header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-09-13 TRAN 69

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(0940)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I'm calling to order the meeting of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, pursuant to the order of reference on Monday, June 19, 2017, to study Bill C-49, an act to amend the Canada Transportation Act and other acts respecting transportation and to make related and consequential amendments to other acts.

I welcome our witnesses who are here to help us get through Bill C-49 and let us know what your thoughts are. I'll open it up by everybody introducing themselves.

Cereals Canada, would you like to start?

Mr. Cam Dahl (President, Cereals Canada):

Certainly. My name is Cam Dahl, and I'm the president of Cereals Canada. Cereals Canada is a value-chain organization covering the entire country, going from the development of seeds, and of course, including farmers, right through to the grocery shelf.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Chemistry Industry Association of Canada, do you want to introduce yourself?

Mr. Bob Masterson (President and Chief Executive Officer, Chemistry Industry Association of Canada):

Yes. Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'm Bob Masterson, president and CEO of the Chemistry Industry Association of Canada. I'm joined today by Ms. Kara Edwards who is our transportation specialist and an expert in all matters related to Bill C-49.

Thank you.

The Chair:

That's going to be interesting.

Grain Growers of Canada, go ahead.

Mr. Jeff Nielsen (President, Grain Growers of Canada):

Good morning.

I'm Jeff Nielsen, I'm a producer in Olds, Alberta, and president of Grain Growers of Canada. I'm here with my executive director, Fiona Cook.

The Chair:

Okay.

Going back to Mr. Dahl, would you like to lead off with your presentation?

Mr. Cam Dahl:

Certainly.

On behalf of Cereals Canada, I want to thank the committee for the invitation to appear before you today. It's not usual for a committee to be holding hearings like these when Parliament is not sitting, and it's definitely not usual for a committee to be holding marathon sessions such as you have been holding. We recognize this and thank you for the high priority you are placing on this legislation. It is absolutely critical for Canada's agriculture sector.

As I mentioned, Cereals Canada is a national value chain organization. Our membership comprises three pillars: farmers, shippers, and processors in crop development and seed companies. Our board has representation from all three of these groups. All parts of the value chain look for transportation reform as a key requirement for the success of our sector.

Canada exports more than 20 million tonnes of cereal grains every year, worth about $10 billion. Virtually all of this grain moves to export position by rail. The profitability of every part of the Canadian agriculture value chain depends on the critical rail link to our markets.

Agriculture has a strong growth potential. The Barton report indicated that Canada has the potential to become the world's second-largest agriculture and agri-food exporter in just a few short years. The report set a target of $75 billion in exports in 2025. This is up from $55 billion in 2015. Modernized transportation legislation is critical if Canada is to meet this growing demand and maintain our reputation as a reliable supplier.

Agriculture is not just about exports. The industry employs Canadians. One in eight jobs in Canada depends on agriculture. Our ability to meet these growth targets and our ability to increase the number of Canadians employed by the sector depend upon moving production to market in a timely manner. I want to stress this next point: “timely manner” must be defined by the international marketplace. We will not achieve these goals if transportation providers limit our ability to satisfy world demand.

These are the implications of Bill C-49, which is before you today. The first message I want to deliver on Bill C-49 is to quickly return this bill to the House for third reading. The bill will help introduce better commercial accountability into the grain transportation system, it will help improve grain-movement planning, and it will improve transparency and reporting.

I do not want to leave the impression that the grain sector has received all that it requested in this bill. There are provisions that the industry had requested: continuation of the extended interswitching provisions from the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act is an example of provisions that have not been brought into the legislation. However, no piece of legislation is perfect, and we believe that the bill should proceed. Cereals Canada has some suggestions for technical amendments to Bill C-49, which are outlined in detail at the end of the written brief you have received.

I want to touch briefly on why we're here and why we have the need for legislation.

Flaws in the grain handling and transportation system were highlighted in 2013 and 2014 when the system suffered a significant breakdown. The systemic failure impacted the entire value chain and damaged Canada's brand and reputation as a reliable supplier of agriculture products. This resulted in lost sales and it resulted in decreases in price. The crisis cost farmers, grain-handling firms, exporters, Canadian value-added processing, and ultimately the Canadian economy.

This was not the first time the transportation system failed one of Canada's largest sectors. This is clearly demonstrated by the multiple past reviews and commissions, such as the studies conducted by the late Justice Estey and by Arthur Kroeger and the report from the senior executive officers, and the list goes on. It is a long list of reports on grain transportation. History shows that if the underlying structural issues are not addressed, transportation failures will recur. Canadian agriculture and the Canadian economy cannot afford to let this happen again.

Railway monopolistic power is a key reason the grain transportation environment does not function to maximize the profitability of the entire value chain. Virtually all shippers are served by one carrier and are subject to monopolistic pricing and service strategies. Therefore, the government has a critical role to play in establishing a regulatory structure that strikes a measured and appropriate competitive balance.

I stress the word competitive. System reform will be successful only if the legislated and regulatory structure for grain transportation is adjusted so that it mimics the conditions of a competitive environment.

It is worth noting that the record size of the 2013 crop, over 70 million tonnes in western Canada, is often cited by the critics of reform as the cause of the breakdown in 2013 and 2014. However, this level of production is not an anomaly. Rather, it is the new normal. Grain production in Canada continues to grow, as does world demand.

This year, 2017, I'm sure many of you have heard—and Ms. Block is in the affected part of the province—there was a drought in many parts of Saskatchewan, yet western Canada is still going to produce one of the largest crops we have ever seen. We expect it to be between 63 million and 65 million tonnes. We have to be able to meet growing demand with growing supply.

I'm not going to go into the details of our amendments; you have them. But in summary, Bill C-49 will move us towards a more accountable and reliable grain-handling and transportation system. This is good news for everybody involved, including our customers.

The grain, oilseed, and special crops industries have been united in their call for measures that will help ensure accountability in the performance of the railways. Bill C-49 will help correct the imbalance in market power between the railways and captive shippers.

The legislation includes the following key positive elements: tools that will allow shippers to hold railways financially accountable for their service performance; improved processes for the Canadian Transportation Agency if issues do arise; clarification of the railway responsibility in the Canada Transportation Act by better defining “adequate and suitable” service; and increased requirements for reporting and railway contingency planning.

If passed, Bill C-49 will help balance railway market power and will help mimic what would happen if we had open competition. This is good economic and public policy.

While the most important part of the railway legislation is the increase in railway accountability, all of these provisions are important. Improving CTA processes is important to ensure that problems are caught and addressed before they snowball into major failures. Together with clarification of the meaning of “adequate and suitable”, this will help ensure that the Canadian transportation system meets the expectations of our customers both within Canada and internationally.

No piece of legislation is perfect, and Bill C-49 is no exception. Cereals Canada has presented a number of technical amendments. The adoption of these amendments should not significantly delay the passage of the bill, and the adoption of these amendments will significantly improve the transparency of the legislation. These are the first four amendments in our brief. They will also help align North American regulations between Canada and the U.S.

The amendments will also help to improve operational planning, as stated in the fifth amendment in our brief. It will also help give improved access to competitive tools to help improve the imbalance in market power. These are the last three amendments.

I welcome any of your questions on my verbal remarks or on the more detailed brief that has been circulated.

(0945)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Dahl.

On to the chemistry industry and Mr. Masterson.

Mr. Bob Masterson:

Thank you again, Madam Chair.

It is an honour to be among the witnesses to appear before this committee as it conducts this very important business on the review of Bill C-49, the transportation modernization act. In our brief time with you today, we want to share three key messages on behalf of Canada's chemistry sector. These are included in the brief before the committee, which provides additional details on our thoughts on Bill C-49.

Briefly, here are our three comments. First, it's important that you recognize that the chemistry industry plays an important role in the Canadian economy, and efficient and competitive rail transportation is critical to our business success. The second key point I wish to emphasize is that we enthusiastically applaud the work of Minister Garneau and his department. They've listened, and both the transportation 2030 agenda and Bill C-49 are highly responsive to the long-standing concerns expressed by our industry regarding Canada's freight rail system. Finally, while we do want to see Bill C-49 advance promptly, and we do not wish to introduce any new measures, we do believe that some amendments are necessary to ensure that the provisions of the act will indeed meet their intended objectives.

Let me begin by providing you with information about our sector, to underscore how important Bill C-49 is to the growth prospects of our industry. Canada's chemistry industry is vital to the Canadian economy. We are the third-largest manufacturing sector, with over $53 billion in annual shipments. Nearly 73% of that is exported, making us the second-largest manufacturing exporter in the country.

Like many people in the country, you probably don't give much thought to the role of chemicals in the economy, but it's important to note that 95% of all manufactured goods are directly touched by the business of chemistry. That includes all the key sectors of the Canadian economy: energy, transportation, agri-food, forestry, mining, and metals. Likewise, the goods the industry produces are also critical to communities and to quality of life for Canadians. This does include some dangerous goods: products such as chlorine, used to purify drinking water; and sulphuric acid, used in the manufacture of agricultural fertilizers.

Equally important, chemistry is a growing sector, both globally and within North America. During the past five years, more than 300 global-scale chemistry investments, with a book value of more than $230 billion Canadian, have been announced in the United States alone. Unfortunately, Canada has missed out on much of that initial wave of investment, but there are some promising prospects for capturing a share of the next wave of investments.

More than three-quarters of the chemistry industry's annual shipments in Canada move by rail. That accounts for 14%, or nearly one-seventh, of all freight volumes in the country. This makes rail costs and service two of the most important factors when investors are deciding whether to locate a next new facility or expand operations in Canada—or not. This makes a well-functioning and competitive rail freight market vital to the competitiveness of our industry and its investment prospects.

As mentioned earlier, we wish to stress that we applaud the government's efforts and are supportive of the rail freight measures to advance “a long-term agenda for a more transparent, balanced, and efficient rail system that reliably moves our goods to global markets”, as outlined in transportation 2030. Regarding Bill C-49, we believe the government has struck a balance between the needs and concerns of both shippers and rail carriers. We also believe the provisions of the bill are highly responsive to the concerns we have shared during consultations both with the Emerson panel, and more recently, with Minister Garneau leading up to the publication of transportation 2030.

Specifically, Bill C-49 addresses the important issues of data transparency and timeliness, market power, shippers' rights, reciprocity, fairer rates, and extended interswitching. The bill also proposes important measures to incorporate best available safety technologies by incorporating in-cab video and data gathering systems that have been used for many years in other transportation industries.

Taken together, the package of measures in Bill C-49 has the potential to make a meaningful contribution to a more balanced relationship between shippers and carriers, where the realities of today's transportation system mean a normal market environment cannot exist. Therefore, we believe that Bill C-49 presents a rare instance where our sector welcomes government involvement in creating market conditions.

The key word I want to stress in what I've just said, however, is the “potential”. Again, we do believe Bill C-49 is responsive to shippers' needs, we do believe it makes an important effort to establish a more balanced relationship between shippers and carriers in an otherwise non-competitive marketplace, and we are not here today to propose a suite of additional measures for your consideration.

(0950)



Nevertheless, we are concerned that specific measures outlined and described in the bill may not achieve the desired outcomes. Specifically, with respect to the data transparency provisions in the bill, we would strongly recommend that these provisions include commodity-specific information on rates, volumes, and level of service that would support investment decisions and assessment of fair and adequate service. In this regard, we also recommend that the availability of information to shippers be expedited by establishing a firm early timeline for the implementation of the regulations.

On a closely related note, we recommend that the act include specific requirements for railways to provide the highest level of service that can be reasonably provided. We see ambiguity in the current language that stops short of equating “adequate and suitable” with the highest reasonable level of rail service. This should be clarified for all parties.

With respect to the Canadian Transportation Agency's powers and informal resolution process, we recommend that the agency's powers be increased, providing it with the ability to independently investigate issues on its own initiative and ensure informal resolutions are implemented and effective, and that policy-makers and stakeholders are then able to measure and analyze the broader trends in freight rail performance.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly to us, the intent of the long-haul interswitching provisions in the bill are most welcome. As noted in the government's own discussion paper, the previous competitive line rate measures were little used and provided no appreciable contribution to establishing a more balanced environment between shippers and carriers. We are, however, concerned that the range of limitations and specific exclusions on long-haul interswitching in the bill will likewise lead to its underuse and ineffectiveness. Many of our members are captive shippers. For many, trucking is not an option. For over 50% of our members, trucking becomes economically unviable at a distance of 500 kilometres. As such, we recommend the elimination of those limitations specifically related to toxic-by-inhalation products, to traffic originating within 30 kilometres of the interchange, and to exclusions pertaining to high-volume corridors.

Madam Chair, in my brief time with you, I'll stop here and welcome any questions you may have. Thank you again for the opportunity to speak to you today.

(0955)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Masterson.

Now we'll go on to the Grain Growers of Canada, with Mr. Nielsen, please.

Mr. Jeff Nielsen:

Thank you, Madam Chair, and committee members.

Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments on this important bill. Grain Growers of Canada represents 50,000 grain, pulse, corn, oilseed, and soybean farmers from across Canada. We have members from the Atlantic provinces to the Peace Country of British Columbia. We are the only national farmer-run group representing all the grains that are exported around the world. Given our dependence on export markets, farmers like myself are highly dependent on a reliable, competitive rail system.

I run a family-owned, incorporated grain farm in south central Alberta near Olds. I grow wheat, malt barley, and canola. Right now, we're in the middle of the harvest. Luckily, we had rain today and I got the day off and I came here. It is important for me to come here personally to speak as a farmer on my thoughts about Bill C-49.

We greatly appreciate the work this committee has done in the past, including the excellent study on the former Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act, and the recommendations made to the government. As Cam mentioned, the Barton report brought to light how important agriculture is, how the government views the goals, and how agriculture can grow to $75 billion in exports by 2025. We're thankful the government has that recognition and had the Barton report presented to Parliament.

The Grain Growers of Canada welcomed the announcement of this new legislation back in December, and we are hopeful for third reading of this bill and royal assent as soon as possible to avoid any of the handling issues with this year's crop, as we are heading well into fall now and winter is on its way. My entire crop is shipped by rail. I need a rail system that will not only perform for me but for our customers. These customers, we know, can go elsewhere. It is imperative that Canada has a rail system that is effective and responsive to get our crops to export position.

With that, I see opportunities within Bill C-49 to look at the ability to hold railways financially accountable for service provided. I want to give an example of how this would work for my farm.

Currently, there's no avenue to penalize the railroads for poor service. This lack of accountability impacts all players in the supply chain and, ultimately, farmers. I market my crops throughout the year when I see best-price opportunities for my farm and for my financial needs. Let's say I decided to sell 200 metric tons of canola in February because I saw a price signal there, and also in February I have an input bill that my farm needs to pay. It is not that I like choosing February, because it's minus-20 and I might need to shovel snow, but I'm quite willing to haul grain any time of year when I have signed contracts.

Here comes February. It's cold, it's snowy, and I'm out there ready to haul grain. The auger's in the bin, and I get loaded up and the elevator calls me that the train's not here. It has been put off for a few weeks. Then I call again and find the train has been put off for another few weeks. Now it's late April, and I'm getting my machinery ready to seed next year's crop. I have delayed paying my farm account, because I hadn't had the grain sales that I thought I had contracted for in February.

It has had a great effect on me personally and on my farm. My grain company has been affected, too. They had sales booked for that canola for an offshore customer. That canola did not reach port in time and those ships may have had to wait in Vancouver harbour for a lengthy period of time. That costs money too. It's called demurrage, which sooner or later will be passed back to me as a producer.

On the flip side, my grain company is fined by railroads if a train is not loaded within a set period of time, yet my grain company cannot fine the railroads for not supplying the train on time as scheduled. I've seen cars sit there for well over a week after they've been filled, yet there's no penalty issued to the rail companies then. That delay in moving that train for that week also delays the next train from coming in, which starts a snowball effect of delays.

We are all very familiar with the mess that happened in the winter of 2013-14. As a grain producer, I experienced it in many ways. I believe I lost marketing opportunities since I could not sell into certain markets because there were no opportunities for grain to be delivered. We saw contracts that were set for December and not delivered until well into the spring. That, of course, affected farmers' financial cycles as far as paying their bills and such. We saw customers, and I'll point to oats here specifically, who lost business. Those customers in the U.S. who wanted Canadian oats went to Scandinavia to fill their needs.

As I mentioned before, our customers have other choices. If we continue to allow the railroads to provide irregular, spotty service, we will lose those customers forever. Winter on the Prairies happens. Sometimes it's more severe than others, but it happens every year.

(1000)



One of the other provisions we welcome in Bill C-49 is the increased requirement for reporting and railway contingency planning. It is hoped that our rail companies will quickly adopt and publish sound contingency plans to demonstrate that they have the capacity to get our products to wherever on time.

In the fall of 2013, farmers, grain companies, and Stats Canada knew that we were going into a large crop, which as Cam has pointed out, is now the norm. We are producing more grain continually, yet our rail companies, in the fall of 2013, were not ready. Winter hit and things literally went off the rails.

Data collection is another key point. It is important that we have a complete dataset. I commend the work of the Agriculture Transportation Coalition and Quorum Group for the information they provide, which has filled in significant gaps and helped us work with railroads to hold them more accountable in the last couple of years.

In Bill C-49, we also appreciate the ability of the Canadian Transportation Agency to play a larger role in areas such as improved dispute resolution. We see increased clarity of railway responsibility in the act when it comes to the definition of adequate and suitable service. One of the clear benefits I see of these two items is a much-needed assurance to me, as a producer, that if there are issues, they will be identified and hopefully dealt with prior to any severe impacts and the potential loss of sales or customers.

Grain Growers of Canada has a few recommendations we feel will strengthen the bill. I reiterate that it is critical that we have this legislation passed as soon as possible to ensure the smooth movement of this year's crop.

Grain farmers support maintaining the current maximum revenue entitlement, MRE, with the adjustments for capital spending, as proposed in Bill C-49. The MRE is working well at this time, and changing it slightly to recognize and incorporate the investments made by each railroad should encourage more investment and will gain infrastructure for the future as a result. The point there is our hopper car fleet, I believe. As we know, it's aging badly.

One glaring omission of grains under the MRE is soybeans. On behalf of our members, we ask that soybeans be included as one of the crops under the MRE's schedule II. Soybean acreage is increasing year over year in the prairie provinces, and naturally, those products are shipped by rail. This update reflects the current needs of an industry that were not anticipated at the time the MRE was set. This truly will be a modernization of the act. Once Bill C-49 is fully in effect, and we've seen the proposed improvements, a comprehensive review of the MRE can be undertaken, but not before.

I would like to quickly speak to long-haul interswitching. In the previous Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act, we saw interswitching increased to 160 kilometres. This provided a very useful tool for our grain companies to obtain more competitive terms of service.

To illustrate how important interswitching is, I draw your attention once again to oats. Oats are a corridor-specific commodity being used by major processors in the U.S., and they need to get to the buyer in a regular, timely fashion. Many customers were lost as a result of the 2013 winter crisis, and the industry is still trying to get those markets back. The extended interswitching provision has helped many oat growers. Given the usefulness of that tool, we, as the Grain Growers of Canada, are concerned that the long-haul provisions set out in Bill C-49 may not be as effective or address some of the needs of all our producers.

We ask that you review the attachment to our submission for the recommendations from the newly reinvigorated crop logistics working group, of which I am a member. The group has proposed amendments to the long-haul provisions that we believe will ensure the security and market reliability the previous extended interswitching provided. Already this year we are seeing increased demand in the U.S. for some of our crops due to the poor quality in the U.S., and it must go by rail.

(1005)



Grain producers are working hard to provide the world with top-quality grain, oilseeds, pulses, and corn. We believe strongly that the goals set out for increased exports are achievable and we are ready to work with the government to meet those goals. However, we need this legislation to pass as soon as possible to ensure that we can rely on the grain-handling system to get our products to export position.

I thank you for the time.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Nielsen, in particular for your personal challenges. Sometimes we forget just how difficult it is out there.

We'll move on to our questions.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I want to thank each one of you for joining us today. I do appreciate your attendance.

As you pointed out, Mr. Nielsen, we know that the timing of these hearings doesn't dovetail very well with our agricultural community, but as it has been pointed out, this is important work that needs to be done. Your testimony here today is crucial in providing the committee with the information needed to ensure that the right balance is struck in addressing the underlying issues that exist in our transportation system. But we know that this is not the first time that your input has been solicited to aid parliamentarians in our deliberations on how to structure legislation that ensures market access and an efficient means of transportation for our shippers and producers.

Every witness so far has testified that there needs to be some changes to this legislation, and all have identified issues with the provisions around long-haul interswitching. Because I have such a limited amount of time to ask each of you questions, I have two questions that I would like each of you to answer.

Does Bill C-49 enhance competition in rail service, and, on balance, do you prefer the extended interswitching at 160 kilometres, as previously outlined in the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act, or do you prefer the LHI provisions in this bill? I'll have each one of you answer those questions.

Mr. Cam Dahl:

I'll give just a quick response to both of those questions. Yes, Bill C-49 will improve the competitive balance when it is passed, which is why, on balance, we are asking that the legislation be brought to royal assent as quickly as possible. This bill will improve railway accountability, will improve transparency, and will move us closer to what we would have if market competitive conditions existed.

That being said, the extended interswitching was used. It was extensively used by the grain industry and it was an effective tool. Given our desire to have Bill C-49 in law as quickly as possible, our approach to you today has been to offer some amendments to the long-haul interswitching. That would make those provisions more effective.

Mr. Bob Masterson:

I think the first answer is, yes, we do believe that the provisions of Bill C-49 will make a more balanced and competitive rail freight environment, but we have to remember the word “balanced” is important. We're not just saying that as a means to keep the peace. Our competitive position depends on the railways also being competitive and profitable. No one's here to punish them, but it hasn't been a balanced relationship up until now. We believe the provisions in this bill will create a more balanced relationship that will allow all of us to have commercial success and to grow our businesses in the future.

To your second question, of course, it depends, and unlike perhaps the agricultural community, with large volumes in a fairly tight geographic boundary, our industry is spread coast to coast and it really depends on the individual circumstances of individual producers in a very heterogenous sector. That said, there have been people who took good advantage of the earlier provisions and did quite well. They were pleased with it. That's one of the reasons why in the consultations as a sector we asked for something that was permanent, something that was available to all sectors, and something that truly provided relief for the opportunity for competitive commercial discussions between service providers on an ongoing permanent basis.

I hope that helps. Thank you.

(1010)

Mr. Jeff Nielsen:

Thank you. I agree with the previous comments. When you look at what we heard in December, when this bill was announced, it was really a godsend. It hit a lot of the avenues we've been searching for. When you look at reciprocal penalties, look at data collection, and is it “adequate and suitable”, these are things we've been asking for in this industry for a long time. We need to have railroads that are accountable. As Cam mentioned, they're a monopoly, a duopoly if you want it call it that. I'm only on one main line. I could access another main line, but it's a good distance away from me, so I'm restricted there.

As far as the long-haul interswitching is concerned, we've done a lot of work with the crop logistics working group at presenting the amendments. As Cam and the rest of us have all mentioned, we need to see passage of this bill soon. We're coming into a large crop this fall. We need to make sure this crop gets to market and gets to export.

Thank you.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I want to address the sense of urgency that I am picking up on from our witnesses today. The question that comes to me as a result of that urgency is this.

We had the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act sunset in the middle of this past summer. You are, then, in fact without any remedy when it comes to interswitching, except for the 30-kilometre right. Is that what's precipitating the urgency to get this law passed, so that you are negotiating contracts with certainty and with terms that you can actually go to the railways with?

Mr. Cam Dahl:

Yes. The protections that the grain industry had under the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act were valuable tools. From my perspective it wasn't just the message that was sent to Canada, but the message sent to our customers. I visit many of our customers internationally, and one of the first questions I am always asked, whether I'm in Bangladesh or in Japan or in Nigeria, is a question about Canadian logistics. I cannot stress enough the harm to our reputation that was caused by that 2013 and 2014 failure. We cannot afford another one.

As Jeff said, we have a large crop to move, despite the drought conditions we have in the Prairies, and we need to have tools in place that will help ensure that if problems begin to develop, they don't turn into the large, systematic failure that we had in the past.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will move on to Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My question is for Mr. Masterson.

First, thank you for being here. I appreciate your opening remarks and I'm very pleased that the ministers heard you. It's a sentiment that's been reiterated by many of our witnesses.

Correct me if any of my facts here are wrong. You said there was a $200-billion investment in the United States and that 14% of rail volume is made up of chemicals. To the best of my knowledge, in the United States the chemical industry also has access to barges to move their products—

Mr. Bob Masterson:

That's correct.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

—and we don't have that here in Canada. I can imagine there are some implications from this difference within the industry.

Could you just speak to that, please?

Mr. Bob Masterson:

This is a question that came up in discussions previously. Does Canada need something that the U.S. has that we don't have? There are a number of factors that say, yes, we do need it. To answer the question from Madam Block, yes, we need it urgently.

The United States has a number of factors that assist in transportation issues. One is that industry and people are much more consolidated and concentrated. When it comes to our business of chemistry, their resources—natural gas, petroleum products, and others—are located much closer to coasts. Texas is on the coast. Louisiana is on the coast. It's easy to get stuff to market, and especially through barging.

In Canada we have tremendous resources, largely in the petrochemical industry concentrated in western Canada—specifically Alberta—and there is something called the Rocky Mountains between Alberta and the west coast that prevents our moving any volumes at all by barge.

Canada is, then, a different marketplace. We have much longer distances to market, and in our case fully 60% of every tonne of product that we move goes across the border into the U.S. Those are long distances. Our industry, like many, is deeply interconnected. Volumes move between Alberta and Texas and back into Ontario, and even into Mexico, on an ongoing basis. That is not going to be accomplished by moving millions of tonnes of product by truck.

We have to make the system we have.... If we want the economy to be strong and to attract investment into our sector, we have to make sure that the economy is working as efficiently as it can in all areas. What you've heard regularly from the stakeholders who have been here is that the rail freight market has not been efficient and competitive for many years.

(1015)

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

I think Mr. Graham is going to take the remainder of my time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Masterson, I'll start with you, but I have only one question for you before I carry on.

Railways carry much more hazardous materials than just toxic inhalation substances. Some of them are called “special dangerous” in the industry, which crews just call “bombs”. Some substances are not even permitted on trucks.

The large carriers argued to us on Monday, I think it was, that if you have access to trucks, you're not a captive industry. You said that is clearly not the case.

Are there any other options for many of these companies besides trains?

Mr. Bob Masterson:

This is a great question to turn over to Ms. Edwards. She is an expert not only on Bill C-49 but also on all matters on dangerous goods.

Kara, are you comfortable with that?

Ms. Kara Edwards (Director, Transportation, Chemistry Industry Association of Canada):

Often rail is the safest mode for highly dangerous goods to travel, or, depending on the volume, you can transport it in cylinders as well that would go by road but in small volumes. With the other traffic on the road, with different conditions, often rail is the safest mode to transport dangerous goods, particularly TIH products and other very dangerous goods.

In Canada, I think we have to also look at how many of these very highly dangerous goods are travelling in high volumes. There is only a handful of TIH products that travel by rail. Often in our membership a lot of companies, let's say with chlorine, will not transport by road because the risk has been deemed too high.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Bob Masterson:

If I could, I'll just add an anecdote to help you understand that.

Styrene is another dangerous good. Previously, shippers in Canada would only ship that by rail. Our industry had a company in the Kelowna area of British Columbia. They took that styrene and turned it into resins that then supplied a small but important regional recreational boating manufacturing industry. Unfortunately, the short-line railway that served that facility decided to close. Neither of the two large class 1 railways picked that short-line railway up, so they suspended service.

Well, there was no way.... It wasn't that it couldn't be delivered by truck. It was a decision by the shippers that they would not move that product by truck. With the rail out of service, the plant that made the resins closed. With the plant that made the resins closed, the boating manufacturers closed.

There are goods that need to move by rail for very good reasons, and they have to be able to get to market. It's not just our members because, again, we supply other industries. The goods have to get to them at the end of the day.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I was in Kelowna last week at caucus, and they found that the track is now a bicycle path.

I have only a few seconds left. I had a number of questions for Mr. Nielsen, but I won't have time to get through them.

Very quickly, a freight car has a service life of about 40 years. How old are the freight cars in service right now?

Mr. Jeff Nielsen:

Actually, I think they're over 40 years, some of them. They have been modified and they have been upgraded, but within the next 10 to 15 years, we're going to see the majority of our cars decommissioned.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Cam Dahl:

I'll just make a quick distinction between the hopper cars that the Government of Canada owns, which were bought in the 1980s, and the private cars that the railways own and lease, which are modern, high-capacity railcars.

(1020)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thanks.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Good morning, Madam Chair.

I want to officially say hello to all my colleagues on this third day, which is bringing us some perspective. Outlines are starting to take shape, and I'm sure our committee will not ignore them. Let's hope the government will follow suit.

My first question for the witnesses has to do with what I refer to as the diffusion effect. The drafting of a bill is not akin to writing a novel or drawing up a business contract. Two of your organizations insisted that the definition of adequate and suitable service must be changed.

I would like to hear your opinion on that issue, since even I am really confused. I feel that, if a service is adequate, it must also be suitable. I feel that synonyms are being used to try to cloud the issue.

You want those two terms to be revised, but what words or underlying definitions would you like to see used? [English]

Mr. Bob Masterson:

I think in our comments we provided some suggestion. In our written submission, we suggested that the ambiguity be removed, and we'd speak of the highest reasonable level of rail service that could be provided. Perhaps Ms. Edwards could expand on that.

Ms. Kara Edwards:

I think a key part of that is understanding at what point there is no longer adequate service. It needs to incorporate that, as well. I think the Western Canadian Shippers’ Coalition did a very eloquent job of explaining the key differences yesterday.

We could propose and submit a legal text to the committee as well, if that's of interest going forward. We didn't bring a copy of the text to specifically note the word changes. They were only very minor, though, but it could save a lot of time and court cases in the future to clarify that early on.

Mr. Cam Dahl:

Just quickly, I'm not a transportation lawyer, so I'm not going to say that the amendments in Bill C-49 are perfect, but the bill does propose to tighten up or better quantify the definition of “adequate and suitable”. “Adequate and suitable” really is how the railways are held to account. Bringing in that broader definition does help improve accountability.

Is that the perfect definition? Probably not, when lawyers give us different legal texts, perhaps, but it is a significant improvement over what is in the current Canada Transportation Act.

Mr. Jeff Nielsen:

I disagree with the previous two comments.

Thank you. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Of course, we are open to any suggestions you could send us.

Mr. Masterson, you gave us concrete examples to help us understand the reality on the ground, especially in my case, as I may be light years away from that world.

In your report, you also recommend that the agency's inquiry powers be increased. Could you give me an example of what the agency could do to be more effective if it had increased powers? [English]

Mr. Bob Masterson:

Again, I'll turn to Ms. Edwards. She spends a lot of time with the folks involved in the transportation agency and is in a better position to speak on our members' behalf.

Ms. Kara Edwards:

With regard to the agency's powers, we believe, if they're expanded for shippers, it gives one more opportunity for remedies to be available. Additionally, with some of the limitations of the agency right now, it might not be as easy for them to see how certain cases fall into the larger system. By expanding their powers, they can take certain cases and be able to see if they're consistent or if things are being followed through after measures are put in place. That's what we meant within our submission. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I still have one minute left.

I will quickly put a question to Mr. Nielsen.

I think you mentioned that soybeans were left off the schedule and should be included on the list. That is an anomaly, and I agree with you that soybeans should be in the schedule.

Should Bill C-49 provide a review mechanism for products on the lists, since we know that agriculture changes quickly? Eating habits change and industry habits change, as well. The market changes, and we can understand that a farmer may decide to change what they grow even though that involves high costs. Should there be a mechanism to review the list regularly?

(1025)

[English]

Mr. Jeff Nielsen:

I don't really agree with that. We're seeing just with the ability of our farming community the adoption of technologies that have really advanced how we as farmers take care of soils yet provide some of the best-quality crops in the world, and we're increasing those crops.

We're increasing those variety crops with technology to develop better breeding techniques. Soybeans are now less than 40 miles from me. Will I ever be able to grow them in my area? I'm not sure yet. I'm in a different climatic zone, but there's the ability to see those crops expand. Some of the crops are very good for our soils, so once again, we need to see some of those abilities to enter new crops into this agreement. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser (Central Nova, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Thanks to our witnesses for being here.

Before I begin, if you'll indulge me for just a moment, I'd like to communicate that I'm here with a bit of a heavy heart today. In Nova Scotia, we lost an absolute political giant yesterday with the passing of Allan J. MacEachen, who served as deputy prime minister and minister of foreign affairs and was responsible during his time in the health portfolio for implementing medicare. Despite all these incredible accomplishments in Ottawa, back home he's best known for his service to his constituents. As a young parliamentarian from Nova Scotia, I hope to emulate that today and over the course of my career.

In that spirit of standing up for Atlantic Canada, I can't help but notice that with the extended interswitching provisions that existed under Bill C-30 a specific sector and a specific region were impacted. Perhaps, Mr. Masterson, you may be best positioned to answer, although Mr. Nielsen pointed out that he has members in Atlantic Canada too. How does this bill service different sectors across the entire country, not just those in one important region?

Mr. Bob Masterson:

From our perspective, as I mentioned, we have a very heterogeneous industry. It's from coast to coast. It's very complex, with a large number of different products. Our view is that this strikes the right balance in the measures that are proposed. If they can be adjusted as discussed, they will bring benefit coast to coast.

We've not identified any regional shortcomings in the provisions that are here at this time. We feel that it will benefit all shippers across the country.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I forget which witnesses—I believe there was more than one—commented specifically about the importance of data and transparency. Right now I understand there's a disparity between even what the bill proposes and what exists in the United States, for example.

I don't want to get into the territory where we're starting to interfere with the proprietary information of the railways, but what can we realistically expect to see? Is harmony between the U.S. and Canada the gold standard here? What kind of data would make it most effective for shippers without compromising the proprietary information of railways?

Mr. Cam Dahl:

That's a great question. Of course, data is key to the concept of accountability. Data is also key to the goal of the legislation in allowing for contingency planning and for capacity planning in advance. That data is absolutely critical.

Some of the amendments we have brought forward tighten up that time window with precisely those objectives of the bill in mind, to ensure, for example, that some of that data is coming forward within a week and is available and useful to shippers, as opposed to three weeks after the fact where it's not as useful. It might be useful for an academic in a university, but not for somebody who's planning for a late train to Vancouver.

Similarly, with some of the provisions of some of the data requirements coming into effect, to your comment about what is happening in the U.S., the railways are already providing that information to the Surface Transportation Board in the U.S. It's not something new. There aren't new systems that have to be brought into place.

This is absolutely critical for contingency planning and for capacity planning, and there's no reason to delay that a year after the bill comes into place.

Mr. Jeff Nielsen:

I totally agree with that. When we talk about CN and CP both providing that data to the Surface Transportation Board in the U.S., it's no different from what they could be providing to us.

When you look at Quorum Group, which is supported through the federal government, their reporting period is weeks, maybe up to three to four weeks after, before they can get some of this data. The Agriculture Transportation Coalition group is going from the industry perspective. They do not get the information from the railroads. We're trying to work with it.

(1030)

Mr. Sean Fraser:

On the timeliness issue, Mr. Dahl, I know you just mentioned that a week might be reasonable, as opposed to three or four weeks. I'm sure you're going to say real-time data is the best data.

What is the reasonable window that you can be working with that's going to make a difference for business decision-making?

Mr. Cam Dahl:

That's why there are three very specific proposals in the brief that has been given to you.

They are proposals 1(a) through 1(c) that tighten up that timeline, as well as some of the specific provisions for proposed section 51.4, proposed subsection 77(5), and proposed section 98. Those amendments are brought in specifically to move that reporting time frame from what would be three weeks in total to about a week. That's in line with what we see in the U.S.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Shifting gears for a moment, I think you're spot-on in discussing that in a world of the global marketplace, timely transport of our goods is absolutely essential. One of the things I find governments aren't very good at is communicating to the people who live in the communities we represent that international trade is good for small businesses and it's good for workers in our communities.

Has anybody done an economic impact on what the losses are for our failure to transport goods in a timely way, using perhaps the 2013 example where you mention that we lost markets to Scandinavia? Is there any kind of economic assessment that we can trumpet at home to say that if we don't do this, we're going to lose jobs in our communities?

Mr. Jeff Nielsen:

I believe that there has been. We had data.... Sorry sir, I can't think of the number that we stated in grain loss sales from the 2014 crop year, but it was a significant amount of dollars. As Cam mentioned, it's our reputation.

There are harvests going on somewhere within the whole world almost every month. We have to compete in that marketplace when our crops come off at this time of year—September, October. We have to make sure that we have those markets.

Winter is hitting, and as Bob has mentioned, we have the Rockies to the west of me. We have to get the grain through those Rockies. It's a bit of a challenge, but we need to be able to guarantee our customers that we are a reliable supplier of a quality product.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Nielsen.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'll preface my questions by stating that on Monday we had a strong theme of safety and passenger rights. Yesterday we had a strong theme of safety and business practice, which ultimately lends itself to safety. Today we're hearing about service levels to the customer.

As I said yesterday, a lot of what we're discussing regarding safety has to do with business practice. How do we lend ourselves to the broader transportation strategy of Bill C-49, building in a better business practice, a better level of service, and being able to bring our product to market, nationally and internationally?

I want to drill down a bit. In my former life at the municipal level we were all about these issues. We considered how to apply ourselves, our daily business at city hall, so as to allow business to be in a more effective and friendly environment. That's what I see here. One of the things we did back then, which I can see happening now on a national level, was to sometimes enter into the business world, not as a government but as a partner. Back then we entered into a partnership with a short-line railway because the class 1s abandoned us. To keep what happened in nearby jurisdictions from happening in ours, we bought a railway, which we ran and operated. We brought a short-line operator on board to make sure the companies that depended on those railways continued to be healthy and got the service they needed.

I want this to be a dialogue like we had back then, the same kind of dialogue here in Ottawa. Business often finds itself abandoned by the traditional transportation services. That could be on the water, the railways, the roads, or in the air. It could have to do with the government or the private sector. One example is short-lines. We all know this service attaches itself directly to business and provides a link to a broader transportation network. Often the future of business depends on that link and that network.

My question to you is twofold. First, can the product be moved by truck or other method of transport? I think I got that answer earlier when you said no. We know that some companies ended up closing because those lines were abandoned and nobody picked up the ball with a short-line operator.

Second, Bill C-49 addresses the broader transportation network and the broader transportation strategy. Do you, being in the business every day, have any recommendations on how this bill could give short-line operators a mechanism that would allow them to pick up on these abandoned lines so that local economies are not hurt and local communities remain healthy?

(1035)

Mr. Bob Masterson:

From our perspective, short-line railways are very important, and we've stressed that their importance has been underplayed in the transportation 2030 agenda. Many of our producers carry product on that crucial first mile, and more important, when you're trying to reach a forest products mill in northern Saskatchewan, you're on the short-line for the last mile as well.

The short-lines are essential, and this is true beyond the provisions of Bill C-49. We've argued in past submissions to the finance committee that, because short-lines play such an important role in the manufacturing sector, we ought to consider putting some of the investment incentives we use for manufacturing into the short-line railways. Perhaps the tools we use to stimulate investment and growth could be applied to make sure those short-lines are on a sustainable financial footing. We should bear in mind that when these short-lines fail it's devastating for our members, our customers, and for many communities.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

This is a dialogue. It's what I'm trying to get out of this in considering the recommendations we bring forward for Bill C-49. It could also affect the deliberations of the finance committee and other committees, as well as future transportation or economic strategies.

Taking it a step further, we can see that a lot of the problems exist because of the capital side of it. There's no question that they're abandoning these lines because the ballast, the rails, or the ties are deteriorating. Instead of putting the capital in, they abandon these lines altogether because they're not getting acceptable returns. Do you find there's a need, not just from the operating side but also from the capital side, to take action before these situations happen?

I say this because we have a lot of capital assets in the form of infrastructure. There is rail, water. There is the St. Lawrence Seaway, where the docks and the canals are falling apart and no capital is being put into those assets. Before it gets to the point of having to abandon these assets, what role do you see government playing to ensure that they're preserved?

Mr. Bob Masterson:

Here are two quick responses from us. Then we'll turn it over to our colleagues.

First, what we feel is very important, and the provisions in Bill C-49 will help with this, is the data access and timeliness to support decision-making. Anecdotally, our view is that the Port of Vancouver, in particular, is getting quite congested. We think about growth plans. We think about a new $6-billion to $10-billion facility in Alberta. Then you have to start to think that the market for that is not North America; it's Asia. How's it going to get there? Anecdotally that's there, but that's why we need the data and the provisions that are here in Bill C-49 to help us understand where the pinch points are.

Second, again, we broadly applaud the work of both the former minister and the current minister. When we look at the transportation infrastructure plans that were announced earlier in the year, we see they will make important contributions to addressing many of the concerns. Anecdotally, again at least, we've been assured that there's opportunity to address short-line issues in there.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Go ahead, Mr. Shields.

Mr. Martin Shields (Bow River, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you for being here this morning. I appreciate the information you're bringing to us.

Going to the LHI, saying that it's regional and doesn't apply, we have exclusion zones in this one. We had Teck here yesterday, talking about the monopoly and the exclusion zones. That's a problem.

Now we go to you and your world. Tell us about exclusion zones.

Mr. Bob Masterson:

Absolutely. We mentioned in our submission and our comments what we think.

If the desire is create a more competitive relationship and more balanced relationship between shippers and carriers, why put in other additional limitations? This is not a competitive marketplace. We should do the maximum we can. Certainly it's our view that those limitations should be removed.

Mr. Martin Shields:

You're saying the exclusion zones should be gone in the corridors.

Mr. Bob Masterson:

Absolutely.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Okay. Thank you.

Moving to Grain Growers of Canada, thank you for mentioning the oats. People may not know, but the area you live in is the most valued for oats in the horse-racing industry in North America. You ship to the U.S. because they are the best quality oats for the racehorse industry. You have to get access to the U.S. market, and you grow those oats in your area. Thank you for mentioning that. They need to be put in there.

One of the things may be an understanding where the farm industry is. I relate the farm industry to the day traders in the market, in a sense. You are technologically advanced. You're day traders, and day traders need access to markets and need things to move. I think people don't understand how technically advanced you are. Maybe you want to touch on that again.

(1040)

Mr. Jeff Nielsen:

Thank you.

I don't grow oats. I find them one of the itchiest crops around. Barley is much better shovelling than oats.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Yes, it is.

Mr. Jeff Nielsen:

It's a very good point. I get market updates three or four times a day. I have market advice coming to me. I look at the opportunities for future contracts for my crops. Usually a certain percentage every spring already has a forward contract. I'm looking at my financial timeline, when I need to make payments for land, equipment, machinery, or whatever. I'll pick certain months that I find a good price, and then I know my bill payments are due that month.

That's where, if there are glitches in the system, there are glitches in my finances. I have, fortunately, with maturity, a very good banker now that will allow me some leverage, but we look at the next generation, the younger farmers coming on. They don't have that ability. They don't have that credit rating built up with a bank.

Mr. Martin Shields:

And with the income tax thing.... Never mind.

Anyway, we have a word in here, “adequate”. Some of us were more recently in the education system. I spent a lot of time in both the public and advanced education, and the bell curve says adequate is C. I think we all relate to what a C is. To me that's adequate. That's not a gold standard.

Mr. Dahl, do you want to respond to that, because you mentioned it?

Mr. Cam Dahl:

Yes.

The terms “adequate” and “suitable” have been part of transportation law and jurisprudence for a long time. That, in fact, is the minium standard that the railways have to meet. That's the reason why those words are used. That's the lowest. That's the point at which the agency can start looking at remedies for shippers. That's not a goal. That's the bare minimum.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Right. We're talking about up to a 40% increase in the next 10 years, and we have problems with it now. In the rail system, if we expand that by up to 40%, which is the goal in the next 10 years, and if we're operating at a minimum, what's going to happen?

Mr. Cam Dahl:

That's why a key point in looking at what we need from our transportation system needs to be defined by the markets. It needs to be defined by what farmers like Jeff are supplying and what customers around the world are demanding. What we can supply to the market should not be defined by what our service providers want to meet.

What level of service is required is something that needs to come from the marketplace. It's something that needs to ensure that Canada is meeting the demand both here at home and in the U.S. and offshore markets as well.

Mr. Martin Shields:

I'll go back to the chemistry industry. If you're competing with the U.S. and you have exclusion zones, how much of a disadvantage does that put to you in, when you compare with somebody going to Canada or the U.S. through our market?

Mr. Bob Masterson:

It's hard to quantify a specific disadvantage from a specific measure. What do we know? I mentioned earlier that our industry has seen over $250 billion of new investment in the United States in the last five years. Historical patterns say Canada should have seen 10% of that. We should have seen $25 billion to $30 billion of new investment in our sector in Canada in the last five years. We've not seen that. We've seen about $2 billion. We know we have a lot of work to do to make business conditions attractive so that people want to invest here.

Going back to your earlier question, maybe C was good enough in the 1970s, but in today's world, for individuals who are moving product from their family farms or for the economy as a whole, when we want to attract a greater share of the global market and attract investment, I can guarantee you that a C is not enough.

I would add one more thing that I think is really important on the data question asked earlier. We have to distinguish between individual claims. There will always be reasons that things don't happen when they should, but the most important information that will come out of this will be those broader trends. Is the system performing the way it's supposed to?

If you look at the United States, one major class 1 railway within the last year had a change of ownership, and within six months, the Surface Transportation Board was able to issue letters and call people in to Washington to say their service wasn't good enough and had to change. I don't think we have the ability today, and that's where we need to get to.

(1045)

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for that.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

This will only be received and understood by a few, but the answer to “adequate and suitable” service is 42.

Mr. Bob Masterson:

And a half.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Is there rationing of rail capacity in Canada? Is there enough to go around?

Mr. Cam Dahl:

That's a complicated question. It depends when you ask.

From a grain perspective, if you ask that question in the middle of July, the answer is no. If you ask that question in the middle of November, the answer is yes, because there are peak demands in international markets, as well as domestically. It depends on the time of year and it depends on the conditions.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Do you think there's dysfunctional competition between various sectors or shippers?

Mr. Cam Dahl:

I don't see that, but what I do see in particular with the grain industry is a sector that's absolutely captive to rail. There's no way we're going to move 20 million tonnes of wheat by truck to Vancouver. If there is a crisis and you're a rail company and you have a choice between moving something that you might lose otherwise or something that you can move two or three months from now, what choice would you make?

Mr. Jeff Nielsen:

We had a famous past chairman of one of the railroads who made a public statement that grain is in the bin. They'll move it when they get to it, and they have the whole 12-month period to move it.

We cannot let our grain go in 12-month increments.

Ms. Fiona Cook (Executive Director, Grain Growers of Canada):

That's an excellent question, though, because it speaks to the need for data. Can we really, at any given time, know what the capacity of the system is? I would say we can't right now, so we need the data and a system-wide dataset to be able to assess where we're at, at any given point in time.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Part of the reason for my question is that there is a very robust debate out in British Columbia right now about pipelines. Pipelines, of course, would offer an alternate form of transport that currently might be taking up capacity of railways.

I want to talk about the exclusion zones. There are the two that I understand: Kamloops to Vancouver; and between Quebec City and, I think, Montreal.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's between Quebec City and Windsor.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay, Quebec City and Windsor. Thank you for that.

Are we not dealing with a couple of corridors, though, where there's pretty adequate competition because of the fact that you have that concentration of service along those two corridors? Do we in fact need extended interswitching along those corridors? You do have the competition.

Mr. Bob Masterson:

Windsor-Quebec, for instance, is a very long distance, and while you might have two class 1s reasonably close together, I would have to even calculate the distance in the centre like Toronto. Elsewhere in that corridor those distances are easily beyond that.

The short answer is no. Again, if the goal is to increase competition, we know those companies that have been given, under the earlier provisions, the opportunity to force competition for moving their product did very well, and had improved rates and were more competitive because the opportunity was there. We don't understand why it would be artificially restricted because of a geography.

I'll leave it at that.

Mr. Cam Dahl:

I would just concur. This is, of course, not one of the primary issues for the grain shippers, but I don't see the reasoning for the exclusions also.

Mr. Jeff Nielsen:

Going back to your previous question on capacity, when you look at the U.S. marketplace, both CN and CP do have rail lines into the U.S., but with this loss, as Ms. Block mentioned about the 160-kilometre interswitching, we're missing opportunities right now to get grain in there because we were relying on those two railroads instead of doing the interswitch at BNSF.

If we're looking at having to ship hopper cars onto CN and CP lines in the U.S., the cycle time there is a lot longer, up to 30 days, to get those cars back into Canada whereas say Saskatchewan to Vancouver is 10 days. That's out there and back. There could be capacity restraints there as well.

(1050)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

In the time I have left I wouldn't mind hearing from Mr. Dahl and Mr. Nielsen on the whole issue of producer cars because we've received signals in some of the testimony so far that they are almost a thing of the past. I don't know if that's correct or not, but the other issue is whether they are available, and how they are handled by the railways. In the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act study we did earlier we heard very strong signals that in situations like that the producers should be considered as shippers as well with the rights that go along with that.

Your thoughts, please.

Mr. Cam Dahl:

I'm a former commissioner of the Canadian Grain Commission so I'm somewhat familiar with producer cars. Producer cars are actually a right that is enshrined in the Canada Grain Act and have existed since 1918, I think. Don't quote me on that date. The right for producers to load their own hopper cars and ship their own hopper cars has existed in Canada for a long time and still continues to exist.

The use of producer cars goes up and down over time. It depends on market conditions, and it depends on the year, but they are still utilized, and they are still an emergency valve, as it were, for producers and are not impacted by Bill C-49 at all.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. I have to move on.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

An observation I would make is that, to a witness, the optimism that has been expressed in the intent of this legislation can't go without being noticed. I appreciate that you have highlighted some of the good provisions in this bill that you strongly support.

If the technical amendments you're suggesting aren't made to this bill, how will your industry be affected? I put that question to each one of you.

Mr. Cam Dahl:

The reason that the technical amendments have been brought forward is to help ensure we meet the intent of the bill in terms of improved service, accountability, and transparency. If we don't see some of those improvements, the ability to meet that intent won't be as high. This would make the bill better and improve the chances of our getting to those intents.

Mr. Jeff Nielsen:

I agree with those comments. We're very happy with a lot of the intent of the bill. We're just asking for some minor amendments to it. As mentioned, we need to see this go through now. We're into week six or seven as far as the crop year goes and as far as the shipping calendar goes. As you mentioned, without the 160-kilometre interswitching in place right now, there could be some blips. I think there are already some blips in the market as far as getting our product into the U.S. is concerned.

Mr. Bob Masterson:

In our case I think it's difficult to say what the impacts will be. What we have said is that there's a lot of ambiguity there. We believe that if we want to realize the intent we should remove that ambiguity and tighten things up as much as possible.

At a minimum, if the committee decides it needs to move the bill forward as is, we're looking for a very strong and short timeline for review. Within two to three years at the most, we should be able to look back and ask, “Do we have the right information? Are we making better decisions? Is there better balance between shippers and carriers?” That has to be a formal requirement to review these provisions in the event that they cannot be strengthened as recommended by the various parties.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much.

Just going back to your comment, Mr. Nielsen, about our being in week six or seven of the shipping season, I would like to hear you expand on what the implications are in regard to what is available to our shippers, our producers, right now in negotiating those contracts.

Mr. Jeff Nielsen:

I'm not sure about negotiating contracts, but I'm just thinking now that the Agriculture Transportation Coalition does a weekly roundup of what cars have been available to the grain companies on certain train runs. Right now, both railroads are sitting at the low nineties. Right now they have a pretty good rating as far as supplying cars on time to certain facilities is concerned.

The concern is that as winter progresses, and if there are some delays in getting products to certain corridors, we will see that spread. Throughout last year we saw maybe one ranging around 80%, the other one ranging around 70%. That is where we saw the delays.

If you're only supplying 70% of your cars on time in a certain period of time, it is then that there's a backlog, and that's when it starts to snowball. That's when we get all the delays. That's when we'll get demurrage at the west coast or demurrage at Thunder Bay or wherever. We just need to speed this along.

(1055)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

What I would follow up on with the time I have left is the observation you made, Mr. Masterson, about building into this bill a provision to review the impacts of any of the amendments being suggested or that have been made in the introduction of this bill. The recommendation was made yesterday by one of our witnesses to include that in this bill. They noted there wasn't one in the bill.

Have you made that formal recommendation in your submission to...?

Mr. Bob Masterson:

We have.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay. Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My next question is for Ms. Edwards, but other witnesses who would like to add a few words should feel free to do so.

Earlier, you talked about the transportation of dangerous goods. You told us that trucks were not really an option, although they were used in some cases. Their use was completely prohibited in other cases, since trains were safer.

Do you think the Canada Transportation Act should contain a section specifically dedicated to the transportation of dangerous goods? [English]

Ms. Kara Edwards:

I think that the transportation of dangerous goods is adequately regulated through the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act. There is a very good relationship among industry, government, and all stakeholders involved in keeping those regulations up to date and responsive to the needs and interests of communities, government, and industry. I think it's being appropriately regulated through the TDGA at the moment. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Bill C-49 introduces what I call reciprocal penalties. That may be a step in the right direction.

Do those penalties seem symbolic or are they sufficiently robust to change the balance of power in contract negotiations? [English]

Mr. Cam Dahl:

This is something that will be subject, of course, to contractual negotiations between shippers and carriers. Yes, I do anticipate that they will be robust enough.

Mr. Jeff Nielsen:

I guess this goes back to Ms. Block's comment too. If we have a contract in place—this is between the shipper and the grain company, or to the end-user or the customer—and the grain company has the guarantee it wants that it will get the product to export position and that there is a reciprocal penalty in place if it doesn't, that hopefully will filter through to better service, if a few of these incidents happen.

We don't want to see them happen. We just want better service.

Mr. Bob Masterson:

I'd just add that it will depend, and that's why we've made the recommendations we have to remove some of the ambiguity. You need the data and information.

In a case such as ours, you need it on a.... What happens with grain movement is irrelevant to chemical movements. We need data for our own industry and our own sector to help us decide whether we had adequate service. Then you're back to the question of whether we have enough clarity on adequate and appropriate levels of service.

If those continue to be grey areas and we lack the data, it becomes very difficult to find the means to impose reciprocity, if all you're doing is argue before the different boards and hearings about whether you were harmed or not.

I think, again, that the job of this committee is to hear what the stakeholders have said and to look to remove as much ambiguity as we can now, so that we don't take up government's time further down the road. Let's get it right at this point. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Now we have about a minute or two left. Is there anyone who has a pertinent outstanding question that they would like to get an answer to when we have such a great panel?

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I just want to go back to what Mr. Hardie was asking and trying to drill down on, and Ms. Cook, you alluded to it. That's data, information.

Can you be more specific in terms of what exactly you're looking for in terms of that data?

(1100)

Ms. Fiona Cook:

Again, it's asking the railroads what their plans are, as is done in the U.S. The Surface Transportation Board asks the class 1 railways to set out their plans for the upcoming year. Again, it's having an idea system-wide—and this goes back to Mr. Masterson's point, too—of all of the players that depend on the rail supply chain. What is the actual availability of rail capacity at a given point in time? It's not an easy question, but you need data.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

It's not necessarily proprietary.

Ms. Fiona Cook:

No.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

You're just looking for data to, again, enable you to do your business better.

Ms. Fiona Cook:

It's to make decisions based on timely information, exactly.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

And it's efficient.

Ms. Fiona Cook:

Yes.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much to the witnesses. You could see this morning that everybody's very interested in all of your comments. We're doing the very best we can, as parliamentarians, with this piece of legislation.

Thank you very much for being here.

We will suspend now for the next panel.

(1100)

(1115)

The Chair:

We are reconvening our meeting on the study of Bill C-49.

We have with us in our next panel the Mining Association of Canada, Teck Resources Limited, the Forest Products Association of Canada, and the Shipping Federation of Canada.

I welcome all of you and look forward to hearing your remarks.

Would the Mining Association of Canada like to open up this panel and start their 10-minute presentation? Mr. Gratton, would you please start?

Mr. Pierre Gratton (President and Chief Executive Officer, Mining Association of Canada):

Thank you very much, Chair and members of the committee, and clerk and fellow witnesses. It's a pleasure to be here.

My name is Pierre Gratton. I'm president and CEO of the Mining Association of Canada. I'm joined by my colleague, Brad Johnston, whom I think you met yesterday. He is the general manager of logistics and planning for Teck Resources Limited and is someone who works with the railways on a daily basis.

I'll begin by saying just a few words about the mining sector, which, as you know, is an economic stalwart, contributing some $56 billion to national GDP in 2015 in what was a down market. We're major employers, with some 373,000 people working directly and another 190,000 working indirectly for our sector. We pay the highest industrial wage in the country. We're active in both urban and rural settings. Proportionally, we're the largest private sector employer of indigenous peoples and a major supporter of indigenous businesses and are thus a powerful partner in indigenous economic reconciliation.

While increased mineral prices have returned some confidence to the global mining industry, increasing domestic uncertainty and business costs are raising questions over whether Canada is well positioned to take advantage of the next upswing. We are seeing Australia, our major competitor, rebound at a far greater rate than we are currently in Canada, which is concerning.

The effectiveness and reliability of rail freight service are critical to Canada's mineral investment competitiveness throughout the ups and downs of the commodity cycle. There are significant costs associated with transporting goods to and from the mine site, and companies need to get their goods to their international customers on time. I can report that our members' customers are closely monitoring this bill and its potential impacts as a measure of Canada's reliability as a source for raw materials.

If railways are the arteries of our trading nation, then the mining industry is the lifeblood upon which they depend. We account for 20% of Canada's exports and over half of total rail freight revenue generated each year, making us the largest single customer group of Canada's railways. I would just ask you to imagine the state of Canadian rail without mining and the impacts it would have on grain, forest products, and all other rail-reliant industries in Canada.

Despite this, we are continually facing an unlevel playing field in the rail freight market, which manifests itself as significant and perennial service failures. The reason is that the Canada Transportation Act is an imperfect surrogate for competition in a monopoly marketplace. Many shippers are captive to one railway and are beholden to railway market power as a result.

It's crucial to get this bill right on this third legislative attempt in four years. We hope the committee is also encouraged by Minister Garneau's boldness in introducing an ambitious package of reforms. On this note, we are highly supportive of a number of provisions in the bill, including new reporting requirements for railways on rates, service, and performance; the addition of a definition of “adequate and suitable” rail service that confirms railways should provide shippers with the highest level of service that can reasonably be provided in the circumstances; and strengthening the prohibitions against railways shifting liability onto shippers through tariffs.

We want profitable railways, but not at the expense of national economic growth. That is why we support the objectives of Bill C-49, with minor adjustments that will ensure its intended outcomes are achieved. I will now address three areas where we think that's necessary.

The first is data transparency. Enhancing railway data transparency is not only consistent with the government's commitment to data transparency and evidence-based policy, but critical to improving the functionality of rail freight markets. Robust disclosure would inform public policy-making, improve railway-shipper relations, and avoid unnecessary and costly disputes. All parties having a clearer picture of respective capacity and limitations would better compel them to achieve the optimal workable outcome.

While Bill C-49 proposes positive measures to address service-level data deficiencies, we're concerned that, as written, certain transparency provisions will not lead to meaningful data on supply chain performance. Of specific concern is the requirement in subclause 77(2), a measure that would align the Canadian and U.S. systems.

(1120)



Our concern is that the U.S. model is based on internal railway data that is only partially reported. It doesn't represent shipments accurately or completely. It was created decades ago when large-scale data storage and transmissions were not technologically possible. With the data-storage capabilities that exist today, there is no rationale for such a restriction in either the waybill system for long-haul interswitching outlined in clause 76, or for system performance outlined in clause 77.

To ensure the appropriate level of data granularity and to ensure the proposed legislation reflects Canada's unique rail freight context, MAC recommends an amendment that would require all waybills to be provided by the railways, rather than the limited reporting that is outlined in subclause 77(2). This modest enhancement is consistent with the direction of this bill, but with the added benefit of modernizing a system that was designed decades ago.

While MAC is supportive of Bill C-49 improvements to costing data collection and processing by the agency, we also raise one minor but important consideration related to final arbitration.

Currently, arbitrators request an agency costing determination only when the two parties agree to make the request. However, railways habitually decline to co-operate with shippers for this request, thus limiting the ability of the parties involved to be equally informed. We know of no legitimate rationale for a railway to decline an agency costing determination, other than to deliberately frustrate the process. To ensure that the right level of transparency and accessibility is struck so that remedies under the act are meaningful and usable, we recommend that shippers be granted the right to an agency costing determination. Often confidentiality considerations are raised, but the committee should note that in agency proceedings redacted decisions protect confidentiality. Further, FOA processes are already confidential. We are not proposing any changes to these practices.

The second issue addresses level-of-service obligations. In proposed subsection 116(1.2), this bill would require the agency to determine whether a railway company is fulfilling its obligations by taking into account the railway company's and the shipper's operational requirements and restrictions. Identical language is also proposed to govern how an arbitrator oversees level-of-service arbitrations.

Our members are concerned that the proposed language for determining whether a railway has fulfilled its service obligations does not reflect the reality of Canada's monopolistic rail freight market. The quality of service that a railway company offers is influenced by how it allocates its resources. These decisions include purchasing assets, staffing, and construction. All those restrictions are determined solely by the rail carrier. Their consideration and fulfillment of service obligations leaves the shipper structurally disadvantaged. The goal of the agency should be facilitating the correct decision based on the facts, not a balanced decision between the parties. To address this, we recommend either striking out this requirement or making the restrictions themselves subject to a separate review.

Third and last, Bill C-49 proposes a long-haul interswitching remedy that demonstrates in principle a creative approach to addressing a long-standing competitive imbalance in our rail freight market. By design, however, when the number of non-entitlement provisions are taken into account, a remedy that could hold significant promise if implemented more liberally, becomes unduly restricted to the exclusion of many. As proposed, it mirrors the current competitive line rate remedy that it proposes to replace.

However, CLR has been largely inoperative for the past three decades because class 1 railways have declined to compete for traffic and are not naturally compelled to do so by market forces. Hypothetically, even if the railways chose to compete using long-haul interswitching, Bill C-49 includes a number of provisions that would make LHI unusable or would create unnecessary barriers for many captive shippers, including a long list of excluded traffic, including by cargo type or geographical restriction. Unless these are revisited, the remedy as proposed will de facto confirm in policy and law the captivity of a host of shippers, the very same shippers it purports to assist.

(1125)



To conclude, we acknowledge that this bill represents a bold and holistic attempt to addressing the anti-competitive challenges inherent in Canada's monopolistic rail freight market, and the disproportionate burden that shippers endure as a result. For this reason, its direction should be lauded.

The amendments we are seeking are modest and highly consistent with the legislative package. They continue to allow the railways to be profitable and have operational flexibility, but are material enough, and definitely important enough, to make a critical difference if not taken into account. In fact, we fear that without these amendments, this bill may leave us in the same situation that the previous bills have done in the past, not ultimately solving the issues we have been challenged with.

Thank you for your time, and I would be pleased to answer questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will move on to the Forest Products Association.

Mr. Joel Neuheimer (Vice-President, International Trade and Transportation and Corporate Secretary, Forest Products Association of Canada):

Thank you, members of the committee, and thank you very much for having me here today on behalf of the members of the Forest Products Association of Canada.

FPAC is the voice of Canada's wood, pulp, and paper producers, a $67-billion a year industry. Our sector is one of the largest employers of indigenous peoples in Canada, including 1,400 indigenous-owned forest businesses. As the third-largest manufacturing industry, it is a cornerstone of the Canadian economy, representing 12% of Canada's manufacturing GDP. We export 33-billion dollars' worth of goods to 180 countries. We are also the second-largest user of the rail system, transporting over 31 million tonnes by rail in 2016.

As Minister Garneau said in his May 18, 2017, speech in Edmonton, “The challenge of our time is to further enhance the utility, the efficiency and the fluidity of our rail system.”

FPAC believes that the primary goal for transportation policy is a freight system that is even more competitive, efficient, and transparent, to reliably move Canada's goods to global markets. This is most likely to emerge if guided by commercial decisions and competitive markets. At the same time, there are some markets where competitive forces are limited or non-existent, and where there is a legitimate and necessary role for regulation and other government action, including a number of the types of concepts being considered in Bill C-49.

Forest industry mills are normally located in rural, remote communities, and served by one single rail carrier hundreds of kilometres away from the next competing railway. That causes an imbalance of power between these mills and the railways. Poor service costs our members in the hundreds of millions of dollars every year, including the cost of things like lost production, alternative transportation costs, additional storage, additional management and overhead costs, and long-term business impacts.

While the railways are one of our most important partners on Canada's supply chain infrastructure needs, as well as reducing GHGs, FPAC members need Bill C-49 to help balance the playing field when it comes to their business dealings with railways.

Bill C-49 needs more robust and workable measures than what are currently included. Without these changes, Canada's economy and the jobs that our member companies and other industries provide across the country will continue to be threatened. Urgent action is needed. The economies of over 600 communities across Canada depend on their local forest products mills. Making Bill C-49 work the way it is intended to will enable our members and other industries to create more middle-class jobs and help prevent economic failures in communities, such as but not limited to things like mill shutdowns resulting from poor rail service. In the case of a large pulp mill, for example, this would mean losses in the range of $1.5 million a day.

FPAC supports Bill C-49's wording on reciprocal penalties. However, to be truly effective, there are some critically important amendments that should be made, which are consistent with the minister's intent for this bill.

FPAC urges the government to make changes in five key areas. The specific wording changes and rationale behind each of these is outlined in the detailed annex that is included with my remarks this morning. I would like to focus today on a few of these important changes.

First is the improved access and timelines to agency decisions. As is, the bill will weaken the agency's ability to respond quickly to urgent rail service issues, unless it is amended so that the agency controls its own procedure. The U.S. equivalent to the Canadian Transportation Agency, the Surface Transportation Board, or STB, recently began a service-related investigation on one of the class 1 railways in the United States. The STB did not have to wait for the U.S. Secretary of Transportation to instruct them to do this. They recognized that there might be a problem and they began to investigate.

Why can't we have the same set-up here in Canada? Who wants to wait for the Minister of Justice to ask the police to investigate every time someone may not be following the law? Bill C-49 needs to be amended to make this so, to help ensure that Canada's supply chain is working well in delivering for the 600 forest communities, hundreds of other communities, and millions of workers it supports across Canada.

The second one relates to the definition of “adequate and suitable”. As currently written, the bill tells the railways that if they provide the highest level of service they can reasonably provide in the circumstances, they cannot lose a service complaint. The objective of our proposed wording change is to make the intent absolutely clear, without the need for protracted litigation about what this clause really means. The final outcome on this component of the bill must prevent current failures, such as the following that our members must live with. At a minimum, give the Canadian Transportation Agency the mandate to investigate, on its own, these types of matters.

(1130)



When members ask why their traffic has been left behind or why they have not received empty cars that have been sitting at the railway's serving yard, they hear it is because priority is being given to another commodity sector.

We have members who have product to ship to current and potential customers, whose facilities are accessible by rail, but they cannot get enough railcars or are not served frequently enough and are being discouraged by the rates that are quoted. These types of service issues are not isolated, and they cost our members in the hundreds of millions of dollars annually.

Third is long-haul interswitching. The bill needs to be amended to eliminate the unnecessary prerequisites for using this remedy as well as the many exclusions. Without important amendments, long-haul interswitching will not be a usable remedy for the majority of captive forest products traffic.

Next is data disclosure. As currently worded, the interim provisions in the bill dealing with rail performance data will provide supply chain participants with data that is too aggregated and too out of date to be of any real use in their planning. The time frames for reporting and publication need to be shortened. For example, the bill says requirements will be set out in a regulation in a year. Can we not do better than that with so much at stake? Also, more granular detail needs to be published, such as, but not limited to, commodity-specific information regarding such things as grain, coal, lumber, pulp and paper; results by railcar type, on a weekly basis; and by region, for example, east and west.

Oversight of railway discontinuance processes needs to be strengthened. As currently worded, the bill will prevent the creation of viable short-lines by allowing railways to suspend service before the process is completed, thereby making it more difficult for an alternative railway to take over. Making these changes will mean Canadians in communities across the country will be served by a more reliable and competitive freight transportation system.

FPAC members take great interest in transportation issues because they account for up to one-third of their input costs. The availability of an efficient, reliable, and cost-competitive transportation system is essential for the future investment in our sector and to support the families across Canada that rely on our industry for their livelihoods.

Members of the committee, for the 230,000 Canadians across Canada directly employed by the forest sector, a more competitive freight transportation system, as outlined here, will ensure increased access to the rail system, more reliable service throughout the supply chain, more competitive rates, and a more competitive supply chain.

I will now be happy to answer any questions you have.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we move on to the Shipping Federation of Canada.

(1135)

Ms. Karen Kancens (Director, Policy and Trade Affairs, Shipping Federation of Canada):

Thank you. Good morning, Madam Chair, and thanks for the opportunity to appear before the standing committee on Bill C-49, the transportation modernization act.

My name is Karen Kancens. I'm here with my colleague Sonia Simard on behalf of the Shipping Federation of Canada, which is the voice of the owners, operators, and agents of foreign-flag ships that carry Canada's imports and exports to and from world markets.

Our members represent more than 200 shipping companies whose vessels make thousands of voyages between Canadian ports and ports overseas every year, carrying hundreds of millions of tonnes of commodities, ranging from dry bulk commodities such as grain and coal, to liquid bulk such as crude oil and oil products, to containerized consumer and manufactured goods.

These ships play an essential role in the Canadian economy by facilitating the movement of Canada's international trade, and they do so safely, securely, and efficiently day in and day out. Indeed, ocean shipping is one of the world's most highly regulated industries, and foreign-flag ships are subject to a stringent regime of safety, environmental, and crewing regulations when sailing in Canadian waters, which are enforced by Canadian authorities as part of Canada's port state obligations.

Like many of our colleagues who have spoken before us, we also have a strong interest in Bill C-49's rail provisions, as we believe that the development of a more efficient rail freight system will have a positive impact on all of the elements of the logistics chain, from carriers in the rail, marine, and trucking sectors, to ports and marine terminals, to inland distribution centres and warehouses, and beyond.

That being said, we'd like to focus our comments today not on Bill C-49's rail provisions but on its maritime provisions, which we believe will also have a beneficial impact on the fluidity of the trade chain overall.

We're especially interested in clause 70 of Bill C-49, which proposes to allow all foreign-flag ships to reposition their empty containers between Canadian ports on a non-revenue basis, which is an activity that has been closed to them up until now due to the prohibitions of the Coasting Trade Act.

It's worth just backtracking a bit and noting that this isn't a new or a revolutionary concept. It's actually something that our container carrier members have been asking for and that our association has been advocating for over the last decade.

Indeed, discussions on this subject between the government and our industry had advanced to such a degree that, in 2011, Transport Canada was on the verge of introducing an amendment to the Coasting Trade Act to allow for the repositioning of empty containers by foreign-flag ships. However, those discussions were subsequently placed on hold when empty container repositioning became a negotiating item in the CETA between Canada and the European Union.

Now that those negotiations are over, Bill C-49 essentially seeks to complete the discussions that were placed on hold in 2011, when we had reached general agreement, including from some domestic ship owners, that empty container repositioning should be open to all ships regardless of flag or ownership.

Why is this issue important? It's important because a significant aspect of the container shipping industry involves moving empty containers from locations where they are not needed, or where there is a surplus, to locations where they are needed or where there is an exporter who needs empties so that he can load them with cargo for an overseas customer.

Because up until now the Coasting Trade Act has prohibited foreign-flag carriers from using their own ships to carry out this activity, they have had no choice but to employ alternative solutions such as moving the empty containers by truck or rail, or more commonly, importing them from overseas. However, none of those solutions represents the most productive use of the carrier's transportation assets, and all of them come at a price not only for the carrier but also for the exporter in the form of a less cost-efficient transportation option, as well as for the logistics chain in the form of reduced fluidity and overall efficiency.

(1140)



The maritime provisions of Bill C-49 would address these issues by giving carriers the flexibility to use their transportation assets, their ships, and their empty containers in the most productive and cost-effective manner possible for the ultimate benefit of everyone in the supply chain.

Although we very strongly support Bill C-49's provisions on the repositioning of empty containers, we have a concern that the actual wording the bill uses to define the party that is eligible to reposition empty containers may be too narrowly focused and that this may make it difficult to achieve the full benefits of liberalizing this activity.

More specifically, subclause 70(1) of Bill C-49 provides that the party that may reposition its empty containers is the owner of the ship, which is defined in subsection 2(1) of the Coasting Trade Act as the party that has the “rights of the owner” with respect to both the ship's possession and its use. We see a potential problem in how this definition will be applied in cases involving vessel-sharing agreements, in which a number of container carriers enter into an agreement to share space on one another's ships and which are used extensively in the container shipping industry.

It's not clear to us at this point how the partners in such an agreement would have the rights of the owner with respect to the ship's possession other than in cases where it's their ship that's being used to reposition the empty containers. Indeed, depending on how the ships in a given vessel-sharing arrangement are allocated, a ship owner may only have the ability to reposition its empty containers on every fourth or fifth voyage, which would reduce the significant potential benefits of liberalizing this activity.

We believe that if Bill C-49's provisions on the repositioning of empty containers are to be fully and effectively implemented for the benefit of all parties, then it must be made clear that any partner in a vessel-sharing agreement may reposition its own empty containers, as well as those of the other partners in the agreement, using any of the vessels named in that agreement. Although there may be various ways of achieving this, including through additional guidance and clarification from Transport Canada, it's our view that the optimal solution is to amend subclause 70(1) of Bill C-49 to clearly indicate that the party that is eligible to reposition empty containers encompasses not only the ship owner, as defined in subsection 2(1) of the Coasting Trade Act, but all the partners who share operational control and use of that vessel as part of a larger vessel-sharing agreement.

We believe that the introduction of such an amendment represents the best means of ensuring that Bill C-49's maritime provisions are implemented in a way that reflects the realities of how the container shipping industry operates, and this for the benefit of all stakeholders, from shipping lines to Canadian importers and exporters to the supply chain overall.

We thank you for your attention and look forward to any questions you might have.

The Chair:

Thank you all very much.

We'll go to Ms. Block for questioning.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you, Madam Chair, and thank you all for being here today. It's good to hear from another group of stakeholders. I look forward to the questions and answers that we're going to hear over the next hour.

I noted earlier today that this is very important work and mentioned how important your remarks are today in providing this committee with the information we need to ensure that the right balance is struck in addressing the issues that exist in our transportation system.

We know that this is not the first time your input has been sought to aid us as parliamentarians in these deliberations. In fact, we know that the Minister of Transport has had the CTA review for almost two years and that broad consultations have been done by Transport Canada and many others, seeking input into how to structure the Canada Transportation Act going forward. It's important that we get it right. It's important that we structure legislation that ensures market access for our producers and an efficient means of transportation.

I will note that every witness to testify so far has recommended changes to this bill, and all have identified issues with the long-haul interswitching provisions, with the exception perhaps of the last witnesses to testify here this morning.

I would pose a question to all of you, and you can each take your turn in answering it. What will be the long-term implications for your industry if the technical amendments that you are proposing are not made to this bill?

(1145)

Mr. Pierre Gratton:

As you rightly noted, this is the third time in four years that I'm appearing before a transport committee on a proposed bill to address these types of issues.

I would make the following observation. My sense is that through this bill, which is the most comprehensive attempt to get at these issues, the witnesses and the shippers are becoming more focused in their recommendations, because this bill is actually making a serious attempt to address the issues. Our recommendations are getting really into the details. That's a good thing.

However, to answer your question, our view is that we're just falling short, particularly in the area of data. If we don't make these amendments—especially the one related to data—we will not be further ahead and will be back in another four years looking at another bill.

There is even a concern within the mining sector that without at least the amendments dealing with data, some of our members if not all of them could find themselves slightly worse off than they were under the current regime. That is the concern. There would still be more to come through regulations, so I say that with some caution.

Nevertheless, we feel that it's so close to making a very meaningful difference to the regime we've been struggling with for 20 years. It's just falling short, and if we don't go the extra mile, we will have really missed a tremendous opportunity.

Mr. Joel Neuheimer:

I'll just start by saying, as Pierre said in his remarks, that what we're looking at in the context of the long-haul interswitching looks a lot like the competitive line rates that we already have. While in theory this is a very powerful concept, in reality, with the exemptions that have been built into it, it is not going to have the desired impact that the minister wants it to have. It's not going to help us as captive shippers.

I'll give you three quick examples showing why that's the case. Example one is that all the traffic that moves between Quebec City and Windsor will be excluded. Two is that all the traffic that moves between Kamloops and Vancouver will be excluded, and three is that we won't be able to move any toxic inhalation hazardous products. Just finishing on TIH, as you just heard from the chemistry session in the last session, TDG is already regulated under the TDG regs. I think we're good there, so why would you make it harder for us to move the things we need to make the stuff that helps pay the bills here in Canada?

As to the two geographic exemptions, it just so happens that's where you have the lion's share of our forest product traffic moving in the system. To be quite frank, what I would suggest, if these exemptions cannot be made, is that you just strike this part of the bill and go back to what we have. We'd probably be better off with what we already have.

Thank you very much for your question.

Ms. Karen Kancens:

To switch tracks just a bit, from our perspective, we've been working on empty container repositioning for the last 10 years. We've made slow and steady progress. We're now on the verge, where we have an amendment that would allow foreign-flag ships to reposition their empty containers between Canadian ports.

It's a big deal because it gives a carrier the flexibility to use its assets in the most efficient way possible, and those effects trickle down through the chain. But because of the way the bill is written, and because of the lack of clarity in terms of which party is actually eligible to reposition its empties, we almost have a missed opportunity. We'll have this amendment come into effect and it could be that when you have a vessel-sharing agreement, which, by the way, is the way the container shipping industry operates, we're going to be in a situation where your carrier can reposition its empties in one-fifth of the cases only when they're acting as the master carrier. It would be a missed opportunity.

(1150)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I do want to note my appreciation to all of you for coming out today. There's no question that we all have a role in contributing to the overall economic growth of the nation, and you guys are contributing to that today.

We want to get this right. We want to ensure that what we hear, we're going to discuss. I was told by our team today that this has been a continuation of dialogue over the course of the years, and the expectation is to in fact get this right from their end, your end, and our end as a committee. I appreciate your participation.

I want to ask one thing of you before I ask my question. For any information and any recommendations—you mentioned the details, Mr. Gratton and Mr. Neuheimer, that you've passed on—could you pass that on to us as well? Albeit it may be for a second or third time, I'd appreciate that. That way, when we go into the room, we can really ensure that those details are being discussed.

I want to ask a question with respect to the indigenous communities. For the northern communities, Mr. Neuheimer, you touched on this a bit, and I believe you did as well, Mr. Gratton, especially in line with your business interests. It's in terms of mining in northern communities and remote communities that are sometimes so remote that service costs and the balancing of the playing field become next to impossible.

My question is very simple. How do we become an enabler—I use this word a lot—for you and what you're doing in these communities to really level that playing field, to contribute to lesser service costs and ultimately to allow those communities, some of which are indigenous, to have available to them a strengthening in the development of their economy, thus creating more jobs for them and ultimately ensuring that access to growth and to goods—affordable goods—is available to them?

Mr. Joel Neuheimer:

Thanks very much for your question. We will make sure that you have the detailed annex that we submitted as part of our remarks this morning, with pleasure.

I have just a couple of quick thoughts. If you go ahead and make the changes we've outlined in relation to “suitable and adequate”, I think it would go a long way to speaking to what you're talking about. It's the same thing with our suggested changes on the long-haul interswitching that we were just talking about.

Really, for me, I think the easiest change at this point with this bill is to really give the agency the power to investigate on its own if something doesn't pass the sniff test, let's call it. You know how it works. Our unique geography is what makes us such an incredible nation, but the realities of what you've just touched on.... I mean, think about it. Any time you make a large purchase.... Imagine you're trying to buy a pickup truck. You're living in one of those communities you're talking about and there's only one dealer in town. You're not looking forward to what you're going to have to pay, and you're probably not looking forward to what your after-service might be, so if by chance something does go wrong, it would be great to have our watchdog able to look at those things to make sure these communities are getting the service they deserve.

Mr. Pierre Gratton:

First, I should just make the observation that we have members with mines that have no railways at all, so investing in infrastructure, which we're seeing particularly in northern Canada by this government, is very much supported by our sector. I should acknowledge that. Otherwise, I would make most of the points that Joel just made. On the issue of data, which we feel is the simplest and easiest change to make, it would provide....

Why is data so important? If we have access to data that actually identifies how many railcars get to a particular location, at what time, and so on, throughout the system, that would show whether the railways are meeting their obligations. It could also help reveal whether there are other reasons beyond the railways' control. That would allow all of us to have a better understanding of how well our system is going, whether we might need to invest resources in infrastructure to improve the functionality of our rail system, or if in fact the railways are doing what we certainly believe they are doing from time to time, which is sweating their assets and not providing good service. Having such data, we believe, would, on its own, have the ability to influence railway behaviour.

If you do nothing else—and it's the simplest thing to do—just extend the breadth of data that is disclosed, recognizing that there are certain things for which confidentiality is required, but those are pretty minimal. I think with the technology we have today it's fully possible to go further.

I thought we had circulated this, but perhaps we haven't. These are the detailed amendments we are proposing to the bill.

(1155)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Do you find, gentlemen and ladies, as well that with this data collection we can actually also highlight and recognize the integrated network of transportation, and with that the need for the infrastructure dollars to follow that strategy ultimately, which Minister Garneau is proposing and attempting to put in place?

Mr. Pierre Gratton:

Absolutely. I think that's absolutely critical; otherwise, we really are operating in a bit of a vacuum. We don't know where the pressure points are.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Exactly. Thank you.

The Chair:

You can have just a quick comment.

Mr. Joel Neuheimer:

If you don't know the data and if you don't know how well or how poorly the system is working, how do you know how to make a well-informed decision about where to invest in infrastructure? I think that's the point that Pierre is making.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Ladies and gentlemen, I want to welcome you and thank you for sharing your expertise with us.

I want to continue discussing the issue of adequate and suitable service. Sometimes, “adequate and valid” is used. However, regardless of the interpretations, the concept is still somewhat vague. That fact has been pointed out by many witnesses, including you, this morning.

The issue of data is also brought up again and again. Is that not a solution? Shouldn't the new definition you want for adequate service contracts be evidence-based? It is possible to connect what is handled differently. Data is considered to be too general, confusing and lacking, and the definition is dealt with afterwards. Can you propose a better definition of what adequate service is? It seems a bit vague to me.

I feel that the best way to be clear may be to establish a link with data.

What do you think about that? [English]

Mr. Joel Neuheimer:

We've provided a very specific amendment in relation to the “suitable and adequate” issue that you've just asked about. That's in our submission, and I hope that will be helpful to you. What it boils down to is that we need to be as explicit as possible that they must meet the highest level of service possible in the situation in question. We have to make sure that in the definition that's included with this bill, there is as much precision as possible about what is acceptable and what is not.

If there is a flood and their tracks get washed out, it's pretty hard to expect that the bus service is going to run on time as usual. However, if there isn't some kind of natural catastrophe and things are as they normally operate here, given the weather we have during the 12 months we have here in Canada, they should be able to deliver a bus service on a regular schedule, and when it arrives, it should have working equipment and be safe for the shippers who are using it. That's how I would try to answer your question.

Merci. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I am not involved in the industry, but with all due respect for your proposal, I feel that “highest level possible” is still a vague concept. It cannot be quantified.

Are you and your industry satisfied with your proposed definition that I read?

Does it enable you to establish concrete business relationships?

(1200)

Mr. Pierre Gratton:

It may be better if I ask my colleague to answer your question, since he deals directly and daily with railway companies. I think he could give you a specific answer.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Great. [English]

Mr. Brad Johnston (General Manager, Logistics and Planning, Teck Resources Limited):

“Adequate and suitable” is currently defined in the act, and in our original submission—and I speak on behalf of Teck in this answer—we asked for one small change to the language, that “adequate and suitable” be based on the requirements of the shipper as opposed to the means of the railway. There's a very specific reason for that, and it goes to when a forecast turns into an order, for a mining company or even a forestry company. In our case, where obviously Canada's an exporting nation, “adequate and suitable” mean that we can export our goods in a timely fashion.

It goes to my comment yesterday. It's not if the trains will come; it's when. That's because in our case or in the case of a mining company—someone shipping copper, zinc, or coal—we have a vessel sitting at a port. That's not an abstract concept. It's as much looking forward as it is reporting on the past. “Adequate and suitable” mean what I need in order to meet my shipments, or my sales, or the delivery of my goods to my customers in Asia, South America, and Europe. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

You say that it's not “if” but “when” the train will come. For me, that also involves the number of cars that will arrive. But that has to be consistent with the contract you have concluded with a railway company and with its capacity to deliver the number of cars you really need. [English]

Mr. Brad Johnston:

That's right, and that's adequate and suitable. In the case of Teck, we give forecasts to the railway going out four years and very specifically over five months. Then for ourselves or for a forestry company or a shipping company—I'm going to use a technical term—we schedule a laycan. The vessel is going to arrive at the port. It's coming. Once again, there's no “if” about that. We don't want to have a debate about whether we will get the trains. There can be no such debate because that falls short of the common carrier obligation. That is not adequate and suitable service. It's not an abstract concept.

If we just change the language in the act to say “according to the requirements of the shipper”, that will satisfy what you're addressing.

Mr. Joel Neuheimer:

To try to clarify what I think you're looking for, let's say you're a mill operating in northern Quebec and you're typically ordering 10 cars a week that arrive on a given day of the week, and all of a sudden you get three cars. Hopefully the next week it's made up, but if on a chronic basis, on a repeated basis, you're ordering 10 cars a week and you're only receiving four or six or seven over an extended period of time, it doesn't feel as if that's meeting the needs of the shipper. So to go back to what they were saying, it needs to meet the needs of the shipper, and this is how I would try to add a little more precision maybe to what you're looking for, if that answers your question.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for your answer.

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I will start in the water. For ships, are there Canadian-flag ships currently moving these, or is it all done by rail and road?

Ms. Karen Kancens:

Could you repeat your question?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

For the empty containers being moved, are there any Canadian-flag ships that do this, or does this just not happen?

Ms. Karen Kancens:

Theoretically, because the activity right now is prohibited to foreign-flag ships under the Coasting Trade Act, a foreign-flag ship could apply for a waiver to carry out the activity, which has happened in the past, so then you will get a domestic ship that will oppose the waiver and say it can carry the empties.

We're aware of a case where that happened. The carrier needed to reposition 400 empties, I think it was, from Montreal to Halifax. The domestic ship owner said it could do that movement and the cost would be $2,000 per container, so that was an $800,000 cost. The cost of transporting those containers on board the ship would have been $2,000 for the domestic ship, and the cost for the foreign-flag ship importing them would have been $300 per container, so it's almost seven times more.

Theoretically, yes, the domestic ship could reposition empties. It will never happen because, even though the foreign-flag carrier's options are not perfect in terms of using rail or importing from overseas, costs will never amount to the $2,000 per container that the domestic ship owner is charging. It exists as an option, but it's one that has never been used, and it won't be used.

(1205)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

For the owners, the leasers of the containers, these are not revenue-generating moves.

Ms. Karen Kancens:

No. We're only talking about the repositioning of their own containers, ones that they own or lease, on a non-revenue basis, so it is purely for logistical purposes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. Now I'm going to jump out of the water and onto the train tracks.

The mining industry is unique in that some mines don't have any rail, and there are some places that have nothing other than rail, and those rails don't connect to anything. I'm thinking of Quebec Cartier Mining or Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway where, if you don't get there by train, you're not getting there. Then you only have one company, so there are absolutely no alternatives. How well did that work?

Most of the competition increasing things in Bill C-49 don't really apply to those areas.

Mr. Pierre Gratton:

In the case of, for example, the Iron Ore Company of Canada, they own and operate their own railway. Obviously, that's how they manage.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

By vertical integration, then.

Mr. Pierre Gratton:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That makes sense. One thing that I'm enjoying teasing—I guess you could say—the larger railway companies about since Monday is their saying that you are not a captive shipper if you have access to trucks.

I think a railway industry should be defending rail, but that's just me. How do you feel about that? If there's access to trucks, are you then not a captive shipper?

Mr. Pierre Gratton:

Trucking can be much more expensive. It depends on the length of the route. It's also not as safe. Trying to move the kinds of volumes that we would move across the country by truck would just be uneconomical, and in some cases, with some bulk commodities, it's just not feasible at all. You're not going to move metallurgical coal in the volumes Teck produces by truck. It's just not an option.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thanks. I'll go to the forestry industry with the same question.

What do you think of trucks as an alternative to making you not captive?

Mr. Joel Neuheimer:

If you think about the government's priority to reduce greenhouse gases, it certainly doesn't make very much sense, does it? If you think about the government's priority to reduce greenhouse gases, we should be shipping by rail more of the products that Pierre and I are describing here and representing here this morning and getting more trucks off the road. It might even be better for our highway system to take those trucks off the road. Wouldn't that be interesting as an impact?

Here's some quick math for you. If we're at a facility using 10 railcars a day, that would be the equivalent of 25 trucks a day, so for a seven-day week, that boils down to 175 trucks a week versus 70 railcars. It's a question of the magnitude of the products we're shipping, and hopefully, it's just a question of common sense, dare I say.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's a perfect segue to my next question.

My riding is mostly forestry lands, a very heavily forested riding. We lost the railways in 1987. They ripped them out. We lost log driving three years later in 1990, and now we have a two-lane highway with 500,000 trucks a year on it that takes care of our logging industry. What can we can do, from your perspective, to protect these rail lines and bring them back? Is there an appetite to bring them back to this kind of place?

Mr. Joel Neuheimer:

I think you'd want to do some kind of cost-benefit analysis in the situation you're describing, but I'm very sympathetic to the point you've just made. We have two specific members who have been hurt in the same way you've just described in the example you've given.

The fifth key ask that we had in our remarks this morning was about making it harder for railways to discontinue rail lines. There's already a number of hurdles in place, but I think the one we need to worry about in the bill and the part we need to have removed is that we need to prohibit, for example, hypothetically, a class 1 from suspending service in that kind of situation, if it's no longer economically viable for them, and give somebody else a chance to come in and run it before it disappears. Once the tracks come up, it's quite difficult to put them back.

To try to go back to my fifth ask, I think it's key to what you're trying to avoid happening again.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right, and in my riding you couldn't track in, so I appreciate that. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

We go on to Mr. Fraser.

(1210)

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you very much.

I'll start with Ms. Kancens and the marine transportation issue. One of the things that I'm trying to wrap my head around now is that most of these things have a bit of a trade-off, and I think it's helpful to know that it's not on a commercial basis that we're talking. Really it's about fluidity of trade.

Where these empty containers are being shipped or trucked now, I assume that they are required to hire a Canadian trucking company or rail line to move these empty containers. Is that right?

Ms. Karen Kancens:

Yes.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Has any economic impact assessment been done that measures the input to the Canadian economy that these European container owners are putting into the Canadian transportation system versus what would actually be achieved by a more effective and efficient transportation system by allowing businesses to ship reliably?

Ms. Karen Kancens:

Just as a point of clarification, you mentioned “European”. I want to be sure that we take this out of the CETA context.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Sure.

Ms. Karen Kancens:

This is about empty-container repositioning on a Canada-wide basis. It's not part of the CETA trade agreement.

In the context we're looking at this, with Bill C-49, I would caution perhaps that when we talk about the costs of repositioning empty containers, the costs are not only financial. Yes, you will always have an extra financial cost, especially when you're using truck or rail, but there are other costs.

Let's say you're a shipowner and you're doing a regular service from Montreal to Halifax. You have a pile of empty containers at Montreal and you have a customer in Halifax who needs 300 containers for export. Your ship is going from Montreal to Halifax in any case. It's part of your regular run. Right now you can't load those empty containers on your own ship. You have to put them on rail or you have to import them. If you're putting them on rail, you're subjecting those containers to additional moves. They're not just going from the port to the ship. They're going to the rail yard and they're being put on the railcars. There are more moves. There is more handling of the container. Yes, of course you have your additional external cost associated with the rail movement, but you also have logistical delays. Your containers are being moved at the convenience of the railway, not at the convenience of the carrier and of the exporter. You're adding elements to the chain, which are costs, yes, but there are also other elements in the form of time, in the form of additional moves.

By the way, the railways would much rather not haul empties, because they generate more revenue hauling laden containers. You're making what could and should be a very simple logistical process a lot more complicated than it needs to be, and you're adding a lot of trade-chain impediments along the way, so I would caution you to maybe not think of it only in terms of costs.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I certainly don't. My inclination is to accept that the benefits from efficiency and the opportunity costs that you just laid out favour the logistical efficiencies that you're describing.

Right now, if there is an increased cost, presumably to the producer, or the importer or exporter here, are they paying the additional costs of moving these empty containers? Is the buck passed down to a Canadian company somewhere along the line?

