header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-12-05 INDU 142

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1620)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody. We're going to get started, because we are almost an hour behind—which happens in the House.

Welcome, everybody, as we continue our five-year statutory review of the Copyright Act.

Today we have with us, from the Copyright Board, Nathalie Théberge, vice-chair and chief executive officer; Gilles McDougall, secretary general; and Sylvain Audet, general counsel.

From the Department of Canadian Heritage, we have Kahlil Cappuccino, director of copyright policy in the creative marketplace and innovation branch. We also have Pierre-Marc Lauzon, policy analyst, copyright policy, creative marketplace and innovation branch.

And finally, from the Department of Industry, we have Mark Schaan, director general, marketplace framework policy branch; and Martin Simard, director, copyright and trademark policy directorate.

As we discussed on Monday, the witnesses will have their regular seven-minute introduction. We do have a second panel, so each party will get that initial seven minutes of questions and then we'll suspend. We'll bring in the second round, and we'll do the same thing all over again. We'll finish when we finish, so that will be good.

We're going to get started right away with the Copyright Board.

Ms. Théberge, go ahead. [Translation]

You have seven minutes.

Ms. Nathalie Théberge (Vice-Chair and Chief Executive Officer, Copyright Board):

Mr. Chair and distinguished members of this committee, thank you.

My name is Nathalie Théberge. I am the new vice-chair and CEO of the Copyright Board, as of October. I will be speaking today as CEO.

As you said, Gilles McDougall, secretary general, and Sylvain Audet, general counsel, both from the board, are with me today. I would like to thank the committee for giving us the opportunity to speak on the parliamentary review of the Copyright Act.

First, I'd like to provide a reminder: The Copyright Board of Canada is an independent, quasi-judicial tribunal created under the Copyright Act. The board's role is to establish the royalties to be paid for the use of works and other subject matters protected by copyright, when the administration of these rights is entrusted to a collective society. The direct value of royalties set by the board's decisions is estimated to almost $500 million annually.

The board sits at the higher end of the independent spectrum for administrative tribunals. Its mandate is to set fair and equitable tariffs in an unbiased, impartial and unimpeded fashion. This is not an easy task, especially as information required to support the work of the board is not easily acquired. The board is on the onset of a major reform following the introduction of changes to the Copyright Act imbedded in the Budget Implementation Act, Bill C-86.

If I may, I would like to state how committed the board is towards implementing the reform proposals. Of course, the impact of these proposals will take some time to assess as there will be a transition period during which all players involved, including the board and the parties that appear before it, will need to adapt and change their practices, behaviours and, to some extent, their organizational culture.

This transition period is to be expected due to the ambitious scope of the reform proposals, but we believe that the entire Canadian intellectual property ecosystem will benefit from a more efficient pricing system under the guidance of the Copyright Board.

However, reforming the board is not a panacea for all woes affecting the ability for creators to get fairly compensated for their work and for users to have access to these works. As such, the board welcomes the opportunity to put forward a few pistes de réflexion to the committee, hoping its experience in the actual operationalization of many provisions of the Copyright Act may be useful.

Today, we would like to suggest three themes the committee may want to consider. We were very careful as to choose only issues of direct implication for the board's mandate and operations, as defined in the Copyright Act and amended through the Budget Implementation Act 2018, No. 2, currently under review by Parliament.

(1625)

[English]

The first theme relates to transparency. Committee members who are familiar with the board know that our ability to render decisions that are fair and equitable and that reflect the public interest depends on our ability to understand and consider the broader marketplace. For that, you need information, including on whether other agreements covering similar uses of copyrighted material exist in a given market. This is a little bit like real estate, where to properly establish the selling price of a property you need to consider comparables, namely, the value of similar properties in the same neighbourhood, the rate of the market, etc.

Currently, filing of agreements with the board is not mandatory, which often leaves the board having to rely on an incomplete portrait of the market. We believe that the Copyright Act should provide a meaningful incentive for parties to file agreements between collectives and users. Some may argue that the board already has the authority to request from parties that they provide the board with relevant agreements. We think that legislative guidance would avoid the board having to exert pressure via subpoena to gain access to those agreements, which in turn can contribute to delays that we all want to avoid.

More broadly, we encourage the committee to consider in its report how to increase the overall transparency within the copyright ecosystem in Canada. As part of the reform, we will do our part at the board by adding to our own processes steps and practices that incentivize better sharing of information among parties and facilitate the participation of the public.

The second theme relates to access. We encourage the committee to include in its report a recommendation for a complete scrub of the act, since the last time it was done was in 1985. Successive reforms and modifications have resulted in a legislative text that is not only hard to understand but that at times appears to bear some incoherencies. In a world where creators increasingly have to manage their rights themselves, it is important that our legislative tools be written in a manner that facilitates comprehension. As such, we offer as an inspiration the Australian copyright act.

We further encourage the committee to consider modifying the publication requirements in the orphan works regime. Currently, where the owner of copyright cannot be located, the board cannot issue licences in relation to certain works, such as works that are solely available online or deposited in a museum. We believe the act should be amended to permit the board to issue a licence in those cases, with safeguards.

Finally, our third theme relates to efficiency. The board reform as proposed in Bill C-86 would go a long way in making the tariff-setting process in Canada more efficient and predictable and ultimately a better use of public resources. I believe the committee has heard the same message from various experts.

We recommend two other possible means to achieve these objectives.

First, we encourage the committee to consider changing the act to grant the board the power to issue interim decisions on its motion. Currently, the board can only do so on application from a party. This power would provide the board with an additional tool to influence the pace and dynamics of tariff-setting proceedings.

(1630)

[Translation]

Second, we encourage the committee to explore whether the act should be modified to clarify the binding nature of board tariffs and licences. This proposal follows a relatively recent decision of the Supreme Court of Canada where the court made a statement to the effect that when the board sets royalties within licences in individual cases—the arbitration regime—such licences did not have a mandatory binding effect against users in certain circumstances. Some commentators have also expressed different views on how that statement would be applicable to the tariff context before the board.

We are aware that this is a controversial issue, but would still invite you to study it if only because parties and the board spend time, efforts and resources in seeking a decision from the board.

On that happy note, we congratulate each member of the committee for the work accomplished thus far, and thank you for your attention.

The Chair:

Thank you.[English]

We're going to move directly to the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Mr. Cappuccino, you have up to seven minutes.

Mr. Kahlil Cappuccino (Director, Copyright Policy, Creative Marketplace and Innovation Branch, Department of Canadian Heritage):

It's actually Mark Schaan who will start.

The Chair:

Okay. We're going to go to the Department of Industry.

Mr. Schaan, you have up to seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Mark Schaan (Director General, Marketplace Framework Policy Branch, Department of Industry):

The Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada will share the time available with the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Good afternoon, distinguished members of the committee.

It is a pleasure for me to be before you again to discuss copyright. My name is Mark Schaan. I am the director general of the Marketplace Framework Policy Branch at Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada.

I am accompanied by Martin Simard, who is the director of the Copyright and Trademarks Policy Directorate in my branch.

We are here with our Canadian Heritage colleagues, Kahlil Cappuccino and Pierre-Marc Lauzon, to update the committee on two recent developments that relate to your review of the Copyright Act.

First, we will speak about the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement and the obligations the agreement contains regarding copyright.

Second, we will highlight the comprehensive actions taken by the government to modernize the Copyright Board of Canada, including the legislative proposals contained in Bill C-86, the Budget Implementation Act 2018, No. 2, which were generally noted as forthcoming in the first letter to your committee on the review and then again more specifically in Minister Bains and Minister Rodriguez's recent letter to you.[English]

On November 30, Canada, the United States and Mexico signed a new trade agreement that preserves key elements of the North American trading relationship and incorporates new and updated provisions to address modern trade issues. Particularly germane to your review of the Copyright Act, the new agreement updates the intellectual property chapter and includes shared commitments specific to copyright and related rights, which will allow Canada to maintain many of the important features in our copyright system with some new obligations as well. As a result, the modernized agreement requires Canada to change its legal and policy framework with respect to copyright in some limited areas, including the following.[Translation]

First, the agreement requires parties to provide a period of copyright protection of life of the author plus 70 years for works of authorship, a shift from Canada's current term of life of the author plus 50 years. The extension to life plus 70 is consistent with the approach in the United States, Europe and other key trading partners, including Japan. It will also benefit creators and cultural industries by giving them a longer period to monetize their works and investments.

That said, we are aware that term extension also brings challenges, as stated by several witnesses during your review. Canada negotiated a two-and-a-half-year transition period that will commence on the agreement entering into force, which will ensure that this change is implemented thoughtfully, in consultation with stakeholders, and with the full knowledge of the results of your review.[English]

The provisions on rights management information will also require Canada to add criminal remedies for altering and removing a copyright owner's rights management information to what it already provides in respect of civil rights management information. In addition, there is an obligation to provide full national treatment to copyright owners from each of the other signatories.

(1635)

[Translation]

The agreement includes important flexibilities that will allow Canada to maintain its current regime for technological protection measures and Internet service providers' liability, such as Canada's notice and notice regime. The government has stated it intends to implement the agreement in a fair and balanced manner, with an eye towards continued competitiveness of the Canadian marketplace.

Moving now to the Copyright Board of Canada. My colleague Kahlil Cappuccino, director of Copyright Policy in the Creative Marketplace and Innovation Branch at Canadian Heritage, will now provide you with an overview of recent measures to modernize the Copyright Board. [English]

Mr. Kahlil Cappuccino:

Thanks very much, Mark.

Mr. Chair and distinguished members of the committee, as the ministers of ISED and PCH committed to in their first letter to your committee in December 2017, and pursuant to public consultations and previous studies by committees of both the House of Commons and the Senate, the government has taken comprehensive action to modernize the board.

First, budget 2018 increased by 30% the annual financial resources of the board. Second, the government appointed a new vice-chair and CEO of the board, Madame Nathalie Théberge, who is sitting with us, as well as appointing three additional members of the board. With these new appointments and additional funding, the Copyright Board is on its way and ready for modernization. Third, Bill C-86, which is now before the Senate, proposes legislative changes to the Copyright Act to modernize the framework in which the board operates.[Translation]

As numerous witnesses stated to you as part of your review, more efficient and timely decision-making processes at the Copyright Board are a priority. The proposed amendments in the bill seek to revitalize the board and empower it to play its instrumental role in today's modern economy.

It would do this by introducing more predictability and clarity in board processes, codifying the board's mandate, setting clear criteria for decision-making and empowering case management. To tackle the delays directly, the proposed amendments would require tariff proposals to be filed earlier and be effective longer, and a proposed new regulatory power would enable the Governor-in-Council to establish decision-making deadlines. Finally, the proposed amendments would allow direct negotiation between more collectives and users, ensuring that the board is only adjudicating matters when needed, thus freeing resources for more complex and contested proceedings.

These reforms would eliminate barriers for businesses and services wishing to innovate or enter the Canadian market. They would also better position Canadian creators and cultural entrepreneurs to succeed so they can continue producing high-quality Canadian content. Overall, these measures would ensure that the board has the tools it needs to facilitate collective management and support a creative marketplace that is both fair and functional.[English]

However, the changes do not address broad concerns that have been raised around the applicability and enforceability of board-set rates. Certain stakeholders asked that the government clarify when users have to pay rates set by the board and provide stronger tools for enforcement when those rates are not paid. The ministers felt that these important issues were more appropriately considered as part of the review of the Copyright Act, with the benefit of the in-depth analysis being undertaken by this committee and the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage.

We look forward to recommendations that will help foster sustainability across all creative sectors, including the educational publishing industry.

At this point, I'd like to hand things back over to Mark to conclude. [Translation]

Mr. Mark Schaan:

Thank you, Mr. Cappuccino.

Allow me to also mention that, as committed in the government's intellectual property strategy, Bill C-86 proposes a change to the notice and notice provisions of the Copyright Act to protect consumers while ensuring that the notice and notice regime remains effective in discouraging infringement.

The proposed amendments would clarify that notices that include settlement offers or payment demands do not comply with the regime. This was an important shift, given the consensus of all parties in the copyright system, and the continued fear of consumer harm in the face of the continued use of settlement demands.

(1640)

[English]

In closing, we would like to applaud the committee for the thorough review of the Copyright Act that you've conducted so far. We've particularly noted members' efforts to raise issues related to indigenous traditional knowledge throughout the exercise. Such probing and open consultations are invaluable to the development of strong public policy.

We would be pleased to answer your questions.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you all very much for your presentations.

We're going to move directly into questions, starting with Mr. Longfield.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you all for being here. It's good timing when we're trying to pull it all together.

Particularly, Mr. Schaan, I was pleased to see that you were on the witness list, and I want to start with you.

We're talking about a market, and how the market efficiency doesn't work for creators and how it works for other people. When we talk about the market itself, transparency seems to be an issue. I'm trying to picture a flow chart in my head that goes from creator through the Copyright Board, Access Copyright and all the holders.

Do you have that type of a flow chart in your department?

Mr. Mark Schaan:

There certainly exists a flow chart about how board-set rates and other aspects of copyright are adjudicated. When there's a public role in those, it can get quite complicated, in terms of the mechanical right, the reproduction right, the performance right and other sorts of rights. It does exist, in some regard, of how that all flows through.

There is also a significant amount of copyright that's negotiated directly between those who own the rights and those who seek to utilize or draw upon those rights. In many cases, that information is proprietary and held within.

Is it possible to understand, for instance, on a board-set rate, how a musician or a photographer or a choreographer may be remunerated for their work? The answer is yes.

In the case where it's potentially engaging with a third party in terms of the distribution within a given contract—what an artist makes from Spotify or from any of the other platforms—that's more complicated, because much of that is proprietary and is a function of the marketplace in terms of how they negotiate those rates.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

In terms of our report, maybe you've just answered part of the question, which is that we can't get some of that information. We've been trying to get it, as a committee, to find out where the money is being made and where it's not being made at each stage of the process. Maybe we could have that as a recommendation, that it be developed, so people in the marketplace know where they sit in the marketplace and how it works.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

There have definitely been significant efforts on the part of my colleagues at Canadian Heritage to try to ensure that creators at least understand where there are value gains to be made from their creative works.

I won't speak for my colleagues at Canadian Heritage, but I think part of it is also, as I said, the significant variation within the marketplace. In a board-set rate, everyone is compensated equally based on use, but in many other, proprietary cases.... A rock star doesn't necessarily make what someone with a YouTube channel makes, and might be compensated differently.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

And we have different markets. We're focusing a little bit on the heritage markets—I'm seeing nodding of heads on that—but we also have the educational markets. We have similar streams, similar points of contact within the Copyright Act, but there are also divergent areas where they don't work in the same way.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

It's also where you have a huge variety of content. You raised the subject of education. In the educational context, you have digital licences, potentially, that allow people access on a per-user basis or sometimes on a per-use basis, on a transactional basis that amounts to a certain amount of compensable copyrighted material. You then potentially have other subscription services, and you have a tariff licence that exists in both cases, which covers other uses.

In all of these cases, you'd have to amass...to know what is all the potential n or openness of content, and then the various mechanisms they're using to draw on that. I think what you probably found in the course of your study, and what we often find, is that the ubiquity of copyrighted content means we're accessing it in dozens of ways through dozens of providers, and each one of those has a remuneration stream that may or may not be governed by a tariff or a contract or a subscription fee, and it may be per use, per year.

(1645)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Yes, or it may be per stream that gets created, so we don't know what's going to be the next stream of creation.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

And then it's divvied up within that by who contributed to it.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Yes, okay.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

Even in the case of a musical work, you're looking at who the background artists are, who the songwriter was, and the producer.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

I'm sorry I'm cutting you short—

Mr. Mark Schaan:

No, no.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

—but it is a complex landscape.

Ms. Théberge, it's great to have you here. It's great to have you on the board and to see the changes on the board. I've heard some positive feedback already from some of the witnesses we've had.

Among the jurisdictions of the world, Australia was mentioned, but also France. The collective rights administration in France involves a significant amount of government oversight, maybe more than what we have here, to look at the behaviour and internal management of copyright collectives.

Is your board engaged in or looking at the tariff-setting power and the scrutiny and oversight of copyright collectives in a new way? We've heard a lot from collectives and how they're managed. It seems that there's.... On the record, I guess I'll watch how far I go with that comment, but it was very hard for me to understand how the collectives work, how they're managed and what role the Copyright Board could play in helping us to understand that situation.

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

I'll invite my colleagues to jump in if they have something to say.

We don't oversee copyright collectives. They come to the board as a party, as part of the process, just as other user organizations are part of the processes that are arbitrated by award. If ever there was an appetite to think from a policy perspective about how collective management in Canada should behave, what it should look like, it would be more of a policy question under the responsibility of the two lead departments.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Which departments?

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

It would be Canadian Heritage and ISED.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I just wanted to get that on the record.

