header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-23 TRAN 115

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(0845)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I am calling to order the meeting of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities.

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) we are doing a study assessing the impact of aircraft noise in the vicinity of major Canadian airports.

This morning, in our first portion of the meeting, we have Colin Novak, associate professor, University of Windsor. From the Community Alliance for Air Safety, we have Mark Kuess, director; and Al Kaminskas, public relations. From the Mississauga Board of Trade, we have David Wojcik, president and chief executive officer.

Thank you all very much for being here this morning.

Mr. Novak.

Dr. Colin Novak (Associate Professor, University of Windsor, As an Individual):

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. My name is Colin Novak. I'm an associate professor at the University of Windsor, specializing in acoustics, environmental noise and psychoacoustics. I'm also a principal with the firm of Akoustic Engineering, and a licensed professional engineer with 25 years of practical experience in the field of noise engineering.

In my capacity as a professor, I am the principal investigator for a three-year collaborative research project on the mitigation of aircraft noise annoyance, and the related community impacts through the development of targeted annoyance metrics. This research is equally funded by the Greater Toronto Airports Authority and Mitacs, a federal funding agency. You'll learn more about this research in the next session from my Ph.D. student, Julia Jovanovic.

As a practising engineer, my experience working with airports and aircraft noises is comprehensive, having worked with Toronto's Pearson airport, Montreal's Pierre Elliott Trudeau airport, Calgary's international airport, and Toronto's Billy Bishop airport. I've also been engaged by Nav Canada in the past to perform environmental noise impact studies on communities affected by flight path changes in the Toronto area.

Last, I'm a technical adviser for Toronto Pearson's Community Environment and Noise Advisory Committee, or CENAC. In this capacity, I provide technical answers and advice to the committee on issues of noise and deliver educational seminars to the committee and public groups.

An important tool to monitor, understand and manage community noise impacts are the airport's noise monitoring terminals. Toronto Pearson airport has 25 noise monitoring terminals. In addition to measuring the noise levels from above aircraft, the measured and archived noise data is associated to specific aircraft and their operation. The real-time noise levels are also shared with the public through the airport's WebTrak web page. This information sharing has been shown across many industries to be an effective community engagement tool and can increase an operator's environmental capacity.

The data has the potential to be used in several ways, including: as a method to monitor impacts during special cases, for example, runway construction or maintenance; as a research tool, as in the university's investigation of social impacts from aircraft noise; as a means of comparing effectiveness of noise mitigation initiatives or impacts of procedural changes; and for community relations, urban planning and public education.

The point that I am trying to make is that airports have and use tools which go beyond the simple measuring and reporting of sound levels. The key is to understand how to interpret the data, and effectively use it in a meaningful way to manage impacts.

I'm sure many of you are aware of the recently released World Health Organization study on environmental noise guidelines for the European region. From both my practical and academic experience, I recognize and support the initiatives that this report has undertaken. The report has clearly identified the problem from not only a European perspective but also a global one. Most importantly, it has identified the potential impacts from airport noise, particularly with respect to health. At the same time, I question the strength and validity of some of the conclusions, and certainly the recommendations.

The report acknowledges that many of the conclusions are weakly supported by the current state of science. Similarly, the recommendations are vague, impractical, and not strongly supported by the research. The report also clearly missed identifying the most significant intermediate between the generation of noise, and the resulting potential health impacts, and that is the annoyance.

It is very clear to me that more understanding of annoyance due to aircraft operation is required. The most important take away from the report is that more research is needed. Studies relevant to Canada, our people, our culture, and our economics are needed.

In closing, looking back as far as the 1960s, the aircraft industry and the airports, through their operations, have done an effective job at mitigating aircraft noise. This has partly been done through improved engine and airframe designs. The Airbus A320 retrofit is an example.

Noise mitigation has also been done through careful in-air operations. Air traffic is strategically managed with safety being paramount, but noise mitigation is also given high importance. However, these efforts are at a point of diminishing returns, with little more noise attenuation expected.

(0850)



Moving forward, it is paramount that aircraft noise expectations and mechanisms for annoyance impacts and resulting health outcomes be more thoroughly studied and understood through good, relevant and properly funded research initiatives.

I thank you for listening. I welcome your questions later.

The Chair:

Okay.

We'll now go to the Community Alliance for Air Safety.

Mark, perhaps you would like to lead off.

Mr. Mark Kuess (Director, Community Alliance for Air Safety):

Thank you.

Madam Chair, distinguished committee, we're honoured to be invited by the chair of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities to appear before your committee today as a representative of the Community Alliance for Air Safety.

The Community Alliance for Air Safety represents more than 40 communities and more than 45,000 people. Our focus is to ensure the safe operations and responsible growth of Toronto's Pearson International Airport and other airports across Canada.

Since our formation about a year ago, we've engaged with most of the operational stakeholders, including pilots, airport unions, industry experts, the airlines, the GTAA and Nav Canada. In the past year we've also engaged with several key government stakeholders including the GTA caucus, Transport Canada and the Transportation Safety Board of Canada. After more than a year of effort, we are encouraged that Transport Canada has recently accepted our invitation to engage in a collaborative discussion on the concerns of the communities that we represent.

We completed our first face-to-face discussion with Transport Canada a few weeks ago and raised three areas of concern. We believe this summary highlights the core of our concerns and we're going to use these as the basis of our introduction today.

The first one is that Transport Canada has been challenged to do more with less in the last 15 to 20 years as a result of available funding. We ask Transport Canada how they're going to bridge this gap between their budget constraints and the objective oversight of the airports across Canada.

The second one, further to the point above, is that Transport Canada has now started to move the responsibility of operational compliance to their operators. This trend is called self-regulation. This is concerning as CAAS is not sure how clear, objective oversight can be achieved when the operator such as the airport, the airlines and Nav Canada are checking themselves. Recent press has highlighted the issue and has included statistics about the lack of effectiveness of this self-regulation model.

The third one is the transparency of Transport Canada's approval process and oversight. We have a few examples. CAAS has requested regular public disclosure of data regarding enforcement of penalties and rule violations. We've received some limited data but we still believe there are significant gaps with the violations that are happening today and what's being enforced. There continues to be no commitment from Transport Canada to publish and discuss this data on a regular basis in a public forum.

We have a few other examples that we've shared in the transcript.

A key point is that the significant growth is concerning us on a number of fronts. At today's volume, the airport experiences a significant number of safety issues annually. As previously stated, the self-regulation model is simply not effective in creating meaningful accountability to ensure these safety issues are reported and resolved.

Second, the current footprint of the GTAA is landlocked on all four sides, which means the growth in traffic is limited to the same size airport. There is simply no physical room to grow.

Third, Transport Canada stated in 1990 that the GTAA is at capacity. The operational density at the airport is at an all-time high. CAAS's view is that if the GTAA continues to grow as quickly as possible to 90 million passengers, we will have planes landing every 15 seconds. This will introduce a significant level of higher risk operationally. We believe that has not been appropriately evaluated. It's definitely not been addressed with the public. We've raised this issue on many occasions. Transport Canada is the only organization in Canada that has full responsibility and full authority to ensure that these critical issues are acknowledged.

In summary, we're honoured that CAAS has been invited to share these concerns with the committee. CAAS is committed to continuing regular discussions with all stakeholders to ensure that the safety and well-being of all those who work and live in close proximity to any airport in Canada are respected. In the end, we're here to ensure that all key stakeholders keep safety top of mind when all decisions are being made regarding the past or future Canadian transport policies or procedures.

We hope we can add to this discussion. We welcome any questions.

(0855)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Wojcik.

Mr. David Wojcik (President and Chief Executive Officer, Mississauga Board of Trade):

Madam Chair and members of the committee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you to discuss this critical economic issue that is impacting international airports across Canada, in particular, Toronto Pearson International Airport, which is Canada's busiest airport and the fifth most connected airport on the planet.

Being a good neighbour is of paramount importance, and airports in general are sensitive to this. No other airport in Canada does more to accomplish and accommodate this good neighbour policy than Toronto Pearson. A major economic component to globalization is Canada's position on that stage, and it's dependent on our ability to move goods and people on a 24-7 basis.

Although technology has vastly improved the ability for people to connect virtually, humans still prefer to do business face to face. Technology has not created a way to move goods across continents. At times, human life hangs in the balance while waiting for organs and tissue. Our Prime Minister, the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development and the Minister of International Trade continually talk about Canada on the international stage, about the importance of Canada to be recognized globally and about how we must adapt to globalization.

A critical factor in competing at this level lies within our airports. In order for a package to arrive on time on another continent depends on the originating departure time. This means leaving Canada during these sensitive nighttime hours. For a tissue sample or an organ to arrive in Canada on time to save a human life, it means having to arrive at an airport during these sensitive nighttime hours. In order for global trade and deals to take place, business travellers must depart or arrive in Canada during these sensitive nighttime hours. In order for Toronto Pearson in particular to remain a Canadian gateway and a global connector, we must examine and expand these sensitive nighttime hours.

Night hours represent 25% of the production time at airports. No economic model would ever suggest shutting down supply and production when demand is present. Lost economic activity during these periods is estimated to be $6 billion per year, and this does not include the lost employment income. If our federal government is serious about Canada competing on an international basis, we must rethink our airport night hours strategy and give consideration to the economic impediment this restriction creates.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you all very much.

Mr. Liepert, you have six minutes.

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC):

Thank you, gentlemen, for being here. I suspect that the folks representing Community Alliance for Air Safety in Mississauga will be the focus of a number of questions because we have a number of members here from central Canada.

Mr. Novak, I'd like to ask you a couple of questions.

I represent a Calgary riding. In good traffic, I'm at least half an hour's drive from the airport. After they put in a new runway in Calgary, which I think you're probably familiar with, I am now getting complaints about air noise half an hour away from the airport because I guess they changed the flight path to come now over my area.

I guess it's one of these things where we're victims of our own success. If we want to be an international trading country, if we want to have three flights per day, increasing to five flights per day, from Calgary to Palm Springs as my city now does—and they're all full. Again, we're victims of our own success.

Would you concur with that? At the same time, in spite of that, are there solutions that you could propose that might alleviate some of the concerns of constituents? I would like you to comment on the presentation from the Community Alliance for Air Safety, which mentioned that there was a gap in Transport Canada funding. Is this a funding issue? Could you make some comments on those observations?

(0900)

Dr. Colin Novak:

Absolutely. There's a lot there.

I think your first question was whether I concur with your observations. Absolutely. What you're describing isn't unique to Calgary. It's what we're seeing at most major airports, especially the airports that are near urban centres. Also, some of the comments are very common to airports that have experienced flight path changes. Toronto Pearson also went through the same thing in 2012, and a lot of the discussions and community concerns are still tied to those flight path changes.

There are solutions. Some are better than others. Some solutions deal with how the aircraft are handled and how they are put on approach. In other words, they deal with the airspace design. Pearson is looking at some changes despite the fact that they did an airspace redesign in 2012. An example that is possible at some airports is continuous descent, where the aircraft would start descending well before they're even near the airport. In doing so, it's almost like a glide down to the airport. They don't have to use flaps which create a lot of noise. They don't have to adjust their position by adding thrust, etc., which also creates a lot of noise. However, this technique isn't possible at all airports. It depends on where the traffic is coming from and which way the runways are oriented.

One of the things that we're advocating, as part of the challenge, is that we have to deal with it at the receiver as well. There are a lot of questions and studies being done, particularly in Europe, in terms of the health effects from this noise. Let me be clear that when I say “the health effects”, it's not the noise itself that's causing you to have high blood pressure or cardiovascular effects; it's the annoyance and the tension associated with being exposed to this aircraft noise. That's why it differs so much from person to person, where you—

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Could I get you to comment on transportation funding?

Then I have a quick question I'd like to sneak in before my time expires. In fact, I'll ask it now, and then you can answer at the same time.

I was at an event last night and I was talking to a retired air traffic controller. He maintained that one of the benefits of some of these changed flight paths is a reduction in emissions. Can you comment on that?

(0905)

Dr. Colin Novak:

That's true. That is one of the mandates they looked at when doing the airspace changes. It's because the aircraft don't have to be put in a holding pattern for as long as they used to be, and they can be taken right from their flight and brought down to a descent quicker, and they're not circling around the airport. Those result in reductions of—

Mr. Ron Liepert:

What about transportation funding?

Dr. Colin Novak:

Transportation funding, as well. Yes, I think with many government agencies they experience the same problem. For example, the models that we use are mandated by Transport Canada. They haven't looked at them or revised them since the 1970s. We're really one of the only countries in the world that are still using NEF contours as a planning tool, and I think that's due to a lack of funding to Transport Canada to do the appropriate research. That's just one example.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Novak.

We're moving to Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I want to thank the witnesses for being here this morning.

Mr. Novak, in this room, you're the noise professional. To give me and my colleagues a better idea of how to manage noise, can you shed light on the different airport noise measurements that currently exist around the world? What measurement best establishes the sound environment perceived by the human ear? [English]

Dr. Colin Novak:

Many different metrics are used by airports, and it changes from country to country. For example, the European region uses something different from what we use in Canada, and what we use in Canada is different from what is used in the U.S.

A lot of the metrics are average-based noise metrics, where they'll measure the sound over an extended period of time and give you an average.

For example, in the U.S., they use something called Ldn, or in some states, like California, Lden. They take the daytime noise over the entire day, and the nighttime noise over that 8-hour period. They add a 10 decibel penalty, then come up with this one single-value number to represent that entire 24 hours.

In my opinion, it's not an appropriate metric to use for impacts that are cyclic, where we have an aircraft flying in anywhere from every 90 seconds to several minutes. It is that frequency of the aircraft, the coming and the going, as well as, if you think about nighttime noise, the Lmax levels. It's not that eight-hour average over the nighttime that's waking you up; it's the maximum levels, the high-impact sounds.

Europe does do a better job, for the most part, than what we do here in Canada.

To answer your other question, yes, certainly there are better metrics out there. With respect to human perception and how we hear sounds, there's another factor that really isn't being taken into account in evaluating aircraft noise, but it is being used in other industries, and that's the human impact of the sound.

A typical metric would be a loudness metric, where it takes not only the sound pressure level, but also includes other factors that affect the quality of the sound, like the frequency, whether it has modulation or is sporadic. All of these have significant impacts on the impression of the sound we hear.

In other words, with psychoacoustics, it's not necessarily how loud or how quiet the sound is, but also how good or bad the sound appears to the human. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

What type of measuring device is best suited to assess the noise? Are we using the right model in Canada? What could Canada do better in comparison with other countries?

(0910)

[English]

Dr. Colin Novak:

Airports use noise monitoring terminals to assess the sound. On the hardware side, I know what is used in Calgary, Montreal and Toronto is a Brüel & Kjær type 2250. Brüel & Kjær is a Danish company. They are the world's oldest manufacturer of sound measuring equipment, going back to 1942.

The equipment these airports use is installed at 80% of the major airports in the entire world. These are type 1 sound level meters. Sound level meters are type 0, 1, 2 or 3. Type 0 is used as a reference in a laboratory to calibrate other instrumentation, and type 1 would be the next level. From a practical perspective, type 1 is the most accurate of all of the equipment used. This data is then sent in real time to servers in Australia via 3G communications.

It's just measuring the data. They're measuring it in terms of the best quality of the signal itself. Next though, the key is what you use that data for. Is it just put there on a server where it's archived or do the airports actively take that data, use it to respond to complaints and monitor infractions, etc.?

I believe that a lot of airports, while they're measuring very good-quality data, are doing very little effectively with the data.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we will go to Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I want to thank all the witnesses for being here this morning. It's a pleasure to hear from them.

We're here to discuss an issue that affects the comfort zone of communities located near airports and the airports themselves. We're not talking about banning air traffic, although we could discuss night departures at greater length, and we'll certainly do so.

Mr. Kuess, I want to start with you.

Your opening remarks didn't surprise me. However, once again, I'm disappointed with the situation. You seem to be saying that, once again, in this area as in many other areas, Transport Canada has been neglecting its responsibilities in order to move toward self-regulation. As we've seen in other areas of transportation, this rarely produces the desired results.

Can you briefly describe how you deal with airport authorities when you try to resolve the issues caused by airport noise for surrounding communities? [English]

Mr. Mark Kuess:

We've been at this for about 16 months. Sixteen months before that, we weren't too informed about how the process works. We've learned a lot on how things go.

What we understand is that the Greater Toronto Airports Authority is responsible for operations on the ground, parking the planes and moving them around. Once they get to a runway, they become the responsibility of Nav Canada. Nav Canada controls the runways and the airspace.

They are two private companies. They used to have connections to the government, but now they operate completely independently. Then you have Transport Canada, which we called, the last time we talked to them, the police in this process. They enforce the rules. You also have the Transportation Safety Board of Canada, which does the investigations.

That's the way it's structured here in Canada. It has worked quite well for many years.

In terms of the challenge, this is industry experts coming to us. We don't go and ask for the questions; it's amazing how many people come to us. They say the funding challenges are there. Transport Canada has difficulties doing what they've done in the past, and we have incredible growth. The GTAA talked about a 2% growth of their passenger volume on an annual basis. They're somewhere between 7% and 9%. Business is really good. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Did you know that a number of countries—France is an excellent example—have established an airport noise pollution control authority? The group is responsible for hearing complaints, conducting investigations and imposing penalties for non-compliance with the regulations. Could this type of model be imported to Canada? [English]

Mr. Mark Kuess:

That's an excellent point. Countries such as the U.K. and Germany have done a phenomenal job and we've raised this issue on several occasions.

If you think about industry best practices, airports such as Frankfurt have done a lot of operational changes that have made the local communities happy. They've made a safer environment and the business is growing quite well. We know that in the U.K. and Germany they're doing great things to progress. These best practices have been talked about with the GTAA, but they have not been implemented. There is a better way to do things.

We can grow. We can have strong economic growth here in Canada. We can have international travel. We can still do it and keep people safe and local communities happy. For sure, it can be done.

(0915)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Mr. Novak, I now have questions for you.

At the start of your presentation, you said that you had participated in a three-year project on the mitigation of noise. Have the project results been released to the public? If so, can the committee obtain a copy of the work? [English]

Dr. Colin Novak:

Actually, the research has just begun this year. The study started in May.

Throughout the three years, we have several deliverables. The first one will be potentially released for public viewing at the end of this year. That's a very comprehensive literature review of what the problems are throughout the world and what is being done both from a technical perspective as well as from a health perspective. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

At the end of your presentation, you said that we need the mandate to set our expectations for the future. Have you set these expectations on your end? Can you suggest any guidelines? [English]

Dr. Colin Novak:

There's still a lot to learn. We feel that the crux of the problem, though, is that we have noise and that noise isn't going away. We have people who are being impacted negatively by this noise, but as we said, the intermediate is the annoyance associated with this. That's where we need to have a better understanding. It's the annoyance from the aircraft and the expectations that people have of the noise that are generating the complaints and some of the health impacts.

Statistically, when you look at the number of people actually impacted through annoyance, it's not nearly as high as we think. However, they're also a very vocal group with a very valid concern. This is the approach that we need to take, to tie in the subjective with the real physical aspects of the noise that's being generated.

We should look to Australia and some of the things they're doing, because this is a more holistic approach that has been very effective so far, even though it's also in the early stages.

The Chair:

We'll go to Mr. Hardie. Maybe you can try to get your comments in during Mr. Hardie's time.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair, and thanks to all of you for being here.

