav Canada when it's conducting airspace change.

That includes how and when consultations are conducted and how we communicate the impacts of those changes. It also provides some timeline guidance in terms of how soon you have to give notification of a public consultation event. There are also follow-up reporting requirements. A public engagement report has to be produced following a consultation and before a recommendation to implement the changes is made. That's a key facet.

There's another piece to it where we need to follow up. It's called the 180-day review, where we come back approximately six months after implementation and look at operational performance, as well as any community feedback we received as a result of the change. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

In France, for example, the continuous descent approach procedure has been implemented at the 11 main airports, including Paris-Charles de Gaulle airport. In 2017 alone, continuous descent approach procedures were used at Paris-Charles de Gaulle airport 30% of the time.

The briefing note that you sent to the committee members states that the “company is increasing the use of quieter continuous descent operations.”

How often are continuous descent approach procedures used in Canada? [English]

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

If you look at our current situation, you will see that we actually recently established something called an industry noise management board, which brings together technical expertise from across the industry. One of the tasks of that industry, starting in Toronto, is to come up with an acceptable definition of continuous descent—what the definition is and what that looks like operationally—and start reporting on it in Toronto. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Is this approach procedure used for all night flights? [English]

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

Ideally, we want to do continuous descent with every aircraft. Ideally, we have an aircraft from top of descent—that's cruise altitude—coming on continuous descent all the way to the runway. We'd like to use that as much as possible.

We do have to use levelling sometimes to provide separation between aircraft. One of the ways we separate aircraft is vertically. You can have 1,000 feet of vertical separation and that does require us to level off an aircraft at times. As we move forward, a lot of the work we're doing internationally and as a company is to promote increased continuous descent operations. That's certainly a priority for this organization. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you,

Ms. Wiebe,[English]we were told at the last panel that Pearson airport is presently under financial difficulties. Can you confirm that allegation? If so, by how much is it in financial difficulty? What's the number?

Ms. Sara Wiebe:

Thank you very much.

First, I read the testimony and the comments around Toronto Pearson being in financial difficulty. I think we need to look at it more from the perspective of the GTAA, the Greater Toronto Airports Authority, taking a look at its future plans in terms of how its infrastructure will continue to support the increasing volumes that want to arrive at that airport. It's from that perspective that Toronto Pearson is undertaking debt in order to finance their operations.

This is as a result of Canada's user-pay policy. Perhaps you've heard reference to that before. I refer to that because our airport authorities must finance all infrastructure at their airports without any financial support from the government; there is some limited support. This means that when you and I travel through that airport, we pay for our travel and we contribute to the infrastructure that's being developed at that airport.

(0925)

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Is the amount that was divulged the correct amount?

Ms. Sara Wiebe:

I think the GTAA is appearing before you at a later date. I think that's a question that would be more specifically answered by them.

Mr. Angelo Iacono: Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Sikand, go ahead.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Thank you.

I'm going to move quite quickly, as I'm trying to share some of my time with my colleague.

We often hear about reports from companies in England, and we hear about the model of Frankfurt. I am a proponent of learning best practices, but, as Mr. Wilson alluded to, Canada is pretty amazing. We have unique challenges, and I'd like to focus on those. What are the unique challenges that Canada faces when it comes to noise abatement?

Mr. Neil Wilson:

Yes, we are amazing.

We have some aspects that are unique, but we can learn a lot from others. I talked about the study that's been requested. The group that we commissioned to do that, we commissioned them because they had done a study on the same issue around Gatwick, in the U.K. We know we can learn from best practices there.

We are unique in terms of the mix of the aircraft fleet that we have to service. My colleague spoke about some of the technology we're using. There are some limitations because we have an interesting fleet mix in Canada. Some of the fleet is equipped very well to take advantage of some of the technology that will allow for continuous descent, and some of it is not there yet. We have a mix of large and small. We have a very large general aviation community in Canada, general being private pilots whom we equally have to service and make sure that we take care of. What is unique about Canada is really the mix of the fleet and who wants to fly into our airports.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you. I'm just going to jump in here.

Mr. Cushnie, you mentioned new technologies that are being implemented at Pearson. What were you referring to?

Mr. Blake Cushnie:

As part of all the work we've done in the six initiatives, which perhaps the GTAA will talk about, we're working on leveraging the accuracy of satellite navigation that's on board a lot of aircraft today to guide the airplanes to the runway, particularly at night, as far away from people as possible. What we see is that as we run on the final approach it becomes a different challenge, but we're trying to use this technology to the best of our advantage to be a leader in noise mitigation.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Great. Thank you.

I represent a riding just outside Pearson. It's a seven-minute drive on a good day, and maybe an hour and a half in traffic. I've always been a proponent of having an airport north of the escarpment of Milton, Brampton and Mississauga. It just makes good sense to me. Could I get some comments from Transport Canada on the implications of this?

Ms. Sara Wiebe:

Thank you for the question.

This is, again, another one of those areas of balance we always try to achieve. We have these large airports to which cargo operators and passengers want to fly. As I think Mr. Wilson referred to earlier, we are not in the business of telling aircraft or passengers or cargo where they must fly. Again, I think this is something the GTAA could speak to a bit more when they appear before you.

That said, in our view the GTAA has done a very good job in terms of developing a collaborative engagement with the smaller airports in the region, including Hamilton and Waterloo, to talk about the moment when they will reach saturation and there will be a need to better manage those flows. But, again, given that our air sector in Canada is market-driven, it's impossible to force these movements in one direction or another.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

Just because I want to share my time, I need a yes or no for the next question.

Do you have the mandate to accommodate such growth?

Ms. Sara Wiebe:

Again, the growth is driven by the market. What we try to do is develop policy frameworks that allow for that growth to occur.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Okay, thank you.

I'll share my time with Mr. Wrzesnewskyj.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Szwalek, I'd like to have clarity on a response you made in regard to the night flights budget increase in 2013. You said that the request went to the minister, to Transport Canada. Could you just clarify?

(0930)

Mr. Joseph Szwalek:

What ended up happening was that the Greater Toronto Airports Authority had asked for a bump-up for the plans for long-term growth of the airport. It came to the minister. It was dealt with in the region for that—

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Okay, I need clarity and not a long answer.

Was it the minister or the regional authority—I guess your predecessor—or maybe you who signed off on that?

Mr. Joseph Szwalek:

It was signed off on by the director general in the region, for the bump-up.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Was it authorized by the minister?

Mr. Joseph Szwalek:

Yes.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

I would ask Transport Canada to provide documentation to the committee that will provide us with clarity on the decision-making around this.

I'd like to turn to Nav Canada. You talked about the environmental carbon footprint reduction. What does that mean in terms of fuel savings in jet fuel for the airlines?

Mr. Neil Wilson:

In broad strokes, it means that whatever we can do to assist the airlines in reducing their fuel burn has a positive impact on reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

The airlines are very happy about reducing their carbon footprint because it means significant reduction in their jet fuel costs.

Mr. Neil Wilson:

They are, and we all are.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Excellent.

I have a couple of questions that go back to accountability. The deck provided to the committee says that Nav Canada and local airports “are committed to a public participation process that provides the community with factual and accurate information before and after a change is implemented.” Was the community consulted or informed before and after the night flights budget increase in 2013?

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

The proponent of that change would be the GTAA, and they'd be better positioned to respond to that question.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

This talks about Nav Canada. So you don't know whether or not Nav Canada.... I'd like to have the information on whether or not—

The Chair:

I'm sorry, Mr. Wrzesnewskyj. I appreciate the questions, but the time is up.

Mr. Liepert, go ahead.

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC):

Thanks, Madam Chair.

I'm going to direct my questions to Nav Canada.

I represent a Calgary riding, and we are a good half hour's drive from the airport. In my first year as a member of Parliament, the complaints about aircraft noise in my constituency were zero, but then we had a new runway open in Calgary. Can you tell my constituents, for the record, why they now have aircraft noise when they're not even in the vicinity of the Calgary airport?

Mr. Neil Wilson:

Do you want to address the specifics of Calgary?

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

Sure. The biggest change that happened in Calgary, obviously, was subsequent to the addition of a new runway. It was important for the airport to be able to accommodate its growth. That resulted in airspace redesign.

Being 30 kilometres from the airport seems quite far, especially when you think of terrestrial transportation like taking a car. For an aircraft, it's not that far. When you look at how planes have to arrive at an airport, you see that they use a system of published routes. Just as a car has to use a road, we have roadways in the sky for planes arriving at the airport. They have to be situated in a way that allows us to manage all the traffic.

Over your area, Signal Hill, for instance, there is one of those routes. There are multiple routes to the airport, and air traffic controllers are managing aircraft from multiple directions. One of the reasons why it is where it is is that it's like hitting a target. The closer that route is to the runway, the easier it is for the controller to do their timings.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I think what my constituents don't understand is that if you go a mile to the west, you're over ranchland. Can you explain how Nav Canada comes up with its routes—I think that's the term you used—when it seems like you're redirecting a new route over an existing residential area when you have nothing but farmland a mile over?

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

Sure, absolutely.

Of course, when you look to the west of the city, there's green or agricultural space and it seems obvious. It is very much about sequencing and managing traffic. We use Transport Canada's approved design criteria, internationally used design criteria, so there are a lot of standards that are applied in terms of designing airspace, which is a key piece.

To the question of why it can't just be shifted further west, that goes to timing. What controllers do is turn the aircraft toward the runway for final approach. They have to get to a place where they can line up with the runway to land. If you put that down too far from the airport, it's hard for the air traffic controller to do the timing.

(0935)

Mr. Ron Liepert:

The reality of that approach is that it's parallel to the runway. It seems to me that the turn thing.... I know we're getting into the weeds here, but another mile over would....

One of the things I've been told is that some of the night noise comes from noisy Russian aircraft or whatever. What controls does Nav Canada have over foreign aircraft coming in and out of our airports with regard to complying with our domestic rules?

Mr. Neil Wilson:

We're not a policeman. We facilitate the safety and efficiency of flight. With regard to aircraft that come in, we have an obligation to bring them in and to make sure that it's safe, that they're separated from other aircraft and that they come in.

We have some moral suasion with operators, but frankly, that only goes so far. We have no mandate, no legal ability, to restrict their flight.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Does anybody?

Ms. Sara Wiebe:

I think this is where I'll turn to my colleague, Mr. Robinson.

Mr. Nicholas Robinson (Director General, Civil Aviation, Department of Transport):

We do have requirements with regard to the safety and security of aircraft landing in our Canadian airports.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Yes, but does that take into account noise?

Mr. Nicholas Robinson:

It does not take noise into account specifically.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

It doesn't sound like there's any governance over foreign aircraft noise coming into our commercial airports.

Mr. Nicholas Robinson:

Our primary responsibility is to make sure that there are safe and secure aircraft landing in our airports, and noise isn't a specific criterion.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I'll direct it to Nav Canada.

Who has control over helicopters?

Mr. Neil Wilson:

If you mean their navigation and the management of traffic, we do.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I think I get as many complaints about helicopter noise, especially police helicopters, as I do about commercial aircraft. Does Nav Canada do helicopters?

Mr. Neil Wilson:

There's a joint accountability for airspace management in the sense that the airspace is divided into different types of airspace with regard to what's allowable in different sectors of the air. If it's permitted, they're going to be flying there.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

If someone wants to operate a helicopter at any time of the day in any part of the city, that operator doesn't need any kind of permission from anybody to do it.

Mr. Neil Wilson:

No, they need clearances within certain airspace, but we give clearances to make sure that the flight is safe. They can only fly in certain airspace. For example, here in Ottawa, there's a restricted airspace above Parliament Hill. There are different airspace classifications that allow certain forms of flight with certain equipped aircraft in certain airspace.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Do you know if Calgary has any of those restrictions?

Mr. Neil Wilson:

It absolutely would. As to what the specifics are in any particular location, I'd have to get back to you on that.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Would the police have to see to those requirements as well?

Mr. Neil Wilson:

Anyone who flies does, yes.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Mr. Bagg, I want to thank you. We've met in the past on this issue. I'm going to go into it right away.

One of the effects of aviation noise is that the airways have impacts on smaller operations. It's not only the airplanes coming into major airports. For example, St-Jérôme Airport, CSN3, where there's a dirt strip and a parachute jumping school, is constrained by airway T709 to the west; Mirabel to the south; airway T636 to the north; and St-Esprit, also a parachute school, CES2, to the east. It gives a very narrow box of operations.

The result of this is that the planes in the parachute school, which are very frequent and very noisy, fly over the same community 20, 30 or 40 times a day.

You mentioned that Dorval changed its approaches in 2012, and T709 is one of the victims of that approach. It now goes just west of CSN3. All these aircraft from the Parachutisme Adrénaline flying school are going over the same lake in Sainte-Anne-des-Lacs every day, all day long.

What can we do as a community, working with you, to allow those aircraft to cross the airway and do their climb-outs on the other side? Is there anything we can do together?

(0940)

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

I'm definitely familiar with that airspace, and there are a lot of constraints around it. There are IFR operations, and how we design an airspace is certainly in a manner in which we want to keep different types of operations away from each other. That ensures safety.

With regard to next steps and what can be done, I think that we're kind of on that path, in the sense that it starts with dialogue. I know that we intend to meet with you and some of our regional operations managers to look at options and see what is a possibility. However, it is challenging when you have a very dense airspace and a lot of operations to either side of that airspace.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Solutions are possible and we should be able to find them.

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

We should certainly discuss them and see what operations.... If there are opportunities, we should look at them.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What prevents us? Right now there's an agreement between Nav Canada and the airport not to have their operations cross the airway. Why would that be?

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

That goes back to the point that we try to keep different types of operations systematically separated. If you look at parachute operations, they're flying using something called VFR navigation, so the pilot is responsible for their manner of operation. As a pilot, they're not on a specific route.

Then, if you look at approaching Montreal, they're on IFR routes. They're on a set of very specific, published routes. It's always safer for us to keep those types of operations away from each other.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

On that topic, you talked about continuous descent. In the final few thousand feet, you're still at a three-degree approach angle. Nothing changes there. Is that correct?

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

That's correct. On final approach, you're usually using an ILS—instrument landing system—and three degrees is the descent rate.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the continuous approach, nothing is really changing that close to the ground toward the end. It's an efficiency.

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

That's correct. It stays the same for final approach.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there any circumstance where we ask departing aircraft to use the best angle, rather than the best rate, to get out of the airspace faster?

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

There are noise abatement departure procedures—NADP 1 and NADP 2. They target different areas. One targets the area close to the airport and tries to provide some abatement nearby. The other operation looks at providing some abatement a little further away. Either way, both of those procedures have aircraft climbing. At that phase of departure, planes tend to be the loudest—at full throttle.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I noticed that in CFS, the Canada Flight Supplement, there's a whole section on noise abatement procedures for Pearson. I didn't see it for most of the other airports, but there is one for Pearson. They refer to ICAO annex 16, volume 1, chapter 2 and chapter 3—types of aircraft. What does that mean?

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

This goes to answering one of Mr. Liepert's questions as well, in terms of the noise standards around aircraft. ICAO sets standards in terms of noise at the source. It's regulation for noise at the source, and maybe Transport Canada can best speak to it. We accept those standards. As time goes by, chapters of aircraft—older aircraft—get retired and are not permitted in airspace. Over time, we are seeing aircraft getting significantly quieter.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are there a lot of aircraft still in chapter 2 and chapter 3?

Mr. Jonathan Bagg:

There are not a lot anymore. There are very few that are still.... Maybe there are some aircraft operators that need special equipment to operate to the north, like gravel kits for gravel runways, and some cargo operators that sometimes have older fleets.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a few quick seconds, and I want to give a few seconds to Vance. Oh, I can't do both.

I have one question, but I'll give it to Vance.

Thank you, guys.

The Chair:

Mr. Badawey, go ahead.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Thank you for being here today.

I want to dig a bit deeper on the municipal official plans. Obviously, a lack of discipline to date has put us in the position we're at right now with respect to sprawl around airports.

That being said, official planned amendments and rezoning have allowed that growth to happen around you. My first question is, has the air sector appealed through those processes of official planned amendments and rezoning?

My second question is, do you have the ability to keep that discipline in place to actually appeal to, for example, the Ontario Municipal Board and get favourable decisions so that the sprawl doesn't happen and these complaints aren't as abundant as they are now? Moving forward, is the ability in place for you to do that, so that, although the problem exists, it won't continue to expand well into the future?

(0945)

Ms. Sara Wiebe:

I could answer your question generally from the perspective of Transport Canada and the airport authorities. Our regional offices are always available to meet and discuss this with municipal boards as they do their planning.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

That's not my question.

My question is, has the air sector had the ability to appeal when a municipality actually allows growth to happen in an area it shouldn't happen in? I'm sure there are setbacks and things of that nature. Is there an opportunity for you to appeal to, for example, the Ontario Municipal Board to get a favourable decision based on provincial policies, municipal OPs and zoning, so that this problem doesn't grow in the future?

Ms. Sara Wiebe:

I'm looking at my colleague from civil aviation. I think there are certainly requirements in our regulations with regard to the type of construction that can happen within a certain distance of the airport. I think that's in a very specific sense.

Nick, do you want to speak a bit about that?

Mr. Nicholas Robinson:

Yes. There are specific parameters that can and cannot happen in and around aerodromes. These are set to ensure the safety and security of those aerodromes and the aircraft landing within them. That's where our regulation sets forth....

For a municipal appeal or appellate process, I wouldn't be certain whether there are any cases where a municipality has appealed against those specific regulations.

The Chair:

That brings us to the conclusion of our first hour of witnesses.

Thank you very much for coming. We may have additional questions and may need to have you back before we finish this study.

We will suspend for a moment while our next panel comes to the table.

(0945)

(0950)



The Chair: I call the meeting back to order.

From the Calgary Airport Authority, we have Mr. Sartor, president, and Carmelle Hunka, general counsel and senior director, risk and compliance. Thank you so much for being here.

From the Vancouver Airport Authority, we have, by video conference, Anne Murray, vice-president, airline business development and public affairs; and Mark Cheng, supervisor, noise and air quality.

From Aéroports de Montréal, we have Martin Massé and Anne Marcotte.

Welcome to all of you.

I would like to start with Aéroports de Montréal.

Mr. Massé, go ahead. [Translation]

Mr. Martin Massé (Vice-President, Public Affairs, Aéroports de Montréal):

Good morning, Madam Chair and committee members.

Thank you for this opportunity to describe the actions we've taken on soundscape management, and to answer your questions as part of efforts to assess the impact of aircraft noise in the vicinity of Canada's major airports.

Under the terms of its lease with Transport Canada, Aéroports de Montréal, or ADM, is responsible for managing and operating Montréal-Trudeau airport and the Mirabel Aeronautics and Industrial Park.

Over the years, Montréal-Trudeau has grown into an aviation hub and the third-largest airport in Canada. The airport serves 151 destinations and is home to 37 air carriers. As a result, it's the most international Canadian airport, since 41% of its passengers travel outside Canada and the United States. Montréal-Trudeau plays a significant role in the economic development of the greater Montreal area, with almost 29,000 direct jobs and some 200 companies on its site.

Soundscape management is and always has been a priority for Aéroports de Montréal. ADM's role is to ensure balance between the airport's growth as a key player in the development of the greater Montreal area and continued harmonious coexistence with its community. This is an integral part of our mission, and we're making sustained efforts to maintain that balance.

We develop our plans by incorporating the principles of the ICAO's balanced approach. We also work with our partners to mitigate the impacts on neighbouring communities of the activities involved in operating an international airport. These partners are the following.

Transport Canada is the regulatory body tasked with ensuring enforcement of the acoustical usage criteria and noise-abatement measures. Transport Canada is empowered to sanction pilots and carriers that violate those rules.

NAV CANADA is responsible for providing air navigation services, which means air traffic control.

Lastly, the airlines are required to fly their aircraft according to the operating hours in effect and comply with the flight procedures at Montréal-Trudeau. They’re also responsible for their aircraft fleets.

As the airport authority, Aéroports de Montréal is responsible for developing a soundscape management plan, setting up a soundscape management advisory committee, and handling complaints regarding noise.

To that end, Aéroports de Montréal put forward a preferential runway system for night-time operations. It ensures compliance with the operating hours in effect at Montréal-Trudeau and performs thorough follow-ups on requests for exemptions.

During the past 15 years, despite significant increases in passenger numbers, the total number of aircraft movements has remained relatively stable. It would therefore be wrong to conclude that Montréal-Trudeau's growth necessarily means an equivalent or proportional increase in the number of movements.

Aircraft today are larger, carry more passengers, and are less noisy. Technical and technological improvements have resulted in major noise reduction over the past decade.

To measure noise levels, Aéroports de Montréal has eight noise-measurement stations, including one mobile unit. ADM publishes the equivalent continuous sound levels, or the Leq, recorded by the various noise-measurement stations located around the airport.

These stations are positioned strategically along the runway centrelines. The equipment is installed and calibrated by independent professionals. The system is linked to NAV CANADA radar data, which ensures that the noises recorded are correlated to aircraft movements.

Night flights are a significant concern for our soundscape management program. Managing flight schedules is a complex exercise for air carriers. On the one hand, the passenger community wants access to a variety of destinations at the best possible cost, and on the other hand, reducing the number of night flights is a crucial requirement.

ln addition to studying all requests for exemptions, ADM enforces the flight schedule restrictions in effect at Montréal-Trudeau. ADM meets regularly with air carriers that have operated flights outside its normal operating hours to demand that they implement action plans to remedy these situations.

Montréal-Trudeau airport is open 24 hours a day to aircraft weighing less than 45,000 kilograms. These are mainly propeller-driven aircraft and CRJ-type planes.

