header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-30 PROC 128

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1200)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Welcome to the 128th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

This meeting is being televised as we begin our study of the question of privilege related to the matter of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police publications respecting Bill C-71, an act to amend certain acts and regulations in relation to firearms.

We are pleased to be joined by Glen Motz, member of Parliament for Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner. Members will recall that Mr. Motz raised the question of privilege.

Mr. Motz, thank you for making yourself available today. You may now proceed with your opening statement.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair and colleagues.

I appreciate the opportunity to speak with you today about the conduct of the Liberal government and the RCMP, and their activities around the implementation of Bill C-71.

While I will attempt to present my remarks in a dispassionate way, it is challenging not to be angered at the arrogance shown by the Liberals in their presentation of this bill, and the systematic way the government ministers and MPs have tried to mislead Canadians. This is a contributing factor to the question of privilege I raised earlier this spring.

Here's the central issue: The RCMP began implementing a proposed law, Bill C-71, before Parliament had deliberated, debated and voted on the bill. The RCMP had posted on their website special bulletin number 93, a notice implementing portions of Bill C-71. At the time, the bill was before committee and under intense scrutiny. The bulletin made use of definitive language, giving Canadians the distinct impression that this bill was current law in Canada.

On May 29, I raised the issue that the RCMP was assuming Parliament would approve the bill, despite the significant reservations of millions of Canadians and many in Parliament. Within 24 hours of that question of privilege being raised, the RCMP modified their special bulletin number 93 to remove a presumption of Parliament's final decision. On that same day, May 30, I rose again to let the Speaker know of the recent change.

On June 19, the Speaker noted he was troubled by the careless manner in which the RCMP chose to ignore the fact that the bill was still before Parliament and not a law. This may seem like a technical issue, but this technical issue supports our very system of a parliamentary democracy. Prime ministers, ministers, departments and agencies are all subject to Parliament. Of all departments and agencies, a federal law enforcement one should not be so careless with Parliament and implementing laws.

Parliament is the voice for all Canadians, and it is beholden on us to scrutinize those laws, rules and regulations for Canadians. The message being sent to Parliament by the minister and by the RCMP is that they can act without Parliament. That contravenes the purpose of this House and those of you sitting around these tables today. It suggests that ministers and senior government officials are ultimately in full control, rather than the elected officials. As Speaker Regan said, “The work of members as legislators is fundamental and any hint or suggestion of this parliamentary role and authority being bypassed or usurped is not acceptable.”

Today, the members of this committee will have the first opportunity in Canada to set the standard for departments and agencies that assume the will of Parliament. We cannot allow the precedent to be and have a muted response.

A decision was made to implement legislation, despite the highly contentious nature of the bill and the serious and valid reservations from thousands of Canadians and parliamentarians. It falls on you, as this committee, to determine who made the decisions, who is responsible, and how we deter this from occurring again. The questions before you, as I see them, are many, but they could include this one: Did the RCMP set rules ahead of parliamentary decision independently, as opposed to being instructed to do so? There are only two potential answers: yes or no. If the answer is yes, then the RCMP made a decision to prioritize their objectives ahead of the voice of our elected representatives. The police in this country do not create the rules and the law; they enforce them. This is a fundamental function of the separation of powers in a democracy.

If the answer is no, then who directed the RCMP to proceed, and, conspicuous by his absence, where has the Minister of Public Safety been on this issue? The RCMP reports to Parliament through the minister, and the minister is responsible for its actions. I contend that if the minister did not actively instruct the RCMP, then he is guilty of failing to do his job of overseeing the RCMP. He has made no comments or statements to address the issue, other than through his parliamentary secretary, the member from Ajax, now the Liberal whip, and that member sought to have the issue dismissed.

(1205)



I know the investigation the committee is now charged to undertake is not about this one instance. It is about the broader principle of ensuring that the House can hold prime ministers, ministers, departments, crown corporations and agencies to account for taking action that conflicts with, undermines or otherwise ignores directions and deliberations of Parliament.

Public servants should always be mindful of the House and our democracy. As parliamentarians, we can disagree, but the function of this House is dependent on the House reviewing and approving the actions of government. Members of Parliament are not here to serve the will of the prime minister and cabinet. We are here to serve our constituents. Ministers and prime ministers are subject to the direction and will of Parliament, not the other way around.

I urge all to look at the facts of the case and see the overall picture. It's hard to argue that the minister has approached this particular legislation with full integrity and transparency. When there is a systematic and consistent attempt to deceive, it becomes harder and harder to believe the individual in question.

So far, the government leadership has made factually inaccurate statements. It could be suggested that they were made to mislead the public on the true nature of this legislation. For example, the Prime Minister suggested that currently no one needs to prove that they have a firearms licence to purchase a firearm. The truth is that selling or buying a firearm in this country without a proper licence is a criminal offence and carries a maximum penalty of five years in jail.

The minister appeared before committee and used several misleading statements as well. He indicated that, based on Toronto Police Service stats, half of crime guns were from domestic sources. Even after those numbers were proven to be completely false, the minister continued to use them. He indicated that there was a sudden spike in violent gun crime, when in fact violent gun crime and homicide by firearm are not at record levels. He used selective dates and stats to create the appearance of a crisis where none existed. Finally, he reported a massive increase in break and enter to steal a firearm, when in fact this charge was first introduced in 2008 and the sudden increase was primarily the result of the application of a new Criminal Code charge where none existed previously.

I could go on with many more examples, but I believe the point has been made. The testimony of the minister and of this government to date has been flawed and misleading. The added fact that the RCMP, upon the issue being raised in the House, immediately revised their bulletin is nothing short of an admission of guilt.

The Minister of Public Safety replied to a letter from me and my colleague from Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles on an issue within the bill. In his reply, dated October 15 of this year, he acknowledged that there was a flaw in the legislation and he would grant the three-year amnesty, no doubt in part because of the overreach of the RCMP. However, there was no indication or responsibility of whether the bulletin from the RCMP was posted through ignorance or intent.

This falls to the investigation and the determination of this committee. It is therefore critical that a decisive and clear report show the prejudgment of Parliament to be a serious issue. This committee is responsible for upholding a key part of our Parliament and democracy, where ministers and agencies of the government must respect and abide by the House.

In closing, I would ask each of you to review the ruling of the Speaker. Putting aside political allegiances and party standing, Speaker Regan put the will of Canadians and their elected representatives ahead of the defence of party brands. He spoke truth to power and called on you to ensure that this Parliament and each one after it are empowered by the Canadians who voted for them, rather than obligated to follow a party hierarchy.

When ministers and parties use misinformation and positions of authority to obstruct the House in its duties, we put our democracy in jeopardy. Look beyond our disagreements and towards the values that bring Canadians together. These values must be reflected and upheld in our Parliament and in the ability of members of Parliament to hold each other and the government to the will of the people.

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for the opportunity to speak today.

(1210)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Now we'll go to seven-minute rounds of questioning. We'll start with Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Motz. I think you might be on the right path here. Misleading members of the House is contemptuous indeed. I don't disagree with that. I looked at the website. It certainly did use language that gave the sense that this was either happening or going to happen and people should be prepared.

The only place where we diverge, I think, is on intent. I won't write this off as an innocent mistake, but I don't want to describe or characterize it as being particularly malicious, either. I've seen this before. I can give you a couple of examples where this has happened. For example, you can say that there are many bureaucrats, many people in agencies, people who work for the government—in essence, they work for the people of this country—who prepare themselves for what is around the corner. To me, there's a lot of due diligence there. For example, we just went through a lot of work on the Canada Elections Act. If the people of Elections Canada had not prepared themselves for what might be coming, then the situation would be exacerbated even further—more difficulties way down the line. For them, I think it's an issue of due diligence.

Now, did the police, in this case, do due diligence? To a certain degree I think they did. They wanted to let the public know what is changing and whatnot. Do you think they should have said—using that language—“This is what's going to happen. This is the new rule. This is how you have to register yourself if you have a firearm”, and then at the end added, “pending parliamentary approval”? Would that have sufficed?

Mr. Glen Motz:

I think it's fair to say that your assessment of trying to get ahead of the ball, if you will, or get ahead of the curve on being proactive, is probably an accurate depiction of what they were trying to do. However, I would suggest that rather than leaving language like that to the back end, you do it at the front end. You say, “This is the proposed legislation that is before Parliament. It is being discussed in the House. It's being debated at committee.”

(1215)

Mr. Scott Simms:

I don't mean to cut you off. I totally agree with you, because I was particularly appalled a few years ago, in 2014, when the headline was “Harper gov't spending funds on ads for measures still 'subject to parliamentary approval'”. Their ads were basically saying that these tax breaks were coming, but right at the bottom they said, “subject to parliamentary approval”. I didn't like that, and I'm sure you didn't either, when it was happening.

In this particular case, when the police made the correction, I guess you'd call it an admission of guilt, that they did something wrong. We're going to have the minister here to get his explanation behind it, but to a great extent, yes, I do agree with you. Not to get into the weeds about the issue, but I think in this particular case.... I don't want to discourage people who work in the public service from practising due diligence and being prepared. As I was angry with Stephen Harper for the ads that he did, because they were misleading, in this case it is misleading too.

But again, it's the intent that bothers me. If the intention, as it was in 2014, was to say, “This is going to happen. We have the majority, so what are you worried about?”, then that's not right. But if this is due diligence that the public service is doing, then good on them. Just don't pretend, as in this case, that it's going to happen.

We'll ask the minister when he gets here.

Mr. Glen Motz:

That's fair enough. I think the minister has a lot to answer for with respect to this. It's important to recognize as well that when you are making a statement or putting out a publication that impacts thousands of Canadians and that can make them believe that they could become criminals overnight—their understanding was that if they didn't comply, they would be criminalized—then it's important that there be some understanding at the front end of that.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Sorry, this is a sincere question. Is that the language they used?

Mr. Glen Motz:

No, but there were repercussions from what they were suggesting, that this will be in effect and it will have this impact—and it was still being debated in committee.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Did they suggest something, or did they say, “These are the rules that will be in place”? There are no ramifications to it—or there will be, of course, but they didn't allude to the fact that people will be punished. Is that right?

Mr. Glen Motz:

No, but every.... The Canadian firearm-owning community is the most responsible of the Canadian public. They know, and they're the ones with all the rules.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Was that mentioned on the website?

Mr. Glen Motz:

Pardon me?

Mr. Scott Simms:

Was that mentioned on the website?

Mr. Glen Motz:

Was what mentioned?

Mr. Scott Simms:

That they are the most responsible.... Listen, I'm a gun owner myself. I consider myself to be quite responsible, as most of them are, no doubt about it.

I'm trying to nail down the intent of this. I don't think they were out there to deliberately mislead people. Do you really think the Mounties did that?

Mr. Glen Motz:

I have some suspicions, but I really think that it's the responsibility of this committee to find out by asking and seeking evidence.

Who authorized it? What was the intent behind it? Whom you call as witnesses could be critical, sir, to the finding of the fact and whatever conclusions you want to draw. I think the most important thing is to make sure it doesn't happen again, regardless of whether it was an honest mistake and there was no intent to mislead, as your contention was, or whatever words you chose to use.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I totally agree.

Mr. Glen Motz:

That's the responsibility, I think, of this committee. I'm not here to presume the will of the committee.

Mr. Scott Simms:

But you're making a presumption on intention. I got the feeling that you were making the presumption that the intention was bad. In the first sentence, the word “arrogance” was used. I'm not sure if arrogance was really the right word. At this point, the minister hasn't even been in yet. Don't you think that's rather presumptive?

Mr. Glen Motz:

No, I don't at all, actually. I think it's completely evidenced by the—

Mr. Scott Simms:

Do you mean that the arrogance is evident?

Mr. Glen Motz:

I was being very polite. The responses that I'm getting from constituents, from Canadians, on Bill C-71 are not as politically correct as that.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Would you be offended if I said that your opinion was arrogant?

Mr. Glen Motz:

Not at all.

The Chair:

Mr. Simms, your time is up.