We'll start with you, Mr. Novak, but with just a brief answer if you could, please, because I have a question for a couple of others.

Is the source of most of the complaints the area around the airport where you have the takeoffs, landings and taxiing happening or is it the flyover?

Dr. Colin Novak:

It's mostly the flyover on the approach as well as the takeoff, but more so on the approach, because it's a longer line of aircraft that are coming in. In my experience, we're talking about 40 or 50 kilometres away from the airport.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Mr. Kuess, you said something quite revealing, which was that Pearson airport is surrounded. I guess this sort of bridges over to Mr. Wojcik as well. Municipal planning certainly has a role to play here. If the City of Toronto or the surrounding cities have allowed development to basically encircle the airport, that's a guarantee there's going to be conflict between people on the ground and aircraft flying over.

Given the economic importance of this, and perhaps given that if we see this growth continuing.... As you said, Mr. Wojcik, there's going to be a lot more by way of cargo, etc. Do we have to start thinking about new cargo-only facilities that are placed well away from residential areas and about putting a deal in place to prevent towns and municipalities from growing up around these facilities?

(0920)

Mr. Mark Kuess:

I'd love to answer that question. I think that's a tremendous idea. We've really focused it at CAAS not to make the recommendations, but to reveal the challenges and then work with the appropriate stakeholders to find the solutions. We're definitely trying to land on a postage stamp with a big envelope. It's a big problem.

In 1990 Transport Canada stated that the airport was at full capacity. The airport was originally designed as a regional airport, so there are problems with landing the aircraft in how the runways are aligned. Every other major new airport in North America is designed east-west, because that's the way the wind flows.

We have a legacy airport with a legacy footprint. It's one of the smallest footprints in all of North America. We have a lot of industrial land beside the airport, but we also have a lot of residential land, and you're not going to move that. There has to be something else. Cargo moving to another location sounds like a great idea.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

The better part of a month ago now, we were out studying trade corridors. It was interesting to see that, again, municipal development is allowing people to build new townhomes next to industrial areas. In fact, they're gobbling up industrial land to do it. It just seems to be counterproductive, both for quality of life on site as well as the economic vitality of the region.

Mr. Wojcik, on your comments on this, as we become a little more concerned about the effect of air travel on climate change, could we not see a gradual shift away from as much passenger travel but a maintaining of the importance of moving cargo, especially special cargos like the ones you mentioned?

Mr. David Wojcik:

There is a tremendous amount of cargo that gets moved with passenger planes today. Separating out that cargo is possible, but it may be problematic if you were to start splitting that cargo into two different airports. I agree with Mark that looking at moving cargo to other airports, other regional airports or other areas is certainly a solution well worth examining.

Today, of course, the economic hub is in southern Ontario. The economic hub centres around the city of Toronto. You can look at the number of companies that have located around the airport, and the number of freight forwarders and transport truck companies that have located around the airport. It certainly would be a long-term strategy to assist them to move to other areas in order to accommodate that request.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I'll set up the question that I'll ask the next panel to get them thinking about it in the meantime.

My dog can hear me lift the lid off his treat jar from half a block away. My kids can smell fresh twenties in my wallet. I think some people are perhaps more tuned to be sensitive to this, so we need to look at that and some of the dynamics there, but perhaps we can also have a discussion about home design and noise suppression. We have noise-cancelling headphones such that even on an aircraft it's very quiet.

Perhaps there's more to this discussion and there are more options if we start to drill a bit deeper. I'll save those questions for the next panel.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

My first question is for Mr. Novak.

Clearly, there is an effect on the quality of life due to the noise from airports. Can you describe to what degree?

Dr. Colin Novak:

As was suggested in the previous question that was posed, it varies from person to person. It also varies with lifestyle and expectations.

I think one of the potentials that can affect us more than anything else is deprivation of sleep at night from high-level incidences, although this does not reflect the overall time average. I've also heard concerns from people such as stay-at-home mothers who are playing with their children outside.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Let me jump in there as I have a limited amount of time.

Perhaps you could describe how this affects the cognitive development of children.

Dr. Colin Novak:

There have been studies done in Europe where they looked at the levels of noise exposure and the effect on children learning to read. It was found that every 10 decibel increase in the noise level they were exposed to slowed down the learning process by, I believe, six months. There definitely is evidence of impacts on children learning when they are exposed to high levels of noise.

(0925)

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

David, welcome. You know better than I do that Mississauga's expansion was mainly a result of its appeal to big business. We are a product of that. It's good that we want to increase our business, and productivity is great, but a problem with that now is that there's a lot of noise. I have people calling in like Gale Santos, who's a frequent flyer and has been there forever and is now seeing the traffic increase.

How do we reconcile the need to grow productivity with the need to keep the quality of life we used to have?

Mr. David Wojcik:

I don't know if you knew this, Gagan, but I was a 20-year resident in Meadowvale, right where you serve as an MP. While some people may disagree, it hasn't affected my mental capacity.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Maybe we should take a vote on it.

Mr. David Wojcik:

Please, Madam Chair, I'd be afraid of the outcome.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Wojcik: That's absolutely right; we have encouraged companies to locate in the area. We have built a strong economy in that area based on an airport. The airport didn't just pop up over the last couple of years. The airport has been there for a long, long time. While I'm not suggesting we shouldn't be sensitive to this, it is a fact that if you are going to locate close to an airport, you're probably going to have to experience a little bit of noise.

I was on a flight path and I would sit in my backyard and I swear I could count the tire treads on some of the big jumbo jets flying overhead. Again, Madam Chair, in reference to my mental capacity, maybe I just got used to it.

I agree we have to be sensitive to it, but we also have to realize that we cannot stand in the way of progress. We cannot limit this economic hub that resides around the Mississauga international airport, as I like to refer to it.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

I definitely know you're a sharp tool in the shed.

What lessons could we learn if we were to expand and have another airport in the GTA, maybe out towards Pickering? What lessons could be learned from our example to help mitigate the noise versus the expansion and need for productivity?

Mr. David Wojcik:

That's an excellent question.

I think we also have to couple that experience with what we experienced at Mirabel. When you build an airport so far away from another major international airport and try to separate passengers, it becomes problematic. Certainly, I concur with my fellow panellists that there needs to be an adequate amount of space around an airport. Where would you build another one? If it's Pickering, that's built out now as well, so you're going to have to go well north of Pickering in order to look at that solution. You also have to take into consideration the problems that happened at Mirabel, which is now virtually a white elephant airport sitting out in the middle of nowhere.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Last, could you comment on the number of jobs associated with more nighttime flights, since you have the operators and people in the airport?

Mr. David Wojcik:

We know that the area around the GTA supports in excess of 130,000 jobs. Just at the airport, there are 44,000 jobs. Mississauga, Brampton and all of Toronto have benefited from that as well. The economic impact of the airport being where it is has certainly benefited all of the communities around the airport.

The airport is not a big, bad economic machine that doesn't care about the community. It does a lot for the community, including—

(0930)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Wojcik. I have to go to Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I want to thank all of the witnesses for joining us here today.

As my colleague who kicked it off has said, I think this conversation has highlighted the tension between competing values. When it comes to finding solutions, it's not as easy as we might think.

Mr. Novak, you made the observation that Europe does a much better job than we do here in Canada. You also suggested that we need to take a look at what is happening in Australia.

Mr. Kuess, you mentioned that there are some best practices out there that need to be looked at.

I need you to describe what some of those are. What are the first things that we should be looking at, in terms of what's happening in Europe? Canada has a much smaller population than Europe, so if Europe has found a way to manage this issue, we would benefit from knowing what Europe is doing and what some of those best practices are.

Dr. Colin Novak:

Was that question for me?

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Either of you could answer.

Mr. Mark Kuess:

I'd love to comment.

Frankfurt is an excellent example. If you compare Frankfurt airport to the greater Toronto airport, they're similar. When they were going through some changes about how they were going to flow traffic into the airport, they did a lot of studies and reports. They were studies and reports that we had actually done in the past. There's a lot of data out there. They were able to achieve zero night flights. They shut it down. The airport has grown. From the management of Frankfurt airport at the time, the testament was that this was going to tank the airport, that they were going to lose their business and profitability, and that it was not going to be a viable airport. It has actually grown.

In addition, there are other examples. Atlanta is a great example. Denver, Colorado has a great example of a well-planned airport.

To the gentleman who was speaking earlier about Pickering, they did do the impact studies. Excellent planning was done for the Pickering airport. They did their homework and Transport Canada was very involved. We need to utilize that information. It's there. We just have to use it.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

Mr. Mark Kuess:

You're most welcome.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Mr. Novak, do you have anything to add?

Dr. Colin Novak:

With respect to Europe, what I think they're doing very well is the studies they're conducting to learn more about the problem. When Frankfurt put the moratorium on nighttime flights, the research showed it was not effective from a health perspective. While it did lessen the number of sleep awakenings, the surveys of people within the community showed that the level of annoyance had not changed since the departure of nighttime flights.

What I think they're doing very well in Australia is information sharing, equal engagement between the community and the airports, and the sharing of information much more freely, to the point where the public can go to the airports and ask for specific information or types of information. There are systems in place that allow the airport to facilitate those requests.

(0935)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

I have lived under a flight path for over a decade. My husband has lived there all his life. We purchased his family home and now I've moved and I listen to train whistles. Again, therein lies the tension of what my colleague has raised in terms of municipal planning.

When we talk about moving, building an airport in a more remote area from a community, Mr. Wojcik, I would be interested in hearing what your thoughts are from a business perspective in terms of the impact of that on the business community. While we can perhaps have cargo flown in much farther away from a community, you're then going to have to load it on to trucks, which then fill our roadways. Perhaps we aren't dealing with the emissions in the way we thought we would be by doing that. I'd like to hear from you what the impact of some of those solutions would be on the business community.

Mr. David Wojcik:

Certainly, the impact on the business community would be far-reaching. While I recognize that it is a potential solution, it needs to form part of a much longer-term strategy for urban planners to recognize. While we could move those transportation hubs out into unpopulated areas, we get into the areas of environmental impact into those sensitive areas, which does tend to hold up the progress of moving businesses out there. There is the cost of moving businesses out there and, quite rightfully so, how would we get the goods from where they are to where they need to be? Is that through rail? Is that through some other technology that is being studied now that is more environmentally friendly? Those are all considerations. It's not a short-term solution.

The Chair:

I believe Mr. Badawey is sharing his time with Borys. You'll notice I said Borys.

Please go ahead.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Wojcik, you referred to night hours as being sensitive. Why is that so?

Mr. David Wojcik:

I think it's sensitive from the respect that these are hours that everyone believes should be quiet. I refer to them as sensitive because they're hours that are traditionally held to be quiet.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Perhaps I can help you with that.

When I was doorknocking, one of the more poignant moments was in the late morning when a mother came to the door. She had a crying baby. She looked ragged and I said that it obviously was not a good time. She said, “No, I want to talk to you. I wasn't able to sleep all night. My baby was being woken up all night. Planes have been flying overhead all through the night.”

They are sensitive because they seriously impact on the quality of lives of those people who find themselves directly under those flight paths. It's what Mr. Novak referred to, that all of a sudden you go from quiet to this loud rumbling noise. People fall back to sleep and a few minutes later, it happens again.

You referred to good neighbour policy. There are people in places like Markland Wood, which predates the operations. It's a mature neighbourhood that predates the GTAA. People's quality of life has been severely impacted by those night flights.

How does Toronto define nighttime hours?

Mr. David Wojcik:

The nighttime flying hours are determined to be from 12:30 a.m. or 00:30 a.m. to 6:30 a.m.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

I would suggest even the definition is a problem. Frankfurt, for instance, which was referenced, has very limited flights between 10 p.m. and 11 p.m. and the night flights ban begins at 11 p.m. and ends at 5 a.m., with very limited flights allowed until 6 a.m.

Would you not agree that the definition of what nighttime, that sensitive quiet sleep time for people, should be is probably not reflective of people's sleeping habits?

Mr. David Wojcik:

I think that as we move through a more robust economy, sleeping becomes relative to what we're doing. There are people who go to bed at 8 p.m. and get up at 3 a.m. to—

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Mr. Wojcik, I beg to differ. Most of my constituents do sleep when the sun is down. Usually people go to sleep by nine or 10 o'clock.

A lot of these night flight problems began when FedEx moved their operations from the Hamilton Mountain airport, which is on the escarpment above the city of Hamilton and basically in the middle of farmland, so it's already elevated away from the city, in farmland. Pearson undercut Hamilton airport to gain that night flight business. At that point, FedEx had no problem moving their hub and all their operations.

Is that not correct?

(0940)

Mr. David Wojcik:

I don't know if there's any statistical proof that noise complaints have increased since FedEx has arrived.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

My question is: Is it not correct that the nighttime cargo operations of FedEx, which began this process, was due to Pearson, the GTAA, undercutting Hamilton to gain that business?

Mr. David Wojcik:

I don't know that undercutting is a fair term. I will acknowledge that they did end up with the cargo business.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

I think there's an obvious opportunity with Hamilton when it comes to all of those nighttime operations—not passenger flights with cargo in the hold. There are literally only five farm fields and five farmhouses in that particular area.

Mr. Kuess, thank you so much for all the work that you're doing on behalf of various communities.

What you pointed out was quite insightful. In fact, the example of Frankfurt, the seventh busiest airport in the world.... Everyone was saying it was going to be disastrous for the economy and the airport was going to go bankrupt. In fact, people still aren't happy about noise during the day, but they actually sleep restfully.

Do you have the data? Would you like to expand on how Frankfurt continues not only to be profitable but increase their profits, notwithstanding the ban on night flights?

The Chair:

Please provide a short answer.

Mr. Mark Kuess:

I would refer to their annual statement. I would also include Glasgow Airport and refer to their annual statement. You'll see that business is good. Things are growing. The business community is very happy.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much to our witnesses. You started off our study. I'm sure we'll be in touch with you as we progress.

I will suspend for a few moments while we change witnesses.

(0940)

(0945)

The Chair:

I'll call this meeting back to order.

We have Chris Isaac as well as Julia Jovanovic, Ph.D. candidate, University of Windsor.

From Terranova International Public Safety Canada, we have James Castle and Priscilla Tang.

Mr. Isaac, you have five minutes and then we'll cut you off so the committee can get to their questions and comments.

Thank you very much. [Translation]

Mr. Chris Isaac (As an Individual):

Thank you.

You know my name. It's written here. I've lived in the city of Laval for 20 years. I've lived in different areas of the city. In recent years, the noise from airplanes flying over our homes has increased. I've noticed this more since I became a consultant and I have the option of working from home. The noise is unacceptable. Laval is a suburb of Montreal. We purchase homes in Laval to live in peace and quiet, but we're not finding this in the city.

Airport management has been privatized for the next 60 years. I gather that all the companies involved, such as NAV CANADA and ADM, couldn't care less about the public.

At this time, airplanes must climb to 1,000 m before they can make a turn. That's what they do. When airplanes reach this altitude, they're 10 km from Dorval airport, so they turn directly over us. Since the airplanes are climbing, the manouevre is performed at maximum thrust. According to my noise level surveys, the noise increases to 65 decibels and sometimes reaches 80 decibels. Laval is a quiet suburb where regulations are supposed to limit noise to 55 decibels. However, the noise level is often above this standard. This prevents us from making full use of our yard in the summer. Even in the colder seasons, when the windows are closed, we still hear all the rumbling. All the accompanying sounds enter the house. I don't want to be forced to build a bunker to escape the noise. I don't see any other solutions at this point.

We had a meeting with NAV CANADA and ADM. They seemed to care on the surface. They told us that they wanted to help us and to resolve the issues. However, we received a letter containing contradictory information. As you'll see in the appendices that will be handed out to you, the number of flights, the flight altitude and the flight schedule are indicated. Some flights are also late in the evening or at night. There are more and more flights. The number of flights is increasing at a rate of 7% a year. That's a huge amount of traffic. For people who live in the suburbs, this is completely unacceptable. I feel very sorry for all the people who live in Montreal and who endure this at an even more severe level. However, that's Montreal. I don't know the solution for Montreal, but we must find solutions for Laval.

NAV CANADA isn't listening. Minister Garneau also wrote a letter that doesn't show any willingness to take action. I'm very surprised that a government has no oversight over private companies. I don't think that's true. I think that the government has oversight over everything happening in communities and in the country. In the appendices, you'll also find the letter from Mr. Garneau and other statistics. Whenever the winds come from the northeast or east, airplanes take off and fly over our area. Laval isn't part of Montreal. Laval doesn't benefit in any way from the economic impact of the airport.

I heard another witness talk about Mirabel and call it a white elephant. That's all well and good, but I used to use the airport back in the day, and it worked well. The decision to move flights from Mirabel to Dorval to be closer to Montreal was a business decision.

I want to thank the committee for working to ensure that citizens are respected. I hope that this will lead somewhere.

(0950)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to Mr. Castle or Ms. Tang, whoever wants to make the presentation.

Mr. James Castle (President, Terranova International Public Safety Canada (Terranova Aerospace)):

Ms. Tang will be doing it.

Ms. Priscilla Tang (Senior Vice-President, Terranova International Public Safety Canada (Terranova Aerospace)):

Thank you, and good morning, Chair and members of the committee.

My name is Priscilla Tang, and I am senior vice-president of Terranova Aerospace. Allow me to introduce to you James Castle, president of Terranova Aerospace.

Thank you for conducting the study on assessing the impact of aircraft noise in the vicinity of major Canadian airports. Thank you for the opportunity to present to you our witness statement. You have asked us to speak to this topic and any relevant issues of importance.

Improving flight safety in Canada is of national importance. Improving flight safety, as it pertains to all aircraft, remotely piloted aircraft systems, unmanned aerial vehicles and unmanned aircraft systems commonly known as drones, is of national and international importance. Canada is well positioned to lead in drone industry innovation, economic development and use for public safety.

Drones can be used to save lives. At Terranova Aerospace, we are driven by our purpose to save lives. Everything we do is in alignment with the mandates of Public Safety Canada and designed to strengthen the Canadian infrastructure for emergency management. The drones we use, called the Silent Falcon unmanned aircraft system, are fixed-wing aircraft that span four metres across and fly up to 20,000 feet. They can be used in emergency search and rescue to locate missing persons in weather or terrain conditions such as avalanches, natural disasters and forest fires, which are otherwise not safely accessible by human-piloted helicopters and civil aircraft.

In the United States, our unmanned aerial vehicles are currently being used to help the U.S. government in wild-land fire operations, search and rescue, emergency management, land management and wildlife management.

Drones can assist in the recovery of human remains. When integrated with infrared detection technology and artificial intelligence, drones could pinpoint the location of human remains in Canada's ocean war graves.

Drones are seeing unprecedented levels of global innovation and accessibility. Today, anyone can purchase a drone at their local electronics retailer or online, and suddenly our airspace has become accessible to the common citizen and not just to pilots.

We at Terranova Aerospace are currently developing a scalable data solution similar to that of Google Maps or Waze, which integrates artificial intelligence, blockchain and big data to chart the Canadian airspace for the common user. In the same way drivers can open up an app on their smart phone and get directions, traffic and safety information on reaching their destination, we plan to build the same publicly accessible capabilities for common users of our airspace.