Heavier aircraft are subject to restricted operating hours. Jet aircraft weighing more than 45,000 kilograms must land between 7 a.m. and 1 a.m. and take off between 7 a.m. and midnight. ADM may grant exemptions as stipulated in the Canada Air Pilot.

Lastly, in co-operation with its soundscape management advisory committee, Aéroports de Montréal is continuing to develop further noise-abatement measures to benefit the Montreal community. To that end, an important action plan will be presented shortly to the committee members.

(0955)



The plan comprises 26 actions in seven categories. These categories are restrictions on night flights; the use of quieter aircraft; noise-abatement procedures at takeoff and landing; the publication of reports and indicators that are more meaningful to the communities; the update of the complaints management policy; land-use planning; and the involvement of neighbouring communities.

Our objective is to reduce the impact of the activities related to airport operations; to provide incentives for air carriers to use the quietest possible aircraft; and to reduce the number of flights taking place during restricted operating hours.

Residents of large cities are exposed to different types of noise from a variety of sources, such as road networks, vehicles, railways and air traffic. It’s therefore important that these sources be properly identified.

ln that context, regarding the land-use planning category, I want to reiterate that ADM endorses the recommendation by Montreal’s public health directorate to enforce action 18.1 of the City of Montreal’s urban plan. This plan calls for the establishment of a coordinating committee with the Ministère des Transports du Québec and the various organizations and firms involved in freight transportation, including CP and CN, the Montreal Port Authority and Aéroports de Montréal, in order to limit noise pollution in residential areas. On multiple occasions, we’ve invited the City of Montreal to establish this type of committee, while pledging our collaboration.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Massé.

Mr. Sartor, go ahead.

Mr. Bob Sartor (President, Calgary Airport Authority):

Good morning, Madam Chair and members of the committee.

Thank you for inviting me here today to present the perspective of the Calgary Airport Authority.

First, I'd like to emphasize that YYC noise management is a priority, as the city now surrounds its major airport.

Airports around the world share similar challenges when it comes to air traffic noise. Airports are the hub for aircraft arrivals and departures, but those aircraft are owned and operated by the air carriers of the world, and the arrivals and departures are directed by Nav Canada. This is important context for our discussions today and for the study you are conducting.

Today I'd like to walk you through three important considerations from the perspective of the Calgary Airport Authority: our economic contributions to the city of Calgary; information about our operations, their impact on our local communities and our approach to noise management; and lastly, some real perspective on the noise calls received from our communities.

I hope to demonstrate how the authority continuously monitors performance to balance airport operations with community concerns, especially during periods of growth, as we are experiencing today.

First, I think it is critical for the committee to understand that the international airports represented here today are economic and employment powerhouses in our respective cities. In Calgary, YYC contributes approximately $8 billion to the city's GDP annually, and 24,000 Calgarians are employed directly at the YYC campus. Nearly 50,000 jobs are created and maintained by our operations, and our airport has continued to grow through the tough economic times in Alberta in recent years, with 3.8% growth in passenger volumes in 2017 and a 7% growth rate to date in 2018. I also have to stress that the growth in demand by our cargo carriers is critical to economic viability and to the city of Calgary. We saw a 7.7% increase in cargo volumes last year alone.

The economic driver that airports are to our cities must be a major consideration as you undertake a review of the impact of aircraft noise. With the number of passengers increasing, we have actually seen a reduction in the total number of aircraft movements from 2016 to 2017 due to upgauging of aircraft. Our average daily movements have dropped from 636 to 615.

In 2017, over 95% of flights at YYC occurred between the hours of 6 a.m. and midnight. This means that less than 5%, or on average only 29 of a total of 615 flights per day, are arriving and departing at YYC between the hours of midnight and 6 a.m.

While airports share similar challenges, it is also important to understand that each airport must address its local concerns, and those concerns may be unique to that airport or to that community.

At YYC, we have an active noise monitoring program; in fact, we have 16 noise monitoring stations throughout the city. We have significant community engagement through consultative committee meetings and ad hoc community open houses. We conduct active investigation of noise concerns. We regularly report information regarding activities at the Calgary airport that impact noise, such as runway closures or construction that results in changed traffic patterns. Finally, we collaborate with Nav Canada and the major air carriers to discuss innovations and industry-leading practices in aircraft noise management at airports.

At the Calgary airport, we have the support of the city and the province in noise management through a commitment to the Calgary International Airport vicinity protection area regulation, a provincial regulation known as the AVPA. The AVPA regulates the development of urban areas in Calgary, as well as Edmonton, based on the noise contours for our city arising from air traffic. The development of the urban landscape of Calgary has largely followed the noise contours, keeping residential developments removed from the highest noise contours.

The third item I would like to discuss is the calls we receive at the airport regarding noise. At YYC, we have continued to receive calls regarding noise and the frequency of air traffic since the opening of our new runway in 2014. We received over 5,700 calls in 2017, a reduction of 11% from 2016. However, what is very important to understand is that a large volume of the calls come from a small group of people. At YYC, five callers made 72% of all the calls received in 2017. That is 4,100 calls from five individuals. Two individuals called over 2,700 times, which is 48% of the calls received. In a city of 1.2 million people, we received calls from less than 3% of the population, or about 400 households.

Restricting air traffic at one airport, as we've seen in Europe, does only one thing: It moves the air traffic to another airport. The demand will remain, and the demand will be serviced somehow.

(1000)



We cannot remove the noise, but we have to take a balanced approach to managing noise, between the needs of the public—who demand more choices in travel destinations and who are increasingly ordering deliveries online—and the residents of the communities over which aircraft fly, as well as the significant role airports play in the economic development of our cities.

I'm happy to answer any questions. Thank you.

The Chair:

We'll go on to Ms. Murray, vice-president of airline business development at Vancouver airport, by video conference.

Welcome to you and Mr. Cheng.

Ms. Anne Murray (Vice-President, Airline Business Development and Public Affairs, Vancouver Airport Authority):

Good morning, Madam Chair, and thank you for the opportunity to speak to the committee today.

Large Canadian airports are managed by local, not-for-profit organizations. Under this unique model, we receive no government funding and are not beholden to shareholders. We reinvest all profits back into our airports.

At YVR, Vancouver International Airport, this model is underpinned by our commitment to our neighbouring communities. This includes managing airport noise to balance the need for safe, convenient 24-hour air travel with enjoyable urban living.

It's our mandate to provide economic and social benefits to the people of British Columbia and operate the airport in the best interest of the region, while keeping safety as our first priority.

YVR is a key economic generator for the region. We facilitate $16.5 billion in total economic output and $8.5 billion in total GDP. Last year, we welcomed more than 24 million passengers. We are also home to 24,000 jobs at the airport.

Vancouver Airport Authority's ground lease with the federal government requires us to manage noise associated with airport operations within 10 nautical miles of the airport. We do so through a comprehensive noise management program, which has a number of core elements: a five-year noise management plan, stakeholder engagement, maintaining noise abatement procedures, noise monitoring and flight tracking, and providing information to answer community questions and concerns.

We're currently updating the five-year noise management plan, and that will go to Transport Canada by year-end. To do so, we engaged residents and stakeholders for their input to customize initiatives for our region. While the core elements are common, each solution must cater to individual airports' unique and local issues and conditions.

As you realize, aircraft noise can be quite technical, but really there are three main ways of addressing it: the aircraft itself; when, where and how the aircraft flies; and the residents, where they live and the environment in which they live.

Looking at the aircraft itself is about reducing noise at the source. Aircraft noise and emissions certification standards are set by ICAO, and the aircraft must meet these standards to operate in Canada.

Over the years, the airlines have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in upgrading their fleets. These aircraft are cleaner and quieter, producing less noise and less emissions.

Secondly, we look at the operating procedures and noise control procedures. This is the part that relates to where and how the airplanes fly. Airports have noise abatement procedures that include night restrictions and preferential runway use. Nav Canada manages the airspace and has procedures to minimize flights over populated areas. The airlines train their crews to fly community-friendly.

The third area we can focus on is the receiver, the person, where they live and what they expect. We work with local cities to manage, through land use planning, the number of people living in high-noise areas. YVR supports the Transport Canada guidelines that discourage non-compatible land use in areas close to airports.

How are we doing? In 1998, we had 369,000 aircraft landings and takeoffs and welcomed 15.5 million passengers. Last year, we had 39,000 fewer aircraft landings and takeoffs and almost 9 million more passengers. To put that in perspective, that's 50% more passengers and 10% less aircraft movement compared to 20 years ago, and all of those operations are with quieter aircraft.

As for noise complaints, in 2017 we received 1,293 noise concerns from 253 people. Four individuals were responsible for 64% of our complaints, two of whom live more than 23 kilometres from the airport. For comparison, the greater Vancouver region has about 2.8 million people.

With respect to night operations, 3% of our total annual runway movements occur between midnight and 6 a.m., an average of 27 operations per night in 2017. These flights are a mix of passenger and courier services. To manage the noise from the night operations, we have procedures and restrictions in place, including an approval process for jet aircraft departures, the closure of our north runway between specified hours, and preferential runway use to keep aircraft landings and takeoffs over the water, where possible.

Our survey results show that we have the community support to grow our air services so long as we continue to manage aircraft noise. We have been successful in doing so within the strong federal framework in place and the flexibility to apply local solutions.

(1005)



Thank you for the opportunity to share why we are successful today.

We would be happy to answer any questions.

The Chair:

Mr. Liepert, you have five minutes, please.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Mr. Massé, we've had various conflicting testimony where it's been suggested that a lot of the cargo traffic could be moved to other airports. The example that's most often given is Hamilton instead of Pearson in Toronto.

We also, however, had testimony from the Mississauga chamber of commerce or a business group that suggested that the Montreal situation with Trudeau and Mirabel is a classic example of why you can't make that happen. The cargo needs to come into the busy airport.

Can you tell us whether it has been successful or not? Who is right in this debate?

(1010)

[Translation]

Mr. Martin Massé:

Thank you for your question.

I don't think that I can determine who's right in the debate. One thing is certain, at Aéroports de Montréal, most of the transportation of large cargo is handled at Mirabel airport, and the transportation of small cargo is handled at Montréal-Trudeau.

Is this the right decision? As fate would have it, we have two airports to manage. Would cargo companies like to be closer to downtown? This is likely the case, but for management reasons, we prefer to keep the transportation of large volumes of cargo at Mirabel.

You know that, now, in the direct passenger service business model, the option of carrying cargo in the aircraft hold is an integral part of the business case. This obviously goes through Montréal-Trudeau. [English]

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Okay.

Mr. Sartor, as you are well aware, I represent a part of Calgary that is a long way from the airport, yet we are now getting complaints about aircraft noise, planes that are 3,000 feet off the ground.

I asked Nav Canada this question, so I'll ask you folks as well. Can you explain to my constituents why this is happening today? Are there alternatives? As I said to Nav Canada, it seems to me that this parallel approach they're now using over Sarcee Trail could just as easily be another mile or two to the west, where there's nothing but cattle to disturb, but that causes another problem, I guess.

Could you explain to me why that's not an option, and why my constituents are facing noise half an hour away from the airport?

Mr. Bob Sartor:

Obviously, I will be speaking to your constituents in a couple of weeks at a consultative committee meeting.

We have absolutely no say on where Nav Canada puts the planes.

At that distance, 3,000 feet is highly unlikely. They're well over 3,000 feet when they come over Inglewood sometimes. I think the altitude might be a little higher.

Having said that, noise still disturbs people, and people have different sensitivities to noise. I think we see that in the statistics we collect from Calgarians. Some feel they need to complain three times a day, and some perhaps once a year if something has been amiss.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I'm going to stop you, because I have only a minute left.

You are the operator of the airport relative to what's coming and going out of the airport. I have been told that some of these noisy aircraft at night are foreign aircraft, Russian or whatever, and it seems to me that the previous panel didn't seem to give any indication that there's any ability to control that situation, if that's correct.

Mr. Bob Sartor:

We have significant cargo operations at Calgary airport. Some of the major freighter carriers have new jets that are quieter, but many of the cargo planes are previous-generation jets. They will be older 767s, some 777s, which are noisier than, say, the 787. Effectively, you have passenger jets and when that generation of jets is done, some of those jets are reconditioned and repurposed as cargo, so they are louder planes.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Iacono, go ahead. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I thank the witnesses for being here this morning. My first question is for Mr. Massé from ADM.

Mr. Massé, you spoke about an advisory committee. What is its purpose?

Mr. Martin Massé:

The airport soundscape advisory committee meets four times a year. It is made up of municipal and borough councillors, representatives from NAV CANADA and Transport Canada, and our own public affairs, operations, and sustainable development managers. The air carriers also sit on this committee, and that is very important. After all, they are the ones who put the planes in the air.

This committee allows us to pool all of our statistics and discuss specific issues that affect certain regions. It will also soon allow us to test—at our next meeting—certain ideas in connection with our airport soundscape management action plan. Through this we are in a better position to align our data with the wishes expressed by the members of the committee regarding various sectors of activity.

(1015)

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Are the results of that committee's work shared with Transport Canada?

Mr. Martin Massé:

Transport Canada sits on the committee.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Perfect.

The word “advisory” makes me think that this committee could just be window-dressing. Why do you not make it permanent? You say it only meets four times a year. Why don't you hold more meetings? Noise is constant, not occasional. The population concerned might think that meeting four times a year is not very serious. What do you think of that?

Mr. Martin Massé:

First, the committee meets four times a year at a minimum. Secondly, I don't think the frequency of meetings should be taken as an indication of how serious the committee is or is not. We are very pleased to be here. I don't think you will call us again next week, but that does not cast doubt on the seriousness of your work.

The existence of the committee is assured since it has existed since 1992. All of the members keep in touch, and the committee publishes a summary of its work on the Internet. I think that if we were to meet more frequently, we would not be able to test the ideas discussed by the committee.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

I have a question for you. Based on the meetings you have held over all of those years, what changes have you made that had some positive noise-related impact on the population?

Mr. Martin Massé:

As I said earlier, we will be able to submit an action plan to the committee by its next meeting. This plan will allow us to manage airport soundscapes even better, and to establish a more direct link with stakeholders and answer questions. Indeed, there are often a lot of urban myths surrounding the management of airport soundscapes. This plan will allow us to be present and accessible and to answer all of the questions, particularly those of elected representatives, who speak out loudly and clearly. This will also allow us to remind everyone that we would like to see the City of Montreal—the greater Montreal area—set up a committee on urban noise, because after all, airplanes are not the only thing that make noise in large cities.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.

In its document entitled “Soundscape Statistics—Year 2017”, ADM lists 543 noise-related complaints. We just learned that in Calgary there were over 5,000 complaints. Could you describe the ADM complaint handling process?

Ms. Anne Marcotte (Director, Public Relations, Aéroports de Montréal):

With your permission, I will answer the question.

Currently, for each person who submits a complaint, we register one complaint per 24-hour period. That is why, in 2017, we received 543 complaints from 277 persons. In the course of our current review of the airport soundscape management plan, we will change that methodology.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Perfect.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin, you have the floor.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'd like to make a comment before I begin my questions. During the presentations by the witnesses who appeared via videoconference, the sound was so bad that it was practically impossible for the interpreters to do their work. When the committee receives guests via videoconference, I wonder whether it would not be worthwhile to do a sound test before the meeting begins to ensure that the communication will be good. That is the end of my comment, and I will leave that with you, Madam Chair.

My questions are for the Aéroports de Montréal, because that is the area I know best. However, I invite the other witnesses to intervene without hesitation if some of the issues speak to them as well.

Some of the points in your presentation were of particular interest to me, such as your statement that you co-operate with many organizations, including Transport Canada. That department is the regulatory body in charge of enforcing acoustic criteria. I have asked about the nature of those acoustic criteria about twelve times. Acoustics are a clear concept for musicians like myself; they are measured in decibels, frequencies, reverberation and even in soundproofing terms. Every time I asked the question, however, no one was able to provide me with any clear acoustic criteria, nor with any scientific numerical standard. Would you, Mr. Massé, be in a position to clarify these acoustic criteria you are attempting to have respected?

(1020)

Mr. Martin Massé:

Earlier, you spoke of the average noise level used by the WHO.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

That is a 55-decibel level, is it not?

Mr. Martin Massé:

Yes.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Mr. Martin Massé:

But that does not take noise peaks into account.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

It's an average, isn't it?

Mr. Martin Massé:

Yes, obviously, it is an average. When noise peaks, things are different.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

If our average is 80, we have to conclude that we aren't in the right range.

Mr. Martin Massé:

Quite so.

ADM uses two noise indicators: the acoustic level, the energy equivalent sound level or Leq, and the noise exposure forecast, NEF, which is basically the digital footprint.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Allow me a side note: are these data regarding the NEF accessible in real time on Transport Canada's website, or does the citizens' committee only have access to those statistics four times a year when the committee meets?

Mr. Martin Massé:

Your question is relevant. No, that data is not available in real time, since the NEF value is determined periodically, on an annual basis I believe. That figure is provided in ADM's annual report and on its website.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Fine.

With regard to the number of complaints, I see that close to one quarter concern night flights. Among the administrative or general choices made by a business, how can we explain that an airport like the Frankfort airport—which is far from small—chooses simply to prohibit night flights, whereas this seems completely impossible for Montreal airports or others in Canada?

Mr. Martin Massé:

This choice results from the balance that must be achieved between what the clientele asks for regarding flights, and what the airline companies can do. I don't know whether anyone has ever spoken to you about double rotation. That concept allows an airline company to use an aircraft to do the same route twice, in four segments, and thus serve a particular destination at a reasonable price, particularly sun destinations. This means that the aircraft has to fly as long as possible given the time it takes to prepare these double rotations in the winter, which probably includes two de-icings. So the point is to balance what the population is asking for, what the passenger is asking for, what the airline companies want, and, of course, what our weather permits, generally speaking.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you for that clarification. We nevertheless note that the number of one-time exceptions continues to increase. Does ADM have a strategy to reduce that number in the context of the large increase—I wouldn't say exponential, but it is really considerable—in air traffic? Is it plausible to think that one-time exemption requests will increase at the same rate as air traffic?

Mr. Martin Massé:

Several points need to be looked at.

First, an increase in the number of passengers does not necessarily lead to a proportional increase in the number of flights.

Secondly, air fleets are being renewed, as my colleague from Calgary, I believe, mentioned. Certain aircraft like Boeing 767s are being taken out of circulation and replaced with new-generation planes. Our studies show that the slight increase in the number of aircraft movements due to the renewal of those fleets over the coming years will not mean an increase in noise levels.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

In the same vein... [English]

The Chair:

I'm sorry, Mr. Aubin, you're overtime.

We now go to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I have a number of questions, so I'll ask for relatively short answers. If you want to expand on any of them, please feel free to submit a note to us, so it can go into the record.

We'll head out west, first and foremost.

Good morning, Ms. Murray and Mr. Cheng.

People in every community—including some in our own—that receives news that Amazon is going to open up a great big new facility jump up and down, rub their hands together and say, oh boy. Then the people at the airport say, okay, here it comes, more aircraft with more cargo, etc.

I'm wondering if, in the context of metro Vancouver, YVR has any kind of strategic collaboration with Abbotsford to see if it's possible to manage not only the noise issue of additional cargo flights, but also time shifting to make sure that they're arriving at less sensitive times, and perhaps to consider the ground transportation that inevitably comes after a cargo plane lands.

I have a general question. Do you work with Abbotsford to look at the larger strategic issues in our region? Could you speak to growth as well?

(1025)

Ms. Anne Murray:

Sure.

We work quite closely with all the airports in the region. There are a number of different airports. We just updated our long-term master plan, which looks out 20 years and looks at how we can manage airspace and the airports.

In terms of cargo and packages, we find that at Vancouver airport the majority of cargo comes in the belly of passenger aircraft. We see that growing. We actually have only one cargo freighter aircraft.

The packages are on relatively small aircraft and they're going in and out. We do have good connections from a ground transportation facility working with the local regional transit.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

It may be worthwhile keeping an eye on that, because you're definitely going to see a lot more bigger packages, especially with Amazon. Lord knows what they're ordering from that company these days.

We heard from a previous panel that sometimes an airport will prepare noise exposure forecasts to give the community a heads-up as to what may be coming with changes.

First, does YVR also provide this kind of service to the community? Do you ever get requests for this from a community that's looking to, for instance, build more housing in a given area on a flight path?

Do you ever hear of developments and proactively offer this kind of information so that the community is aware before things are done that there are some considerations here, particularly with respect to noise?

Ms. Anne Murray:

Yes, we prepare noise exposure forecast contours, and we look out 20-plus years. We provide those to the local municipalities. We have worked with the City of Richmond and encouraged them to require noise insulation information in advance to potential purchasers, and really look to reduce the effect of noise on people choosing to live near airports. It's to give them information so they can make choices about where they want to live.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Having said all that, do you ever hear of a new development somewhere and go, boy, here comes trouble?

Ms. Anne Murray:

Land use planning decisions are the purview of local municipalities. I have had conversations with some of our local municipalities and said that they really need to consider whether it's wise and advisable to have those individuals moving into new residential accommodation near airports.

It is Transport Canada that creates the guidelines. It's municipalities that make those choices. We do work with them, but it is a challenge sometimes.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I'm going to get you to stick your neck way out, here.

Would you advocate for the real estate industry to factor in the proximity of developments or home sales to facilities like yours, to ensure that the buyers understand what they're buying into?

Ms. Anne Murray:

We have actually done that. We've implemented that type of program with the City of Richmond, so that when they approve new developments in high-noise areas, they oblige the developer to include noise information, both in the sales venue and on restrictions on the property. There's a covenant on the land, so that every buyer is aware of the aircraft noise there.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Mr. Sartor—

The Chair:

I'm sorry, Mr. Hardie, but your time is up.

