header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-02-21 TRAN 131

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I am calling to order meeting number 131 of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we are receiving a briefing on the transportation of flammable liquids by rail.

The witnesses we have here from 11 until 12 this morning are from the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board. We have with us the Chair, Kathleen Fox.

Welcome again, Ms. Fox. It's nice to see you.

Also with us are Faye Ackermans, Board Member.

We also have Kirby Jang, Director, Rail and Pipeline Investigations; and, Jean Laporte, Chief Operating Officer.

Welcome to all of you. Thank you for coming back.

Ms. Fox.

Ms. Kathleen Fox (Chair, Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board):

Madam Chair and honourable members, thank you for inviting the Transportation Safety Board of Canada to appear before you today so that we can answer your questions relating to the removal of the transportation of flammable liquids by rail from the most recent update to our watchlist.

First issued in 2010, the TSB's watchlist identifies the key safety issues that need to be addressed to make Canada's transportation system even safer. Each of the seven issues on the current edition is supported by a combination of investigation reports, board safety concerns and board recommendations. [Translation]

Over the years, the watchlist has served as both a call to action and a blueprint for change—a regular reminder to industry, to regulators, and to the public that the problems we highlight are complex, requiring coordinated action from multiple stakeholders in order to reduce the safety risks involved.

And that is exactly what has happened. As Canada's transportation network has evolved, so too has the watchlist: every two years, we put issues on it, call for change, and, when enough action has been taken that the risks have been sufficiently reduced, the issues are removed.[English]

As for the transportation of flammable liquids by rail, it was first added to the watchlist in 2014 in the wake of the terrible tragedy in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, and it was supported by a number of board recommendations. In 2016, we kept the issue on the watchlist. We were also explicit about the type of action we wanted to see—specifically, two things.

First, we called on railway companies to conduct thorough route planning and analysis and to perform risk assessments to ensure that risk control measures are effective. Second, we wanted more robust tank cars used when large quantities of flammable liquids are being transported by rail, in order to reduce the likelihood or consequences of a dangerous goods release following derailments.

Since then, Transport Canada and the industry have taken a number of positive steps. Notably, railway companies are conducting more route planning and risk assessments and have increased targeted track inspections when transporting large quantities of flammable liquids.

New standards were established for the construction of rail tank cars, and the replacement of the DOT-111 legacy cars—as in what occurred in Lac-Mégantic—was initiated. Then, in August 2018, the Minister of Transport ordered an accelerated timeline for removing the least crash-resistant rail tank cars. Specifically, as of November 2018, in addition to the earlier removal of the legacy DOT-111 cars, unjacketed CPC-1232s would no longer be used to carry crude oil and, as of January 1 of this year, they would not be transporting condensate either.

Given that kind of action, we removed the issue from the watchlist. However, that does not mean that all the risks have been eliminated or that the TSB has stopped watching.

On the contrary, we are still closely monitoring the transportation of flammable liquids by rail through our review of occurrence statistics, via our ongoing investigations and via the annual reassessment of our outstanding recommendations. To assist the committee, we are pleased to table today an extract from our most recent rail occurrence statistics showing accidents and incidents involving dangerous goods, including crude oil, from 2013 to 2018.

We are now prepared to answer your questions.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Fox. We'll go on to our questioners.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair. In light of the fact that this motion was brought forward by Mr. Aubin, I am going to trade spots and allow him to have the first line of questioning.

The Chair:

I think we have the best committee ever, right? Everybody gets along so well. Look at that.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC):

We aren't finished yet. Just wait.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you, Ms. Block.

I thank all the members of this committee for agreeing to hold this study.

We are looking into this issue because I feel that Canadians, who—like myself—are not experts on railway safety and are seeing the exponential growth of rail transportation, are generally worried about the increase in the number of incidents and need to be reassured, if that is possible.

Ms. Fox, you have already said that, if the risks increased, nothing was preventing the Transportation Safety Board of Canada, or TSB, from putting the issue back on the watchlist. What criteria would you use to make that decision? Instead of always reacting after an accident, would it to not be possible to proactively implement measures that help avoid those accidents?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

When we put an issue on the watchlist, it is because we have determined that a risk has not been sufficiently reduced. We ask the government, the regulatory organization or the industrial sector in question to take steps that would help further reduce those risks. We consider the statistics we have on incidents and accidents, as well as the recommendations that have not yet been implemented.

In the case of transportation of flammable liquids, we have noted that the actions we requested were taken, and that is why we removed that issue from the watchlist. However, if we note that risk management is declining and that the number of accidents is increasing significantly, we will consider the possibility of putting that issue back on the list.

(1105)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

You are talking about mitigation measures, which I understand. May I conclude from this that, if an issue is on the watchlist, it is because it poses an immediate danger requiring swift action, but if that issue is removed from the list, it is because the risk is considered to be controlled?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

The determining factor here is not that the risk is immediate, but rather that it is ongoing and persistent. The issues we have kept on the watchlist are there because the actions we think would better mitigate the risk have not yet been taken.

Concerning the transportation of flammable liquids, we realize that the risk involved in the transportation of dangerous goods by any mode of transportation is ongoing. In this case, the actions we wanted to see in terms of analysis, risk management and use of more crash-resistant tank cars have been taken. So we have removed that issue from the list.

However, we continue to monitor the statistics and conduct our investigations when necessary. No action has yet been taken in response to three of the five recommendations we issued in relation to the Lac-Mégantic incident, or in response to two other recommendations we proposed after other derailments in 2015. So it is clear that we have not stopped monitoring that safety issue.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

The transportation of goods by rail is increasingly prevalent. In your opening remarks, you talked about different car models. The issue of the DOT-111 models has not yet been completely resolved, but we are getting there, and the issue is behind us. As for the armoured CPC-1232 models that were supposed to be one of the alternatives to the DOT-111 models, recent derailments showed that a number of those cars were not crash-resistant. Thank goodness they were not transporting oil, but they could be used for that.

Does the TSB have reliability data for new types of cars, like the TC-117, which are supposed to be risk-free? In light of the latest derailments, have those new cars been taken into consideration? Have you examined their resistance and how they behave when impact or derailment occurs?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Before I yield the floor to my colleague, who could talk to you a bit about statistics, I just wanted to tell you that, when a derailment involving dangerous goods like crude oil takes place, we always look at the performance of the cars, which we compare to cars used in other accidents.

I will now ask Ms. Ackermans to explain what we have noted about changes in the distribution of tank cars over the last while. [English]

Ms. Faye Ackermans (Board Member, Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board):

We haven't tabled this, but we certainly could. When Lac-Mégantic happened, 80% of the tank cars in service for crude oil were DOT-111 or the CPC-1232 unjacketed, which we have called the least crash-resistant or the less robust tank cars. As of today, virtually all of those have been removed from service in North America, and now 80% of the cars are of a much higher quality. We are still looking at, and will continue to look at, when an accident happens, what happens to the cars involved.

In the most recent accident, only six or seven—we're not quite sure yet of the number—cars out of 37 that derailed were damaged. In Lac-Mégantic about 65 cars derailed and 63 were damaged in the accident. There's clearly a difference in the containment capability, but it will take more accidents for us to be able to have good numbers.

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin, your time is up.

We're on to Mr. Hardie.

(1110)

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'm looking at your statistics sheets here, and they show quite a number of occurrences in 2013 and 2014. There seems to have been a spike there. Would the bad weather conditions over that winter have played a factor in the ability of trains to stay on the tracks? Do we know anything about why we had that spike in occurrences?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I would have to go back and do a lot of analysis to determine that, but what we know is that in 2013 and 2014, the transportation of crude oil by rail was increasing significantly. During those years we had the Lac-Mégantic accident, in 2013.

Since then, and especially since 2015, there have been a number of actions taken by the industry and by the regulator to reduce the risk of a derailment or the consequences of a derailment. We also saw a drop in activity during a couple of years. I don't think you can make a direct cause and effect, especially since Lac-Mégantic happened in the summer, but there's no doubt that winter operations are much harder in terms of rail activities than are those in summer, because of the extreme cold conditions.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

There would seem to have been—and certainly this is what we have seen and heard about—an increase in the shipment of oil by rail simply because everybody's waiting for pipelines to be built, not least those who are on this side of the House.

The longer trains, heavier trains.... I'm not sure if the new cars in fact have more capacity per car than do some of the ones that have been taken out of service, but there does seem to be a perfect storm developing. When you add abnormally cold conditions that can spike, particularly at certain times of the year, it would seem that we're dealing with an elevated risk. I'm wondering if, in terms of the service characteristics, the way trains are put together, the length, etc., you're convinced that the railways are making those adjustments appropriately.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I'll ask Ms. Ackermans to respond.

Ms. Faye Ackermans:

I took at look, in the last few days, at how long some of these unit oil trains are. Typically, when we have an accident, they seem to be about 100 cars long, according to the data we have. In fact, the oil trains don't seem to be abnormally long compared to some of the other trains that the railroads put together.

With respect to capacity, the new cars have less capacity than the old ones because there's extra steel and extra insulation, so they actually hold a little bit less oil in each tank car.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

We know, of course, that it was oil from the Bakken oil fields that was involved in the Lac-Mégantic incident and that, as we learned just from the media reports, it is a much more flammable product than are many of the others. Do you know something about the mix that's being transported by rail? Are there still very high levels of the kind of oil that we had present in Lac-Mégantic being shipped, or are we dealing more now with diluted bitumen and some of those other less flammable products?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I don't know if we have the statistics in terms of the distribution of the type of oil. We certainly look at that during an investigation, and that will be part of the investigation into the most recent—last weekend's—accident in St. Lazare, Manitoba. What we can say is that since the last two major derailments in northern Ontario in 2015—if you look at the statistics—until last weekend, we had not had any significant derailment involving crude oil trains. We'll look at that in the context of the ongoing investigation for St. Lazare.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Now, we also had that incident in the Rockies near Field, B.C. It was just last week or the week before, very, very recently. Of course, anybody who remembers Lac-Mégantic could see some similarities. A train that was parked all of a sudden started to roll. The minister came out with a ministerial order very quickly.

Does that incident concern you? Do you think that the remedies that the minister has required to be put in place now until further notice will be adequate? Do we need even further investigation of the safety equipment present on trains?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

With respect to the investigation into the accident in Field, British Columbia, that accident is currently under investigation. The circumstances were different in Lac-Mégantic; it was an unattended train that was improperly secured that ran away. In this particular accident, there were crew aboard the train, and it would be premature for us to determine—we haven't determined yet, we're doing the investigation—all the factors that were at play.

I think any action that the minister takes to reduce the risk of a loss of control is good. Whether it's adequate remains to be seen once we have further information about what caused that particular accident.

(1115)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I want to thank you for appearing here today to provide testimony on removing the transportation of flammable liquids from your watchlist.

It's already been referenced in light of the three recent derailments in as many weeks. I think the first was on January 24, the next one was on February 4 and now February 14. We've been seeing these derailments happen. Of course, there was the very tragic accident in Field, B.C. where three lives were lost.

I think it's very timely that we're having this study now. I think some people would be asking themselves if it's a good idea to remove this issue from the watchlist, given that there is more oil by rail. Perhaps we need to look at the bigger issue of whether or not we need to be getting oil off rail and into a pipeline. I know that was referenced as well.

I'm just wondering if you could tell me, Ms. Fox, if are you familiar with the August 2015 report by the Fraser Institute comparing the safety records of pipelines and rail.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I'm somewhat familiar, yes. I've seen the report.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay, you're somewhat familiar. Are their conclusions accurate in your opinion?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

We haven't assessed the report in those kinds of critical terms. As far as we know, the information that they used from TSB data sources was accurate. We have no reason to question that. I think the question of rail versus pipeline safety when it comes to transporting dangerous goods is a lot more complex and challenging to answer than may appear on the surface.

It really requires an apples-to-apples comparison. You have to aggregate volume data from various sources. You need a common denominator to compare them on an apples-to-apples basis. That's very difficult.

From our perspective, the risks in pipelines are very different. They relate to, for example, fracturing or fatigue cracks in the pipeline, to interactions with the environment and sometimes to third party intervention, versus rail, where you have hundreds of tonnes of train operating on steel rails in a variety of climatic conditions.

The risks are very different. At the end of the day, our job is to identify where there are deficiencies and where more needs to be done. We don't make those kinds of comparisons as to which mode is safer than the other. We believe that, whatever mode is used, it needs to be done as safely as can be.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

In the last Parliament, I was the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources. I don't question that rail is a safe way of transporting oil; I just believe that pipelines are a bit safer. I think it behooves all of us to try to move this product across our country using the safest mode possible.

One of the main findings of this report was that rail was found to be over 4.5 times more likely to experience an occurrence when compared to pipelines.

I'm wondering if you've noticed a shift in the numbers to indicate that this ratio is no longer accurate.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I can't comment on the specific ratio. What I can tell you from our preliminary 2018 statistics, when we look at the number of occurrences in the rail mode, is that there were 1,468 occurrences reported to the TSB in 2018, which included 1,173 rail accidents. That's all types of accidents: derailments, collisions and so on.

When we look at pipelines, we had a total of 110 occurrences reported to us, including one accident. So there is a definite difference in terms of the number of occurrences that are reported to us, recognizing that we only do federally regulated pipelines. Secondly, we have no outstanding pipeline recommendation. Pipelines are not on our watchlist, but there are a number of anecdotal things that can be used to suggest, or to indicate, relative issues between the modes.

The issue that I think we also have to keep in mind is that if there is a pipeline spill—and depending on whether it is carrying crude oil or gas—the consequences can be quite significant in terms of the amount spilled compared to the amount carried in a unit train of, say, crude oil. I use the example of the October 2018 occurrence that we're investigating north of Prince George, which involved the rupture and fire of a natural gas pipeline.

If you talk frequency, there are more rail occurrences reported than pipeline, but then you also have to look at the consequences in terms of how much is spilled, what is spilled and where it spilled.

(1120)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I represent a riding in Mississauga and we're often reminded of the 1979 derailment, which our mayor was quite aptly named "Hurricane Hazel" for. In 2015 when we were running, there was an incident. I wouldn't call it a derailment but a train did hop off the rails and a minor cleanup was required. In my riding we are quite aware of the safety concerns of rail and transporting chemicals and crude oil. Since 2015 I've gone door knocking and people have a marked difference in their emotions to rail. They feel pretty safe, relative to when I was first running. I think one of the reasons is that we accelerated the phase-out of the CPC-1232 railcars and the DOT-111s.

Could you speak to that and how that's made the entire safety system safer?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Again, when we talk about the transportation of crude oil, specifically, what's been phased out much earlier than was originally planned are the CPC-1232 unjacketed cars. The CPC-1232 jacketed cars are still in service and will be allowed to remain in service until as late as 2025. However, we are seeing a much greater distribution of reducing use of CPC-1232 cars and increasing usage of the newly developed TC 117 standard following the Lac-Mégantic accident. We'll have an opportunity in this investigation into what happened in St. Lazare this past weekend to look at the performance of those cars, compared to CPC-1232 jacketed cars that are still allowed.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

In terms of the GTA, is it the unjacketed cars that are frequently the ones passing through?

Ms. Faye Ackermans:

You can't say that those types of cars are in any particular area. It's really the shipper that determines what car is used to load a product, so we would have to go have a look at who is shipping what and where to be able to answer that question. I don't have the information.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Okay.

I'd like to give the remainder of my time to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Ms. Fox, the thing that surprised me in your first responses to Mr. Aubin is that we have to wait for more crashes to happen to have more data. Are freight cars crash-tested before they're put into service?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

They are crash-tested, but at a lower speed. Maybe Mr. Jang can provide the specific speed. When you have higher speeds, obviously there is a likelihood of greater damage. What we look at for each of the investigations is the relative performance. How many cars were involved? What speeds were they travelling at? What level of damage was incurred? How did these perform?

We can't say that the 117 cars will never be damaged, or that there's no risk. It depends on the speed and it depends on the crash dynamics at which the derailment happens and where it happens. All we can do is compare the relative performance. I can assure you that with the recent ministerial direction, at least the unjacketed 1232 cars have been removed from transporting crude oil about six months earlier, and petroleum distillates. They are not going to be used for the transportation of crude oil anymore.

(1125)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In my experience, ethanol trains have a boxcar at each end to buffer them. Do you see any safety difference with buffer cars or spacers, in terms of outcomes?

