header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-09-11 TRAN 67

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(1205)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I call to order meeting number 67 of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, 42nd Parliament, first session, pursuant to the order of reference on Monday, June 19, 2017, Bill C-49, an act to amend the Canada Transportation Act and other acts respecting transportation and to make related and consequential amendments to other acts. We will start this process now.

Welcome to all our members. Thank you very much for coming back a week earlier than everyone else on the Hill. It shows everyone's commitment to seeing that we continue and get our work done.

To the staff who are here as well, welcome. I hope you all had a good summer.

I will now ask the departmental officials if they would introduce themselves and proceed.

Ms. Helena Borges (Associate Deputy Minister, Department of Transport):

Thank you, Madam Chair. It's a pleasure to be here today.

I am Helena Borges, the associate deputy minister of transport. I have been before this committee before, so maybe you'll remember me.

I have with me several colleagues from the department, as well as the Competition Bureau. Alain Langlois is our chief counsel on this file. Brigitte Diogo is our director general of rail safety. I have Marcia Jones, who is our director of rail policy; Sara Wiebe, who is our director general of air policy; and Mark Schaan from ISED.

First, I would echo the chair's thanking you for coming back early and taking the time to study this bill before Parliament resumes. I must say that if you haven't been in Ottawa all summer, this is officially the first week of summer, at least weather-wise, because it has been raining here non-stop. This is actually summer as we'll have it.

Bill C-49, the transportation modernization act, contains proposed legislative changes that would allow the government to move forward in delivering on initial measures as part of transportation 2030, the government's strategic plan for the future of transportation in Canada, which the minister announced last fall. The plan was announced following an extensive consultation process with industry stakeholders, indigenous groups, provincial and territorial governments, and Canadians, which built on the findings and recommendations from the Canada Transportation Act review report. You will hear from Mr. Emerson, who was the chair of that panel, later today. This process allowed us to hear a broad range of views on the future of transportation over the next 20 to 30 years, and how we can ensure that the national transportation system continues to support Canada's international competitiveness, trade, and prosperity.[Translation]

Bill C-49 promotes transparency, system efficiency and fairness. The bill proposes legislative amendments that would better meet the needs and service expectations of Canadian travellers and shippers, while creating a safer and more innovative transportation network that would better position Canada to capitalize on global opportunities and thrive in a high-performing economy.

Let me highlight the key features of the bill.[English]

I will begin with the air initiatives. Bill C-49 proposes the creation of new regulations to enhance Canada's air passenger rights, ensuring that they are clear, consistent, and fair for both travellers and carriers. The Canadian Transportation Agency would be mandated to develop, in consultation with Transport Canada, these new regulations and would consult Canadians and stakeholders should royal assent be given to this bill.

The overriding objective of this new approach is to ensure that Canadians and anyone travelling to, from, and within Canada understand their rights as air travellers without negatively impacting access to air services and the cost of air travel for Canadians.

Bill C-49 specifies that these regulations would include provisions regarding the following most frequently experienced irritants, some of which you may have heard about: providing passengers with plain language information about carriers' obligations and how to seek compensation or file complaints; setting standards for the treatment of passengers in the case of overbooking, delays, and cancellations, including appropriate compensation for these; standardizing compensation levels for lost or damaged baggage; establishing standards for the treatment of passengers in the case of tarmac delays over a certain period of time; seating children close to a parent or guardian at no extra charge; and requiring carriers to develop standards for transporting musical instruments.

Finally, this bill also proposes that regulations be made for data to be collected in order to be able to monitor the air traveller experience, including air carrier compliance with the proposed passenger rights approach.

(1210)

[Translation]

The legislation also proposes to liberalize international ownership restrictions from 25% to 49%. To protect the competitiveness of our air sector and support connectivity, this provision is accompanied by associated safeguards.

These safeguards include restrictions that a single international investor would not be able to hold more than 25% of the voting interests of a Canadian air carrier and that no combination of foreign air carriers could own more than 25% of a Canadian carrier.

This policy change would not apply to Canadian specialty air services such as heli-logging, aerial photography or firefighting, which would retain international ownership levels at 25%.

Liberalizing international ownership restrictions means Canadian air carriers—and this includes passenger and cargo transportation service providers—would have access to more investment capital that they can use for innovation and, potentially, further expansion.

This would bring more competition into the Canadian air sector, provide more choice for Canadians, and generate benefits for airports and suppliers, including new jobs.

More competition in the market could in turn reduce the cost of air transportation and open other markets to consumers and shippers in Canada. This could include the creation of new ultra-low cost carriers serving new areas of the Canadian market.[English]

The bill also proposes a new, transparent, and predictable process for the authorization of joint ventures between air carriers, taking into account competition and wider public interest considerations and establishing clear timelines for the rendering of a decision.

Joint ventures are a common practice in the global air transport sector. They enable two or more carriers to coordinate functions on specific routes, including scheduling, pricing, revenue management, marketing and sales.

Whereas currently proposed joint ventures in Canada are solely examined by the Competition Bureau under the Competition Act, and thus focus exclusively on anti-competitive impacts on specific markets for air travel, the proposed new legislation would allow for the consideration of wider public interest benefits.

In addition, the new process would include clear timelines for the review process, both for the review of potential competition considerations by the bureau and the assessment of public interest benefits to be undertaken by Transport Canada. It is anticipated that this more holistic and timely review would allow Canadian carriers to engage in this industry trend, which confers benefits not only to the partnering air carriers, but also to consumers who will gain from enhanced flight connectivity and Canadian tourism, which we expect to grow based on expanded network options. [Translation]

Canada's aviation sector has shown interest in investing in and accessing passenger screening services, beyond those already provided by the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority, in order to facilitate travel and gain economic advantages.

The proposed amendments allow for this opportunity on a cost-recovery basis.[English]

Let me now move to the rail initiatives.

A reliable freight rail network is critical to Canada's success as a trading nation. Many of our commodities, from minerals to forest products to grain, depend on rail to move to markets both here and abroad. Canada enjoys efficient rail service with the world's lowest rates.

To sustain this, Bill C-49 aims to address pressures in the system so that it can continue to meet the needs of users and the economy over the long term. To this end, the bill promotes transparency, efficiency and strong private sector investment in the rail system, as well as accessible shipper remedies. The key measures include new data reporting requirements for railways on rates, service, and performance that would greatly increase system transparency; a definition of adequate and suitable rail service affirming that railways should provide shippers with the highest level of service they reasonably can in the circumstances; the ability for shippers to seek reciprocal financial penalties for breaches of their service agreements with railways; updated remedies for rate and service complaints, to make them easier for shippers to access; and more timely, long-haul interswitching, a new measure for giving captive shippers across all sectors and regions the option of accessing a competing railway.

(1215)



These measures would address the needs of shippers for greater competition in the freight rail system while also safeguarding the ability of railways to make crucial investments in the railway network, which benefits all shippers and the broader economy.

The proposed amendments to the Railway Safety Act to mandate installation of voice and video recorders in railway locomotives are designed to further enhance rail safety while safeguarding the privacy of employees. They respond to recommendations from this committee, the CTA review panel, and the Transportation Safety Board, whom you will hear from immediately afterwards.

These recorders would further strengthen rail safety by providing objective data about crew actions leading up to, and during, a rail accident. This technology would also provide companies with an additional safety tool for analyzing trends identified through their safety management systems with the objective of preventing accidents before they happen.

Through its oversight role, Transport Canada would ensure that companies comply with the limits on use and privacy requirements specified in the proposed legislation. [Translation]

I will now turn to marine initiatives.

Finally, Bill C-49 proposes to amend the Coasting Trade Act to allow all vessel owners to reposition their owned or leased empty containers between locations in Canada using vessels of any registry. This measure would support industry's request for greater logistical flexibility and address the shortage of empty containers for export purposes.

Bill C-49 also proposes to amend the Canada Marine Act to allow Canada Port Authorities access to loans and loan guarantees from the Canada Infrastructure Bank, which is starting to happen.[English]

In conclusion, this bill combines proposed legislative initiatives into a single bill that are essential to advancing priority measures related to improving the efficiency and safety of the Canadian transportation system.

In addition to having undertaken a comprehensive consultation process, these proposed amendments are based on solid evidence. For instance, with respect to freight rail measures, we sought technical expertise of stakeholders from the rail sector, the Canadian Transportation Agency, key federal departments, and other authorities as part of consultations for the bill. We analyzed freight rates, investments across jurisdictions, as well as commodity movements across Canada using internal data, and grain monitoring program, and railway waybill data, as well as other data.

The measures contained in this bill are a reflection of the priorities we heard from stakeholders and Canadians during the consultation process. It brings forward proposed legislative changes that promote a safer, more efficient transportation system that would enable growth while strengthening the rights of Canadian travellers to better meet their needs and expectations.

I would add that this bill responds to many of the recommendations this committee put forward in a study last year of the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act.

I would like to thank the committee once again for having me here today. My colleagues and I are available to answer any questions at this meeting and throughout the entire study of the bill. We would be happy to provide any information that you don't have.

On that point, I will mention that we have made available to the committee a series of issue papers and fact sheets that may help you in understanding some of the provisions and the history behind some of the issues that we're dealing with here, the frequently asked questions on some of the items, because we know that there may be confusion amongst stakeholders about what these mean and how they would apply, as well, of course, the clause-by-clause. If there's anything more we can provide, we'd be happy to do so.

(1220)



Thank you, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Borges. We appreciate very much all of the information you have provided to us today.

We will start with our questioning.

Ms. Block, for seven minutes, please.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair, and I would echo the comments welcoming all of you here today. I appreciate the opportunity to ask you questions about Bill C-49.

You welcomed us here and thanked us for taking the time to be here, but it was because of a motion by this committee that we're actually here a week early, and so I want to thank you for being here and taking the time.

I also want to extend a welcome to my colleagues. I hope everyone had a good summer and I am looking forward to working with all of you, going into this session. Of course, there could be some changes. I also want to welcome my two colleagues on this side of the table who aren't normally members of this committee but who have graciously accepted the duty and the opportunity to be here as we work through Bill C-49.

I do appreciate the work that has gone into a bill like Bill C-49, and I think even your own opening remarks demonstrate how broadly this bill casts its net. In fact, we would have suggested that it were an omnibus bill, covering three modes of transportation and addressing a number of issues. One would probably also readily admit that the bill may not be perfect, and so I think what we're here to do is to have the opportunity to ask questions, and hear from witnesses to find out for ourselves what measures you got right, and whether there are amendments or recommendations that our stakeholders might offer.

Given those initial observations, I guess what I would like to ask is when and why was the decision made to create this very large bill that addresses so many different modes of transportation?

Ms. Helena Borges:

The proposed legislative amendments have been put together in one bill since they collectively support the commitments made in the government's strategic plan for transportation 2030. All of these elements are included in the five themes that the minister announced last November when he put forward the plan to modernize Canada's transportation system. The majority of the proposed legislative amendments also include input from the CTA review panel report that was made public on February 25, 2016. Their genesis is in those recommendations.

Further, almost 90% of the amendments will be to one act, which in and of itself is an omnibus act. The Canada Transportation Act is the main piece of legislation for the economic regulation of the air sector and rail sector, and with the powers of the agency in dealing with disputes, and all of those kinds of things. So the majority of them are amendments. A small portion of them are consequential amendments from the amendments made to the Canada Transportation Act, such as the change in the foreign ownership for airlines, which results in consequential amendments to the Air Canada Public Participation Act or the CN privatization act and others.

So to us it makes sense to package all of these together, based on the rooting in those three pieces. As well, I must say that this committee has given us a wealth of information in some of the reports that you've done over the past year on rail safety, on the rail freight legislation, and we thought that putting them together would provide a holistic and wholesome approach to the amendments we are proposing in this bill.

(1225)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

I'll follow up with another question that drills a bit further down into one of the reasons I asked that question. Given that a review of the Railway Safety Act has just been initiated, I believe, why would we include the provisions for the LVVR measures in Bill C-49 rather than looking to include them in the Railway Safety Act?

Ms. Helena Borges:

Thank you very much for that question.

As you may be aware, the recommendations on LVVR have been around for some time. We've been looking at this issue since the early 2000s. More recently, the Transportation Safety Board has put it on their watch-list, and we take the safety board's watch-list very seriously.

In fact, one of the recommendations from this committee, when they reviewed our rail safety measures, was to implement LVVRs as soon as possible. Also, I'll say that a supplementary one was to get on with responding to the safety board's recommendations more quickly than we have in the past.

There are a lot of other reasons why we are moving forward on that, given the benefit that LVVR could have on improving railway safety, and we think now is the right time to move ahead with it, because it will require regulations as well. We could wait for the Railway Safety Act, but that would delay it by at least another year, if not longer. Based on the Transportation Safety Board's recommendations, we agree that we need to move ahead with this quickly.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Block.

Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Good morning. I'd also like to welcome you back.

In your opinion, do you think there's a gap between Bills C-49 and C-30?

Ms. Helena Borges:

I have looked at all of the recommendations that were in your study of Bill C-30. I believe you had 17 recommendations. We've gone through all of those, and I would say that we have addressed them all, as well as actually implementing some of the recommendations you had in there and allowing some to sunset. Those that sunset are two that were in Bill C-30. We have a rationale for letting those sunset: it is basically because the situation has changed considerably since 2013-14.

I don't believe there is a gap. I think we have addressed all of the recommendations well. In fact, I would say that we have gone beyond in addressing other recommendations that the CTA review panel put forward and for which stakeholders have been asking for a few years.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

In your opening remarks you mentioned consultations that were undertaken in regard to rail. I wonder if you have undertaken general consultations in regard to the entirety of the proposed amendments.

Ms. Helena Borges:

I can tell you that we have done exhaustive consultation. We normally do not consult on amendments that are in a bill, as that is a parliamentary privilege, but we do consult on the issues and the policy direction that we are looking at taking.

That consultation has happened over the last 18 months, with the minister launching it right after he tabled the CTA review panel report last February. He launched a series of 10 round tables across the country that were focused on the themes of the transportation plan he announced last fall. In addition to that, he had two Facebook Live sessions with Canadians. We also had opportunities for stakeholders to put comments online and received about 230 submissions. We had over 70 written submissions sent in as part of our consultation, and another 70 went directly to the minister. Those submissions have informed our advice and our amendments. We also involved our provincial and territorial colleagues in that process.

Since then, we have continued to work exhaustively with the railways and the rail sector—shippers that use the railways, and other players in the rail sector—to make sure we understand their concerns and that in putting forward this package we are addressing the issues they had.

(1230)

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

How do Canadians benefit from these changes?

Ms. Helena Borges:

I would say that is probably one of the most important elements of this bill. We and the minister have been hearing for years about air travel and how people are frustrated with their air travel experiences. The passenger rights that are included in the bill are in fact revolutionary from a Canadian perspective.

We've really looked across the globe at what other countries have in place and have taken the best of what we've seen, making sure we are addressing the irritants I listed in my speech, because that is what matters to Canadians. This is an issue that has been quite active in the media even as late as last week here in Ottawa with the Air Transat situation.

I think that is really important for Canadians, but I'd say that the measures in the rest of the bill, particularly the rail freight and marine measures, are also important.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Let me interject here quickly. I'm running a little short on time.

Something in regard to passenger rights that caught my eye was that penalties aren't actually built into the legislation. What are the merits of this?

Ms. Helena Borges:

You'll notice that the amendments to the act give the Canadian Transportation Agency the authority to make regulations. The details of the compensation regimes—the way those irritants will be addressed—will be in regulations.

We will work with the agency. We want to make sure that Canadians have an opportunity to voice their views on what the compensation should be, to make sure that it addresses their concerns.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair. It is a pleasure to see you at the helm of our committee again.

Welcome to everyone with whom I had the pleasure of working last year and whose faces are familiar to me. Welcome also to those of you who are joining us, and I hope you will be here permanently. If not, I heartily commend you. That is all for my greetings, since I probably have more questions to ask than the time available will allow.

I would like to draw particular attention to a sentence in your opening remarks. You said that Bill C-49 seeks transparency, fairness and efficiency. I must admit that I stumbled over the word “efficiency”. Let me cite a few examples from various modes of transportation that do not illustrate efficiency.

The first example is probably voice and video recorders. The report about these recorders, conducted by a working group of the Transportation Safety Board, or TSB, found that the use of these recorders would have been helpful in arriving at definitive conclusions in their investigations in less than 1% of cases. Less than 1% of cases. If we are talking about recorders, that is unfortunately because there has been an accident. In the interest of efficiency, I would think that train conductor fatigue should be addressed before the recorders. In our air safety study last year, we found that pilot fatigue was an important factor to be considered.

Why is Bill C-49 so specific about requirements for recorders while saying so little about conductor fatigue?

Ms. Helena Borges:

Thank you for your question. I will let my colleague Brigitte answer, as she is responsible for these matters. She can tell you about ongoing measures related to conductor fatigue.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo (Director General, Rail Safety, Department of Transport):

Hello. Thank you for your question.

In order to improve rail safety, we are currently considering a range of measures including fatigue. We have in fact begun discussions and preliminary consultations with the industry and unions to review regulations pertaining to fatigue. This was discussed at the rail safety advisory committee's last meeting. In early October, the minister will issue a notice inviting input on the regulatory changes pertaining to fatigue.

(1235)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. If I understand you correctly, you are holding consultations, gathering input and considering the issue of fatigue. In the bill before us, however, which is practically an omnibus bill, we would have expected to see concrete measures. The same can be said for passenger rights. As my colleague Mr. Sikand so rightly pointed out, two years later, there are still no regulations. Rather, you are saying that consultations will begin after royal assent to determine what the bill of rights should include. In other words, it will take at least another year until passengers find out the basis for their rights.

Are we about to miss the train or the plane on this?

In the previous Parliament, a bill of rights was introduced which the minister—who was not the minister at the time—was very favourable to. He even voted for that bill of rights.

Why can the process not be speeded up in order to serve the public?

Ms. Helena Borges:

Thank you very much for your question.

I would like to clarify something. We already have legislative powers and regulations pertaining to fatigue, and we are going to amend the legislation. On the other hand, we do not have legislative powers pertaining to locomotive voice and video recorders. That is something the bill would establish. We need that power in order to introduce regulations.

The same thing applies to passenger rights. At present, the Canada Transportation Act does not yet give the Canadian Transportation Agency the flexibility or power to make regulations on passenger rights. Once this bill is passed, as we hope it will be, we will then, together with the Canadian Transportation Agency, be able to accelerate the regulation process in order to implement the technical aspects of those rights as quickly as possible. The same is true for locomotive voice and video recorders. We have to conduct consultations, but we are prepared to work as quickly as possible in order for these aspects to be in place in 2018.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Borges.

I'm sorry, Mr. Aubin, but your time is up.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I have a quick question with respect to the earlier comments about amending the Canada Marine Act to allow Canada port authorities, the CPAs, and their wholly owned subsidiaries to access the anticipated Canada infrastructure bank loans and loan guarantees. We all recognize that most of those CPAs are former federally owned assets that were negotiated to the private sector.

One of the four pillars contained within the government's transportation strategic plan places an emphasis on trade corridors. As we all know, this is a catalyst to better position Canada to capitalize on global opportunities and to perform better globally and to ensure disciplined asset management, which in turn will develop a stronger trade-related asset that will contribute to Canada's international performance, international competitiveness, and prosperity.

Will the Canada Marine Act allow the St. Lawrence Seaway, a federally owned asset, to access Canada infrastructure bank loans and loan guarantees?

My second question is with respect to other programs that we're currently offering. This government has taken it upon itself to offer, for example, programs attached to super clusters, trade corridors, and smart cities and, finally, in Q1 of 2018, the actual infrastructure program that we're going to be embarking on.

Will the St. Lawrence Seaway have access to those programs as well as CPAs?

(1240)

Ms. Helena Borges:

I'll clarify right off the bat that you're right that the St. Lawrence Seaway is a federal asset. Because of that, it receives a statutory appropriation from Transport Canada on an annual basis for any capital improvements that are required on the seaway. The company that operates the seaway on our behalf tells us basically what the requirements are and receives the funding to make those improvements. Given that it receives a statutory appropriation, that's how it will be appropriated in the future. It doesn't need to have access to these programs because it has access to the fiscal framework directly.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Great. Thank you.

There are areas located along the St. Lawrence Seaway that actually have their trade corridor—I won't say “designations”—but their trade corridors. There's road, air, multimodals, and so forth, that have plans to put in place an economic strategy to take advantage of these assets. Unfortunately, a lot of times those improvements—under that allocation that is being made to the St. Lawrence Seaway—are not being made. The assets have deteriorated and they're in need of some work. When we read today's article by Mr. Runciman, we see that he recognizes that. Moving forward, we expect that work to be done.

If the work isn't in fact part of that program, in terms of the appropriations, what then happens to those areas that made this part of their strategy? Can they make an application for one of those programs that I mentioned earlier to get some of the work done to further their economic desires on a federally owned asset?

Ms. Helena Borges:

If there are needed improvements to the seaway that the corporation hasn't identified and that we're not funding, we would ask that we be made aware of what those are so that we can approach the corporation and find out why those aren't included. That would be part of the answer.

To answer the rest of your question, the minister announced in early July the national trade corridors fund. It's a national fund and its sole purpose is to fund trade-related transportation infrastructure. This is very exciting. There is $2 billion available over the next 11 years. In fact, we've already gone out and just last week received some expressions of interest for projects that people would like funded. The eligible recipients are basically anyone that owns and operates transportation infrastructure that supports trade. They are more than welcome to apply through that program. This will be a first round. We will have subsequent rounds in future years, but that is a way for others, like port authorities, road authorities, airport authorities, railways, and anybody who operates transportation infrastructure that supports trade, to seek funding support for their projects.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Ms. Borges. I appreciate both of those answers. One is to get into contact with Transport Canada to ensure that the assets that should be managed appropriately are—and I'll follow up on that at a later date. But the second part is the other partners that may, in tandem with a federally owned asset such as the seaway, apply to the trade corridors or other programs that are being made available to enhance those assets, as well as having the federally owned asset there, too.

My last question is just that. Do you see it as appropriate that these private sector partners, as well as municipalities that run alongside, in this case, the Welland Canal and the St. Lawrence Seaway, make those applications to work in tandem with a federally owned asset?

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Badawey.

Could we get a short answer to that question?

Ms. Helena Borges:

The answer is yes.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you.

The Chair:

That's great. Thank you very much.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

It's good to see everybody back, and some new faces here as well.

I wanted to reach into the air passenger bill of rights issue a little bit. A lot of focus, of course, has been on the airlines and what they do or don't do. We've had some pretty alarming examples of some difficulties in recent weeks, but I've also been in situations waiting on the tarmac because, for instance, the terminal doesn't have the crew there to operate the gantry and the ramps, etc.

Would we not necessarily focus specifically on airlines but have this be, if you like, a “whole of experience” approach, where if there's a deficit in service to the public it isn't just focused on one part of the sector, which could easily do the old finger-pointing to someplace else?

(1245)

Ms. Helena Borges:

That's a very good question. Yes, there are multiple parties involved in the air experience. As I mentioned in my remarks, one of the elements that is in the bill is giving us the authority to collect information from all of those who are involved in the air traveller experience—the airline, the airport, everybody else who works at the airport, the Canadian air security agency, all of that chain—to look at where things are working, where they are not working, and what kinds of issues are coming up, so that we can report to Canadians on how well those are working.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

There was also, I think, historically some resistance from the Department of Transport to the Government of Canada on joint ventures. I gather there will be some players, particularly in the airlines, that are resistant to joint ventures.

In managing these arrangements on a go-forward basis, can you describe some of the triggers, some things that joint ventures may present to you that would cause concern?

Ms. Helena Borges:

I'm going to ask my colleague, Sara Wiebe, and perhaps Mark Schaan, to answer some of those questions based on the experience to date and what we're proposing as different going forward.

Mr. Mark Schaan (Director General, Marketplace Framework Policy Branch, Strategic Policy Sector, Department of Industry):

Thanks so much. Bill C-49 proposes a new approach to metal-neutral joint ventures, or joint ventures in the air sector. Right now they are assessed solely on the basis of competition and competition law, wherein the primary considerations are duration of competition and economic understanding.

What C-49 does is broaden that examination to include a whole and robust competition assessment by the bureau. It also includes public interest benefits, which may include things like connectedness, safety, or the traveller experience. Insofar as a joint venture raises concerns, I think those would be that the public interest benefits assessed by Transport Canada in that review process are insufficient to overcome what would be the significant lessening of competition in the sector. What C-49 does is to attempt to balance potential negatives in any proposed transaction with potential public surplus benefits that Canadians might experience. It is necessary for one to overwhelm the other in order to go forward. It's a voluntary system by which the proponent has to have a reasonable assumption of likelihood of passage to be able to pursue the voluntary process to get the minister's authority.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you for that.

On the issue of video and voice recorders, I had gone through this in a former role at metro Vancouver's transportation authority in respect of onboard video and voice recording on buses. There are some significant labour relations issues inherent in that, particularly the concern of members that this would be used for disciplinary purposes. The whole privacy issue, of course, centres on who owns the data, how it's stored, how it's accessed, and how long it's going to be kept. Are all of these issues going to be addressed in regulation as we go forward?

Ms. Helena Borges:

The answer is yes. I'll ask my colleague Brigitte to give you a little more on how we're addressing these issues.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I have one additional question I'll throw in right now. We're focusing only on class 1 railroads for this technology. Coincidentally, some of the legal action around Lac-Mégantic is starting just now. Even if these provisions had been in place, the railroad in question wouldn't have had them. Given what we know about the status of the health of short-line railroads, why not have this extended to them? You can include that.

Ms. Helena Borges:

Thank you.

Brigitte.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

Madam Chair, I would say that the regulations under development—and we are engaging stakeholders on this—would indeed look at issues related to data protection, the retention period of the data, the requirement for companies to develop policies to prevent unauthorized access, and the record-keeping requirements a company would need to have in place. How to put this measure forward while we safeguard privacy rights is top of mind.

There is no decision yet on the scope of application. In fact, we are planning to define the scope in regulations, and it would not just be on class 1. It's not a de facto conclusion that it should be class 1. We are doing the risk assessment to determine whom it's going to apply to, and this could include short-lines.

(1250)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I'm sorry, Mr. Hardie, but your time is up.

Mr. O'Toole.

Hon. Erin O'Toole (Durham, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair. It's good to join my colleagues today.

Thank you, ladies and gentlemen, for being part of this.

I think this bill is critical to Canada's future. Modernizing our transportation network is essential to the way we get our goods to market in Canada, across North America, and around the world.

Marine, air, rail, and, by extension, transporter trucking—these form the infrastructure of our economy. This bill's goal is to build that out to 2030 and beyond. One thing I see missing is cabotage. I am wondering which industries considered cabotage, that is, allowing a domestic carrier to pick up and remove commercial goods or passengers en route, by marine or air transport, within the United States. In regard to 2030 and beyond, if we're looking at efficiency—which Ms. Borges said was the goal of all of this—cabotage should certainly be about that. Has the government examined this in any of these areas?

Ms. Helena Borges:

Cabotage is something we've examined repeatedly. The issues behind cabotage go beyond transportation. They deal with the ability of workers from one country to work in another country, and thus would implicate the immigration departments of those countries in terms of their allowing that to happen. We are allowing some cabotage through this bill related to marine transportation, and it relates to empty container movements. Right now, an international vessel that brings in containers full, then empties them here, cannot move them between one point in Canada and another point in Canada. They have to be moved either by truck or by rail. This is allowing them to move empty containers from one port to another port by marine vessel, which, in fact, is the most efficient way to do it, not to mention that it's probably the most environmentally efficient way as well. They can then take the containers back to get them refilled. We are allowing that, but in the other modes there are other hurdles that would have to be overcome, including other countries allowing Canada to do the same in their countries, which so far has not been allowed.

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

The interest in timing that we have, Ms. Borges, is that we're modernizing transportation while we're modernizing NAFTA. If you look at efficiency within transporter trucking, for instance, a lot of the trucks we have going south come back empty. If we could fill them—we're burning greenhouse gas emissions, which I know is another area of interest to this government, and of all of us indeed—that would minimize the wasted GHGs of empty trucks coming back. If we're modernizing transportation and modernizing NAFTA, why would cabotage not be part of it? I notice the commissioner of competition asked for this examination in 2015 in many of these same industries, so to you, Ms. Borges, or to representatives from the Competition Bureau, why weren't these elements part of this act?

Ms. Helena Borges:

As I mentioned, to include that in this act, we would need to have a whole bunch of other issues resolved, such as the labour issue of having people able to work here—and actually, for example, under NAFTA, the U.S. authority to do that. I understand that some of those discussions are going on. Through prior changes, we have already achieved an incidental move: so if you're a trucking company going from Canada to the U.S. and you have a second point in the U.S., as long as it's part of one move, you can stop in two locations. But you're right that we can't pick up the traffic there and bring it back. These are things that are under consideration, as part of discussions, but they're not part of this bill because, frankly, it cannot include those discussions without the other ones happening.

(1255)

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

Certainly I don't want to pry into the confidential negotiating positions of Canada, but I'm wondering whether, within the context of Bill C-49 and the NAFTA negotiations, studies were done on the efficiencies of cabotage, namely in marine, rail, and trucking, and whether an assessment of greenhouse gas emissions was done by your or another department. I'm wondering—without getting into the confidential negotiating positions—whether any studies on those two areas can be shared with this committee.

Ms. Helena Borges:

I would have to check whether there have been any studies done on that recently that could be shared. We can take that back and get back to you.

On rail, cabotage exists today. The rail lines are taking things back and forth, so cabotage on rail is really not an issue. It's more on the trucking and on the air side.

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

Now to my last 50 seconds, thank you very much.

Regarding the child portion of the passenger bill of rights, I see that children's ability to be seated near a parent is critical. I think all of us on all sides have been concerned by cases of children caught on no-fly lists and understand why the ministers has talked about it. Should the fairness and quick resolution of that not be a part of the passenger bill of rights, because these certainly are minors? Was that considered for this bill of rights?

Ms. Helena Borges:

As you may know, it's the Minister of Public Safety who has responsibility for the security elements of the issue you're raising of children on no-fly lists, so I would have to defer that question to Public Safety and Minister Goodale.

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. O'Toole.

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser (Central Nova, Lib.):

Thank you very much to our witnesses, to our chair, and to my colleagues, for being here.

I'll focus my questions on the portion of Bill C-49 that deals with air travel for now, and start with the passenger bill of rights.

You mentioned in passing, Ms. Borges, how these stories sometimes make the news in a rather undesirable way. It doesn't surprise me that some of these videos go viral and I think it's because when we see a passenger mistreated, we have an emotional and visceral response because it sometimes reflects our own experience. I've had my articles of clothing come out one at a time on the conveyor belt before. I've been sitting on the tarmac for hours at a time and I've had my instrument delayed an entire flight before I could pick it up, so I respond the same way the public does and I understand the frustrations.

You mentioned at the beginning a laundry list of the irritants and that language was to be required to be put in place so that essentially consumers understand what the remedies are and how they can enforce them. Could you perhaps go into greater detail to assure Canadians that they are going to have a remedy when their rights are infringed.

Ms. Helena Borges:

Part of the list that I mentioned, or the first element, was that the air carriers will have to make very clear in their tariff what their obligations are in exchange for a ticket being sold, right? That will have to be very clear and understandable, and it will be the basis upon which then passengers can complain to the agency if something hasn't been done. By having the regulations strictly identify what the irritant or the issue is and how it is to be addressed, this will make it more obvious to passengers what they are entitled to if their rights have been violated. If you are stranded on a tarmac or delayed for whatever reason, what should the airline be doing? Or if you're bumped, what should the compensation be? All of that will become very clear because the regulations will specify all of it.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

In terms of the scope of application, will this apply to all passengers travelling within or through Canada?

Ms. Helena Borges:

Yes, it will apply to passengers coming into, leaving, or within Canada.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Excellent.

Assuming that one's rights are infringed by an air carrier, I don't necessarily think that governance by an angry mob is the way to go. I do have some sympathy for the airlines that they don't get unfairly dinged in the event they have a minor breach. Is the style of damages or compensation that we might be looking for a compensatory model, as opposed to a penal model so to speak?

Ms. Helena Borges:

It will definitely be compensatory. In fact, what we envisage is that the penalty will go to the traveller, not as we do sometimes where the government charges the airline for the infraction. And it would be compensatory in terms of directly.... If their flight is bumped and they lose their ticket, it would cover that, but it would also cover the inconvenience faced by the passenger. All of that will be consulted on and we're looking forward to the views of Canadians based on some of their experiences and what we need to put in the regulations.

(1300)

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Certainly.

I would like to shift gears for a moment and deal with international ownership of Canadian airlines. I've met with a number of smaller airlines and discount airlines that were looking for this kind of a change. They've assured me that they can come in and offer lower cost fares. If you allow international ownership to be increased and they can raise the capital, they can open access to new markets within Canada.

First, do you anticipate that those benefits will come to pass with this rule change? Will we see the cost of airfares going down and see airlines servicing new markets in Canada as a result of this change?

Ms. Helena Borges:

Indeed, we do. I'll say that before this bill was put together, the minister authorized two airlines because he has an exemption authority now under the act. Enerjet and Jetlines have filed an application to have greater foreign ownership and he approved that. Interestingly enough, one of them, Jetlines, just announced today that they're planning on starting up their service from Hamilton and Waterloo airports in Ontario starting in the summer of 2018. Those will be new services that are coming to Canadians and, hopefully, as they're saying, these will be lower cost services because they don't have some of the other activities that the other airlines do. We see this as bringing new flight opportunities for Canadians, and probably in locations where the other airlines are not providing sufficient level of service or number of flights.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Certainly.

While we still have a few minutes remaining, I want to tackle the idea of the magic number at 49%. Of course, we all know that's less than 50%, so control would remain within a Canadian entity, but why is Canadian control so important? Some of the arguments that we made—lowering costs and extending service—might be better served at 100% ownership and, of course, we've seen recommendations to that effect before. Why is 49% the right figure?

Ms. Helena Borges:

We looked across the globe at what other countries are doing. This is a very strategic sector for Canada. Much like telecommunications and others, it is a network sector, and we want to have a strong and vibrant airline industry in Canada.

When we looked across the globe, most countries now are in the 49% range. A few are lower—say, 33%—and 49% provides enough flexibility for airlines to get the private investment they need while still ensuring that the control is based in Canada. We think that is a right balance which meets all the objectives we were trying to achieve.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Fraser.

We move on to Mr. Shields.

Mr. Martin Shields (Bow River, CPC):

Thank you, Madame Chair.

I appreciate the opportunity to be here and to participate in this committee this week. You can thank us from the west for bringing summer to Ottawa, to those people who haven't seen it this year, though we will be inside and will be missing it anyway.

I appreciate, Ms. Borges, your presentation. One thing I would like to ask is this. As the sunset clause went into effect, people, knowing what they were going to be faced with, didn't extend. Did you consider extending, rather than going back to a previous structure?

Ms. Helena Borges:

Yes, we did consider extending. Some of the provisions that were in the act have in fact been carried forward, such as level of service, arbitration, and penalties when they don't meet their obligations.

We have let one sunset provision go, which was the government's prescribing the volumes of grain that had to be carried. That provision, when it was implemented, was In fact for the situation of 2013-14, the bumper crop in the bad weather. We ended up using it for only about a year and a half, and then we stopped because the railways were in fact carrying more grain than we were mandating; that situation is gone. We believe we don't need it. It wasn't used for the last two years, so there's no need for it to continue.

The other one we allowed to lapse was extended interswitching, because after the assessment we did, we uncovered that it wasn't heavily used, but it was having unintended consequences on the competitiveness of our railways vis-à-vis the U.S. railways. We replaced it with a measure that we believe will provide greater benefit to more shippers across the country, which is the long-haul interswitching provision.

(1305)

Mr. Martin Shields:

When you move into the proposals next, in the sense of an ongoing negotiation, it's not as if there will be a consistent formula out there: you have to negotiate it. There is some concern that there will be more bureaucracy, that both sides will have to spend more time to deal with it, if you have to negotiate it rather than having a set formula that's consistent over time.

Ms. Helena Borges:

In fact, we encourage negotiation on everything in rail, but the long-haul interswitching provision is that if they cannot come to an agreement, then they go to the agency. It's the agency that actually sets the rate for the portion of the route where the product has to be carried to the interchange.

We've made the process quite efficient so that they would get a decision within 30 days. The rate would be based on comparable traffic moving in similar circumstances.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Okay. Thank you.

You mentioned that you consider the changes to the bill of rights as revolutionary. I guess there could be a slight need for definition of what “revolutionary” is. I don't quite see it as revolutionary in my context.

You also said that you're increasing services but that there would be no cost increase to the traveller. I have a little problem understanding, if you do this, how ticket prices will not be going up. Somebody is going to have to pay for this.

Ms. Helena Borges:

We have tried to balance the expectation of Canadians, when they pay for a ticket to go from A to B, and what the carrier is selling them. The challenge we have right now is that in many cases the consumer—the traveller—is not getting what they've paid for.

We've made sure in constructing this and looking at these issues that the regulations that will come forward will balance these. We want to make sure that travellers are getting what they paid for—that's what they expect and that's what they're entitled to—and that carriers comply with that. If carriers step up their game and deliver the service better, then it shouldn't cost them any more than it's costing them today, because they're getting paid for it.

Mr. Martin Shields:

If they made more money the other way, though, when they overbook, and they're going to make less because they can't overbook—

Ms. Helena Borges:

Yes, we're not prohibiting overbooking.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Ah.

Ms. Helena Borges:

We're in fact telling them, “If you overbook and if a passenger is unable to take that flight, then you have to compensate that passenger for the ticket that passenger has purchased because he's not being allowed to fly, and on top of that you also have to compensate him for his out-of-pocket or other expenses”, and those would be detailed in the regulations.

Mr. Martin Shields:

I understand and agree, but somebody is going to pay somewhere because that's less money.

Ms. Helena Borges:

Somebody's going to pay.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Yes, exactly.

When you talked about consulting with everybody as you go forward on this, do you have a timeline?

The Chair:

Mr. Shields, I'm sorry, I hate to interrupt you.

Mr. Martin Shields:

No problem, thank you, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

You were on a very interesting group of questions.

Monsieur Aubin, you have three minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I would like to draw some more comparisons. For a bill as important as this one, as for any other bill, I think it is important to compare ourselves with others.

You used this approach earlier in answering Mr. Fraser's question about the 49% maximum. For my part, I would like to go back to the two points I mentioned earlier, locomotive voice and video recorders and the passenger bill of rights.

It appears that voice and video recordings are not taken into consideration in Canada, unlike European countries, New Zealand and Australia. As to the passenger bill of rights, those same countries, and in particular European countries, have a much stronger bill of rights than what is proposed in Bill C-49.

There will be consultations. Why isn't Canada doing what is being done elsewhere? That is my main question. In the upcoming consultations on the passenger bill of rights, would it not be helpful to draw on a specific example rather than broad philosophical principles?

(1310)

Ms. Helena Borges:

I will ask Ms. Diogo to talk about the situation in Europe, because we have looked at what is in place. Let me just say that our regulatory and operational framework is completely different from what they have in Europe.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

To develop locomotive voice and video recorders, we have looked at and are continuing to look at what is done elsewhere. We are looking at the system in the United States in particular, because our trains will cross the border. We always look at what is in place elsewhere and how we can learn from those examples. We have done this and we continue to discuss these matters with our European colleagues.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

What about the passenger bill of rights?

Ms. Helena Borges:

As to the bill of rights, we have compared the current frameworks in the United States and Europe, and have taken the best from each of them. When we introduce regulations, we will look at what is in place in the United States, Europe and other countries and develop a framework that is even better than what those countries have. That is our objective.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

The upcoming consultations will be based on the conclusions of the analysis of those two frameworks. Is that correct?

Ms. Helena Borges:

Yes.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Monsieur Aubin.

Go ahead, Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I just want to follow up on some of my colleague's questions around long-haul interswitching as it goes to the extended interswitching that was in Bill C-30. I thought I heard you say that some of the measures in Bill C-30 have been carried over in Bill C-49, but in fact there are no measures in place right now when it comes to interswitching or long-haul interswitching or extended interswitching because that legislation was allowed to sunset on August 1, before this legislation has received royal assent. So right now our shippers are without any ability to do any kind of long-haul or extended interswitching. Is that correct?

Ms. Helena Borges:

That is correct. They do have access to what we call regular interswitching, which is 30 kilometres; that existed in the legislation before and continues to exist.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay.

Ms. Helena Borges:

In fact, we're recommending some improvements to it in this bill, but yes, with the sunset, the extended interswitching no longer operates. That's why we're hopeful that this bill will receive royal assent so that long-haul can be put in place.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I have many questions around long-haul interswitching that I'm sure we'll get to over the next few days, but I'm wondering if you could describe the difference between long-haul interswitching and competitive line rates.

Ms. Helena Borges:

I'm going to ask Marcia Jones to take you through some of the high-level differences between the two and, as you say, we'll probably have more opportunities to get into detail on this.

Ms. Marcia Jones (Director, Rail Policy Analysis and Legislative Initiatives, Department of Transport):

Thank you for the opportunity to respond to this question.

Long-haul interswitching provides to a shipper that's captive to the line of only one railway outside of the regular 30-kilometre interswitch zone with access to the line of a competing carrier for a distance of up to 1,200 kilometres or 50% of the total haul, whichever is greater. In some respects there are some similarities between long-haul interswitching and competitive line rates, but there are some key differences and I'll set them out for you very briefly.

First of all, long-haul interswitching does not include a requirement for a shipper seeking relief to have an agreement with the connecting carrier. We heard from shippers across the board that this was an impediment to their accessing competitive line rates. That does not exist under this provision. In fact, the legislation specifies that the connecting carrier is required to provide cars and to contribute to the cost of the interchange.

Second, the Canadian Transportation Agency will have access to a much more significant amount of granular waybill data, which will allow it to calculate rates that are comparable. They will have access to 100% of railway waybill data, which is a key aspect of this measure.

Third, just generally, we have evidence that railways can and will compete for traffic, as with the case under extended interswitching, and that long-haul interswitch measure builds upon that by allowing for competition between two carriers by which the agency can set both the rate and the terms of service.

(1315)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

One of the questions I have then is with regard to long-haul interswitching rate setting. I know that in Bill C-49, paragraph 135(3)(b), in setting an LHI rate the CTA has to have regard for the rates of comparable traffic for the distance over which the traffic is moved. However, in the “frequently asked questions” document that was circulated last week, it is noted that this does not mean that an LHI rate would be a simple pro-rated amount for the LHI short-haul based on the total distance from origin to destination of the long haul.

Will the total distance from origin to its ultimate final destination and the rates for comparable traffic for these distances be taken into account when setting an LHI rate? Really, it's based on what is perceived to be two different explanations by Transport Canada.

Ms. Marcia Jones:

To be clear, under long-haul interswitching, the agency is provided with considerable discretion to set the rate. You are correct that it is not a prescriptively pro-rated rate. The agency is given a number of factors to consider in setting the rate, which include the distance as well as other factors, including, for example, the operational requirements of the shipper.

However, it is important to note as well that the rate set is a blended rate. For the first 30 kilometres, it is a cost-based regulated interswitch rate with the balance set by the agency under the approach I just outlined.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I have a few questions to follow up on an earlier question. We're talking about the compensatory versus penal punishment for a passengers bill of rights. Will there be any tracking of infractions? If a company routinely overbooks its planes and has to pay off one passenger, will that be known? Is there any punishment for constantly infringing on the rights of passengers as opposed to doing it once every now and again?

Ms. Helena Borges:

As we said, the agency will be getting authority to collect data on the performance of the parties involved in the air traveller experience. The agency will then get information. If there are too many complaints coming to the agency from travellers that certain airlines are not respecting what the commitments are and what's in their tariff, which would include the penalties and the compensation and all of that kind of stuff, then the agency can look at what action needs to be taken in a specific area, because that's how the information will come forward.

We're hoping that through these measures—because it will be clear and transparent—the carriers will comply and that we won't be getting a lot of complaints. But yes, the agency will have that information.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Understood.

On a totally different topic, back to the voice recorders, we're talking about putting them in railways, possibly class 1 railways, or possibly all of them, but we don't know yet. Has there been consideration to doing that in aircraft as well with data recorders?

Ms. Helena Borges:

We already have them in the air sector and the marine sector. Actually, the regulatory environment there is done on an international scale through the International Civil Aviation Organization, which is located in Montreal. They have had voice recorders on the aircraft for decades. That's in addition to the black box that goes in the aircraft to know how the aircraft itself behaves. They already have that. You often hear those tapes on TV when you see they're also in touch with air traffic control, and the air traffic control has the same kind of capability. They, in fact, already exist.

(1320)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have another question. It's one that I've asked many people and I've never had a good answer to.

We're talking about class 1, class 2, and class 3 railways. There is one company—and I won't name it here—that has about 100 short-lines but it's not considered a class 1 railway. Is there any way of fixing that, or is that always going to be the case?

Ms. Helena Borges:

The way the definitions are done is by the revenue they make with the amount of tonnage. If you have what I'll call a “holding company” that holds various railways that operate across the country, in some cases those railways may be under federal jurisdiction, and in other cases they may be under provincial jurisdiction. They're not operating as one company, but operating separately under what I'll call a “franchise”, differently. The classification is really based on those revenues and the activity that the companies generate.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What elements of Bill C-30 are going to remain in place?

Ms. Helena Borges:

The elements of Bill C-30 that will remain in place are the arbitration for level of service, and the operational terms. The agency was given authority to define those operational terms when the bill was first introduced, so that is one element that is there.

The penalties for the railways not complying with what's in their level of service agreement on service also continues to be in operation.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have time left for one question.

On interswitch traffic, railways operate by paying for loaded cars as opposed to empty cars. If you forced another company to take your loaded car and then the company that would originally have had it has to bring back the empty car, who is responsible for that? Is it going to cause problems where one company can be forced to take the traffic and another company has to provide the empty cars?

Ms. Helena Borges:

We're not forcing anybody to carry anything here. The railways, among themselves, determine what arrangements they have with one another. Usually, the railway is carrying full one way and is empty another way, or sometimes they can bring back some stuff on the cars they've unloaded.

The arrangements between the railways are commercially defined and they determine how those cars are moved, where those cars go. It's all between them on a commercial basis.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do I have time?

The Chair:

You have half a minute left.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a final question on security stuff.

In the United States there is a lot of positive train control and I haven't heard much talk of that in Canada. Are we going in that direction?

Ms. Helena Borges:

I will ask Brigitte to answer. It's a hot topic right now, but I'll ask her to give you some context on work that's under way.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

On positive train control, we are following very closely what is happening in the U.S., and we've been doing studies of train control in Canada. Last September or November, we shared with this committee a copy of the report of the Advisory Council on Rail Safety, which did an analysis of train control.

The conclusion was that positive train control, in its current form, was not something that we should be pursuing in Canada. Advanced train control technologies are definitely something that we should do, and we will continue to do those assessments. We are currently working with the rail research group at the University of Alberta to conduct further analysis. We will be happy to share future reports with the committee.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for that information.

Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

My question pertains to the Federal Railroad Administration, which is also opposed to voice and video recorders. In the report, they say the recorders are detrimental to staff relations.

I raised the following question when I spoke earlier. I wonder whether recorders are really the solution or whether Bill C-49 should instead introduce every measure possible to prevent accidents. Consider the transportation of dangerous substances, for example, which is barely mentioned in Bill C-49. This refers to transporting all kinds of substances by rail. Yet Bill C-49 does not include the development of a transportation mode for the future or specific features for dangerous goods. These include inflammable products, for example. Since trains are getting longer and longer, the risk of rail crashes is even greater.

Have these issues been considered or are recorders being offered as the answer to everything?

(1325)

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

Thank you for your question.

Recorders are not the answer to everything. It is important to look at the factors that affect rail safety and what measures should be taken. Since the Lac-Mégantic accident, the department has implemented various initiatives and measures. Changes have been made to the Railway Safety Act. We also continue to examine ways to improve safety. Recorders are intended to confirm exactly what happened on the train. At present, there is no way of knowing what interactions took place among the team members so as to determine what happened during an accident or how to go about preventing future accidents.

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada could provide further information about the incidents under discussion. The Board would like us to focus more on what happens on the train and, in particular, why people are missing red lights.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I have a final question, not that we're running low on time with these witnesses.

Mr. Garneau leveraged key findings from the 2016 Canada Transportation Act review. You were all a part of that, initiating a development of a vision for the future of transportation in Canada. With that, extensive consultations were in fact done. Those in the business, yourselves, were the experts to expand on the Canada Transportation Act review, and of course come up with the findings which we are witnessing today.

I do know that a strong consensus emerged from these consultations. We all understand that Canada's transportation system is critical to the well-being of our economy, moving goods and people throughout the nation, as well as internationally. Federal leadership and a national transportation strategy is, in fact, needed, and well overdue to support the system 20 to 30 years into the future, equalling a vision for transportation, the economy, safety, as well as efficiency.

Being efficient, as I just mentioned, and integrated, the national transportation system is vital to our economic growth, our trade, our social well-being, our environment as my colleagues across the way noted. Transportation 2030, anchored by five themes, responds to that and of course is a part of that.

Do you find that this legislation, based on your experience, which I might add is a lot more than our experience, actually achieves safety, efficiency, and finally, leverages all of our transportation assets throughout the nation to allow us to expand and enhance our global economic performance?

Ms. Helena Borges:

My simple answer to that is yes.

This act, this legislative package, is one of our key initiatives to deliver on the five themes you mentioned that are in the minister's vision. It does improve the travellers' experience. It does support trade corridors. It does improve security. It does deal with making the best use of all the modes and making sure that those modes are integrated. There will be other pieces of legislation that come forward and other initiatives that will be announced. This is the crowning achievement in putting a whole bunch of things together.

The minister also announced last fall the oceans protection plan, which deals extensively with our waterways. There's another bill in Parliament, Bill C-49, that complements that, but this one deals with all the parts and all the five themes. In our view, the proposed amendments to the various bills, particularly the Canada Transportation Act, will put us in good standing to having a very safe, efficient, competitive, and sustainable transportation system for the long term.

(1330)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much to all of you.

Ms. Borges, to all of your officials, thank you so very much for coming today as we open this very interesting piece of legislation.

Thank you for all of the information you provided.

Individually, if any of the committee members have come up with some issues they need answers to, I would certainly encourage them to contact you directly as well so that everyone has the knowledge they require.

Thank you very much.

Ms. Helena Borges:

Thank you. It's been a pleasure.

The Chair:

We will suspend until the next panel.

(1330)

(1350)

The Chair:

I will call the meeting back to order, if committee members could please take their seats.

Before we turn to our witnesses, we have a request for budget approval for this study. You all have a copy of it before you. Are there any questions?

Can I have a motion to adopt the budget proposal that's before you?

I have a motion by Mr. Fraser.

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Thank you all very much.

Turning to our witnesses, thank you very much to all of you for being here.

We now have the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board, a group that we would hope would never have anything to do, but unfortunately, in these last few years especially, you've had a lot on your plate. Thank you very much for being here.

Ms. Fox, would you like to introduce your colleagues? You have the floor.

Ms. Kathleen Fox (Chair, Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Good afternoon and thank you very much, Madam Chair and honourable members, for inviting the Transportation Safety Board of Canada to appear today so that we can answer your questions regarding Bill C-49.

As you know, this bill introduces changes to the Railway Safety Act and to the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act, and these changes would require a mandatory installation of voice and video recorders in locomotive cabs operating on main track and would expand access to those recordings to Transport Canada and the railway companies under specified conditions. You may also know that these kinds of recordings have been in widespread use on board ships and aircraft for many years.

I bring with me today three colleagues who offer a wealth of experience. [Translation]

Mr. Jean Laporte is our chief operating officer. He has been with the TSB since it was created and has extensive knowledge of our mandate and processes.[English]

To my left, Mr. Mark Clitsome is a former director of investigations for the air branch and has been working closely with Transport Canada on the proposed legislative changes as well as those changes proposed to our own act.

On my far right, Mr. Kirby Jang is our director for rail and pipeline investigations and was heavily involved in the study on locomotive voice and video recorders that was released last year.

I'll keep my opening remarks brief today so that we can get to your questions quickly. In fact, there are just four key points I would like to make.

Number one is that at the TSB we need voice and video recorders in locomotive cabs to better conduct our investigations.[Translation]

This is so critical that we have made two recommendations to this effect and put it on our Watchlist of key safety issues. Without locomotive voice and video recorders, or LVVRs, our investigators do not have access to all the information that they need to find out what happened—information that we need to help make Canada's rail network safer.[English]

Let me give you an example.

On February 26, 2012, a VIA Rail passenger train derailed near Burlington, Ontario, killing the three crew in the cab and leaving dozens of passengers injured. The event recorder on board gave us some data, which is how we know that train was travelling 67 miles per hour on a crossover with a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour. What we were never able to determine with certainty was why. Did the crew not see the signals telling them to slow down, or did they see them but somehow misinterpret them? We just don't know, and we never will. An in-cab voice and video recorder would have provided a better understanding of the operational and human factors affecting that crew and would have helped point investigators toward safety deficiencies that could then have been mitigated.

This brings me to my second point. The information obtained from voice and video recorders must remain privileged. It must not be shared publicly. It must remain protected so that only those with the authority and the direct need to use it for legitimate safety purposes may do so.

Third, the information from selected voice and video recorders should be made available to railway companies for use in the context of a non-punitive, proactive safety management system.

(1355)

[Translation]

Railway companies should be able to review the actions of their employees, for example, to see if track signals are always being called out, or if a train's limit of authority has been exceeded—actions that on their own might not directly cause an accident, but which could still indicate areas where safety can be improved. [English]

This should not be for the purposes of discipline but rather to identify and correct systemic issues, which might lead to improvements in operating procedures or training. I stress, though, that this must happen in a non-punitive environment, which is why I make my last point. Notwithstanding the fact that we want railways to be given some access to these recordings, appropriate safeguards must be built into the legislation and the regulations to ensure that this information is not used for disciplinary purposes, except in the most egregious circumstances.

This final requirement may ultimately prove to be among the most challenging, in part because it relies on the existence of something called a “just culture”. This can be defined as an environment that draws a clear distinction between simple human mistakes and unacceptable behaviour, one that does not immediately blame the worker but seeks first to find systemic contributing factors.

Canadian railways, however, have often demonstrated a very rules-based punitive culture. While progress is being made to improve that culture, the TSB nonetheless understands employee concerns about the use and possible misuse of this kind of data.[Translation]

Transport Canada should also have access to these recordings for safety oversight and should be able to use these recordings when taking action against an operator, but not against individual employees.[English]

The proposed legislative changes are a departure from the way things have always been done, but as transportation evolves, so too must the way we do our work. There is little doubt that the information contained in voice and video recordings can be a valuable tool when used for legitimate safety purposes. The legislation and its implementation need to achieve the right balance between the rights of employees and the responsibility of operators to ensure the safety of their operations.

Thank you. We are prepared to answer any questions you may have.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Thank you for joining us today. I appreciate the opportunity to hear from you and to also ask questions in regard to the legislation before us.

Ms. Fox, I thought I heard you say that there will also be information gathered from, I guess, selected different routes. Here's what I'm looking for. Does this mean there will be auditing happening? Let's say there hasn't been an incident, but during the course of a train trip from one point to another you perhaps would look at and audit different things through the LVVR to see what may have been happening. Will this be done randomly?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

That's correct. Under the draft legislation, there are a number of permitted uses beyond the uses by the Transportation Safety Board in the conduct of an investigation. In fact, we've provided you with a one-page fact sheet for ease of reference. It describes the permitted uses.

To answer your question specifically, if this legislation is approved, the railway companies would be allowed to randomly sample voice and video recordings as part of their overall analysis of safety data, as part of their safety management system. The specifics of that would likely be covered under the regulations, so one of the permitted uses would be random sampling under the SMS regulations to help them analyze and identify any concerns on safety.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Can you tell me what laws are currently in place to ensure that locomotive engineers don't spend time on their phones, say, or that they are following the rules of the company they are working for while operating a locomotive?

(1400)

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

There is the Railway Safety Act, the regulations that apply to railway companies, and a number of rules that have been developed by the industry and approved by Transport Canada. Each railway company has its own standard operating procedures as well.

At this time, the only way to monitor for things that people might be doing that they shouldn't be doing would be through the efficiency testing that the railways currently conduct, where they would have a supervisor-trainer ride with the crew. It is unlikely, during that time, the crew would be doing that type of behaviour. Other than that, unless there's some occurrence, there's really no other way to find out.

Part of the idea of having recorders, video and audio, aside from helping us with our investigations, is that it's a way for railway companies and Transport Canada, for different reasons, to see, for example, if the rules and procedures are being followed, but in a non-punitive sense. In other words, it wouldn't be for discipline, except if the sampling demonstrated an immediate threat to safety, which would be defined under the regulations.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

We heard from the department officials from Transport Canada that they had undertaken extensive consultations on everything that we see before us in Bill C-49. Was the Canadian Transportation Safety Board involved in those consultations on this specific issue?

As an observation, the main union representing train engineers has historically been opposed to LVVRs. Can you tell us what has been done to ease their concerns with this measure that is included in Bill C-49?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I will give you a general answer, and then I will ask Mr. Kirby Jang to respond. The fact is that the Transportation Safety Board of Canada conducted a class-4 safety study into the implementation of voice and video recorders. That study involved a number of stakeholders, including Transport Canada, a number of railway companies, and Teamsters Canada Rail Conference representatives. We were very much involved in looking at the implementation issues, the legislative issues, and so on.

With respect to the teamsters' position, Mr. Jang, would you like to add to that?

Mr. Kirby Jang (Director, Rail and Pipeline Investigations, Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board):

Certainly, we recognized that there was a diverse range of opinions in terms of what was appropriate use, when it came to the question of what was the appropriate use of LVVR recordings. As part of the safety study, we had a number of opportunities for very open discussions in terms of what those positions were. They were noted specifically within the safety study. We also explored the question of how these diverging views could be overcome, and there were some strategies identified in the safety study that addressed that question.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I'm looking at the—

The Chair:

I am sorry, you are out of time.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you for being here. Anyone who has ever watched an episode of Mayday has a deep appreciation for your work.

I have a number of questions about the LVVRs. What studies has TSB done on the LVVRs, and how do they compare with the CVR and FDR models in ships and planes? You mentioned ships and planes have these already. They don't use videos. How does that compare and why would we not do video the other way as well?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

In aviation, we have the International Civil Aviation Organization, which is the overarching organization to which Canada is a member, having signed the convention. On the maritime side, it is the International Maritime Organization.

Both of those set overarching standards for standards in aviation and marine. Both have required in Canada, in the case of air for over 50 years, and in the case of marine, since 2002, voice recordings. Video is not yet a requirement. It is something that is being discussed, currently, at the international level.

However, there have been recommendations, and in fact, the TSB has made recommendations with respect to the implementation of video recorders in air as a result of the Swiss Air accident back in 1998, and in rail as a result of the Burlington accident in 2013. In the case of rail, there is no overarching international organization, and that is why each country is left to its own to determine how to proceed in these cases.

(1405)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How does an LVVR work? Is it one camera looking forward from the front of the cab to the back of the cab, so you can see the crew? Is there one looking at the crew, one looking at the cab, one looking front, one looking back? What is the structure of an LVVR as you see it?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I'm going to ask Mr. Jang to answer. Some of these technical aspects were looked at in the context of the LVVR study we completed last year.

Mr. Kirby Jang:

In terms of LVVR, there is no standard in terms of configuration or set-up. As you mentioned, there are various views and fields of views that are obviously of interest. Within our study, we looked at four different configurations. It wasn't exhaustive, but they were experienced through Canadian railways, and even within those four installations the configurations were different.

Some of the things we look for include whether there's a view of the locomotive controls or perhaps a frontal view showing some of the interactions between the crew members. The study itself doesn't identify what is appropriate or what should be the case, but we tried to document some of the best practices.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I understand.

How much would it cost to put a unit into a locomotive?

Mr. Kirby Jang:

From what I understand, it's about $20,000 per unit per locomotive.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Who uses LVVRs now around the world, and what kind of effect are we seeing from them? Do you have a sense of that?

Mr. Kirby Jang:

In terms of the study, we didn't look at applications throughout the world. It was only the installations in the U.S. that we were able to determine had been put in place. There were no other installations that had advanced to the stage of actual use.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

You mentioned in your opening remarks, Ms. Fox, that this would be for equipment operating on main tracks. Which equipment is that? Is that locomotives, high rails, or everything running on the tracks? How do you envision that?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

The equipment will be prescribed as part of the regulations. In broad terms, we're talking about locomotives operating on main tracks to distinguish from equipment that's operating in rail yards where they're marshalling trains and moving trains around. It's mainline track.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was just asking because there's a whole lot of equipment that runs on main tracks that isn't main track equipment. Is there a line there?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

No, it's specific to leading locomotives on main track.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

You mentioned in a number of points in your briefing note that TC will enforce compliance with regard to use and privilege. What enforcement methods will Transport Canada...? Sorry, TSB will enforce compliance with the privilege for employee protections. What methods do you have to enforce that privilege, and how do you propose doing that?

Mr. Jean Laporte (Chief Operating Officer, Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board):

We have been enforcing the privilege in the other modes already. We don't see things any differently with the railways. Essentially, when we find out about an issue, through the use of recordings, as a first step we contact the company and seek to get its voluntary compliance. If it is not willing to comply on a voluntary basis, under our legislation we can then take legal action against the company. In some cases, we have had those discussions. We haven't had to take anyone to court yet, but the provision is there. We're able to do that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It would be like a prosecution.

Mr. Jean Laporte:

Yes.

Under the new legislation, under Bill C-49, in the case of LVVR, we would be able to work with Transport Canada. Also, Transport Canada would have enforcement powers under the Railway Safety Act.

The Chair:

Your time is up. You have 30 seconds left, but it's not enough time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If that's the case, I have a very short question.

The other side of what we're discussing is the passenger bill of rights. In your view, is there anything positive or negative that would impact safety in the passenger bill of rights?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

No.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you for being here, dear colleagues.

Since we are talking about the Transportation Safety Board, or TSB, we know, unfortunately, that there has been an accident and that the conclusions of an investigation could be used to improve future safety.

If possible, I would like to know the percentage of types of conclusions the TSB has reached with regard to rail accidents. To my mind, there are three broad categories: mechanical failure, obstruction on the track, and human error.

Is that correct? Have I forgotten anything?

If this is correct, I would like to know the approximate percentage for the incidents that have happened.

(1410)

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Broadly speaking, those are the main causes. I can give you specific figures for human error. From January 1994 to August 2016, there were 223 accidents involving freight trains. In 94 or 42% of those accidents, the cause was human error. Other factors were involved in the remaining 58%.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

That gives me a good opening. For the incidents that represent 42% of all accidents, to what extent could voice and video recorders have helped prevent what I consider the greatest factor in accidents involving human error, namely, conductor fatigue?

In such cases, could a digital recorder change anything at all? Does Bill C-49 fail to provide sufficient clarity? It does not contain any measures to prevent conductor fatigue and, unfortunately, we will not know until after the fact that nothing could have been done.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Here is what I can tell you about accidents involving human factors. The board determined that about 20% of accidents involved fatigue. That is why, in October 2016, we put fatigue on our latest watchlist of key safety issues for freight train crews.

That being said, whether or not an accident occurs, oftentimes video or voice recordings can reveal what the crew members were doing earlier and whether they had sent signals, whether they were talking and whether they were aware of signals they were receiving. That information helps the TSB identify safety deficiencies. If companies have access to that information, they can introduce training measures and adopt better procedures, which may not have prevented the accident that just took place, but will prevent other accidents.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

In reports produced on past accidents, did the TSB specifically recommend to the government a number of measures that would help reduce fatigue, which is probably behind the chief human errors?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Fatigue is certainly among those factors. As I said, we put it on our watchlist of key safety issues. We have not issued any specific recommendations on that issue, but we have pointed out that it is a problem for freight train crews.

Regulations already require railway companies to have fatigue management plans, but those do not always take fatigue science into account. The matter is sometimes subject to negotiations between the unions and the employer.

However, many other factors can cause an accident. For example, an accident may occur after a misinterpreted signal, as may have been the case in Burlington. So some of the recommendations we made had to do with automated systems to stop trains if the crew is not responding to a signal correctly.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Do you see those automatic measures in Bill C-49 or not?

In this era where means of transportation are increasingly intelligent—our vehicles can recognize a potential accident—instead of having a recorder, would it not be more important to adopt measures or have technology on locomotives that makes it possible to intervene and not only to determine where the error was after the fact?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

We have to know that a problem exists before we can resolve it. Recorders will help the TSB, railway companies and Transport Canada identify problems that may require other solutions that we have not yet considered because we were not aware of existing problems.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

You frequently mentioned freight.

For the TSB, are the measures to be implemented to ensure greater safety the same when it comes to ordinary goods and when it comes to dangerous goods? Are the safety measures to be implemented for the transportation of canola oil different from those for the transportation of flammable products, for instance?

