header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-12-06 TRAN 125

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(0845)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I'm calling to order meeting 125 of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we are continuing a study of the mandate of the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities.

With us today we have the Honourable François-Philippe Champagne, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, and from the Office of Infrastructure Canada, Kelly Gillis, Deputy Minister, Infrastructure and Communities. Welcome to you both. We've been waiting anxiously for your appearance, so thank you for coming today.

Minister Champagne, I'll turn it over to you.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Madam Chair, sorry, just as a bit of housekeeping before we get to the minister's much anticipated comments, I'm hoping he'll address in his opening remarks that he wasn't here for the estimates. I know he's here on his mandate letter today, but I just want to make sure we've flagged the fact that most of the time, ministers come for their supplementary estimates as well.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Jeneroux.

Minister Champagne, you have five minutes, please.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne (Minister of Infrastructure and Communities):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

It's a real pleasure to be in front of you and your colleagues today.

It's my first appearance at this committee, but as a start, I am very delighted to be with all of you and to talk about progress in infrastructure. I think, Madam Chair, that infrastructure touches the lives of Canadians in every community, whether urban or rural.

Good morning and thank you for inviting me, members of the committee.

I'm joined by Kelly Gillis, my very able deputy minister, who has been very active on this file to deliver for Canadians.

I'd like to start by acknowledging the outstanding work of my predecessor, Minister Sohi. Minister Sohi was responsible for this file, and we all know he's truly passionate about infrastructure, almost as much as he is about his hometown of Edmonton. He left a good legacy in the projects and the program. He's been a strong voice for his region, and obviously the province of Alberta, and continues to be in his new portfolio as Minister of Natural Resources.[Translation]

I would also like to thank my Deputy Minister, and the whole department of Infrastructure Canada for their hard work and dedication over the past three years. Thanks to their continued efforts, we have made enormous progress in delivering modern infrastructure to Canadians everywhere in the country.[English]

Let me give a brief overview. Since I was appointed Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, I was fortunate enough to see first-hand our investments in infrastructure across the country. I recently attended the groundbreaking for the Port Lands flood protection project in Toronto, which will help transform the Port Lands into beautiful new communities that will be surrounded by parks and green spaces. It will also add affordable housing to the Toronto region.

I also visited the Inuvik wind generation project in the Northwest Territories, which will provide an efficient, reliable and clean source of energy for Inuvik residents. I was pleased that this was the first project under the Arctic energy fund, which is helping to move communities in the north from diesel to renewable energy.

(0850)

[Translation]

I also visited an underground garage in Montreal that will increase the city's fleet of metro cars, improve the frequency of service, and, of course, support the anticipated growth in ridership on Montreal's public transit.[English]

Let me briefly touch on a few successes that we've had so far. Our plan of investing $180 billion over the next decade in infrastructure across the country is truly historic. I am proud of the progress we have made so far and the positive impact it has made on people across the country. The plan is being delivered by 14 federal departments and agencies.[Translation]

All 70 new programs and initiatives are now launched and more than 32,000 infrastructure projects have already been approved. Nearly all are underway.[English]

Since Minister Sohi's last appearance at this committee in May, I am pleased to note some of the significant milestones we have achieved together. The first one, which I'm very proud of, is the smart cities challenge. Finalists were announced this summer, and the winners will be announced in late spring 2019.[Translation]

The Canada Infrastructure Bank announced its first investment, which is $1.28 billion in the Réseau express métropolitain in Montreal. With this investment, the bank does exactly what it was intended to do: free up grant funding so that we can build more infrastructure for Canadians.[English]

Despite the fact that very little was done to advance this important project when we formed government, the Gordie Howe international bridge is now finally under way. That is truly historic for Canada. We know the Windsor-Detroit corridor has about 30% of all merchandise trade between Canada and the United States. This project is truly building on our current and future prosperity.[Translation]

Infrastructure Canada has also signed bilateral agreements with all of the provinces and territories for the next decade. We have already approved funding under these new guidelines for[English]the Green Line in Calgary, the Millennium Line extension in British Columbia, [Translation]

and Azur subway trains for Montreal,[English]and the water treatment system in the Comox Valley Regional District in British Columbia.

Lastly, we also launched the disaster mitigation and adaptation fund. We've already received a number of applications for funding and are currently reviewing them.

I also had the pleasure to meet with my provincial and territorial counterparts in September. One key item we discussed was how to better match the flow of our funding and our processes with the construction season in the sense that we want to make our intake, review and approval process faster and better, and make sure that our processes, whether federal, provincial or territorial, are in line with the construction season. I have impressed on my colleagues that we need to work diligently on that.

I visited several projects where work is well under way, but the claims for reimbursements have not been submitted, for example the Cherry Street water and lake-filling project in Toronto and the Côte-Vertu garage in Montreal, Quebec. To address this issue, we recently launched a pilot project with Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia and Alberta to test the effectiveness of a progressive billing approach. We know that Canadians want to see funds that match milestones in projects, a “percentage of completion” type of approach, and we have asked our colleagues in the provinces to work with us to achieve that outcome as well.[Translation]

In closing, I would like to thank the committee members for giving me this opportunity to update you. I hope that together, with each member of the committee, we will be able to build 21st-century infrastructures, modern, durable and green, for all Canadians.

Thank you.

(0855)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Champagne. We appreciate all of your comments, and the fact that you kept them to five minutes so that the committee can ask the umpteen questions they have for you.

Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Madam Chair, and thank you, Minister, for being here today.

Have you heard from stakeholders, who I know you meet with frequently, about the social impacts of male construction workers, specifically in rural areas?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

One group of people I meet most often is construction workers. They are the true heroes of what we're doing. I was just recently on the Champlain Bridge in Montreal. I can say to my colleague that when I met the 1,600 workers who are working seven days a week, day and night, in good and bad weather, I really listened to them. I always made sure to repeat to them that my first priority on every construction site is the health and safety of the people and the benefits to the community in which they work.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I know you know this, Minister, but Montreal is not a rural area. My specific question was about rural areas. The Prime Minister recently made a statement that there are negative social impacts of men, specifically construction workers, in rural areas. I'm wondering if you've heard the same thing.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

The member is right. I was referring to an urban project, but since we have more than 4,000 projects across the country, he would appreciate that I do that not only in urban areas, but also in rural areas. I always engage with workers, making sure I understand about their health and safety and the benefits to the community in which they operate. I was recently with the member at the Fort Edmonton Park extension, and we met with workers and people who are going to be doing the work there, and everywhere they are—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Again, Minister, Edmonton is not a rural area. I'm speaking specifically about rural areas and the Prime Minister's comments. Yes or no, do you agree with the Prime Minister's comments?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I appreciate that Edmonton is not a rural area, just as Montreal is not, but everywhere I go, whether it's rural or urban, I meet with workers and I make sure I listen to them. I engage with them, because they are the true heroes of our infrastructure projects across the country.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

It was a yes or no, Minister. The Prime Minister made a comment this past weekend. Did you agree with his comments?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

As I said, again, my role is to ensure that across the country we build infrastructure for the 21st century that is modern, resilient and green, and obviously the workers across the country, male or female, are key in delivering for Canadians across the country.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I'll ask this in a different way, Minister. Does applying the—

The Chair:

Mr. Jeneroux, I think you've beaten that issue up a little bit.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Madam Chair, it's my time. I'm allowed to ask whatever question I wish during my time.

The Chair:

You cannot be repetitive on the same issue.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Madam Chair, I ask you to first of all pause the time, and to quote from which standing order it is that says I'm not allowed to ask a repetitive question.

The Chair:

Would you like me to read it?

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Please.

The Chair:

In Procedure and Practice, at pages 1058-9, it's any time that it is “repetitive or are unrelated to the matter before” us. It's the issue of being repetitive. It's the third time that you've tried to get the same question on the table.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

It was the second time, Madam Chair, and I wouldn't say that. I'm asking it in a different way this time.

Allow me to ask the questions, please. We only have six minutes here to ask the questions.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Does applying the gender lens that the Prime Minister refers to then affect infrastructure getting built on time?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I would say that applying a gender lens is key in every program and project that we're delivering. Understanding the impact on different communities and on different people who will be working on our sites is essential—and on the community—so I think it's a great step forward for our country that we take into account the gender lens. Also, as part of the historic $180-billion infrastructure plan, we have also, as the member knows, not only applied that lens but also put on an environmental lens to understand the impacts of our projects.

The more we understand how to deliver for communities across Canada, I think we're all better as Canadians.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Under your opening comments, Minister, you state that in the Canada Infrastructure Bank you freed up grant funding. I don't think you necessarily freed it up. I'll give you a chance to rephrase that.

There's the $5 billion you took from the investing in Canada plan under public transit systems. You took $5 billion from trade and transportation corridors. You took $5 billion from green infrastructure projects. There's now $15 billion that is sitting in the Infrastructure Bank. You've mentioned that you built one project in Montreal, which was a reannouncement of what the Prime Minister announced back in June of 2017.

First, I don't see how that's freeing up money. That's just moving money around. Secondly, the Infrastructure Bank, for which you trumpet so much success in your opening comments, I think across the country, has been referred to as anything but. I've heard it called a disaster and a debacle. I'm hoping you can comment on why this infrastructure money isn't flowing.

Quite frankly, it's not freeing up anything. It's just moving money around at this point.

(0900)

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I'm very happy to answer that question. I think the Infrastructure Bank is another tool in our tool box to deliver better and faster for Canadians.

We obviously don't talk to the same people. I used to be trade minister, and I can tell you that investors around the world were looking to crowd in investment in Canada. For the Infrastructure Bank, like you said, the first project was the REM in Montreal. It was allowed to give a loan to get that project going, which is going to transform public transit in the city.

I can reassure the member that I speak with the CEO of the bank, although it's an independent entity in its management and investment decisions. I talk to the CEO regularly. They are currently looking at more than a few dozen projects. They have had, I would say, hundreds of conversations across the country with community leaders and representatives of territorial and provincial governments.

For me, it's about doing more. It's making sure that we have more money available to deliver across the country. The bank is allowing us, for example—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

You're just moving money around, Minister. That's all it is. It's the investing in Canada plan. You've moved money from there to the Infrastructure Bank.

On the REM project, was it or was it not a reannouncement from a previous announcement?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I would say no, and I would correct my colleague in a sense. The fact that the bank has provided the loan is freeing up investments that would be otherwise taken from the public transit allocation that Quebec had.

For me, to have been able to attract investors like the Infrastructure Bank to this project is a great thing. It's going to allow us to do more. I can tell the member that we're looking at interties, and we're looking at other light rail transit systems across the country. I think we should celebrate that. Canada was one of the few G7 countries not having an infrastructure bank—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux: Nothing is getting built, Minister.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne: —and having that is another great tool to deliver for Canadians.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

But nothing's getting built with the Infrastructure Bank, Minister.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

We'll move on to Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for being here this morning.

Minister, first of all, I do have to express my appreciation for the over $300 million that you have afforded my riding over the past few years, in terms of the infrastructure work that's been done. Of course, that alleviates the financial burden on those who pay property taxes, but also it enhances diverse business planning within many sectors of our business community. In partnership with the business communities, our municipalities are looking at sustainable funding envelopes to satisfy community improvement planning and community improvement strategies but also at aligning those investments for better returns on those investments for, once again, enhancing the overall structure of the community as well as the different sectors that are part of the community.

Mr. Minister, can you speak on some of the sustainable funding envelopes that are being made available for both communities and the businesses within them?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Thank you very much for the question.

What we have done, which is truly transformational in this country, is to provide stability and predictability in the funding for municipalities. The FCM called it a game-changer. I know the member comes from municipal government, so he well understands what it is to be able to plan infrastructure. I keep saying that when we take money and put it in infrastructure, we invest, because by definition, that goes more than a fiscal cycle. It is for 10, 15 or sometimes even 100 years ahead.

I would say that the $180 billion we have provided is really a game-changer. It's historic in our country. If you look at the stream of investment we have decided on, for me public transit is key. Not only does it afford more mobility so that people can spend more time with their families and friends, since commuting is essential in our communities today, but also the green infrastructure stream is really in line with our values. I think Canadians understand today that we want 21st-century infrastructure, which is green, resilient and modern. The social stream is allowing us to bring Canadians together in the community centres that people want to see across Canada. Trade and transportation are very much linked to the 1.5 billion consumers that we have access to now through our various trade agreements. Making sure our goods go to market is essential. Finally, the rural and northern communities stream is allowing us to take into account the particular needs of communities across Canada.

I would say to my colleague that, indeed, what we are doing, especially with the integrated bilateral agreement—which provides funding over 10 years to communities, and they understand where we want to invest—is to fix the framework, but we let communities decide what is best for them in terms of specific projects.

(0905)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

With respect to meeting what I call the “triple bottom line”—economy, social, environment—in working with municipalities, do you find that the investments you are making are more from a whole-of-government approach and are not just siloed in different ministries, and that those investments are aligning with strategies coming from, say, the departments of transport, environment, or family and children services, and things of that nature?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Yes, it's key. We have put the framework together, as I said, with objectives such as increasing mobility within communities across Canada and reducing our greenhouse gas emissions, but the way to do it....

Phase one of our program was an asset-based program. The second phase is based on outcome. I think the streams we have developed leave all the flexibility for communities to do what's best for them. We're not here pretending that we know—saying that we were recently in Saanich or Inuvik or Norman Wells—what is best for their community. However, what we have done is the framework to allow them to see, with regard to meeting the objectives we have set nationally, what is best to deliver for the people in their community. I would say that all of these projects—which is why I think this committee is essential—are about delivering for people. My mission is to improve the lives of Canadians from coast to coast to coast. I was in Inuvik, where we are going to have the first wind project in the Arctic, which is going to remove about three million litres of diesel from use, and thousands of greenhouse gas emissions.

This is truly what we want to do, and obviously my colleague Mr. Badawey understands what it is, because, coming from a municipal government, he knows that our role is to set the policy agenda but to leave the communities to decide what's best for them.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

With respect to pollution-related costs, right now municipalities are being defaulted upon with respect to those costs. For example, one-hundred-year storms are now five-year storms, and, therefore, oversize pipes have to be placed in the ground, and the costs are defaulting to those who pay property taxes.

How is your ministry working with the environment ministry to, once again, alleviate a great deal of those costs to the payers of property taxes?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madam Chair, I'm very happy to have that question. It's right to the point.

That's why we put forward the disaster mitigation and adaptation fund. I've always said it's better for us to invest in adapting communities to climate change events, which are more frequent and more severe. We have put $2 billion aside to really deal with these issues. I always say that either we invest in adaptation or we'll have to invest in recovery. It's better to prevent that, to remove, I would say, the chance that these disasters would affect communities and people.

We know how disastrous that could be. I look at other members who had flooding, for example. In my own region we know the social toll of that is tremendous. Investing in infrastructure that would withstand storm events, for example, is the right way to go, not only to make our country more resilient but also to prevent the harm and the stress that communities that have to live through these disasters from season to season undergo.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Minister.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Mr. Minister, thank you for joining us this morning. I am probably one of the rare opposition MPs to have such close contact with you, since we are from the same region.

It seems to me that I have heard you many times, particularly in our region, speaking in support of VIA Rail’s high frequency train, the HFT. Here is my first question. Given the concerns about mobility and reducing greenhouse gases that you were talking about earlier, does your department’s philosophy or vision see the HFT as a green infrastructure project?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

My thanks to my colleague, Mr. Aubin. He and I represent much of a major region of Quebec.

The high frequency train has been one of my priorities since I was elected, if not even before. For our region like ours, it is essential in the development of the economy and of recreation and tourism, as well as for labour mobility.

I feel that Mr. Aubin and myself have, in every possible forum, repeated how much the project could make great things happen for the region and even for Quebec. There is often talk about a labour shortage. With a high frequency train between, say, Trois-Rivières, Montreal and Quebec City, people living in other centres would be able to come and work in ours.

Of course, I feel that the high frequency train is a component in 21st-century smart mobility. If we look at what is happening in a number of cities around the world, we can conclude that this is the kind of project that we want to support. That is why, in its recent statement, VIA Rail announced a massive investment in rolling stock, a vital requirement…

(0910)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Minister. Unfortunately, I have very little time. I hope that the Minister of Transport will hear your testimony, because it really goes in the direction that everyone is expecting. We are no longer talking about consensus in this matter, we are talking about virtual unanimity.

When we look at the amounts being spent on the REM project in Montreal, for example, and the endless wait for the simple announcement of the government's desire to move forward with the HFT, we get the impression that major cities and regions are treated differently. Is that perception of mine correct?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

As a minister from a region of Quebec, I always energetically stand up for the regions in Quebec and in Canada. I can assure you that we have set aside significant sums in the recent budget, specifically to conduct the studies needed. Of course, building a high frequency train between Quebec City and Windsor requires a certain number of technical and environmental impact studies.

We are certainly going in the right direction, in my view, first investing in rolling stock and then in allocating funds in the budget for the necessary studies. Those are two steps in the right direction.

It must be understood that these are complex projects in terms of engineering and capacity. I feel that the Minister of Transport, you and I have come out in favour of the project, as you heard on stage at the Chambre de commerce et d'industries de Trois-Rivières. In other words, we have to do the studies and everything else that is required so that we have all the information we need to make the right decision.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Minister.

In your answer to a previous question, I heard you talk about the Canada Infrastructure Bank as a means to do more and to do it more quickly. The principle seems commendable, but I feel that the results are debatable, to say the least, since the process is not very quick and very few projects have been funded.

I am really in favour of public financing, because financing by the Infrastructure Bank would eventually result in increased costs being paid by the consumers. In your opinion, should the HFT project be financed by the Infrastructure Bank or from the public purse?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Setting up a new organization like the Canada Infrastructure Bank requires a certain amount of time. Having myself seen Invest in Canada get under way, another agency in the portfolio I was responsible for previously, I know that you always have to create some buzz at the start. Fortunately, a CEO is now in place to make sure that the agency is well managed.

Several dozen discussions are underway around the country specifically to answer that question. This is the kind of project that the Canada Infrastructure Bank could study and, in my opinion, as you recall, it has to do so more quickly. I understand that my colleagues are asking us to do more, and, in Ottawa, I am one of the ministers who is the most anxious to see things move forward quickly. However, these products do present us with a degree of complexity. Because of the confidentiality of the negotiations and discussions under way, you will understand that I cannot talk about the projects under consideration. However, I can assure you that we are monitoring what is happening and that the bank is in the process of analyzing a number of projects all over the country.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

However, this year, the bank has asked the government for $6 million to cover its operating expenses. That does not seem to me like financing a lot of projects or moving forward quickly, or doing more. Moreover, we are still faced with the divide between the scale of the projects financed by the bank and the scale of the projects that the small communities that you and I represent can afford. Is there not a substantial difference between the intentions announced when the bank was created and its accomplishments after three years?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Mr. Aubin, to answer your question, I would remind you that establishing a new agency requires some unique expenditures, the cost of premises, for example. I can also tell you that the bank has hired someone to be responsible for investments, and that will, in the coming months and years, mean an increase in the number of projects in which the bank will invest.

I am also very aware that the bank must serve not only urban communities but rural communities as well. That is why we are discussing with the bank projects that would see some northern communities move from diesel to renewable sources of energy.

(0915)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will move now to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I want to pull back a bit for the benefit of the people who might be either listening or watching—this is televised—and talk about the big picture on infrastructure. Back in the mid to late 2000s, the previous Conservative Government rolled out a fairly substantial infrastructure program, and it was in response to the recession. I think the issue there was to get people working and to use the opportunity to get some things built. The side effect was the changing of the environmental regulations, which of course had proven to be an impediment to the pipeline expansions, etc. Then when we came along, we had this $180-billion infrastructure program at a time when we were coming out of the recession, and in fact we're not even anywhere close to that now. That took a lot of people by surprise, but it seems to me that there are some really fundamental differences in approach, and the kinds of results that we're looking for in the program we have today versus the one that Mr. Harper's government had back 10 years ago.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madam Chair, I totally agree with my colleague on that. I mean, we faced an era in which there was a decade of underinvestment in infrastructure. Anyone in that field will understand that you then need to invest exponentially. That's why we put together a historic plan of more than $180 billion to address issues that Canadians watching us would understand. When we're talking about public transit, for example, I think the people who live in urban areas in our country would understand that it was about time we made these historic investments to allow people greater fluidity.