Mr. Kirby Jang (Director, Rail and Pipeline Investigations, Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board):

In terms of previous investigations, we have looked at the marshalling of different loaded tank cars and positioning within the train. Any separation between the more dangerous cars is a good thing.

You're probably aware that we have an active recommendation looking at the factors and the severity of derailments involving dangerous goods. Within that analysis, we're asking the railway industry and Transport to look at the risk profiles of various trains to determine whether there should be adjustments to the rules respecting the key trains and key routes. That's a very important aspect. Any train carrying more than 20 loaded cars is defined as a key train. Distribution within the train is quite important.

You bring up a very good factor, in terms of where the buffer cars are located.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I thank the witnesses for being here this morning.

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada's watchlist contains the main safety issues presented by various modes of transportation that must be remedied. Can you tell us what factors the TSB takes into consideration when deciding that a safety issue must not only lead to recommendations, but must also be added to its watchlist?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Every other year, the TSB considers a number of factors. We look at accident and incident statistics to identify patterns. We review the recommendations that have not been implemented, as well as the TSB's concerns. We also consult our staff about their recommendations on what should be added to or kept on the list, or what issues should be removed from it. We also monitor other issues that are not on the list. When we add something to the list, however, it is because we feel that the risk is sufficiently high, that the addition is appropriate and that the corrective actions we called for have not yet been taken.

When it comes to the transportation of flammable liquids, we have two requirements: risk analysis and risk management by railway companies, and the accelerated removal of the least crash-resistant tank cars. Once industry and Transport Canada met those requirements, we removed that issue from the watchlist. A simple activity increase does not in itself justify us keeping an issue on the list. If we believe that the risk is sufficiently managed, we can remove it from the list. However, we continue to monitor it, especially in the case of oil transportation by rail, which is on the rise.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.

Transportation of flammable liquids by rail is a particularly significant concern, especially in Quebec, given the Lac-Mégantic tragedy. Transportation of flammable liquids was added to the TSB's watchlist after that event. As that issue has since been removed from the watchlist, it is fair to say that Transport Canada is working to improve the safety of transportation of flammable liquids by rail. Can you elaborate on the steps Transport Canada has taken in relation to that concern?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I can elaborate, but I think that you will also hear from Transport Canada representatives later, and they will probably be in a better position to give you the details you want.

However, I can tell you that a change was made to the Railway Safety Management System Regulations, 2015. Operating certificates for railway companies were introduced, and the number and extent of checks or inspections of railway companies carried out by Transport Canada was increased. Fines have also been introduced for companies that don't comply with the railway safety act or regulations. Furthermore, the removal of the least crash-resistant cars was ordered, as was the implementation of emergency response plans in case of derailment.

All those measures have reduced the risk, but they have not completely eliminated it. Action is yet to be taken in response to three of the five recommendations we issued in the aftermath of the Lac-Mégantic tragedy, and two other recommendations we issued after the derailments in northern Ontario in 2015. We will continue to monitor this file until all our recommendations have been implemented in a fully satisfactory manner.

(1130)

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

It's good that Transport Canada is a key player in this file, but what about railway companies?

What measures have the companies implemented to make rail transportation safer?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

As I said at the beginning of my presentation, when companies transport large quantities of flammable liquids, the measures have to do with considerations such as the risk management system, inspections, maintenance and risk analysis.

Companies are required to maintain higher standards, especially for key trains or routes. So a measure was implemented to reduce speed for trains transporting oil. However, as we have seen in the accidents that occurred in northern Ontario, speed is not the only factor in derailment. That is why we have asked Transport Canada to carry out a more in-depth study on other risk factors that could lead to new requirements for their reduction and that railway companies will have to comply with.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Are departments aware of all the data related to those measures? Has the data been provided to departments?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Yes, in the sense that the information entered into railway companies' safety management systems must be transmitted to Transport Canada. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Liepert.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you all for being here today.

I represent a Calgary riding. I have a fair bit of interest in the transportation of petroleum products, and I've got a couple of questions that I hope you can answer.

It is clear that the transportation of oil liquids and condensates is much safer by pipeline than by rail. If we didn't have to ship our oil on rail or our liquids and condensates headed to petrochemical manufacturing facilities in Quebec creating thousands of jobs in Quebec, but could ship it on pipelines the way it is supposed to be shipped....

We don't have pipelines to ship it because of special interest groups that are impeding it—including political parties who are seated to my left—with falsehoods and rhetoric about the safety of pipelines. If it weren't for them, we wouldn't even be doing this study today.

Is that fair to say?

The Chair:

That's kind of a loaded question.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I really can't answer that question.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I will take that as a yes, madam. Thank you.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

[Inaudible—Editor] answer that question.

The Chair:

Ms. Fox has indicated that she's not comfortable answering that question.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

All right. Then I'll ask you a second question.

I want to go back to this Fraser Institute report. One of the statistics that came out of the Fraser Institute report was that over 70% of pipeline occurrences resulted in a spill of one cubic metre or less, which probably would be the equivalent to what is spilled on a daily basis at gas stations at the pump.

Is that statistic still relevant three years later?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I can't comment on the statistics in the report. What I can say is that many of the reports that we get are of minor spills or minor releases of product. We do about one or two pipeline investigations a year, when we believe that there's enough to be gained from doing a full investigation in terms of advancing transportation safety. Yes, the vast majority of releases of product that are reported to us are minor.

I just want to qualify that by saying that the risk—as I mentioned earlier, when we were talking about pipelines—is that, if there is a significant spill of product of either oil or gas, the consequences could be quite significant. We saw that with the Prince George occurrence, which we're currently investigating, which involved a rupture and fire involving natural gas.

There are fewer occurrences. Consequences could be potentially more significant. It depends on what's being carried, how much is spilled, how quickly it's stopped and where it happened.

(1135)

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Maybe I'll come back to my first question and try to phrase it another way.

Can you confirm that there are liquids and condensates and oil that is being transported into the province of Quebec on a daily basis that are going to refineries and manufacturing facilities in Quebec, creating thousands of jobs?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I don't have the answers of how much product is being shipped specifically where. I'm sorry I can't—

Mr. Ron Liepert:

But product is being shipped, is that fair to say?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

As far as we know.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Can anybody else shed any light on that?

Mr. Jean Laporte (Chief Operating Officer, Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board):

We typically don't have activity data broken down by province, region or facilities. The National Energy Board and Statistics Canada would capture that type of information. We typically capture information about what was shipped and what was spilled, associated with incidents or occurrences.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

We do know refineries in the province of Quebec are refining oil products for use by Quebeckers. That's fair to say, right?

Mr. Jean Laporte:

Yes.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

And a lot of that oil is coming by rail.

Mr. Jean Laporte:

We don't have accurate and specific data. A lot of the oil that's being refined in Quebec is coming by ship.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Yes, that's foreign oil, isn't it? Now we're getting somewhere.

Do I have any more time?

The Chair:

Yes, you have a minute.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

What would you suggest we do to try to change the narrative to convince people across the country that shipping oil by pipeline is much safer than by rail? We wouldn't need to be spending taxpayers' money doing studies like this if we had the pipelines to ship it.

Mr. Jean Laporte:

Again, that is not for us to determine. Our mandate is very clear; we investigate occurrences. There are regulators, other bodies, other government agencies, that have the responsibility to look at energy products being produced, imported and exported, and to do the oversight.

In terms of pipeline activity, the number of occurrences has been relatively stable, it has dropped a little in the last few years. The quantities spilled when there are occurrences are fairly small, as was mentioned earlier, however, in rail transportation, the data is changing.

If you refer to the Fraser study of 2015, since then, there have been a number of improvements to rail safety and we're seeing some changes in the numbers. n a few weeks, we'll be releasing our formal statistics for 2018 and you'll see in there more current data that could be used by the Fraser Institute and others to do the analysis that you're talking about.

The Chair:

Mr. Laporte, once that report comes out, if you could send it to the clerk for distribution to the committee, it would be appreciated. Thank you.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'm going to share some time with Madame Pauzé. First, I have two questions.

Does your board investigate any issues or any incidents involving ships?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Yes.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

How many incidents have you investigated with respect to shipping of all kinds in and out of Burrard Inlet?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I don't have the numbers at hand to be able to specify how many accidents have involved Burrard Inlet.

We have investigated a number of occurrences off the west coast of Vancouver Island involving all manner of vessels, including fishing vessels, tugs and barges. In my memory, which could be corrected, we have not had spills involving what was being transported, but we have had spills involving what was pulling them. For example, a fishing vessel capsized and released bunker fuel. We had the example of the tug Nathan E. Stewart out west, which released 110,000 litres of bunker fuel.

(1140)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

The focus on the west coast has been the prospect of shipping more oil or diluted bitumen out of the terminal in Burnaby. You're probably aware there are other products, corrosives, other things that would be just as difficult to deal with if they were spilled that have been shipped out of Vancouver for some time.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Again, we don't have specific data on what's transported where or when. We look at each specific occurrence, incident or accident, what is on board, what is being transported and the consequences if that spills.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Transport Canada is obviously involved in doing risk assessments. Are you comfortable with the data they have at hand to do that job effectively?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

We have some data that they have access to. They may have other data. I can't speak to what happens internally in the department in their risk assessments.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Very good.

Madame Pauzé. [Translation]

Ms. Monique Pauzé (Repentigny, BQ):

Thank you very much, Mr. Hardie. That's very nice of you.

Just before Christmas, I went to Lac-Mégantic to meet with people who were affected by the tragedy. They told me that the turning where the train derailed, when it was going 101 kilometres per hour, was 3.1 degrees or 3.2 degrees. As the companies insisted on putting cars back in service and resuming transportation as quickly as possible, a portion of the turning was rebuilt, and it is even more pronounced than it was when the derailment occurred.

In addition, the cars passing through Lac-Mégantic are transporting propane gas, an even more explosive product. You will understand that the situation is pretty traumatic for the people of that small village. Your decision to remove that issue from the watch list is also traumatic. The people of Lac-Mégantic talked to me about it all day. It was very traumatic.

According to your opening remarks, railway companies are assessing risks and carrying out inspections themselves. Once again, it is very troubling for the people of Lac-Mégantic—and it should be for all Canadians—to think that railway companies are being given back the power to carry out their own inspections and assessments.

Earlier, you said that you were suggesting measures and then checking whether they were implemented. Do you trust the representatives of railway companies to tell you?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

First, I can reassure you and the people of Lac-Mégantic: we will never forget what happened there. That was a tragedy.

Three of our five recommendations have still not been implemented. In other words, the TSB is not satisfied with the actions taken in that area.

When it comes to inspections, railway companies definitely must inspect their own infrastructure. However, Transport Canada also carries out inspections and audits of their safety management systems. So it is not quite accurate to say that it's all self-inspection. All companies—be it an airlane, a railway company or a pipeline company—must inspect their own infrastructure according to the standards.

In addition, we require the regulatory body—Transport Canada in the case of railway companies—to conduct its own audits and inspections. That recommendation stems from the Lac-Mégantic tragedy, and it is still in effect because we want to see Transport Canada's inspection results.

We have removed that issue from the watchlist because the specific measures that were part of our requirements have been implemented by railway companies and Transport Canada. That is the only reason we removed it from our watch list, which is like a list of measures to be implemented.

We continue to follow and closely monitor transportation of flammable liquids and railway safety. To do so, we are continuing with our statistical studies and our investigations, and we make recommendations we reassess every year.

(1145)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We go on to Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Thank you for being here today, everyone.

I scrolled through many of the active rail transportation safety recommendations, but most of them are directed at the department of transport. No doubt you've heard that the current Alberta government plans to lease 4,400 railcars to move Alberta oil to market.

I'm curious about those recommendations. Should Transport Canada be acting urgently on them, in light of this oil tanker traffic?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I'm going to ask Ms. Ackermans to put the statistics in context; then I'll add anything I can.

Ms. Faye Ackermans:

We took a look at the data and how much is moving. The NEB issued their crude export data yesterday. There are about 130,000 carloads of product being exported. I haven't seen the Stats Canada data; they will update their data as well. There are probably another 50,000 or 100,000 carloads of crude moving within Canada.

Because all of this extra crude in those 4,400 tank cars is for export market, this means about a 50% increase in the export crude volume that is planned to be shipped by the time it becomes fully implemented in 2020, which, as I understand, is the date.

That's the context.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I will just add that, in terms of the measures and relating to our watchlist, rail accidents can happen for a number of reasons. Crews don't always follow the signals properly. That is a specific issue on our watchlist. We have the issue of fatigue in all modes of transport now—air, rail and marine—so we're certainly looking at that in the context of rail.

The other two issues on the watchlist that are particularly important are safety management and oversight. We're continuing to track what the industry and Transport Canada are doing with respect to safety management and oversight, as well as our outstanding recommendations, some of which date for more than 10 years, and five of which involve rail recommendations. Three of those five are on the watchlist in some other capacity.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Would you do any proactive stuff? The Premier of Alberta applied to the minister to make this happen. Obviously, approval has been given in some form or another. Is there a conversation that you have with the department—perhaps with the minister—in preparation for some of this?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

No, our mandate is to investigate occurrences, incidents and accidents. That's what we do. We gather data, and we share that data with Transport Canada and with the industry—the Railway Association of Canada. We meet periodically—at least once a year—with the major railway companies to find out what they're doing and to signal any concerns we may have.

We have an ongoing dialogue with various stakeholders, including the regulator, as to what we're seeing in our statistics and what further actions we think should be taken.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

How often do you meet with the minister?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

I don't meet that often with the minister. I met with him to brief him initially when he assumed that mandate. We typically meet a deputy minister on a regular basis and quite frequently at the staff level.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

There have been three derailments. There is now a whole bunch more traffic coming onto the rail system and you've only met with the minister once, in terms of briefing him at the beginning. That seems a little strange to me.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

That doesn't include any letters that may have been sent.

Derailments happen. They happen as a consequence of railway operations.

When we're talking about the transportation of flammable liquids, there's been one derailment since January—of the three—that involved the transportation of flammable liquids. That was St. Lazare, and we are conducting an ongoing investigation on that.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We move on to Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

We have a Minister of Transport whose trademark is to repeat as often as possible that safety is his top priority. We would like to believe him, but what I am seeing among Canadians is that they have more trust in the TSB, which has a semblance of neutrality, than the minister.

You have said twice today that three of the five recommendations provided in the report on the accident in Lac-Mégantic have not been acted upon, and I am concerned by that. I would like you to remind us which recommendations they are.

I would also like you to explain to us what the meaning of certain comments in your report is, in a lingo specific to you, regarding the current status of a recommendation—“fully satisfactory”, “satisfactory in part” and “satisfactory intent”.

To me, “satisfactory intent” means that no actions have been taken and “satisfactory in part” means that a step in the right direction has been taken, but the issue has not been resolved. The status “fully satisfactory” would satisfy me, as well, but I have a feeling that we are far from it.

(1150)

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Allow me to reiterate the three recommendations stemming from the investigation into the accident at Lac-Mégantic that are still active.

The first recommendation concerns tank cars. We wanted the tank cars used to transport oil or flammable liquids to be as crash-resistant as possible. A lot of progress has been made in that area, but the recommendation is active because oil is still being transported in other kinds of tank cars than those meeting the latest standards.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Safety standards.

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

The second recommendation involved measures to prevent train derailment.

Measures were taken following the Lac-Mégantic accident. Changes were made to the rules for securing parked and unattended trains. I'm going to come back to your other question in a moment.

The third recommendation concerned oversight of railway safety management systems, as well as auditing and inspections.

Those are the three outstanding recommendations. Despite the significant progress that's been made and the measures that have been taken, the deficiencies have not been fully addressed. We are waiting to see what the next steps will be.

Now I'll talk about how we rate the department's response to the recommendations.

Take, for instance, the emergency response assistance plans that were put in place after the Lac-Mégantic accident. Given that the department acted immediately on our recommendation in a manner that was fully satisfactory, we designated the recommendation as closed.

When the department or Minister of Transport announces a plan that, in our view, will remedy the deficiency once implemented, we assess the response as having “satisfactory intent”, but we don't designate the recommendation as closed until the plan has been fully implemented. If the board considers that the plan will only partially correct the deficiency, we assess the response as being “satisfactory in part”. The measures taken to prevent train derailment are a case in point. We still have concerns regarding the steps the department has taken to date because they may not be adequate to eliminate the risk completely.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

On that very issue, I would point to another train derailment that occurred in the past few weeks. The train wasn't transporting anything flammable, but the problem is the same. The minister responded, but after the fact.

