header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-03-28 TRAN 97

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(1525)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

Before we start the testimony, I need permission from the committee to try to get some testimony in before the vote in spite of the fact the bells are ringing. Do I have unanimous consent from the committee to hear the witnesses?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay, that's good. Thank you very much. We'll go on.

This is the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, 42nd Parliament. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we are doing a study of automated and connected vehicles in Canada.

With us today are Jeremy McCalla, Global UAV Technologies Limited; Bern Grush, from Grush Niles Strategic; and Mark Aruja, Chairman of the Board, Unmanned Systems Canada.

I understand, Mr. Grush, that you have a short video you would like to show us at the end of your testimony with the others today. It's in English only, but you have brought the transcript, which the interpreters have.

Do we have unanimous consent to allow Mr. Grush to show us the video after the testimony of the other gentlemen? Is that all right?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Mr. McCalla, would you like to begin?

Mr. Jeremy McCalla (Manager, Business Development and Operations, Global UAV Technologies Ltd.):

Sure.

The Chair:

You have five minutes, please.

Mr. Jeremy McCalla:

Good afternoon, everyone, and thank you for the opportunity to speak in front of you today.

I am proud to stand here before this committee and discuss some aspects of the unmanned aerial systems industry in Canada.

My name is Jeremy McCalla. I have been involved in almost every aspect of the unmanned aerial systems industry, from UAV piloting to owning my own business, over the past several years.

Currently I work with Global UAV Technologies, a vertically integrated, publicly listed unmanned aerial systems company in Canada. Our company owns and operates service companies specializing in unmanned airborne geophysical surveying and photogrammetry, a Canadian UAV manufacturer, and a regulatory consulting business. All of our current operations are under the existing regulatory framework of Transport Canada, and we are currently working very hard towards a compliant unmanned aerial system and full compliant operator status for our survey companies.

Most of our survey work takes place in remote areas, away from aerodromes, towns, and even public roads. A lot of times we fly unmanned aerial vehicles at low altitudes, sometimes only 10 metres above the treetops. This type of airborne geophysical surveying is performed mainly by piloted aircraft today.

Flying manned aircraft for geophysical surveying is extremely hazardous and dangerous, even for the most experienced pilots, given the monotonous nature of the flying and the low altitude. In fact, according to the International Airborne Geophysics Safety Association, between the year 2000 and the year 2017 there were between five and 15 deaths per year for survey operations.

Currently visual line of sight operations for unmanned aerial systems are permitted in Canada with special flight operations certificates. Although this system is sometimes slow and can be convoluted, it works, and it gives us an environment that allows us to be economically successful. However, to enable growth in the unmanned aerial systems industry, move manned aviation away from dangerous jobs, and enable Canada to lead other countries on the global stage, routine operations beyond the visual line of sight are required, especially in remote areas.

The business prospects, both nationally and internationally, could far be enhanced by a more aggressive time frame on opening up beyond visual line of sight operations and solidifying visual line of sight operations into a regulated, as opposed to a case-by-case, environment. Furthermore, allowing for an alternative unmanned aerial system solution to dangerous manned aviation jobs such as airborne geophysical surveying could save lives.

The ability for Canadian companies to access capital, plan for the future, and invest in research and development could also be enhanced by a more aggressive time frame for opening up beyond visual line of sight operations and solidifying visual line of sight operations into a regulated environment.

Currently, without a clear path forward, companies and investors are sitting idle or looking toward expansion plans in other countries where regulations appear to be moving in a direction favourable to the unmanned aerial systems industry.

We understand that aviation is, and always will be, heavily regulated, and we understand and agree that the flying public and people we fly over need assurances of safety. We also feel that given past resources, Transport Canada has done a good job handling the enormous growth of the unmanned aerial systems industry in Canada.

With budget 2017 allocating more money for Transport Canada, dedicated groups such as Unmanned Systems Canada, and a hard-working unmanned aerial systems sector, Canada still has an unbelievable opportunity to become recognized around the world as having one of the most progressive approaches towards regulating unmanned aerial systems, something that is not only good for Canada but also good for Canadian businesses, research institutions, and students.

We believe that the beyond visual line of sight proof of concept recently released by Transport Canada and some of the proposed changes to visual line of sight operations are a positive step in the right direction. However, there is room for improvement.

What we ask is that industry stakeholders be more involved in the process of developing routine beyond visual line of sight operations and developing a regulated environment for visual line of sight operations that works for everyone, ensures safety, and allows for economic growth.

We also ask for more transparency from Transport Canada in how they are developing their regulations and a timeline for regulations that can be adhered to.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Would you like to go on, Mr. McCalla? Oh, it's the next gentleman over there. I'm sorry.

Go ahead, Mark.

Mr. Mark Aruja (Chairman of the Board, Unmanned Systems Canada):

Good afternoon. I appreciate the opportunity to speak to you today once again on behalf of Unmanned Systems Canada, the national association that represents the unmanned vehicle systems community and our 500 members.

I bring to you today insights gained from over a decade of unmanned aerial systems experience with policy and regulatory development, an integral component of the autonomous vehicles discussion.

Whether airborne or on the ground, these mobile devices are part of a much larger enterprise connected through communication networks to data processing systems and analytical tools. This integrated ecosystem is already demonstrating significant improvements in our productivity, safety, and security, and we've only just begun.

My talk today connects hockey and farming.

As public policy-makers, you need to firmly grasp, as Gretzky said, where the puck is going to be. I'm going to start with where the puck is today, using agriculture as an example, and then share experience with where the puck has been, and end with a few recommendations and requests.

Two major technological trends are driving a change that is transforming our society. These are human sensing being replaced by machine sensing and human decision-making being replaced by data analytics and deep learning. What will that future look like?

Effective public policy will allow us to shape the expected benefits to society, create opportunities, and balance those with an understanding of the risks. That's how we get to where the puck is going to be.

Where is the puck today?

The advent of precision agriculture is truly revolutionary, opening up great possibilities. Starting this spring, every day UAVs will be flying automated missions to image fields for precision such that individual corn plants can be distinguished and characterized. The imagery is combined with many other data sources. It is processed and analyzed, with decisions made often within hours. These decisions on matters such as pesticide applications or seeding are fed digitally into autonomous tractors or other UAVs, which precisely apply that prescription. Farming is becoming evidence-based. Decisions that used to be applied to a field are now applied by the square metre.

Where has the puck been?

In 2006, we first engaged Transport Canada to develop UAS regulations, regulations for unmanned aircraft systems. By 2010, we had implemented a jointly developed road map with a crawl-walk-run strategy. Those efforts guided investment and innovation. In a decade, the UAS industry grew from 80 companies to over 1,000. However, as talented and dedicated as the staff at Transport Canada are, they were not resourced for the task until a decade later, in the budget of 2017.

The result was that in July of last year the first draft regulations for drone operations were published in the Canada Gazette, part I, reflecting a view of the puck being in our skates—obsolete on arrival. As I briefed you in 2016, the economic demand today is to survey that farm on a scale of thousands of acres at a time, not hundreds, meaning that we must be able to operate beyond visual line of sight, which is not yet permitted.

We have two critical concerns. When we had a road map to define manageable goals, we demonstrated success. Let's get back to doing what works. Today we have no road map from Transport Canada to guide the urgent work that we need to jointly undertake. We are steadily losing our global competitiveness, falling behind Europe, the United States, and Australia, to name a few.

Second, Transport Canada needs a formalized risk assessment process. Industry has a vested interest in managing safety risk and has worked for the last two years to develop that capability. Our needs are mutual, and this shortcoming will implicate automated road vehicles as well.

How can we get the puck out of our skates?

We commend the Advisory Council on Economic Growth report as a framework for shaping national policies to spur market development and accelerate the adoption of autonomous systems and new business processes. We also commend the recommendation in the Senate committee's report “Driving Change” to develop a pan-government policy-making framework. There is no government department that isn't implicated by the changes that are under way.

Our advice to the autonomous vehicles industry and government is to set policy to describe the future. Develop best practices and then incrementally validate them through testing. Then, when you're really confident, make regulations. Expect this process to take a long time—but if you do it the other way around, it will take a lot longer.

Ensure that Transport Canada is resourced now to undertake the challenge of autonomous systems. As a footnote, do not separate autonomous cars from UAVs and the other elements in this common ecosystem.

(1530)



Finally, we have two specific requests for this committee. We ask that you request Transport Canada to develop a road map enabling the UAS industry to move forward without further delay, and second, that they work with industry to develop a formalized risk management process.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. I appreciate that.

Mr. Grush, would you like to present your video now?

Mr. Bern Grush (Strategist, Autonomous Transit, Grush Niles Strategic):

I want to open with a few words.

Thank you, Madam Chair and members of the committee, for the opportunity to comment regarding impacts of vehicle automation on cities and public transportation systems. My name is Bern Grush. My background encompasses human factors, human attention, artificial intelligence, and systems design engineering out of the University of Toronto and the University of Waterloo.

I'm a founder of Grush Nile Strategic, a think tank focused on finding ways to deploy automated vehicles to promote environmental sustainability, social equity, and urban livability with regard to human transport.

[Video presentation]

I would like to make two additional observations about vehicle automation specifically for moving people. First, the future of automobility will include two markets, market one for selling and buying personal or family-owned vehicles and market two for selling and buying rides hired only for the duration of a single trip.

Today market two includes all forms of for-hire vehicles, such as taxis, ride hailing, and car share, and includes all forms of transit. This is critical, because these two markets give us two distinct worlds for urban planning. AVs will sustain the 125-year-old competition between public and private modes. Both markets will be very large and will continue to challenge planners to accommodate large numbers of personal vehicles while concurrently seeking ways to harness massive fleets of shared vehicles to benefit urban populations.

Planners, concerned with efficiency and environment, are biased toward fleets of shared vehicles, but the revealed preference of the majority of travellers is biased toward private automobile ownership. Current assertions that this will change significantly are based on wishful thinking and are without reliable evidence. A shift to shared-vehicle mode will occur only if we take strategic and proactive policy decisions.

I recommend three things: that government begin an immediate migration to regulations that require AVs to be zero-emission vehicles, impose distance-based road user fees, and implement demand-based parking fees in all public, commercial, and employee spaces.

My second point is that during their early decades, AVs will not achieve full SAE level 5 automation. Market one personal vehicles will retain user controls, allowing them to be driven anywhere. These vehicles will increase average trip distance and frequency. They will increase sprawl by reducing the discomfort of driving in congestion.

(1535)



This will encourage more families to acquire these vehicles, further worsening congestion. These vehicles will continue to demand an average of four parking spots each, since they will still be parked a majority of the time and will still tend to remain near their owners.

At the same time that this is happening, market two driverless for-hire vehicles will be geofenced—i.e., constrained to carefully mapped roads. These will be robotic taxi and shuttle systems that will appeal first to travellers who are already using taxis, ride-hailing, or using transit. Such fleets will recruit heavily from existing public systems, disrupting transit just as ride-hailing disrupted our taxis. Without government oversight, this will threaten social equity.

I recommend incentives for today's commercial ride providers to encourage rides from and to transit hubs, to increase average vehicle occupancy, and to add transport for disabled travellers and for people from transit deserts, all in a way that accelerates the process of reducing the number of urban trips in personal vehicles in order to prepare ourselves for the AV robotaxis that are coming.

Thank you.

(1540)

The Chair:

Thank you, gentlemen, very much. I appreciate your patience.

We are going to suspend and go off for the vote. We will immediately come back down. Please be prepared for some questions.



(1555)

The Chair:

I'm calling the meeting back to order.

Thank you, gentlemen, for being patient.

We will go to Mr. Jeneroux as the first questioner.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Thank you for waiting for the votes, and thank you for your presentations.

I do want to get your thoughts, particularly Mr. Aruja's, on where artificial intelligence is going in relation to agriculture, because we're seeing it in a lot of rural and remote areas in my province of Alberta with farm tractors and whatnot.

What aspect would rural broadband play into that? I know it's a concern for many small businesses in the area. I wonder if you have any comments on that.

Mr. Mark Aruja:

Rural broadband is a major issue for agriculture. It's also a major issue for the mining sector and others that are trying to move data so that it's processed in a timely fashion. For agriculture it's really important, because although mining might be able to process the data later, agriculture has a real turnaround time criticality.

Rural broadband strategy, I think, is part of this. It also has to do partly with spectrum management and things like the auctioning in due course of 5G spectrum with new generation networks. Moving the data so that these artificial intelligence processors can use it is critical.

(1600)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

We had some witnesses here earlier this week with regard to where the technology is now and where we are going. Mr. Grush, I believe you said in your presentation that it was about 2035 or 2040 when the threshold would be crossed and fully automated vehicles would start to take over from self-driven vehicles. Correct me if I don't have the dates right.

Is there concern with regard to that incident in Arizona that perhaps it's moving too quickly, or do you have thoughts that we're not moving quickly enough on the regulation side? I'd love to have your feedback.

Mr. Bern Grush:

That's a good question, and the answer is quite involved.

Very briefly, that accident had aspects of technology failure. There was no reason to hit a pedestrian. The technology is beyond running over pedestrians. There was something turned off or something not working. We're not sure what that was and we can't speculate yet until the NTSB sorts that out.

We're not moving quickly enough to anticipate the changes in society, which is what my work is about. I won't say that we should move more quickly with testing in Canada, for example. I do think we should be thinking more about deployment as opposed to just testing, because we're a little bit lopsided in Canada. I'm from Ontario, and Ontario has testing programs, but that testing is about the technology itself. Clearly the technology is not ready; I'm not saying it is.

Also, the safety regulations that were in play in Arizona were very clearly insufficient. There are errors being made technically and errors were made in the regulatory area. I don't think we're making those regulatory errors here yet, but I also think we need to be pushing into further layers of anticipation about the social and infrastructural changes and not just the technology itself. The technology itself is a tiny part of a whole picture.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

What are some of those infrastructure changes? What would you suggest? It doesn't necessarily fall on the federal government to do a lot of that, but the municipal and provincial governments, I'm sure, would be interested.

Mr. Bern Grush:

When I say “infrastructure”, just as you include broadband in the infrastructure for UAVs, I'm including our transit fleets in the infrastructure for transportation.

Our habit for the past 100 or more years, for the most part, has been for government to acquire and operate transit systems, all the way from rail to buses. That “acquire and operate” methodology is very slow. The technology of the new mobility is moving very quickly. I'm suggesting that from that perspective, we need to move from the “acquire and operate” to a “specify and regulate” mode.

We have to use the technologies that are there now. We can't make those decisions quickly enough. Governance of transportation is far harder than some entrepreneurs inventing some new LIDAR or something like that.

Government can't keep up with the technology, but government has to keep the fundamental values of transit, which have to do with congestion management, moving large numbers of people to their jobs, and social equity. All of those elements of transit need to be preserved, and that's what's under threat if we just wait until these systems push transit aside. That's my greatest fear.

I hope that's a sufficient answer for you.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Maybe you can answer some of the other questions. I won't expect a response now, but what about in terms of actual physical infrastructure—lines on the road, stop signs, red lights, green lights, and that sort of thing?

The Chair:

We'll go to Mr. Badawey now.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Those are great points, great questions, Matt.

Sometimes I think we get caught up in the minutiae of the technology. Quite frankly, the technology isn't our priority. It's not our area. That's industry's priority. Let them drive that process—no pun intended. I think what's up for us to be concentrating on is being ready for that technology to hit us.

Mr. Grush, you're bang on with respect to the culture, with being prepared with the proper infrastructure, the proper integration of methods of transportation—whether road, air, rail, water—and integrating all methods of transportation that may be automated.

As well—and sometimes we don't think too deeply into this—there's the integration of the distribution logistics side of it when it comes to data management, information, and things like that. It goes a lot further than just the obvious.

My question is to all three of you. In your professional opinions, how would you recommend we start layering that dialogue in terms of what I alluded to, the other aspects, versus the actual technology of the vehicles themselves?

(1605)

Mr. Bern Grush:

The first thing we need to do is ask what the purpose is. Again, I'm focusing back on transit. Why do we have transit? What are our goals and reasons for it? It's not about how we go about it and how we did it before and how we can tune it, but why do we have it in the first place? If we don't understand why we have it, we're not going to be able to defend it in the face of the technology changes that are coming. That's the very first layer.

If we are clear, for example, on whether we agree or not that it's about social equity, whether we agree or not that it's about moving a large mass of people through a dense space.... If we agree that we're going to densify cities—and I'm not saying we should or shouldn't—then we need to ask how we're going to keep transit in that environment.

A very specific example is that it is absolutely certain that the robotic shuttles and taxis and so forth will threaten our municipal bus systems. There are a couple of thousand cities in Canada, and only a couple of hundred of them have transit systems. Many of those are threatened by these robot taxis and so forth now. What happens is that in those five or six larger cities that have subways, for example, these technologies are going to take away buses first, and that will take away some of the funnel into your light rail and urban rail systems. Those would then be the second systems under threat. How do we keep all of those people on those rail systems in spite of the convenience of coming out of their doors, getting into robotic taxis, and taking those taxis all the way to work, all 20 or 30 kilometres? I think that's the huge threat. How do we preserve our rail systems?

We're still investing in rail now in many cities. How do we think about preserving that value in spite of these robotic taxis?

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Mr. Grush—and Mark, I'll go to you in a second—I think it's critical, and correct me if I'm wrong, that we establish that strategy, that plan, before we go to the next step, because we don't want to be going forward and then coming back. It's essential to know exactly how it's going to integrate, and then move forward with infrastructure adjustments, distribution logistics, integration, and things like that.

Mr. Bern Grush:

But we have to say how it's going to integrate. We can't wait for Tesla or Uber to tell us. We have to decide how it's going to integrate.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Right.

Mr. Bern Grush:

Then we have to put the regulations and motivations in place for it to happen that way, right? They'll build what you ask if that channel has been narrowed to that solution.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Mark, would you comment?

Mr. Mark Aruja:

There are a couple of facets to this. One is—and I agree with Bern, in terms of the urban environment, for sure—that we have a lot of converging pieces to this puzzle. I would recommend this committee also talk to the Nokias, the Ericssons, the Teluses, and the AI industry to get a bit of a picture. They are driving a big part of this puzzle

I'll go back to the agriculture example. The advisory committee on economic growth recommended we set a policy of moving from fifth to second globally in the exporting of agricultural products. That is a really straightforward policy statement that will absolutely drive innovation that is connected directly to these systems.

I'll give you a really simple example of what you could do tomorrow—not next week, but literally tomorrow morning. You could say that the federal government will partner with any province that wishes to step up to test the driving of automated tractors on public roads. These tractors are all automated, but they can't go from field to field on a rural road. There's no technological barrier whatsoever to that, so it would be a very simple case study that would provide societal input in a very economic outcome-driven piece, if you will. The societal acceptance in that community would feed part of what Bern is talking about. Not everything is centred around Toronto and how they view things. There might be a different view in Lethbridge.

That would be an example of picking your battle, if you will. I think the advisory group has done a good job of that.

(1610)

The Chair:

Thank you.[Translation]

Mr. Aubin, the floor is yours.

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Gentlemen, thank you for being here and for your patience.

I was born in 1960. In my youth, we thought that, by the year 2000, people would retire at 55, that the work week would be four days and that there would be flying cars. Here too, we are looking 40 years into the future.

