header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2017-09-14 TRAN 70

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(0930)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I'm calling to order meeting number 70 of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Pursuant to the order of reference of Monday, June 19, 2017, we are considering Bill C-49, an act to amend the Canada Transportation Act and other acts respecting transportation and to make related and consequential amendments to other acts.

This is day four, I'd like to say to the minister, that parliamentarians have been here along with Hill staff to deal with Bill C-49. We're very pleased to see, Minister Garneau, that you and your staff have joined us. I'm going to turn the floor over to you for your opening remarks.

Hon. Marc Garneau (Minister of Transport):

Thank you, Madam Chair. I'm delighted to be here. I've been looking forward to this for a long time.[Translation]

Madam Chair and honourable members, I am pleased to meet with the committee today to talk about Bill C-49, the Transportation Modernization Act.[English]

I would like to thank the committee for studying the bill before the House is scheduled to resume. That is very much appreciated. I know that you've had three very busy days.

A strong transportation system is fundamental to Canada's overall economic performance and competitiveness. This bill, once passed, would make amendments to the Canada Transportation Act and other related legislation that would position our country to capitalize on global opportunities and make improvements to better meet the needs and service expectations of Canadians.

The measures included in Bill C-49 reflect what Canadians told us they expect during the extensive consultations we undertook last year. We held more than 200 meetings and round tables across the country with transportation and trade stakeholders, indigenous groups, provinces and territories, and individual Canadians to hear their views on the future of transportation in Canada. Our work is aimed at creating and facilitating the conditions to achieve long-term success, and this is precisely what this bill proposes to do.

Bill C-49 is an important first step, and I emphasize “first step”, towards delivering on early and concrete measures in support of transportation 2030, which is the strategic plan for the future of transportation in Canada. This bill focuses on our immediate priorities in the air, rail, and marine sectors. It aims to implement a series of measures to promote an integrated transportation system that is safe, secure, green, and innovative, and that will contribute to our economic growth and a cleaner environment, not to mention the well-being of Canadians when they travel.

The concerns of Canadians have been highlighted in recent months with the much-publicized cases of unacceptable treatment of air travellers both in this country and elsewhere. Bill C-49 proposes to mandate the Canadian Transportation Agency to develop, in consultation with Transport Canada, new regulations to enhance Canada's air passenger rights. These new rules would ensure that air passenger rights are clear, consistent, and fair for both travellers and air carriers.

Some examples of issues the new regulations would address include denied boarding in cases of overbooking, delays, or cancellations; lost or damaged baggage; tarmac delays beyond a certain period of time; seating children next to a parent or guardian at no extra cost; and ensuring that carriers develop clear standards for transporting musical instruments. Clear information will be provided to travellers in plain language about carriers' obligations and how to seek compensation and file complaints.

Under this proposed legislation, Canadians and anyone travelling to, from, and within Canada would benefit from a uniform, predictable, and reasonable approach. My objective is to ensure that passengers would have a clear understanding of their rights as air travellers while ensuring that this new approach would not negatively impact access to air services or the cost of travel.

I've been clear that regulations would include provisions whose intent would be that any denied boarding due to overbooking is done voluntarily and that under no circumstances someone be involuntarily removed from an aircraft after they have boarded. As Canadians, we expect that air carriers serving our country treat their passengers with the respect they deserve and that they live up to their commitments.

(0935)

[Translation]

This bill also proposes that regulations be made to require data from all air service providers to be able to monitor the air traveller experience, including compliance with the proposed air passenger rights.

The legislation also proposes to liberalize international ownership restrictions from 25% to 49% of voting interests for Canadian air carriers, with accompanying safeguards, while retaining the 25% limit for specialty air services.

These safeguards limit a single international investor to hold no more than 25% of the voting interests of a Canadian air carrier, and no combination of foreign air carriers could own more than 25% of a Canadian carrier.

The direct impact of higher levels of international investment would be that Canadian air carriers or companies wishing to create new air services would have access to a wider pool of risk capital. Consequently, that pool of capital, from both international and domestic sources, would allow the Canadian air sector to become more competitive, and would lead to more choices and to lower prices for Canadians.

Another improvement in the bill is that it proposes a new, streamlined and predictable process for the authorization of joint ventures between air carriers, taking into account competition and wider public interest considerations.

In Canada, air carrier joint ventures are currently examined from the perspective of possible harm to competition by the Competition Bureau, under the Competition Act. Unlike in many other countries, notably the United States, Canada's current approach does not allow for the consideration of the wider public interest benefits with respect to specific routes. Furthermore, the bureau's review is not subject to specific timelines.

This raises concerns that the current approach to assessing joint ventures may make Canadian carriers less attractive to global counterparts as joint venture partners and may be limiting the ability of Canadian carriers to engage in this industry trend.

The bill proposes measures that would allow the Minister of Transport to consider and approve air carrier joint ventures, where it is in the public interest, taking into account competition considerations. The minister would work in close consultation with the Commissioner of Competition to ensure that he or she be properly informed regarding any concerns with regard to competition. Air carriers that would choose to have their proposed joint ventures assessed through the new process would be given clear timelines for an expected decision.

Globally, airports are making unprecedented investments in passenger screening to facilitate travel and gain global economic advantages. Canada's largest airports have also expressed an interest in investing in this area, and smaller airports have shown interest in obtaining access to screening services to promote local economic development.

The bill would create a more flexible framework for the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority to provide screening services on a cost-recovery basis, supporting efforts to maintain an aviation system that is both secure and cost-effective.

(0940)

[English]

Bill C-49 also proposes significant enhancements to increase the safety of the rail sector in order to build a safer, more secure rail transportation system that Canadians trust. As you all know, rail safety, as I've said many times, is my number one priority.

The proposed modifications to the Railway Safety Act would mandate the installation of voice and video recorders to strengthen rail safety by providing objective data about crew actions leading up to and during a rail accident or incident. Beyond that, the requirement would also increase opportunities to analyze identified safety concerns to prevent accidents from occurring.

This would not only require companies to install the recorders, but it would also limit how the recorded data could be used, within strict criteria. For instance, the Transportation Safety Board would have access to the recorded data for post-accident investigations. Transport Canada and railway companies would also have access to the data for proactive safety management and for following up on incidents and accidents not investigated by the Transportation Safety Board, but under specific conditions. The specific limits on the use of the data are designed to maximize the safety value of this technology while limiting its potential to infringe on employees' privacy rights.

Canada's freight rail system is critical to our economy. Bill C-49 would strengthen that system by enhancing its transparency, balance, and long-term efficiency. Let me highlight key examples.

Under this bill, shippers could seek reciprocal financial penalties for breaches of their service agreements by the railways. They would have fair access to more timely processes for settling service and rate disputes. More shippers would be eligible for the streamlined final arbitration process in particular. Further, new measures would ensure that the agency offers shippers informal dispute resolution options as well as guidance.

The bill would also introduce a new measure, long-haul interswitching, to give captive shippers across regions and sectors access to an alternative railway. Rates would be set based on comparable traffic, with the agency having discretion in determining comparability. The bill would modernize key grain measures, such as the maximum reserve revenue entitlement, to promote railway investments—and that's a key feature—and ensure that interswitching rates are updated regularly and compensate railways adequately.

Further, Bill C-49 would enhance sector transparency by requiring large railways to report some performance, service, and rate data about their Canadian operations. Transport Canada would have the authority to publicly report rate trends.

With these and other measures of this bill, we are taking important steps to ensure that Canadians have the freight rail system they need now and in the years ahead.

These aren't the only ways that we propose to improve trade to global markets. Bill C-49 would also amend the Coasting Trade Act and the Canada Marine Act to enhance marine transportation and to allow access for marine-related infrastructure funding. Specifically, amendments to the Coasting Trade Act would allow all vessel owners to reposition their owned or leased empty containers between locations in Canada using vessels of any registry. This would support greater logistical flexibility for industry. In addition, modifications to the Canada Marine Act would permit Canada port authorities to access the Canada infrastructure bank for loans and loan guarantees to support investments in key enabling infrastructure.

(0945)



In conclusion, I believe that this proposed legislation advances important actions that will help to bring Canada's transportation system into the 21st century. Ultimately, we do need a system to meet the demands of today's economy so that we can keep Canada's travellers and cargo moving efficiently and safely. Passage of this bill as soon as possible this fall would represent a critical milestone in achieving tangible improvements to our national transportation system that will benefit Canadians for decades to come.

Thank you for your attention. I now look forward to answering your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Garneau. We appreciate your being here and giving us such an overview.

We'll move to our questions now, with Ms. Raitt.

Hon. Lisa Raitt (Milton, CPC):

Thank you very much, Minister. I appreciate it. Congratulations to you and to the department for bringing forth this legislation. I think it's a good start, as you said at the beginning.

I have a couple of questions that have to do more or less with some of the stuff that may not have been pursued as far as I think we could have pursued it, and I'd like to get your comments. For this round of questions specifically, the first has to do with the bill of rights and the second one has to do with short-line rail.

On the bill of rights, the CTA gave testimony that they will be looking to industry, consumer rights associations, Canadians, and the travelling public for consultation in developing their regs. I guess I'm concerned, Minister, that it doesn't say they'll be consulting with CBSA, CATSA, or Nav Canada, or indeed the other authorities, which could conceivably add to a kind of delay that may cause the airline to be subject to many complaints. Could I get brief comments on that?

Then I have a question about the ability for CTA to bundle complaints together.

(0950)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I'm sorry. What was the last part?

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

The Air Transat inquiry, of course, caught a lot of people's attention, and the only reason the CTA could do this inquiry is that for international flights, they're allowed to self-initiate. They don't possess that ability for domestic flights. I'm wondering what the thought process was in not extending that kind of ability to the CTA in order to self-initiate inquiries that are dealing with domestic flights.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you for your two questions.

There is no question that when the CTA begins its consultation process with the aim of coming up with a charter of rights for passengers.... As I've said many times before, if you buy a ticket for a particular flight, you are entitled to be able to take that flight unless it is beyond the control of that airline. That will be very explicitly stated in the bill of rights. There are certain circumstances when.... We all recognize that sometimes weather can cause delays. We all recognize that there could be situations where air traffic control, for example, is having difficulties in terms of controlling all of the traffic and that may result in delays. We all realize that there could be a security alert at an airport that immobilizes the normal operations of an airport.

These all will be clearly stated so that we are focusing on situations where a right of a passenger has been infringed when it is within the control of the airline. That will be very clearly pointed out. There are many instances where that occurs. I've highlighted some of those. I can assure you that when the consultations do take place, and they will take place broadly with all of the groups that are involved, we will very clearly identify what it means to be “within the control” and “not within the control”.

On the question of the CTA and the situation that we looked at with respect to “own motion”, if you like, for the CTA, we decided that the current parameters that regulate how the CTA operates are good parameters; that we will reserve the right to decide—the minister of transport can make that decision—whether we want them to engage in additional inquiries; that this mechanism is perfectly satisfactory at this point; and, that we will not change the role of the CTA in terms of its present mandate in order to ensure that we preserve its quasi-judicial role in terms of consumer protection. We feel that the way it's organized at the moment is perfectly acceptable.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Thank you.

As well, there's one of the small, niggling issues that was always a problem with the CTA. Given that specifically because of your awareness campaign from your government, there are a lot more complaints to the CTA.... I don't know if people understand this, but the CTA has to deal with each of these on the basis of one complaint at a time. It is incredibly time-consuming. Every investigator has to pick up the phone and call about that specific complaint, but a lot of times these complaints are actually very similar.

You didn't allow the CTA to bundle them together in a one-complaint process in order to gather up all the different complaints originating from one incident. I'm wondering if you could tell me why.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

You've very clearly explained the way the situation exists at the moment.

Yes, at the moment there is a mechanism for a passenger to make a complaint, but they have to know about that mechanism, and many passengers did not know about it or, when they did know about it, felt it was too onerous. I thank the head of the CTA for highlighting this last fall. Yes, it led to more complaints, because people became aware of the fact that there was a mechanism in place, a mechanism that sometimes took a long time and discouraged people from taking action.

That's the whole purpose of the charter of rights:,that there will be a clear set of regulations in place to identify the situations where a passenger's rights have been violated. Those will apply to all passengers.

I am certainly hoping for far fewer cases where passengers need to have recourse to the CTA, because the processes will be in place, clearly explained, and in the English and French languages. They will be able to immediately deal with the airlines in a case like that and, as a result, there will be fewer requirements for the CTA to get involved. Where the CTA does have to get involved, yes, there will be the recognition that these can apply to more than the person who is specifically having to deal with the complaint through the CTA.

(0955)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Garneau.

Mr. Fraser. [Translation]

Mr. Sean Fraser (Central Nova, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Minister, thank you for joining us this morning.[English]

I have three questions and only six minutes, so I'll dig right in.

At home, I do hear about the air passenger bill of rights. We've all experienced the irritants that you've outlined during your remarks. How can the air passenger bill of rights ensure that passengers who experience these ordinary frustrations, and they are frustrating, have recourse to some kind of positive outcome when their rights are infringed?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Well, that's the whole purpose. The whole purpose is to make them aware of their rights in clear language. When they are aware of those rights, they will be able to immediately invoke their rights when they have been infringed, whether it's on overbooking or other situations that are covered by passenger rights.

The whole purpose at the moment is to make sure that it's clear and in simple language. There are clearly identified compensations in the case where rights have been infringed. I think this is something that has been long awaited, and we're going to make it happen. Our hope is that it will be in place in 2018 and that all passengers will be able to use this if their rights are infringed.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Another issue that I'm particularly interested in is the international ownership changes to 49%. I come from a part of the world, and my colleague Ms. Raitt comes from the same part of the world, where a lot of people would love to travel and take a vacation but can't afford it, quite frankly. Do you think this measure is going to bring down the cost of air travel in Canada? Do you think it's going to extend services to parts of Canada that do not have effective service today?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

For that, my hope is that the change in the rules of ownership from 25% to 49%—and to a lesser extent, joint ventures—will actually end up allowing the airlines to serve more communities at a lower cost. It's not a just a question of trying to create the environment where new airlines are created, but that those airlines, for competitive reasons, actually will offer flight routes that are not presently served because there's a market for them to do it.

It's not just a question of bringing down the cost, but it's also the hope that they are going to serve destinations that at the moment the bigger airlines perhaps are not currently serving.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

With the exemptions given to two airlines previously under more or less the same rules that are being implemented through Bill C-49, are you seeing action in that direction already?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Well, certainly we provided an exemption right away to Jetlines and Enerjet to set themselves up. They have been very active in trying to seek out particular markets they could serve, in some cases from airports that are not presently served. I would encourage you to speak to them individually.

Some of them will be launching in the months or years to come. When this bill becomes law, I'm hoping that in the future there will be others that will find they can get the capital necessary to start their own operations. That's the whole purpose here.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Finally, we have about two minutes to go, and I'm curious as to your thoughts more generally speaking. This bill has a number of measures that impact the efficiency in our national transportation system. We're dealing in an era of international trade. I find that back home in Nova Scotia it's a difficult conversation to have and to say that “these trade deals, these investments in a national transportation corridor are going to make government and the economy work for you”. That's what people care about.

Could you perhaps elaborate on how some of the measures in Bill C-49 are going to create jobs for the fishermen in getting their product to market in my riding and for the manufacturers and the farmers not just in my community, but in communities like mine? How is this going to make a difference in the lives of the people we represent?

(1000)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

As the Minister of Transport, I've found that one of the things that is important to communicate, because it's not well known, is how effectively your transportation system works. That applies to all of the country and to all modes of transportation. It has an incredibly important effect on the economy of the country. How well we move and how efficiently we move from all parts of the country that have products that need to be moved has an incredibly important effect on the economy.

I always talk about transport being an economic portfolio, and some of my predecessors felt exactly the same way. It is sometimes a challenge to explain that if you improve the transportation system, which we believe is certainly in part addressed in this bill, you're actually going to improve the economy, and that ultimately will benefit all Canadians.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

As an example, I'm looking at some of the measures in marine transportation, both the investments in ports and the ability to more effectively get empty containers to those ports. One of the big things we're looking for has to do with the recent trade agreement with Europe and the tariffs coming off seafood. I have two coasts in my riding. Is this going to help fishermen get their product to market and get a bigger return and boost the economy in rural Nova Scotia?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

You give a good example. From the marine point of view, repositioning containers is an incredibly important part of the whole business of transporting products. We all understand this. We've seen the big container ships. They bring things loaded up with product and then have to go to another place to load up with others, but the containers aren't there.

The repositioning of those containers will definitely benefit the marine industry on the east coast and our agreement with CETA, and I think ultimately the fishermen in Nova Scotia as well.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Garneau.

We will now go on to Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Good morning, Minister. I have an omnibus list of questions to match Bill C-49, so let's try to be efficient. I will ask you short questions that you could answer briefly.

Let's begin with the charter. For at least a year and a half, I have been hearing you speak in some detail about rights that should be guaranteed under that charter. So why is Bill C-49 full of philosophical intentions with regard to a future consultation, instead of a true charter we could vote on?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you for the question, Mr. Aubin.

First, I want to clarify that this is not an omnibus bill. In fact, 90% of the content of Bill C-49 has to do with the same piece of legislation, the Canada Transportation Act.

Second, as I very clearly explained, when it comes to the future charter of passenger rights, we decided that a regulatory process would be much more effective. So instead of including the charter's contents in the bill, we have mandated the Canadian Transportation Agency to prepare the charter, which will ultimately be submitted for my approval and will then be published as a regulation.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

If I may....

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Allow me to finish.

It will be a regulation. That way, if we decide in three years to make amendments to that charter, the process will be much simpler. It is actually much less complicated to amend regulations than to come back to the House to amend a bill.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I understand that.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

That is extremely important to understand. We never intended to include the charter's contents in Bill C-49. The goal was to mandate the Canadian Transportation Agency to make regulations, so that we would have the flexibility to make adjustments much more quickly in the coming years.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. I understand that process.

When I say that this is an omnibus bill, it's because I think that different types of transportation could have been split up, and we could have started working on the charter much sooner, with the process you are proposing. As things stand, it will not be done before 2018, if everything goes well.

However, we are not reinventing the wheel. Similar charters exist elsewhere. The European charter, among others, is a very effective model. It was used as the basis for an NDP bill, which you endorsed.

Does that mean we won't be able to make any amendments to Bill C-49 that would provide specific guidelines and could at least inform the thinking of the consultation that will begin after the royal assent?

(1005)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

First, how promptly this bill gets passed is in your hands. I encourage you to pass it quickly, as I think that it meets significant needs for Canada. The comments I am hearing support that position.

Second, this committee has the authority to make decisions on the possibility of amendments. I respect that situation, which our government very clearly explained when it took power.

That said, it is important for me to point out that, when we created this bill, we tried to strike a balance on very complex issues. We had to find a balance between passengers and airlines, between producers and railway companies, between railway safety and Canadians' privacy rights. After a tremendous amount of consultation, I believe we have managed to find that balance.

It is certainly possible to bring up a point for any one of these issues and to say that we could have done things differently. You are a member of this committee and, as such, I am asking you to take into consideration the fact that these are complex issues and that we have tried to find a balance.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I understand.

I will now move on to something else.

When the Commissioner of Competition blocks a joint venture, as he did a few years ago, I feel protected as a consumer. I tell myself that the Commissioner of Competition had his reasons to say that the agreement was not good for the consumer. However, in Bill C-49, the commissioner's powers are relayed to advisory powers, and the minister can bypass them. That worries me.

Why is it necessary for the minister to be able to ignore the Commissioner of Competition's recommendations?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

It's because we have to take public interest into account. However, I assure you that the consumer will be protected in terms of competition. The intent here is to do what other countries have done, including the United States, and open the door to the concept of joint venture. That is of tremendous interest to airlines, not only here, in Canada, but around the world. It is also good for the consumer, as it can help reduce prices and simplify the entire reservation process.

It is important to take care of competition, and we will continue to do that, as it is clearly indicated in the bill, but we will do two other things. First, we will take public interest into consideration—in other words, the interest of the consumer, as well as the interest of airlines, which have to compete with companies from other countries. Second, as things currently stand, if the Commissioner of Competition decides to investigate a joint venture, he can do so at any time and without notice, and this does not create an atmosphere conducive to trust.... [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Garneau. I'm sorry to have to cut you off, but we have a lot of questions from a lot of other members.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Minister, thank you for being here this morning.

I am quite pleased and quite excited that the priority that we've established through your leadership is that of balance. We're balancing safety along with value return within the business community, and we're really listening to those thoughts that have come from all sectors.

One of the pillars contained within the government's transportation strategic plan places a strong emphasis on trade corridors, a catalyst to better position Canada to capitalize on global opportunities and to highly perform globally. We get that. However, I want to dig a bit deeper, especially with respect to the question that Mr. Fraser asked. We want to ensure a disciplined asset management plan, both operating capital.... In turn, we want to develop stronger trade-related assets—rail, marine, road, air—that will coordinate and contribute to support Canada's international competitiveness and therefore trade and prosperity. We see Bill C-49 as a component of that; there's no question.

In your own words, how do you see Bill C-49 building itself into the overall strategic plan, transportation 2030, and then ultimately becoming more of a mechanism to be better able to implement that overall strategy?

(1010)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you, Mr. Badawey, for your question.

As I mentioned and as I think I emphasized in my opening remarks, Bill C-49 is a first step because, as you know, transportation 2030, which I outlined about a year ago, is much broader than simply the measures that are contained in Bill C-49. The Bill C-49 measures are an important first step to address a number of particularly important matters. The charter of rights for passengers is long awaited and has not been done in the past.

With regard to the modernization of freight rail, I can't emphasize how important that is. We need to improve safety on our railway systems because there are still too many derailments occurring.

As you know, there are five themes in transportation 2030. One of them is the air passenger experience. It also talks about green transportation and about innovative transportation. It talks about safety in all the forms of transportation, many of which are not addressed in Bill C-49. There is still much more work to do, and that is part of our ongoing work with respect to achieving the aims of transportation 2030, so there will be more projects that will be coming forth.

A simple example is that we have heard from air passengers that it takes too long to go through security at airports. That is still very much something that is on my mind, and it is part of the traveller experience.

We've heard that we need to make transportation greener in this country, and this is a commitment of our country.

There will be more on those as we go along as part of our mandate.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

I want to touch on something that I think Ms. Raitt was trying to touch on, but she ran out of time: the impact of Bill C-49 on short-line railways. We heard a lot about—and I recognize this from my past experience in my former life—how it can be somewhat challenging, in both the operational side and the capital side of short-line railways, to really augment or be a part of the overall transportation system, especially working in tandem with the main lines. How will Bill C-49 and/or any regulations or recommendations that might come out of this process contribute to the overall health of our short-line railways?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Of the short-line railways in this country, there are about 20 that come under federal control, and there are about 30 that come under provincial control. They carry products in this country. I think the total of rail transportation by short-lines is 12%. We did consult the short-lines in the development of Bill C-49, and their input is reflected. They are not subject to long-haul interswitching orders or to the new data requirements, as they were considered too burdensome for them.

Many of the concerns raised by short-line associations relate to infrastructure investment and are beyond the scope of Bill C-49. What I'm saying is that the short-line railways here don't have the funding, the capital, the deep pockets, that class I railways have. They are mostly concerned about that, and that is not addressed in Bill C-49.

Short-lines are eligible, on the other hand, to apply for funding under the national trade corridors fund which was announced in July 2017. However, it's true to say that projects involving regional short-lines tend to be to rehabilitate them rather than to eliminate bottlenecks. It's a little bit of a challenge with them.

We are looking at short-lines, though. We realize that they're an important element of the railway system. They're just not covered specifically in Bill C-49.

The Chair:

We go now to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Good morning, Mr. Minister.

First, I hope you and your staff have been able to absorb what we've heard from the various witnesses, because invariably they're saying this is a major step. We're accomplishing things here that some people have been waiting a long, long time to see. Each one has said there are some things they'd like to improve, so I think a sweet spot has somehow been touched here.

In the fullness of time, you will hear a little bit more about the long-haul interswitching and the nearest transfer point versus the most competitive one. We'll hear about the exclusion of soy from the maximum revenue entitlement, the ownership of records for the LVVR systems, and the timeliness of data and how long it's going to take to get everybody up to speed to be able to provide that data and bring in the transparency. You'll hear all of that later on.

With respect to the air passenger bill of rights, I've spent time on airplanes going back and forth to my riding in Fleetwood—Port Kells in B.C., and if I'm sitting on the tarmac or I'm sitting on top of a rocket, I don't care if it takes a little longer, because I want it to be safe. Obviously, there's a balance there that we have to consider, but notwithstanding the fact that a lot of the focus has been on the airlines, they've also been delayed because ground crews aren't available at an airport. That's not a safety issue; it's an operational glitch.

I'm just wondering about something. If we look at the all-of-experience scenario for passengers and whether or not the focus solely on the airlines is fair and balanced, given that some of the other players can also contribute operationally—not necessarily safety or weather or act of God but just simply not working very well—to the delays and problems that air passengers face, is there a sense that we can include that in the mix?

(1015)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

My aim certainly with the charter of rights for passengers is to address the situations that are within the airline's control. You brought up an example, and I brought up a few more before, in answering Ms. Raitt's question, about weather, air traffic control problems, security alerts and those kinds of things, and go-slows, for example, with respect to baggage handling or getting the stuff on the plane so the plane can leave on time. Those are all factors that will be brought out in the discussions that will occur with the CTA as it consults in determining the charter of rights. But it is, again, a question of balance, if I can use that word. The objective of this is to come up with something that clearly addresses passenger rights but that is also fair to the airlines. We're not here to pick on the airlines. We're here to make sure that passenger rights are respected. When you buy a ticket for a flight, and there is a decision that is within the control of the airline that prevents you from taking that flight, there needs to be compensation.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Got it.

We've heard various testimony. It's amazing how quickly this week has gone. We've had 10 hours a day of witnesses, and it's flown by because we've heard a lot of really interesting stuff.

We understand that being able to ship something is critical to the economy, so our shippers are really a huge catalyst for the wealth and well-being of Canada. At the same time, the transportation system is the enabler. It makes a lot of these things happen. Everybody seems to acknowledge that each side—the shippers and the transport system—needs to be healthy. They acknowledge that, but you see the tension when everybody seems to be operating under enlightened self-interest, and it falls continuously to government to be the referee to try to achieve that balance. Is there any thought in the grand scheme of things, as we look forward to 2030 and all the rest of it, to somehow try to create a new sense of collaboration between the parties, rather than just having everybody pulling for their own side?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

It's a very interesting point.

I should point out that some shippers and railways work under contractual arrangements that they're both very happy with. We're trying to make the system as efficient as possible. Some people will say historically we haven't gotten this right for 150 years. There is a huge amount of history here. This is the attempt by this government, after a great deal of consultation, to get it right.

You may hear from the shippers that they're happy with this but that it would be even better if we did that. You'll hear from the railways likewise. This is a bill that I think achieves a balance, which is going to be to the advantage of both shippers and the railways overall. I can't emphasize how much thought we gave to it before coming out with the specific recommendations.

It would be great if we didn't have to invoke measures such as final offer arbitration, if service level agreements were not needed, if reciprocal penalties were not needed. These are measures that are in place, which hopefully will not be used, but they're there to ensure we have a fair system for both sides.

(1020)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Garneau.

Sorry, Mr. Hardie, your time is up.

Mr. Chong.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for appearing in front of committee.

Minister, I think we would all agree that the privatization of Air Canada in the 1980s and the subsequent privatization of Canadian National Railway in the 1990s, along with the deregulation of parts of the transport system in allowing commercial forces to play a greater role in that system, have been successful. It's better for consumers and customers and better for companies.

What I don't understand is why the government didn't move in Bill C-49 in that direction for the movement of grain. We've had an ongoing crisis in the grain handling industry. This is not new. We had one in 2013-14 under the previous Conservative government. There was one in 2001 under a previous Liberal government. The crisis is only going to get worse. In fact, projections are that the amount of grains and oilseeds produced in Canada is going to continue to increase as a result of advances in crop science and techniques.

Both the June 2001 report, which was commissioned by a Liberal government, and the February 2016 report, commissioned by a Conservative government, recommended that we move toward a commercial grain handling system, and that we lift, over a period of time, the maximum revenue entitlements.

Maybe you could tell this committee why the government didn't move on those recommendations in this bill, particularly in light of the fact that two reports have now recommended that the government move on it, that we've had a number of crises in the grain handling industry over the last two decades, and that it's only going to get worse going forward as production continues to increase.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I certainly hope that production does increase in the years to come. The simple answer to your question is that it's because it's a very complex matter. I would remind you that we have among the lowest rates in the world with respect to the movement of grain. That's a tribute to the efficiency with which our railways are moving.

I can cite to you many sources that will say we shouldn't have touched the MRE at all in this bill. We have done so because we were conscious that we needed to provide investment incentives for the railways. The railways need to upgrade and replace their rolling stock on a continuous basis to be able to continue to deliver goods to ports across this country, so we did make changes to the MRE. Some shippers said they would like to leave the MRE exactly the way it is, and, as you point out, others would like to do away with it completely. It is a complex matter, and we have tried to achieve the proper balance.

As a final comment, I would agree with you that privatizing Air Canada and CN as we did was a very good idea and a very positive step. We're almost 100% there. There are still a few vestiges of government control left, but we've generally gone in a very positive direction with those decisions.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you, Minister, for that answer, but with respect, I think the best investment incentive you could provide to the industry to ensure that the capacity is there particularly during peak times to move grain to tidewater is to move to a system where commercial forces can play a much greater role. I think that's the one big flaw in this bill that has not been addressed. I think we will be revisiting, in a crisis situation, the fact that western Canadian grain farmers cannot get their grain to tidewater when they need to. I think that's the major flaw in this bill.

I applaud you for the other initiatives that you've taken in this bill, but this is clearly an issue. It's not an issue that's new. It's an issue that's been around for the better part of two decades. We have two reports now, one commissioned by a Conservative government and one commissioned by a Liberal government, that have both concluded that the government should lift the maximum revenue entitlements and move the system slowly and gradually to a commercial basis to address this fundamental problem.

You know, in the 2001 report, it says, and I quote, the “failure to move quickly enough to a system where commercial forces are allowed to work” resulted in a crisis in the grain industry in terms of moving grain. The same conclusions were made in the report that David Emerson was involved with in February of last year. We know what the root problem is, and Bill C-49 does not address it.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

(1025)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you for your question.

I should remind everybody here, for those who don't know, that not all grain movement is subject to the MRE.

I do thank the previous government, and particularly the previous minister of transport, who is here, for commissioning the Emerson report. We think it provided an enormous amount of very useful input for the government's consideration.

Once again, on the issue of the MRE, the MRE was put in place specifically for grain. If you look at how grain has moved in the past three years since the very disastrous situation that existed in 2013 and 2014, I think you'll find that it has moved efficiently. I was very proud of the way in which CN and CP moved grain last year, which was not a record year but very close to a record year. We think the provisions that have been put in place, taken as a whole, will continue to allow grain to move efficiently to our ports for export. We're satisfied that we've achieved the right balance, including with the MRE.

The Chair:

That's time.

Just for the information of the committee, we've just been notified—thank you, Ms. Raitt—that Arnold Chan, our member of Parliament from Scarborough, has died. He was a member whom we all very much respected and appreciated. It is with great sadness that I have to make that announcement.

Take a deep breath, and I'm sure all of us will send our sympathies out to his wife and family.

All right, as parliamentarians, we're back to work.

Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for being here and taking our questions.

You've repeatedly mentioned how rail safety is your number one concern and priority. I'd like to express a concern of mine to you before starting my line of questioning. In 1979 Mississauga saw one of North America's worst rail disasters. In fact, I believe it was the largest peacetime evacuation up until 2005 in New Orleans. Now, Mississauga's a very different place. We have freight going through there every single day. In fact, it carries on into my colleague Lisa Raitt's riding. I'm concerned that if there's a disaster now, with the number of people who are in Mississauga, it would be quite a devastating disaster.

I'd like to know what Transport Canada has done to address fatigue in regard to rail.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you, Mr. Sikand.

The issue of fatigue is one that applies not only to railways but also to airlines and the marine industry. We are currently studying the issue of fatigue as it applies to railway engineers and conductors. We are seized with this issue because we think it is a contributing factor that we need to take into account to improve safety in general. We are currently in the midst of evaluating that.

We recently came out with crew duty days and fatigue regulations in Canada Gazette part I for pilots. We will be doing the same thing for the rail industry.

That being said, we are taking other measures and we are reviewing the Railway Safety Act. We have brought in a number of measures since Lac-Mégantic, which of course was an absolutely catastrophic accident that needed a lot of remedies to address it. Fatigue is being studied at the moment with respect to the railway industry.

(1030)

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

We've heard a lot of testimony with regard to LVVRs. How do you think that will help move, as I refer to it, the safety yardstick a bit further?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I believe very firmly that having the presence of a video and voice recorder on board locomotives will definitely contribute to improved safety. As you know, the Transportation Safety Board has been arguing with Transport Canada and the Government of Canada for a number of years on the absolute necessity of putting such recorders in so that at the very least they have available critical information when they decide that they are going to investigate an incident or an accident.

The Transportation Safety Board doesn't always investigate every accident or incident, so it is important for us at Transport Canada to have information as well when we decide to do it. But we're also arguing proactively for the use, under very controlled, random conditions, of data from these video recorders to improve safety in general. If we have concerns about practices that could jeopardize safety, we want to stay on top of those.

I can't tell you to what point I consider railway safety to be important. When we're talking, in some cases, about trains that can approach two miles in length, with thousands of tonnes moving on our railway lines, the potential for something dangerous or catastrophic to happen is there, so we need to take every single measure possible to do it, but we will do it whilst ensuring that privacy rights are respected.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Just to follow up on that last point, do you think privacy concerns were adequately considered?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Yes. In the bill, we point out how we need to address those, but as you know, the bill will trigger a process to make the regulations concerning LVVRs and will specify the specific privacy considerations that need to be taken into account. For example, only certain people will have access to the data and there will be a recorded log of all access to the data. Measures of that nature will ensure that privacy is respected.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Godin. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Minister, thank you for being here this morning and for participating in this exercise.

We all have the will to create laws that will improve the lives of Canadians. I think that is your intent with Bill C-49.

I will repeat the expression used earlier by my NDP colleague and say that, as far as I understand, the bill has a philosophical intention. I would like us to go further and implement more concrete measures.

You want to bring into force legislation whereby the Canadian Transportation Agency would draft the charter of passenger rights. I find that, by doing so, you are just delaying. The situation could already be described in the legislation. I think that the bill is very broad. I'm under the impression that the government is stalling.

If the House of Commons passes this bill, I would like Canadians to feel that their quality of life has finally been improved. But that is not how I see this bill.

(1035)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I will not belabour the fact that your government did nothing about this for 10 years.

Perhaps you did not understand that we chose this approach to give us the flexibility we will need in the future to amend the charter as needed. If this charter comes into force through regulations, we will avoid having to come back to the House to amend a piece of legislation, since that process is much more expensive, as you know. So the goal is to give us that flexibility.

I would also like to add that Canadian Transportation Agency employees are used to dealing with passenger complaints. That is the agency's mandate. Those people know that environment. The agency is in the best position to establish the charter of passenger rights.

Mr. Joël Godin:

Minister, if you feel that the Canadian Transportation Agency is in the best position to take on that responsibility, why should we keep you as minister?

I know that the current Minister of Transportation—in this case the Honourable Marc Garneau—has good intentions. However, in the bill, you grant the Minister of Transportation a discretionary power that will enable him to avoid returning before the House of Commons to validate potential amendments.

How should Canadians interpret that?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

They should interpret it as their Minister of Transportation assuming his responsibilities.

Mr. Joël Godin:

You are doing that now. However, Minister, you will understand that laws are above individuals. This is a general framework whose guidelines help apply rules on a daily basis so that there would be no privileges, so that the process would be very impartial and so that the intent of the legislation in force would always be honoured. What can reassure me in that respect?

I told you earlier that I trusted the current minister, but as you know, ministers change.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I can't say this with complete certainty, but I think that Transport Canada is the department with the most responsibility when it comes to implementing regulations. Our department is very technical. Transportation regulations are complex. At Transport Canada, we are used to those processes.

I think that Bill C-49 expresses what we want to do, while mandating the Canadian Transportation Agency to do what I mentioned. Next year, when we present this charter of passenger rights, I believe that most Canadians will agree that it reflects the intent of Bill C-49. I am confident about that and will make sure to do what is necessary, since our department will have the last word in terms of what will be proposed.

Mr. Joël Godin:

Minister, from what I understand, Bill C-49 does not have enough teeth and is just so much window dressing. I will quickly go over three elements I would remove from this bill.

First, the Canadian Transportation Agency will establish rules about the charter of passenger rights. A bill is drafted and action is urgently needed, but the agency will be given the responsibility to write the regulations.

Second, guidelines are included for joint ventures by increasing foreign ownership to 49%, but the minister will have the power to oversee and authorize that. So what will be the point of the legislation once it has been adopted?

Third, railway companies will have to provide on the Internet information on those of their lines that are operational and those they no longer use. What is the benefit of that for Canadians?

With all due respect, Minister, I feel that this bill is empty; it is just window dressing.

What do you have to say to that?

(1040)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

This bill will do many things that should have been done a long time ago.

As for the very broad question of whether everything should be set out in the bill and whether there should never be any ministerial discretion for certain decisions, I say that many ministers have such discretion in some cases. There is a reason for this and it's something that has been established for a very long time. Canadians accept the fact that it is necessary to have acts and regulations, but that ministerial discretion is acceptable in some cases. That applies to some of the measures we have included in the bill.

Mr. Joël Godin:

Minister, you said that not much has been done in this area in 10 years. That said, the current government's discretion makes me a bit reluctant and nervous.

Could you quickly tell me what this bill contains, in a concrete sense? [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Godin, for this question you have only 15 seconds left, and there will be no opportunity for a response. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Minister, thank you for participating in this exercise. You should know that this process is constructive and that it is always in the interest of Canadians. We have to rise above partisan politics. Thank you very much.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Ms. Moore. [Translation]

Ms. Christine Moore (Abitibi—Témiscamingue, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Mr. Garneau, you visited Rouyn-Noranda recently and made an announcement about the airport. The airport expansion should sort things out, but right now Air Canada is the only carrier with flights to Montreal, meaning that there is no competition and the fares are very high. It could easily cost me $1,200 to fly from Ottawa to Rouyn-Noranda return, even though the distance between the two cities is less than 500 km as the crow flies. This shows that the lack of competition has a huge impact on prices.

In Bill C-49, however, you are giving yourself the power to approve joint ventures between air carriers even if the Commissioner of Competition is of the opinion that the agreement will weaken competition and increase costs for passengers.

Once again, Air Canada's profits seem to take precedence over consumers' rights. After introducing a bill that cost 2,600 workers in Quebec their jobs, you are at it again with a bill that removes powers from the Commissioner of Competition.

Moreover, the register of the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying of Canada shows that Air Canada has been in contact with your government numerous times to discuss the legislative framework for international air carrier joint ventures.

In short, it looks like Air Canada is pressuring your government to weaken the powers of the Commissioner of Competition and passenger rights. Air Canada's lobbyists must be proud to have your support.

I would like to know how diminishing the powers of the Commissioner of Competition will serve air passengers.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you for your question.

You talked about competition on the route between Montreal and Rouyn-Noranda. Our decision to increase foreign ownership from 25% to 49% will, I hope, actually benefit competition and lead to the establishment of new airlines that will offer flights in areas that are not as well served. That benefits competition.

As to your question about joint ventures, your comments suggested that this is limited to Air Canada. You also gave the impression that we are disregarding the Office of the Commissioner of Competition, which is certainly not the case. It is clearly stated that we will consider the public interest, what is good for consumers, by the way. That is the main reason we are doing this.

Furthermore, the Minister of Transport will in the future always work closely with the Commissioner of Competition to ensure there is no significant impact on competition. This is clearly laid out in the bill and that is what we intend to do. We would like Canadian airlines to be prosperous and competitive with those of other countries. This mechanism actually exists in a number of countries. So we are simply catching up in this regard, because it will benefit Canada. That said, competition will not be neglected.

(1045)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Garneau. Sorry, Ms. Moore, it's only a three-minute round.

We'll go to Ms. Raitt.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Thank you very much.

Minister, as I said, I want to talk a bit about short-line rail, and I'm glad that my colleague, Mr. Badawey, brought it up as well. What I want to do was quote something from David Emerson's testimony on Monday, which I think is important, since he chaired the commission that took a look at everything. He said, in response to a question from Mr. Brassard, that “it's a very serious problem”, meaning short-line rail funding, “and if we don't deal with it, it's either going to force everybody onto the roads in trucks or we're going to have to fix the problem, probably when it's very late in the day and it's maybe ineffective.

Mr. Murad Al-Katib, who also sat on the committee, weighed in on it as well. What he said, with respect to short-line rail, is that it's “a very essential element of interconnectivity. The rail lines, with consolidation, will go to the main lines, and the densification of short-lines is essential for rural economic development in this country.”

The question was whether there will be something forthcoming on short-line rail. I note that you said at the beginning that C-49 is a first step. I'm wondering if you can give us some comfort about whether we're going to see a package of reforms from you that focus on the undercapitalization of short-line rail or on a national rail plan in the coming years.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you for the question. I won't repeat what I said. I was specifically asked about short-line rail, and I gave my explanation with respect to that. Yes indeed, we're looking at the situation, and there the challenge is with respect to infrastructure. They do not have the deep pockets that the class I railways have, yet they are an important part of the railway system, 12% by my calculations, and some of them are federally regulated.

I have an enormous amount of respect for David Emerson. I can tell you that I used to work for David Emerson in life before politics. I have a huge amount of respect. He spent a great deal of time with four other members coming up with a first-rate document, which is the review of the Canada Transportation Act. Again, thank you for making that happen.

Having said that, that document carries with it 60 recommendations that cover the vast field of the Canada Transportation Act. It is there as a document to advise us and for our consideration. It is not policy in itself. We, as the government, have to make the decisions with respect to what we implement as policy. I can tell you that it's been very important input, and yes, I'm aware of what David said with respect to short-lines. We are looking at that issue at the moment. We'll see what comes out of that.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Another topic that Mr. Emerson talked about was governance at airports and ports. I found that to be an interesting part of his report as well.

In response to a question that Mr. Fraser had put to another witness, he weighed in on whether ports and airports should have access to this infrastructure bank. What he said I thought was important. He said, “there is inadequate governance when it comes to port or airport authorities entering into business in competition with their own tenants, and so frankly I wouldn't give them any more access to money until you clean that up”.

Do you have any plans on cleaning up the governance at airports and ports, and do we have a problem?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I would not characterize it as “cleaning up”. I would say that as part of our transportation 2030 policy strategy, we are looking at all aspects related to transportation.

I do not rule out the concept of examining certain parts of the governance of our airports and ports. Having said that, by and large our ports and airports work very well in this country. There's always the possibility to make improvements, and we're open to considering other ways of improving that.

(1050)

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

I have one last question.

On the topic of the cameras in cabs, I have a quick story. On my first day on the job that you now hold, which I was honoured to hold for a while, I was told I needed to have an emergency meeting with the major rail line in the country, which I did. Minister, the very first topic they brought up was the notion of having these cameras in the cab. It was something that took a lot of my time and energy over the last two years. However, I was always troubled by one particular issue, and I don't have clarity on it from your Bill C-49. It has to do with the utilization of this information for purposes other than safety management.

Your speech is clear. Your speech says very clearly that this is about safety management, that proactive safety management is what the tapes are going to be for. This week in testimony, rail companies and transport officials indicated that the tapes could also be used for discipline, which is where I have concerns.

Can you help me understand whether or not we are going to be allowing CN and CP, and any other rail company that puts cameras in the cabs, to utilize them for non-safety related disciplinary purposes?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

The purpose of the LVVR legislation is not to conduct discipline with respect to employees, it is related to safety. I think I'm very clear on that. It is a tool that is important to increasing safety.

The TSB would like to have it. In some cases where the TSB doesn't investigate incidents or accidents, Transport Canada would like to have access to that data. In certain very prescribed situations dealing with safety management, where we're concerned about the possibility of unsafe practices, under controlled conditions with random selection and privacy rights taken into account, there will be access to this data. It will be under very controlled conditions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Garneau.

Our next speaker will be Mr. Graham. I have to acknowledge that you had a very close relationship with our colleague, Arnold Chan, in the House leadership. If you want to take a moment to acknowledge that, I believe the committee would welcome that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

I do want to take a moment to acknowledge the immense contribution to this place of my close friend and our colleague, Arnold Chan.

I know he would want us to focus on our work, to move forward with what we need to do. When I visited him a few days ago, his concern was not about himself, but rather how everyone else was doing. He knew where he was going and wanted to make sure that the rest of us were going to carry on. He wanted to know what was happening here, to discuss our work in procedure and House affairs, where we sat together, and to pick up on the most recent gossip from around the Hill.

He loved this place. He lived this place. Of course, being Arnold, he apologized profusely between laboured breaths that he would probably not be able to join us at caucus the following day or at the House this fall.

On behalf of all of us here, I want to send my best to Jean and their three sons. We are with them at this difficult time.

To Arnold, we will remember to follow our hearts and to use our heads. As we do, Arnold, you will always be with us.

The Chair:

I am hopeful that the committee would indulge in our having a moment of silence.

[A moment of silence observed]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Graham, and thank you all very much. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Minister Garneau, for taking this significant step in modernizing the framework that governs transportation. From what the witnesses have said, Bill C-49 is very positive on the whole, but I would like to clarify a few points with you.

The Mont Tremblant International Airport in La Macaza is located in the riding of Laurentides—Labelle, which you know well. Commercial service is seasonal and is not very reliable. There are already problems with CBSA services, which are offered under a cost-recovery agreement. This has effectively killed international flights, since the costs are more than $1,000 per incoming international flight.

CATSA fees are currently the same as at other airports with a fixed cost per passenger. Can you reassure us that the cost recovery rates proposed by CATSA will not hurt small airports such as the one in La Macaza and small airports that are essential to survival in the North?

(1055)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you for your question, Mr. Graham.

When I was in opposition, I became aware of the issues with the Mont Tremblant International Airport. The issue at that time was the availability of CBSA services for incoming flights, usually charter flights with American passengers on board.

Bill C-49 addresses increasing refundable fees for airports that need this service in order to expand. There are a number of small airports all over Quebec and elsewhere that do not have that service and would like to, but they are not designated airports. In fact, this has been available for a while. What is new in a sense is that major airports, such as the Toronto airport, want to pay for additional CATSA resources in order to speed up security screening.

This bill seeks to increase CATSA services for airports that choose to do so. It will not remove services that already exist.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

On another matter, I would like to talk about railway transportation, which interests me a great deal.

Some witnesses said they were concerned that the bill would in some cases allow for service on railway routes to be discontinued within 60 days. A few witnesses also suggested expanding operating rights upon request as a way of enhancing competition.

The Canadian Transportation Agency already has the power to grant operating rights to other companies upon request, but has not done so to date. Will an increase in operating rights be possible in the future?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

There is no mention in Bill C-49 of discontinuing rail lines or of allowing a railway company to discontinue an existing line within 60 days. If a line was active, however, the service level could be raised by the Canadian Transportation Agency. In many cases, the lines that railway companies decide to shut down have not been used for a number of years. It costs them money to maintain those lines. The bill does not cover this issue, but if a line is in active use, it is certainly in the interest of our category 1 rail companies to maintain it, as that gives them better access to transportation business.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Let us hope that access can be given to local railway companies.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Are you referring to right of way?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

That entails expropriation to some extent. If a secondary railway company has permission to use other main lines belonging to category 1 railway companies, it does so knowing that it does not own the line. This happens under certain circumstances. For example, VIA Rail uses a rail line of which it owns just 3%. This is based on an agreement with the railway company in question. This is something that can be negotiated but that is not automatically granted.

(1100)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one more question.[English]

I have a couple of points of clarification in the LHI exemptions. I notice that restricted dimensional loads—you might refer to your staff for these ones—are only exempt on flatcars. Intermodal is only exempt on flatcars. Intermodal usually runs on deep-well cars, and heavy dimensionals are often in Schnabel cars or other specialized equipment, so why is the restriction only for flatcars?

In the same vein, why are toxic insulation hazard substances exempt but not other special, dangerous, or highly dangerous haz-mats?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I'm going to turn to my officials for the first part of your question. I have to compliment you on your detailed knowledge of this bill.

On the issue of dangerous goods, the decision was taken with respect to transporting materials that could involve toxic gases. The LHI exclusion is based on the fact that one wants to minimize the handling.

Now, your point is that there are other dangerous goods. The decision was taken that at this point we would restrict it to toxic inhalation materials. It's something that certainly could be looked at, but for the moment, that was our primary concern. We recognize that there are other dangerous materials as well.

On some of the lines that are very congested, where there's a lot of traffic and there are dangerous inhalation products, we want to minimize the chances of accidental releases, which do unfortunately happen in the present circumstances.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

On the issue of your other question, perhaps I could refer it—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: My time has expired.

The Chair:

A short comment on that, please, because I don't want to take away from the other questions.

Ms. Helena Borges (Associate Deputy Minister, Department of Transport):

The answer is actually quite simple. The legislation only refers to dimensional loads. It doesn't specify what kind of car they would be carried on. Dimensional loads could apply in others. It's really to show where the challenge is.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Moore is up, but she's had to exit for a moment, so we're going to go to Mr. Fraser, and then we'll go back to Ms. Moore.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you. I didn't think I'd be so lucky as to get a second round of questions. I always appreciate the opportunity.

Following up on the issue of the uptake of the infrastructure bank to ports, when we had Mr. Emerson here, he did express some concerns about the governance structure before money is made available to ports. In a conversation following the meeting, he acknowledged that the involvement of the private sector would likely lead to some improved accountability.

I'm curious. On the issue of engaging the private sector through the infrastructure bank and the port authority, is this either going to improve governance or allow us to.... My main concern here is to make the most of every federal dollar to expand our port infrastructure to get our goods to market.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Yes, as you know, the infrastructure bank has an important component that's related to transportation. We feel that at the moment it's not something that's accessible to our Canadian port authorities. Our Canadian port authorities, as the incoming and outgoing terminals of trade for this country, are extremely important. We just wanted to give them an additional tool so that in some cases where there was a good business case they could leverage the capability that would be available when the Canada infrastructure bank is in place.

We felt that this was good for ports that are continuing to grow in terms of their business. Some of the ports in this country are continuing to expand, so we want to help in that process.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

On the issue of short-line railroads, we've heard a number of witnesses. Though it didn't necessarily relate specifically to provisions included in Bill C-49, we talked about the economic importance of short-line railroads to their communities in representing an area that's defined by small towns and rural communities in a province that's really only served by short-line infrastructure.

I'm curious as to whether the rail corridor funding available through your portfolio would help short-line railroads accomplish what they need to in order to ensure they're serving these smaller communities.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

If you're referring to the national trade corridors fund, yes, they're eligible to apply for funding under it. As you know, on September 5, we closed the first call for expressions of interest from across the country. I know that there were hundreds, and I'm looking forward to seeing them.

To be totally frank with you, I think the challenge with the short-haul railways is not so much that they.... The basis of the trade corridors fund is to remove bottlenecks, and I think their primary challenge is maintenance of their infrastructure, which is not quite the same thing. This is a challenge from that point of view. As I say, Transport Canada is looking at that as a separate matter at this point in time.

(1105)

Mr. Sean Fraser:

There are a number of different items about which, as you mentioned, the shippers will say, “We like this. Maybe we could have that.” The rails might say something similar.

One of the themes I heard amongst most of the shippers and some producers as well was on the need for enhanced data. If we're going to be able to make decisions in real time, we need full information to do that. If we were to, say, tinker with the measures impacting data, would doing that potentially upset what you described as a fairly fine balance in the legislation among shippers, railways, and producers with regard to getting goods to market efficiently and allowing everyone to make money?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

It's a very good point that you bring up, and it's an important one to take into consideration along with the very crucial importance of having a greater amount of shared data. It has been a complaint from shippers in the past that to establish rates for transportation, they felt they needed more insight into some of the data from the railways. We recognize that. We're coming up with a process, for example, in LHI, so that the Canadian Transportation Agency can determine comparable rates so that we are providing competitive rates to the railways. Doing that requires us to have a certain amount of information, which is not available at the moment, so that we can set those. That involves actually having waybill information, and this is crucial to the whole thing.

In terms of making that public though, we do recognize that there are sensitivities with respect to the operations of the railways. The data will be made public but in aggregate form so that we are respecting the need, from a competitive point of view, not to put everything on the table.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

One of the other issues that Mr. Emerson raised while he was here was the notion that transportation is not a one-time project in Canada. We must seek continued improvement. We've heard from a few witnesses that implementing a mandatory periodic review into the legislation would be a helpful thing. Is this something that you think would be helpful or do you think the power to initiate a review from the ministry is as effective?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I don't think we need to put that in the legislation. It's the responsibility of all governments to continually review a situation to see if they can make it better, if there are flaws that were not anticipated, so I think the mechanisms are there. They don't need to be in the legislation.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Ms. Moore, are you ready to go or would you like me to hold it down a little bit longer for you? [Translation]

Ms. Christine Moore:

If possible, I would like to ask a few questions.

In your bill, you claim that a passenger bill of rights will protect travellers against unfair treatment by airline companies.

Can you name a single provision that sets the specific amount that an airline company will have to reimburse passengers if a flight is cancelled?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Those amounts will be proposed by the Canadian Transportation Agency and I will have the final word. I can tell you, nonetheless, that if a passenger's rights have been violated and the airline is at fault, the amounts will be quite sufficient. This is not something the airlines will want to do on a regular basis.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Do you know how passengers will be informed of the measures that will enable them to claim those amounts?

Flights are cancelled on a regular basis and the airlines will try anything because passengers do not necessarily know their rights.

What is your strategy to make sure that all passengers are aware of the process and do not have to go through endless bureaucratic red tape to be compensated?

(1110)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

It is certainly important for passengers to be informed. Once the information is released, I think passengers will follow it very closely in the media, so they will be well informed.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Your department does not have a strategy in mind?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

When you purchase a ticket, you receive information. If you do so on line, in particular, the first page describes your flight, but there are about six more pages that cover various other topics. They provide clear information, in French and English, about the steps to be taken if your rights have not been respected.

Ms. Christine Moore:

You do not have a specific communications strategy in this regard?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

When we finalize and implement the passenger bill of rights, we will probably implement a communications strategy in order to keep Canadians well informed. The information will then be available when people purchase their tickets.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Okay.

Will your party be open if the NDP puts forward amendments to improve Bill C-49 and clarify compensation measures, specifically as regards overbooking in order to limit the removal of passengers from aircraft, for example? Can we expect your government to take a collaborative approach?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

That is exactly why we will be creating regulations. That will give us the required flexibility to make any changes that prove necessary without having to present them to Parliament in another bill. The regulations will describe the passenger bill of rights. Should we decide that we need to amend the charter for some reason at a later date, we would have much more flexibility to do so.

Ms. Christine Moore:

As to the provisions pertaining to overbooking, do you have a specific plan or will regulations on this matter be forthcoming?

This is an increasingly serious problem, especially for destinations in Canada to which there are only two or three flights per day. Overbooking can lead to a 12-hour delay. People sometimes even have to wait until the next day.

What are your plans with regard to overbooking? Do you know what measures you will be taking or will that also be set out in the regulations?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Yes, that will be set out in regulations and they will be very clear. They will indicate the compensation when the airline has overbooked. That is what we have said since the beginning.

Ms. Christine Moore:

Right now, there is only financial compensation. There are no protection measures for passengers who face major complications as a result of having to take a subsequent flight. I am thinking of passengers who are are kicked off flights and then miss a funeral or other important event.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

That is precisely why we are establishing a passenger bill of rights. The bill will very clearly indicate that there will be compensation in such cases.

I should perhaps add that the airline will be required to re-book those passengers. A new flight will be arranged for those passengers and they will be offered compensation. Moreover, the compensation will be significant. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Garneau.

Thank you, Ms. Moore.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Madam Chair, I have to say, it's been an enjoyable process, as I said earlier, because not only are we dealing with how Bill C-49 is going to enhance the overall transportation strategy and transportation 2030, but what we also accrued over the last few days was, I'll use the word “residual” discussion, dialogue, and therefore objectives. We spoke about asset management and how overall within the transportation 2030 recommendations and the movement of that it's going to breathe, how it then lends itself to integrating our distribution and logistics system, and the integration of transportation between the four methods of transportation—road, rail, water, or air—how they come closer together.

As we look at the Emerson report and now bring it into a manner of being pragmatic and really take on some of the recommendations that Mr. Emerson made, with that is the...I won't say smaller in terms of size, but I'll say they don't recognize in the Emerson report how we now have to bring things like short-line railways into the bigger picture. It will be my intent today to actually ask for a report, to then proceed with recommendations, all of us working together as we have been for the last few days, to look at short-lines as becoming a larger part of the overall integration of those transportation methods.

I have to zero in on one question, Minister, and I fully respect the efforts that all governments in the past have made with respect to the passenger bill of rights. I have to ask, one, how it evolved. Two, and most important, and I know the NDP put forward a private member's bill in the last session, how does the passenger bill of rights proposed now, differ from the previous approaches and the previous dialogue that we had with the industry, differ from the PMBs and the discussion of past Parliaments? How is this approach now different and how is it going to be more pragmatic, workable, and of course, advantageous to the priority, the customer, the passenger?

(1115)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you for your question. l've been a member of Parliament coming up to nine years now and, yes, it's not the first time the issue of a passenger bill of rights has come up. It has come up. You mentioned the NDP. It came up before that with the Liberals, with Gerry Byrne, in fact, who was a very big proponent of it.

I guess the big difference is that we were in opposition and it was not picked up by the government; however, we are now in a position to put it in place. That's the big difference, and we feel that it is something long overdue. We have an interest in doing it because I've heard the message very clearly from Canadians that we need to have a passenger bill of rights. That's the big difference, and that's why we are putting legislation forward that will make that happen.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Now I'll move forward and go to the preamble that I spoke of earlier, like the passenger bill of rights and the dialogue that's happened among all three parties over the course of time, the current government being pragmatic and moving forward with the bill, as I mentioned earlier, the short-line integration, transportation methods, looking at capital operating sides of the strategy. Is it your intent and the ministry's to take a lot of those residual discussions and dialogue we've had with the industry, with our partners, with our colleagues, and to take the next steps in a short amount of time, to now start implementing those other parts of the overall transportation 2030 strategy?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

The short answer is yes. We're always looking at how we can improve transportation, and it is—as you know very well, because you have been particularly focused on it, as I know it's a strong interest of yours—a very complex set of files, and when we do come forward with a project like Bill C-49, which does actually have concrete measures in it, there's a tendency to ask about the stuff we didn't put in there. We're working on it. We're working on a whole bunch of things ultimately to make transportation safer, greener, more innovative, and economically as efficient as possible. All of these things touch on that. We continue to work at Transport Canada, and I want to give a shout-out to my ministry. We have more than 5,000 people who are very competent people and who are working very hard to try to make our transportation system the best in the world, and we are the best in the world on some of it.

(1120)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Finally, Minister, we're entering into NAFTA. We have CETA in place. How do you see now transportation becoming more of an enabler with our international trade?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I have already met a number of times with Secretary Chao, Secretary of Transportation in the United States, on the issues that touch on transportation that are critical. There's the fact that we're the two strongest trading partners in the country. Some 30,000 trucks go across the border every day and 4,600 train cars cross the border every day. We trade enormously, and we need to make it as efficient as possible. We need to harmonize regulations on both sides of the border so that we don't have any impediments to moving fluidly between our two countries. We need to make the process of security control as rapid and as efficient as possible.

Those are things that are top priorities for both our countries, for that $635 billion U.S. we do in trade every year, and we'll continue to do that. I would say that within the NAFTA negotiations, there's a pretty good consensus on transportation.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Raitt.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

It's back to me again, Minister. It's more like a conversation than it is anything else, I think. The officials around you are probably thinking that this feels like the briefings they used to give me all the time in terms of questions.

Briefly, I want to say that I understand—I know that I'm talking to somebody who understands this—that there is a delicate balancing act when it comes to the portfolio. In the air sector you have to balance airlines, airports, and consumers. You have the bill of rights with that one. In marine you have cargo carriers, ports, shippers. All those guys are important.

In rail you have a different balancing act. It's a very difficult one, I will tell you. You know it's difficult. On one side it's farmers, forestry, mining, containers, and all that. On the other side it's rail companies, and then throw in a little dash of unions. It's a very difficult area. Any time you move off the status quo, which Bill C-49 does, you're going to have people who are winners and people who are losers. Our attempt here is to try to figure out what the best balance is.

I'd like to go back to something you said to I think Mr. Sikand or Mr. Fraser. It had to do with whether or not we need in Bill C-49 the ability, again, for the CTA to do self-implementation. This time I'll give the example of forestry, which is very different.

FPAC came to this committee and asked to have the ability for the agency to intervene so that they will be able to study something. I think it comes from a real place, because as my colleague Mr. Chong pointed out, we have seen this movie before in terms of having emergencies in the transportation of grain and transportation of commodities. Sometimes the politics that invariably are in a minister's office can cloud the quickness by which you can make a direction for a study to happen. It happens in all parties. It's not a partisan issue here. This happens in all parties.

I'm trying to understand, Minister, why you don't think it's a good idea for the CTA to have that experience, to be those people who are the knowledge people in the business, seeing a certain situation happening again where they can actually take action and get in there quicker in order to resolve these disputes because they have the ability to look at it themselves.

That's an area where I'm really concerned about the balance. I don't see the purpose in having the minister hold the only power to start off an investigation by means of a notice of direction. I have used that and you have used that in the past, but we're not always going to be.... I'm not going to be the transport minister, and one day you won't be the transport minister. We have to make the system work for everybody forever.

You have to bear in mind that sometimes ministers just won't take action, so why not have the CTA have that power?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Well, you and I will not necessarily be ministers of transport in the future, but the good news is that we have a ministry where there is continuity. The way things are organized at the moment, I would say to you that we fully respect the independence of the CTA, and it is as it should be. It is a quasi-judicial body that needs to have that independence.

Having said that, we do talk to each other. We do keep each other informed, so I am very comfortable about the fact that the mechanisms exist at Transport Canada. I'm even more happy with the data provisions that are included in this bill, such that we will have even greater awareness of the situation with respect to issues of rail transport in this country.

I think it is unnecessary to make changes at the moment. I think the CTA will have enormous responsibilities with respect to making sure that the measures that we've put in place with respect to freight rail transportation are dealt with efficiently and in a timely fashion. They will make us aware if there are problems that they perceive have not been addressed. Of course, we've also given them additional important responsibilities with respect to the passenger bill of rights, so they have lots of responsibilities on their plate, our channels are open, and I believe we have in place a good system that doesn't need to be changed.

(1125)

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Thank you.

Minister, on the passenger bill of rights, bearing in mind that the CTA is going to be developing the regulations, and you've fleshed out what they should be looking at, can you give us a timeline for implementation? When will the passenger bill of rights go live for Canadians?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

How quickly are you going to pass this bill?

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Well, let's pretend it passes today. What's the date that you can give Canadian passengers?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Okay, well, immediately—sorry, I couldn't help that.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Last time I checked, Minister, you guys had a little thing called a majority.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Of course, I fully respect the autonomy of the transport, infrastructure, and communities committee.

Our intention would be for the CTA to get to work very quickly on its consultation process and to present to us some time early next year their recommendations with respect to it. They, of course, respecting the will of Parliament and the authority of Parliament, cannot get on with this work officially unless this bill gets royal assent. If it does, they will proceed forthwith. I've spoken with Scott Streiner, the head of the CTA. We will then look at it, and we hope to have the charter of rights in place some time in 2018.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Garneau.

We have three minutes for Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Minister Garneau, you and I had a brief offline discussion about the interest in air travel in my home riding. I was going to ask you some questions after the fact, but maybe we can do it right now and just make it really simple.

My folks in Fleetwood—Port Kells do a lot of air travel by virtue of the makeup of the community and where folks are coming from, either visiting or for business. They really want to give you their input on the air passenger bill of rights.

As we go forward into the regulations that will actually have the details as to how the bill of rights will work, what are you going to be thinking about as those details come together? What input would you value from my constituents or anybody else in terms of informing the way those details come together?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I would welcome all input. I can tell you that 10 days ago—and I won't say what airport I was in—I was approached by somebody working for an airline, and offered $400 to take a later flight. It's not the first time it's happened to me, so I am aware of the issue of overbooking. I've heard from tons of people. I've even done Facebook chats and heard about these things, but I welcome all input.

I, like everybody else, watched what happened with United Airlines. I, like everybody else, watched what happened with the Air Transat situation at Ottawa airport. I am hearing from a lot of Canadians. I've heard about Canadians who have said that they resent having to pay extra so that their kids can sit beside them. Yes, I've heard from people in the music industry whose instruments are extremely expensive and are their livelihood. They have felt that their instruments were not properly handled. I've heard from a huge number of people. I welcome all input on this. Though the charter of rights will be in place, it is something that will be open to making changes as required under compelling situations if it has areas that it has not addressed or that are inadequate in any way.

(1130)

The Chair:

Basically, your time is up, Mr. Hardie.

Minister Garneau, thank you so much for spending two hours with us. I think you will have heard that the committee has functioned extremely well, and I believe we all have the very best interests for Canada in mind and we are working very well together to ensure that Bill C-49 is the very best it can be.

Thank you to you and your staff for being here.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Madam Chair, I would like to say one last thing.

I too have to say that in the last hour while I was answering questions what was going through my mind was the loss of our dear colleague Arnold. I think, David, you were extremely eloquent. I would ask us all to reflect on Arnold's last opportunity to stand up in the House of Commons last June. If ever there was a display of non-partisanship and generosity from somebody who was living in incredibly difficult circumstances, I think he was a shining example.

I just wanted to say that today.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Garneau.

We will suspend for the other panel to come to the table.

(1130)

(1140)

The Chair:

We reconvene our meeting with our next panel. We have with us representatives from the Department of Industry, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, and the Competition Bureau. Welcome to you all. We very much appreciate your being here.

The Department of Industry rep, Mark Schaan, would you like to introduce yourself, and start with your opening remarks?

A voice: [Inaudible—Editor]

The Chair: All right, terrific.

Ms. Melissa Fisher (Associate Deputy Commissioner, Mergers Directorate, Competition Bureau):

Madam Chair, my name is Melissa Fisher. I'm the associate deputy commissioner in the mergers directorate at the Competition Bureau. I'm joined today by my colleague, Anthony Durocher, the deputy commissioner of the monopolistic practices directorate at the bureau.[Translation]

Also present is Mark Schaan, director general of the marketplace framework policy branch at Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada. He is in charge of competition policy, while the Bureau carries out the independent enforcement function.[English]

I understand that the committee has questions about changes in the bureau's role in relation to the review of arrangements between air carriers, as set out in Bill C-49.

I'll begin by providing some context about the bureau and its mandate. I will then speak to the bureau's experience in reviewing agreements and arrangements between air service providers. Finally, I will address the provisions of Bill C-49 that would impact the bureau's role in examining these types of agreements or arrangements.[Translation]

The Bureau is an independent law enforcement agency that ensures that Canadian consumers and businesses prosper in a competitive and innovative marketplace that delivers lower prices and more product choice. Headed by the Commissioner of Competition, the Bureau is responsible for the administration and enforcement of the Competition Act and three of Canada's labelling statutes.[English]

The act provides the commissioner with the authority to investigate anti-competitive behaviour. The act contains both civil and criminal provisions and covers conduct such as false and misleading representations, abuse of a dominant market position, mergers, and price-fixing. Civil matters are resolved before the Competition Tribunal, a specialized adjudicative body that comprises Federal Court judges and laypersons with expertise in business, commerce, or economics, whereas criminal matters are resolved before the courts. The act also provides the commissioner with the ability to make representations before regulatory boards, commissions, or other tribunals to promote competition in various sectors. The basic operating assumption of the bureau is that competition is good for both businesses and consumers.

Today I am here to talk about the bureau's role in reviewing arrangements between air carriers and how that role would change if Bill C-49 were passed.

The bureau has a significant amount of experience reviewing arrangements, including mergers and joint ventures, in the air transport sector. From the development of the first broad airline alliances in the late 1990s to the acquisition of Canadian Airlines by Air Canada in 2000 and the entry, and sometimes exit, of a number of carriers since then, the bureau has examined a variety of arrangements between air carriers that could harm businesses and consumers who rely on air services through increased prices and reduced choice.

Notably, in 2011, the bureau challenged before the tribunal a proposed joint venture between Air Canada and United Continental that involved co-operation on certain key aspects of competition, including pricing, capacity setting, frequent flyer programs, and revenue and cost sharing. After conducting an in-depth review, the bureau determined that the proposed joint venture would have resulted in the airlines' jointly monopolizing 10 key Canada-U.S. transporter routes and substantially reducing competition on nine additional routes. In turn, this would have likely led to increased prices and reduced consumer choice. Ultimately, the bureau reached a negotiated resolution with the parties. The consent agreement entered into prohibits Air Canada and United Continental from implementing their joint venture agreement on 14 transborder routes.

The Air Canada-United Continental matter is an example of how the bureau might review an air services arrangement under the Competition Act. The bureau typically examines this type of arrangement in the context of either the merger or the competitor collaboration provisions in the act, depending on how the arrangement is structured. These arrangements can have positive effects, such as increasing efficiency and competitiveness, in turn allowing Canadians to benefit from lower prices and better product choice. However, they can also raise competition concerns. If the commissioner determines that an arrangement is likely to result in a substantial lessening or prevention of competition, which is the statutory threshold, he may, subject to an exception for notifiable transactions under the act, challenge it before the Competition Tribunal, or alternatively, seek a consensual resolution with the parties in the form of a consent agreement.

(1145)



With respect to the factors considered in reviewing mergers or agreements among competitors, the bureau undertakes an exhaustive, fact-intensive and evidence-based review, including quantitative analysis. In analyzing an airline joint venture, the bureau will focus on routes where there is overlap or potential overlap in the service by the parties.

In particular, the bureau typically considers whether the joint venture partners provide competing air passenger services on specific origin-destination city pairs, such as Toronto to Chicago or Winnipeg to North Bay. The bureau also assesses whether consumers view, for example, non-stop or one-stop service, or business and leisure travel as substitutes for one another. The bureau also considers whether there are competitors serving the parties' overlapping routes, any barriers to entry, and whether existing or potential competitors may constrain the ability of the parties to the arrangement to raise prices.

A joint venture that reduces the number of competitors or potential competitors on an already concentrated route will raise concerns. For any particular overlapping route, the bureau will want to ensure that consumers have access to competitive prices and services, and that a proposed arrangement would not result in any route being captive to one or more airlines with enhanced market power.

To assess the competitive impacts of a proposed joint venture, the bureau can require significant amounts of data and other market information from the parties to the joint venture and other market participants. This information is necessary for an informed and credible review based on sound economic principles. The bureau may seek such information on a voluntary basis from the parties to the arrangement, from third parties with knowledge of the industry, or from consumers. At times, it may also seek the issuance of a court order requiring that certain information be produced.

Bill C-49 establishes a new process for the review and authorization of arrangements involving two or more transportation undertakings providing air services. This process will cover all types of arrangements among air carriers, other than arrangements that would be considered notifiable transactions under the Competition Act. Notifiable transactions are transactions that meet specific financial thresholds regarding the size of the parties and the size of the transaction, and that cannot be completed until the commissioner has had an opportunity to review. Notifiable transactions have been subject to a potential public interest review by the minister of transport since 2000.

Bill C-49 proposes a new process for arrangements involving air services that will enable air carriers to voluntarily seek authorization of a proposed arrangement from the minister of transport. The commissioner will receive a copy of any notice of an arrangement that is provided to the minister, along with any information required by the guidelines.

If the minister determines that the proposed arrangement raises significant considerations with respect to the public interest, then the commissioner is required, within 120 days of receiving the initial notice, to report to the minister and the parties on any concerns regarding the potential prevention or lessening of competition that could occur as a result of the proposed arrangement. A summary of the commissioner's report may be made public. I would note in this respect the bureau's ongoing commitment to transparency within the limits of our confidentiality obligations, and that this commitment would continue under this process as well.

The bureau will carry out its usual competitive analysis, but to the extent that the arrangement raises competition concerns, it will not have the option of settling those concerns with the parties directly through the negotiation of remedies or by applying for a remedial order from the tribunal. The final decision in these matters will rest with the minister of transport, and the minister will consult with the commissioner on any remedial measures relating to competition.

In cases where the parties do not seek an authorization from the minister, or where the minister does not trigger a public interest review, the bureau will assess the arrangements under the Competition Act in the usual manner and without any change from its current process. The bureau will make its staff available to consult with the minister of transport to develop guidelines as required by the bill, and is committed to working with transport, including taking steps to ensure that the guidelines require parties to produce the information that the bureau needs to undertake an informed competition analysis.

While the bureau and the minister will work together to share information, the bureau's review of arrangements will remain separate and independent from the public interest review conducted by the minister.

(1150)

The Chair:

Do you want to make another few remarks?

Ms. Melissa Fisher:

No, but I thank you for the opportunity to appear today.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Who would like to go next?

Mr. Ryan Greer (Director, Transportation and Infrastructure Policy, Canadian Chamber of Commerce):

Chair, committee members, first let me offer condolences on behalf of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce regarding the passing of your parliamentary and caucus colleague, Arnold Chan.

The Chair: Thank you.

Mr. Ryan Greer: I think we all appreciate the challenge of continuing your work on a difficult day like today, so thank you for having us here.

Thank you for inviting the chamber to take part in your study on Bill C-49. The package of legislative amendments before you affects chamber members of all sizes across our network of 200,000 members.

I'd like to start by commending Mr. Emerson and the review panel for their work on the Canada Transportation Act review report. The report is a comprehensive landmark piece of work. It made important recommendations toward helping to modernize Canada's trade and transportation networks. Bill C-49 touches on some key issues raised by the review.

The lens by which the chamber considers the individual components of Bill C-49 and offers comments is how we see the proposed changes affecting Canadian competitiveness overall. I'll start briefly on the rail side before jumping over to a few remarks on air travel as well.

Canada's historical trend of privatization in rail is a tremendous success story that has resulted in significant private sector investment leading to some of the lowest freight rates and highest levels of service in the world.

To that end, the chamber offers caution about the urge to expand regulation into Canada's supply chains. In a global economy where connectivity has become a key determinant of economic performance, the objective of any transportation system reform should be on continuous improvement to the efficiency of our supply chains. This was a major theme of Mr. Emerson's review.

The network nature of these supply chains, including our rail system, is such that providing a regulated advantage to one customer, one sector, or one part of the network will inevitably take something away from other parts of the network. This is one of the reasons that the last two Canada Transportation Act review panels, in 2001 and again in 2016, recommended against increased interswitching limits and maintaining a system based principally on commercial relationships and market forces.

Specifically, the chamber has concerns about the proposed new long-haul interswitching provisions. I think we should be wary of unintended consequences, including disincentives to investment and reduced productivity. In particular, the economics around remote branch lines serving resource industries is already difficult. LHI could threaten to reduce the income that railways make on these lines, which makes their future even a little more perilous.

Another consequence of long-haul interswitching is allowing U.S. railways to take advantage of Canadian lines without reciprocity. As currently drafted, Bill C-49 includes some geographical exemptions for U.S. access and, at a minimum, those exemptions should be maintained. Without the exemptions, Canada would stand to lose a large amount of rail and port business to the U.S., particularly through Vancouver and Montreal.

Broadly, supply chain competitiveness is better served by having a commercial marketplace that has sufficient provisions in place to protect customers in the event of a dispute. Bill C-49 does include some reasonable amendments to existing dispute resolution mechanisms.

On the issue of level of service decisions from the CTA, the chamber would suggest that the CTA should take into account the impact of decisions on all aspects of a supply chain and not just a single customer in making their decisions.

Moving on, we are supportive of provisions in the bill that will change the framework of the maximum revenue entitlement to remove some of the disincentives that have discouraged the acquisition of new hopper cars. We are also supportive of the measures for supply chain data transparency and some of the additional steps that the government has already taken in this regard.

We also support Bill C-49's provisions on locomotive video and voice recorders, including the proactive use of this data by railway companies. The minister has repeatedly said that his number one priority is safety, and this will help accomplish that.

Last, on rail, the chamber is supportive of increasing the individual share ownership limit for CN from 15% to 25%. This is an issue for fairness compared to other carriers and other modes and is important for accessing the necessary capital for long-term investment for the railway.

Moving on quickly to the air transportation sections of the bill, the chamber is supportive of a new framework for consumer rights. The current complaint-based system is a bit of a mess. It leads to inconsistent application of rules between carriers. A simplification and standardization of those rules is overdue, both for those travelling on the airlines and the airlines themselves. Like all business, our carriers can operate more effectively and efficiently when they have greater certainty of the environment in which they're operating.

As regulations under the framework are developed, we'd recommend that they clearly reflect the fact that airlines are one part of the air transportation system. For instance, security screening delays remain one of the top complaints from air travellers.

The bill also requires more information and data regarding air carrier service. I would offer that increased data requirements should not be limited to our carriers, but specifically include government entities within the network that affect system performance, including CBSA and CATSA.

(1155)



We are also supportive of the joint venture provisions in the bill and setting up the new approval process for the minister of transport. Moving the authority or creating this new process will allow joint venture decisions to be made with a broader public and economic interest in mind.

We do recommend that some of the joint venture provisions in the bill be amended. Specifically, the allowance of a ministerial review of a joint venture after two years following its approval should be lengthened. The two-year clock begins following the ministerial approval of the joint venture, not from when the joint venture actually commences its operation. Once it's actually off the ground, so to speak, we believe that the two-year time frame will probably not provide sufficient enough time to test the joint venture in the market.

The chamber is also supportive of the CATSA cost-recovery section of this bill, with the major caveat that this is very much a band-aid solution, while the government continues to correct or tries to correct the CATSA funding model. We must look to end the chronic underfunding of CATSA to ensure that air travellers can receive the efficient screening services that they are already paying for on their tickets.

We are also in favour of the foreign ownership provisions for airlines in this bill. The minister has stated that the objective of this change is to help promote more competition and bring down airfares. I would just add that if Canada wants to get serious about lowering airfares, it is time to review the government-imposed costs on ticket prices. This of course includes airport rents, security charges, Nav Canada fees and other taxes, all of which impact the competitiveness of Canadian air travel.

I'll wrap up by commending the minister, his team, and the department for the work they've put into transportation 2030 and Bill C-49, and this committee for all the work that you are doing this week. As the minister said this morning, Bill C-49 is only the first step in a long-term transportation plan and the Canadian Chamber of Commerce looks forward to continuing to work with the government on improving Canada's trade and transportation competitiveness.

Thank you.

(1200)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Schaan is here to answer questions as a representative and the director general of the marketplace framework policy branch, strategic policy sector, so if any of you have any questions, you can direct them directly to Mr. Schaan.

On to questions, Ms. Raitt.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

I don't know who's going to take the question, and you will have to help me with that, officials, but I'll ask for commentary depending upon how you answer.

Here's my problem. The process that's put in place for the minister to make a determination on whether there are significant public interest considerations is so broad and so open-ended I don't know why any companies would ever try to do a joint venture in this country. I'll bring you through the process. Here's what bugs me.

The very first part of it, it's 120 days. This bears repeating because I don't think people understand exactly how difficult this is going to be. The minister or somebody finds out that there is this proposed arrangement. The minister has 45 days after that in order to make some kind of decision as to whether or not to move forward, and then the real time starts. The commissioner of competition has 120 days, and then after that the minister has another 150 days to send a report to the parties. The parties have 30 days to send the response back. The minister has 45 days to give a preliminary decision. The parties have 30 days to respond to the preliminary decision. The minister then within 30 days of those responses has to give a final decision. But wait, there's more, because he then has the ability two years after the deal has been approved to go back and say that he doesn't like that deal on the basis of public interest consideration. The final caveat to all that is found in the proposal, where it says, by the way, all of this timing, the minister can extend it by himself.

On my count, we're looking at 13 and a half months of a flat out process before you get a final decision, which isn't final, and you have no certainty that it's going to get handled in 13 and a half months.

How is that even possible to get investment in this country if that's the kind of process we're going to put companies through?

Mr. Mark Schaan (Director General, Marketplace Framework Policy Branch, Strategic Policy Sector, Department of Industry):

I'll start, and my bureau colleagues may want to intervene.

One of the reasons we introduced the joint venture provisions in Bill C-49 as they are now is that currently joint ventures in this country actually don't have any set timelines necessarily, because they are subject to the commercial collaboration provisions of the Competition Act, which the commissioner of competition can initiate at any time and invoke a review of at any time. That does not allow for any certainty or predictability for proponents unless it's a notifiable merger.

We've taken the merger provisions that currently live under the CTA, which allow for a public interest consideration, and we have actually made those timelines more explicit and shorter. If I take the merger timelines, for instance, it's important to think about the time that leads up to a merger notice being given, but essentially you can take that same time frame and, say, 42 days to inform parties, and, where there is public interest, another 150, and then there's a TBD on all of the steps that follow thereafter.

With respect to the joint venture provisions, one point I want to clarify is that the 120 days for the commissioner of competition are parallel to the 150 days for the minister of transport. Really, in this particular set of time frames we are trying to balance providing predictability and certainty with the need for a robust competition consideration by the commissioner of competition and a robust public interest consideration by the minister of transport. We actually think this particular measure right now allows for an international competitiveness that Canada currently can enjoy like its other comparators.

To your point on the two-year minimum immunity period, I would stress that it's a two-year minimum period, so unless it is otherwise stipulated in the terms and conditions, joint ventures will not have an expiry date and will continue to operate in perpetuity while being monitored annually. That being said, we believe the two-year minimum is sufficient. It's worth noting that in other jurisdictions, such as the United States, antitrust immunity can be reconsidered at any point by the transportation authorities, and so there is actually no certainty to pardon. Therefore, in the joint venture provisions in Bill C-49, we've tried to provide for a balanced and thoughtful consideration of competition and public interest considerations and as much predictability and certainty to parties as possible while ensuring that at all times there's due process.

(1205)

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

Okay. Thank you.

I take your point on the parallel, and thank you very much for clarifying that. It does make it a little more palatable, but still the overriding rule is that the minister can extend any time and any place.

In your experience, what is the definition of public interest consideration?

Mr. Mark Schaan:

Public interest considerations can mean a number of things. The way Bill C-49 is laid out is there will be a guideline-setting process that will essentially be open for consultation to allow for parties to help inform that, but that can include things like safety, tourism, connectivity, economic benefits, and a number of other considerations that potentially provide both increased economic impact and connectivity for Canadian passengers.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

So a government or a minister in the future can probably pick anything out of the air and it will become a public interest. Who tests it if it's not written down?

Mr. Mark Schaan:

The guidelines will be very clear about what constitutes a public interest benefit, and there will be a necessity to be able to manifest those public interest benefits with the possibility from the minister to continue the manifestation of those benefits as the joint venture becomes real.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

You and I both know that guidelines are never prescriptive and there's always a catch-all at the bottom, and anything else that the cabinet would deem to be of public interest is going to be public interest.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

I would suggest that the goal of this is to try to ensure that parties on both sides of the equation, the minister of transport on one and the commissioner of competition on the other, and the parties themselves have clarity about what the expectation is and that it can then be communicated to Canadians how and why we are choosing to proceed with a given transaction.

Hon. Lisa Raitt:

I want to ask about the ability to negotiate. I know that's an important part of the Competition Bureau's work. The ability to negotiate is taken away in this process. There's no negotiation, because the commissioner just provides the summary and then after that, it's in the hands of the minister. That's my read of the legislation. If I have it wrong, you can enlighten me.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

My bureau colleagues may want to intervene, but the remedial orders rest with the minister of transport, because ultimately those remedial orders are subject to the minister's decision to approve or not. The actual negotiation of those remedial orders is informed by both the commissioner of competition and the minister of transport. The negotiation with parties to get to sufficient undertakings that would manifest itself to a good decision that satisfies both public interest considerations and competition considerations would be informed by both the commissioner and the minister of transport.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I had a visit from a couple of airlines prior to these sessions. They were concerned about things being vague with respect to joint ventures and what would be approved and what wouldn't. I actually had some advice for them. I said find out what the trigger points are that attract the interest of the Competition Bureau and don't do that.

Seriously though, looking at it from your vantage point, Ms. Fisher, what are the trigger points? At what point does behaviour become predatory?

Ms. Melissa Fisher:

Actually, Mr. Durocher will answer your question with respect to the predatory pricing provisions in the Competition Act.

Mr. Anthony Durocher (Deputy Commissioner, Monopolistic Practices Directorate, Competition Bureau):

Predatory pricing is something we take very seriously at the Competition Bureau. There was a major court case involving Air Canada in the early 2000s which dealt with that type of behaviour.

The starting point for us in looking at this is that it's a very fine line between what is vigorous pro-competitive, aggressive conduct that we want to see in the economy and what crosses the line to being predatory. Predatory conduct is really aimed at the elimination of a competitor, typically on a specific route, by pricing in such a way that losses can be recouped once the competitor has exited the market.

The jurisprudence from the courts in Canada provides that there's an avoidable-cost test that needs to be met to show predatory pricing in any given case. These are very fact and evidence-based exercises that require a lot of quantitative and financial data about the company to try to assess what its costs and revenues are on a specific route.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Briefly, you really don't want the equivalent of dumping, where someone takes a loss in order to drive a competitor out of business.

Mr. Anthony Durocher:

Again, I think it really depends on the facts. It's normal for companies to react and drop their prices when there's competitive entry on a given route. The question is this: at what level does the lower price represent a predatory tactic aimed at eliminating the competition? That really is a case by case assessment.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you for that.

We talked a lot about airlines with respect to competition, but we're jumping through hoops, or trying to—the previous government and this government—when it comes to the railways. The competitive line rates aren't used anymore because they refuse to compete. Does the Competition Bureau have any influence or observations on what appears to be price-fixing by the railroads?

(1210)

Mr. Anthony Durocher:

The Competition Bureau provided a very comprehensive submission in 2015 to the review panel on the Canada Transportation Act. In doing so, it consulted with a number of major stakeholders to get the lay of the land with respect to competition issues. A significant issue that came up was competitive line rates not being an effective means for captive shippers to benefit from—

Mr. Ken Hardie:

It's the fire alarm. Hold that thought.

