header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-12-04 PROC 136

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 136th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. Today we continue our consideration of the 4th report of the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business, wherein the subcommittee recommended that Bill C-421 be designated non-votable.

We are pleased to be joined by Philippe Dufresne, the House's law clerk and parliamentary counsel.

Thank you for being here today. It's great to have you back again and to have your wise counsel. We look forward to your opening remarks—or your remarks. That's the only reason we're here.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne (Law Clerk and Parliamentary Counsel, House of Commons):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair and members of the committee.

I'm pleased to be here with you today to assist the committee in its work as it considers the votability of Bill C-421. On November 29, 2018, the committee commenced consideration of matters related to private members' business regarding Bill C-421. The committee heard representations from Mr. Mario Beaulieu, the member of Parliament for La Pointe-de-l'Île and sponsor of the bill, and Mr. Marc-André Roche, researcher for the Bloc Québécois.

I understand that the conversation was focused on whether Bill C-421 complies with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and following that meeting the committee decided to invite me to appear to discuss some of the legal issues raised.

My remarks today will be focusing on the following topics. I will address the charter questions and the drafting of private members' bills. I will note the confidentiality of the private members' drafting process in my office. I will speak to the non-votability criterion adopted by this committee specifically, and the requirement that the bill does not clearly violate the Constitution. I will discuss some recent case law of the Federal Court of Appeal that may be helpful in identifying the parameters of this criterion. I will, of course, be happy to respond to any questions that the committee members may have about the specific constitutional issues that have been raised to date. [Translation]

The legislative counsel working for my office are responsible for drafting bills for members who are not part of the government. In my opinion, this is an essential service for parliamentary democracy. We are committed to this mandate and we fulfill it with a great deal of enthusiasm. I am extremely proud of the dedicated team who does this work in a professional and impartial manner.

In addition to drafting the bill properly, the legislative counsel assigned to the bill advises the member if they believe that it raises issues related to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms or to the Constitution of Canada. Depending on the nature of the issue, the counsel may suggest that the member contact the Library of Parliament to obtain further information or they will draft a formal legal opinion for the member. Those exchanges about the bill are confidential and cannot be divulged without the member's consent.

Constitutional issues may be resolved in various ways. For example, the counsel may discuss with the member and suggest an approach to mitigate the risks of violating the charter. The counsel may also suggest drafting a national strategy if the matter in question is rather under provincial jurisdiction, or if the member proceeds by way of a motion instead of a bill. Regardless of any concerns raised, the final decision to proceed with the bill rests with the member.

Confidentiality is extremely important to us. It is mentioned in the 34th report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs dated March 16, 2000, in which the committee noted that the work of legislative counsel is covered by parliamentary privilege, which has an even higher legal basis, as it is provided for in our Constitution. The committee quoted the Speaker from March 13, 2000, who stated: All staff of the House of Commons working in support of Members in their legislative function are governed by strict confidentiality with regard to persons outside their operational field and, of course, vis-à-vis other Members. [English]

This is fundamental. When we serve you as legislators in providing the legislative drafting services, we do so with strict confidentiality. I will not be discussing today any conversations or advice that could have been given to any member on any specific topic. I am available and here to address the issues generally before you, and specifically, to talk about the criteria around non-votability.[Translation]

As you know, a bill that is added to the order of precedence will be reviewed by the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business to determine its votability. An analyst from the Library of Parliament is assigned to assist the subcommittee when considerations relating to votability are raised. The analyst can provide information and analysis on the issue but cannot provide a legal opinion. The votability criteria are established by the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. In the most recent version of the criteria established in May 2007, the four criteria are as follows: Bills and motions must not concern questions that are outside federal jurisdiction; Bills and motions must not clearly violate the Constitution Acts, 1867 to 1982, including the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms;

We are most interested in that last criterion. Bills and motions must not concern questions that are substantially the same as ones already voted on by the House of Commons in the current session of Parliament, or as ones preceding them in the order of precedence; Bills and motions must not concern questions that are currently on the Order Paper or Notice Paper as items of government business.

(1110)

[English]

Bills that fail to meet the criterion, with a clear violation of the Constitution Act, will be found to be non-votable.

To determine if a bill is non-votable, the question is not whether any given bills, or in this case Bill C-421 could violate the charter, but rather whether the bill clearly violates the charter, which is a higher standard for intervention. It is one that is more favourable to allowing debates about bills in the House. The process is internal to the House of Commons. As I've stated, it was set out and the criterion was adopted by this committee.

However, a useful comparison can be made to the standard applied by the Minister of Justice for the review of government bills for charter compliance pursuant to section 4.1 of the Department of Justice Act. This section requires the minister to “ascertain whether any of the provisions” of a government bill “are inconsistent with the purposes and provisions of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms”. It requires the minister to report any such inconsistency to the House.

In a recent decision, Schmidt v. Canada, the Federal Court of Appeal had to determine the interpretation of this criterion of ascertaining whether it's inconsistent. There were two possibilities: Are you going to ask whether it's likely in violation of the charter, or are you going to ask for a higher threshold?

In the decision written by Justice Stratas for the Federal Court of Appeal, the court found that the appropriate standard obliges the Minister of Justice to report when there is no credible argument supporting the constitutionality of a proposed bill, and not when the proposed bill or regulation may likely be unconstitutional.

The court held that, given the uncertain difficult jurisprudential terrain of constitutional law and the time when the minister is expected to assess proposed legislation, the only responsible reliable report that could be given under the examination provisions is when proposed legislation is so constitutionally deficient it cannot be credibly defended. In other words, the court affirmed that the Minister of Justice only needs to inform the House of inconsistency between a government bill and the charter when no credible argument can be made in support of the measure. The court added that this approach was justified, given the inherent difficulty in predicting the outcome of constitutional law cases before the courts.

The court gave a number of examples. The case law can evolve, the Supreme Court itself can change its previous findings, and a lot of the charter cases will be dependent on the facts that will be led in justification of any violation. It's difficult to predict, and that supported a strict standard. The court also noted that it made sense for the standard applied by the minister to be commensurate to the standard applied by this committee in determining votability.

Leave to appeal has been sought, in this decision, to the Supreme Court of Canada. It may not be the last word on this point, but it is to date, at this time, the last word on the interpretation. As a result, in a similar way, the committee examines proposed legislation to determine whether it clearly violates the charter, not whether it could violate the charter.

In my view, if we apply this standard, if you apply it, a bill would only be deemed non-votable in situations where no credible argument could be made in support of the bill's constitutionality. That is, in my view, a helpful standard because it helps to deal with uncertainties.

Justice Stratas talked about this in his decision, saying that there will be rare cases where it's so obvious and so clear that you can make this determination, but in others the standard will not be met. That's the question before this committee, and I will be happy to assist as best I can in answering any questions you may have. I know there were some specific charter issues that were discussed in the previous hearings, and I'm happy to address those.[Translation]

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

I'm just going to go informally and let people ask questions.

I just want to ask two things quickly, though. You talk about helping members of Parliament. Roughly how many people are you?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

The total in my office is 36. We have two main mandates. One is legal advice to the House itself, and one is the legislative drafting. The legislative drafting would be about half of my office, including the publication of bills.

(1115)

The Chair:

When you talk about the justice minister's requirement to see if a bill's content doesn't offend the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, they do not do that analysis of private members' bills in advance, do they?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

They do not. They do that for government bills.

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Mr. Dufresne, for clarity, the charter provides that Canadians can communicate with the government in either language. Is that correct?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Bill C-421 specifies that an applicant for citizenship in Quebec must demonstrate a knowledge of French. The only question for me is this: Is demonstrating a knowledge of a language to the government communicating with the government? If it is, then I don't see a credible argument to make this constitutional. I want to hear your thoughts on that.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

I tried to anticipate some of the dilemma and analysis. I would look at the arguments that could be made in favour of there being a violation and arguments that could be made to say that there is no violation.

To argue that there's a violation of section 20, the argument would be, as you suggest, Mr. Graham, that a person would be forced to speak French with the federal government in establishing that they have an understanding of the French language, and that this would breach section 20 and maybe, arguably, section 16 of the charter in terms of official languages. Another argument could be that it would discourage the use of English by permanent residents in Quebec who wish to obtain citizenship. Those would be some of the types of arguments to say this is breached.

The arguments in support of the provision's constitutionality on those grounds, I think, would be that the bill doesn't prevent a person from communicating with the government. If the government is writing letters to the individual, if the individual is getting invited to the ceremony or is being asked for documentation to demonstrate their knowledge of French, all of that could be done in English, and then of course, demonstrating that the knowledge of French would be dealt with. The argument could be that you need to show that you can understand French, but in your communication with the government, are you able to do that largely in English? That would be the argument.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But Mr. Dufresne, there's no standard saying “largely” in a language. You communicate in the language of your choice. The moment at any step in the process here when you're required to speak only one of the official languages, the whole purpose of that section of the charter seems to be broken to me. Is that fair, or am I misinterpreting it?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

I think this is probably why the Federal Court of Appeal has adopted the standard of, “Does it clearly violate?” You can see the argument. How can you demonstrate your knowledge of French without speaking French? That's the argument on that side of the ledger.

On the other side, you could say that section 20 requires that communication.... When the government invites you and communicates with you, it does it in the language of your choice, which could be English, in this case. The criterion that you have to meet is to demonstrate your knowledge of French. That's part of what you have to show to meet the condition of citizenship, but otherwise, the communications with you by the government before, after and during this are done in the language of your choice. That would be the argument.

At the end of the day, what would a court decide? It's hard to predict. You can have those two arguments. You can have arguments that subsection 16(3) of the charter talks about promoting the use of both French and English in Canada. Is it a relevant consideration that French is the minority language in Canada, but it's the majority language of Quebec? Again, you could have some arguments on those sides.

Assuming there is a violation—the court could say that if you're asked to demonstrate your knowledge of French, you are required to communicate in French, so it's a violation of section 20—then the issue would become whether is it justified by section 1 of the charter. There is case law about the test that has to be met. The test generally requires showing that there is a sufficiently important objective to the legislation, and that it is a reasonable limit. In terms of a reasonable limit, the court will look at whether it minimally impairs the right that is affected.

Case law to date has recognized that the promotion and preservation of French in Quebec is a legitimate objective. The most recent decision of this is the Nguyen case at the Supreme Court of Canada. The first ones were Ford and Devine, talking about the importance there.

It's in the second criterion that it's become quite difficult. Is it a minimal impairment of the right? Then the question becomes, have you adopted the measure that's least intrusive to achieve your objective? In the case law about the language of business in Quebec, when the law required only French, it was found to be an unjustifiable limit because it was too extreme. When the law was that you had to have both French and English, the court found that that was a reasonable measure, even if it brought some disadvantage to English-speaking stores.

Those are all the things that courts will look at when faced with a charter challenge. They will look at evidence to ask what is the impact, what could be alternative measures, and are there any ways to allow some flexibility in the bill? For instance, if someone has a learning disability and has difficulty learning French, is that going to be an absolute prohibition, or is that going to be something that's taken into consideration by providing reasonable accommodation? Those would be some of the issues at play in a court looking at this and determining constitutionality.

(1120)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you for your presentation today.

Could I just ask what year the Nguyen case was?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

The Nguyen case was 2007, if memory serves.

I'll just confirm the date: December 2008.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The reference to the least intrusive measure that's available, you're referring to the Oakes test, I assume?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Effectively, the Oakes test has been applied then to a number of language rights. Nguyen is the most recent, but Ford is another example. What was the third case you mentioned?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

It was the Devine case.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Both of those go back to the 1990s, or even the 1980s.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

That's right, they were 1984 and 1988.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Ford, in particular, was vis-à-vis Bill 101, I think.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

That's correct.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I actually wrote a book on this, but I wrote it in 1993 and a quarter of a century has gone by, and so on.

What is the case on the the ruling from David Stratas? Do you have any idea when we'll find out whether leave to appeal has been granted?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

The issue there was the proper interpretation to give to the minister's interpretation of her obligation to provide a report to the House. The appellant, Edgar Schmidt, who is a former drafter with the Department of Justice, was arguing that the standard should be a stricter standard and that you would have to really be satisfied that there is a strong argument or credible argument of constitutionality and that would provide further charter protection.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It sounds to me as if he was arguing in favour of basically looking at a balance of the probabilities, whereas the standard currently being applied would be sort of a reversed version of beyond a reasonable doubt.

Does that sound like a rough way of describing the two?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

I would agree with that. I think that's really the issue. Are you going to require that you feel it's more likely than not that this is going to be upheld, or are you going to find that there's no credible argument? It's not exactly the same, but it's the same idea.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Forgive me making this editorial observation—you are free to agree or disagree with what I have to say—but balance of the probabilities sounds, when you first hear about it, to be the simpler test. However, I would say that's actually not true. Finding no credible or reasonable argument to be given, no argument that a reasonable person would take seriously—that's the reasonable person test and this is a version of that—is actually I think easier to do because you're surrounded by reasonable people, whereas balance of the probabilities is balance of the probabilities when trying to divine what the nine people on the Supreme Court are going to be ruling. It's actually the balance of the probabilities as to whether it would survive being tested at the Supreme Court.

That is an inherently difficult task. You have people coming onto and leaving the court, some of whom—at this point, the majority of whom—have probably never dealt with a language rights case. There's actually, I would submit, a higher degree of uncertainty about that.

I just throw that out as an observation. Does that sound like...?

Remember, we have a situation in which drafters working for the justice department, for the minister, are trying to provide this kind of feedback on absolutely every single piece of legislation that comes forward. I would think that would actually be a hard standard for them to meet.

(1125)

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

I think your description is consistent with what the Federal Court of Appeal found. It said that the executive is not limited to proposing measures that are: ...certain to be constitutional or likely to be constitutional. Rather, as a constitutional matter, in the words of the Federal Court...it is entitled to put forward proposed legislation that, after a “robust review of the clauses in draft legislation” is “defendable in Court.”

The court goes on to ask why that is. One of the reasons is that the charter is a document suffused with balances. It's not unequivocal. There are no unqualified guarantees of rights and freedoms. There's considerable scope for questioning debate, deliberation in Parliament, vis-à-vis that. At the end of the day, there's a role for courts to play.

What's interesting in the decision in Schmidt is that the court goes through, in large measure, highlighting some of the uncertainties in predicting. They talk about the fact that the constitutional authorities are not necessarily good precedents in later cases. Courts now depart more readily from earlier constitutional precedents.

We're talking about some of the decisions from the 1980s. This is more than 20 years later. We've seen the court, and Schmidt talks about certain specific cases—the Carter case on physician-assisted death where the court changed its jurisprudence on constitutional validity in a charter matter.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Was Justice Stratas's point there that it would have been impossible to bring forward some aspects of bill—I've forgotten the bill number, the assisted dying act—had we applied the stricter criteria we're trying to...? Is that part of what he was saying?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

I think it may be that you would have to report on many more bills, because the consequence for the Minister of Justice is that they have to present a report. It doesn't mean the bill doesn't go forward. It's a different consequence here. With this committee, the consequence is that the bill is not votable.

In my sense, the criterion is a similar one. Just to quote one last part of the decision, the court says: ...in conclusion, I ask this question: given the nature of constitutional law and litigation and the practical obstacles facing the Department of Justice, what is more likely? That the examination provisions require the Minister to reach a definitive view, settle upon probability assessments and report when she concludes that proposed legislation is “likely” unconstitutional? Or that the examination provisions require the Minister to report whenever there is no credible argument supporting the constitutionality of proposed legislation? I would suggest the latter. Given the uncertain, difficult jurisprudential terrain of constitutional law and the time when the Minister is expected to assess proposed legislation—

This is the part I read to you in my statement: —the only responsible, reliable report that could be given under the examination provisions is when proposed legislation is so constitutionally deficient, it cannot be credibly defended.

One of the questions is this: Is that a test that can ever be met? If you're putting the bar too high, you're never going to report, or you're never going to determine something not to be votable. The court says that one thing is clear. Even in this difficult, uncertain, speculative environment, some proposed legislation may be so deficient that the minister can conclude with confidence that no credible argument could be made to support it. I would suggest it's the same for this committee.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Just to be clear, regardless of what report was done, or whether we approve a piece of legislation as votable, it goes through and gets enacted, if it's actually unconstitutional and someone takes it to court, it will eventually be struck down. By definition.... I've actually given a tautological statement. That which is unconstitutional is that which the Supreme Court says is unconstitutional. By definition, this bill, if it's unconstitutional, becomes the law of the land, or is an attempt made by Parliament to make it the law of the land. It will nevertheless not be the law of the land if the court deems it to be unconstitutional.

(1130)

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

That's correct.

It's interesting. In terms of having the last word on something, and in terms of questions not always being clear, administrative law as a field of law recognizes that, for many legal questions, there may be more than one possible answer.

It has been stated sometimes that the court that gets it right is really the court that has the last word, because you have appeals, and you can overturn it. It's not necessarily that the other one was objectively wrong, but someone has to have a last word on those questions.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

That is actually the point. The Supreme Court is.... Simply, the buck has to stop somewhere, and it stops there.