(1415)

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

It is clear that different measures must be taken when dealing with dangerous goods, but fatigue can manifest regardless of what the train is transporting. It is just that the consequences of an accident can be more significant when dangerous goods are involved.

The TSB issued a number of recommendations following the Lac-Mégantic incident, and even prior to it, in order to mitigate the risks associated with transporting dangerous goods. Transport Canada has also adopted many measures since those events to reduce the risk, but the systems still involve risks. We continue to monitor the situation and issue recommendations. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Fox.

Sorry, Mr. Aubin.

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you very much to our witnesses for being here.

One of the things I struggle with when I'm dealing with safety generally is that it's very hard, in my mind, to balance anything against safety. If you're talking about rights, I feel as though the public is always going to side with what's safest, so I feel that this is a very difficult discussion. When we talk about tragic anecdotes such as the Burlington incident, it's very difficult for me to say we should do anything except what's safest. However, to satisfy my own position on issues such as this, I'd really love to see if there's objective data we can look at to back up the assertion that these measures are going to enhance safety.

Do we have a study or quantitative data that actually demonstrates that the use of these recorders is going to improve safety in the Canadian rail industry?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I don't know if one of my colleagues can point to a specific study. We have had voice recorders for years in aviation and for over 10 or 12 years in maritime. Without those recorders—and I can think of a number of accidents—we would not have known what had happened, particularly when the crew did not survive the accident or sometimes they may have survived but there may be discrepancies in their testimony or they simply don't remember everything that happened. As a result of that, steps have been taken, procedures have been changed, training has been increased, and technology has been introduced, and these things have improved the safety of the system.

The fact of being recorded also has a way of influencing and shaping people's behaviour. If there is an issue, for example, with inappropriate use of electronic devices while operating, people may be less inclined to do that if they know they're being recorded. It's very important, and as I mentioned in French, we can't solve the problems and we can't identify the safety deficiencies if we don't know what they are. We don't always know what they are unless we can get a holistic view of the accident based on voice recordings, video, if it's available, digital recordings, as well as any witness testimony that we have had access to.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

You mentioned in response to an earlier question that when it comes to voice recording in rail, there's no international standard here. It's being driven at the domestic level. Are there other countries in the global community that have adopted voice and video recorders that have seen a decrease in the number of incidents?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

If we look at the statistics, even in Canada in aviation and marine, overall, there's been a decrease in the accident rate.

I'm going to put you on the spot, Mr. Clitsome, and ask whether on the international side for aviation you have any demonstrable studies.

Mr. Mark Clitsome (Special Advisor, Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board):

As far as I'm aware, there are no studies, but obviously the accident rate is trending down and a lot of that has to do with technology and the use of on-board recorders.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

It makes sense to me that if it's trending downwards and towards safer transport, this may have played a role and we're just not quite sure how much.

To revisit your comment, Ms. Fox, about how being recorded can change the way a person behaves, your example about using a device when maybe you should be looking at the signal is well taken. Obviously that's hazardous behaviour. Is there a possibility that being recorded could actually change the way a person does their job in a negative way? I know sometimes in my previous career if I went out for lunch and chatted with friends over a beer, although I wasn't on the clock, I may have come up with a good idea that I put into practice, although it was against the office policy.

Is there any concern that it's going to change the behaviour of a person who might ordinarily be quite good at their job or that it could impact their ability to do it safely?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I'm not aware of any negative consequences, and we certainly haven't seen that in the aviation world, where voice recordings have been around for many years. I think after a while the fact that they're being recorded may just blend in with the scenery, so to speak. It may not be obvious to them over time.

(1420)

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I'm curious as well. You mentioned that in some instances TSB might use the data and the recordings to take action against an operator if there is some sort of a pattern of unsafe behaviour. Is there a mechanism in place that's going to prevent the operator from identifying the individuals to eliminate this fear of reprisals?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

First of all, the Transportation Safety Board's only mandate is to advance transportation safety. We conduct investigations following occurrences, accidents, and incidents. We don't have regulatory or enforcement powers. That is up to the specific regulator, in this case, Transport Canada. The provisions under the act would be that unless there was a threat to safety, the recordings could not be used against an individual employee because of any action, unless it involved tampering with the recording equipment.

However, it could be used by the regulator to take enforcement action against the operator but not against the individual employee.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Can you just walk me through? I'm by no means a rail safety expert, notwithstanding that we've gone through a study on this committee. I like the idea that we're trying to be preventative and not just reactive here. Is the real prevention mechanism just the random audit by operators to determine whether we are doing things right?

Can you walk me through the process to say how this is going to prevent more accidents from taking place?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

If we look at the use by the railway companies, they can use it in two specific circumstances under Bill C-49. One is to investigate an incident or an accident that is not being investigated by the TSB.

The other is that on a random-sampling basis, as part of their safety management system, they can do samples to look at how crews are operating the train. During that period, they may identify procedural deficiencies or training deficiencies, on which they could then take action on a systemic basis to reduce risk.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for that quick response.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

First, I think that if Canadians knew a little bit more about your board, the work that it does, and the way it approaches it, they would have a great deal of confidence in the safety of the system. In our past sessions, I've certainly appreciated how candid you've been and the clarity that you offer.

In that regard, looking at the airline industry, what kind of impact would it have on the way you do your job, particularly on the remedies that you're looking for, if fault were in fact included in your assessment of a situation?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Our mandate is to investigate, to find out what happened and why it happened, not to attribute blame or to assign criminal or civil responsibility. That leaves our interaction with people very free in terms of their being forthright in telling us what happened, because they know it can't be used against them for either enforcement purposes or civil or criminal liability. I think that we get a lot more benefit from the fact that it can't be used against them, in terms of identifying what went wrong and what needs to be done to prevent it from happening again.

That being said, if we identify something such as inappropriate use of electronic devices or some other issue, we do not refrain from reporting on it, because somebody else might infer blame.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Is that what you were referring to, at least in the first part of your answer, when you talked about privilege? If somebody tells you, chapter and verse, everything that happened, can they do so without fear of retribution, because it's all privileged?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Under our act, what's privileged are on-board recordings. Voice and video recordings are privileged and cannot be released except under certain very defined situations that are specified in our act. They usually have to be ordered by a court. Even then, they are subject to a confidentiality agreement.

The other information that is privileged is witness statements.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Given the flags that have already been raised about reasonable access to the data captured by LVVRs, such as privacy and the potential for misuse, would it not simply be better if your board owned that data right from the moment it was created?

(1425)

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

There are hundreds of thousands of movements. If you talk about all modes of transport, it's millions, in terms of air, rail, and marine. We only investigate in a very small number of cases. We get roughly 3,500 occurrence reports per year. We do about 60 full investigations with a public report, although all the other occurrences are also documented. The operators are ultimately responsible for the safety of their operations, and of course, the regulator is there to make sure that happens.

In all those cases where we don't have reason to investigate, they really would benefit more than we would by having that data, in order to identify deficiencies in training, unclear procedures, and the need for greater supervision.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

What happens after a crash or after an accident is one thing. Obviously, access to the data there is critical, but before something happens, is there value in the system investigating a rash of breaches, for instance? Looking at rail operations, what rules are most often breached? What would you love to find out is going on when those rules are being breached?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

First of all, we don't only investigate accidents. We also investigate incidents where there was a risk of an accident, which if left unattended could...so we do investigate incidents, even if there was no injury or damage per se.

In terms of the railway industry, they've developed a lot of surveillance technology from the point of view of the conditions of the rail and the condition of the train. That has caused a significant reduction in those types of accidents. What we're missing is on the human-factor side.

Why is it that a crew wouldn't see or respond to a stop signal that's coming up? Why did they not call the signals to each other? Why were they going too fast through a particular area where they were supposed to be operating more slowly? Those are the things that we need to see in our investigations, to point out deficiencies. We believe the railway companies, with the benefit of that information, subject to the safeguards that we mentioned, will be able to take action before an accident occurs to reduce the risk of an accident.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Do you know, for instance, if a signal has been missed, or if a train has exceeded a speed limit going through a certain area? Would that be somehow captured and recorded that would then give you the opportunity to go back to the data captured and find out what was going on?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Those types of events, where a signal is missed, where the movement exceeds what's called “the limits of authority”, are reportable occurrences under our act. We don't always investigate completely with a full report. It depends on the situation, but we have investigated many of those and that is what led us to recommend video recorders in addition to the audio recorders that we recommended several years previously, as well as some form of automated control to stop or slow a train if a signal isn't properly responded to.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. Time is up.

Mr. Shields.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you. I appreciate the witnesses being here today.

Following up on that a little bit, obviously there is push-back from the engineers in the sense of moving to this. I know you talked about four different ways you've modelled that you might use it, and what direction you might.... Were the engineers involved in that process?

Mr. Kirby Jang:

Specifically within the safety study, no, they weren't, but as part of the guidance that was provided to the railways that were participating in the study, there were certain guidelines that had to be respected, which include advising the operating crew that they were being monitored through on-board recorders.

Mr. Martin Shields:

You say it included advising.... I've been through this in the enforcement industry, and it was the enforcement industry that brought this for their own protection. We said, “Be careful what you ask for.” If you're looking at doing this and you're not involving them, I'm a little curious as to why not.

Mr. Jean Laporte:

If I can add to Mr. Jang's reply, the unions were invited to participate in the study. They chose not to participate in all aspects of it. They did attend a few meetings and a few debriefings. They did not participate in all aspects of the study, but they were invited to do so from the onset.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Okay, that answers that question.

Further to that, when you talked about sharing, could you give examples? I know you've used some things in the sense of what you would share, but could you give me a run-through in the sense of what you would share that would make the engineers feel that this would be all right if you shared this information with the rail companies?

(1430)

Mr. Kirby Jang:

I'm sorry, could you repeat that question? It's sharing of information that's—

Mr. Martin Shields:

Yes.

We're talking about safety things that we're all interested in. What examples would you give to the railway that the engineers would say, “Hey, this makes sense to us”?

Mr. Kirby Jang:

As part of the safety study we did look at the safety benefits and as part of that we tried to document some things that were immediately available and usable. Certainly, as Kathleen mentioned, in terms of identifying any unclear instructions, any areas where improvements can be done, it could actually be ergonomic-type improvements, or improvements that would help improve resource management. Those were some of the items that were identified during the safety study and identified as lessons learned or best practices.

To perhaps add a little more context in terms of how some of these safety benefits were identified, we included some very specific reviews of what I'll call scenarios of interest. These scenarios of interest include normal operation, non-normal operations, and different scenarios like time of day or length of shift. The intent was to try to examine certain types of human performance that could be identified and captured as part of the on-board recording, so it's things like stress, workload, fatigue actually, inattention, distractions. Much of that was captured and proven as part of the safety study in terms of the benefits that were available through recorders.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you.

Through airline and marine, is there a sampling that's done from those industries?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

No, because under the CTAISB Act as it exists today, there is a legislative barrier that prohibits sharing of access or use of that information by anybody but the Transportation Safety Board in the course of an accident, unless, as we said, there are certain principles under which a court can order release of a recording.

The changes to the Railway Safety Act require the consequential changes to the CTAISB Act in order to enable the sharing of recorded information with Transport Canada and with the railway companies.

In order for air or marine to be able to do that, there would be changes required to the Aeronautics Act as well as to the Canada Shipping Act. Until those changes take effect, if they ever do, it would only be possible in the railway industry.

Mr. Martin Shields:

I think in the sense of what you're attempting to do, which is safety—and we're all considering safety—the challenge with car companies and independents is that they do a lot of crash tests regarding safety. It's hard to do that with big trains. The challenge is that you're often looking at the after-effects of this. You have to deal with it in the opposite way. Is this trying to do it the reverse way to facilitate that?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

From the perspective of our mandate, we will listen to recordings after a reportable occurrence takes place in the conduct of a TSB investigation. The use of that data is a reactive approach. What we would like to see and what we're supportive of is the railway companies being able to access that information proactively in the context of a non-punitive SMS or to investigate those incidents that we don't investigate as long as the safeguards are there to ensure that the data remains privileged, not public, and isn't used for discipline against individual employees unless they've identified a threat to safety.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Just to continue on that same theme, essentially, this is not only going to be giving you an ability to be reactive to the different incidents that happen but obviously, companies will have information for analysis and identification of safety, as you outline in your fact sheet, as well as sampling by Transport Canada for policy development. Will that in fact now be part of your mandate moving forward?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

No, our mandate does not change.

Our mandate will continue to be to investigate occurrences in the air, rail, marine, and pipeline modes of transportation under federal jurisdiction to identify causal and contributing factors. It will not change our mandate. What it will change, going forward and with the implementation of regulations, is that we will have to look at our processes internally in terms of how we do business and how we share information with the parties in accordance with the amendments to the Railway Safety Act. This will allow Transport Canada to do random sampling of recordings for policy purposes or to ensure compliance with the act. It will allow the railway companies to do random sampling as well as investigate incidents and accidents that we're not investigating for the purposes of improving their system in a non-disciplinary fashion.

(1435)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

On the same theme, with respect to being proactive, do you find yourselves as well not only looking at processes like this and utilizing the resources that may become a mechanism within your day-to-day business but also trying to be proactive with respect to rail lines, waterways, roadways, and trying to look at different situations before they happen with respect to the deficiencies in infrastructure?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Yes, and I can give you a concrete example. We don't do surface. We don't do roadways per se, but certainly we do air, rail, and marine.

I can give you a concrete example right now. There have been a number of occurrences at the Toronto airport involving the potential risk of collision with aircraft. They haven't collided, thankfully, but we are doing a proactive study to look at all of the circumstances that may be leading to that. We're not waiting for an accident to occur.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

On that, what is the process when identified infrastructure is deficient and may pose a safety concern?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

As part of our investigations, we look at everything. If we're looking at a rail derailment, we're going to look at the condition of the track, the maintenance activities and procedures, the condition of the train, the activities of the crew, training of the crew and the procedures and rules they were following, and fatigue. We look at everything. Then we narrow it down to those circumstances and conditions that may have led or contributed to that accident or created a risk of it. If we identify a safety deficiency that isn't being addressed through current regulations, rules, or actions taken by the railway, then we will make a recommendation for further action to be taken.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

In fact, the stewards of that asset would be liable for the lack of management, performance, investment, etc., if a deficiency is found and/or an incident happens.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I would prefer not to use the word “liable” in the sense that it is not our mandate to determine liability but I would certainly say “accountable”. We will point out any deficiencies that we identify, whether those are in infrastructure, procedures, training, or personnel, through the conduct of our investigation.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'll pass the rest of my time on to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Last Thursday, I spent over an hour on the tarmac in Kelowna waiting to take off. The airline had discovered some problems with the landing gear. On the plane there were with me people who had connections to other flights that they were now going to miss because of that delay. Looking ahead at a compensation system for an air passenger bill of rights to be included there, it occurs to me that you could end up with some conflicts between somebody trying to get people to the place where they wouldn't be looking for compensation versus the time it would take to try to find out and remedy the issue that they have on the ground, which may just simply be a wonky trouble light.

Are you concerned about the inherent conflict that an air passenger bill of rights could create?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Not really, no. Airlines want to stay in business, but they also want to get their passengers safely to where they need to go. They make decisions every day about maintenance issues, and they do so in accordance with Transport Canada regulations and their own internal procedures. I expect that will carry on.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. O'Toole.

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair. I'd like to thank all of you for appearing here.

When I was in the Canadian Armed Forces in Shearwater, I dealt with folks from your department in the aftermath of Swissair, which will be 20 years ago next September. The degree of professionalism of your men and women in your department is appreciated. It's an important job.

I have a few questions with respect to LVVR and the rollout. In the permitted uses and non-permitted uses, it seems like random sampling will be permitted. It will be part of the deployment of LVVRs. But then, at the same time, continuous monitoring, as has been assured to employees, will not be the case. Is there a procedure that's been developed for randomized sampling, and how will that be deployed?

(1440)

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

First, most of this technology is on board the aircraft, vessel, or, in this case, train. It's not something that lends itself to automatic download necessarily. The specifics of that is part of what will be determined as part of the regulations in terms of who will have access. Those details will be worked out as the department works through the regulations, consults with industry and other stakeholders, as well as ourselves in terms of how those processes are going to work.

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

In your experience, when LVVRs were being looked at by your department and by industry, in general, and by the department, were other jurisdictions studied that use it, and over a period of time, when they rolled it out, have they seen a net change or net decrease in incidents?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I'll ask Mr. Jang to respond in terms of the LVVR study.

Mr. Kirby Jang:

The LVVR study was actually a review of several pilot studies. In each case, each of those four were at a very early pilot stage, and in terms of capturing trends of accident decreases, that wasn't available nor initially a scope of the activity.

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

Certainly, they are useful as tools for reconstructing accident re-creation, causation, and all those sorts of things, which is your key mandate, but it's uncertain on their ability in and of themselves to reduce accidents. Is that a fair statement, or has that been studied?

Mr. Kirby Jang:

There were clear indications that having recordings available allowed you to get better insight in terms of the actions, decisions, and interactions that occurred prior to any particular scenario of interest. Again, in our analysis, we looked at 37 different situations. None of them were specific accidents or incidents, but they were scenarios that we identified. In each case we were able to identify something about it that allowed us to better understand what was happening over that short period of time.

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

In your experience, in rail accidents and incidents, your department is then tasked to investigate. What are the top three factors or causations related to accidents? We hear a lot, on Parliament Hill as parliamentarians, about fatigue, training, and a range of issues.

Do you have an itemized top three causes for some of these incidents?

Mr. Kirby Jang:

As mentioned earlier, essentially, there are three streams of analysis: infrastructure, mechanical and operations, or human factors.

In each case, we've identified decreases in the infrastructure and mechanical part of it, but the proportion of human factors has been increasing. Much of the follow-up that we've conducted on these various investigations have led to recommendations, and some of those recommendations have been highlighted as part of watch-list issues.

In terms of the general safety issues that are of highest priority in the railway industry, perhaps we can draw you to our watch-list. A few that come to mind immediately are following signal indications; fatigue, certainly, has been added; and on-board voice and video recorders allow us to better understand some of the interactions and causations of accidents.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Let me just add one thing. We've been focusing a lot on identifying the things that go wrong, or mistakes that may be made in the locomotive cab, but it's also a way of capturing best practices and sharing best practices across the locomotive, engineer, and conductor workforce, in terms of why it is that some people do certain things that keep them from maybe missing a signal or that improve communications within the crew. If those best practices can be shared as part of the initial training, etc., that's just going to help the system overall.

(1445)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We move on to Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you once again, Madam Chair.

When we study a bill that is as comprehensive as Bill C-49, we can make amendments to its content. We can also say what the bill is missing and talk about amendments that should be part of it.

I understand your position on voice and video recorders. However, last year, a study on aviation safety showed that many recommendations issued by the TSB remained without a response.

When it comes to rail transportation, or any other mode of transportation, as Bill C-49 is broad in scope, are there two or three priority issues—aside from voice and video recorders—you would like us to add to such an important bill as Bill C-49?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I remind you of our watchlist of key safety issues. When it comes to railway transportation, we talked about the transportation of flammable liquids, and there are other actions to be taken. Although Transport Canada has been in the process of implementing a number of measures since 2013, there are still measures that could be adopted to reduce the risks associated with transporting dangerous goods.

In fact, we just issued two other recommendations in the wake of two accidents in northern Ontario. Transport Canada considers all the factors that affect the severity of a derailment. It also considers all the rail-related conditions that could affect rail structure. So we have submitted a number of recommendations that would help reduce those risks.

Fatigue is another issue. We have identified a problem related to fatigue with crews operating freight trains. Their schedule is less specific than that of passenger train crews. We feel that Transport Canada could do more with the industry and use scientific data to make changes to employees' schedules in order to reduce fatigue.

In addition, a number of incidents and accidents have occurred because crews misinterpreted certain signals. We hope that the recorders will give us a better idea in that respect. However, technology systems could be used to slow down or stop a train before a collision or a derailment occurs.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

In light of the examples you are giving me, which are entirely relevant, should the review of a piece of legislation—like the one we are currently doing—include the revision of the modus operandi between the time the TSB issues a recommendation and the time the government takes action? I feel that the government's slow response to some recommendations is also a significant risk factor.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

In October 2016, the TSB, when updating its watchlist of key safety issues, mentioned, for the first time, Transport Canada's slowness in implementing some of its recommendations. At the time, 52 recommendations were over 10 years old and about 36 of them were over 20 years old. That list includes some recommendations related to the railway sector, but most of them have to do with aviation.

We would like measures to be taken, not only by the department, but also by the government. We would also like the safety-related recommendations to be implemented more promptly.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Do I have any time left, Madam Chair? [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin, I let you go over because I thought the information was really valuable and your questions were right on.

Ms. Block, you have six minutes.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay.

I want to go back to the questions my colleague was asking concerning the permitted uses and the protection of workers and follow up your last response to him, which referenced what this information will be collected for in investigating incidents and accidents, but which also said it may be used to identify best practices.

I'll just observe that I'm going to be interested in seeing how you marry the random sampling of data by companies with the fact that for the protection of the workers there will not be continuous monitoring. I don't know how you capture best practices and those kinds of things if you're not actually monitoring continuously. I'm looking forward to seeing how that plays itself out in the regulations.

I want to follow up on the fact that you commented on the watch-list. You said that this was something you had identified many years ago on your watch-list. Is there anything else on your watch-list that perhaps should have been included here in Bill C-49 or that you would have liked to see included?

(1450)

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

We're very pleased to see that the Minister of Transport is moving forward with respect to the requirement to install voice and video recorders without waiting for the review of the Railway Safety Act. Of course, that leads to consequential changes to our act, so we're pleased about it.

Certainly there are other issues we would like to see, but many of them don't necessarily require changes to legislation. They could involve mandatory requirements for new equipment, or they could involve regulations. We're pleased to see the LVVR issue coming forward. We think it is appropriate at this juncture to consider the expanded use of this information, for the companies and for Transport Canada.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

It is my understanding that Canadian regulations mandate that cockpit voice recorders only retain information captured in the last two hours of each flight. Is anything like that, within the use of the LVVRs, being contemplated in this legislation?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I would like to clarify that the current Canadian regulations for the retention of cockpit voice recordings is only for 30 minutes. The TSB, following the accidents, recommended a minimum of two hours, which is the international standard.

With respect to LVVR recordings, the duration—how long—is something that will be worked out as part of the regulations. We would prefer longer, because often the seeds of an occurrence can happen much earlier than even two hours before, but those details will be worked out as part of the regulations.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I have one final question. As the owner and operator of an LVVR, would a railway company have a duty to discipline employees if they spot unsafe behaviour during SMS monitoring? Perhaps that's where the question of being liable arises. If you know something, see something, but are just seeing it for monitoring purposes, what duty would you, the owner-operator, have to act once you have this information?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Again, some of these details will be worked out as part of the regulations.

Right now, under the provisions of Bill C-49 the information gathered as part of random sampling or resulting from an incident or accident investigation conducted by the railway company may not be used for disciplinary purposes, competence, or for judicial proceedings unless it involved tampering with the equipment or there were a threat to safety determined as part of that sampling.

What constitutes a threat to safety remains to be determined under the regulations. This is why we are emphasizing that those regulations and the powers of enforcement have to be strong to make sure there's not inappropriate use or misuse of the data by those who have access to it.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Just really quickly, once those regulations are set, what's the process for any comment on the regulations? I think I know, but I just want you to clarify that.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I want to be clear that the regulations would be enacted pursuant to the Railway Safety Act, which means they are Transport Canada's regulations. They're not TSB regulations. Transport Canada has a well-established policy and practice in that it has to go through consultation, Treasury Board, economy impact analysis, Canada Gazette, part I, etc. That's a process that's well established, but it's under Transport Canada's authority, not under ours.

(1455)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thanks again, Madam Chair.

Where we left off last time, you explained that there were a few instances where a railway might be able to use the data from a recorder, for example, to date the random audit or to investigate an accident or incident that wasn't being otherwise investigated.

Perhaps call me a bit of a skeptic. I can see a vindictive manager seeing the data, recognizing who the employee is, and taking action. Is there a mechanism that's there or perhaps should be there that would punish someone for acting outside of the rules in this manner?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

First of all, let me say that this was one of the concerns I raised during the opening remarks. We know that the Railway Association of Canada, the industry, and the railways are taking steps to try to improve the safety culture within the railways. We hope that the regulations will have very strict prescribed criteria in terms of what types of situations could lead to any kind of action. In other words, what constitutes a threat to safety?

We believe that, just because somebody doesn't follow a procedure, it shouldn't necessarily lead to discipline. We think it's more important to look at why they didn't follow the procedure. Does the procedure work? Were they trained on the procedure? Where's the supervision? Those are the systemic issues we hope the railway industry will look at in terms of identifying ways to improve and reduce the risk. We believe that the regulations have to clearly identify what those criteria are and have very strong enforcement powers for Transport Canada to impose penalties on companies that do not access or use this information in accordance with the Railway Safety Act and with the regulations.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

In a similar vein, you used two turns of phrase. One was the “most egregious circumstances” and the other was “immediate threat to safety” to describe when an individual could be disciplined or potentially removed from work.

I'm just wondering, is that sort of threshold going to be left up to regulation and the interpretation of what that means?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Yes. I shouldn't use the word “immediate” because that has a very specific meaning, but if there's a threat to safety that's identified. It would be left up to the regulations to determine what constitutes a threat to safety and how that would be dealt with.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

We've had a few helpful comparisons to recorders used in the air and marine sectors as well during the course of your testimony today.

I'm curious as to whether there have been any sorts of privacy complaints on an ongoing basis based on the use of recorders in those other sectors.

Mr. Jean Laporte:

Over the past 30 years that I have been with the Transportation Safety Board, we have not seen any trend or major areas of concern with respect to a breach of privacy associated with any of the recordings that are in place. We have from time to time heard about issues, and we have followed up on each one of those, case by case, as required.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

An additional question back to the watch-list that came up during one of my colleague's lines of questioning, I believe the specific item has been on the watch-list since 2012 or roughly thereabouts.

I'm curious if there are things on this watch-list item that could be better done through Bill C-49, or does the text of the proposed legislation satisfy this watch-list item completely in your view?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

The TSB supports the draft legislation in its current form in terms of addressing the deficiency that we identified, which was our lack of data, and we believe that there will be a lot of positive benefits coming out of it for the railway companies and Transport Canada on the condition that the appropriate safeguards are in place. That we'll largely address. We want to see our watch-list implemented.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Of course.

Those are my questions, Madam Chair.

Mr. Graham will pick up if I have extra time.

The Chair:

You have two minutes left.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll carry right on.

In your studies so far, have you found any companies or operators that are already in routine breach of safety management systems?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Sorry, in breach of safety management systems...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They have their SMS, safety management systems. Do you find companies that are in breach of the systems they already have in place?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Again, our role is not one of compliance monitoring. That's Transport Canada's role, as the regulator. They conduct inspections and audits of railway companies, and other companies in other modes, that are required to have safety management systems. Where they identify non-conformance, they take the appropriate action.

However, when we do an investigation, we look at whether the company had a safety management system. Was it required to have it? Was it effective in identifying the hazards that posed a factor in the particular occurrence? If not, why not? Was Transport Canada aware? What action did they take?

A good example of that is our investigation into the Ornge helicopter accident in northern Ontario that goes back to 2013, which we released a little over a year ago. We look at it as part of an occurrence, but in terms of looking for compliance, that's Transport Canada's role.

(1500)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I understand.

LVVR is specific to locomotives. I assume that's intended only as a lead locomotive. Would all locomotives always have it operational when the engine is running? Would you have it in DPU engines? Would you have it outside of that, on wayside detectors and so forth? With regard to anywhere else where you have a fixed placement, would you want to go that route, or is it only the lead engine that would have it?

I'm assuming it's Mr. Jang on that one.

Mr. Kirby Jang:

Yes, in terms of the recommendation that we've made, it is just the lead locomotive on the front of the train where this equipment should be installed.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I want to come back to the issue of recorders, which have to do with the category of accidents related to human error. If such recorders were in place, the authorities could know whether the train had violated a specific rule or whether it was travelling faster than the speed limit, for example. Are the rules reviewed? Does Bill C-49 provide for a mechanism to monitor the evolution of technology in rail transportation or in any other mode of transportation?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

If we see during an investigation following an accident that a rule does not cover a specific situation or that no rule exists, we can recommend that a rule be added or reviewed.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I will give a specific example that may enlighten us.

After the Lac-Mégantic events, we learned that the very structure of DOT-111s was deficient. So improved DOT-111s were proposed, but that considerably increased the length of trains. Does that have an impact on rail safety? Is it measured? Have the regulations been amended in any way because disaster risk was increased?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I will give you a concrete example. In February 2017, we published our final report on the accident in Gladwick, Ontario. An issue of rail break came up. The train was travelling at a speed that was lower than the speed limit prescribed by the rules. The train was carrying crude oil.

After the accident, we recommended to Transport Canada to carry out a study taking into account all the factors that may lead to derailment, including the train's speed, length and contents—for instance, mixed goods or crude oil. We recommended that Transport Canada review all factors contributing to derailment, that it take measures to mitigate those risks and that it change the rules accordingly.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

What was Transport Canada's response?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

The department simply said it would check whether any studies existed. We are waiting for the follow-up.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

The department did not provide a timeline.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

No.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

This brings us back to what we were discussing earlier—the fact that the government's slowness leads to poor decisions being made. A good report was produced with good conclusions, but no measures have been taken to avoid the same thing happening again.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Indeed. We hope that the next responses we will receive from that department will be more detailed when it comes to what the department will do with regard to that study.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Aubin.

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Hi, I'm back.

To continue on with what we were talking about before on the lead locomotives—and this goes back to Mr. Jang—sometimes an engine is running long hood forward or another configuration where the lead engine is not looking forward the way you'd expect it to. Going back to what I asked in the first round, would you personally expect locomotives to be pointing both ways with the cameras front and back? Would the camera always be operating, or would it be manually set, or as soon as you put the reverser in, it's running? How do you see that?

(1505)

Mr. Kirby Jang:

In terms of the actual configuration in technology, that will be partly answered as part of the regulations. In terms of what we assessed for the configurations in our safety study, all of them had, first of all, a forward-facing camera as well as an inward-facing camera. In terms of the orientation of the locomotive, it was all forward facing.

Certainly to maximize information that's available, it's without question that a forward-facing locomotive with a forward-facing camera, inward-facing camera, would be the optimum set-up.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right. Plenty of operations will not have a wye, and you'll have to run the engine backwards. You need to sometimes.

At the beginning, I talked about use of LVVR only on main lines; it's what we talked about from the beginning. What is your definition of the main line for this purpose? If you have an operation—like there's a railway in the northeastern U.S. that runs a whole track basically on rule 105. It's all very slow, basically yard limit rules. Would that company be required to have this, if it were in Canada, in your view? Is that a main line for your purposes?

Mr. Kirby Jang:

First of all, main line is defined through regulations. In terms of applications within the U.S., certainly the intent is to have similar rules harmonized, but I guess I can't really speak specifically about the U.S. applications.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

With any company that operates without dispatching, which you can do if you're never going over yard limit speeds, it's still technically a main line but do you need the LVVRs? I'm sort of wondering. I think we've killed that one.

Another point is this. Do you have specific examples of where LVVR has actually helped an investigation? I think one of the best known ones is the Kismet investigation in 2006 when two BNSF trains collided. It's really a spectacular video, but was it important to the investigation or is it just a spectacular video?

Mr. Kirby Jang:

In terms of the investigations where we've had access to LVVR, there are actually very few. But certainly as part of our investigations, and certainly recent ones, we've identified investigations in the past where it certainly would have helped. In a recently released investigation, we documented 14 occurrences where the operating crew perhaps misunderstood or misapplied some rules leading to inappropriate response to a signal. These we've added into that particular investigation, so definitely in each of those 14, that would have been useful information to have.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Understood.

Is there any move toward simplifying the signals themselves? If you look at a translation table for signals today, what they actually mean, you'll see that “limited to clear” has something like 15 different ways of configuration. Is there any move toward simplifying that?

Mr. Kirby Jang:

I'm not aware of any specific review of that, along those lines.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

Is there any other high-priority item on your watch-list that you haven't seen?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

We've talked about the four in rail. There are several in air, one in marine, and then there are two multi-modal, one of which we've talked about, which is the slow progress in addressing TSB recommendations by TC. But we're here specifically about the C-49 provisions for the LVVR, which is one of the 10 items on our current watch-list.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Are there any further questions by any of the committee members? All right.

Thank you to our witnesses again. You provided valuable information as we complete this legislation.

We will suspend until 3:30. Then we will have the Canadian Transportation Agency before us.

(1505)

(1530)

The Chair:

We will reconvene meeting number 67 on Bill C-49. We have with us now in this next segment the Canadian Transportation Agency as well as the Honourable David Emerson.

It's nice to see you again, David.

We also have AGT Food and Ingredients.

I'll turn the floor over to whoever would like to go first.

Mr. Steiner, go right ahead. Thank you very much for coming this afternoon.

Mr. Scott Streiner (Chair and Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Transportation Agency):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you to the committee for the invitation to appear before you today.

The Canadian Transportation Agency is Canada's longest-standing independent and expert regulator and tribunal. Established in 1904 as the Board of Railway Commissioners, the CTA has evolved over the years in its responsibilities as Canada has evolved, its transportation system has evolved, and its economy and society have evolved.

Today the CTA has three primary mandates. The first is to help ensure that the national transportation system runs smoothly and efficiently. This includes dealing with rail shipper issues, rail noise and vibration complaints, and challenges to port and pilotage fees.

Our second core mandate is protecting the fundamental right of persons with disabilities to accessible transportation services.

Our third core mandate is providing consumer protection to air travellers.

Among the CTA's most important activities in recent years is the regulatory modernization initiative. Launched in May 2016, this initiative is a comprehensive review of all regulations the CTA administers to ensure they are up to date with business models, user expectations, and best practices in the regulatory field.[Translation]

Over the next 10 minutes, I would like to speak about how Bill C-49 will affect the CTA's roles and how, if and when it is passed, we will implement those elements for which we will be responsible.

I would like to note that my observations are offered from the perspective of the arms-length organization that has primary responsibility for day-to-day administration of the Canada Transportation Act.

The Minister of Transport's principal source of public service policy advice is Transport Canada, and I would defer to the minister and his department with respect to questions regarding the policy intent of the bill's various sections.[English]

I will structure my remarks around two key elements of Bill C-49: air passenger protection and mechanisms for addressing rail shipper matters.

Air travel is an integral part of modern life. Usually it's uneventful, but when something goes wrong, the experience can be frustrating and disruptive, in no small part because as individual passengers we have little control over events.

Bill C-49 mandates the CTA to make regulations establishing passengers' rights if their flights are delayed or cancelled, if they are denied boarding, if their bags are lost or damaged, if they are travelling with children or musical instruments, and if they experience tarmac delays of more than three hours. This is a significant change.

The current regime simply requires that each airline develop and apply a tariff: written terms and conditions of carriage. The CTA's role as it stands right now is to assess whether an airline has properly applied its tariff and whether the tariff's terms are reasonable.

We have said it's important that air passengers' rights be transparent, meaning that they can be found easily by travellers; clear, meaning that they are written in straightforward, non-legalistic language; fair, meaning that they provide for reasonable compensation and other measures if something goes wrong with the flight; and consistent, meaning that travellers facing similar circumstances are entitled to the same compensation and measures.

Last fall we launched public information efforts to help make travellers aware of the recourse available to them through the CTA if they have a flight issue that they are not able to resolve with an airline. We did so because we believe that for remedies created by Parliament to be meaningful, the intended beneficiaries have to know that those remedies exist.

The results of these efforts combined with the Minister of Transport's and media's focus on air travel issues have been dramatic. Between 2013-14 and 2015-16 the CTA typically received about 70 air traveller complaints per month. Over the last year, since we started our public information efforts, that number has risen to 400 complaints per month. And over the last week alone we have received 230 air traveller complaints. That is to say that in one week we have received one-third as many complaints as we used to receive in an entire year.

(1535)



This jump suggests that the need for assistance has always existed and once Canadians knew that the CTA is here to help, they began turning to us in far greater numbers.

If and when Bill C-49 is passed the CTA will move quickly to develop air passenger rights regulations. Our goal will be to balance, on the one hand, the public's high level of interest in air travel issues and desire to shape the rules with, on the other hand, the expectation that those rules will be put into place quickly. To strike this balance we will hold focused, intensive consultations over a two to three-month period with industry, consumer rights associations, and the travelling public using both a dedicated website and in-person hearings across the country. Once in force, the new air passenger rights regulations will give Canadians travelling by air greater and long overdue clarity on their rights and what recourse is available to them.[Translation]

Let me turn now to the second main component of Bill C-49: changes to the provisions dealing with relations between freight rail companies and shippers.

Facilitating these relations has been a key part of the CTA's mandate from the beginning. That reflects both the fundamental importance of the national freight rail system to Canada's prosperity, and the enduring concern among shippers about what they see as an equal bargaining power between them and the small number of railway companies on whom they depend to move their goods.

The CTA has observed that, notwithstanding these concerns, shippers make relatively limited use of the remedies available to them under the law. If this is because good-faith commercial negotiations are producing mutually satisfactory agreements across the board, that is excellent news. But if it is because the cost and effort involved in accessing the remedies are perceived to outweigh the likely benefits, or because of challenges with how these remedies are structured, the provisions in question may not be fully realizing their objectives.[English]

We have also noted that there is relatively little information available about the performance of the freight rail system. This paucity of information affects the effective functioning of the market and evidence for decision-making, and stands in contrast to the situation south of the border.

The freight rail elements of Bill C-49 have the potential to address some of these issues. Amendments related to rate arbitrations, service level arbitrations, and level of service adjudications may help recalibrate the cost-benefit analysis that shippers make when considering whether to access recourse mechanisms. The the requirement that railway companies submit more data and that the CTA publish performance statistics online may help fill information gaps.

Perhaps the most significant rail-related change in Bill C-49 is the replacement of both the CTA's authority to set general interswitching limits beyond 30 kilometres and of the competitive line rate provisions with a new mechanism called long-haul interswitching. The CTA's role with respect to long-haul interswitching will be to order that the requested service be provided if an application is made and certain conditions are met, and to establish the rate for that service.

The bill gives the CTA 30 business days to receive pleadings from parties and to make these determinations. We've already begun to develop a process to ensure that we can meet that extremely tight timeline. We know that the parties will be watching our decisions on long-haul interswitching closely. Those decisions will be based on the criteria that Parliament ultimately adopts and on the CTA's analysis of facts before us, because as a quasi-judicial tribunal and regulator, what guides us is nothing more and nothing less than the law and the evidence.

(1540)

[Translation]

Before concluding, I would like to mention one item that is not contained in Bill C-49: extension of the CTA's ability to initiate inquiries on its own motion.

The CTA already has this authority for international flights—and most recently used it to undertake an inquiry into some of Air Transat's tarmac delays. That case shows how relevant the authority— [English]

The Chair:

I'm sorry.

Mr. Scott Streiner:

I've almost finished. Are we at 10 minutes, Madam Chair?

The Chair:

Yes, you're at 10 minutes and 20 seconds.

Mr. Scott Streiner:

I will conclude in the next minute.

The Chair:

Could you possibly put that into your remarks to one of our colleagues, so we make sure that everybody gets sufficient time?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

Absolutely, Madam Chair.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Emerson, would you like to go next?

Hon. David Emerson (Former Chair, Canada Transportation Act Review Panel, As an Individual):

Thank you, Madam Chair, and honourable members. I'm appearing here not really on behalf of anybody except myself. I headed up a transportation review, some two and a half to three years ago, of the Canada Transportation Act. Much of what I have to say will reflect some of the conclusions of that report.

In the interest of disclosure, I also serve as the chairman of the board of Global Container Terminals, which is in the transportation space, as you know. I am not speaking on behalf of that organization; I'm speaking on my own behalf here today.

I'll just read a statement into the record.

Never before has the triangulation of trade, transportation, and technology been so central to Canada's economic success. We are a small trading nation spread out over a massive and diverse geography. Canada has to get transportation right, in the interest of our competitiveness and of future generations of Canadians. Getting it right requires that we recognize the massively complex, tightly integrated, multimodal, and international nature of the transportation system. It's increasingly a system that is in constant motion, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

In 2014, as I alluded to, I chaired a committee charged with conducting a wide-ranging review of the Canada Transportation Act and related matters. Some 56 recommendations came out of the report, plus over 100 sub-recommendations. An overarching theme in the report was the need for better, more timely decision-making adapted to the evolving nature of today's trade, transportation, and logistics networks.

Many recommendations have been or are being acted upon, at least in spirit, by the government of the day, for example, elevated priority to infrastructure investment, including development of financing mechanisms and a more systematic database on the state of Canada's infrastructure; an increase in the foreign ownership limit for Canada's airlines; recapitalization plans for the Canadian Coast Guard; greater and more comprehensive focus on the transportation needs of Canada's north; a serious move to separate passenger rail lines and operations from freight in the high-density corridors of Ontario and Quebec; a major funding initiative to continue developing Canada's transportation and trade corridors; enhanced rights for air travellers—Mr. Streiner was alluding to that in his remarks—and strengthened standards for travellers with disabilities.

The core of the CTA review was a recognition that there are no magic fixes or silver bullets, and that getting it right involves improving governance. By that we mean establishing frameworks for decision-making that are better adapted to the massive complexity of the modern transportation system and its millions of users and service providers. Getting it right means recognizing that transportation crosses all sectors of the economy, all parts of the country, and virtually all parts of government and public policy. In few areas is the so-called whole-of-government approach more critical to our long-term future. Getting it right also means that the regulator, the CTA, Transport Canada, and other agencies, have the information, the mandate, and the tools to deal in real time with a massively complex and dynamic system.

Bill C-49 includes some significant steps to improving the information base to enable better decisions, improve dispute resolution, and generally enhance the regulatory framework. However, in my view, more is needed. Perhaps the most glaring omission in the context of Bill C-49 is the continuation of the reactive, one-at-a-time, complaint-driven approach of the CTA. I believe the agency needs the mandate and capacity to anticipate and deal with issues before they become systemic crises. Dealing with one complaint at a time when many complaints are symptoms of a broader malaise is simply not effective.

(1545)



Similarly, the agency needs the power to self-initiate investigations. Where there is real and substantial evidence of an emerging problem, the agency needs the own-motion power to self-initiate an investigation, and it should have the ability, where practical, to initiate mitigating or preventive measures. None of this should detract from the ultimate authority of the minister and Parliament to direct the agency, but it should enable better, more timely decisions that lubricate the transportation system in support of better service to the travelling and shipping public.

Getting it right also requires the establishment of robust governance frameworks for organizations created and empowered by government to run various aspects of the transportation system. Airport authorities, for example, were set up 25 years ago to recapitalize and operate Canadian airports. In general this has worked very well, but the governance arrangements need to be refreshed. Airports are for the most part local monopolies with de facto powers of taxation. I note airport improvement fees, for example, buried on airline tickets, tepid accountability to the public, and no real shareholder to hold boards and management to account for the way in which capital is deployed. Similar arguments could be made about port authorities. For the most part there are no legislated guiding principles spelling out public interest considerations. Authority relationships with tenants and customers are important aspects of the public interest, yet there is no clear guidance against abusive pricing power or limiting preferential arrangements with tenants that may undermine the common user principles that are so critical to well-run public facilities. Also, should authorities be permitted to go into business in competition with their own tenants, for example?

At the moment, there is no practical mechanism of appeal for possible abuse of power over tenants and/or customers. An aggrieved party can't even appeal to the CTA because the agency is not empowered to deal with it, and appealing to the minister is generally not practical. There are many mandated entities outside of government. They operate across different modes of the transportation system and with arrangements that are generally spelled out in ground leases, bylaws of the entities or some other form of contractual arrangement. Many of these governance issues were highlighted in the CTA review.

Again, decision making in the world of transportation, where thousands of service providers interact to serve millions of customers and shippers, is all about governance. A healthy, vibrant, global, competitive transportation system requires clear accountabilities in combination with strong checks and balances. The Canada Transportation Act should spell out the principles of good governance to be applied to regulatory bodies as well as non-governmental facility operators and service providers. The act should also include the formal requirement for ongoing renewal of a national transportation strategy. The concept of a decennial review is archaic and it should be done away with in favour of an evergreen process.

Thank you, Madam Chair and honourable members. I look forward to our discussion.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Emerson.

Mr. Al-Katib, go ahead, please.

Mr. Murad Al-Katib (President and Chief Executive Officer, Former Advisor, Canada Transportation Act Review, AGT Food and Ingredients Inc.):

Thank you.

I'm Murad Al-Katib. I'm CEO of AGT Food and Ingredients Inc. I had the honour of serving with Mr. Emerson on the Emerson report as well. I was his lead adviser on the grain sector, on the western Canadian rail chapter, as well as on natural resources, including oil and gas and the mining sector. I'm going to bring to you some perspectives not only in that role, but also as president of one of Canada's largest container intermodal shippers. AGT Food is among, maybe, the top five or seven container shippers in the country. We're also the largest class 3 railway in the country now as well, with the purchase of a short-line railway in Saskatchewan.

Let me pick up on a couple of points that were made by my colleagues. One concerns the work we put forward and the work before you now as Bill C-49. For Canada as a trading nation, transportation infrastructure and the interaction of policy with that infrastructure is one of what I would consider to be Canada's most important generational activities. It means taking a look at how we enable the economy to seize the opportunity, as trade continues to grow, particularly to get our products to market, because of the large geographies we have in our blessed country. With these physical distances, the regulation within the system needed to be addressed in a number of areas. I'm going to break them down into bite-sized pieces.

Transparency of the transportation system was a resonating point of our report and a point that continues to resonate within industry. I think that Bill C-49 addresses greatly one of the major criticisms of the system previously. At least now we have a system such that, if these measures are put forward, the railway systems will be not only encouraged but mandated to provide data input to a system. That data will come into the CTA, will be synthesized, will be published, and will allow policy-makers to make more informed decisions instead of attempting to react on the fly. I think data transparency is a very important part. It is something that was demanded by industry, among the recommendations we made, and certainly it is something we see within Bill C-49.

When we looked at transparency, though, to reiterate both of my colleagues' comments, there was quite a strong desire for ex parte powers of the agency to investigate and be able to look more like a Surface Transportation Board, like a U.S. type of system. We seem to be falling a little bit short on that within this particular round, but we are encouraged as industry, I think, by the type of moves that are being made.

In talking about transparency, I always made the point to industry to be careful what you ask for, because it comes with responsibility. One thing you have to recognize always is that this is a transportation system. Think of it as a supply chain in which each link in the chain is essential for the link directly in front of it and directly behind it. One thing we have in the transportation system is a tendency whereby each link only blames the link ahead of or behind it.

This is a very important element, in that the responsibility of the industry becomes also reliable reporting of our forecasting, reliable reporting of our performance within the system. Efficiency is something that data transparency will drive in the system. I think this is a very important element. This isn't just about railways; it's about each link in the chain.

As that chain continues, fair access to the system is part of what we were looking to see achieved, and I think we made some very good measures in Bill C-49. What we were aiming for in our recommendations was a system whereby the playing field would be levelled to a point that we could encourage commercial agreements.

I think we have to also be very careful. Over-regulation of the transportation industry is a very slippery slope. Over-regulation of our railway system can certainly also have unintended consequences. We have a difficult environment, with long distances, the physical attributes of our terrain, and climate, such that with over-regulation we could actually drive a non-competitive system to become a drag on the economy. But while I say that, I think that fair access to the system and encouraging commercial agreements was really part of the foundation of what we were recommending.

(1555)



So let's get to some of those.

Shipper remedies were quite strong within Bill C-49. There were a number of moves on the agency's authority to make operational terms within service level agreements more permanent. Reciprocal financial consequences were mandated, which was a major ask of shippers for well over a decade, and which were actually skipped in a number of the previous policy revisions. So it was a very popular move within the shipper community to encourage, then, that when you would sit at the table with your railway on a service level agreement, those operational terms would be defined, reciprocal financial consequences would be mandated by each side, and the agency could then impose those on the parties if they couldn't come to a commercial agreement.

Streamlined dispute resolution mechanisms were key. I think we made some very good progress on those. With regard to the definition of adequate and suitable accommodation, you're probably going to hear a lot about that over the next three or four days, but I do think we've certainly made some very good progress there.

In terms of the overall efficiency piece within the system, long-haul interswitching is also something that there's a lot of angst about in the system, because within the grain industry in particular, with the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act, we actually had 160-kilometre interswitching available, hanging there as a shipper remedy that was basically accessible. It was there, and it was extended. That has been sunsetted now, and long-haul interswitching has been introduced as a potential new remedy. I think the angst amongst shippers is from not understanding whether or not it truly can be implemented. Having heard the comments of my colleague Mr. Streiner, I have a level of optimism that in essence shippers will have a chance to apply for 12-month long-haul interswitching, which will involve distances much longer than 160 kilometres, and combining interswitching and the competitive line-haul rates could be an effective mechanism.

It is a new system, and I think that sometimes leads to angst, and as Mr. Streiner has stated, the CTA will be judged by its ability to react and implement. I've also made very strong recommendations to both Transport Canada and the agency to consider expedited renewal processes. So once it is approved for a one-year duration, how do we get the second year and the third year approved on a quicker and quicker basis? Those are service delivery things that I have some optimism about.

In terms of the maximum revenue entitlement, the modernization started within the provisions of Bill C-49 being suggested here, we recommended much broader modernization of the maximum revenue entitlement. There are some first steps that I think are very positive. The container intermodal traffic being excluded and the interswitching revenues being excluded are, I think, common sense provisions, and it made a lot of sense to include those within the modernization. To me, the ability of the railways to reflect individual railway investments was always a ludicrous provision; when one railway invested, that investment was split between the two railways. We've now fixed those. We've fixed out, with the proposals, adjustments to incentivize hopper car investments. These are all positive provisions that still protect the farmer within the MRE and still allow time to see what effect those mechanisms have, but I think they have been very positive.

There are the regulated interswitching rates as well, and then the reduction or the elimination of the minimum grain volumes.

We've made some good progress, I think, and I'm looking forward to being here over the next hour to answer your questions and to give our perspective as you need.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you to all of our witnesses.

Mr. O'Toole.

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Thank you to all of our witnesses for being here. I certainly appreciate your testimony today and your participation in a review of our transportation system.

Mr. Emerson, it would be my privilege to ask you a couple of questions. We're at an interesting time in Canada. In your report, the “Pathways” report that you provided to government, which in some ways was the precursor to Bill C-49, you said on a few occasions that the theme of the report was the relationship between trade and our systems of commerce, and our transportation system, and getting those goods to markets in Canada, in North America, and around the world.

You, as a former minister of international trade, would know that we have a unique opportunity in that we're renegotiating and modernizing NAFTA at the same time that we are supposed to be modernizing our transportation networks for the next 30 years.

In your consultations, did you hear a demand, particularly from the air and the trucking side, for the transborder cabotage approach to linking the North American transportation system, and wouldn't this window—of renegotiating NAFTA— which didn't exist when you wrote the report, be an obvious opportunity to integrate the transportation system in North America?

(1600)

Hon. David Emerson:

I guess the short answer is we heard—and I know from my own experience in business that while we all obsess over international trade, and tariffs, and related agreements—that when you actually look at how supply chain costs accumulate in the total supply chain of companies, transportation and logistics is a lot bigger factor in terms of competitiveness than tariffs and related trade barriers.

Trade barriers are still important, but as you point out, the biggest risk is probably administrative and other kinds of delays, or discrimination, at the border that aren't really a tariff. It's some other form of impediment to a smoothly functioning liquid border, and so clearly North American integration of the transportation system is vitally important, because if you really look at where the potential to be competitive against Asia and some of the emerging power blocks in the world today is, North America really has to integrate integrate itself and not break itself into a fragmented three-country arrangement when it comes to trade, job, and value creation.

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

It's interesting that you say that when free trade with the U.S. was negotiated in the mid-1980s, both Canada and the U.S. were in a process of breaking down internal barriers. The Mulroney government at the same time was turning Air Canada from a crown corporation into a private sector player, so to integrate transportation into the NAFTA negotiations wasn't really possible then, but perhaps it is now.

From your industry experience, when we're talking about efficiency, do you see both a cost saved to business and an environmental positive to integrating transport in North America? Would it make the private sector more efficient because we're using our systems more efficiently and therefore burning fewer GHGs with empty boats and empty trucks moving around the continent?

Hon. David Emerson:

If I were to make a categorical statement, it would be this. For any given entity whether it's a province, a country, or North America, the more efficient the transportation system is in terms of its integration, its fluidity, and how it delivers products to the end user, the less greenhouse gases are produced per dollar of gross domestic product, whether it's North American GDP or Canadian GDP. So to me, people never talk about it, but it is fundamentally true that a highly efficient transportation system is probably one of the best anti-greenhouse gas policy frameworks you could adopt.

Mr. Murad Al-Katib:

I would just add one thing to Mr. Emerson's comments.

The gateway approach was very prevalent within our analysis and the ability now to look at the Port of Prince Rupert and Vancouver as efficient gateways to Asia linking into the Midwest U.S. corridor. In particular, when I look at the Rupert CN Rail connection and 96 hours it takes to go from Rupert to Chicago and the congestion at Long Beach and on the west coast U.S., there is an opportunity to optimize that entry of traffic because this is a trade flow opportunity where imports come in and then we have an opportunity to stop those trains in Saskatoon and fill them with agriproducts so that those containers are not going back out empty.

From that perspective, the optimization of the north-south corridors both on the inbound and then also the north-south rail corridors and the trucking corridors, I think is certainly a massively impactful opportunity, not only, as you say, for the environment but for the economic performance of our country.

Hon. Erin O'Toole:

I have a final question then. I think it's clear that optimizing our routes within North America—

Am I out of time?

(1605)

The Chair:

I want to give everybody as much time as we can.

Can you hold that and try to get it in later? Sometimes I have to stop this right when we're getting some really key information and I don't like having to do that.

Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My question is for the CTA and Mr. Streiner.

In your view, why doesn't our air passengers rights approach deal with physical assault, sexual assault, and assault generally?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

I assume that your question is with respect to what's proposed in Bill C-49.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Streiner:

That said, as I indicated in my opening remarks, questions around the policy intent in the legislation, I think, are best directed to the Minister of Transport and to Transport Canada. I would say, however, that I think those sorts of matters have the potential to be police or criminal matters. It may well be that part of the reason was simply that there is another existing mechanism within the law to deal with them. However, the underlying policy logic of the legislation is a question best directed to the minister.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Okay. Thank you.

In your opening remarks, you did mention tarmac delays. How do you see tarmac delays addressed through the proposed amendments?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

As you know, the bill proposes that the CTA make regulations with respect to a series of different potential events, one of which is tarmac delays over three hours. Exactly how those will be dealt with in the regulations is something that we'll be able to determine after we've held consultations with industry, with consumer rights associations, and with Canadians and the travelling public. That said, I think the hearings we held on August 30 and 31 on the tarmac delay incidents involving two Air Transat flights underscored the importance of getting this right. I think the public reaction to those events and to the hearings themselves indicated that these are issues that Canadians think are very important.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

In your opinion, what would be a fair metric to determine the CTA's effectiveness in protecting passenger rights?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

I think one important metric is the speed with which we are able to process the various complaints.

As I noted in my opening remarks, Madam Chair, we've seen a significant increase in the number of complaints. I think that Canadians expect that when they turn to a body like the CTA, they're going to get relatively quick resolution. We've been placing a great deal of emphasis on a process we call facilitation. It's an ombudsman-like process through which one of our officers will make some phone calls between both parties, the complainant and the airline, to see if a quick and mutually acceptable resolution can be found. We've managed to resolve over 90% of complaints, including some of the more difficult complaints, through the facilitation process. I think Canadians will judge us in part on our ability to secure a fair but timely resolution of their air travel concerns, and that's something we're going to continue to focus on.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

I would like to follow up on a question I asked earlier.

Do you think specific penalties should be placed in the rights? Penalties are not specified in there.

Mr. Scott Streiner:

At the moment, the bill indicates that for certain of the events listed in the section that deals with the regulations, the Canadian Transportation Agency should establish appropriate levels of compensation. In other cases, it talks more about treatment or appropriate measures. At the end of the day, obviously, the regulations that we pass are going to follow whatever you and your fellow parliamentarians decide to put in the law. If the law provides for monetary compensation as well as other measures, then we will set the monetary compensation levels through the regulations. If the law doesn't provide for monetary compensation, then obviously we will not be able to include that.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

I have a very specific question for Mr. Emerson.

In regard to CN, I know there are changes proposed regarding the percentage an individual shareholder can have. Can I perhaps get your view on that?

Hon. David Emerson:

For the benefit of other members, there is a restriction that is being altered—I don't know if it's through this legislation or another bill—that limits a single shareholder presently to 15% of the voting shares of CN. That is being raised to 25%, but the reality is that CP is not subject to that. We have a situation in which railways in North America are either consolidating or on the verge of consolidating. We have Berkshire Hathaway owning 100% of Burlington Northern Railroad. It makes no sense to me to have a limitation placed on CN that wouldn't apply to other competitive railways here in Canada. I would be an advocate of lifting it entirely and putting them on the same footing as CP.

(1610)

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Mr. Al-Katib, do you want to add anything to that?

Mr. Murad Al-Katib:

At the end of the day, it's not an issue that we spend a lot of time on, but the consolidation is real, and the competitiveness of our railways is reliant on their ability to raise capital. I think placing one restriction on one railway over all the other players in this market.... There is an integration of the North American rail system. We can't just consider CP and CN and consider that they're not a part of an integrated North American system.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Your time is up. Thank you very much.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I want to thank the witnesses for joining us this afternoon.

My first question is very simple and is probably for Mr. Emerson and Mr. Streiner. They can answer with a yes or no.

In the previous Parliament, when the NDP was the official opposition, I remember that one of my colleagues invested a tremendous amount of time and energy into putting together a private member's bill, which proposed a passenger bill of rights.

Did you have a chance to look at that bill at the time? [English]

Hon. David Emerson:

No. [Translation]

Mr. Scott Streiner:

Yes, I knew about that initiative.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I am asking you this because that bill, which had received the Liberals' support but did not make it through, contained very specific descriptions that are in line with Mr. Emerson's report. It said that the passenger bill of rights should be consistent with or close to what was being done in the United States or in Europe. Most of the measures were very specific. For example, in case of a cancelled flight, the airline company was asked to provide two or three options. Failing to do so, the company would have to pay a fee that was even costed.

With Bill C-49, we are light-years away from that. We are in the philosophy of what the passenger bill of rights should have been. We will go into consultations once Bill C-49 obtains royal assent. So are we not losing precious time, given the work that has been done already and the fact that problems are becoming more and more persistent? [English]

Hon. David Emerson:

Because I didn't see the bill, and I wasn't aware of its content, I really couldn't answer that. In principle, I think you make a good point. [Translation]

Mr. Scott Streiner:

If the bill is passed, the Canadian Transportation Agency will focus on the regulatory process. Our objective is to complete the work in two or three months. That is precision work.[English]

In the United States and Europe, if I'm not mistaken, some of the details of passenger rights protection are found in regulations as well. We will look at practices in the United States and Europe, but our commitment and our objective is to get the job done and to get the job done quickly. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Wouldn't it have been possible for Bill C-49 to give an overview of what those regulations could be, so that we would know where we are headed? I think that is relatively clear, since we are among the last countries to implement a passenger bill of rights.

Had we benefited from the experience of others, we would have already implemented certain elements. But the consultation will be based on major philosophical principles or regulatory proposals, which we could improve and completely remove or add new ones.

(1615)

Mr. Scott Streiner:

The agency's consultation will be very targeted and will focus on specific issues and details.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I have another question for you, Mr. Emerson. It has to do with the conclusion of your report, where you propose increasing the United States' possible foreign ownership from 25% to 49%.

When you were considering that aspect of the bill, did you read the conclusions of the research report on that issue produced by the University of Manitoba task force? [English]

Hon. David Emerson:

If you're referring to the 15% limitation on single-share ownership in CN, we didn't hear from anyone on that issue during the review process. I don't recall anyone advising us on that in our discussions, or receiving a submission on it. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Sorry to interrupt you, Mr. Emerson, but the idea of wanting to increase foreign ownership in airports from 25% to 49% is the topic I really want to discuss. According to the University of Manitoba's results, it has not been shown that this would lead to value added for consumers.

So I would like to know whether you have read the report published by the University of Manitoba and, if not, on what study you based your proposal to go from 25% to 49%. [English]

Hon. David Emerson:

You're referring to ownership of airlines, air carriers. Okay. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Yes, that's right. [English]

Hon. David Emerson:

We received submissions verbally, particularly from some of the insipient operators or creators of ultra-low-cost carriers. We heard that they were having difficulty raising the kind of capital they needed to start low-cost carriers. We basically recommended something we thought would have traction, because it had been recommended before by, I believe, the Wilson report on competitiveness some years ago. We went to 49% as a threshold that would enable early start-up carriers to get a single shareholder that might get them over the hump in setting up an air carrier. Some of the staff may have, in fact, read the Manitoba study. I did not personally read it.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Emerson.

Sorry, Mr. Aubin, but your time is up.

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Excellent, thank you very much.

I could probably spend an entire day with this panel, so to the extent you can keep your answers short, and I'll try to do the same with my questions, it would be helpful.

First, Mr. Streiner, you mentioned a relative explosion in the number of complaints you dealt with when the public learned that the CTA was there to help. I'm picturing that through a well-publicized process, including these committee hearings and debate in the House of Commons, if C-49 passes, Canadians are going to be very well aware that they have some sort of recourse for the ordinary frustrations that come with travel. Do you have the capacity to deal with a further explosion of complaints? If not, what mechanism can be put in place to give you that capacity?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

I'll try to keep my answer brief, as the member requested, Madam Chair.

I will say that the CTA is, no doubt, somewhat stretched today. This dramatic increase in the number of complaints has stretched us. We're a relatively small organization with a significant number of mandates, including, but not limited to, processing and dealing with air travel complaints. I would be not entirely truthful if I didn't say that we are stretched. That said, we are, for the most part, managing to keep up. We've done some temporary redirection of resources to deal with these complaints. I was very happy to hear the Minister of Transport indicate that the government has committed to ensuring that the CTA has sufficient resources to do its job, but at the end of the day, those decisions on resources, as well as the responsibilities assigned to us, lie with Parliament and lie with the government. We will absolutely do the best we can to provide service to Canadians with whatever resources Parliament chooses to assign to us.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

In addition, at the outset of your remarks, you commented that part of your core mandate is to ensure that individuals living with disabilities have access to effective means of transportation, which I think is extraordinarily important. Do you see that the passenger bill of rights is going to enhance the ability of individuals living with disabilities to access air transportation in a fair and effective way?

(1620)

Mr. Scott Streiner:

Accessible transportation services are, without a doubt, a fundamental human right and one we are committed to advancing. As I understand the bill, which is currently before the committee, the consumer protection regulations it proposes do not deal specifically with accessibility issues. The former Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities indicated on the part of the government that national accessibility legislation would be coming forward in 2018. I understand this is still the government's plan and that legislation may deal in part with questions of accessible transportation.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

If we can shift gears to Mr. Emerson, we haven't touched much on the measures impacting marine transport. One of the measures, of course, is growing access by port authorities to the Canada infrastructure bank. Is there any reason we shouldn't be allowing ports to tap into this new source of capital to grow and expand in an era of international trade?

Hon. David Emerson:

Could I just add something? I want to do two things. One, I want to answer a question you asked Mr. Streiner, that as long as you're restricting the CTA to dealing with issues on a “one complaint at a time” basis, frankly, you're never going to have enough resources to deal with the multitude of complaints. It's lunacy to expect to deal with the accumulation of complaints unless you're giving the agency the authority to deal with clusters of complaints of a similar sort.

On the port authorities, my own feeling is that until there is a thorough review of the governance arrangements that deal with port authorities and airport authorities, I get very nervous about opening up more spigots, if you like, for these authorities to get hold of more money, because I'm concerned with the governance framework that applies both to ports and to airports. I think there is inadequate governance in relation to deployment of capital; there's inadequate governance when it comes to making sure that there is a recourse to a regulator where there is abuse of monopoly power; and there is inadequate governance when it comes to port or airport authorities entering into business in competition with their own tenants, and so frankly I wouldn't give them any more access to money until you clean that up.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

If we can, I'd like to again shift gears and go into some questions about interswitching, and I'll start with Mr. Al-Katib.

We heard during our prior study on Bill C-30 from some folks not in the grain industry that, “Gee, we'd really like to have this, too.” It impacted a certain geography and a certain industry. Although it was put forward, really, in an environment where we were dealing with a bumper crop and terrible weather, the fact that we can be introducing competition where there is none seems to me like a good idea. Is there any reason that we shouldn't be extending this to different industries across the entire country?