The Chair:

Well, we did want to go outside at sometime during these four days. We may have an opportunity.

I will suspend the meeting.

(1210)

(1240)

The Chair:

We will reconvene our meeting, and we'll try to make up our time.

Mr. Hardie, you have about a minute.

The idea would be for everyone to have five minutes and, if witnesses could try to be concise with their answers, we could still give everyone a chance to get their questions in.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I know you may not have wanted to answer that question about price-fixing by the railroads, but that's a little over the top. Just kidding.

Seriously, though, what role has the Competition Bureau played to address the fact that we've had to introduce extraordinary new measures in order to generate at least pseudo-competition from our two railways?

(1245)

Mr. Anthony Durocher:

Thank you for the question.

I agree. Someone, somewhere, did not want me to answer that question.

By and large, the bureau has an advocacy function, in addition to enforcement. As I was stating before we left, in the context of the 2015 review panel, the Competition Bureau provided a detailed submission providing advice, based on its competition expertise, on how to try to inject competition as much as possible in the rail system while acknowledging that market forces, which we would typically want to rely on, may not be appropriate in all instances.

With respect to our investigatory function, for issues such as price-fixing or abuse of dominance, the bureau investigates matters confidentially when there's reason to believe that an offence under the act has occurred. Price-fixing is obviously a major component of any antitrust policy in any country. In Canada these are criminal offences under the Competition Act which we take very seriously.

There is an immunity program in place that may prompt people to bring a bid-rigging matter or a price-fixing matter to the bureau's attention. These are matters that we would investigate in due course and take the appropriate action on, acknowledging that we reference such matters to the PPSC for prosecution as well.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Monsieur Aubin, for five minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Madam Chair, I will limit myself to two topics in order not to go over the five minutes I am allowed.

My first question is for Ms. Fisher or Mr. Durocher.

Your presentation about the Competition Bureau was very well done, although it was a bit technical. For those who are following our work, I will try to be as clear as possible.

You mentioned the example of a potential joint venture between Air Canada and United Continental. After a series of negotiations and studies, the Competition Tribunal systematically blocked this agreement. It did not come to pass.

As I understand it, in view of the powers devolved to the minister in the current Bill C-49, that is over, the Tribunal will no longer be able to block anything. At most, it can recommend that the minister do so. If the minister decides otherwise on the basis of poorly defined public interests, there is no further recourse.

Mr. Anthony Durocher:

Thank you for your question.

First of all, I would like to explain what happened in the case of Air Canada and United Continental. The Bureau referred the matter to the Competition Tribunal, alleging competition issues on 19 routes. The Tribunal never issued a decision on this matter. There was an agreement between the Bureau and the parties to resolve the competition issues on 15 of the routes. It was resolved by an out-of-court settlement.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I understand that example, but to put it more plainly, the minister's authority takes precedence over a potential decision by the Tribunal.

Mr. Anthony Durocher:

As to Bill C-49, if the transport minister deemed something to be in the public interest, that would indeed be the case. It would be left to his discretion, while also bearing in mind the analysis by the Office and the Commissioner.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

You can see the problem though. Competition has quite a clear meaning to all members of the public. Public interest, however, is vague, to say the least.

I will now turn to my second topic before my time runs out. I would like to speak to the official from the Canadian Chamber of Commerce. I will offer a different example this time. I think we are more likely to agree on the issue of economic development.

In my riding of Trois-Rivières, there is a regional airport that has expanded steadily over the years, first to accommodate those travelling for pleasure, then for a pilot school, an aircraft painting company and now to perform maintenance on some Air Canada aircraft. In short, there has been steady investment in an airport that is growing and contributing to regional development. There are even agreements with airline companies to schedule charter flights.

There is a problem, however, since Bill C-49 stipulates that if we want access to security measures for international travel, we have to pay for them ourselves.

With regard to regional economic development, does it seem fair to you that there should be two types of airports, those for which the cost of services is covered and those that have to pay to offer the same services to their customers?

(1250)

[English]

Mr. Ryan Greer:

Yes, thank you for the question.

You've raised what is one of, I think, a few different challenges with the current CATSA funding model and how CATSA operates as a whole. At its most basic level, the fact that we have an air traveller security charge, which funds general revenues of the government and not all of which is put back into security services—it does fund other things, but the fact is that not all of that is reinvested—already puts CATSA on its back foot when it comes to meeting its obligations in airports. I think that's one of the reasons that Bill C-49 in the interim seeks to allow airports to set up these arrangements.

As I said in my remarks, I think the ability of airports to enter into these arrangements should be viewed as a stopgap at best, and a band-aid, until the CATSA funding model can be dealt with in a more reasonable manner. It's not just airports in Quebec; it's small and medium-sized airports across the country, especially for peak tourism season. They get demand for some very high-end travellers or people on charter flights who want to come and spend a lot of money in their community, but for scheduling reasons, they have trouble getting CATSA staff, or funding reasons.

I think you've identified an inequity that is worth having a discussion about. However, before I think that can be addressed, the overall CATSA funding model and how the air travel security charge is actually used to fund CATSA is something that needs to be dealt with because now, as we're seeing, some of the big airports can't meet all their obligations with CATSA's current service provision. They're having to contract for additional provisions at Pearson and another airport.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Greer.

Sorry, Mr. Aubin.

Mr. Badawey, you have five minutes.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you to the panellists for coming out this morning and afternoon. It's a pleasure to have you.

This process, as I said earlier, has been very fruitful in terms of a lot of the information that's come out. There's no question it's going to be a work in progress. We had an environment that we lived in yesterday, and now we're going to have a new environment that we're going to live in tomorrow. I see this bill, in adding to the overall bigger strategy, as becoming more of an enabler, more a plan of action, being very pragmatic. With that, once it reaches royal assent, it will be able to execute a lot of the recommendations that are contained therein.

My question first of all is for Mr. Greer. Speaking of yesterday's environment, a competitive air transportation environment, as you well recognize, is a key economic driver, creating economic growth not only within relevant regions vis-à-vis those that have airports, but also the ones that they cater to that might be some distance away.

In your view, and this is again a work in progress, does this bill bring a proper direction forward in comparison to the way it was, and streamline the process, make it more user friendly, therefore customer friendly? Do you find that, again, we're moving in a more positive direction in comparison to what we had?

Mr. Ryan Greer:

I think, on air travel specifically, moving from a regime that was very unpredictable and very difficult to navigate, both for consumers and for airlines to understand the penalties that could be levelled against them, moving to a clear, more transparent system where everybody understands what is expected of them and what the consequences of potential actions are, is going to be helpful moving forward.

That said, the devil is in the details. With the air passenger bill of rights, most of those provisions will be established through regulations, so if they're overly punitive, if they're, perhaps, penalizing airlines for things that are out of their control, then we may end up with a system that is less competitive or actually ends up resulting in additional traveller costs when airlines have to recoup some of these. I think the framework set out is a good one, but I think the details, the regulations themselves, will tell us whether we sort of get it right.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

That is the reason we're having this dialogue now and the reason I actually asked the question. I think the minister was clear that we don't want to make it punitive. we want to ensure that if it's out of the control of the airlines that of course it wouldn't apply.

I'll ask the Competition Bureau the same question.

Mr. Durocher, do you find today's environment and the direction which the minister is moving in are going to streamline the process, in which you and the folks in your organization of course play a key role? Do you find that tomorrow it is going to be a lot more streamlined than it was yesterday?

(1255)

Ms. Melissa Fisher:

With respect to the proposed legislation around joint ventures, it will certainly implement a well-defined timeline in terms of reviewing those proposed arrangements. Under our current process, if we were to review an arrangement under the competitor collaboration guidelines, there's a bit less certainty in terms of timing for the commissioner's review, although we strive to conduct our reviews as efficiently as possible, given that we're certainly well aware of the business community's desire to move quickly in negotiating and implementing transactions. Under the merger regime, we have a fairly well-defined time period with statutory waiting periods and service standards relating to user fees.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

My last question is for Mr. Schaan.

Over the past week, I've really tried to attach Bill C-49 to the bigger picture when it comes to the transportation 2030 strategy. That, of course, has a balance attached to it when it comes to customers, especially with air, in terms of their rights, as well as with business, with industry, with really injecting this bill into that strategy with respect to trade corridors and enhancing those trade corridors when it comes to our infrastructure investments following those recommendations and strategies. How do you see this, as well as the bigger strategy, actually fitting into the overall strategy to bring Canada to a better performance globally?

The Chair:

Could we have a short answer, please.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

You bet. We're interested in this bill both because we think it's good for competition policy and because it's good for innovation and science and economic development. I think the interest is that a clearer, transparent internationally competitive joint venture process will allow for our air carriers to increase connectivity, particularly to trading zones or regions to which we may not currently have access.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

With respect to the pricing mechanisms, it always puzzles people that you can fly from Vancouver to London for a lot less than you can fly from Vancouver to Winnipeg. It gives rise to the suspicion that in fact there's cross-subsidization, that perhaps the domestic fares we're paying here in Canada are helping to offset fares or make them more competitive on those very competitive routes. Is this something the bureau has looked into?

Ms. Melissa Fisher:

When the bureau conducts its investigations, we look at a particular transaction or a particular merger. We don't tend to look at industries as a whole, but in the context of looking at a particular arrangement, we would look at the competition on specific origin-destination city pairs. We would be looking at the pricing on that specific route to assess whether the transaction was likely to substantially lessen or prevent competition on that route, so whether the prices on that route would be increased or consumer choice would be decreased as a result of the proposed arrangement.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Mr. Schaan, do you have any comment on that?

Mr. Mark Schaan:

No, other than that there are considerable powers afforded in the Competition Act for the commissioner of competition to examine the Canadian marketplace for any zones in which there's potentially anti-competitive behaviour. Whether that's abuse of dominance, price-fixing, deceptive marketing, or otherwise, there are clear processes in place for the commissioner to investigate.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I get the impression that nobody has really thought of that one yet.

Let's talk about the Department of Industry. The legislation provides for a review of a joint venture within two years. I think the airlines would say sometimes it takes about two years for everything to settle into place. For their benefit as well as for the consumer, what would your department be looking for within that two years that might spark some kind of reopening of a review?

Mr. Mark Schaan:

It won't be our department but the minister of transport and the Department of Transport will have the capacity after two years to revisit the transaction as it was initially proposed. That's not the end of immunity; that's the potential for the reconsideration of the arrangement. I just want to make the distinction that it's not two years and then a re-review; it's two years potentially and much longer. One of the things they would be looking for is whether the public interest benefits that were promised or that were part of the overall undertakings or remedies manifest themselves. If it wasn't realistic that those public interest benefits could have manifested themselves in the time period allotted, that would be one of the factors that the minister of transport would need to weigh before deciding to re-examine the transaction.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Mr. Greer, you brought up the issue of the impact of various fees on the cost of air travel. It seems to be that never-ending balance between how the user pays or, if the fee is taken away, how everybody pays through some form of government subsidy. Your reflections on what would be a proper balance generally, please, but can you reflect on the challenges of serving the north and the enormously large airfares that it takes to get back and forth there?

(1300)

Mr. Ryan Greer:

Just to step back to one of your earlier questions about the cost of air travel in Canada, I think all of these extra taxes and fees and the airport rents are one of the reasons why it is more expensive to fly in Canada. Obviously there's the density of our population, but there are also our carriers that serve a lot of routes that aren't as profitable, including into the north, where some of their bigger haul routes actually can cross-subsidize and get into smaller communities the flights that may otherwise not make commercial sense for them. I expect that there is some cross-subsidization when it comes to making sure that Air Canada, WestJet, and other carriers are actually getting into smaller communities where there's maybe not a lot of potential to make money.

The user fee principle built into air travel makes sense, but again, only if those fees are used for what they're determined for. The problem with the air travellers security charge is that not all of that money is put back into CATSA screening. One of the things that Bill C-49 will do in allowing airports to contract out new services from CATSA is that inevitably those authorities will end up recouping those costs through their landing fees and other mechanisms, which are then built into ticket costs. That means consumers could end up double-paying for security fees. They're paying the air travellers security charge, and then they're going to be paying whatever fees end up getting built into tickets because of these additional costs that are being contracted out.

We think it's time for a review of all of the government-imposed costs. We're not saying to get rid of all of them. We're not saying that there shouldn't be a security charge. We're saying to make sure that we're accountable for how those fees are used and that they're invested in what they're supposed to be invested in. Also, then, there's looking to see if there are ways in which we can make the sector as a whole more competitive. Again, airport rents are an area where we impose very high costs, which then of course have to be recouped through the end users.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Greer.

Mr. Chong.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you to our witnesses for appearing. I appreciate the candour of your opening remarks and testimony.

In addition to failing to introduce market forces in grain handling in Canada by lifting the maximum revenue entitlements, thereby failing to address the underlying cause of the grain-shipping crises over the last 20 years, based on your testimony it looks like the government is also weakening the competition in another area by weakening the power of what is a law enforcement agency, the Competition Bureau.

I found it really interesting that in your opening remarks, Madam Fisher, you elaborated at length about the bureau's 2011 case where you went after Air Canada and United Airlines and their proposed joint venture, and ultimately required that they exempt 14 transborder routes from the joint venture in order to ensure greater competition for Canadian consumers and ultimately lower prices for Canadian families.

It's clear to me that the bill in front of us today weakens the bureau and weakens law enforcement by introducing a new process that would allow the minister to essentially bypass the bureau. Had the 2011 case been introduced under this proposed law, it's clear to me what would have happened. Air Canada and United Airlines would have applied directly to the minister for this new process and very likely the minister would have approved the joint venture, possibly without the exemptions for the 14 routes. That ultimately would have led to less competition and to higher prices for Canadian consumers.

I think it's safe to say that Bill C-49 weakens law enforcement. It weakens the powers of one of our premier law enforcement agencies when it comes to competition. Would you agree with that statement?

Ms. Melissa Fisher:

The bureau is an enforcer. We enforce our legislation as it's been enacted. If the present legislation is enacted, we will enforce it as well, and we are strong enforcers.

In terms of our substantive competition analysis under the new legislation, that will not change from the current legislation in terms of how we conduct our review and in terms of the quality of our analysis. The rigour we apply will not change.

The proposed legislation does require the minister of transport to consult with the commissioner with respect to proposed remedies related to competition. We will continue to negotiate hard for those remedies. I don't see any of that changing.

(1305)

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you for that answer.

I just have a comment to make, Madam Chair.

I find it really interesting that there seems to have been a very cozy relationship between big business and government over the past two years. I don't think it's without coincidence that Air Canada purchased the C Series jet, thereby helping a Canadian company, while at the same time provisions concerning maintenance facilities for Air Canada in Winnipeg were watered down. We also now have a bill in front of us that would essentially allow joint ventures, like the one proposed in 2011 between Air Canada and United Airlines, to proceed without a rigorous, mandatory Competition Bureau review. It would also remove the ability of the bureau to directly negotiate the terms and conditions of those joint ventures.

I think it's concerning. Ultimately, the bureau is a world-class organization that has done very good work over the last number of years in enforcing competition and creating greater competition for Canadian consumers. I worry that this legislation weakens the powers of the bureau to continue that role in its world-class manner.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chong.

Mr. Fraser, you have five minutes.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you.

I'll start with you, Mr. Greer. You mentioned that when we're dealing with long-haul interswitching, the absence of reciprocity is a problem. When we spoke with some of the witnesses who testified on behalf of the railways, one of the things that came out of the testimony was that in fact a very, very small portion of their business is subject to being lost to the United States.

What's the extent of this actual threat, with the lack of reciprocity, with business going to American railways?

Mr. Ryan Greer:

As Bill C-49 is currently drafted, both major class Is stand to lose some business in southern Alberta and southern Manitoba. That's what the current exemptions of the bill provide in Ontario, British Columbia, and Quebec.

I think my comment in my remarks was that in the absence of those exemptions, both those railways would stand to lose a significant amount of rail business, and then Canada would lose a significant amount of port business in both Vancouver and Montreal. As it currently stands, there will be a loss of traffic. The railways would have to give you a more precise description of what that loss of traffic in Alberta and Manitoba will be. With the exemptions, which would be maintained, a massive loss of traffic in some of our major centres won't be had.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I'm just curious, then, if we compare it not with the status quo but before Bill C-30 sunsetted, and if we look at the extended interswitching as a comparison, from your perspective, what's the relative loss of business that you would see under a new regime with the excluded corridors? This is as compared with the extended interswitching regime.

Mr. Ryan Greer:

Part of the challenge with LHI, as I think you heard from both the railways and the shippers, is that there's still a lack of understanding about exactly how it would function and what the outcomes would be. The railways will hope that it doesn't lead to a larger loss of business. Some of the shippers have suggested that the old interswitching provisions weren't used nearly often enough but were an important negotiating pressure point for them. It's unclear how LHI might itself include into it. Reading the bill as it is, I think LHI is probably an improvement from the old Bill C-30 in that it's seen as a matter of last resort, but again, we'll have to wait and see until it's in action.

Again, to us the biggest concern is that the exemptions stay in place. Without them, it would really be a free-for-all on major Canadian lines.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I'm going off memory here, so forgive me if I misinterpreted something from your testimony before the fire alarm went off. You spoke about the importance of data. I was unclear as to whether you were saying that the measures put in to enhance access to data were positive, or if you were saying that we need to go further and give the disaggregated data the shippers were talking about to really influence decision-making, or maybe both.

Could you perhaps elaborate on the importance of that quality of information in terms of enhancing efficiency in the transportation system?

(1310)

Mr. Ryan Greer:

Yes, the use of data, and having more data for all members of the supply chain, is hugely important and should be applauded. I think outside of this bill, the government is taking some actions to establish a new data and information group within the Government of Canada.

To me, when you start regulating certain amounts of data, it becomes a tricky proposition. We don't always know what the burden will be on companies to provide that and in a certain timely manner. However, there are a lot of examples of industry and government working together collaboratively, often on a voluntary basis, to bring together information from all parts of the supply chain. Our view is that more of that data is needed to make decisions on infrastructure investment and to make other policy decisions. That data also needs to look at the Canadian network as a whole, not just individual parts of it, and at how all decisions and infrastructure investments will impact supply chains from coast to coast to coast.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

If I could move on to the competition folks, perhaps, Ms. Fisher, you'd be in the best position to answer this.

I've seen from a few recent news articles that Air Transat has come out swinging against the joint measure provisions here, using phraseology like this is going to kneecap the competition regulator. Do you think the provisions in this bill are going to prevent you from doing your work?

Ms. Melissa Fisher:

In terms of our substantive analysis, the proposed legislation provides that the parties to the arrangement will provide the information we need to conduct a review. Having that information, we're going to apply the same rigorous test that we apply now. Our analysis is very well set out and is based on international standards. We'll continue to apply the same analysis as we have applied historically in conducting our review.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I'll go to Mr. Schaan quickly.

The Chair:

Mr. Fraser, your time is up.

Mr. Godin. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for taking part in this exercise, which I think is very important to make sure that the bill is complete, well written, and that it achieves the objectives set out by parliamentarians.

My first question is for Ms. Fisher, from the Competition Bureau.

You said to one of my colleagues earlier that you enforce the law; that is the Competition Bureau's mandate. I understand your role very well. If, however, the bill is not clear, if it is incomplete or evasive, will you be able to play that role effectively? Will the bill give you the necessary tools and enough strength to play your role? [English]

Ms. Melissa Fisher:

In terms of the proposed legislation relating to joint ventures, I think our role has been very well described and it's limited to competition to the extent that there are other public interest factors that are being considered by the Minister of Transport. Those are his considerations to take into consideration.

We will conduct our analysis as we have conducted our analysis and we will prepare our report as we are required to do under the proposed legislation. In terms of how our analysis will be conducted, the factors that we will take into consideration are very well defined and industry players will know what those are.

We will continue to do that in the way that we have always done it. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

As parliamentarians, we want the bill to be even more effective. What would you add to this bill to help the Competition Bureau be effective? [English]

Ms. Melissa Fisher:

That's a good question.

I think the development of the guidelines will be very important in the proposed legislation because they're going to set out the information that we need to conduct our review. The quality, the comprehensiveness, the accuracy of any work we do is all dependent on the information that we have access to.

We're committed to working with Transport to develop those guidelines and ensure that the information that we require to conduct an analysis of a joint venture is clearly set out in the guidelines. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

I have no concerns about the effectiveness of the Competition Bureau in applying the letter of the law. I do have one concern, however. In the case of joint ventures, the minister has the right, after two years, to intervene on the grounds of public interest, but that public interest is not well defined. Is it political interest or a one-time interest? The question is perhaps more for Mr. Schaan.

I am a bit uncomfortable about this power being given. As I said to Mr. Garneau this morning, I do not have doubts about the current minister, but as my colleague said earlier, a law is above individuals and it has to be applicable in the future also. There is nothing in the bill that indicates the kind of public interest that would justify the intervention of an individual politician in that process.

(1315)

Mr. Mark Schaan:

Thank you for your question.

I have two important points.

First of all, with regard to alliances, the process already exists. [English]

The same process that currently exists in the Canada Transportation Act for mergers is what we are now introducing for joint ventures. This notion about a public interest consideration has actually been in our laws since 2000. What we are doing is keeping up with the times in the way the industry internationally is moving forward. Our competitors in other jurisdictions, the United States, Australia, and others, have access to public interest considerations in their joint venture reviews, and Canadian airlines do not. That's one of the views.

The public interest considerations, the minister having heard from the commissioner of competition compulsorily about the considerations from a competition perspective, will be articulated and enumerated in guidelines. They include safety, access to increased connectivity, economic viability, and all sorts of important factors that impact the Canadian economy, Canadian travellers, and the healthiness and competitiveness of our Canadian air industry. Those will be set out in guidelines, and as I say, it's predicated on a process that has already been in existence.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I have a very simple question for the Competition Bureau officials.

Are lobbyists allowed to lobby the Competition Bureau?

Mr. Anthony Durocher:

I think it is allowed. To my knowledge, there is no prohibition against it. I can tell you, however, that in practice it is specifically in relation to files or investigations that we have dealings with the company representatives or their lawyers. That is how it works. That is partly because the political aspect is for the department to deal with, and not the bureau. Companies and their lawyers have dealings with us when we are conducting investigations.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

So the answer is no. On the other hand, it is very easy to lobby a minister's office. That is even part of lobbyists' work. I have the feeling that the measure in Bill C-49 that gives the minister this new power is probably the result of lobbying.

So I come back to the same question. By virtue of his new powers, can the minister circumvent all the Competition Bureau's work?

Mr. Anthony Durocher:

Once again, from the Competition Bureau's point of view, our role is clearly defined in Bill C-49.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Yes, and I have no doubts about the relevance and objectivity of your work. If your work can ultimately be circumvented though, there is a problem.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

I would like to say something about the competition policy.[English]

The beginning of this law was a function of the fact that we believed that there were considerations beyond those of a strict competition nature that needed to be considered in a joint venture transaction. That's what's being afforded by this particular opportunity. We maintained a very strict and compulsory role for the consideration of competition law by the minister, in addition to the public interest, to come to an ultimate determination of whether a transaction is in the public interest for Canada and Canadians. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

When it comes to competition, everyone knows what we are talking about. In the case of public interest, however, it is not clear. Might there be a solution or an amendment to clarify this? Along with giving the minister an additional power, would it also be possible for the bill to define the concept of public interest?

(1320)

[English]

Mr. Mark Schaan:

The proposal is to have public interest expanded upon in the guidelines to allow for an evolutionary understanding of public interest, because it changes, and to allow for a full and robust consultation on what that is.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We've finished the first round. Does anyone have a single question they did not get a chance to ask that's important? Mr. Godin. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Madam Chair, I have a very quick question. Thank you for letting me ask it.

My question is for the official from the Canadian Chamber of Commerce.

Here is what I understood from your comments today. On the whole, your members are satisfied with Bill C-49. Have I understood you correctly today? [English]

Mr. Ryan Greer:

I think that's a bit of a broad statement.

Our membership is very wide and has a lot of different interests within the Canadian chamber. There are some aspects of Bill C-49 which we view as good and necessary, and we are still waiting to see some of the details.

There are other issues, on the rail side, where we're not as certain. Often the chamber, with the size and scope of our network, comes at it from a broad approach, and we have some broad concerns about the creeping regulation into the sector and what that may mean for investment, for productivity, and for the effectiveness of all Canadian supply chains.

We like a lot of what's in Bill C-49. With some parts, we still need to see what's in the regs, and there are other parts where we have some concerns.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you to our witnesses. Sorry for the interruption, but I think everybody has had their questions and their answers that they needed for today.

We will suspend and reconvene in camera at two o'clock.

(1320)

(1425)

The Chair:

I am calling our meeting back to order, our study of Bill C-49.

Apologies that we're a few minutes behind schedule, but welcome to all of you who are here.

If you would like to start by introducing yourselves, we will start with Mr. Lavin.

You have 10 minutes for your comments.

Mr. Douglas Lavin (Vice-President, Members and External Relations, North America, International Air Transport Association):

Madam Chairwoman and honourable members, I appreciate the opportunity to appear before this committee as it considers Bill C-49.

My name is Doug Lavin, and I am the vice-president for member and external relations for North America for the International Air Transport Association, or IATA.

IATA is a Canadian corporation created by a special act of the Canadian Parliament, representing the interests of 275 airlines in more than 117 countries around the world, including Air Canada, Air Transat, Cargojet, and WestJet. As such, IATA has a significant interest in the proceedings of this committee on Bill C-49.

I have submitted my written comments on Bill C-49 for your consideration in advance of today's hearing, but I'd like to take my time this afternoon to highlight several points included in that submission.

First, it is important to note that a key recommendation of the 2016 Canada Transportation Act review was to reduce the high level of government taxes and fees on Canadian air transportation because of their significant negative impact on both airlines and passengers. Specifically, the CTA review recommended a phasing out of airport rent, a reform of the user-pay policy to prevent the government from collecting taxes in excess of its investment in services and infrastructure, and a reduction in the air traveller security charge.

In announcing the government's transportation policy, Minister Garneau promised a reduction of what he characterized as a “litany of fees and charges” on air travel. In fact, this morning he mentioned that he had travelled the country in preparation for Bill C-49, and the number one issue he heard about was the high cost of air travel.

IATA was therefore disappointed that Bill C-49 fails to address any of these cost issues—no call for a reduction in rent, taxes, or fees.

To be fair, Minister Garneau has promised to address these cost issues in phase two of the government's vision for the future of Canadian transportation. We look forward to supporting Minister Garneau and his team in this second phase.

I believe my airline and trade association colleagues who have testified before you yesterday and this afternoon are better equipped than I am to address the issues of airline ownership, joint ventures, and CATSA cost recovery set forth in Bill C-49. I'd like to focus my remarks on Bill C-49's call for the Canadian Transportation Agency and Transport Canada to develop enhanced air passenger protection regulations.

IATA is currently working with approximately 70 governments that have either implemented or are considering implementing air passenger rights regulations. As you would expect, some governments have done a better job than others in this regard. We have seen two primary approaches to these passenger rights regimes.

The first approach is that government steps in and dictates how airlines should treat their passengers. This model is best seen in the approach taken by the United States and the European Union, where regulations impose stiff fines if airlines do not meet government-imposed requirements as to how passengers should be treated in the case of delay, cancellation, or lost baggage.

For the most part, these fines are punitive in nature, as they go beyond the cost of the delay or cancellation to the air passenger. We see a number of challenges to this approach.

First, it is difficult to define in regulatory terms exactly how to treat passengers in any given circumstance. Each irregular operation presents a different set of facts that are difficult to anticipate, much less to regulate. In Europe, for example, the courts stepped in to interpret the intent of the European passenger rights regulations, which more often than not resulted in contradictory interpretations and confusion on the part of airlines and passengers alike.

Second, the most well-intentioned government regulators can sometimes do more harm than good when attempting to protect passenger interests. For example, in the United States the rule against lengthy tarmac delays has resulted in increased flight cancellations, which often prove to be more inconvenient to passengers than the tarmac delay itself.

(1430)



In 1987, Canada deregulated the commercial airline industry based on the belief that the free market, rather than government regulation, would produce better results for airline passengers. There is little evidence to suggest that this assumption was incorrect then or now. We know that rare tarmac delays or lost luggage occasionally cause inconvenience for air passengers. However, the answer is not always government second-guessing airlines when the competitive market, and more recently social media, already provides them with all the incentives they need to treat their customers as well as possible.

While Europe and the U.S. passenger rights approach have been copied by some governments, other countries have taken a second approach that I believe this committee and Canadian regulators should consider.

Under this approach, governments do not impose strict passenger rights rules with accompanied fines or penalties. Instead, they put measures in place to ensure that air passengers are fully aware of their rights before they purchase their ticket, leaving it up to passengers to decide what level of service they're willing to pay for.

Australia is a good example of this approach. In addition to adopting a broad consumer rights law covering all industries, the government has worked with the airlines to develop customer charters that outline each passenger's service commitments and complete handling procedures. China and Singapore have also chosen this focus on transparency rather than imposing punitive measures, and have seen positive results in terms of on-time performance, lower cancellations, and lower airfares

It is interesting to note that last year, the Canadian Transportation Agency took a step in that direction when it requested and received voluntary commitments by Canadian carriers to publish their tariffs and contracts of carriage in clear language on their respective websites.

Bill C-49 seeks to combine both approaches to this passenger rights issue. On the one hand, it requires airlines to make terms and conditions of carriage readily available to passengers in clear and concise language. IATA supports this transparency. Bill C-49 goes on to direct CTA and Transport Canada to develop regulations with minimum standards and compensation for passengers during irregular operations. IATA has significant concerns regarding this approach, particularly if the fines are prescriptive in nature.

If Bill C-49 remains as is and CTA and Transport Canada follow the U.S. and EU approach, we urge these regulators to follow several principles to promote clear and fair regulation. These include guarding against unintended consequences and including provisions to fix them when they arise, as well as ensuring that the benefits outweigh the costs of regulation. Compensation should be equivalent to the cost of lost time and property to passengers and not be punitive. We need to ensure that any customer service requirements apply to all parts of the air transportation ecosystem rather than just airlines, and that fines are only imposed on actions within the airline's control. Finally, passenger rights rules should not be extraterritorial in nature.

Thank you for your consideration. I look forward to answering your questions.

(1435)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Lavin.

On to Mr. Priestley, Northern Air Transport Association.

Mr. Glenn Priestley (Executive Director, Northern Air Transport Association):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

To the committee, thank you for having the Northern Air Transport Association here. My name is Glenn Priestley and I am proud to be the executive director of NATA.

Our membership is representative of all aspects of northern and remote air operations. Our operators are committed to the highest possible standards and co-operating with all government agencies to achieve this standard with rules and recommended practices that make sense and support the Canadian aviation industry.

I would like to take the opportunity to thank the committee and staff for including NATA, including northern and remote operations across Canada on these important discussions on the legislation contained in Bill C-49. Too often, aviation policy is formed with a focus on southern Canadian air services. There has been a genuine effort by this government and various committees like TRAN to understand the unique issues associated with northern and remote aviation and we thank you for that.

Bill C-49 is a large bill that has three sections that concern the Canadian aviation industry. For this briefing we'll be focusing on the passenger bill of rights legislation from the perspective of the northern travel experience. We'll be looking to ATAC as our senior association. We'll be looking at all of the aspects, but I'd like to focus on the passenger bill of rights, if I may.

The management of passenger safety and the overall cost of the travelling experience is a complex and daily issue for northern operators. Long-term commitment to isolated communities with initial and ongoing investment in newer aircraft and facilities creates a special bond between the air carrier and customer. The relationship is more like a partnership, and a unique aspect of all northern operators is significant commercial partnerships with many first nation and Inuit governments. These relationships provide a recognition of the needs of communities and individuals.

Examples of this recognition would be the reserved seating section to community elders located in most northern airport waiting areas. Northern operators have had to find solutions to operational problems that simply do not exist in the south. Examples include long-range flight planning with limited information and support, creating the need for contingency planning to ensure the safety of the travelling public.

This committee had a substantial focus in its June 7, 2017, report on aviation safety in Canada regarding the lack of northern aviation infrastructure needed to improve the travel experience and improve overall system safety and service reliability. The northern focus concluded with the following recommendation, “That Transport Canada develop a plan and timeline to address the specific operating conditions and infrastructure needs of airlines serving Northern Canada and small airports.”

Referring to the Canada Transportation Act amendment to include passenger rights legislation, the Northern Air Transport Association is very concerned with the generalities and the wording, and the increase in regulatory authority that these amendments and others will provide to the Canadian Transportation Agency.

To be clear, NATA agrees that fare-paying passengers have rights. However, there are concerns that because of problems that have been manifested in southern Canada and internationally, northern air carriers are going to be burdened with one-size-fits-all. NATA members are currently very engaged on flawed regulations that were developed this way regarding flight and duty time rules for flight crew.

Here is our summary.

NATA agrees that the travel experience should be as transparent as possible with expectations clearly stated.

NATA does not agree with any minimum standard of compensation in the regulations, as there are simply too many variables.

NATA does agree with the procedures that provide passengers with essential notice for any unscheduled occurrence that causes delay.

NATA agrees every air carrier continue to maintain some form of operation control manual for these and other procedures associated with carriers of passengers and their carry-on-board items as well as checked baggage.

NATA is concerned with the blanket amendment that empowers the minister to give the CTA extra-regulatory authority without consultation.

In summary, the Northern Air Transport Association has an excellent service record with its passenger management, challenging flight environments, and difficult locations. Northern operators pride themselves on a tradition of providing hot meals, for instance, on many flights included in the price of the ticket. Northern operators are invested in the community in a different way than southern operators, which is easy to explain.

NATA agrees passengers have rights. Our operator members have been respecting all their customers for a long time with recognition for special needs and unique cultures. NATA is proud to be an original member of the CTA's accessibility committee, an important forum that provides guidance to our members on how to make a good system better in the movement of all passengers.

Any passenger bill of right needs to recognize existing industry efforts regarding passenger safety. We encourage a new air carrier-centred conflict resolution model to be developed to replace the current CTA model that inhibits consumers' participation.

Thank you.

(1440)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Priestley.

Now we'll go to the Canadian Federation of Musicians. It would have been lovely if we could have had some music in here this afternoon for us to enjoy as we finish our fourth day of being here.

Ms. Schutzman and Mr. Elliott, please go forward.

Mr. Allistair Elliott (International Representative, Canada, Canadian Federation of Musicians):

Before I begin, I'd just like to express our condolences for the loss of your colleague.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Allistair Elliott:

Good afternoon. Thank you very much for the opportunity to appear.[Translation]

We are pleased to be able to have a discussion with the members of the committee. [English]

My name is Allistair Elliott. I'm the international representative for Canada for the American Federation of Musicians for the United States and Canada. As a professional musician over the last 40 years, I've travelled most of the world performing music. My performing career has been paralleled with my work for the Canadian Federation of Musicians, initially as an executive board member, then as president of the Calgary Musicians' Association, Local 547, of the AFM, since 1999, and now as an international representative for Canada.

I'm joined today by oboist, teacher, and my friend, Francine Schutzman, who played in the National Arts Centre Orchestra for 38 years. She's the past-president of the Organization of Canadian Symphony Musicians, and currently the president of the Musicians Association of Ottawa-Gatineau, Local 180, of the AFM.

We are here today to enthusiastically applaud the Honourable Marc Garneau and Transport Canada for the inclusion of musical instruments as part of passenger rights in Bill C-49, an act to amend the Canada Transportation Act.

The Canadian Federation of Musicians is the Canadian national office of the American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada. We are comprised of 200 local offices across North America, collectively representing a membership of approximately 80,000 professional musicians, 17,000 of whom live and work in Canada. We've been representing the interests of musicians for 121 years.

As the distinctly Canadian division of AFM and under the federal Status of the Artist Act recognition, the CFM negotiates fair agreements and working conditions covering all musical services within Canada. Our goal is to pursue harmonization with the United States' FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012, regarding the carriage of musical instruments on commercial air carriers. We have included our original submission to the Canada Transportation Act review in January 2015.

I just want to thank the Honourable Lisa Raitt—I know she was in this morning and she's not in this afternoon, but her colleagues can pass it on—for encouraging us to enter that submission a few years ago.

Following extensive advocacy to all the key stakeholders, we were very pleased to be included in the discussions on passenger rights and are looking forward to working together to develop regulations once royal assent has been received.

We would also like to thank Air Canada for leading the way as an airline and working closely with the CFM to provide better service to musicians. This summer, at the 4th International Orchestra Conference in Montreal, Air Canada was presented with the Federation of International Musicians Airline of Choice award for 2017.[Translation]

We thank Air Canada and offer our congratulations.[English]

Musicians travel for business with oddly shaped briefcases. Players of smaller instruments generally have no issues with stowing their instruments on board. The problems arise with larger instruments. Cellos are the ones that have the most problems. Many instruments are made of wood, fragile, and affected greatly by temperature, which in itself, can damage an instrument beyond repair. Instruments belonging to professional musicians are often old and very expensive. Cellists flying with their instruments typically purchase a second seat for that instrument, but are nevertheless sometimes told they may not take the instrument on board. That equals lost job opportunities, lost work, and lost income. Some of you may be familiar with a song called United Breaks Guitars. This song was generated by an incident in which a guitarist, Dave Carroll, was forced to check his instrument, which arrived at its destination in pieces.

We applaud the steps that have already been taken to ease the problems of musicians travelling with instruments and we thank CATSA for working with us directly on some initiatives. There's still much work to be done. What we need is a well-advertised, industry-wide policy, so that musicians may plan accordingly for business travel with the tools of their trade and the confidence they will make the job interview or performance on time and without incident.

I'd like to conclude with comments made recently by one of our more high-profile member musicians, Dr. Buffy Sainte-Marie, on the floor of the Senate of Canada, when she was given special recognition for her contribution to Canadian music. During her remarks, she asked that the government help connect the dots so that musicians could travel with their instruments. She cited an example where she was charged overage fees of $1,376 for an underweight guitar and a suitcase.

(1445)



Musicians have long had difficulties transporting the tools of their trade, which are often very expensive and irreplaceable. On behalf of all musicians across Canada, we thank you for this inclusion, we applaud your efforts, and we look forward to working closely with you to develop regulations that will be effective for everyone.[Translation]

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We move now to the Air Transport Association of Canada and Mr. McKenna.

Mr. John McKenna (President and Chief Executive Officer, Air Transport Association of Canada):

Good afternoon.

My name is John McKenna. I'm the president of the Air Transport Association of Canada.

ATAC has represented Canada's commercial air transport industry since 1934. We have approximately 190 members engaged in commercial aviation, operating in every region of Canada.[Translation]

We welcome this opportunity to present our comments on Bill C-49 as it addresses important issues of commercial aviation in Canada. Passenger rights, foreign ownership, joint ventures, CATSA, and the CTA have been subjects of debate for some time. [English]

My comments, however, will address only the major themes of the bill as the applicability of the proposed measures will be determined only by the company regulations to ensue. These regulations, which will be developed by the Canadian Transportation Agency, are probably one year away.

As for foreign ownership of Canadian airlines, the minister claimed, in his November 3, 2016, speech before the Chamber of Commerce of Metropolitan Montreal, that increased foreign ownership “will lead to more options for Canadians, and allow the creation of new, ultra-low cost airlines in Canada”.

The presence of more airlines usually offers greater choice to travellers, but we have yet to hear convincing arguments supporting the claim that foreign investments will pave the way to ultra-low-cost carriers.[Translation]

Contrary to what the government claims, increasing foreign ownership of airlines will not lead to the creation of ultra-low-cost airlines in Canada. [English]

Lower operating costs to airlines, not the source of capital, are the key to lower costs to the travelling public. Only when the government decides to support, rather than bleed, the air transport industry will ultra-low-cost carriers stand a chance in Canada.

Increased foreign ownership of airlines can also lead to an increase in the export of profits generated in Canada to foreign interests rather than reinvestment in our industry.

This being said, we don't oppose the government's intention to allow foreign ownership of up to 49%. However, we ask that this proposed change be accompanied by reciprocity with our foreign partners. In other words, if we allow foreign investors to own a 49% stake in our airlines, we would expect to have the same privilege in their country.[Translation]

I would be curious to know if our government has entered into discussions with our major trading partners on reciprocity in terms of increased foreign ownership of airlines.[English]

Passenger rights is a popular theme in Canada, and the government wants to ensure that passengers are protected by law. Some of the measures the minister is keen to address include compensation standards for passengers for delays and denied boarding due to factors within the carrier's control, and lost or damaged baggage. The minister also wants clear standards allowing for children to be seated with parents at no extra charge, and for the transportation of musical instruments.[Translation]

We appreciate that the government wants to help the travelling public navigate through simpler rules and have easier access to support in unfortunate circumstances where those standards are not being met. [English]

Please bear in mind that over 140 million people travelled by air in Canada in 2016. The number of complaints filed each year at the CTA was well under 500. The reason I raise this is to give a perspective regarding the size of the problem. Of course some complaints remain at the airline level, but even then the vast majority of travellers have a good passenger experience.

We believe three major principles have to be incorporated in the passenger rights legislation.

(1450)

[Translation]

A key principle of the bill is that the go-no go decision must remain with the pilot. The threat of severe, even unreasonable, financial repercussions should not be allowed to influence the pilot's decision.[English]

Second, the compensation paid out to aggrieved passengers should be in line with the economic realities of travel in Canada. Unreasonable monetary compensation out of proportion to the magnitude of the carriers' revenue on any given flight could only result in a deterioration of our enviable air transport system, perhaps even including reduced service on some routes.[Translation]

For example, air passenger rights in Europe are generous to the point that a passenger could receive compensation for a delayed flight which by far exceeds the price paid for the ticket.[English]

Such practices can only lead to increased costs to airlines and to all passengers.

Shared responsibility is another major principle. You can’t hold an airline accountable for events beyond its control. The minister has stated, “Some of the measures we are looking at include compensation standards for passengers denied boarding due to factors within the carrier’s control”. We need a clear definition of what falls under a carrier’s control.

While it may be a carrier's decision to cancel or delay a flight, the reason for doing so may be well beyond the carrier's control. Weather, ground delays as a result of de-icing pad congestion, snow clearance, congestion of the airport of destination, and air traffic control all affect an airline's decision. Also, some delays are safety related.

The safety of passengers is the utmost preoccupation of pilots and airlines. Safety-related delays should not result in penalties for the airlines. How such delays are managed by the airlines is what the law should address.

An additional principle is that a one-size-fits-all policy is so widespread at Transport Canada that Transport Canada's policy just can't apply here. You can't impose southern compensation standards as applied to Canada's largest airports to northern and remote airports.[Translation]

Ease of compliance with the law, administration of complaints, and user-friendliness for passengers all depend on the complexity of the regulations which will accompany the proposed changes in the law.[English]

We only ask that the government work collaboratively with stakeholders in the drafting of new regulations attached to the bill. Only then will the minister's objective of improving the passenger experience be met.[Translation]

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. McKenna.

We go on to questions with Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I want to thank our witnesses for joining us today. I appreciate your testimony and look forward to all the questions and answers that we are going to hear over the next hour.

My first question will be for you, Mr. Lavin.

I think back to your opening remarks, and you referenced some of the key recommendations that were made by the Emerson panel in the CTA review to review and reduce some of the taxes in this industry. Then you went on to note that Minister Garneau had promised a reduction, and that Bill C-49 fails to address any of these costs. You also then went on to state that you were looking forward to phase two and being able to support the minister then in terms of when these things will come.

I want to clarify, is it your understanding that we'll be going through this process once again looking at Bill C-49 and then including some of the those changes? Am I hearing from you that we're going to be here again in a year or two?

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

I can't speak for the minister in terms of what his plans are or what the government's plan is, I can only tell you that his assurance to us when we challenged him on this issue was that it would be addressed in the second phase. As I said, that's the number one priority our member airlines that fly in and out of Canada have.

As you know, Canada gets incredibly high ratings for its aviation infrastructure. They're number one in the world, yet they're 68 in terms of taxes and charges around the world. That has a clear impact on airlines coming to this country.

As Mr. McKenna noted, the idea that ownership and control will change the equation here in terms of low-cost carriers is something we don't agree with because the biggest issue preventing airlines from establishing operations here in Canada is the high cost of doing business.

I'm hopeful on phase two. I wish it was phase one, but we'll be prepared to do it in any format that the minister proposes.

(1455)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

I would open up my next question to any of the witnesses to answer. In your view, does Bill C-49 have the potential to increase or decrease the cost of air travel in Canada?

Mr. John McKenna:

If I may, as I mentioned, that would all depend on the compensation that is set, the format that is set. If compensation is beyond reasonable, that can only drive up costs down the line.

I can give you an example. Two of my brothers travelled back from Europe this summer, and their flight was delayed by one day. They both got compensation that way exceeded the price they paid for the round-trip ticket for the trip. I'm saying that having this kind of policy in place will only drive up costs for everyone.

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

Our experience is that by definition the government in a sense re-regulating the airline industry through a passenger rights regime will drive up costs. That's why I stressed in my opening statement that we find it critically important that the regulators do a cost-benefit analysis. In the United States when the regulators pursued passenger rights regulations, three different sets of regulations, they estimated the cost and then they said that they would prove the benefits later. That's not the way to do a cost-benefit analysis.

But it will raise costs. Again, this is a significant issue here in Canada.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay. I want to follow up on that because it has been our concern on this side of the table that this bill is ambiguous at best in the details in regard to the passenger bill of rights. We recognize that detail is going to be left up to the CTA through regulations. I think what I've heard you say is that this is not the best model to use, in fact, it's better to use something different. You also mentioned you have seen 70 or more governments address this issue.

Can you just reframe for us what you think would be the best way to attack creating a passenger bill of rights?

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

Yes, as I stated in my opening remarks, the approach that we see to be most effective is to ensure that the passenger understands what he or she is buying when they purchase a ticket.

One of the dangers of passenger rights regulations is that one of the big competitions between airlines is their passenger service. They compete at that level. If you put a passenger rights regime as a common thread across all airlines in the marketplace, it takes away competition. We find that in Australia, Singapore, and other emerging markets what they have done—and frankly what the CTA did last year—was to make sure that that transparency is there so that passengers can decide what they want to pay for.

All surveys, all evidence, suggest that when they are buying a ticket, any non-business passenger's number one, two, three, four and five concern is the cost of the ticket.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we go on to Mr. Graham.

(1500)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Lavin, I have a problem with one of the things you said early on. You're suggesting that in the 70 countries that have dealt with this, some have gone the legislative manner and the others have enforced that companies clearly spell out what it is they are offering in their tickets. For the government to be required to tell companies to tell us what they are selling us is an admission that the companies are not currently telling us what they are selling us. Is that correct?

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

It is certainly the government's position in those governments that they are not as clear as they could be. For example, in the United States, for anybody who looked at a contract of carriage, it's a very complex and long document. It's difficult for passengers to navigate that document, so what the U.S. did was require them to put it in plain language and put it on the websites in a way that the passengers can understand. IATA is strongly in favour of that kind.... If you would call it a passenger rights regime we're all for it. Transparency is important.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My point is, why should the government have to tell the airlines to tell us what they are selling us? Shouldn't they already be doing that? Why is that the level of service you're suggesting we need to be asking for?

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

I'm not suggesting that governments should step in at all. Around the world if you look at the level of cancellations and delays they have all gone down. In terms of lost luggage that has gone down. Since 1996 air carriers' tickets have gone down by 64%. I don't see a reason for governments to intervene. However, governments do like to intervene at times and I would suggest that, if they do so, make it as transparent as possible for the passenger.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I propose to you, in response to Mr. McKenna's comments—and I'll leave it to both of you or to anybody else who wants to jump in—that 500 or so complaints out of.... Was it 14 million trips?

Mr. John McKenna:

It's 140 million trips.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, 140 million trips. Is it possible that people are not complaining because they're so used to the problems that they just don't see the purpose in complaining? I put that to you from a personal example because I flew to California for a vacation in January. On the way back, I flew United Airlines, which is known for its customer service, really.

During the flight from Los Angeles to Chicago, the crew never exited the galley at the back. They didn't pass once to offer service, they didn't respond to a single service call, and nobody complained because people were so used to that level of customer service.

If we're sitting at 500 complaints out of 140 million trips, maybe it's because we're used to bad service. Do you have a comment on that?

Mr. John McKenna:

First of all, you should have travelled on a Canadian airline. You would have gotten better service, for sure.

I want to raise the question that was asked to the minister this morning as to why this is in regulations rather than law. I think the minister stated that it's easier to amend a regulation than it is to amend a law. Having dealt with Transport Canada for 15 years, I can say that nothing is easy at Transport Canada. Regulations there, on a good day, are very complex and difficult to follow.

I agree with what Mr. Lavin is saying. Whatever you decide to use has to be very clear and transparent for people. We've been waiting for regulatory changes for 10 years and they haven't come around. I think laws change about as quickly as that, so I don't think that's the solution. I do think that, for passengers, finding something in a bill or in a law is probably easier than navigating through Transport Canada regulations.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

I have another quick question for Mr. Priestley. You mentioned the long-range planning problems. Can you give us a bit of a sense of the real-world differences between northern domestic airspace and southern domestic airspace, and what that means for you?

Mr. Glenn Priestley:

As I said in my last testimony here, we own an awful lot of long, lonely routes. A flight on a daily basis from here to Iqaluit is the same as it is from Ottawa to Toronto or Montreal now. There's a beautiful new terminal that just opened up yesterday. Good investment infrastructure has gone into Iqaluit. However, we still have problems remaining at the 115 other airports in the north. They lack the infrastructure.

Say, for instance, we have to go to Pangnirtung. Pangnirtung is one hour and 15 minutes from Iqaluit. We can do that in an ATR-500 on a good day, and that means we have 40 passengers. On a bad day, when the weather's low, when the wind's blowing the wrong way—because we can only go in there one way, but we can go out both ways—we can only take 20 passengers. We have to reduce our load because of the local conditions.

Conversely, we have situations where we take off and fly further north than that. There is, of course, Rankin Inlet on the other side and Resolute to the north. Again, quite often because of the weather reporting, for instance, we can't get there, and we have to turn around and come back.

As I also mentioned, our passengers have a partnership with us. They understand. The average passenger in Canada south of the 55th parallel flies two trips a year. North of the 55th parallel, the average person flies six trips a year, so there's a better understanding.

(1505)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would like to thank our witnesses for being here.

I will begin with a question for Mr. Lavin.

I clearly heard your complaints about high taxes, high rates, and the need to reduce airport rents. The government is considering privatizing airports in order to create capital funding for the Canada Infrastructure Bank. This has not yet been announced, and perhaps it will not be, but it is in the government's plans.

So I would like to ask you the following question. Do you think privatizing our airports would lead to lower rents as compared to the current system? [English]

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

Thank you for that question.

In terms of privatization—and I know that's not the subject of Bill C-49, but I know it's being considered—we are strongly concerned about privatization. There are easier ways to deal with rent than privatization. The government has collected so much rent that it is way beyond the price of the land that was turned over.

We have a significant concern with privatization because airports have a significant market power that they can abuse as part of any privatization. If privatization is pursued, we would need to see very strict regulation to ensure that they don't overcharge airlines for projects on which we have no ability to provide them some direction. We'd need an independent organization to appeal on those issues. No, we are opposed to it in the United States, and we're strongly opposed to it here. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Your introductory remarks gave me a bit of a start, especially when you said that, in certain countries that have adopted a bill of rights that sets out all the usual problems, the fines sometimes exceed the damages caused to the traveller.

How would you assess those damages? How can you say that a fine is out of proportion with the problem caused to the passenger? [English]

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

I apologize. I didn't catch your question. I'm having difficulty hearing. Could you restate it? [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Yes.

You said earlier that, in certain countries that have a bill of rights, the companies have to compensate the aggrieved passengers beyond their actual losses. What are your thoughts on that? [English]

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

Thank you.

Certainly Europe is a very good example of the dangers associated with compensating beyond the loss of time or property. In Europe, with the high fines for even minimal delays, we've seen businesses crop up to help passengers collect fines above and beyond what their damages were. For example, businesses will help a passenger identify a flight that is chronically delayed, have the passenger pay 20 euros for that flight, see it delayed, get the 670 euros for the delay, and then split it with the company. That's the kind of thing we see in Europe and could see here.

I wanted to mention that I think it's important for everybody to note that passengers have significant protections here, but I'll respond if anybody wants any more information on that. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I will now turn to the musicians. We rarely have musicians around the table with us.

Welcome.

I was trained in classical singing myself. The instrument is fairly easy to transport, since it does not take up any more room than myself. I can well imagine that if someone puts a Stradivarius in the baggage hold it might be all right as long as no one puts two or three suitcases on top of it. Yet I have a friend who is cellist whose instrument is worth more than my house. To my mind, that is an extreme. Some people buy an extra ticket to keep their instrument with them on the flight, but forget about it if it is a double bass.

What would you like to see in the passenger bill of rights to protect all instruments? I guess some of the larger instruments, such as a double bass, have to go in the cargo hold.

(1510)

[English]

Mr. Allistair Elliott:

It's a great question. Thank you for asking it.

Double basses obviously are not going on a plane as carry-on instruments. We understand that there have to be reasonable expectations to the regulations, and we're prepared to do that. I think the biggest thing we're looking for is consistency. Right now, consistency doesn't exist. It's very difficult to make any travel plans with any kind of instrument because currently you really don't know what you're going to get until you show up at the gate. That's the biggest issue for us right now.

Double basses of course are not going to go on a plane. They're going to have to go in the hold. There have been instances where a musician shows up.... I had two of them this summer that I got calls on with different airlines and different situations. A musician was told that they could bring it on and then got to the airport and was told that it had to go cargo. Of course, that caused a delay, and different arrangements had to be made. Again, the biggest issue is the inconsistency in the policies right now.

The Chair:

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you very much.

I'll continue with the musicians, but before I do, Monsieur Aubin, I'm a musician as well. I've been playing the bagpipes for about 25 years or so. Perhaps if you and I travel together we can pay for one ticket and I'll store you in the overhead container.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Sean Fraser: I'm curious. One of the things that caught my attention, of course, was the fact that when musicians travel, they're not always travelling for leisure. There's an enormous economic contribution from arts and culture in Canada. Has anyone ever done an assessment on the economic impact of musicians' inability to travel when they do run into issues like this?

Mr. Allistair Elliott:

Not that I'm aware of.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

That was easy.

Ms. Schutzman, you were in the middle of a response. If you wanted to take this opportunity...?

Ms. Francine Schutzman (President, Local 180, Musicians Association of Ottawa-Gatineau, Canadian Federation of Musicians):

I just wanted to say that if people who own large instruments know in advance that they will not be able to transport their instrument, they can purchase, for some instruments, a kind of case that will let them check the instrument. If you've been told that you can carry your instrument on board, and then you don't have that case with you, that's when an instrument can be damaged.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

It seems that you guys might be singing the same tune—no pun intended—as some of the other witnesses. If there really was enhanced transparency, and you knew what the deal was before you made the deal, that would solve both of these problems?

Mr. Allistair Elliott:

I believe it would.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Okay. That's helpful.

Just bouncing around here, a number of the other witnesses discussed the importance of ensuring that the fines only pertain to what's within the airline's control. I think the minister this morning was fairly clear that this was his intention as well. Is there something in the language of the proposed Bill C-49 that has you concerned that this will not be the case?

Mr. Lavin, go ahead.

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

The language itself is not a concern, but as Mr. McKenna said, it's in the details of what the regulation will say. Let me give you an example of the concern. What is meant by “control”? We talked about such things as there being a snowstorm, or maybe no gates because of a snowstorm. That would be seen, and I think anybody would agree, as something not within the airline's control. What about a mechanical issue where the airline said that a part needed to be fixed, and a passenger challenged them that they could have fixed that part some other time, or that it should be investigated as to why that part was broken in the first place?

In the U.K., for example, in Europe, the courts decided that they had.... In Europe they use the standard of extraordinary circumstances—i.e., that they don't fine an airline for delays if there are extraordinary circumstances. A court interpreting that in the U.K. decided that a very major thunderstorm was not an extraordinary circumstance because the airline should have anticipated thunderstorms in July. Again, with tarmac delays, with all the different things, the definition of it has to be quite subjective. As a result, we don't have certainty, which causes confusion for airlines and passengers alike.

(1515)

Mr. Sean Fraser:

How can we achieve that level of certainty? I'm thinking of a weather delay. Nobody is going to blame the weather on an airline, but if the airline made decisions to cut costs along the way and wasn't equipped to deal with the weather that we ordinarily expect, I think that rightfully falls within the intent of the legislation. How do we thread the needle on this one?

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

I'm not sure if you can, and that's the challenge I have with, for example, a three-hour tarmac delay. I think it's important to recognize the experience of the U.S., for example, in implementing three-hour tarmac delays. If you say that after three hours it's a delay, that means that really it's a two-hour tarmac delay, because the airline will be turning back to the gate within two hours. How do you explain that to...? Think about an international flight. You're sitting on the tarmac at two hours and you want to take off to go to Europe. The next flight is 24 hours later. You're told, “We need to turn back now, because we could be subject to a tarmac delay.”

We believe that the airlines are perfectly incented on tarmac delays. It's a wasted asset out on the runway. If it's within their control, they'll do whatever they possibly can to get back. I don't think there should be a hard and fast rule for that reason. As well, defining “control” is very difficult.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Okay.

Mr. McKenna, you mentioned that you're not necessarily opposed to foreign ownership but have some reservations, and that reciprocity would be a nice feature if that were possible. What's the rest of the world doing on foreign ownership? I'm thinking of the U.S., the U.K., the EU. What are the rules on foreign ownership in other countries?

Mr. John McKenna:

I don't have the answer to all of those.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Perhaps I asked the wrong group. IATA possibly would know this.

Mr. John McKenna:

Yes. I'm sure that the U.S. is not quite open to it.

I'll let my colleague answer that.

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

The U.S. isn't open to it yet. The EU has provided for, in the U.S.-EU agreement, relaxation on ownership.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Only between the U.S. and the EU?

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

Yes, that is correct. I'm not sure in terms of others. I'm just familiar with the U.S.-EU one.

IATA generally is in favour of airlines being treated just like any other companies. On this issue in particular, and I'm sure you've had this expression in your Parliament, we have friends on both sides on this issue, and we are voting with our friends. But generally I would say that airlines being treated like other businesses is what we're looking for.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

You mentioned threading the needle, Mr. Lavin. I agree. That's definitely the case. We find ourselves as parliamentarians staring down issues that come along. An airline hasn't behaved well and people are demanding that something be done. They don't look to you. They look to us. There was that poor family that ended up being bumped from the flight, delayed a day, and then dinged another $4,000 to get on the plane they had already actually booked a flight on. That's the sort of lack of judgment that brings down the wrath of the public on us. The heat gets transferred. You can understand that heat.

We have to look at two things here. There are two key words: judgment and expectation. You say that passengers should have a clear expectation when they buy a ticket. If I look at somebody's tariff, and it says that they'll fly you to Toronto for $95, but your luggage will end up in Whitehorse, I'm still not going to buy that.

If we look at the logical sequence of the transaction, I buy a ticket with the expectation that I'm going to get on the plane I booked and that I'm going to end up at my destination with the stuff that's travelling with me. We can understand some delays along the way, because things can happen. I mentioned the other day sitting on the tarmac in Kelowna waiting for them to fix a safety problem. Take your time, guys. I don't want to go up there if I can't get back down safely.

What about the person who has a connecting flight. I'm okay. I'm getting to where I live. I have no problem, but what about the connecting flight? Isn't there a reasonable expectation, if people sequence a trip, that they're going to be able to make those connections? Would you not agree that there should be some compensation for the person who has to stay over a night and incur extra expense?

(1520)

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

You've raised a number of issues. First of all, I'll say I don't envy the job of a politician and don't pretend to be one. I understand that you get hit on these issues.

I think it's important to stress that these are very irregular operations, and they're called irregular operations for a reason, because there are fewer delays, there are fewer cancellations. The bags are being delivered where they're supposed to be delivered.

You mentioned the safety issue. I don't think you're suggesting that if there's a safety issue, we should be overriding the safety issue to make sure people make their connection. Safety is number one in our book.

What I'm suggesting is that, yes, there are circumstances that are unacceptable. The question is whether regulation addresses those circumstances.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

When your members don't, then regulations have to. You're certainly not going to create an unsafe situation by taking off, but let's face it, you're responsible for the aircraft, its maintenance, etc. In this case, the aircraft wasn't airworthy for a period of time. What do you do? What would you suggest as a principle of good customer service in what happened to the people who missed their connections?

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

Any airline that's a competitive airline does its best to accommodate passengers in those situations.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

How?

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

They accommodate passengers by putting them on a later flight. They accommodate passengers by giving them hotel accommodations when appropriate. There are all different things airlines do to accommodate their passengers, and again, their track records show that.

I'm not familiar with the exact situations. Certainly you have airlines that have testified to you before me and will after me, so those issues should be directed specifically to them on specific circumstances.

My point is that in 1987, your predecessors agreed to deregulate the industry, because they said that the private sector and the market mechanisms would do a better job, and there's no evidence that this is not the case.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I would disagree, in some cases, sir.

I want to talk about service to the north, because that is critical, and leaving the burden of that solely on the free enterprise system and market forces has led to extraordinary prices to get around there. I've been pricing some of that out, and it is quite steep. Obviously, those folks find it very difficult to get in and get out.

Is there a solution to that? Does it mean some sort of government subsidy to lower that cost, or are there other things that could happen, Mr. Priestley?

Mr. Glenn Priestley:

We've got an area darn near half the size of Canada with the population of Kingston, if we go from latitude 55° north, which is the true north. It is a problem. It is a concern. How do the operators handle it? All of our airplanes are combi—we can move the wall, so that we can take more. There's always freight to go north. Sometimes there are not that many people, so we can move the wall within an hour to take more cargo if we have it that day. On occasion, sometimes, we reach a situation where we can't do that and some people get left behind.

I can't address your question on cost today. It's economics. It's just very expensive in the north. Our concern with the CTA is because of some of the other modernization initiatives, such as accessibility issues and insurance that they're looking at being empowered under the Canada Transportation Act. They are only going to make the costs higher.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Priestley.

Go ahead, Mr. Chong.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I have a question for Mr. McKenna concerning joint ventures. I know Mr. Lavin declined to comment on it.

Mr. McKenna, do you have an opinion on these joint ventures that airlines have proposed in the past, such as the joint venture between Air Canada and United Airlines that was struck in 2011?

Mr. John McKenna:

Actually, we're still studying that matter and we don't have comments to make at this point. I'm sure you'll be hearing from other airlines later today that have comments on that, and I look forward to hearing their comments also.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Mr. Priestley, do you have any opinions on that?

Mr. Glenn Priestley:

No.

Hon. Michael Chong:

All right.

Madam Chair, I don't have any more questions.

The Chair:

That's wonderful. Sorry, I didn't mean it disrespectfully.

Go ahead, Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

I'm fine.

The Chair:

Mr. Badawey is fine.

Go ahead, Mr. Godin. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My first question is for Mr. Lavin.

In your opening remarks, you said you hope airport fees will be reduced. That is important to you. You said that the minister has not included this in the first phase of Bill C-49. It is unfortunate that this bill does not go far enough.

Do you think measures could be included in this bill to reduce airport fees while also respecting the passenger bill of rights and passengers' wish for a better travel experience?

(1525)

[English]

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

I guess I'm hesitant to second guess whether Bill C-49 could accommodate that. I think that's more your business than mine. All I can say is that the rents in particular have been a concern of the airline industry. For any airline that flies here, rents have been a significant barrier to, for example, Toronto or Vancouver becoming the global hubs that they would like to be. If you look at it, they've collected $58 billion so far and expect to collect $12 billion more in the future. We just find that is not competitive with the rest of the world. We are hopeful that, if you could accommodate that, certainly on the passenger rights side—I've stated our position quite clearly—I anticipate that we will work closely.

We have great respect for CTA and Transport Canada and hope that whatever they come up with post-Bill C-49 is reasonable. But the number one priority of the airlines and the passengers is the high cost of travelling in Canada. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

I would like to continue along this line of questioning.

You can identify certain fees that are perhaps excessive—if I may use that word—and that could be limited, reduced or eliminated. Can you say which fees, in your total bill, you would eliminate if you were in the minister's shoes?

I am asking you to do some role playing this afternoon. [English]

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

Certainly, the rent is a big issue. The air traveller security charge is one of the highest in the world. The fact that you have user-pay plus, plus, plus here, whereby the government itself is not making the investment that it needs on security, and in fact puts it on the back of the passengers, even exceeding the services that are provided. The estimates in terms of.... As I said earlier, the baseline tickets globally are 64% lower now than they were in 1996 in real dollars. In Canada, that's not the case. I don't have that figure. It may be 64% at the base, but the fees associated with it—which are up to 50% to 60% of that base fare for taxes and fees—are the main barrier to a successful and vibrant commercial airline industry in Canada. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you.

As to reducing fees, you have offered some potential ideas and they are duly noted.

Returning to the customer experience, rather than imposing a fine or serious consequence on the company, you suggest that passengers should be informed. You would like us to follow the example of Australia and China as regards transparency. Do you honestly believe that approach could have a positive effect on the experience of Canadian customers? [English]

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

Our experience in Australia, China, and other places, is lower ticket prices, lower delays, and lower cancellations by this approach.

If I can have just one minute I think it's important to recognize here that Canadians have passenger rights now. First of all, Canada is a signatory to the Montreal Convention, which put a maximum in terms of how much they are compensated for lost baggage and for cancellations. You already have those.

Secondly, the CTA—as Mr. McKenna mentioned—has their process. More than 95% of those complaints are resolved between the airline and the passenger. It is 95%. I think this transparency we're talking about in Bill C-49, absent the fees, would make the most sense.

(1530)

[Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

I have one final, quick question.

Are you in favour of the status quo or do you think Bill C-49 will improve the customer experience? [English]

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

I am concerned that it won't improve the customer experience because it will take away competition at the service level by harmonizing across as to the standards. I also feel that unintended consequences are very dangerous across that and it will increase prices. The only place that airlines can go with those increased costs is to pass them on to passengers.

Thank you. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you, Mr. Lavin.

Thank you, Madam Chair. [English]

The Chair:

Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would like to talk to Mr. McKenna for a few minutes.

You made some recommendations for future regulations, which are unfortunately not included in Bill C-49. I hope the Canadian Transportation Agency has heard you and that we can resume this discussion one day.

You also mentioned foreign ownership. In your opinion, there is no evidence that increasing foreign ownership would lead to the creation of low-cost airlines or to price cuts by current airlines.

I was surprised when you said that there is no reciprocity. I would ask you to elaborate on what you mean by that. Are you saying that we should have included such agreements in free trade accords, such as the one with the European Union? Is it on a case-by-case basis such that, for instance, a British investor could not invest in a Canadian company unless Canadian investors could also invest in Great Britain?

Mr. John McKenna:

That is exactly what I meant.

Reciprocity means that we are given a right if we also give that right to foreign investors. So if Americans wanted to invest in Canada, would we have the right, by virtue of reciprocity, to invest in an American airline up to 49% or 25% per investor, as the case may be? That is the question we are raising.

This could indeed be included in a free trade agreement on a national basis, and not necessarily between companies.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I will go back to the musicians.

I clearly understood that you want to see the greatest consistency or uniformity possible in services from one company to the next. I would ask you, however, to tell us the specific elements that would enable us to establish that consistency for all companies.

Would it be reserving the overhead bins for instruments? Or companies having pressurized equipment that would enable them to put larger instruments in the cargo hold? What minimum standards would you like each airline to accept? [English]

Mr. Allistair Elliott:

We refer to what our colleagues in the U.S. went through in the last few years with the FAA Modernization Reform Act of 2012. I don't have that memorized, but the consensus of it is primarily with regard to carrying instruments on within the cabin. If it fits in the overhead bin, it can be put in the overhead bin, not asked to be removed to be replaced with luggage and not asked to be taken off the plane.

If I'm correct, I believe there's a weight limit as opposed to a size limit. As we said earlier, musicians' briefcases are oddly shaped, and they don't fit in the little compartment that is for carry-on baggage. That's the crossover. It didn't get into storage of instruments or pressurized areas underneath the planes. We respect that there are a lot of dollars involved in the economics of that. It hasn't gone that far.

The biggest ask is consistency with regard to carrying instruments on, more than anything.

(1535)

Ms. Francine Schutzman:

I'd like to add that Air Canada's current practice, if I understood correctly, is that musicians will be allowed to pre-board. I think that we have all seen many things put into overhead compartments that could easily be put under seats.

It's a question of balance. When you're talking about something so extremely valuable that even putting it in a pressurized cabin, like animals.... We've heard of animals being harmed in pressurized cabins. It's part of your life. It's your soul, and you want to keep it as close to you as possible. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

We have completed round one. Are there any other questions anyone has that they would like to ask?

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm not going to take much time, I just wanted to finish with Mr. Priestley, from when we were cut off.

Just out of curiosity, in the north, how many of our airports have things that we take for granted in the south, like paved runways, control towers, or ILS?

Mr. Glenn Priestley:

Nine out of 117, and only five of those have all of those things you mentioned.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That puts it into perspective. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mrs. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I have just one more question. I want to go back to some of the observations I made around phase two. I cannot get away from that knowing what brought about the Emerson panel report was the fact that we expedited a statutory review. That statutory review takes place every 10 years.

If we're believing that phase two is going to happen anytime between now and 10 years from now, I'm interested to see how that's going to happen. It doesn't mean that you have to wait 10 years, but there's no requirement to do it. In fact, we've had witnesses recommend that we put back provisions in the bill that require a review of the changes that have been made because that's missing in Bill C-49.

What measures should have been put in this Bill C-49 to address the concerns you've raised about the costs that our air travellers incur, and do you see prices going down under any circumstances in Bill C-49 as it is?

Mr. Douglas Lavin:

I'm happy to answer. I don't see any circumstances whereby Bill C-49 by itself would reduce prices.

In terms of what we would have liked to see, again, the number one focus was costs. First of all, we're on record saying that we want an elimination of airport rent, but even a phase-out of airport rent would be useful. A reduction in the CATSA fee and more government investment in security would be good, as opposed to putting that on the backs of air travellers. We see a lot of evidence in the Emerson report talking about how CATSA could be reformulated to address the security lines issues and to change the one-size-fits-all.

There are all those different things, and those all impact on the competitiveness of the airline business in Canada. The minister said that ownership.... If you listen to his remarks and look at Bill C-49, the only thing he points to on reducing costs is ownership and control, which in theory would increase competition in the marketplace. Again, Mr. McKenna and I have both stated that we find that highly doubtful when the costs to doing business in Canada are so high. It is not ownership and control that are preventing airlines from coming in here and doing business.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Monsieur Godin.

(1540)

[Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I have a very quick question for Mr. McKenna.

Correct me if I am wrong, but I think you said that the cost of reimbursements would affect the fees travellers pay. In other words, that cost would determine whether fees have to go up or down.

Is that what you said?

Mr. John McKenna:

I said that if the bill or the subsequent regulations require the airlines to pay large amounts of compensation, that will ticket prices will of course be higher ultimately.

Mr. Joël Godin:

Okay. That brings me to my second question.

This summer, my son went to Victoria. Owing to special circumstances, Air Canada asked him to give up his place, which meant he had to wait at an airport for 24 hours. For a young person, sleeping on an airport bench is no problem, but older people prefer greater comfort. In any case, my son accepted the offer. His ticket cost about $435, but he was offered $800.

Is it common industry practice to offer compensation above the cost of the ticket?

Mr. John McKenna:

You are talking about a case where one, two or three passengers are asked to leave the aircraft and are in turn offered significant compensation. It is a very different different situation when an airline has to offer compensation to all passengers due to a delay. The cost to the company is not at all the same. That kind of practice does exist. The airlines want to entice those people to leave the aircraft voluntarily, without leading to complaints or similar problems. Those are not really the same circumstances.

Mr. Joël Godin:

Okay, thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Is everyone happy? Does everybody have sufficient information?

Thank you to the witnesses. It has been a bit of a long afternoon for you folks as well, so we thank you very much for coming and sharing your thoughts with us as we move forward.

We will suspend for the next group to come to the table.

(1540)

(1550)

The Chair:

I will call the meeting to order.

Our witnesses are in place, and our staff. We have a very short break between this group and the next, so if we can gain five minutes, I think it would be appreciated.

We have with us, Air Transat, Canadian Air Transport Security Authority, Canadian Automobile Association, and the National Airlines Council of Canada.

I thank you all for being here. Who would like to be the first up?

I don't see any volunteers, so how about Air Transat going first? Please introduce yourselves and go on with your opening remarks. Thank you. [Translation]

Mr. Bernard Bussières (Vice President, Legal Affairs and Corporate Secretary, Transat A.T. Inc., Air Transat):

Thank you, Madam Chair and dear committee members.

My name is Bernard Bussières and I am the vice president of legal affairs at Transat. With me is George Petsikas, senior director, government and industry affairs.

Transat is honoured to be invited to appear before you today as part of your consideration of Bill C-49, Transportation Modernization Act.

Since we were founded in 1987, we have always worked diligently and proactively with government decision- makers, legislators, and regulatory officials in order to develop informed policy that supports growth in travel and tourism, which is an important industry in Canada. It is in this spirit that we appear before you today.

(1555)

[English]

You should be in possession of our detailed corporate brief that we filed with the clerk earlier this month. We would like to use our few minutes this afternoon to offer some supplemental thoughts and reiterate some of our key points outlined therein, which we trust will add value to your deliberations.[Translation]

To begin, we regard Bill C-49 as a first step in resolving certain challenges facing the airline industry, which is vitally important to Canada. Although the bill attempts to include some of the Emerson report recommendations, it does not address certain key aspects such as tax policy for the sector, cost competitiveness, the funding of air travel infrastructures, revision of the user-pay model, and airport governance.

We would ask the federal government to follow up on these aspects as soon as possible in order to thoroughly and comprehensively improve the policies that affect our industry and travellers alike.[English]

With respect to the proposed airline consumer rights framework outlined in Bill C-49, Transat was one of the first industry stakeholders to publicly welcome this initiative after the tabling of the bill in Parliament. As we publicly stated at the time, we are fully prepared to work with government regulators and our industry colleagues to achieve a fair and balanced compensatory and duty-of-care framework that ultimately enhances the consumer experience.

We refer to our further caveats outlined in our brief, and reiterate support for the input that will be provided by our NACC colleague today.[Translation]

Today we would like to focus on our main concerns about Bill C-49, specifically the provisions pertaining to air carrier joint ventures. At first glance, these provisions seem harmless, but they are not. I readily admit that they are obscure and complex. In our brief, we tried to explain in detail why they are in fact a long-term threat to healthy competition in our industry and to achieving a fair and reasonable balance between the public interest and the interest of airline customers.

We therefore invite the committee members to consider the following as they examine the amendments we are proposing to these provisions.[English]

Transat is not attempting to be obstructionist with its approach in this case. There are indeed many reasons why airline joint ventures may result in more services, destinations, and other additional benefits for Canadian travellers, communities, and for the economy as a whole.

This, of course, is good, but we do not believe it should be achieved at any cost or risk to the consumer interest. Put simply, stated efforts by the government to rebalance the public versus consumer interest consideration in this case have resulted in the pendulum being shifted to the other extreme and to the ultimate detriment of fair competition.[Translation]

The ubiquitous public interest standard, which is a common feature of legislation seeking to provide residual powers for ministerial authority to address a broad range of undefined matters and circumstances, is simply not sufficient as drafted here to justify the pre-empting of critical competition law oversight to these potentially anti-competitive agreements between competitors.[English]

The conservation and coordination of critical functions such as route development, capacity deployment, fare-setting, etc., among JV partners should be considered as a de facto merger of these respective commercial entities. Existing law is sufficient to establish whether these types of agreements between competitors are in the public interest.

Indeed, we believe it is incumbent on those stakeholders who are advocating for joint-venture specific provisions to justify why they are in fact needed and why their commercial or corporate objectives are impossible to achieve without same.[Translation]

It must always be remembered that past commissioners of competition have already expressed serious concerns regarding potential anti-competitive behaviour by airline joint ventures, especially in environments where they control high concentrations of market share. This is not just Transat waving the caution flag here.[English]

Furthermore, and as indicated above, we recognize that there has often been a legislative and policy balance to be struck between the concepts of the public and/or national interest versus the narrower consumer interest that competition law primarily oversees. This balance has already been achieved in the transport sector through the merger provisions incorporated through the Canada Transportation Act, which were crafted at that time jointly by the commissioner of competition and the then Minister of Transport.

(1600)

[Translation]

Therefore, instead of reinventing the wheel, we propose for greater clarity and consistency that these merger provisions be largely adopted for the review and approval of joint ventures. The process that we propose would be more transparent as the report of the commissioner of competition, and the decision to immunize a joint venture, would be made public.[English]

It would provide a public rationale for the choices made by the Governor in Council, with input from all relevant departments, instead of granting the Minister of Transport sole responsibility for immunizing joint ventures in a decision that requires no publication.[Translation]

This would result in a decision enforceable by both the commissioner of competition and the minister of Transport, who have different knowledge and responsibility with respect to the joint venture.[English]

It would include a periodic review process to ensure that the consequences of the joint venture continue to justify immunity.[Translation]

In closing, the need for a fair, transparent and public process regarding the immunization of airline joint ventures from competition is particularly important in the Canadian context, where the industry is dominated by one major carrier. We believe our proposal, which mirrors the current process for mergers in the transportation sector, meets these objectives.

Thank you for your kind attention and we look forward to answering your questions. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go on to Mr. Parry and the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority.

Mr. Neil Parry (Vice-President, Service Delivery, Canadian Air Transport Security Authority):

Thank you, and good afternoon, Madam Chair.

My name is Neil Parry. I am vice-president of service delivery at the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority, also known as CATSA. Thank you for the opportunity to speak with you today.

As many of you know, CATSA is an agent crown corporation, funded by parliamentary appropriations and accountable to Parliament through the Minister of Transport. CATSA is responsible for taking actions, either directly or through a screening contractor, for the effective and efficient screening of persons who access aircraft or restricted areas through screening points. Also, the property in their possession is controlled, as well as the belongings or baggage that they give to an air carrier for transportation.

CATSA, as the civil aviation security screening authority for Canada, is regulated by Transport Canada and is the designated national civil aviation security authority. CATSA is subject to domestic legislation, regulations, and procedures in the way that it conducts its business and screening. In this context, CATSA's mandate outlines four core responsibilities within the realm of aviation security: pre-board screening of passengers, screening of hold baggage or checked baggage, the screening of non-passengers, and the restricted area identity card program.

Given the nature of today's meeting examining Bill C-49, the transportation modernization act, my remarks will focus on the amendment associated with the Canadian Air Transport Security Authorization Act. Specifically, this relates to the cost recovery of security screening operations in airports across Canada.

Bill C-49 contains two changes to the CATSA act. These changes would formalize policy authority for cost recovery initiatives for designated airports that strive for expedited passenger screening and cost recovery for non-designated airports. These services would normally be beyond CATSA's mandate and would require authorization from the Minister of Transport.

Under the direction of Transport Canada, CATSA has undertaken two trials on cost recovery to date. In 2014, the Greater Toronto Airport Authority sought the approval of the Minister of Transport to purchase additional screening capacity directly from CATSA for pre-board screening operations. CATSA and the GTAA subsequently entered into an agreement, following authorization from the minister, that allowed us to effectively sell them additional screening hours. A similar trial agreement was entered into in June of this year, between CATSA and the Vancouver Airport Authority, for the same thing.

In 2015, Transport Canada amended regulations to allow non-designated airports to enter into cost recovery agreements with CATSA for the purpose of attracting new commercial routes and potentially enhancing economic development. These airports must meet the same requirements as a class 3 airport within Canada. To date, CATSA has entered into consultations and discussions with 12 non-designated airports and while the discussions have been productive, no agreements have been signed.

With those introductory remarks, I thank the committee. I would be happy to answer any questions related to the subject.

(1605)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Parry.

We will go to the Canadian Automobile Association and Mr. Walker.

Mr. Jeff Walker (Chief Strategy Officer, National Office, Canadian Automobile Association):

Thank you very much.

My name is Jeff Walker and I am the chief strategy officer at the Canadian Automobile Association, or CAA as most people know us.

Thank you very much for having us here today. We're looking forward to speaking today on Bill C-49, specifically as it relates to air passenger rights.

I'm going to begin my remarks by providing a little bit of background on our role in air passenger rights issues. As many of you probably know, CAA has been around for over 100 years. We were founded in 1913 and our major mandate at the beginning was road and driver safety, as an advocate for the consumer and the consumer interests around roads and driving. Today we have 6.2 million members from coast to coast and we offer a wide range of services that go far beyond that.

In fact, CAA is Canada's largest leisure travel provider and we have a large network of 137 stores across the country and online that provide services to members. We remain a not-for-profit, member-driven organization that is at its heart an advocate for the Canadian traveller.

Our agents at CAA work with air passengers every day and we understand this business very well. This allows us to take a strong and informed position in favour of air passenger rights while at the same time recognizing that the consumer interest is best served by healthy, competing airlines.

The passenger protection regime we have in Canada has been untouched for many years, leading to a widening discrepancy between how U.S. and European air travellers are treated on one side, and how Canadians are treated on the other. It's time we do better when it comes to protecting Canadian air travellers.

We do a lot of polling, a lot of member research. The work we've done in talking to members and non-members alike has found that over 90%—in fact, 91%—of Canadians agree that it's time Canada had its own national airline consumer code. We welcome and support Bill C-49 as it contains many of the improvements that we have been calling for over the last several years, and we believe it's going to be better for the travelling public. At the same time, the bill will only take us partway to where we need to be. The bill leaves the all-important details on treatment and compensation—for example, when and how much—to a future regulatory process, and we urge this committee to pay close attention to that process. A good-sounding bill will end up not meeting expectations if the end result is a coffee coupon and compensation for being bumped somewhere someday. We all have to work to make sure that doesn't happen.

Bill C-49 addresses some important areas such as covering all airlines, both domestic and foreign, as well as all passengers, non-Canadian or Canadian, to avoid situations where there is an unlevel playing field. It sets out minimum standards of treatment and compensation for key categories such as delays, cancellations, overbooking, and lost bags. It addresses the seating of families with children at no extra fee. It provides the CTA's ability to collect and monitor airline performance data as it relates to passenger handling, and it gives the agency the ability to extend decisions to other passengers on the same flight who are affected by the same incident.

However, the bill relies on a complaint from a passenger in order to trigger any action. We agree with Scott Streiner, who is the CEO of the CTA, and David Emerson, both of whom said in testimony earlier this week that the regime would be more effective if the agency could initiate its own investigations when it deems necessary and make industry-wide rulings on minimum treatment rather than restricting its findings to passengers on one specific flight.

It's worth noting that the CTA was able to initiate hearings in the Air Transat situation a few weeks ago only because it concerned an international flight. It just happened to fall into that space; otherwise, unfortunately it could not even have been dealt with in that context. The CTA wouldn't have had the authority, even under Bill C-49, to decide to hold a hearing into a similar situation if the flight occurred within Canada, nor will the CTA be able to examine any broader systemic issues that the CTA might note unless they come from a specific complainant. It might have to ask the minister for permission to investigate them.

Another matter worth noting is that in some circumstances, regulations are likely to set out clear rules, for instance, that for a delay of x hours within an airline's control, passengers might receive y in compensation. The current system would require a complaint from a passenger in order to initiate that payment. Airlines have this information though, and they know when they're offside, so why does this system have to wait for a complaint? Why not compensate proactively in these cases?

This is an important consideration in light of recent findings from the EU consumer association, which reports that only one in four EU flyers is getting the compensation they're due for lengthy delays because airlines are not required to proactively offer it. This would allow CTA to focus on more complex complaints.

(1610)



The International Air Transport Association says 60 countries have some form of passenger rights legislation already in place. For too long Canada has relied on the airline's own policy, and a needlessly complex complaint process through the CTA. While the vast majority of air travel goes off without a hitch, a clear set of standards would benefit everyone from passengers to the industry, which will be able to compete on a level playing field.

However, as noted earlier, whether this new regime is effective will be dependent on the regulatory process. As a consumer watchdog, here are some of what CAA is looking for in this process.

First is clear, simple, and understandable terms and conditions that the average traveller can understand. Second is levels of compensation and minimum treatment that ensure travellers are well treated and that for the airlines, in the words of Parliamentary Secretary McCrimmon, “it's not worth your while…to treat people this way”. Third is proactive disclosure by airlines of a consumer's right to compensation and minimum treatment. Fourth is regular reviews to ensure that regulations and compensation levels remain appropriate, and finally, airline performance reporting with respect to the handling of passengers and luggage should be made public regularly. Sunshine is after all the best disinfectant.

We will be participating in the regulation-making process to be sure that consumer interests continue to be heard loud and clear. In order for Canadians to judge the new system a success, we need to make this right.

We urge this committee to stay engaged even beyond these hearings to make sure the eventual system is one that works well for all Canadian air passengers.

Thank you. I'd be pleased to take any questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Walker.

We go to the National Airlines Council of Canada and Mr. Bergamini.

Welcome.

Mr. Massimo Bergamini (President and Chief Executive Officer, National Airlines Council of Canada):

Good afternoon, Madam Chair, members of the committee.[Translation]

My name is Massimo Bergamini, and I am President and CEO of the National Airlines Council of Canada.

I want to thank you for the opportunity to appear today to provide my organization's perspective on Bill C-49.

But before I begin, allow me to say a few words about our organization and industry.

The National Airlines Council of Canada was created in 2008 by Canada's four largest airlines—Air Canada, Air Transat, Westjet and Jazz Aviation—to advocate for policies, regulations and legislation that foster a safe and competitive air transportation system.[English]

Collectively, our members carry over 92% of Canada's domestic air traffic, and 65% of its international air traffic. They employ over 50,000 Canadians directly, and contribute to an additional 400,000-plus jobs in related sectors such as aerospace and tourism. According to the Conference Board of Canada, in 2012 our industry contributed almost $35 billion to Canada's GDP. Those are significant statistics that speak to the role that a strong, competitive aviation industry plays in ensuring Canada's economic prosperity.