We'll go on to Mrs. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Glen, thank you so much for being here today and presenting this case to the House, but also for your bravery in being here, especially as a former law official. It must be very hard for you to stomach that people who come from the same profession of which you were a proud part for so long were part of making such a grave error.

I'm interested whether you could give me an idea of how many stakeholders contacted you regarding this slip of information that occurred on the website.

(1220)

Mr. Glen Motz:

I have no idea how many I personally received at the office. I haven't tracked them.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

But they contacted you.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Yes.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

What would you say were their concerns when they contacted you? What types of things did you hear on the phone and in emails when you received these communications about this misinformation on the website?

Mr. Glen Motz:

From a lot of fronts, it was quite clear that they were confused. The overarching conversation was, “I thought this was still being debated. I didn't realize that it had been passed. What's happened?” There was confusion. There was angst in the firearm community, especially those who were going to be impacted by what the bulletin had suggested.

I think it is most unfortunate that whoever it was and however the decision was made to post this information with the definitive language that was used, it created an opportunity again for Canadians to discredit the national law enforcement agency.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Absolutely. I couldn't agree with you more.

How would you describe the emotions of the people when they contacted you? My goodness, under this misinformation, this penalty potentially carries the punishment of five years in prison. I can't imagine waking up one morning and reading some information that overnight potentially subjects me to five years in prison. What were their emotions when they were contacting you? You mentioned some confusion. Was there some fear as well?

Mr. Glen Motz:

Yes. First of all, many Canadians, including the law-abiding gun-owning community, are quite concerned about the ramifications of Bill C-71 and what it doesn't do for what we're trying to tackle, which is a gang and gun issue in this country, gun violence and gang violence. They're already concerned about the misguided approach that the government is taking with that.

Add on top of that the confusion that suggests we are now.... They didn't understand the process that they've circumvented Parliament. They were saying, “I thought you guys were still talking about this. Now I'm in a panic. Am I going to be a criminal overnight?”

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's a good word.

Mr. Glen Motz:

So there was concern. There was confusion and concern in the firearms community.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I really thank my colleague, the honourable member for Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, for bringing up the advertising case. I would say there are some major discrepancies, though, between that and this. I mean, the RCMP is just law enforcement. They can't presume the law. But I also think it's very important to point out that that case, in its ruling, wasn't determined to be prima facie, and that this one in fact was. That is a major differentiation between the two.

Mr. Motz, I would also like to point to the historic ruling of Speaker Fraser, which was 30 years ago now, as follows: This is a case which, in my opinion, should never recur. I expect the Department of Finance and other departments to study this ruling carefully and remind everyone within the Public Service that we are a parliamentary democracy, not a so-called executive democracy

—you made reference to this potentially being an executive decision— nor a so-called administrative democracy.

In your opinion, do you think something like this should ever happen again?

Mr. Glen Motz:

Well, I think it's quite honestly the responsibility of this committee to find out why it happened, how it happened, and how to ensure that it doesn't happen again, because it does, in my opinion, rattle Canadians' confidence in Parliament and their ability to trust government. Again, I think it's a huge affront to democracy. Regardless of the intent behind it, it's something that this committee is now charged with trying to find a cause for, and then ensuring that steps are taken to ensure that this current government and any future government, and all future ministries and departments moving forward, have a very clear direction and understanding and guidance on how to ensure that it doesn't happen in the future.

(1225)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

I will add that Speaker Fraser, and this was not in a prima facie case, went on in his ruling to state this: I want the House to understand very clearly that if your speaker ever has to consider a situation like this again, the Chair [may] not be as generous.

Would you say, Mr. Motz, that the committee should in fact go to any length and take as long as is necessary to determine how and why this happened? Do you feel we have an obligation to the Canadian public to do that?

Mr. Glen Motz:

Again, I don't want to presume the will of the committee, but I think it's critical that this committee recognize the importance of the study that's before it and recognize that, as I said, it isn't about this incident. It's clearly not about just this incident. It's about a broader issue, a larger thing that other speakers have had to contend with and that we know causes confusion to the public and undermines the authority of Parliament and elected officials. It's really through Parliament, as we all know and we all understand here, that we are the voice of Canadians when we're here. When anybody—bureaucratic officials or departments or ministers—circumvents that process, then really the voice of Canadians is no longer heard.

So yes, I think it's incumbent upon your committee to ask as many questions as you need to ask and find out from as many witnesses as you can about this situation—how to prevent it from happening and what to do about this current one as well.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Stephanie.

Mr. Christopherson, go ahead.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

Thanks very much, Glen. I appreciate your coming in.

I have to say that, like a few people here, I've been around the bush on this one, both here and also in a previous life at Queen's Park. We had a very similar thing. Scotty, you and I have been down the road on this a few times. I very much liken this kind of issue to the MPs' access to the House. The principle is a really big deal.

That's why whenever there is a prima facie case that members may have been held up in accessing the House, usually with the buses—that's the usual place where we have a problem—then we get into the details of it and find out just how much skulduggery is behind the incident that happened. I see this very similarly. The principle is a really big deal.

No government or entity or agency of government has the right to purport to the Canadian people that something is the law if Parliament hasn't passed it. I don't care how big your majority is; only Parliament can pass laws. Since it's not automatic—not everybody is a robot, and people can vote the way they want in the moment—it's not the law until it's the law.

I see this the same way. I have a real concern. With my background as a former Ontario solicitor general, the involvement of the police and their role in society and government, that interface, is an area that I have some interest and experience in, so I understand the severity of why you brought this forward.

I'm very much with Mr. Simms, Chair, in that a lot of this is going to turn on intent. It did happen, so the government has to take the hit for the fact that it happened. We want to hear some appropriate bowing and scraping about how it's not going to happen again.

But whether the government conspired with the RCMP to deliberately mislead the Canadian public or whether it was a comedy of errors remains to be seen. I think we're in the right place. I think that it was appropriate that this matter be sent here. It is a big deal. We need to treat it as a big deal.

I'm very much looking forward to our second meeting, where we will have the other side, if you will—there are always two sides—to get a sense of how close we are to conspiratorial action versus a bunch of clowns. To me, that will be the determination of how much time and how much effort we should spend going forward.

I don't really have any questions for you, Glen. I thought you made your case very clearly, very articulately. You backed it up. I have no questions for you, but I would afford you, if you wish, an opportunity to take the floor and clarify any other points you wish.

(1230)

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Mr. Christopherson. I appreciate your comments, and I would agree with them. I think it's fair to suggest that this committee, as has been suggested, needs to look at this in totality. It is similar to other cases in which contempt of Parliament has been upheld. I think this doesn't impact just me as an MP. This impacts the Canadian public in a way that's a little different, in that there were actions that could have been taken.

Regarding the intent behind this, whether it is, as you put it, a comedy of errors or some willful suggestion, I must make it very clear. I have many current and former members of the RCMP who are great friends and great police officers. I don't believe for a moment that behind all of this.... This is not in any way designed to malign the RCMP. There's nothing that could be further from the truth; that is not my intent.

But I think it's important to recognize that Bill C-71 gives the RCMP some reclassification authorities that they never had previous to Bill C-71. The Canadian public is suspect of that. When they see that an institution of the Canadian government—which is law enforcement, the RCMP—is even presumptuous in its language or believing that this is going to happen, it brings that organization into disrepute even more and discredits it. That's unfortunate.

We're here to ensure that the public institutions we hold true in this land have the confidence of our constituents. However this happened, which I'm confident this committee will certainly find out, it's important that there be mechanisms, checks and balances, that are placed there to ensure that those confidences can be maintained, that there are boundaries that bureaucrats and the agencies they answer to can follow, and that they clearly understand what those might be.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Very good. Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Christopherson.

Now we'll go on to Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you so much, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to thank Mr. Motz for bringing this to the committee's attention.

I agree with Mr. Simms—and I'll carry on for him—that this is a particularly troubling issue, and something that the committee should be looking into. Mr. Motz, Mr. Christopherson, and everyone who has spoken here are correct: Parliamentary privilege is important and needs to be maintained, and if there is a breach of that, that's something to be discussed.

Like Mr. Simms, though, I will be focusing more on the issue of intention. I'll start with a simple question. Would you agree with me that the RCMP is an independent agency that the minister does not govern the day-to-day affairs of?

Mr. Glen Motz:

Yes, the RCMP is an independent agency that answers directly to the Minister of Public Safety.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Okay. We're on the same page.

I was looking through your Wikipedia page when you got here. The interesting thing about this workplace is that we all have Wikipedia pages about us.

I'm very much impressed by your background and your years of service with the Medicine Hat police force, your Order of Merit, and that you retired as an inspector in the department.

Having been a lawyer in my time, I've represented a police service and I've also represented a police association, two different ones. Mistakes happen in those agencies.

I'm sure mistakes happened during your 35 years in the police department—not necessarily your responsibility. In those 35 years, how many times did you blame the mayor's office or the police service board for a day-to-day mistake that happened in the Medicine Hat police department?

(1235)

Mr. Glen Motz:

Well, the mayor's office and the police board are not responsible for the operations of the police service.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

But it reports back. The police department is answerable to the mayor's office and the police service board, similar to what we just described with the RCMP.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Yes, I think that if there was any blame, from an administrative perspective, we certainly looked to government to blame many times, and I was on that side of the fence for issues on legislation, but I see where you're going with this.

It's fair to suggest that if the mayor's office or the police commission—in our province, it was police commissions—wanted our police service to respond to something specific in our community, then we took the direction from that police commission.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Okay, but that wasn't on day-to-day issues, and they didn't tell you what to report.... They told you what they wanted to see in terms of reporting back, but not in terms of day-to-day issues.

I guess what I'm getting at.... There's a valid question here to be discussed, but I'm concerned that this is an opportunity to take a swing at the minister and to question his integrity without evidence—ironically enough, using parliamentary privilege, because you're saying it in the committee and not out in the hallways.

It would seem to me that this alternative.... On the one hand, you said that it seems like a technical issue, and maybe it is a technical issue, but on the other hand, potentially there is a broad conspiracy where the Minister of Public Safety presumably notified the acting commissioner of the RCMP, who notified someone else, who notified someone else, who notified someone else, who notified someone else, who notified the person in charge of the website. I'm guessing that person is pretty low in the hierarchy of the RCMP. I doubt the commissioner of the RCMP changes the website.

So you potentially have 10, 20, 100 people involved in this conspiracy, and in Ottawa, as would be the case in Washington or any other capital, those things don't stay secret. Are those the two options, that it was a technical breach or that there is a vast conspiracy between the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the minister's office on this particular issue? I don't see any other option. It's either one or the other. Do you honestly believe that there's a conspiracy?

Mr. Glen Motz:

What I believe doesn't matter to this committee.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'm sorry?

Mr. Glen Motz:

What I believe actually happened shouldn't matter to this committee. The facts you uncover should matter to this committee. The evidence you uncover as to exactly how this was allowed to happen is what's important. Do I have suspicions? Yes.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

You have suspicions of a conspiracy.

Mr. Glen Motz:

No, I didn't say that. You said that.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Then what's the suspicion?

You questioned the integrity of the minister. You have these suspicions without any evidence. You now say that your opinion doesn't matter, which it should because you're the one bringing this case forward and you're the one questioning the minister's integrity without any basis.

Clearly there's an issue on privilege, and we all agree. But where is this coming from? What's involved here at the end of the day?

We're here. We want to hear what you think. The Speaker agreed that there is an issue based on your report, based on your concerns to the Speaker. But is it a technical breach, or is it a vast conspiracy? It's probably a technical issue. If you say you have suspicions, what are your suspicions?

Mr. Glen Motz:

The committee's responsibility is to find out if the RCMP, the Canadian firearms program people, is responsible—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes, I understand the committee's responsibility. I'm a member of the committee.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Let me finish, and I could answer your question.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

No, no. Mr. Motz, I have only seven minutes, and I'm running out of time. I'll ask it straight out. What is your suspicion?

I know what my role is. We have to find the facts.

What is your suspicion that we should be going to find the facts about? Should I be asking questions about a vast conspiracy involving hundreds of people to change a line on a website, probably contrary to law?