I tend to believe that technological change over the next four decades could lead to what you are describing. However, when I look at the other line that marks the decline in personal cars, it seems to me that the analysis needs to change. Somehow, you have to get rid of the pleasure of driving and the pleasure of owning a car.

How will it be possible to have those two lines cross, that is to say that the technology allows the development of autonomous cars, but also that consumers are willing to give up their cars?

What I'm seeing now, and it will probably be the trend for the next few years, is that clean cars, electric cars, are attracting a lot of interest. We can see it in Tesla's success, for example.

What will motivate people to opt for autonomous cars and lead them to lose the pleasure of driving?

The question arises all the more because, right now, we are not able to develop public transportation between major urban centres. This means that people are going to drive between Montreal and Toronto or between Quebec City and Montreal anyway. Why, once there, would they really have a blast driving an autonomous vehicle? [English]

Mr. Bern Grush:

Thank you.

That is a huge problem. The solution is not to make it miserable to own your car; the solution is to make it wonderful to use a shared vehicle.

There's a natural aversion to the sense of losing your car. I have a car, and I think from your question you have a car. There is a loss. You feel like there might be a loss of something. We're averse to that kind of loss. In order to have someone change something, the thing that they're going to change to has to be almost twice as good as the thing they're leaving. That's the challenge.

To make the activity of using a vehicle and not owning attractive is a much larger challenge than the actual technology challenge of making a vehicle run by itself. Your question is so far unanswered. When you hear people say that no one is going to need to own a car, that's true rationally, but it's not true behaviourally and economically. From a behavioural economics perspective, everything that you're saying is true. Many people prefer to keep their car, and that's a huge problem.

I wish I had the answer. If I had the answer, I would be very wealthy.

Here's what's worse. Right now in Canada, fewer than 10% of all trips are taken in a non-family vehicle. If we get 75% of all trips in a non-owned vehicle 30 years from now, the whole world population of cars will still be the same as now, because our demand for trips will increase, and our wealth increases. That's one of the reasons we demand more trips. A small change of moving from 8% to 18% won't make any difference at all. Our congestion problems are far bigger than a few people shifting to robotaxis. It's a very big problem.

Thank you for that question. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Mr. Aruja, you highlighted the importance of the roadmap.

Mr. McCalla, you talked about the importance of Transport Canada being transparent with the whole process that will be implemented over the next few years.

Could you tell us more specifically what you expect from Transport Canada to better align the industry's wishes with the government's ability to support those technological changes? [English]

Mr. Mark Aruja:

Thank you very much.

In 2007, we had an agreed joint plan developed, which had four phases. We are almost finished phase one, which is the initial regulatory release we're expecting with CG2 this summer. Phase two is kind of halfway, and phases three and four are about beyond visual line of sight—for example, how do we do sections of land, and how does Jeremy get to do hundreds of kilometres of line survey?

We know the industry–government working group relationship is fabulous. It's a great working relationship, but we're totally stopped. There's no visioning. We need something. It's not as if we don't know what we need to do, but it is not written down, it is not transparent, and there's no senior-level oversight, managerially or politically, to make this thing happen.

There are great aspirations. We want to grow our sector of agriculture from 6.7% of GDP to something north of that, but we have these sticky wickets in the way.

It irks me no end that the United States had no road map at all three years ago, but I can go on their website—and I know they're going to be updating their website in a couple of weeks—and I will have full transparency into that, and I will have that transparency for many other jurisdictions.

We need to not have folks just trying to addle their way through every day to what they think industry needs. Let's sort this out. We're not going to have a perfect plan, but let's get your one, two, three sorted out, because we have to deal with the technological change. It is unbelievably rapid, but we can't afford to have regulations drafted that don't reflect reality.

(1615)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go on to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair. It's a fascinating discussion today.

Mr. Grush, I'll probably spend most of my time with you because you've said some fairly provocative things. Let's put it that way. I suppose that's what you wanted to do, right?

Let's go forward to the time when most vehicles are automated, autonomous, etc. What do you predict the average speed to be on roadways?

Mr. Bern Grush:

I'm actually going to answer that even though I have no idea. That's not been studied in the sense that I could provide a reliable answer, but I will say that when you say “most”, we're talking about the point where our highways, for example, in Ontario—

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I would appreciate a short answer, if you could, please, sir.

Mr. Bern Grush:

We're going to be very fast on highways and we are going to have to be much slower in cities. Just for pedestrian and bicycle safety, I would say in cities we'll probably be slower than we are now.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay.

One of the attributes of some mass transit systems is that they can move more quickly than the surrounding traffic if they're grade-separated. Has that kind of approach to mass transit factored into some of your strategy?

Mr. Bern Grush:

No. I haven't really thought much about speeds, and the reason is that I'm just thinking mostly about social equity. My answer about slow is for safety.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay, but average speed will mean something to people who are interested in getting to where they need to go in a reasonable time frame.

Talk about the built environment. We have streets, curbs, cutouts for pedestrians, and a lot of other things. Will the built environment at street level need to change substantially for autonomous vehicles?

Mr. Bern Grush:

At the very least, we need to do massive amounts of changes to our curbs. I would hope—and this is just a hope—that we would be removing street parking by then, “then” being 2040 or 2050, when a majority of vehicles will be automated. There would be no need for street parking. There would be a lot of need for cars to pull over and let passengers in and out, but we wouldn't need parking. Our curbs in our cities need to change dramatically.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

It was interesting to hear you speculate that the number of vehicles on the road would not go down, and in fact might go up, which suggests that the land space we dedicate to roadways and parking will be not the same but even larger than we allocate right now. However, at the same time we're seeing a shift to the shared economy in a number of areas. We have shared ride services right now—we have shared cars, Uber, and a lot of things. Have you factored that proclivity toward more sharing of assets, as opposed to owning, into your estimates and strategies with respect to the onset of automated vehicles?

(1620)

Mr. Bern Grush:

When I talk about more congestion, I'm talking about more cars on the road. What would be absent would be parking. The expectation that I've drawn from my research is that parking would go up a little bit for a little while, plateau at some point, and then go down, but the actual number of cars on the road would go up and keep going up.

The reason the traffic is going up is that there are more people travelling further. Sprawl means more congestion. Sprawl means the average trip is longer. If the robotic services are inexpensive, it's far easier to hop into a vehicle. In other words, there would be more cars on the road, but almost none of them would be parking during peak hours.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

If we have vehicles that are autonomous, that are in the Internet of things, that are well connected, that co-exist quite well with each other, will we come to the point where we will not be allowed to have hands-on driving anymore?

Mr. Bern Grush:

I think so, at some point, in the same sense that I can't take a bicycle onto a highway or that I can't take a horse on most streets. I know it's kind of a silly example, but it is the case that there was a 40-year period in which horses and cars were mixed. I'm expecting about a 30-year or 40-year period in which driven vehicles and driverless vehicles will be sharing roadways in some way. They may be somewhat grade separated, but there is no way we can afford grade separation everywhere, so there is going to be mixed traffic at some point.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Mark, I want to build on your comments about the spread of high-speed broadband. Is that necessary for the operation of unmanned aerial vehicles?

Mr. Mark Aruja:

That's a great question, and the answer is no.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move on to Mr. Iacono, please. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My thanks to the witnesses for being here today.

I understand the importance of being proactive on this issue. I agree with my colleague Mr. Aubin. I love driving cars. What will happen to the Ferrari of tomorrow? Will it exist only so that we can admire its style?

Still, I have some doubts about the automobile. Even today, the automobile can be perceived by outsiders as a sign of wealth. I continue to believe that the need to own a vehicle will not diminish.

Congestion is already a problem. How can autonomous vehicles overcome this problem?

My question is for one of you three, and I would like the answer to be short. [English]

Mr. Bern Grush:

All of my work says that car ownership would still be 25% of all vehicles at the best. There is no way that car ownership is going to go away completely. I actually think it will be fifty-fifty. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

So, do you agree that we will have to build special roads for autonomous vehicles? [English]

Mr. Bern Grush:

In the end, no, but in the interim, yes. There needs to be some degree of thought and separation in these first 15 or 20 years. One of the biggest risks is that we will build something that's going to be for 10 or 15 years that we then don't need anymore, so there is a double hit here, a double expense. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Could you explain to me whether the following scenario is possible?

Suppose I am in an autonomous vehicle, and suddenly I'm on a public road and the vehicle stops. At that point, is it possible for the vehicle to function as a regular car? It would be sort of like the cruise control option we have today. Would it be possible to have a dual system, an autonomous vehicle with some of the features of today's automobile? [English]

Mr. Bern Grush:

Yes, those already exist. Those are called “level 3” in those five SAE levels. Level 3 is called “conditional automation”. You can turn it on, and it drives for you. When you don't want it to drive—for example, if you're in a place where it can't drive—then you turn it off, and you can drive. Those already exist.

(1625)

Mr. Mark Aruja:

I may have a bit of a different perspective, and let me tell you why. When you own a fleet of delivery vehicles, you can buy an application to track all of those vehicles. If someone stops at a Tim Hortons for more than 15 minutes, it will tell you. That technology is in your cellphone.

That technology, I believe, is going to be far more adoptable today, rather than grade separation and all of those things. We can put that into driving cars today to prevent going into a lane that has, let's say, autonomous vehicles in it. We have the technology today to do that, and we're implementing it today for UAVs. We're just putting a propeller onto the cellphone to manage it.

One of the things that was mentioned by Bern is called geofencing. This technology is now widespread out there. It makes sure that autonomous systems or unmanned systems do not go past a geographical barrier, and it goes right into the control system. The technology is here today. It is very simple to adopt it in a manually driven car. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

This week, witnesses have told us that the infrastructure to accommodate autonomous vehicles was not entirely necessary, but desirable. Manufacturers are designing their products on the assumption that such infrastructures will be poorly developed.

First, is it possible to do without specific infrastructure, or not?

Second, what kind of infrastructure is needed? Is having smart cities an advantage? [English]

Mr. Bern Grush:

I think it would be an advantage to have a smart city. I have to caution everybody in the room that these smart city ideas are new in the last couple of years, and they call for changes that would cost trillions of dollars. The city I come from can't fix its potholes, so I don't know how we're going to do this kind of infrastructure that you're describing, which is why the manufacturers in the autonomous space are saying they will develop systems that require no changes.

The problem is that if virtually all the cars are automated at some point in 30 to 40 years, but 10% to 20% are not, how will those last few cars survive in that environment? This is unresolved.

Your question is a very good one. There hasn't been a pathway to that solution yet.

Mr. Mark Aruja:

You're going to have a shift from talking about cars to talking about data, and the UAV industry has made that transition, because the money is in the data. Cars are going to be a commodity. When the day comes that it's a shared system and it just shows up, you have no brand allegiance and you don't care what colour it is. You just care that it gets you there. There'll be no more attachment to it.

The data will drive it. The data is going to be where the money is, and cities and jurisdictions will need to figure out what slice of that revenue stream they need. We had this discussion in the case of Netflix. Where is that industrial Internet of things? Where is the carve-out on the taxes to support that infrastructure for the public good?

The discussion 10 years from now is going to have nothing to do with cars. I suggest it's going to be about the data moving on those networks, and those cars will be just a data source and a data sink.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Do you want two minutes, Michael?

Go ahead.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

This is more of a comment.

When I listen to testimony, I wonder if the federal government has its infrastructure funding program set up right. For example, the public transit infrastructure fund, a $3.5 billion fund, is putting money into renewing bus fleets. In 2012 the TTC retired their last General Motors fishbowl bus that was purchased in the 1980s. These buses last for 20 to 30 years.

I hear about automation and the elimination of jobs and I listen to people like Mark Carney, who was referring to a Bank of England report that 15 million jobs in the U.K. are going to disappear. PricewaterhouseCoopers reported last year that 38% of all jobs in the United States will be eliminated in the next 12 years because of automation. I hear about the rapid transformation of vehicular traffic. Are we making the right capital investments by purchasing buses in our transit fleets in our large cities?

I also wonder about what happens to all these bus drivers and jobs and everything else.

It's more of a comment and something for us to think about as we embark on this study.

The Chair:

Thank you to our witnesses. We very much appreciated your information.

We will suspend for a moment while our other witnesses come to the table.



(1630)

The Chair:

I call the Standing Committee on Transport back to order. Under Standing Order 108(2), we are doing a study of automated and connected vehicles in Canada.

Welcome to all our guests: Denis Gingras, Professor, Laboratory on Intelligent Vehicles, Université de Sherbrooke; Scott Santens, Writer and Advocate of Unconditional Basic Income; and from QNX Software Systems Limited, Grant Courville, Head of Product Management, and John Wall, Senior Vice-President.

Mr. Gingras, why don't you start? You have five minutes, please. [Translation]

Dr. Denis Gingras (Professor, Laboratory on Intelligent Vehicles, Université de Sherbrooke, As an Individual):

Thank you very much for inviting me to appear before you and for giving me the opportunity to share my opinions on the field in which I have been working for more than 30 years.

We often have to ask ourselves questions about the motivation that drives us to make autonomous vehicles. Let's first look at our transportation system and our mobility issues.

In fact, it would be difficult to imagine a more inefficient transportation system than the one we currently have. Our transportation system is based on a business model that relies on the sale of vehicles and the individual ownership of cars. Population growth is constant, and part of the population moves to larger cities at the expense of the regions. In economics, the just-in-time method has been used. All goods that were transported by train are now being transported on our roads by road trains, which has contributed to destroying our road infrastructure. We just have to look at the current state of our roads to see it.

The occupancy rate of the vehicles is to the tune of 5%. Furthermore, 80% of people still travel individually in vehicles. You just have to compare the average weight of a person with the average weight of a vehicle, which is increasing because, according to statistics, people are buying more and more SUVs or vans: this is not going in the right direction at all.

There are still pollution-related issues. More than 80% of vehicles still have combustion engines.

In addition, vehicles are used for approximately one hour per day. Once again, the vehicle usage rate is about 5%, which is completely ineffective. Ask any business owner if they would buy equipment that they would use for only 5% of the time. Nobody would invest money for that.

As we can see, this is significant.

Fortunately, the transportation sector is currently experiencing a revolution around three major pillars. Clearly, there is the electrification of propulsion systems, but I will not talk much about it today. There is also the automation of driving, and the whole area of connectivity, of telecommunications systems. Those three aspects are bringing about a revolution in the transportation sector. This revolution will have major repercussions both in terms of business models and in terms of possible solutions to mobility problems. However, it is up to us to make drastic decisions in order to change course and improve our transportation systems. Like it or not, despite the digitization of our society and the importance of information technology, we remain physical beings manipulating physical objects and we will always have the need to move around.

I will now talk about automated driving.

Why do we want to have autonomous vehicles? There are two major reasons.

First, we want to improve road safety, because computers have a much faster response time than humans. In addition, because of the diversity of on-board sensors and current processing systems that are highly advanced and that continue to improve, including through artificial intelligence, we can come up with solutions to improve road safety and reduce the number of accidents, injuries and fatalities.

The second reason is that autonomous vehicles, as far as the concept of robotic taxis is concerned, can help us reduce the number of vehicles on the roads. Traffic congestions is really one of the major problems, besides the aspects related to the danger of travelling by road.

Telecommunications is also an interesting aspect because it allows us to consider the sharing of intelligence between vehicles and road infrastructures. So far, car manufacturers have invested all their efforts in including embedded intelligence in vehicles, while transportation agencies, departments and all public agencies that deal with road infrastructure have invested very little in their infrastructure to make them smarter. In the current situation, there is an imbalance. We need to further harness the communication capacity in order to try to optimize the sharing of intelligence between infrastructure and vehicles.

(1635)



In terms of the recommendations, I think we urgently need serious and detailed work on regulations and legislation to accommodate these new vehicles, vehicles that can communicate and drive autonomously.

In particular, in the short term, it is essential to oversee the way pilot projects are carried out on public roads and to invest in the development of vehicle testing and validation procedures, including through Transport Canada and testing sites such as the ones we have in Blainville, north of Montreal.

I will stop there.

(1640)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Gingras.

We'll go on to Mr. Santens for five minutes.

Mr. Scott Santens (Writer and Advocate of Unconditional Basic Income, As an Individual):

I would like to thank the committee for having me here today.

In 2014 I went on a road trip with my fiancée, and on the road trip from Louisiana to Florida we had a conversation about the potential effects of driverless trucks. Months later I self-published an article born from that conversation, which went viral globally, and in these past four years, despite my own warnings about it, even I have been shocked by the speed of development of this technology.

I have no Ph.D. I'm not a programmer or a truck-driver. I'm simply a citizen who spends a lot of time researching topics of interest to me and writing about them. The area that tends to interest me most is the effect of technological advancement on human civilization. With that in mind, I wish to spend my time attempting to convey the monumental impacts automated vehicle technology will have on society as we know it, and the utmost need to understand what's coming down the road, so to speak.

To begin, I want to share a quote that I feel summarizes why this technology will happen. “It's not fantasy,” says the CFO of Suncor in regard to a fully automated fleet of driverless trucks operating in their mining operations. He went on to explain, “That will take 800 people off our site. At an average...of $200,000 per person, you can see the savings we’re going to get from an operations perspective.”

That's the cold calculus of self-driving technology.

Humans are expensive. Their labour is expensive. Their benefits can be expensive. They're costly to train. They get injured. They get tired. They make mistakes. They drink and use medications. They get distracted. They look at their phones. They go on strikes. They get involved in lawsuits. They get angry and depressed. They have physical and biological limits. They quit.

Machines do none of these things. Machines are the perfect worker as long as the cost is right and the output is good.

When it comes to driverless trucks, the cost of fuel also enters the equation. Trucks that drive themselves offer incredible efficiencies in fuel costs. Driverless trucks can travel longer distances in shorter times, thanks to not needing to sleep. They can travel in convoys to increase aerodynamic efficiencies. Fewer accidents can save a lot in human and capital costs. There are many reasons driving the adoption of this technology, and billions of dollars—both invested and at stake—for those who get there first.

I'm here speaking only a week after the first death of a pedestrian by a self-driving car, but that accident itself says a lot about the status of this technology. It's already as good as a human, such that people already expect superhuman abilities from it. Why didn't its radar and laser-based system see the woman before tragically colliding with her in the dark? Why didn't the car immediately detect her and immediately slam on the brakes?

We are talking about a matter of seconds, where below-average human drivers would have caused the same death, just as they cause over 3,000 deaths a day and 1.3 million deaths every year all over the world. The first human being has died, but this technology will save lives, money, and time, and it will impact our economies in ways governments needed to start preparing for years ago.

Don't be fooled into thinking this is just about eliminating driving jobs. The automation of vehicular transport will ripple through the economy. Think of cars and trucks as blood cells in a circulatory system, carrying oxygen throughout the body in the form of income and spending. There are businesses that depend on drivers spending their money. There are businesses that depend on car ownership. There are businesses that depend on vehicles getting into accidents, parking, and requiring insurance. These businesses are themselves then depended upon by other businesses, and so on, like falling dominoes.

The challenge that lies ahead for lawmakers is in helping guide this process in a way that doesn't discourage its advancement but enables it to flourish, while leaving as many people as possible better off. This means not just assisting people in learning new skills for new jobs, but also creating a safety net that acknowledges the transformation of work in this 21st century of great uncertainty.