In light of the fact that measures weren't taken until after the Lac-Mégantic derailment and subsequent to a number of other train derailments, can we really say that the department is doing enough? Do you think the recently announced measures are satisfactory or only satisfactory in part?

Ms. Kathleen Fox:

Problems linked to uncontrolled and unplanned movements or runaway trains can be attributed to three factors. The first is a loss of control, as was the case in the Field accident. The train was attended, but for reasons yet to be determined, it derailed. The second factor is a change in car distribution in the yard. The third factor concerns unattended and improperly secured cars, as was also the case in the Lac-Mégantic incident.

Each of those factors has to be examined to determine whether the measures taken will reduce the risk of a train or some of its cars derailing, but we aren't there yet.

Mr. Jean Laporte:

I'd like to add something, Mr. Aubin, if I may.

We assess all of our outstanding recommendations on an annual basis. In fact, we are working on that right now. In late March or early April, the cycle will come to an end. Transport Canada provides us with updates on all the recommendations. We will reassess them over the next two months, and the findings will be made public in April or May.

(1155)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you to our witnesses for providing that valuable information.

We will now suspend for a few minutes until our next panel comes to the table.

(1155)

(1200)

The Chair:

I'm calling the meeting back to order.

Welcome to our witnesses.

From the Department of Transport, we have Kevin Brosseau, Assistant Deputy Minister, Safety and Security; Brigitte Diogo, Director General, Rail Safety; and Benoit Turcotte, Director General, Transportation of Dangerous Goods.

Thank you all very much. I'll turn the floor over to you folks.

Mr. Kevin Brosseau (Assistant Deputy Minister, Safety and Security, Department of Transport):

Thank you very much.

Good afternoon, Madam Chair and committee members. My name is Kevin Brosseau. As mentioned, I'm the assistant deputy minister of safety and security at Transport Canada. I am joined by Brigitte Diogo, the director general of rail safety, and Benoit Turcotte, the director general of transportation of dangerous goods. Given that our time today is short, I will keep my opening remarks similarly short to ensure that we have sufficient time for your questions.

Canada maintains one of the safest rail transportation systems in the world as a result of shared efforts between numerous partners, including other levels of government, railway companies, the TSB, as you just heard, and communities.[Translation]

Transport Canada remains committed to improving public safety as it relates to the transport of dangerous goods by rail.[English]

Transport Canada takes its leadership role seriously, and has a rigorous and robust rail safety regulatory framework and oversight program in place. We've taken significant actions to enhance public safety during the transport of dangerous goods by rail, including flammable liquids by rail, under the pillars of prevention, effective response and accountability. I'll list a few of these actions. They include reducing permitted train speed and accelerating older tank phase-out timelines for the transport of crude oil. In addition, the department has implemented new requirements related to liability and compensation, classification and emergency response, means of containment standards, and additional inspections in key route and key train requirements. Through these actions and 33,000 oversight activities per year, and others, Transport Canada is committed to promoting a rail safety culture in order to keep Canadians safe.

With those words, we look forward to taking your questions.[Translation]

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Brosseau.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Thank you for being here. You're helping us make the most of this very brief half-hour that we have with you today. As I commented to the earlier panel, I appreciate that we're here as a result of a motion that was brought forward by my colleague Mr. Aubin. I made the observation in the last panel that I think it's a timely briefing—I won't necessarily call it a “study”—in light of the three recent derailments in as many weeks. One was tragic in the loss of life that was experienced.

To follow along the same line of questions I had for the previous witnesses, are you familiar with the August 2015 report by the Fraser Institute comparing pipeline and rail safety records?

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

I personally am not, but I'll turn to my colleagues before we answer as a department.

Mr. Benoit Turcotte (Director General, Transportation of Dangerous Goods, Department of Transport):

I am not familiar with the report.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo (Director General, Rail Safety, Department of Transport):

I am.

(1205)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Can you tell me, Ms. Diogo, if, in your opinion, the Fraser Institute's research and conclusions are accurate?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

I think the report makes some very good points in terms of the analysis it conducted, but as an official of the department, I'm not able to comment on whether it was a good report or not. We took a look at the report.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I know there often is a misunderstanding in terms of where pipelines fall and under which department they fall. I know they fall under the Department of Natural Resources. Oftentimes, people think they fall under Transport because it's transporting a commodity. I'm wondering if you have conversations with the Department of Natural Resources around the issues of transporting oil by rail or by pipeline, or if you work closely together on those issues.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

We work closely in the sense that we share information. I think Natural Resources has a lot of information that feeds into our work in terms of volumes of goods that are being transported. I think in the past they were exchanging in terms of “is rail better or is pipeline better”. I think the conclusion is that no matter what the mode of transportation is, it needs to be made safely. That's where, as government officials, our emphasis should be: that regardless, it needs to be made safely.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I appreciate that. It was going to be my next question.

In the previous Parliament, I was the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources, and I know that pipelines have a safety record of 99.99%. That would have been in 2013 to 2015. I think rail had a 99.997% safety record. There's not a lot of difference. However, I think that for most of us, we believe that you would want to see oil transported through a pipeline rather than on rail, for any number of issues, not the least of which is the accidents that can occur when a train derails.

I'm wondering as well if you would comment on the fact that most of the safety recommendations on the active rail transportation, on the watchlist, are directed at the Department of Transport. I'm wondering if you can comment on whether or not you believe that there is a lack of resources to do all the things that could and should be done in order to protect Canadians.

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

I'll start and then turn it over to my colleagues, who are both responsible for their particular sector so that we're driving the priorities forward.

Organizationally, Transport, like every other government department, manages its resources based on the priorities that are set and uses the resources that it has, delivering on a risk-based approach, a priority-based approach. Of course, we know that addressing the watchlist issues and responding to the TSB recommendations, which we take very seriously, are a priority area and accrue resources accordingly. I'll turn it over to my colleagues, who perhaps will be able to put a finer point on that.

Mr. Benoit Turcotte:

It's a very good question. I would say that the government has invested heavily in both the rail safety program and the TDG safety program since the tragedy of Lac-Mégantic.

Our resources in terms of our ability to examine the risks in the transportation of dangerous goods system have been increased. Our program size has more or less tripled. This has allowed us to do tremendous things in terms of examining what those risks are in the transportation of dangerous goods system.

We know that crude oil remains one of the higher risks that we have identified as a program. The volumes will fluctuate. As a program, we're very conscious of that. We do look at the volumes of crude oil being shipped. We've tripled the number of inspections we conduct, from about 2,000 pre-Mégantic to about 6,000 on a yearly basis, ongoing. We're very proud of that.

I would say that we do have enough resources in the transportation of dangerous goods program to fulfill our basic mandate to properly regulate and oversee the transportation of the dangerous goods system.

(1210)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I really did want to ask Mr. DeJong a question with respect to multimodal strategies and program integration, but apparently he's not here. I'm going to attempt to ask you three the question, and hopefully you can help me out.

As you may know, I had the privilege yesterday on behalf of the committee to table a report essentially moving toward a Canadian transportation and logistics strategy. In the process of authoring that report, we recognized strategic areas in our travels throughout Canada, essentially located in the Niagara and Vancouver and Seattle areas. I learned a lot. As I said earlier, what we learned most was the identification of those strategic trade corridor areas within the nation.

With that said, Niagara was identified as a strategic trade corridor. Within the Niagara region, as you can well appreciate, over time there are areas that were identified under official plans at the municipal level allowed to grow in an industrial manner, but over time, they became more of a residential area that is attached to an industrial area.

Right now I'm working with one situation in the city of Thorold, where we have a shunting yard that is literally right next to a water course, an aquifer, as well as a residential area. I have received a lot of, not only complaints, but also concerns with respect to safety in that area because of what's being shunted by trains and, of course, what those trains are carrying. There are concerns relative to noise, safety and so forth, which I'm sure you can well appreciate.

How do I successfully facilitate with, in this case CN, a solution to relocate that shunting yard? By the way, it was relocated from another area, and then the problem just moved to that area. How do I successfully facilitate with that partner, CN Rail, a more appropriate area of relocation for the shunting yard?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

It's very similar to issues that many communities across Canada are raising in terms of the concern of proximity to rail operations. I think CN has a whole infrastructure in terms of how to conduct community engagement. I would say that the best approach would be to connect to CN at the most senior level.

I also think that, when it comes to issues of noise and vibration, the Canadian Transportation Agency is also a good venue to bring some of these issues forward. They have the mandate to examine these types of issues.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you for that.

I have met on site with CN Rail, but to no satisfaction—besides being very much pacified—with respect to trying to deal with that specific issue. To their credit, we did deal with another issue. That very issue, again, hasn't been dealt with to the satisfaction of the community. The next step, of course, is to involve the community, which I intend to do.

You also mentioned bringing in the CTA, and getting them involved as well.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

Yes.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Great.

Madam Chair, how much time do I have left?

The Chair:

One minute.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

I will pass the rest of my time to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I understand that Transport Canada can now assess administrative monetary penalties. You're nodding, so that means yes. Have you done it yet, and what effect do you think that's going to have?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

This is one of the new regulations that were put in place after Lac-Mégantic. It came into effect in April, 2015. Like many of the tools that we have been given, it has been used. In fact, on our website, all of the penalties that we have issued are listed there. To date, we have issued a total of half a million dollars in penalties to various railways.

The tool is really how to bring companies back into compliance, but our work doesn't stop there. Issuing monetary penalties can address an issue in the short term, but we continue to follow up on a particular issue to ensure that the measures a company has taken are lasting.

In our experience, it's a very good tool. We are very careful in how we use it, because our penalties are pretty high.

I think that overall, when we do our inspections, we've seen improvement in the compliance that the railways have to achieve. The defect rates are going down. I can't say that it's due to penalties, because it's not an automatic penalty. Overall we think that it's another tool in our series of measures.

(1215)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Go ahead, Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses for being here today.

When I hear the Department of Transport officials describe Canada's rail transportation system as one of the safest in the world, despite the deficiencies, I'm certainly glad I don't live anywhere else, to put it mildly.

In previous studies, the issue of railway auditing by inspectors came up. Am I right to think that the majority of inspectors—who aren't all that numerous—do more inspections on paper? In other words, they flip through railway reports, ticking boxes before giving the green light.

Of the total number of inspectors, how many are on the ground checking whether the tracks are in good condition or the wheels of the cars have cracks?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

Thank you for the question.

We currently have about 140 inspectors, out of a total of 156 positions. All of them have to go out to the field. They do their work in two stages. First of all, they do a paper-based evaluation using data provided by the railway. It's important to conduct a paper-based review to see what the company has done, what it has identified and whether it has followed up on its own findings. That information helps us determine what to focus on during the on-site inspection.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I see.

You take a risk-based approach, then. You examine the information on paper, and if there are any red flags, you send out an inspector to examine the situation. Is that correct?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

No. I think that's an oversimplification of the work we do.

Every year, we develop an inspection plan using a number of sources of information. We review the volume of transported goods, past inspection results, safety management system audit findings, as well as accident-related data. We look at a set of economic data to measure the risk in different areas.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

The number of inspectors at Transport Canada has been dropping for years, even though rail transportation has grown exponentially. At the very least, doesn't that call for an adjustment on your end? It seems to me the number of inspections should keep pace with the growth in rail traffic.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

The number of inspectors has actually gone up significantly since the accident in Lac-Mégantic. The government gave us a lot more resources and better equipment to carry out that function, and the number of inspections has gone up as a result.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

According to the figures I have, 25 out of 141 inspectors are actually on the ground. The others merely do paper-based inspections. Are you disputing that?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

Yes.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Very well. I'll do some homework.

With a risk-based approach, how can Transport Canada be proactive, not reactive, whenever a rail occurrence or accident happens, as we saw a few weeks ago, with the minister's response to a train derailment? The department could have introduced measures immediately following the Lac-Mégantic accident. It's been six years since the tragedy, and three out of the five recommendations have not been implemented.

Can you at least tell us that, in the upcoming March report, your response to the TSB's five recommendations on the Lac-Mégantic accident will receive a “satisfactory intent” rating?

(1220)

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

That is our hope.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

It's not a matter of hope; it's a matter of action.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

I'd like to finish answering your question, if I may.

The department has taken a number of measures in response to the TSB's recommendations. We've taken all of the recommendations related to the accident seriously and have been working very hard to implement them.

As you mentioned, it's an industry, a sector of the economy, that's changing, and the risks are changing as well. With every reassessment, the TSB calls on us to examine different facets of the issue, and that's what we are doing. With every reassessment, the department has provided a meaningful response and that work is ongoing.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I was rather surprised by something I learned earlier. [English]

The Chair:

Make it very short, Mr. Aubin, please. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Very well.

I was rather surprised to learn that the Minister and his TSB counterpart had met very little, and that the public views the TSB as a very credible organization, on the whole.

Shouldn't Transport Canada and the TSB have a closer working relationship?

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

Mr. Aubin, even though Ms. Fox doesn't meet with the minister, [English]within our department we meet on a regular basis. Monsieur Laporte and I have met frequently over the past month. It is a regular ongoing conversation, discussion, sharing of information and best practices to be able to respond best and for the TSB to have a real important view in terms of what our work is.

Brigitte, perhaps I could just let you augment that.

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

Yes. I would also like to add that the TSB is an independent agency, and in fact it does not fall under the portfolio of the Minister of Transport.[Translation]

The Minister of Transport is not responsible for the TSB. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much. We'll go on to Mr. Hardie.

Just as a reminder, this panel is only here till 12:30, so there's Mr. Hardie, Mr. Iacono and Mr. Liepert who we're trying to get through before we end this panel.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay. We'll do our best here.

Quickly then, going back to the fines that have been levied—your administrative fines. How many of them have been to short-line railways?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

I would not like to say it from memory, but I believe it's two.

What I would suggest, Madam Chair, is we'll provide a list to the committee.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

The reason for that is just out of the ongoing concern we have for the financial health of the short-lines and their ability to stay up to speed on all of the safety regulations. The locomotive video and voice recorders, I think, are imposing quite a cost on them. That's not to say it shouldn't be done, but I think we're all continuously concerned about how well they can hold up, based on their own realities there.

Can you talk about your risk assessment process, particularly when it comes to the transport of dangerous goods? Are you satisfied that you have enough data? Are you collecting enough information about the kinds of shipments being made, how they're being made, when they're being made, etc.? We're managing risk as opposed to doing other things that some people would see as more effective. Talk to us about risk management.

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

I'll let—okay, go ahead.

Mr. Benoit Turcotte:

From the perspective of the transportation of dangerous goods, we do a number of things. Our program has been organized around risk, and we take that very seriously. It drives a lot of what we do, including our inspections.

The first part of how we go about this is that we've developed a risk register. We update it on a continual basis in terms of all the intelligence we gather—the 6,000 inspections we do per year, all the research we do, what we're hearing back from the field and our inspectors when they actually do their inspections, where the non-compliances are and so on. That helps us tremendously.

Then, we produce every year a program environment document that documents all of that, not only the risks in the transportation of dangerous goods but program risks as well. That drives a lot of what we do. That influences our national oversight plan, which is a document we establish every year, and it lays out our priorities. We've developed a risk ranking of all our known transportation of dangerous goods, TDG, sites. That could be a Canadian Tire, an oil field or any place where dangerous goods are handled and/or transported.

(1225)



From that, it drives a lot of our inspections. For example, when talking about crude oil, we inspect and put a high priority on inspecting transload facilities. This is where the crude oil trains are loaded with oil. This current fiscal year, we'll have inspected more than half of all known transload facilities. This is where we target those crude oil trains, to make sure that the crude oil is being placed in the appropriate tank car, that they have the appropriate transport documentation, that their personnel are trained, that they are loading the crude oil appropriately. We check all that very carefully.

That, again, feeds into our risk-based approach to inspecting dangerous goods.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Iacono.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

I would like to start by bringing some clarification and setting the record straight with respect to my colleague MP Liepert's comments before when he was questioning Ms. Fox.

Quebec now gets most of its crude oil from North American producers. Western Canada is now Quebec's top source of crude provider. Much of that stems from the 2015 reversal of Enbridge's Line 9 pipeline. Quebec's refineries now get 82% of their oil from North American sources, thus only 11% comes from, as an example, Algeria. This is just to bring some clarification to your comment.

