header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-02-07 TRAN 129

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I am calling the meeting to order. This is the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, 42nd Parliament. Pursuant to the order of reference from Wednesday, November 28, 2018, we are continuing our study of challenges facing flight schools in Canada.

I welcome all of you here today. This is our new meeting room in West Block and it's our first meeting here. We are joined today by, over and above the committee members, the mover of the motion, Mr. Fuhr. Welcome.

Today we have as witnesses, from Aéro Loisirs, Caroline Farly, Chief Pilot and Chief Instructor; from Air Canada Pilots Association, Captain Mike Hoff, External Affairs Committee; and from Carson Air, Marc Vanderaegen, Flight School Director, Southern Interior Flight Centre.

Mr. Vanderaegen, would you like to begin for five minutes?

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen (Flight School Director, Southern Interior Flight Centre, Carson Air):

Madam Chair, good morning and thank you for the invitation to participate today. I'm going to be reading from notes because I want to make sure I don't miss anything.

Southern Interior Flight Centre is a part of the Carson group of companies, which provides flight training in Kelowna, B.C., and medevac, freight and fuel and hangarage services in Kelowna, Calgary, Vancouver and Abbotsford. We get to face the challenges related to the pilot shortage in all aspects, not just training, but that's the focus for today.

At the flight school level, we train students to become recreational, general commercial, airline and instructor pilots, and we have a commercial aviation diploma program with Okanagan College. We have formal training partnerships with WestJet Encore, Jazz, Porter, and Carson Air, as well as informal connections with many companies seeking our graduates. As to the challenges, some of these you will recognize from previous meetings.

First, there is inadequate financial assistance for students. The high cost of initial training for a commercial pilot's licence combined with low funding leaves students deeply in debt. Available student loan assistance combined through Canada student loans and B.C. student loans, for example, in our province is a mere $5,440 per semester. Put this against the demonstrated need for $23,519 per semester and this means the typical unmet need in this is $18,000 for each semester, or over $90,000 one might need for a five-semester diploma program.

Second, we are facing increasing training costs. To acquire instructor staff, we now have to train flight instructors at a burden of $10,000 per instructor. This used to be a revenue stream generated from commercial pilots who wanted to instruct and has, instead, become a cost that now has to be passed along to the general flight training student group, thereby increasing their financial burden. The costs of aircraft parts and fuel are also unstable and increasing significantly. For example, a single-engine Cessna 172 aircraft new from the factory is currently $411,000 U.S. and requires a lead time of 14 months for delivery. Used aircraft result in bidding wars and still run 50% to 75% of new cost before adding in the high cost of overhauling major components like engines and propellers.

Not only is the domestic training demand fuelling aircraft sales and prices but international companies have been purchasing aircraft in groups of 25 or more for their own training use overseas. In addition to costs being increased through those means, the pool of aircraft maintenance engineers is also being depleted, thereby requiring higher pay and incentives to attract and retain qualified maintenance personnel.

Our third challenge is our general lack of access to potential staff. With the current state of hiring in the industry, new pilots do not need to spend time instructing to build experience to move to being commercial operators. Many graduates are going straight to airlines or other companies directly out of flight school. The lower availability of instructors equals fewer instructors who advance through the instructor class system in order to become supervising instructors or to be able to train new instructors.

As a temporary solution, hiring qualified international applicants for instructor positions is not a viable option for us as the current LMIA process is overly onerous and the lengthy Transport Canada licence conversion process also holds up the administrative processing of international applicants. Medical requirements are also overly restrictive in some circumstances, for example, when dealing with correctable colour blindness or when preventing retired airline pilots who no longer hold medicals from teaching in a simulator for us as they were already able to do at the airlines.

To counter that, our recommendations fall into two groups.

First, we need more aviation-specific funding. I think that's pretty clear. We need to increase federal funding in the way of additional student loans and loan forgiveness programs for students. We need to look at federal funding support in the way of instructor training or retention grants to help alleviate the financial burden passed along to the students. We also need to look at federal funding or tax credits for capital purchases to also help cover the extremely high and increasingly higher equipment costs.

The second group of recommendations involves being able to increase access to instructor staff. First, an increase in student funding would allow flight training units to pay instructors and aircraft maintenance engineers higher wages to be able to retain them. Next, providing easier access in the short term for international employees through the LMIA programs, either on a fast track or by exempting suitable candidates entirely, would allow us to hire pilots or aircraft maintenance engineers who are available internationally to fill the gap.

Reducing turnaround times at Transport Canada for the licence-conversion—

(1105)

The Chair:

Excuse me, Mr. Vanderaegen, could you do your closing comments, please.

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen:

Sure. In closing, I'll get straight to the point. We need these challenges to be addressed to ensure that we cannot only stay in business today but to expand to meet the growing need that's coming up through the market.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Captain Hoff, you have five minutes, please.

Captain Mike Hoff (Captain, External Affairs Committee, Air Canada Pilots Association):

Good morning, and thank you.

My name is Michael Hoff. I am an airline pilot, and I love my job. I'm a Boeing 787 captain at Air Canada based in Vancouver. I'm here representing the Air Canada Pilots Association.

Before I begin my remarks, I'd like to thank all of you for taking on this issue. Stable and predictable access to aviation is important in a country as large as ours. Many sectors are struggling with labour supply issues. For pilots, the issue is complex. In our submission to the committee, you will see that the cost of pilot training and limited access to training flight time are factors, and not only that, so are the poor safety records and working conditions for entry-level pilots, factors that are borne out in research we have done to show that young Canadians are more likely to be interested in a career as a nurse, a firefighter or even a video gamer than as a pilot.

The easiest way for me to explain this is to tell my story through personal experience. Not only am I a pilot, but my 26-year-old son now flies for the regional airline Jazz. Let me explain. Pilot training can run upwards of $90,000, a tremendous cost burden for families, and a difficult case to make if you need to secure a loan. For my son to get the training and accumulate the hours he needed, I ended up buying a small airplane, a PA-22, and we hired our own instructor. Yes, if you're wondering, it is somewhat like learning to drive a car: It can be better if someone else tells your kid what to do.

Flight schools across Canada are fragmented. Some are aligned with accredited colleges; others are not. Many are small, family-run operations. The Canada Revenue Agency does not recognize tuition expenses for all of them. Personally, I can tell you it took three years of fighting before CRA recognized my son's flight school for tax purposes. Not only that, I wasn't able to deduct any of the flying time in my own aircraft. Now contrast this with how easy it was to claim my other son's university tuition.

A lot of students think that when they get their pilot's licence, they can walk into a job at WestJet or Air Canada. In reality, it's more like pro sports. Before you make it to the big leagues, you have to literally get thousands of hours on the farm team. In Canada, that often means flying up north.