More to the point of our discussion, commercial aviation has become the only practical way for millions of Canadians to travel to be with family, for work, or simply to explore our vast country, and travel they do. According to Statistics Canada, the total number of passengers emplaned and deplaned in Canada increased by some 30% between 2008 and 2016. There's no doubt that the era of elite jet-setters is long past.

Our members alone were involved in over 71 million passenger movements last year. As people now book flights as readily as they drive cars, air travel is becoming the domain of the middle class, not the 1%. For Canadians, flying is now part of daily life. It's the lifeblood of an open, diverse, and geographically dispersed society.

In our country the freedom to travel is considered a given. Air transport has become an essential link between people and communities. To quote the Emerson report: Not only does air travel provide access and labour mobility to urban, rural, and remote locations in Canada, but airports and air carriers act as economic engines for communities and for the country as a whole....

This is why a competitive commercial air industry is so important. That is why this bill is so important, and that is why getting it right is also so important.

Unfortunately, we think the government's approach falls somewhat short of that mark.

The Emerson report recognized the complex interconnections that make up the travel experience and that contribute to our industry's global competitiveness. It proposed a three-pronged approach to addressing the major components of a competitive airline industry: cost, access, and the user experience. Bill C-49 addresses only one, the user experience.

For the government to lead with Bill C-49, absent economic measures to address the public cost structure issue, from our perspective, risks creating further economic imbalances that may eventually hurt those the bill is meant to protect.

(1615)

[Translation]

To be clear, while we find that some aspects of the bill require clarification—you will find our recommendations in the technical annex to my remarks—we do not take issue with the bill or in any way oppose its adoption.

We are, however, concerned that the government's approach amounts to putting the cart before the horse.

Putting in place an economic penalty system as the framework for dealing with service issues, without addressing public cost structure at the same time, runs the risk of negatively affecting the industry and, ultimately, passengers.[English]

As Mr. Lavin of IATA pointed out earlier, the international experience on this matter is instructive and should be noted.

As I said at the time of the bill’s tabling last May: Our organization and members share and support Minister Garneau's commitment to ensuring that all air passengers have the best air travel experience possible and look forward to working with him and with the Canadian Transportation Agency to this end.

However, we also recognize that the air travel experience doesn't start with check-in and end with baggage pickup, and it doesn’t happen in an economic or systems vacuum.

There are a lot of moving parts in getting a passenger to destination. It involves the coordinated efforts of hundreds of dedicated people working in airlines, airports, air traffic control, air security, and border services. Every trip takes place within a complex web of systems, regulations, and costs. Each piece contributes to the outcome, and each must be considered when trying to improve service to passengers. There is no doubt that, sometimes in this complex system, capacity is stretched by unforeseen circumstances, mistakes are made, flights are delayed, luggage is lost, and connections are missed.

In 2016, there were some 2,800 passenger complaints made to the Canadian Transportation Agency, or about eight per day. Of these, 560 were either withdrawn or were outside of the agency’s mandate. Of the remaining complaints, 97% were resolved through facilitation. That is to say, the airline was informed of the complaint and reached a mutually satisfactory agreement with the guest without further agency involvement. Less than 1% went to adjudication.[Translation]

Far be it from me to minimize the significance of these complaints, or the inconvenience that passengers experienced, but it is important to place those numbers in the context of a system that moves over 350,000 passengers per day, every day.[English]

Clarifying and codifying the rights of passengers, as Bill C-49 does, is a positive measure, and it will lead to more certainty in the marketplace. Of that, there is no doubt. We are disappointed, however, that this measure was not introduced in conjunction with concrete steps to address the uncompetitive public cost structure faced by our industry or the systems bottlenecks caused by underfunding of air security and border screening.

The Emerson report recognized how mounting fees and charges, as well as delays in security screening, affect travellers and the efficiency of the industry. It recommended phasing out airport rents, reforming the user-pay policy for air transport, and putting in place regulated performance standards for security screening. Unfortunately, absent any provisions in the government’s five-year fiscal framework for additional spending in this area, Bill C-49 alone will do nothing to address the cost pressures on our airline industry or the systems bottlenecks outside of its control.

September is when the leaves start changing in Ottawa and when Parliament resumes sitting. It is also when budget deliberations get under way in earnest within government. It is our hope that when your committee has completed its study of this bill and is ready to return it to the House, you include a recommendation that the government begin taking immediate steps to implement the competitiveness provisions of the Emerson report in next year’s federal fiscal framework. Implementing the Emerson report recommendations on the air industry’s public cost structure as well as on eliminating passenger screening bottlenecks in parallel with the provisions of Bill C-49 would be a true game-changer for airlines, airports, travellers, and ultimately the country.

Thank you.

(1620)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, sir.

Going on to questions, we have Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thanks very much, Madam Chair.

I want to thank all of you for joining us today. I'll get right to my questions, since six minutes goes by pretty quickly.

We know that Bill C-49 is the result of consultations in response to the Emerson panel's review of the Canada Transportation Act, which was expedited by the previous government back in 2014. As was referred to by many of our witnesses, while they appreciate some of the things in Bill C-49, it misses the mark in many ways.

One of the things that I would like to pick up on would be the measures you've just identified that were in the Emerson report but are missing here. I would ask you to comment further on that. Were you consulted during the time when this bill was being contemplated? Were there measures you recommended to Minister Garneau to be included in Bill C-49?

Mr. Massimo Bergamini:

With respect to consultations, yes, on Bill C-49 but also on the industry cost structure. We've had discussions with the government, and not only with the current government but with previous governments. This has been a long-standing issue, of course.

The basic problem is not so much with a willingness and a general commitment on the part of Minister Garneau. Minister Garneau has told us, as I believe he has indicated to this committee, that he is looking at a phased approach. We note, however, that in November, when he unveiled his vision 2030 plan, the minister indicated that he was working towards a set of regulated performance standards for CATSA.

I can tell you that on budget day we were waiting very impatiently for the budget to be tabled so we could see what changes were actually introduced with respect to performance standards, which is a key element of the solution. Of course, performance standards without funding are meaningless. As you can imagine, we were disappointed. The budget was silent in that area.

The issue is not so much that there hasn't been consultation or there haven't been commitments. The issue is that there are competing political priorities that require the allocation of scarce dollars by this government and by all governments.

This is really fundamentally what we're saying: if you go with this as your first step, you run the risk of people saying, “Check, done, and we can move on to something else.” We believe it is fundamentally important to look at the complexity of the system and take an ecosystem or holistic approach to dealing with it, and that requires funding.

Thank you.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Would anyone else like to add anything?

Mr. George Petsikas (Senior Director, Government and Industry Affairs, Transat A.T. Inc., Air Transat):

That's fine.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay. We'll move from the holistic approach that you were hoping for or asking for to drill down into some of the measures that have been raised as problematic.

In your view, is it in the consumer's best interests to have the Minister of Transport, rather than the Competition Bureau, determine whether joint ventures should be approved or blocked? I'll throw that out to any one of you.

(1625)

Mr. George Petsikas:

We'll start since we've made it pretty clear that it's something that concerns us.

As we indicated in our opening statement, we are trying to be realists here. We know how the world is evolving. These joint ventures are out there, not only in Canada but in the United States and Europe, and they offer a lot of potential advantages for travellers in terms of enhanced connectivity, more destinations, etc. However, when we look at it in the Canadian context, we have to look at our specific circumstances here.

We are a small market in Canada. We have one airline in particular that is interested in these sorts of joint ventures and in these provisions that would effectively indemnify that joint venture, protect it from the scrutiny, if you will, or active enforcement of competition law by transferring that power to the minister. We know who that airline is. They're a member of a joint venture right now, which, according to our numbers, out of 30 transatlantic markets in 2016, controlled over 35% market share. That's those three major members: Air Canada, Lufthansa, and United. This is in and out of Canada.

In several of those markets, that figure exceeded 40%, and in two of them over 80%, and one 90%, Switzerland. These are extraordinary market shares, and as such, when you take that reality, and all of a sudden you propose to curtail the ability of the commissioner of competition to look at the ultimate consumer interests here, how this is being deployed, and whether or not it may not be in the long-term interests of the Canadian consumer, that's why we're ringing the bell here and we're saying hold on. Yes, the minister has a role to play. Yes, there are public interest considerations that must be looked at: job creation, connectivity, and trade and commerce. This is all good, and I think our colleagues from WestJet talked about connectivity yesterday.

However, it's not at any cost. What has happened here is that the pendulum, as we said in our opening remarks, has swung too much towards the ability of the minister, in terms of a politicized process, to make this decision without necessarily having a meaningful input on the part of the competition commissioner, and a transparent input at that.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We go on to Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My question is going to be directed towards Air Transat.

I was on a flight once from California that had to declare an emergency landing in Arizona because the air conditioning stopped working. It got so hot in there that the pilots couldn't operate the plane anymore. I can attest to how unbearable that situation is.

When I hear of passengers stuck on a plane for over six hours, I can tell you unequivocally that it's not acceptable, especially if they have to call 911 to get water. This isn't a forum to do an investigation or talk about tariffs, so I'm going to just ask you the same question I asked the other air carriers, and that's whether you understand why passengers are frustrated with the level of service they sometimes receive from your airline and why they may feel powerless or lacking rights?

Mr. George Petsikas:

Thank you, Mr. Sikand, for that question.

First and foremost, we'll state the obvious. This was an extremely unfortunate incident. We obviously regretted what happened there. We are a proud airline with 30 years of service to Canada and Canadians. We have won numerous international awards for our service. This is not the way we wanted things to turn out. We have apologized to our passengers. We are working actively and transparently with the CTA public inquiry into this matter. As you know, they held public hearings a few weeks ago, and we told our version of events there. I don't want to repeat that right now because, obviously, it's all on the record, and I don't think it adds anything more to the discussion here.

What I can say is this. If we are to look at anything in terms of a silver lining from this awful situation that took place, it's that it's a cautionary tale. You heard, I believe, our colleagues at Air Canada and WestJet yesterday talk about a holistic, system-wide approach to ensuring that these sorts of things are avoided in the future.

One thing that you have to understand it this. Just putting out an obligation, a penalty, or a fine and saying that, if you don't disembark your passengers after certain hours, you're going to pay this amount of money, would not have helped those passengers that evening, I can assure you that, because we don't need a financial incentive or threat to do what we're doing. Our crews want to get those people where they're going as quickly and as safely as possible.

What happened here was a system that broke down in terms of communications in terms of central coordination. When an airplane is at 35,000 feet going 600 miles an hour, the captain and his crew are basically in control of the situation, with air traffic control, of course. Once that airplane full of people lands on a piece of pavement at an airport, it's a whole different ecosphere. Now we're talking about all sorts of intermediaries and service providers running all over the place. Usually that works well in normal circumstances. I call it the symphony when the plane pulls up to the gate and the trucks come in, the fuellers and the baggage handlers. But when things go wrong, like they did in Toronto, and the whole thing is in complete meltdown, then we need a plan. We need somebody to conduct that symphony right now. We respectfully suggest that it should be the airport.

(1630)

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

I'm going to just jump in with having heard you say that you need a plan, because I'm short on time.

I can recognize that's not the norm. I used to take Air Transat to England when I was studying there, all the time.

Because of situations like that, we have introduced amendments in Bill C-49. I'd like to know how Air Transat is going to move with regard to the implementation of Bill C-49.

Mr. George Petsikas:

We're going to work with you. We're going to work with the CTA in the regulatory process. We will abide by what the ultimate verdict is in terms of the regulation.

The devil is in the details, if you don't mind that expression. Clearly, we're working with enabling legislation here. As long as the high-level principles are agreed to, we'll work with the CTA to come up with a balanced framework that improves the customer experience.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Okay.

I think I'm going to give you an opportunity to discuss joint ventures. Could you reiterate some of your remarks that you mentioned?

Mr. George Petsikas:

I was with a bunch of American lawyers this morning at the American Bar Association's air and space law forum in Montreal before I drove here. They had a panel on competition law, and aviation and concentration, and their market in the U.S.

It is absolutely a given that if anybody asks for immunity from the application of antitrust laws in the U.S., airline joint ventures—as they've done there—at a minimum, the government has to ensure that they have a comprehensive open skies policy to make sure that the joint venture is being disciplined, if you will, through market forces, competition, and thus the consumer is provided another level of protection.

That's not necessarily the case here in Canada. Canada has some great open agreements with many countries, but we also have restricted agreements with many network competitors that can compete with the JV here in Canada; that is, Atlantic plus, plus.

If you get immunity from competition law, and at the same time you get protection from vigorous competition that's supposed to protect the consumer, well, you just had your cake and your chocolate chip cookies and your ice cream, and you got to eat it. We're suggesting that's not what public policy should be about.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move on to Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Welcome to you all, and thank you for joining us.

My first questions also go to the officials from Air Transat. Perhaps they had not finished their answer. My question is along the same lines.

In the United States, there is an immunization process for certain companies. I do not know whether Bill C-49 mentions harmonization, but perhaps you could list for us, in as clear and simple language as possible, what are the points of convergence and divergence from the immunization process that Bill C-49 is trying to establish.

Mr. Bernard Bussières:

Thank you, sir.

My answer will be quite practical.

Just now, we said that when joint ventures work together to share routes and establish prices, it's a de facto merger. According to the Competition Act and the Canada Transportation Act, it is currently a merger. The current legislation has a process on mergers.

We have attached to our brief an opinion from a former commissioner of the Competition Bureau, Konrad von Finckenstein, who is very well known and respected. He took the time to analyze the proposed provisions on mergers. If joint ventures were subject to those provisions, the concerns would be addressed. The process would then be transparent. Rationales could be submitted and a report could be prepared. So everyone would be able to comment. It would allow companies like ours, or anyone else, such as consumers, to have their say so that any negative consequences for them could be determined.

That is the aspect we are trying to highlight. We are asking you to make some amendments, which basically already appear in existing legislation.

(1635)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. It is much clearer already. We understand each other better now.

Something that is very clear in the mind of every customer and every airline passenger is the idea of competition. Perhaps we all have a slightly different definition of competition, but we know full well that, basically, it should be good for our wallets.

As a passenger on your airline, or on any other airline, why should I be worried about the current measures?

Mr. George Petsikas:

As I mentioned just now, in Canada, we are in a situation with one major player with major market shares, I might even call them market strongholds, that may be considerably supported by the proposals in the bill, were the Minister of Transport to agree to immunize that player against the enforcement of the Competition Act. As a result, we would end up with a dominant player that could potentially exercise undue influence on the prices in the market, not at all what a competitive market is supposed to be. Transat is interested in a competitive market. Transat competes with the company we are talking about, Air Canada and its partners in joint ventures.

You may say that it is in my interest to be negative about what those companies want to do, and about the expansion of the network, but that is not the case at all. We are interested in doing what we have been doing for 30 years, that is, to provide consumers with a service at an attractive price and a choice of travel destinations. For us to do so, the market has to be structured to be competitive.

This is a process of giving a player who is already dominant the ability to strengthen that dominance and therefore to shut out competitors like Transat and prevent them from offering consumers better prices and better choices. That is a goal that everyone wants to reach. But what is happening here is a threat to that goal.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Now I would like to talk to the CAA representative.

When I first saw your association's name on the witness list, I thought about my CAA card. I was wondering what the connection was between your association and our study, until I remembered that you are one of the biggest travel agents.

You said that Bill C-49 could be an obstacle for the air passenger bill of rights if there were not an efficient transition from the principles in the bill to specific regulations. We will see what happens in the coming months.

If I am not mistaken, you also said that some things are missing in the bill of rights or in the focus it is being given. As I see it, when we analyze a bill, it is just as important to analyze what may have been forgotten as what it contains. Could you tell me what is missing in these major principles that will form the basis of the future bill of rights? [English]

Mr. Jeff Walker:

To us, the key piece missing from the bill is the implementation measures that will be provided for people in various circumstances when they run into a problem with an airline. We're not necessarily convinced that those pieces have to be put into the bill. We want to make sure, though, that the Canadian Transportation Authority has enough, if you will, licence or latitude to put appropriate measures in place and to adjust them over time.

Concerning some of the points made down the table here, some provisions that could be put in place might end up being too onerous or might not work properly. Any of us at this table understand that if you try to change legislation because one small line item about baggage handling is not properly written, you could be looking at 10 years, whereas if you give the CTA the licence to make necessary adjustments over time—with ministerial oversight, obviously—we're going to be much more able to put a system in place that is consistent for everyone and as adjustable as we need it to be over time to make it right.

That's what's missing, but I'm not necessarily suggesting making a change, other than to make it such that the CTA has the right.

(1640)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Walker.

We go on to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Mr. Walker, you may be aware of the situation with the Thivakaran family from Toronto. They were the ones who showed up at an airport, were denied entry with their family even though there was space on the plane, were told to come back the following day, and then they were charged again for tickets because they had booked through a travel agency instead of directly with the airline. This to me is a symptom of the old “point in the other direction”.

May we have your comments on this?

Mr. Jeff Walker:

I don't know that case in detail. What I understand about it is that it wasn't just any travel agency. It was a travel agency that was out of country, and there was some murkiness about what the pricing behind that ticket was. I don't want to comment, therefore, on that particular case.

However, there is one sub-element to it that I think we really have to understand. Other people at this table have already talked about it. What we're trying to do is put some system or practices in that are for ordinary Canadians—people who travel once or twice a year, like that family. They don't know their way around an airport. They don't know who to call. They don't know what desk to go to. We need some provisions in place so that it's easy for those people who go to an airport twice a year, not 25 times a year, to know what they're getting and that they're getting the same thing as the people who go 25 times a year.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Mr. Bussières, you were mentioning—or perhaps it was you, Mr. Petsikas—that when you had your situation on the ground, people were running around all over the place trying to figure out what would happen next. I think “meltdown” was the term you used.

As it would have been in the situation I mentioned with Mr. Walker, where was the person who just basically said, “My God, we've got to look after those passengers who are in the plane”? Where was that person? [Translation]

Mr. Bernard Bussières:

Thank you for your question, sir.

Let me put what happened into context, because the situation was exceptional and absolutely extraordinary.

The Toronto and Montreal airports were closed because of weather conditions. Twenty aircraft were rerouted to the Ottawa airport, including an Airbus A380 and some Boeing 777s and Boeing 787s. On those 20 aircraft were more than 5,000 people who suddenly and unexpectedly found themselves at the Ottawa airport. There was refuelling equipment, but no staff. There were also handling staff. That was the situation at Ottawa airport, and it was exceptional. [English]

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Sir, with respect, I understand— [Translation]

Mr. Bernard Bussières:

Sir, an investigation is under way. [English]

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I understand how exceptional it was, but we didn't get complaints from those other aircraft, not that I'm aware of.

Again, if you become aware that you have people in your custody, in your plane.... It's kind of a rhetorical question at this point, and I understand that. But you could save yourself a world of pain and a world of grief from a government that is asked to do something about the problem that's created when people don't think, when they don't use their head, and they don't ask the simple question, “What are we going to do for our passengers?”

Johnson and Johnson set the bar pretty well in the Tylenol tampering. They said they didn't care what the problem was; they would just fix it. Lloyd's of London did exactly the same thing following the San Francisco earthquake. It just dealt with it and paid the claims.

That's the value statement that needs to be nailed to the wall in every airline, every business, in fact. Number one is the customer, and we failed, and that's why government is doing what it's doing right now.

Mr. Bergamini, I'm going to talk about the balance between user-pay and everybody pays. It was interesting that one of our earlier witnesses mentioned that we're first in the world when it comes to our airports. They're great facilities, great everything, but we're 61st when it comes to the cost. He didn't really seem to get the connection between the two: the fact that we do pay a lot is the reason we have really good facilities.

What is the appropriate balance between user-pay, through all of the fees, etc., that we talk about, and everybody pays, which turns into a government subsidy? What's the proper balance here?

(1645)

Mr. Massimo Bergamini:

I'm not sure I have a simple answer to that question. Let me just say that there's no doubt that, from 1994 to today, with the devolution of the airports to local, not-for-profit authorities, we've seen massive user-funded investments that have given us enviable infrastructure. That's the good news.

The bad news is that the governance system and the policy framework have not kept up. This is fundamentally what we're talking about here. As this committee and this government embark on a quest to improve the air traveller experience, it really is important to look at the entire picture, all of the players and all of the elements that are at play that involve whether a passenger movement is successful or turns into a nightmare.

With respect to user-pay—and all we have to do is look at other modes of transport that are heavily subsidized—there's a modal equity debate that we should be having. I can tell you one thing: if we embraced the Emerson report recommendations, reversed some of these historical policies, turned some of that money that is currently being collected by governments and/or through users, and put it back into the system, I think we'd have a much healthier, much more competitive, and much stronger air transportation system. I would even argue that it would be a lot easier to find solutions to some of the issues that we are trying to address through regulation and Bill C-49.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Bergamini.

Mr. Bussières, just hold your response here and if you don't get a chance to get your point in by the end of the meeting, I'll make sure to give you that opportunity.

Go ahead, Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Madam Chair, I just want to preface my comments by saying that this whole process and what we're trying to contribute to the overall, bigger strategy is quite frankly about people.

We're trying to balance passenger rights with value, as well as recognizing the returns that you expect to do business. As a business person, I recognize the challenges you have and that we all have. The way I was brought up in the business world was that you deal with it, period. Easy or not easy, you deal with it. While you deal with it, you put plans in place. You put contingencies in place and best prepare for those situations on an ongoing basis because we all recognize that businesses don't always run smoothly. At the same time, we also have to respect the people that we're actually trying to make it run smoothly for, who are once again, people.

Having said that, my first question is for Mr. Walker. With the organization you represent, it seems the Minister of Transport has moved fairly quickly on this bill. That's why we're here the week before the House is scheduled to sit. With regard to air passenger rights, which is our priority in having embarked on this process, in a span of a year and a half, he's put forward a very comprehensive set of goals and a regulatory plan to ensure necessary safeguards for Canadian air passengers. How long has CAA been pushing for such a regulatory track?

Mr. Jeff Walker:

Informally, for more than a decade and probably since I took over this role, which was seven years ago. For seven years, we've been lobbying for this and talking to people as well.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

With that said, obviously, we've been aware of the challenges for the past decade, if not longer. When I say we, I mean all of us, regardless of government. This is not partisan. This is business, regardless of sector or interests, actually. We've recognized this challenge for the past decade.

My question now is to the industry. Recognizing the challenges that are in front of us, was there in fact a strategic plan with identified objectives put forward? As part of that strategic plan with objectives recognized, was an action plan attached to each and every objective that recognizes, for over a decade, the challenges to yourself, with respect to what you're talking about, the expectations of government, but most importantly, expectations of the passenger? Was there a strategic plan, with objectives identified, and actions attached to those objectives?

(1650)

Mr. George Petsikas:

Are you referring to coordinated industry action and objectives or are you talking about a carrier-by-carrier basis?

Mr. Vance Badawey:

It's to deal with the challenges that passengers are recognizing, I won't say on a regular basis, but on a basis that sometimes is more frequent than not. When situations such as Mr. Hardie and others were speaking of happen, in your strategy and the objectives you identify on behalf of the people you're actually servicing, the passengers, what are those actions over the past decade?

Mr. George Petsikas:

In 2010, as head of the National Airlines Council of Canada, we coordinated with our member airlines the filing of tariff commitments in our tariffs, which are contractually binding. Unfortunately, this is one thing that we've messed up in terms of the public debate because we say there's nothing in Canada to protect the consumer of air travel, but that's incorrect. The largest airlines in this country, represented by the NACC, over 75% of the market, benefit from contractually enforceable tariff provisions regarding overbooking and procedures to be followed in that respect, including calling on volunteers, compensation to be offered, etc. Management of cancellations and delays with respect to duty of care, with respect to refunding of fares in the event that the delay exceeds a certain number of hours, that's in there. There are commitments with respect to baggage delivery. We already have a very clear framework on baggage compensation internationally.

In Bill C-49, I realize that we're trying to establish a clear framework for domestic compensation. We have no problem with that. However, my point is that these provisions have been in place since 2010. They're not widely reported, unfortunately, but what we're saying, for the record here, is that they are there and they provide very real rights for our customers and our consumers. As such, I have always said that we have a basis to work with and, if the minister and the government now wants to codify what we've already had in place since 2010, at least the four major airlines, then I'm there. We can do that. However, it was wrong to say that there was nothing to protect airline consumers in this country compared with the U.S., Europe, etc. That is wrong.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Mr. Walker, can you comment on that?

Mr. Jeff Walker:

Yes. I think the challenge really is that those things are there in some cases, some airlines. Good luck finding them on the website. It's really tough. We had our team go and look for them, and it was a hell of a time to find that stuff.

The other thing is that it's case by case. Like I said, go back to my two trips a year people versus 25 a year. The 25-a-year people, they know where to find things. They know who to call and they know what to do, but families like the one that was just discussed a few minutes ago haven't got the foggiest idea that anything could be available to them.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Hence the reason we're here. I'm not here to talk about the past. I'm here to talk about the future.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Let's work toward that future to ensure that strategic planning objectives and the actions that are attached to them, we can move forward on, including Bill C-49.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Chong.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I want to make a general point because I've been hearing this on this panel and on the previous panel, too, and that's about the high cost of air travel in Canada. The government's airport rents and the fees are always blamed for that as if it's exclusively the only problem, but the reality is that it's not the major area for why there's a cost differential.

There's a Conference Board report from 2012 that did an analysis of why airline tickets are more expensive in Canada than in the United States. It found that we do, indeed, pay about 30% more for air travel in this country than they do south of the border, but that only 40% of that cost is Nav Canada fees and airport fees, and that 60% of that cost is attributable to utilization rates, labour costs, fuel costs, and other things that have nothing to do with airport landing fees and other fees that are charged in the system. I want to put that on the record because, while 40% is a significant component of the 30% price differential, it's not the only thing that's causing that price differential.

I have a question about joint ventures. In the 2011 case where Air Canada proposed the joint venture with United Airlines, the competition bureau disallowed 14 transborder routes from that agreement. Did Air Transat do a cost analysis of what would have happened had the competition bureau not imposed those conditions on that agreement?

(1655)

Mr. George Petsikas:

No, not at the time. We have not done that.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Do you have any information or data for the committee that would inform us as to how much a ticket would rise in price if these joint ventures were allowed to proceed under the new legislation without any conditions imposed by the competition bureau?

Mr. George Petsikas:

We don't have empirical evidence that would point to that necessarily. What we do have is analysis in terms of the trend, in terms of ticket prices in Canada. I mean, that's something that the NACC has worked on, and it showed that mean prices have dropped domestically.

Internationally we look at that, but we don't have anything that points to prices going up necessarily if these joint ventures are authorized, at least in the short term. What we do know is that we have evidence that they already hold dominant or fortress market shares in 20 of 30 transatlantic markets. This is the joint venture we're talking about that's of relevance, Atlantic plus, plus. As such, we're saying the chances are pretty good that, if this operation is immunized, protected, or exempted from competition law enforcement, there's a risk in terms of abusing that dominant position.

We're not accusing these companies of going to do that or doing that right now, absolutely not. What we're saying, though, is that you are more at risk for that sort of behaviour in terms of higher prices, because any economist will tell you, once you control a certain amount of market share in a defined market, you have an inordinate ability and power to drive pricing to your interest in that market, not necessarily to the consumer interest. That's not me talking. Any economist in any competitive market will tell you that.

What we're doing here, I think, goes against that. It basically confirms that wisdom.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Are there any other joint ventures that you're aware of that are in the works?

Mr. George Petsikas:

In Canada?

Hon. Michael Chong:

Yes.

Mr. George Petsikas:

No, we're not aware of them. Obviously WestJet is the second-largest airline in Canada, and I'm sure they would be able to tell you on their own if they have an interest in that, but speaking from Transat, we are always looking at ways of evolving our business model. We don't preclude the possibility in the future, but certainly we have no plans now.

Hon. Michael Chong:

It's safe to say, is it—correct me if I'm wrong—that transborder routes are more profitable than domestic routes?

Mr. George Petsikas:

I'll look at my colleague Massimo here. Maybe he can answer. We haven't really done an analysis of that.

Mr. Massimo Bergamini:

No, I don't have any data.

Hon. Michael Chong:

I have no further questions, Madam Chair.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'll start with Mr. Walker, but I'll open it up to the rest of the panel after that.

I don't know if you heard that last panel, but the IATA told us a few minutes ago that there are two main approaches to passenger rights. One is legislative-regulatory, as we're proposing here, and the other is to tell airlines to please disclose what they are offering when you buy a ticket.

I took that comment as an admission that airlines don't currently do that. They don't currently say what it is you're buying when you buy a ticket. I wonder if you have a reaction to that.

Mr. Jeff Walker:

I would be speculating. I think there is some level of disclosure, at least to the people who get compensation. I don't know about public disclosure—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Not at that point but at the point when you buy a ticket, what exactly are you buying? If you buy a ticket on an overbooked flight, what you're really buying is a standby ticket and you're hoping to get a flight. You don't find that out until you get to the airport. If you're not an experienced traveller, you find that out the hard way.

What they're recommending is that we have a system whereby we tell airlines they have to be up front about that fact. If they're telling us that we have to do that as a government, that's admitting that they're not doing it themselves. I wonder if you agree with that.

Mr. Jeff Walker:

Yes, I think that's fair to say. I think it's fair to say that there's probably more that can be done to inform, but I still think there's utility in having some commonality, and not just in terms of that one example. There's a range of issues and it can get pretty complicated if you start putting all of that information on every single possible scenario in the original communication.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right. It's a matter of making sure that everyone knows what they're getting.

I wonder if the airlines have a comment on this.

Mr. Bergamini or Air Transat?

(1700)

Mr. Massimo Bergamini:

I think to your point, more transparency and a greater.... You know the old saying, of course, of buyer beware. A better-educated and better-informed consumer will lead to a more competitive environment. There's no doubt about it.

At the end of the day, what is important to also keep in mind is—I think some of our member airlines spoke to this—the wafer-thin margins on which airlines operate. I think it was WestJet that talked about clearing in terms of profit about $8 or $9 per passenger. That puts into context what we're talking about.

In terms of viewing the industry, I think it's useful to look at it like going to dinner for an all-you-can-eat buffet as opposed to a fancy, five Michelin-star restaurant. You go for the all-you-can-eat buffet and you might need some medication afterwards; there might be a little indigestion. That's the reality, unfortunately, when you operate with those margins where you need volume. That's the reality in which we operate. This is why, as we've said, we have to change the economic foundations on which our system operates. Do that and the picture changes dramatically.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Gentlemen?

Mr. Bernard Bussières:

If I could add to this, Transat is peculiar in the sense that it's not only an airline company. We have travel agents and we're also a tour operator, so we do inform our clients. One of the peculiarities of being a travel agent is that it's your duty to inform your client well. [Translation]

That is why it is in your interest to deal with a travel agent, because they can explain it all to you.

Can we be better? We can always be better. We at least are trying to be very diligent and give our customers all the information they need so that they know their rights and their remedies. [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Bergamini, I'm going to go back to you very quickly.

You keep talking about changing the financial plan. Do you have a specific submission to give to us on that, on what needs change and how?

Mr. Massimo Bergamini:

In terms of changing the system, you can look at the Emerson report. I think we endorse those recommendations.

Let's phase out the airport rents. Let's deal with proper funding for this agency so that we eliminate some of the system's bottlenecks that have cascading impacts on performance right across the system. Let's look at the level of taxation on aviation fuel, both federally and provincially.

Those are all things that would change the dynamics and bring us more in line with our international competitors.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Parry, I think you're going to have the last few questions for the last few minutes. I have one I have been wanting to ask you on the cost recovery basis for airports. I come from a large rural riding. I have Mont Tremblant in my riding and it's closer to the cities than most of the small rural airports. What would a cost recovery base actually look like for an airport like mine, which has flights seasonally, once a day or a couple of times a week? If you go further north you have very rare flights, but you still have to provide CATSA services. What would the cost-recovery cost look like in those circumstances?

Mr. Neil Parry:

First, it would depend on what the business objectives of that airport are. Specifically, in the case of Mont Tremblant, that's already a designated airport so we provide a level of screening commensurate with the flight volumes and activity it has.

For a non-designated airport seeking to have screening services, it can range, depending on what level of commercial activity it is striving for or achieves.

In all likelihood, and I'll speculate here, because these are smaller non-designated airports, the level of screening they would require would probably, to quantify it, be between one or two screening lines operating several times a week in some cases, maybe five days a week in others, depending on the flight activity. It could range anywhere from $500,000 to $2 million a year.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Godin. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My first question will go to Mr. Bussières, but first, I would like to provide all members of the committee with some information.

I did some quick research on my iPad. The minister and others mentioned this morning that nothing had been done in the last 10 years. We must not forget that, during that period, the Liberals were in power for two years, but that's another story. The Conservatives were in power for the other eight years and I am going to provide some justification for six of those years.

It must be understood that the aviation industry has evolved a great deal. Let me give you this statistic: from 2010 to 2016, that's six years, the number of flights has increased by 31 million. So the industry had to react and adjust. That is probably what explains why the government has decided to develop a bill in order to improve the situation.

So that is now clear. It's important to put things in perspective so that some people's questions can be properly answered.

As I mentioned, my first question goes to Mr. Bussières, from Air Transat. Let me take a different tack. We are not in a courtroom here; our role is not to accuse this airline of badly managing the crisis that arise from the events that took place in Ottawa. At least, I do not intend to do so. I intend to be constructive.

You happened to experience that situation, but it could have happened to other companies. Actually, no airline is immune to problems like that. You have to react to unique situations, and that is quite legitimate. That said, I hope that your reflex is to put mechanisms in place so that you do not have to experience other similar problems. I am sure that you are not happy to have to manage a situation like that.

Could you tell us what, in your opinion, could be included in the passenger bill or rights to deal with that kind of situation and to minimize the impact on Canadians?

(1705)

Mr. Bernard Bussières:

Let me go back to the situation which, thank heavens, is extremely rare. If it were not, we would be talking about it a lot more.

As my colleague Mr. Petsikas mentioned, this is a complex ecosystem. The captains on board their aircraft have to make a decision and, to do so, they need information. The better the information, the better the decision. If the captain can be told precisely how long it will take to refuel the aircraft, it does not matter whether it is 30 minutes, two hours or three hours, everyone's decisions will be better.

At the outset, I have to say that we deeply regret what happened in Ottawa. That is first and foremost. However, I am asking you to consider the background to the situation: no company deplaned its passengers. Everyone was being told that they would be refuelled with the next 30 or 45 minutes. In a situation like that, the captains have a certain mindset: they have to make a decision and to use their judgment that is reasonable in the circumstances. Of course, if the captains are quickly informed of the exact amount of time necessary, the decisions will be better.

As for the passenger bill of rights, situations like that have to be put in context. As my colleagues have mentioned, and I will repeat, the ecosystem is complex; it has links to NAV CANADA, to the airport, and to all the people inside that system. Watching it work is extraordinary. It is fascinating. From 2010 to 2016, the number of flights has increase by 31 million. Considerable organization is needed to get it all rolling. So, touch wood, we have an absolutely extraordinary system. Imagine the risks that all the companies in the sector take in order to make a profit of $8, as was just described.

Mr. Joël Godin:

Let me stop you there, Mr. Bussières.

What is your advice to us? We are parliamentarians, we are not aviation experts. What items should we ask the minister to include in the passenger bill of rights?

Mr. George Petsikas:

Specifically, I would say that we have to start by requiring airports to have emergency plans for that kind of situation. That is clear.

We have to know who is coordinating what, what the lines of communication are, and who you have to call when you need answers. These situations need a conductor, like an orchestra. The requirement should go to the airports because they have communication channels with all the suppliers.

We deal with one ground contractor in Ottawa, but there are several. That contractor said that it would take another 10 minutes, while another was saying something different. In those circumstances, confusion reigned.

Emergency plans must be in place in conjunction with the airlines and the other suppliers, and there must be lines of communication so that people know who to call. Then it has to be communicated to the entire industry.

In the case we were just talking about, our captain could have asked to be given an exact time for refuelling. He could have had a telephone number to reach people at the airport, who would have told him that it might take 45 minutes or it might take two hours. He could have made the decisions that his passengers needed. Unfortunately, there were no lines of communication like that.

(1710)

[English]

The Chair:

We'll have Mr. Aubin, and then if we have any time we will go back to any members who have a question. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Let me fire off a series of quick questions.

As I understand your comments, it is not your responsibility; it should be coordinated by the airport. At the beginning of your remarks, you said that Bill C-49 contains no airport governance measures. Is that what you were alluding to?

Mr. George Petsikas:

I do not want to say that we had no responsibility in the situation we were just talking about. Airlines are part of the overall system and we all have a common responsibility.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Mr. Bussières, at the beginning of your remarks, you said that Bill C-49 is silent on the matter of airport governance measures. Is that what you were alluding to?

Mr. George Petsikas:

May I answer that for you?

No, that is not what we were alluding to. We were actually talking about the system of governance, the way in which airports are managed, how boards of directors are formed and who has the right to appoint administrators to those boards. As you know, airport authorities are governed by a board.

We consider that the issue should be addressed, but Bill C-49 does not address it.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Mr. Parry, I have a quick question for you. It will help me to confirm or refute some other testimony we have heard this week.

Does the funding you receive allow you to fulfill your mission? That is the simplest way to ask you the question.

Mr. Neil Parry:

Thank you for the question.[English]

As you know, CATSA receives its funding through parliamentary appropriations. I would answer, yes, we are able to carry out our mandate effectively with a focus on the highest levels of security for the travelling public. While CATSA does not have a mandated service level, we have been able to achieve a service level of 85% of passengers screened in 15 minutes or less, consistently for the last four years, based on the appropriations we've received. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I have a question for Mr. Walker.

In some testimony yesterday, an amendment was proposed for a potential passenger bill of rights, to the effect that only flights leaving from Canada should be considered.

Let's say that I buy an air ticket that includes connections with joint venture airlines. My question is very simple: should the company I buy my ticket from provide the service from the beginning of the trip to the end, or can it toss it like a hot potato to the second, joint-venture company? [English]

Mr. Jeff Walker:

I heard about this earlier today. Our impression or our take on this is that it has to be the company that the person has purchased the ticket through that is, if you will, the shepherd of that. It may not be reasonable—let's say it's Air Canada and Lufthansa—for Air Canada to carry the ball if a connection with Lufthansa doesn't work, but it has to be somebody's job at Air Canada to shepherd the person to the appropriate process at Lufthansa so they know what their rights are.

Are they responsible? They are not necessarily for the cost, but I think they are for the shepherding of the person to the right place. That would be our take. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We have completed our first full round. I have Mr. Fraser, Mr. Badawey, Mr. Godin, and Mr. Hardie with additional questions.

Please try to be punctual to your point. We'll start with Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you. I don't think this will take a full six-minute round.

I'll pose the question to CAA, or the observation—

The Chair:

Mr. Fraser, it's just one question.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Perfect.

Right now, I think we're in an era when the number of passengers is exploding. I expect that the trend will continue to grow. I think we're in a situation where, with increased knowledge, there will be more people making complaints. We're already starting to see that. I've been through exercises where it seemed too troublesome for me to claim it, where the payoff was limited to $100 on the terms of carriage. I'm hearing the airlines say, on the flip side, look, if compensation levels get too high under this new regime, it will drive up costs.

I'm wondering if you have any comments, when we're looking at this explosion of passengers and the assertion that this will drive up costs, whether the answer is not to say, “Look, if we establish standards, you have to meet them, even though you have razor-thin margins.”

If you could comment, that would be great.

(1715)

Mr. Jeff Walker:

You'd have to unpack the whole puzzle of the extent to which the margins are exactly as they've been described, etc. Again, from our point of view, the case is that the U.S. has this kind of system, the Europeans have this kind of system, and I'm not seeing their systems collapse and all the airlines going out of business in those places. There's an explosion in passengers on those routes just as there is in Canada.

That's my answer to that question.

Mr. George Petsikas:

May I make a comment about the European system, Madam Chair?

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. George Petsikas:

The European regulation right now is under enormous pressure from all groups as being a very poor piece of legislation. The European Council is trying desperately to amend it. They are not able to do it because of a problem they're having, a political problem. The European regulation is certainly not what I would call a success right now. It is understood that it has imposed destructive costs on industry. It goes above and beyond compensating passengers proportionately in terms of what they have experienced with regard to loss and inconvenience. Even in cases where delays are incurred to ensure that the aircraft is able to operate safely, airlines have been penalized under the system in Europe, which is roundly criticized as undercutting a comprehensive safety culture in aviation.

I would definitely take exception to people saying that the European model is working.

The Chair:

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I just want to make a comment. We've been in this process for quite some time now, especially over this past week. As was mentioned earlier, this is not something that will be over tomorrow or next week or next month. This is an evolution of collaboration and, of course, partnership with all 338 members of the House, as well as the industry itself.

An assumptions report has been completed. It leads up to 2022. Within the report it recognizes the socio-economic, supply, and strategic factors. With that, it influences the forecasts of demand for air transportation—for example, gross domestic product, personal disposable income, adult population, economic outlet, airline yield, fleet route structure, average aircraft size, passenger load factors, labour costs and productivity, fuel costs, fuel efficiency, airline costs other than fuel and labour, passenger traffic allocation assumptions, and new technology. That's the basis of a strategic plan. That's the basis of next steps.

May I suggest the following? This committee is not going anywhere, at least for the next two years with the people around this table. Beyond that, there will probably be new people. The bottom line is that we have an opportunity here. Bill C-49 is the foundation that will be injected into the overall strategic plan as it relates to transportation. Let's all go back to our respective organizations and come up with tangible, pragmatic objectives attached to strategy. Let's attach actions to that, actions that are doable, actions that we can execute in the short and long term, based on the socio-economic, supply, and strategic factors I just outlined.

This is not done, gentlemen. Mr. Rock outlined 10 years ago that this was a challenge. I'm surprised it wasn't dealt with within that 10-year span. Unfortunately, it wasn't, but again, I don't want to talk about the past. I want to talk about the future. We have an opportunity here. Let's seize it and move forward with new recommendations, based on what you give us, in terms of the input we're looking for.

Again, Bill C-49 is here, but we have many days after that when we can help to strike that balance for people when it comes to performance, when it comes to passenger rights, when it comes to value, and when it comes to return, because we want you to do good just as much as you want to do good.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Badawey.

Can we go on to Mr. Godin? [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would like to make a quick comment; then I would like to ask Mr. Bergamini a question.

I share the opinion you expressed in your introduction when you said that you considered the government's approach was missing the mark. I think you have hit the nail on the head; it really is missing the mark. I respect Minister Garneau a great deal, but I think this is all for show and that there is no substance to the bill. Everything is just being shuffled to one side.

The Emerson report mentions that increases in fees and charges, as well as delays in security screening, are having an effect on all travellers and on the effectiveness of the industry.

How do you see the situation? Do you have the sense that the Emerson report is true?

(1720)

Mr. Massimo Bergamini:

Thank you for the question.

I feel that our carriers' daily experience shows us that the reality of delays....

Please excuse me, but I'm going to answer in the language of Shakespeare so that I can explain myself better.[English]

As to delays at the front end—and this is the point that we were making—the travel experience doesn't start with check-in. There are all of those steps, and when you have a delay.... We appreciate what our colleagues at CATSA have done in very difficult conditions from a financial perspective and a planning perspective, but our organization, along with the airport council, have been pushing for regulated performance standards that eliminate those bottlenecks that have an impact not only on the passengers affected at that airport, but if there are delays, these delays cascade across the system domestically and internationally.

It really is important and in this sense I echo what has been said by my colleagues at Air Transat.[Translation]

We have to address that question in terms of a complex ecosystem. The problem of funding the system absolutely requires attention. It is not enough to deal with the issue through regulations.

I am sure that you all remember the Walkerton tragedy. I have worked at municipal level. A good number of provincial governments across Canada have passed regulations in order to deal with situations like the one that occurred in Walkerton.[English]

Provincial environment ministers were heros. They signed these tough new regulations, but they passed the bill on to municipalities that didn't have the resources or the capacity to implement those regulations in the first place. You have to look at these things from a holistic perspective. This is a regulatory exercise, in general we agree with it, but we absolutely have to look at the economic foundations of this industry if this is going to work.

The Chair:

Mr. Petsikas, you were trying to make a point earlier on. You've made quite a few, but you had a particular one you wanted to add on. Did you get a chance to get that point done?

Mr. George Petsikas:

Not really. If I may, I would just add on to what Mr. Badawey was saying before.

In fact, I agree with you. For years—again, before Massimo's time, before he joined us—as head of the NACC I begged government for a strategic top-down integrated plan to help our strategic industry help this country succeed. That means a holistic, as Massimo said, approach. The minister said today it's a first step. Bill C-49 is not the basis for that holistic approach, and that's our problem, because there are a lot of issues that are on the table, especially infrastructure financing.

I'd just like to address the point made before when we talked about whether we are asking for a subsidy by the taxpayer to the industry to help us pay for those airports. I would argue that over the last 20 years there has been subsidization absolutely by the user towards the taxpayer. We are talking about airports that were transferred in the early nineties that had a nominal book value of about $1.5 billion. Today, we are talking about well over $7 billion paid in airport rents up until now into the federal treasury. It's not a bad return. Secondly, airports have had $18 billion in capital investments put into the ground, and that's been jobs, construction workers, downstream economic benefits, and billions and billions in terms of economic activity that's enabled by this infrastructure. It's all been paid for by the consumer, not the taxpayer, and this is an almost unique model in the industrialized world.

All we're saying is that it's time to have a look at that again, because we don't think it's helping us achieve what we can achieve or we could achieve, which is even greater things in terms of support in Canada in terms of economic growth, connectivity, trade and commerce, and competing with those global tigers out there who actually do get it when it comes to their aviation sectors. That's all we're saying, so let's go. I'm with you.

(1725)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

May I say something just quickly?

The Chair:

No, I have Mr. Hardie next, and that will be the end of this panel. We have worn them out, I think, with all the enthusiasm and questions on this side as well.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I do take Mr. Petsikas' point because there are more than just dollars and cents involved. There are the ripple effects—the social, environmental, and a lot of beneficial effects—in any sector of business, and that is a key one.

I have a spare question for Mr. Parry. When we talk about development at airports, they've made the investments, as Mr. Petsikas has said, in many cases. The Vancouver airport is a wonderful facility. The one area where I don't see much additional capital investment is in the capacity of CATSA to do its job. Are you're involved in planning with the airports to make sure that as they look at volume increases you will actually have the floor space to do your job?

More importantly, what about the future of your business? Where is technology leading us? Are you going to have some significant capital commitments or requirements going forward to use technology and smarter operations to meet the performance standards that people expect?

Mr. Neil Parry:

With regard to the first part of your question, in terms of capacity planning with the airports, you've hit on a really key driver behind our screening checkpoint operations. CATSA operates in the airport's space. It's not our space. It is the airport's space. It provides the space, and we operate in it.

In some cases, I would argue that we have adequate space. In other cases, due to significant growth in the industry, which you've heard about today as well, we're butting up against the wall. We do work very closely with the airports. We recognize the challenges for the airports. They have to make capital investment decisions, and that's not free. Ultimately, someone has to pay for that. It's an ongoing dialogue with airports.

In terms of effecting an improvement in what are defined as performance standards, we're talking about service levels in terms of wait times. In some cases, we're kind of maxed out within the checkpoint space, so we're having those dialogues. In other cases, there's more space to grow.

That brings me to the second part of your question. The answer is that it requires capital. In terms of the long term, right now we're engaged in dialogue and consultation with Transport Canada officials to look at a forward-looking, long-term plan for our organization in terms of capital investment.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

While you're speaking of dialogue, I have just one last point. The minister is committed to the kind of dialogue that everyone's been talking about here. This is an iterative step. The dialogue will be going forward, even in the creation of regulations that will backstop some of the things that are positioned in Bill C-49, and also as we look forward and move to a system that works even better than one that we all have to admit is working very well.

The Chair:

Thank you all very much. I know sometimes some of the things were a little tough, but this is a forum. We all need to learn, and we're all working as parliamentarians to do the very best we can on behalf of everyone.

Thank you all very much for coming.

Everyone can get themselves something to eat, and I'll get the next panel up as soon as possible so we can continue.

(1725)

(1745)

The Chair:

We are resuming our study on Bill C-49.

Thank you to our witnesses who are coming late in the afternoon of our fourth day of these hearings.

From Flight Claim Canada, we have Mr. Charbonneau, president and chief executive officer.

Please introduce yourself and take your 10 minutes for your presentation. [Translation]

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau (President and Chief Executive Officer, Flight Claim Canada Inc.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My name is Jacob Charbonneau. I am the co-founder and the President and Chief Executive Officer of Flight Claim Canada Inc. I am accompanied today by my colleague Meriem Amir.

Flight Claim Canada Inc. is a multidisciplinary firm, duly registered with the Quebec Bar and made up of a number of professionals governed by Quebec's Professional Code. Through our lawyers, we provide legal services pertaining to air transportation.

The company's primary mission is to advocate for the rights of air passengers by informing consumers of their rights and by helping affected travellers to obtain compensation easily, quickly, and free of risk. We offer our clients a comprehensive service in order to provide them with compensation for delays, cancellations or denials of boarding.

We are proud and honoured to have been invited to these public consultations. So we have submitted a brief, written jointly by Jean-Denis Pelletier, a former Transport Canada commissioner, and myself. In the brief, we highlight the current situation in the airline sector.

In recent months, there have been many discussions, criticisms and complaints regarding air transportation. A number of events have made the headlines, notably cases of overbooking, flight cancellations and delays, failures in passenger care, long waits on the tarmac, and questionable business practices. There is a lack of information about passengers' rights, and pressure from airlines to withdraw advertising intended to inform passengers of their rights. All this is occurring at a time when airlines are raking in record profits.

We therefore feel that that short-term profits and share prices may count for more than client services. Passengers are treated like cargo. The lack of regulations leaves airlines with broad discretion in how they treat their clients. Air carriers suffer few to no consequences from their lack of service to passengers, which leads to general resentment and a loss of passenger confidence in the system.

For this brief, we first of all undertook a survey of our clients who had experienced problems with flights in recent years. We had more than 333 respondents. The following are the highlights from that survey. You can find them in appendix 6 of our brief.

First, we were surprised to learn that, before they heard of us, more than 35% of our clients were unaware that they might be entitled to compensation. Almost all passengers, more than 99% of them, feel that Canada should adopt regulations guaranteeing financial compensation for passengers whose flight is delayed or cancelled.

We also analyzed flight delays and cancellations in Canada, as well as trends in recent years. The following are the highlights from that study.

The number of delayed flights is increasing. The percentage of flights affected by delays of one form or another, in all time slots, went from 12% in 2014 to 15% in 2016. Canadian flight cancellations have also increased. They went from 1.2% in 2014 to 1.4% in 2016. That is a 16% increase. By comparison, with flights subject to European regulations, the rate is 0.4%, or four times less.

We clearly need a law and regulations that will set a minimum level of quality of passenger protection, thus bringing a significant citizen dimension to the liberalization of the aviation market. That means standardized Canadian protection for all users, incorporated into a charter of passenger rights.

Passengers are left to their own devices and do not know who they can turn to for help. They are grateful that there is now a company that can help them navigate their way through the system and obtain compensation. Some of our clients had already attempted the direct approach with the airline and were turned down.

While the Canadian Transportation Agency does have a mediation role, many of our clients prefer to use our services, thereby saving time and benefiting from our expertise to obtain a turnkey solution.

(1750)



The new law and regulations resulting from Bill C-49 must include clear and unequivocal provisions that will reduce differences in interpretation resulting from the existence of gray areas. This new law will make it easier for passengers to assert their individual rights, and will help to restore traveller confidence.

We have therefore focused on current trends and best international practices in order to provide recommendations that will place Canada in the forefront of traveller protection.

The proposed amendments also take into account the financial impact on the airline industry and therefore anticipate measures to limit costs.

Here is a summary of the 15 proposals in our brief.

We propose: to declare Bill C-49 to be complementary to the Montreal Convention; to amend section 67.3, referred to in clause 17 of Bill C-49, by replacing “a person adversely affected” with “from or on behalf of a person,” consistent with section 156 of the current Air Transportation Regulations; to amend paragraph 18(2) of Bill C-49, regarding subparagraph 86(1)(h)(iii) of the act, to allow adversely affected persons to be represented by counsel, consistent with our constitutional rights; to enact clear rules on posting the rights and remedies of air passengers in Canadian airports, in particular, allowing companies and associations that defend passengers' rights to advertise in Canadian airports; to require airlines that deny boarding or cancel a flight to provide each affected passenger with written notice of the reason for the denial of boarding or cancellation. Carriers should also make an effort to inform passengers who reach their final destination with a delay of three hours or more of the reason for the delay; to establish more public monitoring of the management of Canadian airports; to apply or follow the European legislation regarding the minimum compensation to be paid in the event of a long delay, cancellation or denial of boarding. It would be helpful if the committee could provide Transport Canada, who will subsequently be writing the regulations, with clear guidelines on the criteria to be used, equivalent to the European guidelines; to define a long delay as being two hours for domestic flights and three hours for international flights; to establish minimum compensation equivalent to that for a cancelled flight for passengers whose flight is delayed on the tarmac for more than three hours, and require carriers to allow passengers to deplane after 90 minutes, in accordance with the carriers' tariff conditions, regardless of whether or not there are extraordinary circumstances; to apply the same right to care found in the European regulations for cases of denied boarding, cancellations or long delays. This care should apply even under extraordinary circumstances that are beyond the control of the airline; to define extraordinary circumstances as an event that is not inherent in the normal exercise of the activity of the air carrier concerned and that is beyond the actual control of that carrier on account of its nature or origin. We also propose declaring that the burden of proving the extraordinary circumstances is on the carrier; to declare that the limitation of action is equivalent to the three-year time limit applicable under common law in Canada; and finally, to make Canadian airports liable in the event of strikes, major renovations or technical failures that cause long flight delays or cancellations. This would entitle passengers to the same compensation and rights as passengers who have suffered damage caused by air carriers.

In conclusion, we firmly believe that the Canadian Transportation Agency and the government should adopt legislation that is as generous and transparent as that existing at the international level. More than anything, the law should be human and protective and should facilitate access to compensation. It should be a clear and unequivocal law that reduces gray areas as much as possible and leaves little room for interpretation.

This legislation is essential for restoring travellers' confidence in air carriers. These measures will allow us to follow best international practices and trends in consumer protection. They will enable Canada to become a leader in the protection of air passengers.

(1755)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Charbonneau.

Next is Mr. Gooch, from the Canadian Airports Council.

Mr. Daniel-Robert Gooch (President, Canadian Airports Council):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for the invitation to appear before you as part of this committee's study of Bill C-49.

My name is Daniel-Robert Gooch, and I am the president of the Canadian Airports Council.[Translation]

The CAC has 51 members, operating more than 100 airports in Canada, including all the private airports in the National Airports System (NAS). Our members handle more than 90% of commercial air traffic in Canada, and an even higher percentage of the international traffic.[English]

The CAC's priorities involve promoting safe, strong local airports, improving the traveller experience, value for money in government services, and growing by air a globally connected Canada. Over the last few days we've been listening to the testimony on this committee's study of the Transportation Modernization Act.

Certainly, air transport is a complex industry involving interaction with several different partners on the airport grounds, including airport authorities, and airlines, of course, but also Nav Canada, service providers, and government entities such as the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority and the Canada Border Services Agency.

In terms of the role of airport authorities, they provide the infrastructure needed to facilitate air carrier movement and the processing of passengers. They enforce airport safety regulations, employ airport emergency response services in response to aircraft emergencies, and provide central command to respond to operational safety, infrastructure, and security matters.

Major airports have passenger care response plans in place to support passenger needs during irregular operations. These plans involve the deployment of certain assets as needed, such as airfield buses, water bottles, snacks, and baby supplies. Airports are empowered to activate their passenger care plans when needed, and can call in extra resources to assist in ensuring passengers have the basics they need on a short-term basis. During irregular and regular operations, the goal is always to get passengers to where they need to go in a timely, safe, and secure manner.

Airports strive to improve passenger experience on an ongoing basis. This is becoming increasingly important for airports that have seen tremendous growth in air traffic over the past decade. In the first seven months of this year so far, for example, there has been a 6.3% increase in passenger traffic. This traffic is boosting international visitor numbers, which is contributing to Canada's economy and providing extra tax revenues for government. It's a good news story. But while this is good for business and the Canadian economy, fuller airports can create logistical challenges to delivering the high level of passenger experience that the industry strives for. Canada's airports have made strategic investments in infrastructure when needed to accommodate growth and respond to the needs of passengers. In fact, they have spent $22 billion since 1992 on infrastructure, with improvements to safety, security, comfort, and the flow of passengers.

This growth has put a particular strain on government services at airports, in particular on screening provided by CATSA and on border services provided by CBSA. Travellers are faced with long lineups at security screening checkpoints and at our air borders during peak times. This has a negative impact on passenger experience. In fact, it's the complaint that we hear about most often from travellers.

You may recall that I've spoken about these issues before, at your committee earlier this year as part of your study on aviation safety. I'm pleased to say the file is progressing, but we're not where we need to be yet. Transport Minister Marc Garneau has begun important work in this area.

The launch of Transportation 2030 almost a year ago commits to look at CATSA's governance, making it more accountable to a service standard, and its funding more responsive and sustainable. Bill C-49 provides a framework for CATSA to administer new or additional screening services on a cost-recovery basis. This will provide added flexibility for airports to supplement security screening services for business reasons, such as giving a higher level of service for connecting travellers, or a separate check-in area for premium travellers. However, this should be accompanied by a full allocation of air travellers security charge revenue from passengers to funding screening by next year's budget. Otherwise, airports have a real concern that the cost-recovery mechanisms in Bill C-49 would become the mechanism used to prop up funding for screening. In other words, passengers today paying their travel security charge for service at screening...not all that money going to the airports. If airports are having to also pay up to get an acceptable level of service, then they will have to raise additional revenue that would then have to be recovered from air carriers and passengers. In other words, travellers would have to pay twice, and travellers should not have to pay twice for this service.

Canada's airports are pleased that the government has recently begun additional work on a long-term structural fix for the problem. Our shared goal should not only be to improve screening wait times, but to also deliver a professional, facilitative customer experience while continuing to provide a high degree of security.

(1800)



Some airports believe the best approach would be to allow airports a greater role in the delivery of screening at airports, as is the case in Europe and many other parts of the globe, but the important message is that, when it comes to a permanent solution, one size does not fit all. It is important that a fulsome exploration of all options occur before a final decision is made by government.

Finding a long-term solution for screening is essential for passengers, who deserve predictability and value for money, but we also can't be complacent in the meantime. CATSA needs to be sufficiently funded next year to support demand. Government should also restart its stalled investments in CATSA Plus lanes, which is a new approach that is improving traveller experience in the limited sites where it has been deployed. But CATSA isn't able to proceed any further until funding is restarted.

Improving air traveller experience also means improving air service in communities through more air links and lower airfares. The proposed amendment to the Canada Transportation Act to increase foreign ownership limits on Canadian air carriers from 25% to 49% is intended to stimulate traffic and domestic competition, and these are worthy goals.[Translation]

Canada's airports are delighted with the progress made by this government in all these major areas. We hope that the dynamic approach will continue, and that the work that has been started as part of the Transportation 2030 strategic plan, and through the hearings of your committee, will translate into concrete reforms.

Once again, thank you for giving me the opportunity to speak to you today. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Moving on to Air Passenger Rights, with Gábor Lukács, welcome.

Dr. Gábor Lukács (Founder and Coordinator, Air Passenger Rights):

Madam Chair and honourable members, thank you for inviting me to this meeting. It is an exceptional privilege to have the opportunity to present the perspective of air travellers today.

Air Passenger Rights is an independent, non-profit network of volunteers devoted to empowering travellers through education, advocacy, investigation, and litigation. Our Air Passenger Rights Canada group on Facebook has more than 5,000 members.

My name is Dr. Gábor Lukács and I am the founder and coordinator of Air Passenger Rights, which grew out of my advocacy for the rights of Canadian travellers. Since 2008, I've filed 26 successful regulatory complaints against airlines, relating to issues such as liability for baggage damage, delay and loss of baggage, flight delay, flight cancellation, and compensation for involuntary denied boarding.

I'm here today to deliver a cautionary message. Bill C-49 does not address the key issue of lack of enforcement of the rights of passengers in Canada, it does not adequately protect Canadian passengers, and it falls short of the rights provided by the European Union's regime. I will be expanding on each of these issues in turn.

The lack of adequate legislation is often blamed for the woes of passengers. This is a myth. The Montreal convention is an international treaty that protects passengers travelling on international itineraries. It covers a wealth of areas: damage, delay, and loss of baggage, up to $2,000; delay of passengers, over $8,000; and even coverage in the event of injury or death. The Montreal convention is part of the Carriage by Air Act and it has the force of law in Canada.

Canada also requires airlines to set out the terms and conditions of travel in clear language in a so-called tariff. Failure of an airline to apply the terms and conditions of the tariff is punishable by a fine of up to $10,000 and is an offence punishable also on summary conviction. Thus, the existing laws, regulations, and regulatory decisions could provide substantial protection for Canadian passengers if only they were enforced by the regulator, the Canadian Transportation Agency. The trouble is that the agency has abdicated its duty to enforce the law. As you see in this diagram, which shows the statistics for the past four years, the number of complaints has soared, nearly quadrupled over the past four years, while the number of enforcement actions has dropped by an equal factor of four.

The agency has also been criticized by the Federal Court of Appeal. In a recent judgment, Justice de Montigny found that the agency erred by ignoring not only the wording of the Canada Transportation Act, but its purpose and intent. Justice de Montigny went on to remind the agency that it has a role to also ensure that the policies pursued by the legislator—you parliamentarians—are carried out. There's no doubt these laws can be improved, and it is our position that they should be. However, without enforcement, the law will remain that letter. Bill C-49, as it is reads now, does nothing to remedy this state of affairs.

Bill C-49 suffers from numerous major shortcomings. It misses important areas of passenger protection altogether and undermines existing rights in other areas. First, the bill does not create an enforcement mechanism or any financial consequences for airlines that break the rules, that disobey the rules that are laid down. Thus, breaking the rules remains the most profitable course of action for airlines. Second, the bill offers no protection for the most vulnerable passengers: children travelling alone and persons with disabilities. Third, the bill hinders advocacy groups—such as Air Passenger Rights—in protecting the rights of passengers by barring most preventive complaints that seek intervention before anyone could suffer damages.

(1805)



All but one of the 26 complaints I brought and that I mentioned earlier were successful and were of this preventive nature. I was not personally adversely affected, but the practices that I challenged were clearly harmful and were recognized as such.

We recommend that the committee remove from the bill the proposed section 67.3 found in clause 17 of the bill.

Fourth, contrary to the testimony of Transport Canada officials that you heard on Monday, Bill C-49 does not provide protection that is comparable to the European Union's regime. For the all-too-common event of mechanical malfunction, the bill proposes to actually relieve airlines of the obligation to compensate passengers for inconvenience. This is cleverly hidden in proposed subparagraph 86.11(1)(b)(ii).

In sharp contrast, the European Union's regime recognizes that it is the responsibility of the airlines to adequately maintain their fleets and requires airlines to compensate passengers for inconvenience in the event that the flight is delayed or cancelled because of mechanical malfunction.

We recommend that the committee amend paragraph 86.11(1)(b) to clarify that in the event of mechanical malfunction, airlines are liable to compensate passengers for their inconvenience.

Fifth, the bill takes a step backward with respect to long tarmac delays by doubling the acceptable tarmac delay from the current Canadian standard of 90 minutes to three hours. This is a step backward. It's actually clawing back our existing rights as passengers.

We recommend that the committee amend paragraph 86.11(1)(f) by replacing three hours with 90 minutes and thereby restore the status quo.

In closing, we would also like to draw attention to some troubling facts that deepen our concerns about the impartiality and integrity of the Canadian Transportation Agency. Before this bill is passed by Parliament and before any public consultation takes place about the regulations to be developed, the agency has already sought IATA's input with respect to the regulations that the agency is to draft.

IATA is the International Air Transport Association. It represents the private interests of the airline industry. In our view, this was in disregard of the parliamentary process and of the rule of law. Evidence showing this, for the record, is found in an affidavit submitted by IATA in Supreme Court of Canada file number 37276.

We have also received reports from passengers about agency staff turning them away, unceremoniously advising them that their complaint filed with the agency would be closed. The agency did not make a decision or order dismissing these complaints, yet complainants were made to understand that their complaint had been dismissed. Complainants were either not informed about their right to ask for formal adjudication or were discouraged from exercising that right by agency staff.

In our view, the agency has lost its independence, and the integrity of its consumer protection activities has been compromised. The agency's actions and failure to act to enforce the law, as we see right in the statistics, have undermined public confidence in the agency's impartiality.

We recommend that the committee amend the bill to transfer regulation-making power from the agency to the minister and transfer other responsibilities relating to air passenger rights to a separate consumer protection body.

I would like to thank you for the opportunity to present the concerns of air travellers to the committee. A brief outlining these concerns and also providing detailed recommendations on how to salvage the bill has already been submitted.

(1810)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We go on to our first questioner, Mr. Chong.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would like to ask a question of the first panellist, who gave us a very informative slide deck about the number of delays we could expect that would receive compensation, if the government were to implement the same guidelines as currently govern practice in the United States.

I notice that one of the slides in the slide deck says that you estimate that an average of 13,353 flights per year would be delayed beyond two hours or more for domestic flights and three hours or more for international flights, triggering compensation.

Maybe you could tell the committee what the cost of that would be for the airlines. If there are about 13,500 flights delayed, what sort of cost would the airlines be looking at by way of compensation?

(1815)

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

We have to take the number into consideration. When we look at the number it represents less than 1%, so it's 0.061% of the total flight. We also have to take into consideration that when there's a regulation in place, the number of flight delays and number of flights cancelled will be less because, obviously, the industry will adapt.

Hon. Michael Chong:

In Europe what is the compensation for delayed flights?

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

It will depend on the number of kilometres and the number of hours of the delay, so it will go from 250 Euros to 600 Euros.

Hon. Michael Chong:

We're talking about some pretty big numbers here. Let's say there's an average of 100 passengers per flight. For 13,500 flights that's some 1.3 million passengers. If they are all going to be compensated, let's say at an average of $300, that's approximately over $400 million Canadian a year in compensation that the airlines would have to pay out, if that is in fact the model that would be implemented under this bill. I just make that as a point on the record.

I was interested to hear what Air Passenger Rights had to say about enforcement. Do you have any insight as to why the number of complaints that have been investigated and enforced has dropped significantly in the last three or four years?

Dr. Gábor Lukács:

My understanding is that the Canadian Transportation Agency suffers from regulatory capture. We have a manager of enforcement, who admitted under oath on cross-examination that she's on a first-name basis with executives of the industry against whom she's supposed to take enforcement actions. The vice-chairman of the Canadian Transportation Agency is a former lobbyist for the airlines. The chief complaint officer is a lawyer who was suspended for misconduct and was never reinstated. Should I go on? Is it any surprise?

It's a broken system, and that system needs to be fixed before anything else can actually be done to improve Canadians' rights.

Hon. Michael Chong:

How should the agency be fixed? I know you said that the passage of new legislation isn't going to address the fundamental problem, which is lack of enforcement. In your view, since you have been on this file for a number of years, what would be the solution to greater enforcement? Is it a restructuring of the agency? Is it a brand new model, maybe a non-agency model? What is it?

Dr. Gábor Lukács:

We have several recommendations.

First, we would propose transferring those responsibilities to a body that has the single mandate of consumer protection. The second point is to have mandatory compensation and fines for each violation. For one hour on the tarmac over what is allowed, there should be a fixed amount of penalty and a fixed amount of compensation. For an airline that fails to pay compensation and that fixed amount of penalty, there should be no discretion about penalties. The mere fact that they are breaking the rules should automatically trigger a penalty.

The goal is not to punish airlines for their normal business; the goal is to punish airlines that fail to abide by the rules. We also propose having mandatory cost awards in courts on a solicitor-and-client basis when passengers are successful in enforcing their rights. Currently, it is almost impossible from an economic point of view for a passenger to enforce their rights, because it would cost way too much to retain counsel, way more than what the passenger can recover.

Hon. Michael Chong:

I have no further questions.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you very much.

It's been an interesting discussion with all three witnesses.

I hope I have time to touch on something with each of you.

Dr. Lukács, you served up the EU as a model for something that we could be striving to mimic more. Why is the EU a good model? We had testimony just in the last panel saying for God's sake not to do what the EU is doing, because it's crippling the system. The European Council is trying to roll it back.

I'm hearing two different stories here. I do want to protect consumers' rights first and foremost, but I also want to encourage an efficient system that doesn't bring transportation in Canada to its knees.

(1820)

Dr. Gábor Lukács:

The point we are making first is that the testimony of Transport Canada officials requires some rectification. They were claiming that they are taking the best of the European rules, and that's factually not true.

One area where I believe that one should not necessarily follow the European rules is with respect to genuine weather delays. I'm not talking about having rain in Vancouver and therefore flights being cancelled in Halifax; I'm talking about genuine snowstorms, which can happen in Canada's unique climate. But in other aspects, the European system has worked. It has resulted in significant improvements in the rights of passengers.

Just a couple of weeks ago, I was flying back to Budapest to visit my grandmother. We were in Frankfurt airport. There was a small delay that would have required the crew to time out. Lufthansa had a backup crew that was available in 30 minutes to take their positions, because if it had taken them longer they would have been liable to pay compensation. So the place where we see a difference with respect to safety issues—and airlines do have to maintain their fleets and it is possible to maintain fleets—and where we see that this works, is in the European Union. It's the oldest system, and it works.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I want to move on to a similar theme but to our other panellists from Flight Claim Canada. The structure that Dr. Lukács has suggested sounds to me less like a bill of rights for passengers and more like a bill of penalties against airline providers in terms of the compensatory model. If we adopted his approach and said we're going to make mandatory payment—once you break the rule, you make the payment rather than assessing the situation with the customer—it might lead to a circumstance.... I think he said a two-hour delay would be appropriate for domestic flights, and a three-hour delay for international flights. In an instance where that doesn't cause a passenger to miss a connection, for example, is it your opinion that the same penalty should still apply, or should we take an individual approach as was suggested by the testimony by Air Canada earlier this week? [Translation]

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

Given the reality of globalization, it would be helpful to have the same rights as passengers coming to Canada. At the moment, the legislation operates on two levels. For example, on a flight from Canada to Europe with a European company, European rules provide for possible compensation in the event of a problem. However, on a flight to Europe with a Canadian company, that right does not exist. So, two passengers travelling on the same route, with the same departure point and the same destination, do not have the same rights. Passengers travelling from Canada to Europe and encountering problems with delays or cancellations are not eligible for compensation. But when they return from Europe, they can get compensation if a problem arises during the flight.

In today’s globalized world, the viable solution would be to adopt the best practices and provide the same rights to all passengers, no matter the airline or the destination. [English]

Mr. Sean Fraser:

You've touched on something interesting. I know in Europe, they're in a world of ultra-low-cost carriers. I would love to see more low-cost carriers come here. We had earlier testimony describe a situation where the penalty—if we adopted the European fee model, for example—could be so extreme that the penalties paid out on a habitually late flight could outstrip the cost of the fare itself. Is that something that you foresee happening, and do you even think that's a problem? [Translation]

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

It is actually possible, but it depends on the tickets. Today, you often see discount sites advertising tickets at $99 for certain destinations and for a limited number of seats. So it is possible, but, with delays impacting a very small number of flights, they don’t want to compensate all the passengers affected by delays, or 14% of flights in Canada. They just want to compensate the small number of passengers affected by very long delays and for whom a delay had consequences. [English]

The Chair:

You have 35 seconds, Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Can you just elaborate on the CATSA Plus screening that you touched on, Mr. Gooch?

Mr. Daniel-Robert Gooch:

Yes. CATSA Plus is a different process that incorporates technological elements. There's a centralized screening, and then as you actually approach the lane, there are four parallel divest stations, so it gets travellers going through the lane a lot more quickly, and it's a much better traveller experience.

CATSA had plans to roll that out at the eight large airports. There was a plan for that and some money requested, we understand. Unfortunately, all that was funded was what had previously been approved for a very limited implementation at the four largest airports. So, for example, it's in Toronto at U.S. transborder, but it's not at the domestic check-in point in T1, which is the biggest. We really would like to see that investment get restarted. It was put on hold in the budget.

(1825)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

On to Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. Welcome, and thank you for being here today.

I will start the discussion with the people from Flight Claim Canada Inc.

First, congratulations for your courageous testimony. If the government adopted all the recommendations you are proposing, I suppose your operation would close its doors.

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

It actually gives us additional tools with which to help passengers. Today, although European rules are clear, we are mostly helping European passengers.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. It was more along the lines of a joke.

In your opening statement, one thing caught my attention. We have been talking about the passenger bill of rights for weeks. The usual things we hear about are lost luggage, overbooking and flight delays.

You are now adding questionable business practices that require compensation. Could you give me some examples of what you call “questionable business practices”? What impact could they have on passengers, and what solution do you propose?

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

When I said questionable business practices, it was against the background of the current state of affairs and the perception of airlines that passengers have. I am not proposing specific compensation for that. But I was referring to the fact that a class action has been filed about the “Mexican game”, where airlines were selling tickets for so-called direct flights that turned out not to be.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I would now like to turn to Mr. Gooch.

I do not know whether you were here when we heard the testimony from the previous group of witnesses. We briefly touched on the recent events involving Air Transat. Air Transat seems to want to share the responsibility—to put it politely—with the airports. According to Air Transat, a good number of factors put the passengers in the situation they were in because the Ottawa International Airport was not able to respond to unscheduled diversions of flights. Is that the case? Are airports programmed to handle that kind of unexpected happening to any extent?

If we are considering providing passengers with compensation, should we also be considering sharing the responsibility between airlines and airports?

Mr. Daniel-Robert Gooch:

Thank you for that question.

I heard what was said at a meeting with Air Transat last week. Clearly, the situation is really complex. After two days of discussion, I never managed to find out who was responsible for that situation.[English]

I think it's fair to say that the passenger doesn't really want to see a lot of finger pointing, that the passenger wants people to take responsibility.

My sense is that our members from coast to coast strive to positively influence and control the experience of passengers—to the best ability that they can—travelling through their airports, even though they don't necessarily have direct control or influence over a lot of those areas. Certainly what happened was out of the ordinary.

I think it's fair to expect airports to have plans. Major airports do have plans on how they handle irregular operations. I think it's also fair to expect that everybody will communicate and coordinate with each other and strive to do better on an ongoing basis.

I'm not going to speak for the Ottawa airport—I'll let them speak for themselves—but I heard my colleagues there speak to what they had in terms of the buses, the water bottles, and the snacks that were available. A lot of that came from learning from previous experiences.

With airports, airlines, Nav Canada, ground handlers, refuellers, we don't need government to tell us to talk to each other to work better. We do that all the time. When there's an incident like this, everybody gets together and asks, what happened here, where did we drop the ball, and how can we do it better next time?

It was a very unfortunate incident. Certainly aviation is very complex. There are a lot of players involved.

(1830)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I would now like to turn to the representatives of the two organizations that advocate for passengers in these matters.

In the cases you have been involved in, has it ever happened that airlines have backed out by putting the responsibility on the airport and by refusing to compensate passengers?

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

Speaking on behalf of Flight Claim Canada Inc., I can say that the answer is no.

We make sure that the regulations in place are enforced. That is why I said earlier that it would give us additional tools.

We rely on the rules that are in place. The European regulations, in particular, define what is acceptable and what is not acceptable for airlines. In addition, they set out when extraordinary circumstances are applicable and when they are not. Finally, they define what is inherent in the services provided by airlines.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Mr. Lukács, earlier, you said that compensation should also be provided for mechanical malfunctions. Did you mean full compensation? We all know what mechanical issues are, and that even when our car leaves the garage, there can be a glitch. If the airline demonstrates that it has followed its maintenance plan to the letter, should it still be responsible for compensation for mechanical malfunctions that it clearly could not have foreseen? [English]

The Chair:

Make it a short answer, please.

Dr. Gábor Lukács:

The answer is yes. The only exceptions are mechanical issues for which a whole model of aircraft is grounded. If a particular model affecting all models across the airline is grounded, that could be extraordinary. Other than that, it's the airline's responsibility to ensure that they have spare aircraft if needed. That has been the case law already in the context of the Montreal convention, actually.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Lukács.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you Madam Chair.

I have a few questions for Mr. Charbonneau with respect to where we're going and how we're getting there.

Your organization has been pushing for more accountability and more clarity for the traveller for quite some time. You wanted uniform, or you've advocated for a uniform compensation regime. How far do you think Bill C-49 has gone? How far are we, and how much more do you think we should do? Do you think C-49 sits nicely now, that it's a good bill, a good piece of legislation; or do you think that we have some more work to do? [Translation]

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

This is a good starting point that encourages some very good ideas. There is still a need to clearly define when the compensation applies, when it does not, and the type. The committee must study this matter and submit clear rules so that the regulations that result are clear as well. [English]

Mr. Vance Badawey:

With respect to the time, you've been at this for a while. You've been advocating and lobbying for an air passenger rights regime for quite some time. In that time frame, first off, why do think it has taken so long? With that said, what did you gather in terms of information throughout that time? Does it exist now? Is it part of the information that you're speaking of?

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

I'm not sure I'm getting the question.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

You've been advocating for a passenger rights regime for quite some time. It's been a while since you've been doing this, so over that course of time, I'm sure that you've been communicating with people to sort of gather information on what those needs actually are. Again, going back to my first question, did we capture it? Do we have more to do? What specifics haven't we captured? What specifics can we actually take the next step towards? I go back to the panel that was before you. I'm just trying to sort of get down in the weeds a bit and be a bit more pragmatic, beyond the introduction of this bill. [Translation]

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

What matters is the way passengers will be informed afterwards. We may have the finest legislation and regulations in place, but if people do not know their rights and the recourse available to them, those laws and regulations are not very useful.

We realize that, although European regulations have been around since 2004 or 2005, few people in Canada have been aware of them in recent years. Less than 2% of people in North America made claims as a result of delays or cancellations, because they were unaware of their rights or did not want to fight with the airlines.

First, people must be informed of their rights. Second, the airlines must comply with the regulations in place. Customers come to us after trying to approach the airlines that have rejected their claims. They are not very familiar with the legislation, and once their claim is rejected, they do not think they have anywhere else to go, whereas the provisions in place would allow them to obtain compensation.

(1835)

[English]

Mr. Vance Badawey:

What I'm getting at essentially is the next steps. We all know what happened in the past. In the last panel, the message I was trying to get across was “Let's move forward.” Let's work together to ensure that we can deal with this. It is an ongoing process; there's no question. The problems are not going to stop tomorrow; they're going to continue. With that, and with your comments just now, what do you think a fair metric is going to be? We recognize what outcomes we want to recognize. Performance measures are a key part of that, so that we can continue to challenge these problems head-on. What metric, what performance measure do you think would be appropriate? Where is the benchmark? [Translation]

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

Actually, a number of measures can be taken, such as examining the impact of the legislation and regulations on the number of delays and cancellations. Travellers who have experienced delays or cancellations should also be surveyed to determine whether they fully know their rights. We then need to ensure that people are aware of their rights.

During the recent delays on the tarmac, I was surprised to see that the crew members were not specifically trained on the airline's tariffs. Airline employees should be trained so that they are also familiar with the passengers’ rights and able to share the information with them afterwards. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Graham. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Charbonneau, I feel that many people would like to file complaints, but they do not know where to go. If everybody knew their rights, how many complaints do you think we would see on this screen?

Ms. Meriem Amir (Legal Advisor, Flight Claim Canada):

Could you speak louder? I did not hear.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If everybody knew their rights, how many complaints would there be?

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

There would probably be as many complaints as customers who have been affected by a situation that would require a complaint. However, if people were aware of their rights and there was a process in place, they would no longer have to file a complaint because recourse would be available to them.

That is the direction we want to see Bill C-49 move in. People need to be provided with tools so that they no longer need to file a complaint for compensation or settlement. Provisions need to be in place in advance to allow them to get compensation without having to file a complaint and always having to fight to get something. [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You were talking a lot about the Montreal convention earlier. Are there any enforcement mechanisms in the Montreal convention itself?

Dr. Gábor Lukács:

Is the question for me?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. I know they can answer, but I'm asking you.

Dr. Gábor Lukács:

The Montreal convention allows enforcement through the courts. It is also incorporated in the airlines' tariffs, so it is currently the option that offers the most tools for enforcement.

It does not carry penalties. It does not have specific enforcement mechanisms. What we do see in claims relating to the Montreal convention is that the passenger makes a claim for a delay in their flight and gets back an email from Air Canada, for example, thanking them for their email and saying, “Here's 25% off your next flight.” They're completely ignoring the substance of the complaint.

Overall, the picture we see with both the Montreal convention and the tariff system is that the rules are written down there, but airlines are training their lower-level staff to ignore complaints of this nature and provide template answers that essentially are evasive.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

On your chart that you've put up here, you say that the complaints have quadrupled over four years, but we can see fairly clearly that the complaints quadrupled this year. Can you speak to what caused a spike after many years of relative stability?

Dr. Gábor Lukács:

The spike this year was caused by a massive campaign by the Canadian Transportation Agency, as I understand it, to draw attention to itself. However, unfortunately that massive campaign was not coupled with actual structural changes. Passengers are still being sent away without their complaints being resolved.

Just last year it happened that when CBC got on the story that a passenger was being sent away, then all of a sudden people from the agency were very apologetic. It got solved very quickly. However, I don't think Canadian passengers should be walking with a lawyer on their left and a journalist on their right to ensure their rights are respected.

(1840)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

You've indicated that you're not happy with the CTA itself. How would you restructure? How would you change it?

Dr. Gábor Lukács:

To me, the CTA as an organization is beyond redemption. I would like to see the responsibilities partially transferred to Transport Canada in terms of the regulation-making powers, and then the enforcement and the consumer protection to a separate agency that has a single mandate of consumer protection and has stronger mechanisms in place to prevent conflict of interest and regulatory capture.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You talked about having filed I think 32 preventive complaints that succeeded.

Dr. Gábor Lukács:

It was 26.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Twenty-six? Right. That's a good number for an individual. What were these complaints?

Dr. Gábor Lukács:

These complaints were related to Air Canada's refusal, for example, to compensate passengers for damage to baggage when they rip off the handle or damage the wheels. More known issues are the liability of WestJet for baggage on domestic flights, which used to be $250 and was raised to over $1,800 as a result of my complaint, or the amount of denied boarding compensation payable by Air Canada, which was raised from $100 to up to $800, depending on the length of the delay, as a result of my complaint. There was a wide range of issues relating to matters that affect passengers in their daily dealings with airlines.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Gooch, I know you said you weren't closely involved in any way with the Ottawa airport, but the Air Transat incident is obviously one that's on our minds. You talked about the airport passenger care plan. What are the mechanics of an air passenger care program for an emergency like the one that happened in Ottawa?

Mr. Daniel-Robert Gooch:

I'm not as familiar with the technical details, but it would be something that would be created by the airport authority in conjunction with the air carrier partners in that airport. Airports vary quite significantly from one part of the country to another in terms of complexity. Airports have plans for all kinds of contingencies, from security incidents, to safety incidents, to irregular operations. They try to think of the needs of travellers in that type of situation and to predict what might be needed. In some cases, it may be buses to get travellers off an aircraft, snacks and food that can be brought out, maybe cots, and that sort of thing, but it would vary. I'm not personally familiar with the details of that particular airport's plan.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Yurdiga.

Mr. David Yurdiga (Fort McMurray—Cold Lake, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair, and thank you to the witnesses for presenting today.

My biggest concern right now is the northern communities, the isolated communities, where air travel is very expensive. They have a different reality from people in the south. My concern is that this piece of legislation we're studying right now is going to significantly impact the north, because a lot of times, regulations in the south make sense and make absolutely no sense in the north, because they are two different realities. Do you think there should be exceptions for northern communities and isolated communities, or do you think we should just suck it up, and maybe we won't have any industry in the north? My question is to anyone who wants to answer it, because it's multi-faceted. [Translation]

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

I would certainly like to answer.

When you set up a compensation system, you have to take into account the realities. If something is not attributable to the airline, there are reasons for that. There are also reasons for the contrary. That has to be taken into consideration when making regulations.

When an airline faces complications that are not caused by its own decisions, but by geography, those can clearly become exceptional circumstances and the airline may be exempted from providing compensation.

Ms. Meriem Amir:

I can also add to the answer.

In the European Union, we see that many countries have very different geographical realities and climates. All sorts of airports are subject to very different circumstances. Yet they are all subject to the same regulations, which seems to work well.

As my colleague Mr. Charbonneau said, they are exempted only in extraordinary circumstances that arise through no fault of their own. So I do not see why, for the few flights to Canada's north, although I'm not an air transportation expert....

In my opinion, they are designed for the purpose, equipped differently, and have experienced pilots to deal with particular climate conditions. With the equipment and the experience, I think a two-hour delay would be the same as a delay in the south with equipment adapted to the specific temperature of the south. The regulations should simply include a fairly broad and clear framework, as is the case in the European Union.

I think the exemption for exceptional circumstances might be a good thing.

(1845)

[English]

Mr. David Yurdiga:

I'm just looking at the north. The only other country that experiences the same sort of climate that we have is Russia. We have Nunavut, and they're in a unique situation. People are in small, isolated communities and there are so many things outside of their control.

We have to remember that Canada is a very large country, and fuel delivery is a big issue that can be affected for various reasons. By saying that we'll make provisions, it means absolutely nothing if it is not in the legislation. Rules after the fact never happen. I think we have to be very cautious on how we move forward.

Also, I was looking at your chart up there, and it seems like complaints and enforcement go hand in hand—less enforcement, more complaints.

I don't know if the airline industry is getting worse or the enforcement is the problem. I do a lot of travelling and I haven't really experienced a lot of delays. There are delays, but I expect that, because airlines have situations out of their control.

I think we have to do a better job in enforcement. Also, with Bill C-49, we have to ensure that we make provisions for northern communities.

Enforcement has to go hand in hand. Do you think that changing the rules is going to make a difference if enforcement stays the way it is, or do you think that setting up rules and just moving on will make a difference?

Dr. Gábor Lukács:

With respect to northern communities, part and parcel of the problem is lack of sufficient competition. However, even as Bill C-49 reads currently with respect to the challenges for the industry, the delays they experience in the north are often caused by not simply “circumstances beyond the airlines' control”, but purely weather.