Mr. Glen Motz:

It is fair to suggest that the people in the Canadian firearms program are not going to presume anything unless they're directed to do so.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

For the record, then, you believe there's a conspiracy—

(1240)

Mr. Glen Motz:

No, that's not—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

—handed down from the minister straight to the RCMP commissioner's office.

Mr. Glen Motz:

No, no, stop. That's not at all what I said.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

It's one or the other, Mr. Motz.

Mr. Glen Motz:

That's not at all what I said.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

You make these suggestions—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Don't put words in my mouth, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Mr. Motz, I have the floor.

You make these assumptions. You cast these aspersions. You have no evidence. And at the end of the day, you're still suggesting that maybe there's a conspiracy.

I see I'm running out of time.

The Chair:

You're out of time.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Maybe you should go into the hallway and suggest that the minister is involved in these things.

The Chair:

That's your time, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Glen Motz:

You can ask him here.

The Chair:

We will now go to Mr. Nater for five minutes.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Motz, for joining us.

I might follow up a little on what Mr. Bittle was going on. Do you think there's a process in place within a government department for approval of notices and information that go out to the public? Do you assume there's a process that ought to be followed, and could there perhaps have been a breakdown in this process?

Mr. Glen Motz:

Absolutely. Let's look at this.

This is the bill of the Minister of Public Safety. Bill C-71 was his. It's his push to get it through, with time allocation in the House and a rush to get it through committee. Again, the committee did not allow for any amendments of any substance that were going to change the consequence of the bill.

It's fair to suggest that there was.... They're not going to be blind to the way government and the departments work. The people who put the information on the website got their direction to do it from somebody. The choice of language was not.... Was it an oversight? These are pretty bright people who clearly understand the implications.

I think they were under the impression that it was going to happen, either that or they were wilfully blind to the fact that it was still before Parliament, still before committee. It hadn't even gone to third reading, and hadn't been to the Senate.

People can suggest what they want to suggest, but the minister and his department are responsible for the communication on this bill and how it's acted out by an agency responsible to enforce it, which is the RCMP.

Mr. John Nater:

It would be worthwhile for us to look at that approval process, look at how communiqués or bulletins are approved, and find out where in that process there was a breakdown in communication.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I think that would be more than fair, Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I appreciate that.

I want to follow up. It's been mentioned that you have an extensive background in policing, as an inspector. From your police background, when information like this is circulated, which at the very least causes confusion, what kind of effect does it have on a policing community, on a law enforcement community, and on those who are going to be interacting with the law enforcement community?

Mr. Glen Motz:

There are a couple. First of all, it creates confusion for the gun-owning Canadian public. Many of the municipal agencies, provincial agencies and law enforcement agencies in this country receive action bulletins and law bulletins from the RCMP, who have been involved with or play these things out and are responsible for programs, such as the Canadian firearms program. It's possible that it could cause confusion for them. Without checking, someone could believe that this is already enacted and make an error in that regard. Thankfully, I'm not aware of anything like that happening. It was changed. But it's possible.

Mr. John Nater:

Now, certainly when the Speaker made the prima facie ruling, he noted that this was a slight against the authority and dignity of the House of Commons.

Certainly it falls to us to find out exactly what happened, why it happened, where the failure happened. But I'm curious as well whether we should be looking at hearing from certain witnesses who may have been affected by this or may have potentially been impacted, as the target of these bulletins, by the information coming out. Do you think there should be some efforts to reach out to certain groups or organizations that could have potentially been impacted by this?

Mr. Glen Motz:

I think that's more than fair. I think it's essential to call people who are impacted or were impacted to speak to that, and the confusion that was created by this mistake and what the consequences were.

The Canadian Coalition for Firearm Rights, the Canadian Shooting Sports Association and the Canadian Sporting Arms and Ammunition Association are groups that represent a large portion of the Canadian shooting public, the firearms-owning public, through their memberships. I think they can clearly speak to it.

Wolverine Supplies is a distributor of firearms in this country who could speak to the impact that this misinformation could have on that business directly, and then on the retailers down the line. It had the potential to impact not only Canadian gun owners, but also the businesses that make their business off that industry.

(1245)

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Nater.

Now we'll go on to Ms. Sahota for five minutes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

In your previous testimony here today, during your interaction with Mrs. Kusie, there was some discussion of the impact that this posting on the website had on people in your community, people waking up the next day thinking that they were going to have to face repercussions.

Can you explain that to me a little more, what people in your community felt?

Mr. Glen Motz:

This wasn't just my community. As you know, I had been involved in the discussions on Bill C-71, on social media as well as hosting and being involved in town halls and round tables for discussions on Bill C-71 with the Canadian public. As a result of those activities, there were many people following some of our social media feeds.

We received feedback from them, and other offices were also receiving information. I guess it would be fair to suggest that there was confusion. They were hearing that we were still debating this issue, and yet the RCMP was saying that it's going to happen: “It's happening now. You will have to do this. You will be doing this”, specifically about aspects of Bill C-71. So, yes, there was confusion and there was alarm. It's something that obviously we want to try to prevent.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Absolutely. I can see the changes that have been made to the site since the time that you brought up this matter. But even in the original text, although it didn't state “proposed legislation” every step of the way—I guess those are the amendments that they made—in the general information section it did still list it as proposed legislation. It also indicated that the order would “provide protection from criminal prosecution for possession of these firearms until February 28, 2021”, which is many years out, while the government implements measures to address continued possession and use.

There was an amnesty within that, and it would be a long time before any kinds of criminal prosecutions would take effect. That was listed right at the outset of what was online.

The reason I'm bringing this up is that it's going back to the issue of intent. What was the intent, and was it malicious? Was this done in order to scare people? Was this done from above to below, or was it an error that was made down below and then corrected?

What is your feeling on that? They included that right in the general information section. I think they could have done a little better, but do you think, as my colleague suggested, that their intent was some kind of conspiracy from above? Do you think their intent was to make people feel that they were going to be prosecuted under a law that hadn't been enacted at that point?

Mr. Glen Motz:

Absolutely not. I want to make it very clear, again, that I don't believe there's any malicious intent on anyone's part. Mr. Simms took an exception to my choice of words, the word “arrogance”.

If the Canadian public had any comment back to me, it was the apparent arrogance of believing that because of a majority this is going to happen anyway, no matter what happens. No one's going to stop what we want to do. It's going to happen, so let's just tell the public it's going to happen. That's the anger the Canadian public is up in arms about. They're saying that that's not democracy at all.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Is it possible to have that type of thinking within the department and within the RCMP? Is it possible that the RCMP, as my colleague suggested, was trying to prepare for a possible outcome, and therefore alerted the public to things that may be coming? Is that possible at all?

(1250)

Mr. Glen Motz:

Absolutely. I applaud them for being proactive in their approach and the language they use.

To use your statement just from a minute ago, Madam, I think it's fair to say that maybe even in departments there is the presumption that it's going to happen anyway, so they can just go ahead and start doing it even before it's passed. The role of this committee is to try to say, “Hold on a second. You can say, 'If this is passed, these are some of the things....'” With some of the laws we're working on, it will take time for people to make adjustments. Being proactive in that.... No one's faulting the RCMP for being proactive.

The issue here is the presumption that it's been passed in Parliament when it has not, and the confusion it caused. Where did that come from? Where does that mentality come from? Does it come from an attitude? Does it come from a systemic issue? I don't know. That's one of the things that we have to try to prevent from happening.

I don't suggest for a moment that there was any malicious intent or a conspiracy, as Mr. Bittle suggested, or that somebody was saying this. I just think there is potentially a systemic challenge that governments, departments and public servants can have that clouds the reality of the role of Parliament. We need to be mindful of that.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Sahota.

We'll now go on to Monsieur Paul-Hus. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for allowing me to participate in the committee.

I'd like to start by setting some things straight. This is the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. What is happening right now is an inquisition of sorts to determine whether our colleague, a parliamentarian like each of us, raised a point that merits this committee's consideration. My colleague never attacked the minister. We aren't here to attack anyone or play politics. Rather, we are here to determine whether there was an error in procedure and whether this incident led to consequences. This incident could have involved a different issue, but as I understand it, this is the first time that something like this has happened and that the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs is looking into it. It is clear to me that impugning Mr. Motz's motives is misguided on your part. If that's not what's happening, here, the fact remains that you've all asked questions to that effect.

As vice-chair of the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security, I worked on Bill C-71, An Act to amend certain Acts and Regulations in relation to firearms. We proposed 46 amendments to the bill, to address such issues as the June 30 cut-off, which is in question here. In light of the trouble gun owners had in terms of their understanding, we proposed a change.

We aren't talking about lobster traps, here. We are talking about gun owners whose firearms are going to be classified as prohibited. June 30 is an important date. The RCMP posted, on its website, information for the public indicating that June 30, 2018 was the cut-off date. The legislation has not even been approved by Parliament. Privilege is therefore at issue. Privilege affects not just members who belong to the Conservative Party or the NDP. Privilege also affects Liberal members, who are parliamentarians and have a duty to consider the fact that a problem has occurred in this case. In other words, no matter which side of the table members are on, it is incumbent upon them to examine this problem. Right now, you could all care less about what I'm saying as you look down at your iPhones, but the fact remains that this is a problem, one that won't be solved by impugning Mr. Motz's motives.

First, the committee has to figure out where the directive came from, if there was indeed a directive. Did it come from the minister's office, yes or no? It's a simple question.

Next, the committee has to determine whether the RCMP has a practice of posting information before it even becomes law. If the RCMP is following a procedure that isn't appropriate, the force must be asked to change it, simply put. The only goal is to fix a problem that has been identified. The idea isn't to put anyone on trial. If the problem ends up being political, the responsibility will fall on the minister. If not, all the better.

That means the committee has to speak with the RCMP. The RCMP commissioner's mandate letter, which was presented by the minister, is clear. The minister asked the RCMP commissioner to change the force's practices in a number of areas. This may be one of the issues that the commissioner will have to address.

The big problem is that, for the first time, the committee has to deal with a case like this, one involving firearms. As I said, we aren't talking about lobster traps or fishing on the high seas. We are talking about firearms. Canadians could have been impacted. Indeed, some people worry that, because of the information the RCMP posted, they won't be able to retain their firearms under the grandfather clause. This could have caused people problems.

I think my colleague made an important point. This is our privilege as parliamentarians. If we don't think a breach of privilege has occurred, we can call it a day and let the public servants carry on. If we aren't able to get to the bottom of the matter, what purpose do we serve? Absolutely none.

Do I still have time, Mr. Chair?

(1255)

The Chair:

You have two minutes left.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I'm not a regular member of the committee, and I think I'd have problems if I were. When all is said and done, an important public safety issue was identified. We are talking about the management of firearms.

Mr. Motz, is the goal to put the minister on trial, or is it actually to get a clear answer as to why this happened? [English]

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you for your comments and your question.

Not only do parliamentarians need clarity around what happened and an understanding of the steps that were taken or not taken for this to occur, but I think Canadians deserve this. This institution is our democracy in this country, and it's a model for the world. We need to take that seriously, and I know this committee will. In the moments that are left, it's important that beyond any apology that seems to be able to satisfy inquiry on these things, should that be the will of the committee, I think we need to look at how to prevent this from happening again.

In this circumstance, it affected the firearms community. In the next circumstance with a publication from government, it could be anything we can imagine that this Parliament deals with. As parliamentarians, we need to be concerned that the role of what we do here as legislators is not undermined or usurped.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

The Liberals have ceded their next spot to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Oh, how kind. That gives me an opportunity to raise the issue I raised with you earlier, Chair, if I may.

The Chair:

We have to finish this debate first.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Can I hold my five minutes until then?

The Chair:

We will bring that up at the end, but we will be leaving at 1 o'clock exactly.

Does anyone else want to go on with questions for this witness?

Thank you very much for coming, Mr. Motz. We appreciate it, and we will be continuing our study. It's great to have you here today bringing up this important subject.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, sir.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson just asked if we could go back to committee business for a couple of minutes, if it's okay with members of the committee.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

We will be leaving at 1 o'clock, though, because another committee is coming in.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Are we going back in camera, or are we staying public?