Let me speak frankly. Day-to-day regulatory oversight can be totally disconnected from the reality on the ground. Rules require self-monitoring, and that means pilots are supposed to decide for themselves whether or not they are fit for duty, which can be a tough decision when you are new and out of your element. In some operations, if a pilot reports that they are unfit to fly due to fatigue, they will be asked if they need a blankie and a pacifier to facilitate their nap. That is the culture.

If you need the job to get a better job, it can create a tremendous amount of pressure on inexperienced pilots, and it's one of the reasons that, when we look at accident rates in Canadian aviation, the majority of hull losses—in other words, the total loss of an aircraft, and far too often the souls on board—are in the far north. I can tell you honestly that, as a parent, I did not get a good night's sleep when my son was flying up north.

What can we do about this? The survey we commissioned showed very clearly that parents and students today are more attracted to the stable, safe pathways and immediate benefits that more traditional careers might offer. We need to reduce and eliminate the barriers that students face.

That means, one, we need policies to help defray the costs of entry, including making loans and tax credits available for flight schools. Two, we need to find ways to make accumulating flight and simulator time easier. Three, we need to encourage accredited public institutions to build flight schools. Four, we need to work on making aviation safer, which includes ensuring strong regulatory oversight where our new pilots are flying, especially in the north. Statistics show that we must do better. This protects not only our newest pilots but also their passengers.

I am proud to be a pilot. Nothing makes me happier than encouraging young people to consider this as a career. We have the best view in the world from our office, but there's work to be done.

I am grateful for the attention from this committee on these important issues.

(1110)



I would specifically like to thank Mr. Fuhr for bringing this forward.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Captain Hoff.

Ms. Farly, go ahead, please.

Ms. Caroline Farly (Chief Pilot and Chief Instructor, Aéro Loisirs):

Thank you. I will also read, and I'm going to do this presentation in French.[Translation]

Good morning. Thank you for having me today.

I am Caroline Farly, owner of the Aéro Loisirs flying school. I am Chief Pilot and Chief Instructor, as well as the person in charge of aircraft maintenance and authorized agent for Transport Canada. I became an instructor in 2011 in order to pursue it as a career.

I want to thank Louise Gagnon, who was a pilot and class 1 instructor at Cargair for 25 years, and Rémi Cusach, founder of the ALM flying school, also class 1 instructor for 25 years and now retired. Both are currently delegated examiners at Transport Canada and helped me prepare this presentation.

Lengthy student admission delays are a problem for flying schools. Behind the problem is an instructor shortage, which is not improving. It is urgent to address our inability to meet the current and growing demand of commercial pilot licence candidates.

It is no longer necessary to go through the training process to accumulate flying hours. Only pilots who truly show interest will become instructors. Inspiration should be drawn from the conclusions of this study to promote the value of the flight instructor profession, the current perception of which is definitely impeding candidate recruitment.

Pilots who have decided to pursue a career as instructors are few in the network and are mainly school founders, examiners and chief instructors. They have an immeasurable wealth of knowledge in training and aviation and have been playing a leading role over the past 30 years in the establishment of flying schools. However, they are approaching the age of retirement, selling their schools and leaving an enormous void in the field.

That is what happened with the school I took over in 2013. Until the founder retired in 2018, we were two career instructors, but now it's just me. I like to think that our enthusiasm has strongly influenced and inspired pilots we have trained to become instructors, as access to role models or mentors has always been a key to success in professional recruitment.

Instruction is the least valued and the lowest paid aspect of aviation. That is the harsh reality. Schools are paying wages to independent workers instead of salaries to employees. Weather-related loss of income is considerable, both for flight schools and for workers, not to mention the negative impact the loss has on the region where our students live. The demand for our services increases significantly when students are on vacation during the summer and during holidays. Last-minute cancellations because of the weather or mechanical failures make the enforcement of labour standards difficult and costly.

Although instructors at our school are relatively well paid because they receive a significant bonus, the fact remains that our operations impose a ceiling on us. The cost of maintenance and the purchase of aircraft parts and fuel are increasing while we face income variations. Pilot training is expensive, and we are trying to keep its cost at acceptable levels that make aviation accessible. Those costs fluctuate and increase, but the cost of service cannot follow suit.

The big question is: who will train the instructors of tomorrow? Only the most senior instructors—those in class 1—who have accumulated 750 flying hours as instructors can train flight instructors. That is essentially what is stated in standard 421.72 of the Canadian Aviation Regulations.

Today, it is possible to become a class 1 instructor after only one or two seasons. Airlines compete for experienced pilots—all experienced instructors and class 1 instructors—over other instructors and professional pilots lacking additional qualifications. We will witness a gradual drop in the quality of training and a disappearance of role models and mentors with a wealth of experience and operational and practical knowledge.

The reality is also that experienced instructors were running flying schools across Canada. Declining experience levels in that area are certainly likely to affect the quality of the training of new instructors. Currently, Transport Canada is mobilizing class 1 instructors to deal with those challenges, and that highly significant and constructive initiative shows that the department is serious about taking action.

(1115)



The majority of class 1 instructors currently working are over the age of 50, and I am concerned about becoming one of the rare class 1 instructors with more than 10 years of experience. I am already one of the few, if not the only, woman who owns a flying school. [English]

The Chair:

Please give your closing comments. [Translation]

Ms. Caroline Farly:

In closing, one of my last concerns is the availability of flight examiners for flight instructors. That issue needs to be addressed because a flight examiner for flight instructors must currently be an airline pilot, and that complicates the scheduling of instructor exam activities.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We are going to questions from our members.

We have Ms. Block for six minutes, please.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I want to welcome our guests here this morning and, as well, echo your appreciation to Mr. Fuhr for bringing his motion forward. I believe it was unanimously supported, so we recognize the very important role that flight schools have in our airline industry.

I want to go back to the testimony of Captain Hoff. If you wouldn't mind recapping for me, I think you outlined three policies you believed the government should undertake in order to address some of the issues for young pilots who are seeking to get more experience and perhaps make it easier for that to happen.

(1120)

Capt Mike Hoff:

I highlighted four points. They were to improve working conditions for new pilots in Canada's north, encourage accredited public institutions to build flight schools, make it easier for students to accumulate flight and simulator time, and examine options for reducing costs for students, like making it easier to get tax deductions for their education.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

All of those would touch upon the things you have heard, not only perhaps, from your son and his experience, but also from other young pilots, for whom some of these actually are real barriers to pursuing a career in this industry.

Capt Mike Hoff:

That's correct.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you. I appreciate that.

I would like to follow up on the testimony of Ms. Farly. I appreciate what you were saying at the end of your testimony, in terms of being one of the only females—or the only female—who owns a flight school.

Ms. Caroline Farly:

I think I'm one of the only. I'm not sure if there is another one, so I don't want to proclaim myself to be the only one, but I do not know another.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay.