Finally, drones make up an inevitable economic development opportunity for Canada. With the right regulations in place to ensure that all aircraft, unmanned or not, are tracked and operating safely, Canada could become a world leader in industry development and benefit from its economic prosperity.

Work with us, Terranova Aerospace, and we can be your partner in developing and maximizing the potential of this opportunity for Canada to lead in drones for public safety, innovation and economic prosperity.

Thank you, Madam Chair, for allowing us to present.

(0955)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move to Ms. Jovanovic.

Ms. Julia Jovanovic (Ph.D. Candidate, University of Windsor, As an Individual):

Good morning. My name is Julia Jovanovic, and I am part of a research team from the University of Windsor in Ontario.

My team and I are working on a collaborative project with the GTAA, analyzing the effects of aircraft noise on airport-neighbouring communities. Our main focus is aircraft noise annoyance.

Today I am here to brief the committee on the importance of studying aircraft noise annoyance nationwide, as well as to present recent findings on the topic that may inform any such efforts.

In addition, I would like to urge competent authorities to perform location-specific epidemiological studies that monitor objective health indicators for affected individuals, in order to determine with certainty the relative health risks associated with different levels of aircraft noise exposure.

Annoyance is the most common effect of community noise and is considered an adverse health effect by the World Health Organization. In recent years, it has gained much attention, as it is no longer viewed only as the most likely health outcome of environmental noise, but also as a significant modifying factor contributing to risks of other health outcomes.

Results from annoyance surveys form the basis for noise exposure thresholds, regulations and noise mitigation efforts. Thus, any initiative seeking to lessen the effects of aircraft noise on individuals must ultimately strive to reduce noise annoyance and, by way of that, mitigate other health effects, as well.

Trends are emerging in recent studies identifying that transportation noise annoyance is on the rise. More people are expressing high levels of annoyance at lower noise exposure levels than ever before. Among transportation sources, aircraft noise is perceived as the most annoying. With forecasts for continual capacity increases across major airports worldwide and a trend of increasing aircraft noise annoyance, it has never been more critical to study the issue at length in efforts to find solutions to mitigate and manage it.

Given the critical importance of annoyance, it is essential that the issue be studied at length while keeping in mind a few very important considerations. One, noise mitigation and noise annoyance mitigation are not one and the same. This is an important distinction, as there are examples of noise mitigation efforts that have not reaped the benefits of significantly reduced noise annoyance, most notably the Frankfurt nighttime ban. Two, annoyance is a complex psychological and sociological phenomenon that cannot be simply and precisely predicted nor regulated through a dosage-response relationship.

As a brief side note, a dosage-response relationship is a tool commonly used to predict annoyance. Essentially it uses a curve derived from annoyance data correlated with modelled noise exposure levels to state that, at any given noise exposure level, a certain percentage of the population will be highly annoyed. To simply explain this, it is like trying to predict how individuals nationwide will feel about the weather when you're only provided with an outdoor temperature. While temperature is a key indicator, it is not sufficient to make the assumption that people will be comfortable. Other factors are relevant, and maybe even more telling, for example, precipitation, relative humidity, location, individual preferences and so on.

Similarly, the highly subjective response of annoyance cannot be simply predicted by overall noise exposure—how loud an environment is. Other critical acoustic and non-acoustic considerations must be explored, for example, the sound quality, background noise levels, attitudes toward the noise source and/or authorities, coping capacities, individual noise sensitivity and more. It is vital that both acoustic and non-acoustic factors be considered in the study of annoyance. A thorough understanding of non-acoustic contributors to annoyance may reveal novel approaches to its mitigation.

(1000)



Finally, Canada is in need of a proper revision and verification of current noise exposure and noise annoyance metrics and thresholds, as these are not only severely outdated, but they have never been corroborated through Canadian annoyance survey results. This is a necessary step in order to ensure that existing noise abatement policy serves its purpose.

Thank you for your time, and I welcome any questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go to Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair, and I thank our witnesses for joining us today.

This is the very first meeting in which we are studying and assessing the impact of aircraft noise in the vicinity of major Canadian airports. Already we've begun to understand that this is a very complex issue and that there are no easy answers. In the last panel my colleague did a great job of highlighting the tension between competing values, often between the public at large, communities, travellers and businesses.

I do welcome the testimony you have provided.

I want to ask a question of Terranova International Public Safety Canada.

Can remotely piloted aircraft systems technology offer any solutions to aviation noise concerns?

Mr. James Castle:

Yes, absolutely. When the Silent Falcon aircraft flies a hundred feet above a populated area or any area that is regulated, it has virtually no sound. So, the aspect of avoidance of any type of aircraft noise is clearly not a.... It would not happen.

The only types of variances that you would have, as drones become more popular in Canada and people are flying them around disaster areas, forest fires and so on.... They also come off airports, and they can do a lot of damage to aircraft on the ground as well as aircraft taking off.

To return to the question, the sounds from these are virtually zero, from any distance, during takeoff, in the air and in the approach. So if these are being utilized under emergency management guidelines for providing search and rescue or any other efforts, you're not talking about an extended period of sound. RPAS can fly for five hours, and with a current agreement with DARPA, we're looking at developing them so they can stay up indefinitely.

The importance of the sound interruption is going to be a key model with what we're doing.

(1005)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Jovanovic, I appreciated your testimony. You may have answered my question in your opening remarks, but I want to frame it in a different way and perhaps give you an opportunity to expand on it.

We know that Canada's major airports across the country are situated in very diverse locations. What local factors should be taken into account when developing strategies to mitigate aviation noise?

Ms. Julia Jovanovic:

Thank you for asking the question.

As you mentioned at the beginning, it's a very complex topic. There are numerous factors that should be considered, and they're very location-specific, so it is critical that studies be executed in the locations where you seek to propose certain mitigation measures. Factors can vary between demographics—the types of housing, the type of area, the type of neighbourhood, the levels of ambient noise that you have present in the neighbourhood.

Mr. Isaac brought up the point in his opening remarks that in certain neighbourhoods, you have relatively low ambient noise, so any type of overflight would cause a significant disturbance, whereas a more dense urban environment, where ambient noise is in excess of 40 decibels, an overflight might not be perceived as a disturbance.

Any study should be location-specific. It should look at any personal or attitudinal or cultural factors that relate to that specific location. Data have shown that there is significant variance between surveys that are done in different regions.

I hope I've answered your question.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Absolutely. Thank you.

The Chair:

We're moving to Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I want to thank the witnesses for being here and for giving their presentations.

Mr. Isaac, thank you for coming from Laval. You're a citizen from my constituency.

Call you tell the committee about your experience with the noise of airplanes that fly over your home? You've already explained it to me, but can you tell the committee what you did over the summer to determine the trajectory of the airplanes?

Mr. Chris Isaac:

In summer at home, we go outside and use our swimming pool. However, if we're having a conversation and an airplanes passes by, we're forced to stop the conversation and wait until the plane is far enough away to continue talking. We hear the airplanes for the entire time that they take to pass by, and not just when they fly over the house. We hear them coming, and when they fly over the house, we really hear a roar. Since we don't want to shout at the top of our lungs to talk to each other, we stop our conversations and wait until the airplane has flown away to continue talking. All these airplanes come to make a turn near us, then head west to Toronto, Alberta, Vancouver or another location.

The noise is unacceptable, especially in a community where people care about noise. We monitor the noise that we make. For example, people who have dogs must prevent them from barking, or we don't take our sound systems outside.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

How long have you been analyzing the aircraft noise issue? How has the issue evolved?

(1010)

Mr. Chris Isaac:

I've been analyzing the issue for at least four years. The issue must have existed in past, but since I was often on the road or travelling, I didn't notice it as much. In fact, I was using airplanes. However, I could never have imaged that they would make me suffer so much.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Which types of aircraft fly over your home and how often do they do so? You've already told me that you can even determine the types of aircraft. Can you provide more details?

Mr. Chris Isaac:

The aircraft include the entire Airbus series, Boeing 737-7CTs, Bombardier CRJ700s, Embraer ERJ175 SUs and Boeing 737-436s. The companies are Air Canada, the Air Canada Star Alliance network, Air Canada Rouge, Delta Connection, GoJet, Sunwing, WestJet, and so on. All these airplanes pass over my house.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

This means that you can very easily see the airplanes that fly over your house.

Mr. Chris Isaac:

Yes, quite easily.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

How often and at what specific times of the day does this occur? Is it only during the day? Are there airplanes at night or early in the morning?

Mr. Chris Isaac:

It's at any time of day. The frequency varies. I haven't noted down all the days, but I've taken samples. This could easily occur 60 times a day, until 11:30 p.m.

There are also propeller aircraft, such as the Citation Sovereigns and Dash 8 Q300s and Q400s, which fly to Kuujjuaq, Chibougamau, Sept-Îles and the city of Quebec. They all pass very close to the houses.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

You said that you've taken samples. What exactly do you mean?

Mr. Chris Isaac:

I've provided appendices, but they aren't on your table yet. When you're able to check the appendices, you'll see that they show a great deal of information on the airplanes that fly over my house. This includes the series of airplanes, the times that the airplanes pass by and the flight numbers. We can really determine the types of aircraft.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Have you already analyzed the noise? In other words, do you have a device to measure the noise levels?

Mr. Chris Isaac:

Yes. I've taken measurements using a decibel meter. As you'll recall, the people from the Aéroports de Montréal questioned the validity of my device. However, I've used the device for events where sound must be limited to a certain number of decibels, such as during Osheaga, in Montreal. The results provided by my device were comparable to the results provided by the city's devices. If the city's devices aren't good, then I wonder which devices are good. The level reaches 65 decibels and sometimes exceeds 80 decibels.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Have you conducted a daily analysis using this device?

Mr. Chris Isaac:

I've done so a number of times.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Did you also provide this data?

Mr. Chris Isaac:

I don't know whether it's among the photos that I provided, but I have one that shows a result of almost 72 decibels.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

You— [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Iacono. We're out of time.

Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I want to thank the witnesses for being here.

Mr. Isaac, I'll continue the discussion with you.

You spoke earlier about your relationship with ADM. Are you in regular contact, or was there only one meeting, which ended in the way that you described?

Mr. Chris Isaac:

First, I sent my requests to Mr. Iacono, who is the member of Parliament for my constituency, Alfred-Pellan. We sent a letter to ADM, and we then met with representatives of ADM. People from NAV CANADA were also at the meeting. We were told that something would be done.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

However, there was no follow-up

Mr. Chris Isaac:

There were contradictory letters, as you can see in the appendices that I provided. Certain things are proposed, but further on we're told that there's no solution.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Okay.

I think that you referred to your career change, which enables you to work from home now.

Mr. Chris Isaac:

Yes.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Are you back in Laval, or were you there before?

Mr. Chris Isaac:

I was there already. I've always lived in Laval.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

You're now in a better position to actually measure the noise pollution.

(1015)

Mr. Chris Isaac:

Yes, since I spend more time at home.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Is there a difference in the neighbourhood? For example, are people selling their homes because they can't stand the noise anymore?

Mr. Chris Isaac:

It's quite ironic. Many people had already moved from Montreal to Laval as a result of the intolerable noise level in Montreal, and these people are currently considering moving away from Laval. I informed a technician friend about a house for sale near me, and he's already spoken to me about the issue. He told me that it makes no sense, especially since he has a baby. He could even give us his comments.

The situation is very annoying. As I was saying earlier, we citizens are careful to not make too much noise. So why can airlines barge in anywhere and impose all this noise on us?

Mr. Robert Aubin:

We're starting to have a good idea of the situation when we see that, for the past decade or so, Transport Canada has systematically abdicated its responsibilities in favour of the industry.

Ms. Jovanovic, I want to continue the discussion with you.

You said earlier that Canada should review the noise exposure thresholds, since its models are outdated and wouldn't be corroborated through a number of studies.

Could the first issue with the topic that we're currently studying be the lack of evidence to help us understand the situation and find solutions? [English]

Ms. Julia Jovanovic:

I strongly believe there is a lack of Canadian evidence. I've been reviewing this issue for quite some time. I find myself with a significant lack of data that can support any type of assessment of possible mitigation measures.

I was referring to our NEF contours, particularly with outdated metrics that are currently used as guidelines by Transport Canada. Our NEF contours are primarily meant as a land planning tool. Essentially, they predict the noise into the future and how it's going to impact the ground level.

The thresholds currently set forth by Transport Canada are NEF 30, as being inappropriate for noise sensitive development, and NEF 25, which needs to be treated with some acoustic insulation.

In any case, these guidelines have not been reviewed or corroborated by Canadian annoyance surveys, which are the tools used to predict how many people will be annoyed at those exposure levels. These guidelines were set in the 1970s, based on an analysis done in the U.S. for multiple transportation sources, not aircraft noise alone. Many countries across the world have undertaken efforts to review these thresholds and the metrics they use to be better equipped to predict the effects of aircraft noise on communities around air paths or airports.

If we don't have an updated version of a metric like this or guidelines like these, even the measures currently taken in land use and planning are not effective.

There's been a shift. There's an increasing trend in aircraft noise annoyance at lower levels. This is not taken into account currently.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Aubin.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Ms. Jovanovic, first I would make an audio point. You don't have to lean into your microphone. The “p-popping” hurts the ears of our translators.

Ms. Julia Jovanovic: My apologies.

Mr. Ken Hardie: Microphone technique: That was my life for a while.

An hon. member: Noise-making.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Ken Hardie: You mentioned that annoyance can contribute to other health problems. Now, I may ask some questions that will just illuminate the fact that we don't know enough right now, but is the opposite the case? Are there certain health attributes a person would have that would make them more susceptible to being annoyed by noise? What do we know about that?

Ms. Julia Jovanovic:

Thank you for asking that question. That's where my recommendation comes from for a more thorough examination of the issue of annoyance. From as far back as the 1960s, scientists and experts have been aware of contributions of personal noise sensitivity to the assessment of annoyance. There are factors, personal factors, that may impact that assessment of annoyance, whether amplified or reduced.

I'm sure within this room there is a variation in terms of how people react to, for example, the noise that keeps on interrupting us in the background. This is a very subjective metric. The co-founding factors need to be looked at in order to determine what best to do to mitigate it. Noise sensitivity has been found to be one significant co-founding factor contributing to annoyance.

(1020)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

In a past life, relating to my opening comments, I programmed radio stations. I found that men and women reacted quite differently to annoyance factors. That was something we looked at when we programmed music—the tempo, the kind of instrumentation, etc.

Again, do we have data which shows that kind of difference between men and women when it comes to reacting to noise?

Ms. Julia Jovanovic:

Most certainly, and there are variations of that data. Some surveys that were done in the 1970s indicated that there were not significant differences between men and women. However, more recent surveys, and performed in different regions, of course, show the contrary to be true: Females are more annoyed at lower levels of noise than males are. There are variations in conclusions when it comes to that as well.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Our ability to hear various sounds, especially various frequencies, changes as we age. Are there frequency outputs from aircraft engines that tend to penetrate? Are there certain frequencies emitted by aircraft that might be the source of most of the aggravation it causes?

Ms. Julia Jovanovic:

You bring up a very important point, and I thank you for that. Sound quality is critical when we're looking at aircraft noise. The dependence up until this point in terms of regulation has always been sound level—how loud the noise is—but that does not explain the variance between one individual being highly annoyed from automobile traffic at a certain level and being the same amount of annoyed for aircraft noise levels that are lower than those from automobile traffic. It's not all about loudness. It is about loudness to some extent and sound quality to another. The frequency composition of the sound is very relevant.

Typically, when you have the presence of pure tones, which is one dominant frequency, that tends to elicit a very strong reaction from a receiver, from a person. High frequencies also tend to do the same. Low frequencies penetrate the home, for example, more easily, and may be a cause of vibration.

It is something that has been suggested as an alternative route for research going forward. A European study actually took the sound profile of different jet types and asked community members to adjust certain sound quality aspects in order to get a more pleasing overall sound. It was not reduced in loudness, mind you. The composition of the sound was just different, and it had a reduction of annoyance associated with it.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

Mr. Isaac, I'd like to thank you for your testimony. You make it very apparent that this is a national issue because everything you were saying is also reiterated in my riding as well, so thank you for that.

I will start with Mr. Castle and Ms. Tang.

When I first was introduced to drones, I thought it was great because I read an article that a drone had dropped a defibrillator to somebody in a remote area. The person was actually saved and given enough time to get to a hospital.

Since then, it seems we're pretty much just limited by our imagination regarding their capabilities and how we could use them. However, as you mentioned there's also a lot of concern about how dangerous they are. I know that at Pearson, right beside the riding I represent, there were a lot of near misses due to recreational drones. Some were found on the tarmac. You can only imagine what could have happened if one had actually collided with one of the planes.

You mentioned that you're mapping airspace for individuals. I wonder how that would interact with geofencing. For example, would airports have the right to geofence a space so that nobody could use that space?

(1025)

Ms. Priscilla Tang:

Yes, that's exactly the capability that we would build into this. Part of the purpose is to demark areas that are off limits for people who are recreational pilots of drones—areas such as airports and even ocean war graves. It would enable that knowledge to be available to the common user, just as when we use Google Maps or Waze we receive important traffic information about an upcoming construction zone that is to be avoided.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Would this platform be available in app form?

Ms. Priscilla Tang:

Yes. It would be easily integrated into existing technology that we all use. It would be available in the cloud, on your smart phones, on your iPad, and on your computer. It would be accessible remotely as well.

For example, as we regulate drones, if we were simply to install a router or GPS device, like a blockchain router, on every single drone in Canada, then Transport Canada and other governments, as well as airports and pilots, would be able to monitor at all times where all drones are in the air.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

I always have to ask, from a security aspect, are these things going to be fairly secure, or do you think somebody could hack into them? What are the built-in fail-safes if something does happen if it is hacked?

Ms. Priscilla Tang:

If something does happen to the data being hacked?

Mr. Gagan Sikand: Yes.

Ms. Priscilla Tang: Well, the idea is actually that we make this data publicly available, in the same way that we can access data when we go on Google Maps or Waze. Everyone is able to see the traffic information. Everyone is able to see what new roads are created and where other cars are located. The idea is that in order to promote public safety, we make the data available to as many people as possible.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Jovanovic, you mentioned that the WHO recognizes noise as an annoyance. Is that specifically airplane noise or noise generally?

Ms. Julia Jovanovic:

It's noise from a variety of traffic types, including rail, automobile, and aircraft. There's also consideration for industrial noise, entertainment noise, leisure noise and so on—annoyances associated with all of those different types of noise.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Does the measure change for airplane noise or is it all in decibels?

Ms. Julia Jovanovic:

It's usually in a cumulative metric. In Canada, aircraft noise does use a particular cumulative metric, the NEF. However, other places in the world have opted out of that and have determined that Lden or Ldn is better.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

I have limited time.

You said that we're more susceptible to lower levels of noise or that we're becoming more sensitive. Would the sound from the humming of a drone fall within that?

Ms. Julia Jovanovic:

I can't speculate on that. I assume it might for any individual. It becomes a question of particular preferences.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Is low-level sound—

The Chair:

I'm sorry, but your time is up.

Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Welcome to the committee, and thank you for being here today.

I think I know the contradiction that we're essentially facing.

I'm from Edmonton, and there's an airport that's a fair distance from the downtown and a number of residential homes. Even though it's expanding, it's still a fair distance from residential properties. The complaint that we often hear in Edmonton is why we don't have an airport that's closer to the city. There are certain flight paths that go over my riding. However, I wouldn't say the noise is something that I hear to the extent that, perhaps, some of my colleagues are hearing. That's certainly something the analysts will have identified already in terms of the contradiction of the study.