Mr. Murad Al-Katib:

Well, one of the things that are being attempted with the long-haul interswitching solution is to expand that out to various sectors and across the country. There is one glaring criticism at this point of the Bill C-49 provision: the Kamloops-Vancouver corridor is actually excluded from the long-haul interswitching. It's not very clear to me why that is the case, and I think it's certainly something that needs to be looked at. But from the perspective of having it accessible, one thing is that when we did our consultation, the broad 160-kilometre interswitching wasn't being used. It was being used after we filed our report. We couldn't find a single incidence of it being used at the time. That being said, I'm not a fan of remedies just hanging out there for the convenience of shippers. But with a well planned remedy, like the long-haul interswitching, if we can get the CTA to react quickly and to extend that from year to year quickly, I think it's a very effective mechanism, and it is going to inject competition into the system.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will go on to Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I have a quick question, and I think it will go to Mr. Emerson.

With respect to the reviews of the CTA, how important is it to regularly revisit laws as well as to review the Canada Transportation Act?

(1625)

Hon. David Emerson:

Well, we said in our report, and I said in my remarks, that the system today is so big and so complicated and so messy that keeping up with competitive conditions requires much more than a decennial review. There needs to be an evergreen process, I would argue, at least every two years. I believe the act should spell out the requirement for there to be a national transportation strategy and probably specify some of the key components to it, such as a strategy for national infrastructure projects that are critical to transportation and logistics over the next 20 years. You have to get ahead of these projects 20 years or you're going to be building and producing something and getting into regulatory delays and so on to the point where by the time you're finally finished, the economics has swamped you in some other way.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

And you'll obviously find that both the strategy and the infrastructure investments that are being made will yield better returns if they're in fact going to follow one another?

Hon. David Emerson:

Well, for anything, I believe, you need an infrastructure priority list, if you like, that is carefully thought through and analyzed, with a lot of the pre-engineering done, and a lot of the economics and financial dimensions, and some comprehensive assessment of risk. You need private sector investors to give you input into what kind of cost of capital you're looking at for different types of infrastructure and the different arrangements that might be put to financing them. That's all part of it. Leaving it vague and ill-defined and then expecting to be able to implement a timely infrastructure program, I think, is wishful thinking.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

This is with respect to sustainable infrastructure investments and, most importantly, the returns for both the economy and the industry itself.

I guess I can shift over to Mr. Streiner with respect to the agency. Is it incumbent upon the Canada Transportation Agency? You mentioned earlier that you're responsible for, as you say, smooth and efficient transportation systems. Is it appropriate to assume, for lack of a better word, that part of your role is to ensure that the infrastructure that is carrying trains, floating boats, and so on is actually being sustained, is safe, and is adequate for the current transportation environment?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

No, Madam Chair, the CTA's mandate does not include monitoring the maintenance of transportation infrastructure. That's not included currently in our mandate under the legislation.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

So who in fact is...?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

With respect, I would refer the question back to Transport Canada. It regulates for safety and security purposes. The Canadian Transportation Agency, the institution I lead, regulates for economic and accessibility purposes.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

We spoke a lot on governance today. Mr. Emerson had a lot of comments with respect to governance and how much better we can be in governing our airports especially and similar assets, including marine-related. I can cite a few governance challenges that we have with some of those assets, but I'll leave that to another discussion.

Is the CTA charged with ensuring that those who oversee these pieces of infrastructure are doing so in an appropriate manner, whether it be through a code of conduct or whether it be reporting of conflicts of interest and things of that nature? Does the CTA have any opinion and/or any jurisdiction over that area?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

We have very limited jurisdiction with respect to, say, airports or port authorities, which I assume is what the honourable member is referring to. We do have authority with respect to accessibility issues, which I talked about earlier. That's the accessibility of airports and port terminals that serve passengers. We do not have oversight with respect to some of the other issues you identified, or not under the law as it currently stands.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

How about currently owned federal assets that may be managed by private corporations? Do you have any authority there with respect to the question I just asked?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

If the question pertains to governance issues, such as the use of funds, etc., again, we don't have authority to oversee that. We can hear or receive complaints regarding the fees charged by port authorities or by pilotage authorities, but with that exception, and the earlier exception I talked about on accessibility, we have very limited jurisdiction with respect to the entities you describe.

(1630)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Great. Thank you.

For my last question I'll switch gears and ask Mr. Al-Katib a question with respect to the interswitching.

In your opinion, is asking the CTA to set the long-haul interswitching rates based on comparable traffic a feasible way of setting the fare rates while also ensuring that class 1 railroads are not penalized?

Mr. Murad Al-Katib:

That's probably the biggest outstanding question. To set it at a fiftieth percentile and to be able to effectively deal with that in the 30-day window I think will be the judgment of success or failure of this initiative. I think it can be done. I think the costing data is there. The comparables can be identified. I think it can be done.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Great.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

My colleague Mr. O'Toole was about to ask a question and wasn't able to. He pleaded with me to get this question on the books, so I said I was willing to use—

The Chair:

[Inaudible--Editor] leave, or I would have had to make an exception.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

That's okay.

The question is for you, Mr. Emerson. He noted that you served as a trade minister in the past, and he wanted to know, if you were the trade minister in the position of renegotiating NAFTA, whether you would have transportation as a key priority.

Hon. David Emerson:

Well, I think it's a very important priority and should at least be part of the strategic thinking when it comes to the negotiations. Canada might want transportation as a sector specifically discussed at NAFTA. Whether you would get take-up on that from the Americans in particular, I don't know.

As I said earlier, I believe that probably the number one driver of competitive success that we need to deal with going forward is transportation and logistics. As I've said, we have a massive, high-volume, high-speed system. We have all kinds of issues around taxation of rail assets and so on. A large range of issues and border issues create kinks and discontinuities in what should be a smoothly flowing, liquid system.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much.

I feel like my colleague Mr. Fraser. There are many things I would like to ask, but I am going to go to you, Mr. Streiner, and circle back to some of the comments you made in your opening remarks.

You said that perhaps the most significant rail-related change in Bill C-49 is replacement of the CTA's authority to set interswitching distances beyond 30 kilometres and of the competitive line rate provisions with long-haul interswitching. I think it connects quite well with what Mr. Al-Katib said in terms of the angst around interswitching. This would be one of the issues that is raised with me time and time again when I'm meeting with stakeholders around the long-haul interswitching, so some of my questions are based on the conversations with them.

For you, Mr. Streiner, I first want to ask about long-haul interswitching orders and reasonable direction of the traffic. In the bill, clause 136.1 states that an LHI order should be applicable to the “nearest” interchange “in the reasonable direction of the...traffic”. In southern Manitoba, for example, traffic is often moving north to an interchange in Winnipeg, before it moves somewhere down into the lower 48 states. There are, however, closer interchanges at the border, but these are not of the same size or efficiency as the Winnipeg interchanges.

Does Bill C-49 allow for an LHI order to have traffic still move to Winnipeg even if there's a closer but less efficient interchange?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

Madam Chair, I trust that the members will understand that as an adjudicator I have to be careful about interpreting legislation that's not yet on the books and on which we don't have an application. Having said that, as I read the bill, it doesn't dictate to the CTA that the traffic must flow in one direction only, so I think we will make that determination and other determinations, if Bill C-49 is passed into law, based on the facts before us and the arguments brought by the parties.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay.

Another question that was posed to me related to the prohibition to apply for a long-haul interswitching order if a shipper has any interchange within 30 kilometres. Again, clause 129 prohibits shippers from applying for an LHI order if the originating facility has an interchange within 30 kilometres of it. For many, this doesn't make sense if the interchange isn't “in the reasonable direction” of the traffic's ultimate destination. Again, in clauses 129 and 136.1, the legislation allows for the agency to make a rational judgment about the most appropriate nearest interchange given the reasonable direction of the traffic.

The question I was asked is, why wouldn't this also apply to facilities that have an interchange within 30 kilometres, and doesn't that measure put facilities with an interchange within 30 kilometres at a commercial disadvantage to those that do not?

(1635)

Mr. Scott Streiner:

Again, I want to be a little careful about interpreting legislation that I may need to interpret as an adjudicator. I think what I would say is that if the committee wishes the legislation to be clearer on this point, then of course the committee can suggest adjustments that would more clearly direct the CTA with respect to these kinds of assessments.

To the extent that we're left with discretion, we will always apply that discretion in light of section 5 of the Canada Transportation Act. That's the national transportation policy, as you know, which speaks about allowing competition and market forces to be the primary drivers for securing fairly priced and good transportation services and for regulatory intervention to be strategic and targeted. We always look at section 5 for the purposes of interpreting provisions that may otherwise be somewhat unclear.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Block.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Streiner, first of all, do you have anything left from your opening remarks that you haven't had a chance to address yet?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

The only points I would make, I will make extremely briefly, Madam Chair, and Mr. Emerson has already underscored one of the points. Since 2010, the CTA has suggested in its annual reports to Parliament that its own-motion power, its ability to initiate inquiries on its own motion, be tied less specifically to international air travel. Currently, that's really what it's tied to. We used that own-motion authority to launch the Air Transit tarmac delay inquiry. We believe, as Mr. Emerson has indicated in reviewing the results of his review, that within reasonable parameters, it may make sense for that authority to be available to us more broadly. That would bring our tool kit into line with that of other independent regulators, and it would allow us to respond with greater agility to challenges in the transportation system.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. That answers one of my other questions too, so thank you.

You mentioned that the act provides for a three-hour tarmac delay as the baseline. Is that an appropriate amount of time, in your view?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

A three-hour limit with respect to when the tarmac-delay provisions come into play is, if my memory serves me correctly, consistent with the practice in some other jurisdictions. Whether that is the right limit, I think, is something that I would defer to the committee and to Parliament to make a decision on. But certainly, that threshold exists, as I recall, in other jurisdictions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned in your opening remarks that there have been about 230 complaints in the past week. What prompted that jump? Was it a specific incident that had a lot of complaints? Did one plane have a really hard landing, or what happened?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

No, all of those complaints do not come from a single flight. We're entering a bit into the realm of speculation here, but I would suggest, as I did in my opening remarks, that in general the jump in air travel complaints reflects the public's increased awareness of the availability of recourse through the CTA. The Air Transat hearings may have raised public awareness. The committee's work on this bill may have raised public awareness. Media reports on air travel issues may have raised public awareness.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We talked about this with Transport Canada earlier. Do you have enforcement mechanisms to ensure that companies that routinely violate standards or customer rights can be singled out publicly for doing so? Is there a public disclosure database of complaints so you can track which airlines are really not as good as others, for example?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

We already have an obligation under the Canada Transportation Act to report annually to Parliament on trends that we see in air traveller complaints, including how many complaints have been filed with respect to service by different airlines. So that's already in the public domain. Bill C-49 would provide additional provisions with respect to the submission of performance information by airlines, and some of that information may well be available to travellers as they make assessments on the airlines with which they wish to book.

(1640)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You commented earlier that there are few performance metrics for the rail system. What metrics would you like to see improved? You mentioned a few, but is it a widespread problem that there are no metrics?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

One of the things we've observed in our administration of the legislation—and I believe that both of my colleagues at the table have referenced this in some way—is that in the United States, the Surface Transportation Board posts a significant amount of information online on the performance of the freight-rail system. That information is of assistance to decision-makers, both shippers who are deciding whom to contract with and also policy-makers. That kind of information allows us collectively to see where the system is flowing smoothly and where there are pinch points or problems in the system. I think it's important that comparable information be posted online in Canada. That said, it's also important that we protect information that's commercially sensitive. So getting that balance right, I think, will be something that will be important for parliamentarians in finalizing the legislation and for the CTA in implementing it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one last question for you before I go to Mr. Emerson. Can the CTA protect us from the ever-declining quality of airplane food?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Mr. Emerson, you noted in your comments the looming consolidation of rail. In 1999 CN made a bid to buy BNSF and in 2015 CP tried to buy NS. Is rail consolidation a good thing, in your view?

Hon. David Emerson:

I think it is a good thing that we have transcontinental railways, and I think some of the consolidation will be aimed at ensuring there are coast-to-coast high-speed, high-volume corridors. I think consolidation is probably in the interests of greater North American transportation efficiency.

However, I am concerned that, with the consolidation and the greater reliance on high-speed, high-volume corridors, the feeder lines are not being attended to appropriately. I think I would very much like to see the Government of Canada designate a national rail system, whether some of the railways are short-lines within provincial jurisdiction or not. If we do not take much more seriously and become more aggressive about the financial viability of short-lines, we've got literally hundreds of communities that are not very close to the high-speed, high-volume corridors, and they're dependent on truck or short-line. I don't think there's enough attention being paid to it.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Emerson.

Go head, Mr. Shields.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Mr. Streiner, you described a process earlier in which you dealt with about 70 complaints a month, up to almost 1,000 a month now if you take the recent numbers, and you talked about resolving them one-on-one. That can't go on. I'm assuming you've alluded to that, and you probably listened to Mr. Emerson saying there's a different method of doing it. So I'm assuming you can't do that and you are looking for something else in the process as this is coming to light.

Do you want to respond to that?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

Thank you.

I should clarify that while we've had a surge in the last week—230 complaints—we've actually been running at about 400 per month, not 1,000 per month, over the last year. That said, 400 per month is still four, five, or six times, more than we had been processing in the past, depending on the month.

I would reiterate the comments I made earlier. I think that if the CTA had own-motion authority and was able, where it has reasonable grounds to believe that there may be some sort of an issue in the transportation system, to deal with that proactively and on a more systemic basis, that might help to resolve some of the complaints.

It's also possible that when we pass the air passenger rights regulations and there's greater clarity in the system on what traveller's rights are, over time we may see a stabilization at lower levels. I am not certain that would happen at the outset. I think at the outset we might well see a surge. That's what happened in Europe after the new regulations were brought on stream, because these raise people's awareness. But it may be the case that over several years, as people get used to their rights and as the system stabilizes, there might be a levelling off.

(1645)

Mr. Martin Shields:

That is a significant cost factor to deal with them in the way you have been dealing.

Mr. Scott Streiner:

There's no doubt about that. Dealing with complaints takes staff. We have introduced a number of efficiency measures. We've redirected resources to deal with this large number of complaints. We've also introduced a number of efficiency measures that have helped to improve our productivity, so that's good news. The use of facilitation, which I referenced earlier—this ombudsman-like approach in which complaints are resolved through a couple of phone calls, in many cases, a day or two days of a staff member's work—certainly helps to manage the demand. There is no doubt that this many complaints, this dramatic an increase, creates resource pressures on the organization.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Right. You'd be out of business if all that stuff kept coming back to you from dissatisfied customers and that's all you were doing. You'd be out of business, spending all your time on that end.

But going to Mr. Emerson, in the sense of your remarks about systemic issues, do you have a solution that you would suggest?

Hon. David Emerson:

I think the own-motion power—with the premise that this power would require the agency to demonstrate there is reasonable and credible evidence that there is a problem that is not unique to one complainant, or that there are other systemic issues that are incipient or are about to develop—would enable the agency to get ahead of the issue and try to provide preventive guidance or measures or mitigating measures.

I do not believe, as many do, that somehow this could create a rogue agency and that we have to leave it to Parliament and the minister to do everything. I think that comes back to governance. If you haven't got a way of putting an administrative management team in at the agency and governing it properly so that they're doing things in a responsible way, then you'd better go back and look at the governance that you're using that would allow an agency or an agency head to become a rogue. To me it's a pretty straightforward thing, and if it were the corporate sector, I can tell you they'd figure it out pretty fast.

Mr. Martin Shields:

In your 56 recommendations, I'm assuming that the airport authority is one that didn't get dealt with and might be something that you would like to see done.

Hon. David Emerson:

For sure.

The truth of the matter, honourable members, is that we threw the cat amongst the pigeons with the airport authorities. They're very comfortable organizations these days, I have to say. They've mounted a very strenuous lobby campaign to basically argue that everything is good and nothing needs to be fixed. Frankly, I think it's up to people who dig into this to look at the underlying weaknesses, because it was 25 years ago that the airport authorities were basically created. At the time, there was a thought that maybe they should be for-profit authorities because they're essentially amenable to private sector finance. There is a relatively easy way to contain the for-profit influence that a shareholder would bring. To me, it's just so important over time that you have a shareholder looking at and applying discipline to the way capital is being spent and operations are being run at some of these authorities. Today, they are really nice facilities, but going forward it's not clear that we're going to be quite as happy, because the cost base is building up.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My next questions are for you, Mr. Streiner. I really need you to shed some light on the reality of western agriculture, which I'm not familiar with.

My first question is about the maximum revenue entitlement. I'm not able to find why soy derivatives or products are excluded from this measure, especially since the market seems increasingly integrated. Grains from the United States are part of the equation but the soybeans from Canada are not.

Could you enlighten me?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

Once again, it is a matter of politics, objectives and the logic of the bill. With all due respect, this question should be addressed to the minister and the folks from Transport Canada. It is not a question for the agency that administers the act, but is not its author.

(1650)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

To date, has this caused you a number of issues in your relations with the producers or carriers?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

Once again, I don't think this is a question for the agency responsible for administering the act.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I understand.

Let me try with a second topic, hoping—

I see that you want to add something, Mr. Al-Katib. [English]

Mr. Murad Al-Katib:

I could make a quick comment.

Soybeans were actually not very prevalent in western Canada up until recent years. They are spreading eastward. Manitoba has just in the last handful of years become a very major soybean producer. There is a movement by farmers that they do want the number of crops to be expanded in the MRE. Soybeans were raised, chickpeas were raised. They're excluded as well. There were recommendations on our side. We did recommend a few crops to be reviewed and added. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I fully understand that the perspective is historic. At the time when production was minimal, that was understandable, but today, it would be unacceptable. Thank you.

My second question is about interswitching and, specifically, the possibility for a railway company to request an interchange to be removed from its list. Subclauses 136.9(1) and (2) of the bill describe the obligations of railway companies to keep up to date a list of the locations of interchanges and a process including a 60-day notice to remove an interchange from that list.

From reading that, my understanding was that, after a 60-day notice, the obligations no longer applied since the time expired. However, in its FAQ last week, Transport Canada notes that the railway companies have other general obligations that they must continue to fulfill beyond the 60 days.

There is an issue with the consistency between Bill C-49 and Transport Canada's FAQ. At the very least, there is a lack of clarity in terms of the general obligations that carriers must fulfill.

Mr. Scott Streiner:

I was not here for the presentations of the people from Transport Canada. So I'm not sure which provisions they discussed.[English]

If the reference was to the discontinuance provisions in the legislation, those provisions require the railway company to go through a fairly lengthy process to end the operation of or to transfer a railway line.

My understanding with respect to the provision you've spoken about is that removing an interchange from a line is covered by a separate process, the provision to which you referred, but that's different from ending service on a line. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I have one question. Mr. Emerson, you spoke about short-lines and not enough attention being paid to their role. I know that in my municipality, in Barrie, for example, the municipality owns a short-line. In many cases, it's a much cheaper alternative for local businesses to get their goods to a class 1 line so they can be moved down the line. There are some significant capital costs required to maintain the line crossings, rail maintenance, etc.

I'm just wondering if you can expand on that. What attention needs to be paid to ensure that the short-lines many municipalities rely on are made viable or remain viable?

Hon. David Emerson:

A lot of the short-lines were kind of abandoned lines from the class 1 railways. When you look at the financial health of the short-line railways, they're pretty fragile, and they do not get the same kinds of tax benefits and advantages American short-lines get, for example.

In our report we recommended that there be a much greater harmonization of the treatment of investments in Canadian short-lines, more like those that exist in the U.S. The U.S. also has various capital pools available from government for investments in short-lines.

I don't know, Murad, if you want to add to that. I think it's a very serious problem, and if we don't deal with it, it's either going to force everybody onto the roads in trucks, or we're going to have to fix the problem probably when it's very late in the day and maybe ineffective.

(1655)

Mr. Murad Al-Katib:

We did recommend first-mile, last-mile short-line-related incentives, in particular the extension of the accelerated capital cost allowance for short-line railways, the establishment of a short-line railway infrastructure, and allowing short-lines to apply for the building Canada fund. These were all things that were there.

This is an essential element of interconnectivity. The rail lines, with consolidation, will go to main lines. The densification of short-lines is essential for rural economic development in this country.

Mr. John Brassard:

From your standpoint, then, are you disappointed that you didn't see this addressed in this piece of legislation? Should this be something that is looked into?

Mr. Murad Al-Katib:

We recommended it as a key recommendation. It was not contained in this round. It's a disappointing aspect, for sure.

Mr. John Brassard:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Mr. Al-Katib, you brought it up, so I'm going to ask you a question about what constitutes adequate and suitable service. If you have some opinions on what that should look like, I'd love to hear them. If you don't want to go that far out on a limb, you could just tell us or even suggest what we should be thinking about when we come to define that.

Mr. Murad Al-Katib:

This was a point of significant consultation. One of the things is that shippers are of the view that adequate and suitable accommodation is satisfying all the needs of the shipper, full stop. We came to the conclusion that the rights of the shipper need to be satisfied but within an efficient transportation system, so we went one step further. Some of the shipping community really felt that it was quite egregious that we went further than the rights of the shipper, full stop.

For instance, if you have to invest $10 to achieve $1 of efficiency to achieve the rights of the shipper, full stop, is that efficient? My answer would be no. Adequate and suitable accommodation has a number of factors to be considered. The rights of the shipper are paramount, but an efficiently functioning system that addresses the needs of all the players in the system is a key element.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Mr. Streiner, you mentioned that you'll be looking at the airlines' tariffs to determine their performance standards. Did I hear that correctly?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

No, we currently have the ability to look at tariffs. If we get a complaint, for example, about an incident, we can look at whether the airline applied its tariff, but we can also look at whether or not the terms of the tariff are reasonable. Under Bill C-49, we'll be making regulations that establish minimum standards for things like flight delays and lost baggage, and those minimum standards will be deemed to be part of the tariff unless the tariff provides for better compensation than is in the regulations.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

So you would essentially audit the tariffs then to make sure that the right ingredients were in there.

Mr. Scott Streiner:

By definition, if the regulation set a level of compensation, for example, that's here and the previous tariff was lower, the regulations would prevail.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

What about the pieces of the puzzle that aren't covered by a tariff, like the terminal, CATSA, etc.? This is similar to a question I asked an earlier panel. Sometimes it isn't the airline's fault that somebody is stuck on a tarmac somewhere. So again, how do you see that working in?

Mr. Scott Streiner:

At the moment, the legislation, including the act as it would be amended by Bill C-49 , does not give us the authority to go and set standards for or investigate other players in the air travel supply chain. Under the legislation, we are to focus on the airlines and their tariffs. That said, we recognize—and we saw some of this in the testimony at the Air Transat hearing—that there are multiple players and that sometimes events involve more than the airlines. So even in the absence of the authority to make regulations or to adjudicate complaints with respect to other players, to the extent that our assistance could be helpful in facilitating smoother, more fluid, more effective working relationships between the different players, we are more than happy to play that role.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

With respect to compensation for passengers who are basically done poorly by, I use again an example. I had a flight in Kelowna stuck on the tarmac while they worked out a technical issue, and I was late getting to where I needed to go, but other people on the aircraft missed flights, missed connections that they weren't going to be able to take until the following day. So when you are looking at a compensation system, this probably is a regulatory issue, but obviously not every person on the plane is affected in the same way. Would there not be a rationale then for having differential compensation depending on the level of impact?

(1700)

Mr. Scott Streiner:

As things currently stand in the law, we do have in certain circumstances the ability to order compensation for expenses. Some of what you're describing might fall into the category of expenses if somebody had to, for example, stay overnight because they missed a connection, or they needed to pay for some meals. Whether the compensation levels that are set through the regulations that we're going to make are specific numbers that apply across the board or whether there's some variability based on individual circumstances is something, I think, we're going to have to look at when we undertake the consultations.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I have one final question for you, Mr. Emerson. Talk about the far north. What in here is going to make life better for those folks out there?

Hon. David Emerson:

We spend a lot of time in the north talking to people there, and I have a long-standing bias that Canada has neglected the north. That bias remains today. I still do not think we pay enough attention to infrastructure in the north. I don't think we pay enough attention to the roads and the seabed, the mapping of the latter, or the systems for weather forecasting. For example, the air carriers in the north have a terrible time getting their services onto the website that public servants use to book flights, and I don't think that's been resolved yet. For example, Air North has a heck of a time getting a major source of northern travel onto its aircraft because, somehow, somebody in this town doesn't really want to make it easy for public servants to get on Air North. There's a wide range of issues. We identified trade and transportation corridor issues that we think are critically important, because eventually there has to be environmentally sustainable development of the north and you need to get 20 or 30 years ahead of that in identifying corridors and developing infrastructure finance techniques that will allow some of these corridors to be developed, recognizing that the first development in any corridor is not going to be able to pay for the whole corridor, so you need some fairly sophisticated techniques to ensure that you're bringing institutional capital to the north to help them develop.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Emerson, Mr. Streiner, and Mr. Al-Katib, thank you so much. You can see by the interesting questions that your comments are greatly appreciated.

I think Bill C-49 reflects a lot of the work that you've already done, Mr. Emerson.

So thank you all very much. Thank you very much for being here.

For the committee, I will suspend for now.

(1700)

(1800)

The Chair:

I call the meeting on our study of Bill C-49 back to order.

Welcome to the witnesses we have with us now. They are Jeanette Southwood, vice-president, strategy and partnerships, Engineers Canada, from the city of North York; and Ray Orb, president of the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities.

We know you very well. We have a member on this committee who reminds us constantly about Saskatchewan. We're really happy to have you with us here, as well.

Of course, we also have George Bell from Metrolinx.

Welcome to all of you.

Mr. Orb, do you want to start?

Mr. Ray Orb (President, Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities):

Yes. Thank you.

Good evening. Thank you for the opportunity to address the committee tonight. I am pleased to be here today.

My name is Ray Orb, and I'm the president of the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities, or SARM.

SARM represents all 296 rural municipalities in Saskatchewan. Our members are home to a major agriculture sector. Saskatchewan represents nearly 40% of Canada's farmable land. This has allowed Saskatchewan to become the world's largest exporter of lentils, dried peas, mustard, flaxseed, and canola.

In 2016 Saskatchewan exported $14.4 billion worth of agrifood products. For a landlocked province like Saskatchewan, getting these products to market requires an efficient and effective world-class rail transportation system. That is why I'm appreciative of today's opportunity to talk about Bill C-49 since SARM members and the agriculture sector rely so heavily on the transportation system.

SARM has been an advocate for increased data reporting. More data means that better decisions may be made by producers and others in the supply chain. In SARM's view, railways should be required to produce plans that detail how they will deal with demands resulting from the upcoming crop year. This should include railways' contingency plans for larger yields and how they will deal with the cold winter months in the Prairies—that is, the equipment and the number of crews that will be needed, for example.

SARM is pleased to see that Bill C-49 includes an expansion of the Governor in Council's powers to make regulations requiring major railway companies to provide information regarding rates, service, and performance to the Minister of Transport. Enhancing data requirements and making more information available to those in the supply chain is not an immediate resolution to transportation issues, but it is a crucial piece of the solution.

Another advocacy point for SARM has been the need for reciprocal penalties. Holding railways and others in the supply chain to account is important as producers are the ones who ultimately lose out when levels of service are not met.

It appears that Bill C-49 will enable shippers to obtain terms in their contracts dealing with amounts to be paid in relation to a failure to comply with conditions related to railway companies' service obligations. Clarification for producers on how this will function is required. It would be beneficial for all parties involved if the Canadian Transportation Agency would provide further clarification on the issue, such as guidelines or best practices for reciprocal penalties.

SARM is disappointed that reciprocal penalties are not officially mentioned in the legislation. Should an impasse occur between the shipper and the carrier regarding reciprocal penalties, will the CTA intervene? Further clarification on the informal dispute resolution services is required. While there appear to be more details to sort out regarding reciprocal penalties, SARM is happy to see that reciprocal penalties will be allowable.

SARM also welcomes the amendment on the informal dispute resolution services. Providing cost-efficient, effective, and timely dispute resolution services is imperative for producers. Once the harvest is completed, producers must get their products to market in a timely manner to fulfill their contract obligations. Disputes should be resolved as quickly as possible so that producers won't face any additional penalties or unnecessary delays.

Long-haul interswitching may also be a positive new provision for producers. SARM supported the increased interswitching distances in the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act. It was hoped that extended interswitching from that act would be made permanent. While the extended radius will benefit more producers who are eligible, they must still negotiate with carriers before applying for long-haul interswitching. It remains to be seen whether this new provision is the long-term solution needed.

The retention of the maximum revenue entitlement, or MRE, is appreciated by SARM and its members. SARM members oppose the elimination of the MRE. This provision protects producers from excessive freight rates, ensures the movement of grain, and allows railways to reinvest in the rail network. Rather than eliminating the MRE, SARM members have passed a resolution requesting that the MRE formula be reviewed as soon as possible. SARM hopes that the changes to the MRE will continue to ensure railway accountability and transparency while still protecting producers from high freight rates.

(1805)



Overall, Bill C-49 appears to address many of the concerns facing producers. The CTA review provided the agriculture sector with many opportunities to provide feedback and SARM is appreciative of this. SARM will continue to provide comments and feedback at every opportunity and looks forward to continuing to work with the federal government and all agriculture stakeholders to advance the sector.

Thank you again for the opportunity to speak to you today.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Orb.

Mr. Bell, Metrolinx.

Mr. George Bell (Vice-President, Safety and Security, Metrolinx):

Thank you.

First of all, I'd like to thank you for the opportunity to speak to you today. I'd like to address what we consider to be the critically important issue of locomotive voice and video recorders.

My name is George Bell and I work for Metrolinx, an urban transit authority in Toronto that operates Go Transit systems and the Union Pearson Express linking downtown and the airport in Toronto. Metrolinx, through GO Transit, is the largest commuter rail operator in Canada, with over 450 kilometres of track on seven lines in the greater Toronto-Hamilton area. What surprised me when I moved to Toronto for this work is that one in every six Canadians lives in the GO Transit service area. We move over 250,000 people a day. We have a very large fleet of rail equipment: 651 passenger cars, 62 locomotives, and we supplement that with the 15 rail vehicles we have on the Union Pearson Express line. We run 61 train sets a day and we make about 300 trips a day currently. If we put that in context a little further, our largest trains hold about 2,500 passengers. That means that each of our largest trains has about the same number of people on it as five jumbo jets—five.

When we operate our trains, we operate in what's known as a push-pull fashion. That means the locomotive always stays on one end of the train. If we were on an east-west run, the locomotive stays on the east end of the train, no matter which direction we run. If we run north-south, the locomotive runs on the south end of the train. We supply motive power either to push or pull our cars across the track. When the locomotive is pushing, the crew that operates the train is on the opposite end of the train in what's known as a cab car, which has a replica of the locomotive controls and controls the locomotive by remote control. It's converse when we operate from the locomotive. This is important context.

Since our inception, Metrolinx and GO have steadily increased GO transit train service with the goal of transforming from a rush hour commuter service to a two-way, all-day regional transportation service. Our newest program, regional express rail, will build on the planning and infrastructure progress we have already made and fast-track future service expansion. This means that electric trains will be running every 15 minutes or better on our heaviest corridors; that four times the number of trips outside of weekday rush-hour periods will be run, including evenings and weekends; and twice the number of trips during weekday rush-hour periods. The result of this expansion is that we will see approximately 6,000 weekly trips by 2024.

All of this is critically important when we consider the contributions to railway and passenger safety that can be gained from the introduction of locomotive voice and video recorders. Metrolinx and GO have very significant safety responsibilities to our commuters, our communities, and our employees. We take these responsibilities very seriously indeed. We strive to be leaders in safety and are frequent early adopters of new technologies and techniques. Locomotive voice and video recorders are one example of our forward thinking. GO has already equipped all its locomotives and cab cars with LVVRs.

To give you an idea of what those look like, they consist of a recording system that's fed by four cameras and two microphones. I'm sorry, I'd hoped to have some pictures for you, but I don't have them. Three of the cameras show the interior of the locomotive. We can see the two operators from behind, we can see them in the corners of our view, and we can see the back wall of the locomotive from the front of them. We do not focus on the faces or expressions of our operators. The cameras that are looking at them from the front focus on the back wall, which is full of diagnostic equipment for the locomotive, and we can see a great number of outputs from our diagnostics on that wall. The two cameras that are looking at them from behind can see how they operate the trains. We can see their hand motions, we can see their throttle controls, their brake controls, we can see if they're on the phone, which is a prohibited activity—but nonetheless possible.

(1810)



We have two microphones in the locomotive that can capture all the ambient conversation within the locomotive. The fourth camera faces out in front of the locomotive. It's an unfortunate reality that railroads, and commuter railroads in particular, see a lot of suicides. The camera that looks out the front of the locomotive gives us evidence of what's occurring in front of the locomotive. It's the only camera in the system that is readily downloaded. The other three cameras need special permissions to be downloaded and can't be downloaded by anyone but the relevant authorities.

When we consider the system, we strongly believe that the technology that we have in place in our locomotives can save lives and make the travelling public safer. The Transportation Safety Board has called for the use of LVVR technology to be used both as part of their investigatory processes and by railway companies as part of the safety management systems to proactively identify areas for safety improvement. It's undoubtedly useful to collect evidence that may be used after an accident to assist in determining the cause of that accident. It's our opinion that a more powerful and responsible approach is to enable the information captured by an LVVR to be used before an accident occurs. The ability to identify behavioural or ergonomic trends that may lead to accidents would be a great benefit in maintaining our safety.

Metrolinx agrees that the privacy of our operating crews is very important. In the case of an LVVR installation, crews have been well informed that the technology is in place and how it's used. That said, we do not view the operating controls of a cab car or a locomotive to be a place where there should be an expectation of privacy. Our engineers and conductors are highly qualified professionals, and we expect them to conduct themselves in such a manner when they're operating our trains. Further, we believe that if there is to be a balance between safety and privacy, safety must prevail. This is particularly true when we consider that any risk-taking behaviour on the part of the operator of a commuter train puts not just the safety of that operator in jeopardy, but can also put in harm's way the 2,500 people who may be on the train. We believe that we owe those passengers and their families an utmost duty to look after their safety on our trains. Empowering railways to use locomotive voice and video recorders in a non-punitive and proactive manner will help us meet that duty.

Thank you for your attention.

(1815)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Bell.

Ms. Southwood.

Ms. Jeanette Southwood (Vice-President, Strategy and Partnerships, Engineers Canada):

Thank you for the opportunity to be here today, Madam Chair. I'm very pleased to discuss Engineers Canada's stance on Bill C-49, the Transportation Modernization Act.

My name is Jeanette Southwood. In my previous role as principal at a global engineering firm, I was global sustainable cities leader and Canadian urban development and infrastructure leader. My team focused on areas that included supply chain, business continuity, and climate adaptation, urban intensification and restoration, and the strategic integration of cutting-edge global innovation and knowledge into solutions for private and public clients. Our portfolio included rail.

I am currently the vice-president of strategy and partnerships at Engineers Canada based here in Ottawa. Engineers Canada is the national organization that represents the 12 provincial and territorial associations that regulate the practice of engineering in Canada and licenses the country's more than 290,000 professional engineers. Together we work to advance the profession in the public interest.

With the entire Transportation Modernization Act open for public review and consultation, Engineers Canada's testimony today pertains directly to section 11 of the Railway Safety Act, specifically in relation to the design, build, and maintenance stages of railway work in Canada, and we have three recommendations in particular that I'd like to touch on in my remarks today.

The first recommendation is that the engineering principles in section 11 of the Railway Safety Act be further defined. The second is that professional engineers be involved in the entire life cycle of railways' infrastructure. The third is that climate vulnerability assessments be carried out on Canada's rail infrastructure and that Canada's rail infrastructure be adapted to a changing climate.

First, regarding engineering principles, in Canada engineering is regulated under provincial and territorial law by the 12 engineering regulators. The regulators are entrusted to hold engineers accountable for practising in a professional, ethical, and competent manner and in compliance with the applicable provincial or territorial engineering act, code of ethics, or legal framework in place. Technical provincial and professional standards of conduct are set, revised, maintained, and enforced by regulators who are all professional engineers in their jurisdiction.

By virtue of being a regulated professional, professional engineers are required to work with the public interest in mind and to uphold public safety. For this reason, Engineers Canada strongly supports and encourages the direct involvement of professional engineers in the design, construction, maintenance, evaluation, use, and alteration of all engineering work related to railways in Canada, not only to increase transparency and public confidence towards a safe and well regulated rail system, but also to uphold public safety and accountability on all railway work.

It is vital that the federal government incorporate professional engineers through the entire life cycle of a rail project, and not just in the final approval of rail work. Engineers Canada encourages the federal government to put measures in place to ensure that this is the case. It is equally important that it be professional engineers who take on the responsibility of overseeing and maintaining the standards and regulations set out by the federal government.

Currently the Railway Safety Act outlines that companies are obligated to report on the qualifications and licences of safety personnel. However, ambiguity and the possibility of misinterpretation are evident in section 11 of the Railway Safety Act, specifically in regard to the definition of engineering roles and engineering principles. The act states: All work relating to railway works—including, but not limited to, design, construction, evaluation, maintenance and alteration—must be done in accordance with sound engineering principles.

The ambiguity around the term “engineering principles” creates space for misinterpretation and a potential situation where public safety is compromised. The act should specify that where engineering principles are to be applied, they must be applied by a professional engineer. Federal public servants who are tasked with overseeing the engineering work referred to in section 11 must also be professional engineers. Communities are better protected by the consistent application of safety and siting procedures where professional engineers are involved in decisions.

Our second recommendation is regarding the life cycle of railways' infrastructure. Involving professional engineers in the life cycle of rail projects will not only ensure that they are carried out with public safety top of mind, but engineers are also well equipped to design, build, and manage resilient rail infrastructure.

(1820)



Canada's railway infrastructure is an integral enabler of Canada's growing economy, as we've heard from the two speakers who preceded me, providing services to more than 10,000 commercial and industrial customers each year, moving about four million carloads of freight across the country and into the U.S., and getting approximately 70 million people in Montreal, the GTA, and Vancouver alone to work each year. This vast integrated network needs to operate with efficiency and public safety in mind, both of which require a high level of reliable service.

Finally, I'll turn to our recommendation regarding climate vulnerability. Resilient infrastructure is the driving force behind productive societies, stable industries, and increased public confidence in civil infrastructure. However, Canada's infrastructure report card noted that much of Canada's current infrastructure is vulnerable to the effects of extreme weather, which is becoming increasingly frequent and severe. Vulnerable rail infrastructure presents a risk not only to public safety but also to the productivity of Canadian individuals and businesses and of the country's economy. Without the consistent application of climate vulnerability assessments to inform rail design, public confidence and trust in rail infrastructure will be fragile.

For example, floods and historic record water flows severely damaged Churchill, Manitoba's Hudson Bay Railway tracks on May 23, 2017, just a few short months ago. This major flood severely damaged five bridges, washed away 19 sections of track bed, and required that 30 bridges and 600 culverts be checked for structural integrity. This specific rail line transports food, supplies, and people to the remote community of Churchill, Manitoba, a community frequently visited by tourists during the summer months. With severe damage to the Hudson Bay Railway, service disruptions have now caused goods, services, and people to arrive by air transportation, an expensive mode of transportation to the northern community. The catastrophic damage to the rail line will take months to repair, causing major service disruptions to both individual and business productivity, as well as decreased public confidence in rail infrastructure.

Climate vulnerability assessments provide early awareness to planners regarding the potential impacts that extreme weather events could have on both public and private infrastructure in communities across Canada. Professional engineers in Canada are leaders in adaptation and are ready to work collaboratively with the federal government to provide unbiased and transparent advice to safeguard rail infrastructure from the devastating effects of climate changes. Engineers Canada, in conjunction with Natural Resources Canada, has developed a climate risk assessment tool that greatly enhances the resilience of infrastructure, increases public confidence in rail infrastructure, and decreases the severity of climate change impacts on individual and business productivity.

The public infrastructure engineering vulnerability committee protocol, also known as PIEVC, gives engineers, geoscientists, infrastructure owners, and managers a tool to design and construct rail infrastructure that will withstand today's rapidly changing climate. The protocol has been applied to a wide range of infrastructure systems more than 40 times in Canada, including with Metrolinx, and three times internationally. Engineers Canada encourages the federal government to invest in early assessment and prevention tools, such as the PIEVC protocol, to be a condition for funding approvals, accepting environmental impact assessments, and approving designs for rail infrastructure projects that involve rehabilitation, repurposing, maintaining, and decommissioning existing rail infrastructure. This investment will contribute to maintaining levels of service, safeguarding the environment, strengthening individual and business productivity, and upholding public safety.

Madam Chair, thank you for allowing Engineers Canada to present to the committee today on this important issue. We hope the committee will recognize that professional engineers play an integral role in Canada's transportation infrastructure and that our profession is ready and willing to ensure that Canada's railway system is resilient and safe and continues to be an enabler of Canada's economy.

(1825)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Go ahead, Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I'd like to welcome you all here. It's been a long day. We've heard from many witnesses, but perhaps we've saved the best for last. It may not be an enviable position to be that last candle of a long day, but I certainly do appreciate the testimony you've given us.

We talked a fair bit about locomotive video and voice recorders, and we heard from Transport Canada as well as the CTA on that issue.

Mr. Bell, you spoke about using LVVRs in a proactive, not punitive, way. I'm wondering if you could expand upon that, particularly by defining the limits of non-punitive.

Mr. George Bell:

Madam Chair, I'd like to respond by giving a parallel example.

Under the railway safety management system regulations, we as railways are required to institute non-punitive reporting, in the sense that if someone who is less than negligent reports an issue on our railway, there is no possibility that they can be disciplined for doing so. They are doing us a favour, and we look at it in the same way.

We would look at LVVRs in much the same way. We have no interest in delving into the private lives of our operators. What we have an interest in is looking at trends, anomalies, and ways in which we can improve our system without punishing the folks who are doing our work.

What we would intend to do there is use the information we can get from the LVVRs to look at behavioural or ergonomic trends within our locomotives and to respond to the trends rather than the individuals.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

If you were to see activities that would cause you concern and perhaps were unsafe activities taking place, would you feel a duty to act or respond to the data you had collected?

Mr. George Bell:

Yes, we would feel a duty to respond, but not necessarily to the individual. We strive to create safety culture within our railways founded on three principles. One is that we need to have a reporting culture. One is that we need to have a just culture. The third one is that we need to have a learning culture. In order to empower the last two, you can't be punitive to people. If you're overly punitive to them you cannot learn, so we would strive not to do that.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

I'm going to completely change my track of questioning and ask some questions of you, Mr. Orb. Welcome. It's good to see you here. Thank you for taking the time to come to Ottawa to share your thoughts with us.

I noted that in your statement you talked about a number of measures in Bill C-49, but specifically I want to ask you about reciprocal penalties, because you made a comment that SARM was disappointed that these penalties were not officially mentioned in the legislation. I'm going to ask you to expand on that and to then perhaps tell us what your thoughts are in regard to the long-haul interswitching measure in Bill C-49

Thanks.

Mr. Ray Orb:

We're particularly disappointed by the lack of a mention of reciprocal penalties. This has been an outstanding or ongoing issue for several years. If you recall the record crop we had in 2013-14, a lot of our submission statements are based on what happened that year. We certainly don't want anything like that to recur.

The reciprocal penalties are an issue because this is left up to negotiation and, in the end, arbitration, and sometimes it's a cost. Small shippers in particular often can't afford to take anyone to court to fight this. It can be very expensive. The lack of a mention of that is disappointing.

The interswitching is a different issue. We don't totally understand the new legislation. We've been talking to many of the grain elevator companies, and they're really cynical about it. We talked about it at the crop logistics working group, which is made up of industry and, particularly, producers, agriculture commodity groups, and the grain elevator companies.

The advice we've been given is that we need to spend more time on this to be able to clarify it. The problem with that is that the new crop year is already in place, and in Canada, particularly western Canada, we're looking at a far better crop than what was estimated by Stats Canada in July, so we need to fast-track this legislation. It's imperative that those two issues be dealt with.

(1830)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Mr. Bell, if we were to ask the union representing workers at Metrolinx, what would they tell us about that relationship they have with the company vis-à-vis the LVVRs on your system?

Mr. George Bell:

One of the unique features of Metrolinx and some other commuter rails is that we operate on a contract model. The crews that operate our trains actually do not work directly for Metrolinx. They work for Bombardier, who is a contractor to us.

The LVVRs have been in place and active for about six months. We've had no push-back whatsoever from the unions. We have positioned it in a non-punitive manner, very constructive manner. We have also communicated to our operators that part of the reason we wish to review the data on the LVVRs is to illustrate what a good job they do rather than a poor job. There is a positive as well as a learning opportunity there.

So we've had no push-back from the union. As of now, they're fine with what we're doing.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

You and I had the benefit of working together in the past, at Metro Vancouver's transportation authority. I know that quite a number of years ago they went through the process of looking at voice and video recording on the bus system in metro Vancouver. I know that some of the same issues we've been talking about here with respect to labour relations came up there. How close were you to that process? What can you tell us about the state of labour relations, to your knowledge, with that system in Vancouver?

Mr. George Bell:

Actually, I can tell you very little. I spent almost my entire career on the rail side in Vancouver.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Yes.

Mr. George Bell:

I wasn't party to the bus system.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Fair enough.

You don't get live feeds from the cabs, do you?

Mr. George Bell:

We do not.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay.

It's been just a short period of time, but have you noticed any changes with respect to any missed signals or some of the other things that railways would be concerned with on a day-to-day basis, not necessarily leading to a crash but obviously a signal of risk?

Mr. George Bell:

As of yet, we haven't proactively used the information. We're waiting on some of the results of your deliberations before we will consider doing that. As of now, we haven't proactively used it. However, if the outcome was significant enough, we would expect the Transportation Safety Board to intervene and use the information to the best of their ability.

So no, as of yet, we haven't seen the behaviours change because we're not in a position to see the behaviours change.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Ms. Southwood, I'm quite interested in the climate vulnerability assessments that you mentioned. We have a Burlington Northern and Santa Fe line that comes through the waterfront at White Rock, follows the Semiahmoo Peninsula, and then ultimately ends up in Vancouver. That route has been subject to frequent washouts, landslides, and degradation due to erosion from the ocean along the shores. Is that the sort of thing an environmental assessment might illuminate and maybe push toward some kind of resolution or change?

(1835)

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

Yes, Madam Chair and Mr. Hardie, a climate vulnerability assessment would take into account those kinds of current challenges. It would also look to the future to better understand the impacts on the rail line of extreme weather, for example, or changing weather patterns on erosion and other vulnerabilities. It's a current view but it's also a future view so that when investments are made in, let's say, improving or maintaining the rail line, or in expanding such rail lines, a full understanding of the impacts of the investments but also the vulnerabilities to such investments are understood.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Mr. Orb, I'm going to ask this question a few times unless some of my colleagues beat me to it in any given round. One thing that is a question in Bill C-49 is the development of a definition for “adequate and suitable” service. When you're speaking with your networks, what do they think about that? Can you give us any directions as to the sort of things we would ask government to think about when coming up with the definition?

Mr. Ray Orb:

I think that is a difficult question to answer within the industry. Obviously there are some delivery points, especially on branch lines, that require not an extra service but a different kind of service because of the fact that they're not on a high-volume line. The other one is producer-car loading sites. That's required in the Canada Grain Act. Although it wasn't in our submission, we noticed that it was a recommendation from the standing committee that the producer-car rights be continued on the loading sites.

So the level of service that's deemed adequate differs from point to point, but in the industry I think it has to be something that's acceptable—a basic service that's acceptable by the shipper and the carrier.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Do you have any thoughts as to the kind of data reporting that you'd like to see? Are there some key measures that you would want to see on the list of the data that railways would be required to report just in the interests of transparency?

The Chair:

Give a short answer, if possible.

Mr. Ray Orb:

I think there should be a continuation of what's being done now. There is fairly good reporting, but I think it needs to be done a lot faster than it is. Rather than a month's end kind of review, I think it has to be done almost day by day.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My thanks to all three of you for being here with us.

I have questions for each of you and my first question is for Mr. Orb.

Before even talking about Bill  C-49, I would like to point something out. It is almost the middle of September and a number of the provisions in Bill C-30 sunsetted on August 1. Without even knowing what will happen in a few months, are the measures that have not been renewed and that sunsetted on August 1 causing problems for exporters? [English]

Mr. Ray Orb:

Yes, they are problematic. One of the things that I mentioned was the interswitching that was in place in the previous legislation. That is creating some angst amongst the industry, particularly the grain elevator industry, because of the fact that they don't know what will happen if the opposing railway doesn't grant rights for another company to run on the same line. I know there are contracts already put in place, particularly to go into the U.S., and they're really concerned about not being able to service those markets.

The other thing I think would be minimum haul volume requirements. I know that's something that was recommended by this committee to be in this legislation, and we're hoping that it would continue. The fact is, as I mentioned, the crop that we're looking at is at a higher volume than expected. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

In your opening remarks—tell me if I'm reflecting your comments correctly—I did not sense a great deal of excitement for Bill C-49. You seem to have trouble measuring the impact of some of the provisions and determining whether they are true solutions.

Let me give you a few examples of what I heard. I understood that the reciprocal penalties process should be better explained. My understanding is that you don't think the provisions in Bill C-49 are sufficient. You are saying that interswitching might be useful, but you don't seem sure that it is the solution.

Do you have some more specific solutions that you would like us to recommend to the government?

(1840)

[English]

Mr. Ray Orb:

On the interswitching, we would prefer that the interswitching provisions in place in the prior legislation be continued.

On the reciprocal penalties, we think there has to be a better definition in the legislation of what the penalties actually are. We know that there are penalties to the shippers if the railcars aren't loaded on a timely basis, and they know that there's a tariff in place that penalizes those companies. We think there should be a penalty. We're not going to mention a specific penalty, but we think that the railroad should be held accountable to deliver the cars on time.

I can give you a quick example of how it affects the rural municipalities, as well, in the wintertime. We often have to open the roads out to the farmers' yards to get access to the grain. If the grain cars don't show up on time, the roads have to be opened again, and it's an added cost to the ratepayers. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Clearly, I don't know Saskatchewan as well as you do, so I'm really pleased that you are here.

Do you have any major soy producers? [English]

Mr. Ray Orb:

We do have some soybean farmers. It's a crop that's being grown more regularly now. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I will jump right to my question because time flies.

How do you explain that soy is excluded from the maximum revenue entitlement? [English]

Mr. Ray Orb:

I mentioned this previously in response to a question by Ms. Block, from Saskatchewan, but not specifically about soybeans. I mentioned the crop logistics working group. That's a committee that has been created by the federal government. That is a request that will be coming from the crop logistics working group that soybeans be included in the MRE. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

At this very moment, you have no idea why the government decided to exclude soy. [English]

Mr. Ray Orb:

Actually, I don't have the answer to that. I'm sorry. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

You have one minute.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

One minute. [Translation]

I have a question for you, Mr. Bell. In your comments, you said that the position of the cameras in the cabins made it impossible to see the faces of the drivers. It is impossible to see whether they are happy, sad or whatever. However, it is possible to see whether they are using a cellphone, which is prohibited.

What do you do when you see that one of your employees is talking on a cellphone while driving? [English]

Mr. George Bell:

We would go back to the policy we put in place when we're empowered, if we're empowered to use the information. We would go back to address that as a trend rather than with the individual employee. We wouldn't look at it as an opportunity to punish that person. We'd look at it as an opportunity to educate him or her and the remainder of the workforce. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Bell, it's nice to meet you.

You mentioned that the LVVRs have been in place for only about six months, but I think the GO trains have been recording for a heck of a lot longer than that. Can you talk about the previous system and what the change is?

Mr. George Bell:

The difference for us is the migration to the locomotive voice and video recorders. What we had been recording for a long time were the external views. It's the internal views that are new to us.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned that the front-facing camera is readily readable. Does that include audio recording from inside or only external views?

(1845)

Mr. George Bell:

There is no audio on the front-facing camera, only video.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. In what circumstances would you read that in a hurry?

Mr. George Bell:

The most common use of the front-facing video is when we encounter a suicide on the tracks. In that case, we will download that information and provide it to the attending coroner. It's almost always a coroner who attends. It provides, in our experience, incontrovertible evidence as to what has happened in front of our train.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That then permits the train to carry on more quickly than it otherwise would.

Mr. George Bell:

Yes, indeed. If there were to be an ambiguity as to the finding, it would be treated as a crime scene, and it could tie up the train and the subsequent trains for a long time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When that happens, what happens to the crew? Are they taken off and given two weeks off, as it were?

Mr. George Bell:

The crew is relieved from duty. They're not able to continue their trip. They're given post-incident counselling, as are our other responders who come to the scene. As a result of that, there's an assessment made by them and their managers, or our managers, as to when they can return to duty.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are the cameras always on or only when the engine is running or only when the reverser is in? When are they operating?

Mr. George Bell:

The external camera is on when the locomotive is powered up. The internal cameras are only on when the train is active.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. You mentioned earlier that the rear-facing camera in the cabin looks at diagnostic information on the back wall. Is there not also a data recorder? Why would you need to visually look at the instruments rather than having it recorded separately?

Mr. George Bell:

There is a data recorder, but it has a limited number of channels. What we can see on the back wall are a number of indicator lights and other things that may not necessarily be shown on the data recorder but may be useful in interpreting an incident.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I get you.

How long is the data retained on those cameras?

Mr. George Bell:

Currently the data is recorded for 72 hours and then automatically overwritten.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's 72 hours of operation, not 72 hours on the calendar.

Mr. George Bell:

I believe it's 72 hours in which the cameras are active.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's actually a good few weeks probably.

Mr. George Bell:

No, our trains, our locomotives, run a lot.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned that you have 61 train systems and 62 locomotives, and you have one out of service at any given time, which is fairly impressive.

Mr. George Bell:

There are certainly sometimes more than one out of service at a time, but that's how we run.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough. Thank you for that.

I'm going to move to Ms. Southwood briefly. I'm going to focus quickly on only one thing.

I'm trying to understand what your suggestion is in the first recommendation. Are engineers not currently involved in the process of rail? Your suggestion is that the law needs to be changed to say that professional engineers, rather than engineering principles, have to be used. Are you suggesting that engineers are not currently used in the maintenance of railways?

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

Engineers are currently used in the maintenance of railways but not consistently. What we are offering is that we're happy to work collaboratively with the federal government to be able to identify and further define what is meant by “engineering principles” so it reduces the current ambiguity.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

In the case of the Churchill line, if that ambiguity had not been there, would anything had been different?

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

The case of the Churchill line is an example of the need for climate vulnerability assessment.

In the case of the Churchill line, there was no climate vulnerability assessment undertaken. Therefore, there was not the understanding that with the change in climate, more extreme weather, and a change in weather patterns, that was a very vulnerable area.

If the assessment had been done, it would have been much more clear just exactly how vulnerable the railway was and what kinds of practices—as well as what kinds of mitigation measures—needed to be put into place.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I have one final question for you, Mr. Bell, in my remaining few seconds.

On a number of occasions, you've mentioned the proactive use of data. What would that look like? I'm just trying to imagine somebody sitting in a room watching hours and hours of videotape of the trains operating. That doesn't seem like a very efficient way of doing it. How do you do proactive use of data?

Mr. George Bell:

What we would do is look at operating anomalies. We understand very well how our trains run, what our schedules are like, what incidents we may see, and in particular what we may call “near misses”. In all of those cases, we would want to gain that data and look at what is happening inside the cab of that locomotive to see if there's an interaction there that we might act upon to make this a safer railway.

(1850)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you very much.

I'll start with you, Mr. Orb. On the data issue you mentioned, you described how the railway “should be required” to disclose its plans to address the demand. Then, in response to a question by one of my colleagues, you said there should be day-by-day reporting. Is it your view that each day the railways should be disclosing what their plans are to deal with demand? Or did I misinterpret something?

Mr. Ray Orb:

You may have misinterpreted it.

The point I'm trying to make is that it needs to be reported more expeditiously. Right now, it's reported monthly, at the end of every month, but it's a weekly report. I think that in certain delivery points, we need to have the information a lot faster. The reporting is done, and for the minimum amounts that were moved under the order in council of the previous government, it's based on corridoring. The problem with it is that there are some delivery points in western Canada in particular that are being missed, and the corridors are getting the grain but not necessarily the delivery points. We need more refined data.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

On the issue of reciprocal penalties, I need another point of clarification. You expressed I think some general support for some of the items in Bill C-49, but on this issue you think it comes up short. I'm looking at clause 23 of the proposed bill. It seems to me that this is addressing the reciprocal penalties portion, where it empowers the agency to order a company “to compensate any person adversely affected for any expenses that they incurred as a result of the company's failure to fulfil its service obligations”.

Is it that this doesn't apply as a reciprocal penalty or that it doesn't go far enough? Or is it that you think there should be some further guidelines?

Mr. Ray Orb:

I think that provision was in the previous legislation, but as was mentioned, I don't think it was ever enacted, because of the fact that if there's a dispute about what the penalty should be, the smaller shippers are not able to undertake such an endeavour. I really believe that it needs to be mentioned specifically. There needs to be more mention of what a penalty actually is.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Okay. Just for the sake of clarity, that language I'm looking at is meant to replace paragraph 116(4)(c.1), but I am hypersensitive to your point about dispute resolution, particularly for smaller shippers. I was a litigator in a previous life and saw too many cases end when someone couldn't afford to go to court.

Is it your view that the dispute resolution mechanism will be more efficient, in that it will allow more shippers to have their disputes fairly resolved in an expeditious way?

Mr. Ray Orb:

I think it will be more palatable to the shippers, especially the smaller ones, so we believe it's a step in the right direction.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

That's excellent.

With respect to the MRE, you mentioned that it protects producers. One of the things I want you to elaborate on a little as well is the importance of continued investment in railway infrastructure, particularly from a rural perspective.

I come from a very rural community, and we sometimes get complaints about the quality of rail transportation infrastructure. Can you elaborate a little on how this approach is going to allow investment in these important rural networks?

Mr. Ray Orb:

Are you talking in particular about railroads purchasing the hopper cars?

Mr. Sean Fraser:

If you want to take it broader, feel free, but please describe it in your own words.

Mr. Ray Orb:

Well, we believe that the MRE, the entitlement right now, compensates railroads fairly, not only for the costs but also a profit margin and for them to actually be able to service the railcars. I believe that the purchase of the railcars in legislation is actually outside of the MRE, and we're a bit concerned about that because of the fact that it may drive up freight rates and, ultimately, farmers or producers will inherit those costs.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I will shift gears.

Madam Chair, how much time do I have remaining?

The Chair:

Two minutes.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Oh, great. I'll shift to Mr. Bell, please.

You mentioned, I think quite appropriately, that prevention is probably a better way to go than merely reacting to incidents and accidents as they may occur. I completely agree. I'm wondering if you think that the prevention mechanism being considered in Bill C-49 is okay. Is it okay to allow a random snapshot in time to see how things are going? Do you need to be able to have the full body of video? Do you think the proposed mechanism is an appropriate way?

(1855)

Mr. George Bell:

The proposed mechanism is an investigatory one, mostly driven by the Transportation Safety Board. We'd much prefer to investigate proactively. We'd much prefer to investigate at a much lower level. The Transportation Safety Board generally doesn't get involved until there are some very serious consequences or probable consequences.

Yes, we would like to have access to the full suite of video with appropriate protection so that the information that the TSB gets is completely protected; but, yes, we would like to be able to look at any part of the record on an appropriate cue from our operators.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

In earlier testimony, Ms. Fox of the TSB indicated that there were two circumstances you could use this mechanism in, one of which is sort of your random systemic checks. The other is an investigation into an incident or accident where the TSB is not proceeding. Am I mistaken in my understanding that you would, in those near misses you describe, be able to go back and check the record under the proposed mechanism?

Mr. George Bell:

My understanding is that it would be difficult, if not impossible. I would be happy to be wrong about that.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I'm wondering if there would be any internal checks and balances in place to ensure that Metrolinx doesn't come across some kind of a vindictive manager who realizes that one of their employees is breaking the rules? Are there safeguards you would put in place as an organization to ensure that doesn't happen?

Mr. George Bell:

Yes, indeed. We already have a very robust privacy protection system, and we would certainly make sure that there is no misuse of the system.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Bell.

Mr. Shields.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I appreciate your being here today and I appreciate your information.

Ms. Southwood, earlier you referred to the engineering principles versus professional engineers, and you alluded to the fact that it isn't always the case that engineers are involved. Have you any idea of percentages or numbers? Have you anything to back that up?

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

We do have information to back that up. I don't have the percentages here with me today, but I can provide them to the committee following this meeting.

Mr. Martin Shields:

What is the cost implication of doing that?

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

I think there are several aspects of the cost discussion, and it's a cost-benefit risk discussion. We would need to look at what the risks are of not using a professional engineer and factor those into the cost.

Mr. Martin Shields:

That would be good to know, if you can supply that.

Good, thank you.

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

Thank you.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Mr. Bell, you talked about implementing a change six months ago. I understand that you have a contract piece here as well, but do you know if the process that went through included the people involved with this versus what they were doing before? Do you know how it was implemented, how it was worked with? Are you familiar with that?

Mr. George Bell:

Yes. I wasn't there when the process was implemented, but I am familiar with it. It was implemented as an early response to what we saw as forthcoming legislation or regulation, and we explained that to our contractors. We explained our values, of which safety is paramount. They were able to buy into that. We were able to explain the process to their managers and then later to their employees.

We used, as we always try to do, some sound change management principles to make sure that we had buy-in to the extent we could get it from the front lines and all the way through the system.

Mr. Martin Shields:

You weren't there, but you found obviously that you were able to work that in a positive manner at the end result.

Mr. George Bell:

Yes.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you.

Mr. Orb, in regard to Bill C-49 I think I heard some concerns and some positives. If you had your choice, what would be the most positive thing you see out of this and what would be the change you would like to see happen?

Mr. Ray Orb:

I think ultimately it would have to do with defining adequate rail service, and there would be reciprocal penalties. Those are the two big issues, I believe. Our shippers, our rural municipalities, and the farmers within are concerned about interswitching, but the two issues that I mentioned I think are the high priorities.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Is it possible to define that word?

Mr. Ray Orb:

I think there has to be more time spent on that. I think there could even be—we're hoping—something put into regulations that gives a better definition of what that is. I think we need to have a minimum requirement for coverage.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Now you're getting to where I want to go. You want to establish some basic lines to go with the word. It's an adjective.

Mr. Ray Orb:

That's a good point. I think it could be a timeframe perhaps, a quantity. We need to have a certain amount of railcar capacity. We mentioned that previously. That was one of the recommendations that came out of this committee as well that we agreed with, that the railroads needed to show ahead of time in any given crop year what their capacity is and how to be able to handle that.

(1900)

Mr. Martin Shields:

As we move into this, the harvest is well under way in a lot of places and even finished in others. So how sensitive is this document to what needs to happen this winter?

Mr. Ray Orb:

It's very sensitive because I believe the majority of the farmers would already have contracted grain through the grain companies or perhaps other modes of transportation to get that crop into place. That is really important. As I mentioned, a new crop year is already here. We're looking at an above average crop in this country. Our ability to get data from the railroads on a more timely basis—and I think even for our provincial estimates to be handled more expeditiously—will help the industry.

Mr. Martin Shields:

We don't want to face another year like 2013 for grain movement, cereal crops.

For the ones that are missing, are you pursuing all avenues to get those other crops recognized in there, soybeans and the rest of them?

Mr. Ray Orb:

Yes, there is a mention of soybeans, and that's something the crop logistics working group will be putting forward later this week. Soybeans have become an interesting crop because the genetic research has provided better varieties of that kind of grain. It's a product that I think is going to be very important to farmers.

Mr. Martin Shields:

The last thing I'm going to ask about would be the data, in the sense of the weekly reporting now, but culminating in the monthly reports. Who is that distributed to?

Mr. Ray Orb:

The data now is distributed to the general public. It can be found on a website. It's very important to the shippers, particularly the grain companies, who look at that. But the producers look at that too to be able to get better prices in contracting.

Mr. Martin Shields:

That's an excellent point in the sense of the technology involved in the agriculture industry, of how the agriculture sector follows and is technologically advanced. That advanced information data is critical these days.

Mr. Ray Orb:

It's very important.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I just have a few questions with respect to your comments about life cycle of railways, but I'm going to take it a step further. I'm going to refer to the life cycle of all transportation-related infrastructure, whether waterways, railways, roads, or airports, etc.

Currently there is a strategy that the minister has established, and this legislation, Bill C-49, will complement that strategy when we get it. With that there is going to be—I spoke about this with other witnesses—a need for infrastructure investments as it relates to life cycle, replacement maintenance, and ultimately replacement of those assets 30, 40, 50, 60 years down the road.

My question for you as engineers, as folks who are part of transportation-related systems, is do you find that the life cycle is actually being abided by? Are the strategies and asset management plans being put in place? That's my first question.