I know time is short, but you were starting out on that train of thought. Was there anything you wanted to add in regard to that?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

In regard to that, I think I had completed that issue. However, it's a whole generation—

I'll speak in French.[Translation]

The idea here is continuity. We are currently lacking succession and there are no more instructors. Even I, as one of the rare class 1 instructors still active with a certain number of years of experience, need support and a group of peers—other class 1 instructors. We no longer have role models or support.

A process must really be implemented to help retain our instructors and make the profession into a viable vocation. Right now, the instructor profession is negatively perceived because the only thing said about it is that it is not well paid, which is unfortunately true. No one is talking about the richness of that career and the experience of flying with so many different people. That whole issue must really be looked into.[English]

I think that was the main point.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

You also talked about the costs of operating a flight school. I'm wondering about the other side of the balance sheet, which would be revenue. Where do you get your revenue from?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

For any school or aviation service, the revenue comes when the plane takes off and when we give class instructions. We give theoretical classes, so there's revenue from that, but then we have the office. We have the Internet, so I won't go into that business side. If we don't give theoretical classes and we don't have planes flying, there's no revenue. That's also why instructors....

For example, starting in November until today, we've all seen the weather, and when you're in aviation, you don't look at the weather the same way. I don't know if you all have seen how bad the weather has been for flying. That's less revenue. How can we with travailleur autonome ensure a stable work payment when we can't guarantee such a high revenue?

I have a nice team of instructors right now. Because we are career-motivated instructors, I have a really strong and nice team right now, but one is going to leave in a year. He wants to stay, but he's going to be wrapped up by a company. He promised me one year, maybe two, because he wants to stay in the region. He doesn't want to fly an airliner so much. He prefers staying at home. But you cannot compare salaries.

I chose to be an instructor because I love it but also because I have a son at home and I wanted to make sure that I came home at night. We can give instructors different incentives, but right now, the salary is not one of them, unfortunately.

(1125)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

Do I have any time left?

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move to Mr. Fuhr.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr (Kelowna—Lake Country, Lib.):

Thank you all very much for coming. I appreciate that.

Marc, you ran out of time. I want to give you an opportunity to finish what you wanted to say, and then I have a question.

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen:

Thank you, Mr. Fuhr.

The thing that was left out for me was the medical requirements that we have to face when we want to have pilots or instructors. I used a small example of people with colour blindness who can use corrective lenses that could fix that, no different from us when we have to wear regular lenses to repair that. But the people with colour blindness are still not allowed to fly at night, and they're still restricted to having to have a radio and a control zone.

With regard to medicals, the other thing is we have this abundance of people retiring at the top end of the airline community right now. Of course, once you reach a certain age, it's harder to maintain your medicals. If they were at the airlines, they could continue to teach in a simulator, whereas we can't use them for any of the specific licensing requirements in our simulators in flight schools.

Who better to train these people for where they're going than the people who are retiring? We have to add that as additional training, and that comes at a cost to the students in addition to what they're already paying.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Thank you for that.

It's been pretty clear that we need more students. We need to remove the barriers to getting them into flight training. Obviously, there's a financial piece. That's probably the biggest speed bump on that note. We need to train them faster and we need more instructors.

On training them faster, I was wondering if any of the three of you would comment on how you think competency-based training might shorten that training cycle so we can get people through the pipeline faster. Caroline, do you have an opinion on that?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

I need you to clarify. Sorry.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

I'm talking about training people to be competent versus just saying for this phase of flying that they need so many hours. That may not be suitable for ab initio pilot training, but certainly for a commercial standard or an airline transport rating standard, once we get further up the training cycle. Some places will do training to competency regardless of hours. The Canadian system basically says they need to achieve these hours and competency. Do you think if we looked at how we train people that might help us get people through faster once we got them in the door?

The Chair:

Ms. Farly, please feel free to speak in French. We have full translation available.

Ms. Caroline Farly:

Okay. Thank you.[Translation]

Your question is really quite interesting, and I will give you my point of view. That is already an approach we use. Take for example the 45 hours of training required to become a private pilot. It is very rare for candidates, even the most talented ones, to be ready after only 35 hours. With exercises added to it, the 45-hour training is completed quickly and effectively. In addition, people cannot move on to the next flight exercise before they really master the previous one. [English]

I'm sorry. I have difficulty answering this question.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

It's okay. I'll move to Mike.

Ms. Caroline Farly:

Yes, thank you.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Do you have an opinion on that?

Capt Mike Hoff:

Yes. I think that is a piece of it. Some of it is outdated and antiquated, but I think in the process, you have to be careful that you don't start lowering the bar to meet a perceived problem you have. You have to keep the standard, but there are avenues.

My son is in the right seat of a Dash 8 Q400. He's out flying around in circles in my airplane at night, because he needs to tick a Transport Canada box. I really don't think it's going to make him a better pilot, but the box needs to be ticked.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Right. I would agree with you. The standard has to be maintained throughout the entire process. It certainly wouldn't be applicable to every phase of flight training, in my opinion, and based on my experience, but I think it might shorten the process in areas where it made sense.

Marc, do you have an opinion on that?

(1130)

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen:

Yes. I agree with what Mr. Hoff has said here. You have to make sure the bar has been maintained.

We use a combination of competency-based and scenario-based training, but you still have to meet the standards. We have students we will test at three-quarters of their training. That would be more than adequate to fly commercially, but we have to fill in another 40 or 50 hours with them. Those are the ones we do advanced things with, which is fine. Again, that would also be a method of potentially reducing costs for them. On the flip side, you're probably also going to see students with whom you have to go beyond the current limits. I guess it's finding the balance.

I think with input from the airlines.... We have a large program advisory committee. If they're provided access in schools in the way we provide access, where we open the books and show them how everybody is performing, I think that could help maintain those standards.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Thank you very much.

I believe that's my time.

The Chair:

Yes, it is.

Thank you very much.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would like to make a quick comment before I ask my questions. At the meeting's outset, during the opening statements, the interpreters told us that they had not received the texts, which complicated their job. I was wondering whether we could make an effort for future meetings and ensure that interpreters have the texts before the meeting starts.

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. Thank you for joining us this morning.

Your testimony is very enlightening. Since we began our study, I have felt that the situation is complex, but relatively simple to summarize. We have two problems: how to attract new pilots, and how to retain them, regardless of whether they are professionals or instructors.

We are talking about the situation in Canada, but the pilot market is global. With a pilot shortage, I assume that every one of them holds all the cards when it comes to finding the company that will give them the best working conditions.

About a year and a half ago, we carried out a very broad study on aviation safety. One of the issues discussed intensively was the matter of flying hours imposed on Canadian pilots.