Ms. Karen Kancens:

You know, a lot of things go into the exporter's final transportation costs, so it's often difficult to isolate what the specific cost elements are. But yes, there is no question that if your carrier is paying additional costs to reposition those empties, especially if they're not internalized and they're using an external provider such as the railway, those costs will in some way be passed to the exporter. Can I quantify them? No. But certainly there is a cost that will go to the exporter that they wouldn't encounter if the empties were being repositioned on the carrier's own ship.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

In an era when we're seeking to embrace trade, when we know that globalization is happening whether we like it or not, I take it that your opinion is that by implementing this change, we'll allow Canadian businesses, particularly in the import and export business, to create more jobs and all the good things that come with it.

Ms. Karen Kancens:

I don't know that I'm going to go that far. Ultimately, yes, but I look at it this way. Right now we see the greatest lack of empty containers in Halifax. On the east coast of Canada, they particularly need refrigerated containers to load agri-food and seafood. If that exporter doesn't have access to empty containers to load his exports, it's a potential lost business opportunity if the empties can't get there on time. If they are coming via another mode, there is an additional cost.

Is it going to create additional jobs for the Canadian economy? I think you could make that argument for any initiative. Certainly it's going to help that exporter in Halifax who needs the containers to be able to conclude a deal with his customer overseas.

(1215)

Mr. Sean Fraser:

You're playing to my biases—the lobster fishery and a port in my own riding. I do appreciate it.

With respect to the specific change that you've discussed about ownership versus who has an interest in this sort of partnership, if we don't make this change, what will be the fallout? Will you still see things moving by rail and truck inefficiently, or will you see empty containers sitting in ports for a few extra weeks?

Ms. Karen Kancens:

Again, to be clear, for the change we are asking for, whether it's accomplished legislatively or whether it's accomplished through additional guidance from Transport Canada, we have the amendment in clause 70. That will allow the repositioning of empty containers by foreign-flag ships. We're worried, though, that it's not clear that all of the partners in a vessel-sharing agreement would be able to reposition their empties, because you have the question of ownership to be eligible to do so. The worry is not that carriers won't be able to reposition their empty containers; it's that in a vessel-sharing agreement, not all of them would be able to do it.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

That's right, and—

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Fraser. Your time is up.

Mr. Shields.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you, Madam Chair. I appreciate the information from the witnesses and their expertise this morning.

There was one thing that popped out from the Mining Association. It was the arbitration piece. You mentioned that many times you have requested and they have failed to meet with you. Do you have any information or sense of how many requests you made, and how many denials there have been percentage-wise? Do you have any idea?

Mr. Pierre Gratton:

First of all, I would say that most can't get that far, but those who do actually go to arbitration, those who have the resources and the capacity to do so—

Mr. Martin Shields:

That's where I was going next.

Mr. Pierre Gratton:

Right, and this is one of them.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

The question you're asking refers to the final offer arbitration process—

Mr. Martin Shields:

Yes.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

—which in itself is an expensive and difficult process for a shipper to undertake. Nevertheless, specifically answering your question, I have knowledge of.... They're confidential processes so I'll talk only about ones I've been involved in. I can't talk about when or the content, but I guess I can talk about what didn't happen. In 50% of cases that I'm aware of currently, railways did not co-operate in seeking a costing determination from the agency. I am aware that the percentage is increasing over time.

Mr. Martin Shields:

You can't even get into the game, basically, or to state your case 50% of the time.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

No, that's not correct. We can launch a final offer arbitration under certain circumstances. That's the choice of the shipper. What we're talking about is seeking an expert costing determination from the agency to inform the arbitration and the arbitrator as to whether the position of either the shipper or the railway is reasonable or unreasonable. It is our view that there's no legitimate reason to deny or not co-operate in a request for a costing determination from the agency. When the railway does it, it's only for the purpose of frustrating the process. Our ask is that this hole be closed in the legislation.

Mr. Martin Shields:

How much is it? You're a big operator. Would you identify a cost for this process for you? You're saying most can't.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

A final offer arbitration process would cost a shipper like Teck in the millions of dollars to undertake. It's expensive and it's time-consuming, but it is the one remedy that we have and it's one that we want to ensure that the legitimacy of is maintained.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Is there any carry-over from whatever decisions or information you find that is of any advantage to other shippers?

Mr. Brad Johnston:

No.

Mr. Martin Shields:

It's very specific.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

The process itself is such that not just the content is confidential but the actual fact that it's taking place is confidential, so it's not transported from one shipper to another. Of course, we're informed by it for future arbitrations that we undertake, but no, it doesn't go from one shipper to another. The costing determinations are absolutely confidential.

(1220)

Mr. Martin Shields:

What is your ask specifically?

Mr. Brad Johnston:

Our ask specifically is that, in a final offer arbitration process, when a shipper makes a request for a costing determination from the agency, that costing determination be provided to the arbitrator within, let's say, five days of the request. It will not rely on co-operation from the railway. That's very important.

Mr. Pierre Gratton:

I just want to emphasize the point I made at the outset, and which you've acknowledged. This is a very expensive process. The vast majority of those who use the railways can't get that or can't afford to do that. That's why the other measures we're all proposing, whether they deal with data or long-haul interswitching and so on, are so important. We don't want to have to get to.... I mean, this is a last resort. Teck, I think, is the biggest customer of the railways in the country. Is that not right? We don't want to have to get to that point. If we do, we want it to work well.

The other measures we're talking about are to ensure that the system actually works such that we don't actually have to get there in the first place.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Okay.

Is there any response from you on this one?

Mr. Joel Neuheimer:

Yes, I would say on the final offer arbitration tool specifically, as Pierre has said, the changes that we too are asking for would basically be let's make it easier to use, and let's make it cheaper to use, and more accessible for shippers to use if, as a last resort, you have to go there.

Again, I would settle for just giving the agency the power to investigate matters that deserve a closer look on their own. I would be happy with that change to the bill and I would just leave final offer arbitration the way it is, but if that's the one you want to focus on, let's make it easier to use.

Our shippers are what's known as manifest shippers, so they depend on a hodgepodge of client commodities being shipped, whereas they're shipping unit trains, which are entirely different phenomena and it changes the dynamics of the relationship. That being said, it makes it even harder for members of my association to use that type of tool and without being too dramatic, that's one of the reasons why I don't see any of my members sitting beside me here this morning, because given the outcome of some of those matters and the way the railways can treat them after that kind of a case, it doesn't always work out well for the shipper. It's the job of the association to show up at places like this and propose changes to tools like that.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

To Ms. Kancens, one of the things we expect to hear this afternoon from the SIU is about some problems they have with labour standards as they are applied on some of these foreign-flag ships. Are you aware of any provisions to require certain things of these vessels as they're going about this business in Canada?

Ms. Karen Kancens:

Let me make it clear that foreign-flag ships are the ships that carry Canada's international trade. They carry virtually all of our overseas trade and half of our transborder trade. Thousands of these ships trade between Canadian ports and ports overseas. They're nothing new. They're here. They're the way that we move our trade.

Foreign-flag ships are subject to a stringent regime of regulations: safety, environmental, labour. Again, this is nothing new—

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I'm sorry, by whom? Who applies these regulations to them?

Ms. Karen Kancens:

All of the regulations are developed on a global basis by the International Maritime Organization and the International Labour Organization. They're then implemented domestically through domestic legislation. Here in Canada they're enforced by Transport Canada and other regulatory authorities as part of Canada's obligations as a port state.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

But do those regulations brought in by Transport Canada apply to the crews on foreign-flag vessels?

(1225)

Ms. Karen Kancens:

Because it's foreign-flag shipping, foreign-flag ships are subject to regulations that are developed internationally, so then they are applied in Canada. Canada enforces them.

Sonia, maybe I'm going to leave that one to you, because I don't think I'm doing a good job on this.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I have other questions. Basically, the suspicion is that we're using cheap foreign labour that is provided by people who are not well treated. I think in the fullness of time we're going to need some comfort that's it's not the case, but I don't know that anybody can provide us with that comfort at this point.

Ms. Sonia Simard (Director, Legislative Affairs, Shipping Federation of Canada):

Could I maybe have a try for about two minutes?

Mr. Ken Hardie:

No.

Ms. Sonia Simard:

No, I cannot?

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I don't have two minutes to give you, unfortunately. I have other questions.

Ms. Sonia Simard:

Okay.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

But I wouldn't mind a follow-up if you wanted to provide something. That would be quite instructive.

The other thing is that it's the old “thin edge of the wedge” argument. Okay, we're going to allow this to happen, what's next?

So what's next?

Ms. Karen Kancens:

We hear that argument every time there's any discussion about opening up the Coasting Trade Act. The Coasting Trade Act has historically played an important role in protecting and promoting Canadian marine industries. We have no interest in opening it up for the sake of opening it.

The fact that it plays an important role doesn't mean that we shouldn't take a step back periodically and see whether it continues to meet the needs of the Canadian economy, whether it continues to meet the needs of importers and exporters, and whether there are very targeted amendments, like the empty container repositioning provision, that we can make to the act, which improve the logistics system overall without violating any of the underlying principles of that act.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay, I'm going to have to leave it at that.

To the Mining Association, Mr. Gratton and Mr. Johnston, I'm hearing about two dynamics in your problematic relationships with the railroads. One is their pricing strategies and the other is the service issues.

Is it one or the other or both that are the primary drivers of your concerns?

Mr. Pierre Gratton:

It's both, and how they play out. It's changeable depending on the circumstances, depending on who you are, depending on the shipper. You could experience one or both, and it changes over time.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Take us through a typical transaction.

How is it set up? How can and does it go off the rails?

Mr. Pierre Gratton:

Joel gave an example in the forestry sector, which is the same experience in the mining sector. You expect a certain number of cars on a certain date and that number doesn't show up. We had one member who was told by the railways that they weren't going to serve them at all. On the service side, it can really vary.

In terms of pricing, they get to control the price. There is no competition, so they set it the way they choose to set it. They pass on costs very liberally. I recall when B.C. first introduced its carbon tax, the very same day the railroads were announcing they were increasing their rates to pass the cost of the carbon tax on to the shipping community. That's what you can do when you have a monopoly situation.

Brad, do want give specific examples from your experience?

Mr. Brad Johnston:

I think—

The Chair:

Very briefly, Mr. Johnston.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

Okay.

To echo what Pierre said, we're talking about meeting very specific delivery windows for our customers for our exports. At times, we can wait weeks, if not months, to satisfy our orders. We provide forecasts. We have vessels coming. We have orders. When we don't meet them, it's a very big financial penalty to a company like Teck. As I said, yesterday, it has been in the range of $50 million to $200 million over different periods over the last decade.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Johnston.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

My next set of questions will be for the Mining Association.

Mr. Gratton, I want to ask you a question around the three-week delay in providing data. Earlier this week, we heard testimony that Canadian railways already provide more detailed information in regard to the operations happening in the United States. They provide that on a weekly basis.

I'm wondering if the present government, with Bill C-49, should have moved to more closely align the railways reporting requirements in Canada with those in the U.S.

(1230)

Mr. Pierre Gratton:

My understanding is that this bill does more closely align with the United States. What we're saying is that it's not adequate. The U.S. system was designed decades ago. There is the issue of the amount of data that's made available, because in the United States it's a sampling of data, it's not all data. Then it's the issue that Joel has also addressed, which is the timeliness of that information. It can be very dated.

We're saying with the technology that we have now, there's no reason why the information on waybills can't be uploaded and provided. There's no reason.

I know that people like to say we should at least align with the United States. I think we haven't been for decades. Now we have an opportunity to go beyond what the U.S. provides and provide information that we all need to hold the railways to account, but also, as we discussed earlier, to identify those infrastructure challenges that we may have in different parts of the country.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I also want to follow up on the reference you've made to competitive line rates in comparison to the long-haul interswitching. I had an opportunity to ask our Transport Canada officials on Monday to describe the difference. A number of witnesses have made that comparison.

I'm wondering if you could describe the differences between competitive line rates and long-haul interswitching, or the similarities which then make it ineffective as a remedy.

Mr. Pierre Gratton:

Brad, I think I'm going to ask you to take that one.

Mr. Brad Johnston:

I'd say the similarities are that they both have issues. In competitive line rates, as they exist today, essentially the railways don't compete against one another. That's why it's been an ineffective remedy, and it's been little used over the last 20 or 25 years.

Long-haul interswitching, for the mining sector, just because so many areas essentially are geographically barred.... This morning we even had a discussion trying to figure out who in the mining industry might be able to use it. It's not at all clear to us. Certainly, anyone operating in British Columbia, in the entire province, is barred from using long-haul interswitching as it's defined. That's quite astonishing, but in fact, that's the way we interpret it. With respect to areas in the east, in Ontario or Quebec, because of the corridor definition between Windsor and Quebec City, I can't figure out who might actually be able to use the thing. To be candid with you, unless that geographic piece is fixed, I don't know, at least in mining, who might even use it. Therefore, I haven't spent a lot of time thinking about it.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I recall during our study on C-30 that we heard from various stakeholders such as the forestry industry and the mining industry that they would like the same opportunity for interswitching and extended interswitching that had been provided to grain farmers through the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act. When you relate that back to the exemption corridors or the exclusion zones, have you seen any rationale that makes sense to you for why these zones or corridors were created and put into this piece of legislation?

Mr. Pierre Gratton:

We can only assume the railways fought against it and that's why we have these exclusion zones. This attempt essentially maintains the C-30 provisions. Essentially there is a piece of Canada in the Prairies that could benefit from this, much as they did through Bill C-30. I think this has just found a different and more creative way of accomplishing the same thing. I assume if it were more opened up in central Canada or in eastern Canada it would simply force the railways to be more competitive with one another, and they don't want that.

(1235)

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I also want to thank Mr. Hardie, who has asked a number of questions I was planning to ask. To return the favour, I will give the next two minutes to Ms. Simard, so that we can hear her answer, which also interests me. [English]

Ms. Sonia Simard:

To be clear, we're talking about introducing something for seafarers working at a lower wage. Actually, those vessels that are coming to Canada have been coming for more than 120 years. These vessels are regulated by a body of conventions that Canada has helped develop, including the labour requirements on vessels. These are the laws that apply to those vessels. However, to imply that all the seafarers on board ocean-going vessels are badly treated would be quite a disrespect to the seafarer professions. These seafarers work on carriers, and there are over 1.6 million seafarers working on ocean-going vessels. That's more than 55,000 ocean-going vessels trading internationally.

Are there cases when one ship comes to Canadian waters and doesn't have good standards? Yes, it's possible. Do we have cases in Canada where we drive on the highway over the speed limit? It is possible. Does it make all of us non-compliant and subject to road rage? I don't think so. That's the same thing for a very large industry that works with over 55,000 vessels. These are regulated by standards. Those standards are enforced by the Canadian authorities and they have working conditions that allow people to survive on board vessels and thrive as a carrier of seafarers.

To put things in context, can I have 30 more seconds?

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I have time. Go.

Ms. Sonia Simard:

It's the thin edge of the wedge. We're not asking to blow up the Coasting Trade Act, as has been mentioned; we're not here for that.

I'm going to bring you back, however, to another example, that of the U.S. We know they have the Jones Act. It is very strict in ensuring that they protect their domestic fleet. The concept of liberalizing the moving of empty containers is in the Jones Act, so is the ability to use it in vessel-sharing agreements so that the partners in vessel-sharing agreements in the U.S. can move their empty containers. We are not, then, asking to blow up the Coasting Trade Act with this amendment. We're just asking that the amendment be implemented and fully implemented to recognize that container carriers operate under vessel-sharing agreements.

Does that help? [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Yes, thank you. [English]

The Chair:

We could push it a little bit, Mr. Aubin, if you have another request.

All right. Thank you all very much.

We've completed our first round. Before we dismiss the witnesses, does anyone have any special questions that they didn't get a chance to get out?

I'm looking over on this side. Now that I have done so, I'll have to look over on this other side. I'll have to look at anyone who has a really important question that you want to get answered.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair Sgro. I have a question to the shippers with respect to the discussion we've had on Bill C-49 about operational remedies, when moving containers around utilizing marine resources.

I want to touch on one thing that we haven't touched much on for the last couple of days and that may be very relevant to you. That is the capital side of shipping, and the Shipping Federation's opinion and recommendations on the overall system when it comes to both salt water and the Great Lakes.

What is your position on Canadian ports being allowed to access the Canada infrastructure bank and the financial instruments contained within the infrastructure bank to help fund expansion projects? Will this be helpful, in your opinion, in making Canadian ports more competitive?

I want to expand that question to also include not only Canadian ports that are designated as port authorities, but also the St. Lawrence Seaway itself on the Great Lakes. Is there opportunity, in your opinion, to expand on the capital side to enhance the business opportunities for yourselves, speaking on behalf of your organization, as well as for others who ply the waters of Canada and those beyond the borders of Canada?

(1240)

Ms. Karen Kancens:

On the infrastructure side and with respect to having ports access the Canada infrastructure bank, yes, conceptually it could be helpful. I think we would want to look at it from a trade corridor and a network perspective.

You have a port such as the Port of Vancouver, which is growing exponentially, which is building all kinds of infrastructure. You can see how this would be useful to them. 

If you come to the St. Lawrence Seaway or to the St. Lawrence-Great Lakes system, we have infrastructure needs in this part of Canada as well, so this is potentially interesting. We have been making a case for quite some time for the need for more icebreakers to support the system here and to support navigation through the winter months, which is a huge aspect of having a reliable trade corridor, and also for potential infrastructure needs on the east coast.

Theoretically, then, yes, it would be helpful. I might just try to punt that question a little bit, though, and say that we'll expand on it in our written comments.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Madam Chair, that's why I asked the question. I ask that such information to be passed on to us—more detailed information.

Ms. Karen Kancens:

Yes.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

As I stated yesterday, Bill C-49 is meant to be injected into the overall transportation strategy establishing, of course, one of the five pillars that Minister Garneau has announced, which is trade corridors. The more information we can have about what your needs are to make more robust the opportunity for our participation and performance in a global economy, the better. Since, as you stated earlier, you are a part of it, we need to hear what those needs are. That way, when we are actually making the infrastructure investments, they will be made appropriately, for better value and a better return, to therefore position Canada better on the economic global stage than is the case today.

Ms. Karen Kancens:

Yes, absolutely.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Great. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you to all of our witnesses. This has been tremendously informative. We thank you for taking the time to participate and helping all of us as parliamentarians.

We will now suspend until the next panel.

(1240)

(1345)

The Chair:

We're calling the meeting back to order as we continue our study of Bill C-49. We have with us at this panel François Tougas, appearing as an individual, the Canadian National Millers Association, and the Canadian Canola Growers Association.

I welcome all of you. Thank you for coming.

Who would like to start off? Go right ahead, sir.

Mr. Gordon Harrison (President, Canadian National Millers Association):

Thank you very much for the opportunity to appear. It's greatly appreciated. We are very happy to be here after requesting to be here.

The Canadian National Millers Association is Canada's national not-for-profit industry association representing the cereal grain milling industry. Our member companies operate milling establishments across Canada, and a number of them operate establishments in the United States or have affiliated companies with milling facilities in the U.S.

By virtue of where the Canadian milling industry capacity is situated and the regional markets served, the Canadian industry can quite correctly be described as a participant in a North American industry. It is a North American market for this industry, and the industry is integrated much like the rail transportation networks are throughout North America.

We are, however, an independent Canadian not-for-profit organization. We do not directly represent members of the U.S. milling industry except for those who are members in good standing of the CNMA by virtue of their operating facilities in Canada.

In light of the few minutes that are available for everyone to speak, I'd like to start by advising the committee at the outset that the CNMA supports the recommendations that are set out in the amendments to the bill as submitted and presented by the Western Grain Elevator Association. Members of the WGEA are the predominant link between grain producers and our member grain processors and others who are processors in Canada. This is the case for the majority of wheat and oats milled in western Canada.

I would like to touch upon a number of points as context for the committee's consideration of all the submissions you've heard. They are the following.

Our members are primary processors of wheat, oats, rye, and other cereal grains. By “primary processors”, we mean the step in the supply chain at which grain is transformed from a commodity that generally is not consumed to commodities that are consumed and are ingredients in food products and other products at the consumer level.

Top of mind for most people who think of foods that contain such ingredients are bread, other bakery products, pasta, breakfast cereals, and cookies, but I'd like to emphasize that you'll find wheat flour and other products of grain milling in products that are in every aisle of the grocery store, including pet foods, which contain products of grain milling. There are many products that contain or are derived from milled grain products. Those milled grain products are derived from grains across Canada, but predominantly the grains that are produced in western Canada.

There are also very few food service chains or restaurants, if any, whose menus are not largely based on foods based on cereal grains and manufactured from the products of grain milling. During the duration of these hearings, I was reflecting on this. I think Canadians will have consumed approximately 200 million meals containing bakery products, pasta, breakfast cereals, and snack foods, which in turn contain other products of grain milling.

These businesses, from the very largest to the very smallest, operate on a just-in-time delivery basis. The major manufacturing companies or the further processors of milled grain products—such as bakeries for frozen bakery products, or pasta, but principally those further processing manufacturing industries—have only a few days of ingredients in stock, and not just wheat flour and other milled grain products, but all grain products. In that sense, the supply chain beyond the milling industry operates on a just-in-time delivery basis, just like the automotive industry.

The CNMA's interest in rail transportation policy in Bill C-49 is that the cereal grain milling industry is heavily reliant on rail transportation, not only for inbound unprocessed grains but for outbound processed products. Two-thirds of Canada's wheat milling capacity is located off the Prairies, outside of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba, and is situated in B.C., Ontario, Quebec, and Nova Scotia primarily. These mills require rail service to receive approximately three million tonnes of wheat and oats annually. This represents a very predictable demand for rail transportation: in my estimate, 34,000 cars annually for inbound grain, and perhaps another 6,000 to 10,000 cars for the movement forward of milled grain products and by-products.

(1350)



This demand doesn't fluctuate significantly by crop year, is not variant on the size of the Canadian crop for any commodity. Rather, it can be easily forecast a year in advance because it's based on a domestic and a nearby export market, the United States of America.

Having noted some of the ridings held by committee members, it might interest you to know that during the dramatic shortfall in service in the 2013-14 crop year, there were mills in Mississauga, Montreal, and Halifax that actually ran out of wheat, in some cases more than once. That meant that major bakeries were within two to three days of running out of flour, and major retail grocery establishments probably within four to five days of running out of bread on shelves.

In hindsight—and that is now a long time ago and we're not here to whine about what happened back then—we came very close to having a serious interruption in our grains-based food supply. How would we have explained that to Canadians who had gone to the store and found no bread, or to fast-food restaurants which would have had nothing to put their ingredients on in those menu servings?

Other than the extended switching rights, the provisions of the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act did not recognize or assist the rail service requirements of Canada's milling industry. The same can be said for U.S. establishments. In fact, that intervention provided an impediment to service to our industry. As we see it, there are no provisions of the CTA that presently speak to the very predictable and forecastable service needs of the Canadian milling industry, and in most respects the same can be said about the amendments proposed by Bill C-49. The act, as it exists and even as amended, doesn't really speak directly to or recognize the needs of domestic processors.

Those processors really do not have the capacity to receive and unload grain in the way that grain elevators have on the way to export markets. Almost all mill locations are urban. They're in multi-mix environments, in some cases surrounded by residential development, commercial development, and they are equipped to handle only a few cars at a time. The largest capacity of a mill that I'm aware of, without using a transfer elevator nearby, is about 15 cars at a time.

In regard to Bill C-49, it really remains important that under the amended act the definition of “shipper”, as I understand the proposed amendments, will remain, “a person who sends or receives goods by means of a carrier or intends to do so.” That's an extremely important aspect of the legislation as it exists today, and that does ensure that processors, including millers, have access to the benefits of the same provisions of the act.

The key point I want to make is that grain rail service is not only about moving grain to port for onward movement to export markets. It's about moving grain to mills in Canada and the United States, meeting the needs of Canadian and U.S. consumers. The Transport Canada question-and-answer document that was circulated about 10 days ago speaks of global markets. I want to emphasize that North America, Canada and the U.S. combined, is a global market of 400 million people. From our investigation, the recommendations of the WGEA and those carefully considered points of the crop logistics working group will go a long way to meeting the substantial improvement that is described by the WGEA in these amendments. We are supportive of those recommendations.

I must emphasize, however, neither their submission, nor any other that I've read to date, speak to the importance of rail service to cereal grain milling establishments. There are actually many, and the Canadian population relies upon the timely operation of those facilities and the delivery of foods from those facilities.

I've provided some very brief correspondence to the Honourable Marc Garneau, to the clerk, which I gather will be subsequently distributed once it is translated.

Thank you for your attention.

(1355)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we`ll go to the Canada Canola Growers Association.

Mr. Jack Froese (President, Canadian Canola Growers Association):

Good afternoon, Madam Chair and members of this committee.

I am Jack Froese, the president of the Canadian Canola Growers Association. I farm at Winkler, Manitoba. Thank you for inviting me here today to speak with you about Bill C-49, the transportation modernization act.

CCGA is a national association governed by a board of farmer directors who represent the voice of Canada's 43,000 canola farmers from Ontario west to British Columbia. In any given year, over 90% of Canadian canola, in the form of raw seed or the processed products of canola oil or canola meal, is ultimately destined for export markets in more than 50 countries. We are the world's largest exporter of this highly valued oilseed.

Canola farmers critically rely on rail transportation to move our products to customers and keep those products price-competitive within the global oilseed market. Farmers occupy a unique position in this grain supply chain, and that is what fundamentally differentiates this supply chain from other commodities. Farmers are not the legal shippers, but we bear the cost of transport as it is reflected in the price we are offered for our products from the buyers of our grains and oilseeds, who are the shippers.

Simply put, farmers do not book the train or the boat, but they pay for it. Transportation and logistics costs, whatever they might be at a point in time, are passed back and paid for by the farmer.

Farmers independently strive to maximize both the quantity and quality of their production each year. Once harvested, they sell their grain into the system, based on their particular marketing plan, with the overall goal of capturing the highest possible prices at a given time in a dynamic and ever-fluctuating global commodity market.

Transportation of grain is one of several commercial elements that directly affect the price offered to farmers in the country. When issues arise in the supply chain, the price that farmers receive for their grain can drop even at times when commodity prices might be high in the global marketplace.

In periods of prolonged disruptions, space in grain elevators becomes full and grain companies stop buying grain and accepting deliveries. This can occur even when the farmer has an existing contract for delivery, seriously affecting farmers' ability to cash flow their operations. This is a major reason that western Canadian farmers have such an interest in transportation. It directly affects personal farmer income, and beyond that, they critically rely on the service of Canada's railways to move grain to export position. We have no alternative.

It is a complex system, transporting western Canadian grains an average distance of 1,520 kilometres from the Prairies to tidewater, but we need to make it work to the benefit of all parties and the broader national economy as a whole.

The competitiveness and reliability of the canola industry, which currently contributes over $26 billion annually to the Canadian economy, is highly dependent on this supply chain providing timely, efficient, and reliable service. In terms of direct impact on Canadian farmers, canola has been the number one source of farm revenue from crops every year for over a decade. It is a major contributor to grain farmers' profitability.

The 2016-17 crop year that just passed at the end of July set new record levels of canola exports and domestic value-added processing. Strong performance by the railways absolutely supported this achievement. Overall, it was a banner year for railway movement of grain and its products.

That stated, we need to remain future-oriented when we consider public policy changes. The last several years of reasonably good overall total movement and relative fluidity of the supply chain should not lessen our focus on seeking to improve, as fundamental issues still exist beneath the short-term positive headlines.

Spring 2017 saw a record level of canola planted in Canada, the largest single field crop in the country, for the first time surpassing wheat. The most recent, late August, government estimates of production for this fall is 18.2 million tonnes, down slightly from last year due to challenging weather, but still surpassing the five-year average by over one million tonnes.

We are an optimistic and goal-oriented industry with a record of achieving success. When we look forward to 2025, we see demand for our products rising further, both domestically and internationally. In this future, rail transportation will be even more important as our industry strives to reach our strategic goal of Canadian farmers sustainably producing 26 million tonnes of canola every year.

(1400)



To support this, Canadian farmers and the industry will need an effective and responsive rail transportation system, not just for transportation of the current crop sizes but for those of the future. Moreover, farmers will not be able to capitalize on the opportunities from Canada's existing and future trade agreements without a reliable and efficient rail system that grain shippers and our global customers have confidence in. That is a key point: with such a strong reliance on exports, we do need to remain cognizant of the customer service aspect of our export orientation in the agricultural sector.

Canadian canola and other grains are well known for their quality characteristics and sustainable supply, which are market differentiators. But at the end of the day, they remain fungible commodities, and alternatives exist. The reliability of our transportation system affects buyers' confidence in the global Canadian brand. We know, because we hear directly about it.

For the remaining comments, I'll defer to Steve Pratte.

Mr. Steve Pratte (Policy Manager, Canadian Canola Growers Association):

Thank you.

Just very briefly, Bill C-49 attempts to address several long-standing issues in the rail transportation marketplace. You've heard from grain sector representatives, including grain shippers and farm groups, yesterday and this morning, regarding their perspectives on various commercial and legal aspects of the bill, including around reciprocal penalties, long-haul interswitching, and other elements. You've clearly heard from witnesses in other sectors that Canadian class I railways are in monopoly positions. Most grain shippers are served by only one carrier and are subject to monopolistic pricing and service strategies.

The grain sector, from farm groups through the value chain to exporters, has been consistent in its discussions with government since the 2013-14 transportation crisis, and there's been a consistent message. Canada must address the fundamental problem of railway market power and the resulting lack of competitive forces in the rail marketplace. In our view, the government has a clear role to establish a regulatory structure that strikes a measured and appropriate balance and, to the greatest extent possible, creates the market-like forces that do not exist, which in theory should create more market-responsive behaviours of all participants.

This is the reality, a long-standing fact that has led to over a century of government intervention to varying degrees in this sector. Bill C-49 is the current approach before us to bring a more commercially oriented accountability into this historically imbalanced relationship. Bill C-49 appears to make progress in several areas towards this goal, and does reflect a consideration of what Canadian rail shippers and the grain industry have been telling successive governments for years about the core imbalanced relationship between shipper and railway. For that, we thank you.

In our view, the true impact and success of this bill and the measure of its intended public policy outcomes will only really become apparent and known once the shipping community attempts to access and use the remedies and processes this bill will initiate. As Bill C-49 was designed to balance two competing interests—that of the shipper and that of the rail service provider—a true measure of success will likely take several years to fully gauge and appreciate.

In closing, two areas that CCGA would like to briefly highlight, from a farmer's perspective, are the themes of transparency and long-term investment, specifically as they relate to data disclosure and the economic regulatory environment of grain transport in Canada.

One element of Bill C-49 that is of particular importance to farmers is the issue of transparency.

The publication of new railway service data, received by the minister of transport or the Canadian Transportation Agency, is important not only for stakeholders and analysts monitoring the functioning of the grain handling and transportation system but also for government itself—for the twin functions of on-going monitoring and assessment of the system, and when required, the ability to develop prudent public policy and advice to the minister in times of need.

This new information, in conjunction with the comprehensive reporting of the existing grain monitor program, will provide farmers with valuable insights into the performance of the system. As the bill currently reads, clauses 51.1, 77(5), and 98(7) specify timelines associated with this reporting. CCGA would respectfully submit that these timelines are too lengthy and that consideration should be given to shortening them.

In addition, the new proposed annual railway reports to the minister at the beginning of each crop year, contained in clause 151.01, are very positive. CCGA would respectfully submit that the minister of transport consult with the minister of agriculture as to what those reports could specifically contain to be of greatest utility to both government and grain stakeholders.

Lastly, modernizing the economic regulatory environment to stimulate investment, such as the suite of actions aimed at the maximum revenue entitlement, is well intentioned.

One of these policy objectives is to spur investment in grain hopper car replacement by the railways through the calculation of the annual volume related composite price index, as effected by clause 151(4).

CCGA would submit that consideration should be given to having the Canadian Transportation Agency closely monitor these actions and, during its annual administration of the MRE, include a summary comment within its determination.

We appreciate being here to address the committee this afternoon, and we do look forward to the question period.

(1405)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Tougas.

Mr. François Tougas (Lawyer, McMillan LLP, As an Individual):

Thank you for the invitation to appear before the committee today.

I should start by commending the members for their non-partisan approach to this bill, as well as for their fortitude, doing this all week long, and the hours that you're maintaining.

I'm here in my capacity as counsel to shippers, railways, governments, intermediaries, and investors in the areas of rail law and policy. My credentials are attached to my formal submissions.

I should say also that my comments today are informed by more than 60 negotiations and processes with the Canadian National Railway Company and Canadian Pacific. I'm speaking from the position of having seen these negotiations and processes among different categories of commodities as well as railways. Transport Canada consulted with me extensively in the run-up to Bill C-49. Unfortunately, Bill C-49 leaves many shippers without access to a viable remedy. While I have many things to say about the act and the bill, I'm going to confine my remarks today to two areas in particular on data disclosure and rail service, and I'm also going to try to address some points that have arisen since the beginning of the week.

My first point is on costing data. Bill C-49 looks to gather some data similar to that available in the United States. However, the bill will not change the fact that data about CN and CP is much more readily available to shippers in the States than to shippers in Canada. Shippers in the States have access to detailed rail costing data to calculate a carrier's costs of transporting goods, without invoking a proceeding before the U.S. Surface Transportation Board.

Rail carriers in the States are required to report detailed financial and statistical data, which is available publicly on the STB website. CN and CP must provide these reports to the STB too, but Canada does not require it, so shippers in Canada are at a considerable disadvantage in relation to their U.S. counterparts. The STB established the uniform rail costing system, URCS, to “provide the railroad industry and shipper community with a standardized costing model [that can be] used by parties to submit cost evidence before the Board.” Shippers can, by this and yet other means, assess the freight rate competitiveness of CP's and CN's American operations, but not their Canadian operations.

In Canada, the only situation in which a shipper can get rail cost data is in the confidential final offer arbitration, FOA, process. FOA has become increasingly difficult to use for a number of reasons. As you've heard already from other witnesses, an FOA arbitrator has the right, under the act as it presently stands, to get information from the agency but generally will not do so without first getting that class I rail carrier's consent. That's the problem that I think you have an opportunity to fix. CN and CP can merely refuse to consent, leaving the arbitrator in such cases without a critical piece of evidence to make a final offer selection between the shipper's offer and a carrier's offer. In this manner, CN and CP can neuter the FOA process, making it less available and less viable.

While shippers in Canada should have access to the same quantity and quality of information available to the shippers using CN and CP services in the States, for now, I'm advocating something simpler; just require CN and CP to co-operate with the agency in providing the cost of shipments that are submitted to final offer arbitration. I have some recommended language there before you. This committee is already amending subsection 161(2), so this would be the addition of a paragraph (f). It would just add one more item to the list of items that a shipper has to submit to start a final offer arbitration. With this amendment to the act, the FOA process has a better chance of avoiding disputes, reaching good conclusions, and satisfying the parties.

I'll move on to performance data. Railway performance data is also not available in Canada. Bill C-49 proposes to compel the disclosure of a subset of certain U.S. information. As a result, U.S. shippers will end up with more data about CN's and CP's operations than shippers in Canada. Ideally, each class I rail carrier would submit all data from every waybill, including the information required by proposed subsection 76(2), which is dedicated right now just to the LHI remedy.

(1410)



This information is readily accessible to the rail carriers in real time and is easily transferable. That would allow any so-inclined shipper in Canada to assess the extent to which a rail carrier is providing adequate and suitable accommodation for its traffic without having to resort to a legal process, which is what is required right now.

Currently the agency and arbitrators must determine service cases in the absence of performance data. The creation of a database and publication of all waybill and clause 76 information would settle or eliminate many disputes. However, I propose something more modest. I propose three things. First, give the agency the authority and the obligation, as it has for other parts of the act, to make regulations in this area, given its wide-ranging expertise. Second, require service performance information for publication for each rail line or subdivision. System-wide data as presently contemplated by Bill C-49 will do nothing to identify service failures in any region or corridor, much less those faced by any shipper. Third, Bill C-49 seeks to limit commodity information. I've added paragraph (11) to current subclause 77(2)—you can see the language before you—to require each class I rail carrier to report their service performance in respect of 23 commodity groups, just as is required by the STB of CN and CP in the United States—no difference.

Moving on to service levels, both the level of service complaint remedy and the SLA process were designed, along with the statutory service obligations, to compel railways to do things they would not otherwise do. The agency has done an admirable job of determining the circumstances in which it will determine whether a rail carrier has fulfilled its statutory service obligations. This is not a system that needs any further inclination toward rail carriers, which have been performing very, very well financially. Only the most egregious rail carrier conduct gets attention from shippers, which are otherwise prone to sole-service providers and very reluctant to bring proceedings.

Personally, I would not have amended the LOS provisions, but if it must be done, I'd make a few changes—three of them, in fact.

First, I'd change the opening words of proposed subsection 116(1.2), as presently contemplated in Bill C-49, to reverse the logic. Right now, it doesn't say what happens if a rail carrier doesn't provide the highest level of service they can provide. I would reverse the finding requirement so that the level of service is no less than the highest that can be reasonably provided in the circumstances.

Second, Bill C-49 would require the agency, in both the LOS and the SLA process, to consider the rail carrier's requirements and restrictions, which are all outside the control of the shipper and well within the control of the rail carrier. For example, a rail carrier decides how many locomotives to acquire, whether to terminate thousands of employees, eliminate or reduce service, limit infrastructure, or invest in technologies. It is entirely inappropriate for the agency to have to determine whether a shipper should receive a portion of the capacity that has been restricted by decisions of a rail carrier. I would strike the offending provisions entirely, just as you have it before you there.

Third, Bill C-49 imposes an obligation on an arbitrator to render decisions in a balanced way. Now, I would have thought they were already doing that. They enjoy a reputation for fairness and impartiality, and they have enjoyed deference from the appellate courts. Arbitrators are rarely appealed. There's no need for such a provision. The SLA process exists precisely because a rail carrier will not provide what the shipper requires. If it turns out, upon examination, that a shipper doesn't require the service it seeks, the shipper won't get it. That's what the agency will decide. I would strike that proposal altogether.

I've been asked a few times, and contemplated that this would arise, which one of these I would take if I could only take one. Well, it may be that the LHI provisions, if they're amended in accordance with the requests of various parties who've appeared before you, will be helpful to some people. But for sure I would make sure that my priority one amendment is made—that is, demand and require of a railway that it provide its consent to a rail carrier costing demand by the shipper in the FOA process.

Finally, we should return to a periodic review of the act. I would recommend at least every four years. I heard Mr. Emerson say two, and I'd be content with that too.

Thank you very much.

(1415)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you to all of you.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Thank you to all of you for joining us here today.

I want to make the statement that I appreciate the balanced testimony we've heard from all of our witnesses over the past three days in terms of pointing out where things have been structured very well and then identifying those places where they feel the bill needs to be amended. I also appreciate the common themes that have arisen over the past number of days.

With that, I want to ask a couple of questions of you. First, what will be the long-term implications for your industries, and the industry as a whole, if the amendments that you've suggested aren't made?

Mr. Gordon Harrison:

I think the amendments that have been proposed by the major grain supply chain stakeholders have been very carefully considered based on a great deal of experience. I believe they are worthy, have merit, will improve the efficiency and the responsiveness of the system, and speak to the need that has been spoken to by the last presenter, which is the transparency of data that is obligated to be provided, gathered, and published in a very timely fashion. I really appreciate the remarks that it should be no less robust and transparent than users of the system, shippers, have in the United States.

The implications would potentially be lost opportunity. Secondly, there's potential for another precipitous and perhaps economically damaging intervention in the future if we ever again face the kind of circumstances we did three crop years ago. Ultimately, an awful lot of time and effort were wasted in doing better. Doing better is absolutely essential to our economy.

Thank you.

(1420)

Mr. Jack Froese:

I would say our future depends on it. We can ill afford to go back to what we had in the past. If we look at where agriculture is going, with biotechnology we're raising better crops and bigger crops using every technology available to us. We're going to be looking at more volume to be handled in the future. We have set the lofty goal of 26 million tonnes by 2025. We've always achieved our goals in the past. We are going to have to make sure that we can do all the trade agreements, and if the transportation system isn't there to back it up, the trade agreements don't mean a whole lot.

To have the timing of the transportation to meet, to coincide, with the needs of the consumer is extremely important. I know we have had consultations with our Japanese buyers, and they tell us it's extremely important that they get their shipments on time.

Mr. François Tougas:

Let me answer you by posing a question to you, which is, why aren't the remedies used? I know some of you have asked that question. If you approach it from that perspective, you can see what's going to happen to industry over time.

If we look at the Canada Transportation Act as a constant work in progress—which I think we have to admit has been going on for about 100 years or more—then the process that we're in now is really an opportunity to try to get further ahead than where we were. What's actually happening is that the remedies are being eroded, and that's why I'm talking about the things that I'm talking about today.

This can't be surprising. We have a market structure that lends itself to a natural monopoly occupied by the two railways. I wouldn't blame it on their conduct; it's a market structure problem. We address that with remedies in the act. When those remedies are weakened, when they do not do the job that they were intended to do, it makes it hard for those shippers to deliver on their production. That's the simple point I would make.

I know some of you also asked, is it this reason or that reason that this remedy is being used or not being used? On Monday I heard the railways talk about this subject. The reason why the remedies aren't being used is that it gets harder and harder to use each one of those remedies. The shippers are primarily scared of retribution from the carriers for exercising those remedies, and they're expensive. I'm part of the problem, right? I'm a lawyer, and lawyers are people, too, but it costs a lot of money to engage counsel. The harder the process is, the more money it's going to take to solve the problem.

You heard testimony this morning about how much it might cost to do an FOA process for one shipper. Other shippers can exercise some of the remedies for cheaper, but very few shippers have access to a lot of remedies. Most shippers have access to one, sometimes two remedies. You have to make them usable. That's really the point I would emphasize, and I would make that point about LHI as well.

Sorry to go on so long.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

No. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I want to stay on remedies and look for remedies for the remedies. Can you go into a bit more detail on the remedies? Where did they originate? Take a couple of specific examples. Where did they originate, and how did they die?

Mr. François Tougas:

Many of the remedies we have in the act today actually came as a result of possibly a maverick, Don Mazankowski, back in the eighties. The advent of the National Transportation Act of 1987 introduced final offer arbitration and the competitive line rate mechanism. It changed the interswitching mechanism to the thing we have today. Those were bold.

CLR, as you've heard, doesn't work. The railways have refused to compete with one another on that basis. They don't have to. There's no law that requires them to compete with one another. What we're talking about, again, is a market structure problem. When you create a remedy, you want that remedy to be effective, to act as a surrogate for what the market is not going to be able to do.

I practise in the area of antitrust law, and in antitrust economics, the main thing we want is for competition to occur. In a natural monopoly environment, like the one we have here with the railways—not for their entire systems but for large parts of their systems—you want every mechanism available to allow those rail carriers to compete without restrictions. That's where I would say LHI has largely gone wrong. It imposes a bunch of unnecessary restrictions that really will keep those railways from having to compete with one another and with others.

Have I answered that adequately? I may not have.

(1425)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, that's a pretty good start.

As for other solutions, yesterday Teck talked to us about running rights, and I noticed a lot of people didn't know what that was. I know you have some knowledge about this. Can you talk a bit about this?

Mr. François Tougas:

Yes. I've written in this area probably the least read articles in Canada on this subject.

There are many types of running rights regimes. It's a good scaremongering tactic by the carriers. I've heard on numerous occasions about how it would devastate the economy. As the Teck witness mentioned yesterday, running rights are already used throughout North America every single day. There are lots of running rights mechanisms, and there are lots of different forms of them. What they are particularly afraid of is wide open access, with anybody running over anybody's lines. I think there are lots of steps on the way there.

I could go on for days on this subject, but I think in Canada, we have some opportunities to correct our transportation system to introduce direct competition, that is, running rights. But if we're not going to do that, then we should have remedies that provide indirect competition that is effective and viable for the shippers to use.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

One of the issues that came up earlier today was a concern about premature discontinuance of the line. I wonder if you had thoughts on that and remedies for that.

Mr. François Tougas:

I think right now the railways have obtained the ability to discontinue rail lines on a basis that I think is reasonable for the rationalization of their networks. I've always been a little bit concerned about how easy it is for them to go through that process, but that is the process.

What happens now is that if you allow them to discontinue service before that process is run, you're essentially stranding a bunch of shippers on those lines that are about to be abandoned. I think that's a mistake. Reasonable people can differ on that issue. That might be a place where you allow communities to take over those lines immediately or for other parties to come in and run them, on a reasonable basis, as short-lines.

Short-lines get squeezed for both their operating revenue and their capital requirements. This is probably worth spending some time on, probably more time than we have today.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We heard from the short-lines yesterday that their operating ratio is in the 98% range, as opposed to the large carriers being in the 50% range.

I'll come back to another question I've asked a number of panellists, and I'll open it up to everybody.

We were told by the large railways that any company that has access to trucks is basically not a captive client. I'm wondering what your thoughts are on that.

Mr. François Tougas:

Okay, well, that's ridiculous.

The Chair:

We appreciate your honesty.

Mr. François Tougas:

For a slightly more nuanced answer, think about it like this. I heard one comment that if they have access to trucking for 25% of their production, that party is no longer captive. Well, there is the other 75% that's still captive, and that's the thing we're looking for.

Let's just take a sawmill, for example, that's trying to ship its product to 3,000 destinations in the United States, and it's stuck in northwest British Columbia. There is one option, and that option is Canadian National Railway. Now, they could truck to Edmonton and connect to CP. Anybody who hasn't completely lost their minds will realize that this is a much more expensive option. We heard, the railways have said it, that trucking is more expensive once you get beyond a distance. The railways can't compete at the shorter distances, they say. I question their number, but let's just take it for what it is. You still have to get your stuff off the truck and then back onto a railcar. Well, that cross-docking is an expensive process.

Have I used up all the time?

(1430)

The Chair:

No. You can keep going.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There are remedies—

Mr. François Tougas:

I could do an example like this for virtually every shipment in Canada. Anybody who would want to use trucks to move coal would similarly have lost their mind. I did this calculation once, put 25 million tonnes on the road, and you're talking about one truck every two and a half minutes, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The roads couldn't tolerate it. No bridge could tolerate it. That's only one commodity. It is simply not real to say that somebody is not captive because they have some access to trucking.

The Chair:

I think Mr. Harrison was trying to put something in there.

Mr. Gordon Harrison:

Just a quick comment. Trucking is not an alternative to moving grains out of Prairie provinces into processing facilities anywhere else in Canada. It's impractical for reasons of costs, in addition to those of logistics.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I thank the witnesses for joining us.

I would like to begin the conversation with Mr. Harrison.

In your opening remarks, you provided us with a new perspective. For a few days, we have been hearing many producers of grain and ore complain about railway companies. People are saying that those types of productions are growing, that they are trying to export more to international markets and grow the economy. This afternoon, you are bringing us the notion of just-in-time production, the concept involving smaller productions. You are saying that most mills are not equipped to receive many cars.

Does Bill C-49 provide any benefits for you? I will let you tell me, but I am under the impression that railway companies would perhaps have to offer you different treatment than the one large productions get. Am I mistaken? [English]

Mr. Gordon Harrison:

The just-in-time delivery aspect takes place at the milling and beyond stage. Before that stage there is some latitude in milling establishments, provided that the pipeline or the flow of grain is continuous and as anticipated. The milling industry can't deliver just-in-time if the milling industry is allowed to run out of grain.

Eastern Canadian grain—Ontario, Quebec, and Atlantic grain—is not generally substitutable for grain of western Canadian classes and quality. You can't make the same products. In addition to that, to operate a mill efficiently you need different grades and classes and protein levels of western Canadian wheat. In the case of oatmeal, you need specific varieties that have to be declared and delivered.

If you have your inventories drawn down to a level, like we experienced three years ago, where you can't do the blending that is required and you can't achieve the end-use performance required, you can't do just-in-time delivery of the end-use performance that a large further processor would wish.

Mills in Canada would have anywhere from four weeks to, perhaps, a few months of storage, but if your rail service is interrupted for weeks on end, which is what happened—and we would never want anyone to experience that again—that's where you would get into the disruption of just-in-time delivery. The people who are trying to do that just-in-time work and put those products with short shelf life out there in the marketplace don't have the luxury of going to other suppliers on that kind of turnaround time.

That's the way it has become. It requires an adequate supply of raw materials and, beyond the primary manufacturer, an adequate and continuous supply of those products.

I hope that answers your question. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Yes, it does. Thank you.

On a different note, you would really have to be psychic to know what recommendations will be unanimously supported in this committee over the next few weeks. There are many proposals on the table. Nearly everyone agrees that the legislation should be reviewed on a regular basis. Some have suggested that this be done every two years, and others, every four years.

I would like to rephrase the question. Once Bill C-49 has been passed, regardless of the amendments made to it, how much time do you think will be needed to measure its effectiveness? In other words, should the first review of the legislation be done after a year, two years, three years or four years? Then, we could establish the cycle.

(1435)

[English]

Mr. François Tougas:

My view is that we already have some precedents to help us address how quickly a review should occur. I'll give you the answer first. I think it should be two years, but I would live with four. Here's the reason.

The SLA mechanism was introduced through Bill C-52 in 2013. Last year we had precisely zero SLAs go before the agency. The year before that, we had two. The year before that, we had five.

That's the record: five, two, zero. Why is that? Maybe it's not working. Maybe there's a need to review that mechanism. Just as in the case of any other mechanism that we use, we should be constantly reviewing it in a continuous improvement kind of environment.

I know it's very difficult at the parliamentary level to do that, but this committee has been doing it forever. You guys actually have the expertise. You have lots of people whom you can resource to do a proper review of each of the remedies—how they're working, how the act is working in an integrated or unintegrated fashion. This can all be done. I think you could do it two years from now, but I wouldn't go any further than four years. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Mr. Harrison, do you want to answer the question? [English]

Mr. Gordon Harrison:

I would add that growers have spoken today about the future, and the future for producers of all crops including wheat is that the crop genetics and agricultural practices will see a continuous line of growth in the commodities that need to be moved.

In contrast, we're not going to see such robust growth, because of population growth, in Canada—it's a little below that in the United States.

The point I want to make is that the circumstances of the marketplace can change rather quickly, and the performance of any aspect of supply chains could change rather quickly. I would agree, particularly after these amendments are made, that there's a need for review in a timely fashion. I find the example to be excellent. Things can change very quickly, but we certainly know that there will not be less demand to move agricultural commodities, because producers are going to be needing more and more capacity to get commodities to market, including our market.

I hope I didn't misstate.

The Chair:

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thanks very much. I'll start with the lawyer at the table to talk about dispute resolution, mostly because it's one of my favourite subjects, being a dispute resolution lawyer myself before I got into this.

On the final offer arbitration piece, you hinted at the fact that there might be fewer disputes if we had an effective mechanism. One of my great frustrations sometimes, in my previous career, was getting a new file, because it meant that something had gone so wrong that somebody wanted to pay legal fees to sort it out rather than invest those dollars into growing their business.

Can you expand a little on how making participation in this process mandatory, essentially, would actually reduce the time for which shippers or producers are pulled into the dispute resolution process?

Mr. François Tougas:

That's a very good question. If I had it my way, we would do it differently from the way I'm articulating. I'd be asking a lot of you.

Ideally what would happen is that shippers would have an opportunity to get a sense of the railway's costs before they went into the final offer arbitration process. That's what the ideal would be. Then they could assess: “Whoa. It really is costing the railway this much; I'm not getting ripped off.” Right now, they can't tell that. They're clueless about it.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

On that point, before we get too deep into it, is better data disclosure even within the realm of possibility right now?

Mr. François Tougas:

If you made the data that's found in clause 76 available to you and you had in Canada a data disclosure system like the URCS that I described, then you could do it, but not with these amendments. It would take quite a bit more.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Then we're getting into the realm of disclosing the railways' proprietary data to the industry publicly.

(1440)

Mr. François Tougas:

Nonsense. Let me just get on that one, because I hear that a lot too.

They do this in the States. The URCS requires this data disclosure right now. CN and CP have to disclose that data in the United States; there's no reason that it can't be disclosed in Canada.

Further, this bill does a lot of aggregation, even on the performance data, that does not occur in the States. CN and CP have to report individually what they are doing in the United States. They have big operations in the States.

This is just such a red herring.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Before we get into the initial portion, I like the path we're going down.

In terms of the data disclosure, is the gold standard here to just say let's harmonize with the U.S. and that's a perfect outcome or...?

Mr. François Tougas:

No, that isn't the case. I know that it's a very tempting thing to say, but I can tell you that U.S. shippers are frustrated by what they have. What they have is more than what we have on this front, but what we should do because of our modern data ability—data gathering and data transferring abilities—is to make this stuff transparent. Why should it be transparent? If it was a normally functioning market, you wouldn't need that transparency. The market would take care of everything by itself. Because they're monopolies—that's why we talk about data disclosure. This hiding behind the veil of confidentiality is just a red herring. It does not occur in the United States. There is some data that is kept confidential until you get inside a process. So now, just to bring it back to where you started, if you can get into the final offer arbitration process, nothing works more like a charm, from a railway's perspective, than saying, “uh-uh, no, I'm not going to tell you my cost.”

Good luck, shipper, trying to find out whether your rate is high or low.

Good luck, arbitrator, trying to find out whether the offer of the carrier is reasonable in relation to anything, because their shipper doesn't have anybody else's rates. They're confidential. The rates are confidential, so you can't do a comparative thing. All you have is the cost to compare your rate against.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

You made another comment about the requirement you would strike that says that the decision should be made in a balanced way. Is your problem there that it's superfluous and could be interpreted in an unpredictable way or is your fear that where there might be a correct outcome, the balance that might be struck might not be the correct legal outcome? What's the fear here?

Mr. François Tougas:

First of all, it does look like the former point, so I'll concede that, but it's really on the latter point that I'm trying to focus my comments.

If an agency decides, for example, that this x level of service is required in these circumstances in order to meet the adequate and suitable standard that everybody seems to have problems with, which, by the way, I don't have a problem with, but if the agency has to make a decision that is now balanced between the two, the agency has to give meaning to those words. What is that meaning? Does it mean, "oh, I was going to give you an adequate and suitable standard, which I think is this, but because the act says I have to do something balanced, provide some equilibrium, does that mean that I have to take into account how much money you're losing and how much money you're losing off the deal?” The agency is the impartial arbitrator. It is at the very least superfluous, but, I think, much more dangerous, much less benign.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I think I'm out of time. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We go now to Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

I was actually enjoying that, two lawyers going back and forth. That was just good. Thank you.

I want to make two comments before I ask a question.

Thank you, guys, for being here and for your input into this whole process.

I also want to thank you folks across the table. You've taken the partisanship out of this whole process and really, really embraced being in this together to ensure that these folks are being looked after well into the future, so I want to thank you as well.

With that said, I have questions with respect to, one, reciprocal penalties, and, two, as mentioned earlier, short-line operations.

The first question is with respect to reciprocal penalties. What are your thoughts on the reciprocal penalties?

Mr. Steve Pratte:

From the perspective of grain producers, which, as several grain groups have mentioned, are not legal shippers, when our bulk shippers, our smaller specialty crop and containerized shippers, and/or the value-added processors have all consistently talked about reciprocal penalties for over a decade as something that they see as tightening up just that conceptual and not legal relationship between the shipper and the railway, we as a producer group are 100% in support of the reciprocal penalties as a concept and in terms of their application. As far as their perspectives go, I will let their submissions to you stand on that. But certainly there is that balanced accountability, if you will, in all of the other aspects of the supply chain currently, other than between the shipper and the rail provider, in the eyes of our shippers and in our eyes as well.

(1445)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Are there any other comments?

Mr. François Tougas:

I accept all of those comments, but I would do one thing on reciprocal penalties for sure. I would allow the agency a lot more latitude in the setting of those reciprocal penalties than they currently have. Right now, when you invoke a process, the agency has the ability to award a return of expenses incurred, hard costs. I would give the agency a fair bit of latitude on the magnitude of those reciprocal penalties.

Let's say you order 16 cars—we heard that example this morning—and you get 10 cars. What's the penalty? Is it $100 a car? That shipment could be worth $100,000 or a million dollars, depending on what's in the... So it's not much of a return. The penalty has to be meaningful. In order to do that, rather than prescribing it, I'd give the agency the authority to do that.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Great.

My next question is with respect to short-line operators. I think you were the one who mentioned earlier about the responsibility when a line is abandoned. We all try to protect the economy of the area, and a lot of times that area economy is dependent upon that infrastructure or service.

In your opinion, besides defaulting to municipalities, which are also stretched for both capital and operating funds, how can we move forward with respect to a realistic strategy to react to the abandonment of rail lines, and therefore preserve the services available for industry that depend on these very services in partnership with a short-line operator?

Mr. François Tougas:

I've been listening to you on this topic, so I can tell that you have a fair bit of experience in this.

This is complex. I act for some short-lines—strapped for cash, hard to get capital, hard to get customers, and they're squeezed oftentimes by the class I rail carrier to which they connect. I think it's that connection problem, the terms on which the short-line railway can obtain abandoned infrastructure or a short-line piece of class I infrastructure.... The terms on which they obtain it and the terms on which they get to operate it after that I think need to be looked at.

I might have even gone so far, heaven forbid, as asking to have a look at those contracts before they're approved, so that there is some oversight body. This is very uneven bargaining power between the class Is and the shorties.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Are there other comments?

Go ahead.

Mr. Steve Pratte:

As we heard from the witness from the Western Canadian Short Line Railway Association yesterday, we see in the grain sector that, when viable, the short-lines play a very prominent role in that kind of collection system of grain, from country, from lesser used lines historically, and can act as quite a funnel for grain into the main line system of the class Is hook and haul.

Certainly, as mentioned yesterday, with the provincial authority over those rail lines, certain provinces have historically gone out in front of others in terms of helping those short-lines, but it is an important part of our sector's grain movement, collection, and distribution.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Do you also find that there may be opportunity for partnership with the end-users?

What I mean by that is a lot of times obviously the short-lines make their way on to a main line. It is, I guess, up to the main lines to actually allow access to those main lines. As well, it may find itself on a ship. It might find its way on a truck.

Do you think there's opportunity for partnership and/or integration there, as well, with an overall broader strategy?

Mr. Steve Pratte:

Certainly I would think in cases where, let's say, it's producers who are the shareholders of that particular short-line to their benefit and transport, they would be contracting with an end terminal for the export. So they're already in interaction with that actual shipper, for instance, off the west coast.

I would say there is that commercial piece there already. The facilitator of that movement, though, is the class I for the long haul.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move on to Mr. Shields.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I appreciate the expertise you bring to this and your sharing it with us.

Going to the Millers Association, I think you bring a different context to it. It's not just real time, but it's shelf life that you deal with. It's a real factor in its service.

Do you want to reiterate how critical that piece is? It's a two-part...versus others, because of that factor.

(1450)

Mr. Gordon Harrison:

I'll try to take as little time as possible.

Essentially, in order to serve customers in the milling industry well, you don't need just one type of wheat of a particular origin, you need a number of them. You have to have an inventory of all of those at all times. You can't have the kind of interruption we experienced some years ago that affected so many mills adversely in North America.

If you want to provide level of service to someone who wants to make a bagel instead of a whole wheat loaf of bread or flatbread or a tortilla or frozen dough, you have to have those ingredients. These various ingredients are predominantly from western Canada, and CWRS wheat is the real workhorse. You have to have that raw material in order to provide the service, and beyond the mill's door, that service, mostly within a 150-kilometre radius, is just in time. If you miss a delivery as a milling company, it's not that you missed today's delivery to a big bakery, but you might have missed the 11 o'clock shipment to the bakery as opposed to the 7 p.m. shipment. The just-in-time aspect is beyond that.

The shelf life of fresh goods, which accounts for much of the consumption, is very short. Those further processors who are making packaged goods....massive tonnage as compared to things with a longer shelf life, is short. It's a matter of several days. It really depends whether you're satisfying a retail market or a food service market.

I'll stop there. Thank you.

Mr. Martin Shields:

That's very important.

Canola growers, you did mention something about infrastructure and cars. In the world I live in one of the things I hear about on grain, that is on the grain-carrying cars going through the national parks, is the need to have newer cars so they don’t spill grain, and I hear that constantly. But that's not what you're talking about.

Mr. Steve Pratte:

It actually is in the fact that—again, it was talked about briefly yesterday—the age of the currently owned public fleet, which is that amalgam of the federal government's fleet and that of the two provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan, which purchased in the mid seventies, early eighties. Originally, those were 40-year lives, and those aren't dictated by the company, that is an international railway standard that they adhere to because they do cross the 49th. Under that agreement, in 2007, the operating agreement with the two class Is for the movement of Canadian grain, they were given an extra 10-year service life, so they were up to 50. We are approaching that 50-year mark, and as that rolling stock, which is of a different design and different carrying capacity from what we see now in the marketplace with new builds, the gates at the bottom of those hoppers indeed are becoming...you are seeing numbers when cars are received that are rejected for mechanical failures. The gates in the bottom of the hoppers, as they are gravity-fed, there are instances there where they are spilling product across tracks.

Mr. Martin Shields:

You didn't talk about long haul.

Mr. Steve Pratte:

Yes. From a producer's perspective, we would defer to our shippers, and you would have heard their testimony yesterday as far as their perspectives on that go. Because of, as Mr. Froese mentioned, the nature of the structure of our industry, if it's good for them and that fluidity is maintained and they can access those markets and that competition, in economic theory, it's good for that producer as well.

Mr. Martin Shields:

It comes down to you at the bottom line, right?

Mr. Steve Pratte:

Correct.

Mr. Gordon Harrison:

To comment on long haul, it was a disappointment that the extended interswitching rates were not extended, and others have expressed that before this committee, I'm sure—I read a couple of the submissions. There has also been an observation that there is a prerequisite in order to have access to long-haul interswitching rights, and we would support others who would have recommended that that be removed. Anybody who is now going to be denied access to extended interswitching should, by choice, have access to long haul for those reasons that are set out for its very existence, and at their entire discretion, not as a consequence of a hurdle to jump over to satisfy an audit requirement, if you will, of the agency.

Thank you.

Mr. Martin Shields:

What about exclusion zones?

Mr. François Tougas:

You've heard testimony already that those exclusion zones essentially mean the remedy, if it's going to be viable at all, will be viable for I think the group that my colleague here was intending to have replaced with long-haul interswitching that used to have access to extended interswitching. The difficulty is this. To give you a very quick example of how it happens, imagine a shipper that is trying to get into the zone, that has only one interchange between where they are and the zone they're trying to get to. Let's take a shipper that is north of Kamloops, British Columbia, trying to get to Vancouver. There is only one place to interchange, and that's at Kamloops, and it's excluded. That means everybody in northern British Columbia is excluded from access to the LHI remedy. A similar situation would arise in the Quebec-Windsor corridor.

It's not so much about competition within the corridor—yes, sure, they have competition, great—it's the people who are outside the corridor trying to get into the corridor, that's the problem. I would eliminate those restrictions altogether, those geographical restrictions. I would get rid of a couple of other restrictions while I was at it. Why make that remedy so hard? It looks to me to be quite a bit harder than the CLR remedy, and just is not getting used, and I would fix the rate mechanism that's attached to it. That's how I would deal with LHI.

(1455)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Mr. Harrison, you mentioned, quite often of course, that yours is a just-in-time system, you need just-in-time delivery. You mentioned the difficulties in 2013-14. We recognize that there were some pretty extraordinary conditions there, a nasty winter as well as a bumper crop on the Prairies that those producers wanted to have moved. Outside of 2013-14, does your membership experience frequent difficulties with their just-in-time delivery?

Mr. Gordon Harrison:

Frequent, no, but it's not unheard of, however. I think what you've touched on is very important. We're going to have a bumper crop every year from now on, and we're going to have weird winters a lot more often than we've had them in the past, based on our experience of recent years, so the demand for service is going up, and predictability is highly important.

I want to come back to just-in-time again. It's just-in-time for the milling company to meet the customers' needs. It's not just-in-time for the processor. It's well in advance so that the processor can store grain of the right quality, protein level, variety, and all that stuff.

I hope people haven't fixated on just-in-time, but that's the way it works when the mill has to deliver.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

In the past, how many of your operators have been basically stranded by the abandonment of a rail line?

Mr. Gordon Harrison:

Very few, in fact. I can't think of a case in point. Most milling establishments that are of some age have been situated predominantly close to the populations as opposed to in rural parts of the country. The majority of milling capacity is close to the population in the eastern one-third of North America.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I'm sorry if I have cut your answers short. I have more questions than I have time for, as usual.

We get this cat-and-dog thing going between shippers and railroads. What about the governance of the railroads? Are your interests not represented on those boards of directors at all?

Mr. Gordon Harrison:

Are you talking to me?

Mr. Ken Hardie:

We'll start with Jack.

Mr. Jack Froese:

Not really. I mean, we've convened a lot of conferences and stuff like that, but the railroads are never there. I'll give you an example, talking about service-level agreements. Our local elevator has a call that they have a unit train coming in. They don't source the grain until just hours before the train arrives. You have basically 48 hours. Their agreement says that they have to fill that train in 48 hours, and so they have to gather that grain just before that period to make sure that they don't fill the elevator with something that might not move in the event that the train doesn't come.

When the train does come, and they load it in 48 hours, the train will sit there for a week.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

We've heard those stories before, but do those stories percolate up or down to whatever levels in the railroad operations, their governance, or their decision-making process, to have an impact on the way the railways manage themselves? I'm seeing blank looks across the piece.

(1500)

Mr. Gordon Harrison:

Railways used to own milling companies and big milling companies. I have just come from our annual conference from a hotel that used to also be held in part by railways. Those integrations were gone decades and decades ago.

We have just had a meeting for the first time in my 28-year history where railways were not represented there, not because we're at war with one another. It just didn't happen this time because of the focus of our organizations. No, our processors are not there.

The other thing I have to share is that under federal law the milling industry is designated as being for the general advantage of Canada, just like railways are under the act. We were recognized for a century as an essential producer of goods, and railways have been recognized for more than a century as an essential provider of those raw materials, and that's the reality, but no, we're not directly represented, to the best of my knowledge.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

When we met on Bill C-30, the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act, a lot of the interest that we heard about interswitching was to basically get access to Burlington Northern Santa Fe and get that grain moved.

In a conversation with you a little bit earlier, Mr. Tougas, we were talking about the fact that, on those excluded zones, Quebec to Windsor and Kamloops to Vancouver...and this is when the penny kind of dropped for me. What the LHI is supposed to do that it may not do, which is really not to give access to Burlington Northern Santa Fe, is spur competition between the two railroads in Canada.

Mr. François Tougas:

Yes, certainly that has to be one of the objectives. I would have said that by the nature of the exclusion zones the main thing that's happening is eliminating competition that might be possible between CN and CP.

Really, the LHI is dedicated to the idea of what the rate is going to be for the origin portion to connect to that connecting carrier. In those zones.... Let's just take Kamloops again. If you're heading west, you could be coming in on CN into Kamloops, or you could be coming in on CP into Kamloops. If you're trying to switch to the other one, that would be the connecting carrier. There's only one connecting carrier there that's not the same as the origin carrier.

In Quebec, in the Quebec-Windsor corridor, you have the same two railways that are essentially vying for business, but if you're in the Maritimes or you're in northern Quebec, it's CN, CN, or CN. Those are the choices.

To the extent that the American railways can get into the LHI system, I actually think that's a positive. I don't go for the fearmongering about how much business BN is going to get out of this. You've heard the answer already. How many cars actually moved under extended interswitching? It's a tiny number. CN's own witness admitted it, right? It's not a big number at all, so I just don't buy into this “it's a catastrophic kind of problem”.

On top of it, if it is going to be a problem, that's the good part, right? If there's actually going to be competition that gets created out of the system, that's a win, not a loss.

The Chair:

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Perhaps I'll continue with that line of questioning, but maybe in a bit of a different direction. I have two questions.

First, what other remedies are available to U.S. shippers beyond better data information?

My second question, which was asked earlier this week by one of my colleagues, is this: should our Canadian government prioritize transportation in its NAFTA negotiations? We're in the midst of that and we're discussing transportation issues. Embedded in that are trade issues, and we know that we're going to have discussions here in Canada at the end of next week.

Perhaps you could answer those questions for me.

Mr. François Tougas:

On the last one as to whether we should prioritize transportation in NAFTA, the systems are very different. I don't think that the goal, or even an important goal of NAFTA would be to harmonize our rail transportation policy and systems. They are very, very different. I think that would be a pretty darned tall order to try to do, particularly in the current environment. I think we have enough troubles at home that I would make a priority dealing with the domestic issues that we're facing in rail transportation. There are plenty of those to go around. My whole career is built on it. I depend on these problems, so do my kids.

On the first question, whether the remedies exist for U.S. carriers, I think you would hear from American shippers that they would love to have final offer arbitration and don't. They're looking at it. They've been looking at it seriously for a number of years. They don't have it. They have a completely different system. You do have access to a rate reasonableness mechanism before the Surface Transportation Board, and it's used. It's more rule-oriented down there, not surprisingly, than our system is, but they have access to that.

They have all that data, and they have another thing. The Mississippi is a brilliant of example of this. I heard the rail carriers on Monday talking about all this alleged other competition that we have in Canada. By the way, in case they missed it, there's no river in the west that goes to Vancouver from the Prairies, so there is no river competition, but in the Mississippi you have all seven class I railways touching it, or going down that spine. You have the river traffic and you have truck traffic. That's a competitive environment. That's what it looks like when you have a bunch of players. Welcome to reality. In Canada, with a very diverse geography—and by diverse I mean topographically and by the remoteness of our industries—we just need to have a system that deals with the remedies.

If you take just LHI by way of example again, if you want to make that remedy work for people who are remote—and this is where our production facilities are, particularly in the bulk resource sector—in the grain sector these are so remote that they need a remedy, because we're not building any new railways. That is not going to happen. We cannot do that in North America, so we have to rely on the systems that we have now.

Going back to the short-line point earlier, infrastructure is very hard to come by. Giving that up, I think, is a huge mistake. Whenever we have an ability to maintain infrastructure, I think we should. I don't know that we should go to the extent of subsidizing all that activity. Somebody smarter than me is going to have to figure that out. I would definitely make the remedies that we have available for our infrastructure work in a way that makes it accessible and viable for shippers to use in those circumstances. You also heard earlier that nobody's lining up to do this stuff. We don't have hordes of shippers trying to get access to the remedies, waiting for their turn. This is the most reluctant thing they do in their business, so when they use it, it's because it's a last resort and it has to be viable.

(1505)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would like to continue the conversation with Mr. Tougas.

It seems to me that you quietly debunked a myth, in your opening remarks, and I want to make sure that I have understood correctly.

You say that we are not in a process of harmonizing the U.S. system and the Canadian system. At most, Bill C-49 helps us compare ourselves to what is being done in the United States, and my understanding is that this is not really beneficial.

Is that the idea behind what you said? [English]

Mr. François Tougas:

I will answer that by saying that while our systems are very different, to the extent that we have an opportunity to grab better systems from other places, I think we should do so. If somebody has a better idea, we should do it, and right now they have a data disclosure system that is better than ours. It's not great, but it's better than ours. We should grab that, and we should fix it so that we can make it usable in our system. Bringing it holus-bolus, the way it is right now, into Canada, I don't think accomplishes a ton of stuff. Worse than that is that we're not grabbing it all, we're only grabbing part of it. For example, we've left off the commodity list, you don't have to report commodities. So what if all boxcars moved at this speed this week? That's one of the things that's going to be reported. Who cares? You need it corridor by corridor. You need it railway by railway. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I think that confirms my thoughts.

If I may, I have a friendly little criticism. You answered a question by someone—seemingly not someone at the table—asking you which of your amendments you would prioritize. By doing so, you shrunk our playing field.

Did you agree to do so because it's really the priority, or are the recommendations you have submitted part of a coherent set that would help us become a leader instead of a pale copy?

(1510)

[English]

Mr. François Tougas:

My recommendations do not all stand together. You could take one out and the rest would work. They're not a whole. I prioritized them because people came up to me—nobody here from this committee—and asked me, “If you could only have one, which one would it be?”

I've said the one that it would be, because I'm looking at it. We have an LHI bill in front of us, essentially, and if it's is going to go through, fixed or unfixed, then the other remedy that gets used is final offer arbitration. There's only one rate remedy, final offer arbitration, and that is it. If we're not going to fix the LHI system, you have to make the FOA system work better than it's currently working. That's all I'm saying. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

We have completed our first round and have a few minutes left. Does anyone on this side have any pertinent questions that you seek answers to?

Then I'll look over to this side. Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I don't know if anybody is in a position to answer this question. I you look at our two national railways, CN and CP, unlike their American cousins they cross the border and they have routes very deep into the United States. I have to wonder out loud if there are some things they do in the States that somehow disadvantage their operations here in Canada. Is there preference given to what they are able to do down there that somehow works against our interests here?

If nobody has a really good idea, I wouldn't want you to speculate on something such as this, but I'll just put it out there.

An hon. member: That's a great question.

Mr. François Tougas:

I'm embarrassed to admit that I don't actually know the answer to that question. It's rare that I don't have an opinion, but I don't.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you.

The Chair:

That's it. You've been a great group of people. Thank you very much.

I wouldn't want to have to rate all the panels, because all of you have been very informative.

We will now suspend for our next panel to commence.

(1510)

(1525)

The Chair:

Could all the members please take their seats? Thank you very much.

Welcome to our next witnesses. We will very much appreciate listening to you and having your very helpful comments, I hope, on Bill C-49.

We will open the floor with the Seafarers' International Union of Canada. Mr. Given, would you like to start off?

Mr. James Given (President, Seafarers' International Union of Canada):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair. Thank you for having us here today, members of the committee.

My name is Jim Given. I am the president of Seafarers' International Union, and I'm also chair of the Cabotage Task Force worldwide for the International Transport Workers' Federation. .

The SIU is concerned about the proposed amendments to the Coasting Trade Act that build upon amendments to the act put forward through the CETA implementation bill, Bill C-30. They will allow, for the first time, foreign vessels to engage in maritime cabotage without first having to obtain a coasting trade waiver.

The Coasting Trade Act requires that no foreign ship or non-duty ship engage in cabotage without a licence. The broad definition of coasting trade under the act means that maritime activity of a commercial nature in Canadian waters is restricted to Canadian-flagged vessels, including the carriage of goods and passengers by ship from one place in Canada to another. Under the current system, a foreign ship may be imported into Canada to engage in coasting trade if the Canadian Transportation Agency, on application, determines that no available or suitable Canadian-flagged or Canadian-crewed vessel can be used for the required operation.

Changes to the Coasting Trade Act by Bill C-30 will now allow foreign ships owned by European Union citizens or flagged by a European Union member state to engage in the following cabotage activities without a coasting trade waiver: transporting empty containers between two Canadian ports, dredging activities, and the carriage of goods between the ports of Halifax and Montreal as one leg of the importation or exportation of goods to or from Canada.

In addition, subclause 70(1) of Bill C-49 would further amend the Coasting Trade Act to allow any foreign vessel, regardless of flag, to perform the repositioning of empty containers between Canadian ports without obtaining a coasting trade licence.

As a labour union that represents Canadian seafarers working in the Canadian seafaring industry, the SIU cannot support these amendments, because they actively undermine legislation in place to support the domestic Canadian maritime industry and Canadian shipowners.

We strongly support maintaining the current coasting trade waiver system, which already includes a waiver system for foreign vessels. This method ensures the fair practice of giving Canadian shipowners who employ Canadian seafarers the first right of refusal for any available work.

The SIU has previously stated that giving away cabotage rights to the European Union through CETA was an unnecessary concession that has the potential to cause harm to the Canadian seafaring industry.

Canada already has a liberalized version of maritime cabotage, and further relaxation of these restrictions, specifically those involving dredging and feeder services between Canadian ports, does not benefit Canadian shipowners or Canadian seafarers who depend on competitive Canadian labour and domestic market trade for their livelihoods.

Further to these issues are the specific concessions allowing both first and second registry vessels to gain access to the Canadian market. As announced by Minister Garneau, the proposed amendment to allow the movement of empty containers by any vessel, regardless of flag, was done at the request of one shipping federation in Canada, which represents very few or no Canadian-flagged shipping operators. While the SIU does not speak on behalf of Canadian shipowners, it is troublesome to us and our membership that the majority of proposals and concerns from Canadian shipowners and Canadian seafarers appear to have been ignored in favour of one organization representing global shipping agents in Canada.

The domestic maritime industry is a source of direct and indirect employment for over 100,000 Canadians. When discussing global shipping, it is important to distinguish that the Canadian vessel registry, or Canadian first registry, is much more advanced in terms of working conditions and requirements than the majority of global maritime flag states. Global shipping is a highly unregulated industry and one that has seen deteriorating labour and wage conditions define it increasingly over the years. For example, some first registries, and many second registries, are qualified by the ITF, the International Transport Workers' Federation, as being flag of convenience vessels. What this translates to is an underpaid and under-represented work force of mostly third world seafarers who work in an unsafe and unregulated industry with few to no working regulations in place.

In Canada, a maritime accident involving an FOC vessel could lead to months or even years of trying to track down the true owner just to begin the process of seeking compensation, which we know, through experience, is never actually achieved.

Second vessel registries are so under-regulated that a vessel registered in a second registry of an EU country is not even permitted to operate cabotage inside its own flag state. Allowing second registered vessels to operate cabotage inside another country's domestic market is not a common practice and not one Canada should be responsible for initiating.

(1530)



This is a major global issue that has yet to be dealt with in a sufficient and acceptable way to secure the safety and well-being of all seafarers. To allow this sort of shipping to take place, unrestricted, inside Canada’s domestic maritime industry would be unprecedented. The SIU of Canada is actively involved in securing the rights of all seafarers working in Canada. We will work diligently to ensure that any foreign vessel brought into Canada to operate in Canadian cabotage is in compliance with federal standards of labour, and ensure that foreign crews are being paid the prevailing industry wage and being protected as stipulated by the temporary foreign worker program.

We remain concerned about oversight when it comes to foreign vessels operating in Canada. Establishing an effective monitoring and enforcement regime will be essential to ensure full compliance with the conditions and requirements of the new market access provisions of the Coasting Trade Act. In order for Canadian domestic stakeholders to remain competitive, there must be a system to ensure that foreign operators are strictly adhering to Canadian rules and standards, including labour standards and prevailing wage conditions for the crew, and not flag state law.

Again, the SIU's priority is to ensure that Canadian workers have opportunities for employment in the Canadian maritime industy. We believe the proposed amendments to the Coasting Trade Act contained in Bill C-49 undermine the importance of maintaining cabotage restrictions in place to protect Canadian maritime transportation, strengthen commercial trade, and maintain a qualified pool of domestic maritime workers. While securing employment opportunities for Canadian seafarers remains the primary mandate for the SIU, we also have a responsibility to ensure that all seafarers, both domestic and foreign, are properly treated. Canadian seafarers have an international reputation for being the most well-trained and highly qualified maritime workers in the world. As such, Canadian seafarers and Canadian vessel operators should reserve the right to retain the first opportunity to engage in any domestic maritime operations prior to permitting access to foreign operators.

We remain committed to working with our partners in government in order to establish a workable and acceptable solution to the growing amount of trade in Canadian ports. We believe Canada’s international trade ambitions can be achieved while supporting a strong domestic shipping policy that does not facilitate unrestricted market access to foreign vessel operators. Without a strong Canadian domestic fleet crewed and operated by Canadians, our country would be dependent on foreign shipping companies to move goods to, from, and within Canada, with no commitment to uninterrupted service.

On behalf of the Seafarers’ International Union, we once again thank the committee for having us here. I will close by saying that this is a very welcome change to be sitting at this table in front of the committee. We thank you for that.

(1535)

The Chair:

You're welcome.

Next is Ms. Clark from Fraser River Pile & Dredge.

Ms. Sarah Clark (Chief Executive Officer, Fraser River Pile & Dredge (GP) Inc.):

Thank you.

Good afternoon. My name is Sarah Clark, and I serve as president and chief executive officer of Fraser River Pile & Dredge, located in Vancouver, British Columbia. Our company proudly conducts dredging operations in B.C. and across the country. I would like to thank the chair and the honourable members of the committee for hearing us today.

I'm actually here to speak to you on behalf of a coalition of dredging companies that operate from coast to coast. I'm going to share my time today with my friend and colleague Jean-Philippe Brunet, the executive vice-president of corporate and legal affairs for Ocean group of Quebec. We sincerely thank you for the opportunity to present our views on the consequences of amending the Coasting Trade Act as outlined in Bill C-49. For us, this is a fresh opportunity to be heard on the impacts of the amendments to the Coasting Trade Act, an opportunity we previously had in respect to amendments to the same act, under Bill C-30, the Canada-E.U. comprehensive economic trade agreement implementation act.

To be very clear from the onset, the Canadian dredgers are eager to compete in a marketplace fuelled by healthy trade relationships. We simply ask that we continue to compete on a level playing field, where risks and opportunities are equal for all. Unfortunately, CETA was a bad deal for Canadian dredgers. There's no reciprocity for us in the European market, but there's streamlined access for Europeans in the Canadian market. We therefore submit that Bill C-49 represents an ideal opportunity to address this inequity and provide workable policy solutions.

Let me say a few words about the dredging industry in Canada and the critical role it plays for Canada as a maritime and trading nation. Ours is a geographically expansive country that relies on a complex transportation network to move people and goods. As stated by Minister Garneau on May 16 of this year, Canadians rely on the economically viable modes of transportation to travel and move commodities within the country, across the border, and to our ports for overseas shipments. At his announcement regarding the trade and transportation corridors initiative on July 4, Minister Garneau highlighted the digging of deepwater ports as being critical to the development of Canada's north, underscoring the essential role dredging plays in the creation and maintenance of our transportation network and, as a result, our national and economic sovereignty.

Opening routes to Canadian and international shipping vessels brings consumer goods to Canadian markets and takes our export products around the world. Without dredging, ports in major cities across the country would be inaccessible to global trade and transportation. Industry operations, both coastal and inland, would not be able to function. The companies that comprise our coalition actively comply with rigorous government regulations concerning labour, environmental protection, safety, and operating standards while regularly submitting to routine major inspections that are amongst the most rigorous in the world. Canadian dredging companies also provide well-paid, middle-class salaries, which in turn fuel local economies across the country.

We are here with you today to do our part to ensure that the Canadian dredging industry is provided a level playing field on which to compete sustainably and responsibly, to create more jobs, and to continue to contribute practically to Canada's economic success. Unfortunately, these important goals have been put at some risk by the effect of the proposed amendments to the Coasting Trade Act contained in Bill C-49. Proposals in Bill C-49 are of course contingent upon the coming into force of elements of Bill C-30 on September 21, 2017. We understand that the spirit of CETA reflects the wishes of both governing bodies and peoples to create better economic ties and a more prosperous future. We support the government's effort to expand trade and to make our economy as vibrant as possible. At the same time, we wish again to express our concerns about the negative impact. We believe the amendments to the Coasting Trade Act contained in Bill C-30 unfairly advantage foreign dredging companies at the expense of Canadian firms, Canadian workers, and ultimately, Canada's transportation infrastructure. Bill C-49 builds on a foundation laid by Bill C-30 that is highly problematic for Canadian dredgers.

As I've said, we are fully prepared to compete. We do so every day in our industry, both in Canada and abroad. Under CETA, there was no negotiated reciprocity for our industry.

(1540)



CETA opens up the Canadian market to European firms while keeping the European market closed to Canadian dredging firms. This would normally be considered an unpleasant by-product of doing business in the global market, but several factors intervene to create a situation where non-Canadian firms could gain a structural and market advantage over Canadian firms. If a level playing field is not created and maintained, Canadian dredging companies will face structural disadvantages when bidding on contracts, as we pay market rates and benefits that reflect the skills of our crew members in Canada.

For example, foreign crews are typically compensated at about a third or less of the rates we pay. In 2015, the average monthly salary for a chief engineer on a Canadian vessel was $15,000 U.S., while the same position on a Dutch crew was about $7,000 U.S. As salaries represent about one-third of our vessel's operating costs, non-Canadian companies will operate at a significant advantage over Canadian companies, leaving Canadian seafarers out of work. In this scenario, the playing field is inherently uneven, to the detriment of Canadian companies, and, ultimately, to our employees and their families.

Prior to Bill C-30, foreign-flagged vessels were required via the Coasting Trade Act to obtain a coasting trade licence. Jim outlined that process very well in his presentation, which would include paying duties, and following shipping conventions, worker visa requirements, and employment standards. However, even that structure faced monitoring and enforcement challenges. Under CETA, non-Canadian dredgers will have greater access to our waters, and therefore greater opportunity for non-compliance.

Before making our key recommendations, I will now ask my colleague, Jean-Philippe Brunet, to say a few words about Quebec in particular. [Translation]

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet (Executive Vice-President, Corporate and Legal Affairs, Ocean):

Good afternoon.

The dredging market in Quebec is very small. We are talking about some 200,000 cubic metres out of a total 3 million cubic metres in Canada. The dredging season is very short—from April to June and from September to November. There are not many major contracts. A number of us are competing for those contracts. The largest contract would be about 50,000 cubic metres. Those are the contracts Europeans are interested in securing. They are not interested in small contracts.

However, those 50,000-cubic-metre contracts help us depreciate the equipment that requires a lot of investments, as well as offer small marinas good prices.

It should be understood that 80% of the global market, with the exception of China and the United States, is controlled by four European dredgers. They call the shots around the world. They have very significant response capabilities.

We work all along the St. Lawrence River. We go to small and large places. We provide our employees with very beneficial jobs, helping them have a very worthwhile career. We are also trying to develop the foreign market to ensure that we can employ them year around.

Thank you. [English]

Ms. Sarah Clark:

Today, we've highlighted a number of issues associated with the proposed and recently enacted amendments to the Coasting Trade Act. However, we would not come to you with problems were we not also prepared to recommend solutions we believe are reasonable and fair to all.

First, we ask that this committee recommend to the government the establishment of an operational enforcement protocol, led by Transport Canada, binding on the deputy ministers of all relevant departments and agencies. I wish to be clear that we are not seeking the establishment of a new enforcement arm of government. To do so would not be fiscally prudent or organizationally necessary. We simply ask that the government take note of the number and seriousness of the enforcement issues at play where foreign crews on foreign-flagged vessels are concerned. These include temporary foreign workers through IRCC and CBSA, a labour market impact assessment through ESDC, tax administration through CRA, safety inspections through Transport Canada, labour practices through ESDC, and workplace health and safety issues through ESDC, to say nothing of wage disparity and pressure.

Departments must speak to each other, and they must co-operate rapidly and meaningfully in order to enforce an intersecting group of important laws. It's not enough just to have done that inspection of the vessel or to check for its basic safety. We are assured that many of the positions on our vessels would be subject to visas for temporary foreign workers, and to be able to fully police that will take an effort of coordination across departments. After two years of engagement with the government, we have yet to see a concrete plan of action for enforcement. Right now, interdepartmental coordination is not governed by a clear process. It is under-resourced and puts the onus on the industry and workers to help police our waters. To us, this seems unacceptable for Canada as a modern maritime trading nation.

Second, we ask the committee to seek from the Government of Canada a firm commitment that enforcement will be funded appropriately and meaningfully, to ensure that Canadian dredgers can compete on a fair and level playing field with non-Canadian vessels, whether it be with respect to—

(1545)

The Chair:

Ms. Clark, my apologies for interrupting. Could you do your closing remarks? We've passed your 10 minutes.

Ms. Sarah Clark:

Yes. Thank you.

Our final recommendation is that this committee seek a firm commitment from government in the form of a formal mandate to Canadian NAFTA negotiators to seek reciprocity with the U.S. and Mexico for Canadian dredgers and related operators.

Let me be clear. In the wake of CETA, what is at stake here is the basic viability of the Canadian dredging industry. Reciprocity is the entire point of free trade. Let Canada be a champion of full reciprocity on the water for our industry, our workers, and all who seek to make Canada a world leader in dredging and maritime trade.

We thank committee members sincerely for their consideration.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Clark.

We now have Mr. Fournier, from the St. Lawrence Shipoperators. [Translation]

Mr. Martin Fournier (Executive Director, St. Lawrence Shipoperators):

Madam Chair, ladies and gentlemen members of the committee, thank you for giving us an opportunity to share our comments and concerns with respect to Bill C-49, and more specifically the amendments proposed to the Coasting Trade Act.

I will introduce myself. I am Martin Fournier, Executive Director of St. Lawrence Shipoperators, an association whose mission is to represent and promote the interests of Canadian ship operators in order to support their growth and ensure the development of shipping on the St. Lawrence River.

St. Lawrence Shipoperators consists of 15 members—15 Canadian ship operators that have a fleet of more than 130 vessels that employ Canadian sailors. The fleet navigates the St. Lawrence River, the Great Lakes and the east coast, in addition to serving the Atlantic and Arctic provinces. Our members provide thousands of people with quality jobs and generate significant economic spinoffs in Canada.

According to a study carried out by the Council of Canadian Academies, the Canadian shipping industry employs between 78,000 and 99,000 individuals and generates between $3.7 billion and $4.6 billion in employment income. Just the activities of the inland fleet, which operates on the St. Lawrence River and in the Great Lakes—the area generally covered by our members—create more than 44,000 direct jobs and generate more than $2 billion in provincial and federal revenues. Therefore, the domestic marine industry plays a a key role in the competitiveness and prosperity of Canada and of the entire North American economy.

It is important to point out that marine transport operations between various Canadian ports are covered under the Coasting Trade Act, whose aims include supporting domestic marine interests by reserving the coasting trade of Canada to Canadian registered vessels. That information comes directly from Transport Canada's website. Among other things, the act stipulates that transportation between two Canadian ports must be provided by Canadian-flagged vessels with Canadian crews.

In the United States, since 1920, the Merchant Marine Act, better known as the Jones Act, has been protecting the U.S. domestic marine industry by ensuring that coasting trade is handled by U.S.-built vessels that are U.S.-flagged and U.S.-owned, and are operated by U.S. crews. Many other countries around the world, including European countries, have laws that protect their market.

It should be noted that, during the negotiations that led to the economic agreement with Europe, countries of the European Union did not open their market to Canadian ship operators. Only Canada agreed to concede a portion of its market, with no reciprocity.

When a country opens its market to foreign partners that do not operate based on the same rules and are not subject to the same requirements as Canadian ship operators with Canadian-flagged vessels, that favours foreign ship operators at the expense of the very competitiveness of our ship operators and domestic interests.

According to a study carried out in 2015 by Ernst & Young and Innovation maritime, the crew costs for European vessels authorized to operate in Canadian waters under the economic agreement represent only 30% of the costs of a Canadian crew. The wage gap between Canadian crews and crews from other countries, including those provided for under Bill C-49, will be even larger.

This is the second time in less than a year that amendments have been proposed to the Coasting Trade Act. The first time was under Bill C-30, which concerns the implementation of the economic agreement with Europe. The second time was through this bill, which makes certain concessions for the European Union that are criticized by the domestic marine industry.

Canada must also take action to protect its marine industry and refuse to give up its market to foreign companies. This is a matter of the vitality and sustainability of Canada's domestic shipping industry.

I want to mention that, during the latest electoral campaign, the Liberal Party wrote to us that it had no intention of amending the Coasting Trade Act and even recognized the importance of the act for the market. St. Lawrence Shipoperators feels that free trade agreements generally benefit the Canadian economy and supports Canada's efforts to increase trade and the competitiveness of its economy. However, we are concerned about the consequences of loopholes in the Coasting Trade Act and concessions made in trade agreement negotiations that affect the domestic marine sector.

St. Lawrence Shipoperators and its members, as well as a number of stakeholders and industry representatives that participated in the work of the industry-government working group on the implementation of the economic agreement, have repeatedly expressed their concern with regard to the system's effectiveness and the measures currently in place to monitor and effectively control foreign vessels' coasting trade activities. Many examples and situations justify those concerns. The addition of new coasting trade activities in the economic agreement or any further opening of the Coasting Trade Act is of little comfort in that regard.

(1550)



We have requested the establishment of an oversight system on a number of occasions. The request was also made to the Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade, which studied Bill C-30. There was even a recommendation to that effect.

So it is essential that an oversight system be established and that it include all the government departments and agencies involved, meaning Transport Canada, the Canada Border Services Agency, the Canadian Transportation Agency, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, and Employment and Social Development Canada.

St. Lawrence Shipoperators has always been opposed to any opening of the Coasting Trade Act that would allow foreign vessels to transport cargo between two Canadian ports. Unfortunately, we are witnessing a gradual erosion of the act.

This market is reserved for Canadian vessels that, pursuant to regulatory requirements and Canadian standards, are designed, built and refined to handle the numerous challenges of navigation in Canadian waters and waterways. With their adherence to those standards, some of the highest in the world, Canadian vessels are making navigation safe and protecting the environment. These national vessels are operated by crews that are solely and exclusively composed of Canadian mariners, who are among the best qualified and best trained in the world. They are knowledgeable of and experienced in navigation in Canadian waters and they are aware of the challenges inherent in sailing here. Reaching those high standards ensures greater safety and respect for the environment. But that comes with significant operating costs that Canadian shipowners must bear, unlike many other foreign owners.