The Chair:

I guess we should....

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, it has to do with the public meeting. I'm in your hands. It's no big secret. I'm good in public. I'm more worried about the time than anything else.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Here's the thing, if I can jump right in, Chair. I do apologize for not being here right at the top to deal with this.

We're bringing in Mr. Johnston as a result of the announcement today by the government. That's a good thing. But I have to tell you, Chair, we need the minister here. If this were legislation—which it's not because the government ran out of time—we would have the minister here to introduce the legislation, and then we would go from there.

This way, we're putting the cart in front of the horse, in that we're not dealing with the fundamental announcement that leads to why that person has a new appointment.

Could I ask the committee, without increasing time or anything, to agree that the minister should be here with Mr. Johnston to explain the commission, and then logic would have it that we could talk about the person who's actually being appointed the commissioner?

Could we do that, colleagues?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We would be agreeable.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

We can ask. Mr. Christopherson did come over beforehand and did ask. I said I would bring that matter forward. I don't have the minister's calendar, and the parliamentary secretary—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Could we get the government members to agree, in principle, that the minister should be here, as if this were legislation, because it's brand new?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

It's brand new, and I take your point, but on issues of appointments we haven't brought in the minister before. It's not something we've done in the past.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's a brand new entity. It's brand new.

If this were legislation, the minister would be here as a matter of course, but you guys so mismanaged your file on democratic reform that you ran out of time and now you have to do it by edict. At the very least, the committee should have an opportunity to talk about it, given how much time we spent on our report, the very report the minister seems to have conveniently ignored and run roughshod over.

We are ticked about this, and we at least need an opportunity to talk about the structure that's being brought in unilaterally. The only way we can do that is to respectfully ask the minister to please come, along with her appointee.

(1300)

The Chair:

Thanks, David.

I'm sorry. We have to go. There is a very important group coming in here. We'll have to continue this discussion.

Mr. David Christopherson:

This isn't going away, just to let you know.

The Chair:

Okay.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1200)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Soyez les bienvenus à la 128 e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

La séance est télévisée. Nous commençons notre étude de la question de privilège concernant la question des publications de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada au sujet du projet de loi C-71, Loi modifiant certaines lois et un règlement relatif aux armes à feu.

Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir M. Glen Motz, député de Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner. Les députés se souviendront que M. Motz a soulevé la question de privilège.

Monsieur Motz, merci de vous être libéré pour être avec nous aujourd'hui. Vous pouvez prononcer maintenant votre déclaration préliminaire.

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président, et chers collègues.

Je suis heureux d'avoir la possibilité de vous parler aujourd'hui de la conduite du gouvernement libéral et de la GRC ainsi que de leurs activités concernant la mise en oeuvre du projet de loi C-71.

Même si je tenterai de présenter mes commentaires calmement, il me sera difficile de ne pas me laisser emporter par la colère à cause de l'arrogance manifestée par les libéraux lorsqu'ils ont présenté ce projet de loi et des efforts systématiques déployés par les ministres et les députés du gouvernement pour essayer de tromper les Canadiens. Ces comportements ont aggravé la question de privilège que j'ai soulevée le printemps dernier.

Voici le noeud du problème: la GRC a commencé à mettre en oeuvre un projet de loi, le projet de loi C-71, avant que le Parlement n'ait tenu les délibérations, les débats et le vote sur le sujet. En effet, la GRC a affiché sur son site Web un bulletin spécial, le bulletin no  93, un avis dans lequel elle mettait en oeuvre des parties du projet de loi C-71. Or à ce moment-là, le projet de loi était encore à l'étude par un comité et faisait l'objet d'un examen attentif. La GRC a utilisé des termes affirmatifs pour parler du projet de loi, donnant aux Canadiens la nette impression qu'il était déjà une loi en vigueur au pays.

Le 29 mai, j'ai soulevé la question de privilège créée par le fait que la GRC tenait pour acquis que le Parlement allait approuver le projet de loi, même si des millions de Canadiens et nombre de membres du Parlement avaient des réserves importantes à ce sujet. Moins de 24 heures plus tard, la GRC a modifié son bulletin spécial no  93 de façon à ne plus présumer de la décision finale du Parlement. Ce jour-là, le 30 mai, j'ai pris de nouveau la parole pour informer le Président de la Chambre du changement apporté.

Le 19 juin, le Président s'est dit troublé par la désinvolture avec laquelle la GRC a fait abstraction du fait que le projet de loi était encore à l'étude par le Parlement et non pas une loi. Ce qui peut sembler une simple question de forme est ce qui dans les faits constitue le fondement même de notre démocratie parlementaire. Les premiers ministres, les ministres, les ministères et les organismes sont tous assujettis au Parlement. Or, s'il en est un qui ne doit pas traiter le Parlement et la mise en oeuvre des lois à la légère, c'est bien un organisme fédéral d'application de la loi.

Le Parlement est la voix de tous les Canadiens; il nous incombe donc d'examiner au peigne fin les lois, les règles et les règlements pour eux. En agissant de la sorte, le ministre et la GRC donnent l'impression au Parlement qu'ils peuvent agir sans son consentement. Cette attitude est contraire à la raison d'être de cette chambre et de la présence de vous tous dans les comités aujourd'hui. Elle laisse entendre que ce sont les ministres et les cadres supérieurs du gouvernement qui exercent en bout de ligne un contrôle total, et non pas les élus. Comme le Président de la Chambre Regan l'a dit: « Le travail des députés à titre de législateurs est fondamental et la moindre indication ou insinuation que ce rôle parlementaire et cette autorité parlementaire sont contournés ou usurpés n'est pas acceptable. »

Aujourd'hui, les membres du Comité auront pour la première fois au Canada la possibilité de fixer la norme à laquelle seront assujettis les ministères et les organismes qui tiennent pour acquis la volonté du Parlement. Nous ne pouvons pas nous permettre de laisser passer ce précédent sans réagir.

Une décision a été prise d'appliquer un projet de loi en dépit de sa nature hautement discutable et des réserves sérieuses et valides formulées par des parlementaires et des milliers de Canadiens à son sujet. Il vous incombe en qualité de membres de ce comité de déterminer le ou les personnes qui ont pris les décisions, qui sont responsables et les mesures à mettre en oeuvre pour éviter qu'une telle situation ne se présente de nouveau. Les questions auxquelles vous devez trouver des réponses sont nombreuses; vous devez notamment déterminer si la GRC a établi des règles avant que le Parlement ne prenne une décision, en agissant en toute indépendance ou après en avoir reçu l'ordre. Il n'y a que deux réponses possibles: oui ou non. Si la réponse est oui, la GRC a alors décidé de donner priorité à ses objectifs plutôt qu'à la voix de nos représentants élus. Or, au Canada, la police ne crée pas les règles ni les lois, elles les fait respecter. Voilà un aspect fondamental de la séparation des pouvoirs dans une démocratie.

Toutefois, si la réponse est non, qui a alors ordonné à la GRC d'aller de l'avant et où était donc le ministre de la Sécurité publique, qui brille par son absence? En effet, la GRC fait rapport au Parlement par la voix du ministre, et le ministre est responsable des mesures prises par l'organisme. Selon moi, si le ministre n'a pas réellement donné une instruction de la sorte à la GRC, il a quand même manqué à son devoir en ne gardant pas la GRC à l'oeil. De plus, il n'a formulé aucun commentaire ni fait aucune déclaration sur la situation, si ce n'est par l'entremise de son secrétaire parlementaire, le député d'Ajax, maintenant whip des libéraux, lequel a cherché à faire passer la question sous silence.

(1205)



L'enquête que le Comité doit maintenant mener ne porte pas sur un seul cas. Elle porte sur l'application élargie du principe voulant que la Chambre peut obliger les premiers ministres, les ministres, les sociétés d'État et les organismes à lui rendre des comptes lorsque leurs actions vont à l'encontre des directives ou des délibérations du Parlement, qu'elles les fragilisent ou qu'elles y passent outre.

Les fonctionnaires doivent toujours se montrer respectueux de la Chambre et de notre démocratie. En qualité de parlementaires, nous pouvons ne pas être d'accord, mais il appartient à la Chambre d'examiner et d'approuver les actions du gouvernement; sa raison d'être même en dépend. Les députés ne sont pas là pour faire la volonté du premier ministre et de son cabinet. Nous sommes là pour servir nos concitoyens. Ce sont les ministres et les premiers ministres qui sont assujettis à l'orientation et à la volonté du Parlement, et non pas l'inverse.

Je vous exhorte tous à examiner le cas qui vous est soumis et à voir le tableau d'ensemble. Il est difficile de prétendre que le ministre a procédé de façon totalement intègre et transparente pour ce projet de loi. Lorsqu'une personne essaie de façon systématique et constante de tromper les autres, il devient de plus en plus difficile de la croire.

Jusqu'à maintenant, le chef du gouvernement a fait des déclarations inexactes. On pourrait dire qu'il a voulu tromper la population sur la nature véritable du projet de loi. Par exemple, le premier ministre a laissé entendre qu'il n'est pas nécessaire actuellement de prouver qu'on détient un permis d'armes à feu pour acheter une arme à feu. Or, vendre ou acheter une arme à feu sans détenir un permis approprié constitue une infraction criminelle au Canada, punissable d'une peine maximale de cinq ans d'emprisonnement.

Le ministre a comparu devant le Comité et fait également plusieurs déclarations trompeuses. Il a affirmé notamment qu'à la lumière des données de la police de Toronto, la moitié des crimes commis avec une arme à feu sont de nature domestique. Même si cette information s'est révélée totalement fausse, le ministre a continué à dire la même chose. Il a affirmé que les crimes violents commis avec une arme à feu connaissaient une augmentation brusque, alors que les crimes violents et les homicides commis avec une arme à feu ne sont pas à des niveaux records. Il s'est servi de dates et de statistiques pour créer l'illusion d'une crise qui n'existe pas. Enfin, il a signalé une augmentation massive d'introductions par effraction dans le dessein de voler des armes à feu, alors qu'en fait, cette accusation a été inscrite au Code criminel en 2008 et que l'augmentation soudaine de ce type d'infraction résultait principalement de l'application d'une nouvelle disposition.

Je pourrais donner de nombreux autres exemples, mais je crois avoir dit ce que j'avais à dire. Les témoignages du ministre et des membres du gouvernement ont été jusqu'à maintenant lacunaires et trompeurs. Que la GRC ait tout de suite rectifié le tir après que le problème a été soulevé à la Chambre équivaut à rien de moins qu'à un aveu de culpabilité.

Le ministre de la Sécurité publique a répondu à une lettre que mon collègue de Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles et moi-même lui avions envoyée au sujet d'un problème observé dans le projet de loi. Dans sa réponse datée du 15 octobre dernier, il a reconnu qu'il y avait un problème dans le projet de loi et qu'il accorderait une amnistie de trois ans, sans doute à cause de ce que la GRC a fait. Toutefois, rien dans sa réponse ne nous permet de savoir si la GRC a agi par ignorance ou délibérément ni de savoir qui est responsable de la situation.

La réponse à ces questions relève de votre enquête. Il est par conséquent primordial que le Comité montre dans son rapport, de façon claire et convaincante, qu'on ne peut préjuger de la décision du Parlement, qu'agir ainsi constitue un problème grave. Votre comité a la responsabilité de préserver un aspect crucial de notre Parlement et de notre régime démocratique dans lequel les ministres et les organismes du gouvernement doivent respect et soumission à la Chambre.

En terminant, je demanderais à chacun de vous de revoir la décision du Président de la Chambre. Mettant de côté les allégeances politiques et les positions des partis, le Président Regan a placé la volonté des Canadiens et de leurs représentants élus au-dessus de l'image des partis. Il n'a pas mâché ses mots et il vous a invités à veiller à ce que le Parlement actuel, ainsi que tous ceux qui le suivront, soit la voix des Canadiens qui l'ont élu et non le vassal de la hiérarchie d'un parti.