In terms of the big picture, as I always tell my colleagues, infrastructure is key in our country. Modern, resilient green infrastructure will help us attract investment and talent. For me, when we invest in infrastructure, we invest in not only our current prosperity but future prosperity. In terms of our plan, we asked ourselves this: What is one of the biggest challenges we have to tackle as human beings? It's climate change, so when we're building infrastructure, people are watching us. We understand that we cannot do things today the way we did them in 1980. We need to build in a way that will be resilient but also green. Canadians expect this when we are investing in this.

I can give you the example of Saanich. I was in B.C. recently at the Commonwealth pool. They decided to change from fossil fuels to biomass. By doing so, they reduced their energy costs by 90%. That's the type of project we want in communities. You're improving lives and at the same time you're reducing your carbon footprint.

When I think about social infrastructure, as the member from Trois-Rivières was saying before, this is also about making sure.... You know, infrastructure means different things to different people. If you're in an urban area, you may think about a bridge or a road. If you are in a rural community, you may think about a community centre or broadband access. You may think about cellphone coverage. I come from a riding where about half the riding has no cellphone coverage and no Internet coverage.

Obviously, when you talk about infrastructure, it touches the lives of people. When we talk about rural and northern communities and the way we structure it, to the member's point, I can provide another example of why we have a stream that is very specific to rural and northern areas. When I was in Saskatchewan recently, people were telling me that if we gave them the funds to increase, for example, the length of the runway about 200 metres or 300 metres, they could land bigger planes, reduce greenhouse gas emissions with the fewer planes needed, and reduce the price of food by about 50% in northern communities.

That's why we have projects that are tailored to the needs of Canadians across the country.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

With respect to the Infrastructure Bank, I have, like some of my colleagues, a municipal background. I worked with the transportation authority in metro Vancouver.

Thank you, by the way, for the funding for our new SkyTrain extensions. We appreciate that very much. It will go right through my community, in fact.

The Infrastructure Bank represents something that I've seen happen before—public-private partnerships where the private sector comes in as another funding partner. To me, that has to alleviate the pressure, first of all, on municipal governments for their share, provincial governments for their share, and it makes the given funding from the federal government go further. Is that a fair assessment?

(0920)

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Totally. As I've said before, the Infrastructure Bank of Canada is there to do more for Canadians. I'm the former trade minister for Canada, and I can tell you that people in the world want to invest in Canada. Why? We have stability, predictability, rule of law and a very inclusive society that cherishes diversity. People want to invest in Canada to help us build the infrastructure that Canadians need.

Exactly as my colleague said, Madam Chair, that's why we created the Infrastructure Bank. It's just like in Australia, for example, where they created a vehicle to make sure they would have a pipeline of projects where they could crowd in the investment. By crowding in the investment, we can free capital to invest in the types of assets that governments need to invest in and that we know the private sectors will not invest in. It frees up capital to do more. The REM is a good example of where you're better to take a loan from the Infrastructure Bank to do that project and free up capital for us to invest in other projects—for example, in this case, in the province of Quebec under the allocation—where we don't want the private sector to invest.

This is really, truly another tool in our tool box. I'm not suggesting in front of members that this will solve every problem. What I'm saying to Canadians is that it's great to have another tool in our tool box. We're in 2018. Modern countries are looking at different ways to provide infrastructure. We know that in OECD countries there's a huge deficit in infrastructure. Every time we invest in infrastructure, we're giving ourselves the means of our dreams. We can attract better investment. We can attract talent. We know that we are facing labour shortages across Canada. We also know that people move to places where you have modern infrastructure, where you have quality of water, where you can have mobility, where you can have community centres, and where you can have green buildings.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Champagne.

We move on to Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Minister, thank you for being here this morning. On October 25, you had the opportunity to update the media on the Champlain Bridge situation. I would like to thank you for the transparency you are showing to Canadians about it.

Can you tell us about the significant steps forward with the work on the Champlain Bridge?

We know that some work cannot be done until the good weather returns. Do we have a timeline for the work that remains to be done until the bridge opens?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

First, Madam Chair, may I thank my colleague Mr. Iacono for that question.

Yes, I was in Montreal recently, in October, to inform the people of Montreal and Quebec about the Champlain Bridge situation.

I explained that the bridge structure would be complete by December 21 at the latest, but that the bridge would open permanently for vehicle traffic in June 2019. The reason is that some work, such as waterproofing the structure and applying asphalt, cannot be done in winter conditions. The waterproofing, for example requires a certain level of humidity and temperature for three consecutive days.

I have always told Montrealers that my priority is the health and safety of the workers. Sixteen hundred people work on that site around the clock, rain or shine.

The project's durability is another priority. This structure is built to be in service for the next 125 years. Clearly, therefore, we want to make sure that the work is done well.

The matter of the timeline is also essential. I have told Montrealers that, if there are deficiencies and delays, there will be consequences. That is the way the contract with the builder is structured.

Mr. Iacono, I can tell you that I will continue to provide Montrealers with information on the exact status, because the infrastructure is important.

More than 60 million people use that corridor each year. If I recall correctly, the value of the goods shipped to the United States over the bridge is more than $20 billion. The corridor is therefore essential.

As I have always been transparent and open with people, I believe that Montrealers fully understood the situation.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you, Mr. Minister.

I represent the constituency of Alfred-Pellan, located in Laval. I am aware that the realities of urban communities are not the same as those of rural communities, especially in terms of infrastructure. That is why it is critical to understand the infrastructure needs of those communities.

Can you tell us about the efforts being made to support infrastructure projects in small communities and rural communities?

(0925)

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

That somewhat goes back to the question from our colleague, the member for Trois-Rivières.

In the bilateral agreements we have with the provinces, there is a component for rural and northern communities.

The reason why we created a specific program is that we are aware that rural communities, for example, have specific needs.

We also departed from the traditional three-way sharing of the funding between municipalities, provinces and the federal government that was in effect in the past.

For example, if a project is eligible for the infrastructure program for rural and northern communities, and if the local population is under 5,000, the federal government could provide up to 60% of the funding for the infrastructure, the province could assume 33% of the costs, and the community would pay the remaining 7%.

That allows things to be done that would be otherwise difficult to do, given the municipalities' tax base. The program can greatly help small communities in Canada, both in Quebec and in the west, in Alberta, for example. It is one of the programs in which the government has invested $2 billion, specifically for small communities.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you, Mr. Minister.

In your speech, you mentioned that a pilot project had recently been started with the provinces to test the effectiveness of a progressive billing approach.

Could you give us a little bit more detail about that? What will the effects be? What are the expectations?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Thank you for your question, Mr. Iacono.

At the last federal-provincial-territorial meeting, I raised three issues.

First, we had to make sure that our respective processes, federally, provincially and territorially, align with the construction season. Given that the construction season will not change—it is the same each year—it is up to us to plan our projects so that the workers can do their part during each construction season.

Second, we had to see how we could establish a process to make projects easier to call for, to study, and, of course, to approve. That means we have to work in concert with the provinces and territories to come up with a review process for the easiest and quickest projects.

Third, we had to make sure, as Mr. Iacono mentioned, that we have a billing process that takes into account how projects are moving forward. In some cases, provinces send us invoices when projects are complete.

That is in line with what my colleague Mr. Jeneroux asked me earlier about the impact of the projects. I can give you an example.

The Prime Minister and I went to visit the site at the Côte-Vertu metro station in Montreal. This is a major project for an underground garage for metro cars. I saw about 200 to 300 workers there. I am not an engineer, but I would say that the project is about 70 or 76% complete. The work has been going on for several years. The impact on the economy, the workers and the community is clear to see. However, up to now, the federal government has not spent one dollar on the project, because we have not received any invoices.

So we are trying to come to an agreement with the provinces so that they send us invoices as the projects move along. The federal government can then release the money gradually. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We move on to Mr. Godin. Welcome to our committee, by the way. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My greetings to my right honourable colleague, the Minister of Infrastructure. Our constituencies are also adjacent.

So I would like to agree with Mr. Aubin in saying that there is unanimity on the HFT, the high frequency train project in the Quebec City-Windsor corridor, while expressing the hope that service to Portneuf will not be forgotten.

Mr. Minister, earlier you provide an update on the Champlain Bridge. I believe that the Champlain Bridge is really important, and that the people of Montreal, and all Quebecers, look forward to being able to take advantage of that infrastructure.

On November 14, I wrote to you for clearer information and an update on the project. The questions that seem to me very important deal with the costs. Will there be additional costs? Will the penalties for which the consortium is liable be maintained and imposed? What changes have occurred as the process moves to completion?

Just now, you said that they need three days of good temperatures so that the workers, who are working seven days a week, can finish their work properly. This summer has been great for our workers, I feel, and we cannot blame the temperature for the delays. Let's understand that the crane operators’ strike lasted six days.

Initially, the bridge was supposed to be open to traffic on December 1. That date was pushed back to December 21, and now the opening has been postponed until the end of June 2019.

Will you make the commitment, before the committee this morning, that Montrealers will be able to use their infrastructure after a perhaps-justified six-month delay? That's the information I would like.

Will you make the commitment that, at the end of June 2019, just before the federal election campaign, the people of Montreal and Quebec will be able to use the infrastructure?

(0930)

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

First, I would like to thank my colleague, Mr. Godin, who is also my riding neighbour, with whom I share a large part of the territory.

I am pleased to talk about the Champlain Bridge and to answer all of my colleague's questions, as I did last time when I provided an update in Montreal.

It is important to note that the Champlain Bridge is one of the largest construction sites in North America, so it is a major project. As the member mentioned, there are more than 1,600 workers working around the clock, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

In terms of costs, I have always said that, if there are delays, there will be consequences. In conjunction with the announcements I made in Montreal last time, there are currently commercial discussions between the contractor and the Government of Canada.

When the builder informed us, a few weeks before my announcement in Montreal, that it was impossible to do some of the work, I asked for second opinions. I received confirmation that, to do some of the work, a constant temperature and humidity level for three days was required. It is important to understand that the work is being done over the St. Lawrence River.

I would like to remind my colleague that my priority is always the health and safety of the workers. None of the measures we have taken should jeopardize the health and safety of workers.

The durability of the work is another important factor. The bridge is expected to last more than 125 years. We do not want to make any compromises that could affect the durability of the work.

Finally, there is the timeline for the construction of the bridge. I told Montrealers and I am pleased to repeat it to the committee today: the bridge structure will be completed before December 21. I will cross the bridge before December 21 to demonstrate to Montrealers that the structure is complete. Anyway, people can see the progress of the work on satellite photos. However, the bridge will be permanently open to traffic later in June—

Mr. Joël Godin:

Unfortunately, I cannot let you finish your answer because my time is limited. I have only one minute left.

I have another very specific question about the bridge. The original contract provided for toll booths, and there are costs associated with those booths.

Can you tell us how much those toll booths would have cost? Does it reduce the bill for Canadian taxpayers?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Since I made that announcement, we have been in commercial discussions with the builder. When the negotiations are completed, I will be transparent, like last time, with Quebeckers and the committee by providing them with all the information on the agreement we have reached with the final builder on all the costs of the project.

Mr. Joël Godin:

I have another question for you.

With respect to the excise tax, 28 municipalities in my riding are in the process of preparing their budgets and calculating the money they will have available for their activities next year, in 2019. The Programme de la taxe sur l'essence et de la contribution du Québec 2014-2018 (TECQ) has not yet been renewed. However, it will end on December 31, 2018.

Can the minister assure Quebec municipalities that this program will be renewed?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I can assure my colleague that we will provide him with all the details in writing.

The renewal of this gas tax is in progress. I would be pleased to provide him with all the details in writing to keep him well informed on the matter. He will in turn be able to inform the municipalities in his riding. The gas tax is an important lever for small and large municipalities alike, allowing them to carry out infrastructure projects. I would be happy to provide him with details in writing, which he can then share with the municipalities in his riding.

Mr. Joël Godin:

Minister, can you tell me if this program has already been renewed? Can municipalities count on that money?

(0935)

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Municipalities can count on the sustainability of the gas tax program. As for the details, I would be happy to send a letter to the member, providing him and the municipalities in his riding with detailed information.

With your permission, Madam Chair, I will send a letter to the hon. member detailing the amounts that each of the municipalities in his riding will be able to receive.

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you, Minister.

Thank you, Madam Chair. [English]

The Chair:

Would you please send that to the clerk so that all members have an opportunity to review the same information.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Just so I'm clear, Madam Chair, do you want me to provide that information for the gas tax for every member in their riding, or just for that member?

The Chair:

Whatever you distribute to one member, we prefer it to be distributed in the same—

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

We'll do that for the member as he asked, and every other member can see it. Perfect.

The Chair:

Yes, if the others would like to have it for theirs, they can ask for that. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Madam Chair, I am not a member of the committee. Would it be possible to have the information forwarded to me? [English]

The Chair:

Yes, we will, Mr. Godin. [Translation]

Mr. Joël Godin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Rogers.

Mr. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Welcome, Minister.

I'm going to be sharing my time with my colleague, Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Minister, I want to ask specifically about municipal issues. I come from a municipal background from a very small town as a mayor. I've been involved provincially as president of the municipal association and sitting on the FCM board, the federal board. Specifically, I'd like for you to inform the committee about what some of the things are that you're focused on or doing, in trying to assist small towns in rural Canada with their infrastructure needs, specifically things like water, waste water and other issues and challenges that they deal with every day.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I'd like to thank the member. I realize we have a lot of colleagues with a municipal background and that's good.

One of the things we have done is to work with FCM very closely in understanding the needs of municipalities.

As Mr. Rogers knows, I come from a riding that has 34 small municipalities as well, so I really understand the need. That's why I was saying that infrastructure means different things to different people. If you're in an urban area, like in the question before, I can talk about Montreal and the Champlain Bridge, or I can talk about things happening in B.C. or in Alberta in Calgary or Edmonton, but obviously when you're talking, for example, about Newfoundland and Labrador and smaller communities, that's why we tailored part of our program. The $33 billion and the agreements, the integrated bilateral agreements, have a component that deals with rural and northern communities.

The reason was that we understood that for smaller communities you needed more flexibility, that in smaller communities sometimes what would be needed, for example, could be an Internet connection to change the lives of people.

I am very happy to be engaging. I was just, for example, in the province next to yours, in New Brunswick, and I met, for example, I think 30 small municipality mayors. I did the same thing in Alberta the last time I was there. I think it's the Alberta Urban Municipalities Association.

I like to do that because, first of all, it's about providing information. Second, it's about engaging with them about their needs and, third, I would say, it's about making sure that our programs are tailored to fit the purposes of small communities.

Mr. Churence Rogers:

I have one other question. I appreciate the support you provide to municipalities because it sometimes alleviates the municipal burden or the tax burden on people within our small communities, especially, across the country. Today Internet and cellphone service are crucially important but sadly lacking in many parts of rural Canada.

I can specifically talk about my riding and the Baie Verte Peninsula, for instance, where there's very sparse cell coverage. People are calling out for and asking and requesting that I lobby my government for increased funding for Internet and cellphone coverage in my riding. Can you tell us what our government is doing to connect more communities with broadband Internet and improved cell service in rural Canada especially?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madam Chair, I'd like to thank my colleague, Mr. Rogers, because that's something dear to my heart. As I said before, I feel exactly the same as him. A good part of my own riding is not connected with either cellphone or Internet. I'm happy to advocate for him and with him on that very important issue.

The rural and community stream under our program is providing some elements of response to that. We have been able under the program to tailor the rules to be able to finance part of that. However, I would say, Madam Chair, this is only part of the answer.

I think that the connect to innovate program, under Minister Bains, has been very important with the $500 million that was set aside to start connecting Canada. I think that people understand today that Internet connectivity is a bit like electricity in the old days, where this is allowing people to, for example, have remote education, remote learning, or remote medicine, for example, provided in their communities.

I understand the member and I can assure him that I'm on the same page as him. We would like to work with you to make sure that we can do more for communities across Canada with respect to the Internet.

(0940)

Mr. Churence Rogers:

Thank you.

I'll now turn it over to Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Thank you.

I'd actually like to start by thanking you, Minister, for an over $1-million investment out of the $2-billion clean water and waste water fund, as it helped build the foundation drainage collector, the FDC pumping station and utility dewatering system in my riding. Thank you for that.

Following up with that, what has our government done to make sure that Canadians know what we're investing in or are aware of where the dollars are going?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I'm very happy. I think what you see this morning is that there are projects in every community around this table. Canadians watching us at home would feel exactly the same. We have more than 4,400 projects ongoing in the country. Obviously, each and every one of them is improving the quality of life of people.

The first project I announced, to give you an example, was in a community close to my hometown. It was about $10,000. I remember people were asking me, “Minister, why would you make an announcement of $10,000?” I said, “It's because a small amount in a small community can make a big difference.” The example you give is that you have one in your riding. I could go around the table because I have a list of projects in every riding represented around this table.

The green infrastructure, for me, is one of the most important ones. You're talking about waste-water treatment.

Many of these projects may not be visible to Canadians because they will be upgrading stations—for example, pumping stations like in Trois-Rivières—or other things. If Canadians want to know what kinds of projects they have in their communities, we have provided what we call the geo-map. If people go to Infrastructure Canada's website, they'll be able to zoom in on a map. We have tried to provide transparency to Canadians, so that they can see in their communities the types of projects that have been funded and their states of completion. Sometimes we can even provide pictures, so that people can relate to what we're doing. We're going to continue to do that because I think it's important that Canadians realize that these projects, in different ways—whether it's about water, whether it's about public transit, whether it's about extending a runway in a community—are making a difference in their lives.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Jeneroux, you have two minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'd just like to remind colleagues on the other side of the table that this is taxpayers' money.

Everyone's thanking you, Minister. Even though you're here in front of us, this is still taxpayers' money at the end of the day, and it's not from your personal account that you're paying for these projects.

I want to ask you, yes or no, if the Infrastructure Bank is, in your opinion, delayed on announcing projects.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Just allow me, Madame Chair, to say that I think the member made a great point. I never pretend that it's my own money. I'm just here to represent the public interest of the government, parliamentarians and Canadians. I always make the point, I would say to my colleague, to make sure that people understand that it's taxpayers' money. Our job is to manage it, and to allocate it in the best possible way to make an impact. I take that point very—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Is the Infrastructure Bank delayed in announcing projects, yes or no?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

I would say that the Infrastructure Bank, as I said before, is looking at dozens of projects as we're talking. Obviously my colleague, who knows these things well, would understand that there are commercial sensitivities about announcements. We will do the work. The bank will do the work. When it's ready to announce, there will be announcements.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

In terms of timeline, Minister, it was part of the 2015 election that this was going to be a tool. Then it was announced again, in 2016, that you're doing it. There was recently an additional $11 million drawdown on it. This is a $35 billion bank. You have seen one project built in Montreal, which was a reannouncement from a previous project. Do you or do you not think that this bank has been an absolute failure for Canadians up to this point?

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madame Chair, as the member said, our role as parliamentarians and as government, as the Infrastructure Bank, is obviously to invest public dollars. When we do that, I'm sure the member and the people watching us would expect us to do proper due diligence. I'm sure the member is not suggesting that we rush into any investment, but that we need to do the proper due diligence. As you said, those are precious dollars from taxpayers across the country. We need to do the proper due diligence on these projects. This is what is ongoing.

I would hope that the member realizes that the bank is a tool to do more for Canadians. I think that if he were to talk to some of the investors I talk to, and Canadians, they understand that—

(0945)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

It's a very expensive tool, Minister. It's a very expensive tool, from which we've seen very few results.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

We're building a bank for the next century. If I were the member, I would look back at that. I'm sure one day he will see the impacts of that, whether we're looking at interties and other things that will make a difference not only in his province but across Canada. This is a tool to build the types of things that Canadians want. This is about thinking big. This is about thinking smart. I'm sure the member is with us when it comes to building better communities across Canada.