We see how even in our study, both the heritage committee and us, trying to understand how we both get information and put it together has been a challenge, but a creative one.

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

I would just add that where we can have an influence is in the overseeing or monitoring and management of the process once it's before the board. One of the things we will be doing in the following months is trying to instill more discipline—on ourselves, certainly, but also among parties, because it takes two to tango. In this case it takes three to tango, and if you want a fully efficient process before the Copyright Board, everybody has to play nice; everybody has to show discipline from the get-go.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

That would be called line dancing.

Mr. Albas, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to start with the Copyright Board.

We've had witnesses say that decisions from the board can take years. I believe one witness stated it was seven years.

How is it even possible to take that long to get a decision on a tariff? Does one case take years of process, or does it just take years for the board to get to it?

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

I'll start with a few preliminary comments, and then I'll turn to the secretary general, who is one of the key persons involved in managing the process before the board. A lot of numbers fly around the board and a lot of myths as well.

The seven years assumes no stop between the beginning and the end of the process, but in reality a process can be stop-and-go. There are moments during the process when parties come to the board and say to hold off, because they're negotiating. That adds time to the clock.

That being said, we're fully conscious that there's pressure for the board to render decisions more quickly, hence the proposals that were presented by the government in Bill C-86, which would put in regulation a specific time frame for one piece of the process, which is the piece of the process that the board controls, the rendering of decision.

Gilles, I don't know if you want to add something.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Will simply legislating a time period improve the system? How fundamentally will you address the current process?

(1650)

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

It will be addressed based on that, but in addition the government will probably be introducing some regulations, and we will be introducing regulations because currently in the act, the board has a Governor in Council authority to be able to put in regulation—for instance, how we will be using case management to run a tighter ship so that eventually it leads to decisions being more thorough, still based on the evidence provided by the parties and still reflective of the public interest, which is a particular characteristic of the mandate of the Copyright Board, and ultimately to render decisions within the time frame the government will impose.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I am mindful of the time that the chair will impose.

I questioned the deputy minister in regard to your not having asked for any budget extension or expansion, and he said it's simply because you have more than enough supply to be able to meet the demand.

How can you overhaul the Copyright Board and at the same time deliver or at least continue to process files without any extra resources?

Mr. Mark Schaan:

Additional resources have been provided to the Copyright Board. They weren't in supplementary (A)s because our Treasury Board process is continuing. You wouldn't have seen an increase in the supplementary (A)s process, but it's a 30% increase in the total resources afforded to the board, so it's an increase of a third of their annual budget.

Mr. Dan Albas:

That would have been really helpful to hear from the deputy.

Lastly, to the board, you say you would like the ability to issue licence for works the owner of which cannot be located. If the owner is not in the picture to make a claim, why would a licence even be necessary?

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

I'm going to ask my general counsel to take that question, if you don't mind.

Mr. Sylvain Audet (General Counsel, Copyright Board):

That regime is one where the copyright subsists in the work; somebody wants to make use, so the rights are still protected. You cannot locate the owner, but the rights still subsist.

A regime under the act is provided for so there's a request, an application that can be submitted to the board. Some reasonable searches have to be done, and then the board oversees that process. Currently, one of the requirements is that it has to be a published work or published sound recording. Lately, especially, we've been facing a lot of situations where it's really hard to assess, and a lot of requests are based.... We're not able to determine with certainty that the work has been published.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I would go back to it, then. If you're having difficulty resolving the fallacy you have where you have active rights holders who are seeking redress, then why would you want to have jurisdiction over areas where you cannot even locate someone who has it? To me, it sounds as if you're spending more time rather than servicing the people who are before the board.

Mr. Sylvain Audet:

It is in the act. It doesn't mean that they don't exist. There is still a provision, and a period of time where the rightful owner can come forward—there's a mechanism for them to come forward—and the licence provides for that eventuality.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Mr. Lloyd, you can have the remainder of my time.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you.

Thank you to the witnesses.

Madame Théberge, you noted in your written testimony here that you're recommending we change the act to grant the board the power to issue interim decisions. To your knowledge, why wasn't this included in Bill C-86?

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

I think it's probably a question more for the department than for the Copyright Board.

Mr. Martin Simard (Director, Copyright and Trademark Policy Directorate, Department of Industry):

Yes, it was a request that we were conscious of. It was part of the consultation we ran. Some stakeholders were in favour of this; others were against it. Ultimately, the government felt that if either party can now request an interim decision, it seemed superfluous to have the board be able to come at it of its own volition, if neither the demander nor the opponent feel there's a need for an interim tariff.

It was not consensual in our consultation, so ultimately it was not included in the reforms.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Madame Théberge, do you think we missed an opportunity? Your second recommendation was to clarify the binding nature of the board tariffs. Do you think that in Bill C-86 we missed the opportunity, and that maybe this committee could, in part of its recommendations, encourage government to further clarify the binding nature of board tariffs and licences?

Ms. Nathalie Théberge:

The board operates within a legislative framework that is imposed on the board. It is the government's prerogative to decide which is the most appropriate legislative vehicle to make changes to the act.

What we wanted to do here was acknowledge what we feel is an issue worthy of some study by the committee, because it is an issue that has an impact on what we do, on our business. What we hear through our business, or what we can certainly see from our business, is that there is some uncertainty with the interpretation of a Supreme Court decision. So we felt it was appropriate, given the scope of the parliamentary review, to put that forward.

I believe my colleague from the Department of Canadian Heritage also raised it. We just felt that it was appropriate to at least signal that this is something we think the committee members should be thinking about. It echoes a little bit what both department ministers have said in their letter to the chair of the committee.

(1655)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Masse.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Continuing on that line, it's really great to hear the eagerness to reform the Copyright Board. It's actually one of the things on which we see some consensus on this file. The noting of transparency, access and efficiency is, I think, hitting the mark with regard to what we're seeing on building consensus.

You suggested everything from a scrub to pre-emptive decision-making. My understanding is that the three suggestions you're making are all legislative requirements. Is that correct, that those would require some legislative amendments? My question is for your legal counsel.

Mr. Sylvain Audet:

Yes, absolutely.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

My question is for Mr. Simard. Did you consult the Copyright Board, and did they make these suggestions to your department for Bill C-86?

Mr. Martin Simard: Go ahead, Mark.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

We can both take that.

Yes, the legislative effort related to Bill C-86 was conceived and worked on by the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, and the Copyright Board.

Mr. Brian Masse:

And at the end of the day, you just decided to leave those out.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

Obviously, at the end of the day, the government holds policy authority for the overall process, and so they came to decisions that they felt were in the best interests of the overall system and that reflected what we heard from all parties.

Mr. Brian Masse:

This is what the Prime Minister said: We will not resort to legislative tricks to avoid scrutiny. Stephen Harper has...used omnibus bills to prevent Parliament from properly reviewing and debating...proposals. We will change the House of Commons Standing Orders to bring an end to this undemocratic practice.

Here we are again today, back to going through a process on which we are actually spending our time and resources. We are now seeing a legislative requirement—not even a regulatory requirement, which I've been asking for for a period of time, whereby we could have actually seen a proper fix. It's very disappointing and frustrating, especially given the fact that we have this opportunity in front of us.

I want to move now to the USMCA.

Mr. Schaan, you mentioned two and a half years for implementation. Is that ratification of the agreement by the United States or by Canada, with regard to the USMCA? How long does the two and a half years...? What triggers the start time?

Mr. Mark Schaan:

It's from the signing of the agreement. Is that correct?

Mr. Martin Simard:

It would be the coming into force of the agreement, so that would have to be the mechanism. We can come back to you with the exact.... It's the three countries, so I would assume that when the three countries have ratified it through their Parliament, the USMCA, or CUSMA, would come into force. I would have to confirm the understanding of the coming into force of the agreement.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay. That's fine, to make sure that it's not just.... People who have a vested interest, a financial interest, in this are going to want to know when the two and a half years starts exactly, whether it's Canada, the United States, or Mexico that is the final signatory to that deal. If they sign on, it will still have to wait, because in the U.S., Congress still has to pass it. It's also highly debatable whether this will be passed.

What particular studies were done by the department—and will you table those—about the economic implications of a two-and-a-half-year notification process and introduction of that change? What has the department done with regard to studying the economic repercussions for those affected by the two and a half years?

Mr. Mark Schaan:

Obviously, we take a broad analysis of the overall impacts of trade negotiations. On the specifics of the enhanced term of protection, it's very difficult to model.

Mr. Brian Masse:

There was no study done, then, on the two and a half years.

Mr. Mark Schaan:

There was considerable analysis of the overall provisions, but not a specific modelling of those, because it's very difficult to do.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Why two and a half years—and not three years, or three and a half years, or one and a half years—or why have a notification process for the transition? Why two and a half years versus any other option?

Mr. Mark Schaan:

The transition period was negotiated among all parties, and it was agreed that this was a sufficient time period to allow for appropriate study and implementation.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Would you be willing to table that information so that we can see what the decision-making process was based upon? If there is no actual study for the two and a half years, in particular, it would be interesting for the financial interests of people who are involved in this to know exactly why two and a half years and what data was used to accumulate that actual decision at the end of the day.

(1700)

Mr. Mark Schaan:

There was no economic modelling done of a transition period of two and a half years. Two and a half years was a dialogue between those who would have to implement the system to understand how long we thought we would need to consult appropriately.

Mr. Brian Masse:

There you have it.

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Those were all of my questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Before we break off, because we didn't have a full round of questions, if any of the members have any questions they want to submit in writing, could we get them in by Friday at noon to the clerk, and then we could submit them to our panellists?

On that note, thank you very much to our first panel. There is lots of work ahead of us.

We will suspend briefly to change panels, and we'll come right back. Thank you.

(1700)

(1705)

The Chair:

We will resume.

We're moving into the second panel. With us we have, as individuals, Warren Sheffer, from Hebb & Sheffer; Pascale Chapdelaine, associate professor in the faculty of law at the University of Windsor; and Myra Tawfik, professor in the faculty of law at the University of Windsor.

You will each have seven minutes to present. Again, we're going to do the same pattern, with one round of seven minutes.

Mr. Warren Sheffer (Hebb & Sheffer, As an Individual):

Thank you Chair, and members of the committee, for giving me an opportunity to address you today.

I've practised law for 15 years. For 12 of those years, I've worked in association with my colleague Marian Hebb. Together, we are Hebb & Sheffer. My practice largely consists of advising and representing authors and performers who are the original owners of copyright.

In addition to my regular practice, I've spent over a decade serving as duty counsel with Artists' Legal Advice Services, known by its acronym ALAS. At ALAS, a small group of lawyers provide pro bono summary legal advice to creators of all artistic disciplines.

I also currently sit on the board of directors of the West End Phoenix. The West End Phoenix is a not-for-profit, artist-run broadsheet community newspaper, produced and circulated door to door in the west end of Toronto. It contains great writing, illustrations and photography, and the occasional great crossword puzzle. This is a copy of it, here. Our tag line is “Slow print for fast times”.

The West End Phoenix is solely funded by subscriptions and donations. Our freelance contributors include well-known voices like Margaret Atwood, Claudia Dey, Waubgeshig Rice, Michael Winter, rapper Michie Mee, and Alex Lifeson of the iconic Canadian rock band Rush. Other contributors are emerging writers like Alicia Elliott and Melissa Vincent.

The West End Phoenix pays decent rates and prides itself on seeking from authors only a six-month period of exclusivity within which we may publish their works. Our freelancers remain the copyright owners, as they should. After the six-month period of exclusivity, they are free to relicense their works to other parties or to sell or self-publish their contributions for extra income.

The West End Phoenix will typically pay a few hundred dollars for an article, which may seem modest. However, reliance on modest streams of income is a reality for most of Canada's professional writers.

Indeed, many of the creators I work with or have advised at ALAS, or who contribute to the West End Phoenix, rely on several streams of income to get by. For example, there are royalties from publishers and collective licensing, public lending rights payments, speaking engagements, and part-time work in or outside of the publishing industry.

As a lawyer to Canadian authors, I'd like to speak with you today about the general decline in their average income and its relation to the education exception in the Copyright Act. I'd also like to propose a statutory correction to help fix that decline in income, which accords with what the Supreme Court of Canada has declared about the purpose of the Copyright Act.

Specifically concerning the act's purpose, the Supreme Court stated in the 2002 Théberge case, and has repeated in other cases since that time, that the Copyright Act is meant to promote: a balance between promoting the public interest in the encouragement and dissemination of works of the arts and intellect and obtaining a just reward for the creator (or, more accurately, to prevent someone other than the creator from appropriating whatever benefits may be generated).

In my view, the federal government missed the mark badly in 2012, when it boldly introduced into the Copyright Act education as a fair dealing exception. Prior to that 2012 amendment, education sector representatives testifying before legislative committees were insistent that the education exception would not be about getting copyright-protected works for free, and that, instead, the exception would only facilitate taking advantage of teachable moments without disrupting the market for published works.

In other words, using the language of the Supreme Court of Canada employed in Théberge, the exception was to be about ad hoc dissemination of works of art and intellect, and not about systematically appropriating benefits or royalties from creators.

The past six years have shown that notion, that it would do little harm, to be patently false. Royalties have been appropriated from creators on a massive scale.

We know from the Writers' Union of Canada's recently published 2018 income survey that the average net income from writing currently sits at $9,380, with a median net income of less than $4,000. We also know from that same survey that the authors' royalties earned in the education sector have declined precipitously with the implementation of the education exception.

In that regard, Access Copyright reports in its 2017 audited financial statements that since 2012 the amount of revenue collected from the K-to-12 and post-secondary sectors has declined dramatically, by 89.1%.

I won't repeat or drill down into all of the other lost income figures, which I know this committee has been supplied by the Writers' Union of Canada and Access Copyright. Instead of repeating numbers you've already seen or heard, I'd like to focus on the education sector's 2012 fair dealing guidelines, which the education sector unilaterally crafted.

(1710)



In substance, these fair dealing guidelines look substantially similar to the Access Copyright licences that the education sector negotiated and paid for prior to 2012. In short, the education sector has substituted their own fair dealing guidelines for Access Copyright licences.

As you know, the fair dealing guidelines are the centrepiece of the litigation between Access Copyright and York University. In that matter, the federal court found that York created the fair dealing guidelines to reproduce copyright-protected works on a massive scale without licence, primarily to obtain for free that which they had previously paid for. The federal court also found that the guidelines were not fair, either in their terms or in their application. The Federal Court of Appeal will hear that matter next March.

I ask this committee to absorb the consequences of the declaration that York seeks in the appeal in the name of fair dealing, and I would ask that you consider what such a declaration would mean for artists who make publications like the West End Phoenix possible.

As you likely know, York and others in the education sector wish for the Federal Court of Appeal to declare, for example, that it's presumptively fair for York to take a publication like the West End Phoenix and systematically make multiple free copies of entire articles, entire illustrations and entire poems, and then include those works for its own financial benefit in course packs that it sells to students. It's hard to see how anyone could possibly find such an arrangement fair, let alone for Canadian creators getting by on incomes that are very low and declining. However, that has not stopped education bureaucrats from trying to get their fair dealing declaration.

Given the damage done since 2012, I think it's critically important that Parliament make it clear in the Copyright Act that the kind of institutional copying that is the subject of the York litigation does not qualify as fair dealing.

The statutory amendment I propose to fix the damage caused would simply make fair dealing exceptions inapplicable to educational institutions' use of works that are commercially available. In my view, the proposed amendment that Access Copyright submitted to this committee, in its submission dated July 20, 2018, would achieve that goal.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Pascale Chapdelaine.

Ms. Myra Tawfik (Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Windsor, As an Individual):

If you don't mind, we'll do it together. I will start the presentation and then hand it over to Pascale.

The Chair:

Okay. Go for it.

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

Thank you.

Mr. Chair and members of the standing committee, thank you very much for having invited us here to address you regarding the review of Canada's Copyright Act. My colleague Pascale Chapdelaine and I are both law professors at the University of Windsor, and we're appearing here to elaborate further on the recommendations that we made in two briefs that were co-signed by 11 Canadian copyright scholars. Together, we represent a multidisciplinary group that includes librarians, copyright officers, communications scholars as well as legal scholars.

We'd like to begin our remarks with three overarching principles that guide the specific recommendations contained in the briefs, some of which we will elaborate on further in a moment.

We approached our submissions in light of three governing principles. The first is a matter of process with a view to expanding the framework of our law. We recommend, or urge that you consider, a process of consultation with indigenous peoples. In this respect, meaningful consultation must be had with Canada's indigenous peoples, which would seek to implement Canada's obligations under article 31 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. In the context of copyright, this means suitable recognition and protection of indigenous traditional cultural expressions, particularly those that are not currently protected by the act.

Second, in relation to the existing framework, there are two overarching principles that should govern. I'll address the first one, and then I'll turn the floor over to my colleague, who will address the second.