Requiring former drivers to jump through an arduous system of forms and bureaucrats to receive income as they retrain and search for the next opportunity for employment is not the best way forward in a world of work where more and more people are between increasingly insecure jobs of shorter duration and greater monthly income variance.

This is why I also believe any conversation about automation of future work requires a conversation about a basic income guarantee. You're ahead of the curve in that you're already testing it, but I do wish to urge you of its importance. Self-driving tech will absolutely create winners and losers, and all of those who lose cannot be ignored or expected to just easily find a new job with equal pay, hours, benefits, skill requirements, security, meaning, and distance from home. It is imperative that you as lawmakers work to make sure that technology like driverless vehicles, and the AI that makes it possible, effectively works for everyone, not just its owners. Without that focus, danger lies ahead. It's up to you to negotiate our way around these dangers as best you can, so we can all arrive at a place our ancestors perhaps never even imagined possible.

Thank you.

(1645)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Courville, you don't have opening remarks?

Mr. John Wall (Senior Vice-President, QNX Software Systems Limited):

No, I do. I have a short....

The Chair:

Mr. Wall, go ahead.

Mr. John Wall:

Chairperson, thank you for inviting BlackBerry to speak to you today about connected and autonomous vehicles.

As this committee is aware, the automotive industry is undergoing a major transformation wherein a collection of computers, software, sensors, actuators, and connected networks will eventually take over the driving function from humans. BlackBerry is playing a leadership role in this transformation. We are proud to be a Canadian company that employs tremendous Canadian talent and constantly innovates to be at the forefront of technological progress.

BlackBerry QNX has been a trusted technology supplier to the automotive industry for approximately 20 years. Its software is used by more than 40 automakers, is in over 60 million cars, and will provide the foundation for autonomous drive systems into the future. The new generation of vehicles will increasingly be dependent on software and connections to external networks to perform critical functions. This will present increased safety risks if the vehicle systems are not developed in accordance with best practices and industry standards for safety and security.

BlackBerry has developed a framework of disciplines for securing modern cars to reduce the risk of cyber-attacks. We work closely with automakers and their suppliers and we know they are taking the issues of safety and security very seriously. They are aware of the public's concern and are aware that failure to adopt reasonable measures to ensure the safety and security of the vehicles will negatively impact the adoption of this technology, not to mention their reputations.

This is not to suggest that government does not have an important role to play. Governments have a responsibility to ensure that the next generation of vehicles is safely deployed and does not introduce unreasonable risk. Governments should endeavour to harmonize regulations across jurisdictions such that a patchwork of divergent laws and standards does not emerge. This will require coordination between multiple departments and levels of government, including foreign governments. The sharing of test results, ideas, and experiences among agencies and jurisdictions will also provide an efficient way for government to keep pace with rapid technological changes.

Thank you.

The Chair:

We will go to five-minute rounds of questioning, starting with Mr. Chong.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you, Madam Chair.[Translation]

My thanks to the witnesses for their presentations.

I have a question for Professor Gingras and the two representatives from QNX Software Systems Limited. [English]

Can you describe quantitatively or predict quantitatively what percentage of the vehicle fleet on the roads in 2030 will be level 0 through level 5? What will be the mix of the fleet on the roads? I know it's a prediction.

Dr. Denis Gingras:

Sorry, that was zero to what?

Hon. Michael Chong:

Level 0 to level 5—how many cars will there be that are like today, level 0, and how many cars will be level 3, and how many cars will be level 5?

I have two questions, very briefly. First, what will the fleet mix be of vehicles on the road in 2030 among the different levels of autonomous driving? Second, what will the percentage of new vehicle sales be in 2030 among the different levels of autonomous driving?

Those are my two questions for the two groups of witnesses.

Dr. Denis Gingras:

Thank you for your question.

It's a bit tricky to make precise predictions for this—we need a crystal ball—but there will definitely be a kind of hybrid traffic. If you look at the pace of evolution of the technology, right now we have achieved ADSs, automated driving systems, that are commercially available between levels 2 and 3. I assume probably in 2030, 12 years from now, you'll probably have level 4 vehicles commercially available, but probably not level 5. I would really doubt that.

There are so many parameters involved in terms of the business model: social acceptance, how the OEMs will deal with the marketing strategy in selling these automated vehicles and autonomous vehicles, how the insurance companies will react to that, how the legislation will evolve, what kind of collaboration there will be between people in charge of the road infrastructure versus the people in charge of the vehicles, all the different sharing mobility strategies—

(1650)

[Translation]

Hon. Michael Chong:

Do you think that, by 2030, the vast majority of vehicles will be at the third and fourth levels of automation? [English]

Dr. Denis Gingras:

I'd say probably half and half.

Hon. Michael Chong:

To our other two witnesses, do they have quantitative protections? Obviously we're not going to hold you to this—

Mr. John Wall:

I completely agree there's a lot of talk about level 5 autonomous drive, but that's very far off, and 2030 is not when it's going to happen. Level 5 means go anywhere, anytime, under any conditions.

The programs we're working on today are L-3 plus and L-4. These are typically 2023-24 time frames. It trickles down typically to the less expensive vehicle. If I had to hazard a guess, based on the programs we're working on, I'd say that you're going to see probably 30% L-4 and L-4 plus, 30% L-3 and L-3 plus, and probably 40% L-2 in that time frame. There are just different levels of safety features.

The OEMs that we speak to talk about conditioning the public with safety features preventing accidents—not necessarily about autonomous drive, but automated driving which is—

Go ahead.

Mr. Grant Courville (Head, Product Management, QNX Software Systems Limited):

I was going to say that the thing to keep in mind as well is there is no big switch that's going to be thrown. All of the millions and hundreds of millions of vehicles you have globally that are on the road today aren't just going to go away. There's what's on the road today, and just as we have level 2 vehicles today, today the vast majority of vehicles on the road aren't even connected, so the transition period to get to, say, any kind of majority of automated and autonomous cars is easily decades away.

Mr. John Wall:

Yes. When I talk about the distribution, I'm talking about new cars sold in 2030.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Go ahead, Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I have to say this is going to be a monumental process going probably decades ahead into the future. I want to ask you the same questions I asked the previous witnesses who were here about a half an hour ago.

It doesn't necessarily attach itself to the technology, because the technology is going to be driven by two sources: the customer, in terms of establishing their needs, and then the industry itself to try to meet those needs with that new technology. What I want to discuss is how we as government, with U.S. partners, prepare for that new technology when it comes to establishing conducive investments for infrastructure.

The second example is ensuring that we facilitate the integration of methods of transportation as it relates to road, rail, air, and water, because we're not just talking about cars on the roads, buses on the roads, trucks on the roads; we're also talking about ships in the water, trains on the tracks, and airplanes in the air.

The last one is business logistics and distribution to ensure that lobbies, vehicles, and methods of transportation are moving around nationally and internationally, that they integrate methods of transportation while integrating the different business and logistics distribution interests.

I would throw one more in there as it relates to revenue opportunities. There is no question that with the new ability to collect data, there are going to be new revenue opportunities for those who are in the industry, but equally as important, if not more important, is that there are going to be revenue opportunities for customers to be able to collect that data with their own methods and do what they want with it to create revenue opportunities for themselves individually.

With that all said, I want to pick your brains and listen to you in terms of your thoughts on those different bullets that I've brought up, and I'm looking for the “how” to the “what” with respect to attaching ourselves as government and as partners and preparing ourselves with infrastructure, integration, business logistics, and data integration.

It's all for you.

Mr. Grant Courville:

I think you mentioned infrastructure investment. Traditionally, people think of infrastructure as bricks and mortar, concrete, etc. I think the thought has to be towards technology and connectivity. In infrastructure investments looking forward, you have to look at vehicle-to-vehicle connectivity, vehicle-to-traffic-light connectivity, and what not, and put programs together to help accelerate and drive that, as opposed to what we traditionally call infrastructure. I think that would definitely be one area.

Also, safety features can be democratized in the sense that they can be available across vehicle lines. That often is driven by volume, just pure economics. The example I always like to use is government stepped in and mandated rear-view cameras in cars. What happened? By 2018, every vehicle has a camera in it. The cost has come way down. The industry adapted. I think we can look for opportunities like that, where government to step in and accelerate that process.

(1655)

Mr. John Wall:

From a monetization perspective, I think the bigger change in automotive, although we all talk about autonomous drive and automated drive, will be the change in the architecture of the vehicle. There's going to be an ecosystem built around the car.

The best comparison is Android for the phone. There will be an Android for the car. There will be two or three ecosystems, just as today there are iOS and Android, but it won't be Android, because there are very specific properties around security and safety.

However, I think there's a huge opportunity. The car makers are looking at a completely different business model of how to make money in the future. Part of it is data, and the other part is how they sell services into the car. The way people will own cars will be very different in the future. You may own a convertible during the summer and then a sport utility during the winter, but people are going to want their features to follow those cars—seating positions, for example. When people talk about a smart phone on wheels, it actually is headed in that direction.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

You both make a good point with respect to infrastructure and the new normal of what that infrastructure is. When you look at gridlock, for example, digging a bit deeper we can now find ways to eliminate that by timing perfectly not only the infrastructure, but the vehicles that are taking advantage of that infrastructure. Now you've got a seamless movement and flow, strategically timed to eliminate gridlock and have better environmental outcomes, etc.

To your point with respect to data, who actually will be the benefactor of that data when it comes to the financial revenues that will be created from it?

Mr. John Wall:

That will be very interesting.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Is it the companies or is it the individual?

Mr. John Wall:

Why do you think Google wants to get into cars? It's about data. It's all about data. The OEMs know they can monetize it, but they don't know how yet.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Then again, if you take it a step further, it might be the individuals who take advantage of the Google apps who can sell the data, versus Google or the actual car companies.

Mr. John Wall:

It remains to be seen, but today Google and Facebook make all the money.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

It's on to Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

This discussion is exciting. I will dive in right away.

Mr. Gingras, with your presentation, a light bulb went off in my head when you talked about the just-in-time model, which we launched when greenhouse gases were not such a known problem.

Do these technological developments in transportation also require reflection on the need to revise our economic models, or are we strictly focusing on the notions of transportation, vehicles and automation?

Dr. Denis Gingras:

Absolutely. I think mobility and transportation are just two of the pillars of our society. Right now, many notions about how we live and how our society works need to be questioned. We just have to think about climate change, social inequalities, cybersecurity or threats to democracy. Mobility is one of the pillars of the development of our society, since it allows people to go to the office, school or grocery store, or to transport goods. This physical mobility is therefore necessary, in parallel with the mobility of data and knowledge that information systems allow us to exchange.

If we really want to solve the major problems we face in terms of mobility and transportation, we will have to look at this entire issue holistically, in a comprehensive way. We will also have to have the courage to make painful decisions about our current economic models.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Mr. Santens, I noticed earlier that you wanted to react to personal data. Let me give you the opportunity to do so. [English]

Mr. Scott Santens:

Yes, thank you.

I just wanted to mention that as far as monetization of data is concerned, I think it's important, as regards the future, that we stress that people do own their data. If as lawmakers you set the precedent that people own their data, then it makes sense not only from a privacy perspective that the data cannot be leaked and resold, but also that when it is sold and people agree to its being sold, they receive something in return for it.

It's interesting too that there's data that most people think of as data, but there's also ambient data, which is the data that we generate just by being ourselves, doing nothing, walking along the street near a camera. There's a lot of data out there that isn't necessarily seen as data, but it is.

(1700)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Mr. Courville and Mr. Wall, I have a more technical question for you.

We always hear that automated vehicles are safer, since their computers react faster than humans. However, all the examples that I am given are where the car stops faster than I could in order to avoid an accident.

But last year, I managed miraculously, but also thanks to my driving technique, to avoid being involved in a pileup caused by black ice. In that case, the solution was not to stop, but to perform a controlled skid. Are automated vehicles capable of doing that? [English]

Mr. John Wall:

Yes, I think that the algorithms are going to be sophisticated enough to understand black ice, slippage of the wheels, etc. They'll be able to identify more quickly than you what's happening to the vehicle from a geometry perspective.

It's also one of the reasons that I believe autonomous driving is further out than, say, Uber would like to claim. Uber has a business reason for wanting autonomous drive. It's their business model. They don't survive without it.

There's very little testing in Canada for autonomous drive. We have an autonomous car at QNX, and in the winter it behaves much differently on snow and ice. We're nowhere near being prepared to handle those situations. I think people are still better at handling those situations, but I think the technology, with machine learning and AI, will be able to react appropriately to those types of situations. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Is that— [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin, I'm sorry. We're going on to Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

A witness on the previous panel pre-empted my question by describing the period when a horse overlapped with a car on the road. It's amazing that we're here talking about driverless cars.

I was reading a report by the U.K. House of Lords in 2017 entitled “Connected and Autonomous Vehicles: The future?”. From the report, the study discussed the transitional period when traditional vehicles would share the road with CVs and AVs. The report expressed concern that the effects of CVs and AVs sharing the road with traditional vehicles are not fully understood. It recommended that the U.K. government undertake mixed-fleet modelling to inform policy development.

My first question is this: what modelling work, if any, has been undertaken here in Canada to assess the impact of a mixed fleet of autonomous and non-autonomous vehicles on Canadian roads?

Mr. Grant Courville:

That's very admirable. We wholeheartedly agree with that recommendation, because humans by definition are unpredictable. You're absolutely right. The reality is that it will be a mixed fleet, as we discussed earlier.

With regard to what John was saying earlier, the testing we do in inclement weather with all of the sensors is not so much to handle when things are going well but to handle when things are unpredictable and things aren't going well. It's to handle things we haven't foreseen and to find out how we can react to that intelligently. Can cars communicate to each other? John mentioned artificial intelligence, so we wholeheartedly agree.

Part of what we do with the sensors is to deal with obstacles that are not predicted and whatnot. That's one of the other reasons that we have a long way to go before we get to level 5. One of the things we tend to say is that there are connected cars, there are automated cars, and then there are autonomous cars. We tend to jump from connected to autonomous, but there's automated, which is a major step. You're seeing that already with a lot of automated features in the cars. The cars are getting safer, and those are all building blocks on the way to autonomous cars.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

To that point, how can modelling reflect human interactions?

Dr. Denis Gingras:

HMI problems, human-machine interaction problems, are very critical. Actually, there are a lot of unconscious details when we interact between humans—for example, the body language. If you take a pedestrian simply crossing a road, he will probably look at the car and see the driver. Without any talking, he understands that the driver has seen him or her, and he will say he's confident because the car is slowing down. We don't have this kind of interaction with a fully autonomous vehicle yet, and we have no clue on how to predict it precisely.

There's a lot of model-building with psychologists in connective science, and mathematicians trying to develop driver models and HMI models in order to have safer interactions between these highly autonomous vehicles or highly automated driving functions and humans.

To give you an example, there are some German car makers who have developed graphic interfaces with a big smile on the front of the cars, showing the pedestrian that the machine has seen you, so you can safely cross the street. We are exploring all kinds of solutions in that aspect.

This is not a trivial problem. This is also one tiny problem among an ocean of problems before we reach a full, mature solution at level 5. We're not there yet.

(1705)

Mr. Scott Santens:

I'd like to give an example too. In the case of this mix of human and self-driving cars, you can imagine that the way a traffic jam can form is just through, let's say, rubbernecking. Someone will be driving by. You'll look, and you'll slow down. That will cause the car behind you to slow down, and then the car behind, and suddenly there is a big traffic jam. It just snakes its way back.

One possibility is that this will cause all the automated cars to get into that jam as well. If you have some kind of a hybrid system, however, and you still have a human driver, but it detects that the car in front of you has started to slow down, it wouldn't slow down as much as a human would, and the car behind it would be affected differently. Then you would avoid that traffic jam that would otherwise have been caused by a human driver without any kind of assistance.

There is a kind of hybrid system there that could be implemented.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Santens.

We'll move on to Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Professor Gingras, this morning, tests were conducted in Blainville on emergency braking systems. Could you tell us more about that?

Dr. Denis Gingras:

Thank you for your question.

I have actually been at Transport Canada's and PMG Technologies' Motor Vehicle Testing Centre in Blainville for two days. In collaboration with the National Research Council of Canada and Transport Canada, we held a workshop to create what we call a community of practice, in other words, a network composed of all Canadian stakeholders in the road transport and smart vehicle sectors, with a view to developing a national strategy in the area.

The workshop brought together experts from NRC and Transport Canada as well as from universities such as Waterloo and Sherbrooke. There were also representatives from certain organizations in Quebec and Ontario, but also from the City of Calgary, since tests are being done there.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

What did you learn?

Dr. Denis Gingras:

This morning, we did some tests, some with dummies, to check the emergency braking systems of various models of vehicles, specifically from Kia. As we have already seen in previous tests over the last two years, the emergency braking systems on the market do not really work beyond a speed of 40 kilometres per hour. The technology has not yet been refined, and the situation is all the more dangerous because the public has not been made fully aware.

This presents a challenge for transportation regulators, particularly in the provinces. I am referring to the organizations that offer driving courses or issue driver's licences. If someone buys a smart vehicle with automated features, such as a Tesla with an autopilot system, governments need to ensure that the new owner is well informed about the technical limitations of these functions and knows when and how to use them. This is in order to keep within their parameters and to avoid dangerous situations. It is extremely important.

There is also the whole issue of developing new regulations for these new technologies.

(1710)

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

In terms of computer security, is any programming system safe from piracy?

Dr. Denis Gingras:

I do not think any of the current computer systems can claim to be completely safe from a cyberattack.

As soon as a vehicle is connected and is able to communicate and exchange information with the road infrastructure, with other vehicles or with pedestrians, I believe there is a risk that the data will be intercepted and that unauthorized people will be able to control the vehicle remotely.

We have already had an example of that potential danger in the United States, two or three years ago, with a Jeep Cherokee.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, you have one minute.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Okay.[Translation]

Mr. Gingras, you bring up a subject that I wanted to raise. It was exactly that Jeep that was the target of a computer attack in 2015, a zero-day exploit, as it is called.[English]

These are fly-by-wire vehicles, and you can take control of them remotely and take them off the road. What are we doing to prevent that from happening in the future? If you jailbreak a QNX vehicle, what are the consequences of that?

Mr. John Wall:

Specifically on the Charlie Miller hack that we're talking about, we're pretty intimately familiar with that hack.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Was it a QNX vehicle?

Mr. John Wall:

It was a QNX-based vehicle, and the way I would describe it is that somebody left the door wide open. There was no security in mind at all in that vehicle. It was a wake-up call to the auto industry that a lot more had to be done.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But anytime you have a network vehicle, that's going to be in the case anyway—

Mr. John Wall:

No, no, there was very serious things that were done in this vehicle to leave the door open. I'm talking scripts that say “update me” with this. It was ridiculously open.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: That says something to the major point here, which is that no program is better than the programmer who wrote it.

Mr. John Wall:

Yes, there is programming and then there is the methodology of how you put the system together, and cybersecurity is never going to be an absolute certainty. It's a cat-and-mouse game in which you will always be staying ahead in a technology, because we've seen vulnerabilities in things like OpenSSL Heartbleed that happened. You don't know they're there.

We've had just recently Spectre and Meltdown with hardware. I think the—

The Chair:

I'm sorry, Mr. Wall; I have to cut you off.

Mr. Liepert is next.

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC):

The first set of witnesses we had expressed concern that it has been three and a half years since the Emerson report and that there have been subsequent reports done, including the one by the Senate. Their presentation was about being here again studying it again when it's time for government to move on this issue.