I do hope there's some data out there, and I'm hoping you, as witnesses, are able to point us to where we can find that data. Currently, airports have regulations that try to address the noise, for example, airplanes flying at a certain angle, they have to be at certain altitudes; their descent and so on and so forth. Are there consequences if those aren't followed? Are pilots penalized? From your experience, what happens if those things aren't followed?

(1030)

Ms. Julia Jovanovic:

When there are operational infringements that go against best practices that might be established by the airport specifically, or Nav Canada, these infringements, when reported, are investigated by the proper authorities and a fine may be determined to be appropriate.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Do we have data on how many people are being fined, how many of these consequences are...?

Ms. Julia Jovanovic:

I can't speak for all Canadian airports, but I know the GTAA publishes an annual report on how many complaints were received, how many complaints were investigated for infringement, how many of those investigations resulted in a fine, etc.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Those would be specific airports reporting on that.

I anticipate our report is going to provide a recommendation to Transport Canada. If the recommendation is that we track this at the Transport Canada national level for each airport, is that the information we should be advising Transport Canada to track?

Ms. Julia Jovanovic:

You bring up a very interesting dilemma, because currently, accountability is kind of broad and diluted, and is somewhat unclear and not easily followed. I've studied other countries around the world with respect to this issue, and I find it easier to summarize their practices than Canada's. Canada, as it stands currently, does not have a coherent methodology in one, collecting data across all major airports, and two, communicating it in a clear and effective manner to all stakeholders, so that they could facilitate for a collaborative process to manage or address the issue. If you don't have the information, there's very little you can do to manage the issue, right?

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

So, airports would have the information, or are we talking about airlines?

Ms. Julia Jovanovic:

Airports collect a certain extent of the information through noise-monitoring terminals. They know what their expectations are in terms of volumes and types of aircraft. But, in countries like Australia, for example, the federal government takes a very active role at consolidating this information, making sure that all airports report it on a regular basis, and that it's reported in a way that is clear.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Mr. Isaac, have you received a response to your petition? Unfortunately, it didn't meet the 500 threshold, but did you receive a response from the minister on your petition?

Mr. Chris Isaac:

No, not really. We didn't get anything there.

On the subject of Nav Canada, which you just addressed, I don't think Nav Canada is doing a proper job there in consideration of the citizens. They just avoid the problem.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Isaac.

We have a few minutes for Mr. Graham.

It's Mr. Badawey's time that you have. He's in a generous mood today.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I appreciate that. Thank you.

As just a quick note, Mr. Jeneroux, the answer to your question is that most of these airports operate in what we call class C airspace. If you violate something in a significant way, the tower will give you a phone number to call and that means you're in really deep trouble.

We're talking about airplane noise and I'm trying to tie that into the drones. Where are we on passenger-carrying drones?

Ms. Priscilla Tang:

Very soon...it's already happening in a number of Middle Eastern countries, Arab countries, including Dubai. Also, Uber Air is really about passenger drones, which is why drone safety is as important to us as the same safety regulations that we have for passenger-carrying aircraft, because they will soon be one and the same.

(1035)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Should drone operators be required to learn air law?

Ms. Priscilla Tang:

I would say that if we all require licences to operate aircraft, drive cars and drive boats, why shouldn't we have licensing to operate a drone?

To go back to the previous point about compliance issues, the challenge with having regulations is then, of course, the enforcement challenge. We've seen that with Transport Canada. There's significant opportunity for ensuring enforcement across all sectors, including law enforcement.

Currently, some drone fines can be up to $50,000. I live next to Billy Bishop airport along the lake in Toronto. I also live next to a park. I see drones flying all the time recreationally. I also hear a lot of noise that could be better managed.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned blockchain as a method of distributing. We already have mode S transponders. Is there any intent to put mode S transponders in every drone in the sky? The noise of a plane and a drone colliding is quite high, which does tie into this study.

Ms. Priscilla Tang:

Exactly, and on the same frequency, which is part of the safety issue, so yes, absolutely.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, witnesses. We appreciate your contribution today.

I would ask that you to exit the room, as we need to go in camera for committee business for a few minutes.

Thank you very much.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(0845)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

La séance du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités est ouverte.

Conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement, nous menons une étude pour évaluer l'incidence du bruit des avions près des grands aéroports canadiens.

Dans la première partie de la séance ce matin, nous allons entendre les témoins suivants: M. Colin Novak, professeur agrégé, Université de Windsor; M. Mark Kuess, directeur, et M. Al Kaminskas, Relations publiques, Community Alliance for Air Safety; et enfin, M. David Wojcik, président-directeur général, Mississauga Board of Trade.

Merci à tous d'être avec nous ce matin.

Monsieur Novak.

M. Colin Novak (professeur agrégé, University of Windsor, à titre personnel):

Bonjour, mesdames et messieurs. Je m'appelle Colin Novak. Je suis professeur agrégé à l'Université de Windsor, et spécialisé dans l'acoustique, le bruit environnemental et la psychoacoustique. Je suis également l'un des directeurs de l'entreprise Akoustic Engineering et un ingénieur diplômé qui possède 25 ans d'expérience pratique dans le domaine de l'ingénierie acoustique.

En tant que professeur, je suis l'enquêteur principal dans une initiative de recherche collaborative triennale qui vise à élaborer des paramètres ciblés de l'irritation sonore causée par le bruit des avions, afin de pouvoir atténuer cette irritation et ses effets sur la communauté. La recherche est financée en parts égales par l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto et Mitacs, un organisme de financement fédéral. Julia Jovanovic, mon étudiante au doctorat, vous parlera plus en détail de cette initiative dans la deuxième partie de la séance.

En tant qu'ingénieur praticien, je possède une vaste expérience dans le dossier du bruit des avions, car j'ai travaillé avec l'aéroport Pearson à Toronto, l'aéroport Pierre-Elliott-Trudeau à Montréal, l'aéroport international de Calgary et l'aéroport Billy-Bishop à Toronto. J'ai également été embauché par Nav Canada dans le passé pour mener des études sur les effets du bruit environnemental sur les communautés touchées par les changements de trajectoires de vol dans la région de Toronto.

Enfin, je suis également conseiller technique auprès du comité consultatif communautaire sur l'environnement et le bruit de l'aéroport Pearson à Toronto. À ce titre, je réponds aux questions de la communauté et lui fournis des conseils techniques sur les problèmes liés au bruit, et j'offre également des séminaires de formation au comité et à divers groupes au sein de la population.

Les aéroports disposent d'un outil important pour surveiller, comprendre et gérer les effets du bruit sur la communauté, soit les terminaux de surveillance du bruit. L'aéroport Pearson en possède 25. En plus de mesurer le niveau de bruit, les terminaux archivent les données et les associent à un type d'avion et à son fonctionnement. Les niveaux de bruit sont également communiqués à la population en temps réel sur le site Web de l'aéroport dans la section WebTrack. Dans beaucoup d'industries, on a pu constater que la communication de l'information est un outil de mobilisation communautaire efficace, qui peut en outre accroître la capacité environnementale d'un exploitant.

Les données recueillies peuvent servir à diverses fins, notamment surveiller l'incidence du bruit dans des situations particulières, par exemple, la construction ou l'entretien d'une piste; être un outil de recherche, comme c'est le cas dans l'enquête que mène l'université sur les répercussions sociales du bruit des avions; ou comparer l'efficacité des initiatives d'atténuation du bruit ou l'incidence des changements procéduraux. Elles peuvent également être utiles dans les relations avec la communauté, la planification urbaine et l'éducation de la population.

Là où je veux en venir, c'est que les aéroports ont et utilisent des outils qui vont au-delà du simple fait de mesurer les niveaux de bruit et d'en faire rapport. Ce qui est important, c'est de savoir interpréter les données et de bien les utiliser pour gérer les effets du bruit sur la communauté.

Bon nombre d'entre vous ont sans doute eu vent de la publication dernièrement d'une étude de l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé sur les lignes directrices qui s'appliquent au bruit environnemental en Europe. Je salue et j'appuie, tant comme praticien que comme chercheur, les initiatives entreprises dans le rapport. Le rapport met clairement le doigt sur le problème dans une perspective européenne, mais également mondiale. Chose plus importante encore, il recense les répercussions possibles du bruit des avions, en particulier sur la santé. Cela dit, je doute de la solidité et la validité de certaines conclusions, et assurément des recommandations.

Dans le rapport, on reconnaît que l'état actuel de la science permet difficilement d'appuyer nombre de conclusions. Ainsi, les recommandations sont vagues, irréalistes et ne reposent pas sur des recherches solides. On néglige également d'établir le lien le plus important entre la production du bruit et les effets potentiels sur la santé, soit l'irritation sonore.

Il m'apparaît clairement que nous devons mieux comprendre l'irritation sonore que provoque le bruit des avions. Ce qu'il faut surtout retenir du rapport, c'est que plus de recherches s'imposent. Nous avons besoin d'études qui portent sur le Canada, notre population, notre culture et notre économie.

En terminant, il faut dire que l'industrie aérienne et les aéroports, quand on remonte aussi loin que les années 1960, ont fait un excellent travail pour atténuer le bruit des avions dans leurs activités, notamment grâce à l'amélioration des moteurs et des cellules des avions. La modernisation de l'Airbus A320 en est un exemple.

Pour atténuer le bruit, on s'est également employé à bien gérer les activités aériennes. Le trafic aérien est géré de manière stratégique, la sécurité étant primordiale, mais on accorde aussi une grande importance à l'atténuation du bruit. Les efforts produisent toutefois de moins en moins de résultats et ont presque atteint la limite de ce qu'ils peuvent accomplir.

(0850)



Il sera essentiel dorénavant qu'on mène des initiatives de recherche solides, pertinentes et bien financées pour mieux comprendre l'irritation sonore causée par le bruit des avions, ses effets sur la santé et les attentes.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir écouté. Je répondrai avec plaisir à vos questions plus tard.

La présidente:

D'accord.

Nous passons à la Community Alliance for Air Safety.

Mark, vous aimeriez sans doute prendre la parole en premier.

M. Mark Kuess (directeur, Community Alliance for Air Safety):

Merci.

Madame la présidente, distingués membres du Comité, nous sommes très honorés d'avoir été invités par la présidente du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités de la Chambre des communes à comparaître aujourd'hui comme représentants de la Community Alliance for Air Safety.

La Community Alliance for Air Safety représente plus de 40 collectivités et plus de 45 000 personnes. Notre objectif est de veiller à l'exploitation sécuritaire et à la croissance responsable de l'aéroport international Pearson de Toronto et d'autres aéroports au Canada.

Depuis la création de notre organisme il y a environ un an, nous avons discuté avec la plupart des intervenants opérationnels, notamment les pilotes, les syndicats des aéroports, les experts de l'industrie, les compagnies aériennes, l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto et Nav Canada. Nous avons également discuté avec plusieurs intervenants gouvernementaux clés, dont le groupe parlementaire du Grand Toronto, Transports Canada et le Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada. Après plus d'un an d'efforts, nous sommes heureux que Transports Canada vienne d'accepter notre invitation à discuter des préoccupations des collectivités que nous représentons.

Nous avons mené nos premières discussions face à face avec des représentants de Transports Canada il y a quelques semaines, et nous avons soulevé trois sujets de préoccupation. Notre mémoire résume bien nos grandes préoccupations et servira de base à notre exposé aujourd'hui.

Premièrement, comme Transports Canada a été appelé à faire plus avec moins au cours des 15 à 20 dernières années en raison des compressions budgétaires, nous leur avons demandé ce qu'on comptait faire pour assurer une surveillance objective des aéroports au Canada, malgré le manque à gagner.

Deuxièmement, pour faire suite à ce qui précède, Transports Canada a commencé à transférer la responsabilité de la conformité opérationnelle aux exploitants, une tendance appelée autoréglementation. La CAAS ne voit pas comment les aéroports, les compagnies aériennes et Nav Canada, notamment, pourraient arriver à une surveillance claire et objective de leurs activités en vérifiant eux-mêmes ce qu'ils font. C'est inquiétant. De plus, des articles parus récemment ont souligné le problème et présenté des statistiques sur le peu d'efficacité de l'autoréglementation.

Troisièmement, la CAAS s'inquiète de la transparence du processus d'approbation et de surveillance de Transports Canada. Nous avons quelques exemples. La CAAS a demandé à ce qu'on publie régulièrement les données sur les infractions aux règles et l'application des sanctions. Nous avons reçu quelques données, mais nous persistons à croire que beaucoup d'infractions ne sont pas sanctionnées actuellement. Transports Canada refuse encore de s'engager à publier régulièrement les données sur le sujet et à en discuter dans un forum public.

Vous trouverez quelques autres exemples dans notre mémoire.

Nous aimerions souligner, tout d'abord, qu'une croissance importante de l'achalandage nous inquiète à bien des égards. À l'heure actuelle, l'aéroport est déjà aux prises avec des problèmes de sécurité importants chaque année. Comme je viens de le mentionner, l'autoréglementation n'est tout simplement pas efficace pour assurer une solide responsabilisation et faire en sorte que les problèmes de sécurité soient signalés et réglés.

Ensuite, l'aéroport de Toronto est totalement enclavé, ce qui signifie qu'il est impossible de l'agrandir pour répondre à l'augmentation du trafic aérien. Il n'y a tout simplement pas d'espace disponible.

Enfin, Transports Canada a indiqué en 1990 que l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto a atteint sa pleine capacité. La densité des activités à l'aéroport est plus élevée que jamais. Selon la CAAS, si l'Autorité continue d'accroître ses activités pour atteindre rapidement 90 millions de passagers, cela veut dire qu'un avion atterrira toutes les 15 secondes. Les risques augmenteront considérablement, et nous croyons qu'ils n'ont pas été évalués adéquatement. On n'en a assurément pas discuté avec la population. Nous avons soulevé la question à maintes occasions. Transports Canada est le seul organisme au Canada qui dispose des pleins pouvoirs pour s'occuper de cette question cruciale et qui en a la pleine responsabilité.

En résumé, nous sommes honorés que la CAAS ait été invitée à discuter de ses préoccupations avec le Comité. Nous sommes résolus à continuer de discuter régulièrement avec tous les intervenants pour veiller à ce que la sécurité et le bien-être de tous ceux qui travaillent et habitent à proximité d'un aéroport au Canada soient respectés. Nous sommes ici, au fond, pour veiller à ce que la sécurité soit une priorité pour tous les intervenants clés lorsqu'ils prennent des décisions au sujet des politiques ou des procédures passées ou futures dans le domaine du transport au Canada.

Nous espérons pouvoir bonifier la discussion. Nous serons heureux de répondre à vos questions.

(0855)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Wojcik.

M. David Wojcik (président-directeur général, Mississauga Board of Trade):

Madame la présidente, et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, je vous remercie de nous donner l'occasion de discuter d'un enjeu économique important qui touche les aéroports internationaux au Canada, et en particulier l'aéroport international Pearson de Toronto, le plus achalandé au Canada et le cinquième en importance sur la planète en termes de connectivité.

Le bon voisinage est d'une importance cruciale, et les aéroports sont en général sensibles à la question. L'aéroport Pearson est celui qui en fait le plus au Canada pour assurer ce bon voisinage. La position du Canada sur la scène internationale est un élément économique important, et elle dépend de sa capacité de pouvoir transporter des gens et des marchandises 24 heures sur 24, et 7 jours sur 7.

Même s'il est beaucoup plus facile aujourd'hui de se connecter virtuellement grâce à la technologie, les gens préfèrent encore être face à face pour faire des affaires. La technologie ne permet pas de transporter des marchandises entre les continents. La vie d'un être humain dépend parfois de l'arrivée d'un organe ou de tissus humains. Le premier ministre, le ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique et le ministre du Commerce international parlent constamment de la présence du Canada sur la scène mondiale, de l'importance pour le Canada d'être reconnu mondialement, et de l'importance pour nous de nous adapter à la mondialisation.

Les aéroports ont donc un rôle déterminant à jouer dans notre capacité de concurrencer sur la scène internationale. Pour qu'un colis puisse arriver à temps sur un autre continent, il doit partir également à temps. Ce qui veut dire qu'il doit partir pendant les heures critiques de la nuit. Pour qu'un échantillon de tissus ou un organe arrive au Canada à temps pour sauver une vie, il doit arriver à l'aéroport pendant les heures critiques de la nuit. Pour que des échanges internationaux aient lieu ou que des ententes internationales soient conclues, les gens d'affaires doivent arriver au Canada ou quitter le pays pendant les heures critiques de la nuit. Si on veut que l'aéroport Pearson, en particulier, demeure une porte d'entrée et une plaque tournante mondiale, il faudra examiner et étendre ces heures.

En effet, les heures de la nuit représentent 25 % du temps de production des aéroports. Aucun modèle économique ne recommanderait qu'on ferme l'approvisionnement et la production lorsque la demande est là. Les pertes d'activité économique pendant cette période sont évaluées à 6 milliards de dollars par année, et cela ne tient pas compte des pertes de revenus d'emploi. Si le gouvernement fédéral entend sérieusement concurrencer sur la scène mondiale, il faut repenser notre stratégie à l'égard des heures d'activités la nuit et tenir compte des obstacles économiques que les restrictions à cet égard représentent.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Liepert, vous avez six minutes.

M. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, messieurs, d'être avec nous. Je présume que les représentants de la Community Alliance for Air Safety à Mississauga seront la cible d'un certain nombre de questions, car nous avons des députés ici qui viennent du Centre du Canada.

Monsieur Novak, j'aimerais vous poser quelques questions.

Je représente une circonscription de Calgary. Quand il n'y a pas trop de circulation, cela me prend au moins une demi-heure pour me rendre à l'aéroport en auto. Depuis qu'on a construit une nouvelle piste, dont vous êtes probablement au courant, je reçois des plaintes de gens qui habitent à une demi-heure de l'aéroport au sujet du bruit. Je présume qu'on a modifié la trajectoire des vols et qu'ils passent maintenant au-dessus de la région où j'habite.

Il s'agit sans doute de l'une de ces situations où l'on est victime de son propre succès. Si on veut être un pays commerçant à l'échelle mondiale, et si on veut avoir trois vols par jour, et passer à cinq, entre Calgary et Palm Springs, comme c'est maintenant le cas, des vols qui sont toujours pleins, eh bien, on devient victime de son propre succès.

Êtes-vous d'accord? Auriez-vous toutefois des solutions à proposer pour calmer les inquiétudes des habitants? J'aimerais, en outre, que vous nous disiez ce que vous pensez du commentaire de la Community Alliance for Air Safety au sujet du manque à gagner à Transports Canada. Est-ce un problème de financement? Pourriez-vous nous donner votre opinion sur ces observations?

(0900)

M. Colin Novak:

Bien sûr. Il y a beaucoup à dire.

Vous vouliez d'abord savoir si j'étais d'accord avec vos observations. Je suis entièrement d'accord. La situation n'est pas unique à Calgary. C'est le cas pour la plupart des grands aéroports, en particulier ceux qui sont situés près d'un centre urbain. C'est un commentaire qu'on entend souvent également des aéroports qui ont modifié des trajectoires de vol. L'aéroport Pearson a vécu la même situation en 2012, et beaucoup de discussions et de préoccupations de la communauté sont encore en lien aujourd'hui avec les modifications apportées aux trajectoires de vol.