Mr. Graham, go ahead. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Mr. Massé and Ms. Marcotte, I have several questions for you about Dorval and Mirabel airports, as well as those that are located further north.

You heard the questions I put to the NAV CANADA witnesses about the Saint-Jérôme airport. There is a skydiving school at that airport that generates a lot of noise. School activities are restricted because of aircraft approaching Dorval and Mirabel Airports.

What is the current air traffic at Mirabel Airport?

(1030)

Ms. Anne Marcotte:

There are approximately 20,000 flights.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

And what kind of flights are they, generally?

Mr. Martin Massé:

Merchandise transport, some passenger transport, and a piloting school.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the Mirabel Airport operational zone, is there too much traffic for skydiving activities?

Mr. Martin Massé:

I cannot answer your question, but I can provide an answer later.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. We would appreciate that.

The Dorval Airport should continue to grow, because it has not reached full capacity. Even though the terminal was removed from the Mirabel Airport, does it still have a role to play in passenger transport in the Montreal region?

Mr. Martin Massé:

The Mirabel Airport certainly has a role to play. It has in fact never been as large an economic development player as it is today. It employs 5,000 people. These are well-paid jobs, in technical fields or engineering. Obviously, Airbus offers an opportunity for both aviation and industrial growth at Mirabel.

If the point of your question is to see whether that airport could begin to receive passenger flights again, I would say that that does not feature at all in the plans of ADM.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The Dorval Airport will continue to grow, and there will still be air traffic over neighbouring towns rather than in suburbs or agricultural areas. Is that correct?

Mr. Martin Massé:

That airport will without a doubt continue to grow. As for Mirabel, it is much more populous than it was 25 or 30 years ago.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That is also true.

Further north in my riding, at La Macaza, we have the Mont-Tremblant International Airport. That airport is not part of the airports you manage; could it play a role in air traffic management?

Mr. Martin Massé:

I cannot answer you regarding the airport at La Macaza. I can say, however, that an airport management system has to be designed around a large city. You can see this clearly in Toronto, where you have the Pearson, Billy Bishop, Hamilton and other airports. If our Toronto colleagues were here, they would certainly say that they are an occasional relief valve, but I don't want to speak for them.

I believe the future lies in the vision of an airport management system around cities.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would it be fair to say that the Mirabel Airport no longer receives passenger flights in large part because of the absence of rail transport?

Mr. Martin Massé:

That is a factor.

We must also remember that for technological reasons, there was a time when flights from Europe could not go any further than Mirabel on the North American continent. That was one of the reasons why Atlanta became the biggest airport. Several years ago, airplanes began to have the technical capacity to make it to Toronto and then even further.

Of course, access is a factor as well. Highway 13 was never completed and there was no rapid public transit link. But there were also technological reasons. There was also the fact that the choice was made to build an airport without boarding platforms and passenger transfer modules. That may have been a false good idea, which was almost never repeated elsewhere.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are you talking about the buses that went to the airport?

Mr. Martin Massé:

Yes. Most of them now serve Dorval.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I did take one, in fact, when I was young. It was quite interesting.

Mr. Martin Massé:

Nostalgia is a big seller.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I am going to continue to talk about the link between rail transport and air transport.

It is easier to take the train from Toronto to Dorval than from Montreal to Dorval. Is that a reasonable state of affairs?

Mr. Martin Massé:

What do you mean by “easier”?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It is not possible to take a VIA Rail train in Montreal to go to the Dorval Airport. During the entire weekend there are only seven commuter train departures. This is one of the airports in the world that is practically impossible to reach by train. Are you going to solve that problem?

Mr. Martin Massé:

That is an excellent question, sir. That is why we are so pleased about the fact that as early as 2023, an REM west branch line will reach the airport.

Regarding the Montreal Airport, we think that should go even further and that the REM should extend to the Via Rail station. It is located less than a kilometre away from the tiered parking which will be rebuilt, so close to the new REM station.

This will allow people, including those in the regions, to take the train to go to the airport. Trois-Rivières or Drummondville residents could easily go to the VIA Rail station in Dorval, then take a Réseau express métropolitain car for approximately one stop, and be warm and cozy in the airport.

(1035)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Jeneroux, go ahead.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you all for being here today. Thank you for coming from Calgary and Montreal. For you in Vancouver, even though you're not here, it's great to see you tonight.

I want to start with you, Mr. Sartor. In Edmonton, we have a fantastic airport, too. However, we're also in the process of looking at building that third runway, eventually. Depending on whom you talk to, it seems to be around the corner, but it's not quite at the stage that you guys are at. However, we're in a different situation. I don't think I've received a single complaint in my riding—and it goes right up to the edge of the city limits—because there's quite a distance, still, from the airport.

In terms of lessons learned—maybe it's consultation with the community—do you have some advice, perhaps, that you could pass on to me when we head down that path, which I hope is around the corner?

Mr. Bob Sartor:

Certainly. The Calgary airport has been in its existing location since 1937. The city was but a distant cluster of homes and businesses quite far away. What happened is that the city grew around the airport over a period of time. One thing that has been extremely helpful in Alberta—and it's a unique Alberta phenomenon—is the airport vicinity protection area. That was put in place in 1972, I think. Effectively, it looked at those noise exposure forecasts, based on aircraft at the time, in 1972, and said that any kind of residential development of any significance—schools, places of worship, those kinds of things—should not be built here.

So yes, the city is built around it, but unfortunately, even with those noise exposure forecasts.... The noise exposure forecasts are very beneficial, because they forced the municipality, if it wishes to build there, to work collaboratively with the airport. Unless the municipality and the airport agree, the legislation, which is provincial, will override. That's a real plus.

Having said that, we have not moved those noise exposure forecasts since 1972. The reality is that, while aircraft have gotten quieter, we've had much densification around the airport. The challenge is, even with great legislation.... The important thing, realistically, is a set of acoustical standards that will make sense for homes that are built on flight paths. That's something we're working on with the municipality right now. I don't think we'd have the opportunity to do that if we didn't have what we call the vehicle or the tool of the airport vicinity protection area.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

That's unique to Alberta. Has no other jurisdiction, provincially, considered something like this since 1972? That's not a question for you, but I do notice that some of the Nav Canada folks are still around here. Perhaps they could answer after the committee.

You talked about the cargo growth that you're experiencing. Cargo growth is a revenue tool. Is it something that airports out there are actively trying to take from each other? Is it growing? Do you want it from your international partners? How, exactly, does that come about? Do you have insight on some of the conversations that must happen to make this a reality?

Mr. Bob Sartor:

Again, in Calgary we have the unique situation that we are subject to the Regional Airports Authorities Act of Alberta. It's not just federal; we have provincial regulation, and one of those mandates is to drive economic activity, employment and GDP, not only on the airport campus but within the community we service.

We do go after cargo. It's more like the cargo is coming after us, because we happen to be ideally situated, with easy access to the Trans-Canada Highway. We are the largest consumer of that cargo product, so we will get flights coming in, in what we call our integration alley—the area where all the integrators are—and moving out toward Saskatchewan, west into the interior of B.C. and north into Edmonton.

(1040)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Is there a partnership between you and Edmonton? I know there are a bunch of regional airports, but Edmonton is attracting a fair bit of cargo, particularly from China. I'm curious whether there is that level of partnership between the two of you.

Mr. Bob Sartor:

I wouldn't call it a partnership, but Tom Ruth and I are friends and we talk constantly.

In fact, you'd find that most airport CEOs collaborate quite well.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Right. I imagine, though, that there is some competition. We often hear of flights being scooped by Calgary. We'd love the direct flights in Edmonton.

Mr. Bob Sartor:

We are in a unique position because we're a city of 1.2 million people and this year we will move 17.4 million people. Next year, we'll move another million or a million and one more. So we're a heavily connecting airport. Edmonton is less of a connecting airport and more of a feeder airport. It has its own international destinations, for sure, but connections are roughly 38% of our total business today, which makes us the busiest connecting airport in Canada.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

But you don't have the Edmonton Oilers.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Sikand, you have one minute if you have a short question.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

My question is for Mr. Massé.

I represent a riding in Mississauga, in the GTA. I'll tell you about my observations, but my actual question will be, what can we learn from Mirabel?

What I've observed is that Billy Bishop can't really reach its full potential because residents don't want the noise there. We're a bit disconnected. I like Pearson. I go through it and it's going to grow. I don't know if the infrastructure in the cities will be able to handle that unless we can get some rail in there and people moving through passenger means.

Pickering is a bit far, and Hamilton is a bit far. A solution, it seems to me, would be an airport north of the escarpment. It would be close to Hamilton and Pearson and would open up Guelph and Kitchener.

What can we learn from the Mirabel experience, though?

Mr. Martin Massé:

Personally, it would be quite preposterous on my side to interfere in this debate, but as for Mirabel, as I mentioned previously to your colleague, the fact of the matter is that we never had the commuting systems. Airplanes now can go over Mirabel. We also felt that Montreal lost its position as a hub up until 2013-14, when Air Canada decided to go back to Montreal as a hub.

All in all, for the community it made no sense to have two disconnected airports, without the commuting aspect—still having air connection but without the proper system. It made no sense.

Now that we know we'll have a commuting system, the REM, it will provide safe, sound and frequent commuting for the whole region, not just from downtown.[Translation]

I think circumstances and the contributions of all the players have meant that concentration around Dorval is the only way for that airport to play the role of economic driver for greater Montreal. [English]

The Chair:

Unfortunately, we have run out of time.

I've been given notice by Mr. Hardie and then a question from Mr. Aubin, but I'll go to Mr. Hardie if the witnesses will just bear with us for a moment or two.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'd like to raise something that we dealt with and set aside some time ago. I'd like to move that the committee now resume consideration of the motion, which read as follows: The Committee shall commit to not more than 4 meetings to study bus passenger safety, hearing from, in order but not limited to, emergency room physicians and coroners, the Transportation Safety Board, the US National Highway Transportation Safety Authority, transportation safety advocates and stakeholders, and finally from bus manufacturers, and that the Chair shall be empowered to coordinate the necessary witnesses, resources and scheduling to complete this task.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Hardie.

This is a dilatory motion, which is not up for discussion or debate.

(Motion agreed to)

(1045)

Mr. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Madam Chair, I wonder if I could introduce a friendly amendment.

The Chair:

Can you just hold off on that for a moment? I'd like to make a suggestion at this point, given our time. We have time on Thursday under committee business. Could we deal with the contents of the motion and the debate on Thursday?

Is the committee okay with that?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: At that time, on Thursday, we can have any amendments the committee might want to make, if that's all right with everyone.

Mr. Aubin, go ahead. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

This leads me to the question I wanted to ask. I'd like to know if the committee's next hearing on Thursday will be public. I would have also liked to table a motion regarding the Greyhound developments, and the notice period will have expired.

If we don't get good news this week, we can probably ask the minister to come and present his solutions. However, I did not want to table that motion before the deadline, given that the solutions may already be in the works.

Will our Thursday committee meeting be public? [English]

The Chair:

Right now, we're scheduled to do consideration of the draft recommendations for our trade corridor study. It's an in camera session for Thursday. You certainly can move to go in public at any time during that meeting.

You'll have a chance to review that a bit longer, and any amendments that you might want to present on Thursday.

Thank you very much to all of our witnesses. We appreciate it.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(0845)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Bienvenue au Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités de la 42e législature. Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, nous réalisons une étude pour évaluer l'incidence du bruit des avions près des grands aéroports canadiens.

Je souhaite la bienvenue aux membres du Comité et aux témoins.

Nous accueillons Sara Wiebe, directrice générale de la Politique aérienne, Dave Dawson, directeur des Politiques des aéroports et des services de navigation aérienne, Nicholas Robinson, directeur des Politiques et services de réglementation et, par vidéoconférence, Joseph Szwalek, directeur régional de l'Aviation civile — Ontario, et Clifford Frank, directeur associé des Opérations (Ouest), du ministère des Transports.

Nous accueillons aussi Neil Wilson, président-directeur général, Jonathan Bagg, gestionnaire principal des Affaires publiques, et Blake Cushnie, gestionnaire national de la Navigation basée sur les performances, de NAV CANADA.

Merci beaucoup à tous nos témoins d'avoir trouvé le temps de venir partager leurs connaissances avec nous aujourd'hui. Je vous demanderais de vous en tenir à des exposés de cinq minutes, afin que les membres du Comité aient assez de temps pour poser des questions.

Madame Wiebe, allez-y.

Mme Sara Wiebe (directrice générale, Politique aérienne, ministère des Transports):

Merci beaucoup d'avoir invité Transports Canada à comparaître devant le Comité. Je veux prendre le temps aujourd'hui de vous communiquer le point de vue de Transports Canada sur l'enjeu important à l'étude. Comme vous l'avez mentionné, madame la présidente, je suis accompagnée aujourd'hui de collègues de notre administration nationale et de deux collègues de notre bureau régional de Toronto qui participent par vidéoconférence.

Comme vous le savez probablement, l'objectif principal de Transports Canada consiste à s'assurer que les Canadiens ont accès à un système de transport sûr, sécuritaire, économique et responsable du point de vue environnemental. [Français]

À cette fin, au cours des années 1990, le gouvernement a pris une série de décisions visant à améliorer le système de transport aérien. L'une de ces décisions consistait à se soustraire aux opérations quotidiennes et aux choix commerciaux du système de navigation aérienne et des aéroports. En conséquence, NAV CANADA et les administrations aéroportuaires telles que l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto, ou GTAA, sont toutes désormais des sociétés privées à capital-actions et sans but lucratif. Cette décision s'est révélée être un succès.

NAV CANADA et les autorités aéroportuaires exploitant nos plus grands aéroports sont reconnues dans le monde entier pour la qualité de leurs services et leurs installations et, fait plus important, pour l'amélioration continue des niveaux de sécurité. Ces entités se sont révélées plus agiles, innovantes, efficaces et à l'écoute des besoins des parties prenantes. Elles démontrent également ces forces en matière de gestion de leurs affaires.

En ce qui concerne Toronto et ses environs, Transports Canada a observé qu'au cours des cinq dernières années, le degré de transparence, de responsabilité et d'inclusion a considérablement augmenté. NAV Canada et la GTAA travaillent en étroite collaboration avec d'autres intervenants pour trouver des solutions possibles pour réduire l'incidence du bruit des aéronefs dans cette région. Il est important que les parties prenantes, y compris les différents niveaux de gouvernement, l'industrie et les citoyens prennent part à ces discussions, étant donné que nous avons tous un rôle à jouer dans l'atténuation du bruit.

Toutefois, nous pensons que les problèmes spécifiques de bruit sont mieux compris et gérés par les parties prenantes locales. NAV CANADA et les autorités aéroportuaires travaillent avec les politiciens locaux, les groupes d'intérêt et les citoyens et ils mettront au point les meilleures solutions en tenant compte des compromis à faire quant à l'accès au vol, au développement économique et aux impacts environnementaux, y compris le bruit des avions.

(0850)

[Traduction]

Par exemple, jusqu'à maintenant, l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto a souvent été mentionné dans le cadre des discussions sur le bruit. Cet aéroport fournit des vols quotidiens directs vers plus de 67 % des économies mondiales. De plus, il crée ou aide à créer environ 332 000 emplois en Ontario, ce qui représente 42 milliards de dollars, ou encore 6,3 % du PIB ontarien. D'ici 2030, on estime que l'aéroport Pearson pourrait créer ou permettre de créer 542 000 emplois.

Cela dit, nous reconnaissons que le transport a une incidence sur la vie quotidienne des Canadiens. Nous le comprenons. Même si les transports sont l'épine dorsale de l'économie canadienne, les activités de transport doivent tenir compte des besoins des collectivités tout en respectant les Canadiens et l'environnement naturel. C'est la raison pour laquelle nos fonctionnaires surveillent de près les problèmes de bruit de l'aviation tout en participant aux tribunes appropriées et en encourageant des mesures progressistes.

De façon générale, de nombreuses choses entrent en ligne de compte, et une collaboration continue entre les divers intervenants est requise. Les fonctionnaires de Transports Canada s'efforceront toujours de surveiller l'industrie, de se tenir au courant des nouveautés et d'examiner les approbations et d'assurer la surveillance, au besoin.

Pour terminer, j'aimerais rapidement passer en revue la présentation que nous vous avons fournie. Je peux le faire en deux ou trois minutes, et nous serons ensuite heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Comme vous pouvez le voir sur la deuxième diapositive, les objectifs du document consistent à donner un aperçu des éléments essentiels de la gestion du bruit des aéronefs au Canada, à présenter les différents intervenants en cause et à illustrer l'approche canadienne équilibrée en matière de gestion du bruit des aéronefs.

Sur la troisième diapositive, vous constaterez qu'il y a une diversité d'intervenants qui participent à la gestion du bruit et que leurs rôles et responsabilités varient. Une gestion efficace du bruit des aéronefs exige la collaboration de toutes ces entités. L'industrie est responsable des activités quotidiennes, des décisions opérationnelles et de la communication avec les intervenants locaux, tandis que Transports Canada fournit la réglementation, la surveillance et l'orientation.

Passons aux diapositives 4 et 5. Il est important ici de reconnaître les directives internationales fournies relativement à cet enjeu important. Nous nous tournons à cet égard vers l'Organisation de l'aviation civile internationale, l'OACI, dont le siège social est situé à Montréal. Les directives de l'OACI sont axées sur une approche équilibrée en matière de gestion du bruit des aéronefs, et il y a quatre éléments qui se renforcent mutuellement.

La présidente:

Madame Wiebe, pourriez-vous conclure, s'il vous plaît?

Mme Sara Wiebe:

Bien sûr.

La sixième diapositive souligne qu'une approche équilibrée ne peut pas fonctionner sans engagement communautaire, et c'est la raison pour laquelle nous misons sur les exploitants d'aéroports qui oeuvrent dans la collectivité à cet égard. Par exemple, Transports Canada continue de participer aux activités des comités de gestion du bruit.

Je tiens également à souligner que, en 2015, grâce aux encouragements de Transports Canada, l'industrie a élaboré un ensemble de normes claires en vue de l'élaboration d'un Protocole de communications et de consultation sur les modifications à l’espace aérien.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup. Nous vous donnerons le temps de formuler vos autres commentaires.

Monsieur Wilson, vous avez cinq minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Neil Wilson (président-directeur général, NAV CANADA):

Merci, madame la présidente. [Français]

Bonjour tout le monde.[Traduction]

Comme la présidente l'a indiqué, je m'appelle Neil Wilson. Je suis président et chef de la direction de NAV CANADA. Je suis accompagné aujourd'hui de Jonathan Bagg, gestionnaire principal des Affaires publiques, et Blake Cushnie, gestionnaire national de la Navigation basée sur les performances.

J'aimerais d'abord remercier la présidente, les vice-présidents et les membres du Comité de nous accueillir ce matin.

C'est une réalité regrettable, mais, à notre époque, le bruit des aéronefs est une conséquence inévitable du mode de transport aérien. Cela dit, l'ensemble de l'industrie de l'aviation déploie des efforts importants pour réduire l'incidence de la circulation des aéronefs dans les collectivités. NAV CANADA est déterminé à atteindre cet objectif important en travaillant en collaboration avec nos partenaires sur cet enjeu important: les aéroports, les transporteurs aériens, Transports Canada, l'Organisation de l'aviation civile internationale et, ce qui est important, avec les collectivités.

En tant que fournisseur de services de navigation aérienne privés et sans but lucratif, NAV CANADA est responsable des déplacements sécuritaires et efficients des aéronefs dans l'ensemble de l'espace aérien contrôlé par le Canada, ce qui signifie que nous sommes responsables de plus de 18 millions de kilomètres carrés d'espace aérien qui surplombe l'ensemble du pays et couvre la moitié de l'Atlantique Nord, l'espace aérien océanique le plus occupé du monde. Nous gérons chaque année plus de 3,3 millions de vols pour quelque 40 000 clients, y compris des transporteurs aériens, des transporteurs de fret et des entreprises d'aviation générales et d'affaires.

Nous remplissons notre mandat principalement grâce à la prestation de services de contrôle de la circulation aérienne et d'information de vol, la gestion, la mise à niveau et la publication de produits de renseignements aéronautiques, la prestation d'infrastructures fiables de communication, de navigation et de surveillance et la mise à la disposition des intervenants 24 heures sur 24 et 7 jours sur 7 de systèmes de gestion du trafic aérien de pointe, dont bon nombre ont été conçus ici même au Canada par NAV CANADA pour ensuite être exportés dans le monde entier.

Grâce au travail de nos 5 100 employés répartis dans plus d'une centaine d'installations opérationnelles partout au pays, le Canada affiche l'un des meilleurs bilans de sécurité au monde en matière de gestion de la circulation aérienne. De plus, nous affichons une telle réussite grâce à un modèle d'utilisateur-payeur qui affiche certains des frais de gestion les plus bas et qui compte parmi les plus rentables du monde.

Pour dire les choses simplement, notre service est intrinsèquement essentiel à une industrie qui emploie des centaines de milliers de Canadiens, permet à des millions d'entre nous de communiquer avec le reste du monde et fait avancer l'économie canadienne. C'est la raison pour laquelle, depuis 1996 — quand on nous a donné la responsabilité du système de navigation aérienne —, nous avons investi plus de 2 milliards de dollars dans le but de rendre le transport aérien plus sécuritaire et plus efficient.