I'm also wondering about this. We've heard a lot about infrastructure, and it seems to me that's one area where government may be able to be moving to accommodate this eventuality, because infrastructure planning should be done for a number of years down the road.

I'd just like to get a sense of whether you feel government is moving fast enough on its infrastructure investments in the right areas to be accommodating this maybe not even 10 years from now. I'd like a sort of general comment on that.

Dr. Denis Gingras:

Certainly, the federal government and the different levels of government could provide some incentives in order to encourage municipalities, for example, to instrument some critical locations. For example, instrumentations and communications capability could be put into critical intersections in order to help improve safety in those regions.

It would be unrealistic to say that we have to instrument and make more intelligent all of the infrastructure that we have. It's impossible. We don't even have the money to fill in our potholes, so I don't see how we could spend that much money on instrumentation.

(1715)

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Well, that's sort of my point. Are we spending this infrastructure money today thinking about 10 to 15 years down the road? My guess would be that we're investing infrastructure dollars today for projects that are no different from the projects we were investing in 10 to 20 years ago.

I'm not making a partisan thing here; I am saying government in general. Are there some things that government should have maybe been doing two to three years ago—and if not then, at least today and tomorrow—to be ready for this when it comes? It's around the corner.

Mr. John Wall:

It's an interesting question, because we know from working with the car makers on putting V2X systems into the cars today that they don't bother doing it because they can't make money with it—

The Chair:

I'm going to ask Mr. Wall to stop for one second.

The bells have rung. Do I have unanimous consent to complete the meeting?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

Mr. John Wall:

Can I carry on? Okay.

It's almost a chicken-and-egg thing. A car maker can't sell this feature because there is no infrastructure. If there were infrastructure, the car maker could sell that feature, whereby you would have accident avoidance at a very congested intersection, for instance.

Exactly as was mentioned here, you don't have to do all the infrastructure, but certainly there are places where it would make sense.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

There was other testimony that said testing is going on in Arizona today because it has the perfect conditions for testing. We have anything but perfect conditions, so how do you move from there to here, and then how does it work 10 to 15 years from now on my country road? When I pull out of the driveway, sometimes I don't know where the ditch is. Is that a whole other issue?

Mr. Grant Courville:

Yes, it is.

That's one of the things we're testing. If you think about a human on a country road where there are no markers, how do we judge where we are if we're in the middle of a snowstorm? We're probably looking at tree lines, hydro poles, ditches, etc. We have to teach the machines, the computers in the car, to think a bit like we do, and as we were talking about earlier, act in a safer fashion.

These are basic problems. If you look at the DMV in California and the number of disengagements in autonomous cars, guess what? Most of them have to do simply with rain. When it starts to rain, the sensors start to fail.

We've learned here, for instance, in Ottawa, because we have interesting weather at times—which is great for testing, by the way—that LIDAR is not very good in the snow or the rain or when there's slush on your bumper, whereas radar is. We've learned that yellow lines on the road are much better than white lines. Just by what I'm sharing here, you can see this is the kind of learning and testing that we're doing.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Should the government be thinking about those little things in infrastructure investments—painting yellow lines instead of white lines?

Mr. Grant Courville:

As a very simple example, I can share with you what our findings are, but if you were to talk to engineers doing research, they'll tell you they can recognize yellow lines much better than white lines, especially when it's snowing.

It's a bit of a chicken and egg. There are dedicated short-range communications systems, DSRC systems, in cars today that can talk wirelessly, but they have no one to talk to except for the cars among themselves, and automakers can't monetize it because there's no infrastructure, so there's no value necessarily to the consumer. That's just a reflection of where we're at today.

If intersections had this capability, then all of a sudden you could have a safety feature in the vehicles that would benefit the consumer.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I'm glad I'm 68 years old, Chair, and I don't need to deal with this stuff.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

We need to stop because we have to go in camera for an issue on our agenda today.

To our witnesses, thank you very much. Who knows? We may have to have you back, because clearly the committee has lots more questions.

If you could just exit the room as quickly as possible, it would be appreciated.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(1525)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Avant de commencer, je dois demander la permission du Comité afin que nous puissions entendre certains témoignages avant le vote, même si les cloches sonnent. Y a-t-il unanimité du Comité pour entendre les témoins?

Des députés: D'accord.

La présidente: D'accord, c'est bien. Merci beaucoup. Allons-y.

Il s'agit d'une réunion du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités. Nous sommes à la 42e législature. Conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement, nous réalisons une étude sur les véhicules automatisés et branchés au Canada.

Aujourd'hui, nous recevons Jeremy McCalla, de Global UAV Technologies Limited, Bern Grush, de Grush Niles Strategic et Mark Aruja, qui est président du conseil de Systèmes télécommandés Canada.

Selon ce que je comprends, monsieur Grush, vous souhaitez nous présenter une courte vidéo à la fin des témoignages. Elle est en anglais seulement, mais vous nous avez donné la transcription, qui a été remise aux interprètes.

Y a-t-il unanimité du Comité pour permettre à M. Grush de présenter une vidéo après les témoignages? Cela vous convient-il?

Des députés: D'accord.

La présidente: Monsieur McCalla, voulez-vous commencer?

M. Jeremy McCalla (gestionnaire, Opérations et développement des affaires, Global UAV Technologies Ltd.):

D'accord.

La présidente:

Vous disposez de cinq minutes. Allez-y.

M. Jeremy McCalla:

Bonjour à tous. Je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de témoigner devant vous aujourd'hui.

Je suis fier d'être ici devant le Comité pour discuter de certains volets de l'industrie des systèmes aériens sans pilote du Canada.

Je m'appelle Jeremy McCalla. J'ai touché à presque tous les volets de l'industrie des systèmes aériens sans pilote au cours des dernières années. J'ai notamment utilisé des véhicules aériens sans pilote et géré ma propre entreprise dans ce domaine.

À l'heure actuelle, je travaille pour Global UAV Technologies, une entreprise canadienne de systèmes aériens sans pilote intégrée verticalement et cotée en bourse. Notre entreprise détient et exploite des sociétés de services qui se spécialisent dans les levés géophysiques aériens et la photogrammétrie sans pilote, un fabricant canadien de véhicules aériens sans pilote et une société d'experts-conseils en réglementation. Nous réalisons toutes nos activités en vertu de l'actuel cadre réglementaire de Transports Canada et nous travaillons très fort en vue de développer un système aérien sans pilote conforme et d'obtenir le statut d'exploitant entièrement conforme pour nos entreprises d'arpentage.

Nous réalisons la majeure partie de notre travail d'arpentage dans les régions éloignées, loin des aérodromes, des villes et même des voies publiques. Souvent, nous utilisons des véhicules aériens sans pilote à basse altitude, parfois à 10 mètres seulement au-dessus des arbres. À l'heure actuelle, ce type de levé géophysique est réalisé principalement par des aéronefs pilotés.

Le recours aux aéronefs pilotés pour réaliser les levés géophysiques est très dangereux, même pour les pilotes les plus expérimentés, étant donné la nature monotone des vols et leur faible altitude. En fait, selon l'Airborne Geophysics Safety Association, les opérations de levé ont causé entre 5 et 15 décès entre 2000 et 2017.

À l'heure actuelle, les opérations en visibilité directe pour les systèmes aériens sans pilote sont permises au Canada en vertu de certificats d'opérations aériennes spécialisées. Bien que le système soit parfois lent et puisse être complexe, il fonctionne et nous permet de réussir sur le plan économique. Toutefois, pour favoriser la croissance de l'industrie des systèmes aériens sans pilote, pour éviter les tâches dangereuses aux pilotes et pour permettre au Canada d'être un chef de file mondial dans le domaine, il faut pouvoir réaliser des opérations courantes hors visibilité directe, surtout dans les régions éloignées.

Les perspectives commerciales nationales et internationales pourraient être largement accrues si l'on fixait des délais beaucoup plus serrés en vue d'approuver les opérations menées hors de la visibilité directe et si l'on réglementait les opérations en visibilité directe, plutôt que d'y aller au cas par cas. De plus, en ayant recours à un système aérien sans pilote pour effectuer les tâches dangereuses comme les levés géophysiques aériens, on pourrait sauver des vies.

La capacité des entreprises canadiennes d'accéder aux capitaux, de planifier l'avenir et d'investir dans la recherche et le développement pourrait également être accrue par une approbation plus rapide des opérations menées hors de la visibilité directe et par la réglementation des opérations en visibilité directe.

À l'heure actuelle, sans une voie claire à suivre, les entreprises et les investisseurs sont inactifs ou cherchent à accroître leurs activités dans d'autres pays où la réglementation semble favorable à l'industrie des systèmes aériens sans pilote.

Nous comprenons que l'aviation est, et sera toujours, hautement réglementée et nous comprenons qu'il faut assurer la sécurité des passagers et de la population. Nous croyons aussi que Transports Canada a réussi à bien gérer l'importante croissance de l'industrie des systèmes aériens sans pilote du Canada avec les ressources dont il disposait.

Comme le budget de 2017 prévoit un financement accru pour Transports Canada et étant donné la présence de groupes spécialisés comme Unmanned Systems Canada et le travail de l'industrie de systèmes aériens sans pilote, le Canada a une occasion inouïe d'être reconnu à l'échelle internationale pour ses approches progressistes à l'égard de la réglementation des systèmes aériens sans pilote, ce qui profitera non seulement au Canada, mais aussi aux entreprises canadiennes, aux institutions de recherches et aux étudiants.

Nous croyons que la validation de principe relative aux opérations hors visibilité directe récemment produite par Transports Canada et que les changements proposés aux opérations en visibilité directe sont un pas dans la bonne direction. On peut toutefois faire mieux.

Nous demandons à ce que les intervenants de l'industrie participent plus activement à l'élaboration des opérations hors visibilité directe courantes et à l'élaboration de règlements sur les opérations en visibilité directe qui conviennent à tous, qui soient sécuritaires et qui permettent une croissance économique.

Nous demandons également une plus grande transparence de la part de Transports Canada en ce qui a trait à l'élaboration des règlements de même que des échéances qui pourront être respectées.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur McCalla, voulez-vous prendre la parole? Oh, c'est la personne à côté de vous. Je suis désolée.

Allez-y, Mark.

M. Mark Aruja (président du conseil, Systèmes télécommandés Canada):

Bonjour. Je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de témoigner une fois de plus au nom de Systèmes télécommandés Canada, l'association nationale qui représente la communauté des systèmes de véhicules sans pilote et ses 500 membres.

Aujourd'hui, je vais vous faire part des observations qui émanent de plus de 10 ans d'expérience en matière d'élaboration de politiques et de règlements dans le domaine des systèmes aériens sans pilote, qui fait partie intégrante de la discussion sur les véhicules autonomes.

Qu'ils soient dans les airs ou au sol, ces appareils mobiles font partie d'un grand ensemble relié à des systèmes de traitement des données et à des outils d'analyse par l'entremise de réseaux de communication. Cet écosystème intégré nous permet déjà d'améliorer grandement notre productivité et notre sécurité, et ce n'est qu'un début.

Aujourd'hui, je vais faire un lien entre le hockey et l'agriculture.

À titre de décideurs publics, vous devez, tout comme Wayne Gretzky, savoir où ira la rondelle. Je vais commencer par vous dire où elle se trouve aujourd'hui, en utilisant l'agriculture comme exemple, puis je vous dirai où elle a été et je ferai quelques recommandations et demandes.

Deux grandes tendances technologiques entraînent un changement qui transforme notre société: les systèmes humains de détection sont remplacés par des machines et la prise de décisions par les humains est remplacée par l'analyse des données et l'apprentissage en profondeur. À quoi ressemblera l'avenir?

Les politiques publiques efficaces nous permettront de façonner les avantages attendus pour la société, de créer des possibilités et d'équilibrer le tout grâce à une compréhension des risques. C'est ainsi qu'on se place pour recevoir la rondelle.

Où se trouve la rondelle aujourd'hui?

L'agriculture de précision est tout à fait révolutionnaire; elle entraîne de grandes possibilités. À compter du printemps, des véhicules aériens sans pilote réaliseront des missions automatisées au quotidien pour prendre des images précises des champs de sorte qu'on puisse détecter et caractériser chaque plant de maïs. L'imagerie est associée à de nombreuses autres sources de données. Elle est traitée et analysée, et une décision est souvent prise dans les heures qui suivent. Ces décisions au sujet de l'application de pesticides ou de l'ensemencement sont transmises par voie numérique à des tracteurs autonomes ou à d'autres véhicules aériens sans pilote qui appliquent la prescription avec précision. L'agriculture est de plus en plus fondée sur les données probantes. Les décisions qui autrefois étaient prises pour un champ en entier sont maintenant prises pour un mètre carré de terrain.

Où a été la rondelle?

En 2006, nous avons demandé à Transports Canada d'élaborer un règlement sur les systèmes d'aéronef sans pilote. En 2010, nous avions mis en oeuvre un carnet de route élaboré conjointement, de même qu'une stratégie progressive. Ces efforts ont orienté les investissements et l'innovation. En 10 ans, l'industrie des systèmes d'aéronef sans pilote est passée de 80 entreprises à plus de 1 000 entreprises. Toutefois, malgré le talent et le dévouement du personnel de Transports Canada, le ministère n'a pas eu les ressources nécessaires pour effectuer la tâche avant 10 ans, soit dans le budget de 2017.

Ainsi, en juillet 2017, on a publié la première ébauche du règlement sur l'utilisation des drones dans la partie I de la Gazettte du Canada qui, comme une rondelle entre les patins, s'est avérée désuète au moment de sa publication. Comme je vous l'avais dit en 2016, la demande économique d'aujourd'hui vise à survoler des milliers — et non des centaines — d'acres de terrain à la fois, ce qui signifie qu'il faut pouvoir aller au-delà de la visibilité directe, et ce n'est pas permis à l'heure actuelle.

Nous avons deux grandes préoccupations. Lorsque nous avons élaboré le carnet de route pour définir les objectifs gérables, nous avons connu le succès. Revenons à ce qui fonctionne. Aujourd'hui, nous n'avons pas de carnet de route de Transports Canada pour orienter les travaux urgents que nous devons réaliser conjointement. Notre capacité concurrentielle à l'échelle mondiale est sur une pente descendante: nous sommes passés derrière l'Europe, les États-Unis et l'Australie, pour ne nommer que ceux-là.

De plus, Transports Canada doit établir un processus d'évaluation des risques officiel. L'industrie a un intérêt direct dans la gestion des risques pour la sécurité et travaille depuis deux ans à développer cette capacité. Nous avons des besoins mutuels et cette lacune touchera les véhicules automatisés sur les routes également.

Comment pouvons-nous sortir la rondelle de nos patins?

Nous félicitons le Conseil consultatif en matière de croissance économique pour son rapport, qui se veut un cadre pour orienter les politiques nationales en vue de stimuler le développement des marchés et d'accélérer l'adoption des systèmes autonomes et des nouveaux processus opérationnels. Nous félicitions également le comité sénatorial pour son rapport Paver la voie visant l'établissement d'un cadre pangouvernemental d'élaboration des politiques. Tous les ministères sont visés par les changements qui sont en cours.

Nous conseillons à l'industrie des véhicules autonomes et au gouvernement d'élaborer des politiques pour décrire l'avenir. Il faut développer des pratiques exemplaires et les valider par l'entremise d'essais. Ensuite, lorsque vous serez en pleine confiance, vous pourrez élaborer des règlements. Ce processus prendra du temps... mais si vous faites le processus inverse, cela vous prendra encore plus de temps.

Il faut veiller à ce que Transports Canada ait les ressources dont il a besoin pour répondre au défi des systèmes autonomes. Je souligne l'importance de ne pas traiter les voitures autonomes et les véhicules aériens sans pilote de manière distincte dans cet écosystème commun.

(1530)



Enfin, nous avons deux demandes précises à faire au Comité. Nous voulons que vous demandiez à Transports Canada de préparer un carnet de route pour permettre à l'industrie des systèmes d'aéronef sans pilote d'aller de l'avant dès maintenant et de collaborer avec l'industrie pour développer un processus de gestion du risque officiel.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Grush, voulez-vous nous présenter votre vidéo tout de suite?

M. Bern Grush (stratégiste, Transport autonome, Grush Niles Strategic):

J'aimerais commencer par vous dire quelques mots.

Merci, madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, de me donner l'occasion de commenter les répercussions de l'automatisation des véhicules sur les villes et les réseaux de transport en commun. Je m’appelle Bern Grush. J’ai étudié les facteurs humains, la concentration de l'humain, l'intelligence artificielle et l’ingénierie des systèmes à l’Université de Toronto et à l’Université de Waterloo.

Je suis le fondateur de Grush Niles Strategic, un groupe de réflexion spécialisé dans la recherche de solutions pour le déploiement des véhicules automatisés en vue de promouvoir la durabilité environnementale, l’équité sociale et l’habitabilité des villes en ce qui a trait au transport par des humains.

[Présentation audiovisuelle]

J'aimerais faire deux observations supplémentaires au sujet de l'automatisation des véhicules, surtout pour le déplacement des gens. Premièrement, l'avenir du transport automobile comprendra deux marchés. Le marché 1 englobera la vente et l’achat de véhicules appartenant aux personnes et aux familles et le marché 2, la vente et l’achat de services de transport pour des déplacements uniques.

De nos jours, le marché 2 comprend toutes les formes de véhicules à louer, comme les taxis, les véhicules appelés à l’aide d’une plateforme électronique et le partage des véhicules, et toutes les formes de transport en commun. C'est très important, parce que ces deux marchés présentent deux visions distinctes de la planification urbaine. Les véhicules automatisés vont perpétuer la concurrence qui existe entre le mode public et le mode privé depuis 125 ans. Les deux marchés seront très importants et continueront de représenter un défi pour les urbanistes qui devront accommoder un nombre immense de véhicules personnels et, simultanément, trouver des façons de mobiliser d’énormes parcs de véhicules partagés au profit des populations urbaines.

Les urbanistes se soucient de l'efficacité et de l'environnement, et tendent à privilégier les flottes de véhicules partagés, mais la majorité des gens préfèrent posséder leur propre véhicule. Ceux qui affirment que la donne va changer dans une large mesure se leurrent et ne se fondent pas sur des données probantes. Le passage au marché des véhicules partagés ne se produira qu’en appliquant une stratégie réfléchie et en prenant des décisions proactives en matière de politiques.

Je recommande trois choses. Premièrement, que le gouvernement entame immédiatement la transition vers une réglementation qui exige des véhicules automatisés sans émission polluante, qui impose des frais d’utilisation en fonction de la distance parcourue et qui prévoit des frais de stationnement axés sur la demande pour tous les espaces publics, commerciaux et professionnels.

Deuxièmement, durant les premières décennies, l’automatisation des véhicules n'atteindra pas le niveau 5 d’automatisation selon les normes de la SAE. Le marché 1 des véhicules personnels conservera les commandes permettant au propriétaire de se rendre là où il veut. Ces véhicules augmenteront la distance et la fréquence moyennes des déplacements ainsi que l’étalement urbain en réduisant l’inconfort associé à la conduite dans la congestion routière.