My second question is, are those asset management plans actually being financed?

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

Regarding asset management plans, I might defer to my neighbour George Bell, regarding Metrolinx, to begin.

Mr. George Bell:

Thank you.

Yes, indeed we have asset management plans. We do life cycle analysis and life cycle costing. The responsibility—although it's outside of my direct area of expertise—for us is to squeeze the assets and get the greatest economic safe-life out of them that we can. We try to do that. Currently, I believe we are resourced to do that.

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

Regarding asset management plans and whether they are being adhered to, that is a question I will have to take back to my organization and we will provide information to the committee on that.

However, in addition to the asset management plans, I would like to raise the climate vulnerability plans and assessments. Certainly infrastructure in Canada is just embarking on the beginning of the road for those types of assessments. They are a key part of asset management, truly understanding where the vulnerabilities are, what assets are needed, and how to plan for the future, bringing those all together. Thank you.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Madam Chair, the reason I asked that question is that we can have all the strategies in place and legislation that supports those strategies, but if we don't have proper infrastructure and the infrastructure investments being made to ultimately satisfy the recommendations contained within those strategies, it's a no go. Therefore, you folks who are in the business would know best from your travels, whether it's public or private sector, who are the users, the operators, the managers of these assets who are, first, actually adhering to asset management, but most important, second, financing those asset management plans. That is the reason for the question.

Mr. Bell, did you want to comment on that, from the point of view of Metrolinx?

(1905)

Mr. George Bell:

Yes, we have a relatively new system at Metrolinx called assetlinx. Everything at Metrolinx has a “linx” in it. That's entirely designed to do just what you're asking. It's to make sure that we work the economic life of our assets, that we know where we are, that we know what our state of good repair is—something you should hear a lot about from railways—and that we know what we need to do. Currently we have, I think, adequate financing, at least on the capital side. Our operating financing sometimes lags our capital, however.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

That's great, thank you.

Madam Chair, I'm going to give the rest of my time to Mr. Hardie.

The Chair:

You have two minutes.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

You're welcome.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Mr. Bell, I made a strategic error in asking you about the Coast Mountain Bus Company and its experience with on-board video and audio.

Certainly video has been a fact of life for the company you used to work with—for 31 years, I think—and that's the SkyTrain system, which of course is totally automated. Again, I go back to the question about the labour relations climate. Obviously those cameras, and there are hundreds of them on that system, capture every angle and incident. So not only the transit staff but also the transit police staff are covered by that. What can you tell us about the use and management of those video records?

Mr. George Bell:

You're correct; there are in fact thousands of cameras on the SkyTrain system. They cover almost every aspect of the system itself, including something as arcane as inside the elevators. It's always been run, with that as a management tool. We've had no labour relations issues, that I know of, relating to the use of the cameras. We use them to plan proactively, we use them to respond, and we allow transit police to use them to respond to incidents or to plan for future incidents. The cameras capture pretty much everything that takes place outside the trains. There are a limited, but increasing, number of cameras inside the trains. That is for public protection, as well as for staff protection. As we'll see in the future in that system, everywhere will be covered by the cameras. Currently we use them for those purposes, and we've had no trouble with our staff over them.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Ms. Southwood—

The Chair:

Make it very short, Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

It'll have to be very short.

Maybe if I get a chance a little later I'll ask you and Mr. Orb to talk about the health and well-being of the short-line railroads.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Hardie.

Go ahead, Mr. Brassard.

Mr. John Brassard:

Thank you, Madam Chair. I have just a couple of questions.

The first is to you, Mr. Orb. You spoke about the angst among the grain and elevator industry with respect to opposing railways not allowing another company to run on the same line. There seems to be some confusion and, of course, when there's confusion it creates doubts. Do you see the potential risk in the short term to the Canadian grain economy as a result of what's going on right now?

Mr. Ray Orb:

I think there is a certain amount of risk. In particular, the Western Grain Elevator Association is concerned about that. Although I obviously can't speak for them, I have heard them speak about the concern about the contracts, and specifically about being able to deliver into the United States. I believe that they were delivering, and now this new legislation poses a dilemma.

Mr. John Brassard:

The legislation is going to take time. Is there anything that you can recommend to the committee as far as an interim measure to allay some of those concerns?

Mr. Ray Orb:

I think the concern won't be alleviated until the legislation is passed. If there are amendments that need to be made, that's one amendment that.... Perhaps you should go back to Bill C-40 and look at that legislation and reinstate the part of the legislation dealing with interswitching. In the future, perhaps it could be investigated if it needs to be changed.

(1910)

Mr. John Brassard:

Thank you, Mr. Orb.

Ms. Southwood, you spoke about the public infrastructure engineering vulnerability protocol and how that could have related to Churchill. The Churchill incident was a more recent incident. Do you know when that rail line and a large part of that infrastructure was built?

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

I don't have the dates at my fingertips, but it is something that we could provide to the committee after the meeting.

Mr. John Brassard:

You said that had this protocol and the measurement of vulnerability been in place, that could have prevented this type of situation from occurring.

I'm interested to know if you could tell us more about this tool and how it would have prevented the situation in Churchill from occurring.

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

Certainly.

The way the tool works is that a project, whether a proposed project or a piece of infrastructure currently in place, is assessed in terms of how it is operating in our current climate. For example, we look at rain, wind speeds, and so on. Then, we look at what will change in terms of the climate data. One of your colleagues referred to the importance of data earlier. We ask how the weather is going to be changing. Then, we look at the vulnerabilities related to that.

I'll use the Finch Avenue washout as an example that many of you might be familiar with. Finch Avenue was a very important arterial in the city of Toronto that had many unknown vulnerabilities. It had culverts that were not being properly maintained. In addition to being a road that many people used, it was also the location of other key aspects of infrastructure, such as cable, telephone, electricity, and gas. So when the Finch Avenue washout occurred, the city was left with many challenges from the users of the arterial and also astronomical impacts on their economy and the competitive advantage of the city.

If that type of an assessment is done in advance or undertaken on the key infrastructure that a municipality or region depends on, it helps to anticipate where the weaknesses are. For example, in the case of a road like Finch, it was the culverts; it was the importance of cleaning the culverts but also the importance of building the right culvert.

We'll go back to the railway now. Doing this kind of an assessment would identify the vulnerabilities associated with a particular railway. Mr. Hardie talked about the railway, the erosion, the washouts, and the rock falls. All of those are impacted if the weather is changing. Doing this kind of an assessment can assist in preventing and reducing the risks associated with not having the infrastructure at all.

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay.

There's a lot of infrastructure in this country that would require a lot of these types of assessments. Literally, you could run into generations of assessments that go on. I know there's a cost and an impact from these types of infrastructure failures, but what's the cost of doing this type of assessment for every piece of infrastructure in this country?

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

What we would propose is that the assessments be included in new federal funding. Let's look at a simple way of going forward. If the federal government is going to be investing large dollars into new infrastructure, then we believe that it needs to know the vulnerabilities of those infrastructures to changing weather and a changing climate, in order to get the most out of its investments.

Mr. John Brassard:

Okay, thank you.

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

The cost, we believe, would be relatively small compared to the larger cost of losing the infrastructure completely.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Southwood.

Ms. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Ms. Southwood, I would like to continue the discussion with you.

I see no problem with recommendations 2 and 3 of the document that you submitted to us. Involving professional engineers in the entire life cycle of the railway infrastructure and adapting the rail infrastructure to Canada's changing climate make sense to me. Things get more muddled in recommendation 1 that asks to define the engineering principles in section 11.

Could you clarify that? Are you referring to broad principles or to specific standards? Actually, later in the paragraph, you say that consistent standards for engineering roles are not in place.

(1915)

[English]

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

I'm going to separate your question into two. The first aspect would be around the question of the engineering principles. Currently when we see the term “engineering principles” in the Railway Safety Act, we see ambiguity—we see that it's interpreted in a number of different ways. We're offering to work collaboratively with the federal government and departments to provide language to further define the term. We have a large network of subject matter experts on this topic. Our profession is ready to provide that advice and that collaboration. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Could you give us a concrete example of an aspect that you would like to see better defined in Bill C-49? [English]

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

I'm going to go to the other aspect, which is how our professional engineers are currently consulted for a railway project. We look at the way that professional engineers are consulted and we see an inconsistency. We see that it's not always clear exactly when a professional engineer needs to be consulted, and this leads back to this term “engineering principles”, which is not clear. It doesn't lay out exactly when engineers would need to be consulted. We want greater clarity on that, and we're offering to work collaboratively with the federal government and other departments to provide that clarity. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Do provincial associations of engineers follow exactly the same principles? Are they consistent across the provinces? [English]

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

We have consulted our member regulators on the Railway Safety Act and these are the key issues that our member regulators have identified nationally. Thank you. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

I believe Mr. Hardie has a question.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Yes, thank you, Madam Chair. I wanted to follow up on my earlier question about the health and well-being of short-line railways. Saskatchewan certainly has a very robust network. Last year we took a trip to Lac-Mégantic to have a look at the situation there. The locals were showing us some pretty horrible things about the state of repair of that line. So from the engineering side and from Saskatchewan's side, I'd like to hear your comments on short-lines and on any issues you think Bill C-49 may need to address.

Ms. Jeanette Southwood:

I'm going to start with a previous question you asked. It was about climate vulnerability assessments and their connection to environmental assessments. The way that environmental assessments currently work, there is not traditionally a part that includes the climate vulnerability assessments. At this time, they definitely are two separate things. We would like to have those intertwined more frequently.

On the health and well-being of short-line railroads, this is something I would need to consult with my organization about and get back to the committee at a later date.

Thank you.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Mr. Orb.

Mr. Ray Orb:

Saskatchewan, I believe, has more short-lines than any other province in Canada, especially in the southwest part of Saskatchewan, where the major carrier abandoned a good part of the railway system decades ago. Is it very important that those short-lines be maintained and continue to deliver grain? There is a lot of damage to our infrastructure. They're provincially regulated under the ministry of highways, and some of the regulations differ from province to province. Saskatchewan may have some different regulations. One concern when we met with the Saskatchewan Shortline Railway Association was a liability insurance that was imposed on the changes in rail safety. However, I think they are coping with that and are continuing to operate. I don't think they now have the concerns they had at first. I don't know if that exactly answers your question.

(1920)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Well, for instance, we were quoted earlier a cost of around $20,000 per unit to install LVVRs. Would the short-lines be able to deal with that kind of capital cost?

Mr. Ray Orb:

I'm not sure. I would have to consult with the association again.

It may be onerous, but there may be other ways that they would be able to get funding.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I'm not seeing any further questions from the committee.

Thank you very much to our witnesses. It was very informative, and I very much appreciate your contribution.

I move adjournment for this evening.

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(1205)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte la séance no 67 du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités, en cette première session de la 42e législature. Conformément à l'ordre de renvoi adopté le lundi 19 juin 2017, nous étudions le projet de loi C-49, Loi apportant des modifications à la Loi sur les transports au Canada et à d'autres lois concernant les transports ainsi que des modifications connexes et corrélatives à d'autres lois. Nous allons commencer sans plus tarder.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à tous les membres du Comité. D'ailleurs, je vous remercie d'avoir accepté de revenir sur la Colline une semaine avant tout le monde. Cela montre à quel point nous sommes déterminés à accomplir notre travail.

Je souhaite également la bienvenue aux membres du personnel. J'espère que vous avez tous passé un bel été.

Je vais maintenant demander aux représentants du ministère de se présenter à tour de rôle.

Mme Helena Borges (sous-ministre déléguée, ministère des Transports):

Merci, madame la présidente. C'est un plaisir d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Je suis Helena Borges, sous-ministre déléguée des Transports. J'ai déjà comparu devant le Comité par le passé, alors vous allez peut-être vous rappeler de moi.

Je suis aujourd'hui accompagnée de plusieurs de mes collègues du ministère et du Bureau de la concurrence. M. Alain Langlois est l'avocat en chef dans ce dossier. Mme Brigitte Diogo est notre directrice générale de la Sécurité ferroviaire. J'ai ici Mme Marcia Jones, directrice des politiques ferroviaires; Mme Sara Wiebe, directrice générale de la Politique aérienne; et enfin, M. Mark Schaan, d'ISDE.

Tout d'abord, permettez-moi de reprendre les propos de la présidente en remerciant le Comité d'être revenu plus tôt et de prendre le temps d'étudier ce projet de loi avant la reprise des travaux du Parlement. Si vous n'avez pas passé l'été ici à Ottawa, sachez qu'il s'agit officiellement de la première semaine de l'été, du point de vue de la météo, parce qu'il a plu sans arrêt.

Le projet de loi C-49, Loi sur la modernisation des transports, prévoit des modifications législatives qui permettront au gouvernement d'aller de l'avant dans la prise de mesures préliminaires dans le cadre de Transports 2030, un plan stratégique du gouvernement sur l'avenir des transports au Canada. Ce plan a été annoncé par le ministre des Transports en novembre dernier à l'issue de nombreuses consultations menées auprès d'intervenants de l'industrie, de groupes autochtones, de provinces et territoires et de Canadiens, en fonction des constatations et des recommandations du rapport d'examen de la Loi sur les transports au Canada. Vous entendrez plus tard aujourd'hui M. Emerson, qui était le président de ce comité d'examen. Grâce à ce processus, nous avons pu entendre un vaste éventail de points de vue sur l'avenir des transports au cours des 20 à 30 prochaines années, et sur la façon de voir cela se matérialiser pour nous assurer que le réseau national des transports continue de stimuler la compétitivité, les échanges commerciaux et la prospérité du Canada à l'échelle internationale.[Français]

Le projet de loi C-49 fait la promotion de la transparence, de l'efficacité du réseau et de l'équité. Il propose des modifications législatives qui répondront mieux aux besoins et aux attentes des voyageurs et des expéditeurs canadiens en matière de services. Il créera également un réseau de transport plus sécuritaire et plus novateur qui positionnera mieux le Canada afin que ce dernier tire parti des possibilités mondiales et prospère dans une économie très performante.

Permettez-moi de souligner les éléments clés du projet de loi.[Traduction]

Je vais commencer par les initiatives dans le domaine du transport aérien. Le projet de loi C-49 propose la création de nouveaux règlements pour renforcer les droits des passagers aériens du Canada en veillant à ce qu'ils soient clairs, uniformes et équitables, pour les voyageurs et les transporteurs aériens. L'Office des transports du Canada aura pour mandat d'élaborer, de concert avec Transports Canada, ces nouveaux règlements, et il consultera les Canadiens et les intervenants une fois la sanction royale obtenue.

L'objectif primordial de cette nouvelle démarche est d'assurer que les Canadiens et quiconque voyage à destination, en provenance et dans les limites du Canada comprennent leurs droits en tant que passagers aériens sans compromettre l'accès aux services aériens ni faire augmenter le coût des voyages en avion pour les Canadiens.

Le projet de loi C-49 stipule que ces règlements comporteront des dispositions au sujet des irritants les plus courants suivants: fournir aux passagers, en langage clair, des renseignements sur les obligations des transporteurs, ainsi que sur la marche à suivre pour obtenir réparation ou déposer une plainte; établir des normes de traitement des passagers en cas de surréservation, de retard et d'annulation, y compris l'indemnisation; uniformiser les niveaux d'indemnisation en cas de perte ou d'endommagement des bagages; établir des normes de traitement des passagers en cas de retard d'une durée donnée sur l'aire de trafic; asseoir les enfants près d'un parent ou d'un tuteur sans frais supplémentaires; et exiger des transporteurs aériens qu'ils élaborent des normes régissant le transport des instruments de musique.

Enfin, ce projet de loi propose également d'établir des règlements afin de recueillir des données pour permettre de surveiller l'expérience des passagers aériens, notamment le respect par les transporteurs aériens de l'approche envisagée sur les droits des passagers.

(1210)

[Français]

Par ailleurs, le projet de loi propose d'assouplir les restrictions sur la propriété internationale. Ainsi, le maximum en ce qui a trait aux transporteurs aériens canadiens passera de 25 % à 49 %. Afin de protéger la compétitivité du secteur aérien et d'appuyer la connectivité, cette disposition est assortie de garanties connexes.

Parmi ces garanties, mentionnons les restrictions selon lesquelles, d'une part, un seul investisseur international ne pourra détenir plus de 25 % des actions avec droit de vote d'un transporteur aérien canadien et, d'autre part, aucune combinaison de transporteurs aériens étrangers ne pourra posséder plus de 25 % des actions d'un transporteur canadien.

Ce changement de politique ne s'appliquera pas aux services aériens spécialisés du Canada, comme l'hélidébardage, la photographie aérienne ou la lutte contre les incendies, dont le pourcentage maximum d'actionnariat international demeurera à 25 %.

L'assouplissement des restrictions relatives à la propriété internationale signifie que les transporteurs aériens canadiens — ce qui englobe les fournisseurs de services de transport de passagers et de fret — auront accès à davantage de capitaux d'investissement, qu'ils pourront utiliser pour innover et, peut-être même, pour prendre de l'expansion.

Cela contribuera à augmenter la compétitivité du secteur aérien canadien, en plus d'offrir davantage de choix aux Canadiens et de générer des profits pour les aéroports et les fournisseurs, ainsi que de nouveaux emplois pour les Canadiens.

Une plus forte concurrence au sein du marché pourrait à son tour réduire le coût du transport aérien et ouvrir de nouveaux marchés aux consommateurs et aux expéditeurs au Canada. Cela pourrait englober la création de nouveaux transporteurs à très bas coût, desservant de nouveaux secteurs du marché canadien.[Traduction]

Le projet de loi propose un nouveau processus transparent et prévisible autorisant les coentreprises entre transporteurs aériens, en tenant compte de la concurrence et des considérations plus vastes d'intérêt public et en établissant des échéanciers clairs pour la prise de décisions.

Les coentreprises sont monnaie courante dans le secteur mondial du transport aérien. Elles permettent à deux ou à plusieurs transporteurs aériens de coordonner leurs activités sur certains faisceaux, notamment dans le domaine des horaires, des prix, de la gestion des recettes, du marketing et des ventes.

Même si actuellement les coentreprises prévues au Canada sont uniquement examinées par le Bureau de la concurrence aux termes de la Loi sur la concurrence, et qu'elles se concentrent exclusivement sur les effets anticoncurrentiels des déplacements en avion sur certains marchés, le nouveau projet de loi permettra de tenir compte des plus grands avantages pour le public.

En outre, le nouveau processus comportera des échéanciers parfaitement clairs pour le processus d'examen, à la fois pour l'examen des éventuelles considérations de concurrence par le Bureau et l'évaluation par Transports Canada des avantages pour le public. On prévoit que cet examen plus global et ponctuel permettra aux transporteurs canadiens d'épouser cette tendance, qui confère des avantages non seulement aux transporteurs aériens qui en sont partenaires, mais aussi aux consommateurs qui ont tout à gagner d'une amélioration de la connectivité des vols, sans oublier le tourisme canadien qui devrait connaître une certaine croissance en fonction de la multiplication des options de réseau. [Français]

Le secteur canadien du transport aérien a exprimé son intérêt à investir dans des services de contrôle de passagers autres que ceux que fournit déjà l'Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien et à y avoir accès afin de faciliter les voyages par avion et d'en tirer des avantages économiques.

Les modifications prévues permettront à cette possibilité de se matérialiser selon les formules d'un recouvrement des coûts.[Traduction]

Passons maintenant aux initiatives dans le domaine du transport ferroviaire.

Un réseau ferroviaire fiable de transport des marchandises revêt une importance névralgique pour le succès du Canada en tant que pays commerçant. Bon nombre de nos matières premières, depuis les minerais jusqu'aux produits forestiers et aux céréales, dépendent du réseau ferroviaire pour être acheminées jusqu'aux marchés, aussi bien au Canada qu'à l'étranger. Le Canada jouit de services ferroviaires efficaces, et leurs prix sont les plus bas au monde.

C'est d'ailleurs pourquoi le projet de loi C-49 vise à alléger les pressions qui s'exercent sur le réseau pour que celui-ci continue de répondre aux besoins des usagers et de l'économie à long terme. À cette fin, le projet de loi favorise la transparence, l'efficacité et d'importants investissements du secteur privé dans le réseau ferroviaire, ainsi que des recours accessibles aux expéditeurs. Parmi les principales mesures, mentionnons les suivantes: de nouvelles exigences sur les rapports de données des compagnies de chemin de fer au sujet des prix, des services et des résultats qui augmenteront nettement la transparence du réseau; une définition de service ferroviaire adéquat et convenable qui confirme que les compagnies de chemin de fer doivent offrir aux expéditeurs le niveau de service maximum qu'elles peuvent leur offrir raisonnablement dans les circonstances; la capacité des expéditeurs de solliciter des sanctions financières réciproques en cas d'infraction aux accords de niveau de services avec les compagnies de chemin de fer; des recours actualisés pour les plaintes sur les prix et les services, afin d'en faciliter l'accès aux expéditeurs et de les rendre plus ponctuels; et enfin, l'interconnexion de longue distance, nouvelle mesure qui offre l'option aux expéditeurs captifs des différents secteurs et régions d'avoir accès à des compagnies de chemin de fer concurrentes.

(1215)



Ces mesures répondront aux besoins des expéditeurs d'une plus grande concurrence dans le réseau de transport ferroviaire de marchandises, tout en protégeant la capacité des chemins de fer de réaliser des investissements cruciaux dans le réseau ferroviaire, ce qui profite à tous les expéditeurs et à l'ensemble de l'économie.

Les modifications que l'on prévoit apporter à la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire pour rendre obligatoire l'installation d'enregistreurs audio-vidéo dans les locomotives sont conçues pour renforcer encore davantage la sécurité ferroviaire, tout en protégeant la vie privée des employés. Elles répondent aux recommandations émanant de votre comité, du comité d'examen de la Loi sur les transports au Canada et du Bureau de la sécurité des transports, dont vous entendrez les représentants tout de suite après.

Ces enregistreurs contribueront à améliorer la sécurité ferroviaire en fournissant des données objectives sur les mesures prises par les équipes de train avant et pendant un accident ferroviaire. Cette technologie fournira aux compagnies de chemin de fer un instrument de sécurité supplémentaire pour analyser les tendances recensées par le biais de leurs systèmes de gestion de la sécurité.

Grâce à son rôle de surveillance, Transports Canada veillera à ce que les compagnies respectent les limites sur l'utilisation et les exigences en matière de vie privée mentionnées dans le projet de loi.[Français]

Je vais maintenant aborder les initiatives dans le domaine du transport maritime.

Le projet de loi C-49 propose de modifier la Loi sur le cabotage pour permettre à tous les armateurs de repositionner leurs conteneurs vides, loués ou leur appartenant en plusieurs lieux au Canada au moyen de navires battant n'importe quel pavillon. Cette mesure appuiera les demandes de l'industrie d'une plus grande souplesse logistique et permettra de remédier à la pénurie de conteneurs vides pour les marchandises à exporter.

Le projet de loi C-49 propose également de modifier la Loi maritime du Canada afin de permettre aux administrations portuaires canadiennes de solliciter des prêts et des garanties d'emprunt auprès de la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada, qui est en train de voir le jour.[Traduction]

En conclusion, ce projet de loi regroupe des initiatives législatives en un seul projet et ces initiatives sont indispensables pour faire avancer des mesures prioritaires liées à l'amélioration de l'efficacité et de la sécurité du système de transport canadien.

En plus d'avoir fait l'objet d'un processus de consultation complet, ces modifications reposent sur de solides éléments de preuve. Par exemple, pour ce qui est des mesures relatives au transport ferroviaire des marchandises, nous avons sollicité l'expertise technique d'intervenants du secteur ferroviaire, de l'Office, des principaux ministères fédéraux et d'autres administrations dans le cadre des consultations sur ce projet de loi. Nous avons analysé les tarifs marchandises et les investissements entre les administrations, de même que les mouvements des produits au Canada, en utilisant le Programme interne de surveillance des grains et les lettres de voiture des compagnies de chemin de fer et d'autres données.

Les mesures que contient ce projet de loi reflètent les priorités dont nous ont fait part les intervenants et les Canadiens au cours des consultations. Elles pavent la voie à des réformes législatives qui favoriseront un réseau de transport plus sécuritaire et plus efficace qui stimulera la croissance tout en défendant les droits des travailleurs canadiens afin de mieux répondre à leurs besoins et attentes.

J'ajouterais que ce projet de loi fait suite aux nombreuses recommandations formulées par le Comité l'an dernier dans le cadre de son étude de la Loi sur les services équitables de transport ferroviaire pour les producteurs de grains.

Je tiens à remercier une fois de plus le Comité de m'avoir invitée aujourd'hui. Mes collègues et moi-même sommes entièrement disposés à répondre à vos questions, maintenant et tout au long de l'étude de ce projet de loi. Nous serions heureux de vous fournir tout renseignement utile.

D'ailleurs, je tiens à dire que nous avons mis à la disposition du Comité une série de documents et de feuillets d'information qui pourraient vous aider à comprendre les dispositions ainsi que le contexte entourant certains des enjeux dont il est question ici, les questions qu'on nous pose fréquemment, car nous sommes conscients qu'une certaine confusion peut régner au sein des divers intervenants quant à la signification et à l'application de ces dispositions et, évidemment, à l'étude article par article. S'il y a quoi que ce soit que nous pouvons faire pour vous aider, nous le ferons volontiers.

(1220)



Merci, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Borges. Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants de tous les renseignements que vous nous avez fournis aujourd'hui.

Nous allons tout de suite amorcer notre période de questions.

Madame Block, vous disposez de sept minutes.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente. J'aimerais joindre ma voix à la vôtre pour souhaiter à tous la bienvenue. Je suis ravie d'avoir l'occasion de vous poser des questions au sujet du projet de loi C-49.

Vous nous avez souhaité la bienvenue tout à l'heure et vous nous avez remerciés d'être ici aujourd'hui, mais sachez que si notre comité s'est réuni une semaine plus tôt, c'est en raison d'une motion qu'il a lui-même proposée. Cela dit, je tiens à vous remercier d’avoir pris le temps de vous joindre à nous aujourd’hui.

J'aimerais également souhaiter la bienvenue à mes collègues. J'espère que vous avez tous passé un bel été et j'ai très hâte de travailler avec vous tous au cours de la session. Bien entendu, il se peut qu'il y ait des changements. Je tiens aussi à souhaiter la bienvenue à mes deux collègues de ce côté-ci de la table qui ne sont pas des membres permanents du Comité, mais qui ont aimablement accepté le devoir et l'occasion d'être ici pour discuter du projet de loi C-49.

Je suis très reconnaissante du travail qui a été effectué à l'égard du projet de loi C-49, et même en écoutant vos observations préliminaires, on constate à quel point le projet de loi ratisse large. En fait, on avait laissé entendre qu'il s'agissait d'un projet de loi omnibus, englobant trois modes de transport et touchant à plusieurs enjeux. On peut probablement déjà admettre que ce projet de loi n'est pas parfait, et c'est pourquoi, selon moi, nous sommes ici pour poser des questions et entendre des témoins sur les mesures qui sont adéquates et les amendements ou les recommandations que pourraient formuler nos intervenants.

Cela dit, j'aimerais savoir à quel moment et pour quelle raison on a pris la décision de créer un projet de loi aussi vaste, qui traite d'autant de modes de transport.

Mme Helena Borges:

Les modifications législatives proposées ont été rassemblées dans un projet de loi, car elles appuient les engagements pris par le gouvernement dans le cadre de son plan stratégique Transports 2030. Tous ces éléments sont compris dans les cinq thèmes que le ministre a annoncés en novembre dernier lorsqu'il a proposé un plan pour moderniser le réseau de transport du Canada. La majorité des modifications législatives découle également du rapport du comité d'examen de la LTC qui a été rendu public le 25 février 2016. On a tenu compte de ces recommandations.

De plus, il faut savoir que près de 90 % des amendements s'appliqueront à une seule loi, ce qui est en soi une loi omnibus. La Loi sur les transports au Canada est la principale loi qui régit les secteurs aérien et ferroviaire, et qui confère à l'Office les pouvoirs de régler les différends, et ce genre de choses. La plupart sont donc des amendements. Une petite partie d'entre eux sont des amendements corrélatifs découlant des modifications apportées à la Loi sur les transports au Canada, telles que la modification à la propriété étrangère des compagnies aériennes, ce qui a donné lieu à des changements corrélatifs à la Loi sur la participation publique au capital d'Air Canada ou à la Loi sur la privatisation du CN et d'autres.

Par conséquent, il nous semblait logique de rassembler tous ces éléments, étant donné leurs points communs. De plus, je dois dire que le Comité nous a donné une véritable mine de renseignements grâce au rapport qu'il a produit au cours de la dernière année sur la sécurité ferroviaire et le transport de marchandises, et nous avons pensé qu'en combinant tout cela, nous adopterions une approche plus holistique à l'égard des amendements proposés dans le projet de loi.

(1225)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

J'aimerais aller encore un peu plus loin en discutant de l'une des raisons pour lesquelles j'ai posé cette question au départ. On vient d'entreprendre un examen de la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire, si je ne me trompe pas, alors pourquoi inclurions-nous les dispositions relatives aux enregistreurs audio-vidéo dans le projet de loi C-49 plutôt que dans la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire?

Mme Helena Borges:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

Comme vous le savez sans doute, les recommandations concernant les enregistreurs audio-vidéo existent depuis un bon moment déjà. Nous nous penchons là-dessus depuis le début des années 2000. Plus récemment, le Bureau de la sécurité des transports l'a intégré à sa liste de surveillance, et nous prenons cette liste très au sérieux.

En fait, lorsque le Comité s'est penché sur les mesures liées à la sécurité ferroviaire, il avait notamment recommandé de déployer les enregistreurs audio-vidéo le plus tôt possible. De plus, on avait également proposé de donner suite aux recommandations du Bureau de la sécurité des transports plus rapidement que par le passé.

Il y a beaucoup d'autres raisons pour lesquelles nous allons de l'avant, étant donné les avantages bien connus des EAVL en matière de sécurité, et nous estimons qu'il est grand temps d'agir dans ce dossier, car ces enregistreurs nécessiteront une réglementation. Nous pourrions attendre la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire, mais il pourrait y avoir un délai d'un an ou deux. Conformément aux recommandations du Bureau de la sécurité des transports, nous avons convenu qu'il fallait aller de l'avant le plus rapidement possible.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup madame Block.

Monsieur Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Bonjour. J'aimerais également souhaiter un bon retour à tout le monde.

Selon vous, existe-t-il un écart entre les projets de loi C-49 et C-30?

Mme Helena Borges:

J'ai examiné toutes les recommandations que vous aviez formulées dans le cadre de votre étude du projet de loi C-30. Si je ne me trompe pas, vous aviez 17 recommandations. Nous les avons toutes passées en revue, et je dirais même que nous y avons donné suite. Nous avons mis en oeuvre certaines des recommandations et mis un terme à d’autres. Les deux dispositions qui sont devenues caduques figuraient dans le projet de loi C-30. La raison pour laquelle nous les avons laissées venir à échéance, c’est parce que la situation a considérablement changé depuis 2013-2014.

Je ne crois pas qu'il y ait de lacunes. Je pense que nous avons tenu compte de toutes les recommandations. En fait, je dirais que nous sommes allés encore plus loin en donnant suite à d'autres recommandations formulées par le comité d'examen de la LTC et que les intervenants réclamaient depuis quelques années.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Dans votre déclaration, vous avez mentionné avoir tenu des consultations en ce qui a trait au transport ferroviaire. Avez-vous entrepris des consultations générales concernant l'ensemble des amendements proposés?

Mme Helena Borges:

Je peux vous dire que nous avons mené des consultations exhaustives. En règle générale, nous ne tenons pas de consultations sur les amendements qui se trouvent dans un projet de loi, car il s'agit d'un privilège parlementaire. En revanche, nous le faisons pour ce qui est des enjeux qui s'y rattachent et de l'orientation politique que nous prônons.

Ces consultations ont eu lieu au cours des 18 derniers mois, soit tout de suite après que le ministre eut déposé le rapport d'examen de la LTC en février dernier. Il a lancé une série de 10 tables rondes partout au pays axées sur les thèmes abordés dans le plan Transports 2030 annoncé à l'automne dernier. En outre, il a tenu deux discussions en direct sur Facebook avec les Canadiens. Les divers intervenants ont également eu l'occasion de formuler des commentaires en ligne, et nous avons reçu 230 mémoires. Nous avons également reçu plus de 70 mémoires écrits au terme de nos consultations, puis 70 autres adressés directement au ministre. Ces mémoires ont orienté nos avis et nos amendements. Nos collègues provinciaux et territoriaux ont également pris part à ce processus.

Depuis, nous avons continué de travailler de concert avec les sociétés ferroviaires et les divers intervenants du secteur ferroviaire — les expéditeurs qui utilisent les chemins de fer et d'autres intervenants — pour nous assurer de bien comprendre leurs préoccupations et d'y répondre dans le cadre de cette mesure législative.

(1230)

M. Gagan Sikand:

En quoi ces changements sont-ils avantageux pour les Canadiens?

Mme Helena Borges:

Je vous dirais que c'est probablement l'un des aspects les plus importants de ce projet de loi. Le ministre et les fonctionnaires reçoivent des plaintes depuis des années à l'égard du transport aérien. Les gens sont déçus de leur expérience de voyage. Les droits des passagers qui figurent dans ce projet de loi sont absolument révolutionnaires pour les Canadiens.

Nous avons examiné ce qui se faisait à l'échelle internationale et nous nous sommes inspirés des pratiques exemplaires des autres pays pour nous assurer d'éliminer les irritants dont j'ai parlé dans ma déclaration liminaire, car c'est ce qui est le plus important pour les Canadiens. Il s'agit d'un enjeu dont on a beaucoup parlé dans les médias, pas plus tard que la semaine dernière, ici à Ottawa, avec la situation d'Air Transat.

Je pense que c'est ce qui est fondamental pour les Canadiens, mais je dirais que les autres mesures prévues dans le projet de loi, particulièrement concernant les marchandises ferroviaires et les mesures maritimes, sont également importantes.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Permettez-moi de vous interrompre ici. Je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps.

En ce qui a trait aux droits des passagers, j'ai remarqué que le projet de loi ne prévoyait pas de sanctions. Qu'en est-il exactement?

Mme Helena Borges:

Vous remarquerez que les amendements à la loi confèrent à l'Office des transports du Canada le pouvoir de prendre des règlements. Les détails des mesures d'indemnisation — la façon dont ces irritants seront éliminés — seront précisés dans la réglementation.

Nous travaillerons en collaboration avec l'Office. Nous voulons nous assurer que les Canadiens ont l'occasion de donner leur point de vue sur les mesures d'indemnisation souhaitées, de façon à ce qu'elles répondent bien à leurs préoccupations.

M. Gagan Sikand:

D'accord. Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente. C'est un plaisir de vous retrouver à la barre de notre comité.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à tous ceux et celles avec qui j'ai eu le plaisir de travailler l'année dernière et, par conséquent, dont je connaissais déjà le visage. Je souhaite également la bienvenue à ceux qui se joignent à nous, en espérant que ce sera de façon permanente. Dans le cas contraire, je les salue bien bas. Ici s'arrêtent mes salutations, étant donné que j'ai probablement plus de questions à poser que de temps alloué pour le faire.

J'ai souligné à grands traits une phrase de vos observations préliminaires. Vous disiez qu'avec le projet de loi C-49, on recherchait la transparence, l'équité et l'efficacité. J'avoue avoir buté sur le mot « efficacité ». Je vais vous donner quelques exemples qui touchent divers modes de transport et dans le cas desquels je cerne mal l'efficacité.

Le premier exemple concerne probablement les enregistreurs audio-vidéo. À ce sujet, selon le rapport du groupe de travail sur ces enregistreurs, le Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada, ou BST, aurait déclaré que, dans moins de 1 % des cas, l'usage de ces enregistreurs lui aurait été utile pour atteindre la certitude dans les conclusions de ses enquêtes. Il s'agit ici de moins de 1 % des cas. Parler des enregistreurs, c'est parler aussi d'un accident qui est malheureusement survenu. Or il me semble que, par souci d'efficacité, la question de la fatigue des chefs de train devrait être traitée avant celle des enregistreurs. Dans notre étude de l'année dernière portant sur la sécurité aérienne, la fatigue des pilotes était un élément important sur lequel il fallait se pencher.

Comment se fait-il que le projet de loi C-49 soit aussi précis quant à ses demandes sur les enregistrements mais aussi peu loquace concernant le problème de la fatigue des chefs de train?

Mme Helena Borges:

Je vous remercie de votre question. Je vais céder la parole à ma collègue Brigitte, qui est responsable de ces enjeux. Elle pourra vous faire part des mesures qui sont en cours concernant la fatigue des chefs de train.

Mme Brigitte Diogo (directrice générale, Sécurité ferroviaire, ministère des Transports):

Bonjour. Je vous remercie de votre question.

Afin d'améliorer la sécurité ferroviaire, nous examinons présentement une série de mesures qui incluent la question de la fatigue. Nous avons justement entamé des discussions et des consultations préliminaires avec l'industrie et les syndicats pour revoir la réglementation concernant la fatigue. Au cours de la dernière rencontre du comité consultatif qui étudie la sécurité ferroviaire, on a tenu des discussions à ce sujet. Au début du mois d'octobre, le ministre va émettre un avis afin de solliciter des suggestions et commentaires sur les changements réglementaires relatifs à la question de la fatigue.

(1235)

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. Si je comprends bien vos propos, vous en êtes à organiser des consultations, à solliciter des conseils et à réfléchir à la question de la fatigue. Or, dans le cadre du projet de loi qu'on nous propose, qui est pratiquement un projet de loi omnibus, on s'attendait plutôt à des mises en oeuvre. Je dirais qu'il en va de même pour la charte concernant les passagers. Comme le faisait remarquer si justement mon collègue M. Sikand, après deux ans, il n'y a toujours pas de règlements. Plus tôt, vous nous avez annoncé qu'après la sanction royale, on allait entamer des consultations pour déterminer ce que devrait contenir cette charte. C'est donc dire qu'il faudra au minimum une année supplémentaire avant que les passagers puissent savoir exactement ce sur quoi reposent leurs droits.

Est-ce qu'on s'apprête à manquer le train ou l'avion?

Dans le cadre de la précédente législature, on avait déjà déposé une charte à laquelle le ministre — qui n'était pas ministre à ce moment-là — s'était montré très favorable. Il avait même voté en faveur de cette charte.

Pourquoi est-on incapable d'accélérer le processus de façon à pouvoir servir les citoyens?

Mme Helena Borges:

Je vous remercie beaucoup de votre question.

Je vais clarifier un point. Nous avons déjà des pouvoirs législatifs et une réglementation en ce qui concerne la fatigue, et nous allons modifier la législation. Par contre, nous n'avons pas de pouvoirs législatifs en ce qui concerne les enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive. C'est ce que ce projet de loi vise à établir. Nous avons besoin de cela pour mettre en place une réglementation.

C'est la même chose en ce qui a trait aux droits des passagers. Présentement, la Loi sur les transports au Canada ne donne pas encore la flexibilité ou le pouvoir à l'Office des transports du Canada de créer une réglementation sur les droits des passagers. Dès que ce projet de loi sera approuvé — ce que nous espérons —, nous serons en mesure, de concert avec l'Office des transports du Canada, d'accélérer le processus de réglementation pour mettre en oeuvre les aspects techniques de ces droits le plus vite possible. Il en va de même pour les enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive. Nous devons mener des consultations, mais nous sommes prêts à procéder le plus vite possible pour que ces éléments soient en place en 2018.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Borges.

Je suis désolée, monsieur Aubin, mais votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais revenir rapidement à ce qui a été dit plus tôt au sujet des modifications à la Loi maritime du Canada qui permettraient aux administrations portuaires canadiennes, les APC, d'avoir accès aux prêts et aux garanties de prêt de la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada. Nous reconnaissons tous que la plupart de ces APC sont d'anciens actifs détenus par le gouvernement dont la propriété a été transférée au secteur privé.

L'un des quatre piliers prévus dans le plan stratégique du gouvernement met l'accent sur les corridors commerciaux. Comme nous le savons tous, cela permettra au Canada d'être placé dans une meilleure position pour tirer pleinement parti des débouchés mondiaux, d'être plus compétitif sur le marché mondial et d'assurer une gestion rigoureuse des actifs, ce qui fera en sorte d'améliorer son rendement et sa compétitivité à l'échelle internationale, et de favoriser sa prospérité.

Est-ce que la Loi maritime du Canada permettra à la Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent, soit un actif appartenant au gouvernement fédéral, d'accéder aux prêts et garanties de prêt de la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada?

Ma deuxième question concerne les autres programmes qui sont actuellement offerts. Le gouvernement a pris l'initiative d'offrir, par exemple, des programmes qui favorisent le développement de super grappes, de corridors commerciaux et de villes intelligentes et, enfin, de mettre en place le Programme d'infrastructures au cours du premier trimestre de 2018.

La Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent aura-t-elle accès à ces programmes, de même que les APC?

(1240)

Mme Helena Borges:

Tout d'abord, sachez que la Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent est bel et bien un actif fédéral. Par conséquent, elle reçoit des crédits législatifs de Transports Canada chaque année pour apporter les améliorations nécessaires sur la voie maritime. La société qui exploite la voie maritime en notre nom nous indique quels sont ses besoins et reçoit le financement nécessaire pour procéder aux améliorations. Étant donné les crédits législatifs, c'est ainsi qu'elle sera financée à l'avenir. Elle n'a donc pas besoin d'avoir accès à ces programmes, puisqu'elle a directement accès au cadre financier.

M. Vance Badawey:

Très bien. Merci.

Il y a des endroits situés le long de la Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent qui ont leurs propres corridors commerciaux. Qu'il s'agisse de transport routier, aérien, multimodal, et ainsi de suite, on prévoit mettre en place une stratégie économique afin de tirer avantage de ces actifs. Malheureusement, souvent, ces améliorations — en vertu de cette attribution — ne sont pas réalisées. Les actifs se sont détériorés et ont besoin d'être remis en état. Lorsqu'on lit l'article d'aujourd'hui rédigé par M. Runciman, on peut voir que c'est quelque chose qu'il reconnaît. Nous espérons donc que cela sera fait à l'avenir.

Par conséquent, si ces travaux ne font pas partie du programme, en vertu des crédits, qu'en est-il de ces régions qui l'ont intégré à leur stratégie? Peuvent-elles présenter une demande dans le cadre de l'un de ces programmes afin de faire avancer leurs besoins économiques lorsqu'il s'agit d'un actif détenu par le gouvernement fédéral?

Mme Helena Borges:

S'il y a des améliorations qui doivent être apportées à la voie maritime que la société n'a pas relevées et que nous ne finançons pas, nous demanderions d'en être informés pour que nous puissions en discuter avec la société et découvrir pourquoi elles ne sont pas incluses. Ce serait donc une partie de la réponse.

Pour répondre au reste de votre question, sachez que le ministre a annoncé, au début de juillet, la création du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux. Il s'agit d'un fonds national dont le seul but est de financer les infrastructures de transport favorisant les activités commerciales. C'est très excitant. Il y aura donc 2 milliards de dollars qui seront investis au cours des 11 prochaines années. D'ailleurs, pas plus tard que la semaine dernière, nous avons reçu quelques manifestations d'intérêt pour des projets qui nécessitent du financement. Toute personne qui possède et exploite une infrastructure de transport qui appuie le commerce est admissible à ce fonds. On incite donc les gens à présenter une demande dans le cadre du programme. Il s'agit du premier cycle. Il y en aura d'autres au cours des prochaines années, mais c'est un moyen pour les administrations portuaires, routières, aéroportuaires, ferroviaires, bref tous ceux qui exploitent des infrastructures de transport utilisées à des fins de commerce, de demander du financement pour appuyer leurs projets.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame Borges. J'ai apprécié vos deux réponses. Tout d'abord, il faut demander à Transports Canada de veiller à ce que ces actifs soient gérés adéquatement — et j'y reviendrai plus tard. Ensuite, il y a les autres partenaires qui peuvent, en collaboration avec un actif détenu par le gouvernement fédéral tel que la voie maritime, présenter une demande dans le cadre du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux ou d'autres programmes afin d'améliorer ces actifs, en plus de bénéficier de l'actif appartenant au gouvernement fédéral.

C'est donc ma dernière question. Selon vous, est-ce une bonne chose que ces partenaires du secteur privé, ainsi que les municipalités à proximité, en l'occurrence, le canal Welland et la Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent, puissent présenter des demandes dans le but de collaborer avec un actif détenu par le gouvernement fédéral?

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Badawey.

Pourriez-vous répondre brièvement à cette question?

Mme Helena Borges:

La réponse est oui.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci.

La présidente:

Très bien. Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je suis heureux de revoir tout le monde, et de voir également de nouveaux visages autour de la table.

J'aimerais qu'on discute un peu de la question des droits des passagers aériens. Évidemment, on a beaucoup parlé des compagnies aériennes et de ce qu'elles font ou de ce qu'elles ne font pas. Nous avons eu quelques exemples très alarmants de certaines situations au cours des dernières semaines, mais il m'est aussi déjà arrivé de devoir attendre longtemps sur l'aire de trafic parce que, par exemple, il n'y avait pas suffisamment de personnel au terminal pour exploiter les portiques et les rampes d'accès, etc.

Plutôt que de viser particulièrement les compagnies aériennes, ne pourrait-on pas adopter une approche plus globale, de sorte que s'il y avait des lacunes dans le service à la clientèle, on ne ciblerait pas strictement une partie du secteur, étant donné que celle-ci pourrait facilement rejeter le blâme sur quelqu'un d'autre?

(1245)

Mme Helena Borges:

C'est une très bonne question. Effectivement, il y a de nombreux intervenants en cause. Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt dans ma déclaration, ce projet de loi propose notamment de recueillir des données auprès de tous ceux qui font partie de l'expérience des voyageurs aériens — le transporteur aérien, l'aéroport, le personnel de l'aéroport, l'Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien, bref l'ensemble de la chaîne, afin d'examiner tout ce qui fonctionne et ce qui ne fonctionne pas et de déterminer quels sont les problèmes pour ensuite faire rapport aux Canadiens sur le déroulement des opérations.

M. Ken Hardie:

Il me semble qu'il y ait une certaine réticence depuis toujours de la part du ministère des Transports et du gouvernement du Canada à l'égard des coentreprises. J'imagine qu'il y aura certains intervenants, particulièrement au sein des compagnies aériennes, qui s'opposeront aux coentreprises.

Dans le cadre de la gestion de ces ententes, pouvez-vous nous décrire certains des facteurs qui pourraient être préoccupants à l'avenir relativement à ces coentreprises?

Mme Helena Borges:

Je vais demander à ma collègue, Sara Wiebe, et peut-être à Mark Schaan, de répondre à certaines de ces questions en fonction des expériences vécues jusqu'à maintenant et de ce que nous proposons de faire différemment dans le futur.

M. Mark Schaan (directeur général, Direction générale des politiques-cadres du marché, Secteur de la politique stratégique, ministère de l'Industrie):

Merci beaucoup. Le projet de loi C-49 propose une nouvelle approche autorisant les coentreprises à PH neutre ou les coentreprises entre transporteurs aériens. À l'heure actuelle, les coentreprises sont uniquement examinées par le Bureau de la concurrence aux termes de la Loi sur la concurrence, et les principales considérations sont la durée de la concurrence et la compréhension sur le plan économique.

Le projet de loi C-49 fera en sorte d'élargir cet examen afin d'inclure une évaluation de la concurrence plus complète et robuste de la part du Bureau. Elle tiendra compte des avantages pour le public, en ce qui concerne notamment la connectivité, la sécurité ou l'expérience du voyageur. Lorsqu'une coentreprise soulève des préoccupations, ce serait parce que les avantages pour le public évalués par Transports Canada dans le cadre du processus d'examen ne suffisent pas à compenser les effets d'une diminution importante de la concurrence dans le secteur. Ce que fait le projet de loi C-49, c'est d'établir un équilibre entre les désavantages potentiels d'une transaction proposée et les avantages offerts aux Canadiens. Il est nécessaire que l'un l'emporte sur l'autre pour aller de l'avant. Il s'agit d'un système volontaire en fonction duquel le promoteur doit avoir une bonne évaluation de la probabilité d'adoption pour obtenir l'approbation du ministre.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

En ce qui concerne la question des enregistreurs audio-vidéo, je me suis penché sur l'installation de ces appareils à bord des autobus, lorsque je travaillais au sein de la société de transport en commun de la région de Vancouver. Bien entendu, ces enregistreurs soulèvent d'importantes questions liées aux relations de travail. Les membres du personnel craignent qu'ils soient utilisés à des fins disciplinaires. Toute la question de la vie privée repose évidemment sur qui possédera les données, de quelle façon elles seront entreposées, qui y aura accès et pendant combien de temps elles seront conservées. Toutes ces questions seront-elles prises en considération dans les règlements?

Mme Helena Borges:

La réponse est oui. Je vais demander à ma collègue Brigitte de vous en dire un peu plus sur la façon dont nous aborderons ces enjeux.

M. Ken Hardie:

J'aurais une question supplémentaire dans cette même veine. On parle d'installer cette technologie uniquement dans les chemins de fer de classe 1. Comme par hasard, certaines des procédures judiciaires entourant Lac-Mégantic viennent d'être entamées. Même si ces dispositions étaient en place, le chemin de fer en question n'était pas tenu de s'y conformer. Étant donné ce que nous savons au sujet de l'état des chemins de fer d’intérêt local, pourquoi ne pas étendre la portée de cette mesure pour les inclure?

Mme Helena Borges:

Merci.

Brigitte.

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Madame la présidente, je dirais que la réglementation actuellement en cours d'élaboration — et nous consultons divers intervenants dans ce dossier — tiendra compte des questions liées à la protection des données, la durée de conservation des données, la nécessité que les entreprises établissent des politiques afin d'empêcher tout accès non autorisé, et les exigences en matière de tenue de documents qui seront imposées aux entreprises. Chose certaine, nous voulons nous assurer de protéger le droit à la vie privée. C'est notre priorité.

Aucune décision n'a encore été prise concernant le champ d'application. En fait, nous envisageons de définir la portée dans la réglementation, et il ne s'agira pas nécessairement des chemins de fer de catégorie 1. Rien n'est coulé dans le béton. Nous sommes en train d'évaluer les risques pour déterminer à qui cette mesure va s'appliquer, et cela pourrait inclure les CFIL.

(1250)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Je suis désolée, monsieur Hardie, mais votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur O'Toole.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole (Durham, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente. Je suis heureux de retrouver mes collègues aujourd'hui.

Merci, mesdames et messieurs, de prendre part à nos discussions.

Je considère que ce projet de loi est essentiel pour l'avenir du Canada. La modernisation de notre réseau de transport est fondamentale pour nous permettre d'acheminer nos produits vers les marchés au Canada, en Amérique du Nord et partout dans le monde.

Le transport, qu'il soit maritime, aérien, ferroviaire et routier, constitue l'infrastructure de notre économie. Le projet de loi propose des mesures qui s'étendent jusqu'en 2030 et au-delà. Toutefois, on ne fait pas mention du cabotage. Je me demande quels secteurs ont tenu compte du cabotage, soit une pratique qui consiste à autoriser un transporteur national à recueillir des marchandises ou des passagers en cours de route, que ce soit par voie maritime ou aérienne, aux États-Unis. D'ici 2030 et même au-delà, si on parle d'efficacité — ce que Mme Borges considère comme étant l'objectif de tout cela, le cabotage devrait certainement être pris en considération. Le gouvernement s'est-il penché sur ces dossiers?

Mme Helena Borges:

Le cabotage est une question que nous avons examinée à maintes reprises. En fait, les enjeux relatifs au cabotage vont au-delà des transports. Ils portent sur la capacité des travailleurs d'un pays de travailler dans un autre pays, alors cela concernerait le ministère de l'Immigration de ces deux pays. Le projet de loi permet dans une certaine mesure le cabotage lié au transport maritime, et cela concerne les déplacements de conteneurs vides. À l'heure actuelle, un navire international qui amène des conteneurs remplis et qui les vident ici ne peut pas les transporter d'un point à un autre au Canada. Cela doit se faire par camion ou par train. Le projet de loi permet donc aux navires de transporter des conteneurs vides d'un port à un autre, ce qui est d'ailleurs le moyen le plus efficace de procéder, et sans doute le plus écologique. Ils peuvent donc ramener les conteneurs afin qu'ils soient remplis. Nous permettons cette option, mais dans les autres modes de transport, il y aura d'autres obstacles à surmonter, notamment d'autres pays qui devront permettre au Canada de faire de même dans leurs pays, ce qui n'est pas le cas à l'heure actuelle.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

Ce qui est intéressant, madame Borges, c'est que nous modernisons le transport tout en modernisant l'ALENA. Si on se penche sur l'efficacité dans le secteur du camionnage, par exemple, on constate qu'un grand nombre de camions qui vont vers le sud reviennent vides. Ce faisant, nous produisons des émissions de gaz à effet de serre inutilement. Par conséquent, je sais que c'est quelque chose qui intéresse le gouvernement et nous tous, évidemment, alors si nous pouvions remplir ces camions, on se trouverait à réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre. Si nous modernisons le transport et l'ALENA, pourquoi ne pas tenir compte de la question du cabotage? Je sais que le commissaire de la concurrence a demandé cette étude en 2015 dans bon nombre de ces secteurs, alors madame Borges, ou les représentants du Bureau de la concurrence, pourquoi ces éléments ne font-ils pas partie de cette loi?

Mme Helena Borges:

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, pour inclure cela dans la loi, il faut d'abord régler d'autres questions, comme la question des travailleurs qui peuvent travailler ici — et par exemple, en vertu de l'ALENA, l'autorisation des États-Unis de procéder ainsi. Je crois comprendre que certaines de ces discussions sont en cours. N'empêche que nous avons déjà pris des mesures à cet égard: lorsqu'une entreprise de camionnage du Canada se rend aux États-Unis, elle peut effectuer deux arrêts, pourvu que cela fasse partie du même déplacement. Cependant, vous avez tout à fait raison de dire qu'on ne peut pas ramener de marchandises. Voilà donc ce qui est à l'étude dans le cadre de ces discussions, mais cela ne fait pas partie du projet de loi parce que, honnêtement, cela ne peut pas se faire tant que les autres discussions n'ont pas eu lieu.

(1255)

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

Je ne veux certainement pas m'ingérer dans les pourparlers confidentiels du Canada, mais je me demande si, dans le contexte du projet de loi C-49 et des négociations de l'ALENA, des études ont été réalisées sur l'efficacité du cabotage, notamment dans les secteurs du transport maritime, ferroviaire et routier, et si une évaluation des émissions de gaz à effet de serre a été menée par votre ministère ou un autre. J'aimerais donc savoir — sans trop en venir aux positions de négociation confidentielles — si des études dans ces deux domaines peuvent être transmises au Comité.

Mme Helena Borges:

Je devrai vérifier si des études ont été réalisées récemment à ce sujet. Si c'est possible, nous vous les communiquerons.

Sachez que le cabotage se fait actuellement dans le contexte du transport ferroviaire. Les chemins de fer transportent des marchandises des deux côtés, alors ce n'est pas un problème dans ce secteur, contrairement aux secteurs du transport routier et aérien.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

Il me reste 50 secondes, alors je vous remercie beaucoup.

En ce qui a trait à la partie portant sur les enfants de la déclaration des droits des passagers aériens, il est essentiel que les enfants puissent être assis près de leurs parents. Je pense que nous avons tous été troublés de voir des cas d'enfants figurant sur des listes d'interdiction de vol et nous comprenons pourquoi les ministres ont soulevé la question. Le règlement de cette question ne devrait-il pas faire partie de la déclaration des droits des passagers aériens, étant donné qu'il s'agit ici de mineurs? A-t-on examiné cette question dans le cadre de la rédaction de la charte des droits?

Mme Helena Borges:

Comme vous le savez peut-être, c'est le ministre de la Sécurité publique qui est responsable de la question que vous avez soulevée concernant les enfants qui figurent sur des listes d'interdiction de vol, alors vous devriez plutôt poser cette question au ministre Goodale.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur O'Toole.

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Sean Fraser (Nova-Centre, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup à nos témoins, à notre présidente et à mes collègues d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Pour l'instant, mes questions vont surtout porter sur la partie du projet de loi C-49 qui traite du transport aérien, en commençant par la déclaration des droits des passagers aériens.

Madame Borges, vous avez évoqué certaines situations malheureuses qui ont fait les manchettes. Certaines de ces vidéos sont devenues virales, et cela ne m'étonne pas, car lorsqu'on voit un passager malmené, cela nous touche personnellement et nous fait revivre certaines de nos propres expériences. J'ai déjà vu mes vêtements sortir un par un sur la descente de bagages. J'ai déjà été coincé dans l'aire de trafic pendant des heures et j'ai dû attendre tout un vol avant de pouvoir récupérer mon instrument, alors je réagis de la même façon que le public et je comprends ses frustrations.

Vous avez dressé une longue liste des irritants au tout début et vous avez indiqué que les passagers devraient pouvoir bien comprendre leurs droits et leurs recours. Pourriez-vous nous expliquer en détail les mesures que les Canadiens peuvent prendre en cas de non-respect de leurs droits?

Mme Helena Borges:

Tout d'abord, les transporteurs aériens devront indiquer clairement quelles sont leurs obligations en échange d'un billet vendu. Ces obligations devront être très claires et faciles à comprendre, et c'est ce sur quoi les passagers se fonderont pour déposer une plainte auprès de l'Office si une obligation n'a pas été remplie. En ayant une réglementation qui définit clairement les irritants ou les problèmes et la façon de les régler, il sera plus facile pour les passagers de déterminer ce à quoi ils ont droit lorsque leurs droits sont bafoués. Si un passager est coincé sur l'aire de trafic ou si son vol est retardé pour quelque raison que ce soit, qu'est-ce que devra faire la compagnie aérienne? Si le passager perd son siège, quelle devra être l'indemnisation? Tout cela sera précisé dans la réglementation.

M. Sean Fraser:

Pour ce qui est de la portée d'application, est-ce que cela va s'appliquer à tous les passagers qui voyagent à l'intérieur du Canada ou qui transitent par le Canada?

Mme Helena Borges:

En effet, cela va s'appliquer à quiconque voyage à destination, en provenance et dans les limites du Canada.

M. Sean Fraser:

Excellent.

Supposons qu'un transporteur aérien porte atteinte aux droits d'un passager, laisser une foule en colère dicter ce qu'il faut faire n'est pas la solution. J'éprouve tout de même une certaine sympathie pour les compagnies aériennes; il ne faudrait pas qu'elles soient accusées injustement lorsqu'il s'agit en fait d'une violation mineure. En cas de dommages, envisage-t-on davantage un modèle compensatoire plutôt qu'un modèle punitif?

Mme Helena Borges:

Ce sera assurément une indemnisation. En fait, ce que nous envisageons, c'est d'indemniser le voyageur, plutôt que ce soit le gouvernement qui impose des sanctions à la compagnie aérienne pour l'infraction. Et d'ailleurs, si le passager perd son siège, par exemple, il recevra une indemnisation en fonction des inconvénients qu'il aura subis. Nous allons donc tenir des consultations à ce sujet et nous allons recueillir les points de vue des Canadiens afin de déterminer ce qu'il faut prévoir dans la réglementation.

(1300)

M. Sean Fraser:

Absolument.

Dans un autre ordre d'idées, j'aimerais parler de la propriété étrangère des transporteurs aériens canadiens. J'ai rencontré plusieurs petits transporteurs aériens et transporteurs à tarifs réduits qui voulaient ce type de changement. Ils m'ont assuré qu'ils pourraient offrir des tarifs plus avantageux. Si on hausse la limite de la propriété étrangère dans les compagnies aériennes canadiennes, les transporteurs aériens auront accès à davantage de capitaux et pourront accéder à de nouveaux marchés au Canada.

Tout d'abord, croyez-vous qu'il y aura des avantages à la suite de cette modification? Est-ce que le prix des billets d'avion va diminuer et est-ce que les compagnies aériennes desserviront de nouveaux marchés au Canada?

Mme Helena Borges:

Tout à fait. Je dirais qu'avant que ce projet de loi ne soit rédigé, le ministre avait donné l'autorisation à deux transporteurs aériens, étant donné qu'il dispose maintenant d'un pouvoir d'accorder une exemption en vertu de la loi. Enerjet et Jetlines avaient présenté une demande afin d'avoir une propriété étrangère accrue, et le ministre l'avait approuvée. Ce qui est intéressant, c'est que l'une de ces deux compagnies, Jetlines, a annoncé aujourd'hui même qu'elle prévoit mettre sur pied un service aérien de Hamilton à Waterloo, en Ontario, à compter de l'été 2018. Ce sont donc de nouveaux services qui seront offerts aux Canadiens et, idéalement, selon ce qu'on nous a dit, les coûts seront moindres, car contrairement aux autres compagnies aériennes, ces transporteurs n'ont pas besoin de mener certaines activités. Nous considérons que les Canadiens bénéficieront de nouvelles possibilités de vol, probablement dans des endroits où les autres transporteurs aériens n'offrent pas un niveau de service ou un nombre de vols suffisant.

M. Sean Fraser:

Absolument.

Puisqu'il me reste encore quelques minutes, j'aimerais parler de ce chiffre magique de 49 %. Bien entendu, nous savons tous que c'est moins de 50 %, alors la propriété demeure majoritairement canadienne, mais pourquoi est-ce que cette participation canadienne est aussi importante? On a parlé de l'importance de réduire les coûts et d'étendre les services, et on a vu qu'une propriété à 100 % pourrait être plus efficace. On a d'ailleurs formulé des recommandations à cet effet par le passé. Pourquoi alors a-t-on choisi 49 %?

Mme Helena Borges:

Nous avons examiné ce que les autres pays faisaient ailleurs dans le monde. Il s'agit d'un secteur très stratégique pour le Canada. Un peu comme les télécommunications et d'autres secteurs, c'est un secteur axé sur les réseaux, et nous voulons avoir au Canada une industrie du transport aérien solide et dynamique.

Nous avons regardé ce qui se faisait ailleurs, et ce chiffre de 49 % est assez commun. Certains pays ont une participation inférieure — par exemple, 33 % — mais je considère qu'une propriété étrangère à 49 % donne suffisamment de souplesse aux compagnies aériennes pour avoir accès aux capitaux d'investissement dont elles ont besoin, tout en veillant à ce que le contrôle demeure au Canada. Nous estimons qu'il s'agit d'un bon équilibre qui nous permet d'atteindre tous les objectifs que nous nous étions fixés.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Fraser.

Je cède maintenant la parole à M. Shields.

M. Martin Shields (Bow River, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je suis ravi d'être ici et de pouvoir participer aux discussions du Comité cette semaine. Vous pouvez nous remercier, nous les gens de l'Ouest, d'avoir amené l'été ici à Ottawa, pour ceux qui ne l'ont pas encore vu cette année, quoique nous sommes à l'intérieur et que nous allons le manquer de toute façon.

Je vous remercie, madame Borges, pour votre exposé. Lorsque la disposition de temporisation est entrée en vigueur, les gens, en sachant ce à quoi ils devraient faire face, ne l'ont pas prolongée. Aviez-vous envisagé de le faire, plutôt que de revenir à une structure antérieure?

Mme Helena Borges:

En effet, nous avions songé à prolonger cette disposition. Certaines des dispositions qui figuraient dans la loi ont en fait été reconduites, telles que le niveau de service, l'arbitrage et les sanctions en cas de non-respect des obligations.

Nous avons laissé une disposition venir à échéance, soit celle où le gouvernement précisait le volume de grain qui pouvait être transporté. Cette disposition avait été mise en place à la suite des récoltes et des conditions météorologiques exceptionnelles de 2013 et 2014. Au bout du compte, nous y avons eu recours pendant seulement un an et demi, car les compagnies de chemin de fer transportaient plus de grains que ce qui était demandé; la situation a donc changé. Nous estimons que cette disposition n'est plus nécessaire. Nous ne l'avons pas utilisée au cours des deux dernières années, alors nous ne voyons pas la nécessité de la conserver.

Nous avons également laissé la disposition sur l'interconnexion prolongée devenir caduque, car après avoir mené une évaluation, nous avons déterminé qu'elle nuisait à la compétitivité de nos compagnies de chemin de fer par rapport à celles des États-Unis. Nous l'avons remplacée par une mesure qui, selon nous, profitera davantage à un plus grand nombre d'expéditeurs partout au pays, c'est-à-dire la disposition sur l'interconnexion pour le transport longue distance.

(1305)

M. Martin Shields:

Lorsqu'on se penche sur ce qui est proposé, on sait qu'il y a des négociations en cours, mais il ne semble pas y avoir de formule uniforme: il faut négocier. On craint donc qu'il y ait davantage de bureaucratie et que les deux parties doivent consacrer plus de temps au règlement de ces questions, s'il faut négocier plutôt que d'avoir une formule fixe cohérente au fil du temps.

