header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-09-12 TRAN 68

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(0940)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I call to order meeting number 68 of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Pursuant to the order of reference of Monday, June 19, 2017, we are studying BillC-49, an act to amend the Canada Transportation Act and other acts respecting transportation and to make related and consequential amendments to other acts.

Committee members, welcome. I'm glad to see that you all came back for a second day, a week ahead of everybody else.

To our witnesses, thank you for coming this morning. We appreciate it very much.

We will open with the Railway Association of Canada, if you'd like to take the lead.

Mr. Michael Bourque (President and Chief Executive Officer, Railway Association of Canada):

Thank you, Madam Chair.[Translation]

The Railway Association of Canada represents more than 50 freight and passenger railway operators composed of the six class I rail carriers identified in this bill, and 40 local and regional railways, known as shortlines, from coast to coast, as well as many passenger and commuter rail providers, including VIA Rail, GO Transit and RMT, and tourist railways, such as the Charlevoix Railway. [English]

I should mention at the outset that Bill C-49 potentially affects all of our members, including provincial and commuter railways, because of the proposed safety measures included in the bill.

When I appeared before you last year to comment on the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act, I mentioned the negative effect that extended interswitching could have on the short-line rail sector and suggested letting these provisions sunset. We were relieved to see that Bill C-49, by creating the concept of class I rail carriers in its clause 2, has made clear that long-haul interswitching does not apply to short-line railways.

In your report you recommended: That the Minister of Transport request the Canadian Transportation Agency to examine the railway interswitching rates it prescribes to ensure that they are compensatory for railway companies.

Bill C-49 does not request the agency to review interswitching rates but goes one step in the right direction with respect to LHI, by specifying that the rates set by the agency shall be based on comparable commercial rates.

In addition to setting this average as a minimum, the act says that the agency must consider the traffic density on the line and the need for long-term investments, which, if applied properly, should lead to rates above the minimum, which is the average rate. That is good news, but the devil will be in the details of future decisions from the agency.

There are more experienced people from CN and CP with me to speak to the impact of long-haul interswitching and related service provisions on their businesses. Instead, I thought it would be useful to speak to the recent history of the railway industry, the success of Canadian railways in a public policy context, and some important and hard-won lessons from the past three decades of rail regulation and deregulation.

Successive governments, and indeed this committee, have enabled the positive accomplishments of Canada's railway industry by introducing and improving a regulatory regime that prioritizes commercial freedom and reliance on market forces over government intervention.

Before the introduction of the National Transportation Act in 1967, railway economic regulation in Canada involved increasingly restrictive regulation focused on freight rate control and uniformity. This approach led to inefficient railways that had difficulty undertaking much-needed capital investments to maintain and grow their networks.

Railways in the United States faced similar challenges, leading to the adoption of the Staggers Act and, as a result, significant deregulation in the U.S. rail industry. Canada's National Transportation Act represented the beginning of a dramatic shift in the regulatory environment for Canada's railways. Rigid regulatory constraints on pricing were removed, allowing railways to compete more effectively.

By the 1990s, decades of incremental deregulation placed an increasing emphasis on market and commercial forces, while maintaining a number of protections to ensure balance between railways and shippers. The passage of the Canada Transportation Act in 1996 introduced additional changes that reduced market exit barriers, allowing railways to discontinue or transfer portions of their networks to other carriers so as to become more efficient. This gave railways greater freedom to control costs and generate efficiencies. It also fostered sharp growth in Canada's short-line rail industry. Around the same time, CN was privatized, creating competition between two privately held, publicly traded national systems.

As a result of these policies, Canadian railways evolved into highly productive companies capable of providing low-cost service while generating revenues needed to reinvest into their respective networks. Shippers meanwhile gained access to a world-class railway system and today benefit from freight rates that are among the lowest in the world. Canadian railway performance, in terms of rates charged, productivity, and capital investment, greatly improved under these regulatory freedoms.

Since 1999, Canada's railways have invested more than $24 billion in their infrastructure, which has resulted in a safer and more efficient rail network that benefits customers directly.

Despite this record of public policy success, and a national transportation policy that clearly recognizes that competition and market forces are the most effective way of providing viable and effective transportation services, we are here today debating a bill that adds recourse mechanisms for the sole benefit of shippers.

Three weeks ago, the president of the Canadian Transportation Agency gave a speech in Vancouver in which he stated that existing mechanisms—including mediation services, final offer arbitration on rates, arbitration on service levels that allow the agency to craft service-level agreements, and adjudication on the adequacy and suitability of services provided by railways—are not used very often, and that in fact the agency is planning outreach to stakeholders who are not taking advantage of existing provisions. Yet we're here today to discuss new provisions on top of existing recourse mechanisms that are currently underutilized.

Under this bill, long-haul interswitching is available to a rail customer even if they have access to trucking or marine transport, which are competitive services. It is an example of how we can lose sight of the need to recognize competition and move backwards toward regulation.

(0945)

[Translation]

Let me now turn to safety, and to the locomotive voice and video recording, or LVVR, provisions of the bill.[English]

Yesterday, I sent all members of this committee an article outlining the reasons for our support of LVVR for both accident investigation and accident prevention. For a long time, railways have advocated the right to use this technology as another safety defence within railway companies' safety management systems. It has always been the industry's belief that LVVR will, simply by its presence, help to prevent accidents by discouraging unsafe behaviours and unauthorized activities that may distract crew members from their duties.

We believe that this technology will increase safety and that it can be introduced in a thoughtful way and used responsibly. Even with significant investments, there are still accidents that can be prevented. The record of class I railways in North America is excellent, but it is not perfect. Until we have full automation of both freight and passenger trains, we are going to see accidents that can be traced to human error.

LVVR is not a silver bullet. Rather, it is an important, proven tool that can help identify dangers and act as a deterrent for the very small percentage of employees who might be tempted to use their smart phone or read a book when they should be alert and working. In this respect, it will help to change the culture of the workplace in a positive way. This has been the experience of companies such as Phoenix Heli-Flight, a Canadian helicopter company that today uses voice and video recorders in their aircraft. In addition, it is expected that in most cases the LVVR evidence would corroborate the statements and explanations provided by the crew members themselves.

Let me talk about privacy versus safety. Some have expressed concern about privacy, but we already know from the introduction of other technologies and from video in the workplace that there are tests imposed by the Privacy Commissioner to guide us on the responsible implementation of LVVR. We are anxious to work with you and with the department on the creation of these regulations.

LVVR is a technology that will prevent accidents. Investigative bodies such as the TSB and the U.S. NTSB have called for its use. When there is an accident, investigators from the Transportation Safety Board will better understand what happened, and everyone will learn from it.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Bourque.

On to the Canadian Pacific Railway and Mr. Ellis.

Mr. Jeff Ellis (Chief Legal Officer and Corporate Secretary, Canadian Pacific Railway):

Thank you, Madam Chair, and good morning.

I'm Jeff Ellis, chief legal officer for Canadian Pacific. I am joined by James Clements, our vice-president for strategic planning, and Keith Shearer, our general manager of regulatory.

Thank you for the opportunity to speak with you today. In the interest of time, we will focus our remarks this morning on just two issues, LVVR and long-haul interswitching.

As one of Canada's two class I railways, we operate a 22,000-kilometre network throughout Canada and the United States. We link thousands of communities with the North American economy and with international markets. CP has made and continues to make significant levels of capital investment to improve safety and grow the capacity of our network. Since 2011 we've invested more than $7.7 billion on railway infrastructure. In 2017 we plan to invest an additional $1.25 billion. Should the changes to the maximum revenue entitlement come into effect in their current form, CP will likely make a major investment in new covered hopper cars, creating new supply chain capacity.

CP has been recognized as the safest railway in North America by the Federal Railroad Administration in the U.S. We've achieved the lowest frequency of train accidents in each of the past 11 years. That being said, safety is a journey and not a destination. One incident is too many. LVVR technology is essential if we are to materially improve railway safety in Canada, because human factors continue to be the leading cause of railway incidents. Since 2007 we've had a 50% reduction in safety incidents caused by equipment failures. Similarly, track failures are down 39%. However, human-caused incidents have seen little change over the same time period. According to data published by the TSB, 53.9% of railway incidents in 2016 were caused by human factors. It's clear that we must take action to tackle this category of rail safety incidents.

The evidence is also clear. One example is that since the implementation of DriveCam in New Jersey, New Jersey Transit saw a 68% reduction in bus collisions from 2007 through 2010. The number of passenger injuries fell 71% in the same period. Rail commuter Metrolink in California similarly saw a significant reduction in red-signal violations and station platform overruns.

It's imperative, however, that these regulations allow for safety issues to be exposed before an incident occurs. That would enable us to proactively develop effective and appropriate corrective action. It would be a mistake to amend Bill C-49 to prevent any kind of proactive use of LVVR data by railway companies. It would negate a key safety benefit of adopting the technology. CP recognizes the need to use this technology in a way that is respectful of our operating employees, in accordance with Canadian privacy laws, and we are committed to working closely with Transport Canada and our unions over the coming months to do so.

I'll now turn it over to James.

(0950)

Mr. James Clements (Vice-President, Strategic Planning and Transportation Services, Canadian Pacific Railway):

The rail supply chain is the backbone of our economy. Not only is the Canadian freight rail system the safest, most efficient, and environmentally friendly means of transporting goods and commodities, it achieves these goals while maintaining the lowest freight rates in the world. This is a key point. A healthy rail system is critical to Canada's international competitiveness, given our vast geography. Without a competitive, economic, and efficient rail system that can move products thousands of kilometres to ports for export, at the lowest cost in the world, much of what Canadians sell on international markets could not be priced competitively.

Canada's freight transportation system has been successful because the legal and regulatory environment, particularly in recent decades, has recognized that competition and market forces are the most effective organizing principles. These principles are articulated in Canada's national transportation policy declaration, contained in section 5 of the Canada Transportation Act.

It is important not to lose sight of these principles when reflecting upon legislative changes to the framework that has been proven to be so successful in delivering economic benefit to Canadians. CP is pleased that the government has decided to allow the extended interswitching regime of the previous government's Bill C-30 to sunset, as it was based on what we saw as a deeply flawed rationale, and it generated a number of harmful public policy consequences that ultimately disadvantaged the Canadian supply chain.

Similarly, however, the proposed new long-haul interswitching, LHI, regime contains a number of problematic elements. Most fundamentally, the LHI regime, like the extended interswitching regime it is replacing, is non-reciprocal with the U.S. As such, American railroads would be granted significant reach into Canada, up to 1,200 kilometres, to access Canadian rail traffic, but Canadian railways will not have the same reciprocal ability under American law.

The LHI regime is constructed in such a way that it is asymmetrical in its impact, both in terms of non-reciprocal access for American railroads vis-à-vis CP and in terms of CP and CN, because CP's exposure to American railroads under this regime is much greater than is CN's, given the geographical location of our respective networks, further compounded by the two excluded corridors.

The LHI regime could undermine the competitiveness and efficiency of the Canadian supply chain by incentivizing the movement of Canadian traffic to American railroads and supply chains, thereby eroding traffic density for Canadian supply chains.

The negative consequences to the Canadian economy will not be limited to the rail industry. If Canadian rail traffic is diverted to American trade corridors, it will also dampen shipping volumes at Canadian ports. For CP alone, there is a significant amount of our annual revenue that could potentially be moved to American railways and trade corridors under this proposed LHI regime.

A decision to allow non-reciprocal access for American railroads represents a significant concession by Canada to the U.S. while NAFTA is being renegotiated. This strikes us as an unwise public policy choice for the Canadian economy. The proposed LHI regime ought to be reconsidered in that context.

As drafted, Bill C-49 also imposes an obligation on connecting carriers to provide rail cars to the shippers in addition to their other service obligations. It has been well understood that as part of its common carrier obligation, a railway is required to furnish adequate and suitable accommodation for traffic. However, in some cases, the provision of railcars by a connecting carrier is not practical. For example, tank cars are typically owned by the customer, not the railway. The Canada Transportation Act already addresses a railway's car supply obligation, so it is important to clarify that the railway does not have a higher standard to provide car supply under LHI than already exists.

Since the LHI rate is to be determined by the agency, based on the commercial rates charged for comparable traffic, it follows that traffic moving under an LHI rate or any other regulated rate, such as grain under the MRE, should be excluded from the LHI rate determination since those rates cannot be considered commercial.

Further, American railways operating in Canada and regulated by the federal government should also be compelled to provide rate data to be used by the agency in determining LHI rates.

(0955)



We will conclude our opening remarks there. I know there are many other elements of Bill C-49 that we have not discussed this morning. Our letter highlights some considerations on those points, and, of course, we are happy to take questions on any element.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we go to Mr. Finn, from the Canadian National Railway Company.

Mr. Sean Finn (Executive Vice-President, Corporate Services, Canadian National Railway Company):

Madam Chair, good morning, and thank you very much.

This morning I'm joined by two of my colleagues, first of all Janet Drysdale, who's vice-president of corporate development and sustainability at CN; and also, Mike Farkouh, who is vice-president of operations, Eastern Canada. I'm the chief legal officer and executive vice-president of corporate services at CN.

We appreciate very much the opportunity to meet with you today to discuss Bill C-49, which has significant implications for the rail sector in Canada. CN participated very actively in the statutory review of the Canada Transportation Act by the Honourable David Emerson. We believe the panel did a good job in the review of the act, identifying the sorts of policy changes that are necessary to enable Canada to meet its goals for growing trade in the coming decades. Mr. Emerson and his colleagues commissioned a number of useful studies. With regard to rail we recognize that, unlike some past reviews, the panel based their recommendation on evidence and data and less on anecdotes. The panel also accepted the clear evidence that deregulation of the rail sector supported innovation, which derived benefits to shippers, customers and the Canadian economy. We are somewhat disappointed that not more of the panel's recommendations are included in Bill C-49.[Translation]

After the report of the review panel was published, we participated in the consultation process undertaken by Minister  Garneau, specifically in a number of roundtables held across the country.[English]

We have also been encouraged by the work of the government's advisory council on economic growth chaired by Dominic Barton. We are particularly pleased with their first report's focus on the importance of growing trade and the need to strengthen and grow our infrastructure in order to achieve this. The council also stressed the importance of having a regulatory system that encourages investment in infrastructure and enables the transportation sector to attract the capital needed to invest in growing capacity.[Translation]

I am sure that you are familiar with CN, but I would like to remind you of some important aspects.

CN operates its own 19,600-mile network, serving three coasts, the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Gulf of Mexico, as well as the port of Trois-Rivières. In Canada, our network extends over 13,500 miles, linking all main centres and access points. This makes CN a strategic partner in Canada's logistics chain.

We have an extremely diversified commercial portfolio. Our biggest sector is intermodal transportation, or import and export container traffic. Container transportation is the fastest growing and most competitive sector in the rail industry.[English]

More broadly, I think it's imperative for the committee to know that deregulation and market-driven forces over the last 20 years have been the key underpinnings enabling investment and innovation in Canada's rail sector. According to the OECD, Canadian shippers today benefit from rail rates that are the lowest in the industrialized world, lower even than in the United States. In addressing Bill C-49, we acknowledge the minister's attempt to design a package that addresses the interests of both railways and shippers; however, we are concerned with the failure to recognize the degree to which deregulation has led to an environment of both lower prices and more reliable services for shippers and the degree to which deregulation has enabled railways to invest heavily in maintaining and growing our network. CN's capital investment over the last 10 years has totalled approximately $20 billion.

I'd like to turn the microphone over to my colleague, Janet Drysdale.

(1000)

Ms. Janet Drysdale (Vice-President, Corporate Development, Canadian National Railway Company):

Thank you, Sean.

There are a number of provisions in Bill C-49 that run a high risk of unintended consequences. The part of the bill with the greatest risk potential is long-haul interswitching, which I'll subsequently refer to as LHI. LHI is a remedy which, until it appeared in this bill, had never been recommended, discussed, or considered. No assessment of this remedy on the rail industry has been performed and we believe that significant unforeseen and adverse consequences could result from its implementation.

CN has an extensive network of branch lines serving remote communities in all regions of the country. Those branch lines present a challenge, as they are expensive to service and maintain while at the same time handling low volumes of traffic. In many cases, the reason we are able to justify keeping those lines in operation is the long-haul business they generate. LHI makes it possible for a customer to require us to take the traffic to an interchange point and hand it to a competitor, who would then get the majority of the move and its associated revenue.

Under this remedy, the other railway is in a good position to offer lower rates, as it bears none of the cost of maintaining the remote branch line where the shipper is located. Needless to say, if this were to become a common occurrence, it would be difficult for us to justify the ongoing investments required to keep those remote lines operational.

During second reading debate, LHI was identified as an option to captive shippers that would “introduce competitive alternatives for their traffic and better position them in negotiations for service, options and rates”.

Let me start with the notion of captivity. The bill defines captive as having access to only one railroad, completely ignoring the shipper's access to alternative modes of transportation. So if a customer ships product today using both rail and truck, Bill C-49 considers them captive to rail. We are proposing an amendment to clarify the definition of captive such that if a shipper uses an alternative means of transportation for at least 25% of its total shipment, that shipper must be considered to have competitive options and therefore should not have access to LHI.

With respect to negotiating service options and rates, Bill C-49 maintains the shipper's access to all of the existing remedies respecting rates and service, including final offer arbitration, group final offer arbitration, complaints against railway charges, level of service complaints, and arbitration on service-level agreements. Consistent with Canada's national transportation policy and that LHI provides a competitive option, we are proposing an amendment whereby a shipper that can access LHI should not have access to the other rate and service remedies.

LHI also provides a non-reciprocal competitive advantage to U.S.-based railroads. Railways in the U.S. already have a significant advantage because of the much higher density of traffic on their lines. They simply have much more traffic per mile of railway. That higher density means more traffic over which to spread the high fixed cost of maintaining the network. Railways are most profitable on long-haul moves. Under LHI we can be required to move goods a short distance and then transfer them to a U.S. railway that would get the long-haul move and most of the revenue. That is revenue that then becomes available for investment into the U.S. network at the expense of Canada.

We don't understand, particularly at a time when NAFTA is being renegotiated, why Canada would give away this provision with nothing in return. Providing such an advantage to U.S. railways creates a risk to the integrity and sustainability of Canada's transportation network, ports, and railways, which depend on a certain volume of traffic to generate the capital necessary to keep Canadian infrastructure safe and fluid and to keep good, middle-class jobs in Canada.

We acknowledge that the exclusions in the act limit the areas where this new remedy is available, but those exclusions are insufficient, especially near the Canada-U.S. border in all three prairie provinces. If we had access to similar provisions in the U.S., we would not be objecting. However, there is no right to interswitching in the U.S., and this absence of reciprocity is prejudicial to the Canadian rail industry. We are therefore proposing an amendment that would create an additional exclusion to provide that a shipper not be entitled to apply to the agency for an LHI order if the shipper is located within 250 kilometres of the Canada-U.S. border.

Another area where we do not understand the need for intervention is the attempt to define the level of service requirement. The current provisions have been in place and effective for a long period of time. In our view, the current provisions are balanced and do not require the proposed amendment. We are also proposing an amendment respecting the provisions of Bill C-49 that introduce penalties when railways fail to meet service obligations.

(1005)



In 2012, Jim Dinning, a facilitator appointed by government, recommended that penalties of this type should only be introduced when penalties also apply to shippers that commit volumes and fail to meet their commitment. BillC-49 has no such reciprocity. We are proposing amendments that better balance penalties between shippers and railways by making railway penalties contingent on shippers having similar obligations.

We would like to commend the minister for his decision to move forward with legislation making the use of locomotive voice and video recording devices compulsory. This is an important step in our collective goal to increase rail safety. While it is important to have the information provided by these devices available when determining the cause of an accident after it has occurred, they are even more valuable in our ongoing efforts to prevent accidents.

We want to say a word about the provision of the bill that increases the ceiling for the percentage of CN shares that can be held by a single shareholder. The current limit of 15%, a limit no other railway has, impedes CN in attracting the kind of patient, long-term investors that we require in our extremely capital-intensive industry. This change is a good first step to correcting the uneven playing field vis-à-vis our competitors. We will be asking members to consider a minor amendment to ensure that this change takes effect immediately upon royal assent.

Finally, we have a word about grain shipments. In the crop year that just ended, CN moved 21.8 million metric tonnes of grain, the most we have ever moved in a year. We beat the previous record set in 2014-15 by 2% and exceeded the three-year average by 7%. I'm also pleased to be able to tell you that, in advance of the start of the crop year, grain shippers secured approximately 70% of CN's car supply under innovative commercial agreements that provide shippers with guaranteed car supply and that include reciprocal penalties for performance.

We have entered into a period of dramatically increased service, innovation, and collaboration with our customers. We have achieved this through commercial negotiation, improved communication, and a better understanding of the challenges we each face. If the Canadian supply chain is going to move the increased volume of trade that we all support and that we all believe can be achieved, it can only happen with collaboration across the supply chain. Regulation has its place, but experience shows that we reach our goals when it is the exception.

We appreciate the opportunity to speak with you today and look forward to your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Drysdale. You referenced some amendments. Have you submitted a brief to the clerk?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

We have.

The Chair:

Is it in both official languages?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

Yes.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We go on to questioners.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses for being here today, day two of a four-day study on this issue. We're very interested in hearing your testimony.

I will start by saying that it goes without saying that we understand the importance of our railways to our country and our economy and recognize that there needs to be a balance struck between the railways and the customers they serve. Certainly, looking at the legislation that's before us today, I think we're all committed to doing that and ensuring that this legislation does that.

I'm a little confused by some of what I've heard today in relation to Mr. Bourque's comments around Bill,C-49 describing this legislation as creating additional measures on top of measures that are rarely used. I want to then look at the testimony that was given by Mr. Ellis and Mr. Clements in regard to long-haul interswitching. I think those were the measures that Mr. Bourque may have been referring to, I'm not sure, where you defined the extended interswitching regime as being deeply flawed and generating a number of harmful public policy consequences that ultimately disadvantage the Canadian supply chain.

I want to reflect back on some of the testimony that we heard when we were studying the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act. The stats that were provided to our committee during our study demonstrated that extended interswitching was, in fact, rarely used. Our shippers acknowledged that, while that was the case, it was seen as a very helpful tool in negotiating contracts with the railways.

We have folks saying that this was a remedy that was rarely used, but that it created harmful public policy consequences and ultimately disadvantaged the Canadian supply chain. I'm trying to reconcile those comments and would give you an opportunity to speak to that.

(1010)

Mr. Michael Bourque:

I'll maybe start and then hand it over to James.

My simple point was that there are additional provisions in this bill for recourse to the agency by shippers, yet there are already significant recourse mechanisms available to shippers. As stated by the president of the CTA a few weeks ago, these services are essentially not being used very much, to the point where they need to try to drum up business by doing outreach to various customer groups to make them aware of these provisions. My belief is that the reason they are not used is because most of these things are negotiated, commercially, between the companies and their customers. If you have a number of recourse mechanisms already and those are not being fully utilized, then where's the evidence that shows we need even more recourse mechanisms?

I really tried to frame that in the context of the last 30 years of progressive public policy, which has led to a more commercial framework and to the success of North American railways, because of essentially the same thing happening in the United States. It's to the point now where we have the best railways in the world represented in this room, in terms of productivity, low rates, safety, and the ability to pass on these productivity and efficiency gains to customers, which is proven in rates.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

Mr. James Clements:

I'll make a couple of comments first on where we saw some of the flaws in extended interswitching, and then bring it across to where LHI has flaws.

Extended interswitching was done at a regulatory costing at a prescribed rate, which didn't necessarily give us an adequate return. You were effectively giving a regulated, below-cost rate to an American shipper or carrier to gain access to our networks. So that was one of them.

Another component was that it was very regional, which I think the government has acknowledged in some of the amendments it has made.

Then, what's carried over—the final flaw—was this lack of reciprocity. Today let's say that the Burlington Northern has a downturn in crude oil going to the Pacific northwest. It can now choose to fill that vacant capacity and try to cover its fixed cost of that capacity by potentially getting the shipper to get an LHI rate down to the border, and then pricing the rest of the move very cheaply and attracting that volume to be incremental on the top to fill the density.

As you've heard, that takes revenue away from the Canadian railways, takes jobs away from Canadians, and it also takes the density out of the other components in our supply chain, such as the ports. That's the third component that we see is the flaw.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay, I'm—

The Chair:

That is your time.

Mr. Sikand.

(1015)

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Good morning.

My first question is for CP.

In a letter provided to us, CP stated that it was a leader in the space of LVVRs. I want to get your opinion or position on the argument that LVVRs infringe on privacy or are perhaps overly invasive.

Mr. Jeff Ellis:

Thank you for the question from the member. I'll refer the question to Keith Shearer.

Mr. Keith Shearer (General Manager, Regulatory and Operating Practices, Canadian Pacific Railway):

We know there are privacy concerns, but we also know there's a process for that. You probably know we have recording devices in locomotives today for conversations that occur between rail traffic controllers and the train crews, so those occur. We have black boxes, if you will, that were introduced in the early 1980s after the tragic Hinton accident, so those record information as well.

We know that the minister and department will work closely with the Privacy Commissioner on the privacy issues and work through that process. We also know, through consultation with the minister, that those processes will be developed in the regulation to follow.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

My second question is for CN.

Again, in a letter provided to us, CN's position was that changing the maximum revenue entitlement actually allows you to purchase new cars. Could you please speak to this?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

I think that actually might have been a comment from CP.

I think the changes to the maximum revenue entitlement improve the situation with respect to getting the investment credited to the railway that actually makes the investment. It is a rather complex formula, and we feel that there is an opportunity to simplify it further. Railway cars we have to pay for 12 months a year. It's no different than leasing an automobile. You have a monthly payment.

In the context of the way the MRE works, we only earn revenue on the actual amount of tonnage we ship over the mileage we ship. We still feel that there is some disincentive left in the MRE, although the splitting of the index certainly is helpful in that if CN makes an investment in the cars, we no longer have to share 50% of the credit of that investment with CP.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

Ms. Drysdale, you mentioned in your remarks that you've offered amendments with regard to LHI and reciprocity within the 250 kilometres. Could you elaborate on that point, please?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

While the existing exclusions included in the bill we think are very important and need to be maintained, they do not address the issue of U.S. reciprocity in the three prairie provinces. To the point made earlier by my colleague at CP, there is still an opportunity for railroads to come into those three prairie provinces and to take business away from the Canadian rail network. I want to make the point that if a shipper wants to ship to the U.S., we do that day in and day out, and we're prepared to continue to do that, but the rate we do that at should be commercially negotiated with BN in the very same way we negotiate with BN, for example, when we want to access a customer in Chicago. It's this notion of disparity between the two regulatory regimes that concerns us, and the fact that we're giving an unfair advantage to U.S. railways to come in and take Canadian traffic at a prescribed regulated rate, when we don't have the same right to do so in the United States.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Okay.

Do you feel that you were adequately consulted on the minister's transportation 2030 strategy and in regard to Bill C-49?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

We certainly participated extensively in the consultation process. Clearly, we're dissatisfied with some of the outcomes that remain in the existing bill.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

I'll ask the same question to CP.

Mr. Jeff Ellis:

Similarly, we participated, and we respect the process and the fact that we were consulted. Nonetheless, we do have the issues we've set out.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Gentlemen, madam, welcome. Thank you for joining us.

I would like to start with a question for all the witnesses about safety.

I certainly heard your comments about the importance you place on audio and video recorders. However, my gut asks whether a voice and video recorder is going to help the TSB draw any conclusions on an unfortunate event that has already happened. I was rather looking to find out about the measures you plan to implement, or that Bill C-49 should implement, in order to prevent accidents.

As Mr. Ellis said, we know that most incidents are linked to human factors.

There are two major questions about the frequency with which the human factor is at play in accidents. First, there is the level of fatigue of locomotive operators. Then there are the repeated demands from the TSB pointing to the need to instal additional means of physical defence. This can mean alarms. or even technological mechanisms that can make a train stop when the driver has missed a warning he should have noticed. It seems repetitive.

In the major companies, what measures are in place, first to achieve better management of fatigue, and second to move towards these means of physical defence?

Perhaps, Mr. Ellis can start, but I invite everyone to respond.

(1020)

Mr. Sean Finn:

Well, maybe I can start.

There are two things. For the industry, and for CN, safety is clearly an essential value. We cannot be successful in our industry without safe practices. Without them, it is impossible to succeed.

You can ask my colleague, Michael Farkouh, a vice-president involved in operations, to explain a little about how it works, what measures are in place so that we always feel comfortable with safety matters and that we always have the assurance that safety is a daily value for all our employees. [English]

Mr. Michael Farkouh (Vice-President, Eastern Region, Canadian National Railway Company):

To address the question with regard to the locomotive voice and video recording as well as fatigue, our pursuit, of course, is always to reduce any accidents and injuries and to prevent them. Prevention is one of the key elements that we focus in on. When we are looking at our safety management system, we are always building on lines of defence. When we address locomotive voice and video recording, this is a tool that complements our efforts to further reduce that.

Earlier we talked about privacy. We don't take that lightly. We want to be very pinpointed from a risk assessment base as to how best we should use— [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Allow me to interrupt you. I certainly heard your remarks about the recorders. Now I would like you to tell us about driver fatigue and the means of physical defence. [English]

Mr. Michael Farkouh:

With regard to fatigue, it's definitely an area that we are actively working on very closely with our unions. It's not so much fatigue but the healthy rest of individuals.

When we look at safety, we're not necessarily looking at the situation that has arisen but at how to prevent the situation from occurring. When we get to fatigue, it's really about addressing proper scheduling. It's addressing healthy sleep habits. It's an education process. As well, at work, when the individual is already fatigued, we have to look prior to that, and that's what we are currently doing and we are working very closely with our unions. We are not necessarily having to wait for regulations. We are really trying to address these issues as we see there's a level of importance to doing so. We're working closely with our unions on that. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Mr. Ellis, do you have anything to add about fatigue and the means of physical defence?

Mr. Jeff Ellis:

Yes, I understood your question completely, but I will answer in English, if I may.[English]

With regard to fatigue, we take fatigue quite seriously. Our company has been advocating, for example, for a 12-hour maximum workday, as opposed to the current 18 hours. We hope that's going to be a change that will come into effect eventually.

In the meantime, as my colleague Sean said, we're working closely with the unions, because some of the issues around rest are tied up in collective agreements. But we don't dismiss the fatigue issue at all.

That said, it's one lever among several that we need to pull. In our view, LVVR is a critical tool and it has been proven in other realms in transport that it is extremely effective, particularly when you can have proactive use respecting privacy. We have absolute respect for privacy, Canadian privacy laws, and we think that we can address it in a balanced manner that balances risk with privacy protection. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

You did not talk about physical means of defence. Is that because providing additional tools is not part of your short-term or medium-term plans?

Mr. Sean Finn:

At the moment, for example, we are conducting a pilot project with our employees. They are wearing a gadget like a Fitbit, which allows us to find out about their daily habits, when they are both working and resting. It is allowing us to get baseline information that we can rely on. Fatigue is not just a subjective concept; it’s also a scientific one.

I think that is a good example. It’s not a question of regulations, but of pilot projects to which our unions are contributing. Through them, we want to be able to observe the balance between the requirements at work and the practices at rest. Thanks to that physical application, we can jointly determine what can be done so that drivers are more rested when they arrive. We can also determine which habits in their lives mean that they are less rested than they should be when they get to work.

(1025)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Aubin.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'm going to dig a bit deeper for you folks and give you an opportunity to explain how Bill C-49 can actually become an enabler for you versus a disabler and, with that said, enable you to basically recognize the returns established by your strategic business plans.

My question to all of you—and I'm going to give you the time to answer this in depth—is to explain how Bill C-49 can in fact contribute to satisfying the established objectives that you've recognized for your strategic and/or business plans and how it can become an enabler for your organization to then execute those action plans that are contained within your business plan.

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

I'll jump in on that one. In fact, our biggest concern regarding Bill C-49 is that it does just the opposite. One of the greatest challenges we're facing as we look ahead to increasing Canada's trade, export-import activity, is that we need investment in the Canadian rail system that underpins Canada's economy. In order to earn that investment, first of all, we need to ensure that we protect the existing traffic on Canadian rail lines and that we don't give the U.S. an unfair opportunity to come in and take the traffic and increase the density on their rail lines so they can then reinvest it in the U.S. network.

We are a highly capital-intensive business. We spend about 50% of our operating income every year in the context of ongoing maintenance and capital improvements to the physical infrastructure. Our biggest concern about Bill C-49 is the ability to continue to earn an adequate return in order to be able to make those investments that we require to keep the system robust.

At CN we have a particular concern about our remote branch-line networks, as I mentioned, which typically have a lower density of freight, and I think you've heard Michael Bourque speak about some of the challenges that short lines face. The reality is that rail is not particularly competitive when you're talking about distances under 500 miles. A piece of legislation that forces us to have these short-haul movements actually impairs our ability to earn an adequate return on a given movement, which we need to actually reinvest, particularly in those branch lines.

We've seen this happen before. We've had cases where we've actually had to abandon some of our networks in the more remote regions of Canada. Basically what ends up happening is that it encourages more trucking: the truckers have to step in and bring the truck to the more densely populated mainline network of railway. That's not good for our climate change agenda and it's not good for Canadian shippers. These are our concerns about Bill C-49, that in fact it makes it ever more difficult for us to achieve our business plan and to be able to earn those returns that we need in order to reinvest in our infrastructure.

Mr. Jeff Ellis:

I'll refer the question to my colleague James Clements.

Mr. James Clements:

I'm going to make a couple of comments. We have five pillars around our business plan, on what Bill C-49 does to help us enable our business plan.

Around safety, we would agree that the LVVR amendments, as proposed, are ones that would allow us to move forward and improve the safety. That's the first focus of our organization in anything we do, to operate safely in the communities we serve across the country.

We always talk about providing service as one of the core components of our business plan. We haven't had much commentary around the level of service amendment that has been proposed. One area that we would comment on around this is that we run a network. When we think about providing service, we're providing that service on a network basis and we have to juggle all the push and tug of what every individual shipper would like with the realities of serving everybody across that network. We think there needs to be some consideration in the regulation or the bill around looking at the entire impact of a service agreement or a service arbitration award on the network itself, not just on an individual shipper, because if you give the priority to one shipper, it could subordinate everybody else and have negative repercussions. That would be one additional comment I would make.

(1030)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

I'd like to go back to Ms. Drysdale with respect to the branch lines.

You mentioned abandoning the branch lines because of the fact that it's just not feasible for you. Is there dialogue happening with the short-line operators that may be in the areas, or a short-line operator, to actually take on some of these branch lines, therefore creating some more revenue for you to offset the revenues that you need for your asset management plan?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

I think our experience with short lines has shown us that if it's not economically viable for us to operate, the likelihood that it's economically viable for a short line is very unlikely. It's not a matter of having a short-line operator come in to operate in those remote regions. The base level of traffic won't be there for them either.

Our experience with some of the short lines is that, over time, they haven't had enough capital in order to reinvest in their network. Certainly in the U.S. we see the same situation, but the U.S. regulatory framework gives them some different incentives and things such as accelerated depreciation, or even government grants, to help them make investments in their network. We don't have that in Canada.

In the context of a line being viable, if it's not viable for us, it's not going to be viable for a short line. In the context of short-haul moves, it would be more likely that the shippers would have to relocate, go out of business, or use trucking in order to get to the nearest major rail location.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

I wanted to start with Canadian Pacific. This has to do with the LVVRs. I'm looking at your letter. There are a couple of comments in it that I would like you to comment on for me. One line is: “It is simply unjustifiable to tolerate unsafe behaviour by a crew operating a locomotive, without taking appropriate corrective measures.” If I were one of your bargaining unit members, I would take that as a threat.

Can you comment on that?

Mr. Keith Shearer:

I'll start with our operating employees. They are very talented, well trained, well motivated. They know their jobs extremely well. I've had the pleasure of working with many of them myself.

But they are humans, and humans make mistakes. Furthermore, things such as electronic devices are, I would argue, a problem in society. You see that in society today. Their use is a strong detractor from safe behaviour. Certainly in the railroad operating environment, we have rules and procedures that say they must be turned off, stowed, and not on their person; we simply do not allow them in the environment. Without a means to actually monitor on an ad hoc basis, however, we have really no ability to know that this rule, this procedure, is actually being followed.

That's just one example.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

What would you do in a situation such as that? There's obviously corrective action, and then there's punitive action. Where would you go with it?

Mr. Keith Shearer:

If it's egregious, if it's willful, then punitive options absolutely should be there. The minister and the public hold us accountable for safe operations. We take that accountability very seriously, and there's no reason that this shouldn't extend to our employees. For the most part, they understand that, and that's the way they operate.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I want to shift gears to the LHI. I hear a lot of contradictions. On the one hand, I hear that we have one of the most efficient low-cost providers of service in the world. That being the case, why would there be any threat from LHI, particularly given that even in the previous regimes the extended interswitching limits were rarely used. What, then, is the threat?

Go ahead, Ms. Drysdale.

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

I think LHI is significantly broader than what was in place in the context of extended interswitching. The fact that extended interswitching was somewhat a temporary measure may have also played into the fact that shippers perhaps limited their use.

Our point with respect to both of those remedies is that if the shipper has rate and/or service issues, there are significant existing remedies the shipper can use, and we see them used. Shippers use the final offer arbitration remedy; they have used level of service remedies. Those remedies exist to help the captive shipper deal with the nature of being captive.

Long-haul interswitching is a far extension from what we saw with extended interswitching; it could be in excess of 1,200 kilometres. We thus have deep concerns, to the extent that shippers use it and/or that U.S. railways encourage shippers to use it, about the impact it may have on the overall network business.

(1035)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I look at the service map, and what I see is that both your railways have extensive operations down into the United States. I don't see, other than perhaps in the case of the Burlington Northern Santa Fe line up to Metro Vancouver, a lot of incursion by American railroads into British Columbia.

Do you ever in the course of your business actually buy services from American lines?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

We do indeed. In fact about 30% of our business is interchange business with other railroads.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

What, then, is the difference?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

The difference is in the way the rates are negotiated. In the U.S. it's done on a commercial basis. What's being proposed here in Canada is to have those rates all fall under a regulated regime. That's the key difference.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Would you not say—and I'll turn this to CP, because you have taken the first few questions—that in fact the reason the interswitching wasn't used under the old regime very much is that when faced with the competition, you guys lowered your rates?

Mr. Jeff Ellis:

I'll refer to James.

Mr. James Clements:

I'll make a couple of comments. I'll answer that last question first.

The interesting scenario that happened is that we had negotiated commercial rates. I'm going to use the Burlington Northern into Lethbridge as an example. There were products moving in and out of Lethbridge under the bilateral agreements on creating through rates that Janet referred to. What happened is that when extended interswitching came in at a prescribed rate, the shipper paid essentially the same amount, we got paid less, and the revenue for the U.S. portion of the haul went up as a result of the application for interswitching.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Did you lose a lot of business?

Mr. James Clements:

In the Lethbridge area, we saw an impact. If you looked at the whole of the system, it was relatively small. However, in the Lethbridge area where you had Coutts, where the Burlington Northern connects, if you took that as a percentage, it was more significant than elsewhere. Again, that's one of the few locations where the 160-kilometre interswitching limit with the BN really applied. The other area was around Winnipeg.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

However, I think we can count on the finger of one finger the number of times anybody went to the maximum limit.

Mr. James Clements:

To 160 kilometres, but I can follow up with statistics.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

That would be worthwhile.

Mr. James Clements:

We saw a significant percentage in that localized region move over. It was a regular occurrence, with traffic moving on a regular basis in and out of there.

We have moved a little away from that. The first comment I wanted to make overall—

The Chair:

I'm sorry, I'm going to have to cut you off. Perhaps you can find a way of answering Mr. Hardie's question among some of the other questions.

Mr. Shields, please.

Mr. Martin Shields (Bow River, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I appreciate the expertise here in the room today. Obviously, I have very little compared to the knowledge sitting here at the end of the table. Listening to some of the comments made, I say, well, we have the lowest rates, so why are you worried about the competition from the U.S. side? If you have the lowest rates, if you're selling shoes the cheapest, you're going to sell more than the guy next door. When you say that and then the rest of the argument, there's an oxymoron here somewhere.

Back in 2013 when oil was selling for $100 plus, you could make more money hauling oil than you could the wheat out of the Peace country. I understand what you were doing. Then you had intervention and you didn't like the intervention. Somebody stepped in and put a regional thing in to take care of that so you could move wheat that had been piled up for a year.

However, the real thing that gets to me is the consolidation in North America, and you mentioned it. Both CP and CN, can you talk to me about how railroads are consolidating in North America?

Mr. James Clements:

I'll answer your competition question first, and then take the opportunity, as the honourable member suggested, to answer the previous question as well.

Mr. Martin Shields:

No, I want to know about consolidation.

Mr. James Clements:

I'll get there. You asked about—

Mr. Martin Shields:

No, I don't want to go there. I want to talk about consolidation. That's what I asked about. I made a comment.

(1040)

Mr. James Clements:

All right. We haven't seen any major rail line consolidation in North America since the late 1990s. As a company, we have attempted a couple of consolidations with eastern U.S. carriers. In the long term, we think consolidation is something that is likely to happen, given the competitive pressures, when you start looking at, let's say, autonomous trucks and the ability for them to provide service. For us to compete, we're going to have to have end-to-end North American solutions to compete with the changing transportation environment and also address congestion issues and troubles we have building infrastructure. Because of the not-in-my-backyard syndrome, we have to maximize all the existing infrastructure, and consolidation is a path to that.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Okay.

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

I would echo Mr. Clements' comments. Certainly as it exists today, there are six major railroads in North America. Two operate in Canada, two operate in the western United States, and two operate in the eastern United States. It appears unlikely in the context of recent actions that the U.S. regulatory environment would proceed with any type of consolidation scenario. That said, as we think about the future and the longer term, the potential competitive threat from things such as autonomous trucking and the difficulties that the U.S. eastern railroads are facing with respect to significant declines in their coal business, over time there may be economic and regulatory justification for the U.S. railroads to combine.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Trucking, in a sense, is a cost to municipalities. Trucking is huge, and that's an unknown cost that you're not talking about, a competitor that the municipalities pay huge costs for. How critical is reciprocity in negotiations here as we go forward? As we consolidate the industry north and south, how critical is reciprocity?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

In any competitive industry, we want to be on an even playing field with our competitors, and we aren't today. When we look at the U.S. regulatory framework, there's no common carrier obligation. They're not obliged to carry traffic. There's no final offer arbitration, no group final offer arbitration. There's no level of service arbitration. There's no interswitching. There's no extended interswitching, and there's no long-haul interswitching.

Mr. Martin Shields:

How critical is it for you to have in order to survive?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

It's imperative that we have a level playing field with our competitors if we want to remain competitive in an industry that might eventually consolidate.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Does it threaten our industry?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

Yes, it does.

Mr. James Clements:

I would argue the question this way. If I were looking at it from a U.S. carrier's chair—if I were the strategic planning individual at the Norfolk Southern—I wouldn't be interested in a Canadian carrier; I'd be looking west. You could have transcontinental mergers in the U.S. Then I could just pick the traffic I want off the border points because of extended interswitching, and I know I have no threat there.

A consolidation scenario, then, might leave the Canadian carriers out in the cold.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Is it a threat to your existence?

Mr. James Clements:

I think it would increase the density and competitiveness of the U.S. network, if they could combine and our regulatory environment didn't prevent that.

Mr. Michael Bourque:

Madam Chair, I could add a few comments, if that's all right. I'm the chief myth-buster for the railway industry, and there was a significant myth that was perpetuated here, and I must address it.

During 2013-14, there was additional grain—20 million metric tonnes of additional grain—produced by the agriculture industry. Yes, a lot of it was on farm; that's where they store it. We also had the worst winter in 75 years. In June, the ground was frozen in Winnipeg and pipes were frozen, so it was a significant winter. Nevertheless, we moved that grain. It required 2,000 additional trains of 100 cars each just to move the extra grain that was produced that year.

The industry moved the grain. It was a very anomalous situation of a bad winter; it had nothing to do with the movement of oil. There was no oil moved to the west coast, which is primarily where all of that grain moved, to the Port of Vancouver.

I just wanted to address that. Thank you.

Mr. Martin Shields:

There were no trains in [Inaudible--Editor] country for a year.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Shields.

We go on to Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser (Central Nova, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

I appreciate the feedback. I can start by saying that I appreciate the strategic role that the rail industry plays in the economy. I accept in general terms the notion that deregulation over the course of the last 30 years has led to prosperous circumstances for the economy and of course for the rail industry as well.

I think we might part ways to a degree on whether there was somewhat of a market failure involving captive shippers and on what “captive” really means. I think it was Mr. Clements who said that we have the safest, most efficient, environmentally friendly, and low-cost transportation system in rail, potentially in the world. I forget the way you phrased it.

From the government's perspective, if I want to encourage more people to use a safe, cost-effective, environmentally friendly way to transport goods at a low cost, I'm wondering why trucking, for example, is the right comparator group.

(1045)

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

Maybe I can take that with an example.

We have an existing customer today located in a remote region that ships lumber, and they ship all of that lumber today by truck. In coming together on a commercial basis, we made a decision to make some investment in order to bring rail to that customer, which supports our climate change agenda and supports the low-cost enabling of the infrastructure and the shipping of freight. But by bringing rail to that customer who today ships all by truck, once we make that connection this bill now considers that customer to be captive to rail.

Our issue in terms of captivity really concerns the way in which captivity is defined. Particularly on short-haul movements, truck is a viable competitor. We also can't lose sight of other competition, such as the St. Lawrence Seaway, for example.

In the case of other shippers, including very much the petroleum business, there are actually options for swapping: producers will actually change the location from which they are sourcing product. We face competition from product sourcing, we face competition from trucking, in some cases from pipeline, and certainly in the context of the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway.

We're very competitive in terms of the CN/CP dynamic. Our issue is with defining “captive” as only having access to one railroad, when the shipper actually may have access to other modes of transportation that are viable.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I think, Ms. Drysdale, it was you who commented that the interswitching regime generally requires you to essentially drop off someone's goods at an interchange point so that somebody else can pick them up.

When we went through a study of Bill C-30 previously in this committee, the widespread testimony that we heard—and there were comments to this effect today—was that in fact that's not really what's happening. The vast majority of circumstances are really impacting the negotiation, and it is creating a sort of pseudo-competition, whereas there is none in the rail industry.

Is that incorrect? Is a change taking place at the negotiating table, as was the intention, or is it actually causing rail carriers to lose business to competitors?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

We certainly have lost business to BN, as an example. In the context of negotiation, you have to remember that the vast majority of our customers are very large shippers. The top 150 customers of CN represent about 80% of our revenue. These are large multinational companies that have many means of exerting influence and pressure in the negotiation.

Even if we look at grain companies as an example, and we think about the amount of capital they're investing in new elevator capacity or in waterfront terminals, whether or not that elevator capacity comes on CN or CP is a huge amount of leverage in the context of commercial negotiations. When we look at a lot of the existing regulation, such as the final offer arbitration process or the level of service agreements, to suggest that shippers don't have various means of exerting pressure in the negotiation.... Some of these customers also, by the way, have extensive operations in the U.S., where the regulatory framework is different, but again, it gives them another means of exerting pressure. I think that pressure existed before this regulation. I think it's a nice way of saying “we need even more because shippers need even more leverage”.

I don't find that to be true in our case. I think our concern is that having that legislation and, with long-haul interswitching, broadening it even further, risks the sustainability and integrity of the Canadian rail network. We view that as a significant problem in the context of it really being the backbone of the Canadian economy.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

If I can interject, I take your point that a major multinational corporation based in Canada isn't necessarily the weak partner at the bargaining table that some would have you believe.

I come from a very rural part of our country in Nova Scotia. If we ship east, it's going on a boat; if we ship west, it's going on a train. My concern is folks within the rail industry who really are captive to a single shipper. There's really one rail line in Nova Scotia. They do face a lack of an ability.... Realistically, they have to accept terms or reject them.

If I take a step back and look globally at what's in Bill C-49, this is about providing service to all kinds of shippers, those in rural areas and in smaller businesses as well. Do you see that Bill C-49's intent would be to increase service to these shippers, and do you think it will achieve an enhanced service to some of these rural shippers in particular?

(1050)

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

My concern with the rural shippers in those remote locations in particular is that it may actually be harmful to them, because to the extent it encourages that movement—those cars to be off the CN network, let's say—it will be very difficult for us to justify the investments required to keep remote lines operational. We've certainly seen that in Nova Scotia, where some of the lines have been abandoned.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Lauzon, you have five minutes.

Mr. Guy Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

This is my first visit to the transportation committee. It's a very interesting subject matter that we're dealing with. From the get-go here—I might ask whoever wants to answer this question—we're into NAFTA negotiations as we speak. I'm wondering if you folks feel that transportation should be a priority in these NAFTA negotiations. What do you think of that?

Mr. Sean Finn:

Maybe I'll start off. There's no doubt that as you negotiate free trade agreements, you have to move the goods to be a free trader, and there's no doubt that transportation plays a key role. Evidence has shown that because of NAFTA, over the last 20 years in Canada both railways have grown, both in Canada and also in cross-border movement. There's no doubt that transportation is an issue.

I don't think we'll find it at the forefront of the table, but we are monitoring it very closely. You can appreciate that many of our customers are in states that are the big traders with Canada. We've been successful in talking to state reps and state governors to make them realize—and to make sure Washington realizes—how important the flow of goods going north-south is, and then south-north when it comes to a lot of the Midwest states. To answer your question, there's no doubt that it's an important issue. There is I believe a reference to it in negotiating terms on the U.S. side, but we don't think it's going to be at the table other than to make sure of the free flow of goods.

I will repeat my comment that you cannot have a free trade agreement and you cannot trade goods without having very effective transportation. That allows us to also say that we've done a great job in Canada—both CN and CP—in moving goods to the U.S. Our concern, as I said earlier this morning, is that we don't want to be in a situation where U.S. railways have access to our network in Canada and we don't have the same type of access to the network in the U.S. That's a preoccupation of ours.

Mr. James Clements:

I would echo those comments that transportation can play a role in NAFTA. Why are we giving up concessions on market access to the Canadian rail network in the middle of a negotiation with somebody who is a tough negotiator?

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

Thank you very much.

Does anyone else want to make a comment about that?

Mr. Jeff Ellis:

If I may, I can say as well—and Sean may have heard similar comments when we were in the U.S. meeting with the American roads in the context of the AAR—that the U.S. roads are also quite concerned with protecting what's already there in terms of NAFTA and volumes to their businesses. With any luck, that will remain a priority on both sides of the border.

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

Since I am a visitor here, some of these questions might be naive, but Ms. Drysdale, you mentioned truck and rail. Can you just give me an idea of how competitive rail is with trucking? In this incident you talked about, putting a line into a certain area, how would those compare?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

Rail is most competitive when we're talking about long-haul shipments. The number that we use often in the industry is about 500 miles. So if it's shorter than 500 miles, it will be very difficult for rail to compete with truck. In the instance I referred to, the shipper was actually using truck to get onto the rail network, but at a point much further down than their actual physical location.

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

Another thing you mentioned and I've heard about is how much business we're losing to the U.S. How much is that of your total business? How much are we losing—5%, 2%, 9%?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

In CN's context, in the context of business law specifically related to the extended interswitching under Bill C-30, it's probably in the order of a couple of thousand carloads.

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

What would it be percentage-wise?

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

Percentage-wise it would be very small. Our concern is the potential going forward particularly with the long-haul interswitching.

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

Okay.

(1055)

Mr. James Clements:

We would say that on long-haul interswitching—I'm doing rough numbers in my head—over 20% of our revenue is at least exposed to the potential to connect to a U.S. carrier.

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

I think CN invested $20 billion recently in infrastructure, and CP $7.7 billion or something. I think those were the figures. How much of that money went into safety? Could somebody give me a ballpark figure?

Mr. James Clements:

A large portion of it goes into safety, because even if you're putting in new rail or ties, it is improving the quality of the basic infrastructure.

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

How much was directly earmarked for improvement in safety?

Mr. James Clements:

I would look to my colleague.

Mr. Keith Shearer:

I'm stretching here a bit, but I would say probably in the order of 70% goes into safety in terms of technology investment and, as James said, rail ties, ballast, cars, and locomotives.

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

So 70% is earmarked for safety and 30% is for profit making.

Mr. Keith Shearer:

It would be capacity expansion.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Lauzon.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair,

I would like to talk about the same thing, interswitching. As I listen to you, it seems that long-haul interswitching is the devil incarnate.

My question has two parts.

First, does that mean that the concept of interswitching as provided for in Bill C-30 would be acceptable from now on as a way to try to re-establish the negotiation power between producers and carriers?

Second, we have been talking for some time about long-haul interswitching along a north to south axis. I come from Trois-Rivières, Quebec, a city that ships grain, among other things. Can I assume that the principle of long-haul interswitching must also apply along an east to west access? Do the same problems exist in that direction?

Mr. Sean Finn:

I would not say that it is the devil incarnate, but you have to understand that the intent of Bill C-30 was to establish temporary measures to deal with quite an exceptional problem. There had been a major grain harvest, almost a record harvest, as well as a very difficult winter. In terms of the effect of Bill C-30, I could show that, once the winter was over, in March 2014, the rail companies shipped all the grain that needed to be delivered. You cannot really establish that the measures in Bill C-30 helped with the transportation of grain. With Bill C-30, once the winter was over, we managed to clear the backlog caused by the hard winter and by the record grain harvest.

It is important to understand that, in situations where shippers claim to be captive according to the definition in the proposal, that is, when shippers have access to one railway only, they can actually use trucks or other means of transportation. That allows shippers to make choices.

We gave you the example of the Americans who have access to the Canadian network at internetwork interchange points in Canada. We do not have the same access to internetwork interchange points in the United States. That is especially the case with CN, for example, which goes from Chicago to Louisiana. We cannot get access in the same way.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I completely understood the problem on the north-south access. I would like to know the situation on the east-west axis.

Mr. Sean Finn:

On the east-west access, there is no doubt that a lot of competition exists between CN and CP. When the interswitching distance was 30 km, it was in urban areas, especially industrial areas. It’s important to state that the exceptions established so that American railway companies do not have access to the entire network are the same as those on the north-south axis.

So rest assured; it is possible for a shipper in Trois-Rivières to have access to the CN or the CP network using shortlines. That exists today.

The 30-km interswitching distance has been very good for a number of years. The 160-km distance was a temporary measure. There is no doubt that an interswitching distance of 1,200 km will create major problems. [English]

Ms. Janet Drysdale:

If I could just add to clarify, I want to make—

The Chair:

I'm sorry. We've gone beyond 11 o'clock.

I want to thank the panel members so very much for coming today. You've given us a lot of really good information.

We will suspend momentarily while we exchange for a new panel.

(1055)

(1115)

The Chair:

I will reconvene the meeting.

For this panel, we have the Western Grain Elevator Association, the Canadian Oilseed Processors Association, as well as the Canadian Federation of Agriculture.

I'll turn to the Western Grain Elevator Association to lead off.

Mr. Wade Sobkowich (Executive Director, Western Grain Elevator Association):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair and members of the committee.

The Western Grain Elevator Association is pleased to contribute to your study on Bill C-49. The WGEA represents Canada's six major grain-handling companies. Collectively, we handle in excess of 90% of western Canada's bulk grain movements.

Effective rail transportation underpins our industry's ability to succeed in a globally competitive market. We recognize this committee's comprehensive work last year. That was a very important report that this committee completed. The one published in December 2016 largely supported our points of view on the main issues.

In Bill C-49, a number of recommendations made by grain shippers were accepted and a number were not. We were asking the government to strengthen the definition of “adequate and suitable accommodation” to ensure that the railways' obligation to provide service was based on the demands and needs of the shipper, and not on what the railway was willing to supply. The definition proposed in Bill C-49 isn't explicitly based on shipper demand. There are positives and negatives with this new definition.

We were seeking the ability to arbitrate penalties into service-level agreements for poor performance, along with a dispute resolution mechanism to address disagreements in a signed service-level agreement. We are pleased that this is included in Bill C-49. It will resolve many of our challenges on rail performance matters.

We were requesting that extended interswitching be made permanent to allow for the continuation of one of the most effective competitive tools that we have ever seen in rail transportation. Extended interswitching was not made permanent—a significant loss to us.

We were asking that the government maintain and improve on the maximum revenue entitlement to protect farmers from monopolistic pricing. This protection was maintained; however, soybeans remain excluded from this protection.

The WGEA had also supported expanding the agency's authority to unilaterally review and act on performance problems in the rail system, similar to what the U.S. Surface Transportation Board enjoys in the U.S. Bill C-49 includes the provision for the agency to informally look into performance problems, but it doesn't give the agency added power to correct systemic issues.

Lastly, the WGEA was asking the government to improve the transparency and robustness of rail performance data. This has been improved in Bill C-49; however, shipper-related demand data is still not captured. Later this week, some of our colleagues in the grain industry will provide additional perspectives on use of the data, timelines, and reporting to the minister. The WGEA shares their views.

To be clear, on balance, this bill is a significant improvement over the existing legislation and is a positive step forward for the grain industry. As a result, we are choosing to offer only four technical amendments, representing the bare minimum of changes, where the proposed legislation would not be workable and would not result in what the government intended. The main area is long-haul interswitching.

For your reference, annex A, which we circulated to committee members in advance, contains our suggested legislative wording amendments. The extended interswitching order had been in effect for the last three growing seasons and had evolved into an invaluable tool for western grain shippers. Instead, the new long-haul interswitching provision is intended to create these competitive options. In that spirit, shippers need to be able to access interchanges that make the most logistical and economic sense, not necessarily the interchange that's closest.

In terms of reasonable direction of the traffic and its destination, the current wording in proposed subsection 129(1) may give a shipper access to the nearest competing rail line, but this would be of little or no value if the nearest interswitch takes the traffic in the wrong direction for the shipment's final destination, if the nearest interchange does not have the capacity to take on the size of the shipment, or if the nearest competing rail company does not have rail lines running the full distance to the shipment's destination. For the committee's reference, we've circulated annex B, which visually depicts real-world examples of where accessing the nearest interchange makes neither logistical nor economic sense.

(1120)



Two clauses need to be amended to better reflect the spirit of creating competitive options. If you go to map 1 in the package we circulated, you will see an example of an elevator that has access to an interchange within 30 kilometres, but that interchange takes the traffic in the wrong direction. Bill C-49 stipulates in proposed paragraph 129(3)(a) that a shipper may not obtain a long-haul interswitch if a competing rail line is within a distance of 30 kilometres.

Sending a shipment in the wrong direction or to the wrong rail line is cost prohibitive and in those cases renders the interswitch useless. A shipper that happens to be within 30 kilometres of an interswitch that is of no use to them is excluded from long-haul interswitching and is put at a competitive disadvantage.

A similar problem exists for dual service facilities given the prohibition in proposed paragraph 129(1)(a). The solution to this problem is to add the wording “in the reasonable direction of the traffic and its destination” to proposed paragraphs 129(1)(a) and 129(3)(a). This language already exists in the legislation in proposed section 136.1 for other purposes and needs to be replicated in proposed section 129.

On long-haul interswitching rates, proposed paragraph 135(1)(a) of the bill directs the agency to calculate the rate by referring to historical comparable rates, but most comparable rates to date have been set under monopolistic conditions. If the rates themselves are non-competitive and may be the very reason a shipper wants to apply for a long-haul interswitch in the first place, this process would not effectively address the heart of the problem. We're concerned that without an amendment of the nature that we're proposing, LHI will become like CLRs.

Proposed subsection 135(2) directs the agency to set a rate not less than the average revenue per tonne kilometre of comparable traffic. This enshrines monopoly rate setting. In any reasonable marketplace, profitability is set on how much it costs you to do the business, plus a margin to generate a profit. Simply being able to charge any amount without regard to costs will result in rates divorced from the commercial reality of cost-plus.

We're seeking important changes to proposed paragraph 135(1)(b) and proposed subsection 135(2) to ensure the agency has regard to the cost per tonne kilometre, not the revenue, and that the rates are based on commercially comparable traffic, not just comparable traffic. If long-haul interswitching is to work, the rate has to be based on a reasonable margin to the railway, and not at least as much and maybe more than they can charge in a monopoly setting.

The third area where we have a concern is the list of interchanges. Proposed subsection 136.9(2) sets out the parameters for the railways to publish a list of interchanges as well as removing interchanges from the list. Grain shippers are concerned that the railways would have unilateral discretion to take out of service any interchange they choose.

There is existing legislation already in play: sections 127(1) and (2) under “Interswitching” have a process by which a party can apply to the agency for the ability to use an interchange, and the agency has the power to compel a railway to provide “reasonable facilities” to accommodate an interswitch for that interchange. This same language should apply to long-haul interswitching. From an interchange perspective, both interswitching and long-haul interswitching could apply to the same interchange.

On soybeans and soy production, when the MRE was first established in 2000, soybeans were barely grown on the Prairies, and therefore were not included in the original list of schedule II eligible crops. Since then, soy has become a major player in the Prairies and a commodity that holds significant potential growth for oil, meal, and food uses.

It must be pointed out that the Canadian portion of the U.S. movement of crops into Canada is covered under the MRE. As a result, U.S. corn, for example, that happens to be travelling in Canada is covered under the MRE, while Canadian soybeans are not. There is no reason why the government should not take this opportunity to add soybeans and soy products to schedule II.

In conclusion, Bill C-49 is, on balance, an important step in the right direction.

(1125)



It's with restraint that we ask the committee to make only four non-invasive technical amendments to ensure it accomplishes what was intended.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll now move on to the Canadian Oilseed Processors.

Mr. Chris Vervaet (Executive Director, Canadian Oilseed Processors Association):

Thank you very much.

Madame Chair and members of the committee, on behalf of the Canadian Oilseed Processors Association, or COPA, I would like to extend our thanks to the committee for the opportunity to contribute to this important study of Bill C-49.

COPA works in partnership with the Canola Council of Canada to represent the interests of oilseed processors in this country. We represent the companies that own and operate 14 processing facilities spanning every province from Alberta through to Quebec. These facilities process canola and soybeans grown by Canadian farmers into value-added products for the food processing, animal feed, and biofuels sectors. This not only creates incredible demand for oilseeds grown by Canadian grain farmers but also injects stable, high-paying jobs into the rural areas where we operate.

Our industry’s success is predicated on the ability to access foreign markets. Indeed, 85% of our processed canola products are exported to continental and offshore markets. Efficient rail logistics are paramount to getting our products to these markets in a reliable and timely fashion. To put this into perspective, about 75% of our processed products are moved by rail.

Given the importance of rail to the success of our industry, COPA has been working closely with the WGEA over the last couple of years to advocate for key policy recommendations that we believe are fundamental to creating a more competitive rail transportation environment. In our view, Bill C-49 is, on balance, a good bill. It is not a perfect bill but it contains several critical components that value-added processors feel will improve the commercial balance between shipper and railway. These include the ability to arbitrate poor performance penalties into service-level agreements, along with a dispute resolution mechanism to address disagreements in the application of a signed SLA. We also feel that data transparency and its robustness have been significantly improved in the bill, and we have seen a strengthened definition of “adequate and suitable”.

This being said, our concerns with the bill’s proposed changes to essentially convert the former extended interswitch provisions to long-haul interswitching are especially noteworthy. To be very clear, extended interswitching was an incredibly important tool for value-added processors. For the first time, interswitching breathed a semblance of real competition into rail logistics for our sector where there had never been any before, giving previously captive facilities access to a second carrier for U.S.-bound product in particular. Our industry saw a dramatic improvement in rail service to the U.S. while extended interswitching was available.

Extended interswitching was an extremely simple and effective tool. It put all interchanges into scope and involved no application or bureaucratic red tape to access. Rates were clearly published for set distances, giving shippers the certainty and predictability needed to book freight over a longer term. Moreover, it was also a highly effective negotiating tool with the local carrier, which we found to be much more service oriented and likely to enter into a conversation about better service or rates with the leverage of the extended interswitching.

By contrast, the long-haul interswitch mechanism contained in Bill C-49 presents a number of challenges and removes the key characteristics that we were leveraging in extended interswitching. Most notably, LHI proposes a multitude of complicated parameters and conditions to determine how and which interchanges are accessible for shippers. LHI also proposes setting rates based on historical comparable rates. All comparable rates, to date, have been set under monopolistic conditions. If the rates themselves are not competitive, there is no incentive for my members to apply for long-haul interswitch.

Left unaddressed, both of these provisions as currently drafted would render the LHI to be of little to no use. Therefore, we are interested in working with members of this committee to find solutions to put long-haul interswitch to work as a competitive tool for our industry, as we believe the government has intended in this bill. Similar to WGEA, we see three key areas of concern that need to be addressed to make LHI an effective tool.

You will find some of our technical amendments—again, similar to those of the WGEA—in annex A, which we circulated to the committee members prior to this meeting.

(1130)



Number one in terms of our list of technical amendments is to clarify that access to the nearest interchange means an interchange that is in the reasonable direction of the traffic and its destination, whether or not a facility is dual served or if there is another interchange within 30 kilometres. Prescribing access that is simply based on shipper access to the nearest competing rail line without taking into account other considerations would limit the value of LHI. Practically speaking, when determining the nearest interchange, consideration needs to be given to whether, one, it is in the right direction of the shipment's final destination; two, it is serviced by the right rail company to move the shipment to the desired destination; and three, it is the right size with the necessary infrastructure to execute the interswitch.

The intended spirit of the LHI mechanism is to give shippers competitive options. These have to be options that we can actually use and are applied equally among shippers. Proposed paragraph 129(1)(a) of the bill stipulates that a dual-served shipper may not apply for a long-haul interswitch, for example. Excluding dual-served shippers simply on the assumption that they have competitive options is a false premise. In many instances, both rail lines do not service the traffic's final destination. As well, restricting access to long-haul interswitch places dual-served facilities at a competitive disadvantage to those who do have access to the long-haul interswitch.

Let me give you a quick example of what that means in practical terms. In annex B we have attached map 2. In Alberta, in the town of Camrose, we have a member operating a processing facility that is dual served by CN and CP. Currently under the long-haul interswitch they do not have access to apply for long-haul interswitch, even though there is an interswitch opportunity at Coutts in Alberta, at the border, where they could have access to BNSF. This not only limits their access to markets served by BNSF in the United States but also puts them at a competitive disadvantage in terms of other members or other facilities that do have access to that long-haul interswitch because they are not dual served.

Two, in terms of the key technical amendments we're looking to propose, we are also very concerned about the ability of the long-haul interswitch provision to address shipper concerns over rate-setting. In other words, the way that Bill C-49 is currently written, it places a floor on LHI rates, indicating that a rate cannot be less than the average of per-tonne kilometre revenue of comparable traffic. The bill needs language that gives the CTA the ability to consider commercially comparable competitive rates when determining the interswitching rates. Looking to historical and comparable rates as a reference to determine interswitching rates ignores the fact that these rates have been determined under monopolistic conditions. The CTA should also give regard to the actual cost to move the shipment, not what the railways have managed to charge in the past when monopolistic powers were at play. In this way, the agency can ensure that a railway gets a reasonable rate of return for conducting LHI business, on the one hand, and also guard against perpetuating excessive rates set under circumstances where competition does not exist.

The third amendment that we're looking to propose is that we are concerned about the ability of a rail company to take unilateral decisions to stop serving an interchange or tear it up altogether without any further check and balance. Again, this runs directly against the original spirit of the new LHI to give shippers more competitive options. We believe the bill requires tighter controls around decommissioning interchanges and in fact recognition of the other common carrier obligations that seem to already limit the ability for this to happen.

Finally, we just would like to add our voice to the growing number of grower groups and associations raising concern over the fact that soybeans and soy products have been excluded from the MRE. The MRE is a viable tool to protect farmers from exorbitant rate hikes. We know that the government and members of the committee share this concern for farmers, thus the decision to keep the MRE in this new iteration of the CTA. It is therefore surprising that soybeans and soy products would be excluded. As Wade mentioned, soy is now one of the major commodities grown in Manitoba and is expected to see similar growth in seeded acreage in the other two prairie provinces. With this growth in acres, there is increasing potential for value-added processing to expand into soybeans in western Canada, where there is currently no large commercial value-added processing for soy. There is no logical policy rationale to exclude soy over any other crop already under the MRE. COPA members and our farmer customers are asking that soybeans and soy products be added to schedule II.

In conclusion, oilseed processors are of the view that Bill C-49 is an important step in the right direction. Our suggested technical amendments on LHI would provide shippers an opportunity to access alternate carriers, which strengthens the overarching intent of the bill to provide a more competitive system.

Thank you.

(1135)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll now go to the Canadian Federation of Agriculture.

Mr. Hall.

Mr. Norm Hall (Vice-President, Canadian Federation of Agriculture):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

As introduced, I am Norm Hall. I'm the first vice-president of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture, but more importantly, I sit here as a farmer from western Canada, east-central Saskatchewan, Wynyard, on the largest saltwater lakes in Canada, which are rising. Thank you for the invitation to appear before this committee.

As you know, CFA has been a strong proponent of advocating for a review of the regulations and legislation that govern and manage the movement of grain for export and the review of transportation. The government's advisory council on economic growth had coined the phrase “unleashing Canadian agriculture”. An important component of unleashing agriculture is building an efficient export corridor through sound legislative and regulatory process, up-to-date infrastructure, and information systems with the full accountability of all transportation and grain-handling participants. It is very important in order for the industry to confidently develop new and larger export markets. The primary stakeholder in all of this is the producer of the product, the farmer.

In 2014-15, Canadian farmers paid $1.4 billion in freight charges to the railways under the MRE. This was not paid by shippers. Grain companies are cost plus brokers. Any charges from the railways get passed through to the producers. They pay the bill. The railways are basically cost plus facilitators. Under the MRE, they are guaranteed a 27% return. A recent study by one of our members, APAS in Saskatchewan, saw that the number was closer to 60% or 65% return to the railroads in profit. It is the farmers who take all the risk in the production stage and the farmers who pay all the costs of production, the cost of freight from farm gate to the inland terminals and transload sites, the freight to export position, and the cost of any disruptions or delays.

Canada's railways and an efficient, low-cost grain rail transportation system are critical to the country's agricultural economy and the financial health of grains and oilseed producers. To ensure that the system works overall, decision-makers must recognize that farmers pay the entire bill for transportation of export grain from farm gate to port. Western Canadian financial livelihoods are captive to the railway monopoly that is trying to maximize profits for its shareholders.

Between 35 million and 40 million tonnes annually are captive to the railway monopoly. Since transportation costs represent one of the highest input costs in grain farm operation, the importance of ensuring competitive environment through regulation and legislation can never be understated. As Emerson so aptly stated, transportation costs, for example, often represent a more significant hurdle to expanded trade than do the costs associated with international tariffs or trade barriers. This was all brought to a head with the failure of the 2013-14 crop year. Twenty million additional tonnes, as was stated by the previous presenters, could have been alleviated if they had contacted the industry and were able to plan that way instead of leasing 400 of their engines into the States and shorting themselves of power for the winter.

While Bill C-49 takes great steps in the right direction, it almost seems as if they are meant to look like improvements without involving real change, leaving railways with far too much room to not comply with the intent and ending up with far short of a competitive environment: requesting more information while restricting the agency's use of that data; institutionalizing long-term interswitching but with historical revenue-based freight rates and not actual costs; avoiding giving the agency powers to pre-empt problems and requiring formal complaints; regulating interswitch options without giving the shipper flexibility to choose interswitches that would really help the shippers and result in higher levels of competition amongst the railroads; continuing to allow the railways to randomly or arbitrarily close producer car-loading sites and interchange facilities; continuing to allow the railways to use 1990s costing data when they've implemented savings on the backs of farmers; and giving railways a full year post-implementation to comply with new information data requirements.

(1140)



I also want to say that while my comments focus on general policy positions, the CFA fully supports the more detailed technical legislative amendments proposed by the Crop Logistics Working Group, which will be in a letter to your minister.

Under transparency, since 40 million tonnes of grain are annually slated to move by rail, it's absolutely imperative that the railways comply with new regulations for additional data and information to allow proactive logistics and marketing and planning by the entire industry. Real-time data is required to achieve this objective, and timelines for the release of data and information have to be short enough to allow for proactive planning. There is no justification to allow the one year after legislation to come into force before they have to comply.

The use of data information by the agency should not be restricted and should be fully utilized to facilitate and manage the flow of traffic and grain volumes to pre-empt delays, backlogs, and disruptions. For example, if information or data is used for LHI administration, it can be used in other areas and for other purposes. The agency should have the freedom to do so, not for public release, but just for their own use. Further, the agency must be given the authority to find solutions to problems proactively, without waiting for industry to file complaints. The legislation must be amended to give the CTA the added powers to correct service performance failures through their own volition.

Under reciprocal penalties, while this is a contractual agreement between grain companies and railways, I've already told you that any problems arising between these two parties eventually get charged back to the farmers. The CTA must have the mandate and the resources to monitor, regulate, and ensure compliance. Level of service and compliance mechanisms have to prevent the railways, with their monopolistic powers, from becoming nonchalant about service provided, since shippers/farmers have no other options. Producer car loading sites are a good example, and I'll talk about them soon.

The minister must monitor the railways' overall level of service and service availability, and cannot allow the railways to arbitrarily and randomly withdraw services that are required to efficiently and expeditiously transport grain to export markets that provide farmers and shippers with the opportunity to improve their competitive position in the market. Since we're going to be looking at the MRE penalties imposed as a result of this service deficiency or contract, non-compliance must not be allowed to be included in the cost calculations of the MRE.

Under the long-haul interswitch, LHI, railways are concerned about losing market share. Welcome to competition. In one voice, they want to talk about having market-driven agreements, yet as soon as that threatens their monopoly by allowing LHI and U.S. carriers to come up here, they don't want it. They want to have regulation in place.

Under the current interswitch, 30 kilometres, there are four points in western Canada that are naturally served by the two railroads. The 30-kilometre interswitch takes that up to a whole 14 out of 368. Under the 160 kilometres, that extended to 85% of all points, which allowed grain companies to use interswitch if needed, if service was poor.

(1145)



That is why interswitch is there. It's because of poor service. It gives the opportunity for one company to search for another company for better service. It's supposed to be for competition.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Hall. Have you completed your testimony?

Mr. Norm Hall:

Just about. I have just a short bit on the MRE.

While maintaining the MRE is a must, individualizing the railway investment is a good move, but it defies logic that the legislation does not call for regular costing reviews. Tolerating a rail monopoly comes with an obligatory responsibility on the part of government to monitor actual costs to prevent the railways from abusing their monopoly. Efficiency improvements by railways have reduced their costs and have largely come on the backs of farmers. Closing down of inland terminals and forcing farmers to truck their grain further have increased costs for roads for provincial governments and municipalities to the tune of about $600 million of added freight costs for producers from farm gate to elevator.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Hall.

On to our questions, we'll go to Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I want to thank our witnesses for being here. We have quite a diverse representation of witnesses today, which is good when we're talking about providing a balanced approach to ensuring that the needs of our shippers are balanced with those of our railways, which are providing a service to our shippers. I made the observation during our last panel that we definitely understand the importance of our railway system to the economy of our country and the importance of our producers within that environment.

I had the opportunity of asking a question of a previous panel in regard to what I think has been a somewhat confusing message that perhaps has come from our railway companies in terms of comments made in a study done a year ago, when we were reviewing the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act. As I mentioned earlier, stats were provided to our committee during that study that demonstrated that extended interswitching was not used frequently. What we heard from our producer groups was that while it wasn't used frequently, and I think you mentioned it today, it was an effective tool used in negotiating contracts. If the legislation before us is meant to ensure market access and a competitive environment for our producers, what I would like to hear from you is a comment on that confusion. We were told that it wasn't used extensively and that it was an effective tool in negotiating contracts but that there's strong push-back on the long-haul interswitching that's included in this legislation. I'm wondering if you could provide a little more insight on that.

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

Thanks for the great question. It's something that we're a bit confused about ourselves.

On one hand, we have a situation where both railways have said that they're concerned about extended interswitching because of poaching from the U.S. carriers into the Canadian marketplace. On the other hand, we have Canadian rail carriers that already have extensive networks in the U.S. Those are two elements, I guess, to this discussion.

We found that initially the rail companies were objecting to the extended interswitching provisions when they were coming into play, but they began using the extended interswitching. They began soliciting business under extended interswitching and using it as it was intended to be used, which was as a competitive tool. That's what we're after here. I mean, how many times.... This is the fourth time I've personally appeared before the transport committee on different bills to amend the Canada Transportation Act. The recurring theme is, how do we get the rail freight market to behave like a competitive marketplace?

That seems to be a well-accepted premise, yet when we get close to doing that, people seem to get scared and want to pull back. We are after a competitive environment. If the railways are providing good service at good rates to the locations they serve, then they will not find that shippers are looking for other competitive options. It's only when rates are too high or service isn't there that shippers begin looking for other alternatives to get product to the marketplace.

The railways, for reasons I understand, prefer to move product east and west because of the cycle times on the railcars. They prefer to move to Vancouver and to Thunder Bay because of the cycle times; they can get their assets back in the system quicker. When they go down to the United States, it takes a lot longer for them to get the railcars back—maybe 30 days—so they're not that interested in serving the U.S. markets that we find. When extended interswitching was brought into play, it allowed for Burlington Northern, primarily, to come in, fill that void, and take that traffic down to the United States.

Shippers were using it both actively and passively. If you look at the straight statistics on the use of extended interswitching, it seems that maybe it's not a lot of usage. That's active usage. Passively, what would happen is that a shipper would go to the railway and say, “I need service, and these are the rates that I think are reasonable.” The railway might say that it can't do that, it can't provide that service to the U.S., and that it's giving priority to shipments in other corridors, or whatever it is. Then the shipper would say that they're going to talk to Burlington Northern to see if they can get traffic switched over there, after which time the primary carrier would come back and say, okay, let's be reasonable here. They would give you a better rate, or they would provide you with that service.

The benefit of extended interswitching can't be measured just based on how much it was used.

(1150)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

For 100 years, this room has been hearing these stories—for 100 years—and if these walls could talk, they'd say, “God, we haven't heard anything new for 100 years.”

We're now at a point with a new piece of legislation where we're going to try to do something very ticklish, and that is to define what we mean by “adequate and suitable” service. If I listen to you guys, it's, “Let's lean toward the demand side: that's adequate and suitable.” If we listen to the railroads, it's, “Let's lean towards supply, towards what we've got available.” I didn't challenge them—and I know this is unfair—but I'm going to challenge you. What does a win-win definition look like, where you get something good and the railways get something good?

Mr. Sobkowich.

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

Thanks. That's also a really good question. To us, it's based on the premise that we have to take a look at what's best for the Canadian economy, and what's best for the Canadian economy is to get products to the customers we have throughout the world. That's going to return as much value as possible to Canadians.

Therefore, the premise of balancing the views of the railways and the shippers, we believe, is slightly flawed in the sense that the railways are a derivative market. They exist because shippers have products they need to get to somewhere else in the world. Shippers are drivers of the economy in that regard, so we need to make sure the definition of adequate and suitable provides the tools and the motivation the railways need to bring on as much capacity as possible to meet the demands of shippers, just as you would see in a competitive environment. In a competitive environment, if you went to a courier company and it wouldn't provide you with the service you needed in order to get your package to where it needed to go, you would go to someone else and you would get that service, and the package would get where it needed to go.

We need to try to simulate that here. If we had regular and normal competition in the rail freight market, that would just happen, but because we don't have that and because it's not really achievable, given the extensive cost barriers to entry of bringing in new railways and that sort of thing, we have to make the rail freight market behave as though it was a competitive marketplace. That requires legislation.

(1155)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

You could go on for a long time, I'm sure, but the fact is, at the end of the day, what the government would like to achieve is something where you're getting what you need, the railways are getting what they need, and there's no need for government to come in and subsidize anyone. It's kind of a net loss for the country when that has to happen.

Let's look at this as a network. We probed the railroads on the fact that they have extensive networks into the United States. I want to get a better picture of the origin and destination, where you would look at what would be going out of Canada and where it's going, and where the railways, with their current networks and what they could actually organize with American carriers, could actually serve the markets in Canada.

One of the things we heard in the fair rail for grain study was that the real attraction of interswitching, where they're actually going to use it, which was rare, was to get the product down to the States so it too could move to the west. That's what we heard there, but are there other considerations? Where's the product actually going and what role can our Canadian operations in the States actually play to fulfill this to make the whole discussion of interswitching almost moot?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

To answer your question about where the product is going, it goes to most states. Most states in the U.S. receive shipments of Canadian grains and oilseeds. Some of the more notable ones would be the southern California dairy market, for example. The benefit of the interswitching is that you could get onto Burlington Northern and they would take it down to that marketplace for you, and because you have increased capacity to the United States, you could therefore make more sales to the United States.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

What's to stop CN or CP from contracting with Burlington Northern to offer you a seamless service?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

I don't believe there's anything stopping them from doing that.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Does it matter then that we could be in a situation where the U.S. rail lines, if they find themselves with extra capacity, basically dump their product on Canada?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

I don't know the answer to that question. It's a good question.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay.

The Chair:

You have 45 seconds.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I'll leave it at that.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I apologize to Mr. Hardie in advance if I am asking a question that has been asked for the last hundred years. I haven't been here quite that long.

Joking aside, we have often been told that the interswitching measures, and all the other measures in Bill C-30, were designed to respond to the problems caused by an exceptional harvest, followed by a very harsh winter.

Am I wrong to say that agricultural techniques are advancing so rapidly that what was once an exceptional harvest has become the norm? [English]

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

I could take this one, and then maybe Norm could.

We've definitely seen an increase in harvest volumes year over year. We have an upward trend. If you take a look at the last five years, we're now talking about a crop of 65-million tonnes being an average crop. Man, if we'd gotten that number 10 years ago, we would have been busting the rafters of our elevators. We definitely have more and more grain coming off the fields during harvest time. That's attributable to changes in agronomic practices and changes in technology. Farmers are operating with better practices and that sort of thing.

If your question is what has changed to give us comfort that we won't end up with a similar situation to what we had when we started seeing some of these big crop volumes, from our perspective nothing has changed. We don't have a change in the competitive environment. When we had Bill C-30 and we had extended interswitching, we had a glimpse of a change in the competitive environment, but that has sunsetted. We don't have Bill C-49 passed yet, so really, nothing has changed in the competitive environment and nothing has changed in the legislative environment to give us comfort that if we don't get something passed here, with tools we can use like reciprocal penalties, we won't go back to the situation we had in the past.

Does that answer your question?

(1200)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Yes, thank you.

So your producers are concerned about being in a situation where the measures in Bill C-30 have been abandoned and Bill C-49 will not be passed for a number of months. Yet harvest time is almost upon us.

Do your producers have serious concerns about the coming weeks and months? [English]

Mr. Norm Hall:

With the harvest that we're seeing right now in western Canada.... Maybe I'll back up just a little bit. Wade talked about the higher volumes of harvest that we've had over the last five to 10 years. A lot of that is because we actually had moisture. We had rainfalls over the last 10 years that were higher than normal. He's right that technological advances and genetic advances in crops have increased our crop yields, but the current year we're in, a lot of the prairies are in a drought cycle again. We're going to see a much lower number than we've had in the past.

We still have concerns. You heard in the last panel that CN moved a record amount of grain last year, but CP's grain movement was worse than what they did in 2013-14. If CN had worked like that last year as well, we would have been in a worse predicament this past year than we were in 2013-14. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I would like to bring up something else with you.

Progress over 100 years has resulted in bigger harvests, but also in a greater variety of agricultural products. Should Bill C-49 contain a mechanism to specifically review schedule II on a regular basis? For example, I don't understand why soya is not in that schedule.

What is the mechanism to add a product to that schedule? Has it been explained to you at all? If not, do you have a solution to propose? [English]

Mr. Chris Vervaet:

I can take that one.

I think that's a good question and a very good point. We're also a little bit miffed in terms of why soybeans and soy products weren't included in schedule II. To your point about an opportunity for a regular review of that schedule, I think that's a fair proposal and a good proposal, because we do see a shifting agricultural landscape in western Canada.

Using canola as a primary example, 20 years ago we saw almost no canola planted in western Canada. Now we're up to 20 million acres at 20 million tonnes. It's a real success story. We need to have flexible policies and opportunities in place to address issues when they arise, and I think there's an opportunity to review schedule II to include soy. Right now with soy in particular, but I'm sure there are other examples down the road as well, we see a tremendous opportunity for expansion in acres and movement of that particular commodity. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Do I still have a minute, Madam Chair? [English]

The Chair:

No, you don't.

The questions and answers sometimes become very interesting.

We'll go to Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

To follow up on Mr. Aubin's question, Mr. Sobkowich, you mentioned soy in your opening remarks. I'd like to understand the rationale behind excluding it. Could you describe the product volumes to give us a better understanding?

(1205)

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

I have some statistics on soy. In our package of technical amendments, we say that soybeans represent 3.14 million acres in western Canada. Production is growing in leaps and bounds year over year. In 2016, acreage was 1.88 million. In 2015, it was 1.66 million. Other commodities, such as flax, canary seed, and buckwheat, represent a smaller acreage but are included in schedule II. Soybeans and soy products should be included as well.

Soybeans started in Ontario. They were a growing crop there, and they've since migrated to Manitoba. They've surpassed the volume of other crops. We have a certain amount of arable land in Canada. If you're growing more soybeans, it means you're growing less of something else. That something else is covered under the MRE. When you have expanded soybean acres, you have reduced acreage of other crops. Therefore, the MRE is becoming less effective for farmers because they're growing soybeans instead of these other products.