My first questions are for you, Captain Hoff. First, can the number of flying hours imposed on Canadian pilots put the Canadian industry at a disadvantage and push our pilots to work abroad in better conditions? Second, are the new regulations submitted by the minister and by Transport Canada satisfactory to you in that regard? [English]

Capt Mike Hoff:

Sorry, the volume went down there, but I think you were asking if the hours were adequate and if Canada was out of line globally with.... Was that annual flight times or flight times for licensing? [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

My question is about whether the number of hours plays a role.

Can the number of flying hours Canadian pilots must log compared to what is required of foreign pilots affect our ability to keep our pilots in Canada? [English]

Capt Mike Hoff:

I think our pilot qualification times are in line with those of other ICAO countries. We are actually advantaged over the U.S. system where, as a result— [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

If I may, I am not talking about training hours, but about flying hours. [English]

Capt Mike Hoff:

I think we're fairly well aligned with other ICAO jurisdictions. I don't see any disparity there that would tip it one way or the other. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I will move on to another question. In your opening remarks, you quickly mentioned issues with the Canada Revenue Agency that lasted three years. It seems to me that this situation is well within the federal Parliament's jurisdiction. Can you explain to us the issues you have had with the agency, so that we can decide what measures could help retain students? [English]

Capt Mike Hoff:

I'm really glad you asked me that question.

Actually, Marc and I went to college together, a college that no longer exists, unfortunately.

One of the big problems I ran into was the inconsistency in pilot training across the country. Ontario and Quebec have much more fulsome, vertically integrated training programs. Out west it's really become the wild, wild west. Some colleges are affiliated with a flight school, but they have no idea what happens over at the airport. They've put together a basket of some economics classes and called it a business aviation diploma. But you go over to an airport and they're not the college's instructors. They don't really know what's going on with the curriculum, and something magic happens over there.

There are really good examples of how to do it properly; it's just that there's no continuity. It was quite interesting to see the juxtaposition with my younger son, who's an engineer, and the resources afforded to him to pursue his dream there the resources afforded to my older son as a pilot.

(1135)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

My next question is for Ms. Farly.

A lot is being said about the cost of training a student. That is a delicate and complex issue because education also comes under provincial jurisdiction, and the federal government cannot act alone. However, you were saying that you bought a company you were already working for. Could the federal government implement measures that would foster business transfer, thus enabling a flying school to quickly find someone to take over instead of closing?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

That is an excellent question. I was able to benefit from the regional support program for young entrepreneurs under the age of 35. The Community Futures Development Corporation and the local development centre really helped me buy that business, and those measures are in line with what you are talking about.

Currently, flying schools are being bought by people who are passionate about flying, but who are not necessarily flight instructors. In Quebec, I don't know of any schools that have declared bankruptcy or have been closed, which proves that the transition is taking place. However, I know nothing about the rest of Canada. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go to Mr. Graham, for six minutes. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I will start with you, Ms. Farly.

In your conclusion, you talked about the issue of examiner availability. Can you tell me more about that? What is the current time frame for examination candidates? In my case, it only took a few days for me to take the exam. How long does it now take for a candidate to be able to take the exam, receive the results and be able to take on their new role, with their new licence?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

Thank you for the question.

Currently, it takes about one week for someone to be able to take their private pilot or commercial pilot exam. When the instructor feels that the student is ready, they can call in and arrange for the exam to take place fairly quickly. The flight exam can be cancelled due to weather, but it is easy to reschedule it for the next day, the weekend or the following week, if necessary.

However, for a flight instructor flight exam, at least two months are needed, without the possibility of a definitive date because, for the time being, examiners must be airline pilots and have other professional obligations. Since instructor training takes three months when attended full time, as it is generally the case with us, it is difficult to set at the start of the training a specific date for the final exam because a two-month advance notice is needed, which is reset if the exam has to be postponed. So that leads to significant delays. At the same time, I know some class 1 instructors who are currently on the ground as flight examiners and would like to be flight instructor examiners for Transport Canada, but they are being turned away because they are not airline pilots.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are the theory exams up to date? Are they in line with current knowledge?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

That's one of the concerns those of us in the field have right now. The process to review or challenge the theory exams is either outdated or non-existent. A number of my fellow instructors and I have concerns about the subjects covered in the exam. Obviously, the content of the exam isn't public.

To give you a sense of the situation, I'll give you an example. I am an authorized agent for Transport Canada, and my job is to invigilate exams. I had to be fingerprinted by the RCMP. I have a file. I know that I will be held criminally responsible if anything were to occur, but I would like Transport Canada to invite me to take part in an exam review committee. Many of us in the field are concerned about the subjects covered in theory exams and their updating. On both the private and commercial sides, students are discouraged for the simple reason that certain subjects are now out of step with current practice and standards.

(1140)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

At the beginning of your presentation, you talked about the shortage of pilots interested in becoming instructors. In the past, all many pilots wanted was to accumulate flight hours.

Do a lot of pilots interested in becoming instructors not do so because they can't make a good living at it?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

Indeed, I knew many 25 years ago and still know many today. At my school, the pilots who become instructors do it because they want to and can. They're retired and work part time. That's the reality. We work with part-time instructors, so it's quite the juggling act. For example, one of my instructors has another job because he wants to be home with his partner in the evening. I have another young pilot who's becoming an instructor next year. He began the process to become an instructor. He wants to stay in the area and work with his father. It won't be a full-time job for him. These are people who wish to become instructors and make ends meet by working a second job. All of that makes it harder to run the school and provide a stable learning environment. It's tough to make sure students are consistently trained by the same instructor when we work with a team of part-time instructors.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Say an instructor completes their training and has up-to-date skills and knowledge. If they find another job, are you able to keep them on part time but offer them more hours?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

I sure wish I had an incentive other than motivation to offer. The sense of belonging to a school and being part of the culture is what motivates people to work as instructors, not the money. Our schools can't afford to pay them as much as they'd like. There's just no comparing the pay. For now, the only things that can keep someone working as an instructor are motivation and love of the job.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In response to Mr. Aubin's question, you mentioned the help of the CFDC and the CLD. Could you tell us more about the program that made it possible for you to buy the flight school?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

For the project, I submitted an action plan, and I received a grant for young entrepreneurs. Adopting a similar program for instructors would be worth exploring. Unfortunately, I can't remember the name of the program anymore, but the funding enabled entrepreneurs to be paid during the business's first year in operation. That meant the business had more working capital. It was as though I was receiving employment insurance benefits, but they weren't, of course. What it allowed me to do was spend money and revenue on getting the business up and running or at least to have more working capital. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Rogers, please.

Mr. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair, and thank you to the witnesses for appearing today.

I want to address my question to Caroline first.

According to the labour market report of March 2018, only 30% of the people involved in the aviation industry are female, and only 7% of pilots are women. What do you believe is the cause of this significant under-representation of women among Canadian pilots?