First—and I think everyone seems to be in general agreement about this—copyright involves a balancing act of various interests and is an integrated system of incentives whose overarching policy objective is to advance knowledge and culture.

I have been a law professor at the University of Windsor for close to 30 years. My primary area of research and teaching has been focused on copyright law. For the last 15 years, I have been studying Canada's early copyright history to try to tease out from the archival records an understanding of the policy rationale that led to its first enactment at a time when we could boast no professional authors and no publishing industry.

What, then, would have motivated those early parliamentarians to provide for copyright? At its inception, copyright was literally for the encouragement of learning. It was introduced to provide incentives for schoolteachers to write and print schoolbooks and other didactic works to encourage literacy and learning. This meant not only encouraging book production per se, but making sure that the books were affordable: in other words, accessible to the readership.

I am in no way suggesting that this history can automatically be transplanted to current constructions of copyright, but I believe that the foundational principles remain as relevant today. Copyright back then, as now, was not and should not be about rewarding creators for the mere fact of having created. In a similar vein, copyright back then was not about providing a monopoly to printers and publishers as an end in itself. Creators in industry were the means to a larger public policy end. In order to fulfill the law's overarching policy, copyright, which is a monopoly right, needs to be counterbalanced with the establishment and maintenance of robust spaces that can't be captured or owned. It's in this public interest that intellectual property rights should remain limited rights, and there's nothing suspect or ahistorical about this—to the contrary.

Copyright is a calibrated system that mediates the competing interests of creators, industry and users with the ultimate goal of advancing knowledge and facilitating innovation. The user side of copyright policy is integral to the system and manifests itself in our fair dealing provisions and the other statutory limitations and exceptions to copyright.

(1715)

[Translation]

Ms. Pascale Chapdelaine (Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Windsor, As an Individual):

Mr. Chair and members of the committee, to continue on the theme of a balanced approach to copyright introduced by my colleague Myra Tawfik, allow me to briefly present the journey that has brought me here today.

My many years of practice as a lawyer, during which I ensured the protection of the intellectual property of my clients, as well as the findings of my academic research and my doctorate in law, which led to the publication of a book on the rights of users of copyrighted works in 2017 at Oxford University Press, allow me to assess the issues at stake, both on the side of copyright holders and on the side of users and the public. My remarks are, therefore, in line with this perspective.

Copyright has unique characteristics, but it should not be treated in an exceptional way. It is part of a framework of law and established standards that it must a priori respect. Any derogation from these principles must be taken seriously and cannot be done without thinking about the ramifications it may have on the credibility and legitimacy of copyright, in the eyes of the public as well. Recognizing that copyright must respect fundamental rights, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and freedoms, property law and contract law is in fact one of the corollaries of the balanced and measured approach that we advocate in our brief.[English]

My colleague and I will now address specific recommendations in passing that reflect these two guiding principles of a balanced system that must respect fundamental rights and general laws. I will start by making a few recommendations, as contained in the brief, with respect to solidifying exceptions to copyright infringement and user rights.

The specific recommendations made in our briefs regarding the rights of users of copyrighted works are in fact a continuum of the evolution in Canada toward a more balanced approach to copyright, recognizing that users play an integral part in fulfilling the objectives of copyright. We promote continuing an evaluation of recognizing the rights of users, but to the extent that it does promote the objectives of copyright—to the same extent that any expansion of the rights of copyright holders should be made only to the extent that it promotes the objectives of copyright, that is, the promotion of the creation of works and their dissemination to the public.

To begin, a fair use style of approach should replace fair dealing provisions. Eliminating a closed list of specific purposes—such as research, private study, criticism and parody, as in our current act—and replacing them with illustrative purposes, while maintaining a test of fairness justifying some uses of works without the authorization of the copyright holder, would continue to protect copyright holders' interests while offering more adaptability to include new purposes. For example, as we were contemplating, addressing text mining and data mining would come to mind. It wouldn't need to be added each time new technologies evolve. That would also be in keeping with the principle of technological neutrality.

Second, the act needs to clarify that copyright owners cannot contract out of exceptions to copyright infringement, and certainly that would be the case in non-negotiated standard form agreements. A “no contracting out” approach recognizes that exceptions to copyright infringement are an important engine to ensure that copyright respects fundamental rights and other interests that are essential to optimizing users' participation to the objectives of copyright. Such an approach has been taken by other jurisdictions, recently the U.K.

Third, and consistent with a “no contracting out” approach to user rights, technological protection measures should not override exceptions to copyright infringement, as they currently do to a large extent. Copyright holders choosing to secure access and use of their works through TPMs should have the obligation to provide access to the exercise of exceptions to copyright infringement through built-in architecture or other mechanisms.

Fourth, in relation to the constraining effects of TPMs on the legitimate exercise of user rights, specific remedies need to be built into the act when copyright holders fail to provide access to the legitimate exercises of user rights. In addition, proper administrative oversight should be in place to monitor automated business practices of copyright self-enforcement—here, content ID used on Google platforms such as YouTube comes to mind—to ensure that non-infringing material is not inappropriately removed and that freedom of expression is protected.

(1720)

[Translation]

Just as copyright owners benefit from a wide range of legal remedies when their rights are infringed, it goes without saying that users should also have recourse against copyright owners when their rights of use are not respected. Unfortunately, this is not the case in the act at this time. The creation of specific remedies for users in the act would rectify this imbalance and crystallize the need to respect the rights of users of protected works. Specific remedies for users are provided for, for example, in legislation such as that of France and the United Kingdom. [English]

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

I'll just briefly highlight a couple more of our recommendations before concluding.

Again, and similar to the overarching approach upon which we have based our assessment of the Copyright Act review process, one of the recommendations we make is to introduce a provision relating to open access to research and scientific publications, especially in the context of publicly funded research. The federal government has already introduced a tri-agency open access policy for publicly funded research. Our recommendation is to provide for this type of open access provision as a principle within the Copyright Act, and this could be done in a manner that doesn't unduly interfere with the reasonable expectations of the copyright holder in that the publications could be deposited in an institutional repository after a reasonable period of time, with appropriate attribution.

In a similar vein, new technologies and new practices like text and data mining, which allow you to capture large amounts of data that offer insights and innovative solutions to pressing problems, have become important research methods for researchers at academic institutions. The risk of copyright infringement for reproducing copyright works when scraping, mining or downloading is an inhibiting factor that should militate in favour of a reasonable measure to remove some of the copyright barriers to this kind of research.

Finally, with regard to works generated by artificial intelligence, we take it that the rationale underlying copyright is to incentivize human beings to create, disseminate and learn, so we recommend that works entirely created by AI should not be subject to copyright protection. If a human being has exercised sufficient skill and judgment in the way in which they use software or other technologies to produce an original work, then the established copyright principles would apply. There is no policy consistent with history, theory or practice that would justify expanding copyright to works entirely created by artificial intelligence and without any direct human intervention.

The recommendations made in our briefs are modest and incremental steps to maintain a fair balance between the rights of copyright holders, users and the public interest. They are consistent with governing principles that inform our approach to the law. This approach advocates for a continuum on the evolution of copyright that takes a broader approach to competing interests rather than constantly increasing the protection of copyright holders as soon as new technologies emerge, without any consideration of the impact of such enlarged protection on copyright users.

This concludes our remarks. We'd like to thank you very much for hearing us out, and we'd be happy to answer any questions you may have.

Thank you.

(1725)

The Chair:

Thank you very much for your presentation.

We're going to go right into questions, and we're going to start with Mr. Graham.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I'm going to share my time with Mr. Longfield. If you can cut me off at the halfway point, I'd appreciate it.

The Chair:

Okay, I'll cut you off.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Ms. Chapdelaine, you talked about fair dealing as a more fluid model, if we could call it that. How do you see that actually looking, in the law? If there aren't specific fair dealing exceptions, what would it say?

Ms. Pascale Chapdelaine:

Basically, it would be similar to the model in the U.S. The U.S., as you probably know—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair use—

Ms. Pascale Chapdelaine:

—has a fair use model. So it does refer to purposes, but only in an illustrative way, not in a limiting way, as it does in Canada. Expanding that to not stating specific purposes would, I think, bring more flexibility and allow the act to evolve as new technologies arise. Still, there would be a test of fairness—that's very important—to determine whether use could be allowed without the authorization of the copyright holder. It would need to meet the fairness test.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would you see this fair use model as something that would permit us to finally have right to repair, for example? Are you familiar with the movement to right to repair?

Ms. Pascale Chapdelaine:

That would be one example, which is the common law, something that has been recognized in common law.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You also mentioned content ID. We heard from Google and Facebook here last week, and they admitted that their content ID systems don't really care about fair dealing exceptions. What kind of action should we be entitled to take, or should we be taking, against companies that have a system of copyright enforcement that doesn't actually follow Canadian law?

Ms. Pascale Chapdelaine:

Actually, right now there is not much that is provided. That's the whole point of making sure to clarify that there's no contracting out possible of fair dealing, or let's say fair use. That's one of our recommendations, to actually build it in, make it a right, an obligation. Basically, they would be held liable to make sure access is being granted. That's what we're proposing in our recommendations.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that. I don't have much time at all, so I'm going to jump to Mr. Sheffer.

I want to learn a bit more about ALAS, because it seems to be quite relevant to our study. I'll ask three questions together, so you can answer them in the 70 seconds or so I have remaining.

How many clients does ALAS have? What are the most common issues they face? What are the most common resolutions you see?

Mr. Warren Sheffer:

On the question of how many clients ALAS has, we don't carry any caseload, so the—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What kind of legal advice are you providing?

Mr. Warren Sheffer:

It's summary legal advice.

I should mention, too, that ALAS is the administrative end of things and is run by U of T law students. We have anywhere from three to four appointments a night on Tuesdays and Thursdays in Toronto. They're half-hour sessions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it not-for-profit?

Mr. Warren Sheffer:

It is not-for-profit, yes.

The corporation that runs ALAS is Artists and Lawyers for the Advancement of Creativity. The acronym is ALAC, so we have ALAS and ALAC.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

ALAS and ALAC...I gotcha.

I'm already out of time, so thank you very much for that.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

Thank you all for another interesting session.

Mr. Sheffer, the model that you put out, and the presentations we had in the last hour, made me think about value chains. There's no room in the value chain for legal advice, which is not what we need to see going forward. I think the artists need to have the right protection.

With regard to the value chain analysis of this, I was talking about flow charts and where value gets created. Who gets paid for it? How could we have legislation that gives fair value within the value chain?

You have a micromodel with the publication West End Phoenix that we could be using.

Mr. Warren Sheffer:

I think it starts with solid copyright protection for the original owner of copyright, which is the author. Beyond that, one hopes that the author or performer is aware of his or her rights and doesn't go about signing those away. If the author or performer does retain his or her rights, that creator is in a good position to negotiate remuneration.

As I said in my presentation, I'm very proud of the fact that at the West End Phoenix, we make a point of—

Mr. Lloyd Longfield: Right.

Mr. Warren Sheffer: Sorry, I don't want to take up your time.

(1730)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

No, no. That's exactly where I was heading with that.

To the other two presenters, before we began this study, I read a couple of books on copyright history to understand where we're coming from. I remember one of the books talked about the history of copyright in the U.K. versus the U.S. and how very different the history was, and how Canada is somewhere in the middle, as we always are.

When you're looking at us taking ideas from the States—and looking at France and Germany—where are we in that continuum right now?

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

I can tell you that at the very earliest, we modelled ourselves on American copyright law. In effect, some of the recommendations we have—to adopt an American fair use-style provision, for example—are actually quite consistent with our history. However, we're talking about over 200 years of history.

Although Canada has chosen traditions and had traditions imposed on us in the 20th century—the British tradition particularly—we've always taken some elements from the French, British, and American and incorporated them into things that are uniquely Canadian, to try to develop the flexibilities we need to manoeuvre.

In a sense, the quick answer is that it's all of the above, but we've done it differently and our approach has been different.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I loved your approach. I could picture you both having coffee over this and thinking of the guiding principles, going back to the guiding principles.

It seems that we've missed that whole piece in our study: What are our guiding principles as Canadians, and how does our legislation reflect our guiding principles?

That seems like the most common-sense place to start. Thank you for that.

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

We thought so.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

That's terrific.

Thank you very much. That's good insight.

The Chair:

Knowing Mr. Longfield, he'll probably set up coffee with you.

We're going to move to Mr. Albas.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'd like to split my time, if I can, with Mr. Lloyd.

Thank you, everyone, for your presentations.

Ms. Chapdelaine, I'm going to start with you. You argue that Canada should adopt fair use-style provisions. That is something we've started to hear quite a bit. Can you state why you think that fair use is a superior system?

Ms. Pascale Chapdelaine:

It's superior for the reasons I mentioned earlier. There's no limited purpose to begin the analysis as to what would be a use that can be done without the authorization of the copyright holder. We would develop it with our own values and our own legal system. We're not suggesting that we would have to copy what has been done in the U.S., but as an approach at the legislative level, we think it's a good start that would be less limiting and more flexible.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Ms. Tawfik, in your brief, you state that scientific works should be available after “a reasonable period of time”. Could you state what the “reasonable period of time” is in this context?

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

Well, it's reasonable time, obviously, to give the publisher or whomever the return on their initial run. There have already been practices in the context, for example, of the arts and humanities law publishing, where after a period in which the journal gets a return, you can deposit it in an institutional repository, with attribution, for publicly funded research.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I totally understand that the context may differ by industry and industry norms. The challenge for anyone in government is that obviously there needs to be a delineated line at some point, and it's the line in the sand that we're often contemplating on behalf of the government. Can you give any indication in the case of scientific works?

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

For pure science, I can't, no.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Your brief also states that the risk of being liable to statutory damages for infringement “creates a serious chill on socially desirable activities”. Can you explain what you mean by “socially desirable activities”?

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

Again, it's obviously the other side of the coin: users being able to adapt or do whatever copyright permits them to do without the threat or the fear that they will be subject to statutory damages without the plaintiff having to prove them. Anything that short-circuits the regular system is potentially chilling on those people who want to adapt, create, build on knowledge, and use what's out there in a way that is legitimate within the confines of what's reasonable and fair but without these hammers hanging over their heads, which would be huge damages.

Again, this is not to suggest that people who are downloading music or whatever for commercial purposes—there was a big case in the United States involving this—should not be subject to whatever the remedies are. The hammers that are incorporated, and the statutory damages as a hammer, would have a chilling effect on those who might do things that are legitimate but would be inhibited from doing them.

(1735)

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay. Thank you for that explanation.

One of the concerns I've raised a number of times is with content ID. Many of the platforms have said they are doing the best they can within the contextual environment they're operating in.

One of the cases is where someone pays a tariff for a sound clip and then finds that, even though they've paid the tariff, they can't post the content because Sony or another company will have it pulled down. Another, more extreme, example I cited at the last meeting was a YouTube clip that a network television show clipped, put it in the show, and then had the original clip taken down because it was violating their content.

How do we deal with this? A lot of smaller companies—and not even companies, just creators themselves—are posting real, innovative work but are unable to defend themselves. Can you give us any ideas on that?

Ms. Pascale Chapdelaine:

What we're recommending is an administrative body that would have oversight to address such complaints, basically. In cases where it would inhibit user-generated content, which is one of the possibilities under our act, there should be rectification of the information to allow the copyright work to be posted or whatever. That's the oversight part of giving true remedies to users that we were referring to.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I like the word “remedies”, too.

It's over to Mr. Lloyd.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

Thank you for the opportunity to speak to you as witnesses.

Mr. Sheffer, you've laid out a case about institutional abuse in copyright. I think most Canadians would agree that education, as a fundamental principle of fair use, is completely legitimate. If the committee were to recommend clarifying the scope of what we mean by “education” to mean an individual's right to education, as opposed to an institutional right to use education as fair use, do you think that would have a significant impact on the rights of authors?

Mr. Warren Sheffer:

Yes, I think it could. I think what you just described squares nicely with the proposal I'm suggesting would work, and it's the one that Access Copyright gave you.

Nobody is disputing a student's ability to make a copy of a work for that student's education and private study—research and what have you. What creators take exception to is when institutions engage in massive copying of copyright-protected works, then turn around and put them in course packs, sell them to students and call it fair dealing.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Do you think that our government—at all levels, but I guess mostly federally—is doing enough to protect the cultural tapestry of our literary sector in this country? Are we really at risk of losing what makes us unique as Canadians in the literary sense?

Mr. Warren Sheffer:

Yes. I think if the education exception is allowed....

I will just back up for a second. If there's one thing I could leave this committee with, it's that if you haven't already read the York University case, I implore you to do that. You can see exactly how York University—the third-largest institution in this country, with 50,000-plus students—has actually used their fair dealing guidelines.

There's no disputing the findings of fact. I really implore you to read that decision, because if that is allowed to stand as something that's fair dealing, then yes, creators are definitely harmed by that.