In Canada, no person would want to hold an airline responsible for a genuine weather issue. That is a no-brainer. I'm not advocating for holding airlines responsible for what is genuinely weather. The trouble is that airlines often abuse the claims for weather. A claim that a flight from Toronto to Halifax was cancelled due to weather when the weather was happening in Vancouver is unacceptable.

Insofar as enforcement is concerned, the greatest problem is that many of those enforcement actions are discretionary. They are up to someone to decide whether they will or will not take enforcement action, and that has changed....

To be clear, I'm not proposing to punish airlines for delays. What I am proposing is that if a flight is delayed and an amount of compensation is owed, even if it's a small amount, if that amount of compensation is not paid out, then there should be a hefty penalty. The penalty should be attached to not complying with the rules, not the delay itself.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Yurdiga, your time is up. Thank you for participating today.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Mr. Charbonneau, how do you get paid? Do you work on a contingent basis for the files you take on?

(1850)

[Translation]

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

Actually, we provide a service that is risk-free for customers, and we work entirely on commission. If we don't win the case, we do not claim anything from the customer, but if we do, we keep a percentage of the compensation. [English]

Mr. Ken Hardie:

In Canada, that percentage or contingency fee could be as high as 33% of the award. [Translation]

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

In our case, it's 25%. [English]

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Twenty-five per cent.

Mr. Lukács, you've also undertaken action on behalf of some clients. Do you charge a fee?

Dr. Gábor Lukács:

Absolutely not. Our activities are completely pro bono.

Actually, our website has even been set up purely from donations received from the community.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Mr. Charbonneau, I apologize for asking Mr. Lukács that question.

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

He has to make a living.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Yes.

We have an interesting situation. Our previous panels indicated that the profit margin per passenger is very low. In fact, you made the comment that passengers are treated as a commodity, and in a sense I guess they are, because the airlines deal on a volume basis. Gone are the days when only the elite would fly, and therefore everything was crystal and silverware. On the one hand, we have a migration to opening up air travel to more people, but on the other, there seems to have been a trade-off.

One of the principles they've been trying to weave through this bill, Bill C-49, is the principle of balance. What does reflect a balance?

Mr. Lukács, with respect, you sound a little bloodthirsty. But at the same time, obviously we have had some outrageous incidents, so what does the balance really look like?

Mr. Charbonneau, I'll ask you. [Translation]

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

It means striking a balance by providing a service that allows passengers not to feel that they are taken hostage. With respect to the events in the past few months, we are very concerned that the passengers felt like they were being held hostage. They had little recourse, little information, and were left to their own devices. We want rules to be established to allow for compensation, but also to ensure that companies have to adjust and take better care of their customers. They will have to make sure there are fewer and fewer delays and cancellations, and, when they do happen—which they will, because of all sorts of circumstances—the customers will be adequately taken care of.

Right now, there is some general grumbling and that is why bills are introduced. More and more people are dissatisfied with the system. The idea is to find ways to support passengers when they are faced with problems. [English]

Mr. Ken Hardie:

You would want to be cautious. If you're advocating, for instance, for higher penalties, you have a material interest in those higher penalties. If it were discovered that you were chasing people, looking for clients, that's called champerty, and there are some problems with that.

Mr. Gooch, is it recognized that the airports themselves also should have some accountability for the passenger experience, particularly when delays aren't a result of a force of nature or whatever but the ramp people don't show up on time and the airline is stuck out on the tarmac? That's not the airplane's fault. I don't see anything anywhere that suggests the airport authority itself would owe some compensation to the passenger.

Mr. Daniel-Robert Gooch:

As I said earlier, the interaction at an airport is quite complex. There are many different parties involved, and it's not always visible where the issue is. The ramp employee you spoke about actually is usually an airline employee. There's a lot of misunderstanding about who does what at an airport.

I know that travellers want people to take responsibility. Certainly, airports strive to take responsibility for the experience passengers receive at their airport.

If someone comes up to me and yells at me for my lawn being too long and tells me that the lawn is really long and I need to mow that lawn, I look at the lawn and I see it's really long and it really needs to be mowed. But if my house is the one down the street, there's only so much I can do to help that guy get his lawn mowed.

It's not a great analogy.

There are many different players in an incident. Even in some of the biggest ones, it's hard to know who's at fault. Take a tarmac employee, for example—

(1855)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

If I could, I think what we're dealing with here, then, is that.... The lines of accountability aren't terribly clear, because it is such a complex situation.

With respect to incidents that happen, those weird ones, the ones that hit the news, is there a process by which the airport authorities and the airlines collaborate on contingency plans, or at the very least, somebody knows who has the lead on this thing?

Mr. Daniel-Robert Gooch:

Yes. That's an ongoing thing. That happens all the time. When there are major incidents, everybody gets together and asks what they did wrong here, how they dropped the ball, and how they could do this better. And it happens not just—

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I'm not talking about after the fact; I'm talking about when the you-know-what hits the fan.

Mr. Daniel-Robert Gooch:

That's what I'm talking about as well.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Is there a situation room where all of the players come in and say, “Here's what's happening right now. What are we going to do?”

Mr. Daniel-Robert Gooch:

There are. Each airport is set up differently, but there are situation rooms. Some of these things happen very quickly, and when situations like this occur, it's a mess and everybody is just trying to do their best job. They're trying to get the travellers to where they're going safely, securely, and to get together afterwards to help ensure that it doesn't happen again. When they are really big incidents that are high profile, of course they get together after the fact and say, “Okay what did we do wrong; how can we do this better?” They don't just share it amongst themselves; they share it with each other. We talk about it at conferences.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I do understand that, but I—

The Chair:

Thank you very much. I'm sorry, but you're over your time limit.

We'll go on to Mr. Godin. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I want to begin by thanking you for being part of this. You work on a daily basis in this wonderful world of air transportation, especially with passengers. You provide us with tools that allow us to do our jobs well. Thank you for being here despite the rather late hour.

My first question is for the representative from Flight Claim Canada.

You are saying that the information for passengers is inadequate. Your goal is to ensure that the information is more detailed, transparent, clear and unequivocal. That's what you said in your presentation.

My question is very direct: do you think Bill C-49 meets those objectives?

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

Not in its current form. The criteria must be much clearer. That is why I said that the people making the regulations must be given clear criteria.

Mr. Joël Godin:

As I understand it, the bill in its current form does not meet your objectives.

Do you think it might eventually get there?

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

Yes. I think that if some, if not all, of the 15 proposals that we have put forward in the brief are implemented, they will include and protect Canadian passengers as much as, if not more than, what is being done internationally.

Mr. Joël Godin:

Let me continue along the same lines. You have mentioned Europe and its regulations many times. I gather that you think European passengers are better protected and supported, and that the airlines are more responsible and respectful toward their passengers.

Why do you think the government is not drawing inspiration from the European regulations?

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

I actually think that we are reaching a solution, and we have to ensure that it is fair, and therefore as generous as what Europe has to offer. This solution must also be humane, taking passengers into account.

Mr. Joël Godin:

You say that the European regulations are being taken into account. Could you tell me what evidence you have that the current government has considered the European regulations in drafting Bill C-49?

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

Well, a compensation system and the systems in place are mentioned, but in reference to the European regulations. However, we are working on the legislation now. So we will have to compare the regulations stemming from the act to see whether or not they are comparable. We personally want the regulations to ensure that all passengers are treated equally.

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you.

(1900)

Ms. Meriem Amir:

I would like to add something if I may. I think the general principles are somewhat similar to those of the European regulations. I do not recall exactly which clause of the bill it is, but it talks about minimum compensation and the right of passengers to be informed. That follows the European principle almost to the letter, as it establishes a minimum and even a notice that each airline must provide in the event of cancellation or delay.

I think we are there, and the principles are there. A number of things are addressed. I think the only difference is that the criteria are clear in the European regulations, whereas they are still a little fuzzy here.

Mr. Joël Godin:

As I understand it, you think the criteria are not clear and, in order to make them clear, we should define our objective more clearly within the regulations.

Since time flies, I now have a question for the representative from Air Passenger Rights.

You said that the Canadian Transportation Agency is not effective. Today, we have been told quite the contrary, namely that the Agency is effective and that it also enforces the legislation. I wonder who is telling the truth. Could you tell me what makes you say that the Canadian Transportation Agency is not effective? [English]

Dr. Gábor Lukács:

With respect to the Canadian Transportation Agency, this is a question of fact shown by the statistics and shown by the number of decisions and nature of decisions issued by the Canadian Transportation Agency. When you have a regulator that claims to have expertise in the airline industry, which accepts that a jumbo jet can be fully boarded by over 200 passengers in five or 10 minutes, then you know something is really wrong at that body. And these are some of the nature of the decisions that I have seen coming out.

The Chair:

Sorry, the time is up.

Go ahead, Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Ms. Amir, when I last spoke, you wanted to add something, but I ran out of time. If you remember what you wanted to say, please go ahead.

Ms. Meriem Amir:

I have a good memory, I remember.

You had asked whether airlines sometimes pass the buck to airports. It has happened. My colleague Mr. Charbonneau did not remember, but having filed a number of complaints myself and having been front and centre, I remember a clear example involving Vueling Airlines, whose head office is in Barcelona. The company, subject to European regulations, had a three-hour delay. However, it invoked section 3 on compensation, saying that it was not at fault and passing the buck to the airport whose check-in system was down.

Finally, the conclusion was that the circumstances were not extraordinary, since that was part of Vueling's activities, and the company was used to working with airports and check-in systems.

Once again, the extent of the liability is not clear. Is Vueling fully responsible or does half of the responsibility fall on the airport? That's not clear at all. Earlier, I heard comments to that effect, and perhaps the extent of responsibility should be clarified.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. Clearly, you are showing us that Canadians have rights of which they are not aware and that you make sure they are respected.

In the industry, which is not governed by a charter right now, are there huge differences in the compensation to passengers?

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

Are you referring to those that are not subject to—

Mr. Robert Aubin:

No, I would like to know whether, for the same problem, such as lost luggage, there are big differences in compensation from company to company.

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

Yes, indeed, under the Montreal Convention, which provides for compensation, in particular for luggage or for personal or financial losses, there are very big differences. People often have to fight in small claims court, and ultimately a judge will determine the compensation to be awarded to the customer.

Often, the time and effort required to settle everything is not worth the amount claimed initially for the time wasted because of the delay, flight cancellation, or lost luggage.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

When you are involved, do you go to small claims court?

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

No, we apply the criteria that are defined. So there's not a wide gap because all instances are listed. European compensation for a flight delayed more than four hours for a distance of more than 3,500 km will always be in the amount of 600 euros.

(1905)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Let's talk about a flight operated by a joint venture because there is no direct flight. For instance, if I were travelling from Montreal to Brussels and from Brussels to another city, should I have to deal with each airline or only the one from which I bought my ticket?

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

Actually, when it comes to joint ventures and the flight is operated by another company, the airline will pass the buck to the other company.

For the rest, it depends. Do all the segments have the same reservation number or not? Where did the glitch occur? For example, was it a European or Canadian connecting flight? That will affect the legal aspects.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

In your view, should Bill C-49 solve the problem by determining that the company from which the person buys the ticket is responsible for that person?

Mr. Jacob Charbonneau:

Personally, I think so. [English]

The Chair:

All right. We've completed our first round. Does anyone have a question that they have not been able to get sufficient answers to, on either side of the table?

Mr. Sikand has indicated he had a question. Is it one question?

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

It was various questions, but I think they've all been answered.

The Chair:

They've all been answered.

Go ahead, Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I have just one question to wrap up, and perhaps it's a good time to say thank you to our witnesses and to my colleagues on both sides of the table. This has been a valuable and interesting few days, and I really do appreciate everyone's work and look forward to our further deliberations.

Dr. Lukács, chief amongst your complaints seems to be the fact, in essence, that a lot of people are experiencing irritants and not having a remedy, if I can say there's one overarching theme. Do you think Bill C-49, particularly the requirement that would have airlines adopt clear and concise descriptions of how someone can enforce remedies, is going to improve the situation over the status quo?

Dr. Gábor Lukács:

Unfortunately not.

The way I would articulate it is that Bill C-49 is going to double the amount of compensation that passengers are not going to receive.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Chong.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Just to clarify, so I can plan out my week, we're going to meet next week on Tuesday for future committee business. How much time should we budget for that? Are we meeting for an hour or two hours? Are we going to book two hours?

The Chair:

Well, you can book two hours. Hopefully, we'll be finished in 15 minutes. That would be the preferable, but it might take a little longer than that.

Hon. Michael Chong:

That's great.

I have another question. This is the first time I've been on committee in this Parliament, so I don't know what the practice is for committee business. I know that when I first started as a parliamentarian 13 years ago nothing was in camera except for the discussion of potential witnesses, in order to ensure that nobody besmirched the reputation of a witness. In the last Parliament, I think all committee business was in camera for most of the committees. What are we going to do next Tuesday?

The Chair:

Why don't you answer that as the clerk, officially?

Technically, you're automatically in camera, but it's up to the committee. It depends on the issues we're dealing with. Quite often, we try to do things in public. Otherwise it's in camera, but it's totally up to the committee as to how they decide to do it.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you for clarifying that.

The Chair:

You're welcome.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

By the way, Michael, welcome. It's great to have you on board.

The rule of thumb is that we try to stay in public session and stay out of in camera, but there is obviously a lot of sensitivity. When it's a negotiation or an issue of sensitivity that can affect an individual, or things of that nature, we'll go into closed session, but it's very rare. From our side, and even your side, I know that in the past we've always preferred to stay in open session.

The Chair:

To our witnesses, thank you so much. You should feel good. We managed to get pretty much all of the witnesses who wanted to appear before us to appear, and that included the four of you. Thank you very much for the information today.

We will now adjourn the meeting. That's the end of four days. I have to say thank you to all our support staff, our clerk and everyone, and to our members.

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(0930)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte la 70e réunion du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités. Conformément à l'ordre de renvoi du lundi 19 juin 2017, nous examinons le projet de loi C-49, Loi apportant des modifications à la Loi sur les transports au Canada et à d'autres lois concernant les transports ainsi que des modifications connexes et corrélatives à d'autres lois.

Nous en sommes à notre quatrième journée d'étude. Je voudrais dire au ministre que les parlementaires étaient ici, de même que le personnel de la Colline, pour examiner le projet de loi C-49. Nous sommes très heureux de voir, monsieur le ministre, que vous-même et vos collaborateurs vous êtes joints à nous. Je vais maintenant vous céder la parole pour que vous puissiez présenter un exposé préliminaire.

L’hon. Marc Garneau (ministre des Transports):

Merci, madame la présidente. Je suis enchanté d'être ici. Cela fait un long moment que j'attends ce plaisir.[Français]

Madame la présidente et honorables membres du Comité, je suis heureux de vous rencontrer aujourd'hui pour parler du projet de loi C-49, Loi sur la modernisation des transports.[Traduction]

J'aimerais remercier le Comité d'avoir entrepris l'étude du projet de loi avant que la Chambre ne reprenne ses travaux. Nous vous en sommes très reconnaissants. Je sais que vous avez eu trois journées très chargées.

Un réseau de transport dynamique est essentiel pour maintenir le rendement économique et la compétitivité d'ensemble du Canada. Une fois adopté, ce projet de loi se traduira par des modifications à la Loi sur les transports au Canada et à d'autres textes législatifs qui permettront à notre pays de tirer parti des perspectives mondiales et d'apporter des améliorations destinées à mieux répondre aux besoins des Canadiens et à leurs attentes en matière de services.

Les mesures prévues dans le projet de loi C-49 reflètent ce que les Canadiens nous ont dit espérer au cours des nombreuses consultations que nous avons menées l'an dernier. Nous avons organisé plus de 200 rencontres et tables rondes partout dans le pays pour connaître le point de vue des intervenants des domaines du transport et du commerce, des groupes autochtones, des provinces et des territoires et des particuliers sur l'avenir des transports au Canada. Notre travail vise à instaurer et à favoriser les conditions nécessaires au succès à long terme. C'est précisément l'objectif de ce projet de loi.

Le projet de loi C-49 est un important premier pas — et j'insiste sur « premier pas » — sur la voie menant à une mise en oeuvre rapide de mesures concrètes à l'appui de Transports 2030, plan stratégique pour l'avenir des transports au Canada. Le projet de loi est axé sur nos priorités immédiates dans les secteurs des transports aériens, ferroviaires et maritimes. Son but est de réaliser une série de mesures favorisant la mise en place d'un réseau de transport intégré qui soit sûr, vert et innovateur et qui contribue à la croissance économique et à la santé de l'environnement, sans oublier le bien-être des Canadiens lors de leurs déplacements.

Les préoccupations des Canadiens ont été mises en évidence ces derniers mois par des cas très médiatisés de traitement inadmissible de passagers aériens, aussi bien au Canada qu'ailleurs. Le projet de loi C-49 propose de charger l'Office des transports du Canada d'élaborer, de concert avec Transports Canada, de nouvelles règles visant à mieux protéger les droits des passagers aériens au Canada. Ces règles garantiraient aux passagers aériens des droits clairs et uniformes qui seraient équitables aussi bien pour eux que pour les transporteurs aériens.

Voici quelques exemples des questions qui seraient abordées dans les nouveaux règlements: refus d'embarquement en cas de surréservation, retards et annulations, bagages perdus ou endommagés, retards excessifs sur l'aire de trafic, attribution aux enfants, sans frais supplémentaires, de sièges à côté d'un parent ou d'un tuteur et élaboration par les transporteurs de normes claires pour le transport des instruments de musique. Les voyageurs devront disposer de renseignements clairs sur les obligations des transporteurs et sur la marche à suivre pour obtenir une indemnisation ou déposer une plainte.

En vertu des mesures législatives proposées, les Canadiens et tous les voyageurs en déplacement au Canada bénéficieront d'une approche uniforme, prévisible et raisonnable. Mon objectif est de permettre aux passagers aériens de bien comprendre leurs droits tout en veillant à ce que la nouvelle approche n'ait pas d'effets négatifs sur l'accès aux services aériens ou le coût des voyages en avion.

J'ai clairement indiqué que les règlements comporteront des dispositions garantissant que tout cas de refus d'embarquement pour cause de surréservation sera réglé sur une base volontaire et qu'en aucun cas, une personne ne sera expulsée contre son gré d'un avion après avoir embarqué. En tant que Canadiens, nous nous attendons à ce que les transporteurs aériens qui desservent notre pays traitent leurs passagers avec le respect qui leur est dû et honorent leurs engagements.

(0935)

[Français]

Ce projet de loi propose également que des règlements soient établis pour exiger des données de la part de tous les fournisseurs de services aériens afin de surveiller l'expérience des passagers aériens, notamment le respect de l'approche proposée en matière de droits des passagers aériens.

Ce projet de loi propose également d'assouplir les restrictions en matière de propriété internationale. Cela passera de 25 % à 49 % des actions avec droit de vote pour les transporteurs aériens canadiens et sera assorti de mesures de protection connexes, tandis que le plafond de 25 % sera maintenu pour les services aériens spécialisés.

En vertu de ces mesures de protection, un seul investisseur étranger ne pourra détenir plus de 25 % des actions avec droit de vote d'un transporteur aérien canadien, et aucune combinaison de transporteurs aériens étrangers ne pourra posséder plus de 25 % des actions d'un transporteur canadien.

L'incidence directe de niveaux d'investissement internationaux plus élevés sera celle-ci: les transporteurs aériens et les entreprises canadiennes souhaitant créer un nouveau service de transport aérien auront accès à un plus grand nombre de capitaux à risque. Par conséquent, ce bassin de capitaux, tant de source étrangère que de source canadienne, permettra au secteur canadien de devenir plus compétitif, ce qui se traduira par de meilleurs choix et une baisse des prix pour les passagers canadiens.

Une autre innovation de ce projet de loi est qu'il propose un nouveau processus simplifié et prévisible visant à autoriser des coentreprises entre les transporteurs aériens, en tenant compte de la concurrence et des considérations plus vastes d'intérêt public.

Au Canada, les coentreprises aériennes font actuellement l'objet d'un examen du Bureau de la concurrence sous l'angle du préjudice possible qu'elles peuvent causer à la concurrence, et ce, en vertu de la Loi sur la concurrence. Contrairement à de nombreux autres pays, en particulier les États-Unis, l'approche actuelle du Canada ne permet pas de tenir compte des avantages plus vastes que détiennent certains itinéraires pour le public. De plus, l'examen du Bureau n'est assujetti à aucun échéancier particulier.

D'aucuns se demandent si la manière actuelle d'évaluer les coentreprises ne risque pas de rendre les transporteurs canadiens moins attrayants aux yeux de leurs homologues internationaux comme partenaires de coentreprises, en plus de limiter la capacité des transporteurs canadiens à épouser cette nouvelle tendance.

Le projet de loi prévoit des mesures qui permettront au ministre des Transports d'étudier et d'approuver les coentreprises aériennes, lorsque cela sert l'intérêt public, en tenant compte des paramètres de concurrence. Le ministre entend consulter de près le commissaire de la concurrence pour s'assurer qu'il est dûment au courant de toute préoccupation au sujet de la concurrence. Les transporteurs aériens qui décident de faire évaluer leur projet de coentreprise en vertu de ce nouveau processus se verront offrir des échéanciers parfaitement clairs en vue d'une décision attendue.

À l'échelle mondiale, les aéroports engagent des investissements sans précédent dans le contrôle des passagers pour faciliter les voyages et obtenir des avantages économiques mondiaux. Les plus grands aéroports du Canada ont déjà exprimé leur désir d'investir dans ce domaine, et les aéroports plus petits ont manifesté le désir d'avoir accès à des services de contrôle afin de promouvoir le développement économique local.

Le projet de loi créera un cadre plus souple pour l'Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien, chargée de fournir des services de contrôle selon un mode de recouvrement des coûts, afin d'appuyer les efforts visant à préserver un système aéronautique à la fois sécuritaire et rentable.

(0940)

[Traduction]

Le projet de loi C-49 propose par ailleurs d'importantes améliorations visant à renforcer la sécurité du transport par chemin de fer et à nous doter d'un réseau ferroviaire plus sûr auquel les Canadiens peuvent se fier. Comme vous le savez tous, puisque je l'ai répété à maintes reprises, la sécurité ferroviaire constitue ma toute première priorité.

Les modifications prévues de la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire imposeraient d'installer des enregistreurs audio-vidéo pour renforcer la sécurité ferroviaire en fournissant des données objectives sur les mesures prises par les équipes de train avant et pendant un accident ou un incident ferroviaire. De plus, cette obligation faciliterait l'analyse des problèmes connus de sécurité afin de prévenir les accidents.

Les dispositions prévues imposeraient aux compagnies de chemin de fer non seulement d'installer des enregistreurs, mais aussi de limiter l'utilisation des données recueillies en fonction de critères très stricts. Par exemple, le Bureau de la sécurité des transports aurait accès aux données enregistrées pour enquêter sur les causes d'un accident. Transports Canada et les compagnies de chemin de fer y auraient également accès, dans des conditions prescrites, afin d'assurer une gestion proactive de la sécurité et de faire le suivi des incidents et des accidents qui n'ont pas fait l'objet d'une enquête du Bureau de la sécurité des transports. Les limites qui seraient imposées sur l'utilisation des données ont pour but de maximiser la sécurité assurée par cette technologie tout en limitant le risque qu'elle empiète sur la vie privée des employés.

Le réseau canadien de transport ferroviaire des marchandises revêt une importance névralgique pour notre économie. Le projet de loi C-49 renforcerait ce réseau en en améliorant la transparence, l'équilibre et l'efficacité à long terme. Permettez-moi d'en donner quelques exemples clés.

En vertu du projet de loi, les expéditeurs auraient la possibilité de réclamer des sanctions financières réciproques en cas de violation d'un accord de service avec les compagnies de chemin de fer. Ils disposeraient d'un accès équitable à des processus plus opportuns de règlement des différends en matière de services et de prix, et un plus grand nombre d'expéditeurs pourraient en particulier se prévaloir du processus rationalisé d'arbitrage final. En outre, de nouvelles mesures permettraient à l'Office de mettre à la disposition des expéditeurs des moyens informels de règlement des différends, ainsi que des conseils à cet égard.

Le projet de loi introduirait également une nouvelle mesure, l'interconnexion de longue distance, qui permettrait aux expéditeurs captifs de différentes régions et secteurs d'avoir accès à une autre compagnie de chemin de fer. Les prix seraient basés sur des transports comparables, l'Office étant investi des pouvoirs nécessaires pour juger de la comparabilité. Le projet de loi aurait également pour effet de moderniser les mesures clés portant sur le transport du grain, comme le revenu maximal admissible, afin de favoriser les investissements des compagnies de chemin de fer et de veiller à ce que les taux d'interconnexion soient régulièrement mis à jour de façon à leur assurer un revenu adéquat.

De plus, le projet de loi C-49 renforcerait la transparence du secteur en imposant aux grandes compagnies ferroviaires de communiquer certaines données de rendement, de service et de prix relatives à leurs activités canadiennes. Transports Canada serait autorisé à rendre publiques les tendances relatives aux prix.

Grâce à ces initiatives et à d'autres dispositions du projet de loi, nous prenons les importantes mesures nécessaires pour mettre à la disposition des Canadiens le réseau ferroviaire de transport de marchandises dont ils ont besoin aussi bien aujourd'hui que dans les années à venir.

Ce ne sont pas les seules mesures que nous préconisons pour favoriser les échanges avec les marchés mondiaux. Le projet de loi C-49 propose aussi de modifier la Loi sur le cabotage et la Loi maritime du Canada afin d'améliorer le transport maritime et l'accès au financement des infrastructures maritimes. En particulier, les modifications de la Loi sur le cabotage autoriseraient tous les armateurs à repositionner les conteneurs vides qu'ils possèdent ou louent à différents endroits du Canada en utilisant des navires battant n'importe quel pavillon. Cela conférerait une souplesse logistique nettement plus importante à l'industrie. De plus, les modifications proposées de la Loi maritime du Canada permettraient aux administrations portuaires canadiennes d'accéder aux prêts et aux garanties d'emprunt de la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada afin d'appuyer les investissements dans les grandes infrastructures habilitantes.

(0945)



Je dirai en conclusion que je suis convaincu que ce projet de loi permettra de prendre d'importantes mesures qui faciliteront le passage du réseau de transport du Canada au XXIe siècle. En fin de compte, nous avons besoin d'un réseau qui réponde aux exigences de l'économie d'aujourd'hui afin de transporter nos voyageurs et nos marchandises avec efficacité et sécurité. L'adoption rapide du projet de loi cet automne nous permettrait de franchir une étape essentielle à la réalisation d'améliorations concrètes du réseau national de transport, améliorations qui profiteront aux Canadiens pendant des décennies.

Je vous remercie de votre attention. Je me ferai maintenant un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants de votre présence et de l'exposé que vous nous avez présenté.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux questions. À vous, madame Raitt.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt (Milton, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre. Je vous félicite, ainsi que votre ministère, d'avoir déposé ce projet de loi. Je crois que c'est un bon point de départ, comme vous l'avez mentionné au début de votre exposé.

Je voudrais vous poser deux questions concernant de près ou de loin certains des aspects dans lesquels vous n'êtes peut-être pas allés aussi loin que vous auriez pu le faire. Dans ce premier tour, ma première question porte sur la charte des droits des passagers et la seconde, sur les chemins de fer d'intérêt local.

Au chapitre des droits des passagers, l'Office des transports du Canada a dit dans son témoignage qu'il consulterait l'industrie, les associations de défense des droits des consommateurs, les Canadiens et le public voyageur lors de l'élaboration de ses règlements. Je m'inquiète, monsieur le ministre, de l'omission de l'ASFC, de l'ACSTA, de NAV Canada et d'autres administrations responsables pouvant contribuer aux retards et susciter ainsi de nombreuses plaintes contre les transporteurs aériens. Pouvez-vous répondre brièvement à cette question?

J'aurais ensuite une autre question sur la possibilité pour l'Office des transports du Canada de regrouper certaines plaintes.

(0950)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je m'excuse. Qu'avez-vous dit en dernier?

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Bien sûr, l'enquête sur Air Transat a beaucoup retenu l'attention des gens. La seule raison pour laquelle l'Office a pu ouvrir cette enquête, c'est qu'il s'agissait de vols internationaux, ce qui lui permettait de prendre l'initiative d'une enquête. Il n'a pas ce pouvoir dans le cas des vols intérieurs. Je me demande pourquoi ce pouvoir n'a pas été conféré à l'Office afin de lui permettre de prendre l'initiative d'enquêtes portant sur des vols intérieurs.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je vous remercie de vos deux questions.

Il est certain que lorsque l'Office des transports du Canada entreprendra ses consultations en vue d'élaborer une charte des droits des passagers… Comme je l'ai souvent dit, si vous achetez un billet pour un vol particulier, vous devez pouvoir prendre ce vol à moins de circonstances indépendantes de la volonté de la compagnie aérienne. Ce principe sera très explicitement énoncé dans la charte des passagers. Il y a des circonstances particulières dans lesquelles… Nous reconnaissons tous que les conditions météorologiques peuvent parfois causer des retards. Nous sommes tous conscients du fait que, dans certaines situations, le contrôle de la circulation aérienne peut, par exemple, avoir des difficultés susceptibles d'entraîner des retards. Nous savons tous qu'une alerte de sécurité déclenchée dans un aéroport entraîne l'arrêt des opérations aéroportuaires normales.

Toutes ces situations seront clairement énoncées pour qu'il soit possible de concentrer l'attention sur les cas de violation des droits d'un passager attribuables à la compagnie aérienne. Il y a de nombreux cas où cela se produit. J'en ai mentionné quelques-uns. Je peux vous donner l'assurance que lorsque les consultations auront lieu — et elles s'étendront largement à tous les groupes intéressés —, nous définirons très clairement les conditions qui relèvent ou non de la responsabilité de la compagnie aérienne.

Au sujet du pouvoir de l'Office des transports du Canada d'agir de sa propre initiative, ayant examiné la situation, nous avons décidé que les paramètres actuels qui régissent le fonctionnement de l'Office sont adéquats et que nous nous réserverons le droit — il appartient au ministre des Transports de décider — de déterminer s'il convient de lui permettre d'entreprendre des enquêtes supplémentaires. Nous estimons que ce mécanisme est parfaitement satisfaisant en ce moment et qu'il n'y a pas à modifier le rôle de l'Office tel qu'il est défini dans son présent mandat. Nous voulons en effet préserver son rôle quasi judiciaire en matière de protection des consommateurs. Nous croyons que l'organisation actuelle est tout à fait acceptable.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Je vous remercie.

Il y a aussi une petite question embêtante qui a toujours constitué un problème à l'Office des transports du Canada. Surtout à cause de la campagne de sensibilisation de votre gouvernement, l'Office reçoit beaucoup plus de plaintes… Je ne sais pas si les gens le comprennent, mais l'OTC doit traiter séparément chacune de ces plaintes, ce qui prend énormément de temps. Chaque enquêteur doit faire des appels distincts au sujet de chaque plainte alors que, dans beaucoup de cas, les plaintes ont en fait beaucoup de points communs.

Vous n'avez pas permis à l'Office de regrouper les différentes plaintes issues d'un même incident. Pouvez-vous me dire pourquoi?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Vous avez très clairement expliqué la situation telle qu'elle existe en ce moment.

Oui, il y a actuellement un mécanisme qui permet à un passager de déposer une plainte, mais les gens doivent le savoir. Beaucoup de voyageurs ne sont pas au courant ou, s'ils le sont, ils ont l'impression que le mécanisme est beaucoup trop compliqué. Je tiens à remercier le président de l'Office pour l'avoir signalé l'automne dernier. Oui, cela a donné lieu à un plus grand nombre de plaintes parce que les gens ont appris l'existence de ce mécanisme, qui prend parfois beaucoup de temps, ce qui décourage les gens d'y recourir.

C'est tout l'objet de la charte des droits. Nous aurons un ensemble clair de règlements permettant de déterminer les situations dans lesquelles les droits d'un passager sont violés. Les règles s'appliqueront à tous les voyageurs.

J'espère évidemment qu'il y aura beaucoup moins de cas où les passagers auront besoin de recourir à l'OTC parce qu'on aura mis en place des processus clairement expliqués en français et en anglais. Les gens pourront traiter directement avec les compagnies aériennes, ce qui réduira le nombre des cas où l'Office aura à intervenir. S'il doit le faire, oui, nous reconnaîtrons que les mesures prises peuvent s'appliquer à plus que la personne qui a déposé une plainte par l'entremise de l'OTC.

(0955)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Garneau.

Monsieur Fraser. [Français]

M. Sean Fraser (Nova-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie d'être parmi nous ce matin.[Traduction]

Comme j'ai trois questions à poser et seulement six minutes, je vais immédiatement entrer dans le vif du sujet.

Chez moi, j'entends parler de la charte des passagers aériens. Nous avons tous connu les irritants que vous avez mentionnés dans votre exposé. Comment cette charte peut-elle garantir aux passagers qui connaissent ces frustrations ordinaires — qui sont vraiment contrariantes — un recours leur assurant un résultat positif lorsque leurs droits sont violés?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Eh bien, c'est justement l'objectif que nous poursuivons. Nous cherchons à mettre les gens au courant de leurs droits dans un langage clair. Une fois qu'ils connaîtront leurs droits, ils seront en mesure de s'en prévaloir immédiatement, que ce soit en cas de surréservation ou dans d'autres cas couverts par la charte.

Pour le moment, notre seul objectif est de faire en sorte que les droits soient énoncés clairement dans un langage simple. Il y aura des indemnités clairement établies en cas de violation des droits. Je crois que c'est une chose que les gens attendent depuis longtemps. Nous veillerons à ce qu'elle se réalise. Nous espérons tout mettre en place en 2018 pour que tous les passagers soient en mesure d'en profiter si on porte atteinte à leurs droits.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je m'intéresse aussi particulièrement au changement touchant la propriété internationale, qui passerait à 49 %. Comme ma collègue, Mme Raitt, je viens d'un coin du pays où beaucoup de gens aimeraient bien pouvoir voyager et prendre des vacances, mais n'ont tout simplement pas les moyens de le faire. Croyez-vous que cette mesure réduira le prix du transport aérien au Canada? Croyez-vous qu'elle permettra de desservir des régions du pays qui n'ont pas un service efficace aujourd'hui?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

J'espère que le changement des règles concernant la propriété internationale, qui permettrait de passer de 25 à 49 %, et, dans une moindre mesure, les coentreprises donneront aux compagnies aériennes la possibilité de desservir un plus grand nombre de destinations à un moindre coût. Il s'agit non seulement de créer un environnement favorable à la création de nouvelles compagnies aériennes, mais aussi d'amener celles-ci à décider, pour des raisons de concurrence, de desservir des endroits qui n'ont pas actuellement de services aériens parce qu'elles auraient alors un marché suffisant pour le faire.

Il ne s'agit pas seulement de réduire le prix du transport. Nous espérons que les transporteurs établiront des liaisons avec des destinations que les grandes compagnies ne desservent pas encore.

M. Sean Fraser:

Compte tenu des exemptions accordées à deux compagnies aériennes dans des conditions à peu près comparables à celles qu'établit le projet de loi C-49, y a-t-il déjà des mesures prises en ce sens?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Nous avons certes accordé des exemptions à Jetlines et Enerjet pour leur permettre de s'établir. Les deux compagnies ont été très actives dans leur recherche de marchés à desservir, dans certains cas à partir d'aéroports qui ne sont pas actuellement desservis. Je vous engage à prendre directement contact avec ces entreprises.

Quelques services devraient être lancés dans les mois ou les années à venir. Une fois ce projet de loi adopté, j'espère que d'autres entreprises constateront qu'elles peuvent obtenir le capital nécessaire pour créer leurs propres opérations. C'est vraiment l'objectif que nous poursuivons.

M. Sean Fraser:

Il me reste environ deux minutes. Je suis curieux de connaître votre point de vue en général. Ce projet de loi comporte un certain nombre de mesures qui auront des effets sur l'efficacité de notre système national de transport. Nous vivons dans une ère de commerce international. Chez moi, en Nouvelle-Écosse, c'est une conversation difficile à tenir quand on affirme que « ces accords commerciaux et ces investissements dans un corridor national de transport permettront au gouvernement et à l'économie de travailler en votre faveur ». Voilà ce qui intéresse vraiment les gens.

Pouvez-vous nous dire de quelle façon certaines des mesures prévues dans le projet de loi C-49 pourront créer des emplois pour les pêcheurs, pourront aider les gens de ma circonscription à expédier leurs produits vers les marchés de consommation et favoriseront les fabricants et les agriculteurs non seulement de ma collectivité, mais de l'ensemble des collectivités semblables à la mienne? De quelle façon ces mesures influenceront-elles positivement la vie des gens que nous représentons?

(1000)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Comme ministre des Transports, j'ai constaté qu'il est important de dire aux gens — car ils ne le savent pas toujours — à quel point notre système de transport est efficace. Cela est vrai partout dans le pays et pour tous les modes de transport, ce qui a des effets d'une importance incroyable sur l'économie du pays. L'efficacité du transport des produits entre toutes les régions du pays influe très considérablement sur l'économie.

Je dis toujours que Transports Canada constitue un portefeuille économique. Quelques-uns de mes prédécesseurs étaient du même avis. Il est parfois difficile d'expliquer aux gens que l'amélioration du système de transport — que nous essayons d'assurer en partie grâce à ce projet de loi — renforce l'économie et que cela profite en définitive à tous les Canadiens.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je pense, par exemple, à certaines des mesures prises dans le secteur du transport maritime, comme les investissements dans les ports et les moyens de leur faire parvenir efficacement des conteneurs vides. Nous pensons au récent accord commercial conclu avec l'Europe, qui doit réduire les tarifs applicables aux produits de la mer. J'ai deux côtes dans ma circonscription. Ces mesures vont-elles aider les pêcheurs à expédier leurs produits vers les marchés de consommation, à obtenir un meilleur rendement et à stimuler l'économie rurale en Nouvelle-Écosse?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Vous donnez un bon exemple. Dans le secteur maritime, le repositionnement des conteneurs vides est un aspect incroyablement important du transport des produits. Nous le comprenons tous. Nous avons vu les grands bateaux porte-conteneurs. Ils apportent des conteneurs chargés, puis doivent aller à un autre endroit pour en embarquer d'autres, mais ils manquent alors de conteneurs.

Le rapatriement des conteneurs favorisera certainement le secteur maritime de la côte Est, la mise en oeuvre de l'AECG et, en définitive, les pêcheurs de la Nouvelle-Écosse aussi.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre.

La parole est maintenant à M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Bonjour, monsieur le ministre. J'ai un projet de questions omnibus à la hauteur du projet de loi C-49, alors tentons d'être efficaces. Je vais donc vous poser des questions courtes auxquelles vous pourrez donner des réponses courtes.

Commençons par la charte. Depuis au moins un an et demi, je vous entends parler de façon assez précise des droits qui devraient être garantis par cette charte. Or comment se fait-il que le projet de loi C-49 nous arrive assorti d'intentions philosophiques quant à une consultation à venir, plutôt que d'une véritable charte sur laquelle nous pourrions nous prononcer?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je vous remercie de la question, monsieur Aubin.

Premièrement, je tiens à préciser qu'il ne s'agit pas d'un projet de loi omnibus. En effet, 90 % du contenu du projet de loi C-49 touche la même loi, à savoir la Loi sur les transports au Canada.

Deuxièmement, comme je l'ai très clairement expliqué, nous avons fait un choix à l'égard de la future charte des droits des passagers: nous avons décidé qu'un processus par voie de réglementation serait beaucoup plus efficace. Ainsi, plutôt que d'inclure le contenu de la charte dans le projet de loi, nous avons mandaté l'Office des transports du Canada pour préparer cette charte. Celle-ci sera ultimement soumise à mon approbation et sera ensuite publiée à titre de règlement.

M. Robert Aubin:

Si je peux me permettre...

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Laissez-moi terminer.

Il s'agira d'un règlement. De cette façon, si nous décidons dans trois ans d'apporter une modification à cette charte, le processus sera beaucoup plus simple. En effet, il est beaucoup moins compliqué de changer un règlement que de retourner à la Chambre pour modifier un projet de loi.

M. Robert Aubin:

Je comprends bien cela.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

C'est quelque chose qu'il est extrêmement important de comprendre. Nous n'avons jamais eu l'intention de mettre le contenu de la charte dans le projet de loi C-49. Le but était de mandater l'Office des transports du Canada pour nous donner les règlements, afin d'avoir, dans les années à venir, la flexibilité de faire des ajustements beaucoup plus rapidement.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. Je comprends bien cette démarche.

Si je le qualifie de projet de loi omnibus, c'est parce que je pense qu'on aurait pu scinder les différents types de transport et s'atteler beaucoup plus rapidement à la charte, selon la démarche que vous proposez. Là, ce ne sera pas fait avant 2018, si tout va bien.

Pourtant, nous ne sommes pas en train de réinventer la roue. De telles chartes existent ailleurs. La charte européenne, entre autres, est un modèle assez efficace. Elle avait d'ailleurs servi de base à un projet de loi néo-démocrate, que vous aviez entériné.

Est-ce à dire que nous ne pourrons apporter aucun amendement au projet de loi C-49 qui fournirait des balises précises et qui pourrait ne serait-ce qu'orienter la réflexion en vue de cette consultation qui commencera après la sanction royale?

(1005)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

D'abord, la vitesse à laquelle ce projet de loi sera adopté est entre vos mains. Je vous encourage à faire adopter ce projet de loi rapidement, parce que je crois qu'il répond à des besoins importants pour le Canada. Les commentaires que j'entends abondent dans ce sens.

Deuxièmement, ce comité est souverain du point de vue des décisions concernant la possibilité d'amendements. Je respecte cette situation, que notre gouvernement a très clairement expliquée lorsqu'il est arrivé au pouvoir.

Cela dit, il est important que je souligne que nous avons essayé, en créant ce projet de loi, de trouver un équilibre en ce qui concerne des questions très complexes. Nous devions trouver un équilibre entre les passagers et les lignes aériennes, entre les producteurs et les compagnies de chemin de fer, entre la sécurité ferroviaire et le droit à la vie privée des citoyens canadiens. Après d'énormes consultations, je crois que nous avons réussi à trouver cet équilibre.

Il est certainement possible de relever un point pour n'importe quel de ces sujets et de dire que nous aurions pu faire les choses différemment. Vous êtes membre de ce comité et, à ce titre, je vous demande de tenir compte du fait que ce sont des enjeux complexes et que nous avons essayé de trouver un équilibre.

M. Robert Aubin:

C'est bien compris.

Je vais maintenant aborder un autre sujet.

Lorsque le commissaire de la concurrence bloque un projet de coentreprise, comme il l'a fait il y a quelques années, je me sens protégé, comme consommateur. Je me dis que le commissaire de la concurrence avait ses raisons de dire que cette entente n'était pas bonne pour le consommateur. Or, dans le projet de loi C-49, les pouvoirs du commissaire sont relayés par des pouvoirs consultatifs, et le ministre peut y passer outre. Cela m'inquiète.

Pourquoi est-il nécessaire que le ministre puisse passer outre aux recommandations du commissaire de la concurrence?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

C'est parce qu'il faut prendre en considération l'intérêt public. Cependant, je vous assure que le consommateur sera protégé pour ce qui est de la concurrence. L'intention ici est de faire ce que d'autres pays ont fait, notamment les États-Unis, c'est-à-dire ouvrir la porte au concept de coentreprise. Cela présente un énorme intérêt pour les lignes aériennes, non seulement ici, au Canada, mais partout dans le monde. C'est bon également pour le consommateur, car cela peut réduire les prix et simplifier tout le processus de réservation.

Effectivement, il est important de s'occuper de la concurrence, et nous allons continuer de le faire, comme c'est clairement indiqué dans le projet de loi, mais nous allons faire deux autres choses. Premièrement, nous allons prendre en considération l'intérêt public, c'est-à-dire l'intérêt du consommateur, ainsi que l'intérêt des compagnies aériennes, qui doivent concurrencer celles d'autres pays. Deuxièmement, dans la situation actuelle, si le commissaire de la concurrence décide de faire une enquête sur une coentreprise, il peut le faire à n'importe quel moment et sans préavis, et cela ne crée pas un climat qui permette une confiance... [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Garneau. Je suis désolé de vous interrompre, mais beaucoup d'autres membres du Comité ont aussi des questions à poser.

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie de votre présence au Comité ce matin.

Je suis vraiment enchanté de constater que la priorité établie sous votre direction repose sur la notion d'équilibre. Nous voulons réaliser l'équilibre entre la sécurité et la rentabilité des opérations commerciales. Nous sommes vraiment à l'écoute des idées qui nous viennent de tous les secteurs.

L'un des piliers du plan stratégique des transports du gouvernement est l'importance des corridors commerciaux, qui jouent le rôle de catalyseurs, permettant au Canada de saisir les occasions mondiales et d'obtenir de hauts rendements sur la scène internationale. Nous en sommes conscients. Toutefois, j'aimerais aller un peu plus loin, surtout en ce qui concerne la question posée par M. Fraser. Nous voulons avoir un plan discipliné de gestion des infrastructures, tant au niveau du capital d'exploitation… De plus, nous voulons établir une infrastructure plus forte liée au commerce — dans les secteurs ferroviaire, maritime, routier et aérien — qui serait coordonnée et contribuerait au soutien de la compétitivité internationale du Canada et, partant, au commerce et à la prospérité. Il est indubitable que le projet de loi C-49 constitue un élément de tout cela.

Pouvez-vous nous dire de quelle façon, à votre avis, le projet de loi à l'étude s'inscrit dans le plan stratégique d'ensemble, Transports 2030, et se transformera en définitive en un mécanisme qui nous permettra de mieux réaliser la stratégie d'ensemble?

(1010)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je vous remercie de votre question, monsieur Badawey.

Comme je l'ai déjà dit et comme je l'ai souligné dans mon exposé préliminaire, le projet de loi C-49 est une première étape car, comme vous le savez, le plan Transports 2030 que j'ai annoncé il y a près d'un an va bien au-delà des mesures prévues dans le C-49. Les dispositions de ce projet de loi constituent un important premier pas destiné à régler un certain nombre de questions particulièrement importantes. La charte des droits des passagers est attendue depuis longtemps, mais n'a pas fait l'objet de mesures concrètes dans le passé.

En ce qui concerne la modernisation du transport ferroviaire des marchandises, je ne saurais trop insister sur son importance. Nous devons renforcer la sécurité de nos systèmes ferroviaires parce qu'il y a encore beaucoup trop de déraillements.

Comme vous le savez, Transports 2030 comprend cinq thèmes, dont l'expérience des passagers aériens. Le plan aborde également la question de l'écologisation des transports et celle de l'innovation dans ce secteur. Il parle de la sécurité de tous les modes de transport, dont plusieurs ne sont pas mentionnés dans le projet de loi C-49. Il reste encore beaucoup de travail à faire pour réaliser les objectifs de Transports 2030. Il y aura donc d'autres initiatives.

Un petit exemple: les voyageurs aériens nous ont dit que le contrôle de la sécurité aux aéroports prend beaucoup trop de temps. C'est une question à laquelle je pense beaucoup, et qui fait partie de l'expérience des passagers.

On nous a également dit que le Canada a besoin de transports plus verts. C'est un engagement pour notre pays.

Nous prendrons d'autres initiatives à mesure que nous avancerons dans notre mandat.

M. Vance Badawey:

Je voudrais aborder une question que Mme Raitt a évoquée sans avoir le temps d'en parler. Il s'agit des répercussions du projet de loi C-49 sur les chemins de fer d'intérêt local. Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler — et je le sais à cause de mon expérience antérieure — de la difficulté qu'il y a, aussi bien sur le plan opérationnel que du point de vue du capital, à renforcer ces chemins de fer pour qu'ils fassent partie de l'ensemble du système de transport, surtout s'il leur faut travailler de concert avec les chemins de fer des grandes lignes. De quelle façon cette mesure législative ou les règlements ou recommandations qui en découleraient contribueraient-elles au renforcement de nos chemins de fer d'intérêt local?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Parmi ces chemins de fer, une vingtaine relèvent de la réglementation fédérale et une trentaine, de la réglementation provinciale. Ces chemins de fer transportent des produits un peu partout dans le pays. Je crois que leur part totale s'élève à environ 12 %. Nous les avons consultés au stade de l'élaboration du projet de loi C-49 et avons tenu compte de leur point de vue. Ils ne sont assujettis ni aux arrêtés d'interconnexion de longue distance ni aux nouvelles exigences relatives aux données, qui seraient beaucoup trop lourdes pour eux.

Beaucoup des préoccupations soulevées par les associations de courtes lignes concernent les investissements en infrastructure et ne s'inscrivent donc pas dans la portée du projet de loi C-49. Je crois que les chemins de fer d'intérêt local ne disposent pas du financement, du capital et des capacités dont jouissent les compagnies ferroviaires de catégorie I. C'est de cela qu'ils s'inquiètent surtout, mais cette question n'est pas abordée dans le projet de loi C-49.

Par ailleurs, les courtes lignes peuvent demander du financement au Fonds national des corridors commerciaux annoncé en juillet dernier. Toutefois, il est vrai que les projets des chemins de fer d'intérêt local visent davantage à remettre les voies en état qu'à éliminer les goulets d'étranglement. C'est un problème dans leur cas.

Nous examinons cependant la situation des courtes lignes. Nous sommes conscients du fait qu'elles forment un élément important du réseau ferroviaire. Elles ne sont cependant pas mentionnées en particulier dans le projet de loi C-49.

La présidente:

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Bonjour, monsieur le ministre.

Tout d'abord, j'espère que vous-même et vos collaborateurs avez réussi à bien comprendre ce que nous ont dit les différents témoins qui, invariablement, ont parlé d'une étape majeure. Nous réalisons ici des choses que certains attendent depuis très, très longtemps. Tous les témoins ont ajouté qu'ils aimeraient voir améliorer certains aspects, de sorte que j'estime que nous avons en quelque sorte trouvé un juste équilibre.

Vous en entendrez un peu plus, au moment opportun, sur l'interconnexion de longue distance et sur le point de correspondance le plus proche par opposition au point le plus compétitif. Nous entendrons parler de l'exclusion du soja du revenu admissible maximal, de la propriété des données recueillies par les systèmes d'enregistreurs audio-vidéo, de l'actualité des données et du temps qu'il faut pour que tout le monde puisse fournir les données nécessaires et faire preuve de la transparence voulue. Vous entendrez parler de tout cela plus tard.

En ce qui concerne la charte des droits des passagers aériens, j'ai passé beaucoup de temps dans des avions pendant que je faisais la navette entre Ottawa et la circonscription de Fleetwood—Port Kells, en Colombie-Britannique. Que je reste en attente sur une aire de trafic ou dans l'habitacle d'une fusée, il m'est indifférent d'avoir un peu de retard pourvu que je sois en sécurité. De toute évidence, il y a là un équilibre à trouver, mais, en dépit du fait que les compagnies aériennes ont beaucoup retenu l'attention, il ne faut pas perdre de vue que des retards sont causés lorsque les équipes au sol ne sont pas disponibles à un aéroport. Ce n'est pas un problème de sécurité; c'est plutôt un petit problème opérationnel.

Je m'interroge sur un point. Si on considère l'expérience globale des passagers et qu'on se demande si l'insistance sur la responsabilité des compagnies aériennes est équitable et équilibrée, compte tenu du fait que certains des autres intervenants contribuent — pas nécessairement du point de vue de la sécurité, des conditions météo ou des cas de force majeure, mais simplement quand des choses n'ont pas bien fonctionné — aux retards et aux problèmes que connaissent les voyageurs aériens, est-il possible d'inclure tous ces éléments dans l'équation?

(1015)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Au chapitre de la charte des droits des passagers, mon but est certainement de régler les situations qui relèvent de la responsabilité des compagnies aériennes. Vous avez donné un exemple et j'en ai cité quelques autres dans ma réponse à la question de Mme Raitt: météo, problèmes de contrôle de la circulation aérienne, alertes de sécurité, ralentissement de la manutention des bagages, difficultés d'embarquement des choses à mettre dans l'avion pour qu'il puisse partir à temps, etc. Ce sont tous des facteurs qui seront abordés dans les consultations de l'OTC sur la charte des droits. Encore une fois, c'est une question d'équilibre, si je peux utiliser ce mot. L'objectif est d'aboutir à un système qui protège clairement les droits des passagers tout en étant équitable envers les compagnies aériennes. Nous ne cherchons pas à nous en prendre à elles. Nous voulons simplement faire respecter les droits des passagers. Si, après que vous avez acheté un billet d'avion, la compagnie aérienne prend une décision qui vous empêche de prendre le vol en cause, vous devez être indemnisé.

M. Ken Hardie:

Compris.

Nous avons entendu différents témoignages. Cette semaine, le temps a vraiment filé. Nous avons consacré 10 heures par jour à l'audition de témoins, mais nous n'avons pas vu le temps passer tant les témoignages étaient intéressants.

Nous comprenons qu'il est essentiel pour l'économie de pouvoir expédier des marchandises. Nos expéditeurs jouent un très important rôle de catalyseurs qui favorise la richesse et le bien-être du Canada. En même temps, le système de transport est un élément essentiel qui permet à beaucoup de choses de se produire. Tout le monde semble convenir que chaque partie — les expéditeurs et le système de transport — doit être saine. Tout le monde est d'accord sur ce point, mais des tensions se manifestent quand chacun cherche à défendre ses propres intérêts. Il incombe alors au gouvernement de jouer constamment le rôle d'arbitre afin d'essayer de réaliser l'équilibre. Est-il possible, en prévision de 2030 et de tout le reste, d'envisager la possibilité de susciter un nouvel esprit de collaboration entre les parties afin d'éviter que chacun s'occupe uniquement de ses propres intérêts?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

C'est un point intéressant.

Je dois signaler que certains expéditeurs ont avec les chemins de fer des ententes contractuelles dont les deux parties sont parfaitement satisfaites. Nous essayons de rendre le système aussi efficace que possible. Certains diront que nous n'avons pas réussi à le faire dans les 150 dernières années. L'histoire joue un grand rôle à cet égard. Notre gouvernement essaie de mieux faire les choses après avoir procédé à d'importantes consultations.

Les expéditeurs vous diront peut-être qu'ils sont satisfaits de la situation actuelle, mais la situation serait encore meilleure si nous pouvions agir. Vous entendrez la même chose de la part des chemins de fer. Je crois que ce projet de loi réalise un certain équilibre qui sera en général à l'avantage des expéditeurs et des chemins de fer. Nous avons vraiment beaucoup réfléchi à la situation avant de parvenir à des recommandations particulières.

Il aurait été merveilleux de ne pas avoir à invoquer des mesures telles que l'arbitrage de l'offre finale, à conclure des accords sur les niveaux de service ou à imposer des pénalités réciproques. Ces mesures sont en place, mais nous espérons qu'elles ne serviront pas et qu'elles n'existent que pour garantir l'équité du système pour les deux parties.

(1020)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre.

Je regrette, monsieur Hardie, mais votre temps de parole est écoulé.

Monsieur Chong.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci, monsieur le ministre, de comparaître devant le Comité.

Monsieur le ministre, je crois que nous convenons tous que des résultats très positifs ont découlé de la privatisation d'Air Canada dans les années 1980 et des Chemins de fer nationaux du Canada dans les années 1990, de même que de la déréglementation de certaines parties du système de transport qui a permis aux forces du marché de jouer un plus grand rôle dans le système. Ces mesures ont été avantageuses pour les consommateurs et les clients ainsi que pour les entreprises.

Nous ne comprenons donc pas pourquoi, dans le projet de loi C-49, le gouvernement n'a pas avancé dans cette direction en ce qui concerne le transport du grain. Le secteur de la manutention du grain est en crise perpétuelle. Cela n'est pas récent. Nous avons eu une crise en 2013-2014 sous l'ancien gouvernement conservateur. Nous en avons eu une en 2001 sous un ancien gouvernement libéral. La crise ne fera qu'empirer. En fait, d'après les projections, le volume de céréales et d'oléagineux produits au Canada continuera d'augmenter par suite des progrès scientifiques et techniques réalisés dans le domaine agricole.

Tant le rapport de juin 2001, commandé par un gouvernement libéral, que le rapport de février 2016 commandé par un gouvernement conservateur recommandaient de s'acheminer vers un système commercial de manutention du grain et d'éliminer progressivement le revenu admissible maximal.

Pouvez-vous dire au Comité pourquoi le gouvernement n'a pas donné suite à ces recommandations dans le projet de loi à l'étude? Les deux rapports recommandaient d'agir en ce sens. Nous avons connu plusieurs crises dans le secteur de la manutention du grain au cours des deux dernières décennies, et les choses ne feront qu'empirer à l'avenir à mesure que la production continuera d'augmenter.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

J'espère que la production augmentera effectivement dans les années à venir. La réponse la plus simple à votre question, c'est qu'il s'agit d'une affaire très complexe. Je vous rappelle que nous avons des taux de transport de grains qui comptent parmi les plus bas du monde. Cela témoigne de l'efficacité de nos chemins de fer.

Je peux vous citer de nombreuses sources qui ont préconisé de ne pas toucher au RAM dans ce projet de loi. Nous l'avons fait parce que nous sommes conscients du besoin d'encourager les chemins de fer à investir davantage. Les compagnies ferroviaires doivent constamment moderniser et remplacer leur matériel roulant pour être en mesure d'acheminer les marchandises vers les ports du pays. Nous avons donc apporté des modifications au programme du RAM. Certains expéditeurs ont dit préférer que le programme reste tel quel et, comme vous l'avez signalé, d'autres voudraient l'éliminer complètement. C'est une affaire complexe. Nous avons essayé d'établir un juste équilibre.

Je voudrais dire enfin que je conviens avec vous que la privatisation d'Air Canada et du CN était une très bonne idée et une mesure très positive. Nous avons presque atteint l'objectif à 100 %. Il reste encore quelques vestiges de contrôle gouvernemental, mais nous avons généralement progressé d'une façon très positive grâce aux décisions prises.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Je vous remercie de votre réponse, monsieur le ministre, mais je dois vous dire avec respect qu'à mon avis, le meilleur encouragement à l'investissement que vous puissiez donner à l'industrie pour qu'elle augmente sa capacité, surtout dans les périodes de pointe où il faut expédier le grain vers les ports de mer, c'est de passer à un système dans lequel les forces du marché jouent un plus grand rôle. Je crois que c'est là que réside la plus importante lacune du projet de loi. Chaque fois que nous aurons une situation de crise, nous devrons repenser au fait que les producteurs de grains de l'Ouest n'arrivent pas à expédier leur récolte aux ports lorsqu'ils en ont besoin. C'est vraiment le plus grand défaut du projet de loi.

Je vous félicite pour les autres initiatives que vous avez prises dans cette mesure législative, mais c'est certainement là un problème qui n'a rien de récent. Il était présent pendant une bonne partie des deux dernières décennies. Nous disposons maintenant de deux rapports, l'un commandé par un gouvernement conservateur et l'autre par un gouvernement libéral, qui aboutissent tous deux à la conclusion que le gouvernement devrait abolir le revenu admissible maximal et passer progressivement à une base commerciale pour régler ce problème fondamental.

Vous savez, le rapport de 2001 dit, je cite, « l'incapacité d'adopter assez rapidement un système qui permettrait aux forces du marché d'agir » a provoqué une crise dans l'industrie céréalière qui n'arrivait pas à expédier son grain. Le rapport auquel a participé David Emerson en février de l'année dernière avait abouti à la même conclusion. Nous connaissons la racine du problème, et le projet de loi C-49 ne s'y attaque pas.

Merci, madame la présidente.

(1025)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Je devrais peut-être rappeler à ceux qui ne le savent pas que le transport des grains n'est pas soumis en totalité au programme du revenu admissible maximal.

Je tiens à remercier le gouvernement précédent, et particulièrement l'ancien ministre des Transports, qui est présent ici, d'avoir commandé le rapport Emerson. Nous croyons que ce rapport porte des faits très utiles à l'attention du gouvernement.

Encore une fois, au sujet du RAM, le programme a été mis en place très particulièrement pour le grain. Si on considère la façon dont le transport du grain s'est fait dans les trois dernières années depuis la situation vraiment désastreuse de 2013 et 2014, on se rend compte, je crois, que ce transport s'est fait d'une manière efficace. J'étais très fier de la façon dont le CN et le CP ont transporté le grain l'année dernière, qui n'était pas une année record, mais qui n'en était pas très loin. Nous croyons que, dans l'ensemble, les dispositions mises en place continueront à assurer un transport efficace des grains à destination des ports d'exportation. Nous sommes convaincus d'avoir atteint un juste équilibre, même avec le RAM.

La présidente:

Le temps de parole est écoulé.

Pour la gouverne du Comité, nous venons d'être informés — merci, madame Raitt — que M. Arnold Chan, député de Scarborough, est décédé. C'était un parlementaire que nous respections et appréciions beaucoup. C'est avec une grande tristesse que je vous fais part de cette nouvelle.

Reprenons courage. Je suis sûre que nous voudrons tous exprimer nos condoléances à sa femme et aux membres de sa famille.

Très bien. Comme parlementaires, nous devons nous remettre au travail.

Monsieur Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci, monsieur le ministre, de votre présence et de vos réponses à nos questions.

Vous avez mentionné à plusieurs reprises que la sécurité ferroviaire est votre première priorité. Je voudrais vous faire part d'une préoccupation avant de poser mes questions. En 1979, Mississauga a connu l'une des pires catastrophes ferroviaires de l'Amérique du Nord. En fait, je crois qu'elle avait occasionné la plus importante évacuation ordonnée en temps de paix jusqu'aux événements survenus en 2005 à la Nouvelle-Orléans. Aujourd'hui, Mississauga est un endroit très différent. Tous les jours, des marchandises passent par chez nous et continuent dans la circonscription de ma collègue Lisa Raitt. Je crains, s'il y a un autre grand accident qu'avec la population actuelle de Mississauga, ce soit une énorme catastrophe.

J'aimerais savoir ce que Transports Canada a fait pour combattre le problème de la fatigue dans le secteur ferroviaire.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Merci, monsieur Sikand.

Le problème de la fatigue existe non seulement dans les chemins de fer, mais aussi dans les transports aériens et maritimes. Nous l'étudions actuellement dans le cas des mécaniciens et des chefs de train. Nous le faisons parce que nous croyons que la fatigue est un facteur à considérer s'il faut améliorer la sécurité d'une façon générale. Nous sommes actuellement en train d'évaluer le problème.

Nous avons récemment publié dans la partie I de la Gazette du Canada un projet de règlement sur les jours de travail et la fatigue des pilotes. Nous comptons faire la même chose pour le secteur ferroviaire.

Cela dit, nous prenons d'autres mesures et faisons un examen de la Loi sur la sécurité ferroviaire. Nous avons pris un certain nombre d'initiatives depuis l'accident de Lac-Mégantic qui, bien sûr, a été vraiment catastrophique et a imposé de prendre de nombreuses mesures correctives. Nous examinons actuellement le problème de la fatigue dans le secteur ferroviaire.

(1030)

M. Gagan Sikand:

Nous avons entendu beaucoup témoignages concernant les enregistreurs audio-vidéo. De quelle façon pensez-vous que ces appareils contribueront à renforcer la sécurité?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je crois très fermement que la présence d'un enregistreur audio-vidéo à bord des locomotives contribuera à la sécurité. Comme vous le savez, le Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada essaie depuis des années de convaincre Transports Canada et le gouvernement fédéral de la nécessité absolue de ces enregistreurs. Ainsi, le Bureau pourra pour le moins disposer des renseignements critiques nécessaires s'il décide d'ouvrir une enquête sur un incident ou un accident.

Le Bureau de la sécurité des transports n'enquête pas toujours sur tous les accidents. Il est donc important pour nous, à Transports Canada, de disposer de renseignements pour le cas où nous déciderions de le faire nous-mêmes. Nous préconisons en même temps une utilisation proactive des renseignements recueillis par ces enregistreurs, dans des conditions strictement contrôlées, afin d'améliorer la sécurité en général. Si nous avons des préoccupations au sujet de pratiques pouvant compromettre la sécurité, nous voulons avoir la possibilité d'agir.

Je ne saurais pas vous dire à quel point je trouve que la sécurité ferroviaire est importante. Lorsque nous parlons de convois pouvant atteindre dans certains cas trois kilomètres de longueur, qui transportent des milliers de tonnes de marchandises, nous devons envisager la possibilité d'incidents dangereux ou catastrophiques et prendre toutes les mesures possibles pour les éviter. Toutefois, nous le ferons en veillant au respect du droit à la vie privée.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Compte tenu de ce que vous venez de dire, croyez-vous que des mesures adéquates sont prises pour répondre aux préoccupations concernant la protection de la vie privée?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Oui. Nous parlons dans le projet de loi de la nécessité de tenir compte de ces préoccupations, mais, comme vous le savez, le C-49 déclenchera un processus qui permettra d'établir des règlements concernant les enregistreurs audio-vidéo et précisera les facteurs à considérer pour protéger la vie privée. Ainsi, seules certaines personnes auront accès aux données, et il faudra tenir des dossiers sur tous les cas d'accès. Des mesures de cette nature permettront d'assurer le respect de la vie privée.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Je vous remercie.

La présidente:

Monsieur Godin. [Français]

M. Joël Godin (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie d'être présent ce matin et de vous prêter à cet exercice.

Nous avons tous la volonté d'établir des lois qui vont améliorer le quotidien des Canadiens et des Canadiennes. Je pense que telle est votre intention par l'entremise du projet de loi C-49.

Je vais répéter l'expression employée plus tôt par mon collègue du NPD et dire que, selon ce que je comprends, ce projet de loi comporte une intention philosophique. Pour ma part, j'aimerais qu'on aille plus loin et qu'on instaure des mesures plus concrètes.

Vous voulez mettre en vigueur une loi faisant en sorte que l'Office des transports du Canada rédige une charte des droits des passagers. Je trouve que vous retardez ainsi le processus. En effet, la situation pourrait déjà être décrite dans la loi. Je trouve que le projet de loi est très vaste. J'ai l'impression qu'on est en train de gagner du temps.

Si ce projet de loi est adopté par la Chambre des communes, j'aimerais que les Canadiens et les Canadiennes aient l'impression qu'on a enfin amélioré leur qualité de vie. Or ce n'est pas ce que je perçois à l'égard de ce projet de loi.

(1035)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

D'abord, je ne vais pas m'attarder sur le fait que votre gouvernement n'a rien fait à ce sujet pendant 10 ans.

Ensuite, vous n'avez peut-être pas compris que nous avions opté pour l'approche actuelle afin de pouvoir disposer à l'avenir de la flexibilité nécessaire pour modifier la charte au besoin. Si cette charte est mise en vigueur par voie de réglementation, cela évitera qu'on doive retourner à la Chambre pour modifier une loi, ce qui est beaucoup plus onéreux, comme vous le savez. Le but est donc de disposer de cette flexibilité.

Je voudrais aussi ajouter que les gens de l'Office des transports du Canada sont habitués de traiter les plaintes des passagers. C'est son mandat. Ces gens connaissent le milieu. C'est l'organisation qui est la mieux placée pour établir cette charte des droits des passagers.

M. Joël Godin:

Monsieur le ministre, si vous considérez que l'Office des transports du Canada est le mieux placé pour assumer cette responsabilité, pourquoi devrait-on vous garder comme ministre?

Je sais que l'actuel ministre des Transports, en l'occurrence l'honorable Marc Garneau, a de bonnes intentions. Cependant, dans le projet de loi, vous accordez au ministre des Transports un pouvoir discrétionnaire qui lui permettra d'éviter de retourner devant la Chambre des communes pour faire valider d'éventuelles modifications.

Comment les Canadiens et les Canadiennes doivent-ils interpréter cela?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Ils doivent en comprendre que leur ministre des Transports assume ses responsabilités.

M. Joël Godin:

Vous le faites présentement, en effet. Cependant, monsieur le ministre, vous comprendrez que les lois sont au-dessus des individus. C'est un cadre général dont les balises permettent quotidiennement d'appliquer des règles pour qu'il n'y ait pas de privilèges, pour que ce soit très impartial et pour que l'intention de la loi en vigueur soit toujours respectée. Or, qu'est-ce qui peut me rassurer à cet égard?

Je vous ai dit plus tôt que je faisais confiance au ministre actuel, mais comme vous le savez, les ministres ne sont pas immuables.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je ne peux pas l'affirmer avec une entière certitude, mais je pense que Transports Canada est le ministère dont la responsabilité est la plus grande pour ce qui est de la mise en vigueur de règlements. Notre ministère est très technique. La réglementation en matière de transports est complexe. À Transports Canada, nous avons l'habitude de ces processus.

Je crois que le projet de loi C-49 exprime ce que nous voulons faire tout en mandatant l'Office des transports du Canada pour la responsabilité que j'ai mentionnée. L'an prochain, quand nous présenterons cette charte des droits des passagers, je crois que la majorité des Canadiens seront d'accord pour dire qu'elle reflète l'intention du projet de loi C-49. Je suis confiant à ce sujet et je vais m'assurer de faire le nécessaire, étant donné que notre ministère aura le dernier mot quant à ce qui sera proposé.

M. Joël Godin:

Monsieur le ministre, selon la lecture que j'en fais, le projet de loi C-49 n'a pas assez de mordant et ne fait que jeter de la poudre aux yeux. Je vais vous présenter en rafale trois éléments que je retirerais de ce projet de loi.

Premièrement, c'est l'Office des transports du Canada qui établira les règles en ce qui concerne la charte des passagers. On rédige un projet de loi et il y a urgence d'agir, mais on va donner à l'Office la responsabilité d'écrire le règlement.

Deuxièmement, on met des balises en ce qui concerne les coentreprises en haussant à 49 % le pourcentage de propriété étrangère, mais c'est le ministre qui aura le pouvoir de superviser et d'autoriser cela. Alors, à quoi servira la loi une fois adoptée?

Troisièmement, les compagnies de chemin de fer devront fournir sur Internet de l'information sur leurs lignes qui sont en fonction et sur celles qu'elles cessent d'utiliser. Quel est le gain pour les Canadiens et les Canadiennes?

Avec le plus grand respect que je vous dois, monsieur le ministre, selon moi, ce projet de loi est vide, il ne fait que jeter de la poudre aux yeux.

Que me répondez-vous là-dessus?

(1040)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Ce projet de loi va accomplir beaucoup de choses qui auraient dû être accomplies il y a longtemps.

À la question très générale qui cherche à savoir si tout devrait être prévu dans le projet de loi ou s'il ne devrait jamais y avoir de discrétion ministérielle pour certaines décisions, je réponds que beaucoup de ministres ont une telle discrétion dans certains cas. Il y a une raison à cela et c'est quelque chose d'établi depuis très longtemps. Les Canadiens acceptent le fait qu'il est nécessaire d'avoir des lois et des règlements, mais que, dans certains cas, une discrétion ministérielle est acceptable. C'est le cas pour certaines mesures que nous avons mises dans ce projet de loi.

M. Joël Godin:

Monsieur le ministre, vous avez dit qu'il ne s'était pas fait grand-chose dans ce domaine depuis 10 ans. Cela dit, la discrétion du gouvernement actuel me rend un peu plus frileux et nerveux.

Pouvez-vous me dire en rafale ce qu'il y a, concrètement, dans ce projet de loi? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Monsieur Godin, vous n'avez que 15 secondes pour poser la question, et il ne restera pas de temps pour une réponse. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie de vous être prêté à cet exercice. Sachez que cette démarche est constructive et que c'est toujours dans l'intérêt des Canadiens et des Canadiennes. Il faut s'élever au-dessus de la partisanerie politique. Je vous remercie beaucoup.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Madame Moore. [Français]

Mme Christine Moore (Abitibi—Témiscamingue, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur Garneau, vous êtes venu à Rouyn-Noranda dernièrement, où vous avez fait une annonce concernant l'aéroport. Avec l'agrandissement de l'aéroport, les choses devraient s'arranger, mais présentement, seule Air Canada dessert les vols jusqu'à Montréal, de sorte qu'il n'y a pas de concurrence et que les prix sont très élevés. Cela peut facilement me coûter 1 200 $ pour faire un aller-retour entre Rouyn-Noranda et Ottawa, alors qu'à vol d'oiseau la distance entre les deux est de moins de 500 kilomètres. On voit que l'absence de saine concurrence a des répercussions énormes sur les prix.

Pourtant, dans votre projet de loi C-49, vous vous attribuez le pouvoir d'approuver des accords de coentreprise entre compagnies aériennes même si le commissaire de la concurrence estime que l'entente affaiblira la concurrence et augmentera les frais des passagers.

Encore une fois, les profits d'Air Canada semblent passer avant les droits des consommateurs. Après avoir déposé un projet de loi qui a sacrifié l'emploi de 2 600 travailleurs au Québec, vous revenez à la charge avec un projet de loi qui retire des pouvoirs au commissaire de la concurrence.

De plus, selon le registre du Commissariat au lobbying du Canada, Air Canada est entrée en contact à plusieurs reprises avec votre gouvernement pour discuter du cadre législatif régissant les coentreprises aériennes internationales.

En somme, on a l'impression qu'Air Canada pousse votre gouvernement à affaiblir les pouvoirs du commissaire de la concurrence et les droits des passagers. Les lobbyistes d'Air Canada doivent être fiers de pouvoir compter sur votre appui.

J'aimerais que vous me disiez en quoi supprimer les pouvoirs du commissaire de la concurrence va rendre service aux usagers du transport aérien.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Merci de la question.

Vous avez parlé de concurrence quant au trajet entre Montréal et Rouyn-Noranda. Or la décision que nous avons prise et qui consiste à faire passer le taux de propriété étrangère de 25 % à 49 % va, je l'espère, être profitable en matière de concurrence et susciter la création de nouvelles lignes aériennes qui vont offrir des services dans des endroits moins bien desservis. C'est profitable à la concurrence.

En ce qui a trait à la question des coentreprises, vos propos donnaient à penser que cela se limitait à Air Canada. Vous avez aussi donné l'impression que nous faisions fi du Bureau de la concurrence, or ce n'est pas du tout le cas. Il est clairement expliqué que nous allons prendre en considération l'intérêt public, ce qui est bon pour les consommateurs, soit dit en passant. C'est la raison principale pour laquelle nous le faisons.

Par ailleurs, dans l'avenir, le ministre des Transports va toujours travailler étroitement avec le commissaire de la concurrence pour s'assurer qu'il n'y a pas d'effet important sur la concurrence. C'est clairement expliqué dans le projet de loi et c'est ce que nous allons faire. Nous souhaitons que les lignes aériennes canadiennes soient prospères et concurrentielles par rapport à celles d'autres pays. En fait, ce mécanisme existe dans plusieurs pays. Nous nous mettons simplement à jour dans ce domaine, et ce, parce que c'est profitable au Canada. Cela dit, la concurrence ne sera pas négligée.

(1045)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Garneau. Je regrette, madame Moore, mais ce n'était qu'un tour à trois minutes.

La parole est maintenant à Mme Raitt

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur le ministre, comme je l'ai dit, je voudrais parler un peu des chemins de fer d'intérêt local. Je suis heureuse que mon collègue, M. Badawey, ait soulevé la même question. Je voudrais commencer par citer un extrait du témoignage de lundi dernier de David Emerson, que je juge important parce qu'il a présidé la commission qui a examiné la loi. Il a dit, en réponse à une question de M. Brassard, que le manque de financement de ces chemins de fer « est un problème très grave » ajoutant que s'il n'était pas réglé sans tarder, « tout le monde sera forcé de recourir au transport par camion ou alors on devra se tourner vers une solution tardive qui se révélera inefficace ».

Monsieur Murad Al-Katib, qui était également présent, a abondé dans le même sens. Parlant des chemins de fer d'intérêt local, il a dit: « C'est un élément essentiel à l'interconnectivité. Dans le cadre du processus d'intégration, les entreprises ferroviaires vont se tourner vers les lignes principales. La densification des lignes tributaires est essentielle au développement économique rural au Canada. »

M. Brassard voulait savoir si le gouvernement comptait prendre des mesures au sujet de ces chemins de fer. Je note que vous avez dit, dans votre exposé préliminaire, que le projet de loi C-49 est une première étape. Pouvons-nous nous attendre de votre part à une série de mesures de réforme axées sur la sous-capitalisation des chemins de fer d'intérêt local ou sur un plan ferroviaire national dans les prochaines années?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je vous remercie de votre question. Je ne répéterai pas ce que j'ai déjà dit. J'ai répondu à une question précise concernant ces chemins de fer et j'ai donné les explications nécessaires. Oui, bien sûr, nous examinons la situation. Dans ce cas, le problème réside dans l'infrastructure. Ces chemins de fer n'ont pas les moyens dont disposent les compagnies de catégorie I, en dépit du fait qu'ils constituent une part importante — 12 % d'après mes calculs — du système ferroviaire et que certains d'entre eux sont assujettis à la réglementation fédérale.

J'ai énormément de respect pour David Emerson. Je peux vous dire que j'ai déjà travaillé pour lui avant d'entrer en politique. J'ai le plus grand respect pour lui. Il a consacré beaucoup de temps, avec quatre autres, pour produire un document de très grande qualité, l'examen de la Loi sur les transports au Canada. Encore une fois, merci de l'avoir fait.

Cela dit, ce document est accompagné de 60 recommandations couvrant le vaste domaine de la Loi. C'est un document qui sert de guide et dont nous pouvons nous inspirer. Ce n'est cependant pas une politique en soi. À titre de gouvernement, nous devons prendre les décisions concernant les politiques à mettre en oeuvre. Je peux vous dire que c'est un apport très important et que je suis au courant du point de vue de David sur les chemins de fer d'intérêt local. Nous examinons actuellement cette question. Nous verrons bien ce qui sortira de cet examen.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

M. Emerson a également abordé la question de la gouvernance aux ports et aux aéroports. J'ai aussi trouvé intéressantes ces parties du rapport.

En réponse à une question que M. Fraser avait posée à un autre témoin, il s'est interrogé sur l'opportunité de permettre aux ports et aux aéroports d'avoir accès à la Banque de l'infrastructure. Je crois que ce qu'il a dit est important: « La gouvernance est inadéquate… en ce sens qu'elle permet aux autorités portuaires ou aéroportuaires de se lancer dans des secteurs où ils deviennent des concurrents de leurs propres locataires. Donc, pour être franc, je ne leur donnerais pas accès à des fonds supplémentaires jusqu'à ce que tous ces problèmes aient été corrigés. »

Avez-vous songé à des moyens de corriger les problèmes de gouvernance aux ports et aux aéroports? Avons-nous vraiment des problèmes?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je ne parlerai pas de moyens de « corriger les problèmes ». Je dirai que, dans le cadre de la stratégie Transports 2030, nous examinons tous les aspects liés au transport.

Je n'écarte pas la possibilité d'examiner certains éléments de la gouvernance de nos ports et aéroports. Cela dit, j'estime que, dans l'ensemble, ils fonctionnent très bien. Il est toujours possible d'améliorer les choses. Nous sommes donc toujours disposés à envisager des moyens de mieux faire.

(1050)

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

J'ai une dernière question.

J'ai une petite histoire à raconter au sujet des caméras dans les locomotives. Au cours de ma première journée dans le poste que vous occupez maintenant — et que j'ai eu l'honneur d'occuper pendant un certain temps —, on m'a dit que je devais assister à une réunion urgente avec la principale compagnie ferroviaire du pays, ce que j'ai fait. Monsieur le ministre, le tout premier sujet abordé concernait l'installation de ces caméras dans la cabine des locomotives. C'est une question à laquelle j'ai consacré une bonne part de mon temps et de mon énergie dans les deux dernières années. Toutefois, il y a un point particulier qui m'a toujours troublée et sur lequel le projet de loi C-49 n'est pas assez clair. Il s'agit de l'utilisation de l'information obtenue à des fins autres que la gestion de la sécurité.

Votre discours était très clair. Vous avez affirmé très nettement que ces enregistreurs n'avaient pas d'autre but que de renforcer la sécurité et que leurs données ne serviraient qu'à une gestion proactive de la sécurité. Cette semaine, dans leurs témoignages, les chemins de fer et les responsables des transports ont indiqué que les enregistrements pourraient également servir à des fins disciplinaires, ce que je trouve inquiétant.

Pouvez-vous nous dire si nous permettrons ou non au CN, au CP et aux autres compagnies ferroviaires qui placeront des caméras dans les cabines de s'en servir à des fins disciplinaires non liées à la sécurité?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

L'objet de la réglementation relative aux enregistreurs audio-vidéo est non pas de discipliner les employés, mais de renforcer la sécurité. Je crois avoir être très clair à cet égard. C'est un moyen important d'augmenter la sécurité.

Le Bureau de la sécurité des transports tient à ces mesures. Transports Canada aimerait avoir accès à ces données dans les cas où le Bureau n'enquête pas sur certains accidents ou incidents. Dans des circonstances strictement définies liées à la gestion de la sécurité, lorsque nous nous inquiétons de l'existence possible de pratiques dangereuses, nous pourrions accéder à ces données dans des conditions contrôlées, avec sélection aléatoire et protection du droit à la vie privée. Cela se ferait donc sous un contrôle très strict.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Garneau.

Je vais maintenant donner la parole à M. Graham. Je sais que vous aviez des relations très étroites avec votre collègue, Arnold Chan, à la direction de la Chambre. Si vous souhaitez prendre un moment pour parler de lui, je crois que le Comité en serait heureux.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Oui, je veux bien prendre un moment pour mentionner l'énorme contribution de mon cher ami, notre collègue Arnold Chan.

Je sais qu'il voudrait nous voir concentrer nos efforts sur notre travail pour avancer vers les objectifs que nous poursuivons. Lorsque je lui ai rendu visite, il y a quelques jours, il s'inquiétait non de lui-même, mais de ce que chacun de nous faisait. Il savait quel était son sort et voulait être sûr que nous resterions tous attelés à la tâche. Il voulait savoir ce qui se passait ici, discuter de notre travail au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, où nous siégions ensemble, et connaître les derniers potins de la Colline.

Il aimait cet endroit. C'était sa vie. Bien sûr, toujours fidèle à lui-même, il s'est confondu en excuses, malgré sa respiration difficile, parce qu'il ne pensait pas pouvoir se joindre à nous au caucus du lendemain ou à la Chambre, cet automne.

Je voudrais, en notre nom à tous, adresser mes condoléances les plus sincères à sa femme Jean et à ses trois fils. Nous sommes de tout coeur avec eux en ce moment difficile.

Arnold, nous n’oublierons pas de laisser parler notre coeur et d'utiliser notre tête et, en le faisant, nous penserons toujours à toi.

La présidente:

J'espère que le Comité voudra bien observer un moment de silence.

[On observe un moment de silence.]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Graham. Merci beaucoup à tous. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur le ministre Garneau, je vous remercie de faire ce pas significatif pour la modernisation de nos règles sur les transports. Selon les propos des témoins, le projet de loi C-49 est très positif dans l'ensemble, mais il y a quelques points que j'aimerais clarifier avec vous.

Dans la circonscription de Laurentides—Labelle, que vous connaissez bien, il y a l'Aéroport international de Mont-Tremblant, situé à La Macaza. Le service commercial est saisonnier et n'est pas très fréquent. Il y a déjà des problèmes relativement aux services de l'ASFC, qui sont offerts selon une entente de recouvrement des coûts. Cela a effectivement tué les vols internationaux, car ces coûts s'élèvent à plus de 1 000 $ par vol international arrivant.

Les frais de l'ACSTA sont actuellement égaux à ceux des autres aéroports à coût fixe par passager. Pouvez-vous nous assurer que les taux de recouvrement proposés pour l'ACSTA ne nuiront pas à des petits aéroports comme celui de La Macaza ni à des petits aéroports essentiels à la survie dans le Grand Nord?

(1055)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Merci de votre question, monsieur Graham.

Quand j'étais dans l'opposition, j'ai pris connaissance du dossier de l'Aéroport international de Mont-Tremblant. À cette époque, ce qui était en cause avait trait à la disponibilité des services de l'ASFC concernant les vols arrivants, généralement nolisés et ayant à leur bord des passagers américains.

Le projet de loi C-49 traite de l'augmentation à frais remboursables pour les aéroports qui veulent avoir ce service parce que cela va les aider à prendre de l'expansion. Il y a plusieurs petits aéroports partout au Québec et à d'autres endroits qui n'ont pas ce service et qui voudraient l'avoir, mais qui ne sont pas des aéroports désignés. En fait, c'est disponible depuis un certain temps. Ce qui est nouveau, dans un certain sens, c'est que les grands aéroports, par exemple celui de Toronto, veulent payer pour des ressources additionnelles de l'ACSTA afin d'accélérer le processus de passage à la sécurité.

Ce projet de loi vise à augmenter les services de l'ACSTA pour les aéroports qui décident de le faire. Il ne vise pas à enlever ce qui existe déjà.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Dans un autre ordre d'idées, je vais parler du transport ferroviaire qui, personnellement, m'intéresse beaucoup.

Certains témoins nous ont dit être inquiets du fait que le projet de loi permettrait, dans certains cas, la cessation de services sur des lignes ferroviaires dans un délai de 60 jours. Quelques témoins ont aussi suggéré l'augmentation des droits d'exploitation avec sollicitation comme moyen d'améliorer la concurrence.

L'Office des transports du Canada a déjà le pouvoir de donner des droits d'exploitation avec sollicitation aux autres compagnies, mais jusqu'à maintenant, il n'en a jamais accordé. Est-ce que l'augmentation des droits d'exploitation est une possibilité future?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Le projet de loi C-49 ne traite pas de la fermeture de lignes ferroviaires ou du fait qu'une compagnie de chemin de fer peut, dans un délai de 60 jours, fermer une ligne existante. Cependant, si une ligne était active, la question du niveau de service pourrait alors être soulevée par l'Office des transports du Canada. Dans bien des cas, les lignes que les compagnies de chemin de fer décident de fermer ne sont pas utilisées depuis plusieurs années. Le maintien de ces lignes leur coûte de l'argent. Le projet de loi ne couvre pas cet aspect, mais si une ligne est utilisée activement, c'est certainement dans l'intérêt de nos compagnies de chemin de fer de catégorie 1 de la maintenir, parce que cela leur donne un meilleur accès au commerce du transport.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Espérons qu'on pourra donner l'accès aux compagnies de chemin de fer d'intérêt local.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Parlez-vous des droits de passage?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Cela touche un peu à un élément d'expropriation. Si une compagnie de chemin de fer secondaire reçoit la permission de voyager quand elle le veut sur d'autres lignes principales de compagnies de chemin de fer de catégorie 1, elle utilise ce faisant une ressource qui ne lui appartient pas. C'est quelque chose qui se fait dans certaines circonstances. Par exemple, c'est le cas de VIA Rail, qui roule sur un chemin de fer qui ne lui appartient qu'à 3 %. Cela s'appuie sur une entente avec le chemin de fer concerné. C'est quelque chose qui peut être négocié, mais ce n'est pas automatiquement acquis.