Il existe des solutions. Certaines sont meilleures que d'autres. Elles portent parfois sur le maniement de l'avion et la façon d'effectuer l'approche. En d'autres mots, elles portent sur la conception de l'espace aérien. Même si Pearson a reconfiguré son espace aérien en 2012, on envisage encore d'apporter des changements. À certains aéroports, on peut par exemple effectuer une descente en continu, c'est-à-dire que l'avion entreprend sa descente bien avant d'être près de l'aéroport. En procédant ainsi, il glisse presque jusqu'à l'aéroport et le pilote n'a pas besoin d'utiliser les volets, qui font beaucoup de bruit. Il n'a pas besoin non plus d'ajuster sa position par des poussées, etc., qui font également beaucoup de bruit. La technique ne peut être utilisée dans tous les aéroports, toutefois. Cela dépend d'où viennent les avions et de l'orientation des pistes.

Pour nous, le défi consiste à s'occuper du problème du point de vue du récepteur également. On s'interroge beaucoup et on mène beaucoup d'études, tout particulièrement en Europe, sur les effets sur la santé du bruit des avions. Quand je parle des « effets sur la santé », je dois préciser que ce n'est pas le bruit comme tel qui provoque de l'hypertension artérielle ou des effets cardiovasculaires, mais bien l'irritation sonore et les tensions associées au fait d'être exposé à ce bruit. C'est la raison pour laquelle cela varie tellement d'une personne à l'autre...

M. Ron Liepert:

Pourriez-vous me dire ce que vous pensez des fonds alloués au transport?

J'ai une autre petite question que je veux poser avant que mon temps de parole expire. En fait, je vais la poser maintenant et vous pourrez y répondre en même temps.

J'ai participé à une activité hier soir et j'ai discuté avec un contrôleur aérien à la retraite. Il prétendait que dans certains cas, les modifications des trajectoires de vol permettaient de réduire les émissions. Pouvez-vous nous dire ce que vous en pensez?

(0905)

M. Colin Novak:

C'est le cas. C'est un des éléments qu'on examinait lors de la reconfiguration de l'espace aérien. De nos jours, les avions n'ont plus à demeurer aussi longtemps dans le circuit d'attente et peuvent amorcer leur descente plus rapidement, sans tourner en rond autour de l'aéroport. Il en résulte une réduction des...

M. Ron Liepert:

Pouvez-vous nous parler des fonds alloués au transport?

M. Colin Novak:

Même chose pour le financement des transports. Oui, je pense que nombre d'organismes gouvernementaux ont le même problème. Par exemple, les modèles que nous utilisons sont mandatés par Transports Canada. On ne les a ni examinés ni révisés depuis les années 1970. Nous sommes vraiment un des seuls pays au monde à toujours utiliser les contours PAS comme outil de planification, et je pense que c'est en raison du manque de financement versé à Transports Canada pour mener les travaux de recherche appropriés. Ce n'est qu'un seul exemple.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Novak.

Passons maintenant à M. Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins d'être ici ce matin.

Monsieur Novak, dans cette salle, vous êtes le professionnel du bruit. Afin que mes collègues et moi-même puissions avoir une meilleure idée de la façon de gérer le bruit, pouvez-vous nous éclairer un peu sur les différentes mesures du bruit aéroportuaire qui existent présentement dans le monde? Quelle mesure permet d'établir le plus fidèlement l'ambiance sonore perçue par l'oreille humaine? [Traduction]

M. Colin Novak:

Les aéroports utilisent nombre de mesures différentes, et cela varie d'un pays à l'autre. À titre d'exemple, la mesure utilisée en Europe n'est pas la même que celle que nous utilisons au Canada, qui elle-même diffère de la mesure utilisée aux États-Unis.

Nombre de mesures sont des mesures du bruit moyennes, c'est-à-dire qu'on mesure le bruit sur une longue période pour en faire la moyenne.

À titre d'exemple, aux États-Unis, on utilise une technologie qu'on appelle Ldn, ou dans certains États comme la Californie, Lden. Elle permet de mesurer le bruit de jour pendant toute la journée, et le bruit nocturne sur une période de huit heures. On ajoute une pénalité de 10 décibels pour ensuite dégager un chiffre individuel qui représente la période complète de 24 heures.

J'estime que ce n'est pas une mesure qu'il convient d'utiliser dans le cas d'impacts cycliques, où un aéronef survole une zone toutes les 90 secondes ou les quelques minutes. C'est la fréquence de l'aéronef, ses allées et venues, ainsi que, dans le cas des nuisances nocturnes, les niveaux sonores Lmax. Ce n'est pas cette moyenne de huit heures au cours de la nuit qui vous réveille, mais bien les niveaux maximaux, les sons à incidence élevée.

En règle générale, l'Europe fait un meilleur travail que nous au Canada.

Pour répondre à votre autre question, oui, il est clair qu'il existe de meilleures mesures. Quant à la perception humaine et à la façon dont on entend les sons, il y a un autre facteur qu'on ne prend vraiment pas en compte pour évaluer le bruit des aéronefs, mais dont on se sert dans d'autres industries, et c'est l'impact humain du son.

Une mesure typique serait celle de l'intensité sonore, qui ne tient pas seulement compte du niveau de pression acoustique, mais aussi d'autres facteurs qui influent sur la qualité du son, comme la fréquence, et la question de savoir si elle est modulée ou sporadique. Tous ces facteurs ont des répercussions importantes sur l'impression du son que nous entendons.

Autrement dit, avec la psychoacoustique, ce n'est pas nécessairement la question de savoir dans quelle mesure le son est fort ou faible, mais aussi la perception que l'humain a de sa qualité, bonne ou mauvaise. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Quel type d'appareil de mesure permet le mieux d'évaluer le bruit? Selon vous, utilise-t-on le bon modèle au Canada? Qu'est-ce que le Canada pourrait faire de mieux par rapport à d'autres pays?

(0910)

[Traduction]

M. Colin Novak:

Les aéroports se servent de terminaux de surveillance du bruit pour évaluer le son. Côté équipements, je sais qu'à Calgary, Montréal et Toronto, on utilise un appareil Brüel & Kjær de type 2250. Brüel & Kjær est une entreprise danoise, plus vieux fabricant au monde d'équipements de mesure du son, fondée en 1942.

Les équipements que ces aéroports utilisent sont installés dans 80 % des aéroports importants dans le monde entier. Il s'agit de sonomètres de type 1. Les sonomètres sont de type 0, 1, 2 ou 3. Le type 0 sert de référence en laboratoire pour calibrer d'autres instruments, et le type 1 serait le niveau suivant. D'un point de vue pratique, le type 1 est le plus précis de tous les équipements utilisés. Les données sont ensuite envoyées en temps réel aux serveurs en Australie au moyen de communications 3G.

Il ne fait que mesurer les données en fonction de la meilleure qualité du signal en tant que tel. Ensuite, l'élément clé est ce pour quoi vous utilisez les données. Les archive-t-on tout simplement dans un serveur ou les aéroports les utilisent-ils activement pour répondre à des plaintes et surveiller les infractions, par exemple?

Je crois que, bien qu'ils mesurent des données de très bonne qualité, nombre d'aéroports font peu de choses, dans les faits, avec ces données.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci à chacun des invités d'être parmi nous ce matin. C'est un plaisir de les entendre.

Nous sommes ici pour discuter d'un problème qui touche la zone de confort des communautés situées près des aéroports et les aéroports eux-mêmes. Il n'est pas question d'interdire le trafic aérien, bien que nous pourrions discuter plus longuement des départs de nuit, chose que nous ferons sûrement.

Je voudrais commencer par vous, monsieur Kuess.

Dans vos propos préliminaires, vous ne m'avez pas surpris, mais, encore une fois, la situation me déçoit. Vous semblez dire qu'une fois de plus, dans ce domaine comme dans bien d'autres, Transports Canada délaisse ses propres responsabilités pour aller vers l'autoréglementation. Comme nous l'avons bien vu dans d'autres domaines du transport, cela donne rarement les effets escomptés.

En quelques mots, pourriez-vous me dire comment sont vos rapports avec les autorités aéroportuaires quand vous tentez de trouver des solutions au problème que représente le bruit des aéroports pour les communautés avoisinantes? [Traduction]

M. Mark Kuess:

Nous y travaillons depuis environ 16 mois. Seize mois auparavant, nous n'étions pas très au courant du fonctionnement du processus. Nous avons beaucoup appris sur la façon dont les choses se passent.

Nous croyons savoir que l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto est responsable des opérations au sol, du stationnement des aéronefs et de leur déplacement. Une fois qu'ils arrivent sur une piste, ils deviennent la responsabilité de Nav Canada; c'est cet organisme qui contrôle les pistes et l'espace aérien.

Ce sont deux entreprises privées. Par le passé, elles avaient des liens avec le gouvernement, mais elles fonctionnent maintenant en autonomie complète. Ensuite, vous avez Transports Canada, que nous avons appelé l'organisme de maintien de l'ordre dans ce processus la dernière fois que nous leur avons parlé. C'est le ministère qui applique les règles. Il y a aussi le Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada, qui mène les enquêtes.

Voilà la façon dont les choses sont structurées ici au Canada. Elles fonctionnent assez bien depuis de nombreuses années.

Pour ce qui est du défi, ce sont les experts de l'industrie qui viennent à nous. Nous ne leur posons pas de questions; c'est étonnant le nombre de personnes qui viennent à nous. Elles parlent de leurs problèmes de financement. Transports Canada a du mal à faire ce qu'il faisait par le passé, et nous avons connu une croissance incroyable. L'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto a parlé d'une croissance annuelle de 2 % du volume de ses passagers. Il se situe entre 7 % et 9 %. Les affaires sont vraiment bonnes. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Savez-vous qu'un certain nombre de pays — la France est un excellent exemple — se sont dotés d'une autorité de contrôle des nuisances aéroportuaires? Il s'agit d'un groupe chargé d'entendre les plaintes, de faire enquête et d'imposer des sanctions en cas de non-respect de la réglementation. Pourrait-on importer un tel modèle au Canada? [Traduction]

M. Mark Kuess:

C'est un excellent argument. Des pays comme le Royaume-Uni et l'Allemagne ont fait un travail phénoménal, et nous avons soulevé la question à plusieurs occasions.

Si vous pensez aux pratiques exemplaires de l'industrie, les aéroports comme celui de Francfort ont fait beaucoup de changements sur le plan opérationnel qui ont fait le bonheur des collectivités locales. Ils ont sécurisé l'environnement et fait en sorte que l'entreprise prospère. Nous savons qu'au Royaume-Uni et en Allemagne, on fait de grandes choses pour progresser. On a discuté de ces pratiques exemplaires avec l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto, mais on ne les a pas appliquées. Il y a une meilleure façon de faire les choses.

Nous pouvons croître. Nous pouvons connaître une forte croissance économique ici au Canada. Nous pouvons avoir des voyages internationaux. Nous pouvons continuer de le faire tout en assurant la sécurité des gens et le bonheur des collectivités locales. Il est possible de le faire, c'est sûr.

(0915)

[Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Je m'adresse maintenant à vous, monsieur Novak.

D'entrée de jeu, dans votre discours, vous avez dit avoir participé pendant trois ans à un projet sur l'atténuation du bruit. Les résultats de ce travail ont-ils été rendus publics? Si oui, le Comité pourrait-il obtenir une copie de ces travaux? [Traduction]

M. Colin Novak:

En fait, la recherche vient de commencer cette année. L'étude a commencé en mai.

Au cours des trois dernières années, nous avons observé un certain nombre de produits livrables. Le premier sera probablement prêt à être rendu public à la fin de cette année. Il s'agit d'une revue de la littérature très exhaustive des problèmes dans le monde et des mesures prises sur le plan technique ainsi que sur celui de la santé pour y remédier. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Vous avez dit, à la fin de vos propos, qu'il fallait avoir pour mandat d'établir nos attentes pour l'avenir. De votre côté, avez-vous établi ces attentes? Avez-vous des balises à nous suggérer? [Traduction]

M. Colin Novak:

Il reste toujours beaucoup à apprendre. Cependant, nous estimons que l'essentiel du problème est que nous avons du bruit qui est là pour rester et qui incommode des gens, mais comme nous l'avons dit, l'élément intermédiaire est le mécontentement qui y est associé. C'est ce que nous devons mieux comprendre. C'est le mécontentement que suscite l'aéronef et les attentes que les gens ont à l'égard des nuisances sonores qui génèrent les plaintes et certaines des incidences sur la santé.

Statistiquement, lorsque vous prenez le nombre de personnes réellement mécontentes, il n'est pas aussi élevé qu'on pourrait le croire. Cependant, elles représentent aussi un groupe qui exprime des préoccupations très valables. Voilà l'approche que nous devons privilégier: nous devons faire le lien entre les aspects subjectifs et physiques réels du bruit généré.

Nous devrions nous tourner vers l'Australie pour voir certaines des choses qu'on y fait, car ce pays privilégie une approche plus globale qui a été très efficace à ce jour, bien qu'elle en soit aussi aux stades précoces.

La présidente:

Nous allons entendre M. Hardie. Peut-être que vous pourriez essayer de formuler vos commentaires pendant le temps qui lui est alloué.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente, et merci à tous d'être venus.

Nous allons commencer par vous, monsieur Novak, mais soyez bref si vous pouvez, je vous prie, parce que j'ai une question pour deux autres personnes.

Est-ce la zone autour de l'aéroport dans laquelle les avions décollent, atterrissent et circulent au sol ou celle qu'ils survolent qui suscite la plupart des plaintes?

M. Colin Novak:

C'est surtout la zone qu'ils survolent à l'approche de l'aéroport ainsi qu'au décollage, mais plus à l'approche, car la file d'aéronefs qui arrivent est plus longue. D'après ce que j'ai vu, on parle d'une zone à 40 ou 50 kilomètres de l'aéroport.

M. Ken Hardie:

Monsieur Kuess, vous avez dit quelque chose d'assez révélateur, c'est-à-dire que l'aéroport Pearson est entouré. Je pense que cela rejoint en quelque sorte ce que M. Wojcik disait aussi. La planification municipale a un rôle à jouer dans ce dossier, c'est clair. Si la ville de Toronto ou les villes environnantes ont permis aux développements d'encercler l'aéroport, dans les faits, cela garantit qu'il y aura des conflits entre les gens au sol et les aéronefs qui les survolent.

Compte tenu de l'importance économique de ce dossier, et peut-être aussi que si nous constatons que cette croissance se poursuit... Comme vous l'avez dit, monsieur Wojcik, il y aura beaucoup plus de trafic aérien avec le fret, etc. Faut-il commencer à songer à de nouvelles installations réservées au fret bien éloignées des zones résidentielles et à conclure un accord pour empêcher les villes et les municipalités de se construire autour de ces installations?

(0920)

M. Mark Kuess:

J'aimerais beaucoup répondre à cette question. Je pense que c'est une idée géniale. Nous nous sommes vraiment efforcés à la CAAS de ne pas formuler de recommandations, mais de cerner les défis et d'ensuite collaborer avec les intervenants appropriés à y trouver des solutions. Il est clair que nous essayons d'atterrir sur un timbre-poste avec une grosse enveloppe. C'est un problème de taille.

En 1990, Transports Canada a déclaré que l'aéroport était à pleine capacité. Au départ, il a été conçu comme aéroport régional, alors la façon dont les pistes sont alignées complique l'atterrissage des aéronefs. Tous les autres nouveaux aéroports importants en Amérique du Nord sont conçus d'est en ouest, pour suivre la direction du vent.

Nous avons un aéroport traditionnel qui laisse une empreinte traditionnelle. C'est l'une des plus petites empreintes en Amérique du Nord. Nous avons bien des terrains industriels près de l'aéroport, mais aussi beaucoup de terrains résidentiels, et cela ne changera pas. Il faut qu'il y ait autre chose. Envoyer le fret ailleurs semble être une excellente idée.

M. Ken Hardie:

Il y a maintenant près d'un mois, nous étions en train d'étudier les corridors commerciaux. Il était intéressant de voir, encore une fois, que le développement municipal permet aux gens de construire de nouvelles maisons de ville à côté des zones industrielles. En fait, on engloutit des terrains industriels pour ce faire, ce qui semble être contre-productif, tant pour la qualité de vie sur le site que la vitalité économique de la région.

Monsieur Wojcik, vous en avez parlé. Alors que nous commençons à nous préoccuper davantage de l'effet du transport aérien sur les changements climatiques, ne pourrions-nous pas voir un changement graduel qui nous ferait délaisser tant de transport des passagers tout en maintenant l'importance du transport des marchandises, surtout de marchandises spéciales comme celles que vous avez mentionnées?

M. David Wojcik:

Une quantité considérable de fret est aujourd'hui transportée dans des avions de passagers. Il est possible de séparer ce fret, mais il pourrait être problématique de diviser ces marchandises entre deux aéroports. Je suis d'accord avec Mark qu'il vaut certainement la peine d'examiner la solution d'envoyer le fret vers d'autres aéroports, d'autres aéroports régionaux ou d'autres endroits.

Aujourd'hui, bien sûr, la plaque tournante économique se trouve dans le Sud de l'Ontario. Elle gravite autour de Toronto. Prenez le nombre d'entreprises qui se sont installées autour de l'aéroport ainsi que le nombre d'agents d'expédition et d'entreprises de camions de transport. Il faudrait certainement une stratégie à long terme pour les aider à s'installer à d'autres endroits afin de répondre à cette demande.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vais préparer la question que j'aimerais poser aux membres du prochain groupe pour qu'ils aient le temps d'y penser d'ici là.

Mon chien peut m'entendre soulever le couvercle de son pot de gâteries à un demi-coin de rue de là. Mes enfants peuvent sentir les billets de 20 $ frais dans mon portefeuille. Je pense que certaines personnes sont peut-être plus sensibles à ces choses, alors il nous faut nous pencher là-dessus ainsi que sur certaines dynamiques, mais peut-être que nous pouvons aussi discuter de la construction des maisons et de la suppression du bruit. Nous avons des casques d'écoute antibruit qui font que même dans les avions, on est tranquille.

Peut-être qu'il y a d'autres points à discuter et qu'on a plus d'options qu'il n'y paraît si on creuse un peu plus profondément. Je vais garder ces questions pour le prochain groupe.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Ma première question s'adresse à M. Novak.

Manifestement, le bruit émanant des aéroports influe sur la qualité de vie. Pouvez-vous dire dans quelle mesure?

M. Colin Novak:

Comme on l'a laissé entendre dans la question précédente, cela varie d'une personne à l'autre ainsi qu'en fonction du style de vie et des attentes.

Je pense qu'un des effets potentiels qui peut nous affecter plus que tout autre est le manque de sommeil la nuit en raison des nuisances sonores, bien que cela ne reflète pas la moyenne globale des nuisances sonores. Des personnes comme des mères au foyer qui jouent dehors avec leurs enfants nous ont aussi fait part de leurs préoccupations.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Permettez-moi de vous interrompre vu que mon temps est limité.

Peut-être que vous pourriez dire comment cela influe sur le développement cognitif des enfants.