The Chair:

Minister Champagne, thank you very much for being here with the committee today. We waited impatiently. We appreciate all of the information you have shared with the committee.

We will suspend for a moment while we change witnesses—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Madam Chair, before we suspend, I have just a point of order on the quote that you quoted to me, in terms of asking repetitive questions. Typically that's used for repetitive speeches in the House of Commons. I'd like you to come back to this committee with examples of when it's been used in terms of committees here. If you're able to do that, fantastic, because I don't want to raise this in the House and make the Speaker rule on something like this. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Jeneroux.

I'd be happy to share the book with the rules in it, on page 1058, chapter 20 on committees and the ability of the chair to decide whether it's repetitive or out of—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Madam Chair, the request was to bring back examples of when it's been used in the capacity that you're using it. It's been used in the House in terms of saying word for word the same speeches, but in terms of what you're using it for, the committee would love to see examples of when it's been used in the past.

Thank you.

The Chair:

If you would like to challenge the chair, certainly, Mr. Jeneroux, you're welcome to do that.

I will attempt to supply to you what I have, and I doubt that there will be examples, because I just don't think I'm going to ask the clerk to go looking for examples. If you're unhappy with my ruling, you certainly are welcome to challenge the chair, sir.

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madam Chair, I don't want to be repetitive, but I'd just like to thank the members for their questions and their passion in delivering 21st-century infrastructure for Canadians. I think it's the best way to attract talent and investment to our country, and we will continue. I would be happy to come back to answer any questions from the members.[Translation]

Madam Chair and colleagues, thank you all for welcoming me here this morning. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will suspend momentarily.

(0945)

(0950)

The Chair:

I call the meeting back to order.

We will have half an hour to review the study we're doing on assessing the impact of airport noise in the vicinity of major Canadian airports.

With us we have Nick Boud, Principal Consultant for Helios.

Mr. Boud, you have five minutes to address, please, or maybe six, since you're the only witness, and we look forward to your testimony. Thank you.

Mr. Nick Boud (Principal Consultant, Helios):

Okay.

Good morning, Madam Chair, members of the committee. Thank you for inviting Helios to appear before you today.

Helios is a U.K. aviation consultancy working for clients around the world and across the whole of the aviation industry. I lead the airport consultancy business within Helios and have 26 years of aviation experience. Helios is currently contracted to provide independent technical analysis and support to the GTAA as they move forward in the delivery of their latest five-year noise management action plan.

Over the past two and a half years, Helios has completed one study for Nav Canada, two for the GTAA, and one for Aéroports de Montréal. I have submitted four reference documents ahead of today, of which the first two were written by Helios. I'll come on to explain each of those documents.

The first one is the “Independent Toronto Airspace Noise Review”, prepared for Nav Canada, which provides noise mitigation recommendations and conclusions focused on the Toronto airspace, as well as a lot of informative background information.

The second document is “Best practices in noise management”, which was prepared for the GTAA and provides an excellent overview of 11 different noise management practices across 26 international airports that are comparative to Toronto Pearson.

The third document is an analysis paper prepared by the Airports Council International and published earlier this week, addressing the future of aviation noise. This was prepared in response to the recent release by the World Health Organization on their latest environmental noise guidelines.

The final document that I've submitted is a paper from the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The paper concludes that the data used by the World Health Organization and the analysis conducted in establishing the relationship between aviation noise and annoyance has, in the author's words, had “a huge impact on the final recommendations”. The author goes on to conclude that the recommended noise level to avoid adverse health impacts from aviation noise should be eight decibels higher than those proposed by the World Health Organization. An eight-decibel increase is substantial. It is generally accepted that the human ear perceives a 100% increase in volume for every 10-decibel increase.

Aviation noise management is a complex, multi-faceted topic, and I'm going to have a chance to only make a microscope dent in it today.

Helios finds the same aviation noise complaints and challenges everywhere we go. However, the solutions differ, because the urban, social, geographic, political, regulatory and operational environments are never the same.

I must apologize, for I am about to make a generalization. It is the aircraft that makes the noise, yet time and again, the party not present at public meetings, and generally the last at the table, are the airlines. Meaningful progress is only possible if all stakeholders are present at the table on a voluntary basis, work corroboratively, are prepared to give and take, make tough decisions and are committed to the objectives of delivering noise reduction and mitigation.

Moving noise from community A to community B on a long-term or permanent basis for no other reason than to pacify community A is not a solution. It is only likely to inflate the problem exponentially. The short-term relocation of noise on a predictable and regular basis, often referred to as “noise sharing” or “noise respite”, can be a valuable mitigation in some situations. Many airports have worked for decades and invested millions of dollars to reduce or mitigate noise, yet they still have a large number of residents who are not satisfied. This does not mean that we should not continue to try, as major improvements have been made and there is more that can be achieved in the weeks, months and years ahead.

One of the common questions raised by this committee is about what national standards there are to protect people from aviation noise. As far as I'm aware, there are two in Canada.

(0955)



The first is set by Transport Canada and requires airports to prepare a noise exposure forecast, which is used to inform urban zoning strategies. The acoustician, Dr. Colin Novak, spoke about some of the challenges with using the NEF metric. I suspect, based on trends elsewhere in the world, that public tolerance of aviation noise has reduced since the NEF 25 and NEF 30 levels were set by Transport Canada, and I offer that the majority of noise complaints come from people outside of the geographic areas enclosed by these NEF contours.

The second standard is the aircraft noise certification requirements specified by ICAO, which have become more stringent with each generation of aircraft, meaning that aircraft have become quieter. Aircraft remain in active service for 30-plus years, so it can take a long time for noisier aircraft to be retired.

I would like to provide an element of perspective on what flights are in the night at Toronto Pearson. An analysis being undertaken by Helios Technology Ltd. for the GTAA shows that over 80% of night flights are passenger services, with the remainder being cargo, at 10% to 15%, or general and/or business aviation.

Night flights account for 3% of all flights at Toronto Pearson. Airports and community groups argue about whether the number of noise complaints recorded is an accurate indication of the scale of the problem. I counsel that you look at complaints as only one piece of the wider evaluation as to the scale of aviation noise as a problem. There are many factors that mean you cannot directly compare the number of complaints between airports. Identifying the percentage of new complaints each year can be an informative metric, but again, it should never be considered in isolation.

The Chair:

I'm sorry to interrupt, but the committee members have many questions.

Mr. Nick Boud:

I have four lines.

The Chair:

Please continue.

Mr. Nick Boud:

Helios Technology would happily provide further support to this committee, but I hope you understand that the reality is that we are a commercial organization and must limit our non-fee earning work. Up to this point, we have invested our time on a voluntary basis, and I hope our input will be valuable.

Thank you. I look forward to your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

It's on to Mr. Liepert for four minutes.

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC):

Thank you, sir, for your work.

One of the things that I think the committee has had trouble determining—I know I have—is who owns this issue. It seems like the airport authorities say, “We only land the planes that want to land here.” Nav Canada says, “Our job is to make sure they land safely.” It seems like Transport Canada has kind of hived off responsibility to Nav Canada.

Suppose we were to come forward with certain recommendations. Let's just pick one out of the air, one that has been suggested by numerous witnesses: banning night flights, for example. In your study of this issue, in your work, who do you see would actually have the ability or the authority to do that?

(1000)

Mr. Nick Boud:

From experience in other nations around the world, the only people who can do that would be those in the government. It would require legislation to achieve that. That is what is being done. There are some voluntary restrictions, but to ban night flights, I believe, would take formal legislation.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

You seem to have indicated in your statement that this is multi-faceted and that there are various aspects that go into this whole issue.

We've certainly heard about the health aspect of it. We haven't heard a ton about the economic impacts of some of the things that would be the fallout from some recommendations. Can you talk a little bit about the complexity of taking one action that might have unintended consequences for a whole bunch of other things?

Mr. Nick Boud:

I think it comes back to the fact that one solution doesn't fit all airports. Frankfurt, for example, which I know has been spoken of here before, has a period of the night when flights aren't allowed. Zurich has a period when they're not allowed, yet other airports in Germany and Switzerland do have night flights.

It can cause a relocation of services from the airport with the ban to other airports, which is moving noise from one location to another. The airlines, if there is a commercial business there, will find a means to achieve it. There is certainly an economic impact, and I know that the GTAA is looking to do an evaluation of the economics of night flights because we are employed to help formulate some of the traffic scenarios to feed into that study.

You cannot take one action without there being an impact on businesses not directly related to the airport, on employees at the airport and on the wider community.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Certainly, the consumer as well.... Our way of doing business as consumers has moved from shopping malls to online shopping, and that product has to get somewhere. I'm not suggesting that it has to come on a night flight. All I am saying is that it certainly creates, in all likelihood, more problems. Are there any thoughts about that in your work?

Mr. Nick Boud:

The vast majority of cargo is moved on passenger aircraft. The percentage of cargo-dedicated aircraft is tiny, compared to the overall movements. Yes, the change in social attitudes towards shopping will drive up additional air cargo, but unless society changes its practices, it is not something we can avoid.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

It was noted in the Helios report that Toronto Pearson's night period starts late and is shorter in duration than similar periods at other airports. What have other airports that are comparable in size and volume done to address the issue of noise?

Mr. Nick Boud:

In relation to night, I believe there were two other airports with a similar length of night period as Toronto, but others certainly do have night periods of eight or nine hours. Some of them have implemented a quota system, where the noisier the aircraft, the higher the penalty implemented against a total point system.

Others have a total limit, similar to Pearson, as to the number of night flights they can handle each year. Others have put in additional charges, possibly two or three times the daily charge to operate at night. Others have, as does Pearson, a restriction on certain types of aircraft that can operate in the night period.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

My second question is that in the Helios “Independent Toronto Airspace Noise Review” report, it was recommended that Nav Canada should formally write to Transport Canada requesting them to consider the establishment of a sunset date of December 31, 2020, for the operation of the Airbus A320 series. However, the Greater Toronto Airports Authority has proposed incentives for the noise reduction modification to occur electively.

What are your thoughts on the effectiveness of an elective incentive program?

(1005)

Mr. Nick Boud:

They have been shown to work at other airports around the world. Lufthansa, in Germany, voluntarily modified their aircraft and were one of the first airlines to do so. Gatwick has introduced a financial penalty if airlines operate a modified aircraft.

It has to, again, be finding the right solution for Canada. I still stand by the recommendation that there should be action to persuade carriers to modify the A320. It is a simple refit or modification to the aircraft that can make a significant impact on noise.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

This is a question I have been asking because I represent a riding that's pretty much adjacent to Pearson airport. Based on your exhaustive studies, particularly in and around Toronto Pearson, what are your thoughts on the establishment of a new airport within perhaps Kitchener or north of the escarpment, anywhere in and around the GTA?

Mr. Nick Boud:

I say to the establishment of a new airport or through-traffic distribution being directed to other airports, it is moving noise. Also, communities tend to grow up close to airports because they are an economic driver and people will want to be close to that because that is where the jobs are.

Time and again, building new airports may seem like the solution, but in the long term you tend to end up with communities, development, moving closer to the airport. It takes very careful planning to make that a successful solution.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My thanks to the witnesses for joining us.

Madam Chair, before I ask questions, I would like to make a comment for your consideration.

In his opening remarks, the witness referred to four documents he had submitted. However, I have learned that those documents are currently being translated. Because of their volume, they are not available in French.

When we plan our list of witnesses, we should ensure that witnesses only appear once the documents are distributed to everyone in both languages. If I had had all the documents in French, my preparation and my questions would have been significantly different. I probably would have found the answers to my questions in the documents and could have probed further. However, that's impossible.

Could we ensure that we receive the documents in both official languages before hearing the witnesses in committee? It would be much appreciated. I leave that for your consideration, Madam Chair.

I will now turn to you, Mr. Boud. You have already answered one of my questions in your opening remarks. You said that it seemed difficult to apply the conclusions of Helios' report for Toronto Pearson International Airport to each of the airports. There must still be some features that apply to all the airports you have studied.

Would it be fair to say that there can be two types of recommendations: recommendations for all the airports that are experiencing the same problem related to the surrounding communities and recommendations specific to each of the airports? [English]

Mr. Nick Boud:

There is certainly a common thread through the solutions that are out there. We do not have to reinvent solutions with every airport we go to, but just because a solution is right at one airport, it may not be immediately transferable to another airport. That is, flight routings into Vancouver have the option of coming in over the water, but that is not a solution that is available to Toronto Pearson. Yes, you can look at flight routings and try to make use of industrial corridors or rural areas, but it is not immediately transferable.

Keeping aircraft higher certainly is something that is probably achievable at a lot of airports, and it reduces noise, but again, you have to look at the local environment to see what obstacles are there, be they man-made obstacles or mountainous terrain, before you can conclude whether that solution is applicable in that area.

The distribution of residential communities around the airport again has an impact on what solution is right. If you look at the best practices report or the Toronto independent airspace review, when they're translated—and I appreciate one of them is a sizable document to translate—you will find that there is a common thread through there and you will be able to find elements that could be taken and considered for other airports, but bespoking them is still required.

(1010)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

You have worked internationally on these issues. Do you think the committee could target one, two or three airports that could be leaders in noise reduction? Among the top airports, would there be a Canadian airport? When it comes to noise reduction, are Canadian airports at the back of the pack? [English]

Mr. Nick Boud:

I don't believe there's one or a small number that you should look at. Hence, when we undertook the best practices piece of work for the GTAA, we looked at 26 international airports, because it is from taking that broad view that you start to get the multiplicity of the flavours of solutions that are out there.

Schiphol in Amsterdam has made a huge effort to minimize noise in communities and swaps runways so many times a day that it becomes boggling for other airports to consider, yet they do not have a night ban. They have more night flights than Toronto Pearson. It really does need a look across a broad number of airports to pick up the different best practices that can then be applied.

The Chair:

Monsieur Aubin, we're short on time. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I'll be brief. Is the international standard of 55 decibels achieved by a number of airports? [English]

Mr. Nick Boud:

Fifty-five is the standard that the European Union asks airports to report against. It is not a mandated standard that has to be achieved. It is a benchmark to measure the population affected, but it is not something that has to be achieved.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We'll move on to Mr. Maloney.

Mr. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Mr. Boud, thank you for joining us today. You and I have met on several occasions. You know I represent a riding, Etobicoke—Lakeshore, that is very much affected by air traffic noise and volume at Pearson Airport, so it's an issue close to my constituents' hearts.

You've been commissioned previously to do a study for both NavCan and the GTAA, and in the course of doing those studies, you reviewed what's referred to as ideas five and six, which very generally, from a high level—no pun intended—dealt with the direction of traffic on a regular basis. My constituents were concerned about redirecting traffic flow from east-west to north-south and the conclusion from your studies and the decision reached by the GTAA was that they weren't going to increase the north-south air traffic.

I have that right so far, haven't I?

Mr. Nick Boud:

In general.... We looked at weekends and night flights.

Mr. James Maloney:

Weekends and night flights, that's correct.

From a very basic level, and I know this because my brother's a pilot with Air Canada, it's safer for planes to land and take off going into the wind. Is that correct?

Mr. Nick Boud:

Yes, as a basic rule.

Mr. James Maloney:

As a basic rule, and the winds tend to go east-west, so that's a big reason why that happened.

I want to move on to night flights. A formula is used at Pearson in how many flights are allowed to come in and out of Pearson, and I believe the formula is based on an annual basis, as opposed to a per night basis. As a result of that, on any given night, depending on winds and other things, there could be a much higher volume of night flight traffic coming in. Isn't that correct?

Mr. Nick Boud:

That's correct.

Mr. James Maloney:

The night flights are also governed by the rules that apply to runway usage and whatnot.

Mr. Nick Boud:

Yes, there are preferential runways.

Mr. James Maloney:

You talked about the commercial aspect of night flights and the fact that most of it is arising because of passengers. Is it realistic, in your view, to ban night flights altogether at Pearson airport, factoring in the surrounding area and the available alternatives?

Mr. Nick Boud:

Anything is possible, but there would be a significant economic impact because of it.

Mr. James Maloney:

You said one size does not fit all. For example, if you're talking about European airports, if you ban night flights in one large centre, you probably have another large airport two hours away, give or take, that you can divert some of that traffic to. Is that a fair comment?

(1015)

Mr. Nick Boud:

Certainly in Germany, traffic is relocated from Frankfurt to Cologne and aircraft have been relocated because the aircraft doesn't just do the one flight. Overall, that has had an impact on Frankfurt's business.

Mr. James Maloney:

Which takes me to my third point. Your options are limited in Toronto because you don't have other large airports nearby available to you. You said communities tend to grow up around airports, and that's exactly what's happened around Pearson, because when Pearson was put there, Mississauga and Brampton weren't anywhere near the size they are now, and they've developed those cities close to the airport, which has partially contributed to the problem.

I was in Edmonton this summer, and I was impressed by the fact that they had a very positive relationship with the surrounding communities and business community, and it's because they don't have that build up around the airport. We have the Pickering lands, which were secured many years ago, and there's a lot of space around that.

Wouldn't it be sensible to put an airport there, given the opportunity to develop a situation where you don't have that problem?

Mr. Nick Boud:

Building a new airport and moving the whole of the business is a significant undertaking. It has been done by some cities. It is not just the airport you need to consider relocating, generally a huge amount of other infrastructure is required, and the development tends to grow towards that airport, but it is not impossible to do.

Mr. James Maloney:

I have one quick follow-up. You don't have to move the whole of business. You're creating a second office. You're not shutting one down and moving it to another place. You're creating an alternative.

Mr. Nick Boud:

History has shown that if you leave both airports open, a lot of the air carriers will not want to relocate, because relocation is a significant cost to them and their business. The first airport tends to have the best connections and the greatest value to them.

Mr. James Maloney:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We move on to Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you, Madam Chair. [English]

The Chair:

You have two minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Mr. Boud, the witnesses we received were essentially complaining about the lack of accountability and transparency on the part of our airport authorities. The optics it gives is that Canada is trailing behind in terms of noise management.

How do Canadian airports compare to airports in other countries in terms of noise management? How are noise advisory committees organized in other countries compared to Canada's? [English]

Mr. Nick Boud:

In the few days that I've been working in Canada, I would certainly say that Canada has come to the noise mitigation topic later than a lot. Europe and Australia have been looking at this for many more years. The U.S. also, to some extent, is ahead of Canada on this. I only have one real airport to focus on, because that's where I spend most of my effort here, which is Toronto Pearson, and they have made huge steps from where they were when I first came over here.

As to how the committees look, again, the best practice report did look at the structure of committees. There were some recommendations in there. I know that the GTAA is briefing the public this evening at their quarterly meeting about changes to the structure to try to become closer to the best practice that we've looked at across the 26 airports. There is learning to be had, and that can be implemented.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, you have two minutes.

Then we can get to Mr. Jeneroux for two minutes and that will be the end. We have committee business. I'm sorry.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

The time I have is equivalent to about the wake turbulence gap between two planes, so I'll try to be quick. I have two totally different questions.

First, can passengers make ticketing decisions that affect airplane noise? Is there anything they can do when they are buying their tickets to influence when, where and how planes fly?

Mr. Nick Boud:

Certainly, passengers could choose not to take night flights, as an example, and to travel during the day. That would be one situation such as that, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The other side of this is that you talked about the 30-year life cycle for aircraft, more or less. What's the noisiest part of a plane?

(1020)

Mr. Nick Boud:

It depends on which stage of flight you're talking about. For departures, it is the engines. For arrival, it is the body of the aircraft. It's the air rushing over the aircraft that makes more noise than the engines on the final part of the descent.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How do you compare the plane noise of, say, a 787 to that of a 707 or a 747?