The particular circumstances of the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence Seaway, economically and in terms of both maritime and environmental safety, requires that the protection measures, of which the Coasting Trade Act is part, must be maintained.

So it is important to preserve maritime jobs and the expertise that has been built in Canada over centuries. Opening the Coasting Trade Act is risking the loss of priceless knowledge and economic wealth that is of direct benefit to companies and workers here.

For those reasons, St. Lawrence Shipoperators and its members oppose any opening of the Coasting Trade Act and any change to it. We are asking for a single body to control and oversee cabotage activities to be conducted in Canadian waters by foreign vessels.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you all very much.

We'll move on to our first questioner, Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I want to thank our witnesses for joining us today. It is good to turn our attention to another part of Bill C-49 which sees the Coasting Trade Act amended.

I have a couple of questions. They're probably broad questions that any one of you could answer. The first is, can you identify for this committee how Bill C-49 goes further than Bill C-30?

(1555)

Mr. James Given:

I'll attempt it, just because I like to talk.

Bill C-30 deals with the EU and with CETA and is limited to EU first and second registry vessels. If you look at the expansion of the movement of empty containers, it's being opened up to any flag vessel, which would be Panama, Liberia, all of the FOC flag states.

I look at a flag such as that of the Marshall Islands, which many ships that would be trading in this trade fly. The actual flag state of the Marshall Islands is in Reston, Virginia. That's where you pay to get the Marshall Islands flag mailed to you. It goes, then, from the European Union to all flag states.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Would anybody else like to provide an answer?

No? Okay.

I thought I heard one of you say that you had received assurances that the Coasting Trade Act would not be amended during the review of the Canada Transportation Act. Were you consulted, then, on the amendments that you see in Bill C-49? [Translation]

Mr. Martin Fournier:

No, we were not consulted about Bill C-49. [English]

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay.

Then I would ask, can you provide me with either a real or a hypothetical example of what will happen if this provision passes? What are some of the implications of this to your industries? [Translation]

Mr. Martin Fournier:

At the beginning, when we heard what was included in the economic agreement with Europe, one of our concerns was that it was going to open a crack in the Coasting Trade Act. We were afraid that the crack would grow bigger. Bill C-49 shows that our fears were justified, because we are told that opening the Coastal Trade Act to the shipping of empty containers does not just apply to European vessels, but also to vessels of all flags.

So we can already see the crack getting bigger. What is coming next? We do not know, but we are expecting other demands along those lines that will widen even more the scope of the concessions that have been made as part of the agreement with Europe. [English]

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Does anybody else want to answer that?

Mr. James Given:

When you look at the industry as a whole and you start opening up cabotage to foreign carriers, it has a snowball effect. The rates conditions and working conditions on board foreign-flag vessels, and some of these are actually first registry European vessels, second registry European vessels, and especially Ethos sea vessels, are far below what the standard is in Canada.

We have vessels that are currently... There's one in Vancouver where the wage rates on board are as little as $2.50 per hour. We have other scenarios where we go from $1.75 an hour and up. When you look at the working conditions, the safety conditions, the environmental standards, and everything else on board these vessels, it's very lax.

There is no international control on flag of convenience vessels. That's why they're called flag of convenience. The owner of the vessel is in one country. The beneficial owner, the registered owner, is in another country. Their crew could be from three or four different countries. The insurance agent is from another country. There are layers and layers in order not to get to that real beneficial owner.

I'll keep this brief. We've had situations where people have been hanged on board ships, on flag of convenience ships, in order for them to avoid Canadian standards or any other standards. There is a huge discrepancy and there is no control over what goes on aboard those ships, because a lot of it is left to flag state control.

When you look at the flag of convenience countries, the flag state control does not exist. A seafarer who is injured, a seafarer who is cheated wages, a seafarer who has anything on board that ship, who lacks food, who lacks anything, has to look at an outside resource such as the ITF in order to try and get that fixed, and it's a long difficult process because it's the Wild West in shipping.

Shipping was the first globalization industry, and we certainly understand trade. We understand everything else. Our industry is built on trade, but you cannot compare Canadian flag and Canadian conditions, which thank God we're in Canada, to an FOC or a foreign-flag vessel.

(1600)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Do you have something to add?

Ms. Sarah Clark:

I have a good example of this. The current vessel that we use now for dredging the Fraser River was purchased from one of the European dredging companies. It was flagged in a port of convenience. We spent millions of dollars to bring that vessel to Transport Canada's safety standards, especially in the area of fire separation which was non-existent within the vessel. Not only did we bring it up to current Canadian standards so that the crew were protected should a fire break out on the vessel, the crew is also trained to a very high level in firefighting. When they're out in the middle of the Fraser they can't rely on someone coming to rescue them, nor in the middle of the St. Lawrence.

Our crews are doing two fire drills a month covering scenarios that they may encounter in engine rooms, etc. It's not simply an exercise with a fire extinguisher. They are fully trained firefighters on board. They are already on a vessel that has been brought up to today's standards. What Jim is saying is those vessels that we're competing against or we could be competing with, are not built necessarily to the standards, nor are they training their crews to those standards.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

On to Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I have to say as well, thank you, folks, for coming out today. You represent the “how” of executing trade quota strategies. I again want to thank you for that, for being here, but as well for the future efforts you guys are going to participate in to really ensure that those strategies are put in place and executed.

Mr. Given, you answered the first question I was going to ask, and that was on labour conditions. I've always looked at things under a triple bottom line lens: economic, environmental, and social. In your opening dialogue you talked about the economics of this issue. You talked about, to some extent, the environmental side of it as it relates to an integrated transportation network that includes shipping, which of course is the most environmentally friendly mode of transport. The last part was social and labour, and of course you touched on that.

The next part I want to touch on, the question to all of you, is how then the dollars follow the strategy. Currently, as part of Bill C-49, we are looking at positioning Canadian ports to be allowed to access the Canada infrastructure bank, which includes financial instruments to help fund expansion, sustainable infrastructure projects—somewhat the business you're in, Ms. Clark—to ensure that dredging occurs in those areas that need to be expanded upon for bigger vessels with a lot more draught needed. Do you feel that this will be of assistance to Canadian ports being more competitive? That's my first question.

I want to expand my question to also include, not just Canadian ports, but the world of ports. There's an anomaly that we call the St. Lawrence Seaway. I say anomaly because, at least in my part of the world, the Welland Canal, albeit a port, is not technically considered a port.

To some extent, when it comes to its management of asset, in my opinion, it's not up to par, not being abided by. Therefore my question is, when you take all of that into consideration as part of the whole network, do you think, firstly, that under Bill C-49 it is appropriate to have those dollars available to the Canada infrastructure bank? Secondly, is it appropriate to have investment dollars at the ready to expand the St. Lawrence as well as the Welland Canal?

Ms. Sarah Clark:

I can't speak for the Welland Canal, but I can speak for the west coast, which has highly competitive ports, not only Vancouver but also Prince Rupert. Our company just finished the expansion in Prince Rupert a month ago.

For Canadian ports to have access to increased funding I think is very appropriate. I know that they have had struggles with their debt room in the past, and we fully back their being able to have access to the types of funds they need to keep the west coast of Canada as competitive or more competitive.

Maybe you want to speak about it. [Translation]

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Any additional money that serves to strengthen the maritime system would be welcome. Currently, some east-coast ports, in Quebec, are in a sad state in a number of respects. We have activities in all those ports. The port of Quebec City, which is one of the oldest, has difficulty in maintaining its wharves. We are regularly asked to shut down some areas of activity because the wharf is in bad condition. So, the system certainly needs money and that would be a good thing.

I wanted to tell Mrs. Block about one of our concerns about the opening of the European market that has happened, and that we can see in this bill. I feel that it should be of interest to everyone. The Europeans are going to be able to come to Canada with foreign equipment. We have been assured that there are going to be all kinds of ways to make sure that the equipment is adequate. However, if there is foreign equipment for private contracts, it is also going to come with foreign workers.

It has to be a fair fight. We are not afraid of competition, but give us the chance to be competitive. When you implement the agreement, do it in no uncertain terms and tell the Europeans how things are going to work here. That is very important for us.

(1605)

[English]

Mr. James Given:

Mr. Badawey, you talked about the St. Lawrence Seaway and especially the Welland Canal. It's an area that I think is close to both of our hearts, since we're from that area. I think this is one area where we agree.

When you look at port infrastructures, when you look at the Welland Canal, when you look at the seaway property along the canal, this is where your international freight and domestic freight complement each other, where you have international trade and domestic trade working together. Those ports need to be developed. There needs to be money put into them. The development has to continue in order to facilitate the trade that the country wants and that the workforce wants. Domestically and internationally they can work hand in hand to do that. I'm glad you raised the Welland Canal. It has always baffled me why that property isn't developed, because it used to be booming along there.

The Chair:

You have 45 seconds.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

This is the last question, with respect. I want to hear from Mr. Fournier as well.

Right now you represent an area of the country that's very valuable to this entire bill strategy. What are your thoughts on the social, the environment, and of course, the economic issues, the benefits this bill is bringing forward to then contribute ultimately to the overall transportation strategy? [Translation]

Mr. Martin Fournier:

Actually, a strong maritime industry has infrastructure to match the transportation needs. That means having ships that meet the highest standards in terms of energy and operational efficiency. It also means having crews that are well trained and that meet the highest standards. A strong maritime industry has all those aspects: social, environmental and economic. That is how we will be able to develop the Canadian maritime industry and make sure that it prospers. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go on to Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My thanks to each one of you for being here.

I confess that I do not have a lot of questions on the basic content of your testimony, because I share your position. However, I do have some questions on the industry, so that I can understand it better.

I would like to explore the issue of the Canada Infrastructure Bank that Mr. Badawey was talking about. It seems to be well-received, since it is seen as a source of funding. However, the information we have at the moment indicates that port projects to be funded by the Canada Infrastructure Bank would be for $100 million and more.

In the port in the city I represent, Trois-Rivières, projects of $100 million and more are very rare. Perhaps the port of Vancouver has some that go over $100 million, but the Canada Infrastructure Bank is of no use with projects with a budget lower than that.

Is this not another case of what looked great the night before does not look at all good in the morning, as seems to be the case with Bill C-49? Or do you have projects that are worth that much?

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

We do not represent ports. So the projects are not—

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I know, but your industries could access it.

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

It could certainly include dredging work, for example. Perhaps it would be appropriate to amend the program so that more projects could be included; $100 million is a lot of money. At the same time, it is not a lot given the scale of the work that needs to be done. With the exception of the port of Vancouver, which is in good shape, other ports probably need significant investment.

(1610)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Mr. Fournier, in one of your recommendations, you mentioned the importance of a single body. Could you explain that recommendation some more? What would be involved and why is it important?

Mr. Martin Fournier:

What we are asking for is, when a foreign vessel arrives here and applies to engage in cabotage in Canadian waters, we make sure that it has all—

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Are you talking about dredging?

Mr. Martin Fournier:

I am talking about everything, coastal shipping and dredging. If the vessel is coming to do work that is currently governed by the Coasting Trade Act, we are asking that, once it has arrived, it can submit a proper application so that we can check whether it has received all the permits from Employment and Social Development Canada, and that the risk factors posed by the workers can be checked. Work permits also have to be checked, and we have to be sure that the crew will be paid according to Canadian standards and at Canadian rates.

All those things have to be verified before a vessel is given permission and, if so, the permission has to be validated regularly. We know that, in the past, vessels have conducted activities here without having a permit.

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

We are not asking for a new agency to be created, but we are asking that there be real oversight, culminating in final permission from Transport Canada and Employment and Social Development Canada. It is not complicated.

Mr. Martin Fournier:

Actually, those requests are made at the moment, but no one makes sure that everything has been completed before the final authorization is issued. Doing it that way would make sure that there is some rigorous control.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you,

I have a technical question, I completely understand the difference between some vessels that fly foreign flags and Canadian vessels in terms of working conditions and a number of requirements.

But, how about a vessel belonging to a Canadian owner, but flying a foreign flag? Is that vessel subject to Canadian rules or the rules of the country it represents?

Mr. Martin Fournier:

It is subject to the rules of the country whose flag it is flying. If it is registered in a foreign country, it follows the rules of the country whose flag it is flying.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Are you saying that a Canadian shipowner could provide conditions that are equivalent to those in the country where the vessel is registered?

Mr. Martin Fournier:

Yes, if the vessel flies that flag.

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

If it is involved in cabotage, the sailors have to be Canadian. There is that slight difference. [English]

Ms. Sarah Clark:

May I just add on your question on the infrastructure bank, with projects that are over $100 million, there is an expansion of Deltaport planned by the port of Vancouver that is estimated to be in the $2.5-billion range. That would definitely be a project that the port may seek assistance on. It is also a very good example of where the European dredging community is very focused, because of the amount of dredging which is in that project.

We are a prime candidate to compete for that project. It's something we might even partner with our colleagues at Ocean group on. However, if we can't, it's a very good example of where we might not be able to compete if they are not held to that same level playing field. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

Mr. James Given:

If I may, I wanted to touch on what you talked about with regard to a Canadian owner who owns a foreign-flag ship who decides to flag his ship outside of Canada. There are many. They do it for many reasons, not just crew costs. They do it for taxation. To flag a ship outside of Canada, Liberia or Panama or somewhere, your taxation costs are minimal. You usually pay, like with the Marshall Islands, $1,000 to fly their flag, and thank you very much and have a nice day. They'll tax you a bit on something, but it's not much, not compared to Canada.

You also have safety standards. The International Labour Organization, ILO, and the International Maritime Organization set minimum standards. They're not maximum, they're minimum. Not all flag states participate or are signatory to the ILO conventions. Their wages may actually be below the ILO minimum.

When it comes to the IMO enforcing ballast water, emission treatments, sulphur, you have Canadians who are investing millions and billions of dollars to renew their fleets, to bring those environmental standards up. Whereas the norm is that on the international stage on the older ships, you burn the lowest, cheapest gas you can buy. It's the throwaway that you can't burn anywhere else, and the emissions are high.

If you take Canadian ships as the perfect example, with the new tonnage, the new scrubbers, and the new emission controls, you're taking 500 to 600 trucks off of the road and putting that cargo into a vessel, or dredging with Canadian dredges. Your environmental footprint is less. Your social impact, of course, is doing business in Canada, which we all expect. There are many, many things other than just wage rates. Taxation is a huge one when it comes to flagging the ships offshore.

(1615)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Having negotiated with kids and dogs, I know that things can happen incrementally. You give a little, and all of a sudden you've lost your whole ice cream cone kind of thing. This is the concern that I have with respect to the cabotage issue.

As I understand it, what's being permitted now is for any ship to move empty containers from one port to another. You can correct me if I am wrong Mr. Given, but I understand there are no Canadian ships that are doing this business, or none that are interested in doing it at the price they're willing to pay. In fact today, if empties have to go from Montreal to Halifax, they go by train. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think we're losing out on anything at this point.

My question is, if they get their foot in the door here, what do you see next?

Mr. James Given:

I actually look at this outside of the Montreal-Halifax corridor. A lot of that traffic now goes by train. I know you get into issues sometimes of double-stacking and having to unload to go under underpasses, etc.—the infrastructure.

I look at the north, the Arctic sealift that happens every year with some of our partner companies. They do move some empty containers. The issue is that right now if those containers need to be moved, they can be moved by a foreign ship. They apply for a waiver with the CTA. That waiver application goes out to all the Canadian companies, and it asks whether they have a Canadian-flag vessel that can do this work. If they reply no, then the foreign-flag vessel gets its permit to move whatever they need to move. It's not stopped. Commerce is not stopped because of cabotage.

Another part of the issue that you have to look at is whether a Canadian would do it if there was revenue there. I don't know. I can't speak on behalf of the shipping companies. Knowing the shipping companies the way I do, I'm sure that if there was a buck to be made they would do it.

When you look at the non-revenue basis, they say it costs $2,000 to move an empty container on a Canadian ship and $400 on a foreign ship. Well, absolutely. If we want to give the okay to the exploitation of foreign crew and to the non-payment of taxes and to the non-payment of everything else, you can move a container for $400. Personally, I don't think that's what Canada is all about.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay. Basically, then, the money isn't in it at this point; therefore the Canadian shipping operators for the most part are taking a pass on moving empty containers.

Mr. James Given:

I can't speak to whether they are or aren't. I know that in the Arctic they do; in certain areas they do.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

That would be pretty small potatoes compared with, say, Montreal to Halifax.

Let's move on.

Ms. Clark, on the issue of labour, you and I share a bit of history in some of the projects in Metro Vancouver, notably the Canada Line project, in which there was an Italian contractor digging one or both of the tunnels. I don't know whether they were Italian, but their crew was Itallian, and there was a huge dust-up over the wage rates, etc. We've seen this movie before.

With respect to the dredging, correct me again if I'm wrong, but I understand that there's actually a hurdle, a certain size of project—it has to be of a certain value or above—before a European competitor can bid on it. Is that correct?

Ms. Sarah Clark:

Yes, it's about $7.5 million, which is a very low hurdle.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

It is?

Ms. Sarah Clark:

Yes. That's public. Private doesn't have a hurdle, and ports are considered private.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Ports are considered private.

Looking, then, at your book of business over, say, an average year, what percentage of your projects would be over $7 million, would you say?

Ms. Sarah Clark:

I would say 80%. Our main dredging contract is with the port of Vancouver. We have an 11-year contract to maintain the shipping channel, which is worth over $7.5 million a year.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Is that counted as one job, or is it just a series of—?

Ms. Sarah Clark:

It's counted as one job. Then we do a series of smaller dredging projects on an annual basis. But the larger projects, such as the LNG projects or the expansion of Deltaport terminal 2, are well over that level.

As I said, private doesn't have that hurdle, and we do a lot of private dredging on the river, on the island, and up the coast.

(1620)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Do you think that those contracts would be even big enough to attract their attention?

Ms. Sarah Clark:

It all depends on how they feel they need to set up in Canada to be able to compete on the larger projects and what kind of vessels they have available. It's not just dredging vessels; they can use barges with heavy-duty cranes on them to do dredging as well.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay.

Going back to the example of the Canada Line and some of the others, two of you have mentioned that we need oversight, that we need people monitoring. Do a bit of a deeper dive into that. What sort of things do we need to be taking care of?

Ms. Sarah Clark:

I'm glad you asked that question, Member Hardie. We had a good meeting this morning with Transport Canada as they are trying to work this out.

They right now have advance notification, whereby the firm would put in their application and show that they are eligible to opt out of the coasting trade licence because they are eligible under CETA. It only covers that eligibility.

Then, the other requirements, such as the safety standards, visa requirements, and the taxation, are all managed by other departments. We've been strongly asking for the past two years that there be a mechanism whereby one department takes the lead and coordinates across the other departments informationally to ensure that all those requirements are met, because we can see even under the coasting trade licence that they have struggled interdepartmentally.

When we met with them today, they even emphasized that we the industry are part of the policing mechanism to catch anyone who is in non-compliance. We said that we need to know, then, that these vessels are here. That was one discussion that we had: please notify us.

That is our first recommendation today: that there be a protocol led by Transport Canada to ensure that this coordination goes on.

The Chair:

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Hardie launched down the line of questioning I had sketched out, so forgive me if we're a little bit repetitive, but I'll give you a chance to add a bit more colour. I'll start with Mr. Given.

We had some testimony earlier today that I'm trying to square mentally with what you've just given. It was from someone who was a big advocate for adopting the proposed mechanism in the Coasting Trade Act. We essentially heard that the movement of empty containers by Canadian-flag ships isn't happening and is never going to happen.

I think you've suggested that there may be some examples up north to contradict this, but is this something, under anything like the rules that we have in place today, that you could conceivably see happening?

Mr. James Given:

I've heard the testimony. My point is that Canadian companies right now, under the current coasting trade system, have an opportunity to move them if they want to. If they don't want to, the foreign ship or foreign company that applied for the waiver is free to move them. There are certain ones that do, and I know they go by rail and by truck. I wish they would go by ship. It would be more environmentally friendly.

However, in the north and in some of the other areas where they do, to take that away, I don't understand it, and I simply don't understand why we would expand on something where provisions are already there without opening the coasting trade.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

On that issue, if I recall accurately the testimony from earlier today, she explained the waiver process and said that on at least one occasion what happened was that we put it out and asked if anyone was interested. When somebody says, “Yes, we can do it at this cost,” all of a sudden the economic option for the owner of the containers is to import new containers rather than move them within Canada, which strikes me as a strange inefficiency.

Do you have a comment on whether that's the reality we're facing? Are we going to leave containers sitting empty and bring new ones into Canada?

Mr. James Given:

It's my understanding right now, and I stand to be corrected, that the only company that has provisions to have containers in Canada for more than six months is Maersk Line, through a special provision. Other containers do get moved around. We see the field of them sitting in Montreal. We see the empty containers everywhere along rail yards.

Again, knowing shipping companies, present company excluded, they won't leave anything sitting around too long if they can make a buck.

(1625)

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Let's explore why there's such a cost differential for Canadian-flag ships. You mentioned safety regulations, labour standards, and environmental rules, which are mostly quite good. We've adopted them in Canada because we think they're the right policy. Is it the fear that the foreign-flag ships is not going to comply with Canadian laws in Canadian waters, or is it that they're not going to follow the same standards that drive up the cost for Canadian-flag ships globally?

Mr. James Given:

We've proven that they don't follow the same regulations when they're in Canada. There are two issues at play. The ship gets a coasting trade waiver. That covers the ship. The crew then apply for work visas through the temporary foreign worker program.

There are two separate issues. When we look at Bill C-30, as with Bill C-49, nothing is changing when it comes to the provisions under the immigration act for that crew. The problem is that the crew members are never told what their wages are supposed to be. They're never told what their rights are when they're working in Canada, because under the TFW program, for all intents and purposes, they're Canadians. They're never told any of this, and they're paid their regular wage, which is $2.50 or $1.90. They're paid that until someone catches them. Also, there's no enforcement. No enforcement officer goes down unless they get a call. If you're a foreign crew member and you don't know that, or you're too afraid to call because of repercussions, you're not going to make that call.

We've had some very good discussions with the ESDC over the last little while where we're going to change some of that process. However, ESDC was also very clear with us that it doesn't chase a shipping company around the world to try to collect our tax, because they should be paying taxes while they're in Canada. The taxation issue on a foreign ship is a big one, along with crew costs.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

If I can explore this a little further, at risk of outing myself as an enormous nerd, when we start looking at the freedom of the high seas and going back to 16th century Dutch philosophy, I don't think we can properly enforce anything that's taking place on the high seas. However, if we got to a stage where we could actually say foreign vessels have to abide by the same standards and if we had an effective enforcement mechanism in Canada, is their ability to operate more or less how they want outside of Canadian waters still going to render Canadian-flag ships uneconomical?

Mr. James Given:

That's perhaps an unanswerable question. When you get into international waters, it's covered by international law and the law of the sea. When you get within the 200-mile limit or the 12-mile limit of Canada, the law then changes. However, again, working under cabotage, the crew members on board the ship are, for all intents and purposes, Canadian crew.

The vessel itself is covered by a temporary waiver. They still have to comply with the flag state, if flag state law exists. Then they are covered by IMO conventions that are enforced through port state control within Canada, if they have the resources to actually go down and inspect every vessel and enforce them. Transport Canada does a fantastic job, but remember, Transport Canada has been broke for about 12 years, so they're working with what they have.

Again, the system that is in place now is the one that is best placed to inspect the vessels and to enforce the legislation and the IMO and ILO conventions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Shields.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

We appreciate your being here to inform us.

Mr. Fraser, I would not call you a big nerd, but I'd call you a tall guy.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I was one step away from referencing Hugo Grotius, so we'll wait. You can reserve judgment.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you.

It's an interesting conversation. Do you belong to the international convention that develops the rules out there? Do you belong to the organization? Do you participate in developing those standards?

Mr. James Given:

Actually, I do, through the International Transport Workers' Federation. I'm an expert for them, for the ILO and the IMO.

Mr. Martin Shields:

I understand flag of convenience. I understand how it operates. What percentage of the world operates under the enforced rules that you're talking about and have been part of?

Mr. James Given:

When you look at cabotage, the Center for Seafarers' Rights did a survey for us just a month ago, and we looked at United Nations member countries. Of course, we excluded the countries that were landlocked, and then we looked at the countries that had two ports or more. Sixty-seven per cent of those countries have some form of cabotage. So the idea that cabotage is unique to Canada or we're doing something wrong compared to the rest of the world is false. Sixty-seven per cent of United Nations countries with two or more ports have some form of cabotage.

(1630)

Mr. Martin Shields:

You're talking about labour standards, safety, training—all of those things that are in the IMO that you're involved in developing. What percentage of those countries enforce that?

Mr. James Given:

The traditional maritime nations, when you look at Canada, the United States, Norway.... Sweden is the first registry. Norway is the first registry. Denmark is the first registry. Germany is the first registry. They're not their second registries. Those countries are strong maritime nations. It's when you get into the FOC countries—Liberia, Panama, and all of those countries that don't enforce shit—

Mr. Martin Shields:

I get that.

Mr. James Given:

—it's left up to the rest of the world to try to enforce it.

Yes, I did say that. Excuse me.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Are the countries that are signatories to this, that develop these, enforcing them in their own waters?

Mr. James Given:

Yes, but remember, ILO is a minimum standard.

Mr. Martin Shields: I get that.

Mr. James Given: Let's take the Philippines. When a Philippines overseas worker leaves the country to work on a vessel, he leaves with a POEA contract—a Philippines overseas employment—and a lot of times those state the minimum ILO conditions of work. I was an ITF inspector. I inspected foreign ships. Last year the ITF collected over $22 million U.S. in unpaid wages, where the Filipino and the Indonesian wouldn't even get the ILO minimum in their overseas employment contract. They would go six to seven months without any pay, or if they did get paid, it was half of what the ILO recommendation was, because there's no enforcement. We can say as governments, we can say as NGOs, we can say as unions and companies that we're going to enforce the ILO and IMO, and we're going to enforce all of that, but there's no enforcement on the high seas.

Mr. Martin Shields:

We're talking about in Canadian waters, because that's the piece we can deal with. I'm looking at whether other countries will enforce the minimum. You're saying no.

Mr. James Given:

No.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Okay.

Ms. Clark, you talked about enforcement of existing laws and regulations. You said the existing regulations—I think we've heard the same from others—are good, and you said all those pieces are there, and you said existing staff could do this, and you just said there would be no cost increase when you said that, because the rules are there, the regulations are there, existing staff are there, and you said you just have to do it.

Ms. Sarah Clark:

I think that's the basis of our point. We have the conditions. We meet all the standards that Canada requires. Whether it be in wages, safety, taxation, or environment—which was raised by Mr. Fournier—we are compliant. We are audited. And we believe in those standards for our crew. It's not just wages; it's the standards we provide on the ship as well for living conditions. These people are on the ship for two weeks at a time, and in your case longer maybe when you go south.

A voice: It's three weeks.

Ms. Sarah Clark: It's three weeks. We're supplying these very well-paying, middle-class jobs to people who are very skilled and who have taken the time to have that training and spent the money on that.

Mr. Martin Shields:

We're saying the rules and regulations are there and the existing staff could enforce them—

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Do you mean staff of Transport Canada or...?

Mr. Martin Shields:

They're your words, not mine. You said the existing staff—

Ms. Sarah Clark:

Our issue is with the government staff.

Mr. Martin Shields:

I'm just taking the words you said. I'm trying to clarify it. You said the existing rules and regulations there the existing staff can enforce, suggesting that they weren't.

Ms. Sarah Clark:

We know of cases where they have not been. In fact, the SIU went through a case a few years ago where they were not being.... And we know that Transport Canada, as well as the other agencies, have struggled with resources to be able to enforce them, and also struggled with the coordination mechanism to make sure that vessel and that owner are complying with all of the regulations.

Mr. Martin Shields:

That's what I was trying to get at.

Ms. Sarah Clark:

Okay, sorry, yes. I apologize, and on your example of the Hebron project we understand that one of the European dredgers came in, did the work in a month or so, with a full foreign crew, even though they had a coasting trade licence.

Mr. Martin Shields:

And nobody knows that we're here.

So again, you believe that all the rules and regulations are there. There is existing staff. They just need to do it.

Ms. Sarah Clark:

We don't believe there is enough staff.

Mr. Martin Shields:

You didn't say that.

Ms. Sarah Clark:

Sorry. We're not here today asking for money. There have been other groups under CETA that have asked for money for their industries. We're not asking for that. We think the money is much better spent within the agencies of the government to reinforce the ability to enforce those requirements.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you.

Ms. Sarah Clark:

We think it's understaffed right now.

Thank you.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you for clarifying that. I appreciate that.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

(1635)

The Chair:

Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Kelly asked earlier if you had been consulted. Now you're obviously here, but I heard a few mixed responses. You said this morning that you were speaking to Transport Canada, and I saw Martin saying no. So could we just go through the panel.

Have you been consulted for these amendments?

Mr. James Given:

I am going to try to give you an answer without giving you an answer.

I've had many meetings. Everyone of course knows my concerns when it comes to cabotage, and Bill C-30, and CETA, and Bill C-49, and China and whoever the hell else we have on the list, but when it comes to consultation, this is part of the consultation process.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Excluding this.

Mr. James Given:

Excluding this?

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Can I get a yes and no because I have to split my time with my colleague.

Mr. James Given:

Maybe.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Okay.

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Before they signed the agreement, we were not consulted at all, but for the implementation we asked several times for meetings. We got information meetings.

Mr. James Given:

Are you talking about CETA or Bill C-49?

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Bill C-49. [Translation]

Mr. Martin Fournier:

There was no consultation on Bill C-49.

As we mentioned, there were consultations about the economic agreement with Europe from the time when it was signed. Before it was signed, there was no national consultation with industry. We know that international companies were consulted, but not the industry in Canada. So we can say that there was not really any consultation in that respect.

Once the agreement was signed, a working group met for almost two years. Almost everyone involved took part. Certain things that we asked for on a number of occasions appeared in Bill C-30. However, the main request was to establish this single body, and that was completely forgotten. [English]

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

Jean, you mentioned four firms that are interested in operating in Quebec. Where are they based? What country are they based out of?

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

It's all the same. They're Belgian and Dutch, and not only in Quebec. It's all over Canada.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Sarah, you were saying there's a bit of divergence in pay between a Canadian operator, a captain, $15,000, and a Dutch one would be $7,000. Can you paint a picture of your overall operating expenses? I know you were saying you are trained in firefighting. So can you give us an idea of the metrics that add to your operating costs?

Ms. Sarah Clark:

Our crew costs are about a third of our costs. Fuel is another third, and everything else would be thrown into the last third.

So when I gave you the numbers, this is information that this industry has been sharing, we're actually giving you the more optimistic number around what's being paid. Jim is probably painting a better picture of what's actually paid. So when we say crew costs are about a third of ours, they're actually probably less than a third of ours in a lot of cases.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

My last question is do you have contracts outside of Canada?

Ms. Sarah Clark:

At present we don't. We work across Canada.

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

We do. We have contracts in the Dominican Republic, Mexico, and the British Virgin Islands.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

And then when you operate outside of Canada, are you still operating at Canadian standards?

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Yes, with Canadian crews.

Ms. Sarah Clark:

Here's the problem for Canadian dredgers and the reason we're discussing reciprocity. We both have vessels that could work. Ours formerly went all over the world. Our problem is that our markets are so far from us. We can't work in the United States because of the Jones Act. For Jean-Philippe on the east coast, there was no opening of any European market for him other than under CETA, so we have to go to South America, Australia, or New Zealand.

Our mobilization costs are so high that it's very hard for us to get to other markets and be competitive, and it gives the companies a lot of time, because these dredgers are not cheap. They are very expensive to buy. Our cost would be between $30 million and $60 million for the size of vessels we have, and the ongoing annual maintenance is high. When you're planning your business, you don't want to just base it on the contracts as they arise in Canada, but it's very hard for us to be able to travel to other places as well.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you. I don't know whether there's any time left.

The Chair:

There remains two minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I can start with that.

I've heard on a couple of occasions today that ships are more environmentally friendly. I would like to know whether you could back that up, especially given the use of bunker oil.

(1640)

Mr. James Given:

I'll talk about the Canadian domestic fleet. For our domestic fleet there has been a newbuild program ongoing now for a few years. I look at Canada Steamship Lines, or at Algoma Central, or Groupe Desgagnés. They have all updated their fleets, and they have all gone to cleaner-burning fuel. They are all now looking at fitting some of their older tonnages with scrubbers. It's a known fact that is backed up by I think everyone when it comes to transportation that ships are the more environmentally friendly way to transport cargo.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You have expressed concern that flagged ships from all over the world are going to come to move empty containers. These are non-revenue moves. Companies are only allowed to move their own containers. You can't show up and move somebody else's containers. Is that correct?

Mr. James Given:

When I look at the language, I don't know whether that has been clarified yet when it comes to sharing agreements for charter, for ownership, for all of those different things. You have to get a really good explanation of what “non-revenue basis” means. They still talk about $400 and $500 and still talk about certain other things, so you have to dig a little deeper.

Foreign ships always come in. They come in and out. When it comes to import and export, this has been happening since Christ was a cowboy, and it will continue to happen. But those are different movements. They come in, they don't do any domestic trade, and then they go back out.

What they want to try to do now is probably pick up something in the middle, because they are not going to leave the ship here: the season's too short; the seaway closes; they have to get the ship back out. They want to try to pick something up in between their movements, in order maybe to pay for fuel or do something.

What's “revenue”? Is revenue covering costs? Is revenue not covering costs? Maybe you can answer that one for me, because I don't know.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I would, but they don't give me any time.

The Chair:

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much. I hope that's not any of my time.

I have a few questions that have come to mind throughout some of your testimony. They may not be directly linked one to the other, but I am going to follow up on something my colleague Mr. Sikand asked regarding labour costs and the wages that are paid.

I guess I've always believed that we have similar safety standards and labour costs to Europe's. Can you provide any insight for me as to why those wages are so different? Why does a Canadian captain earn $15,000 and someone from Europe earn $7,000? How can they operate so cheaply? [Translation]

Mr. Martin Fournier:

I can give you a simple example. A study conducted two years ago by Ernst & Young and Innovation maritime gave the example of a Danish crew that could, under the economic agreement, come to Canada to engage in cabotage. The Danish vessel could have a Danish captain and a crew from the Philippines, Ukraine, or wherever, because the flag on the vessel allows it. In Canada, the crew would have to be completely Canadian. So it is impossible to compete with them. The Danish captain might have a level of remuneration that is comparable to what is offered here. But the rest of the crew would be paid under different conditions. It is as simple as that. [English]

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Earlier today we heard that most empty shipping containers are moved from port to port by train or truck and not by sea. Would you confirm that? If this is the case, how does Bill C-49 impact Canadian seafarers' jobs? [Translation]

Mr. Martin Fournier:

Yes, most empty containers are moved by train, not by ship. The problem with Bill C-49 is that it is widening the crack that was opened with the economic agreement with Europe. Even before that agreement, we had discussions and we were asked what we thought about the possibility of allowing empty containers to be shipped on foreign vessels. We said no to that. It was all forgotten, then the question came up again with CETA. Then there was the agreement on shipping empty containers, on bulk shipping, on loaded containers between Montreal and Halifax, and on dredging. Now there is talk about the shipping of empty containers being open to everyone. In some ports, questions have been asked about the fact that it is just between Montreal and Halifax and why it is not possible for other ports, like Quebec City and Sept-Îles. In addition, other countries are asking why shipping empty containers would not be open to them as well, now that it is open to the Europeans.

As you can see, the crack is being opened, one change at a time. That's exactly what is happening. That is what we were afraid of at the outset when the issue of transporting empty containers was raised for the first time.

(1645)

[English]

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I have another question that came to mind. Maybe you've already touched on this and I missed it. Are there tangible safety concerns that you have for allowing expanded cabotage?

Mr. James Given:

Absolutely.

As I said earlier, I was fortunate enough—and I still am—to be involved with the ITF and to inspect foreign-flagged vessels that come into Canada and travel around the world. There is absolutely no comparison. You have 5% of the owners who run foreign-flagged vessels who are good owners—I'll stretch it to 8%—and then you have that great big group who aren't, and there is no control.

You have a ship flagged Panama that never goes to Panama. Who's inspecting it? Who's making sure that the safety regimes and everything are in place? If the ship comes to Canada, port state will control for Canada, thank God. Transport Canada, which does a great job, will go down and inspect it under the international conventions. It may still not be up to the Canadian standard, but it may pass the international standard.

If you look at the database for Transport Canada on ship inspections, you will see a list hundreds of ships long and how they've been detained when they come to Canada for no firefighting, no pollution control, no food, no this, no that. They get caught when they come here, but flagged Panama, flagged everywhere, there's no inspection regime; the ship never goes there.

I'm not a geography major, but I know a ship flying the Marshall Islands flag has a heck of a time getting to Reston, Virginia. The controls aren't there. I make light of it and I shouldn't, because it's a very serious situation.

In Australia just recently, there was a foreign-flagged vessel running in their cabotage with two crew members dead, because they couldn't get medical care. It happens all the time, all around the world, and I don't think it's something we want to be a part of.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Aubin.

Ms. Sarah Clark:

Madam Chair, I need to excuse myself.

I know my colleague, Jean-Philippe, can answer any further questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Clark. We appreciated your comments today. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you very much.

I hope you have a good trip back.

My next question is a hypothetical one, of course, but it might help me to understand some points better.

Reciprocity is not in the agreement, but let's imagine for a minute that it is there.

Accepting that transporting containers and dredging seem to me to involve two completely different approaches, I would like to know if the Canadian industry could be competitive, given the rules, the salaries and the working conditions. If not, are we doomed to be limited to the Canadian market and to protect it because we are the only ones that operate under those rules?

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

I can answer that as it pertains to dredging.

As we explained just now, Europe is not so far away: you have Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon, Guadeloupe and St. Martin. We already have a presence in those areas and we are competing with European dredgers right now. They choose the bigger contracts, because they have equipment of the right size. But we try to find our niche and to fit in. So, yes, we actually can be competitive. Even if it takes us two weeks to get from Canada to the Dominican Republic, we still manage to win contracts.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Is it the same for continental Europe?

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

There is so much to do there that you need a lot of equipment. In order to get there, the transportation costs would be too high. Anyway, they already take care of their own market over there.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Earlier, you talked about Belgium and the Netherlands. I assume that there is a link between all the canals they have to maintain and dredging, which is why those countries have developed such a big industry.

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Exactly.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Do you want to add anything, Mr. Fournier?

Mr. Martin Fournier:

I think that Mr. Brunet dealt with the dredging issue well.

As for whether it would be possible for Canadian shipowners to compete in Europe if ever the market were reciprocal, the answer is no. As I mentioned just now, European vessels have much lower operating costs than ours.

There is another factor. Most of the Canadian fleet are lakers. The vessels are not designed to sail on the open sea, which is what you need to get to those markets.

Be that as it may, the main reason is that the operating costs are different from ours.

(1650)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

In terms of the dredging industry, we thought it was a long way away, but it is clearly coming sooner than expected. The Northwest Passage in the Arctic will be a source of contracts for your industry. It is both near and far, given the vastness of our territory.

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

For the time being, we don't know what the situation is there. The mapping of the North is not complete. There may be high volumes, but right now, the routes in demand are those that are navigable right now. That's still a long way away and it requires extensive mobilization. In addition, the dredging period is very short. You need high-performance equipment for a large volume in a very short time.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

The expansion prospects for your industry are extremely limited.

Mr. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Yes, they are minimal.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Okay.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We have completed our preliminary list. Are there any questions on this side that have to have answers? I guess there are none on that side either.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I wanted to pick up where we left off. I was having fun.

For comparison, I was trying to think of a good example of cabotage in land terms, which more people understand. I have an 18-wheeler in Virginia, and I drive it up to Ottawa, and I unload it. I have another load I have to pick up in Montreal and I have to get it back to Virginia. With the cabotage rules we're bringing in today, I can take my trailer from Ottawa to Montreal to pick up my next load, whereas the current system is that I have to deadhead my truck to Montreal and hire someone else to tow my trailer to Montreal. Is that not correct? Would that not be an equivalent to...?

Mr. James Given:

I'm not an expert in the trucking industry, but I'll attempt anything. If you're looking under NAFTA, I know there are provisions in NAFTA right now that allow for cross-border trucking between Mexico and the United States. From what I understand, that provision has never been implemented when it comes to trucking in the United States, because the teamsters have had them tied up in courts since NAFTA was actually negotiated. Again, I'm not an expert on trucking.

Let me put it in terms of airlines, which I'm not an expert in either. A Canadian aircraft goes from Toronto to Berlin. Is it considered cabotage?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If it has to come back from London, and it has to deadhead between them—

Mr. James Given:

It's all considered cabotage.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—are you going to tell me you're going to have to get a larger jumbo jet, like a, what are those things called...?

Mr. James Given:

It's considered cabotage.

I have another example that goes right to maritime. Oil or bitumen leaves the tar sands and goes to Texas, where it's processed, put back in a ship, and brought back to Canada. That's all cabotage because of the origin of it. That's the definition under Transport Canada. This is one of the areas you get into. According to the owner of that ship, and this is a specific one, his definition of cabotage doesn't kick in until the ship enters Canadian waters, but the real definition is when the ship is loaded with the cargo in Texas, because it's a Canadian-originating cargo. That whole trip is cabotage. It is the same with the airlines.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the circumstances of this bill, C-49, what we're talking about moving is empty, not loaded, containers. If I—

Mr. James Given:

It's still considered a product. The container is the movement of the product.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's an empty container. It's an empty trailer. If you're talking about moving the empty container from where it was unloaded to where it's going to be loaded, why should you have to hire a third party to move that container? That's what I'm trying to figure out.

Mr. James Given:

Again, that movement is taking place. I think we've established that it takes place by rail or truck. Now the foreign ship operator wants to move it. Why?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Because the ship arrives with the container. The ship wants to move their container. They're not moving someone else's container. They're moving their own container to the next port where it's going to be loaded, and they're going to leave. I'm trying to see where—

Mr. James Given:

It's still a cabotage run, and under the definitions of cabotage that are there, that's cabotage. That's considered cabotage, because you're moving something between two Canadian ports.

This has to be perfectly clear. That shipowner still has the ability to move that. All he has to do is apply for a waiver, which he'll get if no Canadian shipowner wants to move that particular container.

If you look at all of these years where it's been done by rail and truck, why all of a sudden is it open? Under CETA, it was open for certain reasons, and I believed the reasons that I was told. There were compromises made. It was a negotiation. That's what was done. However, to open it more, to liberalize it more under Bill C-49, is opening the gate to any flag, to any rogue owner, and anything that they want to do.

Concessions were made in a trade negotiation. We all understand that. Concessions are made every day. How they got to that concession...like I said, it was explained to me and I accepted it. Now it's a conscious choice of whether we open it up to more cabotage. We're not in a negotiation with anyone but ourselves right now on what we're going to do with cabotage.

(1655)

The Chair:

Thank you very much

Mr. Badawey, a short question.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

It has resurrected something that happened in our community a few years back. We had a foreign vessel come in to our harbour and it was transiting the canal, and every individual on that vessel was sick, with no idea what they were sick from.

Mr. Given, in your experience with a foreign vessel coming in, what is the protocol? I'll tell you what the protocol was then, and this was only about five or six years ago. The protocol then was that nobody would touch it. Health Canada wouldn't touch it. We ordered the seaway not to allow that vessel into our community, because we didn't know what they were sick from.

It got to the point, just based on human response and wanting to help, that I sent my fire department out there. We are a city of 20,000 people, and I had to send my fire department out to what could have been an international incident. Who knows what they were actually stepping into?

Again, when it comes to labour conditions and protocols within our waterways and allowing something like this, what do you see as a proper protocol when these vessels come in and, as you mentioned earlier, there are health-related issues that have to be dealt with?

Mr. James Given:

Again, I'm going to take the easy way out and go back to the waiver system. It's put in ahead of time, there are screenings done, and basically everything is looked at, Mr. Badawey.

That kind of incident happens more than you think, and there isn't a protocol. Again, as you've said, nobody wants to get involved with it. The only protocol I know is with ITF inspectors who go down and try to help these guys. That's the job I used to do. Then we hope that somebody in the community will get involved. Church groups right now get involved with giving winter clothing to these crew members when they come to Canada in the fall, because they're not prepared for it and they don't have it.

Unfortunately, people die on ships because there is nowhere to turn and there's nobody to turn to. There are international conventions. There's a new convention, which is the convention for seafarers' rights, which goes a lot further than what we've ever had. Again, enforcement is the key, but enforcement is only as good as the people who do it.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you to the panel.

Before I suspend, I want to ask the committee if we could have 15 minutes for committee business either following our next panel, which ends at 6:45, or 15 minutes of our lunch hour tomorrow, for some committee business. What are the wishes of the committee, either 15 minutes following our next panel tonight or 15 minutes of our lunch hour tomorrow for committee business?

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Don't we have time now, Madam Chairman, between now and the next set of panellists?

The Chair:

No, the next set of panellists is at 5:15.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

I have 6:30 on our schedule.

The Chair:

That's because we squeezed a half an hour of our lunch hour to keep things moving along here.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Excellent, you're so efficient.

The Chair:

Tomorrow night we will be finished at 7:15 rather than 7:45, as of our schedule now.

What's the thought process of the committee?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We have an hour-long lunch tomorrow.

The Chair:

We could take 15 minutes of our lunch hour tomorrow and discuss committee business.

Is everybody in agreement with that? Okay, tomorrow we'll take 15 minutes of our lunch hour.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Madam Chair, would there be an opportunity this evening to possibly put a notice of motion forward?

The Chair:

Let's do our committee business tomorrow, and following a discussion with the committee, we can see where we go from there. That would be my suggestion.

(1700)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Okay.

The Chair:

I'm going to suspend until the next panel gets in.

(1700)

(1715)

The Chair:

I'll call back to order the meeting on our study of Bill C-49. We welcome representatives from Air Canada and WestJet Airlines, as well as an assistant professor from the University of Ottawa.

Mr. McNaney, would you like to start off? [Translation]

Mr. Mike McNaney (Vice-President, Industry, Corporate and Airport Affairs, WestJet Airlines Ltd.):

Thank you Madam Chair and members of the committee for the invitation to speak with you this evening.

My name is Mike McNaney and I am vice-president of Industry, Corporate and Airport Affairs at WestJet. Also with me this evening is my colleague, Lorne Mackenzie, senior manager, Regulatory Affairs.[English]

On behalf of over 12,000 WestJetters, we are pleased to participate in your deliberations with respect to Bill C-49 and the critical role that companies such as WestJet play in connecting the economies and people of Canada to each other and the rest of the world.

Our investments and growth over the last 21-plus years have led to downward pressure on airfares, market stimulation, and incredible job creation in many sectors of the economy, including aerospace, tourism, and regional economic development.[Translation]

Our success in a very tough, low-margin industry is a testament to our frontline employees who strive every day to provide our guests with quality service.[English]

Our award-winning culture of care and guest service is a source of tremendous pride. It is not just what we do; it is who we are, and it influences our approach and our respect for the obligation we have to ensure our social and economic licence is strong.

In addition to various awards over the years, this year we were very pleased to be recognized by TripAdvisor as the best airline in Canada and a Travellers' Choice Award winner for mid-sized and low-cost airlines in North America. As members know, this award is based on authentic reviews by the travelling public.

Before providing you with an overview of our views on the legislation, I want to provide a broader context of WestJet operations today.

WestJet is in the midst of an extraordinary evolution from the carrier that launched in February 1996 with 200 employees, three aircraft, and five destinations, all in western Canada. In 2016, we carried over 20 million guests. Getting 20 million-plus guests where they need to be, safely and on time, is a logistical and operational challenge. Things will go wrong, and we do our best to get it right when they do.

We operate approximately 700-plus flights a day, carrying approximately 70,000 guests daily, with a WestJet plane departing approximately every two minutes. Our current fleet consists of 161 aircraft, including Bombardier Q400s, as well as narrow body and wide body aircraft from Boeing. This year we begin taking delivery of the newest version of the 737, the 737 MAX, and in 2019 we take delivery of our first 787 Dreamliner. With respect to the Toronto-manufactured Bombardier Q400, next year we will become the third-largest operator in the world of Q400s with the delivery of our 45th Q400 aircraft.

Based on our most recent economic impact study, utilizing our 2016 operating data, our investments and growth strategy in 2016 has supported over 153,000 jobs in Canada, a labour income in excess of $5.3 billion, over $12 billion of GDP expenditure activity, and an aggregate economic impact greater than $17.3 billion. These employment and economic benefits accrue throughout the country.

In terms of communicating with our guests, we are continuously working to find innovative ways to effectively meet their needs. In April 2016, we became the first Canadian carrier to move its social media team to a 24-7 operation, open 365 days a year. We took this step in recognition of the fact that more and more consumers utilize social media to communicate with companies in real time. Our social media response team now sits in our 24-7 operations control centre to respond to guest questions and concerns in the moment. We also still maintain the more traditional communication means of email and phone contact for guests who wish to reach out to us through those means.

The operations control centre, or OCC, is responsible for all facets of our daily operations: flight schedule, crew scheduling, maintenance, responding to weather, operational delays, and guest services. The composition of this team includes experts from all areas of our business. To say this service has been well received would be an understatement. How our guests interact with us on service issues and questions is now 57% through social media, 34% through email, and 9% through telephone.

In the last year, we have also made the following enhancements, in co-operation with the Canadian Transportation Agency. We developed and posted on our website a plain-language, searchable summary of the provisions of our tariffs related to events most likely to be of concern to travellers, such as denied boarding, flight delays, and misplaced baggage. We placed a full page article on our inflight magazine describing our customer service department and how our guests can get information on their rights should something go wrong. We added a link to every electronic itinerary to make our guests aware of their rights and where to go for additional information.

That brings me to the aspects of Bill C-49 dealing with passenger protection. WestJet supports these provisions and the broad framework the bill sets out to create.

I do want to note for the committee that WestJet currently has enforceable penalties for many of the areas in which the legislation calls for enhanced regulation. These include lost or damaged baggage, delays and cancellations, and tarmac delays. Our obligations are outlined in our tariff, which is accessible online and is used by both us and the CTA to resolve complaints.

(1720)



Bill C-49 will bring uniform standards to all of these issues, and we are supportive of that action.

Within the context of rights and obligations, I would like to encourage the committee to more broadly examine the role of our partners in the travel supply chain. This would include airports, air traffic control, border services, immigration, aviation security, as well as Transport Canada. Our performance is scrutinized by Parliament and the public, and rightly so. However, all these organizations should have the same performance reporting requirements, as well as overall accountability for the services they provide.

You will no doubt have seen media reports over the past several weeks concerning breakdowns of airport baggage systems, understaffing at air traffic control centres, CATSA funding shortfalls, and delays in processing security clearances for aviation employees. How will all these elements of the supply chain, all of which are critical for operations and all of which are completely outside the control of an airline, fit into the new regime established by Bill C-49, as far as accountability is concerned?

Concerning joint ventures, WestJet supports in principle the Government of Canada's approach to airline joint ventures. Airline partnerships are a critical component of our business model. WestJet does not belong to an international alliance. What we do have is 45-plus code-share and interline partners who are all offering greater choice and flexibility for Canadians. These partnerships, coupled with our domestic and international networks, are bringing tourists to all parts of Canada and providing the international connectivity our economy needs.

While we support the JV policy initiative, we have questions that we are discussing with Transport Canada as we seek further clarification on certain points.

With respect to foreign ownership, the foreign ownership provisions outlined in Bill C-49 are ostensibly already in effect, with exemptions granted to two potential ULCCs. Our policy preference with respect to foreign ownership is that any change in the limit should be on a reciprocal basis, particularly with respect to the United States. The government has opted for a unilateral approach, and obviously we respect the government's decision.

Within the context of this unilateral policy change, we believe it is critical to ensure that Canada maintain a strong “control in fact” test. This is a test administered by the Canadian Transportation Agency to ensure that new carriers are controlled and run by Canadians. We believe that Canadian carriers should make their network decisions in Canada for the benefit of Canadian communities, the travelling public, and workers.

I would also like to remind members that we have recently announced the creation of our own ULCC. This was done without foreign investment or any proposed policy change. The objective is straightforward: to provide Canadians with more choice for their travel dollar. We are engaged with both the CTA and Transport Canada on the necessary regulatory approvals to commence service in mid-2018.

With respect to the CATSA provisions that will allow small airports to purchase CATSA services and large airports to top up services, we consider these measures to be stopgaps.

Delays caused by factors such as passenger screening are becoming more and more frequent in our operation. It is a disturbing trend. From a policy perspective we have been frustrated for several years by the government's unwillingness to fully allocate funds collected from the ATSC and tie these funds directly to screening services, the services our guests are paying for when they pay the air transport security charge.

The provisions in Bill C-49 are a stopgap measure that will allow the industry to spend more money to provide services that we believe the ATSC should be covering. We have recommended comprehensive reforms to the funding model and governance of CATSA. We urge this committee to recommend that all money collected from the ATSC be allocated to screening services at Canada's airports.

Before concluding, I want to briefly comment on another aspect of commercial aviation that is certainly of interest to consumers and Parliament. You may have seen the news from StatsCan last month that base air fares in Canada, domestic and international, were on average down 5.4% in 2016 as compared with 2015.

At WestJet, our average fare in 2016 was $162, down $13 from 2015. Our average fare in the first six months of this year was $158, a further drop from the first six months of last year. To provide perspective on these numbers, our average profit per guest in the first six months of this year was $8.34. I provide these figures to give context when discussions turn to the concept of financial penalties.

(1725)

[Translation]

In conclusion, WestJet recognizes that Bill C-49 has the potential to benefit the aviation industry and Canadian consumers. We look forward to participating in upcoming sessions with the committee in order to improve the overall travel experience for Canadians. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much. Now we move on to Air Canada.

Please introduce yourselves. You have 10 minutes for your opening comments. [Translation]

Ms. Lucie Guillemette (Executive Vice-President and Chief Commercial Officer, Air Canada):

Good evening, Madam Chair.[English]

Good evening, members of the committee.[Translation]

My name is Lucie Guillemette and I am the executive vice-president and chief commercial officer at Air Canada.

I am joined by my colleagues David Rheault and Fitti Lourenco.

We are here today to speak about the modernization of the Canada Transportation Act, specifically the intent to improve the traveller experience.

Air Canada is Canada's largest airline. In 2016, Air Canada and its regional partners carried close to 45 million passengers, and operated on average 1,580 scheduled flights each day, offering direct service to more than 200 destinations on six continents.

Since 2009, Air Canada has grown by more than 50%, extending the reach of its global network and achieving its ambition to become a global champion.

We employ 30,000 people and 3,000 of our employees were hired in the last three years alone, providing a significant boost to job creation in this country.

Headquartered in Montreal, Air Canada operates four hubs: Pearson airport in Toronto, Vancouver airport, Trudeau airport in Montreal and Calgary airport. We open Canada to the world and provide travellers unparalleled international access.[English]

We've launched new training programs for front-line staff, introduced on-board customer service management programs, improved and clarified our customer service plan, and created new policies for family seating, family check-in at airports, and the carriage of musical instruments. We have also pioneered flight passes and branded fares, offering more choice and flexibility to our customers, who can select the attributes and features that are most meaningful to them.

We recognize that valuable services and features for leisure vacationers vary significantly from those for business passengers, and we aim to meet the needs of all our customer segments, domestically and internationally.

The airline industry is extremely competitive, and we view service as an important differentiator. Financial stability and sustainability has allowed us to invest significantly to improve passengers' experience. For example, we have renewed our fleet and acquired modern aircraft, such as the Boeing 787 and the Bombardier C series. We've reconfigured our cabins, introduced a new premium economy cabin, and improved the inflight entertainment systems. We've invested in a new website and have developed new applications that simplify the passenger experience.

For all our efforts, we are very proud to have been recognized by Skytrax as the best in North America and to be the only international carrier in North America to receive a four-star ranking. I can assure you that we are committed to continuing our efforts to improve the experience of our passengers on the ground, in flight, and post-travel.

In the current regime, carriers have different standards and offer different compensation in a system based on complaints. Having a clear set of standards for all carriers would be appropriate, without, however, imposing an undue financial burden on carriers or limiting their ability to distinguish themselves through the customer service policies they offer.

Although Bill C-49 takes positive steps in laying the groundwork for the regulatory process, we have concerns, and I would like to address a few now.

Number one is simplifying the regime. The proposed regime would be applicable for flights to and from Canada. This creates complexity for carriers and confusion for passengers, since other regimes are applicable in other countries, which could provide for different rules, different exemptions, and different levels of compensation. For example, in a situation of denial of boarding on a flight departing from the United States to Canada, should we apply the Canadian or the U.S. regime? To simplify the regime and make it effective, we suggest that it be limited to flights departing from Canada, as the American regime is limited to flights departing the United States.

We also submit that in the case of code-share flights, the claim shall be made with the operating carrier, as in the European regime. These adjustments would simplify the regime for carriers and passengers, allow for the speedy and timely issuing of compensation, and avoid the risk of double compensation.

Second, on baggage liability, Air Canada agrees with the principle of harmonizing the rules of liability related to baggage. The bill should, however, acknowledge that passengers are already protected by the Montreal Convention, in the case of international travel, which provides clear and consistent rules that are applicable internationally. We therefore submit that the rules provided in the bill should be limited to domestic travel and harmonized with the rules of the Montreal Convention. This would also simplify the rules for carriers and avoid confusion for passengers.

(1730)



Number three, apply one decision to all passengers on the same flight. In its current form, the bill could also allow for a generalized type of compensation, which would fail to consider the particular circumstances of each passenger. For example, if one passenger submits a claim and is compensated for a delayed flight, the same claimant compensation could potentially be applied to all passengers on that flight. The decision to extend compensation to other passengers should not be arbitrary, but should take into account each passenger's individual circumstance. A connecting passenger who arrives late on the first leg of the trip but catches the next flight is not ultimately delayed.

Number four is on future amendments. Future changes should be transparent and involve all stakeholders, including passengers and carriers. As it stands, Air Canada is concerned that the bill could give the Canadian Transportation Agency powers to create regulations outside of the specific situations provided in the bill. We ask that the committee clarify this language to specify that the regulatory power of the CTA is consistent with the scope of the bill.

Number five is joint ventures and foreign ownership. The amendments to how joint ventures are examined by the government are very positive. In our own experience and from other examples around the world, joint ventures are innovative ways for carriers to expand their networks, add new destinations for passengers, find efficiencies, and offer more pricing options for passengers. Joint ventures allow us to develop the Canadian aviation infrastructure by building international superhighways.

While giving the Minister of Transport the ability to consider joint ventures is excellent, as his department is best-equipped to understand the complexities of our industry, some of the amendments are not in line with best practices around the world. One example is the ability for the minister to review a new joint venture at the two-year mark from approval. The initial period of any joint venture is devoted to better co-operation between partners while the most important changes that pertain to network and fares take more time to implement. We propose that the term for review be lengthened and start from implementation versus approval of the joint venture.

The bill also suggests sanctions that are too punitive, given the commercial nature of JVs. Indeed, the sanction of imprisonment could dissuade a potential partner from even considering the possibility of a joint venture. These issues alone could be a significant barrier to make any use of the benefits of the bill. We ask that the committee consider the suggestions in our submission carefully on this issue.

With respect to foreign ownership, Air Canada is supportive. However, we ask that adjustments be made so that foreign investors cannot negatively influence Canadian carriers or circumvent the spirit of the bill. We also recommend changes that would allow for a ready implementation of the new ownership structure.

(1735)



Finally, I would like to stress that we operate in a very complex environment. The collaboration and efficiencies of many other stakeholders are instrumental to the overall improvement of the traveller experience. These include airports, CATSA, CBSA, and Nav Canada.

Unfortunately, the airline is too often left to manage all of the negative consequences, but we do it because it is the right thing to do for our customers. While the bill would require carriers to provide the CTA and Transport Canada with data, I would submit that all other agencies and organizations required and involved in the transportation system should be equally accountable for their operations, and submit data in a public and transparent manner.

We also invite the government and the committee members to study the measures that could be implemented, so that all government-controlled agencies contribute to the improvement of the traveller's experience and support the growth of traffic by Canadian carriers. After all, we are powerful economic enablers. If the world indeed needs more Canada, we want to bring it to them.

I thank you for the opportunity to present our views. We look forward to your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will now go to Marina Pavlovic, assistant professor at the University of Ottawa faculty of law.

Professor Marina Pavlovic (Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law, As an Individual):

Good evening, Madam Chair, and committee members. I would like to acknowledge that we are on unceded Algonquin territory.

Thank you for the opportunity to present and to bring a research perspective to the discussion of Bill C-49, particularly to the section on an air passenger bill of rights, which is undoubtedly an issue of importance to Canadians.

I am an assistant professor at the common law section of the faculty of law at the University of Ottawa, and my area of expertise is consumer rights in the contemporary cross-border network digital economy. My work covers areas such as consumer protection, dispute resolution, and access to justice. I am also a consumer groups' appointed director at the board of the Commission for Complaints for Telecom-television Services, CCST, which is Canada's communications industry ombudsman. However, I appear in my personal capacity, representing my own views.

Most recently, my work has focused on the wireless code, a bill of rights for Canadian wireless consumers, as well as dispute resolution, including ombuds schemes for consumer complaints. It is my expertise in these broad areas of consumer protection, particularly with the wireless code, that I'm bringing to the table.

While the telecommunications and air travel industries are definitely very different, there are significant parallels when it comes to consumer rights and consumer redress. My comments will focus on clauses 17 to 19 of the bill, which deal with the proposed regime to establish an air passenger bill of rights.

I will focus my remarks around three topics: the need for this bill of rights, the passengers' rights or carriers' obligations in the bill, and redress mechanisms related to the rights in the bill.

As to the need for the bill of rights, the current regime of complicated tariffs and related individual carriers' contracts is overly complex and ineffective. Consumer rights regarding air travel are varied and fragmented. They depend on a number of factors, and it is difficult, if not impossible, for consumers to know ahead of time what rights they have and what the appropriate redress mechanisms are. Market forces alone cannot resolve this issue. Canadians need an air passenger bill of rights that will provide uniform, minimum rights for consumers, or conversely, set minimum obligations for the carriers.

Similar regimes for air passenger rights exist in other jurisdictions, and in Canada they exist in other industries as well. As I already mentioned, as an example, the wireless code sets a mandatory code of conduct for the wireless service providers, and a recently established television service provider code sets minimum rights for consumers with respect to television services.

A mandatory code that would apply to the industry as a whole is the appropriate way to set minimum consumer rights. It is to the benefit of consumers, and it is to the benefit of the industry. For consumers, it provides a clear set of rights that are found in a single place. A clear set of rights builds and enhances consumers' trust in the industry. It also promotes competition in the marketplace. It offers the carriers an opportunity to distinguish themselves from the competition by setting higher levels of customer service. The bill of rights is the floor; it is not the ceiling.

This brings me to my next point on the actual passenger rights or carrier obligations in the bill. Bill C-49, in effect, does not establish the bill of rights for consumers. Proposed subsection 86.11(1) would set the broad parameters of issues that the future bill of rights in the form of regulation must cover. It is the foundational step for the bill of rights to come. These parameters, the list of issues that the bill of rights should cover, are thorough but the list is not an exhaustive one. It provides for ministerial discretion, both in breadth and in coverage, as well as in the form of future regulations.

Passenger rights on the list are similar to the rights in other regimes and correspond generally to the most common types of complaints that are increasingly being reported by the media. However, there may be other kinds of disputes about which we have not yet heard. It is therefore imperative that the list stay as is or be expanded. Similarly, the committee should not decrease the list. By doing so, certain rights would be chipped away, creating a multi-tier system, which is what we have today. That also includes the geographical scope to cover claims that include flights to, from, and within Canada.

Proposed subsection 86.11(4) provides that the rights form part of the carriers' tariff, unless carriers offer more advantageous terms. The spirit of this provision is that the bill of rights would set the minimum standards, and that the carriers may adopt a suite of rights that goes beyond this.

(1740)



My concern, however, is with the drafting, which leaves a lot of discretion and does not provide information on who will assess—and when, how, and how frequently—whether individual carriers' terms meet the obligations of the bill of rights, exceed them, or are actually below them. The wireless code uses wording that in my view is clearer and more precise and does not leave room for discretion. It is a mandatory code of conduct for providers of certain regulated services.

My view is that this provision ought to be redrafted to ensure that the rights under the bill are always included in the tariff, so as to avoid case-by-case assessment, as well as that consumers cannot waive those rights by contract.

You may have heard or will hear concerns about the form and process by which the bill of rights will come into existence, from a broad list of topics in Bill C-49 to a detailed set of rights. I believe the Canadian Transportation Agency is best placed to lead this. However, it is imperative that the process be open and inclusive and offer an opportunity to all stakeholders, including individual consumers and public interest organizations, to participate in creating the bill of rights. A similar process before the CRTC, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, has been used for both the wireless code and the TV service code, and it has worked very well.

I also believe that regulations, rather than an act, provide a more appropriate mechanism for the bill of rights. I have, however, some concerns about the timelines and the feasibility of getting a broad list of topics into the actual bill of rights. It is subject to political will, and sometimes priorities shift. There have certainly been instances in which the legislation required a regulation of this type and there have been years if not decades without it. I'm not suggesting a specific timeline, but I invite committee members to consider the impact of any delays.

Lastly, I would like to briefly address consumer redress under the new regime.

A bill of rights and an effective redress mechanism are essential components of a robust consumer protection regime. A set of rights without an effective redress mechanism is ineffective, in the same way that a redress mechanism without a clear set of guiding principles leads to different outcomes and creates different rights.

Under the proposed regime, the CTA retains its role as dispute resolution provider for air passenger claims. It will not be able to do that effectively without a significant change of its processes and staffing. While this is not on the table before you right now, I also invite you to consider whether there are aspects of Bill C-49 that may actually relate to this.

I strongly believe that proposed section 67.3, which provides that only an affected person can file a complaint, is very limiting. There is a significant body of empirical research that it is consumers themselves who pursue claims, mainly because the value of the complaint does not justify the transaction costs. Actually, very commonly the transaction cost is much higher than the value of the complaint itself. However, there is also research in consumer literature that provides that it is important to allow other parties, such as public interest organizations, to have standing to file complaints, perhaps as a mechanism to challenge systemic problems. I strongly believe that proposed section 67.3 should be amended to allow third parties to file claims.

Concerning the collective aspects of consumer claims, there are complaints that will be highly fact-specific to a single consumer but that there are events that will affect a number of consumers, most commonly all of those who were in the affected aircraft. Proposed section 67.4 gives CTA discretion to apply the decision to all of those affected, but it is not clear whether there will be a specific mechanism to trigger it or whether they would do so on their own.

Finally, proposed subsection 86.11(3) provides what is a common provision in other jurisdictions and other dispute resolution schemes, that consumers cannot double dip and obtain compensation for the same events through different compensation schemes.

In its brief, Air Canada proposed that this provision be significantly limited. My strong view is that the provision as it stands is broad enough to allow CTA to craft a rule to avoid this. For example, CCTS, the Canadian communications ombudsman, has a rule along those lines in its procedural code.

I hope that these comments and recommendations will be useful to the committee. I would be pleased to provide to the members a policy brief summarizing my key points and recommendations and any relevant documentation that may help you navigate—no pun intended—these issues and understand them from not only the industry's perspective but from the perspective of consumers who are your constituents.

Thank you for this opportunity. I will be happy to answer any questions.

(1745)

The Chair:

Thank you very much. Thank you to all of you.

We will now open it up for questions, starting with Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair, and thank you to our witnesses for joining us here this evening. It's good to change our focus now and discuss Bill C-49 within the context of our aviation industry.

Similar to our earlier hearings, we do appreciate your being here to provide your comments to the committee and ensure that we have the information we need to reach our goal, which I think is a shared goal, of ensuring that Bill C-49 strikes the right balance in meeting the needs and concerns of both the airlines and the customers they serve. I'm going to dig in quickly to the questions I have, because I know that the five or six minutes I have goes by very quickly.

First, to Air Canada, regarding the cost of screening at airports, are you concerned that the proposals in Bill C-49 amount to what we could call an extra tax on the flying public?

Mr. David Rheault (Senior Director, Government Affairs and Community Relations, Air Canada):

My name is David Rheault. I'm the senior director of government relations for Air Canada.

In our brief, we have expressed concern about the precedent that this change opens. In the current system, passengers already pay a fee for security, charged when they purchase a ticket. Right now, the amount collected from passengers exceeds the budget of CATSA. In the past year, the number of passengers has significantly increased, the amount collected from passengers has increased, yet CATSA's budget remains relatively stable. The consequence of that is that you have more traffic and fewer resources to screen the traffic, which causes delays and waiting times, which ultimately causes Canadian hubs to be less competitive than foreign hubs. This is an opening for CATSA to have an agreement with airports to buy more services.

The concern we raise in that respect is that passengers already pay for that, so you open the door to a system that is user-pay plus. Passengers pay when they buy their tickets, airports will charge airlines, and ultimately this will have an impact on the cost of travel. We say, if you want to open a door to the possibility of buying extra screening for extra service, you must set a service level standard that would be guaranteed by the actual funding from passengers. If airports want to do more, they could buy from CATSA, but at least the public floor should be clear and standards should be set.

Does that answer your question?

(1750)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

I could pose that very same question to WestJet, and I will.

Mr. Mike McNaney:

In a very rare occurrence, I completely agree with Air Canada. It doesn't happen very often.

In all seriousness, yes, I fully agree with that answer. It all goes back to what David was saying in terms of the funding that's provided. From time to time, we get to periods such as Christmastime and the summertime. When we as an industry—the air carriers, CATSA on the ground, the airport authorities—know we're going to have a crunch time, we all work like heck to expedite those lines and get through that glut and the problem that has occurred.

To be honest, I've often questioned why we do that because, again being honest, if I'm looking for a means of creating public pressure to actually get all the funds that are raised for the ATSC, the air travellers' security charge, to actually go to that service, we need to stop fixing the problem on a regular basis. We will never do that, because we have to deal with our guests and we have to make those connections, but we hold flights and we'll pull people out of the line. You've all seen it when you travel during the summer and winter months. We all do our best to actually overcome those issues, and frankly, from time to time, I think that's defeating to us in the long term.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

In my last minute and a half, I'll pose this question, and if you don't get time to answer it fully, I'll come around to it in another round of questioning. I'll pose it to both of you.

With an eye on the consumer, what other measures could the government have included in Bill C-49 that would have helped or lowered the overall cost of flying in Canada?

Mr. Mike McNaney:

The most straightforward thing, and it's a debate as to whether it would actually be germane to what this legislation is attempting to achieve, is the broader issue of aeronautical charges and how we deal with AIFs, airport improvement fees, in Canada, which gets into a broader issue of airport governance. I'm not convinced that necessarily would be germane to this legislation, but in terms of your broader question, that is the next big issue.

A component of that, which I alluded to in my comments, is that as far as I can tell, information will be requested of all these other elements or organizations of the supply chain: CATSA, CBSA, airport authority operations, baggage handling, and so on. The question becomes what gets done with it, and then who's accountable in the end. At this point, all I see is the point of the spear pointed at the air carrier in terms of financial penalties, and so on. If an airport has taken over sole responsibility for de-icing and the air carrier is not engaged in the contract or the management of de-icing, when the de-icing process goes down and we end up with delays, from what I see in this legislation, everyone is still going to be pointing at me in terms of paying money for it when it's something clearly not in my control.

On the expansion of this notion of accountability, yes, you can request constant repetition of the information, but we have to have something other than just pointing at one entity when these things go wrong. Again, to be somewhat direct on it, a number of these entities, frankly, derive their mandate from this institution.

The Chair:

Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you, Madam Chair, and thank you to everyone for being here today. My questions are going to be directed toward the airlines. I appreciate your opening remarks and welcome them.

That said, do the airlines, Air Canada and WestJet, understand why passengers are frustrated with the level of service they sometimes receive from your airlines? Do you understand why they feel powerless or lacking in rights?

Ms. Lucie Guillemette:

I'm happy to answer that. First and foremost, we have to recognize that for any airline, and I'll speak for Air Canada, the level of customer service that we provide is critical for us. As in any business, we always aim to do better. It would be wrong of me to try to convince you that we don't have those types of issues, but what we need to recognize is that the airline industry is a very complex one, and at times we do get into situations where we fail from a customer service point of view. What is really important is how we recover.

In our opening statement, I was suggesting the fact that we are investing in better tools for us to be able to provide compensation faster or to get to customers faster, to be able to respond more quickly to inquiries.

We carry 45 million passengers a year. There's no doubt that issues will occur. To echo the earlier comment, when we talk about the different stakeholders in any process, if we really want to improve the process for customers, it's best for all of us to understand really where the choke points or the failures are. If we understand that better, we can aim to improve it, but yes, of course, we understand that customers can be frustrated.

(1755)

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

For sure. Thank you.

Mr. Mike McNaney:

Last week I had an opportunity to help with check in at one of our bases out west, a relatively small base. We do these base visits on a regular basis. We meet with WestJetters and our guests. I had a chance to talk to probably 20 or 30 guests over the course of the day. In answer to your question, based on the conversations I was having with them, although I never actually posed that specific question to them, there's a fundamental thing that occurs and it was quite obvious as I was watching people coming into the airport. When you enter into commercial aviation travel, you lose control from the very moment you step into the airport.

As we were saying, we have service failures. We recognize that. We have 700 flights a day. Part of the issue, and it's a challenge for us that we have to deal with, is that regardless of how seasoned a traveller you are, when you step into this process of commercial aviation, you lose control of where you can go, when you can go, and how you can go, and that creates a frustration that we certainly understand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Again this question is for both airlines. Do you think it's reasonable for passengers to expect the same compensation and service levels across all carriers?

Ms. Lucie Guillemette:

When it comes to expecting the same service levels across all carriers, we all compete with each other. We hope that we have differentiators, but I would expect that Canadians would be able to be confident in understanding that if there is a service failure, what it is that an airline provides. I would expect that we should make those competition levels clear to customers. We should post them adequately. We should make it easy and timely for customers to be able to be compensated.

When it comes to whether the compensation should be equal, even in an environment today where there is no legislation, we still compensate customers for service failures. If, for example, flights are delayed, even if there is no legislation, we still do compensate passengers who are travelling within Canada.

So the expectation is—

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Just to follow up on that, is it reasonable for them to expect to have the same rights and compensation across all carriers?

Ms. Lucie Guillemette:

Are you asking whether they would expect to have the same level of compensation?

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Yes, and rights.

Ms. Lucie Guillemette:

Yes, but the airline should also be able to expand a compensation if they choose to.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Can I get a quick “yes” or “no” from WestJet?

Mr. Mike McNaney:

Yes.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

With the remaining time I have, I'm going to switch gears here a bit.

In Canada, 2.5 million people suffer from allergies. What have your airlines done to implement some policy or safety standards for those who suffer from anaphylaxis?

Mr. Lorne Mackenzie (Senior Manager, Regulatory Affairs, WestJet Airlines Ltd.):

I can speak to that. I'm Lorne Mackenzie from WestJet.

It depends on the nature of the allergy. There are a variety of animal allergies versus foods and peanuts. For each type of allergy, there's a different response. The bottom line is to ensure safety for all guests, of course, and for the individual who has a severe allergy, as well as providing a buffer zone from the source. There's guidance from CTA decisions that give clarity around what those expectations are. We have to put that language in our policies and procedures and in our tariffs to ensure that people with allergies have an understanding of what they can expect when they fly with us.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Air Canada?

Ms. Lucie Guillemette:

In the case of Air Canada, we have a similar buffer zone and we also ask our crews to speak to passengers surrounding the individual who may have an allergy. We've taken very similar steps.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you for your responses to my questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My thanks to all the guests for joining us this evening.

Many aspects of Bill C-49 bother me, some of which deal with the air component.

My first question is for the Air Canada officials, not as a way to single out the company, but because the example I have in mind directly concerns them.

A few years ago, a joint venture agreement between Delta and Air Canada was being negotiated, if memory serves, and it was blocked by the Commissioner of Competition. The Commissioner of Competition ensures the safety of consumers and travellers. If the commissioner says that this agreement is not in their best interests, I'm fine with that.

In Bill C-49, the role of the Commissioner of Competition becomes advisory and the minister may decide to override his recommendations for reasons he deems valid. Does this mean that it would be possible to establish joint venture agreements—to which I'm not fundamentally opposed—that the minister deems valid, but the Commissioner of Competition does not?

(1800)

Mr. David Rheault:

It is difficult to speculate and foresee situations that have not happened yet.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Let me ask you a concrete question. Will the agreement with Delta be reinstated if the Commissioner of Competition is no longer an obstacle?

Mr. David Rheault:

Right now, the new system proposed by the bill provides for the involvement of the Competition Bureau, but also for clear authorization by Transport Canada.

The Competition Bureau will be involved and competition-related issues will be raised. However, the public policy principle means to consider the broader interests of air infrastructure development and the potential that those agreements can have.

We are convinced that the finest expertise in the matter is at Transport Canada, and the Competition Bureau, of course. However, given the fundamental importance of those joint ventures for the development of the Canadian industry, the department must consider the broader interests. Transport Canada is mandated to weigh all the factors and make good decisions.

There are statutory review mechanisms to ensure there is monitoring and conditions for authorization in place, to see what the outcome might be for consumers, among other things.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

We can agree that it is not always a team effort. The commissioner has an advisory role.

I will now turn to you, Ms. Pavlovic. I quite agree with you that Bill C-49 does not have a passenger bill of rights, but outlines the general principles that might lead to the creation of one.

In your opening remarks, you said that there were omissions, even in the general principles that must guide the Agency in its consultations. What aspects are missing from Bill C-49?

Prof. Marina Pavlovic:

Thank you for your question.[English]

I think it's very difficult to pinpoint very specific issues, because this is really a very broad list of issues. For the lack of better words, the devil is going to be in the details, in the way these issues are implemented. For me, and this may not necessarily be something my co-panellists agree with, ministerial discretion is very important, because new issues will arise and may actually arise after the bill has been passed, which will allow CTA to add them to that specific list.

One question concerning which I think some consideration may be warranted is whether there are any human rights issues that may be raised. We have seen a few cases—and there is currently a case before the Supreme Court of Canada, which is on a standing issue, not even on the substance—of overweight passengers who are asked to pay for two seats or are taken off the flight. Any issues that may impact human rights more than commercial or economic rights that are currently in the bill may warrant some exploration concerning whether some of these could be put into the bill of rights in the future. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. I'm certainly interested in receiving your brief and your recommendations.

In the one minute I have left, I will turn to the representatives from WestJet.

At the Trois-Rivières regional airport, which is located in a municipality I represent, there have been plans for charter airlines heading south. However, it was impossible to carry them out because the security measures were not available. Those measures could have been available had the associated costs been paid, as mentioned in Bill C-49.

Do you agree with this double standard for airports, meaning that some have the services covered, while others have to pay for them?

(1805)

[English]

Mr. Mike McNaney:

It would be very difficult for me to admit in public that I endorse a double standard. Sometimes it happens.

Speaking seriously, though, to your question, as a general principle I go back to our brief and our statement that the totality of the ATSC should go towards screening, and it doesn't. You then end up with shortfalls across the system.

If you have a small airport, as in the example you've given, I don't think we want to be ridiculously strict on how things can go. If we can find another way to bring in service to that community and you can drive that connectivity, then perhaps that airport would pick up some element of the cost.

I think we have to have some flexibility. As a general principle, I would want all of the ATSC to go to aviation security. Then if we had to have something for smaller airports, or airports of a different size, as happens in the U.S., which has programs for airports in a given population area and for the number of carriers they get.... If we had to look at something like that, so that smaller airports could actually make a go of it, then I think we should do so.

The Chair:

We go on to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Your story, when it comes to air passengers' rights, is a kind of good news, bad news thing. The bad news is that alarming stories come out in the media a few times a year. The good news is that they only come out a few times a year. For the most part, things go well.

But I have to ask what on earth is going on when you have a name on a no-fly list and it turns out to be a six-year-old kid and still the family cannot fly? What happened to that poor family who came to the airport with their kids, weren't allowed on the plane, and then were dinged another $4,000 the next day to get on a plane?

Is this a systems failure, or is it a customer service failure? What kind of training—and I'm sorry, I'm picking on Air Canada because they are the two that are most recent in memory, but I'm sure everybody has their moment.... What's going on there? Do you need government to step in and teach some common sense here?

Ms. Lucie Guillemette:

The answer to that is no. We don't need to be regulated to tell us to do the right thing. However, when you ask the question, is it a training issue, is it a tariff issue, or what is it? In those two particular cases, I don't think you're looking for the answer as to what happened in those specific areas, but the bottom line is that there are situations at times—those two, for example—that on the surface do appear to be pretty dramatic. When we fail and when it is our fault, if it's a training issue or we didn't use good common sense or good judgment, most often we are in contact with the customer as some of these stories unfold in the media. It doesn't make it right, but when we say that we want to improve, it's exactly what we mean.

I can't comment on the one on the no-fly list, because truthfully I don't have all the details, but in many cases, in some of the stories you read at times it is our failure, but at times, as you say, it's a training issue or it's a situation occurring in an airport environment, usually when there is a pretty large irregular air operation. I'm not suggesting that it makes it right, but again, the truth of the matter is that we are trying to improve these things, and to be honest with you, we're not at all opposed to having a set of guidelines under which to operate or to report on these situations. They are our customers and we need to do right by them.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I do submit that it's, in some respect, a corporate value sort of thing as to what you default to when something such as that comes up, but we'll move on.

Let's talk about joint ventures.

Ms. Pavlovic, joint ventures have been problematic over time. Some have been challenged, and we heard about one just this evening. To your mind, what triggers should the airlines be watching for when they're trying to put together a joint venture that would draw at least concerns about anti-competitive behaviour?

(1810)

Prof. Marina Pavlovic:

I think your question is a little outside my area of expertise. I could comment broadly in terms of consumer interests.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Please do.

Prof. Marina Pavlovic:

My view of the Canadian aviation marketplace is not necessarily the same as industry's, in the same way that my view of the telecommunications industry is also very different. I think we have almost virtualized monopolies. The restrictions on foreign investment in Canada are significant, and we don't have enough investment. If we could, probably the marketplace would be a bit more diversified and consumers would have more choice, but consumers have very little choice. Right now, there are few airlines that offer services, so this is pretty much what they can do, in the same way that in telecommunications there is some competition but not a lot.

I can't really comment specifically. There are different mechanisms in place, including the new process suggested that goes through the Competition Bureau and Transport Canada. In those kinds of instances, participation by public interest and consumer groups is really relevant to provide more targeted expertise as to what kind of impact that would have on consumers directly, but this is as far as I can really go with your question.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I have one final quick question.

What is the gap between the amount of money collected to pay for CATSA services and the amount of money actually spent on CATSA services? This question goes to some of your earlier comments about the cost-plus-plus regime that could be settling into place here.

Mr. David Rheault:

I don't have the exact amount with me. We can provide that to the committee.

I know we did some analysis in our submission for the Emerson panel. I'm trying to go by memory, but I think it was at the time about $100 million, or something such as that, but I need to check and get back to the committee.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you.

Mr. David Rheault:

Maybe I could just add that, over the last five or six years, Air Canada has collected almost $90 million more from its passengers on ATSC and remitted it to the government, so this is a significant amount of money.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

On competition, I just have to say that last week I flew to Kelowna on Air Canada and came back on WestJet. On WestJet, the granola bars are much better than the pretzels, so thank you.

I have a very quick question for you.

To build on Mr. Aubin's point, my riding has a number of airfields but one international airport, Mont-Tremblant International. It has seasonal service that's not very frequent. To get customs, it costs a fortune. Does CATSA cost recovery put airports such as mine in danger?

Mr. Mike McNaney:

No, I don't think it does. If we are actually collecting the totality of the funds that are appropriate, then no, it shouldn't.

To the earlier question a few moments ago, CATSA, in the corporate plan submission—I'm not sure of the exact name of it—that it made to the government in July outlined that it's going to be facing further funding crunches, if the means by which it receives its funds are not consistent with how many passengers they're getting.

The biggest issue over the past several years—and in an equal effort, Madam Chair, to annoy both sides of the House, this was under Conservative governments and under Liberal governments—is that for many years this funding has not reached the level it should. You've had a multi-year experience of passenger counts across the country increasing. WestJet has been exponentially increasing its capacity in the market, Air Canada has, Porter Airlines has, Air Canada carriers have through Air Canada's capacity purchase agreements. A heck of a lot more people are flying today than was the case even 10 years ago. What hasn't kept pace with that is the CATSA funds actually flowing on a one-to-one basis. You pay it; it goes into security.

For your smaller airports, then, what you face is to some degree the reality of the policy for the past five to six years whereby CATSA has been starved of the totality of its funds. If you change that system, then perhaps you have to look at some top-ups.

It has happened on a per-budget basis that you look at some top-ups for smaller airports. Again I go back to the United States, which has a very different model, but the United States' federal government does provide direct financial support in a quantum exponentially beyond anything we do in Canada for small regional airports. It's probably something we should take a look at from the standpoint of the economic development that this then unleashes.

Thank you for your earlier comments. We're going to put that on Youtube as an ad.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

(1815)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Most airlines these days overbook flights. I don't think that's a mystery to anybody. The United Airlines incident a few months ago certainly put that into the forefront.

On both of your airlines, if you have more seats sold than there are seats on the plane and there are no volunteers willing to leave the terminal, what do you do?

Ms. Lucie Guillemette:

Before I answer that I just want to make a little bit of a distinction, because I think it's important.

When we look at our statistics and at our performance in cases of denied boardings, it's important for us to recognize what is truly an oversell, meaning it was a commercial decision for us to oversell a flight as distinct from a case in which we end up overbooked. It may not seem important, but it's an important distinction to make.

Even if a flight wasn't oversold at all and we end up in a situation in which we have more passengers than seats, it might be as a result of irregular operation or because we had a downgauged aircraft. Irrespective of the reason, if we were in a situation in which we didn't have any volunteers on board—and even prior to the incidents in the spring this was in our provisions—we would never, without a volunteer, remove a passenger. By that I mean we would come on board and would ask for volunteers.

At that point in time, truth be told, the compensation level might change to such point in time as we got a volunteer. If we never did, our operations control systems would probably help us in looking to see whether there's an ability to upgauge an aircraft, but we would deal with the situation as events progress.

Generally, I have to tell you, we don't face that kind of situation when we have voluntary programs. We at times know that we have a situation coming, so we pre-move passengers. We contact them, we pay compensation in advance to move them, or we'll buy seats on another airline. A multitude of things can occur. In truth, I don't recall in my experience at Air Canada in revenue management having been through a situation in which we had no alternative. We always have alternatives.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have time for one more question.

Does it require, in your view, a bill of rights to raise customer service across the industry so that you're all rising together, so that you're not having to fight over who has better customer service? By putting in the bill of rights you all have to rise. Is that an advantage? Is that going to help us improve customer service overall?

I've flown in Asia, and the customer service is way better than anything we get in North America.

Ms. Lucie Guillemette:

I think there's a two-prong answer.

When you speak about customer service, airlines should want to do that on their own. As I said earlier, we don't need regulation, but we're in favour of having standards across the industry if it makes it better for customers to have clarity in terms of what they can expect if something does go wrong. We're highly motivated to have repeat business and happy customers, to do what's right. It doesn't mean that we don't fail at times, but we're very motivated to do that on our own.

Do we believe some of the provisions could improve the industry at large? For sure. As we noted earlier, if we had a better understanding of all the steps within the process, where there are failures, for sure the industry could improve.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Sorry, you'll have to try to answer somebody else's question to get your point across at this moment.

Mr. Shields.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I appreciate your being here this evening. It's a service that I've used from both airlines, and I appreciate that we have this service in Canada. I've flown on airlines around the world. Some are a little more scary than what we have in Canada, and some that I've flown on in some countries are a lot more scary. I appreciate what we do to get people around our country.

There are a couple of other things.

WestJet, you didn't get the opportunity to answer regarding the joint ventures, or I didn't hear it.

Mr. Mike McNaney:

I'll have to cast my memory back to some of the questions posed on it. There was a question about what carriers can do in terms of dealing with consumer concerns, and so on, and what's an initial metric. I think the first metric on it would simply be the concentration on the given city pair, or city pairs, that the venture wants to start to get engaged in. What happens to the totality, then, of competition and service if two entities are co-operating on a given route?

One thing that does get a bit lost from sight in terms of joint ventures is that if it's working appropriately, and I have no reason to suspect it would not, it actually is providing further alternatives for consumers and further options to then connect to wherever else, in whomever's network, which ultimately simply drives further connectivity.

(1820)

Mr. Martin Shields:

You both might want to answer this if we have enough time. I'll start with WestJet.

There are a lot of pieces that you've referred to that end up in that ticket price. A lot of farm organizations, for example, have been here through the last couple of days. They're the end guy that produces and has no way to get it back. You must have some similar things that price into that ticket in the sense of the things that go on in an airport. Can you define a few of them quickly? Who else do you pay out of that ticket price that you have no control over?

Mr. Mike McNaney:

What we're both familiar with, as are most consumers, is the airport improvement fee, which is an add-on to the ticket. Sometimes there is confusion that this is the totality of the funds that then makes its way to that airport for that service. We have what are called “aeronautical fees”, or you might think of them as landing fees or gate fees, that come out of the airfare itself to pay for those services to the airport in question.

As I mentioned at the closing of my comments, when you shake it all down, the totality of suppliers and costs that go to the airport authority and suppliers we have on the ground, WestJet made, on average, for those first six months, $8.34 or $8.35 per passenger, or “per guest” as we call it. What that underscores is that it is a volume business. When we talk about a $5 shift here or a $5 shift there on an AIF, or some other charge, it is very important to us when you put it in the context of $8.34.

Going back to my earlier comments—and yes, I'm trying to grab everything I can possibly say at this moment—in terms of accountability under this legislation and the entities, yes, we're all going to be providing information, but as far as I can tell, there is only one entity that is going to be asked for compensation.

Mr. Martin Shields:

With Bill C-49, do you see an increase in that cost to the passenger at the end?

Mr. Mike McNaney:

I suspect it will. I saw a comment in one of the presentations given on I think it was the first day, and the commentary was that it shouldn't if the air carriers “up their game”.

I find that somewhat puzzling. I can't up my game if I'm taking delays because we have guests stuck in CATSA. I can't up my game if we have delays in conveying information with regulatory authorities in the other country for aviation security purposes and I'm not getting information back as to whether I can go or it's no-go with that passenger or passengers, and therefore, I'm delaying the flight. I can't up my game if there are delays at de-icing facilities that I do not control and that I do not operate. There's no way around that.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Air Canada.

Mr. David Rheault:

I would just add to the the issue of cost, tax and fees, in addition to what Mike just said.

In our submission for the CTA review panel, our first principle was that the industry should be acknowledged as an economic enabler and the taxation regime should reflect that. In addition to what Mike stated, we also have in Canada what we call airport rent, which is a fee that the airport has to pay to government and that goes into general revenue. This money is not put back into the system. That represents a significant amount of money. In fact, it was billions over the last years.

What we basically say is that any amount that's taken from the industry should at least be put back into the industry.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Is this piece of legislation going to affect your bottom-line ticket prices?

Ms. Lucie Guillemette:

I think it would be a little bit difficult for us to assess. Certainly in some areas when we look at maybe the compensation costs, things like that. To be truthful, we haven't formulated a view on what the incremental cost overall would be. We have to assume that in some circumstances, for example, like I said for compensation purposes, it's important that we understand the impact of the proposal.

Mr. Martin Shields:

Because the regulations haven't been written, that makes this...? Okay.

I would have assumed you would have done some financial analysis on what this might do to you.

Mr. David Rheault:

If I could just add something, right now you have some principles under which there will be some compensation or indemnity payable to passengers. Right now we already have rules in our tariff that provide for compensation in most of these situations. It depends on what will be the regulation to apply that. That's why it's difficult for us to say exactly what the impact would be. Those are representations that we will make in the consultation process.

(1825)

Mr. Martin Shields:

I just assumed there are tech guys in the background examining all sorts of ideas of where this could go, and you'd have all sorts of documents that would tell you what might happen.

Anyway, I'm probably out of time.

The Chair:

You are.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I thank you for coming out tonight. I don't want to necessarily get into what's happened. I want to get more into what's going to happen moving forward.

Two of the themes we've really concentrated on in the last couple of days have to do with both safety as well as business. How do we become more of an enabler for you to be more competitive and to add more value and better service to the customer?

I want to start off with the safety part first. We talked with the rail industry about video-voice recorders. You obviously know what's happening there with Bill C-49 and what it's recommending.

My question to you is with what you have now in your industry, which is not necessarily a video recorder but a voice recorder, do you find that with that in place—and although it's not accessible, I get that, but it can be, if you really wanted it to be with new technology—you can use the voice recorders when it comes to safety, when it comes to prevention of and when it comes to reaction to?

Have flight recorders, voice recorders, served or would the airlines request further capacity or capabilities with those flight recorders?