M. Colin Novak:

En Europe, on a mené des études dans lesquelles on s'est penché sur les niveaux d'exposition au bruit et les effets sur les enfants qui apprennent à lire. On a déterminé que chaque augmentation du niveau de bruit de 10 décibels à laquelle ils étaient exposés ralentissait leur processus d'apprentissage de six mois, je crois. On voit vraiment les répercussions sur l'apprentissage des enfants qui sont exposés à des niveaux élevés de bruit.

(0925)

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Bienvenue, David. Vous savez mieux que moi que l'expansion de Mississauga a découlé principalement de son attrait pour les grandes entreprises. Nous en sommes un produit. C'est bien que nous voulions accroître notre nombre d'entreprises, et la productivité est excellente, mais l'ennui, c'est que nous avons maintenant beaucoup de bruit. Des personnes comme Gale Santos, une voyageuse fréquente, m'appelle pour me dire qu'elle est là depuis toujours et qu'elle remarque maintenant une hausse du trafic.

Comment concilier le besoin d'accroître la productivité et celui de maintenir la qualité de vie que nous avions coutume d'avoir?

M. David Wojcik:

J'ignore si vous le saviez, Gagan, mais j'ai résidé pendant 20 ans dans le quartier Meadowvale, que vous représentez comme député. Certaines personnes diront peut-être le contraire, mais le bruit n'a pas affecté mes capacités mentales.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

La présidente:

Peut-être que nous devrions mettre la question aux voix.

M. David Wojcik:

S'il vous plaît, madame la présidente, j'aurais peur du résultat.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David Wojcik: C'est tout à fait juste; nous avons encouragé les entreprises à s'établir dans le secteur. Nous avons bâti une économie solide dans cette zone en fonction de l'aéroport, qui n'est pas simplement apparu dans le secteur au cours des dernières années; il s'y trouve depuis très très longtemps. Je ne suggère pas que nous ne devrions pas y être sensible, mais c'est un fait que si vous vous installez près d'un aéroport, vous aurez peut-être à vivre avec un peu de bruit.

J'habitais dans une trajectoire de vol et quand je m'assoyais dans mon jardin, je vous jure que je pouvais compter les rainures des pneus de certains des gros porteurs qui passaient au-dessus de moi. Encore une fois, madame la présidente, pour ce qui concerne mes capacités mentales, peut-être que je m'y suis simplement habitué.

Nous devons être sensibles à la question, j'en conviens, mais nous devons aussi prendre conscience du fait que nous ne pouvons pas empêcher le progrès. Nous ne pouvons pas limiter le centre économique qui entoure l'aéroport international de Mississauga, comme je me plais à l'appeler.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Je sais pertinemment que vous avez l'esprit très vif.

Quelles leçons pourrions-nous tirer si nous devions prendre de l'expansion et construire un autre aéroport dans la région du Grand Toronto, peut-être aux alentours de Pickering? Quelles leçons serait-il possible de tirer de notre exemple pour aider à atténuer le bruit, au lieu de miser sur l'expansion et la nécessité d'accroître la productivité?

M. David Wojcik:

C'est une excellente question.

Je crois qu'il faut aussi tenir compte de l'expérience de Mirabel. Quand on construit un aéroport si loin d'un autre grand aéroport international et qu'on essaie de séparer les passagers, la situation se complique. Je suis certainement d'accord avec les autres témoins pour dire qu'il faut un espace suffisant autour d'un aéroport. Où en construiriez-vous un autre? Si c'est à Pickering, une installation est déjà en construction, là-bas aussi; vous devrez donc envisager une solution bien au nord de Pickering. Il faut aussi prendre en considération les problèmes survenus à Mirabel, dont l'aéroport est aujourd'hui considéré pratiquement comme un éléphant blanc situé au milieu de nulle part.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Enfin, pourriez-vous nous dire combien d'emplois sont associés à une augmentation du nombre de vols de nuit, si l'on tient compte des exploitants et des gens dans l'aéroport?

M. David Wojcik:

Nous savons que la région autour du Grand Toronto appuie plus de 130 000 emplois. Rien qu'à l'aéroport, il y a 44 000 emplois. Mississauga, Brampton et l'ensemble de la ville de Toronto en ont également profité. Les retombées économiques de l'aéroport ont certainement aidé toutes les collectivités avoisinantes.

L'aéroport n'est pas une grosse méchante machine économique qui ne se soucie pas de la collectivité. Il lui rend de grands services, notamment...

(0930)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Wojcik. Je dois céder la parole à Mme Block.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à remercier tous les témoins d'être des nôtres aujourd'hui.

Comme l'a dit mon collègue qui est intervenu en premier, cette conversation met en évidence la tension qui existe entre des valeurs concurrentes. Quand vient le temps de trouver des solutions, ce n'est pas aussi facile que nous pourrions le croire.

Monsieur Novak, vous avez dit que l'Europe se débrouille beaucoup mieux que le Canada. Vous nous avez également recommandé d'examiner ce qui se passe en Australie.

Monsieur Kuess, vous avez mentionné qu'il existe certaines pratiques exemplaires qui méritent d'être étudiées.

J'aimerais que vous nous expliquiez en quoi elles consistent. Quelles sont les premières choses que nous devrions examiner pour comprendre la situation en Europe? Le Canada est beaucoup moins peuplé que l'Europe; par conséquent, si l'Europe a trouvé une façon de gérer ce problème, il nous serait utile de savoir quelles mesures sont prises là-bas et en quoi consistent certaines de ces pratiques exemplaires.

M. Colin Novak:

La question s'adresse-t-elle à moi?

Mme Kelly Block:

À l'un ou l'autre d'entre vous.

M. Mark Kuess:

Je serais ravi de répondre.

Francfort est un excellent exemple. Si vous comparez l'aéroport de Francfort à celui du Grand Toronto, vous verrez qu'ils sont semblables. Quand l'aéroport de Francfort s'apprêtait à subir des modifications liées à l'acheminement de son trafic, les gestionnaires ont produit beaucoup d'études et de rapports, tout comme nous l'avions fait dans le passé. Les données ne manquent pas. Ils ont réussi à réduire à zéro le nombre de vols de nuit. Ils y ont mis fin. Depuis, l'aéroport a pris de l'expansion. À l'époque, les gestionnaires de l'aéroport de Francfort estimaient que cette décision serait un coup fatal, qu'ils perdraient des affaires, que leur rentabilité diminuerait et que l'aéroport ne serait plus viable. C'est tout le contraire qui s'est produit.

Il y a d'autres exemples. Atlanta offre un bon modèle. La ville de Denver, au Colorado, est, elle aussi, dotée d'un aéroport bien planifié.

Pour revenir à ce que disait l'intervenant précédent au sujet de Pickering, des études d'impact ont été menées. L'aéroport de Pickering a fait l'objet d'une excellente planification. Les promoteurs ont fait leurs devoirs, et Transports Canada a joué un rôle très actif. Nous devons utiliser cette information. Elle existe déjà. Nous n'avons qu'à nous en servir.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

M. Mark Kuess:

Je vous en prie.

Mme Kelly Block:

Monsieur Novak, avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

M. Colin Novak:

En ce qui concerne l'Europe, je trouve que son point fort réside dans les études effectuées pour mieux comprendre le problème. Lorsque Francfort a imposé un moratoire sur les vols de nuit, les recherches ont révélé que ce n'était pas efficace du point de vue de la santé. Même si cela avait bel et bien diminué le nombre de réveils pendant le sommeil, les sondages auprès des gens de la collectivité montraient que le niveau de désagrément n'avait pas changé depuis l'annulation des vols de nuit.

L'Australie, pour sa part, s'en tire bien en ce qui concerne l'échange de renseignements, la participation équitable des collectivités et des aéroports, ainsi que la communication beaucoup plus libre de renseignements, à tel point que les gens peuvent se rendre aux aéroports et demander une information précise ou des types d'information. En effet, des systèmes sont en place pour permettre à l'aéroport de faciliter ces demandes.

(0935)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

Je vis au-dessous d'une trajectoire de vol depuis plus d'une décennie. Mon mari y a vécu toute sa vie. Nous avons acheté sa maison familiale et maintenant que j'ai déménagé, j'entends les sifflets de train. Je le répète, c'est là que se situe la tension, comme mon collègue l'a dit, sur le plan de la planification municipale.

Quand on parle de déplacer les vols et de construire un aéroport dans un endroit reculé, loin des collectivités, monsieur Wojcik, j'aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez, du point de vue commercial, des répercussions sur le milieu des affaires. Même si nous pouvons peut-être faire livrer des marchandises par avion bien plus loin d'une collectivité, il faudra ensuite les charger dans des camions, lesquels prendront alors de la place sur nos routes. Ainsi, nous ne réduirons peut-être pas les émissions comme nous l'avions prévu. J'aimerais vous entendre parler de l'incidence de certaines de ces solutions sur le milieu des affaires.

M. David Wojcik:

Chose certaine, l'incidence sur le milieu des affaires serait d'une portée considérable. Même si je reconnais qu'il s'agit d'une solution possible, cela doit faire partie d'une stratégie à beaucoup plus long terme afin que les urbanistes en tiennent compte. Bien que nous puissions déplacer ces plaques tournantes du transport dans des régions très peu habitées, nous devons analyser les effets sur l'environnement dans ces zones vulnérables, ce qui a tendance à ralentir l'installation d'entreprises là-bas. N'oublions pas les coûts associés au déménagement des entreprises et, à juste titre d'ailleurs, comment ferions-nous pour livrer les produits à leur destination à partir de là? Est-ce par train? Est-ce au moyen d'une autre technologie plus écologique qui est maintenant à l'étude? Voilà autant de facteurs à prendre en considération. Ce n'est pas une solution à court terme.

La présidente:

Je crois que M. Badawey partage son temps de parole avec Borys. Vous remarquerez que j'ai dit Borys.

Nous vous écoutons.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke-Centre, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Wojcik, vous avez dit que les heures de la nuit sont critiques. Pourquoi donc?

M. David Wojcik:

Je crois qu'elles sont critiques en ce sens qu'il s'agit d'heures de quiétude, de l'avis général. Je les qualifie de critiques parce qu'on doit normalement être silencieux durant ces heures.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Permettez-moi de renchérir là-dessus.

Lorsque je faisais du porte-à-porte, un des moments les plus poignants a été mon entretien avec une mère en fin de matinée. Elle avait un bébé qui pleurait. Voyant son air épuisé, je lui ai dit que ce n'était évidemment pas le bon moment. Elle m'a répondu: « Non, je tiens à vous parler. Je n'ai pas pu dormir de la nuit. Mon bébé se faisait réveiller constamment. Des avions ont survolé notre quartier tout au long de la nuit. »

Ces heures sont critiques parce qu'elles ont de graves répercussions sur la qualité de vie de ceux qui se trouvent directement en dessous de ces trajectoires de vol. C'est ce que M. Novak expliquait: le silence est tout à coup rompu par un fort grondement. Les gens se rendorment et, quelques minutes plus tard, la même chose se reproduit.

Vous avez évoqué la politique de bon voisinage. Il y a des gens dans des endroits comme Markland Wood, qui remonte bien avant le début des opérations. C'est un quartier bien établi dont la création précède celle de l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto. La qualité de vie des habitants s'est gravement détériorée en raison de ces vols de nuit.

Comment est-ce que Toronto définit les heures de la nuit?

M. David Wojcik:

Les heures de vol de nuit sont définies comme celles qui se situent entre 00 h 30 et 6 h 30.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Je dirais que même la définition pose problème. Par exemple, l'aéroport de Francfort, dont on a parlé, reçoit un nombre très limité de vols entre 22 et 23 heures, alors que l'interdiction visant les vols de nuit commence à 23 heures et se termine à 5 heures, et on permet un nombre très restreint de vols jusqu'à 6 heures.

Ne convenez-vous pas que la définition des heures de la nuit, ces heures critiques de sommeil en toute quiétude, ne correspond probablement pas aux habitudes de sommeil des gens?

M. David Wojcik:

Selon moi, à mesure que l'économie se raffermit, les heures de sommeil changent en fonction de ce que nous faisons. Il y a des gens qui vont au lit à 20 heures et qui se réveillent à 3 heures pour...

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Monsieur Wojcik, je me permets de ne pas partager cet avis. La plupart des gens de ma circonscription dorment au coucher du soleil. D'habitude, les gens vont se coucher vers 21 heures ou 22 heures.

Bon nombre des problèmes liés aux vols de nuit ont commencé lorsque FedEx a déplacé ses opérations de l'aéroport d'Hamilton Mountain, situé sur l'escarpement qui domine la ville d'Hamilton et, essentiellement, en plein milieu de terres agricoles; c'est donc déjà bien loin de la ville, en zone agricole. L'aéroport Pearson s'est emparé du marché des vols de nuit, au détriment de l'aéroport d'Hamilton. Sur le coup, FedEx n'avait aucun problème à déplacer son centre et l'ensemble de ses opérations.

N'est-ce pas le cas?

(0940)

M. David Wojcik:

J'ignore s'il y a des preuves statistiques qui montrent que le nombre de plaintes relatives à la pollution sonore a augmenté depuis l'arrivée de FedEx.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Ma question est la suivante: n'est-il pas vrai que les opérations de fret aérien de nuit de FedEx, qui sont à l'origine de ce processus, étaient attribuables au fait que l'aéroport Pearson, sous l'égide de l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto, s'est emparé de ce marché, au détriment de l'aéroport d'Hamilton?

M. David Wojcik:

Je ne crois pas que le verbe « s'emparer » soit le mot juste. Je reconnais que l'aéroport Pearson a fini par obtenir le contrat de fret aérien.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Selon moi, Hamilton représente une occasion évidente en ce qui concerne les opérations de nuit — et non pas les vols passagers transportant des marchandises. Il n'y a littéralement que cinq champs agricoles et cinq maisons de ferme dans cette région précise.

Monsieur Kuess, je vous remercie beaucoup de tout le travail que vous accomplissez au nom de diverses collectivités.

Ce que vous avez souligné était fort judicieux. En fait, pour reprendre l'exemple de l'aéroport de Francfort, qui se classe au septième rang des aéroports les plus achalandés au monde... Tout le monde disait que ce serait désastreux pour l'économie et que l'aéroport ferait faillite. À vrai dire, les gens sont toujours insatisfaits du bruit durant le jour, mais ils peuvent au moins dormir tranquillement.

Avez-vous des données? Aimeriez-vous nous expliquer davantage comment l'aéroport de Francfort continue non seulement d'être rentable, mais aussi d'augmenter ses profits, malgré l'interdiction des vols de nuit?

La présidente:

Veuillez répondre brièvement.

M. Mark Kuess:

Je vous invite à consulter le rapport annuel de cet aéroport. Je vous renvoie également au rapport annuel de l'aéroport de Glasgow. Vous verrez que les affaires vont bien. Il y a une croissance, au grand bonheur des gens d'affaires.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup à nos témoins. Vous avez donné le coup d'envoi à notre étude. Je suis sûre que nous resterons en contact avec vous à mesure que nous progresserons.

Je vais suspendre la séance un instant, le temps de permettre aux prochains témoins de s'installer.

(0940)

(0945)

La présidente:

Nous reprenons la séance.

Nous accueillons Chris Isaac, ainsi que Julia Jovanovic, candidate au doctorat à l'Université de Windsor.

Nous recevons également James Castle et Priscilla Tang, de Terranova International Public Safety Canada.

Monsieur Isaac, vous disposez de cinq minutes, après quoi nous devrons vous interrompre pour être en mesure de passer aux questions et aux observations des membres du Comité.

Merci beaucoup. [Français]

M. Chris Isaac (à titre personnel):

Merci.

Vous connaissez mon nom; il est écrit ici. Je suis un résidant de la ville de Laval depuis 20 ans. J'ai habité dans différents secteurs de cette ville. Au cours des dernières années, le bruit provenant des avions qui passent au-dessus de nos maisons s'est amplifié. Je le remarque davantage depuis que je suis consultant et que j'ai la possibilité de travailler à partir de la maison. Le bruit n'est pas acceptable. Laval est une banlieue de Montréal. On y achète des maisons pour vivre en paix et en toute tranquillité, mais ce n'est pas ce qu'on y trouve.

La gestion des aéroports a été privatisée pour les 60 prochaines années. Ce que je comprends, c'est que toutes les compagnies en cause, comme NAV CANADA et ADM, se foutent éperdument de la population.

Présentement, les avions doivent monter jusqu'à une altitude de 1 000 mètres avant de pouvoir effectuer un virage. C'est que qu'ils font. Lorsqu'ils atteignent cette altitude, ils sont à 10 kilomètres de l'aéroport de Dorval, de sorte que les avions font leur virage directement au-dessus de chez nous. Puisqu'ils sont en train de monter, c'est une manoeuvre qui s'exécute à plein régime. Selon les relevés de bruit que j'ai pris, cela monte jusqu'à 65 décibels, et parfois même jusqu'à 80 décibels. Laval est une banlieue tranquille où les règlements sont censés limiter le bruit à 55 décibels. Pourtant, il se situe souvent au-dessus de cette norme. Cela nous empêche d'utiliser pleinement notre cour durant l'été. Même au cours des saisons plus froides, quand les fenêtres sont fermées, nous entendons encore tous les grondements. Tous les sons afférents entrent dans la maison. Je ne veux pas avoir à me construire un bunker pour y échapper. Je ne vois pas d'autres solutions présentement.

Nous avons eu une rencontre avec NAV CANADA et avec ADM. On nous a fait de belles façons. On a dit vouloir nous aider et régler les choses. Or, dans une lettre que nous avons reçue, il y a des informations contradictoires. Comme vous pourrez le constater dans les annexes qu'on vous distribuera, on mentionne le nombre de vols, l'altitude des vols et l'horaire des vols. Il y en a aussi jusqu'à tard le soir et pendant la nuit. Il y a de plus en plus de vols: le nombre de vols augmente de 7 % par année. C'est énormément de trafic. Pour des gens qui vivent en banlieue, c'est absolument inacceptable. Je suis vraiment désolé pour tous les gens qui vivent à Montréal et qui subissent cela encore plus fortement, mais c'est Montréal. Je ne connais pas la solution pour Montréal, mais pour ce qui est de Laval, il faut trouver des solutions.

NAV CANADA n'écoute pas. Le ministre Garneau a aussi écrit une lettre qui n'indique pas une volonté de faire quelque chose. Cela me surprend énormément qu'un gouvernement n'ait aucun droit de regard sur des compagnies privées. Je ne crois pas que ce soit vrai. Je crois que le gouvernement a un droit de regard sur tout ce qui se passe dans les communautés et dans le pays. Vous trouverez aussi en annexe la lettre de M. Garneau, ainsi que d'autres statistiques. Toutes les fois où les vents proviennent du nord-est ou de l'est, les avions décollent et survolent notre secteur. Laval ne fait pas partie de Montréal. Laval ne profite aucunement des retombées économiques provenant de l'aéroport.

J'ai entendu un autre témoin parler de Mirabel et dire que c'était un éléphant blanc. C'est bien beau de dire cela, mais j'ai fréquenté cet aéroport dans le temps, et il fonctionnait bien. Déplacer les vols de Mirabel à Dorval pour se rapprocher de Montréal a été une décision d'entreprise.

Je remercie le Comité de travailler dans le sens du respect des citoyens. J'espère que cela va mener quelque part.

(0950)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Castle ou Mme Tang, peu importe lequel des deux voudra faire l'exposé.