Is it because of how we have created a gender divide or is it the way we've targeted certain people? I know that back in the day doctors were men and nurses were women. We have gender parity, of course, and gender equality and all the other things we talk about, but is this a problem such that females in our society and under-represented groups, such as minority groups, have not applied to pilot schools to become pilots? Is that one of the biggest causes of the shortage that we see today?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

That's a very good question.

I think we all have this image.... I'm sorry to say it this way, but Captain Hoff represents the image of the pilot that we all have. We do not see a lot of female pilots. The fact is that we need to hear the voice of a woman telling us that we're ready to land in Peterborough or that we're ready to land. Our parents never tell us as young women that it is a possibility to be an airline pilot. We're not given that possibility. It's when we're older and we see someone that we're given the opportunity to think outside the box.

At my school I think I do have a certain influence. I do influence the daughters of my pilots. I do influence my pilots who say, “I have a daughter and I think she should come and meet you.” At my school we're way more than 7%, but I think there's this new generation, and there are a lot of initiatives for women in aviation that are going out. We have the Ninety-Nines. We have a lot of women's associations that do exist. I think that soon enough we'll be increasing those percentages.

If I can be permitted to say one other thing, because I'm asked to talk to a lot of ladies. Although it is conceived of as a male environment, women are so included in aviation. I have never felt discriminated against. I have never felt that I was a woman in a man's group. This is a sisterhood, a brotherhood, and there is always room for women and everyone in aviation. One thing that we learn in aviation is you cannot be a pilot if you're not a team player.

(1145)

Mr. Churence Rogers:

I thank you for that. I've done a lot of flying in my lifetime, and I think last year was the first time on a flight where I ever saw a pilot and a co-pilot who were female. That was the first time I've ever seen that.

The other comment I want to make is directed to Captain Mike Hoff.

Teaching is a noble career. I was a teacher for 29 years. I loved interacting with high school kids on a daily basis—most days, anyway. It was imparting knowledge and guiding these young people who were chasing different careers and stuff.

In your pilot association is wanting to be mentors to young pilots an inspiration for you as part of your career?

Capt Mike Hoff:

Absolutely. I would love to be able to participate in that. I feel strongly about it. My career has been fantastic because of altruistic people ahead of me. Marc and I were extremely fortunate to go through a school that had a lot of retired airline people and retired military people, and we got a fantastic education as a result.

It's been difficult to give back vis-à-vis instructing, because we have time limits and we're expensive to our companies. If I go and teach somewhere else, that takes away from the time my employer can use me. That's a no-go area for them.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Rogers.

We move now to Ms. Leitch.

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch (Simcoe—Grey, CPC):

Thank you, witnesses, for being here today. My questions will be for all of you, so please feel free to step forward.

One of the things I think all of you have mentioned is the high capital cost, obviously, of running flight schools. Has there been any opportunity for you to speak to an increase in the airport capital assistance program or, quite frankly, a change in the capital cost allowance on your taxes for your organizations? We talk about that frequently for other industries, but have you been able to approach the government with respect to that in your flight schools and your overhead costs?

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen:

I can answer a little bit of that.

The way the programs are set up—where we are for the aircraft capital part of it—the airport doesn't qualify, because it's too busy. It's one of these things where there's nothing out there that assists specifically for this. Even if it did qualify, it wouldn't qualify under the equipment and rules of—

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

What I'm saying is I think there may be an opportunity there for you. I would encourage you to be advocates on that, whether it be for your flight simulation equipment, which is a high capital cost.... I'm a surgeon. We use simulators all the time. You guys are like the anaesthetists in my world, you do the takeoff and landing, and I'm the person in between as a surgeon. we use simulators all the time, and they're high capital cost equipment.

I have a second question. With respect to the actual education of young pilots, obviously for undergraduate or post-graduate education in this country, we provide the Canada student loans program and a forgiveness program. Have any of you, or a large industry leader like Air Canada and others, advocated that, similar to skilled trades, your young pilots and trainees should be a component part of that program?

I leave it with you.

(1150)

[Translation]

Ms. Caroline Farly:

In terms of student loans, if a flight school isn't linked to an accredited college program, students aren't eligible for those loan programs.

Even though private schools aren't linked to the college system, their performance levels are recognized by Transport Canada and they are equally as qualified. Ideally, the government would open up those programs to our students as well.

Currently, what students are allowed to do is take out a loan, enter into a specific agreement with a bank for professional training delivered in the region.[English]

One thing, I'm sorry, that I can say is I know that[Translation]

students submit their tuition receipts for a tax deduction. Recently, my students have told me that the percentage of tax deductible tuition fees has dropped significantly for aviation.

By no means an expert in the area, I do know the issue is worth a closer look. Numerous students have told me that changes were made to the tax credit for commercial programs and that it's significantly less. [English]

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Maybe I could ask each of you about one of the other issues that came up, and I guess it's a bit tangential to what Ms. Farly was just mentioning.

It's with regard to the regulations for the simulation schools, and who should be eligible to be running them. That may also aid in providing an opportunity, whether it be for the federal government or provincial governments, to say that all students should be eligible. If there's one set of regulations that governs one being able to function in these facilities, and one standard, then obviously each organization should be eligible for financial support for their students.

Mr. Hoff, you look as if you would like to answer that.

Capt Mike Hoff:

Yes, I'd like to jump in here.

First of all, I'd like to thank both of my colleagues for the work they do at these schools. These schools have done a great job of stepping forward and filling a need—

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Absolutely.

Capt Mike Hoff:

—that wasn't there, because it had been abandoned.

One of the upsides to the type of school that Marc and I attended was that the college bought the simulator. This is not to take anything away from businesses that need to make a profit; they have to pay for that simulator, so they need to charge for the time on it. When Marc and I went to school, our college was very highly regarded for its grads, for their instrument skills, because we had 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week access to those simulators for free. We would get in there and fly them. A private institution can't do that.

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

I would beg to differ on whether a private institution can do it. It's whether they choose to do it. I think that is the issue. I think it's incumbent upon industry to actually try to escalate that bar. If we're going to have excellence, then we should be training people to be excellent.

That being said, with respect to regulations, my question would be for Ms. Farly and Marc Vanderaegen.

Would these regulations be more of a burden to you as a company, or would you see them as something that would augment your ability to receive additional funding and support for your students and for your own company?

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen:

I guess I'm trying to understand what regulations you're actually talking about as a potential.... Are you talking about regulations that would allow, that would be established—

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

I mean educational standards.

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen:

Educational standards of...?

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

You're running a flight school. It's a school.

Mr. Marc Vanderaegen:

It depends on how they're rolled out, I guess, and what they actually are.