Mr. Mike McNaney:

In terms of the use of the recorders for learning purposes or for broadening safety, to some degree I'll have to check back with the ranch, the head office in Calgary, on some details for you on that. I think one particular aspect of commercial aviation is the specifics of the operations of a flight, so if something is occurring that shouldn't be occurring that information is being conveyed back and forth to our OCC. The voice recorders are certainly obviously a piece of getting to the bottom of an issue that may have occurred, but for the actual data in terms of what's going on with the aircraft and how it's performing, there's robust communication on that front that actually is not necessarily germane to the voice recorder itself.

Mr. David Rheault:

I would agree with that.

I'm not an expert.

We should have in safety...and perhaps we can come back with something more specific, but in general we have very strong safety procedures in place to ensure that our operations are safe. If you have more questions regarding the use of the cockpit voice recorder, we can get back to you on this.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Essentially your voice recorders are being used in a reactionary manner versus being proactive for discipline or anything like that. They're not being used for that. There's no desire to use it for that.

I'm just going to cut right to the chase. Right now with some of the comments being made about the video-voice recorders for the rail industry, there's a lot of opinion on how far we should go with legislation, how far with the ability for, in this case, CP and CN, or any others that might be out there. What capacities would they be able to be afforded with respect to discipline, keeping an eye on, etc.?

Is there any desire with the airline industry to have that same capacity?

Mr. Mike McNaney:

Just in terms of WestJet, I'm not aware of any discussions internally about that.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Good. That's a careful answer. Thank you.

Going to the business part of it, right now, as I mentioned earlier in this dialogue from the past few days, we've been teasing out not only those issues having to do with Bill C-49, but ultimately ways that Bill C-49 can contribute to the broader national transportation strategy, especially the strategy that has been outlined by the minister—the trade corridors strategy not only for moving goods but also moving people globally.

How do you see this bill, from the standpoint of your industry, being integrated with other methods of transport in the movement of people and goods to better position Canada with respect to that resource being available to the consumer, to the customer, whether it be business or the daily traveller?

(1830)

Mr. Mike McNaney:

That's a good question, and I can honestly say we didn't prepare for that one beforehand.

I would go back to some things from the earlier questions in terms of establishing overall expectations for consumers and creating a bottom-level base that the industry has to adhere to from a service standard viewpoint. There's some utility in that.

In terms of the broader corridor issues, I don't think there's much, to be honest. I think some of the other issues we've talked about that are not in this legislation would speak to this—some of the accountability issues we've talked about from other levels, with other actors involved, and I think some of the comments that were made a few moments ago about recognizing aviation as a commercial enabler.

By and large, I don't get the sense that we are necessarily seen as a commercial enabler. We are the only mode of transportation that has 100% user pay. I look at some of the other modes and the way they are governed and the extent to which public funds are made available to them, and that doesn't occur with our sector.

If we wanted to actually drive those corridors further and commercial aviation were to play a strong role in that, we should look at some of the policies that exist for these other modes of transport under this rubric and see whether we can apply them to aviation.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

That's a good point. I'll put out the request that you folks go back, and when we take this to the next level—pass Bill C-49—start looking at satisfying some of the recommendations that are contained within the strategy overall and at how the airline industry can integrate data, or logistics and distribution of goods globally, or even the movement of people. How can you participate and as an enabler add to Canada's being better positioned because we have that proper transportation infrastructure in place?

Thank you for that.

Mr. David Rheault:

To answer that question with respect to Bill C-49, I think the review regime that is proposed for joint ventures is very positive. This can help to develop Canadian infrastructure and develop new gateways through Canada to open our country to the world and enhance the movement of passengers and goods.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Great. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Wow. I didn't realize it was my turn already. Thank you very much for that.

I want to ask a question of Air Canada.

In your submission, on your last page in your conclusion, you state: Air Canada, therefore urges caution and asks the government to strike a balance with the implementation of Bill C-49 so as not to put Canada or Canadian airlines at a competitive disadvantage.

Do you believe that Bill C-49 has done this?

Mr. David Rheault:

No, we don't believe that. What we basically say in our submission is that we are in a very competitive environment, which is worthwhile, yet the principle of Bill C-49 to have some established compensation and a certain regime also has to take into account the broader issue of the competitiveness of the industry.

This is a submission we would be making in the consultations for the drafting of the regulation, because we believe that the regulation should take into account also the competitiveness of the industry and the circumstances in which these regulations should be applicable when you compare them with what has been done in other jurisdictions.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I'm going to see whether I heard you correctly.

You believe that Bill C-49 does strike the right balance in terms of continuing to ensure that there is a competitive advantage for your airlines.

Mr. David Rheault:

I'm sorry if I didn't express myself clearly.

Basically what we said is that the way the balance will be struck will depend on what the regulation is and at what level of compensation and in which circumstances you will apply it. What we say in our submission is that you have to be conscious, when you establish those levels, that they might have an impact on competitiveness.

When Bill C-49 was tabled, all public statements from the minister were clear that the intent was not to put at stake the competitiveness of the air industry. This is a message that is well noted by us, because we operate in a very complex and competitive environment and we want to make sure that the regulations that will implement Bill C-49 take that message into account.

(1835)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay.

You've also stated in your submission that changes would be required to the definition of “Canadian” in Bill C-49 to ensure that the policy objectives underlining the new foreign ownership rules are met. Can you tell us more about that? How would you want to see that definition change?

Mr. David Rheault:

That's a very good question.

We have proposed some wording in the annex of our submission. Basically, we want to add the notion of “owned directly or indirectly by a foreign entity” or the notion that a foreign entity cannot be affiliated or be acting in concert. These notions are taken from other corporate law to make sure that the intention is to place certain limits on foreign ownership, but we want to have language that clarifies those limits and that makes sure the intention is not circumvented or that some entity could not do indirectly what they could not do directly, if I'm clear.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Yes, we—

Mr. David Rheault:

Maybe I should state it in French so the translator could get it better than me.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

No, often we have been admonished in the House for trying to do that very thing.

I think that's it for my questions, Madam Chair.

I want to thank you again for being here.

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I will once again turn to the Air Canada representatives.

I just want to make sure I understand one of your first recommendations. You talked about streamlining the system and making it more efficient by applying it only to flights that leave Canada, as is the case in the U.S. system, which is limited to flights that leave the U.S.

Let me use my last trip as an example. I was going to Rwanda. Let's say that, as a consumer, I go to Air Canada to buy the ticket, and since there is no direct flight, I have to go through Brussels. Does this mean that, because my departure is from Canada with Air Canada, you will be responsible for me all the way? If I were denied boarding in Brussels, not on the Air Canada flight, would I have to talk to you or the people in Brussels?

Mr. David Rheault:

First, the system must apply to flights that leave Canada. The NEXUS program, which is linked to Canadian jurisdiction, is the simplest. When you come back, say, from Belgium, the European system is in force. If two systems are in force for the same flight, the situation becomes complicated for passengers and complex to manage for the carriers.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

What happens if I have a problem with my connecting flight in Brussels, not when I leave Montreal?

Mr. David Rheault:

If you have a problem in Brussels, it will be handled under the European regulations already in force. You will have to deal with the airline operating the flight.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Even though Air Canada sold me the ticket, as part of its joint venture?

Mr. David Rheault:

Yes. The European regulations specify that it is the responsibility of the air carrier operating the flight because it is in charge of the operation. We would like to see an amendment that incorporates this principle—which is already in force in European regulations—into Canadian regulations.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I will now turn to Ms. Pavlovic to discuss the bill of rights.

It seems to me that we don't have to reinvent the wheel when it comes to creating a bill of rights. A number of countries have done it before us.

Is there a particularly compelling model from which we could draw inspiration to draft our own Canadian bill of rights? [English]

Prof. Marina Pavlovic:

Let me first just add something on the geographical links.

Limiting it to flights that depart Canada would make sense if every other country in the world had equivalent protection. The European Union does, but there are a hundred other countries that do not have equal levels of protection or do not have any protection.

By doing that, we then exclude a number of people from any kind of protection. I think it's very important, and again the devil is going to be in the details to figure out how we're going to operate it, but there is really no uniformity across the world.

To your actual question, I think the European Union directive is a good start. It is not fully transferable to Canada, and we ought to be careful about importing things that work in one jurisdiction to other jurisdictions, but I think they have spent much more time thinking about this than we have, and we can learn certainly from their successes but also from their mistakes.

(1840)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Mr. Rheault, would you like to add anything?

Mr. David Rheault:

I'd like to go back to what Ms. Pavlovic said.

This could be a topic for an international convention, such as the Montreal convention, that standardizes some of the rules in terms of responsibility.

Here is an example of what happens when the system is applied outside Canada: when a passenger leaves Israel for Canada with a stopover in Europe, three systems apply to that passenger, at different levels and with different carriers. This complicates the administration for us, the carriers, but it also makes the process more difficult to understand for passengers, who want to know on which door to knock and what compensation they are entitled to. It becomes very difficult to manage for us, which delays things.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

That's why I would prefer to deal with the one I bought the ticket from. [English]

The Chair:

Do you have another question, Mr. Aubin? [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Yes, I will be very brief.

There is increased competition between companies. Let me give you two examples of changes made in recent years. The flight attendant/passenger ratio increased from 40 to 50, and the cap for foreign capital funding was changed. Is it acceptable that the changes apply to only a few companies that, I suspect, lobbied more aggressively because that's what they needed at the time? When changes are made, would it not be better if they applied consistently to the entire industry?

Mr. David Rheault:

For us, it's the level playing field principle, or equal competition. It is an important principle.

There have been legislative changes, such as the exemptions granted to certain carriers with respect to foreign ownership. It is a matter of principle to us. We feel that all carriers should be able to enjoy the same rules because we operate in the same industry and compete for the same passengers. So the same system should apply to everyone. [English]

Mr. Mike McNaney:

Very quickly, in terms of the foreign ownership, one other piece that we do have to recognize is that there is no WTO for commercial aviation services. There's no one global agreement, so when all the bilaterals go across all the different jurisdictions in which we operate, nationality is part of the agreement. Regarding that 49%, if you eliminate that or go beyond it, you're going to get into issues of whether you qualify as a Canadian operator, for example, in this instance, under a bilateral agreement with another nation.

There is broader context, and that's why the U.S. is at 25%, and the EU will go up to 49%. It is very interesting that some of those carriers and entities perceived to be the largest that are going to be in the global sphere have 0% foreign ownership, because they view the airline as a competitive asset in terms of their economic growth.

The Chair:

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I think we'll probably only have time for one or maybe two questions. Most of us here fly twice a week when the House is sitting, and I have to say, most of the time the service is actually pretty good. I mentioned the other day during the opening panel how frustrating it can be when you see those videos on the Internet of egregious treatment, because we're all familiar with the frustrations we come across when a flight might be overbooked and you have to sit through that awkward auction, or when you have trouble finding a seat next to your child. I recounted one instance where my size 16 basketball shoes rolled out on the carousel at the end of a long flight, and it is very frustrating.

With this bill of rights, WestJet, I appreciate your answer saying you can live with this, it's good, and you'll look forward to the details in the regulation.

Air Canada, you proposed a handful of amendments that, to be frank, give me some cause for concern. When I'm looking at rights, what I'm hoping for is, through competition, you guys are going to raise the roof and hold each other to account and give me the best possible travel experience.

When I look at the proposed amendments, instead of raising the roof, I fear you're asking us to lower the floor in the name of harmony and ease of operation. When I look at adopting the Montreal Convention when it comes to baggage, or the departure from a location within the U.S., or the carrier obligations such as the EU's that you mentioned, are we risking lowering the floor? To me, that's not a conversation about rights.

Mr. David Rheault:

I just want to add something. If you take the specific example of baggage liability, if you apply the limit of the Montreal Convention to domestic travel you will actually raise the floor, because the limit of liability in the Montreal Convention is around $2,000 right now, while different limits and passenger tariffs will vary from $500 to $1,500.

What we say, basically, is that if there is a limit that is applicable internationally, why don't we just have the same limit domestically so it's easier for us to manage? The customer would be aware that there is a new limit for both. The system is simpler for us, which makes it more efficient.

(1845)

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I would love to dig down more on this.

I have one more question and we only have about one more minute.

There was an important issue that Ms. Pavlovic raised about third parties being able to launch claims for causes of action for systemic problems. This is a conversation going on with human rights around the globe right now.

Can an NGO bring a case on behalf of a large group of complainants who can't bring it forward themselves? Is this something you think is possible, reasonable, and workable, within the context of the aviation industry and the context of the air passenger bill of rights?

Mr. David Rheault:

In our submission before the panel, this is a point that we made, that you have to have a direct interest to be entitled to file a claim. That's a principle that we submitted to the CTA review panel. This principle is included to a certain extent in Bill C-49, and we're comfortable with that, although we have proposed some amendments to give it more clarity.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I think we're out of time.

If Ms. Pavlovic had an opportunity to comment, could we maybe allow a short answer?

The Chair:

I think we could manage another minute.

Prof. Marina Pavlovic:

Thank you.

There is currently a case before the Supreme Court of Canada that is going to be heard on October 2, on standing by non-parties to challenge some of the provinces. I think it is important to have third-party standing. It's not necessarily to encourage the complaints industry—and you might hear from somebody tomorrow who is in that business—but to provide for a legitimate challenge of systemic practices that an individual consumer cannot do.

I strongly suggest to include language that would allow third parties with some interest, not random third parties, to have standing in these kinds of issues.

The Chair:

Okay, thank you all very much.

Everybody seems satisfied with all of the answers, so I think you've done a good job.

Thank you all very much for coming this evening.

We will now adjourn for the day.

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(0940)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Nous allons ouvrir la séance du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités. Conformément à l'ordre de renvoi du lundi 19 juin 2017, nous examinons le projet de loi C-49, loi apportant des modifications à la Loi sur les transports au Canada et à d'autres lois concernant les transports ainsi que des modifications connexes et corrélatives à d'autres lois.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à nos témoins qui sont ici pour nous aider à examiner le projet de loi C-49 et nous faire part de leurs réflexions à ce sujet. Je vais commencer par demander à tous les témoins de se présenter.

Commençons par le représentant de Cereals Canada, s'il vous plaît.

M. Cam Dahl (président, Céréales Canada):

Certainement. Je m'appelle Cam Dahl et je suis président de Cereals Canada, une organisation de la chaîne de valeur présente dans tout le pays qui réunit tous les intervenants du secteur, depuis la production des semences jusqu'aux produits que l'on peut trouver à l'épicerie, sans oublier le secteur agricole.

La présidente:

Merci.

Je vais maintenant demander au représentant de l'Association canadienne de l'industrie de la chimie de se présenter.

M. Bob Masterson (président-directeur général, Association canadienne de l'industrie de la chimie):

Très bien. Merci, madame la présidente.

Je suis Bob Masterson, président-directeur général de l'Association canadienne de l'industrie de la chimie. Je suis accompagné aujourd'hui par Mme Kara Edwards qui est notre spécialiste des transports et qui connaît particulièrement bien tout ce qui se rapporte au projet de loi C-49.

Merci.

La présidente:

Cela va être intéressant.

Et maintenant, les Producteurs de grains du Canada.

M. Jeff Nielsen (président, Producteurs de grains du Canada):

Bonjour.

Je m'appelle Jeff Nielsen, producteur à Olds, en Alberta, et président des Producteurs de grains du Canada. Je suis accompagné de notre directrice exécutive, Fiona Cook.

La présidente:

Très bien.

Je reviens maintenant à M. Dahl. Voulez-vous donner le coup d'envoi de la séance avec la présentation de votre exposé?

M. Cam Dahl:

Avec plaisir.

Au nom de Cereals Canada, je tiens à remercier le Comité de nous avoir invités à comparaître aujourd'hui. Il n'est pas inhabituel pour un comité de tenir des séances comme celle-ci lorsque le Parlement ne siège pas et encore moins de se livrer à des séances marathons comme celle vous tenez aujourd'hui. Nous en avons bien conscience et nous vous remercions pour la priorité que vous accordez à ce projet de loi qui s'avère d'une importance cruciale pour le secteur agricole du Canada.

Comme je l'ai mentionné,Cereals Canada est une organisation qui relève de la chaîne de valeur nationale. Nos membres représentent les trois piliers du secteur: les agriculteurs, les expéditeurs et les transformateurs dans le secteur du développement des semences et des cultures. Notre conseil d'administration est représentatif de ces trois groupes. Tous les éléments de la chaîne de valeur considèrent que la réforme des transports est essentielle au succès de notre secteur.

Le Canada exporte annuellement plus de 20 millions de tonnes de grains céréaliers, pour une valeur d'environ 10 milliards de dollars. Pratiquement tout ce grain est transporté par rail dans un premier temps. La rentabilité de tous les éléments de la chaîne de valeur de l'agriculture canadienne dépend de ce lien ferroviaire vers les marchés.

L'agriculture a un fort potentiel de croissance. Selon le rapport Barton, le Canada pourrait bien, d'ici quelques années, devenir le deuxième exportateur en importance dans le monde dans les domaines de l'agriculture et de l'agroalimentaire. Le rapport fixe un objectif de 75 milliards de dollars d'exportations d'ici 2025, alors qu'elles représentaient 55 milliards en 2015. La modernisation des lois sur le transport est indispensable pour que le Canada puisse répondre à cette demande croissante et maintenir sa réputation de fournisseur fiable.

Dans le domaine de l'agriculture, il n'y a pas que l'exportation qui compte. Cette industrie donne du travail aux Canadiens. Un emploi sur huit au Canada dépend de l'agriculture. Notre capacité à atteindre ces objectifs en matière de croissance et d'augmenter le nombre d'emplois pour les Canadiens dans ce secteur dépend de notre capacité à acheminer notre production vers les marchés en temps opportun. Permettez-moi d'insister sur le fait que c'est bien le marché international qui définit ce que veut dire « en temps opportun ». Nous n'atteindrons pas ces objectifs si les transporteurs limitent notre capacité à répondre à la demande mondiale.

Voilà quelles sont les conséquences du projet de loi C-49 que vous étudiez aujourd'hui. Le premier message que je dois communiquer concernant le projet de loi C-49, c'est qu'il faut renvoyer ce projet de loi à la Chambre pour qu'elle procède à la troisième lecture aussi vite que possible. Il contribuera à une meilleure reddition de comptes de la part des entreprises liées au système de transport du grain, favorisera une meilleure planification des trajets, améliorera la transparence et fixera des exigences de déclaration plus strictes.

Je ne veux pas donner l'impression que le secteur du grain a reçu tout ce qu'il demandait. Certaines dispositions qui étaient réclamées par l'industrie: par exemple, le maintien des dispositions permettant l'interconnexion sur de plus longues distances, prévues dans la Loi sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grain, ne figurent pas dans le projet de loi C-49. Toutefois, aucune loi n'étant parfaite, nous croyons que cette mesure devrait être adoptée. Cereals Canada présente quelques suggestions d'amendements d'ordre technique qui sont exposées en détail à la fin du mémoire qui vous a été remis.

J'aimerais expliquer brièvement pourquoi nous sommes ici et pourquoi la modification de la loi nous paraît nécessaire.

Des failles dans le système de transport du grain ont été mises en évidence en 2013 et en 2014 quand le réseau de transport a connu une défaillance majeure. Cet échec systémique a entraîné des répercussions sur l'ensemble de la chaîne de valeur, nuisant à la marque et à la réputation du Canada à titre de fournisseur fiable de produits agricoles. Des ventes avaient alors été perdues, entraînant ainsi une chute des prix. Cette crise a causé un préjudice aux agriculteurs, aux entreprises de manutention du grain, aux exportateurs, aux transformateurs à valeur ajoutée et, finalement, à l'économie canadienne dans son ensemble.

Ce n'était pas la première fois que système de transport manquait à ses devoirs envers l'un des plus grands secteurs du Canada. Des commissions et des examens antérieurs le prouvent clairement, comme les études réalisées par le défunt juge Estey et par Arthur Kroeger, ainsi que le rapport préparé par les agents de la haute direction de la chaîne de valeur du grain. La liste des rapports sur le transport du grain est assez longue. L'histoire montre que, si les problèmes structurels sous-jacents ne sont pas réglés, le système de transport connaîtra de nouveau des ratés. L'agriculture et l'économie canadiennes ne peuvent pas se permettre de revivre une telle situation.

Si le système ferroviaire ne favorise pas une rentabilité maximale de toute la chaîne de valeur de l'industrie céréalière, c'est en grande partie parce qu'il s'agit d'un quasi-monopole. Presque tous les expéditeurs ont recours aux services du même transporteur. Ils doivent donc composer avec les stratégies de service et les prix qui caractérisent les monopoles. Par conséquent, le gouvernement doit intervenir pour établir une structure de réglementation qui assurera l'équilibre des forces concurrentielles.

Je souligne le mot concurrentiel. La réforme du réseau de transport du grain sera fructueuse uniquement si l'on en modifie la structure législative et réglementaire pour en faire un système fonctionnant comme une industrie concurrentielle.

Il convient de souligner que la campagne agricole record de 2013 n'était pas anormale, plus de 70 millions de tonnes dans l'Ouest canadien, même si les critiques de la réforme en parlent souvent comme d'une cause de la crise de 2013 et 2014. Ce niveau de production n'est pas une anomalie. Il s'agit plutôt de la nouvelle norme. La production céréalière continue à croître au Canada, tout comme la demande mondiale, d'ailleurs.

Beaucoup d'entre vous ont certainement entendu parler de la sécheresse qui a touché de nombreuses régions de la Saskatchewan — je crois d'ailleurs que Mme Block provient de cette région de la province. Malgré cette situation, l'Ouest canadien va produire une des plus grandes récoltes de tous les temps. Nous pensons qu'elle sera de l'ordre de 63 à 65 millions de tonnes. Nous devons être en mesure de répondre à l'augmentation de la demande par une augmentation de l'offre.

Je ne vais pas entrer dans les détails des amendements que nous présentons, puisque vous les avez en main. Mais, pour résumer, je pense que le projet de loi C-49 nous assurera un système de transport du grain plus fiable qui permettra une meilleure reddition de comptes. Le changement est bien accueilli par tous les intéressés, y compris nos clients.

Les industries du grain, des oléagineux et des cultures spéciales se sont unies pour réclamer des mesures qui aideront à rendre les chemins de fer plus fiables, afin d'assurer un meilleur rendement. Le projet de loi C-49 contribuera à corriger le déséquilibre entre les pouvoirs des chemins de fer et les expéditeurs qui en sont captifs.

Les dispositions clés du projet de loi sont les suivantes: des outils permettront aux expéditeurs de tenir les chemins de fer financièrement responsables de leur service; les processus seront améliorés par l'intermédiaire de l'Office des transports du Canada si des problèmes se présentent; les responsabilités des sociétés ferroviaires seront plus claires dans la Loi sur les transports au Canada parce qu'elle offrira une meilleure définition de ce qui constitue un « service adéquat et approprié »; les exigences en matière de reddition de comptes et de plan d'intervention seront accrues.

S'il est adopté, le projet de loi C-49 contribuera à rééquilibrer les pouvoirs du marché grâce à des mesures qui obligeront les chemins de fer à fonctionner comme s'ils étaient en concurrence. C'est une bonne politique économique et publique.

L'élément le plus important est l'accroissement des responsabilités des chemins de fer, mais toutes les dispositions sont importantes. Il importe d'améliorer les procédures de l'Office des transports du Canada pour que les problèmes soient détectés et réglés avant qu'ils ne dégénèrent. Cette amélioration, s'ajoutant à la définition de ce qu'est un service de chemin de fer adéquat, contribuera à faire en sorte que le système de transport du Canada réponde aux attentes de nos clients, tant au Canada qu'ailleurs dans le monde.

Aucune mesure législative n'est parfaite et le projet de loi C-49 ne fait pas exception. Cereals Canada a présenté un certain nombre d'amendements techniques. L'adoption de ces amendements ne devrait pas retarder tellement l'adoption du projet de loi et améliorerait grandement la mesure sur le plan de la transparence. Les quatre premiers amendements présentés dans notre mémoire portent sur ce sujet. Ils contribueront par ailleurs à l'alignement de la réglementation en Amérique du Nord sur le territoire du Canada et des États-Unis.

Les amendements que nous présentons permettront aussi d'améliorer la planification opérationnelle, comme le propose le cinquième amendement que nous présentons dans notre mémoire. Les trois derniers amendements permettront d'améliorer l'accès aux outils propres au marché concurrentiel pour redresser le déséquilibre des forces du marché.

Je suis prêt à répondre à vos questions concernant les observations que je viens de vous présenter ou se rapportant au mémoire plus détaillé que je vous ai distribué.

(0945)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Dahl.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Masterson qui représente l'industrie de la chimie.

M. Bob Masterson:

Encore merci, madame la présidente.

C'est un honneur de figurer parmi les témoins qui comparaissent devant votre comité au moment où il effectue l'étude du projet de loi C-49, loi sur la modernisation des transports. Nous allons profiter du temps relativement court que nous passerons en votre compagnie aujourd'hui pour vous faire part de trois messages clés au nom du secteur de l'industrie chimique du Canada. Le mémoire que nous avons déposé au Comité fait état de ces messages et propose quelques réflexions à propos du projet de loi C-49.

Voici brièvement nos trois commentaires. Tout d'abord, il est important de reconnaître que l'industrie chimique joue un rôle majeur dans l'économie canadienne et qu'un réseau de transport ferroviaire efficient et compétitif est indispensable au succès de notre secteur. Le deuxième élément important que j'aimerais souligner est que nous applaudissons avec enthousiasme les efforts du ministre Garneau et de son ministère. Ils nous ont écoutés et les mesures contenues dans Transports 2030 et dans le projet de loi C-49 tiennent véritablement compte des préoccupations exprimées de longue date par notre industrie au sujet du système de transport ferroviaire des marchandises au Canada. Enfin, nous souhaitons que le projet de loi C-49 soit adopté sans tarder et nous ne désirons pas y introduire de nouvelles mesures, mais nous estimons cependant que certains amendements sont nécessaires pour que les dispositions de la loi atteignent leurs objectifs prévus.

Permettez-moi de commencer par vous donner quelques informations au sujet de notre secteur afin de souligner l'importance que revêt le projet de loi C-49 pour appuyer les perspectives de croissance de notre industrie. L'industrie chimique canadienne est essentielle à l'économie de notre pays. Nous sommes le troisième plus grand secteur manufacturier du Canada et la valeur de nos expéditions s'élève annuellement à plus de 53 milliards de dollars. Près de 73 % de ces expéditions sont destinées à l'exportation, ce qui fait de notre industrie le deuxième plus grand exportateur manufacturier du pays.

Comme beaucoup de Canadiens, vous ignorez probablement le rôle qu'exercent les produits chimiques dans notre économie, mais il est important de savoir que 95 % des produits manufacturés ont un lien direct avec l'industrie de la chimie. C'est le cas de tous les secteurs principaux de l'économie canadienne: l'énergie, les transports, l'agroalimentaire, ainsi que les secteurs de la foresterie, des mines et de l'exploitation des métaux. De même, notre industrie produit des biens essentiels pour les collectivités et pour la qualité de vie des Canadiens. C'est le cas notamment de certains produits dangereux: des produits comme le chlore, qui sert à purifier l'eau potable, et l'acide sulfurique, qui sert à la fabrication d'engrais.

Il est tout aussi important de souligner que l'industrie chimique est un secteur en pleine croissance, tant à l'échelle internationale qu'en Amérique du Nord. Au cours des cinq dernières années, plus de 300 investissements à l'échelle internationale, d'une valeur comptable de plus de 230 milliards de dollars canadiens ont été annoncés dans le secteur de la chimie, aux États-Unis seulement. Le Canada a bénéficié d'une petite partie seulement de cette première vague d'investissements, mais nous pensons que nous serons sans doute en mesure d'obtenir une part de la prochaine vague d'investissements.

Plus des trois quarts des expéditions annuelles de l'industrie chimique au Canada font appel au transport ferroviaire. Par conséquent, les coûts et le service de transport ferroviaire sont deux des plus importants facteurs que les investisseurs prennent en compte lorsqu'ils décident d'implanter une nouvelle usine ou d'agrandir leurs installations au Canada. Par conséquent, la compétitivité de notre industrie et ses perspectives d'investissements sont intimement liées à un service de transport ferroviaire fiable et concurrentiel.

Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, nous tenons à souligner que nous applaudissons les efforts du gouvernement et que nous soutenons les mesures relatives au transport ferroviaire énoncées dans Transports 2030 en vue de développer « un programme à long terme pour un réseau ferroviaire plus transparent, équilibré et efficace qui achemine nos biens vers les marchés mondiaux de façon fiable ». En ce qui a trait au projet de loi C-49, nous sommes d'avis que le gouvernement a trouvé un juste équilibre entre les besoins et les préoccupations des expéditeurs et des transporteurs ferroviaires. Nous pensons par ailleurs que les dispositions du projet de loi répondent aux préoccupations que nous avons soulevées au cours des consultations effectuées par le groupe d'étude Emerson et, plus récemment, avec le ministre Garneau en prélude à la publication du rapport Transports 2030.

Plus précisément, le projet de loi  C-49 prend en compte les importantes questions de la transparence et de l'actualité des données, le pouvoir du marché, les droits des expéditeurs, la réciprocité, les tarifs équitables et l'interconnexion prolongée. Le projet de loi propose également d'importantes mesures visant à intégrer les meilleures technologies disponibles en matière de sécurité à l'aide de dispositifs de vidéo en cabine et d'enregistreurs de données qui sont utilisés dans d'autres secteurs des transports depuis de nombreuses années.

Globalement, l'ensemble des mesures proposées par le projet de loi C-49 a le potentiel d'encourager une relation plus équilibrée entre les expéditeurs et les transporteurs, alors que les réalités du système de transport actuel s'opposent à l'instauration d'un environnement commercial normal. Par conséquent, nous croyons que le projet de loi C-49 offre à notre secteur une occasion rare d'applaudir l'intervention du gouvernement en vue de créer des conditions propices aux activités commerciales.

Cependant, le mot clé que je tiens à souligner dans ce que je viens de dire est « potentiel ». Nous estimons que le projet de loi  C-49 répond aux besoins des expéditeurs, nous croyons qu'il représente un effort important en vue d'établir une relation plus équilibrée entre les expéditeurs et les transporteurs à l'intérieur d'un marché par ailleurs non concurrentiel et nous ne sommes pas venus ici aujourd'hui pour vous proposer d'étudier des mesures supplémentaires.

(0950)



Néanmoins, nous craignons que certaines mesures définies et décrites dans le projet de loi ne produisent pas les effets désirés. En particulier, dans le cas des dispositions du projet de loi concernant la transparence des données, nous recommandons fortement que ces dispositions incluent des données ventilées par produit de base sur les tarifs, les volumes et le niveau de service afin de permettre la prise de décisions en matière d'investissement et l'évaluation d'un service équitable et adéquat. À ce titre, nous recommandons aussi que ces données soient disponibles plus rapidement pour les expéditeurs grâce à l'établissement d'un échéancier de mise en oeuvre de la réglementation.

Dans le même ordre d'idées, nous recommandons que la loi indique clairement que les compagnies de chemin de fer sont tenues d'offrir le niveau de service le plus élevé qu'elles peuvent raisonnablement fournir. La formulation actuelle nous paraît ambiguë, étant donné qu'elle n'assimile pas « un service adéquat et approprié » avec le plus haut niveau de service raisonnable dans les circonstances. Il faudrait clarifier cette mesure pour toutes les parties concernées.

En ce qui a trait aux pouvoirs de l'Office des transports du Canada et au processus de règlement informel des différends, nous recommandons que les pouvoirs de l'office soient élargis afin qu'il puisse agir de sa propre initiative et d'enquêter de façon indépendante pour s'assurer que les règlements informels convenus sont mis en oeuvre et prennent effet et que les décideurs politiques et les intervenants puissent discerner les grandes tendances en matière de rendement du transport ferroviaire.

Enfin, et peut-être surtout pour nous, l'intention des dispositions du projet de loi concernant l'interconnexion de longue distance est des plus bienvenues. Tel que noté dans le propre document d'étude du gouvernement, les mesures précédentes concernant les prix de ligne concurrentiels ont été peu appliquées et n'offraient pas une contribution appréciable à l'établissement d'un environnement plus équilibré entre les expéditeurs et les transporteurs. Nous craignons toutefois que les limites et les exclusions particulières imposées par le projet de loi à l'interconnexion de longue distance entraîneront une sous-utilisation de ces dispositions et les rendront donc inefficaces. Beaucoup de nos membres sont des expéditeurs captifs pour qui le transport routier n'est pas une option. Pour plus de 50 % de nos membres, le transport routier n'est plus économiquement viable sur une distance de 500 kilomètres. Par conséquent, nous recommandons l'élimination des conditions qui s'appliquent expressément aux produits toxiques à l'inhalation, au trafic provenant d'un rayon de moins de 30 kilomètres d'un autre point d'interconnexion, et des exclusions se rapportant à certains corridors à haut volume.

Madame la présidente, compte tenu du temps limité dont je dispose, je vais m'arrêter ici et je me tiens prêt à répondre aux questions que vous voudrez bien me poser. Merci encore de m'avoir donné la possibilité de venir témoigner aujourd'hui.

(0955)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Masterson.

Nous allons maintenant donner la parole aux Producteurs de grains du Canada. Monsieur Nielsen, s'il vous plaît.

M. Jeff Nielsen:

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité.

Je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de présenter des commentaires au sujet de cet important projet de loi. Les Producteurs de grains du Canada représentent 50 000 producteurs de grains, de légumineuses à grains, d'oléagineux et de soya des diverses régions du Canada. Nos membres se répartissent des provinces de l'Atlantique jusqu'à la région du Peace Country, en Colombie-Britannique. Nous sommes la seule organisation nationale gérée par des agriculteurs qui représente tous les producteurs de grains exportés dans le monde. Étant donné que les agriculteurs comme moi font affaire sur les marchés d'exportation, nous sommes extrêmement tributaires d'un réseau ferroviaire fiable et compétitif.

Je cultive une exploitation de céréaliculture constituée en société et appartenant à ma famille, dans le centre-sud de l'Alberta, près de Olds. Je cultive le blé, l'orge de brasserie et le canola. En ce moment, nous sommes en pleine moisson. Comme il pleut aujourd'hui, j'ai pu prendre un jour de congé et venir ici. En tant que cultivateur, c'est important pour moi de venir présenter ici personnellement mes réflexions au sujet du projet de loi C-49.

Par le passé, nous avons beaucoup apprécié le travail effectué par votre comité, y compris l'excellente étude que vous avez consacrée à l'ancienne Loi sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grain, et les recommandations que vous aviez présentées au gouvernement. Comme l'a mentionné Cam, le rapport Barton a souligné l'importance de l'agriculture et précisé la vision qu'entretient le gouvernement quant à ses objectifs et la possibilité pour l'agriculture d'augmenter ses exportations jusqu'à un niveau de 75 milliards de dollars d'ici 2025. Nous sommes heureux que le gouvernement ait reconnu la situation et qu'il ait présenté le rapport Barton au Parlement.

Les Producteurs de grains du Canada ont applaudi à l'annonce de cette nouvelle loi en décembre dernier et nous espérons que le projet de loi sera adopté en troisième lecture et recevra la sanction royale le plus tôt possible, afin d'éviter les problèmes avec la récolte de cette année, étant donné que l'automne est à nos portes et que l'hiver n'est plus très loin. J'expédie l'ensemble de mes récoltes par voie ferroviaire. Nous devons pouvoir compter sur un système ferroviaire qui fonctionne bien pour moi, mais aussi pour nos clients. Vous savez que les clients ont le choix de s'adresser ailleurs. Il est impératif que le Canada dispose d'un réseau ferroviaire efficace et réactif pour nous permettre d'expédier nos récoltes vers les marchés d'exportation.

À ce sujet, je crois que le projet de loi C-49 comporte des dispositions permettant de tenir les transporteurs financièrement responsables des services qu'ils offrent. Je vais vous donner un exemple de la façon dont cela pourrait fonctionner pour mon exploitation agricole.

À l'heure actuelle, il n'y a aucun moyen de sanctionner les transporteurs ferroviaires lorsqu'ils fournissent un mauvais service. Cette absence d'obligation de rendre compte a des répercussions sur tous les intervenants de la chaîne d'approvisionnement et, au bout du compte, sur les agriculteurs. Je vends ma production tout au long de l'année, en fonction de mes besoins financiers et lorsque les cours sont les plus intéressants pour mon exploitation. Disons que je décide de vendre 200 tonnes de canola en février parce que j'ai noté une hausse des cours et aussi parce que j'ai une facture à acquitter en février. Je ne choisirais pas spontanément le mois de février, puisqu'il fait moins 20 degrés à ce moment-là et que j'aurais peut-être à pelleter la neige, mais je suis prêt à expédier du grain à n'importe quelle période de l'année, à partir du moment où j'ai signé des contrats.

Arrive le mois de février. Il fait froid, il neige et je m'apprête à expédier du grain. J'ai installé le matériel et je suis prêt à charger le grain quand je reçois un appel du silo-élévateur pour me dire que le train n'est pas arrivé. Le convoi est retardé de plusieurs semaines. Plus tard, quand je rappelle, j'apprends que le train est encore retardé. Nous sommes à présent à la fin avril et je commence à préparer mes machines pour les semailles de la prochaine récolte. J'ai dû reporter le remboursement de mes prêts agricoles parce que je n'ai pas pu vendre les grains comme je l'avais prévu au mois de février.

Cela a eu des conséquences graves pour moi personnellement ainsi que pour mon exploitation agricole. Mon négociant en grain a lui aussi été touché. Il avait réservé ce canola pour un client étranger. Or, le grain n'est pas arrivé à temps au port et les navires céréaliers ont dû attendre longtemps dans le port de Vancouver. Cela aussi coûte de l'argent. Cela s'appelle les frais de surestaries, frais qui, tôt ou tard, me seront transmis, en tant que producteur.

En revanche, ma compagnie céréalière se voit imposer une amende par le transporteur ferroviaire si le chargement n'est pas effectué dans un certain laps de temps, alors qu'elle ne peut pas imposer une amende au transporteur ferroviaire qui n'a pas fourni un train dans les délais prévus. J'ai vu des wagons attendre pendant plus d'une semaine après avoir été chargés sans qu'aucune pénalité ne soit imposée aux compagnies ferroviaires. Le retard de ce train pendant une semaine se répercute sur le prochain train prévu et cela fait boule de neige.

Nous sommes tous au courant de l'immense gâchis qui s'est produit au cours de l'hiver 2013-2014. Au cours de ma carrière de céréaliculteur, j'ai souvent été aux prises avec des situations comme celle-là. Je crois que j'ai perdu des occasions commerciales parce que je ne pouvais pas vendre mon grain sur certains marchés, faute de pouvoir le livrer. Certains contrats dont la livraison était prévue en décembre n'ont pu être honorés avant le printemps. Cela affecte bien entendu les cycles financiers des agriculteurs qui ne peuvent payer leurs factures et effectuer leurs remboursements. Certains clients, en particulier dans le secteur de l'avoine, ont perdu des marchés. Ces clients des États-Unis qui souhaitaient acheter de l'avoine canadienne, ont dû s'adresser à la Scandinavie pour répondre à leurs besoins.

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, nos clients ont d'autres choix. Si nous continuons à tolérer un service irrégulier et aléatoire de la part des transporteurs ferroviaires, nous allons perdre ces clients à jamais. Dans les Prairies, l'hiver revient chaque année. Parfois, il est plus rude que d'habitude.

(1000)



Une des autres dispositions que nous accueillons avec plaisir dans le projet de loi  C-49 se rapporte aux nouvelles exigences de déclaration de données et en matière de plan d'intervention pour les transporteurs ferroviaires. Nous espérons que nos compagnies ferroviaires adopteront rapidement des plans d'intervention sérieux et les publieront pour montrer qu'elles ont la capacité d'acheminer nos produits à destination dans les délais prévus.

À l'automne 2013, les producteurs agricoles, les compagnies céréalières et Statistique Canada savaient que la récolte allait être abondante et, comme Cam l'a signalé, c'est désormais la norme. Nous produisons régulièrement des récoltes plus abondantes et pourtant, nos compagnies ferroviaires n'étaient pas prêtes, à l'automne 2013. L'hiver est arrivé et tout a littéralement déraillé.

La collecte de données est un autre point important. Il est important pour nous de disposer d'un ensemble complet de données. Je félicite l'Agriculture Transportation Coalition et le Quorum Group pour les données qu'ils nous fournissent, car ces informations ont comblé d'importantes lacunes et nous ont aidés dans nos relations avec les transporteurs ferroviaires en les obligeant à rendre des comptes au cours de ces dernières années.

Dans le projet de loi C-49, nous apprécions également la capacité de l'Office des transports du Canada de jouer un plus grand rôle dans des secteurs comme l'amélioration de la résolution des différends. Le projet de loi définit plus clairement la responsabilité des transporteurs ferroviaires en matière de service adéquat et approprié. Je vois dans ces deux dispositions des avantages très nets, notamment l'assurance, très utile pour un producteur comme moi, que les problèmes pourront être reconnus et réglés avant qu'ils n'entraînent des conséquences graves pouvant aller jusqu'à la perte de certains marchés ou clients.

Les Producteurs de grains du Canada souhaitent présenter quelques recommandations qui permettraient, selon nous, de renforcer le projet de loi. Je réitère qu'il est extrêmement important que la loi soit adoptée le plus rapidement possible afin que la récolte de cette année puisse être acheminée sans problème.

Les Producteurs de grains sont en faveur du maintien de la disposition actuelle concernant le revenu admissible maximal, le RAM, avec les ajustements pour les dépenses en capital, comme proposé dans le projet de loi C-49. Le RAM fonctionne bien actuellement et sa légère modification en vue de reconnaître et d'intégrer les investissements effectués par chaque transporteur ferroviaire devrait encourager plus d'investissements, ce qui permettrait à l'avenir de renforcer l'infrastructure. Je crois que le problème ici est notre flotte de wagons-trémies qui, comme vous le savez, vieillit considérablement.

Les dispositions concernant le RAM comportent une lacune flagrante, puisque le soya n'est pas inclus. Au nom de nos membres, nous demandons que la production de soya soit comprise parmi les cultures prévues à l'annexe II relative au RAM. La superficie consacrée à la culture du soya augmente chaque année dans les provinces des Prairies et ces produits sont, naturellement, expédiés par voie ferroviaire. Une telle mise à jour répondrait aux besoins courants d'une industrie qui n'avait pas été prévue à l'époque où le RAM a été établi. Ce serait une véritable modernisation de la loi. Nous avons pris connaissance des améliorations proposées et une fois que le projet de loi C-49 sera entièrement en vigueur, il faudrait entreprendre une révision complète des dispositions relatives au RAM, mais pas avant.

J'aimerais parler rapidement de l'interconnexion de longue distance. Dans la précédente Loi sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grain, la limite d'interconnexion avait été portée à 160 kilomètres. C'était un outil très utile qui permettait à nos compagnies céréalières d'obtenir des modalités de service plus compétitives.

Afin d'illustrer l'importance de l'interconnexion, j'attire votre attention une fois de plus sur la production d'avoine. Les grands transformateurs des États-Unis achètent de l'avoine, produit dont le transport s'effectue par un couloir particulier, et ils doivent livrer ce produit à leur acheteur de façon régulière et au moment opportun. La crise que nous avons connue au cours de l'hiver 2013 nous a fait perdre de nombreux clients et l'industrie poursuit ses efforts afin de regagner ces marchés. La disposition d'interconnexion de longue distance a été utile pour de nombreux producteurs d'avoine. Étant donné l'utilité de cet outil, les Producteurs de grains du Canada craignent que les dispositions du projet de loi C-49 concernant les longues distances ne soient pas aussi efficaces ou ne répondent pas aux besoins de tous nos producteurs.

Nous vous prions de prendre connaissance des recommandations du Groupe de travail sur la logistique du transport des récoltes, groupe qui connaît une nouvelle vigueur et dont je fais partie. Vous les trouverez en annexe de notre mémoire. Selon nous, les amendements que le groupe a proposé d'apporter aux dispositions concernant les longues distances permettront d'offrir les mêmes conditions de sécurité et de fiabilité du marché qu'offraient les dispositions précédentes concernant l'interconnexion prolongée. Dès cette année, nous pouvons noter une augmentation de la demande aux États-Unis pour certaines de nos récoltes, en raison de la piètre qualité des récoltes américaines. Or, ces produits doivent être transportés par voie ferroviaire.

(1005)



Les producteurs ne ménagent pas leur peine pour offrir au monde des grains, des oléagineux, des légumineuses à grains et du maïs de qualité supérieure. Nous sommes fermement convaincus que les objectifs fixés en matière d'augmentation des exportations sont réalisables et nous sommes prêts à collaborer avec le gouvernement pour les atteindre. Toutefois, il est indispensable que ce projet de loi soit adopté le plus rapidement possible pour que nous puissions nous appuyer sur un système de transport des grains fiable pour acheminer nos produits vers les marchés d'exportation.

Je vous remercie d'avoir pris le temps de m'écouter.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Nielsen, et bonne chance pour les défis que vous devez relever dans vos activités quotidiennes. On a parfois tendance à oublier combien ces situations sont difficiles.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux questions.

Madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à remercier toutes les personnes qui se sont jointes à nous aujourd'hui. Je vous remercie d'être venues.

Comme vous l'avez souligné, monsieur Nielsen, nous avons bien conscience que le calendrier de nos audiences ne s'harmonise pas très bien avec celui du secteur agricole, mais, comme on l'a déjà dit, c'est un important travail qui doit être fait. Le témoignage que vous présentez aujourd'hui est crucial pour fournir au Comité les informations nécessaires afin de trouver le juste équilibre dans le règlement des questions sous-jacentes du système de transport. Nous savons que ce n'est pas la première fois que votre participation a été sollicitée pour aider les parlementaires dans leurs délibérations en vue de structurer les dispositions législatives qui garantissent l'accès au marché et un moyen de transport efficient pour nos expéditeurs et nos producteurs.

Les témoins que nous avons entendus jusqu'à présent ont tous évoqué la nécessité d'apporter des changements à cette loi et tous ont soulevé les problèmes liés aux dispositions concernant l'interconnexion de longue distance. Le temps dont je dispose pour poser des questions à chacun d'entre vous étant limité, j'ai préparé deux questions auxquelles je vais demander à chacun d'entre vous de répondre.

Le projet de loi C-49 augmente-t-il la concurrence dans le service ferroviaire et quelle est l'option que vous préférez: l'interconnexion prolongée à 160 kilomètres telle que décrite précédemment dans la Loi sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grain, ou les dispositions concernant l'ILD contenues dans le projet de loi? J'aimerais que chacun d'entre vous réponde à ces deux questions.

M. Cam Dahl:

Je vais répondre brièvement à vos deux questions. En effet, le projet de loi C-49 améliorera l'équilibre concurrentiel une fois qu'il aura été adopté. C'est pourquoi, nous demandons que, tout bien considéré, la loi reçoive la sanction royale le plus rapidement possible. Ce projet de loi contribuera à améliorer l'obligation de rendre compte des transporteurs ferroviaires, améliorera la transparence et nous rapprochera un peu plus des conditions qui existent dans un marché concurrentiel.

Cela étant dit, l'interconnexion prolongée a beaucoup servi à l'industrie du grain. C'était un outil efficace. Étant donné que nous souhaitons que le projet de loi C-49 devienne loi le plus rapidement possible, nous avons décidé de présenter aujourd'hui quelques amendements concernant l'interconnexion de longue distance en vue d'améliorer l'efficacité de ces dispositions.

M. Bob Masterson:

À la première question, je réponds oui. Nous sommes convaincus que les dispositions du projet de loi C-49 instaureront un environnement plus équilibré et plus compétitif dans le secteur du transport ferroviaire, mais nous devons nous rappeler que le mot « équilibré » est important. Ce n'est pas simplement une façon de calmer le jeu. Pour conserver notre position concurrentielle, il est indispensable que les transports ferroviaires demeurent compétitifs et rentables. Il n'est pas question ici de punir les transporteurs, mais, jusqu'à présent, la relation n'a pas été équilibrée. Nous pensons que les dispositions de ce projet de loi instaureront une relation plus équilibrée qui permettra à tous les intervenants de connaître le succès commercial et de développer nos entreprises à l'avenir.

Quant à votre deuxième question, la réponse peut varier, bien entendu. Contrairement peut-être au secteur agricole qui doit transporter de gros volumes dans une région géographique assez limitée, notre industrie est répartie dans toutes les régions du pays. Par conséquent, il faut tenir compte des situations différentes que vivent les divers producteurs dans un secteur extrêmement hétérogène. Cela dit, les dispositions antérieures ont été très bénéfiques pour certains producteurs. Ils en étaient satisfaits. C'est une des raisons pour lesquelles, au cours des consultations, notre secteur a demandé l'adoption de dispositions permanentes qui seraient ouvertes à tous les secteurs et qui permettraient réellement une amélioration grâce à la possibilité d'engager un dialogue commercial concurrentiel entre les fournisseurs de service, sur une base permanente.

J'espère que ma réponse sera utile. Merci.

(1010)

M. Jeff Nielsen:

Merci. Je partage les points de vue qui viennent d'être exprimés. Le projet de loi, annoncé en décembre, nous est apparu vraiment comme un cadeau du ciel. Il touche à beaucoup de sujets que nous avions explorés. Prenez les pénalités réciproques, la collecte de données et le « service adéquat et approprié ». Ce sont des choses que notre secteur réclame depuis longtemps. Il faut que les transporteurs ferroviaires soient astreints à une obligation de rendre compte. Comme l'a dit Cam, c'est un monopole, ou un duopole, si vous me passez l'expression. Je suis sur une seule ligne principale. Je pourrais avoir accès à une autre ligne, mais comme elle se situe à assez bonne distance de chez moi, je suis plutôt limité.

Pour ce qui est de l'interconnexion de longue distance, nous avons bien étudié la question avec le Groupe de travail sur la logistique du transport des récoltes afin de présenter les amendements. Comme nous l'avons tous dit, Cam et les autres, il faut que le projet de loi soit adopté prochainement. Cet automne, la récolte sera abondante. Il faut que nous soyons en mesure d'écouler cette récolte sur le marché et à l'exportation.

Merci.

Mme Kelly Block:

J'aimerais me pencher sur le sentiment d'urgence que je note chez nos témoins aujourd'hui. La question qui me vient à l'esprit devant ce sentiment d'urgence est la suivante.

Les dispositions de la Loi sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grain sont arrivées à échéance au milieu de l'été. Il ne vous reste donc aucun recours en matière d'interconnexion, hormis le droit de 30 kilomètres. Est-ce la raison du sentiment d'urgence que vous éprouvez pour l'adoption de ce projet de loi, afin que vous puissiez négocier des contrats avec certitude et à des conditions que vous pouvez présenter aux transporteurs ferroviaires?

M. Cam Dahl:

Oui. Les protections dont bénéficiait l'industrie du grain en vertu de la Loi sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grain étaient des outils précieux. D'après moi, les dispositions de cette loi véhiculaient un message qui n'était pas uniquement destiné au Canada, mais également à nos clients. Je voyage beaucoup à l'étranger pour rencontrer nos clients et une des premières questions que l'on me pose toujours, que je sois au Bangladesh, au Japon ou au Nigéria, concerne la logistique des transports au Canada. Notre réputation a vraiment été égratignée par la crise que nous avons connue en 2013 et 2014. Nous ne pouvons pas nous permettre une autre crise de ce type.

Comme l'a dit Jeff, nous avons de grandes récoltes à acheminer, malgré la sécheresse qui a touché les Prairies, et nous devons pouvoir disposer des outils nécessaires pour éviter qu'en cas de problème, la situation se dégrade comme par le passé et prenne l'allure d'une grave crise systématique.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant donner la parole à M. Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Ma question s'adresse à M. Masterson.

Tout d'abord, merci d'être venu. J'ai apprécié vos observations préliminaires et je suis très content que les ministres vous aient écouté. Beaucoup de nos témoins ont eu la même impression.

Rectifiez-moi si je fais erreur. Vous avez dit que les investissements aux États-Unis s'élèvent à 200 milliards de dollars et que les produits chimiques représentent 14 % du trafic ferroviaire. Je crois bien qu'aux États-Unis, l'industrie chimique peut également faire transporter ces produits par barges...

M. Bob Masterson:

C'est exact.

M. Gagan Sikand:

... et ce type de transport n'est pas disponible au Canada. Je peux imaginer les conséquences que cela peut avoir pour votre industrie.

Pourriez-vous nous en parler un peu, s'il vous plaît?

M. Bob Masterson:

C'est une question qui a déjà été soulevée. Le Canada a-t-il besoin de certaines conditions qui existent aux États-Unis et dont nous ne disposons pas? Plusieurs éléments nous amènent à répondre par l'affirmative. Pour répondre à la question de Mme Block, nous en avons besoin de manière urgente.

Aux États-Unis, les questions de transport sont facilitées par un certain nombre de facteurs. Tout d'abord, l'industrie et la population sont beaucoup plus homogènes et concentrées. Dans notre secteur, celui de la chimie, leurs ressources en gaz naturel, produits du pétrole et autres sont situées beaucoup plus près des côtes. Le Texas est sur la côte. La Louisiane aussi. Il est facile d'acheminer les produits sur le marché, en particulier grâce au transport par barge.

Le Canada dispose d'énormes ressources, exploitées en grande partie par l'industrie pétrochimique, qui sont concentrées dans l'Ouest du Canada — surtout l'Alberta. Malheureusement, la barrière des Rocheuses qui se dresse entre l'Alberta et la côte Ouest ne permet pas le transport de gros volumes par barge.

Par conséquent, le Canada est un marché différent. Nous avons de plus grandes distances à franchir pour acheminer les produits sur les marchés et, dans notre cas, 60 % de chaque tonne de produit que nous transportons sont acheminés de l'autre côté de la frontière, vers les États-Unis. Ce sont de longues distances. Notre industrie, comme beaucoup d'autres, est très interconnectée. Sur une base régulière, des chargements de produits transitent entre l'Alberta et le Texas avant de revenir en Ontario, et même d'être acheminés au Mexique. Il serait impossible de transporter des millions de tonnes de produits par camion.

Nous devons nous contenter du système que nous avons... Si nous voulons que l'économie soit forte et si nous voulons attirer des investissements dans notre secteur, nous devons nous assurer que l'économie fonctionne de la manière la plus efficiente possible dans tous les secteurs. Les divers intervenants que vous avez entendus ont régulièrement souligné que le marché du transport ferroviaire n'est plus efficient et compétitif depuis de nombreuses années.

(1015)

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Je pense que M. Graham va utiliser le reste de mon temps.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Masterson, je vais commencer par vous, mais je n'aurai qu'une seule question à vous poser avant de passer à autre chose.

Les chemins de fer transportent beaucoup de marchandises dangereuses autres que les produits toxiques à l'inhalation. Dans l'industrie, on appelle certaines d'entre elles des « marchandises dangereuses spéciales », mais le personnel les qualifie tout simplement de « bombes ». Le transport de certaines de ces substances n'est même pas autorisé par camion.

Les grands transporteurs ont affirmé, lundi je crois, que votre industrie n'est pas captive puisque vous avez accès au transport routier. De votre côté, vous affirmez que ce n'est clairement pas le cas.

Beaucoup de ces compagnies disposent-elles d'autres options que celle du transport ferroviaire?

M. Bob Masterson:

Voilà une excellente question à laquelle je vais demander à Mme Edwards de répondre. Elle est non seulement spécialiste du projet de loi C-49, mais également de toutes les questions relatives aux marchandises dangereuses.

Kara, est-ce que vous pouvez répondre à cette question?

Mme Kara Edwards (directrice, Transport, Association canadienne de l'industrie de la chimie):

Le transport ferroviaire est souvent le mode de transport le plus sûr pour les marchandises très dangereuses, ou il permet le transport en wagons-citernes de plus gros volumes que par le transport routier. En raison de la circulation sur les routes et des différentes conditions auxquelles elle est soumise, le transport ferroviaire est souvent le mode de transport le plus sûr pour les marchandises dangereuses, en particulier les produits toxiques à l'inhalation et autres produits très dangereux.

Au Canada, je crois qu'il faut aussi se demander quelle est la quantité de ces produits extrêmement dangereux qui sont transportés en gros volumes. Seules de faibles quantités de produits toxiques à l'inhalation sont transportées par chemin de fer. Dans le cas du chlore, par exemple, beaucoup de nos compagnies membres n'envisagent pas le transport par voie routière, car elles jugent que le risque est trop élevé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

M. Bob Masterson:

Si vous le permettez, je vais vous raconter une anecdote pour vous aider à comprendre.

Le styrène est un autre produit dangereux. Autrefois, au Canada, les transporteurs acheminaient ce produit uniquement par chemin de fer. Il y avait une compagnie, dans la région de Kelowna, en Colombie-Britannique, qui transformait le styrène en résines pour approvisionner un petit, mais important secteur régional de fabrication de bateaux de plaisance. Malheureusement, le chemin de fer d'intérêt local qui desservait ces installations a décidé de cesser ses activités. Aucune des deux compagnies de chemin de fer de catégorie 1 ne voulant reprendre la voie d'intérêt local, le service a été suspendu.

Il n'y avait aucun moyen... Cela n'aurait pas été impossible de livrer ces marchandises par camion, mais les expéditeurs ne voulaient pas le faire. Après la fermeture de la ligne de chemin de fer, l'usine qui fabriquait les résines a cessé ses activités. L'usine étant fermée, les chantiers navals ont eux aussi décidé de cesser la production.

Certaines marchandises doivent absolument être acheminées par voie ferroviaire. C'est le seul moyen de les acheminer jusqu'au marché. Nos membres ne sont pas les seuls en cause, puisque nous approvisionnons d'autres industries. Les marchandises doivent pouvoir être acheminées jusqu'à elles.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'étais à Kelowna la semaine dernière pour le caucus. On a découvert que la voie a été transformée en piste cyclable.

Il ne me reste que quelques secondes. J'avais plusieurs questions destinées à M. Nielsen, mais je n'aurai pas le temps de les poser.

Très rapidement, un wagon de marchandises a une durée de vie utile d'environ 40 ans. Quel âge ont les wagons de marchandises en service actuellement?

M. Jeff Nielsen:

Je pense que certains d'entre eux ont plus de 40 ans. Ils ont été modifiés et rénovés, mais la majorité de nos wagons seront déclassés au cours des 10 à 15 prochaines années.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

M. Cam Dahl:

J'aimerais rapidement faire la distinction entre les wagons-trémies qui appartiennent au gouvernement du Canada et qui datent des années 1980, et les wagons privés que louent les compagnies de chemin de fer et qui sont des wagons modernes à grande capacité.

(1020)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Bonjour, madame la présidente.

Je salue officiellement tous mes collègues en cette troisième journée qui nous apporte un éclairage. De grandes lignes commencent à se dessiner, auxquelles, j'en suis certain, notre comité ne sera pas insensible. Espérons qu'il en sera de même pour le gouvernement.

La première question que je voudrais poser aux témoins concerne ce que j'appelle des flous artistiques. La rédaction d'un projet de loi n'est pas une oeuvre romanesque ni un contrat d'affaires. Deux de vos organisations ont insisté sur le fait qu'il fallait revoir la définition d'un service adéquat et convenable.

Je vous avoue que j'aimerais entendre votre opinion sur cette question, parce que même moi j'y perds mon latin. Si un service est adéquat, à mon avis, il doit être convenable aussi. Cela m'apparaît être une utilisation de synonymes pour essayer de noyer le poisson.

Vous souhaitez qu'on révise ces deux termes, mais que souhaitez-vous qu'on utilise comme mot ou comme définition sous-jacente? [Traduction]

M. Bob Masterson:

Je pense que nous avons proposé certaines suggestions dans nos commentaires. Dans notre mémoire, nous avons proposé d'éliminer toute ambiguïté et nous parlons du meilleur service ferroviaire qui puisse être raisonnablement offert. Peut-être que Mme Edwards peut nous donner d'autres détails à ce sujet.

Mme Kara Edwards:

Je pense que l'important est de déterminer à quel moment le service n'est plus adéquat. Il est important d'en tenir compte également. Je pense que la Western Canadian Shippers' Coalition a très bien expliqué les différences principales, hier.

Nous pourrions proposer et soumettre un texte juridique au comité si cela peut s'avérer utile. Nous n'avons pas apporté un exemplaire du texte indiquant précisément les changements terminologiques. D'ailleurs, ils étaient très mineurs, mais ils permettraient de gagner du temps et d'éviter à l'avenir de faire appel aux tribunaux pour clarifier le texte.

M. Cam Dahl:

Brièvement, je ne suis pas un avocat spécialisé dans les transports et je ne dirais donc pas que les amendements du projet de loi C-49 sont parfaits, mais le projet de loi propose de renforcer ou de mieux quantifier la définition de service « adéquat et approprié ». Cette définition permet d'exiger des comptes de la part des compagnies ferroviaires. Une définition plus large permet d'améliorer l'obligation de rendre compte.

La définition est-elle parfaite? Probablement pas. Il faudra peut-être attendre que les avocats nous fournissent différents textes juridiques, mais c'est une grande amélioration par rapport aux dispositions de l'actuelle Loi sur les transports au Canada.

M. Jeff Nielsen:

Je ne partage pas le point de vue exprimé dans les deux commentaires précédents.

Merci. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

De toute évidence, nous sommes ouverts à toute suggestion que vous pourriez nous faire parvenir.

Monsieur Masterson, vous nous avez donné des exemples concrets qui aident à comprendre la réalité sur le terrain, surtout pour moi qui suis peut-être à des années-lumière de ce monde.

Dans votre rapport, vous faites aussi une recommandation pour que les pouvoirs d'enquête de l'Office soient augmentés. Pourriez-vous me donner un exemple de ce que pourrait faire l'Office pour être plus efficace s'il avait des pouvoirs accrus? [Traduction]

M. Bob Masterson:

Encore une fois, je me tourne vers Mme Edwards. Elle côtoie souvent le personnel de l'Office des transports et elle est mieux placée pour s'exprimer au nom de nos membres.

Mme Kara Edwards:

Dans le cas des pouvoirs de l'office, nous estimons qu'ils faciliteront les recours s'ils sont étendus aux expéditeurs. Par ailleurs, en raison des limites qui lui sont imposées actuellement, l'office ne pourrait pas aussi facilement déterminer quand certains cas relèvent du système élargi. Grâce à l'élargissement de ses pouvoirs, l'office sera en mesure d'examiner certains cas afin de vérifier leur conformité ou s'assurer que les procédures sont suivies une fois que les mesures auront été mises en place. C'est ce que nous souhaitions indiquer dans notre mémoire. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Il me reste encore une minute.

Je poserai rapidement une question à M. Nielsen.

Je crois que vous avez fait allusion au fait que le soya était exclu de l'annexe et qu'il devrait y paraître. C'est une anomalie et je suis d'avis, comme vous, que le soya devrait y être.

Le projet de loi C-49 devrait-il prévoir un mécanisme de révision des produits qui figurent sur la liste puisque nous savons que l'agriculture change rapidement? Les habitudes alimentaires changent et les habitudes de l'industrie changent aussi. Le marché change et on peut comprendre qu'un agriculteur décide de modifier sa culture même si cela a des coûts élevés. Devrait-il y avoir un mécanisme pour revoir la liste régulièrement?

(1025)

[Traduction]

M. Jeff Nielsen:

Je ne suis pas vraiment d'accord. On a pu voir que notre secteur agricole a été en mesure d'adopter des technologies avancées pour l'entretien des sols tout en permettant de produire des récoltes de la meilleure qualité à l'échelle mondiale et ces récoltes ne cessent d'augmenter.

Nous multiplions les récoltes spéciales grâce à la technologie qui nous permet d'utiliser de meilleures techniques de sélection. La culture du soya se pratique désormais à moins de 40 milles de chez moi. Je ne sais pas encore si je serai un jour en mesure d'en faire pousser dans mon secteur. Ma région se situe dans une zone climatique différente, mais ces cultures se répandent. Certaines de ces cultures sont excellentes pour nos sols et par conséquent, nous devrions être en mesure d'inscrire de nouvelles cultures dans cette entente. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Sean Fraser (Nova-Centre, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je remercie nos témoins d'être venus nous rencontrer.

Avant de commencer, j'aimerais, si vous le permettez, souligner que nous avons un peu le coeur gros aujourd'hui. En Nouvelle-Écosse, nous avons perdu un grand homme politique hier, avec le décès d'Allan J. MacEachen qui a été vice-premier ministre et ministre des Affaires étrangères. C'est lui qui avait été chargé, à son époque, lorsqu'il détenait le portefeuille de la santé, de mettre en oeuvre le régime d'assurance-maladie. Mais malgré toutes les grandes réalisations dont il était l'auteur à Ottawa, il était surtout connu dans sa circonscription pour son dévouement après de ses électeurs. En tant que jeune parlementaire de Nouvelle-Écosse, j'espère pouvoir suivre son exemple aujourd'hui et tout au long de ma carrière.

Toujours dans l'idée de travailler à la promotion du Canada atlantique, je ne peux m'empêcher de noter que les dispositions d'interconnexion prolongée qui existaient dans le projet de loi C-30 ont eu des effets sur un secteur particulier et une région particulière. Monsieur Masterson, vous êtes peut-être le mieux placé pour répondre à cette question, mais je crois que M. Nielsen nous a dit que son association avait aussi des membres au Canada atlantique. Dans quelle mesure ce projet de loi s'adresse-t-il à différents secteurs des diverses régions du pays et pas seulement à une seule région importante?

M. Bob Masterson:

Comme je l'ai dit, en ce qui nous concerne, notre industrie est très hétérogène. Elle n'est pas présente dans toutes les régions du pays. Elle est très complexe et fabrique un grand nombre de produits différents. Selon nous, les mesures proposées constituent un juste équilibre. Si elles peuvent être ajustées tel que proposé, elles bénéficieront à toutes les régions du pays.

Nous n'avons noté aucune lacune régionale dans les dispositions existantes. Nous pensons que tous les expéditeurs du pays en bénéficieront.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je ne me souviens plus quels sont les témoins qui ont parlé de l'importance des données et de la transparence. Je crois que plusieurs y ont fait allusion. Je crois qu'il existe en ce moment une disparité entre les dispositions du projet de loi et la situation qui existe aux États-Unis, par exemple.

Sans vouloir risquer d'interférer dans les renseignements exclusifs des compagnies ferroviaires, j'aimerais savoir à quoi nous pouvons raisonnablement nous attendre. Est-ce que la norme idéale que nous visons est l'harmonisation des systèmes américains et canadiens? Quels types de données seraient les plus utiles pour les expéditeurs, sans compromettre les renseignements exclusifs des compagnies ferroviaires?

M. Cam Dahl:

C'est une excellente question. Il est évident que les données sont indispensables à l'application du concept de reddition de comptes. Elles sont également indispensables pour la réalisation du but prévu dans le projet de loi qui consiste à permettre la préparation de plans d'intervention, ainsi que la planification de la capacité. Ces données sont absolument indispensables.

Certains des amendements que nous avons proposés visent à réduire le délai de présentation de ces données, avec précisément en tête les objectifs du projet de loi visant à assurer, par exemple, que les données sont fournies en moins d'une semaine pour qu'elles soient utiles aux expéditeurs, plutôt que trois semaines plus tard, quand elles ont perdu une bonne partie de leur utilité. En effet, de telles données seraient peut-être utiles pour un universitaire, mais pas pour une personne chargée de planifier une livraison à Vancouver, en tenant compte du retard d'un train.

Pareillement, l'entrée en vigueur des dispositions concernant les exigences en matière de déclaration de données n'est pas quelque chose de nouveau. Vous demandez ce qui se passe aux États-Unis. Là-bas, les compagnies de chemin de fer sont déjà tenues de fournir ces données au Surface Transportation Board. Il ne sera pas nécessaire de mettre en place de nouveaux systèmes.

Ces données sont absolument indispensables pour les plans d'intervention et la planification de la capacité et il n'y a aucune raison de retarder la mise en oeuvre de ces dispositions pendant un an après l'entrée en vigueur du projet de loi.

M. Jeff Nielsen:

Je partage tout à fait ce point de vue. Le CN et le CP fournissent ce type de données au Surface Transportation Board des États-Unis. Ces données ne sont pas différentes de celles qu'ils pourraient nous fournir.

Le Quorum Group, qui reçoit l'appui du gouvernement fédéral, obtient les données au bout de plusieurs semaines, peut-être trois ou quatre semaines plus tard. L'Agriculture Transportation Coalition se place du point de vue de l'industrie. Elle n'obtient pas les données des compagnies ferroviaires. Nous essayons de composer avec cela.

(1030)

M. Sean Fraser:

En ce qui a trait au délai, monsieur Dahl, je sais que vous venez de mentionner qu'une semaine pourrait être raisonnable par opposition à trois ou quatre semaines. Mais je suis sûr que vous pensez que les meilleures données sont celles qu'on peut obtenir en temps réel.

D'après vous, quel serait le délai raisonnable que vous pourriez accepter afin d'être en mesure de prendre de meilleures décisions commerciales?

M. Cam Dahl:

C'est la raison pour laquelle le mémoire que nous vous avons présenté contient trois propositions très précises.

Ce sont les amendements proposés 1a) à 1c) qui réduisent ce délai, ainsi que certaines dispositions précises de la disposition 51.4, de la disposition 77(5) et de la disposition 98. Ces amendements visent expressément à réduire le délai de production de rapports à une semaine, plutôt qu'à trois semaines au total. Cela est conforme à la norme qui s'applique aux États-Unis.

M. Sean Fraser:

Si vous me permettez de changer de sujet pendant un instant, je crois que vous avez tout à fait raison de dire que le transport de nos marchandises en temps opportun est absolument essentiel dans un monde où le commerce est désormais global. À mon sens, les gouvernements ne sont pas très habiles à faire comprendre à la population des collectivités que nous représentons que le commerce international est excellent pour les petites entreprises ainsi que pour les travailleurs locaux.

Avons-nous étudié l'impact économique des pertes qui ont été subies à cause de notre incapacité à transporter des marchandises en temps opportun, en utilisant peut-être l'exemple des marchés que nous avons perdus en Scandinavie en 2013? Pouvons-nous nous appuyer sur une évaluation de l'impact économique pour faire savoir dans nos collectivités que des emplois vont disparaître si nous ne faisons rien?

M. Jeff Nielsen:

Je pense que cela a déjà été fait. Nous avons des données... Malheureusement, je ne me souviens pas des chiffres concernant les pertes subies au cours de la récolte 2014, mais je peux vous assurer que c'était des montants considérables. Comme l'a dit Cam, c'est notre réputation qui est en jeu.

Pratiquement chaque mois, il y a des récoltes qui se font un peu partout dans le monde. Nous sommes confrontés à la concurrence de ce marché lorsque nos récoltes parviennent à maturité à cette période de l'année — soit en septembre et octobre. Nous devons nous assurer d'avoir accès à ces marchés.

L'hiver est à nos portes et comme l'a mentionné Bob, il y a les Rocheuses à l'ouest de mon exploitation. Notre grain doit franchir ces montagnes. C'est un gros défi, mais nous devons être en mesure de garantir à nos clients que nous sommes un fournisseur fiable de produits de qualité.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Neilsen.

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vais commencer mes questions en mentionnant que lundi nous avons beaucoup parlé de sécurité et des droits des passagers. Hier, nous avons beaucoup parlé de sécurité et de pratiques commerciales, ce qui touche finalement la sécurité. Nous parlons aujourd'hui des niveaux de service fournis au client.

Comme je l'ai dit hier, une bonne partie des aspects de la sécurité dont nous parlons concernent en fait les pratiques commerciales. Il s'agit de savoir si nous allons pouvoir mettre en oeuvre la vaste stratégie en matière de transport que propose le projet de loi C-49, en adoptant de bonnes pratiques commerciales, des niveaux de service élevés, ce qui nous permettra d'introduire nos produits dans les marchés, tant nationaux qu'internationaux.

J'aimerais aller un peu plus loin sur ces questions. Dans l'ancienne vie que j'ai vécue au palier municipal, nous parlions constamment de ces sujets. Nous essayions constamment, dans les activités quotidiennes de la mairie, de faire en sorte que nos activités s'exercent dans un environnement convivial et efficace. C'est ce que je constate ici. Une des choses que nous avons faites à cette époque et qui, je le constate, se produit actuellement au palier national, consistait à parfois jouer un rôle dans le monde des affaires, non pas en tant que gouvernement, mais en tant que partenaire. À cette époque, nous avons conclu un partenariat avec une compagnie de chemin de fer d'intérêt local parce que celles de la catégorie 1 nous avaient abandonnés. Pour éviter que se produise chez nous ce qui se passait dans les provinces avoisinantes, nous avons acheté une compagnie de chemin de fer que nous avons exploitée et fait fonctionner. Nous avons invité un exploitant de chemin de fer de ce type à faire partie de notre direction pour être certain que les sociétés qui dépendaient de ces chemins de fer continuent à prospérer et à obtenir le service dont elles avaient besoin.

J'aimerais avoir ici un dialogue comme celui que nous avons eu à l'époque, le même genre de dialogue, mais qui se tiendrait ici à Ottawa. Les entreprises estiment souvent qu'elles sont abandonnées par les services de transport traditionnels. Cela peut concerner le transport par eau, le chemin de fer, le transport terrestre ou aérien. Cela pourrait être le fait du gouvernement ou du secteur privé. Les chemins de fer d'intérêt locaux en sont un exemple. Nous savons que ce service est rendu directement aux entreprises et qu'il fournit un lien vers des réseaux de transport plus vastes. Bien souvent, l'avenir d'une entreprise dépend de ce lien et de ce réseau.

La question que je vais vous poser est double. Premièrement, est-il possible de transporter vos produits par camion ou par un autre moyen de transport? Je crois que j'ai déjà obtenu cette réponse lorsque vous avez répondu non. Nous savons que certaines sociétés ont cessé leurs activités parce que ces lignes de chemin de fer avaient été abandonnées et que personne n'avait voulu reprendre une ligne de chemin de fer d'intérêt local.

Deuxièmement, le projet de loi C-49 traite du réseau de transport en général et d'une vaste stratégie en matière de transport. Vous qui travaillez tous les jours dans ce domaine, pouvez-vous nous présenter des recommandations grâce auxquelles le projet de loi pourrait fournir aux exploitants de ces chemins de fer un mécanisme qui leur permettrait de reprendre ces lignes abandonnées pour ne pas nuire aux économies locales et pour que les collectivités locales demeurent prospères?

(1035)

M. Bob Masterson:

De notre point de vue, les chemins de fer d'intérêt local sont très importants et nous avons souligné qu'on avait minimisé leur importance dans le programme relatif aux transports pour 2030. La plupart de nos producteurs transportent leurs produits sur le premier kilomètre, une distance essentielle, et surtout, lorsque vous essayez de vous rendre dans une scierie du Nord de la Saskatchewan, le dernier kilomètre s'effectue également sur une ligne d'intérêt local.

Ces lignes sont essentielles, et cet aspect va au-delà des dispositions du projet de loi C-49. Nous avons déjà soutenu dans les mémoires que nous avons présentés au Comité des finances que, compte tenu de l'importance du rôle que jouent les lignes d'intérêt local pour le secteur manufacturier, nous devrions réfléchir à offrir les incitations à l'investissement prévues pour ce secteur aux lignes de chemin de fer d'intérêt local. Nous pourrions peut-être utiliser les moyens dont nous nous servons comme incitation à l'investissement et à la croissance pour faire en sorte que ces lignes d'intérêt local soient rentables. Il est bon de rappeler que, lorsque ces lignes de chemin de fer cessent leurs activités, cela a un effet dévastateur sur nos membres, sur nos clients et sur de nombreuses collectivités.

M. Vance Badawey:

Nous sommes en train de dialoguer. C'est ce que j'essaie de faire avec les recommandations que nous présentons au sujet du projet de loi C-49. Cela pourrait également concerner les délibérations du Comité des finances, notamment, ainsi que les stratégies en matière d'économie et de transport qui pourraient être adoptées à l'avenir.

Pour aller un peu plus loin, nous constatons que les problèmes découlent de la difficulté d'obtenir des capitaux. Il est évident que ces compagnies abandonnent ces lignes de chemin de fer parce que le ballast, les rails ou les traverses se détériorent. Au lieu d'y consacrer du capital, ces compagnies abandonnent complètement leurs activités dans ce domaine parce qu'elles ne sont pas rentables. Pensez-vous qu'il serait nécessaire de prendre des mesures, non pas seulement du côté de l'exploitation de ces lignes, mais également du côté de l'accès aux capitaux, avant que ces choses se produisent?

Je le mentionne parce que nous avons acquis de nombreuses immobilisations pour nos infrastructures. Il y a les chemins de fer et le transport par eau. Il y a la voie maritime du Saint-Laurent, où l'on constate que les canaux et les quais tombent en ruine et que nous n'investissons aucunement dans ces infrastructures. Avant d'en arriver au point d'être obligé d'abandonner ces infrastructures, rôle que pourrait jouer le gouvernement, d'après vous, pour que nous puissions les conserver?

M. Bob Masterson:

Je vais vous fournir deux brèves réponses. Nous demanderons ensuite à nos collègues d'intervenir.

Premièrement, un aspect qui nous paraît très important, et les dispositions du projet de loi C-49 vont atténuer ce problème, est que nous avons besoin d'avoir un accès rapidement aux données nécessaires pour prendre des décisions. Sur un plan anecdotique, je peux vous dire que le port de Vancouver, en particulier, est pratiquement saturé. Nous réfléchissons à des plans de développement. Nous réfléchissons à une nouvelle installation de 6 à 10 milliards de dollars pour l'Alberta. Il faut ensuite comprendre que le marché pour de telles installations n'est pas l'Amérique du Nord, mais plutôt l'Asie. Comment allons-nous y transporter ces produits? Sur le plan anecdotique, c'est ce qui se passe et c'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons besoin de données et les dispositions que contient le projet de loi C-49 vont nous aider à comprendre où se trouvent les goulots d'étranglement.

Deuxièmement, encore une fois, nous sommes, dans l'ensemble, très satisfaits du travail qu'ont effectué le ministre précédent et le ministre actuel. Les plans d'infrastructure pour le transport qui ont été annoncés plus tôt cette année vont grandement contribuer à résoudre la plupart de ces problèmes. Sur le plan anecdotique, encore une fois, on nous a déclaré que ces plans nous donneraient la possibilité de nous attaquer à la question des lignes d'intérêt local.

La présidente:

Je vous remercie.

Allez-y, monsieur Shields.

M. Martin Shields (Bow River, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci d'être venus ce matin. Je suis très heureux d'avoir obtenu l'information que vous nous avez fournie.

Pour ce qui est de l'ILD, je dirais que c'est une question régionale et très particulière, mais il demeure néanmoins des zones d'exclusion. Nous avons entendu hier Teck qui nous a parlé de monopole et de zones d'exclusion. C'est un problème.

Nous vous écoutons maintenant parler de votre situation et de vos activités. Parlez-nous des zones d'exclusion.

M. Bob Masterson:

Tout à fait. Nous avons mentionné dans notre mémoire et dans nos commentaires ce que nous pensions à ce sujet.

Si nous voulons vraiment créer une relation commerciale plus compétitive et plus équilibrée entre les expéditeurs et les transporteurs, pourquoi alors ajouter des restrictions supplémentaires? Ce n'est pas un marché compétitif. Nous devrions faire tout ce que nous pouvons. Nous estimons qu'il faudrait certainement supprimer ces restrictions.

M. Martin Shields:

Vous dites que nous devrions supprimer les zones d'exclusion situées dans ces couloirs.

M. Bob Masterson:

Absolument.

M. Martin Shields:

Très bien. Merci.

Je m'adresse maintenant aux producteurs de grains du Canada, que je remercie d'avoir mentionné l'avoine. Les gens ne le savent peut-être pas, mais la région dans laquelle vous vivez fournit la meilleure avoine pour les chevaux de course en Amérique du Nord. Vous expédiez l'avoine aux États-Unis parce que votre avoine possède la qualité que demande le secteur des courses de chevaux. Vous devez avoir accès au marché américain et vous cultivez l'avoine dans votre région. Je vous remercie de l'avoir mentionné. Il faut que cet aspect soit pris en compte.

Il faudrait également peut-être chercher à comprendre ce qu'est le secteur agricole. Je relie, dans un certain sens, le secteur agricole et les spéculateurs sur séance. Vous utilisez une technologie de pointe. Vous êtes des opérateurs de marché et les opérateurs ont besoin d'avoir accès aux marchés et donc de transporter des produits. Je pense que les gens ne savent pas que vous êtes aussi avancés techniquement que vous l'êtes. Vous souhaitez peut-être en parler à nouveau.

(1040)

M. Jeff Nielsen:

Merci.

Je ne fais pas d'avoine. Je trouve que c'est la céréale qui provoque le plus de démangeaisons. Il est beaucoup plus facile de travailler l'orge que l'avoine.

M. Martin Shields:

Oui, c'est vrai.

M. Jeff Nielsen:

C'est une excellente remarque. J'obtiens les cotes trois ou quatre fois par jour. On m'envoie des conseils concernant le marché. Je regarde quels sont les contrats à terme qui sont offerts pour mes produits. Habituellement, au printemps, une partie de mes récoltes fait déjà l'objet d'un contrat à terme. Je regarde mes échéanciers financiers, le moment auquel je dois faire des versements pour les terres, l'équipement, la machinerie, notamment. Je choisis les mois où je peux obtenir un bon prix et je sais ensuite que je paierai mes factures ce mois-là.

C'est ce qui explique que, lorsque le système se bloque, cela se répercute sur mes finances. J'ai eu la chance de connaître, avec le temps, un excellent banquier qui m'accorde une certaine marge, mais si nous pensons à la prochaine génération, aux jeunes agriculteurs qui entrent dans la profession, nous savons qu'ils n'auront pas cette possibilité. Ils n'auront pas eu le temps de se bâtir un crédit auprès d'une banque.

M. Martin Shields:

Et avec les impôts... Laissons cela.

Quoi qu'il en soit, il y a un mot dans ce projet de loi, le mot « adéquat ». Certains d'entre nous travaillaient encore récemment dans le système d'éducation. J'ai passé beaucoup de temps dans le système d'éducation publique et dans l'éducation supérieure et selon la courbe en cloche, adéquat représente un C. Je pense que nous savons tous ce qu'est un C. Pour moi, cela est adéquat. Ce n'est pas une norme d'excellence.

Monsieur Dahl, voulez-vous répondre à cela, puisque vous en avez parlé?

M. Cam Dahl:

Oui.

Cela fait très longtemps que l'on retrouve les mots « adéquat » et « approprié » dans la jurisprudence et dans les lois relatives au transport. Ces termes représentent en fait la norme minimale que doivent respecter les compagnies ferroviaires. C'est la raison pour laquelle ces mots sont utilisés. C'est le seuil le plus bas. C'est le seuil à partir duquel l'Office pense aux recours que peuvent exercer les expéditeurs. Ce n'est pas un objectif. C'est le strict minimum.

M. Martin Shields:

D'accord. Nous savons que les besoins vont augmenter de près de 40 % au cours des 10 prochaines années et le système nous pose déjà des problèmes. Pour ce qui est du transport ferroviaire, si nous augmentons les expéditions de 40 %, qui est l'objectif recherché pour les 10 prochaines années, et si nous fonctionnons selon des normes minimales, que va-t-il se passer?

M. Cam Dahl:

Ce sont en fait les marchés qui doivent définir nos besoins en matière de transport. Cela est un aspect essentiel. Il faut que ces besoins soient fonction des produits qu'offrent des agriculteurs comme Jeff et de ce qu'exigent les clients au palier international. Ce ne sont pas les fournisseurs de service qui doivent dicter quels seront les produits que nous pouvons fournir au marché.

Le niveau de service nécessaire dépend de ce qui se passe sur le marché. Il faut veiller à ce que le Canada soit en mesure de répondre à la demande non seulement interne et américaine, mais également à celle des marchés internationaux.

M. Martin Shields:

Je vais revenir à l'industrie de la chimie. Si vous êtes en concurrence avec les États-Unis et qu'il y a des zones d'exclusion, est-ce que cela vous désavantage grandement, si vous comparez cette situation à celle d'une entreprise qui fournit le Canada ou les États-Unis en passant par notre marché?

M. Bob Masterson:

Il est difficile de chiffrer les répercussions négatives que peut avoir une mesure donnée. Que savons-nous? J'ai mentionné, il y a un instant, que les États-Unis avaient investi plus de 250 milliards de dollars en infrastructures au cours des cinq dernières années. Selon la conversion habituelle, le Canada aurait dû investir 10 % de cette somme. Nous aurions donc dû investir entre 25 et 30 milliards de dollars dans notre secteur au Canada au cours des cinq dernières années. Ce n'est pas ce qui s'est passé. Nous avons investi 2 milliards de dollars environ. Nous savons que nous avons beaucoup de rattrapage à faire pour que la situation de ce secteur au Canada soit suffisamment intéressante pour que les entreprises aient envie d'y investir.

Pour revenir à votre question précédente, il est possible qu'un C était une note suffisante au cours des années 1970, mais aujourd'hui, pour les personnes qui doivent transporter les récoltes de leurs fermes familiales ou pour l'économie en général, lorsque l'on veut attirer un plus grand pourcentage du marché mondial ainsi que des investissements, je peux vous dire qu'un C n'est pas une note acceptable.

J'aimerais ajouter une autre chose qui me paraît très importante et qui porte sur la question des données mentionnée plus tôt. Il faut établir une distinction entre les réclamations individuelles. Il y a toujours des raisons pour lesquelles les choses ne se passent pas comme elles le devraient, mais l'information la plus importante qui va sortir de tout ceci va nous dire quelles sont les grandes tendances. Notre système fonctionne-t-il comme il le devrait?

Si vous prenez le cas des États-Unis, au cours de la dernière année, une des compagnies de chemin de fer de la première catégorie a changé de propriétaire et dans les six mois, le Surface Transportation Board a envoyé des lettres et appelé des gens à Washington pour leur faire savoir que le service n'était pas acceptable et qu'il devait être renforcé. Je ne pense pas que nous puissions faire cela aujourd'hui, et c'est pourtant ce que nous devrions être en mesure de faire.

(1045)

M. Martin Shields:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci pour ces précisions.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Il n'y en a pas beaucoup qui vont comprendre ce que je vais dire, mais la réponse à ce qu'est un service « adéquat et approprié » est 42.

M. Bob Masterson:

Et demi.

M. Ken Hardie:

Au Canada, la capacité ferroviaire est-elle insuffisante? Y a-t-il assez de matériel?

M. Cam Dahl:

C'est une question complexe. Cela dépend du moment auquel vous la posez.

Du point de vue des grains, si vous posez la question à la mi-juillet, la réponse est non. Si vous posez la question à la mi-novembre, la réponse est oui, parce qu'il y a des pics de demande sur les marchés internationaux, ainsi que sur les marchés internes. Cela dépend du moment de l'année et de la situation.

M. Ken Hardie:

Pensez-vous qu'il y ait de la concurrence dysfonctionnelle entre les divers acteurs ou entre les expéditeurs?

M. Cam Dahl:

Je ne pense pas, mais ce que je constate, en particulier pour le secteur des grains, c'est que ce secteur est tout à fait captif du transport ferroviaire. Il est impossible de transporter 20 millions de tonnes de blé par camion à Vancouver. S'il y a une situation d'urgence, si vous êtes une compagnie de chemin de fer, et si vous avez le choix entre transporter un produit que vous risquez de perdre autrement ou un autre que vous pouvez transporter dans deux ou trois mois, lequel allez-vous choisir?

M. Jeff Nielsen:

Il y a un président célèbre d'une compagnie de chemin de fer qui a déclaré publiquement que les grains restent dans les silos. Ils seront transportés lorsque ces compagnies pourront s'en occuper, et elles disposent de 12 mois pleins pour le faire.

Nous ne pouvons pas étaler sur 12 mois le transport de nos grains.

Mme Fiona Cook (directrice exécutive, Producteurs de grains du Canada):

C'est une excellente question, parce qu'elle fait ressortir la nécessité de disposer de données. Connaissons-nous vraiment, à un moment donné, la capacité du système? Je dirais qu'à l'heure actuelle, nous ne sommes pas en mesure de le faire; nous avons donc besoin de données et d'un ensemble de données sur l'ensemble du système pour pouvoir savoir où nous en sommes, à un moment donné.

M. Ken Hardie:

J'ai posé cette question en partie parce qu'il y a, à l'heure actuelle, en Colombie-Britannique, un débat très vif au sujet des oléoducs. Les oléoducs constituent bien sûr une autre forme de transport et il est possible qu'à l'heure actuelle, elle utilise une partie de la capacité des chemins de fer.

J'aimerais parler des zones d'exclusion. Il y en a deux que je comprends: Kamloops à Vancouver et entre Québec et je crois, Montréal.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est entre Québec et Windsor.

M. Ken Hardie:

Très bien, Québec et Windsor. Merci de cette précision.

Ne s'agit-il pas en réalité de quelques couloirs dans lesquels la concurrence est assez active parce qu'il existe en réalité une concentration des services offerts le long de ces deux couloirs? Devons-nous renforcer l'interconnexion de longue distance dans ces couloirs? Il existe de la concurrence dans ces secteurs.

M. Bob Masterson:

Windsor-Québec, par exemple, est une très longue distance et même s'il y a deux compagnies de chemin de fer de catégorie 1 à proximité l'une de l'autre, il faudrait que je calcule également la distance dans un centre comme Toronto. En dehors de ce couloir, il est très probable que ces distances soient beaucoup plus longues.

En bref, la réponse est non. Encore une fois, si notre but est de renforcer la concurrence, nous savons que les sociétés qui ont obtenu, avec les dispositions précédentes, la possibilité d'obliger les transporteurs à se faire concurrence, ont très bien réussi, cela a amélioré les prix, et leur compétitivité grâce à cette possibilité. Nous ne comprenons pas pourquoi il faudrait introduire des restrictions artificielles basées sur la géographie.

Je vais en rester là.

M. Cam Dahl:

Je souscris à ce que vous dites. Ce n'est pas bien sûr le principal problème que connaissent les expéditeurs de grains, mais je ne vois pas non plus le raisonnement qui pourrait justifier les exclusions.

M. Jeff Nielsen:

Pour en revenir à votre question antérieure au sujet de la capacité, lorsque vous examinez le marché américain, vous constatez que le CN et le CP possèdent des lignes de chemin de fer qui vont aux États-Unis et, avec cette perte, comme Mme Block l'a mentionné au sujet de l'interconnexion sur 160 kilomètres, nous n'avons plus la possibilité d'expédier nos grains dans ce pays parce que nous utilisions ces deux compagnies de chemin de fer au lieu de faire une interconnexion avec la compagnie BNSF.

Si nous voulons envoyer des wagons-trémies aux États-Unis en empruntant les lignes du CN et du CP, il faut savoir qu'il faut attendre beaucoup plus longtemps, jusqu'à 30 jours, avant que ces wagons reviennent au Canada, alors qu'entre la Saskatchewan et Vancouver, le transport prend 10 jours. Cela comprend l'aller et le retour. Il pourrait également y avoir certains aspects qui limitent la capacité.

(1050)

M. Ken Hardie:

Dans le temps qu'il me reste, j'aimerais bien entendre ce que M. Dahl et M. Neilsen ont à dire sur la question des wagons de producteurs parce que, d'après certains témoignages que nous avons entendus, il semble que cette possibilité ait pratiquement disparu. Je ne sais pas si cela est exact ou non, mais l'autre question est celle de savoir si ces wagons existent, comment ils sont utilisés par les compagnies de chemin de fer. Dans l'étude sur la Loi sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grains, que nous avons effectuée il y a quelque temps, il nous a été très clairement dit que, dans les cas de ce genre, il fallait considérer les producteurs comme des expéditeurs, qui posséderaient les droits associés à ce statut.

Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Cam Dahl:

Je suis un ancien commissaire de la Commission canadienne des grains, de sorte que je connais assez bien la question des wagons de producteurs. Les wagons de producteurs sont en fait associés à un droit qui est garanti par la Loi canadienne sur les grains et qui existe depuis 1918, je crois. Je ne suis pas absolument certain de cette date. Cela fait très longtemps que les producteurs ont le droit de charger leurs propres wagons-trémies et de les expédier; ce droit existe toujours.

L'utilisation des wagons de producteurs varie beaucoup. Elle dépend de la situation sur les marchés, elle dépend de l'année, mais on les utilise toujours et cela constitue encore un mécanisme d'urgence pour les producteurs; cet aspect n'est pas touché du tout par le projet de loi C-49.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci. Je dois passer à un autre intervenant.

Mme Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais faire remarquer que tous les témoins ont fait preuve d'optimisme au sujet de l'intention de ce projet de loi et il est impossible de ne pas le constater. Je suis heureuse que vous ayez souligné les dispositions du projet de loi que vous appuyez très fortement.

Si les amendements de forme que vous proposez ne sont pas apportés à ce projet de loi, comment cela toucherait-il votre secteur? Je pose cette question à chacun d'entre vous.