We used to have it stop in London, and at that point we discovered, on all kinds of issues—the Persons Case comes to mind—that in the judgment of what was then the final word, the Supreme Court was incorrect. They decided that frequently.

That's all I have at the moment.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

I hope colleagues will agree that, if nothing else, when you bring in the parliamentary law clerk, it's always fascinating.

Just help me make sure I have the horse in front of the cart. The matter before us right now is not specifically the constitutionality of the bill. That is the second step. The first step is that we as an appellant body have been asked to overrule a judgment that a given bill is not votable because it is obviously unconstitutional.

I moved the motion to bring you in. What I wanted to hear from you was just that. Is it that blatant? If so, it's a slam dunk for us, but I'm hearing something very different from that. I'll get to that in a moment.

Staying with the votability, colleagues, I come to this with a strong bias. I've always had a great deal of difficulty with the notion that the majority of MPs get to decide whether an individual MP's bill gets the right of a vote. This is in the context of how our rights as members of Parliament have been lost over the decades as our parliamentary system has evolved. I always start with the bias that you better have a darn good reason for telling a member of Parliament that they don't have the right to air their issue. The one area where you have some sovereignty around here is the private member's bill, and now you're being told by everybody else that your right has been extinguished, and that this was done by peers, colleagues, so I offer my bias up front.

Having said that, I think it makes good sense that if something is outrageously unconstitutional, if it is obviously a violation of our Charter of Rights, we would not want to give it credibility by allowing a vote on it. The fact that it is unconstitutional means, in my view, that you haven't done your homework as member of Parliament. Rather than just saying your rights have been extinguished, go back and do your homework. Do the job right and figure out a way to bring it forward so that it is at least constitutional. If you can't do that, too bad. That's kind of where I am.

Parenthetically, I want to say that one of the things I am truly going to miss in not being a member of Parliament is having a fascinating discussion with a group of people where one of them says, “Yeah, I wrote a book about that.” This didn't happen in my previous life, and I don't expect it to happen in my future life, but in this life it happens, and it's amazing, especially when it's someone of the credibility of the person I'm talking about.

To get back to the point, for me, that's why it was so important to have you in here. There was some question that, by virtue of your office, your having given a constitutional opinion to the author of the bill would somehow negate our right to have an equally thoughtful opinion. That was a real problem.

I think we seem to be okay with that. We're not asking what advice you gave them. We are saying, “This is now before us. What advice do you give us?” It may be the same. It may be different. That's between you and the member, but anything that would preclude a committee of Parliament from seeking and benefiting from the thinking of the parliamentary law clerk nullifies, to me, what the system is there for. I'm a layperson. I have a grade 9 education. If we're going to talk constitutions, I want my lawyer. Who's my lawyer? The parliamentary law clerk.

Anyway, I think we got past that, and it's all good and fine.

Coming back to the actual issue, help me again with the test. Can a credible argument be made against the constitutionality? Tease that out a bit for me, please.

(1135)

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

The test is when there is no credible argument supporting the constitutionality.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

I thought I heard you do that. At least you said, “On the one hand,” and then you said, “On the other hand”. To me, when we're saying something's not votable, it should be so strong that there is no “other hand”, but I heard—as a layperson—what seemed like, at least prima facie, good arguments on both sides.

Are you in agreement with what I'm saying so far?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

I don't know if they were good, but I did give arguments on both sides.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's subjective. The point was that there are at least two arguments that a good lawyer could make.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Right.

Mr. David Christopherson:

How many more tests do we need, though? This is my point.

Regardless of how we feel about the issue—set the politics of the issue aside—the question before us as an appellant body is, should this bill be allowed to have a vote? The only way that it should not be is that if it's so in violation of the Constitution that it just makes a mockery should we allow that vote. That doesn't seem to be where we are.

Now, I've entered into a dialogue with colleagues. I'm only the second speaker—sorry, third—and I enjoy these discussions. I'm looking forward to feedback as we go through, but I have to say, Chair, that this is where I thought we might end up.

Regardless of how I feel about the bill, as a member acting in an appellant body manner, I'm now finding it very difficult to justify saying to a colleague, “Your private member's bill does not deserve to be voted on.” Because why...? The only thing I can think of is that we either start getting into the constitutionality, in which case it seems that there's at least a valid argument and debate to be had, on both sides. Second, of course, is that if it does get past this body and goes on to the House, the House can use a different standard, that is, whether they like the bill or not and whether they agree that it ought to be the law of the land. That's not what we're doing right here and right now.

Somebody please correct me if I'm wrong, but where we are right now is hearing from a subcommittee that has said, “We believe this is not votable because it's not constitutional”. The member has appealed that decision to us. It is our decision to make before it goes to the House. I haven't heard a good argument that backs up the subcommittee argument that it's unconstitutional, because the parliamentary law clerk has at least offered up that there can be at least a credible argument on both sides, as a starting point, recognizing that at the end of the day it's the Supreme Court that will make a final determination on its constitutionality. Even that may not be the end of the day. A further Supreme Court in the future could do something, but for our purposes here, this is where we are in that process.

Right now, colleagues, I am strongly inclined to vote against the recommendation of the subcommittee and vote in favour of this, allowing it to go forward. Having said that, I'm going to listen intently. This is a serious matter. If people see it differently than I do, I can be persuaded. That's my thinking so far.

I thank you for the floor, Chair.

(1140)

The Chair:

Thank you.

By extrapolation, if the member appeals to the House, then you would have the same argument, making—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sorry, but on a process that appeals to the House, does it go to the House for a question of votability, or do we just pass it on and they vote?

The Chair:

If it's turned down here, he can appeal to the House.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If it's supported here, it goes to the House. Is that right? It goes to the House as a bill...? I'm seeing the clerk say yes.

Thank you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We had one appeal once before that went to the House, when Ms. Malcolmson had her appeal. That went to a secret ballot by all members.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Right. Yes, she lost it.

The Chair:

Madam Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I have listened carefully to your arguments, both positive and negative. I have listened carefully and I fully understand, coming from Quebec.

You referred to subsection 16(1), but also to paragraph 20(1)(a) of the Constitution Act, 1982, which states that “there is a significant demand for communications” in English or French. An application for Canadian citizenship is more than significant, it is very significant because the goal is to make you a true Canadian citizen.

Let me take you back to my riding of Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, which is north of Montreal, where there are exclusively English-speaking permanent residents with links to people from the United States.

Many of my fellow constituents who became Canadian citizens told me that it was very difficult to pass the exam and that it required a lot of preparation. If a person has to choose between French and English when they are not fluent in French, it is difficult for them. They all told me that it was already difficult to pass the exam in either of the two languages.

If anglophones in Quebec are not allowed to take their citizenship test in English, will they have to go outside Quebec to do so? Is that the other possibility?

Let's say that I am a permanent francophone resident living outside Quebec, but not in New Brunswick, the only bilingual province. I am elsewhere and the same thing, only in reverse, happens to me. Will I have to take my exam in English when we know that the exam is very difficult and requires a lot of preparation?

You used the words “clearly, likely, could”, but I don't know where the line is drawn. Let me go back to what paragraph 20(1)(a) of the Constitution Act, 1982, says: “there is a significant demand for communications” in English or French. In my opinion, an application to become a Canadian citizen is one of the most significant communications with the federal government.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

As I said with regard to the test, is there a credible argument to defend its validity? So we're really talking about something clear.

With respect to section 20, the issue is whether individuals are prevented from communicating with the government in the language of their choice.

You said that people would be forced to take the citizenship test in English. That would be something to explore. Would the bill you are studying have that effect? According to the bill, people will have to demonstrate that they have “adequate knowledge of French”. Is that separate from the exam?

When other questions are asked, such as about the knowledge of Canada, is the person being forced to take the test in French or are those two completely different things? That would be something important to look at. If the person is actually forced to answer all the other questions of the citizenship process in French, it becomes more difficult to defend, and perhaps it is easier to refer to section 1. However, if people can take their citizenship test in English but, in one part of the process, they must demonstrate that they have an adequate knowledge of French, in terms of a potential violation, it is probably a little less intrusive. It is one of the many facts to be considered.

The Supreme Court, in Schmidt, noted that some constitutional disputes depend on evidence brought before the court.

In practice, how does that work? The charter sets out human rights principles, and the case law says that legislation must be interpreted in a manner consistent with the charter.

In fact, the Solski case in Quebec has set a precedent for the right to education in the minority language. The question was whether the education act violated the charter. The Supreme Court said that the section could be salvaged if it were interpreted more broadly. Allowing a person to study in the minority language in a qualitative way is acceptable, as it it is in keeping with the spirit of the charter. However, if we adopt a stricter approach and evaluate only the quantity, not the quality, of education, it is too stringent and it violates the charter.

That would be the kind of question to ask here. How is this interpreted? Are we really saying that all communications with the government and departments must be in French or are we saying that they can be in the language of one's choice but that, during this process, people must demonstrate that they have an adequate knowledge of French? This could certainly influence the outcome.

(1145)

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you. [English]

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

If I may, I want to go back to one comment you made, Mr. Christopherson. Not to be too technical about it, but I do take the confidentiality of the work of my office so seriously that I want to mention it.

I understood your remarks to say that we did give legal advice to the member in this case, and I want to say I'm not here confirming whether we gave any advice, let alone what the advice would be. That is all confidential. I was speaking very generally to say that as a rule we can give advice—sometimes we do and sometimes we don't—but I'm not here confirming even the fact of advice being given, because that is part of the strict confidentiality.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I see the importance put on individual members. That's why this matters, whether someone gets a vote or not.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, you're up.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Chris, do you want to go first?

No? Okay. [Translation]

We are talking about credible arguments. However, let me point out that there is a difference between a credible argument and one that seems credible. We could talk at length about arguments that seem credible. For example, an argument against climate change may seem credible, even though there is no credible argument against climate change. We might say that we cannot act on an argument that seems credible, so we are no longer moving forward. I just wanted to share these thoughts with you.

When people demonstrate an adequate knowledge, as the bill says, they must do so by communicating. By definition, they are communicating: they are in front of an officer who administers a test to check their ability to speak in one of the two languages in particular.

I have a hard time understanding how this would not apply to communications with the government. Nowhere in the bill does it say that we should normally, or most of the time, speak in a particular language; it says that we must be able to communicate in that language.

Let's take the example of someone who would like to drive from here to Rio de Janeiro. The person would face a slight problem, called the Darién Gap, between Panama and Colombia. There is no road across it. That region is more than 110 kilometres long, and no roads cross it. So we can't drive to South America. It's therefore like saying that, because we can cover 99% of the route, we can cross America by car.

That is not a very compelling argument. Yes, an argument seems credible with respect to the constitutionality of the bill, but I see no credible argument that makes it constitutional.

I would like to hear your comments on that.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

Mr. Graham, all I can say on the matter is that this is really your decision. It is up to you and the committee to assess it. For my part, I try to indicate as best I can what the test is. It's a tough test. I have tried to identify some problems related to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. For example, does this bill violate section 20?

Even if that were the case, you would also have to check whether this is justified under section 1. There are other considerations as well, including minimal or no impairment, and even how important the objective is. To be consistent, it is important to acknowledge that, even if the court recognized in Nguyen that the objective was sufficiently important, this would likely no longer be the case now. Those are the factors at play, but it is really up to you to decide.

(1150)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What if the same bill reversed were to say that, in Alberta alone, you have to demonstrate a knowledge of English in order to apply? There is a francophone community in Alberta.

If there were a requirement to take the test in English or to demonstrate knowledge of English in Alberta, would we be having this discussion? Instead,would we be saying that this is not good and that it is a blatant attack on the French language? It's the same thing. Would we be having the same discussion?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

All I can say is that, in terms of the constitutionality issues, it would be the same discussion in that we would be asking ourselves whether this violates section 20. If so, we would then ask ourselves whether it is justified, whether the legislative objective in this province and in this context is sufficiently important to require knowledge of English in such circumstances and whether it is a minimal impairment.

That being said, for you, members of the committee, the issue would not be to decide whether it is constitutional or not, but to establish whether it is clearly a violation of the charter and whether there is a lack of credible arguments to defend the bill.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Let me point out to my colleagues that there is no credible argument, but there is one that seems credible.

I will yield my place.

Thank you, Mr. Dufresne. [English]

The Chair:

Is there something, though, in the jurisprudence that because it's a minority language, it's a different situation, because French is a minority?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But it's the majority language in Quebec.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

That's where the court in the Quebec case is dealing with the promotion of language. That's the element, with regard to section 1 of the charter, that has to be justified. The court will look at the purpose of the bill. Is it a sufficiently important objective that's being sought and that's infringing a provision of the charter?

In those cases in Quebec, so far, the courts have said it is a sufficiently important objective to promote French in Quebec as a minority language in Canada.

That depends on the facts of the circumstances, and the onus is on the government, in defending the legislation, to establish that for the court.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I listened very carefully to Madame Lapointe and Mr. Graham, but what I heard were arguments against the bill. Fair enough. Let me be further transparent. I'm not a judge, so I don't have to worry about some of those standards.

Somebody is going to have a heck of a time convincing me to vote for that bill for the obvious reason that I think Mr. Graham touched most closely, which is, “What? Are you kidding me?” That's me, the MP from Hamilton Centre, my first blush. I'm like, “Whoa, I don't like this at all.” If I have an opportunity, unless somebody convinces me otherwise, I'm going to vote against it. That is very separate from whether or not my colleague, a fellow MP, has the right to have his private member's bill put to the test of the House.

For those of you who served on local councils, perhaps you would be reminded, like I am, of zoning issues, where you have, say, a small business that is being opened on a corner. It's a good commercial location, but it's abutting a residential area. You can tell that I represented downtown. The zoning allows for use as, let's say, a pizza parlour, but it's short two parking spots. You could go to the committee of adjustment. Its sole focus is whether or not those two spots should be enough to deny them what otherwise they have as of right. Nine times out of 10, residents come in—and constituents, understandably—and they argue against the pizza parlour being there. Really, the only question in front of the committee of adjustment is whether the lack of the two parking spots that are a requirement justifies negating the rest of the right of that property owner to have their as-of-right zoning applied.

I feel the same way here. We keep wanting to get into the issue and whether we like it or not.

Mr. Chair, I would ask you to please be specific and clear. Unless I have this wrong, that's not what's in front of us. What's in front of us right now is us in our capacity as an appellant body to a subcommittee that has recommended that this is not votable. So far, I'm not hearing arguments that justify the banning of a colleague's right to bring a bill before the House of Commons.

Remember colleagues, the day we stop allowing members of Parliament to bring a bill to the House.... This is some dangerous water that we're wading into. It doesn't seem like it in our peaceful kingdom, but when you get a chance to get out in the world and see what can happen, or get a little experience around here or at the provincial level and see the kinds of things that can happen, you will see that these things matter. It's really important that we get them right when there isn't a crisis because when there's a crisis, the politics of the day will take over.

I say that because, colleagues, I am listening carefully. However, I'm still not hearing a good argument yet on why we should deny our colleague the right to have his day in court. In this case, that means his right to put forward his private member's bill that he believes is incredibly important to his riding and, in this case, his province. We should move very, very cautiously when we start denying each other that right.

I'm still listening, Mr. Chair.

(1155)

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you.

We were implored by the member from the Bloc to look at this from a legal standpoint, and I appreciate what Mr. Christopherson is discussing. I look at us—and I think this was mentioned by Mr. Christopherson—as the appeal court in this. Someone is bringing forward an appeal. The way an appeal works is that you have had a trial, the evidence has been presented and the decision has been made. The onus is then on the appellant to come forward and bring some evidence that the trial court was wrong.

I'll be honest that I haven't heard that, especially from the honourable member who brought his appeal forward to us, in that there was no good legal argument. I even asked, “Have you spoken to constitutional scholars about it?” and he said, “Yes, three of them,” but he wouldn't provide their names. There was no briefing. There was no background. There was no information.

I respect Mr. Dufresne and his experience and expertise and what he brings to the table. We have an argument that it could go either way.

As an appeal court would, I give deference to the original decision-makers. It's not a committee that the government has majority on. I give deference to those decision-makers who have made the decision, and I haven't heard anything to really change my mind.

I appreciate the passion and vigour with which Mr. Christopherson is arguing, but nothing was brought forward by the member to really go against what the committee had decided. I even asked him, in terms of bringing an argument.... In the argument he brought forward, he cited one case. That isn't a problem if you have one great case—that's perfectly fine—but it was based on a different section of the charter than the sections of the charter he was arguing about.

Even looking at this from a legal standpoint, I am not convinced that the original committee was wrong. That's what we have to decide at the end of the day: Were they wrong? Again, with respect to Mr. Dufresne, it's not his role and he didn't come here to say someone's right and someone's wrong. He walked a very fine line, and I commend him for doing that.