Mr. Nick Boud:

There are generations of difference between them. If you could put a 707 back at Toronto Pearson and then fly in a 787 behind it, nobody would dispute the fact that they have become significantly quieter.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We've talked a lot about the A320 fix. Can you describe what the fix actually is?

Mr. Nick Boud:

The problem is that there are vents in the underside of that wing and the wind rockets over it, a bit like blowing over the top of a bottle. It is a small piece of metal that has to be attached just ahead of that hole so as to disrupt the airflow so that you do not get that humming-whistling noise as the air goes over the hole.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you know how much it costs to fix it?

Mr. Nick Boud:

I don't. I've had different values quoted because different airlines have different maintenance agreements with Airbus. Some people quote $5,000 or $7,000. The cost of the piece is small compared with the cost of taking the aircraft out of service. You have to drain the fuel to be able to fit it, but that is not major compared with the cost of replacing an aircraft.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Madam Chair. I want to use the two minutes allotted to me just to clarify my intent from the previous witness and the point of order. It certainly wasn't my intention to challenge the chair. I appreciate all that you do in terms of the good nature of our committee. I feel that we work quite well together for the majority of the time.

However, I think it's important that we on this side are able to continue to ask the questions. You in your role don't need to be protective of the minister in any form or fashion whatsoever.

I just want to read into the record a brief quote from page 1078 in chapter 20 of practices, policies and procedures: There are no specific rules governing the nature of questions which may be put to witnesses appearing before committees, beyond the general requirement of relevance to the issue before the committee. Witnesses must answer all questions which the committee puts [before] them.

It states further: The actions of a witness who refuses to answer questions may be reported to the House.

Again, I want to make sure that this committee continues to work together. I know that you had a piece of paper in front of you ready to quote the order you referred to. However, again, I would hate to see us come back in the new year and not remain in the friendly fashion that we've continued up to this point.

I just leave those comments there, Madam Chair, in further clarifying my point of order. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Jeneroux.

There are no pressing questions that we actually have to get done.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre, Lib.):

If I might, I have just one quick question.

The Chair:

You can have a very short question, because we have committee business.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

You mentioned Schiphol in your study, but other than Schiphol, Pearson had the highest number of night flights of any airport that was part of that study, three times more than Heathrow. Was there any particular reason that the study had no recommendations or suggestion that GTAA should reduce the number of night flights, or night flights per night as they have in the annual budget?

Mr. Nick Boud:

No, there was no specific reason why we hadn't. It is a case of our making recommendations about extending the night and changing the controls on the night to potentially freeze the quantity of noise where it is, rather than taking a decision or a recommendation that would have an economic impact, which is something that, as aviation consultants, we feel is outside of our remit.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you to our witness. You can see that we really would have loved to have you for an hour but schedules just didn't permit. Thank you very much for your contribution.

Mr. Nick Boud:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We will suspend for a moment and then we'll go into committee business.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(0845)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte la 125e  du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités. Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, nous poursuivons notre étude du mandat du ministre de l'Infrastructure et des Collectivités.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui l'honorable François-Philippe Champagne, ministre de l'Infrastructure et des Collectivités, ainsi que Kelly Gillis, sous-ministre, Infrastructure et Collectivités, du Bureau de l'infrastructure du Canada. Bienvenue à vous deux. Nous avions hâte à votre comparution, alors je vous remercie de vous être présentés aujourd'hui.

Monsieur le ministre Champagne, je vous cède la parole.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Madame la présidente, je suis désolé, je veux seulement régler quelques petites questions d'ordre administratif avant que nous arrivions aux commentaires très attendus du ministre; j'espère qu'il abordera dans sa déclaration préliminaire le fait qu'il n'était pas là pour l'examen du budget des dépenses. Je sais qu'il comparaît aujourd'hui au sujet de sa lettre de mandat, mais je veux simplement m'assurer que nous avons souligné le fait que, la plupart du temps, les ministres viennent aussi comparaître pour leur Budget supplémentaire des dépenses.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Jeneroux.

Monsieur le ministre Champagne, vous disposez de cinq minutes; allez-y.

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne (ministre de l'Infrastructure et des Collectivités):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je suis très heureux de comparaître devant vous et vos collègues aujourd'hui.

C'est la première fois que je comparais devant le Comité, mais je commencerai par déclarer que je suis tout à fait ravi d'être des vôtres et d'aborder les progrès liés à l'infrastructure. Madame la présidente, je pense que l'infrastructure touche la vie des Canadiens de toutes les collectivités, qu'elles soient urbaines ou rurales.

Bonjour et merci de m'avoir invité, mesdames et messieurs les députés.

Kelly Gillis, ma très apte sous-ministre, qui oeuvre très activement sur ce dossier pour qu'on puisse livrer des résultats aux Canadiens, m'accompagne.

Je voudrais commencer par reconnaître le travail exceptionnel de mon prédécesseur, le ministre Sohi. Il était responsable de ce dossier, et nous savons tous qu'il est un véritable passionné de l'infrastructure, presque autant que de sa ville natale d'Edmonton. Il a laissé un bon héritage en ce qui concerne les projets et le programme. Il défend avec vigueur les intérêts de sa région et, évidemment, de l'Alberta, et il continue d'oeuvrer au sein de son nouveau portefeuille en tant que ministre des Ressources naturelles. [Français]

J'aimerais aussi remercier ma sous-ministre et l'ensemble des employés d'Infrastructure Canada de leurs nombreux efforts et de leur dévouement au cours des trois dernières années. Grâce à leurs efforts soutenus, nous avons fait d'énormes progrès pour livrer des infrastructures modernes aux Canadiens partout au pays.[Traduction]

Laissez-moi vous donner un bref aperçu. Depuis que j'ai été nommé ministre de l'Infrastructure et des Collectivités, j'ai eu la chance de constater par moi-même nos investissements dans les infrastructures de partout au pays. J'ai récemment assisté à l'inauguration du projet de protection des terrains portuaires contre les inondations, à Toronto, qui contribuera à transformer les terrains portuaires en de belles collectivités nouvelles entourées de parcs et d'espaces verts. Le projet ajoutera également des logements abordables dans la région de Toronto.

J'ai également visité le projet d'énergie éolienne à Inuvik, dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest; ce projet fournira une source d'énergie efficiente, fiable et propre aux résidants d'Inuvik. J'ai été heureux de constater qu'il s'agissait du premier projet réalisé au titre du Fonds pour l'énergie dans l'Arctique, qui aide les collectivités du Nord à passer du diesel à l'énergie renouvelable.

(0850)

[Français]

J'ai aussi visité un garage souterrain, à Montréal, qui permettra d'augmenter la flotte de voitures de métro de la Ville de Montréal, d'améliorer la fréquence du service et, évidemment, de soutenir la croissance prévue du nombre d'usagers du transport en commun à Montréal.[Traduction]

Laissez-moi aborder brièvement quelques réussites que nous avons connues jusqu'ici. Notre plan consistant à injecter au cours de la prochaine décennie 180 milliards de dollars dans les infrastructures de partout au pays est véritablement historique. Je suis fier des progrès que nous avons réalisés jusqu'ici et de l'incidence positive qu'a eue le plan sur les gens dans l'ensemble du pays. Il est exécuté par 14 ministères et organismes fédéraux. [Français]

Les 70 nouveaux programmes et initiatives sont maintenant tous lancés, et plus de 32 000 projets d'infrastructure ont déjà été approuvés. Presque tous les projets sont déjà en cours.[Traduction]

Je suis heureux de souligner certaines des importantes étapes clés que nous avons franchies ensemble depuis la dernière comparution du ministre Sohi devant le Comité, au mois de mai. La première, dont je suis très fier, est le Défi des villes intelligentes. Le nom des finalistes a été annoncé cet été, et celui des gagnants le sera à la fin du printemps 2019. [Français]

La Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada a annoncé son premier investissement, soit un montant de 1,28 milliard de dollars dans le Réseau express métropolitain, à Montréal. Au moyen de cet investissement, la Banque fait exactement ce qu'il était prévu qu'elle fasse, c'est-à-dire accorder un financement pour permettre de créer davantage d'infrastructures pour les Canadiens et les Canadiennes de partout au pays.[Traduction]

Même si très peu avait été fait pour promouvoir cet important projet quand nous sommes arrivés au pouvoir, le pont international Gordie-Howe est enfin en cours de construction. C'est vraiment historique pour le Canada. Nous savons que le corridor Windsor-Détroit compte pour environ 30 % du commerce de marchandises entre le Canada et les États-Unis. Ce projet se fonde véritablement sur notre prospérité actuelle pour garantir qu'elle se poursuive à l'avenir. [Français]

Infrastructure Canada a aussi signé des ententes bilatérales avec l'ensemble des provinces et des territoires pour la prochaine décennie. Nous avons déjà approuvé du financement en vertu de ces ententes, comme[Traduction]la ligne verte, à Calgary, le prolongement de la ligne Millenium, en Colombie-Britannique,[Français]les voitures de métro Azur, à Montréal,[Traduction]et le système de traitement des eaux dans le district régional de Comox Valley, en Colombie-Britannique.

Enfin, nous avons également lancé le Fonds d'atténuation et d'adaptation en matière de catastrophes. Nous avons déjà reçu un certain nombre de demandes de financement et sommes en train de les examiner.

J'ai également eu le plaisir de rencontrer mes homologues provinciaux et territoriaux, au mois de septembre. L'un des éléments clés que nous avons abordés tenait à la façon de mieux adapter le versement de nos fonds et nos processus à la saison de la construction, c'est-à-dire que nous voulons accélérer et améliorer notre processus d'évaluation initiale, d'examen et d'approbation et nous assurer que nos processus — fédéraux, provinciaux ou territoriaux — sont harmonisés avec la saison de la construction. J'ai insisté auprès de mes collègues sur le fait que nous devons travailler là-dessus avec diligence.

J'ai visité plusieurs chantiers de projet, où les travaux avancent bien, mais pour lesquels on n'a pas présenté de demandes de remboursement, par exemple le projet de la rue Cherry lié à l'eau et au remblayage du lac, à Toronto, et le garage de Côte-Vertu, à Montréal, au Québec. Pour régler ce problème, nous avons récemment lancé avec la Saskatchewan, la Nouvelle-Écosse et l'Alberta un projet pilote visant à vérifier l'efficacité d'une approche de facturation progressive. Nous savons que les Canadiens veulent voir des fonds qui correspondent aux étapes clés des projets, une approche fondée sur le pourcentage d'achèvement, et nous avons demandé à nos collègues dans les provinces de travailler avec nous afin d'obtenir ce résultat également. [Français]

En conclusion, je souhaite remercier les membres du Comité de m'avoir donné l'occasion de faire une mise à jour. J'espère qu'ensemble, avec chaque membre du Comité, nous pourrons bâtir des infrastructures du XXIe siècle qui soient modernes, résilientes et vertes pour l'ensemble des Canadiens.

Je vous remercie.

(0855)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre Champagne. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants de tous vos commentaires et du fait que vous les avez formulés dans le délai de cinq minutes, de sorte que les membres du Comité puissent poser les innombrables questions qu'ils ont à vous adresser.

Monsieur Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci, madame la présidente, et je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre, de votre présence aujourd'hui.

Avez-vous entendu des intervenants — que vous rencontrez fréquemment, je le sais — parler des conséquences sociales du fait d'avoir des travailleurs de la construction majoritairement de sexe masculin, surtout dans les régions rurales?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

L'un des groupes de personnes que je rencontre le plus souvent est celui des travailleurs de la construction. Ce sont les vrais héros de ce que nous faisons. Je suis allé tout récemment sur le pont Champlain, à Montréal. Je peux dire à mon collègue qu'au moment où j'ai rencontré les 1 600 travailleurs qui oeuvrent sept jours par semaine, jour et nuit, beau temps mauvais temps, je les ai vraiment écoutés. Je me suis toujours assuré de leur répéter que ma grande priorité sur tous les chantiers de construction, c'est la santé et la sécurité des gens et les avantages pour la collectivité dans laquelle ils travaillent.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je sais que vous le savez, monsieur le ministre, mais Montréal n'est pas une région rurale. Ma question précise portait sur les régions rurales. Le premier ministre a récemment fait une déclaration selon laquelle la présence d'hommes — surtout des travailleurs de la construction — a des conséquences sociales négatives dans les régions rurales. Je me demande si vous avez entendu dire la même chose.

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Le député a raison. Je mentionnais un projet urbain, mais, puisque nous réalisons plus de 4 000 projets dans l'ensemble du pays, il souhaiterait que je le fasse non seulement dans les régions urbaines, mais aussi dans les régions rurales. J'interviens toujours auprès des travailleurs, afin de m'assurer d'acquérir une compréhension des questions touchant leur santé et leur sécurité ainsi que des avantages pour la collectivité dans laquelle ils mènent leurs activités. Je suis récemment allé sur le chantier de l'agrandissement du parc Fort Edmonton en compagnie du député, et nous avons rencontré des travailleurs et des gens qui vont faire le travail là-bas, et, partout, on est...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Encore une fois, monsieur le ministre, Edmonton n'est pas une région rurale. Je parle précisément des régions rurales et des commentaires formulés par le premier ministre. Oui ou non, souscrivez-vous à ces commentaires?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Je sais qu'Edmonton n'est pas une région rurale, tout comme Montréal n'en est pas une, mais, partout où je vais, que ce soit en région rurale ou urbaine, je rencontre les travailleurs et m'assure de les écouter. J'interviens auprès d'eux, car ils sont les vrais héros des projets d'infrastructure que nous réalisons partout au pays.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

C'était un oui ou un non, monsieur le ministre. Le premier ministre a formulé un commentaire la fin de semaine dernière. Souscriviez-vous à ses commentaires?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Comme je l'ai dit, encore une fois, mon rôle est de m'assurer que, partout au pays, nous construisons des infrastructures pour le XXIe siècle, qui sont modernes, solides et écologiques, et, évidemment, les travailleurs de l'ensemble du pays — hommes ou femmes — sont la clé de la réalisation de ces projets pour tous les Canadiens.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je vais poser cette question différemment, monsieur le ministre. Est-ce que le fait d'appliquer le...

La présidente:

Monsieur Jeneroux, je pense que vous insistez un peu trop sur cette question.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame la présidente, c'est mon temps de parole. J'ai le droit de poser la question que je souhaite poser durant la période qui m'est allouée.

La présidente:

Vous ne pouvez pas vous répéter sur la même question.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame la présidente, je vous demande tout d'abord d'arrêter le chronomètre, puis de citer l'article du Règlement qui prévoit que je n'ai pas le droit de poser une question répétitive.

La présidente:

Voudriez-vous que je le lise?

M. Matt Jeneroux:

S'il vous plaît.

La présidente:

Dans La Procédure et les usages, aux pages 1058-1059, c'est chaque fois que les questions sont « répétitives ou n'ont aucun rapport avec l'affaire dont » nous sommes saisis. Le problème tient à la répétition. C'est la troisième fois que vous tentez de poser la même question.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

C'était la deuxième fois, madame la présidente, et je ne dirais pas cela. Je pose la question différemment, cette fois.

Permettez-moi de poser la question, s'il vous plaît. Nous ne disposons que de six minutes pour poser les questions.

La présidente:

Oui.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Le fait d'appliquer le point de vue sexospécifique que mentionne le premier ministre, a-t-il une incidence sur le fait que l'infrastructure est construite en temps voulu?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Je dirais que l'application d'un point de vue sexospécifique est capitale dans le cadre de tous les programmes et projets que nous réalisons. Il est essentiel que nous comprenions les conséquences sur les différents groupes et sur les diverses personnes qui travailleront sur nos chantiers — et sur la collectivité —, alors je pense que le fait que nous tenons compte du sexe est un grand pas en avant pour notre pays. En outre, dans le cadre du plan d'infrastructure historique de 180 milliards de dollars, comme le député le sait, nous avons appliqué non seulement ce point de vue, mais aussi un point de vue environnemental afin de comprendre les répercussions de nos projets.

Plus nous comprenons comment fournir des infrastructures aux collectivités de partout au pays, selon moi, mieux ce sera pour nous, en tant que Canadiens.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Monsieur le ministre, dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous affirmez avoir libéré des fonds de subventions dans la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada. Je ne pense pas que vous les ayez nécessairement libérés. Je vais vous donner une chance de reformuler cette affirmation.

Il y a les 5 milliards de dollars que vous avez pris du plan Investir dans le Canada, sous la rubrique des réseaux de transport en commun. Vous avez pris 5 milliards de dollars qui étaient destinés aux corridors commerciaux et de transport, puis un autre 5 milliards de dollars qui étaient destinés à des projets d'infrastructure verte. Vous avez mentionné avoir construit un projet à Montréal, qui était une répétition de l'annonce faite par le premier ministre en juin 2017.

Premièrement, je ne vois pas en quoi il s'agit d'argent libéré. Vous l'avez simplement changé de place. Deuxièmement, la Banque de l'infrastructure, dont vous vantez beaucoup le succès dans votre déclaration préliminaire, selon moi, dans l'ensemble du pays, a été désignée comme étant tout, sauf une réussite. J'ai entendu des gens la qualifier de catastrophe et d'échec. J'espère que vous pourrez formuler un commentaire sur la raison pour laquelle cet argent destiné aux infrastructures n'est pas versé.

Bien franchement, aucune somme n'a été libérée. Pour l'instant, ce n'est que de l'argent déplacé.

(0900)

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Je suis très heureux de répondre à cette question. Je pense que la Banque de l'infrastructure est un autre outil à notre disposition afin que nous puissions travailler mieux et plus rapidement pour les Canadiens.

Manifestement, nous ne parlons pas aux mêmes personnes. Autrefois, j'étais ministre du Commerce, et je peux vous dire que les investisseurs de partout dans le monde envisageaient d'investir au Canada. Dans le cas de la Banque de l'infrastructure, comme vous l'avez affirmé, le premier projet a été le REM, à Montréal. Elle a eu la permission de consentir un prêt afin de faire démarrer ce projet, qui va transformer le transport en commun dans la ville.

Je peux rassurer le député quant au fait que je parle avec le PDG de la Banque, même s'il s'agit d'une entité indépendante du point de vue de sa gestion et de ses décisions en matière d'investissement. Je parle régulièrement au PDG. Il étudie actuellement plus de quelques dizaines de projets. Je dirais que les responsables de la Banque ont tenu des centaines de conversations, dans l'ensemble du pays, avec des dirigeants communautaires et des représentants des gouvernements territoriaux et provinciaux.

À mes yeux, il s'agit d'en faire plus. Il est question de nous assurer que nous avons accès à plus d'argent pour réaliser des projets partout au pays. La Banque nous permet, par exemple...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Vous ne faites que déplacer de l'argent, monsieur le ministre. C'est tout ce que c'est. C'est le plan Investir dans le Canada. Vous avez déplacé de l'argent provenant de ce plan vers la Banque de l'infrastructure.

Concernant le projet de REM, s'agissait-il ou non de la reprise d'une annonce précédente?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

J'affirmerais que non, et je corrigerais mon collègue, dans un sens. Le fait que la Banque a consenti le prêt libère des investissements qui, autrement, seraient retirés de l'allocation pour le transport public qu'a obtenue le Québec.

À mon avis, le fait d'avoir été en mesure de convaincre des investisseurs comme la Banque de l'infrastructure de prendre part à ce projet est une grande chose. Cela nous permettra d'en faire plus. Je peux affirmer au député que nous examinons les interconnexions et que nous envisageons d'autres systèmes de train léger sur rail dans l'ensemble du pays. Je pense que nous devrions célébrer cette situation. Le Canada faisait partie des quelques pays du G7 à ne pas avoir de banque d'infrastructure...

M. Matt Jeneroux: Rien n'est construit, monsieur le ministre.

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne: ... et cette banque est un autre excellent outil permettant de réaliser des projets pour les Canadiens.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Mais rien n'est construit grâce à la Banque de l'infrastructure, monsieur le ministre.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Nous allons passer à M. Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie de votre présence ce matin.