M. Cam Dahl:

Nous avons proposé des amendements de forme pour faire en sorte que l'intention du projet de loi soit respectée sur le plan de l'amélioration des services, de l'imputabilité et de la transparence. Si ces améliorations ne sont pas apportées, je crains que le projet de loi ne puisse atteindre ses objectifs. Elles amélioreraient le projet de loi et faciliteraient la réalisation de ces objectifs.

M. Jeff Nielsen:

Je souscris à ces commentaires. Nous sommes très satisfaits de la plupart des intentions qui sous-tendent le projet de loi. Nous demandons simplement qu'on lui apporte certaines modifications mineures. Comme cela a été mentionné, il faut que ce projet soit adopté. Nous sommes dans la semaine six ou sept de la période des récoltes pour ce qui est du calendrier des expéditions. Comme vous l'avez mentionné, s'il n'y avait pas l'interconnexion de 160 kilomètres à l'heure actuelle, cela pourrait causer certains problèmes. Je crois qu'il existe déjà certains problèmes pour ce qui est de transporter nos produits vers le marché américain.

M. Bob Masterson:

En ce qui nous concerne, il me paraît difficile de dire quelles seraient ces répercussions. Nous avons dit que ce projet de loi est très ambigu. Nous pensons que, si nous voulons concrétiser son intention, il faudrait supprimer cette ambiguïté et resserrer le plus possible la formulation.

Au minimum, si le Comité décide qu'il convient de présenter le projet de loi sous sa forme actuelle, nous souhaiterions qu'il fasse l'objet d'un examen complet dans un délai très court. D'ici deux ou trois ans tout au plus, nous devrions pouvoir examiner la situation et nous demandons: « Possédons-nous les renseignements dont nous avons besoin? Nos décisions se sont-elles améliorées? L'équilibre entre les expéditeurs et les transporteurs est-il meilleur? » Il faut qu'il soit officiellement exigé que ces dispositions soient examinées à nouveau dans le cas où elles ne pourraient être renforcées comme le proposent de nombreux intervenants.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je vous remercie.

Pour en revenir à votre commentaire, monsieur Neilsen, au sujet du fait que nous sommes dans la semaine six ou sept de la période des expéditions, j'aimerais que vous nous en disiez davantage sur les répercussions possibles sur ce qui est offert à nos expéditeurs, à nos producteurs, à l'heure actuelle, lorsqu'ils négocient ces contrats.

M. Jeff Nielsen:

Je ne sais pas très bien ce qu'elles seraient sur la négociation des contrats, mais je me dis simplement qu'à l'heure actuelle, l'Agriculture Transportation Coalition vérifie sur une base hebdomadaire quels sont les wagons disponibles pour les sociétés céréalières sur certaines lignes de chemin de fer. À l'heure actuelle, les notes de nos deux lignes de chemin de fer se situent autour de 90 %. Elles obtiennent, à l'heure actuelle, une assez bonne note pour ce qui est de fournir à temps des wagons à certaines installations.

Le problème est qu'avec l'arrivée de l'hiver et les retards éventuels dans le transport des produits dans certains couloirs, l'écart va se creuser. Pendant toute l'année dernière, ce chiffre a oscillé autour de 80 %, alors que l'autre se situait à près de 70 %. C'est lorsque nous avons constaté des retards.

Si nous ne réussissons qu'à fournir 70 % de vos wagons à temps pendant une certaine période, il y a une accumulation qui fait ensuite boule de neige. C'est de là que viennent tous les retards. Nous sommes alors obligés de payer des surestaries sur la côte ouest ou à Thunder Bay ou ailleurs. Il faut simplement accélérer les choses.

(1055)

Mme Kelly Block:

J'aimerais poursuivre, dans le temps qui me reste, sur la remarque que vous avez faite, M. Masterson, au sujet d'introduire dans ce projet de loi une disposition prévoyant l'examen des répercussions des amendements qui sont proposés ou qui ont été effectués depuis la présentation du projet de loi. Il a été recommandé hier, par un de nos témoins, d'inclure cela dans le projet de loi. Ils ont fait remarquer que celui-ci ne contenait pas une telle disposition.

Avez-vous présenté cette recommandation formelle dans votre mémoire à...?

M. Bob Masterson:

Oui, nous l'avons proposée.

Mme Kelly Block:

Très bien. Je vous remercie.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à Mme Edwards, mais j'invite les autres témoins qui le voudraient à ajouter quelques mots et à se sentir à l'aise de le faire.

Vous avez parlé plus tôt du transport de matières dangereuses. Vous nous avez dit que le camion n'était pas vraiment une option, même s'il était utilisé dans certains cas, mais que son usage était totalement proscrit dans d'autres cas, étant donné que le train s'avérait plus sécuritaire.

Selon vous, la Loi sur les transports au Canada devrait-elle contenir une section spécifiquement consacrée au transport des matières dangereuses? [Traduction]

Mme Kara Edwards:

Je pense que le transport des marchandises dangereuses est réglementé de façon appropriée par la Loi sur le transport des marchandises dangereuses. Il existe une excellente relation entre l'industrie, le gouvernement et les parties prenantes qui participent à mettre à jour les règlements, à répondre aux besoins et aux intérêts des collectivités, du gouvernement et de l'industrie. Je pense que cette activité est bien réglementée par la LTMD à l'heure actuelle. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Le projet de loi C-49 introduit ce que j'appelle des pénalités réciproques. C'est peut-être un pas dans la bonne direction.

Ces pénalités vous semblent-elles symboliques ou suffisamment costaudes pour changer le rapport de force lors de la négociation des contrats? [Traduction]

M. Cam Dahl:

C'est bien évidemment un sujet qui peut faire l'objet de négociations contractuelles entre les expéditeurs et les transporteurs. Oui, j'estime que ces règles seront suffisamment rigoureuses.

M. Jeff Nielsen:

Je crois que cela touche également le commentaire qu'a fait Mme Block. Si nous avons conclu un contrat — à savoir entre l'expéditeur et la société céréalière ou pour l'utilisateur final ou le client — et que la société céréalière a obtenu la garantie qu'elle souhaitait, à savoir qu'elle serait en mesure d'exporter son produit et qu'il existe une pénalité réciproque si cela ne se produit pas, on peut espérer que cela améliorera le service offert, si survient un certain nombre de problèmes de ce genre.

Nous ne voulons pas avoir ces problèmes. Nous voulons simplement obtenir un meilleur service.

M. Bob Masterson:

J'ajouterais simplement que cela dépend de plusieurs choses et c'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons présenté des recommandations qui ont pour but de préciser certains termes. Il faut des données et des renseignements.

Dans un cas comme le nôtre, nous en avons besoin... Ce qui se produit avec le transport des grains ne concerne pas le transport des produits chimiques. Nous avons besoin des données relatives à notre industrie et à notre secteur pour nous aider à décider si le service est adéquat. On en revient alors à la question de savoir si la notion de niveau de service adéquat et approprié est suffisamment claire.

Si ces termes demeurent flous et que nous ne disposons pas des données nécessaires, il nous sera alors très difficile d'imposer la réciprocité, si le litige prend uniquement la forme de discussions devant les différentes commissions, s'il faut tenir des audiences pour savoir si un préjudice a été causé.

Je crois, encore une fois, que le rôle du Comité est d'entendre ce que les intéressés ont à dire, de supprimer le plus possible les ambiguïtés, pour ne pas obliger le gouvernement à intervenir par la suite. Il faut bien faire les choses dès maintenant. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Il nous reste une minute ou deux. Y a-t-il un membre du Comité qui voudrait poser une question pertinente pour laquelle il voudrait obtenir une réponse d'un groupe de témoins aussi experts?

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais revenir à la question qui a été posée à M. Hardie pour essayer de l'approfondir; Mme Cook y a d'ailleurs fait allusion. Il s'agit des données et des renseignements.

Pourriez-vous nous préciser davantage le genre de données que vous voulez obtenir?

(1100)

Mme Fiona Cook:

Encore une fois, il s'agit de demander aux chemins de fer quels sont leurs projets, comme cela se fait aux États-Unis. Le Surface Transportation Board demande aux chemins de fer de catégorie 1 de communiquer leurs plans pour l'année suivante. Encore une fois, il s'agit de se faire une idée générale — et cela revient également à la remarque de M. Masterson — de tous les acteurs qui dépendent de l'accès au transport ferroviaire. Il faut savoir quelle est la capacité réelle des compagnies de chemin de fer à un moment donné? Ce n'est pas une question facile, mais il faut disposer de données pour y répondre.

M. Vance Badawey:

Il ne s'agit pas nécessairement de données commerciales sensibles.

Mme Fiona Cook:

Non.

M. Vance Badawey:

Vous souhaitez simplement obtenir des données pour mieux exercer vos activités.

Mme Fiona Cook:

Le but est de prendre, en temps utile, des décisions fondées sur des renseignements obtenus, c'est bien cela.

M. Vance Badawey:

Et c'est efficace.

Mme Fiona Cook:

Oui.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci.

La présidente:

Je remercie les témoins. Vous avez pu constater ce matin que tous les membres du Comité étaient très intéressés par vos commentaires. Nous faisons ce que nous pouvons, en tant que législateurs, pour améliorer ce projet de loi.

Je vous remercie d'être venus.

Nous allons maintenant suspendre la séance pour accueillir notre nouveau groupe de témoins.

(1100)

(1115)

La présidente:

Nous reprenons notre étude du projet de loi C-49.

Le prochain groupe est composé de l'Association minière du Canada, de Teck Resources Limited, de l'Association des produits forestiers du Canada et de la Fédération maritime du Canada.

Je vous souhaite à tous la bienvenue et j'ai hâte d'entendre vos commentaires.

Est-ce que l'Association minière du Canada pourrait ouvrir la discussion et présenter son exposé de 10 minutes? Monsieur Gratton, voulez-vous commencer?

M. Pierre Gratton (président et chef de la direction, Association minière du Canada):

Je remercie la présidente et les membres du Comité, la greffière et les autres témoins. C'est un plaisir de me trouver ici.

Je m'appelle Pierre Gratton et je suis président et chef de la direction de l'Association minière du Canada. J'ai à mes côtés, mon collègue, Brad Johnston, que vous avez rencontré hier, je crois. Il est le directeur général de la planification pour Teck Resources Limited et travaille quotidiennement avec les compagnies de chemin de fer.

Je vais commencer par dire quelques mots de l'industrie minière, qui est, comme vous le savez, un pilier économique qui a contribué à notre PIB national à hauteur de 56 milliards de dollars en 2015, année où le marché était déprimé. Nous sommes des employeurs de premier plan et notre secteur génère près de 373 000 emplois directs et 190 000 emplois indirects. Notre industrie offre le salaire moyen le plus élevé au pays. Nous exerçons nos activités aussi bien en milieu rural qu'urbain. Proportionnellement, l'industrie minière est le principal employeur des Autochtones dans le secteur privé, elle soutient les entreprises autochtones, et par conséquent, elle constitue un allié de taille dans la réconciliation économique avec les Autochtones.

La hausse des prix des minéraux a redonné confiance à l'industrie minière mondiale, mais l'incertitude nationale et l'augmentation des coûts d'exploitation soulèvent des interrogations quant à la capacité du Canada de tirer profit de la prochaine remontée des prix. Nous avons constaté que l'Australie, notre principal concurrent, avait connu une reprise économique beaucoup plus importante que la nôtre au Canada, ce qui est préoccupant.

Il faut un service de transport ferroviaire fiable et efficace, c'est un facteur déterminant, pour assurer la compétitivité du Canada en matière d'investissement minier, en dépit des fluctuations du marché des produits. Les coûts associés au transport des matières en provenance ou en direction des sites miniers sont considérables et les entreprises doivent acheminer leurs produits à leurs clients internationaux dans les délais prévus. Je peux également affirmer que les clients internationaux de nos membres suivent de très près ce projet de loi et ses répercussions possibles afin d'évaluer la fiabilité du Canada comme fournisseur de matières premières.

Si les transporteurs ferroviaires sont les artères de notre pays commerçant, alors l'industrie minière est l'oxygène dont ils dépendent. Principal client des transporteurs ferroviaires du Canada, le secteur minier représente 20 % de la valeur totale des exportations canadiennes et plus de 50 % des revenus annuels du transport ferroviaire des marchandises. Imaginez quel serait l'état du transport ferroviaire au Canada sans l'industrie minière et les répercussions que cela aurait sur les grains, sur les produits chimiques et forestiers, et sur tous les secteurs qui dépendent du transport ferroviaire canadien.

Nous sommes pourtant constamment aux prises avec des inégalités au sein du marché du transport ferroviaire, qui entraînent d'importantes et perpétuelles défaillances de services. La Loi sur les transports au Canada, qui est un substitut imparfait à la concurrence dans un marché monopolistique, est à l'origine de ces défaillances. De nombreux expéditeurs sont captifs d'une société ferroviaire, et dépendent des compagnies de chemin de fer.

II est donc primordial d'en arriver à un projet de loi bien adapté, puisqu'il s'agit de la troisième mesure législative qui est prise depuis quatre ans. Nous espérons que le Comité est également encouragé par l'audace du ministre Garneau qui veut mettre en oeuvre une ambitieuse série de réformes. Dans cette optique, nous appuyons fortement plusieurs des dispositions de ce projet de loi, notamment les nouvelles exigences relatives à la production de rapports par les compagnies de chemin de fer sur leurs tarifs, leurs services et leur rendement, la nouvelle définition de service ferroviaire « adéquat et approprié », confirmant que les compagnies de chemin de fer doivent fournir aux expéditeurs le niveau de services le plus élevé qu'elles peuvent raisonnablement fournir dans les circonstances et le renforcement des mesures interdisant aux compagnies de chemin de fer de transférer leurs responsabilités sur les expéditeurs au moyen des tarifs.

Nous voulons que les compagnies de chemin de fer soient rentables, mais pas au détriment de la croissance économique de notre pays. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous soutenons les objectifs globaux du projet de loi C-49 et proposons des modifications mineures qui assureront l'obtention des résultats escomptés. Je vais maintenant aborder les trois secteurs où des modifications nous paraissent nécessaires.

Le premier est la transparence des données. Le renforcement de la transparence des données des sociétés ferroviaires est non seulement conforme à l'engagement du gouvernement envers la transparence des données et les politiques fondées sur des données probantes, mais aussi essentiel à l'amélioration de la fonctionnalité des marchés de transport ferroviaire. La divulgation de données solides permettrait d'appuyer le processus décisionnel, d'améliorer les rapports entre les compagnies de chemin de fer et les expéditeurs, et d'éviter les conflits inutiles et coûteux. Si toutes les parties avaient une image claire de leurs capacités et limites respectives, elles seraient davantage incitées à obtenir des résultats exploitables optimaux.

Le projet de loi C-49 contient des mesures positives destinées à pallier les lacunes en matière de données concernant les niveaux de service, mais nous craignons que, sous sa forme actuelle, certaines dispositions relatives à la transparence ne permettent pas d'obtenir des données significatives sur le rendement de la chaîne d'approvisionnement. La disposition que contient le paragraphe 77(2), qui permettrait d'assurer la conformité des systèmes canadien et américain, nous préoccupe particulièrement.

(1120)



Notre inquiétude vient du fait que le modèle américain est fondé sur les données internes relatives aux compagnies de chemin de fer, qui ne sont que partiellement divulguées. II ne dresse donc pas un portrait complet et exact des expéditions. Ce modèle a été élaboré il y a plusieurs décennies, à une époque où la technologie ne permettait pas de stocker et de transmettre des données à grande échelle. Avec les capacités de stockage actuelles, une telle restriction n'a pas lieu d'être, que ce soit pour le système des feuilles de route associé à l'interconnexion de longue distance exposé au paragraphe 76 ou celui des indicateurs de rendement décrits au paragraphe 77.

Afin de maintenir le niveau approprié de granularité des données et de veiller à ce que le projet de loi reflète le contexte unique du marché canadien de transport ferroviaire, I'AMC recommande un amendement qui exigerait que les compagnies de chemin de fer communiquent toutes les feuilles de route plutôt que le rapport limité dont il est question au paragraphe 77(2). Cette légère modification est cohérente avec l’orientation qui sous-tend ce projet de loi et contribuerait en outre à moderniser un système qui a été conçu il y a plusieurs dizaines d'années.

L'AMC appuie les améliorations proposées avec le projet de loi C-49 quant à la collecte et au traitement par l'Office des données relatives aux frais, mais elle a une préoccupation mineure, mais importante, à l'égard du modèle d'arbitrage final.

À l'heure actuelle, les arbitres peuvent déposer une demande de calcul des frais auprès de l'Office que si les deux parties à l’arbitrage y consentent. Toutefois, les sociétés ferroviaires refusent généralement de collaborer avec les expéditeurs dans ce genre de demande, ce qui empêche les parties concernées d'avoir toutes accès aux mêmes renseignements. À notre connaissance, aucune raison légitime, autre qu'une volonté délibérée d'entraver le processus, ne peut justifier qu'une compagnie de chemin de fer refuse une demande de calcul des frais par l’Office. Pour être sûr d'atteindre le bon niveau de transparence et d'accessibilité qui permettrait que les recours aux termes de la loi soient significatifs et utiles, l'AMC recommande d'accorder aux expéditeurs le droit de déposer une demande de calcul des frais auprès de l'Office. Des questions de confidentialité sont souvent soulevées à ce sujet, mais le Comité doit noter que, dans le cadre des instances de l'Office, les décisions écrites sont expurgées pour protéger la confidentialité. De plus, les processus d'arbitrage sur l'offre finale sont déjà confidentiels. Nous ne proposons aucune modification à ces pratiques.

Le deuxième sujet concerne les obligations relatives au niveau de service. Le paragraphe 116(1.2) du projet de loi exige que l'Office détermine si une compagnie de chemin de fer s'acquitte de ses obligations en tenant compte des exigences et des restrictions d'exploitation de la compagnie de chemin de fer et de l'expéditeur. Le même libellé est également proposé pour régir la manière dont l'arbitre supervise le processus d'arbitrage relatif au niveau de service.

Nos membres s'inquiètent du fait que le libellé proposé au sujet de l'acquittement des obligations d'une compagnie de chemin de fer ne reflète pas la réalité du marché du transport ferroviaire du Canada qui est monopolistique. La qualité du service qu'offre une compagnie de chemin de fer dépend des décisions qu'elle prend relativement à l'affectation de ses ressources et aussi à l'achat d'actifs, à la dotation en personnel et à la construction. Toutes ces restrictions sont déterminées exclusivement par le transporteur ferroviaire. Pour ce qui est de leur prise en compte et de l’exécution des obligations en matière de service, les expéditeurs sont désavantagés sur le plan structurel. L'objectif de l'Office devrait être de prendre la décision qui correspond aux faits et non pas une décision qui cherche à établir un équilibre entre les parties. Pour remédier à ce problème, nous recommandons de supprimer cette disposition ou d'assujettir les restrictions à un examen distinct.

Troisième et dernier sujet, le projet de loi C-49 propose un recours en matière d'interconnexion qui, apparemment, reflète une approche créative ayant pour but de corriger le déséquilibre concurrentiel traditionnel que l'on constate dans le marché canadien du transport ferroviaire. Cependant, si l'on prend en compte le nombre des dispositions sur l'inadmissibilité, ce recours, qui pourrait offrir des perspectives très prometteuses s'il était mis en oeuvre de façon plus libérale, est indûment limité parce qu'il exclut de nombreuses situations. Tel que proposé, il reprend en réalité le recours actuel relatif au prix de ligne concurrentiel qu'il se propose de remplacer.

Toutefois, le recours relatif au PLC a été dans l'ensemble inefficace au cours des 30 dernières années, étant donné que les transporteurs ferroviaires de catégorie 1 ont refusé de se faire concurrence en matière de trafic et ne sont pas naturellement contraints de le faire par les forces du marché. En théorie, même si les compagnies de chemin de fer décidaient de se faire concurrence au moyen de l'interconnexion longue distance, plusieurs dispositions du projet de loi C-49 rendent l'interconnexion inutile ou créent des obstacles non nécessaires touchant de nombreux expéditeurs captifs, notamment une longue liste d'exclusions, y compris celles qui sont fondées sur les types de marchandises et sur les restrictions géographiques. Si ces dispositions ne sont pas revues, le recours proposé ne fera que confirmer, par des politiques et la loi, la nature captive d'un grand nombre d'expéditeurs, ceux-là mêmes que le projet de loi a pour but de soutenir.

(1125)



En conclusion, nous reconnaissons que ce projet de loi est une tentative globale et audacieuse de régler les problématiques anticoncurrentielles qui sont inhérentes à l'existence d'un marché du transport ferroviaire monopolistique du Canada et, par conséquent, de mieux répartir le fardeau des expéditeurs. C'est pourquoi il convient de féliciter le gouvernement d'avoir choisi cette orientation.

Les modifications que nous demandons sont modestes et tout à fait conformes à l'ensemble du projet de loi. Elles continueront d'assurer la rentabilité et la souplesse opérationnelle des compagnies de chemin de fer, mais elles sont assez substantielles et surtout assez importantes pour apporter une différence essentielle, si elles ne sont pas prises en compte. En fait, nous craignons que, sans ces modifications, nous nous retrouvions avec ce projet de loi dans la même situation que celle dans laquelle nous nous trouvions avec les projets de loi antérieurs, sans finalement résoudre les problèmes auxquelles nous faisons face.

Je vous remercie de votre attention et je serais heureux de répondre à vos questions.

La présidente:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant passer à l'Association des produits forestiers du Canada.

M. Joel Neuheimer (vice-président, Commerce international et Transports et secrétaire de l'association, Association des produits forestiers du Canada):

Je remercie les membres du Comité de m'avoir invité à prendre la parole ici aujourd'hui au nom des membres de l'Association des produits forestiers du Canada.

L'APFC est le porte-parole des producteurs de bois, de pâte et de papier du Canada, une industrie qui représente 67 milliards de dollars par année. Notre secteur est l'un des plus importants employeurs des travailleurs autochtones du pays, notamment dans les 1 400 entreprises forestières autochtones. Comme troisième industrie manufacturière en importance, l'industrie des produits forestiers est un pilier de l'économie canadienne, qui représente 12 % du PIB manufacturier du Canada. Nous exportons pour plus de 33 milliards de dollars de produits vers 180 pays. Nous sommes aussi le deuxième utilisateur du système ferroviaire en importance, ayant acheminé plus de 31 millions de tonnes de marchandises par rail en 2016.

Comme l'a déclaré le ministre Garneau dans le discours qu'il a prononcé le 18 mai 2017 à Edmonton, « Le défi de notre époque consiste à améliorer l'utilité, l'efficacité et la fluidité de notre réseau ferroviaire ».

L'APFC croit que le principal objectif d'une politique de transport est la mise en place d'un système de transport de marchandises encore plus concurrentiel, efficace et transparent qui permette d'acheminer de façon fiable les marchandises canadiennes vers les marchés mondiaux. C'est ce qui est le plus susceptible d'arriver s'il est guidé par des décisions commerciales prises dans des marchés concurrentiels. En même temps, il existe certains marchés où les forces de la concurrence sont limitées ou inexistantes et où il est légitime et nécessaire d'avoir des règlements ou d'autres mesures gouvernementales, y compris certains types de concepts envisagés par le projet de loi C-49

Les usines de l'industrie forestière sont habituellement situées dans les régions rurales et éloignées, desservies par un seul transporteur ferroviaire, à des centaines de kilomètres du prochain concurrent, ce qui cause un déséquilibre entre le pouvoir que possèdent ces usines et celui des chemins de fer. Les insuffisances du service fourni actuellement coûtent à nos membres des centaines de millions de dollars chaque année, notamment en termes de production perdue, de frais de transport de substitution, de stockage supplémentaire, de coûts de gestion et de coûts fixes supplémentaires ainsi que d'impacts à long terme sur nos activités.

Les sociétés ferroviaires sont un de nos principaux partenaires en ce qui concerne nos besoins en infrastructures de la chaîne d'approvisionnement au Canada, ainsi que pour la réduction des émissions de GES, mais les membres de l'APFC ont besoin du projet de loi C-49 pour équilibrer les forces quand il s'agit de traiter avec les chemins de fer.

Il faut que le projet de loi C-49 s'accompagne de mesures plus rigoureuses et plus fonctionnelles que celles qu'il contient actuellement. Sans ces changements, l'économie canadienne et les emplois que nos sociétés membres et d'autres industries fournissent au pays continueront d'être menacés. Il est urgent d'agir. Les économies de plus de 600 collectivités réparties dans l'ensemble du Canada dépendent des usines locales de produits forestiers. Si le projet de loi C-49 a les effets prévus, il permettra à nos membres et à d'autres industries de créer davantage d'emplois pour la classe moyenne et préviendra les échecs économiques dans les collectivités, entre autres, les fermetures d'usine résultant d'un service ferroviaire inadéquat. La fermeture d'une grande usine de pâte à papier entraîne, par exemple, des pertes de l'ordre de 1,5 million de dollars par jour.

L'APFC appuie la formulation du projet de loi C-49 quant aux pénalités financières réciproques. Toutefois, si l'on veut qu'il soit véritablement efficace, il convient de lui apporter certains amendements importants qui sont conformes à l'intention du ministre avec ce projet de loi.

L'APFC presse le gouvernement d'agir dans cinq grands domaines. Les changements précis de formulation demandés et leur justification sont tous décrits en détail à l'annexe à mes remarques. Je voudrais insister aujourd'hui sur quelques-uns de ces importants changements.

Premièrement, il faut améliorer l'accès et raccourcir les délais en ce qui concerne les décisions de l'Office. Tel qu'il est, le projet de loi affaiblira la capacité de l'Office à réagir rapidement à des problèmes urgents touchant le service ferroviaire à moins qu'il soit modifié de façon à ce que l'Office puisse contrôler sa propre procédure. L'équivalent américain de l'Office des transports du Canada, le Surface Transportation Board, ou STB, a récemment entrepris une enquête sur le service concernant l'un des chemins de fer de catégorie 1 aux États-Unis. La STB n'a pas été obligée d'attendre que le secrétaire au transport lui dise de le faire. La STB a constaté qu'il risquait d'y avoir un problème et a décidé de faire enquête.

Pourquoi ne pas adopter le même système au Canada? Qui veut attendre que le ministre de la Justice demande à la police d'enquêter chaque fois que quelqu'un semble violer la loi? Le projet de loi C-49 doit être modifié en ce sens, pour faire en sorte que la chaîne d'approvisionnement canadienne fonctionne bien et donne un service aux 600 localités forestières, aux centaines d'autres localités et aux millions de travailleurs qui en dépendant au Canada.

Le deuxième changement concerna la définition de ce qu'est un service « adéquat et approprié ». Sous sa forme actuelle, le projet de loi indique aux chemins de fer que, s'ils fournissent le niveau de services le plus élevé qu'ils peuvent raisonnablement fournir dans les circonstances, ils ne peuvent perdre en cas de plainte déposée au sujet du service fourni. Le changement que nous proposons d'apporter à cette formulation vise à exprimer cette intention de façon très claire, sans qu'il soit nécessaire que le sens véritable de cet article suscite des litiges interminables. L'effet final de cet aspect du projet de loi doit être d'empêcher les problèmes actuels comme ceux qui sont présentés ci-dessous et avec lesquels nos membres doivent composer. Au minimum, il faut donner à l'Office des transports du Canada le pouvoir de faire enquête, de sa propre initiative, sur ces questions.

(1130)



Lorsque des membres demandent pourquoi leurs marchandises ont encore été laissées en plan ou pourquoi ils n'ont pas reçu les wagons vides qui se trouvent à la gare de triage, on leur dit que la priorité a été accordée à un autre secteur de produits.

Nous avons des membres qui ont des marchandises à expédier à leurs clients actuels et potentiels dont les installations peuvent être atteintes par rail, mais qui ne peuvent obtenir suffisamment de wagons, ou qui ne sont pas desservis assez souvent ou qui sont découragés par les tarifs demandés. Ces types de problèmes de service ne sont pas des cas isolés et coûtent à nos membres des centaines de millions de dollars chaque année.

Il y a, en troisième lieu, l'interconnexion de longue distance. Il faut modifier le projet de loi pour éliminer les conditions préalables à l'utilisation de ce recours qui sont inutiles ainsi que les nombreuses exclusions. Sans modifications considérables, l'interconnexion de longue distance ne sera pas un recours utilisable pour la majeure partie du trafic captif de produits forestiers.

Il y a ensuite la divulgation des données. Sous sa forme actuelle, les dispositions provisoires du projet de loi qui traitent des données sur le rendement du système ferroviaire offriront aux participants à la chaîne d'approvisionnement des données trop globales et trop anciennes pour être réellement utiles à leur planification. Les échéanciers prévus pour les déclarations et la publication de ces données doivent être resserrés. Par exemple, le projet de loi indique que les exigences seront établies par règlement dans un an. Compte tenu des enjeux, ne pouvons-nous pas faire les choses plus rapidement? Il faudrait également que les données publiées soient davantage ventilées, notamment, par produit, comme les grains, le charbon, le bois d'oeuvre, la pâte et papier, par type de wagon, sur une base hebdomadaire, et par région, par exemple, est et ouest.

Il y a lieu de renforcer la surveillance du processus de cessation de l'exploitation des lignes de chemin de fer. Sous sa forme actuelle, le projet de loi empêchera la création de lignes d'intérêt local en permettant aux compagnies ferroviaires de suspendre le service avant que le processus soit terminé, ce qui n'encouragera pas un autre chemin de fer à prendre le relais. Avec ces changements, les Canadiens qui vivent dans nos collectivités seront desservis par un système de transport des marchandises qui sera plus fiable et plus concurrentiel.

Les membres de l'APFC s'intéressent grandement aux questions de transport parce qu'il représente près du tiers du coût de leurs facteurs de production. L'accès à un système de transport efficace, fiable et concurrentiel est essentiel pour les investissements futurs dans notre secteur, ainsi que pour soutenir les familles qui comptent sur notre industrie pour subvenir à leurs besoins.

Mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, pour les 230 000 Canadiens que le secteur forestier emploie directement partout au pays, un système de transport des marchandises plus concurrentiel, tel que décrit ici, assurera un accès accru au système ferroviaire, un service plus fiable dans toute la chaîne d'approvisionnement, des tarifs plus concurrentiels et une chaîne d'approvisionnement plus compétitive.

Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Je vous remercie.

La présidente:

Je vous remercie.

Nous allons maintenant entendre la Fédération maritime du Canada.

(1135)

Mme Karen Kancens (directrice, Politique et commerce, Fédération maritime du Canada):

Merci. Madame la présidente, bonjour. Je vous remercie de nous fournir la possibilité de comparaître devant le Comité permanent au sujet du projet de loi C-49, la Loi sur la modernisation des transports.

Je m'appelle Karen Kancens. Je suis accompagnée par ma collègue Sonia Simard pour parler au nom de la Fédération maritime du Canada, qui est le porte-parole des propriétaires, exploitants, et mandataires des navires battant pavillon étranger qui transportent les produits d'importation et d'exportation canadiens à destination aussi bien qu'en provenance des marchés internationaux.

Nos membres représentent plus de 200 compagnies de navigation dont les navires effectuent des milliers d'aller-retour entre les ports canadiens et étrangers et qui transportent chaque année des centaines de millions de tonnes de marchandises, qui vont des marchandises en vrac comme les grains et le charbon, à des marchandises et cargaisons liquides comme le pétrole brut et les produits pétroliers, dans des conteneurs destinés aux consommateurs ainsi que des produits manufacturés.

Ces navires jouent un rôle essentiel dans l'économie canadienne parce qu'ils facilitent les échanges internationaux du Canada et parce qu'ils le font tous les jours de façon sécuritaire et efficace. En fait, le transport maritime est une des industries les plus réglementées au monde et les navires battant pavillon étranger sont assujettis à un régime très strict de règlements concernant la sécurité, l'environnement et les équipages lorsqu'ils naviguent dans les eaux canadiennes, règlements qui sont mis en oeuvre par les autorités canadiennes conformément à leurs responsabilités à titre d'État du port.

Comme la plupart des collègues qui ont pris la parole avant nous, nous nous intéressons également de très près aux dispositions du projet de loi C-49 en matière de transport ferroviaire, parce que nous pensons que la mise en place d'un système de transport ferroviaire plus efficace aura un effet positif sur tous les éléments de la chaîne logistique, des expéditeurs dans le secteur du transport par camion, par rail et par navire, jusqu'aux ports et terminaux maritimes, aux centres de distribution et entrepôts intérieurs, et au-delà.

Cela dit, nous allons axer les commentaires que nous allons présenter aujourd'hui au sujet du projet de loi C-49 non pas sur les dispositions qui touchent le système ferroviaire, mais sur celles qui touchent le transport maritime, qui auront également, pensons-nous, un effet positif sur la fluidité de l'ensemble des activités commerciales.

Nous nous intéressons particulièrement à l'article 70 du projet de loi C-49, qui autorise les navires battant pavillon étranger à repositionner leurs conteneurs vides entre des ports canadiens, sans demander de contrepartie, ce qui est une activité qui leur était interdite jusqu'à aujourd'hui par les dispositions de la Loi sur le cabotage.

Il est bon de prendre un peu de recul et de faire remarquer que ce n'est pas une idée révolutionnaire ou nouvelle. C'est en fait une activité que nos membres, les transporteurs de conteneurs, demandent depuis longtemps et que notre association préconise depuis plus de 10 ans.

En réalité, les discussions à ce sujet que notre industrie a eues avec le gouvernement en étaient arrivées à un point où, en 2011, Transports Canada était à la veille de présenter une modification à la Loi sur le cabotage de façon à autoriser le repositionnement des conteneurs vides par les navires battants pavillon étranger. Ces discussions ont toutefois été suspendues parce que le repositionnement des conteneurs vides faisait l'objet de négociations entre le Canada et l'Union européenne dans le cadre de l'Accord économique et commercial global.

Ces négociations sont aujourd'hui terminées et le projet de loi C-49 vise en fait à faire aboutir les discussions qui ont été suspendues en 2011, au cours desquelles nous en étions arrivés à un accord général, notamment avec les propriétaires canadiens de navire, sur le fait que le repositionnement des conteneurs vides devrait être permis pour tous les navires, quel que soit leur pavillon ou la nationalité de leur propriétaire.

Pourquoi cette question est-elle aussi importante? Elle est importante parce qu'un aspect important du secteur du transport maritime par conteneurs est le déplacement des conteneurs vides d'un endroit où ils ne sont pas utiles ou d'un endroit où il y en a trop, à des lieux où ils sont nécessaires ou dans lesquels un exportateur a besoin de conteneurs vides pour les charger de marchandises destinées à un client étranger.

Jusqu'ici, la Loi sur le cabotage interdisait aux transporteurs battant pavillon étranger d'utiliser leurs propres navires pour exercer cette activité, et ils étaient obligés de recourir à des solutions de rechange comme l'envoi des conteneurs vides par camion ou par rail, ou plus fréquemment, ils les faisaient venir de l'étranger. Cependant, aucune de ces solutions ne constitue une utilisation productive des actifs des transporteurs et elles entraînent toutes un prix, non seulement pour l'expéditeur, mais également pour l'exportateur, parce que c'est une solution de transport moins rentable, et moins efficace pour ce qui est de la chaîne de logistique, à cause de la réduction de la fluidité et de l'efficacité globale.

(1140)



Les dispositions du projet de loi C-49 relatives au transport maritime régleraient ces difficultés en accordant aux transporteurs la possibilité d'utiliser leurs moyens de transport, leurs navires, ainsi que leurs conteneurs vides de la façon la plus économique et productive possible, ce qui bénéficierait finalement à tous les acteurs de la chaîne d'approvisionnement.

Nous appuyons très fortement la disposition du projet de loi C-49 relative au repositionnement des conteneurs vides, mais le libellé actuel du projet de loi qui définit la partie autorisée à repositionner ces conteneurs vides a peut-être une portée trop restreinte, et empêcherait peut-être de retirer tous les bénéfices susceptibles de découler de la libéralisation de cette activité.

Plus précisément, le paragraphe 70(1) du projet de loi C-49 énonce que la partie qui est autorisée à repositionner ses conteneurs vides est le propriétaire du navire, qui est défini au paragraphe 2(1) de la Loi sur le cabotage comme étant la partie qui possède les « droits du propriétaire » quant à la possession et à l'utilisation du navire. L'application de cette définition à des situations où il existe des accords de partage de navire, aux termes desquels un certain nombre de transporteurs de conteneur s'entendent pour partager l'espace de leurs navires et qui sont utilisés très fréquemment dans le secteur du transport des conteneurs, est susceptible de causer un problème.

Il est difficile de savoir à l'heure actuelle, si les parties à ce genre d'entente possèdent les droits du propriétaire à l'égard de la possession des navires dans les cas autres que ceux où c'est leur navire qui est utilisé pour repositionner les conteneurs vides. En fait, selon la façon dont les navires visés par une entente de partage de navire sont répartis, les propriétaires de navires ne pourraient être autorisés à repositionner ses conteneurs vides que tous les quatre ou cinq voyages, ce qui réduirait considérablement les avantages que l'on pourrait retirer de la libéralisation de cette activité.

Nous pensons que, si nous voulons que les parties retirent tous les bénéfices de l'application des dispositions du projet de loi C-49 relatives au repositionnement des conteneurs vides, il faudrait alors préciser que les parties à un accord de partage de navire peuvent repositionner leurs propres conteneurs vides ainsi que ceux des autres parties à l'accord et l'utiliser à cette fin tous les navires visés par l'accord en question. Il existe différentes façons de parvenir à ce résultat, notamment par l'émission de directives et de précisions par Transports Canada, mais nous pensons que la meilleure solution consisterait à modifier le paragraphe 70(1) du projet de loi C-49 de façon à préciser clairement que la partie qui est autorisée à repositionner des conteneurs vides est non seulement le propriétaire du navire, tel que défini au paragraphe 2(1) de la Loi sur le cabotage, mais également toutes les parties qui partagent l'utilisation et le contrôle opérationnel du navire en question, dans le cadre d'un accord plus vaste de partage de navire.

Nous pensons que l'ajout d'une telle modification constitue le meilleur moyen de veiller à ce que les dispositions du projet de loi C-49 relatives au transport maritime soient mises en oeuvre de façon à refléter le fonctionnement réel du secteur du transport par conteneur, ce qui bénéficierait à toutes les parties prenantes, qu'il s'agisse de compagnies de transport maritime, d'exportateurs et d'importateurs canadiens ou des autres acteurs de la chaîne d'approvisionnement.

Nous vous remercions de votre attention et avons hâte de répondre aux questions que vous pourriez poser.

La présidente:

Merci.

Nous allons demander à Mme Block de commencer les questions.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je remercie madame la présidente et toutes les personnes qui sont venues aujourd'hui. C'est une bonne chose que d'entendre le point de vue d'un autre groupe de parties intéressées. J'ai hâte d'entendre les questions et les réponses que nous allons échanger au cours de l'heure qui suit.

J'ai fait remarquer plus tôt aujourd'hui que nous effectuons un travail très important et j'ai souligné l'utilité de vos remarques parce qu'elles fournissent au Comité les renseignements dont il a besoin pour instaurer un équilibre approprié dans le but de régler les difficultés que connaît notre système de transport.

Nous savons que ce n'est pas la première fois que vous avez été invités à fournir des commentaires destinés à nous aider, en qualité de parlementaires, dans le cadre de ces délibérations. En fait, nous savons que le ministre des Transports examine la LCT depuis près de deux ans et qu'il a organisé de vastes consultations auxquelles il a convié d'autres organisations, pour obtenir des commentaires sur la façon de structurer pour l'avenir la Loi canadienne sur les transports. Il est important de bien le faire. Il est important de structurer le projet de loi pour que nos producteurs aient accès aux marchés dont ils ont besoin et pour leur fournir des moyens de transport efficaces.

Je constate que tous les témoins qui sont intervenus jusqu'ici ont recommandé de modifier le projet de loi et tous ont souligné les problèmes que posaient les dispositions relatives à l'interconnexion de longue distance, à l'exception peut-être du dernier témoin qui est intervenu ici ce matin.

J'aimerais vous poser une question à tous et vous pourrez y répondre chacun votre tour. Quelles seraient les répercussions à long terme pour votre industrie d'un projet de loi auquel ne seraient pas apportées les modifications de forme que vous proposez?

(1145)

M. Pierre Gratton:

Comme vous l'avez justement noté, c'est la troisième fois en quatre ans que je comparais devant un comité des transports au sujet d'un projet de loi qui a pour but de régler ce type de problèmes.

J'aimerais faire la remarque suivante. J'ai le sentiment qu'avec ce projet de loi, qui constitue la tentative la plus globale de régler tous ces problèmes, les témoins et les expéditeurs formulent des recommandations de plus en plus précises, parce que ce projet de loi constitue une tentative sérieuse de régler tous ces problèmes. Nos recommandations touchent vraiment tous les détails de ce projet de loi. C'est une bonne chose.

Néanmoins, pour répondre à votre question, nous estimons que cette mesure est insuffisante, en particulier pour ce qui est des données. Si nous ne faisons pas ces modifications — en particulier celles qui touchent les données — nous ne progresserons pas beaucoup et nous devrons attendre encore une fois quatre ans avant de pouvoir examiner un autre projet de loi.

Certains acteurs du secteur minier craignent même que, si l'on n'apporte pas à ce projet de loi les modifications touchant les données, ils vont se retrouver dans une situation encore plus mauvaise que celle qui est la leur avec le régime actuel. C'est ce qui les inquiète. Il est vrai que les règlements vont préciser certaines choses et je fais donc cette affirmation avec une certaine prudence.

Néanmoins, nous estimons que nous sommes très près de modifier très utilement un régime avec lequel nous vivons difficilement depuis 20 ans. Il ne manque pas grand-chose, mais si nous ne faisons pas ce dernier effort, nous aurons manqué une excellente occasion de régler tous ces problèmes.

M. Joel Neuheimer:

Je vais commencer par dire, comme Pierre l'a fait dans ses remarques, que, si nous examinons le contexte de l'interconnexion de longue distance, nous constatons qu'elle ressemble énormément aux prix de ligne concurrentielle qui sont déjà en vigueur. C'est en théorie une notion extrêmement utile, mais en réalité, avec les exceptions qui ont été introduites, elle n'aura pas l'effet souhaité par le ministre. Cela ne nous aidera aucunement, nous les expéditeurs captifs.

Je vais vous donner trois petits exemples qui vont éclairer la situation. Le premier est que tout le transport qui s'effectue entre Québec et Windsor sera exclu. Deuxièmement, tout le transport de marchandises qui s'effectue entre Kamloops et Vancouver sera exclu et troisièmement, il ne sera pas possible de transporter des marchandises dangereuses susceptibles d'être toxiques par inhalation. Pour en terminer avec les produits TIH, comme vous venez de l'entendre de la part des témoins du secteur de la chimie au cours de la dernière séance, le TMD est déjà réglementé. Je pense que la situation dans ces domaines est satisfaisante, et c'est la raison pour laquelle je vous demande pourquoi vous voulez rendre plus difficile le transport des produits dont nous avons besoin pour fabriquer les choses qui nous aident à développer l'économie canadienne?

Quant aux deux exceptions géographiques, il se trouve simplement qu'elles représentent la plus grosse part du transport des produits forestiers dans notre système. Pour vous parler franchement, je pense que, s'il n'est pas possible d'apporter ces exclusions, il serait alors préférable de supprimer cette partie du projet de loi et de revenir à la situation actuelle. Il serait sans doute préférable pour nous de conserver la situation actuelle.

Je vous remercie d'avoir posé ces questions.

Mme Karen Kancens:

Je vais légèrement changer de sujet et dire que de notre point de vue, cela fait 10 ans que nous travaillons sur le repositionnement des conteneurs vides. Nous avons progressé lentement, mais sûrement. Nous sommes maintenant sur le point d'obtenir une modification qui autoriserait les navires battant pavillon étranger à repositionner leurs conteneurs vides entre des ports canadiens.

C'est un aspect très important, parce qu'il accorde au transporteur la souplesse d'utiliser ses actifs de la façon la plus efficace possible et que ces effets se font ressentir sur l'ensemble de la chaîne d'approvisionnement. Mais, compte tenu de la façon dont le projet de loi est rédigé, et du manque de précision dans la façon dont est définie la partie autorisée à repositionner ses conteneurs vides, nous risquons de ne pas pouvoir saisir la possibilité qui s'offre maintenant. Avec l'entrée en vigueur de cet amendement, il se pourrait qu'avec les accords de partage de navire, qui est un élément essentiel du secteur du transport par conteneurs, nous allons nous retrouver dans une situation où le transporteur ne pourra repositionner ses conteneurs vides que dans un cinquième des cas, les seuls où il agit en tant que transporteur principal. Ce serait une occasion manquée.

(1150)

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à vous dire que j'apprécie le fait que vous soyez venus aujourd'hui. Il est tout à fait vrai que nous avons chacun un rôle à jouer dans le développement économique de la nation, et c'est vous qui le faites aujourd'hui.

Nous voulons bien faire les choses. Nous voulons être sûrs que nous allons ensuite discuter de ce qui nous a été dit. Notre équipe m'a appris aujourd'hui que c'est un dialogue qui se poursuit depuis des années et le but est de bien faire les choses de votre point de vue, et aussi de notre point de vue en tant que comité. J'apprécie votre participation.

J'aimerais vous demander quelque chose avant de poser ma question. Pour ce qui est de l'information et des recommandations — vous avez parlé, M. Gratton et M. Neuheimer, des détails que vous aviez communiqués — pouvez-vous également nous les transmettre? Ce sera peut-être la deuxième ou la troisième fois que vous le faites, mais je l'apprécierais beaucoup. Ainsi, lorsque nous tiendrons nos séances, nous pourrons être sûrs d'examiner ces renseignements-là.

J'aimerais poser une question au sujet des collectivités autochtones. Monsieur Neuheimer, vous avez quelque peu parlé des collectivités du Nord, et tout comme je crois M. Gratton l'a fait, en particulier pour ce qui est de vos intérêts commerciaux. L'exploitation minière dans les collectivités nordiques et isolées est tellement éloignée des marchés que le coût du service et l'uniformisation des règles du jeu sont pratiquement impossibles à réaliser.

Ma question est très simple. Comment pouvons-nous devenir des facilitateurs — j'utilise beaucoup ce mot — pour vous et pour ce que vous faites dans ces collectivités pour vraiment uniformiser les règles, pour diminuer le coût du service et en fin de compte, permettre à ces collectivités, dont certaines sont autochtones, d'avoir accès aux moyens de développer leur économie, ce qui créerait davantage d'emplois pour elles et finalement, ce qui garantirait l'accès à la croissance et aux marchandises — des marchandises abordables?

M. Joel Neuheimer:

Je vous remercie pour cette question. Nous allons veiller à ce que vous receviez l'annexe détaillée que nous avons présentée dans le cadre des commentaires que nous avons faits ce matin. Ce sera un plaisir pour nous.

J'ai simplement quelques brefs commentaires à faire. Si vous allez de l'avant et introduisez les changements que nous avons décrits pour ce qui est d'un service « adéquat et approprié », cela réglera, d'après moi, la plupart des problèmes dont vous avez parlé. Il en va de même pour les changements proposés aux dispositions relatives à l'interconnexion de longue distance dont nous venons de parler.

Je dirais qu'en fait pour moi, le changement qui est le plus facile à introduire avec ce projet de loi est d'attribuer à l'Office le pouvoir de faire enquête de sa propre initiative si quelque chose lui paraît un peu bizarre. Vous savez comment cela se passe. C'est à cause de notre géographie particulière que nous sommes un pays incroyable, mais les réalités que vous venez de mentionner... Je veux dire qu'il suffit d'y réfléchir. Chaque fois que vous faites un achat important... Supposons que vous voulez acheter un camion. Vous vivez dans une des collectivités dont vous avez parlé et il n'y a qu'un seul concessionnaire dans la ville. Vous ne pensez pas à ce que vous allez devoir payer, et vous ne pensez probablement pas non plus à ce que sera le service après-vente, mais si quelque chose ne va pas, il serait rassurant que cet organisme de surveillance puisse examiner la situation et veille à ce que ces collectivités obtiennent le service qu'elles méritent.

M. Pierre Gratton:

Premièrement, j'aimerais simplement dire que certains de nos membres exploitent des mines et n'ont pas accès au transport par chemin de fer, de sorte que notre secteur est très en faveur d'investir dans les infrastructures, ce qu'est en train de faire le gouvernement dans le nord du Canada. Je voulais le mentionner. Pour le reste, je pourrais faire les mêmes remarques que celles que vient de faire Joel. Pour la question des données, qui nous paraît être l'aspect le plus simple et le plus facile à modifier, cela fournirait...

Pourquoi les données sont-elles aussi importantes? Si vous avions accès aux données qui permettent de savoir quel est le nombre de wagons capables de se rendre dans un lieu donné, à tel moment, et ce dans l'ensemble du système, nous pourrions alors savoir si les chemins de fer respectent leurs obligations. Nous pourrions savoir s'il y a d'autres motifs indépendants de la volonté des compagnies de chemin de fer qui expliquent la situation. Cela nous permettrait à tous de mieux comprendre le fonctionnement de notre système, de savoir s'il faut investir des ressources dans les infrastructures pour améliorer le fonctionnement de notre système ferroviaire ou si, en fait, les compagnies de chemin de fer font de temps en temps ce que nous pensons, à savoir laisser en plan leurs actifs et ne pas fournir un bon service. Le fait d'avoir accès à ces données suffirait, d'après nous, à influencer le comportement des compagnies de chemin de fer.

Si vous ne choisissiez rien d'autre — et c'est la chose la plus simple à faire — élargissez les catégories de données qui doivent être divulguées, en sachant qu'il y en a quelques-unes qui doivent demeurer confidentielles, mais il n'y en a pas beaucoup. J'estime qu'avec la technologie dont nous disposons aujourd'hui, nous pouvons faire beaucoup mieux.

Je pensais que nous avions distribué ce document, mais peut-être que cela n'a pas été fait. Ce sont les modifications détaillées que nous proposons d'apporter au projet de loi.

(1155)

M. Vance Badawey:

Mesdames et messieurs, pensez-vous également que, grâce à cette divulgation des données, nous pourrons constater l'existence d'un réseau de transport intégré et faire ainsi ressortir la nécessité d'investir dans les infrastructures, ce qui devrait accompagner cette stratégie, celle que le ministre Garneau propose et tente de mettre en oeuvre?

M. Pierre Gratton:

Absolument. Je pense que c'est un aspect absolument essentiel; si nous ne le faisons pas, nous travaillerons en fait dans le vide. Nous ne savons pas où se trouvent les goulots d'étranglement.

M. Vance Badawey:

Tout à fait. Merci.

La présidente:

Vous pouvez faire un bref commentaire.

M. Joel Neuheimer:

Sans disposer de ces données et sans savoir comment fonctionne exactement le système, il n'est pas possible de prendre de bonnes décisions au sujet des investissements à effectuer dans les infrastructures? Je crois que c'était ce que voulait dire Pierre.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci.

La présidente:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Mesdames et messieurs, je vous souhaite la bienvenue et vous remercie de nous faire bénéficier de votre expertise.

Je poursuis sur le sujet déjà abordé, soit les niveaux de services adéquats et appropriés. Parfois, on utilise les mots « adéquats et valables ». Toutefois, peu importe les traductions, cela demeure toujours un peu vague. Ce fait a été souligné par de très nombreux témoins, dont vous, ce matin.

La question des données est également toujours rapportée. N'est-ce pas là la solution? En effet, la nouvelle définition que vous souhaitez pour des contrats de services adéquats ne devrait-elle pas être basée sur des données probantes? Il y a la possibilité de jumeler ce qu'on traite de façon différente. On traite des données en disant que c'est trop global, qu'on ne s'y retrouve pas et qu'on n'a pas ce qu'il faut et on traite de la définition après. Avez-vous une meilleure définition à me proposer de ce qu'est un service adéquat? Cela m'apparaît un peu flou.

Il me semble que le meilleur moyen de le préciser serait peut-être de lier cela avec les données.

Qu'en pensez-vous? [Traduction]

M. Joel Neuheimer:

Nous avons présenté un amendement très précis concernant la question du service « adéquat et approprié » que vous venez tout juste de mentionner. Cela se trouve dans notre mémoire et j'espère que cela vous sera utile. En fin de compte, il faut que nous soyons aussi explicites que possible et disions clairement que ces compagnies doivent offrir le meilleur niveau de service possible compte tenu de la situation. Nous devons faire en sorte que la définition qui figure dans le projet de loi soit aussi précise que possible au sujet de ce qui est acceptable et de ce qui ne l'est pas.

Lorsqu'il y a des inondations et que les voies sont emportées, il est bien difficile de s'attendre à ce que les trains circulent à l'heure comme d'habitude. Mais, s'il ne s'agit pas d'une catastrophe naturelle et que la situation est normale, compte tenu du temps que nous avons 12 mois par an au Canada, ces compagnies devraient pouvoir offrir un service respectant les horaires et lorsque les wagons arrivent, ils devraient être accompagnés de l'équipement nécessaire et devraient pouvoir être utilisés de façon sécuritaire par les expéditeurs. Voilà comment j'essayerai de répondre à votre question.

Merci. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je ne proviens pas de l'industrie, mais malgré tout le respect que j'ai pour votre proposition, je trouve que les mots « le plus haut degré possible » demeurent flous. Ils ne peuvent pas être traduits en chiffres.

La définition que vous proposez et que j'ai lue vous satisfait-elle, vous et votre industrie?

Vous permet-elle d'établir des relations d'affaires concrètes?

(1200)

M. Pierre Gratton:

Il serait peut-être préférable que je demande à mon collègue de répondre à votre question, étant donné qu'il interagit directement et quotidiennement avec les compagnies de chemin de fer. Je pense qu'il pourrait vous fournir une réponse précise.

M. Robert Aubin:

C'est parfait. [Traduction]

M. Brad Johnston (directeur général, Logistique et planification, Teck Resources Limited):

« Adéquat et approprié » est la définition actuelle de la loi, et dans notre mémoire initial — et je réponds ici au nom de Teck — nous avons demandé d'apporter une légère modification à ce libellé pour qu'un service « adéquat et approprié » reflète les besoins de l'expéditeur et non pas les moyens à la disposition de la compagnie ferroviaire. Il y a une raison très précise pour cela; c'est parce qu'à un moment donné, la demande prévue se transforme en une demande ferme, pour une compagnie minière ou même pour une compagnie de produits forestiers. Dans notre cas, le Canada est bien évidemment un pays d'exportation, un service « adéquat et approprié » veut dire que le système qui le fournit nous permet d'exporter nos marchandises au moment où cela est nécessaire.

Cela revient au commentaire que j'ai fait hier. Il ne s'agit pas de savoir si les wagons vont arriver, mais du moment où ils vont arriver. C'est parce que, dans notre cas, ou dans le cas d'une société minière — une société qui expédie du cuivre, du zinc ou du charbon — il y a un navire qui attend quelque part. Ce n'est pas une notion abstraite. Il faut tout autant prévoir l'avenir que faire rapport sur ce qui s'est passé. Un service « adéquat et approprié » veut dire un service qui répond à mes besoins, à savoir effectuer mes expéditions, ou mes ventes, ou fournir mes produits à mes clients qui se trouvent en Asie, en Amérique du Sud et en Europe. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Vous ne dites pas « si  » mais « quand » le train va arriver. Pour moi, cela implique également le nombre de wagons qui vont arriver. Or il faut que cela corresponde au contrat que vous avez conclu avec une compagnie ferroviaire et à la capacité de cette dernière de livrer le nombre de wagons dont vous avez réellement besoin. [Traduction]

M. Brad Johnston:

Tout à fait, et c'est cela un service adéquat et approprié. Dans le cas de Teck, nous transmettons à la compagnie de chemin de fer des prévisions sur quatre ans et de façon beaucoup plus précise sur cinq mois. Alors, pour nos besoins ou pour ceux d'une société de produits forestiers ou un transporteur maritime — je vais utiliser un terme technique — nous prévoyons des jours de planche. L'arrivée du navire au port est prévue. Il va arriver bientôt. Encore une fois, il n'y a pas d'incertitude à ce sujet. Nous ne voulons pas commencer une discussion au sujet de savoir si nous allons obtenir des wagons. Il ne peut pas y avoir ce genre de discussion, parce que cela ne respecte pas l'obligation qu'a un transporteur général. Cela ne constitue pas un service adéquat et approprié. Ce n'est pas une motion abstraite.

En modifiant simplement la formulation de la loi pour qu'elle se lise « Conformément aux conditions fixés par l'expéditeur », cela répondrait à la question que vous posez.

M. Joel Neuheimer:

Je vais essayer de préciser ce qui me paraît être le sujet de votre question; prenons une usine qui est exploitée dans le nord du Québec et qui commande habituellement 10 wagons par semaine qui doivent arriver un jour précis, et tout d'un coup, vous n'obtenez que trois wagons. On peut espérer que la semaine prochaine, le manque sera compensé, mais si, de façon chronique et répétée, vous commandez 10 wagons par semaine et que vous n'en recevez que quatre ou six ou sept pendant une certaine période, cela ne répond pas aux besoins de l'expéditeur. Donc, pour revenir à ce que vous disiez, il faut que le service corresponde aux besoins de l'expéditeur et c'est ainsi que j'essayerai de préciser davantage l'idée que vous recherchez, si cela répond bien à votre question.

La présidente:

Merci pour votre réponse.

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vais commencer par le transport maritime. Pour ce qui est des navires, y a-t-il, à l'heure actuelle, des navires battant pavillon canadien qui les transportent ou tout cela se fait-il par chemin de fer ou par la route?

Mme Karen Kancens:

Pourriez-vous répéter la question?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour le déplacement des conteneurs vides, est-ce que ce sont des navires battant pavillon canadien qui le font ou cela n'arrive jamais?

Mme Karen Kancens:

En théorie, étant donné que cette activité est interdite actuellement pour les navires battant pavillon étranger aux termes de la Loi sur le cabotage, un des navires de ce genre pourrait demander une dispense pour pouvoir exercer cette activité, ce qui s'est déjà produit, et il peut y avoir un navire canadien qui s'oppose à la dispense et qui déclare être en mesure de transporter les conteneurs vides.

Nous connaissons un cas dans lequel cela est arrivé. Le transporteur voulait repositionner 400 conteneurs vides, je crois que c'était bien cela, de Montréal à Halifax. Le propriétaire du navire canadien a déclaré qu'il pouvait s'en charger et que cela en coûterait 2 000 $ par conteneur, ce qui représentait un coût de 800 000 $. Le coût du transport de ces conteneurs sur ce navire se serait élevé à 2 000 $ et le coût du même transport par un navire battant pavillon étranger aurait été de 300 $ par conteneur, ce qui est à peu près sept fois moins.

En théorie, oui, un navire canadien pourrait repositionner des conteneurs vides. Cela n'arrive jamais, parce que l'expéditeur étranger pourra utiliser le chemin de fer ou les importer de l'étranger, même si ces choix ne sont pas les meilleurs, mais le coût ne s'élèvera jamais à 2 000 $ par conteneur comme le propriétaire d'un navire canadien l'exigerait. C'est bien une option, mais elle n'a jamais été utilisée et elle ne le sera jamais.

(1205)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour les propriétaires, ceux qui louent les conteneurs, ce n'est pas une activité payante.

Mme Karen Kancens:

Non. Nous parlons simplement du repositionnement de leurs propres conteneurs, de ceux dont ils sont propriétaires ou qu'ils louent, ce qui n'entraîne aucun coût, de sorte qu'il s'agit simplement de logistique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Je vais maintenant quitter le transport maritime pour me lancer sur les voies de chemin de fer.

L'industrie minière est unique parce que certaines mines n'ont pas accès à une ligne de chemin de fer et il y a d'autres endroits où il y a seulement une ligne de chemin de fer, celle-ci n'est reliée à rien d'autre. Je pense à la société Quebec Cartier Mining ou à la Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway où, sans le train, vous ne pouvez pas vous y rendre. Il n'y a qu'une seule compagnie ferroviaire et aucune autre solution. Comment cela fonctionne-t-il?

La plupart des aspects du projet de loi C-49 qui vise à augmenter la concurrence ne s'appliquent pas vraiment à ces secteurs.

M. Pierre Gratton:

La société Iron Ore Company of Canada, par exemple, est propriétaire de sa propre ligne de chemin de fer et c'est elle qui l'exploite. C'est bien évidemment la façon dont elle a réglé cet aspect.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Une intégration verticale, alors.

M. Pierre Gratton:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela paraît logique. Il y a un aspect au sujet duquel j'aime taquiner — je crois que l'on peut utiliser ce mot — les grandes compagnies de chemin de fer depuis lundi, c'est qu'elles disent que vous n'êtes pas un expéditeur captif tant que vous avez accès à des camions.

Je pense que l'industrie ferroviaire devrait défendre ce moyen de transport, mais c'est seulement mon avis. Que pensez-vous de cela? Si vous avez accès à des camions, n'êtes-vous pas encore un expéditeur captif?

M. Pierre Gratton:

Le transport par camion est bien souvent beaucoup plus coûteux. Cela dépend de la longueur du trajet. Ce n'est pas non plus un moyen aussi sûr. Il ne serait absolument pas rentable d'essayer de transporter ces volumes de marchandises à l'autre bout du pays par camion et dans certains cas, avec les produits en vrac, ce n'est absolument pas faisable. Il n'est pas possible de transporter par camion la quantité de charbon métallurgique que produit Teck. Ce n'est tout simplement pas une solution.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Je vais poser la même question au secteur forestier.

Que pensez-vous du transport par camion à titre de solution qui vous permet de ne pas être un expéditeur captif?

M. Joel Neuheimer:

Le gouvernement s'est donné comme priorité de réduire les gaz à effet de serre et cela ne semblerait vraiment pas très logique, n'est-ce pas? Si vous pensez à la priorité que s'est donnée le gouvernement de réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, nous devrions expédier par chemin de fer davantage des produits dont Pierre et moi parlons et que nous représentons ici, de façon à ce qu'il y ait moins de camions sur la route. Il serait même préférable pour notre système routier que ces camions ne circulent pas. Ne serait-ce pas une conséquence intéressante?

Je vais faire un calcul rapide pour vous. Si notre usine utilise 10 wagons par jour, ce qui serait l'équivalent de 25 camions par jour, pour une semaine de sept jours, cela revient à 175 camions par semaine, contre 70 wagons. C'est une question qui concerne le volume des produits que nous expédions et j'espère que c'est aussi une question de logique, si je peux me le permettre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est une introduction parfaite à ma question suivante.

Ma circonscription contient principalement des terres boisées, c'est une circonscription extrêmement boisée. Nous avons perdu nos lignes de chemin de fer en 1987. Les voies ont été arrachées. Il a été mis un terme au transport par rivière, trois ans plus tard, en 1990, et nous avons maintenant une route à deux voies sur laquelle circulent 500 000 camions par année pour répondre aux besoins de notre industrie forestière. Que pouvons-nous faire, de votre point de vue, pour protéger ces lignes de chemin de fer et pour les rétablir? Y a-t-il de l'intérêt pour les rétablir dans des régions de ce genre?

M. Joel Neuheimer:

J'imagine qu'il faudrait commencer par faire une analyse coûts-avantages de ce que vous proposez, mais je suis tout à fait d'accord avec vous. Deux de nos membres ont subi les effets néfastes de ce que vous venez de décrire.

La cinquième grande demande que nous avons présentée ce matin concernait la nécessité de faire en sorte qu'il soit plus difficile pour les compagnies de chemin de fer de cesser l'exploitation d'une ligne ferroviaire. Quelques restrictions sont déjà en place, mais je pense qu'il faut absolument que le projet de loi prévoie une mesure quelconque qui empêcherait un transporteur de catégorie 1 d'interrompre le service dans un tel contexte parce que ce n'est plus rentable pour lui ou pour une autre raison. Il faut aussi faire en sorte que d'autres transporteurs puissent prendre le relais avant le démantèlement complet. Une fois que les rails sont enlevés, il est difficile de les remplacer.

Pour en revenir à cette cinquième demande, je crois qu'elle permettrait d'éviter que la situation que vous avez donnée en exemple se reproduise.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends. En effet, il serait difficile de construire une nouvelle voie ferrée dans ma circonscription. Merci.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Nous allons poursuivre avec M. Fraser.

(1210)

M. Sean Fraser:

Merci beaucoup.

Mes premières questions sur le transport maritime s'adresseront à Mme Kancens. L'une des choses que j'essaie de comprendre concerne le juste milieu à trouver pour tous ces aspects, et je trouve important de souligner que le débat ne porte pas sur leur dimension commerciale. En fait, il est question de fluidité des échanges.

Lorsque des conteneurs vides doivent être expédiés par navire ou par camion, j'imagine qu'une entreprise de camionnage ou une société ferroviaire canadienne est engagée pour les transporter? Est-ce exact?

Mme Karen Kancens:

Oui, c'est exact.

M. Sean Fraser:

Est-ce qu'une analyse a été faite pour mesurer les retombées des activités des propriétaires européens de ces conteneurs sur l'économie et le système de transport du Canada, comparativement aux résultats réels d'un système de transport plus efficace et plus efficient qui garantirait le transport fiable par les entreprises?

Mme Karen Kancens:

J'aimerais clarifier un point. Vous avez parlé de « propriétaires européens ». Je veux simplement m'assurer qu'il n'est pas question de l'AECG.

M. Sean Fraser:

Bien sûr.

Mme Karen Kancens:

On parle ici de repositionnement de conteneurs vides d'un bout à l'autre du Canada, qui n'est pas visé par l'AECG.

Puisque nous abordons la question dans le contexte du projet de loi C-49, il m'apparaît pertinent de rappeler que les coûts du repositionnement de conteneurs vides ne sont pas uniquement financiers. Bien entendu, cette opération entraîne toujours des frais additionnels, surtout si des camions ou des trains sont utilisés, mais d'autres coûts s'ajoutent.

Supposons que vous êtes propriétaire d'un navire qui fait régulièrement le trajet Montréal-Halifax. Des conteneurs vides sont empilés à Montréal et un client de Halifax en a besoin de 300 pour l'exportation. Il est certain que le navire partira de Montréal pour se rendre à Halifax puisque c'est son trajet ordinaire. Actuellement, vous ne pouvez pas embarquer les conteneurs vides à bord de votre propre navire. Vous devez les mettre sur un train ou les importer. Si les conteneurs sont chargés sur un train, des manutentions supplémentaires sont nécessaires. Les conteneurs ne seront pas simplement transbordés du port au navire. Ils devront passer par le dépôt de rails et les montés sur les wagons. Il faut donc plus de déplacements, plus de manutention des conteneurs. Évidemment, un coût externe additionnel est associé au transport ferroviaire, mais il faut aussi tenir compte des retards d'ordre logistique. Vos conteneurs seront transportés au bon vouloir des sociétés ferroviaires, pas forcément au moment qui conviendra le mieux au transporteur et à l'exportateur. Les frais augmentent chaque fois qu'un élément s'ajoute à la chaîne, de toute évidence, mais d'autres coûts liés aux délais et aux opérations de manutention supplémentaires entrent en ligne de compte.

À propos, les sociétés ferroviaires n'aiment pas vraiment transporter des conteneurs vides, parce qu'ils génèrent beaucoup moins de revenus que les conteneurs pleins. Vous compliquez inutilement ce qui pourrait et devrait être un processus logistique très simple, en ajoutant une foule d'obstacles tout au long de la chaîne commerciale. C'est pourquoi je vous déconseille de limiter votre réflexion à la dimension financière.

M. Sean Fraser:

Ce n'est certainement pas mon cas. J'aurais plutôt tendance à être d'accord avec vous pour ce qui est des coûts d'efficacité et d'opportunité auxquels vous avez fait allusion, et que nous aurions tout intérêt à opérer les améliorations logistiques que vous avez décrites.

Actuellement, si le coût est plus élevé... J'imagine que le producteur, l'importateur ou l'exportateur doit assumer les frais additionnels pour la manutention de conteneurs vides? Est-ce que la facture est refilée à une entreprise canadienne à une étape ou une autre de la chaîne?

Mme Karen Kancens:

Comme de multiples éléments de coût sont calculés dans la facture finale du transport de il est souvent difficile de les isoler. Cependant, c'est un fait que si le transporteur doit payer des frais additionnels pour le repositionnement de conteneurs vides, surtout s'ils n'ont pas été internalisés et que les services d'un tiers comme une société ferroviaire sont utilisés, ces frais seront transférés à l'exportateur d'une manière ou d'une autre. Par contre, je ne peux pas les quantifier, mais je peux affirmer que l'exportateur devra assumer des frais qui n'existeraient pas si les conteneurs vides avaient été repositionnés à bord du navire du transporteur.

M. Sean Fraser:

En ces temps où nous cherchons par tous les moyens à favoriser les échanges commerciaux dans un contexte de mondialisation galopante, que cela nous plaise ou non, vous semblez dire que la réforme permettrait aux entreprises canadiennes, et notamment celles du domaine de l'import-export, de créer plus d'emplois, avec tous les bienfaits qui s'ensuivent.

Mme Karen Kancens:

Je n'irais peut-être pas aussi loin. C'est l'objectif ultime, évidemment, mais je l'envisage autrement. Actuellement, le manque de conteneurs vides se fait particulièrement sentir à Halifax. Sur la côte est du Canada, beaucoup de conteneurs frigorifiques sont nécessaires pour charger des produits agroalimentaires et de la mer. Si un exportateur ne reçoit pas à temps les conteneurs vides dont il a besoin pour acheminer les produits vers les marchés d'exportation, il risque de perdre des occasions d'affaires. Si un autre moyen de transport est utilisé, il y aura un coût additionnel.

Est-ce que de nouveaux emplois seront créés dans l'économie canadienne? Peut-être, mais on pourrait en dire autant de toutes les initiatives. Ce que je sais, c'est que ce sera avantageux pour l'exportateur de Halifax qui a besoin de conteneurs pour conclure un marché avec un client d'outre-mer.

(1215)

M. Sean Fraser:

Vous me prenez par les sentiments — la pêche au homard et un port dans ma circonscription. Vous m'en voyez ravi.

Pour ce qui concerne la modification précise dont vous avez parlé au sujet de la propriété par opposition à quiconque a un titre de participation dans ce genre de société, quelles seront les conséquences si la modification n'est pas retenue? L'incapacité de remédier à l'inefficience du transport par train ou par camion? L'entassement de conteneurs vides dans les ports pendant quelques semaines de plus?

Mme Karen Kancens:

Pour que ce soit bien clair, je répète que la modification que nous demandons, peu importe qu'elle soit apportée par voie législative ou par la voie d'une directive supplémentaire de Transports Canada, est prévue au projet de modification de l'article 70. Cette modification autoriserait le repositionnement de conteneurs vides par des navires battant pavillon étranger. Notre inquiétude a trait au manque de précision quant à l'autorisation de toutes les parties à un accord de partage de navires de repositionner leurs conteneurs vides en raison des limites relatives à la participation. Notre crainte n'est pas que les transporteurs soient incapables de repositionner leurs conteneurs vides, mais que ceux qui ont signé un accord de partage de navires ne soient pas tous autorisés à faire ces opérations.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je comprends. Et...

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Fraser. Votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Shields.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci, madame la présidente. Merci également aux témoins pour leurs précieux éclairages et leur expertise.

Dans les remarques de l'Association minière, un élément en particulier m'a frappé concernant l'arbitrage. Vous avez mentionné que vos demandes répétées de rencontre n'ont jamais abouti. Pouvez-vous nous donner le nombre exact de demandes soumises, ou une idée approximative, de même que le nombre de refus, en termes de pourcentage? Avez-vous une idée?

M. Pierre Gratton:

Tout d'abord, je tiens à dire que ce processus n'est pas à la portée de la plupart d'entre eux, mais que ceux qui se rendent en arbitrage, et qui ont donc les ressources et la capacité pour aller jusque-là...

M. Martin Shields:

C'était ma prochaine question.

M. Pierre Gratton:

D'accord. C'est un exemple.

M. Brad Johnston:

Votre question porte sur le processus d'arbitrage de l'offre finale...

M. Martin Shields:

C'est exact.

M. Brad Johnston:

… qui d'emblée est un processus coûteux et laborieux pour tout expéditeur qui s'y engage. Cela dit, pour répondre plus précisément à votre question, je sais que... Comme il s'agit de processus confidentiels, je me limiterai à ceux auxquels j'ai pris part. Je ne peux rien révéler sur les dates ou le contenu, mais j'imagine que je peux parler de ce qui ne s'est pas passé. Dans la moitié des cas dont je suis au courant actuellement, les sociétés ferroviaires n'ont pas collaboré au dépôt d'une demande de calcul des frais auprès de l'Office. Je sais aussi que plus le temps passe, plus ce pourcentage augmente.

M. Martin Shields:

Bref, la moitié du temps, vous n'avez même pas la possibilité de faire entendre votre point de vue.

M. Brad Johnston:

Ce n'est pas ce que j'ai dit. Nous pouvons engager une procédure d'arbitrage de l'offre finale dans certaines circonstances. C'est l'expéditeur qui décide. Je parle plutôt d'une demande d'avis expert de l'Office sur les frais afin d'étayer le processus d'arbitrage et d'éclairer l'arbitre sur la question de savoir si la position de l'expéditeur ou de la société ferroviaire est raisonnable ou déraisonnable. À notre avis, aucune raison légitime ne peut justifier le refus d'une demande de calcul des frais par l'Office, ou l'absence de collaboration au processus. Une société ferroviaire qui agit ainsi veut entraver le processus. Nous demandons que cette brèche dans la législation soit réparée.

M. Martin Shields:

Quel est le coût de ce processus? Vous êtes un exploitant important. Pourriez-vous nous indiquer combien peut coûter ce processus pour vous? Vous avez dit vous-même qu'il était hors de portée pour la plupart.

M. Brad Johnston:

Un processus d'arbitrage de l'offre finale peut coûter des millions de dollars à un expéditeur comme Teck. C'est un recours coûteux et laborieux, mais c'est le seul dont nous disposons et nous tenons à ce qu'il reste légitime.

M. Martin Shields:

Est-ce que les effets décisions ou les renseignements favorables à d'autres expéditeurs peuvent être transposés?

M. Brad Johnston:

Non.

M. Martin Shields:

C'est très précis.

M. Brad Johnston:

Le processus est tel que non seulement son contenu est confidentiel, mais aussi le fait qu'il a été engagé. Par conséquent, les bénéfices ne sont pas transposables d'un expéditeur à l'autre. Évidemment, nous pouvons nous inspirer d'un arbitrage précédent lorsque nous amorçons un nouveau processus, mais les résultats ne sont pas transposés d'un expéditeur à l'autre. La procédure de calcul des coûts est strictement confidentielle.

(1220)

M. Martin Shields:

Et quelle est votre demande au juste?

M. Brad Johnston:

Nous demandons que lorsqu'un expéditeur sollicite le calcul des frais par l'Office dans le cadre d'un processus d'arbitrage de l'offre finale, le résultat lui soit fourni au plus tard cinq jours après le dépôt de la demande, disons. Le délai ne dépendrait pas de la volonté de collaboration d'une société ferroviaire. C'est très important.

M. Pierre Gratton:

Je voudrais revenir sur le point que j'ai soulevé au début, que vous avez vous-mêmes admis. Ce processus coûte très cher. La grande majorité des utilisateurs des chemins de fer n'y ont pas accès, ou n'ont pas les moyens d'engager un tel processus. D'où l'importance des mesures proposées concernant la déclaration des données, l'interconnexion de longue distance et toutes les autres. De préférence, nous ne voulons pas aller jusqu'au... Ce processus est un dernier recours. Teck est l'un des principaux clients des compagnies de chemin de fer canadiennes, n'est-ce pas? Nous ne voulons pas être obligés d'aller jusque-là. Et si nous y sommes forcés, nous voulons que le processus fonctionne bien.

Les autres mesures proposées visent à assurer que le système fonctionne assez bien pour nous éviter de nous rendre jusque-là.

M. Martin Shields:

Je comprends.

Voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Joel Neuheimer:

Oui. Pour ce qui concerne l'outil d'arbitrage de l'offre finale, comme Pierre l'a mentionné, nous proposons aussi des modifications qui en simplifieraient l'utilisation, qui en diminueraient les coûts et qui le rendraient plus accessible aux expéditeurs qui n'ont pas le choix d'exercer ce dernier recours.

Personnellement, je demande simplement que l'Office ait le pouvoir d'enquêter lui-même sur les affaires qui méritent examen. Je pense que cette modification du projet de loi suffirait et je ne toucherais pas au processus d'arbitrage de l'offre finale mais, si vous y tenez, alors assurez-vous de le rendre plus facile à utiliser.

Nos expéditeurs sont tenus de remplir des manifestes, et leur travail dépend de l'expédition d'un méli-mélo de produits de leurs clients, alors qu'eux utilisent des trains-blocs, une tout autre réalité qui change la dynamique de la relation. Cela complique davantage le recours à ce type d'outil pour les membres de mon association et, sans vouloir dramatiser, c'est l'une des raisons qui expliquent leur absence ce matin. La tournure de ces affaires et la manière dont les compagnies ferroviaires les traitent ensuite ne sont pas toujours à l'avantage des expéditeurs. C'est pourquoi l'Association se fait un devoir de se présenter à des endroits comme celui-ci pour proposer des modifications à ce type d'outil.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.

Madame Kancens, l'un des sujets sur lequel nous aimerions entendre le SIU a trait aux difficultés d'application des normes du travail sur certains navires étrangers. Savez-vous si ces navires étrangers sont assujettis à des obligations quand ils naviguent dans les eaux canadiennes?

Mme Karen Kancens:

Je voudrais d'abord préciser que ces navires étrangers transportent les produits canadiens destinés aux marchés étrangers. Ils sont utilisés pour la quasi-totalité de nos activités de commerce outre-mer et la moitié de notre commerce transfrontalier. Des milliers de ces navires acheminent les produits entre les ports canadiens et étrangers. Ce n'est pas un phénomène nouveau. Ils sont notre moyen de transport pour nos marchandises commerciales.

Les navires étrangers sont assujettis à un régime réglementaire strict qui couvre la sécurité, l'environnement, les normes du travail. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, ce n'est rien de nouveau…

M. Ken Hardie:

Je suis désolé, qui est responsable? Qui s'assurer que ces navires respectent la réglementation?

Mme Karen Kancens:

Toute la réglementation de portée internationale est élaborée par l'Organisation maritime internationale et l'Organisation internationale du travail. Chaque pays la met en oeuvre par la voie de mesures législatives nationales. Au Canada, son application relève de Transports Canada et d'autres instances réglementaires, conformément aux obligations qui lui incombent à titre d'État portuaire.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je veux savoir si les règlements pris par Transports Canada s'appliquent aux équipages des navires étrangers.

(1225)

Mme Karen Kancens:

Étant donné que l'expédition est confiée à des navires sous pavillon étranger, ils sont assujettis à des règlements élaborés par des instances internationales qui sont appliqués au Canada. Le Canada s'assure qu'ils sont observés.

Sonia, je crois que je vais avoir besoin de votre aide pour m'en sortir.

M. Ken Hardie:

J'ai d'autres questions. Au fond, on soupçonne que de la main-d'oeuvre étrangère bon marché est utilisée et que ces travailleurs ne sont pas bien traités. J'espère qu'en temps et lieu, ces soupçons seront démentis mais, pour l'instant, je ne crois pas que quiconque puisse nous rassurer à ce propos.

Mme Sonia Simard (directrice, Affaires législatives, Fédération maritime du Canada):

Est-ce que vous m'accordez deux minutes pour tenter de vous rassurer?

M. Ken Hardie:

Non.

Mme Sonia Simard:

Non, je ne peux pas essayer?

M. Ken Hardie:

Je n'ai malheureusement pas deux minutes à vous accorder. J'ai d'autres questions.

Mme Sonia Simard:

D'accord.

M. Ken Hardie:

Par contre, si vous le voulez, vous pourrez faire un suivi. Je suis certain que ce sera instructif.

J'ai toujours l'impression qu'on nous ressert le sempiternel argument « c'est une première étape ». D'accord, nous ne pouvons rien faire pour l'instant. Mais encore?

C'est quoi, l'étape suivante?

Mme Karen Kancens:

Nous entendons cet argument chaque fois qu'il est question de modifier la Loi sur le cabotage. Historiquement, cette mesure législative a beaucoup contribué à la protection et à la promotion des industries maritimes canadiennes. Nous ne voyons pas l'intérêt de la modifier pour le simple plaisir de l'exercice.

En revanche, même si son rôle est important, rien ne nous interdit de prendre du recul de temps à autre pour évaluer si la Loi répond toujours aux besoins de l'économie canadienne et à ceux des importateurs et des exportateurs, ou si des modifications très précises pourraient être apportées, comme celle concernant le repositionnement des conteneurs vides, en vue d'améliorer la chaîne logistique dans son ensemble sans enfreindre les principes fondateurs de la Loi.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'accord, je vais en rester là pour le moment.

Je m'adresserai maintenant aux représentants de l'Association minière, MM. Gratton et Johnston. Apparemment, deux facteurs semblent intervenir dans la dynamique complexe de vos relations avec les compagnies de chemin de fer. Le premier touche les pratiques d'établissement des prix et le second les questions liées au service.

Est-ce que l'un ou l'autre de ces facteurs est une source plus importante de préoccupation, ou les deux vous préoccupent-ils autant?

M. Pierre Gratton:

Les deux nous préoccupent, de même que la manière dont ils opèrent. Tout dépend des circonstances, de qui vous êtes, de l'expéditeur concerné. Nous pouvons être préoccupés par un facteur ou l'autre, ou les deux, de façon variable dans le temps.

M. Ken Hardie:

Pouvez-vous nous donner un exemple d'une transaction type?

Comment les transactions sont-elles établies? Comment peuvent-elles dérailler, s'il arrive qu'elles déraillent?

M. Pierre Gratton:

Joel a donné un exemple tiré du secteur forestier, mais le même exemple pourrait se produire dans le secteur minier. Il arrive qu'on attende un certain nombre de wagons à une certaine date, mais que le compte n'y est pas. Un de nos membres s'est fait dire par les sociétés ferroviaires qu'elles ne le desserviraient plus. C'est donc très variable pour ce qui est du service.

Les compagnies de chemin de fer contrôlent les prix. Comme il n'y a aucune concurrence, elles ont le champ libre pour les établir à leur guise et transférer tous les coûts qu'elles souhaitent. Je me souviens que le jour même de l'adoption de la taxe sur le carbone en Colombie-Britannique, les compagnies ont annoncé qu'elles augmentaient leurs tarifs pour transférer le coût de la taxe aux expéditeurs. C'est le privilège de ceux qui sont en situation de monopole.

Brad, avez-vous des exemples précis tirés de votre propre expérience?

M. Brad Johnston:

Je crois…

La présidente:

Très brièvement, monsieur Johnston.

M. Brad Johnston:

D'accord.

Pour faire écho à ce que Pierre vient de dire, nous sommes toujours confrontés à des délais de livraison très précis de nos clients pour ce qui est des exportations. Il peut arriver que l'exécution d'une commande prenne des semaines, sinon des mois. Nous fournissons des prévisions. Nous attendons des navires. Nous recevons des commandes. Si nous sommes incapables de les exécuter, la sanction financière peut être très importante pour une société comme Teck. Comme je l'ai expliqué hier, les chiffres ont été de l'ordre de 50 à 200 millions de dollars selon les périodes au cours des 10 dernières années.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Johnston.

Madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.

J'ai une série de questions pour l'Association minière.

Monsieur Gratton, j'aimerais vous poser une question au sujet du délai de trois semaines pour la déclaration des données. Au début de la semaine, nous avons entendu des témoignages selon lesquels les compagnies de chemin de fer canadiennes fournissent déjà des renseignements plus détaillés sur leurs activités aux États-Unis. Les données sont transmises sur une base hebdomadaire.

Je me demande si le gouvernement actuel aurait dû intégrer au projet de loi C-49 des exigences de déclaration des données des compagnies de chemin de fer mieux alignées sur celles qui sont imposées aux États-Unis?

(1230)

M. Pierre Gratton:

Selon ce que j'en ai compris, c'est ce que propose le projet de loi. Notre point de vue est que ce n'est pas suffisant. Le régime américain remonte à plusieurs dizaines d'années. Tout d'abord, la quantité de données déclarées n'est pas suffisante — le régime américain exige un échantillon de données, et non la totalité. À cela s'ajoute le problème soulevé par Joel au sujet de l'actualité des données. Elles sont parfois très dépassées.

Les technologies actuelles permettent de télécharger et de déclarer les renseignements des feuilles de route, c'est clair. Il n'y a aucune raison de ne pas le faire.

J'entends souvent dire qu'il faudrait au moins harmoniser nos exigences avec celles des États-Unis. Je pense que ce n'est plus le cas depuis des décennies. Aujourd'hui, nous avons la possibilité de faire mieux que les États-Unis en obligeant les compagnies de chemin de fer à déclarer les données dont nous avons tous besoin pour les tenir comptables, mais aussi, comme nous l'avons dit tout à l'heure, pour repérer les problèmes d'infrastructure un peu partout au pays.

Mme Kelly Block:

J'aimerais revenir sur la comparaison que vous avez faite entre les prix de ligne concurrentiels et l'interconnexion à longue distance. Lundi, j'ai eu l'occasion de demander à des représentants de Transports Canada de nous expliquer la différence. Quelques témoins ont fait cette comparaison.

Pourriez-vous nous expliquer les différences entre les prix de ligne concurrentiels et l'interconnexion à longue distance, ou les similitudes qui en font des mécanismes inefficaces?

M. Pierre Gratton:

Brad, pouvez-vous répondre à cette question?

M. Brad Johnston:

Je dirais qu'ils sont similaires surtout à cause de leurs lacunes. La stratégie des prix de ligne concurrentiels, dans sa forme actuelle, a pour effet d'éliminer toute concurrence entre les compagnies de chemin de fer. Ce mécanisme est donc inefficace et c'est pourquoi il a été très peu appliqué dans les 20 ou 25 dernières années.

Pour le secteur minier, l'interconnexion à longue distance, à cause des restrictions géographiques qui touchent un si grand nombre de régions… Ce matin, nous avons même essayé de voir si des joueurs du secteur minier pourraient y recourir. C'est loin d'être clair pour nous. Une chose est sûre, tous les exploitants de la Colombie-Britannique, peu importe l'endroit dans la province, ne peuvent pas recourir au mécanisme actuel de l'interconnexion à longue distance. C'est assez incroyable, mais c'est l'interprétation que nous en avons. À l'Est du pays, en Ontario et au Québec, en raison de la définition du corridor Québec-Windsor, je vois mal qui pourrait utiliser ce recours. Très honnêtement, si les restrictions géographiques ne sont pas revues, je ne sais vraiment pas qui pourrait recourir à ce mécanisme, du moins dans le secteur minier. C'est pourquoi je ne me suis pas vraiment penché sur la question.

Mme Kelly Block:

Au cours de notre étude du projet de loi C-30, divers intervenants du secteur forestier et du secteur minier nous ont dit qu'ils souhaiteraient avoir accès à des mécanismes d'interconnexion et d'extension de l'interconnexion comme ceux qui sont prévus pour les producteurs de grain dans la Loi sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grain. Si nous revenons aux corridors visés par une exemption ou aux zones d'exclusion, pouvez-vous trouver une explication logique à la création de ces zones ou de ces corridors et à leur intégration dans cette mesure législative?

M. Pierre Gratton:

Nous pouvons seulement présumer que les compagnies de chemin de fer ont haussé le ton et que c'est pourquoi des zones d'exclusion ont été créées. Cette tentative vise pour l'essentiel à conserver les dispositions du projet de loi C-30. Une partie des Prairies pourrait en bénéficier, tout comme elle a bénéficié du projet de loi C-30. À mon avis, c'est simplement une façon différente et plus créative de parvenir aux mêmes fins. Si c'était peu plus ouvert dans le centre et l'est du Canada, les compagnies de chemin de fer n'auraient pas le choix de se livrer une plus forte concurrence, mais ce n'est pas ce qu'elles veulent.

(1235)

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je veux aussi remercier M. Hardie, qui a posé plusieurs des questions que je prévoyais poser. Pour lui retourner l'ascenseur, je vais accorder les deux prochaines minutes à Mme Simard, de façon à pouvoir entendre sa réponse, qui m'intéresse également. [Traduction]

Mme Sonia Simard:

J'aimerais préciser qu'il est question d'adopter une mesure visant les marins travaillant à moindre salaire. Ces navires accostent au Canada depuis plus de 120 ans. Ils sont régis par diverses conventions que le Canada a aidé à rédiger, y compris celles qui portent sur les normes de travail à bord des navires. Ce sont les lois qui s'appliquent à ces navires. Insinuer que tous les marins à bord des navires transocéaniques sont maltraités, c'est manquer de respect à l'ensemble de la profession. Ces marins travaillent sur des navires transporteurs. Ils sont plus de 1,6 million à bord des navires transocéaniques. Plus de 55 000 navires océaniques sont utilisés pour les échanges internationaux.

Est-ce que certains navires qui entrent dans les eaux canadiennes violent les normes? C'est possible. Est-ce que des voitures dépassent les limites de vitesse sur les autoroutes du Canada? C'est possible. Est-ce que cela me permet d'insinuer que tous les automobilistes canadiens sont des voyous et enclins aux accès de rage au volant? Certainement pas. C'est la même chose pour une très vaste industrie qui regroupe plus de 55 000 bâtiments. Ils sont régis par des normes. L'application de ces normes relève des autorités canadiennes, et les conditions de travail sur les navires assurent la survie à bord et la réussite des gens de mer.

Me donnez-vous 30 secondes de plus pour situer le contexte?

M. Robert Aubin:

Il me reste du temps. Allez-y.

Mme Sonia Simard:

C'est une première étape. Au contraire de ce qui a été dit, nous ne demandons pas de sabrer la Loi sur le cabotage. Ce n'est pas pour cela que nous sommes ici.

J'aimerais donner un autre exemple, celui des États-Unis. Nous connaissons la loi Jones, qui protège très jalousement la flotte nationale. Le concept de l'assouplissement des règles sur le transport de conteneurs vides est intégré à la loi Jones, qui permet d'intégrer aux accords de partage de navires signés aux États-Unis une clause autorisant les parties à transporter leurs conteneurs vides. La modification proposée ne vise donc pas à sabrer la Loi sur le cabotage. Nous demandons simplement la mise en oeuvre intégrale de la modification afin d'autoriser les transporteurs de conteneurs à mener leurs activités aux termes d'accords de partage de navires.

Est-ce que c'est plus clair? [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Oui, merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Nous pouvons poursuivre un peu, monsieur Aubin, si vous avez une autre question.

Très bien. Merci infiniment à tous.

Nous avons terminé le premier cycle de questions. Avant que je donne leur congé à nos témoins, avez-vous des questions particulières que vous n'avez pas eu la chance de poser?

Personne de ce côté-ci? Très bien. Et en face? Quelqu'un parmi vous a-t-il une question très importante à laquelle il faut absolument une réponse?

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente. J'ai une question pour les expéditeurs, qui fait suite à notre discussion sur le projet de loi C-49 et les mesures opérationnelles, et plus précisément celles concernant le déplacement de conteneurs au moyen de ressources maritimes.

J'aimerais aborder un sujet dont nous n'avons pas parlé depuis quelques jours et qui pourrait être pertinent, soit le financement des activités d'expédition. J'aimerais connaître le point de vue et les recommandations de la Fédération maritime eu égard au système global en mer et dans les Grands Lacs.

Que pensez-vous de la possibilité pour les administrations portuaires d'obtenir du financement par le truchement des instruments de la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada pour leurs projets d'agrandissement? Selon vous, s'agit-il d'une mesure utile pour accroître la compétitivité des ports canadiens?

Outre les ports canadiens désignés comme administrations portuaires, j'aimerais élargir ma question à la Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent et aux Grands Lacs. À votre avis, serait-il possible d'élargir l'accès au financement afin d'améliorer les perspectives commerciales des membres de votre organisation et d'autres utilisateurs des eaux canadiennes et au-delà de nos frontières?

(1240)

Mme Karen Kancens:

Pour ce qui concerne les infrastructures et l'accès des ports à la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada, c'est une mesure prometteuse, du moins en théorie. Personnellement, je pense qu'il faudra axer la réflexion sur la création de corridors et de réseaux commerciaux.

Vous pouvez prendre l'exemple du port de Vancouver, qui connaît une croissance exponentielle et qui construit toutes sortes d'infrastructures, pour déterminer si cette mesure pourrait lui être utile.

La Voie navigable du Saint-Laurent et le réseau Saint-Laurent-Grands Lacs auront aussi besoin d'infrastructures, et c'est donc une mesure qui pourrait s'avérer intéressante pour cette partie du pays également. Nous réclamons depuis un bon moment déjà des brise-glace additionnels pour soutenir le réseau et la navigation hivernale ici. Les brise-glace jouent un rôle majeur pour assurer la viabilité du corridor commercial et des éventuelles infrastructures qui viendront combler les besoins dans l'Est.