Right now we have educational standards per se through Transport Canada already, so if it's just doubling them up, like we have with the Ministry of Education in B.C. where they try to manage us as well and things like that, it becomes cumbersome, and it doesn't really benefit the students.

No, if it benefits the students and can be managed, that's fine. Just bear in mind that costs do have to come out of the students' pockets unless there are other funding avenues set up as well.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go to Mr. Badawey.

(1155)

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I have a question for Mr. Hoff with respect to the industry, as well as the partnership that industry may have with the Air Canada Pilots Association, and in particular Air Canada itself.

In my former life, we really encouraged industry, in partnership with unions, in partnership with communities, secondary and post-secondary schools, etc., to get students at a younger age interested in different trades, different disciplines, and with that, to partner then to start the process of co-ops, apprenticeship education, etc. Then leading into post-secondary, they would pursue those disciplines to further their education and ultimately end up in the area of expertise they want to be in.

Is there any of that partnership between the association and, in your case, Air Canada with respect to getting the younger secondary individuals interested and from there to pursue it through secondary and post-secondary? You have the air cadet programs. You have other interested organizations that would actually align with being a pilot. Is there any partnership occurring between you and Air Canada?

Capt Mike Hoff:

First of all, I'll speak to the piece with my employer. I've approached my employer. They are the apex predator. Their position is that they don't have a problem getting pilots. I've found very little traction with them. Personally, they do give me access to the simulator, as well as taking would-be pilots, who are looking at it as a career, up in my own plane. I also take them into the simulator. I thank Air Canada for the opportunity to use their simulators, but that's about where it ends.

On the altruistic side, where I feel the need to give back, I've got excellent traction through my association. People would ask why your association would use your membership's dues to hire advocates and do these studies to collect the data. The data wasn't there. I'm a pilot. I need data. I can't come and talk to you and say, “I've heard”. We did a study. We drilled down to get some data and we're trying to help.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

You seem very cautious in your comments. I'll have a little chat with you offline, after the meeting, about some of the—

Capt Mike Hoff:

I appreciate that.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

—comments that I'm sure you're being very cautious with.

With that, I'll pass it over to Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you.

Good morning. Thank you for being here.

Ms. Farly, I want to commend you for having the courage to take over a business that was on the verge of going under. Sorry, I didn't mean that it was about to go under; what I meant was that it was about to close its doors. My apologies.

Ms. Caroline Farly:

That's fine.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Let's say you saved it from going under.

Ms. Caroline Farly:

I saved it from shutting down.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Precisely.

Describe for us, if you would, the challenges you faced or continue to face. What has the economic impact on regional flight schools been?

Ms. Caroline Farly:

Sorry, but are you asking about the challenges I faced getting the business back on track?

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Yes, and those you continue to face.

Ms. Caroline Farly:

Oh, well, that's a lengthy conversation.

The biggest challenge to the school's sustainability is finding instructors. I don't mean instructors just looking to do a few hours—in any case, they don't exist anymore. I'm talking about instructors who can deliver quality training that lives up to the school's reputation—instructors who will stay with us. That's our biggest challenge in terms of long-term survival.

Another challenge I faced was managing the demand. Being a stable resource in the aviation sector, I had five places ask me to start a flying school in their region. I won't name them, mind you. One of my challenges right now is running the flight school with a view to stability, while maintaining the same standard upheld by its founder. I've been there since 2010.

Flight instructors are desperately needed all over the regions for two-engine airplanes. I was discussing it with Mr. Vanderaegen, in fact. Commercial pilots are being trained all over, with demand on the rise. However, there aren't any more two-engine airplanes for pilot training because of how expensive they are. The current wait time for two-engine pilot training is two to three months.

If I was to let the company go, despite the ever-increasing costs of the school, I would buy another plane. I would buy another two-engine plane, but I can't allow training costs to go up. Training has to remain accessible. I try to pay my instructors more. I'd like to provide more training by purchasing a two-engine plane and more, but students are already struggling to register for my programs because of the cost. There aren't any funding programs.

It's a financial challenge. I try to maintain an acceptable balance on both ends without having excessive operating costs. I'm trying to keep aviation accessible to my pilots.

(1200)

[English]

The Chair:

I'm sorry, but our time has expired.

Thank you very much to all of our witnesses for coming today.

We will suspend momentarily, while we change our witnesses.

(1200)

(1205)

The Chair:

Welcome to our witnesses for this portion of the program. By video conference, we have Ms. Bell, Board Chair of the British Columbia Aviation Council. From CAE, we have Joseph Armstrong, Vice-President and General Manager. From Super T Aviation, we have Terri Super, Chief Executive Officer. From Go Green Aviation, we have Gary Ogden, Chief Executive Officer. Welcome to all of you.

I would ask that you keep your comments to five minutes, because the committee members always have lots of questions.

We will start with Ms. Bell from the British Columbia Aviation Council.

Ms. Heather Bell (Board Chair, British Columbia Aviation Council):

Good afternoon. I would like to thank the committee for the opportunity to speak today and for the efforts being taken to address this critical issue.

I speak today as the chair of the British Columbia Aviation Council, which represents the interests of the aviation community in B.C. Personally, my 36-year career has been in air traffic control. I've worked as an operational tower controller and a radar controller. When I retired from NAV Canada, I was the general manager of the Vancouver flight information region. I was responsible for all air navigation services in the province as well as the more than 500 employees who delivered that service.

I am aware that the committee has had the opportunity to hear from many respected industry professionals. As such, I am confident in your awareness of the critical resource shortages being experienced and projected for our industry. These shortages will span the depth and breadth of our industry and will include but not be limited to airport operators, air traffic controllers, aircraft maintenance engineers and pilots.

As the motion before the committee is specific to pilots, I will focus my comments on the pilot shortage and the difficulties at the flight training level, but I feel it is important to note that the pilot shortage, while critical, is not singular. Just as this issue is not specific to the pilot group, the fix for it is not simple or singular, either. I know that several recommendations have been put forth to the committee and I would like to add the support of BCAC for the following four:

Number one is increased and consistent access to student loans for flight training. Currently the access to student loans for flight training is not consistent from province to province. Unlike some other provinces, loans funding in B.C. is based on the length of training rather than the cost of training. As has been presented to the committee, the cost of flight training to the level of a commercial multi-engine IFR-rated pilot will exceed $75,000, certainly more than the cost of tuition and books for most four-year university bachelor degrees. Therefore, the creation of a federally backed national student loan program that makes available a level of funding commensurate with the cost of flight training would be the single most impactful step that could be taken.

Number two is initiatives to increase recruitment and retention of flight instructors. Prior to the resource shortage, flight schools and northern air operators could count on new pilots gaining much-needed flight hours and experience by obtaining instructor ratings and working as flight instructors. They could also take positions with operators servicing northern and remote communities. Now we see our flight training units and northern air operators struggling to recruit and retain employees. Along with the development of a national student loan program, we recommend a matrix of loan forgiveness based on time spent as a flight instructor or time spent flying designated remote routes. For reference, we see similar programs in place for medical personnel working in remote communities.