M. James Castle (président, Terranova International Public Safety Canada (Terranova Aerospace)):

C'est Mme Tang qui prendra la parole.

Mme Priscilla Tang (première vice-présidente, Terranova International Public Safety Canada (Terranova Aerospace)):

Merci et bonjour, madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité.

Je m'appelle Priscilla Tang et je suis première vice-présidente de Terranova Aerospace. Permettez-moi de vous présenter le président de l'entreprise, M. James Castle.

Nous vous remercions d'avoir entrepris cette évaluation de l’incidence du bruit des avions près des grands aéroports canadiens. Merci également de nous donner l'occasion de comparaître à tire de témoins. Vous nous avez demandé de donner notre point de vue sur la question et sur tout autre enjeu important en la matière.

L'amélioration de la sécurité aérienne au Canada est un sujet d'importance nationale. L'amélioration de la sécurité aérienne au Canada telle qu'elle s'applique à tous les aéronefs, aux systèmes d'aéronefs télépilotés, aux véhicules aériens sans pilote et aux systèmes d'aéronefs sans pilote communément appelés drones est un enjeu d'importance nationale et internationale. Dans l'industrie des drones, le Canada est bien placé pour être un chef de file en matière d'innovation, de développement économique et d'utilisation aux fins de sécurité publique.

Les drones peuvent être utilisés pour sauver des vies. Chez Terranova Aerospace, nous sommes motivés par l'objectif que nous nous sommes donné de sauver des vies. Tout ce que nous faisons est conforme aux mandats de Sécurité publique Canada et vise à renforcer l'infrastructure canadienne de gestion des urgences. Les drones que nous utilisons — le système d'aéronef sans pilote Silent Falcon — sont des aéronefs à voilure fixe de quatre mètres d'envergure qui peuvent monter à une altitude de 20 000 pieds. Ces appareils peuvent être utilisés dans les opérations de recherche et de sauvetage déployés pour retrouver des personnes disparues dans des conditions météorologiques difficiles ou sur des terrains accidentés qu'on ne saurait atteindre de façon sécuritaire avec des hélicoptères et des aéronefs civils pilotés par des humains. On n'a qu'à penser aux avalanches, aux feux de forêt et autres catastrophes naturelles.

Aux États-Unis, nos véhicules aériens sans pilote sont utilisés pour aider le gouvernement américain à lutter contre les feux de forêt, à effectuer des opérations de recherche et sauvetage, à gérer des urgences, et à mener à bien la gestion des terres et de la faune.

Les drones peuvent prêter main-forte pour la récupération de restes humains. Avec le concours de la technologie de détection à infrarouge et de l'intelligence artificielle, les drones pourraient localiser avec précision l'emplacement de restes humains dans les sépultures de guerre marines du Canada.

Les drones font l'objet d'innovations sans précédent à l'échelle mondiale et ils sont de plus en plus accessibles. Aujourd'hui, n'importe qui peut acheter un drone chez son marchand d'électronique ou en ligne. L'espace aérien est soudainement devenu accessible au citoyen ordinaire et il n'est plus la chasse gardée des pilotes.

Terranova Aerospace travaille présentement à la mise au point d'une solution à données évolutives semblable à celle qu'utilise Google Maps ou Waze, solution qui intégrera l'intelligence artificielle, la chaîne de blocs et les mégadonnées pour cartographier l'espace aérien canadien à l'intention de l'utilisateur commun. Les capacités que nous cherchons à développer à l'intention de ces utilisateurs de l'espace aérien seront semblables à celles qui permettent actuellement aux automobilistes, par l'intermédiaire d'une application sur leur téléphone intelligent, d'obtenir des directions, et des informations sur la circulation et la sécurité pour atteindre leur destination.

Enfin, les drones constituent une occasion incontournable de développement économique pour le Canada. Pour peu qu'il se donne une réglementation adéquate pour s'assurer que tous les aéronefs, avec ou sans pilote, seront suivis et exploités en toute sécurité, le Canada pourrait devenir un chef de file mondial dans le développement de cette industrie et profiter des retombées économiques connexes.

Nous vous invitons à travailler avec nous: Terranova Aerospace peut être votre partenaire pour assurer le développement et l'optimisation du potentiel de cette nouvelle industrie afin que le Canada puisse devenir un chef de file dans l'exploitation des drones aux fins de sécurité publique, d'innovation et de prospérité économique.

Merci, madame la présidente, de nous avoir donné l'occasion de faire cette présentation.

(0955)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à Mme Jovanovic.

Mme Julia Jovanovic (candidate au doctorat, University of Windsor, à titre personnel):

Bonjour. Je m'appelle Julia Jovanovic et je fais partie d'une équipe de recherche de l'université de Windsor, en Ontario.

En collaboration avec l’Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto, mon équipe et moi travaillons sur un projet portant sur l'analyse des effets qu'a le bruit des avions sur les collectivités voisines des aéroports. Notre travail porte principalement sur l'irritation sonore que causent les avions.

Je suis ici aujourd'hui pour entretenir le Comité au sujet de l'importance d'étudier l'irritation que cause le bruit des avions à l'échelle nationale, et pour présenter les plus récentes découvertes à ce sujet afin d'aider le Comité dans cette étude.

En outre, j'aimerais exhorter les autorités compétentes à effectuer des études épidémiologiques localisées afin de faire le suivi d'indicateurs de santé objectifs chez les personnes touchées de manière à cerner avec certitude les risques relatifs pour la santé associés aux différents degrés d'exposition au bruit des avions.

L'irritation est l'effet le plus courant du bruit dans les collectivités, et l'Organisation mondiale de la santé la considère comme étant néfaste pour la santé. Au cours des dernières années, l'irritation a suscité beaucoup d'attention, car elle n'est plus seulement considérée comme l'effet le plus probable de l'environnement sonore sur la santé, mais aussi comme un facteur pouvant contribuer de manière importante aux risques relatifs à d'autres problèmes de santé.

Les résultats des enquêtes sur l'irritation sont à la base de l'établissement des seuils d'exposition au bruit, de la réglementation et des efforts d'atténuation du bruit. Par conséquent, toute initiative visant à réduire les effets du bruit des avions sur les personnes doit en fin de compte s'efforcer de réduire cette irritation et, par le fait même, d'atténuer d'autres effets néfastes sur la santé.

De plus en plus d'études récentes laissent entendre que l'irritation sonore causée par les transports est à la hausse. Un nombre grandissant de gens témoignent des degrés d'inconfort élevés en présence de niveaux d'exposition sonores plus faibles que jamais auparavant. De tous les moyens de transport, l'avion est celui dont le bruit est perçu comme étant le plus irritant. Compte tenu des prévisions d'augmentation continue de la capacité dans les principaux aéroports du monde entier et de l'augmentation avérée de l'irritation provoquée par le bruit des avions, il n'a jamais été aussi crucial d'étudier la question de façon approfondie et de trouver des solutions pour atténuer et gérer cette irritation.

Étant donné l'importance cruciale que revêt ce phénomène, il est essentiel que la question soit étudiée en profondeur tout en gardant à l'esprit quelques considérations très importantes. Premièrement, l'atténuation du bruit et l'atténuation de l'irritation causée par le bruit ne sont pas une seule et même chose. Il s'agit là d'une distinction importante, car il existe des exemples d'efforts de réduction du bruit qui n'ont pas permis de réduire l'irritation de façon significative, comme cela s'est vu, notamment, avec l'interdiction nocturne de Francfort. Deuxièmement, l'irritation est un phénomène psychologique et sociologique complexe qui ne peut être prédit ou réglementé simplement et précisément par une dynamique dose-réponse.

De façon succincte, disons qu'une dynamique dose-réponse est un outil couramment utilisé pour prédire l'irritation. Essentiellement, cela consiste à utiliser une courbe dérivée de données sur l'irritation corrélée à des niveaux d'exposition au bruit modélisés pour établir qu'à certains niveaux d'exposition, tel pourcentage de la population sera fortement irrité. Pour expliquer cela simplement, c'est comme si l'on essayait de prédire comment les gens de tout le pays se sentiront par rapport au temps qu'il fait, alors qu'on ne dispose que de la température extérieure. Bien que la température soit un indicateur clé, elle ne suffit pas pour présumer du confort ou de l'inconfort des gens. D'autres facteurs sont pertinents, et peut-être encore plus révélateurs. Il faut, par exemple, tenir compte des précipitations, de l'humidité relative, de l'emplacement, des préférences individuelles, etc.

De même, la réponse hautement subjective de ce qui est ressenti comme de l'irritation ne peut pas être prédite uniquement par l'exposition globale au bruit, au niveau sonore d'un environnement. D'autres aspects acoustiques et non acoustiques névralgiques doivent être examinés, comme la qualité du son, les niveaux de bruit de fond, les attitudes envers la source de bruit et envers les autorités, les capacités d'adaptation, la sensibilité individuelle au bruit et plus encore. Il est essentiel que les facteurs acoustiques et non acoustiques soient pris en compte dans l'étude de l'irritation. Une compréhension approfondie des facteurs non acoustiques qui contribuent à l'irritation pourrait déboucher sur de nouvelles approches en matière d'atténuation.

(1000)



Enfin, le Canada a besoin d'un examen et d'une vérification appropriés des paramètres et des seuils actuels d'exposition au bruit et de nuisance sonore, car ces paramètres sont très désuets. En outre, ils n'ont jamais été corroborés par les résultats des enquêtes canadiennes qui ont été menées à ce sujet. Il s'agit là d'une étape nécessaire pour garantir que la politique actuelle de réduction du bruit répond à son objectif.

Je vous remercie du temps que vous m'avez accordé. Je serai heureuse de répondre à vos questions.

La présidente:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant céder la parole à Mme Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente, et je remercie nos témoins de leur présence parmi nous.

Il s'agit de notre toute première réunion concernant l'étude et l'évaluation de l’incidence du bruit des avions près des grands aéroports canadiens. Nous avons déjà commencé à comprendre qu'il s'agit d'une question très complexe et qu'il n'y a pas de réponse facile. Lors de la comparution du groupe d'experts précédent, mon collègue a fort habilement souligné la tension qui existe entre des valeurs concurrentes, souvent entre le grand public, les collectivités, les voyageurs et les entreprises.

Je me réjouis des exposés que vous avez faits.

J'aimerais poser une question à Terranova International Public Safety Canada.

La technologie des systèmes d'aéronefs pilotés à distance peut-elle offrir des solutions aux problèmes de bruit dans l'aviation?

M. James Castle:

Oui, absolument. Lorsque l'avion Silent Falcon vole à une centaine de pieds au-dessus d'une zone habitée ou d'une zone réglementée, il ne produit pratiquement aucun son. Ainsi, la question de l'évitement de tout type de bruit d'avion n'est clairement pas un... Cela n'aurait pas lieu d'être.

Les seuls types de variations que vous auriez, à mesure que les drones deviennent plus populaires au Canada et que les gens les font voler autour des zones sinistrées, des feux de forêt et ainsi de suite... Ils viennent aussi à proximité des aéroports, et ils peuvent causer beaucoup de dommages aux aéronefs, tant au sol et qu'au décollage.

Pour revenir à la question, les sons des drones sont pratiquement nuls, de n'importe quelle distance, au décollage, dans les airs et à l'approche. Donc, si on les utilise conformément aux lignes directrices sur la gestion des urgences pour fournir des services de recherche et de sauvetage ou à d'autres fins, il ne s'agit pas d'une période prolongée d'émissions sonores. Le système d'aéronef télépiloté, le RPAS, peut voler pendant cinq heures et, aux termes d'une entente avec la Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, la DARPA, nous envisageons de les perfectionner pour qu'ils puissent rester dans les airs indéfiniment.

L'importance de couper le son est une préoccupation clé dans ce que nous faisons.

(1005)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Jovanovic, j'ai aimé votre témoignage. Vous avez peut-être déjà répondu à ma question dans vos observations liminaires, mais je veux la formuler autrement et peut-être vous donner l'occasion de nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet.

Nous savons que les principaux aéroports du Canada sont situés dans des endroits très divers. Quels sont les facteurs locaux qui devraient être pris en compte lors de l'élaboration de stratégies visant à atténuer le bruit causé par le trafic aérien?

Mme Julia Jovanovic:

Merci d'avoir posé la question.

Comme vous l'avez dit d'entrée de jeu, c'est un sujet très complexe. Il y a de nombreux facteurs dont il faut tenir compte, et ils sont très particuliers à chaque endroit. Il est donc essentiel que des études soient effectuées là où l'on cherche à proposer certaines mesures d'atténuation. Les facteurs peuvent varier selon les populations — les types de logements, le zonage, le type de quartier, les niveaux de bruit ambiant.

Dans son exposé, M. Isaac a souligné que, dans certains quartiers, le bruit ambiant est relativement faible, de sorte que tout passage aérien causerait une perturbation importante. En revanche, dans un environnement urbain plus dense où le bruit ambiant dépasse 40 décibels, le survol d'un aéronef ne sera peut-être pas perçu comme quelque chose de dérangeant.

Toute étude qui sera menée doit tenir compte des caractéristiques précises du lieu visé, y compris tous les facteurs personnels, attitudinaux et culturels propres à cet endroit. Les données ont montré qu'il existe des écarts importants dans les résultats des enquêtes réalisées dans différentes régions.

J'espère avoir répondu à votre question.

Mme Kelly Block:

Absolument. Je vous remercie.

La présidente:

Passons à M. Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins d'être parmi nous et de nous livrer leurs témoignages.

Monsieur Isaac, je vous remercie d'être venu de Laval. Vous êtes un citoyen de ma circonscription.

Pourriez-vous faire part au Comité de votre expérience concernant le bruit des avions qui survolent votre domicile? Vous me l'avez déjà expliqué, mais pouvez-vous dire au Comité ce que vous avez fait pendant l'été pour déterminer la trajectoire des avions?

M. Chris Isaac:

L'été à la maison, nous allons à l'extérieur et nous utilisons notre piscine. Or si nous sommes en train de converser et qu'un avion passe, nous sommes obligés d'interrompre la conversation et d'attendre que l'avion soit suffisamment loin pour la reprendre. Nous entendons les avions pendant tout le temps qu'ils passent, et pas seulement quand ils survolent la maison. Nous les entendons arriver, et quand ils survolent la maison, c'est vraiment un vrombissement que nous entendons. Comme nous ne voulons pas crier à tue-tête pour nous parler, nous cessons nos conversations et attendons que l'avion se soit éloigné pour les reprendre. Tous ces avions viennent faire un virage près de chez nous pour ensuite se diriger vers l'ouest, que ce soit vers Toronto, l'Alberta, Vancouver ou ailleurs.

Ce bruit est inacceptable, surtout dans une communauté où les gens se soucient du bruit. Nous surveillons le bruit que nous faisons. Par exemple, ceux qui ont des chiens doivent les empêcher d'aboyer, ou encore nous ne sortons pas nos chaînes audio à l'extérieur.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Depuis combien de temps analysez-vous le problème du bruit causé par les avions? Comment a-t-il évolué?

(1010)

M. Chris Isaac:

Cela fait au moins quatre ans. Le problème existait sûrement auparavant, mais comme j'étais souvent en déplacement ou en voyage, je ne le remarquais pas autant. En fait, j'utilisais les avions. Cependant, j'étais loin de m'imaginer qu'ils me feraient autant souffrir.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Pouvez-vous nous dire quels types d'appareils survolent votre domicile et à quelle fréquence? Selon ce que vous m'avez déjà dit, vous êtes même capable de déterminer de quels types d'avions il s'agit. Pouvez-vous nous donner plus de précisions?

M. Chris Isaac:

Il y a toute la série des Airbus, les Boeing 737-7CT, les Bombardier CRJ700, les Embraer ERJ175 SU, les Boeing 737-436. Les compagnies sont Air Canada, le réseau Star Alliance d'Air Canada, Air Canada Rouge, Delta Connection, GoJet, Sunwing, WestJet, et j'en passe. Ces avions passent tous au-dessus de ma maison.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Nous pouvons en conclure que vous arrivez à très bien voir les avions qui survolent votre maison.

M. Chris Isaac:

Oui, assez bien.

M. Angelo Iacono:

À quelle fréquence et à quels moments précis de la journée cela se passe-t-il? Est-ce seulement le jour? Y a-t-il des avions la nuit ou tôt le matin?

M. Chris Isaac:

C'est à toute heure du jour. La fréquence varie. Je n'ai pas noté tous les jours, mais j'ai pris des échantillons. Cela peut avoir lieu facilement soixante fois par jour, et ce, jusqu'à 23 h 30.

Il y a aussi les avions à hélices, par exemple les Citation Sovereign, les Dash 8 Q300 et Q400, qui se rendent à Kuujjuaq, à Chibougamau, à Sept-Îles, à Québec. Ils passent tous très près des maisons.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Vous dites avoir pris des échantillons. Que voulez-vous dire par là, exactement?

M. Chris Isaac:

Je vous ai fait parvenir des annexes, mais elles ne se trouvent pas encore sur votre table. Lorsque vous y aurez accès, vous verrez qu'elles indiquent tout plein d'information sur les avions qui survolent ma maison, par exemple la série d'avions, l'heure à laquelle ils passent et les numéros de vol. On peut vraiment constater de quels types d'avions il s'agit.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Avez-vous déjà analysé le bruit? Autrement dit, avez-vous un appareil qui vous permet de mesurer les niveaux de bruit atteints?

M. Chris Isaac:

Oui, j'ai pris des mesures au décibelmètre. On se souviendra que les gens d'Aéroports de Montréal ont mis en doute la validité de mon appareil. Or je m'en suis servi dans le cadre d'événements où l'on doit limiter le son à un certain nombre de décibels, par exemple lors d'Osheaga, à Montréal. Les résultats donnés par mon appareil étaient comparables à ceux des appareils de la Ville. Si les appareils de la Ville ne sont pas bons, je me demande bien lesquels peuvent l'être. Le niveau atteint 65 décibels et dépasse parfois 80 décibels.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Avez-vous fait une analyse quotidiennement au moyen cet appareil?

M. Chris Isaac:

Je l'ai fait plusieurs fois.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Nous avez-vous également fourni ces données?

M. Chris Isaac:

Je ne sais pas si cela fait partie des photos que je vous ai remises, mais j'en ai une qui indique un résultat de près de 72 décibels.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Vous... [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Iacono. C'est tout le temps que nous avons.

Monsieur Aubin, c'est à vous. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie nos invités d'être parmi nous.

Je poursuis la conversation avec vous, monsieur Isaac.

Vous avez parlé tout à l'heure de vos rapports avec ADM. Avez-vous des contacts réguliers, ou n'y a-t-il eu qu'une rencontre, qui s'est terminée de la manière dont vous l'avez mentionné?

M. Chris Isaac:

Dans un premier temps, j'ai envoyé mes requêtes à M. Iacono, qui est le député de ma circonscription, Alfred-Pellan. Nous avons envoyé une lettre à ADM et, par la suite, nous avons eu une rencontre avec des représentants d'ADM. Des gens de NAV CANADA étaient également présents. On nous a dit qu'on allait faire quelque chose.

M. Robert Aubin:

Toutefois, il n'y a pas eu de suivi.

M. Chris Isaac:

Il y a eu des lettres contradictoires, comme vous pourrez le constater dans les annexes que je vous ai remises. On avance certaines choses, mais on dit plus loin qu'il n'y a pas de solution.