My question is with respect to risk assessment. What oversight measures have been taken in order to see to it that the companies comply with the rules?

Mr. Benoit Turcotte:

With our transportation of dangerous goods rules and rail safety rules we prioritize the sites based on the sort of risk they bring forward. For example, if a site hasn't been inspected in a number of years or if it has a history of non-compliance, we will inspect it more frequently, even on an annual basis. That's generally our approach in addition to what I just mentioned to Mr. Hardie a few moments ago.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.

Madam Chair, I'll give the rest of my time to Madam Pauzé. [Translation]

Ms. Monique Pauzé:

Thank you.

Lac-Mégantic residents gave me photos they had taken of existing tracks that trains still use on their approach to Lac-Mégantic. I posted them on my Facebook page and I've shown them to a lot of people, and everyone's reaction is the same. No one can get over the fact that trains are still travelling on such badly damaged tracks.

And here's something else. A farmer in my riding showed me tracks that pass through his property. He said he's the one who maintains them and tightens the screws because no one else does.

By the way, those trains travel past General Dynamics, which is in my riding. Suffice it to say, if there were an accident, my entire riding would be obliterated. The company is like a powder keg.

That brings me back to what you said earlier: you should see an improvement in compliance.

Doesn't the situation call for rules that are much more stringent, given the two examples I just gave of companies not maintaining the tracks?

Ms. Brigitte Diogo:

Thank you for the feedback.

If you have any complaints, you should share them with us.

We've done many rail inspections in the Lac-Mégantic area, further to concerns raised by residents. A special effort has been made in the area to make sure railways comply with the rules. Any specific issues should be brought to our attention.

I will just end by saying that we're in the midst of examining the rules and standards around rail maintenance, so that could result in changes in the future.

(1230)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We go on to Mr. Liepert.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Just to make sure that we have the facts on the table correctly, it was the Conservative government under Stephen Harper that approved the Enbridge reversal, so let's get that on the table.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

All right. I'm proud of you.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

There is still oil going into Quebec by rail. There is still oil and gas coming from the United States, and it is not....The 82% is counting American products coming into Quebec. All of these jobs that are being created in Quebec, whether it's western Canadian oil, foreign oil or oil from the United States, are all jobs that are being created in Quebec at refineries, at petrochemical operations.

I'm glad that the member has put it on the table so that our friends who are sitting to the left of us, who keep talking about the oil and the bad things that come out of oil.... Maybe they need to know that there are thousands and thousands of jobs that are being created in Quebec every day at refineries, whether that oil comes from the United States, Algeria or western Canada. It goes in by rail because there is no additional pipeline capacity. If they would get out of the way and let pipelines be constructed and quit being an impediment to pipelines....

I'd like to ask our witnesses this. Can you give us an idea of how many extra employees Transport Canada has had to bring on to be inspectors of oil by rail because we don't have adequate pipeline capacity in this country?

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

I'll defer to my colleagues. I don't have that number available to me.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Give me a rough number. How many inspectors do you have? I think you said that you had increased it threefold.

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

We tripled the inspector cadre of our department. That was post-Lac-Mégantic, a number of years ago, obviously. Those numbers are tripled. My colleagues can give you the exact numbers, or we can provide them to the committee.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Is it fair to say that if oil wasn't being shipped by rail, we wouldn't have had to have tripled those numbers?

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

I don't know if that's really the answer. I can't give that answer. It was important that we were able to respond, and—

Mr. Ron Liepert:

But you responded primarily because of Lac-Mégantic, right?

Mr. Kevin Brosseau:

Lac-Mégantic was, obviously, a traumatic event for this country.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

And that was oil being shipped by rail.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you to our witnesses, to our officials from the department. We appreciate your coming.

We will suspend for a moment before we start the committee business.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(1100)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte la séance no 131 du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités. Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, nous allons tenir une séance d'information sur le transport ferroviaire de liquides inflammables.

Les témoins que nous recevons de 11 heures à midi ce matin sont du Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports. Nous avons parmi nous la présidente, Kathleen Fox.

Je vous souhaite encore une fois la bienvenue, madame Fox. Je suis heureuse de vous voir.

Nous accueillons également Faye Ackermans, qui est membre du Bureau.

Kirby Jang, directeur, Enquêtes ferroviaires et pipelines, ainsi que Jean Laporte, administrateur en chef des opérations, se joignent également à nous.

Bienvenue à vous tous. Merci d'être revenus.

Madame Fox, vous avez la parole.

Mme Kathleen Fox (présidente, Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports):

Madame la présidente, chers membres du Comité, merci d'avoir invité le Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada, le BST, à s'adresser à vous et à répondre à vos questions concernant le retrait du transport de liquides inflammables par rail de notre dernière liste de surveillance.

Publiée pour la première fois en 2010, la liste de surveillance du BST contient les principaux enjeux de sécurité auxquels il faut remédier pour rendre le système de transport canadien encore plus sécuritaire. Chacun des sept enjeux de notre nouvelle liste a fait l'objet de rapports d'enquête, de préoccupations liées à la sécurité et de recommandations du Bureau.[Français]

Au fil des ans, la liste de surveillance a servi à mobiliser les intervenants et à guider le changement, tout en rappelant à l'industrie, aux organismes de réglementation et au public que les enjeux en cause sont complexes et qu'ils nécessitent les efforts conjugués de nombreux intervenants afin que nous puissions réduire les risques pour la sécurité.

C'est précisément ce qui s'est produit. Tout comme le système de transport canadien, la liste de surveillance a évolué. Tous les deux ans, nous y plaçons des enjeux et nous appelons au changement. Nous retirons également de cette liste les enjeux dont les risques ont été suffisamment atténués par les mesures prises.[Traduction]

Le transport de liquides inflammables par rail a été ajouté à la liste de surveillance en 2014, à la suite de la tragédie de Lac-Mégantic au Québec, et a fait l'objet de nombreuses recommandations du Bureau. En 2016, nous avons laissé cet enjeu sur la liste de surveillance; nous avons aussi explicité les types de mesures que nous désirions voir mettre en oeuvre, dont deux en particulier.

Premièrement, nous avons demandé aux compagnies ferroviaires de planifier et d'analyser exhaustivement leurs itinéraires et d'effectuer des évaluations de risques afin de s'assurer de l'efficacité des mesures d'atténuation. Deuxièmement, nous avons recommandé l'utilisation de wagons-citernes plus robustes pour le transport par rail de grandes quantités de liquides inflammables afin de réduire les risques et les conséquences d'un déversement de marchandises dangereuses en cas de déraillement.

Depuis ce temps, Transports Canada et l'industrie ont pris un certain nombre d'initiatives concrètes. Notamment, les compagnies ferroviaires ont élargi leur planification des itinéraires et leurs évaluations des risques, et multiplié leurs inspections ciblées des voies lors du transport de grandes quantités de liquides inflammables.

De nouvelles normes de construction de wagons-citernes ont été mises en oeuvre, et le processus de remplacement des wagons DOT-111 — comme ceux impliqués à Lac-Mégantic — a été amorcé. Puis, en août 2018, le ministre des Transports a ordonné un échéancier accéléré pour le retrait des wagons-citernes les moins résistants à l'impact. Ainsi, à partir de novembre 2018, en plus du retrait prévu des DOT-111 existants, les CPC-1232 sans chemise ne devraient plus être utilisés pour transporter du pétrole brut et, à partir du 1er janvier 2019, ils ne devraient plus servir à transporter du condensat.

Compte tenu de ces mesures, nous avons retiré cet enjeu de la liste de surveillance. Toutefois, cela ne veut pas dire que tous les risques ont été éliminés et que le BST a cessé toute surveillance.

Au contraire. Nous surveillons toujours étroitement le transport des liquides inflammables par rail grâce à l'examen des statistiques sur les événements, durant nos enquêtes et lors de la réévaluation annuelle de nos recommandations en suspens. Dans le but d'aider le Comité, c'est avec plaisir que je dépose aujourd'hui un extrait de nos plus récentes statistiques sur le transport ferroviaire, qui présente les accidents et les incidents mettant en cause des marchandises dangereuses, y compris le pétrole brut, de 2013 à 2018.

Nous sommes maintenant prêts à répondre à vos questions.

Merci, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Fox. Nous allons passer aux questions.

Allez-y, madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente. Comme c'est M. Aubin qui a présenté la motion, je vais lui céder mon tour et prendre le sien pour qu'il puisse être le premier à poser une question.

La présidente:

Je pense qu'il n'y a jamais eu d'aussi bon comité, n'est-ce pas? Tout le monde s'entend à merveille. Vous voyez.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, PCC):

Nous n'avons pas encore terminé. Attendez un peu.

La présidente:

Allez-y, monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci, madame Block.

Merci à l'ensemble des membres de ce comité d'avoir accepté de tenir cette étude.

Si nous nous penchons sur cette question, c'est parce que j'ai l'impression que les citoyens, qui — comme moi — ne sont pas des spécialistes de la sécurité ferroviaire et qui constatent l'augmentation exponentielle du transport par rail, sont pour leur part généralement inquiets quant à la multiplication du nombre d'incidents et qu'ils ont besoin d'être rassurés, si tant est que la chose soit possible.

Madame Fox, vous avez déjà dit que si les risques venaient à s'aggraver, rien n'empêcherait le Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada, ou BST, de remettre cet enjeu sur la liste de surveillance. Sur quels critères se fonderait-il pour prendre cette décision? Au lieu de toujours réagir après un accident, ne serait-il pas possible de mettre en place de façon proactive des mesures qui permettent d'éviter ces accidents?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Lorsque nous inscrivons un enjeu sur la liste de surveillance, c'est parce que nous avons déterminé qu'un risque n'était pas suffisamment atténué. Nous demandons au gouvernement, à l'organisme réglementaire ou au secteur industriel visé de prendre des mesures qui permettraient d'atténuer davantage ces risques. Nous étudions les statistiques dont nous disposons sur les incidents et les accidents ainsi que les recommandations auxquelles aucune suite n'a encore été donnée.

Dans le cas du transport des liquides inflammables, nous avons pris acte du fait que les gestes que nous avions demandés ont été posés, ce qui explique que nous avons retiré cet enjeu de la liste de surveillance. Par contre, si nous constatons que le risque devient moins bien géré et que le nombre des accidents augmente de façon importante, nous étudierons alors la possibilité de réinscrire cet enjeu sur la liste.

(1105)

M. Robert Aubin:

Vous parlez de mesures d'atténuation, ce que je comprends bien. Puis-je en conclure que si un enjeu est sur la liste de surveillance, c'est qu'il pose un danger immédiat nécessitant une action rapide, mais que si l'on retire cet enjeu de la liste, c'est que l'on considère que le risque est maîtrisé?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

L'élément déterminant ici n'est pas que le risque est immédiat, mais plutôt qu'il est continu et persistant. Les enjeux que nous avons laissés sur la liste de surveillance y sont parce que les mesures qui permettraient selon nous de mieux atténuer le risque n'ont pas encore été prises.

Dans le cas du transport des liquides inflammables, nous réalisons que le risque posé par le déplacement de matières dangereuses par n'importe quel mode de transport est continu. Dans le cas présent, les mesures que nous voulions voir en ce qui concerne l'analyse, la gestion du risque et le recours à des wagons-citernes plus résistants à l'impact ont été prises. Nous avons donc retiré cet enjeu de la liste.

Par contre, nous continuons à surveiller les statistiques et à mener nos enquêtes lorsqu'il y a lieu. Aucune suite n'a encore été donnée à trois des cinq recommandations que nous avions formulées en lien avec les événements survenus à Lac-Mégantic, pas plus qu'à deux autres recommandations que nous avons proposées après d'autres déraillements en 2015. Il est donc clair que nous n'avons nullement arrêté de surveiller cet enjeu de sécurité.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Le transport de marchandises par rail est de plus en plus courant. Dans vos propos préliminaires, vous avez parlé de différents modèles de wagons. La question des modèles DOT-111 n'est pas encore tout à fait réglée, mais cela s'en vient, et la question est derrière nous. Pour ce qui est des modèles CPC-1232 blindés qui devaient être l'une des solutions de rechange aux modèles DOT-111, on a constaté lors de déraillements récents qu'un certain nombre de ces wagons n'avaient pas résisté aux chocs. Dieu merci, ils ne transportaient pas de pétrole, mais ils pourraient être utilisés à cette fin.

Est-ce que le BST dispose de données sur la fiabilité des nouveaux types de wagons, comme les TC-117, qui sont censés être sans risque? Dans le contexte des derniers déraillements, a-t-on pris en considération ces nouveaux wagons? Est-ce qu'on a étudié leur résistance, leur façon de se comporter lors d'un impact ou d'un déraillement?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Avant de passer la parole à ma collègue, qui pourra vous parler un peu des statistiques, je voudrais simplement vous dire que lorsque survient un déraillement impliquant des matières dangereuses comme du pétrole brut, nous étudions toujours la performance des wagons-citernes, que nous comparons à ceux utilisés dans d'autres accidents.

Je vais maintenant demander à Mme Ackermans de vous expliquer ce que nous avons constaté sur l'évolution relative à la distribution des wagons-citernes depuis un certain temps. [Traduction]

Mme Faye Ackermans (membre du bureau, Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports):

Nous n'avons pas déposé cette information, mais nous pourrions certainement le faire. Quand la tragédie de Lac-Mégantic s'est produite, 80 % des wagons-citernes étaient des DOT-111 ou des CPC-1232 sans chemise, ceux que nous avons appelés les moins résistants aux impacts ou les moins robustes. À l'heure actuelle, pratiquement tous ces wagons ont été mis hors service en Amérique du Nord, et 80 % des wagons sont donc maintenant de bien meilleure qualité. Nous nous penchons encore, et nous continuerons de le faire, sur ce qui arrive aux wagons lors d'un accident.

Lors du dernier accident à être survenu, seuls six ou sept — nous ne sommes pas encore certains du nombre — wagons sur les 37 qui ont déraillé étaient endommagés. À Lac-Mégantic, environ 65 wagons ont déraillé et 63 ont été endommagés dans l'accident. De toute évidence, la capacité de retenue n'est pas la même, mais il faudra que d'autres accidents surviennent pour que nous puissions avoir de bons chiffres.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin, votre temps est écoulé.

Nous passons à M. Hardie.

(1110)

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je regarde vos feuilles de statistiques, et on y voit un bon nombre d'événements en 2013 et en 2014. Il semble y avoir une hausse. Les mauvaises conditions météorologiques cet hiver-là ont-elles nui à la capacité des trains à rester sur les rails? Savons-nous la moindre chose sur ce qui explique cette augmentation du nombre d'événements?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Il faudrait que je revienne en arrière et que je fasse beaucoup d'analyse pour déterminer cela, mais ce que nous savons, c'est qu'en 2013 et en 2014, le transport de pétrole brut par voie ferroviaire augmentait considérablement. C'est pendant cette période que s'est produit l'accident de Lac-Mégantic, en 2013.

Depuis, et surtout depuis 2015, l'industrie et l'organisme de réglementation ont pris un certain nombre de mesures pour réduire le risque de déraillement ou les conséquences d'un déraillement. Nous avons également observé une baisse des activités pendant quelques années. Je ne pense pas qu'on puisse établir un lien direct de cause à effet, surtout parce que l'accident de Lac-Mégantic a eu lieu pendant l'été, mais il ne fait aucun doute qu'il est beaucoup plus difficile de mener des activités ferroviaires l'hiver que l'été, compte tenu des conditions de froid extrême.

M. Ken Hardie:

Il semble y avoir eu — et c'est certainement ce que nous avons vu et entendu — une augmentation des cargaisons ferroviaires de pétrole tout simplement parce que tout le monde attend la construction d'oléoducs, surtout les personnes qui siègent de ce côté-ci de la Chambre.

Les trains plus longs et pesants... Je ne sais pas si les nouveaux wagons ont en fait une plus grande capacité que certains de ceux qui ont été mis hors service, mais il semble y avoir une tempête parfaite qui se profile à l'horizon. Quand on ajoute les conditions anormalement froides qui peuvent survenir, particulièrement à certaines périodes de l'année, nous semblons être face à un risque élevé. Je me demande, pour ce qui est des caractéristiques du service, du type de trains, de leur longueur et ainsi de suite, si vous êtes convaincus que les chemins de fer apportent ces ajustements comme il se doit.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je vais demander à Mme Ackermans de répondre.