Mme Helena Borges:

En fait, nous encourageons la négociation pour tout ce qui touche au secteur ferroviaire, mais pour ce qui est de la disposition sur l'interconnexion de longue distance, si les parties n'arrivent pas à s'entendre, elles devront s'adresser à l'Office. C'est lui qui détermine le taux pour le tronçon de route où le produit doit être acheminé lors de l'interconnexion.

Nous avons rendu le processus plus efficace, de manière à avoir une décision dans les 30 jours. L'Office fixera le tarif en tenant compte du trafic comparable dans des circonstances semblables.

M. Martin Shields:

D'accord. Merci.

Vous avez indiqué que vous considériez les modifications à la déclaration des droits des passagers aériens comme étant révolutionnaires. Il faudrait définir ce que vous entendez par « révolutionnaire », car à mon sens, ce n'est pas très révolutionnaire.

Quoi qu'il en soit, vous avez dit que vous envisagiez d'accroître les services, sans qu'il y ait de coûts supplémentaires pour les voyageurs. J'ai un peu de mal à voir comment on peut y parvenir sans que le prix des billets d'avion augmente. Quelqu'un doit payer la note au bout du compte.

Mme Helena Borges:

Nous avons essayé d'établir un équilibre entre les attentes des Canadiens, lorsqu'ils achètent un billet pour se rendre du point A au point B, et ce que le transporteur aérien leur vend. Le problème, en ce moment, c'est que dans bien des cas, le consommateur — ou plutôt le voyageur — n'en a pas pour son argent.

Nous examinons ces questions pour nous assurer que les règlements qui seront proposés établiront un équilibre entre les deux. Nous voulons que les voyageurs obtiennent ce pour quoi ils ont payé — c'est ce à quoi ils s'attendent et c'est ce à quoi ils ont droit — et que les transporteurs aériens s'y conforment. Si les transporteurs vont de l'avant et offrent un meilleur service, cela ne devrait pas leur coûter plus d'argent que ce qui leur en coûte aujourd'hui, car ils sont payés pour cela.

M. Martin Shields:

Toutefois, s'ils font plus d'argent lorsqu'ils ont recours à la surréservation, et qu'ils en font moins parce qu'ils ne peuvent pas le faire...

Mme Helena Borges:

En effet, la surréservation n'est pas interdite.

M. Martin Shields:

D'accord.

Mme Helena Borges:

Nous leur disons en fait: « Si vous surréservez un vol et qu'un passager ne peut pas prendre place à bord de l'avion, à ce moment-là, vous devrez l'indemniser parce qu'il a acheté son billet, et en plus, vous devrez le dédommager pour les autres frais engendrés », et tout cela sera précisé dans la réglementation.

M. Martin Shields:

Je comprends et je suis d'accord, mais au bout du compte, quelqu'un devra payer.

Mme Helena Borges:

Quelqu'un va payer.

M. Martin Shields:

Oui, exactement.

Lorsque vous avez parlé de mener des consultations dans le cadre de ce processus, avez-vous prévu un échéancier?

La présidente:

Monsieur Shields, je suis désolée, mais je dois vous interrompre.

M. Martin Shields:

Il n'y a pas de problème, merci, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Vos questions étaient fort intéressantes.

Monsieur Aubin, vous disposez de trois minutes. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Je vais encore faire des comparaisons. Pour un projet de loi aussi important que celui-ci et comme pour tout autre, il m'apparaît important de pouvoir se comparer aux autres.

Tantôt, vous avez adopté cette approche en réponse à une question de M. Fraser sur le maximum de 49 %. Pour ma part, je reviens aux deux éléments que j'ai abordés tantôt, soit les enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive et la charte des droits des passagers.

Au Canada, il semblerait que les enregistrements audio-vidéo ne soient pas pris en compte, contrairement à ce qui se fait dans les pays européens, en Nouvelle-Zélande et en Australie. En ce qui a trait à la charte des passagers, ces mêmes pays, notamment les pays européens, ont une charte beaucoup plus développée que ce que propose le projet de loi C-49.

Il y aura des consultations. Comment se fait-il que le Canada ne fasse pas ce qui se fait ailleurs? C'est ma question fondamentale. Dans les consultations à venir sur la charte des passagers, ne serait-il pas intéressant de s'appuyer sur un exemple concret plutôt que sur de grands principes philosophiques?

(1310)

Mme Helena Borges:

Je vais demander à Mme Diogo de parler de la situation européenne, parce que nous avons fait un survol de ce qui existe. Je dirai seulement que notre système réglementaire et opérationnel est complètement différent de celui des pays européens.

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Pour développer les enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive, nous avons regardé et nous continuons de regarder ce qui existe ailleurs. Nous regardons en particulier le système des États-Unis, parce que nos locomotives vont traverser la frontière. Nous cherchons toujours à voir ce qui se fait ailleurs et comment nous pouvons apprendre de ces exemples. Ce travail a été fait et nous continuons d'ailleurs à discuter avec nos collègues européens de cette question.

M. Robert Aubin:

Qu'en est-il de la charte des passagers?

Mme Helena Borges:

En ce qui concerne cette charte, nous avons comparé les régimes qui existent aux États-Unis et en Europe, et nous avons retenu la meilleure part de chacun d'entre eux. Quand nous établirons une réglementation, nous regarderons ce que les États-Unis, les pays européens ou les autres pays font, et nous élaborerons un régime qui sera encore meilleur que celui de ces pays. C'est l'objectif visé.

M. Robert Aubin:

Les consultations à venir seront basées sur les conclusions de l'analyse de ces deux systèmes. Est-ce cela?

Mme Helena Borges:

Oui.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Aubin.

Allez-y, madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais revenir aux questions de mon collègue concernant l'interconnexion pour le transport de longue distance et l'interconnexion prolongée qui existait dans le projet de loi C-30. Si j'ai bien compris, vous avez indiqué que certaines des mesures figurant dans le projet de loi C-30 ont été reprises dans le projet de loi C-49, mais qu'en fait, il n'y a aucune mesure en place en ce moment pour ce qui est de l'interconnexion, l'interconnexion pour le transport longue distance ni l'interconnexion prolongée, parce que cette mesure législative est devenue caduque le 1er août, c'est-à-dire avant que ce projet de loi n'obtienne la sanction royale. Par conséquent, à l'heure actuelle, nos expéditeurs n'ont pas accès à l'interconnexion de longue distance ni à l'interconnexion prolongée. Est-ce exact?

Mme Helena Borges:

C'est exact. Ils peuvent effectuer ce que nous appelons l'interconnexion normale, qui correspond à une distance de 30 kilomètres; cette possibilité, prévue dans l'ancienne loi, existe toujours.

Mme Kelly Block:

D'accord.

Mme Helena Borges:

Nous proposons des améliorations dans le projet de loi, mais de fait, vu que la loi est devenue caduque, il n'est plus possible d'effectuer l'interconnexion de longue distance. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous espérons que le projet de loi recevra la sanction royale, afin que le régime d'interconnexion de longue distance puisse être rétabli.

Mme Kelly Block:

J'ai de nombreuses questions concernant l'interconnexion de longue distance, mais je suis sûre que nous en parlerons au cours des prochains jours. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer la différence entre le régime d'interconnexion de longue distance et les prix de ligne concurrentiels?

Mme Helena Borges:

Je demanderai à Marcia Jones de vous parler de certaines des grandes différences entre les deux et, comme vous le dites bien, nous aurons probablement l'occasion d'en parler davantage.

Mme Marcia Jones (directrice, Analyse des politiques ferroviaires et Initiatives législatives, ministère des Transports):

Merci d'avoir posé la question.

Le régime d'interconnexion de longue distance accorde à l'expéditeur qui n'a accès qu'à une seule voie ferrée de l'une des compagnies ferroviaires à l'extérieur de la zone de 30 kilomètres d'interconnexion normale la possibilité d'utiliser la voie d'un transporteur concurrentiel sur une distance maximale de 1 200 kilomètres ou 50 % de la distance totale, selon la distance la plus longue. Il existe effectivement certaines ressemblances entre le régime d'interconnexion de longue distance et les prix de ligne concurrentiels, mais il y a également des différences de taille, que je vous décrirai sommairement.

Tout d'abord, le régime d'interconnexion de longue distance ne prévoit aucune exigence selon laquelle un expéditeur cherchant une réparation conclurait une entente avec le transporteur de liaison. Nous avons entendu de la part des expéditeurs de tous genres que cela constituerait une entrave quant à leur capacité d'obtenir des prix de ligne concurrentiels. Les dispositions ne prévoient pas ce cas de figure. En fait, le projet de loi précise que le transporteur de liaison doit fournir les wagons et assumer une partie des frais d'interconnexion.

Deuxièmement, l'Office des transports du Canada disposera de beaucoup plus de données granulaires sur les feuilles de route, ce qui lui permettra de calculer des prix comparables. L'Office disposera de 100 % des données des feuilles de route ferroviaires, ce qui constitue un aspect clé de cette mesure.

Troisièmement, nous avons vu de façon générale la preuve que les compagnies ferroviaires peuvent se concurrencer pour le transport et qu'elles le feront, comme nous le montre la période de prolongation du régime d'interconnexion de longue distance. Le régime d'interconnexion de longue distance favorise ce phénomène en permettant la concurrence entre deux transporteurs, du fait que c'est l'Office qui fixe les prix et les modalités de service.

(1315)

Mme Kelly Block:

J'ai une question sur la façon dont les prix d'interconnexion de longue distance sont fixés. Je sais qu'en vertu de l'alinéa 135(3)b) du projet de loi C-49, l'OTC doit, lorsqu'il fixe les prix d'interconnexion de longue distance, tenir compte des prix du transport comparables sur la distance en question. Toutefois, sous la rubrique « Questions fréquemment posées » du document qui a circulé la semaine dernière, on note bien que cela ne veut pas dire que les prix d'interconnexion de longue distance seraient tout simplement le résultat d'un calcul au prorata de l'interconnexion sur une courte distance fait à partir de la distance totale du point d'origine jusqu'à la destination de l'interconnexion de longue distance.

Tiendra-t-on compte de la distance totale depuis le point d'origine jusqu'à la destination et des prix du transport comparables sur ces distances lorsqu'on fixera le prix d'interconnexion de longue distance? En fait, tout cela repose sur ce qui est perçu comme étant deux explications différentes fournies par Transports Canada.

Mme Marcia Jones:

Soyons clairs: en vertu du régime d'interconnexion de longue distance, l'Office dispose d'une grande discrétion pour ce qui est de fixer les prix. Vous avez raison de dire que le prix n'est pas obligatoirement calculé au prorata. L'Office dispose de divers facteurs dont il tiendra compte pour fixer le prix, notamment la distance et les exigences opérationnelles de l'expéditeur.

Toutefois, il faut noter que le prix est pondéré. Pour les 30 premiers kilomètres, c'est un prix d'interconnexion réglementé axé sur les frais et rajusté par l'Office selon l'approche que je viens de décrire.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Graham, c'est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J'aimerais donner suite à une question qui a été posée plus tôt. Nous parlions d'un régime compensatoire pour les violations d'une charte des droits des passagers plutôt que d'un régime prévoyant des sanctions. Tiendra-t-on compte des infractions? Si une société effectue régulièrement des surréservations pour ses vols et doit rembourser les passagers, serons-nous au courant? Prévoit-on des sanctions pour la violation constante des droits des passagers par opposition aux cas ponctuels?

Mme Helena Borges:

Comme nous l'avons dit auparavant, l'Office disposera des pouvoirs nécessaires pour recueillir des données sur le rendement des parties responsables de l'expérience des voyageurs aériens. L'Office disposera alors des renseignements pertinents. Si l'Office reçoit trop de plaintes de la part des voyageurs concernant certaines compagnies aériennes qui ne respectent pas leurs engagements ni les tarifs, l'Office pourra alors examiner les mesures à prendre dans des cas particuliers, ce qui comprendrait les pénalités, les dédommagements et tout ce genre de choses, car les renseignements seront disponibles.

Nous espérons que ces mesures, qui seront claires et transparentes, feront en sorte que les transporteurs respecteront la charte et que nous ne recevrons pas beaucoup de plaintes. Mais la réponse est oui, l'Office disposera des renseignements.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est entendu.

J'aimerais maintenant revenir à la question des enregistreurs audio-vidéo. On propose de les installer à bord des trains des transporteurs ferroviaires, peut-être les transporteurs de catégorie 1, ou peut-être tous, nous l'ignorons pour l'instant. A-t-on songé à imposer la même consigne aux aéronefs, comme c'est déjà le cas avec les enregistreurs de bord?

Mme Helena Borges:

Ces appareils sont déjà utilisés dans les secteurs du transport aérien et maritime, qui sont assujettis à un régime réglementaire international appliqué par l'Organisation internationale de l'aviation civile, dont le siège se trouve à Montréal. Les enregistreurs audio se retrouvent à bord des aéronefs depuis des décennies, en sus de la boîte noire qui nous indique le comportement de l'aéronef. C'est déjà prévu. On entend à la télé les enregistrements des pilotes qui communiquent avec la tour de contrôle aérien, et les gens de la tour peuvent parler aux pilotes. Cette capacité existe déjà.

(1320)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une autre question. Je l'ai posée à bien des gens et je n'ai jamais obtenu de réponse satisfaisante.

Nous parlons des transporteurs ferroviaires de catégorie 1, 2 et 3. Il y a un transporteur, que je ne nommerai point ici, qui exploite environ 100 chemins de fer d'intérêt local, mais qui n'est pas classé dans la catégorie 1. Y a-t-il une façon de régler ce cas, ou la situation perdura-t-elle?

Mme Helena Borges:

Les définitions sont établies à partir des revenus tirés du tonnage. S'il y a ce que j'appelle une « société de portefeuille » qui possède diverses compagnies ferroviaires au pays, dans certains cas ces compagnies ferroviaires pourraient se trouver assujetties aux lois fédérales, alors que dans d'autres cas, ce serait les lois provinciales qui s'appliqueraient. Ce n'est pas une seule compagnie, mais plutôt des compagnies qui feraient partie d'une « franchise », pour ainsi dire. La classification se fait en fonction des revenus et des activités des compagnies.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quels sont les éléments du projet de loi C-30qui demeureront en vigueur?

Mme Helena Borges:

Les dispositions du projet de loi C-30 qui demeureront sont celles qui prévoient un régime d'arbitrage des plaintes visant le niveau de service ainsi que les conditions d'exploitation. Lorsque le projet de loi a été déposé la première fois, il accordait à l'Office les pouvoirs nécessaires pour définir les conditions d'exploitation. Ces pouvoirs existeront toujours.

On a également conservé les pénalités infligées aux compagnies ferroviaires qui ne respectent les modalités de leur entente de service.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il me reste suffisamment de temps pour poser une dernière question.

En vertu du régime d'interconnexion, les compagnies ferroviaires paient les wagons chargés plutôt que les wagons vides. Si vous obligez une autre compagnie de prendre votre wagon chargé et ensuite la compagnie qui l'avait à l'origine doit faire revenir le wagon vide, qui en est responsable? Est-ce qu'un tel scénario causera des problèmes, c'est-à-dire lorsqu'une compagnie est obligée d'assumer le transport et une autre doit faire revenir les wagons vides?

Mme Helena Borges:

Il n'est pas question d'obliger quiconque de faire quoi que ce soit. Ce sont les compagnies ferroviaires qui s'arrangent entre elles. Habituellement, la compagnie ferroviaire achemine un wagon plein dans un sens et le fait revenir vide dans un autre, ou bien il arrive que le wagon déchargé puisse être chargé à nouveau pour le chemin du retour.

Les arrangements sont pris par les compagnies ferroviaires dans une optique commerciale et ce sont les compagnies qui décident comment déplacer les wagons et dans quel sens. Tout cela se fait sur une base commerciale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Me reste-t-il du temps?

La présidente:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une dernière question sur la sécurité.

Aux États-Unis, on utilise beaucoup les systèmes de commande intégrale des trains, alors qu'on n'en parle pas beaucoup ici au Canada. Allons-nous adopter cette technologie?

Mme Helena Borges:

Je vais demander à Brigitte de vous répondre. C'est effectivement un sujet d'actualité et elle vous décrira les travaux en cours.

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Nous suivons de près ce qui se passe dans le domaine de la commande intégrale des trains aux États-Unis, et nous effectuons des études de la commande des trains ici au Canada. En septembre ou en novembre dernier, nous avons remis au Comité une copie du rapport du Conseil consultatif sur la sécurité ferroviaire, dans lequel paraissait une analyse de la commande des trains.

On y a conclu que les systèmes de commande intégrale des trains qui existent actuellement ne devraient pas être adoptés au Canada. Nous devrions certainement rechercher les technologies avancées de commande des trains, et nous continuerons à les évaluer. Nous travaillons actuellement avec le groupe de recherches sur les technologies ferroviaires de l'Université de l'Alberta pour poursuivre ces analyses. Nous nous ferons un plaisir de vous transmettre les rapports ultérieurs à ce sujet.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup pour ces renseignements.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Ma question touche la Federal Railroad Administration, qui s'oppose elle aussi aux enregistreurs audio-vidéo. Le rapport dit que, selon ces gens, cela a une influence corrosive sur les relations de travail.

J'ai abordé la question suivante lors de mon intervention, plus tôt. Je me demande si les enregistreurs sont vraiment la solution ou si le projet de loi C-49 devrait plutôt mettre en vigueur toutes les mesures pour éviter les accidents. Je pense, par exemple, au transport de matières dangereuses, sur lequel le projet de loi C-49 reste à peu près muet. Il s'agit du transport, par le réseau ferroviaire, de matières de toutes sortes. Or on n'a pas cru bon, dans le cadre du projet de loi C-49, de développer pour les années à venir un mode de transport ou des particularités différentes pour les produits dangereux. On pourrait notamment donner comme exemple les produits inflammables. Comme les trains sont de plus en plus longs, les risques de catastrophe sont d'autant plus importants.

Ces questions sont-elles prises en compte ou nous présente-t-on l'enregistrement comme étant la solution à tout?

(1325)

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Les enregistreurs ne sont pas la solution à tout. Il est important de voir quels facteurs peuvent influencer la sécurité ferroviaire et quelles sont les mesures à prendre. Depuis l'accident de Lac-Mégantic, le ministère a mis en oeuvre plusieurs initiatives et mesures. Des changements ont été apportés à la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire. Nous continuons aussi de nous pencher sur les façons d'améliorer la sécurité. Les enregistreurs visent à vérifier spécifiquement ce qui se passe dans la locomotive. Pour le moment, rien ne permet de déterminer quelles interactions ont lieu entre les membres de l'équipage, de façon à pouvoir vérifier ce qui s'est produit lors d'un accident ou comment il serait possible de prévenir d'autres accidents.

Le Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada pourra vous donner plus de détails sur certains des incidents dont il est question actuellement. Ces derniers demandent qu'on se penche un peu plus sur ce qui se passe dans la locomotive et pourquoi, notamment, les gens ratent des feux rouges.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'ai une dernière question même s'il nous reste du temps avec ces témoins.

M. Garneau a présenté les conclusions clés de l'examen de la Loi sur les transports au Canada de 2016. Vous y avez tous participé, en élaborant une vision pour l'avenir des transports au Canada. Ainsi, vous avez effectué des consultations approfondies. C'étaient donc vous, experts en la matière, qui deviez vous pencher sur la Loi sur les transports au Canada et, bien sûr, présenter les conclusions aujourd'hui.

Je sais que les consultations se sont soldées par un grand consensus. Nous comprenons tous que le réseau des transports du Canada joue un rôle critique pour ce qui est du bien-être de notre économie, car il assure le transport des biens et des gens au pays et à l'étranger. Il nous faut, et ce, depuis longtemps, un leadership fédéral et une stratégie nationale pour les transports afin de faire fonctionner le système pendant les 20 et 30 prochaines années et mettre en oeuvre la vision pour les transports, l'économie, la sécurité et l'efficacité.

Un réseau des transports national doit être efficace, comme je viens de le dire, et intégré, afin de jouer le rôle vital nécessaire à notre croissance, au commerce, à notre bien-être social et à notre environnement, comme l'ont bien dit mes collègues d'en face. Le plan Transports 2030, qui repose sur cinq axes, répond à tous ces besoins et en fait partie.

Pensez-vous, fort de votre expérience, qui, je dois dire, est de loin supérieure au nôtre, que le projet de loi répond aux besoins en matière de sécurité et d'efficacité et, enfin, qu'il met à profit tous nos moyens de transport au pays afin que nous puissions améliorer et accroître notre rendement économique à l'échelle internationale?

Mme Helena Borges:

Ma réponse est un simple « oui ».

Ce projet de loi, ce texte, constitue l’une de nos initiatives clés visant à mettre en oeuvre les cinq axes que vous avez mentionnés et qui représentent la vision du ministre. Le projet de loi cherche à améliorer l’expérience des voyageurs et à favoriser les corridors commerciaux. Il vise à améliorer la sécurité et à exploiter de la meilleure façon possible tous les modes de transport et à assurer leur intégration. D’autres textes législatifs et initiatives seront annoncés. C’est le fruit de tout un ensemble de travaux.

Le ministre a également annoncé l’automne dernier le Plan de protection des océans, un document qui porte sur nos cours d’eau. Il y a un autre projet de loi dont est saisi le Parlement, le projet de loi C-49, qui en constitue le complément et qui porte sur toutes les composantes et les cinq axes. À notre avis, les amendements proposés aux diverses lois, notamment la Loi sur les transports au Canada, créeront les conditions propices qui nous permettront d’avoir un réseau de transport sûr, efficace, concurrentiel et durable à long terme.

(1330)

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup à vous tous.

Madame Borges, je vous remercie, ainsi que vos collaborateurs, d'être venus aujourd'hui pour notre première séance sur ce projet de loi fort intéressant.

Merci beaucoup d'avoir fourni tous ces renseignements.

S'il y a des membres du Comité qui ont des questions pour lesquelles ils voudront obtenir des réponses, je les encourage à vous contacter directement afin que chaque membre dispose des renseignements dont il a besoin.

Merci beaucoup.

Mme Helena Borges:

C'est nous qui vous remercions.

La présidente:

Nous allons prendre une pause avant d'accueillir le prochain groupe de témoins.

(1330)

(1350)

La présidente:

Reprenons. Je prie les membres du Comité de revenir à leurs places.

Avant d'entendre les témoins, je vous informe que nous avons reçu une demande d'approbation du budget provisoire pour l'étude. Vous en avez tous une copie. Y a-t-il des questions?

Puis-je demander à quelqu'un de proposer l'adoption du budget provisoire?

C'est M. Fraser qui le propose.

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal]

La présidente: Merci beaucoup à tous.

J'aimerais maintenant remercier les témoins d'être venus.

Nous accueillons le Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports, un bureau qui, nous l'espérons, ne devrait jamais avoir de travail, mais qui malheureusement, notamment au cours des dernières années, a été bien occupé. Merci beaucoup d'être venus.

Madame Fox, voulez-vous présenter vos collègues? Je vous cède la parole.

Mme Kathleen Fox (présidente, Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Bonne après-midi. Je vous remercie, madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, d'avoir invité le Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada à comparaître aujourd'hui, afin de nous permettre de répondre à vos questions au sujet du projet de loi C-49.

Comme vous le savez, ce projet de loi vise à apporter des changements à la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire et à la Loi sur le Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports. Ces modifications exigeraient l'installation d'enregistreurs audio-vidéo dans la cabine des locomotives circulant sur les voies principales, et élargiraient l'accès à ces enregistrements à Transports Canada ainsi qu'aux compagnies ferroviaires dans certaines conditions. Vous savez peut-être également que ce type d'enregistrement est largement utilisé à bord des navires et des aéronefs depuis de nombreuses années.

Les trois collègues qui m'accompagnent aujourd'hui ont une vaste expérience.[Français]

M. Jean Laporte est notre administrateur en chef des opérations. Travaillant au BST depuis sa création, en 1990, il possède une connaissance approfondie de notre mandat et de nos processus.[Traduction]

À ma gauche, j'ai M. Mark Clitsome, ancien directeur des enquêtes aéronautiques qui a collaboré étroitement avec Transports Canada sur les modifications législatives proposées, dont celles qui visent la loi qui régit nos activités.

Tout à fait à ma droite, j'ai M. Kirby Jang, notre directeur des enquêtes ferroviaires et de pipelines, qui a énormément contribué à la réalisation de l'étude sur les enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive publiée l'an dernier.

Je serai brève afin que nous puissions passer rapidement aux questions. En fait, j'aimerais attirer votre attention sur quatre points seulement.

Le premier point, c'est qu'au BST, nous avons besoin d'enregistreurs audio-vidéo à bord des locomotives pour mieux effectuer nos enquêtes.[Français]

C'est essentiel, à tel point que nous avons fait deux recommandations en ce sens et et avons intégré cet élément aux enjeux de sécurité importants de notre liste de surveillance. Privés des données extraites des enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive, ou EAVL, nos enquêteurs ne disposent pas de tous les renseignements dont ils ont besoin pour déterminer ce qui s'est passé, information dont nous avons besoin pour rendre le réseau ferroviaire canadien plus sûr. [Traduction]

Permettez-moi de vous donner un exemple.

Le 26 février 2012, un train de voyageurs VIA Rail a déraillé près de Burlington, en Ontario. Les trois membres d'équipage dans la cabine ont perdu la vie et des dizaines de passagers ont été blessés. Le consignateur d'événements à bord nous a fourni quelques données, grâce auxquelles nous savons que le train circulait à 67 milles à l'heure sur une liaison où la vitesse maximale permise était de 15 milles à l'heure. Mais nous n'avons jamais pu établir avec certitude pourquoi. L'équipage n'a-t-il pas vu les signaux lui indiquant de ralentir? Ou les a-t-il vus mais mal interprétés? Nous ne le savons pas, et nous ne le saurons jamais. Un enregistreur audio-vidéo de locomotive aurait permis de mieux comprendre les facteurs opérationnels et humains influençant l'équipage et aurait orienté les enquêteurs vers les lacunes en matière de sécurité qui auraient ainsi pu être atténuées.

Voilà qui m'amène à mon deuxième point. Les renseignements extraits des enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive doivent demeurer protégés. Ils ne doivent pas être divulgués publiquement. Ils doivent demeurer protégés de manière à ce que seules les personnes autorisées qui en ont directement besoin à des fins légitimes de sécurité puissent y avoir accès.

L'information extraite de certains enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive devrait être mise à la disposition des compagnies ferroviaires à des fins d'utilisation dans l'optique non punitive d'un système de gestion proactive de la sécurité.

(1355)

[Français]

Les compagnies ferroviaires devraient être en mesure d'examiner les actions de leurs employés, par exemple pour vérifier si les signaux en voie sont toujours nommés à haute voix ou si un train a dépassé les limites de son autorisation, autant d'actions qui, en soi, ne causeraient peut-être pas directement un accident, mais qui suggèrent des améliorations possibles de la sécurité.[Traduction]

L'objectif n'est pas disciplinaire: la démarche vise plutôt à repérer et à corriger les problèmes systématiques susceptibles de mener à des améliorations des procédures d'exploitation ou de la formation. J'insiste cependant sur le fait que le tout doit s'inscrire dans un contexte non punitif, d'où mon dernier point, à savoir qu'indépendamment du fait que nous souhaitons donner un certain accès à ces enregistrements aux compagnies ferroviaires, des contrôles adéquats doivent être inclus dans la loi et la réglementation, afin de veiller à ce que ces renseignements ne soient pas utilisés à des fins disciplinaires, sauf dans des circonstances particulièrement accablantes.

Cette dernière exigence pourrait se révéler l'une des plus délicates, notamment parce qu'elle relève de l'existence de ce qu'on appelle une « culture d'équité ». Celle-ci peut être définie comme un environnement de travail où la distinction entre une simple erreur humaine et un comportement inacceptable est clairement tracée, et où on ne met pas en cause le travailleur sans avoir préalablement recherché les facteurs contributifs systématiques.

Cependant, les compagnies ferroviaires canadiennes ont souvent eu des comportements révélant une culture punitive basée sur le respect des règles. Bien que des progrès aient été accomplis pour améliorer cette culture, le BST comprend les préoccupations des employés concernant l'utilisation, éventuellement abusive, de ce genre de données. [Français]

Transports Canada devrait aussi avoir accès à ces enregistrements pour pouvoir exercer une surveillance de la sécurité et devrait pouvoir les utiliser lors de recours contre des exploitants, mais pas contre des employés isolément.[Traduction]

Les modifications législatives proposées constituent une rupture avec la façon dont les choses ont toujours été faites, mais le domaine du transport évolue, et les méthodes de travail doivent suivre. Il est très probable que l'information extraite des enregistrements audio et vidéo puisse être un outil pertinent lorsqu'elle est utilisée à des fins légitimes de sécurité. La loi et la mise en oeuvre de la loi doivent permettre l'atteinte d'un équilibre entre les droits des employés et les responsabilités des exploitants afin d'assurer la sécurité de leurs activités.

Merci. Nous nous ferons un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Merci d'être venus aujourd'hui. Je suis reconnaissante d'avoir eu la possibilité de vous entendre et aussi de vous poser des questions concernant le projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis.

Madame Fox, j'ai cru vous entendre dire que des renseignements seront recueillis par divers moyens. Voici ce que je voudrais savoir. Voulez-vous dire qu'il y aura des audits? Admettons qu'il n'y ait pas eu d'incident pendant qu'un train se déplaçait du point A au point B. Se peut-il que vous effectuiez un audit de différents facteurs grâce aux enregistreurs audio-vidéo à bord des locomotives afin de comprendre ce qui s'est passé?Ce genre de contrôle sera-t-il fait de façon aléatoire?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

C'est exact. Dans le projet de loi, on prévoit plusieurs moyens d'utiliser les données outre les enquêtes menées par le Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada. Nous vous avons fourni une fiche d'information d'une page à des fins de référence. On y décrit les utilisations permises.

Pour répondre à votre question plus précisément, si le projet de loi est approuvé, les compagnies ferroviaires seraient autorisées à prélever des échantillons aléatoires des enregistrements audio et vidéo dans le cadre de leur analyse globale des données liées à la sécurité qui ferait partie de leur système de gestion de la sécurité. Le Règlement sur le système de gestion de la sécurité ferroviaire préciserait probablement les règles visant un tel échantillonnage et autoriserait, entre autres, l'échantillonnage aléatoire afin d'aider les compagnies à analyser les données et à repérer toute source de préoccupations en matière de sécurité.

Mme Kelly Block:

Pouvez-vous me dire quelles sont les lois actuellement en vigueur qui interdisent aux mécaniciens, par exemple, de regarder leurs téléphones, et qui précisent que les employés doivent respecter les règles de la compagnie lorsqu'ils conduisent une locomotive?

(1400)

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Il y a la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire, dont le règlement vise les compagnies ferroviaires, et l'industrie a élaboré un ensemble de règles qui ont été approuvées par Transports Canada. De plus, chaque compagnie ferroviaire met en place ses propres normes pour ce qui est de la conduite.

À l'heure actuelle, la seule façon de surveiller ce que font les gens et ce qu'ils ne devraient pas faire, ce sont les évaluations d'efficacité menées par les compagnies ferroviaires, et c'est un superviseur-formateur qui accompagne l'équipage. Il est peu probable, dans de telles circonstances, que l'équipage se livre à ce type de comportement. Sinon, à moins qu'il y ait un incident quelconque, il n'y a aucun moyen de le savoir.

Ce qui motive en partie notre désir d'avoir des enregistreurs audio-vidéo, outre leur utilité dans nos enquêtes, c'est que c'est une façon pour les compagnies ferroviaires et Transports Canada de constater, par exemple, que les règles et procédures sont respectées dans un cadre non punitif. En d'autres termes, cela ne se ferait pas pour des motifs disciplinaires, à moins que l'échantillonnage démontre qu'il y avait une menace immédiate pour la sécurité. Ce cas de figure serait défini dans le règlement.

Mme Kelly Block:

Nous avons entendu les représentants de Transports Canada nous dire qu'ils avaient mené des consultations approfondies sur tous les aspects visés par le projet de loi C-49. Le Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada a-t-il participé à ces consultations?

Je vous signale que le syndicat principal, qui représente les mécaniciens, s'est toujours opposé aux enregistreurs audio-vidéo à bord des locomotives. Pouvez-vous nous dire ce qui a été fait pour le rassurer quant à cette mesure prévue dans le projet de loi C-49?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je vous répondrai de façon générale, et je demanderai ensuite à Kirby Jang de vous donner plus de détails. Le Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada a mené une étude sur la sécurité des transporteurs de catégorie 4 et de l'installation des enregistreurs audio-vidéo. De nombreux intervenants, y compris Transports Canada, diverses compagnies ferroviaires, et des représentants de la Conférence ferroviaire de Teamsters Canada, ont participé à l'étude. Nous avons examiné de près les problèmes liés à la mise en application, les difficultés législatives, et ainsi de suite.

Monsieur Jang, pouvez-vous nous en dire plus sur la position des Teamsters?

M. Kirby Jang (directeur, Enquêtes ferroviaires et pipelines, Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports):

Bien sûr. Nous avons reconnu qu'il y avait toute une gamme d'opinions quant à l'utilisation correcte des enregistrements audio-vidéo privés sur les locomotives. Dans le cadre de l'étude sur la sécurité, nous avons pu organiser des discussions très ouvertes pour faire connaître les positions. Nous en avons pris bonne note dans le cadre de l'étude sur la sécurité. Nous avons également discuté de solutions possibles pour concilier tous les points de vue, et certaines stratégies ont été formulées à l'issue de l'étude à cette fin.

Mme Kelly Block:

J'ai devant moi...

La présidente:

Je regrette, mais votre temps de parole est épuisé.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci d'être venus aujourd'hui. Quiconque a regardé un épisode de Mayday reconnaît la valeur de votre travail.

J'ai plusieurs questions sur les enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive. Quelles sont les études effectuées par le BST sur ces appareils, et comment se comparent-ils aux appareils CVR et FDR qui sont à bord des navires et des avions? Vous avez dit que ces appareils étaient déjà installés à bord des navires et des avions. Il n'y a pas d'équipement vidéo, par contre. Comment se comparent les données obtenues et pourquoi ne voudrions-nous pas obtenir des données vidéo dans les autres secteurs?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Dans le secteur de l'aviation, il y a l'Organisation de l'aviation civile internationale, qui chapeaute tout le secteur et dont le Canada est membre puisque nous avons signé la convention. Dans le secteur maritime, c'est l'Organisation maritime internationale.

Ces deux organisations établissent des normes générales pour les secteurs de l'aviation et du transport maritime. Les deux exigent que se fassent au Canada des enregistrements audio, et ce, depuis 50 ans dans le cas du transport aérien, et depuis 2002 dans le cas du secteur maritime. Les enregistrements vidéo ne sont toujours pas obligatoires. On en discute actuellement à l'échelon international.

Il y a cependant eu des recommandations et, en fait, le BST a proposé l'installation d'enregistreurs vidéo à bord des avions dans le sillage de l'écrasement de l'appareil Swiss Air en 1998, et à bord des locomotives à la suite de l'accident survenu à Burlington en 2013. Le secteur du transport ferroviaire n'est pas gouverné par une organisation internationale, et c'est la raison pour laquelle chaque pays doit décider de son propre chef de la façon de procéder dans de tels cas.

(1405)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comment fonctionnent les enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive? Est-ce une caméra installée à l'avant de la locomotive afin que l'on puisse voir l'équipage? Y a-t-il une caméra qui surveille l'équipage, l'autre la cabine, encore une autre qui regarde devant et une autre vers l'arrière? Comment percevez-vous l'installation des appareils d'enregistrement?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je vais demander à M. Jang de vous répondre. Nous nous sommes penchés sur certains aspects techniques dans le cadre de notre étude effectuée l'année dernière sur les appareils d'enregistrement audio-vidéo à bord des locomotives.

M. Kirby Jang:

Il n'existe pas de normes en ce qui concerne la configuration ou l'installation de ces appareils. Comme vous l'avez mentionné, plusieurs vues et champs de vision nous intéressent. Nous avons examiné quatre configurations différentes dans le cadre de notre étude. Ce n'était pas exhaustif, mais nous avons tenté l'expérience avec quatre compagnies de chemin de fer canadiennes. Il y avait même des variations au sein des quatre configurations.

Nous recherchons notamment une vue sur les commandes de la locomotive, peut-être encore un champ qui permet de voir les interactions entre les membres de l'équipage. L'étude en soi ne permet pas de décider ce qui convient, mais nous avons tenté d'établir certaines pratiques exemplaires.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Combien coûterait-il d'installer un enregistreur dans une locomotive?

M. Kirby Jang:

D'après ce que j'en sais, il faut prévoir environ 20 000 $ par appareil par locomotive.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quel pays utilise les enregistreurs audio-vidéo dans ses locomotives actuellement, et quelle en est l'incidence? Le savez-vous?

M. Kirby Jang:

Notre étude ne nous a pas permis d'examiner ce qui se fait ailleurs. Nous avons appris cependant que ces appareils sont utilisés aux États-Unis. Il n'y a aucun autre pays qui s'en sert de façon usuelle.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bon.

Madame Fox, vous avez dit dans votre déclaration que cet équipement serait utilisé sur les voies principales. De quel équipement s'agit-il? Est-ce les locomotives, les engins rail-route, ou tout ce qui circule sur les voies? Qu'envisagez-vous?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Le règlement précisera l'équipement qui sera utilisé. Il s'agit grosso modo des locomotives utilisées sur les voies principales, par opposition à l'équipement dont on se sert dans les cours de triage, où l'on forme les trains et les aiguilles. Ce serait l'équipement des voies principales.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai posé la question parce qu'il y a beaucoup d'équipement qui circule sur les voies principales outre les locomotives. Cet équipement est-il concerné?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Non, ce sont uniquement les locomotives de tête qui circulent sur les voies principales.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Vous avez indiqué à maintes reprises dans votre déclaration que Transports Canada verrait à l'observation des règles régissant l'utilisation et les privilèges. De quelles méthodes d'observation se servira Transports Canada...? Pardon, c'est le BST qui verra à l'observation en veillant à la protection des employés. Quelles sont les méthodes dont vous disposez pour assurer cette protection, et comment proposez-vous de le faire?

M. Jean Laporte (administrateur en chef des opérations, Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports):

Nous respectons cette consigne pour d'autres modes de transport déjà. Il n'y a rien qui distingue les chemins de fer. Essentiellement, si nous prenons connaissance d'un problème grâce à l'enregistrement, nous commençons en contactant la compagnie afin de lui demander de se plier à nos exigences. Si la compagnie refuse, la loi nous permet d'actionner la compagnie. Dans certains cas, il a fallu évoquer cette possibilité. Nous n'avons pas dû intenter une action en justice, mais la disposition le permet. Nous avons le pouvoir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce serait des poursuites.

M. Jean Laporte:

Oui.

En vertu de la nouvelle loi, le projet de loi C-49, nous pourrions collaborer avec Transports Canada sur le dossier des enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive. De plus, Transports Canada serait doté de pouvoirs d'application en vertu de la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire.

La présidente:

Votre temps de parole est échu. Il vous reste 30 secondes, mais ce n'est pas suffisant pour poser une autre question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si tel est le cas, je vais poser une toute petite question.

L'autre chose dont nous discutons, c'est la charte des droits des passagers. À votre avis, y a-t-il des aspects positifs ou négatifs en matière de sécurité de la charte des droits des passagers?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.

Je vous remercie, chers collègues, d'être avec nous.

Comme on parle ici du Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada, ou BST, on sait que l'incident est malheureusement bel et bien survenu et que les conclusions d'une enquête pourraient servir à améliorer la sécurité future.

Si c'est possible, j'aimerais obtenir un pourcentage des types de conclusions rendues par le Bureau dans le cas des accidents ferroviaires. Selon moi, il y a trois grandes catégories: un bris mécanique, une obstruction sur la voie ou une erreur humaine.

Est-ce que j'ai raison? Est-ce que j'oublie quelque chose?

Si ce que je dis est exact, j'aimerais savoir quel est le pourcentage approximatif dans le cas des incidents que nous avons eu à vivre?

(1410)

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Ce sont, grosso modo, les principales causes. Pour ce qui est du facteur humain, je peux vous donner des statistiques précises. De janvier 1994 à août 2016, il y a eu 223 accidents impliquant des trains de marchandises. Je spécifie bien qu'il s'agit de trains de marchandises. Dans 94 d'entre eux, soit 42 %, des facteurs humains étaient en cause. Pour ce qui est des 58 % restants, d'autres facteurs pouvaient être en cause.

M. Robert Aubin:

Vous m'ouvrez là une belle porte. Dans le cas de ces incidents qui représentent 42 % de tous les accidents, en quoi les enregistreurs audio et vidéo auraient-ils pu contribuer à prévenir ce qui constitue le problème le plus important, me semble-t-il, dans le cas des accidents liés à l'erreur humaine, c'est-à-dire la fatigue des conducteurs?

À cet égard, l'enregistreur numérique peut-il changer quoi que ce soit? Le projet de loi C-49 pêche-t-il par manque de clarté? En effet, il n'y a pas de mesure pour prévenir la fatigue des conducteurs et, malheureusement, on ne saura seulement qu'après qu'on ne pouvait rien faire.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Voici ce que je peux vous dire sur les accidents impliquant des facteurs humains. Le Bureau en a identifié environ 20 % où il y avait un facteur de fatigue. C'est pourquoi, en octobre 2016, nous avons inscrit la fatigue sur notre dernière liste de surveillance pour les équipages de trains de marchandises.

Cela étant dit, qu'il y ait un accident ou pas, bien souvent, on peut voir sur la vidéo ou entendre dans l'enregistrement audio ce que les membres de l'équipage faisaient plus tôt et s'ils avaient envoyé des signaux, s'ils parlaient et s'ils étaient conscients des signaux qui leur parvenaient. Ces informations permettent au BST de faire part des lacunes sur le plan de la sécurité. Si les compagnies ont accès à ces informations, elles peuvent prendre des mesures relatives à la formation et adopter de meilleures procédures, qui n'auraient peut-être pas empêché l'accident qui vient de se produire, mais qui préviendront d'autres accidents.

M. Robert Aubin:

Dans les rapports qui ont été faits sur des accidents passés, le BST a-t-il spécifiquement recommandé au gouvernement un certain nombre de mesures qui permettraient de diminuer le facteur de la fatigue, qui est probablement à l'origine des principales erreurs humaines?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

La fatigue en fait partie, c'est certain. Comme je l'ai dit, nous avons inscrit cela sur notre liste de surveillance. Nous n'avons pas émis de recommandation spécifique à cet égard, mais nous avons souligné que c'était un problème pour les équipages des trains de marchandises.

Des règlements exigent déjà des compagnies ferroviaires d'avoir des programmes de gestion de la fatigue, mais cela ne tient pas toujours compte de la science de la fatigue. Parfois, c'est sujet à des négociations entre les syndicats et l'employeur.

Toutefois, beaucoup d'autres choses peuvent causer un accident. Par exemple, cela peut arriver à la suite d'un signal mal interprété, comme ce fut peut-être le cas à Burlington. Nous avons alors fait des recommandations relatives, entre autres, à des systèmes automatisés pour arrêter les trains si l'équipage ne répondait pas correctement à un signal.

M. Robert Aubin:

Voyez-vous ces mesures automatiques dans le projet de loi C-49 ou vous ne les voyez pas?

En cette ère où les moyens de transport sont de plus en plus intelligents — nos voitures sont capables de reconnaître un potentiel d'accident —, plutôt que d'avoir un enregistreur, ne serait-il pas plus important d'adopter des mesures ou d'avoir des moyens technologiques sur les locomotives qui permettent d'intervenir et pas seulement de constater, par la suite, où était l'erreur?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Avant de pouvoir régler et résoudre un problème, il faut savoir qu'il y en a un. Les enregistreurs vont permettre au BST, aux compagnies ferroviaires et à Transports Canada de déceler des problèmes qui nécessitent peut-être d'autres solutions, auxquelles on n'a pas encore pensé parce qu'on n'est pas conscient des problèmes existants.

M. Robert Aubin:

Vous avez cité fréquemment le transport de marchandises.

Pour le BST, les mesures à mettre en oeuvre pour assurer une plus grande sécurité sont-elles les mêmes lorsqu'il est question de matières ordinaires et lorsqu'il est question de matières dangereuses? Les mesures de sécurité à mettre en place pour le transport de l'huile de canola sont-elles différentes des mesures à adopter pour le transport de produits inflammables, par exemple?

(1415)

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Il est clair que d'autres mesures doivent être prises quand il s'agit de matières dangereuses, mais la fatigue peut se manifester peu importe ce que transporte le train. Seulement, les conséquences d'un accident peuvent être plus considérables quand il est question de matières dangereuses.

Le BST a émis plusieurs recommandations à la suite de ce qui s'est passé à Lac-Mégantic, et même auparavant, afin d'atténuer les risques associés au transport des matières dangereuses. Transports Canada a aussi adopté beaucoup de mesures depuis ces événements afin de diminuer les risques, mais les systèmes en comportent encore. Nous continuons de suivre cela et d'émettre des recommandations. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Fox.

Je suis désolée, monsieur Aubin.

À vous la parole, monsieur Fraser.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je remercie les témoins d'être venus.

Lorsque je songe à la sécurité en général, je constate qu'il est très difficile, à mon avis, d'opposer tout autre besoin à la sécurité. Si l'on parle de droits, j'ai l'impression que le public penchera toujours pour ce qui est plus sûr, et je trouve donc que c'est une discussion très épineuse. Lorsque nous parlons des événements tragiques comme l'accident de Burlington, il m'est très difficile de vous dire ce que nous devrions faire, hormis qu'il faut faire ce qui est dans les intérêts de la sécurité. Toutefois, afin de mieux asseoir ma position sur des questions semblables, j'aimerais savoir s'il existe des données objectives qui nous permettraient de dire avec confiance que ces mesures amélioreront la sécurité.

Existe-t-il une étude ou des données quantitatives qui montrent que l'utilisation de ces enregistreurs améliorera la sécurité dans l'industrie ferroviaire canadienne?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne sais pas si l'un de mes collègues peut vous citer une étude particulière. Nous utilisons les enregistreurs audio depuis des années dans le secteur de l'aviation et depuis plus de 10 ou 12 années dans le secteur maritime. Sans ces enregistreurs, et je pourrais vous nommer de nombreux accidents, nous n'aurions pas su ce qui était survenu, notamment lorsque les membres de l'équipage n'ont pas survécu ou ils ont survécu, mais il y a des divergences dans leurs témoignages ou leur mémoire leur fait défaut. Par conséquent, nous avons pris certaines mesures et modifié des procédures, nous offrons plus de formation, nous avons adopté des technologies, et la sécurité du système a été renforcée.

Le fait d'être enregistré exerce également une influence sur le comportement des gens. S'il y avait un problème, par exemple, quant à l'utilisation des appareils électroniques par les gens aux commandes, ces gens-là seraient peut-être moins portés à le faire s'ils savaient qu'ils se faisaient enregistrer. C'est très important, et comme je l'ai dit en français, nous ne pouvons pas régler les problèmes et nous ne pouvons pas repérer les lacunes en matière de sécurité si nous ne sommes pas en mesure de les identifier. Nous ne connaissons pas toujours la nature du problème à moins de disposer d'une vue d'ensemble de l'accident à partir d'enregistrements audio, vidéo et, s'ils existent, d'enregistrements numériques, accompagnés de tout témoignage que nous avons pu recueillir.

M. Sean Fraser:

Vous avez répondu à une question précédente en indiquant que dans le cas des enregistrements audio à bord des trains, il n'existe pas de normes internationales. Les efforts ont lieu à l'échelle nationale. Y a-t-il d'autres pays qui ont installé des enregistreurs audio et vidéo et qui ont vu le nombre d'incidents baisser?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Si nous examinons les statistiques ici au Canada dans les secteurs de l'aviation et du transport maritime, il y a eu une baisse du taux d'accidents dans l'ensemble.

Monsieur Clitsome, je vais vous mettre sur la sellette et vous demander s'il existe de telles études sur le secteur de l'avion des autres pays.

M. Mark Clitsome (conseiller spécial, Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports):

À ma connaissance, il n'y a pas d'études semblables, mais il est clair que les accidents sont à la baisse et que c'est en grande partie attribuable à l'utilisation des technologies et des enregistreurs installés à bord des appareils.

M. Sean Fraser:

Il me semble que si la tendance est baissière et que le transport devient plus sûr, ces enregistreurs y ont joué un rôle, mais nous ne connaissons pas exactement l'étendue de ce rôle.

Madame Fox, pour revenir à vos commentaires sur le fait de se faire enregistrer et de modifier son comportement en conséquence, vous avez fourni un exemple pertinent de la personne qui regarde son téléphone lorsqu'elle devrait peut-être regarder les signaux. C'est clair que c'est un comportement dangereux. Est-ce possible que le fait de se faire enregistrer pourrait modifier de façon négative la façon dont une personne fait son travail? Je sais que dans ma carrière précédente, si je sortais le midi et je rencontrais des amis pour prendre une bière, je trouvais peut-être de l'inspiration que je mettais ensuite en pratique, mais j'enfreignais également la politique du bureau.

Y a-t-il des inquiétudes quant à la possibilité qu'une personne qui, dans des circonstances normales, s'acquitte tout à fait correctement de ses tâches, modifie son comportement ou encore se trouve dans des circonstances qui l'empêcheraient de faire son travail en toute sécurité?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne suis pas au courant d'une éventuelle conséquence négative, et nous n'avons certainement pas observé ce phénomène dans le secteur de l'aviation, car les enregistrements audio se font depuis de nombreuses années. Je crois qu'après un bout de temps, les gens s'habituent à se faire enregistrer. Avec le temps, ils ne s'en rendent plus compte.

(1420)

M. Sean Fraser:

J'aimerais bien le savoir. Vous avez dit que dans certaines circonstances, le BST pourrait utiliser les données et les enregistrements afin d'intenter des poursuites contre une compagnie si l'on constate un comportement habituel non sécuritaire. Existe-t-il un mécanisme qui empêchera cette compagnie d'identifier les personnes afin d'éliminer la crainte de représailles?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Sachez tout d'abord que le Bureau a pour unique mandat d'améliorer la sécurité dans les transports, menant des enquêtes à la suite d'événements, d'accidents et d'incidents. Nous n'avons pas de pouvoir de réglementation ou d'application de la loi. Ces derniers relèvent de l'organisme de réglementation concerné, c'est-à-dire Transports Canada dans le cas présent. Les dispositions de la loi indiquent qu'à moins que la sécurité ne soit menacée, les enregistrements ne pourraient pas être utilisés contre un employé en raison d'un acte donné, à moins que le matériel d'enregistrement n'ait été trafiqué.

Cependant, l'organisme de réglementation pourrait les utiliser pour prendre des mesures d'application de la loi contre l'exploitant, mais pas contre l'employé.

M. Sean Fraser:

Pouvez-vous m'expliquer comment cela fonctionne? Je ne suis pas expert de la sécurité ferroviaire, loin de là, même si le Comité a étudié la question. J'aime l'idée que nous tentions de faire de la prévention au lieu de simplement réagir aux événements. La vérification aléatoire par les exploitants constitue-t-elle le seul véritable mécanisme de prévention permettant de déterminer si nous faisons ce qu'il faut?

Pouvez-vous m'expliquer le processus et comment il permettra d'empêcher d'autres accidents de survenir?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Si on examine l'utilisation que font les compagnies ferroviaires des données, le projet de loi C-49 autorise ces dernières à utiliser le mécanisme dans deux cas précis, notamment pour faire enquête sur un incident ou un accident au sujet duquel le BST n'effectue pas d'enquête.

Elles peuvent également recueillir des renseignements de façon aléatoire dans le cadre de leur système de gestion de la sécurité pour vérifier comment leurs équipages conduisent le train. Au cours de cette période, elles peuvent déceler des lacunes de procédure auxquelles elles peuvent s'attaquer dans le cadre d'une approche systémique visant à réduire le risque.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup de cette réponse rapide.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je pense d'abord que si la population canadienne en savait un peu plus sur votre bureau, le travail qu'il accomplit et la manière dont il l'aborde, elle éprouverait une grande confiance à l'égard de la sécurité du réseau. Au cours de nos dernières séances, j'ai certainement été sensible à votre franchise et à votre clarté.

À cet égard, si on pense à l'industrie du transport aérien, quelle incidence cette mesure aurait-elle sur la manière dont vous accomplissez votre travail, en ce qui concerne particulièrement les recours que vous envisagez d'intenter, si votre évaluation d'une situation donnée relevait des lacunes?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Notre mandat consiste à mener des enquêtes pour découvrir ce qu'il s'est passé et pourquoi cela s'est produit, et non à jeter le blâme sur quelqu'un ou à imputer une responsabilité criminelle ou civile. Voilà qui confère une grande liberté à nos interactions, car les gens sont libres de nous dire ce qu'il s'est passé, sachant que nous ne pouvons pas utiliser leurs déclarations contre eux aux fins d'application de la loi ou pour leur faire porter une responsabilité criminelle ou civile. Je pense que le fait que les déclarations ne peuvent être utilisées contre les gens est beaucoup plus avantageux, car nous pouvons ainsi déterminer ce qui cloche et ce qu'il faut faire pour prévenir d'autres incidents.

Cela étant dit, si nous décelons quelque chose comme l'utilisation inappropriée d'appareils électroniques ou d'autres problèmes, nous ne nous empêchons pas de le signaler, car quelqu'un d'autre pourrait attribuer le blâme.

M. Ken Hardie:

Est-ce à cela que vous faisiez référence, du moins dans la dernière partie de votre réponse, quand vous avez parlé de la confidentialité? Si quelqu'un vous révèle en détail ce qu'il s'est passé, cette personne peut le faire sans crainte de représailles, puisque l'information est confidentielle?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

En vertu de notre loi, les enregistrements effectués à bord des locomotives sont confidentiels. Les enregistrements audio et vidéo sont confidentiels et ne peuvent être communiqués, sauf dans certaines situations très précises prévues dans notre loi. Habituellement, un tribunal doit exiger leur divulgation, et même ainsi, ils font l'objet d'une entente de confidentialité.

Les déclarations des témoins sont également confidentielles.

M. Ken Hardie:

Compte tenu des préoccupations qui ont déjà été soulevées à propos de l'accès raisonnable aux données recueillies par les enregistreurs audio et vidéo, notamment au sujet de la protection de la vie privée et de l'utilisation abusive potentielle des renseignements, ne serait-il pas simplement mieux que les données appartiennent à votre bureau dès leur création?

(1425)

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Les mouvements se comptent par centaines de milliers, par millions si l'on tient compte de tous les modes de transport, soit les modes aérien, ferroviaire et maritime. Nous n'enquêtons que dans un nombre minime de cas. Nous recevons quelque 3 500 signalements par année, et nous menons environ 60 enquêtes exhaustives à la fin desquelles nous publions un rapport, même si nous montons un dossier sur tous les autres signalements. Les exploitants sont, au bout du compte, responsables de la sécurité de leurs activités et, bien entendu, l'organisme de réglementation est là pour veiller à ce qu'ils s'exécutent.

Dans tous les cas où nous n'avons pas de raison d'enquêter, il serait plus bénéfique aux exploitants qu'à nous d'avoir les données pour pouvoir déceler les lacunes au chapitre de la formation, des procédures et du besoin de supervision accrue.

M. Ken Hardie:

Ce qu'il se passe après un écrasement ou un accident est une chose. À l'évidence, l'accès aux données est essentiel, mais avant que quelque chose n'arrive, vaudrait-il la peine de faire enquête sur une multiplication d'infractions, par exemple? Dans le domaine ferroviaire, quelles règles sont les plus souvent enfreintes? Quand ces règles sont violées, qu'est-ce que vous voudriez le plus découvrir?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Tout d'abord, ce n'est pas que sur des accidents que nous faisons enquête; nous nous intéressons également aux incidents qui, si on n'y porte pas attention, pourraient entraîner des accidents. Nous réalisons donc aussi des enquêtes sur des incidents, même s'il n'y a pas de blessure ou de dommage comme tel.

Dans l'industrie ferroviaire, les exploitants ont mis au point de nombreuses technologies pour surveiller la condition des rails et du train, ce qui a eu pour effet de réduire considérablement les accidents. Ce qui manque, c'est la surveillance du facteur humain.

Pourquoi un équipage n'a-t-elle pas vu un signal d'arrêt ou n'y a pas réagi? Pourquoi les employés ne se sont-ils pas avisés mutuellement de la présence de signaux? Pourquoi filaient-ils trop vite dans une zone où ils étaient censés circuler lentement? Ce sont là les facteurs que nous devons examiner dans le cadre de nos enquêtes pour déceler les lacunes. Nous considérons qu'avec ces renseignements, les compagnies ferroviaires, soumises aux balises que nous avons énumérées, seront capables de prendre des mesures avant qu'un accident ne survienne afin de réduire le risque d'accident.

M. Ken Hardie:

Savez-vous, par exemple, si un signal a été manqué ou si un train a dépassé une limite de vitesse dans une zone donnée? S'agit-il de renseignements que vous recueilleriez et consigneriez afin d'avoir l'occasion d'examiner les données pour déterminer ce qu'il se passe?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Quand un signal est manqué ou que le mouvement dépasse ce qui s'appelle les « limites d'autorisation », il faut le signaler en vertu de notre loi. Nous n'effectuons pas toujours des enquêtes complètes donnant lieu à un rapport exhaustif. Tout dépend de la situation; nous avons cependant dû faire enquête sur un grand nombre de signalements, ce qui nous a incités à recommander l'ajout d'enregistreurs vidéo aux enregistreurs audio que nous avions recommandés plusieurs années auparavant, ainsi qu'une forme quelconque de contrôle automatisé permettant d'arrêter ou de ralentir un train si l'équipage ne réagit pas adéquatement à un signal.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup. Le temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Shields.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins de comparaître aujourd'hui.

Poursuivons un peu sur le même sujet. Les ingénieurs sont, de toute évidence, réticents à l'égard de ces mesures. Je sais que vous avez établi quatre manières dont vous pourriez utiliser les données et indiqué l'orientation que vous pourriez adopter. Les ingénieurs ont-ils pris part à ce processus?

M. Kirby Jang:

Ils n'ont pas participé à l'étude sur la sécurité proprement dite, mais selon les indications fournies aux compagnies ferroviaires qui ont pris part à l'étude, certaines directives devaient être respectées, notamment le fait d'aviser les cheminots qu'ils étaient surveillés à l'aide d'enregistreurs installés à bord de la locomotive.

M. Martin Shields:

Vous dites qu'ils devaient être avisés... J'ai examiné la question dans l'industrie de l'application de la loi, et c'est cette dernière qui a proposé ces mesures pour sa propre protection. Nous lui avons dit de faire attention à ce qu'elle demandait. Je me demande pourquoi vous ne faites pas participer l'industrie si vous envisagez de prendre ces mesures.

M. Jean Laporte:

Si je peux ajouter quelque chose à la réponse de M. Jang, les syndicats ont été invités à participer à l'étude et ont choisi de ne pas prendre part à tous les volets. Ils ont assisté à quelques réunions et séances d'information. Ils n'ont pas participé à tous les volets de l'étude, mais ils ont été invités d'entrée de jeu.

M. Martin Shields:

D'accord, cela répond à cette question.

Pourriez-vous également donner des exemples de renseignements que vous communiqueriez, comme vous l'avez indiqué? Je sais que vous avez parlé de certains renseignements que vous communiqueriez, mais pourriez-vous m'indiquer quels sont ceux que vous communiquiez aux compagnies ferroviaires sans que les ingénieurs y trouvent à redire?

(1430)

M. Kirby Jang:

Pardonnez-moi, pourriez-vous répéter la question? Il s'agit de la communication de renseignements qui...

M. Martin Shields:

Oui.

Nous parlons des aspects de la sécurité qui nous intéressent tous. Quels sont les exemples de renseignements que vous communiqueriez aux compagnies ferroviaires et que les ingénieurs approuveraient?

M. Kirby Jang:

Dans le cadre de l'étude sur la sécurité, nous nous sommes penchés sur les avantages en matière de sécurité, cherchant à trouver des choses disponibles et utilisables immédiatement. Chose certaine, comme Kathleen l'a fait remarquer, sur le plan des instructions imprécises ou des domaines où des améliorations peuvent être faites, on pourrait améliorer l'ergonomie ou prendre des mesures qui contribueraient à améliorer la gestion des ressources. Voilà certaines des mesures trouvées au cours de l'étude et considérées comme des leçons ou des pratiques exemplaires.

Pour peut-être ajouter un peu de contexte quant à la manière dont les avantages en matière de sécurité ont été déterminés, nous avons procédé à des examens très précis de ce que j'appellerai des scénarios d'intérêt, lesquels incluent les activités normales et inhabituelles, ainsi que divers facteurs, comme la durée de la journée ou la longueur du quart de travail. Nous voulions examiner certains types de comportements humains pouvant être repérés et consignés par l'enregistreur de bord, comme le stress, la charge de travail, la fatigue, l'inattention et les distractions. Une bonne partie de ces facteurs ont été consignés et prouvés dans le cadre de l'étude en matière de sécurité afin de démontrer les avantages des enregistreurs.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci.

Effectue-t-on la collecte de renseignements au sein des industries du transport aérien et maritime?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Non, car en vertu de la Loi sur le Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports actuelle, un obstacle législatif interdit la communication ou l'utilisation des données ou leur accès par qui que ce soit d'autre que le Bureau de la sécurité des transports à la suite d'un accident, à moins, comme nous l'avons souligné, qu'un tribunal puisse ordonner la communication d'un enregistrement en vertu de certains principes.

Les modifications à la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire exigent des modifications corrélatives à la Loi sur le Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports pour autoriser la communication de renseignements enregistrés à Transports Canada et aux compagnies ferroviaires.

Pour que les entreprises de transport aérien ou maritime puissent le faire, il faudrait modifier la Loi sur l'aéronautique et la Loi sur la marine marchande du Canada. Jusqu'à ce que ces modifications entrent en vigueur, si elles le font jamais, cette communication ne sera possible que dans l'industrie ferroviaire.

M. Martin Shields:

En ce qui concerne ce que vous tentez d'accomplir, c'est-à-dire améliorer la sécurité — un aspect auquel nous nous intéressons tous —, le fait est que les fabricants de voitures et les indépendants effectuent beaucoup d'essais de collision pour assurer la sécurité, ce qui est difficile à faire avec de gros trains. Le défi, c'est que vous examinez souvent les répercussions des accidents. Vous devez étudier la question sous l'angle opposé. Tentez-vous ici d'examiner la question de la manière contraire afin de faciliter les choses?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Conformément à notre mandat, nous écouterons les enregistrements dans le cadre d'une enquête du BST après qu'un événement à signaler se soit produit. L'utilisation de ces données s'inscrit dans une approche de réaction. Nous voudrions que les compagnies ferroviaires puissent accéder à ces renseignements de manière proactive dans le cadre d'une stratégie de gestion de la sécurité ferroviaire non punitive ou pour enquêter sur des accidents au sujet desquels nous ne menons pas d'enquête, tant que des balises sont là pour assurer la confidentialité des données afin qu'elles ne soient pas rendues publiques et qu'elles ne servent pas à prendre des mesures disciplinaires contre des employés précis, à moins qu'ils ne posent une menace pour la sécurité.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Juste pour poursuivre dans la même veine, essentiellement, ces mesures ne vous permettront pas seulement de réagir aux divers incidents qui surviennent; les compagnies auront, de toute évidence, les renseignements nécessaires à l'analyse et à l'établissement de la sécurité, comme vous l'indiquez dans votre document. De plus, Transports Canada pourra recueillir des renseignements aux fins d'élaboration de politiques. Cela fera-t-il maintenant partie de votre mandat?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Non, notre mandat ne change pas.

Notre mandat continuera de consister à mener des enquêtes sur les événements survenant dans les modes de transport aérien, ferroviaire et maritime, ainsi que dans les pipelines relevant du gouvernement fédéral afin de déceler les facteurs les ayant causés ou y ayant contribué. Notre mandat ne changera pas. Ce qui changera dans l'avenir avec la mise en oeuvre des règlements, c'est que nous devrons nous pencher sur nos processus internes afin de déterminer comment nous menons nos activités et échangeons des renseignements avec les diverses parties conformément aux modifications apportées à la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire. Ces modifications permettront à Transports Canada de recueillir des renseignements pour élaborer des politiques ou assurer le respect de la loi. Elles permettront en outre aux compagnies ferroviaires de recueillir des renseignements de façon aléatoire et de faire enquête sur des incidents et des accidents au sujet desquels nous n'effectuons pas d'enquête afin d'améliorer leur système de manière non disciplinaire.