There are many uses for soybeans. They're looking at it for crushing, for turning into oil here in Canada. They're looking at doing the same for abroad. It's probably the fastest-growing crop right now in Canada and the one that holds the most potential for us. We definitely see a need to have this added to schedule II or to have some sort of process by which it can be added by regulation.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

I'm going to share my time.

Forgive my ignorance, but is soy a pulse? Is it a grain? What's the classification for that?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

It's a good question. Some people consider it a pulse. We consider it an oilseed.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Okay.

Madam Chair, I'd like to give the remainder of my time to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

The railways talked to us about what a captive client is and suggested that if you have access to a road, if you have access to trucks, you would not be captive. How do you feel about that?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

I suppose you can come up with a solution to anything that doesn't have the railways involved. It's going to sound silly, but you could load grain into backpacks and carry them across the mountains with Sherpas. It's not a viable alternative. When it comes to the cost of trucking grain and all the implications for our roads and everything like that.... Farmers truck grain from their farms to the elevators, but when it comes to shipping grain over long distances from the elevator network to the port terminal facilities, railways are really the only viable solution economically.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How has the loss of the Canadian Wheat Board affected your movement?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

The Canadian Wheat Board was a third entity involved in grain logistics. It was difficult. It made it really cloudy. You couldn't tell where the problem lay. Was it the grain company? Was it the railway? Was it the Canadian Wheat Board? Now that it's been removed, it's allowed each grain company to plan its logistics for its entire pipeline.

The Canadian Wheat Board would plan logistics for wheat. The grain company would plan logistics for canola and flax. It made it more complicated. Now, with the removal of the Wheat Board, it's really revealed where the problems in the system lie. We have the shipper and we have the railway. It's created efficiencies for the grain shippers to manage their own pipelines. We need to de-bottleneck the system and make sure we have adequate service and capacity on the rail side of things.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You also talked about better access to the U.S. markets being created through the interswitch rules. The large railways both claim to have lost traffic because of these rules. Do you agree that you send fewer cars overall via CN and CP as a result of the U.S. interswitches, as you have described them? Would you ever send domestic traffic across the U.S.? Would that ever happen?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

When you say domestic traffic...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would you send Canada-to-Canada traffic through the U.S.? Would that ever happen?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

I don't know. Chris, has that ever happened?

Mr. Chris Vervaet:

Not to my knowledge.

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

Not to my knowledge.

The only point I'd like to make is that they only lose business when they're non-competitive. If they're competitive with rates and service, in each and every case the grain elevator is going to want to stick with the primary carrier.

(1210)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, am I out of time?

The Chair:

Yes, that's it.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

I'm going to take the opportunity to ask the same question I asked the last panel. I expected the answer I received from the last panel. I'm not expecting the same answer from you folks, so I'm going to move on with the intent...as you had mentioned.

We came a week early to the Hill to get this job done, and I'm sure you're anxious to get it done as well. Our intent is to listen and learn, and with that, respond accordingly.

Bills like C-49 are expected to be an enabler for folks like yourselves to work in an environment that, quite frankly, is going to provide the stakeholder the returns they're expecting. With that said, we're trying to create a balance. That balance we're trying to create between the shippers, the providers of the service in terms of transport, was mentioned earlier. You mentioned that you want to ensure you have that value established for all Canadians, in terms of their returns.

Again, being an enabler, we're expecting our GDP to keep rising, as it has in the last few months, and to continue to rise. By utilizing the movement of product, which contributes to our overall enhancement of global economic performance, a lot of that is done by integrating our distribution logistics systems. Bill C-49 is being put forward to provide a platform for good and fair service.

My question is very simple, and I'm going to open up the floor for all three of you to dive in, as I did with the last panel. How can Bill C-49 ultimately contribute to satisfying the objectives contained within your business plans?

Mr. Chris Vervaet:

I'll start with that.

That's a good question. Really, for Bill C-49 to work for processors in particular it's the long-haul interswitch. Out of all the grain shippers in western Canada, processors were probably the biggest utilizers of the extended interswitch.

Again, similar to my testimony, it breathed some semblance of competition into the marketplace and provided an opportunity for many of my members, not just to leverage better service but also to access markets that we previously weren't able to access, primarily into the United States. Seventy per cent of our vegetable oil and protein meal produced in western Canada ends up in the United States. To have a level of competition and access to carriers that can move our products to markets that were previously untapped has generated invaluable benefits to our member companies, but also down the value chain to our growers as well.

Access to new markets means new growth potential for our processing facilities as well. That competitive element drives business, profitability, and it drives value throughout the entire value chain.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

If I can just interject, you made a point that access to carriers obviously makes your margins more robust and, therefore, that's reinvested back for growth in your area.

Mr. Chris Vervaet:

Yes, that's right.

It's not necessarily a question of more robust margins all the time. It's being able to grow and to sell more, maybe if not the same margin, to continue to produce more and add more value throughout.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Great.

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

One of the main opportunities we see in Bill C-49 is the reciprocal penalties piece. We have long been after the ability to get commercial contracts with railways. Every other link in the chain has commercial contracts. We have contracts with farmers, with penalties on both sides for failure to perform. There are contracts with the vessel owners, with the end-use buyer. That's the way business is conducted.

Until now, we've been operating primarily on railway tariffs, so that's a unilateral set of rules and penalties imposed by the railways, supported by statute. Bill C-52 introduced the ability for service-level agreements, but it lacked teeth. There was no ability to include penalties for non-performance in those service-level agreements.

We think that this will go a long way, because now shippers have the ability to try to negotiate penalties. We're talking about balanced penalties here. With regard to the same types of penalties they charge us for certain things, we want to be able to charge them for failure to do certain things. If we can have that in place in something that resembles a normal service contract that you would find in a competitive marketplace, we think that will go a long way.

(1215)

Mr. Norm Hall:

Thank you for the question.

Farmers are not considered shippers under the act, so we're in a unique position. We pay all the costs, but we have no rights when it comes to shipping.

Monsieur Aubin asked about larger production. We are continually improving our production methods and producing larger crops, and therefore, we need larger markets. Without an efficient transportation system, all of that is for naught.

We have the right to order producer cars just in case Wade's members don't perform. We have a safety valve, but we have no right to service those producer cars from the railroads. The years 2013-14 and 2014-15 were some of the largest orders of producer cars in history, but because of poor service, a lot of those orders were cancelled, and those producers are not using producer cars again. Therefore, the railways are saying those sidings aren't being used, and they're going to shut some more down, which exacerbates the problem.

What we're looking for is a more efficient system to get our crops to export position, not always to the ports but to the U.S., to Mexico, and to the Canadian domestic users.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Hall.

Mr. Shields.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

We appreciate the witnesses being here, and again, hearing a variety of opinions from one panel to the next makes it an interesting morning.

Mr. Hall, in the sense of you as the producer, when costs increase, you're in a situation where you have nowhere to pass those costs on other than to just absorb them.

When we talk about soybeans hopefully being added, when you look at that list, is there any direction in the sense of producers out there? Are they going to touch crops that aren't on that list, or does it sort of dictate where you may go as the producer?

Mr. Norm Hall:

It can. In the case of soybeans versus other crops, we're seeing that one railway will haul soybeans at the MRE rate, where the other railway hauls it at MRE plus $10 per tonne. In some cases that will affect where you haul your soybeans once you have produced them. Soybeans, canola, and crops like that are higher-value crops that produce more profit. Guys are going to continue to grow them, and they will run them to the other railway as opposed to the one that's charging more.

You're right. We have no way of getting it from the marketplace other than the cost that's offered by Wade's members and Chris's members.

Mr. Martin Shields:

We have a regulation in place that may prohibit us from growing new industries where there is a market.

Mr. Norm Hall:

Yes. Wade's right. Canola was a small crop 30 and 40 years ago, and it has become huge. Soybean is expanding exponentially every year. What's going to be the next one? We need a flexible way of getting new crops put under schedule II.

Mr. Martin Shields:

It may be hemp if we can get it out of the Health Act and under agriculture where it should belong, because hemp's going to be a growing one.

You as the producer, in the sense of market competition going to your neighbour sitting beside you, do you have access to different places to market your grain through brokers? Is there competition for you to go to different brokers? Is it there?

Mr. Norm Hall:

We have that opportunity. It's all on where they are going to market it and who they are going to get to ship it to, so you shop around just like you do if you're looking for a pair of shoes. You look for the best deal.

Mr. Martin Shields:

That's what you want to continue through to the other end to facilitate your broker for your product.

Mr. Norm Hall:

Yes. Also Wade talked about service. Many times we'll have a contract with one of his members for an October delivery, and if there is not the proper service, we could be waiting for January. We have financial commitments to meet yet we have no recourse because they have no recourse, so that reciprocal penalty is a huge benefit to producers, even though we are not the shippers directly.

(1220)

Mr. Martin Shields:

We've heard about the arbitration resolution process. You're a producer. Have you availed yourself of any of those services that are out there? Have you heard of them? Do you understand them?

Mr. Norm Hall:

I understand them because I've been in this policy game for far too long, but as far as using them goes, I'm not a shipper. I can't use them unless I'm shipping a producer car directly.

Mr. Martin Shields:

For you, in terms of the regulation, you have amendments out there. You have four of them. Which one of those four would you say is critical to have changed?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

I'd like to put that into perspective. We started with about 80. Really, we did. We went through them and said what was not the way it's supposed to be, and we did an assessment of what we think the likelihood of success is. We whittled it down to the bare minimum of technical amendments in order to make long-haul interswitching work, for example, and those are the three. If any one of those three isn't there, then it will become like CLR. We've really done that work and have come down to those three from something that was a much larger list. Then, of course, there's the addition of soybeans, because we just don't understand why that's not there.

Mr. Martin Shields:

You're saying that it's a package? If they don't go as three, it doesn't work?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

Yes, it could fall apart on any one of them.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Okay.

Mr. Chris Vervaet:

I'll echo Wade's comments. It really is a package deal. We did work in partnership to whittle down to those four the 80 amendments that we first identified. If we don't get the amendment on rates but we do get something in terms of nearest interchange, it still wouldn't work. We need them all together.

Mr. Martin Shields:

You need them all to get effect.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thanks very much.

I appreciate your testimony. You're willing to step back and look at the bigger picture, which I find very helpful. I particularly enjoyed your comment about hiring a Sherpa with a backpack. I used to put in hay as a kid at my neighbour's cattle farm, and you'd certainly not want a train to move hay 20 metres from one place to another.

During the last panel, I had a question for the railways about why this is an appropriate comparator group. They talked about the capital investment, and it later came out that in the 500-mile range they can't even compete with trucks. From your perspective, at what point is it no longer competitive to consider trucking?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

It would definitely be for the short haul. Sometimes grain companies will truck grain from one facility to another. Trucking might be a viable option somewhere in the range of 100 or 200 miles, but when we're talking about the vast majority of the crop that's being exported through Vancouver, Prince Rupert, Thunder Bay, or the St. Lawrence, or into the United States, trucking isn't a viable option in the vast majority of those cases.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

To shift gears a bit, under the previous model of extended interswitching in western Canada, being an eastern Canadian, I couldn't help realizing that certain regions of the country got this. I know, of course, that your interests might have been fine with extended interswitching, but do you see any reason not to extend a similar model to allow this sort of pseudo-competition where there is none to apply to different industries in different regions across Canada?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

Personally, I don't see a reason. I can't get my head past the notion that it will be used only if the primary carrier isn't competitive. All they have to do is be competitive and it's not going to be used. I personally think that we should be able to apply it across Canada without reservation, but I do know that there were some concerns about some of the more densely populated areas in eastern Canada, where you have a large number of shippers in tight proximity and it would create some issues. It could potentially create issues if everybody is applying for an extended interswitch to that interchange. It could be a sort of backdoor way of regulating rates.

(1225)

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I think that's why in high-traffic areas like the Quebec to Windsor corridor you see an excluded corridor: because competition exists already.

If I turn my mind to reciprocal penalties, which you brought up, where the railway fails to meet its service obligations, you seem to be fairly happy with this—

Mr. Wade Sobkowich: Yes.

Mr. Sean Fraser: —unless I'm misreading you. Yesterday we had a witness from I think the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities who was quite worried that there wasn't a reciprocal penalty provision in the act. We heard discussions about whether they were mistaken. From the perspective of producers, you are happy with the reciprocal penalty mechanism built into this legislation. Is that fair to say?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

We are. It's pretty well the way we asked for it. I read SARM's brief and I think they just were mistaken about where it's included and how.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I just wanted to make sure because I don't want to entertain amendments that may be based on misinformation.

Is your experience under the previous model, which has some similarities to long-haul interswitching, that in fact the real impact that it had was at the negotiating table? Rather than causing one railway to give up business to a competitor, is the real impact here that you achieve a competitive rate where there is no competition?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

Yes, it's both. It was used both actively and passively. Something is only good as a threat, to be used as a threat, if you actually use it. It was used in both ways and a shipper would decide, I don't like the rate, I don't like the terms of service, I'm going to do an extended interswitch. They didn't have to apply to the agency. They didn't have to use the nearest interswitch as long as it was within 160 kilometres. It was what we would characterize as a competitive tool, whereas long-haul interswitching we would characterize more as a protection against abuse of monopoly powers. You have to go to the primary carrier first. You have to demonstrate that you couldn't reach an agreement with them before you go and use something else.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

You mentioned during one of your responses to an earlier question that it's not really necessarily about balance but about getting goods to market for the sake of the Canadian economy, with which I agree. That being said, at a certain point in time I have to acknowledge that if the system is going to work railways also need to make money. Is there any threat that you see here with introducing competition where the rates become so low that the railways can't possibly profit?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

I don't see that scenario. We're still talking about, in many, cases turning a monopoly into a duopoly, which ain't that great. We're talking about putting in place a small measure of competition. We're not talking about wild competition like you might see in the retail sector, for example, so I don't see that's the case. What's a fair return? That's why we talk about a cost-plus. In any competitive marketplace, somebody is looking at a 10% return, maybe a 15% return if you're being generous. That's reasonable and that's why we're talking about asking for amendments to the rates section of long-haul interswitching to be cost-plus.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Lauzon.

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

Thank you very much. I'd like to address this question to Chris. The railways are asking us to amend Bill C-49 so that facilities within 250 kilometres of the border can't access the long-haul interswitching. What would that do for your members for the value-added processors? What effect would that have on their business?

Mr. Chris Vervaet:

That's a good question.

Again, I mentioned in my response to a previous question that oilseed processors in particular have been using the interswitch quite extensively under the extended interswitch provision. If that were to be something that would be put forth, we'd certainly see a lot of limited access for our facilities that are located in southern parts of the provinces of Alberta and in Manitoba. It would preclude us in terms of having access to the interswitch locations that are located at the border between the U.S. and Canada, where my members anyway have had access to BNSF in particular to—as I mentioned in one of my previous responses as well—access to new markets. That's really what happens when we do have that access to an alternate carrier through the extended interswitch. Limiting it to 250 kilometres from the border certainly would preclude our members from making use of these interswitch locations.

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

I'm not sure who I want to address this to. I'm a visitor to this committee and I'm very intrigued by this discussion.

You mentioned, Wade, that interswitching isn't used that often but the threat is very valuable. That perplexes me. I would think that the railroad companies would have some pretty good negotiators there and they would be able to deal with that. You say that it's active and it's passive. How do you explain that? You're negotiating with me, and you say, if you don't give me the deal that I want I'm going to go to the competitor. That's business, but it seems that you get away with that bluff every time.

(1230)

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

No, it's not a bluff. You'd be prepared to move your business to the competitor. You will go to the primary carrier and say, “What can you do for me for rates on service?” The primary carrier would say, “This is what I can do for you.” You would say, “That's not good enough. I need to meet a time window for my customer in the U.S. and you're not providing service that allows me to get product within that contract window.”

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

Is that time or money, in terms of costs?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

It's both.

It could be rates or it could be service, or it could be both together. You would say, “Your rates are too high and you can't provide service, or you can't provide service in the time that I need it, so I'm going to a competitor” and then I'm going to get an interchange to move traffic from CN to CP, for example, or from CN to Burlington Northern.

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

Is that always available, to go with a competitor?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

It's available with a competitor as long as there's an interswitch or interchange within 160 kilometres that can accommodate that track.

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

You can get a better deal from the competitors.

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

Exactly.

You don't need permission from the agency or anything like that. That would or would not prompt the primary carrier to take a second look at that and say, “Gee, that's a loss of business for me. That's a loss of traffic. Can I sharpen my pencil in any way here?”

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

One of the railway folks mentioned that it's cost-prohibitive to deal with anything.... If trucking works, they can't compete with trucking up to 500 miles. That's where they break even or where they are most cost-effective.

Why can't you do this? Does trucking not work? If they charge as much as truck transport for the first 500 miles—that's where their break-even point is—why would you not use trucking for the first 500 miles?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

You mean to get to the interswitch?

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

Yes.

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

That's a good question. There's an answer to that, but it—

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

The railway people tell us that truckers can do it cheaper than they can. That would be the competitive way to handle that, wouldn't it? Or maybe they can't deal with the volume?

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

Chris, do you want to answer that?

Mr. Chris Vervaet:

I'll do my best to maybe indirectly answer the question.

When in 2013-14 we had a service meltdown when it came to rail performance, we as oilseed processors were forced to use trucks. We would usually prefer to use the rail. We needed to do that to service our customers, but the rates weren't competitive rates. I don't have the rates in front of me. I don't have exact numbers. Anecdotally, my members told me it was a last resort to use the trucks because we were risking shutting down our operations otherwise.

To move things a longer distance, rail service is the most efficient and cost-effective.

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

Yes, but only up to 500 miles, supposedly. We were told that by the railway people.

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

My memory is being jogged. Back in 2013-14, there were situations in which we were trucking grain from one elevator to another because one elevator was getting good service and the other elevator wasn't getting good service. We were doing it in limited circumstances. There were some heavy costs associated with it, and it was being done under desperate circumstances.

Mr. Norm Hall:

If I might, there aren't enough trucks on the road in the Prairies to handle what would be needed under that 500 kilometres.

Mr. Guy Lauzon:

It's supply and demand.

Mr. Norm Hall:

Exactly. For the 250 kilometres from the border, that would mean between half and two-thirds of the prairie grain would not be eligible for interswitch, which is unacceptable.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I don't know if I will be referring to one of the 76 amendments you have submitted to us, but I would like you to provide me with some explanations.

Interswitching seems almost to be a cornerstone of Bill C-49. But while the rail companies tell us that it is absolutely not needed any more, you are telling us that it is practically vital.

According to Bill C-49, a rail company has to provide grain producers with 60 days notice before an interswitching interchange is removed. Theoretically, companies can remove themselves from an interswitching point. But last week, I read on Transport Canada's site that rail companies are still supposed to honour certain general obligations. That was all they said about it.

Do you know what those general obligations are? Should Bill C-49 be more specific about what would happen if a rail company were to issue a 60-day removal notice?

(1235)

[English]

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

That's an excellent question and it gets to the heart of one of our four amendments, actually, which is the list of interchanges. With the introduction of Bill C-49, there will be two different sets of instructions or requirements under publishing a list of interchanges.

For long-haul interswitching, it would say the railways have to publish a list and they can remove anything from that list with 60 days' notice. Proposed subsection 136.9(2) sets out the parameters for the railways to publish a list of interchanges as well as removing them from the list. This is a new provision that goes along with long-haul interswitching. It says railways have to publish a list. They can take something off that list with 60 days' notice. We're worried that a long-haul interswitching order is going to go against them. They're not going to like it. They're going to remove an interchange.

However, we were told that there's already existing legislation that covers interchanges in the act—subsections 127(1) and (2) under “Interswitching”. It says that a party can apply to the agency for the ability to use an interchange and that the agency has the power to compel a railway to provide reasonable facilities to accommodate an interswitch at that interchange.

These are contradictory. One says one thing about interchanges and the other says something about long-haul interswitches, but a long-haul interswitch for one shipper could be an interchange for another shipper, so it doesn't make sense to have two different and potentially divergent sets of instructions on what happens with the interchanges and how they can be decommissioned by the railway.

What we are saying is that you can remove the provision in Bill C-49 on the railways' publishing a list and being able to remove it with 60 days' notice. The existing provisions that talk about the agency's powers to instruct the railways to keep or install an interchange—all this is already in the act and should apply equally to interchanges and long-haul interswitching. Does that make sense? [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Yes. [English]

The Chair:

We've finished our first round. Does the committee have any further questions?

Mr. Badawey, go ahead.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you.

I'm trying to get this balanced between all of the participants in the discussions we're having. The railways mentioned reciprocal agreements—reciprocity with our American counterparts. They stated, if I understood correctly, that because this doesn't currently exist, first, the asset management requirements cannot be satisfied. Second, they are forced to shut down and abandon lines that, because of the service requirements in some areas, would then be picked up by short-line operators, which, I might add, have limited capital resources. Finally, their competitiveness is affected, and this is something I'll leave open for interpretation.

When it comes to reciprocity, what are your thoughts? Keep in mind that we're trying to get a balance here. This goes to Mr. Fraser's question about trying to establish a balance between the railways, the shippers, and those who rely on the service. What are your comments on the reciprocity?

(1240)

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

We see the shippers entering into discussions with railways and negotiations on what a service contract would look like after Bill C-49 passes, presuming that it passes in a similar form to what it is today. We see them entering into negotiations, and then if and when those negotiations fail, the parties would each submit their best offer to an arbitrator and the arbitrator would decide.

We would be looking to the arbitrator to decide that penalties would apply to the shipper and would apply to the railway for similar functions of the same magnitude of a penalty.

For example, if the railways say they're going to.... When grain companies don't load a train of railcars within 24 hours, we pay a penalty of, say, $150 a car. If the railways say they're bringing the cars on a Tuesday and they don't come on a Tuesday, we would see a penalty of $150 a car applied. We're looking for balance in the service contract, something that clearly identifies what the railways' obligations are and what the financial consequences are to them for failure to do so, and the same thing with shippers, and that they be reciprocal. The spirit of it is that you would have penalties of the magnitude that reflect each other's obligations.

That has nothing to do with damages, I might add. We still have issues with damages. If you don't receive the train and you can't get your product to the customer and there are contract extension penalties, or maybe you've had to default on a contract, as we saw in 2013-14, those are still issues that would need to be addressed on the heels of a level-of-service complaint or through the courts. We're just talking about the speeding tickets, if you will, in the system to provide those penalties as discipline to motivate the right behaviour.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Great.

Are there any further comments?

Mr. Norm Hall:

Yes.

I'm afraid that the railways have been monopolies for too long. They don't know how to compete.

In the last panel they talked about losing about 2,000 cars. That's 200,000 tonnes. How many millions of tonnes do they move on an annual basis? The question from over here was what percentage of their business were they actually losing. I would suggest it's far under 1% that they would be in fear of losing.

Mr. Shields brought the question up to them before. Mr. Finn talked about the OECD numbers—the lowest rates in the world, even compared with the U.S.—yet are they worried about losing business to them? I don't see it. They may lose some, they may gain some, but it's not going to hurt them, especially when they're guaranteed profits under the MRE.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much.

I have just one last question and it's in regard to a measure that's included in Bill C-49 that hasn't been mentioned yet, except in the last panel. I recognize you've indicated that you had numerous amendments, 80, and you've boiled them down to just a few that you believe are technical amendments that would truly address the spirit of what was intended.

It's actually that the act is amended by adding the following after section 127, and I'm going to read it. It's under interswitching rate and it says: 127.1(1) The Agency shall, no later than December 1 of every year, determine the rate per car to be charged for interswitching traffic for the following calendar year.

Then it has the considerations, and it states: (2) In determining an interswitching rate, the Agency shall take into consideration (a) any reduction in costs that, in the opinion of the Agency, results from moving a greater number of cars or from transferring several cars at the same time; and

Here's the one that I'm really interested in: (b) any long-term investment needed in the railways.

I'm just wondering if you could comment on that. If you have any comments, was that something you were looking at when you were looking at amendments, or how does this fit in terms of addressing competitiveness?

Also, are you very aware that this is a consideration when looking at an interswitching rate, and how will long-term investment be monitored? Do you know the answer to that?

(1245)

Mr. Wade Sobkowich:

Those are all awesome questions, and I don't know the answer to any of them. We've never been against a reasonable rate of return to the railways for proper investment in the system. The devil is in the detail on those types of things. We would want to spend a lot of time working with the agency to understand how it plans on doing it and to try to provide our perspectives as we get into the meat on this. However, in terms of providing you with an on-the-spot comment on that, I don't know the answer. It's a great question, though.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you all very much.

As you can see, all of the members are very interested in how we're doing with Bill C-49. They want to ensure that we've heard all the voices that are necessary and that it's reflective. Thank you all very much for coming.

We will now suspend for a short period of time.

(1245)

(1345)

The Chair:

We will resume our afternoon session.

Welcome to all of our witnesses. We are pleased to have you here with us.

We have the Western Canadian Shippers' Coalition, the Western Canadian Short Line Railway Association, and the Alberta Wheat Commission.

Would the Western Canadian Shippers' Coalition like to go first?

Mr. David Montpetit (President and Chief Executive Officer, Western Canadian Shippers' Coalition):

Thank you.

Good afternoon, Madam Chair and members of the committee. On behalf of the Western Canadian Shippers' Coalition, WCSC, I would like to thank you for the invitation to participate in this session. My name is David Montpetit, and I'm the president and CEO of WCSC. With me today is Lucia Stuhldreier, our legal adviser.

WCSC represents companies based in western Canada that move mainly resource products through the supply chain to both domestic and international customers. Our organization focuses exclusively on issues related to transportation. Since its inception, WCSC has been actively involved in providing shipper perspective on numerous amendments to legislation. Most recently, we participated in a 2015 review of the act, led by David Emerson, as well as subsequent consultations initiated by Minister Garneau.

WCSC's goal is a competitive, economic, efficient, and safe transportation system in Canada that permits our members to compete both domestically and internationally. Our members represent a wide variety of commodities, including forest products, oil and gas, cement and aggregates, and sulphur, just to name a few. A list of current members is included in the brief if you'd like to take a look further.

One thing they have in common is that they are all users of rail transportation. Their facilities are located where the natural resources are. Their remote locations and the large volumes they ship make them completely dependent on rail to move their products to market. In the vast majority of cases, our members have access to only one rail carrier at origin. That creates a significant imbalance in the commercial relationship, even for very large shippers, which the majority of mine are. Being able to move a small portion—as indicated this morning, something like 25%—of product by another mode does not change that in any significant way.

Our members do try to negotiate commercial agreements for rail freight rates and service, and their preference is to resolve disputes commercially. However, the market in which they have to do this is not competitive. The option of taking their business to a competing railway when faced with excessive freight rates, large price increases, and non-performance or substandard performance simply does not exist. Effective shipper remedies act as a kind of backstop in commercial negotiations carried out in a non-competitive market. The fact that such remedies exist and can be used helps introduce a measure of balance to the shippers.

With respect to Bill C-49, WCSC is focusing on the following key areas: railway data reporting; railway service obligations; more accurate, timely, and effective remedies; agency powers; a mandatory review of the rail-related provisions of the act; and finally, access to competing railways.

Lucia Stuhldreier, my colleague, will walk you through the concerns and specific recommendations in this area.

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier (Senior Legal Advisor, Western Canadian Shippers' Coalition):

Good afternoon.

With respect to the data reporting requirements in Bill C-49, our comments are focused on railway service and performance data. Policy-makers, regulators, and users of the transportation system need this information in order to make evidence-based decisions. They need it to be detailed and they need it as close to real time as possible.

WCSC has two main concerns regarding the interim requirements in the bill. First, the information is too highly aggregated to be of any use. For example, the railways will need to report, on a weekly basis, the average number of boxcars online anywhere in their system in Canada. Those cars could contain refined metals originating in the Montreal area, pulp from a mill north of Edmonton, newsprint from the Maritimes, or any number of other things.

The published data will not tell us that because, unlike in the U.S. where CN and CP have to report separately for 23 separate commodity groups, all of this is going to be aggregated in Canada. There has been a suggestion also that rather than publishing this information separately for each of the railways as is done in the U.S., it might need to be aggregated for CN and CP, and that would further mask what's actually happening in the system. In short, as it stands, this will produce general high-level statistics that are not of any practical value.

Secondly, the information is not going to be available on a timely basis. First, as you've probably heard already, the bill defers any of these requirements for a full year. Once they do kick in, there will be a three-week delay in the publication process. Just for the sake of comparison, that's three times as long as it takes in the U.S. to put this information in front of the public. Historical information is probably useful in tracking overall trends and maybe in assessing past service failures, but when it comes to day-to-day decision-making, it's of very limited usefulness. So we have recommended some changes to those provisions.

The second area I want to talk about is adequate and suitable service. There's a proposed new subsection 116(1.2) in Bill C-49 that states that the agency has to dismiss a shipper complaint if it is satisfied that the railway is providing “the highest level of service...it can reasonably provide in the circumstances”. I was looking for an appropriate example, but this is really a bit like a teacher telling students, “If you get 95% on the final exam, you cannot possibly fail this course.” That doesn't tell the student what happens at 90%, at 85%, or at 65%.

What shippers and railways need to know is when service is no longer adequate and suitable. If the intent is to require the railways to provide the highest level of service they can reasonably provide in the circumstances of the case, we believe the bill should say that, and it should say it clearly. If it doesn't, we expect unnecessary litigation, preliminary objections, and ultimately it may very well be that the Federal Court of Appeal agrees with our interpretation, but we will have spent extra time and money to get there when it can be fixed at this early stage.

Another aspect of the service-related provisions in Bill C-49 has to do with timely access and timely relief. The bill would shorten the time period the agency has to issue a decision from 120 days to 90 days. When you're dealing as a shipper with serious acute shortfalls, waiting three months instead of four months for a fix is really only a marginal improvement. In those cases, it's crucial that the agency continue to have the ability to expedite the process and to make interim protective orders that keep a modicum of service in place while the complaint carries through the process. That can mean the difference between continuing to operate and shutting down, at least on a temporary basis, with all that entails in terms of personnel, cost of restarting major equipment, and loss of business.

As with most administrative tribunals, the agency has the ability to control its own process. What Bill C-49 would do is mandate minimum time frames that the agency has to allow in a level-of-service complaint for the railway and the shipper to present their case. That means the agency will not be able to expedite that process, and it also calls into question whether the agency will be able to issue interim relief on a timely basis. We've made some recommendations to deal with that.

(1350)



The fourth area I want to touch on is more broadly the agency's authority. One of the things the WCSC has advocated for some time is giving the agency the ability to investigate matters within its jurisdiction on its own initiative. You've heard in the earlier part of these meetings about the investigation the agency initiated into the Air Transat tarmac delays. A similar initiative was taken by the U.S. Surface Transportation Board in the case of CSX and widespread complaints about deteriorating rail service that affected a broad range of their customers. Giving the agency that ability will allow them to better address those kinds of systemic issues.

The second point in this area relates to final-offer arbitration in freight rate disputes. A crucial piece of information that's normally not available to the arbitrator in those cases is how each of the final offers stack up in terms of covering the railways' costs and providing a sufficient return above those costs, and you heard this morning from the railway witnesses how significant that issue is to them.

The agency is an independent body. It has the requisite expertise to make cost determinations and to provide them to the arbitrator, and we're recommending that an agency determination of costs be part of what is provided to an arbitrator in every final-offer arbitration.

Before I get into long-haul interswitching, there is one area that WCSC noticed was missing in this act and in this bill that has historically been part of every major amendment to the railway legislation, and that's the provision requiring the minister to initiate a review of how those amendments are faring. We are suggesting that this would be appropriate here.

(1355)

The Chair:

All right.

Next is Mr. Pellerin from Western Canadian Short Line Railway Association.

Mr. Perry Pellerin (President, Western Canadian Short Line Railway Association):

Good afternoon, Madam Chair and committee. Thank you for inviting me to speak today, and for giving the western Canadian association our opportunity to input into the transportation modernization act.

First, I'm thinking after listening this morning that this might be my last trip to Ottawa. According to CN, we're dead in the water—all our members. We don't operate over 500 miles of track. Some are as little as 23 miles, to as high as about 247 miles.

Let me start by saying we've just done a bit of an update on the western Canada association. On a positive note, we've been encouraged by Transport Canada's willingness and interest in working with us in short lines. Our relationship over the past couple of years has grown very strong, and we appreciate being consulted with and included in discussions surrounding direction of both policy and regulatory changes. This co-operation with Transport Canada is making us safer and better-informed short-line partners.

We've also been encouraged by some inroads with, believe it or not, CN. There's a renewed sense of co-operation on such efforts as our safety training program in Saskatchewan. There are some joint efforts where CN has allowed short-line partners to do intercompany switching, or switching at terminals where maybe they weren't very good and the short-line partners got in and supplied some excellent service. There were discussions this morning about where there is a win-win. I think that is one of them. They've also allowed one of our short-line partners to operate on their track into one of their mainline terminals and set off cars and take out their own cars. Again, that's a very efficient operation and cost-effective way of doing business, and a win-win for both.

The Western Canadian Short Line Railway Association, previously the Saskatchewan Short Line Railway Association, is a not-for-profit, membership-based organization that represents the interests of 14 short lines in western Canada. This morning I think CN talked a bit about its having 70% of its customers locked up in service agreements. The WGEA mentioned that it has about 90% of its farmers involved in its organization. I'd venture to guess that the other 10% to 30% are customers of ours, and we're here today to talk on their behalf.

While present in all western provinces, Saskatchewan has the most extensive network of short-line railways. Saskatchewan short lines own and operate 24% of Saskatchewan's 8,722 kilometres of track. We employ about 183 residents. When I say “residents”, these are folks who have grown up and live in the area where we work.

It should also be noted that we serve 72 small and medium-sized businesses and transport approximately 500 million dollars' worth of commodities each year. Every one of our head offices is within one mile of our own track. Also, I think it should be important to know that all of these small and medium-sized businesses that we support are also some of the bigger businesses that CN supports today. Not everybody starts as a corporate company. Some people have to start as single-point shippers and build their business from there. I think short lines are a great place to do that, because we're able to help them get that leg off the ground without a huge expense at the start.

Our members, our railways, and our customers depend on competitive rates and rail transportation options. We believe that the future of transportation should improve competitive choice for farmers, shippers, and small business. It is our fear in the proposed legislation that it will further deter competition. The newly introduced long-haul interswitching rate mechanism is designed in such a way as to be inaccessible to our shipper customers. Using commercial short-haul rates, which are currently higher than that of trucks, makes competing virtually impossible for us.

The legislation is prescriptive, and small shippers are not capable of spending years in litigation with class 1s, meaning that they will not bother to apply some of the mechanisms available to them, as was discussed this morning. It's inconceivable for a producer to take on a class 1. They're not only scared, but financially it does not make sense.

(1400)



Paired with the sunsetting of the 160-kilometre interswitching mechanism and the rapid disappearance of the producer car, this risks putting shippers and short lines in a worse position should the legislation be passed as it is. We believed that the intent of this legislation was not to put small business or short lines out of business, but that appears to be the direction we're going.

I will begin with a quick discussion on the current rate structure for short haul and single car movements to provide some context to what I have been saying. Short-line railways have a variety of customers. Many shippers are single car shippers or, what we refer to as, producer car shippers. We would like to assist all of our customers with their transportation needs and movements. This is not feasible because of excessively high short-haul and single car rates imposed by the class 1s. These goods are often forced or shipped by truck and add significantly to greenhouse gas emissions, destroying our provincial highways and roads, and decentralizing small business economic growth.

Shipping by truck, for distances less than 500 kilometres, is typically more affordable than shipping by rail. The only point to add to that is the fact that, on a short line, we are cheaper than a truck. We can compete with the truck. The problem is that when they give that car over to our class 1 partners, they are unable to compete at that rate, as you heard from them this morning.

To give you an example, we have a line we run from Leader to Swift Current. We go 120 kilometres. We can run in there for about $650, which would be about half of what a truck would be, but if he wanted to move that car to Moose Jaw, which is another 122 kilometres away, we've been quoted rates from CP of about $2,600. All of a sudden, we can't compete anymore. What does the producer do? He puts his grain in his truck, turns on Fox News, and heads off to a distant large terminal or shipper.

As was mentioned this morning, the WGEA members supply competition, but some of that competition is increasing the number of trucks we're putting on the highway. That creates another problem and there will be another committee to decide what to do with our highway infrastructure in the future. Please keep in mind that it is important we understand that we are dealing with the current situation, but what will the future be?

We do need the capacity to move grain. There were discussions the other day about truck driver shortages. Rail is still going to be an option to do that and rail to mainline terminal points doesn't necessarily have to be to the export position. It could be to an inland terminal, which in turn, cleans that grain up and readies it for shipments in those larger trains, which CN and CP do a very good job of hauling.

The other challenge for us is that there is getting to be quite a spread between single and multiple car rates. Right now, even between single and 25-car rates going to the U.S., we see a difference of about $1,000 a car. If a shipper wants to ship 15 cars, he is probably looking at a $15,000 added expense and there is just no way he can justify doing that. Again, he is putting that grain in a truck and not always sending it to the most local inland terminal. He is sending it to where, in his mind, he is getting a better deal and that's a whole other discussion.

The other thing that we want to talk about is interswitching, of course. It is a major part of the legislation. The loss of the 160-kilometre interswitching option is very disappointing to our members. While not available to shippers on our entire network or short lines, it did provide a strengthened bargaining position in most locations. The return to a 30-kilometre switching zone will only make that available to the two of our 14 members that can make it cost effective, while the rest will be outside of that.

(1405)



This affects our ability to attract new customers. Without access to multiple rail lines, businesses recognize that they will be captive to the class 1 that connects to our short lines. This decreases our ability to build new business on our lines.

Unfortunately, the proposed long-haul interswitching is not a good alternative to the 160-kilometre interswitching that has sunset. It is our understanding that the intent of the long-haul interswitching was to increase competition by providing expanded transportation options to shippers. We do not feel that proposed long-haul interswitching will achieve that goal.

The Chair:

We thank you very much, Mr. Pellerin, for your time. Whatever you have left, maybe you can fit it in with some answers to some questions there.

From the Alberta Wheat Commission, we'll have Mr. Auch, please, for 10 minutes.

Mr. Kevin Auch (Chair, Alberta Wheat Commission):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My name is Kevin Auch, and I am pleased to appear before this committee this afternoon alongside our industry partners from the Western Canadian Shippers' Coalition and the Western Canadian Short Line Railway Association to provide a producer perspective as part of this committee's review of Bill C-49, the transportation modernization act.

I am chair of the Alberta Wheat Commission, an organization dedicated to improving the profitability of over 14,000 wheat farmers in the province of Alberta. I also farm in southern Alberta near the town of Carmangay.

I am here today because rail transportation has been one of the commission's top priorities since its inception in 2012. Costs associated with railway failures are ultimately passed down the supply chain to producers. As a price-taker, I cannot adjust the price of my product, so ultimately, these increased costs reduce my profitability. They also negatively impact my cash flow, making timely bill payments an issue.

These challenges are not unique to my operation. They are widespread and that is because when it comes to rail transportation in Canada, the agriculture sector operates in a monopoly environment. Most of the elevators where farmers in western Canada deliver their grain have only access to one railway, leaving both shippers and farmers captive to monopoly carriers.

This is a significant problem because wheat is a crop that relies heavily on export markets and rail transportation to ship our product from the Prairies to port terminal facilities along the west coast and Thunder Bay, as well as our neighbours to the south of the border. While we appreciate this government's efforts to increase market access for farmers through the establishment of free trade agreements, we will lose credibility with international buyers if we are unable to fulfill their orders due to railway failures. We experienced this in 2013 and 2014 when buyers simply sourced their grain from other countries. Canada's reputation as a reliable supplier to global markets is at risk.

Canada's grain supply chain is making significant investments in order to take advantage of new and growing market opportunities. We are seeing major expansion both in port terminal and country elevator capacity. Grain companies have invested hundreds of millions of dollars to ensure they are ready to service growing international markets, and farmers are preparing to take advantage of these opportunities as well. Farmers' significant investments in research as well as new and innovative technology have led to significant yield increases over the years. In fact, just last month CN Rail announced this growth when they implored the Canadian government to invest in new rail infrastructure in order to accommodate the influx of grain. In 2017, CN moved a record 21.8 million metric tons of grain.

My point is that ensuring adequate rail service is paramount to the growth of our sector and Canada's reputation as a reliable supplier of grain to international markets.

AWC appreciates the government's commitment to legislation that will ensure a more responsive, competitive, and accountable rail system in Canada. We believe that Bill C-49 is in fact an historic piece of legislation that paves the way for permanent long-term solutions to the rail transportation challenges that Canadian farmers have faced for decades.

That is why AWC is pleased to see the inclusion of provisions aimed at improving railway accountability, including shippers' ability to seek reciprocal financial penalties, a clear definition of adequate and suitable service, and enhanced interswitching—all measures that AWC has long advocated for. Bill C-49 also contains important provisions that will enhance the inquiry powers of the Canadian Transportation Agency and require that data on rail system performance be made available to the public.

Furthermore, AWC supports the decision to retain the maximum revenue entitlement with modifications that will reflect individual railway investments, incentivizing innovation and efficiency.

With respect to the role that reciprocal penalties play in this legislation, railways have always had a variety of measures that govern shipper efficiencies, including asset use tariffs. These tariffs are used to penalize shipper failures through monetary fines in order to gain shipper efficiencies. For example, when the railway spots cars at my local elevator and the grain company fails to load them within 24 hours, the grain company faces automatic monetary penalties. On the other hand, if the railway shows up two weeks late, there are no penalties. Therefore, the railways are the only link in the grain logistics supply chain that are not held to account.

(1410)



In order to create an efficient supply chain, one with balanced commercial accountability, railways need to be held accountable for service failures.

We were recently made aware that CN Rail has included a form of shipper tariffs in about 70% of their service-level agreements. On the surface this seems like good news, but these tariffs are limited to a failure to spot cars and still neglect to address common challenges, including timely delivery or the provision of accurate information. We are encouraged to see that CN has taken some steps to increase railway accountability, and we are confident that the provisions outlined in Bill C-49 will ensure that, going forward, penalties are truly fair and reciprocal.

In addition to increasing accountability, reciprocal penalties will create the incentive needed for railways to focus on performance and invest in the assets that can improve efficiencies. This recommendation positions railways to compete in order to drive efficiencies, lower shipper risks, and ultimately better serve foreign markets for Canadian exports.

Under Bill C-30, which expired on August 1 of this year, extended interswitching provisions proved to be a powerful competitive tool for grain companies. Bill C-49 proposes that, under some circumstances, interswitching distances will be increased to 1,200 kilometres, but unlike the previous extended interswitching option, there are conditions within the new provisions that seem to contradict the true intentions of the legislation, making them less effective than the provisions under Bill C-30.

For example, the previous interswitching provisions allowed shippers to access any interchange within 160 kilometres without the need to obtain a permit from the Canadian Transportation Agency. The provision outlined in Bill C-49 stipulates that shippers must seek permission from the originating carrier or obtain an order from the agency to access the interchange, and it must be the interchange that is closest to them. Not only do these changes make interchanging more onerous and complicated, they can essentially render the provision useless in a variety of scenarios, including if the interchange in question does not service the appropriate corridor. In other words, if it moves the product in the wrong direction, if the nearest interchange cannot accommodate the size of the car load, or if it is serviced by the wrong rail company, the nearest competing line does not necessarily have lines running the full distance to the shipment's final destination.

To address these challenges we would ask the committee to consider the amendments put forward by the crop logistics working group, of which AWC is a member, that would allow shippers to access the nearest interchange that can accommodate their requirements with respect to the direction, size, and preferred carrier.

Costs incurred by shippers are ultimately passed down the line and on to producers. That is why our members are also concerned about the formula outlined in Bill C-49 to determine the rates associated with long-haul interswitching. Proposed subsection 135(2) directs the agency to set a rate not less than the average of the revenue per tonne kilometre of comparable traffic. In our view this encourages monopoly rate setting as it is based on revenue as opposed to a cost-plus model. Rates should allow for a reasonable profit, but should not reflect those previously charged in a monopolistic environment.

In closing, the Alberta Wheat Commission strongly supports the quick passage of Bill C-49 because we believe it will help to correct the imbalance between the market power of railways and captive shippers. We encourage the federal government to continue the conversation with Canada's agriculture sector as it works to develop the regulations to support the spirit and intention of the legislation, which seeks to create a more responsive, competitive, and accountable rail system in Canada.

With that, I would like to thank the committee for the opportunity to share the producers' perspective with you today, and I invite any questions you may have with respect to the comments I've made.

(1415)

The Chair:

Thank you, all, very much.

We'll go on to questions.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I want to thank our witnesses for being here today.

Six minutes isn't a lot of time, and I do have a number of questions. I'm going to direct my first question to Mr. Pellerin.

I'm glad to see that you are alive and well, and here representing our short lines. I have a very direct question for you. You stated that the long-haul interswitching is inaccessible to your members. Can you clarify why that is the case?

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

I sure can, yes. What it means, as I think other people have discussed, is that the rate will be determined by the commercial rates in place for that similar move today. If that similar move, as I discussed earlier, is $2,600 to go 100-and-some kilometres, the average of $2,600 will still be $2,600. The rate that will be determined will be cost-prohibitive for any type of interswitching distance, which effectively puts us out of the game, especially for our short-line members.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Just as a quick follow-up, what would you recommend needs to be put in place that would be helpful to short-line railways?

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

You know, I think the encouraging part about today was that there was a lot of good discussion that, hey, everybody has to make a profit, but let's look at a cost-plus system that sets what that should be. There's the idea that “commercial rate” is sometimes short for “expensive”. If we had a mechanism where we would at least know ahead of time what it would cost, it would help us a lot.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

To the Western Canadian Shippers' Coalition, I noted that you did not get the chance to speak to long-haul interswitching. I note as well that you have a recommendation in your presentation with regard to extended interswitching, so I'd like to turn over the rest of the time to you so that you can share it with us.

Mr. David Montpetit:

Sure. I'll start off, I guess, and briefly touch on long-haul interswitching. Thank you for that.

For my specific members, this remedy and tool will not be very useful, just based on geography. If you look at the map in front of you, the exclusion zone is basically B.C. and parts of northwestern Alberta. When you look at the western Canadian map, a significant area where my shippers are present or have facilities in is exempted. It's one of the several exemptions that have been presented within the amendments. We're struggling with how useful this will be for my members.

Lucia, you may want to comment further.

(1420)

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

This map will look different from the description of the excluded corridors, but realistically any shipper in that area that's shipping traffic to the Vancouver area, to terminate on a rail siding there, would not be able to use this. We can draw a very similar map for Quebec to show that some of the most captive shippers in the northern part of that province will have exactly the same problem, because their only connection to any other carrier will be in that Quebec-Windsor corridor.

Quite apart from these things, though, one of the underlying issues that WCSC has with this remedy is that it will fundamentally succeed or fail with the willingness of any one of the railways to act as a connecting carrier and to compete for that traffic using long-haul interswitching. Just like its predecessor the CLR, that can make or break that remedy. We haven't seen any willingness to do that, to compete using CLR since the early 1990s, and we don't see anything in the long-haul interswitching remedy that changes that dynamic.

On top of that, the scope of traffic that's eligible for long-haul interswitching, geographically as well as in other respects, is much narrower than what could theoretically take advantage of competitive line rates.

Third, there are a number of hurdles built into this remedy that don't currently exist with CLR.

From that perspective, and given the experience with CLR, even though we may have seen some willingness to compete up to 160 kilometres under the Bill C-30 regime, we haven't seen anything beyond that. CLR has been on the books that entire time. We're concerned that we're not going to see what is really required, which is a willingness to compete on the part of CN and CP—certainly in western Canada the majority of interchanges is between those two carriers—that is necessary to make a remedy like this work.

Yes, the requirement for an agreement with the connecting carrier is taken away, but the fact that people haven't been able to get that agreement is really just a symptom of that underlying, more fundamental issue, which is that CN and CP have “declined to compete”. Those, I want to make sure you know, are not my words. Those are the words of the statutory review report that was issued in 1992. They were repeated in 2001, and I think there was also something along those lines in the most recent report.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

In my first question, I want to dig a bit deeper on the remedies. We can look at some of the documents in front of us from the different presenters.

My first question—and I'm not sure who I can direct it to—is in terms of investigative powers. What are your thoughts on the investigative powers of the CTA?

Mr. David Montpetit:

I'll start on this one.

In my opinion, it has been a bit of a miss in Bill C-49. I think Mr. Emerson touched upon this yesterday, and it has been brought up in some of the discussions thus far.

I think it's an area that should be looked at again. If you have investigative powers, you can be proactive versus reactive to these problems, especially with regard to systemic problems within the transportation system and the transportation corridors. That's why we highly encourage this. In every submission and at every chance we've had in meetings with the minister's office, Transport Canada, and even the agency, we're encouraging having more ability and more power to do this.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Mr. Emerson talked a lot yesterday and spoke in great depth on governance, and of course on good governance. Do you feel that the investigative powers of the CTA will promote better governance with respect to our trade corridors?

Mr. David Montpetit:

I do, yes. Especially if you are looking at long-term sustainability and enhancement of these trade corridors, I think it's important.

Also, from a competitive standpoint, not just domestically but internationally, I think it's important to make sure that our trade corridors are fluid, active, and competitive, and that ongoing issues in some areas we face.... Don't forget that some of these issues do ebb and flow based on weather and on commodity movement. Some commodities are softer at some points, and sometimes there is heavy movement. We've seen that with grain, with coal, and with different commodity groups. You want to ensure that you can address any issues or ongoing issues within those corridors in giving the agency that ability to look into that and find remedies for it.

Again, however they want to structure that or how it should be structured, or whether it's an order to improve it, that's left up to them. But I think it's an area that does need to be focused on.

(1425)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Would it be your opinion that you would add to the accountability credibility of the capital side when it comes to maintaining the infrastructure, whether it be a rail line, a canal, or an airport and things of that nature? Do you feel as well that it would move away from self-interest and agendas more to the value and ultimately the return to the Canadian consumer? As well, thirdly, it would add to our overall enhancement of our economic global performance.

Mr. David Montpetit:

I can direct my comments more to the rail area, since we focus more on the rail and trucking area, but from an overall perspective, without having expertise in air, etc., I think the overall perspective is that anything you can do to enhance, without an agenda such as that, would be beneficial, because there are agendas. Everyone is going to have their own agenda—the whole bit. Organizations will. An unbiased look at it would most likely be preferred and beneficial.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you.

I'm going to switch to the short lines, something that was near and dear to my heart in my former life. I brought a short line into our area. The reason was that we were somewhat abandoned—no pun intended—by the mainline operators. With that, I want to open up the floor to you to address three things.

One is why you exist; I think I just touched on that. The second is what you do. You are one group that attaches yourself directly to the customer. That's done directly. There's no middle person. You're it. To some extent, you're depended upon with respect to their viability. My last question, of course, would be, where do you get your funding from?

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

We could start with that. When the meeting's over, we're going to go around and take a small collection to get us going.

First, I'll start with why. I thought CN did a good job this morning of outlining why they want to get off some lines. I'm not convinced that those lines they want off of are still not productive, and I think short lines have demonstrated right across Canada that, given the opportunity, we can make a go of it. Part of our problem has been that maybe we overpaid for these lines nobody wants, and that put us in a hole at the beginning. Then we get into trying to finance a loan and trying to maintain the railway.

I think, given the opportunity, short-line operators are very innovative. They're very customer-focused. They do a very good job, and they allow our customers to expand. I always said to the folks there when we bought our short line that the key to it is this: if you allow your line to disappear, be it a short line, a producer car site, or a siding, it'll never come back; it's gone. That is the key. We have some stories, especially in Saskatchewan, of where short lines were given up on. However, at the far end of the line they discovered that was a great place to load oil or to do that type of industry, or some grain customer came in there and put in there. Those lines are very valuable and viable now and will be for the conceivable future. What we have to do is figure out how to do that with the other lines.

With regard to your last point, we are very customer-focused. I think our customers really like the idea that they can phone and somebody answers. That's kind of unique. We listen to what our customers need. We're able to be a little more nimble than maybe the class 1 railroads and are able to help them out. This is especially true when we're trying to entice new business to Canada. I think it's critical that we are the points that really could get them off on a good start with good service and a low-cost start-up compared with some of the requirements on the class 1s.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Again, I'm sorry I have to cut you off, but....

(1430)

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

If I could just comment on the funding, we are on our own. We don't get a dime from nobody.

The Chair:

Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My thanks to our guests for joining us and for sharing their expertise with us.

When we do this kind of study, consensus is relatively rare. But we seem to be getting one on long-haul interswitching. Some people don't want it just because it's not competitive and others don't want it because it's not effective.

It is occurring to me that Bill C-49 is not achieving that objective at all. If we were to rethink the objectives of interswitching, where should we start from? Should we go back to what was proposed in Bill C-30 or should we correct Bill C-49 so that it includes a provision on interswitching that favours those who need it? [English]

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

I didn't actually get to our recommendation in the last go-round. Because of where WCSC's members are located—outside, typically, that 160-kilometre radius—some of them have facilities within the 160-kilometre radius or the potential to develop facilities in that radius. From that perspective, the 160-kilometre regulated interswitching rate is much preferable because you can actually use it in planning purposes. A one-year rate that will change every year depending on factors that you have no control over.... You can't use that in a business plan. You can't use that to attract investment.

A regulated interswitching rate, one that everybody sees, that's transparent, and that people know as they're planning their business and negotiating how they participate in this with the local and connecting carriers and everybody else involved, is much more user-friendly. Beyond that radius, though, as I said, it all depends on whether or not the connecting carriers are prepared to compete. From that perspective, CLR, LHI.... CLR has less restrictions than LHI does. My personal perspective is that it's a bit of an academic debate because I don't see a huge uptake on either one of those in the current environment. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Do the other witnesses share that opinion?

Do you want to add anything else about the issue? [English]

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

In Saskatchewan, especially with some of the short-line grain shippers, access to what was in Bill C-30 would allow some new businesses to take a look at our short lines as an opportunity to build on to give them access to other class 1s. The way it's structured right now, I think new business would be reluctant to build on the short line, because you might as well at least get within that 30-kilometre zone to give you those options.

To be honest with you, I think my answer would have been that if we didn't have Bill C-30, this one's worse. I'd rather not have it at all compared with what we had before, if that makes sense. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I was also struck by a statement you made in your opening. Every time the minister has come to meet with us, he has talked to us about the importance of harmonizing our operations and our legislation with those in the American market, because the USA is our biggest exporter, but sometimes also with those in the European market. Now you are telling me that data reporting is being completely ignored. What I understood from your comments was that we see to be light years away from what the Americans are doing, because our data is aggregated and not broken down.

If that is the case, what would you propose in order to make the data useful?

(1435)

[English]

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

Yes. The differences really had to do with the performance reporting of the railways in the U.S. system, and that includes CN and CP in respect of their U.S. operations. It is the data they report on a weekly basis and on a monthly basis. Within the space of a week, that information is on the website of the Surface Transportation Board and is visible on a railway-by-railway basis, and it shows a breakdown of 23 different commodities. It has a different car count for pulp and paper, for forest products, for coal, for potash, for you name it. There are 23 different categories.

To us, that is really the minimum level of detail we need to see, and because of how large the country is and the fact that CN and CP operate pretty much across it, we would like to see that on a railway-specific basis as well as on some kind of geographic granular level. Otherwise, it's not useful.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I understand that you mostly all watched the evidence earlier today. I'm going to go to my first question on captive customers. The larger railways suggested that if you have access to trucks, then you're not captive. I was wondering what your thoughts are on that.

Mr. Kevin Auch:

We also have access to airplanes, but that would be a very ineffective way of shipping. Rail is still by far the cheapest way to move a bulk commodity. Speaking for grains, it's not an option to truck grain to the coast. It would be far more expensive. In a monopolistic environment with no competitors, the only way to stop a monopoly carrier from charging the very maximum price they can is through regulation. In a perfect world, there would be competition, so efficiencies would be bred into the system.

Speaking for grain farmers, it's not an option to truck grain to the coast.

Mr. David Montpetit:

The same thing applies to all other commodity groups. If you have a mine, for example, and I'll hypothetically pick a coal mine that is producing two million tonnes a year, you're taking a truck down a road to the coast, I'm going to guess every 30 seconds, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, from a mine that is probably located either in British Columbia or northwestern Alberta. Practically speaking, you have to give your head a shake. It just doesn't make sense.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How many trucks would the average railcar replace?

Mr. David Montpetit:

Depending on the size of the railcar, it could be, I'm going to guess, depending on the commodity type, two to three trucks. I can be corrected if I'm wrong. You might get 40 or 45 metric tons per truck. You may get 100 to 108 in a car, perhaps.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Unless you have a Schnabel; then you can take a lot.

These rules are for federally regulated railways. I'm assuming, Mr. Pellerin, that most of your railways are not federally regulated. How does this impact your railways in that respect?

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

All our short lines are still connected to those federally regulated railways. That's the reason for our interest in rate structure. If that rate spread gets higher between our short lines and the class 1s, it's harder for us to compete. All we're looking at is this. The decisions that the government makes today will impact us even though we're not federally regulated.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Pellerin, have you ever worked in the running trades?

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

Yes, I started with CN and was there for 22 years.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In your opinion—you have the experience in the cab—should LVVR rules, the option we're discussing, apply to short-line operators?

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

No. What I would suggest on the short line is.... I think we've been working with transport. I think it should be really based on.... A lot of our short lines do 10 miles an hour. We can draw pictures going that slow, never mind having a camera.

The other point I would like to quickly make on that is that I think some stats were brought out this morning about 53% being human failure. On the short line, at least for the ones I represent, in any of our incidents, 100% were track and zero were human. We don't really see that need for the short lines, especially at our speeds and way we handle our traffic.

(1440)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough.

CN and CP both have operating ratios in the mid-50%. What's a typical operating ratio for one of your short lines?

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

It's probably about 98%. I'm embarrassed to say that out loud.

The thing about our short lines is that our shareholders are the municipalities and the farmers we represent. That money is put right back into it. We don't worry too much about share price and profit margin. We worry about being safe and supplying service.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough.

CN has been buying back a lot of short lines across the country over the last few years. How do you take that?

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

In some cases we've seen where maybe initially the short line bought into places. The oil boom caused a lot of people to change their minds. I think the class 1s had a couple of railways they wish they had hung on to. There are a couple in Saskatchewan that I think they would want back if they could get them.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If they took them back, do you think they would actually keep them running the way they are running now?

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

One thing about it is that, if they took them back, they'd have more capital to put into them, but then the customer on that line would have to deal with, let's say, service.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough.

I have one last question. I think I'm almost out of time. Can you go a little more in depth into why short lines are able to run a carload for $650 dollars when the main lines charge $2,000 for the same car, less efficiently, and don't want to do it.

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

Part of it was, I guess, because we try to keep our customers competitive. We really do what our costs are.

The interesting part of that was that some of these rates that we're charging were originally set by our class 1 partners as our division, so that's all we ever got. Our customers were used to that portion. If we went to increase it, then we'd look like the bad person in this. When we look at it, our issue on a lot of short lines is the fact that we could make money. We just have to figure out how to do volume. That's what we have to work on. We've taken quite a hit on the producer car side. Right now, you can't send a producer car to western Canada. That's not good. That's to export position.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

I knew you were going to do that.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you very much,

I'll start with WCSC.

You spoke a bit in your opening remarks about the need for disaggregated data, whether it's by commodity, to make day-to-day decisions. I think my ears are a little bit slow. You had a lot of information densely packed together, which was very helpful. Could you perhaps walk me through the practicalities? How would it help the negotiations if you actually had the transparency in data that you're looking for in order to make sure you're negotiating effective rates and that the railway is operating efficiently?

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

I will answer part of that. Let's say you're a forest products shipper and you're negotiating with the railway. Perhaps you're not happy with the service you're getting. You're shipping pulp or paper in boxcars and you're getting global information about how many cars are online on the entire system for your product, similar products being shipped from the opposite end of the country, other kinds of products altogether, so you have no sense of whether or not the supply of cars generally available in the system has been reduced. That industry, in particular, is seeing shortage of railcars, and we have a number of members in WCSC that are in that industry.

There is no transparency in terms of whether there has been a reduction in capacity that the railways have implemented, because you can't see that. You can't see whether your shortage is peculiar to you, or whether that's something that is happening across the system. You can't tell whether the metal producers are getting more of these cars and your particular industry is not. None of that is there. You don't see where those cars are.

If you have a time sequence of cars in a particular area, you see cars that don't seem to be moving there. To the extent that you can, that may influence your decision to ship somewhere else where it may be more fluid. None of that granularity is available.

(1445)

Mr. David Montpetit:

You don't necessarily have a view of the overall network. We don't have that ability. We don't have the tools and everything else involved. That is our tool. There is no other way that we can really investigate or check for ourselves. If service has been transferred to one side and is taken away from another, we have no way of determining that. This helps determine that. This helps give us a better overall global outlook of how the network looks.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Sure.

I'm curious, as well, about the dispute resolution mechanism contemplated in the event that service obligations are breached. Do you think that the final-offer arbitration is an effective way to deal with these kinds of disputes? Is there a better way to do this, or is this an improvement over what we've had historically?

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

Final-offer arbitration typically is a forward-looking thing. It doesn't really directly deal with a past service problem. Most often final-offer arbitration is focused very much on rates. You can include other conditions, but the more conditions you layer in, the more complicated the process gets, and it's fairly tight to begin with. You can use that going forward to establish some terms, just as you could in the service-level agreement provisions.

But in terms of dealing with things that have already happened and addressing those, it really is only the complaint process, the level-of-service complaint process under section 116.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Sure.

If I can jump around conceptually for a moment, the bulk of the testimony that we heard today really was about interswitching, and of course the class 1 railways were saying this was something that we were going to complicate, and that it's going to force them to give their business away to competitors, essentially.

Do you agree that's the case, or is the real impact here introducing competition at the negotiation table, where it's actually going to cause them to be flexible in their price to the point at which you're offering reasonably realistic market rates?

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

I don't know any shipper whose first instinct is to start a complaint process or use a regulatory process. These are business people, and their preference is always to try to negotiate something.

Part of the usefulness of these remedies is that they provide, as David mentioned earlier, a kind of backstop in an environment where you don't have the option of saying, “Fine, I don't want to deal with you. I don't like your terms. I'm going to go to your competitor.” That doesn't exist, or it only exists for a small portion of your traffic. The fact that this is out there, that there is a remedy and that it is usable, performs that same function for a lot of shippers. It's as important for that negotiating function that the remedy work and be usable as it is for somebody actually wanting to ship traffic under an interswitching order.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

That's whether it's used or not.

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

Exactly.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Mr. Auch, you spoke—

The Chair:

You have 20 seconds.

Thank you very much.

Mr. Shields.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

To the Alberta Wheat Commission, you briefly mentioned cash flow. Could you expand on the issue of cash flow in this, since you mentioned it?

Mr. Kevin Auch:

For example, in 2013, when the level of service was basically deplorable, we had a very large crop that year. Farmers had contracts for a harvest delivery, and because of the rail backup, some of these contracts weren't realized or weren't deliverable until months later. It was six months or eight months later before their contracts were delivered.

Even though we have a contract, the grain company does not issue us a cheque until we deliver it. That disrupts our cash flow. We have a contract. We are planning our cash flow. We have payments to make. We have to pay for our inputs that we've put in the ground, and we make these contracts in order to make revenue. The timeliness was terrible that year.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Even though that happened in 2013, the possibility of it happening again is still there?

Mr. Kevin Auch:

We're not growing less than we did then. The trend in agricultural production has been up. We've been producing more and more efficiently. If you look at the real price of grain, we're selling grain right now this year for about the same price we did in 1981. The only way we can make money is by doing it more efficiently and producing more.

There's not going to be less grain in the system in the future if we keep following the current trends.

(1450)

Mr. Martin Shields:

So you can get caught in that cash flow at any given time?

Mr. Kevin Auch:

Yes.

Mr. Martin Shields:

That leads to income showing up in different years at different times, bills having to be paid without it and cash flow in another year. You have a challenge there.

Data has been mentioned a number of times already. For your organization, is that something of an issue?

Mr. Kevin Auch:

It helps the people we sell to. We've heard their testimony. The grain elevators buy our grain and they ship to our exporting customers. So, if it's important to them, it's important to us.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Okay. I'll go back to the data one more time. I know you've answered this a number of times. Going through the process with municipalities provincially and with FCM federally and trying to get the railways to let us know on time what's in their cars as they go through our communities—because it's our firefighters who are dealing with what's coming through—has been one arduous process. We'd like to know in time, when it goes through, but of course they want to tell us a month later what went through our community.

So data to you, when you talk about businesses, is time, inventory, and shipping: that's how the world has moved. I bring in the inventory today; I don't have it stacked up here for a month, but I also must have it leave on time. Is that the business end you're talking about? Our business world is changing, so that's a critical piece then.

Mr. David Montpetit:

You're asking for something, actually, that's even more accelerated than what we're asking for. We're asking for data and we're recommending or are trying to improve on a three-week delay to be a seven-day delay. You're asking for something that's immediate; it's fluid data.

Ultimately, we would love to have that available. For us at this point it's crawl, walk, run, sprint, and we're probably at the crawl stage. We do want to get to walk before we can sprint, but I would ultimately like to see that, because we would have real-time information on, for example, what's important to us going through our community. We would have real-time information on where our cars are, where they're located. There are whole different sets of useful data that we would love to have available to our group, but we need to take one step at a time.

Using what the U.S. currently has as a base model for our area, we think, would be beneficial just to start off. Ultimately, I agree with you.

Mr. Martin Shields:

But if you're building an economy and you want to advance our economy, as wide and big as we are, isn't that where we should be going?

Mr. David Montpetit:

Absolutely. I wouldn't argue with you for one moment.

Mr. Martin Shields:

If we want to compete with what's coming across the ocean in the Pacific, how are we going to do it if we don't do this?

Mr. David Montpetit:

Several other countries and several other modes of transportation do provide real-time data. So, it's there and that's what we're competing with.

I always stress with our group that we have to think about competing internationally, not just globally and not just locally. We have to look at a larger perspective. I agree with you.

Mr. Martin Shields:

You talked about what was missing, the minister's review of amendments, which had been there before. You're saying it is absent this time.

Mr. David Montpetit:

I'm sorry, are you speaking about investigative abilities, those types of things?

Mr. Martin Shields:

No, I'm talking about the review of the amendments, which you mentioned as being absent.

Mr. David Montpetit:

Okay.

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

I can address that.

In 1996, when the CTA first came in, there was a provision requiring a mandatory review of the act within a certain amount of time. I can't recall exactly what that time frame was, but subsequent to that, whenever major amendments to the act were made, that was updated. So there was another deadline set for a review of how the act was working.

This time around, there seem to be some very widely diverging views, particularly on the long-haul interswitching. We feel that it is not going to be terribly useful to our members. The railways are apparently very concerned about it. There might be some shippers who will use it. We think it would be very useful to policy-makers to see who is using it, if anybody, how it's working, and—

Mr. Martin Shields:

But it's not there.

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

It's not there.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Do you know if it was used in the past and if corrections were maybe made then, or anything in the past when this process was there?

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

The latest review that Mr. Emerson conducted was one of those reviews. He's recommending something more ongoing and evergreening, but at a minimum we think there should be a requirement or commitment for this act to be reviewed again, to see how it's actually working, if at all.

(1455)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I want to talk about the CTA's decision cycle. Mr. Montpetit mentioned, or perhaps it was you, Ms. Stuhldreier, that the time it takes to get a decision out of the CTA on an issue could result in some bad outcomes for the shipper. Do you have an example of how a CTA delay created an adverse result?

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

There are always many factors playing into things. There are certainly examples in the past of a shipper who went on a number of occasions to complain to the agency about the service it was getting and whether it was getting a sufficient number of cars to move, I believe it was, specialty crops from Saskatchewan. Each one of those went through the full process, and ultimately that shipper did not stay in business. There were probably lots of factors contributing to that.

While the process is going on, which takes a few months, you might end up in a situation where the railway beefs up what it's doing because it's under scrutiny, but you might also end up in a situation where there are multiple origin destination pairs. It all depends on the shipper. There are lots of things that can go wrong and negatively affect the shipper's ability to get its goods to market.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Similarly, you mentioned examples or situations where, because of the non-competitive nature that has been portrayed to us between the two railways in Canada, there have been large increases in shipping costs. Can you give me an egregious example of huge increase in prices because of non-competition?

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

For obvious reasons, I can't mention any names. Let me think how I'll put this.

It would not be out of the realm of the possible for a railway with market power to say to a shipper, “You can either have a five-year contract with increases of 15%, 15%, 5%, 9%, or something in that range, or you can ship without a contract and we're going to ding you 50% from one year to the next.”

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Has that happened?

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

Yes, it has happened.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay. It would be nice to get a specific example.

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

I am sorry, but I cannot disclose those.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay, then, let's talk about the long-haul interswitching. On the surface it would seem that not only are we opening it up to greater distances, we're also opening it up to more customers who could potentially make use of it.

What I've heard is that, because they have to go to the nearest competing line, you could end up sending your goods in the wrong direction, or sending them to a line that's going to the wrong place, or sending goods to a nearby point that may not have the capacity. These are three issues I heard.

In that situation, though, could you really define that as a competing option if it's simply not working? I'm just wondering if the subjective definition of the word “competing” might be tangling us up here. That doesn't sound like a competing option to me.

Mr. David Montpetit:

It's not.

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

It's not.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

So the competing option may in fact be the one that exactly fits the bill even though it's not the closest. All right.

I have one other question here—on data. You mentioned that Canadian operators in the U.S. have different data requirements, which they are able to meet within much tighter time periods than are being anticipated here. We know they can do it.

Are there other things that Canadian operators are required to do in the States that they are not doing here but that you would like to see them do in Canada?

(1500)

Mr. David Montpetit:

I can't honestly answer that one. What I can say, though, is if they can provide data in the U.S., there's no reason why they can't provide it here.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Right. You're just using that as one example of something they are doing. I just wondered if there were other things, not necessarily things to do with data.

Mr. David Montpetit:

Okay.

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

There are other things. We've limited our remarks to service and performance metrics. There's a great deal more financial information available in the U.S. than in Canada. We have information on those types of things.

The Chair:

Mr. Blaney. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Good afternoon. I am just passing through the committee.

One thing struck me in Mr. Pellerin's comments. The Conservatives introduced a good bill, Bill C-30, specifically about what you call interswitching. Now we have a Liberal mish-mash that is going to have consequences for small businesses and to threaten jobs.[English]

My first question would be for Madam Stuhldreier. I hope I pronounced her name right.

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

That was very good.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

You mentioned that the Liberal bill would have a negative impact on Quebec regarding exemptions in the corridors. Can you explain in a little more detail what that sounds like.

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

I didn't bring my railway atlas with me; I should have. There are some rail lines in northern Quebec where, in order to come off that line and really go anywhere, the traffic has to move through a corridor that's excluded under the long-haul interswitching provisions. CN lines that connect with the main CN system, or with other carriers in the Montreal or Quebec area, are the only ones where a connection exists. Some parts of Quebec could connect through Rouyn-Noranda or Val-d'Or, but there are significant lines in northern Quebec that don't have that option. Really, the only place they connect with a second carrier would be in the corridor and so long-haul interswitching as drafted is out.

Mr. David Montpetit:

It's very similar to the scenario we're facing in British Columbia.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Is there any way we can fix this or amend the bill?

Mr. David Montpetit:

You would have to take out these exemptions.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Should we recommend that we take out the exemptions?

Ms. Lucia Stuhldreier:

To deal with a specific issue of interchanges in those corridors, you could simply delete the reference to interchanges in the description of those corridors.

Mr. David Montpetit:

That would make it more effective, possibly.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you.

Mr. Pellerin, you are representing small businesses. You are working with small and medium businesses. In your introduction, you say that this mechanism in the bill would negatively impact those businesses.

Can you expand on this? It's a little bit scary when you say that this could even run some of your members out of business.

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

Really, the theme of today from the get-go has been competition. For at least 12 of the 14 short-lines, this reduces that competition. In essence, it makes it more difficult for our customers to compete, and that makes it hard for the short-line.

As I mentioned several times, our issue isn't our ability to operate. We have to work on our ability to increase volumes. Along with our customers, we need to be competitive.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Do you feel this bill would help you to increase your volume?

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

No. As this bill as written right now, if you look at it from the straight, short-line perspective, there's nothing in it that helps.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

It's disappointing. This government claims that it wants to create jobs for the middle class. You come here and say that this will reduce competition, this will increase greenhouse gas, and this is not good for the economy.

Is there any way we can fix this at this time?

(1505)

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

I think what we need to do is go back and look at—

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Bill C-30, the Conservative bill.

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

There were some issues. We were also here discussing that a couple of times. It wasn't perfect.

The point we're trying to make in our visit here is that this does nothing for us. We have come here to Ottawa several times saying that we need some help. We're in very tough shape. We need help, and this isn't helping us. We need to continue to talk if we want to help short-lines and our customers who are on the short-lines.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

If you have any recommendations about amending the bill, show them to us, and we'll do our best. As you know, we're not a majority, but we'll do our best for you.

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

Thank you, sir.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

I'm done.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I am going to continue along the lines of the person who said that we have to continue the discussion.

My question is very clear. What we have here is an omnibus bill that goes off in all directions. I imagine the passengers' bill of rights does not interest you a great deal, except on a personal level, as a consumer. We could also talk about coasting trade, but we fully understand that it is not your favourite subject either.

In terms of the provisions that are of particular concern to you, I would like to know if, in your opinion, Bill C-49 is too fast, or too vague, to provide a viable solution for your problems. Let me put the question another way. Could you accept Bill C-49 if a few amendments were made, or do you feel that there is many a slip twixt cup and lip? [English]

Mr. David Montpetit:

I'll just speak for WCSC.

We have made some suggested amendments to tweak language in the proposed bill. Based on what is in the bill right now, if some of the suggested tweaks, plus some of the other areas that we had expressed to the government to look into, are adopted we think we can enhance the bill to make it a better bill than what was presented to us.

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

We walk a bit of a fine line because there are some positive things in it for our customers away from the short-line.

It was mentioned earlier that there's some concern even this year because the bill is not passed, and we're kind of sitting out there in the open. We want to be careful not to bog this down either. What we're saying is that this is strictly from a short-line perspective. There's nothing here that helps us survive, and we need to change that. Can we do that, and does that have to be part of this bill? I don't even think so.

I think we need to recognize the fact that I don't want anybody in government to think that this is helping short-lines. That's for sure. If we can do it outside of this bill or we can do it within it, we're willing to do either way, but we have to do something to help us out here.

Mr. Kevin Auch:

Alberta Wheat is a member of the crop logistics working group. We had some recommendations that we had made to improve the bill. I think if we had those, it would work very well. There are some good provisions in this bill, as I said before, and with a few little tweaks like that, I think it could be very workable and would bring some balance back into the system.

We have two monopolies that operate in rail transport. I understand why you can't have multiple railways. There is a large infrastructure investment. What we're looking for is some way to approximate a competitive system. I think this bill does go towards doing that.

The Chair:

We do have a couple of minutes left on the clock. Do any members have additional questions or do you want to do another round? We don't have enough time for another round.

Ms. Block, are there any questions on your side?

Mr. Blaney?

Mr. Badawey is interested. He has a question.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would comment first off that the session that we've been having this past week has been very non-political and today that changed, which is giving me the opportunity to respond. I want to make three points based on Mr. Blaney's comments.

If in fact Bill C-30 was good legislation, why did the previous government also introduce the sunset clause? The second point is why did we hear loud and clear from the witnesses criticizing long-haul interswitching during the fair rail for grain farmers study? Lastly, why did the previous government also take it upon itself to commission David Emerson to review the system, as well as propose long-term solutions as seen in Bill C-30?

My apologies, but I had to correct the record.

(1510)

The Chair:

Your question is?

Mr. Vance Badawey:

My question is, Madam Chair, as I just responded.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Do you want us to answer?

Mr. Vance Badawey:

I didn't start it.

The Chair:

I'm watching the clock very carefully.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

To get back to the productive dialogue that we have been having, I'm really interested, Mr. Pellerin, in hearing your comments. Again, the reason why we're here is that, quite frankly, we do want to strike that balance. We want to ensure that balance—albeit we heard a lot of the challenges from the main lines, from the class 1s earlier, some of which I would agree with, but most of which I wouldn't.

Your situation is something that fills that void. It fills the void for those who are most important, those who are our priority, the customers, and, of course, adds value for Canadians.

I'm going to ask the same question that Mr. Blaney asked and that is, what can we do to this bill? What can we do Bill C-49 to make it a better and more conducive for you to be a part of the ultimate performance that we have globally with respect for our economy, which is to make our transportation system more robust, which you're a part of?

Mr. Perry Pellerin:

A point that we didn't make today was the fact that the short-lines don't have some of the opportunities available to shippers through the CTA. I've got to convince one of our shippers to take on that issue, and they're not always very happy to do that on our behalf. So that might be a good start, to allow short-line railways some of the same opportunities and avenues through the CTA. I think the CTA has a very good handle on the system and would be able to help us out in really short order on certain terms, especially issues like the service issues we have.

We give our customers traffic to the class 1 carrier and they sit there for 10 days. That's not right and we have to get that fixed. We need that opportunity ourselves. It would be a good start.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much to our witnesses again. Each one of these panels has so much valuable information. It's amazing. We'll know Bill C-49 in and out by the time it gets back into the House.

Thank you very much.

We will suspend until the next group comes to the table.

(1510)

(1530)

The Chair:

Okay, we're reconvening our meeting.

We have several representatives with us. I am going to ask them all to introduce themselves and the organization they represent.

Mr. Audet, would you like to start, please? Introduce yourself. [Translation]

Mr. Béland Audet (President, Institut en Culture Sécurité Industrielle Mégantic):

My name is Béland Audet and I am the President of the Institut en Culture Sécurité Industrielle Mégantic, or ICSIM. This is an organization that we set up following the tragedy in 2013. We want the organization to be dedicated to the training of first responders in railway safety, and to instilling a culture of safety in rail companies, particularly shortlines, which actually have no training on the culture of safety. We also want to have a section on the culture of safety for the general public in Lac Mégantic. [English]

The Chair:

Would you like to go on? You have 10 minutes, Mr. Audet. We're very interested in Lac-Mégantic, given that the only travel that the committee has done since we convened has been a trip to Lac-Mégantic. We're familiar with your organization and your desires as well. We're happy to have you here with us today.

If you would like to, go ahead and speak to the initiative. [Translation]

Mr. Béland Audet:

As I was saying earlier, we created the organization in the aftermath of the tragedy of 2013. Local business people decided to take charge of the situation and try to make something positive out of this tragedy. We therefore have partnered with institutions such as Université de Sherbrooke, CEGEP Beauce-Appalaches, which is in our region, and the Commission scolaire des Hauts-Cantons. This partnership will enable us to work with people who are at three different levels of education. We are also partners with CN rail and Desjardins.

As you know, there's only one training centre for first responders in Canada: the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC). This institute is in Vancouver, more specifically in Maple Ridge, and provides services in English only. We want to create a similar training centre in Lac-Mégantic, in eastern Canada, and provide those services to francophones and anglophones on our territory. Since Canada is so vast, it is very expensive for people from Quebec, Ontario and the eastern provinces to attend training in the west, for instance in Vancouver. After the tragedy, we felt the desire to create a centre like that in Lac-Mégantic.

As you said earlier, Madam Chair, some members of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities came to Lac-Mégantic in June 2016. One of the committee's recommendations was for Transport Canada to work with the City of Lac-Mégantic to create a training centre. We are here today to talk about it again and to draw attention to the project.

We are asking that Transport Canada standardize and enforce the training for conductors and that the training be provided by accredited organizations. We are also asking that Transport Canada standardize and enforce specific training on risks associated with railway operations for first responders in railway communities. As we know, 1,200 cities in Canada have a railway. However, people there do not receive the necessary railway training. So that's what we are working on.

We have shared a brief with you. I'm not sure whether everyone has seen it, but we can answer any questions you may have about that document.

(1535)

[English]

The Chair:

Unfortunately, the clerk did not receive the brief. If you would, please resend it so that the committee has the information. [Translation]

Mr. Béland Audet:

Okay, I'll resend the document. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Johnston.

Mr. Brad Johnston (General Manager, Logistics and Planning, Teck Resources Limited):

Thank you very much.

Chair, members of the standing committee, clerk and witnesses, good afternoon everyone.

My name is Brad Johnston. I'm the general manager of logistics and planning for Teck Resources. Today I'm joined by my colleague, Alexa Young, head of federal government affairs.

Thank you very much for the opportunity to discuss Teck's view on Bill C-49. Teck is a proudly Canadian diversified resource company. We employ over 7,000 people across the nation. As the country's single largest rail user, and with exports to Asia and other markets totalling close to $5 billion annually, ensuring that this bill enables a transparent, fair and safe rail regime, and one that meets the needs of users and Canadians is of critical importance to Teck.

Throughout the consultation process leading up to this bill's development, Teck has sought to advance balanced solutions to address the significant rail service issues that all sectors have regularly experienced. Perennial rail service challenges have impacted our competitiveness, our national supply chains' long-term economic sustainability, and Canada's global reputation as a trading nation. To put this into perspective, the direct costs attributable to rail service failures incurred by Teck alone have amounted to as much as $50 million to $200 million over 18-month periods in the past decade. These are added costs, of course, that our global competitors do not incur. Foundationally, we believe the solution is a legislative regime that inspires commercial relations in our non-competitive market, while maintaining the railways' abilities to be profitable and operationally flexible. This solution would benefit railways, shippers, and all Canadians.

At the heart of our recommended solution has been the need for a meaningful, granular, and accessible rail freight data regime. We've also advanced a definition of adequate and suitable service that acknowledges the unique monopoly context in which we operate. Teck has offered what we believe to be the only long-term and sustainable solution to addressing the acute imbalance in the railway-shipper relationship, and that is for allowing for real competition in Canada's rail freight market by extending running rights to all persons, including shippers.

What do we mean by “running rights”? Similar to when competition was enabled in the telecommunications sector in Canada, we mean opening the door to competition in the rail sector—in other words, allowing new entrants who meet specific criteria to run a railway. While disappointed that the introduction of real competition isn't addressed in the bill, more so than in any past legislative review, we're strongly encouraged by the bold vision Bill C-49 represents in many of its provisions. These include new reporting requirements for railways on rate, service and performance; a new definition of adequate and suitable rail service; enhanced accessibility to remedies by shippers on both rates and service; and a prohibition on railways from unilaterally shifting liability onto shippers through tariffs.

We also believe that Bill C-49 achieves the right balance in reflecting the needs of various stakeholders, including both shippers and railways. However, it's our view that to meaningfully realize the bill's intent and to strike the balance we believe it seeks to achieve, some minor adjustments will be required. The amendments we propose are meant to address design challenges that will have unintended consequences or that will simply not fulfill the bill's objectives. Our proposed amendments also address the reality that, due to having to rely on one rail carrier for all of the movement of our steelmaking coal and/or because of geographical limitations, some of the major provisions in Bill C-49 aimed at rebalancing the shipper-railway relationship won't apply to certain shippers, including Teck. For instance, the long-haul interswitching provisions aren't an option for our five southeast B.C. steelmaking coal mines, because this region is amongst the vast geographical areas that the provisions simply do not cover. Further, our recommended adjustments reflect Teck's actual experience with existing processes within the act.

On transparency, Bill C-49 goes a long way to addressing service level data deficiencies in our national rail transportation system, deficiencies that have led to business and policy decisions being made in an evidence vacuum. However, we're concerned that, as written, certain transparency provisions will not achieve the objective of enabling meaningful data on supply chain performance to be made available. Of specific concern is the design of the data-reporting vehicle outlined in clause 77(2).

(1540)



The U.S. model that is being relied on is flawed and doesn't provide the level of reliability, granularity, or transparency required for the Canadian context. First, as the U.S. model is based on internal railway data that is only partially reported, it doesn't represent shipments accurately or completely.

Further, the U.S. model was created when the storage and transmittal of large amounts of data wasn't technologically possible. With the data storage capabilities that exist in 2017, there's no need for such a restriction in either the waybill system for long-haul interswitching outlined in clause 76 or the system for service performance outlined in clause 77. Note that railways are already collecting the required data.

To ensure the right level of service level data granularity is struck to make it meaningful, and to ensure it reflects the unique Canadian rail freight context we operate in, we recommend an amendment that ensures all waybills are provided by the railways rather than limiting reporting to what is outlined in 77(2).

For the ability of the agency to collect and process railway costing data, we believe the bill will significantly improve the Canadian Transportation Agency's ability to collect and process this costing data, enabling it to arrive at costing determinations to ensure the rates shippers pay are fair and justifiable. This is critical to maintaining the integrity of the final offer arbitration process as a shipper remedy to deal with the railways' market power. However, we're concerned that as written, a shipper won't have access to that costing determination, which defeats one of its purposes.

Under the current FOA model, it's the practice of an arbitrator to request an agency costing determination only when the railway and the shipper agree to do so. However, we witness the railways routinely declining to cooperate with shippers in agreeing to make such a request. Bill C-49must limit a railway's ability to decline this request. To ensure the right level of transparency and accessibility is struck so that remedies are meaningful and usable, we recommend that shippers also be given access to the agency costing determination that comes out of this process.