(1740)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

That's what I have left for my questioning. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Masse, you have the final seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thanks for being here.

Let's just finish with Mr. Sheffer. Really, at the end of the day, your concern is that the publication they're using is actually creating income for them, and a source of revenue and so forth, but at the end of the day the people are not getting any compensation for that. Is that really the...?

Mr. Warren Sheffer:

Yes, absolutely.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I just wanted to make sure.

I'm going to skip over to artificial intelligence, actually. We haven't heard a lot about that, so I want to spend a little time here on it. Thank you for raising that. It hasn't been raised a lot.

Can you highlight what the concern is? We've heard an argument that if you're the creator of the artificial intelligence, you should then be the owner of the work of the artificial intelligence. Could you perhaps talk a little about that?

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

That's a position we don't uphold. Copyright can't be the policy vehicle or legislative vehicle to deal with everything that's emerging in technology or otherwise today.

Artificial intelligence as technology can be protected through patents, and there are other ways of protecting the technology itself. Copyright, really, is about incenting human beings to create and disseminate, etc. To the extent that we have moved into areas in which copyright is actually protecting technologies, or software and those things, it has already created a distortion not only in the way in which copyright originated, but also, frankly, in its fundamental principle, the intention behind it.

We're not saying that one could never hold copyright in a work that's produced through artificial intelligence, but the copyright tests should not be changed. We should apply the same tests. If a human being has exercised sufficient skill and judgment in the creation of that work using artificial intelligence, then they should be able to claim copyright. If it's just that they've produced the technology that enables the artificial intelligence to create something new, then our position is that copyright ought not to extend to that.

If there is a need to protect the creative output of a robot, then other mechanisms can come into play, not copyright.

Mr. Brian Masse:

It's an interesting aspect that we haven't gone into a lot.

I raised this argument at the beginning of these hearings. Especially when we look at artificial intelligence and the massive government and public subsidization of research into that technology and its products, we see there is an argument for the public expectation for some of that to be shared as well, in my opinion. When we do these public-private partnerships, there is a considerable amount of public resources—be it money, infrastructure, or processes and government resources and so forth—that the public has paid as part of that equity. There needs to be a little discussion there.

I want to quickly turn, with the rest of my time, to sharing information coming from the government. We heard just prior to your coming to the table here that apparently there have been some work and some studies done. I was asking about the USMCA and the extension of copyright and what information they were using for it. There has been no particular study, but they have some government information and documents and so forth. We still don't even know what that is, although government resources and research have been used to do that.

How does Canada rank as a government, among our neighbours and other Commonwealth nations, with regard to disclosure of public information of government materials, research and other types of work that have been done?

Ms. Myra Tawfik:

I have an example.

Because I've been going back into the archives, I made a number of requests to look at 19th century copyright works and 19th century patents. I was blocked and asked to do an ATIP to get the patent information. This is a 19th century patent. The copyright was protected under a Crown prerogative rather than.... In terms of my experience of these kinds of capture of what should otherwise be public documents, it's a very small example, but there isn't a sort of openness in the same way as one sees perhaps in other jurisdictions, although I understand there may be constraints in certain circumstances.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I know that we rank very poorly with our economic partners in the OECD for public disclosure of public-gathered works.

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for the opportunity.

Thank you to the witnesses for being here today.

(1745)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

It was a short session, but I think we got quite a bit out of it. Again, for the members, if there are any extra questions that you would like us to forward to the witnesses, please give them to the clerk by noon on Friday.

Finally, for Monday, just be aware of the room, because we're not sure where the room is going to be. The clerk will advise you.

On that note, thank you to our guests.

We are now adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1620)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Je vous souhaite tous la bienvenue. Nous allons commencer immédiatement, car nous avons presque une heure de retard — cela se produit parfois à la Chambre.

Bienvenue. Aujourd'hui, nous poursuivons notre examen quinquennal prévu par la loi de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Aujourd'hui, nous accueillons, de la Commission du droit d'auteur, Nathalie Théberge, vice-présidente et première dirigeante, Gilles McDougall, secrétaire général et Sylvain Audet, avocat général.

Du ministère du Patrimoine canadien, nous accueillons Kahlil Cappuccino, directeur, Politique du droit d'auteur, Direction générale du marché créatif et innovation. Nous accueillons également Pierre-Marc Lauzon, analyste de politiques, Politique du droit d'auteur, Direction générale du marché créatif et innovation.

Enfin, du ministère de l'Industrie, nous accueillons Mark Schaan, directeur général, Direction générale des politiques-cadres du marché et Martin Simard, directeur, Direction de la politique du droit d'auteur et des marques de commerce.

Conformément à notre discussion de lundi, les témoins auront sept minutes pour livrer leurs exposés. Nous aurons également un deuxième groupe de témoins. Chaque parti aura donc sept minutes de questions et nous suspendrons ensuite la séance. Nous accueillerons le deuxième groupe et nous ferons la même chose. Nous terminerons la réunion lorsque nous aurons terminé, et cela devrait fonctionner.

Sans plus attendre, nous entendrons les témoins de la Commission du droit d'auteur.

Allez-y, madame Théberge.[Français]

Vous disposez de sept minutes.

Mme Nathalie Théberge (vice-présidente et première dirigeante, Commission du droit d'auteur):

Monsieur le président et membres du Comité, je vous remercie.

Je m'appelle Nathalie Théberge. Depuis octobre dernier, je suis la nouvelle vice-présidente et première dirigeante de la Commission du droit d'auteur. Je m'exprimerai aujourd'hui à titre de première dirigeante.

Comme vous l'avez dit, je suis accompagnée de Gilles McDougall, secrétaire général, et de Sylvain Audet, avocat général, tous deux de la Commission. Je vous remercie de nous donner l'occasion de nous prononcer sur l'examen parlementaire de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Je ferai d'abord un rappel: la Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada est un tribunal quasi judiciaire indépendant, créé par la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Il est chargé d'établir les redevances relatives à l'utilisation d'oeuvres et d'autres objets protégés par le droit d'auteur lorsque l'administration de ces droits a été confiée à une société de gestion collective. La valeur directe des redevances homologuées par la Commission est estimée à près de 500 millions de dollars par année.

La Commission se situe à l'échelon supérieur des tribunaux administratifs en matière d'indépendance. Son mandat consiste à fixer des tarifs justes et équitables d'une manière neutre, impartiale et libre d'entraves. Ce n'est pas une tâche facile, notamment dans la mesure où l'information nécessaire au travail de la Commission est parfois difficile à obtenir. La Commission est à la veille d'une réforme majeure à la suite des changements à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur proposés dans le projet de loi C-86 sur la mise en oeuvre du budget de 2018.

Si vous me le permettez, je voudrais en profiter pour réaffirmer l'engagement de la Commission envers la mise en oeuvre de cette réforme. Évidemment, il faudra un certain temps avant de pouvoir apprécier l'impact de ces propositions, puisqu'il y aura une période de transition pendant laquelle toutes les parties en cause, incluant la Commission et les parties qui se présentent devant elle, devront s'adapter et changer leurs pratiques, leurs comportements et, dans une certaine mesure, leur culture organisationnelle.

Cette période de transition est à prévoir en raison de la portée ambitieuse des propositions de réforme, mais nous croyons que c'est tout l'écosystème de propriété intellectuelle canadien qui profitera d'un système de tarification plus efficace sous la gouverne de la Commission du droit d'auteur.

Cela étant, réformer la Commission n'est pas un remède à tous les maux affectant la capacité des créateurs d'être rémunérés de façon juste pour leurs oeuvres et celle des utilisateurs d'avoir accès à ces oeuvres. De ce fait, la Commission profite de l'occasion pour vous soumettre quelques pistes de réflexion en espérant que son expérience dans la mise en oeuvre effective de plusieurs dispositions de la Loi puisse vous être profitable.

Aujourd'hui, j'aimerais proposer trois thèmes pour votre considération. Nous avons choisi seulement des enjeux ayant une incidence directe sur le mandat et les activités de la Commission, tels que définis dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur et modifiés par la Loi no 2 d'exécution du budget de 2018, présentement à l'étude au Parlement.

(1625)

[Traduction]

Le premier terme concerne la transparence. Les membres du Comité qui connaissent la Commission savent que pour être en mesure de prendre des décisions qui sont justes et équitables, et qui reflètent l'intérêt public, nous devons pouvoir comprendre et apprécier le marché dans son ensemble. Pour cela, il faut de l'information, notamment sur l'existence d'autres ententes couvrant des usages similaires de matériel protégé au sein d'un même marché. C'est un peu comme en immobilier où, pour établir le prix de vente d'une propriété, il faut nécessairement tenir compte des comparables, soit de la valeur des propriétés similaires dans le même secteur, le taux du marché, etc.

À l'heure actuelle, le dépôt des ententes auprès de la Commission n'est pas obligatoire, ce qui laisse souvent la Commission devant un portrait incomplet du marché. Nous sommes d'avis que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur devrait encourager le dépôt par les parties des ententes entre les sociétés de gestion et les utilisateurs. Certaines personnes pourraient faire valoir que la Commission a déjà le pouvoir de demander aux parties de leur soumettre les ententes pertinentes. Nous sommes d'avis qu'un incitatif législatif ferait en sorte que la Commission n'aurait pas à faire pression par l'entremise d'une assignation à comparaître afin d'avoir accès à ces ententes, ce qui crée des délais que nous voulons tous éviter.

De façon plus générale, nous encourageons le Comité à considérer, dans son rapport, les meilleurs moyens d'accroître la transparence globale de l'écosystème du droit d'auteur au Canada. Dans le cadre de la réforme, nous ferons notre part en ajoutant à nos propres processus des étapes et des pratiques qui encourageront un meilleur échange de renseignements entre les parties, et qui faciliteront la participation du public.

Le deuxième thème est lié à l'accès. Nous encourageons le Comité à inclure dans son rapport une recommandation pour une refonte complète de la Loi, puisque la dernière refonte date de 1985. Les réformes et les modifications successives ont contribué à rendre le texte législatif difficile à comprendre et lui donnent parfois l'air d'être incohérent. Dans un monde où les créateurs doivent de plus en plus gérer seuls leurs droits, il est important que nos outils législatifs soient rédigés de façon compréhensible et à cette fin, nous vous suggérons de vous inspirer de la loi australienne sur le droit d'auteur.

Nous encourageons le Comité à envisager de modifier les exigences de publication propres au régime d'oeuvres orphelines. Actuellement, lorsqu'on ne peut pas trouver le titulaire d'un droit d'auteur, la Commission ne peut pas émettre de licences pour certaines oeuvres, notamment celles qui ne sont disponibles qu'en ligne ou celles qui sont déposées dans un musée. Nous sommes d'avis que la Loi devrait être modifiée de façon à permettre à la Commission d'émettre une licence dans ces cas, avec des précautions.

Enfin, notre troisième thème est lié à l'efficacité. La réforme de la Commission, telle que proposée dans le projet de loi C-86, permettra d'améliorer l'efficacité et la prévisibilité du processus de tarification au Canada et, au bout du compte, elle devrait assurer une meilleure utilisation des ressources publiques. Je crois que les membres du Comité ont entendu le même message de divers experts.

Nous recommandons deux autres moyens de réaliser ces objectifs.

Tout d'abord, nous encourageons le Comité à envisager de modifier la Loi, afin de permettre à la Commission de rendre des décisions intérimaires de sa propre initiative. Actuellement, la Commission ne peut rendre de telles décisions que sur requête d'une partie. Ce pouvoir offrirait à la Commission un autre outil pour influencer le rythme et les dynamiques propres aux procédures de tarification.

(1630)

[Français]

Deuxièmement, nous encourageons le Comité à s'interroger sur l'opportunité de préciser dans la Loi que les tarifs et licences de la Commission sont contraignants. Cette proposition fait suite à une décision relativement récente de la Cour suprême du Canada voulant que, lorsque la Commission établit des redevances propres à une licence dans les cas individuels — le régime d'arbitrage —, ces licences ne sont pas contraignantes pour les utilisateurs dans certaines circonstances. Certains commentateurs se sont aussi demandé si cette affirmation s'appliquait également aux tarifs fixés par la Commission.

Nous sommes conscients qu'il s'agit d'un enjeu controversé, mais nous vous invitons néanmoins à vous y attarder, ne serait-ce que parce que les parties et la Commission dépensent temps, efforts et ressources afin d'obtenir une décision de la Commission.

Sur cette note, nous félicitons évidemment chaque membre du Comité pour le travail accompli à ce jour et nous vous remercions de votre attention.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.[Traduction]

Nous entendrons maintenant les témoins du ministère du Patrimoine canadien.

Monsieur Cappuccino, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Kahlil Cappuccino (directeur, Politique du droit d'auteur, Direction générale du marché créatif et innovation, ministère du Patrimoine canadien):

En fait, Mark Schaan parlera en premier.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous entendrons donc le ministère de l'Industrie.

Monsieur Schaan, vous avez sept minutes. [Français]

M. Mark Schaan (directeur général, Direction générale des politiques-cadres du marché, ministère de l'Industrie):

Le ministère de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique du Canada va partager le temps disponible avec le ministère du Patrimoine canadien.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Bonjour, distingués membres du Comité.

Je suis heureux d'être ici devant vous encore une fois pour discuter de droit d'auteur. Je m'appelle Mark Schaan. Je suis le directeur général de la Direction générale des politiques-cadres du marché à Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada.

Je suis accompagné de Martin Simard, qui est le directeur de la Direction de la politique du droit d'auteur et des marques de commerce au sein de ma direction générale.

Nous sommes ici avec nos collègues de Patrimoine canadien, Kahlil Cappuccino et Pierre-Marc Lauzon, pour informer le Comité de deux faits récents qui se rapportent à son examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Nous parlerons d'abord de l'Accord Canada—États-Unis—Mexique et des obligations qu'il contient eu égard au droit d'auteur.

Ensuite, nous soulignerons les mesures globales prises par le gouvernement pour moderniser la Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada, notamment les propositions législatives contenues dans le projet de loi C-86, Loi no 2 d'exécution du budget de 2018, qui avaient été annoncées de manière générale dans notre première lettre à votre Comité sur l'examen, et ensuite de manière plus précise dans la récente lettre des ministres Bains et Rodriguez à votre intention.[Traduction]

Le 30 novembre, le Canada, les États-Unis et le Mexique ont signé un nouvel accord commercial qui préserve des éléments clés de la relation commerciale nord-américaine et qui intègre de nouvelles dispositions mises à jour pour aborder les enjeux liés au commerce moderne. D'intérêt particulier pour votre examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, le nouvel accord met à jour le chapitre sur la propriété intellectuelle et comprend des engagements communs propres au droit d'auteur et aux droits connexes, ce qui permettra au Canada de maintenir de nombreux éléments importants qui font partie de notre système de droit d'auteur, ainsi que certaines nouvelles obligations. Ainsi, l'accord modernisé exige que le Canada modifie son cadre juridique et stratégique en ce qui a trait au droit d'auteur dans certains secteurs limités, y compris ce qui suit.[Français]

D'abord, l'Accord stipule que les parties prévoient, dans le cas des oeuvres d'auteurs, une période de protection du droit d'auteur couvrant la durée de la vie de l'auteur plus 70 ans, ce qui représente un changement de la période actuelle au Canada, qui couvre la durée de la vie de l'auteur plus 50 ans. Le fait d'étendre cette période à la durée de la vie de l'auteur plus 70 ans est compatible avec l'approche adoptée par les États-Unis, l'Europe et d'autres partenaires commerciaux clés, dont le Japon. Elle sera avantageuse pour les créateurs et les industries culturelles, puisqu'elle leur accorde une plus longue période pour monétiser leurs oeuvres et leurs investissements.

Cela étant dit, nous sommes conscients que la prolongation de cette période présente aussi des défis, comme l'ont mentionné plusieurs témoins au cours de votre examen. Le Canada a négocié une période de transition de deux ans et demi, qui commencera lorsque l'Accord entrera en vigueur. Cela permettra de veiller à ce que le changement soit mis en oeuvre avec soin, en consultation avec les parties intéressées et en pleine connaissance des résultats de votre examen.[Traduction]

Les dispositions relatives aux renseignements sur la gestion des droits exigeront également que le Canada prévoie des recours en justice pénale pour la modification ou le retrait de renseignements sur la gestion des droits d'un titulaire de droit d'auteur en plus de ce que le pays prévoit déjà relativement aux renseignements sur la gestion des droits civils. Il y a aussi l'obligation d'offrir un traitement national complet aux titulaires de droits d'auteur relevant de chacun des autres signataires.

(1635)

[Français]

L'Accord comprend d'importants éléments flexibles qui permettront au Canada de maintenir son régime actuel touchant les mesures de protection technologique et la responsabilité des fournisseurs de service Internet, comme le régime d'avis et avis du Canada, par exemple. Le gouvernement a indiqué qu'il entendait mettre en oeuvre l'Accord de manière équitable et équilibrée, en vue d'assurer le maintien de la compétitivité du marché canadien.