(1535)



Cela incitera plus de familles à se procurer ces véhicules, ce qui aggravera la congestion. Ces véhicules automatisés personnels continueront de nécessiter une moyenne de quatre espaces de stationnement chacun, puisqu’ils seront la plupart du temps encore garés à une courte distance de leurs propriétaires.

En même temps, le marché 2 de véhicules à louer sans conducteur sera limité à des zones précises pour circuler sur des routes soigneusement cartographiées. Ces taxis et ces navettes robotisés gagneront la faveur des gens qui se déplacent déjà en taxi, en véhicules appelés à l’aide d’une plateforme électronique et en transport en commun. Les véhicules partagés trouveront donc la majorité de leur clientèle auprès des utilisateurs actuels du transport en commun. Ils vont ainsi perturber les réseaux de transport en commun comme les véhicules appelés à l’aide d’une plateforme électronique le font pour les systèmes de taxis. Sans supervision gouvernementale, ces parcs de véhicules commerciaux constituent une menace pour l’équité sociale.

Je recommande d’adopter un système incitatif pour les fournisseurs commerciaux de services de transport afin de favoriser les déplacements en partance et à destination des points de transit, d’augmenter le taux d’occupation moyen par véhicule et de transporter les personnes handicapées et les personnes dans les secteurs non desservis, de manière à réduire plus rapidement la part des déplacements urbains effectués dans les véhicules personnels à un seul occupant et à nous préparer aux taxis robotisés qui arriveront.

Merci.

(1540)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, messieurs. Je vous suis reconnaissante de votre patience.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour la tenue d'un vote. Nous reviendrons immédiatement après. Veuillez vous préparer pour les questions.



(1555)

La présidente:

Nous reprenons.

Merci de votre patience, messieurs.

Le premier intervenant est M. Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Merci d'avoir attendu pendant la tenue de votes. Merci de vos exposés.

J'aimerais avoir vos commentaires, en particulier les vôtres, monsieur Aruja, sur l'avenir de l'intelligence artificielle dans le secteur de l'agriculture, car on voit cela, par exemple pour les tracteurs agricoles, dans beaucoup de collectivités rurales et éloignées de ma province de l'Alberta.

Quel serait le rôle des services à large bande en milieu rural dans tout cela? Je sais que cela préoccupe de nombreuses petites entreprises de la région. J'aimerais avoir vos commentaires à ce sujet.

M. Mark Aruja:

Les services à large bande en milieu rural sont un enjeu majeur en agriculture, tout comme dans le secteur minier et d'autres secteurs où les données transmises doivent être traitées rapidement. Le traitement des données pourrait être retardé dans le secteur minier, mais dans le secteur agricole, c'est extrêmement important en raison des délais d'exécution.

Je pense qu'une stratégie sur l'accès à large bande en milieu rural fait partie de l'équation, tout comme la gestion du spectre et d'autres facteurs, comme la vente aux enchères en temps opportun du spectre 5G des réseaux de nouvelle génération. Il est essentiel d'assurer une transmission des données adéquate pour leur utilisation par les systèmes d'intelligence artificielle.

(1600)

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Plus tôt cette semaine, des témoins sont venus faire le point sur l'état actuel de la technologie et sur les perspectives d'avenir. Dans votre exposé, monsieur Grush, vous avez indiqué qu'on franchirait aux environs de 2035 ou 2040 un seuil où les véhicules entièrement automatisés seraient majoritaires. Veuillez me corriger si je me trompe dans les dates.

Étant donné l'incident qui s'est produit en Arizona, craint-on qu'on aille de l'avant trop rapidement, ou estimez-vous que nous n'adaptons pas la réglementation assez rapidement? J'aimerais beaucoup avoir vos commentaires.

M. Bern Grush:

C'est une bonne question et la réponse est plutôt complexe.

Je dirais brièvement que cet accident laisse penser à une défaillance technologique. Aucun piéton ne devrait être heurté; la technologie devrait l'empêcher. Donc, soit un système quelconque était désactivé, soit il y a eu défectuosité. Nous ne savons pas ce qu'il en est et nous ne pouvons émettre d'hypothèses tant que le NTSB enquête.

Nous tardons à prévoir les changements dans la société, et c'est là la nature de mon travail. Je ne dirais pas que nous devrions intensifier les essais au Canada, par exemple, mais je pense que nous devrions réfléchir davantage au déploiement plutôt que de nous concentrer uniquement sur les essais, car il y a certains déséquilibres au Canada. Je viens de l'Ontario; la province a des programmes d'essais, mais pour la technologie elle-même. La technologie n'est manifestement pas prête. Je ne dis pas le contraire.

En outre, la réglementation en matière de sécurité de l'Arizona était clairement inadéquate. Il y avait donc des problèmes sur le plan de la technologie et de la réglementation. Je ne crois pas qu'on ait fait des erreurs liées à la réglementation jusqu'à maintenant au pays, mais je pense aussi que nous devons tenter de mieux prévoir les changements sociaux et les changements aux infrastructures plutôt que de nous limiter à la technologie elle-même, qui n'est qu'une petite partie de l'ensemble.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Pouvez-vous donner des exemples de changements aux infrastructures? Que proposez-vous? Beaucoup de ces choses ne relèvent pas nécessairement du gouvernement fédéral, mais je suis certain que cela suscite l'intérêt des autorités municipales et provinciales.

M. Bern Grush:

Lorsque je parle d'infrastructures de transport, j'inclus notre flotte de véhicules de transport, comme vous incluez les services à large bande dans les infrastructures des véhicules aériens sans pilote.

Au cours des 100 dernières années, voire plus, les pouvoirs publics avaient la plupart du temps l'habitude d'acquérir et d'exploiter les systèmes de transport, des chemins de fer aux autobus. Cette méthode d'acquisition et d'exploitation est très lente, tandis que dans le nouveau contexte de la mobilité, les technologies évoluent très rapidement. Je propose donc, de ce point de vue, de délaisser la méthode d'acquisition et d'exploitation pour privilégier l'établissement des exigences et de la réglementation.

Nous devons utiliser les technologies existantes. Nous ne parvenons pas à prendre les décisions assez rapidement. Il nous est beaucoup plus difficile d'assurer la gouvernance du secteur des transports que ce ne l'est pour des entrepreneurs d'inventer un nouveau système LIDAR, par exemple.

Le gouvernement ne peut pas suivre l'évolution de la technologie, mais il se doit de protéger les valeurs fondamentales du transport commun, notamment la gestion de la congestion, le transport d'un grand nombre de personnes jusqu'à leur lieu de travail et l'équité sociale. Tous ces aspects doivent être protégés, et ils seront menacés si nous nous contentons d'attendre que ces systèmes relèguent le transport en commun à l'arrière-plan. C'est ma principale crainte.

J'espère que cette réponse vous suffit.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Vous pourriez peut-être répondre à certaines autres questions. Je ne m'attends pas à ce que vous répondiez immédiatement, mais qu'en est-il des aspects physiques, comme les lignes sur les routes, les panneaux d'arrêt, les feux de signalisation, etc.?

La présidente:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Vous avez soulevé d'excellents points et posé d'excellentes questions, Matt.

Je pense que nous avons parfois tendance à nous attarder aux particularités de la technologie. Pour être honnête, la technologie n'est pas notre priorité. Ce n'est pas notre domaine; c'est plutôt la priorité de l'industrie. Sans vouloir faire de jeu de mots, laissons-lui le volant. Je pense que nous devrions plutôt nous assurer d'être prêts pour l'arrivée de cette technologie.

Monsieur Grush, vous avez tout à fait raison sur la question de la culture, sur l'état de préparation nécessaire grâce à des infrastructures adéquates, à l'intégration adéquate des modes de transport — qu'ils soient routiers, aériens, ferroviaires ou maritimes — et à l'intégration de tous les modes de transport qui pourraient être automatisés.

À cela s'ajoute un aspect que nous n'examinons pas toujours assez en profondeur, soit l'intégration de la gestion des données et de l'information, entre autres, dans le volet distribution. Certaines choses ne sont pas évidentes.

Ma question s'adresse à vous trois. En votre qualité de professionnels, quels aspects nous recommandez-vous d'inclure dans les discussions? Je parle des autres aspects que j'ai mentionnés plutôt que la technologie utilisée dans ces véhicules.

(1605)

M. Bern Grush:

La première chose à faire est de déterminer l'objectif. Je reviens encore une fois au transport en commun. Pourquoi avons-nous du transport en commun? Quels sont nos objectifs? Quelle est sa raison d'être? La question n'est pas de savoir ce qu'il faut en faire, ce que nous faisions auparavant et ce qui peut être amélioré, mais plutôt de savoir pourquoi nous avons du transport en commun au départ. Si nous n'en comprenons pas les raisons, nous ne pourrons pas le défendre contre les changements technologiques à venir. C'est le tout premier niveau.

Par exemple, si nous convenons que c'est une question d'équité sociale ou que cela vise à assurer le déplacement d'un grand nombre de personnes dans un espace densément peuplé... Si nous convenons d'accroître la densité urbaine — je ne me prononce pas dans un sens ou dans l'autre —, nous devrons alors déterminer comment maintenir le transport en commun dans ce contexte.

Je vais vous donner un exemple très précis: il est indéniable que les navettes et les taxis autonomes, notamment, menaceront nos réseaux d'autobus municipaux. On compte environ 2 000 municipalités au Canada; seulement 200 sont dotées d'un système de transport en commun. Beaucoup de ces réseaux sont maintenant menacés par les taxis autonomes, etc. Voici comment cela risque de se passer: dans les cinq ou six grandes villes qui ont un métro, par exemple, ces technologies entraîneront d'abord la disparition des services d'autobus, puis une réduction de l'achalandage des réseaux de train léger sur rail et de transport ferroviaire urbain. Ces systèmes seraient les deuxièmes à être menacés. Comment pourrons-nous maintenir l'achalandage des systèmes sur rail malgré la convivialité de taxis autonomes qui prendront les gens à domicile et feront tout le trajet de 20 ou 30 kilomètres directement jusqu'à leur lieu de travail? Je pense que c'est une grande menace. Comment pourrons-nous maintenir nos réseaux de transport sur rail?

Actuellement, beaucoup de villes investissent dans le transport sur rail. Comment pourrons-nous en préserver la valeur malgré la concurrence de taxis autonomes?

M. Vance Badawey:

Monsieur Grush — j'arriverai à vous dans un instant, Mark —, corrigez-moi si je me trompe; je pense qu'il est essentiel d'établir cette stratégie, ce plan, avant de passer à la prochaine étape, pour nous éviter d'avoir à reculer. Il est essentiel de savoir exactement comment tout cela va s'intégrer avant de traiter des ajustements aux infrastructures, des réseaux de distribution, de l'intégration, etc.

M. Bern Grush:

Nous devons préciser les modalités de l'intégration. Ce n'est pas à Tesla ou à Uber d'en décider. C'est à nous de définir les paramètres de l'intégration.

M. Vance Badawey:

Exactement.

M. Bern Grush:

Évidemment, nous devrons ensuite mettre en place la réglementation et les mesures incitatives nécessaires pour que cela fonctionne comme nous le voulons, n'est-ce pas? Ils se plieront aux exigences qui auront été définies, le cas échéant.

M. Vance Badawey:

Mark, pourrais-je avoir vos commentaires?

M. Mark Aruja:

Il y a deux ou trois aspects à cela. L'un d'entre eux — et je souscris aux propos de Bern concernant le milieu urbain — est que ce casse-tête comprend beaucoup d'aspects convergents. Je recommanderais au Comité de discuter avec les Nokia, les Erikson et les Telus de ce monde et les spécialistes de l'intelligence artificielle pour avoir un portrait de la situation, car ils jouent un rôle important dans l'ensemble.

Je reviens à l'exemple de l'agriculture. Le Conseil consultatif en matière de croissance économique a recommandé l'établissement d'une politique pour aider le Canada à passer du cinquième au deuxième rang mondial pour l'exportation de produits agricoles. Il s'agit d'un énoncé de politique très simple qui favorisera certainement l'innovation pour ces systèmes.

Voici un exemple vraiment simple de ce que vous pourriez faire demain; pas la semaine prochaine, mais demain matin. Vous pourriez dire que le gouvernement fédéral travaillera en partenariat avec toute province désireuse de mettre à l'essai des tracteurs automatisés sur la voie publique. Ils sont entièrement automatisés, mais ils ne peuvent se déplacer d'un champ à l'autre en passant par les routes de campagne, même si rien ne les en empêche, sur le plan technologique. Ce serait une étude de cas très simple qui permettrait de tâter le pouls de la population concernant une solution axée sur les résultats économiques. L'acceptabilité sociale dans cette collectivité cadrerait en partie avec les aspects dont Bern a parlé. Tout ne tourne pas autour de Toronto et de l'opinion de ses habitants. La population de Lethbridge pourrait avoir un autre point de vue.

Il faut choisir son combat, pour ainsi dire. Le conseil consultatif a fait un bon travail à cet égard.

(1610)

La présidente:

Merci.[Français]

Monsieur Aubin, vous avez la parole.

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Messieurs, je vous remercie de votre présence et de votre patience.

Je suis né en 1960. Pendant ma jeunesse, nous croyions qu'en l'an 2000 les gens allaient prendre leur retraite à 55 ans, que la semaine de travail serait de quatre jours et qu'il y aurait des voitures volantes. Or ici aussi, c'est un horizon de 40 ans qu'on nous propose.

J'ai tendance à croire que l'évolution technologique au cours des quatre prochaines décennies pourrait nous amener à ce que vous nous décrivez. Cependant, quand j'observe l'autre ligne qui marque la décroissance des voitures personnelles, il me semble qu'il faut changer l'analyse. Il faut en quelque sorte faire disparaître le plaisir de conduire et le plaisir de posséder une voiture.

Comment sera-t-il possible de parvenir à ce que ces deux lignes se croisent, c'est-à-dire que la technologie permette le développement de voitures autonomes, mais aussi que les consommateurs acquièrent la volonté de délaisser leur voiture?

Ce que je perçois présentement, et ce sera sans doute la tendance pour les prochaines années, c'est que les voitures propres, les voitures électriques, suscitent un intérêt marqué. Le succès de Tesla, par exemple, nous permet de le constater.

Qu'est-ce qui va inciter les gens à opter pour une voiture autonome et les amener à perdre le plaisir de conduire?

La question se pose d'autant plus qu'à l'heure actuelle, on n'arrive pas à développer de transports en commun entre les grands centres urbains. C'est donc dire que les gens vont de toute façon se déplacer en voiture entre Montréal et Toronto ou entre Québec et Montréal. Pourquoi, une fois arrivés sur place, auraient-ils un plaisir fou à conduire un véhicule autonome? [Traduction]

M. Bern Grush:

Merci.

C'est un énorme problème. La solution n'est pas de rendre indésirable la possession d'une voiture, mais de faire de l'autopartage une expérience formidable.

Les gens ont une crainte naturelle de perdre leur véhicule. J'ai une voiture, et d'après votre question, j'en déduis que vous en avez une aussi. On perd quelque chose. Vous pourriez avoir un sentiment de perte, un sentiment qui ne plaît à personne. Pour inciter les gens à changer leurs habitudes, il faut que ce qu'ils gagnent soit deux fois mieux que ce qu'ils perdent. Voilà le défi.

Inciter les gens à privilégier l'expérience d'un véhicule partagé plutôt que la propriété d'un véhicule est un défi beaucoup plus grand que de fabriquer un véhicule autonome. Jusqu'à maintenant, votre question est sans réponse. Lorsque vous entendez dire que personne ne ressentira le besoin de posséder une voiture, c'est peut-être vrai sur le plan rationnel, mais non sur les plans comportemental et économique. Du point de vue de l'économie comportementale, tout ce que vous dites est vrai. Beaucoup préfèrent garder leur véhicule, et c'est un énorme problème.

J'aimerais avoir la réponse; si je l'avais, je serais très riche.

Il y a pire encore: actuellement, au Canada, moins de 10 % des déplacements se font dans des véhicules non familiaux. Si nous parvenons à porter à 75 % le pourcentage de déplacements dans un véhicule partagé d'ici 30 ans, le parc automobile mondial sera tout de même aussi important qu'il l'est aujourd'hui, puisque la demande de déplacements augmentera. Notre richesse augmente, et c'est l'une des causes de l'augmentation de la demande de déplacements. Une faible variation de 8 % à 18 % ne fera aucune différence. La congestion routière est un problème bien plus important que quelques personnes choisissant d'utiliser des taxis autonomes. C'est un problème très grave.

Je vous remercie de la question. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Monsieur Aruja, vous avez souligné l'importance de la feuille de route.

Monsieur McCalla, vous avez parlé de l'importance de la transparence de Transports Canada concernant toute la procédure qui sera mise en oeuvre au cours des prochaines années.

Pourriez-vous nous dire plus précisément ce que vous attendez de Transports Canada pour qu'il y ait une meilleure harmonisation des souhaits de l'industrie et de la possibilité pour le gouvernement de soutenir ces changements technologiques? [Traduction]

M. Mark Aruja:

Merci beaucoup.

En 2007, un plan commun à quatre phases a été élaboré. Nous avions presque terminé la première phase, soit la publication initiale de la réglementation dans la partie 2 de la Gazette du Canada prévue pour cet été. Nous sommes environ à mi-chemin de la phase deux, tandis que les phases trois et quatre concernent les opérations menées hors de la visibilité directe. Par exemple, comment pouvons-nous traiter de portions de territoire, comment Jeremy peut-il faire des levés géophysiques sur des centaines de kilomètres?

Nous savons que le groupe de travail mixte industrie-gouvernement est un excellent partenariat qui fonctionne admirablement bien, mais ses activités sont à l'arrêt complet. Il n'y a aucune vision. Il nous faut quelque chose. Ce n'est pas comme si nous ignorions ce que nous avons à faire, mais il n'y a aucun énoncé écrit, aucune transparence et aucune supervision des hauts dirigeants, administratifs ou politiques, pour que cela se poursuive.

Les attentes sont grandes. Nous voulons accroître la contribution du secteur agricole au PIB — 6,7 % actuellement —, mais nous sommes confrontés à divers obstacles.

Cela m'irrite au plus haut point de constater que les États-Unis n'avaient aucun plan il y a trois ans, mais que je peux maintenant aller sur leur site Web, qui sera mis à jour dans deux ou trois semaines, et avoir accès à tout cela en toute transparence. Cela vaut aussi pour beaucoup d'autres administrations.

Il faut éviter que les gens fonctionnent continuellement à l'aveuglette en fonction de besoins perçus de l'industrie. Trouvons des solutions. Certes, nous n'aurons pas un plan parfait, mais il convient de définir les paramètres, car nous devons composer avec cette évolution technologique incroyablement rapide. On ne peut se permettre d'avoir une réglementation qui ne reflète pas la réalité.

(1615)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente. La discussion d'aujourd'hui est fascinante.

Monsieur Grush, je vais probablement vous consacrer la majorité de mon temps parce que vous avez tenu des propos plutôt provocateurs, pour ainsi dire. Je suppose que c'est ce que vous vouliez, n'est-ce pas?

Rendons-nous au moment où la plupart des véhicules seront automatisés, autonomes et ainsi de suite. En moyenne, à quelle vitesse vous attendez-vous à ce que les véhicules circulent sur les routes?