On level of service, we're concerned that the language offered in Bill C-49 for determining whether a railway has fulfilled its service obligations doesn't reflect the reality of the railway-shipper imbalance, given the monopoly context in which we operate in Canada. In proposed subsection 116(1)(1.2), Bill C-49 would require the agency to determine whether a railway company is fulfilling its service obligations by taking into account the railway company's and the shipper's operational requirements and restrictions. The same language is also proposed for how an arbitrator would oversee the level of service arbitrations. This language doesn't reflect the reality that in connection with the service a railway may offer its customers, it's the railway that decides the resources it'll provide. Those decisions include the purchasing of assets, hiring of labour, and building of infrastructure. Any of these decisions could result in one or more restrictions.

As those restrictions are determined unilaterally by the rail carrier, it's not appropriate for those restrictions to then become a goal post in an agency determination. As such, we recommend either striking out the provision or making the restrictions themselves subject to review.

In conclusion, as the failures of past rail freight legislative reviews have demonstrated, despite good intentions, legislative design is critical to enabling those intentions to come to fruition. Getting this bill's design right with a few minor amendments will help Canada shift away from a status quo that has resulted in continued rail freight service failures and led to a proliferation of quick-fix solutions that have picked winners and losers across industries over the past years.

Again, as the biggest rail user in Canada, we believe this is the opportunity to be bold and to set a new course in building a truly world-class rail freight regime in Canada to the benefit of shippers, railways, and all Canadians. Thank you very much, and I look forward to your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we go to Mr. Ballantyne from the Freight Management Association of Canada.

Mr. Robert Ballantyne (President, Freight Management Association of Canada):

Thank you for the opportunity to appear.

FMA has been representing the freight transportation concerns of Canadian industry, including rail, truck, marine, and air cargo, to various levels of government and international agencies since 1916. We're now in our 101st year, and, despite appearances, I was not at the first meeting.

In our remarks today, we will focus primarily on Bill C-49's amendments to the rail shipper sections of the Canada Transportation Act, but we will make brief comments on the proposed amendments to the Railway Safety Act and the Coasting Trade Act.

There are approximately 50 railways in Canada, but the rail freight industry is dominated by the two class 1 carriers, and these two companies account for approximately 90% of Canadian rail freight revenues. The fundamental problem is that there is not effective competition within the railways, and the barriers to new entrants are so high that this situation will not be rectified through market forces.

The best that can be done, therefore, is to provide a legal and regulatory regime that is a surrogate for real competition and that rebalances the bargaining power between the buyers and sellers in the freight market.

While there is limited competition between CN and CP in a few markets, primarily intermodal, for many shippers the rail market can best be characterized as being a dual monopoly rather than even a duopoly; that is, each of CN and CP is the only railway available to shippers at many locations. It should be noted that this is not just a western Canadian problem. I'd like to stress that. This is not just a western Canadian problem, but it exists in the east as well, including in the Quebec-Windsor corridor. Rail freight is not a normally functioning competitive market, and this fact has been acknowledged in railway law in Canada for over 100 years.

The minister, in introducing Bill C-49, stated the objectives of the bill, as follows: The Government of Canada...introduced legislation to provide a better experience for travellers and a transparent, fair, efficient and safer freight rail system to facilitate trade and economic growth.

Bill C-49 contains a number of provisions that will go some distance to meeting that objective. In its review of the bill, FMA has analyzed the changes that are proposed in Bill C-49 and how well they will play out in practice when shippers attempt to use them. Our recommendations address the places in the bill where our experience indicates that the provisions, as drafted, will not meet the government's stated objectives.

My colleague, Mr. Hume, will refer to the 10 recommendations that we're making on the rail shipper provisions and comment on the policy basis for Bill C-49.

I should mention that Mr. Hume has worked in the law departments of both CN and CP in his career, and for the past 23 years has built a successful practice representing rail shippers before not only the Canadian Transportation Agency, using all the provisions of the act that are in place now, but in the courts, up to and including the Supreme Court of Canada. He has important insights that are somewhat unique, in that he is one of the few people who has been using these provisions over his career.

At the conclusion of Mr. Hume's remarks, unless we run out of time, Madam Chair, I'll comment very briefly on the proposed changes to the Railway Safety Act and to the Coasting Trade Act.

Forrest.

(1545)

Mr. Forrest Hume (Legal Advisor, and Partner, DLA Piper (Canada) LLP, Freight Management Association of Canada):

Thank you, Bob.

The recommendations we're making on the rail shipper provisions are summarized in our submissions beginning on page 25. As Mr. Ballantyne has indicated, the recommendations that FMA is making have been designed to give effect to what we believe to be the goals of the transportation modernization act.

Our recommendations deal with the proposed changes to the level of service provisions; the proposed creation of a long-haul interswitching remedy; the need for enhancing the powers of the agency over interswitching; providing the agency with adequate funding and the ability to act on its own motion, and on an ex parte basis where necessary, authorizing the agency to share reasonable railway-provided costs and rate information with shippers, and I stress “with shippers”; clarifying the proposed change requiring the filing of a list of interchanges; and suggesting changes to the service level agreement arbitration and summary process FOA amendments.

Following the filing of our submission with this committee, we received a copy of a Transport Canada document entitled “FAQs—Trade Corridors to Global Markets”, which provides insight as to the issues in Bill C-49 that the bill seeks to address. Unfortunately, the document contains a number of misconceptions that need to be addressed.

For instance, on page 11, the FAQ document claims that various factors help ensure that the LHI rate will be competitive. However, the bill has a provision that ensures that it will not be competitive. For instance, proposed subsection 135(2) requires that the agency not determine the LHI rate to be less than the average of the revenue per tonne kilometre for the movement by the local carrier of comparable traffic. What that means is that an LHI rate will necessarily be uncompetitive with other comparable traffic revenues that are below the average.

The document states in a number of places that the LHI provisions give the agency discretion in defining what traffic is comparable. However, when the agency does that, it is restricted in setting a competitive rate by the operation of subsection 135(2).

Our recommendation to fix the problem is twofold. First, specify in subsection 135(2) that the agency shall not determine an LHI rate that is more than—not less than—the average of the revenue per tonne kilometre for the movement by the local carrier of comparable traffic.

Second, amend the section to require the agency to determine the LHI rate from among rates where shippers have access to two or more railways at origin. If there are no competitive rates, i.e. rates where a shipper has access to two or more railways at origin, the agency should be required to set the LHI rate on a cost-plus basis. Thus, LHI rates would be determined from competitive rates, not from a menu of captive rates. I'll be talking a little more about “cost plus” later, because I understand that to be an issue before you that's somewhat controversial.

On page 11, the FAQ document refers to the many LHI exclusions in the bill, and attempts to justify them by citing possible congestion issues and the difficulty in allocating liability for certain hazardous materials. With great respect, Madam Chair, and members of the committee, these concerns have no merit whatsoever.

(1550)



Why should the LHI remedy, a competitive remedy, be unavailable to large groups of shippers? Why should the remedy discriminate against shippers because of location or the type of commodity shipped? How does all of that comport with our national transportation policy?

In summing up on the exclusions, the FAQ document at page 12 refers the excluded shippers to other remedies since access to LHI is being withheld from them. This provides little comfort and doesn't say much about the efficacy of the remedy. Our recommendation is to eliminate the exclusions for LHI.

At page 7, the FAQ document states that extended interswitching demonstrated that railways can and will compete for traffic from each other's networks, providing shippers with leverage in negotiations. Similarly, it is expected that LHI will stimulate this kind of competition.

However, the comparison between extended interswitching and LHI is not an apt comparison. Extended interswitching rates—

The Chair:

I'm sorry to interrupt, but the committee has a lot of questions, and each member is restricted to just 10 minutes. I'm sure that the valuable information you have there will get passed on through the questions that will be asked by many of the members. We have to go on to our questioners, starting with Ms. Block.

(1555)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I want to thank all of our witnesses for being here today. It's been a long day, and it's only going to get longer, but I certainly do appreciate everything we've heard today.

I want to start with some questions for you, Mr. Johnston, and for you, Ms. Young, in regard to your presentation. I did look at the document that you circulated. In your conclusion you state that getting the design right on Bill C-49 will help Canada shift away from a status quo that has resulted in continued rail service failures, has damaged Canada's global reputation as a trading nation, has led to the proliferation of quick-fix policy solutions that have not been based on evidence, and has picked winners and losers across industries over the years.

I'm not sure if you suggested that Bill C-49 was the result of a bold vision. I want to give you an opportunity to perhaps speak to some of the areas in Bill C-49 where you see there being that bold vision. Also, I want you to comment on the creation of the corridors in Bill C-49. I'm not sure if that was what you were referring to when you talked about the five areas that weren't going to be able to access long-haul interswitching or that weren't going to be able to use these remedies. I'm wondering if you could speak to that as well.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

I was taking notes as you were asking your question, because you touched on a great many points. If I overlook any of them, please remind me.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Sure.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

First, I'll talk about the exclusion, because you referenced that. Teck is the second-largest exporter of steelmaking coal in the world. Our main competitor is in Australia. We service customers all over the world, including in China, Asia, North and South America, and Europe. It's basically just a fact that the geographic exclusions for long-haul interswitching will bar our five southeast B.C. steelmaking coal mines from utilizing that remedy. Under the current draft, it just won't be an option for us.

In fact, it is our view that will serve to further cement our captivity to the rail carrier, which in this case happens to be CP, for those mines. They export approximately 28 million tonnes a year. I referenced that we're the largest user of rail in the country as a company, not as a commodity but as a company.

So yes, long-haul interswitching under the current drafted legislation will not be a remedy for us. We will continue to rely on things like final-offer arbitration.

Does that answer that part of the question?

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Yes, it does. Thank you.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

I guess it would be our view that currently policy-makers or users are trying to carry out their different activities in an evidence vacuum. That's basically due to the fact that a coherent or rational system for measuring the movement of goods in Canada—like the waybill system—just simply does not exist.

Moving towards a data regime is part of that whole vision, and we welcome that step and think that we're moving in the right direction, but as it is currently drafted, it's not quite there yet. As for some simple changes to the legislation, ensuring that all data is accounted for is a very easy thing to do. Being a bit of a data-wonk myself, I'll say that we want to look at data. We want to look at raw data, not aggregated data.

On clause 76, the data piece on long-haul interswitching, our concern is that if we mimic the U.S. system, not all data is reported by the railways. It's all collected by the railways, but it's not reported by the railways. This we understand from our subject matter experts who also practise in the United States. That would be a concern. There's no point in collecting data and not getting all the data. That would quite likely lead to imperfect assessments or conclusions, whether that has to do with service failures or infrastructure investment.

On clause 77 on performance indicators, if we're going to measure the performance of the rail system with data, once again we have to look at all the data. I talked about the waybill system. It's not addressed in clause 77, but the waybill system is in essence a record. It's a record of movement of a good from a particular origin to a particular destination. It's a very easy way to document the movement of goods in our system. The two class 1 railways are doing it in the United States. They can do it in Canada.

I'm sorry. It was a lengthy question and—

(1600)

The Chair:

I know, and I was trying to give you as much time as possible—

Mr. Brad Johnston:

Yes. Thank you.

The Chair:

—to get out the answer that Ms. Block was looking for.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Hopefully, that answers it.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Graham. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Mr. Audet, thank you for taking the time to meet with us.

Since you have more experience than others in rail safety issues in your region, could you tell us about the plan to establish a training centre specialized in rail safety. We don't often hear about something like that.

Mr. Béland Audet:

There is no training in rail safety or the culture of safety.

The national railway companies, the CN and CP, provide training on safety, specifically to operators, but that training is not recognized from company to company. In other words, a CN employee who is going to work at CP has to redo the training.

Shortlines provide no training. CN or CP retirees are often the ones providing the training.

There is no common training whatsoever, whether in terms of operations or the culture of safety. We have been talking about the culture of rail safety since the 2013 accident, but that did not use to be the case in the industry in general. That said, I think that's a very important point.

The bill talks about voice and video recorders only. It is a useful type of technology, but the fact remains that it is used after a tragedy happens. But what is being done to ensure tragedies no longer happen? We want to make sure that no one ever has to go through a disaster like the one we experienced in Lac-Mégantic.

We want to work with Transport Canada and the Canadian government to improve this aspect of training, which is very important.

The second aspect that we are addressing is the training of first responders. In eastern Canada, they receive no training on rail safety. Not all the cities can afford to send their first responders to the training courses in Vancouver or Pueblo, in the United States. So a centre for francophones, a bilingual centre, needs to be established in eastern Canada. In my view, that's very important. The bill is silent on training like that. It only talks about voice and video recorders.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does Lac-Mégantic itself have a new way of training regional firefighters and first responders?

Mr. Béland Audet:

We have organized training with the folks from TRANSCAER, who came to Lac-Mégantic to provide training to the people in the region. In fact, people from New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Montreal and Quebec City also came for the training on rail issues. The event was on a weekend with an eight-hour training session one day, but that was just an overview. More in-depth training is needed.

As I said in my presentation, in Canada, 1,200 cities have a railway, but there is no training on rail issues. So there is great urgency to have something for that. However, since Lac-Mégantic, nothing suggests that the Canadian government wants to head in that direction.

(1605)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you for coming to tell us about that.[English]

I want to go now to Teck and Mr. Johnston.

I was interested in your comments about universal running rights. I think it's an interesting concept. It would separate the infrastructure from the operations on railways. How would you see it working? By having the infrastructure in private hands, would there be a risk, to smaller lines, that nobody would be interested in operating a line they don't own?

I'm curious to hear your thoughts on that. You had suggested that allowing running rights on a much more widespread basis would increase competition. I like the theory, but I'm trying to see how it would work in practice.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

I guess the best example would be our competition in Australia, where they have what's called an above-rail and below-rail freight regime. Having more than one carrier operate on rail lines is something that's done throughout the world.

Just a month ago I was in Poland visiting our customers in eastern Europe. Certainly in Poland they have such a regime. I believe they have as many as five carriers on the rail network there. How it would work, I would say, would be pretty similar to air traffic, with one centralized rail traffic control and many carriers.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You're taking the infrastructure away from the private companies to make a national system. To accomplish what you're saying, you're not talking about running rights on a CN track; you're talking about changing the whole nature of the infrastructure, which is a fairly significant paradigm shift.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

I don't see it that way. To us it answers a question we've faced in the past: what happens when the rail carrier either can't or won't move your traffic? For us, moving 25 million tonnes a year, this is a significant problem. What do you do? Is it a significant step? Of course. For a new entrant, there would be very high barriers on things like operational capability, safety, and insurance. Nevertheless, it's something that's done quite efficiently and safely in different jurisdictions, including Australia. If a company such as Teck simply can't get its goods moved to market, then this could be a potential remedy.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Johnston.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would first like to turn to Mr. Ballantyne.

In your opening remarks, you drew my attention to a topic that you did not have time to address, namely coasting. I'm ready to give you two of my six minutes to summarize your position. I will then probably have one or two questions for you about it. [English]

Mr. Robert Ballantyne:

Thank you very much.

What I wanted to say is this. In our formal submission we did indicate that we support the proposed changes to the Coasting Trade Act that are included in Bill C-49. These give effect to a requirement of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement. While it's a relatively minor element in terms of improving global supply chain efficiency, the requirement does do that for Canadian importers and exporters using containers. That is, what it's proposing to do is to allow foreign-flag ships to move empty containers between Canadian ports. That is, if containers were emptied in Halifax, the foreign-flag carrier could move them to the Port of Montreal, for example.

This is something we support. It is something that will slightly improve global supply chains for Canadian shippers, and for importers as well. There is a complication with regard to the large shipping alliances, where there are three or four shipping lines that come together in alliance. We think that the regulations should make sure that this provision would be able to be used within the full alliance, so all the member shipping companies within that alliance could access this provision.

(1610)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you very much for the summary.

This brings me to my question.

I understand that it's better to do a route with empty containers than with a completely empty vessel. However, as you so rightly said, the proposal in the agreement with the European Union does not give Canadian-flag ships the possibility to do the same thing and to fly the Canadian flag on European territory.

Is that an irritant for you? [English]

Mr. Robert Ballantyne:

No, actually, I haven't read the CETA, or haven't committed it to memory. My recollection is that it is reciprocal, that it would allow Canadian-flagged ships the same privilege within Europe. However, the number of Canadian-flagged shipping lines operating internationally is either very small or not existent at all. While I think that within the agreement it is reciprocal, the practicalities are that it would be used mostly in Canada.

I support it. I think it is a good thing. It's good thing for Canadian exporters and for Canadian importers that use containers. This really has to do with the movement only of empty containers between Canadian ports by foreign-flagged ships. I think it's a good move. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I don't want to contradict you, but I will check my sources, because my understanding was that there was no reciprocity. Based on what you said, I gather that it would be acceptable as long as there is a reciprocity. [English]

Mr. Robert Ballantyne:

Yes, it would. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I have a question for Mr. Audet.

First, we have just received your documents. Thank you. We will read them carefully.

In light of your tragic experience, how do you explain Canada's delay in rail safety? I would say that Bill C-49 is pretty much silent on the issue, although it's supposed to be the bill that will take us to 2030. It talks at length about voice and video recorders, which can allow the TSB to draw better conclusions after the incident. However, preventive measures are needed instead. I completely agree with you on that.

To your knowledge, does the absence of safety or security regulations fly in the face of international standards?

Mr. Béland Audet:

Not to my knowledge.

The U.S. has what is known as the Positive Train Control. I'm not sure what the French equivalent is.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

It doesn't matter.

Mr. Béland Audet:

We have examined the technology and the type of reports it can do. It is really wonderful. Of course, the cost of the system implemented in the United States is huge. At any rate, 60% of CN's locomotives have this system, since they operate in the U.S. They therefore must have those systems, which are really amazing in terms of safety. That is a big step forward.

In terms of voice and video recorders, let me draw a parallel with the Beta recorders back in the day. If those were sold in stores today, we would miss the mark, which is to increase safety.

That's more or less what I think.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

You spoke at length about the importance of training for first responders, and I entirely agree with you on that. My concern is not about the fact that this training is necessary, but the fact that municipalities are not familiar with the content of the hazardous products on the trains crossing their roads.

How can first responders react effectively if Bill C-49 has no measures enabling municipalities to find out what products are being carried across their territory?

Mr. Béland Audet:

There's a new application, AskRail, that makes it possible to obtain all that information, but it is certainly not in line with the bill that was just introduced. Positive Train Control provides that sort of information very quickly.

(1615)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Excellent.

I'll begin by saying thank you to Monsieur Aubin for asking my planned first question to my intended witness and saving me two minutes of my life. It allows me to follow up on the Coasting Trade Act.

One of the things I'm curious about that you mentioned would be more efficient, and I agree with you, was to have European vessels carrying empty containers. I think that's fairly obvious. Today, are Canadian shipping companies moving empty containers? My understanding is that the bulk of the empty containers were being moved by truck to new ports.

Mr. Robert Ballantyne:

It's probably true that they are. This provision is included in the CETA agreement. I suspect it may be something that the Europeans wanted, though I'm not certain of that.

What happens now under the Coasting Trade Act is that any movements between Canadian ports have to be done in Canadian flagged ships. Essentially, the Canadian shipping lines are big, either in the coasting trade or in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway. Canada Steamship Lines and Algoma, some of those companies, are the obvious ones.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Perhaps I can jump in for a moment. Reciprocity or not, the added efficiency probably doesn't come at great cost to Canadian business if most of the empty containers aren't being shipped anyway.

Mr. Robert Ballantyne:

That's right. This is a relatively minor provision, and it seemed to make sense to me. My point here today is that the hundred companies that are in our membership support this.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Perhaps I can jump to Teck. You mentioned that five of your steel-producing coal facilities aren't going to have access because of the excluded corridor in British Columbia. My understanding—and maybe you'll correct me if I'm wrong, and Mr. Ballantyne alluded to this as well—is that the two excluded corridors at issue had competition to some degree, and the rest of the country did not have that level of competition. This justifies introducing some sort of mechanism. The Canadian and American freight rates were a little better, but they're roughly comparable. I'm curious to know how the rates of your competitors in the U.S., for example, or companies of a similar size, compare to the rates you get with Canadian rail service providers.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

With respect to the rates my competitors pay in the United States, it would be variable—some are lower, some higher.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I very much got the vibe from your responses earlier that you feel there's a lack of competition, but it seems as though, just from this line of questioning, that you're in the middle of the pack of what competition might provide if it existed fully. Is that not accurate?

Mr. Brad Johnston:

I'm not exactly sure what you mean by that question. Let me simply say that our five southeast B.C. steelmaking coal mines are all captive to a single rail service provider. They're captive for a significant portion of the movement of the material from the mines through to Vancouver. There is no competition for those mines at their origin, and there is limited competition for a portion of the movement through the Fraser River corridor. It is our view that those mines are very much captive to the rail service provider and that they do not have competition. Some of the elements we've suggested in our submission, including the provision for data, or enhancing the costing determination, or the access to it under FOA, we view will help us balance that lack of a competitive reality in which we operate.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

My perspective is informed a bit by representing an area that mostly has smaller operators than you guys have. I guess what I'm getting at is that at the bargaining table, you guys are no slouches; you know what you're doing. I sense that your ability to negotiate at the table, with the single service provider you have, is roughly.... I don't think the lack of competition has the same impact on you that it might have on smaller companies in captive regions.

Am I totally off-base here?

(1620)

Mr. Brad Johnston:

Speaking as someone who has experience in negotiating with railways, irrespective of the fact that I'm with Teck, I would say that it does have its challenges. As a consequence of that, we've used remedies under the act, just like anyone else. In some ways, our size is not as much of an advantage as you might think. We have had to use processes such as FOA under the act. It's very important to us to have a very robust remedy, because we have used it in the past and we see that it's quite possible we could use it in the future.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Let me move to follow up on my colleague Mr. Graham's line of questioning.

There was something I'm not sure I quite follow going on, but I was fascinated by it. It was something about running rights and the circumstances in which someone can't or won't ship your product.

Is what you were suggesting running railways almost as we do public highways? Subaru and Honda and Chrysler don't all have separate highways that only their cars can drive on.

Are you suggesting that the current infrastructure that is privately owned move to a public model that different operators could provide services on?

Mr. Brad Johnston:

No, I'm not suggesting any such thing, not at all. But it is a fact that across North America there are literally hundreds of running rights arrangements in place today. Railways run on each other's lines all over North America and in Canada. The directional running zone in the Fraser Canyon is a prime example of that. That is a running rights arrangement. They do exist.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I want to stick with the running rights issue a little bit, in the context of what has been described to us as a congestion issue in that corridor between Kamloops and Vancouver and offered as one of the reasons LHI wasn't considered.

Mr. Hume introduced himself to me a little earlier.

It occurs to me, sir, that you've actually had some experience in negotiating running rights on that corridor for West Coast Express, have you not?

Mr. Forrest Hume:

It wasn't on that corridor. It was on the corridor between Waterfront and Mission City.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

But that's still part of the—

Mr. Forrest Hume:

It's a part, but only a small part of it.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Sure, but can you reflect on that experience and consider opening up that corridor for the long-haul interswitching system?

Mr. Forrest Hume:

In my view, there is no reason to exclude shippers in that corridor or in the Windsor-Quebec corridor. There are shippers within those corridors who do not have competitive options and could avail themselves of that remedy. It's a competitive remedy, at least as the minister contemplates it. I think it should be altered from the way it is currently written, so that it will continue as a competitive remedy, available to all shippers who find themselves having a need to access that remedy.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

The argument of the congestion currently on those corridors isn't material, then, as far as you're concerned?

Mr. Forrest Hume:

I don't think congestion is the concern of the railways; I think reduced revenues is the concern of the railways. U.S. railways making incursions into Canada constitute competition from the shippers' perspective. The Canadian railways can retain the traffic: all they have to do is sharpen their pens and provide competitive service. Competition is what the remedy is about, and competition is what will prevail for Canadian railways, if in fact they choose to compete once the LHI remedy is injected into the negotiations.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Certainly the experience so far with the former interswitching regime suggested that they can sharpen their pencils, because they didn't really lose that much business to the American carriers.

Mr. Forrest Hume:

Mr. Hardie, on that issue, if I may—

(1625)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I have a limited amount of time and I really want to get to Mr. Ballantyne with a question as to who should be considered the shipper. We heard, for instance, from the short-lines a little while ago who had issues handing off cars to the main lines. Would we have a more efficient system if that short-line or the producer car user was considered a shipper with the shipper's rights?

Mr. Robert Ballantyne:

I would say the simple answer to that is yes. The definition of a shipper should be quite broad. Usually the term that's used is the beneficial owner of the cargo as the real shipper, but it could be a freight forwarder. It could be a short-line railway, and I think that would make a lot of sense, actually, for the short-line railways to have some of those rights.

I think Mr. Pellerin's comment about the short-lines being able to take cases before the agency, similar to the way shippers can for service problems, for example, makes a lot of sense. So I would make it a very broad definition.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Mr. Johnston, I'll pose the same question to you as I have done to a few of the other panellists along the way. Could you define for me what, to you, constitutes adequate and suitable service?

Try to be magnanimous, fair about this. Enlightened self-interest is a beautiful thing, but everybody has to make money and it all has to work for everybody. What constitutes that, particularly with respect to a win-win outcome for people?

Mr. Brad Johnston:

That's a great question. In terms of adequate and suitable service, I'll speak as a shipper. That's what I am. There are a multitude of ways in which a railway can ensure that it's profitable, whether through negotiating an agreement with a shipper such as me or issuing a tariff.

To me, “adequate and suitable” means that my goods will move through to their destination. It's not a debate about if, but about when. We cannot entertain any discussion about whether our goods will move. They must move. The common carrier obligation also dovetails into adequate and suitable service. The railways have an obligation to move our goods. It can't be a debate about if; it has to be a discussion about when.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

What constitutes a good “when”?

The Chair:

Mr. Hardie, you've run out of time again.

Mr. Shields.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'll let you finish the answer.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

I think I did. Did I overlook something?

Mr. Martin Shields:

Yes. The question was about the “when”.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

“When” is in a fashion that works for both the railway and the shipper. It is our view that the common carrier obligation and adequate and suitable does not mean I get what I want when I ask for it. That is not our view. However, it can't mean that the scheduling or the eventual provision of the service can be in a time frame that just does not work for the shipper. In our view, that does not fulfill the common carrier obligation.

Mr. Martin Shields:

You were going to talk about the loss that we heard CP and CN might have to the U.S. market because of the TIH. You were starting into an answer about loss to the competitive U.S.

Mr. Forrest Hume:

I want to point out that in the time that extended interswitching was in effect, from 2014 to 2017, the railways earned record profits and were able to provide extensive capital infusion to their infrastructure. In other words, there was no hit whatsoever. In my opinion, the idea that cost-based provisions or regulatory intervention is somehow damaging to the railway's ability to make money and to invest in infrastructure is a false claim.

(1630)

Mr. Martin Shields:

[Inaudible—Editor] indicators to you there. Thank you.

Going back to Teck, you described some amendments that you would make, and you talked about transparency, costing determination, and service definition. Those are the amendments you feel would be practical to this piece of legislation.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

Yes, that's correct.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Could you expand a little on those three, or pick one of them that's more critical than the other two?

Mr. Brad Johnston:

Sure. We're data-driven people. We spend a lot of time trying to use facts to guide our supply chain. The fact there's really no such regime in Canada currently is a problem for shippers, railways, and policy-makers. Being called upon to enact legislation, being called upon to invest in infrastructure, in the absence of data, is a problem. Someone even made a reference to congestion. In our view, that's a conclusion one makes from assessing data. It's not just something that someone gets to state. You should have to prove it.

Data will allow us to do that. We'll be able, in a meaningful way, to make a whole bunch of very good decisions if we have the right data. That is why, in our submission on the draft bill, we spent a great deal of time talking about data and what we think would allow for that to improve and give everyone—shippers, railways, and policy-makers—a very clear understanding of what's happening in our supply chain.

Mr. Martin Shields:

As a major supplier of steel or coal, that on-time delivery, do you think it would negotiate some strength for you, or for both parties be advantageous, if you had agreed-upon data?

Mr. Brad Johnston:

Absolutely. Our supply chain might even then have an opportunity to become what we could call world class. If everyone had a very clear understanding as to what was taking place, absolutely.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you.

The Chair:

You have a minute left.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Sir, you had 10 recommendations. You got through some of them. Is there one out of those 10 that you would stick out and say it would really make a difference?

Mr. Forrest Hume:

The recommendation we make with respect to the changes proposed to the level of service provisions is important. We believe there is no need for further clarification of those provisions.

In the last three years, there have been a number of cases that were litigated before the agency and the Federal Court of Appeal that clarified in detail the seminal Patchett case of 1959 and the agency's evaluation process for determining level of service complaints. The need for clarification no longer exists. In fact, putting mandatory considerations in place only gives the opportunity for the finality of the agency's decision to be disturbed through protracted litigation and appeals. I have level of service cases that are going on for two and three years without a final conclusion in the courts.

Mr. Martin Shields:

That's a lot of wasted time and money.

Mr. Forrest Hume:

Correct.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Go ahead, Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I want to give you folks an opportunity to think outside the box. Looking at a transportation vision 30 years down the road, 23 years down the road, the minister has put forward a transportation strategy 2030. With this bill, we are looking particularly at trying to establish balance and therefore return in value, in particular as it relates to future investments that support the overall transportation strategy.

That said, managing risks and creating value is of utmost importance. As business, shippers, and service providers, looking through a lens of contributing to economic environmental social strategies, what are your opinions on how we can utilize Bill C-49 to ultimately contribute to an overall transportation strategy and how it's going to help you be a global enabler and lead us to perform better economically on a global stage?

(1635)

Mr. Robert Ballantyne:

Goodness.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

Mr. Hume will comment if you—

Mr. Robert Ballantyne:

Yes, go ahead.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

I would like to answer that question. I'm just going to collect my thoughts. It's quite a question.

Anyway by all means, please, Mr. Hume.

Mr. Forrest Hume:

I'll start off, if I may.

It would be important that the bill comport with our existing national transportation policy, which highlights competition in market forces. If we can get these two railways to compete with each other in the manner that is contemplated by that policy, we will have a bright future in this country.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

The time is ticking, guys.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

All right.

There's no doubt about it that Canada is a trading nation and, in our particular case, our main competitor is Australia. The output for steelmaking coal mines in Canada has been more or less flat for a decade, and in Australia it has grown by, let's say, 60%. I reflect sometimes on why that is, and one of the reasons is supply chain.

In my view, there are different characteristics of what we might call a world-class supply chain, and that would include a platform for investing in infrastructure. That's well understood by the participants. It would include real-time measuring and monitoring of the supply chain. It would include a common platform for planning, and.... Well, let's just leave it at those three items.

It's a measure of how the participants control the supply chain. All those things are fact driven; they're data driven. It's why we spent so much time in our initial submission on data, on assessing the U.S. waybill system, and the main point of our response.

On the earlier question, I talked about the importance of getting the data right. We're not measuring what we're doing right now. There's nothing world class about that, and we can't improve. As a quality management system person, you have to measure what you're doing. The actual publishing of that measurement has to be transparent. Everyone has to have the same understanding of what's taking place. That's how people run supply chains.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Great.

Mr. Ballantyne.

Mr. Robert Ballantyne:

I have a couple of other comments.

In April of last year, Mr. Garneau made the following statement: “I see transportation in Canada as a single, interconnected system that drives the Canadian economy.”

If the overall objective is to make our economy as competitive as possible on a global basis, then all the things in Bill C-49, and obviously other pieces of legislation and so on, and our trade agreements, whether NAFTA or CETA or whatever, should be geared towards that objective. One would hope, as we're talking about Bill C-49 today, that the various provisions would help lead to that objective.

I think in talking about it being an interconnected system, one of the inconsistencies that we have, and this is just an issue of a normal free market system, is that each of the players in effect is an island unto themself. They're all trying to maximize their own situation. That's, in a sense, a conundrum in terms of Mr. Garneau's view that it should be an interconnected system.

One of the governance problems, it seems to me, for the government, is how you reconcile the quite legitimate needs of private businesses to maximize the return for their shareholders on the one hand, but make sure that the system is working effectively for the whole economy on the other hand.

I think those are things that hopefully this bill will contribute to.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Blaney. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you very much.

I really liked the question from my colleague at 40,000 feet, but unfortunately the road to hell is paved with good intentions and the devil is in the details.

My question is for Mr. Hume, but before I ask it, let me stress how important it will be to consider the excellent recommendations made here when studying the bill. This bill will increase paperwork and it shows serious gaps in data collection. In addition, there are many comments about the interswitching system.

(1640)

[English]

My question will be for you, Mr. Hume. At the beginning of this presentation you were cut short, and I would like to give you the opportunity to expand.

You were mentioning that you were recommending the elimination of the exclusions for long-haul interswitching. Could you elaborate a little more on how we could fix this bill, if I could put it that way, to at least reach the ultimate objective of making our country more effective in terms of this transportation supply chain?

Mr. Forrest Hume:

Well, of course, our recommendation is to eliminate the exclusions, but one of the things that could be done to make the long-haul interswitching rate efficacious is to make its application automatic. Right now, a shipper would have to apply to the agency. I'm quite well aware of what happens when the shipper applies to the agency. There is protracted litigation. It's lengthy. It's costly. There are appeals to the courts. It takes months, and in some cases years, before the shipper actually knows what the final determination is.

The difference between extended interswitching and long-haul interswitching is that extended interswitching was automatic. The shippers knew what the rate was by simply referring to the regulation. The agency calculated the rates on a fair and commercially reasonably basis, it included a reasonable contribution above the railways' costs, and it was accepted.

The long-haul interswitching remedy is not automatic. It will be as litigious, in my view, as competitive line rates were. There were five cases of which I am aware of competitive line rates. One of them went to the Federal Court of Appeal. Eventually, the railways stopped competing with each other and rendered the remedy inoperative. I don't want that to happen to long-haul interswitching. If it's made automatic, it will work.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Yes, so extended is what you recommend. I would recall for my friend that it was in our Bill C-30, but let's forget that it was a Conservative measure. This is what people asked for, and it's what would help.

Is there any other recommendation or any other issue you would like to see addressed in this bill?[Translation]

Mr. Audet, you talked about safety. Of course, there are the recordings that can be heard after the fact, but you think the focus needs to be on training. What would you like to see in Bill C-49 to that effect?

Mr. Béland Audet:

In our view, it is clear that the training for conductors and first responders should be standardized and made compulsory. Those are our two recommendations. [English]

Hon. Steven Blaney:

My last question is for you, Mr. Johnston. In terms of data, you recognize that it is important that we collect the data, but you mentioned that the way it is proposed in the bill is not the way to move forward. How could we tweak it or make it more efficient?

Mr. Brad Johnston:

Obviously, there's a great deal about the data that we like. It's certainly an improvement over what we have today, which is essentially nothing, so I don't want to give the wrong impression. Nevertheless, I think the biggest thing is just to ensure that all the data is collected and then submitted to the agency that will collate and publish it. It must be a complete dataset. Really, that would do it.

The Chair:

Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Mr. Audet, I would like to resume our conversation that was gently and fairly interrupted by our chair.

You mentioned Positive Train Control. Does the system exist in Canada or the United States?

(1645)

Mr. Béland Audet:

It's an American system. It sort of has to do with the supply chain you mentioned earlier, since it provides information about it. The system also provides information about mechanical issues, such as brakes and maintenance. You can obtain a lot of information with the system.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

So I was not mistaken in saying that, right now, municipalities are unable to know what types of products cross their territory by rail.

Mr. Béland Audet:

They are able to find out with the system—

Mr. Robert Aubin:

After the fact.

Mr. Béland Audet:

No, the municipalities can find out with the help of the AskRail application. We don't have access to it, but first responders can have the app on their phones and find out exactly what's on the train. However, they can only find out as the train goes by.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

That's when the reaction time starts. I imagine that there's a specific type of intervention for each product.

Mr. Béland Audet:

That's right.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

This means that not even the application provides the time required to react.

Mr. Béland Audet:

The fact remains that we know what a train contains in the event of an accident. That's still an excellent source of information. We know exactly what type of intervention will be needed. However, clearly—

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Why can't the information be available at the outset?

Mr. Béland Audet:

I'm not sure I can answer that. It may be possible to obtain the information sooner. In terms of the delay itself, I would not want to mislead you by answering inaccurately.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Okay.

Over the past few minutes, while listening to the comments with one ear, I have been trying to quickly scan through the documents you provided. Clearly, the institute you are in the process of setting up can only be beneficial for safety.

What is the status of the funding for the institute? Is Transport Canada contributing? Is this still being studied? Could the objectives outlined your document materialize quickly?

Mr. Béland Audet:

We have obtained funding from private partners. We have the funds we need from that sector. The provincial governments' contribution is also very good, but we are still waiting for the federal government. For almost a year, we have been waiting for answers about funding for this project. We are still at the stage of discussions with Transport Canada.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Are you getting more specific answers than those we usually get about the rail bypass?

Mr. Béland Audet:

Oh, oh!

I don't think I need to answer that.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I think you actually have. Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Monsieur Aubin.

We have about 10 minutes left. Do we want to do another round, starting with Ms. Block? Or does anyone have further questions?

Do you have a question, Mr. Hardie? Go ahead.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I wanted to go back to the issue of data, because it has come up a number of times in previous studies, including this one. Somebody in one of the earlier panels talked about the granularity of the data. In other words, what kind of detail is there in the data that would be helpful to shippers and in their negotiations with the rail companies?

Mr. Johnston, maybe you could speak to that. Data is one thing, but what kind of data? What do you really need to know that you would like to have, practically real time?

Mr. Brad Johnston:

I think at the very end you referred to two different points. One is real-time data and the other is a reporting on what took place. Was that on purpose, or...?

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Well, as I understand it, the need for data is all about getting your head around what the railways have available in any particular part of the country in terms of rolling stock, etc., and how it's being used. You would have a reasonable expectation, if you ordered up some rail service, of what they would be able to provide.

This is what I took away from some of the earlier comments, not just today but in previous studies. If I'm not headed down the right track on that one, tell me what kind of data would be most useful to you going forward.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

That's a great question.

Let's start with time, time for, in our case, a train to go from an origin to a destination and to return. We measure that in hours. The quantity is moot.

There is time over a particular subdivision. When we talk about granularity, to us that means not measuring things in terms of the system-wide averages. In our particular case, from southeast B.C. to Vancouver, that's not that useful to us. In fact, it's not useful at all. We would want to know, for our specific good, the time, the quantity, the availability of locomotives, the availability of cars. Gosh, why locomotives? What is the redundant capacity? We don't plan to 100% perfection, so what's available to us, should we need it? What's the contingent capacity on cars? Are there some available? Are they all being utilized? We go into a great deal of detail on that in our submission. There is time across a particular subdivision.

When we talk about the issue of congestion for someone like Teck, we could aggregate it, but we want to know what's moving in the corridor in which our goods are travelling. You could aggregate the rest of the traffic. You could do it by car type. You could do it by length of train, and so on. But when our particular good now merges with the other goods, how are they behaving in conjunction with each other? We do that. How it's happening in January might be different from how it happens in August. There's a seasonality to it too.

There's labour capacity. How many additional crews do you have? You have to measure, on a very granular basis, the supply chain in order to understand whether you have adequate capacity—that's the denominator—and what's actually moving—that's the numerator.

(1650)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

The example was given of the reporting requirements in the United States by Canadian railways operating down there. To your knowledge, are those requirements sufficient to meet what you would like to see in Canada?

Mr. Brad Johnston:

No, they're not. The main reason for that is that what's supplied in the United States under the waybill system is a sample. It's not a complete reporting on the actual material movements. As I said, in 2017 with data capabilities and transmission, there's no need for any restrictions on data. All the data created in Canada in a year for all our railways we could store on a laptop that we could buy at Best Buy. Data storage is fantastic compared to what it was 30 years ago.

The waybill itself is a satisfactory record. It includes subdivision information. It includes interchanges. It includes what we call the “STCC” codes, the material, itself. But you need to report all of them. You give it to the reporting agency, which then collates it and publishes it.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Is everybody all right and satisfied?

Thank you very much to the witnesses. We appreciate your coming.

We are going to suspend until the next panel. The next panel will start at 5:30. I've cut half an hour off your dinner time so that we can move along a little bit faster.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

The Chair:

All right.

(1650)

(1730)

The Chair:

We're reconvening for our last session of the day. As the witnesses know, this is our second full day of hearings. We have two more days to go. We welcome you all here this evening for our final panel. We look forward to hearing your comments.

We'd like to start with Pulse Canada. Introduce yourselves, please.

Mr. Greg Northey (Director, Industry Relations, Pulse Canada):

Thank you, Madam Chair and members of the committee, for the opportunity to discuss Bill C-49 with you.

Pulse Canada appreciates your focus on this bill and your efforts to expedite the study prior to the return of Parliament. We submitted a brief to you, and I will touch on a few of the recommendations contained within it.

Pulse Canada is a national industry association that represents over 35,000 growers and 130 processors and exporters of peas, lentils, beans, chickpeas, and specialty crops like canary, sunflower, and mustard seeds. Since 1996 Canadian pulse and specialty crop production has quadrupled, and Canada is now the world's largest producer and exporter of peas and lentils, accounting for one-third of global trade. The value of the industry's exports exceeded $4 billion in 2016.

The market for pulse and specialty crops is highly competitive, and maintaining and growing Canada's market share in over 140 countries that the sector ships to is a top priority for the industry. Pulse and specialty crops are the most multimodal grain crops in western Canada; 40% of our sector's exports through Vancouver are containerized. Efficiently managing the logistics in these supply chains drives the competitiveness of our sector. As such, predictable and reliable rail service is central to ensuring this competitiveness and economic growth.

It is through this lens that Pulse Canada has assessed Bill C-49. Will it deliver improved service, increase rail capacity and competitive freight rates to the small and medium-sized shippers that constitute much of the pulse and specialty crops sector? Pulse Canada believes that Bill C-49 has the potential to deliver these outcomes, but we would like to offer some recommendations to ensure that the bill delivers the results that government intended, that shippers need, and that the overall Canadian economy expects.

Increased competition is the most effective way to deliver improved service capacity and rates, and this is where the proposed long-haul interswitching rate regime holds the most potential. The competitive forces that extended interswitching delivered to the rail market as a result of Bill C-30 were directly beneficial to pulse and specialty crop shippers, and the sector would like to see the long-haul interswitching deliver the same results.

You have heard significant and detailed recommendations on how to improve LHIR today. So I would only like to reiterate one point: excluding large groups of shippers from accessing the provision or limiting a shipper's access to the nearest rail competitor when the next competitor may offer the best combination of service, price, and routing, significantly decreases the potential impact of this provision. For LHIR to work as intended, by letting market forces and competition prevail—a point shippers and railways agree on—it should not be artificially limited through a list of exclusions that cuts out huge swaths of the economy. These exclusions should be removed to allow shippers and railways to operate under LHIR in as competitive an environment as possible. This will bring maximum benefit to shippers, railways, and the Canadian economy. This would also help reduce the differences in interpretation and intents as well as the expected legal challenges that will plague decisions with this remedy for years to come.

I will now focus on provisions of the bill that are intended to help increase supply chain transparency. Creating a competitive environment with balanced commercial relationships requires a transparent freight rail system so that all involved can make commercial decisions based on timely and accurate information. To achieve this, the bill proposes two significant new data regulations and a transitional provision that would require railways to provide service and performance data based on the model used by the U.S. Surface Transportation Board. This is a good start. However, Bill C-49 proposes that this data will not be available to the commercial market until a full year after royal assent. When the data does become available, the bill allows a three-week lag between collection and publication of this data.

In the U.S. case, the railways and regulator began publication of this data within three months after it was ordered, and it was available publicly one week after the railways provided it to the regulator. With a concerted effort by shippers, governments, and railways, and an amendment to Bill C-49, Pulse Canada believes Canada can match, at minimum, the timelines set in the United States and fulfill the intention of Bill C-49 to provide timely data to the commercial market.

As recommended by the committee in your report on Bill C-30 in December, Bill C-49 has introduced a significant new requirement for the railways to provide confidential, commercial, and proprietary data to the Canadian Transportation Agency.

(1735)



As you identified, this data is important, as it would permit the agency to more effectively identify and investigate issues in the rail system and exercise its authority to issue orders to railway companies. This is the point that Scott Streiner identified yesterday as an important issue, and it's one that Pulse Canada believes in as well. However, Bill C-49 limits the use of this data by explicitly specifying that it can only be used by the agency to calculate long-haul interswitching rates. Requiring this data from railways, but narrowing its application, severely limits the impact of this new regulatory provision and does not fully achieve the intent for the data to support the agency's delivery of its statutory responsibilities. Equally important, this data could be used to fully measure the impact of Bill C-49 and allow for evidence-based assessments as the bill is implemented.

To conclude, I'd like to address the proposed changes in Bill C-49 that will remove containerized grain from the maximum revenue entitlement. Pulse Canada understands that the government's intent with respect to this policy change is to incent innovation in the container supply chain, increase container capacity, and improve levels of service. These are valuable outcomes, and we must collectively ensure they are achieved, as removing this traffic from the MRE could potentially negatively impact the Canadian pulse and special crop sectors' international competitiveness. The focus, then, must be to ensure that other provisions in Bill C-49 set the necessary conditions for this change to the MRE to be a success and to truly result in more service and capacity. The data recommendations I discussed earlier will help ensure that everyone can measure the policy outcome, but Pulse Canada has recommendations on other provisions within the bill that will ensure that the remedy suite available to shippers in the event of service failure or costing disputes is functional.

First, the reciprocal penalty provision and the accompanying dispute resolution process introduced for service level agreements is a valuable change that will establish commercial accountability between shippers and railways. We applaud the government for introducing this. To ensure that it functions effectively, Pulse Canada asked the committee to consider clarifying that the intent of these penalties is to be sufficient to encourage commercial accountability and performance while recognizing the differences in economic power of small shippers compared with that of the railways.

Second, for small and medium-sized shippers and containerized shippers no longer shipping under the MRE, it will be essential that the general strengthening of the agency's information and dispute resolution services introduced in this bill, Bill C-49, is effective. The agency having the ability to attempt to resolve an issue a shipper may have with the railway company in an informal manner provides shippers with a less confrontational, more cost-effective and timely way to resolve service issues without having to bring a formal level of service complaint to the agency. These are barriers facing shippers when considering accessing agency provisions, and this is why the agency has stated they will increase outreach to shippers. It has nothing to do with the agency “drumming up business”.

To fully realize the potential of this provision, Pulse Canada requests the committee to consider clarifying what it means for the agency to take action on informal resolution. Our view is that taking action can include a wide variety of activities, including such things as questioning, site visits, requesting information, investigating, etc. Clarity on this issue would help during the implementation of this bill. Ultimately, however, Pulse Canada views agency own-motion powers, which has been discussed at length today, as the most efficient and effective way to address disputes and network issues and strongly urges the government to consider the agency's request to be granted these powers.

Finally, I'd like to briefly touch on a provision in Bill C-49 that is specifically focused on the grain sector. The requirement in clause 42 of the bill that railways self-assess their ability to move grain during a upcoming grain year and identify the steps they will take to enable grain to move can be an extremely powerful provision that can establish the basis for measuring railway activities against their plan both during and at the end of the grain year. To strengthen this provision and ensure it delivers the intended outcome, Pulse Canada offers recommendations in our brief to enhance that section to clearly set the parameters for the type of information railway companies must provide. For the pulse and special crops sector, better defining these parameters provides an additional platform for the monitoring and assessment of the impact of the decision to remove containerized grain from the MRE.

Thank you.

(1740)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Northey.

Now we go to the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference, Mr. Hackl and Phil Benson. Of course, Phil is well known to many of us on the Hill here.

Welcome to both of you.

Mr. Phil Benson (Lobbyist, Teamsters Canada):

Thank you.

I'm Phil Benson, a lobbyist with Teamsters Canada. With me is brother Roland Hackl, the vice-president of the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference, who will be making our presentation today.

Mr. Roland Hackl (Vice-President, Teamsters Canada Rail Conference):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

As vice-president, I represent members on every freight, commuter and passenger railway in this country. Prior to that, however, some 29 years ago, I was hired as a brakeman at CN Rail. I'm a qualified conductor and locomotive engineer, so I have spent a significant portion of my life cooped up in an 8' by 10' control cab of a locomotive, so I am very familiar with the conditions we're talking about with respect to live video and voice recording.

Bill C-49 would provide for potential relaxations of various pieces of legislation that cause extreme concern to Teamsters Rail. We believe that Bill C-49 would compromise our membership's privacy for what can be stated as questionable safety and public benefits. For example, many of you will recall that a few months ago there was a derailment in north Toronto. A locomotive consist crossed over into a train. There was little damage but a lot of publicity; it was in a very populated area. Immediately following that, senior management from CP Rail, who owned the equipment and the track, came out on record saying that live video and voice recording would have prevented the accident. That's impossible. Live video and voice recording is to be reviewed after the fact, so unless these employers are suggesting monitoring live video and voice at the time it happens, there is no prevention possible. It's a tool, at best, for studying incidents after the fact.

The TSB currently has access to LVVR equipment, so for the past several years both major freight carriers and VIA Rail have been receiving locomotives fully equipped with LVVR equipment. This is live equipment. It is recording to date. In the event of an accident or incident, current legislation provides the TSB with full access to the information or data collected through this process.

The proposed legislation would allow employer or third-party access to LVVR, and we believe that would create a chilling effect on communications within a locomotive. It's a 10' by 8' space, where a person is sitting for 10, 12, 14, or 16 hours, communicating with a fellow employee during that period of time, talking about a lot of things. The concern we have is with the the chilling effect—which has been discovered and was referred to by Parliament some time ago as a culture of fear—that was instilled and fostered and nurtured first by the management of CN Rail. That management all moved to CP Rail. The same type of effect is in place now, especially when I hear CP Rail speaking about using this type of information for disciplinary processes. And that's no secret to us, because they have approached the union to say, “We want to use this for discipline. We want to be able to discipline based on monitoring this equipment.”

We believe that open communication between the employees in the cab, much like that between a co-pilot and pilot in an aircraft, is essential to the safe operation of this equipment. If you stifle that for fear of employers reviewing video recording at their leisure for the sole purpose of disciplining an individual, whether or not something has happened, it's going to create a problem with open communications on a locomotive. The private information will no longer be private. People talk about a lot of things in the course of their daily work. This is a locomotive engineer and conductor's office for 10 or 12 hours a day, sometimes longer, and there are a lot of things discussed. Some of it is relevant to railway operations. Some of it is only the conversation that every one of us has with co-workers during the course of our day. Should employers have access to that for any reason?

We think the bill in its present form is contrary to our rights as Canadians. To exempt 16,000 railroaders from PIPEDA, we believe is not appropriate, and this legislation would call for a specific exemption for the purpose of our employers, the people who have been found to foster a culture of fear, to watch. We have a problem with that.

(1745)



We think the bill is overly vague in how private information is accessed, collected, and used. What third parties are we talking about? What is the purpose of a third party looking at this information?

As you've heard earlier, at least from CP Rail, the LVVR recordings could be used for a disciplinary investigation and proceedings against employees. The employers already have significant means at their disposal to track. There are forward facing cameras called Silent Witness. These face outside a locomotive and track crossings. There are audio recordings of what's going on outside of the locomotive. In the event of a crossing accident, that information is used. There is a locomotive event recorder, commonly called a black box, that records all of the mechanical functions.

There are Wi-Tronix that track the speed and can be utilized to track cellular use. They will send an alarm to the employer to say when something is wrong. Currently, if a train stops in an emergency brake application, an alarm goes off, triggered by the Wi-Tronix, to tell the employer so. With the existing equipment, the employer can then remotely review the forward-facing camera. That exists today. That's what they're using today, without having the invasive technology that puts a camera squarely in my face for 10 or 12 hours, recording absolutely everything I do.

We believe the bill is contrary to the TSB recommendations in its report on the LVVR. The original TSB recommendations call for non-punitive, non-disciplinary, privileged recording of information. We're fine with that, and we're fine with the TSB having access to this information. There is no apparent limit to what data can be collected. We talked about safety-beneficial uses. It's a very vague term. What is a safety-beneficial use? As it stands right now, a recording is running, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The TSB has full access to that today. Should an employer have access to that information as well?

Many levels of the legal system, including arbitration, judicial review, court of appeals, and all the way to the Supreme Court, have upheld our existing rights to privacy. This bill would exempt us from those rights. With respect to that, there are multiple cases. I brought two with me. Unfortunately, they're only available in English. In one case, an employer thought it necessary to purchase a camera from a local shop and to install it in a clock in the booking-in facility, where employees report for work, to surreptitiously monitor crews. The employer portrayed this as a rogue manager taking this action on his own, but what we have to keep in mind is that the actions of that rogue manager were defended by a multinational corporation to arbitration. Had those actions been upheld, that would be the law in Canada today.

With the other federal employer, we had an incident where there was some suspicion on the part of a manager that an employee was fraudulently claiming benefits from workers' compensation. The manager took it upon himself to retain a private investigator based on a hunch. There was no proof, no data. The video tape was entered into an investigation, and a manager testified that on the Monday following a hockey tournament, the manager became aware of this. I have to ask what this manager knew on the Friday such that he took it upon himself to hire private surveillance to surreptitiously monitor an employee, when he didn't become aware of the fact until Monday. Again, that is what the employers are doing today with the equipment they have at their disposal. Again, the company portrayed it as a rogue manager taking the law into his own hands, but a multinational corporation defended that to the point of arbitration, and again, had we not been successful at arbitration, that would be the law today.

(1750)



We believe further that this bill is contrary to section 8 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, either because the state is allowing the collection of this private information without proper safeguards, or by virtue of allowing employers to collect this private information without proper safeguards. We do not believe there is an attempt to balance the safety benefits with the rights of employees to privacy, as protected by law.

The Chair:

Mr. Hackl, I'm going to have to stop you there. I hope you don't have too much more to say.

Mr. Roland Hackl:

Did I hit 10 minutes already? I'm sorry.

The Chair:

Yes, you did. It's almost 11 minutes, and I let you go a little bit further.

Mr. Roland Hackl:

Okay.

The Chair:

Maybe you could try to get those last comments in through your answers to questions from the committee. Otherwise, it takes away from the committee's ability to ask you the questions they want to ask.

Mr. Roland Hackl:

I'm here for your questions, to help.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

From Fertilizer Canada, we have Mr. Graham and Mr. MacKay.

Mr. Clyde Graham (Senior Vice-President, Fertilizer Canada):

Good evening, Madam Chair and members of the committee.

Thank you for inviting Fertilizer Canada to speak with you today in relation to your study on the transportation modernization act. We are pleased to appear before you to provide the committee with information about our mandate, as well as to present our recommendations to help enhance the legislation's goal of furthering competition in the freight rail sector.

I will start with introductions. I am Clyde Graham, senior vice-president of Fertilizer Canada. I am joined by Ian MacKay, our legal adviser on rail issues.

Fertilizer Canada represents the manufacturers and wholesale and retail distributors of potash, nitrogen, phosphate and sulphur fertilizer, and related products. Collectively, our members employ more than 12,000 Canadians and contribute over $12 billion annually to the Canadian economy through advanced manufacturing, mining, and distribution facilities.

Our association, which includes companies such as PotashCorp, Koch Fertilizer Canada, the Mosaic Company, CF Industries, Agrium, and Yara Canada, amongst many more, is committed to the fertilizer sector's continued growth through innovative research, programming and advocacy.

Canada is one the world's leading producers of fertilizer. It is our products that help farmers produce bountiful, sustainable food in Canada and the United States and in more than 70 countries worldwide. We therefore play a crucial role in Canada's agrifood industry, an innovative industry identified by the Prime Minister's advisory council on economic growth.

To meet the demand of the world's farmers, we rely heavily on the railway system to move our products along our trade and transportation corridors to national, North American, and international markets. Fertilizer Canada is a proud partner of the Canadian rail system, and our reliance on rail is so extensive that our membership comprises one of the largest customer groups by volume for both CN and CP.

As key stakeholders, we are encouraged to be working with the government, which has demonstrated a commitment to modernizing Canada's transportation system and capacity. We commend the legislation's objectives regarding freight rail, and we are supportive of many of the proposed changes, including those clarifying third party liability, reinforcing rail safety, promoting competitiveness, and increasing data transparency.

In an increasingly globalized world, we appreciate the government's recognition that a nuanced approach to freight rail is necessary to meet the needs of the Canadian economy. We make our following recommendations understanding that the freight rail system should evolve to ensure that management of Canadian railways does not impair Canadian jobs, trade, or healthy competition.

I would like to begin by discussing the exclusions for long-haul interswitching.

Measures proposed in the legislation that would exclude certain materials and certain regions from accessing the benefits of long-haul interswitching are a serious concern for our members. Canada has long adhered to the common carrier principle as a foundation of our economy. This principle prevents shipping companies from discriminating against a particular type of good. It is what has kept the Canadian economy in motion despite our vast distances. Amending the legislation to exclude certain materials and regions from long-haul interswitching will have the negative effect of eroding the common carrier principle—a concerning precedent for all Canadians.

As most of our members operate in communities and regions captive to rail, denying access to long-haul interswitching based solely on their location increases their costs of doing business. From a safety perspective, I would also like to draw attention to measures excluding toxic inhalation hazard materials from long-haul interswitching. One such material, anhydrous ammonia, is a key building block of nitrogen fertilizer, and it is used extensively in Canada for direct application into the soil to grow healthy crops across Canada. It's a vital fertilizer for many farmers.

(1755)



To date, there is no evidence to suggest that this material is not safely and securely transported by rail. Our members take transportation of their material seriously.

In support of that record, I'll add the following. Our members use purpose-built railcars for safe handling of ammonia. Our members invest significantly in the insurance coverage and safety measures necessary to safeguard the transportation of our products. Our members already pay significantly higher freight rates to transport dangerous material, and our association proactively develops safety codes and educational resources for our supply chain and for first responders to support the safe handling of fertilizer.

Tragedies such as Lac-Mégantic must never happen again. However, having said that, it is critical that we approach the transportation of dangerous goods through responsible, evidence-based policy decisions.

I reiterate that there are not and have not been any safety reasons to discriminate against the shipment of TIH material, such as ammonia, by long-haul interswitching. Our members already pay premium rates, which compensate the railways for their liability in handling it. When it comes to hauling ammonia, the rates are four to five times the rates we pay for other kinds of fertilizer. Any long-haul interswitching rate established by the agency will reflect this and adequately compensate the railways.

I would also like to briefly present two other recommendations relating to changes to extended interswitching and interchanges.

First, we caution against the provisions that would allow rail companies to remove interchanges from service simply by giving notice. We are concerned that the amendments strip the Canadian Transportation Agency of its authority to reinstate interchanges and strengthen the existing power imbalance between shippers and our railway companies. In the past, railways have denied that interchanges exist to avoid having to turn traffic over to connecting railways. We recommend this provision be removed from Bill C-49 to prevent inadvertent harm to captive shippers in the future.

Second, Fertilizer Canada and its members are disappointed in the government's decision to sunset extended interswitching up to 160 kilometres. I think you've heard this over and over again. We have found 160-kilometre interswitching has strengthened competition over greater distances, as Transport Canada has confirmed. Since western Canada's freight rail landscape has not changed in any fundamental manner since 160-kilometre interswitching regulations were introduced in 2014, we are disappointed by the government's decision to sunset extended interswitching.

The Canadian fertilizer sector is a proud partner of Canada's rail system. It is a system that works for all Canadian industries. It's a team approach to moving goods within Canada and to export markets. Together, we support Canada's global competitiveness in the agrifood sector through trade and transportation. Our $12 billion industry and our 12,000 jobs depend on a healthy, modernized, competitive rail system to survive and to thrive. Ensuring that our products are delivered to farmers safely and securely in places such as Niagara, the prairie grain fields, or the B.C. interior is of paramount importance to us, and we have a long proud record of success in that regard.

We are very supportive of much of what this bill proposes and commend its intentions. The captive shippers, who are on one rail line and captive to that railway, need to benefit from our national railway infrastructure. It's great to see the government act to support them. We do believe that more can be done, though, which is why we strongly encourage the members of the committee to consider our recommendations. We believe they can improve Bill C-49 through a considered, evidence-based policy approach.

Thank you. That's the end of our presentation. Ian and I will be happy to answer any questions that you have.

(1800)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Graham.

We'll move on to questions, starting with Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair, and thank you to our witnesses for joining us today. I do appreciate the testimony you have provided.

As you noted, Mr. Graham, there's a recurring theme that we are hearing throughout the testimony that I would highlight that. Many witnesses appreciate much of what's in this bill, but they have concerns around certain provisions, one of them being the long-haul interswitching.

You mentioned the measures to exclude the movement of toxic inhalation hazard material and I think that was raised with me in a meeting that we would have had. I'm wondering if you can comment on what the rationale may be. Have you been provided with any rationale for why this exclusion has been made in this act?

Mr. Clyde Graham:

We have not been given any persuasive rationale by the government, and it appears from our point of view to have been an arbitrary decision. There's no safety reason to do this, and I don't know why our products would be discriminated on that basis.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

You also commented on the common carrier obligations, or the common carrier principle, and the concern that this is foundational to the business that you do. Does your organization have any concern that it is somewhat of a slippery slope if this exclusion is made for long-haul interswitching? Could one assume that down the road these obligations will perhaps not be met?

Mr. Clyde Graham:

That's what our brief says. We believe that this is a dangerous precedent. It could be applied to other aspects of the movement of our products, particularly ammonia, by rail. We don't think the railways should be allowed to pick and choose what they move. That's not their job. Their job is to move it safely.

(1805)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Northey, I do want to ask you a question. Yesterday morning, the associate deputy minister stated that extended interswitching was allowed to lapse because it wasn't heavily used, but was having unintended consequences in terms of the competitiveness of our railways vis-à-vis the U.S. railways. I guess there has been some confusion in some of the testimony we've been given when witnesses have said it was a remedy that wasn't used very much, but then they go on to talk about the implications and consequences it's had in the marketplace. Could you comment on that?

Mr. Greg Northey:

It's been well addressed that there's the usage of it, where people would actually use the provision, and then the ability to negotiate better. In our case, we have specific cases where traffic has moved. We would ship a lot of product in the U.S. What we've found is that CN and CP don't necessarily want to move our traffic to the U.S. because they'll often lose those cars for 30 days potentially. Generally, they price very high for those moves to discourage shippers from being able to access those markets. They have to structure their network however they think, and optimize and utilize their assets the way they feel.

What extended interswitching did was it to actually allow those shippers to access BNSF, which wants to move that traffic. When we really look at this and think about the whole network, having that competition is actually helping the entire network. Those who want to use those assets for another move or to go to the west coast or to Thunder Bay won't necessarily feel the pressure from the shippers who are complaining about a lack of service and the lack of adherence to common carrier obligations because another railway can pick it up. In fact, we're optimizing, in general, that provision. It optimizes the entire network, and it optimizes things as far as making economic decisions is concerned, both for the railways and shippers.

That's what competition does, and that's what we saw. When it was used, it had a huge impact. We have a small shipper, and it's able to save $1,500 per car. It's only moving 15 cars, and it has maybe five employees, so that has a huge impact for that shipper. It can invest that money in its business, and it can invest in the economy and grow its business.

As much as it may seem like small numbers for small or medium shippers, it has a huge impact.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My question is for Mr. Hackl. I know that the issue of LVVRs is quite contentious, and I'm hoping that this dialogue will be productive and fruitful.

I was listening to your opening remarks without any prejudice or bias, but for this exercise, I'd like take some positions. The first is that there is no absolute right to privacy in the workplace. You shouldn't be discussing anything that is inappropriate or that you wouldn't mind hearing afterwards. For example, I don't mind shooting the breeze with my staff, and it's something I don't mind being recorded. The second position is that, in the interest of public safety and moving the safety yardstick further, LVVR is perhaps a component that's missing in all of the devices that you mentioned. Lastly, I guess, is that the legislation doesn't state that data from LVVRs can be used for punitive or disciplinary measures. Anybody who does that would be acting outside the legislation.

Could I have your comments, please.

Mr. Roland Hackl:

Thank you for your question.

An absolute right is an oddity. I believe there is a reasonable expectation of privacy in the workplace. I'm not sure an employer would really want to hear the conversation that goes on in a locomotive after a crew that was contractually or legally required to be relieved from that train in 12 hours was still there 14 or 15 hours later. While entertaining, that may not be the most helpful, so I don't know why we'd want to record that.

I disagree, though, that the technology is not available. The technology is in place and active today. It is there for the TSB to use. Where our concerns lie is in who should be the custodians of this information, of this protected, private, privileged information? Should it be the TSB, which has a mandate and a responsibility to impartially investigate incidents and accidents, or should it be employers that have on many occasions been demonstrated to be.... I don't know if it was a finding of fact that they were malicious, but there was certainly "malintent" in some of the actions employers have used with respect to discipline and punitive actions against employees. That's the concern.

I'm not sure I read the legislation the same way when we say it's not punitive or disciplinary. The way our legal folks have looked at it might be a bit different, but we'll have to look into it and get back to you on that.

(1810)

Mr. Phil Benson:

Actually, to clarify that, if you read the transportation department's actual facts and questions and answers, they state quite specifically that yes, it can be used for discipline. This morning, you heard CPR state quite specifically that, yes, it will be used for discipline.

From Transport Canada itself, it has been answered, which is contrary to what madam Fox from the TSB said the other day that privacy rights had to be privileged and protected. Privilege belongs to the person whose privacy it is, so with all respect to you, I don't really care what you think about privacy rights. What I care about is what our members say about privacy rights, and what the Supreme Court arbitrators and the law of this country has said about privacy rights. It's easy for somebody else to give away another's privacy rights. The privilege stays with the person, not with the company or the government.

The second point madam Fox made was that it must be non-disciplinary and non-punitive. Based on the statement from Transport Canada, it's not going to be.

We have a third point if you want it, but go ahead.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

No, please go on.

Mr. Phil Benson:

Third, madam Fox specifically said that they need a just culture. As I've said repeatedly before this, and brother Hackl has just stated, there isn't a just culture. We have a fantasy being developed about what an LVVR could or should be, but not what it will be.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Quickly, because I want you to respond to my follow up. In regard to the just culture or what was said earlier, what I'm saying is that if those actions were outside the legislation, if you used it for a punitive or disciplinary measures, you would be doing it wrongly. You wouldn't be acting within the legislation. Does that change your viewpoint?

Mr. Phil Benson:

That would address this somewhat, but to be clear, that is not what Transport Canada has told you in their response and facts, and it's not what the companies have stated to you. With all respect, we can't comment on what could be in a piece of legislation; all we can deal with is what is in that legislation at this moment.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

In your opinion, if that were to be in the legislation—that those actions would be outside of it—would your position be different?

Mr. Phil Benson:

You're asking a hypothetical question, which is difficult to answer because the privilege of the person to have their privacy protected is an individual privilege. It's not something on which I, as a Teamsters Canada representative, or brother Hackl, as the vice-president, can say, “Oh, gosh darn, according to our legal opinion, it is a violation of section 8 of the charter and a violation of the Privacy Act.”

Quite bluntly, you're saying that if we change a piece of legislation that, in all likelihood, is unconstitutional and a violation of the Privacy Act, then it will make this okay in our opinion. As you understand, Mr. Sikand, that puts us in a very difficult situation. It's a hypothetical question that we will not answer.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We are over time.

Monsieur Aubin.

(1815)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Good afternoon, gentlemen. Thank you for being here.

A lot has been said about those voice and video recorders. I don't want to prolong the debate excessively, since I think you did a very good job of expressing your view, and we have heard it.

I just have one question: if Bill C-49 were to  clearly and explicitly state that voice and video recorders can be used solely by the TSB and only after an accident, would your position change in any way whatsoever? [English]

Mr. Roland Hackl:

That is our position, that it should be Transportation Safety Board access only. It should not be shared with employers or third parties. That's been our position since the initial introduction of this equipment, and that would satisfy us. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

This brings me to the topic of safety measures that, in my opinion, are even more important, and many witnesses have spoken about this. You can probably corroborate that. Most rail incidents tied to a human factor can be attributed to fatigue, yet Bill C-49 does nothing to address train operator fatigue.

Representatives of the railways tell us that they are in continuous discussions with the unions about this and that it is important, a priority even. However, it seems to me that the slowness with which the government and the railways are implementing measures to combat fatigue is a much more important safety aspect than installing a recorder or not, which will only help with the post-accident investigation.

Do you think there has been any progress and that measures can soon be in place for fatigue? [English]

Mr. Roland Hackl:

Happily, yes. First of all, LVVR would do nothing for fatigue.

As far back as 2010, CN Rail and our union started negotiating methods within the collective agreement for how to address fatigue. It didn't get a lot of steam and didn't get a lot of headway. The last collective agreement, which I believe was ratified with CN on August 4, contained a lot more on fatigue. As well, CN and the Teamsters have entered into a co-operative plan with the help of a fatigue specialist, a former TSB officer who specializes in sleep science, to work with us accumulating and tracking scientific information to ensure that the methods we're taking with respect to crew scheduling, rest, and work-life balance are having a positive and factual impact. It's one thing to say that we think this is going to help; it's another thing to measure how it's going to help.

I believe you heard a little bit from CN today about the Fitbit study, in which we actually.... I've worn them. We wouldn't put anything on our members that I wouldn't do myself. It tracks your waking and sleep habits. There were a few bugs at first. For instance, it recorded that during a two-hour period when I was at a pension meeting, I was asleep, so there is a little debate on that, but we worked out some of the bugs in that and our members are wearing them. The plan, and what we've done, is to put them in the non-scheduled environment without the enhancements that we've negotiated, track their information, transform their environment to a more scheduled, structured environment, and let them adjust to that. We're just now getting the data back with the follow-up information, and it's been very positive so far.

We are getting letters from members saying, “My goodness, I finally have a life and things are working well”.

Interestingly, last week—I'm not sure what CP said to you about this—we reached a tentative agreement with CP Rail, a one-year extension to the existing collective agreements for locomotive engineers and conductors at CP. That agreement expires this December. There is a tentative extension out for ratification now. The cornerstone of that agreement is provisions with respect to scheduling to try to address fatigue in a similar manner using the same sleep specialists we are using at CN to try to make improvements there as well.

We are seeing a lot of things, from better work-life balance and better retention to the employers benefiting from better attendance at work, and people aren't booking off unexpectedly.

We're working through the collective agreement process to get there, so there has been some good news. You may or not be aware of the agreement reached last week, but that's positive for everybody to try to get something done there.

(1820)

The Chair:

You have one minute. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

My next question is for you, Mr. Graham. I have to say that I cannot explain the exclusion you're subject to any more than you can.

Should Bill C-49 contain specific conditions for transporting dangerous goods? Currently, the transportation of oil and the transportation of canola oil seem to be handled exactly the same way, which seems a little strange to me. I'm not saying that there is a connection between that and your exclusion, but do you acknowledge that dangerous goods should be handled differently? This isn't in Bill C-49.

Mr. Clyde Graham:

Thank you for your question.[English]

What we're talking about here, in this bill, is the exclusion for toxic inhalation goods, which includes ammonia. There's no safety reason for this. We're not sure what that exclusion was done for. Other dangerous goods are not excluded, so there can't be a safety reason for this. Obviously, our goods, when they're dangerous, we have to look after. We have to steward them. We work very closely with the railways and everyone else, including first responders, in doing that. But these provisions that we're talking about, interswitching, are economic provisions. They're not safety provisions.

I don't know if that gets to your question.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Let's talk about the LVVR, because I can see that this is.... I'm torn on this one. I'll follow my colleague's thinking and give a little bit of a personal reflection on this. Traditionally, there have been some challenging labour relations issues between the companies and their workers. I understand that. You've just talked about a couple of agreements that have come across. It sounds like things are improving, but still, this could plunge the whole system back into a kind of toxic soup. You just don't want to go there.

I guess the question then, and I'll expect just a short answer, is that if LVVRs come in, who should own the data?

Mr. Roland Hackl:

The short answer, as I said before, is that the custodians of the data should be the TSB in the event of an incident or accident. It should not go to an employer for whatever reason they want to use it, especially a vindictive employer, as we've seen over so long.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay. What would happen, though, if the TSB found, in reviewing the record that was captured, that one or both of the crew were on a cellphone? We all know that cellphone use in that operating environment is against the rules and should be against the law, just as it is for driving. Certainly, in my ex-life with the transportation authority in metro Vancouver, where we do have LVVRs, by the way, on the buses, we don't need that because passengers would be taking pictures of that operator on the cellphone.

But okay, so the TSB discovers that the crew was using cellphones. The right-thinking, average, reasonable person would expect there to be punitive action on that, would you not agree?

Mr. Roland Hackl:

I would agree that people may expect that. The reality is that if I'm on a cellphone today, without LVVR, I'm fired. If I'm involved in a crossing accident and I'm on the cellphone, not only am I fired and never getting my job back, as the arbitral jurisprudence has upheld time and time again, but I'm also probably going to get charged with a criminal offence. The other thing that's going to happen is that I'm going to be charged civilly, so while I'm in jail my family is going to get booted out of their house.

There are extreme ramifications.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

All this does is just put the nail in, in other words. If there's a record of this having happened, really nothing changes. The punishment would fit the crime, basically.

Mr. Roland Hackl:

The record is not the issue. If the data is used responsibly by the TSB for the purposes of investigation, and cellphones are shown to be the problem....

We know that cellphones are a problem. If a guy's on a cellphone, that's an issue. The concern is not necessarily cellphones. Nobody wants that. We tell people, point-blank, “No cellphones. You are fired. Don't do it.” The concern is around the other things. For 12 hours I am being recorded, to be reviewed at my employer's leisure. This technology is live-streamed to my manager at his house at four o'clock in the morning, if he so desires. I don't think that is a situation that any employee should be subject to in this country.

(1825)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I understand that.

What happened in the collision in Toronto? What was the cause of it?

Mr. Roland Hackl:

The report just came out. I can't quote it verbatim. It was human error. I understand that fatigue may have been a factor, a piece of equipment.... There are a lot of other factors going on too. A light engine, which is a three-locomotive consist, crossed over into a freight train, as I recall.

What a lot of people didn't hear about, what didn't make the headlines, was that the crew was called immediately before and told to be on the lookout because there were trespassers in the yard. So they were watching for people running around and paying attention to a whole bunch of things. They hit a crossover, which is a very short piece of track that crosses them from one track into another, and they struck another movement.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I see.

Would there be some learning out of that, that perhaps a video record would provide to the company and to the employees alike, suggesting other ways of handling a situation like that, because it's bound to recur, right?

Mr. Roland Hackl:

I don't know if it's bound to recur, but I would suggest that current legislation and what we are advocating TSB use in the event of an incident or accident would provide exactly what you're asking for. After that incident, the TSB would say, ”We have a problem; send us the footage, and let's have a look at it”. The TSB investigates and we go forward from there.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I think, and I'll comment, that your crews are operating multi-tonne units that are very difficult to stop, very difficult to adjust. I think there is a reasonable expectation among the public that things happen the right way, and I think obviously given the safety record, most of the time they do.

When something goes haywire, though, there is also a reasonable expectation that mechanisms should be in place to find out what happened, to remedy the situation on an operational basis; and if somebody has done the wrong thing, if the evidence is there of that, the public will expect some kind of punishment for that. That's just a comment of mine.

Mr. Phil Benson:

I think Madame Fox of the TSB addressed that. The TSB, in its review, is to find out what and how, but what goes forward as to criminal and civil liability is something that happens after the TSB does a review. She was quite clear about that: privacy will not get you around violation of the Criminal Code.

There's a difference. When people make the statement, “If somebody violated the law, nothing saves you against a violation of law”, but what it does do is it brings that record into a court where a judge will review to decide whether or not it is probative, whether or not it will be public, whether or not it will be seen.

We personally do not want pictures of our membership eventually ending up in the press, because once the privilege and protection is broken from the TSB and it goes to third parties, it is going to get out. I really don't think it's appropriate to have, as in America, sort of a live streaming of what happened in the last 30 seconds of your loved one's life, over and over again.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. Thanks, Mr. Benson.

Go ahead, Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'm going to continue with the theme that I've been sticking to for these past many hours. I'm going to direct my questions to Mr. Graham.

I'm very much interested in the overall vision. Let's face it: this is all about business. This is about business practice and, with that, trying to establish a balance based on value return on your investments, ultimately giving us, as you stated earlier, a better performance by your company and those you represent. Fertilizer Canada's members provide 12,000 jobs and contribute $12 billion annually in economic activity in Canada alone; 12% of the world's fertilizer supply comes from Canada, making a heavy contribution to GDP that we're counting on; and Canada exports fertilizer to 80-plus countries, with 95% of Canada's potash production being exported; and finally, fertilizer is the third biggest volume commodity shipped by Canadian railways. So with all of that, there is in fact something to be said about that.

What interests me most in this process this week of listening is ensuring that we inject the attributes of Bill C-49 into the overall bigger vision as it relates to proper business practice. It becomes an enabler for you, so that the vision of Minister Garneau with respect to ensuring that future infrastructure investment is aligned with a national transportation strategy commences, and that we don't find ourselves with the same problems and challenges we had going back to the early part of the century when we started building these pieces of infrastructure in silos, unfortunately.

How do we integrate our data, our distribution, our logistics systems? How do we ensure that we integrate not only our national transportation infrastructure but also our international transportation system, so that once again our GDP performs at a better rate well into the future, for 30 to 50 years? My question for you is this. How do we get better at that to become more of an enabler for you to do business?

(1830)

Mr. Clyde Graham:

I'm just a fertilizer guy.

The economy works together best when businesses collaborate, and there are a lot of players in the whole supply chain that moves products in and out of Canada. Obviously, having forecasts of what we're going to be doing with our business and where we're going is important, and we hope that the railways react to that. I think sometimes the railways have delayed making investments in infrastructure until the volume is there.

Our industy in potash, in particular in the province of Saskatchewan, has invested about $18 billion in increasing its capacity. That's an important signal to the marketplace, to the ports, to ocean freight, to the railways that our industry is growing and that we need more capacity in the system. We hope the railways would respond to that.

There are constraints in the system because of geography. We understand that. We know that there's an aggressive program of infrastructure improvements at the Port of Vancouver that's being proposed. We'd like to see the government get behind that, for example. I don't think there's a simple answer to that.

I'd just like to ask if the chair would allow Mr. MacKay to respond briefly regarding the North American network.

Mr. Ian MacKay (Legal Counsel, Fertilizer Canada):

Just to address the member's question, one of the great things about this bill is it recognizes that rail-to-rail competition is important for shippers. In the absence of real rail-to-rail competition, we heard Mr. Johnston from Teck talking about running rights today. That's one version or possibility. But the measures that are proposed in Bill C-49 are crucial in substituting legislative prohibitions for real competition. To meet the goals that you've talked about, we want to make sure that those measures are effective in actually creating an appropriate substitute for competition.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

How much time do I have left? Two minutes.

I'll go to Pulse Canada, Mr. Northey.

Can you add your two cents' worth to that question?

Mr. Greg Northey:

I'll just build on what Ian said. We have the building blocks right now in Bill C-49. We've had a lot of shippers here today. There's been pretty strong unity on some key points. Bill C-49 adds a building block to your vision, and that's the intention. I think everyone can see that potential in this bill. It gets very close to what we want, and competition is a big part and long haul is a big part of that as well as the data.

Ultimately, if we're going to achieve those objectives, we need to be able to measure. We need to be able to measure it to see whether the policy is actually working. We have to be able to measure whether people are having success within the system we have.

Bill C-49 brings those data, this idea of data and evidence, into scope for one of the first times. It's just those really minor tweaks to make sure that we actually unlock that and allow it to become a platform to work towards. As well, Transport Canada is also in parallel doing their data and transportation systems. I think everything is there. We just need to bring it together.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Shields.

Mr. Martin Shields:

I appreciate your being here this evening. I have just a few questions. I haven't touched on this one: soybeans and pulse. Some people say soybeans are a pulse, and some say they aren't, but I believe they are. Are you working on that because it's not in here?

(1835)

Mr. Greg Northey:

Yes, our members also represent soybean growers in the west, the Manitoba group and the Saskatchewan group. Our initial position when Mr. Emerson's review was happening was that soybeans and chickpeas in fact should be in schedule II. Absolutely, and the cases made today make a lot of sense for including it. We're in a situation, though, as I mentioned in my opening statement, that we're getting all containerized grain removed from the MRE.

So we have both the desire to put those crops into it, but then we're also grappling with the situation of having a huge portion of our movement pulled out of the MRE.

Mr. Martin Shields:

That's where I was going next. You've gotten there.

In the sense of regulatory, you didn't have any amendment in the sense of changing the regulatory to.... As more niche crops, I believe, will move into that, and some that are less are still in it, I think that's a piece that would be very important, the sense of how those ones that are in there....

Have you had any direction or information that says what the rationale is for excluding...which I believe is going to be growing more as intermodal container shipping.... Why? Have you been given any rationale?

Mr. Greg Northey:

We've asked a lot about what the rationale is, and we've done our own study on what the impact of that would be. We haven't had been given a reason. One of the things that makes it complicated.... We love the outcome, the intent of it of more capacity, more service, and more innovation in containerized movement. That's great. There is not a shipper in Canada that wouldn't want that.

The issue with containerized movement is that the ocean containers are owned by the shipping lines, and so the railways don't necessarily control the capacity or where they're going, and a lot of decisions are made about those containers that are not in the railways' control. Just moving containerized grain from the MRE basically just gives the railways the ability to change rates because you don't have the MRE protection of the rates.

If rates increase, it will be great if it goes into the supply chain, if it goes into innovation, and if it goes into all these things that the goal is. We want to see that monitored. We want to see evidence that the policy decision, which is a big one, is going to work because we want to see those results. We want to be able to measure that and to be able to make sure it's happening. We will do everything we can to try to make that happen, if that's a policy decision, but we need to see it happen because otherwise there's no point.

Mr. Martin Shields:

With those being built, we can go to the railway that you go to with the fertilizer. We see your railway going through our communities. They're your cars, you built them, you label them, and we see car after car. How many cars will you stack on a railway line these days?

Mr. Clyde Graham:

There are around 200 in some trains of the Teamsters. There are unit trains in that magnitude.

Mr. Martin Shields:

[Inaudible--Editor] cars, which is, with the containers that are already built, you don't want to have to move to that because you have a lot of small producers, and you referred to that earlier. You're in large where you can put 220 cars. You can't do that, so it penalizes those small producers for products that are in demand in the world for what you might believe you're saying is a profit because it can't control it.

Mr. Greg Northey:

Yes.

It's already difficult now to get ocean containers in the country. Some of the larger shippers can control them because they will have an agreement with the shipping line that controls the containers. Shipping lines don't want to see containers languish and not be used, because they want to get them back to China as quickly as possible to bring them back with consumer goods, because that's where they make their money. They don't necessarily make it back hauling grain to Vancouver. There is a lot of complication in that supply chain.

Removing the MREs is a small piece of how to unlock the potential of that supply chain. If this is a policy decision that's going to be made, we want to use it as a platform to have a discussion and make that happen. Those small shippers need those containers. We want those containers.

Mr. Martin Shields:

It think that's important because we've talked about supply chains today, and you want to make them as efficient and smooth as possible because we have the products that the world wants, and those small, niche crops that we're developing in Canada are really crucial to developing larger markets.

(1840)

Mr. Greg Northey:

Absolutely.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Sikand has a great question before I start.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Greg, do you classify soy as a pulse?

Mr. Greg Northey:

Technically, we wouldn't classify it as a pulse. We represent the growers of pulses, because it's grown, but it's not.... We wouldn't describe it as a pulse.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Hackl, I'm going to come back to you. I'm sure you're not going to be surprised by that.

Nine years ago today, one of the worst railway accidents in North America happened at Chatsworth, California, when a Metrolink commuter train crashed into Union Pacific freight train. Twenty-five people were killed and 135 injured. The operator of the train was on his cellphone texting at the time. In your view, if he had known he'd be on an LVVR, would that accident have happened?

Mr. Roland Hackl:

I don't know that. I know that since that time there's been technology in place, through the Wi-Tronix, that can evaluate whether there is a cellphone signal being received or transmitted from a locomotive. It can tell you if a cellphone is on in a locomotive. That technology exists. Most of it is already installed on a locomotive, so if they really wanted to go after cellphones they could flip the switch on that and tell you if a cellphone is on and could investigate that.

There is no need to have live video monitoring. It's something the airlines don't have, something that no other country has. This would be a first in the world. To institute this type of technology with employer access at this level would be a first in the world. I simply don't see a need for it when you have the technology that would do exactly what you ask.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You've already mentioned that many locomotives already have the technology in place. Are you already seeing abuse by employers of this technology?

Mr. Roland Hackl:

Yes, I am. As I reported, there's been a couple fairly recently—I'd say within the last couple of years because it takes a while for an arbitration case to get through—showing abuse of video technology with respect to existing employees.

There are currently outstanding grievances with respect to the Silent Witness, the forward-facing camera. Those have not progressed through the arbitration process yet, so it's difficult for me to comment on the facts of those cases, but they would involve the company going and reviewing after the fact. These track data for 72 or 96 hours. A shop employee would be recorded in that data and then a manager reviews it, just to check and see if there's anything out of the ordinary. There was no incident to prompt an investigation, but the use of video technology in that manner we think is abusive and shouldn't be allowed. We don't see any need to open up the door further.