Tout d'abord, monsieur le ministre, je dois vous faire part de mon appréciation à l'égard de la somme de 300 millions de dollars que vous avez accordée à ma circonscription au cours des dernières années, en ce qui a trait aux travaux d'infrastructure qui ont été effectués. Bien entendu, cet argent allège le fardeau financier des personnes qui paient des impôts fonciers, mais il améliore aussi la planification de diverses activités menées au sein de nombreux secteurs de notre milieu des affaires. En partenariat avec les milieux d'affaires, nos municipalités veulent obtenir des enveloppes de financement durable pour répondre aux besoins liés à la planification de l'amélioration communautaire et aux stratégies connexes, mais elles envisagent aussi l'harmonisation de ces investissements afin d'accroître le rendement de ce capital investi, encore une fois, dans le but d'améliorer la structure générale de la collectivité ainsi que les divers secteurs qui en font partie.

Monsieur le ministre, pouvez-vous nous parler de certaines des enveloppes de financement durable qui sont mises à la disposition des collectivités et des entreprises qui s'y trouvent?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Merci beaucoup de poser la question.

Ce que nous avons fait, qui suscite une véritable transformation au pays, c'était assurer la stabilité et la prévisibilité du financement destiné aux municipalités. La Fédération canadienne des municipalités, la FCM, a affirmé que cela avait changé la donne. Je sais que le député provient d'une administration municipale, alors il comprend bien ce que c'est que de pouvoir planifier des projets d'infrastructure. Je n'arrête pas de dire que, quand nous prenons de l'argent et l'injectons dans les infrastructures, nous investissons, car, par définition, cet argent couvre plus qu'un cycle budgétaire. C'est pour les 10, 15 ou parfois même 100 années à venir.

J'affirmerais que la somme de 180 milliards de dollars que nous avons fournie change réellement la donne. C'est historique au pays. Si on regarde le volet d'investissement à l'égard duquel nous avons pris des décisions, à mon avis, le transport en commun est la clé. Non seulement il procure une plus grande mobilité afin que les gens puissent passer plus de temps auprès de leur famille et leurs amis, puisque le navettage est essentiel dans nos collectivités d'aujourd'hui, mais, de plus, le volet des infrastructures écologiques est vraiment harmonisé avec nos valeurs. Je pense qu'aujourd'hui, les Canadiens comprennent que nous voulons une infrastructure du XXIe siècle, qui est écologique, solide et moderne. Le volet social nous permet de rassembler les Canadiens dans les centres communautaires que les gens veulent voir partout au Canada. Le commerce et les transports sont tout à fait liés aux 1,5 milliard de consommateurs à qui nous avons maintenant accès, grâce à nos divers accords commerciaux. Il est essentiel que nous nous assurions que nos marchandises se rendent sur le marché. Enfin, le volet des collectivités rurales et nordiques nous permet de tenir compte des besoins particuliers des collectivités de partout au Canada.

Je dirais à mon collègue que, en effet, ce que nous faisons, surtout dans le cas de l'accord bilatéral intégré — qui prévoit un financement sur 10 ans destiné aux collectivités, et elles savent où nous voulons investir —, c'est établir le cadre, mais nous laissons les collectivités décider de ce qui est le mieux pour elles du point de vue des projets particuliers.

(0905)

M. Vance Badawey:

En ce qui concerne l'obtention de ce que j'appelle le « triple résultat » — l'économie, l'aspect social, l'environnement — en collaboration avec les municipalités, estimez-vous que les investissements que vous effectuez s'inscrivent dans une approche pangouvernementale, par opposition à une démarche cloisonnée des divers ministères, et que ces investissements s'harmonisent avec des stratégies provenant, disons, des ministères des Transports, de l'Environnement ou des services aux enfants et à la famille, et des choses de cette nature?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Oui, c'est la clé. Nous avons créé le cadre, comme je l'ai dit, en fonction d'objectifs tels que l'accroissement de la mobilité au sein des collectivités de l'ensemble du Canada et la réduction de nos émissions de gaz à effet de serre, mais la façon de procéder...

La première étape de notre programme était fondée sur les actifs. La deuxième étape est fondée sur le résultat. Je pense que les volets que nous avons élaborés laissent toute la marge de manoeuvre nécessaire pour que les collectivités puissent faire ce qui est le mieux pour elles. Nous ne sommes pas là pour faire semblant de savoir — en disant que nous sommes récemment allés à Saanich, à Inuvik ou à Norman Wells — ce qui est le mieux pour leurs collectivités. Toutefois, ce que nous avons fait, c'est créer un cadre qui leur permettra de voir, en ce qui concerne l'atteinte des objectifs que nous avons établis à l'échelle nationale, quels sont les meilleurs projets à réaliser pour les gens de leur collectivité. J'affirmerais que tous ces projets — et c'est pourquoi je pense que le Comité est essentiel — ont pour but de procurer des résultats aux gens. Ma mission consiste à améliorer la vie des Canadiens de partout au pays. Je suis allé à Inuvik, où nous réaliserons le premier projet d'énergie éolienne dans l'Arctique, lequel réduira la consommation de diesel d'environ 3 millions de litres, et les émissions de gaz à effet de serre à hauteur de milliers...

C'est vraiment ce que nous faisons, et, évidemment, mon collègue M. Badawey comprend de quoi il s'agit, car, comme il vient d'une administration municipale, il sait que notre rôle est d'établir le programme stratégique, mais de laisser les collectivités décider de ce qui est le mieux pour elles.

M. Vance Badawey:

En ce qui concerne les coûts liés à la pollution, actuellement, les municipalités se voient imposer ces coûts par défaut. Par exemple, les tempêtes du siècle ont maintenant lieu tous les cinq ans; par conséquent, il faut placer des tuyaux surdimensionnés dans le sol, et les coûts qui s'y rattachent sont imposés par défaut aux personnes qui paient des impôts fonciers.

Comment votre ministère travaille-t-il avec le ministère de l'Environnement afin, encore une fois, de réduire considérablement ces coûts pour les contribuables fonciers?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madame la présidente, je suis très heureux de me faire poser cette question. Elle va droit au but.

Voilà pourquoi nous avons présenté le Fonds d'atténuation et d'adaptation en matière de catastrophes. J'ai toujours dit qu'il vaut mieux pour nous d'investir dans l'adaptation des collectivités aux événements liés aux changements climatiques, qui sont plus fréquents et plus graves. Nous avons mis de côté 2 milliards de dollars pour faire vraiment face à ces problèmes. J'ai toujours affirmé que nous devons investir dans l'adaptation, sans quoi nous devrons investir dans le rétablissement. Il vaut mieux prévenir ces événements et d'éliminer — je dirais — la possibilité que ces catastrophes nuisent aux collectivités et aux gens.

Nous savons à quel point ce pourrait être catastrophique. Je regarde d'autres députés qui ont vécu une inondation, par exemple. Dans ma propre région, nous savons que les conséquences sociales de ces catastrophes sont énormes. L'investissement dans des infrastructures qui résisteraient aux tempêtes, par exemple, est la bonne façon de procéder, non seulement pour rendre notre pays plus résilient, mais aussi pour prévenir les dommages et le stress que doivent vivre les collectivités qui subissent ces catastrophes de saison en saison.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie d'être avec nous ce matin. Je suis probablement l'un des rares députés de l'opposition à avoir un contact aussi privilégié avec vous, puisque nous sommes de la même région.

Il me semble vous avoir entendu à multiples reprises, en région particulièrement, soutenir le projet de train à grande fréquence de VIA Rail, le TGF. Ma première question est la suivante. Compte tenu des préoccupations de mobilité et de réduction des gaz à effet de serre dont vous parliez tantôt, votre ministère, dans sa philosophie ou sa vision, considère-t-il le projet du TGF comme un projet d'infrastructure verte?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

J'aimerais remercier mon collègue M. Aubin. Nous partageons, lui et moi, la représentation d'une bonne partie d'une grande région du Québec.

Le train à grande fréquence est l'une de mes priorités depuis mon élection, sinon même avant. Pour une région comme la nôtre, c'est un élément essentiel au développement économique et récréotouristique, ainsi qu'à la mobilité de la main-d'oeuvre.

Je pense que M. Aubin et moi avons répété sur toutes les tribunes possibles à quel point ce projet pourrait permettre de grandes choses pour la région, et même pour le Québec. On parle souvent de pénurie de main-d'oeuvre. S'il y avait un train à grande fréquence entre, par exemple, Trois-Rivières, Montréal et Québec, cela permettrait à des gens qui habitent dans d'autres centres de venir travailler chez nous.

Je considère évidemment que le train à grande fréquence est une composante de la mobilité intelligente du XXIe siècle. Si on regarde ce qui se passe dans plusieurs villes du monde, on peut conclure que c'est le genre de projet que nous voulons soutenir. C'est pour cette raison que VIA Rail, dans son dernier énoncé, a investi massivement dans le matériel roulant, un préalable sine qua non...

(0910)

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Je ne dispose malheureusement que de très peu de temps. J'espère que le ministre des Transports entendra votre témoignage, parce qu'il va vraiment dans le sens de ce que tout le monde attend. On ne parle plus de consensus dans ce dossier, on parle pratiquement d'unanimité.

Quand on regarde les sommes qui sont consacrées au projet du REM à Montréal, par exemple, et l'attente interminable de la simple annonce d'une volonté gouvernementale d'aller de l'avant avec le TGF, on a l'impression que les grandes villes et les régions sont traitées différemment. Est-ce que ma perception est bonne?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

En tant que ministre québécois qui vient d'une région, je défends toujours avec énergie les régions du Québec et du Canada. Je peux vous assurer que si nous avons prévu des sommes importantes dans le dernier budget, c'est notamment pour réaliser les études nécessaires. En effet, la construction d'un train à grande fréquence entre Québec et Windsor demande un certain nombre d'études techniques et d'études d'impact sur le territoire.

Nous allons certainement dans la bonne direction, selon moi, d'abord en ayant investi dans le matériel roulant, puis en ayant prévu dans le budget les montants nécessaires pour les études. Ce sont là deux pas dans la bonne direction.

Il faut comprendre que ces projets sont complexes en matière d'ingénierie et de capacité. Je pense que le ministre des Transports, vous et moi nous sommes exprimés en faveur de ce projet, comme vous l'avez entendu à la tribune de la Chambre de commerce et d'industries de Trois-Rivières. En d'autres termes, il faut maintenant réaliser les études et tout ce qu'il faut d'autre pour obtenir toute l'information nécessaire pour prendre la bonne décision.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Je vous ai entendu, en réponse à une question précédente, parler de la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada comme d'un moyen d'en faire plus et plus rapidement. Le principe peut sembler louable, mais je pense que les résultats sont pour le moins discutables, puisque le processus n'est pas très rapide et que peu de projets sont financés.

Je suis vraiment en faveur d'un financement public, car un financement par la Banque de l'infrastructure aurait comme conséquence éventuelle d'augmenter les coûts payés par les consommateurs. Selon vous, est-ce que le projet du TGF devrait être financé par la Banque de l'infrastructure ou par les deniers publics?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

L'établissement d'un nouvel organisme comme la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada demande un certain temps. Pour avoir moi-même vu démarrer Investir au Canada, une autre agence dans le portefeuille dont j'étais responsable auparavant, je sais qu'il faut toujours créer un certain élan au début. Heureusement, il y a maintenant un président en place pour assurer la bonne gestion de cette agence.

Quelque douzaines de discussions sont en cours au pays pour répondre spécifiquement à cette question. C'est le genre de projet que la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada pourrait étudier et, selon moi et comme vous le rappeliez, il faut en faire plus et plus rapidement. Je comprends que mes collègues nous demandent d'en faire plus, étant à Ottawa l'un des ministres les plus impatients de voir avancer les choses rapidement. Cependant, ces projets présentent une certaine complexité. Pour des raisons de confidentialité des négociations et des discussions en cours, vous comprendrez que je ne peux pas parler des projets à l'étude. Je peux toutefois vous assurer que nous suivons ce qui se passe et que la Banque est en train d'analyser plusieurs projets de partout au pays.

M. Robert Aubin:

Pourtant, la Banque a demandé cette année 6 millions de dollars au gouvernement pour couvrir ses frais de fonctionnement. Cela ne m'apparaît pas financer beaucoup de projets ni aller très vite et en faire plus. Par ailleurs, nous faisons toujours face à cette dichotomie entre l'ampleur des projets financés par la Banque et celle des projets que peuvent se permettre les petites communautés que vous et moi représentons. N'y a-t-il pas une différence notable entre les intentions énoncées lors de la création de la Banque et ses réalisations après trois ans?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

En réponse à votre question, monsieur Aubin, je vous rappellerais que la mise sur pied d'une nouvelle agence exige certains coûts uniques, des coûts d'immobilisations par exemple. D'autre part, je peux vous dire que la Banque a embauché un responsable des investissements, ce qui devrait permettre, au cours des prochains mois et des prochaines années, une augmentation du nombre de projets dans lesquels la Banque investira.

Je suis par ailleurs très conscient que la Banque doit servir les communautés non seulement urbaines, mais aussi rurales. C'est pour cette raison que nous étudions avec elle certains projets qui permettraient, par exemple, à des communautés du Nord de passer du diesel à des sources d'énergie renouvelables.

(0915)

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je veux revenir un peu en arrière pour la gouverne des gens qui pourraient nous écouter ou nous regarder — la séance est télévisée — et aborder le tableau d'ensemble de l'infrastructure. Du milieu à la fin des années 2000, le gouvernement conservateur précédent a mis en oeuvre un programme d'infrastructure assez important, et c'était en réaction à la récession. Je pense que l'idée était de faire travailler les gens et de se servir de l'occasion pour faire construire des choses. L'effet indésirable a été la modification de la réglementation environnementale, laquelle, bien entendu, s'est avérée être un obstacle pour les projets de prolongement de pipelines, etc. Ensuite, quand nous sommes arrivés, nous avions ce programme d'infrastructure de 180 milliards de dollars à une époque où nous sortions de la récession, et, de fait, nous sommes maintenant très loin de cette situation. Cela a pris beaucoup de gens par surprise, mais il me semble qu'il y a des différences vraiment fondamentales dans l'approche, et les résultats que nous souhaitons obtenir dans le cadre du programme que nous exécutons aujourd'hui varient grandement par rapport aux résultats que le gouvernement de M. Harper voulait obtenir il y a 10 ans.

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madame la présidente, je suis totalement d'accord avec mon collègue sur cette question. Nous avons dû composer avec les conséquences d'une décennie de sous-investissement dans les infrastructures. Quiconque travaillant dans ce domaine comprendra qu'il faut ensuite investir de façon exponentielle. Voilà pourquoi nous avons dressé un plan historique de plus de 180 milliards de dollars pour régler des problèmes que les Canadiens qui nous regardent comprendraient. Lorsqu'il est question de transport en commun, par exemple, je pense que les gens qui vivent dans les régions urbaines de notre pays comprennent qu'il était à peu près temps que nous fassions ces investissements historiques afin de permettre aux gens de se déplacer avec plus de fluidité.

Pour ce qui est du tableau d'ensemble, comme je le dis toujours à mes collègues, l'infrastructure est la clé, au pays. Une infrastructure moderne, solide et écologique nous aidera à attirer les investissements et les talents. À mes yeux, lorsque nous investissons dans les infrastructures, nous le faisons non seulement pour notre prospérité actuelle, mais aussi pour notre prospérité à venir. En ce qui concerne notre plan, nous nous sommes posé la question suivante: Quel est l'un des plus grands défis auxquels nous devons nous attaquer, en tant qu'êtres humains? Ce sont les changements climatiques, alors, quand nous construisons des infrastructures, les gens nous regardent. Nous comprenons que nous ne pouvons pas faire les choses aujourd'hui de la façon dont nous les faisions en 1980. Nous devons construire des infrastructures solides, mais aussi écologiques. Les Canadiens s'attendent à cela lorsque nous réinvestissons là-dedans.

Je peux vous donner l'exemple de Saanich. J'étais en Colombie-Britannique, récemment, à la piscine du Commonwealth. On a décidé de passer des combustibles fossiles à la biomasse. Ainsi, on a réduit les coûts énergétiques de 90 %. Voilà le type de projet que nous voulons mettre en oeuvre dans les collectivités. On améliore des vies, tout en réduisant l'empreinte carbone.

Quand je songe à l'infrastructure sociale, comme le mentionnait le député de Trois-Rivières tout à l'heure, il s'agit aussi de s'assurer... Vous savez, l'infrastructure a un sens différent pour diverses personnes. Si on est dans une région urbaine, on pourrait penser à un pont ou à une route. Si on est dans une collectivité rurale, on pourrait penser à un centre communautaire ou à l'accès à la large bande. On pourrait penser à la présence d'un réseau de téléphonie cellulaire. Je viens d'une circonscription où le réseau cellulaire et Internet sont absents sur environ la moitié du territoire.

Évidemment, quand on parle d'infrastructure, elle touche la vie des gens. Lorsqu'il est question de collectivités rurales et nordiques et de la façon dont nous structurons l'infrastructure, pour revenir aux propos du député, je peux donner un autre exemple du pourquoi nous avons établi un volet qui est très propre aux régions rurales et nordiques. Quand je suis allé en Saskatchewan, récemment, les gens me disaient que, si nous leur donnions les fonds nécessaires pour augmenter, par exemple, la longueur de la piste d'environ 200 ou 300 mètres, ils pourraient faire atterrir de plus gros avions, et ainsi réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre grâce au moins grand nombre d'avions nécessaires et réduire le prix des aliments environ de moitié dans les collectivités nordiques.

Voilà pourquoi nos projets sont adaptés aux besoins des Canadiens de partout au pays.

M. Ken Hardie:

En ce qui concerne la Banque de l'infrastructure, j'ai acquis de l'expérience à l'échelle municipale, comme certains de mes collègues. J'ai travaillé auprès de l'autorité des transports de la région métropolitaine de Vancouver.

Je vous remercie, soit dit en passant, du financement accordé pour le nouveau prolongement de notre SkyTrain. Nous sommes très reconnaissants. De fait, la ligne traversera ma collectivité.

La Banque de l'infrastructure correspond à quelque chose que j'ai déjà connu, c'est-à-dire des partenariats publics-privés dans le cadre desquels des acteurs du secteur privé agissent à titre d'investisseurs additionnels. À mon avis, cela doit avoir pour effet de réduire la pression exercée, tout d'abord, sur les administrations municipales et provinciales quant à leur part des investissements, et cela permet d'en faire davantage avec les fonds octroyés par le gouvernement fédéral. Est-ce une évaluation juste?

(0920)

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Tout à fait. Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada existe afin qu'on puisse en faire davantage pour les Canadiens. J'occupais auparavant le poste de ministre du Commerce au fédéral, et je peux vous confirmer que les étrangers veulent investir au Canada. Pourquoi? Parce que notre pays offre de la stabilité et de la prévisibilité, applique la primauté du droit et possède une société très inclusive qui chérit la diversité. Les gens veulent investir au Canada pour nous aider à construire l'infrastructure dont les Canadiens ont besoin.

Tout comme mon collègue l'a dit, madame la présidente, c'est pourquoi nous avons créé la Banque de l'infrastructure. Cela ressemble à ce qui est fait en Australie, par exemple, où les dirigeants ont créé un moyen d'avoir une série de projets qui favoriseraient les investissements provenant du secteur privé. Grâce à cette approche, il est possible de libérer du capital pour investir dans les actifs qui doivent être financés par le gouvernement, car nous savons que le secteur privé ne le fera pas. Cela libère du capital pour en faire davantage. Le REM est un bon exemple de projet pour lequel il est préférable de consentir un prêt de la Banque de l'infrastructure, et de libérer des capitaux que nous pourrons investir dans d'autres projets — dans ce cas précis, au Québec, à l'aide de l'allocation prévue — pour lesquels nous ne souhaitons pas d'investissements provenant du secteur privé.