(1100)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une dernière question.[Traduction]

Je voudrais demander quelques précisions au sujet des exemptions relatives à l'interconnexion de longue distance. Je remarque que les chargements de dimensions exceptionnelles — vous pouvez consulter vos collaborateurs à ce sujet — ne sont exemptés que sur les wagons plats. Le transport intermodal n'est exempté que dans le cas des wagons plats. Ce transport se fait ordinairement par wagon-poche, et les chargements lourds aux dimensions exceptionnelles sont souvent pris en charge dans des wagons « mille-pattes » ou d'autres wagons spécialisés. Pourquoi alors la restriction ne s'applique-t-elle qu'aux wagons plats?

Dans le même ordre d'idée, pourquoi les substances isolantes toxiques sont-elles exemptées, mais non d'autres matières spéciales dangereuses ou hautement dangereuses?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je vais laisser mes collaborateurs répondre à la première partie de votre question. Je dois vous féliciter pour votre connaissance détaillée du projet de loi.

Au sujet des marchandises dangereuses, la décision concernait le transport des matières pouvant produire des gaz toxiques. L'exclusion relative à l'interconnexion de longue distance se fonde sur le fait qu'on souhaite minimiser la manutention.

Vous dites qu'il y a d'autres produits dangereux. La décision prise pour le moment vise à limiter les dispositions aux matières pouvant produire des gaz toxiques. C'est une question que nous pouvons certainement examiner, mais, pour le moment, les gaz toxiques constituaient notre principale préoccupation. Nous reconnaissons qu'il y a aussi d'autres substances dangereuses.

Sur certaines des voies les plus achalandées, où la circulation est assez dense, nous voulons minimiser les chances de déversement accidentel de produits pouvant générer des gaz toxiques. Malheureusement, ce sont des choses qui se produisent à l'heure actuelle.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Quant à votre autre question, je vais peut-être demander à…

M. David de Burgh Graham: Mon temps de parole est écoulé.

La présidente:

Une réponse très brève, je vous prie, parce que je ne veux pas enlever du temps aux autres.

Mme Helena Borges (sous-ministre déléguée, ministère des Transports):

La réponse est en fait très simple. Le projet de loi ne traite que des chargements aux dimensions exceptionnelles, sans préciser le type des wagons utilisés. Les dispositions concernant les chargements exceptionnels peuvent s'appliquer à d'autres types de wagons. Il s'agissait simplement de montrer où réside le défi.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

C'est le tour de Mme Moore, mais elle est sortie pour quelques instants. Nous allons donc passer à M. Fraser, puis nous reviendrons plus tard à Mme Moore.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je vous remercie. Je ne pensais pas avoir l'occasion d'obtenir un second tour. C'est une occasion que j'apprécie toujours.

Je voudrais revenir à la question de l'accès des ports à la Banque de l'infrastructure. Dans son témoignage, M. Emerson a dit qu'il faudrait s'occuper de la structure de gouvernance avant de mettre de l'argent à la disposition des ports. Dans une conversation que j'ai eue avec lui après la réunion, il a admis que la participation du secteur privé entraînerait probablement une plus grande responsabilité.

Je suis curieux. Si le secteur privé intervient par l'entremise de la Banque de l'infrastructure et des administrations portuaires, est-ce que cela améliorera la gouvernance ou nous permettra de… Je voudrais surtout être sûr qu'on utilise à bon escient chaque dollar des fonds fédéraux qui servent à développer notre infrastructure portuaire et à permettre que nos produits atteignent les marchés de consommation.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Oui. Comme vous le savez, la Banque de l'infrastructure a une importante composante liée au transport. Nous croyons que, pour le moment, les administrations portuaires canadiennes n'ont pas accès aux fonds de la Banque. Ces administrations qui contrôlent les terminaux d'entrée et de sortie de notre commerce sont extrêmement importantes. Nous voulions simplement leur donner un moyen supplémentaire pour qu'il leur soit possible, dans certains cas où la rentabilité est bien établie, de profiter des capacités disponibles une fois que la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada sera en place.

Nous avons estimé que cela serait bon pour les ports dont l'activité continue à croître. En effet, certains de nos ports prennent encore de l'expansion. Nous voulons les aider à le faire.

M. Sean Fraser:

Nous avons entendu plusieurs témoignages concernant les chemins de fer d'intérêt local. Même s'ils n'étaient pas directement liés à des dispositions précises du projet de loi C-49, nous avons parlé de l'importance économique de ces chemins de fer pour leurs collectivités, qui consistent souvent en petites villes et en localités rurales dans une province qui n'est vraiment desservie que par une infrastructure locale.

J'aimerais savoir si le financement des corridors commerciaux offert par votre ministère peut aider les chemins de fer d'intérêt local à réaliser les travaux dont ils ont besoin pour desservir ces petites collectivités.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Si vous parlez du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux, oui, les chemins de fer d'intérêt local sont admissibles au financement. Comme vous le savez, le premier appel de manifestations d'intérêt provenant de tous les coins du pays a pris fin le 5 septembre. Je sais que des centaines de demandes ont été reçues. J'ai vraiment hâte de les voir.

En toute franchise, je dirai que le problème des chemins de fer d'intérêt local n'est pas tant de… En fait, l'objectif fondamental du Fonds des corridors commerciaux est d'éliminer les goulets d'étranglement. Or, la principale préoccupation de ces chemins de fer est d'entretenir leur infrastructure, ce qui ne correspond pas tout à fait à l'objectif. C'est le problème qui se pose à cet égard. Comme je l'ai dit, Transports Canada examine pour le moment cette question comme une affaire distincte.

(1105)

M. Sean Fraser:

Il y a un certain nombre de points au sujet desquels, comme vous l'avez mentionné, les expéditeurs diront qu'ils sont satisfaits. Il en est de même des compagnies ferroviaires.

La plupart des expéditeurs et quelques producteurs aussi ont souligné qu'ils ont besoin de meilleures données. Si nous devons être en mesure de prendre des décisions rapides, il nous faut des renseignements complets. Si nous devions, mettons, remanier des mesures qui influent sur les données, est-ce que nous risquerions de compromettre le juste équilibre dont vous avez parlé entre les expéditeurs, les compagnies ferroviaires et les producteurs, cet équilibre qui permet de transporter les marchandises efficacement tout en laissant chacun réaliser des bénéfices raisonnables?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Vous soulevez un très bon point. Il est important d'en tenir compte. Il est aussi extrêmement important de disposer de plus de données partagées. Les expéditeurs se sont plaints dans le passé du fait qu'ils ont besoin d'accéder à certaines données des chemins de fer pour être en mesure d'établir les taux de transport. Nous l'admettons. Nous élaborons un processus, comme dans l'interconnexion de grande distance, pour que l'Office des transports du Canada puisse déterminer des taux comparables et accorder des taux compétitifs aux chemins de fer. Pour le faire, nous avons besoin de certains renseignements dont nous ne disposons pas en ce moment. Il nous faut en fait avoir des données tirées des connaissements. Cela est essentiel pour tout le processus.

Toutefois, pour ce qui est de rendre ces données publiques, nous reconnaissons que les opérations des chemins de fer comportent des aspects délicats. Les données seront rendues publiques, mais seulement après avoir été regroupées, de façon à éviter de communiquer des détails liés à la concurrence.

M. Sean Fraser:

Parmi les autres questions que M. Emerson a abordées dans son témoignage, il y a la notion que les transports ne consistent pas en projets ponctuels au Canada. Nous devons constamment rechercher les améliorations. Quelques témoins ont dit qu'un examen périodique obligatoire de la loi serait utile. Croyez-vous qu'un tel examen serait souhaitable, ou bien pensez-vous qu'il est tout aussi efficace de laisser le ministère en prendre l'initiative quand il le juge nécessaire?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je ne crois pas que nous ayons besoin de prévoir un examen périodique dans la loi. Tous les gouvernements ont la responsabilité d'examiner continuellement la situation pour essayer de l'améliorer en cas de lacunes imprévues. Je crois donc que les mécanismes nécessaires sont là. Nous n'avons pas à les prévoir dans la loi.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je vous remercie.

La présidente:

Madame Moore, êtes-vous prête à intervenir ou préférez-vous attendre un peu plus longtemps? [Français]

Mme Christine Moore:

Si c'est possible, j'aimerais poser quelques questions.

Dans votre projet de loi, vous prétendez qu'une charte des droits des passagers protégera les voyageurs contre les abus des compagnies aériennes.

Pourriez-vous nous citer une seule mesure qui détermine le montant précis que la compagnie aérienne devra rembourser aux passagers en cas d'annulation de vol?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Ces montants seront proposés par l'Office des transports du Canada et j'aurai le dernier mot à ce sujet. Toutefois, je peux vous dire que si le droit d'un passager a été violé et que la compagnie aérienne en est responsable, ces montants seront amplement suffisants. Ce n'est pas une chose que les compagnies aériennes voudront faire de façon régulière.

Mme Christine Moore:

Avez-vous une idée de la façon dont les passagers seront mis au courant des mesures qui leur permettront de se prévaloir de ces sommes?

Il arrive régulièrement, lorsque des vols sont annulés, que les responsables tentent un peu n'importe quoi parce que les passagers ne savent pas nécessairement à quoi ils ont droit.

Quelle stratégie avez-vous prévue pour vous assurer que tous les passagers connaîtront la procédure et qu'ils n'auront pas à subir d'interminables formalités administratives pour obtenir compensation?

(1110)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Il est certainement important que les passagers soient au courant. J'ai l'impression que, lorsque cette information sera rendue publique, les passagers suivront cela de près dans les médias. Ils seront donc bien informés.

Mme Christine Moore:

Votre ministère n'a pas prévu de stratégie?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Quand vous achetez un billet, on vous fournit de l'information. Si vous le faites en ligne, en particulier, la première page décrit votre vol, mais il y a environ six pages supplémentaires qui couvrent divers autres points. Vous y trouvez de l'information claire, en français et en anglais, sur la procédure à suivre dans les cas où vos droits n'auraient pas été respectés.

Mme Christine Moore:

Vous n'avez pas prévu de stratégie de communication particulière à ce sujet?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Lorsque nous finaliserons et mettrons en vigueur la charte des droits des passagers, nous mettrons probablement en oeuvre une stratégie de communication, de façon à bien informer les Canadiens. L'information sera ensuite disponible lorsque les gens achèteront leurs billets.

Mme Christine Moore:

D'accord.

Est-ce que votre parti fera preuve d'ouverture si le NPD présente des amendements pour améliorer le projet de loi C-49 et clarifier les mesures de compensation, notamment dans les cas de surréservation, afin de limiter l'expulsion de passagers, par exemple? Pouvons-nous nous attendre à ce que votre gouvernement adopte une approche de collaboration?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

C'est précisément pour cette raison que nous procédons par voie de réglementation. Cela nous permettra de disposer de la souplesse nécessaire pour faire des changements si cela s'avère nécessaire, et ce, sans avoir à les soumettre au Parlement dans le cadre d'un projet de loi. C'est une réglementation qui va décrire la charte des droits des passagers. Si, pour une raison quelconque, nous considérions nécessaire d'apporter plus tard un changement à cette charte, nous disposerions de beaucoup plus de flexibilité pour le faire.

Mme Christine Moore:

Concernant les mesures relatives à la surréservation, avez-vous un plan précis ou est-ce que des règlements à ce sujet vont suivre?

Ce problème est de plus en plus sérieux, surtout dans le cas de destinations au Canada vers lesquelles il y a seulement deux ou trois vols par jour. La surréservation peut entraîner un retard de 12 heures. La période d'attente peut même durer jusqu'au lendemain.

Quel est votre plan concernant la surréservation? Savez-vous quelles mesures vous prendrez ou allez-vous, dans ce cas également, établir un règlement?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Oui, il va s'agir d'un règlement et ce dernier sera très clair. Il va préciser la compensation pour les cas où la surréservation sera imputable à la ligne aérienne. C'est ce que nous disons depuis le début.

Mme Christine Moore:

À l'heure actuelle, vous ne prévoyez qu'une compensation financière. Il n'y a pas de mesures de protection prévues pour les cas où les passagers subissent des complications majeures du fait qu'ils sont obligés de prendre le vol suivant. Je pense, par exemple, à des passagers dont l'expulsion fait en sorte qu'ils ratent des funérailles ou d'autres événements importants.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

C'est exactement pour ces raisons que nous mettons en vigueur une charte des droits des passagers. Celle-ci va très clairement expliquer qu'il y aura une compensation dans de telles situations.

Je devrais peut-être ajouter que la compagnie aérienne aura l'obligation de refaire une réservation pour ces passagers. Un nouveau vol sera prévu pour ces passagers et une compensation leur sera offerte. En outre, la compensation sera importante. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Garneau.

Merci, madame Moore.

À vous, monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Madame la présidente, je dois dire que j'ai trouvé cet exercice très satisfaisant, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, non seulement parce que nous examinons la façon dont le projet de loi C-49 améliorera l'ensemble de la stratégie des transports et Transports 2030, mais aussi parce que nous avons accumulé ces derniers jours des discussions, un dialogue et donc des objectifs que je qualifierai de « résiduels ». Nous avons parlé de la gestion des infrastructures et de la façon dont les recommandations générales de Transports 2030 et l'essor qui en découlera favoriseront l'intégration de notre système de distribution et de logistique ainsi que l'intégration des quatre modes de transport: route, rail, eau et air.

Tandis que nous examinons le rapport Emerson d'un point de vue pragmatique et que nous étudions certaines de ses recommandations qui sont… je ne dirais pas moins importantes. Il faut cependant reconnaître que le rapport Emerson n'admet pas que nous devons maintenant donner une plus grande place à des choses telles que les chemins de fer d'intérêt local. J'ai l'intention aujourd'hui de proposer la production d'un rapport assorti de recommandations. Nous travaillerions tous ensemble comme nous l'avons fait ces derniers jours pour veiller à ce que ces chemins de fer prennent davantage d'importance dans l'intégration d'ensemble des différents modes de transport.

Je veux me concentrer sur une question, monsieur le ministre. Je respecte pleinement les efforts que tous les gouvernements ont déployés dans le passé au sujet de la charte des droits des passagers. Je veux savoir, premièrement, comment la question a évolué. En deuxième lieu, et c'est le plus important — je sais que le NPD avait proposé au cours de la dernière session un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire à ce sujet —, je veux savoir en quoi la charte des droits des passagers proposée maintenant diffère des approches précédentes de l'industrie et des discussions que nous avons eues au cours des précédentes législatures. En quoi cette approche se distingue-t-elle de celles qui ont précédé? De quelle façon sera-t-elle plus pragmatique, plus viable et bien sûr plus avantageuse pour ceux qui importent le plus, c'est-à-dire les clients et les passagers?

(1115)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Merci pour votre question. Je siège au Parlement depuis bientôt neuf ans maintenant et ce n'est pas la première fois en effet que la question d'un régime des droits des passagers a été soulevée. Vous avez mentionné que le NPD avait proposé d'agir en ce sens. Mais ce sont en fait les libéraux qui ont soulevé cette question pour la première fois et Gerry Byrne en était un fervent défenseur.

La grande différence est que nous étions alors dans l'opposition et que le gouvernement de l'époque avait décidé de ne pas retenir notre proposition. En revanche, nous sommes désormais en mesure d'agir en ce sens. C'est la grosse différence et nous estimons qu'il aurait fallu intervenir depuis longtemps. Nous voulons agir, parce que j'ai clairement entendu le message des Canadiens qui souhaitent l'instauration d'un régime des droits des passagers. C'est là la grande différence et c'est la raison pour laquelle nous présentons une loi afin de le mettre en place.

M. Vance Badawey:

Je vais maintenant poursuivre et aborder le préambule dont j'ai parlé un peu plus tôt à propos du régime des droits des passagers et du dialogue qui s'est tissé entre les trois partis au fil du temps, le gouvernement actuel étant pragmatique et ayant décidé d'aller de l'avant avec le projet de loi, comme je l'ai mentionné un peu plus tôt, avec l'intégration des lignes de chemin de fer d'intérêt local, les méthodes de transport, les volets d'exploitation et d'immobilisations de la stratégie. Est-ce votre intention et celle du ministère de prendre en compte la majorité des autres discussions et dialogues que nous avons eus avec l'industrie, avec nos partenaires, avec nos collègues, et de franchir brièvement les prochaines étapes afin de commencer à mettre en oeuvre les autres parties de la stratégie globale Transports 2030?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Brièvement, la réponse est oui. Nous cherchons toujours des façons d'améliorer les transports et vous savez pertinemment — car c'est, je crois un dossier qui vous intéresse particulièrement — que c'est une question très complexe et lorsque nous présentons un projet de loi comme le C-49, qui contient des mesures concrètes, on a tendance à pointer les éléments qui ont été omis. Nous y travaillons. Nous travaillons sur de nombreux dossiers afin de rendre les transports plus sûrs, plus verts, plus innovateurs et aussi efficients que possible sur le plan économique. Nous abordons toutes ces choses. Nous continuons à travailler à Transports Canada et je tiens à remercier l'ensemble de mon personnel. Nous avons plus de 5 000 personnes extrêmement compétentes qui travaillent d'arrache-pied pour faire en sorte que notre système de transport soit le meilleur au monde, ce qui est déjà le cas dans certains domaines.

(1120)

M. Vance Badawey:

Enfin, monsieur le ministre, nous entamons les négociations dans le cadre de l'ALENA. L'AECG est en place. Pensez-vous que le secteur des transports peut désormais favoriser notre commerce international?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

J'ai déjà rencontré à plusieurs reprises Mme Chao, la secrétaire aux Transports des États-Unis, à propos d'enjeux importants touchant les transports. Il est clair que nous sommes les deux plus grands partenaires commerciaux du pays. Chaque jour, environ 30 000 camions et 4 600 wagons traversent la frontière. Nos échanges commerciaux sont énormes et nous devons faire en sorte qu'ils soient les plus efficients possible. Nous devons harmoniser la réglementation de part et d'autre de la frontière afin que rien ne nuise à la fluidité des échanges entre nos deux pays. Nous devons faire en sorte que le processus de contrôle de sécurité soit aussi rapide et aussi efficient que possible.

Ce sont là de grandes priorités pour nos deux pays car nos échanges commerciaux s'élèvent annuellement à 635 milliards de dollars américains. Ces échanges vont se poursuivre. Dans le cadre des négociations de l'ALENA, je dirais que le consensus sur les transports est assez bon.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Raitt.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

C'est encore moi, monsieur le ministre. J'ai l'impression que je suis en conversation avec vous. Cela doit rappeler aux fonctionnaires qui vous entourent les séances d'information qu'ils avaient l'habitude de me présenter.

Je tiens à dire brièvement que j'ai bien conscience qu'il faut trouver un équilibre délicat dans le portefeuille que vous occupez — et je sais que je parle à quelqu'un qui comprend bien la situation. Dans le secteur aérien, il faut tenir compte des compagnies aériennes, des aéroports et des voyageurs. Pour ces derniers, il y a la déclaration des droits des passagers. Dans le secteur de la marine, il faut tenir compte des cargos, des ports, des expéditeurs. Tous ces intervenants sont importants.

Dans le secteur ferroviaire, l'équilibre est différent et plus difficile à trouver, c'est garanti. Vous savez que c'est difficile. D'un côté, il y a les agriculteurs, les compagnies forestières, les compagnies minières, les conteneurs et le reste. De l'autre côté, il y a les compagnies ferroviaires et à cela, il faut ajouter un brin de syndicat. C'est un secteur très difficile. Chaque fois que l'on touche au statu quo, ce que fait le projet de loi C-49, on crée des gagnants et des perdants. Le défi ici est de trouver quel est le meilleur équilibre.

J'aimerais revenir à ce que vous avez dit, je crois, à M. Sikand ou à M. Fraser. Il était question de savoir s'il fallait inclure dans le projet de loi C-49 la capacité pour l'OTC de prescrire l'autoapplication. Je vais prendre cette fois l'exemple du secteur forestier qui est très différent.

L'APFC s'était présentée devant le Comité pour demander d'accorder à l'office la capacité d'intervenir pour leur permettre d'étudier certains aspects. Je pense que tout cela est authentique, puisque, comme l'a souligné mon collègue M. Chong, ce n'est pas la première fois que l'on fait face à des situations d'urgence dans le secteur du transport du grain et des marchandises. Il arrive parfois que les jeux politiques qui se jouent invariablement dans le bureau d'un ministre empêchent ce dernier d'agir rapidement pour autoriser la réalisation d'une étude. Cela arrive dans tous les partis. Ce n'est pas une question partisane.

J'essaie de comprendre, monsieur le ministre, pourquoi vous ne pensez pas que ce serait une bonne idée pour l'OTC, qui possède les compétences en la matière, de prendre des mesures et d'agir rapidement afin de résoudre les différends, lorsqu'une situation se reproduit, parce que l'office a la capacité de le faire lui-même.

Voilà un domaine dans lequel l'équilibre me préoccupe vraiment. Je ne vois pas l'utilité d'accorder seulement au ministre le pouvoir d'enclencher une enquête sur présentation d'un avis écrit. Par le passé, j'y ai eu recours et vous aussi, mais nous ne demeurons pas toujours en poste... Je ne suis pas ministre des Transports et un jour vous ne le serez plus. Nous devons faire en sorte que le système fonctionne pour tous et pour toujours.

Vous devez vous souvenir que parfois les ministres hésitent à prendre des décisions, alors pourquoi ne pas accorder ce pouvoir à l'OTC?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

C'est vrai que ni vous ni moi ne serons nécessairement ministre des Transports à l'avenir, mais la bonne nouvelle, c'est qu'il existe un ministère pour assurer la continuité. Dans l'état actuel des choses, je dirais que nous respectons entièrement l'indépendance de l'OTC et que c'est bien ainsi. C'est un organisme quasi judiciaire qui doit disposer d'une telle indépendance.

Cela étant dit, nous communiquons. Nous nous tenons informés et je suis très satisfait que ces mécanismes existent à Transports Canada. Je suis encore plus heureux que le projet de loi contienne des dispositions en matière de déclaration des données, car elles nous permettront d'être mieux au courant de la situation en cas de problèmes de transport ferroviaire au pays.

Je pense qu'il n'est pas utile de procéder à des changements pour le moment. Je pense que l'OTC aura d'énormes responsabilités qui l'amèneront à s'assurer que les mesures que nous avons mises en place en matière de transport de marchandises par rail sont appliquées de manière efficiente et en temps opportun. L'office nous avertira s'il s'avère que certains problèmes n'ont pas été résolus. Bien entendu, nous lui avons aussi donné d'importantes responsabilités supplémentaires en ce qui a trait à la déclaration des droits des passagers. Par conséquent, l'office a beaucoup de responsabilités, mais les voies de communication sont ouvertes et je pense que nous avons mis en place un bon système qui n'a pas besoin d'être modifié.

(1125)

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Merci.

Monsieur le ministre, à propos de la déclaration des droits des passagers, pouvez-vous nous dire à quel moment elle sera mise en oeuvre, compte tenu du fait que l'OTC devra élaborer des règlements pour lesquels vous lui avez déjà donné quelques orientations? Quand la déclaration des droits des passagers entrera-t-elle en vigueur au Canada?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Quand allez-vous approuver ce projet de loi?

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Eh bien, supposons qu'il soit adopté aujourd'hui même. Quelle date proposez-vous aux passagers canadiens?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Eh bien, tout de suite — excusez-moi, je n'ai pas pu m'empêcher.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Aux dernières nouvelles, monsieur le ministre, vous disposez de ce qu'on appelle une majorité.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Bien entendu, je respecte entièrement l'autonomie du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités.

Nous avons l'intention de demander à l'OTC de se mettre très rapidement à la tâche, de lancer son processus de consultation et de nous présenter ses recommandations au début de l'année prochaine. Cependant, l'office doit respecter la volonté et l'autorité du Parlement et il ne peut pas se mettre officiellement au travail tant que ce projet de loi n'a pas obtenu la sanction royale. Il procédera sans délai lorsque la sanction royale sera obtenue. J'ai parlé avec Scott Streiner, le directeur de l'OTC. Nous allons nous pencher sur le dossier et nous espérons que nous pourrons disposer d'une charte des droits en 2018.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre Garneau.

Vous disposez de trois minutes, monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Monsieur le ministre Garneau, nous avons eu ensemble une brève discussion hors micro, à propos de l'intérêt de mes électeurs pour les transports aériens. J'avais l'intention de vous poser certaines questions par la suite, mais peut-être que je peux le faire directement et simplement maintenant.

Mes électeurs de Fleetwood—Port Kells doivent beaucoup se déplacer en avion en raison de l'endroit où ils habitent et c'est le cas également pour les personnes qui viennent en visite ou pour affaires dans la région. Ils veulent vraiment vous donner leur point de vue sur le régime des droits des passagers.

Au moment d'élaborer les règlements qui fixeront les détails de fonctionnement du régime des droits des passagers, quelle sera votre ligne de pensée à mesure que ces détails prendront forme? Quels commentaires en provenance de mes électeurs ou de toute autre personne vous seraient utiles pour agencer ces détails?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Tous les commentaires sont les bienvenus. Il y a une dizaine de jours, un employé d'une compagnie aérienne m'a proposé un dédommagement de 400 $ si j'acceptais de prendre un vol plus tard. Je tairai le nom de l'aéroport où cela s'est passé. Comme ce n'est pas la première fois que cela m'arrive, je suis bien au courant du problème des surréservations. Beaucoup de gens se sont plaints auprès de moi à ce sujet. J'ai même participé à des forums sur Facebook et je suis au courant de la situation, mais tous les commentaires sont les bienvenus.

Comme tout le monde, j'ai vu ce qui est arrivé sur ce vol de United Airlines. Comme tout le monde, j'ai suivi ce qui est arrivé à l'Aéroport d'Ottawa aux passagers de la compagnie Air Transat. Nombreux sont les Canadiens qui communiquent avec moi à ce sujet. Des Canadiens m'ont dit qu'ils n'aiment pas payer un supplément pour que leurs enfants puissent s'asseoir à côté d'eux. J'ai aussi entendu les doléances des musiciens qui voyagent avec des instruments extrêmement précieux et qui sont indispensables pour l'exercice de leur métier. Ils affirment que leurs instruments ne reçoivent pas les soins appropriés. J'ai entendu les commentaires d'un grand nombre de personnes. Je suis prêt à entendre tous les commentaires à ce sujet. Une fois que le régime des droits des passagers entrera en vigueur, il sera susceptible d'être modifié si certaines situations l'exigent, si certains aspects n'ont pas été prévus ou s'avèrent inadéquats.

(1130)

La présidente:

En fait, votre temps de parole est écoulé, monsieur Hardie.

Je remercie le ministre Garneau de nous avoir consacré deux heures. Je crois que vous avez pu constater que le Comité a très bien fonctionné, et je pense que nous avons tous l'intérêt du Canada à coeur et que nous travaillons ensemble très bien pour faire en sorte que le projet de loi C-49 soit le meilleur possible.

Je vous remercie, vous et vos collaborateurs, d'être venus.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Madame la présidente, j'aimerais dire une dernière chose.

Je dois également vous dire que, pendant la dernière heure, au cours de laquelle je répondais aux questions, je pensais en fait à notre cher collègue Arnold qui vient de décéder. Je pense, David, que vous avez été très éloquent. J'aimerais tous vous demander de penser à la dernière fois où Arnold a pu prendre la parole à la Chambre des communes en juin dernier. Il a été l'exemple frappant d'un député qui vivait une situation extrêmement difficile et qui a fait preuve d'une grande générosité et d'une absence totale de partisanerie.

Je tenais à le mentionner aujourd'hui.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Garneau.

Nous allons suspendre la séance un instant pour que l'autre groupe de témoins prenne place à la table.

(1130)

(1140)

La présidente:

Nous reprenons notre séance avec le groupe suivant. Nous accueillons des représentants du ministère de l'Industrie, de la Chambre de commerce du Canada et du Bureau de la concurrence. Je vous souhaite à tous la bienvenue. Nous sommes très heureux que vous soyez ici.

J'aimerais demander à Mark Schaan, le représentant du ministère de l'Industrie, de se présenter et de commencer ses remarques préliminaires?

Une voix: [Inaudible]

La présidente: Très bien, parfait.

Mme Melissa Fisher (sous-commissaire associée, Direction des fusions, Bureau de la concurrence):

Madame la présidente, je m'appelle Melissa Fisher. J'occupe le poste de sous-commissaire déléguée à la Direction des fusions du Bureau de la concurrence. Mon collègue Anthony Durocher, sous-commissaire des pratiques monopolistiques, m'accompagne aujourd'hui.[Français]

Est également présent Mark Schaan, directeur général de la Direction générale des politiques-cadres du marché à Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada. Il est responsable de la politique sur la concurrence, alors que le Bureau remplit la fonction indépendante d'application de la loi.[Traduction]

Je crois comprendre que le Comité a des questions au sujet des modifications apportées au rôle du Bureau en ce qui concerne l'examen des ententes entre les transporteurs aériens, comme l'énonce le projet de loi C-49.

Je vais commencer en donnant quelques renseignements contextuels sur le Bureau et son mandat. Je parlerai ensuite de l'expérience du Bureau en ce qui concerne l'examen des fusions et des accords ou ententes entre les fournisseurs de services aériens. Finalement, je parlerai des dispositions du projet de loi C-49 qui ont une incidence sur le rôle du Bureau relativement à l'examen de ces types d'accords ou d'ententes.[Français]

Le Bureau est un organisme d'application de la loi indépendant qui veille à ce que les consommateurs et les entreprises du Canada puissent prospérer dans un marché concurrentiel et innovateur qui offre des prix moins élevés et un meilleur choix de produits. Le Bureau est dirigé par le commissaire de la concurrence et il est chargé d'assurer et de contrôler l'application de la Loi sur la concurrence et de trois lois canadiennes sur l'étiquetage.[Traduction]

La loi octroie au commissaire le pouvoir d'enquêter sur les comportements anticoncurrentiels. Elle contient des dispositions civiles et pénales et couvre des sujets comme les indications fausses ou trompeuses, l'abus de position dominante dans un marché, les fusions et la fixation des prix. Les affaires civiles sont réglées devant le Tribunal de la concurrence, un organisme juridictionnel spécialisé, composé de juges de la Cour fédérale et de simples citoyens possédant une expertise dans le domaine des affaires, du commerce et de l'économie, alors que les affaires pénales sont réglées devant les tribunaux. La loi permet également au commissaire de faire des démarches auprès des organismes de réglementation, des commissions ou des tribunaux afin de promouvoir la concurrence dans divers secteurs. Le Bureau a pour hypothèse de travail fondamentale que la concurrence est profitable tant pour les entreprises que pour les consommateurs.

Je suis ici aujourd'hui pour parler du rôle du Bureau relativement à l'examen des ententes entre les transporteurs aériens et de la manière dont ce rôle changera si le projet de loi C-49 est adopté.

Le Bureau détient une vaste expérience de l'examen des ententes, y compris les fusions et les coentreprises, dans le secteur du transport aérien. De la formation des premières grandes alliances entre des compagnies aériennes à la fin des années 1990 à l'acquisition de Canadian Airlines par Air Canada en l'an 2000 et l'arrivée, et parfois le départ, de divers transporteurs depuis ce temps, le Bureau a examiné diverses ententes entre les transporteurs aériens qui pouvaient nuire aux entreprises et aux consommateurs qui dépendent des services aux passagers aériens en introduisant des hausses de prix et en limitant les choix.

Plus particulièrement, en 2011, le Bureau a contesté devant le Tribunal une proposition de coentreprise entre Air Canada et United Continental qui prévoyait une collaboration quant à certains aspects clés de la concurrence, notamment la tarification, l'établissement de la capacité, les programmes de fidélisation, de même que le partage des revenus et des coûts. Après un examen approfondi, le Bureau a déterminé que le projet de coentreprise aurait eu pour effet de permettre aux compagnies aériennes de monopoliser ensemble 10 liaisons transfrontalières principales entre le Canada et les États-Unis et de diminuer sensiblement la concurrence sur 9 liaisons supplémentaires. Cette situation aurait alors vraisemblablement entraîné une augmentation des coûts et une réduction des choix pour les consommateurs. En définitive, le Bureau a conclu un règlement négocié avec les parties. Le consentement conclu interdit à Air Canada et à United Continental de mettre en oeuvre leur entente de coentreprise dans 14 liaisons transfrontalières.

L'affaire Air Canada et United Continental est un exemple de la manière dont le Bureau pourrait examiner une entente relative à des services aériens en vertu de la Loi sur la concurrence. Le Bureau examine généralement ce type d'entente en vertu des dispositions sur les fusions ou de celles touchant la collaboration entre concurrents de la Loi sur les fusions, en fonction de la structure de l'entente. Ces ententes peuvent avoir des effets positifs, notamment renforcer l'efficience et la compétitivité, ce qui permet aux Canadiens de profiter de prix moins élevés et d'un meilleur choix de produits. Cependant, elles peuvent également soulever des préoccupations sur le plan de la concurrence et, si le commissaire détermine qu'une entente aura vraisemblablement pour effet de diminuer sensiblement ou d'empêcher la concurrence, ce qui correspond au seuil prévu par la Loi, il peut la contester devant le Tribunal, sous réserve d'une exception s'appliquant aux coentreprises considérées comme des fusions devant faire l'objet d'un préavis en vertu de la Loi, ou il recherche une solution consensuelle avec les parties sous la forme d'une entente.

(1145)



Pour ce qui est des facteurs pris en compte lors de l'examen des fusions ou des ententes conclues entre concurrents, le Bureau procède à un examen exhaustif, tributaire des faits et fondé sur des données probantes, notamment sur une analyse quantitative. Dans son analyse d'une coentreprise entre des compagnies aériennes, le Bureau se concentrera sur les liaisons ou les services offerts par les parties se chevauchent ou sont susceptibles de se chevaucher.

Plus particulièrement, le Bureau détermine habituellement si les partenaires de la coentreprise fournissent des services concurrents aux passagers aériens entre une paire donnée de villes de départ et d'arrivée comme Toronto-Chicago ou Winnipeg-North Bay. Le Bureau détermine aussi si les consommateurs considèrent que le service sans escale ou avec une escale ou les voyages d'affaires et d'agrément se substituent l'un l'autre, par exemple. Le Bureau détermine s'il y a des concurrents qui desservent les liaisons exploitées par les parties qui se chevauchent, s'il ya des obstacles à l'entrée de nouveaux acteurs, ou si les concurrents actuels ou potentiels peuvent limiter la capacité de hausser les prix des parties à l'entente.

Une coentreprise qui réduit le nombre de concurrents ou de concurrents potentiels dans un marché déjà concentré soulèvera des préoccupations. Dans le cas de toute liaison qui se chevauche, le Bureau voudra s'assurer que les consommateurs ont accès à des services et à des prix concurrentiels et qu'une entente proposée ne ferait pas en sorte qu'une liaison soit captive d'une compagnie aérienne ayant un pouvoir de marché accru.

Pour l'évaluation des effets d'une coentreprise proposée sur la concurrence, il se peut que le Bureau doive obtenir une quantité importante de données et d'autres renseignements sur les marchés concernés auprès des parties à la coentreprise et d'autres intervenants dans ces marchés. Ces renseignements sont nécessaires pour effectuer un examen éclairé et crédible, basé sur de solides principes économiques. Le Bureau peut demander aux parties à l'entente de lui fournir ces renseignements de manière volontaire, obtenir ceux-ci auprès de tierces parties connaissant l'industrie ou consulter des sources publiques. Dans certains cas, il peut aussi s'adresser aux tribunaux pour obtenir une ordonnance de production de certains renseignements.

Le projet de loi C-49 établit un nouveau processus pour l'examen et l'autorisation des ententes entre au moins deux entreprises de transport offrant des services aériens. Ce processus couvrira tous les types d'ententes entre des transporteurs aériens, à l'exception des ententes pouvant être considérées comme des fusions devant faire l'objet d'un avis en vertu de la Loi sur la concurrence. Les fusions devant faire l'objet d'un avis sont des transactions de fusion qui atteignent des seuils financiers précis concernant la taille des parties et la taille de la transaction, et qui ne peuvent être effectuées que si le commissaire a eu la possibilité de procéder à un examen. Le ministre des Transports a le pouvoir de procéder à un examen de l'intérêt public des fusions devant faire l'objet d'un avis depuis l'an 2000.

Le projet de loi C-49 propose un nouveau processus pour les ententes concernant les services aériens qui permettront aux transporteurs aériens de volontairement demander au ministre des Transports d'autoriser un projet d'entente. Le commissaire recevra une copie de tout avis concernant une entente qui est fourni au ministre, accompagnée des informations prescrites par les lignes directrices.

Si le ministre détermine que le projet d'entente soulève des préoccupations importantes en lien avec l'intérêt public, le commissaire doit alors élaborer, dans les 120 jours suivant la réception de l'avis initial, un rapport à l'intention du ministre et des parties portant sur toute inquiétude liée à la possibilité que l'entente proposée empêche ou diminue sensiblement la concurrence. Un résumé du rapport du commissaire peut être rendu public. J'aimerais signaler à cet égard l'engagement pris actuellement par le Bureau en matière de transparence, sans sortir des limites dictées par les obligations de confidentialité, et préciser que cet engagement persistera dans le cadre de la procédure en question.

Le Bureau procédera à son analyse habituelle de la concurrence mais, dans la mesure où l'entente donne lieu à des préoccupations sur le plan de la concurrence, il n'aura pas la possibilité de résoudre ces préoccupations directement avec les parties en négociant des mesures correctives, ou en cherchant à obtenir une ordonnance corrective auprès du Tribunal. La décision finale dans de tels cas sera prise par le ministre des Transports et le ministre consultera le commissaire en ce qui concerne toute mesure corrective.

Dans les cas pour lesquels les parties ne demandent pas une autorisation au ministre et le ministre ne déclenche pas un examen de l'intérêt public, le Bureau évaluera les ententes en vertu de la Loi selon la procédure habituelle en vigueur, qui reste inchangée. Le Bureau s'engage à collaborer pleinement avec le ministère des Transports, notamment en faisant en sorte que ses employés soient disponibles pour fournir des conseils au ministre sur l'élaboration des lignes directrices exigées par le projet de loi et en prenant des mesures pour veiller à ce que ces lignes directrices obligent les parties à fournir l'information dont le Bureau a besoin pour réaliser une analyse de la concurrence de manière éclairée.

Même si le Bureau collaborera avec le ministre en échangeant des renseignements avec lui, l'examen des ententes réalisé par le Bureau demeurera distinct et indépendant de l'examen de l'intérêt public effectué par le ministre.

(1150)

La présidente:

Voulez-vous ajouter quelques remarques?

Mme Melissa Fisher:

Non, mais je vous remercie de nous avoir invités à comparaître aujourd'hui.

La présidente:

Je vous remercie.

Qui aimerait intervenir maintenant?

M. Ryan Greer (directeur, Politiques du transport et de l'infrastructure, Chambre de commerce du Canada):

Madame la présidente, membres du Comité, permettez-moi d’abord de vous présenter mes condoléances au nom de la Chambre de commerce du Canada, à l’occasion du décès de votre collègue parlementaire et membre de votre caucus, Arnold Chan.

La présidente: Merci.

M. Ryan Greer: Je suis sûr que nous sommes tous sensibles à la difficulté que vous devez ressentir à continuer de travailler dans une circonstance aussi pénible, et je vous suis reconnaissant de nous accueillir aujourd’hui.

Merci d’avoir invité la Chambre de commerce à participer à votre étude du projet de loi C-49. Les amendements législatifs qui vous sont proposés affecteront les membres de toutes tailles de la Chambre, partout au pays et dans notre réseau de 200 000 membres.

J’aimerais commencer par féliciter M. Emerson et le Comité d’examen pour le rapport qu’ils ont préparé au sujet de la Loi sur les transports au Canada. Ce rapport exhaustif est à marquer d’une pierre blanche. Il contient des recommandations importantes pour moderniser les réseaux de commerce et de transport du Canada, et le projet de loi C-49 porte sur certaines des questions fondamentales qui y sont soulevées.

Notre angle d’approche, face aux différents éléments du projet de loi C-49, est l’impact des modifications proposées sur la compétitivité canadienne, de manière générale. Je commencerai donc par parler du secteur ferroviaire avant de faire quelques remarques sur le transport aérien.

Au Canada, la privatisation progressive du secteur ferroviaire a été un succès remarquable qui s’est traduit par d’importants investissements du secteur privé, lesquels nous permettent d’avoir des taux de fret parmi les plus bas et des niveaux de service parmi les plus élevés au monde.

Pour cette raison, la Chambre recommande la prudence si l’on envisage d’étendre la réglementation des chaînes d’approvisionnement du Canada. Dans une économie mondialisée, où la connectivité est devenue un facteur déterminant du succès économique, l’objectif de toute réforme du système de transport devrait être de continuer à rehausser l’efficience des chaînes d’approvisionnement, ce qui est d’ailleurs un thème essentiel du rapport de M. Emerson.

Le fait que ces chaînes d’approvisionnement soient organisées en réseaux, y compris dans le secteur ferroviaire, signifie qu’accorder un avantage réglementaire à un client, un secteur ou une partie du réseau prive inévitablement les autres parties du réseau de quelque chose. C’est l’une des raisons pour lesquelles les deux derniers comités d’examen de la Loi sur les transports au Canada, en 2001 puis en 2016, ont recommandé de ne pas élargir les limites de l’interconnexion et de maintenir un système essentiellement fondé sur les relations commerciales et les forces du marché.

En particulier, la Chambre est préoccupée par les dispositions proposées pour l’interconnexion de longue distance. Je pense que nous devrions nous méfier des conséquences imprévues, notamment du risque de décourager l’investissement et de réduire la productivité. N’oublions pas, en particulier, que la situation économique des voies secondaires éloignées desservant les industries des ressources naturelles est déjà difficile. L’ILD risquera de réduire le revenu que les compagnies de chemin de fer tirent de ces voies, ce qui compromettra leur survie.

Une autre conséquence de l’interconnexion de longue distance est qu’elle permettra aux compagnies ferroviaires américaines de profiter des lignes de chemin de fer canadiennes sans réciprocité. Sous sa forme actuelle, le projet de loi C-49 prévoit certaines exceptions géographiques pour l’accès américain, qui devraient au minimum être préservées. Sans ces exceptions, le Canada risquerait de perdre une grande quantité du trafic ferroviaire et portuaire destiné aux États-Unis, en particulier celui qui passe par Vancouver et Montréal.

Globalement, la compétitivité des chaînes d’approvisionnement est mieux assurée par l’existence d’un marché commercial comportant des dispositions suffisantes pour protéger les consommateurs en cas de litige. Le projet de loi C-49 propose des modifications raisonnables des mécanismes actuels de règlement des différends.

En ce qui concerne les décisions relatives au niveau de service au titre de la Loi sur les transports au Canada, la Chambre estime que la Loi devrait permettre de tenir compte de l’impact de ces décisions sur tous les éléments de la chaîne d’approvisionnement, et pas simplement sur un client particulier.

Cela étant, nous approuvons les dispositions du projet de loi qui modifient le régime du revenu maximum admissible, afin de supprimer certains des facteurs qui ont dissuadé les compagnies de chemin de fer de procéder à l’acquisition de nouveaux wagons-trémies. Nous approuvons également les mesures destinées à rehausser la transparence des données des chaînes d’approvisionnement, ainsi que certaines des mesures que le gouvernement a déjà prises à cet égard.

Nous appuyons aussi les dispositions du projet de loi C-49 concernant l’installation de caméras et d’enregistreurs dans les locomotives, y compris l’utilisation proactive de ces données par les compagnies de chemin de fer. Le ministre a souvent dit que la sécurité était sa grande priorité, et cela y contribuera.

Finalement, pour ce qui est du chemin de fer, la Chambre est favorable à l’augmentation de la limite individuelle de participation au capital-actions du CN de 15 % à 25 %. Il s’agit là d’une question d’équité par rapport aux autres transporteurs et aux autres modes de transport, et il est important de permettre à la compagnie d’avoir accès au capital nécessaire pour ses investissements à long terme.

Je passe maintenant rapidement aux dispositions du projet de loi concernant le transport aérien pour dire que la Chambre appuie l’instauration d’un nouveau régime des droits des voyageurs. Le régime actuel fondé sur les plaintes est chaotique. Il se traduit par une application incohérente des règles par les transporteurs. Il est grand temps de simplifier et d’uniformiser ces règles, autant dans l’intérêt des voyageurs que dans celui des compagnies aériennes elles-mêmes. Comme toute entreprise, une compagnie d’aviation est plus efficace et plus efficiente quand elle a plus de certitude au sujet de l’environnement dans lequel elle doit fonctionner.

Lorsqu’on procédera à l’élaboration des textes réglementaires pertinents, il conviendra selon nous de veiller à ce qu’ils reflètent clairement le fait que les compagnies d’aviation ne sont qu’une partie du système de transport aérien. Par exemple, les retards causés par les contrôles de sécurité restent l’une des principales plaintes des voyageurs qui prennent l’avion.

Le projet de loi exige aussi plus d’informations et de données sur le service des transporteurs aériens. Je recommande que cette exigence d’informations supplémentaires ne soit pas limitée à nos transporteurs, mais qu’elle s’applique aussi spécifiquement aux entités gouvernementales qui font partie du réseau et qui ont un impact sur la performance du système, comme l’ASFC et l’ACSTA.

(1155)



Nous approuvons aussi les dispositions du projet de loi concernant les coentreprises et l’instauration d’un nouveau processus d’approbation par le ministre des Transports. Transférer le pouvoir ou créer ce nouveau processus permettra de prendre les décisions concernant les coentreprises en tenant compte de l’intérêt public et économique au sens large.

Nous recommandons que certaines des dispositions du projet de loi touchant les coentreprises soient modifiées. Notamment, la période d’examen d’une coentreprise par le ministre deux ans après son approbation devrait être allongée. Le compteur de cette période de deux ans démarre dès l’approbation du projet par le ministre plutôt qu’au moment où la coentreprise commence effectivement ses activités. Une fois qu’elle a décollé, si je peux dire, la période actuelle de deux ans n’est à notre avis pas suffisante pour évaluer le fonctionnement de la coentreprise sur le marché.

La Chambre approuve aussi les dispositions du projet de loi relatives au recouvrement des coûts de l’ACSTA, avec cependant une réserve importante, à savoir que ce n’est là qu’un palliatif en attendant que le gouvernement corrige ou tente de corriger le modèle de financement de l’agence. L’objectif du gouvernement devrait être de mettre fin au sous-financement chronique de l’ACSTA pour garantir que les voyageurs reçoivent vraiment les services de contrôle de sécurité qu’ils payent déjà avec leurs billets d’avion.

Nous approuvons également les dispositions concernant la propriété étrangère des compagnies d’aviation. Le ministre a déclaré que ce changement est destiné à stimuler la concurrence de façon à faire baisser les tarifs que payent les voyageurs. J’ajouterai seulement que, si le gouvernement veut vraiment faire baisser les tarifs, la première chose à faire est de revoir les coûts qu’il ajoute d’autorité au prix des billets, tels que les loyers aéroportuaires, les frais de sécurité, les droits de NAV Canada et d’autres taxes, qui ont tous un impact sur la compétitivité du transport aérien au Canada.

Je termine en félicitant le ministre, son équipe et son ministère pour tout le travail qu’ils ont consacré à Transport 2030 et au projet de loi C-49. Je félicite également votre comité pour tout le travail qu’il fait cette semaine. Comme l’a dit le ministre ce matin, le projet de loi C-49 n’est que la première étape d’un projet de transformation de longue durée, et la Chambre de commerce est prête à continuer de collaborer avec le gouvernement pour rehausser la compétitivité du commerce et du transport au Canada.

Merci.

(1200)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Schaan est ici pour répondre aux questions en qualité de représentant et directeur général des politiques-cadres du marché, du secteur de la politique stratégique. Si les membres du Comité ont des questions à poser à ce sujet, ils peuvent les lui adresser directement.

Madame Raitt.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Je ne sais pas lequel des fonctionnaires pourra répondre à ma question et je m’adresse donc à tous en même temps. Je demanderai ensuite quelques commentaires, selon la manière dont on répondra à la question.

Voici le problème. Le processus mis en place par le ministre pour déterminer s’il y a des facteurs importants d’intérêt public à prendre en considération est tellement vaste et ouvert que je me demande vraiment pourquoi des sociétés envisageraient de créer des coentreprises dans ce pays. Voyons donc quel est ce processus, et je vous dirai ce qui me gêne à ce sujet.

La toute première chose concerne les 120 jours. Ça vaut la peine d’y revenir, car je ne pense pas que les gens comprennent exactement combien ce sera difficile. Une fois que le ministre ou quelqu’un apprend qu’un arrangement est proposé, le ministre a 45 jours pour décider si le projet ira de l’avant ou non. C’est alors que le délai important commence à courir. Le commissaire de la concurrence a 120 jours et ensuite, le ministre a 150 jours de plus pour adresser un rapport aux parties et ces dernières ont 30 jours pour y répondre. Le ministre a 45 jours pour rendre une décision préliminaire et les parties, 30 jours pour y répondre. Ensuite, le ministre a 30 jours pour rendre une décision finale. Mais, attendez, ce n’est pas fini. Il a encore la possibilité, deux ans après avoir approuvé le projet, de revenir sur sa décision en disant que ça ne lui plaît pas parce que ce n’est pas dans l’intérêt public. Et, pour couronner le tout, après tous ces délais, le ministre peut encore décider lui-même de prolonger le dernier délai.

Si j’ai bien compté, il pourra y avoir un délai de 13 mois et demi avant la décision finale, qui ne sera d’ailleurs pas vraiment finale parce que les parties n’auront absolument aucune certitude quant à ce qui risque d’arriver après ces 13 mois et demi.

Comment peut-on croire que des gens vont venir investir dans notre pays si les entreprises doivent se plier à un tel processus?

M. Mark Schaan (directeur général, Direction générale des politiques-cadres du marché, Secteur de la politique stratégique, ministère de l'Industrie):

Je vais commencer et mes collègues du bureau voudront peut-être intervenir.

L’une des raisons pour lesquelles nous avons introduit des dispositions sur les coentreprises dans le projet de loi C-49 est qu’à l’heure actuelle, les coentreprises n’ont pas de délais clairement définis dans notre pays parce qu’elles sont assujetties aux dispositions de la Loi sur la concurrence touchant la collaboration commerciale, que le commissaire de la concurrence peut invoquer à n’importe quel moment pour entreprendre un examen. Cela ne donne aucune certitude ni aucune prévisibilité aux parties, à moins qu’elles n’envisagent une fusion devant faire l’objet d’un avis.

Nous avons repris les dispositions sur les fusions, qui existent actuellement dans la Loi sur les transports au Canada et qui permettent de tenir compte de l’intérêt public, et nous y avons associé des délais plus clairs et plus courts. Si l’on prend les délais prévus pour les fusions, par exemple, il est important de tenir compte de la période qui mène au dépôt d’un avis de fusion, mais, en fin de compte, on peut prendre ce délai et dire qu’il y aura 42 jours pour informer les parties, et 150 jours s’il y a un facteur d’intérêt public à prendre en considération, et ensuite une date à déterminer pour toutes les étapes suivantes.

En ce qui concerne les coentreprises, je tiens à préciser que les 120 jours accordés au commissaire de la concurrence sont parallèles aux 150 jours du ministre des Transports. En fait, dans cet échéancier, nous avons essayé de trouver un juste équilibre entre la prévisibilité et la certitude, d’une part, et le souci de faire préserver une solide concurrence par le commissaire de la concurrence, d’autre part, ainsi que la prise en compte de l’intérêt public par le ministre des Transports. Nous croyons donc que la mesure envisagée préserve la compétitivité internationale dont le Canada jouit actuellement comme ses autres comparateurs.

En ce qui concerne votre remarque sur la période d’immunité minimum de deux ans, je tiens à souligner que c’est une période minimum de deux ans et qu’à moins d’indication contraire dans les modalités, les coentreprises n’auront pas de date d’expiration et continueront de fonctionner à perpétuité tout en faisant l’objet d’un examen annuel. Cela dit, nous croyons que le minimum de deux ans est suffisant. Il convient de souligner que, dans d’autres pays, comme les États-Unis, l’immunité antitrust peut être revue à n’importe quel moment par les autorités du secteur des transports et qu’il n’y a donc aucune garantie de pardon. Voilà pourquoi, dans les dispositions du projet de loi C-49 touchant les coentreprises, nous nous sommes efforcés de trouver un juste équilibre entre la préservation de la concurrence et la protection de l’intérêt public, tout en donnant aux parties le plus de certitude et de prévisibilité possible dans le cadre d’une procédure équitable.

(1205)

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Très bien. Merci.

Je prends note de votre remarque sur le parallèle et vous remercie infiniment d'avoir clarifié ce point. Cela rend l'idée un peu plus acceptable, mais la règle générale n'en reste pas moins que le ministre peut prolonger tout délai à tout moment.

Comment définiriez-vous les considérations d'intérêt public?

M. Mark Schaan:

Les considérations d'intérêt public recouvrent plusieurs choses. Si on prend le libellé du projet de loi C-49, des consultations auront lieu dans le cadre du processus d'élaboration de lignes directrices mis en place pour permettre aux parties d'aider à éclairer à ce sujet, mais les considérations d'intérêt public peuvent inclure des choses comme la sécurité, le tourisme, les liaisons aériennes, les retombées économiques et un certain nombre d'autres considérations qui peuvent accroître l'incidence économique et les liaisons pour les passagers canadiens.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Il est donc possible qu'un gouvernement ou un ministre choisisse un jour un sujet qui deviendra de fait d'intérêt public. Qui vérifie qu'il est bien d'intérêt public si ce n'est pas couché par écrit?

M. Mark Schaan:

Les lignes directrices seront claires quant à ce qui constitue un avantage d'intérêt public, il faudra être en mesure de présenter ces avantages d'intérêt public et le ministre doit pouvoir continuer de les présenter lorsque la coentreprise devient réalité.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

Nous savons tous les deux que les lignes directrices ne sont jamais normatives, qu'il y a toujours à la fin un concept fourre-tout et que tout ce que le Cabinet considérera par ailleurs comme étant d'intérêt public sera d'intérêt public.

M. Mark Schaan:

Je dirais que cette disposition a pour but de faire en sorte que les parties des deux côtés de l'équation, le ministre des Transports, d'une part, et le commissaire de la concurrence, d'autre part, et que les parties elles-mêmes sachent quelle est l'attente et qu'on puisse ensuite dire aux Canadiens quand et pourquoi nous choisissons de donner suite à une certaine opération.

L'hon. Lisa Raitt:

J'aimerais poser une question sur la capacité de négocier. Je sais qu'il s'agit d'un aspect important du travail du Bureau de la concurrence. La capacité de négocier disparaît dans ce processus. Il n'y a pas de négociations parce que le commissaire se contente de remettre le résumé et qu'ensuite, le dossier est entre les mains du ministre. C'est ce que je comprends du projet de loi. Si je me trompe, pouvez-vous éclairer ma lanterne?

M. Mark Schaan:

Il se peut que mes collègues du Bureau veuillent intervenir, mais les ordonnances correctives sont du ressort du ministre des Transports, car il lui appartient en fin de compte de les approuver ou pas. La négociation en tant que telle de ces ordonnances est éclairée par le commissaire de la concurrence et le ministre des Transports. La négociation avec les parties pour parvenir à des engagements satisfaisants s'exprimant dans une bonne décision qui réponde aux considérations d'intérêt public et aux considérations relatives à la concurrence sera guidée par le commissaire et le ministre des Transports.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Deux ou trois compagnies aériennes sont venues me voir avant ces réunions. Les explications vagues au sujet des coentreprises et de ce qui serait approuvé ou pas les inquiètent. Je leur ai en fait donné quelques conseils. Je leur ai dit de déterminer ce qui éveille l'intérêt du Bureau de la concurrence et d'éviter ces sujets.

Plus sérieusement, quels sont, de votre point de vue, les éléments qui éveillent l'intérêt du Bureau? Quand des pratiques deviennent-elles déloyales?

Mme Melissa Fisher:

M. Durocher répondra à votre question sur les dispositions de la Loi sur la concurrence relatives aux prix d'éviction.

M. Anthony Durocher (sous-commissaire, Direction des pratiques monopolistiques, Bureau de la concurrence):

Au Bureau de la concurrence, nous prenons très au sérieux la question des prix d'éviction. Au début des années 2000, les tribunaux ont été saisis d'une affaire importante concernant ce type de pratiques à Air Canada.

Notre point de départ pour nous en l'espèce est la différence, très ténue, entre une concurrence dynamique livrée de manière vigoureuse que nous voulons voir dans l'économie et un comportement abusif. Un comportement abusif vise en fait à éliminer un concurrent, généralement sur une ligne en particulier, en fixant les prix de manière à pouvoir compenser les pertes une fois le concurrent évincé du marché.

La jurisprudence canadienne précise qu'il faut satisfaire à un critère de coût évitable pour démontrer qu'on a affaire à des prix d'éviction dans un cas donné. Il s'agit d'exercices très factuels qui nécessitent beaucoup de données quantitatives et financières sur la compagnie aérienne pour essayer de déterminer ses coûts et ses revenus sur une ligne donnée.

M. Ken Hardie:

Brièvement, on veut vraiment éviter l'équivalent d'un dumping, où quelqu'un vend à perte pour se débarrasser d'un concurrent.

M. Anthony Durocher:

Là encore, je pense que cela dépend des faits. Il est normal pour des compagnies de baisser leurs prix lorsque l'entrée sur une ligne donnée est concurrentielle. La question est: à partir de quand le prix plus bas relève-t-il d'une méthode abusive visant à éliminer la concurrence? L'évaluation se fait au cas par cas.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci de votre explication.

Nous avons beaucoup parlé des compagnies aériennes par rapport à la concurrence, mais nous sommes mis à rude épreuve — le gouvernement précédent et celui-ci — dans le cas des sociétés ferroviaires. Les prix de ligne concurrentiels ne sont plus utilisés parce qu'elles refusent de se livrer concurrence. Le Bureau de la concurrence a-t-il une influence quelconque ou des observations sur ce qui ressemble à une fixation collusoire des prix de la part des sociétés ferroviaires?

(1210)

M. Anthony Durocher:

En 2015, le Bureau de la concurrence a présenté un mémoire très détaillé au Comité d'examen de la Loi sur les transports au Canada. Pour cela, il a consulté un certain nombre d'intervenants afin de prendre le pouls du pays sur les questions relatives à la concurrence. Il en est ressorti notamment que les prix de ligne concurrentiels ne permettent pas aux expéditeurs captifs de profiter de...

M. Ken Hardie:

C'est l'alarme-incendie. Attendez un instant.

La présidente:

Eh bien, nous voulions sortir à un moment donné au cours de ces quatre jours. L'occasion s'en présente peut-être.

Je suspends la réunion.

(1210)

(1240)

La présidente:

Nous reprenons la séance et nous essaierons de rattraper le temps perdu.

Monsieur Hardie, vous avez une minute environ.

L'idéal serait que chacun dispose de cinq minutes et, si les témoins pouvaient essayer d'être concis dans leurs réponses, tout le monde pourrait poser ses questions.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je sais que vous ne vouliez peut-être pas répondre à cette question sur la fixation collusoire des prix par les sociétés ferroviaires, mais c'est un peu excessif. Je plaisante.

Sérieusement, toutefois, quel rôle a joué le Bureau de la concurrence par rapport au fait que nous avons dû adopter de nouvelles mesures extraordinaires pour générer au moins une pseudo-concurrence de la part de nos deux sociétés ferroviaires?

(1245)

M. Anthony Durocher:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Je suis d'accord. Quelqu'un, quelque part, ne voulait pas y répondre.

De manière générale, en plus de l'application de la loi, le Bureau a une fonction de défense des intérêts. Comme je l'expliquais avant que nous quittions la salle, il a présenté, dans le contexte du comité d'examen de 2015, un mémoire détaillé où, se fondant sur ses compétences en matière de concurrence, il formulait des conseils sur les mesures à prendre pour injecter autant de concurrence que possible dans le réseau ferré, tout en reconnaissant que les forces du marché, auxquelles nous voudrions généralement nous en remettre, ne sont peut-être pas appropriées dans tous les cas.

En ce qui concerne notre fonction d'enquête, pour des questions telles que la fixation collusoire de prix ou l'abus de position dominante, le Bureau examine les affaires confidentiellement s'il y a des raisons de croire qu'une infraction à la loi a été commise. La fixation collusoire des prix est évidemment un élément majeur de toute politique antitrust de tout pays. Au Canada, il s'agit d'infractions criminelles aux termes de la Loi sur la concurrence que nous prenons très au sérieux.

Nous avons en place un programme d'immunité qui peut inciter des gens à porter à l'attention du Bureau des affaires de truquage d'offres ou de fixation collusoire de prix que nous examinerions en temps utile et à propos desquelles nous prendrions les mesures appropriées, en sachant aussi que nous transmettons ces affaires au SPPC en vue de poursuites.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aubin, vous disposez de cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Madame la présidente, je vais me limiter à deux sujets, question de respecter la limite de cinq minutes qui m'est imposée.

Je commencerai par une question qui s'adresse à Mme Fisher ou à M. Durocher.

J'ai bien aimé votre présentation sur le Bureau de la concurrence, même si c'était un peu technique. À l'intention de ceux qui suivent nos travaux, j'aimerais essayer d'être le plus clair possible.

Vous citez l'exemple de cette entente potentielle de coentreprise entre Air Canada et United Continental. Après une série de tractations et d'études, le Tribunal de la concurrence a bloqué systématiquement cette entente. Elle n'a pas eu lieu.

D'après ce que je comprends, dans l'état actuel du projet de loi C-49, compte tenu des pouvoirs qui sont dévolus au ministre, c'est terminé, le Tribunal n'a plus les moyens de bloquer quoi que ce soit. Il peut, tout au plus, recommander au ministre de le faire. Si le ministre en décide autrement pour des intérêts publics mal définis, les recours sont terminés.

M. Anthony Durocher:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Tout d'abord, j'aimerais clarifier ce qui s'est passé dans le cas d'Air Canada et United Continental. Le Bureau a apporté un dossier au Tribunal de la concurrence, alléguant qu'il y avait des problèmes de concurrence dans le cas de 19 routes. Le Tribunal n'a jamais émis de jugement relativement à cette question. Il y a eu une entente entre le Bureau et les parties pour régler les problèmes de concurrence pour 15 des routes. Une entente hors cour a mis un terme à cela.

M. Robert Aubin:

Je comprends cet exemple, mais dit plus simplement, le pouvoir du ministre a préséance sur une possible décision du Tribunal.

M. Anthony Durocher:

En ce qui a trait au projet de loi C-49, si le ministre des Transports jugeait que quelque chose était dans l'intérêt public, ce serait bien le cas. Ce serait laissé à sa discrétion, en même temps qu'on tiendrait compte de l'analyse faite par le Bureau et le commissaire.

M. Robert Aubin:

Toutefois, vous pouvez voir le problème. Lorsqu'on parle de concurrence, cela a une résonnance assez claire dans la tête de tous les citoyens. Lorsqu'on parle d'intérêt public, on est dans la vacuité, c'est le moins qu'on puisse dire.

Je passe au deuxième sujet, avant que le temps ne m'échappe. Je voudrais parler avec le représentant de la Chambre de commerce du Canada. Je vais donner un autre exemple, cette fois. Je pense que, en matière de développement économique, nous risquons de nous entendre.

Chez nous, à Trois-Rivières, il y a un aéroport régional qui, au fil des ans, n'a cessé de se développer, d'abord pour amener du trafic de plaisance, une école de pilotage, une compagnie de peinture d'avions et, maintenant, pour faire l'entretien d'un certain nombre d'avions d'Air Canada. Bref, on ne cesse d'investir dans un aéroport qui prend de l'ampleur et qui contribue au développement régional. Il y a même des ententes avec des compagnies aériennes pour organiser des vols nolisés.

Par contre, on achoppe sur un problème, parce que le projet de loi C-49 indique que si on veut avoir accès aux mesures de sécurité nécessaires pour faire un voyage hors frontières, on doit faire cela à ses frais.

Dans une perspective de développement économique régional, vous apparaît-il loyal que l'on ait deux types d'aéroports, c'est-à-dire certains qui reçoivent des services payés et d'autres qui doivent payer pour offrir ces mêmes services à leur clientèle?

(1250)

[Traduction]

M. Ryan Greer:

Oui, je vous remercie de votre question.

Vous avez soulevé, à mon sens, ce qui est un des quelques problèmes que posent le modèle de financement actuel de l'ACSTA et le fonctionnement de l'ACSTA dans son ensemble. À la base, le fait que nous percevons un droit pour la sécurité des passagers du transport aérien, qui entre dans les recettes générales du gouvernement, mais ne va pas entièrement aux services de sécurité — il sert à financer d'autres choses, mais le fait est qu'il n'est pas intégralement réinvesti —, met l'ACSTA en porte-à-faux pour ce qui est de remplir ses obligations dans les aéroports. C'est, à mon avis, une des raisons pour lesquelles le projet de loi C-49 cherche en attendant à autoriser les aéroports à prendre ces dispositions.

Comme je l'ai dit dans mes observations, je pense qu'on devrait considérer la capacité des aéroports de conclure ces ententes au mieux comme un palliatif, une solution temporaire, en attendant de revoir le modèle de financement de l'ACSTA pour arriver à quelque chose de plus raisonnable. Les aéroports québécois ne sont pas les seuls concernés. Il y a aussi des aéroports de petite et de moyenne taille dans tout le pays, surtout en pleine saison touristique. Ils reçoivent des demandes de voyageurs très haut de gamme ou de personnes qui voyagent sur des vols nolisés et qui souhaitent venir dépenser beaucoup d'argent dans leur collectivité, mais pour des raisons de calendrier ou de financement, ces aéroports ont du mal à obtenir du personnel de l'ACSTA.

À mon sens, vous avez mis le doigt sur une inégalité qui mérite d'être discutée. Cependant, je crois qu'avant de pouvoir y remédier, il faut revoir le modèle de financement global de l'ACSTA et l'utilisation faite du droit pour la sécurité des passagers du transport aérien pour financer l'ACSTA parce que, comme nous le voyons, certains gros aéroports sont incapables de satisfaire à toutes leurs obligations avec la prestation de services actuelle de l'ACSTA. Ils doivent passer des contrats pour des prestations supplémentaires à Pearson et ailleurs.

La présidente:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Greer.

Désolé, monsieur Aubin.

Monsieur Badawey, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Vance Badawey:

Je remercie les experts de leur présence ce matin et cet après-midi. C'est un plaisir de vous recevoir.

Ce processus, comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, s'est révélé très fructueux en ce qui concerne une grande partie de l'information qui en est ressortie. Il ne fait aucun doute que ce sera un processus continu. Nous avions un environnement dans lequel nous vivions hier et nous allons en avoir un autre dans lequel nous vivrons demain. Selon moi, en ajoutant à la stratégie globale plus vaste, ce projet de loi très pragmatique devient davantage une sorte d'instrument, de plan d'action. Cela dit, une fois la sanction royale obtenue, il permettra d'exécuter beaucoup des recommandations qu'il contient.

Ma question s'adresse avant tout à M. Greer. À propos de l'environnement actuel, un environnement du transport aérien concurrentiel, comme vous le reconnaissez volontiers, est un moteur économique essentiel pour créer de la croissance non seulement dans les régions concernées par rapport à celles qui ont des aéroports, mais aussi dans celles qu'ils desservent et qui peuvent être assez éloignées.

À votre avis, et une fois encore, le travail n'est pas terminé, ce projet de loi va-t-il dans le bon sens par rapport à la situation antérieure et simplifie-t-il le processus, le rend-il plus convivial et donc plus en phase avec les attentes des clients? Avez-vous le sentiment, je me répète, que nous prenons une orientation plus positive qu'auparavant?

M. Ryan Greer:

À mon avis, en ce qui concerne plus précisément le transport aérien, le passage d'un régime très imprévisible et dans lequel il était très difficile de s'y retrouver, tant pour les consommateurs que pour les compagnies aériennes pour ce qui est de comprendre les sanctions auxquelles elles s'exposaient, à un système plus transparent où chacun sait ce qu'on attend de lui et comprend les conséquences d'actes potentiels et ce qu'on attend de lui, aidera à progresser.

Cela dit, ce sont comme toujours les détails qui posent des problèmes. Avec la déclaration des droits des passagers aériens, la plupart de ces dispositions seront établies par des règlements. Par conséquent, s'ils sont trop punitifs, s'ils sanctionnent les compagnies aériennes pour des choses qui échappent à leur contrôle, nous risquons de nous retrouver avec un système moins concurrentiel ou avec des coûts supplémentaires par passager lorsque les compagnies aériennes doivent les recouvrer en partie. Je pense que le cadre proposé est bon, mais je suis d'avis que les détails, les règlements eux-mêmes nous diront si nous avons la bonne solution.

M. Vance Badawey:

C'est pourquoi nous avons ce dialogue à présent et pourquoi je vous ai posé cette question. Je crois que le ministre a clairement dit que nous ne voulons pas d'un système punitif. Nous voulons nous assurer que dans les cas indépendants de la volonté des compagnies aériennes, les sanctions ne s'appliquent pas.

Je poserai la même question au Bureau de la concurrence.

Monsieur Durocher, êtes-vous d'avis que l'environnement actuel et la direction prise par le ministre simplifieront le processus dans lequel vous-mêmes et les fonctionnaires de votre organisme jouent évidemment un rôle clé? Pensez-vous que demain, il sera nettement simplifié par rapport à ce qu'il était hier?

(1255)

Mme Melissa Fisher:

Pour ce qui est de la mesure législative proposée relativement aux coentreprises, le calendrier prévu pour l'examen des ententes proposées sera certainement bien défini. Dans le processus actuel, si nous avons à examiner une entente en vertu des Lignes directrices sur la collaboration entre concurrents, on ne sait pas aussi précisément quand le commissaire procédera à son examen, même si nous nous efforçons d'être aussi efficaces que possible dans nos examens, car nous savons que les milieux d'affaires souhaitent avancer rapidement dans les négociations et la réalisation d'opérations. Dans le cadre du régime en matière de fusions, les délais sont assez bien définis, avec des délais obligatoires et des normes de services relatives aux frais d'utilisation.

M. Vance Badawey:

Ma dernière question est pour M. Schaan.

Depuis une semaine, j'essaie de rattacher le projet de loi C-49 au contexte plus général de la stratégie Transports 2030. Il y a évidemment un pendant à cela qui concerne les clients, en particulier dans le transport aérien, par rapport à leurs droits, ainsi que les entreprises, l'industrie, le rapprochement véritable entre ce projet de loi et la stratégie en ce qui a trait aux corridors commerciaux et à leur renforcement par nos investissements dans les infrastructures en suivant ces recommandations et stratégies. Selon vous, comment ce projet de loi, et la stratégie des transports, s'inscrit-il dans la stratégie globale qui doit aider le Canada à améliorer sa performance à l'échelle mondiale?

La présidente:

Pouvez-vous répondre brièvement, s'il vous plaît?

M. Mark Schaan:

Certainement. Ce projet de loi nous intéresse parce que nous pensons qu'il est bon pour la politique de la concurrence et parce qu'il est bon pour l'innovation, les sciences et le développement économique. Je crois qu'un processus de coentreprise plus clair, transparent et concurrentiel à l'échelle internationale permettra à nos transporteurs aériens d'augmenter les liaisons, en particulier vers des zones commerciales ou des régions auxquelles nous n'avons peut-être pas accès à l'heure actuelle.

La présidente:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

En ce qui concerne les mécanismes de tarification, les gens sont toujours étonnés qu'un vol de Vancouver à Londres coûte beaucoup moins cher qu'un vol de Vancouver à Winnipeg. Ils en viennent à soupçonner l'existence de subventions croisées, à se demander si les tarifs intérieurs que nous payons au Canada aident à compenser des tarifs ou à les rendre plus concurrentiels sur les lignes très concurrentielles. Est-ce que le Bureau se penche sur ce sujet?

Mme Melissa Fisher:

Quand le Bureau procède à ses enquêtes, il examine une opération ou une fusion en particulier. Il ne s'intéresse généralement pas aux industries globalement, mais dans le contexte d'une entente particulière, il examine la concurrence sur certaines paires de villes de départ et d'arrivée. Si nous examinons l'établissement des prix sur une ligne donnée, c'est pour déterminer si l'opération est susceptible de réduire sensiblement la concurrence ou de l'empêcher, c'est-à-dire pour savoir si l'entente proposée entraînera une augmentation des tarifs sur cette ligne ou une réduction des choix pour les consommateurs.

M. Ken Hardie:

Monsieur Schaan, avez-vous un commentaire à ce sujet?

M. Mark Schaan:

Non, si ce n'est que la Loi sur la concurrence confère au commissaire de la concurrence des pouvoirs considérables qui lui permettent d'examiner le marché canadien afin d'y repérer toute zone dans laquelle il y aurait des comportements anticoncurrentiels. Qu'il s'agisse d'abus de position dominante, de fixation collusoire de prix, de pratiques commerciales trompeuses ou d'autre chose encore, des processus clairs sont en place pour que le commissaire fasse des enquêtes.

M. Ken Hardie:

J'ai l'impression que personne n'a encore vraiment pensé à cela.

Parlons du ministère de l'Industrie. Le projet de loi prévoit l'examen de la coentreprise dans le deux ans. Je crois que les compagnies aériennes diraient qu'il faut parfois deux ans pour que tout se mette en place. Dans leur intérêt et dans celui des consommateurs, que rechercherait votre ministère au cours de ces deux années qui pourrait déclencher la réouverture d'un examen?

M. Mark Schaan:

Ce ne sera pas notre ministère, mais le ministre des Transports et le ministère des Transports pourront après deux années revoir l'opération telle qu'elle était proposée à l'origine. Ce n'est pas la fin de l'immunité, mais la possibilité de réexaminer l'entente. Je souhaite souligner qu'il ne s'agit pas de deux années suivies d'un réexamen, mais de deux années éventuellement et bien plus longtemps. Ce qu'ils chercheront, entre autres, c'est à déterminer si les avantages qui ont été promis sur le plan de l'intérêt public ou qui faisaient partie des engagements globaux ou des correctifs se manifestent. S'il n'était pas réaliste que ces avantages d'intérêt public se manifestent dans le temps alloué, ce serait un des facteurs dont le ministre des Transports devrait tenir compte avant de décider de réexaminer l'opération.

M. Ken Hardie:

Monsieur Greer, vous avez soulevé la question des répercussions de différents droits sur le coût des voyages en avion. Il semble qu'on doive sans cesse trouver un équilibre entre ce que l'usager paie et, si le droit est supprimé, ce que tout le monde paie sous forme de subvention publique. Quel serait, selon vous, le bon équilibre de manière générale et que pensez-vous des défis que présentent la desserte du Nord et les tarifs aériens exorbitants pratiqués à destination et en provenance de ces régions?

(1300)

M. Ryan Greer:

Juste pour revenir à une de vos questions précédentes sur le coût des voyages aériens au Canada, je crois que toutes ces taxes et droits supplémentaires ainsi que les loyers des aéroports expliquent en partie pourquoi il est plus cher de voyager par avion au Canada. Évidemment, il y a la densité de notre population, mais il y a aussi que nos transporteurs desservent un tas de lignes qui ne sont pas aussi rentables, y compris dans le Nord, où certaines de leurs lignes plus importantes permettent d'interfinancer et de desservir de plus petites collectivités qu'il ne serait pas logique autrement de desservir d'un point de vue commercial. J'imagine qu'il y a une part d'interfinancement pour que Air Canada, WestJet et d'autres transporteurs desservent effectivement de petites collectivités où il n'y a pas beaucoup d'argent à faire.

Le principe des frais d'utilisation intégrés dans le transport aérien est logique, mais là encore, seulement si ces frais servent à financer ce pour quoi ils sont facturés. Le problème du droit pour la sécurité des passagers du transport aérien, c'est que tout l'argent ne va pas aux contrôles effectués pas l'ACSTA. En autorisant les aéroports à sous-traiter de nouveaux services de l'ACSTA, le projet de loi C-49 aura entre autres pour effet que les administrations aéroportuaires finiront inévitablement par récupérer ces frais dans le cadre de leurs redevances d'atterrissage et d'autres mécanismes, qui seront ensuite répercutés sur le prix des billets. Autrement dit, les consommateurs risquent de payer deux fois les frais de sécurité. Ils paient le droit pour la sécurité des passagers du transport aérien et ils paieront les frais qui seront facturés dans leur billet à cause des coûts de sous-traitance supplémentaires.

Nous pensons qu'il est temps d'examiner tous les coûts imposés par le gouvernement. Nous ne disons pas qu'il faut tous les supprimer. Nous ne disons pas qu'il ne devrait pas y avoir de droit pour la sécurité. Nous disons qu'il faut vérifier que nous rendons compte de l'utilisation de ces frais et que cet argent est investi comme il devrait l'être. Il faudrait aussi voir s'il existe des façons de rendre tout le secteur plus concurrentiel. Là encore, les loyers des aéroports sont très élevés et ce coût se répercute évidemment sur les utilisateurs finals.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Greer.

Monsieur Chong.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Je remercie les témoins de leur présence. Je vous sais gré de la sincérité de vos observations préliminaires et de vos témoignages.

En plus de ne pas laisser jouer les forces du marché dans la manutention du grain au Canada en relevant le revenu maximum admissible, ce qui revient également à ne pas remédier à la cause sous-jacente des crises du transport du grain des 20 dernières années, il semblerait, d'après votre témoignage, que le gouvernement affaiblit aussi la concurrence dans un autre domaine en affaiblissant le pouvoir de ce qui est un organisme chargé de l'application de la loi, à savoir le Bureau de la concurrence.

Je trouve très intéressant, madame Fisher, que dans vos observations préliminaires, vous ayez longuement parlé du cas où le Bureau s'est attaqué, en 2011, à Air Canada et à United Airlines et à leur projet de coentreprise, pour finir par demander qu'ils excluent 14 lignes transfrontières de la coentreprise afin de garantir plus de concurrence pour les consommateurs canadiens et, donc, des prix plus bas pour les familles canadiennes.

Il est évident pour moi que le projet de loi que nous examinons aujourd'hui affaiblit le Bureau et l'application de la loi en mettant en place un nouveau processus qui permettra tout simplement au ministre de contourner le Bureau. Si la loi proposée s'était appliquée à l'affaire de 2011, j'imagine très bien ce qui se serait passé. Air Canada et United Airlines auraient demandé directement au ministre de bénéficier de ce nouveau processus et il est très probable que le ministre aurait approuvé la coentreprise, peut-être sans l'exclusion des 14 lignes. Il en serait résulté moins de concurrence et des prix plus élevés pour les consommateurs canadiens.

Je crois ne pas me tromper en disant que le projet de loi C-49 affaiblit l'application de la loi. Il affaiblit les pouvoirs de nos principaux organismes chargés de son application en ce qui concerne la concurrence. Êtes-vous d'accord avec moi?

Mme Melissa Fisher:

Le Bureau veille à l'application de la loi. Nous l'appliquons dès son approbation. Si ce projet de loi est adopté, nous l'appliquerons aussi et avec fermeté.

Pour ce qui est de notre analyse de fond de la concurrence aux termes de la nouvelle loi, elle ne change pas par rapport à la loi en vigueur en ce qui concerne la façon dont nous procédons à notre examen et la qualité de notre analyse. Nous nous montrerons toujours aussi rigoureux.

Le projet de loi exige du ministre qu'il consulte le commissaire sur les recours proposés en matière de concurrence. Nous continuerons de négocier ferme sur ces recours. Je ne pense pas que cela changera du tout.

(1305)

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Merci pour cette réponse.

Madame la présidente, j'ai une observation.

Il est intéressant de constater qu'il semble y avoir depuis deux ans des relations très privilégiées entre les grandes entreprises et le gouvernement. Je ne crois pas que ce soit une coïncidence qu'Air Canada ait acheté des aéronefs de la Série C, aidant ainsi une société canadienne, alors que les promesses concernant le centre de maintenance d'Air Canada à Winnipeg ont été diluées. Nous avons maintenant un projet de loi qui, essentiellement, permettrait des coentreprises, comme celle proposée en 2011 entre Air Canada et United Airlines, sans que le Bureau de la concurrence soit tenu d'effectuer un examen sérieux. De plus, le Bureau n'aurait plus la capacité de participer directement aux négociations concernant les modalités de ces coentreprises.

C'est inquiétant. Au final, le Bureau est une organisation de renommée internationale qui a fait un excellent travail au cours des dernières années en vue de veiller à la concurrence et de l'accroître pour le bien des consommateurs canadiens. Je crains que ce projet de loi n'affaiblisse la capacité du Bureau pour ce qui est de continuer à assurer son rôle de façon si exemplaire.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Chong.

Monsieur Fraser, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Sean Fraser:

Merci.

Monsieur Greer, je commencerai par vous. Vous avez dit que l'absence de réciprocité constituerait un problème pour un régime d'interconnexion de longue distance. Lorsque nous avons parlé à certains des témoins représentant les compagnies ferroviaires, l'une des choses qui est ressortie, c'était qu'en fait, une part infime de leur chiffre d'affaires risque d'être accaparée par les États-Unis.

Quelle est l'ampleur réelle de la menace d'absence de réciprocité, c'est-à-dire que les compagnies ferroviaires américaines accaparent une partie du marché?

M. Ryan Greer:

Selon le libellé actuel du projet de loi C-49, les deux grands transporteurs ferroviaires de catégorie I risquent de perdre une partie de leurs activités dans le Sud de l'Ontario et du Manitoba. Cela correspond aux exemptions accordées actuellement par la loi en Ontario, en Colombie-Britannique et au Québec.

Ce que j'ai voulu dire c'était que sans exemptions, les deux compagnies ferroviaires risqueraient de céder une bonne partie de leurs chiffres d'affaires, et le Canada perdrait un volume considérable de l'activité portuaire à Vancouver et à Montréal. En vertu de la loi actuelle, on subira déjà des pertes. Les compagnies ferroviaires devront vous préciser davantage à quoi correspondraient les pertes en Alberta et au Manitoba. Si l'on conserve les exemptions, nos grands centres ne perdront pas une partie massive de leurs activités.

M. Sean Fraser:

J'aimerais bien savoir, si nous comparons non pas le statu quo, mais la situation avant que les dispositions du projet de loi C-30 ne deviennent caduques et l'interconnexion de longue distance, selon vous, quelles seraient les pertes relatives du chiffre d'affaires sous un nouveau régime prévoyant des axes exclus? C'est donc une comparaison avec le régime d'interconnexion de longue distance.

M. Ryan Greer:

Comme vous l'ont dit les compagnies ferroviaires et les expéditeurs, un des défis que pose l'interconnexion de longue distance, c'est qu'on ne comprend pas toujours exactement comment un tel régime fonctionnerait et quels en seraient les résultats. Les compagnies ferroviaires espèrent qu'elles ne perdront pas encore plus de leurs chiffres d'affaires. Certains expéditeurs ont indiqué que les anciennes dispositions visant l'interconnexion n'étaient pas assez souvent invoquées mais constituaient néanmoins un levier de négociation important à leurs yeux. On ignore comment l'interconnexion de longue distance entrerait en ligne de compte. Si je lis le projet de loi actuel, je crois que l'interconnexion de longue distance constitue probablement une amélioration par rapport à l'ancien projet de loi C-30 dans la mesure où elle constitue un dernier ressort, mais là encore, il faudra attendre et voir ce qui se passe en réalité.

Je le répète, pour nous, le plus important, c'est de conserver les exemptions. Sans elles, le chaos régnerait sur les grands axes canadiens.

M. Sean Fraser:

J'y vais de mémoire, donc je vous demande pardon si j'ai mal compris certains éléments de votre témoignage prononcés avant que l'alarme d'incendie ne soit déclenchée. Vous avez parlé de l'importance des données. Je ne suis pas sûr de comprendre si vous disiez que les mesures prévues pour améliorer l'accès aux données étaient positives, ou que nous devions aller plus loin et transmettre les données désagrégées dont ont parlé les expéditeurs afin d'exercer une influence réelle sur la prise de décisions, ou encore les deux.

Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus sur l'importance de la qualité de l'information pour ce qui est d'améliorer l'efficacité du réseau des transports?

(1310)

M. Ryan Greer:

Effectivement, l'utilisation des données, et le fait de transmettre plus de données à tous les maillons de la chaîne d'approvisionnement, constitue une démarche extrêmement importante et devrait être encouragée. Il me semble déjà qu'outre ce projet de loi, le gouvernement prend certaines mesures afin d'établir un nouveau groupe responsable des données et de l'information au sein du gouvernement.

À mon avis, lorsque l'on commence à réglementer certaines quantités de données, les choses deviennent épineuses. Nous ne savons pas toujours ce qui serait le fardeau imposé aux compagnies qui devront respecter des délais pour la transmission des données. Toutefois, il existe de nombreux exemples de cas où le secteur et le gouvernement ont collaboré, bien souvent sur une base volontaire, afin de réunir tous les renseignements de tous les maillons de la chaîne d'approvisionnement. Nous pensons qu'il faudrait disposer de davantage de données pour prendre des décisions sur les investissements en infrastructures et d'autres décisions en matière de politique. Les données doivent également porter sur l'ensemble du réseau canadien, et non seulement sur quelques composantes, et sur la façon dont les décisions en matière d'investissement en infrastructures auront une incidence sur les chaînes d'approvisionnement partout au pays.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je vais maintenant m'adresser aux représentants du Bureau de la concurrence. Madame Fisher, vous êtes peut-être la mieux placée pour répondre.