Mme Faye Ackermans:

Au cours des derniers jours, j'ai regardé à quel point certains de ces trains qui transportent du pétrole sont longs. Habituellement, lorsque nous avons un accident, il semble y avoir environ 100 wagons, selon nos données. En fait, les trains de pétrole ne semblent pas être anormalement longs par rapport à certains des autres trains des chemins de fer.

À propos de la capacité, les nouveaux wagons ont une capacité moindre que celle des anciens wagons à cause de l'acier et du revêtement supplémentaires. Ils contiennent donc chacun un peu moins de pétrole.

M. Ken Hardie:

Nous savons, bien entendu, que le pétrole impliqué dans l'accident de Lac-Mégantic provenait des champs de Bakken, et nous venons tout juste d'apprendre dans les médias que c'est un produit beaucoup plus inflammable qu'une grande partie des autres. Savez-vous quelque chose à propos du mélange transporté par voie ferroviaire? Comporte-t-il encore de très hautes concentrations du type de pétrole impliqué à Lac-Mégantic, ou avons-nous maintenant du bitume plus dilué et certains des autres produits moins inflammables?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne sais pas si nous avons les chiffres sur la distribution du type de pétrole. C'est certainement une chose sur laquelle nous nous penchons dans le cadre d'une enquête, et cela fera d'ailleurs partie de l'enquête sur le dernier accident, qui a eu lieu la fin de semaine passée, à Saint-Lazare, au Manitoba. Ce que nous pouvons dire, c'est que depuis les deux déversements majeurs dans le Nord de l'Ontario en 2015 — quand on regarde les chiffres — jusqu'à la fin de semaine passée, nous n'avions pas eu de déraillement important de wagons de pétrole. Nous allons nous pencher là-dessus dans le cadre de l'enquête en cours sur l'accident à Saint-Lazare.

M. Ken Hardie:

Nous avons aussi eu l'incident dans les Rocheuses près de Field, en Colombie-Britannique. C'était la semaine dernière ou celle d'avant, tout récemment. Bien sûr, quiconque se souvient de l'accident de Lac-Mégantic peut voir des similitudes: un train stationné a soudainement commencé à bouger, et le ministre a pris très rapidement un arrêté.

Êtes-vous préoccupés par cet incident? Pensez-vous que les remèdes exigés par le ministre jusqu'à nouvel ordre seront adéquats? Avons-nous même besoin d'enquêter sur l'équipement de sécurité à bord des trains?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

En ce qui a trait à l'enquête sur l'accident à Field, en Colombie-Britannique, elle est toujours en cours. Les circonstances étaient différentes à Lac-Mégantic; c'était un train sans surveillance aux freins mal actionnés qui s'est mis à bouger. À Field, il y avait des membres d'équipage dans le train, et il est trop tôt pour que nous déterminions — nous ne le savons pas encore puisque l'enquête est en cours — tous les facteurs en jeu.

Je pense que toute mesure prise par le ministre pour réduire le risque d'une perte de maîtrise est bonne. Quant à savoir si les mesures sont adéquates, il faut attendre d'en savoir plus long sur la cause de cet accident.

(1115)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Allez-y, madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à vous remercier de comparaître aujourd'hui pour témoigner sur le retrait du transport ferroviaire de liquides inflammables, qui se trouvait sur votre liste de surveillance.

Il en a déjà été question à la lumière des trois déraillements récents en autant de semaines. Je pense que le premier était le 24 janvier, le deuxième, le 4 février et le dernier, le 14 février. Nous voyons ce genre de déraillements se produire. Bien entendu, il y a eu l'accident tragique à Field, en Colombie-Britannique, où trois personnes sont décédées.

Je pense qu'il est opportun de faire cette étude maintenant. Je crois que certaines personnes pourraient se demander s'il est judicieux de retirer cela de la liste de surveillance, alors qu'on transporte plus de pétrole par voie ferroviaire. Nous devrions peut-être examiner la grande question de savoir si nous devrions ou non transporter le pétrole par oléoducs plutôt que par voie ferroviaire. Je sais qu'il en a également été question.

Je me demande juste si vous pourriez me dire, madame Fox, si vous connaissez le rapport d'août 2015 de l'Institut Fraser dans lequel on compare le bilan en matière de sécurité des oléoducs à celui des trains.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je le connais un peu, oui. J'ai vu le rapport.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je vois; vous le connaissez donc un peu. À votre avis, les conclusions du rapport sont-elles exactes?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Nous n'avons pas évalué le rapport de manière aussi sévère. À notre connaissance, les renseignements du BST qui ont été utilisés sont exacts. Nous n'avons aucune raison d'en douter. Je pense que la comparaison des trains et des oléoducs pour ce qui est du transport sécuritaire de matières dangereuses est beaucoup plus complexe et qu'il est beaucoup plus difficile d'y répondre que ce qu'on pourrait croire à première vue.

Il faut vraiment comparer des comparables. Il faut des données agrégées sur le volume provenant de différentes sources. Il faut un dénominateur commun pour les comparer. C'est très difficile.

De notre point de vue, les risques associés aux oléoducs sont très différents. Ils se rapportent, par exemple, au bris ou à l'usure, aux interactions avec l'environnement et parfois à l'intervention d'une tierce partie. En revanche, par voie ferroviaire, des cargaisons pesant des centaines de tonnes circulent sur des rails en acier dans toutes sortes de conditions climatiques.

Les risques sont très différents. Au bout du compte, notre travail consiste à trouver les lacunes et les aspects pour lesquels il faut en faire davantage. Nous ne faisons pas de comparaisons pour déterminer quel est le moyen le plus sécuritaire. Nous croyons que, peu importe le moyen, il faut que ce soit fait de la façon la plus sécuritaire qui soit.

Mme Kelly Block:

Au cours de la dernière législature, j'étais secrétaire parlementaire du ministre des Ressources naturelles. Je ne remets pas en question la sûreté du transport de pétrole par voie ferroviaire; je crois tout simplement que les oléoducs sont un peu plus sécuritaires. Je crois qu'il incombe à chacun de nous d'essayer de transporter ce produit partout au pays en recourant au moyen le plus sécuritaire.

L'une des principales constatations de ce rapport, c'est que le risque d'avoir un événement était 4,5 fois plus élevé par voie ferroviaire qu'au moyen d'oléoducs.

Je me demande si vous avez remarqué dans les chiffres un changement qui indique que ce ratio n'est plus exact.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne peux pas me prononcer sur le ratio. Ce que je peux vous dire d'après nos chiffres préliminaires de 2018, c'est que lorsqu'on regarde le nombre d'événements dans le transport ferroviaire, on constate que 1 468 événements ont été signalés au BST en 2018, ce qui comprend 1 173 accidents ferroviaires. On parle de tous les types d'accidents: les déraillements, les collisions et ainsi de suite.

Quand on regarde les chiffres sur les oléoducs, on constate premièrement qu'on nous a signalé un total de 110 événements, y compris un accident. Il y a donc une différence nette dans le nombre d'événements qui nous sont signalés. Je mentionne que nous nous préoccupons uniquement des pipelines sous réglementation fédérale. Deuxièmement, nous n'avons pas de recommandation en suspens pour ce qui est des pipelines. Les pipelines ne figurent pas sur notre liste de surveillance, mais un certain nombre d'exemples anecdotiques peuvent évoquer, ou indiquer, des problèmes connexes entre les moyens de transport.

Je pense qu'il ne faut également pas oublier qu'en cas de déversement de pipeline — et selon ce qui est transporté, à savoir du pétrole brut ou du gaz —, les conséquences peuvent être majeures compte tenu de la quantité déversée par rapport au volume de, disons, pétrole brut transporté dans un train-bloc. Je me sers de l'exemple de l'événement d'octobre 2018 sur lequel nous enquêtons au nord de Prince George, où un gazoduc s'est rompu et a pris en feu.

En ce qui a trait à la fréquence, le nombre d'événements ferroviaires signalés est supérieur aux événements impliquant des pipelines, mais il faut également tenir compte des conséquences, à savoir la quantité déversée, le produit concerné et l'endroit touché.

(1120)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Sikand, vous avez la parole.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je représente une circonscription à Mississauga, et on nous rappelle souvent le déraillement de 1979, après lequel notre mairesse a été nommée à juste titre l'« Ouragan Hazel ». En 2015, pendant notre campagne, un incident a eu lieu. Je ne parlerais pas d'un déraillement, mais un train est sorti des rails, et il a fallu faire un petit nettoyage. Dans ma circonscription, nous sommes bien conscients des préoccupations en matière de sécurité liées au transport ferroviaire, au transport de produits chimiques et de pétrole brut. Depuis 2015, je fais du porte-à-porte et je constate une différence marquée dans les émotions que le transport ferroviaire suscite chez les gens. Ils se sentent plutôt en sécurité, par rapport à l'époque où je menais ma première campagne. Je pense que c'est, entre autres, parce que nous avons accéléré l'élimination progressive des wagons CPC-122 et DOT-111.

Pouvez-vous en parler et dire comment cette mesure a rendu plus sécuritaire l'ensemble du système de sécurité?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Lorsqu'on parle du transport du pétrole brut, les wagons CPC-1232 sans chemise sont éliminés progressivement plus tôt que prévu. Les wagons CPC-1232 avec chemise sont toujours en service et pourront le demeurer jusqu'en 2025. Toutefois, on constate une réduction de l'utilisation de ces wagons et une augmentation du recours à la nouvelle norme relative aux wagons-citernes TC-117, qui a été établie à la suite de l'accident de Lac-Mégantic. Nous aurons l'occasion d'apprendre ce qui s'est passé à Saint-Lazare la fin de semaine dernière et de comparer le rendement de ces wagons à celui des wagons-citernes CPC-1232 avec chemise qui sont toujours permis.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Dans la région du Grand Toronto, ce sont les wagons sans chemise qui passent fréquemment?

Mme Faye Ackermans:

On ne peut pas dire quel type de wagon-citerne passe dans une région en particulier. L'expéditeur détermine le wagon à utiliser pour transporter un produit en particulier, alors il faut se demander qui transporte quel produit pour répondre à cette question. Je n'ai pas la réponse.

M. Gagan Sikand:

D'accord.

J'aimerais céder le reste de mon temps de parole à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Madame Fox, ce qui m'a surpris le plus dans vos premières réponses aux questions de M. Aubin, c'est d'entendre dire qu'il faudra plus d'accidents pour que nous obtenions plus de données. Est-ce que les wagons de marchandises sont soumis à des essais de collision avant d'être mis en service?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Oui, mais à une vitesse moins élevée. M. Jang pourrait peut-être vous donner la vitesse exacte. Lorsque la vitesse est plus grande, bien entendu, les dommages risquent d'être plus importants. Dans le cadre de nos enquêtes, nous évaluons la performance relative. Combien de wagons ont été impliqués? À quelle vitesse allaient-ils? Quelle est l'importance des dommages? Quel était le rendement?

Nous ne pouvons pas affirmer que ces 117 wagons ne subiront jamais de dommages ou qu'ils ne présentent aucun risque. Tout dépend de la vitesse, des forces dynamiques associées au déraillement et du moment de l'incident. Nous pouvons uniquement comparer le rendement relatif. Je peux vous assurer que selon une consigne ministérielle récente, les wagons-citernes 1232 sans chemise ont été éliminés du transport du pétrole brut et des distillats de pétrole environ six mois plus tôt que prévu. C'est au moins cela. Ils ne seront plus utilisés à cette fin.

(1125)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Selon mon expérience, les trains qui transportent de l'éthanol ont un wagon couvert à chaque extrémité, qui sert de zone tampon. Avez-vous constaté une différence sur le plan de la sécurité avec les wagons tampons ou les séparateurs?

M. Kirby Jang (directeur, Enquêtes ferroviaires et pipelines, Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports):

Dans le cadre des enquêtes précédentes, nous avons étudié la formation des wagons-citernes chargés et leur position dans le train. Toute séparation entre les wagons les plus dangereux est une bonne chose.

Vous savez probablement que nous avons fait une recommandation active en ce qui a trait aux facteurs associés aux déraillements de trains contenant des matières dangereuses et à leur gravité. Dans le cadre de cette analyse, nous demandons à l'industrie ferroviaire et au ministère des Transports d'étudier le profil de risque des divers trains afin de déterminer si des modifications doivent être apportées aux règles associées aux trains et itinéraires clés. C'est un élément très important. Un train qui comprend plus de 20 wagons chargés est considéré à titre de train clé. La distribution dans le train est assez importante.

Vous soulevez un bon point au sujet de l'emplacement des wagons tampons.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

La présidente:

Allez-y, monsieur Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins de leur présence ce matin.

La liste de surveillance du Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada comprend les principaux enjeux de sécurité des différents modes de transport auxquels il faudrait remédier. Pouvez-vous nous dire quels éléments sont pris en considération par le BST lorsqu'il détermine qu'un enjeu de sécurité ne doit pas seulement mener à des recommandations, mais être inclus dans sa liste de surveillance?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Tous les deux ans, le BST étudie plusieurs éléments. Nous nous penchons sur les statistiques d'accidents et d'incidents pour dégager des tendances. Nous révisons les recommandations auxquelles aucune suite n'a encore été donnée, ainsi que les préoccupations du BST. Nous consultons aussi notre personnel pour savoir ce qu'il recommande d'inscrire ou de conserver sur la liste, ou quels sont les enjeux à retirer. Nous surveillons également d'autres enjeux qui ne figurent pas sur la liste. Quand nous inscrivons quelque chose sur la liste, par contre, c'est parce que nous croyons que le risque est suffisamment important, que l'inscription est appropriée et que les correctifs que nous avons demandés n'ont pas encore été mis en place.

Pour ce qui est du transport de liquides inflammables, nous avions deux exigences: une analyse des risques et la gestion des risques de la part des compagnies ferroviaires, et l'accélération du retrait des wagons-citernes les moins résistants à l'impact. Quand l'industrie et Transports Canada ont répondu à ces exigences, nous avons retiré cet enjeu de la liste de surveillance. Une simple augmentation de l'activité ne justifie pas en soi que nous conservions un enjeu sur la liste. Si nous croyons que le risque est suffisamment géré, nous pouvons retirer un enjeu de la liste. Nous continuons toutefois de le surveiller, surtout dans le cas du transport du pétrole par rail, qui est en hausse.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.

Le transport des liquides inflammables par train est une préoccupation particulièrement importante, surtout au Québec, étant donné la tragédie de Lac-Mégantic. D'ailleurs, le transport des liquides inflammables avait été ajouté à la liste de surveillance du BST à la suite de cet événement. Étant donné que cet enjeu a depuis été retiré de la liste de surveillance, il est juste de penser que Transports Canada travaille à l'amélioration de la sécurité du transport des liquides inflammables par train. Pouvez-vous nous donner plus de précisions sur les mesures qui ont été prises par Transports Canada par rapport à cette préoccupation?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je peux vous donner des précisions, mais je crois que vous allez aussi recevoir les représentants de Transports Canada tout à l'heure, qui seront probablement plus en mesure de vous donner les détails que vous souhaitez obtenir.

Je peux cependant vous dire qu'il y a eu un changement dans le Règlement de 2015 sur le système de gestion de la sécurité ferroviaire. Il y a eu l'introduction de certificats d'exploitation pour les compagnies ferroviaires ainsi qu'une augmentation du nombre et de l'envergure des vérifications ou inspections faites par Transports Canada auprès des compagnies ferroviaires. Des amendes ont aussi été instaurées si les compagnies ne se conforment pas à la loi ou au règlement sur la sécurité ferroviaire. Par ailleurs, le retrait des wagons les moins résistants à l'impact a été décrété, ainsi que la mise en place de plans d'intervention d'urgence en cas de déraillement.

L'ensemble de toutes ces mesures a fait en sorte de réduire le risque, mais sans l'éliminer complètement. Il reste encore à donner suite à trois des cinq recommandations que nous avions faites dans la foulée de la tragédie de Lac-Mégantic, ainsi qu'à deux autres recommandations que nous avons formulées après des déraillements survenus dans le nord de l'Ontario en 2015. Nous continuerons à suivre ce dossier jusqu'à ce que toutes nos recommandations aient été mises en oeuvre de façon pleinement satisfaisante.

(1130)

M. Angelo Iacono:

C'est bien que Transports Canada soit un acteur principal dans ce dossier, mais qu'en est-il des compagnies ferroviaires?