Mr. Dufresne can correct me—not that he ever has to. I'm a lawyer and would never advise my clients to waive their confidentiality, their solicitor-client privilege, but if they couldn't afford the legal advice, which is something they said, we've been told that the confidentiality could be waived with regard to the legal advice that may or may not have been provided by the parliamentary clerks, and that wasn't done. That was another opportunity for the members to come forward and say, “Here's some evidence that the original committee was wrong.” At the end of the—

(1200)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Are you suggesting that the member ought to give up some of his privilege in order to satisfy you, or...?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

No. As I said, just a second ago—but I have the floor—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Be quiet so I can hear him.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Are you suggesting duplicity here on Mr. Dufresne's part? I'm just not sure what accusation you're making or what you are insinuating.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

As I just said, Mr. Reid—and I'm sure you were paying full attention to that—as a lawyer, I respect solicitor-client privilege, but if the honourable member says they have no expertise and there is nothing they can bring forward.... It's something they could have provided. It's not something I'm suggesting he should have provided, but it's their job, his job, to present us with evidence that the original committee was wrong. It's something he didn't do. At the end of the day, that was an avenue that was open to him. He didn't choose it. He shouldn't have to. I respect solicitor-client privilege, as I mentioned in the same paragraph.

You're still listening at the same level that you were before. I appreciate that, Mr. Reid.

At the end of the day, I'm not convinced, and I respect and give deference to the original committee. Thank you.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

The credible argument.... I'm going back to what David said originally about how you demonstrate knowledge of a language without being forced to speak it or communicate in it. I don't think there is another credible argument. How else would you do it? Is being forced to demonstrate knowledge of a language not a violation of the charter at that point? You're being forced to speak it. Doesn't everyone have the right to choose?

What's the argument? Can you walk me through the other credible argument on the other side?

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

I indicated that the argument would be that the person can communicate with the federal government in the language of his or her choice. It would only be the part of demonstrating proficiency in the language that might require speaking French or providing some kind of evidence to satisfy the department that the person has an understanding of French. The debate would become—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

But it's not a could. They would have to.

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

They would have to demonstrate that they have an understanding of French.

What I was adding afterwards is that if it were found to be a violation of section 20 the issue would become whether this can be justified under section 1 of the charter, and there would be issues there.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think we're pretty much at a point where it would violate but section 1 could pass in this case. The bill itself would violate the charter—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Should the House be able to vote on it, though?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

The House should only be able to vote if it's not a violation of the charter in the bill. This bill is essentially a violation of the charter.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Who said that? Who made that proclamation?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm making it. I feel it is. I guess it could pass the charter test if the court feels it's a justifiable limit.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I thought this would be quick.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm done. I'm just pondering.

The Chair:

Before we go to Mr. Christopherson, do people know what the bill says? The French they have to have is not just the language but it's the language in relation to an adequate knowledge of Canada and the responsibilities and privileges of citizenship as demonstrated in French. They have to be able to demonstrate all that in French.

We'll have Mr. Christopherson, and then Mr. Reid.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair. I'll be brief.

Again, I reiterate. I don't like the bill. I can't think of an argument. I'll be open-minded, because it's important, it's our Constitution, but it's an uphill climb for somebody to convince me to vote for that bill for all the good reasons my colleagues have made. That's not the issue. What is in front of us is not whether we like it or not or would vote against it or not or whether we believe it's constitutional or not.

The question before us is just this. Forget the substance of the bill. I guess you can't completely set it aside, fair enough, but the matter that's before us, the decision, the instant case before us is, should this bill be allowed to go to the floor of the House of Commons for a debate and a vote?

The reason I asked for the floor, Chair, was that I heard Mr. Bittle and, in fact, it was at the last meeting that I agreed with Mr. Bittle that this turned on the question of whether this is constitutional or not. If it's clearly not constitutional, slam dunk, we support the subcommittee, case closed, next.

But, Mr. Bittle, I have to tell you that I'm very disappointed that you would use the argument based on that at the last meeting and you would now use the argument that the members themselves didn't offer up the legal argument or the legal case that the parliamentary law clerk just did, which by the way, was the sole purpose for us coming together. I find that intellectually dishonest.

There is not a requirement for us to hear from colleagues the definitive legal case, and that's the end of it. If you weren't smart enough to bring it to the table, well too bad. We as a committee decided that our next step was to ask for some legal advice, so at that point, if it's legal advice that carries water, whether it came from our parliamentary law clerk at our request or whether it came from the members when they were here is not the point. I just have a real problem with that.

Again, so far, everybody who has taken the floor is arguing the merits of the bill. I'm still not hearing a strong argument as to why we should extinguish the member's right to have a vote when the only thing that would preclude it is if it's clearly unconstitutional. I'm not hearing clearly from anybody that it's unconstitutional. That is debatable.

Some may think it's a weak debate against a strong debate, but is it so outrageous that it would never have a credible argument in front of the Supreme Court? I'm not hearing that. To me, that should be the test when we are going to extinguish a member of Parliament's right, especially a sacred one, especially when there's so damn few of them.

I still remain unconvinced, and I'm still listening.

(1205)

The Chair:

Okay, just before we go to Mr. Reid, I'll just reiterate what Mr. Christopherson just said.

The decision we're making is whether the criterion that bills and motions must not clearly violate the Constitution Act of 1982, including the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.... It's not just whether you can vote, but whether it violates the Constitution.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

To be clear, it's “must not clearly violate” as opposed to “clearly must not violate”, which would be utterly different. Lawyers put a lot of emphasis on that kind of thing, and so do courts, actually.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: I want to say the same thing that Mr. Christopherson said in his very first remarks. If this comes to the House of Commons, I would be voting against it. It's not a policy that I could support. Having said that, I do want to respond to the question about deference.

A suggestion was made that we ought to defer to the subcommittee. I just disagree. This is a language issue, perhaps, between Mr. Bittle and me, as opposed to a substantive difference maybe, but by definition you don't defer to a body that is subordinate to you.

When the courts deal with an item that has been dealt with on appeal from a lower court, they adopt a language of respect. They respectfully disagree. They go to great lengths in their language to demonstrate that they are respectful of the thoughtfulness of the body with whose decision they are disagreeing. Nonetheless, they disagree.

The body we defer to is the House of Commons. We are the subordinate body of the House of Commons. By taking away the right of the House of Commons to consider this potential piece of legislation, we are actually being the opposite of deferential, and there is no court of appeal for our decision. Effectively, we kill it before the House can hear it.

I know there is a way. If the sponsor can get a signature from a member of the majority of the parties in the House—he himself does not represent a recognized party, so this is a doubly hard task for the member—then he can have it go to the House, where we decide by secret ballot whether it lives or dies.

That is a tough criterion to meet, particularly since it seems that the real point of all of this is to get the governing party, the Liberals, off the hook of having to vote on something that splits them on a regional basis. I would maintain that it is not our business to make life politically easier for one of the parties—

An hon. member: Hear, hear!

Mr. Scott Reid: —and to get them off of the hook on something that's awkward, where the Quebec members and the members outside of Quebec will be driven to vote on different sides of the same issue, an issue that is inherently awkward, and we have members of all three of the parties here, both from Quebec and outside of Quebec.

There is a simple solution to this. I invite the Liberals to think about this. Allow a free vote of your members in the House of Commons and, presto, you've resolved the matter very tidily. Killing this is not the right way to do it.

A final note regarding deference is that this is a matter where what we're trying to do is to not go outside our legitimate authority. Surely the decision as to whether or not something would clearly violate the Charter of Rights as determined by the courts—which means the Supreme Court in the end—is not something where we ought to be prejudging the Supreme Court and anticipating what they might do by saying, “No, you guys, you don't even get the chance to do this because we've decided that we know what you will say yes and no to.”

Now, if something is really clearly unconstitutional, if there is a reason that a reasonable person would accept where we would say that we can reasonably be certain that the Supreme Court would never accept this, then we're not wasting the court's time or, for that matter, the House's time, but no argument to that effect has been presented. It's been only arguments that are like the arguments I would give in the House of Commons if I were presenting a speech as to why I'm voting against this bill and urging my colleagues to do the same thing. On that basis, I simply disagree with Mr. Bittle and a number of the other Liberal speakers.

The final thing I want to say about this is that what's important here is not ultimately how we vote on this piece of legislation, on this yes-or-no vote. What is important is that we should not be in the position of inventing arguments as to unconstitutionality as a way of killing items of private members' business that are difficult for us to deal with. By definition, the things that are difficult for us to deal with are the hard questions that are the most important for us to deal with: language rights, other constitutional rights....

Just go through all of the things that have been hard during your career, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson: Abortion, divorce....

Mr. Scott Reid: There were issues relating to—

(1210)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Gender rights....

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, euthanasia, assisted dying, the cannabis legalization discussion that's gone on for a number of years.... We should not be killing private members' business dealing with this sort of stuff. We should allow an open debate in the House at which point we all go out and vote according to our consciences. That splits our caucuses. That is a sign that it is an issue that is not easily resolvable, not easily incorporated into a party's platform, and if that's the case, then my goodness, we really should be discussing and debating it as parliamentarians, as decision-makers. That's the principle. Even if I consider the precedent we set, we just get into the habit of killing every uncomfortable piece of legislation. Having been in the position of arguing as someone asking the private members' business committee to make my item votable, and having also sat in the committee when it was trying to deal with these things, I'd just say that is a really bad precedent to set.

The best place to deal with the contentious issues is first by means of private member's legislation so we can work out the bugs, and then when government legislation comes along, we are better equipped to handle those pieces of legislation.

Openness in government, openness to the private member's initiatives is surely the hallmark of an increasingly open society. We've moved really far in this direction over my career, and Mr. Christopherson's career. I would like to not see us starting to backpedal now.

That is my plea to the Liberal members on this committee.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

(1215)

The Chair:

Well put.

Just so people know, if this is turned down, it doesn't totally mean the House wouldn't see it. It means they wouldn't vote on it. The member has a couple of options. One is to appeal to the House, and the second is to replace it with another item, or to waive that, and then it can go to the House for debate, but it wouldn't be voted on.

The next person is Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate your comments, both Mr. Reid and Mr. Christopherson, very much. I resent the comments that it's because it's going to cause a division in the caucus.

I'm an English MP for a riding that's 94% French, and I'm the one here on the record saying that this is unconstitutional. If it's going to be awkward for anybody, it's going to be awkward for me. I'm the one who is taking this quite as far as I can because I think it is fundamentally on its face unconstitutional, and that is a standard we as a committee have adopted.

If we don't agree with that standard, then it's up to us in the committee, and we have the power, to change that standard. But when I look at this law, cut and dried, it attacks minority language rights in all of Canada on its face, and that is against the purpose and the intent of the Constitution, and the Constitution itself.

That's the only reason I'm voting against it being votable. It's not to go after his rights. He has the right, as was just outlined, to replace it with another bill that is not unconstitutional. He has that right. We're not taking away his right to present a bill. We're taking away his right to violate the Constitution out of the gate.

People vote where they may, and if one person on this side changes their mind, then I'll lose my argument too, and that's fine. That's the way this place works. This is private members' business. It's up to us as individuals to make our decisions.

I was at the private members' meeting. I looked at the bill. I had this debate all the way through it. My assessment of it is that it is 100% unconstitutional. I see a credible founding, but I do not see a credible argument to how this could be constitutional. You are communicating with the government and you are being forced to pick a language in one province alone that goes against several aspects of the Charter of Rights. That is the only reason that I am opposing this. In English, as a minority anglophone in a French riding in Quebec, I am saying this is wrong. On the rules that we have adopted as a committee, we cannot vote for it.

That is my take. I'll leave it there. It is my personal decision. I came to this myself, and this is where I land.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Bittle, you're on the list.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much.

I guess I'll speak to a couple of points first about my academic dishonesty. Again, this isn't a government-led subcommittee, where the government's trying to kill this and I'm looking for any excuse to do this. This is about backing up colleagues. I guess speaking to Mr. Reid's point about deference and that courts don't deal with deference, courts deal with deference all the time. It's one of the—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, it's higher up and not lower....

Mr. Chris Bittle:

No. One of the issues of judicial review is the level of deference that you grant to a lower court or tribunal.

Mr. Scott Reid:

But you look for errors in law.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

You always look for errors in law, and that's fine—

Mr. Scott Reid:

My point is that once it's decided—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Mr. Reid, I have the floor. I don't interrupt you when you have the floor, and this is now the second time today.

The issue at the end of the day.... Maybe we're speaking to it from a different standpoint. I'm coming at it from the legal side of things in terms of how a court would view deference, which is polite respect of a lower court, or in this case the subcommittee that had the chance to hear it, debate it and deal with it. It was not just the members from this side. It required a vote from the opposition to engage this process, and that's the reason we're here.

Again, at the end of the day—and back to Mr. Christopherson's point—I don't think it's the members' responsibility to bring us a legal case, but it's their duty to bring forward their best case and their best foot forward. The fact that we have Mr. Dufresne here....

That's part of that case and I respect that, and different members can think differently about that, but what I'm hearing is that it could go either way. In my mind, if the subcommittee heard...and in their view it went one particular way, I haven't been blown away by evidence to overturn that subcommittee's decision. That's where I'm coming from.

I didn't want it to come across as academically dishonest and I don't want to discount Mr. Dufresne and his expertise, but that's where I'm coming from at the end of the day.

(1220)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I might also point out that this bill has now had more debate at this committee than it would otherwise have had.

The Chair:

Mr. Dufresne. [Translation]

Mr. Philippe Dufresne:

I would just like to make one clarification.

Ms. Lapointe, in our discussion, we talked about doing the citizenship test on the knowledge of Canada in French. We had a discussion about whether or not this would be required.

If paragraphs 1(1)(d) and 1(1)(e) of the bill are considered together to be joint requirements, the argument could be the second: knowledge of benefits and responsibilities should be demonstrated in French.

It is also important to ask whether this part is stricter than paragraph 1(1)(d), which simply requires an adequate knowledge of French

As for taking the citizenship test in French, would the court consider whether the interpretation of this part could be mitigated, because it would be considered excessive, while the first part would be justified?

That would also be part of the discussion.[English]

On the issue of appeals, the only thing I would add is that, in some cases, courts will defer—that's quite right—and courts also, in other cases, will ask the questions: Who is best placed to make the determination? Is the administrative tribunal a better place or has it better expertise than the reviewing court? If no, then sometimes the reviewer court may call for less deference.

However, that's a part of administrative law in terms of asking those questions: How much deference, if any, is owed to the initial decision-maker?

The Chair:

Are there any more questions for the witness, or any more views that members want to express?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is anybody convinced of anything?

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's why we vote, to find out.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I was persuaded by Mr. Christopherson's arguments.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's high praise.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Can we suspend and—?

Mr. David Christopherson:

For what? Why aren't we voting?

The Chair:

Do you want to have a vote now?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Why wouldn't we? I'd like a recorded one at that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, there is a reason why we don't have a vote just at this moment.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Can we suspend for a couple of minutes?

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's fine. Would that be okay?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, absolutely. We used to have a rule for that provincially. I don't know what it is here.

Yes, let's take a couple of minutes and give everybody a chance to regather.

The Chair:

Then we'll come back and make our decision.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Very good.

The Chair:

We have other committee business to do too.

We'll suspend.

(1220)

(1230)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 136th meeting. We will have discussion and then a vote. People want to continue in public.

Is there any discussion?

Mr. Graham, you brought a list.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As I said to David, this comes from a very personal place for me as a minority in Quebec who wants French to spread across the country and English to be protected in Quebec. I spent my whole life in a position where I was, quite frankly, being pushed out of Quebec. The culture's changed in Quebec and that's not the case anymore, so it allowed me to be an MP in my home area.

This is all about undoing the protection the Constitution has given us. At the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business, our job is to follow the four criteria that the members of PROC approved last year. If we don't look at something, ask if it's constitutional and if it's not, reject it, then what's the purpose of that process in the first place? Why do we even bother with the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business? Let everything go to the House and don't worry about it.

That's my final comment on this. When you're going to go after minority rights in this country against the Constitution, I will be there to protect the Constitution and I'm ready to vote on that basis. Thank you.

(1235)

The Chair:

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

I've been sitting here for the past hour and a half as the proverbial sponge to take it all in. As I meandered my way through the arguments, I'm going to be quite honest with you, it was a fantastic discussion in many regards.

Mr. Christopherson brings up some really salient points about who we are and what we need to do, not only to represent our constituents but on our shoulders comes the responsibility of governing a nation as parliamentarians—not an executive, but as parliamentarians. We keep them in check, but by the same token, we also have given to us, thank goodness, by the sheer grace of this wonderful democracy, that we can put together a private member's bill to be understood by everybody and voted on by our peers and which eventually may or may not become the law of the land. Thank goodness for that.

Let me go to Mr. Graham's argument. There is a process in place by which the protection or the reputation of the Constitution is not held in contempt by anyone's private member's bill. At the core of it, some of that needs to be changed because it just might be too overly prescriptive in how we filter through these bills, who gets to go to the House and who does not.