Cet organisme constitue véritablement un autre outil dans notre coffre. Je ne suis pas en train d'affirmer au député que cela réglera tous les problèmes. Ce que je dis aux Canadiens, c'est qu'il est formidable d'avoir un outil de plus à notre disposition. Nous sommes en 2018. Les pays modernes cherchent différentes façons de fournir des infrastructures. Nous savons qu'il y a un immense déficit en infrastructure dans les pays de l'OCDE. Chaque fois que nous investissons dans l'infrastructure, nous nous donnons les moyens de réaliser nos rêves. Nous pouvons attirer de meilleurs investissements et nous pouvons attirer des talents. Nous savons que nous devons faire face à des pénuries de travailleurs partout au Canada. Nous savons aussi que les gens se déplacent vers les endroits où l'infrastructure est moderne, où l'eau est de qualité, où la mobilité est grande et où il existe des centres communautaires et des bâtiments verts.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Champagne.

Nous cédons la parole à M. Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie, monsieur le ministre, d'être ici ce matin. Le 25 octobre dernier, vous avez eu l'occasion de présenter aux médias l'état de la situation du pont Champlain. J'aimerais vous remercier de la transparence dont vous faites preuve envers les Canadiens à ce sujet.

Pouvez-vous nous parler de l'avancement important des travaux sur le pont Champlain?

Nous savons que certains travaux ne pourront se faire qu'au retour des beaux jours. Avons-nous un échéancier quant aux travaux qu'il reste encore à mener jusqu'à l'ouverture du pont?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

D'abord, madame la présidente, j'aimerais remercier mon collègue M. Iacono de cette question.

Récemment, au mois d'octobre, j'étais effectivement à Montréal pour informer les Montréalais, les Québécois et les Québécoises de la situation du pont Champlain.

J'ai expliqué que la structure du pont serait complétée au plus tard le 21 décembre, mais que le pont serait ouvert de façon permanente à la circulation des véhicules au plus tard au mois de juin 2019. La raison en est que certains travaux, comme l'imperméabilisation de la structure et l'asphaltage, ne peuvent pas être faits dans des conditions hivernales. Pour procéder à l'imperméabilisation de la structure, par exemple, il faut un certain taux d'humidité et de température pendant trois jours consécutifs.

J'ai toujours dit aux Montréalais et aux Montréalaises que ma priorité était la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs. Il y a 1 600 personnes qui travaillent jour et nuit sur ce chantier, 24 heures sur 24, beau temps mauvais temps.

La durabilité de l'oeuvre est un autre aspect prioritaire. En effet, cette infrastructure est construite pour servir au cours des 125 prochaines années. Nous voulons évidemment nous assurer que le travail sera bien fait.

La question de l'échéancier est aussi essentielle. J'ai dit aux Montréalais et aux Montréalaises que, s'il y avait des manquements et des retards, il y aurait des conséquences. Le contrat avec le constructeur est ainsi structuré.

Je peux vous dire, monsieur Iacono, que je vais continuer d'informer les Montréalais et les Montréalaises de ce qu'il en est exactement, parce que cette infrastructure est importante.

Plus de 60 millions d'utilisateurs empruntent ce corridor chaque année. Si ma mémoire est bonne, la valeur des marchandises qui sont acheminées vers les États-Unis par le pont est de plus de 20 milliards de dollars. C'est donc un corridor essentiel.

Comme j'ai toujours pratiqué la transparence et l'ouverture avec les gens, je crois que les gens de Montréal ont bien compris la situation.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Je représente la circonscription d'Alfred-Pellan, qui se trouve à Laval. Je suis conscient que les réalités des communautés urbaines ne sont pas les mêmes que celles des communautés rurales, surtout en ce qui concerne les infrastructures. C'est pourquoi il est primordial de connaître les besoins en infrastructures de ces communautés.

Pouvez-nous parler des efforts entrepris pour soutenir les projets d'infrastructures des petites collectivités ainsi que des collectivités rurales?

(0925)

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Cela revient un peu à la question de notre collègue le député de Trois-Rivières.

Dans l'entente bilatérale conclue avec les différentes provinces, il y a un volet qui s'applique aux communautés rurales et aux communautés nordiques.

La raison pour laquelle nous avons créé un programme spécifique, c'est que nous sommes conscients que, dans les communautés rurales par exemple, il y a des besoins particuliers.

Nous nous sommes aussi éloignés de l'habituel partage à trois du financement entre les municipalités, les provinces et le gouvernement fédéral, qui se pratiquait par le passé.

Par exemple, si un projet est admissible au programme Infrastructure collectivités rurales et nordiques et que la population locale est de moins de 5 000 habitants, le gouvernement fédéral pourrait financer jusqu'à 60 % de l'infrastructure, la province pourrait assumer 33 % des coûts et la communauté, les 7 % restants.

Cela permet de faire des choses autrement difficilement réalisables, compte tenu de l'assiette fiscale des municipalités. Ce programme peut aider grandement les petites communautés du Canada, et ce, tant au Québec que dans l'Ouest, en Alberta, par exemple. C'est l'un des programmes dans lesquels le gouvernement a investi 2 milliards de dollars, spécifiquement pour les petites communautés.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Durant votre allocution, vous avez mentionné que, récemment, un projet pilote avait été lancé avec les provinces pour tester l'efficacité d'une approche de facturation progressive.

Pourriez-vous nous donner un peu plus de détails là-dessus? Quels en seront les effets? Quelles sont les attentes à cet égard?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Je vous remercie de votre question, monsieur le député.

Lors de la dernière rencontre fédérale-provinciale-territoriale, j'ai soulevé trois enjeux.

Premièrement, il fallait s'assurer que nos processus respectifs, sur les plans fédéral, provincial et territorial, s'ajustent en fonction de la saison de la construction. Étant donné que la saison de la construction ne changera pas — elle est la même chaque année —, c'est à nous de prévoir nos projets de telle sorte que les travailleurs et les travailleuses peuvent y prendre part chacune des saisons de la construction.

Deuxièmement, il fallait voir comment nous pouvions établir un processus pour faciliter l'appel de projets, leur étude et, évidemment, leur approbation. Cela veut dire qu'il faut travailler de concert avec les provinces et les territoires pour obtenir un processus de révision des projets plus facile et plus rapide.

Troisièmement, il fallait nous assurer, comme le mentionnait le député, d'avoir une facturation qui tienne compte de l'avancement des projets. Ainsi, dans certains cas, des provinces nous envoient la facture quand le projet est complété.

Cela est en lien avec ce que me demandait plus tôt mon collègue le député Jeneroux, au sujet de l'impact de ces projets. Je peux vous en donner un exemple.

Le premier ministre et moi sommes allés visiter le chantier à la station de métro Côte-Vertu, à Montréal. Il s'agit d'un important projet de garage souterrain pour les wagons de métro. J'ai pu constater qu'il y avait là entre 200 et 300 travailleurs. Je ne suis pas ingénieur, mais je dirais que ce chantier était probablement avancé à 70 ou 76 %. Les travaux durent depuis quelques années. L'impact sur l'économie, les travailleurs et la communauté est évidemment visible. Cependant, jusqu'à maintenant, le fédéral n'a pas versé un dollar dans ce projet parce qu'il n'a pas reçu de factures.

Nous essayons donc de nous entendre avec les provinces pour qu'elles nous envoient des factures à mesure que les projets progressent. Ainsi, le fédéral peut remettre de l'argent graduellement. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Godin, vous avez la parole. Bienvenue à notre comité, soit dit en passant. [Français]

M. Joël Godin (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais saluer mon très honorable collègue le ministre des Infrastructures. Nos circonscriptions sont aussi limitrophes.

J'aimerais donc joindre ma voix à celle de M. Aubin pour dire qu'il y a unanimité en ce qui concerne le projet de train à grande fréquence, ou TGF, dans le corridor Québec-Windsor, en espérant qu'on n'oublie pas d'établir une desserte dans Portneuf.

Monsieur le ministre, tout à l'heure, vous avez fait une mise à jour concernant le pont Champlain. Je crois que le pont Champlain est un élément bien important et que les Montréalais et tous les Québécois ont hâte de pouvoir profiter de cette infrastructure.

Le 14 novembre dernier, je vous ai écrit pour obtenir des informations plus claires et une mise à jour du dossier. Les questions qui m'apparaissaient très importantes portaient sur les coûts. Y aura-t-il un dépassement de coûts? Les pénalités prévues à l'endroit du consortium seront-elles respectées et appliquées? Quels sont les changements survenus dans le processus de réalisation?

Tout à l'heure, vous avez parlé du fait que l'on devait avoir trois jours de belle température pour que les travailleurs, qui travaillent sept jours sur sept, puissent bien accomplir leur besogne. Je pense que cet été a été formidable pour nos travailleurs et qu'on ne peut pas blâmer la température pour les retards. Pour ce qui est de la grève des grutiers, il faut comprendre qu'elle a duré six jours.

Initialement, le pont devait être ouvert à la circulation le 1er décembre. La date a été reportée au 21 décembre et, maintenant, on reporte l'ouverture à la fin de juin 2019.

Prenez-vous l'engagement, ce matin, devant le Comité, que les Montréalais auront accès à leur infrastructure avec un retard de six mois, qui est peut-être justifié? J'aimerais avoir ces informations.

Prenez-vous l'engagement qu'à la fin de juin 2019, juste avant la campagne électorale fédérale, les Montréalais et les Québécois pourront utiliser cette infrastructure?

(0930)

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

J'aimerais tout d'abord remercier mon collègue le député Godin, qui lui aussi est mon voisin de circonscription, avec qui je partage une grande partie du territoire.

Je suis heureux de parler du pont Champlain et de répondre à toutes les questions de mon collègue, comme je l'ai fait la dernière fois, lorsque j'ai fait la mise à jour à Montréal.

Il faut savoir que le pont Champlain est l'un des plus grands chantiers en Amérique du Nord; c'est donc un projet important. Comme le député le mentionnait, il y a plus de 1 600 travailleurs qui travaillent jour et nuit, 24 heures sur 24 et sept jours sur sept.

Pour ce qui est des coûts, j'ai toujours dit que, s'il y avait des retards, il y aurait des conséquences. En parallèle des annonces que j'ai faites à Montréal la dernière fois, il y a présentement des discussions de nature commerciale entre le constructeur et le gouvernement du Canada.

Quand le constructeur nous a avisés, quelques semaines avant mon annonce à Montréal, de l'impossibilité de faire certains travaux, j'ai demandé des contre-expertises. On m'a confirmé que, pour faire certains travaux, il fallait une température constante et un certain taux d'humidité pendant trois jours. Il faut comprendre que le travail se fait au-dessus du fleuve Saint-Laurent.

Je veux rappeler à mon collègue que ma priorité est toujours la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs. Aucune des mesures que nous avons prises ne devrait mettre en jeu la santé et la sécurité des travailleurs.

La durabilité de l'oeuvre est un autre aspect important. Il s'agit d'un pont qui devrait durer plus 125 ans. Nous ne voulons faire aucun compromis qui pourrait affecter la durabilité de l'oeuvre.

Enfin, il y a l'échéancier de la réalisation du pont. Je l'ai dit aux Montréalais et je suis heureux de le répéter devant le Comité aujourd'hui: la structure du pont sera complétée avant le 21 décembre. Je traverserai le pont avant le 21 décembre pour démontrer aux Montréalais et aux Montréalaises que la structure est complétée. De toute façon, les gens peuvent voir les progrès des travaux sur des photos prises par satellite. Par contre, le pont sera ouvert de façon permanente à la circulation plus tard, en juin...

M. Joël Godin:

Malheureusement, je ne peux pas vous laisser terminer votre réponse parce que je suis limité par le temps. Il ne me reste qu'une minute.

J'ai une autre question bien précise concernant le pont. Le contrat initial prévoyait des postes de péage, et il y a des coût associés à ces postes.

Pouvez-vous nous dire combien auraient coûté ces postes de péage? Est-ce là une réduction de la facture pour les contribuables canadiens?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Depuis que j'ai fait cette annonce, nous avons entamé des discussions de nature commerciale avec le constructeur. Lorsque les négociations seront complétées, je ferai preuve de transparence, comme nous l'avons fait la dernière fois, à l'égard des Québécois, des Québécoises et du Comité en leur fournissant toute l'information sur l'entente à laquelle nous serons arrivés avec le constructeur final sur l'ensemble des coûts du projet.

M. Joël Godin:

J'ai une autre question à vous poser.

Pour ce qui est de la taxe d'accise, 28 municipalités de ma circonscription sont en train d'établir leur budget et de calculer l'argent dont elles pourront disposer pour leurs activités l'an prochain, en 2019. Le Programme de la taxe sur l'essence et de la contribution du Québec 2014-2018, le TECQ, n'a pas encore été renouvelé. Or il prendra fin le 31 décembre 2018.

Le ministre peut-il assurer aux municipalités du Québec que ce programme sera renouvelé?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Je peux affirmer à mon collègue que nous allons lui fournir toutes les précisions par écrit.

Le renouvellement de cette taxe sur l'essence est en cours. Cela me fera plaisir de lui fournir tous les détails par écrit pour bien l'informer à ce sujet. Il pourra à son tour en informer les municipalités de sa circonscription. La taxe sur l'essence est un levier important, pour les petites municipalités comme pour les grandes, car elle leur permet de réaliser des projets d'infrastructure. Je serai heureux de lui donner des détails par écrit, qu'il pourra ensuite communiquer aux municipalités de sa circonscription.

M. Joël Godin:

Monsieur le ministre, pouvez-vous me dire si ce programme a déjà été renouvelé? Les municipalités peuvent-elles compter sur cet argent?

(0935)

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Les municipalités peuvent compter sur la pérennité du programme de la taxe sur l'essence. Pour ce qui est des détails, je serai heureux d'envoyer une lettre au député pour lui donner, ainsi qu'aux municipalités de sa circonscription, de l'information détaillée.

Avec votre permission, madame la présidente, je vais envoyer une lettre au député pour lui donner le détail des sommes que chacune des municipalités de sa circonscription pourra recevoir.

M. Joël Godin:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.

Merci, madame la présidente. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Pourriez-vous s'il vous plaît faire parvenir ce document à la greffière du Comité pour que tous les membres puissent avoir l'occasion de consulter la même information?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Pour être certain de bien comprendre, madame la présidente, souhaitez-vous que je fournisse les renseignements concernant la taxe sur l'essence à chaque député dans sa circonscription, ou bien seulement à ce député?

La présidente:

Peu importe le document que vous transmettez à un membre, nous souhaitons qu'il soit communiqué de la même...

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Nous transmettrons les renseignements au député, comme il l'a demandé, et tous les autres membres pourront le consulter. Très bien.

La présidente:

Oui, si les autres souhaitent obtenir ces renseignements pour leur circonscription, ils pourront le demander. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Madame la présidente, je ne suis pas un membre du Comité. Pourra-t-on me transmettre cette information? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Oui, nous le ferons, monsieur Godin. [Français]

M. Joël Godin:

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Monsieur Rogers.

M. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Bienvenue, monsieur le ministre.

Je vais commencer par partager le temps qui m'est alloué avec mon collègue, M. Sikand.

Monsieur le ministre, je souhaite aborder en particulier les questions qui touchent les municipalités. Je suis issu du milieu municipal; j'ai été maire d'une très petite municipalité. J'ai participé à l'association des municipalités à l'échelle provinciale à titre de président et j'ai été membre de la FCM, à l'échelle fédérale. J'aimerais que vous expliquiez au Comité, plus particulièrement, les points sur lesquels vous portez votre attention ou les réalisations projetées, pour venir en aide aux petites municipalités rurales du Canada quant à leurs besoins en infrastructure, en particulier ce qui touche l'eau potable, les eaux usées et d'autres enjeux et problèmes auxquels les responsables de ces collectivités doivent faire face chaque jour.

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Je tiens à remercier le député. Je constate que bon nombre de nos collègues viennent du milieu municipal, et c'est une bonne chose.

Parmi les choses que nous avons faites, nous avons collaboré très étroitement avec les membres de la FCM pour comprendre les besoins des municipalités.

Comme M. Rogers le sait, je viens d'une circonscription qui compte 34 petites municipalités aussi, donc je comprends vraiment ce besoin. C'est pourquoi j'ai dit que l'infrastructure ne signifie pas la même chose pour tout le monde. Quand il s'agit d'un milieu urbain, comme c'était le cas dans la question précédente, je peux parler de Montréal et du pont Champlain, ou je peux parler de projets en cours en Colombie-Britannique ou en Alberta, à Calgary ou à Edmonton, mais, de toute évidence, les choses sont différentes quand il s'agit, par exemple, de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador et de petites collectivités, et c'est pourquoi nous avons adapté en partie notre programme. Les modalités liées à la somme de 33 milliards de dollars, aux ententes et aux ententes bilatérales intégrées comprennent des dispositions qui visent les collectivités rurales et du Nord.

C'est ainsi parce que nous avons compris que, dans le cas des petites collectivités, les responsables ont besoin de plus de souplesse et que parfois, ce qu'il faut, par exemple, c'est d'offrir la connexion à Internet pour changer la vie des gens.

Je suis très heureux d'échanger. J'étais récemment, par exemple, dans la province voisine de la vôtre, au Nouveau-Brunswick, et j'ai rencontré, si ma mémoire est bonne, 30 maires de petites municipalités. J'ai fait la même chose en Alberta lors de mon dernier passage là-bas. Je crois qu'il s'agissait de l'Alberta Urban Municipalities Association.

J'aime ces rencontres parce que, premièrement, elles servent à communiquer de l'information. Deuxièmement, elles permettent d'échanger avec les responsables à propos de leurs besoins et, troisièmement, je dirais qu'elles visent à nous assurer que nos programmes sont adaptés aux objectifs des petites collectivités.

M. Churence Rogers:

J'ai une autre question. Je suis reconnaissant du soutien que vous offrez aux municipalités, parce que cela permet d'alléger parfois le fardeau municipal ou de taxation imposé aux résidants des petites collectivités partout au pays. De nos jours, les services Internet et de téléphone cellulaire sont essentiels, mais, malheureusement, il y a des lacunes à cet égard dans beaucoup de régions rurales au Canada.

Je peux parler de façon spécifique de ma circonscription et de la péninsule de Baie Verte, par exemple, où le réseau cellulaire est très déficient. Les gens me demandent de presser mon gouvernement d'augmenter les fonds consacrés aux services de téléphonie cellulaire et d'accès à Internet dans ma circonscription. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer ce que votre gouvernement fait pour rendre accessible à davantage de collectivités la connectivité Internet à large bande et améliorer les services de téléphonie cellulaire dans les régions rurales, en particulier?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madame la présidente, j'aimerais remercier mon collègue, M. Rogers, parce qu'il soulève un sujet qui m'est cher. Comme je l'ai mentionné précédemment, je partage son avis. Dans une bonne partie de ma propre circonscription, il n'y a pas de connectivité à Internet ni de réseau de téléphonie cellulaire. Je suis heureux de défendre cette importante question pour lui et avec lui.

Le volet de notre programme touchant les régions rurales et les collectivités contient quelques éléments de réponse. Nous avons été en mesure, dans le cadre de ce programme, d'adapter les règles pour pouvoir financer en partie cette infrastructure. Toutefois, je dirais, madame la présidente, qu'il ne s'agit que d'une partie de la réponse.

Je crois que le programme Brancher pour innover, offert par le ministère du ministre Bains, a eu un effet très important grâce à la somme de 500 millions de dollars réservée pour brancher les collectivités au Canada. Je crois que les gens comprennent maintenant que la connectivité à Internet est semblable à ce qu'était l'électricité à une autre époque, car ce service permet aux gens, par exemple, d'avoir accès à de l'éducation à distance, à de l'apprentissage en ligne ou à des consultations médicales à distance dans leurs collectivités.

Je comprends le député et je peux lui assurer que je partage sa position. Nous souhaitons collaborer avec vous afin de nous assurer que nous pouvons en faire davantage pour les collectivités partout au Canada en ce qui concerne la connectivité à Internet.