Quelles mesures ont été mises en place par les compagnies pour assurer une plus grande sécurité sur les rails?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Comme je l'ai mentionné au début de ma présentation, quand les compagnies transportent de grandes quantités de liquides inflammables, les mesures ont trait, entre autres, au système de gestion du risque, aux inspections, à l'entretien et à l'analyse de risques.

Les compagnies sont tenues de maintenir des normes supérieures particulièrement quand il s'agit de trains ou de routes clés. Il y a ainsi eu la mise en place d'une mesure visant la réduction de la vitesse pour les trains qui transportent le pétrole. Par contre, comme on l'a vu dans des accidents survenus dans le nord de l'Ontario, ce n'est pas juste la vitesse qui peut provoquer un déraillement. C'est pourquoi nous avons demandé à Transports Canada d'effectuer une étude plus approfondie sur d'autres facteurs de risques, laquelle pourrait mener à de nouvelles exigences visant leur réduction et auxquelles devraient se soumettre les compagnies ferroviaires.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Est-ce que les ministères ont connaissance de toutes les données liées à ces mesures? Les données sont-elles transmises aux ministères?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Oui, en ce sens que l'information entrée dans les systèmes de gestion de sécurité des compagnies ferroviaires doit être transmise à Transports Canada. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Liepert.

M. Ron Liepert:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie tous les témoins de leur présence ici aujourd'hui.

Je représente une circonscription de Calgary. Je m'intéresse au transport des produits du pétrole et j'ai quelques questions à vous poser; j'espère que vous pourrez y répondre.

Il est évident qu'il est beaucoup plus sécuritaire de transporter les liquides pétroliers et les condensats par pipeline que par rail. Si nous n'avions pas à expédier par rail notre pétrole ou nos liquides et condensats destinés aux installations de fabrication de produits pétrochimiques du Québec — qui créent des milliers d'emplois dans la province —, mais que nous pouvions les transporter par pipeline, comme ils devraient l'être...

Nous n'avons pas de pipelines pour les transporter parce que des groupes d'intérêts particuliers n'en veulent pas — et cela comprend les membres des partis politiques qui se trouvent à ma gauche — et qu'ils transmettent des faussetés ou leur rhétorique sur la sécurité des pipelines. Si ce n'était d'eux, nous ne ferions même pas cette étude aujourd'hui.

Est-ce que c'est exact?

La présidente:

C'est une question tendancieuse.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne peux pas répondre à cette question.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je vais prendre cela pour un oui, madame. Merci.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

[Inaudible] répondre à cette question.

La présidente:

Mme Fox dit qu'elle n'est pas à l'aise de répondre à cette question.

M. Ron Liepert:

D'accord. Je vais vous en poser une autre.

J'aimerais qu'on revienne au rapport de l'Institut Fraser, qui indique que les déversements de plus de 70 % des pipelines sont de l'ordre d'un mètre cube ou moins, ce qui équivaut probablement à ce qui est répandu au quotidien dans les stations-services.

Est-ce que cette statistique est toujours pertinente trois ans plus tard?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne peux faire de commentaire sur les statistiques du rapport. Je peux vous dire que bon nombre des rapports que nous recevons font état de déversements ou de rejets mineurs des produits. Nous réalisons environ une ou deux enquêtes sur les pipelines par année, lorsque nous croyons que ces enquêtes exhaustives peuvent améliorer la sécurité des transports. Oui, dans la grande majorité des cas, les rejets déclarés sont mineurs.

Je tiens à préciser que le risque — comme je l'ai dit plus tôt lorsque nous parlions des pipelines — est qu'en cas de déversement important de produit, qu'il s'agisse de pétrole ou de gaz, les conséquences peuvent être assez importantes. C'est ce qui est arrivé à Prince George, où nous menons présentement une enquête: il y a eu un bris et le gaz naturel a pris feu.

Les cas sont moins nombreux. Les conséquences pourraient être plus graves. Cela dépend de ce qui est transporté, de la quantité déversée, du temps qu'il faut pour arrêter la fuite et de l'endroit où elle se produit.

(1135)

M. Ron Liepert:

J'aimerais revenir à ma première question et la formuler autrement.

Pouvez-vous me confirmer qu'on transporte chaque jour des liquides, des condensats et du pétrole vers les raffineries et les installations de fabrication du Québec, ce qui crée des milliers d'emplois?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne sais pas quelle quantité de produits est acheminée à un endroit en particulier. Je suis désolée, je ne peux pas...

M. Ron Liepert:

Mais on transporte ces produits, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

À notre connaissance, oui.

M. Ron Liepert:

Quelqu'un peut-il nous éclairer là-dessus?

M. Jean Laporte (administrateur en chef des opérations, Bureau canadien d'enquête sur les accidents de transport et de la sécurité des transports):

Habituellement, nous ne ventilons pas les données sur les activités selon les provinces, les régions ou les installations. L'Office national de l'énergie et Statistique Canada auraient ces renseignements. En règle générale, nous recueillons les données sur les produits qui ont été expédiés et déversés, les incidents et leur occurrence.

M. Ron Liepert:

Nous savons que les raffineries du Québec transforment les produits pétroliers pour les clients québécois. Est-ce exact?

M. Jean Laporte:

Oui.

M. Ron Liepert:

Tous ces produits sont transportés par rail.

M. Jean Laporte:

Nous n'avons pas de données précises à ce sujet. Une grande partie du pétrole raffiné au Québec arrive par bateau.

M. Ron Liepert:

C'est du pétrole étranger, n'est-ce pas? Nous progressons.

Est-ce qu'il me reste du temps?

La présidente:

Oui, il vous reste une minute.

M. Ron Liepert:

Que pourrions-nous faire pour changer les choses et convaincre la population que le transport du pétrole par pipeline est beaucoup plus sécuritaire que le transport par rail? Nous n'aurions pas besoin de dépenser l'argent des contribuables pour réaliser des études comme celle-ci si nous avions des pipelines pour expédier le pétrole.

M. Jean Laporte:

Encore une fois, ce n'est pas à nous de déterminer cela. Notre mandat est très clair: nous enquêtons sur les événements. Des organismes de réglementation et autres organismes gouvernementaux sont responsables d'examiner la production, l'importation et l'exportation de produits énergétiques, et d'exercer une surveillance à cet égard.

En ce qui a trait aux activités relatives au transport par pipeline, le nombre d'incidents a été relativement stable et a légèrement diminué au cours des dernières années. Les quantités déversées en cas d'incident sont assez petites, comme nous l'avons dit plus tôt, mais les données sur le transport par rail changent.

Si vous faites référence à l'étude de 2015 de l'Institut Fraser, plusieurs améliorations ont été apportées en matière de sécurité ferroviaire depuis, et les chiffres changent. Dans quelques semaines, nous publierons nos statistiques officielles pour l'année 2018; vous aurez donc accès à des données plus actuelles dont pourraient se servir l'Institut Fraser et d'autres pour procéder à l'analyse à laquelle vous faites référence.

La présidente:

Monsieur Laporte, lorsque le rapport sera publié, pourriez-vous l'envoyer à la greffière afin qu'elle en transmette une copie aux membres du Comité? Nous vous en serions reconnaissants. Merci.

Monsieur Hardie, vous avez la parole.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vais partager mon temps de parole avec Mme Pauzé. J'aimerais tout d'abord poser deux questions.

Est-ce que le Bureau enquête sur les problèmes ou incidents impliquant des navires?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Oui.

M. Ken Hardie:

Sur combien d'incidents impliquant le transport de toutes sortes de marchandises dans l'inlet Burrard avez-vous enquêté?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne sais pas exactement combien d'accidents impliquaient l'inlet Burrard.

Nous avons enquêté sur plusieurs événements au large de la côte ouest de l'île de Vancouver impliquant toutes sortes de navires, y compris des bateaux de pêche, des remorqueurs et des barges. De mémoire — et je me trompe peut-être —, il n'y a pas eu déversement d'un produit qui était transporté; c'est plutôt ce qui permettait aux navires d'avancer qui s'est déversé. Par exemple, un bateau de pêche a chaviré et le combustible de soute s'est déversé. Dans l'Ouest, le remorqueur Nathan E. Stewart a déversé 110 000 litres de combustible de soute.

(1140)

M. Ken Hardie:

Sur la côte Ouest, on songe à expédier plus de pétrole ou de bitume dilué à partir du terminal de Burnaby. Vous savez probablement qu'il y a d'autres produits comme les substances corrosives qui seraient tout aussi difficiles à gérer en cas de déversement qui sont expédiés de Vancouver depuis un bon moment.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Encore une fois, nous n'avons pas de données précises sur les produits transportés, la destination ou le moment du transport. Nous étudions chaque événement, incident ou accident de façon précise. Nous déterminons ce qui était à bord, ce qui était transporté et les conséquences du déversement.

M. Ken Hardie:

Transports Canada participe évidemment à l'évaluation des risques. Croyez-vous que le ministère pourra faire son travail de manière efficace avec les données dont il dispose?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Nous lui donnons accès à certaines de nos données. Il a peut-être d'autres données. Je ne peux me prononcer sur ce qui se passe au ministère dans le cadre de l'évaluation des risques.

M. Ken Hardie:

Très bien.

Madame Pauzé, vous avez la parole. [Français]

Mme Monique Pauzé (Repentigny, BQ):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Hardie. C'est très gentil de votre part.

Peu de temps avant Noël, je suis allée à Lac-Mégantic afin de rencontrer les gens touchés par le drame. Ils m'ont expliqué que la courbe où le train a déraillé, alors qu'il circulait à 101 kilomètres à l'heure, était de 3,1 ou 3,2 degrés. Comme les compagnies ont insisté pour remettre le plus rapidement possible des wagons en circulation et reprendre le transport, une section de la courbe a été refaite et elle est encore plus accentuée qu'au moment du déraillement.

De plus, c'est du gaz propane, un produit encore plus explosif, que transportent les wagons qui passent à Lac-Mégantic. Vous comprendrez que, pour les gens de ce petit village, c'est assez traumatisant. Votre décision de retirer cet enjeu de la liste de surveillance est également traumatisante. Les citoyens de Lac-Mégantic m'en ont parlé toute la journée. C'était vraiment dramatique.

Dans vos notes d'allocution, on peut lire que les compagnies ferroviaires font elles-mêmes l'évaluation des risques et les inspections. Encore une fois, c'est très troublant pour les gens de Lac-Mégantic — cela devrait l'être pour tous les Canadiens — de penser qu'on remet entre les mains des compagnies ferroviaires le pouvoir de faire leurs propres inspections et évaluations.

Plus tôt, vous avez dit que vous suggériez des mesures et que vous vérifiiez par la suite si elles étaient prises. Vous fiez-vous à ce que les représentants des compagnies ferroviaires vous disent?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Premièrement, je peux vous rassurer et rassurer les citoyens et les citoyennes de Lac-Mégantic: nous n’oublierons jamais ce qui s'y est passé. Cela a été une tragédie.

Trois de nos cinq recommandations n'ont toujours pas fait l'objet de suivi, c'est-à-dire qu'on n'y a pas encore répondu de façon satisfaisante, selon le BST.

En ce qui concerne les inspections, c'est certain que les compagnies ferroviaires doivent faire des inspections de leur propre infrastructure. Cependant, Transports Canada fait aussi des inspections et des audits de leurs systèmes de gestion de la sécurité. Ce n'est donc pas tout à fait précis de dire que c'est de l'auto-inspection. Toutes les compagnies, que ce soit une compagnie d'aviation, une compagnie ferroviaire ou une compagnie de pipeline, doivent faire les inspections de leur propre infrastructure selon les normes.

De plus, nous exigeons que l'organisme de réglementation, soit Transports Canada dans le cas des compagnies ferroviaires, fasse ses propres audits et inspections. Il s'agit d'une recommandation découlant de la tragédie de Lac-Mégantic qui est encore en vigueur et qui n'est pas fermée, parce que nous voulons voir les résultats des inspections de Transports Canada.

Nous avons retiré cet enjeu de la liste de surveillance parce que les mesures précises qui faisaient partie de nos exigences ont été prises par les compagnies ferroviaires et Transports Canada. C'est la seule raison pour laquelle nous l'avons retiré de notre liste de surveillance. C'est comme une liste de mesures à prendre.

Nous continuons de suivre et de surveiller de près le transport des liquides inflammables et la sécurité ferroviaire. Pour ce faire, nous poursuivons nos études statistiques et nos enquêtes, et nous proposons des recommandations que nous réévaluons chaque année.

(1145)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Merci à tous d'être ici aujourd'hui.

J'ai lu bon nombre des recommandations actives sur la sécurité du transport ferroviaire, mais la plupart d'entre elles visent le ministère des Transports. Vous savez sans doute que le gouvernement de l'Alberta prévoit de louer 4 400 wagons pour transporter le pétrole de l'Alberta vers le marché.

Je me pose des questions au sujet de ces recommandations. Est-ce que Transports Canada devrait agir rapidement en raison des activités à venir?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je vais demander à Mme Ackermans de mettre les statistiques en contexte; je compléterai la réponse du mieux que je le pourrai.

Mme Faye Ackermans:

Nous avons examiné les données et la quantité de produits déplacée. L'ONE a publié ses données sur l'exportation du pétrole brut hier. Environ 130 000 wagons de produits sont exportés. Je n'ai pas vu les données de Statistique Canada; elles seront mises à jour également. Il y a probablement 50 000 ou 100 000 autres wagons de pétrole brut transporté au Canada.

Puisque ce pétrole brut transporté dans 4 400 wagons supplémentaires vise le marché de l'exportation, il entraînera une augmentation d'environ 50 % du volume d'exportation du pétrole brut d'ici la mise en oeuvre complète de ces mesures, soit en 2020, selon ce que je comprends.

Voilà le contexte.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

J'ajouterais simplement qu'en ce qui a trait aux mesures et à notre liste de suivi, les accidents ferroviaires arrivent pour plusieurs raisons. L'équipage ne respecte pas toujours les signaux. C'est un enjeu particulier. La fatigue est aussi un facteur d'importance pour tous les modes de transport — aérien, ferroviaire et maritime — alors nous étudions la question dans le contexte du transport ferroviaire.

Les deux autres éléments qui se trouvent sur la liste de suivi et qui sont particulièrement importants sont la gestion de la sécurité et la surveillance. Nous continuons de suivre les activités de l'industrie et de Transports Canada en ce qui a trait à cela et en ce qui a trait aux recommandations en suspens, dont certaines datent d'il y a plus de 10 ans. Cinq d'entre elles visent le transport ferroviaire. Parmi ces cinq recommandations, trois figurent à la liste de suivi à un autre titre.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Est-ce que vous prenez des mesures proactives? La première ministre de l'Alberta a fait une demande au ministre à cet égard. De toute évidence, la demande a été approuvée d'une manière ou d'une autre. Est-ce que vous échangez avec le ministère — et peut-être avec le ministre — dans le but de vous préparer à cela?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Non. Notre mandat consiste à enquêter sur les événements, les incidents et les accidents. C'est ce que nous faisons. Nous recueillons des données que nous transmettons à Transports Canada et à l'industrie... à l'Association des chemins de fer du Canada. Nous rencontrons périodiquement — au moins une fois par année — les représentants des grandes compagnies de chemin de fer pour savoir où elles en sont et pour leur faire part de nos préoccupations.

Nous entretenons un dialogue continu avec les divers intervenants, notamment l'organisme de réglementation, sur ce qui se dégage de nos statistiques et sur les mesures qui, à notre avis, devraient être prises

M. Matt Jeneroux:

À quelle fréquence rencontrez-vous le ministre?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Je ne rencontre pas souvent le ministre. Je l'ai rencontré pour une séance d'information au début de son mandat. Nous avons des rencontres régulières avec les sous-ministres et des rencontres assez fréquentes avec le personnel.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Il y a eu trois déraillements. On prévoit une hausse considérable de la circulation ferroviaire, mais vous n'avez rencontré le ministre qu'une fois, pour une séance d'information au début. Cela me semble un peu étrange.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Cela n'inclut pas les lettres qui peuvent avoir été envoyées.

Les déraillements font partie de la réalité dans le secteur ferroviaire.