Parallèlement, nous sommes aussi déterminés à aider à réduire l'empreinte de l'industrie — en ce qui concerne tant les émissions de gaz à effet de serre que le bruit des aéronefs — et nous investissons aussi à ces fins. Grâce à des innovations technologiques et des améliorations procédurales, NAV CANADA a aidé à réduire la consommation de carburant de l'industrie et les émissions de gaz à effet de serre connexes. Nous estimons que nos efforts ont permis, en 2017 seulement, des réductions des gaz à effet de serre de 1,5 million de tonnes.

En outre, en raison de notre rôle de fournisseur de services de navigation aérienne, nous devons nous assurer que nos procédures de contrôle du trafic aérien respectent les restrictions d'exploitation liées au bruit et les procédures d'atténuation du bruit partout au Canada. NAV CANADA participe régulièrement à des projets de modernisation de l'espace aérien. En mettant en place des procédures de pointe, NAV CANADA cherche à définir des trajectoires d'approche et de départ au-dessus de zones non résidentielles, ciblant les terrains industriels et commerciaux et les terres agricoles. Dans plusieurs cas, nous avons réussi à éloigner en totalité ou en partie les trajectoires de vol des zones résidentielles. Les nouvelles technologies augmentent par ailleurs le recours à des méthodes de descente continue moins bruyantes, ce qui permet aux aéronefs une descente plus fluide en faisant tourner leur moteur à un régime plus bas.

Lorsque je suis devenu président-directeur général en 2016, l'une des premières choses que j'ai faites, c'est de rencontrer certains dirigeants communautaires préoccupés par le bruit des aéronefs à Toronto pour discuter de leurs préoccupations. Nos discussions ont débouché sur un examen indépendant de l'espace aérien, examen que nous avons demandé et qui a récemment été terminé. Dans le cadre de ces travaux, nous avons examiné les méthodes d'atténuation du bruit dans des aéroports de partout dans le monde et sollicité des commentaires des collectivités de la région de Toronto ce qui a donné lieu à une série de recommandations qui sont, selon moi, à la fois utiles et réalistes.

Certaines de ces recommandations ont fait l'objet de vastes consultations publiques menées conjointement avec l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto au printemps dernier. Le processus se soldera par la mise en oeuvre, dès novembre, de nouvelles procédures d'approche et de départ de nuit. Ces mesures d'atténuation feront en sorte que jusqu'à 221 000 personnes de moins seront touchées par le bruit lié aux vols de nuit, selon la piste et la procédure utilisée. À mesure que nous évaluerons ces mesures d'atténuation et solliciterons la rétroaction de la collectivité et des intervenants, nous verrons si d'autres aéroports pourraient bénéficier d'une approche similaire.

Lorsque nous concevons ces améliorations liées à l'espace aérien, nos responsabilités sont décrites dans le Protocole de communications et de consultation sur les modifications à l’espace aérien, qui fournit des directives sur des situations où des consultations publiques devraient être menées et la façon dont il faut les mener tout en favorisant une collaboration à l'échelle de l'industrie.

(0855)



Nous restons déterminés à travailler en toute transparence autant avec les intervenants de l'industrie qu'avec les collectivités, de façon à cerner les occasions de réduire l'impact de l'exploitation des aéronefs tout en répondant aux besoins actuels et futurs dans l'espace aérien du pays.

Merci, madame la présidente; nous serons heureux de répondre à vos questions.

La présidente:

Nous allons passer à Mme Block.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je vous remercie de votre présence et de votre témoignage.

J'ai deux ou trois questions pour NAV CANADA. Je crois savoir qu'un des aspects du mandat de NAV CANADA consiste à modifier les trajectoires de vol afin d'améliorer l'efficience au sein de l'espace aérien. Vous en avez parlé dans votre déclaration préliminaire. Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus sur les facteurs que vous prenez en considération lorsque vous apportez des changements aux trajectoires de vol existantes?

(0900)

M. Neil Wilson:

Merci de la question.

Lorsque nous examinons les trajectoires de vol dans des collectivités précises, nous avons évidemment à l'esprit l'impact que les changements auront sur les personnes touchées dans les environs des aéroports. Au pays, les aéroports ont tendance à être situés dans de grandes villes, et il y a donc des répercussions lorsque des aéronefs passent par là. Nous tenons compte des économies de carburant et des facteurs liés à la sécurité associés à la modification des trajectoires de vol. Nous interagissons aussi de façon très délibérée et très prudente avec les collectivités touchées.

Nous participons d'un certain nombre de façons différentes, et nos actions s'appuient en grande partie sur le Protocole de communications et de consultation sur les modifications à l’espace aérien, qui définit les responsabilités des aéroports, de NAV CANADA et des autres intervenants de l'industrie. En effet, c'est vraiment un effort conjoint auquel nous participons tous. Lorsque nous procédons ainsi, nous organisons des séances d'information à l'intention des résidents des zones touchées, et le contenu des séances est adapté en fonction de leurs préoccupations. Nous fournissons des renseignements précis sur la façon dont les gens pourront être touchés et au sujet des possibles mesures d'atténuation dans leur région. Nous en discutons avec eux. Nous rencontrons les représentants élus comme vous — à l'échelon national ou aux échelons provinciaux et municipaux — qui représentent d'autres personnes possiblement touchées, de façon à bien comprendre les enjeux. Nous fournissons beaucoup de renseignements en ligne à l'intention des personnes qui ne peuvent pas participer aux réunions en personne que nous organisons dans les collectivités.

Nous essayons de procéder ainsi le plus rapidement et le plus uniformément possible. Au fil des ans, nous n'avons peut-être pas toujours fait un aussi bon travail qu'il aurait fallu. Nous avons appris de ça et nous tentons, jour après jour, de nous améliorer.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup.

En tant qu'organisme responsable de la gestion du trafic aérien partout au pays, de quelle façon croyez-vous que l'ensemble de l'industrie canadienne de l'aviation peut dissiper les préoccupations liées au bruit des aéronefs sans nuire à la compétitivité économique de notre pays?

M. Neil Wilson:

Selon moi, nous devons trouver un équilibre. L'aviation est un moteur important de l'activité économique au pays. Ce l'est à l'échelle internationale. Le Canada est tout particulièrement touché par l'aviation. Nous nous trouvons sur les trajectoires de vol entre l'Europe et les États-Unis, au sud, puisque le trafic aérien entre ces deux zones passe par notre espace aérien. Nous avons bâti notre pays non seulement grâce au chemin de fer, mais aussi grâce à l'aviation. L'aviation est essentielle à l'économie du pays. Il ne faut pas l'oublier.

En même temps, nous devons comprendre et prendre en considération les préoccupations très légitimes des personnes dans les collectivités touchées par le bruit, les gens qui vivent près des principaux aéroports qui ont pris de l'expansion au fil du temps. Il faut en tenir compte et s'assurer de trouver un juste équilibre.

Mme Kelly Block:

Pouvez-vous nous parler un peu du rôle que vous pourriez jouer pour atteindre cet équilibre, peut-être en déplaçant une partie du trafic aérien destiné à un aéroport comme Pearson, vers celui de Hamilton. Nous savons que certains ont suggéré la possibilité de transférer une partie du trafic aérien, surtout le trafic aérien de fret, vers un plus petit aéroport régional, de façon à réduire la pression exercée sur un plus grand centre et à accommoder les résidents qui y vivent.

Pouvez-vous formuler des commentaires à ce sujet, s'il vous plaît?

M. Neil Wilson:

Bien sûr. Nous facilitons le déplacement des aéronefs. Nous ne décidons pas où les aéronefs s'en vont. Nous n'exploitons pas les aéroports, ce travail relève des aéroports eux-mêmes. Les transporteurs aériens s'occupent du transport aérien, et les transporteurs de fret choisissent leur base d'opérations.

Ils ont tous des intérêts en ce qui concerne les endroits d'où ils doivent exercer leurs activités et la façon dont ils doivent travailler, et nous facilitons les déplacements en conséquence. Nous nous assurons que les déplacements sont sécuritaires — c'est notre objectif primordial —, et nous nous assurons qu'ils sont aussi efficients.

Évidemment, nous nous intéressons aux décisions stratégiques prises par les divers intervenants. Nous voulons nous assurer qu'ils puissent faire les choses comme bon leur semble. Nous voulons nous assurer que tout se fait de façon sécuritaire et de la façon la plus efficiente possible. Lorsque nous examinons les trajectoires de vol qu'on nous demande de concevoir ou relativement auxquelles on nous demande un soutien, nous voulons nous assurer que, si des collectivités sont touchées de façon négative, nous sommes là pour essayer de réduire au minimum les dégâts et formuler des suggestions sur la façon dont on pourrait y arriver.

Nous faisons partie de cette infrastructure. Nous ne prenons pas ces genres de décisions, mais nous voulons nous assurer d'être parties à la conversation et d'être le plus utiles possible pour tous les intervenants et toutes les collectivités pouvant être touchées.

(0905)

Mme Kelly Block:

D'accord. Merci.

La présidente:

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci à vous tous d'être là.

Madame Wiebe, j'ai une question pour vous. La responsabilité ultime du fonctionnement de tout le système revient inévitablement au gouvernement, parce que tout le monde se tourne vers le gouvernement lorsque les choses ne fonctionnent pas comme il faut. Au sein du gouvernement, qui, au bout du compte, est responsable du dossier?

Mme Sara Wiebe:

Comme je l'ai mentionné dans ma déclaration préliminaire, le ministère — le gouvernement — est déterminé à offrir un système de transport qui est sûr, sécuritaire et respectueux de l'environnement et qui contribue à notre économie.

Selon moi, au bout du compte, Transports Canada continue d'examiner de très près tous les éléments du secteur du transport aérien qui ont été déréglementés, comme le travail de NAV CANADA et la gestion de nos administrations aéroportuaires.

Nous travaillons en très étroite collaboration avec ces entités. Je crois que Neil en a un peu marre de nous voir, parfois, mais nous travaillons vraiment en très étroite collaboration avec son organisation pour surveiller les activités qu'elle réalise, du point de vue du cadre stratégique, certes, mais aussi du point de vue très important du cadre réglementaire dont nous assurons la gestion et la surveillance en ce qui concerne non seulement le bruit, mais les divers éléments associés à la sûreté et la sécurité de notre secteur aérien.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci de votre réponse.

Monsieur Wilson, vous avez mentionné avoir réalisé une étude auprès de la collectivité sur les problèmes de bruit liés au trafic aérien autour de l'aéroport Pearson. Pouvons-nous obtenir une copie du rapport et des recommandations?

M. Neil Wilson:

Bien sûr. Il y a eu deux ou trois initiatives réalisées au sujet de Pearson et de la région du Grand Toronto. En collaboration avec l'aéroport Pearson...

M. Ken Hardie:

Je suis désolé, mais j'ai besoin d'une réponse très brève, monsieur, parce que j'ai d'autres questions.

M. Neil Wilson:

Oui.

M. Ken Hardie:

C'est une bonne réponse. Merci.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. Ken Hardie: J'ai noté avec intérêt les commentaires d'un de nos témoins précédents, qui a dit que l'aéroport Pearson est enclavé, complètement enclavé. Je ne sais pas s'il l'était au moment de sa construction, mais il l'est assurément actuellement.

Dans le régime actuel, NAV CANADA participe-t-elle aux discussions, par exemple, si une municipalité voulait rezoner et réaménager une zone à proximité d'un aéroport? Est-ce que vous participeriez aux consultations publiques?

M. Neil Wilson:

Je vais laisser M. Bagg répondre. Nous voulons être le plus utiles et le plus coopératifs possible. Je ne peux pas vous dire que nous allons recevoir un avis à chaque fois qu'un tel incident se produit, mais M. Bagg peut vous aider à ce sujet.

M. Jonathan Bagg (gestionnaire principal, Affaires publiques, NAV CANADA):

Lorsqu'il est question du zonage et du développement, les autorités aéroportuaires sont responsables de produire ce qu'on appelle des prévisions d'ambiance sonore. Elles reçoivent à cet égard des directives de Transports Canada. Ces prévisions d'ambiance sonore fournissent une orientation quant aux genres de projets immobiliers qui sont appropriés à proximité d'un aéroport. Il revient à la municipalité de tenir compte de ces directives.

M. Ken Hardie:

Si vous êtes mis au courant d'un projet et que personne n'est venu vous voir pour que vous participiez, offririez-vous vos services de façon proactive?

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Les prévisions d'ambiance sonore sont préparées par les aéroports, et plus précisément par les autorités aéroportuaires, pas par NAV CANADA en tant que tel.

M. Ken Hardie:

Nous devrons leur demander si elles participent de façon proactive, parce que, comme nous l'avons remarqué dans certains autres témoignages, de tels projets peuvent se produire et, la prochaine chose qu'on apprend, c'est que quelqu'un appelle pour se plaindre du bruit.

Je remarque avec intérêt qu'il y a habituellement un grand nombre d'hôtels près des aéroports, des endroits où les gens peuvent dormir après un long vol ou avant de décoller. Je suis resté dans quelques-uns de ces hôtels, et j'ai remarqué qu'ils sont remarquablement insonorisés. Y a-t-il des techniques de construction — particulièrement lorsqu'il y a un nouveau projet, un projet d'aménagement résidentiel — dont devraient tenir compte les promoteurs et la municipalité dans le cas des villes ou des collectivités qui se trouveront sur une trajectoire de vol?

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Il y a différentes techniques de construction permettant d'atténuer le bruit, et tout ça tient à la qualité de l'isolant, aux vitres et ainsi de suite. Au Canada, nous bénéficions de facteurs naturels d'atténuation du bruit en raison de nos hivers — nous avons beaucoup d'isolant dans nos maisons —, mais ce n'est pas un dossier relativement auquel NAV CANADA pouvait fournir des directives précises.

M. Ken Hardie:

Qui pourrait le faire?

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Je ne suis pas sûr à 100 % de quel organisme serait responsable de ça. Je crois qu'on en revient aux exigences en matière de zonage permettant de définir quels genres de projets sont appropriés dans une zone.

(0910)

M. Ken Hardie:

Qui prend les décisions quant au nombre de vols de nuit permis dans une installation donnée?

M. Neil Wilson:

Les aéroports décident des vols qu'elles vont recevoir en fonction des demandes précises qu'ils reçoivent. Nous n'établissons pas la demande dans les aéroports. Nous gérons le va-et-vient des avions dans les aéroports. Nous ne décidons pas qui peut se poser et qui ne peut pas le faire. Ce sont les aéroports qui prennent ces décisions.

Cela dit, lorsqu'il y a moins de vols, la nuit, par exemple, nous pouvons faire différentes choses. Si nous pouvons le faire et si la sécurité le permet, nous pouvons modifier nos procédures pour modifier les trajectoires de différentes façons. C'est l'une des choses précises que nous envisageons de faire à l'aéroport Pearson.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'accord.

Madame Wiebe, est-ce que Transports Canada est consulté? Qui doit approuver le plan d'un aéroport d'accroître le nombre de vols de nuit?

Mme Sara Wiebe:

Je pourrais peut-être demander à nos collègues de la région de l'Ontario de parler précisément des circonstances entourant l'aéroport Pearson, par exemple.

Joe et Cliff, je vous laisse répondre.

M. Joseph Szwalek (directeur régional, Aviation civile - Ontario, ministère des Transports):

D'accord. Merci de la question.

En ce qui concerne les vols de nuit, tout dépend des passagers qui arrivent à l'aéroport et en partent. En 2013, nous avons reçu une demande pour accroître le nombre de vols de nuit. Encore une fois, on parle de la période calme, de 0 h 30 à 6 h 30 du matin. Jusqu'à présent, l'aéroport n'a pas augmenté le nombre de vols. Le bail foncier exige de l'Autorité qu'elle garde l'aéroport tel qu'il était lorsqu'elle l'a pris en charge en 1996.

M. Ken Hardie:

À qui la demande a-t-elle été faite?

M. Joseph Szwalek:

Vous parlez de la demande d'augmentation?

M. Ken Hardie:

Oui.

M. Joseph Szwalek:

Elle a été présentée au ministre de Transports Canada.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie aussi nos nombreux témoins d'être parmi nous ce matin.

Je vais adresser mes questions à Mme Wiebe et à M. Wilson, mais elles pourront être dirigées vers d'autres personnes au besoin. J'aimerais recevoir des réponses brèves puisque j'ai beaucoup de questions et que je ne dispose que de peu de temps.

Monsieur Wilson, vous avez dit, dans vos propos préliminaires que vous mettiez tout en place pour atteindre cet objectif de réduction du bruit, mais cela m'apparaît un peu vague. Y a-t-il une norme chiffrée?

Par exemple, il me semble avoir lu que l'OACI dit qu'on ne devrait pas dépasser 55 décibels. Y a-t-il un objectif chiffré en ce qui concerne le bruit? [Traduction]

M. Neil Wilson:

Je vais demander à M. Bagg de répondre à votre question.

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Il n'y a pas de directive précise en ce qui a trait à d'éventuelles exigences en matière de bruit visant les aéronefs qui survolent des zones résidentielles. Nous utilisons des méthodes comme la modélisation du bruit lorsque nous concevons les trajectoires de vol afin de comprendre l'impact sonore des changements, et nous communiquons ces changements. Nous cernons aussi des façons d'accroître les avantages. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

J'imagine que c'est la même chose quand vous parlez de conformité aux normes acoustiques. Là non plus, il n'y a pas de norme scientifique chiffrée qui permettrait à tout le monde d'avoir une compréhension commune. Est-ce exact? [Traduction]

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Il y a certaines mesures. Vous avez accueilli des gens plus tôt — durant une réunion précédente à laquelle Colin Novak avait participé, par exemple —, qui vous ont parlé de mesures et du fait qu'ils peuvent comprendre le désagrément, il n'y a pas d'exigence précise de respecter un certain niveau de décibels. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Vous avez parlé de descente progressive — je ne me rappelle pas le terme exact — des avions qui passent principalement au-dessus des zones industrielles ou des zones agricoles, mais le problème ne se situe pas tellement dans ces zones — bien qu'il puisse y en avoir aussi.

Est-ce que cette pratique est généralisée à l'ensemble des vols ou peut-on utiliser une autre technique d'atterrissage en zones résidentielles qui permettrait peut-être des approches plus rapides, mais qui diminuerait le bruit? [Traduction]

M. Neil Wilson:

Je vais demander à M. Cushnie de répondre en fournissant certains détails, mais, de façon générale, nous préférons les opérations de descente continue, peu importe la zone survolée, parce que cette méthode est beaucoup plus silencieuse.

M. Cushnie peut vous fournir des renseignements plus détaillés à ce sujet.

M. Blake Cushnie:

Merci de la question.

Pour répondre à la question sur les zones industrielles, je peux vous dire que l'un des objectifs que nous tentions d'atteindre récemment, et c'est quelque chose que nous mettrons en oeuvre en novembre, à Toronto, c'est l'utilisation d'une nouvelle technologie pour essayer d'éloigner le plus possible les vols de nuit des zones peuplées.

Durant le jour, notre objectif consiste à miser sur la descente continue, essentiellement d'utiliser la nouvelle technologie pour guider les avions vers les pistes par les moyens les plus silencieux possible. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse d'abord aux témoins de Transports Canada.

Le ministère fait un certain nombre d'études sur le bruit, ce qu'on appelle les NEF. Ma question est très simple. Ces données sont-elles rendues publiques? Si non, pourquoi?

(0915)

[Traduction]

Mme Sara Wiebe:

Lorsque nous parlons des différentes études qui ont été réalisées au sujet de la réduction du bruit, je soulignerais surtout les études qui ont été réalisées par NAV CANADA et l'AAGT, par exemple. Nous travaillons avec eux sur la production de ces rapports ainsi que sur l'évaluation et la surveillance de la mise en oeuvre de certaines recommandations. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

J'ai peut-être mal formulé ma question. Lorsque Transports Canada utilise le système de prévisions de l'ambiance sonore, publie-t-il les résultats sur son site ou pas? [Traduction]

Mme Sara Wiebe:

Merci de la question.

Je regarde mon collègue de l'aviation civile, mais je ne crois pas que nous connaissons les rapports dont vous parlez. Nous pourrons certainement prendre la question en délibéré, mais je ne connais pas ce genre de rapport. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord.

Je vous ferai parvenir la question par écrit pour être plus précis et ne pas perdre trop de temps sur cette question ce matin.

Il y a un point qui me chicote. Vous avez dit que Transports Canada a pour premier souci la sécurité et qu'il fait affaire avec des organismes que je respecte, comme NAV CANADA. En quoi le fait que Transports Canada se retire d'un certain nombre de réglementations et confie ses responsabilités en la matière à d'autres organismes a-t-il fait augmenter la sécurité au Canada? [Traduction]

Mme Sara Wiebe:

Encore une fois, merci de la question.

J'ai mentionné que, vers la fin des années 1980, nous avons déréglementé notre secteur aérien dans le cadre d'initiatives comme la privatisation d'Air Canada. Au milieu des années 1990, nous avons poursuivi la déréglementation du secteur en créant les autorités aéroportuaires, des mesures qui ont mené à la création de NAV CANADA.

Je tiens à préciser que la responsabilité finale quant à la sûreté du secteur aérien canadien revient au ministre, en ce sens que cette responsabilité est en grande partie assurée grâce à la surveillance réglementaire de mes collègues de l'aviation civile. La responsabilité de la sécurité reste entre les mains du ministre. Cependant, la mise en oeuvre de la responsabilité se fait par l'entremise d'entités comme NAV CANADA et les autorités aéroportuaires. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Depuis bon nombre d'années — et cela a commencé avant que l'administration libérale actuelle arrive au pouvoir —, le ministère des Transports se retire d'une série de réglementations et donne de plus en plus de pouvoirs à de grandes compagnies ou à d'autres organismes.