Lorsque des ministres et des partis utilisent la désinformation et des positions d'autorité pour empêcher la Chambre de s'acquitter de ses fonctions, nous mettons notre démocratie en péril. Regardez au-delà de nos différends et donnez préséance aux valeurs qui permettent de réunir les Canadiens. Ces valeurs doivent trouver écho dans notre Parlement et dans la capacité de ses membres de faire respecter la volonté de la population.

Merci, monsieur le président, de m'avoir donné la possibilité de m'exprimer aujourd'hui.

(1210)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Nous procédons maintenant aux tours de questions de sept minutes. Nous commençons par M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur Motz. Je crois que vous devez viser juste ici. Tromper les députés est effectivement méprisable. Je suis d'accord avec vous pour cela. J'ai regardé le site Web. On y a assurément utilisé des termes qui laissaient entendre que c'était ce qui arrivait ou devait arriver et que les gens devaient s'y préparer.

La seule chose pour laquelle nous divergeons, je crois, est l'intention derrière cela. Je ne dis pas qu'il s'est simplement agi d'une erreur innocente, mais je ne dis pas non plus que l'erreur était particulièrement malicieuse. J'ai vu cela auparavant. Je peux vous donner deux ou trois exemples. Ainsi, on peut dire que beaucoup de bureaucrates, beaucoup de personnes dans les organismes, des gens qui travaillent pour le gouvernement — et qui dans les faits travaillent pour les Canadiens — se préparent à mettre en oeuvre rapidement les décisions qui seront prises par le Parlement. En ce qui me concerne, j'estime que ces gens font montre de la diligence appropriée. Par exemple, nous venons tout juste de beaucoup travailler à la Loi électorale du Canada. Or, si les gens d'Élections Canada ne s'étaient pas préparés à mettre en oeuvre les futures mesures, la situation aurait été encore pire — avec plus de difficultés au bout du compte. Pour eux, c'est, je crois, une question de diligence appropriée.

Maintenant, les responsables de la GRC ont-ils fait montre d'une diligence appropriée dans ce cas? À un certain degré, j'estime que oui. Ils voulaient informer la population des changements à venir, etc. Selon vous, auraient-ils dû dire — en utilisant ces termes — « Voici ce qui va arriver. C'est la nouvelle règle. Voici comment vous devez vous inscrire si vous avez une arme à feu », et à la fin, ajouter « en attendant l'approbation du Parlement »? Cela aurait-il suffit?

M. Glen Motz:

Il est assez juste de dire, je crois, comme vous le faites dans votre évaluation de la situation, que d'essayer de prendre les devants, si vous voulez, de se montrer proactif décrit probablement exactement ce qu'ils ont essayé de faire. Toutefois, selon moi, il vaudrait mieux placer ce genre d'information non pas à la fin du bulletin, mais au début. Il faut dire: « Voici les mesures législatives proposées au Parlement. Elles font actuellement l'objet de discussions à la Chambre. Elles sont débattues en comité. »

(1215)

M. Scott Simms:

Je ne veux pas vous interrompre. Je suis totalement d'accord avec vous, parce que j'ai été moi-même tout particulièrement horrifié il y a quelques années, en 2014, lorsque le gouvernement Harper a fait les manchettes parce qu'il dépensait des fonds pour annoncer des mesures toujours « sous réserve de l'approbation du Parlement ». Le gouvernement annonçait alors des allègements fiscaux à venir, mais, tout au bas de l'annonce, il était inscrit « sous réserve de l'approbation du Parlement ». Je n'ai pas aimé cela, et je suis certain qu'il en a été de même pour vous.

Dans ce cas particulier, lorsque la police a apporté la correction, j'imagine que vous avez dit que c'était un aveu de culpabilité, qu'elle reconnaissait avoir fait quelque chose de mal. Le ministre viendra nous expliquer ce qui est arrivé, mais, dans une grande mesure, oui, je suis d'accord avec vous. Sans nous perdre dans les détails, je crois qu'il faut dans ce cas particulier... Je ne veux pas décourager ceux qui travaillent dans la fonction publique de faire montre d'une diligence appropriée et d'être prêts à intervenir. Tout comme j'étais en colère contre Stephen Harper pour avoir fait des annonces, parce qu'elles étaient trompeuses, je reconnais que la situation dans le cas qui nous occupe était trompeuse également.

Mais, là encore, c'est l'intention qui me dérange. Si l'intention, comme cela était le cas en 2014, est de dire: « Cela va arriver. Nous avons la majorité, alors qu'est-ce qui vous inquiète? », ce n'est pas acceptable. Mais si la fonction publique fait montre d'une diligence appropriée, tant mieux pour elle. Il suffit simplement de ne pas prétendre, comme cela a été le cas ici, que la mesure est sur le point d'être mise en oeuvre.

Nous poserons la question au ministre lorsqu'il comparaîtra devant nous.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord. Le ministre a beaucoup de choses à dire, je crois, à ce sujet. Il faut reconnaître qu'il est important de préciser les choses dès le début lorsqu'on fait une déclaration ou publie un document qui a des répercussions sur des milliers de Canadiens et qui peut leur faire croire qu'ils pourraient devenir des criminels du jour au lendemain — l'information donnait à croire aux Canadiens qu'ils allaient être coupables d'un acte criminel s'ils ne se conformaient pas à ce qui y était dit.

M. Scott Simms:

Excusez-moi, ma question est sincère: s'est-on exprimé de cette façon?

M. Glen Motz:

Non, mais ils laissaient entendre des choses dans ce qu'ils ont dit qui ont eu des répercussions, à savoir que la mesure allait entrer en vigueur et qu'elle aurait des répercussions pour les Canadiens — alors qu'elle était encore débattue en comité.

M. Scott Simms:

Ont-ils laissé entendre des choses ou ont-ils dit: « Voici les mesures qui seront mises en place »? Il n'y a aucune répercussion — ou il y en aura, naturellement, mais ils n'ont pas fait allusion au fait que les gens seraient punis. N'est-ce pas?

M. Glen Motz:

Non, mais chaque... Les Canadiens qui possèdent une arme à feu composent le groupe le plus responsable de la population. Ils sont assujettis à énormément de règles et ils connaissent ces règles.

M. Scott Simms:

Cela était-il mentionné dans le site Web?

M. Glen Motz:

Excusez-moi?

M. Scott Simms:

A-t-on mentionné cela dans le site Web?

M. Glen Motz:

A-t-on mentionné cela?

M. Scott Simms:

Qu'ils sont les Canadiens les plus responsables... Écoutez-moi, j'ai moi-même une arme à feu. Je me considère comme étant très responsable, comme la plupart des propriétaires d'armes à feu le sont, il n'y a pas de doute là-dessus.

J'essaie de clarifier l'intention ici. Je ne crois pas qu'ils aient essayé de tromper délibérément la population. Croyez-vous vraiment que la GRC voulait cela?

M. Glen Motz:

J'ai certains doutes, mais j'estime qu'il est de la responsabilité du Comité de trouver la réponse à cette question en faisant témoigner les responsables.

Qui a autorisé la publication de ce bulletin? Quelle était l'intention derrière cette décision? Le choix des témoins pourrait être déterminant, monsieur, pour l'établissement des faits et des conclusions auxquelles vous voulez en venir, quelles qu'elles soient. Ce qui importe le plus est de veiller à ce que cela ne se reproduise plus, qu'il se soit agi d'une erreur de bonne foi, sans intention de tromper, comme vous le prétendez, ou d'autre chose, formulé dans les mots de votre choix.

M. Scott Simms:

Je suis parfaitement d'accord avec vous.

M. Glen Motz:

Voilà la responsabilité du Comité, je crois. Je ne suis pas ici pour présumer de la volonté du Comité.

M. Scott Simms:

Toutefois, vous formulez une présomption d'intention. Vous semblez prétendre que la publication de ce bulletin était mal intentionnée. Vous avez prononcé le mot « arrogance » dans votre première phrase. Je ne suis pas certain que le mot soit vraiment approprié. Le ministre n'a pas encore comparu devant nous. Ne croyez-vous pas aller un peu trop vite?

M. Glen Motz:

Non, pas du tout, en fait. C'est parfaitement évident, je crois, par le...

M. Scott Simms:

Vous voulez dire que l'arrogance est évidente?

M. Glen Motz:

J'étais très poli. Les réflexions que me font mes concitoyens, des Canadiens, sur le projet de loi C-71 ne sont pas aussi politiquement correctes que cela.

M. Scott Simms:

Seriez-vous offensé si je vous disais que votre opinion est arrogante?

M. Glen Motz:

Pas du tout.

Le président:

Monsieur Simms, votre temps est écoulé.

Nous passons à Mme Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Glen, merci beaucoup d'être avec nous aujourd'hui et de présenter ce cas à la Chambre, et merci aussi pour le courage que vous manifestez en vous présentant ici, tout spécialement en qualité d'ancien membre du milieu de la justice. Cela doit être très difficile pour vous de souffrir que des gens provenant de la même profession que celle dont vous avez fait partie avec fierté pendant si longtemps puissent faire une erreur aussi grave.

Pourriez-vous nous donner une idée du nombre d'intervenants qui ont communiqué avec vous au sujet de cette bévue commise dans le site Web?

(1220)

M. Glen Motz:

Je n'ai aucune idée du nombre de personnes qui se sont manifestées à mon bureau. Je n'en ai pas gardé la trace.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Mais ces gens ont pris contact avec vous.

M. Glen Motz:

Oui.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Quelles étaient leurs préoccupations? Quel genre de choses avez-vous entendues au téléphone ou lues dans vos courriels au sujet de cette fausse information dans le site Web?

M. Glen Motz:

Il était clair que beaucoup ne savaient pas à quoi s'en tenir. La plupart du temps, on me disait: « Je croyais que la question était encore en train d'être débattue. Je ne m'étais pas rendu compte que le projet de loi avait été adopté. Qu'est-ce qui est arrivé? ». Les gens étaient confus. Les gens qui s'intéressent aux armes à feu étaient très inquiets, tout spécialement ceux qui étaient visés par ce que le bulletin a laissé entendre.

Peu importe qui a pris la décision et peu importe la façon dont la décision d'afficher cette information dans des termes assurés a été prise, il est malheureux qu'une fois de plus, l'organisme national d'application de la loi ait pu être discrédité auprès des Canadiens.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Absolument, je suis totalement d'accord avec vous.

Comment décririez-vous les émotions des gens qui ont communiqué avec vous? Mon Dieu, cette fausse information donnait à croire que les coupables risquaient une peine d'incarcération de cinq ans. Je ne peux pas m'imaginer me réveiller un matin et lire une information m'annonçant que je me suis rendue coupable dans le courant de la nuit d'une peine de cinq ans d'emprisonnement. Étaient-ce les émotions manifestées par les gens qui ont communiqué avec vous? Vous avez parlé d'une certaine confusion. Les gens avaient-ils un peu peur également?

M. Glen Motz:

Oui. Tout d'abord, beaucoup de Canadiens, y compris ceux qui ont des armes à feu et qui respectent la loi, sont très préoccupés par les répercussions du projet de loi C-71 et ce qu'il ne nous permet pas de faire, comme nous le voudrions, soit de lutter contre les gangs et l'utilisation des armes à des fins criminelles. Ils sont préoccupés par la mauvaise approche choisie par le gouvernement à ce sujet.

Et s'ajoute à cela la confusion qui porte à croire que nous sommes maintenant... Ils ne comprenaient pas le processus avec lequel ils avaient contourné le Parlement. Ils disaient « Je croyais que vous en parliez encore. Maintenant, je suis paniqué. Est-ce que je serai un criminel du jour au lendemain? »

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Voilà qui est bien dit.

M. Glen Motz:

Alors, les gens étaient préoccupés. Les gens qui s'intéressent aux armes à feu étaient confus et préoccupés.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je remercie sincèrement mon collègue, le député de Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, d'avoir soulevé le cas de cette publication. Je dirais qu'il y a quelques différences très importantes entre ce cas et celui dont vous avez parlé précédemment. Je veux dire que la GRC n'est qu'un organisme d'application de la loi. Elle ne peut présumer de la loi. Mais je crois également qu'il est très important de préciser qu'il a été décidé que le premier cas n'était pas fondé de prime abord, mais que celui qui nous occupe aujourd'hui l'était dans les faits. Voilà une différence majeure entre les deux.