Un seul des trois déraillements qui ont eu lieu depuis janvier était lié au transport de liquides inflammables. C'était à Saint-Lazare, et l'enquête sur cet incident se poursuit.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons à M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

On a un ministre des Transports dont la marque de commerce est de répéter aussi souvent qu'il le peut que la sécurité est sa priorité absolue. Nous aimerions le croire, mais ce que je découvre dans la population, c'est que celle-ci fait davantage confiance au BST, qui a l'apparence d'une certaine neutralité, qu'au ministre.

Vous avez dit deux fois aujourd'hui qu'on n'avait pas encore donné suite à trois des cinq recommandations formulées dans le rapport sur l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic, et cela m'inquiète. J'aimerais que vous nous rappeliez de quelles recommandations il s'agit.

J'aimerais aussi que vous nous expliquiez ce que veulent dire les mentions faites dans votre rapport, dans un jargon qui vous est propre, relativement à l'état actuel d'une recommandation, à savoir « attention satisfaisante », « attention en partie satisfaisante » et « intention satisfaisante ».

Selon moi, « intention satisfaisante » veut dire qu'il n'y a pas eu de mesures prises et « attention en partie satisfaisante », qu'on a fait un pas dans la bonne direction, mais qu'on n'a pas réglé le problème. La cote « satisfaisant » me satisferait aussi, mais j'ai l'impression que nous sommes loin du compte.

(1150)

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Permettez-moi de rappeler les trois recommandations encore actives découlant de l'enquête sur l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic.

La première recommandation concerne les wagons-citernes. Nous voulons que les wagons-citernes utilisés pour le transport de pétrole ou de liquides inflammables soient les plus résistants possible à l'impact. Beaucoup de progrès ont été faits de ce côté, mais la recommandation est active parce que le pétrole est encore transporté dans d'autres sortes de wagons-citernes que ceux qui respectent les normes les plus récentes.

M. Robert Aubin:

Des normes sécuritaires.

Mme Kathleen Fox:

La deuxième recommandation concerne la prise de mesures visant à empêcher que les trains partent à la dérive.

On a pris des mesures à la suite de l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic. On a changé les règlements concernant la manière de sécuriser un train garé et non supervisé. Je vais revenir à votre autre question tantôt.

La troisième recommandation concerne la surveillance du système de gestion de la sécurité des compagnies ferroviaires ainsi que des vérifications et des inspections qui ont été faites.

Ce sont les trois recommandations encore actives. Bien qu'il y ait eu beaucoup de progrès et qu'on ait pris des mesures, les lacunes ne sont pas complètement corrigées. Nous attendons de voir les suites qui y seront données.

Je vais maintenant parler de la façon dont nous évaluons l'état des recommandations.

Prenons l'exemple des plans d'urgence et d'intervention qui ont été mis en place après l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic. Étant donné qu'on a immédiatement donné suite à notre recommandation de façon entièrement satisfaisante, nous avons fermé la recommandation.

Quand le ministère ou le ministre des Transports annonce un plan d'action et que nous croyons que celui-ci permettra de corriger les lacunes une fois qu'il aura été mis en œuvre, nous attribuons la cote « intention satisfaisante ». Cependant, nous ne fermons pas la recommandation tant que le plan n'a pas complètement été mis en oeuvre. Si nous pensons que le plan va corriger seulement une partie des lacunes, nous indiquons « attention en partie satisfaisante ». Les mesures prises pour empêcher que les trains partent à la dérive en sont un exemple: nous avons encore des préoccupations en ce qui concerne les mesures prises à ce jour en ce sens qu'elles ne sont peut-être pas suffisantes pour éliminer complètement ce risque.

M. Robert Aubin:

Justement, à ce sujet, il y a eu un autre train qui est parti à la dérive au cours de ces dernières semaines. Il ne contenait pas de produits inflammables, mais le problème reste le même. On a vu le ministre réagir, mais après coup.

Compte tenu du fait que des mesures ont été prises seulement après le déraillement survenu à Lac-Mégantic et après que plusieurs autres trains sont partis à la dérive, pouvons-nous dire que le ministre en fait suffisamment? Selon vous, les dernières mesures annoncées sont-elles satisfaisantes ou en partie satisfaisantes?

Mme Kathleen Fox:

Les problèmes liés à des mouvements non maîtrisés et non planifiés ou à des trains qui partent à la dérive sont attribuables à trois facteurs. Le premier est la perte de maîtrise, comme cela a été le cas dans l'accident survenu à Field. Le train était surveillé, mais pour des raisons qu'il nous reste à déterminer, il est parti à la dérive. Il y a aussi les changements de distribution des wagons dans les gares de triage. Le troisième facteur concerne les wagons non surveillés et mal sécurisés, comme cela a aussi été le cas à Lac-Mégantic.

Il faut vérifier chacun de ces enjeux pour voir si les mesures prises vont réduire le risque qu'un train ou quelques wagons partent à la dérive, mais on n'en est pas encore là.

M. Jean Laporte:

J'aimerais ajouter un commentaire, monsieur Aubin.

Nous faisons une évaluation annuelle de toutes nos recommandations en cours. Nous sommes actuellement engagés dans ce processus annuel. Vers la fin mars ou le début d'avril, le cycle devrait être terminé. Transports Canada nous présente des mises à jour relativement à toutes les recommandations. Nous allons les réévaluer dans les deux prochains mois et ce sera rendu public au cours d'avril ou de mai.

(1155)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Je remercie les témoins de ces précieux renseignements.

Nous allons maintenant suspendre la séance pour quelques minutes pour permettre au prochain groupe de prendre place.

(1155)

(1200)

La présidente:

Reprenons.

Bienvenue aux témoins.

Représentant le ministère des Transports, nous avons M. Kevin Brosseau, sous-ministre adjoint de la sécurité et de la sûreté; Mme Brigitte Diogo, directrice générale de la sécurité ferroviaire; M. Benoit Turcotte, directeur général du transport des marchandises dangereuses.

Merci beaucoup à tous. La parole est à vous.

M. Kevin Brosseau (sous-ministre adjoint, Sécurité et sûreté, ministère des Transports):

Merci beaucoup.

Madame la présidente, membres du Comité, bonjour. Je m'appelle Kevin Brosseau. Comme il a été mentionné, je suis sous-ministre adjoint de la sécurité et de la sûreté à Transports Canada. Je suis accompagné de Mme Brigitte Diogo, notre directrice générale de la sécurité ferroviaire et de M. Benoit Turcotte, qui est directeur général du transport des marchandises dangereuses. Puisque nous avons peu de temps, je vais faire un bref exposé. Cela vous donnera le temps de poser des questions.

Le Canada a l'un des réseaux de transport ferroviaire les plus sécuritaires au monde grâce à la collaboration de nombreux partenaires, notamment les autres ordres de gouvernement, les compagnies de chemin de fer, le BST, comme vous venez de l'entendre, et les communautés.[Français]

Transports Canada demeure engagé à améliorer la sécurité du public lors du transport des marchandises dangereuses par train. [Traduction]

Transports Canada prend son rôle de chef de file au sérieux et dispose d’un cadre de réglementation de la sécurité ferroviaire et d’un programme de surveillance rigoureux et solides. Nous avons pris des mesures importantes pour améliorer la sécurité publique durant le transport de marchandises dangereuses par train, y compris les liquides inflammables, dans le cadre d'une stratégie de prévention, d'intervention efficace et de responsabilisation. Parmi ces mesures, notons la réduction de la vitesse autorisée des trains et la mise hors service accélérée des anciens wagons-citernes servant au transport de pétrole brut. En outre, le ministère a établi de nouvelles exigences en matière de responsabilité et d'indemnisation, de classification, d'intervention d'urgence ainsi que de nouvelles normes sur les moyens de confinement, en plus d'augmenter le nombre d'inspections des tronçons principaux et d'ajouter des exigences pour les trains clés. Grâce à ces mesures et aux 33 000 activités de surveillance menées chaque année, Transports Canada est déterminé à promouvoir une culture de la sécurité au sein de l'industrie ferroviaire afin d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens.

C'est avec plaisir que nous répondrons à vos questions.[Français]

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Brosseau.

Madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Merci beaucoup d'être ici. Vous nous aidez à tirer parti de la petite demi-heure que nous passons ensemble aujourd'hui. Comme je l'ai indiqué au groupe précédent, nous sommes ici en raison d'une motion de mon collègue, M. Aubin. Au cours de la partie précédente, j'ai indiqué que je considère que cette séance d'information — je ne dirais pas que c'est une étude — tombe à point, étant donné les trois déraillements survenus en autant de semaines, dont l'un avec décès, malheureusement.

Pour poursuivre dans la même veine qu'avec les témoins précédents, avez-vous pris connaissance du rapport de l'Institut Fraser publié en août 2015 comparant les bilans de sécurité des pipelines et du transport ferroviaire?

M. Kevin Brosseau:

Non, personnellement, mais je demanderais à mes collègues de répondre aussi.

M. Benoit Turcotte (directeur général, Transport des marchandises dangereuses, ministère des Transports):

Je ne connais pas ce rapport.

Mme Brigitte Diogo (directrice générale, Sécurité ferroviaire, ministère des Transports):

Moi oui.

(1205)

Mme Kelly Block:

Madame Diogo, les recherches et les conclusions de l'Institut Fraser sont-elles exactes, à votre avis?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Je pense que ce rapport contient de très bons points d'analyse, mais en tant que fonctionnaire du ministère, je ne peux me prononcer sur la qualité de ce rapport. Nous en avons pris connaissance.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je sais qu'on se demande souvent de qui relèvent les pipelines. Je sais qu'ils relèvent du ministère des Ressources naturelles, mais les gens pensent souvent qu'ils relèvent de Transports Canada parce qu'ils servent au transport d'une marchandise. Je me demande si vous avez des discussions avec le ministère des Ressources naturelles sur le transport du pétrole par rail ou par pipelines, ou si vous collaborez étroitement pour ces questions.

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Nous avons une étroite collaboration sur le plan de la communication des renseignements. Je pense que le ministère des Ressources naturelles a beaucoup de données liées à notre secteur d'activité, notamment sur le volume de biens transportés. Je dirais qu'auparavant, les discussions portaient sur le mode de transport idéal, entre les trains ou les pipelines, mais qu'on en est venu à la conclusion que cela importait peu, pourvu que le transport soit sécuritaire. En tant que fonctionnaire, c'est ce qui devrait être notre préoccupation première. Le mode de transport importe peu, pourvu que ce soit sécuritaire.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci de la réponse. C'était ma prochaine question.

Pendant la législature précédente, j'étais secrétaire parlementaire du ministre des Ressources naturelles, et je sais que les pipelines sont sûrs à 99,99 %. Ce sont les données pour 2013 à 2015. Quant au transport ferroviaire, je pense que le taux était de 99,997 %. Ce n'est pas une grosse différence. Je pense toutefois que la plupart des gens estiment que le pétrole devrait être transporté par pipelines plutôt que par train, pour diverses raisons, notamment les accidents qui peuvent survenir lors d'un déraillement de train.

J'aimerais aussi avoir vos commentaires sur le fait que la plupart des recommandations actives en matière de sécurité — la liste de surveillance — visent le ministère des Transports. J'aimerais savoir si vous considérez qu'il y a un manque de ressources pour faire tout ce qui pourrait ou devrait être fait pour protéger les Canadiens.

M. Kevin Brosseau:

Je vais commencer, puis je céderai la parole à mes collègues, qui sont tous les deux responsables de leur secteur respectif, ce qui contribue à l'avancement des priorités.

Comme tout autre ministère, le ministère des Transports gère et utilise ses ressources en fonction des priorités établies selon une approche axée sur les risques et les priorités. Nous savons évidemment que régler les problèmes qui figurent sur la liste de surveillance et répondre aux recommandations du BST, que nous prenons très au sérieux, sont une priorité. Nous y consacrons les ressources nécessaires. Je cède la parole à mes collègues. Ils pourront peut-être fournir une réponse plus détaillée.

M. Benoit Turcotte:

C'est une très bonne question. Je dirais que depuis la tragédie de Lac-Mégantic, le gouvernement a investi massivement, tant dans le programme de sécurité ferroviaire que dans le programme de sécurité du transport des marchandises dangereuses.

Nous avons augmenté les ressources consacrées à l'évaluation des risques dans le système de transport des marchandises dangereuses. La taille du programme a pratiquement triplé, ce qui nous a permis de faire des progrès considérables pour l'évaluation des risques dans ce système.

Grâce à ce programme, nous savons que le pétrole brut demeure parmi les marchandises qui présentent le risque le plus élevé. Les volumes varieront, et nous en sommes très conscients. Nous examinons les volumes de pétrole brut expédié. Nous avons triplé le nombre d'inspections, qui sont passées de 2 000 inspections par année avant la catastrophe de Lac-Mégantic à environ 6 000. Nous en sommes très fiers.

Je dirais que nous consacrons au programme du transport des marchandises dangereuses les ressources nécessaires pour nous acquitter de notre mandat de base, qui est d'assurer une réglementation et une surveillance adéquates du système de transport des marchandises dangereuses.

(1210)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'avais une question sur les stratégies multimodales et l'intégration des programmes pour M. DeJong, mais il n'est pas là, semble-t-il. Je vais quand même vous poser la question à tous les trois et j'espère que vous pourrez m'aider.

Hier, comme vous le savez peut-être, j'ai eu le privilège de présenter, au nom du Comité, un rapport sur l'établissement d'une stratégie canadienne de transport et de logistique. Pendant les voyages que nous avons faits partout au Canada pour préparer ce rapport, nous avons cerné des secteurs stratégiques, qui sont surtout situés dans les régions de Niagara, de Vancouver et de Seattle. J'ai beaucoup appris. Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, nous avons notamment cerné les corridors commerciaux stratégiques du pays.

La région de Niagara était du nombre. Selon les plans municipaux officiels, comme vous le savez sûrement, certains secteurs étaient zonés industriels, mais au fil du temps, ils sont devenus des quartiers résidentiels en périphérie d'une zone industrielle.

Je travaille actuellement sur un cas précis, dans la municipalité de Thorold, où l'on trouve une gare de triage directement à côté d'un cours d'eau, d'un aquifère et d'une zone résidentielle. J'ai reçu beaucoup de plaintes, et entendu beaucoup de préoccupations concernant la sécurité dans la région en raison des aspects négligés en raison de la présence des trains et de la nature des marchandises transportées, évidemment. Vous savez certainement que les préoccupations portent sur le bruit, la sécurité, etc.

Comment puis-je contribuer à trouver une solution avec le CN, dans ce cas-ci, pour relocaliser cette gare de triage? Je souligne au passage qu'elle a déjà été relocalisée et qu'on avait simplement déplacé le problème dans ce secteur. Comment puis-je réussir à trouver une solution avec ce partenaire — le CN — pour trouver un meilleur emplacement pour cette gare de triage?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Beaucoup de collectivités partout au Canada ont des préoccupations semblables en raison de la proximité des opérations ferroviaires. Je pense que le CN a établi un mécanisme pour les relations avec les communautés. Je dirais que la meilleure solution serait de communiquer avec les hauts dirigeants du CN.

En outre, je pense que l'Office des transports du Canada est aussi une instance appropriée pour soulever les problèmes liés au bruit et aux vibrations, car cela relève de son mandat.

M. Vance Badawey:

Je vous remercie.

J'ai rencontré les gens du CN sur place, mais je n'ai reçu aucune réponse satisfaisante sur les mesures prises pour régler ce problème, mais cela m'a permis d'apaiser mes craintes. Je dois dire que nous avons réussi à régler un autre problème. Quant à ce problème précis, nous n'avons pu le régler à la satisfaction de la communauté. Donc, bien entendu, la prochaine étape sera de mobiliser la communauté, ce que j'ai l'intention de faire.

Vous avez aussi indiqué qu'on peut faire appel à l'OTC.

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Oui.

M. Vance Badawey:

Excellent.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, madame la présidente?

La présidente:

Une minute.

M. Vance Badawey:

Je cède le reste de mon temps à M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je crois comprendre que Transports Canada peut imposer des pénalités pécuniaires administratives. Je vois que vous acquiescez de la tête. L'avez-vous déjà fait? Quel effet cela aura-t-il, à votre avis?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Ce règlement, qui fait partie des nouveaux règlements mis en place après l'accident de Lac-Mégantic, est entré en vigueur en avril 2015. Nous y avons eu recours, comme pour beaucoup d'outils à notre disposition. Vous trouverez la liste des pénalités qui ont été imposées sur notre site Web. À ce jour, nous avons imposé un demi-million de dollars en pénalités aux diverses sociétés ferroviaires.