(1435)

M. Vance Badawey:

Toujours sur le même thème, pour ce qui est d'être proactif, considérez-vous que non seulement vous examinez les processus comme celui-ci et utilisez les ressources qui pourraient devenir un mécanisme dans le cadre de vos activités quotidiennes, mais que vous tentez aussi d'être proactif dans les domaines aérien, maritime et routier, et essayez d'examiner diverses situations avant qu'elles ne surviennent afin de détecter des déficiences dans les infrastructures?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Oui, et je peux vous donner un exemple concret. Nous ne nous intéressons pas au transport de surface ou aux routes proprement dites, mais nous portons certainement attention aux domaines aérien, ferroviaire et maritime.

Je peux vous donner un exemple concret immédiatement. Il s'est produit, à l'aéroport de Toronto, un certain nombre d'incidents présentant un risque potentiel de collision avec un aéronef. Aucune collision n'est survenue, heureusement, mais nous effectuons une étude proactive de toutes les circonstances pouvant mener à de tels événements. Nous n'attendons pas qu'un accident se produise.

M. Vance Badawey:

À cet égard, en quoi consiste le processus lorsque l'on détecte une infrastructure déficiente qui pourrait poser un problème au chapitre de la sécurité?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Au cours de nos enquêtes, nous examinons tout. S'il s'agit d'un déraillement de train, nous nous pencherons sur l'état des rails, les activités et les procédures d'entretien, la condition du train, les activités et la formation de l'équipage, les procédures et les règles qu'elle suivait, ainsi que la fatigue. Nous nous intéressons à tout. Nous rétrécissons ensuite la portée de l'enquête aux circonstances et aux conditions qui pourraient avoir causé l'accident, y avoir contribué ou avoir créé un risque qu'il se produise. Si nous décelons une lacune sur le plan de la sécurité qui n'est pas couverte par les règlements ou les règles actuels ou par les mesures prises par l'entreprise ferroviaire, alors nous recommanderons d'autres démarches.

M. Vance Badawey:

En fait, les gardiens de l'actif seraient responsables des lacunes au chapitre de la gestion, du rendement ou de l'investissement si une déficience est détectée et/ou si un incident survient.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je préférerais ne pas employer le mot « responsable », car il n'est pas de notre mandat d'attribuer la responsabilité, mais je dirais certainement qu'il y a des comptes à rendre. Nous signalerons toutes les lacunes que nous détectons au cours de notre enquête, que ce soit au chapitre des infrastructures, des procédures, de la formation ou du personnel.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je laisserai le temps qu'il me reste à M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Jeudi dernier, j'ai passé plus d'une heure sur le tarmac à Kelowna, attendant le décollage. Le transporteur aérien avait découvert des problèmes avec le train d'atterrissage. À bord de l'appareil se trouvaient des gens qui devaient effectuer des correspondances avec d'autres vols et qu'ils allaient manquer à cause du retard. Comme on envisage un régime de dédommagement et une charte des droits des voyageurs aériens, il me vient à l'idée qu'il pourrait exister un conflit entre les efforts déployés pour transporter des passagers à l'endroit où ils ne réclameraient pas de dédommagement et le temps nécessaire pour tenter de détecter et de résoudre le problème au sol, lequel pourrait simplement s'avérer être une lumière défectueuse.

Vous préoccupez-vous du conflit inhérent que cette charte des droits pourrait engendrer?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Pas vraiment, non. Les compagnies aériennes souhaitent rester en affaires, mais elles veulent aussi conduire leurs passagers à destination en sécurité. Chaque jour, elles prennent des décisions sur des questions d'entretien, et ce, conformément aux règlements de Transports Canada et à leurs propres procédures internes. Je m'attends à ce qu'elles continuent ainsi.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur O'Toole.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente. Je voudrais également remercier tous les témoins de comparaître.

Quand j'étais membre des Forces armées canadiennes à Shearwater, j'ai collaboré avec les employés de votre ministère à la suite de l'écrasement de l'appareil de Swissair, drame qui aura 20 ans en septembre prochain. Nous sommes sensibles au degré de professionnalisme des hommes et des femmes de votre ministère, qui accomplissent un travail important.

J'ai quelques questions à propos des enregistreurs audio et vidéo de locomotive et de leur utilisation. En ce qui concerne leurs utilisations autorisées et non autorisées, il semble que la collecte de renseignements aléatoires sera permise et s'inscrira dans le déploiement de ces appareils. Cependant, comme on l'a assuré aux employés, la surveillance continue ne le sera pas. A-t-on élaboré une procédure de collecte de renseignements aléatoires? Comment la déploiera-t-on?

(1440)

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Sachez d'abord que cette technologie se trouve en grande partie à bord de l'aéronef, du navire ou, dans le cas présent, du train. Ce n'est pas quelque chose qui se prête nécessairement au téléchargement automatique. Les détails de l'affaire seront déterminés dans les règlements, qui indiqueront qui aura accès aux appareils. Ces détails se préciseront à mesure que le ministère élaborera les règlements et consultera l'industrie et d'autres parties prenantes, ainsi que nous-mêmes afin de déterminer comment les processus se dérouleront.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

Selon votre expérience, quand votre ministère et l'industrie en général se sont penchés sur les enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive, vous êtes-vous intéressés aux autres pays qui utilisent cette technologie? Au cours d'une certaine période, lorsqu'ils l'ont implantée, ont-ils observé un changement net ou une diminution évidente du nombre d'incidents?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je demanderai à M. Jang de répondre en ce qui concerne l'étude sur les enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive.

M. Kirby Jang:

Cette étude était en fait un examen de plusieurs études pilotes. Dans chaque cas, chacune des quatre études pilotes en était à ses tout débuts et ne permettait donc pas de déceler des tendances baissières au chapitre des accidents. Cela ne s'inscrivait d'ailleurs pas dans leur portée.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

Il s'agit certainement d'outils utiles pour reconstituer les accidents, en trouver les causes et tout cela. Cela fait partie de votre mandat principal, mais la capacité de ces appareils de réduire à eux seuls le nombre d'accidents reste incertaine. Est-ce juste ou est-ce qu'on a examiné la question?

M. Kirby Jang:

Des indications montraient clairement que le fait de disposer d'enregistrements permettait de mieux comprendre les actions, les décisions et les interactions ayant précédé un scénario d'intérêt donné. Ici encore, dans notre analyse, nous avons étudié 37 situations. Il ne s'agissait pas d'accidents ou d'incidents précis, mais de scénarios que nous avions établis. Dans chaque cas, nous avons pu déceler quelque chose qui nous a permis de mieux comprendre ce qui se passait au cours de ce court laps de temps.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

D'après votre expérience, lorsque des accidents et des incidents ferroviaires se produisent, votre ministère est chargé de mener une enquête. Quels sont les trois principaux facteurs ou causes à l'origine d'accidents? Sur la Colline du Parlement, nous entendons, à titre de parlementaires, beaucoup parler de la fatigue, de la formation et d'un éventail de problèmes.

Connaissez-vous les trois principales causes d'incidents?

M. Kirby Jang:

Comme nous l'avons souligné précédemment, notre analyse porte essentiellement sur trois éléments: les infrastructures, la mécanique et les activités, ou les facteurs humains.

Dans chaque cas, nous avons noté des diminutions sur les plans des infrastructures et de la mécanique, mais la proportion de facteurs humains va en s'accroissant. Le suivi que nous avons mené à cet égard s'est en grande partie traduit par des recommandations, et certaines d'entre elles ont été mises en lumière en ce qui concerne les problèmes figurant sur la liste de surveillance.

Pour ce qui est des problèmes de sécurité générale qui sont les plus prioritaires dans l'industrie ferroviaire, je vous dirigerais peut-être vers notre liste de surveillance. Parmi ceux qui me viennent immédiatement à l'esprit figure certainement la fatigue, qui a été ajoutée à la liste, et les enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive nous aident assurément à mieux comprendre certaines des interactions et des causes à l'origine d'accidents.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Permettez-moi d'ajouter quelque chose. Nous nous sommes évertués à détecter les choses qui clochent ou les erreurs commises dans le poste de pilotage de la locomotive, mais nous avons également cherché à trouver un moyen d'établir des pratiques exemplaires et de les communiquer aux ingénieurs et aux conducteurs de locomotive afin de savoir pourquoi des gens prennent certaines mesures pour éviter de manquer un signal ou pour améliorer la communication au sein de l'équipage. Si ces pratiques exemplaires peuvent être transmises au cours de la formation initiale ou à un autre moment, cela aidera l'ensemble du système.

(1445)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous accordons maintenant la parole à M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie encore une fois, madame la présidente.

Quand on fait l'étude d'un projet de loi aussi exhaustif que le projet de loi C-49, il est possible d'apporter des amendements à son contenu. Il est aussi possible de dire ce qui en est absent et de parler des amendements qui devraient y être.

Je comprends bien votre position sur les enregistreurs audio et vidéo. Cependant, l'an dernier dans une étude sur la sécurité aérienne, on a observé que bon nombre de recommandations émises par le BST demeuraient sans réponse.

Dans le cas du transport ferroviaire, ou de tout autre mode de transport puisque le projet de loi C-49 ratisse large, existe-t-il deux ou trois éléments prioritaires — mis à part les enregistreurs audio et vidéo — que vous aimeriez nous signaler en disant que cela devrait faire partie d'un projet de loi aussi important que le projet de loi C-49?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je vous rappelle notre liste de surveillance. Ainsi, en ce qui a trait au domaine ferroviaire, nous avons parlé du transport de liquides inflammables et il y a encore d'autres gestes à poser. Bien que Transports Canada ait entrepris de mettre en oeuvre plusieurs mesures depuis 2013, il reste des mesures qu'on pourrait adopter pour réduire les risques associés au transport des matières dangereuses.

D'ailleurs, nous venons d'émettre deux autres recommandations à la suite de deux accidents survenus dans le Nord de l'Ontario. Transports Canada étudie tous les facteurs qui affectent la gravité d'un déraillement. Il étudie aussi toutes les conditions relatives aux rails qui pourraient affecter leur structure. Nous avons donc soumis plusieurs recommandations à cet égard qui permettraient de réduire ces risques.

Il y a aussi la question de la fatigue. Nous avons identifié un problème relatif à la fatigue au sein des équipages qui conduisent des trains de marchandises. En effet, l'horaire de ceux-ci est moins précis que celui de ceux qui transportent des passagers. Nous croyons que Transports Canada pourrait en faire davantage avec l'industrie et se baser sur les données scientifiques et apporter des changements à l'horaire des employés de façon à réduire le niveau de fatigue.

Par ailleurs, il y a eu plusieurs incidents et accidents parce que des équipages ont mal interprété certains signaux. Nous espérons que les enregistreurs nous donneront une meilleure idée à cet égard. Cependant, des systèmes technologiques pourraient être utilisés afin de ralentir ou arrêter un train avant que ne se produise une collision ou un déraillement.

M. Robert Aubin:

À la lumière des exemples que vous me donnez et qui sont tout à fait pertinents, y aurait-il lieu, dans le cadre de la révision d'une loi comme on le fait présentement, de prévoir ou de revoir le modus operandi entre le moment où le BST émet une recommandation et celui où le gouvernement passe à l'action? J'ai l'impression que la lenteur du gouvernement à réagir à certaines recommandations est aussi un facteur de risque important.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

En octobre 2016, le BST, en mettant à jour sa liste de surveillance, a parlé, pour la première fois, de la lenteur de Transports Canada à mettre en oeuvre certaines de ses recommandations. À l'époque, 52 recommandations dataient de plus de 10 ans et environ 36 d'entre elles dataient de plus de 20 ans. Cette liste comprend certaines recommandations se rapportant au domaine ferroviaire, mais la majorité se rapporte à l'aviation.

En effet, nous aimerions que des mesures soient prises, non seulement par le ministère, mais aussi par le gouvernement, et qu'on mette en oeuvre plus rapidement les recommandations relatives à la sécurité.

M. Robert Aubin:

Me reste-t-il du temps, madame la présidente? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin, je vous ai laissé poursuivre parce que je pensais que l'information était vraiment précieuse et que vos questions étaient fort pertinentes.

Madame Block, vous disposez de six minutes.

Mme Kelly Block:

D'accord.

Je veux revenir aux questions que mon collègue a posées au sujet des utilisations autorisées et la protection des travailleurs, et donner suite à la dernière réponse que vous lui avez donnée, dans laquelle vous avez précisé quels renseignements seront recueillis lorsque vous faites enquête sur des incidents ou des accidents, mais aussi indiqué qu'ils pourraient servir à établir des pratiques exemplaires.

Je ferai simplement remarquer que je serai fort intéressée de voir comment vous concilierez la collecte de renseignements aléatoires par les compagnies avec le fait qu'elles n'effectueront pas de surveillance continue pour protéger les travailleurs. J'ignore comment vous établirez des pratiques exemplaires et ce genre de choses sans effectuer de surveillance continue. Je suis impatiente de voir comment cela se répercutera dans les règlements.

Je veux assurer le suivi quant au fait que vous avez parlé de la liste de surveillance. Vous avez indiqué que c'est quelque chose qui figure dans votre liste de surveillance depuis de nombreuses années. Cette liste contient-elle autre chose qui aurait peut-être dû être inclus dans le projet de loi C-49 ou que vous auriez souhaité y voir intégrer?

(1450)

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Nous sommes enchantés que le ministre des Transports ait décidé d'imposer l'installation d'enregistreurs audio et vidéo sans attendre l'examen de la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire. Bien entendu, cela entraînera des modifications corrélatives à notre loi; nous sommes donc satisfaits de cette décision.

Nous voudrions certainement que l'on s'attaque à d'autres problèmes, mais un grand nombre d'entre eux n'exigent pas nécessairement de modifications législatives. Ils pourraient requérir des exigences obligatoires de nouvel équipement ou la prise de règlements. Nous sommes ravis que le gouvernement ait décidé d'imposer des enregistreurs audio et vidéo de locomotive. Nous considérons qu'il convient à ce moment-ci d'envisager l'élargissement de l'utilisation de ces renseignements aux compagnies et à Transports Canada.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je crois comprendre que les règlements canadiens exigent que les enregistreurs audio installés dans le poste de pilotage ne conservent que les renseignements des deux dernières heures de vol. Envisage-t-on, dans ce projet de loi, de faire de même pour les enregistreurs audio et vidéo de locomotive?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je voudrais préciser que le règlement actuel exige que les enregistrements effectués dans le poste de pilotage ne soient conservés que pour 30 minutes. Le BST, à la suite d'accidents, a recommandé qu'ils le soient au moins deux heures, conformément à la norme internationale.

En ce qui concerne les enregistrements des enregistreurs audio et vidéo de locomotive, la durée sera déterminée dans le règlement. Nous préférerions qu'elle soit plus longue, car le facteur à l'origine d'un événement se manifeste souvent bien avant deux heures précédant l'accident, mais ces détails seront précisés dans le règlement.

Mme Kelly Block:

J'ai une dernière question. À titre de propriétaire et d'exploitant d'un enregistreur audio et vidéo de locomotive, une compagnie ferroviaire aurait-elle le devoir de prendre des mesures disciplinaires à l'égard des employés si elle détecte un comportement peu sécuritaire au cours de la surveillance effectuée dans le cadre du système de gestion de la sécurité ferroviaire? C'est peut-être à cet égard que la question de responsabilité se pose. S'il sait quelque chose ou voit quelque chose, mais simplement dans le cadre d'activités de surveillance, qu'est-ce que le propriétaire-exploitant serait tenu de faire une fois qu'il a cette information?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Ici encore, certains de ces détails seront précisés dans le règlement.

À l'heure actuelle, selon les dispositions du projet de loi C-49, les renseignements recueillis de façon aléatoire par une compagnie ferroviaire ou à la suite d'une enquête sur un incident ou un accident ne peuvent être utilisés à des fins disciplinaires, pour des questions de compétences ou pour des procédures judiciaires, à moins que l'équipement ait été trafiqué ou que l'on ait déterminé que la sécurité était menacée au cours de la collecte.

Ce qui constitue une menace à la sécurité reste à déterminer dans les règlements. Voilà pourquoi nous faisons valoir que ces règlements et les pouvoirs d'application de la loi doivent être forts pour empêcher ceux qui ont accès aux données de les utiliser de manière inappropriée.

Mme Kelly Block:

Très brièvement, une fois que ces règlements auront été élaborés, en quoi consistera le processus pour formuler des observations à leur sujet? Je pense le savoir, mais je veux simplement que vous éclaircissiez ce point.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je tiens à ce qu'il soit clair que les règlements seront pris en vertu de la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire; il s'agira donc des règlements de Transports Canada et non du BST. Transports Canada dispose d'une politique et d'une pratique bien établies pour effectuer des consultations, s'adresser au Conseil du Trésor, procéder à l'analyse des répercussions économiques, publier les règlements dans la Partie I de la Gazette du Canada, etc. C'est un processus bien établi, mais qui relève de l'autorité de Transports Canada, non de la nôtre.

(1455)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Sean Fraser:

Merci encore, madame la présidente.

Lors de notre dernier échange, vous avez expliqué qu'en certaines circonstances, une compagnie ferroviaire pourrait utiliser les données tirées d'un enregistreur pour, par exemple, déterminer la date de la collecte aléatoire ou pour mener une enquête sur un accident ou un incident n'ayant pas fait l'objet d'une enquête.

Peut-être suis-je légèrement sceptique, mais je peux voir un gestionnaire vindicatif examiner les données, reconnaître l'employé concerné et prendre des mesures. Existe-t-il ou devrait-il exister un mécanisme permettant de sanctionner quelqu'un qui agirait ainsi à l'encontre des règles?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Tout d'abord, permettez-moi de dire qu'il s'agit là d'une des préoccupations que j'ai soulevées au cours de mon exposé. Nous savons que l'Association des chemins de fer du Canada, l'industrie et les compagnies ferroviaires prennent des mesures pour tenter d'améliorer la culture de sécurité dans le secteur. Nous espérons que les règlements comprendront des critères réglementaires très stricts au sujet des situations qui pourraient mener à certains genres d'action. Autrement dit, qu'est-ce qui constitue une menace à la sécurité?

Nous considérons que le simple fait que quelqu'un ne suive pas une procédure ne signifie pas nécessairement qu'elle devrait faire l'objet de mesures disciplinaires. Nous pensons qu'il est plus important de chercher à savoir pourquoi elle n'a pas suivi la procédure. Cette dernière fonctionne-t-elle? La personne a-t-elle suivi une formation à ce sujet? Y a-t-il de la supervision? Voilà les questions systémiques que nous espérons que l'industrie ferroviaire examinera afin de trouver des moyens d'améliorer la situation et de réduire le risque. Nous pensons que le règlement doit indiquer clairement quels sont les critères et conférer de très forts pouvoirs d'application de la loi à Transports Canada pour qu'il puisse imposer des sanctions aux compagnies qui n'accèdent pas aux renseignements et qui ne les utilisent pas conformément à la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire et aux règlements.

M. Sean Fraser:

Toujours dans la même veine, vous avez employé deux expressions, soit « circonstances particulièrement accablantes » et « menace immédiate à la sécurité » pour expliquer quand une personne pourrait faire l'objet de mesures disciplinaires ou potentiellement être retirée du travail.

Je me demande simplement si ce genre de seuil sera déterminé dans les règlements et laissé à son interprétation?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Oui. Je ne devrais pas employer le mot « immédiat » parce qu'il revêt un sens très précis. Il faut qu'une menace à la sécurité soit détectée. Ce sera alors aux règlements de déterminer ce que constitue une menace à la sécurité et comment il faudrait y réagir.

M. Sean Fraser:

Nous avons également entendu quelques comparaisons pertinentes avec les enregistreurs utilisés dans les secteurs du transport aérien et maritime lors de votre témoignage d'aujourd'hui.

Je me demande si l'utilisation d'enregistreurs dans ces secteurs a suscité des plaintes quelconques à propos de la protection de la vie privée.

M. Jean Laporte:

Au cours des 30 années que j'ai passées au Bureau de la sécurité des transports, nous n'avons jamais décelé de tendance ou de domaine de préoccupation notable concernant la violation de la vie personnelle découlant de l'utilisation des enregistrements. Nous avons parfois eu vent de problèmes et nous avons, au besoin, donné suite à chaque affaire, au cas par cas.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je vais revenir à une question complémentaire sur la liste de surveillance qui a été soulevée par l'un de mes collègues, et je crois que le point précis figure sur la liste de surveillance depuis 2012 environ.

Je serais curieux de savoir s'il y a des éléments sur cette liste de surveillance qui pourraient être mieux gérés par l'entremise du projet de loi C-49, ou le libellé du projet de loi répond-il complètement à cet élément, d'après vous?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Le BST appuie le projet de loi dans sa forme actuelle pour corriger la lacune que nous avons relevée, à savoir notre manque de données, et nous croyons qu'il y a de nombreux avantages pour les sociétés ferroviaires et Transports Canada à condition que les mécanismes de protection appropriés soient en place. Nous réglerons en grande partie ce problème. Nous voulons que notre liste de surveillance soit mise en oeuvre.

M. Sean Fraser:

Bien entendu.

Voilà qui met fin à mes questions, madame la présidente.

M. Graham poursuivra les questions s'il me reste du temps.

La présidente:

Il vous reste deux minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais continuer.

Dans les études que vous avez menées jusqu'ici, avez-vous relevé des sociétés ou des exploitants qui contreviennent aux systèmes de gestion de la sécurité dans leurs activités courantes?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Désolée, des sociétés qui contreviennent aux systèmes de gestion de la sécurité...?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Elles ont des SGS, des systèmes de gestion de la sécurité. Y a-t-il des sociétés qui ne respectent pas les systèmes déjà en place?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je répète que notre rôle n'est pas d'assurer la surveillance de la conformité. C'est le rôle de Transports Canada, en tant qu'organisme de réglementation. Il effectue des inspections et des vérifications des sociétés ferroviaires et d'autres entreprises qui évoluent dans d'autres secteurs des transports, qui sont tenues d'avoir les systèmes de gestion de la sécurité. Lorsqu'il détecte un non-respect des règles, il prend les mesures appropriées.

Cependant, lorsque nous effectuons une enquête, nous examinons si la société avait un système de gestion de la sécurité. Était-il nécessaire d'en avoir un? Était-ce efficace pour relever les dangers dans l'incident particulier? Si non, alors pourquoi? Transports Canada était-il au courant? Quelles mesures a-t-il prises?

Un bon exemple de cela est l'enquête qui a été menée à la suite de l'accident de l'hélicoptère d'Ornge dans le Nord de l'Ontario qui remonte à 2013, que nous avons rendue publique il y a de cela un peu plus d'un an. Nous avons examiné ce qui s'est passé, mais pour ce qui est de vérifier la conformité, c'est le rôle de Transports Canada.

(1500)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

Les enregistreurs audio-vidéo sont utilisés dans les locomotives. Je suppose qu'ils sont installés dans les locomotives de tête. Les enregistreurs sont-ils opérationnels dans toutes les locomotives lorsque le moteur est en marche? Est-ce qu'on les retrouverait dans les moteurs du DPU? Seraient-ils à l'extérieur de ces moteurs, sur les systèmes de détection en voie notamment? Dans le cas de dispositifs fixes, voulez-vous opter pour cette avenue, ou seraient-ils seulement installés dans le moteur principal?

J'imagine que ces questions s'adressent à M. Jang.

M. Kirby Jang:

Oui, la recommandation que nous avons formulée est que l'équipement devrait être installé dans la locomotive de tête.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie.

Je reviens à la question des enregistreurs, lesquels font partie de la catégorie des accidents liés à l'erreur humaine. Si on avait de tels enregistreurs, on pourrait savoir que le train a enfreint une certaine règle ou qu'il roulait trop vite par rapport à la norme établie, par exemple. Est-ce que les règles établies, elles, sont revues? Le projet de loi C-49 prévoit-il un mécanisme permettant de suivre l'évolution de la technologie dans le transport ferroviaire ou dans tout autre mode de transport?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Lors d'une enquête à la suite d'un accident, si nous remarquons qu'une règle ne couvre pas une situation donnée ou qu'il n'y a pas de règle, nous pouvons recommander l'ajout ou la révision d'une règle.

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vais donner un exemple précis qui peut nous éclairer.

Après les événements de Lac-Mégantic, on a appris que la structure même des DOT-111 était déficiente. On a alors proposé des DOT-111 amélioré, mais cela a augmenté considérablement la longueur des convois ferroviaires. Est-ce que cela a un impact sur la sécurité ferroviaire? Est-ce mesuré? Est-ce qu'on a modifié la réglementation d'une quelconque façon parce que cela augmentait les risques de catastrophe?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je vais vous donner un exemple concret. En février 2017, nous avons publié notre rapport final sur l'accident de Gladwick, en Ontario. Une question de bris de rail s'est posée. Le train roulait à une vitesse inférieure à la limite de vitesse prescrite par les règles. C'était un train de pétrole brut.

À la suite de l'accident, nous avons recommandé à Transports Canada de faire une étude qui tienne compte de tous les facteurs ayant comme conséquence un déraillement, incluant la vitesse, la longueur, la composition du train ou ce qu'il transporte, par exemple des marchandises mixtes ou du pétrole brut. Nous avons recommandé que Transports Canada révise tous les facteurs qui contribuent à un déraillement, qu'il prenne des mesures pour atténuer ces risques et qu'il modifie les règles en conséquence.

M. Robert Aubin:

Quelle a été la réponse de Transports Canada?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Il a simplement dit qu'il vérifierait s'il y avait des études existantes. Nous attendons la suite.

M. Robert Aubin:

Or il n'a pas donné d'échéance.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Non.

M. Robert Aubin:

Cela revient à ce dont il a été question tantôt, c'est-à-dire que la lenteur du gouvernement fait en sorte qu'on ne prend pas les bonnes décisions. Il y a un bon rapport et de bonnes conclusions, mais aucune mesure pour éviter que cela se reproduise.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Effectivement. Nous espérons que les prochaines réponses que nous recevrons de ce ministère seront plus détaillées en ce qui concerne ce qu'il fera par rapport à cette étude.

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Aubin.

On vous écoute, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bonjour, je suis de retour.

Pour poursuivre dans le même ordre d'idées en ce qui concerne les locomotives de tête — et ce que M. Jang a dit —, parfois un moteur fonctionne avec son capot long vers l'avant ou avec une autre configuration où le moteur principal n'est pas dirigé dans le sens auquel on s'attendrait. Pour revenir à la question que j'ai posée dans la première série d'interventions, vous attendez-vous à ce que les locomotives soient dotées de caméras à l'avant et à l'arrière? La caméra serait-elle toujours opérationnelle, ou serait-elle allumée manuellement, ou dès que l'on met en marche l'inverseur, elle s'allumerait? Qu'en pensez-vous?

(1505)

M. Kirby Jang:

Pour ce qui est de la configuration dans la technologie, le règlement fournira une réponse partielle. En ce qui concerne ce que nous avons évalué pour les configurations dans le cadre de notre étude sur la sécurité, toutes les locomotives étaient dotées d'une caméra orientée vers l'avant et d'une caméra orientée vers l'intérieur. Pour les locomotives, elles étaient toutes orientées vers l'avant.

Pour maximiser l'information disponible, il ne fait aucun doute qu'une locomotive dotée d'une caméra orientée vers l'avant et d'une caméra orientée vers l'intérieur serait l'idéal.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Absolument. Un grand nombre d'opérations n'auront pas une configuration en étoile, et il faudra un moteur de propulsion en mode arrière. C'est parfois nécessaire.

Au début, j'ai parlé d'utiliser les EAVL seulement sur les lignes principales; nous en avons discuté au début. Comment définissez-vous une ligne principale dans ce cas précis? Supposons que vous avez une opération — par exemple, un chemin de fer au Nord-Est des États-Unis qui exploite toute une ligne conformément à la règle 105. C'est très lent, pratiquement une limite dans une zone de triage. Cette société serait-elle tenue d'être munie de ces dispositifs, au Canada, d'après vous? Est-ce une ligne principale dans ce cas-ci?

M. Kirby Jang:

Premièrement, la notion de ligne principale est définie dans le règlement. Pour ce qui est de l'application aux États-Unis, l'intention est certainement d'harmoniser des règles semblables, mais j'imagine que je ne peux pas vraiment parler des applications aux États-Unis.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que les sociétés qui exercent leurs activités sans système de régulation, ce qui est possible lorsqu'on ne dépasse jamais la vitesse fixée dans les zones de triage, sont techniquement quand même une ligne principale qui ont besoin d'avoir des EAVL? Je m'interroge à ce sujet car je pense que nous avons sabordé cette question.

Il y a aussi le point suivant. Avez-vous des exemples précis où des EAVL ont facilité la tenue d'une enquête? Je pense que l'un des exemples les mieux connus est l'enquête sur Kismet en 2006 lorsque deux trains de BNSF sont entrés en collision. C'est une vidéo spectaculaire, mais l'enregistrement a-t-il été important dans le cadre de l'enquête ou est-ce seulement une vidéo spectaculaire?

M. Kirby Jang:

Pour ce qui est des enquêtes où nous avons eu accès aux EAVL, il y a en eu très peu. Mais dans le cadre de nos enquêtes, et certainement dans les enquêtes récentes, nous avons relevé des enquêtes passées où il aurait été utile de les avoir. Dans un rapport d'enquête rendu public récemment, nous avons recensé 14 incidents où l'équipe a peut-être mal compris ou mal appliqué certaines règles, donnant ainsi lieu à une réponse inappropriée à un signal. Nous avons ajouté ces éléments d'information dans cette enquête, et dans ces 14 cas, il aurait été utile d'avoir ces renseignements.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est compris.

Y a-t-il des démarches pour simplifier les signaux? Si l'on examine la table de traduction des signaux à l'heure actuelle, ce qu'ils signifient, on constate que « De vitesse limitée à vitesse normale » a quelque 15 configurations différentes. Des efforts sont-ils déployés pour simplifier ces signaux?

M. Kirby Jang:

Je ne sais pas si un examen précis ou d'autres démarches sont en cours à l'heure actuelle.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Y a-t-il un autre point prioritaire sur votre liste de surveillance que vous n'avez pas vu?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Nous avons parlé des quatre points prioritaires dans le secteur ferroviaire. Il y en a plusieurs dans le secteur aerien, un dans le secteur maritime, puis deux dans le secteur du transport multimodal, et nous en avons évoqué un d'ailleurs. Transports Canada progresse très lentement pour adopter les recommandations du BST. Mais nous sommes ici pour discuter plus particulièrement des dispositions du projet de loi C-49 pour l'EAVL, qui est l'un des 10 éléments qui figurent sur la liste de surveillance.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Les membres du Comité ont-ils d'autres questions? Très bien.

Merci encore une fois à nos témoins. Vous nous avez fourni des renseignements utiles alors que nous terminons l'étude de ce projet de loi.

Nous allons suspendre nos travaux jusqu'à 15 h 30. Puis nous entendrons le témoignage de l'Office des transports du Canada.

(1505)

(1530)

La présidente:

Nous allons reprendre la séance no 67 sur le projet de loi C-49. Nous accueillons parmi nous dans ce segment l'Office des transports du Canada et l'honorable David Emerson.

Je suis ravie de vous revoir, David.

Nous recevons également un représentant d'AGT Food and Ingredients Inc.

Je vais céder la parole au témoin qui veut intervenir en premier.

Monsieur Steiner, allez-y. Merci beaucoup d'être venu cet après-midi.

M. Scott Streiner (président et premier dirigeant, Office des transports du Canada):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci au comité de l'invitation à comparaître aujourd'hui.

L'Office des transports du Canada est le plus ancien organisme de réglementation et tribunal spécialisé indépendant du Canada. Créé en 1904 en tant que Commission des chemins de fer du Canada, il a vu ses responsabilités et ses fonctions évoluer parallèlement à l'évolution du réseau national de transport et à celle de l'économie et de la société canadiennes.

De nos jours, les trois mandats fondamentaux de l'Office des transports du Canada sont les suivants. Le premier est de voir au bon fonctionnement et à l'efficacité du réseau national de transport, notamment en réglant les différends opposant les expéditeurs par rail aux transporteurs, les plaintes relatives au bruit et aux vibrations et les contestations liées aux droits de port et de pilotage.

Notre deuxième mandat consiste à protéger le droit fondamental des personnes ayant un handicap à des services de transport accessibles.

Notre troisième est d'offrir un régime de protection du consommateur aux passagers aériens.

L'un des plus importants projets auxquels nous nous sommes consacrés ces dernières années est l'Initiative de modernisation de la réglementation, ou IMR. Dans le cadre de cette initiative lancée en mai 2016, nous réalisons un examen exhaustif de l'ensemble des règlements que l'Office est chargé d'appliquer afin de nous assurer qu'ils sont conformes aux modèles opérationnels, aux attentes des utilisateurs et aux pratiques exemplaires en vigueur dans le domaine de la réglementation.[Français]

Durant les 10 prochaines minutes, j'aimerais vous parler de l'incidence qu'aura le projet de loi C-49 sur les différents rôles de l'OTC et, s'il est adopté, de la façon dont nous mettrons en oeuvre les éléments dont nous aurons la responsabilité.

J'aimerais souligner que je formule mes commentaires dans l'optique de l'organisme indépendant qui est le principal responsable de l'administration quotidienne de la Loi sur les transports au Canada.

C'est principalement de Transports Canada que le ministre des Transports reçoit ses conseils sur la politique publique, et je me référerai au ministre et à son ministère pour toute question liée à l'objectif des diverses dispositions du projet de loi.[Traduction]

Mes observations porteront principalement sur deux grands volets du projet de loi C-49, soit la protection des passagers aériens et les mécanismes utilisés pour régler les questions liées aux expéditeurs par rail.

Les voyages en avion font partie intégrante de la vie d'aujourd'hui. Même s'ils se déroulent généralement sans incident, lorsqu'il y a un problème, l'expérience peut être frustrante et troublante pour les passagers, en grande partie parce que, comme individus, ils ont très peu de contrôle sur les événements.

En vertu du projet de loi C-49, l'Office des transports du Canada sera tenu de prendre des règlements pour consacrer les droits des passagers aériens dont le vol est retardé ou annulé, dont les bagages sont perdus ou endommagés, qui voyagent avec des enfants ou des instruments de musique, ou en cas de retard de plus de trois heures sur l'aire de trafic. Il s'agit d'un changement considérable.

Selon le régime actuel, les transporteurs aériens sont uniquement tenus d'élaborer et d'honorer un tarif: le document dans lequel ils énoncent leurs conditions de transport. Le rôle de l'Office des transports du Canada consiste à déterminer si un transporteur a correctement appliqué son tarif et si les conditions prévues dans ce tarif sont raisonnables.

Nous estimons qu'il est important que les droits des passagers aériens soient transparents, ce qui signifie que les voyageurs peuvent facilement les trouver; clairs, ce qui suppose qu'ils sont rédigés dans un langage clair et non dans un jargon juridique; équitables, en ce sens qu'ils prévoient une indemnisation et d'autres mesures raisonnables si des problèmes surviennent pendant un vol; et uniformes, ce qui signifie que les voyageurs qui se retrouvent dans les mêmes circonstances devraient avoir droit à la même indemnisation et aux mêmes mesures.

L'automne dernier, nous avons lancé une campagne d'information du public afin de mieux faire connaître aux voyageurs les recours dont ils peuvent se prévaloir par l'entremise de l'OTC en cas de problème relatif au transport aérien qu'ils ne réussissent pas à régler en s'adressant à la compagnie aérienne. Pour que les recours prévus par le Parlement soient efficaces, il faut que les personnes à qui ils s'adressent sachent qu'ils existent. C'est pourquoi nous avons mené ces efforts de sensibilisation.

Les résultats de ces efforts, combinés à l'attention accordée par les médias et le ministère des Transports aux questions de transport aérien, ont été spectaculaires. Entre 2013-2014 et 2015-2016, l'Office recevait généralement environ 70 plaintes liées au transport aérien par mois. Au cours de la dernière année, nous en avons reçu en moyenne plus de 400 par mois. Et au cours de la dernière semaine, nous avons reçu 230 plaintes de voyageurs aériens. Autrement dit, en l'espace d'une semaine, nous avons reçu le tiers des plaintes que nous recevions habituellement dans une année complète.

(1535)



Cette hausse marquée laisse croire que le besoin d'aide a toujours existé et qu'il suffisait de faire connaître aux Canadiens l'aide que l'Office peut leur apporter pour qu'ils commencent à faire appel à ses services en très grand nombre.

Si et lorsque le projet de loi C-49 sera adopté, l'OTC devra agir rapidement pour élaborer les règlements sur la protection des passagers aériens. Nous chercherons à trouver un juste équilibre entre, d'une part, le grand intérêt que les questions liées au transport aérien suscitent au sein de la population et le désir des passagers d'avoir leur mot à dire dans l'élaboration des nouvelles règles et, d'autre part, les attentes selon lesquelles ces règles seront mises en oeuvre le plus rapidement possible. Pour atteindre un tel équilibre, nous tiendrons des consultations ciblées et approfondies échelonnées sur une période de deux ou trois mois auprès des représentants de l'industrie, des associations de défense des droits des consommateurs et des passagers à l'aide d'un site Web créé expressément pour les consultations et des audiences en personne tenues dans différentes régions du pays. Lorsqu'ils seront en vigueur, les nouveaux règlements sur la protection des passagers aériens offriront aux Canadiens qui voyagent par avion une définition claire de leurs droits et des recours qui s'offrent à eux si ces droits ne sont pas respectés. Une telle mesure s'imposait depuis longtemps.[Français]

Permettez-moi maintenant d'aborder un autre élément principal du projet de loi: les changements aux dispositions portant sur les relations entre les compagnies de transport ferroviaire et les expéditeurs.

Faciliter ces relations a toujours été un élément essentiel du mandat de l'Office des transports du Canada, ou OTC. Cela reflète l'importance du réseau national de transport ferroviaire pour la prospérité du Canada et les préoccupations constantes parmi les expéditeurs relativement à ce qu'ils qualifient de pouvoir inégal de négociation entre eux-mêmes et les compagnies de chemin de fer dont ils dépendent pour transporter leurs marchandises.

L'OTC a fait valoir que, malgré ces préoccupations, les expéditeurs n'utilisent que de façon relativement restreinte les recours que leur procure la loi. Si cela se justifie par des négociations commerciales de bonne foi qui donnent lieu à des accords satisfaisants, c'est là une excellente nouvelle. Par contre, si c'est plutôt attribuable au fait que les coûts et les efforts engendrés pour avoir accès aux recours sont perçus comme surpassant les avantages probables, alors les dispositions en question n'atteignent peut-être pas les objectifs.[Traduction]

Nous avons également constaté qu'il existe très peu de données accessibles sur le rendement du réseau de transport ferroviaire de marchandises. Cette situation, qui contraste avec celle que l'on observe au sud de la frontière, nuit au bon fonctionnement des marchés et fait en sorte que les dirigeants n'ont pas l'information voulue pour prendre des décisions éclairées.

Les éléments du projet de loi C-49 liés au transport ferroviaire de marchandises pourraient permettre de régler une partie de ces problèmes. Les modifications proposées concernant le recours à l'arbitrage pour des questions de prix ou d'entente sur le niveau de service et les décisions que doit rendre l'office à ce sujet pourraient rendre les mécanismes de recours plus avantageux aux yeux des expéditeurs. Par ailleurs, en imposant aux compagnies ferroviaires l'obligation de soumettre davantage de renseignements et en exigeant de l'office qu'il publie en ligne des données sur le rendement, le projet de loi pourrait contribuer à pallier le manque de renseignements.

Le changement lié au transport ferroviaire le plus important prévu par le projet de loi C-49 est sans doute celui qui consiste à remplacer le pouvoir conféré à l'office de fixer des distances d'interconnexion supérieures à 30 kilomètres ainsi que les dispositions relatives aux prix de ligne concurrentiels par une nouvelle option appelée l'interconnexion de longue distance. Le rôle de l'OTC consistera à ordonner que le service demandé soit fourni, si les conditions voulues sont respectées, et à établir le prix pour ce service.

Le projet de loi nous accorde 30 jours ouvrables pour recevoir les demandes, les examiner et prendre les décisions nécessaires. Nous avons déjà commencé à élaborer un processus qui nous permettra de respecter ce délai extrêmement court. Nous savons que les parties intéressées surveilleront de près les décisions que nous prendrons concernant les demandes d'interconnexion de longue distance. Ces décisions seront fondées sur les critères adoptés par le Parlement et l'analyse que nous ferons des faits qui nous seront soumis. En effet, en tant que tribunal quasi judiciaire et organisme de réglementation, l'office se préoccupe uniquement de la loi et des éléments de preuve.

(1540)

[Français]

Avant de conclure, je tiens à mentionner un élément qui n'est pas compris dans le projet de loi, à savoir le pouvoir élargi de l'OTC de mener des enquêtes de sa propre initiative.

L'OTC détient déjà ce pouvoir en ce qui a trait aux vols internationaux. Il l'a tout récemment utilisé pour entreprendre une enquête relativement aux retards sur l'aire de trafic de certains vols d'Air Transat. Ce cas démontre la pertinence de ce pouvoir... [Traduction]

La présidente:

Je suis désolée.

M. Scott Streiner:

J'ai presque terminé. Mes 10 minutes sont écoulées, madame la présidente?

La présidente:

Oui, vous êtes rendu à 10 minutes et 20 secondes.

M. Scott Streiner:

Je vais conclure mes remarques dans la prochaine minute.

La présidente:

Pourriez-vous les inclure dans vos observations en réponse aux questions de l'un de nos collègues, pour veiller à ce que tous les témoins aient suffisamment de temps?

M. Scott Streiner:

Absolument, madame la présidente.

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Emerson, aimeriez-vous prendre la parole?

L'hon. David Emerson (ancien président, Comité d'examen de la Loi sur les transports au Canada, à titre personnel):

Merci, madame la présidente, et merci honorables membres du Comité. Je comparais aujourd'hui à titre personnel. J'ai dirigé un examen de la Loi sur les transports au Canada il y a de cela deux ans et demi ou trois ans. Une grande partie des observations que je formulerai feront écho à quelques-unes des conclusions présentées dans ce rapport.

Pour votre gouverne, je suis également le président du conseil d'administration de Global Container Terminals, qui est un intervenant dans le secteur des transports, comme vous le savez. Je ne prends pas la parole aujourd'hui au nom de cette organisation. Je suis ici à titre personnel.

Je vais maintenant faire mon exposé aux fins du compte rendu.

La triangulation du commerce, des transports et des technologies n'a jamais été aussi primordiale au succès économique du Canada. Nous sommes une petite nation commerçante dispersée sur un territoire immense et diversifié. Le Canada doit bien gérer les transports, dans l'intérêt de notre compétitivité et des générations futures. Pour ce faire, nous devons reconnaître la nature extrêmement complexe, étroitement intégrée, multimodale et internationale du système des transports. C'est de plus en plus un système qui évolue constamment, 24 heures par jour, sept jours par semaine.

En 2014, comme je l'ai mentionné, j'ai présidé un comité chargé de mener un examen exhaustif de la Loi sur les transports au Canada et d'autres questions connexes. Le rapport renferme 56 recommandations et plus de 100 sous-recommandations. Le sujet principal du rapport portait sur la nécessité d'instaurer un processus décisionnel amélioré, opportun et adapté à la nature changeante du commerce, des transports et des réseaux de logistique.

De nombreuses recommandations ont été mises en oeuvre ou sont en train de l'être, du moins en principe, par le gouvernement en place, notamment les suivantes: une priorité accrue aux investissements dans les infrastructures, dont l'élaboration de mécanismes de financement et d'une base de données plus systématique sur l'état des infrastructures au Canada, une hausse de la limite de propriété étrangère pour les compagnies aériennes du Canada, des plans de recapitalisation de la Garde côtière canadienne, une priorité accrue sur les besoins en matière de transport dans le Nord canadien, le déplacement sérieux des services ferroviaires voyageurs dans les corridors à forte densité de l'Ontario et du Québec, une importante initiative de financement pour continuer à créer des corridors de commerce et de transport, des droits accrus pour les voyageurs aériens — M. Streiner l'a mentionné dans son exposé — et des normes renforcées pour les voyageurs handicapés.

Dans le cadre de l'examen de la LTC, on a reconnu principalement qu'il n'existe pas de solution magique ou de panacée et que pour faire les choses correctement, il faut améliorer la gouvernance. Nous entendons par cela qu'il faut établir des cadres relatifs à la prise de décisions qui sont mieux adaptés à l'importante complexité du système de transports moderne, de ses fournisseurs de services et de ses millions d'utilisateurs. Pour faire les choses correctement, il faut reconnaître que le secteur des transports transcende tous les secteurs de l'économie, toutes les régions du pays et pratiquement tous les aspects des politiques gouvernementales et publique. La prétendue approche pangouvernementale est plus essentielle à notre avenir à long terme dans quelques secteurs seulement. Pour faire les choses correctement, il faut aussi que l'organisme de réglementation, l'OCT, Transports Canada et d'autres agences aient les renseignements, le mandat et les outils requis pour composer en temps réel avec un système extrêmement complexe et dynamique.

Le projet de loi C-49 prévoit quelques étapes importantes pour accroître la base d'information afin d'améliorer la prise de décisions, le règlement des différends et, de façon générale, le cadre de réglementation. Cependant, à mon avis, il faut faire plus. L'omission la plus flagrante dans le projet de loi C-49 est peut-être l'approche réactive, à la pièce et axée sur les plaintes que continue d'adopter l'OTC. Je crois que l'organisme a besoin du mandat et de la capacité d'anticiper les problèmes et de les gérer avant qu'ils deviennent des crises systémiques. Le fait de gérer une plainte à la fois lorsque de nombreuses plaintes sont les symptômes d'un problème plus grand n'est tout simplement pas efficace.

(1545)



Par ailleurs, l'agence doit avoir le pouvoir de lancer des enquêtes. Lorsqu'elle dispose de preuves réelles et concrètes d'un problème émergent, l'agence doit avoir son propre pouvoir de lancer une enquête et devrait avoir la capacité, dans la mesure du possible, d'adopter des mesures d'atténuation ou de prévention. Aucun de ces pouvoirs ne doit nuire au pouvoir du ministre et du Parlement de donner des directives à l'agence, mais ces pouvoirs devraient favoriser une prise de décisions améliorée et opportune qui aide le système des transports à offrir de meilleurs services pour les déplacements et les expéditions.

Pour faire les choses correctement, il faut établir des cadres de gouvernance robustes créés et autorisés par le gouvernement pour permettre aux organismes d'administrer divers aspects du système des transports. Les autorités aéroportuaires, par exemple, ont été mises sur pied il y a 25 ans pour recapitaliser et exploiter des aéroports canadiens. De façon générale, ces démarches ont donné d'excellents résultats, mais les ententes de gouvernance doivent être mises à jour. Les aéroports sont en grande partie des monopoles locaux qui disposent de pouvoirs de facto de taxation. Je signale que les frais d'amélioration aéroportuaire, par exemple, intégrés au coût des billets d'avion, affaiblissent la responsabilité à l'égard du public, et il n'y a aucun vrai intervenant pour demander des comptes aux conseils d'administration et à la direction quant à la façon dont les capitaux sont déployés. Des arguments semblables pourraient être présentés au sujet des administrations portuaires. Dans la plupart des cas, il n'existe aucun principe directeur législatif qui expose les considérations relatives à l'intérêt public.

À l'heure actuelle, il n'y a aucun mécanisme d'appel pratique pour l'abus de pouvoir possible sur les locataires ou les clients. Une partie lésée ne peut même pas interjeter appel auprès de l'OTC car l'organisme n'a pas le pouvoir de traiter ces situations, et il n'est habituellement pas pratique d'interjeter appel auprès du ministre. Il y a de nombreuses entités mandatées à l'extérieur du gouvernement. Elles exploitent divers systèmes de mode de transport et ont des ententes qui sont généralement énoncées dans les baux fonciers, les règlements des entités ou d'autres formes d'arrangements contractuels. Bon nombre de ces problèmes liés à la gouvernance ont été soulignés dans l'examen de la Loi sur les transports au Canada.

Là encore, la prise de décisions dans l'univers des transports, où des milliers de fournisseurs de services interagissent pour servir des millions de clients et d'expéditeurs, s'articule autour de la gouvernance. Pour avoir un système de transports sain, dynamique, mondial et compétitif, il faut des responsabilités claires et un système robuste de freins et de contrepoids. La Loi sur les transports au Canada devrait préciser les principes de bonne gouvernance devant être appliqués aux organismes de réglementation de même qu'aux exploitants non gouvernementaux et aux fournisseurs de services. La loi devrait également prévoir officiellement l'obligation de renouveler une stratégie nationale des transports. Le concept d'un examen décennal est archaïque et devrait être aboli pour être remplacé par un processus évolutif.

Merci, madame la présidente et honorables membres du Comité. J'ai hâte à notre discussion.

(1550)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Emerson.

Monsieur Al-Katib, allez-y, s'il vous plaît.

M. Murad Al-Katib (président et directeur général, ancien conseiller, Comité d'examen de la Loi sur les transports au Canada, AGT Food and Ingredients Inc.):

Merci.

Je suis Murad Al-Katib. Je suis le directeur général d'AGT Food and Ingredients Inc. J'ai eu l'honneur de collaborer avec M. Emerson à la rédaction du rapport Emerson également. J'étais son premier conseiller sur le secteur des grains, le transport ferroviaire de l'Ouest canadien et les ressources naturelles, y compris le secteur pétrolier et gazier et le secteur minier. Je veux vous faire part de mes perspectives non seulement dans le cadre de ce rôle que j'ai assumé, mais aussi en tant que président de l'un des plus grands expéditeurs de conteneurs par transport intermodal au Canada. AGT Food figure, peut-être, parmi les cinq ou sept principaux expéditeurs de conteneurs au pays. Nous sommes également le plus grand chemin de fer de catégorie 3 au pays à l'heure actuelle, depuis l'acquisition d'un chemin de fer d'intérêt local en Saskatchewan.

Permettez-moi de revenir sur quelques points qui ont été soulevés par mes collègues. L'un porte sur notre travail et le travail dont vous êtes saisis maintenant avec l'étude du projet de loi  C-49. Pour le Canada en tant que nation commerçante, les infrastructures de transport et l'interaction des politiques avec ces infrastructures sont des éléments que je considère comme étant les activités générationnelles les plus importantes du pays. Il faut examiner comment nous permettons à l'économie de saisir les occasions qui se présentent, à mesure que les échanges commerciaux continuent de prendre de l'expansion, et plus particulièrement pour commercialiser nos produits sur les marchés, étant donné la vaste superficie de notre merveilleux pays. En raison de ces distances physiques, la réglementation au sein du système devait tenir compte d'un certain nombre de secteurs. Je vais les expliquer en détail.

La transparence du système de transports était un thème récurrent de notre rapport qui continue de trouver écho au sein de l'industrie. Je pense que le projet de loi C-49 règle en grande partie l'une des principales critiques que l'on formulait au sujet du système. Maintenant, nous avons au moins un système dans le cadre duquel, si ces mesures sont mises de l'avant, les sociétés ferroviaires seront non seulement encouragées mais mandatées à fournir des données. Ces données seront incorporées dans la LTC, résumées et publiées. Elles permettront aux décideurs de prendre des décisions plus éclairées plutôt que d'essayer de réagir au pied levé. Je pense que la transparence des données est un élément très important. L'industrie le demande, parmi les recommandations que nous avons formulées, et c'est certainement un aspect dans le projet de loi C-49.

Lorsque nous nous sommes penchés sur la transparence cependant, pour réitérer les observations de mes collègues, nous avons constaté une grande volonté d'octroyer des pouvoirs ex parte à l'office pour tenir des enquêtes et de lui donner la capacité de ressembler davantage à un Conseil sur le transport de surface, comme aux États-Unis. Nous semblons rater un peu la cible dans cette ronde, mais je pense qu'en tant qu'industrie, nous sommes encouragés par les mesures qui sont prises.

Sur le sujet de la transparence, j'ai toujours dit à l'industrie de faire attention à ce qu'elle demande car les requêtes s'accompagnent de responsabilités. Il faut toujours reconnaître que c'est un système de transports. Considérez-le comme une chaîne d'approvisionnement où chaque lien dans la chaîne est essentiel pour le lien précédent ou suivant. Dans le système de transports, chaque lien a tendance à blâmer le lien qui précède ou qui suit.

C'est un élément très important, à savoir la responsabilité de l'industrie d'assurer une reddition de comptes fiable quant aux prévisions et à son rendement au sein du système. L'efficacité est un aspect que la transparence des données apportera au système. Je pense que c'est un élément très important. Il n'y a pas que les chemins de fer; il faut penser à chaque lien de la chaîne.

À mesure que cette chaîne continue d'évoluer, l'accès équitable au système fait partie de nos objectifs, et je pense que nous avons intégré d'excellentes mesures dans le projet de loi C-49. Dans le cadre de nos recommandations, nous cherchions à établir un système où les règles du jeu seraient uniformisées de manière à favoriser la conclusion d'ententes commerciales.

Je pense que nous devons aussi être très prudents. La réglementation excessive de l'industrie des transports est une pente très glissante. La surréglementation de notre réseau ferroviaire peut certainement entraîner des conséquences imprévues. En raison de notre environnement difficile, des longues distances, des caractéristiques physique de notre territoire et du climat, une réglementation excessive pourrait donner lieu à un système non concurrentiel qui deviendrait un boulet pour l'économie. Je pense qu'un accès équitable au système et des mesures visant à encourager la conclusion d'ententes commerciales faisaient partie intégrante de nos recommandations.

(1555)



Discutons de quelques-uns de ces points.

Les recours offerts aux expéditeurs étaient très robustes dans le projet de loi C-49. Il y avait un certain nombre de mesures concernant le pouvoir de l'agence de rendre les plans opérationnels et les accords sur les niveaux de service plus permanents. Des conséquences financières réciproques ont été mandatées, ce qui était une importante requête des expéditeurs depuis plus d'une décennie, et que l'on a esquivé dans un certain nombre de révisions des politiques précédentes. C'était donc une mesure populaire au sein de la communauté des expéditeurs pour que lorsqu'ils négocient un accord sur les niveaux de service, ces plans opérationnels doivent être définis et des conséquences financières réciproques doivent être mandatées par les deux parties. L'agence peut alors les imposer aux parties si elles ne parviennent pas à conclure une entente commerciale.

Les mécanismes simplifiés de règlement des différends ont été essentiels. Je pense que nous avons réalisé des progrès appréciables à cet égard. En ce qui concerne la définition d'ententes adéquates et convenables — vous en entendrez beaucoup parler au cours des trois ou quatre prochains jours —, je pense que nous avons réalisé d'importants progrès.

Pour ce qui est de l'efficacité globale au sein du système, l'interconnexion pour le transport longue distance soulève de grandes inquiétudes, car dans l'industrie céréalière plus particulièrement, avec la Loi sur les services équitables de transport ferroviaire pour les producteurs de grains, nous avions une interconnexion de 160 kilomètres, en tant que recours pour les expéditeurs. Cette interconnexion existait et a été prolongée. Elle n'existe plus maintenant, et une interconnexion pour le transport longue distance a été mise en place en tant que nouveau recours potentiel. Je pense que les inquiétudes des expéditeurs sont attribuables au fait qu'ils ne comprennent pas si cette interconnexion peut ou non être mise en oeuvre. Après avoir entendu les observations de mon collègue, M. Streiner, j'ai bon espoir que les expéditeurs auront l'occasion de faire une demande pour une interconnexion pour le transport longue distance de 12 mois, sur des distances beaucoup plus longues que 160 kilomètres, et je pense que la combinaison de l'interconnexion et des taux concurrentiels des parcours de ligne pourrait être un mécanisme efficace.

C'est un nouveau système, et je pense que cela soulève parfois des inquiétudes, et comme M. Streiner l'a dit, la LTC sera jugée en fonction de sa capacité d'intervenir et de mettre en oeuvre des mesures. J'ai également formulé des recommandations très fermes à Transports Canada et à l'agence pour qu'ils envisagent des processus de renouvellement accélérés. Donc, lorsqu'on a reçu l'approbation pour un an, comment peut-on être approuvé pour une deuxième et troisième année plus rapidement? Ce sont des aspects de la prestation de services envers lesquels je suis optimiste.

Pour ce qui est du revenu admissible maximal, la modernisation a commencé avec les dispositions du projet de loi C-49 qui sont proposées, et nous avons recommandé une modernisation beaucoup plus exhaustive du revenu admissible maximal. Il y a quelques mesures initiales qui ont été prises qui sont, à mon avis, très positives. L'exclusion du trafic intermodal des conteneurs et l'exclusion des revenus d'interconnexion sont des mesures très sensées, à mon avis, et il était très logique de les inclure dans la modernisation. La capacité des sociétés ferroviaires de tenir compte des investissements effectués était absurde. Lorsqu'une société ferroviaire effectuait un investissement, ces fonds étaient répartis entre les deux chemins de fer. Nous avons maintenant réglé ce problème. Nous l'avons fait en proposant d'apporter des ajustements pour encourager les investissements dans les wagons-trémies. Ce sont toutes des dispositions positives qui continuent de protéger les agriculteurs en ce qui a trait au revenu admissible maximal et qui prévoient du temps pour voir quels effets ces mécanismes auront, mais je pense qu'ils donnent des résultats très positifs.

Il y a les taux d'interconnexion réglementés également, et la réduction et l'élimination des volumes minimaux de grain.

Nous avons réalisé de bons progrès, je pense, et je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions et de vous faire part de nos points de vue au cours de la prochaine heure.

Merci, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à tous nos témoins.

Monsieur O'Toole.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je remercie tous les témoins d'être ici. Je vous suis très reconnaissant de votre témoignage aujourd'hui et de votre participation à l'examen de notre système de transport.

Monsieur Emerson, c'est un privilège d'avoir l'occasion de vous poser deux ou trois questions. Nous vivons une période intéressante au Canada. Dans votre rapport, Parcours, le rapport que vous avez fourni au gouvernement et qui est d'une certaine façon le précurseur du projet de loi C-49, vous avez indiqué à plusieurs reprises qu'il avait pour thème la relation entre le commerce et nos systèmes de logistique commerciale, et notre système de transport, ainsi que l'acheminement des biens vers le marché canadien, le marché nord-américain et les marchés mondiaux.

En tant qu'ancien ministre du Commerce international, vous savez certainement que nous avons une occasion unique, étant donné que nous en sommes à renégocier et à moderniser l'ALENA, au moment même où nous devons entreprendre la modernisation de nos réseaux de transport pour les 30 prochaines années.

Dans vos consultations, avez-vous entendu des revendications, en particulier de la part des secteurs du transport aérien et du camionnage, pour l'adoption d'une approche fondée sur le cabotage transfrontalier pour l'intégration du système nord-américain de transport? Cette fenêtre —  la renégociation de l'ALENA —, qui n'était pas d'actualité lorsque vous avez rédigé le rapport, ne serait-elle pas une occasion manifeste d'intégrer le réseau de transport en Amérique du Nord?

(1600)

L'hon. David Emerson:

Pour répondre brièvement, je dirais que ce que l'on entend — et je sais d'après mon expérience dans le domaine que nous avons tous une obsession pour le commerce international, les tarifs douaniers et les accords connexes —, c'est que lorsqu'on fait une véritable analyse de l'accumulation des coûts d'approvisionnement dans l'ensemble de la chaîne d'approvisionnement des entreprises, on constate que les coûts liés au transport et à la logistique ont un rôle bien plus déterminant dans la compétitivité que les tarifs douaniers et les obstacles commerciaux connexes.

Les obstacles au commerce sont toujours importants, mais comme vous le soulignez, le risque le plus important est probablement lié à des retards à la frontière attribuables à des facteurs d'ordre administratif, notamment, ou à de la discrimination, ce qui n'est pas réellement lié à des tarifs. Il s'agit d'obstacles d'une tout autre nature qui nuisent à la perméabilité des frontières. Donc, manifestement, l'intégration du réseau de transport nord-américain est d'une importance capitale, car lorsqu'on se penche réellement sur les facteurs qui pourraient contribuer à la compétitivité face à l'Asie et à certaines plaques tournantes émergentes dans le monde d'aujourd'hui, l'Amérique du Nord doit, sur les plans du commerce, de l'emploi et de la création de valeur, être un ensemble intégré et non un arrangement fragmenté entre trois pays.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

Il est intéressant d'entendre ce commentaire, car lorsque l'accord de libre-échange avec les États-Unis a été négocié au milieu des années 1980, le Canada et les États-Unis cherchaient tous deux à démanteler les barrières au commerce intérieur. Le gouvernement Mulroney cherchait en même temps à transformer Air Canada d'une société d'État à une société privée, de sorte qu'il n'était pas vraiment possible à l'époque d'intégrer le secteur du transport aux négociations de l'ALENA, mais ce l'est peut-être maintenant.

D'après votre expérience au sein de l'industrie, lorsqu'on parle d'efficacité, y a-t-il selon vous des économies possibles pour les entreprises et un climat favorable à l'intégration du transport en Amérique du Nord? Cela favorisera-t-il une efficacité accrue du secteur privé, étant donné que nous utilisons nos systèmes de manière plus efficace et que la réduction du nombre de navires et de camions qui sillonnent le continent sans chargement se traduira par une diminution des émissions de GES?

L'hon. David Emerson:

Si je devais y aller d'une affirmation catégorique, ce serait la suivante: pour toute entité — une province, un pays ou l'Amérique du Nord —, plus le réseau de transport est efficient, sur les plans de l'intégration, de la fluidité et du mode de livraison des produits jusqu'à l'utilisateur, moins on émet de gaz à effet de serre par dollar de produit intérieur brut, que ce soit le PIB de l'Amérique du Nord ou celui du Canada. Donc, en mon sens, même si les gens n'en parlent jamais, il est foncièrement vrai qu'un réseau de transport hautement efficace est probablement l'un des meilleurs cadres stratégiques de lutte contre les gaz à effet de serre qu'on puisse adopter.

M. Murad Al-Katib:

J'ajouterais simplement une chose aux commentaires de M. Emerson.

L'approche axée sur les portes d'entrée faisait partie intégrante de notre analyse et nous permet maintenant de considérer les ports de Prince Rupert et de Vancouver comme des portes d'entrée efficaces pour lier l'Asie aux corridors du Midwest américain. Lorsque je pense à la voie de raccordement du CN à Prince Rupert, aux 96 heures nécessaires pour faire le trajet de Prince Rupert à Chicago et à la congestion à Long Beach et sur la côte ouest des États-Unis, je considère que nous avons l'occasion d'optimiser la circulation. Nous avons en effet la possibilité d'améliorer le flux du commerce, car il s'agit d'une porte d'entrée des importations. Nous pourrons ensuite arrêter les trains à Saskatoon pour les charger de produits agricoles afin de ne pas transporter des conteneurs vides sur le chemin du retour.

De ce point de vue, celui de l'optimisation des corridors nord-sud entrants, des corridors ferroviaires nord-sud et des couloirs de camionnage, je pense qu'il s'agit d'une occasion qui pourrait avoir des effets considérables non seulement pour l'environnement, comme vous l'avez indiqué, mais aussi pour le rendement économique de notre pays.

L’hon. Erin O'Toole:

Dans ce cas, j'ai une dernière question. Je pense que l'optimisation des réseaux de l'Amérique du Nord...

Mon temps est-il écoulé?

(1605)

La présidente:

J'aimerais, autant que possible, donner du temps à chacun.

Pourriez-vous retenir cette idée et y revenir plus tard? Même si je n'aime pas cela, je dois parfois interrompre la discussion alors que nous commençons à obtenir des renseignements très importants.

Monsieur Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Ma question s'adresse à M. Streiner, de l'OTC.

Selon vous, pourquoi les enjeux liés aux agressions physiques, aux agressions sexuelles et aux agressions en général ne sont-ils pas abordés dans notre initiative sur les droits des passagers aériens?

M. Scott Streiner:

Je suppose que votre question porte sur ce qui est proposé du projet de loi C-49.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Oui.

M. Scott Streiner:

D'accord. Comme je l'ai indiqué dans mon exposé, je suis d'avis que le ministre des Transports et Transports Canada sont mieux placés pour répondre aux questions sur l'objectif du projet de loi. Je dirais toutefois que je pense que ce sont là des problèmes qui pourraient relever des services de police ou des affaires pénales. L'explication pourrait simplement être que la loi comporte d'autres mécanismes existants pour traiter de ces questions. Cela dit, il vaudrait mieux poser les questions relatives à la logique sous-jacente du projet de loi au ministre.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Très bien. Merci.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez parlé des retards sur l'aire de trafic. Selon vous, en quoi les modifications proposées permettront-elles de régler les problèmes à cet égard?