J'ai lu quelques articles récents indiquant qu'Air Transat s'oppose fermement aux dispositions visant les coentreprises, en disant vertement que de telles dispositions vont éventrer le Bureau de la concurrence. Pensez-vous que les dispositions du projet de loi vous empêcheront de faire votre travail?

Mme Melissa Fisher:

En ce qui concerne notre analyse de fond, le projet de loi stipule que les parties qui prennent des arrangements nous transmettront les renseignements dont nous avons besoin à des fins d'examen. Lorsque nous disposons de ces renseignements, nous allons en faire un examen rigoureux, tout comme nous le faisons maintenant. Notre analyse est très bien structurée et repose sur des normes internationales. Nous continuerons à effectuer la même analyse que dans le passé lorsque nous effectuions un examen.

M. Sean Fraser:

J'ai une petite question pour M. Schaan.

La présidente:

Monsieur Fraser, il ne vous reste plus de temps.

Monsieur Godin. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Mesdames et messieurs, merci de vous prêter à cet exercice qui, je pense, est très important pour s'assurer que le projet de loi est complet, qu'il est bien écrit et qu'il atteint les objectifs fixés par les parlementaires.

Ma question s'adresse à Mme Fisher, du Bureau de la concurrence.

Un peu plus tôt, vous avez dit à l'un de mes collègues que vous appliquiez la loi; c'est le mandat du Bureau de la concurrence. Je comprends très bien votre fonction. Cependant, si le projet de loi n'est pas bien défini, qu'il est incomplet et évasif, va-t-il vous permettre d'être efficaces? Vous donnera-t-il les outils nécessaires et suffisamment de mordant pour jouer votre rôle? [Traduction]

Mme Melissa Fisher:

Les dispositions du projet de loi qui portent sur les coentreprises précisent bien notre rôle, c'est-à-dire qu'il se cantonne à la concurrence, dans la mesure où il y a d'autres facteurs d'intérêt public auxquels s'intéresse le ministre des Transports. Il doit donc en tenir compte.

Nous effectuerons notre analyse comme nous l'avons fait dans le passé et nous rédigerons notre rapport tel que nous devons le faire en vertu du projet de loi. Pour ce qui est de la façon dont notre analyse se déroulera, les facteurs dont nous tiendrons compte sont très bien définis et les acteurs du secteur les connaîtront.

Nous continuerons à faire notre travail comme nous l'avons toujours fait. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Nous, les parlementaires, voulons faire en sorte que la loi soit encore plus efficace. Qu'ajouteriez-vous à ce projet de loi pour permettre au Bureau de la concurrence d'être efficace? [Traduction]

Mme Melissa Fisher:

C'est une bonne question.

À mon avis, l'ajout de lignes directrices au projet de loi serait très important, car elles préciseront les renseignements dont nous aurons besoin pour effectuer notre examen. La qualité, l'exhaustivité et l'exactitude de tout travail que nous effectuons dépendent des renseignements dont nous disposons.

Nous sommes prêts à travailler avec Transports Canada afin d'élaborer ces lignes directrices et nous assurer que les renseignements dont nous avons besoin pour effectuer une analyse d'une coentreprise y sont clairement précisés. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

En fait, je n'ai pas de crainte quant à l'efficacité du travail du Bureau de la concurrence lorsqu'il applique la loi à la lettre. Cependant, une chose m'inquiète. Dans le cas d'une coentreprise, le ministre a le droit, après deux ans, d'intervenir sous un prétexte d'intérêt public, mais l'intérêt public n'est pas défini. Est-ce l'intérêt politique, est-ce l'intérêt ponctuel? La question s'adresse peut-être plus à M. Schaan.

Je suis un peu mal à l'aise à l'idée qu'on accorde ce pouvoir. Comme je le mentionnais ce matin au ministre Garneau, ce n'est pas que j'aie des doutes sur le ministre actuel, mais comme ma collègue le mentionnait tout à l'heure, une loi est au-dessus des individus et il faut s'assurer que la loi sera applicable dans l'avenir également. Rien dans le projet de loi ne précise la nature de cet intérêt public qui pourrait justifier l'intervention d'un homme ou d'une femme politique dans un tel processus.

(1315)

M. Mark Schaan:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

J'aimerais souligner deux points importants.

Tout d'abord, en ce qui a trait aux alliances, ce processus existe présentement.[Traduction]

Nous appliquons maintenant aux coentreprises le processus que prévoit actuellement la Loi sur les transports au Canada pour les fusions. La notion selon laquelle il faut tenir compte de l'intérêt public se trouve dans nos lois depuis l'an 2000. Nous nous adaptons donc aux progrès de l'industrie à l'échelle internationale. Nos concurrents dans d'autres pays, par exemple les États-Unis, l'Australie, etc., ont accès à des considérations relatives à l'intérêt public dans le cadre de l'examen des coentreprises, mais pas les transporteurs aériens canadiens. C'est l'un des points de vue.

Comme il doit le faire, le commissaire de la concurrence a communiqué au ministre les considérations relatives à la concurrence, et les considérations relatives à l'intérêt public seront donc décrites et énumérées dans des lignes directrices. Elles visent notamment la sécurité, l'accès à une connectivité accrue, la viabilité économique et d'autres facteurs importants qui ont des effets sur l'économie canadienne, les voyageurs canadiens et la santé et la compétitivité de l'industrie aérienne au Canada. Ces considérations seront donc établies dans des lignes directrices, et comme je l'ai dit, cela découle d'un processus déjà en place.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

J'ai une question très simple pour les représentants du Bureau de la concurrence.

Est-il permis à un lobbyiste de faire du lobbying auprès du Bureau de la concurrence?

M. Anthony Durocher:

Je pense que c'est permis. Rien n'interdit cela, que je sache. Toutefois, je peux vous dire que, en pratique, c'est vraiment dans le cadre des dossiers ou des enquêtes que nous faisons affaire avec les représentants des compagnies en question et leurs avocats. C'est ce qui se passe. C'est en partie parce que l'aspect politique est l'affaire du ministère, et non pas du Bureau. Les compagnies et leurs avocats viennent faire affaire avec nous quand nous avons notre chapeau d'enquêteur.

M. Robert Aubin:

Finalement, la réponse est non. En revanche, il est très facile de faire du lobbying auprès du bureau d'un ministre. Cela fait même partie du travail des lobbyistes. J'ai l'impression que la mesure dans le projet de loi C-49 qui octroie ce nouveau pouvoir au ministre est probablement le résultat de lobbying.

Alors, je pose encore la même question: le ministre, par ses nouveaux pouvoirs, peut-il contourner tout le travail fait par le Bureau de la concurrence?

M. Anthony Durocher:

Encore une fois, selon le point de vue du Bureau de la concurrence là-dessus, notre rôle est bien défini dans le projet de loi C-49.

M. Robert Aubin:

Oui, et je ne doute pas de la pertinence et de l'objectivité de vos travaux. Toutefois, si, au bout du compte, vos travaux peuvent être contournés, il y a un problème.

M. Mark Schaan:

J'aimerais dire quelques mots au sujet de la politique sur la concurrence.[Traduction]

Au début, cette mesure législative découlait du fait qu'à notre avis, dans le cadre d'une transaction liée à une coentreprise, il fallait tenir compte de considérations autres que la nature concurrentielle. C'est ce que cette occasion permet d'accomplir. Le ministre doit absolument continuer de tenir compte de la Loi sur la concurrence, en plus de l'intérêt public, afin de déterminer, au bout du compte, si une transaction est dans l'intérêt public des Canadiens et du Canada. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Lorsqu'on parle de concurrence, tout le monde sait de quoi on parle. Lorsqu'on parle d'intérêt public, on ne le sait pas. N'y a-t-il pas une piste de solution ou un amendement à apporter pour clarifier cela? Pourrait-on, en même temps qu'on accorde un pouvoir supplémentaire au ministre, préciser dans le projet de loi ce que signifie le concept d'intérêt public?

(1320)

[Traduction]

M. Mark Schaan:

On propose d'expliquer en détail les considérations liées à l'intérêt public dans les lignes directrices, afin de mieux comprendre l'évolution de cet intérêt et d'être en mesure de mener des consultations complètes et rigoureuses sur sa nature.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

C'est ce qui termine la première série de questions. Quelqu'un a-t-il une question importante qu'il n'a pas eu la chance de poser? Monsieur Godin. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Madame la présidente, j'ai une question très rapide. Merci de me permettre de la poser.

Ma question s'adresse au représentant de la Chambre de commerce du Canada.

Voici ce que je comprends de votre intervention d'aujourd'hui: de façon sommaire, vos membres sont satisfaits du projet de loi C-49. Ai-je bien compris le sens de votre intervention d'aujourd'hui? [Traduction]

M. Ryan Greer:

Je crois que c'est un énoncé un peu général.

Les membres de la Chambre de commerce du Canada sont nombreux et ont des intérêts diversifiés. Nous sommes d'avis que certains éléments contenus dans le projet de loi C-49 sont adéquats et nécessaires, et nous attendons de voir les détails.

Par contre, nous n'éprouvons pas la même certitude à l'égard d'autres éléments qui visent le domaine ferroviaire. Étant donné la taille et la portée de son réseau, la Chambre de commerce utilise souvent une approche générale, et nous avons quelques préoccupations de nature générale au sujet de la progression des règlements dans ce secteur et des effets qu'ils pourraient avoir sur l'investissement, la productivité et l'efficacité de toutes les chaînes d'approvisionnement canadiennes.

Nous aimons un grand nombre d'éléments contenus dans le projet de loi C-49. Toutefois, en ce qui concerne certaines parties, nous attendons de voir ce qui sera énoncé dans la réglementation. D'autres parties nous causent également quelques inquiétudes.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais remercier nos témoins. Nous sommes désolés de l'interruption, mais je crois que tous les intervenants ont eu le temps de poser leurs questions et de recevoir les réponses dont ils ont besoin pour aujourd'hui.

Nous allons suspendre la séance et nous réunir à huis clos à 14 heures.

(1320)

(1425)

La présidente:

Nous reprenons la séance sur l'étude du projet de loi C-49.

Nous nous excusons du retard de quelques minutes. Nous aimerions également souhaiter la bienvenue à toutes les personnes présentes.

Je vous demanderais de vous présenter. Nous entendrons d'abord M. Lavin.

Vous avez 10 minutes pour livrer votre exposé.

Monsieur Douglas Lavin (vice-président, Membres et relations externes, Amérique du Nord, Association du transport aérien international):

Madame la présidente et honorables membres du Comité, je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de témoigner devant votre comité dans le cadre de votre étude sur le projet de loi C-49.

Je m'appelle Doug Lavin, et je suis vice-président des Membres et relations externes de l'Amérique du Nord pour l'Association du transport aérien international — ou l'IATA.

L'IATA est une entreprise canadienne créée en vertu d'une loi spéciale du Parlement canadien. Elle représente les intérêts de 275 transporteurs aériens dans plus de 117 pays, dont Air Canada, Air Transat, Cargojet et WestJet. Par conséquent, l'IATA s'intéresse de près à l'étude du Comité sur le projet de loi C-49.

Je vous ai fait parvenir mon mémoire écrit sur le projet de loi C-49 à l'avance, mais j'aimerais profiter du temps de parole qui m’est accordé cet après-midi pour souligner plusieurs points mentionnés dans ce mémoire.

Tout d'abord, il est important de souligner qu'une recommandation principale issue de l'examen de la Loi sur les transports au Canada mené en 2016 visait à réduire les lourdes taxes gouvernementales et les droits élevés qui s’appliquent au transport aérien au Canada, en raison de leurs effets négatifs importants sur les transporteurs aériens et les passagers. Plus précisément, dans le cadre de l'examen de la LTC, on a recommandé l'élimination progressive du loyer aéroportuaire, une réforme de la politique de l'utilisateur-payeur afin d'empêcher le gouvernement de percevoir des impôts dépassant ses investissements dans les services et les infrastructures, et la réduction du droit pour la sécurité des passagers du transport aérien.

Lorsqu'il a annoncé la politique du gouvernement en matière de transports, le ministre Garneau a promis de réduire ce qu'il a appelé une « longue liste de frais et de redevances » applicables au transport aérien. En fait, ce matin, il a mentionné qu'il avait parcouru le pays en prévision du projet de loi C-49 et qu'on lui avait d'abord et avant tout parlé du coût élevé du transport aérien.

À l'IATA, nous sommes donc déçus d'apprendre que le projet de loi C-49 ne traite aucunement des problèmes liés aux coûts — il n’y a aucun appel à la réduction des loyers, des taxes ou des droits.

Reconnaissons toutefois que le ministre Garneau a promis de régler ces problèmes au cours de la deuxième phase de concrétisation de la vision du gouvernement pour l'avenir des transports au Canada. Nous avons hâte d'appuyer le ministre Garneau et son équipe lors de la mise en oeuvre de cette deuxième phase.

Je crois que mes collègues de l'industrie aérienne et des associations commerciales qui ont comparu devant vous hier et cet après-midi sont mieux outillés que moi pour aborder les questions liées à la propriété des transporteurs aériens, aux coentreprises et à l'application du principe de recouvrement des coûts à l'ACSTA dont il est question dans le projet de loi C-49. J’entends cibler mes observations sur le fait que le projet de loi C-49 demande à l’Office des transports du Canada et à Transports Canada de mettre au point un nouveau régime de droits des passagers plus strict.

L'IATA collabore actuellement avec quelque 70 gouvernements qui envisagent de réglementer les droits des passagers aériens ou qui l’ont déjà fait. Comme vous vous en doutez, certains gouvernements ont mieux réussi que d'autres à ce chapitre. Nous avons constaté qu'il existe deux approches principales en ce qui concerne les régimes de droits des passagers.

Dans le cadre de la première approche, le gouvernement intervient et décide comment les transporteurs aériens devraient traiter leurs passagers. Ce modèle est plus apparent dans l'approche adoptée par les États-Unis et l'Union européenne qui, par règlement, imposent de lourdes amendes aux transporteurs aériens qui ne satisfont pas aux exigences gouvernementales sur la façon dont les passagers devraient être traités en cas de retard, d'annulation ou de bagages égarés.

Ces amendes sont essentiellement punitives, car elles sont largement supérieures à ce qu’un retard ou une annulation coûte au passager aérien. Nous sommes d'avis que cette approche présente plusieurs difficultés.

Tout d'abord, il est difficile de définir précisément dans un règlement comment il convient de traiter un passager en couvrant toutes les situations possibles. En effet, chaque irrégularité est assortie de faits distincts qu’il est difficile de prévoir et encore davantage de réglementer. Par exemple, en Europe, les tribunaux sont intervenus en interprétant l’intention qui sous-tend la réglementation européenne relative aux droits des passagers, ce qui, plus souvent qu’à son tour, a débouché sur des interprétations contradictoires et a engendré de la confusion à la fois pour les transporteurs aériens et les passagers.

Deuxièmement, même les organismes de réglementation gouvernementaux les mieux intentionnés font souvent plus de mal que de bien en tentant de protéger les intérêts des passagers. Ainsi, aux États-Unis, la règle qui interdit les retards sur l’aire de trafic a fait augmenter le nombre de vols annulés, ce qui cause souvent aux passagers des désagréments autrement plus fâcheux que ne l’aurait fait un retard sur l’aire de trafic.

(1430)



En 1987, le Canada a déréglementé l’industrie aérienne commerciale en se fondant sur le principe voulant que le libre marché, et non la réglementation gouvernementale, optimise l’expérience des passagers aériens. Encore aujourd’hui, rien ne permet de douter de la véracité de ce principe. Nous savons que les rares retards sur l’aire de trafic ou des bagages égarés causent des désagréments aux passagers aériens, sauf que la solution ne passe pas nécessairement par la mise en doute par le gouvernement des décisions des transporteurs aériens, puisque le marché concurrentiel, et plus récemment les médias sociaux, fournit déjà aux transporteurs tous les incitatifs nécessaires pour traiter les passagers le mieux possible.

Bien que des États aient repris à leur compte l’approche de l’Europe et des États-Unis à l’égard des droits des passagers, d’autres pays ont opté pour une seconde approche, une approche que le Comité et les organismes de réglementation canadiens devraient envisager, à mon avis.

Dans le cadre de cette approche, les États n’imposent à l’égard des droits des passagers aucune règle stricte assortie d’amendes ou de sanctions. Ils prévoient plutôt l’instauration de mesures pour que le passager soit pleinement au fait de ses droits avant même d’acheter un billet d’avion; c’est alors à lui de décider du niveau de service qu’il est prêt à s’offrir.

L'Australie est un bon exemple à ce chapitre. En plus d'avoir adopté une vaste loi de protection des droits du consommateur qui s’applique à toutes les industries, l’État australien a travaillé de pair avec les transporteurs aériens pour mettre au point des chartes des consommateurs qui précisent les engagements de chaque transporteur à l’égard du service et sa procédure de règlement des plaintes. La Chine et Singapour ont également choisi de miser sur la transparence plutôt que sur l’application de mesures punitives, et les résultats sont positifs sur les plans du respect des horaires ainsi que de la réduction du taux d’annulation et du prix des vols.

Il convient de souligner que, l’an dernier, l’Office des transports du Canada a agi en ce sens en obtenant l’engagement volontaire des transporteurs canadiens de publier, sur leur site Web respectif, leur grille tarifaire et leurs modalités de transport, en langage clair.

Le projet de loi C-49 vise à combiner les deux approches à l'égard de la question des droits des passagers. D’une part, il oblige les transporteurs aériens à rendre les modalités de transport facilement accessibles aux passagers, en langage clair et concis. L'IATA appuie une telle transparence. Le projet de loi réclame également que l’Office des transports du Canada et Transports Canada mettent au point une réglementation pour encadrer les normes minimales à respecter et le dédommagement à accorder aux passagers en cas d’irrégularité. L'IATA a de sérieuses réserves par rapport à cette approche, surtout si les amendes sont de nature punitive.

Advenant que le projet de loi C-49 conserve sa forme actuelle et que l'OTC et Transports Canada adoptent l'approche utilisée par les États-Unis et l'UE, nous exhortons ces organismes de réglementation à respecter des principes qui favorisent la prise de règlements précis et équitables. Il s'agit notamment de se prémunir contre les conséquences imprévues et d'inclure des dispositions pour les résoudre lorsqu'elles se présentent, et de s'assurer que les avantages valent bien les coûts engendrés par la réglementation. Le dédommagement devrait correspondre au temps ou aux biens perdus par les passagers et ne pas être de nature punitive. Nous devons garantir que les exigences relatives au service à la clientèle s’appliquent à tous les maillons de l’écosystème du transport aérien, et non uniquement aux transporteurs aériens, et que les transporteurs aériens puissent être mis à l’amende strictement pour ce qui relève de leur champ d’action. Enfin, les règles régissant les droits des passagers ne devraient pas être de nature extraterritoriale.

Je vous remercie de votre attention. J'ai hâte de répondre à vos questions.

(1435)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Lavin.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Priestley, de la Northern Air Transport Association.

M. Glenn Priestley (directeur exécutif, Northern Air Transport Association):

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais remercier le Comité d'avoir invité la Northern Air Transport Association à comparaître. Je m'appelle Glenn Priestley et je suis fier d'être le directeur exécutif de la NATA.

Nos membres représentent toutes les facettes des activités aériennes menées dans les régions nordiques et éloignées. Nos exploitants s'engagent à respecter les normes les plus élevées et à coopérer avec tous les organismes gouvernementaux en vue de respecter ces normes par l'entremise de l'application de règles et de pratiques recommandées qui sont logiques et qui soutiennent l'industrie de l'aviation canadienne.

J'aimerais profiter de cette occasion pour remercier les membres du Comité et son personnel d'avoir inclus la NATA, qui représente les opérations menées dans les régions nordiques et éloignées partout au Canada, dans ces importantes discussions sur les mesures législatives énoncées dans le projet de loi C-49. Il arrive trop souvent que la politique en matière d'aviation soit élaborée en tenant surtout compte des services aériens offerts dans le Sud du Canada. Le présent gouvernement et divers comités, notamment le Comité permanent des transports, n'ont ménagé aucun effort pour comprendre les problèmes propres à l'aviation dans les régions nordiques et éloignées, et nous vous en remercions.

Le projet de loi C-49 est vaste et comporte trois sections qui touchent le secteur de l'aviation au Canada. Toutefois, dans le cadre de cette comparution, nous mettrons l'accent sur les mesures législatives visant à établir un régime de droits des passagers aériens du point de vue de la réalité nordique. Nous considérerons que l'ATAC représente notre association principale. Nous examinerons tous les éléments, mais si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais me concentrer sur le régime de droits des passagers.

La gestion de la sécurité des passagers et du coût d'ensemble de l'expérience de voyage représente une question complexe et quotidienne pour les exploitants nordiques. En effet, leur engagement à long terme à l'égard des collectivités isolées, qui exige d'importants investissements initiaux et continus dans de nouveaux aéronefs et de nouvelles installations, crée une relation spéciale entre le transporteur aérien et le client. Cette relation ressemble davantage à un partenariat, et les importants partenariats commerciaux établis avec de nombreux gouvernements des collectivités inuites et des Premières Nations représentent une facette unique pour tous les exploitants nordiques. Ces relations permettent de reconnaître les besoins des collectivités et des particuliers.

À titre d'exemple de cette reconnaissance, mentionnons les places réservées aux aînés de la collectivité dans les aires d'attente de la plupart des aéroports nordiques. Les exploitants dans le Nord ont dû trouver des solutions à des problèmes opérationnels qui n'existent tout simplement pas dans le Sud. Par exemple, il y a la planification de vols de longue distance avec des renseignements et du soutien limités, ce qui signifie qu'il faut prévoir des plans de rechange pour assurer la sécurité des voyageurs.

Dans son rapport sur la sécurité aérienne au Canada en date du 7 juin 2017, votre comité a souligné l'insuffisance de l'infrastructure aéronautique dans le Nord, une infrastructure requise pour améliorer l'expérience des voyageurs, la sécurité globale du système et la fiabilité des services. La section du rapport consacrée aux enjeux concernant le Nord se termine sur la recommandation suivante: « Que Transports Canada élabore un plan et un échéancier afin de répondre aux besoins en matière d'infrastructure et de conditions d'opérations des compagnies aériennes qui servent le Nord du Canada et les petits aéroports. »

En ce qui concerne la modification apportée à la Loi sur les transports au Canada en vue d'établir un régime de droits des passagers aériens, la Northern Air Transport Association est très préoccupée par les généralités incluses dans la formulation et par l'accroissement du pouvoir réglementaire que ces modifications et d'autres conféreraient à l'Office des transports du Canada.

Soyons clairs: la NATA convient que le passager payant a des droits. Toutefois, nous craignons qu'en raison de problèmes qui se sont produits dans le Sud du Canada et ailleurs dans le monde, les transporteurs aériens du Nord soient accablés d'une réglementation à taille unique. En ce moment, les membres de la NATA participent activement à des consultations sur des règlements problématiques qui ont été établis dans ce cadre relativement aux heures de vol et au service des équipages.

Voici notre résumé.

La NATA convient que l'expérience de voyage devrait être aussi transparente que possible et que les attentes devraient être clairement énoncées.

La NATA s'oppose à l'inclusion d'indemnités minimales dans la réglementation, car il y a trop de variables.

La NATA souscrit aux procédures visant à aviser les passagers des situations imprévues qui provoquent des retards.

La NATA convient que chaque transporteur aérien doit continuer de maintenir un manuel opérationnel visant ces procédures et d'autres procédures liées au transport des passagers, aux articles apportés à bord et aux bagages enregistrés.

La NATA est préoccupée par la modification de nature générale qui autorise le ministre à attribuer des pouvoirs réglementaires additionnels à l'OTC sans consultation.

En résumé, la Northern Air Transportation Association a un excellent bilan de service sur le plan de la gestion des passagers dans des environnements de vol et des emplacements difficiles. Par exemple, les exploitants nordiques sont fiers de leur tradition d'offrir des repas chauds compris dans le prix du billet sur de nombreux vols. Pour des raisons évidentes, les exploitants du Nord se sont investis dans leurs collectivités d'une façon différente de celle des exploitants du Sud.

La NATA convient que les passagers ont des droits. Nos membres respectent tous leurs clients depuis de nombreuses années, et savent reconnaître leurs besoins spéciaux et leur culture unique. La NATA est fière d'être un membre fondateur du Comité consultatif sur l'accessibilité de l'OTC, un forum important qui fournit des orientations à nos membres sur la façon d'améliorer un système déjà performant lorsqu'il s'agit du transport des passagers.

La mise en oeuvre de tout régime de droits des passagers doit tenir compte des efforts actuels de l'industrie sur le plan de la sécurité des passagers. Nous sommes pour l'élaboration d'un nouveau processus de règlement des différends axé sur les transporteurs aériens pour remplacer le modèle actuel de l'OTC qui fait obstacle à la participation des consommateurs.

Merci.

(1440)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Priestley.

C'est maintenant au tour des représentants de la Fédération canadienne des musiciens. Il aurait été charmant d'avoir de la musique aujourd'hui en terminant cette quatrième séance de la semaine.

Madame Schutzman, monsieur Elliott, allez-y, s'il vous plaît.

M. Allistair Elliott (représentant international, Canada, Fédération canadienne des musiciens):

Avant de commencer, nous voudrions vous offrir nos condoléances pour la perte de votre collègue.

La présidente:

Merci.

M. Allistair Elliott:

Bonjour. Je vous remercie beaucoup de nous donner l'occasion de comparaître devant vous.[Français]

Nous sommes heureux de pouvoir discuter avec les membres du Comité.[Traduction]

Je m'appelle Allistair Elliott. Je suis représentant de la Fédération américaine des musiciens des États-Unis et du Canada pour le Canada — la FAM. En tant que musicien professionnel depuis 40 ans, j'ai joué de la musique dans le monde entier, ou presque. Parallèlement à ma carrière sur la scène, je travaille à la Fédération canadienne des musiciens —FCM. Au départ, j'ai été membre de son conseil d'administration, ensuite, à partir de 1999 j'ai présidé la Calgary Musicians' Association — section locale 547 de la FAM, et maintenant, je suis représentant international pour le Canada.

Je suis accompagné de mon amie Francine Schutzman, hautboïste et professeure, qui a joué dans l'Orchestre du Centre national des Arts pendant 38 ans. Elle a déjà présidé l'Organisation des musiciens d'orchestres symphoniques du Canada et préside maintenant la Musicians Association of Ottawa-Gatineau — section locale 180 de la FAM.

Nous sommes ici aujourd'hui pour féliciter avec enthousiasme l’honorable Marc Garneau et Transports Canada d'avoir inclus les instruments de musique dans le régime de droits des passagers dans le cadre du projet de loi C-49, Loi apportant des modifications à la Loi sur les transports au Canada.

La Fédération canadienne des musiciens est le bureau canadien de la Fédération américaine des musiciens des États-Unis et du Canada, qui est composée de 200 bureaux régionaux en Amérique du Nord représentant collectivement environ 80 000 musiciens professionnels, dont 17 000 vivent et travaillent au Canada. Nous défendons les intérêts des musiciens depuis 121 ans.

Comme division distincte de la FAM et en vertu de sa reconnaissance au titre de la Loi sur le statut de l'artiste au Canada, la FCM peut négocier des ententes et des conditions de travail équitables couvrant tous les secteurs de l'activité musicale au Canada. Notre objectif, c'est que le Canada harmonise ses dispositions avec celles de la Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 de la FAA concernant le transport d'instruments de musique à bord des transporteurs aériens commerciaux. Nous avons fourni au Comité notre présentation à l'Examen de la loi sur les transports au Canada qui remonte à janvier 2015.

Je veux remercier l'honorable Lisa Raitt — je sais qu'elle était présente ce matin, mais ses collègues peuvent lui transmettre le message — de nous avoir encouragés à soumettre cette présentation il y a quelques années.

Après avoir plaidé notre cause auprès de tous les principaux intervenants, nous étions très heureux de participer aux discussions sur les droits des passagers et nous sommes impatients de collaborer à l'élaboration de règlements une fois que le projet de loi aura reçu la sanction royale.

Nous voudrions remercier également Air Canada d'avoir agi en chef de file en tant que transporteur aérien et d'avoir collaboré étroitement avec la FCM pour offrir un meilleur service aux musiciens. Cet été, lors de la quatrième Conférence internationale des orchestres, Air Canada a remporté le prix Federation of International Musicians Airline of Choice de 2017.[Français]

Nous remercions Air Canada et lui offrons nos félicitations.[Traduction]

Lorsque les musiciens se déplacent dans le cadre de leur travail, ils transportent des bagages aux formes bizarres. Les joueurs de petits instruments n'ont généralement aucune difficulté à les ranger à bord. Ce sont les gros instruments qui posent problème. Ce sont les violoncelles qui posent le plus de problèmes. De nombreux instruments sont en bois, sont fragiles et subissent grandement les effets des changements de température qui, à eux seuls, peuvent endommager irrémédiablement un instrument. Souvent, les instruments des musiciens professionnels sont vieux et coûtent très cher. Le plus souvent, les violoncellistes réservent un deuxième siège pour leur instrument. Néanmoins, on leur dit parfois qu'ils ne peuvent pas monter à bord avec leurs instruments, ce qui représente des pertes de possibilités de travail, de travail et de revenus. Certains d'entre vous connaissent peut-être une chanson intitulée United Breaks Guitars. Elle a été inspirée par un incident. En effet, un guitariste, Dave Carroll, a été forcé d'enregistrer son instrument, qui était brisé une fois arrivé à destination.

Nous saluons les mesures qui ont déjà été mises en oeuvre pour résoudre en partie les problèmes auxquels font face les musiciens qui voyagent avec leurs instruments, et nous remercions l'ACSTA d'avoir collaboré directement avec nous à certaines initiatives. Il reste encore beaucoup de travail à faire. Il nous faut une politique applicable à l'échelle de l'industrie qui soit bien annoncée, de sorte que les musiciens puissent planifier en conséquence leurs déplacements avec leurs outils de travail en ayant l'assurance qu'ils arriveront à temps pour leur entrevue ou leur spectacle, et ce, sans qu'un incident survienne.

J'aimerais conclure en parlant des observations qu'a faites récemment l'une des membres les plus en vue de notre fédération, Mme Buffy Sainte-Marie, lorsqu'elle a reçu, au Sénat du Canada, une reconnaissance spéciale pour sa contribution à la culture musicale canadienne. Pendant sa déclaration, elle a demandé que le gouvernement prenne des mesures pour que les musiciens puissent voyager avec leurs instruments. Elle a donné un exemple où on lui avait imposé des frais supplémentaires de 1 376 $ pour une guitare et une valise.

(1445)



Les musiciens ont depuis longtemps du mal à transporter leurs outils de travail qui, souvent, coûtent très cher et sont irremplaçables. Au nom de tous les musiciens du pays, nous vous remercions pour l'inclusion des instruments dans les mesures, nous saluons vos efforts, et nous sommes impatients de collaborer étroitement avec vous à l'élaboration des règlements qui seront utiles à tous.[Français]

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. McKenna, qui représente l'Association du transport aérien du Canada.

M. John McKenna (président et chef de la direction, Association du transport aérien du Canada):

Bonjour.

Je m’appelle John McKenna et je suis président de I’Association du transport aérien du Canada.

L’ATAC représente le secteur canadien du transport aérien commercial depuis 1934. Elle compte environ 190 membres qui oeuvrent dans l’aviation commerciale dans toutes les régions du Canada.[Français]

Nous accueillons favorablement cette occasion de nous prononcer sur le projet de loi C-49, car il aborde des éléments importants de l'aviation commerciale au Canada. Les droits des passagers, la propriété étrangère, les coentreprises, l'Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien et l'Office des transports du Canada sont autant de sujets qui suscitent des débats depuis un certain temps déjà.[Traduction]

Toutefois, je me prononcerai uniquement sur les thèmes principaux de ce projet de loi étant donné que l'applicabilité des mesures proposées ne sera déterminée que par les règlements connexes qui en résulteront. Ces règlements, qui seront élaborés par l'Office des transports du Canada, ne verront probablement pas le jour avant un an.

Pour ce qui est de la propriété étrangère des compagnies aériennes canadiennes, lors de son discours du 3 novembre 2016 à la Chambre de commerce du Montréal métropolitain, le ministre a affirmé que grâce à la hausse de la limite de propriété étrangère, « il sera possible d'offrir plus d'options aux Canadiens et de créer de nouvelles compagnies aériennes à bas prix ».

La présence d'un plus grand nombre de transporteurs se traduit habituellement par un meilleur choix pour les voyageurs, mais il faudra nous donner un argument convaincant qui confirme l’affirmation selon laquelle les investissements étrangers favorisent l’émergence de transporteurs à bas prix.[Français]

Contrairement à ce que prétend le gouvernement, ce n'est pas le fait de permettre aux investisseurs étrangers de détenir une plus grande part des compagnies aériennes qui favorise la création de plus de transporteurs à très bas taux au Canada.[Traduction]

La réduction des coûts d’exploitation des compagnies aériennes permet de réduire les coûts pour les voyageurs, et non l’origine du capital. Des compagnies aériennes à bas prix verront le jour au Canada uniquement lorsque le gouvernement décidera d’aider le secteur aérien plutôt que de le saigner.

Accroître la limite de propriété étrangère des compagnies aériennes pourrait également entraîner une hausse de l’exportation des bénéfices générés au Canada vers des intérêts étrangers, qui ne seraient alors pas réinvestis dans notre secteur.

Cela dit, nous ne nous opposons pas à l’idée du gouvernement d’autoriser la propriété étrangère à concurrence de 49 %. Néanmoins, nous demandons que ce changement s'accompagne du principe de réciprocité chez nos partenaires étrangers. Autrement dit, si nous autorisons les investisseurs étrangers à détenir 49 % des intérêts de nos compagnies aériennes, nous devrions bénéficier du même privilège dans leur pays.[Français]

Je serais curieux de savoir si notre gouvernement a amorcé un dialogue avec nos principaux partenaires d'affaires concernant la réciprocité en matière d'augmentation des limites de la propriété étrangère des transporteurs aériens canadiens.[Traduction]

Les droits des passagers sont souvent au coeur des discussions au Canada, et le gouvernement tient à ce qu'ils soient protégés par la loi. Entre autres mesures étudiées par le ministre, il y a l'imposition de normes d’indemnisation des passagers pour les retards de vols et les refus d’embarquement à cause de facteurs qui relèvent du transporteur, ainsi que pour la perte ou le bris de bagages. Par ailleurs, le ministre désire clarifier les règles qui permettent aux enfants de s’asseoir avec un parent sans frais supplémentaires et les règles qui régissent le transport d’instruments de musique.[Français]

Nous cautionnons le fait que le gouvernement veut simplifier les règles pour les voyageurs et leur faciliter l'accès à de l'assistance lorsqu'ils se trouvent dans des circonstances inhabituelles où ces règles ne sont pas observées.[Traduction]

Sachez que plus de 140 millions de personnes ont voyagé par avion au Canada en 2016. Le nombre de plaintes déposées chaque année à l’Office des transports du Canada était bien inférieur à 500. Je soulève ce point pour vous donner une idée de la véritable ampleur du problème. Bien entendu, certaines plaintes demeurent dans la sphère du transporteur, mais malgré tout, la vaste majorité des voyageurs ont une expérience positive.

Selon nous, les mesures législatives sur les droits des passagers devraient comporter trois grands principes.

(1450)

[Français]

L'un des principes fondamentaux du projet de loi est que la décision de décoller ou non doit appartenir au pilote. Le risque de subir des répercussions financières graves, voire excessives, ne devrait pas influencer la décision du pilote.[Traduction]

Ensuite, les dédommagements versés aux passagers qui ont subi des désagréments devraient correspondre aux réalités économiques du transport aérien au Canada. Les dédommagements financiers abusifs qui sont disproportionnés par rapport au chiffre d'affaires des transporteurs réalisé pour un vol donné ne peuvent qu'entraîner la détérioration de notre réseau de transport aérien enviable et même la diminution des services offerts sur certains itinéraires.[Français]

À titre d'exemple, les droits des passagers aériens en Europe sont si généreux qu'un passager voyant son vol retardé ou reporté peut obtenir un dédommagement qui excède largement le prix même du billet.[Traduction]

Ces façons de faire ne peuvent qu'entraîner la hausse des coûts imposés aux compagnies aériennes et à tous les passagers.

La responsabilité commune est un autre principe majeur. On ne peut tenir une compagnie aérienne responsable des événements qui sont indépendants de sa volonté. Le ministre a dit que « [l]es normes d’indemnisation font partie des mesures à l’étude [et que] [c]es normes s’appliqueraient aux passagers qui se sont vu refuser l’embarquement à cause de facteurs qui relèvent du transporteur ». On doit définir clairement les facteurs qui relèvent directement du transporteur.

Un transporteur peut certes prendre la décision d'annuler ou de retarder un vol, mais la raison qui le justifie peut être totalement indépendante de sa volonté. Les conditions météorologiques, les retards au sol causés par la congestion dans la zone de dégivrage, le déblaiement des neiges, la congestion à l'aéroport d'arrivée et le contrôle du trafic aérien influencent tous la décision du transporteur. En outre, certains retards sont liés à la sécurité.

La sécurité des passagers est l'aspect le plus important pour les pilotes et les compagnies aériennes. Les retards liés à la sécurité ne devraient pas entraîner de pénalités pour les transporteurs. La loi devrait s'attaquer à la façon dont les compagnies aériennes gèrent de tels retards de vol.

J'ajouterais que l'application d'une politique universelle est tellement répandue à Transports Canada et que la politique du ministère ne peut tout simplement pas s'appliquer ici. On ne peut pas imposer aux aéroports éloignés et du Nord les normes d'indemnisation qui s'appliquent aux grands aéroports du Sud du pays.[Français]

La facilité de se conformer à la loi, la gestion des plaintes et la convivialité pour les passagers sont des éléments qui dépendent tous de la complexité des règles qui accompagneront les modifications proposées à la loi.[Traduction]

Nous souhaitons seulement que le gouvernement travaille en collaboration avec les parties intéressées à l'ébauche des nouveaux règlements afférents au projet de loi. Après quoi, l'objectif du ministre, celui d'améliorer l'expérience des passagers, sera réalisable.[Français]

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur McKenna.

Nous passons aux questions de Mme Block.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins de leur présence. Je vous remercie de vos témoignages et je suis impatiente d'entendre toutes les questions qui seront posées et toutes les réponses qui seront fournies au cours de la prochaine heure.

Ma première question s'adresse à vous, monsieur Lavin.

Je repense à votre déclaration préliminaire, et vous avez parlé de recommandations clés du groupe d'experts Emerson dans le cadre de l'examen de la Loi sur les transports au Canada consistant à réduire les taxes s'appliquant à cette industrie. Ensuite, vous avez souligné que le ministre Garneau avait promis une réduction, et que le projet de loi C-49 ne traite aucunement des problèmes liés aux coûts. Vous avez aussi déclaré avoir hâte d'appuyer le ministre lors de la mise en oeuvre de cette deuxième phase.

Je veux obtenir des précisions. Croyez-vous comprendre que nous répéterons ce processus quant à l'étude du projet de loi C-49 et que nous inclurons à ce moment-là certains de ces changements? Croyez-vous que nous nous retrouverons ici dans un an ou deux?

M. Douglas Lavin:

Je ne peux parler au nom du ministre ou du gouvernement quant à ce qu'ils prévoient faire. Je peux seulement vous dire que lorsque nous avons interrogé le ministre à ce sujet, il nous a assuré que cette question serait réglée au cours de la deuxième phase. Comme je l'ai dit, c'est la priorité de nos transporteurs aériens qui utilisent les aéroports du Canada.

Comme vous le savez, le Canada obtient des cotes élevées pour son infrastructure d'aviation. Il occupe le premier rang au monde à ce chapitre. Toutefois, il se classe au 68e rang sur le plan des frais et des taxes. Cela a d'importantes répercussions sur les transporteurs aériens qui viennent au pays.

Comme l'a indiqué M. McKenna, nous ne croyons pas que les mesures sur la propriété et les mesures de contrôles changeront la donne ici et qu'elles favoriseront la création de transporteurs à bas prix, car le plus grand facteur qui empêche les transporteurs de mener des activités ici au Canada, ce sont les coûts d'entreprise élevés.

J'ai bon espoir que les choses changeront dans la deuxième phase. J'aurais voulu que cela se passe dans la première, mais peu importe la manière proposée par le ministre, nous serons prêts.

(1455)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

Ma question s'adresse à n'importe quels témoins. À votre avis, le projet de loi C-49 fera-t-il augmenter ou baisser les coûts du transport aérien au Canada?

M. John McKenna:

Si vous me le permettez, comme je l'ai mentionné, tout dépend de l'indemnisation prévue, du cadre établi. Si l'indemnisation n'est pas raisonnable, il ne peut qu'en résulter une hausse des coûts au bout du compte.

Je vous donne un exemple. Deux de mes frères sont revenus d'Europe cet été, et leur vol a été retardé d'une journée. Ils ont tous les deux obtenu une indemnisation qui était de loin supérieure au prix du billet aller-retour qu'ils avaient payé. Je veux dire que la mise en place de ce type de politique ne va que faire grimper les coûts pour tout le monde.

M. Douglas Lavin:

De notre côté, nous savons que forcément, si le gouvernement, dans un sens, réglemente de nouveau l'industrie du transport aérien dans le cadre d'un nouveau régime de droits des passagers, les coûts augmenteront. Voilà pourquoi, dans ma déclaration préliminaire, j'ai indiqué que nous trouvions essentiel que les organismes de réglementation mènent une analyse coûts-avantages. Aux États-Unis, lorsque les organismes de réglementation ont examiné la question des règlements sur les droits des passagers, trois ensembles différents de règlements, ils ont évalué les coûts et ont dit qu'ils prouveraient les avantages plus tard. Ce n'est pas de cette façon que l'on fait une analyse coûts-avantages.

Or, les coûts grimperont. Encore une fois, c'est un problème important qui existe au Canada.

Mme Kelly Block:

D'accord. Je veux revenir sur la question, car de ce côté-ci, nous trouvons que le projet de loi est au mieux ambigu quant aux éléments qui portent sur la déclaration des droits des passagers. Nous savons que ce sera à l'OTC d'établir les détails dans un règlement. Je pense que vous avez dit que ce n'est pas le meilleur modèle et qu'en fait, il est préférable d'adopter une autre démarche. Vous avez dit que 70 gouvernements ou plus se sont penchés sur la question.

Pouvez-vous seulement nous expliquer quelle serait la meilleure façon de créer une déclaration des droits des passagers, selon vous?

M. Douglas Lavin:

Oui, comme je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration, l'approche la plus efficace, selon nous, consiste à s'assurer que le passager comprend bien ce qu'il achète en se procurant un billet.

L'un des dangers de la réglementation sur les droits des passagers est le fait que le service offert aux voyageurs fait l'objet d'une concurrence dynamique entre les compagnies aériennes. Elles rivalisent à ce niveau. Par conséquent, si on instaure un régime de droits des passagers aériens, on élimine une partie de la concurrence. En Australie, à Singapour et dans d'autres marchés émergents — et à vrai dire c'est ce que l'OTC a fait l'an dernier —, on s'est assuré de garantir une certaine transparence, de sorte que les passagers puissent déterminer ce qu'ils sont prêts à payer.

Tous les sondages et toutes les enquêtes révèlent que la préoccupation numéro un des voyageurs d'agrément est le coût du billet d'avion.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous.

(1500)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Monsieur Lavin, j'ai un problème avec ce que vous avez dit un peu plus tôt. Vous dites qu'il y a 70 pays qui se sont penchés sur cette question, que certains ont emprunté la voie législative et que d'autres ont obligé les compagnies aériennes à indiquer clairement ce qu'elles offraient en échange d'un billet. Si le gouvernement doit demander aux compagnies aériennes de nous dire ce qu'elles nous vendent, c'est forcément parce qu'elles ne nous disent pas exactement ce qu'elles nous vendent à l'heure actuelle. Qu'en est-il?

M. Douglas Lavin:

Dans ces pays, le gouvernement estime que ces compagnies ne sont pas aussi claires qu'elles le devraient. Par exemple, aux États-Unis, ceux qui ont déjà consulté un contrat de transport savent que c'est un document très complexe et volumineux. Il est difficile pour les passagers de naviguer dans ce document. Le gouvernement a donc exigé que les compagnies le rédigent en langage clair et l'affichent sur leur site Web de manière à ce que les passagers puissent le consulter et le comprendre. L'IATA est d'ailleurs très en faveur de ce type... Nous sommes donc tous favorables à un régime de droits des passagers aériens. La transparence est importante.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends, mais pourquoi le gouvernement devrait-il dire aux compagnies aériennes ce qu'elles devraient nous dire? Ne devraient-elles pas déjà le faire? Selon vous, pourquoi est-ce le niveau de service que nous devrions exiger?

M. Douglas Lavin:

Je ne suis pas en train de dire que les gouvernements devraient intervenir. Si vous regardez la situation ailleurs dans le monde, vous constaterez que le nombre d'annulations et de retards a diminué. Il en va de même pour les bagages perdus. Depuis 1996, le prix des billets d'avion a chuté de 64 %. Je ne vois pas pourquoi le gouvernement devrait intervenir. Cependant, les gouvernements aiment intervenir de temps à autre, alors s'ils le font, il faudrait que ce soit de la manière la plus transparente possible pour le passager.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour revenir aux propos de M. McKenna — et j'invite tout le monde à répondre — il semble y avoir eu quelque 500 plaintes sur... Quatorze millions de voyages?

M. John McKenna:

Cent quarante millions de voyages.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien. Est-ce possible que les gens ne se plaignent pas parce qu'ils sont si habitués aux problèmes qu'ils ne voient tout simplement pas le but de se plaindre? Je vous le demande par expérience, car je suis allé passer mes vacances en Californie en janvier. Pour le retour, j'ai pris un vol d'United Airlines, qui est reconnu pour son service à la clientèle.

Durant le vol de Los Angeles à Chicago, l'équipage n'a jamais circulé avec le chariot. Il n'a pas passé une seule fois pour offrir un service et n'a répondu à aucune demande, et personne ne s'est plaint, car tout le monde était habitué à ce niveau de service à la clientèle.

Cela dit, si on n'a que 500 plaintes pour 140 millions de voyages, c'est peut-être parce que les gens sont habitués à un service médiocre. Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. John McKenna:

Tout d'abord, vous auriez dû voyager avec une compagnie canadienne. Vous auriez assurément reçu un meilleur service.

Ce matin, on a posé la question au ministre à savoir pourquoi on emprunte la voie réglementaire plutôt que la voie législative. Le ministre a répondu qu'il était plus facile de modifier un règlement que de modifier une loi. J'ai fait affaire avec Transports Canada pendant 15 ans, et je peux vous dire que rien n'est facile. Les règlements peuvent être très complexes et difficiles à suivre.

Je suis d'accord avec M. Lavin. Peu importe ce que vous décidez, il faut que ce soit clair et transparent pour les gens. Nous attendons des changements réglementaires depuis 10 ans et nous ne les avons pas encore. C'est la même chose du côté des lois, alors je ne crois pas que ce soit la solution. En revanche, je considère qu'il est plus facile pour les passagers de trouver quelque chose dans un projet de loi ou dans une loi que de passer à travers les règlements de Transports Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

J'aurais une autre brève question pour M. Priestley. Vous avez parlé des problèmes de planification à long terme. Pourriez-vous nous décrire concrètement les différences entre l'espace aérien intérieur du Nord et celui du Sud, et ce que cela représente pour vous?

M. Glenn Priestley:

Comme je l'ai dit précédemment, nous avons un grand nombre de routes longues et isolées. Un vol quotidien d'ici à Iqaluit équivaut maintenant à un vol d'ici à Toronto ou Montréal. Il y a un tout nouveau terminal qui a ouvert pas plus tard qu'hier. On a effectué de bons investissements dans les infrastructures à Iqaluit. Cependant, des problèmes persistent dans les 115 autres aéroports dans le Nord. Il y a un grand manque d'infrastructures.

Supposons qu'on doit aller à Pangnirtung. Pangnirtung est située à une heure et quart d'Iqaluit. On peut s'y rendre à bord d'un ATR-500 par une belle journée, et on peut embarquer 40 passagers. Toutefois, si les conditions météorologiques ne sont pas favorables, par exemple, si le vent souffle dans le mauvais sens — parce qu'on peut seulement y aller dans un sens —, on ne peut prendre que 20 passagers. Nous devons donc réduire notre charge en fonction des conditions locales.

À l'inverse, il y a des fois où on se rend encore plus au nord. Il y a évidemment Rankin Inlet de l'autre côté et Resolute. Il arrive souvent, en raison des conditions météorologiques, par exemple, qu'on ne puisse s'y rendre et qu'on doive rebrousser chemin.

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, nos passagers ont conclu un partenariat avec nous. Ils comprennent la situation. Le citoyen moyen, au sud du 55e parallèle, voyage deux fois par année, alors qu'au nord du 55e parallèle, il effectue six voyages par année.

(1505)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie nos invités d'être parmi nous.

Je commencerai par poser une question à M. Lavin.

J'ai bien entendu vos récriminations sur le coût élevé des taxes, sur les tarifs élevés et sur l'importance de réduire le loyer des aéroports. Le gouvernement envisage la possibilité de privatiser les aéroports afin de constituer une mise de fonds pour la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada. Ce n'a pas encore fait l'objet d'une annonce, et peut-être que cela ne se fera pas, mais le gouvernement a cela dans ses cartons.

J'ai donc envie de vous poser la question suivante: croyez-vous que la privatisation de nos aéroports vous apportera de meilleurs tarifs de loyer que sous l'administration actuelle? [Traduction]

M. Douglas Lavin:

Je vous remercie pour cette question.

Pour ce qui est de la privatisation — et je sais que ce n'est pas le sujet du projet de loi  C-49, mais on en a parlé —, c'est l'une de nos grandes préoccupations. Il y a des moyens plus faciles de régler le loyer que la privatisation. Le gouvernement a perçu tellement d'argent en loyer que cela représente bien plus que le prix de la terre qui a été cédée au départ.

Nous sommes très préoccupés par la privatisation, parce que les aéroports ont une emprise importante sur le marché, et ils peuvent abuser de ce pouvoir dans le cadre d'une privatisation. Si on va de l'avant avec la privatisation, il faudrait adopter un règlement très rigoureux pour s'assurer qu'ils n'imposent pas des frais excessifs aux compagnies aériennes pour des projets pour lesquels on n'a aucune capacité de leur fournir des directives. Il faudrait absolument avoir un organisme indépendant pour interjeter appel sur ces questions. À l'instar des États-Unis, nous nous opposons fortement à la privatisation. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

J'ai sursauté un peu en entendant vos propos d'introduction, plus particulièrement quand vous avez dit que, dans certains pays ayant adopté une charte où l'ensemble des problèmes usuels est déjà codifié, il y a parfois des amendes qui vont au-delà du préjudice causé aux voyageurs.

Comment évaluez-vous ce préjudice? Comment pouvez-vous dire que l'amende vous apparaît déraisonnable par rapport au problème qui a été causé aux voyageurs? [Traduction]

M. Douglas Lavin:

Je suis désolé, mais je n'ai pas bien compris votre question. Pourriez-vous la répéter s'il vous plaît? [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Oui.

Vous avez dit tantôt que, dans certains pays qui ont une charte, les compagnies doivent verser aux voyageurs ayant subi un inconvénient une compensation supérieure à ce que l'inconvénient leur coûte réellement. Comment évaluez-vous cela? [Traduction]

M. Douglas Lavin:

Merci.

L'Europe est certainement un très bon exemple des dangers associés au dédommagement qui va au-delà de la perte de temps ou de biens. En Europe, en raison des amendes élevées qui sont imposées même pour des retards minimes, nous avons vu des entreprises aider des passagers à percevoir des amendes qui vont au-delà des dommages subis. Par exemple, les entreprises peuvent aider un passager à cibler un vol qui est constamment retardé, pour lequel le passager va payer 20 euros et en obtiendra 670 pour le retard, qu'il divisera ensuite avec l'entreprise. C'est le genre de chose qu'on voit en Europe et cela pourrait se faire ici également.

Je crois qu'il est important que les gens sachent que les passagers bénéficient de protections considérables ici, mais si vous avez d'autres questions là-dessus, j'y répondrai volontiers. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

J'aimerais maintenant parler à mes collègues musiciens. Nous recevons rarement des musiciens autour de la table.

Je vous souhaite la bienvenue.

J'ai moi-même une formation en chant classique. C'est un instrument assez facile à transporter, car il ne prend pas plus de place que moi. J'imagine aisément que, si on met un stradivarius dans la soute à bagages et qu'on ne met pas deux ou trois valises par dessus, cela peut aller. Or, j'ai une amie qui est violoncelliste et dont l'instrument vaut plus cher que ma résidence. Dans ma tête, c'est la limite. Certains achètent un billet supplémentaire pour pouvoir voyager avec leur instrument. Dans le cas de la contrebasse, on n'en parle plus.

Quel élément souhaitez-vous qu'on inclue dans la charte des passagers pour protéger l'ensemble des instruments? J'imagine que certains des plus gros instruments, comme les contrebasses, doivent obligatoirement voyager en soute.

(1510)

[Traduction]

M. Allistair Elliott:

C'est une très bonne question. Je vous remercie de me la poser.

De toute évidence, les contrebasses ne pourront pas être rangées dans la cabine. Nous sommes conscients qu'il faut avoir des attentes raisonnables à l'égard de la réglementation. Je pense que ce qui nous importe le plus, c'est l'uniformité. À l'heure actuelle, il n'y a pas d'uniformité. Il est donc très difficile de planifier un voyage lorsqu'on a un instrument, car on ne sait jamais ce qui va se passer avant d'arriver à la porte d'embarquement. C'est donc ce qui nous pose le plus grand problème à l'heure actuelle.

Bien entendu, les contrebasses ne seront pas acceptées à bord de l'avion. Elles devront aller dans la soute à bagages. Il est arrivé qu'un musicien se présente... En fait, j'ai reçu deux appels cet été de deux musiciens concernant deux différentes compagnies aériennes. Dans le cas du premier, on lui avait dit qu'il pouvait amener son instrument à bord de l'avion et, une fois à l'aéroport, il n'en était plus ainsi. Évidemment, cela a causé un retard, et différentes mesures ont dû être prises. Encore une fois, notre plus grande préoccupation est le manque d'uniformité dans les politiques en vigueur.

La présidente:

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Sean Fraser:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais poursuivre dans la même veine, mais tout juste avant, monsieur Aubin, sachez que je suis également musicien. Je joue de la cornemuse depuis environ 25 ans. Peut-être que si vous et moi voyageons ensemble, nous pourrions acheter un seul billet et je pourrais vous mettre dans le coffre supérieur.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

M. Sean Fraser: Je suis curieux. L'une des choses qui a attiré mon attention, évidemment, était le fait que lorsque les musiciens voyagent, ils ne le font pas toujours à des fins d'agrément. Ils apportent une contribution énorme aux arts et à la culture au Canada. Quelqu'un a-t-il déjà évalué l'impact économique de l'incapacité des musiciens à voyager lorsqu'ils éprouvent de tels problèmes?

M. Allistair Elliott:

Pas à ma connaissance.

M. Sean Fraser:

C'était facile.

Madame Schutzman, vous alliez répondre. Si vous voulez saisir cette occasion...

Mme Francine Schutzman (présidente, Local 180, Musicians Association of Ottawa-Gatineau, Fédération canadienne des musiciens):

Je voulais simplement dire que si les gens qui possèdent de gros instruments savent à l'avance qu'ils ne pourront pas les transporter, ils peuvent acheter un type d'étui dans lequel ils emballeront leur instrument. Si on vous a dit que vous pouviez apporter votre instrument à bord de l'avion, et que vous n'avez pas cet étui avec vous, c'est à ce moment-là que l'instrument peut être endommagé.

M. Sean Fraser:

Il semble que vous parliez sur la même note — sans mauvais jeu de mots — que les autres témoins. S'il y avait une plus grande transparence, et que vous saviez exactement ce qui vous attend, est-ce que cela réglerait les problèmes?

M. Allistair Elliott:

Je crois que oui.

M. Sean Fraser:

Très bien. C'est très utile.

Dans un autre ordre d'idées, plusieurs autres témoins ont parlé de l'importance de s'assurer que les amendes ne se rapportent qu'à ce qui est du ressort de la compagnie aérienne. Le ministre a également dit ce matin que c'était son intention. Y a-t-il quelque chose dans le libellé du projet de loi C-49 qui vous fait croire que ce ne sera pas le cas?

Monsieur Lavin, la parole est à vous.

M. Douglas Lavin:

Le libellé en soi ne nous inquiète pas, mais comme M. McKenna l'a dit, c'est plutôt les détails de la réglementation qui risquent de poser problème. Permettez-moi de vous donner un exemple. Qu'est-ce qui est du « ressort » d'une compagnie aérienne? On a notamment parlé des tempêtes de neige. Cela s'est déjà vu, et je pense que tout le monde serait d'accord pour dire que ce n'est pas quelque chose qui est du ressort de la compagnie aérienne. En revanche, qu'en est-il d'un bris mécanique? Qu'est-ce qui se passe lorsqu'il faut réparer une pièce et qu'un passager conteste la décision de la compagnie en disant qu'elle aurait pu réparer cette défaillance à un autre moment? Doit-on mener une enquête pour déterminer ce qui a causé le bris au départ?

Au Royaume-Uni, par exemple, les tribunaux ont déterminé que... Du moins, en Europe, on utilise la norme des circonstances extraordinaires — c'est-à-dire qu'on n'impose pas d'amende à une compagnie aérienne si les circonstances qui ont causé le retard sont exceptionnelles. Un tribunal au Royaume-Uni a déterminé qu'un orage majeur ne constituait pas une circonstance extraordinaire en ce sens que la compagnie aérienne aurait dû prévoir un risque d'orage en juillet. Encore une fois, avec les retards dans l'aire de trafic, avec toutes les différentes choses, la définition doit être très subjective. Par conséquent, nous n'avons pas de certitude, ce qui entraîne de la confusion pour les compagnies aériennes et les passagers.

(1515)

M. Sean Fraser:

Maintenant, comment peut-on obtenir ce niveau de certitude? Je songe notamment aux retards dus aux intempéries. Personne ne va blâmer la compagnie aérienne pour cela, mais si la compagnie aérienne a décidé de réduire ses coûts en cours de route et n'était pas outillée pour faire face aux conditions météorologiques habituelles, je pense que cela s'inscrit dans la lignée du projet de loi. Peut-on couper la poire en deux?

M. Douglas Lavin:

Je ne suis pas sûr que vous puissiez, et c'est là la difficulté à laquelle nous sommes confrontés, par exemple, dans le cas d'un retard au sol de trois heures. Je pense qu'il est important de reconnaître l'expérience des États-Unis en cas de retards sur l'aire de trafic. Si l'on dit qu'après trois heures d'attente sur l'aire de trafic, cela constitue un retard, en réalité, il s'agit plutôt d'un retard de deux heures, car la compagnie aérienne doit retourner à la porte d'embarquement dans les deux heures qui suivent l'embarquement. Comment expliquez-vous... Pensez à un vol international. Vous attendez sur l'aire de trafic pendant deux heures et vous vous apprêtez à vous envoler vers l'Europe. Le prochain vol a lieu dans 24 heures. On vous dit qu'il faut rebrousser chemin parce qu'il se peut qu'il y ait un retard sur l'aire de trafic.

Nous croyons que les compagnies aériennes sont très sensibilisées aux retards sur l'aire de trafic. C'est en quelque sorte une ressource gaspillée sur la piste. Alors si c'est de leur ressort, ils vont faire tout ce qui est en leur pouvoir pour revenir. Par conséquent, je ne crois pas qu'il devrait y avoir une règle stricte pour cette raison. De plus, il est très difficile de définir ce qui est du « ressort » de la compagnie aérienne.

M. Sean Fraser:

D'accord.

Monsieur McKenna, vous avez indiqué que vous n'étiez pas nécessairement contre la propriété étrangère, mais que vous aviez tout de même quelques réserves, et que la réciprocité serait une bonne chose, dans la mesure du possible. Qu'en est-il de la propriété étrangère ailleurs dans le monde? Je pense notamment aux États-Unis, au Royaume-Uni, à l'Union européenne. Quelles règles les autres pays ont-ils adoptées à l'égard de la propriété étrangère?

M. John McKenna:

Je n'ai pas la réponse à toutes vos questions.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je n'ai peut-être pas posé la question au bon groupe. Le représentant de l'IATA aurait sans doute la réponse.

M. John McKenna:

Oui. Je ne crois pas que les États-Unis y sont très favorables.

Je vais laisser mon collègue répondre à cette question.

M. Douglas Lavin:

Les États-Unis ne sont pas encore prêts à accepter cela. Toutefois, l'Union européenne, dans le cadre d'une entente avec les États-Unis, a assoupli ses règles concernant la propriété étrangère.

M. Sean Fraser:

Seulement entre les États-Unis et l'Union européenne?

M. Douglas Lavin:

Oui, c'est exact. Pour ce qui est des autres, je ne suis pas certain. Je connais seulement la situation des États-Unis et de l'Union européenne.

L'IATA souhaiterait généralement que les compagnies aériennes soient traitées comme toute autre entreprise. À ce sujet, et je suis sûr que vous avez déjà entendu cette expression au Parlement, nous comptons des amis des deux côtés, et nous votons avec nos amis. Toutefois, de façon générale, je dirais que les compagnies aériennes devraient être traitées comme toutes les autres entreprises.

M. Sean Fraser:

Merci beaucoup.

La présidente:

Monsieur Hardie, vous avez la parole.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur Lavin, vous avez parlé d'enfiler l'aiguille, et je suis d'accord avec vous. C'est effectivement le cas. En tant que parlementaires, nous examinons les dossiers qui nous sont acheminés. Lorsqu'une compagnie aérienne fait quelque chose de mal et que les gens demandent à ce que des mesures soient prises, ils ne se tournent pas vers vous, mais bien vers nous. Il y a eu l'histoire de cette pauvre famille qui s'est vu refuser l'embarquement pour le vol qu'elle avait réservé. Elle a été retardée d'une journée et a dû ensuite débourser 4 000 $ supplémentaires pour prendre l'avion qu'elle avait déjà réservé. C'est ce genre d'erreur de jugement qui soulève l'ire du public. C'est nous qui ressentons cette pression. Vous pouvez le comprendre.

Il y a deux choses dont il faut tenir compte, deux mots clés: jugement et attentes. Vous dites que les passagers devraient avoir des attentes claires lorsqu'ils se procurent un billet d'avion. Si vous offrez à quelqu'un un billet d'avion pour Toronto à 95 $, mais en précisant que ses bagages seront acheminés à Whitehorse, cette personne ne sera pas intéressée.

Regardons la séquence logique de la transaction. Si j'achète un billet d'avion, je m'attends à embarquer dans cet avion et à me rendre à destination avec mes effets personnels. On peut comprendre qu'il y ait des délais. Ce sont des choses qui peuvent arriver. J'ai raconté avoir déjà passé une journée sur le tarmac à Kelowna à attendre qu'un problème de sécurité soit réglé. Prenez tout votre temps, messieurs. Je ne veux pas m'envoler si je ne peux pas atterrir en toute sécurité.

Mais, qu'en est-il des passagers qui doivent prendre un vol de correspondance? Personnellement, ça va. Je me rends à destination. Je n'ai aucun problème. Mais, qu'en est-il des vols de correspondance? N'est-il pas raisonnable pour les gens qui prévoient leurs déplacements de s'attendre à arriver à temps afin de prendre leur vol de correspondance? N'êtes-vous pas d'accord que les passagers qui doivent passer la nuit ailleurs qu'à leur destination et engager des dépenses supplémentaires devraient être admissibles à une certaine indemnité?

(1520)

M. Douglas Lavin:

Vous soulevez plusieurs points. D'abord, je dois admettre que je ne vous envie pas votre emploi de politicien et que je ne prétends pas être un politicien. Je suis conscient que la pression est sur vous dans ce genre de situations.

Je crois qu'il est important de souligner qu'il s'agit ici d'activités très irrégulières. On les appelle des activités irrégulières pour une raison: il y a moins de délais et moins d'annulations. Les bagages arrivent là où ils sont censés arriver.

Vous avez parlé de la sécurité. Je ne crois pas que vous prétendiez qu'il faille outrepasser une question de sécurité pour s'assurer que les gens arrivent à temps pour leur vol de correspondance. Pour nous, c'est la sécurité qui prime.

Ce que je dis, c'est que, effectivement, certaines circonstances sont inacceptables. La question est de savoir si la réglementation tient compte de ces circonstances.

M. Ken Hardie:

Lorsque vos membres ne tiennent pas compte de ces circonstances, la réglementation doit le faire. Évidemment, vous ne placerez pas les passagers dans une situation dangereuse, mais, soyons honnêtes, c'est vous qui êtes responsables de l'appareil et de son entretien, notamment. Dans ce cas-ci, l'avion n'était pas apte à voler pour une certaine période de temps. Que faites-vous? Pour offrir un bon service à la clientèle, que proposez-vous pour les gens qui ratent leur vol de correspondance?

M. Douglas Lavin:

Toute compagnie aérienne compétitive fait de son mieux pour accommoder les passagers dans ce genre de situations.

M. Ken Hardie:

Oui, mais, comment?

M. Douglas Lavin:

Elles modifient la réservation des passagers pour un vol prévu plus tard, elles les logent dans des hôtels, le cas échéant. Les compagnies aériennes peuvent faire différentes choses pour accommoder leurs passagers et, encore une fois, leurs bilans en témoignent.

Les situations auxquelles vous faites référence ne me sont pas familières. Des compagnies aériennes sont déjà venues témoigner devant vous et d'autres suivront. Il serait préférable de leur adresser vos questions au sujet des circonstances particulières.

Ce que je tiens à souligner, c'est qu'en 1987, vos prédécesseurs ont convenu de déréglementer l'industrie, car, selon eux, le secteur privé et les mécanismes de marché seraient en mesure de faire un meilleur travail, et aucune donnée ne vient les contredire.

M. Ken Hardie:

Dans certains cas, monsieur, je ne suis pas d'accord avec vous.

J'aimerais parler du service dans le Nord, car c'est très important. Le fait de laisser la libre entreprise et les forces du marché porter le fardeau a entraîné une hausse faramineuse des prix pour se rendre dans la région. J'ai vérifié les prix et ils sont très élevés. Évidemment, les citoyens de cette région ont beaucoup de difficultés à se déplacer.

Existe-t-il une solution? Faudrait-il une sorte de subvention gouvernementale pour faire baisser les prix ou y a-t-il une autre option? Monsieur Priestley?

M. Glenn Priestley:

La région située au nord du 55e parallèle, le nord géographique, représente près de la moitié du territoire canadien et compte une population équivalente à celle de la ville de Kingston. C'est un problème, une source de préoccupation. Que font les exploitants? La configuration de tous nos appareils peut être modifiée afin d'accroître la capacité de chargement. Il y a toujours des cargaisons à transporter vers le nord. Parfois, il y a peu de passagers. En moins d'une heure, nous pouvons modifier la configuration de l'appareil pour accueillir une plus grande cargaison, s'il y a lieu. Parfois, une telle modification de la configuration n'est pas possible et nous devons refuser l'embarquement à certains voyageurs.

Je ne peux pas répondre à votre question au sujet des coûts. C'est une question économique. Il est tout simplement très dispendieux de voyager dans le Nord. Ce qui nous inquiète, c'est les initiatives de modernisation de la LTC, comme la question de l'accessibilité et de l'assurance, que l'on songe à inclure dans la Loi sur les transports au Canada. Ces initiatives ne feront qu'augmenter le prix des billets.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Priestley.

Monsieur Chong, vous avez la parole.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur McKenna, j'aimerais vous poser une question au sujet de la coentreprise. Je sais que M. Lavin a refusé de se prononcer sur le sujet.

Monsieur McKenna, que pensez-vous de ces coentreprises proposées dans le passé par les compagnies aériennes, comme celle conclue entre Air Canada et United Airlines en 2011?

M. John McKenna:

En fait, nous étudions toujours cette question et ne pouvons pas nous prononcer pour le moment. Je suis convaincu que vous accueillerez d'autres compagnies aériennes plus tard aujourd'hui et que celles-ci pourront se prononcer sur la question et je suis impatient d'entendre ce qu'elles auront à dire.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Monsieur Priestley, auriez-vous une opinion à formuler sur la question?

M. Glenn Priestley:

Non.

Hon. Michael Chong:

D'accord.

Madame la présidente, je n'ai pas d'autres questions.

La présidente:

Excellent. Pardonnez-moi, je ne voulais pas vous manquer de respect.

Monsieur Badawey, vous avez la parole.

M. Vance Badawey:

Je n'ai aucune question.

La présidente:

M. Badawey n'a aucune question à ajouter.

Monsieur Godin, vous avez la parole. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Ma première question s'adresse à M. Lavin.

Lors de votre présentation d'ouverture, vous avez dit que vous espériez que les frais d'aéroport allaient être diminués. C'est un élément important pour vous. Vous affirmez que le ministre n'a pas prévu cela dans cette première phase du projet de loi C-49. Je trouve malheureux que ce projet de loi n'aille pas assez loin.

Pensez-vous qu'il est possible d'intégrer dans ce projet de loi des mesures pour diminuer les frais d'aéroport et également respecter la charte des passagers et leur désir que leur expérience de voyage soit améliorée?

(1525)

[Traduction]

M. Douglas Lavin:

J'hésite à remettre en question la capacité du projet de loi C-49 à régler ce problème. Ce serait davantage votre responsabilité que la mienne. Tout ce que je peux dire, c'est que les frais d'aéroports, entre autres, sont une source de préoccupation pour l'industrie aérienne. Il s'agit d'un obstacle important pour toute compagnie aérienne qui offre des vols à destination du Canada. Par exemple, ces frais nuisent aux ambitions de Toronto ou de Vancouver qui souhaitent devenir des plaques tournantes au pays. Jusqu'à maintenant, elles ont perçu 58 milliards de dollars et s'attendent à percevoir 12 milliards de dollars supplémentaires. À notre avis, ces frais ne sont pas concurrentiels avec le reste du monde. Nous espérons que vous pourrez trouver une solution, certainement en ce qui a trait aux droits des passagers — je vous ai déjà fait part de notre position et celle-ci est très claire — et je crois que nous pourrons travailler en étroite collaboration.

Nous avons beaucoup de respect pour l'OTC et Transports Canada et nous espérons que ce qu'ils proposeront après le projet de loi C-49 sera raisonnable. Toutefois, le prix élevé des billets pour les vols domestiques est la principale priorité des compagnies aériennes et des passagers. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Je vais pousser plus loin cette interrogation.

Vous êtes capable de déceler certains frais qui sont peut-être abusifs — je me permets d'utiliser ce mot — et qui pourraient être limités, réduits ou éliminés. Êtes-vous capable de déterminer quels frais, dans la facture totale, vous pourriez retirer si vous étiez à la place du ministre?

En fait, c'est un jeu de rôle que je vous demande de faire, cet après-midi. [Traduction]

M. Douglas Lavin:

Il est clair que les frais d'aéroports sont un problème important. Le droit pour la sécurité des passagers du transport aérien est l'un des plus élevés au monde. Le fait que le prix que paient les utilisateurs comprenne tant de coûts et que le gouvernement lui-même n'investit pas ce qu'il devrait investir en matière de sécurité... D'ailleurs, il laisse les passagers porter ce fardeau et les coûts dépassent les services offerts. Selon les estimations... Comme je l'ai souligné plus tôt, le prix de base des billets à l'échelle mondiale est 64 % moins élevé qu'il ne l'était en 1996 en dollars indexés. Au Canada, c'est une tout autre chose. Je n'ai pas les chiffres avec moi. Peut-être le prix de base des billets est-il 64 % moins élevé, mais les frais qui y sont ajoutés — ces taxes et frais peuvent représenter 50 à 60 % du tarif de base — constitue le principal obstacle à la création d'une industrie de l'aviation commerciale prospère et dynamique au Canada. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Merci.

En ce qui a trait à la diminution des frais, vous avez lancé des pistes de solution et nous en avons pris bonne note.

Revenons à l'expérience du client. Plutôt que d'imposer une contravention ou une conséquence sévère à la compagnie, vous suggérez que le passager soit informé. Vous voulez qu'on s'inspire de l'Australie et de la Chine en ce qui concerne la transparence. Croyez-vous sincèrement que cette démarche pourrait avoir un effet positif sur l'expérience des clients canadiens? [Traduction]

M. Douglas Lavin:

Cette approche en Australie et en Chine, notamment, a entraîné une baisse des prix ainsi qu'une diminution du nombre de délais et d'annulations.

Si vous me le permettez, il est important de reconnaître que les Canadiens jouissent déjà de droits des passagers. Premièrement, le Canada est l'un des pays signataires de la Convention de Montréal qui fixe un plafond quant à l'indemnité que peuvent recevoir les passagers en cas de perte de bagages et d'annulations. Ces droits existent déjà.

Deuxièmement, comme l'a souligné M. McKenna, la LTC propose des processus qui lui sont propres. Plus de 95 % des plaintes — 95 % — sont résolues entre les compagnies aériennes et les passagers. Outre la question des frais, je crois que la transparence dont il est question dans le projet de loi C-49 serait l'approche la plus logique.

(1530)

[Français]

M. Joël Godin:

J'ai une dernière question rapide.

Êtes-vous favorable au statu quo, ou pensez-vous que le projet de loi C-49 améliorera l'expérience du client? [Traduction]

M. Douglas Lavin:

Je m'inquiète qu'il ne permette pas d'améliorer l'expérience du client, car il éliminera plutôt la concurrence en matière de service en harmonisant les normes. Je crois également que les conséquences involontaires seront très dangereuses et que les prix augmenteront. La seule option pour les compagnies aériennes sera de refiler aux passagers ces coûts supplémentaires.

Merci. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Merci, monsieur Lavin.

Merci, madame la présidente. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin, vous avez la parole. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais discuter avec M. McKenna quelques minutes.

Vous avez fait des recommandations relativement à une réglementation à venir, qui n'est malheureusement pas présente dans le projet de loi C-49. J'espère que l'Office des transports du Canada vous a entendu et que nous pourrons reprendre cette discussion un jour.

Je vous ai aussi entendu parler de propriété étrangère. Selon vous, il n'a aucunement été démontré que l'augmentation de la propriété étrangère allait entraîner l'arrivée de compagnies à bas prix ou des réductions de prix chez les compagnies existantes.

Vous m'avez étonné quand vous avez dit qu'il n'existait aucune réciprocité. J'aimerais que vous expliquiez un peu ce que vous entendez par là. Voulez-vous dire que nous aurions dû inclure de telles ententes dans les accords de libre-échange, comme celui conclu avec l'Union européenne? Est-ce selon le principe d'un à un, par exemple un investisseur britannique ne pourrait investir dans une compagnie canadienne que dans la mesure où des investisseurs canadiens pourraient aussi le faire en Grande-Bretagne?

M. John McKenna:

C'est exactement ce que je voulais dire.

La réciprocité veut dire qu'un droit nous est accordé si nous l'accordons aux investisseurs d'un pays étranger. Ainsi, si les Américains veulent investir au Canada, aurions-nous le droit, en vertu d'un principe de réciprocité, d'investir dans une compagnie aérienne américaine jusqu'à concurrence de 49 % ou 25 % par investisseur, selon le cas? C'est la question que nous soulevons.

En effet, cet aspect pourrait faire partie d'une entente de libre-échange à l'échelle nationale, et pas nécessairement entre compagnies.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Je reviens vers les musiciens.

J'ai bien compris que vous souhaitez que les services d'une compagnie à l'autre aient la plus grande cohérence ou uniformité possible. Toutefois, j'aimerais que vous mettiez le doigt sur des éléments précis qui nous permettraient de trouver cette cohérence pour toutes les compagnies.

Est-ce l'accès aux espaces à bagages supérieurs réservés aux instruments? Est-ce la capacité pour les compagnies d'avoir des équipements pressurisés qui permettent de mettre les plus gros instruments en soute? Quelles normes minimales souhaiteriez-vous que chacune des compagnies aériennes reconnaisse? [Traduction]

M. Allistair Elliott:

Nous faisons référence à ce que nos collègues américains ont vécu au cours des dernières années avec l'adoption de la FAA Modernization Reform Act, en 2012. Je n'ai pas les détails en mémoire, mais il s'est dégagé un consensus sur la possibilité de ranger les instruments de musique dans les compartiments de rangement supérieur. Si la taille des instruments le permet, ils peuvent être rangés dans ces compartiments au lieu d'être rangés avec les autres bagages ou déchargés.

Si je ne m'abuse, cette loi impose une limite de poids plutôt qu'une limite de taille. Comme nous l'avons déjà fait remarquer, les valises des musiciens ont parfois des formes étranges et ne peuvent pas être rangées dans les petits compartiments réservés aux bagages à main. C'est ce qui a changé. Cette loi n'aborde pas le rangement des instruments ou les compartiments pressurisés sous les appareils. Nous sommes conscients qu'il y a beaucoup d'argent associé à cette question. Les choses ne sont pas allées aussi loin.

Ce que nous souhaitons plus que tout, c'est une harmonisation des règles concernant le rangement des instruments dans les compartiments de rangement supérieur.

(1535)

Mme Francine Schutzman:

J'aimerais ajouter que, si j'ai bien compris, la pratique actuelle chez Air Canada est de permettre le préembarquement des musiciens. Je crois que nous avons tous déjà vu des bagages rangés dans les compartiments de rangement supérieur qui auraient facilement pu être rangés sous les sièges.

C'est une question d'équilibre. Lorsqu'il est question d'un objet aussi précieux, l'idée de le ranger dans un compartiment pressurisé, comme les animaux... Nous avons entendu des histoires d'animaux blessés dans les compartiments pressurisés. Les instruments font partie de nos vies. Ils sont une partie de nous et nous voulons les garder aussi près de nous que possible. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Ceci met fin à notre première série de questions. Quelqu'un d'autre aimerait intervenir?

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je serai bref. J'aimerais simplement terminer la discussion que j'avais amorcée avec M. Priestley avant d'être interrompu.

Par simple curiosité, combien de nos aéroports dans le Nord disposent de choses que nous tenons pour acquis dans le Sud, comme des pistes d'atterrissage pavées, des tours de contrôle ou des ILS?

M. Glenn Priestley:

Neuf des 117 aéroports, et seulement cinq d'entre elles ont toutes les choses que vous avez mentionnées.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela met les choses en perspective. Merci.

La présidente:

Madame Block, vous avez la parole.

Mme Kelly Block:

J'aurais simplement une autre question à poser. J'aimerais revenir sur les observations que j'ai faites au sujet de la phase deux. Je ne peux m'en empêcher sachant que le rapport du groupe d'experts Emerson découle du fait que nous avons précipité un examen législatif. Cet examen législatif doit avoir lieu tous les 10 ans.

Si nous croyons que la phase deux sera réalisée d'ici 10 ans, j'ai hâte de voir ce qui se produira. Il n'est pas nécessaire d'attendre 10 ans, mais rien ne nous oblige à faire cet examen plus tôt. D'ailleurs, des témoins ont recommandé l'ajout de dispositions au projet de loi C-49 exigeant la tenue d'un examen des changements apportés, car le projet de loi ne contient aucune disposition en ce sens.

Quelles mesures devrait-on ajouter au projet de loi C-49 pour éloigner les préoccupations que vous avez soulevées au sujet des coûts que doivent engager les passagers aériens et, selon vous, y a-t-il des circonstances où le projet de loi C-49, dans sa forme actuelle, entraînerait une baisse des prix?

M. Douglas Lavin:

Je vais répondre. Je ne vois aucune circonstance où le projet de loi C-49 à lui seul entraînerait une réduction des prix.

Encore une fois, nous aurions souhaité que le projet de loi se concentre davantage sur les prix. D'abord, nous avons déjà déclaré que nous souhaitons l'élimination des frais d'aéroport, mais même une élimination progressive de ces frais serait utile. Une réduction des frais de l'ACSTA et un investissement supplémentaire du gouvernement en matière de sécurité seraient les bienvenus, plutôt que d'obliger les passagers aériens à porter ce fardeau. Le rapport Emerson parle beaucoup de la façon dont l'ACSTA pourrait être restructurée afin de traiter les problèmes associés aux zones d'inspection et de modifier l'approche unique en vigueur.

Toutes ces choses ont un impact sur la compétitivité des compagnies aériennes au Canada. Le ministre a parlé de la propriété... Dans ses commentaires, le ministre ne parle que de la propriété et du contrôle pour réduire les prix, ce qui, en théorie, entraînerait une augmentation de la concurrence sur le marché. Encore une fois, M. McKenna et moi avons déjà dit que nous en doutons beaucoup, étant donné le prix élevé à payer pour faire des affaires au Canada. Ce n'est pas la propriété ou le contrôle qui empêche les compagnies aériennes de venir ici pour faire des affaires.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Godin, vous avez la parole.

(1540)

[Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Ma question, qui sera très rapide, s'adresse à M. McKenna.

Corrigez-moi si ce n'est pas ce que vous avez affirmé, mais je crois que vous avez mentionné que le coût des remboursements aurait une incidence sur les frais imposés aux voyageurs. Autrement dit, ce coût déterminerait si les frais doivent augmenter ou diminuer.

Est-ce bien ce que vous avez affirmé?

M. John McKenna:

J'ai dit que si ce projet de loi ou les règlements connexes qui seront pris par la suite imposent aux compagnies aériennes qu'elles versent des compensations aussi élevées, il va de soi que le prix des billets va finir par augmenter.

M. Joël Godin:

D'accord. Cela m'amène à ma deuxième question.

Cet été, mon fils est allé à Victoria. En raison de circonstances particulières, Air Canada lui a proposé de céder sa place, ce qui impliquait pour lui une attente de 24 heures à l'aéroport. Quand on est jeune, on peut sans problème dormir sur des banquettes d'aéroport, mais les gens plus âgés préfèrent bénéficier de plus de confort. Quoi qu'il en soit, mon fils a accepté l'offre. Le coût de son billet était d'environ 435 $, mais on lui a offert 800 $.

Le fait d'offrir une compensation supérieure au coût du billet est-il une pratique qui a cours dans l'industrie?

M. John McKenna:

Vous parlez d'une situation où l'on demande à un, deux ou trois passagers de quitter un appareil et où, pour ce faire, on leur offre une compensation importante. C'est très différent d'une situation où la compagnie aérienne doit offrir une compensation à l'ensemble des passagers à cause d'un retard. Cela ne représente pas du tout les mêmes coûts pour la compagnie. Ce genre de pratique existe. En effet, les compagnies aériennes veulent inciter ces gens à quitter l'appareil volontairement, sans que cela donne lieu à des plaintes ou à d'autres problèmes du genre. On ne parle vraiment pas des mêmes circonstances.

M. Joël Godin:

D'accord, merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Tout le monde est content? Avez-vous tous suffisamment d'information?

Je remercie les témoins. L'après-midi a été long pour vous aussi alors nous vous remercions d'être venus et d'avoir partagé vos idées avec nous.

Nous allons suspendre les travaux pour permettre au prochain groupe de témoins de s'installer.

(1540)

(1550)

La présidente:

Nous reprenons les travaux.

Nos témoins et notre personnel sont prêts. Nous n'aurons droit qu'à une courte pause entre ce groupe-ci et le suivant, alors si nous pouvions gagner cinq minutes, cela ferait notre affaire.

Nous recevons les représentants d'Air Transat, de l'Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien, de l'Association canadienne des automobilistes et du Conseil national des lignes aériennes du Canada.

Je vous remercie de votre présence. Qui aimerait commencer?

Je ne vois pas de volontaire. Est-ce que les représentants d'Air Transat veulent bien commencer? Veuillez vous présenter et faire votre déclaration préliminaire. Merci. [Français]

M. Bernard Bussières (vice-président, Affaires juridiques, et secrétaire de la société Transat A.T. inc., Air Transat):

Merci, madame la présidente et chers membres du Comité.

Je m'appelle Bernard Bussières. Je suis vice-président des affaires juridiques de Transat. Je suis accompagné de mon collègue George Petsikas, directeur principal des affaires gouvernementales.

Transat est honorée d'avoir été invitée à comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui dans le cadre de votre étude du projet de loi C-49, Loi sur la modernisation des transports.

Depuis notre fondation en 1987, nous avons toujours collaboré de manière assidue et proactive avec les décideurs gouvernementaux, les législateurs et les autorités de réglementation dans le but de formuler une politique avisée qui assure la croissance d'une industrie importante au Canada, celle du voyage et du tourisme. C'est dans cet esprit que nous nous présentons devant vous aujourd'hui.

(1555)

[Traduction]

Vous devriez avoir à votre disposition un mémoire détaillé que nous avons transmis à la greffière du Comité plus tôt ce mois-ci. Nous aimerions profiter des quelques minutes qui nous sont accordées cet après-midi pour apporter des éléments de réflexion supplémentaires et reprendre quelques points clés de notre mémoire qui, nous le croyons, enrichiront vos délibérations.[Français]

En premier lieu, nous considérons le projet de loi C-49 comme une première étape visant à résoudre certains défis auxquels doit faire face l'industrie du transport aérien, qui est d'une importance vitale pour le Canada. En effet, bien que le projet de loi tente d'intégrer certaines des recommandations du rapport Emerson, il ne se prononce pas sur certains aspects critiques comme la politique fiscale sectorielle, la compétitivité des coûts, le financement des infrastructures aériennes, la révision du modèle de l'utilisateur-payeur, pas plus que sur la gouvernance des aéroports.

Nous demandons au gouvernement fédéral d'effectuer un suivi à cet égard dans les plus brefs délais, afin d'assurer une amélioration approfondie intégrale des politiques qui touchent notre industrie ainsi que les voyageurs.[Traduction]

En ce qui concerne le cadre régissant les droits des consommateurs prévu par le projet de loi C-49, Transat figure parmi les premiers acteurs de l’industrie à avoir accueilli favorablement cette initiative lorsque le projet de loi a été déposé devant le Parlement. Comme nous l’avons clairement indiqué à cette occasion, nous sommes prêts à travailler en étroite collaboration avec le gouvernement, les instances réglementaires et nos collègues de l’industrie afin d’élaborer un cadre juste et équilibré pour l’indemnisation et la prestation des services de soutien nécessaires à nos clients dans le but d’améliorer leur expérience de voyage.