Donc, il s'agit d'une mesure utile en théorie, mais je m'arrêterai là pour l'instant. Nous ferons une analyse plus poussée dans nos observations écrites.

M. Vance Badawey:

Madame la présidente, c'était mon but. Je voulais demander que de l'information plus détaillée nous soit transmise à ce sujet.

Mme Karen Kancens:

Oui, bien entendu.

M. Vance Badawey:

Comme je l'ai déjà dit hier, le projet de loi C-49 s'insère dans une stratégie globale en matière de transport et, de toute évidence, vise à établir ce qui constitue l'un des cinq thèmes annoncés par le ministre Garneau, soit les corridors de commerce. Il est impératif de bien connaître nos besoins pour être en mesure de renforcer notre capacité de participation et de prospérité dans l'économie mondiale. Comme vous l'avez dit tout à l'heure, vous faites partie intégrante de cet effort, et nous voulons connaître vos besoins. C'est essentiel pour nous assurer qu'au moment venu, nous serons en mesure de faire des investissements judicieux, qui nous procureront le meilleur rendement possible et qui amélioreront la position du Canada sur la scène économique mondiale.

Mme Karen Kancens:

Oui, tout à fait.

M. Vance Badawey:

Formidable! Merci infiniment.

La présidente:

Je remercie tous nos témoins. Vos interventions ont été très instructives. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants d'avoir pris le temps de venir nous rencontrer et de nous aider dans notre travail de parlementaires.

Nous allons suspendre nos travaux pour permettre aux témoins suivants de prendre place.

(1240)

(1345)

La présidente:

Nous reprenons notre étude du projet de loi C-49. Nous accueillerons maintenant M. François Tougas, qui interviendra à titre personnel, ainsi que des représentants de la Canadian National Millers Association et de la Canadian Canola Growers Association.

Je vous souhaite la bienvenue et vous remercie d'être venus à notre rencontre.

Qui veut commencer? Vous avez la parole, monsieur.

M. Gordon Harrison (président, Canadian National Millers Association):

Merci beaucoup de me donner l'occasion de m'adresser à vous. Je vous en suis très reconnaissant. Mon association a été très heureuse de voir sa demande de comparution accueillie.

La Canadian National Millers Association est un organisme national sans but lucratif qui représente l'industrie de la mouture des grains de céréale. Les sociétés membres exploitent des minoteries partout au Canada, et une partie d'entre elles exploitent des installations situées aux États-Unis ou ont des sociétés affiliées qui ont des installations de meunerie aux États-Unis.

Si l'on considère sa capacité et les marchés régionaux qu'elle dessert, on peut affirmer que l'industrie meunière canadienne fait partie prenante de l'industrie meunière nord-américaine. Le marché de cette industrie couvre l'ensemble du territoire nord-américain et elle est intégrée, à l'instar des réseaux de transport ferroviaire, à l'échelle de l'Amérique du Nord.

Cela étant dit, nous sommes un organisme canadien sans but lucratif. L'Association ne représente pas directement l'industrie meunière des États-Unis, mis à part certains de nos membres en règle qui viennent des États-Unis, mais qui exploitent des installations au Canada.

Comme j'ai seulement quelques minutes à ma disposition, j'aimerais d'entrée de jeu souligner que notre Association appuie les recommandations formulées dans les modifications du projet de loi qui ont été soumises par la Western Grain Elevator Association, ou WGEA. Ses membres font le pont entre les producteurs de grain et les transformateurs qui font partie de notre Association et d'autres transformateurs au Canada, qui traitent la très grande partie du blé et de l'avoine dans l'Ouest canadien.

J'aimerais aborder quelques thèmes pour donner un cadre à votre analyse de tous les témoignages que vous avez entendus.

Nos membres sont des transformateurs primaires de blé, d'avoine, de seigle et d'autres céréales. Pour nous, le terme « transformateurs primaires » englobe tous ceux qui participent à l'étape de la chaîne d'approvisionnement consistant à transformer le grain pour le faire passer d'un produit de base généralement non consommé à un produit consommable et qui entre dans la composition de produits alimentaires ou d'autres produits destinés à des consommateurs.

Dans les aliments contenant ces ingrédients, les premiers qui viennent à l'esprit sont le pain, d'autres produits de boulangerie, les pâtes, les céréales prêtes à consommer et les biscuits. J'aimerais souligner toutefois que la farine de blé et les autres produits de minoterie sont utilisés pour fabriquer des articles vendus dans tous les rayons d'épicerie, et notamment les aliments pour animaux. La gamme des produits qui contiennent des grains moulus ou qui en sont dérivés est très vaste. Les grains moulus utilisés pour ces produits proviennent de partout au Canada, mais l'Ouest canadien est le principal producteur.

Par ailleurs, rares sont les chaînes d'alimentation ou les restaurants, s'il en existe, dont le menu n'est pas essentiellement composé d'aliments à base de grains de céréale et fabriqués à partir de produits de minoterie. J'ai fait un petit calcul. Pendant la durée des présentes audiences, les Canadiens auront consommé approximativement 200 millions de repas comprenant des produits de boulangerie, des pâtes, des céréales prêtes à consommer et des collations qui contiennent d'autres produits de minoterie.

Ces entreprises, des plus grandes aux plus petites, fonctionnent selon un modèle de livraison juste à temps. Les principaux fabricants ou les transformateurs secondaires de produits de minoterie — comme les boulangeries dans le cas des produits congelés, ou des pâtes, mais surtout les transformateurs secondaires de l'industrie de la fabrication — gardent des stocks d'ingrédients de quelques jours seulement. Je ne parle pas seulement de la farine de blé ou d'autres grains moulus, mais de tous les produits céréaliers. On peut donc dire qu'au-delà de l'étape de la mouture, la chaîne d'approvisionnement fonctionne donc selon un modèle de livraison juste à temps, tout comme l'industrie automobile.

Notre Association se sent interpellée par les mesures sur le transport ferroviaire du projet de loi à cause de la très forte dépendance de l'industrie de la minoterie à ce mode de transport, pas seulement pour l'acheminement des grains non transformés vers les installations, mais aussi pour la livraison des produits transformés. Les deux tiers de la capacité de mouture du blé ne se trouvent pas dans les Prairies, soit en Alberta, en Saskatchewan ou au Manitoba, mais en Colombie-Britannique, en Ontario, au Québec et en Nouvelle-Écosse. Ces minoteries comptent sur le service ferroviaire pour leur acheminer quelque trois millions de tonnes de blé et d'avoine par année. C'est donc une demande facilement prévisible pour le transport ferroviaire: selon mon estimation, il faut compter 34 000 wagons pour le transport du grain vers les minoteries, et de 6 000 à 10 000 wagons environ pour la livraison des produits de minoterie et leurs dérivés ensuite.

(1350)



Cette demande ne fluctue pas vraiment d'une campagne agricole à l'autre, et elle ne dépend pas non plus de la production canadienne pour aucun produit. Au contraire, il est facile de faire des prévisions une année à l'avance parce que la demande est liée au marché national et à un marché d'exportation à proximité, les États-Unis d'Amérique.

Selon la circonscription que vous représentez, certains d'entre vous seront peut-être intéressés d'apprendre que pendant la grave crise qui a perturbé le service durant la campagne 2013-2014, des minoteries de Mississauga, de Montréal et de Halifax ont manqué de blé, à plus d'une reprise dans certains cas! Des boulangeries importantes se sont retrouvées avec des réserves d'à peine deux ou trois jours, et des commerces d'épicerie de détail étaient probablement à quatre ou cinq jours de manquer de pain sur leurs étalages.

Avec le recul... Je sais que cela fait longtemps et que nous ne sommes pas ici pour gémir sur le passé, mais il n'en reste pas moins que nous avons frôlé une grave interruption de l'approvisionnement en aliments à base de céréales. Comment aurions-nous expliqué cette pénurie aux Canadiens qui se seraient retrouvés devant des étalages de pain vides dans les magasins, ou aux chaînes de restauration rapide qui n'auraient eu rien pour servir les garnitures annoncées sur leurs menus?

Outre l'extension de l'interconnexion, les dispositions de la Loi sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grain ne tiennent pas compte des besoins en matière de services ferroviaires de l'industrie canadienne de la minoterie, et elles ne contribuent pas à les combler. On pourrait en dire autant des minoteries américaines. En fait, cette mesure entrave la prestation du service à notre secteur. À nos yeux, aucune disposition de la Loi sur les transports au Canada ne semble tenir compte des besoins de service éminemment prévisibles de l'industrie canadienne de la minoterie et, à bien des égards, le même constat se dégage des modifications proposées au projet de loi C-49. La Loi dans sa forme actuelle ou même modifiée ne tient pas vraiment compte, ni directement ni indirectement, des besoins des transformateurs canadiens.

La capacité des transformateurs de réceptionner et de décharger le grain ne se compare pas du tout à celle des élévateurs à grain avant la distribution aux marchés d'exportation. La grande majorité des minoteries sont situées dans un milieu urbain, souvent dans un environnement composite, et parfois au coeur de quartiers résidentiels ou commerciaux, où elles peuvent accueillir seulement quelques wagons à la fois. À ma connaissance, la minoterie qui a la plus forte capacité peut accueillir une quinzaine de wagons à la fois sans recourir à un silo de transbordement à proximité.

Pour ce qui est du projet de loi C-49, il sera très important que la version modifiée, telle que je l'ai comprise, conserve la définition d'expéditeur c'est-à-dire « Personne qui expédie des marchandises par transporteur, ou en reçoit de celui-ci, ou qui a l'intention de le faire ». C'est un élément très important de la législation actuelle, qui garantit que les transformateurs, y compris les meuniers, bénéficient des mêmes mesures législatives.

Ce que je veux dire, essentiellement, est que pour l'industrie du grain en général, le service ferroviaire ne se limite pas à la livraison aux ports en vue de la distribution aux marchés d'exportation. Il englobe également le transport vers les minoteries du Canada et des États-Unis qui répondent aux besoins des consommateurs des deux côtés de la frontière. Le questionnaire que Transports Canada a fait circuler il y a une dizaine de jours parlait des marchés mondiaux. J'aimerais rappeler que l'Amérique du Nord, c'est-à-dire les territoires du Canada et des États-Unis réunis, est un marché mondial de 400 millions de personnes. Selon notre analyse, les recommandations de la WGEA et les résultats de l'étude rigoureuse du groupe de travail sur la logistique des récoltes offrent un appui très solide aux améliorations proposées par la WGEA aux modifications. Nous appuyons ces recommandations.

Je dois préciser cependant que ni le mémoire de la WGEA ni aucun autre que j'ai lu jusqu'ici ne parle de l'importance du service ferroviaire pour les minoteries. Elles sont très nombreuses, et il est primordial pour les besoins de la population canadienne qu'elles puissent fonctionner efficacement et que leurs produits alimentaires soient livrés en temps opportun.

J'ai remis au greffier les courtes lettres qui ont été adressées à L’honorable Marc Garneau. Si j'ai bien compris, elles seront distribuées une fois qu'elles auront été traduites.

Je vous remercie de votre attention.

(1355)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Je donne maintenant la parole aux représentants de la Canada Canola Growers Association.

M. Jack Froese (président, Canadian Canola Growers Association):

Bonjour, madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs.

Je m'appelle Jack Froese, je suis président de la Canadian Canola Growers Association (CCGA), et j'ai une exploitation au Manitoba. Je vous remercie de m'avoir invité aujourd'hui afin de discuter du projet de loi C-49, la Loi sur la modernisation des transports.

La CCGA est une association nationale régie par un conseil d'administration composé d'agriculteurs, qui représente la voix des 43 000 producteurs de canola au Canada, de l'Ontario jusqu'à la Colombie-Britannique. Plus de 90 % du canola cultivé au Canada au cours d'une année est destiné à être exporté vers des marchés dans plus de 50 pays, sous forme de graines non traitées ou de produits transformés, soit l'huile ou la farine de canola. Le Canada est le plus grand exportateur au monde de cet oléagineux très prisé.

Les producteurs de canola dépendent fortement du réseau ferroviaire pour acheminer leurs produits à leurs clients et pour continuer à offrir leurs produits à des prix concurrentiels dans le marché mondial des oléagineux. Dans la chaîne d'approvisionnement des grains, les producteurs occupent une position unique, et c'est ce facteur même qui différencie cette chaîne approvisionnement de celles des autres produits primaires. Les producteurs agricoles ne sont pas les expéditeurs officiels de leurs produits, mais ils en assument les frais de transport, puisqu'ils se reflètent dans le prix qui leur est offert pour leurs grains et oléagineux par les acheteurs, qui sont, eux, les expéditeurs.

En bref, les agriculteurs ne s'occupent pas d'organiser le transport par train ou par bateau, mais ce sont eux qui en assument les coûts. Les coûts de transport et de logistique, quels qu'ils soient au moment de la transaction, sont retransmis au producteur et absorbés par celui-ci.

Chaque année, les producteurs s'efforcent individuellement de maximiser la quantité et la qualité de leur production. Une fois récoltés, les grains sont vendus au système, selon le plan de commercialisation adopté par le producteur, dans le but général d'obtenir le meilleur prix possible dans un marché mondial des produits primaires dynamique et fluctuant.

Le transport du grain est l'un des nombreux facteurs commerciaux qui influent directement sur le prix que peuvent obtenir les producteurs agricoles au Canada. Lorsque des problèmes surviennent dans la chaîne d'approvisionnement, cela peut faire chuter le prix offert aux producteurs pour leurs grains, et ce, même si le marché mondial des produits primaires affiche des prix élevés.

Dans les périodes d'interruption prolongées, les silos à grains se remplissent et les entreprises céréalières cessent d'acheter du grain et d'accepter les livraisons. Cette situation peut se produire même lorsque le producteur détient un contrat de livraison, ce qui risque de nuire considérablement à sa capacité financière de maintenir ses activités à flot. Il s'agit là de l'une des raisons principales pour lesquelles les producteurs de l'Ouest canadien accordent autant d'importance au transport. Le transport a une incidence directe sur leurs revenus personnels. De plus, ils dépendent fortement du service ferroviaire du Canada pour acheminer leurs grains jusqu'aux ports d'exportation. Ils n'ont pas d'autres options.

Le transport du grain de l'Ouest canadien sur une distance moyenne de 1 520 kilomètres, des prairies jusqu'à l'océan, est un processus complexe, mais nous devons en assurer l'efficacité au profit de toutes les parties concernées et de l'ensemble de l'économie canadienne.

La compétitivité et la fiabilité de l'industrie du canola, qui contribue plus de 26 milliards de dollars par année à l'économie canadienne, dépendent fortement de la capacité de la chaîne d'approvisionnement de fournir un service rapide, efficace et fiable. Pour ce qui est de l'importance du canola pour les producteurs agricoles canadiens, ce grain a été la principale source de revenus agricoles annuels provenant de cultures depuis plus de 10 ans, et il contribue grandement à la rentabilité des producteurs de grains.

La campagne agricole 2016-2017, qui s'est terminée à la fin du mois de juillet, a vu l'établissement de nouveaux records en matière d'exportation du canola et de transformation à valeur ajoutée de cet oléagineux sur le marché intérieur. L'excellent rendement des compagnies ferroviaires a sans aucun doute contribué à l'atteinte de ces résultats. En ce qui concerne le transport ferroviaire du grain et de ses produits dérivés, la dernière année a été, dans l'ensemble, exceptionnelle.

Cela dit, il faut continuer à mettre l'accent sur l'avenir lorsqu'il s'agit de prendre des décisions concernant la modification de politiques gouvernementales. L'efficacité, dans l'ensemble, raisonnablement élevée du transport des marchandises et la fluidité relative de la chaîne d'approvisionnement observées au cours des dernières années ne doivent pas diminuer l'importance accordée à la recherche de solutions pour améliorer le système. Malgré les manchettes favorables à court terme, il reste encore des problèmes fondamentaux à régler.

Au printemps 2017, une superficie record de canola a été semée au Canada et, pour la première fois, le canola a dépassé le blé en tant que plus importante culture au pays. Les plus récentes estimations du gouvernement, datant de la fin août, chiffrent la production d'automne à 18,2 millions de tonnes. C'est un résultat légèrement en baisse par rapport à l'année précédente, en raison de conditions météorologiques difficiles, mais tout de même supérieur de plus d'un million de tonnes à la moyenne des cinq dernières années.

Reconnue pour ses nombreuses réussites, notre industrie est optimiste et axée sur l'atteinte d'objectifs. Nos prévisions pour 2025 voient une augmentation continue de la demande pour nos produits au pays ainsi qu'à l'étranger. Dans un tel avenir, notre industrie dépendra encore plus fortement du transport ferroviaire, puisqu'elle s'efforcera d'atteindre son objectif stratégique de produire de manière durable 26 millions de tonnes de canola par année au Canada.

(1400)



Pour soutenir cette vision, l'industrie et les producteurs agricoles canadiens auront besoin d'un réseau de transport ferroviaire efficace, adapté non seulement à la taille des récoltes actuelles, mais à celles des récoltes futures. Les producteurs ne pourront tirer profit des possibilités présentées par les traités commerciaux existants et futurs du Canada que s'ils ont accès à un réseau ferroviaire fiable et efficace, auquel les expéditeurs de grains et nos clients internationaux font confiance. En effet, étant donné que notre industrie dépend aussi fortement des exportations, nous devons tenir compte de l'importance du service à la clientèle dans le cadre de nos activités d'exportation dans le secteur agricole.

Le canola et les autres grains du Canada sont reconnus pour leur qualité et leur approvisionnement durable, qui leur permettent de se démarquer sur le marché. Toutefois, au bout du compte, il s'agit de produits primaires facilement remplaçables. La fiabilité de notre système de transport a des répercussions sur la confiance des acheteurs à l'égard de l'image de marque du Canada dans le monde. Nous le savons, parce que nous en entendons parler directement.

Je cède la parole à Steve Pratte pour le reste de notre intervention.

M. Steve Pratte (gestionnaire responsable des politiques, Canadian Canola Growers Association):

Merci.

En bref, le projet de loi C-49 vise à régler plusieurs difficultés qui existent depuis longtemps dans le marché du transport ferroviaire. Hier et ce matin, de nombreux représentants du secteur des grains, y compris des expéditeurs et des groupements agricoles, ont pris la parole afin de vous présenter leurs points de vue sur divers aspects commerciaux et juridiques du projet de loi, dont les sanctions réciproques et l'interconnexion de longue distance. Des participants dans d'autres secteurs l'ont déjà exprimé clairement: les compagnies ferroviaires de catégorie 1 au Canada bénéficient d'un monopole. La plupart des expéditeurs de grains ont accès aux services d'un seul transporteur et sont soumis à des stratégies de service ainsi qu'à des pratiques d'établissement des prix monopolistiques.

Depuis la crise du transport de 2013 et 2014, le secteur des grains, des groupements agricoles jusqu'aux exportateurs, en passant par toute la chaîne de valeur, a fait preuve de cohérence dans ses discussions avec le gouvernement et a livré un message uniforme. Le Canada doit s'attaquer au problème fondamental que pose le pouvoir commercial des compagnies ferroviaires ainsi que les conséquences qui en découlent, soit l'absence de forces concurrentielles dans le marché du transport ferroviaire. À notre avis, le gouvernement a un rôle précis à jouer, soit celui d'établir une structure réglementaire permettant d'atteindre un équilibre calculé et approprié et,dans la mesure du possible, de créer des forces de marché jusqu'à présent inexistantes et qui favoriseraient, du moins en théorie, l'adoption de comportements plus adaptés au marché.

Il est question ici d'une réalité, d'un fait de longue date qui a donné lieu à plus d'un siècle d'intervention gouvernementale, à divers degrés, dans le secteur. Le projet de loi C-49 est le moyen actuellement à notre disposition d'apporter un niveau de responsabilisation commerciale accru à une relation qui est depuis très longtemps déséquilibrée. Le projet de loi C-49 représente, à plusieurs égards, un pas en avant vers l'atteinte de ce but et reflète la prise en compte des commentaires transmis au fil des ans aux gouvernements successifs par les expéditeurs par rail et les membres de l'industrie des grains canadiens concernant le déséquilibre dans la relation entre les expéditeurs et les compagnies ferroviaires. Et nous vous en remercions.

À notre avis, on pourra constater les effets et la réussite de ce projet de loi, ou évaluer les résultats des politiques gouvernementales qui en découleraient seulement après que la communauté des expéditeurs aura tenté d'engager les recours et les procédures qu'il mettra à leur disposition. Étant donné que le projet de loi C-49 tente de concilier des intérêts opposés, soit ceux des expéditeurs et ceux des transporteurs ferroviaires, il faudra vraisemblablement attendre plusieurs années avant que l'on puisse évaluer concrètement sa réussite.

En conclusion, la CCGA souhaite aborder brièvement deux sujets du point de vue des producteurs agricoles, soit la transparence et l'investissement à long terme, surtout en ce qui concerne les questions de divulgation des données et de l'environnement économique réglementaire du transport du grain au Canada.

L'un des éléments du projet de loi C-49 auxquels les producteurs accordent une importance particulière est la question de la transparence.

La publication des nouvelles données des compagnies ferroviaires reçues par le ministre des Transports ou l'Office des transports du Canada sera non seulement utile aux intervenants et aux analystes qui surveillent le fonctionnement du système de manutention et de transport du grain, mais aussi au gouvernement. Celui-ci pourra se servir de ces données pour assurer des suivis et effectuer des évaluations sur une base continue et, au besoin, pour élaborer des politiques prudentes et conseiller le ministre.

Ces nouveaux renseignements, en combinaison avec les rapports exhaustifs du programme de surveillance des grains existant, fourniront aux producteurs agricoles des éclaircissements précieux sur le rendement du système. Les versions actuelles de l'article 51.1 ainsi que des paragraphes 77(5) et 98(7) prévoient des délais pour la publication de ces rapports. La CCGA soutient respectueusement que ces délais sont trop longs et qu'il conviendrait d'examiner la possibilité de les raccourcir.

Par ailleurs, le nouveau processus proposé concernant la présentation de rapports annuels par les compagnies ferroviaires au ministre au début de chaque campagne agricole, décrit à l'article 151.01, constitue une excellente mesure. La CCGA soutient respectueusement que le ministre des Transports devrait toutefois consulter le ministre de l'Agriculture eu égard au contenu des rapports, afin d'en maximiser l'utilité pour le gouvernement et les intervenants de l'industrie des grains.

Finalement, la politique relative à la modernisation de l'environnement économique réglementaire en vue de stimuler l'investissement, notamment par l'entremise d'une série de mesures visant le revenu admissible maximal, est fondée sur de bonnes intentions.

L'un des objectifs de cette politique consiste à encourager les compagnies ferroviaires à investir dans le remplacement de leurs wagons-trémies, grâce à la modification du calcul de l'indice des prix composite afférent au volume, tel qu'il est décrit à l'article 151(4).

La CCGA recommande qu'il soit envisagé que l'Office des transports du Canada assure un suivi étroit de ces mesures et qu'il fournisse, au moment de procéder au calcul annuel du revenu admissible maximal, des commentaires sur sa détermination.

Nous sommes heureux d'avoir pu nous adresser au Comité cet après-midi, et nous nous ferons un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

(1405)

La présidente:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Tougas.

M. François Tougas (avocat, McMillan S.E.N.C.R.L., s.r.l., à titre personnel):

Je vous remercie de l'invitation à comparaître devant vous.

Je tiens d'abord à féliciter les membres du Comité, non seulement de la manière non partisane dont ils abordent l'étude de ce projet de loi, mais aussi de leur persévérance étant donné le temps et les efforts qu'ils ont consacrés à ce texte tout au long de la semaine.

Je suis spécialisé en droit des chemins de fer et en politique des transports ferroviaires et j'interviens aujourd'hui en tant que conseiller juridique d'expéditeurs, de compagnies ferroviaires, de gouvernements, d'intermédiaires et d'investisseurs. J'ai joint aux mémoires remis au Comité une note sur mes états de service.

Je tiens aussi à préciser que mes propos d'aujourd'hui sont le fruit de plus de 60 négociations et dossiers menés auprès de la Compagnie des chemins de fer nationaux du Canada et du Canadien Pacifique. J'ai participé à ces négociations et à ces divers dossiers impliquant non seulement des entreprises de chemin de fer, mais des catégories très diverses de produits. Transports Canada m'a consulté à de multiples reprises dans le cadre des travaux préparatoires du projet de loi C-49. Il est à regretter, cependant, que le projet de loi n'offre à bien des expéditeurs aucun recours utile. J'aurais de nombreuses choses à dire au sujet tant de la loi que du projet de loi, mais je voudrais aujourd'hui m'en tenir à deux aspects de la question, notamment la communication des renseignements et le niveau de service. Je tenterai également d'aborder certaines des questions soulevées en cours de semaine.

Mon premier point concerne les données relatives aux coûts. Le projet de loi C-49 envisage la collecte de certaines des données dont la communication est obligatoire aux États-Unis. Le projet de loi ne change cependant rien au fait qu'aux États-Unis les expéditeurs ont un bien meilleur accès que les expéditeurs du Canada aux renseignements concernant le CN et le CP. Aux États-Unis, en effet, les expéditeurs ont accès à des renseignements détaillés touchant le coût de revient du transport ferroviaire, ce qui leur permet de calculer ce que le transport des marchandises coûte aux transporteurs, sans avoir pour cela à engager une procédure devant le Surface Transportation Board (STB) des États-Unis.

Aux États-Unis, les entreprises de transport ferroviaire sont tenues de fournir des renseignements statistiques et financiers très détaillés qui peuvent être consultés sur le site Internet du STB. Le CN et le CP sont, eux aussi, tenus de transmettre ces rapports au STB, mais ils ne sont pas tenus de fournir de tels renseignements au Canada, ce qui fait qu'au Canada les expéditeurs se trouvent désavantagés par rapport à leurs homologues des États-Unis. Le STB a mis en place un système d'établissement uniforme du coût du transport — le Uniform Rail Costing System ou URCS —, qui vise à doter le secteur ferroviaire et l'ensemble des expéditeurs d'un modèle normalisé d'évaluation des coûts. Les diverses parties sont ainsi à même de produire devant le STB des preuves pertinentes concernant les coûts du transport. Ce moyen, s'ajoutant à plusieurs autres, permet aux expéditeurs de mesurer la compétitivité du coût des transports assurés par le CP et le CN dans le cadre de leurs opérations américaines, mais cela ne leur est pas possible en ce qui concerne les opérations du CP et du CN au Canada.

Au Canada, la possibilité de se procurer des renseignements sur le coût du transport ferroviaire est réservée à l'expéditeur qui recourt à la procédure d'arbitrage de l'offre finale. Non seulement cette procédure est-elle confidentielle, mais il est, pour diverses raisons, de plus en plus difficile d'y recourir. Comme plusieurs témoins ont déjà eu l'occasion de vous le dire, dans le cadre de la procédure d'arbitrage de l'offre finale, l'arbitre est, en vertu des dispositions actuelles de la loi, en droit d'obtenir de l'Office les renseignements nécessaires. Or, l'arbitre n'exerce généralement pas ce droit sans obtenir au préalable le consentement du transporteur ferroviaire de catégorie 1 en cause. Il y a là un problème que vous êtes, selon moi, en mesure de résoudre. En effet, actuellement, le CN et le CP peuvent simplement refuser de donner leur consentement, et, en pareille hypothèse, il manquera à l'arbitre un élément essentiel dont il devrait disposer pour choisir entre l'offre présentée par l'expéditeur et l'offre avancée par le transporteur. Cela donne au CN et au CP le moyen de neutraliser la procédure d'arbitrage de l'offre finale, réduisant l'efficacité de la procédure ainsi que les possibilités d'y recourir.

Les transporteurs du Canada devraient avoir accès à des données aussi nombreuses et aussi complètes que les transporteurs qui, aux États-Unis, recourent aux services du CN et du CP, mais je propose, pour l'instant, une solution moins poussée. Il s'agirait simplement d'obliger le CN et le CP à coopérer avec l'Office et à divulguer le coût des transports faisant l'objet d'un arbitrage de l'offre finale. J'ai rédigé à cet égard un projet d'alinéa. Le Comité propose déjà de modifier le paragraphe 161(2), et il suffirait d'y ajouter un alinéa f). Il s'agit simplement, en l'occurrence, d'ajouter une donnée de plus aux données qu'un expéditeur doit présenter lors d'une procédure d'arbitrage de l'offre finale. La modification que je propose pourrait permettre d'éviter certains différends et, dans d'autres cas, d'aboutir à une solution satisfaisante aux yeux des parties.

Je voudrais maintenant passer à la question des données sur le rendement. Au Canada, on ne peut pas, en effet, obtenir les données concernant le rendement des entreprises de chemin de fer. Le projet de loi C-49 se propose de rendre obligatoire la communication d'un sous-ensemble des données auxquelles on a accès aux États-Unis. C'est dire qu'en ce qui concerne les opérations du CN et du CP, les expéditeurs américains demeureront mieux renseignés que les expéditeurs canadiens. Idéalement, les transporteurs ferroviaires de catégorie 1 communiqueraient toutes les données figurant sur la feuille de route, y compris les renseignements exigés par le projet de paragraphe 76(2) qui, à l'heure actuelle ne concerne que l'interconnexion à longue distance.

(1410)



Les transporteurs ferroviaires ont facilement accès à ces données en temps réel, et ces renseignements pourraient aisément être communiqués. Cela permettrait, au Canada, à tout expéditeur qui le souhaiterait, de savoir dans quelle mesure le transporteur ferroviaire lui assure un service adéquat et approprié, sans avoir pour cela à l'actionner en justice, ce qui est actuellement la seule solution qui s'offre à lui.

À l'heure actuelle, l'Office et les arbitres ont, dans les dossiers mettant en cause le niveau de service, à se prononcer sans avoir connaissance des données sur le service. La constitution d'une base de données et la publication de tous les renseignements figurant sur les feuilles de route, ainsi que les renseignements exigés au titre de l'article 76 faciliteraient le règlement de nombreux différends, et permettraient même d'en éviter certains. La solution que je propose ne va cependant pas jusque-là. Je propose en effet trois choses. D'abord, d'autoriser et d'obliger l'Office, comme c'est déjà le cas dans d'autres parties de la loi, à réglementer en ce domaine, vu les vastes connaissances qu'il a de ce genre de questions. Deuxièmement, exiger pour chaque ligne ou subdivision de chemin de fer, la publication des données touchant la qualité du service. Les données sur l'ensemble du système qu'envisage, dans son état actuel, le projet de loi C-49, ne permettront pas de repérer les défaillances de service dans telle ou telle région ou tel ou tel corridor, et encore moins celles auxquelles peut être exposé un expéditeur. Troisièmement, le projet de loi C-49 vise à limiter la communication de renseignements concernant les produits acheminés. J'ai ajouté à l'actuel paragraphe 77(2), un nouveau paragraphe (11) — vous en avez le texte sous les yeux — qui impose à chaque transporteur ferroviaire de catégorie 1 de communiquer les indicateurs de service concernant 23 catégories de produits, ainsi que le CN et le CP sont déjà tenus par le STB de le faire aux États-Unis — il n'y aurait, sur ce point, aucune différence entre les deux pays.

Passons maintenant aux niveaux de service. Le mécanisme de plainte touchant le niveau de service et la procédure applicable aux accords sur le niveau de service sont, tout comme les obligations que la loi impose en matière de niveau de service, censés obliger les transporteurs ferroviaires à faire ce qu'ils ne feraient pas autrement. L'Office fait un travail remarquable lorsqu'il s'agit de préciser les circonstances dans lesquelles il va pouvoir conclure qu'un transporteur ferroviaire a effectivement manqué aux obligations qui lui incombent quant au niveau du service. Il n'y a pas lieu de modifier l'actuel système pour le rendre encore plus favorable aux transporteurs ferroviaires dont les résultats financiers sont déjà excellents. Actuellement, les expéditeurs, obligés de s'en remettre au transporteur, ne sont portés à lui reprocher que les écarts de conduite les plus graves. Ils hésitent beaucoup, en effet, à porter plainte.

Je n'aurais pas, pour ma part, modifié les dispositions touchant le niveau de service, mais si l'on tient à les modifier, il y aurait, effectivement, quelques changements à y apporter. Pour ma part, j'en propose trois.

D'abord, je modifierais le début du paragraphe 116(1.2), tel qu'il figure dans le texte du projet de loi C-49, afin d'en inverser la logique. L'article ne dit actuellement rien, en effet, de ce qui se produira si un transporteur ferroviaire n'assure pas le niveau de service le plus haut dont il soit capable. D'après moi, en effet, il conviendrait d'inverser la conclusion à laquelle parvenir afin que l'Office ait plutôt à décider si le niveau de service est le meilleur qui puisse raisonnablement être assuré compte tenu des circonstances.

Deuxièmement, le projet de loi C-49 oblige l'Office, tant pour ce qui est du niveau de service que de l'accord sur le niveau du service, à prendre en compte les exigences et les restrictions du transporteur ferroviaire, autant de facteurs qui relèvent intégralement du transporteur, mais qui échappent au contrôle de l'expéditeur. C'est le transporteur ferroviaire, par exemple, qui décide du nombre de locomotives qu'il devrait acquérir, c'est lui qui décide s'il y a lieu ou non de licencier des milliers d'employés, de supprimer ou de réduire certains services, de contracter ou non ses infrastructures ou d'investir dans certaines technologies. Il n'appartient aucunement à l'Office de décider si un expéditeur peut prétendre à telle ou telle part des moyens ferroviaires comprimés par décision du transporteur. Il convient donc, selon moi, de supprimer entièrement cette disposition dont vous avez le texte sous les yeux.

Troisièmement, le texte du projet de loi C-49 précise que l'arbitre doit trancher de manière équitable. Or, d'après moi, c'est déjà le cas. Les arbitres sont connus pour leur impartialité et leur sens de l'équité et les cours d'appel se montrent déférentes à leur égard. Il est rare qu'une sentence arbitrale soit portée en appel. Cette disposition ne s'impose donc aucunement. La procédure relative aux accords sur le niveau de service est justement prévue pour les cas où un transporteur ferroviaire refuse de fournir le service exigé par l'expéditeur. S'il s'avère, après examen, que l'expéditeur n'a effectivement pas besoin du niveau de service auquel il prétendait, il ne l'obtiendra pas. C'est cela que l'Office décidera. J'estime donc qu'il conviendrait de supprimer entièrement cette partie du texte.

On m'a demandé, à plusieurs reprises, et j'ai moi-même envisagé cette hypothèse, laquelle de ces trois mesures je retiendrais si je ne pouvais en obtenir qu'une. Il se peut que les dispositions touchant l'interconnexion à longue distance, dans la mesure où elles sont modifiées conformément aux souhaits des diverses parties qui ont comparu devant vous, soient utiles à certaines parties prenantes. Mais il faudrait que je sois assuré de l'adoption de l'amendement qui me paraît le plus indispensable, c'est-à-dire qu'il faudrait qu'une compagnie de chemin de fer soit tenue de donner suite dans le cadre d'une procédure d'arbitrage de l'offre finale à la demande d'un expéditeur qui souhaite obtenir des renseignements sur les coûts d'exploitation du transporteur ferroviaire.

Et enfin, je rétablirais le réexamen périodique de la loi. Cet examen devrait, selon moi, avoir lieu au moins tous les quatre ans. M. Emerson a, lui, évoqué un examen biennal et je n'y vois pas pour ma part le moindre inconvénient.

Je vous remercie.

(1415)

La présidente:

Je vous remercie.

Mes remerciements à tous.

Madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vous remercie tous d'avoir répondu à notre invitation.

Je tiens aussi à préciser combien j'apprécie le caractère équilibré des témoignages qui nous ont été livrés ces trois derniers jours. On nous a présenté des exposés très structurés, et attiré notre attention sur les dispositions du projet de loi qu'il conviendrait éventuellement de modifier. Je constate également avec satisfaction qu'un certain nombre de thèmes se dégagent de ce qui s'est dit ici au cours des derniers jours.

J'aurais, maintenant, quelques questions à vous poser. D'abord, dans l'hypothèse où les amendements que vous proposez ne seraient pas retenus, quelles pourraient en être, à long terme, les conséquences pour vos diverses entreprises, et aussi, pour l'ensemble du secteur?

M. Gordon Harrison:

Les amendements proposés par les représentants des principaux acteurs de la chaîne d'approvisionnement en céréales ont fait l'objet de réflexions approfondies elles-mêmes fondées sur une longue expérience. D'après moi, ces amendements se justifient, car ils permettront d'améliorer l'efficacité et la réactivité du système. Ils répondent au besoin évoqué par le dernier intervenant, au niveau de la transparence des renseignements qui devraient être recueillis, fournis et publiés en temps utile. Je suis entièrement d'accord avec l'idée que ces renseignements devraient être aussi complets et aussi transparents que ceux dont les expéditeurs disposent aux États-Unis.

Le rejet des amendements proposés nous fera perdre des occasions. Et puis, si l'on devait à nouveau se trouver dans la situation survenue il y a maintenant trois récoltes, l'économie s'exposerait à des interventions qui risqueraient de lui être néfastes. Les efforts engagés à l'époque ont entraîné un énorme gaspillage de temps et de moyens. Une amélioration de la situation à cet égard est absolument essentielle à notre économie.

Je vous remercie.

(1420)

M. Jack Froese:

D'après moi, notre avenir en dépend. On ne peut tout simplement pas se permettre de revenir à la situation antérieure. Songez aux nouvelles orientations de notre agriculture. Les avancées biotechnologiques permettent de meilleures récoltes, des récoltes plus importantes. Les volumes sont appelés à augmenter. Nous nous sommes fixés le but ambitieux de 26 millions de tonnes d'ici 2025. Or, dans le passé, nous avons toujours réalisé nos objectifs. Nous devons être à même de respecter nos engagements commerciaux, et si notre système de transport n'est pas à la hauteur, les accords de commerce que nous pouvons conclure ne serviront pas à grand-chose.

Il est essentiel que les délais de transport correspondent aux besoins du consommateur. Lors de discussions que nous avons eues avec eux, nos clients japonais nous ont dit que le respect des délais de livraison revêt pour eux une importance extrême.

M. François Tougas:

Permettez-moi de répondre en vous posant à mon tour une question. Pourriez-vous me dire, en effet, pourquoi les intéressés n'exercent pas les recours prévus à leur intention? Je sais que vous êtes plusieurs à avoir déjà posé la question. En envisageant la situation sous cet angle, on peut prévoir ce qui finira par se produire dans le secteur.

Si nous considérons que la Loi sur les transports au Canada demeure une oeuvre inachevée — ce qu'il nous faut bien reconnaître, car le texte est en chantier depuis plus de 100 ans — nos travaux actuels nous donnent l'occasion de progresser. Si j'évoque devant vous un certain nombre de questions, c'est parce que les recours qui ont été mis en place s'effritent petit à petit.

Ce n'est d'ailleurs pas surprenant. L'actuelle structure de marché se prête en effet à l'exercice d'un monopole naturel par les deux compagnies de chemin de fer. Je ne leur impute aucune faute, car ce problème est, en effet, dû à la structure du marché. Nous avons tenté de régler le problème en inscrivant dans la loi un certain nombre de recours. Or, lorsque ces recours sont affaiblis, lorsqu'ils ne remplissent pas le rôle qui devait être le leur, les expéditeurs ont du mal à acheminer leurs marchandises. Je ne voulais dire que cela.

Je sais que certains d'entre vous ont cherché à expliquer pourquoi les divers recours ne sont pas exercés. Lundi, les représentants des chemins de fer ont évoqué la question. Or, si ces recours ne sont pas exercés, c'est parce que leur exercice devient de plus en plus difficile. Les expéditeurs craignent en effet que l'exercice d'un recours ne les expose aux représailles du transporteur. J'ajoute que les recours en question sont soumis à des procédures très onéreuses. Vous me direz que c'est en partie de ma faute, non? Je suis en effet avocat, et si chacun a le droit de gagner sa vie, il est clair que les services d'un avocat coûtent cher. Plus une procédure est compliquée et plus le problème coûtera cher à régler.

Un des intervenants de ce matin vous a dit combien il lui en coûte pour engager une procédure d'arbitrage de l'offre finale. D'autres expéditeurs ont l'occasion d'exercer des recours moins coûteux, mais très peu sont ceux qui disposent d'une gamme complète de recours. Pour la plupart des expéditeurs, le choix se limite à un, et parfois à deux recours. Or, il faut faciliter l'accès à ces recours. C'est surtout sur cela que j'insiste et cela vaut également pour le mécanisme d'interconnexion à longue distance.

Pardonnez-moi de m'être étendu peut-être un peu trop longtemps.

Mme Kelly Block:

Non, pas du tout. Je vous remercie.

La présidente:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Je vais m'en tenir à la question des recours et des correctifs qui pourraient y être apportés. Pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus au sujet de ces recours? Comment sont-ils nés? Pourriez-vous nous citer quelques exemples précis? Quelle en est l'origine, et comment ont-ils fini par s'éteindre?

M. François Tougas:

La plupart des recours prévus actuellement dans la loi remontent aux années 1980, et à l'action d'une sorte de franc-tireur, M. Don Mazankowski. C'est en 1987 que la Loi sur les transports nationaux a instauré l'arbitrage de l'offre finale ainsi que le mécanisme du prix de ligne concurrentiel. C'est cette loi qui a transformé le mécanisme d'interconnexion pour en faire ce qu'il est aujourd'hui. Il s'agissait à l'époque de mesures audacieuses.

Or, ainsi que plusieurs vous l'ont dit ici, le prix de ligne concurrentiel ne donne pas les résultats voulus. Les chemins de fer ont, en effet, toujours refusé de se livrer concurrence sur ce point. Rien ne les y oblige d'ailleurs. Aucune disposition législative ne leur impose de se faire concurrence. Il s'agit, encore une fois, d'un problème né de la structure actuelle du marché. Tout recours institué se doit d'être efficace puisqu'il s'agit de se substituer au marché qui se révèle incapable de faire le nécessaire.

Mon domaine d'exercice est le droit de la concurrence et l'économie en matière de lutte contre les cartels. Notre principal souci est de maintenir la concurrence. Dans une situation de monopole naturel, qui est, en l'occurrence, celle du secteur ferroviaire — et cela ne vaut pas pour l'intégralité du réseau, mais pour de grands pans tout de même — il conviendrait d'instaurer des mécanismes permettant à ces transporteurs ferroviaires de se faire librement concurrence. Et c'est là que le mécanisme d'interconnexion à longue distance me paraît avoir échoué. Il impose toute une série de restrictions qui n'ont pas lieu d'être et qui font que les chemins de fer n'ont en fait pas à se livrer concurrence ou à concurrencer d'autres entreprises de transport.

Ma réponse vous paraît-elle satisfaisante? Je ne suis pas certain qu'elle le soit.

(1425)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est à tout le moins un assez bon début.

Quant aux autres solutions, les représentants de Teck ont évoqué la question des droits de circulation et j'ai remarqué que beaucoup d'entre nous ne voyaient pas très bien de quoi il s'agit. Or, je sais que ce n'est pas votre cas. Pourriez-vous nous en dire quelque chose?

M. François Tougas:

Oui. J'ai, sur la question, écrit l'article le moins lu au Canada.

En matière de droits de circulation, il existe des régimes très divers et c'est une sorte d'épouvantail qu'agitent les transporteurs. J'ai, à de nombreuses reprises, entendu dire que cela serait un désastre pour l'économie. Or, ainsi que nous l'a rappelé hier le représentant de Teck, on a, en Amérique du Nord, constamment recours aux droits de circulation. Il existe, en ce domaine, de nombreux mécanismes et de nombreux types de droits. Je pense que ce qu'ils craignent particulièrement c'est une totale liberté d'accès, chacun pouvant alors emprunter n'importe quelle ligne. Or, il y aurait avant cela de nombreuses étapes à franchir.

Je pourrais vous entretenir de cela des jours entiers, mais nous avons actuellement au Canada l'occasion de réformer nos transports afin d'y injecter une dose de concurrence directe, sous la forme de droits de circulation. Mais, si nous n'optons pas pour cette solution, nous devrions au moins mettre en place des recours commodes et efficaces afin que s'exerce une concurrence indirecte.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelqu'un a manifesté plus tôt aujourd'hui une certaine inquiétude à l'idée de voir cesser prématurément l'exploitation de certaines lignes. Vous êtes-vous fait une opinion sur la question, et si oui que pourrait-on faire à cet égard?

M. François Tougas:

Les chemins de fer sont désormais en mesure de mettre fin à l'exploitation d'une ligne dans des conditions qui me paraissent raisonnables, compte tenu du souci de rationaliser les réseaux ferroviaires. J'estime pour ma part qu'on leur facilite, à cet égard, un peu trop les choses, mais telle est la situation.

Si on leur permet de mettre fin à l'exploitation d'une ligne sans devoir attendre la fin des procédures, on laisse à l'abandon tous les expéditeurs qui empruntaient cette voie. Ce serait d'après moi une erreur de procéder ainsi. On peut parfaitement ne pas être d'accord sur ce point et on pourrait peut-être, dans certains cas,  %permettre à la collectivité locale de reprendre, sans attendre, la gestion de la ligne en cause, ou permettre à d'autres parties de la reprendre à des conditions raisonnables.

Les exploitants de lignes ferroviaires sur courte distance éprouvent des difficultés tant au niveau de leurs recettes d'exploitation que de leurs besoins en capitaux. Cette question mériterait qu'on s'y attarde, mais je ne pense pas que nous ayons aujourd'hui le temps qu'il faudrait pour cela.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les compagnies ferroviaires sur courte distance nous ont indiqué hier que leur coefficient d'exploitation se situe aux environs de 98 %, alors qu'il est de 50 % pour les grands transporteurs.

Je voudrais maintenant poser une question que j'ai déjà posée à plusieurs de nos intervenants. Elle s'adresse à tous ceux qui voudront y répondre.

Les représentants des grandes sociétés ferroviaires nous ont dit qu'une compagnie qui peut recourir à une entreprise de transport routier n'est pas à proprement parler captive des sociétés ferroviaires. Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. François Tougas:

Il est, d'après moi, ridicule d'affirmer une telle chose.

La présidente:

J'admire votre franchise.

M. François Tougas:

Je pourrais nuancer quelque peu ma réponse. Selon un de vos intervenants, les entreprises en mesure de faire transporter par route 25 % de leur production cessent d'être captives. Mais elles restent pourtant captives au regard des autres 75 %, et c'est là que le bât blesse.

Prenons l'exemple d'une scierie située dans une région éloignée du nord-ouest de Colombie-Britannique, et qui doit acheminer sa production vers quelque 3 000 clients installés aux États-Unis. Elle n'a d'autre solution que les chemins de fer du Canadien National. Elle pourrait, bien sûr, acheminer sa production par route jusqu'à Edmonton, et à partir de là, emprunter les lignes du CP. Mais, toute personne un peu saine d'esprit sait très bien que cela lui coûterait beaucoup trop cher. Les représentants des entreprises de chemin de fer ont eux-mêmes dit qu'à partir d'une certaine distance le transport routier est plus onéreux. Ce n'est, disent-ils, que sur les trajets courts que les chemins de fer ne sont pas concurrentiels. Je mets en doute certains des chiffres qu'ils ont cités, mais admettons. Et puis, encore faut-il décharger les camions et charger la marchandise à bord d'un wagon de chemin de fer. Le transbordement coûte lui-même cher.

Ai-je épuisé mon temps de parole?

(1430)

La présidente:

Non. Continuez, je vous prie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a moyen...

M. François Tougas:

Je pourrais citer un exemple comparable dans presque toutes les catégories de marchandises. Ainsi, ceux qui envisageraient d'emprunter la route pour transporter du charbon auraient manifestement perdu la raison. Un jour j'ai fait le calcul. Pour transporter 25 millions de tonnes de charbon par la route, il faudrait charger un camion toutes les deux minutes et demie, 24 heures par jour, 365 jours par an. Les routes seraient incapables d'accueillir un tel trafic. Aucun pont n'en serait capable. Et je ne parle là que d'une seule catégorie de marchandises. Il n'est tout simplement pas réaliste d'affirmer qu'une clientèle n'est pas captive du simple fait qu'elle serait en mesure de faire acheminer par route une partie de sa production.

La présidente:

Je pense que M. Harrison souhaitait faire une observation.

M. Gordon Harrison:

Un simple commentaire. Pour expédier les céréales des provinces des Prairies jusqu'aux établissements de transformation situés ailleurs au Canada, le transport routier n'est pas envisageable. Outre les problèmes de logistique, le coût d'un tel transport rend cela impraticable.

La présidente:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les invités d'être parmi nous.

Je voudrais amorcer la conversation avec M. Harrison.

Dans votre discours de présentation, vous avez apporté un éclairage un peu nouveau. Depuis quelques jours, nous entendons beaucoup de producteurs de grain et de minerai se plaindre des compagnies ferroviaires. On dit que ces types de production sont en croissance, qu'on cherche à exporter davantage sur les marchés internationaux et à faire croître l'économie. De votre côté, vous apportez cet après-midi la notion de la production juste-à-temps, c'est-à-dire le concept selon lequel on fait de plus petites productions. Vous dites que la plupart des meuneries ne sont pas équipées pour recevoir de très nombreux wagons.

Le projet de loi C-49 vous permettra-t-il d'y trouver votre compte? Ce sera à vous de me le dire, mais j'ai l'impression qu'il faudrait peut-être que les compagnies ferroviaires vous offrent un traitement différent de celui accordé aux grandes productions. Est-ce que je fais erreur? [Traduction]

M. Gordon Harrison:

La livraison en flux tendus s'impose au niveau de la minoterie et en aval. Mais avant cela, on a, pour les livraisons, une certaine latitude, dans la mesure où la continuité des livraisons est assurée et le calendrier respecté. L'industrie céréalière ne peut effectivement pas livrer la marchandise en flux tendus si elle se trouve tout d'un coup à court de matières premières.

Les céréales produites dans l'Est du Canada — en Ontario, au Québec et dans la région de l'Atlantique — ne peuvent généralement pas remplacer, pour des raisons de catégorie et de qualité, les céréales de l'Ouest canadien. Elles ne servent pas à fabriquer les mêmes produits. J'ajoute que le fonctionnement efficace d'une minoterie impose l'utilisation de diverses qualités et catégories de blé provenant de l'Ouest canadien, en raison notamment de leurs teneurs différentes en protéines. La farine d'avoine, par exemple, exige l'emploi de variétés très précises qui sont déterminées à l'avance et livrées en conséquence.

Si, comme cela s'est produit il y a trois ans, les stocks baissent au point où l'on ne peut plus effectuer les mélanges nécessaires, et donc obtenir le produit fini escompté, on ne peut pas assurer en flux tendus la livraison du produit fini et satisfaire les besoins des entreprises de transformation situées en aval.

Les minoteries canadiennes possèdent en général des stocks capables de les alimenter au moins un mois, voire plusieurs mois, mais si, comme cela s'est déjà produit, le transport ferroviaire est interrompu pendant plusieurs semaines — situation qui, espérons-le, ne se reproduira pas — c'est l'arrêt des livraisons en flux tendus. Or, les entreprises qui fonctionnent, elles aussi, à flux tendus, et qui mettent en marché des produits à courte durée de conservation ne peuvent pas se payer le loisir de s'adresser, à si brève échéance, à d'autres fournisseurs.

Nous en sommes là. Il faut donc assurer dans de bonnes conditions les approvisionnements en matières premières et, en aval du fabricant primaire, assurer en quantité suffisante la livraison continue des produits.

J'espère avoir en cela répondu à votre question. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Oui, tout à fait. Merci.

Dans un tout autre ordre d'idées, il faudrait vraiment être devin pour savoir quelles recommandations feront l'unanimité au sein de ce comité au cours des prochaines semaines. Il y a beaucoup de propositions sur la table. À peu près tout le monde s'entend pour dire qu'il faut une révision périodique de la Loi. Certains ont suggéré que cela se fasse aux deux ans, d'autres aux quatre ans.

Je voudrais formuler la question autrement. Une fois le projet de loi C-49 adopté, peu importe les amendements qui y auront été apportés, combien de temps faudra-t-il, selon vous, pour en mesurer l'efficacité? Autrement dit, la première évaluation de la Loi devrait-elle être faite après un an, deux ans, trois ans ou quatre ans? Par la suite, nous pourrons établir le cycle.

(1435)

[Traduction]

M. François Tougas:

Mais, d'après moi, il existe un certain nombre de précédents qui devraient nous aider à décider du délai de réexamen. Permettez-moi de dire que la loi devrait, je pense, être réexaminée tous les deux ans, mais que je ne m'opposerais guère à un délai de quatre ans.

Le mécanisme des accords de niveau de service a été institué en 2013 dans le cadre du projet de loi C-52. Or, l'année dernière, aucun accord de niveau de service n'a été soumis à l'Office. Ils étaient, l'année précédente, au nombre de deux, et l'année d'avant, au nombre de cinq.

Voilà donc la situation: cinq, deux et puis zéro. Comment expliquer cela? Serait-ce que ce mécanisme ne donne pas les résultats voulus? Peut-être aurait-il lieu de le revoir. Nous devrions, comme pour tout mécanisme, y veiller continuellement dans un effort permanent d'amélioration.

Je sais qu'il est très difficile de faire cela à l'échelon parlementaire, mais le Comité s'attelle depuis toujours à la tâche. Vous avez les connaissances spécialisées voulues. Vous pouvez faire appel à de nombreuses personnes capables d'examiner à fond chacun des recours qui ont été mis en place, de voir s'ils fonctionnement correctement, et si les diverses dispositions de la loi forment un tout intégré. Tout cela est possible. Je pense que vous pourriez le faire dans deux ans, mais, d'après moi, on ne devrait pas attendre plus de quatre ans pour cela. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Monsieur Harrison, voulez-vous répondre à la question? [Traduction]

M. Gordon Harrison:

Aujourd'hui, les éleveurs ont aussi évoqué l'avenir. La génétique végétale et les pratiques agricoles vont augmenter régulièrement le rendement des cultures, y compris celle du blé. Le volume des marchandises à acheminer augmentera donc en conséquence.

En revanche, notre croissance démographique, légèrement inférieure à celle des États-Unis, ne sera pas un facteur important de développement.

Je rappelle que les conditions du marché peuvent évoluer très vite, cela étant également vrai des diverses composantes de la chaîne d'approvisionnement. J'estime que les dispositions de la loi devraient être révisées sans attendre, cela étant particulièrement vrai une fois ces amendements adoptés. L'exemple cité me paraît excellent. La situation peut changer très rapidement, mais nous pouvons être sûrs qu'en matière de transport de produits agricoles, la demande ne diminuera pas, car pour répondre à la demande, y compris celle du consommateur canadien, les producteurs vont devoir acheminer des quantités de plus en plus importantes.

J'espère ne pas avoir exagéré.

La présidente:

M. Fraser.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je vous remercie. Je vais m'adresser en premier à l'avocat qui siège parmi nous, et évoquer la question du règlement des différends, notamment parce que c'est un de mes sujets favoris, ayant moi-même pratiqué le droit en ce domaine avant d'entrer en politique.

En ce qui concerne l'arbitrage de l'offre finale, vous avez laissé entendre qu'une procédure plus efficace permettrait peut-être de réduire le nombre des différends qui surviennent. Dans ma carrière antérieure, j'éprouvais toujours une légère tristesse lorsqu'on me confiait un nouveau dossier, car cela voulait dire qu'une situation s'était envenimée au point où quelqu'un allait devoir verser des honoraires à un avocat au lieu d'investir le montant correspondant dans le développement de son entreprise.

Pourriez-vous nous expliquer un petit peu comment, en rendant la procédure d'arbitrage obligatoire, on réduirait le temps qu'il faut pour assurer la participation des producteurs ou des expéditeurs?

M. François Tougas:

La question mérite effectivement d'être posée. Je souhaiterais pour ma part que les choses se passent autrement que ce que je viens de dire. Je vais vous en demander beaucoup.

Idéalement, on donnerait aux expéditeurs, avant même d'engager la procédure d'arbitrage de l'offre finale, la possibilité de se faire une idée des coûts d'exploitation du chemin de fer. Ce serait la solution idéale. Ils pourraient ainsi se dire « Oh là, cela coûte effectivement tant au chemin de fer; je ne me fais donc pas voler ». Or, les expéditeurs ne sont pas actuellement à même de tirer une telle conclusion, car ils n'ont pas en main les données nécessaires.

M. Sean Fraser:

Pourriez-vous me dire, avant d'aller plus loin, si dans l'état actuel des choses, on peut effectivement envisager une communication plus complète des renseignements en cause?

M. François Tougas:

Ce serait possible si vous donniez accès aux renseignements prévus à l'article 76, et que vous instauriez au Canada un régime de communication des données tel que l'URCS américain dont je parlais tout à l'heure. Ce serait possible, mais pas avec les amendements envisagés actuellement. Il faudrait en effet adopter des mesures sensiblement plus énergiques.

M. Sean Fraser:

Mais il s'agirait alors de rendre publics des renseignements exclusifs que les entreprises de chemin de fer tiennent pour confidentiels.

(1440)

M. François Tougas:

C'est totalement absurde. C'est ce qu'on entend souvent dire, mais laissez-moi vous préciser ce qu'il en est.

Cela se fait déjà aux États-Unis, où l'URCS exige la communication de ce type de données. Aux États-Unis, le CN et le CP sont tenus de communiquer ces renseignements et je ne vois vraiment pas pourquoi ils ne seraient pas tenus d'en faire autant au Canada.

J'ajoute que même en ce qui concerne les données sur le rendement, les dispositions du projet de loi autorisent une agrégation considérable des données, ce qui n'est pas le cas aux États-Unis. Aux États-Unis, en effet, le CN et le CP doivent chacun rendre compte de leurs opérations. Or, aux États-Unis, ces deux entreprises mènent des opérations de très grande envergure.

Tout cela n'est donc qu'un prétexte.

M. Sean Fraser:

Avant d'aborder la partie initiale, je dois dire que je trouve très intéressante la piste que nous venons d'évoquer.

Selon vous, en ce qui concerne la communication des données, l'idéal serait-il d'harmoniser notre régime avec les dispositions américaines. Serait-ce là l'idéal ou...?

M. François Tougas:

Non, ce n'est pas le cas. Je sais qu'il est tentant de dire cela, mais je précise qu'aux États-Unis les expéditeurs ne sont pas vraiment satisfaits des renseignements dont ils disposent. Ils ont en effet accès à des données plus complètes qu'ici, mais étant donné les moyens modernes de collecte et de transmission dont nous disposons, il y aurait lieu d'assurer une plus grande transparence des données. Peut-être allez-vous me demander pourquoi? Eh bien, c'est parce que le marché ne fonctionne pas comme il devrait; autrement, il ne serait pas nécessaire d'en assurer la transparence, car le marché lui-même réglerait la question. Si la question de la communication des données se pose, c'est parce que nous sommes en situation de monopole. Le caractère confidentiel des données en question n'est qu'un faux-fuyant. Cela ne pose aucun problème aux États-Unis où certaines données demeurent en effet confidentielles et ne sont communiquées que dans le cadre de la procédure de divulgation des coûts de revient. Mais pour en revenir à ce que vous disiez tout à l'heure, lors d'une procédure d'arbitrage de l'offre finale, les entreprises de chemin de fer ont beau jeu de dire « Ah, non, nous ne pouvons tout de même pas vous divulguer nos coûts d'exploitation ».

Je souhaite alors bonne chance à l'expéditeur qui voudrait savoir combien le transport de tel ou tel produit coûte effectivement à la compagnie de chemin de fer.

Et bonne chance à l'arbitre qui souhaiterait savoir si l'offre du transporteur est raisonnable par rapport au marché, étant donné que l'expéditeur en cause ne connaît pas les taux pratiqués par les autres transporteurs. Ces taux sont en effet tenus pour confidentiels et on ne peut donc pas effectuer de comparaisons. La seule comparaison possible serait entre le coût d'exploitation et le prix pratiqué.

M. Sean Fraser:

Vous avez également dit qu'il conviendrait selon vous de supprimer l'obligation faite à l'arbitre de rendre une décision équitable. Est-ce parce que, selon vous, cette disposition est superflue et qu'elle peut être interprétée de diverses manières, ou est-ce plutôt que vous craignez qu'une sentence qui est équitable puisse néanmoins ne pas être juridiquement correcte? Quel est votre souci à cet égard?

M. François Tougas:

Je reconnais que c'est la première hypothèse qui semblerait la bonne, mais la seconde retient davantage mon attention.

Si, par exemple, l'Office décide que, compte tenu de la situation, le critère du service adéquat et approprié exige un service de niveau X. Je précise tout de suite que tout le monde semble gêné par ce critère, mais ce n'est pas mon cas. Dans la mesure où l'Office doit parvenir à une décision équitable pour les parties, il lui faut définir ce qu'il convient d'entendre par ces deux mots. Que signifient-ils, en effet? Ce critère veut-il dire qu'on entendait effectivement trancher le dossier au regard de ce qui est adéquat et approprié, mais que la loi imposant une décision qui est équitable pour les parties, et conforme donc à un certain équilibre, on va devoir, dans le cadre de la sentence, prendre en compte la perte que risque de subir l'une des parties? Or, l'Office est un arbitre impartial. La disposition en cause me paraît donc à tout le moins superflue, mais elle est encore moins anodine que cela. Elle me paraît en effet dangereuse.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je pense avoir épuisé mon temps de parole. Je vous remercie.

La présidente:

Merci.

La parole passe maintenant à M. Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

C'était un véritable plaisir d'assister à ce débat entre deux avocats. C'était très bien et je vous en remercie.

J'aurais des questions à poser, mais je voudrais avant cela faire un ou deux commentaires.

Je vous remercie, messieurs, de votre présence ici et de votre participation à nos travaux.

Je tiens également à remercier mes collègues de l'autre bord. Vous agissez dans ce dossier sans le moindre esprit partisan et vous voyez dans nos travaux une oeuvre de collaboration vissant à améliorer la situation des expéditeurs et, là encore, je tiens à vous remercier.

J'aurais maintenant quelques questions à poser, d'abord au sujet des sanctions réciproques, puis au sujet des lignes de chemin de fer secondaires.

La première question concerne les sanctions réciproques. Quel est votre avis au sujet de ces sanctions?

M. Steve Pratte:

Ainsi que l'ont rappelé plusieurs groupements de producteurs, du point de vue juridique, les producteurs ne sont pas à proprement parler des expéditeurs. Depuis plus de 10 ans, les expéditeurs de moindres volumes de cultures spécialisées ou de produits conteneurisés, ainsi que les entreprises de transformation à valeur ajoutée, font valoir que l'imposition de sanctions de part et d'autre permettrait de préciser la relation conceptuelle, et non juridique, qui existe entre l'expéditeur et l'entreprise de chemin de fer. En tant que groupement de producteurs, nous sommes tout à fait favorables à l'idée de sanctions réciproques, et à l'imposition de telles sanctions. Pour vous faire une meilleure idée de leur point de vue à cet égard, vous n'avez qu'à consulter les mémoires qu'ils ont remis au Comité. L'équilibre des responsabilités est correctement assuré à chaque palier de la chaîne d'approvisionnement, sauf, de l'avis de nos expéditeurs et de nous-mêmes, en ce qui concerne la relation entre l'expéditeur et le prestataire de services de transport ferroviaire.

(1445)

M. Vance Badawey:

Quelqu'un souhaite-t-il ajouter quelque chose?

M. François Tougas:

J'admets tout ce qui vient d'être dit, mais en ce qui concerne les sanctions réciproques, il y a une mesure que je souhaiterais beaucoup voir adopter. En matière de sanctions réciproques, j'accorderais à l'Office une latitude beaucoup plus grande. Actuellement, en effet, dans le cadre d'une procédure engagée devant l'Office, celui-ci peut ordonner le remboursement des dépenses encourues, c'est-à-dire essentiellement des coûts de base. Il conviendrait, d'après moi, d'accorder à l'Office une plus grande latitude quant aux montants pouvant être accordés au titre des sanctions réciproques.

À supposer que vous ayez commandé 16 wagons — c'est l'exemple qui nous a été cité ce matin — et qu'on ne vous en attribue que 10. Quelle sera la sanction imposée? Cent dollars par wagon? Mais, selon la marchandise en question, la cargaison peut valoir 100 000 $ ou un million... Le montant de la sanction n'a donc que peu de rapport avec la valeur de la cargaison. Il faudrait tout de même que la sanction imposée signifie quelque chose. C'est pourquoi, au lieu de fixer une sorte de barème des sanctions, j'accorderais à l'Office le pouvoir d'en déterminer le montant.

M. Vance Badawey:

Excellente idée.

Je voudrais maintenant vous poser une question au sujet des exploitants de lignes de chemin de fer secondaires. N'est-ce pas vous qui, tout à l'heure, avez évoqué les responsabilités qu'engage l'abandon d'une ligne de chemin de fer? Nous souhaitons tous protéger l'économie des régions concernées mais, souvent, la santé économique de la région est tributaire du service ferroviaire.

Sauf à s'en remettre entièrement aux municipalités, qui ne disposent pas, elles non plus, des capitaux et des fonds nécessaires à l'exploitation de la ligne, quelle serait la stratégie réaliste qui permettrait, dans le cadre d'un partenariat avec un exploitant de chemin de fer secondaire, d'assurer la continuité du service indispensable à certaines entreprises?

M. François Tougas:

Je constate, à vous entendre, que vous avez une bonne connaissance de la question.

C'est plutôt compliqué. Il m'arrive de représenter des exploitants de chemins de fer secondaires — des entreprises qui n'ont pas toutes les fonds nécessaires, qui ont du mal à se procurer des capitaux et à élargir leur clientèle, et qui, souvent, subissent les contraintes des transporteurs ferroviaires de catégorie 1 auxquels ils se raccordent. C'est là que se situe le problème, au niveau des interconnexions, et des conditions auxquelles un exploitant de chemin de fer secondaire est admis à reprendre une infrastructure qui va être délaissée, ou un tronçon de ligne qu'exploitait avant cela une entreprise ferroviaire de catégorie 1... Nous devons, d'après moi, nous pencher sur les conditions de reprise et les conditions d'exploitation de ces tronçons de ligne.

Dieu m'en garde, mais j'allais presque demander que les contrats régissant ce type d'opérations soient préalablement soumis à un organisme de surveillance. Entre les chemins de fer de catégorie 1 et les exploitants de lignes secondaires, il existe une énorme inégalité quant au pouvoir de négociation.

M. Vance Badawey:

Quelqu'un souhaite-t-il ajouter quelque chose?

Allez-y.

M. Steve Pratte:

Ainsi que nous l'a dit le représentant de la Western Canadian Short Line Railway Association, le transport ferroviaire sur courte distance joue, lorsque les conditions s'y prêtent, un rôle important au sein du système de collecte des céréales, et même les lignes assurant un trafic relativement peu important contribuent notablement à l'acheminement des céréales jusqu'aux lignes principales où les wagons sont raccrochés au train d'un chemin de fer de catégorie 1.

Ces lignes relèvent des autorités provinciales et, ainsi que quelqu'un l'a dit hier, certaines provinces ont contribué beaucoup plus que d'autres au maintien de ces lignes secondaires. Quoi qu'il en soit, ces lignes sont un élément important de notre système de transport, de collecte et de distribution des céréales.

M. Vance Badawey:

Y aurait-il également, selon vous, des possibilités de partenariats avec les destinataires ultimes?

Ce que je veux dire par cela c'est qu'il est fréquent qu'une ligne de chemin de fer secondaire aboutisse à une ligne principale. J'imagine que c'est aux lignes principales qu'il appartient d'en accorder l'accès aux autres lignes. Il en irait de même s'agissant de transport routier ou de transport maritime.

Pensez-vous, donc, qu'il y ait des occasions de créer des partenariats ou d'intégrer davantage les opérations dans le cadre d'une stratégie plus large?

M. Steve Pratte:

Je pense qu'il arrive effectivement que les producteurs soient eux-mêmes actionnaires d'une ligne secondaire servant au transport de leurs produits. Ils concluent alors des ententes avec le terminal d'exportation. C'est dire qu'ils entretiennent effectivement des liens avec un expéditeur, installé sur la côte Ouest, par exemple.

Il se peut qu'il y ait déjà une entente sur le plan commercial, mais ce sont néanmoins les chemins de fer de catégorie 1 qui assurent le transport sur les longues distances.

La présidente:

Je vous remercie.

La parole passe maintenant à M. Shields.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vous remercie de nous faire bénéficier de vos connaissances en ce domaine.

Passons maintenant la parole à l'Association des minoteries de farine de blé qui, me semble-t-il, étoffe un peu le contexte. En effet, il vous faut non seulement travailler en temps réel, mais vous devez en outre tenir compte de la durée de conservation des produits. C'est un facteur important du service.

Pourriez-vous nous indiquer l'importance que cela revêt? C'est un tout autre aspect de la question.

(1450)

M. Gordon Harrison:

Je tenterai d'être bref.

Je rappelle, en quelques mots qu'en réponse aux besoins des minoteries, il vous faut fournir plusieurs sortes de blé. Il vous faut en effet maintenir en permanence un stock de divers types de blé. Il faut absolument éviter l'interruption des livraisons que nous avons éprouvée il y a quelques années, et qui a fait tant de mal aux minoteries d'Amérique du Nord.

Pour répondre aux besoins de quelqu'un qui veut, par exemple, faire des bagels plutôt que du pain complet, du pain plat ou des tortillas, ou qui a besoin de pâte congelée, il vous faut stocker les matières premières correspondant à ces divers usages. Or, ces céréales proviennent essentiellement de l'Ouest du Canada, et la catégorie la plus généralement utilisée est le blé roux des provinces de l'Ouest canadien, dit CWRS. Il vous faut ces matières premières pour répondre aux besoins de la clientèle et, au-delà des portes de la minoterie, les livraisons, la plupart du temps dans un rayon de 150 kilomètres, doivent être assurées à flux tendus. Il se peut qu'une minoterie manque un matin la livraison à une grande entreprise de boulangerie, mais qu'elle puisse néanmoins assurer la livraison de l'après-midi. Or, le concept de livraison à flux tendus va au-delà de ce cas de figure.

Les produits frais, qui représentent une part importante de la consommation, ont en effet une très courte durée de vie. Les établissements de transformation fabriquent des produits emballés dans des quantités énormes par rapport aux produits ayant une longue durée de conservation, qui, eux, ont une durée de conservation très courte, de quelques jours seulement. Tout va donc dépendre du marché desservi, le marché de détail ou celui des services alimentaires.

Je vais m'en tenir à cela. Je vous remercie.

M. Martin Shields:

Ce point me paraît très important.

Vous avez, vous, producteurs de canola, évoqué la question des infrastructures et des wagons de chemin de fer. Dans la région que je représente, on entend souvent parler de wagons de céréales traversant les parcs nationaux, et du besoin de renouveler le matériel afin de ne plus répandre sur les voies une partie de la cargaison. Il est fréquent qu'on me parle de cela, mais ce n'est pas de cela qu'il s'agit.

M. Steve Pratte:

Si, c'est bien de cela qu'il s'agit, et hier nous avons brièvement évoqué l'âge du parc de wagons de chemin de fer, qui regroupe les wagons appartenant au gouvernement fédéral et les wagons appartenant aux provinces de l'Alberta et de la Saskatchewan. Ces wagons sont entrés en service au milieu des années 1970 et au début des années 1980. On leur prêtait au départ une durée de vie de 40 ans. Ce n'est pas la compagnie qui en a décidé ainsi, mais il existe des normes ferroviaires internationales qu'il nous faut respecter, étant donné que les wagons franchissent le 49e parallèle. En vertu d'un accord de fonctionnement sur le transport des céréales canadiennes conclu en 2007 avec les deux sociétés de chemin de fer de catégorie 1, on a allongé de 10 ans la vie utile de ces wagons. Or, ces wagons vont bientôt avoir 50 ans et le matériel roulant actuellement en service ne répond plus aux normes de conception et de capacité utile du matériel moderne. On constate, par exemple, que les panneaux ouvrables qui se trouvent au bas des trémies commencent à... Il arrive que l'on refuse des livraisons assurées par des wagons qui éprouvent des défaillances mécaniques. Il arrive que les céréales se répandent sur les voies après s'être échappées par les panneaux ouvrables qui fonctionnent par gravité.

M. Martin Shields:

Vous n'avez pas parlé de l'interconnexion à longue distance.

M. Steve Pratte:

En effet. Les producteurs s'en remettent en cela aux expéditeurs et les témoignages que vous ont livrés hier leurs représentants vous ont permis de connaître leur point de vue sur la question. Je dis cela car, comme M. Froese le disait, et étant donné la manière dont notre secteur d'activité est structuré, tout ce qui est avantageux pour les expéditeurs, ce qui leur permet d'assurer la fluidité des transports, ce qui leur donne accès aux marchés et leur permet d'affronter la concurrence, doit, théoriquement, être en même temps dans l'intérêt économique du producteur.

M. Martin Shields:

Tout est donc fonction des résultats obtenus, est-ce bien cela?

M. Steve Pratte:

C'est exact.

M. Gordon Harrison:

En ce qui concerne la longue distance, nous avons été déçus que les prix d'interconnexion n'aient pas été augmentés et c'est l'avis que vous ont exprimé plusieurs autres intervenants. J'en suis certain, car j'ai pris connaissance de plusieurs mémoires allant dans ce sens. Certains ont également fait remarquer que l'accès aux droits d'interconnexion à longue distance est soumis à certaines conditions. Nous partageons l'avis de ceux qui recommandent le retrait de ces conditions. Ceux qui vont désormais se voir refuser l'accès au régime élargi d'interconnexion devraient pouvoir, au choix, avoir accès à l'interconnexion à longue distance pour les raisons qui justifient l'existence de ce mécanisme, et ne pas avoir à se plier préalablement à des exigences de l'Office en matière de vérification.

Je vous remercie.

M. Martin Shields:

Que pensez-vous des zones d'exclusion?

M. François Tougas:

D'autres ont eu l'occasion de vous dire que la solution que constituent ces zones d'exclusion ne se justifie que dans la mesure où elle est utile au groupe qui, selon mon collègue, devrait pouvoir bénéficier de l'interconnexion à longue distance, c'est-à-dire le groupe qui avait avant cela accès aux zones d'interconnexion élargies. Mais voici la difficulté que cela pose. Je vais vous citer, très rapidement, un exemple de ce que cela donne. Imaginez un expéditeur qui souhaite accéder à une zone où il n'y a, entre le point de départ et la zone à laquelle l'expéditeur souhaite accéder, qu'un seul noeud de correspondance. Disons que l'expéditeur se trouve au nord de Kamloops en Colombie-Britannique, et qu'il souhaite se rendre à Vancouver. Il n'existe, en effet, qu'un seul noeud de correspondance, situé en l'occurrence à Kamloops. Or, ce point se trouve en dehors de la zone. C'est dire que les expéditeurs du nord de la Colombie-Britannique sont exclus du mécanisme d'interconnexion à longue distance. Le même problème se pose dans le corridor Québec-Windsor.

Le problème ne se pose donc pas essentiellement au plan de la concurrence au sein du corridor — car la concurrence, effectivement, s'exerce et c'est très bien ainsi —, mais le problème se situe au niveau de l'accès au corridor pour les personnes qui se trouvent en dehors. Il conviendrait donc, selon moi, de supprimer entièrement les actuelles restrictions géographiques. Nous devrions supprimer en même temps certaines autres restrictions. Pourquoi rendre aussi difficile l'accès à ce mécanisme? Cela me semble en effet être sensiblement plus difficile que ne l'est l'accès au mécanisme du prix de ligne concurrentiel et c'est bien pour cela que personne n'y recourt. Il y aurait lieu de réformer le mécanisme de taux qui s'y rattache. C'est comme cela que je réglerais la question de l'interconnexion à longue distance.

(1455)

La présidente:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur Harrison, vous avez rappelé à plusieurs reprises que dans la mesure où votre système fonctionne à flux tendus, les livraisons doivent elles aussi être effectuées à flux tendus. Vous avez rappelé les problèmes qui se sont posés en 2013-2014. Nous avons dû faire face à des conditions tout à fait extraordinaires, avec un hiver très dur, alors même que les producteurs des Prairies se trouvaient devant une récolte exceptionnelle dont ils souhaitaient assurer le transport. À part la période 2013-2014, vos adhérents éprouvent-ils souvent des difficultés au niveau des livraisons à flux tendus?

M. Gordon Harrison:

Cela n'arrive pas souvent, non, mais cela arrive. Vous soulevez là un point très important. Nous allons, désormais, avoir chaque année une récolte exceptionnelle, et nous allons beaucoup plus souvent qu'avant éprouver des hivers bizarres. C'est ce que nous montre l'expérience de ces dernières années et, en matière de service, la demande va donc augmenter. Or, la prévisibilité revêt pour nous une importance extrême.

Permettez-moi de revenir un moment à la question des livraisons en flux tendus. Cela vaut pour la minoterie qui peut ainsi répondre aux besoins des clients, mais cela ne vaut pas pour les entreprises de transformation à qui l'on doit en effet largement livrer à l'avance des céréales de telle et telle qualité, de telle et telle sorte, et de telle et telle teneur en protéines.

J'espère que personne ne voit dans les livraisons à flux tendus une règle d'airain, mais en ce qui concerne les minoteries, c'est effectivement la règle.

M. Ken Hardie:

Combien de vos entreprises se sont-elles retrouvées en rade suite à l'abandon d'une ligne de chemin de fer?

M. Gordon Harrison:

En fait, elles ont été très peu nombreuses. La plupart des minoteries installées depuis un certain temps sont situées près des centres de population et non en zone rurale. Cela est vrai de la plupart des minoteries de l'est de l'Amérique du Nord.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je regrette d'avoir à vous interrompre, mais j'aurais, comme d'habitude, d'autres questions à poser.

Les expéditeurs et les entreprises de chemin de fer semblent s'entendre comme chien et chat. Mais que se passe-t-il au niveau de la direction des chemins de fer? Vous n'êtes donc pas représentés au sein des conseils d'administration?

M. Gordon Harrison:

C'est à moi que vous posez la question?

M. Ken Hardie:

Demandons d'abord à Jack de répondre.

M. Jack Froese:

Non, pas vraiment. Nous avons organisé de nombreuses conférences et autres réunions, mais les représentants des chemins de fer n'y ont jamais pris part. Permettez-moi de vous citer un exemple concernant les accords de niveau de service. Disons que notre silo élévateur est averti de l'arrivée d'un train-bloc. Il ne se procurera les céréales voulues que quelques heures avant l'arrivée du train. On dispose d'un délai de 48 heures. Selon l'accord conclu, le train doit être chargé dans les 48 heures. C'est dire que la quantité de grain voulue va devoir être réunie peu avant l'expiration de ce délai afin de ne pas remplir le silo avec du grain dont le transport ne pourra pas être assuré si le train n'arrive pas comme prévu.

Or, lorsque le train arrive effectivement, il est chargé dans les 48 heures, mais il se peut que ce train reste après cela toute une semaine sur place.

M. Ken Hardie:

On a déjà entendu parler de cela, mais de tels incidents sont-ils portés à l'attention des responsables de ces diverses opérations, à l'attention des dirigeants des entreprises de chemin de fer, des décideurs afin d'influer sur la manière dont les chemins de fer gèrent leurs opérations? Je vois que cette question vous laisse un peu perplexe.

(1500)

M. Gordon Harrison:

Dans le temps, les sociétés de chemin de fer étaient elles-mêmes propriétaires de grosses sociétés meunières. Je viens de revenir de notre conférence annuelle qui s'est tenue dans un hôtel qui appartenait autrefois en partie aux chemins de fer. Mais ce genre d'entreprise intégrée a disparu depuis de nombreuses décennies.

Je viens de participer à une réunion à laquelle, pour la première fois dans mes 28 ans de carrière, des représentants des chemins de fer n'ont pas participé. Ce n'est pas parce que nous nous faisons actuellement la guerre. Si c'est arrivé comme cela, c'est simplement parce que nos organisations poursuivent des objectifs très différents. Non, les entreprises de transformation n'étaient pas non plus représentées.

J'ajoute qu'aux termes de la législation fédérale, l'industrie céréalière est déclarée être pour l'avantage général du Canada, tout comme le sont les chemins de fer aux termes de la loi. Nous sommes depuis un siècle reconnus comme étant un producteur essentiel de biens, et depuis plus d'un siècle les chemins de fer sont reconnus comme fournisseurs essentiels de ces matières premières. C'est un fait. Mais non, je crois savoir que nous n'y sommes pas directement représentés.

M. Ken Hardie:

Quand nous avons étudié le projet de loi C-30, la Loi sur le transport ferroviaire équitable pour les producteurs de grain, bon nombre des interventions que nous avons recueillies au sujet de l’interconnexion portaient essentiellement sur l’accès à la Burlington Northern Santa Fe et sur la nécessité d’assurer un transport efficace des céréales.

Vous disiez tout à l’heure, monsieur Tougas, que dans ces zones d’exclusion, de Québec à Windsor et de Kamloops à Vancouver... et c’est là que la lumière s’est faite dans mon esprit. Ce que l’ILD est censée faire et qu’elle ne fait peut-être pas, ce n’est pas vraiment de donner accès à la Burlington Northern Santa Fe, mais plutôt de stimuler la concurrence entre les deux compagnies de chemin de fer du Canada.

M. François Tougas:

Oui, c’est certainement l’un des objectifs. J’ai dû dire que, considérant la nature même des zones d’exclusion, cela contribue à éliminer la concurrence qui pourrait exister entre le CN et le CP.

En fait, l’ILD repose sur l’idée que le tarif est fixé pour la section d’origine menant à la connexion avec le transporteur. Dans ces zones... Reprenons l’exemple de Kamloops. Si vous allez vers l’ouest, vous pouvez arriver à Kamloops par le CN ou par le CP. Si vous voulez transférer à l’autre compagnie, c’est elle qui sera le transporteur de connexion. Il n’y a là-bas qu’un seul transporteur de connexion, qui n’est pas le même que le transporteur d’origine.

Au Québec, dans le corridor Québec-Windsor, vous avez les deux mêmes compagnies de chemin de fer qui se font essentiellement concurrence pour attirer la clientèle mais, si vous êtes dans les Maritimes ou dans le nord du Québec, vous n’avez que le CN, le CN et encore le CN. Il n’y a pas d’autre choix.

Si les compagnies de chemin de fer américaines peuvent entrer dans le système de l’ILD, ce sera positif. Je ne partage pas les craintes de ceux qui s’inquiètent du trafic que la BN pourrait obtenir de cette manière. Vous connaissez déjà la réponse. Combien de wagons ont réellement circulé grâce à l’interconnexion élargie? Le chiffre est minuscule. C’est le propre témoin du CN qui l’a reconnu, n’est-ce pas? Le nombre n’est absolument pas élevé et je ne crois donc pas que c’est un « problème catastrophique ».

En outre, si cela doit devenir un problème, tant mieux, car cela signifiera qu’il y a vraiment de la concurrence dans le système, ce qui sera un gain plutôt qu’une perte.

La présidente:

Madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vais poursuivre sur le même sujet, mais en l’abordant peut-être d’un point de vue légèrement différent. J’ai deux questions à vous poser.

Premièrement, quels recours auraient les expéditeurs américains, à part l’obtention de données?

Deuxièmement, et cette question a déjà été soulevée cette semaine par l’un de mes collègues, est-ce que notre gouvernement devrait faire du transport l’une de ses priorités dans les négociations de l’ALENA? Ces négociations sont en cours et nous discutons de questions de transport. Or, le transport est étroitement relié au commerce et nous savons que les négociations reprendront au Canada à la fin de la semaine prochaine.

Pourriez-vous répondre à mes deux questions?

M. François Tougas:

En ce qui concerne la deuxième, c’est-à-dire la priorité du transport dans les négociations, je ne pense pas que le but principal de l’ALENA, ou même l’un de ses buts importants, soit d’harmoniser nos politiques et systèmes de transport ferroviaire. Ils sont extrêmement différents. Je pense que ce serait un but incroyablement difficile à atteindre, surtout dans le contexte actuel. Je crois que nous avons suffisamment de problèmes à résoudre chez nous, et ma priorité serait d’essayer d’abord de résoudre nos propres difficultés en matière de transport ferroviaire. Nous en avons une pléthore, et j’en ai même fait une carrière! Je dépends de ces problèmes, tout comme mes enfants.

Pour ce qui est de votre première question, concernant les recours possibles pour les transporteurs américains, je pense que les expéditeurs américains vous diraient qu’ils seraient tout à fait ravis d’obtenir l’arbitrage des offres finales. C’est ce qu’ils souhaiteraient. Ils étudient sérieusement la question depuis plusieurs années. Ils n’ont pas cette solution. Ils ont un système complètement différent. Ils ont accès à un mécanisme de tarif raisonnable devant le Surface Transportation Board, et ils s’en servent. Leur système est plus un système de règles que le nôtre, et c’est le recours dont ils disposent.

Ils ont toutes ces données, et ils ont aussi une autre chose. Le Mississippi en est un parfait exemple. J’ai entendu lundi les transporteurs ferroviaires parler de toute cette prétendue concurrence qu’il y a maintenant au Canada. Au fait, au cas où ils ne le sauraient pas, je précise qu’il n’y a pas de fleuve entre Vancouver et les Prairies, ce qui veut dire qu’ils n’ont pas de concurrence fluviale. Au Mississippi, les sept compagnies de chemin de fer de catégorie 1 longent le fleuve et doivent donc faire face à la concurrence du transport fluvial, en plus de celle du camionnage. C’est un environnement très concurrentiel. C’est à ça que ressemble un environnement dans lequel il y a beaucoup de transporteurs. C’est ça la réalité. Au Canada, nous avons une géographie très variée, sur le plan topographique et du fait de l’éloignement des industries. Nous avons donc absolument besoin d’un système adapté à cette situation.

Je vais reprendre l’exemple de l’ILD en disant que, si vous voulez offrir un recours efficace aux gens qui sont éloignés, aux producteurs qui sont loin des grands centres — ce qui est particulièrement le cas des producteurs de ressources naturelles et des producteurs de céréales —, ils sont tellement éloignés qu’ils ont besoin d’une solution vraiment efficace, parce que n’allons pas créer de nouvelles compagnies de chemin de fer avant longtemps, alors nous sommes bien obligés de faire avec le système que nous avons maintenant.

Pour en revenir à la question des lignes courtes, il est très difficile d’aménager de nouvelles infrastructures. Les abandonner serait une erreur monumentale. Chaque fois qu’on a la possibilité de préserver une infrastructure, je pense qu’on doit le faire. Je ne sais pas si on devrait aller jusqu’à subventionner toute cette activité; il faudrait poser la question à quelqu’un de plus éclairé que moi sur ce sujet. Je suis par contre totalement convaincu que nous devrions veiller à ce que les recours que nous avons à notre disposition pour notre infrastructure soient accessibles et viables pour les expéditeurs. On vous a également dit un peu plutôt que personne ne se précipite pour faire ça. Nous n’avons pas de hordes d’expéditeurs qui attendent leur tour pour avoir accès aux recours. C’est généralement la dernière chose qu’ils souhaitent faire car, quand ils invoquent un recours, c’est parce qu’ils ont épuisé d’autres solutions et il faut que ce soit efficace.

(1505)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame le présidente.

J'aimerais reprendre la conversation avec M. Tougas.

Il me semble que vous avez déboulonné en douce un mythe, lors de vos propos préliminaires, et je voudrais m'assurer d'avoir bien compris.

Vous dites que nous ne sommes pas dans un processus d'harmonisation du système américain et du système canadien. Tout au plus, le projet de loi C-49 nous permet de nous comparer à ce qui se fait aux États-Unis, et j'en comprends que ce n'est pas nécessairement de façon gagnante.

Était-ce bien le sens de vos propos? [Traduction]

M. François Tougas:

Je répondrai en vous disant que, même si nos systèmes sont très différents, lorsque nous avons la possibilité de copier de meilleurs systèmes existant ailleurs, nous ne devrions pas hésiter à le faire. S’il existe un meilleur système ailleurs, copions-le. Actuellement, ils ont un meilleur système de divulgation des données que nous. Il n’est pas exceptionnel mais il est meilleur que le nôtre. Nous devrions le copier et l’adapter afin de pouvoir l’utiliser dans notre contexte. L’adopter complètement, tel quel, ne serait pas très utile. Mais ne pas l’adopter totalement serait une solution pire que de n’en adopter qu’une partie. Par exemple, nous n’avons pas adopté la liste des denrées. On n’est pas obligé de fournir des données sur les denrées. Quel intérêt y a-t-il à savoir que tous les wagons à trémies circulent à une certaine vitesse pendant une semaine donnée? C’est l’une des informations qui seront communiquées. Qui cela peut-il intéresser? On a besoin de le savoir corridor par corridor. On en a besoin compagnie par compagnie. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je pense que cela confirme ce que je pensais.

Si vous me le permettez, je vais vous faire un léger reproche, bien amicalement. Dans vos propos, vous avez répondu à la question qui vous a été posée par je ne sais trop qui — cela ne semble pas être quelqu'un autour de la table — vous demandant auquel de vos amendements vous accorderiez la priorité. Ce faisant, vous avez rapetissé l'assiette dans laquelle on peut jouer.

Avez-vous accepté de le faire parce que c'est vraiment la priorité, ou les recommandations que vous avez soumises forment-elles un ensemble cohérent qui nous permettrait de devenir un chef de file plutôt qu'une pâle copie?

(1510)

[Traduction]

M. François Tougas:

Mes recommandations ne sont pas toutes intégrées. Vous pouvez en laisser une de côté et les autres fonctionneront quand même. Elles ne sont pas à prendre en bloc. Je les ai classées par ordre de priorité parce que certaines personnes, mais aucune de ce Comité, sont venues me voir en me disant: si l’on ne pouvait en accepter qu’une seule, laquelle devrait-on choisir?

J’ai dit laquelle ce devrait être parce que je l’ai sous les yeux. Nous avons actuellement un projet de loi concernant essentiellement l’interconnexion de longue distance. S’il est adopté sous sa forme actuelle après modification, l’autre recours qui sera utilisé sera l’arbitrage des offres finales. Il n’y a qu’un seul recours en matière de tarifs, et c’est l’arbitrage des offres finales. Il n’y en a pas d’autres. Si l’on ne répare pas le système d’interconnexion de longue distance, on devra s’assurer que le système de l’arbitrage des offres finales fonctionne mieux qu’actuellement. C’est tout ce que je peux vous dire. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Nous venons de terminer le premier tour et il nous reste quelques minutes. Quelqu’un de ce côté-ci a-t-il encore des questions pertinentes à poser?

Dans ce cas, je me tourne de l’autre côté. Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je ne sais pas si quelqu’un sera en mesure de répondre à cette question. S’agissant de nos deux compagnies nationales, le CN et le CP, à la différence des compagnies américaines, elles traversent la frontière et assurent des liaisons sur une grande partie du territoire américain. Je ne peux m’empêcher de me demander s’il y a des choses qu’elles font aux États-Unis qui désavantagent d’une certaine manière leurs activités au Canada. Est-ce qu’elles bénéficient d’une certaine préférence pour pouvoir aller aux États-Unis, ce qui pourrait nuire à nos intérêts au Canada?

Si vous n’en avez pas la moindre idée, je ne vous demande pas de spéculer sur ce sujet. Je laisse simplement la question en suspens.

Une voix: C’est une très bonne question.

M. François Tougas:

Je dois admettre, à mon grand regret, que je n’ai pas la réponse à cette question. Il est rare que je n’aie pas un avis sur un sujet donné mais c’est le cas maintenant.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

La présidente:

Voilà, c’est tout. Vous avez été d’excellents témoins.

Je ne voudrais pas avoir à faire un classement, parce que vous nous avez tous donné de très bonnes informations. Merci beaucoup.

Je vais maintenant suspendre la séance avant d’accueillir les témoins suivants.

(1510)

(1525)

La présidente:

J’invite tous les députés à reprendre leur place. Merci.

Je souhaite la bienvenue aux témoins suivants. Nous sommes très heureux de vous accueillir et nous allons écouter avec beaucoup d’attention ce que vous avez à dire sur le projet de loi C-49.

Nous accueillons maintenant le syndicat international des marins canadiens. Monsieur Given, voulez-vous commencer?

M. James Given (président, Syndicat international des marins canadiens):

Merci, madame la présidente. Je remercie les membres du Comité de nous avoir invités à comparaître aujourd’hui.

Je m’appelle Jim Given. Je suis président du Syndicat international des marins canadiens et je préside aussi le groupe de travail mondial sur le cabotage de la Fédération internationale des ouvriers du transport.

Notre syndicat est préoccupé par les modifications proposées à la Loi sur le cabotage, qui s’inspirent des modifications apportées à cette loi par le truchement de la Loi portant mise en œuvre de l’AECG, le projet de loi C-30. Elles permettront pour la première fois à des navires étrangers de pratiquer le cabotage maritime sans avoir à obtenir de dérogation à la réglementation du cabotage.