À votre avis, ne serait-il pas justifié de reprendre la direction d'un certain nombre de réglementations pour veiller à que des normes nationales soient établies et respectées? [Traduction]

Mme Sara Wiebe:

En réponse à votre question, comme je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire, j'estime qu'on peut considérer la déréglementation du secteur aérien canadien comme une réussite. Nous considérons que le secteur est maintenant plus concurrentiel à l'échelle internationale d'un point de vue économique à certains égards, mais nous croyons aussi que le secteur aérien canadien est plus sûr et sécuritaire grâce aux mesures prises à la fin des années 1980 et au milieu des années 1990.

Encore une fois, j'insiste sur le fait que la responsabilité ultime pour la sûreté et la sécurité du secteur aérien canadien incombe au ministre et tient à la surveillance réglementaire réalisée par le ministère et mes collègues de l'aviation civile.

La présidente:

Monsieur Iacono, allez-y. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins d'être ici ce matin.

Lors de notre rencontre en mai avec des représentants de NAV CANADA, ces derniers ont souligné qu'il n'y avait pas eu de changements importants dans la manière de voir les choses depuis les 20 dernières années. Par contre, il est clair que les réalités urbaines dans la région du Grand Montréal et celle de Laval ont changé depuis ces 20 dernières années.

Est-ce que NAV CANADA a adapté les différentes trajectoires de vol en fonction du développement urbain dans la région du Grand Montréal et celle de Laval? [Traduction]

M. Neil Wilson:

La ville de Montréal a assurément changé au cours des 20 dernières années. Je vais demander à M. Bagg de vous donner des détails sur les changements liés aux trajectoires de vol. [Français]

M. Jonathan Bagg:

En effet, récemment, il n'y a pas eu de changements importants concernant les approches. C'est sûr que le trafic à l'aéroport de Montréal a augmenté et que plus d'avions y atterrissent, mais il n'y a pas eu de changements quant aux routes aériennes pour tenir compte de l'augmentation de la population dans ces régions.

(0920)

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.

Est-ce que la densité de la population est un critère dans l'établissement de nouveaux corridors de transport?

Quels sont les critères? De quand date la dernière mise à jour de ces critères?

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Nous utilisons bien sûr la modélisation du bruit pour comprendre l'incidence des routes aériennes. Quand nous travaillons spécifiquement à la modernisation de l'espace aérien et que nous envisageons de changer celui-ci, nous utilisons la modélisation et de l'information issue du recensement pour connaître le nombre de personnes susceptibles de subir le bruit et pour déterminer comment nous pourrions réduire ce nombre.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Y a-t-il eu une mise à jour récente? Le cas échéant, pouvez-vous nous donner la date précise?

M. Jonathan Bagg:

La dernière mise à jour importante de l'espace aérien de Montréal a eu lieu en 2012.

M. Angelo Iacono:

NAV CANADA est autorisée à modifier unilatéralement les routes aériennes afin d'améliorer l'efficacité de l'espace aérien.

Pouvez-vous nous décrire le déroulement du processus de modification des routes aériennes et nous dire quelles sont les principales raisons de ces changements, particulièrement en ce qui concerne les vols de nuit? [Traduction]

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Pour ce qui est du changement lié à l'espace aérien, nous nous appuyons sur le Protocole de communications et de consultation sur les modifications à l’espace aérien, qui inclut des exigences et des responsabilités rigoureuses que NAV CANADA doit respecter et assumer au moment d'apporter des changements à l'espace aérien.

Cela comprend la façon dont les consultations sont réalisées et la façon dont nous communiquons les répercussions des changements. Le Protocole donne aussi certaines directives en matière de délai quant à la rapidité avec laquelle nous devons fournir des avis en cas d'événement de consultation publique. En outre, il y a aussi des exigences redditionnelles de suivi. Un rapport d'engagement public doit être produit après une consultation et avant qu'une recommandation de procéder au changement soit formulée. C'est un aspect clé du processus.

Il y a un autre aspect relativement auquel il faut faire un suivi, et c'est l'examen après 180 jours. Dans le cadre de cet examen, nous revenons sur ce qui s'est passé environ six mois après la mise en oeuvre pour examiner le rendement opérationnel et prendre le pouls de toute rétroaction communautaire reçue à la suite du changement. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

En France, par exemple, la procédure d'approche en descente continue est mise en place dans les 11 principaux aéroports, dont celui de Paris-Charles de Gaulle. Dans le cas de ce dernier, le taux de réalisation des procédures d'approche en descente continue s'élevait à 30 %, seulement en 2017.

Dans la note d'information que vous avez fait parvenir aux membres du Comité, il est mentionné que « la Société augmente l'utilisation de descentes continues moins bruyantes ».

Quel est le taux de réalisation des procédures d'approche en descente continue au Canada? [Traduction]

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Si vous regardez notre situation actuelle, vous verrez que, en fait, nous avons récemment créé une entité, le conseil de l'industrie sur la gestion du bruit, qui réunit des experts techniques de toute l'industrie. Une des tâches du groupe, à commencer par Toronto, c'est d'en venir à une définition acceptable de la notion de descente continue — la définition en tant que telle et ce à quoi cette technique ressemble d'un point de vue opérationnel — et de commencer à produire des rapports à ce sujet à Toronto. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Est-ce que cette procédure d'approche est mise en pratique dans le cas de tous les vols de nuit? [Traduction]

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Idéalement, nous voulons que tous les aéronefs misent sur la descente continue. Encore une fois, idéalement, du début de la descente — c'est l'altitude de croisière — jusqu'à ce qu'il touche la piste, l'aéronef serait en descente continue. Nous essayons d'utiliser cette méthode le plus possible.

Nous devons parfois avoir recours à la mise en palier pour assurer la distance entre les aéronefs. L'une des façons de séparer les aéronefs, c'est sur un plan vertical. Il peut y avoir 1 000 pieds de séparation verticale, et cela exige que nous demandions à un aéronef de garder une certaine altitude. À l'avenir, une bonne partie des travaux que nous continuerons de faire à l'échelle internationale et en tant qu'entreprise, ce serait de promouvoir une augmentation du recours à la descente continue. C'est assurément une priorité pour l'organisation. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.

Madame Wiebe,[Traduction]on nous a dit durant la comparution du dernier groupe de témoins que l'aéroport Pearson connaît actuellement des difficultés financières. Pouvez-vous le confirmer? Dans l'affirmative, dans quelle mesure est-ce le cas? Quel est le chiffre?

Mme Sara Wiebe:

Merci beaucoup.

Tout d'abord, j'ai lu le témoignage et les commentaires sur le fait que l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto était en difficulté financière. Je crois qu'il faut plutôt regarder la situation du point de vue de l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto, l'AAGT. Il faut regarder ses plans futurs, la façon dont son infrastructure continuera de soutenir des volumes accrus d'avions qui veulent se poser à l'aéroport. C'est de ce point de vue que l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto contracte une dette afin de financer ses activités.

C'est le résultat de la politique canadienne de l'utilisateur-payeur. Vous en avez peut-être déjà entendu parler. Je le mentionne parce que nos autorités aéroportuaires doivent financer toutes les infrastructures de leurs aéroports sans aucun soutien financier du gouvernement. En fait, il y a un soutien limité. Cela signifie que, lorsque vous et moi nous rendons à cet aéroport, nous payons pour notre déplacement et nous contribuons à l'infrastructure construite à l'aéroport.

(0925)

M. Angelo Iacono:

Le montant divulgué était-il le bon?

Mme Sara Wiebe:

Je pense que l'AAGT comparaîtra devant le Comité à une date ultérieure. Je crois qu'il serait préférable de poser cette question à ses représentants.

M. Angelo Iacono: Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Sikand, allez-y.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Merci.

Je vais essayer de faire vite, parce que je veux partager mon temps avec un collègue.

On entend souvent parler de rapports d'entreprises en Angleterre, et nous avons entendu parler du modèle de Francfort. Je suis un partisan de l'apprentissage des pratiques exemplaires, mais, comme M. Wilson y a fait allusion, le Canada est assez extraordinaire. Nous avons des défis uniques, et j'aimerais qu'on mette l'accent sur ceux-ci. Quels sont les défis uniques auxquels le Canada est confronté lorsqu'il est question de réduction du bruit?

M. Neil Wilson:

Oui, nous sommes extraordinaires.

Nous avons certaines caractéristiques qui sont uniques, mais nous pouvons apprendre beaucoup des autres. J'ai parlé d'une étude qui a été demandée. Le groupe chargé de la réaliser... Nous avons choisi ce groupe parce qu'il avait réalisé une étude sur le même problème près de Gatwick, au Royaume-Uni. Nous savons que nous pouvons apprendre des pratiques exemplaires de là-bas.

Nous sommes uniques en ce qui concerne la composition de la flotte d'aéronefs que nous devons desservir. Mon collègue a parlé de certaines des technologies que nous utilisons. Il y a des limites, parce que la flotte canadienne est particulière. Une partie des aéronefs sont très bien équipés, et nous pouvons tirer parti de certaines des technologies permettant la descente continue, tandis que certains aéronefs ne sont pas encore rendus là. La flotte est composée de grands et de petits appareils. Nous avons une très grande communauté de l'aviation générale au Canada, soit les pilotes privés que nous devons également desservir et dont nous devons nous occuper. Ce qui est unique au Canada, c'est vraiment la composition de la flotte et des appareils qui veulent atterrir dans nos aéroports.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci. Je vais intervenir.

Monsieur Cushnie, vous avez mentionné des nouvelles technologies qui sont mises en oeuvre à l'aéroport Pearson. À quoi faisiez-vous allusion?

M. Blake Cushnie:

Dans le cadre de tous les travaux que nous avons réalisés au cours des six initiatives dont l'AAGT parlera peut-être, nous nous efforçons de tirer parti de l'exactitude des systèmes de précision de la navigation par satellite à bord de beaucoup des aéronefs modernes pour guider les avions vers la piste, particulièrement la nuit, et ce, le plus loin possible des gens. Ce que nous constatons, c'est que, au moment de l'approche finale, le défi change, mais nous tentons d'utiliser cette technologie du mieux possible et à notre avantage afin d'être des chefs de file en matière d'atténuation du bruit.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Parfait. Merci.

Je représente une circonscription tout juste à côté de l'aéroport Pearson. C'est un trajet de sept minutes lorsque tout va bien, et peut-être une heure et demie lorsqu'il y a de la circulation. J'ai toujours été en faveur d'un aéroport au nord de l'escarpement de Milton, Brampton et Mississauga. Ça me semble tout simplement logique. Puis-je obtenir certains commentaires de Transports Canada sur les répercussions d'une telle proposition?

Mme Sara Wiebe:

Merci de la question.

Encore une fois, c'est un autre de ces domaines où l'on tente de trouver un équilibre. Nous avons ces grands aéroports où les transporteurs de fret et de passagers veulent se rendre. Comme M. Wilson l'a mentionné précédemment, si je ne m'abuse, nous ne pouvons pas dire aux aéronefs ou aux passagers ou encore aux transporteurs de fret là où ils doivent atterrir. Encore une fois, c'est quelque chose dont pourrait vous parler l'AAGT de façon un peu plus précise lorsqu'elle comparaîtra ici.

Cela dit, selon nous l'AAGT a fait du très bon travail pour permettre un engagement axé sur la collaboration avec les petits aéroports de la région, y compris Hamilton et Waterloo, pour parler du moment où le point de saturation sera atteint et où il faudra mieux gérer le trafic. Cependant, encore une fois, vu que notre secteur aérien canadien est fondé sur le marché, il est impossible de forcer les déplacements dans une direction ou l'autre.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Puisque je veux partager mon temps, j'ai besoin que vous répondiez à la prochaine question par un oui ou un non.

Avez-vous le mandat de prendre les mesures nécessaires pour qu'on s'adapte à une telle croissance?

Mme Sara Wiebe:

Encore une fois, la croissance est dictée par le marché. Ce que nous tentons de faire, c'est d'élaborer des cadres stratégiques qui permettent cette croissance.

M. Gagan Sikand:

D'accord, merci.

Je vais laisser le temps qu'il me reste à M. Wrzesnewskyj.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke-Centre, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Szwalek, j'aimerais obtenir des précisions sur une réponse que vous avez donnée au sujet de l'augmentation des vols de nuit dans le budget de 2013. Vous avez dit que la demande a été présentée au ministre, à Transports Canada. Pouvez-vous nous fournir des précisions?

(0930)

M. Joseph Szwalek:

Ce qui s'est produit, c'est que l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto avait demandé une augmentation en raison des plans de croissance à long terme de l'aéroport. La demande s'est retrouvée devant le ministre. Le dossier a été géré dans la région pour ce...

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

D'accord. J'ai besoin de clarté, pas d'une longue réponse.

Était-ce le ministre ou l'autorité régionale — votre prédécesseur, j'imagine — ou peut-être même vous qui avez donné l'approbation?

M. Joseph Szwalek:

Pour ce qui est de l'augmentation, la demande a été approuvée par le directeur général de la région.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Avec l'autorisation du ministre?

M. Joseph Szwalek:

Oui.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Je demanderais à Transports Canada de fournir au Comité des documents qui nous éclaireront sur la façon dont les décisions ont été prises dans ce dossier.

J'aimerais revenir à NAV CANADA. Vous avez parlé d'une réduction de l'empreinte carbonique sur l'environnement. De quelle façon cela se traduit-il par des économies de carburant pour les compagnies aériennes?

M. Neil Wilson:

En gros, cela signifie que, tout ce que nous pouvons faire pour aider les compagnies aériennes à réduire leur consommation de carburant a une incidence positive sur la réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Les transporteurs aériens sont très heureux de réduire leur empreinte carbonique, parce que cela signifie des coûts de carburant aviation moindres.

M. Neil Wilson:

Ils le sont, nous le sommes tous.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Excellent.

J'ai deux ou trois questions pour en venir à la question de la responsabilisation. La présentation fournie au Comité indique que NAV CANADA et les aéroports locaux « s'engagent dans un processus de participation du public fournissant à la communauté des informations factuelles et précises avant et après la mise en oeuvre d'une modification ». La collectivité a-t-elle été consultée ou informée avant et après l'augmentation du financement affecté aux vols de nuit prévue dans le budget de 2013?

M. Jonathan Bagg:

C'est l'AAGT qui aurait demandé ce changement, et ses représentants seront mieux placés pour répondre à cette question.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Il est question de NAV CANADA. Donc, vous ne savez pas si NAV CANADA... J'aimerais qu'on me fournisse l'information quant à savoir si...

La présidente:

Je suis désolé, monsieur Wrzesnewskyj. Je comprends les questions, mais votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Liepert, allez-y.

M. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Mes questions sont destinées à NAV CANADA.

Je représente une circonscription de Calgary qui se trouve à pas moins d'une demi-heure de route de l'aéroport. Au cours de ma première année comme député, il n'y avait pas de plaintes au sujet du bruit des aéronefs dans ma circonscription, mais une nouvelle piste a été ouverte à Calgary. Pouvez-vous dire à mes électeurs, pour le compte rendu, pourquoi ils entendent maintenant le bruit des avions alors qu'ils ne sont même pas à proximité de l'aéroport de Calgary?

M. Neil Wilson:

Voulez-vous parler précisément de Calgary?

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Bien sûr. Le principal changement qui s'est produit à Calgary, évidemment, c'est après l'ajout d'une nouvelle piste. L'ajout était important pour l'aéroport de façon à ce qu'il puisse s'adapter à sa croissance. Il a fallu modifier l'espace aérien.

Le fait d'être à 30 kilomètres de l'aéroport peut sembler très loin — surtout lorsqu'on envisage la chose dans l'optique du transport terrestre, comme un trajet en voiture —, mais pour un aéronef, ce n'est pas loin. Lorsqu'on regarde la façon dont les avions approchent des aéroports, on constate qu'ils utilisent un système de trajets publiés. Tout comme une voiture doit utiliser la route, nous avons des « routes » dans le ciel pour les avions qui arrivent à l'aéroport. Ces trajectoires doivent être disposées de façon à ce que nous puissions gérer toute la circulation.

Une de ces trajectoires passe au-dessus de votre région, Signal Hill. Il y a plusieurs trajectoires vers l'aéroport, et les contrôleurs aériens gèrent les aéronefs qui arrivent de plusieurs directions. L'une des raisons pour lesquelles il y en a une qui passe par là... C'est comme lorsqu'on veut atteindre une cible: plus la route est près de la piste, plus c'est facile pour le contrôleur de synchroniser les déplacements.

M. Ron Liepert:

J'imagine que ce que mes électeurs ne comprennent pas, c'est que, à un mille à l'ouest, il y a des terres d'élevage. Pouvez-vous m'expliquer de quelle façon NAV CANADA établit ses trajectoires — je crois que c'est le terme que vous avez utilisé —, car on dirait que vous avez créé une nouvelle trajectoire au-dessus d'une zone résidentielle alors qu'il n'y a rien d'autre que des terres d'élevage un mille plus loin?

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Bien sûr, absolument.

Il est évident, lorsqu'on regarde à l'ouest de la ville, qu'il y a des terres vertes et agricoles, et tout ça semble évident. L'enjeu consiste vraiment à coordonner et gérer le trafic. Nous utilisons les critères de conception approuvés par Transports Canada, des critères utilisés à l'échelle internationale, alors il y a beaucoup de normes qu'on applique au moment de concevoir l'espace aérien, et c'est là un aspect clé.

Pour ce qui est de la question de savoir pourquoi on ne peut pas tout simplement se tasser un peu plus à l'ouest, c'est une question de synchronisation. Les contrôleurs font tourner les avions pour les aligner vers la piste en vue de l'approche finale. Les avions doivent se rendre à un endroit où on peut les aligner avec la piste afin qu'ils puissent atterrir. Si on fait passer les avions trop loin de l'aéroport, c'est plus difficile pour le contrôleur aérien de coordonner le tout.

(0935)

M. Ron Liepert:

La réalité de cette approche, c'est qu'elle se fait parallèlement à la piste. J'ai l'impression que toute la question de tourner... Je sais qu'on entre dans le détail, mais un mille de plus serait...

L'une de choses qu'on m'a dites, c'est qu'une partie du bruit nocturne vient d'avions russes bruyants ou je ne sais trop quoi. Quel contrôle NAV CANADA peut-il avoir sur le respect de nos règles nationales par les aéronefs étrangers qui entrent dans nos aéroports et en sortent?

M. Neil Wilson:

Nous ne sommes pas des policiers. Nous facilitons la sécurité et l'efficience des vols. Pour ce qui est des aéronefs qui arrivent, nous avons l'obligation de les aider à atterrir et de nous assurer que le processus est sécuritaire. Nous veillons à ce que les avions ne soient pas collés les uns sur les autres et qu'ils puissent atterrir.

Nous exerçons une certaine pression morale auprès des exploitants, mais, franchement, on ne peut pas faire grand-chose. Nous n'avons pas de mandat, pas de capacité juridique de les empêcher de voler.

M. Ron Liepert:

Est-ce que quelqu'un a un tel pouvoir?

Mme Sara Wiebe:

Je crois que c'est là que je vais céder la parole à mon collègue, M. Robinson.

M. Nicholas Robinson (directeur général, Aviation civile, ministère des Transports):

Des exigences sont liées à la sûreté et à la sécurité des atterrissages des aéronefs dans nos aéroports canadiens.

M. Ron Liepert:

Oui, mais tenez-vous compte du bruit?

M. Nicholas Robinson:

Les exigences ne tiennent pas compte du bruit précisément.

M. Ron Liepert:

Il ne semble pas y avoir de gouvernance en ce qui concerne le bruit des aéronefs étrangers qui atterrissent dans nos aéroports commerciaux.

M. Nicholas Robinson:

Notre principale responsabilité, c'est de nous assurer que les atterrissages dans nos aéroports se font de façon sûre et sécuritaire, et le bruit n'est pas un critère précis.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je vais maintenant m'adresser à NAV CANADA.

Qui est responsable des hélicoptères?

M. Neil Wilson:

Si vous parlez de la navigation et de la gestion du trafic, c'est nous.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je crois bien recevoir autant de plaintes au sujet du bruit des hélicoptères, surtout les hélicoptères de police qu'au sujet des aéronefs commerciaux. Est-ce que NAV CANADA s'occupe des hélicoptères?

M. Neil Wilson:

Il y a une responsabilité conjointe en matière de gestion de l'espace aérien dans la mesure où l'espace aérien est divisé en différents types d'espaces, et différentes choses sont permises dans différents secteurs du ciel. Si c'est permis, des hélicoptères y voleront.

M. Ron Liepert:

Si quelqu'un veut utiliser un hélicoptère à n'importe quel moment du jour et n'importe où dans la ville, il n'a pas à obtenir une permission de quiconque pour pouvoir le faire?

M. Neil Wilson:

Non. Il a besoin d'autorisations dans certains espaces aériens, mais nous donnons ces autorisations pour nous assurer que le vol se fait en toute sécurité. Les gens peuvent seulement emprunter certains espaces aériens. Par exemple, ici, à Ottawa, il y a un espace aérien réglementé au-dessus de la Colline du Parlement. Il y a différentes classifications d'espaces aériens qui permettent certaines formes de vols pour des types spécifiques d'aéronefs équipés dans diverses zones de l'espace aérien.

M. Ron Liepert:

Savez-vous s'il y a ce genre de restrictions à Calgary?

M. Neil Wilson:

Il y en a assurément. Pour ce qui est des restrictions précises dans un endroit précis, il faudrait que je vous revienne là-dessus.