M. Scott Streiner:

Comme vous le savez, le projet de loi propose que l'OTC soit chargé de la réglementation relative à une série d'incidents potentiels, dont les retards de plus de trois heures sur l'aire de trafic. Nous serons en mesure de traiter des modalités de la réglementation à cet égard après la tenue de consultations avec l'industrie, les associations des droits des consommateurs, les Canadiens et les voyageurs. Cela dit, je pense que les audiences que nous avons tenues les 30 et 31 août concernant les retards sur l'aire de trafic de deux vols d'Air Transat ont souligné l'importance d'apporter des correctifs adéquats. Je pense que la réaction de la population lors de ces incidents et lors des audiences elles-mêmes témoigne de l'importance que revêtent ces enjeux pour les Canadiens.

M. Gagan Sikand:

À votre avis, quel indicateur pourrait-on utiliser pour juger équitablement de l'efficacité de l'OTC à protéger les droits des passagers?

M. Scott Streiner:

Je pense qu'un indicateur important sera notre rapidité à examiner les diverses plaintes.

Comme je l'ai indiqué dans mon exposé, madame la présidente, nous avons constaté une hausse importante du nombre de plaintes. Je pense que lorsqu'ils se tournent vers un organisme comme l'OTC, les Canadiens s'attendent à ce que leur dossier soit réglé assez rapidement. Nous insistons fortement sur un processus que nous appelons la facilitation, qui est un processus semblable à celui d'un ombudsman. Un de nos agents communique par téléphone avec les deux parties, le plaignant et le transporteur aérien, pour déterminer si une solution rapide et mutuellement acceptable peut être trouvée. Grâce à ce processus de facilitation, nous avons réussi à résoudre plus de 90 % des plaintes, dont certaines plaintes plus complexes. Je pense que les Canadiens nous jugeront en fonction de notre capacité à trouver une solution juste, mais rapide, pour leur plainte liée au transport aérien, et nous continuerons de mettre l'accent là-dessus.

M. Gagan Sikand:

J'aimerais revenir sur une question que j'ai posée plus tôt.

Devrait-on prévoir des sanctions précises pour les atteintes à ces droits, à votre avis? Actuellement, aucune sanction n'est prévue.

M. Scott Streiner:

Dans la version actuelle du projet de loi, on indique, pour certains incidents énumérés dans la section portant sur la réglementation, que l'Office des transports du Canada peut prévoir le versement d'indemnités adéquates. Pour d'autres cas, il est plutôt question de traitement ou de mesures appropriées. Évidemment, en fin de compte, les règlements que nous adopterons iront dans le sens de ce que vous et vos collègues aurez décidé d'inclure dans la loi. Si la loi prévoit le versement d'une indemnité monétaire et d'autres mesures, nous établirons le montant des indemnités par voie de règlement. Si la loi ne prévoit aucune indemnité, nous ne pourrons en inclure, bien entendu.

M. Gagan Sikand:

J'ai une question très précise pour M. Emerson.

En ce qui concerne le CN, je sais qu'on propose des changements concernant le pourcentage que peut détenir un actionnaire individuel. J'aimerais avoir votre point de vue à ce sujet.

L'hon. David Emerson:

Je précise, pour les autres députés, qu'il est question de la modification d'une restriction — je ne sais pas si c'est par l'intermédiaire de cette mesure législative ou d'un autre projet de loi  — qui limite à 15 % le pourcentage d'actions du CN avec droit de vote que peut détenir un actionnaire unique. Le pourcentage est augmenté à 25 %, et cette mesure ne vise pas le CP. Actuellement, en Amérique du Nord, les sociétés ferroviaires procèdent à une consolidation ou sont sur le point de le faire. Berkshire Hathaway détient 100 % des actions de Burlington Northern Railroad. À mon avis, imposer au CN des restrictions qui ne s'appliqueraient pas à ses concurrents au Canada n'a aucun sens. Je suis favorable à l'élimination de ces restrictions pour que le CN soit sur un pied d'égalité avec le CP.

(1610)

M. Gagan Sikand:

Souhaitez-vous ajouter quelque chose à cela, monsieur Al-Katib?

M. Murad Al-Katib:

Nous n'avons pas consacré beaucoup de temps sur cet enjeu, en fin de compte, mais la consolidation est réelle et la compétitivité de nos sociétés ferroviaires dépend de leur capacité à obtenir du capital. Je pense qu'imposer une restriction à une seule société ferroviaire et non aux autres acteurs du marché... On observe une intégration du système de transport ferroviaire de l'Amérique du Nord. On ne peut se concentrer uniquement sur le CP et le CN et considérer que ces sociétés ne font pas partie d'un système nord-américain intégré.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci beaucoup.

La présidente:

Votre temps est écoulé. Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins d'être avec nous cet après-midi.

Ma première question, toute simple, s'adresse probablement à MM. Emerson et Streiner, et on peut y répondre par oui ou par non.

Dans la législature précédente, à l'époque où le NPD formait l'opposition officielle, je me rappelle qu'un de mes collègues avait consacré énormément de temps et d'énergie à élaborer un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire, qui proposait justement une charte des droits des passagers.

À l'époque, aviez-vous eu l'occasion de prendre connaissance de ce projet de loi? [Traduction]

L'hon. David Emerson:

Non. [Français]

M. Scott Streiner:

Oui, je savais qu'il y avait une telle initiative.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Je vous demande cela parce que ce projet de loi, qui avait reçu l'appui des libéraux mais qui n'avait pas passé la rampe, contenait des descriptions très précises qui vont dans le sens du rapport de M. Emerson. On y énonçait que la charte des droits des passagers devait s'harmoniser ou se rapprocher de ce qui se faisait aux États-Unis ou en Europe. La plupart des mesures étaient donc très précises. Par exemple, pour une annulation de vol, on demandait à la compagnie aérienne d'offrir deux ou trois choix, à défaut de quoi elle devait payer une cotisation qui était même chiffrée.

Avec le projet de loi C-49, on est à des années-lumière de cela. On est dans la philosophie de ce que devrait être une charte des droits des passagers. Nous irons en consultation une fois que le projet de loi C-49 obtiendra la sanction royale. Ne sommes-nous pas en train de perdre un temps précieux, étant donné le travail qui a déjà été fait et le fait qu'il y ait des problèmes de plus en plus récurrents? [Traduction]

L'hon. David Emerson:

Je n'ai pas vraiment pu répondre à cela étant donné que je n'avais pas consulté le projet de loi et que j'ignorais son contenu. Je pense que vous soulevez un bon point. [Français]

M. Scott Streiner:

Si le projet de loi est adopté, l'Office des transports du Canada va se focaliser sur le processus de réglementation. Notre objectif est de compléter le travail dans deux ou trois mois. C'est un travail de précision. [Traduction]

Aux États-Unis et en Europe, si je ne me trompe pas, certains aspects de la charte des droits des passagers se retrouvent également dans la réglementation. Nous examinerons les pratiques des États-Unis et l'Europe, mais notre engagement, notre objectif, est de faire le travail, et ce, rapidement. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

N'aurait-il pas été possible, dans le projet de loi C-49, de donner un aperçu de ce que pourrait être cette réglementation, de façon à ce qu'on sache où on s'en va? À mon avis, c'est relativement clair, puisque nous sommes à peu près les derniers à mettre en place une charte des droits des passagers.

Si nous avions bénéficié et profité de l'expérience des autres, nous aurions déjà mis en place des éléments. Or la consultation s'alignera sur de grands principes philosophiques ou sur des propositions de règlement, que nous pourrons améliorer et annuler complètement ou en ajouter de nouvelles.

(1615)

M. Scott Streiner:

Les consultations de l'Office seront très ciblées et porteront sur des questions spécifiques et sur les détails.

M. Robert Aubin:

J'ai une autre question qui s'adresse à vous, monsieur Emerson. Elle a trait à la conclusion de votre rapport, où vous proposez de faire passer de 25 % à 49 % la possibilité de propriété étrangère des États-Unis.

Lors de votre étude sur cet aspect du projet de loi, avez-vous été amené à lire les conclusions du rapport de recherche sur cet enjeu du groupe de travail de l'Université du Manitoba? [Traduction]

L'hon. David Emerson:

Si vous faites référence à la restriction de 15 % imposée pour la propriété d'actions du CN par un actionnaire unique, nous n'avons reçu aucun commentaire à ce sujet de qui que ce soit lors du processus d'examen. Je n'ai pas souvenir qu'on nous ait donné des conseils à ce sujet lors des discussions, ou encore qu'on ait reçu un mémoire à cet égard. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je suis désolé de vous interrompre, monsieur Emerson, mais l'idée qu'on fasse passer de 25 % à 49 % la propriété étrangère dans les aéroports est le sujet que je veux vraiment aborder. Selon les résultats de l'Université du Manitoba, on n'a pas démontré que cela représentait une plus-value pour les consommateurs.

J'aimerais donc savoir si vous avez lu ce rapport de l'Université du Manitoba et, sinon, sur quelle étude vous vous basez pour proposer qu'on passe de 25 % à 49 %. [Traduction]

L'hon. David Emerson:

Je vois. Vous parlez de la propriété des sociétés aériennes, des transporteurs aériens. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Oui, tout à fait. [Traduction]

L'hon. David Emerson:

Des observations nous ont été présentées de vive voix, en particulier de la part de nouveaux exploitants ou de propriétaires de sociétés de transport aérien à très bas coût. Ils ont parlé de leur difficulté à obtenir le capital nécessaire au démarrage de telles entreprises. Essentiellement, nous avons recommandé une solution que nous jugions efficace, une mesure qui avait été recommandée il y a quelques années dans le rapport Wilson sur la compétitivité, je crois. Nous avons établi le seuil à 49 % de façon à permettre aux transporteurs en démarrage d'avoir un actionnaire unique pouvant les aider au lancement de l'entreprise. Certains membres du personnel ont peut-être lu l'étude réalisée au Manitoba, mais je n'en ai pas eu l'occasion.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Emerson.

Je suis désolée, monsieur Aubin. Votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Sean Fraser:

Excellent. Merci beaucoup.

Je pourrais probablement passer la journée à discuter avec ce groupe de témoins. Si vous pouviez veiller à répondre de façon succincte — et je vais tenter de poser des questions brèves —, ce serait utile.

Premièrement, monsieur Streiner, vous avez parlé de l'explosion relative du nombre de plaintes qui vous ont été transmises lorsque le public a appris que l'OTC était là pour les aider. J'ai l'impression, étant donné toute la publicité qui entoure cet enjeu, ce qui comprend les délibérations du Comité et les débats à la Chambre des communes, que si le projet de loi C-49 est adopté, les Canadiens seront très au fait des diverses options qui leur seront offertes pour atténuer les frustrations ordinaires qu'ils vivent lors de leurs voyages. Avez-vous la capacité nécessaire de traiter un nombre encore plus élevé de plaintes? Sinon, quel mécanisme pouvez-vous mettre en oeuvre pour y arriver?

M. Scott Streiner:

Comme le député l'a demandé, madame la présidente, je vais essayer de répondre brièvement.

Je dirais que l'OTC utilise ses ressources au maximum actuellement. La hausse marquée du nombre de plaintes a contribué à cette situation. L'OTC est un organisme relativement petit ayant de nombreux mandats, y compris, mais sans s'y limiter, l'examen et le règlement des plaintes relatives au transport aérien. Je ne serais pas totalement honnête si je ne mentionnais pas que nous sommes poussés à nos limites. Cela dit, nous réussissons la plupart du temps à suivre le rythme. Nous avons procédé à la réaffectation temporaire de nos ressources pour le traitement des plaintes. J'ai été heureux d'entendre le ministre des Transports indiquer que le gouvernement s'est engagé à veiller à ce que l'OTC ait des ressources suffisantes pour s'acquitter de son mandat, mais au bout du compte, les décisions relatives aux ressources et aux responsabilités qui nous sont confiées relèvent du Parlement et du gouvernement. Il ne fait aucun doute que nous ferons de notre mieux pour servir les Canadiens avec les ressources que le Parlement choisira de nous accorder.

M. Sean Fraser:

Vous avez également mentionné, au début de votre exposé, qu'une partie de votre mandat consiste à protéger le droit fondamental des personnes ayant un handicap à des services de transport accessibles, ce qui est extrêmement important, à mon avis. Selon vous, la déclaration des droits des passagers permettra-t-elle d'améliorer, de façon juste et efficace, l'accès des personnes ayant un handicap aux services de transport aérien?

(1620)

M. Scott Streiner:

Avoir droit à des services de transport accessible fait sans contredit partie des droits fondamentaux de la personne et nous sommes engagés à les promouvoir. D'après ce que je comprends du projet de loi dont le Comité est actuellement saisi, la réglementation de protection des consommateurs qui y est proposée ne traite pas des enjeux liés à l'accessibilité. L'ancienne ministre des Sports et des Personnes handicapées a annoncé l'intention du gouvernement de présenter une mesure législative nationale en matière d'accessibilité en 2018. Je crois comprendre que c'est toujours l'intention du gouvernement et que cette mesure législative pourrait traiter, en partie, des enjeux d'accessibilité des transports.

M. Sean Fraser:

Permettez-moi de passer à M. Emerson. Nous n'avons pas beaucoup parlé des mesures qui touchent le transport maritime. Une des mesures, évidemment, est l'accès croissant des autorités portuaires à la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada. À l'ère du commerce international, y a-t-il une raison quelconque pour laquelle nous ne devrions pas permettre aux ports d'avoir accès à cette nouvelle source de capitaux pour favoriser leur croissance et leur expansion?

L'hon. David Emerson:

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose? J'aimerais faire deux choses. Premièrement, je tiens à répondre à une question que vous avez posée à M. Streiner. Pour parler sans détour, tant que vous obligerez l'OTC à régler les plaintes à la pièce, vous n'aurez jamais assez de ressources pour examiner la multitude de plaintes. Il est utopique de penser qu'on pourra régler le problème de l'accumulation des plaintes si vous n'autorisez pas l'Office à examiner en bloc des plaintes de même nature.

En ce qui concerne les autorités portuaires, tant qu'on n'aura pas procédé à un examen rigoureux des structures de gouvernance relatives aux autorités portuaires et aux autorités aéroportuaires, l'idée de leur donner accès à d'autres robinets, pour ainsi dire — à des fonds supplémentaires —, me rend très nerveux, parce que je suis préoccupé par les cadres de gouvernance applicables aux ports et aux aéroports. Je pense que la gouvernance est inadéquate; elle est inadéquate quant à l'utilisation des capitaux; elle est inadéquate pour assurer à la mise en place de recours auprès d'un organisme de réglementation en cas d'abus de pouvoir monopolistique; elle est inadéquate en ce sens qu'elle permet aux autorités portuaires ou aéroportuaires de se lancer dans des secteurs où ils deviennent des concurrents de leurs propres locataires. Donc, pour être franc, je ne leur donnerais pas accès à des fonds supplémentaires jusqu'à ce que tous ces problèmes aient été corrigés.

M. Sean Fraser:

J'aimerais si possible changer de sujet encore une fois et poser des questions sur l'interconnexion, en commençant par M. Al-Katib.

Dans notre étude précédente sur le projet de loi C-30, des gens de l'extérieur de l'industrie des grains ont indiqué qu'ils aimeraient vraiment avoir cela aussi. Cela touchait un certain territoire et une certaine industrie. Même si cela a essentiellement été proposé dans une période caractérisée par des récoltes exceptionnelles et le mauvais temps, le fait qu'on puisse instaurer une concurrence dans un milieu monopolistique est, à mon avis, une bonne idée. Y a-t-il une raison quelconque pour laquelle nous ne devrions pas étendre cela à diverses industries partout au pays?

M. Murad Al-Katib:

Eh bien, une des choses que l'on tente actuellement de faire par rapport au régime d'interconnexion de longue distance, c'est de l'étendre à divers secteurs, partout au pays. Une critique manifeste concernant la disposition du projet de loi C-49 est ressortie jusqu'à maintenant: le corridor Kamloops-Vancouver est exclu du régime d'interconnexion de longue distance. Je ne sais pas trop pourquoi il en est ainsi, et je pense que cet aspect doit certainement être étudié. Quant à l'accessibilité du réseau, nous avons notamment constaté, pendant notre étude, que l'important réseau d'interconnexion de 160 kilomètres n'était pas utilisé. Il a été utilisé après le dépôt de notre rapport, mais au moment de notre étude, nous n'avons trouvé aucun cas où il avait été utilisé. Cela dit, je ne suis pas favorable à la mise en place de solutions simplement pour accommoder les expéditeurs. Je pense cependant qu'une solution bien planifiée, comme le réseau d'interconnexion de longue distance, peut être un mécanisme très efficace, pourvu qu'on puisse inciter l'OTC à réagir rapidement et à reconduire cette mesure rapidement d'année en année. À mon avis, cela ajouterait un élément de concurrence dans le système.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons à M. Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'ai une brève question et elle s'adresse à M. Emerson, je crois.

En ce qui concerne les examens de la LTC, dans quelle mesure est-il important de revoir les lois, notamment la Loi sur les transports au Canada?

(1625)

L'hon. David Emerson:

Eh bien, nous avons indiqué dans notre rapport — je l'ai mentionné dans mon exposé — que si nous voulons nous adapter aux conditions de la concurrence sur le marché, étant donné la taille considérable, la grande complexité et l'encombrement du système, il est nécessaire de faire bien plus qu'un examen décennal. Je dirais qu'il nous faut un système évolutif, avec examen au moins tous les deux ans. Je pense que la loi devrait prévoir la mise en place d'une stratégie nationale des transports et devrait probablement en préciser certains des éléments clés, comme une stratégie relative aux projets d'infrastructure d'envergure nationale qui sont essentiels au secteur des transports et de la logistique pour les 20 prochaines années. Il convient de se préparer sur un horizon de 20 ans; autrement, vous construirez et produirez quelque chose, puis vous accuserez des retards en matière de réglementation, entre autres, de sorte que lorsque tout sera enfin terminé, vous serez déjà dépassés par les conditions économiques.

M. Vance Badawey:

En outre, évidemment, vous constaterez que la stratégie et les investissements en infrastructures donneront tous les deux de meilleurs résultats s'ils vont dans le même sens?

L'hon. David Emerson:

Eh bien, je crois qu'il faut, pour quoi que ce soit, établir une liste des priorités d'infrastructures soigneusement réfléchie et analysée. Cela doit comprendre des travaux de préingénierie complets, l'analyse de facteurs économiques et financiers et une évaluation exhaustive des risques. Vous devez obtenir des investisseurs du secteur privé un aperçu des dépenses en immobilisations pour différents types d'infrastructures et des divers mécanismes qui pourraient être adoptés pour leur financement. Tous ces aspects en font partie. Je pense qu'il est illusoire de s'attendre à mettre en oeuvre un programme d'infrastructures réactif en laissant les choses vagues et mal définies.

M. Vance Badawey:

Cela est lié aux investissements dans les infrastructures durables et, plus important encore, au rendement tant pour l'économie que pour l'industrie elle-même.

Je vais maintenant passer à M. Streiner pour parler de l'Office. Cela relève-t-il de l'Office des transports du Canada? Vous avez indiqué précédemment que vous êtes chargés d'assurer le fonctionnement harmonieux et efficace des systèmes de transport. Convient-il de présumer, à défaut d'un meilleur terme, que votre rôle consiste en partie à veiller à ce que les infrastructures de transport ferroviaire et maritime, notamment, soient maintenues, sécuritaires et adéquates dans le contexte actuel du milieu du transport?

M. Scott Streiner:

Non, madame la présidente, le mandat de l'OTC ne comprend pas la surveillance de l'entretien des infrastructures de transport. Cela ne fait pas partie, actuellement, de notre mandat prévu par la loi.

M. Vance Badawey:

Donc, qui est réellement...

M. Scott Streiner:

Je vous invite respectueusement à poser la question à Transports Canada, qui est chargé de la réglementation en matière de sécurité et de sûreté. L'Office des transports du Canada, l'organisme que je dirige, est chargé du cadre réglementaire sur l'économie et l'accessibilité du réseau.

M. Vance Badawey:

Il a beaucoup été question de gouvernance aujourd'hui. M. Emerson a fait beaucoup de commentaires à ce sujet et a mentionné à quel point nous pouvons faire mieux sur le plan de la gouvernance, en particulier pour nos aéroports, mais aussi pour d'autres immobilisations semblables, notamment celles du secteur maritime. Je pourrais citer quelques-uns des défis en matière de gouvernance auxquels nous sommes confrontés pour certaines de ces immobilisations, mais j'y reviendrai dans une autre discussion.

L'OTC a-t-il le mandat de s'assurer que ceux qui assurent la surveillance de ces infrastructures exercent une surveillance adéquate, que ce soit par l'intermédiaire d'un code de conduite, du signalement de conflits d'intérêts et de ce genre de choses? L'OTC a-t-il son mot à dire? Cela relève-t-il de sa compétence?

M. Scott Streiner:

Peu d'aspects liés aux autorités aéroportuaires ou portuaires — auxquelles le député fait référence, je crois — relèvent de notre compétence. Nous avons compétence sur les enjeux liés à l'accessibilité, comme je l'ai indiqué plus tôt. Je parle de l'accessibilité des aéroports et des terminaux portuaires qui servent au transport des passagers. Nous n'exerçons aucune surveillance, aux termes de la loi actuelle, sur certains des autres enjeux que vous avez mentionnés.

M. Vance Badawey:

Qu'en est-il des immobilisations appartenant actuellement au gouvernement fédéral, mais dont la gestion pourrait relever de sociétés privées? Avez-vous une autorité quelconque à cet égard, par rapport à ce que j'ai mentionné dans la question que je viens de poser?

M. Scott Streiner:

Je répète que si la question est liée aux enjeux en matière de gouvernance, comme l'utilisation des fonds, etc., cela ne relève pas de notre compétence. Nous pouvons examiner ou recevoir les plaintes concernant les frais exigés par les autorités portuaires ou par les autorités de pilotage, mais outre cette exception et celle que j'ai mentionnée plus tôt concernant l'accessibilité, notre compétence à l'égard des entités que vous avez énumérées est très limitée.

(1630)

M. Vance Badawey:

Excellent. Merci.

Pour ma dernière question, je vais passer à M. Al-Katib. La question porte sur l'interconnexion.

À votre avis, demander à l'OTC d'établir les frais de l'interconnexion de longue distance en fonction d'un trafic comparable est-il une manière convenable d'établir les tarifs tout en veillant à ne pas pénaliser les chemins de fer de classe 1?

M. Murad Al-Katib:

Il s'agit probablement de la question non résolue la plus importante. Je pense qu'on pourra juger de la réussite ou de l'échec de cette initiative en fonction de notre capacité d'établir cela au 50e percentile et de le faire dans un délai de 30 jours. Je pense que c'est possible. Les données sur les coûts sont là et les éléments comparables peuvent être ciblés. Je pense que cela peut être fait.

M. Vance Badawey:

Excellent.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Mon collègue, M. O'Toole, voulait poser une question, mais il n'en a pas eu l'occasion. Il m'a supplié de poser la question et je lui ai répondu que j'étais prête à utiliser...

La présidente:

[Inaudible] partir, sinon j'aurais dû faire une exception.

Mme Kelly Block:

D'accord.

La question s'adresse à vous, monsieur Emerson. Il a indiqué que vous avez été ministre du Commerce dans le passé. Il voulait savoir si le transport figurerait parmi vos principales priorités si vous étiez ministre du Commerce chargé de la renégociation de l'ALENA.

L'hon. David Emerson:

Je pense qu'il s'agit d'une priorité d'une grande importance et qu'elle devrait à tout le moins faire partie de la réflexion stratégique liée à ces négociations. Le Canada pourrait certainement vouloir intégrer la question du secteur du transport aux négociations de l'ALENA. Quant à savoir si les Américains accepteraient l'idée, je n'en sais rien.

Comme je l'ai indiqué plus tôt, je crois que la question du transport et de la logistique est probablement le principal vecteur de notre succès dans un milieu concurrentiel dont nous devrons nous occuper à l'avenir. J'ai aussi mentionné que nous avons un imposant système de transport à grande vitesse et à volume élevé. Nous avons toutes sortes de problèmes quant au régime d'imposition des actifs ferroviaires, etc. Un large éventail de problèmes, notamment des problèmes frontaliers, entraîne des perturbations et des discontinuités dans un système qui devrait être efficient et fluide.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup.

J'ai le même sentiment que mon collègue, M. Fraser. J'aurais beaucoup de questions à poser, mais je vais m'adresser à vous, monsieur Streiner, et revenir à certains commentaires que vous avez faits dans votre exposé.

Vous avez dit que le changement lié au transport ferroviaire le plus important prévu dans le projet de loi C-49 est sans doute celui qui consiste à remplacer le pouvoir conféré à l'OTC de fixer des distances d'interconnexion supérieures à 30 kilomètres ainsi que les dispositions relatives aux prix de ligne concurrentiels par l'interconnexion de longue distance. Je pense qu'il y a un rapport étroit avec les propos de M. Al-Kalib concernant les préoccupations relatives à l'interconnexion. C'est un enjeu dont j'ai entendu parler à maintes reprises dans mes discussions avec les intervenants au sujet de l'interconnexion de longue distance. Mes questions sont donc fondées sur les discussions que j'ai eues avec eux.

Monsieur Streiner, j'aimerais d'abord vous poser une question sur les arrêtés d'interconnexion de longue distance et sur la direction raisonnable du trafic. L'article 136.1 du projet de loi précise qu'un arrêté d'interconnexion de longue distance devrait s'appliquer au point de correspondance « le plus proche », « dans la direction la plus judicieuse de l'origine à la destination ». Dans le sud du Manitoba, par exemple, la circulation se fait souvent vers le nord jusqu'à une interconnexion à Winnipeg, avant de se diriger vers le sud, vers les 48 États continentaux des États-Unis. Il existe toutefois des points de correspondance plus près de la frontière, mais ils n'ont pas la même taille ou la même efficacité que l'interconnexion de Winnipeg.

Le projet de loi C-49 permet-il qu'un arrêté d'interconnexion de longue distance dirige la circulation vers Winnipeg même s'il existe un point de correspondance plus proche, mais moins efficace?

M. Scott Streiner:

Madame la présidente, je suis convaincu que les membres du Comité comprendront qu'en tant qu'arbitre, je me dois de faire preuve de prudence quant à l'interprétation d'une mesure législative qui n'est pas encore adoptée et pour laquelle nous n'avons pas les modalités d'application. Cela dit, selon ma lecture du projet de loi, il ne précise pas à l'OTC que la circulation doit se faire uniquement dans une seule direction. Par conséquent, je pense que nous prendrons cette décision, et d'autres, si le projet de loi C-49 est adopté, en fonction des faits qui nous auront été présentés et des arguments soulevés par les parties.

Mme Kelly Block:

Très bien.

Une autre question qui m'a été posée portait sur l'interdiction de présenter une demande d'arrêté d'interconnexion de longue distance lorsqu'un expéditeur a accès à un point de correspondance située à moins de 30 kilomètres. Encore une fois, l'article 129 interdit à un expéditeur de demander un arrêté d'ILD si le point d'origine est situé à moins de 30 kilomètres du point de correspondance. Beaucoup considèrent que c'est illogique si le point de correspondance n'est pas « dans la direction la plus judicieuse » de l'origine à la destination. En outre, aux articles 129 et 136.1, la mesure législative autorise l'Office à prendre une décision rationnelle concernant le point de correspondance le plus proche et le plus approprié en fonction de la direction judicieuse du trafic.

La question qui m'a été posée était la suivante: pourquoi cela ne s'appliquerait-il pas également aux installations qui sont à moins de 30 kilomètres d'un point de correspondance? Cette mesure ne représenterait-elle pas, pour les installations situées à moins de 30 kilomètres d'un point correspondance, un désavantage commercial par rapport à leurs concurrents plus éloignés?

(1635)

M. Scott Streiner:

Encore une fois, je tiens à faire preuve de prudence quant à l'interprétation d'une mesure législative que je pourrais être appelé à interpréter en tant qu'arbitre. Je dirais que si le Comité souhaite que la mesure législative soit plus claire à cet égard, il peut évidemment proposer des ajustements visant à donner à l'OTC des directives claires concernant les évaluations de ce genre.

Tout pouvoir discrétionnaire qu'on pourrait nous accorder sera toujours appliqué conformément aux dispositions de l'article 5 de la Loi sur les transports au Canada. Comme vous le savez, il s'agit de la Politique nationale des transports qui précise que la concurrence et les forces du marché sont les principaux facteurs en jeu dans la prestation de services de transport de qualité, selon une tarification équitable, et que les interventions de l'organisme de réglementation se doivent d'être stratégiques et ciblées. Nous tenons toujours compte de l'article 5 dans notre interprétation de dispositions qui pourraient être imprécises.

La présidente:

Merci, madame Block.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

D'abord et avant tout, monsieur Streiner, auriez-vous quelque chose à ajouter aux observations préliminaires que vous nous avez déjà présentées?

M. Scott Streiner:

J'aurais seulement quelques points à préciser très brièvement, madame la présidente, et M. Emerson y a déjà fait allusion. Dans les rapports annuels qu'il a présentés au Parlement depuis 2010, l'OTC a recommandé que son pouvoir de mener des enquêtes de sa propre initiative ne soit pas limité au transport aérien international. C'est malheureusement le cas actuellement. C'est en application de ce pouvoir que nous avons déclenché l'enquête concernant la période d'attente sur l'aire de trafic d'Air Transat. Comme M. Emerson l'a indiqué à la lumière de son examen de la question, nous estimons qu'il serait logique que nous puissions bénéficier d'un tel pouvoir de manière plus générale, dans les limites de paramètres raisonnables. Grâce à ce nouvel outil dont disposent déjà les autres agences réglementaires indépendantes, nous serons en mesure de réagir plus efficacement en cas de problèmes touchant notre système de transport.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Vous avez d'ailleurs répondu à une autre de mes questions.

Vous avez indiqué que la loi fixe à trois heures le temps limite d'attente sur une aire de trafic. À votre avis, est-ce que ce seuil est raisonnable?

M. Scott Streiner:

Si ma mémoire est fidèle, cette limite de trois heures pour la période d'attente sur la piste est conforme à ce que l'on retrouve dans d'autres pays. Quant à savoir si cette limite est appropriée, je pense qu'il revient au Comité et au Parlement d'en décider. Je peux toutefois vous assurer, sauf erreur de ma part, que c'est une période limite qui s'applique également ailleurs dans le monde.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez indiqué dans votre déclaration préliminaire avoir reçu quelque 230 plaintes la semaine dernière. Qu'est-ce qui a causé une telle augmentation? Est-ce un incident qui a entraîné un si grand nombre de plaintes? Est-ce qu'un avion a connu un atterrissage particulièrement difficile? Que s'est-il passé exactement?

M. Scott Streiner:

Non, toutes ces plaintes ne concernent pas le même vol. Cela relève un peu du domaine de la conjecture, mais je dirais, comme je l'ai indiqué au départ, que le nombre de plaintes concernant le transport aérien augmente généralement lorsque les gens sont davantage sensibilisés aux possibilités de recours que leur offre l'Office. C'est ce qui est peut-être arrivé à la suite des audiences sur l'incident d'Air Transat. Le travail accompli par votre comité relativement à ce projet de loi est peut-être aussi à l'origine d'une telle prise de conscience. Les reportages médiatiques au sujet des problèmes liés au transport aérien peuvent également avoir eu le même effet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est une question que nous avons déjà abordée avec les gens de Transports Canada. Disposez-vous de moyens d'action vous permettant de veiller à ce que les entreprises qui se rendent coupables à répétition de ne pas respecter les normes ou les droits des passagers puissent être pointées du doigt publiquement? Existe-t-il par exemple une base de données sur les plaintes que les gens pourraient consulter pour savoir quelles compagnies aériennes se tirent moins bien d'affaire que d'autres?

M. Scott Streiner:

La Loi sur les transports au Canada nous oblige déjà à présenter un rapport annuel au Parlement sur les tendances constatées quant aux plaintes des voyageurs aériens. Ce rapport comprend une ventilation des plaintes relatives au service pour les différentes compagnies. Ces renseignements sont donc déjà accessibles à la population. Le projet de loi C-49 prévoit des dispositions additionnelles relativement à la production d'information sur le rendement des compagnies aériennes. Une partie de cette information sera mise à la disposition des voyageurs pour les guider dans leurs décisions de réservation.

(1640)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez indiqué tout à l'heure qu'il n'y avait pas beaucoup de paramètres de mesure du rendement dans le secteur ferroviaire. Quelles améliorations préconiseriez-vous à ce chapitre? Vous en avez mentionné quelques-unes, mais j'aimerais savoir si vous considérez que cette absence de paramètres est un problème systémique?

M. Scott Streiner:

Dans notre rôle d'administrateurs de la loi, nous avons notamment pu constater — et mes deux collègues y ont fait référence en quelque sorte — que l'organisme américain responsable du transport de surface rend accessibles en ligne de grandes quantités d'information sur le rendement du système de transport ferroviaire de marchandises. Il s'agit d'une information utile à la prise de décisions, tant pour les expéditeurs eux-mêmes que pour ceux qui sont chargés d'établir les politiques. Tous les intervenants peuvent ainsi se faire une meilleure idée des secteurs où les choses se passent bien ainsi que des points de friction ou des problèmes qui peuvent affecter le système. Je pense qu'il serait important que des renseignements comparables soient accessibles en ligne au Canada. Cela étant dit, il ne faut pas négliger pour autant la protection des informations ayant une valeur commerciale. Je pense donc qu'il est primordial que les parlementaires trouvent le juste équilibre en mettant la dernière main à cette loi dont l'Office devra assurer la mise en oeuvre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une dernière question pour vous avant de passer à M. Emerson. Est-ce que l'OTC peut faire quelque chose relativement à la qualité sans cesse décroissante de la nourriture que l'on nous sert dans les avions?

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. David de Burgh Graham: Monsieur Emerson, vous avez mentionné dans vos observations l'intégration imminente du secteur ferroviaire. En 1999, le CN a essayé d'acheter BNSF alors que le CP a fait la même chose avec NS en 2015. Est-ce qu'une telle fusion des entreprises ferroviaires est une bonne chose à vos yeux?

L'hon. David Emerson:

Je pense qu'il est souhaitable que nous ayons des chemins de fer transcontinentaux, et j'estime qu'une partie de ces efforts d'intégration viseront l'ouverture de corridors transcontinentaux de transport à grande vitesse et à volume élevé. Selon moi, cette intégration va dans le sens d'une plus grande efficience du transport en Amérique du Nord.

J'ai toutefois bien peur que l'on néglige les lignes tributaires dans le contexte de ce regroupement des forces et d'un recours accru aux corridors à grande vitesse et à fort volume. C'est ainsi que j'aimerais bien voir le gouvernement du Canada mettre en place un système national de transport ferroviaire qui comprendrait notamment des chemins de fer d'intérêt local relevant ou non de la compétence des provinces. En l'absence de mesures plus concrètes et plus ciblées pour assurer la viabilité financière de ces transporteurs sur courte distance, nous allons littéralement abandonner à leur sort des centaines de localités ne se situant pas à proximité des corridors à haute vitesse et volume élevé qui dépendent du transport par camion ou au moyen des lignes tributaires. Je ne crois pas que l'on porte une attention suffisante à ces services.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Emerson.

À vous la parole, monsieur Shields.

M. Martin Shields:

Monsieur Streiner, vous nous avez parlé d'un processus où l'on est passé d'environ 70 plaintes par mois à près de 1 000 mensuellement, si l'on en croit les données les plus récentes, en nous précisant que toutes ces plaintes sont réglées à la pièce. Cela ne pourra pas continuer indéfiniment. Vous avez sans doute entendu M. Emerson nous indiquer que l'on pourrait faire les choses différemment, et je présume que vous partagez cet avis et que vous examinez les possibilités qui s'offrent à vous.

Pouvez-vous nous dire ce qu'il en est?

M. Scott Streiner:

Merci.

Je dois préciser une chose. Malgré l'augmentation subite de la semaine dernière au cours de laquelle nous avons reçu 230 plaintes, notre moyenne de la dernière année se situe à environ 400 plaintes par mois, et non pas 1 000. Cela étant dit, 400 plaintes par mois c'est tout de même quatre, voire cinq ou six fois plus que ce que nous devions traiter auparavant.

Cela me ramène à mes commentaires de tout à l'heure. Si l'Office avait le pouvoir d'agir de sa propre initiative et d'intervenir de manière proactive et plus générale lorsqu'il a des motifs raisonnables de croire qu'il y a un problème dans le système de transport, une partie de ces plaintes se règleraient sans doute d'elles-mêmes.

Il est également possible que l'éventuelle adoption de la réglementation touchant les voyageurs aériens permettra de mieux préciser les droits dont disposent ces voyageurs, ce qui entraînera une stabilisation du nombre de plaintes à des niveaux inférieurs. Je ne suis pas convaincu qu'il y aura diminution dès le départ. Il est fort possible qu'il y ait plutôt augmentation. C'est ce qui est arrivé en Europe lors de l'adoption de la nouvelle réglementation qui a entraîné une plus forte prise de conscience au sein de la population. Il est toutefois plausible qu'il y ait baisse du nombre de plaintes au bout de plusieurs années, une fois que les gens connaîtront mieux leurs droits et que le système se sera stabilisé.

(1645)

M. Martin Shields:

Étant donné la manière dont vous procédez, il y a des coûts considérables associés au traitement de ces plaintes.

M. Scott Streiner:

Cela ne fait aucun doute. Il faut du personnel pour traiter ces plaintes. Nous avons pris un certain nombre de mesures d'optimisation à cet effet. Nous avons réaffecté des ressources en fonction de l'augmentation du nombre de plaintes. Les mesures que nous avons ainsi prises contribuent à l'amélioration de notre productivité, ce qui est une bonne chose en soi. La gestion de la demande est certes facilitée par le recours à la conciliation, cette approche de type ombudsman dont j'ai parlé qui permet dans bien des cas de régler une plainte en un ou deux jours ouvrables au moyen de quelques coups de téléphone. Il va de soi qu'une hausse aussi considérable du nombre de plaintes exige de nous des ressources supplémentaires.

M. Martin Shields:

Effectivement. Si vous deviez consacrer dorénavant tout votre temps à ces plaintes incessantes de clients mécontents, vous en viendriez à ne plus être capables de remplir votre mandat.

Je me tourne vers M. Emerson. Compte tenu des remarques que vous avez faites au sujet des problèmes systémiques, auriez-vous une solution à proposer?

L'hon. David Emerson:

Si l'Office avait le pouvoir d'agir de sa propre initiative — pour autant qu'il soit alors tenu de démontrer qu'il y a des motifs raisonnables de croire que le problème ne se limite pas à un seul plaignant ou que d'autres problèmes systémiques existent ou sont sur le point de se manifester — il pourrait intervenir de façon proactive en essayant de prendre des mesures de prévention ou d'atténuation.

Contrairement à bien d'autres, je ne pense pas que nous créerions ainsi une agence hors-la-loi et qu'il faudrait plutôt laisser au Parlement et au ministre le soin de tout faire. Je crois que cela nous ramène à la question de la gouvernance. Si cela n'est pas déjà chose faite, il convient de s'assurer de mettre en place une équipe de gestion capable d'agir de manière responsable de telle sorte que l'agence ou son administrateur ne devienne pas hors-la-loi. C'est tout ce qu'il y a de plus simple. Si nous étions dans le secteur privé, il y a belle lurette que l'on aurait fait le nécessaire.

M. Martin Shields:

Parmi vos 56 recommandations, je présume que vous considérez qu'il conviendrait que l'on donne suite à celle qui touche les autorités aéroportuaires.

L'hon. David Emerson:

Certainement.

Pour dire vrai, nous avons en quelque sorte perdu le contrôle pour ce qui est de ces autorités. Il faut avouer que ces gens-là sont maintenant bien tranquilles. Ils ont mené une très énergique campagne de lobbying pour faire valoir que tout se déroulait bien et qu'il n'y avait aucun problème à régler. En toute franchise, j'estime qu'il faut aller au fond des choses pour déterrer les faiblesses sous-jacentes. Ces autorités aéroportuaires ont vu le jour il y a 25 ans. Certains étaient d'avis à l'époque qu'il faudrait peut-être en faire des organisations à but lucratif parce qu'elles représentaient une formule propice au financement par le secteur privé. Il existe un moyen relativement facile d'endiguer l'influence des actionnaires à la recherche d'un bénéfice. À mes yeux, il est primordial à long terme qu'un actionnaire puisse surveiller le déroulement des choses et imposer une discipline quant à la manière dont les capitaux sont dépensés et les activités sont administrées par certaines de ces autorités. Tout semble aller plutôt bien pour l'instant, mais il est fort possible que l'avenir soit moins rose, car les coûts ne cessent d'augmenter.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Mes prochaines questions s'adressent à vous, monsieur Streiner. J'ai vraiment besoin de vos lumières pour essayer de comprendre une réalité qui n'est pas la mienne, celle de l'agriculture dans l'Ouest.

Ma première question concerne le revenu admissible maximal. Je n'arrive pas à trouver la raison pour laquelle les dérivés ou les produits du soya sont exclus de cette mesure, d'autant plus que le marché semble de plus en plus intégré. Les grains provenant des États-Unis font partie du calcul alors que le soya produit au Canada n'en fait pas partie.

Pouvez-vous m'éclairer là-dessus?

M. Scott Streiner:

Encore une fois, c'est une question de politique, d'objectifs et de logique du projet de loi. En tout respect, c'est une question qu'il faudrait poser au ministre et aux gens de Transports Canada. Ce n'est pas une question qui s'adresse à l'Office qui administre la loi, mais qui n'en est pas l'auteur.

(1650)

M. Robert Aubin:

Jusqu'à présent, cela vous a-t-il causé un certain nombre de problèmes dans vos relations avec les producteurs ou les transporteurs?

M. Scott Streiner:

Encore une fois, je ne pense pas que ce soit une question qui s'adresse à l'organisme responsable de l'administration de la loi.

M. Robert Aubin:

J'ai bien compris.

J'essaie avec un deuxième sujet, en espérant...

Je vois que vous voulez ajouter quelque chose, monsieur Al-Katib. [Traduction]

M. Murad Al-Katib:

J'aurais une brève précision à apporter.

Jusqu'à tout récemment, le soya était très peu cultivé dans l'Ouest canadien. Cette culture s'étend maintenant vers l'est du pays. Au cours des dernières années, le Manitoba est ainsi devenu un producteur très important de soya. Des agriculteurs exercent des pressions pour que le programme du revenu admissible maximal s'applique à d'autres produits. On a notamment évoqué le soya et les pois chiches qui sont également exclus. Nous avons nous-mêmes recommandé que quelques produits supplémentaires puissent être ajoutés après examen. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je comprends bien que la perspective est historique. À l'époque où la production était minimale, cela pouvait se comprendre, mais aujourd'hui, ce serait inacceptable. Je vous remercie.

Ma deuxième question porte sur les mesures d'interconnexion et, surtout, sur la possibilité pour une compagnie de chemin de fer de supprimer une interconnexion de sa liste. Les paragraphes 136.9(1) et (2) du projet de loi décrivent les obligations des compagnies de chemin de fer de maintenir une liste des interconnexions disponibles et un processus prévoyant un préavis de 60 jours pour retirer un échange de cette liste.

À la lecture de cela, j'avais compris que, après avoir donné le préavis de 60 jours, le temps s'étant écoulé, ces obligations étaient terminées. Or, dans sa foire aux questions de la semaine dernière, Transports Canada note que les compagnies de chemin de fer ont d'autres obligations générales qu'elles doivent continuer à respecter au-delà de ce préavis de 60 jours.

Il y a là un problème de cohérence entre ce que dit le projet de loi C-49 et ce que dit la foire aux questions de Transports Canada. Tout au moins, en tout cas, il y a un manque de clarté au sujet des obligations générales que doivent respecter les transporteurs.

M. Scott Streiner:

Je n'étais pas ici pendant les témoignages des gens de Transports Canada. Je ne sais donc pas de quelles dispositions ils ont parlé.[Traduction]

Si vous parlez des dispositions de la loi en matière de suspension, je peux vous assurer qu'elles imposent un long processus aux entreprises ferroviaires qui souhaitent mettre fin à l'exploitation d'une ligne de chemin de fer ou en transférer la responsabilité.

Par ailleurs, je crois que la suppression d'un point d'interconnexion est assujettie à un processus distinct, conformément à la disposition à laquelle vous faites référence, mais les choses se passent autrement lorsqu'il s'agit d'interrompre le service. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Monsieur Brassard.

M. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur Emerson, vous avez indiqué que l'on ne se préoccupe pas suffisamment du rôle joué par les chemins de fer d'intérêt local. Si je peux vous donner l'exemple de ma ville, la municipalité de Barrie est propriétaire d'un tel chemin de fer. Dans bien des cas, c'est la solution la moins coûteuse pour les entreprises locales qui souhaitent expédier leurs marchandises jusqu'à un chemin de fer de catégorie 1. L'entretien des passages à niveau, des voies et de tout le reste exige des investissements importants.

J'aimerais savoir si vous pourriez nous en dire plus long à ce sujet. Quelles mesures doivent être prises pour assurer la rentabilité à long terme de ces lignes secondaires si importantes pour bien des municipalités?

L'hon. David Emerson:

Bon nombre de ces chemins de fer d'intérêt local ont en quelque sorte été abandonnés par des entreprises ferroviaires de catégorie 1. Leur santé financière est plutôt fragile, notamment du fait qu'ils ne bénéficient pas d'allégements fiscaux et d'avantages comparables à ceux dont profitent par exemple leurs équivalents américains.

Dans notre rapport, nous recommandons que les investissements dans les chemins de fer canadiens d'intérêt local soient traités d'une manière qui se rapproche davantage de ce qui se fait aux États-Unis où le gouvernement donne en outre accès à différents bassins de capitaux pour ces investissements.

Je ne sais pas si Murad souhaite ajouter quelque chose à ce sujet, mais j'estime que c'est un problème très grave qui doit être réglé sans tarder. Sinon, tout le monde sera forcé de recourir au transport par camion ou alors on devra se tourner vers une solution tardive qui se révélera inefficace.

(1655)

M. Murad Al-Katib:

Nous avons recommandé des mesures incitatives pour le recours aux voies tributaires afin d'assurer le transport jusqu'aux derniers tronçons. À ce titre, je peux vous citer l'application de la déduction pour amortissement accéléré aux chemins de fer d'intérêt local, l'établissement d'une infrastructure pour ces chemins de fer et la possibilité pour ceux-ci de demander du financement dans le cadre du Fonds Chantiers Canada. C'est ce que nous avons proposé.

C'est un élément essentiel à l'interconnectivité. Dans le cadre du processus d'intégration, les entreprises ferroviaires vont se tourner vers les lignes principales. La densification des lignes tributaires est essentielle au développement économique rural au Canada.

M. John Brassard:

Êtes-vous déçu de constater que ce projet de loi ne s'attaque pas au problème en question? Y aurait-il lieu de faire quelque chose à ce chapitre?

M. Murad Al-Katib:

C'était l'une de nos recommandations principales. On n'y donne pas suite pour l'instant. Il est bien certain que c'est décevant.

M. John Brassard:

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur Al-Katib, comme vous avez vous-même soulevé cet aspect, j'aimerais savoir ce qui constitue selon vous un service suffisant et adéquat. Si vous avez des idées sur la forme qu'un tel service devrait prendre, je voudrais bien les entendre. Si vous estimez que c'est trop délicat, vous pourriez seulement nous suggérer des pistes de réflexion aux fins de notre analyse de la question.

M. Murad Al-Katib:

Il en a été amplement question lors des consultations. Les expéditeurs considèrent notamment qu'un service est suffisant et adéquat s'il répond à tous leurs besoins, point final. Nous en sommes arrivés à la conclusion qu'il fallait respecter les droits des expéditeurs tout en assurant l'efficience du système de transport. Nous sommes donc allés un peu plus loin. Certains expéditeurs estiment tout à fait aberrant que nous ne nous soyons pas contentés de respecter leurs droits.

À titre d'exemple, on peut se demander s'il est judicieux d'investir 10 $ pour obtenir un gain d'efficience de 1 $ en respectant les droits de l'expéditeur. Je dirais que ce n'est pas le cas. Il y a différents facteurs à considérer pour déterminer si un service est adéquat et suffisant. Les droits des expéditeurs sont fondamentaux, mais il est également primordial d'assurer le fonctionnement efficace d'un système qui répond aux besoins de tous les intervenants.

M. Ken Hardie:

Monsieur Streiner, vous avez indiqué que vous alliez vous pencher sur les tarifs des compagnies aériennes pour déterminer dans quelle mesure elles satisfont aux normes de rendement applicables. Est-ce bien ce que vous avez dit?

M. Scott Streiner:

Pas tout à fait, car il nous est déjà possible d'évaluer l'application de ces tarifs. Lorsque nous recevons une plainte au sujet d'un incident, nous pouvons vérifier si la compagnie aérienne s'est conformée aux tarifs applicables. Nous pouvons aussi toutefois déterminer si les tarifs en question sont raisonnables. En vertu du projet de loi  C-49, nous prendrons des règlements établissant les normes minimales pour des incidents comme des vols retardés et des bagages perdus. On considérera que ces normes minimales sont intégrées aux tarifs, à moins que ceux-ci soient plus généreux que ce que prévoit la réglementation.

M. Ken Hardie:

Il s'agirait donc essentiellement de vérifier les tarifs pour s'assurer qu'ils respectent toutes les normes applicables.

M. Scott Streiner:

Par définition, si le règlement prévoit un certain niveau d'indemnisation, par exemple, qui serait supérieur à ce que prévoyait le tarif applicable, c'est le règlement qui aurait préséance.

M. Ken Hardie:

Qu'en est-il des éléments qui ne sont pas visés par un tarif, comme le terminal, l'ACSTA et tout le reste? J'ai déjà posé la question à d'autres témoins. Il arrive que des gens soient coincés sur une aire de trafic sans que ce soit la compagnie aérienne qui en soit responsable. Comment les choses devraient-elles se passer selon vous?

M. Scott Streiner:

Les lois actuellement applicables, y compris la loi telle qu'elle serait modifiée par le projet de loi C-49 , ne nous permettent pas d'intervenir et d'imposer des normes aux autres intervenants de la chaîne d'approvisionnement du transport aérien, pas plus que de faire enquête à leur sujet. La loi nous oblige à nous limiter aux compagnies aériennes et à leurs tarifs. Cela étant dit, nous sommes conscients — comme l'ont indiqué certains témoignages entendus lors des audiences sur l'incident d'Air Transat — qu'il y a de nombreux intervenants et que les compagnies aériennes ne sont parfois pas les seules à blâmer lorsque des incidents surviennent. Ainsi donc, même si nous ne sommes pas autorisés à prendre des règlements ou à traiter des plaintes touchant d'autres intervenants, nous nous faisons un plaisir d'apporter notre aide pour contribuer à faciliter les échanges et les relations de travail entre les différentes parties en cause.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vais utiliser à nouveau un exemple pour parler de l'indemnisation des passagers qui ne sont pas traités adéquatement. J'ai été coincé sur l'aire de trafic de l'aéroport de Kelowna alors que l'on s'affairait à régler un problème technique. Je suis arrivé en retard à un rendez-vous, mais d'autres passagers ont raté leur vol de correspondance et n'ont pu partir que le lendemain. Le système d'indemnisation relève sans doute davantage de la réglementation, mais il va de soi que tous les passagers d'un même aéronef ne sont pas touchés de la même manière. Ne serait-il pas logique que l'indemnisation versée varie en fonction des répercussions ressenties?

(1700)

M. Scott Streiner:

Suivant la loi dans sa forme actuelle, il nous est possible dans certaines circonstances d'ordonner que des passagers soient indemnisés pour les dépenses engagées. Dans l'exemple que vous donnez, il pourrait ainsi y avoir indemnisation à l'égard d'une nuit d'hébergement ou de repas supplémentaires pour une personne qui a raté une correspondance. Quant à savoir si les niveaux d'indemnisation établis par les règlements que nous allons prendre correspondront à un montant fixe applicable à tous ou si on laissera une certaine marge de manoeuvre en fonction des circonstances particulières à chaque cas, je crois qu'il conviendra d'en traiter dans le cadre des consultations à venir.

M. Ken Hardie:

J'ai une dernière question pour vous, monsieur Emerson. J'aimerais que nous parlions du Grand Nord. Y a-t-il dans ce projet de loi des mesures qui vont faciliter la vie aux résidants de cette région du pays?

L'hon. David Emerson:

Nous avons passé beaucoup de temps dans le Nord pour discuter avec les gens. Je suis convaincu depuis longtemps que le Canada néglige cette partie du pays. J'estime toujours que nous n'accordons pas suffisamment d'importance aux infrastructures en place dans le Nord. Selon moi, nous ne nous occupons pas assez des routes, de la cartographie des fonds marins ou des systèmes de prévision météo. Il est ainsi très difficile pour les transporteurs aériens du Nord d'offrir leurs services sur les sites Web utilisés par les fonctionnaires pour réserver des vols. Le problème n'est toujours pas réglé. À titre d'exemple, Air North arrive très difficilement à remplir ses avions de voyageurs nordiques du fait que quelqu'un là-bas s'emploie en quelque sorte à compliquer les choses aux fonctionnaires qui souhaiteraient recourir aux services de cette entreprise. Il y a toute une variété de problèmes. Nous avons cerné des enjeux liés aux corridors de commerce et de transport que nous estimons cruciaux, car il y aura éventuellement développement durable du Nord du point de vue environnemental, et nous devons agir 20 ou 30 ans à l'avance pour déterminer les corridors à utiliser et penser à des techniques de financement des infrastructures qui permettront l'exploitation de certains de ces corridors, en reconnaissant le fait que le premier projet réalisé dans n'importe lequel d'entre eux ne permettra pas de financer l'ensemble du corridor. Il devient donc nécessaire de s'appuyer sur des techniques très perfectionnées pour attirer dans le Nord les investissements institutionnels nécessaires à ce développement.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Hardie.

MM. Emerson, Streiner et Al-Katib, nous vous remercions sincèrement. Les questions intéressantes qui vous ont été posées témoignent bien de l'intérêt suscité par vos observations.

Je crois que le projet de loi C-49 va dans le sens d'une grande partie du travail que vous avez déjà accompli, monsieur Emerson.

Merci beaucoup à tous les trois de votre présence aujourd'hui.

Le Comité interrompt temporairement ses travaux.

(1700)

(1800)

La présidente:

Nous allons reprendre notre étude du projet de loi C-49.

Nous accueillons maintenant un nouveau groupe de témoins. Il s'agit de Mme Jeanette Southwood, vice-présidente, Stratégie et partenariats, pour Ingénieurs Canada à North York; et de M. Ray Orb, président de l'Association des municipalités rurales de la Saskatchewan.

Nous vous connaissons très bien. Nous avons un membre du Comité qui nous rappelle sans cesse la situation de la Saskatchewan. Nous sommes très heureux de vous accueillir.

Nous recevons bien sûr également M. George Bell de Metrolinx.

Bienvenue à tous les trois.

Monsieur Orb, vous voulez commencer?

M. Ray Orb (président, Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities):

Merci.

Bonsoir. Je vous remercie de m'avoir invité à témoigner, et je suis heureux d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Je m'appelle Ray Orb et je suis vice-président de la Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities (SARM).

La SARM représente les 296 municipalités rurales de la Saskatchewan. Le secteur agricole revêt une importance capitale au sein de nos municipalités membres. Près de 40 % des terres arables du Canada se trouvent en Saskatchewan. Cette province est ainsi devenue le plus grand exportateur mondial de lentilles, de pois secs, de moutarde, de lin et de canola.

En 2016, la Saskatchewan a exporté pour 14,4 milliards de dollars de produits agroalimentaires. Comme la Saskatchewan est une province enclavée, il lui faut un système de transport ferroviaire efficace et efficient pour amener ces produits vers les marchés. Je suis heureux d'avoir la chance aujourd'hui de discuter du projet de loi C-49, car la réussite des membres de la SARM et du secteur de l'agriculture dépend du système de transport.

La SARM défend depuis longtemps l'idée d'une obligation accrue de production de rapports. Une meilleure connaissance des faits favorise une meilleure prise de décisions par les producteurs et les autres intéressés de la chaîne d'approvisionnement. Selon la SARM, les compagnies de chemin de fer devraient être tenues de présenter des plans exposant la façon dont elles vont répondre à la demande pour la prochaine campagne agricole. Ces plans devraient englober des plans d'intervention en cas de moissons plus abondantes et prévoir des dispositions pour composer avec les mois d'hiver, qui sont très froids dans les Prairies, en indiquant, par exemple, quel matériel et combien d'équipes seront nécessaires.

La SARM se réjouit de constater que le projet de loi C-49 prévoit conférer au gouverneur en conseil des pouvoirs accrus d'exiger, par règlement, que les compagnies de chemin de fer importantes fournissent au ministère des Transports des renseignements relatifs à leurs services, à leurs prix et à leur rendement. Le fait d'exiger plus de renseignements et de faire en sorte que les différents maillons de la chaîne d'approvisionnement aient plus d'information n'est pas, en soi, une solution aux problèmes que pose le transport, mais c'est un élément crucial dans le règlement de ces problèmes.

La SARM a toujours défendu aussi l'idée qu'il fallait des sanctions réciproques. Il importe d'exiger des comptes des sociétés ferroviaires et des autres intervenants de la chaîne d'approvisionnement parce que ce sont les producteurs qui risquent de tout perdre quand les services ne sont pas adéquats.

Le projet de loi C-49 conférera aux expéditeurs le droit d'obtenir des conditions contractuelles prévoyant les sommes à payer en cas de non-respect des obligations de service des compagnies de chemin de fer. Il faudra mieux expliquer aux producteurs comment cette mesure fonctionnera. Il serait utile pour toutes les parties en cause que l'Office des transports du Canada fournisse plus d'information, comme des lignes directrices ou des exemples de pratiques exemplaires dans le cas des sanctions réciproques.

La SARM regrette que la mesure législative ne fasse aucune mention des sanctions réciproques. En cas d'impasse entre l'expéditeur et le transporteur concernant les sanctions réciproques, l'Office des transports du Canada interviendra-t-il? Il faut plus de précisions sur les services de règlement informel de différends. Il semble qu'il faille encore régler des détails concernant les sanctions réciproques, mais la SARM est heureuse de voir que de telles sanctions seront permises.

Les services de règlement informel des différends constituent également une modification appréciée par la SARM. Il est indispensable de fournir en temps utile aux producteurs des services de règlement des différends efficaces et d'un bon rapport qualité-prix. Une fois les récoltes terminées, les producteurs doivent acheminer rapidement leurs produits aux marchés pour respecter leurs obligations contractuelles. Les différends devront être réglés aussi vite que possible afin que les producteurs n'encourent pas des sanctions additionnelles ou des délais inutiles.

L'interconnexion de longue distance pourrait aussi être une nouvelle disposition intéressante pour les producteurs. La SARM était favorable à l'augmentation des distances d'interconnexion proposée dans la Loi sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grain. On espérait que l'augmentation des distances d'interconnexion prévue dans cette loi soit rendue permanente. Le rayon élargi sera utile à davantage de producteurs, mais ceux qui sont admissibles devront toujours négocier avec les transporteurs avant de demander une interconnexion de longue distance. Il reste à voir si cette nouvelle disposition est la solution à long terme dont on avait besoin.

La SARM et ses membres sont heureux que la disposition sur le revenu admissible maximal (RAM) ait été conservée. Les membres de la SARM sont contre l'élimination du RAM. Cette disposition met les producteurs à l'abri de frais de transport excessifs, assure le mouvement du grain et permet aux compagnies de chemin de fer de réinvestir dans le réseau ferroviaire. Les membres de la SARM ont adopté une résolution demandant que la formule du RAM, au lieu d'être éliminée, soit révisée dès que possible. La SARM espère que les modifications au RAM assureront toujours la reddition de comptes et la transparence des sociétés ferroviaires tout en protégeant les producteurs contre les frais de transport élevés.

(1805)



Dans l'ensemble, le projet de loi C-49 semble répondre à bon nombre des préoccupations des producteurs. L'examen fait par l'Office des transports a donné beaucoup d'occasions au secteur de l'agriculture de réagir aux propositions, et la SARM en est reconnaissante. La SARM continuera à faire part de ses réactions et de ses observations chaque fois qu'on le lui permettra. Elle est prête à poursuivre le travail avec le gouvernement fédéral et tous les intéressés pour assurer l'essor du secteur agricole.

Merci encore de nous avoir permis de vous rencontrer aujourd'hui.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Orb.

Monsieur Bell de Metrolinx.

M. George Bell (vice-président, Sécurité et protection, Metrolinx):

Merci.

Je veux d'abord vous remercier de me donner l'occasion de prendre la parole devant vous aujourd'hui. J'aimerais traiter avec vous de la question des enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive, un enjeu que nous estimons crucial.

Je m'appelle George Bell et je travaille pour Metrolinx, une société de transport en commun qui exploite le réseau GO et la liaison express entre le centre-ville et l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto. Le réseau GO fait de Metrolinx le plus important exploitant de transport urbain par rail au Canada avec plus de 450 kilomètres de voies pour les sept lignes desservant la grande région de Toronto et Hamilton. Lorsque j'ai déménagé à Toronto pour occuper cet emploi, j'ai été surpris d'apprendre qu'un Canadien sur six vit dans la région desservie par le réseau GO. Nous transportons plus de 250 000 personnes par jour. Notre flotte ferroviaire est impressionnante: 651 wagons de voyageurs, 62 locomotives et 15 véhicules ferroviaires pour notre liaison express avec l'aéroport Pearson. Nous utilisons actuellement 61 rames de train pour effectuer quelque 300 trajets par jour. Pour vous donner une meilleure idée, nos trains les plus longs peuvent transporter environ 2 500 passagers, soit à peu près le même nombre que cinq avions gros porteurs.

Nos trains roulent en mode réversible. Ainsi, la locomotive demeure toujours à la même extrémité du train. Si nous faisons un trajet est-ouest, la locomotive demeure à l'extrémité est du train, peu importe la direction prise. Pour les trajets nord-sud, la locomotive est toujours au sud du train. Nous produisons une force motrice pour tirer ou pousser les wagons sur la voie. Lorsque la locomotive est en mode poussée, l'équipage dirige le train à partir de l'extrémité opposée dans ce qu'on appelle une voiture à cabine de conduite. On y retrouve les mêmes commandes que dans la locomotive avec contrôle à distance. C'est l'inverse lorsque la locomotive tire le train. C'est une considération importante dans ce contexte.

Depuis les tout débuts, Metrolinx a amélioré sans cesse son offre sur le réseau GO en vue d'en faire un service continu de transport régional bidirectionnel, plutôt que de simplement desservir les banlieues aux heures de pointe. Notre plus récent service, le train express régional, misera sur la planification effectuée et les progrès réalisés au chapitre des infrastructures, autant d'éléments qui accéléreront l'expansion future des services. Ainsi, des trains électriques circuleront à toutes les 15 minutes ou moins dans nos corridors les plus achalandés; nous multiplierons par quatre le nombre de trajets en dehors des heures de pointe sur semaine, en incluant les soirées et les fins de semaine; et nous doublerons le nombre de trajets pendant les périodes de pointe en semaine. Grâce à cette expansion, le nombre de voyages hebdomadaires passera à environ 6 000 d'ici 2024.

Tous ces chiffres revêtent une importance cruciale lorsque l'on considère le recours aux enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive pour améliorer la sécurité des chemins de fer et des passagers. Nous devons ainsi assumer de très importantes responsabilités quant à la sécurité de nos voyageurs, de nos collectivités et de nos employés. Nous prenons ces responsabilités très au sérieux. Nous nous efforçons d'être des chefs de file en matière de sécurité et il n'est pas rare que nous soyons parmi les premiers à adopter de nouvelles technologies et méthodes de travail. L'utilisation d'enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive témoigne bien de nos idées avant-gardistes. Toutes les locomotives et les voitures à cabine de conduite du réseau GO sont déjà équipées de tels enregistreurs.

Pour vous donner une meilleure idée, disons qu'il s'agit d'un système d'enregistrement qui est alimenté par quatre caméras et deux microphones. J'aurais voulu vous présenter des photos, mais je ne les ai malheureusement pas avec moi. Trois des caméras fournissent des images de l'intérieur de la locomotive. Deux d'entre elles montrent les conducteurs à partir des coins arrière de la cabine. L'autre est placée à l'avant pour présenter une image de la paroi arrière de la locomotive. Nous ne cherchons pas à capter l'expression faciale de nos conducteurs. La caméra située à l'avant vise surtout à montrer le mur arrière où l'on retrouve différents équipements permettant de poser un diagnostic sur le fonctionnement de la locomotive. Les deux caméras arrière permettent de voir comment les conducteurs s'y prennent. On peut voir la façon dont ils manipulent les commandes d'accélération et de freinage et même les prendre en flagrant délit s'ils utilisent un téléphone, une activité interdite, mais tout de même possible.