M. Bern Grush:

Je vais répondre même si je n'en ai pas la moindre idée. Cela n'a pas été étudié, et je ne peux donc pas vous donner une réponse fiable, mais je vais dire que lorsque vous parlez de la « plupart » des véhicules, nous parlons du moment où nos autoroutes, par exemple, en Ontario...

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vous prie de répondre brièvement, si vous le pouvez, monsieur.

M. Bern Grush:

Nous allons nous déplacer très rapidement sur les autoroutes et nous devrons être beaucoup plus lents dans les villes. Ne serait-ce que pour assurer la sécurité des piétons et des cyclistes, je dirais que, dans les villes, nous devrons probablement nous déplacer plus lentement que nous le faisons actuellement.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vois.

L'une des caractéristiques des moyens de transport en commun est qu'ils peuvent se déplacer plus rapidement que les véhicules qui les entourent lorsqu'ils ont des voies réservées. Avez-vous intégré à votre stratégie ce genre de caractéristique du transport en commun?

M. Bern Grush:

Non. Je n'ai pas vraiment réfléchi beaucoup à la vitesse, et c'est parce que je pense surtout à l'équité sociale. Dans ma réponse, j'ai parlé de vitesse moins élevée pour assurer la sécurité.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je comprends, mais la vitesse moyenne aura de l'importance pour les gens qui doivent se rendre à destination dans un délai raisonnable.

Parlez de l'environnement bâti. Nous avons des routes, des bordures, des passages piétonniers et beaucoup d'autres choses. Sera-t-il nécessaire de modifier considérablement les rues pour les adapter aux véhicules autonomes?

M. Bern Grush:

À tout le moins, nous devrons apporter d'énormes changements aux bordures de route. J'espère — et ce n'est qu'un voeu pieux — que nous aurons alors éliminé le stationnement dans les rues, en 2040 ou en 2050, lorsque la majorité des véhicules seront automatisés. Le stationnement dans les rues ne sera plus nécessaire. Il faudra beaucoup d'espace pour permettre aux véhicules de s'arrêter pour permettre aux passagers d'entrer et de sortir, mais le stationnement ne sera plus nécessaire. Il faudra apporter d'énormes changements aux bordures de route dans nos villes.

M. Ken Hardie:

J'ai trouvé intéressant de vous entendre avancer que le nombre de véhicules sur les routes ne diminuera pas, qu'il pourrait en fait augmenter, ce qui laisse croire que l'espace que nous consacrons aux routes et aux stationnements ne sera plus le même, qu'il sera même plus grand qu'à l'heure actuelle. Cependant, nous voyons en même temps un virage vers une économie commune dans de nombreux domaines. Nous avons maintenant des services de covoiturage et d'autopartage, Uber et j'en passe. Avez-vous tenu compte de cette propension à partager les biens, plutôt que de les posséder, dans vos estimations et vos stratégies concernant l'introduction des véhicules automatisés?

(1620)

M. Bern Grush:

Quand je parle d'une congestion accrue, je parle d'un plus grand nombre de voitures sur les routes. Ce qui disparaîtra, c'est le stationnement. Selon les conclusions de mes recherches, le nombre de stationnements augmentera un petit peu pendant un certain temps, plafonnera et diminuera ensuite, mais le nombre de voitures sur la route augmentera de manière constante.

La circulation augmentera parce qu'un plus grand nombre de personnes se déplacera sur de plus grandes distances. L'étalement augmentera la congestion et signifiera que le déplacement moyen est plus long. Des services robotiques plus abordables feront en sorte qu'il sera plus facile de prendre place à bord d'un véhicule. Autrement dit, le nombre de voitures sur les routes augmentera, mais pratiquement aucune de ces voitures ne sera stationnée aux heures de pointe.

M. Ken Hardie:

Lorsque nous aurons des véhicules autonomes bien branchés à Internet qui coexistent parfaitement entre eux, nous arriverons au point où nous n'aurons plus le droit d'avoir des véhicules traditionnels, n'est-ce pas?

M. Bern Grush:

Je crois que c'est ce qui se produira à un moment donné, un peu comme je ne peux pas rouler à vélo sur l'autoroute ou me promener à cheval sur la plupart des routes. Je sais que c'est un exemple un peu ridicule, mais il est vrai que pendant 40 ans, les chevaux et les voitures circulaient ensemble. Je m'attends à ce qu'il y ait une période de 30 ou de 40 ans pendant laquelle les véhicules traditionnels et les véhicules autonomes se partageront les routes d'une certaine façon. Il pourrait y avoir des voies réservées, mais il sera impossible d'en avoir partout, ce qui signifie qu'il y aura des voies de circulation mixte à un moment donné.

M. Ken Hardie:

Mark, je veux donner suite à ce que vous avez dit au sujet de la propagation de la haute vitesse à large bande. Est-ce nécessaire au fonctionnement des véhicules aériens sans pilote?

M. Mark Aruja:

C'est une excellente question, et la réponse est non.

M. Ken Hardie:

Bien.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Iacono, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aux témoin d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Je comprends l'importance d'être proactif relativement à cette question. J'abonde dans le sens de mon collègue M. Aubin. J'adore conduire des autos. Qu'arrivera-t-il à la Ferrari de demain? Existera-t-elle seulement pour qu'on en admire le style?

Pourtant, j'ai certains doutes concernant l'automobile. Encore aujourd'hui, l'automobile peut être perçue par les gens de l'extérieur comme un signe de richesse. Je continue à croire que le besoin de posséder un véhicule n'ira pas en diminuant.

La congestion est déjà problématique. Comment les véhicules autonomes pourront-ils pallier ce problème?

Ma question s'adresse à l'un des vous trois, et j'aimerais que la réponse soit courte. [Traduction]

M. Bern Grush:

L'ensemble de mes travaux laisse croire que la proportion de propriétaires de véhicules sera encore de 25 %, dans le meilleur des scénarios. Il est impossible que plus personne ne possède un véhicule. À vrai dire, je crois que ce sera à parts égales. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Alors, êtes-vous d'accord qu'il faudra construire des routes spéciales pour les véhicules autonomes? [Traduction]

M. Bern Grush:

À la fin, non, mais entretemps, oui. Il doit y avoir une certaine réflexion et une certaine séparation au cours des 15 ou 20 premières années. L'un des plus grands risques consiste à construire une chose dont nous n'aurons plus besoin 10 ou 15 ans plus tard, ce qui signifie que nous serions doublement frappés, que les dépenses seraient doubles. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

J'aimerais que vous m'expliquiez si le scénario suivant est possible.

Supposons que je sois à bord d'un véhicule autonome, que soudainement j'arrive sur une route publique et que le véhicule s'arrête. Serait-il possible, à ce moment-là, que le véhicule puisse fonctionner comme une auto régulière? Ce serait un peu comme l'option du régulateur de vitesse qu'on a aujourd'hui. Serait-possible d'avoir un système double, c'est-à-dire un véhicule autonome ayant certaines caractéristiques de l'automobile d'aujourd'hui? [Traduction]

M. Bern Grush:

Oui, ces véhicules existent déjà. C'est le troisième niveau, l'« automatisation conditionnelle », parmi les cinq niveaux d'automatisation SAE. Vous pouvez activer la conduite automatique et vous laisser conduire. Lorsque vous ne souhaitez pas que le véhicule conduise — par exemple à un endroit où il ne peut le faire —, vous pouvez la désactiver et prendre le volant. Ces véhicules existent déjà.

(1625)

M. Mark Aruja:

Mon point de vue diffère peut-être un peu, et je vais vous expliquer pourquoi. Le propriétaire d'une flotte de véhicules de livraison peut acheter une application pour en suivre les déplacements. Si l'un de ses véhicules arrête plus de 15 minutes à un Tim Hortons, il en sera informé. Cette technologie fonctionne à partir d'un téléphone cellulaire.

Je crois qu'elle sera beaucoup plus facile à adopter de nos jours, plutôt que de réserver des voies et prendre d'autres mesures du genre. À l'heure actuelle, on peut l'intégrer aux véhicules traditionnels pour éviter d'emprunter une voie où se trouvent, par exemple, des véhicules autonomes. Nous avons déjà cette technologie, et nous l'intégrons maintenant aux véhicules aériens sans pilote. C'est comme fixer une hélice à un téléphone cellulaire pour suivre les déplacements.

Bern a entre autres parlé de géorepérage. Cette technologie est maintenant largement répandue. Elle permet d'éviter que les appareils autonomes ou sans pilote dépassent une limite géographique, et c'est intégré à même le système de commande. La technologie existe. Il est très simple de l'adapter à un véhicule traditionnel. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Cette semaine, des témoins nous ont mentionné que les infrastructures pour accueillir les véhicules autonomes n'étaient pas tout à fait nécessaires, mais souhaitables. Les constructeurs conçoivent leurs produits en prenant pour hypothèse que de telles infrastructures seront peu développées.

Tout d'abord, est-il possible, oui ou non, de se passer d'infrastructures particulières?

Deuxièmement, quel type d'infrastructures est nécessaire? Le fait d'avoir une ville intelligente est-il un avantage? [Traduction]

M. Bern Grush:

Je pense qu'il serait avantageux d'avoir une ville intelligente. Je dois prévenir toutes les personnes présentes que l'idée des villes intelligentes ne remonte qu'à quelques années. Les changements nécessaires coûteraient des billions de dollars. Je viens d'une ville qui n'arrive pas à boucher ses nids de poule. Je ne sais donc pas comment nous pourrions construire le genre d'infrastructure que vous décrivez, ce qui explique d'ailleurs pourquoi les fabricants de véhicules autonomes disent qu'ils mettront au point des systèmes qui ne nécessitent aucun changement.

Le problème, c'est que si pratiquement toutes les voitures sont automatisées dans 30 ou 40 ans, mais qu'une proportion de 10 à 20 % de véhicules ne l'est pas, comment ces derniers véhicules survivront-ils dans cet environnement? Ce n'est pas résolu.

Vous avez posé une excellente question. On n'a pas encore trouvé de moyen de parvenir à une solution.

M. Mark Aruja:

Plutôt que de parler de voitures, vous devriez plutôt parler de données, et l'industrie des véhicules aériens sans pilote a fait cette transition, car c'est là que se trouve l'argent. Les voitures seront une marchandise. Le jour où nous aurons un système commun et que les véhicules viendront tout simplement à nous, nous n'aurons plus d'attachement pour la marque du véhicule et sa couleur n'aura plus d'importance. La seule chose qui comptera, c'est d'arriver à destination. Nous ne serons plus attachés au véhicule.

Les données vont conduire les véhicules. L'argent se trouvera dans les données, et les villes et les administrations devront déterminer quelle partie de cette source de revenus leur sera nécessaire. Nous avons eu cette discussion à propos de Netflix. Où en est l'Internet industriel des objets? Quelle partie des impôts et des taxes servira à financer cette infrastructure pour le bien public?

Dans 10 ans, la discussion n'aura rien à voir avec les voitures. À mon avis, elle portera sur les données échangées sur ces réseaux, et les voitures ne seront qu'une source de données, un collecteur de données.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci.

Voulez-vous deux minutes, Michael?

Allez-y.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

C'est plutôt une observation.

À l'écoute des témoignages, je me demande si le gouvernement fédéral a bien établi son programme de financement des infrastructures. À titre d'exemple, le fonds pour l'infrastructure de transport en commun, qui est de 3,5 milliards de dollars, investit dans le renouvellement des parcs d'autobus. En 2012, la Toronto Transit Commission a mis au rancart ses autobus de General Motors surnommés « fishbowl buses » qu'elle avait achetés dans les années 1980. Ces autobus ont un cycle de vie de 20 à 30 ans.

J'entends parler de l'automatisation et de l'élimination d'emplois, et j'écoute des personnes comme Mark Carney, qui a parlé d'un rapport de la Banque d'Angleterre selon lequel 15 millions d'emplois allaient disparaître au Royaume-Uni. L'année dernière, PricewaterhouseCoopers a indiqué que 38 % des emplois aux États-Unis allaient être éliminés à cause de l'automatisation. J'entends également parler de la transformation rapide de la circulation automobile. Faisons-nous un bon investissement en achetant des autobus pour renouveler le parc de véhicules de nos grandes villes?

Je me demande également ce qui arrivera à tous les chauffeurs d'autobus, à tous ces emplois et à tout le reste.

C'est plutôt une observation et matière à réflexion alors que nous entamons cette étude.

La présidente:

Merci à nos témoins. Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants des renseignements que vous nous avez donnés.

Nous allons suspendre la séance un instant pour permettre à nos autres témoins de prendre place.



(1630)

La présidente:

Reprenons. Conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement, le Comité permanent des transports fait une étude sur les véhicules automatisés et branchés au Canada.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à tous nos témoins: Denis Gingras, professeur, Laboratoire en intelligence véhiculaire, Université de Sherbrooke; Scott Santens, écrivain et défenseur du revenu de base inconditionnel; et de QNX Software Systems Limited, Grant Courville, chef, Gestion de produits, et John Wall, vice-président sénior.

Je vous propose de commencer, monsieur Gingras. Vous avez cinq minutes, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Denis Gingras (professeur, Laboratoire en intelligence véhiculaire, Université de Sherbrooke, à titre personnel):

Merci beaucoup de m'avoir invité à comparaître devant vous et de me donner la chance d'exprimer mes opinions sur le domaine dans lequel je travaille depuis plus de 30 ans.

Souvent, il faut se poser des questions sur la motivation qui nous pousse à faire des véhicules autonomes, entre autres. Regardons d'abord notre système de transport et nos problèmes de mobilité.

En fait, ce serait difficile d'imaginer un système de transport plus inefficace que celui que nous avons actuellement. Notre système de transport est basé sur un modèle d'affaires qui repose sur la vente de véhicules et la propriété individuelle des voitures. La croissance démographique est constante, et une partie de la population se déplace dans les grandes villes, au détriment des régions. En économie, on a utilisé la méthode du juste-à-temps. Toutes les marchandises qui étaient transportées par train sont maintenant transportées sur nos routes par des trains routiers, ce qui a contribué à détruire nos infrastructures routières. Nous n'avons qu'à regarder l'état actuel de nos routes pour le constater.

Le taux d'occupation des véhicules est de l'ordre de 5 %. Qui plus est, 80 % des gens voyagent encore de façon individuelle dans les véhicules. Il n'y a qu'à comparer le poids moyen d'une personne avec le poids moyen d'un véhicule, qui est de plus en plus élevé puisque, selon les statistiques, les gens achètent de plus en plus de véhicules utilitaires ou de camionnettes: cela ne va pas dans le bon sens du tout.

Il y a encore des problèmes liés à la pollution. Plus de 80 % des véhicules ont encore des moteurs à combustion.

De plus, le temps d'utilisation des véhicules est d'environ une heure par jour. Encore une fois, le taux d'utilisation d'un véhicule est à peu près de 5 %, ce qui est totalement inefficace. Demandez à n'importe quel chef d'entreprise s'il achèterait un équipement qu'il utiliserait uniquement pendant 5 % du temps. Personne n'investirait d'argent pour cela.

Comme nous pouvons le constater, c'est majeur.

Heureusement, le domaine du transport vit actuellement une révolution basée sur trois axes majeurs. Évidemment, il y a l'électrification des systèmes de propulsion, mais je n'en parlerai pas beaucoup aujourd'hui. Il y a aussi l'automatisation de la conduite, de même que tout ce qui est relié à la connectivité, donc aux systèmes de télécommunications. Ces trois aspects amènent une révolution dans le domaine du transport. Cette révolution aura des répercussions majeures tant sur le plan des modèles d'affaires que sur le plan des solutions possibles qu'on peut trouver aux problèmes de mobilité. Toutefois, c'est à nous de prendre des décisions draconiennes afin de changer de cap et d'améliorer nos systèmes de transport. Qu'on le veuille ou non, malgré la numérisation de notre société et l'importance des technologies de l'information, nous demeurons des êtres physiques qui manipulent des objets physiques et nous aurons toujours des besoins relativement à la mobilité.

Je parlerai maintenant de l'automatisation de la conduite.

Pourquoi veut-on avoir des véhicules autonomes? Il y a deux raisons majeures.

D'abord, c'est pour améliorer la sécurité routière, parce que les ordinateurs ont un temps de réponse beaucoup plus rapide que les humains. Aussi, grâce à la diversité des capteurs embarqués et aux systèmes de traitement actuels qui sont très perfectionnés et qui continuent de se perfectionner notamment au moyen de l'intelligence artificielle, on peut arriver à des solutions permettant d'améliorer la sécurité routière et de réduire le nombre d'accidents, de blessés et de morts.

La deuxième raison, c'est que les véhicules autonomes, dans un concept de taxis robotisés, peuvent nous amener à réduire le nombre de véhicules sur les routes. L'achalandage des routes est vraiment un des problèmes majeurs, outre les aspects liés à la dangerosité du transport routier.

Les télécommunications sont aussi un aspect intéressant, parce qu'elles nous permettent de considérer un partage de l'intelligence entre les véhicules et les infrastructures routières. Jusqu'à présent, les constructeurs automobiles ont investi tous leurs efforts pour inclure l'intelligence embarquée dans les véhicules, alors que les agences de transport, les ministères et toutes les agences publiques qui s'occupent des infrastructures routières ont très peu investi dans leurs infrastructures pour les rendre plus intelligentes. Dans la situation actuelle, il y a donc un déséquilibre. On a besoin d'exploiter davantage la capacité de communication afin d'essayer d'optimiser le partage de l'intelligence entre les infrastructures et les véhicules.

(1635)



En ce qui a trait aux recommandations, je pense que nous avons un urgent besoin de procéder à un travail sérieux et détaillé sur la réglementation et la législation pour accueillir ces nouveaux véhicules, soit les véhicules communicants et les véhicules en mode de conduite automatisée.

Plus particulièrement, à court terme, il faut absolument encadrer la façon dont les projets pilotes sont exécutés sur les routes publiques et investir dans l'élaboration de procédures de tests et de validation des véhicules, notamment par l'entremise de Transports Canada et des sites de tests comme ceux que nous avons à Blainville, au nord de Montréal.

Je vais m'arrêter ici.

(1640)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Gingras.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Santens, pour cinq minutes.

M. Scott Santens (écrivain et défenseur du revenu de base inconditionnel, à titre personnel):

Je remercie le Comité de m'accueillir ici aujourd'hui.

En 2014, j'ai fait un voyage en voiture avec ma fiancée. Entre la Louisiane et la Floride, nous avons discuté des répercussions possibles des camions autonomes. Des mois plus tard, je me suis inspiré de cette conversation pour publier à mon compte un article qui est devenu viral à l'échelle planétaire. Au cours des quatre dernières années, malgré mes propres mises en garde, j'ai moi-même été choqué par la rapidité à laquelle cette technologie s'est développée.

Je n'ai pas de doctorat. Je ne suis ni programmeur ni camionneur. Je suis tout simplement un citoyen qui passe beaucoup de temps à étudier des sujets d'intérêts pour ensuite écrire des articles. Ce qui a tendance à m'intéresser le plus, c'est l'effet des progrès technologiques sur la civilisation. Dans cette optique, je souhaite prendre le temps à ma disposition pour tenter de faire comprendre les répercussions monumentales que la technologie des véhicules automatisés aura sur la société ainsi que le grand besoin de comprendre ce qui nous attend au prochain virage, pour ainsi dire.