M. Ron Liepert:

Est-ce que la police doit aussi respecter ces exigences?

M. Neil Wilson:

Tous ceux qui volent doivent les respecter, oui.

La présidente:

Monsieur Graham, allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Monsieur Bagg, je tiens à vous remercier. Nous nous sommes déjà rencontrés dans le passé pour parler de ce sujet. Je vais sauter tout de suite dans le vif du sujet.

L'un des effets du bruit de l'aviation, c'est que les voies aériennes ont des répercussions sur les petits exploitants. Ce ne sont pas seulement les avions qui arrivent dans les grands aéroports. Par exemple, l'aéroport de St-Jérôme, CSN3, où il y a une piste de terre battue et une école de saut en parachute, est limité par la voie aérienne T709 à l'ouest, Mirabel, au sud, la voie aérienne T636, au nord et St-Esprit, une autre école de parachute, CES2, à l'est. Il reste donc une toute petite zone à exploiter.

Cela fait en sorte que les avions de l'école de parachute, qui passent souvent et sont très bruyants, passent au-dessus de la même collectivité 20, 30 ou 40 fois par jour.

Vous avez mentionné que Dorval a modifié ses approches en 2012, et T709 est l'une des victimes de cette approche. Elle passe maintenant tout juste à l'ouest de CSN3. Tous les aéronefs de l'école de pilotage Parachutisme Adrénaline passent au-dessus du même lac à Sainte-Anne-des-Lacs, tous les jours, et toute la journée.

Que pouvons-nous faire en tant que collectivité, en travaillant en collaboration avec vous, pour permettre à ces aéronefs de traverser la voie aérienne pour ensuite prendre de l'altitude de l'autre côté? Y a-t-il quoi que ce soit qu'on peut faire ensemble?

(0940)

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Je connais très bien cet espace aérien, et il y a beaucoup de contraintes qui y sont liées. Il y a des vols aux instruments, des vols IFR, et, lorsqu'on conçoit un espace aérien, on le fait assurément en s'assurant que les différents types de vol sont loin les uns des autres. C'est une façon d'assurer la sécurité.

Pour ce qui est des prochaines étapes et de ce qui peut être fait, je crois que nous sommes un peu en voie d'y arriver, dans la mesure où tout commence par le dialogue. Je sais que nous avons l'intention de vous rencontrer et de rencontrer certains de nos gestionnaires opérationnels de la région pour voir les options et essayer de trouver une possibilité. Cependant, c'est difficile lorsqu'on doit composer avec un espace aérien dense et lorsqu'il y a beaucoup d'activités de part et d'autre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Des solutions sont possibles, et nous devrions pouvoir les trouver.

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Nous pouvons assurément en discuter et voir quelles opérations... S'il y a des occasions, nous les examinerons.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Qu'est-ce qui nous empêche de le faire? Actuellement, il y a un accord entre NAV CANADA et l'aéroport afin que les vols ne traversent pas l'espace aérien. Pourquoi en est-il ainsi?

M. Jonathan Bagg:

On en revient au fait que nous tentons de séparer systématiquement les différents types de vol. Dans le cas des activités de parachutisme, les vols se font conformément à la navigation VFR; ce sont donc les pilotes qui sont responsables de leur trajet. En tant que pilotes, ils ne suivent pas une route précise.

Puis, si on regarde les vols à destination de Montréal, les aéronefs empruntent des routes pour des vols aux instruments. Ils respectent des routes publiées très précises. Il est toujours plus sécuritaire pour nous de nous assurer que ces différents types d'activité restent loin l'une de l'autre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À ce sujet, vous avez parlé de descente continue. Dans les derniers milliers de pieds, les aéronefs maintiennent encore un angle d'approche de trois degrés. Rien n'a changé là. C'est exact?

M. Jonathan Bagg:

C'est exact. Au moment de l'approche finale, l'aéronef utilise habituellement un système d'atterrissage aux instruments, et le taux de descente est de trois degrés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avec l'approche continue, rien ne change vraiment si près du sol, vers la fin. C'est un gain d'efficience.

M. Jonathan Bagg:

C'est exact. Rien ne change au moment de l'approche finale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il des situations où on demande à l'aéronef qui décolle d'utiliser le meilleur angle, plutôt que seulement le meilleur taux pour sortir plus rapidement de l'espace aérien?

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Il y a des procédures d'atténuation du bruit au départ, NADP 1 et NADP 2. Ces procédures ciblent des zones différentes. Une cible la zone près d'un aéroport et essaie d'assurer une certaine atténuation du bruit à proximité, et l'autre concerne l'atténuation du bruit un peu plus loin. Dans les deux cas, ces procédures prévoient que l'aéronef gagne de l'altitude. Durant cette phase de départ, les avions ont tendance à être le plus bruyants, les moteurs tournent à plein régime.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je remarque que, dans le SVC, le Supplément de vol-Canada, il y a toute une section sur les procédures d'atténuation du bruit liées à l'aéroport Pearson. Je n'en ai pas vu pour la plupart des autres aéroports, mais il y en a dans le cas de Pearson. On y mentionne les types d'aéronefs des chapitres 2 et 3 du volume 1 de l'annexe 16 de l'OACI. Qu'est-ce que cela signifie?

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Cela répond également à l'une des questions de M. Liepert en ce qui concerne les normes liées au bruit des aéronefs. L'OACI établit des normes concernant le bruit à la source. Il s'agit d'une réglementation liée au bruit à la source, et Transports Canada est peut-être le mieux placé pour en parler. Nous acceptons ces normes. Avec le temps, des chapitres d'aéronefs — les plus anciens — sont éliminés et ne peuvent plus entrer dans l'espace aérien. Au fil du temps, on constate que les avions sont de plus en plus silencieux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Reste-t-il encore beaucoup d'aéronefs des chapitres 2 et 3?

M. Jonathan Bagg:

Il n'y en a plus beaucoup. Il en reste très peu qui sont encore... Il y a peut-être certains exploitants d'aéronefs qui ont besoin d'un équipement spécial pour des vols dans le Nord, comme des dispositifs pour utiliser les pistes de gravier et certains transporteurs de fret dont les flottes sont parfois plus anciennes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je veux parler encore quelques secondes, et je veux laisser aussi quelques secondes à Vance. Oh, je ne peux pas faire les deux.

J'ai une question, mais je cède la parole à Vance.

Merci à vous.

La présidente:

Monsieur Badawey, allez-y.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Merci d'être là aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais approfondir un peu la question des plans municipaux officiels. De toute évidence, le manque de discipline jusqu'à présent nous a mis dans la position où nous nous trouvons actuellement en ce qui a trait à l'étalement urbain autour des aéroports.

Cela dit, ce sont les modifications et les décisions de rezonage prévues et officielles qui ont permis cet étalement tout autour de vous. Ma première question est la suivante: le secteur aérien a-t-il tenté de contester certaines décisions dans le cadre de ces processus officiels de modification et de rezonage prévues?

Voici ma deuxième question: avez-vous la capacité de faire appliquer une telle conduite et de vraiment interjeter appel, par exemple, devant la Commission des affaires municipales de l'Ontario, pour obtenir des décisions favorables, arrêter l'étalement et faire en sorte qu'il y ait moins de plaintes qu'il y en a maintenant? À l'avenir, aurez-vous la capacité de le faire de façon à ce que, même si le problème existe déjà, la situation ne continuera pas à dégénérer davantage à l'avenir?

(0945)

Mme Sara Wiebe:

Je peux répondre à votre question d'un point de vue général et du point de vue de Transports Canada et des autorités aéroportuaires. Nos bureaux régionaux sont toujours ouverts à rencontrer les conseils municipaux et à en discuter avec eux lorsqu'ils réalisent leurs travaux de planification.

M. Vance Badawey:

Ce n'est pas ma question.

Je veux savoir si le secteur aérien a eu la capacité d'interjeter appel lorsqu'une municipalité décidait de permettre de nouveaux projets dans une zone où il ne devrait pas y en avoir? Je suis sûr qu'il y a des revers et des choses de cette nature, mais avez-vous l'occasion d'interjeter appel, par exemple, devant la Commission des affaires municipales de l'Ontario pour obtenir une décision favorable à la lumière des politiques provinciales, des plans officiels des municipalités et du zonage, de sorte que le problème n'empire pas à l'avenir?

Mme Sara Wiebe:

Je veux me tourner vers mon collègue de l'aviation civile. Je crois qu'il y a certaines exigences dans notre réglementation concernant les types de constructions possibles à une certaine distance d'un aéroport. Je crois que c'est quelque chose de très précis.

Nick, voulez-vous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet?

M. Nicholas Robinson:

Oui. Il y a des paramètres précis quant aux choses qui peuvent ou ne peuvent pas se faire dans les aérodromes et autour de ceux-ci. Ces paramètres sont établis pour assurer la sûreté et la sécurité des aérodromes et des aéronefs qui y atterrissent. C'est là que notre réglementation définit...

Pour ce qui est d'un processus d'appel ou de contestation à l'échelon municipal, je ne crois pas qu'il y a eu des situations où une municipalité a interjeté appel de ces règlements précis.

La présidente:

Voilà qui met fin à notre première heure de témoignages.

Merci beaucoup d'être venus. Nous aurons peut-être des questions supplémentaires à vous poser et nous vous demanderons peut-être de revenir avant la fin de notre étude.

Nous allons suspendre la séance quelques instants pendant que notre prochain groupe de témoins se prépare.

(0945)

(0950)



La présidente: Nous reprenons nos travaux.

Nous accueillons M. Sartor, président, et Carmelle Hunka, avocate générale et directrice principale, Risques et conformité, de l'Autorité aéroportuaire de Calgary. Merci beaucoup d'être là.

Nous accueillons aussi, par vidéoconférence, Anne Murray, vice-présidente du Développement des entreprises de transport aérien et des Affaires publiques, et Mark Cheng, superviseur, Bruit et qualité de l'air, de l'Autorité aéroportuaire de Vancouver.

Enfin, nous accueillons Martin Massé et Anne Marcotte des Aéroports de Montréal.

Bienvenue à vous tous.

Nous allons commencer par Aéroports de Montréal.

Monsieur Massé, allez-y. [Français]

M. Martin Massé (vice-président, Affaires publiques, Aéroports de Montréal):

Bonjour, madame la présidente, membres du Comité.

Je tiens à vous remercier de nous donner l'occasion de vous présenter nos actions pour la gestion du climat sonore et de répondre à vos questions dans le cadre de l'évaluation de l'incidence du bruit des avions près des grands aéroports canadiens.

En vertu de son bail avec Transports Canada, Aéroports de Montréal, ou ADM, est responsable de la gestion et de l'exploitation de l'aéroport de Montréal-Trudeau et du parc aéronautique et industriel de Mirabel.

Montréal-Trudeau est devenu, au fil des ans, une plaque tournante du trafic aérien et le troisième aéroport en importance au Canada. L'aéroport offre 151 destinations et dessert 37 transporteurs aériens. De ce fait, il est l'aéroport canadien le plus international puisque 41 % de ses passagers voyagent à l'extérieur du Canada et des États-Unis. Montréal-Trudeau contribue de façon importante au développement économique du Grand Montréal, car il génère près de 29 000 emplois directs et compte 200 entreprises actives sur son site.

La gestion du climat sonore est, et a toujours été, une priorité pour Aéroports de Montréal. Le rôle d'ADM est d'assurer un équilibre entre le développement de l'aéroport comme acteur de développement du Grand Montréal et le maintien d'une cohabitation harmonieuse avec cette même communauté. Cela fait partie intégrante de notre mission et nous déployons des efforts soutenus pour assurer cet équilibre.

Nous élaborons nos plans en intégrant les principes du Balance Approach de l'OACI. Nous travaillons également avec nos partenaires afin de réduire l'incidence des activités liées à l'exploitation d'un aéroport international sur les communautés riveraines. Ces partenaires sont les suivants.

Transports Canada est l'organisme réglementaire chargé de veiller au respect de l'application des critères acoustiques et des mesures d'atténuation du bruit. Il a le pouvoir d'infliger des sanctions aux pilotes et aux transporteurs qui contreviennent à ces règles.

NAV CANADA est responsable de la prestation de services de navigation aérienne, donc de la gestion du trafic aérien.

Finalement, les transporteurs aériens sont tenus de gérer les vols selon les heures d'exploitation en vigueur et de respecter les procédures de vols de Montréal-Trudeau. Ils sont également responsables de leur flotte aérienne.

À titre d'autorité aéroportuaire, Aéroports de Montréal est responsable de l'élaboration d'un plan de gestion du climat sonore, de la mise sur pied d'un comité consultatif sur le climat sonore et du traitement des plaintes relatives au bruit.

Dans ce contexte, Aéroports de Montréal a mis en place un système de pistes préférentielles pour les opérations de nuit. Elle s'assure du respect des heures d'exploitation en vigueur pour l'aéroport Montréal-Trudeau et assure un suivi rigoureux des demandes d'exemptions.

Au cours des 15 dernières années, malgré une augmentation importante du nombre de passagers, le nombre de mouvements d'avions est demeuré relativement stable. Il ne faut donc pas conclure que la croissance de Montréal-Trudeau signifie nécessairement une augmentation équivalente ou proportionnelle du nombre de ces mouvements.

Les avions sont plus gros, transportent plus de passagers et sont moins bruyants. En effet, les améliorations techniques et technologiques ont permis une grande réduction du bruit au cours de la dernière décennie.

Pour mesurer les niveaux de bruit, Aéroports de Montréal dispose de huit stations de mesure de bruit, dont une mobile. ADM publie les niveaux continus équivalents de bruit, ou Leq, enregistrés aux différentes stations de mesure de bruit autour de l'aéroport.

Ces stations sont stratégiquement disposées dans les axes de pistes, et les équipements sont installés et calibrés par des professionnels indépendants. Le système est lié aux données radar de NAV CANADA; les bruits sont donc corrélés aux mouvements d'avions.

Les vols de nuit représentent une préoccupation importante pour notre programme de gestion du climat sonore. La gestion des horaires de vols est un exercice complexe pour les transporteurs aériens. D'un côté, la communauté souhaite avoir accès à des destinations variées, au meilleur coût possible, et de l'autre il est primordial de réduire le nombre de vols de nuit.

En plus d'analyser toutes les demandes d'exemptions, ADM applique les restrictions en vigueur pour les horaires de vols à Montréal-Trudeau. ADM rencontre régulièrement les transporteurs aériens qui ont effectué des vols à l'extérieur des heures d'exploitation pour exiger des plans d'action pour remédier à ces situations.

L'aéroport Montréal-Trudeau est ouvert 24 heures sur 24 pour les avions de moins de 45 000 kg. Il s'agit principalement d'avions à hélices ou d'avions de type CRJ.

Les avions plus lourds ont des restrictions en ce qui concerne les heures d'exploitation. Les périodes d'atterrissage et de décollage des jets de plus de 45 000 kg sont restreintes: ils doivent atterrir entre 7 h et 1 h, et décoller entre 7 h et minuit. ADM peut accorder des exemptions, comme il est prévu dans le Canada Air Pilot.

Je terminerai en disant que, de concert avec son comité consultatif sur le climat sonore, Aéroports de Montréal continue de s'employer à élaborer des mesures d'atténuation du bruit pour la collectivité montréalaise. À cet effet, un important plan d'action sera présenté prochainement aux membres de ce comité.

(0955)



Ce plan regroupe 26 actions dans sept catégories: restrictions sur les vols de nuit; utilisation d'avions moins bruyants; procédures de réduction du bruit à l'atterrissage et au décollage; publication de rapports et d'indicateurs plus pertinents pour les communautés; mise à jour de la politique de gestion des plaintes; planification du territoire; et enfin, implication des communautés riveraines.

Notre objectif est de réduire l'incidence des activités liées à l'exploitation d'un aéroport, d'inciter les transporteurs aériens à utiliser les avions moins bruyants et de réduire le nombre de vols durant les heures restreintes d'exploitation.

Parce que les résidants des grandes villes sont exposés à différents types de bruits provenant de diverses sources, par exemple, des réseaux routiers, des véhicules routiers, du rail ou des avions, il importe de bien définir ces sources.

Dans ce contexte, concernant la catégorie relative à la planification du territoire, je tiens à rappeler qu'ADM souscrit à la recommandation de la Direction de la santé publique de Montréal de mettre en application l'action 18.1 du Plan d'urbanisme de la Ville de Montréal qui prévoit, entre autres, la mise en place d'un comité de concertation avec le ministère des Transports du Québec ainsi qu'avec les différentes sociétés et entreprises de transport de marchandises, notamment le CP et le CN, l'administration portuaire de Montréal et Aéroports de Montréal pour limiter les nuisances sonores dans les milieux de vie résidentiels. Nous avons invité la Ville de Montréal à plusieurs reprises à le mettre sur pied en l'assurant de notre collaboration.

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Massé.

Monsieur Sartor, allez-y.

M. Bob Sartor (président, Calgary Airport Authority):

Bonjour, madame la présidente, et bonjour aux membres du Comité.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir invité aujourd'hui pour vous présenter le point de vue de l'Autorité aéroportuaire de Calgary.

Pour commencer, je tiens à souligner que la gestion du bruit à l'aéroport YYC est une priorité, puisque la ville fait maintenant tout le tour de son aéroport principal.

Les aéroports de partout dans le monde sont confrontés à des défis similaires lorsqu'il est question du bruit de la circulation aérienne. Les aéroports sont la plaque tournante des arrivées et des départs d'aéronefs, mais ces aéronefs appartiennent aux transporteurs aériens du monde et sont exploités par eux tandis que les arrivées et les départs sont dirigés par NAV CANADA. C'est un aspect contextuel important dans le cadre de nos discussions d'aujourd'hui et dans le cadre de l'étude que vous réalisez.

J'aimerais aujourd'hui vous présenter trois considérations importantes du point de vue de l'Autorité aéroportuaire de Calgary: notre contribution économique à la ville de Calgary, les renseignements au sujet de nos activités, leur incidence sur nos collectivités locales et notre approche en matière de gestion du bruit et, pour terminer, un point de vue concret sur les appels liés au bruit provenant de nos collectivités.

J'espère démontrer de quelle façon l'autorité surveille continuellement le rendement pour trouver un juste équilibre entre les activités aéroportuaires et les préoccupations de la collectivité, surtout en période de croissance comme c'est le cas aujourd'hui.

De prime abord, je crois qu'il est essentiel que le Comité comprenne que les aéroports internationaux représentés ici aujourd'hui sont d'importants moteurs économiques et d'emploi dans leur ville respective. À Calgary, l'aéroport YYC participe à hauteur d'environ 8 milliards de dollars annuellement au PIB de la ville, et 24 000 Calgariens travaillent directement dans les installations de l'aéroport. Près de 50 000 emplois sont créés et maintenus grâce à nos activités, et notre aéroport a poursuivi sa croissance malgré les difficultés économiques en Alberta des dernières années, affichant une croissance de 3,8 % en ce qui concerne le volume de passagers en 2017 et un taux de croissance de 7 % jusqu'à présent en 2018. Je dois également souligner que la croissance de la demande émanant de nos transporteurs de fret est cruciale pour la viabilité économique et pour la ville de Calgary. L'année dernière seulement, nous avons affiché une augmentation de 7,7 % du volume de fret.

Le moteur économique que sont les aéroports pour nos villes doit être une considération majeure dans le cadre de votre examen de l'incidence du bruit des avions. Malgré l'augmentation du nombre de passagers, nous avons en fait constaté une réduction du nombre total des déplacements d'aéronefs de 2016 à 2017 en raison de la mise à niveau des aéronefs. En moyenne, les déplacements quotidiens ont diminué, passant de 636 à 615.

En 2017, plus de 95 % des vols à l'aéroport YYC avaient lieu entre 6 heures et minuit, ce qui signifie que moins que 5 % des vols — ou, en moyenne, seulement 29 des 615 vols par jour — arrivaient à l'aéroport YYC ou en partaient de minuit à 6 heures.

Même si tous les aéroports sont confrontés à des défis semblables, il est important de comprendre que chaque aéroport doit tenir compte de ses préoccupations locales et que ces dernières peuvent être uniques à un aéroport ou à une collectivité.

À l'aéroport YYC, nous misons sur un programme de surveillance active du bruit. En fait, nous possédons 16 stations de surveillance du bruit un peu partout dans la ville. Il existe un important engagement communautaire grâce à des réunions de comité consultatif et des portes ouvertes communautaires spéciales. Nous menons des enquêtes actives en cas de préoccupations liées au bruit. Nous communiquons régulièrement des renseignements concernant les activités à l'aéroport de Calgary pouvant avoir une incidence sur le bruit, comme la fermeture de pistes ou des travaux de construction pouvant entraîner une modification de la trajectoire des avions. Enfin, nous travaillons en collaboration avec NAV CANADA et les principaux transporteurs aériens pour discuter des innovations et des pratiques de pointe au sein de l'industrie en matière de gestion du bruit des aéronefs dans les aéroports.

À l'aéroport de Calgary, nous avons le soutien de la ville et de la province dans le dossier de la gestion du bruit grâce au respect d'un règlement sur la zone de protection entourant l'aéroport international de Calgary. Il s'agit d'un règlement provincial qu'on appelle l'AVPA et qui réglemente le développement dans les zones urbaines de Calgary et d'Edmonton en fonction des courbes de bruit dans notre ville découlant du trafic aérien. Le développement du paysage urbain de Calgary a en grande partie tenu compte de ces courbes de bruit, et on a veillé à ce que les projets résidentiels soient à l'écart des courbes de bruit les plus élevées.