Essentiellement, l'outil sert à amener les entreprises à se conformer, mais notre rôle ne s'arrête pas là. Les pénalités pécuniaires administratives peuvent aider à régler un problème à court terme, mais nous exerçons un suivi constant des problèmes pour nous assurer que les mesures prises par l'entreprise sont durables.

Notre expérience démontre que c'est un très bon outil. Nous y avons recours avec prudence, car nos pénalités sont assez élevées.

Dans l'ensemble, à mon avis, nos inspections démontrent une amélioration de la conformité des sociétés ferroviaires. Les taux de défectuosité sont en baisse. Je ne dirais pas que c'est attribuable aux pénalités, parce qu'elles ne sont pas automatiques. Essentiellement, nous considérons que c'est un outil parmi de nombreux autres.

(1215)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Allez-y, monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Quand j'entends les représentants du ministère des Transports dire que le Canada offre l'un des réseaux les plus sécuritaires du monde malgré les lacunes qui existent, je ne souhaiterais pas vivre ailleurs, c'est le moins qu'on puisse dire.

Dans des études antérieures, il a été question des inspecteurs qui font des audits chez des compagnies ferroviaires. Ai-je raison de penser que la majorité de ces inspecteurs, qui, au fait, ne sont pas très nombreux, font davantage des inspections sur papier? Autrement dit, ils tournent les pages des rapports des compagnies ferroviaires, cochent des cases, puis ils donnent leur approbation.

Sur le nombre total d'inspecteurs, combien sont sur le terrain pour vérifier si les rails sont en bon état et combien sont capables de vérifier si les roues des wagons sont fissurées?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

Présentement, nous avons environ 140 inspecteurs en place, sur un nombre total de 156 postes. Tous ces inspecteurs doivent aller sur le terrain. Leur travail se fait en deux étapes. Premièrement, ils font une évaluation sur papier en se fondant sur les données que les compagnies doivent nous transmettre. Il est important que nous révisions sur papier ce que la compagnie a fait, ce qu'elle a trouvé et si elle a donné suite à ses propres constatations. Cela nous permet de savoir comment cibler notre propre inspection quand nous allons sur le terrain.

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord.

On revient donc à l'approche basée sur le risque. On étudie des éléments sur papier et, si une alarme sonne, on envoie quelqu'un vérifier la situation sur le terrain. Est-ce cela?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Non. Je pense que dire les choses de cette façon simplifie la façon dont nous faisons le travail.

Chaque année, nous préparons un plan d'inspection fondé sur plusieurs sources d'information. Nous passons en revue le volume des biens transportés, les constatations découlant de nos inspections passées et de nos audits sur les systèmes de gestion de la sécurité, de même que les données sur les accidents. Nous examinons une série de données économiques pour déterminer quel est le risque dans différents domaines.

M. Robert Aubin:

Depuis des années, on observe une diminution du nombre d'inspecteurs à Transports Canada, alors que le transport ferroviaire est en pleine expansion et qu'il croît de façon exponentielle. N'y a-t-il pas là un rajustement, pour le moins, à faire? Il me semble que le nombre d'inspections devrait suivre la croissance du trafic ferroviaire.

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

En fait, le nombre d'inspecteurs a augmenté de façon importante depuis l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic. Le gouvernement nous a donné beaucoup plus de ressources et un meilleur équipement pour faire le travail. Par conséquent, le nombre de nos inspections a augmenté en conséquence.

M. Robert Aubin:

Selon les données dont je dispose, 25 inspecteurs sur 141 sont vraiment sur le terrain, les autres ne faisant que des inspections sur papier. Réfutez-vous cela?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Oui.

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord. Je vais faire mes vérifications.

Comment une approche basée sur le risque permet-elle à Transports Canada d'être proactif plutôt que réactif chaque fois qu'il survient un incident ou un accident ferroviaire, comme on l'a vu il y a quelques semaines suite à la réaction du ministre lorsque des trains sont partis à la dérive? On aurait pu imposer des mesures tout de suite après l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic. Cela fait déjà six ans que ces événements sont survenus et il reste encore trois recommandations sur cinq qui n'ont pas fait l'objet de suivi.

Pouvez-vous au moins nous annoncer que, dans le prochain rapport qui doit être présenté en mars, les cinq recommandations du BST découlant de l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic auront obtenu la cote « attention satisfaisante »?

(1220)

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Nous l'espérons.

M. Robert Aubin:

Il ne faut pas espérer, il faut le faire.

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Permettez-moi de finir de répondre à cet aspect de votre question.

Le ministère a pris plusieurs mesures pour répondre aux recommandations du BST. Nous avons pris au sérieux toutes les recommandations faites à la suite de l'accident et avons beaucoup travaillé pour y donner suite.

Comme vous le dites, c'est une industrie, une économie qui évolue, et les risques évoluent aussi. À chaque réévaluation, le BST nous demande de regarder différents aspects de la question, et c'est ce que nous sommes en train de faire. Pour toutes ces évaluations, il y a une réponse concrète du ministère et nous continuons à travailler sur la question.

M. Robert Aubin:

J'ai été assez surpris d'apprendre un fait tantôt. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Très brièvement, monsieur Aubin, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord.

J'ai donc été assez surpris d'apprendre qu'il y avait peu de rencontres entre le BST et le ministre. Le public en général accorde une grande crédibilité au BST.

N'y a-t-il pas lieu d'avoir un rapprochement ou une collaboration plus serrée entre Transports Canada et le BST?

M. Kevin Brosseau:

Monsieur Aubin, même si Mme Fox ne rencontre pas le ministre,[Traduction]nous nous rencontrons régulièrement au ministère. J'ai eu de fréquentes réunions avec M. Laporte au cours du dernier mois. Nous discutons et mettons en commun des renseignements et des pratiques exemplaires de façon continue pour améliorer nos interventions et pour que le BST ait un aperçu réel et important de nos activités.

Brigitte, je pourrais vous laisser compléter la réponse.

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Certainement. J'aimerais aussi ajouter que le BST est un organisme indépendant et qu'il ne relève pas du portefeuille du ministre des Transports.[Français]

Le ministre des Transports n'est pas le ministre responsable du BST. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup. Nous passons à M. Hardie.

Je rappelle que ce groupe de témoins sera ici jusqu'à 12 h 30 seulement. Donc, d'ici la fin, nous entendrons M. Hardie, M. Iacono et M. Liepert.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'accord. Nous allons faire de notre mieux.

Rapidement, pour revenir aux amendes — vos amendes administratives —, combien ont été imposées à des lignes ferroviaires sur courtes distances?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Je préférais ne pas le dire de mémoire, mais je crois que c'est deux.

Ce que je suggère, madame la présidente, c'est de faire parvenir une liste au Comité à une date ultérieure.

M. Ken Hardie:

La raison, c'est que nous nous préoccupons de la santé financière des lignes ferroviaires sur courtes distances et de leur capacité de rester au fait des règlements relatifs à la sécurité. Je pense que les enregistreurs audio-vidéo dans les locomotives imposent un coût élevé à ces lignes ferroviaires. On ne dit pas qu'il ne devrait pas y en avoir, mais je pense que nous nous préoccupons constamment de la façon dont elles peuvent rester en activité, compte tenu de leurs réalités.

Pouvez-vous parler de votre processus d'évaluation des risques, plus particulièrement en ce qui concerne le transport de matières dangereuses? Estimez-vous que vous avez suffisamment de données? Recueillez-vous suffisamment de renseignements à propos des types d'expéditions effectuées, de la façon dont elles sont effectuées, du moment où elles sont effectuées, etc.? Nous gérons les risques plutôt que de prendre des mesures qui, selon certains, seraient plus efficaces. Parlez-nous de la gestion des risques.

M. Kevin Brosseau:

Je vais laisser [...] d'accord, allez-y.

M. Benoit Turcotte:

Du point de vue du transport des matières dangereuses, nous prenons un certain nombre de mesures. Notre programme s'articule autour du risque, et nous prenons les risques très au sérieux. Une grande partie de ce que nous faisons se fonde sur la gestion des risques, y compris nos inspections.

La première étape pour établir la façon de procéder est que nous avons créé un registre des risques. Nous le mettons à jour de façon continue à partir de tous les renseignements que nous recueillons — les 6 000 inspections que nous effectuons par année, toutes les recherches que nous menons et les observations que nous recevons des gens sur le terrain et de nos inspecteurs, pour connaître notamment les cas de non-conformité. Ces données nous sont extrêmement utiles.

Par ailleurs, nous produisons chaque année un document sur l'environnement du programme qui renferme tous ces renseignements, et non pas seulement les risques du transport des matières dangereuses, mais les risques du programme également. Une bonne partie de notre travail repose sur ces renseignements. Ce document influe sur notre plan national de surveillance, qui est un document que nous préparons chaque année et qui énonce nos priorités. Nous classons les risques de tous nos sites connus où des matières dangereuses sont acheminées. Ce pourrait être un magasin Canadian Tire, un champ pétrolifère ou n'importe quel endroit où des matières dangereuses sont manutentionnées ou transportées.

(1225)



Nous effectuons un grand nombre de nos inspections en tenant compte de ces renseignements. Par exemple, lorsqu'il est question de pétrole brut, nous accordons une grande priorité à l'inspection des installations de transbordement. C'est là où les trains transportant du pétrole brut sont chargés. Au cours du présent exercice financier, nous aurons inspecté plus de la moitié de toutes les installations de transbordement connues. C'est là où nous ciblons les trains transportant du pétrole brut, pour nous assurer que le pétrole brut est chargé dans le wagon-citerne approprié, qu'elles ont les documents liés, au transport, adéquats, que leur personnel est formé et qu'elles chargent le pétrole brut de façon appropriée. Nous vérifions soigneusement tous ces éléments.

Là encore, cela cadre avec notre approche axée sur les risques pour l'inspection des matières dangereuses.

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Iacono.

M. Angelo Iacono:

J'aimerais commencer par apporter quelques clarifications et remettre les pendules à l'heure concernant les remarques que mon collègue, le député Liepert, a faites plus tôt lorsqu'il interrogeait Mme Fox.

Le Québec reçoit maintenant la majorité de son pétrole brut de producteurs nord-américains. L'Ouest canadien est maintenant le principal fournisseur de pétrole brut du Québec. C'est en grande partie à la suite du projet d'inversion du pipeline no 9 d'Enbridge. Les raffineries du Québec reçoivent maintenant 82 % de leur pétrole de sources nord-américaines, si bien que seulement 11 % du pétrole provient de l'Algérie, par exemple. Je le mentionne pour clarifier votre observation.

Ma question porte sur l'évaluation des risques. Quelles mesures de surveillance ont été prises pour vérifier que les entreprises respectent les règles?

M. Benoit Turcotte:

À l'aide de nos règles relatives au transport des matières dangereuses et de nos règles sur la sécurité ferroviaire, nous établissons l'ordre de priorité des sites en fonction du type de risques qu'ils présentent. Par exemple, si un site n'a pas fait l'objet d'une inspection depuis un certain nombre d'années ou qu'il a des antécédents de non-conformité, nous effectuerons des inspections plus fréquentes, voire tous les ans. C'est généralement l'approche que nous adoptons, outre ce que je viens de mentionner à M. Hardie il y a quelques instants.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.

Madame la présidente, je vais céder le reste de mon temps de parole à Mme Pauzé. [Français]

Mme Monique Pauzé:

Merci beaucoup.

Des citoyens de Lac-Mégantic m'ont donné des photos qu'ils ont prises de rails encore existants sur lesquels des trains circulent vers Lac-Mégantic. Je les ai publiées sur ma page Facebook, je les ai montrées à de nombreuses personnes et la réaction est unanime: tout le monde s'étonne du fait que des trains circulent encore sur des rails aussi abîmés.

Voici un autre élément. Un agriculteur de ma circonscription m'a montré des rails qui sont installés sur sa propriété. Il m'a dit que c'était lui qui les entretienait et qui resserrait les vis parce que personne ne le fasait.

En passant, ces wagons circulent près de la General Dynamics, située dans ma circonscription. On s'entend pour dire que, s'il y avait un accident, ma circonscription au complet disparaîtrait. Cette compagnie, c'est de la « dynamite ».

Je reviens donc sur ce que vous avez dit tantôt: vous devez constater une amélioration de la conformité.

N'y aurait-il pas lieu d'avoir plutôt des règles beaucoup plus sévères que celles qui existent déjà, compte tenu des deux exemples que je vous donne de rails qui ne sont pas entretenus par les compagnies?

Mme Brigitte Diogo:

Merci du commentaire.

Si vous avez des plaintes, ce serait bien de nous les communiquer.

Nous avons fait beaucoup d'inspections de rails dans la région de Lac-Mégantic en réponse aux préoccupations de la population. Il y a eu un effort particulier en ce sens dans la région pour veiller à ce que les compagnies soient en conformité avec les règlements. Ce serait bon de nous communiquer les plaintes précises, le cas échéant.

Je terminerai en disant que nous examinons présentement la question des règles et des normes qui ont trait à l'entretien des rails afin de favoriser, peut-être, des changements dans l'avenir.

(1230)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Liepert.

M. Ron Liepert:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Simplement pour m'assurer que nous avons tous les faits en main, c'est le gouvernement conservateur de Stephen Harper qui a approuvé le projet d'inversion d'Enbridge. Mettons les choses au clair.

M. Vance Badawey:

Très bien. Je suis fier de vous.

M. Ron Liepert:

Du pétrole est encore acheminé dans la province du Québec par voie ferroviaire. Du pétrole et du gaz arrivent des États-Unis, et ce n'est pas... Les 82 % englobent les produits américains qui sont acheminés au Québec. Tous ces emplois qui sont créés au Québec, que ce soit du pétrole de l'Ouest canadien, du pétrole étranger ou du pétrole des États-Unis, ce sont tous des emplois qui sont créés au Québec à des raffineries et à des installations qui se livrent à des activités de pétrochimie.

Je suis heureux que le député ait soulevé ce point pour que nos amis qui sont à notre gauche, qui parlent sans cesse du pétrole et de ses effets néfastes... Ils doivent peut-être savoir qu'il y a des milliers et des milliers d'emplois qui sont créés au Québec chaque jour à des raffineries, que ce pétrole provienne des États-Unis, de l'Algérie ou de l'Ouest canadien. Il est acheminé par voie ferroviaire car il n'y a aucune capacité de transport par pipeline. Si ces gens s'écartaient du chemin et permettaient la construction de pipelines et de faire obstacle aux pipelines...

J'aimerais poser à nos témoins la question suivante. Pouvez-vous nous donner une idée du nombre d'employés supplémentaires que Transports Canada a dû embaucher pour inspecter le pétrole acheminé par train parce que nous n'avons pas les capacités de transport par pipeline adéquates au pays?

M. Kevin Brosseau:

Je vais laisser le soin à mes collègues de poser la question. Je n'ai pas ce chiffre.

M. Ron Liepert:

Donnez-moi un chiffre approximatif. Combien d'inspecteurs avez-vous? Je pense que vous avez dit que vous avez dû tripler le nombre d'inspecteurs.

M. Kevin Brosseau:

Nous avons tripé le nombre d'inspecteurs à notre ministère. C'était après l'accident à Lac-Mégantic il y a un certain nombre d'années, évidemment. Les chiffres ont triplé. Mes collègues peuvent vous fournir les chiffres exacts, ou nous pouvons les faire parvenir au Comité.

M. Ron Liepert:

Est-il juste de dire que si le pétrole n'était pas expédié par train, nous n'aurions pas été obligés de tripler le nombre d'inspecteurs?

M. Kevin Brosseau:

Je ne sais pas si c'est vraiment la réponse. Je ne peux pas fournir cette réponse. Il était important que nous puissions intervenir, et...

M. Ron Liepert:

Mais vous êtes intervenus principalement à cause de l'accident survenu à Lac-Mégantic, n'est-ce pas?

M. Kevin Brosseau:

L'accident de Lac-Mégantic a évidemment été un événement traumatisant pour le pays.

M. Ron Liepert:

Et c'était du pétrole qui était expédié par train.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à nos témoins, à nos fonctionnaires du ministère. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants d'être venus.

Nous allons suspendre la séance un instant avant de passer à l'étude des travaux du Comité.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on February 21, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.