En vertu de la Loi sur le cabotage, aucun navire étranger ou navire non dédouané ne peut exercer une activité maritime à caractère commercial dans les eaux canadiennes, ce qui est réservé à des navires battant pavillon canadien, y compris pour le transport de marchandises et de passagers par bateau entre deux points situés au Canada. Dans le régime actuel, un navire étranger peut être importé au Canada pour pratiquer du cabotage si l’Office des transports du Canada détermine, sur demande, qu’aucun navire battant pavillon canadien ou utilisant un équipage canadien n’est disponible ou adéquat pour l’activité souhaitée.

Les modifications proposées à la Loi sur le cabotage par le truchement du projet de loi C-30 autoriseront désormais les navires étrangers appartenant à des citoyens de l’Union européenne ou battant le pavillon d’un État membre de l’Union européenne à exercer les activités de cabotage suivantes sans dérogation: transporter des conteneurs vides entre deux ports canadiens, faire du dragage, et transporter des marchandises entre les ports de Halifax et de Montréal en vue de leur importation au Canada ou de leur exportation du Canada.

En outre, le paragraphe 70(1) du projet de loi C-49 modifiera encore plus la Loi sur le cabotage puisqu’il permettra à n’importe quel navire étranger, quel que soit son pavillon, d’exécuter le repositionnement de conteneurs vides entre des ports canadiens sans obtenir de licence de cabotage.

En qualité de syndicat représentant les marins canadiens œuvrant dans le secteur du transport maritime canadien, le SIU ne saurait approuver ces amendements qui auront pour effet de saper directement la législation destinée à soutenir l’industrie canadienne du transport maritime et les armateurs canadiens.

Nous réclamons vigoureusement le maintien du système actuel de dérogation, qui permet déjà aux navires étrangers de demander une dérogation de cabotage. Ce système accorde aux armateurs canadiens qui emploient des marins canadiens le droit de premier refus de tout travail disponible, ce qui est une pratique équitable.

Le SIU a déjà dit que le fait d’accorder des droits de cabotage à l’Union européenne par le truchement de l’AECG était une concession qui n’était pas nécessaire et qui risquait de nuire à l’industrie canadienne du transport maritime.

Le Canada a déjà une version libéralisée du cabotage maritime, et tout assouplissement de ses restrictions, notamment concernant le dragage et les services d’apport entre des ports canadiens, ne bénéficiera ni aux armateurs ni aux marins canadiens qui dépendent d’un marché du travail et d’un réseau commercial canadiens compétitifs pour gagner leur vie.

Il faut ajouter à ces problèmes des concessions particulières qui accordent aux navires de premier et deuxième registre l’accès au marché canadien. Comme l’a annoncé le ministre Garneau, l’amendement proposé pour permettre le transport de conteneurs vides par n’importe quel navire, quel que soit son pavillon, a été réclamé par une fédération de transport maritime du Canada qui ne représente que très peu de transporteurs maritimes battant pavillon canadien, voire aucun. Bien que le SIU ne représente pas les armateurs canadiens, nous déplorons que la majorité des propositions et des préoccupations des armateurs et des marins canadiens semblent avoir été purement et simplement laissées de côté au profit d’une organisation représentant des agents maritimes mondiaux au Canada.

L’industrie canadienne du transport maritime est une source d’emplois directs et indirects pour plus de 100 000 personnes. Quand on parle du transport maritime mondial, il faut bien comprendre que le registre des navires canadiens, ou premier registre canadien, est beaucoup plus avancé en termes de conditions de travail et d’exigences que ceux de la majorité des États participant au transport maritime mondial. Le transport maritime mondial est un secteur extrêmement déréglementé, dans lequel les conditions de travail et de salaire n’ont cessé de se détériorer au cours des années. Par exemple, un certain nombre de navires de premier registre et un grand nombre de navires de second registre sont qualifiés par l’ITF, la Fédération internationale des ouvriers du transport, de navires opérant sous pavillon de complaisance. Autrement dit, ils opèrent avec un équipage sous-payé et sous-représenté, composé essentiellement de marins du tiers-monde travaillant dans des conditions dangereuses et peu réglementées, voire pas du tout.

Au Canada, en cas d’accident maritime impliquant un navire opérant sous un pavillon de complaisance, il faut parfois des mois, si ce n’est des années, pour retracer son vrai propriétaire afin de commencer le processus de réclamation d’indemnités, processus qui, nous le savons d’expérience, n’aboutit jamais.

Les navires de second registre sont tellement peu réglementés que ceux qui sont immatriculés dans un second registre d’un pays de l’Union européenne ne sont même pas autorisés à faire du cabotage dans leur propre pays d’immatriculation. Autoriser un navire de second registre à faire du cabotage dans un autre pays que son pays d’origine n’est pas une pratique courante et certainement pas une pratique que le Canada devrait envisager d’inaugurer.

(1530)



Cela constitue un enjeu mondial qui n’a pas encore été examiné de manière suffisante et acceptable pour assurer la sécurité et le bien-être de tous les marins. Autoriser ce genre d’activité maritime, sans aucune restriction, au sein de l’industrie du transport maritime du Canada serait un acte sans précédent. Le SIU du Canada œuvre avec beaucoup de détermination pour protéger les droits de tous les marins travaillant au Canada. Nous continuerons d’œuvrer avec diligence pour veiller à ce que tout navire étranger entrant au Canada pour y pratiquer du cabotage respecte rigoureusement les normes fédérales du travail, et pour assurer que les équipages étrangers sont rémunérés aux tarifs en vigueur dans notre industrie, comme le prévoit le programme des travailleurs étrangers temporaires.

La surveillance des navires étrangers opérant au Canada est un sujet qui continue de nous préoccuper. Il va falloir absolument mettre en œuvre un régime efficace de surveillance et d’exécution pour assurer le respect rigoureux des conditions et exigences des nouvelles dispositions d’accès au marché de la Loi sur le cabotage. Si nous voulons que les participants nationaux de l’industrie restent compétitifs, il convient d’instaurer un système garantissant que les opérateurs étrangers respectent rigoureusement les règles et normes canadiennes, notamment les normes du travail et les conditions de salaire qui prévalent au Canada, et non pas dans l’État du pavillon étranger.

Je répète que la priorité du SIU est de veiller à ce que les travailleurs canadiens aient des possibilités d’emploi dans l’industrie canadienne du transport maritime. Nous croyons que les modifications proposées à la Loi sur le cabotage par le truchement du projet de loi C-49 vont entraver le maintien des restrictions du cabotage qui servent actuellement à protéger le transport maritime canadien, à stimuler notre commerce et à préserver un bassin adéquat de marins canadiens qualifiés. Bien que la préservation des emplois des marins canadiens soit le mandat primordial du SIU, nous avons aussi la responsabilité de veiller à ce que tous les marins, aussi bien canadiens qu’étrangers, soient traités correctement. Les marins canadiens ont la réputation internationale d’être les ouvriers les mieux formés et les plus qualifiés au monde. Par conséquent, les marins canadiens et les armateurs canadiens devraient conserver le droit de premier refus de participer aux activités maritimes intérieures, avant que des exploitants étrangers y aient accès.

Nous restons déterminés à œuvrer avec nos partenaires du gouvernement pour mettre en œuvre une solution réaliste et acceptable face à l’expansion continue de l’activité commerciale dans les ports canadiens. Nous croyons que le Canada peut réaliser ses ambitions en matière de commerce international en mettant en œuvre une politique solide du transport maritime intérieur qui ne donne pas aux armateurs étrangers un accès illimité à notre marché. En l’absence d’une flotte canadienne solide, dotée d’équipages canadiens, notre pays deviendra tributaire d’armateurs étrangers pour acheminer des marchandises sur son territoire et pour en assurer le transport à l’intérieur de ses frontières, sans aucune garantie d’un service ininterrompu.

Au nom du syndicat international des marins canadiens, je remercie à nouveau votre Comité de nous avoir invités à témoigner. Permettez-moi de dire en conclusion que le fait que nous soyons assis à cette table constitue pour nous un changement que nous apprécions beaucoup et dont nous vous remercions sincèrement.

(1535)

La présidente:

Il n’y a pas de quoi.

Je donne maintenant la parole à Mme Clark de Fraser River Pile & Dredge.

Mme Sarah Clark (directrice générale, Fraser River Pile & Dredge (GP) Inc.):

Merci.

Bonjour. Je m’appelle Sarah Clark et je suis présidente et directrice générale de la société Fraser River Pile & Dredge, de Vancouver, en Colombie-Britannique. Notre société effectue des opérations de dragage à l’échelle de la province et du pays tout entier. Permettez-moi de remercier d’emblée la présidente et les membres du Comité de nous avoir invités à témoigner aujourd’hui.

Je m’adresse à vous au nom d’une coalition de sociétés de dragage de tout le pays et je partagerai mon temps de parole avec mon ami et collègue Jean-Philippe Brunet, président-directeur des affaires corporatives et juridiques du Groupe Océan, de Québec. Nous vous remercions sincèrement de nous donner l’occasion de présenter notre point de vue sur les modifications proposées à la Loi sur le cabotage, par le truchement du projet de loi C-49. C’est pour nous une nouvelle occasion de donner notre point de vue sur l’impact des modifications apportées à la Loi sur le cabotage, comme nous l’avions fait au sujet du projet de loi C-30, Loi portant mise en œuvre de l’Accord économique et commercial entre le Canada et l’Union européenne.

Permettez-moi de dire d’emblée que les sociétés canadiennes de dragage sont tout à fait disposées à faire face à la concurrence sur un marché caractérisé par de saines relations commerciales. Nous demandons simplement de pouvoir continuer à le faire sur un pied d’égalité, au sein d’un marché où les risques et les opportunités sont les mêmes pour tous. Malheureusement, l’AECG a été un mauvais accord pour les sociétés de dragage canadiennes. Il facilite l’accès des Européens au marché canadien, mais ne comporte aucune réciprocité pour nous sur le marché européen. C’est pourquoi nous affirmons que le projet de loi C-49 nous offre une excellente occasion de corriger cette injustice et de mettre en œuvre une nouvelle politique adéquate.

Permettez-moi de dire quelques mots sur l’industrie du dragage au Canada et sur le rôle crucial qu’elle joue dans notre nation maritime et commerciale. Notre pays est extrêmement vaste et exige un réseau de transport complexe pour assurer la bonne circulation des personnes et des marchandises. Comme le disait le ministre Garneau le 16 mai dernier, les Canadiens doivent pouvoir compter sur des moyens de transport économiquement viables pour se déplacer et assurer le transport de leurs marchandises à l’intérieur du pays, au-delà des frontières et outre-mer. Lorsqu’il a annoncé le lancement de l’initiative des corridors de transport, le 4 juillet, le ministre Garneau n’a pas manqué de dire que le dragage des ports en eau profonde était crucial pour le développement du Nord canadien, et il a souligné le rôle essentiel que joue l’industrie du dragage dans le développement de notre réseau de transport et, partant, de notre souveraineté nationale et économique.

Ouvrir des voies aux navires canadiens et internationaux permet d’acheminer des biens de consommation sur les marchés canadiens et permet d’exporter nos propres produits dans le monde entier. Sans le dragage, les ports de nos grandes villes seraient inaccessibles au commerce et aux transports mondiaux. Les activités de nos industries, à la fois sur nos côtes et à l’intérieur du pays, seraient impossibles. Les sociétés composant notre coalition respectent strictement les règlements rigoureux du gouvernement concernant le travail, la protection environnementale, la sécurité et les normes opérationnelles en se soumettant régulièrement à des inspections de routine approfondies qui sont parmi les plus poussées au monde. Les sociétés canadiennes de dragage payent également de bons salaires, des salaires de classe moyenne, qui contribuent à la prospérité des économies locales de l’ensemble du pays.

Nous nous adressons à vous aujourd’hui pour faire notre part afin de garantir que l’industrie canadienne du dragage puisse faire face à la concurrence sur un pied d’égalité, de manière durable et responsable, créer toujours plus d’emplois et continuer à contribuer au succès économique du pays. Malheureusement, ces objectifs importants sont menacés par les amendements proposés à la Loi sur le cabotage dans le projet de loi C-49. Évidemment, ces amendements dépendent de l’entrée en vigueur du projet de loi C-30 le 21 septembre 2017. Nous comprenons que ces propositions reflètent le désir des instances gouvernementales et des populations d’établir des liens économiques plus solides et d’assurer un avenir plus prospère. Nous appuyons les efforts déployés par le gouvernement pour développer notre commerce international et rendre notre économie aussi dynamique que possible. Toutefois, cela ne doit pas nous empêcher d’exprimer nos préoccupations au sujet de l’impact négatif qu’auront, selon nous, les amendements à la Loi sur le cabotage proposés dans le projet de loi C-30, car ils offrent un avantage inéquitable aux sociétés de dragage étrangères, aux dépens des sociétés canadiennes, des travailleurs canadiens et de l’infrastructure de transport du Canada. Le projet de loi C-49 repose sur des principes établis dans le projet de loi C-30 qui sont extrêmement problématiques pour les sociétés canadiennes de dragage.

Comme je l’ai dit, nous sommes tout à fait prêts à faire face à la concurrence. Nous le faisons déjà quotidiennement dans notre secteur, aussi bien au Canada qu’à l’étranger. Il n’y a dans l’AECG aucune réciprocité négociée pour notre industrie.

(1540)



L'AECG ouvre le marché canadien aux entreprises européennes, tout en maintenant le marché européen fermé aux entreprises de dragage canadiennes. En temps normal, on pourrait considérer cela comme une conséquence désagréable de faire des affaires dans le marché mondial, mais plusieurs facteurs interviennent pour créer une situation où des entreprises non canadiennes pourraient avoir un avantage structurel et commercial par rapport aux entreprises canadiennes. Si des règles du jeu équitables ne sont pas appliquées, les sociétés canadiennes de dragage seront confrontées à un handicap structurel lorsqu'elles répondront à des appels d'offres puisqu'elles ont signé des accords qui les obligent à verser des salaires et des garanties équitables à leurs membres d'équipage.

Par exemple, les équipages étrangers reçoivent habituellement une rémunération qui équivaut à environ le tiers ou moins du salaire que nous versons. En 2015, le salaire mensuel moyen d'un chef mécanicien à bord d'un navire canadien était de 15 000 $US, tandis qu'un employé occupant le même poste sur un bateau hollandais recevait environ 7 000 $US. Étant donné que les salaires représentent environ le tiers des coûts d'exploitation de notre navire, les entreprises non canadiennes auront un important avantage au plan de l'exploitation par rapport aux sociétés canadiennes, qui se traduirait par des pertes d'emploi pour les marins canadiens. Selon un tel scénario, les règles du jeu sont totalement inégales, au détriment des entreprises canadiennes et, en fin de compte, de nos employés et leur famille.

Avant le projet de loi C-30, les navires battant pavillon étranger étaient tenus en vertu de la Loi sur le cabotage d'obtenir une licence de cabotage. Jim a très bien décrit ce processus dans son exposé, ce qui comprendrait le paiement de droits, le respect des conventions maritimes, des exigences en matière de visa pour les travailleurs et des normes d'emploi. Par contre, même cette structure a dû faire face à des défis en matière de surveillance et d'exécution de la loi. En vertu de l'AECG, les sociétés de dragage non canadiennes auront un plus grand accès à nos eaux et, par conséquent, une plus grande possibilité de ne pas se conformer à la réglementation.

Avant de formuler nos principales recommandations, je demanderais à mon collègue Jean-Philippe Brunet de dire quelques mots au sujet du Québec plus particulièrement. [Français]

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet (vice-président exécutif, Affaires corporatives et juridiques, Océan):

Bonjour.

Le marché du dragage au Québec est très petit. On parle d'environ 200 000 mètres cubes sur un total de 3 millions de mètres cubes au Canada. La saison pour faire le dragage est très courte, soit d'avril à juin et de septembre à novembre. Il n'y a pas beaucoup de contrats majeurs. Nous sommes plusieurs à nous faire concurrence pour obtenir ces contrats. Le plus gros contrat serait d'environ 50 000 mètres cubes. Ce sont les contrats que les Européens sont intéressés à obtenir. Ils ne sont pas intéressés par les petits contrats.

Cependant, ces contrats de 50 000 mètres cubes nous permettent d'amortir les équipements qui nécessitent beaucoup d'investissements et d'offrir des prix intéressants aux petites marinas.

Il faut comprendre que 80 % du marché mondial, à l'exception de la Chine et des États-Unis, est contrôlé par quatre dragueurs européens. Ils font la pluie et le beau temps un peu partout. Ils ont des capacités d'intervention très importantes.

Nous oeuvrons tout le long du fleuve Saint-Laurent. Nous allons aux petits et aux grands endroits. Nous offrons des emplois très avantageux à nos employés, leur permettant d'avoir une carrière très intéressante. Nous essayons aussi de développer le marché à l'étranger pour nous assurer de les employer toute l'année.

Merci. [Traduction]

Mme Sarah Clark:

Aujourd'hui, nous avons mis en évidence plusieurs questions associées aux modifications proposées à la Loi sur le cabotage qui ont été proposées et récemment adoptées. Cependant, nous ne comparaîtrions pas devant vous pour vous parler de problèmes si nous n'étions pas prêts à recommander des solutions qui, selon nous, sont raisonnables et justes pour tous.

Premièrement, nous demandons que votre comité recommande que le gouvernement établisse un protocole opérationnel d'exécution, sous la direction de Transports Canada, qui lie les sous-ministres de tous les ministères et organismes pertinents. Je tiens à le dire clairement, nous ne cherchons pas à obtenir la création d'un nouvel organisme d'exécution de la loi du gouvernement. Il ne serait pas prudent sur le plan financier ni nécessaire sur le plan organisationnel de le faire. Nous demandons tout simplement que le gouvernement prenne note du nombre et de la gravité des questions d'exécution de la loi en jeu lorsqu'il s'agit d'équipages étrangers ou de navires battant pavillon étranger. Il est question ici des travailleurs temporaires étrangers par l'entremise d'IRCC et de l'ASFC, d'une étude d'impact sur le marché du travail par l'entremise d'EDSC, de l'administration de l'impôt par le biais de l'ARC, d'inspections en matière de sécurité de la part de Transports Canada, de pratiques de travail par EDSC et de questions de santé et sécurité en milieu de travail par l'entremise d'EDSC, sans parler de disparité salariale et de pressions à cet égard.

Les ministères doivent se parler, et ils doivent collaborer rapidement et de façon significative afin de mettre en application un groupe de lois importantes qui s'entrecoupent. Il ne suffit pas d'avoir fait cette inspection du navire ou d'en contrôler la sécurité fondamentale. On nous donne l'assurance qu'un grand nombre des titulaires de postes à bord de nos navires feraient l'objet d'une vérification des visas pour les travailleurs temporaires étrangers. Pour contrôler tout cela, il faudra une coordination entre les ministères. Après deux années de démarches auprès du gouvernement, nous n'avons pas encore vu un seul plan d'action concret pour l'application de la loi. En ce moment, la coordination interministérielle n'est pas régie par un processus clair, qui manque de ressources et fait assumer par l'industrie et les travailleurs la responsabilité du maintien de l'ordre dans nos eaux. Pour nous, cela semble inacceptable de la part du Canada en tant que nation maritime commerçante moderne.

Deuxièmement, nous demandons que votre comité obtienne du gouvernement du Canada un engagement ferme en vertu duquel l'application de la loi sera financée de façon appropriée et significative pour faire en sorte que les sociétés de dragage canadiennes puissent faire concurrence en vertu de règles du jeu justes et équitables avec les navires étrangers, qu'il s'agisse...

(1545)

La présidente:

Madame Clark, je m'excuse de vous interrompre. Pourriez-vous clore? Nous avons dépassé le délai de 10 minutes qui vous était alloué.

Mme Sarah Clark:

Oui. Merci.

Notre dernière recommandation est que votre comité obtienne un engagement ferme de la part du gouvernement sous la forme d'un mandat officiel aux négociateurs canadiens de l'ALENA d'obtenir la réciprocité avec les États-Unis et le Mexique pour les sociétés canadiennes de dragage et les exploitants connexes.

Soyons clairs. À la suite de l'AECG, la viabilité fondamentale de l'industrie canadienne du dragage est vraiment ce qui est en jeu. La réciprocité est au cœur du libre-échange. Laissez le Canada être un champion de la réciprocité totale sur l'eau pour notre industrie, nos travailleurs et tous ceux qui cherchent à faire du Canada un chef de file mondial du commerce maritime et du dragage.

Nous vous remercions sincèrement de votre attention.

La présidente:

Merci, madame Clark.

Nous accueillons maintenant M. Fournier, des Armateurs du Saint-Laurent. [Français]

M. Martin Fournier (directeur général, Armateurs du Saint-Laurent):

Madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, je vous remercie de nous donner l'occasion de vous faire part de nos commentaires et préoccupations à l'égard du projet de loi C-49, et plus précisément à l'égard des modifications proposées à la Loi sur le cabotage.

Je me présente: je suis Martin Fournier, directeur général d'Armateurs du Saint-Laurent, une association qui a pour mission de représenter les armateurs nationaux et de promouvoir leurs intérêts afin de soutenir leur croissance et d'assurer le développement du transport maritime sur le fleuve Saint-Laurent.

Armateurs du Saint-Laurent regroupe 15 membres, c'est-à-dire 15 armateurs canadiens qui exploitent une flotte de plus de 130 navires sur lesquels travaillent des marins canadiens. La flotte navigue sur le fleuve Saint-Laurent, dans les Grands Lacs et sur la côte Est, en plus de desservir les provinces de l'Atlantique et l'Arctique. Nos membres procurent donc des emplois de qualité à des milliers de personnes et génèrent d'importantes retombées économiques au Canada.

Selon une étude du Conseil des académies canadiennes, le secteur canadien du transport maritime emploie entre 78 000 et 99 000 personnes et génère entre 3,7 et 4,6 milliards de dollars en revenus de travail. À elles seules, les activités de la flotte intérieure présente sur le fleuve Saint-Laurent et dans les Grands Lacs — c'est le secteur qui est généralement couvert par nos membres — créent plus de 44 000 emplois directs et génèrent plus de 2 milliards de dollars en revenus fiscaux provinciaux et fédéraux. L'industrie maritime intérieure joue donc un rôle essentiel pour la compétitivité et la prospérité du Canada et de l'ensemble de l'économie nord-américaine.

Il est important de mentionner que les activités de transport maritime entre les différents ports du Canada sont réalisées en vertu de la Loi sur le cabotage, qui vise notamment à soutenir les intérêts maritimes nationaux en réservant le cabotage canadien aux navires immatriculés au Canada. Cette information provient directement du site Internet de Transports Canada. La loi prévoit notamment que le transport entre deux ports canadiens doit être assuré par des navires battant pavillon canadien et ayant à leur bord des équipages canadiens.

Aux États-Unis, depuis 1920, le Merchant Marine Act, mieux connu sous le nom de Jones Act, protège l'industrie maritime intérieure américaine en s'assurant que le cabotage est effectué par des navires construits aux États-Unis, battant pavillon américain, détenus par des intérêts américains et ayant à leur bord des équipages américains. De nombreux autres pays dans le monde, notamment en Europe, ont des lois qui protègent leur marché.

Fait à noter, lors des négociations qui ont mené à l'accord économique avec l'Europe, les pays de l'Union européenne n'ont pas ouvert leur marché aux armateurs canadiens. Seul le Canada a accepté de concéder une partie de son marché, et ce, sans réciprocité.

Quand on ouvre son marché à des partenaires étrangers qui ne fonctionnent pas selon les mêmes règles et qui ne sont pas soumis aux mêmes exigences que les armateurs nationaux exploitant des navires sous pavillon canadien, on favorise les armateurs étrangers au détriment de la compétitivité même des armateurs d'ici et des intérêts nationaux.

Selon une étude réalisée en 2015 par Ernst & Young et Innovation maritime, les coûts des équipages pour les navires européens qui sont autorisés à être présents en eaux canadiennes en vertu de l'accord économique représentent seulement 30 % des coûts d'un équipage canadien. L'écart de rémunération entre les équipages canadiens et les équipages provenant d'autres pays, notamment ceux prévus dans le projet de loi C-49, va être encore plus grand.

En moins d'un an, c'est la deuxième fois que des modifications à la Loi sur le cabotage sont proposées. La première fois, c'était dans le cadre du projet de loi C-30 portant sur la mise en oeuvre de l'accord économique avec l'Europe. La seconde fois, c'est par ce projet de loi-ci, qui fait certaines concessions à l'Union européenne qui sont décriées par l'industrie maritime intérieure.

Le Canada doit lui aussi agir pour protéger son industrie maritime et refuser de céder son marché à des intérêts étrangers. Il en va de la vitalité et de la pérennité du transport maritime intérieur du Canada.

Je tiens à mentionner que, lors de la dernière campagne électorale, le Parti libéral nous avait écrit qu'il n'avait aucunement l'intention de toucher à la Loi sur le cabotage et reconnaissait même l'importance de la Loi pour le marché. Armateurs du Saint-Laurent considère que les accords de libre-échange sont, de façon générale, bénéfiques à l'économie canadienne et soutient les efforts du Canada pour accroître le commerce et la compétitivité de son économie. Nous sommes cependant inquiets quant aux conséquences des brèches qui sont faites dans la Loi sur le cabotage et des concessions touchant le secteur maritime intérieur accordées dans le cadre des négociations d'accords commerciaux.

Armateurs du Saint-Laurent et ses membres, de même que plusieurs intervenants et représentants de l'industrie qui ont participé aux travaux du groupe de travail gouvernement-industrie sur l'implantation de l'accord économique, ont à de nombreuses reprises exprimé leur inquiétude quant à l'efficacité du système et des mesures actuellement en place pour surveiller et contrôler efficacement les activités de cabotage effectuées par des navires étrangers. De nombreux exemples et situations justifient ces inquiétudes. L'ajout de nouvelles activités de cabotage dans le cadre de l'accord économique ou de toute autre ouverture de la Loi sur le cabotage est peu rassurant à cet égard.

(1550)



À de nombreuses reprises, on a demandé qu'un système de surveillance soit instauré. Cette demande a également été formulée devant le Comité permanent des affaires étrangères et du commerce international du Sénat, qui a étudié le projet de loi C-30. Une recommandation en ce sens a même été faite.

Il est donc essentiel qu'un système de surveillance soit instauré et qu'il inclue l'ensemble des ministères et des agences gouvernementales concernés, c'est-à-dire Transports Canada, l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, l'Office des transports du Canada, Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada ainsi qu'Emploi et Développement social Canada.

Depuis toujours, Armateurs du Saint-Laurent s'est opposé à toute ouverture de la Loi sur le cabotage qui permettrait à des navires étrangers d'assurer le transport de marchandises entre deux ports canadiens. Malheureusement, on assiste graduellement à un effritement de la Loi.

Ce marché est réservé aux navires canadiens qui, conformément aux exigences réglementaires et aux normes canadiennes, sont conçus, adaptés et optimisés pour tenir compte des nombreux défis de la navigation dans les eaux et les voies navigables du Canada. Par le respect de ces normes parmi les plus élevées au monde, les navires canadiens contribuent à la sécurité de la navigation et à la protection de l'environnement. Ces navires nationaux sont dirigés par un équipage uniquement et exclusivement constitué de marins canadiens, qui sont parmi les plus qualifiés et les mieux formés au monde. Ils ont les connaissances et l'expérience de la navigation dans les eaux canadiennes et ils sont conscients des défis inhérents à la navigation dans cette zone. L'atteinte de ces normes élevées assure une sécurité accrue et un respect de l'environnement, mais entraîne d'importants coûts d'exploitation que doivent assumer les armateurs canadiens, contrairement à de nombreux autres armateurs étrangers.

Le contexte particulier des Grands Lacs et de la Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent, tant sur le plan économique que sur celui de la sécurité de la navigation et de l'environnement, nécessite le maintien de ces mesures de protection dont fait partie la Loi sur le cabotage.

Il importe donc de préserver les emplois maritimes et l'expertise qui s'est bâtie au fil des siècles au Canada. Ouvrir la Loi sur le cabotage, c'est prendre le risque de perdre un savoir-faire inestimable et une richesse économique qui bénéficient directement aux entreprises et aux travailleurs d'ici.

Pour ces raisons, Armateurs du Saint-Laurent et ses membres s'opposent à toute ouverture de la Loi sur le cabotage et à tout changement à celle-ci, et demandent la mise sur pied d'un guichet unique de contrôle et de surveillance des activités de cabotage qui vont être effectuées en eaux canadiennes par des navires étrangers.

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Nous vous remercions beaucoup.

Nous donnons la parole à Mme Block, qui posera la première question.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à remercier nos témoins d'être venus aujourd'hui. Il fait bon de porter notre attention sur une autre partie du projet de loi C-49 qui permet de modifier la Loi sur le cabotage.

J'ai quelques questions. Il s'agit probablement de questions générales auxquelles n'importe qui d'entre vous pourrait répondre. La première est la suivante: pouvez-vous indiquer pour notre comité en quoi le projet de loi C-49 va plus loin que le projet de loi C-30?

(1555)

M. James Given:

Je vais essayer de répondre, tout simplement parce que j'aime parler.

Le projet de loi C-30 traite de l'UE et de l'AECG et se limite aux navires de première et deuxième immatriculation de l'UE. Si vous prenez l'augmentation des déplacements de conteneurs vides, il est offert à n'importe quel navire battant un pavillon, soit du Panama, du Libéria, de tous les États offrant pavillon de complaisance.

Prenons un pavillon comme celui des Îles Marshall, que de nombreux navires qui oeuvreraient dans ce domaine battent. En réalité, l'État du pavillon des Îles Marshall se trouve à Reston, en Virginie. C'est là que vous payez pour recevoir par la poste le pavillon des Îles Marshall. Ensuite, il va de l'Union européenne à tous les États du pavillon.

Mme Kelly Block:

Quelqu'un d'autre aimerait-il répondre?

Non? D'accord.

Je pensais avoir entendu quelqu'un parmi vous dire avoir reçu des assurances selon lesquelles la Loi sur le cabotage ne serait pas modifiée pendant l'étude de la Loi sur les transports au Canada. Avez-vous été consultés relativement aux modifications présentées dans le projet de loi C-49? [Français]

M. Martin Fournier:

Non, nous n'avons pas été consultés relativement au projet de loi C-49. [Traduction]

Mme Kelly Block:

D'accord.

Je vous demanderais alors si vous pouvez me donner un exemple réel ou hypothétique de ce qui se passera si cette disposition est adoptée? Quelles sont les répercussions pour vos industries? [Français]

M. Martin Fournier:

Au départ, lorsque nous avons entendu ce qui était inclus dans l'accord économique avec l'Europe, une de nos préoccupations était que cela allait créer une brèche dans la Loi sur le cabotage. Nous craignions de voir cette brèche s'agrandir. Le projet de loi C-49 démontre que nos craintes étaient fondées, puisqu'on dit que l'ouverture de la Loi sur le cabotage pour le transport de conteneurs vides ne s'applique pas seulement aux navires européens, mais aussi à l'ensemble des pavillons.

On vient donc déjà d'agrandir cette brèche. Qu'est-ce qui viendra par la suite? Nous ne le savons pas, mais nous nous attendons à ce qu'il y ait d'autres demandes en ce sens pour élargir encore plus la portée de concessions qui ont été faites dans le cadre de l'accord avec l'Europe. [Traduction]

Mme Kelly Block:

Quelqu'un d'autre veut-il répondre?

M. James Given:

Lorsque vous prenez l'industrie dans son ensemble et que vous commencez à ouvrir le cabotage aux transporteurs étrangers, il s'ensuit un effet d'entraînement. Les conditions relatives aux tarifs et les conditions de travail à bord de navires battant pavillon étranger, dont certains sont en réalité des navires européens de première immatriculation, des navires européens de deuxième immatriculation, et en particulier les navires de la mer Ethos, sont nettement inférieures à la norme en vigueur au Canada.

Actuellement, nous avons des navires qui... Il y en a un à Vancouver où le taux de rémunération n'est que de 2,50 $ l'heure. Nous avons d'autres scénarios où le taux de rémunération horaire est de 1,75 $ en montant. Lorsque vous prenez en compte les conditions de travail, les conditions de sécurité, les normes environnementales, et tout ce qu'il y a d'autre à bord de ces navires, c'est très laxiste.

Il n'existe aucun contrôle international dans le cas des navires battant pavillon de complaisance. C'est d'ailleurs pour cette raison que nous les appelons des pavillons de complaisance. Le propriétaire du navire se trouve dans un pays. Le véritable propriétaire, le propriétaire immatriculé, se trouve dans un autre pays. L'équipage peut provenir de trois ou quatre pays. L'agent d'assurance vient d'un autre pays. Il y a des couches et des couches qui font en sorte que nous ne pouvons pas parvenir au véritable propriétaire.

Je vais être bref. Nous avons eu des situations où des gens ont été pendus à bord de navires, des navires battant pavillon de complaisance, pour que ces navires contournent les normes canadiennes ou n'importe quelle autre norme. Il y a un écart considérable et il n'existe aucun contrôle sur ce qui se passe à bord de ces navires, parce qu'une grande partie de tout cela est laissé au contrôle de l'État du pavillon.

Lorsque vous prenez les pays offrant pavillon de complaisance, le contrôle de l'État du pavillon n'existe pas. Un marin qui est blessé, un marin qui est sous-payé, un marin qui a quoi que ce soit à bord de ce navire, qui manque de nourriture, qui manque de quoi que ce soit, doit se tourner vers une ressource extérieure comme l'ITF pour essayer de faire corriger la situation, et il s'agit d'un long processus difficile, parce que c'est chacun pour soi dans le transport maritime.

Le transport maritime a été la première industrie de la mondialisation. Il ne fait donc aucun doute que nous savons ce qu'est le commerce. Nous comprenons tout le reste. Notre industrie est fondée sur le commerce, mais vous ne pouvez pas comparer le pavillon canadien et les conditions canadiennes, Dieu merci nous sommes au Canada, à un navire battant pavillon étranger ou pavillon de complaisance.

(1600)

Mme Kelly Block:

Avez-vous autre chose à ajouter?

Mme Sarah Clark:

Permettez-moi de vous donner un bon exemple. Le navire actuel que nous utilisons pour le dragage du fleuve Fraser a été acheté de l'une des sociétés de dragage européennes. Il battait pavillon de complaisance. Nous avons dépensé des millions de dollars pour le rendre conforme aux normes de sécurité de Transports Canada, en particulier pour ce qui est de la séparation coupe-feu qui était non existante dans le navire. Non seulement l'avons-nous rendu conforme aux normes canadiennes actuelles de façon à ce que l'équipage soit protégé advenant un incendie à bord du navire, l'équipage a aussi reçu une formation de très haut niveau dans la lutte aux incendies. Lorsqu'ils sont au milieu du Fraser, ils ne peuvent pas compter sur qui que ce soit pour venir à leur rescousse, pas plus qu'au milieu du Saint-Laurent d'ailleurs.

Nos équipages procèdent à deux exercices d'incendie par mois, selon des scénarios qui pourraient survenir dans la salle des machines, etc. Il ne s'agit pas tout simplement d'un exercice à l'aide d'un extincteur. Ils sont des pompiers hautement formés à bord. Ils se trouvent déjà à bord d'un navire conforme aux normes en vigueur. Ce que Jim dit, c'est que les navires avec lesquels nous sommes en concurrence ou pourrions l'être ne sont pas nécessairement construits selon les normes, et leurs équipages ne sont pas formés en fonction de ces normes.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à M. Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je tiens également à remercier nos témoins d'être venus aujourd'hui. Vous représentez le « comment » de l'exécution de stratégies en matière de quotas commerciaux. Encore une fois, je tiens à vous en remercier, à vous remercier d'être ici, mais aussi à vous remercier des efforts que vous allez déployer pour y participer et vraiment vous assurer que ces stratégies sont mises en place et réalisées.

Monsieur Given, vous avez répondu à la première question que j'allais poser, et elle portait sur les conditions de travail. J'examine toujours les choses à l'aide d'un filtre à trois lentilles: économique, environnementale et sociale. Dans vos propos liminaires, vous avez parlé de l'aspect économique de cet enjeu. Dans une certaine mesure, vous avez parlé de l'aspect environnemental d'un réseau de transport intégré qui comprend le transport maritime, qui est bien entendu le mode de transport le plus écologique. La dernière partie portait sur l'aspect social et la main-d’œuvre, et vous avez bien entendu abordé cet aspect.

L'autre aspect que je veux aborder, question que je vous pose à tous, c'est comment alors apparier le financement à la stratégie. À l'heure actuelle, dans le cadre du projet de loi C-49, nous envisageons d'autoriser les ports canadiens à avoir accès à la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada, qui offre des instruments financiers pour aider à financer des projets d'agrandissement, d'infrastructure durable — en quelque sorte votre domaine, madame Clark — pour nous assurer que le dragage se fait dans les endroits qu'il faut agrandir pour accueillir des navires plus grands dont le tirant d'eau est plus fort. Pensez-vous que cela aidera les ports canadiens à être plus concurrentiels? Voilà pour ma première question.

Je vais préciser ma question de façon à inclure non seulement les ports canadiens, mais l'ensemble des ports. Il existe une anomalie que nous appelons la Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent. Je dis anomalie parce que, du moins dans ma partie du monde, le canal Welland, même s'il est un port, n'est pas considéré comme tel au plan technique.

Dans une certaine mesure, à mon avis, lorsqu'il s'agit de sa gestion du patrimoine d'infrastructure, elle n'est pas à la hauteur, elle n'est pas respectée. Par conséquent, ma question est la suivante: lorsque vous tenez compte de tout cela dans l'ensemble du grand réseau, pensez-vous, premièrement, qu'en vertu du projet de loi C-49, il convient de mettre toutes ces sommes à la disposition de la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada? Deuxièmement, convient-il que ces fonds d'investissement soient disponibles pour l'expansion du Saint-Laurent de même que du canal Welland?

Mme Sarah Clark:

Je ne peux pas parler pour ce qui est du canal Welland, mais je peux parler pour ce qui est de la côte Ouest, où l'on retrouve des ports hautement concurrentiels, non seulement à Vancouver, mais aussi à Prince Rupert. Notre société vient de terminer l'agrandissement à Prince Rupert il y a de cela un mois.

Pour que les ports canadiens aient accès à un financement accru, je pense que cela convient tout à fait. Je sais qu'ils ont eu de la difficulté par le passé au chapitre de la dette, et nous sommes tout à fait d'accord pour qu'ils aient accès aux fonds dont ils ont besoin pour maintenir la côte Ouest du Canada aussi concurrentielle, ou plus concurrentielle.

Peut-être que vous voudriez nous en toucher quelques mots. [Français]

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Toute somme d'argent supplémentaire qui permettrait de renforcer le système maritime serait bienvenue. Actuellement, il y a des ports sur la côte Est, au Québec, qui sont dans un état lamentable à certains égards. Nous avons des activités dans tous ces ports. Le port de Québec, qui est l'un des plus vieux, a de la difficulté à maintenir ses quais. Régulièrement, on nous demande de fermer certaines sections d'activité parce que le quai est en mauvais état. Il est donc certain que le système a besoin d'argent et que ce serait une bonne chose.

Je voulais mentionner à Mme Block l'une de nos préoccupations au sujet de l'ouverture du marché européen qui a été faite et qu'on voit dans le projet de loi. Je pense que cela devrait intéresser tout le monde. Les Européens vont pouvoir venir au Canada avec de l'équipement étranger. On nous assure qu'il va y avoir toutes sortes de moyens pour vérifier que l'équipement est adéquat. Toutefois, s'il y a de l'équipement étranger pour des contrats privés, cela vient aussi avec de la main-d'oeuvre étrangère.

Il faut se battre à armes égales. Nous n'avons pas peur de faire face à la concurrence, mais donnez-nous la chance de le faire. Lorsque vous mettrez l'accord en vigueur, faites-le de façon vigoureuse et dites aux Européens comment cela va se passer ici. C'est très important pour nous.

(1605)

[Traduction]

M. James Given:

Monsieur Badawey, vous avez parlé de la Voie maritime du Saint-Laurent et, plus particulièrement, du canal Welland. Je pense que c'est un secteur qui nous tient tous deux à cœur, puisque nous venons de cette région. Je pense que c'est un aspect avec lequel nous sommes d'accord.

Lorsque vous prenez les infrastructures portuaires, lorsque vous prenez le canal Welland, lorsque vous prenez les biens de la Voie maritime le long du canal, c'est là que votre fret international et votre fret national se complètent, là où vous avez le commerce international et le commerce national qui travaillent ensemble. Ces ports ont besoin d'être mis en valeur. Il faut leur consacrer des fonds. La mise en valeur doit se poursuivre afin de faciliter le commerce que le pays veut et que la population active veut. À l'échelle nationale comme internationale, ils peuvent travailler de concert pour le faire. Je suis heureux que vous ayez soulevé la question du canal Welland. Cela m'a toujours déconcerté de voir que ce bien n'est pas mis en valeur, parce qu'il débordait d'activité auparavant.

La présidente:

Il vous reste 45 secondes.

M. Vance Badawey:

Respectueusement, je pose ma dernière question. J'aimerais que M. Fournier réponde également.

En ce moment, vous représentez une région du pays qui est très importante pour la stratégie du projet de loi. Que pensez-vous des éléments sociaux, environnementaux et, bien entendu, économiques, des avantages que le projet de loi met de l'avant pour contribuer en fin de compte à la stratégie globale en matière de transport? [Français]

M. Martin Fournier:

En fait, une industrie maritime forte a des infrastructures adaptées aux besoins en matière de transport. Cela veut dire avoir des navires qui respectent les plus hautes normes en matière d'efficacité énergétique et opérationnelle. Cela veut aussi dire avoir un équipage bien formé et qui respecte les plus hautes normes. Une industrie maritime forte a tous ces éléments. On parle d'éléments sociaux, environnementaux et économiques. De cette façon, nous pourrons développer l'industrie maritime canadienne et en assurer la prospérité. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie chacun d'entre vous d'être ici.

J'avoue ne pas avoir beaucoup de questions sur le fond de votre témoignage, puisque je partage votre position. Cependant, j'ai des questions sur l'industrie afin de mieux la comprendre.

J'aimerais m'attarder sur la question de la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada, dont parlait M. Badawey. Celle-ci semble bien reçue, puisqu'elle est vue comme une source de financement. Toutefois, les informations dont on dispose au moment où on se parle indiquent que les projets portuaires financés par la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada seraient de 100 millions de dollars et plus.

Au port de Trois-Rivières, dans la ville que je représente, les projets de 100 millions de dollars et plus sont rares. Le port de Vancouver a peut-être quelques projets qui dépassent 100 millions de dollars, mais la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada n'est d'aucune utilité dans le cas des projets dont le budget est inférieur à cela.

N'est-on pas en train, encore une fois, de vous faire miroiter le meilleur pour vous réveiller avec le pire, comme cela semble être le cas avec le projet de loi C-49, ou avez-vous des projets qui sont de cet ordre de financement?

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Nous ne représentons pas les ports. Donc, les projets ne sont pas...

M. Robert Aubin:

Je le sais, mais pour vos industries, cela pourrait être accessible.

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

C'est certain que, par exemple, cela pourrait comprendre des travaux de dragage. Il y aurait peut-être lieu d'apporter des modifications au programme pour incorporer davantage de projets. Une somme de 100 millions de dollars, c'est beaucoup d'argent. En même temps, c'est peu, étant donné l'ampleur des travaux à effectuer. À l'exception du port de Vancouver, qui est dans un bon état, les autres ports auraient besoin d'investissements importants.

(1610)

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Monsieur Fournier, dans une de vos recommandations, vous avez parlé de l'importance d'un guichet unique. Pourriez-vous expliquer davantage cette recommandation? Quels sont les éléments qui seraient traités et pourquoi est-ce important?

M. Martin Fournier:

En fait, nous demandons que, lorsqu'un navire étranger arrive ici et fait une demande pour faire du cabotage en eaux canadiennes, on s'assure qu'il a obtenu l'ensemble des...

M. Robert Aubin:

Parlez-vous du dragage?

M. Martin Fournier:

J'inclus tout, le cabotage et le dragage. Si le navire vient faire des travaux qui sont actuellement régis par la Loi sur le cabotage, nous demandons que, une fois qu'il est arrivé ici, il puisse faire une demande en bonne et due forme, qu'on puisse valider s'il a reçu l'ensemble des autorisations d'Emploi et Développement social Canada et qu'on puisse s'assurer qu'une vérification relative aux analyses de risque pour les travailleurs a été faite. Il faut aussi vérifier les permis de travail et s'assurer que les marins seront payés selon les normes et les taux canadiens.

Tous ces éléments doivent être vérifiés avant qu'on donne une autorisation à un navire, et il faut valider régulièrement cette autorisation, si c'est le cas. On sait, que par le passé, des navires ont fait des activités ici sans avoir de permis.

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

On ne demande pas la création d'une nouvelle agence, mais on demande qu'il y ait une véritable supervision et, à la fin, une autorisation finale de Transports Canada et d'Emploi et Développement social Canada. Ce n'est rien de compliqué.

M. Martin Fournier:

En fait, ces demandes existent actuellement, mais personne ne s'assure que tout a été rempli avant d'accorder une autorisation finale. En le faisant de cette façon, on va s'assurer qu'il y a un contrôle rigoureux.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

J'ai une question de nature technique. Je comprends très bien la différence entre certains navires qui battent pavillon étranger et les navires canadiens, en ce qui concerne les conditions de travail et un certain nombre de mesures.

Un navire qui appartient à un propriétaire canadien, mais qui bat pavillon étranger, est-il soumis aux règles canadiennes ou à celles du pays qu'il représente?

M. Martin Fournier:

Il est soumis aux règles du pays dont il bat pavillon. S'il est enregistré à l'étranger, il suit les règles du pays dont il bat pavillon.

M. Robert Aubin:

Voulez-vous dire qu'un propriétaire de bateau canadien pourrait offrir des conditions équivalentes à celles du pays au nom duquel il est enregistré?

M. Martin Fournier:

Oui, s'il navigue sous ce pavillon.

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

S'il fait du cabotage, il faut que les marins soient canadiens. C'est la nuance. [Traduction]

Mme Sarah Clark:

Puis-je ajouter au sujet de votre question sur la banque de l'infrastructure dans le cas des projets de plus de 100 millions de dollars, le port de Vancouver prévoit un agrandissement du terminal Deltaport qui serait de l'ordre de 2,5 milliards de dollars. Il ne fait aucun doute qu'il s'agit d'un projet à l'égard duquel le port pourrait demander de l'aide. Il s'agit aussi d'un très bon exemple sur lequel le milieu du dragage européen est très concentré, en raison de la quantité de dragage que ce projet représente.

Nous constituons un candidat de premier plan pour faire concurrencer à l'égard de ce projet. Nous pourrions même créer un partenariat avec nos collègues du Groupe Océan. Cependant, si nous ne pouvons pas le faire, c'est un très bon exemple d'un endroit où nous ne pourrions pas être en mesure de faire concurrence s'ils ne sont pas tenus de respecter les mêmes règles du jeu que nous. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

M. James Given:

Si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais aborder ce dont vous avez parlé pour ce qui est d'un propriétaire canadien d'un navire qui bat pavillon étranger et qui décide d'immatriculer son navire à l'extérieur du Canada. Il y en a beaucoup. Ils le font pour de nombreuses raisons, pas seulement les coûts d'équipage. Ils le font pour des raisons d'impôt. Immatriculez un navire à l'extérieur du Canada, au Libéria ou au Panama ou ailleurs, vos coûts d'imposition sont minimes. Habituellement, vous payez, comme dans le cas des Îles Marshall, 1 000 $ pour battre leur pavillon, puis le tour est joué. Ils vous feront payer de l'impôt sur quelque chose, mais pas beaucoup, comparativement au Canada.

Vous avez aussi les normes de sécurité. L'Organisation internationale du Travail, l'OIT, et l'Organisation maritime internationale fixent des normes minimales. Elles ne sont pas maximales, elles sont minimales. Les États du pavillon ne sont pas tous des signataires des conventions de l'OIT ou n'y participent pas tous. Les salaires qu'ils versent peuvent en fait être inférieurs au minimum de l'OIT.

Lorsqu'il s'agit de faire appliquer par l'OMI la réglementation sur l'eau de ballast, le traitement des émissions, le soufre, des Canadiens investissent des millions et des milliards de dollars pour renouveler leurs flottes, pour les rendre conformes à ces normes environnementales. Par ailleurs, la norme est que sur la scène internationale à l'égard des navires plus anciens, vous utilisez le carburant le plus faible, le moins cher que vous pouvez acheter. C'est le laissé-pour-compte que vous ne pouvez pas employer nulle part ailleurs, et les émissions sont élevées.

Si vous prenez les navires canadiens comme l'exemple parfait, avec le nouveau tonnage, les nouveaux épurateurs, et les nouvelles normes de lutte contre les émissions, vous parlez de 500 à 600 camions de moins sur les routes et vous mettez cette marchandise dans un navire, ou vous faites le dragage à l'aide de dragues canadiennes. Votre empreinte écologique est moindre. Votre impact social, bien entendu, est que vous faites des affaires au Canada, ce à quoi nous nous attendons tous. Il y a de très nombreux éléments autres que tout simplement la rémunération. L'imposition en est un considérable lorsqu'il est question de battre le pavillon d'un pays étranger.

(1615)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.

Pour avoir déjà négocié avec des enfants et des chiens, je sais pertinemment que les choses peuvent toujours changer. Vous cédez un petit morceau de votre friandise et, l'instant d'après, vous n'en avez plus. C'est justement ce que je crains dans le dossier du cabotage.

D'après ce que je comprends, la loi autorise actuellement tout navire à transporter des conteneurs vides d'un port à un autre. Corrigez-moi si je fais erreur, monsieur Given, mais si j'ai bien compris, aucun navire canadien n'est engagé dans ce genre d'activité ou n'est intéressé à le faire au prix qu'on leur offre. Aujourd'hui, en fait, si des conteneurs vides doivent être déplacés de Montréal à Halifax, ils sont expédiés par train. Corrigez-moi si je fais erreur, mais je ne crois pas que nous soyons perdants jusqu'à maintenant.

Ma question est la suivante: si nous concédons un bout de terrain, que va-t-il se passer ensuite?

M. James Given:

En fait, regardons ce qui se passe à l'extérieur du corridor Montréal-Halifax. Une grosse partie du fret est maintenant expédiée par train. Je sais qu'il y a parfois des problèmes avec les trains à empilement double qu'il faut décharger avant de traverser un viaduc ou d'autres problèmes d'infrastructure.

Dans le Nord, certaines de nos compagnies partenaires assurent le transport maritime dans l'Arctique chaque année. Elles transportent des conteneurs vides. Le problème qui se pose actuellement, c'est que si des conteneurs vides doivent être déplacés, ils peuvent l'être par un navire étranger. Il lui suffit de demander une exemption auprès de l'Office des transports du Canada. Cette demande d'exemption est alors envoyée à toutes les compagnies canadiennes pour savoir si elles disposent d'un navire sous pavillon canadien pouvant effectuer ce travail. Si la réponse est négative, le navire étranger obtient alors l'autorisation de transporter les conteneurs. Il peut continuer sa route sans problème. Le cabotage n'interrompt pas le commerce.

Vous devez également chercher à savoir si un navire canadien serait prêt à assurer le déplacement si cela générait des revenus. Je l'ignore. Je ne peux parler au nom des compagnies maritimes, mais je les connais assez bien pour savoir que s'il y avait de l'argent à faire là, elles n'hésiteraient pas.

Comme cette activité n'est pas payante, elles disent qu'il en coûte 2 000 $ pour déplacer un conteneur vide à bord d'un navire canadien, comparativement à 400 $ à bord d'un navire étranger. Oui, c'est bien ça. Si nous voulons donner le feu vert à l'exploitation d'un équipage étranger et au non-paiement de taxes et tout le reste, nous pouvons faire transporter un conteneur pour 400 $. Personnellement, je pense que cela n'est pas ce que veut le Canada.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'accord. Au fond, l'argent n'est pas au rendez-vous pour le moment; la majorité des armateurs canadiens passent donc leur tour pour le transport de conteneurs vides.

M. James Given:

Je ne peux pas dire s'ils le font ou non. Je sais qu'ils le font dans l'Arctique; dans certaines régions, ils le font.

M. Ken Hardie:

Ça ne doit pas être très payant, comparativement à ce que rapporterait un déplacement entre Montréal et Halifax.

Poursuivons.

Madame Clark, concernant la main-d'oeuvre, vous et moi avons une expérience commune dans le cadre de certains projets entrepris dans le port Metro Vancouver, notamment le projet Canada Line, dans le cadre duquel une entreprise italienne a creusé un tunnel, voire les deux. Je ne sais pas si elle était italienne, mais son personnel l'était, et il y a eu un énorme cafouillage au sujet des taux salariaux, par exemple. C'est du déjà-vu.

En ce qui concerne le dragage, et corrigez-moi si je fais erreur, je crois comprendre qu'il y a un obstacle lié à l'envergure du projet — celui-ci doit avoir une valeur minimale — avant qu'un compétiteur européen puisse soumissionner. Est-ce exact?

Mme Sarah Clark:

Oui, une valeur d'environ 7,5 millions de dollars, ce qui est un obstacle très mineur.

M. Ken Hardie:

Vraiment?

Mme Sarah Clark:

Oui. C'est public. Dans le privé, il n'a pas d'obstacle et les ports sont considérés comme étant privés.

M. Ken Hardie:

Les ports sont considérés comme étant privés.

En consultant le registre de vos activités pour une année moyenne, dites-moi quel pourcentage de vos projets ont une valeur de plus de 7 millions de dollars?

Mme Sarah Clark:

Je dirais 80 %. Nous avons signé notre principal contrat de dragage avec le port de Vancouver. Nous avons un contrat d'entretien du chenal de navigation, d'une durée de 11 ans, dont la valeur annuelle s'élève à plus de 7,5 millions de dollars.

M. Ken Hardie:

Est-ce que cela compte pour un seul contrat, ou simplement comme une série de...?

Mme Sarah Clark:

Comme un seul contrat. Chaque année, nous effectuons également une série de petits projets de dragage. Mais les gros projets, comme les projets de GNL ou l'agrandissement du terminal 2 de Deltaport, sont d'un tout autre niveau.

Comme je l'ai dit, les entreprises du secteur privé ne sont pas assujetties à cette condition; nous effectuons donc beaucoup de travaux de dragage dans le fleuve, sur l'île et le long de la côte.

(1620)

M. Ken Hardie:

Croyez-vous que ces contrats soient assez importants pour attirer l'attention des compagnies étrangères?

Mme Sarah Clark:

Tout dépend de leur intention de s'implanter au Canada pour pouvoir soumissionner sur de gros projets et du genre de navires dont ils disposent. En plus des dragueuses, ils peuvent utiliser des barges supportant des grues de gros calibre pour effectuer les travaux de dragage.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'accord.

Pour revenir au projet Canada Line ou à d'autres projets, deux d'entre vous ont parlé de la nécessité d'exercer une surveillance, d'avoir des gens qui supervisent les travaux. Pouvez-vous donner plus de détails. De quoi devons-nous nous préoccuper exactement?

Mme Sarah Clark:

Je suis ravie que vous me posiez cette question, monsieur Hardie. Nous avons eu une réunion fructueuse ce matin avec Transports Canada qui planche justement sur cette question.

Le ministère a mis en place un mécanisme de préavis en vertu duquel la compagnie l'informe de son intention de déposer sa demande et démontre qu'elle est autorisée à renoncer à son permis de cabotage, étant donné qu'elle est admissible en vertu de l'AECG. Cela ne couvre que cette admissibilité.

Les autres exigences relatives aux normes de sécurité, aux visas et aux impôts, sont du ressort d'autres ministères. Depuis deux ans, nous demandons à ce qu'il y ait un mécanisme en vertu duquel un seul ministère piloterait le dossier et assurerait la coordination entre tous les ministères pour s'assurer que toutes les exigences sont respectées. Nous avons constaté que, même pour le permis de cabotage, la coordination interministérielle a été difficile.

Lors de notre rencontre d'aujourd'hui, les représentants ministériels ont même insisté sur le fait que nous, les acteurs de l'industrie, avons un rôle à jouer dans le mécanisme de contrôle afin que les contrevenants soient épinglés. Nous leur avons dit que nous devions être informés de la présence de ces navires. C'est l'un des points sur lesquels nous avons insisté: avisez-nous.

C'est la première recommandation que nous vous adressons aujourd'hui: qu'un protocole soit établi sous l'égide de Transports Canada afin que cette coordination soit assurée.

La présidente:

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Sean Fraser:

Merci beaucoup.

M. Hardie a déjà posé une question dans le même ordre d'idées, veuillez donc m'excuser si nous nous répétons un peu. Je vais vous donner l'occasion d'étoffer vos réponses. Je commence par vous, monsieur Given.

Nous avons entendu un témoignage en début de journée et j'essaie mentalement de faire des recoupements avec ce que vous venez d'expliquer. Ce témoignage a été livré par une fervente partisane de l'adoption du mécanisme proposé dans la Loi sur le cabotage. En gros, nous avons appris que le déplacement de conteneurs vides par des navires sous pavillon canadien n'est pas une pratique courante et ne le sera jamais.

Vous avez laissé entendre, je pense, qu'il pouvait y avoir des exemples dans le Nord qui contredisent cette affirmation. En vertu des règles en vigueur aujourd'hui, pouvez-vous imaginer que cette pratique devienne courante un jour?

M. James Given:

J'ai entendu ce témoignage. Ce que je veux dire, c'est que des compagnies canadiennes ont actuellement la possibilité, en vertu du régime de cabotage en place, de les transporter si elles le souhaitent. Si elles ne veulent pas le faire, le navire étranger ou la compagnie étrangère qui a demandé une exemption est libre de les transporter. Certaines le font, et je sais que les conteneurs sont acheminés par train et par camion. Je préférerais qu'ils le soient par bateau, ce serait plus écologique.

Néanmoins, je ne comprends pas pourquoi on veut mettre fin à cette pratique dans le Nord et dans d'autres régions où elle a cours. Je ne comprends simplement pas pourquoi on voudrait changer la loi sur le cabotage, alors que des dispositions existent déjà.

M. Sean Fraser:

À ce sujet, si je me rappelle bien le témoignage livré plus tôt, l'intervenante a expliqué le processus d'exemption, ajoutant qu'à une occasion, un appel avait été lancé pour savoir s'il y avait des intéressés. Quelqu'un a alors répondu qu'il pouvait le faire pour tel prix. Vu le prix demandé, le propriétaire des conteneurs a soudainement décidé d'importer de nouveaux conteneurs plutôt que de les faire transporter au Canada. Je suis frappé ce manque flagrant d'efficience.

Pouvez-vous me dire si c'est vraiment la réalité à laquelle nous sommes confrontés? Allons-nous laisser des conteneurs vides sur place et en importer de nouveaux au Canada?

M. James Given:

D'après ce que je comprends, et corrigez-moi si je me trompe, Maersk est la seule compagnie maritime à être autorisée à avoir des conteneurs au Canada pendant plus de six mois, en vertu d'une disposition spéciale. D'autres conteneurs sont déplacés d'un endroit à l'autre. Il y en a plein à Montréal. Nous voyons des conteneurs vides partout le long des voies de triage.

Je le répète, connaissant les compagnies maritimes, à l'exception de celle ici présente, elles ne laisseraient aucun conteneur traîner longtemps s'il y avait de l'argent à faire avec ça.

(1625)

M. Sean Fraser:

Essayons de comprendre pourquoi le coût exigé par les navires canadiens est si élevé. Vous avez parlé des règles de sécurité, des normes de travail et des règles environnementales, qui sont pour la plupart d'assez bonnes mesures. Nous les avons adoptées au Canada parce que nous croyons qu'elles sont bonnes. Est-ce le fait que nous avons peur que les navires battant pavillon étranger ne se conforment pas aux lois canadiennes dans nos eaux territoriales ou qu'ils ne se plient pas aux mêmes normes qui fait grimper le coût pour les navires canadiens en général?

M. James Given:

Nous avons démontré qu'ils ne suivent pas les mêmes règles lorsqu'ils se trouvent au Canada. Il y a deux enjeux distincts. Le navire obtient une exemption au titre de la Loi sur le cabotage. Cette exemption s'applique au navire. Ensuite, les membres d'équipage présentent une demande de visa de travail dans le cadre du programme des travailleurs étrangers temporaires.

Il y a deux enjeux distincts. Dans le projet de loi C-30, comme dans le projet de loi C-49, rien n'est changé en ce qui concerne les dispositions de la loi sur l'immigration visant l'équipage de ces navires. Le problème, c'est que les membres d'équipage ne sont jamais informés du salaire qu'ils toucheront. Ils ne sont pas informés de leurs droits lorsqu'ils travaillent au Canada parce qu'en vertu du programme des travailleurs étrangers temporaires, ils sont considérés, à tous égards, comme des Canadiens. On ne leur dit rien et ils sont rémunérés à leur taux habituel, soit 2,50 $ ou 1,90 $ l'heure. Ils sont rémunérés à ce taux jusqu'à ce que quelqu'un découvre la supercherie. De plus, la loi n'est jamais appliquée. Aucun agent d'exécution ne se rend sur place à moins d'être expressément appelé. Si vous êtes un membre d'équipage étranger, si vous ignorez la procédure ou si vous avez peur des représailles, jamais vous ne ferez cet appel.

Nous venons d'avoir des discussions très fructueuses avec EDSC et nous allons modifier ces modalités. EDSC nous a toutefois très clairement dit qu'il n'allait pas poursuivre une compagnie maritime autour du monde pour percevoir nos impôts, parce qu'elle devrait payer des impôts durant son séjour au Canada. Le problème de l'évasion fiscale des navires étrangers est de taille, sans parler des frais liés à l'équipage.

M. Sean Fraser:

Permettez-moi d'aller un peu plus loin, au risque de passer pour un tatillon de la pire espèce. À en juger par l'esprit de liberté qui régnait en haute mer et par la philosophie hollandaise du XVIe siècle, je ne crois pas qu'il soit possible de réglementer les activités qui ont lieu en haute mer. Par contre, si nous pouvions obliger les navires étrangers à se conformer aux mêmes normes et si nous avions un mécanisme d'exécution de la loi en place au Canada, est-ce qu'ils pourraient continuer à faire plus ou moins ce qu'ils veulent à l'extérieur des eaux canadiennes, tout en lésant économiquement les navires battant pavillon canadien?

M. James Given:

Il est peut-être impossible de répondre à cette question. Les activités en eaux internationales sont régies par le droit international et le droit de la mer. Dès que vous pénétrez dans la limite des 200 milles ou la limite des 12 milles du Canada, la loi change. Pour les activités de cabotage, les membres d'équipage à bord du navire sont considérés, à tous égards, comme des Canadiens.

Quant au navire, il est visé par une exemption temporaire. Il doit quand même se conformer à la loi de l'État du pavillon, s'il en existe une. Lorsque les navires sont visés par des conventions de l'OMI, celles-ci sont appliquées par les autorités chargées du contrôle portuaire à l'intérieur du Canada, à condition qu'elles disposent des ressources requises pour aller inspecter chaque navire aux fins d'exécution de la loi. Transports Canada fait un travail extraordinaire, mais n'oublions pas que le ministère est à court d'argent depuis environ 12 ans. Les responsables font leur possible avec les moyens dont ils disposent.

Là encore, le système actuellement en vigueur est le meilleur mécanisme pour assurer l'inspection des navires et l'application de la loi et des conventions de l'OMI et de l'OIT.

La présidente:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Shields.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je suis ravi que vous soyez venus nous rencontrer pour nous informer.

Monsieur Fraser, je ne dirais pas que vous êtes un tatillon de la pire espèce, mais vous êtes certes un homme imposant.

M. Sean Fraser:

J'ai failli mentionner Hugo Grotius. Attendons un peu. Vous pouvez réserver votre jugement.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci.

Cette conversation est intéressante. Travaillez-vous pour l'organisation internationale qui élabore ces règles? Faites-vous partie de cette organisation? Participez-vous à l'élaboration de ces normes?

M. James Given:

En fait, moi j'y travaille par l'intermédiaire de la Fédération internationale des ouvriers du transport. Je suis un expert auprès de l'OMI et de l'OIT.

M. Martin Shields:

Je sais ce qu'est un pavillon de complaisance. Je comprends comment cela fonctionne. Quel pourcentage des navires du monde sont assujettis aux règles en vigueur dont vous venez de parler et à l'élaboration desquelles vous avez contribué?

M. James Given:

Pour ce qui est du cabotage, le Center for Seafarers' Rights a mené une enquête pour nous il y a tout juste un mois portant sur les pays membres des Nations unies, à l'exclusion naturellement des pays enclavés. Elle portait sur les pays qui possèdent au moins deux ports. Soixante-sept pour cent de ces pays pratiquent une forme ou une autre de cabotage. L'idée que le cabotage est propre au Canada ou que nous n'agissons pas correctement comparativement aux autres pays du monde est donc fausse. Soixante-sept pour cent des pays membres des Nations unies disposant d'au moins deux ports pratiquent une forme ou une autre de cabotage.

(1630)

M. Martin Shields:

Vous parlez des normes de travail, de la sécurité, de la formation — autant d'éléments couverts par les règles de l'OMI et à l'élaboration desquelles vous collaborez. Quel pourcentage des pays les appliquent?

M. James Given:

Pour ce qui est des pays maritimes traditionnels, comme le Canada, les États-Unis, la Norvège... la Suède est le premier registre d'immatriculation. La Norvège également. Le Danemark aussi. L'Allemagne aussi. Ils ne sont pas leurs deuxièmes registres. Ces pays ont une solide tradition maritime. Par contre, pour les pays sous pavillon de complaisance — le Libéria, Panama et tous ces pays qui n'ont rien à foutre de la loi...

M. Martin Shields:

J'ai compris.

M. James Given:

... il revient aux autres pays d'essayer de l'appliquer.

Veuillez m'excuser pour mon langage.

M. Martin Shields:

Les pays signataires de ces conventions, ceux qui élaborent les règles, les appliquent-ils dans leurs eaux territoriales?

M. James Given:

Oui, mais rappelez-vous que la norme de l'OIT est minimale.

M. Martin Shield:Je comprends.

M. James Given:Prenons l'exemple des Philippines. Lorsqu'un travailleur philippin embarque à bord d'un navire, il quitte son pays avec un contrat de la POEA — un contrat d'emploi à l'étranger octroyé par le gouvernement philippin — qui, la plupart du temps, énonce les conditions minimales de travail de l'OIT. J'ai été inspecteur pour la FIOT. J'ai inspecté des navires étrangers. L'an dernier, la FIOT a perçu plus de 22 millions de dollars américains en salaires impayés. Les marins philippins ou indonésiens ne touchaient même pas le salaire minimal recommandé par l'OIT dans le cadre de leur contrat d'emploi à l'étranger. Ils pouvaient passer six ou sept mois sans être payés ou, lorsqu'ils l'étaient, ils touchaient la moitié du salaire recommandé par l'OIT, parce que la loi n'est pas appliquée. En tant que gouvernements, en tant qu'ONG, en tant que syndicats et entreprises, nous pouvons nous engager à appliquer les règles de l'OIT et de l'OMI, à appliquer toutes ces règles. Mais en haute mer, la loi n'est pas appliquée.

M. Martin Shields:

Nous parlons des eaux territoriales canadiennes, parce que c'est là que nous pouvons agir. Je voudrais savoir si d'autres pays appliqueront des règles minimales. Vous me dites que non.

M. James Given:

Non.

M. Martin Shields:

D'accord.

Madame Clark, vous avez parlé de l'application des lois et règlements en vigueur. Vous avez dit que les règlements actuels — et d'autres témoins nous ont dit la même chose — étaient efficaces. Vous avez dit que toutes les règles étaient là et que le personnel en place pouvait les appliquer. Vous venez de dire que cela n'entraînerait pas de hausse de coûts parce que les règles, les règlements et le personnel sont déjà en place. Il ne reste plus qu'à agir.

Mme Sarah Clark:

C'est justement le fondement de notre argument. Nous avons les conditions. Nous respectons toutes les normes exigées par le Canada. Qu'il s'agisse de salaires, de sécurité, d'impôts ou d'environnement — un point soulevé par M. Fournier — nous respectons les règles. Nous faisons l'objet de vérifications. Et nous croyons en ces normes pour nos équipages. Je ne parle pas seulement de salaires, mais aussi des normes que nous appliquons à bord des navires et des conditions de vie de l'équipage. Ces équipiers vivent à bord deux semaines d'affilée et encore plus lorsque le navire va dans le sud.

Une voix: Trois semaines.

Mme Clark: Trois semaines. Nous offrons ces emplois bien rémunérés à des gens de la classe moyenne très qualifiés qui ont pris le temps et l'argent requis pour suivre cette formation.

M. Martin Shields:

Nous disons qu'il existe des règlements et que le personnel en place pourrait les faire appliquer...

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Vous parlez des fonctionnaires de Transports Canada, ou bien...?

M. Martin Shields:

Ce sont vos propres mots, pas les miens. Vous avez dit « le personnel en place »...

Mme Sarah Clark:

Ce qui nous préoccupe, ce sont les fonctionnaires.

M. Martin Shields:

J'essaie seulement de suivre votre discours. J'essaie de le clarifier. Vous avez dit qu'il existe des règlements que le personnel en place pourrait faire appliquer; cela sous-entend qu'il ne le fait pas.

Mme Sarah Clark:

On nous a effectivement signalé des situations de cet ordre. Le Syndicat international des gens de mer a étudié un cas de non-application des règlements, il y a quelques années... Nous savons d'ailleurs que Transports Canada, comme d'autres organisations, manque de ressources pour faire appliquer tous ces règlements; nous savons aussi que le mécanisme de coordination visant à garantir que les navires et armateurs s'y conforment donne du fil à retordre au ministère.

M. Martin Shields:

Voilà où je voulais en venir.

Mme Sarah Clark:

Ah, désolée: je vois. Excusez-moi. En ce qui concerne le projet Hebron, que vous avez cité comme exemple, d'après ce que nous avons compris, un des dragueurs européens est arrivé, il a fait le travail en un mois et quelque, avec un équipage entièrement étranger, même s'il détenait un permis de cabotage.

M. Martin Shields:

Ni vu ni connu.

Pour résumer, selon vous, nous disposons de tous les règlements nécessaires. Nous avons du personnel en place. Il suffit que ce personnel fasse son travail.

Mme Sarah Clark:

Nous croyons que le personnel n'est pas suffisant.

M. Martin Shields:

Ce n'est pas ce que vous avez dit.

Mme Sarah Clark:

Pardon. Nous ne venons pas ici pour demander de l'argent. D'autres groupes visés par l'AECG l'ont fait pour leur industrie. Ce n'est pas notre cas. Pour renforcer notre capacité à faire respecter ces exigences, nous croyons que l'argent sera beaucoup mieux dépensé par les pouvoirs publics.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci.

Mme Sarah Clark:

Nous croyons qu'on manque de personnel, actuellement.

Merci.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci d'avoir apporté cet éclaircissement. Je l'apprécie.

Merci, madame la présidente.

(1635)

La présidente:

Monsieur Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Kelly a demandé tout à l'heure si l'on vous avait consulté. Vous êtes ici aujourd'hui, bien sûr, mais j'ai entendu quelques réponses mitigées. Quand vous avez dit ce matin que vous parliez avec Transports Canada, j'ai vu Martin secouer la tête. J'aimerais donc avoir une réponse de chacun d'entre vous.

Avez-vous été consultés au sujet de ces modifications?

M. James Given:

Je vais vous donner une réponse qui n'en est pas une.

J'ai eu de nombreuses rencontres. Tout le monde connaît l'intérêt que je porte au cabotage, au projet de loi C-30, à l'AECG, au projet de loi C-49, à la Chine et à je ne sais plus combien de sujets connexes, bien sûr, mais si l'on parle de consultation, je considère que la rencontre d'aujourd'hui en est une.

M. Gagan Sikand:

À part aujourd'hui.

M. James Given:

À part aujourd'hui?

M. Gagan Sikand:

Pouvez-vous me répondre par oui ou par non, parce que je dois partager mon temps de parole avec mon collègue.

M. James Given:

Peut-être.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Entendu.

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Avant la signature de l'accord, nous n'avons pas été consultés du tout, mais, en ce qui concerne sa mise en oeuvre, nous avons plusieurs fois sollicité des rencontres. On nous a invités à des rencontres d'information.

M. James Given:

Parlez-vous de l'AECG ou du projet de loi C-49?

M. Gagan Sikand:

Du projet de loi C-49. [Français]

M. Martin Fournier:

Il n'y a pas eu de consultation relative au projet de loi C-49.

Comme nous l'avons mentionné, il y a eu des consultations relatives à l'accord économique avec l'Europe à partir du moment où il a été signé. Avant la signature, il n'y a pas eu de consultation de l'industrie nationale. Nous savons que les entreprises internationales ont été consultées, mais pas l'industrie canadienne. Nous pouvons donc dire qu'il n'y a pas vraiment eu de consultation de ce côté.

Une fois l'accord signé, un groupe de travail s'est réuni pendant près de deux ans. Pratiquement tous les intervenants ici y ont participé. Certaines des choses que nous avons demandées à plusieurs reprises se sont retrouvées dans le projet de loi C-30. Cependant, la principale demande était la mise sur pied de ce guichet unique, et cela a été totalement oublié. [Traduction]

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Jean, vous avez parlé de quatre sociétés qui aimeraient s'implanter au Québec. D'où viennent-elles? De quel pays?

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

C'est pareil. Elles sont belges et hollandaises; d'ailleurs, ce n'est pas seulement le Québec qui les intéresse: c'est tout le Canada.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Sarah, vous avez dit qu'il y avait un écart salarial appréciable, qu'un capitaine canadien gagne 15 000 $, alors qu'un capitaine hollandais gagne 7 000 $. Pouvez-vous nous parler de vos frais d'exploitation? Vous nous avez dit que vous êtes formés pour lutter contre les incendies. Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée des facteurs qui augmentent vos frais d'exploitation?

Mme Sarah Clark:

Nos frais d'équipage représentent environ le tiers de nos coûts; le carburant, un autre tiers; et puis il y a tout le reste.

Quand je vous ai donné ces chiffres, que notre industrie avait déjà communiqués, je vous donne une idée plutôt optimiste des sommes qui sont payées. Les chiffres de Jim sont probablement plus précis. Donc, quand nous disons que leurs frais d'équipage sont environ trois fois plus bas que les nôtres, en fait, très souvent, ils sont probablement encore plus bas.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Dernière question: avez-vous des contrats à l'étranger?

Mme Sarah Clark:

Pas à l'heure actuelle, non. Nous travaillons dans tout le Canada.

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Nous, oui. Nous avons des contrats en République dominicaine, au Mexique et dans les îles Vierges britanniques.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Et quand vous travaillez en dehors du Canada, est-ce que vous appliquez toujours les normes canadiennes?

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Oui, avec des équipages canadiens.

Mme Sarah Clark:

Voilà le problème des dragueurs canadiens et voilà pourquoi nous parlons de réciprocité. Nous avons tous les deux des navires disponibles. Auparavant, les nôtres circulaient dans le monde entier. Le problème, c'est que nos marchés sont si éloignés. Nous ne pouvons pas travailler aux États-Unis, à cause de la loi Jones. Pour Jean-Phillippe, basé sur la côte Est, il n'y avait aucune ouverture dans aucun des marchés européens en dehors du cadre de l'AECG; voilà pourquoi nous devons nous tourner vers l'Amérique du Sud, l'Australie ou la Nouvelle-Zélande.

Nos coûts d'installation de chantier sont si élevés qu'il est très difficile d'être concurrentiels dans les autres marchés; c'est un casse-tête pour les entreprises, parce que ces dragueurs ne sont pas bon marché. Ils coûtent très cher. Pour nous, le prix varie entre 30 millions et 60 millions de dollars, vu la taille des navires, sans parler de l'entretien continu, qui coûte cher aussi. Quand on planifie ses investissements, on ne veut pas dépendre des aléas du marché canadien, mais c'est très difficile pour nous d'aller ailleurs.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci. Je ne sais pas s'il reste du temps.

La présidente:

Il reste deux minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est un bon début.

J'ai entendu dire quelques fois aujourd'hui que les navires étaient devenus moins polluants. J'aimerais savoir si vous êtes d'accord, surtout quand on pense au diesel marine.

(1640)

M. James Given:

Je vous parlerai de la flotte intérieure canadienne. Pour cette flotte, un nouveau programme de construction navale est en cours depuis quelques années. Je pense à la Canada Steamship Lines, à l'Algoma Central ou au Groupe Desgagné. Tous ces armateurs ont renouvelé leur flotte et ils sont tous passés à des carburants plus propres. Tous envisagent aussi d'installer des épurateurs dans certains de leurs vieux navires. Je crois que tout le monde convient que la navigation est le mode de transport de marchandises le plus écologique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous vous êtes inquiété du risque que des navires du monde entier commencent à repositionner des conteneurs vides. Il s'agit de déplacements « sur une base non payante ». Les entreprises ne peuvent déplacer que leurs propres conteneurs. Elles ne peuvent pas se pointer et déplacer les conteneurs de quelqu'un d'autre. Est-ce que c'est juste?

M. James Given:

Quand je lis le libellé, je ne sais pas si on a clarifié les questions relatives à l'affrètement, à la propriété et ainsi de suite. Il va falloir expliquer clairement ce que signifie « sur une base non payante ». On parle encore de 400 $ et de 500 $, sans compter d'autres éléments; je crois donc qu'il va falloir fouiller un peu plus loin.

Des navires étrangers, il y en a toujours. Ils arrivent et ils repartent. L'importation et l'exportation, cela existe depuis Mathusalem et cela n'est pas prêt de disparaître. Mais il s'agit ici de quelque chose de différent. Ils arrivent, ils ne participent pas au commerce et ensuite ils repartent.

Ce qu'ils veulent faire maintenant, c'est probablement de ramasser quelque chose en cours de route, parce qu'ils ne vont pas laisser les navires ici: la saison est trop courte; la Voie maritime ferme; ils doivent faire sortir les navires. Ils veulent embarquer quelque chose entre les déplacements, peut-être pour payer le carburant ou autre chose.

Que veut dire « base payante »? Est-ce que le navire fait ses frais ou non? Peut-être pouvez-vous me l'expliquer, parce que je n'en sais rien.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je le pourrais, mais on ne me donne pas de temps de parole.

La présidente:

Madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup. J'espère que ce n'est pas de mon temps de parole dont on parle.

J'aimerais vous poser quelques questions qui me sont venues à l'esprit pendant votre témoignage. Elles ne sont pas nécessairement reliées, mais j'aimerais suivre la piste des frais de main-d'oeuvre et des salaires sur laquelle mon collègue M. Sikand s'est engagé.

J'imagine que j'ai toujours cru que nous avions des normes de sécurité et des frais de main d'oeuvre similaires à ceux que l'on trouve en Europe. Pouvez-vous m'expliquer pourquoi ces salaires sont si différents? Pourquoi est-ce qu'un capitaine canadien gagne 15 000 $, alors qu'un capitaine européen gagne 7 000 $? Comment les armateurs peuvent-ils obtenir des coûts aussi avantageux? [Français]

M. Martin Fournier:

Je pourrais donner un exemple simple. L'étude réalisée il y a deux ans par Ernst & Young et Innovation maritime donnait l'exemple d'un équipage danois qui pourrait, en vertu de l'accord économique, venir faire du cabotage au Canada. Le bateau danois pourrait avoir un capitaine danois et un équipage philippin, ukrainien ou autres, puisque le pavillon de ce bateau le permet. Au Canada, il faut que l'équipage soit complètement canadien. Il est donc impossible de leur faire concurrence. Le capitaine danois aurait peut-être un taux de rémunération qui ressemble à ce qu'on offre ici, mais le reste de l'équipage serait payé selon d'autres conditions. C'est tout simplement cela. [Traduction]

Mme Kelly Block:

Plus tôt, nous avons entendu que la plupart des conteneurs vides sont acheminés d'un port à un autre par train ou par camion, pas par bateau. Pouvez-vous le confirmer? Si tel est le cas, qu'est-ce que le projet de loi C-49 implique pour les emplois des gens de mer? [Français]

M. Martin Fournier:

La majorité des conteneurs vides est effectivement transportée par train, et non par navire. Le problème que pose le projet de loi C-49, c'est qu'on élargit la brèche qui a été ouverte avec l’accord économique avec l'Europe. Même avant cet accord, nous avions tenu des discussions et on nous avait demandé ce que nous pensions de la possibilité de confier le transport de conteneurs vides à des navires étrangers. Nous avions dit non à cela. Tout cela avait été oublié, puis cette question est revenue avec l'AECG. Il y avait alors l'accord sur le transport des conteneurs vides, le transport de vrac et de conteneurs pleins entre Montréal et Halifax, ainsi que le dragage. On parle maintenant de transport de conteneurs vides ouvert à tous. Dans certains ports, on s'est déjà interrogé sur le fait que ce soit uniquement entre Montréal et Halifax et on a demandé pourquoi on n'offrirait pas cette possibilité à d'autres ports, notamment celui de Québec et de Sept-Îles. En outre, d'autres pays demandent pourquoi le transport de conteneurs vides, alors qu'il est ouvert aux Européens, ne le serait pas également dans leur cas.

Comme vous pouvez le constater, on vient d'élargir cette brèche, une modification à la fois. C'est exactement ce qui se produit. Or, c'est la crainte que nous avions au départ, lorsque la question sur le transport de conteneurs vides a été soulevée la première fois.

(1645)

[Traduction]

Mme Kelly Block:

Une autre question me vient à l'esprit. Peut-être que vous en avez parlé et que je ne vous ai pas entendu. Est-ce que cet assouplissement des règles de cabotage suscite chez vous des préoccupations concrètes en matière de sécurité?

M. James Given:

Certainement.

Comme je vous l'ai dit, j'ai eu et j'ai encore la chance de participer aux activités de la FIOT et d'inspecter des navires étrangers qui viennent au Canada et naviguent dans le monde entier. Ils n'y a aucune commune mesure. On a 5 % des armateurs de navires battant pavillon étranger qui sont respectueux des lois — j'irais même jusqu'à 8 % — et puis il y a la majorité qui ne l'est pas et qui échappe à tout contrôle.

Pensez à un navire battant pavillon panaméen qui n'accoste jamais au Panama. Qui va l'inspecter? Qui va s'assurer que les mesures de sécurité sont en place et ainsi de suite? Si ce navire fait escale au Canada, l'État du port s'en charge, Dieu merci. Les fonctionnaires de Transports Canada, qui font de l'excellent travail, vont monter à bord et l'inspecter en vertu des conventions internationales. Le navire ne sera peut-être pas conforme aux normes canadiennes, mais il risque au moins de respecter les normes internationales.

Quand on fouille dans la base de données sur les inspections de navires de Transports Canada, on trouve que des centaines de navires ont été interdits de navigation à leur arrivée au Canada parce qu'ils ne respectaient pas les règles sur la prévention des incendies, la lutte contre la pollution, l'alimentation, etc. On les harponne quand ils viennent ici, mais avec un pavillon du Panama ou de n'importe quel autre pays, il n'y a pas de régime d'inspection; le navire n'y jette jamais l'ancre.

Je ne suis pas géographe, mais je sais qu'un bateau immatriculé dans les Îles Marshall doit naviguer drôlement longtemps avant d'arriver à Reston, en Virginie. Il n'y a pas de contrôle. Je fais des blagues et je ne devrais pas, parce que c'est très grave.

Tout récemment, en Australie, deux marins sont morts sur un navire étranger en cabotage, parce qu'ils ne pouvaient pas obtenir de services médicaux. Ce genre de choses arrive tout le temps, partout dans le monde; je ne crois pas que nous voulons en être complices.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aubin.

Mme Sarah Clark:

Madame la présidente, je dois malheureusement vous quitter.

Je suis sûr que mon collègue, Jean-Philippe, pourra répondre à vos questions.

La présidente:

Merci, madame Clark. Nous avons apprécié vos observations. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vous souhaite un bon retour.

Ma prochaine question est hypothétique, certes, mais elle va peut-être me permettre de mieux comprendre certains points.

La réciprocité est absente de l'accord, mais imaginons pendant une minute qu'elle y soit présente.

Malgré le fait que le transport des conteneurs et le dragage me semblent impliquer deux approches totalement différentes, j'aimerais savoir si l'industrie canadienne pourrait être compétitive, compte tenu des règles, des salaires et des conditions de travail. Sinon, sommes-nous condamnés à nous limiter au marché canadien et à le protéger du fait que nous sommes les seuls à fonctionner selon ces règlements?

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Je peux vous répondre pour ce qui est du dragage.

Comme on l'expliquait tout à l'heure, l'Europe n'est pas si éloignée; c'est Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon, la Guadeloupe et Saint-Martin. Nous sommes déjà présents dans ces zones et nous faisons actuellement concurrence aux dragueurs européens. Ceux-ci choisissent les gros contrats parce qu'ils possèdent de l'équipement de taille, mais de notre côté, nous essayons de nous trouver une niche en tant qu'organismes complémentaires. Cela dit, nous pouvons effectivement être compétitifs. Même s'il faut deux semaines pour nous rendre en République dominicaine à partir du Canada, nous réussissons à obtenir des contrats.

M. Robert Aubin:

En va-t-il de même pour le continent européen?

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Il y a tellement à faire là-bas que cela nécessite beaucoup d'équipement. Pour s'y rendre, le coût de mobilisation serait trop élevé. En plus, ces gens occupent déjà leur propre marché.

M. Robert Aubin:

Plus tôt, vous avez parlé de la Belgique et des Pays-Bas. J'imagine qu'il y a un lien entre les nombreux canaux à entretenir et le dragage, et que c'est pour cela que ces pays ont développé une si grosse industrie.

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

C'est exact.

M. Robert Aubin:

Voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose, monsieur Fournier?

M. Martin Fournier:

Je crois que M. Brunet a bien couvert la question du dragage.

Quant à la question de savoir s'il serait possible pour les armateurs canadiens de compétitionner en Europe si jamais le marché était réciproque, la réponse est non. Comme je l'ai mentionné tout à l'heure, les navires européens ont des coûts d'exploitation nettement moins élevés que les nôtres.

Il y a un autre élément. La majorité de la flotte canadienne est une flotte de lac. Ces navires ne sont pas conçus pour naviguer en haute mer, ce qui est nécessaire pour atteindre ces marchés.

Quoi qu'il en soit, la principale raison, c'est que les coûts d'exploitation sont différents des nôtres.

(1650)

M. Robert Aubin:

En ce qui concerne l'industrie du dragage, on considérait que c'était très loin, mais cela arrive nettement plus rapidement que prévu. Le passage du Nord-Ouest dans l'Arctique sera une source de contrats pour votre industrie. C'est à la fois chez nous et très loin, étant donné l'immensité de notre territoire.

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Pour l'instant, on ne sait pas trop ce qu'il en est à cet égard. La cartographie du Nord n'est pas complète. Il pourrait y avoir du volume, mais à l'heure actuelle, les routes recherchées sont celles qui sont actuellement navigables. C'est quand même très loin et cela demande beaucoup de mobilisation. De plus, la période de dragage est très courte. Il faut avoir de l'équipement très performant pour faire un grand volume, et ce, en peu de temps.

M. Robert Aubin:

Les possibilités d'expansion de votre industrie sont extrêmement limitées.

M. Jean-Philippe Brunet:

Oui, elles sont minimes.

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord.

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous avons épuisé la liste préliminaire. Y a-t-il d'autres questions à poser de ce côté-ci? Je crois qu'il n'y en a pas non plus de l'autre côté.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je voulais reprendre là où nous nous étions interrompus. Je m'amusais bien.

Pour illustrer le cabotage, j'essayais de trouver un équivalent terrestre qui serait compris par plus de monde. Disons que je pars de la Virginie avec mon 18 roues, je conduis jusqu'à Ottawa et je livre mon chargement. Une autre cargaison m'attend à Montréal, à destination de la Virginie. Selon les règles de cabotage que nous proposons aujourd'hui, je pourrais conduire moi-même ma remorque d'Ottawa à Montréal pour prendre la marchandise. Selon le régime actuel, par contre, je dois décrocher ma remorque et la faire tirer par quelqu'un d'autre jusqu'à Montréal pendant que je roule en arrière avec mon tracteur. N'est-ce pas? C'est bien cela?

M. James Given:

Je ne suis pas un spécialiste du camionnage, mais je suis prêt à tout essayer. Dans l'ALENA, par exemple, je sais qu'il y a des dispositions qui permettent actuellement le camionnage transfrontalier entre le Mexique et les États-Unis. D'après ce que je comprends, cette disposition n'a jamais été mise en application parce que les Teamsters la bloquent devant les tribunaux depuis que l'ALENA a été négocié. Ceci dit, je ne suis pas un spécialiste du camionnage.

Prenons l'exemple du transport aérien, dont je ne suis pas un spécialiste non plus. Disons qu'un avion canadien vole de Toronto à Berlin. Est-ce que c'est considéré comme du cabotage?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si le vol de retour part de Londres et qu'il doit voyager à vide entre les deux...

M. James Given:

Tout cela est considéré comme du cabotage.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... êtes-vous en train de me dire qu'on va devoir utiliser un gros porteur, du genre, comment les appelle-t-on...

M. James Given:

C'est considéré comme du cabotage.

J'ai un autre exemple, directement lié à la circulation maritime. Du pétrole ou du bitume quitte les sables bitumineux à destination du Texas, où on le transforme avant de le recharger dans un navire pour le ramener au Canada. Tout cela est considéré comme du cabotage, à cause de l'origine du chargement. C'est la définition de Transports Canada. Voilà le genre de situation devant laquelle on se retrouve. Selon le propriétaire de ce navire — j'ai un exemple précis en tête — le cabotage commence seulement quand le navire pénètre dans les eaux canadiennes, alors qu'en réalité, il commence dès qu'on embarque le chargement au Texas, parce que c'est une cargaison d'origine canadienne. L'ensemble du voyage est du cabotage. C'est pareil pour les compagnies d'aviation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans le contexte du projet de loi qui nous intéresse, le C-49, ce que l'on déplace, ce sont des conteneurs vides, pas des conteneurs pleins. Si je...

M. James Given:

Ils sont quand même considérés comme des marchandises. Le conteneur est le produit que l'on déplace.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est un conteneur vide. C'est une remorque vide. S'il s'agit de déplacer un conteneur vide de l'endroit où on l'a vidé jusqu'à l'endroit où on va le remplir, pourquoi devrait-on engager un tiers pour le faire? Voilà ce que j'essaie de comprendre.

M. James Given:

Je le répète, ce déplacement se fait déjà. Je crois que nous avons établi qu'il se fait en train ou en camion. Maintenant, l'armateur étranger veut s'en charger. Pourquoi?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Parce que le bateau arrive avec le conteneur à bord. L'armateur veut déplacer son conteneur. Il ne déplace pas le conteneur de quelqu'un d'autre. Il déplace son conteneur jusqu'au prochain port pour le faire remplir, l'embarquer et l'emporter ailleurs. J'essaie de comprendre ce que...

M. James Given:

C'est quand même un voyage de cabotage et, selon les définitions du cabotage en vigueur, c'est bien ce que c'est. C'est considéré comme du cabotage, parce que l'on déplace quelque chose entre deux ports canadiens.

Il faut que ce soit très clair. L'armateur peut toujours déplacer ce conteneur. Il lui suffit de demander une dérogation, qui lui sera accordée si aucun armateur canadien ne veut s'en charger.

Après avoir fait déplacer ces conteneurs en train et en camion pendant tant d'années, pourquoi changer les choses tout à coup? En vertu de l'AECG, c'était autorisé pour certaines raisons; je crois aux raisons que l'on m'a confiées. On a fait des compromis. On négociait. Voilà. Cependant, si on assouplit les règles, si l'on libéralise encore plus le cabotage aux termes du projet de loi C-49, je crois qu'on ouvre la porte aux navires battant n'importe quel pavillon et qu'on laisse le champ libre aux armateurs sans scrupule.

On a fait des concessions dans le cadre d'une négociation commerciale. Nous le comprenons tous. On fait des concessions tous les jours. Comment en est-on arrivé à ces concessions... Comme je l'ai dit, on me l'a expliqué et j'ai accepté ce qu'on m'a dit. Maintenant, il s'agit de savoir si nous voulons délibérément rendre le cabotage plus accessible. Nous ne négocions avec personne d'autre que nous-mêmes, aujourd'hui, par rapport à l'avenir du cabotage.

(1655)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Badaway, brièvement.

M. Vance Badawey:

Cela me rappelle quelque chose qui s'est passé dans ma localité il y a quelques années. Un navire étranger est arrivé dans notre port; il transitait par le canal; toutes les personnes à bord étaient malades, sans avoir la moindre idée de la maladie dont elles étaient atteintes.

Monsieur Given, dans votre expérience, quand un navire étranger arrive, quel est le protocole à suivre? Je peux vous dire quel protocole on a suivi à l'époque, il y a cinq ou six ans à peine. Le protocole consistait à s'en laver les mains. Santé canada s'en est lavé les mains. Nous avons ordonné à la Voie maritime d'interdire l'accès de notre localité aux membres de l'équipage, parce que nous ne savions pas quelle était leur maladie.