Nous vous renvoyons à nos observations supplémentaires sur ce sujet dans notre mémoire et nous réitérons notre appui aux interventions que nos collègues du CNLA ont fait à ce propos aujourd’hui. [Français]

Aujourd'hui, nous aimerions mettre l'accent sur nos principales préoccupations concernant le projet de loi C-49, lesquelles sont motivées par les dispositions relatives aux coentreprises aériennes. À première vue, ces dispositions semblent anodines, mais elles ne le sont pas. Elles sont obscures et complexes, j'en conviens aisément. Dans notre mémoire, nous avons tenté d'expliquer en détail pourquoi elles constituent dans les faits une menace à long terme pour une concurrence saine dans notre industrie et pour l'atteinte d'un équilibre juste et raisonnable entre l'intérêt public et l'intérêt du consommateur aérien.

Par conséquent, nous invitons les membres du Comité à tenir compte de ce qui suit lorsqu'ils traiteront des modifications que nous proposons aux dispositions.[Traduction]

Transat ne cherche aucunement à faire obstruction dans ce dossier. En effet, de nombreux facteurs peuvent faire en sorte que les coentreprises de transporteurs aériens soient en mesure d’offrir un plus large éventail de services, de destinations et d’avantages aux voyageurs, aux collectivités et à l’économie du Canada.

C'est une bonne chose, bien sûr, mais à notre avis, cela ne doit pas se faire au détriment des consommateurs. En termes simples, les efforts du gouvernement pour rééquilibrer l’intérêt public et l’intérêt des consommateurs auront en réalité pour effet de favoriser le premier au détriment du second, ce qui nuira à terme à une saine concurrence.[Français]

La norme omniprésente de l'intérêt public, qui est une caractéristique commune de toute loi visant à conférer des pouvoirs résiduels à l'autorité ministérielle pour traiter un large éventail de questions et de circonstances indéfinies, n'est pas suffisante dans sa formulation actuelle pour justifier la neutralisation d'un contrôle, en vertu de la Loi sur la concurrence, des ententes potentiellement anticoncurrentielles entre les partenaires d'une coentreprise aérienne.[Traduction]

La conservation et la coordination de fonctions critiques telles que le développement d’itinéraires, le déploiement de capacités, la détermination des tarifs, etc. entre les partenaires d’une coentreprise devraient être considérées comme une fusion de facto de ces entités commerciales. Les lois existantes suffisent à déterminer si ces types d’accords entre concurrents favorisent l’intérêt public.

En effet, nous croyons qu’il incombe aux parties qui préconisent des dispositions spécifiques pour la coentreprise de démontrer pourquoi elles sont nécessaires et pourquoi elles ne pourraient pas atteindre leurs objectifs commerciaux autrement.[Français]

Il faut toujours se rappeler que des commissaires de la concurrence ont, par le passé, exprimé de sérieuses inquiétudes concernant les comportements anticoncurrentiels potentiels des coentreprises aériennes, plus particulièrement lorsque celles-ci contrôlent une importante part de marché. Ce n'est donc pas seulement Transat qui formule cette mise en garde.[Traduction]

En outre, et comme nous l'avons déjà mentionné, nous reconnaissons qu'il faut souvent atteindre un équilibre législatif et politique entre le concept de l’intérêt public ou national et le concept de l’intérêt des consommateurs au sens plus étroit, ce que le droit de la concurrence surveille d’ailleurs. Cet équilibre a déjà été atteint dans le secteur des transports grâce aux dispositions relatives à la fusion incorporées à la Loi sur les transports au Canada, élaborées conjointement par le commissaire de la concurrence et le ministre des Transports.

(1600)

[Français]

Par conséquent, au lieu de réinventer la roue, nous proposons, pour plus de clarté et de cohérence, que les dispositions liées aux fusions soient largement adoptées aux fins d'examen et d'approbation des coentreprises. Le processus que nous proposons serait plus transparent, car le rapport du commissaire de la concurrence et la décision d'immuniser une coentreprise seraient alors rendus publics.[Traduction]

Il permettrait de justifier les choix du gouverneur en conseil, avec l’apport de tous les ministères concernés, au lieu d’accorder au ministre des Transports la responsabilité exclusive d’immuniser les coentreprises par une décision qui ne nécessite aucune publication.[Français]

Cela entraînerait une décision exécutoire aussi bien du commissaire de la concurrence que du ministre des Transports, qui ont des connaissances et responsabilités différentes à l'égard de la coentreprise.[Traduction]

Il comprendrait un processus d’examen périodique afin de s’assurer que les conséquences de la coentreprise continuent de justifier l’immunité contre la Loi sur la concurrence.[Français]

En conclusion, la nécessité d'un processus équitable, transparent et public concernant l'immunisation des coentreprises de compagnies aériennes contre la concurrence est particulièrement importante dans le contexte canadien, où l'industrie est dominée par un transporteur important. Nous croyons que notre proposition, qui reflète le processus actuellement prévu dans le cas de fusions dans le secteur des transports, répond à ces objectifs.

Nous vous remercions de votre aimable attention et nous sommes à votre disposition pour répondre à vos questions. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Parry de l'Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien.

M. Neil Parry (vice-président, Prestation de services, Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien):

Bonjour et merci, madame la présidente.

Je m'appelle Neil Parry. Je suis le vice-président de la prestation des services de l'Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien, aussi appelée l'ACSTA. Je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de témoigner devant vous aujourd'hui.

Comme bon nombre d'entre vous le savent, l'ACSTA est une société d'État mandataire financée au moyen de crédits parlementaires, qui relève du Parlement par l'entremise du ministre des Transports. L'ACSTA est responsable des mesures — directes ou prises par un fournisseur de services — visant un contrôle efficace des personnes qui montent à bord des avions ou qui accèdent à une zone contrôlée par l'entremise des points de contrôle. De plus, les biens que ces personnes ont en leur possession font l'objet d'un contrôle, tout comme les biens ou les bagages qu'elles donnent à une compagnie aérienne aux fins du transport.

À titre d'autorité de contrôle de la sécurité de l'aviation civile du Canada, l'ACSTA est réglementée par Transports Canada et est désignée à titre d'autorité nationale en la matière. L'ACSTA est assujettie aux lois, à la réglementation et aux procédures nationales en ce qui a trait à la façon dont elle réalise ses activités et ses contrôles. Dans ce contexte, le mandat de l'ACSTA comprend quatre responsabilités de base dans le domaine de la sécurité de l'aviation: le contrôle des passagers préalable à l'embarquement, le contrôle des bagages enregistrés, le contrôle des non-passagers et le Programme de carte d'identité pour les zones réglementées.

Étant donné la nature de la réunion d'aujourd'hui sur l'examen du projet de loi C-49, Loi sur la modernisation des transports, mes commentaires se centreront sur les modifications relatives à la Loi sur l’Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien. De façon précise, mes commentaires porteront sur le recouvrement des coûts des activités de contrôle de la sécurité dans les aéroports du Canada.

Le projet de loi  C-49 vise à apporter deux modifications à la Loi sur l'ACSTA. Ces modifications officialiseraient les pouvoirs en matière de politique associés aux initiatives de recouvrement des coûts des aéroports désignés qui souhaitent accélérer le contrôle des passagers, de même qu'au recouvrement des coûts des aéroports non désignés. Ces services dépasseraient le mandat de l'ACSTA et nécessiteraient l'autorisation du ministre des Transports.

Sous la direction de Transports Canada, l'ACSTA a jusqu'à maintenant entrepris deux essais en matière de recouvrement des coûts. En 2014, l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto a demandé l'approbation du ministre des Transports pour l'achat d'une capacité de contrôle supplémentaire directement auprès de l'ACSTA aux fins des opérations de contrôle préembarquement. Après avoir reçu l'autorisation du ministre, nous avons conclu un accord avec l'AAGT afin de lui vendre des heures de contrôle supplémentaires. En juin dernier, nous avons conclu une entente d'essai similaire avec l'Autorité portuaire de Vancouver, pour les mêmes besoins.

En 2015, Transports Canada a modifié la réglementation pour permettre aux aéroports non désignés de conclure des accords de recouvrement des coûts avec l'ACSTA en vue d'attirer de nouveaux circuits commerciaux et d'accroître le développement économique. Ces aéroports doivent répondre aux mêmes exigences que les aéroports de catégorie 3 du Canada. Jusqu'à maintenant, l'ACSTA a tenu des consultations et discussions avec 12 aéroports non désignés et, bien qu'elles aient été productives, aucun accord n'a encore été signé.

Voilà qui met fin à mon discours préliminaire. Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions. Merci.

(1605)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Parry.

La parole est maintenant à M. Walker, de l'Association canadienne des automobilistes.

M. Jeff Walker (gestionnaire stratégique principal, Bureau national, Association canadienne des automobilistes):

Merci beaucoup.

Je m'appelle Jeff Walker. Je suis le gestionnaire stratégique principal de l'Association canadienne des automobilistes. La plupart des gens nous connaissent sous le nom de CAA.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir invité ici aujourd'hui. Je suis heureux de pouvoir vous parler du projet de loi  C-49, surtout en ce qui a trait aux droits des voyageurs aériens.

Je vais commencer par vous présenter quelques renseignements généraux sur notre rôle à l'égard des droits des voyageurs aériens. Comme bon nombre d'entre vous le savent, la CAA existe depuis plus de 100 ans. Elle a été fondée en 1913 et à cette époque, son principal mandat à titre de défenseure des intérêts des consommateurs était d'assurer la sécurité des routes et des automobilistes. Nous avons aujourd'hui 6,2 millions de membres d'un océan à l'autre, et les services que nous leur offrons dépassent largement notre mandat d'origine.

En fait, la CAA est le plus grand exploitant d'agences de voyages d'agrément au Canada, notamment grâce à son réseau de 137 boutiques et à ses services en ligne. Cela dit, nous sommes un organisme sans but lucratif et nous travaillons d'abord et avant tout dans l'intérêt de nos membres, y compris ceux qui voyagent.

Nos agents sont tous les jours en interaction avec des voyageurs aériens. Nous comprenons bien ce marché, ce qui nous permet d'adopter une position solide et éclairée en faveur des droits des voyageurs aériens, tout en reconnaissant que les intérêts de ces consommateurs sont mieux servis lorsque les transporteurs se livrent une saine concurrence.

Le régime de protection des voyageurs aériens est demeuré inchangé depuis plusieurs années au Canada, si bien que le traitement réservé aux voyageurs canadiens accuse maintenant un sérieux retard comparativement à ce qui est offert aux voyageurs américains et européens. Il est temps de retrousser nos manches et de mieux protéger les voyageurs aériens de notre pays.

Nous réalisons de nombreux sondages et effectuons des recherches auprès de nos membres. Un sondage mené auprès de Canadiens membres ou non de la CAA a révélé que plus de 90 %  — 91 % en fait — des Canadiens trouvaient que le Canada devait avoir sa propre charte des voyageurs aériens. Nous accueillons favorablement le projet de loi C-49 et l'appuyons, puisqu'il contient nombre des améliorations que nous demandons depuis plusieurs années et que nous croyons qu'il améliorera les choses pour le public voyageur. Cela dit, le projet de loi ne permettra pas d'atteindre tous les objectifs souhaités. Il laisse entre autres à un futur processus réglementaire le soin de régler des aspects très importants du traitement et des dédommagements prévus pour les voyageurs, notamment le montant auquel ils auront droit et le moment de le recevoir, et nous encourageons vivement le Comité à suivre de près ce processus. Même si ses intentions sont bonnes, le projet de loi sera considéré un échec si, au bout du compte, les voyageurs lésés ne reçoivent qu'un maigre bon de réduction pour un café en guise d'indemnisation. Nous devons tous veiller à ce que cette situation ne se produise pas.

Le projet de loi C-49 aborde certains points importants; il s'applique notamment à toutes les compagnies aériennes, qu'elles soient canadiennes ou étrangères, ainsi qu'à tous les voyageurs, qu'ils soient Canadiens ou non, afin d'éviter que certains passagers soient moins bien traités que d'autres. Il prévoit l'établissement de normes minimales concernant le traitement des passagers et les indemnités à verser en cas de retard, d'annulation, de surréservation ou de bagage perdu ou endommagé. Il traite de l'obligation, pour le transporteur, de veiller à ce que les enfants aient un siège à côté de leurs parents, et ce, sans frais supplémentaires. Il permet à l'Office des transports du Canada de recueillir et d'observer des données sur la manière dont les transporteurs traitent leurs passagers. Enfin, il donne à l'OTC le pouvoir d'étendre ses décisions aux autres passagers d'un même vol qui auraient été lésés de la même manière.

Toutefois, le projet de loi demande à ce qu'une plainte soit déposée par un passager avant que toute action puisse être entreprise. Nous sommes d'accord avec Scott Streiner, le premier dirigeant de l'OTC, et avec David Emerson, qui ont tous deux fait valoir devant le Comité plus tôt cette semaine que le régime de protection serait plus efficace si l'OTC avait le pouvoir d'ouvrir ses propres enquêtes lorsqu'il le juge nécessaire et la capacité d'appliquer ses décisions à l'ensemble de l'industrie, plutôt qu'aux passagers d'un même vol seulement, lorsqu'une situation touche les normes minimales de traitement.

Il est d'ailleurs intéressant de souligner que si l'OTC a pu convoquer une audience publique sur l'affaire ayant impliqué Air Transat il y a quelques semaines, c'est uniquement parce qu'il s'agissait d'un vol international. S'il avait été question d'un vol intérieur, l'OTC n'aurait pas eu le pouvoir de décider par lui-même de tenir une audience, même sous le régime du projet de loi C-49. Et si rien ne change, l'OTC ne pourra pas non plus enquêter sur tout problème d'ordre systémique qu'il pourrait déceler, à moins qu'une plainte soit formulée ou qu'il en fasse la demande au ministre.

Il convient aussi de souligner que la réglementation établira vraisemblablement des règles précises pour certaines situations. Par exemple, pour un retard de x heures imputable à une compagnie aérienne, les passagers devront recevoir une compensation y. Or, selon le système actuel, il faudra quand même qu'une plainte soit déposée par un passager pour qu'une indemnisation puisse être versée. Considérant que les transporteurs connaîtront d'emblée les règles du jeu, ils sauront très bien quand ils seront en faute, alors pourquoi attendre une plainte? Ne devrait-on pas plutôt indemniser les voyageurs de façon proactive dans ces situations?

C'est un élément important à considérer, surtout quand on sait que l'Association de consommateurs de l'UE a conclu dernièrement que seulement un voyageur aérien sur quatre en Europe obtenait l'indemnisation qui lui était due à la suite d'un long retard, les compagnies aériennes n'étant pas tenues de la verser automatiquement. L'ajout d'une telle clause permettrait à l'OTC de se concentrer sur les plaintes plus complexes.

(1610)



Selon l'Association du transport aérien international, 60 pays ont déjà adopté un régime protégeant les droits des voyageurs aériens. Les voyageurs du Canada, pour leur part, sont depuis trop longtemps assujettis aux politiques respectives de chaque compagnie aérienne, et doivent en plus se soumettre à un processus inutilement laborieux auprès de l'OTC en cas de plainte. Même si la grande majorité des voyages aériens se déroulent sans anicroche, il serait utile pour tout le monde — pour les voyageurs comme pour les membres de l'industrie — d'avoir un ensemble de normes clairement définies. Les transporteurs auraient alors une chance équitable de se livrer concurrence.

Or, comme je l'ai mentionné précédemment, l'efficacité du nouveau régime dépendra du processus réglementaire à venir. En tant que protecteur des consommateurs, la CAA espère que ce processus permettra d'atteindre certains objectifs.

Il faudrait premièrement que les conditions soient rédigées en langage clair et simple par les transporteurs, afin d'être faciles à comprendre par le commun des voyageurs. Deuxièmement, il faudrait des indemnisations et des normes minimales garantissant aux voyageurs qu'ils seront bien traités et, comme l'a fait valoir la secrétaire parlementaire Karen McCrimmon, il faut s'assurer que les transporteurs n'aient aucun avantage à mal servir leurs clients. Troisièmement, il faudrait que les compagnies aériennes communiquent de façon proactive les indemnisations et les normes minimales auxquelles le consommateur a droit. Quatrièmement, il faudrait des évaluations récurrentes pour vérifier que la réglementation et les indemnisations conviennent toujours. Finalement, il faudrait publier de façon périodique des rapports détaillant la façon dont les transporteurs traitent les passagers et gèrent leurs bagages, car la transparence encourage la droiture.

Nous allons participer à ce processus réglementaire pour nous assurer que les intérêts des consommateurs soient encore et toujours pris en compte. C'est un prérequis incontournable si l'on veut que les Canadiens applaudissent ce nouveau régime.

Nous vous exhortons donc à demeurer bien engagés dans ce dossier, au-delà des présentes audiences, pour vous assurer que le nouveau régime soit efficace et profitable pour tous les voyageurs aériens du Canada.

Je vous remercie. Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Walker.

La parole est maintenant à M. Bergamini, du Conseil national des lignes aériennes du Canada.

Nous vous souhaitons la bienvenue, monsieur.

M. Massimo Bergamini (président et directeur général, Conseil national des lignes aériennes du Canada):

Bonjour madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité.[Français]

Je m'appelle Massimo Bergamini et je suis président-directeur général du Conseil national des lignes aériennes du Canada.

Je tiens à vous remercier de l'occasion qui nous est offerte aujourd'hui de témoigner devant vous pour présenter la perspective de notre organisme au sujet du projet de loi C-49.

Avant de commencer, permettez-moi de dire quelques mots au sujet de notre organisme et de notre industrie.

Le Conseil national des lignes aériennes du Canada a été créé en 2008 par les quatre principales lignes aériennes du Canada, soit Air Canada, Air Transat, WestJet et Jazz, dans le but de promouvoir des politiques, des lois ainsi qu'un cadre réglementaire qui favorisent un réseau de transport aérien sécuritaire et concurrentiel.[Traduction]

Collectivement, nos membres transportent plus de 92 % du trafic aérien intérieur du Canada et 65 % de son trafic aérien international. Ils emploient directement plus de 50 000 Canadiens et contribuent à 400 000 autres emplois dans des secteurs connexes, comme l’aérospatiale et le tourisme. D’après le Conference Board du Canada, en 2012 notre industrie a contribué près de 35 milliards de dollars au PIB du Canada. Ces statistiques impressionnantes témoignent du rôle qu’une industrie de l’aviation forte et concurrentielle joue pour assurer la prospérité économique du Canada.

Mais pour en venir au point qui nous intéresse, l’aviation commerciale est devenue la seule façon pratique pour des millions de Canadiens de voyager pour rencontrer leurs familles, se rendre au travail ou simplement explorer notre vaste pays. Et ils voyagent beaucoup. D’après Statistique Canada, le nombre total de passagers embarqués et débarqués au Canada a augmenté de 30 % entre 2008 et 2016. Il est clair que l’époque de l’élite du jet set est depuis longtemps révolue.

À eux seuls, nos membres ont participé à plus de 71 millions de déplacements de passagers l’an dernier. Alors que les gens peuvent maintenant réserver un vol d’avion aussi facilement qu’ils conduisent une automobile, le voyage aérien est en voie de devenir le domaine de la classe moyenne, et non l'exclusivité du 1%. Pour les Canadiens, l’avion fait maintenant partie que de la vie quotidienne. Il est l’élément vital d’une société ouverte, diversifiée et dispersée géographiquement.

Dans notre pays, la liberté de voyager est considérée comme un acquis et le transport aérien est devenu un lien essentiel entre les gens et les collectivités. Pour citer le rapport Emerson: Le transport aérien fournit un accès et une mobilité à la main-d’oeuvre afin qu’elle se rende dans les endroits urbains, ruraux et éloignés du Canada et les aéroports et transporteurs aériens agissent comme des moteurs économiques pour les collectivités et le pays [...]

C’est la raison pour laquelle une industrie aérienne commerciale concurrentielle est si importante. C’est la raison pour laquelle ce projet de loi est si important. Et c’est la raison pour laquelle il est très important de réussir du premier coup.

Malheureusement, nous considérons que l’approche du gouvernement rate la cible.

Le Rapport Emerson a reconnu l’interconnectivité complexe sur laquelle repose l’expérience des voyages aériens et qui contribue à la compétitivité mondiale de notre industrie. Il propose une approche en trois volets qui s’attaque aux principales composantes d’une industrie aérienne concurrentielle: le coût, l’accès et l’expérience des utilisateurs. Le projet de loi C-49 n’en aborde qu’une seule: l’expérience des utilisateurs.

De notre point de vue, l’adoption du projet de loi C-49 sans mesures économiques pour s’attaquer au problème de la structure des coûts publics risque de créer d’autres déséquilibres économiques qui pourraient éventuellement nuire à ceux que le projet vise à protéger.

(1615)

[Français]

En termes clairs, même si nous trouvons que certains aspects du projet de loi nécessitent des éclaircissements — vous trouverez nos recommandations à l'annexe technique après mes commentaires —, nous ne nous inscrivons pas en faux contre le projet de loi et nous ne nous opposons d'aucune façon à son adoption.

Nous sommes toutefois préoccupés par le fait que l'approche du gouvernement revient à mettre la charrue avant les boeufs.

Instaurer un système de pénalités économiques comme cadre pour aborder les problèmes de services, sans régler en même temps la structure des coûts publics, risque d'avoir une incidence négative sur l'industrie et, au bout du compte, sur les passagers.[Traduction]

Comme M. Lavin de l’IATA l’a souligné plus tôt, l’expérience internationale sur cette question est éclairante et elle devrait être prise en compte.

Comme je l’ai souligné au moment du dépôt du projet de loi en mai dernier: Notre organisme et nos membres partagent et appuient l’engagement du ministre Garneau à s’assurer que tous les passagers aériens ont la meilleure expérience possible dans leurs voyages aériens et nous avons hâte de collaborer avec lui et avec l’Office des transports du Canada à cette fin.

Toutefois, nous reconnaissons également que l’expérience d’un voyage en avion ne commence pas avec l’enregistrement des bagages et ne se termine pas avec la récupération des bagages. Et cela ne se produit pas dans un vide économique ou systémique.

Il faut faire intervenir beaucoup d’éléments mobiles pour amener un passager à sa destination. Il faut les efforts coordonnés de centaines de personnes dévouées qui travaillent dans des sociétés aériennes, des aéroports, des tours de contrôle du trafic aérien, la sécurité aérienne et les services frontaliers. Chaque voyage est lié à un ensemble complexe de systèmes, de règlements et de coûts. Chaque élément contribue au résultat, et il convient d’examiner chacun d’entre eux lorsqu’on cherche à améliorer les services offerts aux passagers. Il ne fait aucun doute que dans ce système complexe, les capacités sont parfois sollicitées au maximum en raison de circonstances imprévues et c’est alors que des erreurs sont commises, des vols sont retardés, des bagages sont perdus et des correspondances sont manquées.

En 2016, environ 2 800 plaintes ont été formulées par des passagers à l’Office des transports du Canada. Parmi celles-ci, environ 560 ont été retirées ou ne relevaient pas du mandat de l’Office. Parmi le reste des plaintes, 97 % ont été réglées sans médiation, c'est-à-dire que la compagnie aérienne a été informée de la plainte et qu’elle a conclu une entente mutuellement satisfaisante avec ses invités sans autre intervention de l’Office. Moins de 1 % des plaintes ont été soumises à l’arbitrage.[Français]

Loin de moi l'intention de minimiser les inconvénients que connaissent parfois nos passagers. Il est toutefois important de mettre ces chiffres dans le juste contexte d'un système qui mène à bon port plus de 350 000 passagers par jour, et ce, à longueur d'année.[Traduction]

L’éclaircissement et la codification des droits des passagers, comme le fait le projet de loi C-49, sont des mesures positives qui amèneront davantage de certitude sur le marché. C’est une certitude. Nous sommes déçus toutefois que cette mesure n’ait pas été introduite conjointement avec des mesures concrètes pour s’attaquer à la structure non concurrentielle des coûts publics à laquelle notre industrie est confrontée ou les engorgements dans le système causés par le sous-financement de la sécurité aérienne et des contrôles frontaliers.

Le rapport Emerson a reconnu comment la hausse des frais et des redevances ainsi que les retards dans les contrôles de sécurité ont une incidence sur tous les voyageurs et l’efficacité de l’industrie. Il recommande d’éliminer graduellement les loyers aéroportuaires, de réformer la politique de l’utilisateur-payeur pour le transport aérien et de mettre en place des normes de rendement réglementées pour les contrôles de sécurité. Malheureusement, il n’y a aucune disposition dans le cadre fiscal quinquennal du gouvernement pour des dépenses additionnelles dans ce secteur. À lui seul, le projet de loi C-49 ne pourra rien faire pour atténuer la pression des coûts exercée sur notre industrie aérienne ou sur les engorgements dans le système qui échappent à son contrôle.

Septembre est le mois où les feuilles commencent à changer de couleur à Ottawa et c’est aussi le moment où le Parlement reprend ses activités. C’est également le moment où les délibérations budgétaires sont amorcées sérieusement au sein du gouvernement. Nous espérons que, lorsque votre comité aura terminé son étude du projet de loi et qu’il sera prêt à le renvoyer à la Chambre des communes, vous recommanderez que le gouvernement commence immédiatement à prendre les mesures nécessaires pour mettre en oeuvre les dispositions en matière de concurrence du rapport Emerson dans le cadre financier fédéral de l’an prochain. La mise en oeuvre des recommandations du rapport Emerson concernant la structure de coûts publics de l’industrie aérienne, ainsi que l’élimination des engorgements durant les contrôles de passagers, en parallèle avec les dispositions du projet de loi C-49, permettraient d’établir de nouvelles règles de jeu pour les compagnies aériennes, les aéroports, les voyageurs et, en fin de compte, pour notre pays.

Merci.

(1620)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur.

Nous passons maintenant aux questions, en commençant par Mme Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à remercier chacun d'entre vous d'être venu aujourd'hui. Je vais passer directement aux questions; six minutes, c'est vite passé.

Nous savons que le projet de loi C-49 découle de consultations menées dans la foulée de l'examen de la Loi sur les transports au Canada par le groupe d'experts Emerson, loi qui a été adoptée en toute hâte par le gouvernement précédent en 2014. Bien qu'ils soient satisfaits de certains aspects du projet de loi C-49, beaucoup de témoins ont indiqué qu'il rate la cible à bien des égards.

Parmi les aspects que j'aimerais aborder, il y a notamment les mesures que vous venez d'énumérer, qui figuraient dans le rapport Emerson, mais non dans le projet de loi. Je vous demande de nous donner plus de détails à ce sujet. Vous a-t-on consulté avant que ce projet de loi soit présenté? Avez-vous fait des recommandations au ministre Garneau quant aux mesures à inclure dans le projet de loi C-49?

M. Massimo Bergamini:

Dans le cadre des consultations, nous avons fait des recommandations au sujet du projet de loi C-49, mais aussi sur la structure des coûts de l'industrie. Nous avons des discussions avec le gouvernement, pas seulement avec le gouvernement actuel, mais avec les gouvernements précédents, car cet enjeu perdure depuis longtemps, évidemment.

Essentiellement, le problème n'est pas tant la volonté et l'engagement général du ministre Garneau. Il nous a indiqué, comme il l'a fait au Comité, je crois, qu'il envisageait une approche par étapes. Soulignons toutefois qu'en novembre, lors du dévoilement du plan Vision 2030, le ministre a indiqué qu'il travaillait l'établissement d'un ensemble de normes de rendement réglementé pour l'ACSTA.

Je peux vous dire que nous attendions avec impatience le dépôt du budget pour prendre connaissance des modifications concrètes qui seraient apportées aux normes de rendement, qui sont un élément essentiel de la solution. Évidemment, établir des normes de rendement, mais sans financement, est un exercice futile. Comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, nous étions déçus. Le budget ne comprenait aucune mesure à cet égard.

Le problème n'est pas tant l'absence de consultation ou le manque d'engagement. Le problème, ce sont les priorités politiques conflictuelles qui nécessitent l'affectation des maigres ressources financières par ce gouvernement et par tous les gouvernements.

Notre position est essentiellement la suivante: si vous choisissez de faire de cette mesure votre première étape, vous risquez que les gens se disent que tout est réglé et qu'ils peuvent passer à autre chose. Nous croyons qu'il est primordial de tenir compte de la complexité du système et d'adopter une approche systémique ou holistique à l'égard du système, ce qui nécessite du financement.

Merci.

Mme Kelly Block:

Quelqu'un souhaite ajouter quelque chose?

M. George Petsikas (directeur principal, Affaires gouvernementales et de l'industrie, Transat A.T. Inc., Air Transat):

Non, cela va.

Mme Kelly Block:

Très bien. Passons maintenant de l'approche holistique que vous espérez ou demandez aux mesures qui, selon ce qui a été dit, posent problème.

Selon vous, est-il dans l'intérêt supérieur du consommateur que les décisions relatives à l'approbation ou au rejet des coentreprises relèvent du ministre des Transports et non du Bureau de la concurrence? La question s'adresse à n'importe lequel d'entre vous.

(1625)

M. George Petsikas:

Nous allons commencer, puisque nous avons indiqué clairement nos préoccupations à cet égard.

Comme nous l'avons indiqué dans notre exposé, nous essayons d'être réalistes. Nous savons comment les choses évoluent dans le monde. Les coentreprises existent, pas seulement au Canada, mais aussi aux États-Unis et en Europe, et elles offrent beaucoup d'avantages potentiels pour les voyageurs, notamment une connectivité améliorée, plus de destinations, etc. Toutefois, nous devons tenir compte des conditions précises du contexte canadien.

Le Canada est un petit marché. Un de nos transporteurs aériens en particulier porte intérêt aux coentreprises de ce genre et aux dispositions qui auraient pour effet de dédommager cette coentreprise, de la protéger contre la surveillance, pour ainsi dire, ou l'application active de la législation sur la concurrence en transférant ce pouvoir au ministre. Nous savons de quel transporteur aérien il s'agit. Il participe actuellement à une coentreprise qui, selon les chiffres que nous avons pour 2016, contrôlait plus de 35 % des parts de marché dans 30 marchés transatlantiques. Il s'agit des trois principaux membres suivants: Air Canada, Lufthansa et United. On parle ici des vols à destination et en provenance du Canada.

Dans plusieurs de ces marchés, ce chiffre dépassait les 40 %; il était de plus de 80 % dans deux marchés et de 90 % dans un marché, la Suisse. Ce sont d'extraordinaires parts de marché, et on propose soudainement de réduire la capacité du commissaire de la concurrence de veiller aux intérêts des consommateurs, de surveiller la façon dont cette mesure sera mise en oeuvre et de déterminer si ce sera ou non dans l'intérêt à long terme des consommateurs canadiens. Voilà pourquoi nous sonnons l'alarme et vous demandons d'attendre. Le ministre a certes un rôle à jouer. Il y a bien sûr des considérations d'intérêt public qui doivent être examinées, comme la création d'emplois, la connectivité et le commerce. Tout cela est valable, et je crois savoir que nos collègues de WestJet ont parlé de connectivité hier.

Toutefois, cela ne doit pas se faire à n'importe quel prix. Ce qu'on observe ici, comme nous l'avons indiqué dans votre exposé, c'est que le pendule — la politisation du processus — oscille beaucoup trop vers la capacité du ministre de prendre cette décision sans nécessairement s'appuyer sur une contribution significative du commissaire de la concurrence, qui plus est une contribution transparente.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Ma question s'adresse aux représentants d'Air Transat.

Un jour, j'étais sur un vol en provenance de Californie qui a dû faire un atterrissage d'urgence en Arizona en raison d'une panne du système d'air climatisé. Dans l'appareil, il faisait si chaud que les pilotes ne pouvaient poursuivre le vol. Je peux vous dire à quel point une telle situation est intolérable.

Lorsque j'entends dire que des passagers sont restés pris dans un avion pendant plus de six heures, je peux vous dire sans équivoque que je trouve cela inacceptable, en particulier s'ils doivent faire un appel au 911 pour avoir de l'eau. Le Comité n'est pas une tribune pour mener une enquête ou pour discuter de tarification. Je vais donc simplement vous poser la même question que celle que j'ai posée à tous les autres transporteurs aériens: comprenez-vous pourquoi les passagers sont frustrés du niveau de service qu'ils reçoivent parfois de votre entreprise et pourquoi ils peuvent se sentir impuissants ou avoir l'impression qu'ils n'ont aucun droit?

M. George Petsikas:

Merci de la question, monsieur Sikand.

Premièrement, allons-y d'une évidence. C'était un incident extrêmement malheureux. Nous regrettons manifestement ce qui s'est produit là-bas. Nous sommes une entreprise de transport aérien fière qui sert le Canada et les Canadiens depuis 30 ans. Nous avons remporté de nombreux prix internationaux pour notre service. Ce n'est pas ainsi que nous voulions que cela se déroule. Nous avons présenté nos excuses à nos passagers. Nous participons activement, en toute transparence, à l'enquête publique de l'OTC sur cet incident. Comme vous le savez, l'OTC a tenu des audiences publiques il y a quelques semaines, et nous y avons présenté notre version des événements. Je ne veux pas répéter cela maintenant parce que cela a été dit publiquement, évidemment, et je ne crois pas que cela ajoute quoi que ce soit à la discussion que nous avons ici.

Je peux toutefois dire ceci: si nous pouvons dégager un quelconque bon côté de ce malheureux incident, c'est que cela nous sert de mise en garde. Je crois savoir que vous avez entendu, hier, nos collègues d'Air Canada et de WestJet parler d'une approche holistique et systémique pour veiller à ce que des incidents de ce genre ne se reproduisent pas à l'avenir.

Vous devez comprendre une chose. Le simple fait d'établir une obligation, une pénalité ou une amende et de dire qu'il faudra verser un montant d'argent quelconque si on ne procède pas au débarquement des passagers après un certain nombre d'heures n'aurait été d'aucune utilité pour les passagers qui étaient là ce soir-là. Je peux vous en assurer, car il n'est pas nécessaire de mettre en place des mesures incitatives d'ordre financier ou de nous menacer pour que nous menions à bien nos activités. Nos équipages veulent amener les gens à destination le plus rapidement possible et en toute sécurité.

Ce qui s'est produit résulte de la défaillance de la coordination centrale des communications au sein du système. Lorsqu'un avion vole à 35 000 pieds d'altitude à la vitesse de 600 milles à l'heure, le capitaine et son équipage contrôlent la situation, essentiellement, en collaboration avec les contrôleurs aériens, évidemment. Une fois que cet aéronef rempli de passagers se retrouve sur le tarmac d'un aéroport, il se retrouve dans un tout autre environnement. Entrent alors en scène une multitude d'intermédiaires et de fournisseurs de services qui s'affairent dans tous les sens. Habituellement, dans des circonstances normales, cela fonctionne bien. J'ai l'habitude de dire que cela ressemble à une symphonie lorsqu'un avion s'arrête à une porte d'embarquement et que les camions, les ravitailleurs et des bagagistes arrivent. Mais lorsque les choses tournent mal, comme ce fut le cas à Toronto, et que toute l'opération vire au chaos total, nous devons alors avoir un plan. Il nous faut un chef d'orchestre immédiatement. Nous suggérons respectueusement que ce rôle incombe à l'aéroport.

(1630)

M. Gagan Sikand:

Je veux juste intervenir après vous avoir entendu dire que vous avez besoin d'un plan, car mon temps est limité.

Je peux reconnaître que ce n'est pas la norme. Je prenais les vols d'Air Transat tout le temps pour me rendre en Angleterre lorsque j'étudiais là-bas.

En raison de situations comme celle-là, nous avons proposé des amendements au projet de loi C-49. J'aimerais savoir comment Air Transat ira de l'avant concernant la mise en oeuvre du projet de loi C-49.

M. George Petsikas:

Nous allons travailler avec vous. Nous allons collaborer avec l'OTC dans le cadre du processus de réglementation. Nous respecterons le verdict final en ce qui concerne la réglementation.

Le diable se cache dans les détails, si vous me permettez l'expression. De toute évidence, nous travaillons avec des mesures habilitantes. Tant que les principes de haut niveau sont approuvés, nous collaborerons avec l'OTC pour établir un cadre équilibré qui améliorera l'expérience des clients.

M. Gagan Sikand:

D'accord.

Je pense que je vais vous donner l'occasion de discuter de coentreprises. Pourriez-vous réitérer quelques-unes des remarques que vous avez formulées?

M. George Petsikas:

J'étais avec un groupe d'avocats américains ce matin au forum sur le droit aérien et spatial de l'American Bar Association à Montréal avant de conduire jusqu'ici. Il y avait un groupe d'experts en matière de droit de la concurrence, d'aviation et de concentration et du marché aux États-Unis.

Il va de soi que si des entités demandent l’immunité contre l'application des lois antitrust aux États-Unis, les coentreprises des compagnies aériennes — comme elles l'ont fait là-bas —, le gouvernement doit à tout le moins veiller à ce qu'elles aient une politique exhaustive d'ouverture des espaces aériens afin de s'assurer que la coentreprise fait l'objet de mesures disciplinaires, pour ainsi dire, par l'entremise des forces du marché, de la concurrence. Ainsi, le consommateur dispose d'une autre couche de protection.

Ce n'est pas nécessairement le cas ici. Le Canada a quelques excellents accords ouverts avec de nombreux pays, mais nous avons aussi des accords restreints avec de nombreux concurrents qui peuvent rivaliser avec les coentreprises au Canada, à savoir Atlantic plus et d'autres.

Si vous recevez l'immunité contre le droit à la concurrence et que vous recevez une protection contre la concurrence vigoureuse qui est censée protéger le consommateur, vous avez eu votre gâteau, vos biscuits aux brisures de chocolat et votre crème glacée, que vous avez pu manger aussi. À notre avis, ce n'est pas ce qu'une politique publique devrait faire.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Walker.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Bienvenue à vous tous. Je vous remercie d'être parmi nous.

Mes premières questions s'adressent aussi aux représentants d'Air Transat. Leur réponse n'était peut-être pas terminée. Ma question va dans le même sens.

Aux États-Unis, il y a un processus d'immunisation de certaines compagnies. Je ne sais pas si on parle d'harmonisation dans le projet de loi C-49, mais j'aimerais que vous établissiez, si possible dans un langage clair et simple, quels sont les points de ressemblance et les points divergents dans ce processus d'immunisation que le projet de loi C-49 tente d'établir.

M. Bernard Bussières:

Merci, monsieur le député.

Ma réponse sera plutôt d'ordre pratique.

Tout à l'heure, nous avons dit que lorsque des coentreprises travaillent ensemble pour partager les routes et établir les prix, c'est une fusion de facto. Selon la Loi sur la concurrence et la Loi sur les transports au Canada, actuellement, c'est une fusion. Dans la loi actuelle, il y a un processus en ce qui concerne les fusions.

Nous avons joint à notre mémoire une opinion d'un ancien commissaire du Bureau de la concurrence, Konrad von Finckenstein, qui est très connu et très respecté. Il a pris le temps d'analyser les dispositions proposées relativement aux fusions. Si on assujettissait les coentreprises à ces dispositions, déjà, cela répondrait aux préoccupations soulevées. Il y aurait alors un processus transparent. On pourrait présenter des exposés justificatifs et un rapport serait déposé. Ainsi, tout le monde pourrait faire des commentaires. Cela permettrait à des entreprises comme la nôtre ou à d'autres personnes, par exemple les consommateurs, d'intervenir pour qu'on détermine s'il pourrait y avoir des conséquences négatives sur elles.

C'est cet aspect que nous essayons de mettre en lumière. Nous vous demandons d'y apporter des modifications qui, somme toute, sont déjà prévues dans les lois existantes.

(1635)

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. C'est déjà beaucoup plus clair. Le simple fait que le débit était adéquat nous a permis de mieux nous comprendre.

Un élément qui est très clair dans la tête de tout consommateur et de tout passager aérien est la notion de concurrence. Nous avons peut-être tous une définition légèrement différente de la concurrence, mais nous savons bien qu'en définitive cela devrait être profitable à notre porte-monnaie.

Pour quelles raisons, en tant que passager au sein de votre compagnie ou d'une autre compagnie aérienne, devrais-je être inquiet des mesures actuelles?

M. George Petsikas:

Comme je l'ai mentionné tantôt, au Canada, nous sommes dans un contexte où il y a un joueur dominant qui détient des parts de marché dominantes, que je qualifierais même de forteresses, qui risque d'être épaulé de façon substantielle par ce qui est proposé dans le projet de loi, advenant le cas où le ministre des Transports soit d'accord pour immuniser ce joueur contre l'application de la Loi sur la concurrence. Par conséquent, nous nous retrouverions avec un joueur dominant qui pourrait potentiellement exercer une influence indue sur les prix dans un marché, contrairement à un marché compétitif proprement dit. C'est plutôt un marché compétitif qui intéresse Transat. Transat est un compétiteur de la compagnie dont nous parlons ici, soit Air Canada et ses partenaires de coentreprise.

Vous pourriez dire que j'ai intérêt à être négatif relativement à ce que ces entreprises veulent faire et à l'accroissement du réseau, mais ce n'est pas du tout le cas. Nous sommes intéressés à faire ce que nous faisons depuis 30 ans, c'est-à-dire offrir aux consommateurs un service à des prix intéressants et divers choix de destinations de voyage. Pour ce faire, il faut que le marché soit compétitif de façon structurelle.

On est en train de donner à un joueur déjà dominant la possibilité de renforcer sa dominance et, par le fait même, d'écarter les concurrents comme Transat et de les empêcher d'offrir de meilleurs prix et de meilleurs choix aux consommateurs. C'est habituellement ce qu'un marché compétitif et efficace réussit à offrir aux consommateurs. C'est un but que tout le monde veut atteindre. Or ce qui se retrouve ici est une menace à un tel contexte.

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie.

J'aimerais maintenant m'adresser au représentant de la CAA.

La première fois que j'ai lu le nom de votre association sur la liste des témoins, je pensais à ma carte de la CAA et je me demandais quelle était le lien entre votre association et notre étude, jusqu'à ce que je me rappelle que vous êtes quand même l'une des plus grandes agences de voyage.

Vous avez dit que le projet de loi C-49 pourrait être un échec pour ce qui est de la charte des droits des passagers aériens si on ne passait pas de manière efficace des principes contenus dans le projet de loi à une réglementation précise. Nous verrons ce qui arrivera dans les prochains mois.

Si je ne m'abuse, vous avez aussi mentionné que certaines choses manquaient dans cette charte ou dans l'orientation qu'on lui donne. Selon moi, lors de l'analyse d'un projet de loi, c'est aussi important d'analyser ce qu'il contient que ce qu'il a peut-être oublié. Pourriez-vous nous indiquer ce qui manque dans ces grands principes qui serviront à établir la future charte? [Traduction]

M. Jeff Walker:

À notre avis, ce qui fait défaut principalement dans le projet de loi, ce sont des mesures de mise en oeuvre qui seront offertes aux gens dans différentes circonstances lorsqu'ils ont un problème avec une compagnie aérienne. Nous ne sommes pas forcément convaincus que ces mesures doivent être incorporées dans le projet de loi. Nous voulons nous assurer cependant que l'Office des transports du Canada a suffisamment de pouvoir ou de latitude pour mettre des mesures appropriées en place et les ajuster avec le temps.

En ce qui concerne certains des points qui ont été présentés, certaines mesures qui pourraient être mises en place pourraient être trop coûteuses ou pourraient ne pas fonctionner correctement. Nous tous à cette table comprenons que si nous essayons de changer la loi parce qu'une petite ligne concernant la manutention des bagages est mal formulée, nous pourrions devoir attendre 10 ans, tandis que si nous donnons à l'OTC l'autorisation d'apporter les ajustements nécessaires au fil du temps — sous la surveillance du ministère, évidemment —, nous serons beaucoup plus en mesure de mettre un système en place qui est uniforme pour tout le monde et que nous pouvons ajuster, au besoin, pour rectifier des choses.

C'est ce qui fait défaut, mais je ne suggère pas nécessairement d'apporter un changement; je suggère seulement d'octroyer le droit à l'OTC d'effectuer des ajustements.

(1640)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Walker.

Nous allons poursuivre avec M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur Walker, vous êtes peut-être au courant de la situation qui est survenue avec la famille Thivakaran de Toronto. Elle s'est présentée à un aéroport, s'est vu refuser le droit de monter à bord de l'avion même s'il y avait des places disponibles, s'est fait dire de revenir le lendemain, puis a dû repayer pour les billets, car les réservations avaient été effectuées par l'entremise d'une agence de voyage plutôt que directement avec la compagnie aérienne. À mon avis, c'est là un exemple qui illustre l'argument selon lequel on s'oriente dans l'autre direction.

Pouvons-nous entendre vos observations à ce sujet?

M. Jeff Walker:

Je ne connais pas ce cas en détail. Ce que je comprends, c'est qu'il ne s'agissait pas de n'importe quelle agence de voyage. C'était une agence de voyage à l'extérieur du pays, et il y avait une certaine ambiguïté entourant le prix du billet. Je ne veux donc pas commenter ce cas particulier.

Toutefois, il y a un sous-élément que nous devons vraiment comprendre. D'autres personnes à cette table en ont déjà parlé. Ce que nous essayons de faire, c'est de mettre en place un système ou des pratiques destinés aux Canadiens ordinaires — aux gens qui voyagent une fois ou deux par année, comme cette famille. Ils ne s'y retrouvent pas dans un aéroport. Ils ne savent pas à qui téléphoner. Ils ne savent pas à quel comptoir se présenter. Nous devons avoir des dispositions en place pour qu'il soit facile pour ces gens qui vont à un aéroport deux fois par année, et non pas 25 fois, de savoir ce qu'ils obtiennent et de savoir qu'ils reçoivent le même service que ceux qui voyagent 25 fois par année.

M. Ken Hardie:

Monsieur Bussières, vous avez mentionné — ou peut-être c'était vous, monsieur Petsikas — que lorsque vous avez eu votre situation sur le terrain, les gens circulaient un peu partout pour connaître la suite des choses. Je pense que vous avez parlé de « chaos ».

Comme dans la situation que j'ai mentionnée avec M. Walker, où était la personne qui a dit essentiellement, « Mon Dieu, nous devons nous occuper des passagers à bord de cet avion »? Où était cette personne? [Français]

M. Bernard Bussières:

Merci de votre question, monsieur le député.

Permettez-moi de remettre en contexte ce qui s'est passé, car cette situation était exceptionnelle et absolument extraordinaire.

Les aéroports de Toronto et de Montréal ont été fermés à cause des conditions météorologiques. Vingt avions ont été déroutés sur l'aéroport d'Ottawa, dont un Airbus A380, des Boeing 777 et des Boeing 787. À bord de ces 20 avions, il y avait plus de 5 000 personnes, qui se sont retrouvées subitement et de façon imprévue à l'aéroport d'Ottawa. Il y avait des appareils de ravitaillement, mais pas de personnel. Il y avait également des manutentionnaires. C'était la situation à l'aéroport d'Ottawa et elle était exceptionnelle. [Traduction]

M. Ken Hardie:

Monsieur, sauf votre respect, je comprends... [Français]

M. Bernard Bussières:

Monsieur le député, une enquête est en cours. [Traduction]

M. Ken Hardie:

Je comprends à quel point la situation était exceptionnelle, mais nous n'avons pas reçu de plaintes concernant d'autres appareils, pas à ma connaissance.

Là encore, si vous vous apercevez que vous avez des personnes sous votre responsabilité, dans votre avion... C'est un peu une question rhétorique à ce stade-ci, et je comprends cela. Mais vous vous épargneriez bien des soucis en ayant un gouvernement à qui l'on demande d'intervenir pour régler le problème qui se présente lorsque les gens ne pensent pas, lorsqu'ils n'utilisent pas leur tête, et ne posent pas la simple question, « Qu'allons-nous faire pour nos passagers? »

Johnson & Johnson a mis la barre haute dans l'affaire de l'altération du Tylenol. L'entreprise a dit qu'elle se fichait de savoir quel était le problème, et qu'elle allait simplement le régler. Lloyd's de Londres a fait exactement la même chose à la suite du tremblement de terre à San Francisco. Elle a simplement réglé le problème et payé les réclamations.

C'est l'énoncé de valeur qui doit être affiché sur le mur de toutes les compagnies aériennes, de toutes les entreprises, en fait. Le consommateur a priorité, et nous avons manqué à notre engagement, et c'est la raison pour laquelle le gouvernement fait ce qu'il fait à l'heure actuelle.

Monsieur Bergamini, je vais parler de l'équilibre entre un système où l'utilisateur paie et un système où tout le monde paie. J'ai trouvé intéressant d'entendre l'un de nos témoins précédents mentionner que nous nous classons au premier rang dans le monde pour ce qui est de nos aéroports. Ce sont d'excellentes installations, mais nous sommes au 61e rang pour les coûts. Il ne semblait pas comprendre le lien entre les deux: le fait que nous payons des coûts élevés est la raison pour laquelle nous avons de bonnes installations.

Quel est l'équilibre approprié entre un système où l'utilisateur paie, compte tenu de tous les frais, etc., dont nous parlons, et un système où tout le monde paie, qui devient une subvention gouvernementale? Quel est l'équilibre approprié?

(1645)

M. Massimo Bergamini:

Je ne suis pas certain d'avoir une réponse simple à vous donner à cette question. Permettez-moi simplement de vous dire qu'il ne fait aucun doute que, depuis 1994 jusqu'à aujourd'hui, avec le transfert des responsabilités des aéroports aux administrations locales sans but lucratif, nous avons constaté des investissements considérables financés par les utilisateurs qui nous ont permis d'avoir des infrastructures enviables. C'est la bonne nouvelle.

La mauvaise nouvelle est que le système de gouvernance et le cadre stratégique n'ont pas évolué au même rythme. C'est fondamentalement ce dont nous discutons ici. À mesure que ce comité et ce gouvernement tentent d'améliorer l'expérience des passagers aériens, il est très important d'examiner la situation d'ensemble, tous les intervenants et tous les éléments qui jouent un rôle pour veiller à ce que les déplacements des passagers soient un succès ou un cauchemar.

En ce qui concerne le système où l'utilisateur paie — et tout ce que nous avons à faire, c'est d'examiner d'autres modes de transport qui sont fortement subventionnés —, il y a un débat sur l'équité en matière de moyens de transport que nous devrions tenir. Je peux vous dire une chose: si nous adoptons les recommandations présentées dans le rapport Emerson, annulons certaines de ces politiques historiques et investissons dans le système une partie de l'argent qui est actuellement perçu par les gouvernements ou par l'entremise des utilisateurs, et je pense que nous aurions un système de transport aérien en meilleure santé, plus concurrentiel et plus robuste. Je dirais même qu'il serait beaucoup plus facile de trouver des solutions à quelques-uns de ces problèmes que nous tentons de régler par l'entremise de règlements et du projet de loi C-49.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Bergamini.

Monsieur Bussières, gardez votre réponse à l'esprit, et si vous n'avez pas la chance de faire valoir votre argument d'ici la fin de la réunion, je m'assurerai de vous en donner l'occasion.

On vous écoute, monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Madame la présidente, je veux simplement commencer par dire que tout ce processus et ce que nous essayons d'apporter à la stratégie globale, ce sont pour les gens.

Nous essayons d'établir un équilibre entre les droits des passagers et la valeur, tout en reconnaissant le rendement attendu des entreprises. En tant qu'entrepreneur, je reconnais les défis auxquels vous et nous tous sommes confrontés. Ce qu'on m'a enseigné dans le milieu des affaires, c'est qu'on doit gérer les situations qui se présentent, un point c'est tout. Que ce soit facile ou non, vous réglez le problème. Pendant que vous le faites, vous mettez des plans en place. Vous mettez en place des plans d'urgence et vous vous préparez le mieux possible pour pouvoir faire continuellement face à ces situations, car nous reconnaissons tous que les entreprises ne fonctionnent pas toujours sans anicroche. De plus, nous devons également respecter les gens qui essaient d'assurer le bon déroulement des activités.

Cela dit, ma première question s'adresse à M. Walker. Avec l'organisation que vous représentez, il semble que le ministre des Transports ait agi assez rapidement sur ce projet de loi. C'est pourquoi nous sommes ici une semaine avant que la Chambre devait commencer à siéger. En ce qui concerne les droits des passagers aériens, qui est notre priorité dans le cadre de ce processus, en l'espace d'un an et demi, il a fixé un ensemble très exhaustif d'objectifs et un plan de réglementation pour veiller à ce que les mécanismes de protection nécessaires soient en place pour les passagers aériens canadiens. Depuis combien de temps la CAA réclame-t-elle un cadre de réglementation?

M. Jeff Walker:

Officieusement, depuis plus d'une décennie et probablement depuis que j'ai accepté d'assumer ce rôle, il y a sept ans. Depuis sept ans, nous exerçons des pressions pour obtenir ce cadre et discutons avec des gens.

M. Vance Badawey:

Cela dit, de toute évidence, nous sommes au courant des défis auxquels nous nous sommes heurtés au cours de la dernière décennie, voire depuis plus longtemps. Par « nous », j'inclus tout le monde, peu importe le gouvernement en poste. Ce n'est pas de la partisanerie. Ce sont les affaires, peu importe le secteur ou les intérêts. Nous avons reconnu ce problème au cours de la dernière décennie.

Ma question s'adresse à l'industrie. Si nous reconnaissons les difficultés auxquelles nous sommes confrontés, y avait-il un plan stratégique assorti d'objectifs? Dans le cadre de ce plan stratégique assorti d'objectifs reconnus, y avait-il un plan d'action pour chaque objectif qui reconnaissait vos difficultés depuis une décennie, en ce qui a trait à ce que vous discutez, aux attentes du gouvernement, mais plus important encore, aux attentes des passagers? Y avait-il un plan stratégique assorti d'objectifs et des plans d'action liés à ces objectifs?

(1650)

M. George Petsikas:

Faites-vous référence à des mesures et à des objectifs coordonnés de l'industrie ou de chaque transporteur?

M. Vance Badawey:

C'est pour relever les défis que les passagers reconnaissent, je ne dirais pas au quotidien, mais parfois assez fréquemment. Lorsque des situations comme celles que M. Hardie et d'autres ont mentionnées surviennent, dans votre stratégie et les objectifs que vous relevez au nom de vos clients, des passagers, quelles mesures ont été prises au cours de la dernière décennie?

M. George Petsikas:

En 2010, en tant que dirigeants du Conseil national des lignes aériennes du Canada, nous avons coordonné avec nos lignes aériennes membres la présentation de nos engagements tarifaires, qui sont des engagements contractuels à caractère obligatoire. Malheureusement, nous avons commis des erreurs dans le débat public à cet égard, car nous disons qu'il n'existe aucune mesure au Canada pour protéger le consommateur de transport aérien, mais c'est faux. Les plus grandes lignes aériennes au pays, qui sont représentées par le CNLAC et qui constituent plus de 75 % du marché, bénéficient des dispositions tarifaires contractuellement applicables concernant la surréservation et les procédures à suivre, dont le recours à des bénévoles, les indemnisations, etc. La gestion des annulations et des retards relativement au devoir de diligence, pour le remboursement des billets si le retard excède un certain nombre d'heures, est prévue dans ces dispositions. Il y a des engagements à l'égard de la livraison des bagages. Nous avons déjà un cadre très clair sur l'indemnité pour les bagages à l'échelle internationale.

Dans le cadre du projet de loi C-49, je m'aperçois que nous essayons d'établir un cadre clair pour l'indemnisation nationale. Nous n'avons aucun problème avec cela. Cependant, ces dispositions sont en place depuis 2010. Elles ne sont pas bien connues, mais ce que nous disons ici, c'est qu'elles existent et qu'elles fournissent des droits bien réels à nos clients et à nos consommateurs. Par conséquent, j'ai toujours dit que nous avons des assises avec lesquelles nous pouvons travailler, et si le ministre et le gouvernement veut maintenant codifier ce qui est déjà en place depuis 2010, à tout le moins les quatre principales lignes aériennes, je suis là. Nous pouvons le faire. Toutefois, on avait tort de dire qu'il n'y avait aucune mesure pour protéger les consommateurs des lignes aériennes au pays, comparativement aux États-Unis, à l'Europe, etc. C'est faux.

M. Vance Badawey:

Monsieur Walker, pouvez-vous vous prononcer là-dessus?

M. Jeff Walker:

Oui. Je pense que le défi, c'est que ces mesures existent dans certains cas, dans certaines lignes aériennes. Bonne chance pour les trouver sur le site Web. C'est très difficile. Notre équipe a consulté le site pour les trouver, ce qui n'a pas été une tâche facile.

Il y a aussi le fait que c'est au cas par cas. Comme je l'ai dit, revenez à ce que j'ai dit au sujet des deux voyages par année par rapport à 25 par année. Ceux qui voyagent 25 fois par année savent où trouver les ressources. Ils savent à qui téléphoner et ils savent quoi faire, mais des familles comme celles que nous avons mentionnées il y a quelques minutes n'ont pas la moindre idée des ressources à leur disposition.

M. Vance Badawey:

C'est pourquoi nous sommes ici. Je ne suis pas ici pour parler du passé. Je suis ici pour parler de l'avenir.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Tournons-nous vers l'avenir pour veiller à ce que des objectifs de planification stratégique et des mesures connexes soient en place et pour pouvoir aller de l'avant, notamment avec le projet de loi C-49.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Chong.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais faire une observation générale au sujet d'une chose que j'entends à ce comité comme au précédent aussi, et je parle du coût élevé du transport aérien au Canada. Les loyers imposés par le gouvernement et les frais aéroportuaires sont toujours blâmés, comme si c'était le seul problème, mais la réalité est telle que ce n'est pas le principal facteur expliquant la différence de coût.

Le Conference Board a produit un rapport en 2012, dans lequel il analyse pourquoi les billets d'avion sont plus chers au Canada qu'aux États-Unis. Il a constaté que nous payons environ 30 % de plus pour les voyages en avion au Canada qu'au sud de la frontière, en effet, mais que 40 % de ces coûts correspondraient aux frais aéroportuaires et aux frais de Nav Canada, puis que 60 % seraient plutôt attribuables au taux d'utilisation, à la main-d'oeuvre, au carburant et à d'autres choses qui n'ont rien à voir avec la taxe d'atterrissage et les autres frais facturés. Je tiens à le souligner pour le compte rendu: si cette proportion de 40 % compte effectivement pour beaucoup dans la différence de prix de 30 %, ce n'est pas la seule chose à laquelle elle est attribuable.

J'ai une question à vous poser sur les coentreprises. En 2011, quand Air Canada a proposé son projet de coentreprise avec United Airlines, le Bureau de la concurrence a refusé 14 routes transfrontalières prévues dans l'entente. Air Transat a-t-il réalisé une analyse des coûts de cette entente si le Bureau de la concurrence n'avait pas imposé ses conditions?

(1655)

M. George Petsikas:

Non, pas à l'époque. Nous ne l'avons pas fait.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Avez-vous de l'information ou des données pour le Comité sur la hausse de prix à laquelle on pourrait s'attendre si ce genre de coentreprise était autorisé en vertu de la nouvelle loi sans les conditions imposées par le Bureau de la concurrence?

M. George Petsikas:

Nous n'avons pas nécessairement de données empiriques qui en feraient foi. Nous avons toutefois une analyse des tendances relatives au prix des billets au Canada. En fait, le CNLA y travaille, et ses travaux montrent que les prix moyens ont baissé au Canada.

À l'échelle internationale, c'est une question que nous évaluons, mais rien ne nous porte à croire que les prix vont nécessairement augmenter si les coentreprises sont autorisées, au moins à court terme. Nous savons qu'il y a des preuves que ces entreprises détiennent déjà des parts de marché dominantes ou imbattables dans 20 des 30 marchés transatlantiques. Nous parlons là de la coentreprise Atlantic Plus-Plus. Ainsi, nous estimons que si cette transaction est protégée ou qu'elle est exemptée de l'application des lois sur la concurrence, il y a un risque assez fort que l'entreprise abuse de sa position dominante.

Nous n'accusons pas ces entreprises de vouloir le faire ou de le faire en ce moment, absolument pas. Nous disons toutefois qu'il y aurait un risque plus élevé qu'elles finissent par adopter un comportement qui ferait augmenter les prix, parce que n'importe quel économiste vous dira qu'à partir du moment où l'on domine une certaine part de marché dans un marché défini, on a le pouvoir démesuré d'influencer les prix en fonction de ses intérêts sur ce marché, et pas nécessairement en fonction des intérêts des consommateurs. Ce n'est pas moi qui le dis. N'importe quel économiste vous le dira, et cela s'applique à n'importe quel marché concurrentiel.

Je pense que ce que nous sommes en train de faire ici va exactement dans le sens contraire. Cela vient confirmer cette sage position.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Y a-t-il d'autres projets de coentreprise qui se trament, à votre connaissance?

M. George Petsikas:

Au Canada?

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Oui.

M. George Petsikas:

Non, nous ne sommes au courant d'aucun. Évidemment, le deuxième transporteur aérien en importance au Canada est WestJet, et je suis certain que ses représentants pourraient vous dire eux-mêmes si ce modèle les intéresse, mais pour ce qui est de Transat, nous cherchons toujours des façons de faire évoluer notre modèle d'affaires. Nous n'écartons aucune possibilité pour l'avenir, mais nous n'avons vraiment pas de plan en ce sens en ce moment.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Peut-on dire — et corrigez-moi si je me trompe — que les vols transfrontaliers sont plus rentables que les vols intérieurs?

M. George Petsikas:

Je vais me tourner vers mon collègue Massimo. Il peut peut-être vous répondre. Nous n'avons pas vraiment analysé la chose.

M. Massimo Bergamini:

Non, je n'ai pas de données à ce sujet.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Je n'ai pas d'autres questions, madame la présidente.

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je m'adresserai d'abord à M. Walker, puis je laisserai les autres témoins intervenir ensuite.

Je ne sais pas si vous avez entendu les témoignages du dernier groupe, mais le représentant de l'ATEI nous a dit il y a quelques minutes qu'il y a deux façons d'aborder les droits des passagers. Il y a l'approche législative ou réglementaire, comme celle que nous proposons ici, et il y a la possibilité de demander aux transporteurs aériens de bien vouloir divulguer ce qu'ils offrent quand on achète un billet.

J'interprète ce commentaire comme un aveu que les transporteurs ne le font pas actuellement. Ils ne nous disent pas ce qu'on achète quand on achète un billet. J'aimerais savoir comment vous réagissez à cela.

M. Jeff Walker:

Ce seraient des hypothèses. Je pense qu'ils en divulguent une partie, au moins aux gens qui obtiennent une indemnité. Je ne sais pas trop ce qui est divulgué au public...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pas à ce stade, mais quand on achète un billet: qu'achète-t-on exactement? Quand on achète un billet pour un vol surréservé, on se trouve en fait à acheter un billet sans réservation et l'on espère réussir à avoir un siège. On n'en sera pas certain avant d'arriver à l'aéroport. Le voyageur inexpérimenté l'apprendra à la dure.

Ils recommandent en fait de mettre en place un système par lequel nous obligerions les transporteurs à l'admettre clairement. S'ils nous disent que c'est le gouvernement qui doit le faire, c'est comme s'ils admettaient qu'ils ne le font pas eux-mêmes. Je ne sais pas si vous êtes d'accord avec cela.

M. Jeff Walker:

Oui, je pense qu'on peut dire cela. On peut dire qu'on pourrait probablement en faire plus pour informer les gens, mais je crois tout de même qu'il y a une utilité à la mise en commun, et pas seulement dans ce cas particulier. Il y a toutes sortes de facteurs qui entrent en ligne de compte, et ce peut être assez compliqué si l'on commence à donner toute l'information sur tous les scénarios possibles dans la communication d'origine.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est vrai, mais l'idée est de faire en sorte que tout le monde sache à quoi s'attendre.

Je ne sais pas si les représentants des transporteurs aériens ont quelque chose à dire à ce sujet.

Monsieur Bergamini ou les gens d'Air Transat?

(1700)

M. Massimo Bergamini:

Pour répondre à votre question, je pense qu'une plus grande transparence et une plus grande... Vous connaissez le vieil adage, bien sûr, sur l'acheteur averti. Plus le consommateur sera éduqué et informé, plus l'environnement sera concurrentiel. Cela ne fait aucun doute.

En bout de ligne, il ne faut pas oublier non plus les marges bénéficiaires extrêmement minces des transporteurs aériens, et je pense que certains de nos membres en ont parlé. Je pense que ce sont les gens de WestJet qui ont mentionné réaliser un profit d'environ 8 ou 9 $ par passager. Cela met les choses en contexte.

Quand on regarde l'industrie, je pense qu'on peut faire la comparaison entre un buffet à volonté et un restaurant chic, cinq étoiles. Quand on opte pour le buffet à volonté, on peut avoir besoin de prendre quelques médicaments après; on peut faire une petite indigestion. C'est la réalité, malheureusement, quand on a de très faibles marges bénéficiaires et qu'on a besoin de volume. C'est notre réalité. C'est la raison pour laquelle, comme nous l'avons dit, il nous faut changer les fondements économiques à la base de notre système. Faisons-le et le portrait changera radicalement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Messieurs?

M. Bernard Bussières:

Si je peux ajouter une chose, Transat est particulière, en ce sens qu'il ne s'agit pas seulement d'un transporteur aérien. Nous avons des agents de bord et offrons des voyages organisés, donc nous informons nos clients. L'une des particularités des agents de bord, c'est qu'ils ont le devoir de bien informer leurs clients.[Français]

C'est pourquoi vous avez intérêt à faire affaire avec un agent de voyage, car il va vous expliquer tout cela.

Est-ce que nous pouvons être meilleurs? Nous pouvons toujours l'être. En ce qui nous concerne, du moins, nous essayons d'être très diligents et de bien informer notre client pour qu'il connaisse ses droits et ses recours. [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Bergamini, j'ai une autre question pour vous, rapidement.

Vous parlez constamment de changer les plans financiers. Avez-vous quelque chose à nous proposer sur ce qu'il faudrait changer et comment?

M. Massimo Bergamini:

Vous pouvez lire ce que dit le rapport Emerson sur les changements à apporter au système. Je pense que nous endossons ces recommandations.

Éliminons graduellement les loyers aéroportuaires. Finançons adéquatement l'organisme pour éliminer les goulots d'étranglement qui ont des répercussions en chaîne sur le rendement de tout le système. Revoyons les taux d'imposition du carburant aviation, aux échelles fédérale comme provinciale.

Voilà autant d'éléments qui changeraient la dynamique et rapprocheraient nos conditions de celles de nos concurrents internationaux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Monsieur Parry, je crois bien que c'est à vous que je poserai mes dernières questions pendant mes dernières minutes. Il y en a une que je souhaite vous poser sur le principe de recouvrement des coûts des aéroports. Je viens d'une vaste circonscription rurale. Mont Tremblant se trouve dans ma circonscription, et il est plus près des villes que la plupart des petits aéroports ruraux. À quoi ressemblerait le modèle de recouvrement des coûts pour un petit aéroport comme le mien, qui accueille des vols saisonniers, une fois par jour ou quelques fois par semaine? Encore plus au nord, il y a très rarement de vols, mais il faut tout de même assurer la prestation des services de l'ACSTA. Que serait le modèle de recouvrement des coûts dans ces circonstances?

M. Neil Parry:

Premièrement, tout dépend des objectifs d'affaires de chaque aéroport. Dans le cas de Mont Tremblant, en particulier, il s'agit déjà d'un aéroport désigné, donc nous assurons un niveau de contrôle proportionnel au volume de vols et d'activités de l'aéroport.

Pour les aéroports non désignés qui souhaitent obtenir des services de contrôle, l'étendue des services dépend du niveau d'activités commerciales visé.

Selon toutes probabilités, et je m'avance, parce qu'il y a de tout petits aéroports non désignés, le niveau de contrôle nécessaire serait probablement, pour vous donner des chiffres, d'une ou deux lignes de contrôle plusieurs fois par semaine, dans certains cas, peut-être cinq jours par semaine dans d'autres, selon le volume d'activités. Cela pourrait équivaloir à quelque chose entre 500 000 $ et 2 millions de dollars par année.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Godin. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Ma première question va s'adresser à M. Bussières, mais j'aimerais d'abord fournir de l'information aux membres du Comité.

J'ai fait une recherche rapide sur mon iPad. Le ministre, entre autres personnes, a mentionné ce matin que rien n'avait été fait au cours des 10 dernières années. Il ne faut pas oublier que, pendant cette période, les libéraux ont été au pouvoir pendant deux ans, mais cela, c'est une autre histoire. Les conservateurs étaient donc au pouvoir pendant les huit autres années, et je vais fournir des justifications pour six de ces années.

Il faut comprendre que l'industrie de l'aviation a énormément évolué. J'aimerais vous part part de la statistique suivante: de 2010 à 2016, c'est-à-dire pendant six ans, le nombre de vols a augmenté de 31 millions. L'industrie devait donc réagir et s'ajuster. C'est probablement ce qui explique que le gouvernement ait décidé d'élaborer un projet de loi afin d'améliorer la situation.

Ce point est maintenant clarifié. Il est important de remettre les choses en perspective, de façon à bien répondre aux interrogations de certains.

Comme je l'ai mentionné, ma première question s'adresse à M. Bussières, d'Air Transat. Je vais adopter une approche différente. Ce n'est pas un tribunal, ici, et notre rôle n'est pas d'accuser cette compagnie aérienne de mal gérer la crise associée aux événements qui se sont produits à Ottawa. Ce n'est du moins pas ce que j'entends faire. J'ai l'intention d'être constructif.

Vous avez vécu cette situation, mais cela aurait pu arriver à d'autres compagnies. En effet, aucune compagnie aérienne n'est à l'abri de tels problèmes. Vous devez réagir ponctuellement, ce qui est tout à fait légitime. Cela dit, j'espère que votre réflexe est de mettre sur pied des mécanismes pour éviter de vivre d'autres problèmes de ce genre. Je suis convaincu que vous n'êtes pas heureux d'avoir à gérer ce genre de situation.

J'aimerais que vous nous disiez ce qui, selon vous, pourrait être inclus dans la charte des passagers pour contrer ce genre de situation et en minimiser les répercussions sur les Canadiens et les Canadiennes.

(1705)

M. Bernard Bussières:

Je me permets de revenir sur la situation à Ottawa, qui est rarissime, Dieu merci. Sinon, on en parlerait beaucoup plus.

Comme l'a mentionné mon collègue M. Petsikas, il s'agit d'un écosystème complexe. Les commandants qui sont à bord de leur appareil doivent prendre une décision, et pour ce faire, il faut de l'information. Plus l'information est bonne, plus la décision l'est également. Si on peut dire précisément au commandant de bord combien de temps il faudra pour faire le plein, que ce soit 30 minutes, deux heures ou trois heures, peu importe, tout le monde pourra prendre de meilleures décisions.

D'abord, je tiens à dire que nous regrettons profondément ce qui s'est produit à Ottawa. C'est la première des choses. Je vous demande néanmoins de prendre en compte le contexte lié à la situation, à savoir qu'aucune compagnie n'a fait débarquer ses passagers. Tout le monde se faisait dire que le plein se ferait au cours de la demi-heure ou des 45 minutes suivantes. Dans de telles situations, les commandants adoptent un certain état d'esprit; ils doivent prendre une décision et exercer un jugement raisonnable dans les circonstances. Il est certain que si on informe les commandants rapidement du temps précis qui sera nécessaire, les décisions seront meilleures.

Pour ce qui est de la charte des passagers, il faut mettre ces situations en contexte. Comme mes collègues l'ont mentionné, et je le répète, il s'agit d'un écosystème complexe, qui est lié à NAV CANADA, à l'aéroport et aux gens qui sont à l'intérieur de tout ce système. C'est extraordinaire de voir cela fonctionner. C'est fascinant. Le nombre de vols a augmenté de 31 millions de 2010 à 2016. Il faut une organisation considérable pour faire rouler tout cela. Or — et je touche du bois —, nous avons un système absolument extraordinaire. Imaginez les risques que prend l'ensemble des entreprises de ce secteur pour un profit de 8 $. C'est ce qu'on vient de dire.

M. Joël Godin:

Je vous arrête ici, monsieur Bussières.

Que nous conseillez-vous? Nous sommes des parlementaires, nous ne sommes pas des spécialistes en aviation. Quels éléments devrions-nous demander au ministre d'inclure dans la charte des passagers?

M. George Petsikas:

Pour être précis, je dirais qu'on doit commencer par imposer l'obligation aux aéroports d'adopter des plans d'urgence dans ce genre de situation. C'est clair.

Il faut savoir qui coordonne quoi, quels sont les liens de communication et qui on doit appeler pour avoir l'heure juste. Il faut un chef d'orchestre dans ces situations. Cette obligation devrait être imposée aux aéroports parce que ce sont eux qui ont des liens de communication avec tous les fournisseurs.

Nous faisions affaire avec un manutentionnaire à Ottawa, mais il y en a plusieurs. Ce manutentionnaire disait que cela prendrait encore 10 minutes, alors qu'un autre disait quelque chose de différent. Dans un tel cas, c'est la confusion qui règne.

De concert avec les compagnies aériennes et les autres fournisseurs, il faut adopter des plans d'urgence et avoir des liens de communication, afin de savoir qui on appelle et de communiquer cela à l'ensemble de l'industrie.

Dans le cas dont on vient de parler, notre commandant aurait pu demander qu'on lui donne l'heure juste relativement au carburant. Il aurait pu avoir un numéro de téléphone pour joindre des gens à l'aéroport, qui lui auraient dit si cela prendrait 45 minutes ou encore deux heures. Il aurait pu prendre les décisions qui s'imposaient pour ses passagers. Malheureusement, il n'y avait pas ces liens de communication.

(1710)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Nous allons donner la parole à M. Aubin, puis s'il nous reste du temps, nous la redonnerons aux députés qui ont une question à poser. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Je vais y aller d'une série de questions rapides.

Selon ce que je comprends de votre intervention, ce n'est pas votre responsabilité, mais celle de la coordination de l'aéroport. Au début de votre intervention, vous avez dit que le projet de loi C-49 ne contenait pas de mesures de gouvernance des aéroports. Est-ce à cela que vous faisiez allusion?

M. George Petsikas:

Je ne veux pas dire que nous n'avions pas de responsabilité dans la situation dont on vient de parler. Les compagnies aériennes font partie du système global et nous avons toutes une responsabilité commune.

M. Robert Aubin:

Monsieur Bussières, au début de votre intervention, vous avez dit que le projet de loi C-49 était muet quant aux mesures de gouvernance des aéroports. Est-ce à cela que vous faisiez allusion?

M. George Petsikas:

Permettez-moi de vous répondre.

Non, ce n'est pas ce à quoi nous faisions allusion. Nous parlions plutôt du système de gouvernance, c'est-à-dire la façon dont les aéroports sont gérés, comment les conseils d'administration sont formés et qui a le droit de nommer des administrateurs à ces conseils. Comme vous le savez, ces entités sont gouvernées par un conseil.

Nous considérons que cette question devrait être abordée, mais elle ne l'est pas dans le projet de loi C-49.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Monsieur Parry, j'ai une question rapide à vous poser. Elle me permettra de corroborer ou d'infirmer d'autres témoignages entendus cette semaine.

Le financement que vous recevez vous permet-il d'accomplir votre mission? C'est la façon la plus simple de vous poser la question.

M. Neil Parry:

Merci de votre question.[Traduction]

Comme vous le savez, l'ACSTA est financée par crédits parlementaires. Je vous répondrais que oui, nous arrivons à accomplir notre mission efficacement, en mettant l'accent sur un niveau de sécurité supérieur pour les passagers. Bien que l'ACSTA n'ait pas de niveau de service obligatoire, nous arrivons à assurer un niveau de service de 85 % des passagers contrôlés en 15 minutes ou moins et ce, depuis quatre ans, grâce aux crédits que nous recevons. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

J'ai une question à poser à M. Walker.

Dans un témoignage d'hier, on a proposé un amendement à une éventuelle charte des passagers, à savoir qu'on ne devrait tenir compte que des vols en partance du Canada.

Disons que j'achète un billet d'avion qui comprend des correspondances avec des compagnies aériennes en coentreprise. Ma question est très simple: est-ce la compagnie de qui j'achète mon billet qui devrait assurer le service du début à la fin du voyage, ou peut-elle refiler la patate chaude à la deuxième compagnie en coentreprise? [Traduction]

M. Jeff Walker:

J'en ai justement entendu parler aujourd'hui. Notre impression ou notre position à ce sujet, c'est que c'est l'entreprise de qui la personne a acheté son billet qui devrait en être le gardien, si l'on veut. Il ne serait peut-être pas raisonnable que le fardeau incombe à Air Canada, par exemple, si elle travaille en coentreprise avec Lufthansa et qu'une correspondance avec Lufthansa ne fonctionne pas, mais il doit y avoir quelqu'un à Air Canada dont le travail consiste à guider la personne dans les démarches auprès de Lufthansa pour qu'elle connaisse ses droits.

Est-ce que c'est cette entreprise qui doit en assurer la responsabilité? Pas nécessairement pour le coût, mais je pense qu'elle a la responsabilité de guider la personne au bon endroit. Ce serait notre impression. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Le premier tour est terminé. J'ai les noms de MM. Fraser, Badawey, Godin et Hardie, qui souhaitent poser des questions supplémentaires.

Je vous prie d'essayer d'aller droit au but. Nous commencerons par M. Fraser.

M. Sean Fraser:

Merci. Cela ne devrait pas prendre six minutes.

Je pose ma question ou je présente mon observation au représentant de l'ACA.

La présidente:

Monsieur Fraser, une seule question, s'il vous plaît.

M. Sean Fraser:

Parfait.

Je pense que nous vivons à une époque où le nombre de passagers explose. Je m'attends à ce que cette tendance se poursuive. Je pense aussi que plus les gens seront informés, plus ils seront nombreux à porter plainte. On le voit déjà. J'ai vécu des cas où le processus de réclamation me semblait trop fastidieux, où le gain se limitait à 100 $ par bagage. J'entends les dirigeants des transporteurs aériens me dire que si l'indemnisation est trop élevée dans le nouveau régime, les coûts vont augmenter.

J'aimerais savoir comment vous réagissez à cela. Le nombre de passagers explose, on nous dit que cela va faire augmenter les coûts, mais ne faudrait-il pas répondre: « Mais si nous établissons des normes, vous devez les respecter, même si vos marges sont extrêmement minces. »

Si vous pouviez réagir à cela, ce serait bien apprécié.

(1715)

M. Jeff Walker:

Il faudrait connaître toutes les pièces du casse-tête pour savoir si les marges sont vraiment aussi minces qu'ils l'affirment. Encore une fois, de notre point de vue, le fait est que ce genre de système s'applique aux États-Unis, que les Européens ont un système comparable et que je ne vois pas ces systèmes s'effondrer ni tous les transporteurs aériens faire faillite. Il y a une explosion du nombre de passagers sur leurs vols tout comme au Canada.

C'est ma réponse à cette question.

M. George Petsikas:

Puis-je faire une observation sur le système européen, madame la présidente?

La présidente:

Allez-y.

M. George Petsikas:

Le règlement européen est sous un feu nourri de critiques de tous les groupes, qui estiment que c'est un bien piètre règlement. Le Conseil européen essaie désespérément de le modifier. Il n'y arrive pas pour des raisons politiques. La réglementation européenne n'est certainement pas ce que je qualifierais de succès à l'heure actuelle. On s'entend pour dire qu'il impose des coûts destructeurs à l'industrie. Il indemnise les passagers de façon disproportionnée, par rapport à leur expérience, à leur perte et à leur inconfort. Même quand les délais sont attribuables à des vérifications de sécurité, pour que l'avion puisse voler en toute sécurité, les transporteurs sont pénalisés selon le régime européen, ce qui soulève énormément de critiques et mine la culture de la sécurité aérienne dans son ensemble.

Je m'inscris totalement en faux contre ceux qui affirment que le modèle européen fonctionne.

La présidente:

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais simplement faire une observation. Cette réflexion se poursuit depuis un certain temps déjà et nous a particulièrement occupés cette semaine. Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, ce ne sera pas fini demain, ni la semaine prochaine ni le mois prochain. C'est une collaboration qui évolue constamment et bien sûr, un partenariat avec les 338 députés, ainsi qu'avec les membres de l'industrie eux-mêmes.

Un rapport sur les hypothèses a été préparé. Il nous mène à 2022. Ce rapport fait état des facteurs socioéconomiques, stratégiques et liés à l'approvisionnement. Ces facteurs influencent les prévisions de la demande aérienne: par exemple, le produit intérieur brut, le revenu personnel disponible, la population adulte, les débouchés économiques, le rendement des transporteurs aériens, la structure des itinéraires de vol, la taille moyenne des aéronefs, l'occupation passagers, les coûts de la main-d'oeuvre et la productivité, le coût du carburant, l'efficacité du carburant, les coûts que doivent absorber les transporteurs aériens outre ceux liés au carburant et à la main-d'oeuvre, les hypothèses concernant le modèle de la répartition des passagers et les nouvelles technologies. C'est la base d'un plan stratégique. C'est la base des prochaines étapes.

Puis-je proposer ce qui suit? Ce comité continuera d'exister encore au moins deux ans, avec les membres présents autour de cette table. Après, il accueillera probablement de nouveaux membres. Le fin mot de l'histoire, c'est que nous avons une occasion à saisir. Le projet de loi C-49 est le fondement d'un futur plan stratégique global en matière de transports. Réfléchissons tous au sein de nos organisations respectives afin de proposer des objectifs tangibles et pragmatiques pour cette stratégie. Attachons-y des mesures concrètes, réalistes, que nous pouvons accomplir à court et à long terme, en fonction des facteurs socioéconomiques, stratégiques et liés à l'approvisionnement que je viens de décrire.

Ce n'est pas une mince affaire, messieurs. M. Rock disait il y a 10 ans que c'était un défi. Je suis surpris qu'on n'ait toujours rien fait 10 ans plus tard. Malheureusement, c'est ainsi, mais encore une fois, je ne veux pas parler du passé. Je veux parler de l'avenir. Nous avons une occasion à saisir. Saisissons-la et allons de l'avant avec de nouvelles recommandations, à la lumière de ce que vous venez de nous dire, de l'information que nous cherchons à recueillir.

Encore une fois, le projet de loi C-49 est là, mais nous aurons encore bien du temps pour essayer de trouver un juste équilibre entre le rendement, les droits des passagers, la valeur et le retour sur l'investissement, parce que nous voulons tout autant que vous que vous réussissiez.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Badawey.

Pouvons-nous passer à M. Godin? [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais faire un commentaire rapidement et, par la suite, j'aimerais poser une question à M. Bergamini.

Je partage votre opinion, celle que vous avez émise lors de votre introduction alors que vous avez dit que vous considériez que l'approche du gouvernement ratait la cible. Je pense que vous avez bien cerné le problème: on rate vraiment la cible. Malgré tout le respect que j'ai pour le ministre Garneau, je pense que c'est du tape-à-l'oeil et que le projet de loi est vide. On ne fait que pelleter tout cela en avant.

Dans le rapport Emerson, on mentionne que la hausse des frais et des redevances ainsi que les retards dans les contrôles de sécurité ont une incidence sur tous les voyageurs et sur l'efficacité de l'industrie.

Comment voyez-vous cette situation? Avez-vous l'assurance que le rapport Emerson dit la vérité?

(1720)

M. Massimo Bergamini:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Je pense que l'expérience quotidienne de nos transporteurs nous indique que la réalité des retards...

Veuillez m'excuser, mais je vais vous répondre dans la langue de Shakespeare afin de mieux m'expliquer.[Traduction]

Concernant les lenteurs en première ligne — et c'est le coeur de notre argument — l'expérience du voyageur ne commence pas au moment de l'enregistrement. Il y a toute une série d'étapes, et quand il y a un retard... Nous apprécions les efforts déployés par nos collègues de l'ACSTA dans des conditions très difficiles d'un point de vue financier et de la planification, mais notre organisation, tout comme le conseil des aéroports, réclame fortement des normes de rendement réglementées qui élimineraient les goulots d'étranglement qui pénalisent non seulement les passagers touchés à l'aéroport, mais tout le système national et international, puisque les retards déclenchent toute une réaction en chaîne.

C'est très important et en ce sens, j'appuie ce qu'ont dit mes collègues d'Air Transat.[Français]

Nous devons aborder cette question en tant qu'écosystème complexe. Il faut absolument s'attarder au problème du financement de ce système. Il n'est pas suffisant d'aborder cette question par la voie réglementaire.

Je pense que vous vous souvenez tous de la tragédie de Walkerton. J'ai travaillé dans le secteur municipal. Bon nombre de gouvernements provinciaux à l'échelle du Canada ont adopté des règlements afin d'aborder des situations comme celle survenue à Walkerton.[Traduction]

Les ministres provinciaux de l'Environnement ont joué les héros. Ils ont signé une nouvelle réglementation stricte, mais ont refilé la facture aux municipalités, qui n'avaient pas les ressources ni les moyens de la mettre en oeuvre. Il faut regarder l'ensemble du tableau. C'est un exercice réglementaire — de manière générale, nous sommes d'accord avec cela —, mais il faut absolument nous pencher sur les fondements économiques de l'industrie si nous voulons qu'il porte fruit.

La présidente:

Monsieur Petsikas, vous essayiez de dire quelque chose un peu plus tôt. Vous avez déjà fait de nombreuses observations, mais y en a-t-il une en particulier que vous vouliez ajouter? Avez-vous eu la chance de l'exprimer?

M. George Petsikas:

Pas vraiment. Si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais enchaîner sur ce que M. Badawey disait tout à l'heure.

En fait, je suis d'accord avec vous. Pendant des années — encore une fois, avant que Massimo se joigne à nous — alors que je dirigeais le CNLA, j'ai supplié le gouvernement d'élaborer un plan stratégique intégré descendant pour aider notre industrie stratégique à participer à la réussite de notre pays. Comme Massimo l'a mentionné, cela supposait une approche globale. Le ministre a dit aujourd'hui qu'il s'agissait d'une première étape. Le projet de loi C-49 n'est pas le fondement de cette approche globale, et c'est notre problème, car il y a plein de questions à l'étude, en particulier celle du financement de l'infrastructure.