Pour commencer, je veux reprendre des propos qui expliquent bien selon moi l'essor de cette technologie. Le directeur financier de Suncor a dit que l'éventuel recours à des parcs de camions entièrement automatisés dans la mine de la société n'avait rien de fantaisiste. Il a ensuite expliqué qu'il y aura donc 800 personnes de moins à la mine et que cela représentera en moyenne des économies de 200 000 $ par personne, ce qui donne une idée des économies qui seront réalisées sur le plan de l'exploitation.

C'est le calcul froid qui est associé à la technologie des véhicules autonomes.

Les humains coûtent cher. Leur main-d'oeuvre est dispendieuse. Les avantages qui leur sont offerts sont coûteux. Leur formation coûte cher. Ils se blessent. Ils se fatiguent. Ils font des erreurs. Ils boivent et prennent des médicaments. Ils se laissent distraire. Ils regardent leur téléphone. Ils font la grève. Ils entament des poursuites judiciaires. Ils se fâchent et souffrent de dépression. Ils ont des limites physiques et biologiques. Ils démissionnent.

Les machines ne font rien de tout cela. Ce sont des travailleurs parfaits tant que le coût est raisonnable et que le rendement est bon.

En ce qui a trait aux camions autonomes, le coût de l'essence fait également partie de l'équation. Les camions qui se conduisent eux-mêmes permettent d'économiser énormément d'essence. Ils peuvent parcourir de longues distances en moins de temps, car ils n'ont pas besoin de dormir. Ils peuvent voyager dans des convois pour accroître l'efficacité aérodynamique. Le nombre inférieur d'accidents permet de réduire les coûts humains et les coûts en capital. De nombreuses raisons mènent à l'adoption de cette technologie, notamment des économies de milliards de dollars — investis et en jeu — pour les premiers à la mettre en place.

Je prends la parole une semaine seulement après le premier décès d'une piétonne frappée par une voiture autonome. Cet accident en dit long sur l'état d'avancement de cette technologie. Elle est déjà aussi bonne que les humains, au point où les gens s'attendent déjà à ce que cette technologie possède des capacités surhumaines. Pourquoi le radar et le système au laser n'ont-ils pas vu la femme avant d'entrer en collision avec elle dans le noir? Pourquoi la voiture ne l'a-t-elle pas immédiatement détectée et n'a-t-elle pas activé les freins?

C'est une question de secondes, et le conducteur ordinaire aurait causé le même décès, comme c'est le cas 3 000 fois par jour et 1,3 million de fois par année à l'échelle mondiale. Le premier humain est mort, mais cette technologie sauvera des vies, de l'argent et du temps, et elle aura une incidence sur nos économies de sorte que les gouvernements doivent commencer à se préparer pour les années à venir.

Ne vous laissez pas leurrer en pensant qu'elle ne fera qu'éliminer des emplois. L'automatisation du transport par véhicules se répercutera sur l'économie. Pensez aux voitures et aux camions comme des globules dans un système circulatoire, dans lequel ils transportent de l'oxygène partout dans le corps sous forme de recettes et de dépenses. Des entreprises dépendent de l'argent que les conducteurs dépensent. D'autres dépendent des propriétaires de voiture, des accidents de la route, du stationnement et de la nécessité de contracter une assurance, tandis que d'autres entreprises encore dépendent des activités de ces premières entreprises, et ainsi de suite. C'est l'effet de dominos.

Le défi que les législateurs devront relever consiste à orienter ce processus de manière à ne pas décourager son progrès, mais plutôt à le favoriser, tout en permettant au plus grand nombre de personnes possible de mieux s'en porter. Cela signifie qu'il faudra non seulement aider les gens à acquérir de nouvelles compétences pour occuper de nouveaux emplois, mais aussi créer un filet de sécurité qui tient compte de la transformation du travail dans un XXIe siècle empreint d'une grande incertitude.

La meilleure façon de procéder n'est pas de demander à d'anciens conducteurs de manoeuvrer dans un pénible système de formulaires et de bureaucratie pour recevoir un revenu pendant qu'ils se recyclent et cherchent un autre emploi sur un marché du travail où un nombre croissant de personnes composent avec des emplois précaires à court terme et un revenu mensuel qui varie de plus en plus.

C'est pour cette raison que je crois également qu'il faut discuter en même temps de l'automatisation future du travail et d'un revenu de base garanti. Vous avez une longueur d'avance dans le sens où vous mettez déjà la technologie à l'essai, mais je vous prie de porter attention à son importance. L'automatisation fera sans aucun doute des gagnants et des perdants, et on ne peut pas ignorer les perdants ou s'attendre tout simplement à ce qu'ils se trouvent un nouvel emploi qui offre le même salaire, les mêmes heures, les mêmes avantages et la même sécurité, qui nécessite les mêmes compétences, qui revêt pour eux le même sens et qui se trouve à la même distance de leur domicile. En tant que législateurs, vous devez absolument veiller à ce qu'une technologie comme les véhicules autonomes — et l'intelligence artificielle qui la rend possible — fonctionne pour tout le monde, pas seulement pour les gens qui la possèdent. À défaut de mettre l'accent là-dessus, notre parcours sera risqué. C'est à vous qu'il revient de nous faire contourner les risques autant que possible, pour que nous arrivions tous à un point que nos ancêtres n'auraient peut-être même pas cru possible.

Merci.

(1645)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Courville, vous n'avez pas de déclaration préliminaire?

M. John Wall (vice-président sénior, QNX Software Systems Limited):

Non, c'est moi qui ai une courte...

La présidente:

La parole est à vous, monsieur Wall.

M. John Wall:

Madame la présidente, merci d'avoir invité les représentants de BlackBerry à venir discuter avec vous aujourd'hui des véhicules automatisés et branchés.

Comme vous le savez, l'industrie automobile connaît actuellement une profonde transformation par laquelle un ensemble d'ordinateurs, de logiciels, de capteurs, d'actionneurs et de réseaux finira par remplacer l'humain au volant. BlackBerry joue un rôle de chef de file dans cette transformation. Nous sommes fiers d'être une entreprise canadienne qui emploie de grands talents canadiens et qui innove sans cesse pour être au premier plan du progrès technologique.

BlackBerry QNX est un fournisseur de technologies de confiance pour l'industrie automobile depuis environ 20 ans. Ses logiciels sont utilisés par plus de 40 constructeurs automobiles, ils se trouvent dans plus de 60 millions de voitures et ils constitueront le fondement des systèmes de conduite autonome de demain. Les nouvelles générations de véhicules dépendront de plus en plus de logiciels et de connexions à des réseaux externes pour remplir des fonctions essentielles. Il y aura donc une augmentation des risques pour la sécurité si les systèmes automobiles ne sont pas conçus selon les pratiques exemplaires et les normes de l'industrie.

BlackBerry a établi un cadre de disciplines afin de sécuriser les voitures modernes et de limiter les risques de cyberattaques. Nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec les constructeurs d'automobiles et leurs fournisseurs, et nous savons qu'ils prennent très au sérieux les questions de sûreté et de sécurité. Ils sont conscients des inquiétudes du public et ils savent que le fait de ne pas prendre les mesures raisonnables pour garantir la sûreté et la sécurité des véhicules aurait des répercussions néfastes sur l'adoption de la technologie, sans parler de leur réputation.

Cela ne veut pas dire pour autant que le gouvernement n'a pas un rôle important à jouer. Les gouvernements ont la responsabilité de garantir que la prochaine génération de véhicules soit mise en service de façon sécuritaire et qu'elle n'entraîne pas de risques déraisonnables. Les gouvernements doivent se charger d'harmoniser les réglementations des différents territoires afin d'éviter qu'on se retrouve avec un ensemble disparate de lois et de normes divergentes. Pour y arriver, il faudra assurer une bonne coordination entre les divers ministères et gouvernements, y compris étrangers. L'échange des résultats d'essais, des idées et des expériences entre les organismes et les gouvernements permettra également aux gouvernements de se tenir efficacement au courant des changements technologiques rapides.

Merci.

La présidente:

Nous allons commencer la série de questions de cinq minutes. Monsieur Chong.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Merci, madame la présidente.[Français]

Je remercie les témoins de leurs présentations.

J'aimerais poser une question au professeur Gingras et aux deux représentants de QNX Software Systems Limited.[Traduction]

Quantitativement, selon vous, quel pourcentage des véhicules circulant en 2030 seront de niveau 0 à niveau 5? Quelle sera la composition du parc de véhicules? Je sais que je vous demande une prédiction.

M. Denis Gingras:

Pardon, vous avez dit zéro à combien?

L'hon. Michael Chong:

De niveau 0 à niveau 5; combien y aura-t-il de voitures comme celles d'aujourd'hui, c'est-à-dire de niveau 0, combien y en aura-t-il de niveau 3 et combien y en aura-t-il de niveau 5?

J'ai deux questions, très brièvement. Premièrement, quelle sera la composition du parc de véhicules circulant en 2030 selon les différents niveaux de conduite autonome? Deuxièmement, quels seront les pourcentages de ventes de nouveaux véhicules en 2030, répartis selon les différents niveaux de conduite autonome?

Voilà mes deux questions pour les deux groupes de témoins.

M. Denis Gingras:

Merci pour la question.

C'est un peu difficile de faire des prédictions précises — il nous faudrait une boule de cristal —, mais il y aura certainement une sorte de parc hybride. Si vous regardez le rythme auquel la technologie évolue, aujourd'hui, des SCA — des systèmes de conduite automatisée — de niveaux 2 et 3 sont offerts sur le marché. Je présume qu'en 2030, c'est-à-dire dans 12 ans, on vendra probablement des véhicules de niveau 4, mais sûrement pas de niveau 5. J'en doute fort.

Il y a tellement de facteurs qui entrent en ligne de compte par rapport au modèle commercial: l'acceptabilité sociale, la stratégie de commercialisation que les FEO vont utiliser pour vendre les véhicules automatisés et autonomes, la réaction des sociétés d'assurances, l'évolution de la législation, la collaboration entre les responsables des infrastructures routières et les responsables des véhicules, les différentes stratégies de mobilité partagée...

(1650)

[Français]

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Pensez-vous qu'en 2030, la grande majorité des véhicules se situeront aux troisième et quatrième niveaux d'automatisation? [Traduction]

M. Denis Gingras:

Je dirais que ce sera probablement la moitié.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Nos deux autres témoins ont-ils des prédictions quantitatives? Bien sûr, nous n'allons pas vous...

M. John Wall:

Je suis tout à fait d'accord. On parle beaucoup de la conduite autonome de niveau 5, mais c'est encore très loin, et nous ne serons pas rendus là en 2030. Le niveau 5 signifie que le véhicule peut aller partout, en tout temps, dans n'importe quelles conditions.

Nous travaillons actuellement à des programmes de niveaux 3+ et 4. Ils devraient être prêts d'ici à 2023-2024. Normalement, la technologie finit par se retrouver dans les véhicules les plus abordables. Si j'avais à deviner, selon les programmes auxquels nous travaillons, je dirais qu'à ce moment-là, probablement 30 % des véhicules seront de niveaux 4 et 4+, 30 % de niveaux 3 et 3+, et 40 % de niveau 2. Il y a simplement différents niveaux de dispositifs de sécurité.

Les FEO avec lesquels nous discutons parlent de conditionner le public au moyen de dispositifs de sécurité empêchant les accidents — pas nécessairement pour la conduite autonome, mais pour la conduite automatisée, qui est...

Je vous en prie.

M. Grant Courville (chef, Gestion de produits, QNX Software Systems Limited):

J'allais dire qu'il ne faut pas oublier non plus qu'il n'y a pas de gros bouton sur lequel nous allons appuyer. Les millions et les centaines de millions de véhicules qui circulent aujourd'hui partout dans le monde ne vont pas simplement disparaître. Il faut tenir compte des véhicules utilisés aujourd'hui, et bien que nous ayons actuellement des véhicules de niveau 2, la grande majorité des véhicules sur les routes en ce moment ne sont même pas branchés. Il faudra donc facilement des dizaines d'années pour faire la transition vers une majorité de véhicules automatisés et autonomes.

M. John Wall:

Oui. Les pourcentages que j'ai donnés sont pour les nouveaux véhicules vendus en 2030.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je dois souligner qu'il s'agira d'un processus monumental qui durera probablement plusieurs décennies. Je veux vous poser les mêmes questions que j'ai posées aux témoins précédents qui étaient ici il y a environ 30 minutes.

Cela n'est pas nécessairement lié à la technologie, car deux éléments feront avancer la technologie: d'un côté, le client et ses besoins, et de l'autre, l'industrie même, qui devra tenter de répondre à ces besoins au moyen de la nouvelle technologie. Ce dont j'aimerais parler, c'est de la façon dont nous, le gouvernement, en collaboration avec des partenaires américains, pouvons nous préparer pour la nouvelle technologie en favorisant les investissements dans les infrastructures.

Nous devons également faciliter l'intégration des divers moyens de transport routier, ferroviaire, aérien et maritime, car il n'est pas seulement question des voitures, des autobus et des camions sur les routes; il est aussi question des navires sur l'eau, des trains sur les voies ferrées et des avions dans les airs.

Le dernier aspect est la logistique commerciale et la distribution. Il faut veiller à ce que les groupes de pression, les véhicules et les moyens de transport circulent aux échelles nationale et internationale, ainsi qu'à ce que l'intégration des moyens de transport inclut également les divers intérêts relatifs à la logistique commerciale et à la distribution.

J'ajouterais un autre élément: les sources de revenus. Il est indubitable que la nouvelle possibilité de recueillir des données offrira de nouvelles sources de revenus aux gens de l'industrie, mais ce qui est aussi important, voire plus important encore, c'est que les clients pourront employer leurs propres moyens pour recueillir des données et s'en servir à leur guise afin de se créer des sources de revenus individuelles.

Tout cela étant dit, j'aimerais maintenant savoir ce que vous pensez de tous les aspects que j'ai soulevés. Quel rôle le gouvernement doit-il jouer et comment doit-il faire pour devenir partenaire et pour se préparer sur les plans de l'infrastructure, de l'intégration, de la logistique commerciale et de l'intégration des données?

La parole est à vous.

M. Grant Courville:

Je pense que vous avez mentionné les investissements dans les infrastructures. Traditionnellement, les gens associent les infrastructures aux bâtiments, au béton, etc. Je pense qu'il faut élargir cette vision pour inclure la technologie et la connectivité. Les investissements dans les infrastructures de demain doivent comprendre la connectivité de véhicule à véhicule, de véhicule à feu de circulation et autres. Il faut également créer des programmes pour accélérer et stimuler le progrès technologique, et non se limiter à ce qui est traditionnellement considéré comme des infrastructures. Je pense que vous pourriez certainement intervenir sur ce plan.

En outre, il est possible de démocratiser les dispositifs de sécurité, c'est-à-dire de les offrir sur l'ensemble des gammes de véhicules. Cela dépend souvent du volume, de questions purement financières. L'exemple que j'aime toujours donner, c'est que le gouvernement est intervenu et qu'il a rendu les caméras de recul obligatoires dans les voitures. Résultat? En 2018, tous les véhicules sont munis d'une caméra de recul. Le coût a diminué considérablement. L'industrie s'est adaptée. Je pense que nous pouvons chercher les possibilités de ce genre, les occasions pour le gouvernement d'intervenir et d'accélérer le processus.

(1655)

M. John Wall:

Sur le plan des profits, bien que nous parlions tous de la conduite autonome et automatisée, d'après moi, le plus grand changement que nous verrons dans le secteur de l'automobile touchera l'architecture du véhicule. Il y aura un écosystème conçu pour la voiture.

La meilleure comparaison que je puisse faire, c'est de dire qu'il y aura un Android pour la voiture comme pour le téléphone. Il y aura deux ou trois écosystèmes, tout comme nous avons aujourd'hui iOS et Android, mais ce ne sera pas Android parce qu'il y a des caractéristiques très précises liées à la sûreté et à la sécurité.

Toutefois, je pense qu'il y a des possibilités énormes. Les constructeurs d'automobiles considèrent un tout nouveau modèle commercial pour produire des revenus dans l'avenir. Les données en font partie, ainsi que la façon de vendre des services dans les voitures. Dans l'avenir, les gens posséderont leurs voitures très différemment. Ils auront peut-être une décapotable en été et un véhicule utilitaire sport en hiver, mais ils voudront que les caractéristiques de leurs véhicules les suivent d'une voiture à l'autre — la position des sièges, par exemple. Les gens parlent d'un téléphone intelligent muni de roues; c'est bel et bien la direction dans laquelle nous allons.

M. Vance Badawey:

Ce que vous dites tous les deux concernant les infrastructures et la nouvelle définition des infrastructures est juste. Par rapport aux embouteillages, par exemple, si nous creusons un peu plus, nous pouvons maintenant trouver des façons de les éliminer en synchronisant parfaitement non seulement les infrastructures, mais aussi les véhicules qui en tirent parti. Dorénavant, les déplacements et la circulation seront fluides et stratégiquement coordonnés dans le but d'éliminer les embouteillages, ce qui aura notamment un effet bénéfique sur l'environnement.

Au sujet des données, qui seront les bénéficiaires réels des recettes générées par les données?

M. John Wall:

Ce sera très intéressant.

M. Vance Badawey:

Est-ce que ce seront les entreprises ou les individus?

M. John Wall:

Pourquoi pensez-vous que Google s'intéresse aux voitures? C'est à cause des données, strictement des données. Les FEO savent qu'ils peuvent en tirer profit, mais ils ne savent pas encore comment.

M. Vance Badawey:

Or, ce serait aussi possible que ce soit les personnes utilisant les applications de Google qui pourraient vendre les données, plutôt que Google ou que les fabricants d'automobiles mêmes.

M. John Wall:

Cela reste à voir, mais aujourd'hui, tout l'argent se retrouve dans les poches de Google et de Facebook.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Je donne la parole à M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Cette discussion est passionnante. Je vais donc plonger tout de suite.

Monsieur Gingras, dans votre présentation, vous avez allumé une lumière dans mon esprit quand vous avez parlé du modèle juste-à-temps, que nous avons lancé à une époque où les gaz à effet de serre n'étaient pas tellement un problème connu.

Est-ce que ces développements technologiques en matière de transport entraînent aussi une réflexion sur le besoin de réviser nos modèles économiques, ou est-ce qu'on s'en tient strictement aux notions de transport, de véhicules et d'automatisation?

M. Denis Gingras:

Tout à fait. Je suis d'avis que la mobilité et le transport ne sont que deux des piliers de notre société. À l'heure actuelle, beaucoup de notions doivent être remises en question sur la façon dont nous vivons et sur le fonctionnement de notre société. Il n'y a qu'à penser notamment aux changements climatiques, aux inégalités sociales, à la cybersécurité ou aux menaces à la démocratie. La mobilité est l'un des piliers du développement de notre société, puisque cette mobilité permet aux gens d'aller au bureau, à l'école ou à l'épicerie, ou encore de transporter des marchandises. Cette mobilité physique est donc nécessaire, en parallèle avec la mobilité des données et des connaissances que les systèmes d'information nous permettent d'échanger.

Si nous voulons vraiment résoudre les problèmes majeurs auxquels nous faisons face en matière de mobilité et de transport, il faudra étudier toute cette question de façon holistique, de façon globale. Nous devrons aussi avoir le courage de prendre des décisions douloureuses quant à nos modèles économiques actuels.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Monsieur Santens, j'ai remarqué tout à l'heure que vous souhaitiez réagir au sujet des données personnelles. Je vous laisse donc l'occasion de le faire. [Traduction]

M. Scott Santens:

Oui, merci.