There are existing measures. The TSB and Transport Canada have both endorsed efficiency testing as a means of checking for crew activity and rule compliance. I don't see the need for the unprecedented use of this technology.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If the technology exists, which we know it does, should or could the equipment indicate to the operators of the train that they're being monitored actively, telling them when a light comes on that they are being watched by a manager right now?

Mr. Roland Hackl:

I don't think it's appropriate that a manager does that, but the technology is live today.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's what I'm asking you. Given that it already exists, is there any way of having feedback when you're under way saying that you are being watched right now?

Mr. Roland Hackl:

That a manager is...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You said you can tap into an engine and live-stream that. You just told us that, so can they go the other way?

Mr. Roland Hackl:

The technology exists and it's currently for use by TSB only. That's what the law provides for today. What you're asking me, I guess the way I see it, is that if I know my rights are being violated, that's okay. I can't agree with that, I'm sorry.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's a fair point.

Metrolinx was here yesterday and I'm sure you saw the testimony. They were very clear that in their view the LVVRs, which they already have in place and which I believe are already with the union members on those trains, are intended as preventive and they intend to review the tapes on a preventive basis rather than a disciplinary basis. How do you feel about that? If they're not listening to the conversations to hear what you're saying after 15 hours of service on a 12-hour shift, but to make sure you're calling the signals and clearly enforce whatever you're doing, do you see a role for it in a preventive capacity?

Mr. Roland Hackl:

I'm not familiar with what Metrolinx said yesterday, but I can tell you that Metrolinx, the GO train, which is obviously the largest conveyor of passengers in the country, has an exhaustive LVVR policy that was negotiated with the Teamsters Union—and the Ministry of Transport, and I believe the federal ministry was involved as well, because the tracks that Metrolinx operates on are federal ones—that allows for TSB use only. This is what's in place today. It allows for TSB use only in the event of an incident or accident. There is a defined chain of command. There is one person, and the position is specifically named in the policy—who has access. It is put onto an encrypted key and hand delivered to the TSB for evaluation. That is the process in place today, and if they have advocated for something else, I'm not aware of it. I haven't seen any submissions from Metrolinx so I can't really comment on what they've said, but that's what's in place today at GO.

(1845)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If the companies are to get access to this data, should the unions also get access to it?

Mr. Roland Hackl:

I don't want access to this data and I don't think the employer should have access to this data.

If I could clarify one thing, Metrolinx does not employ any conductors or locomotive engineers.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No. They're using Bombardier, I know.

Mr. Roland Hackl:

Bombardier, yes, is the employer. Metrolinx is the umbrella organization, so they do not have any actual employees, which was the subject of the arbitration case and how that policy came to be.

The Chair:

Did you want to clarify that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. Are Bombardier crews Teamsters members?

Mr. Roland Hackl:

That's correct.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I want to ask another question of you, Mr. Northey. I noted that in your response to the CTA review report, dated April 18, you had recommended that the 160-kilometre limit be made permanent. You've seen Bill C-49, and I know you made other recommendations.

How does Bill C-49 address the recommendations you made following the release of the CTA review?

Mr. Greg Northey:

We wanted it to be made permanent because we were seeing real value for shippers. Service capacity at a fair cost comes from competition. Extended interswitching was providing that. It was very clean and simple, and it worked well.

We had an exhaustive list of other recommendations. At Pulse Canada, we focus heavily on data; we're very data-driven. We're evidence-driven: we don't want to use anecdotes to describe service failure; we want it measured. We have put lot of money into developing new data. Data is a big piece. Bill C-49 really moves the bar on data. It doesn't quite get to where we want it, but it's there.

As to own-motion powers for the agency, for small and medium-sized shippers there are serious roadblocks to being able to access level of service complaints, or FOAs. They have neither the time, the money, nor the desire really to go up against a railway when service is failing. Our view is that in those cases you need a strong regulatory backdrop, and we need an agency that has data and evidence, and that can monitor the network and intervene when service is failing.

As was discussed earlier today, own-motion powers are extremely important for us. We don't see provision for them in the bill, and it's one of our recommendations now. We would like to see such a provision in there.

Those, I think, are the key issues. Reciprocal penalties are also very important. We do see provision for these in this bill. All we really want is a clarification of intent, of what it means. When you talk about a balanced penalty or a balanced amount, what a shipper can pay versus what the railway can pay, and also what that number has to be set at to drive a change in behaviour are very different. If a shipper had to pay a fee of $100 for not loading a car in time, that has an impact, but a fee of $100 for the railway for not delivering cars to a shipper who's shipping 15 cars.... They're probably just going to pay that penalty, potentially.

What is it, then, that will drive a change in behaviour within a contract? That's really what we want. It's all there. It's not a change in the wording of the bill; it's just clarifying the intent of it. Balance needs to take into account the ability of a small shipper versus that of a large railway, and how you drive performance.

I would say, then, those three: data, reciprocal penalties, and creating a competitive option that extends interswitching. We want to make long-haul work. We don't really care what the name of it is or how it works; we want to see a result from it. We're concerned right now by all the exclusions.

As you heard today, the costing.... We support all of that. We really need it to work. It's a result. We're results-based. Shippers don't care what the names of these things are; it's the result.

(1850)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I have one minute. I would just make an observation. I think our witnesses have been very gracious in extending to the authors of this legislation a belief that the intent is there in the bill.

It is my hope that the recommendations and the amendments that have been suggested and have come forward from so many witnesses will be seriously considered, to address the concerns that each of you has raised, and their implications for the industry.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would like to speak to Mr. Northey for 30 seconds.

You said something that burns my ears every time I hear it, which is that Bill C-49 is a step in the right direction. If it's in the right direction, why aren't we going there? I find it difficult to understand this approach that makes many witnesses say that the bill is a step in the right direction.

Do we want to get the consent of the various lobbies to arrive at a bill that ultimately doesn't make anyone happy? For some, this is a step in the right direction, and for others it is a step in the wrong direction. Shouldn't Bill C-49 make a decision and go as far as possible in the areas where we can, be it in data or interswitching? I have the impression here that the positions are always neither here nor there. [English]

Mr. Greg Northey:

We've had a lot of rail legislation in the past few years. It has been about incremental improvement each step of the way. That's the nature of what happens. We've been discussing this for 100 years. Shippers carry on with what they get—restricted capacity, poor service, unreliable rail delivery. We just soldier on.

In legislation we've certainly seen these incremental steps, and Bill C-49 just adds to that. We would love it if it would really resolve the issues we have and the fact that there is not a functioning market in rail, but it's difficult. Legislation is clearly difficult. We really want to get there, and we think this step could be a big one. We just hope it can be. The intent is there. We're trying. We want to make this work this time to the extent we can.

I'm sorry. It does seem unsatisfactory, but I'll tell you what. When we talk to our stakeholders, they ask exactly the same question, because ultimately when it comes down to it, they are going to ask for results. Is this going to work for them? We look at it, and some of it likely won't work for smaller shippers. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you all the same for making that distinction. We've gone from one step to a big step. I imagine we're ahead.

I'll now go back to Mr. Hackl and Mr. Benson.

As far as the recordings are concerned, which have created quite an uproar, I think we agree. The TSB asks for access to the recordings to conduct its investigations, and you are prepared to give them, as long as the recordings remain confidential. I think we agree on that. That said, it is a post-accident measure. You have given me a glimmer of hope as to possible measures to counter fatigue.

I would like to address one last point with you. For decades, Canada's rail industry has relied on a visual signal system to control traffic over a significant portion of the network. It has also been more than 15 years since the TSB has steadily emphasized the need for additional physical defence. We are talking here about alarms. It even asks that the train be automatically stopped if the driver misses a signal, for instance. Bill C-49 says nothing about all of these measures. In my opinion, these are genuine rail safety measures, since they allow pre-accident response, not post-accident analysis.

Where do you stand on these measures? I would like to hear your views on establishing additional physical defences on locomotives.

(1855)

[English]

Mr. Roland Hackl:

That's an interesting question, and I wish there were a short answer. Unfortunately, I think locomotives are currently equipped with LVVR. The only cost that the railways will see is for the maintenance of that and access to it. Positive train control or cab override systems or those types of things would involve a multi-billion dollar input on the part of the railways.

First of all, let me say that I hope we're not arguing about these things. We're discussing them. I think it's the line of least resistance right now. LVVR is something that exists, and the railway companies are seeking to exploit the legislation. Whether they are interested in putting billions of dollars into positive train control and those types of things, I don't know.

Whether that's the answer or not.... I don't know if that helps you, but that's the concern I have with respect to what you have asked.

Mr. Phil Benson:

Taking away our privacy rights doesn't cost them any money. Quite often when I look at rail regulation, it involves a lot of smoke and mirrors, a lot of stuff, but we don't really want to spend any money.

One of our concerns here that Mr. Hackl has laid out quite eloquently relates to all of the features already in place that could be used currently. When you are going to take away somebody's privacy right, the first question the courts will ask you is whether there is an alternative way that could be used that would achieve the same ends or better without taking away that privacy right. The answer is yes. It already exists.

The question I have for all of you MPs to think about is that slippery slope, the fact that I think the bureaucracy has been pushing their agenda for a long time on this. It's something that we have been fighting them about. They are not particularly friendly to us or to labour. The point simply put is that they want this policy because they want it to happen. There are other ways of doing it, but they're just going to exempt somebody from privacy. They think, let's just exempt somebody from the Constitution. Let's just exempt somebody's rights.

I think every parliamentarian should have their back up about this and should be thinking seriously. Especially for the Liberal Party, this is the foundation of most of these rights. Just because a bureaucrat or somebody walks in and says this is something they would like to do.... Mr. Hackl has laid out quite eloquently what else already exists, and that slippery slope is something we should try to avoid at all costs.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Benson.

Thank you to all the witnesses.

I think you can see by the questioning that we all care very much about Bill C-49. More importantly, we care about doing the right thing.

I thank you for sharing your thoughts with us. The committee will continue to grapple with this as parliamentarians always trying to do the right thing.

I move adjournment for today.

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(0940)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte la 68e séance du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités. Conformément à l'ordre de renvoi adopté le lundi 19 juin 2017, nous étudions le projet de loi C-49, Loi apportant des modifications à la Loi sur les transports au Canada et à d'autres lois concernant les transports ainsi que des modifications connexes et corrélatives à d'autres lois.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à tous les membres du Comité. Je suis heureuse de vous revoir tous en cette deuxième journée de séance, une semaine avant tout le monde.

Je remercie également nos témoins d'être avec nous ce matin. C'est très apprécié.

Nous commencerons par le témoignage de l'Association des chemins de fer du Canada, si vous voulez bien briser la glace.

M. Michael Bourque (président et directeur général, Association des chemins de fer du Canada):

Merci, madame la présidente.[Français]

L'Association des chemins de fer du Canada représente plus de 50 exploitants de chemins de fer de marchandises et de voyageurs, dont les six transporteurs ferroviaires de catégorie 1 visés par ce projet de loi. Elle représente également 40 chemins locaux ou régionaux, dits d'intérêt local, partout au pays, de même que de nombreux fournisseurs de services voyageurs et de banlieue, dont VIA Rail, GO Transit et le RMT, et des chemins de fer touristiques comme le Chemin de fer Charlevoix.[Traduction]

Je dois préciser dès le départ que le projet de loi C-49 pourrait avoir des répercussions sur tous nos membres, ce qui comprend les chemins de fer provinciaux et de banlieue, en raison des mesures de sécurité qu’il propose.

Quand j’ai témoigné ici l’an dernier au sujet de la Loi sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grain, j’ai parlé des effets négatifs que l’interconnexion prolongée pourrait avoir sur le secteur ferroviaire d’intérêt local, et j’ai suggéré de laisser ces dispositions devenir caduques. Nous avons été soulagés de constater que le projet de loi C-49, qui crée le concept de transporteurs ferroviaires de catégorie 1 à l’article 2, indique clairement que l’interconnexion de longue distance ne s’applique pas aux chemins de fer d’intérêt local.

Dans votre rapport, vous recommandez, et je cite: Que le ministre des Transports demande à l’Office des transports du Canada d’examiner les prix d’interconnexion du trafic ferroviaire qu’il prescrit afin de s’assurer qu’ils compensent adéquatement les compagnies de chemin de fer.

Le projet de loi C-49 n’exige pas que l’Office examine les prix d’interconnexion, mais fait un pas dans la bonne direction en ce qui a trait à l’interconnexion de longue distance en précisant que les prix établis par l’Office se fondent sur les tarifs commerciaux comparables.

En plus de faire de cette moyenne un minimum, la Loi stipule que l’Office doit tenir compte de la densité du trafic sur les lignes et des investissements à long terme requis, ce qui, si cette disposition est correctement appliquée, devrait nécessiter des prix supérieurs au minimum (prix moyen). C’est une bonne nouvelle, mais les problèmes pourraient se trouver dans les détails des futures décisions de l’Office.

Il y a ici des représentants du CN et du CP plus expérimentés que moi pour parler des conséquences de l’interconnexion de longue distance et des conditions de service connexes sur leurs activités. Au lieu de cela, j’ai pensé qu’il serait utile de parler de l'histoire récente du secteur ferroviaire, du succès des chemins de fer canadiens dans un contexte de politique publique et de certaines leçons importantes et durement apprises au cours des 30 dernières années de réglementation et de déréglementation du transport ferroviaire.

Les gouvernements successifs et ce comité ont contribué au succès du secteur ferroviaire canadien en établissant et en améliorant un régime réglementaire qui fait passer la liberté commerciale et les forces du marché avant l’intervention gouvernementale.

Avant l’introduction de la Loi nationale sur les transports, en 1967, la réglementation économique des chemins de fer au Canada était de plus en plus restrictive et axée sur le contrôle et l’uniformité des tarifs du transport marchandises. Avec cette approche, les chemins de fer étaient inefficients et avaient de la difficulté à faire les investissements de capitaux absolument requis pour maintenir et agrandir leurs réseaux.

Les chemins de fer aux États-Unis faisaient face à des défis similaires, ce qui a entraîné l’adoption de la Staggers Act et, en conséquence, la déréglementation significative du secteur ferroviaire américain. La Loi nationale sur les transports du Canada représentait le début d’un changement radical du cadre réglementaire des chemins de fer canadiens. Les contraintes rigides sur les prix ont été éliminées, permettant aux chemins de fer de faire concurrence plus efficacement.

Dans les années 1990, des décennies de déréglementation progressive avaient fait en sorte que l’accent était de plus en plus mis sur les forces commerciales, malgré le maintien de certaines protections afin d’assurer un équilibre entre les chemins de fer et les expéditeurs. L’adoption de la Loi sur les transports au Canada (LTC) en 1996 a apporté des changements additionnels qui ont réduit les obstacles à la sortie du marché, permettant aux chemins de fer de cesser d’exploiter des portions de leurs réseaux ou de les transférer à d’autres transporteurs afin d’être plus efficients. Cela a donné aux chemins de fer plus de liberté pour contrôler les coûts et faire des économies accrues. Cela a également stimulé fortement la croissance des chemins de fer d’intérêt local. À peu près au même moment, le CN a été privatisé, créant une compétitivité entre deux systèmes nationaux privés cotés en bourse.

Grâce à ces initiatives, les chemins de fer canadiens sont devenus des entreprises très productives, capables d’offrir un service à faible coût, tout en générant les revenus requis pour réinvestir dans leurs réseaux respectifs. Les expéditeurs, de leur côté, ont eu accès à un réseau ferroviaire de classe mondiale et bénéficient aujourd’hui de tarifs parmi les plus bas du monde. La performance des chemins de fer canadiens — en matière de prix, de productivité et d’investissements de capitaux — s’est grandement améliorée grâce à cette liberté réglementaire.

Les investissements par les chemins de fer canadiens dans l’infrastructure – plus de 24 milliards de dollars depuis 1999 – ont créé un réseau ferroviaire plus sécuritaire et plus efficient, dont bénéficient directement les clients.

Malgré ce bilan positif en matière de politique publique, et une politique nationale sur les transports qui reconnaît clairement que la concurrence et les forces du marché sont le meilleur moyen d’offrir des services de transport viables et efficaces, nous sommes ici aujourd’hui pour débattre d’un projet de loi qui ajoute aux recours pour le seul bénéfice des expéditeurs.

Il y a trois semaines, le président de l’Office des transports du Canada a prononcé un discours à Vancouver où il a dit que les recours existants, dont les services de médiation, l’arbitrage final sur les tarifs, l’arbitrage sur les niveaux de service qui permet à l’Office d’élaborer des ententes de niveau de service, et les décisions sur la qualité et l'étendue des services fournis par les chemins de fer, ne sont pas très utilisés et qu’en fait, l’Office prévoit communiquer avec les intervenants qui semblent ignorer les dispositions existantes. Et pourtant, nous sommes ici aujourd’hui pour discuter de nouvelles dispositions qui s’ajoutent à des mécanismes existants qui sont sous-utilisés.

En vertu de ce projet de loi, l’interconnexion de longue distance est offerte aux clients même s’ils ont accès à un transport routier ou maritime. Ce sont des services concurrentiels. Cela illustre comment nous oublions la nécessité de reconnaître la concurrence et de ne pas s’ingérer sur le marché.

(0945)

[Français]

Permettez-moi maintenant de parler de la sécurité et des dispositions du projet de loi qui touchent les enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive, ou EAVL. [Traduction]

J’ai écrit hier à tous les membres de ce comité afin de préciser pourquoi nous soutenons les enregistreurs pour les enquêtes sur les accidents et la prévention des accidents. Les chemins de fer défendent depuis longtemps le droit d’utiliser cette technologie comme une autre mesure de défense de la sécurité au sein des systèmes de gestion de la sécurité des compagnies ferroviaires. Le secteur a toujours cru que les enregistreurs, par leur seule présence, décourageront les comportements non sécuritaires ou les activités non autorisées qui peuvent distraire l’équipage, aidant ainsi à prévenir les accidents.

Nous croyons que cette technologie permettra de sauver des vies, et qu’elle peut être mise en place de façon sensée et utilisée de manière responsable. Malgré des investissements considérables, il y a toujours des accidents qui pourraient être évités. Le bilan de sécurité des chemins de fer de classe 1 en Amérique du Nord est excellent, mais il n’est pas parfait. Tant que nous n’aurons pas des trains marchandises et voyageurs pleinement automatisés, il y aura des accidents dus à l’erreur humaine.

Les enregistreurs sont un outil, pas une solution magique, mais un outil important, qui a fait ses preuves, pour identifier les dangers, tout en dissuadant le très petit pourcentage d’employés qui pourraient être tentés d’utiliser leur téléphone intelligent ou de lire un livre alors qu’ils devraient être alertes et actifs. À cet égard, nous allons aider à changer la culture du milieu de travail de manière positive, comme l’ont fait des entreprises comme Phoenix Heli-Flight, une entreprise qui exploite des hélicoptères et utilise déjà des enregistreurs audio-vidéo dans ses appareils. De plus, on s’attend à ce que dans la grande majorité des cas, les preuves fournies par les enregistreurs corroboreront les déclarations et les explications des membres d’équipage.

Permettez-moi de parler de la question de la vie privée et de la sécurité. Certains disent se préoccuper de la protection de la vie privée, mais nous savons déjà, par l’utilisation d’autres technologies et de vidéos en milieu de travail, que le Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée impose des tests sur l’utilisation responsable des enregistreurs. Nous sommes impatients de travailler avec vous et le ministère afin d’élaborer cette réglementation.

En conclusion, les enregistreurs sont une technologie qui permettra de prévenir les accidents. Divers organismes d'enquête comme l'Office des transports du Canada et le NTSB, aux États-Unis, réclament son utilisation. Et si un accident se produit, les enquêteurs du Bureau de la sécurité des transports pourront mieux comprendre ce qui est arrivé. Ce sera utile à tout le monde.

Merci beaucoup.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Bourque.

Écoutons maintenant M. Ellis, qui prend la parole au nom de Chemin de fer Canadien Pacifique.

M. Jeff Ellis (chef des services juridiques et secrétaire général, Chemin de fer Canadien Pacifique):

Merci, madame la présidente, bonjour.

Je m'appelle Jeff Ellis, je suis le chef des services juridiques du Canadien Pacifique. Je suis accompagné de James Clements, notre vice-président à la Planification stratégique, ainsi que de Keith Shearer, directeur général des Pratiques réglementaires.

Je vous remercie de nous fournir l'occasion de nous exprimer devant vous aujourd'hui. Comme le temps est compté, nous concentrerons nos observations de ce matin sur deux questions, soit les enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive et l'interconnexion de longue distance.

Notre entreprise est l'un des deux chemins de fer de catégorie 1 du Canada et exploite un réseau de 22 000 kilomètres au Canada et aux États-Unis. Nous relions des milliers de communautés avec l'économie nord-américaine et les marchés internationaux. Le CP a d'ailleurs fait divers investissements de capitaux importants, et continue d'en faire, pour améliorer la sécurité et la capacité de notre réseau. Depuis 2011, nous avons investi plus de 7,7 milliards de dollars dans l'infrastructure ferroviaire. En 2017, nous prévoyons investir encore 1,25 milliard de dollars. Si les modifications prévues au revenu admissible maximal entrent en vigueur dans leur forme actuelle, le CP investira probablement massivement dans de nouveaux wagons-trémies afin d'accroître la capacité de la chaîne d'approvisionnement.

Le CP détient la palme du chemin de fer le plus sûr en Amérique du Nord selon la Federal Rail Road Administration, aux États-Unis. Nous affichons la fréquence d'accidents ferroviaires la plus basse chaque année depuis 11 ans. Cela dit, la sécurité est un cheminement et non une destination en soi. Le moindre incident est un incident de trop. La technologie des enregistreurs est essentielle si nous voulons améliorer substantiellement la sécurité ferroviaire au Canada, parce que les facteurs humains demeurent la principale cause d'incidents ferroviaires. Depuis 2007, les incidents de sécurité causés par des défectuosités matérielles ont diminué de 50 %. De même, les défectuosités des rails ont diminué de 39 %. Parallèlement, le nombre d'incidents d'origine humaine a peu changé au cours de la même période. Selon les données publiées par l'OTC, 53,9 % des incidents ferroviaires survenus en 2016 sont attribuables à des facteurs humains. Il est clair que nous devons intervenir pour nous attaquer à ce type d'incident ferroviaire.

Les données objectives sont claires aussi. Par exemple, depuis la mise en place de DriveCam au New Jersey, New Jersey Transit affiche une réduction de 68 % des collisions d'autobus de 2007 à 2010. Le nombre de blessures causées aux passagers a diminué de 71 % pendant la même période. Les services de trains de banlieue Metrolink, en Californie, ont également enregistré une réduction importante du non-respect de la lumière rouge et de dépassement du quai de gare.

Il est toutefois impératif que la réglementation permette d'exposer les problèmes de sécurité avant qu'un incident ne survienne. Nous pourrons ainsi prendre des mesures proactives efficaces et appropriées pour rectifier le tir. Ce serait une erreur que de modifier le projet de loi C-49 pour empêcher les compagnies ferroviaires d'utiliser proactivement les données des enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive. On se priverait de l'avantage indéniable de la technologie pour la sécurité. Le CP reconnaît que cette technologie doit être utilisée de façon respectueuse pour les employés en service, conformément aux lois canadiennes sur la protection de la vie privée, et nous sommes déterminés à travailler en étroite collaboration avec Transports Canada et nos syndicats au cours des prochains mois en vue de cet objectif.

Je céderai maintenant la parole à James.

(0950)

M. James Clements (vice-président, Planification stratégique et services de transport, Chemin de fer Canadien Pacifique):

La chaîne d'approvisionnement ferroviaire est l'épine dorsale de notre économie. Non seulement le système de transport de marchandises canadien est-il le plus sûr, le plus efficace et le plus écologique des moyens de transport de biens au Canada, mais il parvient à atteindre ses objectifs tout en maintenant les tarifs parmi les plus bas au monde pour le transport de marchandises. C'est un élément clé. Le Canada a absolument besoin d'un système ferroviaire en santé pour préserver sa compétitivité à l'échelle nationale, compte tenu de son vaste territoire. Faute d'un réseau ferroviaire concurrentiel, économique et efficace, capable de transporter des produits sur des milliers de kilomètres jusqu'aux ports pour l'exportation, au coût le plus bas au monde, la plupart des produits que les Canadiens vendent sur les marchés internationaux ne pourraient pas afficher de prix concurrentiels.

Le système de transport de marchandises doit son succès au cadre juridique et réglementaire, particulièrement depuis quelques décennies, parce qu'on reconnaît au Canada que la concurrence et les forces du marché sont les principes organisateurs les plus efficaces. Ces principes sont présentés dans la déclaration sur la politique nationale des transports, ainsi que dans l'article 5 de la Loi sur les transports au Canada.

Il importe de ne pas perdre ces principes de vue pendant notre réflexion sur les modifications législatives à apporter au cadre qui a si bien fait ses preuves pour assurer le bien-être économique des Canadiens. Le CP est ravi que le gouvernement ait décidé de laisser périmer le régime d'interconnexion étendue adopté par le gouvernement précédent avec son projet de loi C-30, puisqu'il se fondait sur une justification qui nous semblait grandement déficiente et qui a engendré bon nombre de conséquences néfastes sur la politique publique, qui ont fini par nuire à la chaîne d'approvisionnement canadienne.

De même, il faut cependant souligner que le nouveau régime proposé pour l'interconnexion de longue distance, l'ILD, contient un certain nombre d'éléments problématiques. L'un des problèmes les plus fondamentaux du nouveau régime, comme du régime d'interconnexion étendue qu'il remplace, est la non-réciprocité avec les États-Unis. Ainsi, les compagnies de chemin de fer américaines auraient un accès important au réseau canadien (jusqu'à 1 200 kilomètres); elles auraient accès aux voies de circulation canadiennes, alors que les chemins de fer canadiens ne bénéficieraient pas des mêmes avantages en vertu de la loi américaine.

De par sa conception, le régime d'ILD aura des répercussions asymétriques, d'une part en ce qui concerne l'accès non réciproque par les compagnies de chemin de fer américaines aux réseaux respectifs du CP et du CN, et d'autre part, entre le CP et le CN, car notre exposition au trafic américain en vertu de ce régime est beaucoup plus grande que celle du CN étant donné l'emplacement géographique de nos réseaux respectifs et l'exclusion de deux corridors.

En outre, ce régime pourrait miner la compétitivité et l'efficacité de la chaîne d'approvisionnement canadienne en encourageant le déplacement du trafic canadien vers les chemins de fer américains et les chaînes d'approvisionnement des États-Unis, réduisant ainsi la densité de circulation pour les chaînes d'approvisionnement canadiennes.

Les conséquences négatives sur l'économie canadienne ne se limiteraient pas au secteur ferroviaire: si le trafic ferroviaire canadien est détourné vers les corridors commerciaux américains, cela diminuera aussi les volumes de transport de marchandises aux ports canadiens. Pour le CP seulement, cela signifie qu'une part importante de nos revenus annuels pourrait aller aux chemins de fer américains ainsi qu'aux corridors commerciaux des États-Unis selon le nouveau régime d'ILD proposé.

Soulignons par ailleurs que la décision d'accorder un accès non réciproque aux compagnies de chemin de fer américaines représente une concession importante faite par le Canada aux États-Unis au moment où l'on renégocie l'ALENA. Cela nous apparaît comme un choix politique non avisé pour l'économie canadienne. Il faudrait reconsidérer le régime proposé dans ce contexte.

Ensuite, tel qu'il est rédigé, le projet de loi C-49 oblige également un transporteur de liaison à fournir des wagons à l'expéditeur, outre ses autres obligations de service. Il est bien entendu qu'un transporteur public est tenu de fournir des installations convenables pour le transport. Toutefois, dans certains cas, la fourniture de wagons par un transporteur de liaison n'est pas possible. Par exemple, les wagons-citernes appartiennent généralement au client, pas à la compagnie de chemin de fer. Comme la Loi sur les transports au Canada traite déjà des obligations de fourniture de wagons par les compagnies de chemin de fer, il est important de préciser que le régime d'ILD n'impose pas d'exigences plus strictes dans ce domaine que les dispositions existantes.

Ensuite, comme le prix de l'ILD doit être déterminé par l'Office, sur la base des tarifs commerciaux fixés pour un transport comparable, il s'ensuit que les transports assurés au prix de l'ILD ou à tout autre prix réglementé (comme le grain en vertu du RAM) devraient être exclus de la détermination du prix de l'ILD, étant donné que ces tarifs ne peuvent être considérés comme commerciaux.

Par ailleurs, les compagnies de chemin de fer américaines qui mènent leurs activités au Canada et qui sont réglementées par le gouvernement fédéral devraient également être tenues de fournir des données sur les prix, qui seront utilisées par l'Office pour déterminer les prix de l'ILD.

(0955)



Nous arrêterons nos observations préliminaires ici. Je sais qu'il y a beaucoup d'autres éléments du projet de loi C-49 dont nous n'avons pas discuté ce matin. Nous vous faisons part de nos considérations dans notre lettre et bien sûr, nous serons heureux de répondre à vos questions sur tous les enjeux.

Merci, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Écoutons maintenant M. Finn, de la Compagnie des chemins de fer nationaux du Canada.

M. Sean Finn (vice-président exécutif, Services corporatifs, Compagnie des chemins de fer nationaux du Canada):

Bonjour, madame la présidente, et merci beaucoup.

Je suis accompagné ce matin de deux de mes collègues: Janet Drysdale, vice-présidente, Développement de l'entreprise et durabilité au CN, ainsi que Mike Farkouh, vice-président des opérations pour la Région de l'Est. Je suis moi-même chef des services juridiques et vice-président exécutif des Services corporatifs du CN.

Nous apprécions beaucoup cette occasion de vous rencontrer aujourd'hui pour discuter du projet de loi C-49, qui aura des incidences profondes sur le secteur ferroviaire au Canada. Le CN a participé très activement à l'examen de la Loi sur les transports au Canada dirigé par l'honorable David Emerson. Nous croyons que le comité d'examen de la loi a fait du bon travail, qu'il a réussi à exposer les changements législatifs nécessaires pour permettre au Canada d'atteindre ses objectifs de croissance du commerce pour les prochaines décennies. M. Emerson et ses collègues ont commandé un certain nombre d'études bien utiles. En ce qui concerne le transport ferroviaire, nous reconnaissons que, contrairement à certains examens antérieurs, celui-ci donne lieu à des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes davantage que sur des anecdotes. Le comité a également accepté l'évidence que la déréglementation du secteur ferroviaire favorise l'innovation, dont bénéficient ensuite les expéditeurs, les clients et l'économie canadienne dans son ensemble. Nous sommes un peu déçus qu'il n'y ait pas plus de recommandations du comité d'examen reprises dans le projet de loi C-49.[Français]

À la suite de la publication du rapport du comité d'examen, nous avons participé au processus de consultation entrepris par le ministre Garneau, notamment à plusieurs des tables rondes tenues aux quatre coins du pays.[Traduction]

Il y a aussi le travail du Conseil consultatif en matière de croissance économique présidé par Dominic Barton qui nous donne espoir. Nous sommes particulièrement satisfaits du premier rapport de ce conseil, qui met l'accent sur l'importance de la croissance commerciale ainsi que du renforcement de notre infrastructure pour la réaliser. Il souligne également l'importance d'un système réglementaire qui favorise les investissements en infrastructure et permet au secteur des transports d'attirer les capitaux nécessaires pour investir dans une capacité accrue.[Français]

Je suis sûr que vous connaissez le CN, mais j'aimerais vous rappeler quelques points importants.

Le CN exploite un réseau unique de 19 600 milles qui dessert trois côtes, soit celles de l'Atlantique, du Pacifique et du golfe du Mexique, ainsi que le port de Trois-Rivières. Au Canada, notre réseau s'étend sur 13 500 milles et relie tous les principaux centres et points d'accès, ce qui fait du CN un partenaire stratégique de la chaîne logistique du Canada.

Nous avons un portefeuille commercial extrêmement diversifié. Notre plus important secteur est le transport intermodal, soit l'acheminement de conteneurs pour l'importation et l'exportation. Le transport par conteneurs est le secteur de l'industrie ferroviaire qui connaît la croissance la plus rapide et qui est le plus concurrentiel.[Traduction]

Plus en général, il me semble impératif que les membres du Comité comprennent que la réglementation et les forces du marché sont les principaux facteurs depuis 20 ans qui ont favorisé l'investissement et l'innovation dans le secteur ferroviaire du Canada. Selon l'OCDE, les expéditeurs canadiens bénéficient aujourd'hui des tarifs ferroviaires les plus faibles du monde industrialisé, nos tarifs étant même inférieurs à ceux des États-Unis. Au sujet du projet de loi C-49, nous reconnaissons les efforts du ministre pour trouver un juste milieu entre les intérêts des chemins de fer et ceux des expéditeurs. Cependant, nous déplorons qu'il ne reconnaisse pas l'importance de la déréglementation tant pour favoriser des prix inférieurs et des services plus fiables pour les expéditeurs que pour permettre aux compagnies de chemin de fer d'investir massivement dans le maintien et la prolongation de notre réseau. Au cours des 10 dernières années, le CN a investi environ 20 milliards de dollars de capitaux au total.

J'aimerais maintenant céder la parole à ma collègue, Janet Drysdale.

(1000)

Mme Janet Drysdale (vice-présidente, Développement de l'entreprise, Compagnie des chemins de fer nationaux du Canada):

Merci, Sean.

Le projet de loi C-49 contient un certain nombre de dispositions qui risquent fortement d'avoir des conséquences imprévues. Les éléments du projet de loi qui présentent les plus grands risques sont ceux qui concernent l'interconnexion de longue distance, que j'appellerai ILD. L'ILD est une solution qui, avant qu'elle n'apparaisse dans le projet de loi, n'avait jamais été recommandée, débattue ou examinée. Aucune évaluation de cette solution pour l'industrie ferroviaire n'a été menée et nous croyons que sa mise en oeuvre pourrait avoir des conséquences néfastes et imprévues.

Le CN a un vaste réseau de lignes secondaires desservant des collectivités éloignées dans toutes les régions du pays. Ces lignes secondaires posent un défi, car elles coûtent cher d'entretien et, en même temps, elles doivent gérer un trafic qui n'est pas dense. Souvent, la raison pour laquelle nous sommes en mesure de justifier le maintien du service sur ces lignes, ce sont les activités de longue distance qu'elles génèrent. L'ILD fait en sorte qu'un client peut nous obliger à diriger le trafic vers un point d'échange et à le céder à un concurrent, qui devient alors responsable de la majeure partie du déplacement et qui en récolte les bénéfices.

Cette solution fait en sorte que l'autre chemin de fer peut offrir des tarifs réduits, puisqu'il n'assume aucun des coûts d'entretien des lignes secondaires desservant les régions éloignées, où se trouve l'expéditeur. Il va sans dire que si cela devait devenir chose courante, nous aurions de la difficulté à justifier les investissements qu'il faut faire pour que ces lignes demeurent opérationnelles.

Au cours du débat en deuxième lecture, l'ILD a été décrite comme un mécanisme qui présentera aux expéditeurs captifs « des choix concurrentiels de trafic et [qui] les placera en meilleure posture pour négocier les options de services et les prix ».

Permettez-moi de parler d'abord de la notion de captivité. Selon le projet de loi, « captif » signifie le fait de n'avoir accès qu'à un seul chemin de fer. On fait fi complètement du fait que l'expéditeur a accès à d'autres moyens de transport. Ainsi, si un client expédie des produits en ayant recours à la fois au transport ferroviaire et au transport routier, dans le projet de loi C-49, on le considère comme un expéditeur captif du transport ferroviaire. Nous proposons un amendement visant à clarifier la définition de « captif » de sorte que si un expéditeur utilise un autre moyen de transport pour au moins 25 % de l'expédition, on doit considérer qu'il a d'autres options et que, par conséquent, il ne devrait pas avoir accès à l'ILD.

En ce qui concerne la négociation des options de service et des prix, le projet de loi C-49 continue de donner aux expéditeurs un accès à tous les recours qui existent déjà à cet égard, dont l'arbitrage sur l'offre final, l'arbitrage final en groupe, les plaintes contre les frais de transport ferroviaire, les plaintes concernant le niveau de service et l'arbitrage sur les ententes de niveau de service. Conformément à la politique nationale des transports, et l'ILD offre une solution concurrentielle, nous proposons un amendement en vertu duquel un expéditeur qui peut avoir accès à l'ILD ne devrait pas avoir accès aux autres recours sur les prix et les services.

Par ailleurs, l'ILD offre un avantage compétitif non réciproque aux chemins de fer basés aux États-Unis. Ces chemins de fer ont déjà un net avantage parce que le trafic est beaucoup plus dense sur leurs lignes que sur les nôtres. Il y a tout simplement un plus grand nombre de trains qui circulent par mille de voie. Cette plus forte densité fait en sorte que les coûts fixes élevés d'entretien du réseau sont répartis sur un trafic plus dense. Les chemins de fer obtiennent de meilleurs rendements dans les déplacements sur de longues distances. Avec l'ILD, nous pouvons être tenus de transporter des marchandises sur une courte distance et de les transférer à une compagnie de chemin de fer états-unienne qui les transportera sur de longues distances et récoltera la plus grande partie des bénéfices. Ce sont des sommes qui pourraient alors être investies dans le réseau des États-Unis aux dépens du Canada.

Particulièrement en cette période où l'ALENA est en train d'être renégocié, nous ne comprenons pas pourquoi le Canada céderait cela en n'obtenant rien en retour. Offrir un tel avantage aux chemins de fer états-uniens pose un risque pour l'intégrité et la durabilité du réseau de transport, des ports et des chemins de fer du Canada, qui, pour générer le capital nécessaire permettant d'assurer la sécurité de l'infrastructure canadienne et de conserver de bons emplois pour la classe moyenne au Canada, a besoin d'un certain volume de trafic.

Nous savons que les exclusions prévues amènent des restrictions quant aux endroits où cette nouvelle solution est offerte, mais elles ne suffisent pas, surtout près de la frontière canado-américaine dans les trois provinces des Prairies. S'il y avait des dispositions similaires aux États-Unis, nous ne nous y opposerions pas. Cependant, il n'existe pas de droit à l'interconnexion chez nos voisins du Sud et cette absence de réciprocité nuit à l'industrie ferroviaire canadienne. Par conséquent, nous proposons un amendement qui établirait une autre exclusion pour qu'un expéditeur ne puisse pas demander à l'Office de prendre un arrêté d'interconnexion de longue distance si l'expéditeur se trouve à moins de 250 kilomètres de la frontière canado-américaine.

Un autre aspect au sujet duquel nous ne comprenons pas en quoi il est nécessaire d'intervenir, c'est la tentative de définir l'exigence relative au niveau de service. Les dispositions actuelles existent depuis longtemps. À notre avis, elles sont équilibrées et il n'est pas nécessaire d'adopter la modification proposée. Nous proposons également un amendement au sujet des dispositions du projet de loi C-49 qui prévoient des sanctions lorsque les chemins de fer ne respectent pas leurs obligations en matière de service.

(1005)



En 2012, Jim Dinning, un facilitateur nommé par le gouvernement, a dit que ce type de sanctions ne devrait être imposé que si des sanctions s'appliquent également aux expéditeurs qui s'engagent à expédier certaines quantités, mais ne respectent par leur engagement. Le projet de loi C-49 ne contient pas de telles mesures de réciprocité. Nous proposons des amendements qui favorisent un meilleur équilibre entre les expéditeurs et les chemins de fer sur le plan des sanctions en rendant l'imposition de sanctions aux chemins de fer conditionnelle à l'imposition d'obligations similaires aux expéditeurs.

Nous aimerions féliciter le ministre d'être allé de l'avant en rendant obligatoire l'utilisation d'enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive. Il s'agit d'une étape importante pour l'objectif collectif d'améliorer la sécurité du transport ferroviaire. Bien qu'il soit important d'avoir accès à l'information fournie par ces appareils lorsqu'il faut déterminer la cause d'un accident, ils sont encore plus précieux dans le cadre de nos efforts visant à prévenir les accidents.

Nous voulons dire quelques mots sur la disposition du projet de loi qui hausse le plafond quant à la proportion des actions du CN que peut détenir un seul actionnaire. La limite actuelle de 15 % — une limite que n'a aucun autre chemin de fer — empêche le CN d'attirer le type d'investisseurs de long terme dont il a besoin dans son secteur extrêmement capitalistique. Ce changement constitue une bonne première étape visant à corriger les règles du jeu inéquitables par rapport à nos concurrents. Nous demanderons aux membres du Comité d'examiner un amendement mineur pour veiller à ce que ce changement entre en vigueur immédiatement après la sanction royale.

Enfin, nous voulons dire un mot sur les expéditions de grain. Au cours de la campagne agricole qui vient de se terminer, le CN a transporté 21,8 millions de tonnes métriques de grains, la plus grande quantité qu'il n'a jamais transportée en une année. Nous avons battu de 2 % l'ancien record qui avait été établi en 2014-2015 et nous avons dépassé la moyenne triennale de 7 %. Je suis également ravie de vous dire que, préalablement au début de la campagne agricole, les expéditeurs de grain ont obtenu environ 70 % de l'approvisionnement en wagons du CN dans le cadre d'ententes commerciales novatrices qui garantissent aux expéditeurs un nombre de wagons et qui incluent des sanctions réciproques sur le plan du rendement.

Nous sommes dans une période de forte amélioration des services, de l'innovation et de la collaboration avec nos clients. Nous y sommes parvenus grâce à la négociation commerciale, à une meilleure communication et à une meilleure compréhension des défis auxquels nous faisons face chacun de notre côté. Si la chaîne d'approvisionnement canadienne veut déplacer le volume des échanges commerciaux que nous soutenons tous, cela ne peut être possible qu'avec la collaboration de l'ensemble de la chaîne d'approvisionnement. La réglementation a sa place, mais l'expérience montre que nous atteignons nos objectifs lorsque c'est l'exception.

Nous sommes ravis de pouvoir discuter avec vous aujourd'hui et nous avons hâte de répondre à vos questions.

La présidente:

Merci, madame Drysdale. Vous avez parlé de certains amendements. Avez-vous soumis un document à la greffière?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Oui.

La présidente:

Est-il dans les deux langues officielles?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Oui.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons aux questions.

Madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais remercier nos témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui, en ce deuxième jour de notre étude de quatre jours sur la question. Vos témoignages nous intéressent beaucoup.

J'aimerais tout d'abord souligner qu'il va sans dire que nous comprenons l'importance de nos chemins de fer pour notre pays et notre économie, et que nous reconnaissons qu'il faut atteindre un équilibre entre les compagnies de chemin de fer et leurs clients. Je crois certainement que le projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis démontre que nous sommes déterminés à concrétiser cette vision, et que nous tenons tous à veiller à ce que le projet de loi nous permette d'y arriver.

Toutefois, certains commentaires formulés aujourd'hui par M. Bourque me rendent un peu perplexe, par exemple lorsqu'il affirme que le projet de loi C-49 crée des mesures qui s'ajoutent à des mesures rarement utilisées. J'aimerais ensuite examiner le témoignage de M. Ellis et de M. Clements sur l'interconnexion pour le transport longue distance. Je crois qu'il s'agit peut-être des mesures auxquelles M. Bourque a fait référence — mais je n'en suis pas certaine — lorsqu'il affirme que le régime de la zone d’interconnexion prolongée est foncièrement défectueux et qu'il a plusieurs conséquences néfastes sur les politiques publiques, ce qui, au bout du compte, nuit à la chaîne d'approvisionnement canadienne.

J'aimerais revenir sur certains témoignages que nous avons entendus dans le cadre de notre étude sur la Loi sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grain. Les statistiques qui avaient été fournies à notre comité dans le cadre de cette étude démontraient que l'interconnexion prolongée était, en fait, rarement utilisée. Nos expéditeurs ont reconnu que même si c'était le cas, ils considéraient qu'il s'agissait d'un outil très utile dans la négociation de contrats avec les compagnies de chemin de fer.

Des gens affirment donc qu'il s'agit d'un recours rarement utilisé, mais qu'il a eu des conséquences néfastes sur les politiques publiques et qu'au bout du compte, cela nuit à leurs chaînes d'approvisionnement canadiennes. Je tente de réconcilier ces commentaires et j'aimerais vous fournir l'occasion de nous donner votre avis sur la question.

(1010)

M. Michael Bourque:

Je commencerai à répondre, et je donnerai ensuite la parole à James.

Je tentais simplement de faire valoir que le projet de loi contient des dispositions qui offrent des recours supplémentaires aux expéditeurs auprès de l'Office, même si ces expéditeurs profitent déjà d'importants mécanismes de recours. Comme l'a déclaré le président de l'OTC il y a quelques semaines, ces services ne sont pas beaucoup utilisés, au point où on doit tenter d'attirer des clients en faisant la promotion de ces dispositions auprès de divers groupes de consommateurs. Je crois que si ces services ne sont pas utilisés, c'est parce que la plupart de ces éléments commerciaux font l'objet de négociations entre les entreprises et leurs clients. S'il existe déjà plusieurs mécanismes de recours et qu'ils ne sont pas pleinement utilisés, qu'est-ce qui prouve que nous avons besoin d'autres mécanismes de recours?

J'ai vraiment tenté d'inscrire cela dans le contexte des 30 dernières années de politiques publiques progressistes, ce qui a créé un cadre plus commercial et a contribué à la réussite des compagnies de chemin de fer nord-américaines, car la même chose se produit essentiellement aux États-Unis. Nous sommes au point où les meilleures compagnies de chemin de fer du monde sont représentées dans cette salle, lorsqu'on parle de la productivité, des bas prix, de la sécurité et de la capacité de transmettre ces gains en productivité et en efficacité aux consommateurs — ce que prouvent les prix.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

M. James Clements:

Je formulerai d'abord quelques commentaires sur les problèmes que nous avons cernés en ce qui concerne l'interconnexion prolongée, et je parlerai ensuite des problèmes liés à l'ILD.

L'interconnexion prolongée a été effectuée en se fondant sur des coûts déterminés par réglementation, ce qui ne nous a pas nécessairement permis d'obtenir un rendement adéquat. En fait, on offrait à un expéditeur ou à un transporteur américain un prix réglementé et inférieur pour lui permettre d'avoir accès à nos réseaux. C'était donc l'un des problèmes.

L'autre problème, c'est que c'était très régional, et je crois que le gouvernement l'a reconnu par l'entremise de certaines modifications apportées.

Ensuite, ce qui reste — et c'est le dernier problème —, c'est le manque de réciprocité. En effet, supposons qu'aujourd'hui, l'entreprise Burlington Northern enregistre une diminution dans la quantité de pétrole brut expédiée le long de la côte nord-ouest du Pacifique. L'entreprise peut maintenant décider d'utiliser cette capacité vacante et tenter de couvrir les coûts fixes liés à cette capacité en faisant en sorte que l'expéditeur obtienne un tarif d'ILD jusqu'à la frontière, pour lui offrir ensuite un prix très bas pour le reste du déplacement, tout cela en vue d'augmenter le volume et de rétablir la densité.

Comme vous l'avez entendu, cela enlève des revenus aux compagnies de chemin de fer canadiennes et des emplois aux Canadiens, et cela diminue également la densité des autres éléments de notre chaîne d'approvisionnement, par exemple les ports. C'est le troisième élément qui, à notre avis, présente un problème.

Mme Kelly Block:

D'accord, je...

La présidente:

Votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Sikand.

(1015)

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Bonjour.

J'aimerais d'abord m'adresser aux représentants du CFCP.

Dans une lettre qui nous a été fournie, le CFCP a déclaré qu'il était un chef de file en matière d'EAVL. J'aimerais avoir votre avis sur la position selon laquelle les EAVL portent atteinte à la vie privée ou sont peut-être excessivement intrusifs.

M. Jeff Ellis:

J'aimerais remercier le député d'avoir posé cette question. Je souhaite transmettre la question à Keith Shearer.

M. Keith Shearer (directeur général, Pratiques réglementaires et d'exploitation, Chemin de fer Canadien Pacifique):

Nous savons qu'il y a des préoccupations liées à la vie privée, mais nous savons également qu'il existe un processus à cet égard. Vous savez probablement que nous avons aujourd'hui des appareils d'enregistrement dans les locomotives pour enregistrer les conversations entre les contrôleurs de la circulation ferroviaire et l'équipage des trains; ces enregistrements sont donc effectués. Des boîtes noires, si on peut les appeler ainsi, ont été installées au début des années 1980 à la suite du tragique accident qui s'est produit à Hinton; ces appareils enregistrent également des informations.

Nous savons que le ministre et les intervenants du ministère collaboreront étroitement avec le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée en ce qui a trait aux questions liées à la protection de la vie privée et qu'on mettra en oeuvre ce processus. Nous savons également, par l'entremise de nos consultations avec le ministre, que ces processus seront élaborés dans la réglementation à venir.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Ma deuxième question s'adresse aux représentants du CN.

Encore une fois, dans une lettre qui nous a été fournie, les représentants du CN soutenaient que la modification du revenu admissible maximal permettait d'acheter de nouveaux wagons. Pourriez-vous nous en dire plus à cet égard?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Je crois qu'il s'agissait peut-être d'un commentaire des représentants du CFCP.

Je pense que les changements apportés au revenu admissible maximal améliorent la situation lorsqu'il s'agit d'attribuer l'investissement à la compagnie de chemin de fer qui effectue cet investissement. C'est une formule assez complexe, et nous pensons qu'il est possible de la simplifier. Nous devons payer pour les wagons de chemin de fer 12 mois par année. Ce n'est pas différent de la location d'une automobile; dans les deux cas, il faut effectuer un paiement mensuel.

Dans le contexte du fonctionnement du RAM, nous générons seulement des revenus sur le volume réel de marchandises que nous expédions selon la distance sur laquelle nous l'expédions. Nous sommes d'avis que le RAM présente toujours un élément dissuasif, même si la division de l'indice est certainement utile, car si le CN investit dans les wagons, l'entreprise n'a plus à partager 50 % du crédit de cet investissement avec le CP.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Madame Drysdale, vous avez indiqué dans votre exposé que vous aviez proposé des modifications relativement à l'ILD et à la réciprocité à l'intérieur des 250 kilomètres. Pourriez-vous approfondir ce point, s'il vous plaît?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Même si, à notre avis, les exclusions déjà présentes dans le projet de loi sont très importantes et doivent être maintenues, elles ne règlent pas la question de la réciprocité américaine dans les trois provinces des Prairies. En ce qui concerne le point qu'ont fait valoir nos collègues du CP plus tôt, ces compagnies de chemin de fer ont toujours la possibilité de venir dans ces trois provinces des Prairies et de s'approprier une partie de la clientèle des compagnies de chemin de fer canadiennes. J'aimerais faire valoir que si l'expéditeur souhaite envoyer des produits aux États-Unis, nous le faisons tous les jours, et nous sommes prêts à continuer à le faire, mais le prix auquel nous le faisons devrait faire l'objet de négociations commerciales avec la BNSF, comme nous le faisons avec cette compagnie, par exemple, lorsque nous souhaitons avoir accès à des clients de Chicago. C'est la disparité entre les régimes réglementaires qui nous préoccupe, et le fait que nous offrons un avantage injuste aux compagnies de chemin de fer américaines, car elles peuvent prendre le trafic canadien à un tarif déterminé par règlement, alors que nous n'avons pas le droit de faire la même chose aux États-Unis.

M. Gagan Sikand:

D'accord.

Jugez-vous que l'on vous a consultés adéquatement dans le cadre de la stratégie Transports 2030 du ministre et en ce qui concerne le projet de loi C-49?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Nous avons certainement fortement participé au processus de consultation. Mais nous sommes manifestement mécontents de certains résultats qui se trouvent toujours dans le projet de loi.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

J'aimerais poser la même question aux représentants du CP.

M. Jeff Ellis:

Nous avons également participé, et nous respectons le processus et le fait qu'on nous a consultés. Néanmoins, nous éprouvons les problèmes que nous avons décrits.

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Madame et messieurs, bienvenue. Merci d'être parmi nous.

J'aimerais débuter par une question qui s'adresse à tous les témoins et qui porte sur la sécurité.

J'ai bien entendu vos propos sur l'importance que vous accordez aux enregistreurs audio-vidéo. Cependant, dans mon esprit, un enregistreur audio-vidéo va aider le BST à tirer des conclusions sur un événement malheureux qui est déjà arrivé. Je cherche plutôt à savoir quelles mesures vous comptez mettre en oeuvre ou quelles mesures le projet de loi C-49 devrait prévoir pour éviter les accidents.

Comme M. Ellis l'a dit, on sait qu'une grande partie des incidents sont liés à des facteurs humains.

Il y a deux questions importantes quant à la fréquence à laquelle le facteur humain est en cause dans les accidents. D'une part, il y a le degré de fatigue des conducteurs de locomotive. D'autre part, il y a la demande répétée du BST qui souligne la nécessité d'instaurer des moyens de défense physiques supplémentaires. Il peut s'agir d'alarmes ou même de mécanismes technologiques qui permettent d'arrêter un train quand le conducteur a raté l'avertissement qu'il aurait dû percevoir. Cela semble répétitif.

Dans les principales compagnies, qu'en est-il des moyens mis en oeuvre, d'une part, pour atteindre une meilleure gestion de la fatigue et, d'autre part, pour aller vers ces moyens de défense physiques?

M. Ellis peut peut-être commencer, mais tout le monde est invité à répondre.

(1020)

M. Sean Finn:

En fait, je peux commencer.

Il y a deux choses. Pour l'industrie et pour le CN, il est clair que la sécurité est une valeur essentielle. Nous ne pouvons pas avoir du succès dans notre industrie sans avoir des pratiques sécuritaires. Si nous n'avons pas cela, c'est impossible de réussir.

Vous pouvez demander à mon collègue le vice-président Michael Farkouh, dont le travail touche les opérations, de vous expliquer un peu comment cela fonctionne, quelles mesures sont instaurées afin que nous nous sentions toujours à l'aise en matière de sécurité et que nous ayons l'assurance que la sécurité est une valeur quotidienne pour tous nos employés. [Traduction]

M. Michael Farkouh (vice-président, Région de l'Est, Compagnie des chemins de fer nationaux du Canada):

Pour répondre à la question sur les enregistrements audio et vidéo dans les locomotives et sur la fatigue, manifestement, nous nous efforçons constamment de réduire le nombre d'accidents et de blessures et de prévenir les incidents. La prévention représente l'un des éléments clés sur lesquels nous misons. Dans le cadre de notre système de gestion de la sécurité, nous renforçons toujours nos lignes de défense. Quant aux enregistrements audio et vidéo dans les locomotives, nous jugeons qu'il s'agit d'un outil qui s'ajoute à nos efforts en vue de réduire les incidents.

Plus tôt, nous avons parlé de la protection de la vie privée. Nous ne prenons pas ce sujet à la légère. Nous souhaitons véritablement nous concentrer, en nous fondant sur une évaluation des risques, sur la façon dont nous devrions utiliser plus efficacement... [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Permettez-moi de vous interrompre. J'ai bien entendu vos propos sur les enregistreurs. J'aimerais maintenant que vous nous parliez de la fatigue des conducteurs ainsi que des moyens de défense physiques. [Traduction]

M. Michael Farkouh:

La fatigue est certainement un enjeu sur lequel nous travaillons activement en collaboration avec nos syndicats. Il ne s'agit pas seulement de la fatigue; il faut aussi permettre aux gens de se reposer suffisamment.

Lorsque nous abordons la question de la sécurité, nous n'examinons pas nécessairement la situation qui s'est produite, mais la façon d'empêcher cette situation de se reproduire. Lorsque nous nous attaquons à la question de la fatigue, il s'agit vraiment d'établir des horaires appropriés. Il faut favoriser de saines habitudes de sommeil. Il faut établir un processus fondé sur la sensibilisation. En fait, il faut intervenir avant qu'un employé soit fatigué au travail, et c'est ce que nous faisons actuellement, car nous collaborons très étroitement avec nos syndicats à cet égard. Nous ne devons pas nécessairement attendre que des règlements soient pris. Nous tentons réellement de régler ces problèmes, car nous croyons que c'est très important. Nous collaborons étroitement avec nos syndicats à cet égard. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Monsieur Ellis, avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter sur la fatigue et sur les moyens de défense physiques?

M. Jeff Ellis:

Oui. J'ai bien compris votre question, mais je vais vous répondre en anglais, si vous me le permettez.[Traduction]

En ce qui concerne la fatigue, nous prenons cette question très au sérieux. En effet, notre entreprise a fait la promotion, par exemple, des jours de travail d'un maximum de 12 heures pour remplacer le maximum actuel de 18 heures. Nous espérons que ce changement sera bientôt apporté.

Entretemps, comme l'a dit Sean, mon collègue, nous collaborons étroitement avec les syndicats, car certains des enjeux liés au repos dépendent des conventions collectives. Toutefois, nous ne mettons certainement pas de côté la question de la fatigue.

Cela dit, il s'agit de l'un des leviers que nous devons utiliser. À notre avis, les EAVL représentent un outil essentiel, et on a prouvé, dans d'autres modes de transport, que c'est un outil extrêmement efficace, surtout lorsqu'on en fait une utilisation proactive qui respecte la vie privée. Nous avons le plus grand respect pour la protection de la vie privée et pour les lois canadiennes en matière de protection de la vie privée, et nous pensons que nous pouvons traiter cet enjeu de façon à atteindre un équilibre entre les risques et la protection de la vie privée. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Si vous n'avez pas parlé des moyens de défense physiques, est-ce parce qu'offrir des outils supplémentaires ne fait pas partie des plans à court ou moyen terme?

M. Sean Finn:

À l'heure actuelle, par exemple, nous réalisons des projets pilotes avec nos employés. Ceux-ci portent un genre d'appareil Fitbit pour qu'il nous soit possible de connaître leurs habitudes quotidiennes, au travail et au repos. Cela nous permet d'obtenir de l'information de base sur laquelle nous pouvons nous appuyer. La fatigue n'est pas seulement une notion subjective; c'est aussi une affaire de science.

Je pense qu'il s'agit là d'un bon exemple. Il ne s'agit pas ici de réglementation, mais de projets pilotes auxquels contribuent nos syndicats. Nous pouvons ainsi observer l'équilibre qui s'instaure entre les exigences liées au travail et les pratiques de repos. Grâce à cette application physique, nous pouvons déterminer ensemble ce qui peut être fait pour que les conducteurs soient mieux reposés à leur arrivée. Nous pouvons également déterminer quelles habitudes de vie font en sorte que, dans certaines situations, ils soient moins reposés qu'ils ne devraient l'être à leur arrivée.

(1025)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Aubin.

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais approfondir les choses et vous donner l'occasion d'expliquer comment le projet de loi C-49 peut vous aider au lieu de vous nuire et, cela dit, vous permettre d'atteindre les rendements établis dans vos plans d'activités stratégiques.

Je demande donc à tous les témoins — et je vous donnerai le temps nécessaire pour répondre à cette question de façon approfondie — d'expliquer comment le projet de loi C-49 peut vous aider à atteindre les objectifs que vous avez établis dans vos plans d'activités stratégiques et comment il peut permettre à votre organisme de mettre en oeuvre les plans d'action qui sont décrits dans vos plans d'activités.

Mme Janet Drysdale:

J'aimerais répondre à cette question. En fait, notre plus grande préoccupation au sujet du projet de loi C-49, c'est qu'il accomplit exactement le contraire. L'un des plus grands défis auxquels nous faisons face lorsque nous tentons d'accroître le commerce au Canada, c'est-à-dire les activités d'exportation et d'importation, c'est de parvenir à obtenir des investissements dans le système ferroviaire canadien qui soutient l'économie du pays. Afin d'obtenir ces investissements, nous devons tout d'abord veiller à protéger l'utilisation actuelle des chemins de fer canadiens et ne pas offrir aux États-Unis une occasion injuste de profiter de cette utilisation et d'augmenter la densité sur leurs propres chemins de fer, ce qui permet ensuite aux Américains de réinvestir dans leur réseau.

Notre industrie exige des investissements élevés en capitaux. En effet, chaque année, nous dépensons environ 50 % de nos revenus d'exploitation pour entretenir et améliorer les immobilisations de l'infrastructure physique. Ce qui nous préoccupe le plus au sujet du projet de loi C-49, c'est qu'il doit nous permettre de conserver la capacité d'obtenir un rendement adéquat, afin que nous puissions effectuer les investissements nécessaires pour assurer la solidité du système.

Comme je l'ai mentionné, les intervenants du CN sont particulièrement préoccupés par les réseaux de lignes secondaires dans les régions éloignées, car en général, un nombre moins élevé de trains de marchandises utilisent ces lignes, et je crois que Michael Bourque vous a parlé de certains des défis auxquels font face ces lignes de courte distance. La réalité, c'est que les chemins de fer ne sont pas réellement concurrentiels sur des distances de moins de 500 milles. Une mesure législative qui nous oblige à effectuer ces déplacements sur de courtes distances nuit à notre capacité d'obtenir un rendement adéquat lors d'un déplacement donné, et nous avons besoin de ces rendements pour pouvoir réinvestir, surtout dans ces lignes secondaires.

Oui, nous avons déjà été témoins d'une telle situation. En effet, nous avons dû abandonner certains de nos réseaux dans les régions les plus éloignées au Canada. Cela encourage essentiellement l'utilisation de camions, car les camionneurs doivent amener leurs camions jusqu'à la ligne principale du chemin de fer situé dans une région plus densément peuplée. Cela nuit à notre programme sur les changements climatiques et aux expéditeurs canadiens. Nous craignons donc que le projet de loi C-49 nous complique la tâche lorsqu'il s'agit de mettre en oeuvre nos plans d'activités stratégiques et d'obtenir les rendements nécessaires afin de réinvestir dans notre infrastructure.

M. Jeff Ellis:

J'aimerais transmettre la question à mon collègue James Clements.

M. James Clements:

J'aimerais formuler quelques commentaires à cet égard. Notre plan d'activités repose sur cinq piliers et voici ce que fait le projet de loi C-49 pour nous aider à mettre en oeuvre ce plan d'activité.

En ce qui concerne la sécurité, nous convenons que les modifications liées aux EAVL, telles que proposées, nous permettraient d'aller de l'avant et d'améliorer la sécurité. La première question que se pose notre organisme dans toutes ses activités, c'est comment fonctionner de façon sécuritaire dans les collectivités que nous desservons d'un bout à l'autre du pays.

Nous soutenons toujours que l'offre de service représente l'un des éléments clés de notre plan d'activité. Nous n'avons pas eu beaucoup de commentaires sur la modification liée au niveau de service qui a été proposée. L'un de nos commentaires à cet égard, c'est que nous exploitons un réseau. Nous offrons nos services dans le cadre d'un réseau et nous devons adapter les préférences de chaque expéditeur aux réalités auxquelles nous faisons face lorsque nous desservons tous nos clients sur ce réseau. À notre avis, tout règlement ou projet de loi doit tenir compte de tous les effets qu'aura une entente sur les services ou une décision d'arbitrage liée aux services sur l'ensemble du réseau, et pas seulement sur un expéditeur quelconque, car si on accorde la priorité à un expéditeur, cela pourrait reléguer tous les autres au second rang, ce qui pourrait entraîner des répercussions négatives. C'est un commentaire supplémentaire que je tenais à formuler.

(1030)

M. Vance Badawey:

J'aimerais maintenant m'adresser à Mme Drysdale au sujet des lignes secondaires.

Vous avez indiqué que vous abandonniez les lignes secondaires, car il était tout simplement impensable de continuer ainsi. A-t-on engagé un dialogue avec les chemins de fer d'intérêt local situés dans les régions afin qu'ils puissent exploiter certaines de ces lignes secondaires, générant ainsi davantage de revenus pour vous permettre de contrebalancer les revenus dont vous avez besoin dans le cadre de votre plan de gestion des actifs?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Notre expérience avec les CFIL nous a démontré que si ce n'est pas rentable pour nous de les exploiter, il est très peu probable que ce le soit pour eux. Il ne s'agit pas de demander à un chemin de fer d'intérêt local de venir exploiter ces lignes dans ces régions éloignées. Il n'y aurait pas suffisamment de trafic pour eux non plus.

Au fil du temps, nous avons constaté que les chemins de fer d'intérêt local n'ont pas eu suffisamment de capitaux pour être en mesure de réinvestir dans leur réseau. Chose certaine, la situation est la même aux États-Unis, mais en raison du cadre réglementaire différent dans ce pays, les CFIL bénéficient de divers incitatifs, tels que l'amortissement accéléré ou même les subventions gouvernementales, ce qui leur permet d'effectuer des investissements. Nous n'avons pas cela au Canada.

Lorsqu'on parle de rentabilité, si ce n'est pas économiquement viable pour nous, ce ne le sera pas pour un CFIL. Dans le contexte du transport de courte distance, les expéditeurs devront possiblement s'installer ailleurs, faire faillite ou utiliser des camions pour se rendre à l'emplacement ferroviaire le plus proche.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

J'aimerais tout d'abord m'adresser aux représentants du Canadien Pacifique. Ma question porte sur les EAVL. Je regarde votre lettre, et il y a quelques observations que j'aimerais que vous m'expliquiez, dont celle-ci: « On ne peut tolérer de comportement dangereux de la part des équipes de conduite des locomotives; il faut prendre les mesures correctrices qui s'imposent. » Si j'étais un membre de l'unité de négociation, je verrais cela comme une menace.

Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Keith Shearer:

Tout d'abord, sachez que nos employés d'exploitation sont très talentueux, bien formés et très motivés. Ils connaissent très bien leur travail. J'ai d'ailleurs eu le plaisir de travailler avec bon nombre d'entre eux.

N'empêche qu'il ne faut pas oublier que ce sont des êtres humains, et les êtres humains commettent des erreurs. De plus, comme on peut le voir dans la société d'aujourd'hui, il y a divers facteurs qui peuvent poser problème, notamment les appareils électroniques. Leur utilisation nuit à la sécurité. Chose certaine, dans le milieu d'exploitation ferroviaire, nous avons des règles et des procédures selon lesquelles ces appareils doivent être fermés et rangés; ils ne sont tout simplement pas permis dans l'environnement de travail. Toutefois, sans aucun moyen de surveiller la situation de façon ponctuelle, on ne peut aucunement savoir si cette règle, cette procédure, est bel et bien appliquée.

Ce n'est qu'un exemple.

M. Ken Hardie:

Que feriez-vous dans une telle situation? Il y a évidemment des mesures correctives qui peuvent être prises, mais aussi des mesures punitives. Que feriez-vous?

M. Keith Shearer:

Si c'est flagrant et délibéré, à ce moment-là, il sera nécessaire d'adopter des mesures punitives. Le ministre et le public nous obligent à rendre des comptes en matière de sécurité. Nous prenons cette responsabilité très au sérieux, et il n'y a aucune raison pour laquelle cela ne s'appliquerait pas à nos employés. La plupart d'entre eux le comprennent, et ils s'y conforment.

M. Ken Hardie:

J'aimerais maintenant parler de l'interconnexion pour le transport longue distance. J'entends beaucoup de contradiction à ce sujet. D'un côté, on me dit que nous avons l'un des meilleurs fournisseurs de service à bas tarifs dans le monde. Dans ce cas, pourquoi l'ITLD poserait-elle une menace, surtout lorsque l'on sait que dans les régimes précédents, les limites d'interconnexion prolongée étaient rarement utilisées. Quelle est donc la menace?

Allez-y, madame Drysdale.

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Je pense que l'ITLD est beaucoup plus vaste que ce qui était en place dans le contexte de l'interconnexion prolongée. Le fait que l'interconnexion prolongée était en quelque sorte une mesure temporaire peut en partie expliquer pourquoi les expéditeurs ont limité son utilisation.

En ce qui concerne ces deux recours, sachez que lorsque des expéditeurs éprouvent des problèmes liés au taux ou au service, il y a des recours à leur disposition, et on constate qu'ils les utilisent. Ils peuvent notamment avoir recours à l'arbitrage de l'offre finale et à l'arbitrage sur le niveau de service. Ces recours sont en place pour aider les expéditeurs captifs à composer avec le fait qu'ils sont captifs.

L'interconnexion pour le transport longue distance va bien plus loin que l'interconnexion prolongée; on parle ici de 1 200 kilomètres de plus. Par conséquent, dans la mesure où les expéditeurs l'utilisent ou que les chemins de fer américains encouragent les expéditeurs à l'utiliser, nous craignons qu'il y ait des répercussions sur l'ensemble du réseau.

(1035)

M. Ken Hardie:

Je regarde la carte de service, et je constate que vos deux sociétés sont très actives aux États-Unis. Mise à part la société ferroviaire Burlington Northern Santa Fe qui se rend dans la région du Grand Vancouver, je ne vois pas beaucoup de chemins de fer américains qui vont dans cette province.

Dans le cadre de vos activités, est-ce que vous achetez des services à des sociétés ferroviaires américaines?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Absolument. En fait, près de 30 % de nos activités découlent d'ententes avec d'autres chemins de fer.

M. Ken Hardie:

Quelle est la différence?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

C'est la façon de négocier les tarifs qui est différente. Aux États-Unis, c'est fait sur une base commerciale. Ce qu'on propose au Canada, c'est d'avoir des taux qui respectent un régime réglementé. C'est donc la principale différence.

M. Ken Hardie:

J'aimerais maintenant m'adresser aux représentants du CP, étant donné que vous avez répondu aux premières questions. Selon vous, si l'interconnexion n'a pas été tellement utilisée dans le cadre de l'ancien régime, est-ce parce que vous avez baissé vos prix face à la concurrence?

M. Jeff Ellis:

Je vais m'en remettre à James.

M. James Clements:

J'aurais quelques observations. Je vais tout d'abord répondre à la dernière question.

Ce qui est intéressant, c'est que nous avions négocié des taux commerciaux. Je vais vous donner l'exemple du transporteur ferroviaire Burlington Northern qui va à Lethbridge. Il y avait des produits qui entraient à Lethbridge et qui en sortaient en vertu des accords bilatéraux qui précisaient les taux dont Janet a parlé. Ce qui s'est passé, c'est que lorsqu'il y a eu l'interconnexion prolongée avec un taux fixe, l'expéditeur payait essentiellement le même montant, et nous, on nous payait moins, et les revenus générés pour la partie du transport aux États-Unis ont augmenté à la suite de cette demande.

M. Ken Hardie:

Est-ce que vous avez essuyé des pertes?

M. James Clements:

Dans la région de Lethbridge, il y a eu une incidence. Si on regardait le système dans son ensemble, cela semblait assez minime, mais dans la région de Lethbridge, plus précisément à Coutts, où se raccorde la ligne de Burlington Northern, si on se penche sur le pourcentage, on remarque qu'il y a eu une incidence plus importante à cet endroit qu'ailleurs. Encore une fois, il s'agissait de l'un des emplacements où la limite d'interconnexion étendue de 160 kilomètres s'appliquait. L'autre région était située près de Winnipeg.

M. Ken Hardie:

Toutefois, je pense que l'on peut compter sur les doigts d'une main le nombre de fois où on a atteint la limite maximale.

M. James Clements:

À 160 kilomètres, mais je pourrais vous fournir les statistiques.

M. Ken Hardie:

Ce serait très intéressant.

M. James Clements:

Nous avons constaté un pourcentage important dans cette région. Il y avait une circulation régulière en provenance et à destination de cette région.

Nous nous sommes en quelque sorte détournés de cela. Ce que je voulais dire au départ concernant...

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, mais je vais devoir vous interrompre. Vous aurez peut-être l'occasion de répondre à la question de M. Hardie dans le cadre d'autres questions.

Monsieur Shields, allez-y, je vous prie.

M. Martin Shields (Bow River, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je suis reconnaissant de l'expertise que chacun apporte à cette étude. Évidemment, j'ai très peu de connaissances dans le domaine comparativement aux gens assis au bout de la table. Si j'ai bien compris ce que vous avez dit, nous avons les taux les plus bas, alors pourquoi avez-vous peur de la concurrence du côté des États-Unis? Par exemple, si vous vendez les souliers les moins chers, vous allez en vendre plus que votre voisin. Cela dit, je considère qu'il y a une contradiction dans vos propos.

En 2013, lorsque le prix du baril se vendait à plus de 100 $, on pouvait faire plus d'argent en transportant le pétrole que le blé dans la région de Peace country. Je comprends ce que vous faisiez. Ensuite, il y a eu une intervention et vous n'avez pas apprécié. Quelqu'un est intervenu et a mis sur pied un organe régional pour s'occuper de ces questions et veiller à ce que vous puissiez transporter le blé qui s'était accumulé depuis un an.

Toutefois, ce qui me préoccupe, c'est la consolidation des chemins de fer en Amérique du Nord, et vous avez effleuré la question. Je m'adresse maintenant aux représentants du CP et du CN. Pouvez-vous me dire dans quelle mesure les chemins de fer fusionnent en Amérique du Nord?

M. James Clements:

Je vais tout d'abord répondre à votre question au sujet de la concurrence, et ensuite, comme l'honorable député l'a proposé, je vais répondre à la question précédente.

M. Martin Shields:

Non, je veux que vous me parliez de la consolidation.

M. James Clements:

J'y arrive. Vous m'avez demandé...

M. Martin Shields:

Non, je ne veux pas attendre. Je veux discuter de la consolidation. C'est la question que j'ai posée, et j'ai fait une observation à ce sujet.

(1040)

M. James Clements:

Très bien. Il n'y a pas eu de fusion majeure de sociétés ferroviaires en Amérique du Nord depuis la fin des années 1990. En tant qu'entreprise, nous avons tenté d'effectuer quelques consolidations avec des transporteurs de l'Ouest des États-Unis. À long terme, nous estimons que la consolidation est quelque chose qui risque d'arriver, étant donné les pressions liées à la concurrence. On peut songer entre autres aux camions autonomes et à leur capacité de fournir des services. Pour être en mesure de soutenir la concurrence, nous devons mettre en place des solutions d'un bout à l'autre de l'Amérique du Nord, compte tenu du secteur des transports qui évolue sans cesse, et régler les problèmes liés à la congestion et aux infrastructures. Étant donné le syndrome « pas dans ma cour », nous devons maximiser toutes les infrastructures existantes, et la consolidation fait partie de la solution.

M. Martin Shields:

D'accord.

Mme Janet Drysdale:

J'aimerais faire écho aux observations de M. Clements. À l'heure actuelle, il y a six chemins de fer importants en Amérique du Nord: deux au Canada, deux dans l'Ouest des États-Unis, et deux dans l'Est des États-Unis. Il semble très peu probable, dans le contexte des mesures que nous avons vues récemment, que le cadre réglementaire américain aille de l'avant avec un scénario de fusion. Cela dit, si l'on songe à l'avenir et au long terme, en raison de la concurrence accrue découlant des camions autonomes et des difficultés auxquelles sont confrontés les chemins de fer de l'Est des États-Unis relativement au déclin de l'industrie du charbon, au fil du temps, il pourrait être justifié pour les chemins de fer américains de procéder à des fusions.

M. Martin Shields:

Le transport par camion représente un coût pour les municipalités. Le secteur du camionnage est énorme, et on ne parle pas du coût qui s'y rattache, mais c'est un concurrent qui coûte très cher aux municipalités. Dans quelle mesure la réciprocité est-elle importante dans les négociations à mesure que nous allons de l'avant? Si l'on fusionne les industries au nord et au sud de la frontière, dans quelle mesure la réciprocité est-elle importante?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Comme pour toute industrie concurrentielle, nous voulons être sur un pied d'égalité avec nos concurrents, et ce n'est pas le cas aujourd'hui. Lorsqu'on se penche sur le cadre réglementaire des États-Unis, on constate qu'il n'y a aucune obligation de transporteur public. Les sociétés ne sont pas obligées de transporter les marchandises. Il n'y a pas d'arbitrage de l'offre finale, de recours collectif à l'arbitrage des propositions finales ni d'arbitrage sur les niveaux de service. Il n'y a pas d'interconnexion, d'interconnexion prolongée ni d'interconnexion pour le transport de longue distance.

M. Martin Shields:

Dans quelle mesure la réciprocité est-elle importante pour survivre?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Il est impératif que nous rivalisions à armes égales avec nos concurrents si nous voulons demeurer compétitifs dans une industrie qui risque de fusionner tôt ou tard.

M. Martin Shields:

Est-ce que cela menace notre industrie?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Oui, absolument.

M. James Clements:

Permettez-moi d'aborder la question sous un autre angle. Si j'étais à la tête d'une compagnie américaine — si je m'occupais de la planification stratégique à Norfolk Southern —, je ne serais pas intéressé par un transporteur canadien; je miserais plutôt sur l'Ouest. Il pourrait y avoir des fusions transcontinentales aux États-Unis. À ce moment-là, je pourrais simplement choisir le trafic qui m'intéresse aux points frontaliers en raison de l'interconnexion prolongée, car je sais que cela ne poserait pas de menace.

Un scénario de consolidation pourrait donc mettre les transporteurs canadiens de côté.

M. Martin Shields:

Est-ce que cela menace notre existence?

M. James Clements:

Je pense que cela pourrait accroître la densité et la compétitivité des États-Unis, s'ils fusionnent et si notre environnement réglementaire n'a pas prévu le coup.

M. Michael Bourque:

Madame la présidente, si je puis me permettre, j'aimerais faire quelques observations. Je suis ici pour rétablir les faits au nom de l'industrie ferroviaire, car il y a un mythe important qui s'est perpétué, et j'aimerais remettre les pendules à l'heure.

En 2013-2014, il y a eu un accroissement du volume de grain — 20 millions de tonnes métriques supplémentaires de grain — produit par le secteur agricole. Effectivement, une grande partie se trouvait dans les fermes; c'est là où on l'entrepose. Nous avions également connu le pire hiver en 75 ans. En juin, le sol était gelé à Winnipeg, tout comme les tuyaux d'ailleurs; pas besoin de vous dire que ce fut un hiver très rigoureux. Malgré tout, nous avons transporté le grain. Il a fallu 2 000 trains supplémentaires de 100 wagons chacun seulement pour transporter l'excédent de grain qui avait été produit cette année-là.

L'industrie a donc transporté le grain. Cette situation anormale était attribuable à un hiver très difficile; cela n'avait rien à voir avec le transport du pétrole. On n'a pas expédié de pétrole vers la côte ouest, plus précisément au port de Vancouver, là où on avait essentiellement acheminé le grain.

Je voulais seulement rétablir les faits. Merci.

M. Martin Shields:

Il n'y a pas eu de trains au [Inaudible-Note de la rédaction] pays pendant un an.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Shields.

Monsieur Fraser, la parole est à vous.

M. Sean Fraser (Nova-Centre, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

J'apprécie grandement vos commentaires. Tout d'abord, sachez que je suis reconnaissant du rôle stratégique que joue l'industrie ferroviaire au sein de l'économie. Je conviens que la déréglementation des 30 dernières années a donné lieu à des circonstances prospères pour l'économie et, évidemment, pour le secteur du transport ferroviaire.

Je pense que, dans une certaine mesure, nos points de vue diffèrent quant à savoir s'il y a eu une défaillance du marché concernant les expéditeurs captifs et ce que « captifs » signifie réellement. Si je ne me trompe pas, c'est M. Clements qui a dit que nous étions dotés du réseau de transport ferroviaire le plus sécuritaire, efficace, écologique et abordable dans le monde. Je ne me souviens pas des mots exacts.

Du point de vue du gouvernement, si je peux encourager davantage de gens à utiliser un moyen sécuritaire, rentable et écologique de transporter des marchandises à faible coût, j'aimerais savoir en quoi cela se compare au transport par camion, par exemple.

(1045)

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Je peux peut-être répondre à l'aide d'un exemple.

Aujourd'hui, l'un de nos clients situés dans une région éloignée livre du bois d'oeuvre exclusivement par camion. Après concertation, nous avons pris la décision commerciale d'investir dans une voie ferrée qui se rendrait jusque chez lui, conformément à notre programme de lutte contre le changement climatique et à l'aide à faible coût aux infrastructures et au transport de marchandises. Mais, dès que nous établissons ce lien ferroviaire avec ce client qui, aujourd'hui, se sert exclusivement du camionnage, le projet de loi le considère désormais comme captif du transport ferroviaire.

Nous éprouvons des difficultés avec la définition de cette notion de captivité. Le camion, particulièrement sur de courtes distances, est un concurrent redoutable. N'oublions pas non plus les autres concurrents comme, par exemple, la Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent.

Quant aux autres expéditeurs, notamment, et à une très grande échelle le secteur pétrolier, ils peuvent choisir leur lieu d'approvisionnement. Nous affrontons la concurrence de l'approvisionnement en produits, du camionnage et, dans certains cas, du transport par oléoduc et, certainement, celle de la voie maritime des Grands Lacs et du Saint-Laurent.

Nous sommes très concurrentiels dans la dynamique CN-CP. Le hic, c'est la définition de « captif », celui qui ne peut accéder qu'à une voie ferrée, alors que, en fait, l'expéditeur a le choix d'autres moyens de transport viables.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je pense, madame Drysdale, que c'est vous qui avez dit que le régime d'interconnexion exige généralement que, essentiellement, vous déposiez les marchandises d'un client à un point d'échange pour qu'elles soient ramassées par un autre transporteur.

Quand nous avons étudié le projet de loi C-30, les témoignages que nous avons généralement entendus — et il y en a eu dans le même sens aujourd'hui — étaient que, dans les faits, ce n'est pas ce qui arrivait. L'immense majorité des circonstances influe très fortement sur les négociations, et elle crée une sorte de pseudo-concurrence qui n'existe pas dans l'industrie du chemin de fer.

Est-ce faux? Un changement a-t-il lieu à la table des négociations, comme c'était l'intention ou, en réalité, est-ce que ça fait perdre aux transporteurs ferroviaires leur clientèle aux mains de leur concurrence?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Il est sûr que nous avons perdu des clients au profit de BN, par exemple. Dans le contexte des négociations, il faut se rappeler que l'immense majorité de nos clients sont de très gros expéditeurs. Les 150 premiers clients de CN représentent environ 80 % de nos revenus. Ces grandes multinationales possèdent de nombreuses cartes dans leur jeu pour exercer de l'influence et de la pression sur les négociations.

Même les sociétés céréalières, par exemple, et il faut songer à tous les capitaux qu'elles investissent dans la construction de silos élévateurs ou de terminaux maritimes, que cette capacité supplémentaire soit attribuée au CN ou au CP, influent de ce fait beaucoup sur les négociations commerciales. Compte tenu de beaucoup de règlements en vigueur, par exemple sur l'arbitrage des propositions finales ou sur les accords sur les niveaux de service, laisser entendre que les expéditeurs n'ont pas le choix des moyens de pression sur les négociations... Certains de ces clients, à propos, ont d'importantes activités aux États-Unis, où le cadre réglementaire est différent, mais, encore une fois, ça leur donne d'autres moyens de pression. Je pense que cette pression existait avant ce règlement. Disons que c'est une façon élégante d'amplifier les demandes parce que les expéditeurs ont besoin d'encore plus d'influence.

Je ne trouve pas que, dans notre cas, c'est vrai. Nous craignons que l'adoption de ce projet de loi et l'élargissement de l'interconnexion de longue distance ne mettent en péril la viabilité et l'intégrité du réseau ferroviaire canadien. D'après nous, c'est, pour ce que nous considérons comme la véritable ossature de l'économie canadienne, un problème important.

M. Sean Fraser:

Si je peux intervenir, je suis d'accord, une grande multinationale basée au Canada n'est pas nécessairement aussi démunie à la table des négociations que certains voudraient le faire croire.

Je viens d'une partie très rurale de notre pays, en Nouvelle-Écosse. Nos expéditions vers l'est se font par bateau; vers l'ouest, par train. Je me soucie de ceux qui sont vraiment captifs, dans l'industrie ferroviaire, d'un seul expéditeur. En Nouvelle-Écosse, il n'y a vraiment qu'un seul chemin de fer. Ces clients sont impuissants... Réalistement, ils doivent accepter les conditions ou les rejeter.

Vu de plus haut et dans son ensemble, le projet de loi C-49 concerne la fourniture de services à toutes sortes d'expéditeurs, ceux des zones rurales et de petites entreprises aussi. Constatez-vous qu'il vise à augmenter les services qui leur sont offerts et à l'améliorer, en particulier pour certains de ces expéditeurs ruraux?

(1050)

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Pour les expéditeurs ruraux des endroits éloignés en particulier, je crains que ça leur soit nuisible. Dans la mesure où ça favorise la sortie de ces wagons du réseau du CN, par exemple, il nous sera très difficile de justifier les investissements nécessaires pour maintenir l'exploitation des lignes éloignées. C'est ce que nous avons sûrement vu en Nouvelle-Écosse, où des lignes ont été abandonnées.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Lauzon, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Guy Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

C'est ma première visite au comité des transports. Le sujet est très intéressant. Depuis le début, ici — je pose la question à qui veut y répondre — nous sommes en ce moment même en plein milieu des négociations sur l'ALENA. Je me demande si vous estimez que le transport devrait en être un sujet prioritaire. Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Sean Finn:

J'y vais le premier. C'est sûr que, dans la négociation d'accords de libre-échange, il faut transporter les marchandises pour être libre-échangiste, et il est sûr que les transports jouent un rôle déterminant. Les faits ont prouvé que, ces 20 dernières années au Canada, l'ALENA a favorisé la croissance des deux chemins de fer et celle des mouvements transfrontaliers. Il est sûr que les transports sont un enjeu.