The standard is set at a certain level. Maybe that standard should be—I know this is going to sound terrible—lowered to the point where we defer to the sheer respect of a member of Parliament to bring a law to this land.

Mr. Christopherson, I'm with you all the way, but this gentleman here has got a point about the system that exists right now. I'm going to have to defer to that, but in the future, I'm going to look at it with a closer eye and say maybe we're just being a little overly prescriptive in how we may be.... We're not allowing a member of Parliament to freely do their job, not as a partisan, not as an executive, but as a member of Parliament who has rights and privileges.

I'll leave it at that. Thank you.

The Chair:

There's nothing to stop the committee from better defining the criteria in the future.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you want to change the process we have now, that's a discussion we can have.

The Chair:

Is there anyone else on the list?

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

On my overenthusiasm earlier on for the appropriately named Simms rule, which I just unilaterally invoked and extended its reach, I apologize to Mr. Bittle for that. My comment was really for Mr. Bittle. If I came across as being in any way intentionally disrespectful, then that was not my intention and I enjoy his interventions.

Finally, as someone who has spent time living close to Mr. Graham's riding in Saint-Jérôme—his riding is so freaking large there's not much that isn't in it—I think we disagree on the point but I appreciate his sincere sentiments.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Just to pick up on the last point, I enjoyed the respectful stimulating debate. These things are tough and they do come down to judgment calls. At the end of the day, you have to be comfortable enough in your own skin to go back to your own riding and feel comfortable that you made the right decision as you see it.

This is the kind of thing I am truly going to miss. When people ask what I am going to miss in politics, it's exactly this. Things that really matter, debated by really smart caring people who are trying to do the best they can and trying to prove that there are other ways to resolve massive differences without being violent, but that you can still make important points on important matters.

I just want to say again how much I respect everybody here, and I enjoyed the debate. I found it stimulating. Chair, we don't give enough credit to you, because you have a very low key way of doing things, but it's incredibly effective. You do set the tone that allows us to have these kinds of debates, and that comes from your deep respect for everyone at the table and the institution we serve. I want to thank everybody. I've enjoyed this, separate and apart from the outcome. This is why it's a great country, the greatest country in the world.

(1240)

The Chair:

Thank you, David. You made an excellent point. I appreciate that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Now a recorded vote, we haven't left politics.

The Chair:

A recorded vote has been requested.

(Motion agreed to: yeas 5; nays 4)

The Chair:

The subcommittee's decision is sustained.

We're going to suspend for a minute while we go in camera.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 136e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Aujourd'hui, nous poursuivons notre examen du quatrième rapport du Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés, dans lequel le Sous-comité recommande que le projet de loi C-421 soit désigné non votable.

Nous avons le plaisir d'accueillir Philippe Dufresne, le légiste et conseiller parlementaire de la Chambre.

Merci d'être des nôtres aujourd'hui. Nous sommes heureux de vous accueillir de nouveau et de bénéficier de vos sages conseils. Nous avons hâte d'entendre votre déclaration préliminaire, ou vos remarques. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici.

M. Philippe Dufresne (légiste et conseiller parlementaire, Chambre des communes):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président et merci aux membres du Comité.

Je suis heureux d'être parmi vous aujourd'hui pour aider le Comité dans son examen de la question de la votabilité du projet de loi C-421. Le 29 novembre 2018, le Comité a entrepris l'examen de questions d'affaires émanant des députés se rapportant au projet de loi C-421. Le Comité a entendu M. Mario Beaulieu, député de La Pointe-de-l'Île et parrain du projet de loi, et M. Marc-André Roche, chercheur pour le Bloc Québécois.

Je crois comprendre que la conversation visait à déterminer si le projet de loi C-421 respecte la Charte des droits et libertés et que, à la suite de cette réunion, le Comité a décidé de m'inviter à parler de certains des points juridiques soulevés.

Mes remarques aujourd'hui porteront sur les sujets suivants. Je parlerai des aspects concernant la Charte et la rédaction des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire. Je préciserai le caractère confidentiel du processus de rédaction pour les députés dans mon bureau. Je parlerai du critère de non-votabilité particulier adopté par ce comité et de l'exigence que le projet de loi ne transgresse pas la Constitution. Je parlerai de la jurisprudence récente de la Cour d'appel fédérale qui pourrait aider dans la détermination des paramètres de ce critère. Enfin, c'est avec plaisir que je répondrai aux questions que les membres du Comité pourraient avoir quant aux points d'ordre constitutionnel précis qui ont été soulevés jusqu'à présent.[Français]

Les conseillers législatifs qui travaillent pour mon bureau sont responsables de rédiger les projets de loi pour les députés qui ne font pas partie du gouvernement. C'est un service essentiel à la démocratie parlementaire, à mon avis. Ce mandat nous tient à coeur et nous l'exécutons avec grand enthousiasme. Je suis extrêmement fier de l'équipe de personnes dévouées qui effectuent ce travail de manière professionnelle et non partisane.

En plus de rédiger le projet de loi selon les règles de l'art, le conseiller législatif assigné au projet avise le député si le projet soulève des questions liées à la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés ou à la Constitution du Canada. Selon la nature de la question, le conseiller ou la conseillère peut soit suggérer au député de communiquer avec la Bibliothèque du Parlement pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires, soit rédiger un avis juridique formel pour le député. Ces échanges au sujet du projet de loi sont strictement confidentiels et ne peuvent être divulgués sans le consentement du député.

Les questions d'ordre constitutionnel qui sont soulevées peuvent être traitées de diverses façons. Le conseiller peut en discuter avec le député, par exemple, ou lui suggérer une approche permettant d'atténuer les risques de violation de la Charte. Le conseiller peut aussi proposer la rédaction d'une stratégie nationale si le sujet en cause est plutôt de compétence provinciale, ou que le député procède par voie de motion plutôt que de projet de loi. Peu importent les préoccupations soulevées, la décision définitive de mettre en avant ou non un projet de loi appartient au député.

La confidentialité est un élément extrêmement important pour nous. Il en est question dans le 34e rapport du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre en date du 16 mars 2000, dans lequel le Comité signalait que le travail du conseiller législatif était régi par le privilège parlementaire, dont le fondement juridique est encore plus important puisqu'il est prévu par la Constitution. Le Comité citait le Président en date du 13 mars 2000, lequel indiquait ceci: Tout le personnel de la Chambre qui donne son appui aux députés dans leurs fonctions législatives est tenu à la plus stricte confidentialité par rapport aux personnes qui ne travaillent pas dans leur secteur et aussi, bien entendu, vis-à-vis les autres députés. [Traduction]

C'est un aspect fondamental. Quand nous vous prodiguons nos services, les services de rédaction législative, nous le faisons dans la plus stricte confidentialité. Je ne parlerai pas aujourd'hui des conversations tenues avec n'importe quel député, ni des conseils qui lui auraient été donnés, sur n'importe quel sujet précis. Je suis ici aujourd'hui pour parler de questions d'ordre général et, en particulier, des aspects se rapportant aux critères de non-votabilité.[Français]

Comme vous le savez, un projet de loi qui s'ajoute à l'ordre de priorité est revu par le Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés, qui détermine s'il est votable ou non. Un analyste de la Bibliothèque du Parlement est chargé d'aider le Sous-comité lorsque des considérations relatives à la votabilité du projet sont soulevées. L'analyste peut alors fournir des informations et des analyses, mais pas d'avis juridique. Les critères de votabilité sont établis par le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre et, dans sa version la plus récente, qui remonte à mai 2007, les quatre critères sont les suivants:: Les projets de loi et les motions ne doivent pas porter sur des questions qui ne relèvent pas de la compétence fédérale; Les projets de loi et les motions ne doivent pas transgresser clairement les Lois constitutionnelles de 1867 à 1982, y compris la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés;

Ce dernier critère est celui qui nous importe aujourd'hui. Les projets de loi et les motions ne doivent pas porter sur des questions qui sont essentiellement les mêmes que celles sur lesquelles la Chambre des communes s'est déjà prononcée au cours de la même session de la législature ou que celles traitées dans les projets de loi et les motions qui les précèdent dans l'ordre de priorité; Les projets de loi et les motions ne doivent pas porter sur des questions inscrites à ce moment-là au Feuilleton ou au Feuilleton des avis à titre d'affaires émanant du gouvernement.

(1110)

[Traduction]

Les projets de loi qui ne respectent pas le critère et transgressent clairement la Constitution seront jugés être non votables.

Pour déterminer si un projet de loi est non-votable, il ne s'agit pas d'établir si le projet de loi, dans le cas présent, le projet de loi C-421, pourrait transgresser la Charte, mais plutôt s'il transgresse clairement la Charte, ce qui représente une norme d'intervention plus élevée. C'est une norme plus propice aux débats sur les projets de loi à la Chambre. Le processus est interne, restreint à la Chambre des communes. Comme je l'ai mentionné, le critère a été établi et été adopté par le Comité.

Toutefois, on pourrait faire une comparaison utile avec la norme que suit la ministre de la Justice pour l'examen des projets de loi du gouvernement en ce qui concerne le respect de la Charte conformément à l'article 4.1 de la Loi sur le ministère de la Justice. Au titre de cet article, la ministre doit « vérifier si l'une [des] dispositions » d'un projet de loi « est incompatible avec les fins et dispositions de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. » La ministre est tenue de faire rapport de toute incompatibilité à la Chambre des communes.

Dans une décision récente, Schmidt c. Canada, la Cour d'appel fédérale a dû déterminer l'interprétation de ce critère voulant qu'il faille déterminer s'il y a transgression. Deux possibilités se présentent: soit déterminer qu'une transgression de la Charte est probable, soit appliquer un seuil plus élevé.

Selon la décision de la Cour d'appel fédérale, rédigée par le juge Stratas, la cour a déterminé que la norme appropriée oblige la ministre de la Justice à faire rapport quand on ne peut avancer aucun argument crédible à l'appui de la constitutionnalité d'un projet de loi, et non pas quand il est probable qu'un projet de loi ou règlement proposé soit inconstitutionnel.

Le tribunal a jugé que, compte tenu de l'incertitude et de la complexité du terrain jurisprudentiel du droit constitutionnel et du moment où la ministre est tenue d'évaluer le projet de loi, le seul rapport sérieux et fiable en vertu des dispositions législatives sur l'évaluation est celui produit lorsque le projet de loi comporte tant de lacunes sur le plan constitutionnel qu'il ne peut être défendu par des arguments crédibles. En d'autres termes, le tribunal affirme que la ministre de la Justice n'est tenue d'informer la Chambre de tout écart entre un projet de loi du gouvernement et la Charte que lorsqu'aucun argument crédible ne peut venir appuyer la mesure. Le tribunal a ajouté que cette approche était justifiée, compte tenu de la difficulté inhérente à prédire l'issue des causes en matière de droit constitutionnel devant les tribunaux.

Le tribunal a cité quelques exemples. La jurisprudence peut évoluer, la Cour suprême elle-même peut annuler une décision antérieure, et un grand nombre de causes portant sur la Charte dépendront des faits menant à la justification de toute transgression. C'est difficile à prédire, et cela appuie une norme stricte. Le tribunal a aussi précisé que, logiquement, la norme appliquée par la ministre doit être à la hauteur de la norme appliquée par ce comité dans la détermination de la votabilité.

Une demande d'autorisation d'interjeter appel de cette décision a été présentée à la Cour suprême du Canada. Cette décision n'est donc peut-être pas le dernier mot à ce sujet, mais elle représente pour l'instant la dernière interprétation. Par conséquent, dans le même ordre d'idées, le Comité doit analyser le projet de loi pour déterminer s'il transgresse clairement la Charte, et non pas s'il pourrait transgresser la Charte.

À mon avis, si l'on applique cette norme, si vous l'appliquez, vous ne pourrez juger un projet de loi non votable que si aucun argument crédible ne pourrait être avancé à l'appui de sa constitutionnalité. C'est une norme utile, je pense, car elle permet d'éliminer les incertitudes.

Le juge Stratas a parlé de cela dans sa décision, disant qu'il y aura des cas rares où cela est si clair et évident qu'il est possible d'en arriver à cette détermination, mais d'autres cas ne respecteront pas cette norme. C'est la question dont est saisi ce comité et je m'efforcerai de vous aider en répondant à vos questions. Je sais qu'il y avait certaines questions précises sur la Charte qui ont été débattues lors de séances antérieures et je traiterai volontiers de celles-ci. [Français]

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

Je vais procéder de manière informelle et laisser les gens poser leurs questions.

J'aimerais simplement demander deux choses très rapidement. Vous avez parlé de l'aide que vous prodiguez aux députés. Approximativement, votre effectif compte combien de personnes?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Mon bureau compte en tout 36 personnes. Nous avons deux mandats principaux. Un porte sur les conseils juridiques à la Chambre elle-même et un autre sur la rédaction législative. Cette dernière occupe près de la moitié de mon bureau, y compris pour la publication des projets de loi.

(1115)

Le président:

Quand vous dites que la ministre de la Justice doit déterminer si le contenu d'un projet de loi ne contrevient pas à la Charte des droits et libertés, ce n'est pas une chose qu'elle fait pour les projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire, n'est-ce pas?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Non, elle ne le fait pas. Elle le fait pour les projets de loi gouvernementaux.

Le président:

Très bien.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Monsieur Dufresne, pour dire clairement les choses, la Charte prévoit que les Canadiens peuvent communiquer avec le gouvernement dans l'une ou l'autre des deux langues. Est-ce exact?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le projet de loi C-421 précise que le demandeur de la citoyenneté au Québec doit démontrer une connaissance du français. La seule question qui se pose pour moi est la suivante: Est-ce que démontrer la connaissance d'une langue au gouvernement constitue une communication avec le gouvernement? Le cas échéant, je ne vois pas d'argument crédible qui rendrait ceci constitutionnel. J'aimerais entendre votre opinion là-dessus.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

J'ai tenté d'anticiper certains des dilemmes et des points d'analyse. Ce faisant, j'ai cherché les arguments qui pourraient prouver qu'il y a transgression, et les arguments qui pourraient établir qu'il n'y a pas transgression.

Pour alléguer qu'il y a eu transgression de l'article 20, on pourrait dire, comme vous l'avez précisé, monsieur Graham, qu'une personne serait forcée de parler en français avec le gouvernement fédéral pour établir qu'elle a une compréhension de la langue française, et ce fait même va à l'encontre de l'article 20 et, peut-être de l'article 16 de la Charte en ce qui concerne les langues officielles. On pourrait dire aussi que cela décourage l'usage de l'anglais par les résidents permanents du Québec qui cherchent à obtenir la citoyenneté. Ce sont là certains des arguments visant à établir qu'il y a transgression.

Les arguments à l'appui de la constitutionnalité de la disposition pour ces motifs, je crois, seraient que le projet de loi n'empêche pas une personne de communiquer avec le gouvernement. Si le gouvernement écrit à cette personne, si la personne est invitée à la cérémonie ou si on lui demande des documents pour démontrer sa connaissance du français, tout ceci pourrait être fait en anglais, puis, bien sûr, il s'agirait alors pour elle de démontrer sa connaissance du français. On pourrait dire qu'elle a besoin de démontrer qu'elle comprend le français, mais dans ses échanges avec le gouvernement, ne pourrait-elle pas faire largement cela en anglais? Ce serait un argument.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais monsieur Dufresne, aucune norme de langue ne précise « largement ». On communique dans la langue de son choix. Dès le moment où, à n'importe quel stade du processus, on exige d'une personne qu'elle parle seulement une des langues officielles, cela est en contravention directe avec l'objet de cet article de la Charte. Ai-je raison, ou je l'interprète mal?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Je crois que c'est probablement la raison pour laquelle la Cour d'appel fédérale a adopté la norme selon laquelle il faut demander si cela constitue une transgression claire. Vous pouvez comprendre l'argument. Comment peut-on démontrer sa connaissance du français sans parler le français? Voilà l'autre côté de la médaille.

De l'autre côté, on pourrait dire que l'article 20 exige cette communication... Quand le gouvernement invite une personne et communique avec elle, il le fait dans la langue de prédilection de la personne, qui serait l'anglais dans ce cas. Le critère que la personne doit alors démontrer est le fait qu'elle a une connaissance du français. C'est, en partie, ce qu'elle doit démontrer pour satisfaire aux conditions de la citoyenneté, mais les autres communications avec le gouvernement avant, après et pendant cela peuvent se faire dans la langue de son choix. C'est l'argument.

En fin de compte, que déciderait un tribunal? C'est dur à dire. On pourrait présenter ces deux arguments. On pourrait déclarer que le paragraphe 16(3) de la Charte parle de promouvoir l'usage tant du français que de l'anglais au Canada. Le fait que le français est une langue minoritaire au Canada, mais majoritaire au Québec est-il pertinent? Là encore, il y aurait des arguments des deux côtés.