Passons maintenant à la Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada. Mon collègue Kahlil Cappuccino, le directeur de la Politique du droit d'auteur à la Direction générale du marché créatif et innovation, du ministère du Patrimoine canadien, vous donnera maintenant un aperçu des mesures récentes adoptées en vue de moderniser la Commission du droit d'auteur. [Traduction]

M. Kahlil Cappuccino:

Merci beaucoup, Mark.

Monsieur le président et membres du Comité, comme les ministres d'ISDE et de Patrimoine canadien se sont engagés à le faire dans la première lettre qu'ils ont envoyée à votre comité en décembre 2017, et à la suite des consultations publiques et des études précédentes menées par des comités de la Chambre des communes et du Sénat, le gouvernement a pris des mesures complètes pour moderniser la Commission.

Tout d'abord, dans le budget de 2018, on a augmenté de 30 % les ressources financières annuelles de la Commission. Deuxièmement, le gouvernement a nommé une nouvelle vice-présidente et première dirigeante de la Commission, soit Mme Nathalie Théberge, qui est avec nous aujourd'hui. Il a également nommé trois membres supplémentaires à la Commission. Grâce à ces nouvelles nominations et au financement supplémentaire, la Commission du droit d'auteur est sur la voie de la modernisation. Troisièmement, le projet de loi C-86, qui se trouve maintenant au Sénat, propose des changements législatifs à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, afin de moderniser le cadre dans lequel la Commission mène ses activités.[Français]

Comme de nombreux témoins vous l'ont mentionné au cours de votre examen, des processus décisionnels plus efficaces et opportuns à la Commission du droit d'auteur constituent une priorité. Les modifications proposées dans le projet de loi visent à revitaliser la Commission et à l'habiliter à jouer un rôle de premier plan dans l'économie moderne actuelle.

Pour ce faire, elles intégreraient plus de prévisibilité et de clarté aux processus de la Commission, codifieraient son mandat, tout en établissant des critères précis pour la prise de décisions et en encourageant la gestion responsable des dossiers. Pour aborder directement la question des délais, les modifications proposées exigeraient que les propositions tarifaires soient déposées plus rapidement et soient en vigueur plus longtemps, tandis qu'un nouveau pouvoir réglementaire permettrait au gouverneur en conseil d'établir des délais pour la prise de décision. Enfin, les modifications proposées permettraient des négociations directes entre plus de sociétés de gestion et d'utilisateurs, de sorte que la Commission ne se prononcerait sur des questions qu'au besoin, ce qui libérerait des ressources pour les procédures plus complexes et contestées.

Ces réformes élimineraient les obstacles pour les entreprises et les services qui souhaitent innover ou pénétrer le marché canadien. Elles permettraient de mieux positionner les créateurs et les entrepreneurs culturels canadiens afin qu'ils continuent de produire du contenu canadien de grande qualité. Dans l'ensemble, ces mesures veilleraient à ce que la Commission puisse disposer des outils nécessaires pour faciliter la gestion collective et appuyer un marché créatif qui soit à la fois équitable et fonctionnel.[Traduction]

Toutefois, ces changements ne règlent pas les préoccupations générales qui ont été soulevées sur l'applicabilité et la mise en oeuvre des taux établis par la Commission. Certaines parties intéressées ont demandé que le gouvernement précise le moment où les utilisateurs doivent payer les taux établis par la Commission et qu'il fournisse des outils plus efficaces pour les faire respecter lorsqu'ils ne sont pas payés. Les ministres ont jugé que ces questions importantes seraient étudiées de façon plus appropriée dans le cadre de l'examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, avec l'avantage d'une analyse plus approfondie effectuée par votre comité et le Comité permanent du Patrimoine canadien.

Nous avons hâte de connaître les recommandations qui aideront à favoriser la pérennité dans tous les secteurs créatifs, y compris dans l'industrie de l'édition pédagogique.

J'aimerais maintenant demander à Mark de terminer la présentation. [Français]

M. Mark Schaan:

Merci, monsieur Cappuccino.

Permettez-moi de mentionner également que, selon l'engagement pris dans la Stratégie en matière de propriété intellectuelle du gouvernement, le projet de loi C-86 propose un changement aux dispositions d'avis et avis de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur afin de protéger les consommateurs, tout en veillant à ce que le régime d'avis et avis reste efficace pour dissuader l'atteinte aux droits d'auteur.

Les modifications proposées préciseraient que les avis qui comprennent des offres de règlement ou des demandes de paiement ne sont pas conformes au régime. Il s'agit d'un virage important, étant donné le consensus de toutes les parties du système du droit d'auteur et la crainte continue de préjudice aux consommateurs face à l'utilisation continue des demandes de règlement.

(1640)

[Traduction]

En terminant, nous aimerions remercier le Comité de son examen rigoureux de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur à ce jour. Nous avons remarqué particulièrement les efforts des membres du Comité pour soulever des questions liées au savoir traditionnel des Autochtones tout au long de l'exercice. Ces consultations ouvertes et approfondies sont inestimables pour l'élaboration d'une saine politique publique.

Nous serons heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Merci.

Le président:

J'aimerais remercier les témoins de leurs exposés.

Nous passons maintenant directement aux questions. Nous entendrons d'abord M. Longfield.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais remercier les témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui. Vous tombez pile, car nous tentons justement de faire une synthèse.

Monsieur Schaan, j'étais particulièrement heureux de constater que vous étiez sur la liste des témoins. J'aimerais vous poser mes premières questions.

Nous parlons du marché et de la façon dont il n'est pas efficace pour les créateurs, tout en l'étant pour d'autres personnes. Lorsque nous parlons du marché en tant que tel, il semble que la transparence soit un problème. Je tente de m'imaginer un diagramme qui montre les liens entre les créateurs, la Commission sur le droit d'auteur, Access Copyright et tous les titulaires de droits.

Votre ministère a-t-il ce type de diagramme?

M. Mark Schaan:

Il existe certainement un diagramme sur la façon dont les frais établis par la Commission et d'autres éléments du régime de droit d'auteur sont adjugés. Lorsque ces éléments ont un rôle public, cela peut devenir assez complexe en ce qui concerne le droit mécanique, c'est-à-dire le droit de reproduction, le droit de représentation, etc. Il y a donc un type de diagramme qui explique les relations entre tous ces éléments.

De plus, une grande partie des droits d'auteurs sont négociés directement entre les titulaires des droits et les personnes qui souhaitent les utiliser ou en tirer profit. Dans de nombreux cas, les renseignements sur ces transactions sont exclusifs et confidentiels.

Est-il possible de comprendre, par exemple, dans le cadre d'un taux établi par la Commission, comment un musicien ou une photographe ou une chorégraphe peut être rémunéré pour son travail? La réponse est oui.

Dans le cas où une tierce partie s'occupe de la distribution dans le cadre d'un contrat — ce qu'un artiste gagne par l'entremise de Spotify ou d'une autre plateforme —, c'est plus complexe, car une grande partie de ces renseignements sont exclusifs et la négociation de ces taux dépend du marché.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

En ce qui concerne votre rapport, vous venez peut-être de répondre à une partie de la question, c'est-à-dire que nous ne pouvons pas obtenir certains de ces renseignements. Le Comité a tenté d'obtenir ces renseignements pour déterminer où l'argent est gagné et où il n'est pas gagné à chaque étape du processus. Nous pourrions peut-être recommander que cela soit éclairci, afin que les gens connaissent leur place dans le marché et qu'ils connaissent son fonctionnement.

M. Mark Schaan:

Mes collègues de Patrimoine canadien ont certainement déployé de gros efforts pour tenter de veiller à ce que les créateurs comprennent au moins où ils peuvent réaliser des gains avec leurs oeuvres.

Je ne parlerai pas au nom de mes collègues de Patrimoine canadien, mais je crois que, comme je l'ai dit, c'est également attribuable, en partie, aux grandes variations sur le marché. Dans le cadre d'un taux établi par la Commission, tous les intervenants sont rémunérés de façon égale selon l'usage, mais dans de nombreux autres cas exclusifs... Par exemple, une vedette de rock ne gagne pas nécessairement la même chose qu'une personne qui exploite une chaîne YouTube, et elle pourrait être rémunérée de façon différente.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Et nous avons des marchés différents. Nous nous concentrons un peu sur les marchés patrimoniaux — je vois des personnes hocher la tête —, mais nous avons également des marchés éducatifs. Il y a des sources et des points de contact semblables dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, mais également des sources différentes qui ne fonctionnent pas de la même façon.

M. Mark Schaan:

Il y a aussi une énorme diversité de contenu. Vous avez soulevé la question de l'éducation. Dans le contexte de l'éducation, il existe des licences de services numériques qui permettent potentiellement aux gens d'avoir accès selon l'utilisateur ou parfois selon l'utilisation, par transaction qui représente une certaine quantité de matériel visé par le droit d'auteur donnant droit à une rémunération. Ensuite, il y a potentiellement d'autres services d'abonnement et il existe une licence de tarifs dans ces deux cas, et elle couvre les autres utilisations.

Dans tous ces cas, il faut amasser... pour connaître le potentiel n ou l'ouverture du contenu, et ensuite les divers mécanismes utilisés pour tirer profit de cela. Je crois que dans le cadre de votre étude, vous avez probablement conclu — comme nous l'avons souvent conclu — que l'omniprésence du contenu protégé par le droit d'auteur signifie que nous y avons accès de dizaines de façons différentes par l'entremise de dizaines de fournisseurs, et que chacun d'eux a une catégorie de rémunération qui pourrait ou pourrait ne pas être régie par un tarif ou un contrat ou des frais d'abonnement, et que cela peut s'appliquer par utilisation, par année.

(1645)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui, ou cela peut s'appliquer par catégorie créée, et nous ne savons donc pas ce qui sera dans la prochaine catégorie d'oeuvres.

M. Mark Schaan:

Ensuite, c'est réparti entre ceux qui ont contribué.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui, d'accord.

M. Mark Schaan:

Même dans le cas d'une oeuvre musicale, on parle des artistes en arrière-plan, par exemple l'auteur-compositeur et le producteur.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Je suis désolé de vous interrompre...

M. Mark Schaan:

Non, non.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

... mais c'est un sujet complexe.

Madame Théberge, nous sommes très heureux que vous soyez ici. C'est formidable que vous fassiez partie de la Commission et que des changements soient apportés à la Commission. J'ai déjà entendu des commentaires positifs de certains témoins qui ont comparu devant le Comité.

On a mentionné quelques pays, par exemple l'Australie, mais également la France. En France, l'administration des sociétés de gestion de droits fait l'objet d'un niveau élevé de surveillance gouvernementale, peut-être plus élevé qu'ici, dans le cas du comportement et de la gestion interne des sociétés de gestion des droits d'auteur.

Votre Commission aborde-t-elle le pouvoir d'établir des tarifs et la surveillance et la supervision des sociétés de gestion de droits d'auteur d'une nouvelle façon? Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler de ces sociétés et de la façon dont elles sont gérées. Il semble qu'il y a... Je présume que je vais surveiller la portée de mon commentaire, en raison du compte rendu, mais j'ai trouvé très difficile de comprendre le fonctionnement des sociétés de gestion du droit d'auteur, la façon dont elles sont gérées et le rôle que la Commission du droit d'auteur pourrait jouer pour nous aider à comprendre cette situation.

Mme Nathalie Théberge:

J'aimerais inviter mes collègues à prendre la parole s'ils ont quelque chose à ajouter.

Nous ne supervisons pas les sociétés de gestion du droit d'auteur. Elles s'adressent à la Commission à titre de partie au processus, tout comme d'autres organismes d'utilisation font partie des processus qui sont réglés par attribution. Si on jugerait utile de réfléchir, dans une perspective stratégique, sur la façon dont les sociétés de gestion du droit d'auteur devraient agir au Canada, et sur ce à quoi ce secteur devrait ressembler, ce serait plutôt une question de politique sous la responsabilité des deux ministères responsables.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Quels sont ces ministères?

Mme Nathalie Théberge:

Patrimoine canadien et ISDE.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je voulais seulement ajouter cela au compte rendu.

Nous pouvons constater que même dans le cadre de notre étude, il peut être difficile, pour le Comité permanent du patrimoine canadien et notre comité, de comprendre comment nous obtenons des renseignements et en faisons une synthèse, mais c'est un défi créatif.

Mme Nathalie Théberge:

J'aimerais seulement ajouter que nous pouvons avoir une influence sur la surveillance ou la supervision et la gestion du processus une fois qu'il se trouve devant la Commission. Au cours des prochains mois, nous tenterons notamment d'encourager la discipline — certainement pour nous-mêmes, mais également entre les parties, car cela se joue à deux. Dans ce cas-ci, cela se joue à trois, et si on souhaite présenter un processus vraiment efficace à la Commission du droit d'auteur, tout le monde doit respecter les règles et faire preuve de discipline dès le départ.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D'accord.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

C'est ce qu'on appellerait la danse en ligne.

Monsieur Albas, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais d'abord m'adresser aux témoins de la Commission du droit d'auteur.

Des témoins précédents nous ont dit que la Commission pouvait prendre des années pour rendre une décision. Je crois qu'un témoin a parlé de sept ans.

Comment est-il possible de prendre autant de temps pour prendre une décision liée à un tarif? Faut-il des années pour traiter un cas ou la Commission n'aborde-t-elle pas certains cas avant des années?

Mme Nathalie Théberge:

Je formulerai d'abord quelques commentaires et je donnerai ensuite la parole au secrétaire général, qui est l'un des intervenants clés dans la gestion du processus qui se trouve devant la Commission. De nombreux chiffres sont liés à la Commission, ainsi que de nombreux mythes.

La période de sept ans qui a été mentionnée présume qu'il n'y a eu aucune interruption entre le début et la fin du processus, mais en réalité, ce processus peut être interrompu à plusieurs reprises. En effet, à certains moments durant le processus, les parties concernées demandent à la Commission de cesser ses travaux, car elles sont en négociation. Cela ajoute du temps au processus.

Cela dit, nous sommes tout à fait conscients qu'on exerce des pressions pour que la Commission rende ses décisions plus rapidement, et c'est l'objectif des propositions qui ont été présentées par le gouvernement dans le projet de loi C-86, qui déterminerait, par voie réglementaire, un délai précis pour une partie du processus, c'est-à-dire la partie du processus contrôlé par la Commission, à savoir la prise d'une décision.

Gilles, souhaitez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Dan Albas:

La simple imposition d'un délai dans la loi sera-t-elle une amélioration? Comment, à la base, corrigerez-vous le processus actuel?

(1650)

Mme Nathalie Théberge:

En s'inspirant de cette solution, mais, en plus, le gouvernement promulguera peut-être des règlements et nous le ferons nous-mêmes aussi, parce que, dans sa version actuelle, la loi accorde à notre commission le pouvoir de faire prendre des règlements par le gouverneur en conseil — par exemple pour, au moyen de la gestion de cas, resserrer la discipline, ce qui conduira à des décisions plus cohérentes, qui continueront de s'appuyer sur les faits présentés par les parties et qui resteront soucieuses de l'intérêt public, ce qui caractérise le mandat de notre commission et, en fin de compte, à des décisions prises dans le délai imposé par le gouvernement.

M. Dan Albas:

Je suis attentif à celui que m'impartit le président.

J'ai interrogé le sous-ministre sur le fait que vous n'avez pas demandé de report de fonds ni de hausse du budget, et il m'a répondu que c'était simplement parce que vous en aviez amplement pour répondre à la demande.

Comment pouvez-vous restructurer la Commission du droit d'auteur tout en expédiant les dossiers ou, du moins, en continuant de les traiter sans ressources supplémentaires?

M. Mark Schaan:

La Commission dispose de ressources supplémentaires. Elles ne viennent pas du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A), parce que notre processus faisant appel au Conseil du Trésor est continuel. Vous n'auriez pas vu d'augmentation dans les budgets supplémentaires des dépenses (A), mais la Commission s'est vu accorder une augmentation de 30 % de ses ressources totales. C'est donc une augmentation d'un tiers de son budget annuel.

M. Dan Albas:

Il aurait vraiment été utile de l'apprendre du sous-ministre.

Enfin, votre commission dit qu'elle aimerait pouvoir délivrer une licence pour les oeuvres dont le propriétaire est introuvable. Dans ce cas, si le propriétaire n'est pas là pour faire une demande, pourquoi une licence serait-elle même nécessaire?

Mme Nathalie Théberge:

Je passe la question à mon avocat général, si vous voulez bien.

M. Sylvain Audet (avocat général, Commission du droit d'auteur):

Dans ce régime, le droit d'auteur subsiste dans l'oeuvre; si quelqu'un veut l'utiliser, les droits restent protégés. Même si le propriétaire est introuvable, les droits subsistent.