Monsieur Motz, j'aimerais également souligner la décision rendue par le Président Fraser, il y a 30 ans, et qui s'établit comme suit: À mon avis, c'est une situation qui ne devrait jamais se reproduire. Je m'attends à ce que le ministère des Finances et les autres ministères étudient cette décision avec soin et je rappelle à tous, dans la fonction publique, que nous sommes une démocratie parlementaire et non une démocratie de type exécutif

... vous avez dit que c'était peut-être une décision exécutive... ou de type administratif.

Selon vous, une telle chose devrait-elle encore arriver?

M. Glen Motz:

En toute honnêteté, je crois qu'il appartient au Comité de découvrir pourquoi et comment une telle chose s'est produite et d'établir les mesures à prendre pour qu'elle ne survienne plus, parce que, selon moi, cela a ébranlé la confiance des Canadiens dans le Parlement et leur capacité de faire confiance au gouvernement. Une fois de plus, j'estime que l'incident a été un affront énorme à la démocratie. Peu importe l'intention des responsables, le Comité a la responsabilité de trouver la cause de cet incident et de veiller à ce que des mesures soient prises pour que le gouvernement actuel et ceux qui le suivront, ainsi que tous les futurs ministres et ministères sachent très clairement comment éviter la répétition d'une telle erreur.

(1225)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

J'ajouterai que le Président Fraser, et cela ne s'appliquait pas à une question fondée de prime abord, a déclaré ce qui suit: Je veux toutefois que la Chambre comprenne très clairement que si jamais le Président est appelé à examiner de nouveau une situation comme celle-ci, la présidence ne sera pas aussi généreuse.

Diriez-vous, monsieur Motz, que le Comité devrait en fait déployer tous les efforts et prendre tout le temps nécessaire pour trouver comment et pourquoi un tel incident s'est produit? Avez-vous l'impression que nous avons une obligation à l'endroit des Canadiens à cet égard?

M. Glen Motz:

Une fois de plus, je ne veux pas présumer de la volonté du Comité, mais je crois qu'il est primordial que le Comité reconnaisse l'importance de cette étude et du fait, comme je l'ai dit, qu'elle ne porte pas seulement sur l'incident même, cela est bien clair, mais sur l'ensemble du problème auquel les autres Présidents de la Chambre ont été confrontés et qui, comme nous le savons, crée de la confusion dans la population et mine l'autorité du Parlement et des élus. C'est réellement par l'entremise du Parlement, comme nous le savons et le comprenons tous ici, que nous sommes la voix des Canadiens. Lorsque quelqu'un — un bureaucrate, le responsable d'un ministère ou un ministre — contourne le processus, c'est véritablement la voix des Canadiens qui n'est plus entendue.

Alors, oui, je crois qu'il incombe au Comité de poser toutes les questions qu'il faut poser à autant de témoins qu'il le faut pour trouver comment éviter qu'une telle situation ne se présente de nouveau et savoir ce qu'il faut faire dans le cas présent également.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, Stephanie.

Monsieur Christopherson, la parole est à vous.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup, Glen. Je vous suis reconnaissant de comparaître devant nous.

Je dois dire que, comme quelques personnes ici, j'ai déjà été confronté moi-même au problème, ici et également dans une vie antérieure à Queen's Park, où nous avons vécu une situation très semblable. Scotty, vous et moi avons connu cela quelques fois. J'ai beaucoup comparé ce genre de problème à l'accès des députés à la Chambre. Le principe est véritablement important.

C'est pourquoi quand il y a une question fondée de prime abord que les députés peuvent avoir soulevée en accédant à la Chambre, habituellement en autobus — c'est généralement là où nous avons un problème — et que nous examinons la situation en détail, nous constatons que l'incident est largement attribuable à du maquignonnage. Pour moi, la situation actuelle est très semblable à cela. Le principe est véritablement important.

Aucun gouvernement, aucune entité ni aucun organisme gouvernemental n'a le droit de prétendre devant les Canadiens que quelque chose est obligatoire en vertu de la loi si la loi en question n'a pas été adoptée par le Parlement. Peu importe la majorité du parti au pouvoir, seul le Parlement peut adopter les lois. Étant donné que l'adoption des lois n'est pas automatique — les gens ne sont pas tous des robots et ils peuvent voter comme ils le veulent à ce moment-là —, une loi n'est pas une loi tant qu'elle n'en est pas une.

Pour moi, c'est la même chose ici. La situation me préoccupe vraiment. J'ai été solliciteur général de l'Ontario; la participation et le rôle de la police dans la société ainsi que ses relations avec le gouvernement m'intéressent donc quelque peu et j'ai une certaine expérience dans ce domaine. Je comprends donc bien la gravité des raisons pour lesquelles vous avez soulevé le problème.

Je suis largement d'accord avec M. Simms, monsieur le président, pour dire que le noeud de l'affaire, c'est l'intention. L'incident est arrivé et le gouvernement doit en accepter la responsabilité. Nous voulons voir le gouvernement nous faire quelques courbettes d'usage pour nous expliquer comment il s'y prendra pour qu'une telle chose ne se reproduise pas.

Que le gouvernement ait conspiré avec la GRC pour tromper délibérément les Canadiens ou qu'il se soit agi d'une suite d'erreurs reste à déterminer. Nous sommes au bon endroit pour cela, je crois. À mon avis, c'était la bonne chose à faire que de renvoyer la question ici. C'est important. Nous devons considérer l'affaire comme importante.

J'ai très hâte à notre deuxième séance, au cours de laquelle nous entendrons l'autre version des faits, si vous voulez — il y a toujours deux côtés à une médaille — pour savoir un peu dans quelle mesure l'incident relève d'une conspiration ou de l'action d'une bande de clowns. À mon sens, nous verrons alors combien de temps et d'efforts il faudra consacrer à cette étude.

Je n'ai pas vraiment de questions à vous poser, Glen. Vous avez exposé votre position très clairement et de façon très structurée. Vous avez fourni des données à l'appui de ce vous avez dit. Je n'ai donc aucune question pour vous, mais je vous céderais la parole, si vous le voulez, pour parler d'autres points que vous aimeriez clarifier.

(1230)

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur Christopherson, de vos commentaires. Je serais plutôt d'accord avec vous. Il est juste de dire, comme on l'a fait observer, que le Comité doit examiner la situation dans son intégralité. Elle est semblable aux autres cas confirmés d'outrage au Parlement. La situation ne se répercute pas seulement sur moi, en qualité de député, mais sur la population canadienne, d'une façon un peu différente, du fait que des mesures auraient pu être prises.

En ce qui concerne l'intention derrière cela, que ce soit, comme vous l'avez dit, une série d'erreurs ou une proposition faite de propos délibéré, je veux être très clair: j'ai plusieurs amis très chers qui sont ou qui ont été membres de la GRC et qui font ou ont fait de l'excellent travail. Je ne crois pas un instant que derrière tout cela... Je ne veux en aucun cas médire de la GRC. Rien n'est plus faux; ce n'est pas mon intention.

Toutefois, il est important de reconnaître que le projet de loi C-71 donne à la GRC certains pouvoirs de reclassification qu'elle n'avait pas auparavant. La population canadienne a des appréhensions à ce sujet. Lorsqu'une institution du gouvernement canadien — un organisme d'application de la loi, la GRC — fait montre de présomption dans sa façon de s'exprimer ou croit que quelque chose va arriver, cela la discrédite encore plus et nuit à sa réputation. C'est malheureux.

Nous sommes ici pour voir à ce que les institutions publiques que nous voulons authentiques au Canada aient la confiance de ceux que nous représentons. Toutefois, cet incident est survenu, et j'ai bonne confiance que le comité découvrira ce qui s'est passé. Il est important que des mécanismes, des freins et contrepoids, soient mis en place pour conserver la confiance de la population et que des limites soient instituées que les bureaucrates et les organismes qui en répondent peuvent comprendre très clairement et respecter.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. Merci, monsieur Motz.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Christopherson.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais remercier M. Motz d'avoir porté cette question à l'attention du Comité.

Je suis d'accord avec M. Simms — et je vais poursuivre dans la même voie pour lui — que cette question est particulièrement troublante, et qu'elle doit être examinée par le Comité. M. Motz, M. Christopherson et tous les autres qui ont pris la parole ont raison: le privilège parlementaire est important et doit être maintenu; toute atteinte à ce privilège doit faire l'objet d'une discussion.

Pour faire suite à M. Simms, toutefois, je vais me concentrer davantage sur l'intention. Je vais commencer par une simple question. Êtes-vous d'accord avec moi pour dire que la GRC est un organisme indépendant dont le ministre ne dirige pas les affaires quotidiennes?

M. Glen Motz:

Oui, la GRC est un organisme indépendant qui relève directement du ministre de la Sécurité publique.

M. Chris Bittle:

D'accord. Nous sommes donc sur la même longueur d'onde.

Je regardais votre page Wikipedia lorsque vous êtes arrivé. Ce que notre milieu de travail a d'intéressant, c'est que nous avons tous des pages Wikipedia.

Je suis très impressionné par vos antécédents et vos années de service dans la police de Medicine Hat, l'Ordre du Mérite que vous avez reçu et le statut d'inspecteur que vous aviez lorsque vous avez pris votre retraite.

J'ai été avocat dans mon temps et j'ai représenté un service de police ainsi qu'une association de police, deux mondes différents. Or ces organismes font des erreurs.

Je suis certain que des erreurs sont survenues pendant vos 35 années de service dans la police — qui n'étaient pas nécessairement de votre faute. Au cours de ces 35 ans, combien de fois avez-vous blâmé le cabinet du maire ou la commission de police pour une erreur du quotidien survenue au service de police de Medicine Hat?

(1235)

M. Glen Motz:

Eh bien, le cabinet du maire et la commission de police ne sont pas responsables des opérations du service de police.

M. Chris Bittle:

Mais le service de police relève du cabinet du maire et de la commission de police, comme c'est le cas de la GRC dont nous venons de parler.

M. Glen Motz:

Oui, je crois s'il y avait quelqu'un à blâmer, d'un point de vue administratif, nous avons certainement fait porter le blâme sur le gouvernement de nombreuses fois, et j'étais de ce côté-là de la clôture pour les questions relatives aux lois, mais je vois où vous voulez en venir.

Il est juste de dire que si le cabinet du maire ou la commission de la police — dans notre province, c'était les commissions de police — voulait que notre service de police réagisse à quelque chose de particulier dans notre collectivité, c'était la commission de police qui nous en donnait l'ordre.

M. Chris Bittle:

D'accord, mais ce n'était pas pour les affaires courantes, et ils ne vous disaient pas de faire rapport... Ils vous disaient sur quels sujets vous deviez leur présenter des rapports, mais ce n'était pas sur les affaires de tous les jours.

J'imagine que j'en arrive à... Il y a une question qui mérite une discussion ici, mais je crains qu'on saisisse l'occasion pour s'en prendre au ministre et remettre en question son intégrité sans aucune preuve — en utilisant, assez ironiquement, le privilège parlementaire, parce que vous tenez ces propos devant le Comité et non pas dans les couloirs.

Il me semble que ces deux options... D'une part, vous déclarez que cela semble être une question de forme, et c'est peut-être une question de forme, mais, d'autre part, vous prétendez qu'il peut y avoir une grande conspiration dans laquelle le ministre de la Sécurité publique aurait avisé le commissaire intérimaire de la GRC, qui aurait avisé une autre personne, laquelle aurait avisé une autre personne et ainsi de suite jusqu'à celle qui s'occupe du site Web. J'imagine que cette personne se situe assez bas dans la hiérarchie de la GRC. Je doute que le commissaire de la GRC modifie lui-même le site Web.