En supposant qu'il y a transgression — le tribunal pourrait dire que si l'on demande à une personne de démontrer sa connaissance du français, elle doit communiquer en français et que cela contrevient donc à l'article 20 —, il s'agirait alors de déterminer si cela est justifié par l'article 1 de la Charte. Il y a une jurisprudence sur les critères qui doivent être respectés. Ces critères exigent généralement de démontrer que le projet de loi a un objectif suffisamment important et qu'ils constituent une limite raisonnable. En ce qui concerne la limite raisonnable, le tribunal cherchera à déterminer si elle constitue un préjudice minimal au droit qui est touché.

Jusqu'à présent, la jurisprudence a reconnu que promouvoir et préserver le français au Québec est un objectif légitime. La décision la plus récente à ce sujet est l'affaire Nguyen à la Cour suprême du Canada. Les premières décisions étaient celles de l'affaire Ford et de l'affaire Devine, parlant de l'importance.

C'est le deuxième critère qui est devenu assez difficile. Y a-t-il préjudice minimal au droit? Ensuite, il s'agit de savoir si l'on a adopté la mesure la moins intrusive pour atteindre l'objectif. Dans la jurisprudence concernant la langue des affaires au Québec, quand la loi exige le français exclusivement, il a été établi que c'était une limite non justifiable parce que l'exigence était extrême. Quand la loi stipulait qu'il fallait utiliser à la fois le français et l'anglais, le tribunal a déterminé que c'était une mesure raisonnable, même si cela causait un certain inconvénient pour les magasins anglophones.

Ce sont toutes là des choses que les tribunaux examinent quand ils sont saisis d'une contestation fondée sur la Charte. Ils examinent les preuves pour déterminer l'impact, quelles seraient les autres mesures possibles et s'il y a moyen d'incorporer une certaine flexibilité dans le projet de loi. Par exemple, si une personne a des difficultés d'apprentissage et a de la difficulté à apprendre le français, est-ce une interdiction absolue ou une chose à prendre en considération avec des mesures d'adaptation raisonnables? Ce sont là certaines des questions en cause lorsqu'un tribunal examine ces choses et détermine la constitutionnalité.

(1120)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci de votre exposé aujourd'hui.

En quelle année s'est tenue l'affaire Nguyen?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

L'affaire Nguyen était en 2007, si je me souviens bien.

Je vais vous confirmer la date: décembre 2008.

M. Scott Reid:

Quand vous parlez de mesure la moins intrusive possible, vous parlez du test de l'arrêt Oakes, n'est-ce pas?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Reid:

À l'époque, le test de l'arrêt Oakes a été appliqué à un certain nombre de droits de langue. L'affaire Nguyen est la plus récente, mais l'affaire Ford est un autre exemple. Quelle était la troisième affaire que vous avez mentionnée?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'était l'affaire Devine.

M. Scott Reid:

Deux de celles-ci remontent aux années 1990, ou même aux années 1980.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est exact, c'était en 1984 et 1988.

M. Scott Reid:

L'affaire Ford en particulier portait sur le projet de loi 101, je crois.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai écrit un livre là-dessus, mais je l'ai écrit en 1993 et il s'est écoulé un quart de siècle depuis.

De quoi s'agissait-il dans la décision de David Stratas? Avez-vous une idée si nous saurons si l'autorisation d'interjeter appel a été accordée?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Il était question de la bonne interprétation à donner à l'interprétation par la ministre de son obligation de faire rapport à la Chambre. L'appelant, Edgar Schmidt, qui est un ancien rédacteur au ministère de la Justice, soutenait que la norme devait être plus stricte et qu'il fallait être entièrement satisfait qu'il y a un solide argument ou un argument crédible de constitutionnalité, et que cela protégerait davantage la Charte.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai l'impression qu'il plaidait en faveur d'une prépondérance des probabilités, alors que la norme en application à l'heure actuelle serait une version inverse de la prépondérance des probabilités.

Est-ce bien la façon, en gros, de décrire les deux?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Je serais d'accord. Je crois que c'est un véritable problème. Faut-il exiger qu'il soit plus que probable que cela sera respecté, ou va-t-on découvrir l'absence d'arguments crédibles? Ce n'est pas la même chose, mais c'est dans le même ordre d'idées.

M. Scott Reid:

Excusez ma remarque — et vous pouvez être d'accord ou pas avec ce que je vais dire —, mais à première vue, la prépondérance des probabilités semble être le test le plus simple. Cependant, ce n'est pas tout à fait vrai. Déterminer l'absence d'un argument crédible ou raisonnable, aucun argument qu'une personne raisonnable prendrait au sérieux — ce qui serait le test de la personne raisonnable et ceci en est une version —, est plus facile à mon avis, car on est entouré de personnes raisonnables, alors que la prépondérance des probabilités signifie prédire, selon toutes probabilités, ce que neuf personnes à la Cour suprême décideront. Cela revient à déterminer si, selon toutes probabilités, la mesure législative survivrait au test imposé par la Cour suprême.

C'est une tâche fondamentalement difficile. Au tribunal, les personnes vont et viennent, dont certaines — et à l'heure actuelle, la majorité — n'ont probablement jamais eu à statuer sur un dossier de droits linguistiques. Je dirais que le degré d'incertitude est encore plus élevé.

C'est une simple observation de ma part. Semble-t-il que...?

Rappelez-vous, nous avons une situation où des rédacteurs travaillant pour le ministère de la Justice, pour la ministre, tentent de produire ce genre de rétroaction pour chaque mesure législative proposée. Je dirais que ce serait une norme qu'ils auraient beaucoup de difficulté à respecter.

(1125)

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Je crois que vos observations correspondent à ce que la Cour d'appel fédérale a déterminé. Elle a déclaré que le pouvoir exécutif ne se limite pas à proposer des mesures qui sont: [...] certainement constitutionnelles ou probablement constitutionnelles. Au contraire, constitutionnellement, selon les paroles de la Cour fédérale [...] il peut présenter un projet de loi qui, après un « examen rigoureux des dispositions de l'ébauche du projet de loi » est « défendable devant les tribunaux. »

Le tribunal poursuit en demandant pourquoi le fait que la Charte est un document dans lequel les équilibres sont très nombreux. Elle n'est pas sans équivoque. Elle ne comporte aucune garantie de droits et libertés non qualifiées. Elle offre une large possibilité de débat, de délibération au Parlement à cet égard. En fin de compte, les tribunaux ont un rôle à jouer.

Fait intéressant, dans l'arrêt Schmidt, le tribunal met en relief, dans une large mesure, certaines des incertitudes reliées aux prédictions. Il parle du fait que les autorités constitutionnelles ne sont pas forcément de bons précédents dans les causes subséquentes. Les tribunaux s'écartent maintenant plus facilement des précédents constitutionnels antérieurs.

Nous parlons de certaines des décisions qui remontent aux années 1980, plus de 20 ans plus tard. Le tribunal et l'arrêt Schmidt parlent de certaines causes précises — l'affaire Carter concernant l'aide médicale à mourir où le tribunal a changé sa jurisprudence quant à la validité constitutionnelle d'une question relevant de la Charte.

M. Scott Reid:

Le juge Stratas voulait-il dire qu'il aurait été impossible de présenter certains aspects du projet de loi — j'ai oublié le numéro du projet de loi, celui portant sur l'aide médicale à mourir — si nous avions appliqué les critères plus stricts que nous tentons...? Était-ce, en partie, ce qu'il voulait dire?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Je crois que c'est le fait qu'il faudrait faire rapport sur un nombre bien plus élevé de projets de loi, car la conséquence pour la ministre de la Justice est l'obligation de présenter un rapport. Cela ne veut pas dire que le projet de loi ne va pas de l'avant. C'est une autre conséquence ici. Dans le cas de ce comité, cependant, la conséquence est que le projet de loi n'est pas votable.

À mon sens, le critère est semblable. Permettez-moi de citer une dernière partie de la décision; le tribunal déclare: [...] en conclusion, je demande: Compte tenu de la nature du droit et des litiges constitutionnels, ainsi que des obstacles pratiques auxquels le ministère de la Justice est confronté, qu'est-ce qui est plus probable? Que les dispositions législatives sur l'évaluation exigent que la ministre produise une opinion définitive, se contente des évaluations de probabilité et fasse rapport quand elle arrive à la conclusion que le projet de loi proposé est « probablement » inconstitutionnel? Ou que les dispositions législatives sur l'évaluation exigent de la ministre qu'elle fasse rapport lorsqu'il n'y a aucun argument crédible à l'appui de la constitutionnalité du projet de loi proposé? Je dirais la deuxième possibilité: compte tenu de l'incertitude et de la complexité du terrain jurisprudentiel du droit constitutionnel et du moment où la ministre est tenue d'évaluer le projet de loi,...

C'est la partie que je vous ai lue dans mon exposé: ... le seul rapport sérieux et fiable en vertu des dispositions législatives sur l'évaluation est celui produit lorsque le projet de loi comporte tant de lacunes sur le plan constitutionnel qu'il ne peut être défendu par des arguments crédibles.

On peut se poser la question: Ce critère ne pourra-t-il jamais être respecté? Si l'on place la barre trop haut, il n'y aura jamais de rapport ou on ne déterminera jamais qu'un projet de loi n'est pas votable. Selon la Cour, il est clair que même dans cet environnement complexe et incertain, certains projets de loi peuvent être si déficients que la ministre peut conclure, avec assurance, qu'aucun argument crédible ne pourrait les appuyer. Je dirais qu'il en va de même pour votre comité.

M. Scott Reid:

Pour éclaircir les choses, même si un rapport a été présenté ou si nous avons jugé un projet de loi votable, si celui-ci est adopté et s'il est effectivement inconstitutionnel et une personne le conteste devant les tribunaux, il finira par être abrogé. Par définition... c'est une tautologie. Est inconstitutionnel ce que la Cour suprême juge inconstitutionnel. Par définition, ce projet de loi, même inconstitutionnel, devient loi ou est une tentative du Parlement d'en faire une loi. Cependant, il ne deviendra pas une loi si la Cour le juge inconstitutionnel.

(1130)

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C'est exact.

C'est intéressant. Parlant de dernier mot sur un sujet donné, et de questions qui ne sont pas toujours claires, le droit administratif reconnaît que, pour bien des questions juridiques, il peut y avoir plus d'une réponse.

Il a été dit quelquefois que la Cour qui statue en dernier est celle qui a raison, parce qu'il y a des appels et les décisions peuvent être infirmées. L'autre n'est pas forcément fausse, mais il faut bien que quelqu'un ait le dernier mot sur ces questions.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est exact.

C'est justement ce dont il s'agit. La Cour suprême est... Pour dire les choses simplement, il faut bien qu'il y ait un organe qui ait l'ultime responsabilité.

D'antan c'était Londres, et à ce stade nous avons découvert, pour toutes sortes de questions — je pense à l'affaire « personne » —, que dans sa dernière décision la Cour suprême avait tort. C'était fréquent.

C'est tout ce que j'ai à dire pour l'instant.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Reid.

Monsieur Christopherson

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Mes collègues conviendront, j'en suis sûr, que lorsqu'on invite le légiste et conseiller parlementaire, la conversation est toujours fascinante.

Aidez-moi à m'assurer que ma charrue est bien derrière les boeufs. Il ne s'agit pas pour nous ici de déterminer la constitutionnalité du projet de loi. C'est une deuxième étape. Pour la première étape, on nous a demandé, en notre qualité d'organe d'appel, d'infirmer une décision selon laquelle un projet de loi n'est pas votable parce qu'il est clairement inconstitutionnel.

C'est moi qui ai présenté la motion de vous inviter. Je voulais précisément vous l'entendre dire. Est-ce aussi flagrant? Le cas échéant, cela devient pour nous une simple formalité, mais je perçois là quelque chose de très différent. J'y reviendrai dans un moment.

Restons sur le sujet de la votabilité, j'avoue que je l'aborde avec un fort parti pris. J'ai toujours mal accepté la notion que la majorité des députés peut décider si un projet de loi émanant d'un député particulier a le droit d'être mis aux voix. Cela signifie que nos droits, à titre de députés, se sont délayés au fil des décennies, au fur et à mesure de l'évolution de notre système parlementaire. Je pars toujours du principe qu'il faut avoir une sacrée bonne raison pour dire à un député qu'il n'a pas le droit d'exprimer un enjeu. Le système des projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire constitue le seul domaine ici où nous avons une certaine souveraineté; or, c'est là que nos pairs, nos collègues, nous disent que notre droit est écrasé. Je présente donc ici, ouvertement, mon parti pris.

Cela étant dit, si une chose est outrageusement inconstitutionnelle, si elle contrevient clairement à notre Charte des droits et libertés, il est logique que nous ne lui accordions pas de crédibilité en lui permettant de faire l'objet d'un vote. Le fait même qu'elle est inconstitutionnelle signifie, à mon avis, que le député n'a pas bien étudié la question. Au lieu d'abolir simplement ses droits, il faudrait l'inviter de se remettre à la tâche et de faire ses devoirs. Qu'il fasse le travail correctement et trouve un moyen de présenter la chose de sorte qu'elle soit au moins constitutionnelle. S'il ne peut pas faire cela, tant pis. C'est mon opinion.

Entre parenthèses, je dois dire que quand je cesserai d'être député, ce qui me manquera le plus, c'est la discussion fascinante avec un groupe de personnes où une d'entre elles mentionne en passant: « Oui, j'ai écrit un livre là-dessus. » Cela n'arrivait pas dans ma vie antérieure, et je ne m'attends pas à ce que cela arrive dans ma vie future, mais ici, je le vis et c'est fantastique, surtout quand il s'agit d'une personne qui a la crédibilité de celle dont je parle.

Pour revenir à ce dont nous parlons, c'est la raison pour laquelle il était si important pour nous de vous accueillir ici. On s'est demandé si, votre bureau ayant conseillé l'auteur du projet de loi quant à sa constitutionnalité, cela n'annulerait pas en quelque sorte notre droit à une opinion tout aussi réfléchie. C'était un véritable problème.

Je crois que nous sommes rassurés là-dessus. Nous ne vous demandons pas de nous dire quel avis vous lui avez donné. Nous vous demandons simplement de nous donner votre avis sur ce que nous avons devant nous. Cet avis pourrait être le même. Il pourrait être différent. Cela reste entre vous et le député, mais toute chose qui empêcherait un comité parlementaire de demander et de recevoir l'opinion du légiste et conseiller parlementaire annule, à mon avis, l'objet même du système. Je suis un profane, qui a tout juste une 9e année. Si nous allons parler de constitutions, je veux mon avocat avec moi. Qui est mon avocat? Le légiste et conseiller parlementaire.

Enfin, je crois que nous pouvons tourner la page et que tout est beau.

Revenant au sujet de la discussion, aidez-moi de nouveau à comprendre le test. Un argument crédible peut-il être avancé contre la constitutionnalité? Expliquez-moi un peu plus cela, s'il vous plaît.

(1135)

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Le critère déterminant, c’est l’absence d’argument crédible en faveur de la constitutionnalité.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous remercie.

Il m’a semblé vous avoir entendu dire cela. Au moins, vous avez dit « d’une part » et ensuite « d’autre part ». À mes yeux, quand vous affirmez qu’une affaire est non votable, il devrait s’agir d’une affirmation si catégorique qu’il ne puisse y avoir « d’autre part », alors que le béotien que je suis a compris quelque chose qui semble vouloir dire, au moins au premier abord, que les tenants du pour et du contre peuvent tous deux avoir de bons arguments.

Jusqu’ici, êtes-vous d’accord avec moi?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Je ne sais pas s’il s’agissait de bons arguments, mais je vous ai donné ceux des tenants des deux opinions.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David Christopherson:

C’est subjectif. Je voulais insister sur le fait qu’il existe au moins deux arguments auxquels un bon avocat pourrait recourir.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

D’accord.

M. David Christopherson:

Mais de combien d’autres critères avons-nous besoin? C’est ce que je me demande.

Peu importe notre opinion en la matière, et laissons de côté la dimension politique de cette question, la réponse attendue de l’organisme d’appel que nous sommes est de dire si ce projet de loi doit ou non donner lieu à un vote. Les seuls cas de réponse négative à cette question sont ceux d’une violation de la Constitution qui, si nous autorisions ce vote, ferait de cet exercice une parodie. Ce ne semble pas être le cas ici.

Maintenant, j’ai entamé un dialogue avec mes collègues. Je ne suis que le second à prendre la parole, pardon le troisième, et j’adore ces discussions. J’ai hâte d’entendre leurs commentaires lorsque nous allons débattre, mais je dois dire, monsieur le président, que je m’attendais à ce que nous en arrivions là.