(0940)

M. Churence Rogers:

Merci.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à M. Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Merci.

J'aimerais d'abord vous remercier, monsieur le ministre, de l'investissement de plus de 1 million de dollars provenant des 2 milliards de dollars alloués au Fonds pour l'eau potable et le traitement des eaux usées. Cet investissement a aidé à construire l'égout collecteur et son poste de pompage, ainsi que le système de déshydratation des boues dans ma collectivité. Je vous en remercie.

À ce propos, qu'a fait le gouvernement pour s'assurer que les Canadiens sont au courant des réalisations effectuées grâce à nos investissements ou qu'ils savent où va l'argent?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Je suis très heureux. Je crois qu'on peut constater ce matin qu'il y a des projets dans toutes les collectivités des personnes réunies autour de cette table. Les Canadiens qui regardent cette séance chez eux seraient du même avis. Il y a plus de 4 400 projets en cours au pays. De toute évidence, chacun d'entre eux améliore la qualité de vie des gens.

À titre d'exemple, le premier projet que j'ai annoncé concernait une collectivité située près de ma ville natale. Il s'agissait d'un investissement d'environ 10 000 $. Je me souviens que des gens m'ont demandé: « Monsieur le ministre, pourquoi faites-vous une annonce pour un investissement de 10 000 ? » J'ai répondu: « Parce qu'une petite somme dans une petite collectivité peut vraiment changer les choses. » L'exemple que vous avez donné montre qu'il y a un projet dans votre circonscription. Je pourrais faire un tour de table, et ce serait le cas pour chaque personne, parce que j'ai une liste de projets pour chaque circonscription représentée autour de cette table.

À mes yeux, les infrastructures vertes sont les plus importantes. Vous avez parlé du traitement des eaux usées.

Bon nombre de ces projets ne sont peut-être pas visibles pour les Canadiens, parce qu'il s'agira de mettre à niveau des stations de traitement — par exemple, des stations de pompage, comme c'est le cas à Trois-Rivières — ou d'autres équipements. Si les Canadiens souhaitent connaître quels types de projets seront réalisés dans leur collectivité, nous avons créé ce que nous appelons la carte des projets. Si les gens consultent le site Web d'Infrastructure Canada, ils pourront cliquer sur une carte. Nous avons essayé d'offrir de la transparence aux Canadiens afin qu'ils puissent prendre connaissance des types de projets qui ont été financés dans leur collectivité et connaître leur état d'achèvement. Parfois, nous sommes même en mesure de fournir des photos, pour que les personnes puissent comprendre ce que nous faisons. Nous allons continuer de fournir ces renseignements parce que je crois que c'est important que les Canadiens comprennent que ces projets — qu'ils concernent la gestion des eaux, le transport en commun ou le prolongement d'une piste d'atterrissage dans une collectivité — permettent, de différentes façons, de changer leur vie.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Jeneroux, vous disposez de deux minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais simplement rappeler à mes collègues assis de l'autre côté de la table qu'il s'agit de l'argent des contribuables.

Tout le monde vous remercie, monsieur le ministre. Même si c'est vous qui êtes ici, devant nous, il s'agit quand même de l'argent des contribuables et, à la fin, l'argent pour réaliser ces projets ne proviendra pas de votre compte bancaire personnel.

Voici ma question: selon vous, la Banque de l'infrastructure est-elle retardée dans ses annonces de projets?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Permettez-moi, madame la présidente, de souligner que le député a soulevé un excellent point. Je ne prétends jamais qu'il s'agit de mon propre argent. Je suis ici pour représenter les intérêts du gouvernement, des parlementaires et des Canadiens. Je ferais remarquer à mon collègue que je m'assure toujours que les gens comprennent qu'il s'agit de l'argent des contribuables. Nous sommes responsables de gérer cet argent et de l'allouer de la meilleure façon possible pour obtenir des résultats. Sur ce point, j'accorde beaucoup...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

La Banque de l'infrastructure est-elle retardée en ce qui concerne l'annonce des projets, oui ou non?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Je dirais que la Banque de l'infrastructure, comme je l'ai déjà dit, examine des dizaines de projets en ce moment même. Évidemment, mon collègue, qui connaît bien ces choses, comprend bien qu'il y a des questions délicates sur le plan commercial en ce qui concerne les annonces. Nous ferons le nécessaire. La banque s'en chargera. Quand elle sera prête à faire les annonces, elle les fera.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

En ce qui concerne l'échéancier, monsieur le ministre, il était prévu lors des élections de 2015 que cela serait un outil. Ensuite, on a de nouveau annoncé, en 2016, que vous alliez le faire. Il y a eu récemment un prélèvement supplémentaire de 11 millions de dollars. C'est une banque de 35 milliards de dollars. Vous avez vu un projet réalisé à Montréal, lequel était une répétition de l'annonce d'un projet précédent. Pensez-vous ou non que cette banque a été un échec absolu pour les Canadiens jusqu'à maintenant?

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madame la présidente, comme le député l'a dit, notre rôle en tant que parlementaires et en tant que gouvernement, ainsi qu'en tant que Banque de l'infrastructure, est évidemment d'investir des fonds publics. Je suis certain que le député et les gens qui nous regardent s'attendent à ce que nous fassions preuve de diligence raisonnable lorsque nous investissons. Le député, j'en suis convaincu, ne suggère pas que nous nous empressions d'investir, mais que nous agissions en toute diligence. Comme vous l'avez dit, il s'agit d'argent précieux provenant des contribuables de partout au pays. Nous devons faire preuve de diligence raisonnable à l'égard de ces projets. C'est ce qui se passe.

J'espère que le député se rend compte que la banque est un outil visant à en faire plus pour les Canadiens. Je pense que, s'il parlait à certains des investisseurs à qui je parle... et les Canadiens comprennent que...

(0945)

M. Matt Jeneroux:

C'est un outil très coûteux, monsieur le ministre. C'est un outil très coûteux, pour lequel nous avons vu très peu de résultats.

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Nous bâtissons une banque pour le prochain siècle. Si j'étais le député, je ne l'oublierais pas. Je suis certain qu'un jour, il en verra les répercussions, qu'il s'agisse d'interrelations ou d'autres choses qui feront une différence non seulement dans sa province, mais partout au Canada. Il s'agit d'un outil qui permet de bâtir le genre de choses que les Canadiens veulent. Il s'agit de voir grand, de penser intelligemment. Je suis certain que le député pense comme nous lorsqu'il s'agit de bâtir de meilleures collectivités partout au Canada.

La présidente:

Monsieur le ministre Champagne, merci beaucoup d'être ici avec nous aujourd'hui. Nous avons attendu votre visite avec impatience. Nous sommes reconnaissants de tous les renseignements que vous avez communiqués au Comité.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour un moment, le temps que nos nouveaux témoins s'installent...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame la présidente, avant que nous suspendions la séance, je voudrais simplement invoquer le Règlement au sujet de ce que vous m'avez cité, en ce qui concerne le fait de poser des questions répétitives. On le fait généralement dans le cas de discours répétitifs à la Chambre des communes. J'aimerais que vous nous reveniez avec des exemples de cas où les comités ont posé ce genre de questions. Si vous pouvez le faire, c'est fantastique, parce que je ne veux pas soulever cette question à la Chambre et demander au Président de se prononcer sur le sujet. Merci.

La présidente:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Jeneroux.

Je serais heureuse de vous reporter au livre contenant les règles, à la page 1 058, au chapitre 20, concernant les comités et la capacité du président de décider si c'est répétitif ou...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Madame la présidente, ma demande était que vous nous présentiez des exemples où c'est utilisé de la façon dont vous le dites. On s'en sert à la Chambre lorsque le discours est le même mot pour mot, mais, en ce qui concerne l'usage que vous en faites, le Comité aimerait beaucoup voir des exemples de cas où cela a été fait dans le passé.

Je vous remercie.

La présidente:

Si vous voulez contester la présidence, monsieur Jeneroux, vous pouvez certainement le faire.

Je vais essayer de vous fournir ce que j'ai, et je doute qu'il y aura des exemples, parce que je ne pense pas que je vais demander à la greffière d'en chercher. Si vous n'êtes pas satisfait de ma décision, vous pouvez certainement contester la décision de la présidence, monsieur.

L'hon. François-Philippe Champagne:

Madame la présidente, je ne veux pas me répéter, mais j'aimerais simplement remercier les membres du Comité de leurs questions et de leur passion envers l'infrastructure du XXIe siècle pour les Canadiens. Je pense que c'est la meilleure façon d'attirer des talents et des investissements dans notre pays, et nous allons continuer dans cette voie. Je serais heureux de revenir pour répondre aux questions des membres du Comité. [Français]

Madame la présidente et chers collègues, je vous remercie tous de m'avoir accueilli ici ce matin. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons suspendre temporairement la séance.

(0945)

(0950)

La présidente:

Nous reprenons nos travaux.

Nous disposerons d'une demi-heure pour examiner notre étude sur l'évaluation de l'incidence du bruit des avions près des grands aéroports canadiens.

Nous accueillons Nick Boud, consultant principal pour Helios.

Monsieur Boud, vous avez cinq minutes pour parler, ou peut-être six, puisque vous êtes le seul témoin et que nous avons hâte de vous entendre. Merci.

M. Nick Boud (consultant principal, Helios):

D'accord.

Bonjour, madame la présidente et chers membres du Comité. Merci d'avoir invité Helios à comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui.

Helios est un cabinet britannique de consultants en aviation qui travaillent pour des clients du monde entier et de l'ensemble de l'industrie du transport aérien. Je dirige les activités de consultation aéroportuaire au sein d'Helios et j'ai 26 ans d'expérience dans le domaine de l'aviation. Helios s'est vu confier le contrat de mener une analyse technique indépendante et de soutenir la GTAA dans le cadre de la mise en oeuvre de son dernier plan d'action quinquennal de gestion du bruit.

Au cours des deux dernières années et demie, Helios a réalisé une étude pour NAV CANADA, deux pour la GTAA et une pour Aéroports de Montréal. J'ai présenté quatre documents de référence avant aujourd'hui, dont les deux premiers ont été rédigés par Helios. Je vais vous expliquer chacun de ces documents.

Le premier est une étude indépendante du bruit dans l'espace aérien de Toronto préparée pour NAV CANADA, qui fournit des recommandations et des conclusions sur l'atténuation du bruit dans l'espace aérien de Toronto, ainsi que de nombreux renseignements généraux.

Le deuxième document, intitulé Best practices in noise management, a été préparé pour la GTAA et donne un excellent aperçu de 11 pratiques différentes de gestion du bruit dans 26 aéroports internationaux qui sont comparables à l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto.

Le troisième document est un document d'analyse préparé par le Conseil international des aéroports et publié plus tôt cette semaine. Il traite de l'avenir du bruit aérien. Ce document a été préparé en réponse à la récente publication par l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé de ses dernières lignes directrices sur le bruit ambiant.

Le dernier document que j'ai présenté est un article de l'International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. L'auteur conclut que les données utilisées par l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé et l'analyse effectuée pour établir la relation entre le bruit lié au transport aérien et les désagréments ont, selon ses propres termes, des répercussions importantes sur les recommandations finales. L'auteur conclut également que le niveau de bruit recommandé pour éviter les effets néfastes du bruit du trafic aérien sur la santé devrait être de huit décibels supérieur à celui proposé par l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé. Une augmentation de huit décibels est substantielle. Il est généralement admis que l'oreille humaine perçoit une augmentation de l'intensité sonore de 100 % pour chaque augmentation de 10 décibels.

La gestion du bruit du trafic aérien est un sujet complexe comprenant de multiples facettes, et je ne pourrai qu'effleurer la question aujourd'hui.

Helios constate les mêmes plaintes et les mêmes défis en matière de bruits aériens partout où il va. Cependant, les solutions diffèrent, car les environnements urbain, social, géographique, politique, réglementaire et opérationnel ne sont jamais les mêmes.

Je vous prie de m'excuser, car je suis sur le point de faire une généralisation. C'est l'aéronef qui fait du bruit, mais, bien souvent, les parties qui ne sont pas présentes aux réunions publiques et qui sont généralement les dernières à la table, ce sont les compagnies aériennes. Des progrès importants ne sont possibles que si toutes les parties prenantes sont présentes à la table de façon volontaire, travaillent de manière corroborative, sont prêtes à donner et à recevoir, prennent des décisions difficiles et s'engagent à atteindre les objectifs de réduction et d'atténuation du bruit.

Déplacer le bruit de la collectivité A vers la collectivité B de manière permanente ou à long terme sans autre raison que d'apaiser la collectivité A n'est pas une solution. Cela est seulement susceptible d'accroître le problème de façon exponentielle. La relocalisation à court terme du bruit de manière prévisible et régulière, souvent appelée « répartition du bruit » ou « répit sonore », peut être une mesure d'atténuation précieuse dans certaines situations. De nombreux aéroports travaillent depuis des décennies à réduire ou à atténuer le bruit et ont investi des millions de dollars à cet égard, mais un grand nombre de résidents ne sont toujours pas satisfaits. Cela ne veut pas dire que nous ne devons pas continuer d'essayer, car des améliorations majeures ont été apportées et il y a encore beaucoup à faire dans les semaines, les mois et les années à venir.

L'une des questions fréquemment soulevées par le Comité concerne les normes nationales qui sont en place pour protéger les gens contre le bruit lié au transport aérien. Pour autant que je sache, il y en a deux au Canada.

(0955)



La première est établie par Transports Canada et exige que les aéroports préparent des prévisions de l'ambiance sonore, ou NEF, qui sont utilisées pour orienter les stratégies de zonage urbain. L'acousticien, M. Colin Novak, a parlé de certains des défis que pose l'utilisation de ces NEF. Je présume, d'après les tendances observées ailleurs dans le monde, que la tolérance du public à l'égard du bruit lié au transport aérien a diminué depuis que Transports Canada a établi les niveaux NEF 25 et NEF 30, et je dirais que la majorité des plaintes concernant le bruit proviennent de personnes qui ne sont pas situées dans les zones géographiques délimitées par les courbes de ces NEF.

La deuxième norme concerne les exigences relatives à la certification acoustique des aéronefs fixées par l'OACI, qui sont devenues plus strictes avec chaque génération d'aéronefs, ce qui signifie que les aéronefs sont devenus plus silencieux. Ces derniers demeurent en service actif pendant plus de 30 ans, de sorte qu'il peut s'écouler beaucoup de temps avant que les aéronefs plus bruyants ne soient mis hors service.

J'aimerais vous donner un aperçu de ce que sont les vols de nuit à l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto. Une analyse entreprise par Helios Technology Ltd. pour le compte de la GTAA montre que plus de 80 % des vols de nuit sont des services de passagers, le reste étant du fret, entre 10 et 15 %, ou des transports aériens généraux et/ou d'affaires.

Les vols de nuit représentent 3 % de tous les vols à l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto. Les aéroports et les groupes communautaires se demandent si le nombre de plaintes déposées relativement au bruit est une indication précise de l'ampleur du problème. Je vous conseille de voir les plaintes uniquement comme un élément de l'évaluation plus large de l'ampleur du problème du bruit aérien. De nombreux facteurs font qu'il est impossible de comparer directement le nombre de plaintes d'un aéroport à l'autre. Le pourcentage de nouvelles plaintes chaque année peut être une mesure informative, mais, encore une fois, il ne devrait jamais être pris en compte de manière isolée.

La présidente:

Je suis désolée de vous interrompre, mais les membres du Comité ont beaucoup de questions.

M. Nick Boud:

Il me reste quatre lignes.

La présidente:

Continuez, je vous prie.

M. Nick Boud:

Helios Technology serait ravi d'apporter un soutien supplémentaire à ce comité, mais j'espère que vous comprenez que la réalité est que nous sommes une organisation commerciale et que nous devons limiter notre travail non rémunéré. Jusqu'à présent, nous avons investi notre temps de façon bénévole, et j'espère que notre contribution sera utile.

Je vous remercie. Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

La présidente:

merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Liepert, pour quatre minutes.

M. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, PCC):

Merci, monsieur, de votre travail.

L'une des choses que le Comité a de la difficulté à déterminer — c'est mon cas, du moins —, c'est à qui revient le problème. On dirait que les autorités aéroportuaires disent: « Nous ne faisons atterrir que les aéronefs qui veulent atterrir ici. » NAV CANADA dit: « Notre travail est de nous assurer qu'ils atterrissent en toute sécurité. » Il semble que Transports Canada a en quelque sorte refilé cette responsabilité à NAV CANADA.

Supposons que nous présentions certaines recommandations. Prenons un exemple qui a été suggéré par de nombreux témoins: l'interdiction des vols de nuit. Dans votre étude de cette question, qui, selon vous, aurait la capacité ou l'autorité de le faire?

(1000)

M. Nick Boud:

Selon l'expérience d'autres pays ailleurs dans le monde, les seules personnes qui ont l'autorité d'interdire les vols de nuit sont celles qui font partie du gouvernement. Il faudrait une loi pour imposer cette interdiction. C'est ce qui se fait. Il y a des restrictions volontaires, mais l'interdiction des vols de nuit, à mon avis, exigerait l'adoption officielle d'une loi.

M. Ron Liepert:

Vous semblez avoir dit dans votre déclaration qu'il y a plusieurs facettes à ce problème et que divers aspects interviennent dans toute cette question.

Nous avons certainement entendu parler de l'aspect de la santé, mais pas des incidences économiques qui découleraient de certaines recommandations. Pouvez-vous nous dire à quel point il est complexe de prendre une mesure qui pourrait avoir des conséquences imprévues sur une quantité d'autres aspects?

M. Nick Boud:

Selon moi, cela revient au fait qu'une solution unique ne conviendra pas à tous les aéroports. L'aéroport de Francfort, par exemple, dont il a été question plus tôt, prévoit une période de la nuit où les vols sont interdits. C'est la même chose pour l'aéroport de Zurich, mais d'autres aéroports en Allemagne et en Suisse ont des vols de nuit.

Cela peut causer le déplacement de services d'un aéroport qui interdit les vols de nuit vers d'autres, ce qui transfère le bruit d'un endroit vers un autre. Les compagnies aériennes, s'il y a des activités commerciales à cet endroit, trouveront une façon d'offrir le service. Il y a certainement des incidences économiques, et je sais que la GTAA désire réaliser une évaluation de l'aspect économique des vols de nuit; c'est pourquoi elle a retenu nos services pour l'aider à élaborer des scénarios de la circulation dans le cadre de l'étude.

On ne peut pas prendre une mesure sans qu'il y ait des incidences sur des entreprises qui ne sont pas directement liées à l'aéroport, sur des employés de l'aéroport et sur l'ensemble de la collectivité.

M. Ron Liepert:

Certainement, le consommateur également... Les consommateurs fréquentent moins les centres commerciaux et font davantage leurs achats en ligne, et le produit doit se rendre quelque part. Je n'affirme pas qu'il doit être transporté dans un vol de nuit. Tout ce que je dis, c'est qu'une interdiction des vols de nuit créera fort probablement plus de problèmes. Vous êtes-vous penchés sur cet aspect au cours de votre travail?

M. Nick Boud:

La grande majorité du fret est transportée sur un aéronef de passagers. Le pourcentage d'aéronefs consacrés au fret est infime en comparaison de l'ensemble des transports. Oui, le changement des attitudes sociales en matière d'achats augmentera le fret aérien, mais à moins que la société ne change ses pratiques, ce n'est pas quelque chose que nous pouvons éviter.

M. Ron Liepert:

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Le rapport Helios indique que la période de nuit de l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto commence tard et est plus courte que celle d'autres aéroports. Qu'ont fait certains aéroports de taille et de volume comparables pour régler le problème de bruit?

M. Nick Boud:

Pour ce qui est des vols de nuit, je crois que deux autres aéroports prévoient une période de nuit similaire à celle de l'aéroport de Toronto, mais d'autres ont certainement des périodes de nuit de huit ou de neuf heures. Certains aéroports ont mis en place un système de quotas, où plus l'aéronef est bruyant, plus la pénalité imposée sera lourde en fonction d'un système de points totaux.