Il y aurait donc pu y avoir 10, 20 ou 100 personnes mêlées à la conspiration; toutefois, à Ottawa, comme cela est le cas à Washington ou dans toute autre capitale, les choses de ce genre ne restent pas secrètes. Est-ce que ce sont là les deux options: soit qu'il y a eu un manquement de forme ou une vaste conspiration entre la Gendarmerie royale du Canada et le cabinet du ministre sur ce point particulier? Je ne vois aucune autre option. C'est l'une ou l'autre. Croyez-vous en toute honnêteté qu'il y a une conspiration?

M. Glen Motz:

Ce que je crois n'a aucune importance pour le Comité.

M. Chris Bittle:

Excusez-moi?

M. Glen Motz:

Mon opinion sur ce qui est réellement arrivé ne devrait avoir aucune importance pour le Comité. Les faits que vous mettez au jour devraient en avoir, toutefois. Les éléments de preuve que vous découvrez sur ce qui a permis un tel incident sont ce qui est important. Est-ce que j'ai des soupçons? Oui, j'en ai.

M. Chris Bittle:

Vous soupçonnez une conspiration.

M. Glen Motz:

Non, je n'ai pas dit cela. C'est vous qui le dites.

M. Chris Bittle:

Alors, que soupçonnez-vous?

Vous avez remis en question l'intégrité du ministre. Vous avez formulé vos soupçons sans aucune preuve. Vous dites maintenant que votre opinion n'a pas d'importance, mais elle en a puisque c'est vous qui soulevez cette affaire et remettez en question l'intégrité du ministre sans aucun fondement.

Il y a à l'évidence une question de privilège, nous en convenons tous. Mais d'où provient-elle? Qu'est-ce qui est en cause ultimement ici?

Nous sommes ici. Nous voulons connaître votre opinion. Le Président de la Chambre a convenu qu'il y a un problème à la lumière de votre rapport, fondé sur les préoccupations dont vous lui avez fait part. Mais, est-ce une question de forme ou est-ce une vaste conspiration? C'est probablement une question de forme. Si vous dites avoir des soupçons, quels sont-ils?

M. Glen Motz:

La responsabilité du Comité est de trouver si la GRC, qui gère le Programme canadien des armes à feu, est responsable...

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui, je comprends la responsabilité du Comité; j'en suis membre.

M. Glen Motz:

Laissez-moi terminer, et je pourrai répondre à votre question.

M. Chris Bittle:

Non, non, monsieur Motz, je n'ai que sept minutes, et je commence à manquer de temps. Je vous le demande sans détour: que soupçonnez-vous?

Je sais quel est mon rôle. Nous devons établir les faits.

Selon vous, sur quel soupçon devrions-nous poser des questions pour établir les faits? Devrais-je poser des questions sur une grande conspiration impliquant des centaines de personnes pour changer une ligne dans un site Web, de façon probablement illégale?

M. Glen Motz:

Il est raisonnable de croire que les responsables du Programme canadien des armes à feu ne vont pas présumer de quoi que ce soit à moins d'en recevoir l'ordre.

M. Chris Bittle:

Pour les fins du compte rendu alors, vous croyez qu'il y a une conspiration...

(1240)

M. Glen Motz:

Non, ce n'est pas...

M. Chris Bittle:

... ourdie par le ministre et ordonnée au bureau du commissaire de la GRC.

M. Glen Motz:

Non, non, arrêtez. Ce n'est pas du tout ce que j'ai dit.

M. Chris Bittle:

C'est soit une option, soit l'autre, monsieur Motz.

M. Glen Motz:

Ce n'est pas du tout ce que j'ai dit.

M. Chris Bittle:

Vous formulez ces hypothèses...

M. Glen Motz:

Ne me faites pas dire ce que je n'ai pas dit, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Monsieur Motz, c'est moi qui ai la parole.

Vous formulez ces hypothèses. Vous lancez ces calomnies. Vous n'avez aucune preuve. Et au bout du compte, vous prétendez encore qu'il y a peut-être une conspiration.

Je vois que mon temps de parole achève.

Le président:

Votre temps est écoulé.

M. Chris Bittle:

Vous devriez peut-être aller dans le corridor et affirmer que le ministre est mêlé à ces actes.

Le président:

Votre temps est écoulé, monsieur Bittle.

M. Glen Motz:

Vous pouvez le lui demander ici.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Nater pour cinq minutes.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur Motz, de vous joindre à nous.

Je devrais donner suite un peu aux propos de M. Bittle. Croyez-vous qu'il y a un processus en place au ministère pour l'approbation des avis et des informations diffusés à la population? Tenez-vous pour acquis qu'un processus est en place qui doit être suivi et se pourrait-il qu'il y ait eu un accroc dans ce processus?

M. Glen Motz:

Absolument. Regardons cela.

C'est le projet de loi du ministre de la Sécurité publique. Le projet de loi C-71 est le sien. C'est lui qui a exercé des pressions pour le faire adopter, en utilisant l'attribution de temps à la Chambre de façon à le faire passer à l'étape de l'étude par le Comité. Là encore, le Comité n'a permis aucun amendement important qui aurait modifié les répercussions du projet de loi.

Il est légitime de dire qu'il y a eu... Ce n'est pas qu'ils ne savent pas comment le gouvernement et les ministères fonctionnent. Les gens qui ont mis l'information sur le site Web avaient reçu une directive en ce sens. Le choix des mots n'était pas... Passait-on outre au Parlement? Ces gens sont très futés; ils comprennent les répercussions de ce qu'ils font.

Ils avaient l'impression, je crois, que le projet de loi allait être adopté; alors, soit cela, soit qu'ils ont délibérément passé outre au fait que le projet de loi était encore débattu devant le Parlement, encore à l'étude par un comité. De plus, le projet de loi n'avait pas encore passé l'étape de la troisième lecture et il n'avait pas encore été soumis au Sénat.

Les gens peuvent dire ce qu'ils veulent, mais le ministre et son ministère sont responsables des communications relatives à ce projet de loi et de la façon dont un organisme chargé de le mettre en oeuvre, soit la GRC, s'est comportée à ce sujet.

M. John Nater:

Il vaudrait la peine que nous examinions le processus d'approbation, la façon dont les communiqués ou les bulletins sont approuvés et de découvrir où un accroc est survenu dans les communications.

M. Glen Motz:

Cela serait plus qu'une bonne chose à faire, monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je vous en remercie.

Je veux continuer sur ce point. On a mentionné que vous avez une longue expérience de la police, comme enquêteur. Alors, selon vous, quand une information comme celle-là est transmise, qui cause à tout le moins de la confusion, quelles conséquences cela a-t-il sur le milieu de la police, sur le milieu de l'application de la loi et sur ceux qui ont des relations avec ces gens?

M. Glen Motz:

Il y en a deux ou trois. Tout d'abord, cela crée de la confusion pour les Canadiens qui possèdent une arme à feu. Beaucoup d'organismes municipaux et provinciaux ainsi que des organismes d'application de la loi au Canada reçoivent des bulletins sur des dispositions législatives et d'autres sujets envoyés par la GRC, l'organisme qui a la responsabilité de diffuser cette information et de réaliser des programmes, comme le Programme canadien des armes à feu. Il est possible que cela ait causé de la confusion pour eux. Sans vérifier l'information, quelqu'un pourrait croire que les mesures sont déjà en vigueur et commettre une erreur à cet égard. Heureusement, à ce que je sache, rien de tel n'est arrivé. Le bulletin a été modifié. Mais ce genre de chose est possible.

M. John Nater:

Maintenant, lorsque le Président de la Chambre a établi que la question était fondée de prime abord, il a certainement pris acte de cet affront à l'autorité et à la dignité de la Chambre des communes.

Il nous incombe assurément de découvrir ce qui s'est passé exactement, les raisons de cet incident et à quel niveau la faute a été commise. Toutefois, je me demande également s'il ne faudrait pas inviter comme témoins des gens pour qui cette information a eu ou aurait pu avoir des répercussions, car ce sont eux qui reçoivent ces bulletins. Selon vous, devrait-on déployer des efforts pour joindre ces groupes ou ces organismes?

M. Glen Motz:

Ce serait une excellente idée. C'est essentiel, je crois, d'appeler les gens qui sont ou qui ont été victimes de cet incident et de parler de la confusion qui a été ainsi créée et des conséquences qu'elle a eues.

La Canadian Coalition for Firearm Rights, l'Association des sports de tir du Canada et la Canadian Sporting Arms and Ammunition Association représentent une grande proportion des Canadiens amateurs de tir et des Canadiens propriétaires d'une arme à feu. Des représentants de ces organismes pourraient parler clairement des conséquences de cet incident.

Wolverine Supplies est un distributeur d'armes à feu au Canada qui pourrait parler des répercussions que cette désinformation a pu avoir directement sur leurs affaires, et ensuite sur celles des détaillants. L'incident pouvait avoir des conséquences non seulement sur les Canadiens propriétaires d'armes à feu, mais également sur les entreprises qui évoluent dans cette industrie.

(1245)

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Nater.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Sahota pour cinq minutes.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Dans vos échanges précédents avec Mme Kusie, vous avez parlé de l'incidence que cet affichage dans le site Web a eue sur les gens de votre milieu, soit de personnes qui se sont levées un matin en pensant qu'elles allaient devoir faire face à des conséquences.

Pourriez-vous m'expliquer un peu mieux comment les gens de votre collectivité se sont sentis?

M. Glen Motz:

Il ne s'agit pas seulement des gens de ma collectivité. Comme vous le savez, j'ai participé à des discussions sur le projet de loi C-71 dans les médias sociaux; j'ai également organisé des rencontres de discussion ouverte et des tables rondes sur le sujet avec la population canadienne, ou j'ai participé à de telles rencontres tenues par d'autres. Ces activités ont amené beaucoup de personnes à nous suivre sur les réseaux sociaux.

Nous avons reçu de la rétroaction de ces gens et d'autres bureaux ont également reçu de l'information. Il serait assez juste de dire, je crois, qu'il y avait de la confusion. Ces gens entendaient dire que nous étions encore en train de débattre de la question, mais la GRC disait que ces mesures s'en venaient. « C'est ce qui arrive maintenant. Vous devrez faire cela. Vous ferez cela », en précisant certains aspects du projet de loi C-71. Alors, oui, les gens étaient confus et alarmés. Voilà une chose que nous voulons évidemment tenter de prévenir.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Absolument. Je peux voir les changements qui ont été apportés au site depuis le temps où vous avez soulevé cette question. Toutefois, même dans le texte original, bien qu'on n'ait pas affiché la mention « projet de loi » à toutes les étapes de la communication — j'imagine que ce sont les changements qui ont été apportés —, on a bel et bien précisé dans la section des renseignements généraux qu'il s'agissait encore d'un projet de loi. On y a indiqué également que les personnes concernées seraient protégées contre des poursuites criminelles pour possession de ces armes à feu jusqu'au 28 février 2021, soit pendant encore plusieurs années, période au cours de laquelle le gouvernement mettra en place les mesures pour régir la possession continue et l'utilisation de ces armes.

Le bulletin faisait part d'une amnistie et du fait qu'il s'écoulerait beaucoup de temps avant que toute forme de poursuites criminelles soient déposées. Cette information figurait tout au début du bulletin mis en ligne.

Je vous parle de cela parce qu'il est ici question de l'intention derrière cette affaire. Quelle intention avait-on? Voulait-on faire du mal? Voulait-on faire peur aux gens? La décision venait-elle d'en haut, ou était-ce une erreur faite à un échelon inférieur et corrigée par la suite?

Quelle impression avez-vous? Ils ont inclus cette information directement dans la section des renseignements généraux. Ils auraient peut-être pu mieux travailler, mais croyez-vous, comme mon collègue le laisse entendre, qu'une sorte de conspiration venant d'en haut était derrière tout cela? Croyez-vous qu'ils voulaient donner aux gens l'impression qu'ils allaient être poursuivis en vertu d'une loi qui n'avait pas encore été adoptée à ce moment-là?

M. Glen Motz:

Absolument pas. Je veux être très clair là-dessus une fois de plus: je ne crois pas à une intention malicieuse de qui que ce soit. M. Simms s'est formalisé du fait que j'ai employé le mot « arrogance ».