Mais ce n'est pas l'enjeu prioritaire des négociations. Nous surveillons quand même les choses de près. Vous pouvez comprendre que beaucoup de nos clients se trouvent dans des États qui sont d'importants partenaires commerciaux du Canada. Nous avons réussi à parler à des représentants de ces États et à des gouverneurs pour leur faire comprendre, et faire comprendre aussi à Washington, l'importance des flux nord-sud de marchandises et des flux sud-nord pour beaucoup d'États du Midwest. Pour répondre à votre question, c'est indéniablement un enjeu important, mentionné, je pense, dans le mandat de négociation de l'équipe américaine, mais nous ne croyons pas qu'on en parlera à la table des négociations, si ce n'est pour s'assurer de la libre circulation des marchandises.

Je le répète: impossible de conclure un accord de libre-échange et de faire des échanges sans moyens de transport très efficaces. Ça nous permet aussi d'affirmer que le CN et le CP ont fait de l'excellent travail au Canada pour l'acheminement de marchandises vers les États-Unis. Notre crainte, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt ce matin, est de nous retrouver dans une situation où les sociétés ferroviaires américaines auront accès à notre réseau, au Canada, sans réciprocité pour nous aux États-Unis.

M. James Clements:

Je fais miennes aussi ces observations sur le rôle des transports dans l'ALENA. Pourquoi renonçons-nous à des concessions accordées au réseau ferroviaire canadien sur l'accès aux marchés, au milieu de négociations avec d'âpres négociateurs?

M. Guy Lauzon:

Merci beaucoup.

D'autres commentaires à ce sujet?

M. Jeff Ellis:

Si vous permettez, et il se peut que Sean ait entendu des observations semblables aux États-Unis, pendant notre rencontre avec nos homologues américains de l'Association of American Railroads, je peux dire que nos homologues américains tiennent aussi beaucoup à protéger les acquis de l'ALENA et à maintenir leurs volumes d'activité. Avec un peu de chance, ça restera une priorité des deux côtés de la frontière.

M. Guy Lauzon:

Comme je ne suis pas un membre régulier, certaines de mes questions pourraient vous paraître naïves, mais, madame Drysdale, vous avez parlé de camionnage et de transport ferroviaire. Pouvez-vous me donner une idée de la capacité des chemins de fer de concurrencer le camionnage? Dans votre exemple de pose de voie ferrée dans une région, comment les deux se comparaient-ils entre eux?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Le chemin de fer est des plus concurrentiels pour le transport à grande distance. Le chiffre que nous utilisons souvent dans l'industrie est d'environ 500 milles. Sur moins, il sera très difficile pour le chemin de fer de concurrencer le camionnage. Dans mon exemple, l'expéditeur se servait en fait du camionnage pour accéder au réseau ferroviaire, mais beaucoup plus au sud que l'endroit où il se trouvait.

M. Guy Lauzon:

Vous avez aussi mentionné, et j'en ai entendu parler, la clientèle que nous perdions aux États-Unis. Dans quelle proportion par rapport à votre activité totale — 5 %, 2 %, 9 %?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Au CN, du fait des lois sur les entreprises commerciales touchant expressément l'interconnexion étendue sous le régime du projet de loi C-30, c'est probablement de l'ordre de quelques milliers de wagons.

M. Guy Lauzon:

En pourcentage, qu'est-ce que cela représente?

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Très peu. Nos craintes sont dirigées vers l'avenir, particulièrement en ce qui concerne l'interconnexion de longue distance.

M. Guy Lauzon:

D'accord.

(1055)

M. James Clements:

Je dirais que l'interconnexion de longue distance — je jongle mentalement avec des chiffres approximatifs — expose au moins plus de 20 % de nos revenus à une connexion avec un transporteur américain.

M. Guy Lauzon:

Récemment, le CN aurait investi 20 milliards de dollars dans des infrastructures, le CP 7,7 milliards et quelques. Je pense que c'était les chiffres. Quelle proportion, approximativement, est allée à la sécurité?

M. James Clements:

On en consacre beaucoup à la sécurité, parce que, même quand on installe de nouveaux rails et traverses, ça améliore la qualité des infrastructures de base.

M. Guy Lauzon:

Combien ont directement étés affecté à l'amélioration de la sécurité?

M. James Clements:

J'appelle mon collègue à la rescousse.

M. Keith Shearer:

J'extrapole un peu, mais je dirais que peut-être 70 % vont dans la sécurité, par rapport aux investissements dans la technologie, et, comme James l'a dit, les rails, les traverses, les wagons et les locomotives.

M. Guy Lauzon:

Donc, 70 % ont été affectés à la sécurité, et 30 % aux profits.

M. Keith Shearer:

Pour augmenter la capacité.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Lauzon.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais continuer à parler du même sujet, soit l'interconnexion. À vous entendre, l'interconnexion de longue distance, c'est comme le diable en personne.

Ma question comporte deux volets.

Tout d'abord, cela veut-il dire que le concept d'interconnexion qui était prévu dans le projet de loi C-30 vous serait dorénavant acceptable, afin d'essayer de rétablir le pouvoir de négociation entre les producteurs et les transporteurs?

Par ailleurs, on parle depuis tantôt d'interconnexion de longue distance selon un axe nord-sud, donc avec les États-Unis. Je viens de Trois-Rivières, au Québec, une ville qui exporte du grain, entre autres. J'imagine que le principe d'interconnexion de longue distance doit aussi s'appliquer selon un axe est-ouest. Y a-t-il les mêmes problèmes dans cette direction?

M. Sean Finn:

Je ne dirais pas que c'est le diable en personne, mais il faut comprendre que le projet de loi C-30 visait à instaurer des mesures temporaires pour régler un problème assez exceptionnel: il y avait eu une récolte de grain très importante, presque une récolte record, ainsi qu'un hiver très difficile. En ce qui concerne la mise en vigueur du projet de loi C-30, je pourrais démontrer que, une fois l'hiver terminé, en mars 2014, les compagnies de chemins de fer ont acheminé tout le grain qu'il fallait livrer. On ne peut pas vraiment établir que ce sont les mesures instaurées par le projet de loi C-30 qui ont aidé à ce que le transport du grain se fasse. Dans le cas du projet de loi C-30, une fois que l'hiver s'est terminé, nous avons réussi à rattraper le retard causé par l’hiver rigoureux et par la récolte record de grain.

Il est important de comprendre que, dans une situation où il y a un expéditeur qu'on prétend être captif, selon la définition contenue dans la proposition, c'est-à-dire que cet expéditeur a seulement accès à un chemin de fer, en fait, il peut avoir accès à des camions ou à d'autres moyens de transport. Cela permet à l'expéditeur de faire des choix.

Nous vous donnions l'exemple des Américains, qui ont accès au réseau canadien à des points d'échange interréseaux au Canada. Or, nous n'avons pas le même accès aux points d'échange interréseaux aux États-Unis. C'est surtout le cas du CN, à titre d'exemple, qui va de Chicago à la Louisiane. Nous ne pouvons pas y avoir accès de la même façon.

M. Robert Aubin:

J'ai bien compris le problème touchant l'axe nord-sud. J'aimerais savoir ce qu'il en ait de l'axe est-ouest.

M. Sean Finn:

En ce qui concerne l'axe est-ouest, il y a beaucoup de compétition entre le CN et le CP, sans aucun doute. Quand la distance d'interconnexion était de 30 kilomètres, c'était dans des zones urbaines, surtout des zones industrielles. Il est important de dire que les exceptions instaurées pour s'assurer que les compagnies de chemin de fer américaines n'ont pas accès à tout le réseau sont les mêmes que celles qui existent pour les interconnexions selon l'axe est-ouest.

Soyez rassuré: il est possible pour un expéditeur de Trois-Rivières d'accéder au réseau du CN ou du CP par l'entremise d'un chemin de fer d'intérêt local. Cela existe aujourd'hui.

La distance d'interconnexion de 30 kilomètres a été très bonne pendant plusieurs années. Celle de 160 kilomètres était une mesure temporaire. Il n'y a pas de doute qu'une distance d'interconnexion de 1 200 kilomètres créera des problèmes importants. [Traduction]

Mme Janet Drysdale:

Pour une petite précision...

La présidente:

Je suis désolée. Il est plus de 11 heures.

Je tiens à remercier les témoins de s'être présentés. Vous nous avez communiqué de l'excellente information.

Je suspends momentanément les travaux, pendant que les nouveaux témoins s'approchent.

(1055)

(1115)

La présidente:

Reprenons.

Nous accueillons maintenant des représentants de la Western Grain Elevator Association, de la Canadian Oilseed Processors Association ainsi que de la Fédération canadienne de l'agriculture.

Pour commencer, je cède la parole à la Western Grain Elevator Association.

M. Wade Sobkowich (directeur général, Western Grain Elevator Association):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente, et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité.

La Western Grain Elevator Association est heureuse de contribuer à votre étude du projet de loi C-49. Elle représente les six entreprises de manutention des grains les plus importantes du Canada. Ensemble, ces entreprises s'occupent de plus de 90 % des mouvements de grain en vrac de l'Ouest canadien.

Un transport par rail efficace soutient la capacité de notre industrie de réussir dans un marché concurrentiel sur le plan mondial. Nous reconnaissons le travail exhaustif de votre comité qui, l'année dernière, a rédigé un rapport très important. Celui qui a été publié en décembre 2016 appuyait en grande partie nos points de vue sur les principales questions.

Dans le projet de loi C-49, un certain nombre de recommandations formulées par les expéditeurs de grains ont été acceptées et un certain nombre d'autres pas. Nous demandions au gouvernement de renforcer la définition d'« installations convenables », afin de baser sur la demande et les besoins de l'expéditeur l'obligation des compagnies de chemin de fer de leur fournir des services et non sur ce que la compagnie était disposée à offrir. La définition du projet de loi ne se fonde pas explicitement sur la demande de l'expéditeur. Il y a des points positifs et négatifs dans la nouvelle définition.

Nous cherchions à obtenir la possibilité d'arbitrer les sanctions d'un piètre rendement au moyen d'accords sur le niveau de service et à disposer aussi d'un mécanisme de règlement des différends découlant de ces accords. Nous nous réjouissons de voir figurer des mesures en ce sens dans le projet de loi. Elles résoudront bien des défis en matière de performance du rail.

Nous demandions que l'interconnexion étendue soit rendue permanente pour permettre la poursuite de l'accès à l'un des outils les plus efficaces et les plus concurrentiels que nous ayons connus en matière de transport par rail. Mais l'interconnexion étendue n'a pas été rendue permanente, ce qui est une perte importante pour nous.

Nous demandions aussi que le gouvernement maintienne et améliore le revenu admissible maximal afin de protéger les agriculteurs contre les taux qu'on connaît en conditions monopolistiques. Cette protection a été maintenue; toutefois le secteur du soja en demeure exclu.

Nous avions également appuyé l'élargissement de l'autorité de l'Office pour qu'il puisse entreprendre, de son propre chef, l'examen des problèmes de performance du système ferroviaire et de les régler, de la même façon que, aux États-Unis, l'U.S. Surface Transportation Board. Le projet de loi C-49 prévoit l'examen officieux des problèmes par l'Office, mais sans lui accorder le pouvoir accru de corriger les problèmes systémiques.

Enfin, nous demandions au gouvernement d'améliorer la transparence et la robustesse des données sur les performances du secteur ferroviaire. Elles ont été améliorées dans le projet de loi, mais les données liées aux demandes des expéditeurs ne sont pas toujours collectées. Plus tard, dans la semaine, certains de nos homologues de l'industrie des grains donneront des points de vue supplémentaires sur l'utilisation des données, les échéanciers et les délais ainsi que les rapports au ministre. Notre association partage leur opinion sur ces sujets.

Bref, dans l'ensemble, le projet de loi constitue une amélioration importante par rapport à la loi actuelle et une avancée pour l'industrie des grains. Voilà pourquoi nous choisissons de ne proposer que quatre modifications techniques, qui représentent le strict minimum de modifications à apporter pour éviter que le projet de loi ne soit inapplicable et ne donne pas les résultats escomptés par le gouvernement. La principale concerne l'interconnexion de longue distance.

Nous vous dirigeons vers l'annexe A, que nous vous avons distribuée à l'avance. L'ordonnance sur l'interconnexion étendue en vigueur au cours des trois dernières saisons de croissance est progressivement devenue un outil inestimable pour les expéditeurs de grains de l'Ouest canadien. La nouvelle disposition sur l'interconnexion de longue distance est plutôt conçue pour créer des solutions de rechange concurrentielles. Dans cet esprit, les expéditeurs doivent pouvoir accéder à des lieux de correspondance qui constituent le choix logistique et économique le plus sensé et, pas nécessairement, à celui qui est le plus rapproché.

En ce qui concerne le sens raisonnable de la circulation et sa destination, le libellé actuel de l'article 129(1) peut donner à l'expéditeur un accès à la ligne de chemin de fer concurrente la plus proche, mais ce ne sera de presque aucune utilité si le lieu de correspondance le plus rapproché éloigne le chargement de sa destination finale; s'il n'a pas la capacité de traiter le volume du chargement; si la compagnie de chemin de fer concurrente la plus proche ne possède pas de voie ferrée sur toute la distance jusqu'à la destination finale du chargement. Pour vous aider à mieux comprendre, nous avons distribué l'annexe B, qui présente graphiquement des exemples concrets d'accès au lieu de correspondance le plus proche n'ayant aucun sens sur les plans logistique et économique.

(1120)



Nous croyons que deux dispositions doivent être modifiées afin de mieux refléter l’esprit de la création de choix concurrentiels. Si vous allez à la carte 1 des documents que nous vous avons distribués, vous y verrez l’exemple d’un élévateur qui a accès à un lieu de correspondance se situant dans un rayon de 30 kilomètres, mais qui est dans la mauvaise direction. Le projet de loi C-49, à l’alinéa proposé 129(3)a), dit qu’un expéditeur ne peut obtenir une interconnexion de longue distance si une ligne de chemin de fer d’une compagnie concurrente se trouve dans un rayon de 30 kilomètres.

Expédier une cargaison dans la mauvaise direction ou sur la mauvaise voie ferrée occasionne des dépenses prohibitives et, dans ces cas, rend inutile le principe de l’interconnexion. Un expéditeur qui se trouve dans un rayon de 30 kilomètres d’un lieu de correspondance qui lui est inutile ne peut donc avoir accès à l’option d’interconnexion de longue distance; il se trouve donc en situation de désavantage concurrentiel.

Et à cause d’une interdiction figurant à l'alinéa proposé 129(1)a), un problème similaire existe pour les installations desservies par deux compagnies de chemin de fer. La solution à ce problème est d’ajouter le libellé « dans la direction la plus judicieuse de l'origine à la destination » aux alinéas proposés 129(1)a) et 129(3)a). Un tel énoncé, qui existe déjà pour d’autres fins à l’article proposé 136.1 du projet de loi, devrait être repris à l'article 129.

À propos du prix de l’interconnexion de longue distance, ou ILD, l’alinéa proposé 135(1)a) du projet de loi fait en sorte que l’Office calculera les prix en prenant comme référence les prix comparables antérieurs. Cependant, la plupart des prix « comparables » à ce jour ont été établis dans des conditions monopolistiques. Si les prix eux-mêmes ne sont pas concurrentiels, et sont la vraie raison pour laquelle un expéditeur demanderait une ILD, ce processus ne réglera pas efficacement le coeur du problème. Nous craignons que sans une modification comme celle que nous proposons, une ILD devienne au prix de ligne concurrentiel.

Le paragraphe proposé 135 (2) énonce que l’Office des transports du Canada, ou OTC, établira un prix qui ne peut être inférieur à la moyenne des recettes par tonne-kilomètre pour un transport comparable. Cela enchâsse dans la loi un établissement de prix de monopole. Dans tout marché raisonnable, la rentabilité est établie sur ce qu’il vous en coûte pour faire des affaires, ce à quoi on ajoute une marge pour générer un profit. Le fait de pouvoir simplement facturer n’importe quel montant, sans regard aux coûts d’exploitation, peut entraîner des prix déconnectés de la réalité commerciale qui devrait être celle du « prix majoré ».

Nous espérons qu’il y aura d’importants changements aux dispositions proposées 135(1)b) et 135(2) afin que l’Office puisse avoir un droit de regard sur le coût, et non sur les recettes par tonne-kilomètre, et que les prix soient basés sur un transport commercialement comparable, et pas seulement sur un transport comparable. Pour que l’interconnexion de longue distance fonctionne, le taux doit être basé sur une marge raisonnable pour les compagnies de chemin de fer, et non sur au moins autant ou peut-être plus que ce qu’elles peuvent facturer dans un environnement monopolistique.

Le troisième domaine qui nous préoccupe est la liste des lieux de correspondance. Le paragraphe proposé 136.9(2) établit les paramètres de publication par les compagnies de chemin de fer de la liste des lieux de correspondance, de même que de retrait d’un de ces lieux de la liste. Les expéditeurs de grains sont inquiets de voir que les compagnies de chemin de fer pourraient choisir, de façon unilatérale, de mettre hors service tout lieu de correspondance.

Il y a d’autres lois qui interviennent dans ce contexte. Les paragraphes 127(1) et (2), sous la rubrique « Interconnexion », présentent un processus par lequel tout intéressé peut demander à l’Office d’ordonner une interconnexion, et où l’Office a le pouvoir de forcer une compagnie de chemin de fer à fournir les « installations convenables » pour permettre l’interconnexion à un lieu de correspondance. Ce même énoncé devrait s’appliquer à l’interconnexion de longue distance. Dans une perspective de lieu de correspondance, à la fois l’interconnexion et l’interconnexion de longue distance pourraient s’appliquer à un lieu de correspondance donné.

En ce qui concerne le soya et les produits du soya, quand le revenu admissible maximal, ou RAM, a été mis sur pied en 2000, le soya était à peine cultivé dans les Prairies et, par conséquent, il n’a pas été inclus dans la liste originale de l’Annexe II des grains visés par le programme. Depuis, le soya est devenu un acteur important dans les Prairies et une culture de base dotée d’un fort potentiel de croissance pour la production d’huile, de tourteau et d’aliments pour humains.

On doit noter que la portion canadienne du déplacement de cultures états-uniennes au Canada est assujettie au RAM. En conséquence, du maïs états-unien est couvert par le RAM, alors que le soya canadien ne l’est pas. Il n’y a aucune raison pour laquelle le gouvernement ne devrait pas saisir cette occasion d’ajouter le soya et les produits du soya à l’Annexe II.

En conclusion, le projet de loi C-49 est, dans l’ensemble, un pas important dans la bonne direction.

(1125)



Et c’est en tout respect que nous demandons aux membres du Comité d'apporter seulement quatre modifications techniques non invasives afin de s’assurer que le projet de loi concrétise vraiment les intentions énoncées.

Merci beaucoup.

La présidente:

Merci infiniment.

Nous allons maintenant écouter le représentant de la Canadian Oilseed Processors Association.

M. Chris Vervaet (directeur général, Canadian Oilseed Processors Association):

Merci beaucoup.

Madame la présidente, membres du Comité, au nom de la Canadian Oilseed Processors Association, ou COPA, j’aimerais remercier le Comité pour la possibilité qui nous est offerte de contribuer à cette importante étude du projet de loi C-49.

La COPA travaille en partenariat avec le Conseil canadien du canola pour défendre les intérêts des transformateurs d’oléagineux. Nous représentons des entreprises qui possèdent et exploitent 14 installations de transformation, dans chacune des provinces depuis l’Alberta jusqu’au Québec. Ces installations transforment le canola et le soya cultivés par des agriculteurs canadiens en produits à valeur ajoutée pour les secteurs de la transformation alimentaire, de l’alimentation animale et des biocarburants. Cela crée non seulement une énorme demande en oléagineux cultivés par les producteurs de grains du Canada, mais aussi des emplois stables et bien rémunérés dans les régions rurales où s’effectuent nos activités.

Le succès de notre industrie repose sur la capacité d’accéder aux marchés étrangers. En fait, 85 % de nos produits de canola transformés sont exportés sur les marchés continentaux et d’outre-mer. Une logistique ferroviaire efficace est essentielle à l’expédition fiable et rapide de nos produits vers ces marchés. Pour mettre les choses en perspective, soulignons que 75 % de tous nos produits transformés transitent par le rail.

Étant donné l’importance du rail dans le succès de notre industrie, la COPA a travaillé en étroite collaboration avec la Western Grain Elevator Association, ou WGEA, au cours des deux dernières années afin de promouvoir des recommandations politiques clés qui, selon nous, sont indispensables à la création d’un environnement plus concurrentiel en transport ferroviaire. À notre avis, C-49 est, dans l’ensemble, un bon projet de loi. Il n’est pas parfait, mais il renferme plusieurs éléments essentiels qui, aux yeux des transformateurs de produits oléagineux à valeur ajoutée, amélioreront l’équilibre commercial entre l’expéditeur et la compagnie de chemin de fer. Il améliore notamment la capacité d’arbitrer les sanctions pour rendement médiocre au moyen d’accords de niveau de services, ou ANS, ainsi qu’un mécanisme de règlement des différends pour résoudre les désaccords concernant l’application d’un ANS signé. Nous sommes également d'avis que la transparence des données et leur robustesse ont été considérablement améliorées dans le projet de loi. Nous avons enfin constaté que la définition de « convenable » est renforcée.

Cela dit, nos préoccupations concernant les modifications proposées dans le projet de loi et visant à convertir, essentiellement, les anciennes dispositions relatives à l’agrandissement des limites d’interconnexion en interconnexion de longue distance, ou ILD, sont particulièrement notables. Pour le dire très clairement, l’interconnexion agrandie était un outil incroyablement important pour les transformateurs de produits à valeur ajoutée. Pour la première fois, l’interconnexion insufflait un semblant de concurrence véritable dans la logistique ferroviaire pour notre secteur, où il n’y en avait jamais eu auparavant, et donnait aux installations précédemment captives un accès à un deuxième transporteur pour les produits à destination des États-Unis. Notre industrie a constaté une amélioration spectaculaire du service ferroviaire vers les États-Unis pendant la période où l’interconnexion agrandie était en vigueur.

L’interconnexion agrandie était un outil extrêmement simple et efficace. Elle englobait toutes les interconnexions et son accès n’impliquait ni demande ni lourdeurs bureaucratiques. Les prix étaient clairement publiés pour des distances définies, ce qui donnait aux expéditeurs la certitude et la prévisibilité nécessaires pour réserver du transport à plus long terme. En outre, c’était un outil de négociation très efficace avec les transporteurs locaux, qui nous semblaient beaucoup plus axés sur le service et disposés à discuter d’une amélioration du service ou des prix grâce à l’effet de levier de l’interconnexion agrandie.

En revanche, le mécanisme d’ILD contenu dans le projet de loi C-49 présente un certain nombre de défis et supprime les caractéristiques clés dont nous tirions parti dans l’interconnexion agrandie. Plus particulièrement, l’ILD propose une multitude de paramètres et conditions compliqués pour déterminer quels lieux de correspondance sont accessibles aux expéditeurs et de quelle façon. L’ILD propose aussi une fixation des prix basée sur les prix comparables antérieurs. Jusqu’ici, tous les prix comparables ont été établis dans des conditions monopolistiques. Si les prix eux-mêmes sont non concurrentiels, il n’y a pas d’incitation à demander une ILD.

À défaut de mesures correctives, ces deux dispositions, dans leur forme actuelle, rendraient l’ILD peu ou pas utile. C’est pourquoi nous désirons travailler avec les membres de ce comité afin de trouver des solutions visant à faire de l’ILD un instrument de concurrence pour notre industrie, comme nous estimons que le gouvernement en avait l’intention avec ce projet de loi. À l'instar de la WGEA, nous croyons qu'il y a trois sujets de préoccupation principaux auxquels il faut remédier pour faire de l’ILD un outil efficace.

Certaines des modifications de forme que nous proposons, qui ressemblent à celles de la WGEA, se trouvent à l’annexe A, que nous avons distribuée à l’avance aux membres du Comité.

(1130)



Le premier élément de notre liste de modifications de forme est qu'il faut préciser que l’accès au lieu de correspondance le plus proche signifie: un lieu de correspondance qui est dans la direction la plus judicieuse du transport et de sa destination, qu’une installation soit desservie par deux chemins de fer ou non, ou qu’il y ait ou non un autre lieu de correspondance dans un rayon de 30 kilomètres. Prescrire un accès en se basant simplement sur l’accès d’un expéditeur à la ligne de chemin de fer concurrente la plus proche, sans tenir compte d’autres facteurs, limiterait la valeur de l’ILD. Dans la pratique, quand on détermine le lieu de correspondance le plus proche, il faut considérer, d'abord, s’il se trouve en direction de la destination finale de la cargaison; ensuite, s’il est desservi par la meilleure compagnie de chemin de fer pour acheminer la cargaison vers la destination désirée; enfin, s’il a la taille et les infrastructures nécessaires pour exécuter l’interconnexion.

L’esprit du mécanisme d’ILD est de donner aux expéditeurs des options concurrentielles. Mais il faut que celles-ci soient des options que nous pouvons effectivement utiliser et qui sont appliquées de manière uniforme pour tous les expéditeurs. L'alinéa proposé 129(1)a) du projet de loi énonce que toute installation d’un expéditeur desservie par deux compagnies de chemin de fer ne peut pas faire de demande pour une ILD. Exclure des expéditeurs ayant deux compagnies de chemin de fer à leur disposition, en présumant simplement qu’ils ont ainsi des options concurrentielles, constitue une conclusion basée sur une fausse prémisse. Dans bien des cas, aucune des deux lignes de chemin de fer ne dessert la destination finale de l’expéditeur de la cargaison. De plus, le fait de restreindre l’accès à l’ILD place les installations desservies par deux compagnies de chemin de fer en situation de désavantage concurrentiel par rapport aux installations qui peuvent se prévaloir de l’ILD.

Permettez-moi de vous donner un petit exemple de ce que cela signifie dans les faits. Prenez la carte 2 qui se trouve à l'annexe B. Dans la municipalité de Camrose, en Alberta, un de nos membres exploite une installation de transformation qui est desservie par deux compagnies de chemin de fer, le Canadien National, ou CN, et le Canadien Pacifique, ou CP. À l'heure actuelle, cette installation a deux compagnies de chemin de fer à sa disposition, de sorte qu'elle n’est pas admissible à une interconnexion de longue distance, ou ILD, même s'il y en a une à Coutts, à la frontière de l'Alberta, où elle pourrait avoir accès au chemin de fer Burlington Northern Santa Fe, ou BNSF. En plus de limiter son accès aux marchés américains servis par BNSF, exclure cette installation la place en situation de désavantage concurrentiel par rapport à toutes les autres installations qui ont accès à cet ILD parce qu'elles ne sont pas desservies par deux compagnies de chemin de fer.

La deuxième modification de forme que nous voulons proposer, c'est que nous sommes aussi très inquiets par rapport à la capacité des dispositions d’ILD à répondre aux préoccupations des expéditeurs quant à la fixation des prix. Autrement dit, dans sa forme actuelle, C-49 définit un plancher pour les prix d’ILD, en indiquant qu’un prix doit être égal ou supérieur à la moyenne des recettes par tonne-kilomètre pour un transport comparable. Il faut que la formulation du projet de loi donne à l’Office des transports du Canada, ou OTC, la capacité de prendre en considération des prix concurrentiels commercialement comparables lorsqu’il détermine les prix d’interconnexion. En prenant comme référence les prix comparables antérieurs pour établir les prix d’interconnexion, on oublie le fait que ces prix ont été fixés dans des conditions monopolistiques. L’OTC devrait également tenir compte du coût réel pour transporter les marchandises, et non de ce que les compagnies de chemin de fer ont réussi à percevoir dans le passé, quand les pouvoirs monopolistiques étaient à l’oeuvre. Ainsi, tout en s’assurant que la compagnie de chemin de fer obtient un rendement raisonnable pour la conduite des affaires d’ILD, l’Office se gardera de perpétuer des prix excessifs fixés dans des circonstances où la concurrence n’existait pas.

En troisième lieu, nous nous inquiétons du pouvoir qu’ont les compagnies de chemin de fer de prendre la décision unilatérale de cesser de desservir un lieu de correspondance ou de le supprimer, sans aucun mécanisme de contrôle. Cela aussi va directement à l’encontre de l’esprit originel de la nouvelle ILD, à savoir donner aux expéditeurs plus d’options concurrentielles. Nous croyons que le projet de loi doit prévoir un contrôle plus strict sur le démantèlement des lieux de correspondance, en reconnaissant en fait les obligations qui incombent à d’autres transporteurs publics et qui semblent déjà limiter la possibilité que cela se produise.

Enfin, la COPA aimerait joindre sa voix à celles du nombre croissant de groupes de producteurs et d’associations agroalimentaires qui s’inquiètent du fait que le soya et les produits du soya ont été exclus du Programme de revenu admissible maximal, ou RAM. Le RAM est un outil précieux pour protéger les agriculteurs contre les hausses de taux exorbitantes. Nous savons que le gouvernement et les membres du Comité se soucient également des producteurs agricoles, d’où la décision de conserver le RAM dans cette nouvelle mouture de la Loi sur le transport au Canada. Il est donc surprenant que le soya et les produits du soya en soient exclus. Comme Wade l'a mentionné, le soya est maintenant l’une des principales cultures au Manitoba, et l’on s’attend à un accroissement semblable de la superficie qui lui est consacrée dans les deux autres provinces des Prairies. Vu cette hausse du nombre d’hectares, le potentiel de transformation à valeur ajoutée du soya dans l’Ouest canadien augmente, là où il n'y a actuellement aucune installation de transformation du soya à valeur ajoutée. Il n’y a pas de justification politique logique pour laquelle le soya devrait être exclu de ce programme, et non une autre culture qui y est déjà comprise. Les membres de la COPA et nos clients agriculteurs demandent donc que le soya et les produits du soya soient ajoutés à l’annexe II.

En conclusion, les transformateurs d’oléagineux sont d’avis que C-49 est un pas important dans la bonne direction. Les modifications de forme que nous proposons concernant l’ILD donneraient aux expéditeurs la possibilité d’avoir accès à d’autres transporteurs, ce qui renforcerait l’objectif général du projet de loi: offrir un système plus compétitif.

Merci.

(1135)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant écouter le témoignage de la Fédération canadienne de l'agriculture.

Monsieur Hall.

M. Norm Hall (vice-président, Fédération canadienne de l'agriculture):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Comme vous l'avez dit, je suis Norm Hall, premier vice-président de la Fédération canadienne de l'agriculture, ou FCA. Mais je suis surtout ici à titre d'agriculteur de l'Ouest du Canada, plus précisément de Wynyard, au Centre-Est de la Saskatchewan, où se trouvent les plus grands lacs alcalins au Canada, dont la salinité est à la hausse. Je vous remercie de m'avoir invité à comparaître devant vous.

Comme vous le savez, la FCA a très fortement réclamé un examen des règlements et des lois qui régissent et gouvernent le transport du grain jusqu'aux points d'exportation, de même qu'un examen des transports. Le Conseil consultatif en matière de croissance économique du gouvernement a parlé de libérer l'agriculture canadienne. Voilà qui passe en grande partie par l'établissement d'un corridor d'exportation efficace au moyen d'un processus législatif et réglementaire solide, d'infrastructures modernes et de systèmes d'information où toutes les entreprises de transport et de manutention de grain sont tenues de rendre des comptes. C'est fort important pour que l'industrie puisse faire son entrée en toute confiance dans de nouveaux grands marchés d'exportation. Le principal intervenant dans toute cette chaîne est le producteur de la denrée, à savoir l'agriculteur.

En 2014 2015, les agriculteurs canadiens ont versé 1,4 milliard de dollars de fret aux chemins de fer en vertu du régime de revenu admissible maximal, ou RAM. Ce ne sont pas les expéditeurs qui en ont payé la note. Les entreprises céréalières sont des courtiers à prix coûtant majoré. L'ensemble des frais des chemins de fer sont refilés aux producteurs. Ce sont eux qui les assument. Les chemins de fer sont essentiellement des intervenants à prix coûtant majoré. Dans le cadre du RAM, ils sont assurés d'un rendement de 27 %. D'après une étude menée récemment par un de nos membres, l’Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan, ou APAS, ce chiffre se rapprocherait davantage de 60 à 65 % de bénéfices pour les chemins de fer. Ce sont pourtant les agriculteurs qui assument tous les risques à l'étape de la production, et qui paient tous les coûts pour la production, le transport de la ferme aux installations terminales intérieures et aux sites de transbordement, puis jusqu'au point d'exportation, de même que pour l'ensemble des interruptions ou retards.

Les chemins de fer canadiens de même qu'un réseau de transport ferroviaire des grains efficace et peu coûteux sont essentiels à l'économie agricole du pays et à la santé financière des producteurs de céréales et d'oléagineux. Pour s'assurer que l'ensemble du réseau fonctionne, les décideurs doivent reconnaître que les agriculteurs paient la totalité de la facture du transport des grains exportés de la ferme jusqu'au port. Les moyens de subsistance de l'Ouest canadien sont donc à la merci du monopole ferroviaire qui tente de maximiser les bénéfices de ses actionnaires.

Il y a chaque année entre 35 et 40 millions de tonnes sous l'emprise de ce monopole. Puisque le transport est un des intrants les plus coûteux d'une ferme céréalière, on ne soulignera jamais assez l'importance d'assurer un milieu compétitif au moyen des règlements et des lois. Comme M. Emerson l'a dit avec justesse, les coûts de transport représentent souvent un obstacle plus sérieux à l'expansion des marchés que ceux des tarifs internationaux ou des barrières commerciales. Cette constatation a été mise en évidence lors de l'échec de la campagne agricole de 2013–2014. Comme les témoins précédents l'ont dit, 20 millions de tonnes additionnelles auraient pu être distribuées si l'industrie avait été contactée et en mesure de planifier en conséquence, plutôt que de louer 400 locomotives aux États-Unis, ce qui a court-circuité la capacité durant l'hiver.

Alors que le projet de loi C-49 représente un pas dans la bonne direction, on dirait presque qu'il a été conçu pour sembler améliorer les choses sans vraiment changer quoi que ce soit: laisser beaucoup trop de place aux chemins de fer pour ne pas respecter l'intention des dispositions, de sorte que nous serons bien loin d'un environnement concurrentiel; demander plus d'informations tout en limitant la capacité de l'Office à utiliser ces données; institutionnaliser les ILD, mais avec des tarifs fondés sur les recettes antérieures plutôt que sur les coûts réels; éviter de donner à l'Office le pouvoir de prévenir les problèmes et d'exiger des plaintes formelles; réguler les options d'interconnexion sans donner à l'expéditeur la flexibilité de choisir les lieux de correspondance qui les aideraient vraiment et augmenteraient la concurrence entre les chemins de fer; continuer à autoriser les chemins de fer à fermer de manière aléatoire ou arbitraire les sites de chargement de wagon et les installations de correspondance des producteurs; continuer à permettre aux chemins de fer d'utiliser les données d'établissement des coûts des années 1990, époque où ils ont réalisé des économies sur le dos des agriculteurs; et donner aux chemins de fer une année complète après la mise en oeuvre pour se conformer aux nouvelles exigences en matière d'information.

(1140)



Je tiens également à préciser que même si mon exposé porte principalement sur des propositions stratégiques générales, la Fédération canadienne de l'agriculture appuie sans réserve les modifications législatives détaillées proposées par le Groupe de travail sur la logistique des récoltes, lesquelles figureront dans une lettre destinée au ministre.

Aux fins de transparence, puisque 40 millions de tonnes de grain doivent être transportées par train chaque année, il est absolument impératif que les compagnies ferroviaires respectent les nouveaux règlements exigeant la communication de renseignements et de données supplémentaires afin de permettre la logistique, le marketing et la planification proactifs dans l'ensemble de l'industrie. Pour atteindre cet objectif, il faut disposer de données en temps réel, lesquelles doivent être transmises assez rapidement pour permettre la planification proactive. Rien ne justifie le fait que les compagnies disposent d'une période d'un an après l'entrée en vigueur de la loi avant de s'y conformer.

L'utilisation des données par l'Office des transports du Canada ne devrait pas être restreinte; ces données devraient être entièrement utilisées pour faciliter et gérer la circulation et les volumes de grain afin de prévenir les retards, les arriérés et les perturbations. Par exemple, si les renseignements ou les données sont utilisés pour la gestion de l'interconnexion de longue distance, elles peuvent l'être dans d'autres domaines et à d'autres fins. L'Office devrait être libre de le faire, non pas pour rendre les données publiques, mais pour les utiliser lui-même. En outre, il faut lui conférer le pouvoir de trouver des solutions aux problèmes de manière proactive, sans attendre que l'industrie dépose des plaintes. Il faut amender la mesure législative pour lui donner des pouvoirs supplémentaires afin qu'il puisse, de son propre chef, corriger les lacunes au chapitre du rendement du service.

En ce qui concerne les sanctions réciproques, même si elles font l'objet d'un accord contractuel entre les compagnies de grain et les sociétés ferroviaires, je vous ai déjà indiqué que ce sont les agriculteurs qui finiront par faire les frais des problèmes qui surgiront entre elles. L'Office doit avoir le mandat et les ressources nécessaires pour surveiller, réglementer et assurer la conformité. Le niveau de service et les mécanismes de conformité doivent empêcher les compagnies ferroviaires, fortes de leurs pouvoirs de monopole, de devenir nonchalantes à propos du service fourni, puisque les expéditeurs et les agriculteurs n'ont d'autre choix que de faire appel à elles. Les lieux de chargement de wagons des producteurs constituent un bon exemple, et j'en traiterai bientôt.

Le ministre doit surveiller le niveau global de service et la disponibilité de service des compagnies ferroviaires; il ne peut les laisser retirer arbitrairement et à leur fantaisie des services qui sont nécessaires au transport efficace et rapide des grains vers des marchés extérieurs qui offrent aux agriculteurs et aux expéditeurs l'occasion d'améliorer leur position concurrentielle sur le marché. Puisque nous allons nous pencher sur les sanctions relatives au revenu admissible maximal imposées par suite d'une lacune au chapitre du service ou du contrat, la non-conformité ne doit pas être prise en compte dans le calcul du revenu admissible maximal.

Pour ce qui est de l'interconnexion de longue distance, ou ILD, les compagnies ferroviaires craignent de perdre des parts de marché. Bienvenue dans le monde de la concurrence. D'une seule voix, elles veulent discuter de la conclusion d'accords axés sur le marché, mais dès que leur monopole est menacé si on autorise l'ILD et la venue de transporteurs américains au pays, elles se ravisent et souhaitent l'adoption de règlements.

En ce qui concerne la limite d'interconnexion actuelle, qui est de 30 kilomètres, il existe, dans l'Ouest canadien, quatre points qui sont naturellement desservis par deux compagnies ferroviaires. La limite d'interconnexion de 30 kilomètres porte ce nombre à 14 sites sur 368. En vertu de la disposition fixant la limite à 160 kilomètres, la portée est élargie à 85 % des points, ce qui permet aux compagnies ferroviaires de recourir à l'interconnexion au besoin, si le service est lacunaire.

(1145)



Car voilà l'utilité de l'interconnexion; elle sert en cas de piètre service. Elle permet à une entreprise de faire appel à une autre compagnie pour obtenir un meilleur service. L'interconnexion est censée être là pour favoriser la concurrence.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Hall. Avez-vous terminé votre témoignage?

M. Norm Hall:

Presque. Je dois traiter brièvement du revenu admissible maximal.

Même s'il est essentiel de maintenir ce mécanisme, c'est une bonne idée d'individualiser les investissements dans le domaine ferroviaire, mais le fait que le projet de loi n'exige pas d'examens réguliers des coûts défie l'entendement. S'il tolère le monopole des compagnies ferroviaires, le gouvernement a la responsabilité de surveiller les coûts réels afin de les empêcher d'abuser de ce monopole. En améliorant leur efficacité, elles ont réduit leurs coûts, les faisant porter en large partie aux agriculteurs. La fermeture des terminaux intérieurs, qui a obligé les agriculteurs à transporter leurs grains plus loin en camion, ont fait augmenter de quelque 600 millions de dollars les frais routiers des provinces et des municipalités et accru les coûts qu'assument les producteurs pour le transport du grain de la ferme à l'élévateur.

Merci, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Hall.

Passons maintenant aux questions. Mme Block a la parole.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je veux remercier nos témoins de comparaître. Nous recevons aujourd'hui un éventail fort diversifié de témoins, ce qui est une bonne chose quand on cherche à adopter une approche équilibrée afin de concilier les besoins des expéditeurs et des compagnies ferroviaires qui leur fournissent des services. Lors de la comparution des témoins précédents, j'ai fait remarquer que nous comprenons certainement l'importance de notre réseau ferroviaire pour l'économie et l'importance des producteurs à cet égard.

J'ai eu l'occasion de poser une question à un groupe de témoins précédent sur ce qui est peut-être, à mon avis, un message quelque peu déroutant de la part des compagnies ferroviaires, qui ont formulé des observations dans une étude effectuée il y a un an, lorsque nous nous penchions sur la Loi sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grain. Comme je l'ai souligné précédemment, notre comité a reçu, au cours de cette étude, des statistiques montrant que l'interconnexion de longue distance n'était pas utilisée fréquemment. Or, nos groupes de producteurs nous ont indiqué que même si elle n'était pas utilisée souvent — comme vous l'avez d'ailleurs fait remarquer, il me semble —, il s'agissait d'un outil utile lors de la négociation de contrats. Si le projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis vise à assurer l'accès au marché et un environnement concurrentiel à nos producteurs, j'aimerais avoir votre avis sur la confusion qui règne à cet égard. On nous a dit que l'interconnexion de longue distance ne sert pas fréquemment et qu'elle constitue un outil efficace lors de la négociation de contrats, mais les dispositions relatives à l'interconnexion que prévoit le projet de loi suscitent une levée de boucliers. Je me demande si vous pouviez nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet.

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Merci de cette excellente question. C'est un point qui suscite une légère confusion chez nous également.

D'une part, deux compagnies ferroviaires ont indiqué que l'augmentation de la limite d'interconnexion les préoccupait, car elles craignent que les transporteurs américains viennent jouer dans leur plate-bande. D'un autre côté, certains transporteurs de pétrole canadiens disposent déjà de réseaux étendus aux États-Unis. Je suppose que deux éléments entrent en compte dans cette discussion.

Nous avons constaté que les compagnies ferroviaires s'opposaient initialement aux dispositions relatives à l'interconnexion de longue distance lorsque ces dernières sont entrées en vigueur, mais qu'elles ont commencé à s'en prévaloir, sollicitant les entreprises et utilisant cette mesure aux fins prévues, c'est-à-dire à titre d'outil favorisant la concurrence. Car voilà l'objectif recherché. Combien de fois... C'est la quatrième fois que je comparais personnellement devant le comité des transports à propos de divers projets de loi visant à modifier la Loi sur les transports au Canada, dans lesquelles un thème revient sans cesse: comment faire en sorte que le marché du transport ferroviaire se comporte de manière concurrentielle?

Cela semble un postulat bien accepté; pourtant, quand on touche au but, les gens semblent prendre peur et veulent faire marche arrière. Nous sommes à la recherche d'un environnement concurrentiel. Si les compagnies ferroviaires offrent des services convenables à des taux adéquats dans les endroits qu'elles desservent, elles constateront que les expéditeurs ne cherchent pas d'autres solutions concurrentielles. Ce n'est que lorsque les taux sont trop élevés ou que le service est déficient qu'ils commencent à chercher des solutions de rechange pour acheminer leurs produits au marché.

Les compagnies ferroviaires, pour des motifs que je comprends, préfèrent transporter les produits vers l'est et vers l'ouest en raison des temps de cycle. Elles préfèrent aller à Vancouver et à Thunder Bay à cause des temps de cycle, car elles peuvent récupérer leurs actifs plus rapidement. Quand elles se rendent aux États-Unis, il leur faut beaucoup de temps — peut-être 30 jours — avant de récupérer leurs wagons. Nous constatons donc qu'elles ne sont pas très intéressées à servir le marché américain. Quand l'interconnexion de longue distance est entrée en jeu, elle a principalement permis à Burlington Northern d'intervenir pour combler le vide et transporter les produits vers les États-Unis.

Les expéditeurs utilisent l'interconnexion de longue distance activement et passivement. Si vous examinez les simples statistiques sur le recours à l'interconnexion de longue distance, ce mécanisme ne semble pas très utilisé. Mais il s'agit d'une utilisation active. Passivement, un expéditeur s'adresserait à une compagnie ferroviaire pour obtenir un service, en lui indiquant des taux qu'il jugerait raisonnables. La compagnie pourrait lui répondre qu'elle ne peut fournir le transport vers les États-Unis et qu'elle accorde la priorité aux expéditions dans d'autres corridors ou à autre chose. Elle ajouterait qu'elle parlerait à Burlington Northern pour voir si cette dernière pourrait accepter le transfert. Le transporteur principal dirait ensuite à l'expéditeur qu'il faut se montrer raisonnable; il lui proposerait un meilleur taux ou lui fournirait le service.

L'avantage de l'interconnexion de longue distance ne peut être évalué que par sa simple utilisation.

(1150)

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Voilà 100 ans — 100 ans — que ces histoires sont racontées dans cette pièce, et si ces murs pouvaient parler, ils diraient qu'ils n'ont rien entendu de nouveau depuis 100 ans.

Nous sommes maintenant saisis d'un nouveau projet de loi grâce auquel nous tentons d'accomplir quelque chose de très délicat: définir ce qui constitue un service « convenable ». Selon vous, il faut tendre vers la demande: c'est ce qui est convenable. Pour leur part, les compagnies ferroviaires préconisent de mettre l'accent sur l'offre, sur ce qui est disponible. Je ne les ai pas mises au défi de s'expliquer, mais je vais le faire pour vous, et je sais que c'est injuste. En quoi consisterait, selon vous, une définition qui conviendrait à tous et qui permettrait tant à vous qu'aux compagnies ferroviaires d'en tirer quelque chose de bénéfique?

Monsieur Sobkowich.

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Merci. Il s'agit ici encore d'une excellente question. Pour notre part, nous fondons notre raisonnement sur le fait que nous devons étudier ce qui est le mieux pour l'économie canadienne, c'est-à-dire acheminer les produits jusqu'aux consommateurs du monde entier. Voilà qui offrira une valeur optimale à la population canadienne.

Il est donc quelque peu difficile de vouloir concilier les opinions des compagnies ferroviaires et des expéditeurs, puis que les compagnies ferroviaires forment un marché dérivé. Elles existent parce que les expéditeurs doivent acheminer leurs produits quelque part dans le monde. Ce sont donc ces derniers qui constituent le moteur de l'économie. Par conséquent, nous devons veiller à ce que la définition de service convenable fournisse les outils et la motivation dont les compagnies ferroviaires ont besoin pour offrir le plus de capacité possible afin de satisfaire la demande des expéditeurs, comme ce serait le cas dans un environnement concurrentiel. Dans un contexte concurrentiel, si l'on s'adresse à un service de messagerie et qu'il ne peut fournir les services dont on a besoin pour acheminer un colis à destination, on se tournerait vers quelqu'un d'autre pour obtenir ce service, et le colis se rendrait là où il doit aller.

Nous devons tenter de stimuler ce qui est là. Si une concurrence normale régnait sur le marché du transport ferroviaire, les choses s'équilibreraient d'elles-mêmes; cependant, puisque cette concurrence n'existe pas et ne peut pas vraiment être instaurée, compte tenu des coûts faramineux afférents à l'entrée de nouvelles compagnies ferroviaires et à ce genre d'initiative, nous devons faire en sorte que le marché du transport ferroviaire se comporte comme s'il était un secteur concurrentiel. Voilà qui exige une loi.

(1155)

M. Ken Hardie:

Je suis convaincu que vous auriez encore beaucoup à dire, mais, au bout du compte, ce que le gouvernement aimerait serait de trouver une solution qui répond à vos besoins et à ceux des chemins de fers sans être obligé d'intervenir et de subventionner quiconque. Lorsque le gouvernement doit intervenir, c'est un peu comme une perte nette pour le pays.

Regardons la situation comme un réseau. Nous avons interrogé les chemins de fer sur leurs vastes réseaux qui s'étendent jusqu'aux États-Unis. J'aimerais avoir une meilleure idée du point d'origine et de la destination, des exportations du Canada et où vont ces exportations et dans quelle mesure les chemins de fer pourraient servir les marchés canadiens grâce à leurs réseaux actuels et aux ententes qu'ils pourraient conclure avec les transporteurs américains.

L'une des choses que nous avons entendues dans le cadre de l'étude sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grain, c'est que le véritable attrait des interconnexions, dans la mesure où elles sont utilisées, un fait rare, est qu'ils permettent de transporter le produit aux États-Unis d'où il peut être acheminé vers la côte Ouest. C'est ce que nous avons appris, mais y a-t-il d'autres considérations dont il faut tenir compte? Où va réellement le produit et quel rôle les entreprises canadiennes peuvent-elles jouer aux États-Unis pour faciliter l'atteinte de cet objectif et rendre la discussion entourant l'interconnexion presque discutable?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Pour répondre à votre question sur la destination du produit, celui-ci est envoyé dans la plupart des États. La plupart des États américains reçoivent des cargaisons de grains et d'oléagineux canadiens. Le marché des produits laitiers du Sud de la Californie, par exemple, est un des marchés importants. L'avantage des interconnexions, c'est qu'il est possible de transférer au Burlington Northern la cargaison et de laisser ce chemin de fer transporter votre produit pour vous jusqu'à destination. De plus, puisque vous avez une capacité plus grande de transport vers les États-Unis, il vous est donc possible de faire plus de ventes aux États-Unis.

M. Ken Hardie:

Qu'est-ce qui empêche le CN ou le CP de conclure une entente avec le Burlington Northern afin de vous offrir un service continu?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

À ma connaissance, rien ne les empêche de conclure une telle entente.

M. Ken Hardie:

Dans ce cas, est-ce un problème si nous nous retrouvons dans une situation où les chemins de fer américains auraient une surcapacité et transféreraient essentiellement leurs produits aux chemins de fer canadiens?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

C'est une bonne question. Je ne saurais vous répondre.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'accord.

La présidente:

Il vous reste 45 secondes.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vais m'arrêter ici.

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Aubin, vous avez la parole. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je m'excuse à l'avance auprès de M. Hardie si je pose une question qui a déjà été posée au cours des 100 dernières années. Le fait est que ma présence ici date d'un peu moins longtemps.

Blague à part, on nous a souvent mentionné que les mesures d'interconnexion ainsi que toutes les autres mesures contenues dans le projet de loi C-30 visaient à répondre aux problèmes causés par une récolte exceptionnelle suivie d'un hiver très rude.

Est-ce que je me trompe en disant que les techniques d'agriculture progressent si rapidement que ce qui était auparavant une récolte exceptionnelle est devenu la norme? [Traduction]

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Je vais répondre d'abord et peut-être que Norm pourra compléter.

Il ne fait aucun doute que les volumes des récoltes ont augmenté au fil des ans. Nous observons une tendance à la hausse. Depuis cinq ans, une culture moyenne se situe à environ 65 millions de tonnes. Si nous avions connu de telles productions il y a 10 ans, nous aurions défoncé les plafonds de nos élévateurs. Il est clair que les récoltes produisent de plus en plus de grains. Ceci est attribuable aux changements apportés aux pratiques agronomiques et aux changements technologiques. Les agriculteurs ont recours à de meilleures pratiques, notamment.

Si vous voulez savoir ce qui a changé pour nous rassurer que nous ne nous retrouverons pas dans une situation similaire à celle que nous avons connue lorsque les cultures se sont mises à augmenter, de notre point de vue, rien n'a changé. Rien n'a changé sur le plan concurrentiel. À l'époque du projet de loi C-30, il y avait beaucoup d'interconnexions. Il y a eu un léger changement sur le plan concurrentiel, mais celui-ci n'a pas duré. Le projet de loi C-49 n'a pas encore été adopté. Donc, en réalité, rien n'a changé ni sur le plan concurrentiel ni sur le plan législatif pour nous rassurer que nous ne vivrons pas à nouveau la même situation si une mesure législative n'est pas adaptée ou si des outils, comme les sanctions réciproques, ne sont pas mis en place.

Est-ce que cela répond à votre question?

(1200)

[Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Oui, merci.

Vos producteurs sont donc inquiets de se retrouver dans une situation où les mesures prévues dans le projet de loi C-30 ont été abandonnées et où le projet de loi C-49 ne sera pas adopté avant plusieurs mois, alors que le temps des récoltes est pratiquement arrivé.

Vos producteurs ont-ils de sérieuses inquiétudes quant aux semaines et aux mois à venir? [Traduction]

M. Norm Hall:

Étant donné les récoltes que nous connaissons en ce moment dans l'Ouest du pays... Je vais d'abord revenir un peu en arrière. Wade a souligné qu'au cours des 10 dernières années, nous avons connu des volumes de récolte plus élevés. Cela est attribuable en grande partie à l'humidité. Au cours des 10 dernières années, nous avons eu des précipitations plus élevées que d'habitude. Il a raison de dire que les avancées technologiques et génétiques dans le domaine des cultures ont eu une incidence positive sur les récoltes, mais, cette année, une grande partie des Prairies vit à nouveau un cycle de sécheresse. Les chiffres seront beaucoup moins élevés que par le passé.

Nous avons encore certaines préoccupations. Un peu plus tôt, les représentants du CN ont souligné que l'entreprise a transporté une quantité record de grains l'année dernière. Pour le CP, l'année fut pire à ce chapitre que 2013-2014. Si le CN avait lui aussi connu ce genre d'année, l'année dernière aurait été bien pire que 2013-2014. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Je voudrais aborder avec vous un autre sujet.

En 100 ans, les progrès ont permis d'augmenter les récoltes, mais également de varier les produits agricoles. Le projet de loi C-49 devrait-il contenir un mécanisme permettant de revoir régulièrement l'annexe II, notamment? Par exemple, je n'arrive pas à comprendre pourquoi le soya n'est pas contenu dans cette annexe.

Quel est le mécanisme qui permet d'inscrire un produit à cette annexe? Vous a-t-on donné des éclaircissements à ce sujet? Autrement, avez-vous une solution à proposer? [Traduction]

M. Chris Vervaet:

Je vais répondre.

C'est une bonne question. Vous soulevez un très bon point. Nous aussi sommes quelque peu mécontents de voir que le soya et les produits du soya n'ont pas été inclus à l'annexe II. Pour répondre à votre question, je crois que votre proposition de mener un examen régulier de l'annexe est une bonne proposition, même une proposition fondée, car nous observons un changement dans le paysage agricole de l'Ouest du pays.

Prenons, par exemple, le canola. Il y a 20 ans, le canola n'était pratiquement pas cultivé dans l'Ouest canadien. Aujourd'hui, on parle de 20 millions d'acres et de 20 millions de tonnes. Il s'agit d'un succès retentissant. Nous avons besoin de politiques souples et nous devons avoir la possibilité d'adresser les situations au fur et à mesure qu'elles se présentent. À cet égard, je crois que nous avons l'occasion de revoir l'annexe II afin d'y inclure le soya. En ce qui a trait au soya en particulier, mais je suis convaincu que d'autres exemples s'ajouteront, nous croyons que l'occasion est formidable pour accroître la culture et le transport de ce produit. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Est-ce que je dispose encore d'une minute, madame la présidente? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Non.

Les questions et réponses peuvent parfois être très intéressantes.

Monsieur Sikand, vous avez la parole.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur Sobkowich, j'aimerais poursuivre sur le même sujet que M. Aubin. Dans votre exposé, vous avez parlé du soya. J'aimerais comprendre les raisons derrière l'exclusion de ce produit. Pourriez-vous nous décrire les volumes de produits afin de nous aider à mieux comprendre?

(1205)

M. Wade Sobkowich:

J'ai avec moi quelques statistiques sur le soya. Dans notre document sur les modifications techniques que nous proposons, nous précisons que, dans l'Ouest canadien, 3,14 millions d'acres sont consacrés au soya, une production qui croît de façon exponentielle année après année. En 2016, on parlait d'une superficie en soya de 1,88 million d'acres et de 1,66 million d'acres en 2015. D'autres productions, comme le lin, les graines à canaris et le sarrasin, sont cultivées sur des superficies plus petites, mais sont incluses à l'annexe II. Le soya et les produits du soya devraient, eux aussi, y être inclus.

La culture du soya s'est amorcée en Ontario avant d'être transportée au Manitoba. Le volume de la culture du soya dépasse celui des autres cultures. Le Canada dispose d'une certaine quantité de terres arables. Si l'on cultive davantage de soya, cela signifie que l'on cultive moins d'autres produits. Ces autres produits sont couverts dans le cadre du RAM. Si l'on consacre davantage de superficie à la culture du soya, nous réduisons la superficie consacrée aux autres cultures. Par conséquent, le RAM devient moins efficace pour les agriculteurs, car ceux-ci se concentrent sur la culture du soya plutôt que sur la culture de ces autres produits.

Le soya peut servir à beaucoup de choses. On étudie la possibilité de l'écraser et de s'en servir pour faire de l'huile destinée au Canada ou à la vente à l'étranger. Actuellement, le soya est probablement la culture qui connaît la plus forte croissance au Canada et celle qui offre le plus de potentiel. Il est clair que le soya doit être ajouté à l'annexe II ou qu'un processus doit être adopté afin de permettre son ajout à l'annexe II par règlement.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Je vais partager mon temps de parole.

Pardonnez-moi mon ignorance, mais est-ce que le soya est une légumineuse à grains? Un grain? Comment le classe-t-on?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

C'est une bonne question. Certains le considèrent comme une légumineuse à grains. Nous le considérons comme un oléagineux.

M. Gagan Sikand:

D'accord.

Madame la présidente, j'aimerais céder le reste de mon temps de parole à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Les représentants des compagnies de chemin de fer nous ont expliqué ce qu'était un client captif. Ils ont dit que si vous aviez accès aux routes et aux camions, vous ne seriez plus captifs. Que pensez-vous de cela?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Je suppose qu'on peut trouver une solution pour ne pas avoir à utiliser les chemins de fer. Ce serait ridicule, mais on pourrait aussi mettre les grains dans des sacs à dos qui seraient portés par les sherpas à travers les montagnes. Ce n'est pas une solution viable. Lorsqu'on pense au coût du transport des grains par camion et à son incidence sur nos routes et tout cela... Les agriculteurs transfèrent les grains de la ferme aux silos par camion, mais lorsqu'on parle du transport longue distance à partir du réseau de silos jusqu'aux terminaux portuaires, les chemins de fer constituent la seule solution viable sur le plan économique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelle a été l'incidence de la perte de la Commission canadienne du blé sur votre mouvement?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

La Commission canadienne du blé était un tiers qui se chargeait de la logistique du transport des grains. C'était difficile. La situation n'était pas claire. On ne pouvait pas savoir d'où venait le problème. Est-ce qu'il venait de la compagnie céréalière? De la compagnie de chemin de fer? De la Commission canadienne du blé? Maintenant que la Commission n'est plus là, chaque compagnie céréalière planifie sa propre logistique pour l'ensemble de son réseau de pipelines.

La Commission canadienne du blé assurait la logistique du transport du blé. La compagnie céréalière planifiait la logistique du transport du canola et du lin. Cela compliquait les choses. Aujourd'hui, on peut facilement cibler les problèmes du système. Il y a l'expéditeur et la compagnie de chemin de fer. Comme ils gèrent leurs propres pipelines, les expéditeurs de grain réalisent des gains d'efficacité. Il faut désengorger le système et assurer un service et une capacité adéquats en matière de chemins de fer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez aussi parlé d'un meilleur accès aux marchés américains grâce aux règles en matière d'interconnexion. Les grandes compagnies de chemin de fer disent que ces règles ont entraîné une diminution du trafic. Selon vous, est-ce que le trafic sur le réseau du CN et du CP a diminué à cause de ces règles d'interconnexion avec les États-Unis? Est-ce que le trafic intérieur pourrait passer par les États-Unis?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Lorsque vous parlez de trafic intérieur...?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce qu'un chargement canadien à destination du Canada pourrait passer par les États-Unis? Est-ce que c'est possible?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Je ne le sais pas. Chris, est-ce que c'est déjà arrivé?

M. Chris Vervaet:

Pas à ma connaissance.

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Pas à ce que je sache.

J'aimerais seulement dire que les compagnies de chemin de fer perdent des clients uniquement lorsqu'elles ne sont pas concurrentielles. Si elles offrent des taux et des services concurrentiels, alors les agriculteurs continueront de faire affaire avec le transporteur principal.

(1210)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Est-ce que mon temps de parole est écoulé?

La présidente:

Oui.

Monsieur Badawey, vous avez la parole.

M. Vance Badawey:

Je vais profiter de l'occasion pour vous poser la même question que j'ai posée au dernier groupe de témoins. J'avais prédit leur réponse. Je ne m'attends pas à obtenir la même réponse de votre part. Je vais parler de l'intention... comme vous l'avez mentionné.

Nous sommes rentrés sur la Colline une semaine plus tôt pour faire ce travail et je suis certain que vous avez hâte que cela soit fait également. Nous avons l'intention d'écouter et d'apprendre puis d'agir en conséquence.

On s'attend à ce que les mesures législatives comme le projet de loi C-49 permettent à des gens comme vous de travailler dans un environnement qui répondra aux attentes des intervenants. Cela étant dit, nous tentons d'atteindre un certain équilibre. On a parlé de cet équilibre pour les expéditeurs, les fournisseurs de services de transport. Vous avez dit vouloir assurer une certaine valeur de retour pour les Canadiens.

On s'attend à ce que le PIB continue de croître, comme il l'a fait au cours des derniers mois. Une grande partie du mouvement des produits, qui contribue à l'amélioration globale du rendement économique mondial, se fait par l'intégration de nos systèmes de logistique de distribution. Le projet de loi C-49 vise à offrir une plateforme de services équitables de qualité.

Ma question est très simple, et je vous invite tous les trois à intervenir, comme je l'ai fait pour le dernier groupe d'experts: au bout du compte, de quelle façon le projet de loi C-49 contribuera-t-il à l'atteinte des objectifs de vos plans opérationnels?

M. Chris Vervaet:

Je vais commencer par cela.

C'est une bonne question. L'interconnexion de longue distance est essentielle pour permettre au projet de loi C-49 d'aider les transformateurs. Parmi tous les expéditeurs de grains de l'Ouest canadien, les transformateurs étaient probablement les plus grands utilisateurs de l'interconnexion agrandie.

Comme je l'ai dit dans mon témoignage, cela donnait lieu à un semblant de concurrence au sein du marché et donnait l'occasion à nombre de mes membres non seulement d'obtenir un meilleur service, mais aussi d'avoir accès à des marchés qui n'étaient auparavant pas accessibles, principalement aux États-Unis. Soixante-dix pour cent de l'huile végétale et des tourteaux de protéines de l'Ouest canadien sont destinés aux États-Unis. La concurrence et l'accès aux transporteurs qui peuvent acheminer nos produits vers des marchés inexploités ont donné lieu à des avantages précieux pour nos sociétés membres, mais aussi pour les autres intervenants de la chaîne de valeur, jusqu'aux cultivateurs.

L'accès aux nouveaux marchés donne lieu à de nouvelles possibilités de croissance pour nos installations de transformation également. Cet élément de concurrence augmente l'activité, la profitabilité et la valeur de l'ensemble de la chaîne de valeur.

M. Vance Badawey:

Permettez-moi de vous interrompre. Vous avez dit que l'accès aux fournisseurs augmentait vos marges et que vous pouviez donc réinvestir dans la croissance du secteur.

M. Chris Vervaet:

Oui, c'est exact.

Il n'est pas toujours question d'augmenter les marges. L'important, c'est de pouvoir croître et augmenter nos ventes — pas nécessairement selon les mêmes marges — et d'accroître la production et la valeur dans l'ensemble du système.

M. Vance Badawey:

Très bien.

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Les sanctions réciproques représentent l'une des principales possibilités créées par le projet de loi C-49. Nous voulons depuis longtemps pouvoir passer des marchés commerciaux avec les compagnies de chemin de fer. Tous les autres maillons de la chaîne passent des marchés commerciaux. Nous avons des marchés avec les agriculteurs, associés à des sanctions réciproques en cas d'inexécution. Il y a les marchés avec les propriétaires de navires, avec l'acheteur final. C'est la façon de faire des affaires.

Jusqu'à maintenant, on fonctionnait principalement avec les tarifs de chemin de fer. C'est donc un ensemble de règles et de sanctions unilatérales imposées par les compagnies de chemin de fer, appuyées par la loi. Le projet de loi C-52 permettait de conclure des accords sur les niveaux de service, mais il manquait de mordant. On ne pouvait pas prévoir des sanctions en cas d'inexécution de ces accords.

Nous croyons que le projet de loi nous aidera grandement parce que les expéditeurs auront maintenant la capacité de négocier les sanctions. On parle de sanctions équilibrées. Comme les compagnies de chemin de fer nous imposent certaines sanctions, nous voulons nous aussi leur en imposer pour le défaut de réaliser certaines choses. Si nous pouvions mettre en place quelque chose qui ressemblerait aux contrats de service que l'on retrouve habituellement dans les marchés concurrentiels, cela nous aiderait beaucoup.

(1215)

M. Norm Hall:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Les agriculteurs ne sont pas considérés à titre d'expéditeurs en vertu de la loi, alors ils se retrouvent dans une position unique. Nous payons tous les coûts, mais n'avons aucun droit en matière d'expédition.

M. Aubin a parlé d'une production accrue. Nous améliorons continuellement nos méthodes de production et nous produisons de plus grandes cultures. Par conséquent, nous avons besoin de marchés plus vastes. Sans un système de transport efficace, tout cela est en vain.

Nous avons le droit de commander des wagons de producteurs si les membres de l'association de Wade ne répondent pas à la demande. Nous avons une soupape de sûreté, mais nous n'avons pas le droit d'utiliser ces wagons de producteurs sur les chemins de fer. Les exercices 2013-2014 et 2014-2015 ont donné lieu à certaines des plus importantes commandes de wagons de producteurs de l'histoire, mais en raison du mauvais service, nombre de ces commandes ont dû être annulées et les producteurs n'utiliseront plus ces wagons. Donc, les compagnies de chemin de fer disent que ces voies d'évitement ne sont pas utilisées et prévoient en fermer encore plus, ce qui aggrave le problème.

Nous voulons un système plus efficace pour pouvoir être en position d'exporter, non seulement par l'entremise des ports, mais aussi vers les États-Unis, le Mexique et d'autres régions du Canada.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Hall.

Monsieur Shields, vous avez la parole.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Nous remercions les témoins de leur présence ici aujourd'hui. C'est intéressant d'entendre les diverses opinions des groupes de témoins ce matin.

Monsieur Hall, en tant que producteur, lorsque les coûts augmentent, vous ne pouvez pas les refiler à d'autres; vous devez les éponger.

Si le soya est ajouté — ce qu'on espère —, comment cela orientera-t-il les producteurs? Est-ce qu'ils vont viser des cultures qui ne font pas partie de la liste ou est-ce qu'elle dictera leur travail?

M. Norm Hall:

C'est possible. Dans le cas du soya — et contrairement à d'autres cultures —, on constate qu'une compagnie de chemin de fer peut exiger le RAM tandis qu'une autre exigera le RAM plus 10 $ par tonne. Dans certains cas, cela aura une incidence sur l'endroit où l'on enverra le soya après sa production. Le soya, le canola et les cultures de ce genre ont une plus grande valeur et génèrent plus de profits. Les producteurs continueront de les cultiver et ils utiliseront les chemins de fer qui exigent moins de frais.

Vous avez raison. Nous n'avons aucun moyen de l'obtenir à un prix autre que celui offert par les membres de l'association de Wade ou de celle de Chris.

M. Martin Shields:

La réglementation en place pourrait nous empêcher de créer de nouvelles industries alors qu'il y a un marché pour cela.

M. Norm Hall:

Oui. Wade a raison. Le canola était peu cultivé il y a 30 ou 40 ans. Aujourd'hui, c'est une industrie énorme. L'industrie du soya prend de l'ampleur chaque année. Quel sera le prochain produit? Nous devons avoir un moyen souple de pouvoir ajouter de nouvelles cultures à l'annexe II.

M. Martin Shields:

Ce pourrait être le chanvre si nous réussissons à le retirer de la Loi sur la santé et à le faire passer au domaine de l'agriculture comme il se doit, parce que c'est une industrie en croissance.

Pour revenir à la question de la concurrence, en tant que producteurs, avez-vous accès à divers marchés par l'entremise des courtiers? Est-ce qu'il y a une certaine concurrence à cet égard?

M. Norm Hall:

C'est une possibilité. Tout dépend du lieu du marché et du destinataire du produit. On magasine comme on le ferait pour une paire de chaussures. On tente d'obtenir le meilleur prix.

M. Martin Shields:

C'est ce que vous voulez continuer de faire jusqu'à l'autre extrémité pour faciliter le travail des courtiers.

M. Norm Hall:

Oui. Wade a aussi parlé des services. Souvent, nous passons un marché avec l'un de ses membres pour une livraison en octobre, mais si le service n'est pas adéquat, nous pourrions attendre jusqu'en janvier. Nous avons des engagements financiers à respecter, mais nous n'avons aucun recours parce qu'ils n'en ont pas non plus. Les sanctions réciproques profiteront donc grandement aux producteurs, même si nous n'expédions pas directement la marchandise.

(1220)

M. Martin Shields:

Nous avons entendu parler du processus de règlement par arbitrage. Vous êtes producteur. Avez-vous eu recours aux services qui sont offerts? En avez-vous entendu parler? Les comprenez-vous?

M. Norm Hall:

Je les comprends parce que je joue à ce jeu de politiques depuis beaucoup trop longtemps, mais pour ce qui est d'y avoir recours, je ne suis pas un expéditeur. Je ne peux pas les utiliser si je n'expédie pas la marchandise dans un wagon de producteur.

M. Martin Shields:

Vous avez proposé quatre modifications à la réglementation. À votre avis, laquelle parmi ces quatre est essentielle?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

J'aimerais mettre les choses en perspective. Nous en avions environ 80 au départ. C'est vrai. Nous les avons passées en revue et avons parlé de ce qui ne fonctionnait pas comme il le faudrait, puis nous avons évalué les possibilités de réussite de chacune. Nous n'avons gardé qu'un strict minimum de modifications techniques pour assurer le bon fonctionnement de l'interconnexion longue distance, par exemple, et ce sont les trois qui sont proposées. Si l'une ou l'autre de ces modifications n'est pas apportée, alors on aura quelque chose qui ressemble au PLC. Nous avons fait le travail et en sommes arrivés à ces trois propositions, à partir d'une liste beaucoup plus exhaustive. Il y a aussi bien sûr l'ajout du soya, parce que nous ne comprenons tout simplement pas pourquoi il n'est pas là.

M. Martin Shields:

Vous dites qu'il s'agit d'un ensemble. Si l'on n'apporte pas ces trois modifications, cela ne fonctionnera pas?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

C'est exact. Cela pourrait faire tomber les autres modifications.

M. Martin Shields:

D'accord.

M. Chris Vervaet:

Je vais faire écho aux commentaires de Wade. Ces modifications forment vraiment un tout. Nous avons travaillé ensemble pour décortiquer les 80 modifications de départ et en dégager les quatre modifications que nous proposons maintenant. Si l'on n'obtient pas la modification sur les taux, mais qu'on obtient la modification sur le lieu de correspondance le plus proche, cela ne fonctionnera pas. Il faut que toutes les modifications soient apportées.

M. Martin Shields:

Il faut apporter toutes les modifications pour obtenir l'effet souhaité.

Merci, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Monsieur Fraser, vous avez la parole.

M. Sean Fraser:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vous remercie de votre témoignage. Vous êtes prêts à prendre du recul pour avoir une vue d'ensemble de la situation, ce que je trouve très utile. J'ai surtout aimé vos commentaires au sujet du transport des grains par les sherpas. Quand j'étais jeune, je déplaçais le foin dans la ferme bovine de mon voisin; on n'aurait certainement pas voulu utiliser un train pour déplacer le foin de 20 mètres.

J'ai demandé aux représentants des chemins de fer de notre premier groupe de témoins pourquoi il s'agissait d'un groupe de comparaison approprié. Ils ont parlé d'investissements de capitaux. Plus tard, on a fait valoir que les compagnies de chemin de fer ne pouvaient pas faire concurrence aux entreprises de camionnage pour les déplacements sur une distance de 500 miles. À votre avis, à quel moment n'est-il plus avantageux de songer au transport par camion?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Ce serait évidemment pour les courtes distances. Il arrive parfois que les sociétés céréalières transportent par camion leurs produits d'une installation à l'autre. Le transport par camion peut être une option viable pour une distance de 100 à 200 miles. Cependant, pour la vaste majorité des cultures qui sont exportées à partir de Vancouver, de Prince Rupert et de Thunder Bay et par le Saint-Laurent ou qui sont envoyées aux États-Unis, les camions ne sont pas une option viable dans la vaste majorité des cas.

M. Sean Fraser:

J'aimerais changer un peu de sujet. Sous le précédent régime concernant le prolongement des limites d'interconnexion dans l'Ouest canadien, étant donné que je suis de l'Est canadien, je n'ai pas pu m'empêcher de constater que c'était offert dans certaines régions canadiennes. Je suis certain que vous étiez probablement d'accord avec le prolongement des limites d'interconnexion, mais je me demande s'il y a une raison, selon vous, pour ne pas établir un modèle similaire en vue de permettre un tel semblant de concurrence où il n'y en a aucune que nous pourrions appliquer à diverses industries dans les différentes régions canadiennes.

M. Wade Sobkowich:

À mon humble avis, je ne vois aucune raison pour ne pas le faire. Je n'arrive pas à faire abstraction de l'idée que ce sera seulement utilisé si le transporteur principal n'est pas concurrentiel. Tout ce que les acteurs ont à faire, c'est d'être concurrentiels, et cette mesure ne sera pas utilisée. Je suis d'avis que nous devrions pouvoir l'appliquer partout au Canada sans réserve, mais je sais que des gens émettent des préoccupations concernant certaines régions plus densément peuplées dans l'Est canadien où nous retrouvons un grand nombre d'expéditeurs très près les uns des autres; cette situation entraînerait des problèmes. Cette situation pourrait entraîner des problèmes si tout le monde présente une demande concernant le prolongement des limites d'interconnexion pour un même lieu de correspondance. Cela pourrait devenir une façon dissimulée de réglementer les prix.

(1225)

M. Sean Fraser:

Je crois que c'est la raison pour laquelle dans les zones très achalandées, comme le corridor Québec-Windsor, nous avons un corridor exclu; la concurrence y est déjà présente.

En ce qui concerne les sanctions réciproques, dont vous avez parlé, dans le cas où les compagnies de chemin de fer ne s'acquittent pas de leurs obligations en matière de service, vous semblez assez heureux de cette mesure...

M. Wade Sobkowich: Oui.

M. Sean Fraser: ... à moins que je vous interprète mal. Nous avons entendu hier au Comité un représentant, je crois, de l'Association des municipalités rurales de la Saskatchewan qui se disait très inquiet qu'il n'y ait aucune disposition dans la mesure législative sur les sanctions réciproques. Nous avons entendu des discussions sur la possibilité qu'il y ait méprise à ce sujet. Du point de vue des producteurs, vous êtes satisfaits du mécanisme relatif aux sanctions réciproques prévu dans la mesure législative. Est-ce juste?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

C'est le cas. C'est pratiquement ce que nous avions demandé. J'ai lu le mémoire de l'Association des municipalités rurales de la Saskatchewan et je crois que les gens se méprennent tout simplement sur l'endroit où cela se trouve et la façon dont c'est inclus.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je tenais à m'en assurer, parce que je ne veux pas discuter d'amendements qui s'appuient peut-être sur des renseignements erronés.

D'après votre expérience sous l'ancien modèle, qui présente certaines similitudes avec l'interconnexion de longue distance, diriez-vous que son véritable effet se faisait sentir à la table de négociation? Au lieu de forcer une compagnie de chemin de fer à perdre un client au profit d'un concurrent, le véritable effet de cette mesure est-il de vous permettre d'obtenir des prix concurrentiels là où il n'y a aucune concurrence?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Oui. C'est les deux. C'était utilisé de manière active et passive. Une menace n'est seulement efficace que si vous la mettez à exécution. C'était utilisé des deux manières, et un expéditeur pouvait décider qu'il n'aimait pas le prix ou les conditions de service et qu'il se prévalait du prolongement des limites d'interconnexion. Il n'avait pas besoin de présenter une demande à l'Office. Il n'avait pas besoin d'utiliser l'interconnexion la plus près tant qu'elle se trouvait à moins de 160 kilomètres. Nous considérions cela comme un outil pour stimuler la concurrence, tandis que nous considérions davantage l'interconnexion de longue distance comme une protection contre l'abus du monopole. Il faut d'abord communiquer avec le transporteur principal. Vous devez démontrer qu'il vous était impossible d'en arriver à une entente avec lui avant de passer à d'autres recours.

M. Sean Fraser:

En répondant à une autre question plus tôt, vous avez mentionné que cela ne vise pas nécessairement à établir un équilibre, mais bien à transporter les produits vers les marchés dans l'intérêt de l'économie canadienne, et je suis d'accord. Cela étant dit, à un certain point, je dois reconnaître que, si nous voulons que le système fonctionne, les compagnies de chemin de fer doivent aussi réaliser des profits. Selon vous, risquons-nous en favorisant la concurrence de faire chuter les prix à un point tel que les compagnies de chemin de fer ne pourront plus réaliser de profits?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Je ne crois pas que c'est possible. Dans bien des cas, nous parlons de transformer un monopole en un duopole, ce qui n'est guère mieux. Il est question de créer une faible concurrence. Il ne s'agit pas d'une concurrence féroce, comme nous pouvons le voir dans le secteur de la vente au détail, par exemple. Je ne crois donc pas que c'est le cas. Qu'est-ce qui serait un bon rendement? Voilà pourquoi nous parlons d'un modèle de coût de production majoré. Dans un marché concurrentiel, les acteurs visent un rendement de 10 %, voire de 15 %, si nous nous montrons généreux. C'est raisonnable, et voilà pourquoi nous demandons de modifier la partie sur les prix de l'interconnexion de longue distance pour tenir compte d'un modèle de coût de production majoré.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Fraser.

Monsieur Lauzon, vous avez la parole.

M. Guy Lauzon:

Merci beaucoup. Ma question s'adresse à Chris. Les compagnies de chemin de fer nous demandent de modifier le projet de loi C-49 pour faire en sorte que les installations à moins de 250 kilomètres de la frontière ne puissent avoir recours à l'interconnexion de longue distance. Quels effets cela aurait-il sur vos membres et les entreprises de transformation à valeur ajoutée? Quelles répercussions cela aurait-il sur leurs activités?

M. Chris Vervaet:

C'est une bonne question.

Comme je l'ai mentionné en répondant à une autre question, les transformateurs d'oléagineux en particulier utilisent abondamment l'interconnexion en vertu de la disposition sur l'interconnexion de longue distance. Si une telle mesure était adoptée, cela aurait certainement l'effet de limiter fortement l'accès pour nos installations situées au sud de l'Alberta et du Manitoba. Cela nous empêcherait d'avoir accès aux interconnexions qui sont situées à la frontière canado-américaine, où nos membres ont de toute manière accès à BNSF en vue d'avoir notamment accès à de nouveaux marchés, comme je l'ai déjà mentionné dans une réponse précédente. C'est vraiment ce qui se produit lorsque nous avons accès à un autre transporteur grâce au prolongement des limites d'interconnexion. Si nous limitons cela à 250 kilomètres de la frontière, cela empêchera certainement nos membres d'utiliser ces interconnexions.

M. Guy Lauzon:

Je ne sais pas trop à quel témoin poser ma question. Je suis de passage au Comité, et cette discussion m'intrigue énormément.

Wade, vous avez mentionné que l'interconnexion n'est pas utilisée très souvent, mais que cette menace qui plane est très précieuse. Cela me laisse perplexe. Je serais porté à croire que les compagnies de chemin de fer auraient à leur solde d'excellents négociateurs qui seraient en mesure de s'en occuper. Vous dites que c'est une mesure active et passive. Pouvez-vous nous l'expliquer? Si nous négocions ensemble et que vous me dites que vous irez voir le concurrent si je n'accepte pas de vous donner l'entente que vous voulez, ce sont les affaires, mais j'ai l'impression que vous réussissez toujours à vous en sortir avec ce bluff.

(1230)

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Non. Ce n'est pas du bluff. Il faut être prêt à passer au concurrent. Vous allez voir le transporteur principal et vous lui demandez ce qu'il peut faire pour vous relativement aux prix du service. Le transporteur principal vous présentera son offre. Vous pouvez lui répondre que c'est insuffisant et que vous devez respecter un échéancier par rapport à votre client américain et que le transporteur ne vous offre pas le service qui vous permet d'acheminer le produit en respectant l'échéancier convenu.

M. Guy Lauzon:

Pour ce qui est des coûts, est-il question de temps ou d'argent?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Ce sont les deux.

Il peut s'agir des prix, des services ou des deux. Vous pouvez répondre au transporteur que ses prix sont trop élevés et qu'il n'est pas en mesure d'offrir le service ou qu'il n'est pas en mesure de le faire tout en respectant vos échéanciers et que vous irez voir le concurrent. Vous pouvez ensuite obtenir une interconnexion du trafic pour passer, par exemple, du CN au CP ou du CN à Burlington Northern.

M. Guy Lauzon:

Est-ce toujours possible d'aller voir un concurrent?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

C'est toujours possible d'aller voir un concurrent tant qu'une interconnexion ou un lieu de correspondance à moins de 160 kilomètres est compatible avec la voie.

M. Guy Lauzon:

Vous pouvez obtenir une meilleure entente des concurrents.

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Exactement.

Vous n'avez pas besoin d'obtenir la permission de l'Office ou toute autre chose. Cela peut inciter le transporteur principal à réviser sa décision et à se rendre compte que cela représente une lourde perte de trafic pour lui. Cela le motivera peut-être à voir ce qu'il peut faire de plus pour vous.

M. Guy Lauzon:

L'un des représentants des compagnies de chemin de fer a mentionné que c'est une approche très coûteuse de s'occuper de... Si le transport par camion fonctionne, les compagnies de chemin de fer ne peuvent pas concurrencer cette industrie si la distance est de moins de 500 miles. C'est à partir de cette distance qu'elles rentrent dans leurs frais ou qu'elles sont les plus rentables.

Pourquoi ne pouvez-vous pas le faire? Le transport par camion ne fonctionne-t-il pas? Si les compagnies de chemin de fer et les entreprises de transport par camion imposent les mêmes prix pour les 500 premiers miles — c'est à partir de cette distance qu'elles rentrent dans leurs frais —, pourquoi n'avez-vous pas recours au transport par camion pour les 500 premiers miles?

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Pour nous rendre jusqu'à l'interconnexion?

M. Guy Lauzon:

Oui.

M. Wade Sobkowich:

C'est une bonne question. Il y a une raison qui l'explique, mais ce...

M. Guy Lauzon:

Les compagnies de chemin de fer nous disent que les entreprises de transport par camion peuvent le faire à moindre coût qu'elles. Ne serait-ce pas là la manière concurrentielle de traiter de la question? Les entreprises de transport par camion ne sont peut-être pas capables de gérer un tel volume.

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Chris, voulez-vous répondre à la question?

M. Chris Vervaet:

Je vais essayer le mieux possible de répondre peut-être indirectement à votre question.

Lorsque nous avons connu une débâcle dans le rendement des services ferroviaires en 2013-2014, les transformateurs d'oléagineux ont été forcés d'avoir recours au transport par camion. Nous préférons normalement le faire par train. Nous avons dû le faire pour servir nos clients, mais les prix n'étaient pas concurrentiels. Je n'ai pas les prix sous la main. Je ne connais pas les chiffres exacts. J'ai entendu des membres me dire que le transport par camion était leur dernier recours, parce que nous risquions autrement de devoir cesser nos activités.

Pour transporter des produits sur une plus longue distance, les services ferroviaires sont la manière la plus efficace et la plus économique.

M. Guy Lauzon:

D'accord, mais c'est censé être vrai seulement en deçà de 500 miles. Du moins, c'est ce que les représentants des compagnies de chemin de fer nous ont dit.

M. Wade Sobkowich:

J'ai des souvenirs qui me reviennent. En 2013-2014, il nous arrivait de transporter par camion du grain d'un élévateur à l'autre, parce qu'un élévateur recevait un bon service, alors que ce n'était pas le cas à l'autre élévateur. Nous le faisions dans des cas précis. Ces mesures entraînaient des coûts importants, et nous le faisions lorsque la situation était désespérée.

M. Norm Hall:

Si vous me le permettez, il n'y a pas suffisamment de camions sur la route dans les Prairies pour subvenir à la demande pour le transport sur une distance de moins de 500 kilomètres.

M. Guy Lauzon:

C'est la loi de l'offre et de la demande.

M. Norm Hall:

Exactement. En ce qui concerne la question des 250 kilomètres de la frontière, cela signifierait que le transport de la moitié ou des deux tiers du grain des Prairies ne serait pas admissible à l'interconnexion, ce qui serait inacceptable.

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Aubin, vous avez la parole. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je ne sais pas si je vais faire référence à l'un des 76 amendements que vous ne nous avez pas présentés, mais j'aimerais que vous me donniez des éclaircissements.