Certains aéroports, comme l'aéroport Pearson, ont fixé une limite totale du nombre de vols de nuit qu'ils peuvent accueillir chaque année. D'autres facturent des frais supplémentaires possiblement deux ou trois fois plus élevés que les frais de jour pour effectuer des vols de nuit. D'autres encore, à l'instar de Pearson, imposent une restriction sur les types d'aéronefs qui peuvent voler pendant la période de nuit.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Ma deuxième question est la suivante. Dans l'Étude indépendante du bruit dans l'espace aérien de Toronto, réalisée par Helios, il est recommandé que NAV CANADA rédige une lettre officielle à Transports Canada pour lui demander d'envisager d'établir au 31 décembre 2020 la date butoir pour l'exploitation de la série Airbus A320. Toutefois, la GTAA a proposé des incitatifs pour des modifications optionnelles visant l'atténuation du bruit.

Que pensez-vous de l'efficacité d'un programme d'incitatifs pour des modifications optionnelles?

(1005)

M. Nick Boud:

Ces incitatifs ont fait leurs preuves dans d'autres aéroports ailleurs dans le monde. Lufthansa, en Allemagne, a volontairement modifié son aéronef et a été une des premières compagnies aériennes à le faire. L'aéroport Gatwick impose une sanction pécuniaire aux compagnies aériennes si elles exploitent un aéronef modifié.

Encore une fois, on doit trouver la bonne solution pour le Canada. J'approuve encore la recommandation selon laquelle on doit prendre des mesures pour persuader les transporteurs de modifier l'A320. Il s'agit d'une simple transformation ou modification de l'aéronef qui peut avoir une incidence importante sur le bruit.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Je pose cette question parce que je représente une circonscription qui se trouve très près de l'aéroport Pearson. Selon vos études exhaustives, particulièrement celle sur l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto et ses environs, que pensez-vous de l'établissement d'un nouvel aéroport à Kitchener ou au nord de l'escarpement, n'importe où dans le Grand Toronto et autour de celui-ci?

M. Nick Boud:

Je dirais que l'établissement d'un nouvel aéroport ou la redistribution des vols vers d'autres aéroports est un déplacement du bruit. Également, les collectivités ont tendance à croître près des aéroports parce que ces derniers sont un moteur économique et que les gens peuvent y trouver un emploi.

Maintes fois, la construction de nouveaux aéroports a pu sembler être la solution, mais, à long terme, les collectivités ont tendance à croître près de l'aéroport. Il faut une planification très minutieuse pour en arriver à une solution satisfaisante.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci beaucoup.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins d'être avec nous.

Madame la présidente, avant de poser des questions, je vais me permettre de faire un commentaire à votre endroit.

Dans ses propos préliminaires, le témoin a parlé de quatre documents qu'il avait déposés. Or j'ai appris que lesdits documents étaient présentement en cours de traduction. Compte tenu de leur volume, ils ne sont pas disponibles en français.

Dans notre planification relativement à la liste de témoins, il faudrait s'assurer que les témoins ne comparaissent qu'une fois les documents distribués à tout le monde dans les deux langues. Si j'avais disposé de tous les documents en français, cela aurait changé considérablement ma préparation et mes questions. J'aurais probablement trouvé réponse à mes questions dans les documents et j'aurais pu aller plus loin. Or tout cela est impossible.

Pourrait-on s'assurer d'avoir reçu les documents dans les deux langues officielles avant d'entendre les témoins en comité? Ce serait fort apprécié. Je laisse cela à votre réflexion, madame la présidente.

Je vais maintenant me tourner vers vous, monsieur Boud. Vous avez déjà répondu à une de mes questions dans vos propos préliminaires. Vous avez dit qu'il semblait difficile d'appliquer à chacun des aéroports les conclusions du rapport qu'Helios a fait pour l'Aéroport international Toronto Pearson. Il doit quand même y avoir des éléments communs à l'ensemble des aéroports que vous avez étudiés.

Serait-il juste de dire qu'il peut y avoir deux types de recommandations, c'est-à-dire des recommandations qui s'adressent à l'ensemble des aéroports qui vivent le même problème lié aux communautés environnantes et des recommandations spécifiques à chacun des aéroports? [Traduction]

M. Nick Boud:

Il y a certainement un point commun aux solutions qu'on peut envisager. Nous n'avons pas besoin de réinventer la roue pour chaque aéroport, mais ce n'est pas parce qu'une solution est la bonne pour un aéroport qu'elle peut s'appliquer immédiatement à un autre. Par exemple, les itinéraires de vol vers Vancouver ont la possibilité de passer au-dessus de l'eau, mais ce n'est pas une solution envisageable pour l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto. Oui, on peut examiner les itinéraires de vol et essayer d'utiliser les corridors industriels ou les régions rurales, mais ça ne s'applique pas partout.

Le maintien des aéronefs en altitude plus élevée est quelque chose qui est probablement réalisable dans nombre d'aéroports, et cela réduit le bruit, mais, encore une fois, on doit examiner l'environnement local pour relever les obstacles qui s'y trouvent — des obstacles artificiels ou un terrain montagneux — avant de conclure que cette solution s'applique dans la région.

La répartition des collectivités résidentielles autour de l'aéroport a aussi une incidence sur la solution adéquate. Dans le rapport sur les pratiques exemplaires ou l'Étude indépendante du bruit dans l'espace aérien de Toronto, lorsque les documents seront traduits — et je comprends qu'un des documents est assez volumineux à traduire —, vous verrez qu'il y a un point commun et vous serez en mesure de trouver des éléments qui pourraient être examinés pour d'autres aéroports, mais on doit quand même les adapter.

(1010)

[Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Vous avez travaillé à l'international sur ces questions. Croyez-vous que le Comité pourrait cibler un, deux ou trois aéroports qui pourraient faire office de chefs de file en matière de réduction du bruit? Parmi les aéroports en tête de peloton, se trouverait-il un aéroport canadien? En matière de réduction du bruit, les aéroports canadiens sont-ils plutôt en queue de peloton? [Traduction]

M. Nick Boud:

Je ne crois pas qu'on devrait examiner seulement un ou deux aéroports. C'est pourquoi, lorsque nous avons réalisé le travail sur les pratiques exemplaires pour la GTAA, nous avons examiné 26 aéroports internationaux parce que c'est grâce à une vue d'ensemble que nous pouvons obtenir toute la panoplie de solutions qui existent.

L'aéroport Schiphol, à Amsterdam, a déployé d'énormes efforts pour réduire au minimum le bruit dans les collectivités; il change de pistes tellement de fois par jour qu'il devient presque impossible pour les autres aéroports de faire la même chose, mais il n'interdit pas les vols de nuit. L'aéroport accueille plus de vols de nuit que l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto. On doit vraiment examiner un grand nombre d'aéroports pour trouver les différentes pratiques exemplaires qui peuvent être appliquées.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin, nous manquons de temps. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vais être bref. La norme internationale de 55 décibels est-elle atteinte par un certain nombre d'aéroports? [Traduction]

M. Nick Boud:

L'Union européenne demande aux aéroports de tenir compte de la norme de 55 décibels. Il ne s'agit pas d'une norme obligatoire. C'est un point de référence pour mesurer la population touchée, mais ce n'est pas quelque chose qui doit être respecté.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup. Nous allons passer à M. Maloney.

M. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur Boud, merci de vous joindre à nous aujourd'hui. Nous nous sommes rencontrés à plusieurs occasions. Je représente la circonscription d'Etobicoke—Lakeshore, qui est très touchée par le bruit et le volume de la circulation aérienne de l'aéroport Pearson, alors il s'agit d'une question qui touche de près mes électeurs.

Des études vous ont été commandées auparavant pour NAV CANADA et la GTAA dans le cadre desquelles vous avez examiné ce qu'on appelle les idées cinq et six, qui, en règle générale, si on regarde cela de très haut — sans faire de jeu de mots —, concernaient la direction de la circulation de manière régulière. Mes électeurs étaient préoccupés par la redirection de la circulation de l'est vers l'ouest et du nord vers le sud, et la GTAA, suivant la conclusion de vos études, a décidé qu'elle n'allait pas augmenter la circulation aérienne du nord au sud.

C'est bien ça, n'est-ce pas?

M. Nick Boud:

En général... Nous avons examiné les vols de fin de semaine et de nuit.

M. James Maloney:

Les vols de fin de semaine et de nuit, c'est exact.

Essentiellement, et je sais cela parce que mon frère est pilote pour Air Canada, il est plus sécuritaire pour les aéronefs de décoller et d'atterrir face au vent, n'est-ce pas?

M. Nick Boud:

Oui, c'est une règle de base.

M. James Maloney:

C'est une règle de base, et les vents ont tendance à souffler de l'est vers l'ouest, alors c'est une raison importante qui explique ce qui s'est produit.

J'aimerais passer aux vols de nuit. À l'aéroport Pearson, on utilise une formule pour savoir combien d'aéronefs peuvent atterrir et décoller, et je crois que cette formule donne un résultat par année plutôt que par nuit. Par conséquent, au cours d'une nuit donnée, selon les vents et d'autres facteurs, il pourrait y avoir un volume beaucoup plus élevé d'aéronefs qui atterrissent la nuit. Est-ce exact?

M. Nick Boud:

C'est exact.

M. James Maloney:

Les vols de nuit sont également régis par les règles relatives à l'utilisation des pistes, entre autres.

M. Nick Boud:

Oui, il y a des pistes préférentielles.

M. James Maloney:

Vous avez parlé de l'aspect commercial des vols de nuit et du fait que la plus grande partie de ces vols ont lieu en raison des passagers. Est-ce réaliste, à votre avis, d'interdire complètement les vols de nuit à l'aéroport Pearson, compte tenu de la région environnante et des solutions de rechange existantes?

M. Nick Boud:

Tout est possible, mais cette interdiction entraînerait d'importantes répercussions économiques.

M. James Maloney:

Vous avez dit qu'on ne peut pas appliquer une approche unique à tous les aéroports. Par exemple, si on prend des aéroports européens et qu'on interdit les vols de nuit dans un grand centre, il y a probablement un autre aéroport important deux heures plus loin, plus ou moins, où on peut détourner une partie de la circulation aérienne. Est-ce juste?

(1015)

M. Nick Boud:

Certainement en Allemagne, la circulation est détournée de l'aéroport de Francfort vers celui de Cologne, et des aéronefs ont été déplacés parce qu'ils n'effectuent pas seulement un vol. En général, cela a eu des incidences sur les activités de Francfort.

M. James Maloney:

Voilà qui m'amène à mon troisième point. Les options sont limitées à Toronto parce qu'il n'y a pas d'autres grands aéroports dans la région où l'on peut envoyer des aéronefs. Vous avez affirmé que les collectivités tendent à croître autour des aéroports, et c'est exactement ce qui s'est produit dans le cas de l'aéroport Pearson parce que, lors de sa construction, Mississauga et Brampton étaient loin d'avoir la taille qu'elles ont aujourd'hui, et ces villes ont pris de l'ampleur près de l'aéroport, ce qui a contribué en partie au problème.

J'étais à Edmonton cet été et j'ai été impressionné par le fait que la ville entretient une relation très positive avec les collectivités environnantes et le milieu des affaires; c'est parce que l'aéroport est isolé. Nous avons les terres de Pickering, qui ont été acquises il y a de nombreuses années, et il y a beaucoup d'espace autour.

Ne serait-il pas logique d'y construire un aéroport, étant donné qu'il est possible de créer un environnement où l'on peut éviter ce problème?

M. Nick Boud:

La construction d'un nouvel aéroport et le déplacement complet d'une activité sont une entreprise de taille. Certaines villes l'ont fait. Il ne s'agit pas seulement de déplacer l'aéroport, il faut généralement beaucoup d'autres infrastructures, et les projets domiciliaires ont tendance à croître autour de l'aéroport, mais il n'est pas impossible de le faire.

M. James Maloney:

J'ai une petite question complémentaire. On n'est pas obligé de déplacer toute l'activité. C'est comme si on établissait un deuxième bureau. On ne ferme pas une entreprise à un endroit pour l'ouvrir ailleurs. On trouve une solution de rechange.

M. Nick Boud:

L'histoire montre que, si on conserve les deux aéroports ouverts, nombre de transporteurs aériens ne voudront pas déménager parce que cela leur entraîne des coûts importants. Le premier aéroport tend à avoir les meilleures liaisons, et les transporteurs lui accordent une plus grande valeur.

M. James Maloney:

Merci, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci, madame la présidente. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Vous avez deux minutes. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Monsieur Boud, les témoins que nous avons reçus se plaignaient essentiellement du manque de responsabilité et de transparence de la part de nos autorités aéroportuaires. L'impression que cela donne est que le Canada se situe parmi les derniers de classe pour ce qui est de la gestion du bruit.

Comment les aéroports canadiens se comparent-ils aux aéroports d'autres pays en ce qui concerne la gestion du bruit? Comment les comités consultatifs sur le bruit sont-ils organisés dans d'autres pays comparativement à ceux du Canada? [Traduction]

M. Nick Boud:

Au cours des quelques jours où j'ai travaillé ici, je dirais certainement que le Canada s'est intéressé à la question de l'atténuation du bruit plus tard que nombre d'administrations. L'Europe et l'Australie examinent cela depuis beaucoup plus longtemps. Les États-Unis sont également, dans une certaine mesure, en avance sur le Canada à cet égard. Je peux seulement parler d'un aéroport parce que c'est là où j'ai concentré la plupart de mes efforts, à savoir l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto, et il a réalisé d'énormes progrès depuis ma première visite.

Quant à la façon dont les comités se penchent sur la question, encore une fois, le rapport sur les pratiques exemplaires contient un examen de la structure des comités. Il comporte des recommandations. Je sais que la GTAA va tenir une séance d'information ce soir au cours de sa réunion trimestrielle concernant les changements qu'elle apportera à la structure afin d'essayer de se rapprocher des pratiques exemplaires que nous avons étudiées dans les 26 aéroports. On peut en tirer des leçons et les mettre en oeuvre.

La présidente:

Monsieur Graham, vous avez deux minutes.

Nous pouvons ensuite passer à M. Jeneroux pour deux minutes, et ce sera la fin de la séance. Nous devons nous occuper d'affaires du Comité. Je suis désolée.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Le temps dont je dispose est équivalent à environ l'écart de turbulence de sillage entre deux avions, alors je tâcherai d'être bref. J'ai deux questions complètement différentes.

D'abord, les passagers peuvent-ils, lorsqu'ils réservent un vol, prendre des décisions qui ont une incidence sur le bruit des avions? Peuvent-ils faire quelque chose lorsqu'ils achètent leurs billets pour influer sur le moment, l'endroit et l'itinéraire des vols?

M. Nick Boud:

Certainement, les passagers pourraient choisir de ne pas réserver de vols de nuit, par exemple, et de se déplacer le jour. Ce serait une solution, à mon avis.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'autre aspect, c'est lorsque vous avez parlé du cycle de vie de plus ou moins 30 ans d'un aéronef. Quelle est la partie la plus bruyante d'un avion?

(1020)

M. Nick Boud:

Cela dépend du moment du vol dont vous parlez. Au décollage, ce sont les moteurs. À l'atterrissage, c'est le fuselage. La friction de l'air sur l'aéronef fait plus de bruit que les moteurs au cours de la dernière partie de la descente.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comment se compare le bruit d'un avion, disons, un 787 à celui d'un 707 ou d'un 747?

M. Nick Boud:

Il y a tout un monde de différence entre eux. Si on pouvait ramener un 707 à l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto et faire voler un 787 derrière, personne ne contesterait le fait que ces derniers sont devenus beaucoup plus silencieux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avons beaucoup parlé de la modification de l'A320. Pouvez-vous nous décrire en quoi consiste cette modification?

M. Nick Boud:

Le problème, c'est qu'il y a des prises d'air sous l'aile de l'appareil, et le vent souffle au-dessus, un peu comme lorsqu'on souffle sur le goulot d'une bouteille. C'est une petite pièce de métal qui doit être fixée juste devant cette ouverture pour bloquer la circulation d'air, ce qui empêche le sifflement provoqué par l'air qui s'introduit dans l'ouverture.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Savez-vous combien il en coûte pour modifier l'appareil?

M. Nick Boud:

Non. J'ai obtenu des évaluations variées parce que des compagnies aériennes ont des ententes d'entretien différentes avec Airbus. Des gens ont établi des devis à 5 000 ou à 7 000 $. Le coût de la pièce est faible en comparaison du coût de la mise hors service d'un aéronef. Vous devez vider le réservoir d'essence afin de procéder à la modification, mais ce n'est pas un coût important par comparaison avec le remplacement d'un aéronef.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci, madame la présidente. J'aimerais utiliser les deux minutes qui me sont imparties pour préciser mon intention avec le témoin précédent lorsque j'ai invoqué le Règlement. Ce n'était certainement pas mon intention de contester la présidente. Je vous suis reconnaissant de tout ce que vous faites en ce qui concerne le bon fonctionnement de notre comité. Je crois que nous travaillons très bien ensemble la plupart du temps.

Toutefois, je crois qu'il est important que nous, de notre côté, soyons en mesure de continuer à poser des questions. Votre rôle ne consiste pas à protéger le ministre de quelque façon que ce soit.

Je veux lire, aux fins du compte rendu, une citation de la page 1 078 du chapitre 20 des pratiques, des politiques et des procédures: La nature des questions pouvant être posées aux témoins qui comparaissent devant les comités n’est assujettie à aucune règle précise à part le fait qu’elles doivent se rapporter à la question à l’étude. Les témoins doivent répondre à toutes les questions que leur pose le comité.

On retrouve plus loin: Un témoin qui refuse de répondre aux questions peut faire l'objet d'un rapport à la Chambre.

Encore une fois, je veux m'assurer que les membres du Comité continuent de travailler ensemble. Je sais que vous aviez devant vous un document qui vous permettait de citer la disposition à laquelle vous avez fait référence. Cependant, encore une fois, je ne veux pas que nous revenions l'an prochain et que nous ne puissions pas continuer à travailler de manière amicale comme nous l'avons fait jusqu'à maintenant.

Je vais m'en tenir là, madame la présidente, pour ce qui est de préciser mon appel au Règlement. Merci.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Jeneroux.

Il n'y a aucune question pressante sur laquelle nous devons nous pencher.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke-Centre, Lib.):

Si vous me le permettez, j'ai une petite question.

La présidente:

Vous pouvez poser une très brève question parce que nous devons discuter d'affaires du Comité.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Vous avez mentionné l'aéroport de Schiphol dans votre étude. Mais, à part celui-là, l'aéroport Pearson comptait le nombre le plus élevé de vols de nuit de tous les aéroports qui faisaient l'objet de l'étude, soit trois fois plus que l'aéroport Heathrow. Y a-t-il une raison particulière pour laquelle il n'y avait dans l'étude aucune recommandation ou proposition selon laquelle la GTAA devrait réduire le nombre de vols de nuit ou le nombre de vols de nuit par nuit comme c'est le cas dans le budget annuel?

M. Nick Boud:

Non, il n'y a aucune raison précise pour laquelle nous n'avons pas formulé de recommandations. Nos recommandations visent la prolongation de la période de nuit et le changement des mécanismes de contrôle de cette période pour que l'on puisse possiblement maintenir la quantité de bruit à son niveau actuel, plutôt que prendre une décision ou formuler une recommandation qui aurait des incidences économiques, ce qui, à titre de consultants en aéronautique, ne relève pas de nous.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à nos témoins. Vous pouvez voir que nous aurions vraiment aimé poursuivre la séance avec vous pendant une autre heure, mais l'horaire ne nous le permet pas. Je vous remercie infiniment de votre contribution.

M. Nick Boud:

Merci.

La présidente:

Nous allons suspendre la séance un moment et nous allons passer aux affaires du Comité.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on December 06, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.