Le troisième point que j'aimerais aborder concerne les appels que nous recevons à l'aéroport concernant le bruit. À l'aéroport YYC, nous avons continué de recevoir des appels concernant le bruit et la fréquence de la circulation aérienne depuis l'ouverture de notre nouvelle piste en 2014. Nous avons reçu plus de 5 700 appels en 2017, une réduction de 11 % comparativement à 2016. Cependant, il est très important de comprendre qu'un très grand nombre d'appels vient d'un très petit groupe de personnes. À l'aéroport YYC, cinq personnes ont fait 72 % de tous les appels reçus en 2017. On parle de 4 100 appels provenant de cinq personnes. Deux d'entre elles ont appelé plus de 2 700 fois, ce qui représente 48 % des appels reçus. Dans une ville de 1,2 million d'habitants, nous avons reçu des appels de moins de 3 % de la population, soit environ 400 ménages.

La restriction du trafic aérien d'un aéroport, comme on l'a vu en Europe, ne fait qu'une chose: il déplace le trafic aérien vers un autre aéroport. La demande restera la même, et elle sera comblée d'une façon ou d'une autre.

(1000)



Nous ne pouvons pas éliminer le bruit, mais nous avons adopté une approche équilibrée en matière de gestion du bruit, en tenant compte à la fois des besoins du public — qui exige plus de choix en matière de destinations de voyage et qui commande de plus en plus de choses en ligne — et les résidents des collectivités au-dessus desquelles passent les avions, tout en prenant aussi en considération le rôle important que jouent les aéroports dans le développement économique de nos villes.

Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions. Merci.

La présidente:

Nous allons maintenant passer à Mme Murray, la vice-présidente du Développement des entreprises de transport aérien à l'aéroport de Vancouver, par vidéoconférence.

Bienvenue à vous, et bienvenue aussi à M. Cheng.

Mme Anne Murray (vice-présidente, Développement des entreprises de transport aérien et Affaires publiques, Vancouver Airport Authority):

Bonjour, madame la présidente, et merci de me donner l'occasion de m'adresser au Comité aujourd'hui.

Les grands aéroports canadiens sont gérés par des organismes locaux sans but lucratif. En vertu de ce modèle unique, nous ne recevons aucun financement du gouvernement et nous ne sommes pas redevables à des actionnaires. Nous réinvestissons tous nos profits dans nos aéroports.

À l'aéroport YVR, l'aéroport international de Vancouver, ce modèle repose sur notre engagement à l'égard des collectivités avoisinantes, ce qui inclut la gestion du bruit dans les aéroports de façon à trouver un juste équilibre entre le besoin d'un transport aérien sécuritaire et pratique 24 heures sur 24 et une vie urbaine agréable.

Notre mandat consiste à offrir des avantages économiques et sociaux aux résidents de la Colombie-Britannique et à exploiter l'aéroport dans le meilleur intérêt de la région, tout en faisant de la sécurité notre priorité absolue.

L'aéroport YVR est un moteur économique clé pour la région. Nous facilitons une production économique totale de 16,5 milliards de dollars et une participation de 8,5 milliards de dollars au PIB. L'an dernier, nous avons accueilli plus de 24 millions de passagers. En outre, il y a 24 000 emplois à l'aéroport.

Le bail foncier conclu entre l'Autorité aéroportuaire de Vancouver et le gouvernement fédéral exige que nous assurions la gestion du bruit associé aux activités de l'aéroport dans un rayon de 10 milles marins autour de l'aéroport. Nous y arrivons grâce à un programme complet de gestion du bruit, qui compte un certain nombre d'éléments principaux: un plan quinquennal de gestion du bruit, l'engagement des intervenants, le maintien de procédures d'atténuation du bruit, la surveillance du bruit et le suivi des vols et la prestation de renseignements pour répondre aux questions et préoccupations émanant de la collectivité.

Nous mettons actuellement à jour notre plan quinquennal de gestion du bruit, que nous soumettrons à Transports Canada d'ici la fin de l'année. Pour y arriver, nous interagissons avec les résidents et les intervenants pour obtenir leurs commentaires de manière à adapter les initiatives dans notre région. Même si les principaux éléments sont communs, chaque solution doit tenir compte des enjeux et conditions uniques et locales des différents aéroports.

Comme vous pouvez vous en rendre compte, la question du bruit des aéronefs peut être très technique, mais il n'y a en fait que trois façons principales d'y voir: l'aéronef lui-même, le moment et l'endroit où passent les avions et la façon dont ils le font et les résidents, c'est-à-dire là où ils vivent et l'environnement dans lequel ils vivent.

Pour ce qui est de l'aéronef en tant que tel, l'idée est ici de réduire le bruit à la source. Le nombre de certifications relatives au bruit et aux émissions des aéronefs sont établies par l'OACI, et l'aéronef doit respecter ces normes pour être exploité au Canada.

Au fil des ans, les transporteurs aériens ont investi des centaines de millions de dollars pour moderniser leur flotte. Les nouveaux aéronefs sont plus propres et plus silencieux et produisent moins de bruit et d'émissions.

Ensuite, on peut se tourner vers les procédures d'exploitation et les processus de contrôle du bruit. On parle ici des trajectoires empruntées par les avions et de la façon de voler. Les aéroports misent sur des procédures d'atténuation du bruit qui incluent des restrictions la nuit et la préférence donnée à certaines pistes. NAV CANADA gère l'espace aérien et a mis en place des procédures pour réduire au minimum les vols au-dessus de zones peuplées. Les compagnies aériennes forment leur équipage de façon à ce qu'il adopte des techniques de vol adaptées aux collectivités.

Le dernier élément sur lequel on peut mettre l'accent concerne les gens qui entendent les bruits, là où ils vivent et leurs attentes. Nous travaillons en collaboration avec les différentes villes pour gérer — grâce à la planification de l'utilisation du territoire — le nombre de personnes qui vivent dans des zones très bruyantes. L'aéroport YVR soutient les lignes directrices de Transports Canada qui découragent l'utilisation non compatible de terrains dans les zones près des aéroports.

Où en sommes-nous? En 1998, il y avait 369 000 atterrissages et décollages d'aéronefs, et nous avons accueilli 15,5 millions de passagers. L'année dernière, il y a eu 39 000 atterrissages et décollages d'aéronefs de moins, et nous avons accueilli presque 9 millions de passagers de plus. Pour mettre les choses en perspective, il y a eu 50 % plus de passagers et 10 % moins de déplacements d'aéronefs comparativement à il y a 20 ans, et tous les aéronefs utilisés aujourd'hui sont plus silencieux qu'avant.

Pour ce qui est des plaintes liées au bruit, en 2017, nous avons reçu 1 293 plaintes liées au bruit de 253 personnes. Quatre personnes ont été responsables de 64 % de nos plaintes, dont deux qui vivent à plus de 23 kilomètres de l'aéroport. À titre de comparaison, la région du Grand Vancouver compte environ 2,8 millions d'habitants.

En ce qui concerne les activités de nuit, 3 % de nos activités annuelles sur piste ont lieu entre minuit et 6 heures, pour une moyenne d'environ 27 atterrissages ou décollages par nuit en 2017. Ces vols incluent des vols de passagers et des services de messagerie. Pour gérer le bruit causé par ces opérations nocturnes, nous avons mis en place des procédures et des restrictions, y compris un processus d'approbation pour les départs d'avion à réaction, la fermeture de notre piste Nord entre certaines heures et l'utilisation préférentielle d'une piste pour que les atterrissages et les décollages se fassent au-dessus de l'eau lorsque c'est possible.

Les résultats de notre sondage révèlent que nous possédons le soutien de la collectivité pour accroître nos services aériens tant que nous continuons de gérer le bruit des aéronefs. Nous avons réussi à le faire grâce au solide cadre fédéral qui a été mis en place et à la marge de manoeuvre dont nous bénéficions pour appliquer des solutions locales.

(1005)



Merci de m'avoir donné l'occasion d'expliquer pourquoi nous réussissons aujourd'hui.

Nous serons heureux de répondre à vos questions.

La présidente:

Monsieur Liepert, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Ron Liepert:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur Massé, nous avons entendu divers témoignages contradictoires au cours desquels on a laissé entendre qu'une grande partie du transport de fret pourrait être transférée vers d'autres aéroports. L'exemple le plus souvent cité est Hamilton au lieu de l'aéroport Pearson, à Toronto.

Toutefois, nous avons également entendu des témoignages de la Chambre de commerce ou d'un groupe de gens d'affaires de Mississauga selon lesquels la situation à Montréal, avec les aéroports Trudeau et Mirabel, est un exemple classique de la raison pour laquelle cela est impossible. Le fret doit arriver à l'aéroport occupé.

Pouvez-vous nous dire si cela a réussi ou non? Qui a raison dans ce débat?

(1010)

[Français]

M. Martin Massé:

Merci de votre question.

Je ne crois pas être en mesure de déterminer qui a raison dans le débat. Chose certaine, à Aéroports de Montréal, la majorité du transport de grandes cargaisons est traitée à l'aéroport de Mirabel, et le transport de petites cargaisons, à Montréal-Trudeau.

Est-ce la bonne décision? Le sort a voulu que nous ayons deux aéroports à gérer. Les entreprises cargo souhaiteraient-elles se rapprocher du centre-ville? C'est probablement le cas, mais, pour une question de gestion, on préfère garder le transport de grands volumes de marchandises à Mirabel.

Vous savez, maintenant, dans le modèle d'affaires relatif aux liaisons directes de passagers, la possibilité de transporter des marchandises dans la soute de l'avion fait partie intégrante de l'analyse de rentabilité, et cela passe évidemment par Montréal-Trudeau. [Traduction]

M. Ron Liepert:

D'accord.

Monsieur Sartor, comme vous le savez très bien, je représente une partie de Calgary qui est loin de l'aéroport, mais nous recevons maintenant des plaintes à propos du bruit des avions, qui sont à 3 000 pieds d'altitude.

J'ai posé cette question à NAV CANADA et je vais donc vous la poser également. Pouvez-vous expliquer à mes électeurs pourquoi cela se produit aujourd'hui? Y a-t-il des solutions de rechange? Comme je l'ai dit à NAV CANADA , il me semble que cette approche parallèle qu'ils utilisent maintenant au-dessus de Sarcee Trail pourrait tout aussi bien se situer à deux ou trois kilomètres à l'ouest, où il n'y a rien d'autre que du bétail à déranger, mais je suppose que cela cause un autre problème.

Pourriez-vous m'expliquer pourquoi ce n'est pas une option et pourquoi mes électeurs subissent du bruit à une demi-heure de l'aéroport?

M. Bob Sartor:

Évidemment, je parlerai à vos électeurs dans quelques semaines lors d'une réunion du comité consultatif.

Nous n'avons absolument aucun mot à dire sur l'endroit où NAV CANADA fait passer les avions.

À cette distance, 3 000 pieds est hautement improbable. Ils dépassent parfois 3 000 pieds lorsqu'ils survolent Inglewood. Je pense que l'altitude pourrait être un peu plus élevée.

Cela dit, le bruit perturbe les gens, et ceux-ci ont des différences de sensibilité au bruit. Je pense que nous le constatons dans les statistiques que nous recueillons auprès des Calgariens. Certains estiment avoir besoin de se plaindre trois fois par jour, et d'autres, peut-être une fois par année, si quelque chose ne va pas.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je vais vous arrêter, car il ne me reste qu'une minute.

Vous êtes l'exploitant de l'aéroport pour ce qui arrive à l'aéroport et en repart. On m'a dit que certains de ces aéronefs bruyants la nuit étaient des aéronefs étrangers, russes ou autres, et il me semble que les témoins précédents n'ont rien mentionné quant aux moyens de contrôler cette situation, si je ne m'abuse.

M. Bob Sartor:

Nous avons d'importantes activités liées au fret à l'aéroport de Calgary. Certains des principaux transporteurs de fret ont de nouveaux avions à réaction qui sont plus silencieux, mais bon nombre des avions-cargos sont des jets de la génération précédente. Ce seront des appareils plus anciens que les 767, certains 777, qui sont plus bruyants, disons, que le 787. Vous avez effectivement des avions à réaction transportant des passagers, et lorsque les jets de cette génération sont retirés de la circulation, certains sont remis à neuf et transformés pour le fret, et ce sont donc des avions plus bruyants.

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Iacono, vous avez la parole. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins d'être ici ce matin. Ma première question s'adresse à M. Massé, d'ADM.

Monsieur Massé, vous parlez d'un comité consultatif. À quoi sert-il?

M. Martin Massé:

Le Comité consultatif sur le climat sonore se réunit quatre fois par année. Il est composé d'élus municipaux et d'arrondissements, de représentants de NAV CANADA et de Transports Canada, et de nos propres responsables des affaires publiques, des opérations et du développement durable. Les transporteurs aériens sont aussi membres de ce comité, ce qui est très important. Après tout, ce sont eux qui font voler les avions.

Ce comité permet de mettre en commun toutes les statistiques et d'échanger sur des problèmes particuliers que certaines régions peuvent vivre. Ce comité nous permettra aussi bientôt de tester — au cours de notre prochaine rencontre — certaines idées liées à notre plan d'action de gestion du climat sonore. Nous sommes ainsi en mesure de mieux arrimer nos données aux souhaits exprimés par les membres du Comité relativement à divers secteurs d'activité.

(1015)

M. Angelo Iacono:

Les résultats des travaux de ce comité sont-ils transmis à avec Transports Canada?

M. Martin Massé:

Transports Canada siège à ce comité.

M. Angelo Iacono:

C'est parfait.

Le mot « consultatif » laisse penser que ce comité pourrait n'être qu'une façade. Pourquoi ne le rend-on pas permanent? Vous dites qu'il y a seulement quatre rencontres par année. Pourquoi n'en tenez-vous pas plus? Le problème du bruit n'est pas occasionnel, mais continu. La population qui est représentée pourrait ne pas trouver très sérieux que votre comité ne se réunisse que quatre fois par année. Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Martin Massé:

Premièrement, quatre réunions par année est un minimum. Deuxièmement, je ne crois pas que la fréquence des rencontres doive être un indicateur du sérieux du comité. Ainsi, il nous fait très plaisir d'être ici. Je ne crois pas que vous nous convoquerez de nouveau la semaine prochaine, mais cela ne me fait pas pour autant douter du sérieux de vos travaux.

L'existence du comité est assurée, puisqu'il existe depuis 1992. Il y a des échanges entre tous les membres, et le comité publie un résumé de ses travaux sur Internet. Je pense que le fait d'avoir des rencontres moins espacées ne nous permettrait pas de tester les idées discutées au comité.

M. Angelo Iacono:

J'ai une question à vous poser. En vous basant sur les rencontres que vous avez eues depuis toutes ces années, quels changements avez-vous apportés qui ont eu des incidences positives pour la population en ce qui a trait au bruit?

M. Martin Massé:

Comme je le disais plus tôt, nous serons en mesure de soumettre un plan d'action au comité dès sa prochaine rencontre. Ce plan nous permettra de gérer encore mieux le climat sonore, d'établir un lien plus direct avec les intervenants et de répondre aux questions. En effet, il y a souvent beaucoup de mythes urbains entourant la gestion du climat sonore. Ce plan nous permettra d'être présents et accessibles, et de répondre à toutes les questions, particulièrement celles des élus, qui s'expriment haut et fort. Cela nous permettra aussi de rappeler que nous souhaitons que la Ville de Montréal — l'agglomération de Montréal — mette sur pied un comité sur le bruit urbain, parce qu'il n'y a pas que les avions qui font du bruit dans les grandes métropoles, après tout.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.

Dans son document intitulé « Statistiques sur le climat sonore — Année 2017 », ADM répertorie 543 plaintes liées au bruit. Nous venons tout juste d'apprendre qu'à Calgary, il y en a eu plus de 5 000. Pouvez-vous nous décrire le processus de traitement des plaintes qui est en vigueur à ADM?

Mme Anne Marcotte (directrice, Relations publiques, Aéroports de Montréal):

Si vous me le permettez, je vais répondre à la question.

À l'heure actuelle, pour chaque personne qui dépose une plainte, nous enregistrons une plainte par période de 24 heures. Voilà pourquoi, en 2017, nous avons reçu 543 plaintes provenant de 277 personnes. Dans le cas de la révision du plan de gestion du climat sonore que nous sommes en train d'effectuer, nous changerons cette méthodologie.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Parfait.

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin, vous avez la parole.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je me permets de faire une remarque avant de commencer mes questions. Pendant les discours des témoins qui ont comparu par vidéoconférence, le son était tellement mauvais qu'il était à peu près impossible pour les interprètes de faire leur travail. Lorsque le Comité reçoit des invités par vidéoconférence, je me demande s'il ne vaudrait pas la peine de faire un test de son avant le début des audiences pour s'assurer que la communication est bonne. Je referme ici ma parenthèse et je laisse cela à votre réflexion, madame la présidente.

Je vais poser mes questions à Aéroports de Montréal, parce que c'est le territoire que je connais le plus. J'invite cependant les autres témoins à ne pas hésiter à intervenir s'ils se sentent interpellés par les mêmes questions.

Certains éléments de votre présentation m'ont particulièrement intéressé, notamment quand vous dites que vous collaborez avec plein d'organismes, dont Transports Canada. Ce ministère est l'organisme réglementaire chargé de veiller au respect de l'application des critères acoustiques. J'ai posé la question à peu près 12 fois pour savoir ce que sont ces critères acoustiques. L'acoustique est un concept clair pour le musicien que je suis: cela se mesure en fonction de décibels, de fréquences, de réverbération ou même d'insonorisation. Chaque fois que j'ai posé la question, cependant, personne n'a su me fournir de critère acoustique clair ni de norme scientifique chiffrée. Seriez-vous en mesure, M. Massé, de me préciser les critères acoustiques que vous tentez de faire respecter?

(1020)

M. Martin Massé:

Vous aviez parlé tantôt du niveau moyen de bruit retenu par l'OMS.

M. Robert Aubin:

Ce niveau est bien de 55 décibels, n'est-ce pas?

M. Martin Massé:

Oui.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

M. Martin Massé:

Mais cela ne tient pas compte des pics de bruit.

M. Robert Aubin:

C'est une moyenne, n'est-ce pas?

M. Martin Massé:

Oui. Il est évident que c'est une moyenne. Lorsqu'on est en période de pic sonore, c'est différent.

M. Robert Aubin:

Si notre moyenne est de 80, il faut donc conclure que nous ne sommes pas dans la bonne plage.

M. Martin Massé:

Tout à fait.

ADM se sert de deux indicateurs de bruit: le niveau acoustique continu équivalent, ou Leq, et la prévision de l'ambiance sonore, ou NEF, qui est dans le fond l'empreinte sonore.

M. Robert Aubin:

Permettez-moi une parenthèse: les données sur la NEF sont-elles accessibles en temps réel sur le site de Transports Canada, ou est-ce que le comité de citoyens n'a accès à ces statistiques que quatre fois par année, au moment des rencontres?

M. Martin Massé:

Votre question est pertinente. Non, ces données ne sont pas accessibles en temps réel, car la valeur de la NEF est déterminée de façon périodique, annuellement je crois. Cette valeur est affichée dans le rapport annuel d'ADM et sur son site Web.

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord.

En ce qui a trait au nombre de plaintes, je constate que près du quart ont trait aux vols de nuit. Parmi les choix administratifs ou généraux d'une entreprise, comment expliquer qu'un aéroport comme celui de Francfort — qui me semble loin d'être petit — choisisse purement et simplement d'interdire les vols de nuit, alors que cela semble totalement impossible pour les aéroports de Montréal ou d'ailleurs au Canada?

M. Martin Massé:

Ce choix résulte de l'équilibre à atteindre entre ce que la clientèle demande quant aux vols et ce que les compagnies aériennes sont en mesure de faire. Je ne sais pas si l'on vous a déjà parlé de la double rotation. Ce concept permet à une compagnie aérienne de décider d'utiliser un aéronef pour effectuer deux fois un même trajet, soit quatre segments, et d'ainsi desservir une destination donnée à un prix raisonnable, particulièrement une destination soleil. Cela veut donc dire que l'aéronef doit être en vol le plus longtemps possible, compte tenu du fait que le temps de préparation pour ces doubles rotations en hiver comprend probablement deux déglaçages. Il s'agit donc d'équilibrer ce que la population demande, ce que le passager demande, ce que les compagnies aériennes demandent et, évidemment, ce que permet le climat en général.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci de cet éclairage. L'on constate quand même que le nombre d'exemptions ponctuelles ne cesse d'augmenter. Aéroports de Montréal a-t-elle une stratégie pour réduire ce nombre dans le contexte d'une augmentation importante — peut-être pas exponentielle, mais vraiment importante — du trafic aérien? Est-il plausible de dire que les demandes d'exemption ponctuelles vont augmenter au même rythme que le trafic aérien?

M. Martin Massé:

Il y a plusieurs éléments de réponse.

Tout d'abord, je ne crois pas qu'il faille croire qu'une augmentation du nombre de passagers entraîne nécessairement une augmentation du nombre de mouvements d'avions dans les mêmes proportions.

Deuxièmement, les flottes aériennes sont en train de se renouveler, comme l'a mentionné, je crois, mon collègue de Calgary. Certains appareils, comme les Boeing 767, sont retirés de la circulation pour être remplacés par des avions de nouvelle génération. Nos études démontrent que la légère augmentation du nombre de mouvements d'avions découlant du rajeunissement de ces flottes dans les prochaines années ne devrait pas signifier une augmentation du bruit.