J'aimerais simplement revenir sur le point qui a été soulevé tout à l'heure lorsque nous nous sommes posés la question de savoir si nous demandions une subvention à l'industrie financée par les contribuables pour nous aider à payer ces aéroports. Je ferais valoir qu'au cours des 20 dernières années, il est clair que les usagers ont subventionné les aéroports en faveur des contribuables. Il est ici question d'aéroports qui ont été transférés au début des années 1990 et dont la valeur comptable nominale était d'environ 1,5 milliard de dollars. Aujourd'hui, on parle de bien plus de 7 milliards de dollars de loyers aéroportuaires versés à ce jour au Trésor fédéral. Ce n'est pas un mauvais rendement. Ensuite, les aéroports ont bénéficié d'investissements en immobilisations de 18 milliards de dollars qui se sont traduits par des emplois —  notamment pour les travailleurs de la construction — des avantages économiques en aval, ainsi que des milliards et des milliards de dollars en activité économique que cette infrastructure a rendu possible. Tout cela s'est réalisé aux frais des consommateurs, et non des contribuables, et c'est un modèle quasi unique dans le monde industrialisé.

Tout ce que nous disons, c'est qu'il est temps de revoir ce modèle, car nous ne pensons pas qu'il nous aide à réaliser ce dont nous sommes capables ou pourrions l'être, c'est-à-dire des choses encore plus grandes au Canada sur le plan de la croissance économique, de la connectivité, du commerce et de la concurrence avec les grands acteurs mondiaux qui savent bien gérer leurs secteurs de l'aviation. C'est tout ce que nous disons, alors allons-y. Je suis d'accord avec vous.

(1725)

M. Vance Badawey:

Puis-je faire un bref commentaire?

La présidente:

Non, la parole est maintenant à M. Hardie, qui sera le dernier intervenant du présent groupe. Je pense que nous avons épuisé nos témoins avec notre enthousiasme et toutes nos questions de ce côté aussi.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je comprends l'argument de M. Petsikas, car il n'y a pas que l'argent qui entre en ligne de compte. Il y a les répercussions — sur le plan social, environnemental et bien des effets positifs — dans tout secteur du monde des affaires, et c'en est une qui est primordiale.

Il me reste une question pour M. Parry. Comme M. Petsikas l'a mentionné, pour ce qui concerne le développement dans les aéroports, on a fait les investissements dans bien des cas. L'aéroport de Vancouver est une installation merveilleuse. Je constate qu'on n'a cependant pas fait beaucoup d'investissements supplémentaires en immobilisations pour assurer la capacité de l'ACSTA de faire son travail. Participez-vous à la planification avec les aéroports pour veiller à ce que, lorsqu'ils envisagent des agrandissements, ils fassent en sorte que vous disposiez de l'espace nécessaire au sol pour faire votre travail?

Par-dessus tout, qu'en est-il de l'avenir de votre administration? Où nous mènera la technologie? Aurez-vous besoin de faire d'importants investissements en immobilisations ou d'avoir recours à des technologies et à des opérations intelligentes pour respecter les normes de rendement auxquelles les gens s'attendent?

M. Neil Parry:

Pour répondre à la première partie de votre question qui concerne la planification de notre capacité avec les aéroports, vous avez touché un moteur vraiment important de nos opérations au point de contrôle. L'ACSTA mène ses opérations dans l'espace aéroportuaire, alors il ne nous appartient pas. L'aéroport fournit l'espace dans lequel nous travaillons.

Dans certains cas, j'estime que nous disposons de suffisamment d'espace. Dans d'autres, en raison d'une croissance importante de l'industrie — croissance dont vous avez aussi entendu parler aujourd'hui — nous nous cognons à un mur. Nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec les aéroports. Nous sommes conscients des défis qu'ils doivent relever. Ils doivent prendre des décisions concernant les investissements en immobilisations, et tout cela a un coût. Au bout du compte, quelqu'un doit payer. Nous en discutons constamment avec eux.

Pour ce qui est d'améliorer ce qu'on définit comme les normes de rendement, on parle de niveaux de service pour les temps d'attente. Dans certains cas, nous avons, en quelque sorte, atteint notre limite dans l'espace au point de contrôle, alors nous en parlons. Dans d'autres cas, nous avons plus d'espace pour élargir nos opérations.

Cela m'amène à la seconde partie de votre question. La réponse est qu'il faut du financement. Nous tenons actuellement des discussions et des consultations avec les fonctionnaires de Transports Canada pour envisager un plan à long terme pour notre organisme en ce qui a trait aux investissements en immobilisations.

M. Ken Hardie:

Parlant de discussions, j'ai un dernier point à soulever. Le ministre s'engage à tenir les discussions dont tout le monde a parlé ici. Il s'agit d'une étape itérative. Les discussions se poursuivront, alors que nous prenons des règlements qui appuient certaines des dispositions contenues dans le projet de loi C-49 et que nous optons pour un système qui fonctionne encore mieux que celui que nous avons et qui, avouons-le, fonctionne très bien.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup à vous tous. Je sais qu'il est arrivé qu'on soulève des points un peu difficiles, mais il s'agit d'une tribune. Nous avons tous besoin d'apprendre et nous travaillons tous comme parlementaires à faire du mieux que nous pouvons au nom de tout le monde.

Merci beaucoup à vous tous d'être venus.

Vous pouvez tous aller vous chercher quelque chose à manger. Je passerai au prochain groupe dès que possible pour que nous puissions continuer.

(1725)

(1745)

La présidente:

Nous poursuivons notre étude du projet de loi C-49.

Merci aux témoins qui nous rejoignent en fin d'après-midi pendant la quatrième journée de nos audiences.

Nous accueillons le président et directeur de Réclamation vol en retard Canada, M. Charbonneau.

Je vous demanderais de vous présenter et de prendre 10 minutes pour prononcer vos remarques liminaires. [Français]

M. Jacob Charbonneau (président et directeur général, Réclamation vol en retard Canada):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je m'appelle Jacob Charbonneau, cofondateur et président et directeur général de Réclamation vol en retard Canada. Meriem Amir, une collègue, m'accompagne aujourd'hui.

Réclamation vol en retard Canada est une société multidisciplinaire dûment enregistrée auprès du Barreau du Québec, regroupant plusieurs professionnels régis par le Code des professions du Québec. Nous offrons des services juridiques relativement au transport aérien par l'entremise de nos avocats.

La mission première de l'entreprise est de défendre les droits des passagers aériens en informant les consommateurs de leurs droits et en aidant les voyageurs lésés à obtenir des compensations facilement, rapidement et sans risque. Nous offrons un service clés en main à nos clients pour qu'ils obtiennent des compensations pour un retard, une annulation ou un refus d'embarquement.

Nous sommes fiers et honorés d'avoir été invités à ces consultations publiques. Nous avons donc déposé un mémoire coécrit par M. Jean -Denis Pelletier, ancien commissaire à Transports Canada, et moi-même. Dans ce mémoire, nous mettons en exergue la situation actuelle dans le secteur aérien.

Au cours des derniers mois, il y a eu un grand nombre de discussions critiques et de plaintes relatives au transport aérien. Plusieurs événements ont défrayé les manchettes, notamment des cas de surréservation, d'annulation et de retard de vols, de manque de prises en charge, de longues attentes sur le tarmac et de pratiques d'affaires douteuses. Il y a un manque d'information sur les droits des passagers et des pressions des compagnies aériennes pour retirer les publicités visant à informer les passagers de leurs droits dans les aéroports canadiens, le tout, dans un contexte où les compagnies aériennes engrangent des profits records.

Nous avons donc le sentiment que les profits à court terme et la valeur boursière prennent le dessus, au détriment des services offerts aux clients. Les passagers sont traités comme de la marchandise à transporter. Le manque de réglementation fait en sorte que les compagnies aériennes ont une marge discrétionnaire sur le plan du traitement du client. Les transporteurs aériens ne subissent que peu ou pas de conséquences relativement à la façon dont les passagers sont servis, ce qui soulève une grogne générale et une perte de confiance des passagers envers le système en place.

Dans le cadre de ce mémoire, nous avons procédé, en premier lieu, à un sondage auprès de notre clientèle ayant subi des problèmes de vol au cours des dernières années. Nous avons obtenu la participation de plus de 333 répondants. Voici les faits saillants du sondage. Vous les trouverez à l'annexe 6 de notre mémoire.

Tout d'abord, nous avons été surpris de constater que plus de 35 % de nos clients n'étaient pas au courant des compensations possibles avant d'entendre parler de nos services. La quasi totalité des passagers, soit plus de 99 % d'entre eux, pensent que le Canada devrait adopter des règlements afin de garantir une compensation financière aux passagers à la suite de vols retardés ou annulés.

Nous avons aussi analysé les retards et les annulations de vols au Canada et les tendances au cours des dernières années. Voici les points saillants de cette étude.

En ce qui concerne le nombre de retards, nous avons vu une augmentation. Le pourcentage des vols qui ont été touchés par une forme ou une autre de retard, pour toutes les tranches d'heure, est passé de 12 % en 2014 à 15 % en 2016. Les annulations de vols canadiens ont aussi augmenté. Elles sont passées de 1,2 % en 2014 à 1,4 % en 2016. C'est une augmentation de 16 %. À titre de comparaison, pour les vols soumis à la réglementation européenne, le taux est de 0,4 %, soit quatre fois moins.

Il semble évident que nous avons besoin d'une loi et de règlements qui fixeront un niveau de qualité minimal de la protection des passagers, apportant ainsi une dimension citoyenne importante à la libéralisation des marchés de l'aviation et une protection canadienne normalisée pour tous les usagers et encadrée dans une charte des droits des passagers.

Les passagers sont laissés à eux-mêmes et ne savent plus vers qui se tourner pour obtenir de l'aide. Ils sont heureux qu'une entreprise puisse maintenant les accompagner afin de s'y retrouver et les aider à obtenir une compensation. D'ailleurs, plusieurs de nos clients ont déjà tenté une approche directe auprès de la compagnie aérienne et ont essuyé un refus.

Bien que l'Office des transports du Canada joue un certain rôle de médiation, plusieurs de nos clients préfèrent utiliser nos services, et ainsi gagner du temps et une expertise avec une solution clés en main.

(1750)



La nouvelle loi et les règlements découlant du projet de loi C-49 doivent contenir des dispositions claires et sans équivoque, afin de limiter les divergences d'interprétation étant donné l'existence de zones grises. Cette nouvelle loi facilitera la tâche aux passagers désirant faire valoir leurs droits individuels et permettra de regagner la confiance des voyageurs.

Nous avons donc tenu compte des tendance actuelles et des meilleures pratiques internationales pour faire quelques recommandations, afin de placer le Canada à l'avant-garde en matière de protection des voyageurs.

Les modifications proposées tiennent également compte de l'impact financier sur le secteur du transport aérien et prévoient dès lors des mesures visant à plafonner les coûts.

Voici en résumé quelques-unes des 15 propositions de notre mémoire.

Nous proposons de: déclarer le projet de loi C-49 complémentaire à la convention de Montréal; modifier l'article 67.3 dont il est question à l'article 17 du projet de loi  C-49 en remplaçant les termes « seule une personne lésée » par « représentée par une personne ou en son nom », conformément au Règlement sur les transports aériens actuel; modifier le paragraphe 18(2) du projet de loi C-49, qui concerne le sous-alinéa 86(1)h)(iii) de la loi, afin de permettre aux personnes lésées d'être représentées par un avocat, conformément à nos droits constitutionnels; édicter des règles claires quant à l'affichage des droits et des recours des passagers aériens dans les aéroports canadiens, notamment en permettant aux entreprises et aux associations qui défendent les droits des passagers d'afficher des publicités dans les aéroports canadiens; obliger les compagnies aériennes qui refusent l'embarquement ou qui annulent un vol d'avoir à présenter à chaque passager concerné un avis écrit de la raison du refus d'embarquement ou de l'annulation — il conviendrait que les transporteurs s'efforcent également d'informer les passagers qui atteignent leur destination finale avec un retard d'au moins trois heures de la raison de ce délai; créer une vigie plus publique de la gestion des aéroports canadiens; appliquer ou suivre la législation européenne en matière d'indemnité minimale à verser en cas de retard important, d'annulation ou de refus d'embarquement — il serait souhaitable que le Comité donne à Transports Canada, qui écrira les règlements par la suite, des directives claires, équivalentes aux directives européennes, sur les barèmes à utiliser; définir un retard important comme étant de deux heures pour les vols intérieurs et de trois heures pour les vols internationaux; établir les indemnisations minimales à verser aux passagers, équivalentes à un vol annulé pour tous les délais d'attente sur le tarmac excédant trois heures, et exiger que les transporteurs permettent aux passagers de quitter après 90 minutes, conformément aux conditions de tarifs des transporteurs, et ce, peu importe les circonstances, qu'elles soient exceptionnelles ou non; appliquer les mêmes droits à la prise en charge prévue au règlement européen lors d'un refus d'embarquement, d'annulation ou de retard important — cette prise en charge doit s'appliquer même en cas de circonstances extraordinaires échappant au contrôle de la compagnie aérienne; définir une circonstance extraordinaire comme un événement n'étant pas inhérent à l'exercice normal de l'activité du transporteur aérien concerné et qui échappe à la maîtrise effective de celui-ci du fait de sa nature ou de son origine — aussi, nous proposons de déclarer que le fardeau de prouver la circonstance extraordinaire repose sur les épaules du transporteur; déclarer que le délai de prescription doive correspondre aux délais de droit commun de trois ans au Canada; enfin, rendre imputables les aéroports canadiens en cas de grève, de rénovations majeures ou de bris mécaniques causant des retards importants ou des annulations de vols — cela permettrait aux passagers d'obtenir les mêmes indemnisations et d'avoir les mêmes droits que les passagers ayant subi un préjudice de la part des transporteurs aériens.

En conclusion, nous croyons fermement que l'Office des transports du Canada et le gouvernement se doivent d'adopter une loi qui soit aussi généreuse et transparente que ce que nous pouvons voir au niveau international; surtout, une loi qui soit humaine, protégeant et facilitant l'accès à une indemnisation; une loi claire et sans équivoque qui réduise au maximum les zones grises et laissant peu de place à l'interprétation.

Cette loi est plus que nécessaire pour ranimer la confiance des voyageurs dans les transporteurs aériens. Ces mesures permettront de suivre les meilleures pratiques internationales et les tendances en matière de protection des consommateurs. Elles permettront au Canada d'être à l'avant-garde pour ce qui est de la protection des passagers aériens.

(1755)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Charbonneau.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Gooch du Conseil des aéroports du Canada.

M. Daniel-Robert Gooch (président, Conseil des aéroports du Canada):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Mesdames et messieurs, merci de m'avoir invité à témoigner devant vous dans le cadre de votre étude du projet de loi C-49.

Je m'appelle Daniel-Robert Gooch et je suis le président du Conseil des aéroports du Canada.[Français]

Le CAC compte 51 membres, qui exploitent plus de 100 aéroports au Canada, y compris tous les aéroports privés du Réseau national d'aéroports. Nos membres gèrent plus de 90 % du trafic aérien commercial au Canada et une proportion encore plus élevée du trafic international.[Traduction]

Le CAC s’attache notamment à promouvoir la sécurité et le dynamisme des aéroports locaux, à améliorer l’expérience des voyageurs, à optimiser les services gouvernementaux et à connecter le Canada au reste du monde par voie aérienne. Au cours des derniers jours, nous avons écouté les témoignages dans le cadre de l’étude que fait ce comité de la Loi sur la modernisation des transports.

Il est clair que l’industrie des transports aérien est complexe et qu’elle suppose l’interaction entre différents partenaires sur le site de l’aéroport, y compris les administrations aéroportuaires et les transporteurs aériens, bien entendu, mais aussi Nav Canada, des fournisseurs de services et des organismes gouvernementaux comme l’Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien et l’Agence des services frontaliers du Canada.

Les administrations portuaires ont pour mandat de fournir l’infrastructure nécessaire en vue de faciliter le mouvement des transporteurs aériens et le traitement des passagers. Elles appliquent la réglementation en matière de sécurité aéroportuaire, offrent des services d’intervention en cas d’urgence dans les aéroports pour composer avec des situations d’urgence liées aux aéronefs et assurent un commandement central pour intervenir en cas de problèmes relatifs à la sûreté opérationnelle, à l’infrastructure et à la sécurité.

Les grands aéroports disposent de plans d’intervention pour s’occuper des passagers dans le cadre d’opérations irrégulières. Ces plans prévoient le déploiement, au besoin, de certains biens, comme des autobus de terrain d’aviation, des bouteilles d’eau, des goûters et des fournitures pour bébés. Les aéroports sont habilités à appliquer leurs plans d’intervention pour s’occuper des passagers si nécessaire et peuvent faire appel à des ressources supplémentaires pour les aider à s’assurer que les passagers disposent des éléments essentiels dont ils ont besoin à court terme. Pendant des opérations régulières et irrégulières, le but est toujours de transporter les passagers où ils doivent se rendre de façon sécuritaire et en temps opportun.

Les aéroports s’efforcent constamment de rehausser l’expérience des passagers, point de plus en plus important pour ceux qui ont connu une hausse extraordinaire du trafic aérien au cours de la dernière décennie. À titre d’exemple, au cours des sept premiers mois de cette année, le mouvement des passagers a augmenté de 6,3 %. Ce mouvement hausse le nombre de visiteurs internationaux, ce qui contribue à l’économie canadienne et génère des recettes fiscales supplémentaires pour le gouvernement. C’est une bonne nouvelle. Cependant, s’il est bon pour les affaires et l’économie canadienne que les aéroports soient plus occupés, il peut être plus difficile sur le plan logistique d’offrir aux passagers la bonne expérience que vise l’industrie. Les aéroports du Canada ont fait des investissements stratégiques dans l’infrastructure lorsqu’ils ont eu besoin de croître et de répondre aux besoins des passagers. En fait, depuis 1992, ils ont investi 22 milliards de dollars dans l’infrastructure pour rehausser la sûreté, la sécurité, le confort et le mouvement des passagers.

Cette croissance a exercé des pressions particulières sur les services gouvernementaux dans les aéroports, en particulier sur le contrôle des passagers assuré par l’ACSTA et les services frontaliers offerts par l’ASFC. Aux heures de pointe, les voyageurs sont confrontés à de longues files d’attente aux points de contrôle de sécurité et à nos frontières aériennes, ce qui ternit l’expérience des passagers. En fait, c’est la plainte la plus fréquente des voyageurs.

Vous vous rappellerez peut-être que j’ai déjà soulevé ces questions devant le Comité plus tôt cette année dans le cadre de votre étude sur la sécurité aérienne. Je suis ravi d’annoncer que le dossier avance, mais nous ne sommes toujours pas rendus où nous devrions l’être. Le ministre des Transports Marc Garneau a entrepris d’importants travaux dans ce secteur.

L’initiative Transports 2030, lancée il y a près d’un an, s’engage à examiner la structure de gouvernance de l’ACSTA et à faire en sorte qu’elle doive respecter davantage une norme de service et que son financement soit plus réactif et durable. Le projet de loi C-49 offre à l’ACSTA un cadre pour administrer de nouveaux services de contrôle ou des services supplémentaires suivant un régime de récupération des coûts. Cette mesure donnera aux aéroports la souplesse accrue de faire des ajouts aux services de contrôle de sécurité pour des raisons opérationnelles, comme celle de rehausser le niveau de service aux voyageurs en correspondance ou de prévoir une aire d’enregistrement distincte pour les voyageurs en classe affaires. Cependant, d'ici le budget du prochain exercice, elle devrait être accompagnée de la pleine affectation des droits pour la sécurité des passagers du transport aérien au financement des contrôles. Les responsables des aéroports s’inquiètent vraiment que les mécanismes de récupération des coûts prévus dans le projet de loi C-49 deviennent le mécanisme servant à recueillir du financement afin de procéder aux contrôles. Autrement dit, les aéroports ne recevraient pas la totalité des droits que les passagers paient pour leur sécurité. Si les aéroports doivent aussi payer pour bénéficier d’un niveau de service acceptable, ils devront générer des revenus supplémentaires qu’il faudrait ensuite récupérer auprès des transporteurs aériens et des passagers. En d’autres termes, les voyageurs devraient payer deux fois pour le même service et ils ne devraient pas avoir à le faire.

Les responsables des aéroports du Canada se réjouissent que le gouvernement ait récemment entrepris des travaux supplémentaires pour adopter un ajustement structurel à long terme dans le but de régler ce problème. Notre objectif commun ne devrait pas seulement être d’améliorer les temps d’attente aux points de contrôle, mais aussi d’offrir aux clients une expérience professionnelle et satisfaisante tout en continuant d’assurer un niveau élevé de sécurité.

(1800)



Certains responsables d’aéroports croient que la meilleure approche consisterait à rehausser leur rôle dans la prestation des contrôles de sécurité dans les aéroports, comme c’est le cas en Europe et dans bien d’autres régions du monde; cependant, le message à retenir est que, lorsqu’il est question de trouver une solution permanente, il n’en existe pas qui convienne à toutes les situations. Il est important qu’on explore toutes les options avant que le gouvernement ne prenne de décision finale.

Il est essentiel de trouver une solution de contrôle de sécurité à long terme pour les passagers, qui méritent un service prévisible et un bon rapport qualité-prix; cependant, nous ne pouvons pas nous asseoir sur nos lauriers dans l’intérim. L’ACSTA a besoin de recevoir un financement suffisant pendant le prochain exercice pour répondre à la demande. Le gouvernement devrait aussi relancer ses investissements stagnants dans les voies ACSTA Plus, nouvelle approche qui améliore l’expérience des voyageurs dans les quelques sites où cette initiative a été mise en place. Cependant, l’ACSTA ne sera pas en mesure d’aller plus loin avant de recommencer à recevoir du financement.

En améliorant l’expérience des voyageurs aériens, on améliore aussi le service aérien dans les collectivités en offrant plus de liaisons aériennes à des prix plus avantageux. La modification que l’on propose d’apporter à la Loi sur les transports au Canada en vue de hausser de 25 % à 49 % les limites concernant la propriété étrangère des transporteurs aériens canadiens vise à stimuler le trafic et la concurrence à l’échelle nationale, objectifs louables dans les deux cas.[Français]

Les aéroports du Canada se réjouissent des progrès réalisés par ce gouvernement dans tous ces dossiers importants. Nous espérons que cette dynamique se poursuivra et que le travail amorcé dans le cadre du plan stratégique Transports 2030 et des audiences de votre comité se traduira par des réformes concrètes.

Une fois de plus, je vous remercie de m'avoir donné l'occasion de m'adresser à vous aujourd'hui. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous entendrons maintenant le témoignage de Gábor Lukács, qui représente Air Passenger Rights. Bienvenue.

M. Gábor Lukács (fondateur et coordonateur, Air Passenger Rights):

Madame la présidente, honorables membres du Comité, merci de m’avoir invité à cette réunion. C’est pour moi un privilège exceptionnel de partager le point de vue des voyageurs aériens aujourd’hui.

Air Passenger Rights est un réseau indépendant et sans but lucratif de bénévoles qui s'attachent à responsabiliser les voyageurs par le truchement de l’éducation, de la défense des intérêts, des enquêtes et des poursuites. Notre groupe Air Passenger Rights Canada sur Facebook compte plus de 5 000 membres.

Je m’appelle Gábor Lukács et je suis le fondateur et coordonnateur du réseau Air Passenger Rights, qui est né de mes activités de défense des droits des voyageurs canadiens. Depuis 2008, j’ai déposé contre des transporteurs aériens 26 plaintes concernant la réglementation qui ont obtenu gain de cause; elles se rapportaient à des questions comme la responsabilité pour les bagages endommagés, les retards et les pertes de bagages, les retards et les annulations de vols, et les dédommagements pour les embarquements refusés involontaires.

Je suis ici pour émettre une mise en garde. Le projet de loi C-49 ne se penche pas sur la question clé du manque de respect des droits des passagers au Canada, il ne protège pas adéquatement les passagers canadiens et il ne respecte pas les droits prévus dans le régime de l’Union européenne. Je couvrirai chaque point en détail.

On blâme souvent l’absence d’une mesure législative adéquate pour justifier les malheurs des passagers. C’est un mythe. La Convention de Montréal est un traité international qui protège les passagers qui voyagent à l’étranger. Elle couvre une multitude de secteurs: les dommages, les retards et la perte de bagages jusqu’à concurrence de 2 000 $; et les retards des passagers, à hauteur de plus de 8 000 $. Elle offre même un dédommagement dans le cas de blessures ou de décès. La Convention de Montréal s’inscrit dans la Loi sur le transport aérien et a force de loi au Canada.

Le Canada exige aussi des transporteurs aériens qu’ils énoncent les conditions de voyage en langage clair dans un soi-disant tarif. Le défaut pour un transporteur aérien d’appliquer les conditions du tarif est passible d’une amende pouvant aller jusqu’à 10 000 $ et constitue une infraction punissable sur déclaration de culpabilité par procédure sommaire. Par conséquent, les lois, les règlements et les décisions réglementaires existantes pourraient offrir une protection appréciable aux passagers canadiens si seulement ils étaient appliqués par l’organisme de réglementation, l’Office des transports du Canada. L’ennui, c’est que cet organisme a renoncé à son devoir d’appliquer la loi. Comme vous le voyez dans ce diagramme qui montre les statistiques des quatre dernières années, le nombre de plaintes est monté en flèche — il a presque quadruplé — tandis que le nombre de mesures d’application a baissé pour être quatre fois moins élevé qu’il ne l’était.

La Cour fédérale d’appel a aussi critiqué l’Office. Dans un jugement récent, le juge de Montigny a conclu que l’Office avait commis une faute en faisant fi non seulement du libellé de la Loi sur les transports au Canada, mais aussi de son objet et de son intention. Il a aussi rappelé à l’Office qu’il était responsable de veiller à ce que les politiques menées par le législateur — en l’occurrence vous, les parlementaires — soient appliquées. Il ne fait aucun doute que ces lois peuvent être améliorées, et nous estimons qu’elles devraient l’être. Cependant, sans application, la loi ne restera qu’un libellé. Dans sa forme actuelle, le projet de loi C-49 ne fait rien pour remédier à la situation.

Le projet de loi C-49 accuse de nombreuses lacunes majeures. Il omet complètement des secteurs importants de la protection des passagers et mine les droits existants dans d’autres secteurs. Premièrement, il ne crée pas de mécanisme d’application et ne prévoit pas la moindre conséquence financière pour les transporteurs aériens qui enfreignent les règles, qui désobéissent aux règles établies. Par conséquent, le non-respect des règles reste l’option la plus profitable pour eux. Deuxièmement, le projet de loi n’offre aucune protection aux passagers les plus vulnérables: les enfants voyageant seuls et les personnes handicapées. Troisièmement, il nuit aux groupes de défense — comme Air Passenger Rights — dans leurs efforts pour protéger les droits des passagers en interdisant la plupart des plaintes préventives qui visent une intervention avant que quelqu’un ne puisse être lésé.

(1805)



J'ai eu gain de cause dans les 26 plaintes que j'ai déposées et dont j'ai parlé plus tôt à une exception près, et ces plaintes étaient à caractère préventif. Je n'ai pas personnellement été touché, mais les pratiques que j'ai remises en doute étaient manifestement néfastes, et les autorités l'ont reconnu.

Nous recommandons que le Comité retire le nouvel article 67.3 qui se trouve à l'article 17 du projet de loi.

Quatrièmement, contrairement à ce que les représentants de Transports Canada vous ont dit lors de leur passage au Comité lundi, le projet de loi C-49 ne fournit pas une protection comparable à ce que prévoit le régime de l'Union européenne. Dans le cas des défaillances mécaniques, qui sont monnaie courante, le projet de loi propose en fait de désengager les transporteurs aériens de l'obligation d’indemniser les passagers pour les désagréments causés. C'est brillamment caché au nouveau sous-alinéa 86.11(1)b)ii).

C'est tout le contraire que prévoit le régime de l'Union européenne. Il reconnaît que c'est la responsabilité des transporteurs aériens de veiller à un entretien adéquat de leur flotte et oblige les transporteurs aériens à indemniser les passagers pour les désagréments qu'entraînent le retard ou l'annulation d'un vol en cas de défaillance mécanique.

Nous recommandons que le Comité modifie l'alinéa 86.11(1)b) pour préciser qu'en cas de défaillance mécanique les transporteurs aériens sont tenus d'indemniser les passagers pour les désagréments que cela entraîne.

Cinquièmement, le projet de loi fait un pas en arrière en ce qui concerne les longs retards sur l'aire de trafic en doublant le retard acceptable sur l'aire de trafic, faisant passer la norme canadienne de 90 minutes à 3 heures. C'est un recul. Cela vient en fait éroder les droits actuels des passagers.

Nous recommandons que le Comité modifie l'alinéa 86.11(1)f) en remplaçant 3 heures par 90 minutes, ce qui aurait pour effet de rétablir le statu quo.

En terminant, nous souhaitons également attirer votre attention sur certains faits troublants qui renforcent nos inquiétudes au sujet de l'impartialité et de l'intégrité de l'Office des transports du Canada. Avant même l'adoption du projet de loi par le Parlement et la tenue de toute consultation publique sur les règlements à venir, l'Office a déjà consulté l'IATA en ce qui a trait aux règlements qu'il devra élaborer.

L'IATA est l'Association du transport aérien international et représente les intérêts privés de l'industrie du transport aérien. Selon nous, l'Office a ainsi agi sans tenir compte du processus parlementaire et de la primauté du droit. À titre informatif, nous en avons la preuve dans la déclaration sous serment de l'IATA présentée devant la Cour suprême du Canada; c'est le numéro de dossier 37276.

Des passagers ont également communiqué avec nous pour nous expliquer que le personnel de l'Office leur avait tourné le dos et les avait informés sans cérémonie que le dossier relatif à leur plainte auprès de l'Office serait fermé. Aucune décision n'a été rendue et aucune d'ordonnance n'a été émise pour confirmer le rejet de ces plaintes; or, le personnel a fait comprendre aux demandeurs que leur plainte avait été rejetée. Les demandeurs n'ont pas été informés de leur droit de demander un processus d'arbitrage officiel, ou le personnel de l'Office les a dissuadés de se prévaloir de ce droit.

À notre avis, l'Office a perdu son indépendance, et l'intégrité des activités de protection des consommateurs est compromise. Les gestes de l'Office et son inaction quant à l'application de la loi, comme les statistiques nous le démontrent, ont miné la confiance du public à l'égard de l'impartialité de l'Office.

Nous recommandons que le Comité modifie le projet de loi pour transférer au ministre le pouvoir de l'Office de prendre des règlements et transférer d'autres responsabilités relatives aux droits des passagers du transport aérien à un organisme de protection des consommateurs distinct.

Je tiens à vous remercier de nous avoir donné l'occasion de vous présenter les préoccupations des passagers du transport aérien. Nous vous avons déjà soumis un mémoire qui souligne ces préoccupations et qui présente des recommandations détaillées sur la manière de sauver le projet de loi.

(1810)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons au premier intervenant; c'est M. Chong.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais poser une question au premier groupe de témoins, qui nous ont remis une présentation très instructive sur le nombre de retards pour lesquels nous pouvons nous attendre à ce que des voyageurs touchent une indemnisation, si le gouvernement décide d'adopter les mêmes lignes directrices qui régissent actuellement la pratique aux États-Unis.

Je remarque que dans l'une des diapositives de votre présentation vous estimez qu'en moyenne 13 353 vols par année seraient retardés de deux heures ou plus pour les vols intérieurs et de trois heures pour les vols internationaux, ce qui entraînerait une indemnisation.

Pouvez-vous nous dire ce que cela coûterait aux transporteurs aériens? S'il y a environ 13 500 vols retardés, à combien les indemnisations versées par les transporteurs aériens s'élèveraient-elles?

(1815)

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Nous devons mettre en contexte ce nombre. Cela représente moins de 1 % des vols; c'est 0,061 %. Nous devons également comprendre que le nombre de vols retardés ou annulés diminue lorsqu'il y a un règlement en place, parce que l'industrie s'y adapte évidemment.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

En Europe, quelle est l'indemnisation pour un vol retardé?

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Cela dépend du nombre de kilomètres et de la durée en heure du retard; l'indemnisation est de 250 à 600 euros.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Il est question ici d'un nombre plutôt élevé. Disons qu'il y a en moyenne 100 passagers par vol. Si nous avons 13 500 vols, cela représente 1,3 million de passagers. Si tous ces passagers ont droit en moyenne à une indemnisation de 300 $, par exemple, cela représente plus de 400 millions de dollars canadiens que les transporteurs aériens devront verser en indemnisation par année, si c'est le modèle que prévoit le projet de loi. Je tiens seulement à le mentionner aux fins du compte rendu.

J'ai trouvé intéressant d'entendre les commentaires de l'organisme Air Passenger Rights au sujet de l'application de la loi. Avez-vous une idée de la raison pour laquelle le nombre de plaintes qui ont fait l'objet d'une enquête et qui ont mené à des mesures a considérablement chuté au cours des trois ou quatre dernières années?

M. Gábor Lukács:

Selon ce que j'en comprends, l'Office des transports du Canada est victime de la capture de la réglementation. Nous avons une gestionnaire chargée de l'application de la loi, qui a admis sous serment lors d'un contre-interrogatoire connaître par leur prénom les cadres de l'industrie contre lesquels elle est censée prendre des mesures d'application de la loi. Le vice-président de l'Office des transports du Canada a déjà fait du lobbyisme pour le compte des transporteurs aériens. L'agent principal aux plaintes est un avocat qui a été suspendu pour inconduite et qui n'a jamais été réintégré dans ses fonctions. Voulez-vous que je poursuive? Cela vous surprend-il?

Il s'agit d'un système défaillant, et nous devons réparer ce système avant de faire quoi que ce soit d'autre pour réellement renforcer les droits des Canadiens.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Comment devrions-nous nous y prendre pour remédier aux problèmes au sein de l'Office? Je sais que vous avez dit que l'adoption de nouvelles mesures législatives ne réglera pas le problème fondamental, qui est la non-application de la loi. Selon vous, étant donné que vous suivez ce dossier depuis des années, quelle serait la solution pour renforcer l'application de la loi? Faut-il restructurer l'Office? Cela passe-t-il par un tout autre modèle d'organisme qui ne prendrait pas la forme d'un office? Que pouvons-nous faire?

M. Gábor Lukács:

Nous avons plusieurs recommandations.

Premièrement, nous proposons de transférer ces responsabilités à un organisme, dont le seul mandat est la protection des consommateurs. Deuxièmement, il faut prévoir une indemnisation et des amendes obligatoires pour chaque violation. Si l'avion passe une heure de plus sur l'aire de trafic que ce qui est permis, nous devons établir une sanction et une indemnisation fixes. Si les transporteurs aériens ne paient pas l'indemnisation et la sanction fixes prévues, il ne devrait y avoir aucune latitude possible quant aux sanctions. Le simple fait que les transporteurs aériens enfreignent les règles devrait automatiquement entraîner une sanction.

L'objectif n'est pas de punir les transporteurs aériens dans le cadre de leurs activités courantes; l'objectif est de punir les transporteurs aériens qui ne respectent pas les règles. Nous proposons également que les tribunaux accordent automatiquement l'adjudication des dépens sur une base avocat-client lorsque des passagers réussissent à faire respecter leurs droits. Actuellement, il est pratiquement impossible pour un passager d'avoir les moyens de faire respecter ses droits, parce que les honoraires d'avocat dépasseraient largement ce qu'un passager pourrait espérer obtenir.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Je n'ai plus d'autres questions.

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Fraser, allez-y.

M. Sean Fraser:

Merci beaucoup.

Nos discussions avec les trois témoins sont intéressantes.

J'espère avoir le temps d'aborder un aspect avec chacun d'entre vous.

Monsieur Lukács, vous nous avez présenté le modèle de l'Union européenne comme un modèle que nous pourrions nous efforcer d'imiter davantage. Pourquoi ce que prévoit l'Union européenne est-il un bon modèle? Nous venons tout juste d'entendre des témoins dans le précédent groupe implorer Dieu de ne pas prendre exemple sur ce que fait l'Union européenne, parce que l'effet est catastrophique sur le système. Le Conseil européen essaye de faire marche arrière.

J'entends deux versions différentes. Je tiens en premier lieu à protéger les droits des consommateurs, mais je souhaite également encourager la présence d'un système efficace qui n'entraîne pas la ruine des transporteurs au Canada.

(1820)

M. Gábor Lukács:

Nous faisons valoir tout d'abord qu'il faut remettre les pendules à l'heure quant au témoignage des représentants de Transports Canada. Ils prétendent adopter les meilleures règles européennes, et les faits tendent à prouver le contraire.

À mon avis, nous ne devrions pas nécessairement suivre ce que prévoient les règles européennes en ce qui concerne les retards légitimes en cas de conditions météorologiques. Je ne parle pas d'une forte pluie à Vancouver qui entraîne par conséquent l'annulation de vols à Halifax; je pense aux graves tempêtes de neige, qui peuvent survenir dans notre climat canadien unique. Cependant, à d'autres égards, le système européen fonctionne. Il a grandement amélioré les droits des passagers.

Il y a quelques semaines, je retournais à Budapest pour rendre visite à ma grand-mère. Nous étions à l'aéroport de Francfort. Il y avait un léger retard qui aurait forcé l'équipage à prendre une période de repos. Lufthansa avait un équipage de remplacement qui était prêt en 30 minutes à prendre le relais, parce que le transporteur aurait été tenu de verser une indemnisation si cela lui avait pris plus de temps. Bref, l'endroit où nous constatons une différence en ce qui concerne les questions de sécurité — et les transporteurs aériens doivent veiller à l'entretien de leur flotte, et c'est possible de le faire — et où nous pouvons voir que cela fonctionne, c'est dans l'Union européenne. C'est le plus vieux système, et cela fonctionne.

M. Sean Fraser:

J'aimerais poursuivre dans une veine similaire, mais je m'adresse cette fois aux représentants de Réclamation vol en retard Canada. La structure proposée par M. Lukács concernant les indemnisations m'apparaît moins comme une charte des droits des passagers et plus comme une charte des sanctions contre les transporteurs aériens. Si nous adoptons son approche et décidons qu'une indemnisation obligatoire doit être versée — lorsqu'une règle est enfreinte, vous versez l'indemnisation au lieu d'évaluer la situation avec le client —, cela peut conduire à une situation... Je crois avoir entendu dire qu'un retard de deux heures dans le cas des vols intérieurs et de trois heures dans le cas des vols internationaux était adéquat. Dans le cas où le retard ne fait pas rater sa correspondance à un passager, par exemple, êtes-vous d'avis que la même sanction devrait tout de même s'appliquer ou devrions-nous plutôt adopter une approche au cas par cas comme nous l'avons entendu lors du témoignage d'Air Canada plus tôt cette semaine? [Français]

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Dans le contexte de la mondialisation, il serait intéressant d'obtenir les mêmes droits que les passagers venant au Canada. À l'heure actuelle, la loi fonctionne à deux niveaux. Par exemple, pour un vol du Canada vers l'Europe avec une compagnie européenne, les règlements européens font qu'on peut être admissible à une compensation en cas de problème. Par contre, pour un vol du Canada vers l'Europe avec une compagnie canadienne, ce droit n'existe pas. C'est donc dire que deux passagers faisant le même trajet, de la même origine à la même destination, n'ont pas les mêmes droits. Le passager qui voyage du Canada vers l'Europe et qui est aux prises avec un problème de retard ou d'annulation n'est pas admissible à une compensation, mais lorsqu'il revient de l'Europe, il peut obtenir une compensation si un problème se produit pendant son vol.

Aujourd'hui, dans le contexte de la mondialisation, la solution viable consisterait à offrir les mêmes droits à tous les passagers, peu importe la ligne aérienne ou la destination choisie, et à adopter de meilleures pratiques... [Traduction]

M. Sean Fraser:

Vous avez touché un aspect intéressant. Je sais que dans le marché européen il y a des transporteurs aériens à très faible coût. Je serais heureux de voir un plus grand nombre de transporteurs aériens à faible coût s'établir au Canada. Nous avons entendu un témoin décrire plus tôt une situation où la sanction — si nous adoptons le régime européen de sanctions, par exemple — pourrait être tellement élevée que les sanctions payées dans le cas d'un vol généralement en retard pourraient dépasser le prix des billets. Est-ce quelque chose que vous considérez comme possible ou considérez-vous même cela comme un problème? [Français]

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

En fait, c'est possible, mais cela dépend des billets. Aujourd'hui, on voit souvent des sites qui annoncent des rabais, par exemple des billets à 99 $ pour certaines destinations et pour un nombre limité de sièges. C'est donc possible, mais quand les retards ont des répercussions sur un très faible pourcentage des vols, on ne veut pas dédommager l'ensemble des gens qui ont été affectés par un retard, ce qui représente 14 % des vols au Canada. On veut plutôt offrir une compensation au faible pourcentage de passagers qui ont été affectés par le plus long retard et pour qui ce retard a eu des conséquences. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Il vous reste 35 secondes, monsieur Fraser.

M. Sean Fraser:

Monsieur Gooch, pouvez-vous nous dire quelques mots au sujet des contrôles ACSTA Plus dont vous avez parlé?

M. Daniel-Robert Gooch:

Oui. Le concept ACSTA Plus est un processus différent qui intègre des éléments technologiques. Il y a un contrôle centralisé. Lorsque vous faites la file, vous avez quatre postes de retrait simultané des effets personnels. Cela permet donc aux voyageurs de passer beaucoup plus rapidement la sécurité, et cela améliore grandement leur expérience.

L'ACSTA avait envisagé de déployer ce concept dans les huit plus importants aéroports. Il y avait un plan en ce sens, et des fonds avaient été demandés, d'après nos informations. Malheureusement, tout ce qui a été financé est ce qui avait déjà été approuvé, soit une mise en oeuvre très limitée dans les quatre plus gros aéroports. Par exemple, nous retrouvons ce concept à Toronto pour les vols transfrontaliers à destination des États-Unis, mais nous ne le retrouvons pas au point de contrôle pour les vols intérieurs au T1, qui est le plus grand. Nous serions vraiment ravis que le gouvernement aille de l'avant avec ces investissements; cette idée a été mise en veilleuse dans le budget.

(1825)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aubin, vous avez la parole. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Mesdames et messieurs, bonsoir. Je vous souhaite la bienvenue, et je vous remercie d'être présents aujourd'hui.

Je commencerai la discussion en m'adressant aux représentants de Réclamation vol en retard Canada.

Tout d'abord, je vous félicite de votre courageux témoignage. Si on adoptait l'ensemble des recommandations que vous proposez et que le gouvernement faisait, je pense que votre entreprise fermerait ses portes.

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

En fait, cela nous donne des outils supplémentaires pour aider les passagers. Aujourd'hui, bien qu'il y ait des règles claires en Europe, nous aidons principalement les passagers européens.

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie, c'était plutôt une boutade.

Dans vos propos préliminaires, un élément a attiré mon attention. Nous parlons de la charte des droits des passagers aériens depuis des semaines. Or nous plus particulièrement de problèmes usuels, par exemple de la perte de bagage, de la surréservation et des vols en retard.

Vous, vous ajoutez à cela des pratiques d'affaires douteuses qui demanderaient compensation. J'aimerais avoir quelques exemples de ce que vous appelez des « pratiques d'affaires douteuses ». Quelles répercussions cela peut-il avoir sur les passagers et quelle solution proposez-vous?

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

En fait, quand j'ai parlé de pratiques d'affaires douteuses, c'était dans la mise en contexte de l'échiquier actuel et des sentiments des passagers envers les compagnies aériennes. Je ne propose pas qu'il y ait des compensations particulières pour cela. En fait, je faisais référence au fait qu'un recours collectif a été lancé concernant les Mexican games: des compagnies aériennes vendaient des billets pour des vols soi-disant directs mais qui, en fin de compte, ne l'étaient pas..

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie.

J'aimerais maintenant m'adresser à M. Gooch.

Je ne sais pas si vous étiez présent lorsque nous avons entendu les témoignages du précédent groupe de témoins. Nous sommes revenus brièvement sur les derniers événements impliquant Air Transat. Il semble qu'Air Transat voulait partager la responsabilité — c'est une façon polie de le dire — avec les aéroports. Selon Air Transat, bon nombre d'éléments qui avaient placé les passagers dans la situation où ils se retrouvaient étaient dus à l'incapacité de l'Aéroport international d'Ottawa à répondre à une demande non planifiée de détournement de vol. Est-ce la réalité? Dans une certaine mesure, les aéroports sont-ils programmés pour faire face à ce type d'imprévus.

Lorsque l'on pense à accorder une compensation aux passagers, faudrait-il aussi penser au partage des responsabilités entre la compagnie aérienne et l'aéroport?

M. Daniel-Robert Gooch:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

J'ai écouté ce qui s'est dit lors d'une réunion sur Air Transat, la semaine dernière. Il est clair que la situation est vraiment complexe. Après deux jours de discussions, je n'arrivais pas à savoir clairement qui était responsable de cette situation.[Traduction]

Je crois qu'il est juste de dire que les passagers ne veulent pas vraiment que les gens jettent le blâme sur un autre et qu'ils veulent que les gens assument leurs responsabilités.

J'ai l'impression que nos membres de partout au Canada s'efforcent de contrôler et d'influencer positivement l'expérience des passagers — dans la mesure de leurs moyens — qui transitent par leur aéroport, même s'ils n'ont pas nécessairement de contrôle ou d'influence directement sur bon nombre de ces éléments. Il ne fait aucun doute que ce qui est survenu sortait de l'ordinaire.

Je crois que nous sommes aussi en droit de nous attendre à ce que les aéroports élaborent des plans. Les grands aéroports ont des plans sur la manière de gérer des situations irrégulières. Je crois que nous sommes aussi en droit de nous attendre à ce que tout le monde communique entre eux, coordonne ensemble les mesures et s'efforce de faire constamment mieux.

Je ne vais pas parler au nom des autorités de l'aéroport d'Ottawa — je vais les laisser parler en leur propre nom —, mais j'ai entendu mes collègues mentionner ce qu'ils avaient à leur disposition: les autobus, les bouteilles d'eau et les collations. Cela découle en grande partie des leçons retenues des expériences précédentes.

En ce qui concerne les aéroports, les transporteurs aériens, NAV CANADA, les agents de service d'escale et les entreprises de ravitaillement, nous n'avons pas besoin que le gouvernement nous rappelle qu'il faut communiquer entre nous pour améliorer nos pratiques. Nous le faisons constamment. Lorsqu'un tel incident survient, tout le monde se réunit et se demande ce qui s'est produit, où nous avons failli à la tâche et comment nous pouvons intervenir plus efficacement la prochaine fois.

C'était un incident très malheureux. Il va sans dire que l'aviation est très complexe; cela nécessite la collaboration de nombreux acteurs.

(1830)

[Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie.

J'aimerais maintenant m'adresser aux représentants des deux organismes qui appuient les passagers ayant eu des problèmes à cet égard.

Dans les causes que vous avez plaidées, est-il déjà arrivé que des compagnies aériennes se retirent en se déchargeant de la responsabilité sur l'aéroport et qu'elles refusent de donner une compensation aux passagers?

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Si je parle au nom de Réclamation vol en retard Canada, la réponse est non.

Nous veillons à faire appliquer les règlements qui sont en place. C'est pour cette raison que j'ai dit plus tôt que cela nous donnerait des outils supplémentaires.

Nous nous fions aux règles qui sont en place. Le règlement européen, notamment, définit bien ce qui est acceptable et ce qui ne l'est pas en ce qui a trait aux compagnies aériennes. De plus, il permet de savoir à quel moment une circonstance extraordinaire est applicable et à quel moment elle ne l'est pas. Enfin, il permet de définir ce qui est inhérent aux services offerts par les compagnies aériennes.

M. Robert Aubin:

Monsieur Lukács, vous avez dit plus tôt qu'on devrait aussi accorder un dédommagement pour les bris mécaniques. Parliez-vous d'un dédommagement complet? On sait tous que, la mécanique étant ce qu'elle est, même quand notre voiture sort du garage, il peut survenir un pépin. Si la compagnie aérienne démontrait qu'elle a suivi son plan d'entretien à la lettre, devrait-elle quand même être responsable d'un dédommagement pour un bris mécanique qu'elle ne pouvait évidemment pas prévoir? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Veuillez être bref.

M. Gábor Lukács:

La réponse est oui. Les seules exceptions concernent des problèmes mécaniques qui forcent tous les appareils d'un même modèle à rester cloués au sol. Si un certain modèle force tous les modèles d'un transporteur aérien à rester cloués au sol, il s'agira d'une circonstance qui sort de l'ordinaire. Dans les autres cas, c'est la responsabilité du transporteur aérien de s'assurer d'avoir un appareil de rechange, au besoin. C'est en fait déjà ce que dit la jurisprudence dans le contexte de la Convention de Montréal.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Lukács.

Monsieur Badawey, allez-y.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J’ai quelques questions pour M. Charbonneau à propos de ce que nous cherchons à faire et sur la façon d’y arriver.

Cela fait déjà un bon moment que votre organisme demande qu’il y ait davantage de reddition de compte et de clarté pour le voyageur. Vous avez revendiqué un régime d’indemnisations uniforme. Selon vous, jusqu’où le projet de loi C-49 va-t-il? Où en sommes-nous et que pensez-vous que nous devrions faire de plus? Croyez-vous que le projet de loi C-49 est convenable maintenant, que c’est un bon projet de loi, un bon texte de loi, ou que nous devrions y travailler encore un peu? [Français]

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Il s'agit d'une bonne base de travail qui propose de très bonnes idées. Il va rester à bien définir quand les indemnisations s'appliqueront, quand elles ne s'appliqueront pas et de quel ordre elles seront. Le Comité doit faire un travail de réflexion à ce sujet et soumettre des règles claires, pour que les règlements qui vont en découler soient également clairs. [Traduction]

M. Vance Badawey:

C’est une chose sur laquelle vous travaillez depuis pas mal longtemps. Vous revendiquez un régime des droits des passagers et vous faites du lobbying en ce sens depuis pas mal longtemps. Tout d’abord, pourquoi croyez-vous que cela a pris tant de temps? Cela dit, qu’avez-vous recueilli comme information dans l’intervalle? Ce régime existe-t-il maintenant? Est-ce que cela fait partie de l’information dont vous parlez?

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Je ne suis pas certain de bien comprendre votre question.

M. Vance Badawey:

Vous revendiquez un régime des droits des passagers depuis pas mal longtemps. Comme vous travaillez là-dessus depuis tout ce temps, je présume que vous avez dû contacter des gens pour amasser des renseignements sur la nature de ces besoins. Encore une fois, je reviens à ma première question: sommes-nous arrivés à quelque chose qui tient la route? Que devrions-nous faire de plus? Quelles sont les particularités qui nous ont échappées? Quelles sont les particularités que nous devrions viser pour la suite des choses? Je reviens au groupe d’experts qui était devant vous. Tout ce que j’essaie de faire, c’est de sonder ce qui se passe au niveau du terrain et d’essayer d’être un peu plus pragmatique, d’aller au-delà de la présentation de ce projet de loi. [Français]

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Ce qui est important, c'est la façon dont on va informer les passagers par la suite. Même si on a les plus belles lois et les plus beaux règlements en place, si les gens ne connaissent pas leurs droits et les possibilités de recours qu'ils ont, ces lois et règlements ne servent pas à grand-chose.

Nous nous rendons compte que, bien que les règlements européens existent depuis 2004 ou 2005, peu de gens au Canada les connaissaient au cours des dernières années. C'est moins de 2 % des gens en Amérique du Nord qui ont fait des réclamations à la suite de retards ou d'annulations de vol parce qu'ils n'étaient pas au courant de leurs droits ou qu'ils ne voulaient pas se battre contre des compagnies aériennes.

D'une part, il faut faire connaître leurs droits aux citoyens. D'autre part, il faut faire respecter les règlements en place par les compagnies aériennes. Des clients viennent nous voir après avoir tenté une approche auprès des compagnies aériennes qui ont refusé leurs demandes. Ces gens ont peu de connaissances du droit, et après avoir essuyé un refus, ils ne pensent pas pouvoir aller plus loin, alors que les dispositions en place leur permettraient d'obtenir un dédommagement.

(1835)

[Traduction]

M. Vance Badawey:

Ce que j’essaie de voir, essentiellement, c’est quelles seront les prochaines étapes. Nous sommes tous au courant de ce qui s’est produit dans le passé. Avec le dernier groupe de témoins, le message que j’essayais de faire passer c’est « passons à la prochaine étape ». Travaillons ensemble pour nous assurer d’être en mesure de composer avec cela. C’est un processus permanent, cela ne fait aucun doute. Les problèmes ne vont pas disparaître demain matin; il continuera à y en avoir. Cela dit, et compte tenu de ce que vous venez de dire, que proposez-vous comme moyen raisonnable de mesurer les résultats? Nous convenons des résultats que nous souhaitons voir. Des mesures de rendement appropriées sont une partie essentielle de l’exercice, car elles nous permettront de nous attaquer de face à ces problèmes. Quelle serait selon vous une mesure de rendement appropriée? Que devrions-nous prendre comme référence? [Français]

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

En fait, plusieurs mesures peuvent être mises en place, notamment en examinant les répercussions des lois et des règlements sur le nombre d'occasions de retards et d'annulations de vol. Il faudrait aussi mener des sondages auprès de tous les voyageurs ayant subi un retard ou une annulation de vol pour savoir s'ils connaissent bien leurs droits. Ensuite, il faudrait s'assurer que les gens sont au courant de leurs droits.

Dernièrement, lors des retards sur le tarmac, j'ai été surpris de voir que le personnel de bord n'était pas formé spécifiquement sur les tarifs de la compagnie aérienne. Il faudrait donc former les employés des compagnies aériennes afin qu'ils soient eux aussi au courant des droits des passagers pour pouvoir leur transmettre l'information par la suite. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Monsieur Graham. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Charbonneau, j'ai l'impression que plusieurs personnes aimeraient déposer des plaintes, mais qu'elles ne savent pas vers qui se tourner. Si tout le monde connaissait ses droits, combien de plaintes verrait-on sur cet écran, d'après vous?

Mme Meriem Amir (conseillère juridique, Réclamation vol en retard Canada):

Pourriez-vous parler plus fort? Je n'ai pas saisi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si tout le monde connaissait ses droits, combien de plaintes y aurait-il?

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Il y aurait probablement autant de plaintes que de clients qui ont été affectés par une situation qui requerrait une plainte. Par contre, si les gens étaient au courant de leurs droits et qu'il y avait un processus en place en ce sens, ils n'auraient plus besoin de déposer une plainte parce qu'ils disposeraient alors d'un recours.

C'est en ce sens que nous voulons voir aller le projet de loi C-49. Il faut offrir des outils aux gens pour qu'ils n'aient plus besoin de déposer une plainte pour obtenir un dédommagement ou un règlement. Il faut des prédispositions qui leur permettent d'obtenir un dédommagement sans avoir à déposer une plainte et à toujours devoir se battre pour obtenir quelque chose. [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Plus tôt, vous avez parlé abondamment de la Convention de Montréal. Cette convention contient-elle des mécanismes de mise en application?

M. Gábor Lukács:

Cette question s’adresse-t-elle à moi?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. Je sais qu’ils peuvent y répondre, mais je vous la pose à vous.

M. Gábor Lukács:

La Convention de Montréal permet de veiller à l'application des règlements par l’intermédiaire des tribunaux. Elle est également incorporée dans les tarifs des compagnies aériennes, alors c’est l’option qui fournit le plus d’outils pour veiller à la mise en application.

La convention n’est pas assortie de sanctions. Elle ne contient pas de mécanismes de mise en application proprement dits. Les demandes présentées aux termes de la Convention de Montréal concernent des passagers qui soumettent une réclamation pour un vol retardé et qui reçoivent un courriel d’Air Canada où on les remercie d’avoir écrit et où on leur offre, par exemple, un rabais de 25 % sur leur prochain vol. On ne tient aucunement compte de leur teneur de la plainte.

Globalement, ce que nous retenons, tant de la Convention de Montréal que du système de tarification, c’est que les règles sont écrites, mais que les compagnies aériennes forment leurs employés des niveaux inférieurs à ignorer les plaintes de cette nature et à donner des réponses toutes faites qui, essentiellement, sont évasives.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Concernant le graphique que vous nous avez montré, vous dites que le nombre de plaintes a quadruplé depuis quatre ans, mais nous pouvons clairement voir qu’elles ont quadruplé cette année. Comment expliquez-vous une telle augmentation après de nombreuses années d’une relative stabilité?

M. Gábor Lukács:

L’augmentation de cette année est attribuable à la vaste campagne qu’a menée l’Office des transports du Canada dans le but, d’après ce que j’ai compris, d’attirer l’attention sur lui. Malheureusement, cette vaste campagne n’a pas été accompagnée de réels changements structuraux. Les passagers continuent d’être éconduits sans qu’on ait donné suite à leurs plaintes.

Pas plus tard que l’an dernier, la CBC/Radio-Canada a fait un reportage sur un passager qui avait été éconduit et, du jour au lendemain, le personnel de l’office s’est montré plein de sollicitude. Le problème évoqué a été réglé très rapidement. Je ne crois toutefois pas que les passagers canadiens devraient avoir à se déplacer avec un avocat à leur gauche et un journaliste à leur droite pour s’assurer que leurs droits seront respectés.

(1840)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Voilà qui me semble raisonnable.

Vous avez dit ne pas être particulièrement content de l’OTC en tant que tel. Quels sont, selon vous, les changements structuraux qui devraient y être apportés? Comment le modifieriez-vous?

M. Gábor Lukács:

Pour moi, l’OTC ne peut pas être récupéré. J’aimerais qu’une partie de ses responsabilités soient données à Transports Canada, nommément les pouvoirs présidant à l’élaboration des règlements, et que les aspects application et protection du consommateur soient confiés à un organisme distinct dont le seul mandat serait de protéger les consommateurs et qui disposerait pour ce faire de mécanismes rigoureux lui permettant de prévenir les conflits d’intérêts et les emprises réglementaires.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez dit avoir déposé, je crois, 32 plaintes préventives à la suite de cela.

M. Gábor Lukács:

C’était plutôt 26.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vingt-six? D’accord. C’est quand même pas mal pour une personne. Sur quoi portaient-elles?

M. Gábor Lukács:

Ces plaintes portaient, par exemple, sur le refus d’Air Canada d’indemniser les passagers dont les bagages avaient été endommagés à cause de poignées arrachées ou de roulettes endommagées par son personnel. Il y a aussi des problèmes qui sont plus connus, comme celui de la responsabilité de WestJet à l’égard des bagages transportés lors de liaisons intérieures, une couverture qui, grâce à ma plainte, est passée de 250 $ à plus de 1 800 $. On pourrait aussi parler du montant de l’indemnité pour refus d’embarquement payable par Air Canada, qui, grâce à ma plainte, est passé de 100 $ à un maximum de 800 $, selon la longueur du retard. Mes plaintes ont porté sur une vaste gamme de problèmes qui ont une incidence sur les interactions quotidiennes entre les passagers et les transporteurs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Monsieur Gooch, je sais que vous avez dit que vous n’aviez rien à voir de près avec l’aéroport d’Ottawa, mais l’incident d’Air Transat en est un qui, de toute évidence, est très présent dans nos esprits. Vous avez parlé du régime d’accompagnement des passagers de l’aéroport. De quels mécanismes un tel programme d’accompagnement dispose-t-il pour faire face à une situation d’urgence comme celle qui s’est produite à Ottawa?

M. Daniel-Robert Gooch:

Je ne suis pas au fait des détails techniques, mais il s’agirait de quelque chose que la direction de l’aéroport mettrait au point de concert avec ses partenaires transporteurs aériens sur place. La complexité des aéroports varie considérablement d’une région à l’autre. Les aéroports ont des plans pour toutes sortes de contingences, qu’il s’agisse d’incidents en matière de sécurité, de sûreté ou d’opérations inhabituelles. Ils essaient de penser aux besoins des voyageurs dans de telles situations et de prévoir des réponses appropriées. Il pourrait s’agir d’autobus pour aller chercher les voyageurs qui sont pris à bord d’un avion, ou de collations que l’on pourrait leur servir, ou de lits portatifs. La réponse variera selon les cas. Je ne connais pas vraiment les détails particuliers du plan de l’aéroport d’Ottawa.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Yurdiga.

M. David Yurdiga (Fort McMurray—Cold Lake, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente, et merci à nos témoins de leur présence parmi nous aujourd'hui.

Ma plus grande préoccupation du moment concerne les collectivités du Nord, les collectivités éloignées, c'est-à-dire ces endroits où les déplacements en avion sont très chers. Leur réalité est différente de celle des collectivités du Sud. Je m'inquiète du fait que le texte de loi dont nous discutons ne changera pas grand-chose pour le Nord. En effet, dans bien des cas, les règlements mis au point au sud ont un sens pour le Sud, mais aucun sens pour le Nord, car il s'agit de deux réalités distinctes. Croyez-vous qu'il devrait y avoir des exceptions pour les collectivités du Nord et les collectivités éloignées, ou pensez-vous que nous devrions ne pas nous en soucier au risque de nous retrouver sans industrie dans cette partie du pays? Ma question s'adresse à quiconque voudra bien y répondre, car elle comporte de multiples aspects. [Français]

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Je veux bien vous répondre.

Quand on met en place un système d'indemnisation, on doit tenir compte des réalités. Si quelque chose n'est pas imputable à la compagnie aérienne, il y a des raisons pour cela. Il y a aussi des raisons pour que ce le soit. Il faut prendre cela en considération lorsqu'on fait des règlements.

Quand une compagnie aérienne, à cause de la situation géographique, fait face à des complications qui ne sont pas causées par les décisions qu'elle prend, cela peut évidemment devenir des circonstances exceptionnelles et la dispenser d'offrir une compensation.

Mme Meriem Amir:

Je peux également compléter la réponse.

Au sein de l'Union européenne, on s'aperçoit qu'énormément de pays ont des réalités géographiques et des climats fort différents. Toutes sortes d'aéroports sont soumis à des circonstances très diverses. Pourtant, ils sont tous soumis à la même réglementation et cela semble bien fonctionner.

Comme l'a dit mon collègue, M. Charbonneau, ils ne sont exemptés que dans des circonstances extraordinaires qui ne résultent pas de leur volonté. Je ne vois donc pas pourquoi pour les quelques vols qui vont vers le Nord du Canada, quoique je ne sois pas experte en transport aérien...

Selon moi, ils sont adaptés, équipés différemment et ont des pilotes expérimentés pour faire face à des conditions climatiques particulières. Un retard de deux heures, lorsqu'on est équipé et expérimenté, à mon avis, serait la même chose qu'un retard dans le Sud avec l'équipement adapté à la température spécifique du Sud. Il faudrait simplement inclure, dans la réglementation, un cadre assez vaste et clair, comme c'est le cas dans l'Union européenne.

Je crois que l'exemption pour circonstances exceptionnelles pourrait être positive.

(1845)

[Traduction]

M. David Yurdiga:

Je pense au Nord. Le seul autre pays qui a un climat semblable au nôtre, c'est la Russie. Nous avons le Nunavut, qui est dans une situation tout à fait unique en son genre. Les gens sont répartis dans de petites collectivités isolées et il y a beaucoup de choses sur lesquelles ils n'ont pas de contrôle.

Nous ne devons pas oublier que le Canada est un très grand pays, que la livraison de carburant est un enjeu de taille, et que cette livraison peut être perturbée par divers facteurs. Lorsque nous disons que nous allons prendre des mesures, cela ne veut absolument rien dire si ce n'est pas dans le texte de loi. Les règlements « après coup » n'existent pas. Je crois que nous devons faire très attention à la façon dont nous allons procéder.

De plus, votre graphique semble indiquer que les plaintes et l'application sont interreliées — lorsque l'application se relâche, les plaintes augmentent.

Je ne sais pas si ce sont les compagnies aériennes qui sont moins bonnes qu'avant ou si c'est l'application qui fait défaut. Je voyage beaucoup et il ne m'est pas arrivé souvent d'avoir des vols en retard. Il y en a, mais il faut s'attendre à cela, car les compagnies aériennes doivent composer avec des choses qu'elles ne contrôlent pas.

Je crois néanmoins que l'application doit être améliorée. De plus, avec le projet de loi C-49, nous devons veiller à prévoir des dispositions particulières pour les collectivités du Nord.

Il faut que les règles et leur mise en application aillent de pair. Croyez-vous que le fait de modifier les règles va changer quoi que ce soit si l'application reste comme elle est aujourd'hui? Croyez-vous que le fait de prévoir des règlements et de continuer comme si de rien n'était va changer quelque chose?

M. Gábor Lukács:

En ce qui concerne les collectivités du Nord, une partie intégrante du problème est le manque de concurrence appropriée. Cependant, même avec ce que le projet de loi C-49 prévoit dans sa forme actuelle au sujet des problèmes de l'industrie, bon nombre des retards dans cette région sont causés non pas seulement par des « circonstances échappant au contrôle des compagnies aériennes », mais aussi, purement et simplement, par la météo.

Au Canada, personne ne cherchera à tenir un transporteur responsable d'un problème manifestement attribuable à la météo. C'est une évidence. Je ne cherche pas à rendre les compagnies aériennes responsables de ce qui est manifestement attribuable à la météo. Le problème, c'est que les compagnies abusent de cette excuse. Le fait de prétendre qu'un vol Toronto-Halifax a été annulé à cause des conditions météorologiques qui sévissaient à Vancouver est inacceptable.

En ce qui concerne l'application, le principal problème est que bon nombre de ces mesures d'application sont discrétionnaires. La décision d'appliquer ces mesures ou de ne pas les appliquer est laissée à la discrétion de quelqu'un, et cela a changé...

En clair, je ne suis pas en train de proposer que l'on punisse les compagnies pour leurs retards. Ce que je propose, c'est qu'une compagnie qui ne payerait pas les indemnités dues pour un vol en retard devrait se voir imposer une amende salée, et ce, même s'il s'agit de petits montants. La sanction ne devrait être imposée pour le retard proprement dit, mais bien pour non-conformité aux règlements.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Yurdiga, votre temps est écoulé. Merci d'avoir été des nôtres aujourd'hui.

Passons maintenant à M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur Charbonneau, comment vous faites-vous payer? Vos honoraires sont-ils conditionnels aux indemnités versées pour les dossiers que vous acceptez de prendre?

(1850)

[Français]

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

En fait, nous offrons un service sans risque pour le client et nous sommes entièrement rémunérés à la commission. Si nous n'avons pas gain de cause, nous ne réclamons rien au client, mais si nous avons gain de cause, nous conservons un pourcentage de la compensation. [Traduction]

M. Ken Hardie:

Au Canada, ce pourcentage — ces honoraires conditionnels — peut atteindre 33 % de l'indemnité accordée. [Français]

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Dans notre cas, il s'agit de 25 %. [Traduction]

M. Ken Hardie:

Vingt-cinq pour cent.

Monsieur Lukács, vous avez aussi intenté des poursuites au nom de certains clients. Exigez-vous des honoraires?

M. Gábor Lukács:

Absolument pas. Nous travaillons strictement à titre bénévole.

En fait, notre site Web a été réalisé grâce aux dons reçus de la communauté et rien d'autre.

M. Ken Hardie:

Monsieur Charbonneau, je m'excuse d'avoir posé cette question à M. Lukács.

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Il doit gagner sa vie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Oui, il doit gagner sa vie.

Nous nous retrouvons dans une situation intéressante. Les témoins du groupe précédent nous ont dit que la marge de profit par passager est très mince. En fait, vous avez fait observer que les passagers sont traités comme des marchandises et, dans une certaine mesure, je crois qu'ils le sont, car les compagnies aériennes fonctionnent en termes de volumes. Le temps où les membres de l'élite étaient les seuls à prendre l'avion est révolu. Tout ce qui était cristal et argenterie a aussi disparu. Les compagnies cherchent à ouvrir le transport aérien à un plus grand nombre de gens, mais il semble que quelque chose a été perdu dans le processus.

L'un des principes que nous avons tenté d'inscrire dans ce projet de loi, le projet de loi C-49, c'est celui de l'équilibre. À quoi voit-on cet équilibre?

Monsieur Lukács, sans vouloir vous manquer de respect, vous semblez avoir les dents un peu longues. Sauf qu'en même temps, nous avons été témoins de certains incidents scandaleux. Alors, à quoi ressemble vraiment l'équilibre?

Monsieur Charbonneau, qu'en pensez-vous? [Français]

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Il s'agit d'établir un équilibre en offrant un service qui permette aux passagers de ne pas se sentir pris en otage. Concernant les événements des derniers mois, nous déplorons beaucoup le fait que les passagers aient eu l'impression d'être pris en otage. Ils avaient peu de recours, peu d'information, et étaient laissés à eux-mêmes. Nous voulons que des règles soient établies pour permettre l'indemnisation, soit, mais aussi pour faire en sorte que les compagnies aient à s'ajuster et mieux prendre en charge leurs clients. Elles devront voir à ce qu'il y ait de moins en moins de retards et d'annulations et que, lorsque ceux-ci se produiront — il va en effet continuer à y en avoir, à cause de toutes sortes de circonstances —, les clients seront pris en charge adéquatement.

À l'heure actuelle, une grogne générale s'installe et c'est pourquoi un projet de loi voit le jour. De plus en plus de gens sont insatisfaits du système en vigueur. Il va s'agir de trouver des façons d'accompagner les passagers lorsqu'ils seront aux prises avec des problèmes. [Traduction]

M. Ken Hardie:

La prudence est de mise. Si, par exemple, vous préconisez des amendes plus élevées, c'est quelque chose qui pourrait vous avantager sur le plan financier. Si l'on découvrait que vous pourchassez les gens à la recherche de clients, il serait question de champartie — c'est le nom que l'on donne à cela —, et cela pourrait s'avérer problématique.

Monsieur Gooch, il est reconnu que les aéroports eux-mêmes devraient assumer une certaine responsabilité en ce qui concerne l'expérience des voyageurs, en particulier lorsque les retards ne sont pas causés par une force de la nature ou parce que les employés de piste ne se présentent pas à l'heure et que l'avion reste pris sur le tarmac? Ce n'est pas la faute de l'appareil. Or, je ne vois rien nulle part qui proposerait que les autorités aéroportuaires soient tenues de verser une forme d'indemnité au passager.

M. Daniel-Robert Gooch:

Comme je l'ai dit tout à l'heure, les interactions dans un aéroport sont fort complexes. Elles engagent un grand nombre de parties distinctes, et l'on ne peut pas toujours voir où se situe le problème. En fait, les employés de piste dont vous parlez sont habituellement des employés de la compagnie aérienne. Il y a beaucoup de confusion au sujet de qui fait quoi dans un aéroport.

Je sais que les voyageurs veulent que les parties concernées soient responsables. Assurément, les autorités aéroportuaires s'efforcent d'assumer la responsabilité du bon déroulement de l'expérience des passagers qu'elles accueillent.

Si quelqu'un se met à me crier dessus pour me dire que mon gazon est vraiment trop long et que je dois passer la tondeuse, je vais jeter un coup d'oeil à la pelouse et constater que le gazon est vraiment trop long et qu'il doit être tondu. Sauf que si ma maison est plus loin sur la rue, il y aura des limites à ce que je peux faire pour aider cette personne à tondre son gazon.

Ce n'est pas une analogie particulièrement heureuse.

Un incident met en scène de nombreux acteurs distincts. Même dans le cas des incidents les plus imposants, il est difficile de savoir à qui revient la faute. Prenons, par exemple, un employé de tarmac...

(1855)

M. Ken Hardie:

Si je puis me le permettre, je crois que ce dont il est question ici, dans ce cas-là, c'est... La hiérarchie des responsabilités n'est pas trop claire puisqu'il s'agit d'une situation très complexe.

En ce qui concerne les incidents, c'est-à-dire les incidents bizarres qui font la manchette, y a-t-il un processus par lequel les autorités aéroportuaires et les lignes aériennes collaborent pour l'élaboration de plans d'intervention ou, à tout le moins, sait-on qui assume la responsabilité à cet égard?

M. Daniel-Robert Gooch:

Oui. C'est une réalité permanente. Cela se produit tout le temps. Lorsqu'il y a des incidents majeurs, tout le monde se réunit et se demande ce qui a mal tourné, comment on a manqué son coup et comment on peut faire mieux. Et cela arrive non seulement...

M. Ken Hardie:

Je ne parle pas de ce qui se passe après coup, plutôt sur le coup lorsque les choses dérapent.

M. Daniel-Robert Gooch:

C'est ce dont je parle, moi aussi.

M. Ken Hardie:

Y a-t-il une salle de gestion de crise où tous les intervenants se réunissent et font le point en disant: « Voici la situation actuelle. Qu'allons-nous faire? »

M. Daniel-Robert Gooch:

Oui, il y en a. Chaque aéroport est conçu différemment, mais il y a des salles de gestion de crise. Certaines de ces choses arrivent très rapidement et, quand des situations de ce genre surviennent, c'est la pagaille, et tout le monde s'efforce de bien faire son travail. On essaie d'amener les voyageurs à leur destination, en toute sécurité, et ce n'est qu'après qu'on se réunit pour s'assurer que cela ne se reproduit plus. En cas d'incidents importants très médiatisés, bien entendu, on se rassemble après le fait pour déterminer ce qu'on a mal fait et comment on peut mieux s'y prendre. Ces renseignements sont partagés entre les intervenants. Nous en parlons dans le cadre de conférences.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je comprends cela, mais je...

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup. Je regrette, mais vous avez dépassé votre limite de temps.

Nous allons passer à M. Godin. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je veux d'abord vous remercier de vous prêter à l'exercice. Vous travaillez au quotidien dans ce merveilleux monde du transport aérien, notamment auprès des passagers. Vous nous fournissez des outils qui nous permettent de bien faire notre travail. Je vous remercie d'être parmi nous malgré l'heure assez tardive.

Ma première question s'adresse au représentant de l'entreprise Réclamation vol en retard Canada.

Vous affirmez que l'information destinée aux passagers est déficiente. Votre objectif est que cette information soit plus généreuse et transparente, claire et sans équivoque. C'est ce que vous avez mentionné lors de votre présentation.

Ma question sera très directe: selon vous, le projet de loi C-49 répond-il à ces objectifs?

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Il n'y répond pas dans sa forme actuelle. Il faut que les barèmes soient beaucoup plus clairs. C'est pourquoi j'ai mentionné qu'il faudra aussi fournir des barèmes clairs aux gens qui établiront les règlements.

M. Joël Godin:

D'après ce que je comprends, le projet de loi dans sa forme actuelle ne répond pas à vos objectifs.

Croyez-vous qu'il pourrait finir par y arriver?

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Oui. Je pense que si quelques-unes voire l'ensemble des 15 propositions que nous avons soumises dans le mémoire sont mises en oeuvre, celles-ci vont inclure et protéger les passagers canadiens autant sinon plus qu'on ne le fait à l'échelle internationale.

M. Joël Godin:

Je poursuis dans le même ordre d'idées. Vous avez parlé à maintes reprises de ce qui se passe en Europe et des règlements qui y sont appliqués. J'en déduis que, selon vous, les passagers européens sont mieux protégés et mieux encadrés et que les compagnies aériennes sont plus responsables et plus respectueuses envers leurs passagers.

Selon vous, pourquoi le gouvernement ne s'inspire-t-il pas des règlements européens?

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

En fait, je pense plutôt qu'on en arrive à une solution et qu'il faut s'assurer qu'elle est équitable, donc aussi généreuse que ce qui est offert du côté européen. Il faut aussi que cette solution soit humaine et qu'elle prenne en compte les passagers.

M. Joël Godin:

Vous dites qu'on prend en compte les règlements européens. Or j'aimerais savoir ce qui vous démontre que, dans le cadre de la rédaction du projet de loi C-49, le gouvernement actuel considère les règlements européens.

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Eh bien, on parle d'un système d'indemnisation et des systèmes qui sont en place, mais on fait référence aux règlements européens. Or ici, on travaille sur le plan de la loi. Il faudra donc comparer le règlement qui découlera de la loi pour voir si, au bout du compte, c'est comparable ou non. Pour notre part, nous souhaitons que les règlements fassent en sorte que les passagers soient tous traités de façon égale.

M. Joël Godin:

Merci.

(1900)

Mme Meriem Amir:

Si vous me le permettez, je vais ajouter ce qui suit. Je pense que les principes généraux sont un peu calqués sur ceux des règlements européens. Je ne me souviens plus de quel article du projet de loi il s'agit exactement, mais il est question d'une indemnisation minimale et du droit des passagers à être informés. On reprend presque entièrement le principe européen, qui établit un minimum et même un avis conforme que chaque compagnie aérienne doit fournir en cas d'annulation ou de retard.

Je pense que nous y sommes et que les principes sont là. On parle de plusieurs choses. La seule différence, à mon avis, est que, dans la réglementation européenne, les barèmes sont clairs tandis qu'ici, c'est encore un peu flou.

M. Joël Godin:

Si je comprends bien, vous trouvez que les balises ne sont pas claires et que pour les rendre claires, il faudrait définir plus précisément notre objectif dans le cadre de la réglementation.

Comme le temps file, je vais maintenant poser une question au représentant de Air Passenger Rights.

Vous avez affirmé que l'Office des transports du Canada n'était pas efficace. Or, aujourd'hui, on nous a dit tout le contraire, c'est-à-dire que l'Office est efficace et qu'en outre, il applique les lois. Je me demande qui dit vrai. Je voudrais savoir sur quoi vous vous basez pour dire que l'Office des transports du Canada n'est pas efficace. [Traduction]

M. Gábor Lukács:

En ce qui a trait à l'Office des transports du Canada, il s'agit d'une question de fait démontrée par les statistiques, comme le nombre et la nature des décisions rendues par l'Office. Quand on a un organisme de réglementation qui prétend avoir une expertise dans l'industrie du transport aérien et qui accepte l'idée qu'il est possible de faire monter plus de 200 passagers à bord d'un gros-porteur en l'espace de 5 ou 10 minutes, alors on sait que quelque chose ne tourne pas rond. Voilà la nature de certaines des décisions dont j'ai été témoin.

La présidente:

Désolée, votre temps est écoulé.

Allez-y, monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Madame Amir, lors de ma dernière intervention, vous souhaitiez ajouter quelque chose, mais je n'avais plus de temps de parole. Si vous vous souvenez de ce que vous vouliez dire, allez-y.

Mme Meriem Amir:

J'ai une bonne mémoire, je m'en rappelle.

Vous m'aviez demandé s'il arrivait parfois que les compagnies aériennes relancent la balle aux aéroports. C'est arrivé. Mon collègue, M. Charbonneau ne s'en rappelait pas, mais ayant fait plusieurs réclamations moi-même et étant à l'avant-scène, je me rappelle d'un exemple clair concernant la compagnie Vueling Airlines, dont le siège social est à Barcelone. Cette compagnie, soumise à la réglementation européenne, avait accusé un retard de trois heures. Par contre, elle a invoqué l'article 3 sur l'indemnisation en disant que ce n'était pas de sa faute et a relancé la balle à l'aéroport dont le système d'enregistrement était en panne.

Finalement, on a conclu qu'il ne s'agissait pas d'une circonstance extraordinaire puisque c'était inhérent aux activités de Vueling, qui était habituée à faire affaire avec les aéroports et les systèmes d'enregistrement.

Encore là, la limite de la responsabilité n'est pas claire. Est-ce que 100 % de la responsabilité revient à Vueling, est-ce que 50 % de la responsabilité revient à l'aéroport? Ici, ce n'est pas clair du tout. J'entendais plus tôt des commentaires à cet effet et il faudrait peut-être clarifier la limite de la responsabilité.

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie. De toute évidence, vous nous démontrez que les Canadiens ont des droits qu'ils ne connaissent pas et que vous arrivez à faire respecter.

Dans l'industrie, qui n'est pas chapeautée par une charte ou moment où on se parle, y a-t-il de très grands écarts dans les compensations offertes aux passagers?

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Voulez-vous parler, par exemple, de celles qui ne sont pas soumises au domaine...

M. Robert Aubin:

Non, j'aimerais savoir si, pour un même problème, la perte de bagages par exemple, il y a de grands écarts de compensations entre une compagnie et une autre.

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

En fait, présentement, en vertu de la convention de Montréal, qui permet d'obtenir des dédommagements, notamment pour les bagages ou pour des préjudices personnels ou financiers, il y a de très grands écarts. Souvent les gens doivent se battre devant la cour des petites créances et finalement un juge va chiffrer la compensation qui sera accordée au client.

Souvent, le temps et l'effort nécessaires pour arriver à la conclusion de tout cela ne valent pas ce qu'on réclamait à la base pour le temps perdu à la suite d'un retard, d'une annulation de vol ou d'une perte de bagages.

M. Robert Aubin:

Quand vous faites une intervention, allez-vous à la cour des petites créances?

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Non, nous appliquons les barèmes qui sont définis. Il n'y a donc pas beaucoup d'écart car tous les cas sont répertoriés. Ainsi, le dédommagement européen pour le retard de plus de quatre heures admissible d'un vol dont la distance est de plus de 3 500 km sera toujours une somme de 600 euros.

(1905)

M. Robert Aubin:

Prenons le cas d'un vol qui serait géré par une coentreprise parce qu'il n'y aurait pas de vol direct. Par exemple si je faisais le voyage de Montréal à Bruxelles et de Bruxelles vers une autre ville, devrais-je traiter avec chaque compagnie d'aviation ou seulement avec celle de qui j'ai acheté mon billet?

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

En fait, quand il s'agit de coentreprises et que le vol est opéré par une autre entreprise, la compagnie aérienne va relancer la balle à l'autre entreprise.

Pour la suite, cela dépend. Tous les segments ont-ils tous le même numéro de réservation ou pas? Où est survenu le pépin? Par exemple, y a-t-il eu une correspondance européenne plutôt qu'une correspondance canadienne? Cela aura une influence en ce qui a trait aux aspects légaux.

M. Robert Aubin:

Selon vous, le projet de loi C-49 devrait-il régler ce problème en déterminant que la compagnie auprès de laquelle une personne se procure son billet est responsable de cette personne?

M. Jacob Charbonneau:

Personnellement, je pense que oui. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Très bien. Nous avons terminé notre premier tour de table. Y a-t-il des questions dont nous n'avons pas suffisamment parlé, de l'un ou l'autre côté de la table?

M. Sikand a indiqué qu'il avait une question à poser. S'agit-il d'une seule question?

M. Gagan Sikand:

Il y avait plusieurs questions, mais je crois qu'elles ont toutes été répondues.

La présidente:

D'accord.

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Sean Fraser:

J'ai une dernière question à soulever, et c'est peut-être le bon moment pour remercier nos témoins et mes collègues des deux côtés de la table. Ces quelques jours ont été enrichissants et intéressants; je suis vraiment reconnaissant du travail accompli par tout le monde et j'attends avec impatience nos délibérations futures.

Monsieur Lukács, votre principal sujet de plainte semble être, essentiellement, le fait que beaucoup de gens sont confrontés à des irritants et qu'ils ne disposent pas de recours; voilà, pour ainsi dire, le thème dominant. Croyez-vous que le projet de loi C-49 vaut mieux que le statu quo et qu'il permettra d'améliorer la situation, surtout en ce qui concerne l'exigence selon laquelle les lignes aériennes doivent adopter des directives claires et concises sur la façon dont une personne peut exercer des recours?

M. Gábor Lukács:

Malheureusement, non.

Je dirais que le projet de loi C-49 va doubler le montant de l'indemnisation que les passagers ne recevront pas.

Des voix: Ah, ah!

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Chong.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Merci, madame la présidente.

À titre de précision, histoire de planifier ma semaine, nous allons nous rencontrer mardi prochain pour nous occuper des travaux futurs du Comité. Combien de temps devrions-nous prévoir à cet effet? Allons-nous nous rencontrer pendant une heure ou deux heures? Faut-il réserver deux heures?

La présidente:

Eh bien, vous pouvez réserver deux heures. Il est à espérer que nous terminerons en 15 minutes. Ce serait préférable, mais il se peut que nous ayons besoin d'un peu plus de temps.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

C'est très bien.

J'ai une autre question. C'est la première fois que je siège au Comité au cours de la présente législature, alors j'ignore quelle est la pratique à suivre pour les travaux du Comité. Je sais qu'à mes débuts, en tant que parlementaire, il y a 13 ans, rien ne se faisait à huis clos, sauf lorsqu'il fallait discuter des témoins potentiels pour éviter de ternir la réputation d'un témoin. Or, pendant la dernière législature, je crois que toutes les séances consacrées aux travaux des comités ont été tenues à huis clos dans la plupart des cas. Qu'allons-nous faire mardi prochain?

La présidente:

Voulez-vous répondre à cette question officiellement, en votre qualité de greffière?

Techniquement, on siège automatiquement à huis clos, mais c'est au Comité d'en décider. Cela dépend des questions dont nous sommes saisis. Bien souvent, nous essayons de faire les choses en séance publique. Sinon, c'est à huis clos, mais la décision revient entièrement au Comité.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Merci d'avoir apporté cette précision.

La présidente:

Je vous en prie.

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

En passant, Michael, soyez le bienvenu. Je suis heureux de vous avoir parmi nous.

En règle générale, nous essayons de rester en séance publique et d'éviter les séances à huis clos, mais il y a évidemment beaucoup de questions délicates. Lorsqu'il s'agit d'une négociation ou d'une question délicate susceptible de toucher une personne, ou des choses de ce genre, nous siégeons à huis, mais c'est très rare. De notre côté, et même du vôtre, je sais que, par le passé, nous avons toujours privilégié les séances publiques.

La présidente:

Je remercie tous nos témoins. Il y a de quoi se réjouir. Nous avons réussi à entendre presque tous les témoins qui voulaient comparaître devant nous, y compris vous quatre. Merci beaucoup de l'information que vous nous avez fournie aujourd'hui.

Nous allons maintenant lever la séance. Cela met fin au quatrième jour. Je tiens à remercier notre personnel de soutien, notre greffière et tout le monde. Merci aussi aux membres du Comité.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on September 14, 2017

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.