Indépendamment de ce que m’inspire ce projet de loi, le député que je suis, assumant en quelque sorte un rôle d’organisme d’appel, trouve maintenant très difficile de justifier de dire à un collègue: « Votre projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire ne mérite pas d’être soumis au vote. » Et pourquoi cela? La seule explication à laquelle je pense est que nous pouvons soit nous pencher sur une question de constitutionnalité, auquel cas il y aurait au moins un argument valide dans chaque camp et il serait alors justifié d’en débattre, soit ce projet de loi franchit l’étape de ce comité et se rend à la Chambre. Celle-ci pourra décider de s’en remettre à une norme différente, que les députés aiment ou non ce projet de loi et qu’ils conviennent ou non qu’il devrait avoir force de loi. Ce n’est pas ce que nous faisons ici, ni maintenant.

Que quelqu’un me corrige si j’ai tort, mais ce que nous faisons actuellement est d’entendre ce qu’un sous-comité a à nous dire, soit: « Nous pensons qu’il n’y a pas lieu de voter sur ce projet de loi parce qu’il n’est pas constitutionnel. » Le député a fait appel de cette décision devant nous. Il nous incombe de prendre cette décision avant que le projet de loi ne soit renvoyé à la Chambre. Je n’ai pas entendu d’argument convaincant qui étayerait l’opinion du sous-comité voulant que cela soit inconstitutionnel, parce que le légiste et conseiller parlementaire nous a indiqué, pour commencer, que les tenants de chaque opinion peuvent avoir recours à au moins un argument crédible et que, au bout du compte, la décision finale sur le caractère constitutionnel d’un projet de loi reviendra à la Cour suprême. Cela pourrait prendre un certain temps. La Cour suprême pourrait peut-être trancher cette question à l’avenir, mais, nous, nous en sommes à cette étape du processus à laquelle nous devons donner une réponse.

Chers collègues, je suis actuellement fortement enclin à voter contre la recommandation du sous-comité et à me prononcer en faveur de ce projet de loi, pour lui permettre d’aller de l’avant. Cela dit, je vais écouter attentivement ce que mes collègues diront. Si certains ont une vision différente de la situation, je pourrais me laisser persuader de changer d’avis. C’est donc ce que j’en pense jusqu’à maintenant,

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, de m’avoir donné la parole.

(1140)

Le président:

Merci.

En extrapolant, si le député dépose un recours en appel devant la Chambre, vous pourriez reprendre le même argument…

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous demande pardon, mais en cas d’appel devant la Chambre, celle-ci doit-elle se prononcer sur le bien-fondé d’un vote ou nous contentons-nous de renvoyer la question à la Chambre qui votera sur celle-ci?

Le président:

Si nous votons contre, le député peut faire appel devant la Chambre.

M. David Christopherson:

Si nous votons en faveur, il est transmis à la Chambre. C’est bien cela? C’est alors un projet de loi que nous renvoyons à la Chambre? Je vois que le greffier acquiesce.

Je vous remercie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avons déjà eu un appel d’une de nos décisions, interjeté par Mme Malcolmson, et tous les députés ont dû tenir un vote secret.

M. David Christopherson:

C’est exact et cet appel a été rejeté.

Le président:

Madame Lapointe, la parole est à vous. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

J'ai écouté avec attention vos arguments tant favorables que défavorables. Je vous ai bien écouté et j'ai bien compris, venant du Québec.

Vous avez fait allusion au paragraphe 16(1), mais aussi à l'alinéa 20(1)a) de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1982, qui dit que « l'emploi du français ou de l'anglais fait l'objet d'une demande importante ». Une demande de citoyenneté canadienne est plus qu'importante, elle est très importante, car elle vise à faire de vous un vrai citoyen canadien.

Je vous ramène à ma circonscription de Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, qui est au Nord de Montréal, où il y a des résidents permanents exclusivement anglophones qui sont en lien avec des gens qui viennent des États-Unis.

Plusieurs de mes concitoyens devenus citoyens canadiens m'ont dit qu'il était très difficile de réussir l'examen et que cela demandait une très grande préparation. S'il faut qu'une personne choisisse entre le français et l'anglais alors qu'elle ne contrôle pas le français, c'est difficile pour elle. Tous m'ont dit qu'il était déjà difficile de réussir l'examen dans une des deux langues.

Si l'on ne permet pas à un anglophone au Québec de faire son examen de citoyenneté en anglais, va-t-il devoir aller à l'extérieur du Québec pour le faire? Est-ce cela, l'autre possibilité?

Disons que je suis une résidente permanente francophone qui vit à l'extérieur du Québec, mais pas au Nouveau-Brunswick, la seule province bilingue. Je suis ailleurs et on me fait la même chose, mais à l'inverse. Devrai-je passer mon examen en anglais alors qu'on sait que cet examen est très difficile et qu'il demande beaucoup de préparation?

Vous avez employé les mots « clearly, likely, could », mais je ne sais où on trace la ligne. Je reviens à ce qui est écrit à l'alinéa 20(1)a) de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1982: « l'emploi du français ou de l'anglais fait l'objet d'une demande importante ». D'après moi, une demande pour devenir un citoyen canadien fait partie des demandes importantes lorsqu'on communique avec le gouvernement fédéral.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Comme je l'ai dit en ce qui concerne le test, y a-t-il un argument crédible pour défendre la validité de cela? Alors, on parle vraiment de quelque chose d'évident.

En ce qui concerne l'article 20, l'enjeu consiste à savoir si l'on empêche la personne de communiquer avec le gouvernement dans la langue de son choix.

Vous avez dit qu'on forcerait une personne à passer l'examen de citoyenneté en anglais. Ce serait une question à explorer. Le projet de loi à l'étude aurait-il cet effet? Selon le projet de loi, la personne devra démontrer qu'elle a une « connaissance suffisante de la langue française ». Est-ce séparé de l'examen?

Lorsqu'on pose des questions autres, sur la connaissance du Canada, par exemple, force-t-on la personne à faire l'examen en français ou s'agit-il de choses complètement séparées? Ce serait un élément important à voir. Si, effectivement, on force la personne à répondre à toutes les questions autres du processus de citoyenneté en français, cela devient plus difficile à défendre, et on tombe peut-être plus facilement dans l'article 1. Par contre, si la personne peut faire son examen de citoyenneté en anglais mais que, dans un élément du processus, elle doit démontrer qu'elle a une connaissance suffisante du français, pour ce qui est d'une violation potentielle, c'est probablement un peu moins intrusif. Cela fait partie de tous ces éléments de fait.

La Cour suprême, dans l'affaire Schmidt, mentionne que certains litiges constitutionnels dépendent de la preuve faite devant le tribunal.

Dans les faits, comment cela s'applique-t-il? La Charte énonce les principes de droits de la personne, et la jurisprudence dit qu'il faut interpréter les lois de façon conforme à la Charte.

D'ailleurs, l'affaire Solski, au Québec, a fait jurisprudence quant au droit à l'éducation dans la langue de la minorité. La question était de savoir si la loi sur l'éducation violait la Charte. La Cour suprême a dit qu'on pouvait sauver l'article si on l'interprétait de façon plus large. Si on permet à une personne d'étudier dans la langue de la minorité de façon qualitative, c'est acceptable, cela respecte l'esprit de la Charte, mais si on adopte une approche plus stricte où l'on n'évalue pas la qualité de l'enseignement mais seulement la quantité, c'est trop strict et cela viole la Charte.

Ce serait le genre de questions à se poser ici. Comment interprète-t-on cela? Dit-on vraiment que toutes les communications avec le gouvernement et les ministères doivent se faire en français ou dit-on qu'elles peuvent se faire dans la langue de son choix mais que, au cours de ce processus, on doit démontrer qu'on a une connaissance suffisante du français? Cela pourrait certainement influencer le résultat.

(1145)

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Avec votre permission, j’aimerais revenir sur un commentaire que vous avez fait, monsieur Christopherson. Comme je prends le caractère confidentiel du travail de mon bureau très au sérieux, je tiens, sans être trop technique, à vous dire ceci.

Je comprends que vous ayez dit que, dans ce cas-ci, nous avons donné un avis juridique au député et je tiens à vous préciser que je ne confirme ni n’infirme ici lui avoir donné un avis, sans parler de ce qu’aurait été cet avis. Tout cela est confidentiel. Je vous disais que, en règle générale, nous pouvons donner un avis, mais pas toujours. Je ne confirme toutefois pas ici lui avoir donné un tel avis, parce que notre intervention, s’il y en a eu une, est strictement confidentielle.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vois l’importance que vous accordez à chaque député. Décider qu’un projet de loi ou une motion d’un député pourront ou non être soumis au vote est une décision importante.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Bittle, voulez-vous commencer?

Non? Très bien.[Français]

On parle d'arguments crédibles. Toutefois, je vous ferai remarquer qu'il y a une différence entre un argument crédible et un autre qui a l'air crédible. On pourrait parler en long et en large de ces arguments qui semblent crédibles. Par exemple, un argument contre les changements climatiques peut sembler crédible, alors qu'il n'y a pas d'argument crédible contre les changements climatiques. On peut dire qu'on ne peut pas agir en se fondant sur un argument qui semble crédible, ce qui fait qu'on n'avance plus. Je voulais simplement vous faire part de cette réflexion.

Quand on démontre une compétence suffisante, comme le dit le projet de loi, on doit le faire en communiquant. Par définition, on communique: on est devant un agent qui nous fait passer un test pour vérifier notre capacité à parler dans l'une des deux langues en particulier.

J'ai beaucoup de difficulté à comprendre comment cela ne s'appliquerait pas aux communications avec le gouvernement. Le projet de loi ne dit nulle part qu'on doit normalement, ou la plupart du temps, parler dans une langue en particulier, il dit qu'on doit être capable de communiquer dans cette langue.

Prenons l'exemple de quelqu'un qui voudrait se rendre en voiture d'ici à Rio de Janeiro. Il se buterait à un léger problème, qui s'appelle le bouchon du Darién, entre le Panama et la Colombie. Il n'existe pas de route pour le traverser. Cette région est longue de plus de 110 kilomètres, et aucune route ne la traverse. On ne peut donc pas conduire jusqu'en Amérique du Sud. Alors, c'est comme si on disait que, parce qu'on est capable de parcourir 99 % de la route, on peut traverser l'Amérique en voiture.

Cela n'est pas un argument très convaincant. Oui, un argument a l'air crédible en ce qui concerne la constitutionnalité du projet de loi, mais je ne vois pas d'argument crédible qui le rende constitutionnel.

Je vais entendre vos commentaires là-dessus.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Tout ce que je peux dire à ce sujet, monsieur Graham, c'est qu'il s'agit vraiment de votre décision. C'est à vous et au Comité d'évaluer cela. De mon côté, j'essaie d'indiquer du mieux que je peux ce qu'est le test. C'est un test onéreux. J'ai essayé d'identifier certains problèmes liés à la Charte des droits et libertés. Par exemple, ce projet de loi viole-t-il l'article 20?

Même si c'était le cas, il faudrait aussi vérifier si c'est justifié en vertu de l'article 1. Il y a d'autres considérations aussi, notamment celle de l'atteinte minimale ou non, et même celle de l'importance de l'objectif. Pour être conséquent, il faut reconnaître que, même si la Cour a reconnu, dans l'arrêt Nguyen, que l'objectif était suffisamment important, ce ne serait probablement pas le cas maintenant. Ce sont les éléments qui sont en jeu, mais c'est vraiment à vous d'en décider.

(1150)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Qu'en serait-il si le même projet de loi inverse disait qu'en Alberta seulement, pour faire une demande, il faut démontrer une connaissance de l'anglais? Il y a une communauté francophone en Alberta.

S'Il y avait une obligation de subir le test en anglais ou de démontrer une connaissance de l'anglais en Alberta, est-ce que nous aurions cette discussion? Dirions-nous plutôt que ce n'est pas bien et qu'il s'agit d'une attaque flagrante contre le français? C'est la même chose. Aurions-nous la même discussion?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Tout ce que je peux dire à ce sujet, c'est qu'en ce qui concerne les questions de constitutionnalité, ce serait la même discussion dans la mesure où on se demanderait cela viole l'article 20. Si oui, on se demanderait alors si c'est justifié, s'il y a un objectif législatif suffisamment important dans cette province et dans ce contexte pour exiger la connaissance de l'anglais dans de telles circonstances et s'il s'agit d'une atteinte minimale.

Cela dit, pour vous, membres du Comité, la question ne serait pas de décider si c'est constitutionnel ou pas, mais d'établir si c'est clairement une violation de la Charte et s'il y a une absence d'arguments crédibles pour défendre le projet de loi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ferai remarquer à mes collègues qu'il n'existe pas d'argument crédible, mais qu'il y en a un qui a l'air crédible.

Je cède ma place.

Je vous remercie, monsieur Dufresne. [Traduction]

Le président:

Cependant, comme il s’agit d’une langue minoritaire, parce que le français est une langue minoritaire, la jurisprudence traite-t-elle de cette question?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais c’est la langue de la majorité au Québec.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

C’est précisément dans le cas du Québec que le tribunal est intervenu au sujet de la promotion de la langue. C’est l’élément qui doit être justifié d’après l’article premier de la Charte. Le tribunal va se pencher sur l’objet du projet de loi. Vise-t-il un objectif suffisamment important et celui-ci contrevient-il à une disposition de la Charte?

Au Québec, dans ce cas et jusqu’à maintenant, la promotion du français dans cette province comme langue minoritaire au Canada constitue un objectif suffisamment important.

Cela dépend des faits et des circonstances, et c’est au gouvernement qu’il incombe de défendre la législation pour en convaincre le tribunal.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, nous vous écoutons.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

J’ai écouté très attentivement ce que nous ont dit Mme Lapointe et M. Graham, mais je n’ai entendu que des arguments contre le projet de loi. C’est leur droit. Permettez-moi d’être plus transparent. Je ne suis pas un juge et je n’ai donc pas à me préoccuper des règles et des normes qu’ils ont à respecter.

Quelqu’un va devoir passer beaucoup de temps à me convaincre de voter en faveur de ce projet de loi pour la simple raison mentionnée avec le plus de précision par M. Graham, soit: « Quoi? Vous plaisantez, j’espère? » C’est moi, le député de Hamilton-Centre, qui dit cela d'emblée. J'ajouterais: « Waouh! Je n’aime pas du tout ça. » Si j’en ai l’occasion, à moins que quelqu’un ne me convainque du contraire, je vais voter contre ce projet de loi. C’est sans lien avec le fait que mon collègue député ait ou non le droit de demander à la Chambre de voter sur son projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire.

Permettez-moi de rappeler à ceux d’entre vous qui ont siégé à un conseil municipal, comme c’est mon cas, les questions de zonage. Prenons l’exemple d’une petite entreprise qui ouvre sur un coin de rue. C’est un bon emplacement commercial, mais contigu à une zone résidentielle. Vous pouvez en déduire que je représente une circonscription du centre-ville. Le zonage permet l’ouverture, par exemple, d’une pizzeria, mais il manque deux places de stationnement. Vous pouvez transmettre le dossier au comité des dérogations. La seule chose qu’il va vouloir savoir est si ces deux places de stationnement justifient le refus d’un droit de ce commerce qu’il aurait autrement. Neuf fois sur 10, des résidants vont se présenter, qui sont bien évidemment des électeurs, pour s’opposer à l’ouverture de la pizzeria à cet endroit-là. En réalité, la seule question à laquelle ce comité des dérogations va devoir répondre est de dire si l’absence de ces deux places de stationnement, qui sont nécessaires, suffit à nier le reste des droits du propriétaire de ce commerce en matière de zonage.

J’ai le sentiment ici d’une situation comparable. Nous continuons à vouloir nous occuper de cette question, que cela nous plaise ou non.

Monsieur le président, je vais vous demander d’être clair et précis. À moins que je ne me trompe, ce n’est pas le type de cas que nous avons devant nous. Il s’agit plutôt de notre capacité, comme organisme d’appel, parce qu’un sous-comité a recommandé que cette question ne fasse pas l’objet d’un vote. Jusqu’à maintenant, je n’ai pas entendu d’argument justifiant d’empêcher un collègue de présenter un projet de loi à la Chambre des communes.

N’oubliez pas, chers collègues, le jour où nous interdirons à des députés de présenter des projets de loi à la Chambre... Nous nous aventurons là dans des eaux dangereuses. Ce n’est pas évident dans l’univers pacifique qui est le nôtre, mais lorsque vous avez la chance de sortir dans le monde et de voir ce qui s’y passe, ou d’avoir acquis un peu d’expérience autour de nous, ou au niveau provincial, et de voir ce qui peut se produire, vous constaterez que ce sont là des questions importantes. Il importe vraiment que nous les traitions comme elles doivent l’être quand nous ne faisons pas face à une crise parce que, en cas de crise, ce sont les politiques en vogue qui l’emporteront.

Je vous dis cela, chers collègues, parce que j’écoute attentivement ce qu’on me dit. Toutefois, je n’ai pas encore entendu de bonnes justifications pour refuser à notre collègue le droit de faire entendre sa cause. Dans ce cas-ci, cela signifie qu’il a raison de présenter son projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire qui lui semble si important pour sa circonscription et sa province. Nous devrions faire preuve de la plus grande prudence avant de nous priver mutuellement de ce droit.