La loi prévoit de soumettre toute demande à l'examen de la Commission. Il faut faire des recherches suffisantes, puis la Commission supervise ce processus. Actuellement, il faut notamment que l'oeuvre ou qu'un enregistrement sonore ait été publié. Dernièrement, plus particulièrement, nous avons dû évaluer beaucoup de situations vraiment difficiles, et beaucoup de demandes se fondent sur... Nous ne sommes pas en mesure de déterminer avec certitude que l'oeuvre a été publiée.

M. Dan Albas:

Je reviens donc à la charge. Si vous éprouvez des difficultés à résoudre le faux choix entre les ayants droits actifs demandant réparation et des propriétaires introuvables, pourquoi alors voudriez-vous régir ce dernier groupe? Il me semble que vous lui consacrez plus de temps qu'à votre véritable clientèle.

M. Sylvain Audet:

Ainsi le veut la loi. Cela ne signifie pas qu'ils n'existent pas. Il subsiste une disposition et un délai pendant lequel le propriétaire légitime peut se manifester — un mécanisme est prévu à cette fin —, et la licence répond à cette éventualité.

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur Lloyd, je vous cède le reste de mon temps.

Merci, monsieur le président.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci.

Je remercie les témoins.

Madame Théberge, dans votre mémoire, ici, vous recommandez que nous modifiions la loi pour accorder à la Commission le pouvoir de rendre des décisions provisoires. À votre connaissance, pourquoi est-ce que cela ne se retrouve pas dans le projet de loi C-86?

Mme Nathalie Théberge:

C'est peut-être parce que la question relève davantage du ministère que de la Commission du droit d'auteur.

M. Martin Simard (directeur, Direction de la politique du droit d’auteur et des marques de commerce, ministère de l'Industrie):

Oui, nous étions conscients de cette demande. Il en a été question dans nos consultations. Certains joueurs l'appuyaient, d'autres s'y opposaient. En fin de compte, le gouvernement a estimé que si les parties pouvaient désormais demander une décision provisoire, il semblait superflu d'accorder à la Commission le pouvoir d'en rendre de son propre chef si ni le demandeur ni la partie adverse estimaient nécessaire l'imposition d'un tarif.

Faute de consensus à la fin des consultations, c'est omis des réformes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Madame Théberge, avons-nous raté une occasion? Votre deuxième recommandation était de préciser la nature contraignante des tarifs de la Commission. Croyez-vous que, dans le projet de loi C-86, nous ayons raté l'occasion et que, peut-être, notre comité pourrait, dans ses recommandations, inciter le gouvernement à préciser la nature contraignante des tarifs et des licences de la Commission?

Mme Nathalie Théberge:

La Commission fonctionne à l'intérieur d'un cadre législatif imposé. C'est la prérogative du gouvernement de décider du mécanisme législatif le mieux approprié à la modification de la loi.

Nous avons voulu reconnaître une question qui, d'après nous, mérite d'être étudiée par votre comité, parce qu'elle a des conséquences sur notre activité. Nous sommes en mesure de constater quotidiennement l'interprétation incertaine d'une décision de la Cour suprême. Nous avons donc estimé qu'il convenait, vu la portée de l'examen parlementaire la loi, de l'exprimer.

Je crois que mon homologue du ministère du Patrimoine canadien a aussi soulevé cette question. Nous avons estimé qu'il convenait au moins de signaler à votre comité que nous croyons que ses membres devraient y réfléchir. Nous rejoignons ainsi un peu la position exprimée par les ministres dans leur lettre au président de votre comité.

(1655)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Au tour maintenant de M. Masse.

Vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Toujours sur cette piste, il est vraiment réjouissant de constater l'ardeur de la Commission du droit d'auteur pour les réformes. En fait, c'est l'un des points sur lesquels nous constatons un consensus, dans ce dossier. L'insistance sur la transparence, l'accès et l'efficacité satisfait au critère qui préside, à notre avis, à la formation du consensus.

Vous avez tout proposé, du changement de décision à la prise de décisions préventives. Si j'ai bien compris, n'est-ce pas que vos trois propositions exigent toutes de modifier la loi? Je pose la question à votre conseiller juridique.

M. Sylvain Audet:

Oui, absolument.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Monsieur Simard, avez-vous consulté la Commission du droit d'auteur et a-t-elle proposé à votre ministère des idées pour le projet de loi C-86?

M. Martin Simard: Mark.

M. Mark Schaan:

Nous pouvons répondre tous les deux.

Oui, l'effort législatif consacré au projet de loi C-86 a été conçu et réalisé par le ministère du Patrimoine canadien, celui de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique et la Commission du droit d'auteur.

M. Brian Masse:

En fin de compte, vous avez simplement décidé de n'en pas parler.

M. Mark Schaan:

En fin de compte, le gouvernement a visiblement le dernier mot sur l'ensemble du processus. Il a donc tranché dans, d'après lui, l'intérêt de l'ensemble du système et conformément aux avis des parties.

M. Brian Masse:

Voici ce qu'a dit le premier ministre: Nous n'userons pas de subterfuges législatifs pour nous soustraire à l'examen du Parlement. M. Harper s'est servi des projets de loi omnibus pour empêcher les parlementaires d'étudier ses propositions et d'en débattre convenablement. Nous mettrons un terme à cette pratique antidémocratique en modifiant le Règlement de la Chambre des communes.

Aujourd'hui, encore une fois, voici que nous revenons à un processus auquel nous consacrons notre temps et nos ressources. Nous avons sous les yeux une exigence législative — pas même réglementaire, que je réclame depuis un certain temps, qui nous aurait laissés espérer une solution convenable. C'est très décevant et très irritant, particulièrement en raison de cette occasion qui s'offre à nous.

Passons maintenant à l'accord conclu entre les États-Unis, le Mexique et le Canada.

Monsieur Schaan, vous avez parlé d'une mise en oeuvre étalée sur deux ans et demi. Est-ce pour la ratification de l'accord par les États-Unis ou le Canada? Pendant combien de temps ces deux années et demie...? Qu'est-ce qui enclenche le compte à rebours?

M. Mark Schaan:

La signature de l'accord. Est-ce exact?

M. Martin Simard:

Le mécanisme serait l'entrée en vigueur de l'accord. Nous pouvons obtenir pour vous la confirmation de... Je suppose que quand les Parlements des trois pays auront ratifié l'accord, il entrera en vigueur. Il faudrait que j'en obtienne la confirmation.

M. Brian Masse:

D'accord. C'est bien de s'assurer que ce n'est pas seulement... Les personnes directement concernées, les détenteurs d'intérêts financiers voudront savoir quand commence exactement le compte à rebours des deux années et demie, si c'est le Canada, les États-Unis ou le Mexique qui est le dernier signataire de l'accord. Après la ratification, il faudra encore attendre, parce que le Congrès des États-Unis doit encore l'adopter. Et on est très en droit de se demander s'il sera adopté.

Quelles études particulières votre ministère a-t-il faites — et vous les déposerez — sur les conséquences économiques d'un processus de notification étalé sur deux années et demie et l'introduction de ce changement? Qu'a fait le ministère pour étudier les répercussions économiques subies par ceux qui sont touchés par le délai de deux ans et demi?

M. Mark Schaan:

Visiblement, nous avons fait une analyse générale des répercussions globales des négociations commerciales. Sur les détails de la protection accrue, c'est très difficile à modéliser.

M. Brian Masse:

Donc, aucune étude n'a porté sur les deux ans et demi.

M. Mark Schaan:

On a analysé en profondeur les clauses globales, mais sans modélisation particulière, parce que c'est très difficile à réaliser.

M. Brian Masse:

Pourquoi deux ans et demi et non trois ans, trois ans et demi ou un an et demi? Pourquoi, encore, un processus de notification pour la transition? Pourquoi deux ans et demi plutôt qu'autre chose?

M. Mark Schaan:

La période de transition a été négociée entre toutes les parties, qui ont convenu que c'était suffisant pour une étude et une mise en oeuvre appropriées.

M. Brian Masse:

Seriez-vous disposé à déposer ces renseignements pour que nous puissions connaître les bases de la décision? Si aucune étude n'a porté sur les deux ans et demi, notamment, il serait intéressant, dans l'intérêt financier des personnes concernées de savoir exactement pourquoi on a choisi cette période et quelles données ont finalement conduit à la décision.

(1700)

M. Mark Schaan:

Aucune modélisation économique n'a porté sur une transition de deux ans et demi. Ce délai résulte de discussions entre ceux qui étaient chargés de la mise en oeuvre du système, sur le temps nécessaire, d'après eux, pour des consultations appropriées.

M. Brian Masse:

Le tour est joué!

Merci, monsieur le président. Je n'ai plus de questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Avant de suspendre la séance, comme nous n'avons pas pu compléter une série de questions, nos membres qui s'en posent encore peuvent les soumettre par écrit. Dans ce cas, pourraient-ils les communiquer d'ici vendredi, à midi, à notre greffier, qui les acheminera aux témoins?

Sur ce, je remercie sincèrement notre premier groupe de témoins. Nous avons beaucoup de pain sur la planche.

Faisons une courte pause pour accueillir les nouveaux témoins. Nous reprenons la séance tout de suite après. Merci.

(1700)

(1705)

Le président:

Reprenons.

Nous accueillons le deuxième groupe, composé de M. Warren Sheffer, de Hebb & Sheffer; et de Mmes Pascale Chapdelaine et Myra Tawfik, respectivement professeure associée et professeure à la faculté de droit de l'Université de Windsor. Ils viennent témoigner à titre personnel.

Vous disposez chacun de sept minutes pour votre exposé. Encore une fois, nous ferons comme au tour précédent: chaque intervenant disposera de sept minutes.

M. Warren Sheffer (Hebb & Sheffer, à titre personnel):

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, je vous remercie de votre invitation.

Je pratique le droit depuis 15 ans. Depuis 12 ans, je suis associé à ma collègue Marian Hebb. Ensemble, nous formons le cabinet Hebb & Sheffer. Mon travail consiste en grande partie à conseiller et à représenter des auteurs et des artistes qui sont les propriétaires d'origine d'un droit d'auteur.

En plus de l'exercice du droit, j'ai agi pendant plus de 10 ans à titre de conseiller juridique de permanence aux Artists' Legal Advice Services, connus sous l'acronyme ALAS. Aux ALAS, un petit groupe d'avocats donne bénévolement des conseils juridiques sommaires aux créateurs de tous les domaines artistiques.

Je siège aussi au conseil d'administration du West End Phoenix, journal communautaire grand format, sans but lucratif, dirigé par des artistes, produit et distribué de porte-à-porte dans la partie ouest de Toronto. Il renferme des oeuvres écrites, illustrées et photographiques de qualité ainsi que, de temps à autre, des mots croisés géniaux. J'en ai un exemplaire, ici. Son slogan est: « Des presses pas pressées pour une époque pressée ».

Ce journal est uniquement financé par les abonnements et les dons. Nos pigistes comprennent les voix bien connues de Margaret Atwood, Claudia Dey, Waubgeshig Rice, Michael Winter, du rappeur Michie Mee et d'Alex Lifeson, membre du groupe rock emblématique canadien Rush. On peut aussi ajouter les noms d'écrivains qui se font peu à peu connaître comme Alicia Elliott et Melissa Vincent.

Le West End Phoenix verse des cachets convenables et s'enorgueillit d'obtenir des auteurs seulement six mois d'exclusivité, pendant lesquels nous pouvons les publier. Nos pigistes restent propriétaires de leurs droits d'auteur, comme ce le devrait. Après ces six mois, ils sont libres d'accorder la licence de leurs oeuvres à d'autres ou de vendre ou de publier eux-mêmes leurs contributions pour en tirer des revenus supplémentaires.

D'ordinaire, le West End Phoenix verse quelques centaines de dollars pour un article, ce qui peut sembler peu. Cependant, la réalité, pour la plupart des écrivains professionnels canadiens, est de vivre de sources modestes de revenus.

Bien sûr, beaucoup de créateurs avec qui je collabore ou que j'ai conseillés aux ALAS ou qui contribuent au West End Phoenix mangent à tous râteliers, par exemple les redevances des éditeurs et les licences collectives, les droits reçus pour prêts au public, les conférences et le travail à temps partiel dans l'édition ou à l'extérieur.

En ma qualité d'avocat d'auteurs canadiens, je voudrais parler de la baisse générale de leur revenu moyen et du rapport entre cette baisse et l'exception faite pour l'éducation dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Je voudrais aussi proposer une modification à la loi pour remédier à cette paupérisation, conformément à l'arrêt de la Cour suprême du Canada sur l'objet de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

À ce sujet, elle a plus précisément déclaré, dans l'arrêt Théberge (2002) et répété dans d'autres arrêts depuis, que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur visait à favoriser: un équilibre entre, d'une part, la promotion, dans l'intérêt du public, de la création et de la diffusion des oeuvres artistiques et intellectuelles et, d'autre part, l'obtention d'une juste récompense pour le créateur (ou, plus précisément, l'assurance que personne d'autre que le créateur ne pourra s'approprier les bénéfices qui pourraient être générés).

D'après moi, le gouvernement fédéral a royalement raté l'objectif en 2012, quand il a témérairement introduit dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur l'éducation comme exception équitable. Avant, les représentants du secteur de l'éducation, dans leurs témoignages devant les comités législatifs, avaient insisté pour dire que cette exception ne visait pas à obtenir gratuitement des travaux dont le droit d'auteur était protégé, mais, plutôt, à ne faciliter que les moments propices à l'apprentissage sans perturber le marché des oeuvres publiées.

Autrement dit, pour reprendre les termes de l'arrêt Théberge, l'exception concernait la dissémination d'oeuvres d'art et d'oeuvres intellectuelles dans des situations particulières et non l'appropriation systématique des avantages ou des redevances aux dépens des créateurs.

Les six dernières années ont montré la fausseté manifeste de l'idée selon laquelle ça causerait peu de torts. Le détournement des redevances a été massif.

Nous savons, grâce à l'étude de 2018, récemment publiée par la Writers' Union of Canada, que le revenu net moyen tiré de l'écriture se situe à 9 380 $, la médiane étant de moins de 4 000 $. Que, selon la même source, les redevances aux auteurs du secteur de l'éducation se sont effondrées avec la mise en oeuvre de l'exception accordée à l'éducation.

À cet égard, Access Copyright déclare, dans ses états financiers audités de 2017 que, depuis 2012, les revenus, tirés des secteurs de la maternelle à la 12e année et de l'éducation postsecondaire, ont diminué de façon spectaculaire, de 89,1 %.

Je ne répéterai pas ou je n'insisterai pas sur toutes les autres statistiques relatives aux pertes de revenus que, je le sais, votre comité a reçues de la Writers' Union of Canada et d'Access Copyright. Je voudrais plutôt me focaliser sur les Lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable de 2012 dans le secteur de l'éducation, que ce secteur a unilatéralement concoctées.

(1710)



Essentiellement, ces lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable sont très semblables aux licences que le secteur de l'éducation avait négociées et signées avec Access Copyright avant 2012. Bref, le secteur de l'éducation a substitué ses propres lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable aux licences d'Access Copyright.

Comme vous le savez probablement, les lignes directrices visant l'utilisation équitable sont au coeur du litige entre Access Copyright et l'Université York. Dans ce cas, la Cour fédérale a conclu que York avait créé les lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable afin de reproduire à grande échelle des ouvrages protégés par le droit d'auteur sans licence, principalement pour obtenir gratuitement ce qu'ils devaient auparavant payer. La Cour fédérale a également conclu que les lignes directrices n'étaient pas équitables, que ce soit dans leur formulation ou leur application. La Cour d'appel fédérale entendra cette affaire en mars prochain.

Je demande au Comité de vous arrêter à comprendre toute l'ampleur des conséquences de la déclaration que York cherche à obtenir dans son appel, au nom de l'utilisation équitable, et je vous demande de penser à ce qu'une telle déclaration signifierait pour les artistes qui font que des publications comme le West End Phoenix sont possibles.

Comme vous le savez sans doute, York et d'autres établissements d'enseignement souhaitent que la Cour d'appel fédérale déclare, par exemple, qu'il s'agit d'une utilisation dont on peut présumer qu'elle est équitable, si York prend une publication comme le West End Phoenix et qu'elle fait systématiquement de multiples copies d'articles entiers, d'illustrations entières, de poèmes entiers, pour ensuite inclure ces ouvrages, pour son propre bénéfice financier, dans des recueils de cours qu'elle vend à ses étudiants. On peut difficilement comprendre que quiconque trouverait un tel arrangement équitable, et c'est d'autant plus vrai pour les créateurs canadiens qui se débrouillent avec de très faibles revenus en déclin. Cependant, cela n'a pas arrêté les bureaucrates du secteur de l'éducation qui essaient d'obtenir leur déclaration voulant qu'il s'agisse d'une utilisation équitable.