Si la population canadienne m'a parlé d'une chose, c'est bien l'arrogance apparente du gouvernement, qui croit qu'à cause de sa majorité, le projet de loi va être adopté, peu importe ce qui va arriver. Personne ne va nous empêcher de faire ce que nous voulons. Les choses vont se passer comme cela, alors disons à la population que les choses vont se passer comme cela. C'est de la colère des Canadiens qu'il est question. Pour eux, agir ainsi est contraire à la démocratie.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Se peut-il que ce genre de mentalité existe à l'intérieur d'un ministère et de la GRC? Se peut-il que la GRC, comme mon collègue l'affirme, essayait de se préparer à ce qui pouvait s'en venir et qu'elle a donc informé la population en conséquence? Est-ce possible?

(1250)

M. Glen Motz:

Absolument. Je les félicite d'être proactifs et du langage qu'ils utilisent.

Pour en revenir à ce que vous disiez il y a une minute, madame, je crois qu'il est juste de dire que peut-être même dans les ministères, on présume que les choses vont se passer ainsi de toute façon, et qu'on peut donc aller de l'avant et commencer à mettre la loi en oeuvre même si elle n'a pas encore été adoptée. Le rôle du Comité est d'essayer de dire: « Un instant. Vous pouvez dire: “Si le projet de loi est adopté, certaines choses...” ». Il faudra du temps aux Canadiens pour apporter les changements qui seront rendus nécessaires après l'adoption de certaines lois auxquelles nous travaillons actuellement. Être proactif en... Personne ne reprochera à la GRC de se montrer proactive.

Nous parlons ici de la présomption d'adoption d'un projet de loi par le Parlement, alors que ce projet de loi n'a pas encore été adopté et de la confusion que cela a causée. D'où le problème est-il donc provenu? D'où vient cette mentalité? Est-ce un problème systémique? Je ne sais pas. C'est une des choses que nous devrons tenter de prévenir à l'avenir.

Je ne prétends nullement qu'une intention malicieuse ou qu'une conspiration est à l'origine de l'incident, comme M. Bittle l'a laissé entendre, ou comme quelqu'un l'affirmait. Je crois simplement qu'il y a peut-être un problème systémique à l'intérieur des gouvernements et des ministères qui occulte la réalité du rôle du Parlement. Nous devons être conscients de cela.

Le président:

Merci, madame Sahota.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Paul-Hus. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, PCC):

Monsieur le président, je vous remercie de m'accueillir à votre comité.

J'aimerais d'abord que nous clarifiions certains points. Nous sommes ici au Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Or on fait présentement une forme d'inquisition visant à déterminer si notre collègue, qui est un parlementaire comme nous tous, a soulevé un point qui mérite d'être discuté ici, à ce comité. Mon collègue n'a jamais attaqué le ministre. Nous ne sommes pas ici pour livrer des attaques et faire de la politique, mais bien pour déterminer s'il y a eu un problème de procédure et si cet incident a eu des conséquences. Il aurait pu s'agir d'un incident portant sur un autre sujet, mais si je comprends bien, c'est la première fois qu'un tel incident se produit et qu'il est traité par le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Il est clair pour moi que faire un procès d'intention à M. Motz est malavisé de votre part. Si ce n'est pas ce qui se passe, il reste que vous avez tous posé des questions de la même façon.

En tant que vice-président du Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale, j'ai travaillé au projet de loi C-71, Loi modifiant certaines lois et un règlement relatifs aux armes à feu. Nous avons proposé 46 amendements à ce projet de loi, notamment sur le problème lié à la date du 30 juin, qui est en cause ici. Nous avons proposé un changement, étant donné qu'il y avait un problème de compréhension qui touchait les propriétaires d'armes.

Présentement, on ne parle pas de casiers à homards, mais bien de propriétaires dont les armes à feu vont être classifiées et prohibées. Le 30 juin est une date importante. La GRC a publié un bulletin à l'intention du public mentionnant que ce sera en vigueur à compter du 30 juin prochain. Or la loi n'a même pas encore été votée de façon finale au Parlement. Il y a donc un problème de privilège. Le privilège ne touche pas seulement les députés conservateurs ou ceux du NDP. Je crois que, des députés libéraux, c'est aussi leur privilège, en tant que parlementaires, de prendre en considération le fait qu'il y a un problème. Autrement dit, peu importe de quel côté de la table on se trouve, il faut aborder ce problème. En ce moment, vous regardez tous vos iPhones et vous vous moquez bien de ce que je dis, mais il reste qu'il y a un problème et que ce n'est pas en faisant un procès d'intention à M. Motz que ce problème sera résolu.

D'abord, il faut savoir d'où venait la directive, s'il y en a eu une. Est-ce que, oui ou non, le cabinet du ministre l'a émise? C'est simple.

Ensuite, il faut déterminer si la GRC a des procédures lui permettant de publier des choses avant même qu'une loi soit votée. Si la GRC applique une procédure inappropriée, il faut tout simplement lui demander de la changer. C'est un problème qui est soulevé et qu'on veut simplement régler. On ne veut faire le procès de personne. Si le problème est de nature politique, c'est le ministre qui va en hériter. Si ce n'est pas le cas, tant mieux.

On doit donc discuter avec la GRC. La lettre de mandat de la commissaire de la GRC, qui a été soumise par le ministre, est claire. Le ministre demande à la commissaire de la GRC de changer des procédures touchant divers aspects. Cela fait peut-être partie des choses que la commissaire devra régler.

Il reste que le problème majeur est que, pour la première fois, le Comité doit gérer un cas comme celui-ci, qui touche les armes à feu. Comme je l'ai dit, il n'est pas question de casiers à homards ou de pêche en haute mer, mais d'armes à feu. Il aurait pu y avoir des incidences sur la population canadienne. En effet, certaines personnes craignent notamment, vu les renseignements publiés, de ne pas pouvoir se prévaloir de la clause de maintien des droits acquis pour conserver leurs armes. La situation aurait pu être problématique.

Je crois que mon collègue a soulevé un point important. En tant que parlementaires, c'est notre privilège. Si nous ne considérons pas que ce privilège a été bafoué, aussi bien rentrer chez nous et laisser faire les fonctionnaires. Si nous ne sommes pas capables de régler cette question, nous ne servons absolument à rien.

Monsieur le président, est-ce qu'il me reste du temps de parole?

(1255)

Le président:

Il vous reste deux minutes.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je ne suis pas un membre régulier de ce comité et je pense que j'aurais des problèmes si j'y siégeais souvent. Il reste que le point qui a été soulevé est important pour la sécurité publique. On parle de gestion d'armes à feu.

Monsieur Motz, le but est-il de faire un procès au ministre ou plutôt d'obtenir une réponse claire sur la raison pour laquelle c'est arrivé? [Traduction]

M. Glen Motz:

Merci pour vos commentaires et votre question.

Non seulement les parlementaires doivent faire la lumière sur ce qui est survenu et comprendre les mesures qui ont été prises ou qui n'ont pas été prises pour en arriver à ce résultat, mais je crois que les Canadiens méritent qu'ils s'y attardent. Le Parlement constitue notre démocratie et il est un modèle pour le monde. Nous devons prendre cet incident au sérieux, et je sais qu'il en sera ainsi pour le Comité. Pour le temps qui reste, au-delà d'excuses qui semblent pouvoir répondre à l'enquête sur cet incident, si cela devait être la volonté du Comité, je crois important d'examiner la façon d'empêcher qu'une telle situation ne se présente de nouveau dans l'avenir.

L'incident a eu des répercussions sur les gens qui s'intéressent aux armes à feu. La prochaine publication du gouvernement pourrait porter sur n'importe quelle question traitée par le Parlement. En qualité de parlementaires, nous devons veiller à ce que le rôle que nous jouons comme législateurs ne soit ni fragilisé ni usurpé.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Les libéraux ont cédé la prochaine plage de temps à M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Oh, comme c'est gentil. J'ai ainsi la possibilité de soulever de nouveau la question dont j'ai parlé avec vous plus tôt, monsieur le président, si je peux me permettre.

Le président:

Nous devons tout d'abord terminer ce débat.

M. David Christopherson:

Puis-je réserver mes cinq minutes jusqu'à ce moment-là?

Le président:

Nous parlerons de cette question à la fin, mais nous devrons partir à 13 heures exactement.

Quelqu'un d'autre veut-il poser des questions au témoin?

Merci beaucoup de votre visite, monsieur Motz. Nous vous en sommes reconnaissants. Nous poursuivrons notre étude. C'était extrêmement intéressant de vous avoir ici aujourd'hui pour nous parler ce cette question importante.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur.

Le président:

M. Christopherson vient tout juste de demander si nous pourrions reparler des affaires courantes du Comité pendant deux ou trois minutes, si les membres sont d'accord.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nous partirons à 13 heures, toutefois, parce qu'un autre comité s'en vient.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Continuons-nous à huis clos ou restons-nous en audience publique?

Le président:

J'imagine que nous devrions...

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, cela concerne la réunion publique. C'est à vous de décider. Ce n'est pas un grand secret. Je fonctionne bien en public. Je m'inquiète plus du temps que de quoi que ce soit d'autre.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. David Christopherson:

Voici, si je peux commencer tout de suite, monsieur le président. Je vous prie de m'excuser si je ne suis pas ici au meilleur de ma forme pour parler de cette question.

Nous avons avec nous M. Johnston à la suite de l'annonce faite aujourd'hui par le gouvernement. C'est une bonne chose. Toutefois, je dois vous dire, monsieur le président, qu'il faut faire venir le ministre ici. S'il s'agissait d'une loi — ce qui n'est pas le cas parce que le gouvernement a manqué de temps — le ministre serait ici pour nous en parler, et nous pourrions alors discuter à partir de son témoignage.

Nous mettons la charrue devant les boeufs, parce que nous ne nous occupons pas de l'annonce fondamentale qui conduit aux raisons pour lesquelles cette personne a une nouvelle affectation.

Pourrais-je demander au Comité, sans prolonger la séance ou quoi que ce soit d'autre, d'acquiescer au fait que le ministre devrait être ici avec M. Johnston pour donner des explications sur la commission et qu'il serait ensuite logique de parler de la personne qui est dans les faits nommée commissaire?

Pourrions-nous faire cela, chers collègues?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous serions d'accord.

M. Chris Bittle:

Nous pouvons le demander. M. Christopherson est bel et bien venu à l'avance et l'a bel et bien demandé. J'ai dit que je soulèverais ce point. Je n'ai pas le calendrier du ministre, et le secrétaire parlementaire...

M. David Christopherson:

Pourrions-nous obtenir l'accord de principe des députés pour dire que le ministre devrait être ici, comme s'il s'agissait d'un projet de loi à adopter, parce que c'est tout nouveau?

M. Chris Bittle:

C'est tout nouveau, j'en conviens, mais nous n'avons jamais demandé la présence du ministre pour des nominations. Nous n'avons jamais fait cela par le passé.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est une nouvelle entité. C'est tout nouveau.

Si c'était une loi, le ministre serait ici naturellement, mais vous avez tellement mal géré votre dossier sur la réforme démocratique que vous avez manqué de temps et vous devez maintenant procéder par décret. À tout le moins, le Comité devrait avoir la possibilité d'en parler, étant donné tout le temps que nous avons passé sur ce rapport, le rapport même que le ministre semble avoir, de façon bien commode, passé sous silence et dont il a fait bien peu de cas.

Cela nous embête, et il nous faut à tout le moins avoir l'occasion de parler de la structure mise en place de façon unilatérale. Or le seul moyen d'y arriver, c'est de demander respectueusement au ministre de bien vouloir venir nous rencontrer, accompagné de la personne nommée.

(1300)

Le président:

Merci, David.

Veuillez m'excuser, mais nous devons partir. Un groupe très important s'en vient ici. Nous devrons poursuivre cette discussion.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous en reparlerons, je veux juste que vous le sachiez.

Le président:

D'accord.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 30, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.