L'interconnexion semble être presque une pierre angulaire du projet de loi C-49. D'un côté, les compagnies de chemin de fer nous disent que ce n'est absolument plus nécessaire; de votre côté, vous dites que c'est pratiquement vital.

Selon le projet de loi C-49, une compagnie de chemin de fer est tenue d'émettre un avis de 60 jours aux producteurs de grain avant la surpression d'un tracé d'interconnexion. Théoriquement, les compagnies peuvent se retirer d'une interconnexion. Cependant, j'ai lu la semaine dernière, sur le site de Transports Canada, que la compagnie de chemin de fer devait quand même honorer certaines obligations générales. On n'en disait pas plus.

Savez-vous quelles sont ces obligations générales? Est-ce que le projet de loi C-49 devrait être plus précis sur ce qui arriverait quand une compagnie de chemin émettrait un avis de retrait de 60 jours?

(1235)

[Traduction]

M. Wade Sobkowich:

C'est une excellente question qui va droit au coeur de l'un de nos quatre amendements, soit la liste des lieux de correspondance. Avec l'arrivée du projet de loi C-49, il y aura deux séries d'instructions ou d'exigences différentes concernant la publication d'une liste des lieux de correspondance.

Pour ce qui est des interconnexions de longue distance, les compagnies de chemin de fer devront publier une liste et pourront retirer tout élément de cette liste 60 jours après avoir publié un avis en ce sens. Le paragraphe 136.9(2) du projet de loi établit les paramètres concernant la publication par les compagnies de chemin de fer d'une liste des lieux de correspondance ainsi que le retrait des lieux de la liste. Il s'agit d'une nouvelle disposition qui concerne les interconnexions de longue distance et qui prévoit que les compagnies de chemin de fer doivent publier une liste. Les compagnies de chemin de fer peuvent retirer un élément de cette liste 60 jours après avoir publié un avis en ce sens. Nous craignons qu'un arrêté d'interconnexion de longue distance joue en leur défaveur. Les compagnies de chemin de fer n'aimeront pas cela. Elles retireront un lieu de correspondance.

Cependant, nous avons appris qu'il existe déjà des dispositions de la Loi sur les transports au Canada qui régissent les lieux de correspondance; ce sont les paragraphes 127(1) et 127(2) sous « Interconnexion ». Il est écrit que tout intéressé peut demander à l'Office la possibilité d'utiliser un lieu de correspondance et que l'Office a le pouvoir de forcer une compagnie de chemin de fer à fournir les installations convenables pour permettre l'interconnexion au lieu de correspondance.

Ces dispositions sont contradictoires. Nous en avons une qui dit une chose concernant les lieux de correspondance, et nous en avons une autre qui dit quelque chose au sujet des interconnexions de longue distance. Toutefois, une interconnexion de longue distance pour un expéditeur peut être un lieu de correspondance pour un autre. Il n'est donc pas logique d'avoir deux séries d'instructions différentes et potentiellement divergentes sur ce qui se passe concernant les lieux de correspondance et la manière dont la compagnie de chemin de fer peut les démanteler.

Ce que nous essayons de faire valoir, c'est que vous pouvez éliminer la disposition du projet de loi C-49 sur la publication d'une liste par les compagnies de chemin de fer et le retrait possible d'un élément de cette liste 60 jours après avoir publié un avis en ce sens. Les dispositions actuelles qui portent sur les pouvoirs de l'Office de contraindre des compagnies de chemin de fer à maintenir ou à créer un lieu de correspondance se trouvent déjà dans la Loi et devraient s'appliquer également aux lieux de correspondance et aux interconnexions de longue distance. Est-ce assez clair? [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Oui. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Nous avons terminé notre première série de questions. Le Comité a-t-il d'autres questions?

Monsieur Badawey, allez-y.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci.

J'essaie d'arriver à un équilibre entre tous les participants à nos discussions. Les compagnies de chemin de fer ont mentionné les ententes de réciprocité avec nos homologues américains. Si j'ai bien compris, elles ont mentionné que premièrement, étant donné que cela n'existe actuellement pas, les exigences en matière de gestion des biens ne peuvent être respectées. Deuxièmement, elles sont forcées de cesser leurs activités et d'abandonner des lignes qui, en raison des besoins en services dans certaines régions, seront reprises par des compagnies de chemin de fer d'intérêt local qui, j'ajouterais, disposent de ressources financières limitées. Enfin, cela mine leur compétitivité, et je vous laisse l'interpréter comme bon vous semble.

En ce qui concerne la réciprocité, quels sont vos commentaires? N'oubliez pas que nous essayons d'établir un équilibre. Cela fait écho à la question de M. Fraser, soit que nous essayons d'établir un équilibre entre les compagnies de chemin de fer, les expéditeurs et ceux qui dépendent du service. Qu'avez-vous à dire au sujet de la réciprocité?

(1240)

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Les expéditeurs entament des discussions et des négociations avec les compagnies de chemin de fer sur la forme que pourrait prendre un contrat de service après l'adoption du projet de loi C-49, à supposer que le libellé définitif soit semblable à la version actuelle. Les expéditeurs entreprennent donc des négociations et, si celles-ci devaient échouer, les parties soumettraient leur meilleure offre à un arbitre, qui rendrait ensuite sa décision.

Nous nous en remettrions à l'arbitre pour décider quelles sanctions s'appliqueraient à l'expéditeur et à la compagnie de chemin de fer pour des fonctions semblables et proportionnelles.

Par exemple, si les compagnies de chemin de fer affirment qu'elles vont... Lorsque les compagnies céréalières ne remplissent pas les wagons d'un train dans les 24 heures, nous payons une sanction de, disons, 150 $ par wagon. Si les compagnies de chemin de fer disent que les wagons arriveront le mardi, mais que ce n'est pas le cas, on appliquerait une sanction de 150 $ par wagon. Nous recherchons un équilibre dans le contrat de service, c'est-à-dire une disposition qui énonce clairement les obligations des compagnies de chemin de fer et des expéditeurs ainsi que les conséquences financières auxquelles ils s'exposent réciproquement en cas d'inexécution. L'objectif serait d'avoir des sanctions qui correspondent aux obligations de chacune des parties.

J'ajouterais que cela n'a rien à voir avec les dommages. Nous faisons toujours face à de tels problèmes. Si le train n'est pas là, vous ne pouvez pas acheminer le produit au client et vous êtes passible de sanctions liées à la prolongation du contrat, ou vous avez peut-être dû manquer à vos obligations contractuelles, comme c'était le cas en 2013-2014; ce sont des problèmes qui doivent être réglés dans le cadre d'une plainte sur le niveau de service ou par le recours aux tribunaux. Nous parlons seulement de contraventions pour excès de vitesse, pour ainsi dire, dans le réseau; il s'agit d'infliger des sanctions comme mesures disciplinaires afin d'encourager les bons comportements.

M. Vance Badawey:

Très bien.

Y a-t-il d'autres observations?

M. Norm Hall:

Oui.

Je crains que les compagnies de chemin de fer aient été des monopoles pendant trop longtemps. Elles ne savent pas comment soutenir la concurrence.

Les témoins du dernier groupe ont parlé de la perte de 2 000 wagons. Cela représente 200 000 tonnes. Combien de millions de tonnes les compagnies de chemin de fer transportent-elles par année? La question qui a été posée de ce côté-ci, c'était de savoir ce que représentent ces pertes en pourcentage de leur volume d'activités. Je dirais que c'est beaucoup moins que 1 %; voilà ce qu'elles risqueraient de perdre.

M. Shields a déjà porté la question à leur attention. M. Finn a parlé des chiffres de l'OCDE — les prix les plus bas au monde, même comparativement aux États-Unis —, et pourtant, elles craignent de perdre des clients au profit des sociétés américaines? Je ne vois pas comment. Elles pourraient perdre certaines commandes et en gagner d'autres, mais cela ne leur fera pas de mal, d'autant plus qu'elles ont des profits garantis en vertu du revenu admissible maximal.

La présidente:

Allez-y, madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup.

J'ai une dernière question, et elle porte sur une mesure qui est prévue dans le projet de loi C-49, mais dont nous n'avons pas encore parlé, sauf avec le dernier groupe de témoins. Je reconnais que vous avez de nombreux amendements à proposer, 80 en tout, et que vous les avez réduits à seulement quelques-uns; il s'agit, selon vous, de modifications techniques qui traitent vraiment de l'objectif prévu.

En fait, la loi est modifiée par adjonction, après l'article 127, de ce qui suit, et je vais en lire le libellé. C'est sous la rubrique « Prix par wagon pour l'interconnexion », et je cite: 127.1(1) Au plus tard le 1er décembre de chaque année, l’Office fixe le prix par wagon à exiger durant l’année civile suivante pour l’interconnexion du trafic.

Viennent ensuite les éléments à prendre en compte: (2) Lorsqu’il fixe le prix, l’Office prend en compte (a) les réductions de coûts qui, à son avis, sont entraînées par le mouvement d’un plus grand nombre de wagons ou par le transfert de plusieurs wagons à la fois;

Voici l'alinéa qui m'intéresse vraiment: (b) les investissements à long terme requis dans les 20 chemins de fer.

Je me demande si vous pourriez nous dire un mot là-dessus. Le cas échéant, cela faisait-il partie des modifications que vous aviez envisagées, ou comment cette disposition permet-elle de s'attaquer à la question de la compétitivité?

Par ailleurs, savez-vous si cet élément est bel et bien pris en considération au moment d'évaluer le prix pour l'interconnexion, et comment les investissements à long terme seront-ils surveillés? Connaissez-vous la réponse à ces questions?

(1245)

M. Wade Sobkowich:

Ce sont là d'excellentes questions, mais je ne connais la réponse à aucune d'elles. Nous n'avons jamais été contre un taux de rendement raisonnable pour les compagnies de chemin de fer afin qu'elles puissent investir suffisamment dans le réseau. En l'espèce, tout est dans les détails. Nous voulons collaborer longuement avec l'Office pour comprendre comment il envisage de s'y prendre et pour essayer de lui présenter notre point de vue avant d'entrer dans le vif du sujet. Cependant, pour ce qui est de fournir une observation précise à ce sujet, je ne connais pas la réponse. C'est tout de même une excellente question.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

La présidente:

Un grand merci à vous tous.

Comme vous pouvez le voir, tous les députés s'intéressent beaucoup à nos travaux sur le projet de loi C-49. Ils veulent s'assurer que nous entendons tous les points de vue qui sont nécessaires et représentatifs. Je vous remercie tous de votre présence.

Nous allons maintenant faire une petite pause.

(1245)

(1345)

La présidente:

Nous reprenons notre séance de l'après-midi.

Bienvenue à tous les témoins. Nous sommes heureux de vous avoir parmi nous.

Nous recevons des témoins de la Western Canadian Shippers' Coalition, de la Western Canadian Short Line Railway Association et l'Alberta Wheat Commission.

Les représentants de la Western Canadian Shippers' Coalition souhaitent-ils parler en premier?

M. David Montpetit (président et directeur général, Western Canadian Shippers' Coalition):

Merci.

Bonjour, madame la présidente, distingués membres du Comité. Au nom de la Western Canadian Shippers' Coalition, ou WCSC, je tiens à vous remercier de nous avoir invités à participer à cette séance. Je m'appelle David Montpetit, et je suis le président-directeur général de la WCSC. Je suis accompagné aujourd'hui de Lucia Stuhldreier, notre conseillère juridique.

La WCSC représente des entreprises qui sont situées dans l'Ouest canadien et qui expédient principalement des produits de base issus des ressources naturelles à des clients canadiens et étrangers de la chaîne d'approvisionnement. Notre organisation se concentre exclusivement sur les questions liées au transport. Depuis sa création, la WCSC contribue activement à exposer le point de vue des expéditeurs sur de nombreuses modifications à la législation. Plus récemment, nous avons participé à l'examen de la loi de 2015, mené par David Emerson, ainsi qu'aux consultations subséquentes lancées par le ministre Garneau.

Notre objectif est de doter le Canada d'un système de transport concurrentiel, économique, efficace et sûr, qui permette à nos membres de soutenir la concurrence tant sur le marché national que sur le marché international. Nos membres représentent un éventail de marchandises, notamment des produits forestiers, des produits pétroliers et gaziers, du ciment, des granulats et du soufre, pour ne nommer que ceux-là. Vous trouverez une liste des membres actuels dans le mémoire, si cela vous intéresse.

Une chose que nos membres ont en commun, c'est qu'ils utilisent tous le transport ferroviaire. Leurs installations sont situées à proximité des ressources naturelles. Du fait de leur emplacement éloigné et du grand volume de marchandises expédiées, leur dépendance à l'égard du chemin de fer est totale pour l'acheminement des produits vers les marchés. Dans leur très grande majorité, ils n'ont accès qu'à un seul transporteur ferroviaire. Cet état de fait crée un déséquilibre considérable dans les relations commerciales, même face à de très gros expéditeurs, comme c'est le cas de la majorité de nos membres. La capacité de transporter une petite partie — comme on l'a dit ce matin, environ 25 % — des produits par un autre moyen de transport ne change pas grand-chose.

Nos membres essaient de négocier des accords commerciaux sur le prix du fret et des services ferroviaires, et ils préfèrent régler les différends sur le plan commercial. Toutefois, la réalité est que le marché au sein duquel ils doivent évoluer n'est pas concurrentiel. La possibilité de trouver un transporteur ferroviaire concurrent n'existe tout simplement pas, même si le prix du transport est exagéré ou en cas d'une augmentation de prix importante, d'une inexécution ou encore d'un rendement insatisfaisant. Les recours efficaces pour les expéditeurs servent donc, en quelque sorte, de filet de sécurité dans les négociations commerciales menées dans un marché non concurrentiel. L'existence de tels recours et la possibilité de les exercer aident à garantir un certain équilibre pour les expéditeurs.

En ce qui concerne le projet de loi C-49, la WCSC a dirigé son attention vers les secteurs clés suivants: la déclaration des données des compagnies de chemin de fer; les obligations en matière de service ferroviaire; des recours plus faciles d'accès, plus rapides et plus efficaces; les pouvoirs de l'Office des transports du Canada; un examen obligatoire des dispositions de la loi relatives au transport ferroviaire; et, enfin, l'accès à des compagnies de chemin de fer concurrentes.

Ma collègue, Lucia Stuhldreier, vous présentera les préoccupations et les recommandations précises dans ce domaine.

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier (conseillère juridique principale, Western Canadian Shippers' Coalition):

Bonjour.

En ce qui concerne les exigences de déclaration des données prévues dans le projet de loi C-49, nos observations portent sur les données sur le service et le rendement des compagnies de chemin de fer. Les décideurs politiques, les organismes de réglementation et les utilisateurs du système de transport ont besoin de ces renseignements pour prendre des décisions fondées sur les faits. Ils ont besoin de données détaillées, presque en temps réel.

La WCSC a deux principales réserves au sujet des exigences provisoires prévues dans le projet de loi. Premièrement, les données sont trop générales pour pouvoir être d'une quelconque utilité. Par exemple, les compagnies de chemin de fer devront déclarer chaque semaine le nombre moyen de wagons se trouvant en déplacement sur leur réseau au Canada. Ces wagons pourraient contenir des métaux raffinés en provenance de la région de Montréal, de la pâte à papier provenant d'une usine située au nord d'Edmonton, du papier journal en provenance des Maritimes, ainsi qu'une foule d'autres produits.

Les données publiées n'indiqueront pas ces détails parce que, contrairement aux États-Unis, où le CN et le CP doivent produire une déclaration distincte pour chacun des 23 groupes de produits, toutes ces données seront regroupées au Canada. Certains ont également laissé entendre qu'au lieu de publier ces renseignements séparément pour chacune des compagnies de chemin de fer, comme c'est le cas aux États-Unis, on devrait les regrouper pour le CN et le CP; or, cela ne ferait que masquer davantage ce qui se passe vraiment dans le réseau. Bref, on produira ainsi des statistiques générales, de haut niveau, qui n'auront pas d'utilité sur le plan pratique.

Deuxièmement, les renseignements ne seront pas disponibles en temps opportun. D'abord, comme on vous l'a probablement déjà dit, le projet de loi prévoit retarder d'une année entière la mise en oeuvre de ces exigences. Une fois qu'elles entreront en vigueur, il y aura un délai de trois semaines pour le processus de publication. À titre de comparaison, c'est un délai trois fois plus long que celui en vigueur aux États-Unis pour rendre publics ces renseignements. Les données historiques sont probablement utiles pour discerner les tendances générales ou peut-être pour évaluer les défaillances passées en matière de service, mais elles sont très peu utiles pour la prise de décisions quotidiennes. Nous avons donc recommandé des modifications à ces dispositions.

Le deuxième point dont j'aimerais vous parler, c'est le service adéquat et approprié. Aux termes du nouveau paragraphe 116(1.2) du projet de loi C-49, l'Office doit rejeter la plainte d'un expéditeur si l'Office est convaincu que la compagnie de chemin de fer offre « le niveau de services le plus élevé qu'elle peut raisonnablement fournir dans les circonstances ». J'ai essayé de trouver un bon exemple, mais c'est un peu comme si un enseignant disait à ses élèves: « Si vous obtenez 95 % à l'examen final, vous ne pourrez certainement pas échouer ce cours. » Cela n'indique pas à l'élève ce qui se passe s'il obtient 90 %, 85 % ou 65 %.

Ce que les expéditeurs et les compagnies de chemin de fer doivent savoir, c'est dans quelles conditions le service n'est plus adéquat ni approprié. Si le but est d'obliger les compagnies de chemin de fer à assurer le meilleur niveau de service qui peut être raisonnablement offert dans les circonstances, alors nous croyons que le projet de loi devrait l'énoncer clairement. Faute de quoi, nous nous attendons à des litiges superflus, à des objections préliminaires et, au bout du compte, il se peut fort bien que la Cour d'appel fédérale accepte notre interprétation, mais nous aurons consacré du temps et des ressources supplémentaires pour en arriver là, alors que nous pouvons régler la question dès le départ.

Un autre aspect des dispositions relatives au service aux termes du projet de loi C-49 concerne les recours rapides et faciles d'accès. Le projet de loi raccourcirait de 120 à 90 jours le délai dont dispose l'Office pour rendre une décision. Toutefois, pour un expéditeur aux prises avec de graves pénuries, attendre trois mois plutôt que quatre pour obtenir un dédommagement ne constitue pas vraiment une grande amélioration. Dans ces cas, il est essentiel que l'Office puisse accélérer le processus ou rendre un arrêté provisoire assurant un service minimum pendant le déroulement de l'instance. Cela peut faire la différence entre la poursuite ou la fermeture, du moins temporaire, des activités d'une installation, avec tout ce que cela peut engendrer, comme les mises à pied, les coûts associés à la remise en service d'un équipement important et les pertes commerciales.

Comme la plupart des tribunaux administratifs, l'Office a la capacité de contrôler ses propres instances. Or, le projet de loi C-49 imposerait les délais minimaux que l'Office doit laisser à la compagnie de chemin de fer et à l'expéditeur pour le dépôt des plaidoiries dans le cadre des plaintes sur le niveau de service. Cela signifie que l'Office ne pourra pas accélérer le processus, et cela remet aussi en question la capacité de l'Office d'émettre un arrêté provisoire en temps opportun. Nous avons formulé quelques recommandations à cet égard.

(1350)



Le quatrième sujet que je voudrais aborder concerne, de façon plus générale, les pouvoirs de l'Office. Une des choses que la WCSC préconise depuis un certain temps, c'est l'idée de donner à l'Office la capacité d'enquêter, de sa propre initiative, sur des questions relevant de sa compétence. Vous avez entendu parler, au début de ces réunions, de l'enquête sur les retards au sol d'Air Transat. Une initiative semblable a été menée par le Surface Transportation Board aux États-Unis dans le cas de CSX en réaction à l'insatisfaction répandue à l'égard de la détérioration du service ferroviaire qui a touché un large éventail de clients. L'inclusion de tels pouvoirs dans le mandat de l'Office lui permettra de mieux régler ce genre de problèmes systémiques.

Par ailleurs, il y a l'arbitrage d'offre finale dans les différends relatifs au prix du transport de marchandises. Un élément crucial qui n'est d'ordinaire pas connu de l'arbitre dans pareils cas, c'est comment chacune des offres finales permet aux compagnies de chemin de fer de récupérer leurs coûts et d'offrir un rendement suffisant qui dépasse les coûts. D'ailleurs, les témoins du secteur ferroviaire vous ont expliqué ce matin à quel point cette question revêt une importance pour eux.

L'Office est un organisme indépendant. Il possède l'expertise requise pour déterminer les coûts en vue de les transmettre à l'arbitre. Nous recommandons donc que l'établissement des coûts par l'Office fasse partie des renseignements fournis à l'arbitre dans le cadre de tout arbitrage de l'offre finale.

Avant d'aborder la question de l'interconnexion de longue distance, j'aimerais mentionner que la WCSC a remarqué qu'un élément était absent de la loi et du projet de loi, et il s'agit d'une disposition qui, par le passé, a fait partie de presque toute réforme importante de la législation sur les chemins de fer: l'exigence que le ministre lance un examen pour vérifier comment se portent ces modifications. Selon nous, c'est ce qui s'imposerait en l'occurrence.

(1355)

La présidente:

Très bien.

Nous allons maintenant écouter M. Pellerin, de la Western Canadian Short Line Railway Association.

M. Perry Pellerin (président, Western Canadian Short Line Railway Association):

Madame la présidente, distingués membres du Comité, bonjour. Merci de m’avoir invité à témoigner et de donner la chance à notre organisme de présenter son point de vue sur la Loi sur la modernisation des transports.

Premièrement, après avoir écouté ce qui s'est dit ce matin, je pense que c'est peut-être la dernière fois que je viens à Ottawa. Selon le CN, nous ne sommes pas mieux que morts, et je veux parler ici de tous nos membres. Les opérations de nos membres ne couvrent pas 500 miles de chemins de fer. Certains de nos membres ne couvrent que 23 miles, et la limite est d'environ 247 miles.

Je commencerai en vous informant de plus récents développements. Sur une note positive, disons que la volonté et l'intérêt que Transports Canada nous a témoignés pour ce qui est de travailler avec nous sur les chemins de fer d’intérêt local ont été très encourageants. Nos relations avec le ministère se sont considérablement raffermies au cours des deux dernières années. Nous apprécions le fait d'être consultés et inclus dans les discussions concernant l'orientation des modifications apportées tant aux politiques qu'aux règlements. Grâce à cette coopération avec Transports Canada, nous sommes des partenaires d'intérêt local plus sécuritaires et mieux informés.

Nous avons aussi été encouragés par certains progrès réalisés avec — croyez-le ou non — le CN. Nous constatons une volonté de coopération renouvelée à certains égards, comme c'est le cas pour le programme de formation en matière de sécurité que nous offrons en Saskatchewan. Il y a eu une certaine collaboration où nous avons vu le CN permettre à des partenaires d'intérêt local de faire des commutations entre compagnies ou de commuter à des terminaux où ils n'étaient peut-être pas très bons, laissant pour l'occasion les partenaires d'intérêt local intervenir et leur fournir l'excellent service dont ils sont capables. Certains échanges de ce matin ont porté sur ces situations où tous les intervenants peuvent trouver leur compte, et je crois que ces commutations en sont un bon exemple. Le CN a même permis à l'un de nos partenaires d'utiliser la voie de l'un de ses terminaux de ligne principale afin de garer des wagons et de sortir ses propres wagons. Voilà un autre exemple d'une intervention très efficace et d'une façon efficience de faire des affaires. Bref, c'est un scénario où tout le monde est gagnant.

La Western Canadian Short Line Railway Association, auparavant connue sous le nom de Saskatchewan Short Line Railway Association, est un organisme sans but lucratif défendant les intérêts des 14 compagnies de chemin de fer de l’Ouest du Canada qui en sont membres. Ce matin, je crois que le CN a mentionné que 70 % de ses clients étaient liés par des ententes de service. La Western Grain Elevator Association a pour sa part indiqué que 90 % de ses agriculteurs ont des liens commerciaux avec le CN. Je présume que les 10 ou 30 % qui restent font affaire avec nos membres, et nous sommes ici aujourd'hui pour parler au nom de ces derniers.

Bien que nos membres soient présents dans toutes les provinces de l’Ouest, c’est en Saskatchewan que se trouve le réseau le plus complet de transport ferroviaire sur de courtes distances. Les compagnies de chemin de fer d’intérêt local détiennent ou exploitent 24 % des 8 722 km de voie ferrée de la Saskatchewan. Nous employons environ 183 résidents. Le terme « résident » désigne des gens qui ont grandi et qui vivent dans la région où nous travaillons.

Il importe de mentionner que nous prodiguons nos services à 72 PME et que nous transportons environ 500 millions de dollars de marchandises par année. Tous nos bureaux principaux sont à moins d'un mile de notre propre chemin de fer. Je crois qu'il est aussi important de savoir que toutes les PME auxquelles nous donnons des services sont également parmi les grandes entreprises que le CN dessert. Toutes les entreprises ne commencent pas en tant que société. Certaines personnes commencent en tant qu'expéditeurs fixés à un seul endroit et bâtissent leur entreprise à partir de cela. Je crois que les lignes de courte distance sont toutes indiquées pour ce faire, car cela nous permet d'aider ces entreprises à prendre leur envol sans qu'elles aient à dépenser des sommes colossales dès le départ.

Nos membres, nos compagnies de chemin de fer et nos clients veulent des tarifs concurrentiels et des options en matière de transport ferroviaire. Nous croyons que l’avenir du transport passe par une bonification de l’offre de choix concurrentiels pour les agriculteurs, les expéditeurs et les petites entreprises. Nous craignons que le projet de loi proposé ne décourage encore plus la concurrence. Le nouveau mécanisme d’établissement du prix de l’interconnexion de longue distance est conçu de telle façon que nos expéditeurs clients n’y ont pas accès. Le recours aux prix du transport sur de courtes distances — qui est actuellement plus élevé que pour les camions — fait en sorte qu'il est virtuellement impossible pour nous d'être concurrentiels.

La loi est prescriptive, et les petits expéditeurs n’ont pas les moyens de s’engager dans des poursuites de plusieurs années contre des transporteurs ferroviaires de classe 1, ce qui signifie qu’ils n’essaieront même pas d’appliquer certains des mécanismes qui sont à leur disposition, comme cela a été mentionné ce matin. Il est inconcevable pour les producteurs de s’attaquer à un transporteur de classe 1. Cela leur fait peur, certes, mais c’est aussi un non-sens sur le plan financier.

(1400)



Conjointement avec l’élimination prochaine de l’option d’interconnexion de 160 km et la disparition rapide des wagons de producteurs, l'adoption du projet de loi dans sa forme actuelle mettra les expéditeurs et les lignes ferroviaires sur de courtes distances dans une situation encore plus difficile. Nous croyions que l'intention de ce projet de loi n'était pas de mettre les petites entreprises et les lignes ferroviaires sur de courtes distances en faillite, mais il semble bien que ce soit vers cela que nous nous dirigeons.

Afin de donner un peu de contexte à mon propos, je vais commencer par une brève description de la structure actuelle des prix du transport sur de courtes distances et des mouvements d’un seul wagon. Les petites compagnies de chemin de fer ont une variété de clients. De nombreux expéditeurs n'ont qu'un seul wagon. Ce sont les expéditeurs de wagons de producteurs. Nous aimerions aider tous nos clients quant à leurs besoins en matière de transport et de mouvements. Hélas, cela n'est pas possible en raison des prix excessivement élevés qu'imposent les transporteurs de classe 1 pour les transports de courtes distances et les mouvements d'un seul wagon. Par choix ou par nécessité, ces marchandises sont souvent expédiées par camion, ce qui contribue grandement à l'augmentation des gaz à effet de serre, à la détérioration de nos routes provinciales et à la décentralisation de la croissance économique générée par les petites entreprises.

Pour des trajets de moins de 500 kilomètres, le transport routier est habituellement plus abordable que le transport ferroviaire. Tout ce que nous pouvons ajouter à cela, c'est qu'avec les chemins de fer d'intérêt local, nous sommes meilleur marché que le transport routier. Nous pouvons concurrencer le camion. Le problème, c'est que lorsque le wagon est remis à nos partenaires de classe 1, ces derniers ne sont pas en mesure d'être concurrentiels par rapport à ces prix, comme ils vous l'ont dit ce matin.

Permettez-moi de vous donner un exemple. Nous avons une ligne de chemin de fer qui va de Leader à Swift Current. Elle fait 120 kilomètres. Nous pouvons faire le trajet pour environ 650 $, ce qui est à peu près la moitié de ce que cela coûterait en camion, mais si nous souhaitons amener ce wagon jusqu'à Moose Jaw, c'est-à-dire 122 kilomètres plus loin par la grande ligne, le CP nous demandera environ 2 600 $. Dès lors, nous ne sommes plus concurrentiels. Que fera le producteur? Il mettra son grain dans son camion, il syntonisera Fox News et il se rendra jusqu'à un terminal ou un expéditeur plus important.

Comme cela a été dit ce matin, les membres de la Western Grain Elevator Association approvisionnent la compétition, mais certains de ces compétiteurs augmentent le nombre de camions qu'ils mettent sur la route. Cela crée un autre problème, et il y aura un autre comité pour décider de ce qu'il faudra faire pour l'avenir de notre réseau routier. Il est certes important de ne pas perdre de vue que nous examinons la situation actuelle, mais que nous réserve l'avenir?

Nous devons avoir les capacités nécessaires pour transporter le grain. L'autre jour, on discutait des pénuries de chauffeurs de camion. Le transport ferroviaire va rester une option à cet égard, et les déplacements jusqu'aux terminaux n'ont pas nécessairement besoin de viser les exportations. Il pourrait s'agir de terminaux intérieurs, un endroit où le grain pourrait être trié et préparé aux fins d'expédition à bord de trains plus gros pour le déplacement desquels le CN et le CP excellent.

L'autre problème pour nous, c'est qu'il commence à y avoir un écart considérable entre les prix pour un wagon unique et ceux pour plusieurs wagons. À l'heure actuelle, la différence entre les prix pour un wagon unique et pour un train de 25 wagons à destination des États-Unis est d'environ 1 000 par wagon. Si un expéditeur veut acheminer 15 wagons, cela lui coûtera probablement 15 000 $ de plus, une dépense additionnelle qu'il n'aura absolument aucune façon de justifier. Par conséquent, il optera pour un camion, même si ce ne sera pas toujours à destination du terminal intérieur le plus proche. Il l'expédiera là où il croira obtenir le meilleur marché, ce qui pourrait faire l'objet d'une tout autre discussion.

L'autre sujet dont nous devons parler, bien sûr, c'est celui de l'interconnexion. C'est d'ailleurs une partie très importante du projet de loi. La perte de la possibilité d'une interconnexion de 160 kilomètres est une grande déception pour nos membres. Même si elle n'était pas accessible à tous les expéditeurs de notre réseau ou aux lignes ferroviaires sur de courtes distances, cette option renforçait la position de négociation dans la plupart des endroits. Le retour de la zone d'interconnexion de 30 kilomètres fera en sorte que cette option ne sera plus offerte qu'aux deux de nos quatorze membres qui peuvent la rendre profitable. Les autres ne pourront plus s'en prévaloir.

(1405)



Cette modification nuit à notre capacité à recruter de nouveaux clients. Comme elles n’ont pas accès à plusieurs voies ferrées, les entreprises se rendent compte qu’elles demeureront captives des transporteurs de classe 1 qui relient nos lignes ferroviaires sur courtes distances. Cette dynamique réduit notre capacité à développer nos activités sur nos lignes.

Malheureusement, l'interconnexion de longue distance qui est proposée n'est pas une alternative convenable à l'interconnexion de 160 kilomètres qui a été perdue. Selon notre compréhension, l’instauration d’un mécanisme d’interconnexion de longue distance visait à favoriser la concurrence en offrant aux expéditeurs des options étendues de transport. Nous ne croyons pas que l’interconnexion de longue distance atteindra cet objectif.

La présidente:

Monsieur Pellerin, merci beaucoup de votre temps. Vous pourrez peut-être nous faire part de ce que vous n'avez pas eu le temps de dire lorsque vous répondrez aux questions qui vous seront posées tout à l'heure.

De l'Alberta Wheat Commission, écoutons maintenant M. Auch. Monsieur, vous avez 10 minutes.

M. Kevin Auch (président, Alberta Wheat Commission):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Mon nom est Kevin Auch et je suis heureux de comparaître devant vous cet après-midi en compagnie de nos partenaires de l’industrie, la Western Canadian Shippers’ Coalition et la Western Canadian Short Line Railway Association, afin de vous faire part du point de vue des producteurs agricoles dans le cadre de l’étude par le Comité du projet de loi C-49, Loi sur la modernisation des transports.

Je suis président de l’Alberta Wheat Commission, un organisme se consacrant à l’amélioration de la profitabilité de plus de 14 000 producteurs de blé de la province de l’Alberta. J’exploite aussi ma propre ferme près de la ville de Carmangay, dans le sud de l’Alberta.

Je suis ici aujourd’hui parce que le transport ferroviaire est une priorité de la Commission depuis sa création, en 2012. Les coûts associés aux insuffisances des chemins de fer remontent la chaîne d’approvisionnement et sont absorbés en fin de compte par les producteurs. À titre de preneur de prix, je ne peux pas modifier le prix de mon produit; par conséquent, ces coûts accrus diminuent ma profitabilité. Ils ont également un effet défavorable sur ma trésorerie, ce qui rend difficile le paiement des factures en temps opportun.

Ces problèmes ne touchent pas que mon exploitation. Ils sont répandus parce que, pour ce qui est du transport ferroviaire au Canada, le secteur agricole fonctionne dans un environnement de monopole. La plupart des silos auxquels les producteurs de l’Ouest du Canada livrent leur grain n’ont accès qu’à une seule voie ferrée, ce qui rend les expéditeurs et les producteurs agricoles captifs de transporteurs monopolistiques.

C’est un problème de taille, car le blé est une denrée lourdement dépendante des marchés d’exportation et du transport ferroviaire pour son expédition à partir des Prairies vers les installations terminales des ports de la côte Ouest et de Thunder Bay, ainsi que vers nos voisins au sud de la frontière. Nous apprécions les efforts du gouvernement visant à ouvrir les marchés aux producteurs agricoles grâce à des accords de libre-échange, mais nous perdrons notre crédibilité auprès des acheteurs étrangers si nous sommes incapables d’honorer leurs commandes en raison des insuffisances du transport ferroviaire. Nous en avons fait l’expérience en 2013 et en 2014, lorsque les acheteurs se sont tout simplement procuré leur grain d’autres pays. La réputation du Canada en tant que fournisseur fiable des marchés mondiaux est en péril.

La chaîne d’approvisionnement du grain au Canada fait d’importants investissements afin de tirer profit des occasions offertes par les nouveaux marchés et les marchés en croissance. Nous assistons à une grande expansion de la capacité des terminaux portuaires et des silos au pays. Les entreprises céréalières ont investi des centaines de millions de dollars pour s’assurer d’être prêtes à répondre à la croissance des marchés étrangers. Les producteurs agricoles se préparent aussi à tirer profit de ces occasions. Les investissements importants consentis par les producteurs agricoles ainsi que de nouvelles technologies novatrices ont beaucoup augmenté le rendement au fil des ans. En fait, le mois dernier seulement, le CN a reconnu cette situation en implorant le gouvernement du Canada d’investir dans de nouvelles infrastructures ferroviaires afin d’absorber l’afflux du grain. Le CN a déplacé en 2017 un volume record de 21,8 millions de tonnes métriques de grain.

Mon argument est qu’assurer un service ferroviaire adéquat est capital pour la croissance de notre secteur et la réputation du Canada en tant que fournisseur de grain fiable pour les marchés étrangers.

L’AWC loue l’engagement du gouvernement à l’égard d’un texte de loi visant à assurer un système ferroviaire mieux adapté, plus concurrentiel et plus responsable au Canada. Nous croyons que le projet de loi C-49 est un texte de loi historique qui pave la voie à des solutions permanentes et à long terme aux difficultés du transport ferroviaire auxquelles les producteurs agricoles canadiens font face depuis des décennies.

C’est pourquoi l’AWC est heureuse de l’inclusion de dispositions visant à augmenter la responsabilisation des compagnies de fer, notamment la possibilité pour les expéditeurs d’obtenir des sanctions financières réciproques, une définition claire d’un service adéquat et approprié et une interconnexion améliorée, toutes des mesures que l’AWC défend depuis longtemps. Le projet de loi C-49 contient aussi des dispositions majeures qui renforceront les pouvoirs d’enquête de l’Office des transports du Canada et exigeront la publication de données sur le rendement du système de transport ferroviaire.

En outre, l’AWC soutient la décision du gouvernement de conserver le revenu admissible maximal avec des modifications qui tiendront compte des investissements faits par les compagnies de chemin de fer et prévoient des incitatifs pour l’innovation et l’efficience.

En ce qui a trait au rôle joué par les sanctions financières réciproques, les compagnies de chemin de fer ont toujours disposé de diverses mesures visant à obtenir des gains d’efficience de la part des expéditeurs, notamment des tarifs fondés sur l’utilisation des actifs. Ces tarifs servent à pénaliser les omissions des expéditeurs par des sanctions financières afin d’améliorer leur efficience. Par exemple, lorsque la compagnie de chemin de fer place des wagons à mon silo local et que l’entreprise céréalière ne réussit pas à les remplir dans les 24 heures, cette dernière fait face à des sanctions financières automatiques. De son côté, la compagnie de chemin de fer ne subit aucune pénalité si elle a deux semaines de retard. Les compagnies de chemin de fer sont donc le seul maillon de la chaîne d’approvisionnement du grain qui n'a aucun compte à rendre.

(1410)



Pour créer une chaîne d’approvisionnement efficiente, assurant une responsabilisation commerciale équilibrée, il faut que les compagnies de chemin de fer rendent des comptes pour les lacunes de leurs services.

Nous avons récemment appris que le CN avait inclus un genre de tarif d’expéditeur dans environ 70 % de ses ententes de services. Cela semble une bonne nouvelle à première vue, mais ces tarifs ne s’appliquent qu’en cas d’omission de placer les wagons et ne couvrent pas encore des problèmes courants tels que la livraison en temps opportun ou la fourniture d’information exacte. Nous sommes encouragés par le fait que le CN a pris certaines mesures pour améliorer la responsabilisation des compagnies de chemin de fer et nous sommes confiants que les dispositions énoncées dans le projet de loi C-49 assureront que les sanctions seront vraiment équitables et réciproques à l’avenir.

Tout en renforçant la responsabilisation, les sanctions financières réciproques créeront l’incitatif nécessaire pour que les compagnies de chemin de fer mettent l’accent sur le rendement et investissent dans des actifs permettant des gains d’efficience. Cette recommandation met les compagnies de chemin de fer en concurrence en vue d’obtenir des gains d’efficience, de réduire les risques des expéditeurs et, en fin de compte, de mieux desservir les marchés étrangers grâce aux exportations canadiennes.

Les dispositions relatives à l’interconnexion étendue en vertu du projet de loi C-30, venues à terme le 1er août de cette année, se sont avérées un puissant outil d’intensification de la concurrence au profit des entreprises céréalières. Le projet de loi C-49 propose d’étendre, dans certaines situations, la limite d’interconnexion jusqu’à 1 200 km; à la différence cependant de l’option antérieure d’interconnexion étendue, des conditions du nouveau texte de loi semblent contredire l’intention première du législateur et rendent la nouvelle option moins efficace que les dispositions du projet de loi C-30.

Par exemple, les dispositions antérieures relatives à l’interconnexion permettaient aux expéditeurs d’avoir accès à tout point de correspondance situé à moins de 160 kilomètres sans devoir présenter une demande de permis à l’Office des transports du Canada. La disposition énoncée dans le projet de loi C-49 stipule que l’expéditeur doit demander la permission du transporteur de départ ou demander un arrêté de l’Office pour avoir accès à l’interconnexion, au point de correspondance le plus proche. Non seulement ces modifications rendent-elles l’interconnexion plus onéreuse et compliquée, mais elles rendent la disposition essentiellement inutile dans divers scénarios y compris les suivants: si le point de correspondance en question ne dessert pas le corridor voulu. En d’autres mots, si les produits seraient déplacés dans la mauvaise direction; si le point de correspondance le plus proche ne peut pas recevoir le nombre prévu de wagons; ou si le point de correspondance en question est desservi par la mauvaise compagnie de chemin de fer — la ligne ferroviaire concurrente ne dispose pas nécessairement de voies ferrées couvrant tout le trajet jusqu’à la destination finale du mouvement.

Afin d’aplanir ces difficultés, nous demanderons au Comité d’étudier les modifications préconisées par le Groupe de travail sur la logistique des récoltes dont l’AWC est membre et qui permettraient aux expéditeurs d’avoir accès au point de correspondance le plus proche pouvant répondre à leurs exigences relatives à la direction, au volume et au transporteur privilégié.

Les coûts facturés aux expéditeurs sont en fin de compte imposés aux producteurs en remontant la chaîne d’approvisionnement. C’est pourquoi nos membres sont aussi préoccupés par la formule énoncée dans le projet de loi C-49 afin de fixer les prix de l’interconnexion de longue distance. Le paragraphe 135(2) prescrit à l’Office d’établir un prix qui n’est pas inférieur au revenu moyen par tonne-kilomètre d’un mouvement comparable. À notre avis, cela invite à établir un prix de monopole, fondé sur le revenu plutôt que sur un modèle de coût de production majoré. Le prix devrait permettre un profit raisonnable, mais ne devrait pas tenir compte des prix imposés antérieurement dans le cadre d’un environnement monopolistique.

En conclusion, l’Alberta Wheat Commission appuie fortement l’adoption rapide du projet de loi C-49 parce que nous croyons qu’il contribuera à corriger le déséquilibre entre le pouvoir de marché des compagnies de chemin de fer et celui des expéditeurs captifs. Nous invitons le gouvernement du Canada à poursuivre le dialogue avec le secteur de l’agriculture pendant l’élaboration de règlements appuyant l’esprit et l’intention de ce texte de loi, qui cherche à créer un système de transport ferroviaire mieux adapté, plus concurrentiel et plus responsable au Canada.

Je voudrais enfin remercier le Comité de l’occasion qui m’a été donnée aujourd’hui d’exposer le point de vue des producteurs et je vous invite à poser toute question que vous auriez à propos de mes observations.

(1415)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup à tous.

Nous allons passer aux questions.

Madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à remercier nos témoins d'être venus aujourd'hui.

Six minutes, c'est peu, et j'ai un certain nombre de questions à poser. Je vais adresser ma première question à M. Pellerin.

Je suis ravie de voir que vous vous portez bien et que vous êtes ici pour représenter nos compagnies de chemin de fer d'intérêt local. J'ai une question très directe à vous poser. Vous avez affirmé que vos membres n'ont pas accès à l'interconnexion pour le transport de longue distance. Pouvez-vous expliquer pourquoi c'est le cas?

M. Perry Pellerin:

Bien sûr. Comme d'autres personnes l'ont, je crois, mentionné, le taux sera fixé en fonction des taux commerciaux en vigueur pour une distance semblable aujourd'hui. J'en ai parlé plus tôt: s'il faut débourser 2 600 $ pour parcourir une centaine de kilomètres, le montant moyen de 2 600 $ restera le même. Le taux qui sera fixé sera trop élevé pour tout type de distance d'interconnexion, ce qui, dans les faits, nous exclut — surtout nos partenaires des compagnies de chemin de fer d'intérêt local.

Mme Kelly Block:

J'ai une brève question de suivi: selon vous, quelle mesure devrait-on mettre en place pour aider les compagnies de chemin de fer d'intérêt local?

M. Perry Pellerin:

Vous savez, je pense que ce qu'il y a d'encourageant aujourd'hui est que nous avons beaucoup discuté du fait que tout le monde a besoin de réaliser des profits, mais qu'il faut nous pencher sur un modèle de coût de production majoré qui fixe ce qu'ils devraient être. On semble penser que « taux commercial » est parfois synonyme de « coûteux ». Il nous serait très utile de disposer d'un mécanisme qui nous donnerait au moins à l'avance les coûts prévus.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

Je m'adresse maintenant à la Western Canadian Shippers' Coalition: j'ai remarqué que vous n'aviez pas eu l'occasion de parler de l'interconnexion pour le transport de longue distance. Je remarque aussi que, dans votre présentation, vous avez formulé une recommandation concernant l'interconnexion étendue, alors j'aimerais vous donner le temps qu'il me reste pour que vous puissiez en parler.

M. David Montpetit:

D'accord. Je vais commencer, je suppose, et parler brièvement de l'interconnexion pour le transport de longue distance. Merci de m'en donner l'occasion.

Pour les membres de ma coalition, cet outil ne sera pas très utile pour des questions d'ordre géographique. Si vous prenez la carte devant vous, la zone d'exclusion englobe, en gros, la Colombie-Britannique et des parties du Nord-Ouest de l'Alberta. Lorsque vous prenez la carte de l'Ouest canadien, vous constatez qu'une zone importante où mes expéditeurs se trouvent ou possèdent des installations n'est pas visée. Il s'agit d'une des nombreuses exclusions ayant été présentées dans les amendements. Nous avons de la difficulté à comprendre en quoi cela sera utile à nos membres.

Lucia, vous avez peut-être quelque chose à ajouter.

(1420)

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

Cette carte sera différente de la description des corridors exclus mais, de façon réaliste, tout expéditeur qui envoie ses marchandises vers la région de Vancouver pour qu’elles finissent sur une voie d'évitement à cet endroit ne pourrait pas s’en servir. Nous pouvons dessiner une carte très semblable pour le Québec afin de montrer que certains des expéditeurs les plus captifs dans le Nord de cette province auront exactement le même problème, car leur unique lien avec tout autre transporteur se trouvera dans ce corridor Québec-Windsor.

Cela dit, à part ces éléments, pour la WCSC, un des problèmes sous-jacents que ce recours pose est que, pour qu'il soit efficace, il faudra qu'une quelconque des compagnies de chemin de fer soit disposée à faire office de transporteur de liaison et à faire concurrence aux autres pour ce transport au moyen de l’interconnexion de longue distance. Tout comme son prédécesseur le prix de ligne concurrentiel, cela peut être déterminant pour ce recours. Depuis le début des années 1990, nous n’avons pas observé que des compagnies étaient disposées à se faire concurrence en se servant du prix de ligne concurrentiel, et aucun élément du recours à l’interconnexion de longue distance ne semble changer cette dynamique.

En plus de cela, la portée du transport admissible à l’interconnexion de longue distance, sur le plan géographique et à d'autres égards, est beaucoup plus étroite que ce qui, en théorie, pourrait permettre de profiter de prix de ligne concurrentiels.

Troisièmement, cette solution présente un certain nombre d’obstacles qui n'existent pas actuellement avec le prix de ligne concurrentiel.

De ce point de vue, et compte tenu de notre expérience du prix de ligne concurrentiel, bien que nous ayons observé que certains transporteurs étaient disposés à se faire concurrence jusqu’à 160 kilomètres sous le régime du projet de loi C-30, nous n’avons rien vu de plus. Le prix de ligne concurrentiel a été en vigueur tout ce temps. Nous nous inquiétons que le CN et le CP ne soient pas disposés à se faire concurrence — il est clair que dans l’Ouest canadien, la majorité des interconnexions se fait entre ces deux transporteurs — ce qui est nécessaire pour que pareille solution soit efficace.

Oui, on élimine l’exigence de conclure un marché avec le transporteur de liaison, mais le fait que les gens n’aient pas été en mesure de conclure cet accord n’est vraiment qu’un symptôme de cette question sous-jacente plus fondamentale, qui est que le CN et le CP ont « refusé de se faire concurrence ». Je veux être certain que vous sachiez que ce n’est pas moi qui le dis, mais bien le rapport sur l’examen législatif publié en 1992. On a repris ces mots en 2001, et je pense qu’on a aussi dit quelque chose du genre dans le dernier rapport.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Avec ma première question, je veux parler plus en détail des recours. Nous pouvons nous reporter à certains des documents que les divers intervenants nous ont remis.

Ma première question — et je ne sais pas bien à qui l’adresser — se rapporte aux pouvoirs d’enquête. Que pensez-vous des pouvoirs d’enquête prévus dans la LTC?

M. David Montpetit:

Je vais commencer.

J’estime que c’est un peu une lacune du projet de loi C-49. Je pense que M. Emerson en a parlé brièvement hier et qu'il en a aussi été question dans certaines des discussions que nous avons tenues jusqu’à présent.

Je pense que c’est un domaine sur lequel on devrait se pencher à nouveau. Si vous êtes investi de pouvoirs d’enquête, vous pouvez prendre des mesures proactives plutôt que réactives à l’égard de ces problèmes, surtout en ce qui concerne les problèmes systémiques dans le réseau et les corridors de transport. Voilà pourquoi nous l’encourageons vivement. Dans chaque mémoire et à chaque occasion que nous avons eue dans le cadre de réunions avec le cabinet du ministre, Transports Canada et même l’Office, nous avons milité en faveur d’une capacité et d’un pouvoir accrus de le faire.

M. Vance Badawey:

M. Emerson a beaucoup parlé hier et a discuté en détail de la gouvernance et, bien sûr, de la bonne gouvernance. Estimez-vous que les pouvoirs d’enquête prévus dans la LTC favoriseront une meilleure gouvernance en ce qui touche nos corridors de commerce?

M. David Montpetit:

Oui, je l'estime. Surtout si on prend la viabilité et le rehaussement à long terme de ces corridors de commerce, je pense que c'est important.

En outre, du point de vue de la concurrence, non seulement à l'échelle nationale, mais aussi internationale, je pense qu'il est important de s'assurer que nos corridors de commerce soient fluides, actifs et concurrentiels, et que les questions actuelles auxquelles nous faisons face dans certains secteurs... N'oubliez pas que certaines de ces questions fluctuent en fonction du climat et du mouvement des marchandises. Certaines marchandises sont plus ou moins en demande à certains moments tandis qu'à d'autres, c'est le contraire. Nous l'avons vu avec les céréales, le charbon et différentes catégories de marchandises. Il faut s'assurer de pouvoir traiter toute question, actuelle ou non, dans ces corridors en permettant à l'Office de l'étudier et de trouver des solutions.

Encore une fois, c'est à eux qu'il revient de déterminer comment ils veulent structurer la question ou comment elle devrait être structurée ou s'il s'agit d'une ordonnance pour l'améliorer. Cependant, je crois qu'il y a lieu de s'attacher à ce secteur.

(1425)

M. Vance Badawey:

Êtes-vous d'avis que vous rehausseriez la crédibilité de la responsabilité au plan des immobilisations lorsqu'il est question de conserver l'infrastructure, qu'il s'agisse d'un chemin de fer, d'un canal ou d'un aéroport et de choses du genre? Croyez-vous aussi qu'on s'éloignerait de l'intérêt et des buts personnels pour privilégier la valeur et, au bout du compte, le rendement pour le consommateur canadien? Troisièmement, cela contribuerait aussi à l'amélioration générale de notre rendement économique à l'échelle mondiale.

M. David Montpetit:

Je peux parler du secteur ferroviaire, car nous nous attachons surtout au transport ferroviaire et par camion, mais en gros, sans avoir d'expertise dans le transport aérien, etc., je pense que l'idée générale est que tout ce qu'on peut faire pour rehausser, sans but comme celui-là, serait positif, parce qu'on a des buts. Chaque personne aura son propre but et tout. Même chose pour les organisations. Il serait probablement préférable et utile d'examiner la question de façon impartiale.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci.

Je vais passer aux chemins de fer d'intérêt local, question qui me tenait à coeur dans mon ancienne vie. J'ai amené pareil chemin de fer dans notre région. La raison étant que nous étions, en quelque sorte, abandonnés — sans vouloir faire de mauvais jeu de mots — par les lignes de chemin de fer principales. Sur ce, je veux vous donner la parole pour aborder trois points.

Le premier est la raison de votre existence; je pense en avoir parlé brièvement. Le deuxième est ce que vous faites. Vous êtes un groupe qui travaille directement avec le consommateur, sans intermédiaire. Dans une certaine mesure, vous dépendez d'eux et de leur viabilité. Ma dernière question, bien sûr, est celle de savoir d'où provient votre financement.

M. Perry Pellerin:

Nous pourrions commencer par la dernière question. Après la réunion, nous allons faire le tour de la pièce et recueillir les dons pour nous aider à avancer.

Je vais commencer par la raison de notre existence. Je pense que les représentants du CN ont bien expliqué pourquoi ils souhaitent ne plus exploiter certaines lignes. Je ne suis pas convaincu que les lignes qu'ils ne veulent plus exploiter ne sont toujours pas productives et je crois que les chemins de fer d'intérêt local ont montré partout au Canada qu'ils peuvent réussir si on leur en donne la chance. Une partie de notre problème réside dans le fait que nous avons peut-être payé trop cher ces lignes dont personne ne veut, et cela nous a placés en situation de déficit au début. Ensuite, nous essayons d'obtenir un prêt et d'entretenir le chemin de fer.

Je pense que, lorsqu'ils en ont la chance, les exploitants de chemins de fer d'intérêt local sont très novateurs et très axés sur la clientèle. Ils font un très bon travail et permettent à leurs clients de prendre de l'expansion. Lorsque nous avons acheté notre chemin de fer d'intérêt local, j'ai toujours dit aux gens que l'essentiel était de comprendre que si vous permettez que votre ligne de chemin de fer disparaisse — qu'il s'agisse d'une ligne d'intérêt local, d'un site de chargement de wagons de producteurs ou d'une voie d'évitement — elle ne reviendra jamais; elle sera partie pour toujours. C'est l'élément essentiel. Nous avons des exemples, surtout en Saskatchewan, d'endroits où on a abandonné les chemins de fer d'intérêt local. Cependant, à la toute fin de la ligne, on s'est rendu compte que c'était un excellent endroit où charger du pétrole, exploiter ce type d'industrie ou entreposer des cargaisons de céréales. Ces lignes sont très précieuses et viables aujourd'hui et le seront encore dans un avenir prévisible. Il ne nous reste qu'à trouver la façon de faire la même chose avec les autres lignes.

En ce qui concerne le dernier point que vous avez soulevé, nous sommes très axés sur la clientèle. Je pense que nos clients aiment vraiment l'idée qu'ils peuvent prendre le téléphone et parler à quelqu'un. C'est unique en quelque sorte. Nous tenons compte des besoins de nos clients. Nous sommes en mesure d'être un peu plus souples que pourraient l'être les compagnies de chemin de fer de classe 1 et sommes capables d'aider notre clientèle. C'est particulièrement le cas lorsque nous essayons d'attirer de nouvelles entreprises au Canada. Je pense qu'il est primordial que nous soyons ceux qui pourraient leur donner un bon départ en leur offrant un service de qualité et une occasion de démarrer leur entreprise à moindres coûts comparativement à certains chemins de fer de classe 1 dont les exigences ne sont pas les mêmes.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Je suis désolée d'avoir à vous interrompre à nouveau, mais...

(1430)

M. Perry Pellerin:

Permettez-moi seulement d'ajouter un mot sur le financement. Nous sommes autosuffisants. Nous ne recevons pas un sou de personne.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les invités d'être parmi nous et de nous faire part de leur expertise.

Quand nous faisons ce type d'étude, les consensus sont relativement rares. Or il semble s'en dégager un quant à l'interconnexion de longue distance. Les uns n'en veulent tout simplement pas parce que ce ne serait pas compétitif, et les autres n'en veulent pas parce que ce ne serait pas efficace.

Je suis en train de me faire à l'idée que le projet de loi C-49 n'atteint pas du tout cet objectif. Si nous devions repenser les objectifs visés par l'interconnexion, d'où devrions-nous partir? Devrions-nous revenir à ce qui avait été proposé dans le projet de loi C-30, ou encore corriger le projet de loi C-49 pour établir une mesure d'interconnexion qui soit à la faveur de ceux qui en ont besoin? [Traduction]

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

Je n'ai pas eu le temps de formuler notre recommandation au cours de mon intervention précédente. Les membres de la WCSC sont généralement implantés à l'extérieur de ce rayon de 160 kilomètres, bien que certains possèdent des installations à l'intérieur de ce rayon ou peuvent en aménager. De ce point de vue, le rayon d'interconnexion réglementé de 160 kilomètres est de loin préférable parce que nous pouvons l'utiliser aux fins de planification. Un prix fixé pour un an qui sera modifié d'une année à l'autre en fonction de facteurs qui nous échappent totalement... Nous ne pouvons pas nous en servir pour établir nos plans d'activités. Pour attirer des investissements non plus.

Un prix d'interconnexion fixé par règlement, un prix que tout le monde peut voir, un prix transparent que les gens connaissent au moment où ils planifient leurs activités et négocient leur participation avec des transporteurs locaux et correspondants et tous les autres intervenants, c'est beaucoup plus pratique. Au-delà de ce rayon, je le répète, tout dépend de la mesure dans laquelle les transporteurs correspondants sont prêts à soutenir la concurrence. Dans cette optique, le régime d'interconnexion de longue distance présente moins de restrictions que les prix de ligne concurrentiels. Personnellement, je pense qu'il s'agit là d'un débat abstrait parce qu'aucun des deux n'offre un énorme avantage dans l'environnement actuel. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Les autres témoins partagent-ils cette opinion?

Souhaitez-vous ajouter quelque chose sur cette question? [Traduction]

M. Perry Pellerin:

En Saskatchewan, surtout dans le cas de certains des expéditeurs de grains qui utilisent les chemins de fer secondaires, le projet de loi C-30 permettrait à de nouvelles entreprises d'utiliser nos lignes secondaires pour avoir accès à d'autres chemins de fer de catégorie 1. De la manière dont le système est actuellement structuré, je pense qu'une jeune entreprise hésiterait à miser sur les chemins de fer secondaires, parce que vous pourriez également avoir accès à la zone des 30 kilomètres pour vous prévaloir de ces options.

Pour être franc avec vous, je vous aurais répondu que si nous n'avions pas le projet de loi C-30, celui-ci est pire. Je préférerais ne pas l'avoir du tout, comparativement à ce que nous avions avant, si vous comprenez. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

J'ai aussi été interpellé par une déclaration que vous avez faite en ouverture. Toutes les fois que le ministre est venu nous rencontrer, il nous a parlé de l'importance d'harmoniser nos façons de faire et nos lois avec celles du marché américain, puisque les États-Unis sont notre principal exportateur, mais parfois aussi avec celles du marché européen. Vous me dites maintenant que, dans le signalement des données, on passe complètement à côté. Selon ce que j'ai compris de votre intervention, nous serions à des années-lumière de ce que font les Américains, tellement les données recueillies sont agrégées et indéfinissables.

Si c'est le cas, que proposez-vous pour que les données soient utiles?

(1435)

[Traduction]

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

Oui. Les différences étaient attribuables aux rapports de rendement des chemins de fer dans le réseau américain, et cela comprend le CN et le CP pour ce qui est de leurs activités aux États-Unis. Ce sont les données que ces compagnies déclarent chaque semaine ou chaque mois. En l'espace d'une semaine, ces données sont publiées sur le site Web de la Surface Transportation Board, pour chaque compagnie ferroviaire, et pour 23 produits différents. Le compte des wagons est différent selon qu'il s'agit de pâtes et papiers, de produits forestiers, de charbon, de potasse ou de tout autre produit. Il y a 23 catégories distinctes.

Pour nous, c'est vraiment le niveau minimal d'information dont nous avons besoin et, en raison de la taille du pays et du fait que le CN et le CP exercent leurs activités d'un bout à l'autre, nous aimerions que cela se fasse pour chaque chemin de fer et à une échelle géographique plus détaillée. Autrement, ça ne sert à rien.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pense que vous avez presque tous entendu les témoignages livrés en matinée. Ma première question porte sur les clients captifs. Les grandes compagnies de chemin de fer ont laissé entendre que si vous avez accès à des camions, vous n'êtes donc pas captifs. J'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez.

M. Kevin Auch:

Nous avons également accès à des avions, mais ce serait un moyen très peu efficace pour expédier nos produits. Le chemin de fer demeure le moyen le plus économique pour acheminer des marchandises en vrac. Quant aux céréales, le transport par camion vers la côte n'est pas une option. Ce serait beaucoup trop cher. Dans un environnement de monopole sans concurrence, la seule façon d'empêcher un transporteur en situation de monopole d'exiger le prix le plus élevé possible, c'est d'imposer une réglementation. Dans un monde idéal, la concurrence ferait en sorte que les gains en productivité seraient investis dans le système.

Pour les producteurs de grains, le transport par camion vers la côte n'est pas une solution.

M. David Montpetit:

C'est la même chose pour tous les autres groupes de marchandises. Si vous exploitez une mine, par exemple, disons une mine de charbon qui produit deux millions de tonnes par année, cela signifierait que vous devriez faire partir un camion vers la côte presque toutes les 30 secondes, 24 heures sur 24, tous les jours de l'année, à partir d'une mine située en Colombie-Britannique ou dans le nord-ouest de la Saskatchewan. Cela vous donnera littéralement le tournis. Cela n'a aucun sens.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de camions un wagon moyen peut-il remplacer?

M. David Montpetit:

Tout dépend de la taille du wagon. Je dirais deux ou trois camions, selon les marchandises transportées. Vous pouvez me corriger si je fais erreur. Un camion peut avoir une capacité de 40 ou 45 tonnes métriques. Un wagon peut en avoir une 100 à 108, peut-être.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À moins d'avoir un Schnabel qui peut transporter une charge extraordinaire.

Ces règles s'appliquent aux chemins de fer sous réglementation fédérale. Je suppose, monsieur Pellerin, que ce n'est pas le cas de la plupart de vos chemins de fer. Quelles sont les répercussions sur vos chemins de fer?

M. Perry Pellerin:

Tous nos chemins de fer secondaires sont encore reliés aux chemins de fer sous réglementation fédérale. C'est pour cette raison que nous nous intéressons à la structure tarifaire. Si l'écart des prix se creuse entre nos chemins de fer secondaires et ceux de la catégorie 1, il nous est alors plus difficile de soutenir la concurrence. Voilà ce qui nous préoccupe tous. Les décisions que le gouvernement prend aujourd'hui auront un impact sur nous, même si nous ne sommes pas sous réglementation fédérale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Pellerin, avez-vous déjà fait partie du personnel itinérant?

M. Perry Pellerin:

Oui, j'ai débuté ma carrière au CN et j'y ai travaillé pendant 22 ans.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme vous avez de l'expérience en cabine, pensez-vous que les règles relatives aux enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive, l'option à l'étude, s'appliquent aux exploitants de chemins de fer secondaires?

M. Perry Pellerin:

Non. Je dirais que pour les chemins de fer secondaires... Nous avons travaillé avec Transports. Je pense que l'application de ces règles devrait être basée sur... Bon nombre des trains qui circulent sur nos lignes secondaires roulent à une quinzaine de kilomètres à l'heure. Nous pouvons faire des photos à cette vitesse, pas besoin d'avoir une caméra.

L'autre point que j'aimerais soulever rapidement à ce sujet, c'est que selon certaines statistiques fournies ce matin, 53 % des incidents sont attribuables à une erreur humaine. Sur les lignes secondaires, du moins sur celles que je représente, la voie est la cause de la totalité des incidents et aucun n'est attribuable à une erreur humaine. Ce n'est donc pas vraiment une nécessité pour les lignes secondaires, surtout en raison de nos vitesses et de la manière dont nous gérons notre trafic.

(1440)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

Le CN et le CP ont des ratios d'exploitation variant entre 50 et 60 %. Quel est le taux d'exploitation type pour l'une de vos lignes secondaires?

M. Perry Pellerin:

Il est probablement d'environ 98 %. Je suis gêné de le dire à voix haute.

La caractéristique des lignes secondaires, c'est que nos actionnaires sont les municipalités et les agriculteurs que nous représentons. L'argent est réinvesti directement dans le réseau. Nous ne nous préoccupons pas trop du prix des actions ni des marges de profit. Ce qui nous préoccupe, c'est la sécurité et la prestation des services.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

Ces dernières années, le CN a racheté un grand nombre de voies ferrées secondaires partout au pays. Que pensez-vous de cela?

M. Perry Pellerin:

Dans certains cas, peut-être que l'achat de lignes secondaires permet initialement d'atteindre certains endroits. Le boom pétrolier a incité beaucoup de gens à changer d'idée. Les chemins de fer de catégorie 1 possédaient quelques lignes ferroviaires qu'ils auraient bien voulu avoir conservées. En Saskatchewan, ils voudraient bien en reprendre deux ou trois si cela était possible.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

S'ils les reprenaient, croyez-vous qu'ils les exploiteraient de la même manière qu'ils le sont maintenant?

M. Perry Pellerin:

Une chose est sûre, c'est que s'ils les reprenaient, ils pourraient y investir plus de capitaux. Mais le client de cette ligne devrait négocier le niveau de service, par exemple.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

J'ai encore une dernière brève question. Je pense avoir épuisé mon temps de parole. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer plus en détail pourquoi les chemins de fer secondaires sont capables d'acheminer un wagon complet pour 650 $, tandis que les grandes compagnies facturent 2 000 $ pour le même chargement, qu'elles sont moins efficaces et qu'elles ne veulent pas le faire.

M. Perry Pellerin:

À mon avis, cela s'explique en partie par le fait que nous préservons la compétitivité de nos clients. Nous facturons ce que cela nous coûte.

L'intéressant dans tout cela, c'est que certains des prix que nous facturons ont été initialement établis par nos partenaires de catégorie 1, dont nous étions une division. C'est donc tout ce que nous avons obtenu. Nos clients étaient habitués à utiliser cette portion. Si nous avions augmenté le prix, nous aurions joué le rôle du méchant. En fait, notre problème sur bon nombre de lignes secondaires, c'est que nous pouvions faire de l'argent. Il suffisait de trouver le moyen d'augmenter le volume. Nous devons travailler là-dessus. Nous avons pris un gros coup du côté des wagons de producteurs. Actuellement, il est impossible d'envoyer un wagon de producteurs vers l'Ouest canadien. Ce n'est pas bon. C'est pour l'exportation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

M. Perry Pellerin:

Je savais que vous feriez cela.

La présidente:

C'est à vous, monsieur Fraser.

M. Sean Fraser:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais d'abord m'adresser à la WCSC.

Dans votre allocution d'ouverture, vous avez brièvement dit que vous aviez besoin de données plus détaillées, par produit ou autrement, pour prendre vos décisions quotidiennes. Je ne vous ai pas bien saisi, je pense. Vous nous avez donné un bloc compact de renseignements, au demeurant fort utiles. Pourriez-vous me donner plus de détails? De quelle manière le fait d'avoir en main les données transparentes que vous souhaitez avoir vous aiderait-il à négocier de bons prix et à vous assurer que le chemin de fer est exploité de manière efficace?

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

Je vais vous donner une partie de la réponse. Supposons que vous êtes un expéditeur de produits forestiers et que vous négociez avec le chemin de fer. Il se peut que vous ne soyez pas satisfait du service offert. Vous expédiez des pâtes et papiers dans des wagons couverts et vous avez en main des données générales quant au nombre de wagons en circulation dans l'ensemble du réseau transportant votre produit, des produits similaires expédiés à partir de l'autre bout du pays, et un lot d'autres produits en vrac, mais vous n'avez aucune idée si le nombre de wagons généralement disponibles dans le réseau a été réduit. Il y a une pénurie de wagons dans ce secteur en particulier et un certain nombre de membres de la WCSC travaillent dans ce secteur.

Il n'y a pas de données transparentes vous permettant de savoir si la capacité établie par les chemins de fer a été réduite. Vous ne pouvez pas savoir si la pénurie s'applique seulement à vous, ou si elle se produit à la grandeur du réseau. Vous ne pouvez pas savoir si les producteurs de métaux obtiennent plus de wagons que votre secteur. Il n'y a aucune donnée à ce sujet. Vous ne savez pas où sont ces wagons.

Par exemple, s'il y a une série de wagons à un moment précis dans une région donnée et que vous constatez que des wagons ne semblent pas circuler, cela peut vous inciter à expédier ailleurs, là où la circulation est peut-être plus fluide. Les données ne sont pas suffisamment détaillées.

(1445)

M. David Montpetit:

Nous n'avons pas une vue d'ensemble du réseau. Nous n'avons pas cette possibilité. Nous n'avons pas les outils nécessaires ni toutes les autres données. C'est pourtant notre outil de travail. Nous n'avons aucun autre moyen d'investiguer ou de vérifier par nous-mêmes. Si le service a été transféré d'un côté ou interrompu à l'autre, nous n'avons aucun moyen de le savoir. Les données nous permettraient de savoir. Elles nous aident à avoir une meilleure vue d'ensemble du réseau.

M. Sean Fraser:

Bien sûr.

Je suis curieux d'en savoir plus sur le mécanisme de règlement des différends envisagé en cas de non-respect des obligations de service. Croyez-vous que l'arbitrage des propositions finales soit un moyen efficace de régler ce genre de différends? Existe-t-il un meilleur moyen de procéder, ou est-ce une amélioration par rapport au mécanisme que nous avions auparavant?

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

L'arbitrage des propositions finales est un mécanisme tourné vers l'avenir. Il ne règle pas vraiment directement un problème antérieur lié au service. La plupart du temps, ce genre d'arbitrage porte surtout sur les prix. Vous pouvez y ajouter d'autres conditions, mais plus il y en a, plus le processus se complique. Il est déjà assez complexe pour commencer. Vous pouvez dorénavant l'utiliser pour établir certaines conditions, comme vous pourriez le faire au moyen des dispositions des ententes sur les niveaux de service.

Mais pour ce qui est de régler des problèmes antérieurs, il n'y a que mécanisme de plaintes, le mécanisme de plaintes liées au niveau de service prévu à l'article 116.

M. Sean Fraser:

Bien sûr.

Permettez-moi de passer du coq à l'âne un instant. La plupart des témoignages que nous avons entendus aujourd'hui concernaient l'interconnexion; les chemins de fer de catégorie 1 nous ont dit, en gros, que nous allions compliquer les choses et que cela les forcerait à céder leurs entreprises à des concurrents.

Êtes-vous d'accord avec cela? Le véritable impact n'est-il pas plutôt que cela ferait une place à la concurrence à la table des négociations, ce qui va obliger les grandes compagnies à proposer des prix plus flexibles dans la mesure où vous proposez des prix raisonnablement conformes à ceux du marché?

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

À ma connaissance, aucun expéditeur n'aurait l'idée d'amorcer un processus de plainte ou de recourir à un processus réglementaire. Ce sont des gens d'affaires et ils préfèrent toujours essayer de négocier une entente.

Ces recours sont en partie utiles parce qu'ils offrent, comme l'a mentionné David plus tôt, une sorte de garantie dans un environnement où vous n'avez pas la possibilité de dire: « Ok, je n'ai pas envie de faire affaire avec vous, je n'aime pas vos conditions. Je vais aller voir votre concurrent ». C'est impossible ou c'est uniquement possible pour une petite partie de notre clientèle. Le seul fait que ce recours existe et qu'il soit accessible donne le même résultat pour de nombreux expéditeurs. Il est tout aussi important pour le mécanisme de négociation que ce recours existe et soit accessible que ce l'est pour quelqu'un qui veut acheminer des marchandises en vertu d'un arrêté d'interconnexion.

M. Sean Fraser:

Qu'on l'utilise ou non.

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

C'est exact.

M. Sean Fraser:

Monsieur Auch, vous avez parlé...

La présidente:

Vous avez 20 secondes.

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Shields.

M. Martin Shields:

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.

Je m'adresse à l'Alberta Wheat Commission. Vous avez brièvement parlé du flux de trésorerie. Puisque vous avez soulevé la question, pouvez-vous nous en dire plus à ce sujet?

M. Kevin Auch:

En 2013, par exemple, lorsque le niveau de service était absolument déplorable, nous avons eu une récolte très abondante. Les agriculteurs avaient signé des contrats pour la livraison de leurs produits et, en raison des retards dans le transport ferroviaire, certains contrats n'ont pu être honorés ou les marchandises ont été livrées avec plusieurs mois de retard. C'est six ou huit mois plus tard que les contrats ont été honorés.

Même si nous avons signé un contrat, la compagnie céréalière nous paiera qu'au moment de la livraison. Cela se répercute sur notre flux de trésorerie. Nous avons un contrat. Nous planifions notre flux de trésorerie. Nous avons des paiements à faire. Nous devons payer les intrants que nous utilisons pour nos cultures et nous signons ces contrats pour générer des recettes. L'an dernier, les retards ont été terribles.

M. Martin Shields:

Est-il encore possible que le problème de 2013 se reproduise?

M. Kevin Auch:

Nous ne cultivons pas moins que cette année-là. La tendance en matière de production agricole est à la hausse. Nous produisons davantage et plus efficacement. Si vous regardez le prix réel du grain, vous constaterez qu'il est le même aujourd'hui qu'en 1981. La seule façon de faire de l'argent, c'est d'accroître notre production de manière plus efficiente.

Si les tendances actuelles se maintiennent, la production de grain ne risque pas de diminuer.

(1450)

M. Martin Shields:

Vous pouvez donc avoir ce problème de flux de trésorerie à n'importe quel moment?

M. Kevin Auch:

Oui.

M. Martin Shields:

Autrement dit, vos recettes n'arrivent pas au même moment d'une année à l'autre, mais vous devez payer vos factures quand même et reporter vos liquidités sur une autre année. C'est tout un défi.

On a soulevé à plusieurs reprises la question des données. Votre organisation a-t-elle un problème à cet égard?

M. Kevin Auch:

Cela aide les gens à qui nous vendons nos produits. Nous avons entendu leurs témoignages. Les élévateurs à grains achètent notre grain et l'expédient à nos clients exportateurs. C'est donc important pour eux, et pour nous aussi.

M. Martin Shields:

D'accord, je vais revenir aux données à nouveau. Je sais que vous avez souvent répondu à cette question. Il a été difficile de réviser ce processus avec les municipalités, à l'échelle provinciale, et avec la FCM, au niveau fédéral, et d'essayer de convaincre les chemins de fer de nous informer à temps du contenu de leurs wagons qui traversent nos collectivités — parce que ce sont nos pompiers qui s'occupent de cela. Nous aimerions en être informés à temps, au moment du passage des wagons, mais bien entendu, ils préfèrent attendre un mois après leur passage dans les collectivités avant de nous en informer.

Pour vous, les données que vous exigez des entreprises concernent les délais, les marchandises en stock et les expéditions: c'est ainsi que les choses ont toujours été. J'apporte l'inventaire aujourd'hui; je ne laisse pas les marchandises stockées ici pendant un mois, je dois aussi les expédier à temps. Est-ce de cet aspect de vos activités dont vous parlez? Notre industrie est en pleine mutation, c'est donc un aspect important.

M. David Montpetit:

Vous demandez un changement qui, en réalité, va plus loin que ce que nous demandons nous-mêmes. Nous demandons des données et nous recommandons un délai de sept jours au lieu de trois semaines. Nous essayons d'améliorer ce délai. Vous demandez un changement immédiat; ce sont des données fluides.

En fin de compte, ce serait génial d'avoir ces données. Pour le moment, nous en sommes probablement au stade des premiers pas. Ensuite, nous passerons aux stades de la marche, de la course et du sprint. Nous voulons apprendre à marcher avant de sprinter, mais j'aimerais bien que nous y arrivons parce que nous aurions alors des données en temps réel, par exemple, sur ce qui est important pour nous et notre communauté. Nous aurions accès à des données en temps réel sur l'endroit où se trouvent nos wagons. Nous aimerions vraiment que notre groupe ait accès à des ensembles très différents de données, mais il ne faut pas brûler les étapes.

Pour commencer, je pense qu'il serait approprié d'utiliser le modèle de base américain pour notre région. En fin de compte, je suis d'accord avec vous.

M. Martin Shields:

Mais si vous bâtissez une économie et si vous voulez la faire avancer, vu notre vaste étendue, n'est-ce pas dans cette direction que nous devrions aller?

M. David Montpetit:

Tout à fait. Je ne vous contredis pas pour l'instant.

M. Martin Shields:

Si nous voulons faire concurrence à ce qui est en train d'émerger de l'autre côté du Pacifique, que se passera-t-il si nous ne prenons pas ces mesures?

M. David Montpetit:

Plusieurs autres pays et différents autres modes de transport fournissent des données en temps réel. C'est un fait et c'est ce à quoi nous devons nous mesurer.

Je ne cesse de répéter à notre groupe que nous devons songer à faire concurrence à l'échelle internationale, pas à l'échelle locale ou générale. Nous devons adopter une perspective plus large. Je suis d'accord avec vous.

M. Martin Shields:

Vous avez parlé de ce qui manquait dans le projet de loi, soit l'examen ministériel des modifications, qui était auparavant prévu à la loi. Vous dites qu'il n'y a pas de disposition à cet égard cette fois-ci.

M. David Montpetit:

Désolé, parlez-vous des capacités d'enquête, de ce genre de choses?

M. Martin Shields:

Non, je parle de l'examen des modifications qui, d'après ce que vous venez de dire, n'est pas mentionné dans le projet de loi.

M. David Montpetit:

D'accord.

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

Je peux répondre.

En 1996, lors de l'adoption de la LTC, une disposition prévoyait un examen obligatoire de la loi dans le cadre d'un certain délai. Je ne me rappelle plus exactement du délai, mais par la suite, chaque fois que des modifications majeures étaient apportées à la loi, on faisait une mise à jour. Il y avait également un autre délai de prévu pour l'examen de l'application de la loi.

Cette fois-ci, il semble y avoir une grande divergence d'opinions, surtout en ce qui concerne l'interconnexion de longue distance. Nous pensons que cela ne sera pas d'une grande utilité pour nos membres. Les chemins de fer semblent s'en préoccuper vivement. Il se peut que quelques expéditeurs y aient recours. Nous pensons que les décideurs politiques pourront se servir de ce mécanisme pour savoir qui l'utilise et comment et...

M. Martin Shields:

Mais il n'est pas prévu.

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

Il ne l'est pas.

M. Martin Shields:

Savez-vous si on l'a déjà utilisé dans le passé et si des corrections ont déjà été apportées? Est-ce que des modifications ont été apportées dans le passé lorsque ce mécanisme était en vigueur?

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

Le dernier examen a été mené par M. Emerson. Il recommande un processus plus stable et permanent, mais nous croyons qu'il devrait y avoir au moins une disposition ou un engagement prévoyant un nouvel examen de la loi, pour voir si elle fonctionne bien, ou si elle fonctionne tout court.

(1455)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

J'aimerais parler du cycle décisionnel prévu à la LTC. M. Montpetit a dit, ou c'était peut-être vous madame Stuhldreier, que le délai d'attente pour rendre une décision en vertu de la LTC sur une question risque d'avoir des effets néfastes pour l'expéditeur. Pouvez-vous nous donner un exemple d'effet néfaste attribuable à un délai?

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

Il y a toujours plusieurs facteurs en jeu. Il existe certainement des exemples dans le passé d'un expéditeur qui s'est plaint à plusieurs reprises auprès de l'Office du service qu'il recevait et du nombre insuffisant de wagons pour acheminer, si ma mémoire est bonne, des cultures spéciales de la Saskatchewan. Chaque plainte a suivi le processus complet, mais l'expéditeur s'est finalement retiré des affaires. Il y a probablement de nombreux facteurs contributifs.

Pendant la durée du processus, qui s'échelonne sur plusieurs mois, il se peut que la compagnie de chemin de fer renforce ses activités parce qu'elle est sous surveillance, mais il se peut également qu'il y ait de multiples combinaisons origine-destination. Tout dépend de l'expéditeur. Beaucoup de choses peuvent mal tourner et empêcher l'expéditeur d'acheminer ses biens sur le marché.

M. Ken Hardie:

De la même manière, vous avez mentionné des exemples ou des situations où, à cause de la nature non compétitive qui nous a été décrite entre les deux chemins de fer au Canada, les frais d'expédition ont grandement augmenté. Pouvez-vous me donner un exemple flagrant d'une forte hausse de prix attribuable à l'absence de concurrence?

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

Pour des raisons évidentes, je ne peux citer de noms. Je vais vous présenter les choses ainsi.

Il ne serait pas impossible qu'un chemin de fer détenant un pouvoir de marché dise à un expéditeur: « Vous pouvez avoir un contrat de cinq ans avec des hausses de 15 %, 15 %, 5 %, 9 % ou un taux de cet ordre, ou vous pouvez expédier vos marchandises sans contrat et nous vous imposerons une hausse de 50 % l'année prochaine ».

M. Ken Hardie:

C'est arrivé?

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

Oui, c'est arrivé.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'accord. Ce serait bien d'avoir un exemple précis.

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

Je suis désolée, mais je ne peux pas divulguer ces informations.

M. Ken Hardie:

Bien. Parlons alors de l'interconnexion de longue distance. À première vue, il semblerait que non seulement nous donnions accès à de plus grandes distances, mais que nous permettions également à un plus grand nombre de clients d'en profiter.

Selon ce que j'ai entendu, comme les expéditeurs doivent utiliser la ligne de chemin de fer concurrente la plus proche, ils peuvent se retrouver à envoyer leur marchandise dans la mauvaise direction, ou la ligne de chemin de fer ne se rend pas à la destination voulue, ou encore, le point de correspondance le plus proche n'a pas nécessairement la capacité requise. Ce sont là trois problèmes qui ont été énoncés.

Dans ce genre de situations, peut-on réellement parler d'option concurrente si cela ne fonctionne tout simplement pas? Je me demande seulement si la définition subjective de « concurrente » ne fait pas que nous embrouiller. À mon avis, cela ne semble pas être une option concurrente.

M. David Montpetit:

Ça ne l'est pas.

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

Ça ne l'est pas.

M. Ken Hardie:

Donc, l'option concurrente pourrait en fait être le point de correspondance qui est à tout point conforme au projet de loi, même s'il n'est pas le point le plus proche. Très bien.

J'ai une autre question, au sujet des données. Vous avez indiqué que les exploitants canadiens doivent, aux États-Unis, satisfaire à des exigences différentes en matière de données, et qu'ils sont en mesure d'y répondre dans des délais beaucoup plus courts que ceux prévus ici. Nous savons qu'ils peuvent le faire.

Y a-t-il d'autres choses que les exploitants canadiens sont tenus de faire aux États-Unis, mais pas ici, et que vous souhaiteriez qu'ils fassent au Canada?

(1500)

M. David Montpetit:

Je ne peux franchement pas répondre à cette question. Toutefois, ce que je peux dire, c'est que s'ils sont en mesure de fournir des données aux États-Unis, il n'y a aucune raison pour qu'ils ne puissent pas le faire ici.

M. Ken Hardie:

Exact. Mais c'est un exemple de ce qu'ils font. Je me demandais simplement s'il n'y avait pas d'autres choses, pas nécessairement en lien avec les données.

M. David Montpetit:

D'accord.

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

Il y a d'autres choses. Nous avons limité nos réflexions aux mesures du service et du rendement. Aux États-Unis, il y a beaucoup plus de données d'ordre financier disponibles qu'au Canada. Nous avons des renseignements sur ce genre de choses.

La présidente:

Monsieur Blaney. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Bonjour. Je suis de passage au Comité.

Une chose m'a frappé dans les commentaires de M. Pellerin. On avait un bon projet de loi, c'est-à-dire le projet de loi C-30 présenté par les conservateurs, notamment pour ce que vous appelez l'interconnexion. Là, on arrive avec un ramassis libéral qui va avoir des conséquences sur les petites entreprises et menacer des emplois.[Traduction]

Ma première question s'adresse à Mme Stuhldreier. J'espère avoir correctement prononcé son nom.

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

C'était très bien.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Vous avez souligné que le projet de loi libéral aurait des répercussions négatives sur le Québec en ce qui a trait aux exemptions dans les corridors. Pouvez-vous expliquer un peu plus en détail la situation?

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

Je n'ai pas apporté mon atlas des chemins de fer, j'aurais dû. Dans le nord du Québec, il y a quelques lignes de chemin de fer où, pour quitter la ligne afin de se rendre à divers endroits, le trafic doit passer dans un corridor exclu en vertu des dispositions relatives à l'interconnexion de longue distance. Les lignes du CN se raccordant au réseau principal du CN, ou à d'autres transporteurs dans les régions de Montréal et de Québec, sont les seules lignes où il existe un point de correspondance. Certaines régions du Québec peuvent se raccorder à Rouyn-Noranda ou à Val-d'Or, mais il existe des lignes importantes dans le nord du Québec qui n'ont pas cette option. Véritablement, le seul endroit où les expéditeurs peuvent avoir accès à un second transporteur est par l'entremise du corridor. L'interconnexion de longue distance, telle qu'elle est rédigée, ne fonctionne pas.

M. David Montpetit:

Cela ressemble beaucoup à la situation en Colombie-Britannique.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Y a-t-il une façon de corriger ce problème ou d'amender le projet de loi?

M. David Montpetit:

Il faudrait que vous supprimiez ces exemptions.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Devrions-nous recommander de supprimer les exemptions?

Mme Lucia Stuhldreier:

Pour régler le problème précis lié aux points de correspondance dans ces corridors, vous pourriez simplement supprimer la mention des points de correspondance dans la description de ces corridors.

M. David Montpetit:

Cela la rendrait plus appropriée, possiblement.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci.