Compte tenu des dommages causés depuis 2012, je pense qu'il est d'une importance critique que le Parlement indique clairement dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur que le type de reproduction institutionnelle faisant l'objet du litige de l'Université York ne peut être admis comme étant une utilisation équitable.

La modification législative que je propose pour réparer les dommages causés aurait simplement pour effet de rendre les exceptions relatives à l'utilisation équitable non applicables à l'utilisation d'ouvrages qui sont offerts sur le marché par les établissements d'enseignement. D'après moi, la modification proposée au Comité par Access Copyright dans son mémoire du 20 juillet 2018 permettrait d'atteindre ce but.

Je vous remercie de votre temps et de votre attention.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant écouter Pascale Chapdelaine.

Mme Myra Tawfik (professeure, Faculté de droit, University of Windsor, à titre personnel):

Si cela ne vous dérange pas, nous allons le faire ensemble. Je vais commencer l'exposé et céder la parole à Pascale.

Le président:

D'accord. Allez-y.

Mme Myra Tawfik:

Merci.

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, je vous remercie beaucoup de nous avoir invitées à venir vous parler de l'examen prévu de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Ma collègue Pascale Chapdelaine et moi sommes toutes les deux professeures de droit à l'Université de Windsor, et nous comparaissons aujourd'hui afin de donner des précisions sur les recommandations que nous avons présentées dans deux mémoires cosignés par 11 universitaires canadiens spécialistes du droit d'auteur, des communications et du droit.

Nous aimerions amorcer notre exposé en énonçant les trois principes directeurs qui sous-tendent les recommandations particulières présentées dans les mémoires. Nous allons nous arrêter plus longuement sur certaines de ces recommandations un peu plus tard.

Nous avons fondé nos mémoires sur trois principes directeurs. Le premier est une question de processus dont le but est d'élargir la portée du cadre de notre loi. Nous vous recommandons ou vous pressons d'envisager un processus de consultation des peuples autochtones. Il faut une véritable consultation des peuples autochtones du Canada en vue de la mise en oeuvre des obligations du Canada en vertu de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones. Dans le contexte du droit d'auteur, cela signifie la reconnaissance et la protection, comme il se doit, des expressions culturelles autochtones traditionnelles, en particulier celles qui ne sont pas en ce moment protégées par la Loi.

En deuxième lieu, en ce qui concerne le cadre existant, deux principes directeurs devraient dominer. Je vais parler du premier, puis je vais céder la parole à ma collègue, qui va traiter du deuxième.

Le premier — et je crois que tout le monde semble d'accord — est que le droit d'auteur exige une approche équilibrée des divers intérêts et qu'il s'agit d'un système intégré d'incitatifs dont l'objectif stratégique général est de faire progresser les connaissances et la culture.

Je suis professeure de droit à l'Université de Windsor depuis près de 30 ans. Mon principal domaine de recherche et d'enseignement est le droit d'auteur. Depuis 15 ans, j'étudie les débuts du droit d'auteur au Canada afin de tirer des documents archivés une compréhension du fondement stratégique qui a mené à l'adoption de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur à une époque où nous ne pouvions pas nous vanter d'avoir des auteurs professionnels ou une industrie de l'édition.

Qu'est-ce qui a donc motivé les premiers parlementaires à légiférer en matière de droit d'auteur? Au début, le droit d'auteur avait littéralement comme objectif d'encourager l'apprentissage. On a adopté la Loi afin d'encourager les enseignants à écrire et à imprimer des manuels scolaires et autres ouvrages didactiques afin d'encourager la littératie et l'apprentissage. On cherchait donc à encourager la production de livres comme telle, mais on voulait aussi veiller à ce que les livres soient abordables, ou autrement dit, accessibles aux lecteurs.

Je ne dis absolument pas que la réalité du passé peut automatiquement être appliquée aux principes actuels du droit d'auteur, mais je crois que les principes de base demeurent pertinents aujourd'hui. Le droit d'auteur n'était pas à l'époque et ne doit pas être aujourd'hui une simple question de récompense des créateurs parce qu'ils ont simplement créé quelque chose. Dans la même veine, le droit d'auteur à l'époque n'avait pas comme objectif d'assurer un monopole aux imprimeurs et aux éditeurs comme une fin en soi. Les créateurs, dans l'industrie, représentaient le moyen d'atteindre un objectif stratégique plus vaste. Afin de réaliser la politique générale de la loi, le droit d'auteur, qui est un droit de monopole, doit être équilibré par l'établissement et le maintien d'espaces fermes qui ne peuvent être détenus ou acquis. Compte tenu de cet intérêt public, les droits de propriété intellectuelle devraient demeurer limités, et il n'y a rien de suspect ou d'anhistorique à cela, tout au contraire.

Le droit d'auteur est un système calibré qui modère les intérêts divergents des créateurs, de l'industrie et des utilisateurs et dont le but ultime est de faire progresser les connaissances et de faciliter l'innovation. En matière de droit d'auteur, l'utilisateur fait partie intégrante du système et se manifeste dans nos dispositions relatives à l'utilisation équitable et dans les autres restrictions et exceptions prévues par la loi, en matière de droit d'auteur.

(1715)

[Français]

Mme Pascale Chapdelaine (professeure associée, Faculté de droit, University of Windsor, à titre personnel):

Monsieur le président et membres du Comité, pour poursuivre sur le thème d’une approche équilibrée du droit d’auteur introduit par ma collègue Myra Tawfik, permettez-moi de présenter brièvement le parcours qui m'a menée ici aujourd’hui.

Mes nombreuses années de pratique en tant qu’avocate, pendant lesquelles j’ai veillé à la protection de la propriété intellectuelle de mes clients, de même que le fruit de mes recherches universitaires et de mon doctorat en droit, qui a mené à la publication d’un livre sur le droit des usagers d’oeuvres protégées par le droit d’auteur, en 2017, chez Oxford University Press, me permettent d’apprécier les enjeux, tant du côté des titulaires de droits d’auteur que de ceux des usagers et du public. C’est donc dans cette perspective que s’inscrivent mes remarques.

Le droit d’auteur a des caractéristiques uniques, mais il ne doit pas être traité de façon exceptionnelle. Il s’inscrit dans un cadre de droit et de normes établies qu’il doit à priori respecter. Toute dérogation à ces principes doit être prise au sérieux et ne peut se faire sans qu'on pense aux ramifications qu’elle pourrait avoir sur la crédibilité et la légitimité du droit d’auteur, aux yeux du public également. Reconnaître que le droit d’auteur doit respecter les droits fondamentaux, la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, le droit des biens et le droit des contrats est en fait un des corollaires de l’approche équilibrée et pondérée que nous prônons dans notre mémoire.[Traduction]

Ma collègue et moi allons maintenant parler de recommandations particulières qui sont le reflet des deux principes directeurs d'un système équilibré qui doit respecter les droits fondamentaux et les lois générales. Je vais commencer par faire quelques recommandations, énoncées dans le mémoire, concernant le resserrement des exceptions à la violation du droit d'auteur et des droits des utilisateurs.

Les recommandations présentées dans nos mémoires concernant les droits des utilisateurs d'ouvrages soumis au droit d'auteur s'insèrent en fait dans le continuum de l'évolution vers une approche plus équilibrée du droit d'auteur au Canada. On reconnaît que les utilisateurs jouent un rôle important dans la réalisation des objectifs du droit d'auteur. Nous préconisons la poursuite de l'évaluation relative à la reconnaissance des droits des utilisateurs, mais ce, dans la mesure où cela fait progresser la réalisation des objectifs du droit d'auteur — de la même façon qu'une expansion des droits des titulaires de droits d'auteur ne devrait se faire que dans la mesure où cela fait progresser la réalisation des objectifs du droit d'auteur, soit la promotion de la création d'oeuvres et leur diffusion au public.

Pour commencer, il faudrait remplacer les dispositions relatives à l'utilisation équitable par des dispositions de type utilisation équitable. En éliminant la liste fermée de fins qui se trouve dans la loi actuelle — recherche, étude privée, critique ou parodie —, et en remplaçant cela par des exemples tout en maintenant un critère d'équité justifiant certains usages d'ouvrages sans l'autorisation du titulaire des droits d'auteur, on continuerait de protéger les intérêts des titulaires de droits d'auteur tout en offrant une plus grande souplesse pour l'inclusion de nouvelles fins. Par exemple, on peut penser à l'exploration de textes et de données. Il ne serait pas nécessaire de faire des ajouts chaque fois que les technologies évoluent. Cela correspondrait aussi au principe de la neutralité technologique.

Deuxièmement, il faut que la Loi indique clairement que les titulaires de droits d'auteur ne peuvent faire la sous-traitance des exceptions à la violation du droit d'auteur, ce qui serait assurément le cas avec les contrats types non négociés. Une approche ne permettant pas la sous-traitance reconnaît que les exceptions à la violation du droit d'auteur sont une façon importante de garantir que le droit d'auteur respecte les droits fondamentaux et les autres intérêts essentiels à l'optimisation de la participation des utilisateurs aux objectifs du droit d'auteur. D'autres autorités ont adopté une telle approche, dont le Royaume-Uni, récemment.

Troisièmement, et conformément au principe de l'interdiction de la sous-traitance, concernant les droits des utilisateurs, les mesures techniques de protection ne doivent pas supplanter les exceptions à la violation des droits d'auteur comme c'est le cas en ce moment dans une très grande mesure. Les titulaires de droits d'auteurs qui choisissent de garantir l'accès à leurs ouvrages et l'utilisation de leurs ouvrages au moyen de mesures techniques de protection devraient avoir l'obligation de permettre l'exercice des exceptions à la violation du droit d'auteur dans l'architecture de leurs MTP ou par d'autres mécanismes.

Quatrièmement, concernant les effets contraignants des MTP sur l'exercice légitime d'exceptions à la violation du droit d'auteur, il faut intégrer dans la loi des recours particuliers quand les titulaires de droits d'auteurs ne permettent pas l'exercice légitime des droits des utilisateurs. De plus, il faut une surveillance administrative appropriée pour le contrôle des pratiques commerciales automatisées d'autoapplication du droit d'auteur — ID de contenu utilisé sur les plateformes Google comme YouTube, par exemple — afin de garantir que le matériel qui ne représente pas une violation n'est pas retiré de façon inappropriée et que la liberté d'expression est protégée.

(1720)

[Français]

Au même titre que les titulaires des droits d'auteur bénéficient d'une panoplie de recours judiciaires lorsque l'on enfreint leurs droits, il va de soi que les usagers devraient eux aussi avoir des recours contre les détenteurs de droit d'auteur, quand leurs droits d'usage ne sont pas respectés. Cela n'est malheureusement pas le cas dans la Loi en ce moment. La création de recours spécifiques pour les usagers dans la Loi rectifierait ce déséquilibre et cristalliserait la nécessité de respecter les droits des usagers d'oeuvres protégées. Des recours spécifiques pour les usagers sont prévus, par exemple, dans des législations comme celles de la France et du Royaume-Uni. [Traduction]

Mme Myra Tawfik:

Je vais brièvement souligner quelques autres recommandations avant de terminer.

Encore une fois, en fonction de l'approche générale sur laquelle nous avons fondé notre évaluation du processus d'examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, l'une de nos recommandations est d'ajouter une disposition relative au libre accès aux publications de recherche et aux publications scientifiques, en particulier dans le contexte de la recherche financée par des fonds publics. Le gouvernement fédéral a déjà adopté la Politique des trois organismes sur le libre accès aux publications pour la recherche financée par des fonds publics. Nous recommandons d'inclure ce type de disposition sur le libre accès comme principe dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, et cela peut se faire d'une façon qui n'interfère pas indûment avec les attentes raisonnables du titulaire de droits d'auteur dans le sens que les publications pourraient être placées dans un dépôt institutionnel après une période de temps raisonnable, avec la mention claire de la source.

Dans la même veine, les nouvelles technologies et nouvelles pratiques, comme l'exploration de textes et de données qui permet la collecte d'importantes quantités de données comportant des idées et des solutions novatrices à des problèmes pressants, sont devenues d'importantes méthodes de recherche pour les chercheurs des établissements d'enseignement supérieur. Le risque d'infraction au droit d'auteur associé à la reproduction d'ouvrages, pendant la collecte, l'exploration ou le téléchargement est un facteur qu'il faudrait atténuer par une mesure raisonnable visant le retrait de certains des obstacles du droit d'auteur à ce type de recherche.

Enfin, concernant les oeuvres créées par l'intelligence artificielle, nous comprenons que la raison à l'origine du droit d'auteur est d'encourager les humains à créer, diffuser et apprendre. Nous recommandons par conséquent de ne pas soumettre à la protection du droit d'auteur les ouvrages entièrement créés par l'intelligence artificielle. Dans la mesure où une personne physique ferait preuve de suffisamment de compétences et de jugement dans la façon dont elle utilise des logiciels ou d'autres technologies pour produire une oeuvre originale, les principes habituels s'appliqueraient pour conférer le droit d'auteur à cette personne. Aucune politique relevant de l'histoire, de la théorie ou de la pratique ne justifie d'étendre la portée du droit d'auteur aux oeuvres entièrement créées par l'intelligence artificielle sans intervention humaine directe.

Les recommandations qui se trouvent dans nos mémoires sont modestes et progressives, et visent à maintenir un juste équilibre entre les droits des titulaires de droits d'auteur, les droits des utilisateurs et l'intérêt public. Elles correspondent aux principes directeurs qui sous-tendent notre façon d'aborder la loi. Cette approche préconise un continuum de l'évolution du droit d'auteur qui aborde de façon plus générale les intérêts concurrents, plutôt que de constamment accroître la protection des titulaires de droits d'auteur dès que de nouvelles technologies émergent, sans tenir compte des effets de cette protection accrue sur les utilisateurs des oeuvres.

C'est là-dessus que se termine notre exposé. Nous vous remercions beaucoup de nous avoir écoutées, et nous serons ravies de répondre à toutes vos questions.

Merci.

(1725)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup de votre exposé.

Nous allons passer directement aux questions, à commencer par M. Graham.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Je vais partager mon temps avec M. Longfield. Je vous en saurais gré de m'arrêter au milieu de mon temps.

Le président:

D'accord. Je vais vous arrêter.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Madame Chapdelaine, vous avez parlé de l'utilisation équitable comme modèle plus fluide, si je peux me permettre cette expression. Comment verriez-vous cela dans la Loi, concrètement? S'il n'y a pas d'exceptions relatives à l'utilisation équitable, quel serait le libellé?

Mme Pascale Chapdelaine:

Ce serait semblable au modèle des États-Unis. Aux États-Unis, comme vous le savez probablement...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le type utilisation équitable...

Mme Pascale Chapdelaine:

... on a le type utilisation équitable. On parle des fins, mais seulement à titre d'exemple, et non de façon restrictive comme on le fait au Canada. En étendant la portée de cela sans préciser des fins particulières, on apporterait d'après moi plus de flexibilité et on permettrait à la Loi d'évoluer avec l'émergence de nouvelles technologies. Il y aurait quand même un critère d'équité — c'est très important — pour déterminer si l'utilisation peut être permise sans l'autorisation du titulaire des droits d'auteur. Il faudrait répondre au critère d'équité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que vous verriez ce modèle axé sur le type utilisation équitable comme quelque chose qui nous permettrait finalement d'avoir le droit de réparer, par exemple? Connaissez-vous le mouvement qui préconise le droit de réparer?

Mme Pascale Chapdelaine:

Ce serait un exemple, et c'est en common law. C'est une chose reconnue en common law.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez aussi mentionné l'ID de contenu. Nous avons entendu les témoignages de Google et Facebook, la semaine passée, et ils ont admis que leurs systèmes d'ID de contenu ne s'arrêtent pas vraiment aux exceptions relatives à l'utilisation équitable. Quel type de mesures devrions-nous avoir le droit de prendre ou devrions-nous prendre contre les sociétés qui ont un système d'application du droit d'auteur qui ne respecte pas en fait les lois canadiennes?

Mme Pascale Chapdelaine:

En fait, il n'y a pas grand-chose de prévu en ce moment. C'est ce qui justifie d'éclaircir l'interdiction de la sous-traitance des droits des utilisateurs concernant l'utilisation équitable, ou le type utilisation équitable. C'est une de nos recommandations: intégrer cela, en faire un droit, une obligation. En gros, ils seraient responsables de veiller à ce que l'accès soit accordé. C'est ce que nous proposons dans nos recommandations.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends cela. Je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps, alors je vais passer à M. Sheffer.

J'aimerais en apprendre un peu plus à propos des Artist Legal Advice Services, ou ALAS, car cela me semble très pertinent à notre étude. Je vais vous poser trois questions, et vous pourrez y répondre dans les 70 secondes qu'il me reste environ.