(1810)



Nous avons aussi deux micros qui captent toutes les conversations dans la locomotive. La quatrième caméra présente ce qui se passe devant la locomotive. Les suicides sont malheureusement chose fréquente pour les chemins de fer, et les trains de banlieue tout particulièrement. La caméra située à l'avant nous fournit des éléments de preuve lorsqu'il arrive quelque chose devant la locomotive. C'est la seule caméra du système dont les images peuvent être téléchargées directement. Pour les trois autres, des permissions spéciales sont nécessaires, et seules les autorités responsables ont accès aux images.

Nous sommes convaincus que la technologie que nous avons mise en place dans nos locomotives peut permettre de sauver des vies et d'améliorer la sécurité de nos passagers. Le Bureau de la sécurité des transports a recommandé le recours aux enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive, tant aux fins des enquêtes que dans le cadre des systèmes de gestion de la sécurité utilisés par les entreprises ferroviaires pour déterminer proactivement les améliorations à apporter. Il est bien certain que cette technologie permet de recueillir des éléments de preuve lorsqu'il s'agit de déterminer les causes d'un accident. Nous sommes d'avis qu'il serait plus utile et responsable d'autoriser la consultation des renseignements captés par ces enregistreurs avant même qu'un accident se produise. Notre sécurité se trouverait grandement améliorée si nous pouvions déterminer à l'avance les tendances comportementales ou ergonomiques pouvant être à l'origine d'accidents.

Metrolinx convient qu'il est très important de protéger la vie privée de l'équipage de conduite. Toutes les fois qu'un enregistreur a été installé, nous en avons informé nos équipages en précisant bien la manière dont il était utilisé. Cela étant dit, nous ne voyons pas vraiment de caractère privé aux activités qui ont cours aux commandes d'un véhicule à cabine de conduite ou d'une locomotive. Nos mécaniciens et nos conducteurs sont des professionnels très qualifiés, et nous nous attendons à ce qu'ils se comportent en conséquence dans le cadre de leurs fonctions. En outre, nous estimons que la sécurité doit primer lorsqu'il y a un choix à faire entre sécurité et protection de la vie privée. C'est d'autant plus vrai que tout comportement dangereux du conducteur d'un train de banlieue ne met pas seulement en péril sa propre sécurité, mais aussi celle de 2 500 passagers à bord. Nous estimons avoir l'obligation absolue d'assurer aux passagers de nos trains et à leur famille des déplacements en toute sécurité. Nous serons mieux à même de nous acquitter de cette obligation si l'on permet aux entreprises comme la nôtre d'utiliser les enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive de façon non punitive et proactive.

Merci de votre attention.

(1815)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Bell.

Madame Southwood.

Mme Jeanette Southwood (vice-présidente, Stratégie et Partenariats, Ingénieurs Canada):

Je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de vous parler aujourd'hui, madame la présidente. Je suis très heureuse d'exposer la position d'Ingénieurs Canada sur le projet de loi C-49, Loi sur la modernisation des transports.

Je m'appelle Jeanette Southwood. Dans le cadre de mes fonctions précédentes de directrice d'une société d'ingénierie mondiale, je dirigeais le volet de la viabilité des villes à l'échelle mondiale et celui du développement urbain et de l'infrastructure au Canada. Mon équipe se concentrait sur des domaines tels la chaîne d'approvisionnement, la continuité des activités, l'adaptation au climat, l'intensification et la réhabilitation urbaines, ainsi que l'intégration stratégique d'innovations et de connaissances de pointe dans les solutions proposées aux clients privés et publics. Nous nous occupions notamment du transport ferroviaire.

Je suis actuellement vice-présidente, Stratégie et Partenariats, à Ingénieurs Canada, un organisme qui se situe ici, à Ottawa. Ingénieurs Canada est un organisme national qui représente 12 associations provinciales et territoriales qui réglementent l'exercice de la profession d'ingénieur au Canada et qui accorde des permis d'exercice à plus de 290 000 ingénieurs professionnels au pays. Ensemble, nous nous efforçons de faire progresser la profession pour servir l'intérêt public.

Dans le cadre de l'examen et des consultations publiques visant l'ensemble de la Loi sur la modernisation des transports, le témoignage d'Ingénieurs Canada se concentre aujourd'hui sur l'article 11 de la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire, et surtout sur les éléments liés à la conception, à la construction et à l'entretien d'installations ferroviaires au Canada. Aujourd'hui, j'aimerais parler de trois recommandations que nous formulons à cet égard.

Nous recommandons d'abord de préciser la définition des principes d'ingénierie contenus dans l'article 11 de la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire. Ensuite, nous recommandons d'obtenir la participation d'ingénieurs professionnels tout au long du cycle de vie de l'infrastructure ferroviaire. Enfin, nous recommandons de mener des évaluations sur la vulnérabilité des infrastructures ferroviaires du Canada au climat et d'adapter ensuite ces infrastructures aux changements climatiques.

Tout d'abord, en ce qui concerne les principes d'ingénierie,12 ordres provinciaux et territoriaux réglementent l'exercice de l'ingénierie au Canada. Ces organismes de réglementation doivent s'assurer que les ingénieurs exercent leurs fonctions de manière professionnelle, éthique et compétente, et qu'ils respectent les lois provinciales ou territoriales, les codes de déontologie ou les cadres juridiques en vigueur relativement à la profession d'ingénieur. Des normes de conduite techniques et professionnelles sont établies, révisées et mises en oeuvre à l'échelon provincial, et des organismes de réglementation formés d'ingénieurs professionnels sont responsables de leur mise en oeuvre sur leur territoire.

Étant donné qu'ils sont des professionnels réglementés, les ingénieurs professionnels doivent travailler dans l'intérêt du public et assurer la sécurité de la population. C'est pourquoi Ingénieurs Canada appuie et encourage vivement la participation directe d'ingénieurs professionnels à la conception, à la construction, à l'entretien, à l'évaluation, à l'utilisation et à la modification de tous les travaux d'ingénierie liés au transport ferroviaire au Canada, non seulement dans le but d'accroître la transparence et la confiance du public à l'égard d'un système ferroviaire sécuritaire et bien réglementé, mais également pour assurer la sécurité du public et la reddition de comptes dans toutes les installations ferroviaires.

Il est essentiel que le gouvernement fédéral intègre les ingénieurs professionnels à l'ensemble du cycle de vie d'un projet ferroviaire, et pas seulement à la dernière étape de l'approbation d'un projet ferroviaire. Ingénieurs Canada encourage donc le gouvernement fédéral à prendre des mesures pour veiller à concrétiser cette vision. Il est également important de confier à des ingénieurs professionnels la tâche de superviser et de faire respecter les normes et les règlements mis en oeuvre par le gouvernement fédéral.

Actuellement, la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire précise que les entreprises sont tenues de divulguer les qualifications et les permis des membres de leur personnel de sécurité. Toutefois, il est évident que l'article 11 de la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire présente des ambiguïtés et des possibilités de fausses interprétations, surtout en ce qui concerne la définition des rôles et des principes liés à l'ingénierie. En effet, la loi énonce ce qui suit: Les travaux relatifs aux installations ferroviaires, notamment la conception, la construction, l'évaluation, l'entretien ou la modification, sont effectués conformément à des principes d'ingénierie bien établis.

L'ambiguïté liée à l'expression « principes d'ingénierie » peut fausser l'interprétation et créer une situation dans laquelle la sécurité du public est compromise. La loi devrait préciser que les principes d'ingénierie doivent être mis en oeuvre par un ingénieur professionnel. Les fonctionnaires fédéraux responsables de la supervision des travaux d'ingénierie auxquels fait référence l'article 11 doivent également être des ingénieurs professionnels. En effet, lorsque des ingénieurs professionnels participent à la prise de décision, l'application cohérente des procédures liées à la sécurité et au choix de l'emplacement permet de mieux protéger les collectivités.

Notre deuxième recommandation concerne le cycle de vie de l'infrastructure ferroviaire. En effet, la participation d'ingénieurs professionnels au cycle de vie des projets ferroviaires assurera non seulement que ces projets sont mis en oeuvre en tenant compte de la sécurité du public, mais également que les ingénieurs sont bien équipés pour la conception, la construction et la gestion d'une infrastructure ferroviaire résiliente.

(1820)



Comme nous l'ont dit les deux témoins précédents, l'infrastructure ferroviaire du Canada favorise directement la croissance de l'économie canadienne, car ce secteur fournit chaque année des services à plus de 10 000 clients commerciaux et industriels, déplace environ 4 millions de wagons de marchandises d'un bout à l'autre du pays et aux États-Unis, et fournit du travail à environ 70 millions de personnes chaque année à Montréal, dans la région du Grand Toronto et à Vancouver. Ce vaste réseau intégré doit être exploité efficacement en tenant compte de la sécurité du public, ce qui nécessite des services extrêmement fiables.

Enfin, j'aimerais parler de notre recommandation liée à la vulnérabilité au climat. Une infrastructure résiliente représente la force motrice des sociétés productives et des industries stables et elle accroît la confiance du public à l'égard de l'infrastructure civile. Toutefois, le bilan en matière d'infrastructure du Canada souligne que la plus grande partie de l'infrastructure canadienne actuelle est vulnérable aux effets des conditions météorologiques extrêmes, qui sont de plus en plus fréquentes et violentes. L'infrastructure ferroviaire vulnérable pose un risque non seulement pour la sécurité publique, mais également pour la productivité des particuliers et des entreprises canadiennes, ainsi que pour l'économie du pays. Sans le recours constant aux évaluations liées à la vulnérabilité au climat pour éclairer la conception dans le domaine ferroviaire, la confiance du public à l'égard de l'infrastructure ferroviaire s'effritera.

Par exemple, le 23 mai 2017 — il y a seulement quelques mois —, des inondations et des débits d'eau jamais enregistrés auparavant ont lourdement endommagé le chemin de fer de la baie d'Hudson à Churchill, au Manitoba. Cette inondation importante a lourdement endommagé cinq ponts, a emporté 19 sections de voies ferrées, et exigé la vérification de l'intégrité structurale de 30 ponts et de 600 ponceaux. Sur ce chemin de fer, on transporte des aliments, des marchandises et des gens vers la collectivité éloignée de Churchill, au Manitoba, une collectivité fréquemment visitée par les touristes pendant l'été. Les dommages considérables qu'a subis le chemin de fer de la baie d'Hudson ont causé des perturbations au service, ce qui a nécessité le transport par avion de biens, de services et de gens — un mode de transport dispendieux pour cette collectivité nordique. Il faudra des mois pour réparer les dommages catastrophiques causés au chemin de fer, ce qui perturbera considérablement le service sur le plan de la productivité individuelle et commerciale et diminuera confiance du public à l'égard de l'infrastructure ferroviaire.

Les évaluations sur la vulnérabilité au climat informent les planificateurs des effets potentiels des conditions météorologiques extrêmes sur l'infrastructure publique et privée dans les collectivités de partout au Canada. Les ingénieurs professionnels du Canada sont des chefs de file dans le domaine de l'adaptation et ils sont prêts à collaborer avec le gouvernement fédéral pour fournir des conseils impartiaux et transparents en vue de protéger l'infrastructure ferroviaire des effets dévastateurs liés aux changements climatiques. Ingénieurs Canada, en collaboration avec Ressources naturelles Canada, a mis au point un outil d'évaluation du risque posé par le climat. Cet outil augmente grandement la résilience de l'infrastructure, accroît la confiance du public à l'égard de l'infrastructure ferroviaire et diminue la gravité des effets des changements climatiques sur la productivité individuelle et commerciale.

Le protocole du Comité sur la vulnérabilité de l'ingénierie des infrastructures publiques, aussi appelé CVIIP, fournit aux ingénieurs, aux géoscientifiques, aux propriétaires d'infrastructures et aux gestionnaires un outil pour concevoir et construire une infrastructure ferroviaire qui sera en mesure de s'adapter à un climat qui change rapidement. Ce protocole a été mis en oeuvre plus de 40 fois au Canada dans un large éventail de systèmes d'infrastructure — notamment dans le cas de Metrolinx —, et trois fois à l'étranger. Ingénieurs Canada encourage le gouvernement fédéral à investir dans l'évaluation précoce et dans les outils de prévention, par exemple le protocole du CVIIP, à en faire une condition à l'approbation de financement, à l'acceptation d'évaluations liées à l'impact environnemental et à l'approbation de la conception de projets d'infrastructure ferroviaire qui font intervenir la réhabilitation, la réorientation, l'entretien et la mise hors service d'infrastructure ferroviaire existante. Cet investissement contribuera à maintenir les niveaux de service, à protéger l'environnement, à renforcer la productivité individuelle et commerciale, et à assurer la sécurité du public.

Madame la présidente, je vous remercie d'avoir permis à Ingénieurs Canada de livrer un exposé sur cet enjeu important devant le Comité aujourd'hui. Nous espérons que les membres du Comité reconnaîtront que les ingénieurs professionnels jouent un rôle essentiel dans l'infrastructure de transport au Canada et que les membres de notre profession sont prêts à veiller à ce que le système ferroviaire canadien soit résilient et sécuritaire et qu'il continue de contribuer à la croissance de l'économie canadienne.

(1825)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Allez-y, madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais souhaiter la bienvenue à tous les témoins. Nous avons eu une longue journée et nous avons entendu de nombreux témoins, mais nous avons peut-être gardé le meilleur pour la fin. Il se peut que personne ne vous envie de comparaître à la fin d'une longue journée, mais je vous suis certainement reconnaissante de votre témoignage.

Nous avons beaucoup parlé des enregistreurs audio-vidéo dans les locomotives, et des représentants de Transport Canada et de l'OTC nous ont également parlé de cet enjeu.

Monsieur Bell, vous avez dit qu'on utilisait les EAVL de façon proactive plutôt que de façon punitive. J'aimerais que vous approfondissiez cette question, surtout en ce qui concerne les limites de l'utilisation non punitive.

M. George Bell:

Madame la présidente, j'aimerais répondre à l'aide d'un exemple parallèle.

En vertu du Règlement sur le système de gestion de la sécurité ferroviaire, les compagnies de chemin de fer sont tenues d'instaurer un système de signalement non punitif, c'est-à-dire que si une personne moins que négligente signale un problème lié à notre chemin de fer, il est impossible de soumettre cette personne à des mesures disciplinaires ensuite. En effet, ces personnes nous rendent service, et nous voyons les choses de la même façon.

Nous considérons les EAVL de la même façon. En effet, nous ne souhaitons pas examiner la vie privée de nos opérateurs. Nous préférons nous concentrer sur l'examen de tendances et d'anomalies, et sur les façons par lesquelles nous pouvons améliorer notre système sans nuire aux personnes qui accomplissent le travail.

Nous aimerions donc utiliser les renseignements que nous pouvons obtenir grâce aux EAVL pour examiner les tendances liées au comportement ou à l'ergonomie dans nos locomotives et réagir à ces tendances plutôt que de cibler des individus.

Mme Kelly Block:

Si vous observiez des activités qui soulèvent des préoccupations ou des activités qui ne sont peut-être pas sécuritaires, estimeriez-vous avoir le devoir d'agir ou d'intervenir relativement à ces données que vous avez recueillies?

M. George Bell:

Oui, nous estimerions que nous avons le devoir d'intervenir, mais pas nécessairement par rapport à l'individu. En effet, nous souhaitons créer une culture de sécurité au sein de notre entreprise, et cette culture se fonde sur trois principes. Le premier, c'est que nous devons créer une culture de signalement. Ensuite, nous devons créer une culture axée sur la justice. Finalement, nous devons créer une culture qui favorise l'apprentissage. Si nous souhaitons créer ces deux derniers types de culture, nous ne pouvons pas adopter une approche punitive à l'égard des individus. En effet, lorsqu'on adopte une approche trop punitive à leur égard, les gens ne peuvent pas apprendre, et nous souhaitons donc éviter cela.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

J'aimerais maintenant changer complètement de sujet et vous poser quelques questions, monsieur Orb. Je tiens également à vous souhaiter la bienvenue. Je suis heureuse de vous voir. Je vous remercie de prendre le temps de venir à Ottawa pour nous faire part de vos réflexions.

J'ai remarqué que dans votre exposé, vous avez parlé de plusieurs mesures contenues dans le projet de loi C-49, mais j'aimerais surtout vous poser des questions sur les sanctions réciproques. En effet, vous avez précisé que les membres de la SARM étaient déçus, car ces sanctions n'étaient pas mentionnées de façon officielle dans le projet de loi. J'aimerais donc vous demander d'approfondir cette question et de nous faire part de vos réflexions à l'égard de la mesure d'interconnexion à longue distance contenue dans le projet de loi C-49.

Merci.

M. Ray Orb:

L'omission de mentionner les sanctions réciproques nous déçoit particulièrement, car il s'agit d'une question en suspens depuis plusieurs années. Un grand nombre des soumissions que nous avons présentées se fondent sur les récoltes de 2013-2014, qui ont battu des records. Nous ne souhaitons certainement pas qu'une telle situation se reproduise.

Les sanctions réciproques représentent un problème, car cet enjeu est réglé par l'entremise de négociations et, au bout du compte, par l'arbitrage, ce qui peut entraîner des coûts. Dans bien des cas, les petits expéditeurs n'ont pas les ressources nécessaires pour intenter des poursuites en justice, car ces démarches peuvent devenir très coûteuses. Il est donc décevant que cette question n'ait pas été mentionnée.

L'interconnexion est un enjeu différent. Nous ne comprenons pas tout à fait le nouveau projet de loi. Nous avons parlé aux représentants d'un grand nombre d'entreprises de stockage de grains, et ils sont très cyniques à cet égard. Nous en avons parlé aux membres du Groupe de travail sur la logistique du transport des récoltes — ce groupe est formé de membres de l'industrie et surtout de producteurs, de groupes de produits agricoles et d'entreprises de stockage de grains.

On nous a conseillé de prendre le temps de préciser cette question. Le problème, c'est que la nouvelle année de récolte est déjà entamée, et au Canada, et surtout dans l'Ouest canadien, la récolte devrait être beaucoup plus abondante que ce qu'avait estimé Statistique Canada en juillet, et nous devons donc accélérer ce projet de loi. Il est essentiel de régler ces deux questions.

(1830)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur Bell, si nous posions la question au syndicat qui représente les travailleurs de Metrolinx, que nous diraient ses membres au sujet de leurs relations avec l'entreprise en ce qui concerne les EAVL dans votre système?

M. George Bell:

Ce qui caractérise notamment Metrolinx et d'autres chemins de fer de banlieue, c'est que nous fonctionnons selon le modèle de passation de contrats. Les personnes qui travaillent sur nos trains ne travaillent pas directement pour Metrolinx. Elles travaillent plutôt pour Bombardier, un sous-traitant.

Les EAVL sont installés et fonctionnent depuis environ six mois. Nous n'avons eu aucune rétroaction négative de la part des syndicats. Nous les avons mis en oeuvre de manière très constructive et non punitive. Nous avons également expliqué à nos opérateurs que l'une des raisons qui nous motivent à examiner les données recueillies par les EAVL, c'est que nous souhaitons attirer l'attention sur leur bon travail et non souligner les erreurs. Cela crée donc une occasion d'apprentissage positive.

Nous n'avons donc reçu aucune réaction négative de la part du syndicat. À ce jour, ses membres ne s'opposent pas à ce que nous faisons.

M. Ken Hardie:

Vous et moi avons déjà eu la chance de travailler ensemble pour la Commission des transports du Grand Vancouver. Je sais qu'il y a plusieurs années, on a envisagé d'avoir recours aux enregistrements audio-vidéo dans le système d'autobus du Grand Vancouver. Je sais que certains des enjeux liés aux relations de travail dont nous avons parlé ici ont également émergé dans ce cas-là. Dans quelle mesure étiez-vous près de ce processus? Que pouvez-vous nous dire sur l'état des relations de travail, à votre connaissance, au sein de ce système à Vancouver?

M. George Bell:

En fait, je ne peux pas vous dire grand-chose, car j'ai presque toujours travaillé dans le domaine des chemins de fer à Vancouver.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'accord.

M. George Bell:

Je n'ai pas travaillé dans le système d'autobus.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'accord.

Vous ne recevez aucune transmission en direct des taxis, n'est-ce pas?

M. George Bell:

Non.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'accord.

Il s'est écoulé peu de temps, mais avez-vous remarqué des changements en ce qui concerne les signalements omis ou d'autres choses qui pourraient préoccuper les compagnies de chemin de fer au quotidien et qui ne mènent pas nécessairement à une collision, mais qui pourraient signifier qu'il y a un risque?

M. George Bell:

À ce jour, nous n'avons pas utilisé les renseignements de façon proactive. Nous attendons les conclusions de vos délibérations avant d'envisager de faire cela. Jusqu'à maintenant, nous n'avons pas utilisé ces renseignements de façon proactive. Toutefois, si les conclusions sont péremptoires, nous nous attendons à ce que le Bureau de la sécurité des transports intervienne et utilise les renseignements dans la mesure de ses moyens.

Donc, à l'heure actuelle, nous n'avons observé aucun changement lié aux comportements, car nous ne sommes pas en position d'observer de tels changements.

M. Ken Hardie:

Madame Southwood, les évaluations liées à la vulnérabilité au climat que vous avez mentionnées m'intéressent beaucoup. En effet, la compagnie Burlington Northern and Santa Fe a un trajet qui passe par le secteur riverain de White Rock, longe la péninsule Simiahmoo et aboutit à Vancouver. Ce trajet est souvent touché par le ravinement, les glissements de terrain et la dégradation du sol en raison de l'érosion causée par l'océan le long des côtes. S'agit-il du type de choses qu'une évaluation environnementale pourrait mentionner en vue de provoquer un changement ou de proposer une solution?

(1835)

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

Oui, madame la présidente et monsieur Hardie, une évaluation de la vulnérabilité au climat tiendrait compte de ces types de défis qui se posent en ce moment. Elle examinerait également l'avenir pour mieux comprendre les effets des conditions météorologiques extrêmes sur les chemins de fer, par exemple, ou les effets des conditions météorologiques changeantes sur l'érosion et d'autres vulnérabilités. On se fonde sur la situation actuelle, mais également sur l'avenir, afin de bien comprendre, dans les cas d'investissement dans l'amélioration, l'entretien ou l'expansion des chemins de fer, les effets de ces investissements, ainsi que les vulnérabilités.

M. Ken Hardie:

Monsieur Orb, je vais poser cette question à quelques reprises, à moins que certains de mes collègues la posent avant moi lors d'une série de questions. L'un des points qui soulèvent des questions dans le projet de loi C-49, c'est l'élaboration d'une définition pour « service adéquat et approprié ». Que vous ont dit les intervenants de vos réseaux à cet égard? Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée du type de choses dont le gouvernement devrait tenir compte dans l'élaboration de cette définition?

M. Ray Orb:

Je crois qu'il est difficile de répondre à cette question dans l'industrie. Manifestement, certains points de livraison, surtout sur les voies secondaires, nécessitent non pas un service supplémentaire, mais un différent type de service, car ce ne sont pas des voies à volume élevé. L'autre point concerne les lieux de chargement de wagons de producteur, une exigence de la Loi sur les grains du Canada. Même si cela n'est pas dans notre mémoire, nous avons remarqué que le Comité permanent recommandait le maintien des droits de wagons de producteur sur les lieux de chargement.

Donc, le niveau de service jugé adéquat est différent d'un point à l'autre, mais au sein de l'industrie, je crois qu'il faut que ce soit un niveau acceptable, c'est-à-dire un service de base acceptable pour l'expéditeur et le transporteur.

M. Ken Hardie:

Avez-vous une idée du type de données que vous aimeriez recevoir? Y a-t-il des mesures que vous aimeriez ajouter à la liste des données que les compagnies de chemin de fer seraient tenues de signaler à des fins de transparence?

La présidente:

Veuillez répondre brièvement, si possible.

M. Ray Orb:

Je crois qu'on devrait poursuivre ce qui se fait actuellement. En effet, le signalement fourni est assez satisfaisant, mais je crois qu'il doit être beaucoup plus rapide. Plutôt que de se contenter d'un examen à la fin de chaque mois, je crois que cela devrait être fait presque tous les jours.

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vous remercie tous les trois d'être avec nous.

J'ai des questions à poser à chacun de vous et ma première s'adresse à M. Orb.

Avant même de parler du projet de loi C-49, j'aimerais préciser quelque chose. C'est bientôt la mi-septembre et un certain nombre de mesures prévues dans le projet de loi C-30 sont devenues caduques le 1er août. Avant même de savoir ce qui va se passer dans quelques mois, les mesures non reconduites et qui sont devenues caduques le 1er août causent-elles des problèmes aux exportateurs? [Traduction]

M. Ray Orb:

Oui, elles causent des problèmes. J'ai notamment mentionné l'interconnexion qui était en vigueur dans la loi précédente. Cela crée une certaine anxiété au sein de l'industrie, surtout dans l'industrie des élévateurs à grains, car les intervenants ne savent pas ce qui se produira si la compagnie de chemin de fer qui s'oppose à cela ne permet pas à une autre entreprise d'utiliser la même voie. Je sais que des contrats sont déjà en cours, surtout en ce qui concerne l'expédition vers les États-Unis, et on est très préoccupés à l'idée de ne pas être en mesure de desservir ces marchés.

Je crois aussi qu'il y a les exigences liées à un volume minimal. Je sais que votre comité a recommandé d'ajouter cela au projet de loi, et nous espérons que cela se poursuivra. Comme je l'ai mentionné, les cultures dont nous parlons ont un volume plus élevé que prévu. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Dans votre présentation de départ — vous me direz si je traduis bien vos propos —, je n'ai pas senti un grand emballement pour le projet de loi C-49. Vous semblez avoir de la difficulté à mesurer la portée d'un certain nombre de mesures, à savoir si elles constituent véritablement des solutions.

Je vous donne quelques exemples de ce que j'ai entendu. On a dit qu'il vaudrait mieux expliquer le processus des sanctions réciproques. J'en comprends que ce qui est proposé dans le projet de loi C-49 ne vous apparaît pas suffisant. Vous dites que l'interconnexion pourrait être intéressante, mais vous ne semblez pas être certain que ce soit la solution.

Avez-vous des solutions plus précises que vous souhaiteriez que nous recommandions au gouvernement?

(1840)

[Traduction]

M. Ray Orb:

En ce qui concerne l'interconnexion, nous préférerions qu'on maintienne les dispositions en vigueur dans la loi précédente.

En ce qui a trait aux sanctions réciproques, nous pensons qu'elles doivent être mieux définies dans la loi. Nous savons que les expéditeurs subissent des sanctions si les wagons ne sont pas chargés assez rapidement, et ils savent que ces entreprises sont pénalisées par des frais. Nous pensons qu'on devrait imposer une sanction. Nous ne mentionnerons aucune sanction précise, mais nous sommes d'avis que la compagnie de chemin de fer devrait être tenue responsable de livrer les wagons à temps.

Je peux vous donner un bref exemple de la façon dont cela touche aussi les municipalités rurales pendant l'hiver. Nous devons souvent dégager le chemin jusqu'au terrain de l'agriculteur pour pouvoir avoir accès au grain. Si les wagons à grains n'arrivent pas à temps, il faut dégager le chemin à nouveau, ce qui représente un coût supplémentaire pour les consommateurs. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Évidemment, je ne connais pas la Saskatchewan aussi bien que vous, alors je suis vraiment content que vous soyez là.

Y a-t-il d'importants producteurs de soya chez vous? [Traduction]

M. Ray Orb:

Nous avons quelques producteurs de soya. C'est une culture qui est produite plus souvent de nos jours. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vais tout de suite à ma question car le temps file.

Comment expliquez-vous que le soya soit exclu du revenu maximal admissible? [Traduction]

M. Ray Orb:

Lorsque j'ai répondu à une question posée par Mme Block, de la Saskatchewan — mais qui ne portait pas précisément sur le soya —, j'ai parlé du Groupe de travail sur la logistique du transport des récoltes, un comité créé par le gouvernement fédéral. Ce groupe de travail demandera à ce que le soya soit inclus dans le REM. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

En ce moment même, vous n'avez pas d'idée expliquant pourquoi le gouvernement a décidé d'exclure le soya. [Traduction]

M. Ray Orb:

En fait, je n'ai pas la réponse à cette question. Je suis désolé. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Il vous reste une minute.

M. Robert Aubin:

Une minute.[Français]

J'ai une question à vous poser, monsieur Bell. Dans vos propos, vous avez dit que le positionnement des caméras dans la cabine empêchait de voir le faciès des chauffeurs. On ne peut pas voir s'ils sont heureux, malheureux ou peu importe. Cependant, on peut voir s'ils utilisent un téléphone cellulaire, ce qui est proscrit.

Que faites-vous lorsque vous voyez qu'un de vos employés parle au téléphone cellulaire en conduisant? [Traduction]

M. George Bell:

Nous utiliserions la politique mise en oeuvre si nous avions le pouvoir d'utiliser ces renseignements. Nous traiterions cela comme une tendance plutôt que comme un cas individuel. Nous ne considérerions pas qu'il s'agit d'une occasion de punir cette personne. Nous jugerions plutôt qu'il s'agit d'une occasion de sensibiliser l'employé et de sensibiliser le reste de la main-d'oeuvre. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Monsieur Bell, je suis heureux de faire votre connaissance.

Vous avez précisé que les EAVL sont seulement en oeuvre depuis environ six mois, mais je crois que les trains GO font des enregistrements depuis beaucoup plus longtemps que cela. Pouvez-vous nous parler du système précédent et des changements qui ont été apportés?

M. George Bell:

Pour nous, la différence concerne le passage aux enregistreurs audio-vidéo à bord des locomotives. Pendant longtemps, nous avons enregistré les points de vue extérieurs. Les points de vue intérieurs sont nouveaux pour nous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez mentionné que la caméra orientée vers l'avant était facile à consulter. Cela inclut-il les enregistrements audio à l'intérieur ou seulement les vues extérieures?

(1845)

M. George Bell:

Il n'y a pas d'audio sur la caméra orientée vers l'avant, seulement la vidéo.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans quelles circonstances consulteriez-vous ces renseignements rapidement?

M. George Bell:

L'utilisation la plus courante de la vidéo orientée vers l'avant est liée aux suicides sur la voie ferrée. Dans ces cas, nous téléchargeons l'information et nous la transmettons au coroner qui s'occupe de l'affaire. C'est presque toujours un coroner qui s'en occupe. Selon notre expérience, cela permet d'obtenir des preuves irréfutables de ce qui s'est produit devant notre train.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela permet ensuite au train de se remettre en route plus rapidement.

M. George Bell:

Oui, en effet. Si les conclusions étaient ambiguës, cela deviendrait une scène de crime, et cela pourrait immobiliser le train et d'autres trains pendant longtemps.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsque cela se produit, qu'arrive-t-il à l'équipage? Ces employés sont-ils relevés de leurs fonctions et reçoivent-ils un congé de deux semaines?

M. George Bell:

L'équipage est relevé de ses fonctions. En effet, ces employés ne sont pas en mesure de poursuivre le voyage. On leur fournit des services de consultation psychologique après incident, tout comme aux autres intervenants sur les lieux. Ensuite, ces employés évaluent, à l'aide de leurs gestionnaires ou de nos gestionnaires, le moment où ils peuvent reprendre leurs fonctions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les caméras sont-elles toujours allumées ou le sont-elles seulement lorsque le moteur tourne ou lorsque l'inverseur est enclenché? Quand fonctionnent-elles?

M. George Bell:

La caméra extérieure fonctionne lorsque la locomotive est mise sous tension. Les caméras intérieures fonctionnent seulement lorsque le train est actif.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Vous avez mentionné plus tôt que la caméra orientée vers l'arrière de la cabine capture des renseignements diagnostiques sur le mur arrière. N'y a-t-il pas également un enregistreur de données? Pourquoi auriez-vous besoin de visualiser les instruments plutôt que d'effectuer un enregistrement distinct?

M. George Bell:

Il y a un enregistreur de données, mais il a un nombre limité de canaux. Sur le mur arrière, nous pouvons voir plusieurs indicateurs lumineux et d'autres éléments qui ne sont peut-être pas montrés par l'enregistreur de données, mais qui pourraient être utiles pour interpréter un incident.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

Pendant combien de temps ces caméras conservent-elles ces données?

M. George Bell:

Actuellement, les données sont enregistrées pendant 72 heures et elles sont ensuite automatiquement remplacées par de nouvelles données.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il s'agit de 72 heures d'activité, et non de 72 heures consécutives.

M. George Bell:

Je crois qu'il s'agit de 72 heures pendant lesquelles les caméras sont actives.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela signifie probablement quelques semaines.

M. George Bell:

Non, car nos trains et nos locomotives sont grandement utilisés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez mentionné que vous disposiez de 61 systèmes de trains et de 62 locomotives, et qu'en tout temps, un de ces trains n'est pas en service. C'est assez impressionnant.

M. George Bell:

Il arrive certainement que plus d'un train soit hors service au même moment, mais c'est notre mode de fonctionnement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Je vous remercie de votre réponse.

J'aimerais maintenant m'adresser brièvement à Mme Southwood. Je me concentrerai sur un seul point.

Je tente de comprendre ce que vous laissez entendre dans la première recommandation. Les ingénieurs ne participent-ils pas actuellement aux processus liés au chemin de fer? Vous laissez entendre qu'il faut modifier la loi pour qu'elle exige de faire appel à des ingénieurs professionnels, plutôt qu'à des principes d'ingénierie. Laissez-vous entendre qu'on ne fait pas appel, en ce moment, à des ingénieurs pour l'entretien des chemins de fer?

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

On fait appel à des ingénieurs pour l'entretien des chemins de fer, mais pas de façon constante. Nous disons seulement que nous serions heureux de collaborer avec le gouvernement fédéral, afin d'être en mesure de préciser la notion de « principes d'ingénierie » en vue de réduire l'ambiguïté existante.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

En ce qui concerne le trajet Churchill, si cette ambiguïté n'avait pas existé, les choses auraient-elles été différentes?

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

Le cas du trajet Churchill est un exemple qui illustre la nécessité de mener une évaluation de la vulnérabilité au climat.

Dans le cas du trajet Churchill, on n'a mené aucune évaluation de la vulnérabilité au climat. Ainsi, on n'a pas compris qu'en raison du changement climatique, de conditions météorologiques extrêmes plus fréquentes et d'un changement dans les tendances météorologiques, il s'agissait d'une région très vulnérable.

Si on avait mené une telle évaluation, on aurait pu démontrer plus clairement à quel point le chemin de fer est vulnérable et cerner les types de procédures — ainsi que les types de mesures d'atténuation — qui auraient dû être mis en oeuvre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Monsieur Bell, j'aimerais profiter des quelques secondes qu'il me reste pour vous poser une dernière question.

Vous avez mentionné à quelques reprises l'utilisation proactive des données. À quoi cela ressemble-t-il? J'essaie seulement d'imaginer une personne, seule dans une pièce, en train de regarder des heures et des heures d'enregistrement vidéo de trains en déplacement. Cela ne me semble pas une façon très efficace de procéder. Comment utilisez-vous les données de façon proactive?

M. George Bell:

En fait, nous examinons les anomalies de fonctionnement. Nous comprenons très bien le fonctionnement de nos trains, nos horaires, les incidents que nous pouvons observer et en particulier, ce que nous pouvons appeler les incidents évités de justesse. Dans tous ces cas, nous souhaitons obtenir des données et vérifier ce qui s'est produit à l'intérieur de la cabine de la locomotive pour déterminer si nous pourrions modifier des interactions en vue d'améliorer la sécurité sur ce chemin de fer.

(1850)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci beaucoup.

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Sean Fraser:

Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais d'abord m'adresser à vous, monsieur Orb. Lorsque vous avez soulevé la question des données, vous avez précisé que les chemins de fer devraient être tenus de divulguer leurs plans pour répondre à la demande. Ensuite, en réponse à une question posée par l'un de mes collègues, vous avez dit qu'on devrait effectuer des signalements tous les jours. Êtes-vous d'avis que les compagnies de chemin de fer devraient divulguer chaque jour leurs plans pour répondre à la demande? Ai-je mal compris?

M. Ray Orb:

Vous avez peut-être mal compris ma réponse.

Le point que je tente de faire valoir, c'est qu'il faut effectuer les signalements plus rapidement. En ce moment, les signalements sont effectués chaque mois, c'est-à-dire à la fin de chaque mois, mais c'est un rapport hebdomadaire. Je crois que dans le cas de certains points de livraison, nous devons obtenir l'information beaucoup plus rapidement. Le signalement est effectué, et en ce qui concerne le volume minimal transporté en vertu du décret émis par le gouvernement précédent, on se fonde sur les corridors. Le problème, c'est que certains points de livraison de l'Ouest canadien sont omis, ce qui signifie que les corridors obtiennent les grains, mais pas nécessairement les points de livraison. Il nous faut des données plus précises.

M. Sean Fraser:

J'aimerais obtenir d'autres éclaircissements sur la question des sanctions réciproques. Je crois que vous avez exprimé un appui général à l'égard de certains éléments contenus dans le projet de loi C-49, mais vous êtes d'avis que le projet de loi ne vise pas suffisamment cet enjeu. J'aimerais parler de l'article 23 du projet de loi. Il me semble qu'il vise la partie sur les sanctions réciproques lorsqu'il donne à un organisme le pouvoir d'ordonner à une entreprise « d'indemniser toute personne lésée des dépenses qu'elle a supportées en conséquence du non-respect des obligations de la compagnie... ».

Est-ce parce que cette mesure ne représente pas une sanction réciproque ou est-ce parce qu'elle n'est pas assez sévère? Ou êtes-vous d'avis qu'il faudrait établir d'autres lignes directrices?

M. Ray Orb:

Je crois que cette disposition existait dans la loi précédente, mais comme on l'a mentionné, je ne crois pas qu'elle ait déjà été mise en oeuvre, car s'il y a un différend au sujet de la nature de la sanction, les plus petits expéditeurs ne sont pas en mesure de défendre leur point. Je crois vraiment qu'il faut le mentionner de façon précise. Il faut préciser la nature de la sanction.

M. Sean Fraser:

D'accord. À des fins d'éclaircissement, le libellé que j'examine en ce moment vise à remplacer l'alinéa 116(4)c.1), mais je comprends très bien le point que vous avez fait valoir au sujet de la résolution de différends, surtout en ce qui concerne les plus petits expéditeurs. J'ai déjà été avocat plaidant, et j'ai vu trop de cas se terminer lorsqu'une personne n'avait pas les moyens de se rendre devant le tribunal.

Êtes-vous d'avis que le mécanisme de résolution de différends sera plus efficace, c'est-à-dire qu'il permettra à un plus grand nombre d'expéditeurs de résoudre leurs différends équitablement et plus rapidement?

M. Ray Orb:

Je crois que ce sera plus acceptable pour les expéditeurs, surtout les plus petits, et nous croyons donc qu'il s'agit d'un pas dans la bonne direction.

M. Sean Fraser:

Excellent.

Vous avez dit que le RAM protège les producteurs. J'aimerais que vous nous parliez davantage, entre autres, de l'importance de l'investissement continu dans l'infrastructure ferroviaire, surtout pour les régions rurales.

Je viens d'une collectivité rurale, et nous recevons parfois des plaintes liées à la qualité de l'infrastructure du transport ferroviaire. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer comment cette approche permettra d'effectuer des investissements dans ces réseaux ruraux très importants?

M. Ray Orb:

Parlez-vous surtout de l'achat des wagons-trémies par les compagnies de chemin de fer?

M. Sean Fraser:

Si vous souhaitez aborder le sujet de façon plus générale, n'hésitez pas à le faire, mais veuillez décrire la situation dans vos propres mots.

M. Ray Orb:

Eh bien, nous croyons que dans le cadre du RAM, à l'heure actuelle, les chemins de fer sont rémunérés de façon équitable, et c'est bien pour ce qui est non seulement des coûts, mais aussi de la marge de profit, et cela leur permet d'entretenir les wagons. Je crois que l'achat de wagons, dans le cadre des mesures législatives, ne fait pas partie du RAM, en fait, ce qui nous préoccupe quelque peu parce qu'il pourrait en découler une hausse des tarifs marchandises et, au bout de compte, ce sont les agriculteurs et les producteurs qui devront assumer ces coûts.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je vais changer de sujet.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, madame la présidente?

La présidente:

Deux minutes.

M. Sean Fraser:

Oh, très bien. Je vais maintenant m'adresser à M. Bell.

Vous avez dit, et à juste titre, qu'il est probablement préférable de miser sur la prévention que de simplement réagir au fur et à mesure que des incidents ou des accidents se produisent. Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec vous. Je me demande si vous êtes d'avis que le mécanisme de prévention dont il est question dans le cadre du projet de loi C-49 est bon. Est-il acceptable qu'on permette la prise d'instantanés de façon aléatoire pour voir comment se passent les choses? Est-il nécessaire de voir toutes les vidéos? Pensez-vous que le mécanisme proposé est une solution appropriée?

(1855)

M. George Bell:

Le mécanisme proposé est un processus d'enquête qui est mené surtout par le Bureau de la sécurité des transports. Nous préférerions de loin faire enquête de façon proactive. Nous préférerions de loin enquêter beaucoup moins. En général, le Bureau de la sécurité des transports n'intervient que lorsqu'il y a de très graves conséquences ou des conséquences probables.

En effet, nous aimerions avoir accès à l'ensemble des vidéos, ce qui inclut les mesures de protection voulues de sorte que l'information obtenue par le BST soit complètement protégée; or, nous aimerions pouvoir examiner n'importe quelle partie de l'enregistrement dès que nos opérateurs nous mettent au courant de quelque chose.

M. Sean Fraser:

Un peu plus tôt aujourd'hui, Mme Fox, du BST, a indiqué qu'on pouvait utiliser ce mécanisme dans deux cas, dont lors de vérifications aléatoires dans le cadre d'une approche systémique. Dans l'autre cas, il s'agit de faire enquête sur un incident ou un accident au sujet duquel le BST n'effectue pas d'enquête. Est-ce que je me trompe en disant que pour les incidents évités de justesse dont vous parlez, il serait possible d'utiliser l'enregistrement dans le cadre du mécanisme proposé?

M. George Bell:

Je crois comprendre que ce serait difficile, voire impossible. Je serais ravi de me tromper à cet égard.

M. Sean Fraser:

Y a-t-il des mesures de freins et contrepoids internes pour veiller à ce que Metrolinx ne tombe pas sur un gestionnaire vindicatif qui pense que l'un de ses employés enfreint les règles? Y a-t-il des mesures de protection que vous mettriez en place, en tant qu'organisme, pour que cela ne se produise pas?

M. George Bell:

Effectivement. Nous avons déjà un système de protection de la vie privée très solide, et il va sans dire que nous veillerions à ce que le système ne soit pas utilisé de mauvaise façon.

M. Sean Fraser:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Bell.

Monsieur Shields.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vous remercie de votre présence et de l'information que vous nous fournissez.

Madame Southwood, un peu plus tôt, vous avez parlé de la question des principes d'ingénierie et des ingénieurs professionnels et vous avez laissé entendre qu'on n'a pas toujours recours à des ingénieurs. Avez-vous des données à cet égard ou une idée quant à la proportion? Avez-vous de l'information qui appuie ce que vous dites?

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

Nous avons de l'information qui appuie cela. Je n'ai pas les données aujourd'hui quant à la proportion, mais je pourrai les fournir au Comité après la réunion.

M. Martin Shields:

Quelles sont les répercussions sur les coûts?

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

Je crois qu'il y a plusieurs aspects qui entrent en ligne de compte quant aux coûts, et on parle de risque et des coûts-avantages. Il nous faudrait déterminer quels risques pose le fait de ne pas avoir recours à un ingénieur professionnel et en tenir compte.

M. Martin Shields:

Ce serait bon à savoir, si vous pouvez fournir cette information.

Bien. Merci.

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

Merci.

M. Martin Shields:

Monsieur Bell, vous avez parlé d'un changement qui a été mis en oeuvre il y a six mois. Je crois comprendre qu'il y a aussi un volet lié à la passation de contrats, mais savez-vous si le processus incluait les gens concernés par rapport à ce qu'ils faisaient auparavant? Savez-vous comment cela a été mis en oeuvre, comment les choses ont-elles fonctionné? Êtes-vous au courant de cela?

M. George Bell:

Oui. Je n'étais pas là lorsque le processus a été mis en oeuvre, mais je suis au courant. Il s'agissait d'intervenir rapidement par rapport à ce que nous considérions comme des mesures législatives ou des règlements à venir, et nous l'avons expliqué à nos sous-traitants. Nous leur avons expliqué nos valeurs, parmi lesquelles la sécurité est primordiale. Ils ont été en mesure d'y adhérer. Nous avons pu expliquer le processus à leurs gestionnaires et ensuite aux employés.

Nous avons eu recours, comme nous essayons toujours de le faire, à des principes d'une saine gestion du changement, pour assurer l'adhésion au changement à toutes les étapes.

M. Martin Shields:

Vous n'étiez pas présents, mais de toute évidence, vous avez été en mesure de constater que les résultats étaient positifs.

M. George Bell:

Oui.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci.

Monsieur Orb, en ce qui concerne le projet de loi C-49, je crois avoir entendu des préoccupations et des points positifs de votre côté. Quelles seraient les répercussions les plus positives et quels changements voudriez-vous voir apporter?

M. Ray Orb:

Je crois qu'en définitive, il s'agirait de préciser ce qu'on entend par service ferroviaire adéquat, et il y a aussi les sanctions réciproques. Voilà, à mon avis, les deux questions importantes. La question de l'interconnexion préoccupe nos expéditeurs, nos municipalités rurales et les agriculteurs, mais je pense que les deux questions que j'ai mentionnées sont prioritaires.

M. Martin Shields:

Est-il possible de définir ce mot?

M. Ray Orb:

Je pense qu'il faut y consacrer plus de temps. Je crois qu'il serait possible même — nous l'espérons — d'intégrer dans la réglementation un élément qui en donne une meilleure définition. Je crois qu'il nous faut une exigence minimale.

M. Martin Shields:

C'est là où je veux en venir. Vous voulez que des exigences de base soient établies pour ce mot. C'est un adjectif.

M. Ray Orb:

C'est un bon point. Je pense qu'il pourrait s'agir peut-être d'une durée, d'une quantité. Nous avons besoin d'un certain nombre de wagons. Nous l'avons déjà mentionné auparavant. C'est aussi l'une des recommandations formulées par votre comité au sujet de laquelle nous étions d'accord, soit qu'il fallait que les chemins de fer indiquent à l'avance, au cours d'une campagne agricole donnée, quelles sont leurs capacités et comment ils géreront le tout.

(1900)

M. Martin Shields:

Au moment où nous allons de l'avant, la récolte est en cours à bien des endroits et même terminée ailleurs. À quel point ce document est-il important pour ce qui doit se passer cet hiver?

M. Ray Orb:

C'est très important, car je crois que la majorité des agriculteurs auraient déjà des contrats avec des entreprises céréalières ou peut-être d'autres moyens de transport. C'est vraiment important. Comme je l'ai dit, une nouvelle campagne agricole est déjà en cours. On parle d'une campagne supérieure à la moyenne au pays cette année. L'obtention des données en temps plus opportun de la part des chemins de fer — et, je crois, même le fait que nos prévisions provinciales soient traitées plus rapidement — aidera l'industrie.

M. Martin Shields:

Nous ne voulons pas nous retrouver dans une situation comme celle de 2013, en ce qui a trait au transport du grain, aux céréales.

Concernant ce qu'il manque, examinez-vous toutes les possibilités pour que ces autres cultures soient incluses, soit le soya et toutes les autres?

M. Ray Orb:

Oui, on parle du soya, et c'est quelque chose que le Groupe de travail sur la logistique du transport des récoltes proposera plus tard cette semaine. Le soya est devenu une culture intéressante parce que la recherche génétique nous permet d'avoir de meilleures variétés de ce type de céréale. C'est un produit qui sera très important pour les agriculteurs, à mon avis.

M. Martin Shields:

Ma dernière question porte sur les données, c'est-à-dire les rapports hebdomadaires qui, en définitive, sont des rapports mensuels. À qui les fournit-on?

M. Ray Orb:

À l'heure actuelle, les données sont fournies au grand public. On peut les trouver sur un site Web. C'est très important pour les expéditeurs, en particulier pour les compagnies céréalières, qui les consultent. Or, les producteurs les consultent également afin d'obtenir de meilleurs prix dans la passation de contrats.

M. Martin Shields:

C'est un excellent point par rapport à la technologie utilisée dans le secteur agricole, au fait que le secteur agricole est à la fine pointe de la technologie. Ces données sont essentielles ces jours-ci.

M. Ray Orb:

Elles sont très importantes.

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je n'ai que quelques questions au sujet de vos observations sur le cycle de vie des chemins de fer, mais j'irai plus loin. Je vais parler du cycle de vie de toutes les infrastructures liées au transport, qu'il s'agisse des voies de navigation, des chemins de fer, des routes, des aéroports, etc.

À l'heure actuelle, le ministre a établi une stratégie, et les mesures législatives que nous étudions, soit le projet de loi C-49, seront complémentaires à cette stratégie. En outre, il sera nécessaire — j'en ai parlé avec d'autres témoins — d'investir dans les infrastructures en ce qui a trait au cycle de vie, à l'entretien avec remplacement et, au bout du compte, au remplacement de ces actifs, d'ici 30, 40, 50 ou 60 ans.

La question que je vous pose à vous, qui êtes ingénieurs, qui jouez un rôle dans les systèmes liés au transport, est la suivante: trouvez-vous que le cycle de vie est respecté? Est-ce que ces stratégies et ces plans de gestion des actifs sont mis en place? Voilà ma première question.

Pour ce qui est de ma deuxième question, les plans de gestion des actifs sont-ils financés?

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

En ce qui concerne les plans de gestion des actifs, je m'en remettrais d'abord à mon voisin, George Bell, qui peut vous parler de Metrolinx.

M. George Bell:

Merci.

En effet, nous avons des plans de gestion des actifs. Nous menons des analyses du cycle de vie et établissons les coûts du cycle de vie. Notre responsabilité — bien que ce ne soit pas directement dans mon champ de compétence —, c'est de maximiser la durée de vie assurée et économique pour nos actifs. Nous essayons de le faire. À l'heure actuelle, je crois que nous avons les ressources voulues pour le faire.

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

Concernant les plans de gestion des actifs et la question de savoir s'ils sont respectés, je devrai consulter mon organisme et nous fournirons l'information au Comité à cet égard.

Toutefois, en plus des plans de gestion des actifs, j'aimerais parler des plans et des évaluations sur la vulnérabilité au climat. Il va sans dire qu'on n'en est qu'aux débuts quant à ces types d'évaluations pour ce qui est de l'infrastructure au Canada. Ce sont des éléments essentiels de la gestion des actifs, soit comprendre réellement où sont les vulnérabilités, quelles ressources sont nécessaires et comment préparer l'avenir, et réussir à concilier tout cela. Merci.

M. Vance Badawey:

Madame la présidente, si j'ai posé la question, c'est que nous pouvons bien mettre en place toutes les stratégies et les mesures législatives appuyant ces stratégies, mais si nous n'avons pas l'infrastructure qui convient et que les investissements en infrastructure nécessaires ne sont pas faits pour, au bout du compte, satisfaire aux recommandations contenues dans ces stratégies, cela ne marchera pas. Par conséquent, vous, qui travaillez dans le milieu, savez mieux que quiconque, compte tenu de vos déplacements, s'il s'agit du secteur public ou du secteur privé, qui sont les utilisateurs, les exploitants, les gestionnaires de ces biens qui, premièrement, respectent les plans de gestion des actifs, mais surtout, deuxièmement, financent ces plans. Voilà pourquoi j'ai posé la question.

Monsieur Bell, vouliez-vous intervenir et répondre à la question selon le point de vue de Metrolinx?

(1905)

M. George Bell:

Oui, Metrolinx a un système relativement nouveau qui s'appelle assetlinx. Chez Metrolinx tout comprend « linx ». Il est entièrement conçu pour ce à quoi vous faites référence dans votre question. Il s'agit de faire en sorte que les choses se passent bien sur le plan de la durée économique de nos actifs, et que nous sachions où en sont les choses, où nous en sommes sur le plan de la remise en état — un sujet dont les représentants des chemins de fer devraient beaucoup vous parler — et ce que nous devons faire. À l'heure actuelle, nous avons, à mon avis, accès au financement dont nous avons besoin, du moins du côté des immobilisations. Toutefois, notre financement d'exploitation ne suit pas le même rythme.

M. Vance Badawey:

Excellent. Merci.

Madame la présidente, je vais céder le temps qu'il me reste à M. Hardie.

La présidente:

Vous disposez de deux minutes.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

M. Vance Badawey:

De rien.

M. Ken Hardie:

Monsieur Bell, j'ai commis une erreur stratégique en vous interrogeant sur la Coast Mountain Bus Company et son expérience avec le matériel audio-vidéo.

L'utilisation d'équipement vidéo est une réalité pour la compagnie avec laquelle vous avez travaillé — pendant 31 ans, je crois — et il s'agit du réseau SkyTrain, qui, bien entendu, est complètement automatisé. Je reviens à la question des relations de travail. Évidemment, ces caméras, et ce système en compte des centaines, filment chaque angle et chaque incident. Ainsi, non seulement le personnel du transport en commun, mais aussi les membres de la police des transports sont filmés. Que pouvez-vous nous dire au sujet de l'utilisation et de la gestion de ces enregistrements vidéo?

M. George Bell:

Vous avez raison; en fait, le réseau SkyTrain compte des milliers de caméras. Elles couvrent presque chaque aspect du réseau en tant que tel dont des endroits comme les ascenseurs. Elles fonctionnent toujours, comme outil de gestion. À ma connaissance, nous n'avons pas eu de problèmes de relations de travail liés à l'utilisation des caméras. Nous les utilisons pour la planification et pour intervenir, et nous permettons à la police des transports en commun de les utiliser pour intervenir en cas d'incidents ou pour se préparer à des incidents. Les caméras enregistrent à peu près tout ce qui se passe à l'extérieur des trains. Il y a un nombre limité, mais grandissant, de caméras dans les trains. C'est pour assurer la protection du public, de même que celle du personnel. Comme nous le verrons dans l'avenir, dans ce système, tous les lieux seront filmés par des caméras. À l'heure actuelle, nous les utilisons à ces fins, et il n'y a eu aucun problème sur le plan des relations avec les membres de notre personnel.

M. Ken Hardie:

Madame Southwood...

La présidente:

Très brièvement, monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

La réponse devra être très brève.

Si j'en ai la possibilité un peu plus tard, je demanderai à vous ainsi qu'à M. Orb de parler de l'état des chemins de fer d'intérêt local.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Hardie.

Allez-y, monsieur Brassard.

M. John Brassard:

Merci, madame la présidente. Je n'ai que deux ou trois questions.

La première s'adresse à vous, monsieur Orb. Vous avez parlé de l'anxiété créée au sein de l'industrie des élévateurs à grains quant à ce qui se produira si les chemins de fer ne permettent pas à une autre compagnie d'utiliser la même voie. Il semble régner une certaine confusion et, bien entendu, la confusion crée des doutes. Voyez-vous le risque potentiel à court terme que la situation actuelle pose pour le secteur des grains au Canada?

M. Ray Orb:

Je pense qu'il y a certains risques. En particulier, la Western Grain Elevator Association a des préoccupations à cet égard. Bien qu'évidemment, je ne peux parler en son nom, je l'ai entendu parler de la question au sujet des contrats, et plus précisément de la capacité d'expédier vers les États-Unis. Je crois que cela se faisait, et maintenant, les nouvelles mesures législatives posent un dilemme.

M. John Brassard:

Les mesures législatives ne s'appliqueront pas avant un certain temps. Avez-vous une mesure provisoire à recommander au Comité qui permettrait d'apaiser une partie des inquiétudes?

M. Ray Orb:

Je crois que les inquiétudes ne seront apaisées que lorsque le projet de loi sera adopté. Si des amendements sont nécessaires, c'est un amendement que... Vous devriez peut-être revenir au projet de loi C-40, l'examiner et remettre en place la partie qui portait sur l'interconnexion. Plus tard, on pourrait déterminer si des changements doivent y être apportés.

(1910)

M. John Brassard:

Merci, monsieur Orb.

Madame Southwood, vous avez parlé du protocole sur la vulnérabilité de l'ingénierie des infrastructures publiques et de ce qui aurait pu être fait dans le cas de Churchill. L'événement survenu à Churchill est récent. Savez-vous à quand remonte la construction de la ligne ferroviaire et d'une grande partie de l'infrastructure là-bas?

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

Je ne connais pas les dates par coeur, mais nous pourrions fournir l'information au Comité après la réunion.

M. John Brassard:

Vous avez dit que si le protocole avait été utilisé et l'évaluation de la vulnérabilité avait été menée, ce type de situation ne se serait pas produit.

J'aimerais savoir si vous pouvez nous en dire plus sur cet outil et de quelle façon il aurait pu empêcher ce qui s'est produit à Churchill.

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

Bien sûr.

L'outil fonctionne comme suit. Il s'agit d'évaluer un projet, qu'il s'agisse d'un projet proposé ou d'un élément d'infrastructure existant, sur le plan de son fonctionnement dans notre climat. Par exemple, nous examinons certains aspects, comme la pluie et la vitesse du vent. Ensuite, nous nous penchons sur les changements dans les données climatiques. Un de vos collègues a parlé de l'importance des données. Nous nous demandons de quelle façon le temps changera. Par la suite, nous examinons les vulnérabilités qui y sont liées.

Je vais utiliser l'exemple de l'affouillement de l'avenue Finch, que peut-être bon nombre d'entre vous connaissent. Cette avenue est une artère très importante de Toronto dont bon nombre de vulnérabilités étaient inconnues. Des caniveaux n'étaient pas bien entretenus. En plus d'être une route utilisée par bon nombre de gens, c'était un endroit où il y avait d'autres éléments d'infrastructure clés: câble, téléphone, électricité et gaz, par exemple. Ainsi, lorsque l'affouillement de l'avenue Finch s'est produit, la Ville s'est retrouvée avec de nombreuses contestations de la part des utilisateurs de l'artère ainsi qu'avec d'énormes répercussions sur l'économie et l'avantage concurrentiel de la ville.

En effectuant à l'avance ce type d'évaluation des infrastructures clés dont dépendent une municipalité ou une région données, on peut savoir où se trouvent les faiblesses. Par exemple, dans le cas d'une route comme l'avenue Finch, il s'agissait des caniveaux; c'était lié à l'importance de les nettoyer, mais aussi de construire les bons caniveaux.

Revenons maintenant aux chemins de fer. Faire ce type d'évaluation permettrait de relever les vulnérabilités liées à un chemin de fer donné. M. Hardie a parlé des chemins de fer, de l'érosion, des affouillements et des éboulements. Tout cela entre en jeu si le temps change. Ce type d'évaluation peut aider à prévenir et à réduire les risques associés au fait de ne pas avoir l'infrastructure du tout.

M. John Brassard:

D'accord.

Pour une grande partie des infrastructures au pays, il serait nécessaire de mener ces évaluations. On pourrait mener des évaluations littéralement pendant des générations. Je sais que des coûts et des répercussions découlent de ce type de bris d'infrastructure, mais qu'en coûterait-il de mener ce type d'évaluation pour chaque élément d'infrastructure du pays?

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

Nous proposons que les évaluations soient incluses dans de nouveaux fonds fédéraux. Prenons une façon simple de procéder. Si le gouvernement fédéral doit investir de grosses sommes dans de nouvelles infrastructures, à notre avis, il faut qu'il connaisse leurs vulnérabilités aux changements météorologiques et climatiques afin de tirer le maximum de ses investissements.

M. John Brassard:

Merci.

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

Nous croyons que les coûts seraient relativement peu élevés par rapport aux coûts liés à la perte complète de l'infrastructure.

La présidente:

Merci, madame Southwood.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Madame Southwood, j'aimerais poursuivre la discussion avec vous.

Les recommandations 2 et 3 du document que vous nous avez remis ne me causent pas de problème. Faire participer les ingénieurs à l'ensemble du cycle de vie de l'infrastructure ferroviaire et adapter l'infrastructure ferroviaire aux changements climatiques au Canada, pour moi, c'est clair. Là où c'est moins clair, c'est à la recommandation 1, où il est question de définir les principes d'ingénierie à l'article 11.

J'aimerais que vous clarifiiez cela. Parle-t-on de grands principes d'ordre général ou cela va-t-il jusqu'à édicter des normes précises? En effet, plus loin dans ce paragraphe, vous dites que les rôles des ingénieurs ne sont pas encadrés par des normes uniformes.

(1915)

[Traduction]

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

Je vais diviser votre question en deux. Le premier aspect concerne la question des principes d'ingénierie. À l'heure actuelle, dans la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire, le terme « principes d'ingénierie » comporte une certaine ambiguïté — nous constatons qu'il est interprété d'un certain nombre de façons différentes. Nous offrons de collaborer avec le gouvernement fédéral et les ministères pour donner une définition. Nous avons un grand réseau d'experts en la matière. Les membres de notre profession sont prêts à fournir ces conseils et à collaborer. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Pourriez-vous nous donner un exemple concret d'un élément que vous voudriez voir mieux défini dans le projet de loi C-49? [Traduction]

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

Je vais passer à l'autre aspect, qui concerne la façon dont nos ingénieurs professionnels sont consultés dans le cadre d'un projet de chemin de fer. En nous penchant sur la façon dont les ingénieurs professionnels sont consultés, nous constatons qu'il y a incohérence. Il n'est pas toujours évident de savoir précisément à quel moment un ingénieur professionnel doit être consulté, ce qui nous ramène au terme « principes d'ingénierie », qui n'est pas clair. On n'explique pas exactement à quel moment il faut consulter un ingénieur. Nous voulons que cela soit plus précis, et nous offrons de collaborer avec le gouvernement fédéral et les ministères pour fournir cette clarification. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Est-ce que les regroupements d'ingénieurs provinciaux ont exactement les mêmes principes? Est-ce uniforme d'une province à l'autre? [Traduction]

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

Nous avons consulté les organismes de réglementation au sujet de la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire et ce sont les principales questions qu'ils ont relevées à l'échelle nationale. Merci. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Je crois que M. Hardie a une question.

M. Ken Hardie:

Oui. Merci, madame la présidente. Je voulais revenir à ma question sur l'état des chemins de fer d'intérêt local. La Saskatchewan a certes un réseau très robuste. L'an dernier, nous nous sommes rendus à Lac-Mégantic pour examiner la situation. Les résidants nous ont montré des choses assez affreuses quant à l'état de cette ligne. Du point de vue de l'ingénierie et de la Saskatchewan, j'aimerais entendre vos observations sur les chemins de fer d'intérêt local et tout problème que le projet de loi C-49 devrait régler selon vous.

Mme Jeanette Southwood:

Je vais commencer par revenir à une question que vous avez posée. Elle portait sur les évaluations de la vulnérabilité au climat et leurs liens avec les évaluations environnementales. À l'heure actuelle, les évaluations de la vulnérabilité au climat ne font pas partie des évaluations environnementales. Pour le moment, ce sont deux choses différentes. Nous aimerions qu'elles soient plus souvent étroitement liées.

En ce qui a trait à l'état des chemins de fer d'intérêt local, il me faudrait consulter mon organisme et fournir une réponse au Comité ultérieurement.

Merci.

M. Ken Hardie:

Monsieur Orb.

M. Ray Orb:

Je crois qu'il y a plus de chemins de fer d'intérêt local en Saskatchewan que dans n'importe quelle autre province canadienne, en particulier dans la partie sud-ouest de la Saskatchewan, où le principal transporteur a abandonné une bonne partie du réseau ferroviaire il y a des décennies. Est-il très important que ces chemins de fer d'intérêt local continuent de livrer le grain? Notre infrastructure est grandement endommagée. Elle est réglementée par le ministère provincial de la Voirie, et certains règlements peuvent différer d'une province à l'autre. Il se peut qu'une partie des règlements de la Saskatchewan soient différents. Lorsque nous avons rencontré la Saskatchewan Shortline Railway Association, l'une de ses préoccupations concernait la question de l'assurance-responsabilité imposée sur les changements dans la sécurité ferroviaire. Toutefois, je pense qu'elle s'adapte et continue de mener ses activités. Je ne crois pas qu'elle ait toujours les préoccupations qu'elle avait au départ. Je ne sais pas si cela répond à votre question.

(1920)

M. Ken Hardie:

Eh bien, par exemple, un peu plus tôt, on a dit que l'installation d'enregistreurs audio-vidéo de locomotive coûte environ 20 000 $ par appareil. Est-ce que les chemins de fer d'intérêt local sont capables de faire face à ce type de coût en capital?

M. Ray Orb:

Je ne le sais pas. Il me faudrait consulter l'association à nouveau.

Les coûts peuvent être élevés, mais il existe peut-être d'autres moyens pour eux d'obtenir du financement.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

La présidente:

Le Comité ne semble pas avoir d'autres questions.

Je remercie beaucoup nos témoins. C'était très informatif et je vous remercie beaucoup de votre participation.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on September 11, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.