Number three is support for training innovation. The regulatory requirements around aviation can be an impediment to innovation and training. We need to rethink how and who is doing our training. Aviation is an extremely complex environment, so it's interesting that flight training is one of—if not perhaps the only—system I can think of where, for the most part, we send our least experienced aviators to train our new aviators. We don't send first-year medical students to train new doctors and we don't send high school students to train the next generation of teachers, yet in the beginning of their career, that is what we do with pilots. I'm not saying it's not safe and I'm not saying we don't produce a good product, because it is and we do, but is it the best way?

ATAC, the Air Transport Association of Canada, has recommended the approved training organization model that could change, streamline and improve training, all while meeting regulatory requirements. BCAC strongly supports this initiative.

Four is support for initiatives to remove barriers to entry for women and indigenous people. Women and indigenous people continue to be under-represented in this industry. With women making up 50% of our population and indigenous youth the fastest-growing demographic in Canada, a focus on these groups could prove advantageous on many levels. We strongly encourage continued support to established outreach programs for women such as Elevate Aviation.

To energize the indigenous sector, I believe there needs to be a concerted effort to take culturally relevant programs of introduction and education out to indigenous communities. I'm the co-founder of a program we have called Give Them Wings where we will introduce indigenous youth to careers in aviation, with a focus on pilots. Our first event will be held in March at Boundary Bay Airport, where we will connect with the Musqueam, Tsawwassen and Tsleil-Waututh communities. With support, we hope to take this initiative across the province and beyond.

Today our transport has become a “taken for granted” mode of transportation in the developed world.

(1210)



The social and economic impacts stemming from a pilot shortage have the potential to be annoying at best. It would be annoying if your vacation is ruined because your flight from Vancouver to Penticton or vice versa was cancelled because of a lack of a pilot and then you miss your connection to Rome and subsequently your cruise.

(1215)

The Chair:

Do your closing lines, Ms. Bell.

Ms. Heather Bell:

At worst, it can be devastating, like when there is no pilot to transport your critically ill child and the unimaginable happens.

I thank the committee, and I look forward to any questions you may have and to any assistance I or my organization can lend.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move to Mr. Armstrong from CAE.

Mr. Joseph Armstrong (Vice-President and General Manager, CAE):

Hello Madam Chair and committee members. It's an honour to be here today on behalf of CAE to provide our perspectives on pilot training in Canada and abroad.

I'll give a bit of a history lesson. In 1939, in conjunction with its allies, Canada established the British Commonwealth air training plan, or BCATP. Located in communities across Canada, the BCATP trained more that 130,000 crew men and women over a six-year period, which is considered today one of Canada's great contributions to allied victory. Today our nation's history in pilot training and our strong aerospace sector remain some of our greatest national assets. Successive governments have identified flight training as a key industrial capability.

Building on the BCATP heritage, CAE was founded in 1947 by Mr. Ken Patrick, an ex-Royal Canadian Air Force officer, who had a goal to create something Canadian and take advantage of a war-trained team that was extremely innovative and very technology intensive.

Fast forward to today. We're now the world leader in training for civil, defence and health care professionals. With over 65 training locations, we have the largest civil aviation training network in the world. Each year, we train more than 220,000 civil and defence crew members, including more than 135,000 pilots. Most people don't realize it, but wherever you're travelling, chances are the pilots were either trained at CAE in a simulator we built right here in Canada, or in a training centre located somewhere in the world.

Although the number of pilots we train annually is impressive, it is far from being sufficient to meet current and future needs. In 2018, we released a pilot demand outlook. According to our analysis, by 2028 the active combined airline and business jet pilot population will exceed half a million pilots, and 300,000 of those pilots will be new. Many military pilots are choosing a career in the commercial sector. Some of the driving factors are quality of life and better pay and opportunities. Military pilot attrition is also having a significant impact on professional air forces, reducing their ability to maintain a cadre of pilots to meet operational requirements, as well as their ability to produce qualified flight instructors to support their training pipelines. We see this impact today on the military training programs we deliver right here in Canada.

In this context, maximizing the available pool of potential talent is more important than ever. Today, women make up only 5% of professional pilots and cadets worldwide. Tackling gender diversity would address that imbalance, while giving the aviation community access to a talent pool nearly twice its current size.

In a recent survey that we conducted of aviation students and cadets in Canada and abroad, a number of issues were raised consistently, including the significant financial burden placed on students to enter into pilot training as well as the lack of certainty in career outcomes when they make that investment. Women specifically raised concerns about being able to fit in a male-dominated world and have an appropriate work-life balance. The fact that they have very few female role models in aviation does not help to mitigate their concerns.

Faced with such a shortage, our industry is looking for solutions to help develop more pilots faster. We'll do this by building new types of partnerships between fleet operators and training providers to provide better links between flight schools and the airlines that will ultimately receive these students. New training systems that make better use of real-time data and analytics are facilitating a move towards competency-based training. We are taking advantage of AI and big data analytics.

The Chair:

I'm sorry to interrupt, but could you slow down a little. I realize you only have five minutes, but the translators have to—

Mr. Joseph Armstrong:

Yes, no problem.

I'll slow down the fire hose. It's a lot of information.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Joseph Armstrong:

Last summer, in partnership with the governments of Canada and the province of Quebec, CAE announced a digital transformation project to develop the next generation of training solutions. We will be investing $1 billion over the next five years in innovation, which is one of the largest investments of its kind in the aviation training sector anywhere in the world.

Beyond technology and improving training, the real challenge is attracting students and increasing diversity to broaden the civil aviation talent pool. As an example, through its recently launched CAE women in flight scholarship program, we will award up to five full scholarships to women who are passionate about becoming professional pilots and interested in becoming role models.

Incentives are required to stimulate pilot production in both the civil and military markets and to offset the significant costs associated with student fees, investments in infrastructure and the need to evolve technology to optimize training output. Focused investments are required, targeting areas such as scholarships and bursaries, which should be put in place to support financing of pilot training in Canada for students and cadets; infrastructure, to support increased pilot training capacity; committing to training and simulation as a key industrial capability; and AI and competency-based training.

We encourage Canada to increase funding and directly support pilot training as a unique part of our heritage that must be maintained as a key economic driver for growth within Canada and abroad, and as a key focus for young Canadians to become part of the global aviation community.

Thank you very much.

(1220)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Armstrong.

We go now to Ms. Super from Super T Aviation.