Combien de clients les ALAS ont-ils? Quels sont les problèmes les plus courants qui sont rencontrés? Quelles sont les solutions les plus courantes que vous voyez?

M. Warren Sheffer:

Concernant le nombre de clients des ALAS, nous ne gérons pas de dossiers, alors...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quel type de conseils juridiques donnez-vous?

M. Warren Sheffer:

Ce sont des conseils juridiques sommaires.

Je devrais aussi mentionner que les ALAS représentent le volet administratif et qu'ils sont administrés par les étudiants en droit de l'Université de Toronto. Nous avons trois ou quatre rendez-vous par soir, les mardis et jeudis, à Toronto. Ce sont des sessions d'une demi-heure.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est sans but lucratif?

M. Warren Sheffer:

C'est sans but lucratif, oui.

La société qui gère les ALAS est Artists and Lawyers for the Advancement of Creativity. L'acronyme est ALAC. Nous avons donc, les ALAS et les ALAC.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

ALAS et ALAC... D'accord.

Je n'ai déjà plus de temps. Je vous remercie beaucoup.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à vous pour cette autre session intéressante.

Monsieur Sheffer, le modèle que vous suggérez et les exposés que nous avons entendus au cours de la dernière heure m'ont fait penser aux chaînes de valeur. Il n'y a pas de place dans la chaîne de valeur pour les conseils juridiques, et ce n'est pas ce qu'il nous faudrait à l'avenir. Je crois que les artistes ont besoin d'avoir la bonne protection.

En ce qui concerne l'analyse de la chaîne de valeur, à cet égard, je parlais d'organigrammes et des endroits où il se crée de la valeur. Qui est payé pour cela? Comment pouvons-nous avoir des dispositions législatives qui accordent une juste valeur, à l'intérieur de la chaîne de valeur?

Vous avez, avec la publication de West End Phoenix, un micro modèle que nous pourrions utiliser.

M. Warren Sheffer:

Je pense qu'il faut d'abord protéger adéquatement le droit d'auteur du premier propriétaire, c'est-à-dire l'auteur. Au-delà de cela, il est à espérer que l'auteur ou l'interprète connaît ses droits et n'y renonce pas. Si l'auteur ou l'interprète conserve ses droits d'auteur, il est alors bien placé pour négocier une rémunération.

Comme je l'ai dit dans mon exposé, je suis très fier qu'au West End Phoenix, nous veillions...

M. Lloyd Longfield: Exactement.

M. Warren Sheffer: Je suis désolé; je ne veux pas prendre tout votre temps.

(1730)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Pas de souci; c'est exactement à cela que je voulais en venir.

Je m'adresse maintenant aux deux autres témoins. Avant que nous entreprenions cette étude, j'ai lu quelques livres sur l'histoire du droit d'auteur pour comprendre le contexte. Je me rappelle qu'un des livres était une analyse comparative de l'histoire du droit d'auteur au Royaume-Uni et aux États-Unis. Il y a de grandes différences, et le Canada est quelque part au milieu, comme toujours.

Nous empruntons des idées aux États-Unis et nous nous inspirons aussi de la France et de l'Allemagne. Où sommes-nous actuellement dans ce continuum?

Mme Myra Tawfik:

Je peux vous dire que nous nous sommes inspirés des lois américaines sur le droit d'auteur dès le départ. En effet, certaines de nos recommandations, notamment l'adoption d'une disposition de type utilisation équitable semblable à celle des États-Unis, cadrent plutôt bien avec notre histoire. Cela dit, nous parlons de plus de 200 ans d'histoire.

Même si le Canada a fait certains choix et s'est vu imposer des traditions au XXe siècle, en particulier la tradition britannique, il a toujours emprunté des éléments des Français, des Britanniques et des Américains pour les incorporer dans des mesures toutes canadiennes afin de se donner la latitude nécessaire pour évoluer.

Dans un certain sens, la réponse courte, c'est que cela englobe tout ce que je viens de dire, mais nous avons procédé différemment avec une approche distincte.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

J'ai aimé votre approche. Je vous imagine bien tous les deux en train de discuter des principes directeurs autour d'un café. Parlons justement de ces principes directeurs.

Il semble que nous avons omis d'aborder cet aspect dans notre étude. En tant que Canadiens, quels sont nos principes directeurs? Dans quelle mesure nos lois reflètent-elles ces principes?

Cela semble être le point de départ le plus logique. Je vous remercie.

Mme Myra Tawfik:

C'est ce que nous pensions.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

C'est formidable.

Merci beaucoup. C'était d'excellentes observations.

Le président:

Connaissant M. Longfield, il vous invitera probablement à aller prendre un café.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Albas.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci, monsieur le président. Si vous le permettez, j'aimerais partager mon temps avec M. Lloyd.

Merci à tous de vos exposés.

Je vais commencer par vous, madame Chapdelaine. Vous faites valoir que le Canada devrait adopter des dispositions sur l'utilisation équitable. On en entend beaucoup parler. Pouvez-vous nous dire pourquoi vous estimez que l'utilisation équitable est un meilleur système?

Mme Pascale Chapdelaine:

Il est supérieur pour les raisons que j'ai mentionnées plus tôt. Cela ne comprend pas une liste limitée de buts aux fins de l'analyse visant à établir si l'utilisation peut être faite sans l'autorisation titulaire du droit d'auteur. Il s'agirait d'établir cela en fonction de nos propres valeurs et de notre propre système juridique. Nous ne proposons pas de copier ce qui a été fait aux États-Unis. Toutefois, sur le plan législatif, nous pensons que ce serait un bon début, puisque ce serait moins restrictif et plus souple.

M. Dan Albas:

Madame Tawfik, dans votre mémoire, vous indiquez que les publications scientifiques devraient être accessibles après une période raisonnable. Dans ce contexte, pouvez-vous dire ce que vous entendez par « période raisonnable »?

Mme Myra Tawfik:

Eh bien, il s'agit évidemment du temps raisonnable pour que l'auteur d'une publication rentabilise la première publication. Cela s'est déjà fait pour la publication dans les domaines des arts, des sciences humaines et du droit, par exemple. Après une certaine période de rentabilisation, la publication est versée dans un dépôt institutionnel, avec mention de la source, pour utilisation dans le cadre de recherches financées par l'État.

M. Dan Albas:

Je comprends tout à fait que le contexte puisse varier selon l'industrie et selon les normes de l'industrie. Pour quiconque au gouvernement, la difficulté est évidemment d'établir une limite, et c'est ce que nous essayons souvent de faire au nom du gouvernement. Pouvez-vous donner un exemple lié aux publications scientifiques?

Mme Myra Tawfik:

Je ne peux donner d'exemple lié aux sciences pures.

M. Dan Albas:

Dans votre mémoire, vous indiquez aussi que le risque de payer des dommages-intérêts préétablis en cas de manquement « freine sérieusement les activités socialement souhaitables ». Pouvez-vous expliquer ce que vous entendez par « activités socialement souhaitables »?

Mme Myra Tawfik:

Il s'agit bien sûr de l'envers de la médaille. Les utilisateurs peuvent s'adapter ou faire ce qui est autorisé par le droit d'auteur, mais n'ont pas à craindre le risque de payer des dommages-intérêts sans que le plaignant fournisse de preuves. Tout ce qui entrave le fonctionnement habituel peut représenter un frein pour ceux qui veulent utiliser ce qui existe déjà pour l'adapter, créer et accroître les connaissances, de manière légitime, dans une optique raisonnable et équitable, mais sans cette épée de Damoclès que sont ces énormes dommages-intérêts.

Encore une fois, cela ne veut pas dire que les personnes, qui téléchargent de la musique ou autre chose à des fins commerciales, ne devraient pas faire l'objet de sanctions quelconques. Il y a d'ailleurs eu une affaire importante aux États-Unis à ce sujet. Les mesures punitives incluses, notamment les dommages-intérêts préétablis, pourraient constituer un frein pour ceux qui pourraient mener des activités légitimes, mais qui s'en empêchent.

(1735)

M. Dan Albas:

Très bien. Je vous remercie de l'explication.

J'ai souvent soulevé des préoccupations concernant l'identification de contenu. Les représentants de nombreuses plateformes ont indiqué qu'ils font de leur mieux dans le contexte dans lequel ils exercent leurs activités.

Voici un exemple: une personne paie des droits pour l'utilisation d'un extrait sonore, puis découvre qu'elle ne peut publier le contenu, malgré le paiement de droits, parce que Sony ou une autre entreprise le fera retirer. À la dernière réunion, j'ai donné un exemple encore plus extrême. Un réseau de télévision a pris un clip sur YouTube pour l'utiliser dans une émission télévisée, puis a demandé le retrait du clip original, sous prétexte que c'était une violation de son droit d'auteur pour son contenu.

Que peut-on faire dans de tels cas? Beaucoup de petites entreprises — ou parfois les créateurs eux-mêmes — publient des oeuvres véritablement novatrices, mais sont incapables de se défendre. Pouvez-vous nous donner des idées?

Mme Pascale Chapdelaine:

Nous recommandons la création d'un organisme administratif chargé d'examiner ces plaintes. Dans les cas liés à la restriction de la publication de contenu généré par l'utilisateur, une des possibilités incluses dans la loi, il convient d'apporter des correctifs pour permettre l'utilisation légitime des oeuvres protégées. Voilà en quoi consisterait l'aspect surveillance dont nous avons parlé pour donner de véritables recours aux utilisateurs.

M. Dan Albas:

J'aime aussi le mot « recours ».

Je cède la parole à M. Lloyd.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Je suis reconnaissant d'avoir l'occasion de parler aux témoins.

Monsieur Sheffer, vous avez parlé d'utilisation abusive du droit d'auteur par les institutions. Je pense que la plupart des Canadiens conviendront que l'utilisation dans un cadre éducatif est tout à fait légitime et constitue un principe fondamental de l'utilisation équitable. Si le Comité recommandait de préciser la portée du terme « éducation » pour que cela renvoie au droit individuel à l'éducation plutôt qu'au droit d'une institution d'utiliser l'éducation comme motif d'utilisation équitable, pensez-vous que cela aurait une incidence importante sur les droits des auteurs?

M. Warren Sheffer:

Je pense que oui. Ce que vous venez de décrire correspond parfaitement à la proposition qui, à mon avis, donnerait des résultats, celle d' Access Copyright.

Personne ne conteste qu'un étudiant puisse copier une oeuvre à des fins d'éducation et d'études privées, de recherche, etc. Ce à quoi les créateurs s'opposent, c'est la reproduction à grande échelle d'oeuvres protégées par le droit d'auteur, comme le font les établissements d'enseignement, qui incluent ces documents dans des recueils de cours pour les vendre aux étudiants en disant qu'il s'agit d'une utilisation équitable.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Pensez-vous que nos gouvernements, à tous les échelons, mais surtout le fédéral, je suppose, en font assez pour protéger la trame culturelle du milieu littéraire au Canada? Risquons-nous vraiment de perdre ce qui fait la spécificité de la littérature canadienne?

M. Warren Sheffer:

Oui. Je pense que si on autorise une exception pour l'éducation...

Permettez-moi un bref retour en arrière. Si je n'avais qu'une seule chose à dire, je vous implorerais de prendre connaissance de l'affaire de l'Université York. Vous verriez comment cette université — la troisième en importance au pays, avec ses quelque 50 000 étudiants — a utilisé ses directives en matière d'utilisation équitable.

Les constatations de faits sont incontestables. Je vous implore de lire cette décision, car si on permet que cela fasse jurisprudence en matière d'utilisation équitable, ce sera certainement préjudiciable aux créateurs.

(1740)

M. Dane Lloyd:

C'est ce que j'ai à retenir de mes questions. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Masse, les sept dernières minutes sont à vous.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci de votre présence.

J'ai une dernière question pour M. Sheffer. En somme, ce qui vous préoccupe vraiment, c'est que les établissements tirent un revenu de l'utilisation de l'oeuvre, que cela représente une source de revenus, etc., mais qu'en fin de compte, son auteur n'est pas rémunéré. Est-ce vraiment ce...

M. Warren Sheffer:

Oui, tout à fait.

M. Brian Masse:

Je voulais seulement m'en assurer.

J'aimerais maintenant parler d'intelligence artificielle, dont on n'a pas beaucoup discuté. J'aimerais donc m'y attarder. Je vous remercie d'avoir soulevé la question, parce qu'on n'en a pas beaucoup parlé.

Quelle est la préoccupation à cet égard? Quelqu'un a fait valoir que le créateur de l'intelligence artificielle deviendrait le propriétaire des oeuvres créées par l'intelligence artificielle. Auriez-vous des commentaires à ce sujet?

Mme Myra Tawfik:

Nous n'appuyons pas cette position. Le droit d'auteur ne peut être un instrument de politique ou un outil législatif pour traiter des technologies émergentes ou d'autres choses.

La technologie de l'intelligence artificielle peut être protégée à l'aide de brevets, et la technologie elle-même peut être protégée autrement. Essentiellement, le droit d'auteur vise à inciter les êtres humains à créer et à diffuser des oeuvres, etc. Donc, le recours au droit d'auteur pour protéger des technologies, des logiciels et des choses du genre a déjà entraîné une distorsion, non seulement par rapport à l'origine du droit d'auteur, mais aussi, pour parler franchement, par rapport à son principe fondamental, à l'intention sous-jacente.

Nous ne disons pas que personne ne devrait être titulaire du droit d'auteur d'une oeuvre produite par l'intelligence artificielle. Toutefois, les critères du droit d'auteur ne doivent pas changer; nous devons appliquer les mêmes critères. Si un être humain a eu la compétence et l'intelligence de créer une oeuvre à l'aide de l'intelligence artificielle, il devrait alors pouvoir revendiquer le droit d'auteur. Toutefois, s'il a simplement produit la technologie qui permet à l'intelligence artificielle de créer quelque chose de nouveau, nous sommes d'avis que le droit d'auteur ne devrait pas s'appliquer à cela.

S'il devenait nécessaire de protéger le travail de création d'un robot, d'autres mécanismes que le droit d'auteur entreraient en jeu.

M. Brian Masse:

C'est un aspect intéressant qu'on n'a pas beaucoup étudié.

J'ai soulevé ce document au début des audiences à ce sujet. Compte tenu des subventions publiques massives à la recherche sur l'intelligence artificielle et à ses produits, il est facile de comprendre que le public s'attend à ce qu'une partie des retombées soit partagée, à mon avis. Beaucoup de ressources publiques sont sollicitées dans le cadre des partenariats public-privés: financement, infrastructures, processus et ressources publics, etc. Cela provient des deniers publics. C'est un aspect dont il faut discuter.

Pour le temps qui reste, j'aimerais parler de la communication des renseignements par le gouvernement. Tout juste avant que vous preniez place à la table, on nous a dit qu'il y avait eu, semble-t-il, des travaux et des études. Mes questions portaient sur l'Accord États-Unis-Mexique-Canada, la prolongation de la protection du droit auteur et les informations utilisées à cette fin. Cela n'a fait l'objet d'aucune étude précise, mais le gouvernement a des renseignements et des documents sur le sujet. Nous ne savons pas encore en quoi cela consiste, même si des ressources gouvernementales ont servi à ces recherches.

Comment le gouvernement canadien se compare-t-il à ses voisins et à d'autres pays du Commonwealth sur le plan de la divulgation des renseignements publics, comme les documents gouvernementaux, les recherches et les autres études qui ont été faites?

Mme Myra Tawfik:

J'ai un exemple.

J'ai présenté plusieurs demandes de consultation d'archives pour des oeuvres protégées et des brevets du XIXe siècle. J'ai été bloquée; on m'a demandé de présenter une demande d'accès à l'information pour obtenir des renseignements sur le brevet, un brevet du XIXe siècle. Le droit d'auteur était protégé en vertu d'une prérogative de la Couronne plutôt que... Ce n'est qu'un petit exemple de ce que j'ai constaté pour des documents qui devraient être publics. Cela dit, on n'a pas ici le même degré d'ouverture qu'on trouve ailleurs, même si je comprends qu'il puisse y avoir des restrictions dans certaines circonstances.

M. Brian Masse:

Je sais que nous sommes loin derrière nos partenaires économiques de l'OCDE pour la divulgation publique de renseignements produits par la fonction publique.

Je vous remercie de l'occasion, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins d'être venus ici aujourd'hui.

(1745)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

C'était une brève réunion, mais je pense qu'elle a été très instructive. Encore une fois, chers collègues, si vous avez des questions supplémentaires que vous voudriez que nous transmettions aux témoins, veuillez les communiquer au greffier avant vendredi midi.

Enfin, nous ne savons pas encore dans quelle pièce se tiendra la réunion de lundi. Le greffier vous tiendra au courant.

Je tiens à remercier nos invités.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on December 05, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.