Monsieur Pellerin, vous représentez les petites entreprises. Vous travaillez avec des petites et moyennes entreprises. Dans votre exposé, vous avez dit que les mécanismes prévus dans le projet de loi auraient des incidences défavorables sur ces entreprises.

Pourriez-vous nous en dire davantage sur le sujet? C'est un peu inquiétant lorsque vous déclarez que cela pourrait même ruiner certains de vos membres.

M. Perry Pellerin:

En fait, le thème du jour, et ce, depuis le début, c'est la concurrence. Pour au moins 12 des 14 chemins de fer sur courtes distances, ces mécanismes réduiraient la concurrence. Essentiellement, ils feraient en sorte que nos clients auraient plus de difficultés à soutenir la concurrence, et cela mettrait les chemins de fer sur courtes distances dans une situation très précaire.

Comme je l'ai souligné à plusieurs reprises, notre problème n'est pas notre capacité de fonctionner. Nous devons nous attaquer à notre capacité d'accroître les volumes. De concert avec nos clients, nous devons être concurrentiels.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Croyez-vous que ce projet de loi vous aidera à accroître vos volumes?

M. Perry Pellerin:

Non. Le libellé actuel, si on le considère du strict point de vue des chemins de fer sur courtes distances, ne prévoit rien qui puisse nous aider.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

C'est décevant. Ce gouvernement prétend vouloir créer des emplois pour la classe moyenne. Vous vous présentez devant nous, et déclarez que cela réduira la concurrence, augmentera les émissions de gaz à effet de serre et nuira à l'économie.

Pouvons-nous corriger cette situation d'une quelconque façon à l'heure actuelle?

(1505)

M. Perry Pellerin:

Je crois que nous devons revenir en arrière et examiner...

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Le projet de loi C-30, le projet de loi conservateur.

M. Perry Pellerin:

Il y avait quelques problèmes. Nous sommes également venus ici à quelques reprises pour en discuter. Il n'était pas parfait.

Ce que nous tentons de faire comprendre en nous présentant devant vous, c'est que le projet de loi ne nous aide en rien. Nous sommes venus plusieurs fois à Ottawa pour demander de l'aide. Nous nous trouvons dans une situation très difficile. Nous avons besoin d'un coup de main, et le projet de loi ne nous est d'aucun secours. Nous devons poursuivre les discussions si nous voulons soutenir les chemins de fer sur courtes distances et nos clients qui les utilisent.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Si vous avez des amendements à suggérer, remettez-les-nous, et nous allons faire notre possible. Certes, nous ne sommes pas majoritaires, mais nous ferons de notre mieux pour vous aider.

M. Perry Pellerin:

Merci, monsieur.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

J'ai terminé.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Je vais poursuivre sur la lancée de la personne qui a dit que nous devions continuer la discussion.

Ma question est très claire. Nous sommes en présence d'un projet de loi omnibus qui va dans tous les sens. J'imagine que la charte des passagers ne vous intéresse pas tellement, sauf sur le plan personnel, à titre de consommateur. Nous pourrions aussi parler de cabotage, mais on comprend bien que ce n'est pas non plus votre sujet de prédilection.

Pour ce qui est des dispositions qui vous préoccupent particulièrement, j'aimerais savoir si, à votre avis, le projet de loi C-49 chemine trop vite ou de façon vraiment trop imprécise pour fournir une solution viable à vos problèmes. Je peux formuler la question autrement. Pourriez-vous trouver acceptable le projet de loi C-49 si quelques amendements y étaient apportés, ou considérez-vous qu'il y a loin de la coupe aux lèvres? [Traduction]

M. David Montpetit:

Je voudrais seulement parler au nom de la WCSC.

Nous avons suggéré quelques amendements pour moduler le libellé du projet de loi. À partir du projet de loi en l'état, si les propositions d'améliorations que nous avons faites étaient retenues par le gouvernement et adoptées, nous pourrions améliorer ce texte.

M. Perry Pellerin:

Nous devons faire la part des choses, car on y retrouve quelques éléments positifs pour nos clients qui se trouvent loin des chemins de fer sur courtes distances.

On a mentionné plus tôt qu'il y a des inquiétudes même cette année, car le projet de loi n'est pas adopté, et nous avons le sentiment que rien ne bouge. Nous voulons faire attention de ne pas embourber le processus. Nous disons simplement que, du point de vue des chemins de fer sur courtes distances, il n'y a rien dans le projet de loi qui nous aide à survivre. Nous devons remédier à cette situation. Pouvons-nous le faire? Et cela doit-il faire partie de ce projet de loi? Je ne crois pas.

Je crois que nous devons reconnaître le fait que je ne veux pas que quiconque au sein du gouvernement croit que le projet de loi aide les chemins de fer sur courtes distances. Cela est certain. Peu importe que nous le fassions hors du cadre de ce projet de loi ou dans le cadre de celui-ci, nous sommes prêts à le faire d'une façon ou de l'autre, mais quelque chose doit être fait pour nous aider.

M. Kevin Auch:

Alberta Wheat est membre du Groupe de travail sur la logistique des récoltes. Nous avons fait quelques recommandations visant à améliorer le projet de loi. Je crois que si elles sont acceptées, cela fonctionnerait très bien. Le projet de loi contient de bonnes dispositions, comme je l'ai souligné plus tôt, et avec quelques légères modifications comme celles-ci, je crois qu'il pourrait être très viable et rétablirait l'équilibre au sein du système.

Nous avons deux monopoles qui oeuvrent dans le secteur du transport ferroviaire. Je comprends pourquoi nous ne pouvons pas avoir de multiples chemins de fer. Il s'agit d'un grand investissement en infrastructures. Ce que nous recherchons, c'est un moyen de nous rapprocher d'un système concurrentiel. Je crois que ce projet de loi s'engage dans cette voie.

La présidente:

Il reste quelques minutes. Est-ce que des membres ont des questions supplémentaires, ou souhaitez vous faire un autre tour de questions? Nous n'avons pas suffisamment de temps pour un autre tour.

Madame Block, est-ce que vous avez une question?

Monsieur Blaney?

M. Badawey a une question.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je voudrais tout d'abord faire remarquer que la session de la semaine dernière a été apolitique. Mais, aujourd'hui, cela a changé, ce qui me donne l'occasion de réagir. Je tiens à faire trois observations sur les commentaires de M. Blaney.

Si, en fait, le projet de loi C-30 était une bonne mesure législative, alors pourquoi le gouvernement précédent a-t-il également ajouté la disposition de temporisation? Seconde observation: pourquoi avons-nous entendu les témoins critiquer haut et fort l'interconnexion de longue distance au cours de l'étude portant sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grain? Et, finalement, pourquoi le gouvernement précédent a-t-il également décidé de charger David Emerson de revoir le système et proposé des solutions à long terme comme on a vues dans le projet de loi C-30?

Je suis désolé, mais je devais remettre les pendules à l'heure.

(1510)

La présidente:

Quelle est votre question?

M. Vance Badawey:

Ma question est, madame la présidente, ce que je viens de dire.

Mme Kelly Block:

Voulez-vous que nous répondions?

M. Vance Badawey:

Ce n'est pas moi qui ai commencé.

La présidente:

Je surveille l'horloge de près.

M. Vance Badawey:

Pour revenir au dialogue constructif que nous avions, j'aimerais beaucoup, monsieur Pellerin, entendre votre opinion. Une fois de plus, la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici est que, en toute franchise, nous voulons parvenir à un équilibre. Nous voulons garantir que l'équilibre — même si nous avons beaucoup entendu parler des difficultés des chemins de fer principaux, des transporteurs ferroviaires de catégorie 1. Je suis d'accord avec certains d'entre eux, mais en désaccord avec la plupart de ces derniers.

Votre situation comble ce vide. Elle comble le vide pour les personnes les plus importantes, les personnes qui sont notre priorité: les clients, et, bien sûr, elle constitue une plus-value pour les Canadiens.

Je vais poser la même question que M. Blaney a posée, soit que pouvons-nous modifier dans ce projet de loi? Comment pouvons-nous améliorer le projet de loi C-49 et le rendre plus propice pour vous afin que vous puissiez faire partie du rendement ultime que nous avons globalement en ce qui concerne notre économie, qui est de rendre notre système de transport plus solide, système dont vous faites partie?

M. Perry Pellerin:

Un aspect que nous n'avons pas soulevé aujourd'hui est le fait que les chemins de fer sur courtes distances n'ont pas certaines des possibilités offertes aux expéditeurs en vertu de la LTC. J'ai eu à convaincre un de nos expéditeurs de s'occuper de ce dossier. Ils ne sont pas toujours ravis de le faire en notre nom. Un bon départ pourrait être d'offrir aux chemins de fer les mêmes possibilités et moyens en vertu de la LTC. Je crois que la LTC régit très bien le système et serait en mesure de nous aider rapidement à certains égards, notamment sur des problèmes tels que ceux liés au service.

Nous offrons à nos clients le transport avec des transporteurs de catégorie 1, et ils restent là pendant 10 jours. Ce n'est pas correct, et nous devons régler ce problème. Nous devons avoir nous-mêmes cette possibilité. Ce serait un bon départ.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci.

La présidente:

Je remercie à nouveau nos témoins. Chacun de ces groupes a énormément d'informations précieuses. C'est incroyable. Nous connaîtrons le projet de loi C-49 sous toutes ses coutures d'ici à ce qu'on le renvoie à la Chambre.

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons suspendre la séance le temps que le prochain groupe prenne place à la table.

(1510)

(1530)

La présidente:

Bien, nous reprenons la séance.

Nous avons plusieurs représentants avec nous. Je leur demanderais de se présenter ainsi que l'organisation qu'ils représentent.

Monsieur Audet, voudriez-vous commencer s'il vous plaît? Veuillez vous présenter. [Français]

M. Béland Audet (président, Institut en Culture Sécurité Industrielle Mégantic):

Je m'appelle Béland Audet et je suis président de l'Institut en Culture Sécurité Industrielle Mégantic, l'ICSIM. Il s'agit d'un organisme que nous avons créé à la suite de la tragédie de 2013. Nous voulons consacrer cet organisme à la formation des premiers répondants en matière de sécurité ferroviaire ainsi qu'à l'instauration d'une culture de la sécurité au sein des compagnies de chemin de fer, plus particulièrement les chemins de fer d'intérêt local. En effet, ceux-ci ne bénéficient pas de formation sur la culture de la sécurité. Nous voulons également mettre sur pied un volet sur la culture de la sécurité destiné au grand public à Lac-Mégantic. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Souhaitez-vous poursuivre? Vous avez 10 minutes, monsieur Audet. Lac-Mégantic nous intéresse au plus haut point, car c'est le seul endroit où s'est rendu le Comité depuis le début de ses réunions. Nous connaissons votre organisation ainsi que ses souhaits. Nous sommes ravis de vous avoir avec nous aujourd'hui.

Si vous le souhaitez, allez-y et parlez de l'initiative. [Français]

M. Béland Audet:

Comme je le disais plus tôt, nous avons créé cet organisme à la suite de la tragédie de 2013. Ce sont des gens d'affaires locaux qui ont décidé de prendre la situation en main et de tenter de faire ressortir quelque chose de positif de cette tragédie. Nous nous sommes donc associés à des partenaires tels que l'Université de Sherbrooke, le Cégep Beauce-Appalaches, qui est situé dans notre région, et la Commission scolaire des Hauts-Cantons. Ce partenariat va nous permettre de travailler avec des gens se situant à trois différents niveaux d'enseignement. La compagnie de chemin de fer CN et Desjardins comptent également parmi nos partenaires.

Comme vous le savez, il n'y a qu'un seul centre de formation destiné aux premiers répondants au Canada et il s'agit du Justice Institute of British Columbia, le JIBC. Cet institut est situé à Vancouver, plus précisément à Maple Ridge, et offre des services en anglais seulement. Nous voulons créer un centre de formation du même type à Lac-Mégantic, dans l'Est du Canada, et offrir ces services aux francophones ainsi qu'aux anglophones de notre territoire. En effet, comme le Canada est très vaste, il est fort coûteux pour les Québécois, les Ontariens et les gens des provinces de l'Est d'aller suivre de la formation dans l'Ouest, par exemple à Vancouver. À la suite de la tragédie, nous avons ressenti la volonté de créer un centre de ce type à Lac-Mégantic.

Comme vous le disiez plus tôt, madame la présidente, certains membres du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités sont venus à Lac-Mégantic en juin 2016. L'une des recommandations du Comité était que Transports Canada se joigne à la Ville de Lac-Mégantic pour créer ce centre de formation. Nous sommes ici aujourd'hui pour en parler de nouveau et pour attirer l'attention sur ce projet.

Ce que nous demandons, c'est que Transports Canada uniformise et rende obligatoire la formation des chefs de train et que celle-ci soit dispensée par des organisations accréditées. Nous demandons également que Transports Canada uniformise et rende obligatoire une formation portant précisément sur les risques ferroviaires à l'intention des premiers répondants des localités traversées par une voie ferrée. Comme on le sait, 1 200 villes au Canada sont traversées par un chemin de fer. Or, ces gens ne reçoivent pas la formation nécessaire en matière ferroviaire. C'est donc à cela que nous travaillons.

Nous vous avons fait parvenir un mémoire. Je ne sais pas si tout le monde en a pris connaissance, mais nous pourrons répondre à vos questions concernant ce document.

(1535)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Malheureusement, la greffière n'a pas reçu le mémoire. Pourriez-vous le renvoyer s'il vous plaît afin que le comité ait l'information? [Français]

M. Béland Audet:

Très bien, je m'occupe de vous envoyer de nouveau ce document. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Johnston.

M. Brad Johnston (directeur général, Logistique et planification, Teck Resources Limited):

Merci beaucoup.

Bon après-midi à vous, madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les membres du comité permanent, madame la greffière et madame et messieurs les témoins.

Je m'appelle Brad Johnston. Je suis le directeur général de la logistique et de la planification de Teck Ressources. Aujourd'hui, je suis accompagné de ma collègue Alexa Young, responsable des relations avec le gouvernement fédéral.

Je vous remercie de nous permettre de présenter l'opinion de Teck au sujet du projet de loi C-49. Teck est une entreprise exploitante de ressources diversifiée et fièrement canadienne. Nous comptons plus de 7 000 employés partout au pays. Teck est le principal utilisateur du réseau ferroviaire canadien, et ses exportations vers l'Asie et d'autres marchés représentent près de 5 milliards de dollars par année. Il est donc très important pour nous que le projet de loi favorise un service de transport ferroviaire transparent, équitable et sécuritaire qui répond aux besoins des utilisateurs et des Canadiens.

Tout au long du processus de consultation qui a mené à l'élaboration du projet de loi, Teck s'est efforcée de proposer des solutions équilibrées aux problèmes importants liés au service ferroviaire qui touchent régulièrement tous les secteurs. Les problèmes qui touchent le service ferroviaire depuis longtemps nuisent à notre compétitivité, à la viabilité économique à long terme de notre chaîne d'approvisionnement nationale, ainsi qu'à la réputation du Canada en tant que nation commerçante. À titre d'exemple, au cours des 10 dernières années, les coûts directs engagés par Teck en raison d'interruptions du service ferroviaire ont représenté de 50 à 200 millions de dollars sur des périodes de 18 mois. Ce sont des coûts, bien entendu, que nos compétiteurs internationaux n'ont pas à payer. Essentiellement, nous croyons que la solution est une législation qui favorise les relations commerciales dans un marché sans concurrence, tout en permettant aux chemins de fer de demeurer rentables et souples sur le plan opérationnel. Cette solution profiterait aux chemins de fer, aux expéditeurs et à tous les Canadiens.

Notre solution repose principalement sur le besoin de mettre sur pied une base de données précise, accessible et complète pour le transport ferroviaire de marchandises. Nous avons également proposé une définition d'un service convenable qui tient compte du monopole dans lequel nous oeuvrons. Teck a également présenté ce qui constitue, selon nous, la seule solution viable à long terme au grand déséquilibre de la relation expéditeur-compagnie de chemin de fer, et ce, afin d'introduire une réelle concurrence au sein du marché du transport ferroviaire de marchandises du Canada en accordant les droits de circulation à tous, y compris les expéditeurs.

Qu'entendons-nous par « droits de circulation »? Comme dans le secteur des télécommunications au Canada, nous voulons voir une vraie concurrence au sein du secteur ferroviaire. Autrement dit, nous proposons une solution qui permettrait à de nouveaux joueurs qui répondent aux critères de gérer un chemin de fer. Nous sommes déçus que l'introduction d’une réelle concurrence ne soit pas prévue dans le projet de loi C-49, encore plus que dans le cadre des examens législatifs antérieurs, mais nous sommes satisfaits de la vision audacieuse d'un grand nombre de dispositions, notamment: les nouvelles exigences redditionnelles pour les compagnies de chemin de fer en ce qui a trait aux tarifs, au service et au rendement; une nouvelle définition de service ferroviaire convenable; des recours plus accessibles pour les expéditeurs relativement aux tarifs et aux services et l'interdiction faite aux compagnies de chemin de fer de transférer unilatéralement la responsabilité aux expéditeurs par l'établissement des tarifs.

Nous croyons également que le projet de loi C-49 réussit à répondre aux besoins de tous les intervenants, y compris les expéditeurs et les compagnies de chemin de fer. Par contre, pour que le projet de loi atteigne son but et qu'un équilibre soit atteint, nous croyons que des modifications mineures doivent être apportées. Les modifications que nous proposons visent à résoudre les problèmes de conception qui auront des conséquences non voulues ou qui ne correspondent simplement pas aux buts du projet de loi. Nos amendements proposés visent également à tenir compte de la réalité selon laquelle, en raison des contraintes associées au fait de dépendre d’un seul chemin de fer pour tous les déplacements de notre charbon destiné aux aciéries et des limites géographiques, certains éléments clés du projet de loi C-49, dont l'objectif est de rééquilibrer la relation expéditeur-compagnie de chemin de fer, ne s'appliqueront pas à certains expéditeurs, dont Teck. À titre d'exemple, les dispositions relatives à l'interconnexion de longue distance n'aideront aucunement nos cinq mines de charbon destiné aux aciéries du sud-est de la Colombie-Britannique, car cette région, et de nombreuses autres, ne sont tout simplement pas visées par ces dispositions. De plus, nos recommandations tiennent compte de l'expérience que possède Teck des processus prévus par la loi.

Quant à la transparence, le projet de loi C-49 donne de solides munitions pour combler les lacunes au chapitre des données sur le niveau de service qui minent actuellement notre système national de transport ferroviaire et qui font en sorte que les décisions commerciales et stratégiques ne sont pas assez éclairées. Cependant, nous croyons que certaines dispositions relatives à la transparence n'atteignent pas l'objectif qui consiste à rendre accessibles les données pertinentes sur le rendement de la chaîne d'approvisionnement. Nous sommes particulièrement préoccupés par le mécanisme de communication des données énoncé au paragraphe 77(2).

(1540)



Le modèle américain sur lequel le projet de loi est fondé présente des lacunes et ne fournit pas le niveau de fiabilité, de précision et de transparence requis dans le contexte canadien. Tout d’abord, le modèle américain ne repose que sur une partie des données internes des compagnies de chemin de fer, et il n'est pas exact ni complet en ce qui a trait aux expéditions.

De plus, le modèle américain a été élaboré à un moment où la technologie ne permettait pas le stockage et la transmission de grandes quantités de données. En 2017, nous avons les capacités voulues en matière de stockage de données, et une telle restriction n'est plus nécessaire relativement au système des feuilles de route pour l'interconnexion de longue distance énoncé à l'article 76 ni au système relatif au rendement du service dont il est question à l'article 77. Soulignons que les compagnies de chemin de fer recueillent déjà ces données.

Afin que l'on puisse s'assurer que les rapports relatifs au transport ferroviaire des marchandises contiennent des données suffisamment détaillées en ce qui a trait au niveau de service et qu'ils tiennent compte de la réalité canadienne, nous recommandons un amendement qui garantira que les compagnies de chemin de fer fourniront toutes les feuilles de route plutôt que de limiter les obligations en matière de rapports à ce qui est prévu au paragraphe 77(2).

En ce qui a trait à la capacité de l'Office de recueillir des données sur le calcul des frais ferroviaires et de les traiter, nous croyons que le projet de loi renforcera considérablement la capacité de l’Office des transports du Canada de le faire. Ainsi, ses décisions quant au calcul des frais feront en sorte que les tarifs facturés aux expéditeurs seront justes et justifiables. Cela est primordial pour maintenir l'intégrité de l'arbitrage sur la dernière offre, qui constitue le recours pour les expéditeurs contre les compagnies de chemin de fer et leur pouvoir de marché. Cependant, vu le libellé actuel, nous craignons que les expéditeurs n'aient pas accès au calcul des frais ferroviaires, ce qui va à l'encontre de l'un des objectifs du recours.

Dans le cadre du modèle d'arbitrage actuel sur la dernière offre, les arbitres demandent à l'Office une décision quant au calcul des frais seulement si la compagnie de chemin de fer et l'expéditeur acceptent que la demande soit faite. Nous avons cependant remarqué que les compagnies de chemin de fer refusent habituellement de collaborer avec les expéditeurs et s'opposent à la demande. Le projet de loi C-49 doit limiter la capacité d'une compagnie de chemin de fer de refuser ce type de demande. Pour assurer le niveau de transparence et d'accessibilité adéquat afin que les recours prévus soient pertinents, nous recommandons que les expéditeurs aient également accès à une décision de l'Office quant au calcul des frais qui découlent de ce processus.

Quant au niveau de service, nous craignons que le libellé du projet de loi C-49 quant à savoir si une compagnie de chemin de fer a respecté ses obligations en matière de service ne tienne pas compte du déséquilibre entre les compagnies de chemin de fer et les expéditeurs, vu le monopole qui existe au Canada. Le paragraphe 116(1.2) du projet de loi C-49 obligerait l'Office à déterminer si une compagnie de chemin de fer s'acquitte de ses obligations en matière de service en tenant compte des besoins et des contraintes de l'expéditeur et de la compagnie de chemin de fer en matière d’exploitation. Le libellé est le même en ce qui a trait aux arbitrages portant sur le niveau de service. Le libellé ne reflète pas la réalité, car pour ce qui est du service qu'une compagnie de chemin de fer peut offrir à ses clients, c’est à la compagnie de chemin de fer de déterminer les ressources à fournir. Ces décisions comprennent l'achat d'actifs, l'embauche de main-d'oeuvre et la construction d'infrastructures, ce qui peut entraîner une ou plusieurs contraintes.

Puisque ces contraintes ne sont déterminées que par le transporteur ferroviaire, il n'est pas approprié qu'elles deviennent un facteur déterminant dans une décision de l'Office. Par conséquent, nous recommandons de supprimer la disposition ou de prévoir l'examen des contraintes.

En guise de conclusion, comme le démontre l'échec des examens législatifs antérieurs touchant le transport ferroviaire de marchandises, malgré de bonnes intentions, la bonne conception des lois est essentielle pour que l'on puisse obtenir les résultats souhaités. Moyennant quelques modifications mineures, le projet de loi permettra de délivrer le Canada du statu quo qui a entraîné des interruptions du service de transport ferroviaire de marchandises à répétitions et mené à une multitude de solutions de fortune qui ont fait des gagnants et des perdants dans toutes les industries au fil des ans.

Encore une fois, en tant que plus grand utilisateur du réseau ferroviaire au Canada, nous croyons que nous avons maintenant l'occasion d'être audacieux et de construire une nouvelle législation du transport ferroviaire de marchandises de renommée mondiale pour le Canada, qui profitera aux expéditeurs, aux compagnies de chemin de fer et à tous les Canadiens. Je vous remercie, et j'ai bien hâte de répondre à vos questions.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Ballantyne, de l'Association canadienne de gestion du fret.

M. Robert Ballantyne (président, Association canadienne de gestion du fret):

Merci de l'occasion de comparaître devant vous.

Depuis 1916, l'AGF représente les intérêts de l'industrie canadienne en matière de fret ferroviaire, routier, maritime et aérien auprès de divers paliers de gouvernement et organismes internationaux. Nous en sommes dans notre 101e année et, malgré les apparences, je n'étais pas à la première assemblée.

Dans notre témoignage d'aujourd'hui, nous nous attacherons principalement aux modifications du projet de loi C-49 aux articles de la Loi sur les transports du Canada qui concernent les expéditeurs ferroviaires, et nous dirons aussi un mot des modifications proposées à la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire et à la Loi sur le cabotage.

Le Canada compte une cinquantaine de chemins de fer, mais l'industrie du fret ferroviaire est dominée par deux transporteurs de catégorie 1, qui pèsent environ 90 % des recettes du fret ferroviaire canadien. Le problème fondamental est qu'il n'y a pas de concurrence efficace dans les chemins de fer, et que les obstacles à l'entrée sont si grands que la situation ne saurait être rectifiée par les seules forces du marché.

Le mieux que l'on puisse faire, donc, c'est d'instaurer un régime juridique et réglementaire qui remplacera une concurrence réelle et rééquilibrera le pouvoir de négociation entre les acheteurs et les vendeurs sur le marché du fret.

Certes, il y a une concurrence limitée entre le CN et le CP dans quelques marchés, essentiellement intermodaux, mais pour de nombreux expéditeurs, le marché ferroviaire est un double monopole plutôt que même un duopole; c'est-à-dire que le CN ou le CP est le seul chemin de fer possible pour les expéditeurs à bien des endroits. Il faut noter que le problème n'est pas que dans l'Ouest canadien. Je tiens à le souligner. Le problème n'est pas que dans l'Ouest canadien; il existe dans l'Est également, y compris dans l'axe Québec-Windsor. Le fret ferroviaire n'est pas un marché concurrentiel normal, comme le reconnaît la législation ferroviaire au Canada depuis 100 ans.

Lors du dépôt du projet de loi C-49, le ministre a dit qu'il vise les objectifs suivants: Le gouvernement du Canada... a déposé aujourd'hui un projet de loi visant à améliorer l'expérience des voyageurs et à mettre en place un système de fret ferroviaire transparent, équitable, efficient et plus sécuritaire pour faciliter le commerce et la croissance économique.

Le projet de loi C-49 renferme diverses dispositions qui contribueront à l'atteinte de cet objectif. Dans son examen du projet de loi, l'AGF a analysé les changements proposés et les résultats que les expéditeurs en tireront dans la pratique lorsqu'ils voudront en tirer parti. Nos recommandations visent les parties du projet de loi où notre expérience indique que les dispositions, telles qu'elles sont formulées, ne permettront pas d'atteindre les objectifs que s'est fixés le gouvernement.

Mon collègue, M. Hume, présentera les 10 recommandations que nous proposons au sujet des dispositions concernant les expéditeurs et commentera la politique qui sous-tend le projet de loi C-49.

Je devrais mentionner que M. Hume a travaillé aux Contentieux du CN et du CP, et que, ces 23 dernières années, il a mis sur pied une pratique pour représenter les expéditeurs non seulement devant l'Office des transports du Canada, en tirant parti de toutes les dispositions de la loi qui sont actuellement en place, mais aussi devant les tribunaux, jusqu'à la Cour suprême du Canada inclusivement. Il a des perceptions importantes qui lui sont en quelque sorte propres, en ce sens qu'il est une des rares personnes à avoir eu recours à ces dispositions au cours de sa carrière.

À la fin des remarques de M. Hume, s'il nous reste du temps, madame la présidente, nous commenterons très brièvement les changements proposés à la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire et à la Loi sur le cabotage.

Forrest.

(1545)

M. Forrest Hume (conseiller juridique, et associé, DLA Piper (Canada) S.E.N.C.R.L., Association canadienne de gestion du fret):

Merci, Bob.

Les recommandations que nous faisons sur les dispositions applicables aux expéditeurs sont résumées dans notre mémoire à partir de la page 25. Comme M. Ballantyne l'a indiqué, les recommandations de l'AGF visent à donner effet aux objectifs de la Loi sur la modernisation des transports tels que nous les voyons.

Nos recommandations concernent les changements proposés aux dispositions relatives au niveau de service; le projet de création d'un remède pour l'interconnexion de longue distance; la nécessité d'accroître les pouvoirs de l'Office en matière d'interconnexion; le dégagement d'un financement suffisant pour l'Office et l'octroi du pouvoir d'agir de sa propre initiative, et par requête ex parte s'il y a lieu, pour s'autoriser à partager avec les expéditeurs — et je dis bien « avec les expéditeurs » — l'information fournie par les chemins de fer sur les coûts et les prix raisonnables; la clarification du changement proposé obligeant à déposer une liste de lieux de correspondance; et les changements proposés à l'arbitrage des ententes sur le niveau de service et les modifications à la procédure sommaire pour l'arbitrage sur l'offre finale (AOF).

Après la remise de notre mémoire au Comité, nous avons reçu un exemplaire d'une FAQ de Transports Canada intitulée « Des corridors de commerce aux marchés mondiaux », qui dégage des perceptions sur les enjeux que vise le projet de loi C-49. Malheureusement, le document renferme plusieurs idées fausses qu'il faut corriger.

Ainsi, à la page 11, on peut lire que divers facteurs contribuent à la compétitivité du prix de l'ILD. Cependant, le projet de loi renferme une disposition qui bloque cette compétitivité. Ainsi, le nouveau paragraphe 135(2) interdit à l'Office d'établir le prix plus bas que la moyenne des recettes par tonne-kilomètre pour un transport comparable qui est effectué par le transporteur local. Cela signifie que le prix sera nécessairement non concurrentiel par rapport aux autres recettes pour le transport comparable qui sont inférieures à la moyenne.

Le document précise à plusieurs endroits que les dispositions ILD donnent à l'Office le pouvoir discrétionnaire de définir quel transport est comparable. Ce faisant, par contre, l'Office est restreint dans l'établissement d'un prix concurrentiel par application du paragraphe 135(2).

Notre recommandation pour corriger le problème est double. En premier lieu, il faut préciser au paragraphe 135(2) que l'Office n'établit pas de prix qui est supérieur — et non pas inférieur — à la moyenne par tonne-kilomètre pour un transport comparable qu'effectue le transporteur local.

En second lieu, il faut amender l'article pour obliger l'Office à établir le prix en se fondant sur les prix consentis aux expéditeurs qui ont accès à deux ou plusieurs chemins de fer au point d'origine. S'il n'y a pas de prix concurrentiel, c'est-à-dire de prix qui donne accès à deux ou plusieurs chemins de fer à l'origine, l'Office devrait être tenu de fixer le prix en régie intéressée. Ainsi, les prix seraient établis à partir de prix concurrentiels, plutôt que d'un menu de prix sur un marché captif. Je reviendrai plus loin sur la « régie intéressée », car je crois savoir que c'est un enjeu qui peut prêter à controverse pour vous.

À la page 11, la FAQ mentionne de nombreuses exclusions ILD dans le projet de loi, et les justifie en citant des problèmes possibles de congestion et la difficulté d'imputer la responsabilité pour certaines matières dangereuses. En toute déférence, madame la présidente, et membres du Comité, ces craintes sont sans fondement aucun.

(1550)



Pourquoi le remède ILD, un remède concurrentiel, devrait-il être hors de la portée de grands groupes d'expéditeurs? Pourquoi devrait-il être discriminatoire à l'endroit des expéditeurs à cause du point d'origine ou du type des marchandises expédiées? Comment tout cela s'aligne-t-il sur notre politique nationale des transports?

Dans un sommaire de nos exclusions, à la page 12, la FAQ renvoie les expéditeurs exclus à d'autres remèdes puisque l'accès à l'ILD leur est refusé. Voilà qui n'est pas rassurant et qui est loin de témoigner de l'efficacité du remède. Nous recommandons d'éliminer les exclusions pour l'ILD.

À la page 7, la FAQ énonce que l'interconnexion étendue a démontré que les chemins de fer peuvent soutenir et soutiennent effectivement la concurrence pour le transport dans les divers réseaux des transporteurs, ce qui donne de la marge de négociation aux expéditeurs. On s'attend de même que l'ILD stimule ce genre de concurrence.

Cependant, la comparaison entre l'interconnexion étendue et l'ILD ne se prête pas à la comparaison. Le prix de l'interconnexion étendue...

La présidente:

Désolée de vous interrompre, mais le Comité a une foule de questions, et chaque membre ne dispose que de 10 minutes. Je suis sûre que les précieux renseignements que vous avez entre les mains nous seront transmis dans les réponses aux questions que nombre de membres auront à poser. Nous devons passer aux questions, en commençant par Mme Block.

(1555)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à remercier tous nos témoins de leur présence. La journée, déjà longue, est loin d'être finie, mais je vous suis certainement reconnaissante de tout ce que nous avons entendu aujourd'hui.

C'est à vous, monsieur Johnston, et à vous, madame Young, que je poserai d'abord certaines questions au sujet de votre exposé. J'ai pris connaissance du document que vous avez distribué. Vous dites dans votre conclusion que le plan approprié du projet de loi C-49 aidera le Canada à s'éloigner d'un statu quo qui a été la cause d'échecs constants du service ferroviaire, qui a entaché la réputation du Canada dans le monde comme pays de commerce, qui est à l'origine de la prolifération de politiques palliatives ne reposant pas sur des éléments probants, et qui a fait des gagnants et des perdants entre les industries au fil des ans.

Je ne sais pas trop si vous avez dit que le projet de loi C-49 traduit une vision audacieuse. Je veux vous donner l'occasion de parler peut-être de certains passages du projet de loi C-49 où vous voyez cette vision audacieuse. De même, je voudrais vous entendre commenter la création des axes dans le projet de loi C-49. Je ne sais pas trop si c'est ce dont vous parliez lorsque vous avez mentionné les cinq régions qui n'allaient pas pouvoir accéder à l'interconnexion de longue distance ou qui n'allaient pas pouvoir utiliser ces remèdes. Je me demande si vous pourriez parler de cela également.

M. Brad Johnston:

Je prenais des notes pendant votre question, car vous avez soulevé bien des points. Si j'en oublie, rappelez-les-moi.

Mme Kelly Block:

Oui bien sûr.

M. Brad Johnston:

Tout d'abord, je parlerai de l'exclusion parce que vous en avez fait mention. Teck est le deuxième exportateur mondial de charbon sidérurgique. Notre principal concurrent est en Australie. Nous avons des clients dans le monde entier, soit en Chine, en Asie, en Amérique du Nord et du Sud, et en Europe. Essentiellement, les exclusions géographiques pour l'interconnexion de longue distance priveront nos cinq mines de charbon sidérurgique dans le sud-est de la Colombie-Britannique de la possibilité d'utiliser ce remède. Selon la version actuelle du projet de loi, cela ne sera même pas une option pour nous.

De fait, nous sommes d'avis que cela servira à nous rendre davantage captif du transporteur, qui, dans le cas qui nous occupe, se trouve être le CP, pour ces mines. Les exportations sont d'environ 28 millions de tonnes par an. J'ai dit que nous sommes le premier utilisateur des chemins de fer au pays, comme entreprise, pas pour les marchandises, mais comme entreprise.

Donc, oui, l'interconnexion de longue distance dans le projet de loi ne sera pas un remède pour nous. Nous continuerons de recourir à des choses comme l'arbitrage sur l'offre finale.

Cela répond-il à cette partie de la question?

Mme Kelly Block:

Oui, en effet. Merci.

M. Brad Johnston:

Nous serions d'avis, je suppose, que les décideurs ou les utilisateurs actuels tentent de mener leurs différentes activités dans un vide d'information. C'est essentiellement parce qu'il n'existe tout simplement pas de système cohérent ou rationnel de mesure du transport des marchandises au Canada — comme le système de feuilles de route.

La transition vers un régime de données est un élément de cette vision, et nous applaudissons à cette mesure, convaincus que nous allons dans la bonne direction, mais, avec la formulation actuelle, nous n'y sommes pas encore tout à fait. Quant à certains changements simples à la loi, il est très facile de voir à ce que toutes les données soient prises en compte. Étant moi-même un peu maniaque des données, je dirai que nous voulons les voir. Nous voulons voir les données brutes, pas les données agrégées.

Au sujet de l'article 76, qui concerne les données sur l'interconnexion de longue distance, nous craignons que, si nous copions le système américain, les chemins de fer ne fourniront pas toutes les données. Elles sont toutes recueillies par les chemins de fer, qui ne les communiquent cependant pas. C'est ce que nous disent nos spécialistes qui exercent également aux États-Unis. Cela serait un problème. Rien ne sert de recueillir les données si nous ne les avons pas toutes. Cela serait très probablement la cause d'évaluations ou de conclusions imparfaites, qu'elles s'expliquent par des pannes de service ou par un sous-investissement en infrastructure.

À l'article 77 sur les indicateurs de rendement, si nous voulons mesurer le rendement du système ferroviaire à l'aide de données, nous devons examiner toutes les données là aussi. J'ai parlé des feuilles de route. Il n'en est pas question à l'article 77, mais ce système, c'est essentiellement un enregistrement. C'est un système de consignation du transport d'une marchandise d'une origine donnée vers une destination donnée. C'est un moyen très facile de documenter le transport des marchandises dans notre système. Les deux chemins de fer de catégorie 1 le font aux États-Unis. Ils peuvent le faire au Canada.

Je suis désolé. Votre question était longue et...

(1600)

La présidente:

Je sais, et j'essayais de vous laisser tout le temps possible...

M. Brad Johnston:

Oui. Merci.

La présidente:

... pour donner la réponse que cherchait Mme Block.

M. Brad Johnston:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'espère avoir répondu.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Graham. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur Audet, je vous remercie d'avoir pris le temps de venir nous rencontrer.

Comme vous avez plus d'expérience que les autres en ce qui a trait aux questions de sécurité ferroviaire touchant votre région, j'aimerais que vous nous parliez du projet de création d'un centre de formation spécialisé en sécurité ferroviaire. On n'entend pas souvent parler d'une telle chose.

M. Béland Audet:

Il n'existe pas de formation en matière de sécurité ferroviaire ou de culture de la sécurité.

Les compagnies ferroviaires nationales, soit le CN et le CP, offrent de la formation sur la sécurité, notamment aux opérateurs, mais cette formation n'est pas reconnue d'une compagnie à l'autre. Autrement dit, un employé du CN qui va travailler au CP doit recommencer sa formation.

Les chemins de fer d'intérêt local, pour leur part, n'offrent aucune formation. Ce sont souvent des retraités du CN ou du CP qui donnent de la formation.

Il n'existe absolument aucune formation commune, qu'il s'agisse des opérations ou de la culture en sécurité. On parle de culture en sécurité ferroviaire depuis l'accident de 2013, mais auparavant, il n'en était pas question dans l'industrie en général. Cela dit, je pense que c'est un point très important.

Dans le projet de loi, on ne parle que des enregistreurs audio-vidéo. C'est une technologie intéressante, mais il reste que c'est un moyen qu'on utilise après qu'une tragédie est survenue. Or, que fait-on pour ne plus qu'il y ait de tragédies? Nous voulons que plus personne ne vive une catastrophe comme celle que nous avons vécue à Lac-Mégantic.

Nous désirons travailler de concert avec Transports Canada et le gouvernement canadien pour améliorer cet aspect de la formation, qui est très important.

Le deuxième aspect que nous touchons est la formation des premiers répondants. Dans l'Est du Canada, ceux-ci ne reçoivent aucune formation en matière de sécurité ferroviaire. Toutes les villes ne peuvent pas se permettre d'envoyer leurs premiers répondants suivre de la formation à Vancouver ou à Pueblo, aux États-Unis. Il faut donc créer un centre pour les francophones, un centre bilingue, dans l'Est du Canada. À mon avis, c'est très important. On ne dit rien dans le projet de loi sur une telle formation. Il n'est question que des enregistreurs audio-vidéo.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À Lac-Mégantic même, y a-t-il une nouvelle manière de former les pompiers et les premiers répondants régionaux pour les chemins de fer?

M. Béland Audet:

Nous avons organisé une formation avec les gens de TRANSCAER, qui sont venus à Lac-Mégantic pour donner de la formation aux gens de la région. En fait, des gens du Nouveau-Brunswick, de la Nouvelle-Écosse, de Montréal et de Québec sont aussi venus suivre cette formation sur le domaine ferroviaire. L'événement s'est échelonné sur une fin de semaine. Il y a eu une journée de formation de huit heures, mais cela ne constituait qu'un survol. Il faudrait aller plus en profondeur.

Comme je le disais dans ma présentation, au Canada, 1 200 villes sont traversées par un chemin de fer, mais il n'y a pas de formation dans le domaine ferroviaire. Il est donc très urgent qu'il y ait quelque chose à ce chapitre. Or, depuis les événements de Lac-Mégantic, rien n'indique que le gouvernement canadien veuille aller dans ce sens.

(1605)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous remercie d'être venu nous parler de cela.[Traduction]

Je passe maintenant à Teck et à M. Johnston.

J'ai trouvé intéressants vos commentaires au sujet des droits de circulation universels. Le concept est intéressant. L'infrastructure et les opérations ferroviaires seraient distinctes. Comment cela pourrait-il fonctionner, selon vous? Si l'infrastructure était privatisée, y aurait-il un risque, pour les petites lignes, que personne ne veuille exploiter une ligne qui ne lui appartient pas?

J'aimerais bien voir ce que vous en pensez. Vous aviez exprimé l'avis qu'il serait possible d'accroître la concurrence en généralisant beaucoup plus les droits de circulation. La théorie me plaît, mais j'aimerais voir comment cela fonctionnerait concrètement.

M. Brad Johnston:

Le meilleur exemple serait peut-être notre concurrence en Australie, où il y a ce qu'on appelle un régime de fret dit « above-rail » et « below-rail ». Permettre à plus d'un transporteur d'utiliser les voies ferrées, cela se fait dans le monde entier.

Il y a un mois, j'étais en Pologne pour visiter nos clients en Europe de l'Est. En Pologne, ce régime existe. Je crois qu'il y a jusqu'à cinq transporteurs sur le réseau ferroviaire là-bas. Comment cela fonctionnerait-il? J'imagine que cela ressemblerait beaucoup au trafic aérien, avec centralisation du contrôle du trafic ferroviaire et un grand nombre des transporteurs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous enlevez l'infrastructure aux entreprises privées pour créer un réseau national. Vous ne parlez pas des droits de circulation sur une voie du CN pour faire ce que vous dites; vous parlez d'un changement de toute la nature de l'infrastructure, qui est un changement de paradigme très considérable.

M. Brad Johnston:

Je ne vois pas les choses du même oeil. Pour nous, cela répond à une question qui s'est posée jadis: qu'arrive-t-il lorsque le transporteur soit est incapable soit refuse de transporter nos marchandises? Pour nous, transporter 25 millions de tonnes par année, c'est un gros problème. Que faire? Est-ce bien important? Bien sûr. Pour un nouveau venu, il y aurait de très grands obstacles au niveau de choses comme la capacité opérationnelle, la sécurité et l'assurance. Néanmoins, cela se fait de façon très efficiente et sécuritaire dans différents secteurs de compétence, y compris en Australie. Si une entreprise comme Teck n'arrive pas à envoyer ses produits sur le marché, cela pourrait devenir un remède.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Johnston.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais d'abord m'adresser à M. Ballantyne.

Dans vos propos préliminaires, vous avez attiré mon attention sur un sujet dont vous n'avez pas eu le temps de parler, soit le cabotage. Je serais prêt à vous accorder deux minutes de mes six minutes de temps de parole pour que vous nous résumiez votre position. Après, j'aurai probablement une ou deux questions à vous poser là-dessus. [Traduction]

M. Robert Ballantyne:

Merci beaucoup.

Voici ce que je voulais dire. Dans notre mémoire officiel, nous avons dit que nous appuyons les changements proposés à la Loi sur le cabotage selon le projet de loi C-49. Ces changements donnent effet à une exigence de l'Accord économique et commercial global entre le Canada et l'Union européenne. Il s'agit d'un élément relativement mineur pour l'amélioration de l'efficience de la chaîne d'approvisionnement mondiale, mais telle est l'exigence pour les importateurs et les exportateurs canadiens utilisant des conteneurs. C'est-à-dire qu'il est proposé de permettre à des navires immatriculés à l'étranger de transporter des conteneurs vides entre ports canadiens. Si les conteneurs étaient vidés à Halifax, le transporteur étranger pourrait les amener à Montréal, par exemple.

Nous sommes d'accord. Cela améliorera un petit peu les chaînes d'approvisionnement mondiales pour les expéditeurs canadiens, et pour les importateurs également. Il y a une complication dans le cas des grandes alliances de transport, où trois ou quatre lignes de navigation se regroupent pour faire alliance. Nous croyons que la réglementation devrait donner la garantie que cette disposition pourra être utilisée dans toute l'alliance, de manière que les sociétés expéditrices membres de l'alliance puissent s'en prévaloir.

(1610)

[Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci beaucoup de ce résumé.

J'en arrive à ma question.

Je comprends qu'il vaut mieux faire un tronçon avec des conteneurs vides qu'avec un bateau complètement vide. En contrepartie, comme vous l'avez si bien dit, cette proposition dans le cadre de l'accord avec l'Union européenne ne donne pas la possibilité aux navires canadiens de faire la même chose et de battre pavillon canadien en territoire européen.

Cela est-il une source d'irritation, selon vous? [Traduction]

M. Robert Ballantyne:

Non, de fait, je n'ai pas lu l'AECG, ou je ne l'ai pas mémorisé. Si je me rappelle bien, c'est réciproque, en ce sens que les navires canadiens auraient le même privilège en Europe. Par contre, les lignes maritimes au niveau international sont soit très peu nombreuses, soit complètement inexistantes. Je pense que c'est réciproque dans l'accord, mais dans la pratique, cela serait utilisé surtout au Canada.

Je suis d'accord. Pour moi, c'est une bonne chose. L'utilisation de ces conteneurs est une bonne chose pour les exportateurs canadiens et pour les importateurs canadiens. Cela ne concerne véritablement que le transport de conteneurs vides entre ports canadiens par des navires étrangers. Pour moi, c'est bien. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Je ne veux pas vous contredire, mais je devrai vérifier mes sources, parce que j'avais compris que la situation réciproque n'existait pas. Selon ce que je comprends de vos propos, ce serait acceptable dans la mesure où il y aurait cette réciprocité. [Traduction]

M. Robert Ballantyne:

Oui, en effet. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

J'ai une question qui s'adresse à M. Audet.

Tout d'abord, nous venons de recevoir vos documents. Je vous remercie. Nous allons les lire avec attention.

À la lumière de votre tragique expérience, comment expliquez-vous le retard du Canada en matière de sécurité ferroviaire? Je dirais que le projet de loi C-49 est à peu près muet sur cette question, alors qu'il est censé être le projet de loi qui nous lancera jusqu'en 2030. En effet, on parle abondamment des enregistreurs audio-vidéo, qui peuvent permettre au BST de tirer de meilleures conclusions après l'incident. Toutefois, il faut plutôt mettre en oeuvre des mesures préventives. Là-dessus, je partage tout à fait votre opinion.

L'absence d'un tel règlement sur la sécurité ou la sûreté va-t-elle à l'encontre de normes internationales, à votre connaissance?

M. Béland Audet:

À ma connaissance, non.

Aux États-Unis, il y a ce qu'on appelle le Positive Train Control, dont j'ignore l'appellation en français.

M. Robert Aubin:

Peu importe.

M. Béland Audet:

Nous avons examiné cette technologie et le genre de rapports qu'elle permet de faire. C'est vraiment merveilleux. Bien sûr, le coût de ce système implanté aux États-Unis est gigantesque. Quoi qu'il en soit, 60 % des locomotives du CN ont ce système, puisqu'elles roulent aux États-Unis. Elles doivent donc avoir de tels systèmes, qui sont vraiment formidables sur le plan de la sécurité. Cela constitue un grand pas vers l'avant.

Quand on parle d'enregistreurs audio-vidéo, je fais un parallèle entre ceux-ci et les enregistreurs Beta de l'époque. Si on vendait cela dans les magasins aujourd'hui, on passerait à côté de l'objectif, qui est ici d'augmenter la sécurité.

C'est un peu ce que je pense.

M. Robert Aubin:

Vous avez parlé abondamment de l'importance de la formation des premiers répondants, et je suis tout à fait d'accord avec vous à ce sujet. Ma préoccupation ne porte pas sur le fait qu'il faille donner cette formation, mais sur le fait que les municipalités ne connaissent pas, au moment où les convois de train traversent leurs rues, la teneur des produits dangereux qu'ils contiennent.

Comment les premiers répondants pourront-ils réagir efficacement si le projet de loi C-49 ne contient pas de mesures permettant aux municipalités de savoir quels produits sont transportés sur leur territoire?

M. Béland Audet:

Il y a une nouvelle application, AskRail, qui permet d'obtenir toutes ces informations, mais c'est sûr que ce n'est pas aligné sur le projet de loi qui vient d'être déposé. Pour sa part, le Positive Train Control fournit ce genre d'information très rapidement.

(1615)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Sean Fraser:

Excellent.

Je voudrais d'abord remercier M. Aubin d'avoir posé la première question que je destinais à mon témoin et de m'avoir fait économiser deux minutes de ma vie. Je peux donc poursuivre avec la Loi sur le cabotage.

Une chose qui m'intrigue et qui serait selon vous plus efficiente — et je suis d'accord avec vous — est la possibilité que des navires européens transportent des conteneurs vides. Cela m'apparaît assez évident. Aujourd'hui, les transporteurs maritimes transportent-ils des conteneurs vides? Je crois savoir que le gros des conteneurs vides est acheminé par camion jusqu'aux nouveaux ports.

M. Robert Ballantyne:

Vous avez probablement raison. Cette disposition figure dans l'accord AECG. Je soupçonne que c'est peut-être ce que voulaient les Européens, mais je n'en suis pas certain.

À l'heure actuelle, selon la Loi sur le cabotage, les transports entre ports canadiens doivent être assurés par des navires canadiens. Essentiellement, les sociétés maritimes canadiennes sont grandes, soit dans le cabotage, soit sur les Grands Lacs et dans la Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent. La Société maritime CSL et Algoma, et certaines autres sont les plus évidentes.

M. Sean Fraser:

Pourrais-je intervenir un moment. Réciprocité ou pas, l'augmentation d'efficience ne coûte probablement pas très cher aux entreprises canadiennes si la plupart des conteneurs vides ne sont pas expédiés par navire de toute façon.

M. Robert Ballantyne:

C'est juste. La disposition est relativement mineure et m'a paru logique. Je dis aujourd'hui que des centaines de nos sociétés membres sont en faveur.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je pourrais peut-être passer à Teck. Vous avez dit que cinq de vos installations de production de charbon sidérurgique n'auront pas accès à cause de l'exclusion de l'axe en Colombie-Britannique. Selon ce que je comprends — et vous pourriez peut-être me corriger si je me trompe, et M. Ballantyne y a fait allusion lui aussi — c'est que les deux axes exclus avaient un certain niveau de concurrence que le reste du pays n'avait pas. Cela justifie la création d'un mécanisme quelconque. Les prix du fret au Canada et aux États-Unis étaient un peu mieux, mais ils sont à peu près comparables. Je suis curieux de savoir comment les prix de vos concurrents aux États-Unis, par exemple, ou de sociétés de même taille, se comparent avec les prix que vous obtenez des fournisseurs de service ferroviaire au Canada.

M. Brad Johnston:

Les prix que mes concurrents paient aux États-Unis sont variables; et certains sont plus bas, d'autres plus hauts.

M. Sean Fraser:

Vos réponses précédentes m'ont laissé la nette impression que vous n'estimez pas la concurrence suffisante, mais je crois comprendre, de notre échange, que vous êtes en milieu de peloton de ce que pourraient offrir vos concurrents si elle existait intégralement. N'est-ce pas exact?

M. Brad Johnston:

Je ne vois trop ce que vous voulez dire par votre question. Je dirai tout simplement que nos cinq mines de charbon sidérurgique du sud-est de la Colombie-Britannique sont toutes captives d'un même fournisseur de service ferroviaire. Elles sont captives pour une proportion importante de leur production qu'elles acheminent jusqu'à Vancouver. Il n'y a pas de concurrence pour ces mines au point d'origine, et il y a une concurrence limitée pour une partie du transport par l'axe du fleuve Fraser. À notre avis, ces mines sont totalement captives du fournisseur de service ferroviaire et elles n'ont pas de concurrence. Certains des éléments que nous avons soulevés dans notre mémoire, et notamment la fourniture de données, ou l'amélioration du calcul des coûts, ou encore l'accès à ce calcul en vertu de l'AOF, selon nous, nous aideront à faire contrepoids à l'absence de réalité concurrentielle dans laquelle nous opérons.

M. Sean Fraser:

Ma perspective est un peu éclairée par le fait que je représente une région qui compte surtout des exploitants plus petits que les vôtres. Je veux dire que, à la table des négociations, vous n'êtes pas des empotés; vous savez ce que vous faites. J'ai le sentiment que votre capacité de négocier, avec votre unique fournisseur de services, est grosso modo... Je ne pense pas que l'absence de concurrence ait le même effet sur vous qu'il pourrait avoir sur les petites sociétés dans les régions captives.

Suis-je dans le champ?

(1620)

M. Brad Johnston:

En homme d'expérience de la négociation avec les chemins de fer, indépendamment du fait que je suis chez Teck, je dirais que cela présente des défis. C'est pourquoi nous avons utilisé les remèdes prévus par la loi, comme tous les autres. À certains égards, la taille de notre entreprise ne procure pas tout l'avantage que vous pourriez imaginer. Nous avons dû utiliser des procédures comme l'AOF prévues par la loi. Il est très important d'avoir un remède très solide, parce que nous l'avons utilisé par le passé et qu'il reste très possible que nous le réutilisions.

M. Sean Fraser:

Permettez-moi de revenir au genre de questions de mon collègue, M. Graham.

Il y a une chose que je ne suis pas sûr de bien comprendre, mais qui m'a fasciné. Elle concerne les droits de circulation et les circonstances dans lesquelles un transporteur est incapable ou refuse de transporter votre produit.

Voulez-vous dire que vous pourriez presque exploiter les chemins de fer comme des autoroutes publiques? Subaru et Honda et Chrysler n'ont pas tous leurs propres autoroutes pour leurs voitures.

Voulez-vous dire que l'infrastructure actuelle qui est propriété privée devrait adopter un modèle public selon lequel différents exploitants pourraient offrir leurs services?

M. Brad Johnston:

Non, je ne propose rien de tout cela. Mais il reste que l'Amérique du Nord a littéralement des centaines d'accords de droits de circulation en place aujourd'hui. Les chemins de fer empruntent les voies ferrées de leurs concurrents partout en Amérique du Nord et au Canada. La zone de circulation directionnelle dans le canyon du Fraser en est un excellent exemple. C'est cela un accord de droits de circulation. Cela existe.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Fraser.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je voudrais poursuivre avec les droits de circulation pendant quelques instants, dans le contexte de ce qu'on a décrit comme un problème de congestion dans l'axe Kamloops-Vancouver et de ce qu'on nous a présenté comme l'une des raisons pour lesquelles l'ILD n'a pas été envisagée.

M. Hume s'est présenté à moi un peu plus tôt.

Il me semble, monsieur, que vous avez une certaine expérience de la négociation des droits de circulation dans cet axe pour West Coast Express, n'est-ce pas?

M. Forrest Hume:

Il s'agissait en fait de la ligne reliant Waterfront à Mission.

M. Ken Hardie:

Cette ligne fait tout de même partie de...

M. Forrest Hume:

Oui, mais ce n'en est qu'une petite partie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Bien entendu. Pouvez-vous néanmoins revenir sur cette expérience? Envisagez-vous d'ouvrir cette ligne à l'interconnexion de longue distance, c'est-à-dire à l'ILD?

M. Forrest Hume:

À mon avis, rien ne justifie l'exclusion des expéditeurs de cette ligne ou de la ligne Québec-Windsor. Il y a le long de ces lignes des expéditeurs en mal d'avantages concurrentiels; ils pourraient profiter de cette solution. Selon ce que le ministre envisage, il s'agit bien d'un avantage concurrentiel. Je suis d'avis que l'on devrait modifier le texte pour préserver la dimension concurrentielle et pour que les expéditeurs qui ont besoin de cette solution puissent y avoir accès.

M. Ken Hardie:

Ainsi, selon vous, l'argument selon lequel ces lignes sont engorgées manque de substance. C'est bien cela?

M. Forrest Hume:

Selon moi, le problème des sociétés de chemin de fer n'est pas la congestion, mais bien plutôt les baisses de revenus. Pour les expéditeurs, l'incursion des sociétés de chemin de fer américaines en territoire canadien constitue une forme de concurrence. Les sociétés de chemin de fer canadiennes peuvent conserver le trafic ferroviaire; elles n'ont qu'à réduire leurs prix et à offrir un service concurrentiel. La solution réside dans la concurrence. Pour les sociétés de chemin de fer canadiennes, c'est la concurrence qui primera, si tant est qu'elles en décident ainsi lorsque la solution de l'ILD aura été intégrée aux négociations.

M. Ken Hardie:

Si l'on se fie aux expériences passées, l'ancien système d'interconnexion a montré que les sociétés pouvaient réduire leurs prix, puisque les transporteurs américains ne leur prenaient pas un si grand nombre de clients.

M. Forrest Hume:

À ce propos, monsieur Hardie, si l'on me permet...

(1625)

M. Ken Hardie:

Le temps file et je tiens absolument à poser à M. Ballantyne la question suivante: qui devrait être désigné comme expéditeur? Par exemple, les exploitants de chemins de fer d'intérêt local ont indiqué il y a peu de temps avoir du mal à transférer les wagons sur les lignes principales. Est-ce que le système ne serait pas plus efficace si l'exploitant de la ligne de courte distance ou l'utilisateur du wagon de producteur était considéré comme un expéditeur, avec les droits que cela suppose?

M. Robert Ballantyne:

Je répondrai simplement par l'affirmative. La définition de ce qu'est un expéditeur devrait être assez large. On considère normalement que le véritable expéditeur est le propriétaire bénéficiaire de la cargaison, mais il pourrait aussi s'agir d'un commissionnaire. Il me semblerait logique que les sociétés ferroviaires de courte distance bénéficient de tels droits.

Je trouve très judicieuse la remarque de M. Pellerin selon laquelle les sociétés de lignes de courte distance devraient être habilitées à porter plainte auprès de l'Office tout comme le font les expéditeurs lorsque le service pose problème, par exemple. La définition s'en trouverait donc élargie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Monsieur Johnston, je vous adresserai la même question que j'ai déjà posée à d'autres experts. Pouvez-vous me dire ce qui, selon vous, fait qu'un service est adéquat et convenable?

Je vous prie de répondre de manière mesurée et juste. Je reconnais les vertus d'un intérêt personnel bien placé, mais tout le monde doit faire de l'argent et chacun doit y trouver son compte. Comment faire en sorte que tout le monde retire des avantages de la situation?

M. Brad Johnston:

C'est une excellente question. J'aborderai l'enjeu du service adéquat du point de vue qui est le mien, c'est-à-dire en tant qu'expéditeur. Les sociétés de chemin de fer peuvent faire des profits d'une multitude de façons: en négociant une attente avec un expéditeur comme moi, par exemple, ou en imposant un tarif.

Selon moi, un service est « adéquat et convenable » lorsque les produits se rendent à destination. Il ne s'agit pas de savoir si les marchandises seront transportées, mais bien à quel moment elles le seront. On ne peut pas se demander si le transport aura lieu; il doit avoir lieu. Ainsi, l'obligation de base du transporteur rejoint la notion de service adéquat et convenable. Les sociétés de chemin de fer ont l'obligation de transporter nos marchandises. On ne peut débattre de cette question. On doit plutôt se demander quand cela aura lieu.

M. Ken Hardie:

Comment définir le moment opportun, alors?

La présidente:

Monsieur Hardie, votre temps est de nouveau écoulé.

Monsieur Shields.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vous laisse conclure votre réponse.

M. Brad Johnston:

C'est déjà fait, je crois. Ai-je oublié quelque chose?

M. Martin Shields:

Oui. Il était question du « quand ».

M. Brad Johnston:

La question du « quand » relève autant de la société de chemin de fer que de l'expéditeur. Nous ne croyons pas que les obligations de base du transporteur et la notion de service adéquat et convenable signifient que l'on doive s'attendre à obtenir ce que l'on veut dès qu'on le demande. En revanche, si le calendrier de planification ou de prestation de services ne convient pas du tout à l'expéditeur, on ne peut dire que le transporteur respecte ses obligations de base.

M. Martin Shields:

Vous alliez parler des pertes que le CFCP et le CN pourraient accuser au profit du marché américain en raison de l'ILD. Vous aviez commencé à formuler une réponse ayant trait à la concurrence américaine.

M. Forrest Hume:

Je tiens à souligner que pendant la période d'application de la zone d'interconnexion agrandie, soit de 2014 à 2017, les sociétés de chemin de fer ont enregistré des profits records et ont été à même d'injecter beaucoup de capitaux dans leurs infrastructures. En clair, on ne peut pas parler de coup dur. Je trouve aberrante l'idée selon laquelle les dispositions fondées sur les coûts et l'intervention réglementaire nuiraient à la capacité des sociétés de chemin de fer de faire de l'argent et d'investir dans les infrastructures.

(1630)

M. Martin Shields:

[Note de la rédaction: inaudible] indicateurs, selon vous. Merci.

Je reviens à M. Johnston, de Teck Resources. Monsieur, vous avez parlé d'amendements que vous aimeriez voir adopter. Vous avez aussi parlé de transparence, de détermination des coûts et de définition du service. Selon vous, il s'agit là d'amendements qui conviendraient à cette mesure législative.

M. Brad Johnston:

En effet.

M. Martin Shields:

Pourriez-vous nous en dire davantage sur ces trois aspects? Vous pouvez aussi en choisir un seul que vous jugeriez plus important.

M. Brad Johnston:

Oui. Nous accordons beaucoup d'importance aux données. Nous essayons ardemment d'améliorer notre chaîne d'approvisionnement en nous fondant sur des faits. L'absence d'un système de cet ordre au Canada en ce moment représente un obstacle pour les expéditeurs, les sociétés de chemin de fer et les décideurs. En l'absence de données, il est difficile d'adopter une loi ou d'investir dans les infrastructures. Quelqu'un a même parlé de congestion. Selon nous, on doit évaluer des données pour en venir à une telle conclusion. On ne peut pas simplement énoncer cela sans présenter de preuves.

Les données nous permettront justement d'étayer nos propos. Si nous disposons de données pertinentes, nous serons à même de prendre de très bonnes décisions conformes au bon sens. C'est pourquoi, dans nos recommandations au sujet du projet de loi, nous nous étendons sur la question des données et sur les mesures à prendre pour améliorer cela et pour que tout le monde — les expéditeurs, les sociétés de chemin de fer et les décideurs — comprenne parfaitement bien le fonctionnement de notre chaîne d'approvisionnement.

M. Martin Shields:

Vous êtes un fournisseur majeur d'acier ou de charbon. À ce titre, croyez-vous que le fait de vous mettre d'accord sur des données serait à votre avantage ou encore à l'avantage des deux parties afin d'assurer une livraison dans les temps?

M. Brad Johnston:

Absolument. On peut même penser que cela rendrait possible le progrès vers une chaîne d'approvisionnement d'envergure internationale. Si tout le monde avait une compréhension très nette des faits, ce serait tout à fait possible.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci.

La présidente:

Il vous reste une minute.

M. Martin Shields:

Monsieur, vous aviez 10 recommandations. Vous en avez formulé quelques-unes. Y en a-t-il une en particulier qui vous semble particulièrement importante?

M. Forrest Hume:

Notre recommandation au sujet des changements proposés aux dispositions portant sur le niveau de service est importante. Nous ne croyons pas que ces dispositions devraient faire l'objet d'une clarification.

Au cours des trois dernières années, plusieurs différends ont été portés devant l'OTC et la Cour d'appel fédérale. Ces dossiers ont jeté une nouvelle lumière sur l'affaire Patchett de 1959 — un dossier précurseur — et sur la procédure d'évaluation de l'OTC en cas de plaintes liées au niveau de service. Il n'est plus nécessaire d'apporter de nouvelles clarifications. À vrai dire, l'obligation de prendre en compte certains facteurs ouvrira la porte à des différends et des appels qui s'éterniseront au point de compromettre la finalité de la décision de l'OTC. J'ai des dossiers de niveau de service qui traînent en longueur depuis deux ou trois ans et la décision des tribunaux se fait toujours attendre.

M. Martin Shields:

C'est un grand gaspillage de temps et d'argent.

M. Forrest Hume:

En effet.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci.

Merci, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Badawey, c'est à vous.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais vous donner l'occasion d'envisager les choses de manière créative. Le ministre a une vision de ce que sera le transport dans 30 ans, dans 23 ans. Il a formulé sa stratégie des transports de 2030. Ce projet de loi est l'occasion pour nous d'essayer d'établir un équilibre et, partant, d'obtenir un gain en retour. Je pense en particulier aux futurs investissements qui contribueront à la stratégie des transports globale.

Cela dit, il est essentiel de gérer le risque et de créer une plus-value. À vous qui êtes des représentants d'entreprise, des expéditeurs, des prestataires de services, je vous demande de répondre à la question suivante en envisageant votre contribution à des stratégies économiques, environnementales et sociales: à votre avis, comment pouvons-nous utiliser le projet de loi C-49 pour contribuer à la stratégie de transport globale? Aussi, en quoi cela vous aidera-t-il à devenir des catalyseurs de croissance à l'échelle mondiale, afin que nous améliorions notre rendement sur la scène internationale?

(1635)

M. Robert Ballantyne:

Grand Dieu.

M. Brad Johnston:

M. Hume prendra la parole si vous...

M. Robert Ballantyne:

Oui, allez-y.

M. Brad Johnston:

J'aimerais répondre à cette question. Je vais simplement mettre de l'ordre dans mes idées. C'est toute une question.

Enfin, allez-y, je vous prie, monsieur Hume.

M. Forrest Hume:

Je répondrai en premier si vous me le permettez.

Il faudrait voir à ce que le projet de loi aille dans le même sens que notre politique nationale des transports, laquelle fait la part belle à la concurrence selon la logique des forces du marché. Si nous arrivons à susciter une concurrence entre les deux sociétés de chemin de fer, suivant l'esprit de cette politique, l'avenir sera radieux dans notre pays.

M. Vance Badawey:

Le temps file, messieurs.

M. Brad Johnston:

D'accord.

Il ne fait aucun doute que le Canada est une nation commerçante. Dans le cas qui nous occupe, c'est l'Australie qui est notre principal concurrent. La production des mines de charbon sidérurgique canadiennes n'a presque pas changé en 10 ans, alors qu'en Australie elle a bondi de, disons, 60 %. Je me demande parfois pourquoi. La chaîne d'approvisionnement est l'une des raisons qui expliquent cet état de fait.

À mon avis, une chaîne d'approvisionnement de calibre mondial, comme on dit, devrait présenter différentes caractéristiques, dont une plateforme d'investissement dans les infrastructures. Les participants comprennent bien cela. On devrait mesurer et surveiller les opérations de la chaîne d'approvisionnement en temps réel. Il devrait aussi y avoir une plateforme de planification ainsi que... Bon, tenons-nous-en à ces trois caractéristiques pour l'instant.

Voilà qui donne la mesure du niveau de contrôle des participants sur la chaîne d'approvisionnement. Tout cela est fondé sur les faits, c'est-à-dire sur les données. C'est pourquoi nous consacrons une grande partie de nos suggestions aux données, à l'évaluation du système américain de lettre de transport. C'est l'élément principal de notre réponse.

Au sujet de la question précédente, j'ai parlé de l'importance de l'exactitude des données. En ce moment, nous ne prenons pas de mesure de nos opérations. Ce n'est pas ce que l'on appelle du calibre mondial et il n'y a pas d'amélioration. Si vous travaillez au système de gestion de la qualité, vous devez mesurer ce que vous faites. La publication de ces mesures doit être transparente. Tout le monde doit partager la même compréhension de ce qui se passe. C'est ainsi que les gens gèrent les chaînes d'approvisionnement.

M. Vance Badawey:

Très bien.

Monsieur Ballantyne.

M. Robert Ballantyne:

J'aimerais formuler encore quelques remarques.

Au mois d'avril de l'an dernier, M. Garneau a déclaré ceci: « Je vois les transports au Canada comme un réseau unique et interconnecté qui stimule l’économie canadienne. »

Si l'objectif global est de rendre notre économie aussi concurrentielle que possible à l'échelle internationale, alors tout ce que comprend le projet de loi C-49, tout comme d'autres mesures législatives évidemment, qu'il s'agisse de l'ALENA, de l'AECG ou autres, devrait être orienté vers ce but. Espérons que les différentes dispositions du projet de loi contribueront à l'atteinte de cet objectif.

La notion de système interconnecté soulève certaines contradictions, comme le fait que chaque acteur du système est, de facto, une sorte d'île coupée du monde et ce n'est rien là qu'un enjeu suscité par la logique normale du libre marché. Chaque acteur tente d'obtenir la meilleure position possible pour lui-même. D'une certaine façon, c'est un casse-tête pour M. Garneau, qui aspire à un système interconnecté.

L'un des problèmes de gouvernance auxquels est confronté le gouvernement est le suivant: comment conjuguer, d'une part, le besoin légitime des entreprises privées qui veulent maximiser le retour sur investissement des actionnaires et, d'autre part, la nécessité d'un système qui fonctionne de manière efficace pour l'ensemble de l'économie.

J'espère que le projet de loi pourra contribuer à cela.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Blaney. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci beaucoup.

J'ai bien aimé la question de mon collègue à 40 000 pieds d'altitude, mais malheureusement, l'enfer est pavé de bonnes intentions et le diable est dans les détails.

Ma question s'adresse à M. Hume, mais avant de la formuler, je tiens à souligner qu'il sera important, dans l'examen de ce projet de loi, de tenir compte des excellentes recommandations qui ont été faites. C'est un projet de loi qui va augmenter la paperasse et qui présente des lacunes importantes quant à la collecte des données. De plus, il y a de nombreux commentaires au sujet du système d'interconnexion.

(1640)

[Traduction]

Ma question s'adresse à vous, monsieur Hume. Vous avez été coupé en début d'intervention; j'aimerais vous donner la chance de développer votre pensée.

Vous disiez recommander l'élimination des exclusions dans l'ILD. Pourriez-vous nous en dire davantage? Comment pourrions-nous corriger le tir, disons, afin que le projet de loi atteigne son objectif final, qui est de rendre la chaîne d'approvisionnement des transports canadiens plus efficace?

M. Forrest Hume:

En effet, nous recommandons l'élimination des exclusions. Cela dit, pour que le tarif de l'interconnexion de longue distance soit optimal, on pourrait notamment en rendre l'application automatique. À l'heure actuelle, l'expéditeur doit présenter une requête à l'OTC. Je sais pertinemment ce qui se passe dans ces cas-là. Le différend traîne en longueur. En plus, c'est une procédure coûteuse. On interjette appel. Il faut plusieurs mois, des années parfois, avant que l'expéditeur sache ce qui a été décidé.

Il y a une différence entre l'interconnexion de longue distance et la zone d'interconnexion agrandie; cette dernière était automatique. L'expéditeur n'avait qu'à consulter les règles pour connaître le tarif. L'OTC calculait les tarifs d'une manière juste et raisonnable au point de vue commercial, en prévoyant une contribution modérément plus élevée que les coûts d'exploitation du chemin de fer, et le tout était accepté.

En revanche, la solution de l'ILD n'est pas automatique. Elle provoquera autant de différends, à mon avis, que les tarifs des lignes concurrentes en suscitaient. Je connais cinq affaires liées aux tarifs des lignes concurrentes. L'une d'entre elles s'est rendue en Cour d'appel fédérale. Finalement, les sociétés de chemin de fer ont mis fin à la concurrence, rendant la solution inefficace. Je ne voudrais pas que la même chose se reproduise dans le cas de l'ILD. Le caractère automatique est la clé du bon fonctionnement.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Vous recommandez donc l'agrandissement de la zone d'interconnexion. J'aimerais rappeler à mon collègue que cela se trouvait dans notre projet de loi C-30, mais passons outre le fait qu'il s'agissait d'une mesure proposée par les conservateurs. C'est ce que les gens réclament. C'est ce qui leur serait utile.

Avez-vous d'autres recommandations portant sur des enjeux que le projet de loi devrait, selon vous, aborder?[Français]

Monsieur Audet, vous avez parlé de la sécurité. Bien sûr, il y a les enregistrements qu'on peut écouter après les faits, mais, selon vous, il faut miser sur la formation. Qu'aimeriez-vous voir dans le projet de loi C-49 à ce chapitre?

M. Béland Audet:

Selon nous, c'est clair qu'il faudrait uniformiser et rendre obligatoire la formation des chefs de train, de même que la formation des premiers répondants. Ce sont nos deux recommandations. [Traduction]

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Ma dernière question vous revient, monsieur Johnston. Vous jugez important que l'on recueille les données, mais vous dites que la méthode proposée dans le projet de loi n'est pas la bonne. Quelle modification devrait-on apporter pour gagner en efficacité?

M. Brad Johnston:

En matière de données, il y a bien des aspects du projet de loi que nous apprécions. C'est une nette amélioration par rapport au vide actuel en cette matière. Je ne voudrais pas être mécompris. Néanmoins, ce qui importe, selon moi, c'est que toutes les données soient recueillies, puis remises à l'OTC qui les rassemblera et les publiera. Il doit s'agir d'un ensemble de données complet. Voilà qui ferait l'affaire.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur Audet, j'aimerais reprendre notre conversation qui a été interrompue avec délicatesse et justice par notre présidente.

Vous me parliez du Positive Train Control. Est-ce un système qui existe au Canada ou aux États-Unis?

(1645)

M. Béland Audet:

C'est un système américain. Il a à voir un peu avec la chaîne d'approvisionnement dont vous parliez tout à l'heure, car il donne des informations à cet égard. Ce système permet aussi d'obtenir des informations d'ordre mécanique, par exemple sur les freins et l'entretien. On peut obtenir beaucoup d'informations par l'entremise de ce système.

M. Robert Aubin:

Je n'étais donc pas dans l'erreur quand j'ai dit qu'en ce moment, les municipalités sont incapables de connaître la nature des produits qui traversent leur territoire par les chemins de fer.

M. Béland Audet:

Elles peuvent le savoir avec le système...

M. Robert Aubin:

Après coup.

M. Béland Audet:

Non, les municipalités peuvent le savoir à l'aide de l'application AskRail. Nous n'y avons pas accès, mais les premiers répondants peuvent avoir cette application dans leurs téléphones et savoir exactement ce qu'il y a dans le train. Par contre, c'est lorsque le train passe qu'ils peuvent le savoir.

M. Robert Aubin:

En effet, le temps de réaction commence à ce moment-là. J'imagine qu'il y a un type d'intervention propre à chaque produit transporté.

M. Béland Audet:

C'est exact.

M. Robert Aubin:

C'est donc dire que même l'application ne permet pas de disposer du temps de réaction nécessaire.

M. Béland Audet:

Il reste que, lors d'un accident, on sait ce que contient le train. C'est déjà une excellente source d'information. On sait exactement sur quoi l'intervention va se concentrer. Par contre, il est clair que...

M. Robert Aubin:

Comment se fait-il qu'on ne puisse pas disposer de cette information dès le départ?

M. Béland Audet:

Je ne suis pas sûr de pouvoir vous répondre. Il est possible qu'on puisse obtenir cette information plus tôt. Pour ce qui est du délai lui-même, je ne voudrais pas vous induire en erreur en vous répondant de façon inexacte.

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord.

Au cours des dernières minutes, en écoutant les propos d'une oreille, j'ai tenté de lire en diagonale les documents que vous nous avez distribués. L'institut que vous êtes en train de mettre sur pied ne peut être que bénéfique en matière de sécurité, c'est clair.

Où en est le financement de cet institut? Transports Canada y participe-t-il? Ce dossier est-il encore à l'étude? Est-il probable que les objectifs présentés dans votre document se matérialisent rapidement?

M. Béland Audet:

De notre côté, nous avons obtenu du financement de partenaires privés. Dans ce secteur, nous avons récolté les fonds nécessaires. Par ailleurs, la participation des gouvernements provinciaux est très bonne, mais nous attendons toujours celle du gouvernement fédéral. Depuis pratiquement un an, nous attendons des réponses relativement au financement de ce projet. Nous en sommes toujours à l'étape des discussions avec Transports Canada.

M. Robert Aubin:

Obtenez-vous des réponses plus précises que celles qu'on obtient en général au sujet de la voie de contournement?

M. Béland Audet:

Ah, ah!

Je pense que je n'aurai pas besoin de vous répondre.

M. Robert Aubin:

Je crois en effet que vous m'avez répondu. Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Aubin.

Il nous reste environ 10 minutes. Devrions-nous y aller d'une autre série de questions, en commençant par M. Block? Sinon, quelqu'un a-t-il d'autres questions?

Monsieur Hardie, avez-vous une question? Allez-y.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je voulais revenir à l'enjeu des données, parce qu'il a été soulevé un certain nombre de fois dans des études antérieures ainsi que dans l'étude que nous sommes en train de mener. Un expert de l'un des groupes précédents a parlé de la « granularité » des données. Autrement dit, on se demande quels détails, compris dans les données, pourraient aider les expéditeurs dans leurs négociations avec les sociétés de chemin de fer.

Monsieur Johnston, peut-être souhaitez-vous aborder cette question. On parle de données, mais quel genre de données? Que voudriez-vous savoir, précisément, presque en temps réel?

M. Brad Johnston:

À la toute fin de votre question, vous avez évoqué deux enjeux distincts. D'une part, les données en temps réel; d'autre part, une déclaration de ce qui s'est passé. Était-ce intentionnel?

M. Ken Hardie:

Pour ce que j'en comprends, le besoin en données tient au fait que vous voulez savoir ce que les sociétés de chemin de fer peuvent mettre à votre disposition — matériel roulant, etc. — à des endroits précis à travers le pays et quelle en est l'utilisation. Ainsi, si vous faites appel à un service de chemin de fer, vous saurez à quoi vous attendre, c'est-à-dire ce que l'on peut vous fournir.

C'est ce que j'ai retenu de ce qui a été dit précédemment, non seulement aujourd'hui, mais aussi lors d'études antérieures. Si je me trompe, alors dites-moi, je vous prie, quel genre de données vous serait utile à l'avenir.

M. Brad Johnston:

C'est une excellente question.

Commençons par le temps, en l'occurrence le temps que met un train pour faire le trajet aller-retour entre un point A et un point B. Nous mesurons cela en heures. Cette mesure est hypothétique.

Il y a le temps attribué à une subdivision précise. Quand nous employons le mot « granularité », cela signifie que nous ne mesurons plus les choses selon les moyennes dans l'ensemble du système. Dans le cas qui nous occupe, à savoir le trajet entre le sud-est de la Colombie-Britannique et Vancouver, cela ne nous est pas très utile. Pas du tout, à vrai dire. Nous désirons connaître le temps, la quantité, la disponibilité des locomotives et des wagons pour transporter nos marchandises. Mon Dieu, pourquoi les locomotives? Quelle est la capacité de redondance? Nous ne visons pas la perfection à 100 %, alors nous voulons savoir ce qui est à notre disposition en cas de besoin. Quelle est la capacité contingente en matière de wagons? Certains sont-ils libres? Sont-ils tous utilisés? Nous abordons ces questions dans le détail dans nos recommandations. Il y a le temps attribué à une subdivision précise.

Au sujet de l'enjeu de la congestion tel qu'il se pose à un acteur comme Teck Resources, nous pourrions regrouper les données, mais nous voulons savoir ce qui se déplace dans le couloir où les marchandises sont transportées. Il serait possible de fondre toutes les données de circulation ou de les regrouper selon le type de wagon, la longueur du train, etc. Cependant, quand notre marchandise est combinée à d'autres marchandises, comment les produits réagissent-ils? Voilà ce que nous faisons. Ce qui se produit en janvier peut différer de ce qui se produit en août. Il y a aussi un facteur saisonnier.

Il y a la capacité en main-d'oeuvre. Combien d'employés avez-vous en réserve? Il s'agit de mesurer, de manière très « granulée », la chaîne d'approvisionnement afin de savoir, d'une part, si l'on dispose d'une capacité adéquate — c'est le dénominateur — et, d'autre part, ce qui est transporté — c'est le numérateur.

(1650)

M. Ken Hardie:

On a donné l'exemple des exigences de déclaration auxquelles sont soumises les sociétés de chemin de fer canadiennes aux États-Unis. À votre connaissance, ces exigences sont-elles à la hauteur de vos attentes dans le contexte canadien?

M. Brad Johnston:

Non. La raison principale en est que, dans le système de lettre de transport américain, on ne déclare qu'un échantillon de données et non l'entièreté des déplacements physiques réels. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, vu l'état des capacités et de la transmission des données en 2017, aucune restriction des données n'est nécessaire. Nous pourrions prendre toutes les données des chemins de fer canadiens créées pendant une année et les sauvegarder dans un ordinateur portable acheté chez Best Buy. Le stockage des données est incroyable comparativement à ce qu'il était il y a 30 ans.

En soi, la lettre de transport est une archive acceptable. Elle comprend l'information au sujet des subdivisions, les points d'échange, les codes unifiés des marchandises, les équipements. Or, il faut déclarer tout cela. Il s'agit de les donner à l'OTC, qui ensuite les rassemblera et les publiera.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

La présidente:

Tout le monde est satisfait?

Je remercie les témoins d'être venus nous parler.

Nous allons suspendre la séance jusqu'à 17 h 30, heure à laquelle nous accueillerons le prochain groupe d'experts. J'ai retranché une demi-heure à votre temps de repas afin que nous avancions un peu plus vite.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

La présidente:

Très bien.

(1650)

(1730)

La présidente:

Nous reprenons la séance pour la dernière portion de la journée. Les témoins savent déjà qu'il s'agit de notre deuxième journée complète de témoignages. Il reste encore deux journées. Nous vous souhaitons la bienvenue ce soir pour l'intervention de notre dernier groupe d'experts. Il nous tarde d'entendre vos témoignages.

Nous accueillons d'abord Pulse Canada. Présentez-vous, je vous prie.

M. Greg Northey (directeur, Relations avec l'industrie, Pulse Canada):

Merci, madame la présidente et membres du comité de nous donner l'occasion de discuter du projet de loi C-49 avec vous.

Pulse Canada apprécie l'attention particulière que vous portez à ce projet de loi, ainsi que vos efforts pour accélérer son étude avant la reprise des travaux parlementaires. Nous avons déposé un mémoire à votre attention, et je vais aborder quelques-unes des recommandations qui y figurent.

Pulse Canada est une association sectorielle nationale qui représente plus de 35 000 producteurs et 130 transformateurs et exportateurs de pois, de lentilles, de haricots, de pois chiches et de cultures spéciales telles les graines à canaris, les graines de tournesol et les graines de moutarde. Depuis 1996, la production canadienne des légumineuses à grains et des cultures spéciales a quadruplé, et le Canada est maintenant le plus gros producteur et exportateur de pois et de lentilles au monde, ce qui représente le tiers du commerce mondial. La valeur des exportations de l'industrie a dépassé 4 milliards de dollars en 2016.

Le marché des légumineuses à grains et des céréales spécialisées est très compétitif, et le maintien et la croissance de la part de marché du Canada dans plus de 140 pays desservis par ce secteur d'activité représentent une priorité absolue pour l'industrie. Les cultures de légumineuses à grains et de céréales spécialisées sont les cultures céréalières les plus multimodales de l'Ouest canadien; 40 % des exportations de notre secteur qui transitent par Vancouver sont conteneurisées. La gestion efficace de la logistique de ces chaînes d'approvisionnement stimule la compétitivité de notre secteur. À ce titre, un service ferroviaire prévisible et fiable est essentiel pour assurer cette compétitivité et cette croissance économique.

C'est dans cette optique que Pulse Canada a évalué le projet de loi C-49. Fournira-t-il un service amélioré, une meilleure capacité ferroviaire et des tarifs marchandises compétitifs aux expéditeurs de petite et de moyenne taille qui constituent la grande partie du secteur des légumineuses à grains et des cultures spécialisées? Pulse Canada estime que le projet de loi C-49 a le potentiel de produire ces résultats, mais nous aimerions proposer certaines recommandations afin de nous assurer que le projet de loi fournisse les résultats escomptés par le gouvernement, qu'il réponde aux besoins des expéditeurs, ainsi qu'aux attentes de l'ensemble de l'économie canadienne.

Une concurrence accrue est le moyen le plus efficace de fournir de meilleures capacités de service et des tarifs améliorés, et c'est dans ce contexte que le régime de tarifs du trafic d'interconnexion de longue distance proposé présente les meilleures possibilités. Les forces concurrentielles à l'origine de l'élargissement du principe d'interconnexion offert au marché ferroviaire et découlant du projet de loi C-30, ont directement profité aux expéditeurs de légumineuses à grains et de cultures spécialisées, et le secteur souhaiterait que le trafic d'interconnexion de longue distance entraîne les mêmes résultats.