Monsieur le président, je reste à l’écoute de mes collègues.

(1155)

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, nous vous écoutons.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Je vous remercie.

Le député du Bloc québécois nous a implorés d’aborder cette question d’un point de vue juridique, et j’apprécie les propos de M. Christopherson à leur juste mesure. Dans cette affaire, je considère, comme l’a indiqué M. Christopherson, que nous assumons un rôle de cour d’appel. Quelqu’un interjette appel. Cela suppose auparavant qu’il y ait eu un procès au cours duquel les éléments de preuve ont été présentés avant que la décision ne soit rendue. Il incombe alors à l’appelant de présenter des preuves que le tribunal de première instance a erré.

Je me dois de convenir que je n’ai rien entendu de tel, en particulier du député qui a interjeté appel auprès de nous, car il ne nous a soumis aucun bon argument juridique. Je lui ai même demandé: « Avez-vous parlé de ceci à des constitutionnalistes? » Et il a répondu « oui, à trois », mais sans nous communiquer leurs noms. Il n’y a pas eu de séance d’information, de présentation du contexte. Nous n’avons eu aucune information.

J’ai du respect pour M. Dufresne, son expérience, ses compétences et tout ce qu’il apporte à la discussion. Notre discussion pourrait tout aussi bien pencher d’un bord que de l’autre.

Tout comme le ferait une cour d’appel, je fais part de ma considération pour les décideurs de la première instance. Les membres du parti gouvernemental ne sont pas majoritaires à ce comité. Je fais confiance aux décideurs qui ont fait ce choix et je n’ai rien entendu qui m’amènerait à changer d’avis.

J’apprécie la ferveur avec laquelle M. Christopherson débat, mais rien de ce qu’il a dit ne m’a convaincu d’aller à l’encontre de la décision du Comité. Je l’ai même invité à présenter un argument… Quand il l’a fait, il a évoqué un cas, ce qui est très bien en soi lorsque celui-ci colle au même type de situation. Or ce cas reposait sur un autre article de la Charte que ceux qu’il a repris dans son argumentation.

Même en examinant toute cette question d’un point de vue juridique, je ne suis pas convaincu que le premier comité à avoir tranché était dans l’erreur. Au bout du compte, c’est la réponse que nous devons vous donner: était-il ou non dans l’erreur? Une fois encore, avec tout le respect dû à M. Dufresne, ce n’est pas son rôle et il n’est pas venu ici pour nous dire que quelqu’un avait raison et que quelqu’un d’autre avait tort. Il a fait très attention à ne rien affirmer de tel et je l’en félicite.

M. Dufresne peut me corriger, même s’il ne l’a jamais fait. Je suis avocat et je ne conseillerais jamais à mes clients de renoncer au caractère confidentiel de leur relation avec un avocat, d’abandonner le secret professionnel. Par contre, s’ils n’ont pas les moyens de demander un avis juridique, l’un des arguments que l’on nous a donnés, on nous a expliqué que ce caractère confidentiel concernant l’avis juridique donné ou non par des greffiers du Parlement peut être levé, ce qui n’a pas été fait. C’était pourtant là une autre occasion offerte aux députés d’intervenir et de dire: « Voici certains éléments prouvant que le premier comité était dans l’erreur. » Au final…

(1200)

M. Scott Reid:

Laissez-vous entendre que, pour que vous soyez satisfait, le député devrait renoncer à certains de ses privilèges, ou…?

M. Chris Bittle:

Non, comme je viens tout juste de le dire. C’est moi qui ai la parole...

M. David Christopherson:

Taisez-vous pour que je puisse l’entendre.

M. Scott Reid:

Suggérez-vous dans cette enceinte que M. Dufresne fait preuve de duplicité? Je ne saisis pas bien la nature de votre accusation ni ce que vous insinuez.

Le président:

Nous vous écoutons, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Comme je l’ai dit, monsieur Reid, et je suis certain que vous y avez accordé toute l’attention voulue, comme avocat, je respecte le principe du secret professionnel dans les relations d’un avocat avec son client, mais si le député affirme qu’il n’a pas de compétences en la matière et qu’il n’est là d’aucune utilité… Il aurait pu le dire. Ce n’est pas que je laisse entendre qu’ils auraient pu le donner, mais c’est leur fonction, leur travail, de nous présenter des preuves que le comité de première instance était dans l’erreur. Le député ne l’a pas fait. Au bout du compte, c’était une possibilité pour lui et il ne l’a pas retenue. Il n’était d’ailleurs pas tenu de le faire. Comme je l’ai indiqué dans le même paragraphe, je respecte le principe du secret professionnel dans les relations d’un avocat avec son client.

Les arguments que nous entendons se situent au même niveau qu’auparavant. J’en suis bien conscient, monsieur Reid.

Au bout du compte, je ne suis pas convaincu par ce que je viens d’entendre et je respecte le comité qui a traité la question en première instance et je lui fais part de ma déférence. Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Madame Sahota, la parole est à vous.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

L’argument crédible… J’en reviens à ce qu’a dit M. Christopherson au début sur la façon de prouver la connaissance d’une langue sans être contraint de la parler ou de l’utiliser pour communiquer. Je ne crois pas qu’il y ait d’autres arguments crédibles. Comment pourriez-vous faire autrement? Le fait d’être contraint de fournir la preuve de la connaissance d’une langue ne constitue-t-il pas une violation de la Charte? Vous êtes obligés de la parler. Tout un chacun n’a-t-il pas le droit de choisir?

Quel est l’argument? Pouvez-vous m’expliquer pas à pas l’autre argument crédible, celui de l’autre partie?

M. Philippe Dufresne:

J’ai indiqué que cet argument devrait être que la personne puisse communiquer avec le gouvernement fédéral dans la langue de son choix. Ce ne serait là qu’un élément prouvant sa maîtrise de la langue dans un cas où il est nécessaire de parler français ou de fournir certains éléments de preuve pour convaincre le ministère que la personne comprend le français. Le sujet du débat deviendrait alors…

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Mais il ne s’agit pas d’une possibilité, mais d’une obligation.

M. Philippe Dufresne:

Ils seraient tenus de fournir la preuve qu’ils comprennent le français.

J’ai ajouté ensuite que si cela s’avérait en contravention de l’article 20, il faudrait déterminer si une telle contravention peut être justifiée en application de l’article 1 de la Charte, ce qui poserait des problèmes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je crois que nous serions tout près de contrevenir à l’article 20 de la Charte, mais dans ce cas-ci, je pourrais faire appel à l’article premier de cette Charte. Le projet de loi lui-même contreviendrait à la Charte…

M. David Christopherson:

La Chambre devrait-elle alors pouvoir voter sur celui-ci?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

La Chambre ne devrait pouvoir voter qu’en l’absence de contravention du projet de loi à la Charte. Pour l’essentiel, ce projet de loi contrevient à la Charte.

M. David Christopherson:

Qui a dit cela? Qui l’a décrété?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C’est moi. C’est mon opinion. J’imagine qu’il pourrait franchir le critère de la Charte si la Cour estime qu’il s’agit là d’une restriction justifiable.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je croyais que cela irait vite.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J’ai terminé. Je ne faisais que réfléchir.

Le président:

Avant de donner la parole à M. Christopherson, je me demande si tous savent bien quel est le contenu de ce projet de loi? Pour obtenir la citoyenneté, il ne suffit pas que la personne maîtrise le français; elle doit également « avoir une connaissance suffisante du Canada et des responsabilités et avantages conférés par la citoyenneté, [soit] en français dans le cas où elle réside habituellement au Québec. »

Nous allons maintenant écouter M. Christopherson, et ensuite M. Reid.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président. Je serai bref.

Une fois encore, je me répète. Je n’aime pas ce projet de loi. Je ne trouve pas d’argument en sa faveur. Je vais faire preuve d’ouverture d’esprit parce que c’est important, il s’agit de notre Constitution, mais qui que ce soit aura du mal à me convaincre de voter en sa faveur pour toutes les bonnes raisons mentionnées par mes collègues. Le problème n’est pas là. Il ne s’agit pas de savoir si nous aimons ou non ce texte ou voterons ou non en sa faveur ni de savoir s’il respecte ou non notre Constitution.

Oublions le contenu de ce projet de loi. Je suppose que ce sera difficile. C’est très bien ainsi, mais la réponse que nous devons donner dans l’affaire qui nous est soumise est de dire si ce projet de loi devrait être autorisé à être renvoyé à la Chambre des communes pour que celle-ci tienne un débat et un vote?

Monsieur le président, si j’ai demandé la parole, c’est que j’ai entendu M. Bittle, en vérité je me suis entendu avec lui lors de notre dernière réunion pour convenir qu’il s’agit là de savoir si ce projet de loi est constitutionnel ou non. S’il est manifeste qu’il ne l’est pas, c’est une simple formalité: nous appuyons le sous-comité, le dossier est clos et nous passons au suivant.

Je dois cependant vous dire, monsieur Bittle, que j’ai été fort déçu de vous entendre, lors de notre dernière réunion, recourir à l’argument voulant que les députés eux-mêmes n’aient pas proposé d’argument juridique ou ne nous aient pas éclairés sur la situation juridique comme le légiste et conseiller parlementaire vient de le faire, ce qui était en réalité le seul motif de notre réunion. Je trouve cela malhonnête intellectuellement.

Nous n’avons pas besoin d’entendre des collègues nous donner une solution définitive à cette question juridique. Point final. Si vous n’avez pas eu l’à-propos de soulever cette question, et bien tant pis; c’est trop tard. Le comité que nous constituons a décidé que notre prochaine étape serait de demander des avis juridiques et donc, à cette étape, si c’est un avis juridique qui doit orienter notre vote, qu’il vienne du légiste et conseiller parlementaire à qui nous en avons fait la demande ou qu’il vienne des députés lorsqu’ils ont siégé à ce comité est hors sujet. Cela me pose un vrai problème.

Une fois encore et jusqu’à maintenant, tous ceux qui ont pris la parole ont discuté du bien-fondé de ce projet de loi. Je n’ai toujours pas entendu d’argument justifiant de façon convaincante de retirer à un député le droit de soumettre son projet de loi au vote quand la seule chose qui pourrait empêcher de procéder à ce vote serait qu’il soit manifestement inconstitutionnel. Je n’ai entendu personne affirmer sans ambiguïté qu’il est inconstitutionnel. Cela peut faire l’objet d’un débat.

Certains d’entre vous peuvent penser qu’il s’agit là d’un débat sans grand intérêt en regard d’un débat vigoureux, mais est-il si scandaleux qu’il n’en sortirait jamais d’argument crédible à exposer devant la Cour suprême? Je n’ai entendu personne le dire. Pour moi, cela devrait être le critère à retenir lorsque nous envisageons de retirer un droit à un député, un droit sacré, et en particulier lorsqu’il y en a si peu.

Je ne suis toujours pas convaincu et je continue à écouter ce que vous avez à dire.

(1205)

Le président:

Très bien. Juste avant que M. Reid ne prenne la parole, je vais vous répéter ce que vient de nous dire M. Christopherson.

La décision que nous avons à prendre est de dire si oui ou non les critères qui s’appliquent aux projets de loi et aux motions des députés ne doivent pas manifestement contrevenir à la Loi constitutionnelle de 1982, y compris à la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés. Il ne suffit pas de déterminer si un projet de loi peut être soumis au vote, mais plutôt s’il contrevient ou non à la Constitution.

Monsieur Reid, nous vous écoutons.

M. Scott Reid:

Pour être clair, il « ne doit pas contrevenir de façon manifeste à la Constitution » et non pas « manifestement ne pas contrevenir à la Constitution », ce qui serait sensiblement différent. Les avocats, comme les tribunaux, accordent beaucoup d’importance à ce type de nuances.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: Je tiens à reprendre à mon compte les tout premiers commentaires de M. Christopherson. Si ce projet de loi se rend à la Chambre des communes, je voterai contre. Il ne vise pas à mettre en place une politique que je pourrais appuyer. Cela dit, je veux répondre à la question sur la déférence.

Quelqu’un a suggéré que nous devrions faire preuve de déférence envers le sous-comité. Je suis en désaccord. C’est, peut-être, une question de formulation différente entre M. Bittle et moi, et non pas un désaccord majeur sur le fond, mais par définition, on ne fait pas preuve de déférence envers une personne ou un organisme qui vous est subordonné.

Lorsque les tribunaux d’appel ont à revoir la décision d’un tribunal inférieur, ils adoptent des formulations respectueuses. Ils font part respectueusement de leur désaccord. Ils prennent grand soin dans les formulations qu’ils utilisent de montrer leur respect pour le sérieux de l’organisme dont ils contestent la décision. Cela ne les empêche pas d’être en désaccord.

L’organisme envers lequel nous faisons preuve de déférence est la Chambre des communes. Nous sommes un organisme subsidiaire de la Chambre des communes. En retirant à celle-ci le droit d’étudier ce projet de loi, nous faisons tout le contraire de manifester notre déférence. S’ajoute à cela qu’il n’existe pas de modalités d’appel de notre décision. Concrètement, nous tuons donc un projet de loi dans l’oeuf avant que la Chambre puisse en prendre connaissance.

Je sais qu’il y a une façon de contourner cette difficulté. Si le parrain du projet de loi peut obtenir la signature d’un député de la majorité des partis représentés à Chambre, puisqu’il n’appartient pas lui-même à un parti reconnu, ce qui complique sa tâche, il peut alors transmettre son texte à la Chambre, et c’est en Chambre que nous déciderons à vote secret du sort de ce projet de loi.

C’est là un critère difficile à respecter, surtout qu’il semble que l’objectif réel de tout ceci est de ne pas obliger le parti au pouvoir, les libéraux, à voter sur un texte sur lequel, en son sein, les opinions divergent selon la région dont ils sont issus. Je redis qu’il ne nous appartient pas de faciliter la vie d’un parti politique…

Un député: Bravo!

M. Scott Reid: … et de lui permettre de se sortir d’un guêpier dans lequel les députés du Québec et ceux de l’extérieur du Québec auraient tendance à voter différemment sur la même question, une question délicate par nature. Nous avons ici des membres des trois partis, aussi bien élus au Québec qu’à l’extérieur de celui-ci.

Il y a une solution simple à ce dilemme. J’invite les libéraux à y réfléchir. Il leur suffirait d’autoriser leurs députés à voter librement et la question serait résolue proprement. Tuer ce projet de loi dans l’oeuf n’est pas la bonne façon de procéder.

Permettez-moi un dernier commentaire au sujet de la déférence: avec cette question, nous essayons de ne pas sortir du champ de notre pouvoir légitime. Il est certain qu’il ne nous appartient pas de décider si un texte contrevient à l’interprétation que les tribunaux, et en dernier recours la Cour suprême, font de la Charte des droits et libertés. Nous n’avons pas à prévoir la décision de la Cour, ni à anticiper ce qu’elle pourrait dire. Ce serait dire à la Cour: « Non, messieurs, vous n’aurez même pas la possibilité de vous prononcer sur ce sujet parce que nous avons décidé que nous savions à l’avance ce à quoi vous diriez oui et ce à quoi vous diriez non. »

Maintenant, si quelque chose est manifestement inconstitutionnel, s’il y a une bonne raison pour qu’une personne raisonnable en convienne, et que nous estimions pouvoir être raisonnablement certains que la Cour suprême n’acceptera jamais cela, alors nous ne perdrions pas son temps, ni d’ailleurs le temps de la Chambre, mais aucun n’argument en ce sens ne nous a été présenté. Ceux que nous avons entendus ressemblent à ce que je présenterais à la Chambre des communes si je prononçais un discours expliquant pourquoi je vais voter contre ce projet de loi et pourquoi j'exhorte mes collègues à faire de même. Dans ce contexte, je ne suis tout simplement pas d’accord avec M. Bittle ni avec un certain nombre d’autres orateurs libéraux.

La dernière chose que je tiens à vous dire à ce sujet est que la question qui importe ici n’est pas de savoir comment nous allons voter sur ce texte de loi, en votant oui ou en votant non. Ce qui importe est de ne pas chercher à inventer des arguments sur le caractère constitutionnel d’un projet de loi d’initiative parlementaire difficile à traiter. Par définition, les questions difficiles à traiter pour nous sont aussi celles qui méritent le plus notre attention: les droits linguistiques, les autres droits constitutionnels…

Monsieur Christopherson, passez simplement en revue tous les sujets épineux abordés au cours de votre carrière.

M. David Christopherson: L’avortement, le divorce…

M. Scott Reid: Il y a eu des sujets concernant…

(1210)

M. David Christopherson:

Les droits relatifs au genre...