Je tenais simplement à mentionner que pour ce qui concerne la capitalisation des données, je trouve important de souligner, par rapport à l'avenir, que les gens sont propriétaires de leurs données. Si, en votre qualité de législateurs, vous établissez un précédent selon lequel les gens possèdent leurs données, alors il sera logique, du point de vue de la protection des renseignements personnels, non seulement que les données ne puissent pas être divulguées et revendues, mais aussi que lorsqu'elles sont vendues avec la permission de leurs propriétaires, leurs propriétaires doivent recevoir quelque chose en retour.

C'est aussi intéressant qu'il y a non seulement ce que tous considèrent comme des données, mais aussi les données ambiantes, les données que nous produisons sans rien faire, en étant simplement nous-mêmes, en marchant près d'une caméra dans la rue. Il existe beaucoup de données qui ne sont pas considérées comme telles, mais qui le sont bel et bien.

(1700)

[Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Messieurs Courville et Wall, j'ai une question plus technique à vous poser.

Nous entendons toujours dire que les véhicules automatisés offrent une plus grande sécurité, puisque leur ordinateur réagit plus vite que l'humain. Cependant, tous les exemples que l'on me donne en sont où la voiture, pour éviter un accident, s'arrête plus rapidement que je ne l'aurais fait.

Or l'an dernier, j'ai réussi par miracle, mais aussi grâce à ma technique de conduite, à éviter d'être impliqué dans un carambolage causé par la glace noire. Dans ce cas précis, la solution n'était pas d'arrêter, mais bien d'effectuer un dérapage contrôlé. Est-ce que les véhicules automatisés sont capables de faire cela? [Traduction]

M. John Wall:

Oui, d'après moi, les algorithmes seront assez élaborés pour comprendre la glace noire, le dérapage des roues, etc. Ils pourront déterminer plus rapidement que vous ce qui arrive au véhicule du point de vue de la géométrie.

C'est aussi une des raisons pour lesquelles selon moi, l'avènement de la conduite autonome est moins proche qu'une entreprise comme Uber, par exemple, le prétend. Uber veut des véhicules autonomes pour des raisons commerciales. C'est son modèle d'entreprise. Uber ne survivra pas sans cela.

On fait très peu d'essais de conduite autonome au Canada. Nous avons une voiture autonome à QNX, et elle se comporte très différemment en hiver, sur la neige et la glace. Nous sommes loin d'être prêts à maîtriser ces situations. Les gens sont encore meilleurs que les véhicules dans de telles situations, mais je pense que grâce à l'apprentissage machine et à l'intelligence artificielle, la technologie finira par être en mesure de réagir adéquatement aux situations de ce genre. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Est-ce que c'est... [Traduction]

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, monsieur Aubin. C'est au tour de M. Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Un des témoins du groupe précédent a devancé ma question en décrivant la période où la voiture et le cheval circulaient ensemble sur les routes. C'est incroyable que nous soyons en train de parler de véhicules sans conducteur.

J'ai lu un rapport publié en 2017 par la Chambre des lords du Royaume-Uni, intitulé: Connected and Autonomous Vehicles: The future? Le rapport se penche sur la période de transition où les véhicules traditionnels partageront la route avec les véhicules branchés et autonomes. On y constate que les effets de cette coexistence ne sont pas pleinement compris et on recommande au gouvernement du Royaume-Uni de produire des modélisations à ce sujet avant d'établir les politiques.

Ma première question est la suivante: a-t-on produit des modélisations pour évaluer l'impact de la coexistence, sur les routes du Canada, des véhicules autonomes et non autonomes? Dans l'affirmative, quelles sont ces modélisations?

M. Grant Courville:

C'est très admirable. Nous sommes absolument d'accord avec cette recommandation, parce que les humains sont par définition imprévisibles. Vous avez tout à fait raison. La réalité est telle que la flotte sera mixte, comme on l'a déjà dit.

Pour revenir à ce que John disait un peu plus tôt, nous menons des essais dans des conditions météorologiques difficiles parce que tous ces capteurs fonctionnent très bien quand tout va bien, mais c'est plus difficile quand la situation devient imprévisible et s'envenime. Ils doivent pourvoir s'adapter aux imprévus; nous devons comprendre comment y réagir intelligemment. Les voitures pourraient-elles communiquer entre elles? John a mentionné l'intelligence artificielle, et nous sommes tout à fait d'accord.

Une partie de notre travail avec les capteurs vise à gérer les obstacles imprévus. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles il nous reste encore beaucoup de travail pour parvenir au niveau 5. Nous avons tendance à dire qu'il y a les voitures connectées, qu'il y a les voitures automatisées, puis qu'il y a les voitures autonomes. On a tendance à voir les voitures autonomes tout de suite après les voitures connectées, mais il y a toute l'automatisation entre les deux, qui représente une étape majeure. On voit déjà beaucoup de fonctions automatisées dans les véhicules. Les voitures sont de plus en plus sécuritaires, et ce sont autant de petits pas vers la voiture autonome.

M. Gagan Sikand:

À ce sujet, comment peut-on intégrer les interactions humaines à la modélisation?

M. Denis Gingras:

Les problèmes d'interaction homme-machine (IHM) sont au coeur de la problématique. Il y a beaucoup de détails inconscients dans nos interactions entre humains, tout le langage corporel, par exemple. Prenons le simple piéton qui traverse la rue. Il jettera probablement un regard à la voiture et au conducteur. Sans qu'ils n'échangent un mot, il aura compris que le conducteur l'a vu et il se sentira en confiance parce qu'il verra que la voiture ralentit. Nous n'avons pas encore ce genre d'interaction avec une voiture totalement autonome, et nous n'avons encore aucune idée de la façon de le prévoir avec précision.

On déploie beaucoup d'efforts pour établir avec des psychologues spécialisés en connectivité et des mathématiciens des modèles des comportements des chauffeurs et des IHM pour rendre les interactions plus sûres entre les véhicules très autonomes ou les fonctions de conduite très automatisées et les humains.

Pour vous donner un exemple, il y a des constructeurs d'automobiles allemands qui ont mis au point des interfaces graphiques afin d'afficher un grand sourire devant la voiture pour montrer au piéton que la machine l'a vu et qu'il peut traverser la rue en toute sécurité. Nous étudions toutes sortes de solutions du genre.

Ce n'est pas banal, mais ce n'est qu'un problème minuscule dans l'océan des problèmes à surmonter pour parvenir à une solution mature et entière de niveau 5. Nous n'y sommes pas encore.

(1705)

M. Scott Santens:

J'aimerais vous donner un autre exemple. S'il y avait un mélange de véhicules automatisées et de véhicules conduits par des humains, imaginons un embouteillage causé par la curiosité. Quelqu'un passe devant quelque chose et ralentit pour regarder. Cela porte la voiture de derrière à ralentir, puis la voiture suivante aussi, puis soudainement, il y a tout un embouteillage. Il y a un effet domino.

Il y a un risque que toutes les voitures automatisées entrent elles aussi dans l'embouteillage. Toutefois, s'il y avait un système hybride et qu'il y avait toujours un conducteur humain dans la voiture, le système détecterait que la voiture devant a commencé à ralentir, mais il ne ralentirait pas autant qu'un humain, si bien la voiture derrière ne serait pas ralentie de la même façon. On pourrait alors éviter l'embouteillage qui se serait formé sinon, avec un conducteur humain, sans aucune forme d'assistance.

Il y aurait donc lieu de mettre en place un genre de système hybride.

La présidente:

Merci infiniment, monsieur Santens.

Écoutons maintenant M. Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Professeur Gingras, des tests ont été effectués ce matin à Blainville sur des systèmes de freinage d'urgence. Pourriez-vous nous en dire plus?

M. Denis Gingras:

Merci de votre question.

En fait, j'étais au Centre d'essais pour véhicules automobiles de Transports Canada et de PMG Technologies à Blainville depuis deux jours. Nous y avons tenu un atelier de travail dont le but était de créer, en collaboration avec le Conseil national de recherches du Canada et Transports Canada, ce que l'on appelle une communauté de praticiens, c'est-à-dire un réseau composé de tous les intervenants canadiens des secteurs du transport routier et des véhicules intelligents dans le but d'en arriver à une stratégie nationale dans ce domaine.

L'atelier regroupait donc des experts du CNRC et de Transports Canada ainsi que de certaines universités comme celles de Waterloo et de Sherbrooke. Il s'y trouvait également des représentants de certains organismes du Québec et de l'Ontario, mais aussi de la Ville de Calgary, puisque des essais y sont faits.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Qu'avez-vous appris?

M. Denis Gingras:

Ce matin, nous avons effectué quelques essais, dont certains avec mannequins, pour vérifier le système de freinage d'urgence de divers modèles de véhicules, notamment du constructeur Kia. Comme nous l'avions déjà vu lors des tests menés ces deux dernières années, les systèmes de freinage d'urgence qui sont commercialisés ne fonctionnent pas vraiment au-delà d'une vitesse de 40 kilomètres à l'heure. La technologie n'est donc pas encore au point, et cette situation est d'autant plus dangereuse que la population n'est pas bien informée.

Cela représente un défi pour les organismes de régulation des transports, notamment dans les provinces. Je parle ici des organismes qui offrent des cours de conduite ou qui émettent les permis de conduire. Si quelqu'un achète un véhicule intelligent équipé de fonctions automatisées, comme une Tesla muni d'un système de pilotage automatique, il faut que les gouvernements s'assurent que le nouveau propriétaire est bien informé des limites techniques de ces fonctions et qu'il sait quand et comment les utiliser, de façon à respecter leurs paramètres et à éviter des situations dangereuses. C'est extrêmement important.

Il y a aussi toute la question de l'élaboration d'une nouvelle réglementation pour encadrer ces nouvelles technologies.

(1710)

M. Angelo Iacono:

En matière de sécurité informatique, existe-t-il un système de programmation qui soit à l'abri de tout piratage?

M. Denis Gingras:

Je crois qu'aucun des systèmes informatiques actuels ne peut prétendre être entièrement à l'abri d'une cyberattaque.

Dès le moment où un véhicule est interconnecté et qu'il est capable de communiquer et d'échanger des informations avec les infrastructures routières, avec un autre véhicule ou avec un piéton, je crois qu'il y a risque que ces données soient interceptées et qu'une personne non autorisée puisse prendre à distance le contrôle de ce véhicule.

Nous avons déjà eu un exemple de ce danger potentiel aux États-Unis, il y a deux ou trois ans, dans le cas d'une Jeep Cherokee.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Monsieur Graham, vous avez une minute.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Très bien.[Français]

Monsieur Gingras, vous soulevez une question que je voulais aborder. C'était précisément ce cas d'une Jeep qui, en 2015, a fait l'objet d'une attaque informatique, ce qu'on appelle en anglais un zero-day exploit.[Traduction]

Ce sont des véhicules à commande électrique, qu'on peut diriger à distance et faire sortir de la route. Que faisons-nous pour prévenir ce genre d'incident? Quelles sont les conséquences du piratage d'un véhicule QNX?

M. John Wall:

On parle ici en particulier de la faille identifiée par Charlie Miller, que nous connaissons assez bien.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le véhicule ciblé était-il muni du système QNX?

M. John Wall:

Oui, et je vous dirais que c'est comme si quelqu'un avait laissé la porte grande ouverte. Il n'y avait absolument aucun mécanisme de sécurité dans ce véhicule. Cela a vraiment fait comprendre à l'industrie automobile qu'elle devait en faire beaucoup plus en matière de sécurité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais dès qu'un véhicule sera relié à un réseau, ce sera le cas de toute façon...

M. John Wall:

Non, non, il y a des choses très graves qui avaient été faites dans ce véhicule pour laisser la porte grande ouverte. Je parle de scripts qui affichent les mises à jour nécessaires. C'était épouvantablement ouvert.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Cela nous enseigne une chose essentielle, c'est-à-dire qu'aucun programme ne sera meilleur que le programmeur qui l'a écrit.

M. John Wall:

Oui, il y a la programmation, mais il y a aussi toute la façon dont le système est assemblé, et la cybersécurité ne sera jamais une certitude absolue. Il y a toujours un jeu du chat et de la souris, et il faut toujours avoir un pas d'avance sur la technologie, parce qu'il peut y avoir des vulnérabilités comme la vulnérabilité Heartbleed d'OpenSSL. Nous les connaissons pas à l'avance.

Nous avons récemment découvert les vulnérabilités matérielles Spectre et Meltdown. Je pense que...

La présidente:

Je suis désolée de devoir vous interrompre, monsieur Wall.

Le prochain intervenant est M. Liepert.

M. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, PCC):

Le premier groupe de témoins que nous avons reçu déplorait que trois ans et demi se sont écoulés depuis le rapport Emerson et qu'il y a même d'autres rapports qui ont été publiés ensuite, y compris au Sénat. Ils se disaient frustrés qu'on en soit encore à étudier la question alors qu'il serait temps que le gouvernement aille de l'avant.

Je m'interroge aussi. Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler d'infrastructure, et il me semble que c'est justement un front sur lequel le gouvernement pourrait avancer afin de permettre ce développement, parce que la planification de l'infrastructure doit se faire bien des années à l'avance.

J'aimerais savoir si vous avez l'impression que le gouvernement agit assez vite dans ses investissements en infrastructure, afin d'investir aux bons endroits en prévision des besoins qui s'imposeront dans peut-être moins de 10 ans. C'est une observation assez générale.

M. Denis Gingras:

Bien sûr, le gouvernement fédéral et les divers ordres de gouvernement pourraient offrir des incitatifs pour encourager les municipalités, par exemple, à équiper des lieux essentiels. Par exemple, elles pourraient installer des appareils d'instrumentation et de communication aux principales intersections pour améliorer la sécurité dans la région.

Il serait toutefois irréaliste de prétendre qu'il faut installer des appareils partout pour rendre toute notre infrastructure plus intelligente. C'est impossible. Nous n'avons même pas les moyens de colmater tous les nids-de-poule, donc je vois bien mal comment nous pourrions investir autant dans l'instrumentation.

(1715)

M. Ron Liepert:

C'est à peu près ce que je voulais dire. Tenons-nous compte des besoins que nous aurons dans 10 ou 15 ans quand vient le temps de dépenser nos fonds d'infrastructure? Je serais porté à croire que nous investissons plutôt dans des projets d'infrastructure qui ne diffèrent pas beaucoup des projets dans lesquels nous investissions il y a 10 ou 20 ans.

Je n'essaie pas de faire un commentaire partisan, je pense que c'est ce qui se passe au gouvernement en général. Y a-t-il des choses que le gouvernement aurait peut-être dû faire il y a deux ou trois ans ou qu'il devrait peut-être au moins faire aujourd'hui ou demain pour être prêt le temps venu? C'est pour très bientôt.

M. John Wall:

C'est une question intéressante, parce que nous savons, à force de travailler avec les constructeurs automobiles, qu'ils n'installeront pas de système V2X dans les voitures tant qu'ils ne pourront pas faire d'argent avec cela...

La présidente:

Je vais demander à M. Wall de s'arrêter une seconde.

Nous avons entendu l'alarme. Ai-je votre consentement unanime pour terminer la séance?

Des voix: D'accord.

M. John Wall:

Puis-je continuer? Très bien.

C'est comme la question de l'oeuf et de la poule. Le constructeur automobile ne peut pas vendre cette fonctionnalité parce l'infrastructure correspondante n'est pas là. Si l'infrastructure était là, le constructeur pourrait la vendre, ce qui éviterait des accidents aux intersections très achalandées, par exemple.

Exactement comme on l'a déjà mentionné, nul besoin d'installer cette infrastructure partout, mais il serait bien de l'installer à certains endroits.

M. Ron Liepert:

D'autres témoins nous ont dit que les essais se font en Arizona actuellement parce que les conditions y sont idéales. Les conditions ici, sont tout sauf parfaites, donc comment pouvons-nous importer ces technologies ici? Pourront-elles vraiment fonctionner dans 10 ou 15 ans sur ma petite route de campagne? Quand je sors de mon entrée, je ne vois pas toujours très bien où se trouve le fossé. Est-ce une toute autre question?

M. Grant Courville:

Oui.

C'est l'une des choses que nous testons. Quand un humain conduit sur une route de campagne où il n'y a pas d'indicateurs, comment fait-il pour se situer en plein milieu d'une tempête? Nous regardons probablement les arbres, les poteaux hydroélectriques, les fossés, etc. Nous devons enseigner aux machines, aux ordinateurs dont sont munis les véhicules, à penser un peu comme nous pour agir de façon sécuritaire, comme on le disait plus tôt.

Ce sont des problèmes de base. Si l'on regarde ce qui se passe en Californie, au DMV, on voit qu'il y a tout un désengagement à l'égard des voitures autonomes. Pourquoi? La plupart des problèmes sont simplement liés à la pluie. Dès qu'il commence à pleuvoir, les capteurs cessent de fonctionner.

Nous nous sommes rendu compte ici, à Ottawa, par exemple, parce que la météo est parfois intéressante ici, ce qui est fantastique pour réaliser des essais, soit dit en passant, que les lidars ne fonctionnent pas très bien dans la neige, dans la pluie ou quand il y a de la gadoue sur le pare-chocs, où se situe le radar. Nous nous sommes rendu compte que les lignes jaunes produisent de bien meilleurs résultats que les lignes blanches. Je veux simplement dire que nous apprenons toutes sortes de choses grâce à nos essais, comme vous pouvez le constater.

M. Ron Liepert:

Le gouvernement devrait-il penser à toutes ces petites choses quand il investit en infrastructure? Devrait-il songer à peindre les lignes en jaune plutôt qu'en blanc, par exemple?

M. Grant Courville:

Pour vous donner un exemple très simple, je peux vous faire part de quelques-uns de nos constats, mais si vous en parlez avec des ingénieurs qui font de la recherche, ils vous diront que ces systèmes peuvent reconnaître les lignes jaunes bien mieux que les lignes blanches, surtout quand il neige.

C'est un peu la question de l'oeuf et de la poule. On trouve aujourd'hui des systèmes de communications dédiées à courte distance, des systèmes CDCD, qui peuvent se parler sans fil mais qui ne peuvent échanger qu'avec les autres voitures, sauf que les constructeurs automobiles ne peuvent pas rentabiliser un investissement dans cette technologie parce que l'infrastructure n'est pas là, donc cela n'apporte pas nécessairement grand-chose au consommateur. Ce n'est qu'une illustration de la situation actuelle.

Si les intersections étaient munies d'appareils de ce genre, soudainement, on pourrait offrir une fonction qui ajouterait à la sécurité des véhicules et dont bénéficierait le consommateur.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je suis bien content d'avoir 68 ans et de ne pas avoir à trop me soucier de ces choses-là, madame la présidente.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

La présidente:

Nous devrons nous arrêter là, parce que nous devons délibérer un peu à huis clos d'une question qui figure à notre ordre du jour.

Je remercie infiniment nos témoins. Qui sait? Nous vous réinviterons peut-être, parce que manifestement, les membres du comité ont bien d'autres questions à vous poser.

Si vous voulez bien sortir de la pièce le plus rapidement possible, ce serait apprécié.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on March 28, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.