Vous avez aujourd'hui pris connaissance de recommandations importantes et détaillées sur la façon d'améliorer le LIH. Je voudrais simplement insister sur un point: exclure l'accès à cette disposition à de grands groupes d'expéditeurs ou limiter l'accès d'un expéditeur au concurrent ferroviaire le plus proche alors que le concurrent suivant peut peut-être offrir la meilleure combinaison de services, de prix et d'acheminent, diminue considérablement l'effet potentiel de cette disposition. Pour que le LIH fonctionne comme prévu, en laissant prévaloir les forces du marché et la concurrence — un point sur lequel les expéditeurs et les sociétés ferroviaires s'entendent — cela ne devrait pas être artificiellement limité à partir d'une liste d'exclusions qui réduit de vastes possibilités économiques. Ces exclusions devraient être supprimées pour permettre aux expéditeurs et aux compagnies ferroviaires de fonctionner avec le LIH dans un environnement aussi compétitif que possible. Les expéditeurs, les compagnies ferroviaires et l'économie canadienne en retireraient d'énormes avantages. Le retrait de ces exclusions contribuerait également à réduire les différences d'interprétations et d'intentions, ainsi que les problèmes juridiques éventuels qui nuiraient aux décisions liées à cette solution pour les années à venir.

Je vais maintenant me concentrer sur les dispositions du projet de loi qui vise à accroître la transparence de la chaîne d'approvisionnement. La création d'un environnement concurrentiel avec des relations commerciales équilibrées nécessite un réseau de transport ferroviaire de marchandises transparent, afin que toutes les parties prenantes puissent prendre des décisions commerciales fondées sur des informations claires et en temps opportun. Pour y parvenir, le projet de loi propose deux nouvelles réglementations significatives en matière de données et une disposition transitoire qui exigerait que les réseaux ferroviaires fournissent des données sur les services et les performances en fonction du modèle utilisé par la United States Surface Transportation Board. C'est un bon début. Cependant, le projet de loi C-49 prévoit que suite à la sanction royale, une année complète s'écoulera avant que ces données ne soient disponibles sur le marché. Lorsque les données deviennent disponibles, le projet de loi permet un décalage de trois semaines entre la collecte de ces données et leur publication.

Dans le cas des États-Unis, les compagnies ferroviaires et l'organisme de réglementation ont commencé à publier ces données dans les trois mois qui ont suivi leur demande, et elles étaient rendues publiques une semaine après leur remise par des compagnies ferroviaires aux responsables de la réglementation. Grâce aux efforts concertés des expéditeurs, des gouvernements et des compagnies ferroviaires, ainsi qu'à un amendement au projet de loi C-49, Pulse Canada croit que le Canada peut au minimum égaler les échéanciers établis aux États-Unis et respecter l'intention du projet de loi C-49 de fournir des données opportunes au marché commercial.

Comme recommandé en décembre par le comité dans votre rapport concernant le projet de loi C-30, le projet de loi C-49 a présenté une nouvelle exigence importante afin que les compagnies ferroviaires fournissent des renseignements confidentiels, commerciaux et exclusifs à l'Office des transports du Canada.

(1735)



Comme vous l'avez constaté, ces données sont importantes, car elles permettraient à l'office d'évaluer plus efficacement les problèmes liés au réseau ferroviaire, puis d'enquêter, et d'exercer son autorité pour émettre des ordonnances aux compagnies ferroviaires. Hier, Scott Streiner a considéré ce point comme étant une question importante et Pulse Canada partage également cette opinion. Cependant, le projet de loi C-49 limite l'utilisation de ces données en précisant explicitement qu'elles ne peuvent être utilisées que par l'Office pour calculer les taux d'interconnexion longue distance. Le fait d'exiger ces données des compagnies ferroviaires, mais en réduisant l'étendue de leur application, limite considérablement l'effet de cette nouvelle disposition réglementaire et ne respecte pas pleinement l'intention des données qui est de soutenir l'exécution par l'Office de ses responsabilités légales. Tout aussi importantes, ces données pourraient être utilisées pour mesurer pleinement l'incidence du projet de loi C-49 et permettre des évaluations fondées sur des preuves, jusqu'à l'entrée en vigueur du projet de loi.

Pour conclure, j'aimerais aborder les changements proposés au projet de loi C-49 qui élimineront le grain conteneurisé du revenu admissible maximal. Pulse Canada comprend que l'intention du gouvernement à l'égard de ce changement de politique est d'inciter à l'innovation dans la chaîne d'approvisionnement par conteneurs, d'augmenter la capacité des conteneurs et d'améliorer les niveaux de service. Ce sont des résultats précieux et nous devons collectivement nous assurer qu'ils sont atteints, car l'élimination de ce trafic du calcul du RAM pourrait avoir un effet négatif sur la compétitivité internationale des secteurs des légumineuses à grains et des cultures spéciales. Nous devons donc veiller à ce que d'autres dispositions du projet de loi C-49 fixent les conditions nécessaires à cette modification du RAM pour qu'elles soient couronnées de succès et qu'elles donnent lieu à plus de service et à une plus grande capacité. Les recommandations en matière de données que j'ai abordées plus tôt permettront à toutes les parties prenantes d'évaluer le résultat de la politique, mais Pulse Canada a formulé des recommandations concernant d'autres dispositions du projet de loi, afin de s'assurer que l'ensemble des solutions proposé aux expéditeurs, en cas d'échec du service ou de litiges liés aux coûts, fonctionne.

Tout d'abord, la disposition réciproque de pénalité et le processus de règlement des différends qui l'accompagne mis en place pour les accords des niveaux de service représentent un changement précieux qui établira la responsabilité commerciale entre les expéditeurs et les compagnies ferroviaires. Nous félicitons le gouvernement pour l'avoir présenté. Afin de s'assurer de l'efficacité de son fonctionnement, Pulse Canada a demandé au comité d'envisager de préciser que l'intention de ces pénalités est suffisante pour encourager la responsabilisation commerciale et les performances, tout en reconnaissant les différences de pouvoir économique des petits expéditeurs par rapport à celui des compagnies ferroviaires.

Deuxièmement, pour les expéditeurs de petite et de moyenne taille et les expéditeurs conteneurisés qui n'expédient plus dans le cadre du RMA, il sera essentiel que le renforcement général des services d'information de l'Office et des services de règlement des différends présenté dans ce projet de loi, le projet de loi C-49, soit efficace. L'Office ayant la capacité de tenter de résoudre un problème qu'un expéditeur peut avoir avec la compagnie ferroviaire d'une façon informelle offre aux expéditeurs un moyen moins conflictuel, plus rentable et opportun de résoudre les problèmes de service, sans qu'une plainte formelle liée au niveau de service ne soit déposée auprès de l'Office. Ce sont les obstacles auxquels sont confrontés les expéditeurs lorsqu'ils envisagent d'accéder aux dispositions de l'Office, et c'est la raison pour laquelle l'Office a déclaré qu'il augmenterait ses activités de liaison auprès des expéditeurs. Cela n'a rien à voir avec une « campagne de promotion » de l'agence.

Pour réaliser pleinement le potentiel de cette disposition, Pulse Canada demande au comité d'envisager de préciser ce que signifie pour l'Office de prendre des mesures en cas de résolution informelle. Notre point de vue est que la prise de mesures peut inclure une grande variété d'activités, y compris des interrogations, des visites sur le site, des demandes d'informations, des enquêtes, etc. Des précisions sur cette question pourraient aider l'élaboration de ce projet de loi. En définitive, cependant, Pulse Canada considère les pouvoirs de l'Office proprement dit, pouvoirs qui ont été longuement discutés aujourd'hui, comme le moyen le plus efficace et le plus efficient d'aborder les différends et les problèmes de réseau, et invite fortement le gouvernement à examiner la demande de l'Office d'obtenir ces pouvoirs.

Enfin, j'aimerais aborder brièvement une disposition du projet de loi C-49 qui est spécifiquement axée sur le secteur des céréales. L'exigence énoncée à l'article 42 du projet de loi, selon laquelle les compagnies ferroviaires autoévaluent leur capacité à transporter le grain au cours d'une prochaine année céréalière et à évaluer les mesures qu'ils prendront pour permettre le transport du grain, peut être une disposition extrêmement puissante qui peut servir de base à la mesure de l'optimisation des activités ferroviaires pendant l'année céréalière, ainsi qu'à sa fin. Afin de renforcer cette disposition et de s'assurer qu'elle livre les résultats escomptés, Pulse Canada offre dans son mémoire, des recommandations pour améliorer cette section, afin de définir clairement les paramètres du type d'information que les compagnies ferroviaires doivent fournir. Pour le secteur des légumineuses à grains et des cultures spéciales, des paramètres bien définis fournissent une plateforme supplémentaire pour le suivi et l'évaluation de l'effet de la décision de retirer le grain conteneurisé du RMA.

Merci.

(1740)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Northey.

Nous passons maintenant à la Conférence ferroviaire Teamsters Canada, avec MM. Hackl et Phil Benson. Bien sûr, Phil est bien connu de beaucoup d'entre nous, ici sur la colline.

Bienvenus à vous deux.

M. Phil Benson (lobbyiste, Teamsters Canada):

Merci.

Je suis Phil Benson, lobbyiste chez Teamsters Canada. Je suis accompagné de mon frère Roland Hackl, le vice-président de la Conférence ferroviaire de Teamsters Canada, qui présentera notre exposé aujourd'hui.

M. Roland Hackl (vice-président, Conférence ferroviaire de Teamsters Canada):

Merci, madame la présidente.

En tant que vice-président, je représente les membres qui travaillent sur tous les trains de marchandises, les trains de banlieue et les trains de passagers de ce pays. Auparavant, il y a environ 29 ans, je travaillais comme serre-frein pour le CN. Comme je suis chef de train qualifié et mécanicien de locomotive, j'ai passé une bonne partie de ma vie recroquevillé dans les cabines de commande de locomotives qui mesurent 2,4 mètres ou 8 pieds par 3 mètres ou 10 pieds. Je suis donc très familier avec les questions entourant les enregistrements audio et vidéo dont nous sommes en train de parler.

Le projet de loi C-49 entraînerait possiblement l'assouplissement de différentes mesures législatives qui causent énormément de soucis à Teamsters Canada. Nous croyons que le projet de loi C-49, avec ses prétendus avantages qu'il offrirait au public et sur le plan de la sécurité, compromettrait la vie privée de nos membres. Par exemple, nombre d'entre vous se souviendront du déraillement de train qui s'est produit au nord de Toronto. Un groupe de traction a percuté un train, sans causer beaucoup de dommages, certes, mais l'accident est survenu dans un secteur densément peuplé et il a été très médiatisé. Par la suite, un cadre supérieur du CP et propriétaire du matériel roulant et de la voie ferrée a déclaré publiquement que l'accident aurait pu être évité si les locomotives avaient été équipées d'appareils d'enregistrement audio et vidéo. C'est impossible. L'enregistrement audio et vidéo est examiné après l'accident; or, à moins que les employeurs prétendent pouvoir exercer une surveillance audio et vidéo au moment de l'accident, il n'y a pas de prévention possible. Au mieux, ce sont des outils qui permettent d'analyser un accident après coup.

Le Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada, le BST, a actuellement accès à des enregistreurs vidéo et audio de locomotives. Or, depuis plusieurs années, VIA Rail et la majorité des transporteurs de marchandises reçoivent des locomotives équipées d'enregistreurs audio et vidéo. Ces appareils placés sous tension enregistrent en direct. Si un incident ou un accident survient, la réglementation actuelle donne au BST plein accès à l'information ou aux données recueillies à la faveur de ce processus.

Le projet de loi proposé autoriserait l'accès à ces enregistrements à un employeur ou à une tierce partie et nous croyons que cette disposition jetterait un froid sur la communication entre les travailleurs dans les locomotives. La dimension de ces locomotives est de 2,4 mètres ou 8 pieds par 3 mètres ou 10 pieds et les employés y passent 10, 12, 14 ou 16 heures; ils communiquent entre eux; ils discutent de choses et d'autres. Nous nous préoccupons du froid que jettera cette mesure sur les communications. Il en a été question et le Parlement a parlé il y a quelque temps de cette culture de la peur qui était inculquée, voire encouragée par la direction du CN. Les membres de la direction se sont tous retrouvés chez CP. Ce même climat se reproduit actuellement, surtout lorsque j'entends les gens de CP parler de la possibilité d'utiliser ce genre de renseignements à des fins disciplinaires. Et ce n'est un secret pour personne, car ils ont approché le syndicat et leur ont dit qu'ils voulaient se servir de ces appareils pour exercer leur autorité sur les employés. Ils veulent utiliser cet équipement de surveillance à des fins de discipline.

Nous croyons que le maintien de communications ouvertes entre les employés dans les cabines de locomotives est essentiel au bon fonctionnement de l'équipement, tout comme le sont les communications entre le pilote et le copilote d'un avion. Si ces communications sont entravées parce que des employeurs peuvent écouter ces enregistrements à volonté et les utiliser simplement comme outil de discipline, peu importe les circonstances, cela ne favorisera certainement pas le maintien de communications ouvertes dans les locomotives. Les renseignements privés ne seront plus du domaine privé. Les gens discutent de choses et d'autres au cours d'une journée de travail. Il s'agit ici du bureau du mécanicien de locomotive et du chef de train; ces derniers y passent de 10 ou 12 heures par jour, parfois davantage, alors ils discutent de tout et de rien. Certaines conversations portent sur les activités ferroviaires, d'autres sur des sujets que tout un chacun peut avoir avec ses collègues durant une journée de travail. Pourquoi les employeurs devraient-ils y avoir accès?

Nous pensons que le projet dans sa forme actuelle va à l'encontre de nos droits en tant que Canadiens. Nous considérons qu'il serait inapproprié de demander une dérogation à la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques, LPRPDE, pour 16 000 cheminots. Cette mesure nous obligerait à demander une exemption spécialement pour nos employeurs — ceux-là mêmes qui encouragent l'instauration d'une culture de la peur — pour surveiller. Nous avons un problème avec cela.

(1745)



Nous pensons que le projet de loi est beaucoup trop vague, qu'il ne précise pas comment les renseignements privés seront consultés, recueillis et utilisés. Qui sont ces tierces parties? Quel est l'objectif derrière l'idée d'une tierce partie qui aurait accès à ces renseignements?

Vous avez certainement entendu parler, par le CP du moins, de l'éventualité d'utiliser les enregistrements audio et vidéo à des fins d'enquêtes disciplinaires et dans le cadre d'actions menées contre les employés. Les employeurs ont déjà d'importants moyens mis à leur disposition pour assurer la surveillance de leurs employés. Il existe des caméras orientées vers l'avant appelées les « témoins silencieux »; elles sont disposées à l'extérieur, face aux locomotives, et aux passages à niveau. Il y a des enregistrements audio de ce qui se passe à l'extérieur. On utilise ces renseignements lorsqu'un accident survient à un passage à niveau. Il y a également un consignateur d'événements de locomotive, communément appelé la « boîte noire », qui enregistre toutes les fonctions mécaniques.

Il y a le Wi-Tronix qui contrôle la vitesse et qui permet de surveiller les communications cellulaires. Il envoie un signal d'alarme à l'employeur lorsque quelque chose ne va pas. Actuellement, si un train s'arrête après l'application des freins d'urgence, le Wi-Tronix déclenche un signal d'alarme pour aviser l'employeur. Grâce à cet appareil, l'employeur peut examiner les prises de vue de la caméra orientée vers l'avant à distance. Tout cela existe aujourd'hui. Nous utilisons tout cet équipement actuellement et nous n'avons nullement besoin de cette technologie invasive, de cette caméra vidéo qu'ils colleraient en pleine face des employés pendant 10 ou 12 heures consécutives, enregistrant absolument tout ce qu'ils font.

Nous pensons que ce projet de loi va à l'encontre des recommandations que le BST a faites dans son rapport sur les enregistreurs vidéo et audio dans les locomotives. Le BST recommande plutôt l'enregistrement de renseignements protégés à des fins non punitives et non disciplinaires. Nous sommes d'accord avec cela; nous sommes d'accord avec l'idée de donner accès à cette information au BST. Les possibilités en matière de cueillette de données semblent illimitées. Nous avons parlé de l'utilisation sûre et salutaire des renseignements, mais ce sont là des termes très vagues. Qu'est-ce qu'une utilisation sûre et salutaire exactement? Dans l'état actuel des choses, un enregistrement est effectué, 24 heures par jour, sept jours par semaine, et le BST a accès à ces enregistrements. Devrait-on en donner également l'accès à l'employeur?

Le système judiciaire a confirmé le droit à la vie privée à de nombreux paliers, y compris en arbitrage, dans le cadre d'examens judiciaires, dans les cours d'appel, et jusqu'en Cour suprême. Ce projet de loi nous priverait de ce droit. De nombreuses causes sur cette question ont été débattues. J'en mentionnerai deux. Malheureusement, nous ne disposons que de la version anglaise. Dans un premier cas, un employeur a jugé nécessaire d'acheter une caméra d'un commerçant local et de la placer à l'intérieur de l'horloge d'une salle où les équipes de travail s'enregistrent en entrant au travail, afin de les surveiller subrepticement. L'employeur a déclaré qu'il s'agissait d'un gestionnaire sans scrupule, qui avait agi de son propre chef, mais il ne faut pas oublier que ce gestionnaire sans scrupule a été défendu en arbitrage par une entreprise multinationale. Si ces agissements avaient été jugés bien fondés, le jugement aurait force de loi aujourd'hui au Canada.

Nous avons également eu cet incident avec l'autre employeur fédéral, mettant en cause un gestionnaire qui soupçonnait un employé de réclamer frauduleusement des indemnités à la Commission de la santé et de la sécurité du travail. Le gestionnaire a décidé de son propre chef de retenir les services d'un enquêteur privé sur la base d'une impression, sans aucune preuve ni aucun renseignement étayant ses soupçons. Une cassette vidéo a été utilisée dans le cadre de cette enquête et un gestionnaire a affirmé avoir été mis au courant de l'affaire le lundi suivant un tournoi de hockey. Je me demande ce que ce gestionnaire savait ce vendredi-là pour décider de son propre chef d'embaucher un enquêteur privé afin de surveiller subrepticement son employé, alors qu'il n'avait pas été mis au courant de la situation avant le lundi. Voilà ce que les employeurs sont en mesure de faire aujourd'hui avec l'équipement qu'ils ont à leur disposition. Encore là, la société a présenté le gestionnaire comme une personne sans scrupule qui s'est fait elle-même justice, mais une multinationale a défendu le gestionnaire jusqu'en arbitrage, et si nous n'avions pas gagné, le jugement aurait force de loi aujourd'hui.

(1750)



Nous croyons en outre que ce projet de loi va à l'encontre de l'article 8 de la Charte des droits et libertés parce qu'il autoriserait l'État ou les employeurs à recueillir des renseignements privés sans toutefois offrir de protection adéquate. Nous ne croyons pas que l'on cherche à atteindre un juste équilibre entre la sécurité et le droit des employés à la vie privée.

La présidente:

Monsieur Hackl, je vais devoir vous arrêter ici. J'espère que vous n'avez pas grand-chose d'autre à ajouter.

M. Roland Hackl:

J'ai dépassé les 10 minutes qui m'étaient allouées? Je suis désolé.

La présidente:

Oui, en effet. Vous parlez depuis près de 11 minutes, mais je vous laisse continuer encore un peu.

M. Roland Hackl:

D'accord.

La présidente:

Vous pourriez peut-être glisser ces derniers commentaires dans vos réponses aux questions des membres du Comité. Autrement, vous leur enlevez du temps qui leur est imparti pour vous poser des questions.

M. Roland Hackl:

Je suis ici pour répondre à vos questions, pour apporter mon aide.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Voici maintenant M. Graham et M. MacKay de la société Fertilisants Canada.

M. Clyde Graham (vice-président directeur, Fertilisants Canada):

Bonsoir, madame la présidente et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité.

Je vous remercie d'avoir invité Fertilisants Canada à venir s'entretenir avec vous aujourd'hui de la Loi sur la modernisation du transport. Nous sommes heureux de comparaître devant vous pour vous présenter de l'information sur notre mandat et formuler nos recommandations afin de favoriser le renforcement de l'objectif du projet de loi, à savoir promouvoir la concurrence dans le secteur du transport ferroviaire des marchandises.

Je vais commencer par nous présenter. Je m'appelle Clyde Graham et je suis premier vice-président de Fertilisants Canada. Je suis accompagné de M. Clyde MacKay, notre conseiller juridique sur les questions liées au transport ferroviaire.

Fertilisants Canada représente les fabricants, les grossistes et les détaillants d'engrais azotés, phosphatés, potassiques et sulfureux, et de produits connexes. Collectivement, nos membres emploient plus de 12 000 Canadiens et contribuent à plus de 12 milliards de dollars annuellement à l'économie canadienne grâce à ses installations manufacturières, minières et de distribution de pointe.

Notre association qui comprend des sociétés comme PotashCorp, Koch Fertilizer Canada, The Mosaic Company, CF Industries, Agrium et Yara Canada, entre nombreuses autres, est déterminée à favoriser la croissance continue du secteur des fertilisants par des programmes et des travaux de recherche novateurs et des initiatives de sensibilisation.

Le Canada est l'un des premiers producteurs de fertilisants au monde. Nos produits aident les agriculteurs à fournir des aliments en abondance et de manière viable au Canada et aux États-Unis et dans plus de 70 autres pays dans le monde. Nous jouons donc un rôle fondamental dans l'industrie agroalimentaire canadienne qui, selon le conseil consultatif en matière de croissance économique du premier ministre, est très novatrice.

Afin de répondre à la demande des agriculteurs dans le monde entier, nous nous appuyons fortement sur le réseau ferroviaire pour le transport de nos produits le long de nos corridors commerciaux vers les marchés nationaux et internationaux. Fertilisants Canada est un fier partenaire du réseau ferroviaire canadien et nous sommes l'un de ses plus importants groupes de clients à la fois pour le CN et le CP.

En tant qu'intervenants clés, nous sommes encouragés à travailler avec le gouvernement, et ce dernier a montré qu'il avait à coeur de moderniser le réseau de transport canadien et d'améliorer sa capacité. Nous saluons les objectifs du projet de loi en ce qui touche le transport de marchandises et nous appuyons nombre de changements qui ont été proposés, y compris ceux qui apportent des éclaircissements aux questions touchant la responsabilité civile, le renforcement de la sécurité ferroviaire, la promotion de la concurrence et la transparence des données.

Dans le contexte actuel de mondialisation croissante, nous sommes heureux de la reconnaissance par le gouvernement de la nécessité d'adopter une approche nuancée du transport des marchandises pour répondre aux besoins de l'économie canadienne. Nous formulons les recommandations suivantes, tout en sachant que le réseau de transport de marchandises par train doit évoluer afin d'assurer que les cadres des sociétés ferroviaires canadiennes ne nuisent pas à la qualité des emplois, au commerce et à la saine concurrence au Canada.

J'aimerais commencer par discuter des exclusions pour l'interconnexion de longue distance.

Les mesures proposées dans le projet de loi empêcheraient certains produits et certaines régions de bénéficier des avantages de l'interconnexion de longue distance, et cela inquiète beaucoup nos membres. Le Canada adhère depuis longtemps au principe du transport public comme fondement de notre économie. Ce principe empêche les sociétés de transport de faire de la discrimination à l'encontre de certains types de biens. C'est ce qui a maintenu l'économie canadienne en marche en dépit des distances considérables. Si l'on amende la loi pour y exclure certains types de biens et certaines régions de l'interconnexion de longue distance, cette mesure aura l'effet négatif d'éroder le principe du transport public, créant un dangereux précédent pour l'ensemble des Canadiens.

Comme la majorité de nos membres exercent leurs activités dans des collectivités et des régions qui dépendent du réseau ferroviaire, si l'accès à l'interconnexion de longue distance leur est refusé simplement pour des raisons de localisation, le prix à payer pour poursuivre leurs activités augmentera d'autant. En ce qui touche la sécurité, j'aimerais également que vous portiez votre attention sur les mesures visant l'exclusion des produits toxiques par inhalation de l'interconnexion de longue distance. L'un de ces produits, l'ammoniac anhydre, est un élément de base des engrais azotés et il est appliqué directement et à grande échelle dans le sol canadien pour l'obtention de récoltes plus saines. Ce fertilisant est indispensable pour de nombreux agriculteurs.

(1755)



À ce jour, aucune preuve ne porte à croire que ce produit ne puisse être transporté par chemin de fer en toute sécurité. Nos membres ont à coeur la sécurité du transport des marchandises.

Pour étoffer mon observation, je tiens à préciser que nos membres utilisent les wagons construits précisément pour la manutention en toute sécurité de l'ammoniac. Nos membres paient des sommes élevées pour la couverture d'assurance et les mesures de sécurité nécessaires à la protection du transport des produits. Ils paient déjà des tarifs marchandises nettement supérieurs pour le transport de matières dangereuses et notre association élabore de façon proactive des codes de sécurité et des ressources didactiques pour la chaîne d'approvisionnement et pour les premiers intervenants afin de favoriser la manutention sécuritaire des engrais.

D'autres catastrophes, comme celles survenues à Lac-Mégantic, ne doivent jamais se reproduire. Cependant, il faut adopter une approche sur le transport de marchandises dangereuses axée sur des décisions de principe responsables à l'aide de données probantes.

Je tiens à préciser qu'il n'existe aucune raison de sécurité, et il n'en a jamais existé, pour discriminer l'expédition de MTI, comme l'ammoniac, par interconnexion de longue distance. Nos membres paient déjà des taux de prime, ce qui permet d'indemniser les compagnies ferroviaires qui assument la responsabilité d'assurer la manutention de ces produits. Au sujet du transport de l'ammoniac, les taux sont de quatre à cinq fois plus élevés que pour d'autres genres d'engrais. Les prix d'interconnexion de longue distance établis par l'Office en tiendront compte et permettront d'indemniser adéquatement les compagnies ferroviaires.

J'aimerais également vous présenter brièvement deux autres recommandations portant sur les changements prévus à la zone d'interconnexion agrandie et aux lieux de correspondance.

Tout d'abord, une mise en garde s'impose contre les dispositions qui permettraient aux compagnies ferroviaires d'annuler le service des lieux de correspondance par la présentation d'un simple préavis. Nous sommes d'avis que les modifications proposées empêcheraient l'Office des transports du Canada de rétablir les lieux de correspondance et accentueraient le déséquilibre de pouvoir actuel entre les expéditeurs et les compagnies ferroviaires. Auparavant, les compagnies ferroviaires refusaient la présence de lieux de correspondance afin d'éviter le transfert du transport ferroviaire vers des réseaux adjacents. Nous recommandons d'abolir cette disposition du projet de loi C-49 afin d'éviter de commettre à l'avenir un préjudice contre les expéditeurs captifs.

Ensuite, les membres de Fertilisants Canada sont déçus de la décision du gouvernement de mettre un terme à la disposition sur la zone d'interconnexion agrandie dans un rayon de 160 kilomètres. Je crois bien que cette question a été abordée plus d'une fois. Nous avons constaté que l'interconnexion dans un rayon de 160 kilomètres a permis d'améliorer la concurrence sur de plus longues distances comme l'a confirmé Transports Canada. Puisque le fret ferroviaire dans l'Ouest canadien n'a pas fondamentalement changé depuis l'adoption en 2014 du règlement sur l'interconnexion dans un rayon de 160 kilomètres, nous sommes déçus que le gouvernement ait décidé de mettre un terme à la zone d'interconnexion agrandie.

Le secteur des engrais canadien est un fier partenaire du réseau ferroviaire du Canada. Ce réseau fonctionne bien pour l'ensemble des industries canadiennes. Il s'agit d'une approche concertée sur le transport des biens au Canada et ceux destinés à l'exportation. Ensemble, nous contribuons à la concurrence du Canada sur les marchés mondiaux dans le secteur agroalimentaire grâce au commerce et au transport. Notre industrie de 12 milliards de dollars et les 12 000 emplois comptent sur un réseau ferroviaire moderne, concurrentiel et en santé pour survivre et prospérer. Il est crucial pour nous de veiller à ce que nos produits soient livrés en toute sécurité aux agriculteurs, notamment vers la région du Niagara, les champs de céréales des Prairies ou dans les terres intérieures de la Colombie-Britannique et nous sommes très fiers de nos réussites à ce chapitre.

Nous appuyons vivement la plupart des propositions présentées dans ce projet de loi et en saluons les intentions. Les expéditeurs captifs, qui sont affectés à une ligne ferroviaire et tributaires de la compagnie de chemin de fer, doivent profiter de notre infrastructure ferroviaire à l'échelle nationale. Nous nous réjouissons que le gouvernement les appuie. Nous croyons, cependant, que d'autres efforts s'imposent et nous encourageons donc les membres de ce comité à tenir compte de nos recommandations. Nous estimons pouvoir améliorer le projet de loi C-49 grâce à l'adoption d'une approche de principe réfléchie et axée sur des faits probants.

Je vous remercie. Il s'agit de la fin de notre exposé. Ian et moi serons heureux de répondre à vos questions.

(1800)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Graham.

Nous allons passer à la période des questions et nous cédons la parole à Mme Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente, et je tiens à remercier les témoins qui ont comparu aujourd'hui. Je vous suis reconnaissante de vos témoignages.

Comme vous l'avez mentionné, monsieur Graham, un thème se répète dans les témoignages entendus et j'aimerais le souligner. Bon nombre des témoins acceptent une grande partie des éléments présentés dans ce projet de loi, mais certaines dispositions suscitent leurs inquiétudes et je tiens à mentionner notamment la question de l'interconnexion de longue distance.

Vous avez précisé diverses mesures pour exclure le transport de matières toxiques par inhalation et je crois que cette question m'a été présentée lors d'une réunion précédente. Je me demande si vous pouvez en expliquer le raisonnement. Quels motifs ont été invoqués pour prévoir une disposition d'exclusion dans la loi?

M. Clyde Graham:

Le gouvernement ne nous a pas présenté d'arguments persuasifs et, selon nous, il semble qu'il s'agisse d'une décision arbitraire. Il n'existe pas de raison sécuritaire valable à cet égard et je ne comprends pas pourquoi nos produits feraient l'objet de discrimination.

Mme Kelly Block:

Vous avez également commenté les obligations communes des transporteurs, soit le principe commun des transporteurs, et, cela est inquiétant, car c'est le fondement même de votre industrie. Votre organisation est-elle préoccupée par le fait que cette exclusion pourrait être risquée au sujet de l'interconnexion de longue distance? Peut-on présumer, en bout de ligne, que ces obligations ne seront peut-être pas honorées?

M. Clyde Graham:

Le mémoire abonde dans ce sens. Nous croyons qu'il s'agit d'un dangereux précédent. Cette mesure pourrait viser d'autres aspects du transport ferroviaire de nos produits, en particulier l'ammoniac. Nous ne croyons pas que les compagnies ferroviaires devraient être autorisées à choisir les produits qu'elles transportent. Ce n'est pas de leur ressort. Leur travail consiste à assurer le transport des marchandises en toute sécurité.

(1805)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Northey, j'aimerais vous poser une question. Hier matin, le sous-ministre délégué a précisé qu'on permettrait le non-renouvellement de l'interconnexion prolongée devienne caduque, car elle est peu utilisée, mais cette mesure aurait des conséquences imprévues sur le caractère concurrentiel des compagnies ferroviaires canadiennes par rapport aux compagnies américaines. Je crois que certains témoignages ont semé la confusion lorsque des témoins ont affirmé qu'il s'agissait d'une solution à laquelle on n'avait pas souvent recours et puis ils enchaînent en mentionnant les retombées sur le marché. Pourriez-vous vous prononcer sur cette question?

M. Greg Northey:

Cette question a été bien abordée et il faut mentionner l'utilisation que l'on en fait. On se servirait de la disposition et le pouvoir de négociation serait alors accru. Dans notre situation, il existe des cas précis là où il y a transport de marchandises. Nous pourrions expédier une grande quantité de produits vers les États-Unis. Nous avons remarqué que le CN et le CP ne tiennent pas nécessairement à assurer le transport des marchandises vers les États-Unis, car souvent ils ne pourront pas se servir de ces wagons pendant peut-être 30 jours. En général, ils imposent un prix élevé pour ces transports-là afin de dissuader les expéditeurs d'avoir accès à ces marchés. Ils doivent structurer leur réseau, mais ils estiment qu'ils peuvent optimiser et utiliser leurs actifs comme bon leur semble.

La zone d'interconnexion agrandie a permis à ces expéditeurs d'avoir accès au BNSF, qui désire assurer le transport de ces marchandises. Lorsque nous nous penchons sur cette question et sur l'ensemble du réseau, l'accès à un marché concurrentiel profite à tout le réseau. Ceux qui désirent exploiter ces actifs pour une autre raison ou se rendre sur la côte Ouest ou à Thunder Bay ne ressentiront pas nécessairement de pression de la part des expéditeurs qui se plaignent du manque de services et du non-respect des obligations communes des transporteurs puisqu'une autre compagnie de chemin de fer peut prendre la relève. L'objectif en général consiste à optimiser cette disposition. Il s'agit d'exploiter l'ensemble du réseau et d'optimiser les décisions économiques, tant pour les compagnies de chemin de fer que pour les expéditeurs.

C'est là la loi de la concurrence et c'est ce que nous avons constaté. Lorsque l'on y a eu recours, les retombées ont été considérables. Un petit expéditeur peut économiser 1 500 $ par wagon. Il peut seulement utiliser 15 wagons et il a peut-être cinq employés à son actif, alors les conséquences pour cet expéditeur sont immenses. Il peut investir l'argent économisé dans son entreprise et il peut investir dans l'économie et faire progresser son entreprise.

Ces économies peuvent sembler bien minces pour de petits ou moyens expéditeurs, mais les retombées sont énormes.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Ma question s'adresse à M. Hackl. Je sais que la question des enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive est relativement litigieuse et j'espère que ces échanges seront productifs et fructueux.

J'ai prêté une oreille attentive à vos observations préliminaires sans préjugé, mais, pour cet exercice-ci, j'aimerais prendre position. Tout d'abord, il n'existe pas de droit absolu à la vie privée en milieu de travail. On ne doit pas discuter de sujets inappropriés qui pourraient être une source d'embarras après coup. En outre, je ne vois aucun inconvénient à bavarder avec mon personnel, et cette discussion pourrait être enregistrée sans problème. Ensuite, par souci de sécurité du public et pour avancer les choses en la matière, les EAVL représentent peut-être un élément absent de la liste de tous les dispositifs dont vous venez de mentionner. Enfin, j'imagine que la loi ne précise pas que les données provenant des EAVL peuvent être utilisées à des fins répressives ou disciplinaires. Quiconque le ferait ne respecterait pas la loi.

Je vous prie de bien vouloir me faire part de vos commentaires à ce sujet.

M. Roland Hackl:

Je vous suis reconnaissant de me poser la question.

Un droit absolu est plutôt singulier. Je crois qu'il est raisonnable de s'attendre à une vie privée en milieu de travail. Je doute qu'un employeur soit vraiment intéressé à la conversation dans une locomotive après qu'une équipe qui devait, aux termes d'un contrat ou d'une loi, être relevée de ses fonctions après 12 heures se retrouve toujours dans le train après 14 ou 15 heures. Bien que la discussion puisse être intéressante, le sujet pourrait être plutôt futile, alors je ne sais pas pourquoi nous voudrions enregistrer ces conversations-là.

Je ne partage pas votre avis cependant selon lequel la technologie n'est pas disponible. La technologie existe et on l'utilise activement aujourd'hui. Le BST peut s'en servir. Nous nous inquiétons à savoir qui serait responsable de ces renseignements, de cette information protégée, privée et privilégiée? Devrait-on confier au BST le mandat et la responsabilité de faire enquête de façon impartiale sur un incident ou une catastrophe ou cette responsabilité devrait-elle relever des employeurs qui ont posé à de nombreuses reprises... je ne sais pas si des actes de malice ont été avérés, mais certains des gestes posés par les employeurs avaient certainement été « malveillants » par l'imposition de mesures disciplinaires ou répressives contre des employés. Ces gestes nous préoccupent.

Je ne suis pas sûr de lire la loi de la même manière lorsqu'il est question de sanctions ou de mesures disciplinaires. Le regard posé par les juristes peut être légèrement différent, mais nous devrons étudier la question et vous en faire rapport.

(1810)

M. Phil Benson:

Par souci de clarté, si vous consultez les faits réels ainsi que les questions et réponses du ministère des Transports, on précise que ces mesures pourraient vraiment servir à des fins disciplinaires. Un représentant du CP a été clair ce matin que l'on appliquerait des mesures disciplinaires.

La réponse de Transports Canada est contraire à la déclaration précédente de Mme Fox du BST qui a mentionné qu'il faillait privilégier et protéger le droit à la vie privée. Le privilège vise la personne dont la vie privée est en jeu et, avec tout le respect qui s'impose, je me moque royalement de ce que vous pensez du droit à la vie privée. Je me soucie plutôt des propos tenus par nos membres au sujet du droit à la vie privée et des déclarations des juges de la Cour suprême et des législateurs de ce pays relativement aux droits à la vie privée. Il est facile pour quiconque de retirer le droit à la vie privée d'une autre personne. Le privilège accompagne la personne, et cette question ne relève d'aucune compagnie ni du gouvernement.

Comme deuxième sujet évoqué par Mme Fox, les mesures ne doivent pas servir à des fins disciplinaires ni répressives. D'après la déclaration de Transports Canada, ce ne sera pas le cas.

Il y a un troisième sujet à l'étude si vous le souhaitez, mais la parole est à vous.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Non, veuillez poursuivre.

M. Phil Benson:

Troisièmement, Mme Fox a précisé qu'on a besoin d'une culture juste. Comme je l'ai répété auparavant, et comme mon confrère M. Hackl vient tout juste de le mentionner, la culture n'est pas juste. Nous sommes en train de créer un fantasme au sujet de ce que pourrait ou devrait être un EAVL, mais pas de ce dont il s'agira.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Rapidement, parce que je veux que vous répondiez à ma question de suivi: en ce qui concerne la culture juste ou ce qui a été dit plus tôt, ce que je dis, c'est que, si ces actes sortaient du cadre législatif, si vous les utilisiez en tant que mesures punitives ou disciplinaires, vous le feriez à tort. Vous n'agiriez pas conformément à la loi. Est-ce que cela change votre point de vue?

M. Phil Benson:

Cela réglerait cette question, d'une certaine manière, mais, pour être clair, ce n'est pas ce que Transports Canada vous a dit dans sa réponse et ses faits, et il ne s'agit pas de ce que les entreprises vous ont déclaré. Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, nous ne pouvons pas formuler de commentaires au sujet de ce que pourrait contenir un projet de loi; tout ce que nous pouvons traiter, c'est ce qui figure dans le projet de loi en ce moment.

M. Gagan Sikand:

À votre avis, si cela devait figurer dans le projet de loi — le fait que ces actes sortiraient de son cadre —, votre position serait-elle différente?

M. Phil Benson:

Vous posez une question hypothétique, à laquelle il est difficile de répondre, car le privilège de la personne de voir sa vie privée protégée est un privilège personnel. Ce n'est pas quelque chose à l'égard de quoi je peux, en tant que représentant de Teamsters Canada — ou mon confrère M. Hackl, en tant que vice-président de cette entreprise — peut dire: « Oh, sapristi, selon notre avis juridique, il s'agit d'une contravention à l'article 8 de la Charte et d'une infraction à la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels. »

Très franchement, vous affirmez que, si nous modifions un projet de loi qui, selon toute probabilité, est inconstitutionnel et enfreint la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels, cette disposition va le rendre acceptable, à votre avis. Comme vous le comprenez, monsieur Sikand, cela nous met dans une situation très difficile. Nous n'allons pas répondre à cette question hypothétique.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup. Nous avons dépassé le temps dont nous disposions.

Monsieur Aubin.

(1815)

[Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Bonjour, messieurs. Je vous remercie de votre présence.

Beaucoup de choses ont été dites sur ces enregistreurs audio-vidéo. Je ne veux pas étirer le débat outre mesure, puisque vous avez, me semble-t-il, très bien fait valoir votre point de vue, et nous l'avons entendu.

J'ai une seule question: si le projet de loi C-49 énonçait de façon claire, nette et précise que les enregistreurs audio-vidéo ne peuvent être utilisés que par le BST et seulement à la suite d'un accident, cela modifierait-il votre position de quelque façon que ce soit? [Traduction]

M. Roland Hackl:

C'est notre position: que seul le Bureau de la sécurité des transports devrait y avoir accès. Les enregistrements ne devraient pas être communiqués aux employeurs ou à des tiers. Nous sommes de cet avis depuis l'instauration initiale de cet équipement, et nous serions satisfaits d'une telle disposition. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Cela m'amène à vous parler de mesures de sécurité qui, à mon avis, sont encore plus importantes. D'ailleurs, de nombreux témoins en ont parlé et vous pouvez probablement le corroborer. La plupart des incidents ferroviaires liés à un facteur humain sont attribuables à la fatigue. Or le projet de loi C-49 ne prévoit aucune mesure pour traiter de la fatigue des conducteurs de train.

Les représentants des compagnies ferroviaires nous disent être en discussion constante avec les syndicats sur cette question et que c'est important et même prioritaire. Or, la lenteur avec laquelle le gouvernement ou les compagnies ferroviaires mettent en oeuvre des mesures pour lutter de façon efficace contre la fatigue m'apparaît être un élément de sécurité beaucoup plus important que le fait d'installer ou non un enregistreur, qui ne fera que faciliter l'enquête après un accident.

Sentez-vous qu'il y a des progrès et que des mesures pourront s'appliquer bientôt en ce qui a trait à la fatigue? [Traduction]

M. Roland Hackl:

Heureusement, oui. Tout d'abord, l'EAVL ne changerait rien à la fatigue.

Déjà, en 2010, les responsables du chemin de fer du CN et notre syndicat commençaient à négocier dans la convention collective des méthodes permettant de régler le problème de la fatigue. On n'a pas accordé la priorité à cette question, et la situation n'a pas beaucoup progressé. La dernière convention collective, qui — je crois — a été ratifiée avec le CN le 4 août, contenait beaucoup plus de dispositions sur la fatigue. En outre, le CN et les Teamsters ont établi, avec l'aide d'un spécialiste en matière de fatigue — un ancien agent du BST qui se spécialise dans la science du sommeil —, un plan de collaboration afin que nous puissions travailler ensemble pour cumuler des renseignements scientifiques et en faire le suivi pour nous assurer que les méthodes que nous adoptons en ce qui a trait à l'horaire, au repos et à l'équilibre travail-vie personnelle des membres d'équipage ont une incidence positive et factuelle. C'est une chose que d'affirmer que nous pensons que ces méthodes seront utiles; c'en est une autre que de mesurer leur utilité.

Je crois que vous avez entendu aujourd'hui les représentants du CN aborder un peu l'étude menée au moyen de l'appareil Fitbit, dans le cadre de laquelle nous... J'en ai porté un. Je ne ferais rien porter à nos membres que je ne porterais pas moi-même. L'appareil surveille nos habitudes de marche et de sommeil. Il y a quelques bogues, au début. Par exemple, selon l'enregistrement, durant une période de deux heures où je me trouvais à une réunion concernant les pensions, je dormais, alors il y a eu un petit débat à ce sujet, mais nous avons réglé certains des bogues à cet égard, et nos membres portent les appareils. Nous prévoyons — c'est ce que nous avons fait — les mettre dans un environnement sans horaire établi et sans les améliorations que nous avons négociées, faire le suivi des renseignements sur les membres, transformer leur environnement afin qu'il soit plus structuré, selon un horaire établi, puis les laisser s'y adapter. Nous commençons tout juste à recevoir les données contenant les renseignements de suivi, et, jusqu'ici, c'est très positif.

Nous recevons des lettres de membres qui disent: « Ma foi, j'ai enfin une vie, et les choses fonctionnent bien. »

Fait intéressant: la semaine dernière — je ne suis pas certain de ce que les représentants du CP vous ont dit à ce sujet —, nous avons conclu un accord provisoire avec le chemin de fer du CP, soit une prolongation de un an des conventions collectives actuelles des mécaniciens de locomotive et des chefs de train du CP. Cette entente arrivera à échéance en décembre. Une prolongation provisoire a maintenant été présentée à des fins de ratification. La pierre angulaire de cette entente, ce sont les dispositions qui concernent l'établissement des horaires de manière à tenter d'éviter la fatigue d'une façon semblable, à l'aide des mêmes spécialistes du sommeil que ceux à qui nous avons recours, au CN, pour tenter d'apporter des améliorations sur ce plan également.

Nous observons beaucoup de progrès, depuis un meilleur équilibre travail-vie personnelle jusqu'à des gens qui ne s'absentent pas à l'improviste, en passant par un meilleur maintien en poste pour les employeurs, qui profitent d'une meilleure assiduité au travail.

Nous suivons le processus relatif aux conventions collectives pour y arriver, alors il y a eu de bonnes nouvelles. Vous êtes peut-être au courant de l'entente conclue la semaine dernière, mais cette entente est positive pour tout le monde afin que l'on tente de faire avancer les choses sur ce plan.

(1820)

La présidente:

Vous disposez d'une minute. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à vous, monsieur Graham. Je tiens à vous dire que je ne m'explique pas plus que vous l'exclusion que vous subissez.

Est-ce que le projet de loi C-49 devrait prévoir des conditions particulières pour le transport de matières dangereuses? Présentement, le transport de pétrole et le transport d'huile de canola semblent être gérés exactement de la même façon, ce qui m'apparaît un peu particulier. Je ne dis pas qu'il y a un lien entre cela et votre exclusion, mais est-ce que vous reconnaissez que les matières dangereuses devraient être traitées de façon différente? Cela n'apparaît pas dans le projet de loi C-49.

M. Clyde Graham:

Merci de votre question.[Traduction]

Ce dont il est question, dans le projet de loi, c'est l'exclusion des marchandises produisant des inhalations toxiques, ce qui comprend l'ammoniac. Aucune raison liée à la sécurité ne justifie cette exclusion. Nous ne sommes pas certains du but dans lequel elle a été créée. D'autres marchandises dangereuses ne sont pas exclues, alors celle-ci ne peut être expliquée par une raison liée à la sécurité. Évidemment, si nos marchandises sont dangereuses, nous devons y faire attention. Nous devons en être les intendants. Pour ce faire, nous travaillons en très étroite collaboration avec les compagnies de chemin de fer et tous les autres intervenants, y compris les intervenants de première ligne. Toutefois, les dispositions dont nous discutons — les manoeuvres interréseaux — sont d'ordre économique. Elles ne concernent pas la sécurité.

Je ne sais pas si cela répond à votre question.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Parlons de l'EAVL, car je peux voir qu'il s'agit... Je suis déchiré à ce sujet. Je vais suivre la ligne de pensée de mon collègue et y ajouter un peu de réflexion personnelle. Il y a toujours eu des problèmes liés à des relations de travail difficiles entre les entreprises et leurs travailleurs. Je comprends cela. Vous venez tout juste de parler de deux ou trois ententes qui ont été conclues. On dirait que la situation s'améliore, mais, tout de même, cela pourrait replonger tout le système dans un genre de soupe toxique. On ne veut tout simplement pas en arriver là.

Je suppose que, dans ce cas — et je ne m'attendrai qu'à une courte réponse —, la question est la suivante: si les EAVL sont instaurés, à qui les données devraient-elles appartenir?

M. Roland Hackl:

La courte réponse — comme je l'ai déjà dit —, c'est que les gardiens des données devraient être le BST, en cas d'incident ou d'accident. Elles ne devraient pas être transmises à un employeur, quelle que soit la raison pour laquelle il voudrait les utiliser, surtout s'il s'agit d'un employeur vindicatif, comme nous en voyons depuis très longtemps.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'accord. Toutefois, qu'arriverait-il si, en examinant l'enregistrement qui a été saisi, le BST découvrait qu'un des membres de l'équipage ou les deux avaient utilisé un téléphone cellulaire? Nous savons tous que l'utilisation d'un téléphone cellulaire dans cet environnement d'exploitation est contraire aux règles et devrait être contraire à la loi, comme ça l'est cas de la conduite automobile. Certes, dans mon ancienne vie à l'autorité des transports du Vancouver métropolitain, où nous avons des EAVL, en passant, à bord des autobus, nous n'avons pas besoin de ces enregistrements parce que les passagers prendraient des photographies du conducteur utilisant le téléphone cellulaire.

Mais, d'accord, alors le BST découvre que les membres de l'équipage utilisaient des téléphones cellulaires. La personne moyenne, raisonnable et bien pensante s'attendrait à ce que des mesures punitives soient prises à cet égard, n'est-ce pas?

M. Roland Hackl:

Je souscris à l'opinion selon laquelle les gens pourraient s'attendre à cela. La réalité, c'est que, si j'utilise un téléphone cellulaire aujourd'hui, sans EAVL, je suis congédié. Si je suis impliqué dans un accident à un passage à niveau et que je suis au téléphone cellulaire, non seulement je suis congédié et je ne récupérerai jamais mon emploi — comme l'a confirmé à maintes reprises la jurisprudence arbitrale —, mais je vais aussi me faire accuser d'une infraction criminelle. L'autre chose qui va arriver, c'est que je vais me faire accuser au civil, alors, pendant que je serai en prison, ma famille va se faire expulser de sa maison.

Il y a des ramifications extrêmes.

M. Ken Hardie:

Autrement dit, cela ne fait qu'enfoncer le clou. Si un enregistrement confirme que cela s'est produit, rien ne change vraiment. La punition correspond au crime, essentiellement.

M. Roland Hackl:

L'enregistrement n'est pas la question. Si les données sont utilisées de façon responsable par le BST aux fins de l'enquête et que les téléphones cellulaires se révèlent être le problème...

Nous savons que les téléphones cellulaires posent problème. Si une personne utilise un téléphone cellulaire, c'est un problème. La préoccupation ne tient pas nécessairement au téléphone cellulaire. Personne ne veut cela. Nous disons aux gens carrément: « Pas de téléphone cellulaire. Vous êtes congédié. Ne le faites pas. » La préoccupation est liée à d'autres éléments. Pendant 12 heures, je suis enregistré, afin que mon employeur puisse m'examiner à loisir. Cette technologie est diffusée en continu auprès de mon gestionnaire, à son domicile, à 4 heures du matin, s'il le souhaite. Selon moi, aucun employé au pays ne devrait être soumis à une telle situation.

(1825)

M. Ken Hardie:

Je comprends cela.

Qu'est-il arrivé dans le cas de la collision survenue à Toronto? Quelle en était la cause?

M. Roland Hackl:

Le rapport vient tout juste d'être publié. Je peux le citer mot pour mot. Il s'agissait d'une erreur humaine. Je crois savoir que la fatigue pourrait avoir été un facteur, une pièce d'équipement... Beaucoup d'autres facteurs sont en cause également. Un moteur léger, c'est-à-dire un groupe de trois locomotives, est entré en collision avec un train de marchandises, si je me souviens bien.

Ce dont peu de gens ont entendu parler, qui n'a pas fait les manchettes, c'est qu'on avait appelé l'équipage immédiatement avant pour lui dire d'être aux aguets parce qu'il y avait des intrus dans la cour. Alors, les membres de l'équipage surveillaient les gens qui se promenaient partout et prêtaient attention à tout un tas de choses. Ils sont arrivés à une liaison, c'est-à-dire un très court segment de voie qui traverse d'une voie à une autre, et ils ont frappé un autre train en mouvement.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vois.

Y a-t-il une leçon à tirer de cela, que peut-être un enregistrement vidéo fournirait à l'entreprise comme aux employés, qui laisserait entrevoir d'autres façons de faire face à une situation comme celle-là, car il est certain qu'elle se reproduira, n'est-ce pas?

M. Roland Hackl:

Je ne sais pas s'il est certain qu'elle se reproduira, mais j'aurais tendance à penser que le projet de loi actuel et ce que nous proposons que le BST utilise en cas d'incident ou d'accident fournirait exactement ce que vous demandez. Après cet incident, le BST dirait: « Nous avons un problème; envoyez-nous l'enregistrement, et nous allons y jeter un coup d'œil », le BST enquête, et nous allons de l'avant à partir de là.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je pense — et je vais formuler un commentaire à ce sujet — que vos équipages exploitent des unités de plusieurs tonnes qui sont très difficiles à arrêter, très difficiles à ajuster. Je pense qu'il y a au sein du public une attente raisonnable que les choses se passent de la bonne façon, et, selon moi, il est évident qu'étant donné le bilan de sécurité, la plupart du temps, c'est le cas.

Quand quelque chose tourne mal, par contre, il y a également une attente raisonnable que des mécanismes soient en place pour que l'on puisse découvrir ce qui est arrivé, remédier à la situation de façon opérationnelle et, si quelqu'un a commis une erreur, si les éléments de preuve l'indiquent, le public s'attendra à ce que cette erreur entraîne un certain genre de punition. C'est seulement un de mes commentaires.

M. Phil Benson:

Je pense que Mme Fox, du BST, a abordé cette question. Dans son examen, le BST doit découvrir ce qui s'est passé et comment cela s'est passé, mais ce qui arrive ensuite sur le plan de la responsabilité criminelle et civile survient après l'examen du BST. Elle a été assez claire à ce sujet: la protection des renseignements personnels ne vous permet pas de contourner la contravention du Code criminel.

Il y a une différence. Des gens disent parfois: « Si quelqu'un a enfreint la loi... rien ne vous prémunit contre une infraction », mais dans la réalité, un dossier est présenté dans un tribunal, où un juge l'examinera pour décider s'il est ou non probant, s'il sera ou non public, s'il sera ou non vu.

Personnellement, nous ne voulons pas voir apparaître dans la presse des photos de nos membres, parce qu'une fois que le privilège et la protection du BST disparaissent et que des tiers seront informés, l'information sera mise au jour. Je pense que ce n'est vraiment pas approprié d'avoir, comme aux États-Unis, un genre de diffusion en direct, en boucle, de ce qui s'est produit dans les 30 dernières secondes de la vie de votre être cher.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Benson.

Allez-y, monsieur Badawey

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vais continuer avec le thème auquel je m'en suis tenu au cours des dernières heures. Je vais adresser mes questions à M. Graham.

La vision d'ensemble m'intéresse beaucoup. Soyons clairs: il ne s'agit que des affaires. Il s'agit de pratiques commerciales et, par le fait même, de tenter d'établir un équilibre fondé sur la valeur du rendement des investissements, qui nous donne, au final, comme vous l'avez mentionné plus tôt, un meilleur rendement de l'entreprise et de ceux que vous représentez. Les membres de Fertilisants Canada comptent pour 12 000 emplois et contribuent annuellement à hauteur de 12 milliards de dollars à l'activité économique au Canada seulement; 12 % de l'approvisionnement en fertilisants du monde provient du Canada, apportant une forte contribution au PIB sur laquelle nous comptons; le Canada exporte des fertilisants dans plus de 80 pays, et 95 % de la production de potasse du Canada est exportée; enfin, le fertilisant est la troisième marchandise expédiée en masse par les chemins de fer canadiens. Vu tous ces éléments, il y a de fait quelque chose à dire à ce sujet.

Ce qui m'intéresse le plus dans ce processus d'écoute, cette semaine, c'est que nous nous assurions d'intégrer les caractéristiques du projet de loi C-49 dans la grande vision d'ensemble concernant les bonnes pratiques commerciales. Cela devient pour vous un moteur pour que la vision du ministre Garneau, qui suppose de s'assurer que les investissements futurs en matière d'infrastructures sont alignés sur une stratégie de transport nationale, commence à prendre forme et que nous ne nous retrouvions pas avec les mêmes problèmes et difficultés que ceux que nous avons déjà éprouvés au début du siècle, lorsque nous avons commencé à construire ces éléments d'infrastructure en vase clos, malheureusement.

Comment pouvons-nous intégrer nos données, notre distribution, nos systèmes logistiques? Comment pouvons-nous nous assurer d'intégrer non seulement notre infrastructure de transport nationale, mais aussi notre système de transport international, pour que, de nouveau, notre PIB connaisse une croissance rapide pendant de nombreuses années, pour 30 à 50 ans? Voici ma question: comment pouvons-nous nous améliorer pour devenir un moteur qui vous permettra de faire des affaires?

(1830)

M. Clyde Graham:

En ce qui me concerne, je ne m'occupe que des fertilisants.

L'économie fonctionne mieux lorsque les entreprises collaborent, et beaucoup d'acteurs dans l'ensemble de la chaîne d'approvisionnement déplacent des produits à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur du Canada. Évidemment, il est important d'établir des prévisions concernant ce que nous allons faire avec notre entreprise et ce que nous visons, et nous espérons que les compagnies ferroviaires soient en mesure de réagir à cela. Je pense qu'elles ont parfois attendu que le volume soit suffisant avant de consentir des investissements dans les infrastructures.

Notre industrie de la potasse, en particulier dans la province de la Saskatchewan, a investi environ 18 milliards de dollars pour accroître sa capacité. C'est un signal important qu'elle envoie aux marchés, aux ports, au fret maritime et aux compagnies de chemins de fer, selon lequel notre industrie est en pleine croissance et nous avons besoin d'une capacité accrue dans le système. Nous espérons que les compagnies de chemins de fer puissent répondre à cela.

Le système est limité en raison de la géographie. Nous comprenons cela. Nous savons qu'un ambitieux programme d'améliorations des infrastructures est proposé au port de Vancouver. Nous aimerions voir le gouvernement y donner son appui, par exemple. Je ne pense pas qu'il y ait une réponse simple à cela.

J'aimerais demander à la présidente si elle autoriserait M. MacKay à répondre brièvement à cette question qui concerne le réseau nord-américain.

M. Ian MacKay (conseiller juridique, Fertilisants Canada):

En réponse à la question du député, une des excellentes choses au sujet de ce projet de loi, c'est qu'il reconnaît que la concurrence entre les chemins de fer est importante pour les expéditeurs. En l'absence d'une concurrence réelle entre les chemins de fer... Nous avons entendu aujourd'hui M. Johnston, de Teck, parler de droits d'exploitation. C'est une version ou une possibilité. Mais les mesures qui sont proposées dans le projet de loi C-49 sont essentielles pour ce qui est de substituer des interdictions législatives à une concurrence réelle. Pour atteindre les objectifs dont vous avez parlé, nous voulons nous assurer que ces mesures sont efficaces pour créer bel et bien un substitut approprié à la concurrence.

M. Vance Badawey:

Combien de temps nous reste-t-il? Deux minutes.

Je vais m'adresser à M. Northey, de Pulse Canada.

Pouvez-vous ajouter votre grain de sel au sujet de cette question?

M. Greg Northey:

Je vais seulement faire fond sur ce que Ian a dit. Nous avons en ce moment les éléments fondamentaux dans le projet de loi C-49. Beaucoup d'expéditeurs se sont présentés ici aujourd'hui. Ceux-ci se sont montrés assez solidaires sur certains éléments clés. Le projet de loi C-49 ajoute un élément fondamental à votre vision, et c'est l'intention. Je pense que tout le monde peut voir ce potentiel dans le projet de loi. Il se rapproche énormément de ce que nous voulons, et la concurrence est un élément important, tout comme le long terme, ainsi que les données.

Au bout du compte, si nous voulons atteindre ces objectifs, nous devons pouvoir les mesurer. Nous devons pouvoir les mesurer de manière à savoir si la politique fonctionne réellement. Nous devons pouvoir mesurer si les gens réussissent au sein du système en place.

Le projet de loi C-49 met en évidence, pour l'une des premières fois, la portée de ces données, de cette idée des données et des données probantes. Nous n'avons vraiment qu'à apporter ces légers changements pour nous assurer de réellement débloquer tout cela et d'en faire une plateforme vers laquelle avancer. De plus, Transports Canada élabore en parallèle ses systèmes de données et de transport. Je pense que tout est là. Nous devons seulement réunir ces éléments.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Shields.

M. Martin Shields:

Je vous suis reconnaissant d'être ici ce soir. Je n'ai que quelques questions. Je n'ai pas encore abordé celle du soya et des légumineuses. Certaines personnes disent que les graines de soya sont des légumineuses, et d'autres disent qu'elles ne le sont pas, mais je crois qu'elles le sont. Travaillez-vous là-dessus, parce que je ne vois pas cela ici?

(1835)

M. Greg Northey:

Oui, nos membres représentent aussi les cultivateurs de soya dans l'Ouest, le groupe du Manitoba et le groupe de la Saskatchewan. Lorsque l'examen de M. Emerson avait cours, notre position de départ était que les graines de soya et les pois chiches devraient en fait être compris dans l'annexe II. Tout à fait. Et les arguments présentés aujourd'hui montrent avec force logique qu'ils devraient en faire partie. Cependant, comme je l'ai mentionné dans ma déclaration liminaire, tout le grain conteneurisé que nous recevons est retiré du RAM.

Nous souhaitons donc y mettre nos cultures, mais nous sommes aussi confrontés à la situation où une immense partie de nos mouvements est retirée du RAM.

M. Martin Shields:

C'était là où je voulais en venir. Vous y êtes arrivé.

En ce qui concerne l'aspect réglementaire, vous n'aviez aucune modification pour ce qui est de changer la réglementation pour... Je crois que, à mesure que les cultures spécialisées y seront intégrées, et certaines qui le sont moins s'y trouvent encore, c'est un élément dont il faudrait vraiment tenir compte, la façon dont ceux qui s'y trouvent sont...

Avez-vous reçu de l'orientation ou des renseignements concernant la justification touchant l'exclusion... qui, je crois, va devenir davantage des expéditions de conteneurs intermodaux... Pourquoi? Avez-vous reçu une justification?

M. Greg Northey:

Nous avons posé beaucoup de questions au sujet de la justification, et nous avons mené notre propre étude sur les répercussions possibles. On ne nous a pas donné de raison. L'une des choses qui rend cela compliqué... Nous adorons le résultat, l'intention qu'il permette d'ajouter de la capacité, des services et de l'innovation dans le mouvement des conteneurs. C'est super. Il n'y a pas d'expéditeur au Canada qui ne voudrait pas cela.

Le problème avec le mouvement des conteneurs, c'est que les conteneurs maritimes sont la propriété des transporteurs maritimes, et les compagnies ferroviaires ne contrôlent pas nécessairement la capacité ni la direction, et beaucoup de décisions concernant ces conteneurs qui ne relèvent pas des compagnies de chemins de fer sont prises. Le fait de déplacer du grain conteneurisé hors du RMA donne pratiquement aux compagnies de chemins de fer la capacité de changer les prix, parce qu'on ne bénéficie pas de la protection des prix du RAM.

Si les prix augmentent, ce sera une bonne chose si cela sert à la chaîne d'approvisionnement, à l'innovation et à toutes ces choses qui concourent au but. Nous voulons que cela fasse l'objet de surveillance. Nous voulons voir des données probantes selon lesquelles la décision stratégique, qui est importante, va fonctionner, parce que nous voulons voir ces résultats. Nous voulons pouvoir mesurer cela et nous assurer que les choses se concrétisent. Nous ferons tout en notre pouvoir pour que cela se produise, si c'est une décision stratégique, mais nous devons voir cela arriver, parce qu'autrement, il n'y a aucun intérêt.

M. Martin Shields:

Étant donné ceux qui sont en cours de construction, nous pouvons nous rendre au chemin de fer où vous allez avec le fertilisant. Nous voyons que votre chemin de fer traverse nos collectivités. Ce sont vos wagons, vous les avez construits, vous les avez marqués, et nous voyons les wagons défiler l'un après l'autre. Combien de wagons pouvez-vous entasser sur une ligne de chemin de fer aujourd'hui?

M. Clyde Graham:

Il y a quelque 200 wagons dans certains trains des Teamsters. Il y a des trains-blocs de cette importance.

M. Martin Shields:

[Inaudible ] des wagons, c'est-à-dire, avec les conteneurs qui sont déjà construits, on ne veut pas avoir à passer à cela, parce qu'il y a beaucoup de petits producteurs, et vous en avez déjà parlé. Vous êtes dans les grandes ligues lorsque vous pouvez aligner 220 wagons. Vous ne pouvez pas faire cela. Cela pénalise donc les petits producteurs de produits qui sont en demande dans le monde, en raison de ce que vous croyez être un profit, parce qu'ils ne peuvent pas le contrôler.

M. Greg Northey:

Oui.

C'est déjà assez difficile maintenant de faire venir des conteneurs maritimes au pays. Certains des grands expéditeurs peuvent les contrôler, parce qu'ils ont une entente avec la compagnie maritime qui contrôle les conteneurs. Les compagnies maritimes ne veulent pas voir de conteneurs qui languissent et qui ne sont pas utilisés; ils veulent qu'ils soient renvoyés en Chine le plus rapidement possible pour revenir avec des biens de consommation, parce que c'est ainsi qu'ils font leur argent. Ils ne reviennent pas nécessairement à Vancouver en transportant du grain. Cette chaîne d'approvisionnement connaît beaucoup de complications.

Le retrait des RMA est une petite partie de la réponse si l'on veut débloquer le potentiel de cette chaîne d'approvisionnement. Si c'est une décision stratégique qui sera prise, nous voulons l'utiliser comme plateforme pour lancer une discussion et concrétiser tout cela. Ces petits expéditeurs ont besoin de ces conteneurs. Nous voulons ces conteneurs.

M. Martin Shields:

Je pense que c'est important, parce que nous avons parlé des chaînes d'approvisionnement aujourd'hui, et vous voulez les rendre aussi efficaces et fluides que possible, parce que nous avons les produits que le monde souhaite obtenir, et ces petites cultures spécialisées que nous mettons au point au Canada sont vraiment essentielles à l'accroissement des marchés.

(1840)

M. Greg Northey:

Tout à fait.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

M. Sikand a une excellente question à poser avant que je commence.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Greg, classez-vous le soya dans la catégorie des légumineuses?

M. Greg Northey:

Techniquement, le soya n'entre pas dans la catégorie des légumineuses. Nous représentons les cultivateurs de légumineuses, parce qu'on en fait pousser, mais ce n'est pas... je ne décrirais pas le soya comme une légumineuse.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Hackl, je reviens à vous, ce qui, j'en suis sûr, ne vous surprendra pas.

Il y a neuf ans, aujourd'hui, l'un des pires accidents ferroviaires qu'ait connus l'Amérique du Nord est arrivé à Chatsworth, en Californie, lorsqu'un train de voyageurs de Metrolink est entré en collision avec un train de marchandises de l'Union Pacific. Vingt-cinq personnes ont perdu la vie, et 135 ont été blessées. Le conducteur du train textait sur son téléphone cellulaire à ce moment-là. Selon vous, s'il avait su qu'il y avait un enregistreur audio-vidéo dans la cabine de la locomotive, l'accident se serait-il produit?

M. Roland Hackl:

Je ne peux pas vous dire. Je sais que, depuis ce temps, une technologie a été mise en place, une technologie de Wi-Tronix, qui peut déterminer si un signal de téléphonie cellulaire est reçu ou émis dans une locomotive. La technologie peut nous dire si un téléphone cellulaire se trouve à bord d'une locomotive. Cette technologie existe. En grande partie, la technologie est déjà installée sur les locomotives, alors si les responsables voulaient vraiment s'attaquer aux téléphones cellulaires, ils pourraient activer l'appareil et savoir si un téléphone cellulaire est allumé, et on pourrait alors mener une enquête à ce sujet.

Il n'est pas nécessaire d'assurer une surveillance vidéo en direct. C'est quelque chose que même les transporteurs aériens ne font pas, quelque chose qu'aucun autre pays ne fait. Il s'agirait d'une première mondiale. Le fait de mettre en place ce type de technologie auquel les employeurs ont accès, à ce niveau, serait un précédent à l'échelle internationale. Je ne vois tout simplement pas en quoi c'est nécessaire, alors qu'on a une technologie permettant de faire exactement ce que vous demandez.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez déjà mentionné que beaucoup de locomotives sont déjà munies de la technologie. Constatez-vous déjà que des employeurs en abusent?

M. Roland Hackl:

Oui, c'est quelque chose que j'ai constaté. Comme je l'ai déclaré, il y a eu deux ou trois cas assez récemment — je dirais au cours des deux ou trois dernières années, parce qu'il faut un certain temps pour que le dossier passe par l'arbitrage — qui démontrent une utilisation abusive des technologies vidéo à l'égard des employés actuels.

Il y a actuellement des griefs non réglés liés au système Silent Witness, la caméra orientée vers l'avant. Ces dossiers n'en sont pas encore rendus au processus d'arbitrage, alors je peux difficilement vous parler des faits connexes, mais ils sont liés au fait qu'une entreprise soit allée examiner les enregistrements après coup. Ces systèmes conservent les données pendant 72 ou 96 heures. Un employé d'atelier peut être enregistré, puis un gestionnaire examine les enregistrements, tout simplement pour vérifier s'il n'y a pas quoi que ce soit qui sort de l'ordinaire. Aucun incident n'avait entraîné la tenue d'une enquête, et nous croyons qu'une telle utilisation des technologies vidéo est abusive et devrait être interdite. Nous ne voyons pas pourquoi il faudrait ouvrir la porte davantage.

Il y a des mesures en place. Le Bureau de la sécurité des transports et Transports Canada ont tous les deux approuvé les contrôles d'efficacité en tant que moyen pour vérifier l'activité des équipages et le respect des règles. Je ne vois pas pourquoi il faudrait faire une utilisation sans précédent de cette technologie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si la technologie existe, et nous savons qu'elle existe, l'équipement devrait-il ou pourrait-il indiquer aux opérateurs du train qu'ils sont surveillés activement? Un témoin lumineux pourrait s'allumer lorsqu'un gestionnaire les regarde en temps réel.

M. Roland Hackl:

Je ne crois pas qu'il soit approprié pour un gestionnaire de le faire, mais la technologie existe actuellement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est ce que je vous demande. Puisqu'elle existe déjà, y a-t-il une façon, lorsque le train est en marche, de dire aux opérateurs à bord qu'ils sont surveillés actuellement?

M. Roland Hackl:

Qu'un gestionnaire est...?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez dit pouvoir vous connecter à une locomotive et regarder ce qui se passe en temps réel. C'est ce que vous venez de nous dire, alors peut-on envoyer de l'information dans l'autre sens?

M. Roland Hackl:

La technologie existe, et, actuellement, elle peut seulement être utilisée par le BST. C'est ce que la loi prévoit actuellement. Ce que vous demandez, si j'ai bien compris, c'est s'il serait approprié de procéder à une surveillance si on dit à la personne surveillée que ses droits sont violés. Je ne peux pas être d'accord avec une telle affirmation, je suis désolé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est une bonne observation.

Metrolinx était ici, hier, et je suis sûr que vous avez regardé le témoignage. Les représentants ont dit très clairement que, selon eux, les enregistreurs audiovisuels dans les cabines de locomotives, qu'ils ont déjà installés et qui, si je ne m'abuse, accompagnent déjà les membres syndiqués à bord de ces trains, sont destinés à une utilisation préventive; Metrolinx a l'intention d'examiner les enregistrements à des fins de prévention, et non à des fins disciplinaires. Qu'en pensez-vous? Si l'entreprise n'écoute pas les conversations pour entendre ce que les employés disent après 15 heures de services d'un quart devant en durer 12, mais pour s'assurer qu'ils donnent les signaux et font clairement ce qu'ils doivent faire, estimez-vous que ces systèmes pourraient jouer un rôle de prévention?

M. Roland Hackl:

Je ne sais pas vraiment ce que Metrolinx a dit hier, mais je peux vous dire que Metrolinx, qui exploite les trains GO, lesquels, de toute évidence, sont les trains qui transportent le plus de passagers au pays, possède une politique exhaustive concernant les enregistreurs audiovisuels dans les cabines de locomotive qui a été négociée avec le syndicat des Teamsters — et le ministère des Transports, et je crois que le ministre fédéral a aussi participé, parce que les voies utilisées par Metrolinx sont des voies qui relèvent du fédéral — et qui prévoient que seul le BST peut utiliser ces systèmes. C'est la politique en place actuellement. Seulement le BST peut examiner les enregistrements en cas d'incident ou d'accident. Il y a une chaîne de commandement claire en place. Il n'y a qu'une personne — et le titulaire du poste en question est nommé précisément dans la politique — qui y ait accès. Les enregistrements sont chiffrés et remis en mains propres aux représentants du BST aux fins d'évaluation. C'est le processus en place actuellement, et je ne suis pas au courant si l'entreprise a proposé de faire quelque chose d'autre. Je n'ai vu aucune présentation de Metrolinx, alors je ne peux pas vraiment formuler de commentaires sur ce que l'entreprise a dit, mais c'est le système qui est actuellement en place pour les trains GO.

(1845)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si les entreprises doivent avoir accès à ces données, les syndicats devraient-ils aussi y avoir accès?

M. Roland Hackl:

Je ne veux pas avoir accès à ces données et je ne crois pas que les employeurs devraient y avoir accès non plus.

Si je peux préciser une chose, c'est que Metrolinx n'emploie pas de chef de train ni de mécanicien de locomotive.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non. Ils utilisent ceux de Bombardier, je sais.

M. Roland Hackl:

Bombardier, oui, est l'employeur. Metrolinx est un organisme-cadre qui n'a pas d'employés en tant que tels, ce qui était à l'origine du cas en arbitrage et la raison pour laquelle cette politique a été adoptée.

La présidente:

Vouliez-vous le préciser?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. Est-ce que les équipages de Bombardier sont des membres des Teamsters?

M. Roland Hackl:

C'est exact.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

La présidente:

Madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je veux vous poser une autre question, monsieur Northley. J'ai constaté dans votre réaction au rapport d'examen de l'OTC daté du 18 avril que vous aviez recommandé d'établir de façon permanente la limite de 160 kilomètres. Vous avez vu le projet de C-49, et je sais que vous avez formulé d'autres recommandations.

Est-ce que le projet de loi C-49 tient compte des recommandations que vous avez formulées après la publication du rapport d'examen de l'OTC?

M. Greg Northey:

Nous voulions que la limite soit permanente parce qu'il y avait là, selon nous, une valeur réelle pour les expéditeurs. La capacité de service à un juste prix découle de la concurrence. L'accroissement des distances limites d'interconnexion le permettait. La mesure était très claire et simple, et elle fonctionnait bien.

Nous avions une longue liste d'autres recommandations. Chez Pulse Canada, nous mettons beaucoup l'accent sur les données, nos travaux sont vraiment axés sur les données. Nous mettons l'accent sur les données probantes: nous ne voulons pas utiliser de données anecdotiques pour décrire les défaillances de service: nous voulons que tout ça soit mesuré. Nous avons consacré beaucoup d'argent pour obtenir de nouvelles données. Les données sont très importantes. Le projet de loi C-49 fait vraiment monter la barre en ce qui a trait aux données, pas autant que nous le voudrions, mais tout de même.

Pour ce qui est des pouvoirs d'agir de sa propre initiative dont dispose l'Office, pour les expéditeurs de petite et moyenne tailles, il y a d'importants obstacles pour avoir accès au processus de plainte sur les niveaux de service, ou d'arbitrage de l'offre finale. Ils n'ont ni le temps, ni l'argent, ni le désir de vraiment combattre une compagnie de chemin de fer lorsque le service est déficient. Selon nous, dans de tels cas, il faut un cadre réglementaire plus strict, et nous avons besoin d'un organisme qui a en sa possession les données et les éléments de preuve et qui peut surveiller le réseau et intervenir lorsque les services sont défaillants.

Comme nous en avons discuté plus tôt aujourd'hui, les pouvoirs d'agir de sa propre initiative sont extrêmement importants pour nous. Nous n'avons pas vu de disposition à ce sujet dans le projet de loi, et c'est l'une de nos recommandations maintenant. Nous aimerions qu'une telle disposition s'y trouve.

Ce sont là, selon moi, les principaux enjeux. Les pénalités réciproques sont aussi très importantes. Nous avons constaté qu'il y a une disposition à ce sujet dans le projet de loi. Tout ce que nous demandons, en fait, c'est que l'intention soit précisée. Lorsqu'on parle d'une pénalité équilibrée ou d'un montant équilibré — ce qu'un expéditeur peut payer comparativement à ce qu'une compagnie de chemin de fer peut payer — lorsqu'on pense aussi au montant qu'il faut établir pour susciter un changement comportemental, eh bien, ces montants sont très différents. Si un expéditeur doit payer un frais de 100 $ parce qu'il n'a pas chargé un wagon à temps, ce montant a un impact, mais des frais de 100 $ pour la compagnie de chemin de fer qui ne livre pas les wagons à un expéditeur qui en expédie 15... l'entreprise va probablement tout simplement choisir de payer la pénalité, c'est possible.

Qu'est-ce qui, alors, entraînera un changement comportemental dans le cadre du contrat? C'est ce que nous voulons vraiment. Tout est là. Il ne s'agit pas de modifier le libellé du projet de loi, il suffit d'en préciser l'intention. Il faut trouver le juste équilibre entre la prise en considération de la capacité des petits expéditeurs comparativement à celle d'une grande compagnie de chemin de fer et la façon d'accroître le rendement.

Je proposerai donc les trois éléments suivants: les données, les pénalités réciproques et la création d'une option concurrentielle qui prolonge les distances d'interconnexion. Nous voulons offrir des services de transport sur de longues distances, peu importe le nom qu'on donnera au système ou de quelle façon il fonctionnera, nous voulons obtenir des résultats. Nous sommes préoccupés, actuellement, par toutes les exclusions.

Comme vous l'avez entendu aujourd'hui, l'établissement des coûts... Nous sommes favorables à toutes ces choses. Il est très important pour nous que le système fonctionne. C'est le résultat qui importe. Nous mettons l'accent sur les résultats. Les expéditeurs n'accordent aucune importance aux noms qu'on donnera à ces choses: ce sont les résultats qui importent.

(1850)

Mme Kelly Block:

Il me reste une minute. J'aimerais formuler une observation. Je crois que nos témoins ont été très courtois en accordant aux auteurs du projet de loi le bénéfice du doute que l'intention est bel et bien celle du projet de loi.

J'espère que les recommandations et les amendements qui ont été formulés et suggérés et qui l'ont été par un très grand nombre de témoins, seront sérieusement pris en considération, pour dissiper les préoccupations que chacun d'entre vous avez soulevées ainsi que leurs répercussions sur l'industrie.

Merci beaucoup.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais m'entretenir avec M. Northey pendant 30 secondes.

Vous avez dit quelque chose qui me frise les oreilles chaque fois que je l'entends, à savoir que le projet de loi C-49 est un pas dans la bonne direction. Si on est dans la bonne direction, pourquoi n'y va-t-on pas? J'ai de la difficulté à comprendre cette approche qui fait dire à plusieurs témoins que ce projet de loi est un pas dans la bonne direction.

A-t-on voulu à ce point obtenir l'assentiment des différents lobbys qu'on en est arrivé à un projet de loi qui, finalement, ne satisfait à peu près personne? Pour les uns, c'est un pas dans la bonne direction, et pour les autres, c'est un pas dans la mauvaise direction. Le projet de loi C-49 ne devrait-il pas trancher et permettre d'aller aussi loin que possible dans des domaines où on peut le faire, que ce soit les données ou l'interconnexion? Or là, j'ai l'impression qu'on est toujours dans des positions mitoyennes. [Traduction]

M. Greg Northey:

Il y a eu beaucoup de projets de loi liés au transport ferroviaire au cours des dernières années. À chaque étape, il s'agissait d'apporter des améliorations graduelles. C'est ainsi que les choses se passent. C'est un sujet dont nous discutons depuis 100 ans. Les expéditeurs se débrouillent avec ce qu'ils ont, une capacité limitée, de mauvais services, une livraison ferroviaire peu fiable. Nous poursuivons malgré tout.

Au fil des projets de loi, nous avons bien sûr constaté ces mesures graduelles, et le projet de loi C-49 est un nouveau pas en avant. Nous aimerions bien qu'il règle vraiment les problèmes auxquels nous sommes confrontés et qu'il tienne compte du fait que le marché ferroviaire n'est pas fonctionnel, mais c'est difficile. Le processus législatif est de toute évidence difficile. Nous voulons vraiment arriver à bon port, et nous croyons que ce pas en avant pourrait en être un grand. Nous espérons simplement que ce sera le cas. L'intention est là. Nous essayons. Nous voulons que les choses fonctionnent cette fois-ci dans la mesure du possible.

Je suis désolé. Les propos ont l'air de refléter une insatisfaction, mais j'ai quelque chose à vous dire: lorsque nous parlons à nos intervenants, ils nous posent exactement la même question, parce que, au bout du compte, quand on en vient là, ce qu'ils veulent, ce sont des résultats. Est-ce que le système fonctionnera pour eux? Nous nous sommes penchés sur cette question, et nous constatons que certains éléments ne vont probablement pas être appropriés pour les petits expéditeurs. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie tout de même d'apporter cette nuance. On est passé d'un pas à un grand pas. On y gagne, j'imagine.

Je vais me tourner de nouveau vers M. Hackl et M. Benson.

En ce qui concerne les enregistrements, dont on fait tout un tabac, je pense qu'on s'entend sur la ligne. Le BST demande d'avoir accès aux enregistrements pour mener ses enquêtes et vous êtes prêts à lui accorder cela, dans la mesure où les enregistrements demeurent confidentiels. Je pense qu'on s'entend là-dessus. Cela dit, c'est une mesure qui arrive après les accidents. Vous m'avez donné une lueur d'espoir quant à d'éventuelles mesures pour contrer la fatigue.

J'aimerais aborder un dernier point avec vous. Depuis des décennies, l'industrie ferroviaire du Canada s'en remet à un système de signaux visuels pour contrôler la circulation sur une partie importante du réseau. Il y a aussi plus de 15 ans que le BST souligne sans relâche la nécessité de disposer de moyens de défense physiques supplémentaires. On parle ici d'alarmes. Il demande même qu'il y ait un arrêt automatique du train si, par exemple, le conducteur rate un signal. Le projet de loi C-49 ne dit rien sur l'ensemble de ces moyens. Or, à mon avis, ce sont de véritables mesures de sécurité ferroviaire, puisque cela permet une intervention avant l'accident, et non pas une analyse par la suite.

Où en êtes-vous quant à ces mesures? J'aimerais connaître votre point de vue sur l'établissement de moyens de défense physiques supplémentaires dans les locomotives.

(1855)

[Traduction]

M. Roland Hackl:

C'est une question intéressante, et j'aimerais pouvoir vous répondre de façon plus brève. Malheureusement, je crois que les locomotives sont actuellement équipées d'enregistreurs audio-vidéo dans les cabines. Le seul coût pour les compagnies de chemin de fer, ce sera l'entretien des systèmes et l'accès aux systèmes. Les systèmes de commande intégrale des trains, les systèmes de prise en charge des cabines ou ces types de choses exigeraient des investissements de plusieurs milliards de dollars des entreprises de chemins de fer.

Dans un premier temps, permettez-moi de dire que j'ai bon espoir qu'on ne se dispute pas au sujet de ces choses. Nous en discutons. Je crois que c'est la ligne de moindre résistance, pour l'instant. Les enregistreurs audio-vidéo existent, et les compagnies de chemin de fer veulent miser sur le projet de loi. Je ne pourrais pas vous dire si elles veulent investir des milliards de dollars dans les systèmes de commande intégrale des trains et ces genres de choses.

Je ne sais pas si c'est une réponse ou non... je ne sais pas si la réponse vous aide, mais c'est la préoccupation que j'ai en ce qui a trait à ce dont vous avez parlé dans votre question.

M. Phil Benson:

Il ne coûte rien aux compagnies de nous retirer nos droits à la vie privée. Très souvent, lorsque je regarde la réglementation ferroviaire, il y a beaucoup de poudre aux yeux, beaucoup de choses, mais on ne veut pas vraiment dépenser d'argent.

Une de nos préoccupations, ici, dont M. Hackl a parlé avec beaucoup d'éloquence, concerne toutes les fonctionnalités déjà en place qui pourraient être utilisées actuellement. Lorsqu'on retire à quelqu'un son droit à la vie privée, la première question que les tribunaux poseront, c'est de savoir s'il y avait une solution de rechange qui aurait pu être utilisée pour en arriver à la même fin ou obtenir de meilleurs résultats sans retirer ce droit à la vie privée. La réponse est oui. De telles possibilités existent déjà.

Ce à quoi j'aimerais que tous les députés réfléchissent, c'est cette pente glissante, le fait que, selon moi, la bureaucratie a mis de l'avant son programme depuis longtemps dans ce dossier. C'est une lutte que nous avons menée pour eux. Ils ne sont pas particulièrement gentils pour nous ni pour la main-d'oeuvre. Pour dire les choses simplement, ils veulent cette politique parce qu'ils veulent qu'on en arrive là. Il y a beaucoup d'autres façons de procéder, mais ils vont simplement retirer à quelqu'un son droit à la vie privée. Ils se disent, pourquoi ne pas seulement soustraire quelqu'un à la Constitution. Retirons tout simplement ses droits.

Selon moi, tous les députés devraient être contre une telle chose et devraient bien y réfléchir. Surtout dans le cas des députés du Parti libéral, on parle ici du fondement de la plupart de ces droits. Le simple fait qu'un bureaucrate ou quelqu'un se pointe et dise que c'est quelque chose qu'il aimerait faire... M. Hackl a présenté ce qui est déjà en place avec beaucoup d'éloquence, et il faut tenter d'éviter à tout prix cette pente glissante.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Benson.

Merci à tous les témoins.

Je crois que vous avez constaté à la lumière de nos questions que nous avons tous beaucoup à coeur le projet de loi C-49, fait plus important encore, nous voulons faire la bonne chose.

Je vous remercie de nous avoir fait part de vos réflexions. Le Comité continuera de réfléchir à cette question, parce que les parlementaires tentent toujours de faire la bonne chose.

Je propose l'ajournement de la réunion d'aujourd'hui.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on September 12, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.