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, l'euthanasie, la mort assistée, la discussion sur la légalisation du cannabis qui a duré des années... Nous ne devrions pas rejeter les projets de loi d'origine parlementaire qui traitent des questions de ce genre. Il faudrait permettre un débat ouvert devant la Chambre après lequel nous voterions tous selon notre conscience. Cela divise nos caucus. C'est un signe qui montre que cette question n'est pas facile à régler, qu'il n'est pas facile de l'intégrer au programme d'un parti et que, si c'est bien le cas, alors nous devrions vraiment en débattre, nous les parlementaires, les décideurs. C'est le principe général. Même si je tiens compte du précédent que nous établirions, nous allons simplement prendre l'habitude de rejeter tous les projets de loi un peu sensibles. J'ai déjà été dans la position d'avoir à présenter des arguments pour convaincre les membres du Comité permanent des affaires émanant des députés de rendre mon projet votable et ayant déjà été membre du Comité lorsqu'il était saisi de ce genre de problème, je dirais simplement que ce n'est pas un précédent qui mérite d'être établi.

Le meilleur endroit pour examiner ces questions controversées est de les introduire tout d'abord dans un projet de loi d'origine parlementaire pour que nous puissions l'améliorer et pour que, lorsque le gouvernement présente un projet de loi sur ce sujet, nous soyons mieux armés pour examiner ce type de projet de loi.

La transparence dans le gouvernement, la transparence dans les initiatives émanant des députés ne font bien sûr que refléter une société de plus en plus transparente. Nous avons fait beaucoup de progrès dans cette direction au cours de ma carrière et au cours de celle de M. Christopherson. Je n'aimerais pas nous voir faire machine arrière maintenant.

C'est l'invitation que je lance aux membres du Parti libéral du Comité.

Monsieur le président, je vous remercie.

(1215)

Le président:

Bien dit.

Pour la gouverne des membres, je dirais que, si ce projet est rejeté, cela ne veut pas dire que la Chambre n'aura jamais l'occasion de l'examiner. Cela veut dire qu'il n'y aura pas de vote sur ce projet. Le député dispose de quelques solutions. Une consiste à en saisir la Chambre et la deuxième est de remplacer ce projet par un autre ou d'y renoncer, et il pourra ensuite faire l'objet d'un débat à la Chambre, mais sans qu'il y ait de vote.

L'intervenant suivant est M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'apprécie beaucoup vos commentaires, tant ceux de M. Reid que de M. Christopherson. Je n'aime pas, par contre, les commentaires qui consistent à affirmer que la décision s'explique parce que cette question va entraîner une scission au sein du caucus.

Je suis un député anglophone dans une circonscription qui contient 94 % de francophones et j'ai déjà déclaré ici officiellement que cela n'était pas constitutionnel. Si cette mesure paraît trop sensible à certains, elle le sera également pour moi. C'est moi qui vais aussi loin que possible sur cette question, parce que je crois que, fondamentalement, cette mesure est inconstitutionnelle et que c'est une norme que notre comité a adoptée.

Si nous n'acceptons pas cette norme, ce sera aux membres du Comité de décider, et nous avons le pouvoir de la modifier. Mais, si je m'attache uniquement au texte de cette loi, je constate qu'il porte atteinte aux droits des langues minoritaires dans l'ensemble du Canada et que cela va à l'encontre de l'objet et de la portée de la Constitution, et de la Constitution elle-même.

C'est la seule raison pour laquelle j'estime que cette affaire ne peut être mise aux voix. Il ne s'agit pas de restreindre ses droits. Il a le droit, comme cela vient d'être mentionné, de remplacer cette mesure par un autre projet de loi qui ne serait pas inconstitutionnel. Il possède ce droit. Nous ne supprimons pas son droit de présenter un projet de loi. Nous lui supprimons le droit de violer dès le départ la Constitution.

Les gens votent comme ils veulent, et s'il y a un député de ce côté qui change d'idée, alors je perdrai également mon argument et c'est très bien. C'est ainsi que cela fonctionne. Il s'agit d'un projet émanant d'un député. C'est à chacun d'entre nous de décider.

J'ai assisté à la réunion sur les affaires émanant des députés. J'ai examiné le projet de loi. J'ai eu cette discussion à propos de cette mesure. J'estime qu'elle est tout à fait inconstitutionnelle. Je peux concevoir que cette mesure ait un fondement crédible, mais je ne vois pas d'argument crédible qui établirait qu'elle est constitutionnelle. Vous êtes en communication avec le gouvernement et vous êtes obligé dans une seule province de choisir une langue ce qui va à l'encontre de plusieurs aspects de la Charte des droits. C'est la seule raison pour laquelle je m'y oppose. En anglais, en tant qu'anglophone minoritaire dans une circonscription francophone du Québec, je dis que cela est une mauvaise mesure. D'après les règles que le Comité a adoptées, il n'est pas possible d'adopter cette mesure.

Voilà mon point de vue. Je vais en rester là. C'est ma décision personnelle. J'en suis arrivé moi-même à cette conclusion et c'est la mienne.

Le président:

Très bien.

Monsieur Bittle, vous êtes sur la liste.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je vous remercie.

Je vais faire d'abord quelques remarques au sujet de ma malhonnêteté intellectuelle. Encore une fois, il ne s'agit pas d'un sous-comité dirigé par le gouvernement ou dans lequel celui-ci essaie de rejeter une mesure, et je ne cherche pas à la faire rejeter à tout prix. Il s'agit d'appuyer nos collègues. Je veux parler de la remarque qu'a faite M. Reid au sujet de la retenue et du fait que les tribunaux ne s'occupent pas de la notion de retenue. En réalité, les tribunaux appliquent très souvent la notion de retenue. C'est une des...

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, mais pour le haut, et non pas pour le bas...

M. Chris Bittle:

Non. Une des questions qui se posent en matière de contrôle judiciaire est le niveau de retenue dont doit bénéficier un tribunal judiciaire ou administratif inférieur.

M. Scott Reid:

Mais vous recherchez les erreurs de droit.

M. Chris Bittle:

Nous recherchons toujours les erreurs de droit et c'est très bien...

M. Scott Reid:

Je voulais dire que, lorsque cela a été décidé...

M. Chris Bittle:

Monsieur Reid, j'ai la parole. Je ne vous interromps pas lorsque vous avez la parole, et c'est maintenant la deuxième fois que vous le faites aujourd'hui.

En fin de compte, il s'agit... Nous abordons peut-être cette question d'un point de vue différent. Je me place du côté juridique des choses, sur la question de savoir comment un tribunal judiciaire conçoit la retenue, qui est une marque de courtoisie envers un tribunal inférieur ou dans ce cas envers le sous-comité qui a eu la possibilité d'examiner la mesure, d'en débattre et de prendre une décision. Il n'y a pas que les députés de ce côté-ci de la table. Il a fallu obtenir le vote de l'opposition pour démarrer ce processus, et c'est la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici.

Encore une fois, en fin de compte — et je reviens à la remarque de M. Christopherson — je ne pense pas qu'il appartienne aux députés de présenter un argument juridique, mais c'est leur devoir de présenter leurs meilleurs arguments et de le faire de la meilleure façon possible. Le fait que M. Dufresne soit ici...

Cela fait partie de ce dossier et je l'accepte; d'autres députés peuvent avoir un avis différent, mais il me semble que cela pourrait aller dans un sens ou dans un autre. À mon avis, si le sous-comité a entendu... et que de son point de vue, cela a donné lieu à une certaine décision, je dirais que je n'ai pas été convaincu par les arguments selon lesquels il conviendrait d'annuler la décision du sous-comité. Voilà ce que je pense.

Je ne voulais pas faire preuve de malhonnêteté intellectuelle et je ne veux pas écarter l'expertise que nous apporte M. Dufresne, mais c'est finalement ma position.

(1220)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pourrais peut-être faire remarquer que ce projet de loi a déjà été davantage débattu devant ce comité qu'il ne l'aurait été autrement.

Le président:

Monsieur Dufresne. [Français]

M. Philippe Dufresne:

J'aimerais simplement apporter une clarification.

Au cours de la discussion que nous avons eue, madame Lapointe, il a été question de subir en français l'examen de citoyenneté portant sur la connaissance du Canada. Nous avons eu une discussion pour chercher à savoir si cela serait exigé ou non.

Si on considère les alinéas 1(1)d) et 1(1)e) du projet de loi comme étant des exigences conjointes, ou les deux, l'argument pourrait être le deuxième: on devrait démontrer en français la connaissance des avantages et des responsabilités.

Il faudrait aussi se demander si cette partie est plus stricte que l'alinéa 1(1)d), qui demande simplement une connaissance suffisante du français?

Pour ce qui est de subir l'examen de citoyenneté en français, la cour se demanderait-elle si l'interprétation de cette partie pourrait être atténuée, parce qu'elle serait jugée excessive, alors que la première serait justifiée?

Cela ferait aussi partie de la discussion.[Traduction]

Sur la question des appels, j'aimerais ajouter une seule chose; dans certains cas, les tribunaux vont faire preuve de retenue — cela est très bien — et les tribunaux vont également, dans d'autres circonstances, poser les questions suivantes: qui est l'organisme le mieux placé pour prendre cette décision? Le tribunal administratif est-il mieux placé pour la prendre ou possède-t-il une expertise plus grande que le tribunal chargé de réviser sa décision? Si ce n'est pas le cas, le tribunal chargé de la révision est moins amené à faire preuve de retenue.

Ces questions, le cas échéant, font toutefois partie du droit administratif: quelle est la retenue dont doit bénéficier le décideur initial?

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres questions pour le témoin ou d'autres points de vue que les membres du Comité veulent exprimer?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelqu'un a-t-il été convaincu de quoi que ce soit?

M. David Christopherson:

C'est la raison pour laquelle nous votons, pour le savoir.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai été convaincu par les arguments de M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est me faire un grand compliment.

M. Chris Bittle:

Pouvons-nous suspendre la séance et...?

M. David Christopherson:

Pourquoi faire? Pourquoi ne votons-nous pas?

Le président:

Voulez-vous que nous passions au vote maintenant?

M. David Christopherson:

Pourquoi ne pas le faire? J'aimerais un vote par appel nominal.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, il y a une raison pour laquelle nous ne voulons pas voter maintenant.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien.

M. Chris Bittle:

Pouvons-nous suspendre la séance pour quelques instants?

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien. Cela est-il acceptable?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, tout à fait. Il existait une règle pour ce genre de chose au palier provincial. Je ne sais pas quelle est celle qui s'applique ici.

Oui, prenons quelques instants pour donner à tous le temps de repenser à tout cela.

Le président:

Ensuite, nous reviendrons et prendrons notre décision.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien.

Le président:

Nous avons également un autre point à examiner.

Nous allons suspendre.

(1220)

(1230)

Le président:

Reprenons notre 136e séance. Nous allons tenir une discussion et nous passerons ensuite au vote. Nous voulons poursuivre la séance en public.

Y a-t-il une discussion?

Monsieur Graham, vous avez apporté une liste.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme je l'ai dit à David, cela s'explique par le fait que j'occupe une place très particulière en tant que minoritaire au Québec, qui veut étendre le français à l'ensemble du pays et protéger l'anglais au Québec. Je me suis trouvé toute ma vie dans une situation où, je dois le dire franchement, on essayait de m'expulser du Québec. Les attitudes ont toutefois évolué au Québec et ce n'est plus le cas, mais c'est ainsi que j'ai pu devenir député dans ma région d'origine.

Cela revient en fait à saper la protection que la Constitution nous a accordée. Le rôle du Sous-comité sur les affaires émanant des députés consiste à suivre les quatre critères que les membres du Comité ont approuvés l'année dernière. Si nous n'étudions pas la mesure proposée, si nous ne nous demandons pas si elle est constitutionnelle et si elle ne l'est pas, nous ne la rejetons pas, à quoi sert donc tout ce processus? Pourquoi même avoir mis sur pied le Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés? Confions tous ces projets à la Chambre et ne nous en occupons plus.

C'est mon dernier commentaire sur cette question. Si l'on attaque les droits minoritaires dans ce pays en violant la Constitution, je serai ici pour protéger la Constitution et je suis prêt à voter selon ce point de vue. Je vous remercie.

(1235)

Le président:

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Cela fait une heure et demie que j'écoute tout cela et que je fais l'éponge pour essayer d'absorber tout ce qui se dit. J'ai essayé de comprendre tous les arguments et je vais vous dire franchement, j'estime que, sur de nombreux points, cette discussion a été fantastique.

M. Christopherson a fait d'excellentes remarques au sujet de qui nous sommes, de ce que nous devons faire, à savoir non seulement représenter nos électeurs, mais aussi assumer la responsabilité de gouverner une nation comme parlementaires — non pas comme des dirigeants, mais comme des parlementaires. Nous exerçons un contrôle sur eux, mais en même temps, nous avons également reçu, j'en remercie le ciel, grâce à la magie de cette magnifique démocratie, la possibilité de présenter un projet de loi d'origine parlementaire pour qu'il soit compris par tous, adopté ou rejeté par nos pairs et qui peut éventuellement faire partie des lois de notre pays. Je remercie le Ciel pour tout cela.

Je vais maintenant aborder l'argument de M. Graham. Il existe un processus qui assure la protection de la Constitution et de sa réputation de façon à ce qu'elle ne soit pas compromise par un projet de loi d'origine parlementaire. Il y a certains aspects fondamentaux de ce processus qui doivent être modifiés parce que celui-ci est peut-être trop strict sur la façon dont nous devons trier ces projets de loi, et décider de ceux qui seront renvoyés à la Chambre et de ceux qui ne le seront pas.

La norme a été fixée à un certain niveau. Il est possible que cette norme — et je sais que cela va vous paraître terrible d'entendre cela — devrait être abaissée au point où nous devons accorder un respect absolu au député qui souhaite présenter une loi pour ce pays.

M. Christopherson, je suis tout à fait d'accord avec vous, mais le monsieur qui est ici a présenté un excellent argument au sujet du système actuel. Je suis obligé de le respecter, mais à l'avenir, je l'examinerai de plus près et je dirai que nous sommes peut-être un peu trop stricts sur la façon dont... Nous empêchons un député de faire librement son travail, non pas en tant que membre d'un parti, non pas en tant que dirigeant, mais en tant que député qui possède des droits et des privilèges.

Je vais en rester là. Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Rien n'empêche le Comité de mieux définir ces critères à l'avenir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si vous voulez modifier le processus maintenant, cela pourrait faire l'objet d'une discussion.

Le président:

Y a-t-il quelqu'un d'autre sur la liste?

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai été un peu trop enthousiaste il y a un moment lorsque j'ai parlé de la règle Simms si bien nommée, que j'ai invoquée unilatéralement et dont j'ai élargi la portée; je m'en excuse auprès de M. Bittle. Mon commentaire s'adressait en fait à M. Bittle. Si mon intervention a pu être interprétée comme si j'étais intentionnellement irrespectueux, alors je dis que ce n'était pas mon intention et que j'apprécie ses interventions.

Enfin, j'ai passé pas mal de temps à vivre à proximité de la circonscription de M. Graham dans Saint-Jérôme — sa circonscription est tellement vaste qu'il n'y a pas beaucoup de secteurs qui n'en font pas partie — je crois que nous ne sommes pas d'accord sur ce point, mais j'apprécie la sincérité de ses sentiments.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Pour revenir à cette dernière remarque, j'ai beaucoup aimé le débat stimulant et respectueux que nous venons d'avoir. Ce sont des questions complexes qui sont finalement des questions de jugement. En fin de compte, il faut que vous soyez suffisamment confortable avec votre décision pour pouvoir retourner dans votre circonscription et savoir que vous avez pris la bonne décision, à votre avis.

C'est le genre de choses qui va beaucoup me manquer. Lorsque les gens me demandent ce qui va me manquer dans la politique, c'est exactement cela. Les choses qui importent vraiment, qui sont débattues par des personnes intelligentes et sensibles qui essaient de faire de leur mieux et aussi de prouver qu'il existe d'autres façons de résoudre des différends sur ces grandes questions sans utiliser la violence, ce qui ne les empêche pas de présenter les arguments importants sur des questions importantes.

J'aimerais simplement vous redire que je respecte énormément les gens qui sont ici et que j'ai beaucoup aimé le débat. Je l'ai trouvé stimulant. Monsieur le président, nous ne vous accordons pas suffisamment de crédit, parce que vous avez une façon très discrète de faire les choses, qui est cependant incroyablement efficace. C'est vous qui donnez le ton à nos débats et cela vient du fait que vous respectez vraiment tous les membres assis à cette table ainsi que l'institution que nous servons. Je tiens à remercier tout le monde. J'ai aimé le processus, quelle que puisse en être l'issue. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons un grand pays, le meilleur pays au monde.

(1240)

Le président:

Merci, David. Vous avez fait une excellente remarque. Je l'apprécie.

M. David Christopherson:

Passons maintenant à un vote par appel nominal, parce que nous n'avons pas encore quitté la politique.

Le président:

Un vote par appel nominal a été demandé.

(La motion est adoptée par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président:

La décision du Sous-comité est confirmée.

Nous allons suspendre la séance une minute pour siéger ensuite à huis clos.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on December 04, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.