C'en est arrivé au point où, pour des motifs humanitaires et charitables, j'ai demandé au service des incendies d'intervenir. Nous sommes une ville de 20 000 habitants et il a fallu que j'envoie les pompiers locaux évaluer une situation qui aurait pu se transformer en incident international. Personne n'avait aucune idée de ce qui les attendait.

Donc, pour ce qui est des conditions de travail, des protocoles d'intervention dans nos voies navigables et de ce genre de situation, d'après vous, quel protocole devrait-on appliquer quand ces navires arrivent et qu'on découvre des problèmes de santé à bord?

M. James Given:

Encore une fois, je vais prendre la solution de facilité et revenir au système d'autorisation. C'est fait d'avance, il y a des inspections, et essentiellement tout est passé au peigne fin, monsieur Badawey.

Ce genre d'incident est plus fréquent que vous ne le pensez et il n'y a pas de protocole. Encore une fois, comme vous l'avez dit, personne ne veut être mêlé à cela. Le seul protocole que je connaisse fait intervenir les inspecteurs de la Fédération internationale des ouvriers du transport qui prêtent main-forte à ces gens-là. C'est le boulot que je faisais jadis. Nous espérons donc l'intervention d'un membre de la collectivité. Des groupes religieux s'occupent de distribuer des vêtements chauds à ces membres d'équipage lorsqu'ils viennent au Canada en automne, car ces marins ne sont pas prêts pour l'hiver et n'ont pas de vêtements adaptés.

Malheureusement, des personnes meurent sur les navires parce qu'elles ne savent pas où aller ni vers qui se tourner. Il y a des conventions internationales, dont une nouvelle, la convention sur les droits des gens de la mer qui va beaucoup plus loin que tout ce que nous avons déjà eu. Là encore, la clé, c'est le contrôle d'application, qui ne saurait quand même être meilleur que les personnes qui en ont la responsabilité.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à nos témoins.

Avant de suspendre nos travaux, j'aimerais que nous prenions 15 minutes pour les affaires du Comité après le prochain groupe, c'est-à-dire à 18 h 45, ou encore 15 minutes sur notre heure de déjeuner demain, pour régler certaines affaires du Comité. Que préférez-vous: 15 minutes après notre prochain groupe de ce soir ou 15 minutes de notre heure de déjeuner demain pour les affaires du Comité?

M. Vance Badawey:

N'avons-nous pas le temps aujourd'hui, madame la présidente, avant le prochain groupe?

La présidente:

Non, le prochain groupe est attendu à 17 h 15.

M. Vance Badawey:

J'ai 18 h 30 à notre horaire.

La présidente:

C'est que nous avons amputé une demi-heure de notre pause-déjeuner pour accélérer les choses.

M. Vance Badawey:

Excellent, vous êtes d'une efficacité!

La présidente:

Demain soir, nous aurons terminé à 19 h 15 plutôt que 19 h 45.

Quel est le sentiment du Comité?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avons une heure pour le déjeuner demain.

La présidente:

Nous pourrions prendre 15 minutes de notre heure de déjeuner pour discuter des affaires du Comité.

Tout le monde est-il d'accord là-dessus? Très bien, demain nous prendrons 15 minutes de notre heure de déjeuner.

M. Vance Badawey:

Madame la présidente, y aurait-il une occasion ce soir de peut-être présenter un avis de motion?

La présidente:

Occupons-nous des affaires du Comité demain; après discussion avec le Comité, nous verrons ce que nous pouvons faire. C'est ce que je propose.

(1700)

M. Vance Badawey:

Très bien.

La présidente:

Je vais suspendre jusqu'à l'arrivée de notre prochain groupe de témoins.

(1700)

(1715)

La présidente:

Nous reprenons l'étude du projet de loi C-49. Nous accueillons les représentants d'Air Canada et de WestJet Airlines, ainsi qu'un professeur adjoint de l'Université d'Ottawa.

Monsieur McNaney, voulez-vous commencer? [Français]

M. Mike McNaney (vice-président, Affaires industrielles, commerciales et aéroportuaires, WestJet Airlines Ltd.):

Madame la présidente, je vous remercie ainsi que les membres du Comité de m'avoir invité à venir vous parler ce soir.

Je m'appelle Mike McNaney et je suis vice-président des Affaires industrielles, commerciales et aéroportuaires de WestJet. Je suis accompagné d'un de mes collègues, Lorne Mackenzie, qui est le directeur principal des Affaires réglementaires.[Traduction]

Au nom des plus de 12 000 employés de WestJet, nous sommes heureux de participer à vos délibérations sur le projet de loi C-49 et le rôle critique que jouent les compagnies aériennes comme WestJet pour rapprocher les économies et les habitants du Canada entre eux et avec le reste du monde.

Nos investissements et notre croissance des 21 dernières années et plus sont à l'origine de pressions qui font baisser les tarifs aériens, de la stimulation du marché, de la création incroyable de l'emploi dans de nombreux secteurs de l'économie, comme l'aérospatiale, le tourisme et le développement économique régional.[Français]

Notre succès dans une industrie où la concurrence est forte et où les marges sont faibles repose sur nos employés de première ligne, qui s'assurent d'offrir chaque jour un service de qualité à nos invités.[Traduction]

La culture de minutie et de service à nos clients qui nous a valu de gagner des prix est une source d'immense fierté. Ce n'est pas seulement ce que nous faisons; c'est qui nous sommes, et cela a une influence sur notre approche et notre respect de l'obligation que nous avons de maintenir la vigueur de notre licence sociale et économique.

En plus de divers prix que nous avons remportés au fil des ans, cette année nous avons été ravis d'être reconnus par TripAdvisor comme la meilleure ligne aérienne au Canada et d'avoir eu un prix de Travellers' Choice dans la catégorie des lignes moyennes à faible coût en Amérique du Nord. Comme le savent les membres du Comité, ce prix est accordé d'après les commentaires formulés par le public-voyageurs.

Avant de vous donner un survol de nos vues sur le projet de loi, je voudrais situer le contexte plus vaste des activités de WestJet aujourd'hui.

WestJet connaît une évolution extraordinaire depuis son lancement en février 1996, avec ses 200 employés, 3 avions et 5 destinations, toutes dans l'Ouest canadien. En 2016, nous avons transporté plus de 20 millions de passagers. Amener plus de 20 millions de personnes là où elles doivent aller, en toute sécurité et dans les temps, est un défi logistique et opérationnel. Il y a toutes sortes de choses qui peuvent mal aller, et nous faisons de notre mieux pour apporter des correctifs lorsqu'elles vont mal.

Nous offrons plus de 700 vols par jour et accueillons quelque 70 000 passagers par jour, avec des départs aux deux minutes. Notre flotte compte 161 appareils, dont des Q400 de Bombardier, ainsi qu'un avion à fuselage étroit et un autre à fuselage large de Boeing. Cette année, nous commençons à prendre livraison de la dernière version du 737, le 737 MAX et, en 2019, nous prendrons livraison de notre premier Dreamliner 787. Quant au Q400 de Bombardier construit à Toronto, l'an prochain, nous deviendrons le troisième exploitant mondial de Q400, avec la prise de livraison de notre 45e Q400.

Selon notre plus récente étude d'incidences économiques avec nos données d'exploitation de 2016, nos investissements et notre stratégie de croissance en 2016 ont viabilisé plus de 153 000 emplois au Canada, produit plus de 5,3 milliards de dollars de rémunération, contribué à 12 milliards de dollars de dépenses dans le PIB, et représenté des incidences économiques globales de plus de 17,3 milliards de dollars. Ces retombées sur l'emploi et l'économie profitent à tout le pays.

Pour ce qui est de la communication avec nos clients, nous cherchons sans cesse des moyens innovateurs de répondre efficacement à leurs besoins. En avril 2016, nous sommes devenus le premier transporteur canadien à transformer son équipe des médias sociaux en service ouvert 24 heures par jour, 7 jours par semaine, et 365 jours par année. Nous avons pris cette mesure après avoir compris que de plus en plus de consommateurs utilisent les médias sociaux pour communiquer en temps réel avec les compagnies. Notre équipe des médias sociaux travaille désormais dans un centre de contrôle des opérations, 24 heures par jour et 7 jours par semaine, pour répondre instantanément aux questions et aux préoccupations des clients. Nous maintenons aussi les moyens de communication plus traditionnels que sont le courriel et le téléphone pour les clients qui préfèrent ces moyens de communication.

Le centre de contrôle des opérations, ou le CCO, est responsable de tous les aspects de nos opérations quotidiennes: horaire des vols, affectation des équipages, maintenance, gestion des retards dus à la météo et aux retards opérationnels, et services aux passagers. Cette équipe comprend des experts de tous nos secteurs d'activité. Ce ne serait pas lui rendre justice que de se contenter de dire qu'il a été bien reçu. Aujourd'hui, l'interaction de nos clients avec nous sur les enjeux et les questions de service passe à 57 % par les médias sociaux, à 34 % par le courriel, et à 9 % par le téléphone.

Dans la dernière année, nous avons aussi apporté les améliorations suivantes, en collaboration avec l'Office des transports du Canada. Nous avons créé et lancé sur notre site Web un sommaire en langage simple et interrogeable des dispositions de nos tarifs pour les événements les plus susceptibles d'inquiéter les voyageurs, comme les refus d'embarquement, les retards de vols et les pertes de bagages. Nous avons fait paraître un article d'une page dans notre revue de bord pour décrire notre service à la clientèle et expliquer comment nos clients peuvent obtenir de l'information sur leurs droits si quelque chose devait mal aller. Nous avons ajouté un lien d'accès à chaque itinéraire électronique pour informer nos clients de leurs droits et leur indiquer où s'adresser pour un complément d'information.

Cela m'amène aux aspects du projet de loi C-49 qui concerne la protection des passagers. WestJet appuie ces dispositions et le vaste cadre que le projet de loi vise à créer.

Je tiens à signaler au Comité que WestJet a déjà des pénalités automatiques pour un grand nombre des points sur lesquels le projet de loi prévoit un resserrement de la réglementation. Cela comprend les bagages perdus ou endommagés, les retards d'embarquement et les annulations, et les retards sur le tarmac. Nos obligations sont expliquées dans notre tarif, que l'on peut se procurer en ligne et que l'Office et nous-mêmes utilisons pour régler les plaintes.

(1720)



Avec le projet de loi C-49, il y aura des normes uniformes pour tous ces enjeux, et nous sommes d'accord.

Dans le contexte des droits et des obligations, je vous inviterais à faire un examen plus vaste du rôle joué par nos partenaires dans la chaîne d'approvisionnement des voyages. Cela comprend les aéroports, le contrôle de la circulation aérienne, les services frontaliers, l'immigration, la sécurité de l'aviation, ainsi que Transports Canada. Le Parlement et le public passent au peigne fin notre rendement, à juste titre. Cependant, tous ces organismes devraient être soumis aux mêmes exigences en matière de rapports de rendement, ainsi qu'à l'obligation globale de rendre compte des services qu'ils assurent.

Vous aurez sans doute vu des rapports des médias ces dernières semaines au sujet des pannes des systèmes de manutention des bagages dans les aéroports, du manque de personnel dans les centres de contrôle de la circulation aérienne, des déficits de financement de l'ACSTA, et des retards de traitement des habilitations de sécurité pour les employés du domaine de l'aviation. Comment tous ces éléments de la chaîne d'approvisionnement, qui sont tous d'une importance capitale pour les opérations et qui échappent tous complètement à la maîtrise d'une ligne aérienne, s'insèrent-ils dans le nouveau régime d'obligation de rendre compte qu'impose le projet de loi C-49?

Au sujet des coentreprises, WestJet appuie en principe l'approche du gouvernement du Canada à l'égard des coentreprises. Les partenariats de lignes aériennes sont une composante critique de notre modèle d'affaires. WestJet ne fait pas partie d'une alliance internationale. Nous avons par contre plus de 45 partenaires à code partagé et intercompagnies qui offrent tous un plus grand choix et plus de souplesse pour les Canadiens. Conjugués à nos réseaux intérieurs et internationaux, ces partenariats amènent des touristes dans tous les coins du Canada et assurent la connectivité internationale dont notre économie a besoin.

Nous appuyons la politique des coentreprises, mais il y a des questions dont nous discutons avec Transports Canada pour faire clarifier certains points.

En ce qui a trait à la propriété étrangère, les dispositions du projet de loi C-49 concernant la propriété étrangère sont manifestement déjà en vigueur, avec les exemptions accordées à deux transporteurs à très faible coût. Notre préférence, au niveau des politiques, en ce qui concerne la propriété étrangère est que tout changement de limite soit réciproque, particulièrement dans le cas des États-Unis. Le gouvernement a opté pour une approche unilatérale, et, bien sûr, nous respectons sa décision.

Dans le contexte de ce changement unilatéral de politique, nous croyons qu'il est crucial de maintenir au Canada un solide critère de « contrôle de fait ». Il s'agit d'un critère qu'administre l'Office des transports du Canada pour faire en sorte que les nouveaux transporteurs soient contrôlés et gérés par des Canadiens. Nous croyons que les décisions des transporteurs canadiens concernant leurs réseaux devraient se prendre au Canada même au bénéfice des collectivités, du public-voyageurs et des travailleurs canadiens.

J'aimerais aussi rappeler aux membres du Comité que nous avons annoncé récemment la création de notre propre transporteur à très faible coût. Cela s'est fait sans investissement étranger ou sans projet de changement de politique. L'objectif est simple: donner aux Canadiens un plus vaste choix pour leurs fonds de voyage. Nous sommes en consultation avec l'Office et Transports Canada au sujet des approbations réglementaires nécessaires pour commencer le service à la mi-2018.

Quant aux dispositions de l'ACSTA qui permettront aux petits aéroports d'acheter les services de l'ACSTA et aux grands aéroports de faire l'appoint des services, nous jugeons que ces mesures sont des palliatifs.

Les retards imputables à des facteurs comme le contrôle des passagers sont de plus en plus fréquents dans notre exploitation. La tendance est troublante. Dans une perspective de politique, nous avons connu plusieurs années de frustrations à cause du refus du gouvernement d'affecter tout produit du DSPTA et directement aux services de contrôle, que paient nos clients par le DSPTA.

Les dispositions du projet de loi C-49 sont une mesure palliative qui permettra à l'industrie de consacrer plus d'argent aux services que devrait couvrir le DSPTA, selon nous. Nous avons recommandé des réformes globales du modèle de financement et de la gouvernance de l'ACSTA. Nous incitons votre comité à recommander que toutes les sommes provenant du DSPTA soient affectées aux services de contrôle dans les aéroports du Canada.

Avant de terminer, j'aimerais dire un mot sur un autre aspect de l'aviation commerciale qui intéresse sûrement les consommateurs et le Parlement. Vous avez peut-être vu le mois dernier le communiqué de Statistique Canada qui annonçait que les tarifs aériens de base au Canada, aux niveaux intérieur et à l'international, étaient en baisse de 5,4 %, en moyenne, en 2016 comparativement à 2015.

Chez WestJet, notre tarif moyen en 2016 était de 162 $, soit 13 $ de moins qu'en 2015. Notre tarif moyen pour les six premiers mois de cette année était de 158 $, soit un nouveau recul par rapport aux six premiers mois de l'an dernier. Pour mettre ces chiffres en perspective, disons que notre profit moyen par passager dans les six premiers mois de l'année a été de 8,34 $. Je donne ces chiffres en guise de contexte pour les discussions que nous avons sur le concept des pénalités financières.

(1725)

[Français]

En conclusion, WestJet reconnaît que le projet de loi C-49 pourrait profiter à l'industrie de l'aviation et aux consommateurs canadiens. Nous avons hâte de participer aux prochaines discussions avec le Comité, afin d'améliorer l'expérience de voyage dans son ensemble pour tous les Canadiens. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup. Passons maintenant à Air Canada.

Veuillez vous présenter. Vous avez 10 minutes pour vos observations liminaires. [Français]

Mme Lucie Guillemette (vice-présidente exécutive et agente commerciale principale, Air Canada):

Bonjour, madame la présidente.[Traduction]

Bonsoir, membres du Comité.[Français]

Je m'appelle Lucie Guillemette et je suis la vice-présidente générale et la chef des Affaires commerciales d'Air Canada.

Je suis accompagnée ce soir de mes collègues David Rheault et Fitti Lourenco.

Nous sommes ici aujourd'hui pour parler de la modernisation de la Loi sur les transports au Canada, tout particulièrement de l'intention d'améliorer l'expérience des voyageurs.

Air Canada est le plus important transporteur aérien au Canada. En 2016, Air Canada et ses partenaires régionaux ont transporté près de 45 millions de passagers, exploité en moyenne 1 580 vols par jour et proposé des services directs vers plus de 200 destinations sur six continents.

Depuis 2009, nous avons connu une croissance de plus de 50 %, étendant la portée de notre réseau à l'échelle de la planète et réalisant notre ambition de devenir un champion mondial.

Nous avons 30 000 employés, dont 3 000 ont été embauchés au cours des trois dernières années seulement, contribuant ainsi à la création d'emplois au pays.

Air Canada, dont le siège social est à Montréal, exploite quatre plaques tournantes: l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto, celui de Vancouver, l'aéroport Trudeau de Montréal et celui de Calgary. Nous ouvrons le Canada sur le monde et procurons un accès international inégalé aux voyageurs.[Traduction]

Nous avons lancé de nouveaux programmes de formation pour le personnel de première ligne, institué des programmes de gestion du service à la clientèle à bord, amélioré et clarifié notre plan de service à la clientèle, et institué de nouvelles politiques pour garder les familles ensemble à bord, enregistrer ensemble tous les membres d'une même famille à l'embarquement et transporter les instruments de musique. Nous avons également fait oeuvre de pionniers en matière de passes de vol, et de tarifs de marque, offrant plus de choix et de souplesse à nos clients, qui peuvent choisir les attributs et les caractéristiques qui les intéressent le plus.

Nous reconnaissons que les services et les caractéristiques de valeur pour les vacanciers sont bien différents de ceux de la clientèle d'affaires, et nous visons à répondre aux besoins de tous nos segments de clientèle, au Canada et à l'international.

L'industrie du transport aérien est extrêmement concurrentielle, et nous considérons le service comme un grand facteur de différenciation. La stabilité financière et la durabilité nous ont permis de faire des investissements d'importance pour améliorer l'expérience des passagers. Par exemple, nous avons renouvelé notre flotte et acquis des appareils modernes, comme le Boeing 787 et le C Series de Bombardier. Nous avons reconfiguré nos cabines, introduit la nouvelle cabine Économique Privilège, et amélioré les systèmes de divertissement à bord. Nous avons investi dans un nouveau site Web et créé de nouvelles applications pour simplifier l'expérience des passagers.

Pour tous nos efforts, nous sommes très fiers d'avoir été reconnus par Skytrax comme l'un des meilleurs transporteurs nord-américains et d'être le seul transporteur international en Amérique du Nord à s'être vu décerner quatre étoiles. Je peux vous assurer que nous sommes résolus à poursuivre nos efforts d'amélioration de l'expérience de nos passagers au sol, en vol et au débarquement.

Dans le régime actuel, les transporteurs ont des normes différentes et offrent des indemnités différentes dans un système fondé sur les plaintes. Il conviendrait d'avoir un ensemble clair de normes pour tous les transporteurs, sans toutefois imposer un fardeau financier indu aux transporteurs ou limiter leur capacité de se distinguer par leurs politiques de service à la clientèle.

Le projet de loi C-49 renferme des mesures positives pour jeter les fondements du processus de réglementation, mais nous avons des réserves, et j'aimerais en aborder quelques-unes.

La première est la simplification du régime. Le régime proposé s'appliquerait aux vols à destination et au départ du Canada. Cela complique les choses pour les transporteurs et fait naître de la confusion pour les passagers, puisque d'autres pays ont d'autres régimes qui pourraient ne pas être assortis des mêmes règles, exemptions et niveaux d'indemnités. Ainsi, dans un cas de refus d'embarquement sur un vol en partance des États-Unis pour le Canada, faudra-t-il appliquer le régime canadien ou le régime américain? Pour simplifier le régime et en accroître l'efficacité, nous proposons qu'il se limite aux vols en partance du Canada, vu que le régime américain ne s'applique qu'aux vols en partance des États-Unis.

Nous proposons également que dans le cas des vols à code partagé, la demande d'indemnité soit adressée au transporteur d'exploitation, comme dans le régime européen. Ces rajustements simplifieraient le régime pour les transporteurs et les passagers, permettraient d'accélérer le versement de l'indemnité et écarteraient le risque de double indemnité.

En second lieu, Air Canada est d'accord sur les principes d'harmonisation des règles de responsabilité pour les bagages. Le projet de loi devrait, par contre, reconnaître que les passagers sont déjà protégés par la Convention de Montréal, dans le cas des voyages internationaux, qui fixent des règles claires et convergentes applicables à l'échelle internationale. Nous pensons donc que les règles prévues dans le projet de loi devraient se limiter aux voyages intérieurs et être harmonisées avec les règles de la Convention de Montréal. Cela simplifierait également les règles pour les transporteurs et lèverait toute confusion pour les passagers.

(1730)



En troisième lieu, il faudrait appliquer une même décision à tous les passagers d'un même vol. Dans sa forme actuelle, le projet de loi pourrait permettre également un type généralisé d'indemnités, qui ne tiendrait pas compte de la situation particulière de chaque passager. Par exemple, si un passager reçoit une indemnité pour un retard, la même indemnité pourrait peut-être valoir pour tous les passagers du même vol. La décision d'étendre l'indemnité aux autres passagers ne devrait pas être arbitraire, mais devrait tenir compte de la situation particulière de chaque passager. Le passager d'un vol de correspondance qui arrive en retard, mais qui attrape le vol suivant, ne subit pas de retard à la fin.

Le quatrième point concerne les modifications futures. Les changements futurs devraient être transparents et s'appliquer à tous, passagers et transporteurs compris. Actuellement, Air Canada craint que le projet de loi ne donne à l'Office des transports du Canada le pouvoir de prendre des règlements en dehors des situations particulières prévues dans le projet de loi. Nous demandons au Comité de clarifier cette formulation pour préciser que le pouvoir de réglementation de l'Office est compatible avec la portée du projet de loi.

Le cinquième point concerne les coentreprises et la propriété étrangère. Les changements à la façon dont le gouvernement examine les coentreprises sont très positifs. Selon notre expérience et d'autres exemples relevés ailleurs dans le monde, les coentreprises sont des moyens innovateurs pour les transporteurs d'étendre leurs réseaux, et d'ajouter de nouvelles destinations pour leurs passagers, de trouver des liens d'efficacité, et d'offrir de nouvelles options de prix à leurs passagers. Les coentreprises nous permettent de développer l'infrastructure de l'aviation canadienne en construisant des superautoroutes internationales.

S'il est excellent de donner au ministre des Transports la capacité d'envisager des coentreprises, vu que son ministère est le mieux équipé pour comprendre les complexités de notre industrie, il reste que certaines des modifications ne sont pas compatibles avec les pratiques exemplaires dans le monde. Par exemple, mentionnons la capacité du ministre de réexaminer une nouvelle coentreprise deux ans après son approbation. La période initiale de toute coentreprise est consacrée à l'amélioration de la collaboration entre partenaires, alors que les changements les plus importants qui concernent le réseau et les tarifs prennent plus de temps à mettre en oeuvre. Nous proposons de repousser le mandat d'examen pour qu'il commence avec la mise en oeuvre plutôt qu'avec l'approbation de la coentreprise.

Le projet de loi prévoit aussi des sanctions qui sont trop punitives, compte tenu de la nature commerciale des coentreprises. En effet, la peine d'emprisonnement pourrait dissuader un partenaire éventuel de même envisager la possibilité d'une coentreprise. Ces enjeux, à eux seuls, pourraient être un obstacle de taille à l'utilisation des avantages du projet de loi. Nous demandons au Comité de se pencher avec soin sur les suggestions que nous faisons dans notre présentation sur ce point.

Quant à la propriété étrangère, Air Canada est d'accord. Toutefois, nous demandons d'apporter des rajustements pour empêcher les investisseurs étrangers d'exercer une influence négative sur les transporteurs canadiens ou de contourner l'esprit du projet de loi. Nous recommandons aussi des changements qui permettraient d'instaurer sans tarder la nouvelle structure de propriété.

(1735)



Enfin, je tiens à insister sur le fait que nos activités se déroulent dans un environnement très complexe et que la collaboration et l'efficacité de nombreux intervenants sont indispensables à l'amélioration globale de l'expérience des voyageurs, notamment les aéroports, l'ACSTA, l'ASFC et Nav Canada.

Malheureusement, la compagnie aérienne a trop souvent à gérer toutes les conséquences négatives pour les passagers, mais elle le fait parce que c'est la bonne chose à faire pour ses clients. Bien que le projet de loi oblige les transporteurs à fournir des données à l'Office des transports du Canada et à Transports Canada, toutes les autres parties prenantes du système devraient être tenues aussi responsables de leurs activités et devraient soumettre des données de manière transparente et publique.

Nous invitons aussi le gouvernement et les membres du comité à étudier les mesures à mettre en place pour que tous les organismes contrôlés par le gouvernement contribuent également à l'amélioration de l'expérience des passagers et soutiennent la croissance des transporteurs canadiens. Après tout, nous sommes de puissants moteurs de développement économique. Si le monde a effectivement besoin de plus de pays semblables au Canada, nous voulons répondre à son attente.

Nous vous remercions de nous avoir donné l'occasion d'exprimer notre point de vue et nous avons hâte de répondre à vos questions.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous entendrons maintenant Marina Pavlovic, professeure adjointe à la faculté de droit de l'Université d'Ottawa.

Mme Marina Pavlovic (professeure adjointe, Université d'Ottawa, Faculté de droit, à titre personnel):

Bonsoir, madame la présidente et mesdames et messieurs les membres du comité. Je rappelle aussi que nous sommes ici en territoire algonquin non cédé.

Merci de me donner l'occasion de témoigner et de faire valoir le point de vue des chercheurs dans l'étude du projet de loi C-49, et notamment de la partie qui porte sur la Déclaration des droits de passagers aériens, question qui revêt assurément une grande importance pour les Canadiens.

Je suis professeure adjointe à la section de la common law de la faculté de droit de l'Université d'Ottawa, et mon champ de compétence est celui des droits des consommateurs dans l'économie numérique, dont le réseau contemporain transcende les frontières. Mes travaux portent par exemple sur la protection du consommateur, le règlement des différends et l'accès à la justice. Je siège également, à titre de membre désigné par les groupes de consommateurs, au conseil d'administration du bureau du commissaire aux plaintes relatives aux services de télécommunications, le CPST. Il s'agit de l'ombudsman des services de télécommunications. Je comparais toutefois à titre personnel et les opinions que j'exprimerai ne sont que les miennes.

Tout récemment, mes travaux ont porté sur le code des services sans fil, déclaration des droits des consommateurs canadiens de ces services, ainsi que sur le règlement des différends, notamment les programmes de protection qui accueillent les plaintes des consommateurs. Je veux faire profiter le comité de mes compétences dans ces grands domaines de la protection des consommateurs, notamment à propos du code des services sans fil.

Les secteurs des télécommunications et des transports aériens sont certes très différents, mais, sur le plan des droits des consommateurs et des réparations à leur accorder, les similitudes sont importantes. Mes propos porteront sur les articles 17 à 19 du projet de loi, qui prévoient un régime comprenant une déclaration des droits des passagers aériens.

J'aborderai trois sujets: la nécessité d'une déclaration des droits, les droits des passagers et les obligations des transporteurs aux termes du projet de loi et les mécanismes de recours relatifs aux droits prévus dans le projet de loi.

Pourquoi faut-il une déclaration des droits? L'actuel régime de tarifications compliquées et de contrats des différents transporteurs est inefficace et trop complexe. Divers facteurs jouent, et il est difficile voire impossible aux consommateurs de connaître à l'avance leurs droits et leurs recours. Les forces du marché ne peuvent à elles seules régler le problème. Les Canadiens ont besoin d'une déclaration des droits des passagers aériens qui accorde un minimum de droits uniforme aux consommateurs et, à l'inverse, un certain minimum d'obligations pour les transporteurs.

Des régimes de droits semblables existent ailleurs et, au Canada, on en trouve dans d'autres secteurs. J'ai déjà dit que, par exemple, un code des services sans fil impose des obligations aux fournisseurs de ces services, et un code récemment mis en place pour les fournisseurs de services de télévision accorde un certain minimum de droits aux consommateurs.

La bonne façon d'établir ce minimum de droits, c'est d'imposer un code contraignant qui viserait l'ensemble de l'industrie. C'est à l'avantage aussi bien des consommateurs que de l'industrie. Aux premiers, ce code apporte un ensemble clair de droits garantis dans un seul texte. Cet ensemble clair de droits fonde et renforce leur confiance envers l'industrie. Il favorise aussi la concurrence sur le marché. Les transporteurs tiennent là une occasion de se démarquer de leurs concurrents en assurant un service de qualité supérieure. La déclaration des droits est un minimum, pas un plafond.

Voilà qui m'amène au point suivant: les droits des passagers et obligations des transporteurs aux termes du projet de loi. En réalité, le projet de loi C-49 n'établit pas la déclaration des droits des consommateurs. Son paragraphe 86.11(1) définit les grands paramètres des questions que la future déclaration, qui prendra la forme d'un règlement, doit couvrir. Il s'agit du fondement de la déclaration à venir. La liste des paramètres, des questions à couvrir, est fouillée, mais non exhaustive. Une certaine latitude est laissée au ministre quant à la portée et au champ d'application ainsi qu'à la forme du futur règlement.

Les droits qui figurent sur la liste sont semblables à ceux qui se trouvent dans d'autres régimes et ces droits correspondent généralement aux types de plainte les plus courants dont les médias font de plus en plus largement état. Il peut toutefois exister d'autres types de différend dont nous n'avons pas encore entendu parler. Il est donc impérieux que la liste reste inchangée ou soit étoffée. Le comité ne doit pas non plus réduire la liste. S'il le faisait, certains droits disparaîtraient, de sorte que nous aurions, comme en ce moment, un système à plusieurs vitesses. Cela vaut aussi pour la portée géographique, pour qu'on puisse se saisir de demandes qui portent notamment sur les vols à destination ou en provenance du Canada et les vols intérieurs.

Le paragraphe 86.11(4) du projet de loi dispose que les droits sont réputés figurer au tarif du transporteur à moins que celui-ci ne prévoie des conditions plus avantageuses. Il vise donc à faire en sorte que la déclaration des droits établisse des normes minimales et que les transporteurs puissent adopter une série de droits qui va plus loin.

(1740)



Ce qui me préoccupe, c'est la formulation. Elle laisse beaucoup de latitude et elle est avare d'information: qui fera l'évaluation, quand, comment et à quelle fréquence, pour que nous sachions quels transporteurs respectent les obligations de la déclaration, vont au-delà ou restent à court. Le code des services sans fil a un libellé qui me semble plus clair et plus précis et ne laisse aucune latitude. C'est un code de conduite contraignant pour les fournisseurs de certains services réglementés.

À mon avis, il faudrait revoir le texte de cette disposition pour faire en sorte que les droits prévus par le projet de loi figurent toujours au tarif de façon à éviter les évaluations au cas par cas et à empêcher que les consommateurs ne renoncent par contrat à ces droits.

Vous aurez peut-être entendu ou entendrez des préoccupations au sujet des modalités de la genèse d'une déclaration des droits détaillée à partir de la longue liste de sujets qui figure dans le projet de loi C-49. Selon moi, l'Office des transports du Canada est le mieux placé pour diriger le travail. Il n'est pas moins impérieux que le processus soit ouvert à tous et donne l'occasion à tous les intervenants, y compris les consommateurs et les organisations au service de l'intérêt public, de participer à l'élaboration de la déclaration des droits. Une démarche semblable a été retenue par le CRTC, le Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes, pour le code des services sans fil et celui des services télévisuels, et cela a très bien marché.

Je crois aussi qu'un règlement convient mieux qu'une loi pour établir la déclaration des droits. J'ai néanmoins quelques inquiétudes au sujet des délais et de la possibilité d'intégrer à la déclaration de nombreux sujets. Cela dépend de la volonté politique, et il arrive que les priorités changent. Il est arrivé que des lois prévoient un règlement de cette nature et qu'il faille attendre des années, voire des décennies. Je ne propose aucun calendrier précis, mais j'invite les membres du comité à réfléchir aux conséquences qu'auraient des retards.

Enfin, quelques mots sur les recours des consommateurs dans le cadre du nouveau régime.

Une déclaration des droits et un mécanisme de recours efficace sont des éléments essentiels d'un solide régime de protection des consommateurs. Des droits sans recours sont sans effet et un mécanisme de recours sans une série de principes directeurs clairs donne des résultats variables et crée des droits différents.

Dans le régime proposé, l'OTC conserve son rôle d'agent de règlement des différends pour les demandes des passagers aériens. Il sera incapable de jouer ce rôle efficacement sans un profond remaniement de ses processus et de son personnel. Pour l'heure, vous n'êtes pas saisis de ce problème, mais je vous invite à essayer de voir si des aspects du projet de loi C-49 ont un lien avec cette question.

Je suis profondément convaincue que l'article 67.3 du projet de loi, restreignant à la seule personne lésée la possibilité de déposer une plainte, est très limitatif. D'importantes recherches empiriques montrent que ce sont les consommateurs eux-mêmes qui déposent des plaintes, surtout parce que la valeur en cause ne justifie pas les frais de la démarche. En effet, il arrive très souvent que ces frais soient beaucoup plus élevés que la valeur de la plainte. Par contre, d'autres recherches dans la littérature sur la consommation révèlent qu'il est important de permettre à d'autres parties, comme des organisations au service de l'intérêt public, d'intervenir pour déposer des plaintes, ce qui peut être un moyen de s'attaquer aux problèmes systémiques. Je crois fermement qu'il faudrait amender l'article 67.3 pour permettre à des tiers de déposer des plaintes.

Quant à la dimension collective des plaintes des consommateurs, il est vrai que certaines se rapportent très précisément à un seul consommateur, mais il arrive aussi qu'un certain nombre de consommateurs soient touchés, le plus souvent la totalité des passagers de l'appareil en cause. L'article 67.4 donne à l'OTC la possibilité d'appliquer sa décision à tous les consommateurs lésés, mais on ne voit pas clairement si un mécanisme précis peut déclencher cette décision ou si l'Office agira de sa propre initiative.

Enfin, le paragraphe 86.11(3) dispose, ce qui est courant dans d'autres administrations et régimes de règlement des différends, que les consommateurs ne peuvent obtenir une double indemnité en faisant jouer, pour les mêmes faits, différents régimes d'indemnisation.

Dans son mémoire, Air Canada propose que l'application de cette disposition soit nettement limitée. Je suis très convaincue que la disposition, telle quelle, est assez large pour que l'OTC puisse formuler une règle pour éviter ce problème. Ainsi, le CPRST, qui est l'ombudsman chargé des services de communication au Canada, a une règle de cette nature dans son code de procédure.

J'espère que mes observations et recommandations seront utiles au comité. C'est avec plaisir que je communiquerais à ses membres un mémoire qui résume mes principales observations et recommandations ainsi que toute documentation pertinente qui pourrait les aider à naviguer dans ces eaux, si j'ose dire, et à les aborder sous l'angle non seulement de l'industrie, mais aussi des consommateurs, qui sont leurs électeurs.

Merci de m'avoir accueillie. Ce sera un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

(1745)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup à tout le monde.

Passons maintenant aux questions. Ce sera d'abord Mme Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente, et merci aux témoins de comparaître ce soir. Il est bon de changer d'angle et de discuter du projet de loi C-49 dans le contexte du secteur de l'aviation.

Comme ce fut le cas à nos séances précédentes, nous sommes heureux que vous veniez exposer votre point de vue au comité et lui communiquer l'information nécessaire pour que nous atteignions un objectif que nous avons sans doute en commun, soit parvenir à établir le juste milieu dans le projet de loi C-49 pour répondre aux besoins et préoccupations à la fois des transporteurs aériens et de leurs clients. Je passe rapidement à mes questions, car je sais que mes cinq ou six minutes s'écoulent très vite.

Je m'adresse d'abord à Air Canada. Il s'agit du coût du filtrage dans les aéroports. Craignez-vous que les propositions contenues dans le projet de loi C-49 n'ajoutent pour les voyageurs aériens une sorte de nouvelle taxe?

M. David Rheault (premier directeur, Affaires gouvernementales et Relations avec les collectivités, Air Canada):

Je m'appelle David Rheault et je suis premier directeur des affaires gouvernementales chez Air Canada.

Dans notre mémoire, nous avons exprimé la crainte que cette modification ne crée un précédent. Dans le système actuel, les passagers paient déjà, dans le prix de leurs billets, des frais pour la sécurité. En ce moment, le montant perçu auprès d'eux dépasse le budget de l'ACSTA. L'année passée, le nombre de passagers a nettement augmenté, tout comme le montant perçu auprès d'eux, mais le budget de l'ACSTA reste relativement stable. La conséquence, c'est que le trafic augmente alors que les ressources affectées au filtrage diminuent, ce qui entraîne des retards et de l'attente, de sorte que les plaques tournantes canadiennes deviennent moins concurrentielles que celles de l'étranger. Il y a là pour l'ACSTA une occasion de conclure un accord avec les aéroports sur l'achat de services plus importants.

Ce qui nous inquiète, à cet égard, c'est que les passagers paient déjà ce service. Vous ouvrez la porte à un système de paiement accru par l'usager. Les passagers paient en achetant leurs billets, les aéroports facturent les lignes aériennes et cela finit par avoir un impact sur le coût des déplacements. Selon nous, si vous voulez ouvrir la porte à la possibilité d'acheter des services supplémentaires de contrôle, il faut établir une norme de service qui serait garantie par les fonds venant des passagers. Si les aéroports veulent offrir plus, ils pourraient acheter des services à l'ACSTA, mais au moins, le minimum devrait être clair et il faudrait établir des normes.

Ai-je répondu à votre question?

(1750)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

Je pourrais poser la même question à WestJet, et c'est ce que je vais faire.

M. Mike McNaney:

Pour une très rare fois, je suis tout à fait d'accord avec Air Canada, ce qui n'arrive pas très souvent.

Tout à fait sérieusement, je dois dire que je suis pleinement d'accord. Tout cela dépend de ce que David a dit des fonds qui sont versés. Il y a parfois des périodes plus actives comme celles de Noël et de l'été. Les transporteurs aériens, l'ACSTA, au sol, et les autorités aéroportuaires savent tous qu'ils seront alors surchargés, et ils travaillent d'arrache-pied pour résorber les files d'attente, dégager l'engorgement et régler le problème.

Pour être honnête, je me suis souvent demandé pourquoi nous agissons de la sorte. Si nous voulons susciter des pressions du public afin d'obtenir la totalité des fonds recueillis pour l'ACSTA au moyen des frais de sécurité perçus auprès des passagers aériens, de façon à assurer le service, nous devons arrêter de régler périodiquement le problème. Mais nous ne renoncerons jamais à essayer de le faire, car nous devons nous occuper de nos clients et assurer les correspondances. Nous retardons les vols et faisons sortir des gens de la file d'attente. Vous avez tous été témoins de cela dans vos déplacements en été et en hiver. Nous faisons de notre mieux pour surmonter les difficultés et, à dire vrai, il arrive que cela nous desserve à long terme.

Mme Kelly Block:

Pendant ma dernière minute et demie, je vais poser une question et, si vous n'avez pas le temps de donner une réponse exhaustive, j'y reviendrai au deuxième tour. Je vous l'adresse à tous les deux.

Du point de vue du consommateur, quelles autres mesures le gouvernement aurait-il pu prendre dans le projet de loi C-49 pour faciliter les choses ou faire diminuer le coût des déplacements en avion au Canada?

M. Mike McNaney:

Le plus simple, mais il reste à voir si cela peut se rattacher au projet de loi, est de s'attaquer à la vaste question des redevances aéronautiques et des frais d'améliorations aéroportuaires, les FAA, au Canada. Et cela est lié à la question plus large de la gouvernance aéroportuaire. Je ne suis pas convaincu que cela puisse se rattacher au projet de loi, mais pour répondre à votre question plus vaste, je dirai que c'est le prochain gros problème auquel il faudra s'attaquer.

Comme j'y ai fait allusion dans mes observations, un élément à considérer est que, autant que je puisse dire, de l'information sera demandée à tous les autres éléments ou entités de la chaîne d'approvisionnement: l'ACSTA, l'ASFC, les services de l'administration aéroportuaire, les services de manutention des bagages, et ainsi de suite. La question est de savoir ce qu'on en fait et qui est responsable, en fin de compte. Pour l'instant, tout ce que je vois, c'est qu'on s'attaque aux transporteurs aériens, qui sont menacés de sanctions pécunaires, par exemple. Si un aéroport a assumé la responsabilité exclusive du déglaçage et si le transporteur ne participe pas au contrat ou à la gestion du déglaçage, lorsque ce service tombe et qu'il y a des retards, d'après ce que je vois dans le projet de loi, tout le monde va encore accuser le transporteur et lui imposer des frais, alors que la question n'est clairement pas de son ressort.

Pour élargir la notion de responsabilité, vous pouvez effectivement demander une répétition constante de l'information, mais il nous faut autre chose qu'une mise en accusation d'une seule entité lorsque des services déraillent. Pour être plutôt direct, un certain nombre de ces entités tiennent leur mandat de votre institution, à dire vrai.

La présidente:

Monsieur Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci, madame la présidente, et merci à tous les témoins d'être parmi nous. Mes questions s'adressent aux lignes aériennes. Je vous sais gré de vos déclarations d'ouverture et je m'en félicite.

Cela dit, les lignes aériennes que sont Air Canada et WestJet comprennent-elles pourquoi les passagers s'indignent du niveau de service qu'ils reçoivent parfois des transporteurs? Comprenez-vous pourquoi ils se sentent réduits à l'impuissance et privés de droits?

Mme Lucie Guillemette:

Ce sera un plaisir de répondre. Nous devons reconnaître avant tout que le niveau de service au client est un élément crucial pour toutes les lignes aériennes, mais je me borne à parler au nom d'Air Canada. Comme dans tout secteur d'activité, nous cherchons toujours à améliorer notre rendement. Ce serait une erreur d'essayer de vous convaincre que nous n'éprouvons jamais ce genre de problème, mais il faut reconnaître que le secteur des transports aériens est très complexe, et il arrive que nous ayons des échecs, du point de vue du service au consommateur. Ce qui est vraiment important, c'est la façon dont nous reprenons pied.

Dans notre déclaration d'ouverture, j'ai dit que nous investissons dans de meilleurs outils qui nous permettront d'indemniser les clients plus vite ou de répondre à leurs demandes de renseignements plus rapidement.

Nous transportons 45 millions de passagers par an. Les problèmes sont inévitables. Pour revenir sur une réflexion de tout à l'heure, à propos de différents intervenants dans n'importe quel processus, je dirai que si nous voulons vraiment améliorer le service pour les clients, il vaut mieux que nous comprenions tous où se trouvent les goulots d'étranglement ou les défaillances. Si nous parvenons à une meilleure compréhension, nous pouvons chercher à apporter des améliorations, mais oui, nous comprenons que des clients puissent être exaspérés.

(1755)

M. Gagan Sikand:

Bien sûr. Merci.

M. Mike McNaney:

La semaine dernière, j'ai eu l'occasion de participer à l'enregistrement des voyageurs à l'un de nos points de services dans l'Ouest, un point de service relativement modeste. Nous visitons régulièrement les points de service. Nous rencontrons le personnel de WestJet et nos clients. J'ai pu discuter avec une vingtaine ou une trentaine de clients au cours de la journée. Pour répondre à votre question, à la lumière de ces conversations, je dirai, même si je n'ai pas posé cette question précise, que l'élément fondamental — et cela ressort nettement en regardant les voyageurs entrer dans l'aérogare — est qu'on perd tout contrôle lorsqu'on entre dans l'aérogare pour recevoir des services commerciaux de transport aérien.

Comme nous l'avons admis, il y a des défaillances dans nos services. Nous le reconnaissons. Nous offrons 700 vols par jour. Une partie du problème, et nous devons nous y attaquer, c'est que le voyageur, même s'il est chevronné, perd le contrôle dès qu'il entre en contact avec des services commerciaux d'aviation. Il ne peut pas décider où aller, quand ni comment, et cela occasionne une exaspération que nous pouvons certainement comprendre.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Cette question-ci s'adresse aussi aux deux lignes aériennes. Vous semble-t-il raisonnable que les passagers s'attendent à recevoir la même indemnisation et le même niveau de service chez tous les transporteurs?

Mme Lucie Guillemette:

Peut-on attendre le même niveau de service de tous les transporteurs? Nous sommes tous en concurrence. Nous espérons nous démarquer par divers éléments, mais j'espère que les Canadiens peuvent être sûrs de comprendre ce à quoi ils peuvent attendre d'une ligne aérienne en cas de défaillance. Nous devrions faire comprendre les niveaux de concurrence aux clients. Nous devrions donner à ce sujet une information satisfaisante. Nous devrions faire en sorte que les clients soient indemnisés facilement et rapidement.

L'indemnisation devrait-elle être égale? Même aujourd'hui, sans cadre législatif, nous indemnisons les clients en cas de défaillance des services. Si des vols sont retardés, par exemple, nous indemnisons ceux qui voyagent au Canada même en dehors de toute contrainte législative.

Par conséquent, l'attente...

M. Gagan Sikand:

À ce même propos, est-il raisonnable que les clients s'attendent à avoir les mêmes droits et la même indemnisation chez tous les transporteurs?

Mme Lucie Guillemette:

Vous me demandez s'ils devraient s'attendre à recevoir le même niveau d'indemnisation?

M. Gagan Sikand:

Oui, et les mêmes droits.

Mme Lucie Guillemette:

Oui, mais la ligne aérienne devrait pouvoir bonifier son indemnisation si elle le juge bon.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Puis-je avoir de WestJet une réponse rapide par oui ou par non?

M. Mike McNaney:

Oui.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Pendant le temps qu'il me reste, je vais réorienter mon approche.

Au Canada, 2,5 millions de personnes souffrent d'allergies. Qu'ont fait vos lignes aériennes pour appliquer une politique ou des normes de sécurité pour protéger les clients victimes d'anaphylaxie?

M. Lorne Mackenzie (gestionnaire supérieur, Affaires réglementaires, WestJet Airlines Ltd.):

Je peux intervenir à ce sujet. Je m'appelle Lorne Mackenzie, et je travaille chez WestJet.

Cela dépend de la nature de l'allergie. Il y a diverses allergies aux animaux par opposition aux aliments et aux arachides. Pour chaque type d'allergie, l'intervention diffère. L'essentiel est d'assurer la sécurité de tous les clients, bien sûr et, dans les cas d'allergie grave, de prévoir une zone tampon par rapport à l'allergène. Les décisions de l'OTC donnent des indications sur les attentes. Nous devons traduire ces décisions dans nos politiques et procédures, ainsi que dans notre tarification, pour que les personnes souffrant d'allergies sachent à quoi s'attendre s'ils font appel à nos services.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Air Canada?

Mme Lucie Guillemette:

Chez Air Canada, nous avons également une zone tampon semblable, et nous demandons aussi à nos équipages de parler aux passagers qui se trouvent à proximité de la personne souffrant d'allergie. Nous avons pris des mesures tout à fait semblables.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci de vos réponses.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aubin, à vous. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie tous les invités d'être présents parmi nous ce soir.

Un bon nombre d'éléments du projet de loi C-49 me chicotent et quelques-uns portent sur le volet aérien.

Ma première question s'adresse aux représentants d'Air Canada, non pas pour stigmatiser cette compagnie, mais parce que l'exemple que j'ai en tête la concerne directement.

Il y a quelques années, une entente de coentreprise liant Delta et Air Canada était en négociation, si ma mémoire est bonne, et elle a été bloquée par le commissaire de la concurrence. Le commissaire de la concurrence assure la sécurité des consommateurs et voyageurs. Si le commissaire dit que cette entente n'est pas dans leur intérêt, cela me va.

Dans le projet de loi C-49, le rôle du commissaire de la concurrence devient consultatif et le ministre peut décider de passer outre à ses recommandations pour des raisons qu'il jugerait valables. Cela veut-il dire que l'on pourrait mettre en place des ententes de coentreprises — auxquelles je ne suis pas opposé à la base — que le ministre jugerait valables et que le commissaire de la concurrence jugerait non valables?

(1800)

M. David Rheault:

Il est difficile de spéculer et de prévoir des situations qui ne sont pas encore réelles.

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous poserai une question concrète. L'entente avec Delta reviendra-t-elle si le commissaire de la concurrence n'est plus un obstacle?

M. David Rheault:

Actuellement, le nouveau régime proposé par le projet de loi prévoit l'implication du Bureau de la concurrence, mais aussi un processus d'autorisation clair par Transports Canada.

Le Bureau de la concurrence va être impliqué et les enjeux relatifs à la concurrence vont être soulevés. Toutefois, le principe des politiques publiques est de considérer les intérêts plus larges du développement de l'infrastructure aérienne et du potentiel que ces ententes peuvent avoir.

Nous sommes convaincus que l'expertise la plus pointue en la matière se trouve au sein de Transports Canada, de concert, bien sûr, avec le Bureau de la concurrence. Cependant, vu l'importance fondamentale de ces coentreprises pour le développement de l'industrie canadienne, le ministère doit tenir compte d'intérêts plus larges. Transports Canada aurait le mandat de soupeser tous les aspects et de prendre les bonnes décisions.

Il existe des mécanismes de révision prévus par la loi pour s'assurer qu'il y a un suivi et des conditions pour obtenir l'autorisation, afin de voir ce que cela pourrait donner pour les consommateurs, entre autres choses.

M. Robert Aubin:

On s'entendra pour dire que ce n'est pas nécessairement un travail d'équipe. Le commissaire est consultatif.

Je vais maintenant m'adresser à vous, madame Pavlovic. Je suis assez d'accord avec vous, le projet de loi C-49 ne contient pas de charte des passagers mais énonce des principes généraux qui pourraient permettre d'en créer une.

Dans vos propos du début, vous avez dit qu'il y avait des manques ou des omissions, même dans les grands principes qui devaient orienter l'Office dans ses consultations. Quels sont ces éléments qu'on ne retrouve pas dans le projet de loi C-49?

Mme Marina Pavlovic:

Je vous remercie de votre question.[Traduction]

Il est difficile de mettre le doigt sur des points très précis, car la liste des questions est très longue. Faute de mieux, je dirai que les difficultés surgissent dans les menus détails, pour ce qui est de la façon d'aborder ces questions. À mon avis, mais les autres témoins ne sont pas nécessairement d'accord, il est très important de laisser une certaine latitude au ministre, car de nouveaux problèmes vont surgir, même après l'adoption du projet de loi, et l'OTC pourra alors les ajouter à la liste.

Il y aurait peut-être lieu de se demander si des questions de droits de la personne peuvent être soulevées. Il y a eu quelques cas de passagers en surpoids à qui on a demandé de payer deux sièges ou qu'on a refusé de prendre à bord. La Cour suprême du Canada est actuellement saisie d'une affaire. C'est un enjeu qui existe depuis un certain temps, et la cause ne porte même pas sur le fond. Tous les problèmes qui peuvent avoir un effet sur les droits de la personne plutôt que sur les droits commerciaux ou économiques dont il est actuellement question dans le projet de loi mériteraient peut-être d'être étudiés. Il faudrait voir s'il y a lieu de les ajouter à l'avenir dans la déclaration des droits. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie. Assurément, je suis intéressé à recevoir votre mémoire et vos recommandations.

Dans la minute qu'il me reste, je vais m'adresser aux représentants de WestJet.

À l'aéroport régional de Trois-Rivières, qui est situé dans une municipalité que je représente, il y a eu des projets de transporteurs de vols nolisés vers le Sud. Cependant, ils ont été impossibles à réaliser parce que les mesures de sécurité n'étaient pas disponibles. On aurait pu avoir de telles mesures si on avait payé les coûts afférents, comme le mentionne le projet de loi C-49.

Êtes-vous d'accord sur ce double standard pour les aéroports, c'est-à-dire que pour certains d'entre eux les services sont payés, mais que d'autres doivent payer pour les obtenir?

(1805)

[Traduction]

M. Mike McNaney:

Il me serait très difficile d'avouer publiquement que je suis favorable à une double échelle de valeurs. Cela arrive parfois.

Mais soyons sérieux. Pour répondre à votre question, je dirai, pour en revenir à notre mémoire et à notre déclaration, que, comme principe général, il faudrait que tout le produit du DSPTA soit affecté aux services de filtrage, et ce n'est pas le cas. On se retrouve alors avec des pénuries dans tout le système.

Dans le cas d'un petit aéroport comme celui de votre exemple, je ne crois pas qu'il faille être ridiculement strict sur le déroulement des choses. Si nous pouvons trouver un autre moyen d'assurer le service à la collectivité et s'il est possible d'améliorer la connectivité, alors l'aéroport devrait peut-être assumer une partie des coûts.

Il nous faut une certaine souplesse. Je voudrais que, comme principe général, tout le produit du DSPTA soit consacré à la sécurité de l'aviation. Ensuite, s'il nous faut avoir quelque chose pour les petits aéroports ou les aéroports d'une taille différente, comme cela se produit aux États-Unis, qui ont des programmes destinés aux aéroports qui desservent un secteur démographique donné, selon le nombre de transporteurs qu'ils accueillent... Si nous devions songer à ce modèle pour les petits aéroports aient une chance, alors je crois qu'il faudrait aller de l'avant.

La présidente:

M. Hardie a maintenant la parole.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Vous dites que, en ce qui concerne les droits des passagers aériens, il y a à la fois de bonnes et de mauvaises nouvelles. Les mauvaises nouvelles, ce sont les incidents inquiétants dont les médias font état quelques fois par année. La bonne nouvelle, c'est que les mauvaises nouvelles ne viennent que quelques fois par année. Pour l'essentiel, tout se passe bien.

Mais que diable se passe-t-il lorsqu'un nom qui figure sur une liste d'interdiction de vol est celui d'un enfant de six ans et que sa famille est tout de même interdite de vol? Qu'est-il arrivé à cette pauvre famille qui s'est présentée à l'aéroport avec ses enfants et qui n'a pu monter à bord, qui a dû débourser encore 4 000 $ le lendemain pour monter dans un avion?

Est-ce une défaillance des systèmes ou une défaillance des services au consommateur? Quel genre de formation... Je suis désolé de m'en prendre à Air Canada, mais ce sont les deux incidents les plus récents. Je suis sûr que tout le monde a ses difficultés. Que se passe-t-il dans ce cas? Faut-il que le gouvernement intervienne pour faire régner un peu de bon sens?

Mme Lucie Guillemette:

La réponse est non. Nous n'avons pas besoin de règlements pour nous dire quoi faire. Vous demandez si c'est une question de formation, de tarification ou autre chose. Dans ces deux cas, je ne pense pas que vous veuillez savoir ce qui s'est passé précisément, mais au fond, il arrive parfois, dans ces deux cas par exemple, qu'il y ait des situations plutôt dramatiques. Lorsque nous errons par notre faute, s'il y a un problème de formation ou si nous n'avons pas fait preuve de bon sens, de bon jugement, le plus souvent, nous communiquons avec le client lorsque les incidents sont révélés dans les médias. Cela ne justifie rien, mais lorsque nous disons vouloir nous améliorer, c'est exactement ce que nous voulons dire.

Je ne peux rien dire de l'incident de cette personne inscrite sur la liste d'interdiction de vol parce que je ne suis pas au courant des détails, mais dans bien des incidents dont on entend parler, nous sommes en faute, mais parfois, comme vous le dites, c'est un problème de formation, ou un problème lié au contexte aéroportuaire, habituellement lorsqu'il y a d'importantes opérations aériennes qui sortent de l'ordinaire. Je ne veux pas dire que ce soit acceptable, mais la vérité, c'est que nous essayons d'apporter des améliorations et, pour être bien honnête, nous ne sommes pas du tout contre l'adoption d'un ensemble de lignes directrices sur notre mode de fonctionnement ou sur la déclaration de ces problèmes. Ce sont nos clients qui sont en cause, et nous devons nous comporter correctement à leurs yeux.

M. Ken Hardie:

Selon moi, c'est d'un certain point de vue une valeur d'entreprise qui dicte ce que vous devez faire lorsque ces incidents surviennent, mais passons à autre chose.

Parlons des coentreprises.

Madame Pavlovic, les coentreprises font problème depuis un certain temps. Certaines ont été remises en question, et nous avons entendu parler d'un cas ce soir. Selon vous, à quels signaux les lignes aériennes devraient-elles être attentives lorsqu'elles songent à lancer une coentreprise propre à au moins susciter des préoccupations au sujet d'un comportement hostile à la concurrence?

(1810)

Mme Marina Pavlovic:

La question ne relève pas vraiment de mon champ de compétence, mais je pourrais parler de façon générale des intérêts des consommateurs.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vous en prie.

Mme Marina Pavlovic:

Ma conception du marché canadien de l'aviation n'est pas forcément identique à celle de l'industrie. Tout comme ma conception du secteur des télécommunications est aussi très différente. Nous sommes en présence de quasi-monopoles virtuels. Les restrictions qui pèsent sur l'investissement étranger au Canada sont importantes, et nous n'avons pas assez d'investissements. S'ils étaient suffisants, il est probable que le marché serait un peu plus diversifié et que les consommateurs auraient plus de choix, mais ils n'ont vraiment pas beaucoup de choix. En ce moment, peu de lignes aériennes offrent des services. C'est à peu près tout ce qu'elles peuvent faire. Tout comme, en télécommunication, il y a un peu de concurrence, mais pas beaucoup.

Je ne peux pas vraiment entrer dans les détails. Différents mécanismes sont en place, y compris le nouveau processus proposé qui fait intervenir le Bureau de la concurrence et Transports Canada. Dans des cas comme ceux-là, la participation de groupes voués au service de l'intérêt public et à la protection du consommateur est très intéressante pour que nous connaissions de manière plus précise l'impact direct sur les consommateurs. Mais je ne peux rien dire de plus pour répondre à votre question.

M. Ken Hardie:

Une dernière question rapide.

Quel est l'écart entre le montant recueilli pour payer les services de l'ACSTA et le montant effectivement consacré à ces services? Cette question se rapporte à des propos que vous avez tenus plus tôt au sujet du régime multipliant les coûts qui est peut-être en train de se mettre en place.

M. David Rheault:

Je n'ai pas les chiffres exacts sous les yeux. Nous pourrions les communiquer au comité.

Nous avons proposé une certaine analyse dans notre mémoire au groupe d'experts Emerson. Je crois me souvenir que l'écart est de l'ordre de 100 millions de dollars, mais je dois vérifier et je communiquerai l'information au comité.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

M. David Rheault:

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose? Ces cinq ou six dernières années, Air Canada a perçu près de 90 millions de dollars de plus auprès de ses passagers au titre du DSPTA et a remis ce montant au gouvernement. Ce n'est pas une somme négligeable.

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham, à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Au sujet de la concurrence, je dois dire simplement que la semaine dernière, je suis allé à Kelowna par Air Canada et suis revenu avec WestJet. Chez WestJet, les barres de céréales sont bien meilleures que les bretzels. Merci.

J'ai une question très rapide à vous poser.

Pour revenir sur les propos de M. Aubin, je dirai que ma circonscription compte un certain nombre de terrains d'aviation, mais un seul aéroport international, Mont-Tremblant International. Il offre un service saisonnier dont les vols ne sont pas très fréquents. Obtenir les services douaniers coûte une fortune. Le recouvrement des coûts de l'ACSTA met-il en danger les aéroports comme les miens?

M. Mike McNaney:

Non, je ne le crois pas. Si nous recueillons la totalité des fonds exigibles, ce ne devrait pas être le cas.

Je reviens sur une question posée tout à l'heure. Dans son mémoire sur son plan d'entreprise — je ne sais pas au juste comment il s'intitule — présenté au gouvernement en juillet, l'ACSTA explique qu'elle sera de nouveau à cours de fonds si la façon dont elle est financée ne correspond pas au nombre de passagers qu'elle doit prendre en charge.

Le gros problème, depuis plusieurs années... Madame la présidence, je vais faire un effort pour ennuyer également les deux principaux partis, puisqu'il y a eu pendant cette période des gouvernements conservateurs et libéraux. Depuis bien des années, ces fonds ne se rendent pas là où ils devraient aller. Depuis des années, le nombre des passagers augmente. WestJet a accru sa capacité de façon exponentielle sur le marché. Air Canada l'a fait, Porter Airlines aussi. Les transporteurs d'Air Canada l'ont fait grâce à des accords d'achat de capacité d'Air Canada. Il y a aujourd'hui beaucoup plus de passagers qu'il n'y en avait ne fût-ce qu'il y a 10 ans. Ce qui a pris du retard, c'est le financement de l'ACSTA qui aurait dû progresser au même rythme. Le passager paie des droits, et ceux-ci devraient servir à assurer la sécurité.

Dans les petits aéroports, il faut faire face dans une certaine mesure à la réalité de la politique qui, depuis cinq ou six ans, affame l'ACSTA, puisque celle-ci ne reçoit pas la totalité de ses fonds. Si vous modifiez ce système, peut-être faudrait-il envisager d'accorder des compléments de financement.

Il est arrivé à chaque budget que vous envisagiez un financement complémentaire pour les petits aéroports. Aux États-Unis, qui ont un modèle très différent, le gouvernement fédéral consent un soutien financier direct bien supérieur à ce que nous accordons aux petits aéroports régionaux au Canada. C'est probablement une solution à considérer, compte tenu du développement économique que cela rendrait possible.

Merci de ce que vous avez dit tout à l'heure. Nous allons reprendre cela sur YouTube comme publicité.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

(1815)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

De nos jours, la plupart des lignes aériennes pratiquent la surréservation. Ce n'est un mystère pour personne. L'incident survenu chez United Airlines, il y a quelques mois, a braqué les feux de l'actualité sur le problème.

Dans vos deux lignes aériennes, si vous vendez plus de sièges qu'il n'y en a à bord et que personne n'accepte de céder son siège, que faites-vous?

Mme Lucie Guillemette:

Avant de répondre, je voudrais faire une distinction qui me semble importante.

Lorsque nous étudions nos statistiques et notre comportement dans les cas de refus d'embarquement, il est important de savoir ce qui correspond vraiment à une survente, à une décision commerciale de vendre trop de sièges pour un vol, par opposition aux cas nous nous retrouvons en situation de surréservation. La distinction peut sembler négligeable, mais elle a son importance.

Même s'il n'y a pas eu surréservation sur un vol et que nous nous retrouvions quand même avec plus de passagers que de sièges, ce peut être la conséquence d'irrégularités dans les opérations ou d'une réduction de la taille de l'appareil. Quelle que soit la raison, si nous nous retrouvons dans une situation où il n'y a aucun volontaire — et cela figurait dans nos dispositions même avant les incidents du printemps dernier —, nous n'expulserions jamais un passager, s'il n'y a pas de volontaire. Je veux dire par là que nous venons à bord et sollicitons des volontaires.

À ce moment-là, il faut l'avouer, le niveau d'indemnisation peut augmenter jusqu'à ce que nous trouvions un volontaire. Si nous n'en trouvons aucun, nos systèmes de contrôle des opérations nous aideraient probablement à chercher s'il est possible d'utiliser un appareil plus gros. Mais nous gérerions la situation au fil des événements.

Je dois vous dire que, en général, nous ne sommes pas mis dans cette situation lorsque nous faisons appel à des volontaires. Parfois, nous voyons venir le problème et nous déplaçons certains passagers au préalable. Nous communiquons avec eux, nous les indemnisons à l'avance ou nous achetons des sièges chez un autre transporteur. On peut faire une multitude de choses. En vérité, depuis que je travaille à la gestion des revenus chez Air Canada, il n'est jamais arrivé, que je sache, que nous soyons à court de solutions. Il y a toujours des solutions de rechange.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai encore du temps pour poser une question.

À votre avis, a-t-on besoin d'une déclaration des droits pour relever le niveau de service au consommateur dans l'industrie, pour que vous progressiez tous ensemble au lieu de devoir vous bagarrer pour savoir qui a le meilleur service au consommateur? L'imposition d'une déclaration des droits vous obligerait tous à progresser. Est-ce un avantage? Cela nous aidera-t-il à améliorer le service au consommateur globalement?

J'ai pris des vols en Asie, et le service est nettement meilleur que tout ce que nous avons en Amérique du Nord.

Mme Lucie Guillemette:

J'ai une double réponse.

Les lignes aériennes devraient vouloir améliorer le service au consommateur de leur propre gré. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, nous n'avons pas besoin de règlement pour cela, mais nous sommes favorables à l'imposition de normes dans toute l'industrie s'il est préférable pour les consommateurs de savoir clairement ce à quoi ils auront droit si quelque chose tourne mal. Nous cherchons avec beaucoup de motivation à fidéliser et à satisfaire les clients, à faire ce qu'il faut. Cela ne veut pas dire que nous ne ratons pas parfois notre coup, mais nous ne manquons pas de motivation pour agir de notre propre initiative.

Croyons-nous que certaines de ces dispositions pourraient améliorer l'ensemble de l'industrie? Certainement. Comme nous l'avons dit tout à l'heure, si nous comprenions mieux toutes les étapes du processus, là où il y a des défaillances, il est certain que l'industrie pourrait s'améliorer.

La présidente:

Merci.

Désolée, vous allez devoir répondre à la question de quelqu'un d'autre pour faire valoir votre point de vue.

Monsieur Shields, à vous.

M. Martin Shields:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vous remercie d'être parmi nous ce soir. J'ai utilisé les services des deux lignes aériennes et je suis heureux que nous ayons ces services au Canada. J'ai volé un peu partout dans le monde. Certaines lignes aériennes sont un peu plus inquiétantes que ce que nous avons au Canada. Dans certains pays, elles le sont beaucoup plus. Je suis reconnaissant des moyens que nous avons de nous déplacer au Canada.

J'ai un ou deux autres points à aborder.

Les témoins de WestJet n'ont pas eu la possibilité de répondre à la question sur les coentreprises. En tout cas, je n'ai pas entendu leur réponse.

M. Mike McNaney:

Je vais devoir faire un effort pour me souvenir des questions qui ont été posées à ce sujet. On a demandé ce que les transporteurs pouvaient faire pour répondre aux préoccupations des consommateurs et quel était le facteur initial à considérer. À ce propos, la première mesure serait simplement la concentration dans une ou plusieurs liaisons où l'entreprise veut s'implanter. Qu'arrive-t-il à la totalité de la concurrence, si deux entités coopèrent sur une liaison donnée?

Au sujet des coentreprises, on oublie parfois un peu que, si on travaille correctement, et je n'ai aucune raison de croire que ce ne soit pas le cas, on offre de nouveaux choix aux consommateurs, de nouvelles possibilités de connexion avec tous les réseaux, ce qui, en fin de compte, améliore la connectivité.

(1820)

M. Martin Shields:

Vous voudrez peut-être répondre tous les deux à cette question-ci, si nous avons assez de temps. Je commence par WestJet.

Bien des éléments dont vous avez parlé ont un effet sur le prix des billets. Beaucoup d'organisations agricoles sont ici depuis quelques jours. Elles représentent le producteur qui est en bout de ligne et ne peut pas récupérer tous ses frais. Vous devez bien avoir des éléments semblables qui se répercutent sur le prix du billet, parmi les services de l'aéroport. Pourriez-vous en définir quelques-uns rapidement? Qui d'autre devez-vous payer, sans que vous ayez quelque contrôle, avec ce que vous rapporte le billet?

M. Mike McNaney:

Ce qui nous est familier à tous les deux, comme à la plupart des consommateurs, ce sont les frais d'améliorations aéroportuaires, qui s'ajoutent au prix du billet. Il règne parfois une certaine confusion et on croit que la totalité des fonds vont à l'aéroport pour financer le service. Nous avons ce qu'on appelle des « frais aéronautiques », ou on peut parler de frais d'atterrissage ou des frais de poste de stationnement, qui sont prélevés sur le prix du billet pour payer ces services à l'aéroport.

Comme je l'ai dit à la fin de mes observations, quand on tient compte de l'ensemble, de la totalité des fournisseurs et des montants versés à l'administration aéroportuaire et aux fournisseurs au sol, WestJet a dégagé en moyenne, pour les six premiers mois, un bénéfice de 8,34 $ ou 8,35 $ par passager ou, comme nous le disons, « par invité ». Cela montre que le secteur dépend du volume d'affaires. Lorsqu'il est question d'une modification de 5 $ sur les FAA ou quelque autre prélèvement, c'est très important pour nous, compte tenu de ces 8,34 $.

Pour en revenir à ce que j'ai dit plus tôt... Effectivement, j'essaie de dire le maximum en ce moment. À propos de la responsabilité aux termes du projet de loi et des diverses entités, nous allons tous fournir de l'information, mais autant que je puisse dire, il n'y a qu'une seule entité à qui on demandera une indemnisation.

M. Martin Shields:

Estimez-vous que le projet de loi C-49 fera augmenter les coûts pour le passager, en fin de compte?

M. Mike McNaney:

Sans doute. Dans l'un des exposés qui ont été donnés dès le premier jour, je crois, on a dit qu'il ne faudrait pas demander si les transporteurs aériens peuvent améliorer leur prestation.

Cela me semble un peu étrange. Je ne peux pas améliorer ma prestation si j'ai des retards parce que j'ai des invités retardés par l'ACSTA. Je ne peux pas le faire non plus s'il y a des retards dans l'échange d'information avec les autorités réglementaires de l'autre pays pour assurer la sécurité de l'aviation et si on ne me dit pas si je peux emmener ou non tel ou tel passager. Je dois donc retarder le vol. Je ne peux pas améliorer ma prestation s'il y a des retards aux installations de déglaçage que je ne contrôle pas et que je n'exploite pas. Il n'y a pas moyen de s'en tirer.

M. Martin Shields:

Air Canada.

M. David Rheault:

Après ce que Mike vient de dire, je n'ai qu'un mot à ajouter au sujet des coûts, des taxes et des redevances.

Dans le mémoire que nous avons soumis au groupe d'experts de l'OTC, nous avons posé comme premier principe que notre secteur doit être reconnu comme un moteur de l'économie, ce dont le régime fiscal doit tenir compte. Outre ce que Mike a dit, nous avons aussi au Canada ce que nous appelons un loyer aéroportuaire. C'est un montant que l'aéroport doit payer à l'État, et ce montant est versé au Trésor. Cet argent n'est pas réinjecté dans le système. Le montant n'est pas négligeable. Au cours des dernières années, il a représenté des milliards.

Nous disons en somme que tout montant retiré de l'industrie doit y être réinjecté au moins en partie.

M. Martin Shields:

Le projet de loi à l'étude va-t-il avoir une influence sur le prix de base des billets?

Mme Lucie Guillemette:

Il nous serait un peu difficile de le dire. Il est certain que dans certains secteurs... Il y a les coûts des indemnisations, par exemple. À dire vrai, nous n'avons pas encore défini notre point de vue sur l'augmentation globale des coûts. Nous devons présumer que, dans certaines circonstances, par exemple, comme je l'ai dit à propos des indemnisations, il est important de comprendre l'impact de la proposition.

M. Martin Shields:

Comme le règlement n'a pas été élaboré, c'est difficile? Très bien.

J'aurais cru que vous feriez une certaine analyse financière des conséquences pour vous.

M. David Rheault:

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose? Pour l'instant, vous proposez des principes selon lesquels les passagers recevront une indemnisation. En ce moment, nous avons déjà des règles dans notre tarification qui prévoient une indemnisation dans la plupart des situations. Cela dépend du champ d'application du règlement. Voilà pourquoi il nous est difficile de dire au juste quel sera l'impact. Nous donnerons notre point de vue au cours des consultations.

(1825)

M. Martin Shields:

Je présumais que vous aviez des spécialistes en coulisse qui étudient toutes sortes d'idées sur l'évolution du dossier et que vous aviez toutes sortes de documents qui vous expliquent ce qui risque d'arriver.

De toute façon, mon temps de parole est probablement terminé.

La présidente:

Effectivement.

Monsieur Badawey, à vous.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci de comparaître ce soir. Je ne veux pas nécessairement revenir sur ce qui est arrivé par le passé. Je m'intéresse davantage à l'avenir.

Deux des thèmes qui ont vraiment retenu notre attention ces deux derniers jours, ce sont la sécurité et l'entreprise. Comment pouvons-nous vous aider à devenir plus concurrentiels, à offrir une meilleure valeur et à mieux servir le consommateur?

Commençons par la sécurité. Nous avons discuté avec le secteur ferroviaire des enregistreurs vidéo et phonique. Vous savez sûrement ce que le projet de loi C-49 contient et ce qu'il recommande.

Ma question porte sur ce que vous avez actuellement dans votre secteur, ce qui n'est pas nécessairement un enregistreur vidéo, mais un enregistreur phonique. Croyez-vous que, avec ce matériel... Bien qu'il ne soit pas accessible, je le comprends, mais il peut l'être, si vous voulez vraiment adopter la nouvelle technologie... Croyez-vous pouvoir utiliser les enregistreurs phoniques pour la sécurité, la prévention et l'intervention?

Les enregistreurs de bord, les enregistreurs phoniques ont-ils servi ou les lignes aériennes voudraient-elles disposer d'une capacité accrue sur ces enregistreurs de bord?

M. Mike McNaney:

Quant à l'utilisation d'enregistreurs pour la formation ou pour améliorer la sécurité, je vais dans une certaine mesure devoir vérifier avec l'administration centrale, à Calgary, pour vous communiquer des détails. Un aspect particulier de l'aviation commerciale tient aux éléments précis des opérations en vol. S'il se produit quelque chose d'anormal, l'information est communiquée à notre centre de commande des opérations. Les enregistreurs phoniques sont un moyen de faire la lumière sur le problème qui s'est produit, mais pour ce qui est des données concrètes sur ce qui se passe dans l'appareil et sur son comportement, il existe de solides communications qui ne sont pas nécessairement liées à l'enregistreur phonique même

M. David Rheault:

Je suis d'accord.

Je ne suis pas un expert.

Nous devrions avoir en matière de sécurité... Peut-être pourrions-nous vous présenter des renseignements plus précis, mais en général, nous avons en place de très solides procédures pour garantir la sécurité de nos opérations. Si vous avez d'autres questions sur l'utilisation des enregistreurs de conversations de poste de pilotage, nous pourrons vous communiquer les réponses plus tard.

M. Vance Badawey:

Essentiellement, vos enregistreurs de conversations servent après coup au lieu d'être un moyen proactif d'assurer la discipline, par exemple. Ils ne sont pas utilisés à cette fin. On ne souhaite pas le faire.

J'irai droit au but. En ce moment, avec certaines choses qui se disent au sujet des enregistreurs vidéo et phoniques dans le secteur ferroviaire, il y a bien des opinions: jusqu'où la loi doit-elle aller en ce qui concerne la capacité du CP et du CN, dans ce cas, ou de tout autre transporteur ferroviaire? Quelles capacités devrait-on leur consentir en matière de discipline, de surveillance, et ainsi de suite?

Les transporteurs aériens souhaitent-ils se doter de la même capacité?

M. Mike McNaney:

Chez WestJet, je ne suis au courant d'aucune discussion à ce sujet à l'interne.

M. Vance Badawey:

Très bien. Voilà une réponse prudente. Merci.

Passons à la dimension commerciale. Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt dans ces échanges des derniers jours, nous avons abordé non seulement les questions qui se rattachent au projet de loi C-49, mais aussi la façon dont ce projet de loi peut contribuer à concrétiser la stratégie nationale plus large des transports, et notamment celle que le ministre a esquissée, soit la stratégie des corridors de commerce que le ministre a exposée. Et cette stratégie porte sur le transport non seulement des marchandises, mais aussi des passagers, à l'échelle planétaire.

Comment percevez-vous le projet de loi, du point de vue de votre industrie, qui est intégrée à d'autres modes de transport des passagers et des marchandises pour mieux positionner le Canada, à l'égard de cette ressource mise à la disposition du consommateur, qu'il voyage pour affaires ou pour ses activités courantes?

(1830)

M. Mike McNaney:

Bonne question. Et je peux dire en toute honnêteté que ne nous sommes pas préparés à y répondre.

J'en reviendrais à d'autres éléments abordés à propos d'autres questions concernant l'établissement pour les consommateurs d'attentes générales et la création d'une norme de service de base que l'industrie devrait respecter. Cela n'est pas sans utilité.

Les questions plus larges qui portent sur les corridors? Je ne crois pas qu'il faille en faire grand cas, à vrai dire. D'autres enjeux dont nous avons parlé et dont le projet de loi ne traite pas auraient une certaine pertinence. Il y a des questions de reddition des comptes dont nous avons parlé à propos d'autres niveaux, avec d'autres acteurs. Je pense aussi à des observations faites il y a un moment sur la nécessité de reconnaître que l'aviation est un moteur de l'économie.

Globalement, je n'ai pas l'impression que nous soyons nécessairement perçus comme un moteur de l'économie. Nous sommes le seul mode de transport entièrement à la charge de l'usager. Si je considère d'autres modes de transport, leurs modalités de gouvernance et l'apport de fonds publics, je dois dire que les choses se passent bien différemment dans notre secteur.

Si nous voulions donner une certaine impulsion à ces corridors et si l'aviation commerciale devait y jouer un rôle important, nous devrions nous pencher sur les politiques régissant ces autres modes de transport et voir s'il est possible de les appliquer à l'aviation.

M. Vance Badawey:

Bon point de vue. Je vais demander que vous comparaissiez de nouveau lorsque nous passerons à la prochaine étape, l'adoption du projet de loi C-49, et que nous examinerons les moyens de mettre en oeuvre certaines des recommandations de la stratégie globale et, pour les lignes aériennes, les moyens d'intégrer les données, le dispositif logistique et l'acheminement des marchandises à l'échelle mondiale, et même le transport des personnes. Comment pouvez-vous participer et, comme moteur de l'économie, mieux positionner le Canada parce que nous aurions en place l'infrastructure des transports nécessaire?

Merci.

M. David Rheault:

Pour répondre à cette question sur le projet de loi C-49, je dirai que, à mon sens, le régime d'examen proposé pour les coentreprises est très constructif. Cela peut aider à développer l'infrastructure canadienne et à mettre en place de nouvelles portes d'entrée partout au Canada pour ouvrir notre pays au monde et faciliter la circulation des personnes et des biens.

M. Vance Badawey:

Très bien. Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Block, à vous.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je ne croyais pas que c'était déjà mon tour. Merci beaucoup

J'ai une question à poser aux témoins d'Air Canada.

Vous dites dans votre mémoire, à la dernière page de la conclusion: Air Canada recommande donc au gouvernement de faire preuve de prudence et de parvenir à un juste équilibre avec le projet de loi C-49 afin de ne pas désavantager, sur le plan concurrentiel, le Canada et les sociétés aériennes canadiennes.

Croyez-vous que le projet de loi C-49 répond à cette attente?

M. David Rheault:

Non, nous ne le croyons pas. Au fond, ce que nous disons dans notre mémoire, c'est que nous sommes dans un secteur très concurrentiel, ce qui est bien, mais que le principe du projet de loi C-49 qui prévoit une indemnisation bien établie et un certain régime, doit aussi tenir compte de l'enjeu plus vaste de la concurrence dans l'industrie.

C'est un point de vue que nous ferons valoir au cours des consultations sur le règlement, car nous croyons que celui-ci doit tenir compte de la concurrence dans l'industrie et des circonstances de son application, si on le compare à ce qui se fait ailleurs.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je vais essayer de voir si je vous comprends bien.

Vous croyez que le projet de loi C-49 a trouvé le juste milieu pour préserver un avantage concurrentiel pour vos lignes aériennes.

M. David Rheault:

Désolé si je ne me suis pas exprimé clairement.

Ce que nous avons dit, en somme, c'est que l'équilibre à trouver dépendra du contenu du règlement, de l'importance de l'indemnisation et des circonstances de l'application. Dans notre mémoire, nous écrivons qu'il faut être conscient, lorsqu'on fait ces choix, des conséquences possibles pour la compétitivité.

Lorsque le projet de loi C-49 a été présenté, toutes les déclarations du ministre ont été claires: il n'était pas question de mettre en péril la compétitivité du secteur des transports aériens. C'est là un message dont nous avons pris bonne note, car nous travaillons dans un environnement très complexe et concurrentiel, et nous voulons nous assurer que le règlement d'application du projet de loi C-49 tient compte de ce message.

(1835)

Mme Kelly Block:

D'accord.

Vous affirmez également dans votre mémoire qu'il faudrait modifier la définition du terme « Canadien » qui figure dans le projet de loi C-49 pour veiller à ce que les objectifs de la politique qui sous-tend les nouvelles règles sur la propriété étrangère soient respectées. Pourriez-vous expliciter? Comment voudriez-vous que cette définition soit modifiée?

M. David Rheault:

Excellente question.

Dans l'annexe de notre mémoire, nous avons proposé un libellé. Essentiellement, nous voulons ajouter l'idée de propriété directe ou indirecte par une entité étrangère ou l'idée qu'une entité étrangère ne peut être affiliée ni agir de concert. Ces notions viennent d'autres lois sur les sociétés et garantissent que l'intention poursuivie est d'imposer certaines limites à la propriété étrangère, mais nous voulons avoir un libellé qui précise ces limites et assure qu'on ne contourne pas l'intention du législateur ou qu'une entité ne peut pas faire indirectement ce qu'il lui est interdit de faire directement.

Mme Kelly Block:

Oui, nous...

M. David Rheault:

Peut-être devrais-je m'exprimer en français pour que l'interprète dise mieux les choses que moi.

Mme Kelly Block:

Non. On nous a souvent fait des reproches à la Chambre parce que nous tentions justement de faire cela.

Je n'ai plus de questions, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à vous remercier de nouveau d'être parmi nous.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vais de nouveau m'adresser aux représentants d'Air Canada.

Je veux m'assurer de bien comprendre l'une de vos premières recommandations. Vous y parlez de simplifier le régime et de le rendre plus efficace en l'appliquant uniquement aux vols quittant le Canada, comme le fait le régime américain en se limitant aux vols qui quittent les États-Unis.

Je vais utiliser comme exemple mon dernier voyage, dont la destination était le Rwanda. Disons que, à titre de consommateur, je m'adresse à Air Canada pour l'achat du billet et que, comme il n'y a pas de vol direct, je doive passer par Bruxelles. Est-ce à dire que, parce que je suis parti du Canada avec Air Canada, vous serez responsable de moi pendant tout le trajet? Si je faisais face à un refus d'embarquement à Bruxelles, et non pas pour le vol d'Air Canada, devrais-je m'adresser à vous ou aux gens de Bruxelles?

M. David Rheault:

Premièrement, le système doit s'appliquer aux vols qui quittent le Canada. C'est le programme NEXUS, qui est lié à la juridiction canadienne, qui est le plus simple. En effet, lorsque vous revenez de la Belgique, par exemple, le système européen est en vigueur. Or si deux systèmes sont en vigueur pour le même vol, la situation devient compliquée pour le passager et complexe à administrer pour le transporteur.

M. Robert Aubin:

Que se passe-t-il si le problème survient non pas à mon départ de Montréal mais à Bruxelles, quand j'effectue ma correspondance?

M. David Rheault:

Si votre problème survient à Bruxelles, il sera régi par le règlement européen déjà en vigueur et c'est auprès de la compagnie aérienne qui effectue le vol que vous pouvez faire un recours.

M. Robert Aubin:

Même si c'est Air Canada qui m'a vendu le billet, dans le cadre de sa coentreprise?

M. David Rheault:

Oui. Le règlement européen spécifie que la responsabilité incombe au transporteur qui effectue le vol parce que c'est lui qui contrôle l'opération. Nous voudrions qu'un amendement faisant en sorte que ce principe, qui est déjà en vigueur dans la réglementation européenne, soit intégré à la réglementation canadienne.

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie.

Je vais maintenant me tourner vers Mme Pavlovic pour parler de la charte.

Il me semble que nous n'avons pas à réinventer la roue lorsqu'il s'agit de créer une charte. En effet, plusieurs pays l'ont fait avant nous.

Est-ce qu'il existe un modèle particulièrement probant dont nous pourrions nous inspirer pour rédiger notre propre charte canadienne? [Traduction]

Mme Marina Pavlovic:

Permettez-moi seulement d'ajouter quelque chose à propos des liens géographiques.

Se limiter aux vols qui partent du Canada aurait du sens si tous les autres pays du monde assuraient une protection équivalente. L'Union européenne le fait, mais une centaine de pays n'assurent aucune protection ou alors une protection inférieure.

En agissant de la sorte, nous priverions un certain nombre de personnes de toute protection. Cela me paraît très important. Là encore, les difficultés résident dans les menus détails. Il faut voir comment nous nous y prendrons, mais il n'existe vraiment aucune uniformité dans le monde.

Pour répondre à votre question, je dirai que la directive de l'Union européenne est un bon début. On ne peut pas la reprendre intégralement au Canada, et il faut être prudent lorsqu'on pense à importer dans un pays les pratiques d'un autre, mais je crois que les Européens ont réfléchi beaucoup plus longtemps à la question que nous ne l'avons fait, et nous pouvons tirer des enseignements non seulement de leurs réussites, mais aussi de leurs erreurs.

(1840)

[Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Monsieur Rheault, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. David Rheault:

J'aimerais revenir sur ce que madame a dit.

Ce sujet pourrait faire l'objet d'une convention internationale, comme la Convention de Montréal, qui uniformise certaines règles en matière de responsabilité.

Voici un exemple de ce qui se passe quand on applique le système à l'extérieur du Canada: quand un passager part d'Israël, fait une escale en Europe et arrive au Canada, trois régimes de responsabilité se seront alors appliqués à ce passager, à des niveaux différents et à des transporteurs différents. Cela complexifie l'administration pour nous, les transporteurs, mais la rend aussi plus difficile à comprendre pour le passager, qui veut savoir à quelle porte frapper et quelle indemnisation il peut obtenir. Pour nous, cela devient très complexe à gérer, ce qui retarde les choses.

M. Robert Aubin:

C'est pourquoi j'aimerais faire affaire avec celui de qui j'ai acheté le billet. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Une autre question, monsieur Aubin? [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Oui. Je vais être très bref.

Il y a une compétitivité accrue entre les entreprises. Je vous donne deux exemples de modification qui ont été apportées au cours des dernières années. Le ratio agent de bord/passagers est passé de 40 à 50 et le plafond du financement des capitaux étrangers a été modifié. Est-ce acceptable qu'on ne le fasse que pour quelques compagnies qui, j'imagine, ont fait un lobbying plus fort de ce côté parce que c'est ce dont elles avaient besoin au moment où elles l'ont fait? Ne serait-il pas mieux que, chaque fois qu'on apporte une modification, elle s'applique de façon uniforme à l'ensemble de l'industrie?

M. David Rheault:

Pour nous, il s'agit du principe du level playing field — je n'ai jamais trouvé d'équivalent français à cette expression. On peut parler de terrain égal ou de concurrence égale. C'est un principe important.

Il y a eu des changements législatifs, par exemple les exemptions qui ont été accordées à certains transporteurs en ce qui concerne le capacité de propriété étrangère. Pour nous, cela devient une question de principe. Nous croyons que tous les transporteurs devraient pouvoir bénéficier des mêmes règles parce que nous opérons dans la même industrie et que nous nous faisons concurrence pour les mêmes passagers. Par conséquent, le même régime devrait s'appliquer à tout le monde. [Traduction]

M. Mike McNaney:

Très rapidement, je dirai que, en ce qui concerne la propriété étrangère, il nous faut aussi reconnaître qu'il n'existe pas d'OMC pour l'aviation commerciale. Il n'y a pas d'accord mondial unique. Dans les accords bilatéraux avec les pays où nous avons des activités, on ne peut pas faire abstraction de la dimension nationale. Quant aux 49 %, si on élimine ce seuil ou si on va au-delà, on se retrouvera avec divers problèmes. Il faudra voir par exemple si on peut être considéré comme exploitant canadien aux termes d'un accord bilatéral avec un autre pays.

Il existe un contexte plus large, et c'est pourquoi les États-Unis ont opté pour 25 % et l'UE passera à 49 %. Il est très intéressant de constater que certains de ces transporteurs et entités perçus comme les plus importants qui sont actifs au niveau mondial n'acceptent aucune propriété étrangère. Ils considèrent la ligne aérienne comme un atout concurrentiel pour assurer leur croissance économique.

La présidente:

Monsieur Fraser, à vous.

M. Sean Fraser:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Il est probable que nous n'aurons le temps de poser qu'une question, peut-être deux. La plupart d'entre nous prenons l'avion deux fois par semaine lorsque la Chambre siège, et je dois dire que, la plupart du temps, le service est plutôt bon. J'ai dit l'autre jour, lorsque nous recevions le premier groupe de témoins, à quel point il est exaspérant de voir sur Internet des vidéos sur le traitement scandaleux réservé à certains. Nous savons tous à quel point il est irritant que des vols soient surréservés et qu'on doive assister à ces enchères bizarres ou qu'on ait du mal à obtenir un siège près de son enfant. J'ai parlé d'un incident où mes chaussures de basket de pointure 16 se sont retrouvées sur le carrousel, au terme d'un long vol. C'est très irritant.

WestJet, vous dites que vous pouvez accepter cette déclaration des droits, qu'elle est bonne et que vous avez hâte de connaître les détails qui seront arrêtés par règlement.

Air Canada, vous avez proposé quelques amendements qui, bien franchement, me préoccupent. À propos de ces droits, j'espère que, grâce à la concurrence, vous allez relever le niveau, exiger des comptes les uns des autres et m'offrir la meilleure expérience possible comme voyageur.

Les amendements proposés me font craindre que vous ne nous demandiez pas de relever la barre, mais plutôt, au nom de l'harmonie et de la facilité de fonctionnement, de réduire le minimum exigé. Lorsque je songe à l'adoption de la Convention de Montréal pour ce qui est des bagages, des départs d'un aéroport américain ou des obligations du transporteur comme celles de l'UE, dont vous avez parlé, je me demande si nous ne risquons pas d'abaisser le minimum exigé. À mon sens, ce n'est pas là un échange qui porte sur les droits.

M. David Rheault:

Je voudrais simplement ajouter quelque chose. Si on prend l'exemple précis de la responsabilité pour les bagages, si on applique aux voyages intérieurs la limite fixée dans la Convention de Montréal, on relèvera le minimum, car cette convention l'établit à environ 2 000 $ en ce moment, alors que les limites et la tarification varient entre 500 $ et 1 500 $.

Nous demandons en somme, si une limite s'applique au niveau international, pourquoi ne pas adopter cette limite pour les vols intérieurs, puisque ce serait plus facile à gérer. Le client saurait qu'il existe une nouvelle limite pour les deux types de vol. Le système est plus simple pour nous, et donc plus efficace.

(1845)

M. Sean Fraser:

Je voudrais creuser cette question davantage.

J'ai encore une question et il ne nous reste qu'une minute environ.

Mme Pavlovic a soulevé une question importante au sujet de la possibilité pour des tiers de faire des réclamations au sujet de problèmes systémiques. C'est un débat qui a cours dans le monde en ce moment à propos des droits de la personne.

Une ONG pourrait-elle se charger d'une cause au nom d'un groupe important de plaignants qui ne peuvent la porter eux-mêmes? Cela vous semble-t-il possible, raisonnable et pratique, dans le contexte de l'industrie de l'aviation et de la Déclaration des droits des passagers aériens?

M. David Rheault:

Dans notre mémoire soumis au groupe d'experts, nous avons abordé la question. Pour déposer une plainte, il faut avoir un intérêt direct. C'est un principe que nous avons fait valoir auprès du groupe d'experts de l'OTC. On le retrouve dans une certaine mesure dans le projet de loi C-49, et cela nous convient, même si nous avons proposé des amendements pour rendre les choses plus claires.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je crois que nous n'avons plus de temps.

Si Mme Pavlovic voulait dire quelque chose, pourrions-nous peut-être lui permettre de répondre brièvement?

La présidente:

Nous pourrions nous permettre une minute encore.

Mme Marina Pavlovic:

Merci.

La Cour suprême du Canada est actuellement saisie d'une affaire qui sera entendue le 2 octobre. Il s'agit de la possibilité pour des tiers qui ne sont pas parties à une affaire de mener une contestation dans certaines provinces. Il me semble important que des tiers puissent intervenir. Il ne s'agit pas nécessairement d'encourager l'industrie des plaintes. Vous entendrez peut-être demain un représentant de ce secteur. Il s'agit plutôt de permettre les contestations légitimes de pratiques systémiques, contestations dont un simple consommateur ne peut pas se charger.

Je suis très favorable à une disposition qui autoriserait des tiers qui ont un certain intérêt, et pas n'importe quel tiers, à intervenir dans ce genre de dossier.

La présidente:

Très bien. Merci beaucoup à tout le monde.

Tout le monde semble satisfait de toutes les réponses. Vous avez donc fait du bon travail.

Merci beaucoup à vous tous d'avoir participé à la séance de ce soir.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on September 13, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.