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord.

Je crois que vous avez fait allusion à votre changement de carrière, qui vous permettait de travailler à la maison maintenant.

M. Chris Isaac:

Oui.

M. Robert Aubin:

Est-ce que vous êtes de retour à Laval, ou est-ce que vous y étiez auparavant?

M. Chris Isaac:

J'y étais déjà. J'ai tout le temps habité à Laval.

M. Robert Aubin:

À présent, vous êtes plus à même de mesurer réellement la nuisance.

(1015)

M. Chris Isaac:

Oui, car je suis plus présent à la maison.

M. Robert Aubin:

Constatez-vous une différence dans le voisinage? Par exemple, est-ce que des gens vendent leur résidence parce qu'ils n'en peuvent plus de ce bruit?

M. Chris Isaac:

C'est vraiment paradoxal, parce qu'il y a beaucoup de gens qui ont déjà déménagé de Montréal à Laval, à cause du bruit intolérable à Montréal, et ces gens considèrent actuellement déménager de Laval. Moi-même, j'ai un ami technicien à qui j'ai parlé d'une maison à vendre près de chez moi, et il m'en parle déjà. Il me dit que cela n'a pas de sens, d'autant plus qu'il a un bébé. Il pourrait même nous fournir son témoignage.

Cette situation est très agaçante. Comme je le disais plus tôt, nous, les citoyens, faisons attention de ne pas faire trop de bruit, alors pourquoi les compagnies aériennes peuvent-elles arriver n'importe où, avec leurs gros sabots, et nous imposer tout ce bruit?

M. Robert Aubin:

On commence à avoir une bonne idée de la situation quand on voit que, depuis à peu près une décennie, Transports Canada abdique systématiquement ses responsabilités au profit de l'industrie.

J'aimerais maintenant poursuivre avec vous, madame Jovanovic.

Vous avez dit plus tôt que le Canada devait revoir les seuils d'exposition au bruit, parce que ses modèles sont désuets et qu'ils ne seraient pas corroborés par un certain nombre d'études.

Est-ce que le premier problème lié au sujet que nous étudions présentement pourrait être l'impossibilité d'obtenir des données probantes qui nous permettraient de comprendre la situation et de trouver des solutions? [Traduction]

Mme Julia Jovanovic:

Je crois fermement qu'il y a un manque de données probantes pour le Canada. J'examine cette question depuis un certain temps déjà. Je constate qu'il manque beaucoup de données pour évaluer de possibles mesures d'atténuation.

Je faisais référence aux courbes de niveau de la prévision de l'ambiance sonore, la PAS, et en particulier aux mesures désuètes qui sont actuellement utilisées comme lignes directrices par Transports Canada. Ces courbes de niveau se veulent avant tout un outil d'aménagement du territoire. Essentiellement, elles prédisent le bruit à venir et son incidence au sol.

Actuellement, Transports Canada recommande de ne pas aménager de nouveaux ensembles résidentiels dans les secteurs où le coefficient PAS dépasse 30, et de prévoir une forme d'insonorisation là où ce coefficient est de 25.

Quoi qu'il en soit, ces lignes directrices n'ont pas été examinées ou corroborées par des enquêtes canadiennes sur l'irritation, qui sont les outils utilisés pour déterminer combien de personnes seront incommodées par tel ou tel niveau d'exposition. Ces lignes directrices ont été établies dans les années 1970 à partir d'une analyse effectuée aux États-Unis pour de multiples formes de transport, et pas seulement pour le bruit des avions. De nombreux pays à travers le monde ont entrepris de revoir ces seuils et les mesures qu'ils utilisent afin d'être mieux équipés pour prédire les effets du bruit des avions sur les communautés situées à proximité des couloirs aériens ou des aéroports.

Si nous n'avons pas une version mise à jour d'une mesure comme celle-là ou de lignes directrices comme celles-là, même les mesures actuellement prises en matière d'aménagement du territoire ne seront pas efficaces.

Les choses ont changé. Nous assistons à une recrudescence des nuisances sonores causées par des avions, mais à des fréquences inférieures. Cela n'est pas pris en compte actuellement.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Aubin.

Monsieur Hardie, nous vous écoutons.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Madame Jovanovic, tout d'abord, j'aimerais faire une petite mise au point acoustique. Vous n'avez pas à vous pencher sur votre microphone. La prononciation percutante des « p » heurte les oreilles de nos traducteurs.

Mme Julia Jovanovic: Toutes mes excuses.

M. Ken Hardie: La technique du microphone: j'en ai fait ma vie pendant un certain temps.

Un député: À faire du bruit.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Ken Hardie: Vous avez dit que l'irritation peut contribuer à d'autres problèmes de santé. Maintenant, je vais peut-être vous poser quelques questions qui mettront en évidence le fait que nous n'en savons pas assez pour l'instant. Se peut-il que ce soit le contraire qui se produise? Se peut-il qu'une personne ait certains traits particuliers de santé qui la rendraient plus susceptible d'être irritée par le bruit? Que sait-on à ce sujet?

Mme Julia Jovanovic:

Merci d'avoir posé cette question. C'est de là que vient ma recommandation pour un examen plus approfondi de la question de l'irritation. Dès les années 1960, les scientifiques et les experts étaient conscients du rôle joué par la sensibilité personnelle au bruit dans l'évaluation de l'irritation. Il y a des facteurs, des facteurs personnels, qui peuvent avoir une incidence sur l'évaluation de l'irritation, des facteurs susceptibles d'amplifier ou d'atténuer cette irritation.

Je suis certaine que dans cette salle, tous les gens ne réagiront pas de la même façon à, par exemple, ce bruit qui continue de nous interrompre en arrière-plan. Il s'agit d'une mesure très subjective. C'est l'ensemble des facteurs qui nourrissent cette irritation qui doit être examiné pour déterminer ce qu'il y a de mieux à faire pour les atténuer. La sensibilité au bruit s'est révélée être l'un des facteurs importants qui contribuent à l'irritation.

(1020)

M. Ken Hardie:

Pour en revenir à mes observations de tout à l'heure, je signale qu'il fût un temps où je travaillais à la programmation de stations de radio. J'ai constaté que les hommes et les femmes réagissaient très différemment aux facteurs d'irritation. C'est quelque chose dont nous tenions compte au moment de programmer la musique — le tempo, le type d'instrumentation, etc.

Cela dit, avons-nous des données qui montrent comment les hommes et les femmes réagissent différemment au bruit?

Mme Julia Jovanovic:

Très certainement, et les données varient. Des sondages qui ont été menés dans les années 1970 indiquaient que les hommes et les femmes ne réagissaient pas de façon bien différente. Toutefois, des sondages plus récents, qui ont été menés dans différentes régions, bien entendu, indiquent au contraire que les femmes sont plus incommodées par de faibles niveaux de bruit que les hommes. Les conclusions varient également à cet égard.

M. Ken Hardie:

Notre capacité d'entendre divers sons, surtout différentes fréquences, change à mesure que nous vieillissons. Y a-t-il des fréquences émises par des moteurs d'avion qui ont tendance à pénétrer? Est-ce que certaines fréquences émises par les avions constituent la plus grande source d'irritation causée?

Mme Julia Jovanovic:

Vous soulevez un point très important, et je vous en remercie. Lorsqu'on parle du bruit des avions, la qualité du son est très importante. Jusqu'à présent la réglementation a toujours été basée sur le niveau sonore — la mesure dans laquelle le son est fort —, mais cela n'explique pas les différences chez les individus: une personne peut être très incommodée par la circulation routière et l'être tout autant par le niveau de bruit d'un avion, qui est plus faible que celui émis par la circulation routière. Tout n'est pas lié au volume. C'est lié au volume d'une certaine façon et à la qualité du son d'une autre façon. La fréquence est très pertinente.

Généralement, lorsqu'on est en présence de sons purs, qui constituent une fréquence dominante, cela suscite une très forte réaction de la part d'un récepteur, d'une personne. Il en est habituellement de même des hautes fréquences. Les basses fréquences pénètrent la maison, par exemple, plus facilement, et peuvent causer une vibration.

C'est une autre voie qui a été proposée pour la recherche. En fait, dans le cadre d'une étude européenne, on a pris le profil sonore de différents types de jet et on a demandé aux membres de la collectivité d'ajuster certains aspects de la qualité du son pour obtenir un son généralement plus agréable. On n'en avait pas réduit le volume, remarquez. La composition du son était simplement différente, et il était alors moins irritant.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Monsieur Isaac, je vous remercie de votre témoignage. Vous montrez très clairement qu'il s'agit d'un problème national, car tout ce que vous disiez est exprimé dans ma circonscription également. Je vous en remercie.

Je vais d'abord m'adresser à M. Castle et à Mme Tang.

Lorsqu'on m'a parlé des drones pour la première fois, j'ai pensé que c'était très bien, car j'ai lu dans un article qu'on avait utilisé un drone pour envoyer un défibrillateur à une personne qui vivait en région éloignée. La personne a été sauvée et a pu se rendre à l'hôpital à temps.

Depuis, il semble que nous ne sommes limités que par notre imagination concernant leurs capacités et l'utilisation que nous pouvons en faire. Toutefois, comme vous l'avez dit, on est également très préoccupé par leur dangerosité. Je sais qu'à l'aéroport Pearson, juste à côté de la circonscription que je représente, à bien des reprises, des collisions impliquant des drones utilisés à des fins récréatives ont été évitées de justesse. On en a trouvé sur la piste. On ne peut qu'imaginer ce qui se serait passé si un drone était entré en collision avec un avion.

Vous avez mentionné que vous êtes en train de cartographier l'espace aérien à l'intention des individus. Je me demande comment cela interagirait avec le géorepérage. Par exemple, les aéroports auraient-ils le droit d'interdire l'utilisation d'un espace?

(1025)

Mme Priscilla Tang:

Oui, cela correspond exactement à la capacité qui y serait intégrée. L'objectif est en partie de délimiter des zones interdites d'accès aux gens qui pilotent des drones à des fins récréatives — comme les aéroports et même des sépultures de guerre marines. L'utilisateur commun aurait accès à cette information, de la même façon que lorsque nous utilisons Google Maps ou Waze, nous obtenons de l'information importante sur la circulation, sur une zone de construction à éviter.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Cette plateforme serait-elle accessible sous forme d'application?

Mme Priscilla Tang:

Oui. Elle serait facilement intégrée à la technologie que nous utilisons tous. Ce serait accessible sur le nuage, les téléphones intelligents, les iPad et les ordinateurs, ainsi qu'à distance.

Par exemple, dans la réglementation sur les drones, si nous devions simplement installer un routeur ou un appareil GPS, comme un blockchain router, sur chaque drone au Canada, alors Transports Canada et d'autres organismes gouvernementaux, de même que les aéroports et les pilotes, seraient en mesure de surveiller en tout temps où se trouvent les drones dans l'espace aérien.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Je dois toujours poser une question sur l'aspect sécuritaire. Est-ce que ce sera sécuritaire ou vous croyez qu'il pourrait y avoir piratage? Quels dispositifs de sécurité sont intégrés s'il y a piratage?

Mme Priscilla Tang:

Si les données étaient piratées?

M. Gagan Sikand: Oui.

Mme Priscilla Tang: Eh bien, l'idée, en fait, c'est de rendre ces données accessibles au public, de la même façon que nous pouvons accéder aux données lorsque nous utilisons Google Maps ou Waze. Tout le monde peut voir l'information sur la circulation. Tout le monde peut voir les routes en construction et à quel endroit se trouvent les autres voitures. L'idée, c'est que pour favoriser la sécurité publique, nous rendons les données accessibles au plus grand nombre de gens possible.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Jovanovic, vous avez dit que l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé considère le bruit comme une source d'irritation. S'agit-il du bruit des avions ou du bruit en général?

Mme Julia Jovanovic:

Il s'agit du bruit provenant de divers moyens de transport, dont le train, l'automobile et l'avion. Il y a également le bruit industriel, le bruit associé au divertissement et aux loisirs, etc. — tous ces différents types de bruit causent de l'irritation.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Est-ce qu'on utilise une mesure différente pour le bruit d'un avion, ou bien on utilise toujours les décibels?

Mme Julia Jovanovic:

Ce sont habituellement des données cumulatives. Au Canada, pour le bruit des avions, il s'agit des prévisions d'ambiance sonore. Toutefois, ailleurs dans le monde, on a déterminé que l'indice Lden était meilleur.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps.

Vous avez dit que nous devenons plus sensibles à de faibles niveaux de bruits. Cela inclut-il le bruit d'un drone?

Mme Julia Jovanovic:

Je ne peux avancer d'hypothèses à cet égard. J'imagine que cela pourrait être le cas de certaines personnes. Ce serait alors une question de préférence.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Est-ce que...

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, mais votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Bienvenue au Comité. Je vous remercie de votre présence.

Je comprends la contradiction à laquelle nous sommes confrontés, essentiellement.

Je viens d'Edmonton, et il y a un aéroport qui est situé à une bonne distance du centre-ville et d'un certain nombre de résidences. Malgré l'expansion, il est toujours à une bonne distance des propriétés résidentielles. On entend souvent des gens d'Edmonton se plaindre du fait qu'il n'y a pas d'aéroport près de la ville. Des avions passent au-dessus de ma circonscription. Cependant, je ne dirais pas que j'entends autant de bruit que peut-être certains de mes collègues. Nul doute que les analystes auront déjà relevé cette contradiction dans l'étude.

J'espère que des données existent, et j'espère qu'en tant que témoins, vous êtes en mesure de nous dire où nous pouvons les trouver. Actuellement, les aéroports ont une réglementation visant à résoudre les problèmes de bruit. Par exemple, les avions doivent voler dans un certain angle, à une altitude donnée, et il y a des règles liées à leur descente, etc. Y a-t-il des conséquences si les règles ne sont pas respectées? Les pilotes sont-ils pénalisés? D'après votre expérience, qu'arrive-t-il si la réglementation n'est pas respectée?

(1030)

Mme Julia Jovanovic:

Lorsque des pratiques exemplaires établies par l'aéroport, ou par Nav Canada, ne sont pas respectées, et qu'on le signale, les autorités compétentes enquêtent sur la situation et on peut déterminer qu'il convient d'imposer une amende.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Avons-nous des données sur le nombre de personnes qui reçoivent des amendes, le nombre de conséquences...?

Mme Julia Jovanovic:

Je ne peux parler au nom de tous les aéroports canadiens, mais je sais que l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto publie un rapport annuel sur le nombre de plaintes reçues, le nombre de plaintes qui ont fait l'objet d'une enquête pour violation, le nombre d'enquêtes qui ont abouti à l'imposition d'une amende, etc.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Les aéroports font état de cela.

Je m'attends à ce que nous fassions une recommandation à Transports Canada dans notre rapport. Si nous recommandons que le ministère fasse ce suivi pour chaque aéroport, s'agit-il là de l'information que nous devrions conseiller à Transports Canada de recueillir?

Mme Julia Jovanovic:

Vous soulevez un dilemme très intéressant, car à l'heure actuelle, la reddition de comptes est plutôt vaste et affaiblie, et elle n'est pas claire, ni facilement suivie en quelque sorte. J'ai examiné la situation d'autres pays à cet égard, et je trouve qu'il est plus facile de résumer leurs pratiques que celles du Canada. À l'heure actuelle, le Canada n'a pas de méthodologie cohérente pour ce qui est, premièrement, de recueillir les données de tous les grands aéroports et, deuxièmement, de les communiquer clairement et efficacement à tous les intervenants, ce qui favoriserait un processus collaboratif de gestion ou de résolution du problème. Si l'on n'a pas l'information, on ne peut pas faire grand-chose pour gérer le problème, n'est-ce pas?

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Donc, les aéroports auraient l'information, ou parlons-nous des transporteurs?

Mme Julia Jovanovic:

Les aéroports recueillent l'information dans une certaine mesure par les terminaux de surveillance du bruit. Ils connaissent les attentes sur le plan du volume et du type d'avion. Or, dans des pays comme l'Australie, le gouvernement fédéral joue un rôle très actif dans la consolidation de cette information et s'assure que tous les aéroports en font rapport régulièrement et de façon claire.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Monsieur Isaac, avez-vous reçu une réponse au sujet de votre pétition? Malheureusement, le seuil de 500 n'a pas été atteint, mais le ministre vous a-t-il répondu?

M. Chris Isaac:

Non, pas vraiment. Nous n'avons rien reçu.

Concernant Nav Canada, dont vous venez de parler, je ne crois pas que l'organisme fait du bon travail pour ce qui est de tenir compte des citoyens. Il ne fait qu'éviter le problème.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Isaac.

Il reste quelques minutes pour M. Graham.

Il s'agit du temps qui était accordé à M. Badawey. Il est d'humeur généreuse aujourd'hui.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je lui en suis reconnaissant. Merci.

Je veux dire brièvement, monsieur Jeneroux, pour répondre à votre question, que la plupart de ces aéroports sont actifs dans ce que nous appelons l'espace aérien de classe C. Si vous contrevenez de façon importante à une règle, la tour vous donnera un numéro de téléphone auquel vous devrez appeler, ce qui signifie que vous êtes dans le pétrin.

Nous parlons du bruit d'un avion et j'essaie de faire le lien entre les avions et les drones. Où en sommes-nous sur le plan du transport de passagers par drone?

Mme Priscilla Tang:

Très bientôt... cela existe déjà dans un certain nombre de pays du Moyen-Orient, de pays arabes, comme à Dubaï. De plus, quand on parle d'Uber Air, il s'agit vraiment de drones transportant des passagers. C'est pourquoi la sécurité liée aux drones est aussi importante pour nous que les règles de sécurité qui existent pour les aéronefs de passagers, car bientôt, ce sera une seule et même chose.

(1035)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les pilotes devraient-ils être tenus d'apprendre le droit aérien?

Mme Priscilla Tang:

Je dirais que si nous devons tous obtenir un permis pour pouvoir piloter un avion et conduire une voiture ou un bateau, pourquoi ne nous faudrait-il pas en obtenir un pour piloter un drone?

Pour revenir à ce qui a été dit au sujet de la non-conformité, le problème concernant la réglementation est lié, bien sûr, à son application. Nous l'avons constaté avec Transports Canada. Il y a une importante occasion pour tous les secteurs de voir à l'application, dont l'application de la loi.

À l'heure actuelle, certaines amendes imposées à des pilotes de drones peuvent atteindre 50 000 $. Je vis près de l'aéroport Billy-Bishop, le long du lac à Toronto. Je vis également près d'un parc. Je vois constamment des drones qui sont utilisés à des fins récréatives. J'entends également beaucoup de bruits qui pourraient être mieux gérés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez parlé de la chaîne de blocs comme méthode de distribution. Nous avons déjà des transpondeurs mode S. A-t-on l'intention de munir chaque drone de transpondeurs mode S? Le bruit d'une collision entre un avion et un drone est assez fort, ce qui est tout à fait en rapport avec l'étude.

Mme Priscilla Tang:

Exactement, et on parle de la même fréquence, ce qui fait partie de la question de sécurité. Alors, oui, tout à fait.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Merci.

La présidente:

Je remercie les témoins. Nous vous remercions de votre participation.

Je vous demanderais de quitter la salle, puisque nous devons faire des travaux à huis clos pendant quelques minutes.

Merci beaucoup.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 23, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.