M. Robert Aubin:

Dans le même ordre d'idées... [Traduction]

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, monsieur Aubin, vous avez dépassé votre temps.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'ai un certain nombre de questions et je vais donc vous demander des réponses relativement courtes. Si vous souhaitez fournir des précisions à l'une ou à l'autre, n'hésitez pas à nous envoyer une note afin qu'elle puisse être consignée au compte rendu.

Dirigeons-nous d'abord et avant tout vers l'Ouest.

Bonjour, madame Murray et monsieur Cheng.

Les habitants de toutes les collectivités, y compris certains des nôtres, ont appris qu'Amazon ouvrira une nouvelle et très grande installation; ils se frottent les mains et disent « youpi ». Ensuite, les gens à l'aéroport disent bon, ça y est, plus d'aéronefs avec plus de fret, etc.

Je me demande si, dans le contexte du Vancouver métropolitain, l'aéroport YVR entretient une quelconque collaboration stratégique avec Abbotsford afin de déterminer s'il est possible de gérer non seulement le problème du bruit lié aux vols de fret supplémentaires, mais également l'horaire des vols pour s'assurer qu'ils arrivent à des heures moins critiques et d'envisager peut-être le transport terrestre qui intervient inévitablement après l'atterrissage d'un avion-cargo.

J'ai une question générale. Collaborez-vous avec Abbotsford pour examiner les grands enjeux stratégiques dans notre région? Pourriez-vous parler de la croissance aussi?

(1025)

Mme Anne Murray:

Bien sûr.

Nous travaillons en collaboration assez étroite avec tous les aéroports de la région. Il y a un certain nombre d'aéroports différents. Nous venons de mettre à jour notre plan directeur à long terme, qui porte sur 20 ans et sur la façon dont nous pouvons gérer l'espace aérien et les aéroports.

En ce qui concerne le fret et les colis, nous constatons qu'à l'aéroport de Vancouver, la majeure partie du fret provient de la soute d'avions de passagers. Nous constatons une augmentation à cet égard. Nous n'avons en fait qu'un seul aéronef cargo.

Les colis se trouvent dans des aéronefs relativement petits; ils y entrent et en sortent. Nous avons de bonnes connexions depuis une installation de transport terrestre qui travaille avec le transport régional et local.

M. Ken Hardie:

Il vaut peut-être la peine de garder un oeil sur cet aspect, car il y aura des colis beaucoup plus nombreux et plus gros, en particulier avec Amazon. Dieu sait ce que les gens commandent auprès de cette entreprise de nos jours.

Les témoins d'un groupe précédent ont dit qu'un aéroport préparait parfois des prévisions d'ambiance sonore afin d'informer la collectivité de ce qui pourrait survenir avec des changements.

Tout d'abord, l'aéroport YVR fournit-il également ce genre de service à la collectivité? Avez-vous déjà reçu des demandes à ce sujet de la part d'une collectivité qui envisage, par exemple, de construire davantage de logements dans une zone donnée sur une trajectoire de vol?

Avez-vous déjà entendu parler de projets d'aménagement et offert proactivement cette information afin que la collectivité sache bien que certains aspects doivent être pris en considération avant de faire les choses, notamment en ce qui concerne le bruit?

Mme Anne Murray:

Oui, nous préparons des courbes de niveau de bruit pour les prévisions d'ambiance sonore et nous regardons une période de 20 ans et plus. Nous les fournissons aux municipalités locales. Nous avons travaillé avec la ville de Richmond et avons encouragé les responsables à demander d'avance aux acheteurs potentiels de l'information sur l'isolation sonore et à chercher réellement à réduire les effets du bruit sur les personnes qui choisissent de vivre à proximité des aéroports. C'est pour leur donner de l'information afin qu'ils puissent faire des choix quant à l'endroit où ils veulent vivre.

M. Ken Hardie:

Cela dit, avez-vous déjà entendu parler d'un nouveau projet immobilier quelque part en vous disant: « Oh la la, les ennuis arrivent? »

Mme Anne Murray:

Les décisions en matière de planification du territoire relèvent de la compétence des municipalités locales. J'ai eu des conversations avec certaines d'entre elles et leur ai dit qu'elles devaient vraiment se demander s'il était sage et souhaitable que ces personnes déménagent dans de nouvelles installations résidentielles près des aéroports.

C'est Transports Canada qui crée les lignes directrices. Ce sont les représentants des municipalités qui font ces choix. Nous travaillons avec eux, mais c'est parfois un défi.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vais vous demander de mettre votre tête sur le billot, ici.

Est-ce que vous recommanderiez au secteur immobilier de tenir compte de la proximité de projets de construction domiciliaire ou des maisons à vendre par rapport à des installations comme la vôtre pour que l'on s'assure que les acheteurs puissent agir en connaissance de cause?

Mme Anne Murray:

Nous l'avons effectivement fait. Nous avons mis en place ce type de programme avec la ville de Richmond. Ainsi, lorsque celle-ci approuve de nouveaux projets dans des zones très bruyantes, elle oblige le promoteur à inclure de l'information sur le bruit, à la fois sur le lieu de vente et en ce qui concerne les restrictions visant la propriété. Il existe une clause restrictive concernant le terrain, de sorte que chaque acheteur est au courant du bruit des avions.

M. Ken Hardie:

Monsieur Sartor...

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, monsieur Hardie, mais votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Graham, allez-y. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur Massé et madame Marcotte, j'ai plusieurs questions à vous poser au sujet des aéroports de Dorval et de Mirabel ainsi que de ceux situés encore plus au nord.

Vous avez entendu les questions que j'ai posées aux témoins de NAV CANADA à propos de l'aéroport de Saint-Jérôme. À cet aéroport, il y a une école de parachutisme qui fait beaucoup de bruit. Les activités de cette école sont restreintes à cause des approches des avions aux aéroports de Dorval et de Mirabel.

Quel est le trafic actuel à l'aéroport de Mirabel?

(1030)

Mme Anne Marcotte:

Il y a environ 20 000 mouvements d'avions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En quoi consistent-ils principalement?

M. Martin Massé:

Il y a du transport de marchandises, un peu de transport de passagers et une école de pilotage.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans la zone classée d'exploitation aéroportuaire de Mirabel, y a-t-il de trop de trafic pour qu'il y ait des activités de parachutage?

M. Martin Massé:

Je ne suis pas en mesure de répondre à votre question, mais je fournirai une réponse plus tard.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Nous vous en serions gré.

L'aéroport de Dorval devrait poursuivre sa croissance, car il n'a pas atteint sa pleine capacité. Même si on a enlevé le terminal à l'aéroport de Mirabel, ce dernier a-t-il encore un rôle à jouer dans le transport de passagers de la région de Montréal?

M. Martin Massé:

L'aéroport de Mirabel a certainement encore un rôle à jouer. Il n'a jamais été un aussi grand acteur de développement économique qu'il ne l'est aujourd'hui. Il emploie 5 000 personnes. Il s'agit d'emplois bien rémunérés, par exemple en techniques ou en ingénierie. Évidemment, Airbus présente une occasion de développer le pôle aéronautique et industriel de Mirabel.

Si votre question vise à savoir s'il y a une possibilité que cet aéroport recommence à accueillir les vols de passagers, je vous dirais que ce n'est pas du tout dans les plans d'Aéroports de Montréal.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'aéroport de Dorval va continuer sa croissance. Il y aura donc encore du trafic aérien dans les villes avoisinantes plutôt que dans les banlieues ou les zones agricoles. Est-ce exact?

M. Martin Massé:

Cet aéroport va sans aucun doute poursuivre sa croissance. Du côté de Mirabel, cette ville est beaucoup plus populeuse qu'elle ne l'était il y a 25 ou 30 ans.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est vrai aussi.

Plus au nord, il y a l'Aéroport international de Mont-Tremblant, à La Macaza, dans ma circonscription. Cet aéroport, qui ne fait pas partie des aéroports que vous gérez, pourrait-il jouer un rôle dans la gestion du trafic?

M. Martin Massé:

Je ne peux pas vous répondre en ce qui concerne l'aéroport situé à La Macaza en particulier. Je peux vous dire cependant qu'il faut concevoir le système de gestion aéroportuaire autour d'une grande ville. C'est ce que démontre bien l'exemple de Toronto, où il y a les aéroports Pearson, Billy Bishop, Hamilton et les autres. Si nos collègues de Toronto étaient là, ils vous diraient sûrement que cela sert parfois de soupape, mais je ne veux pas parler pour eux.

Je crois que l'avenir réside dans la vision d'un système de gestion aéroportuaire autour des villes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'aéroport de Mirabel ne gère plus de vols de passagers en grande partie à cause de l'absence de transport ferroviaire. Peut-on dire cela?

M. Martin Massé:

C'est un facteur.

Il faut également se rappeler que, pour des raisons technologiques, il y a eu une époque où les aéronefs venant d'Europe ne pouvaient pas se rendre plus loin que Mirabel à l'intérieur du continent nord-américain. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles Atlanta est devenu le plus grand aéroport. Il y a plusieurs années, les avions ont commencé à pouvoir se rendre jusqu'à Toronto et ils ont ensuite pu se rendre plus loin.

Effectivement, il y a des raisons liées à l'accessibilité. L'autoroute 13 n'a pas été terminée et il n'y a pas eu de lien rapide de transport en commun. Mais il y a aussi des raisons technologiques. Il y a aussi le fait qu'on ait choisi de faire un aérogare sans portes d'embarquement avec des transbordeurs. Cela a peut-être été une fausse bonne idée, qui n'a pratiquement jamais été reprise ailleurs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Parlez-vous des autobus qui desservaient l'aéroport?

M. Martin Massé:

Oui. On les a récupérés à Dorval, en bonne partie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'en ai effectivement pris un, quand j'étais jeune. C'était assez intéressant.

M. Martin Massé:

La nostalgie vend beaucoup.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais continuer à faire le lien entre le transport ferroviaire et le transport aérien.

Il est plus facile de prendre le train de Toronto à Dorval que de Montréal à Dorval. Est-ce raisonnable?

M. Martin Massé:

Que voulez-vous dire par « plus facile »?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il n'est pas possible de prendre un train de VIA Rail à Montréal pour se rendre à l'aéroport de Dorval. Pendant toute la fin de semaine, il y a sept départs du train de banlieue. C'est l'un des aéroports au monde où il est quasiment impossible de prendre le train pour s'y rendre. Va-t-on régler cette question?

M. Martin Massé:

C'est une excellente question, monsieur le député. C'est pourquoi nous sommes si heureux du fait que, dès 2023, nous aurons une station du REM, l'antenne ouest, qui se rendra jusqu'à l'aéroport.

Du côté de l'aéroport de Montréal, on croit qu'on doit aller encore plus loin et faire en sorte que le REM se rende jusqu'à la gare de VIA Rail, qui est située à moins d'un kilomètre du stationnement étagé qui sera refait, donc de la nouvelle station du REM.

Cela permettra aux gens, notamment ceux des régions, de prendre le train pour se rendre à l'aéroport. Les gens de Trois-Rivières ou de Drummondville pourraient très bien venir à la gare VIA Rail à Dorval, pour ensuite prendre le REM l'équivalent d'une station, et être au chaud dans l'aérogare.

(1035)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Jeneroux, la parole est à vous.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.

Merci à vous tous d'être ici aujourd'hui. Merci d'être venus de Calgary et de Montréal. Pour les gens à Vancouver, même si vous n'êtes pas ici, c'est un plaisir de vous voir ce soir.

J'aimerais commencer avec vous, monsieur Sartor. À Edmonton, nous avons également un aéroport sensationnel. Cependant, nous sommes aussi en train de songer à construire cette troisième piste. Selon la personne à qui vous parlez, cela semble imminent, mais ce n'est pas encore tout à fait là où vous en êtes. Toutefois, nous sommes dans une situation différente. Je ne pense pas avoir reçu une seule plainte dans ma circonscription — et celle-ci va jusqu'aux limites de la ville —, car elle est encore à bonne distance de l'aéroport.

En ce qui concerne les leçons apprises — il s'agit peut-être de consultations avec la collectivité —, avez-vous un conseil que vous pourriez peut-être me communiquer, pour le moment où nous nous engagerons dans cette voie, qui, je l'espère est imminent?

M. Bob Sartor:

Certainement. L'aéroport de Calgary occupe son emplacement actuel depuis 1937. La ville n'était qu'un lointain groupe de maisons et d'entreprises. Ce qui est arrivé, c'est que la ville a grandi autour de l'aéroport au fil du temps. Une chose a été extrêmement utile en Alberta, et il s'agit d'un phénomène unique à notre province: la zone tampon d'un aéroport. Elle a été mise en place en 1972, je pense. Effectivement, on a étudié ces prévisions d'ambiance sonore, en fonction des avions à l'époque, en 1972, et on a déclaré que tout type d'ensemble résidentiel d'une importance quelconque — écoles, lieux de culte, entre autres — ne devait pas être construit ici.

Donc oui, la ville est construite tout autour, mais malheureusement, même avec ces prévisions d'ambiance sonore... Les prévisions d'ambiance sonore sont très bénéfiques, car elles obligent la municipalité, si elle souhaite construire à cet endroit, à collaborer avec l'aéroport. À moins d'un accord entre la municipalité et l'aéroport, la législation, qui est provinciale, l'emportera. C'est un véritable avantage.

Cela dit, nous n'avons pas modifié ces prévisions d'ambiance sonore depuis 1972. En réalité, bien que les aéronefs soient devenus plus silencieux, la population s'est beaucoup densifiée autour de l'aéroport. Même avec une bonne législation, le défi... L'important, de façon réaliste, est un ensemble de normes acoustiques qui auront du sens pour les maisons construites sur les trajectoires de vol. Nous y travaillons actuellement avec la municipalité. Je ne pense pas que nous aurions l'occasion de le faire si nous n'avions pas ce que nous appelons le moyen ou l'outil appelé zone tampon d'un aéroport.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

C'est unique en Alberta. Aucune autre administration, à l'échelle provinciale, n'a envisagé une telle chose depuis 1972? Ce n'est pas une question pour vous, mais je remarque que certains membres de NAV CANADA sont toujours là. Ils pourraient peut-être répondre après les travaux du Comité.

Vous avez parlé de la croissance du fret que vous connaissez actuellement. Cette croissance est un outil générateur de revenus. Est-ce quelque chose que les aéroports tentent activement de s'arracher? Est-ce une tendance à la hausse? Voulez-vous que cela vienne de vos partenaires internationaux? Comment cela se passe-t-il exactement? Avez-vous des idées sur les discussions qui doivent avoir lieu pour que cela devienne une réalité?

M. Bob Sartor:

Encore une fois, à Calgary, notre situation est unique du fait que nous sommes assujettis à la Regional Airports Authorities Act de l'Alberta. Ce n'est pas seulement le gouvernement fédéral; nous avons un règlement provincial dont l'un des mandats est de stimuler l'activité économique, l'emploi et le PIB, non seulement sur le campus aéroportuaire, mais au sein de la collectivité que nous servons.

Nous sommes à la recherche de fret. De fait, c'est davantage le fret qui vient à nous, car nous sommes idéalement situés, avec un accès facile à la route transcanadienne. Nous sommes le plus gros consommateur de ce produit de fret. Nous allons donc recevoir des vols dans ce que nous appelons notre allée d'intégration — la zone où se trouvent tous les intégrateurs — et nous diriger vers la Saskatchewan, à l'ouest, vers l'intérieur de la Colombie-Britannique et au nord, vers Edmonton.

(1040)

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Y a-t-il un partenariat entre vous et Edmonton? Je sais qu'il existe de nombreux aéroports régionaux, mais Edmonton attire beaucoup de fret, en particulier de la Chine. Je suis curieux de savoir s'il existe un tel partenariat entre vous deux.

M. Bob Sartor:

Je n'appellerais pas cela un partenariat, mais Tom Ruth et moi sommes amis, et nous parlons constamment.

En fait, vous constateriez que la plupart des PDG des aéroports collaborent très bien.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

D'accord. J'imagine cependant qu'il y a une certaine concurrence. Nous entendons souvent dire que Calgary récupère des vols. Nous adorerions les vols directs à Edmonton.

M. Bob Sartor:

Nous sommes dans une position unique, car nous sommes une ville de 1,2 million d'habitants, et cette année, nous transporterons 17,4 millions de personnes. L'année prochaine, nous en transporterons un ou deux millions de plus. Nous sommes donc un aéroport fortement axé sur les liaisons. Edmonton est moins un aéroport de liaison qu'un aéroport d'apport. Certes, il a ses propres destinations internationales, mais les correspondances représentent environ 38 % de notre chiffre d'affaires total, ce qui en fait l'aéroport de liaison le plus achalandé au Canada.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Mais vous n'avez pas les Oilers d'Edmonton.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Sikand, vous avez une minute si vous avez une courte question.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Ma question s'adresse à M. Massé.

Je représente une circonscription à Mississauga, dans la RGT, la région du Grand Toronto. Je vous ferai part de mes observations, mais ma vraie question sera: « Quelles leçons pouvons-nous tirer de Mirabel? »

Ce que j'ai observé, c'est que l'aéroport Billy-Bishop ne peut pas vraiment atteindre son plein potentiel parce que les résidents ne veulent pas de bruit là-bas. Nous sommes un peu déconnectés. J'aime l'aéroport Pearson; je passe par là, et il va grandir. Je ne sais pas si l'infrastructure dans les villes sera en mesure de gérer cet essor, à moins que nous puissions avoir un service ferroviaire là-bas et que les gens utilisent les moyens de transport pour passagers.

Pickering est un peu loin, tout comme Hamilton. Une solution, me semble-t-il, serait un aéroport au nord de l'escarpement. Ce serait près de Hamilton et de l'aéroport Pearson et s'étendrait à Guelph et à Kitchener.

Que pouvons-nous apprendre de l'expérience de Mirabel?

M. Martin Massé:

Personnellement, j'estime qu'il serait assez ridicule de ma part de m'immiscer dans ce débat, mais en ce qui concerne Mirabel, comme je l'ai déjà mentionné à votre collègue, le fait est que nous n'avons jamais eu les systèmes de navettage. Les avions peuvent maintenant aller à Mirabel. Nous avions également le sentiment que Montréal avait perdu sa position en tant que plaque tournante du trafic aérien jusqu'en 2013-2014, quand Air Canada a décidé de revenir à Montréal en tant qu'aéroport-pivot.

Somme toute, pour la collectivité, il n'était pas logique d'avoir deux aéroports non reliés, sans l'aspect « navettage » — ayant toujours une liaison aérienne, mais sans le système approprié. Cela n'avait aucun sens.

Maintenant, nous savons que nous aurons un système de navettage, le REM, le Réseau express métropolitain, qui assurera un transport sûr, sensé et fréquent pour l'ensemble de la région, non pas seulement depuis le centre-ville.[Français]

C'est, je crois, un concours de circonstances et l'apport de tous les joueurs qui ont fait en sorte que la concentration à Dorval soit, pour cet aéroport, la seule façon de jouer le rôle de moteur économique pour la grande ville de Montréal. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Malheureusement, le temps est écoulé.

J'ai reçu un avis de M. Hardie puis une question de M. Aubin, mais je donnerai la parole à M. Hardie si les témoins sont indulgents avec moi quelques minutes.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais soulever une question que nous avons abordée et mise de côté il y a quelque temps. J'aimerais proposer que le Comité reprenne maintenant l'examen de la motion, ainsi rédigée: Que le Comité s’engage à consacrer au plus quatre réunions à l’étude de la sécurité des passagers d’autocar, et entende, dans cet ordre, mais sans se limiter à ces témoins, des médecins urgentistes et des coroners, le Bureau de la sécurité des transports, la National Highway Transportation Safety Authority des États-Unis, des défenseurs de la sécurité des transports et des parties intéressées, puis enfin de constructeurs d’autocars, et que la présidente soit habilitée à coordonner le choix des témoins, l’affectation des ressources et l’établissement du calendrier afin de mener à bien cette tâche.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Hardie.

Il s'agit d'une motion dilatoire, qui ne fait pas l'objet de discussion ou de débat.

(La motion est adoptée.)

(1045)

M. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Madame la présidente, je me demande si je pourrais présenter un amendement favorable.

La présidente:

Pouvez-vous attendre un instant? J'aimerais faire une suggestion à ce moment-ci, compte tenu du temps dont nous disposons. Nous avons du temps jeudi pour les travaux du Comité. Pourrions-nous traiter du contenu de la motion et du débat jeudi?

Le Comité est-il d'accord?

Des députés: D'accord.

La présidente: À ce moment-là, jeudi, nous pourrons proposer des amendements que le Comité voudra peut-être apporter, si cela convient à tout le monde.

Monsieur Aubin, allez-y. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Cela va dans le sens de la question que je voulais poser. En effet, j'aimerais savoir si la séance du Comité sera publique jeudi prochain. J'aurais aussi souhaité déposer une motion au sujet des événements relatifs à la compagnie Greyhound, étant donné que le délai sera expiré.

Si jamais nous n'avons pas de bonnes nouvelles cette semaine, nous pourrons probablement demander au ministre de venir nous présenter ses solutions. Cependant, je ne voulais pas déposer cette motion avant que les délais soient expirés, étant donné que les solutions sont peut-être déjà en cours.

Notre réunion de jeudi sera-t-elle publique lors des travaux du Comité? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Actuellement, il est prévu que nous examinions les ébauches de recommandations pour notre étude sur les corridors commerciaux. C'est une séance à huis clos pour jeudi. Vous pouvez certainement proposer une séance publique en tout temps pendant cette réunion.

Vous aurez l'occasion de les examiner un peu plus longuement, ainsi que tout autre amendement que vous pourriez vouloir présenter jeudi.

Merci beaucoup à tous nos témoins. Nous apprécions vos interventions.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 30, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.