Ms. Terri Super (Chief Executive Officer, Super T Aviation):

Madam Chair, it is with great pleasure that I present to this committee the concerns and challenges facing Canadian flight schools. As the chief pilot of Super T Aviation based in Medicine Hat, Alberta, I have over 13,000 hours in medevac, training, and charter and scheduled flying experience. While I have provided the committee with a briefing document outlining our recommendations, I would like to highlight three categories for the committee to consider: student support, instructor attention and school support.

Pursuing a career as a professional pilot costs between $75,000 and $85,000 in training alone, not including living expenses. Lack of funds or their unavailability are often the reasons for student dropout or students' inability to consider a career in aviation. Therefore, we are calling for increased government-backed financial aid and assistance for flight training. This would allow students to obtain financing through the government and/or a commercial pathway and eliminate a major barrier facing Canadians interested in becoming pilots.

Amending the Canada-provincial job grant program to allow flight schools to obtain funds for employee training without the need for the training to be done by third party providers would remove another barrier facing pilots who want to improve flying qualifications. Most flight schools are the only training unit at an airport. To receive advanced training through this federal assistance program, these pilots would have to move to a new city and new airport to obtain training that could last anywhere from one to six months.

Retention of experienced flight instructors has become a major issue facing the flight school community. While flight schools would traditionally mentor an inexperienced flight instructor for one and a half to two years before they moved on to bigger, faster aircraft with a charter or small airline operator, these days the progression can be as little as a matter of months. This puts a tremendous strain on flight schools, which must constantly be training and hiring new students. This also adds a safety concern where inexperienced pilots are focused on moving on to their next job and end up flying more complex aircraft without sufficient experience.

In order to rectify this situation, I recommend that the government offer loan forgiveness for instructors similar to what is offered to medical...working in the remote and rural areas. I also recommend legislation similar to that of the United States, where pilots are required to obtain a minimum of 1,500 hours of flying experience before they are eligible to fly for the major airlines. Regulations such as these would not only aid flight schools but also small charter and medevac operations.

We need to provide help for flight schools. Flight schools are the backbone of the aviation industry and we cannot keep up with the demand, given the high cost of training which is partly due to government policy. It's a harsh reality that aircraft burn fossil fuels. The cost of fuel is one of the largest expenses for a flight school. This cost of course is passed on to the student as part of instructional fees.

To help keep the cost of training down for the student, we recommend that the federal government: one, exclude flight schools from the carbon tax, which has increased and/or will increase the cost of training for the student dramatically; two, reprise the federal excise tax for fuel on instructional aircraft; three, support the development of alternate biofuels for aircraft or electric aircraft; and four, financially support flight schools in their use of specialized equipment that is required for flight training, including flight training devices commonly known as simulators. These devices increase competency and experience in a controlled environment but come at a cost usually several times greater than the cost of a flight school's other capital assets.

In conclusion, this committee has been presented with statistics of the pilot shortage from various witnesses appearing before it. The numbers are real and the shortage is real. Flight schools are tasked with producing safe, dependable and professional pilots in ever-increasing numbers in order to sustain and in fact expand the growing aviation industry. This can only be accomplished by government and the aviation industry working together to provide students, instructors and flight schools with the resources and help they need.

Thank you very much for your time. I look forward to answering any of your questions.

(1225)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We go now to Go Green Aviation. Mr. Ogden, you have five minutes, please.

Mr. Gary Ogden (Chief Executive Officer, Go Green Aviation):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you, members of the committee, and thank you to my fellow witness colleagues.

My name is Gary Ogden—Gary Douglas Ogden, if my mom's watching—and I'd like to speak to a higher level. My colleague Mike Rocha, who is an executive from our flight school, will be speaking to this committee on the 19th. I'd like to touch on some of the elements of our business and offer analysis of a possible root cause showing why we're in the situation we're in right now.

My background aligns itself with airports, airlines and ground service providers in the aviation industry. I rode my bike to the airport in 1979 and haven't been home since. I started as a security guard and I became a CEO. The business and the industry holds much for us all, and it offers opportunity.

I'm concerned with the fact that I have five major clients, all of whom—including Aura Airlink, which will be doing business as Central North Flying Club—are struggling to find and keep people. We face the enemy of attrition and turnover in aviation.

I have worked overseas at airports in Ashgabat, Turkmenistan, in the States, and pretty much everywhere. I choose to work in Canada because I'm proud of our aviation, and as my colleague points out, we have a vast history of training. We are world-renowned for the training we offer. Part of the reason I wanted to be involved with Aura and CNFC in a flying school in Canada is that we have this reputation and should be able to attract domestic students, and we should be very successful at attracting international students as well.

We do this business for two reasons, one a holistic reason. These do still exist. I listened to my colleagues here speak about this earlier. There are holistic reasons for doing this work. We see a shortage and we want to fill it. We want to accommodate the view stated by ICAO, IATA and ATAC, and all of the industry pundits who say that there is growth in their business. We want to accommodate that growth. We want to facilitate regional access. We don't want to lose regional access by having no air service. We want also to serve our remote communities and our indigenous people to the level to which they deserve to be served. We want to build bridges and we want to fly over obstacles. We want to do so holistically, but then the economic reality sets in: The math doesn't work. Airlines and the industry itself are burdened with a number of challenges. The price of a ticket today is probably as low as or maybe less than it was in 1980, yet our costs are a lot higher.

Central North Flying Club plans to start up in Sudbury. A regional airport has to struggle to get the attention of government. I salute Mr. Fuhr and the efforts of the current sitting and previous governments as we work towards alleviating some of this problem. The problem with general aviation, GA, at regional airports is that they don't generate revenue. They generally don't pay for themselves. At best, they are revenue neutral. We don't have duty free. We don't have parking. We don't have non-aeronautical revenues to support the airport.

Kelly, who I believe is gone for now, brought up the ACAP. We need to do more for regional airports at which flying schools are located to ensure that the flying school is not burdened with the infrastructure of that airport. We have to see the flight schools, the medevac, the charters, and the public flying and learning as critical, as providing a benefit in the pipeline of our aviation industry.

In a hockey sense, think of it as your farm team. If you don't have a farm team, if you don't reproduce for the future, you are doomed not to successfully live it. We must support the farm team, must support flying schools, and must support regional aviation to the best of our abilities.

(1230)



I thank all of you, because there are a number of initiatives with loans, student work programs and LMIAs. We have a number of initiatives. As for what I would like to see—I was talking to my friend MP Sikand about this—maybe we have to get our information out there better. Maybe there are programs, but maybe they're not consolidated and maybe they're not accessible, so for somebody who struggles...and God bless our friend who started a flight school after it looked like it was closing.

Maybe access to information is something that we can do, perhaps even as low-hanging fruit. Give people access to the information that they can use in order to access those funds that you have there. As well, let's grow the funding, and let's grow the initiatives to further those funds.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Ogden.

We'll start the questioning from our members.

Mr. Falk, you have five minutes.

Mr. Ted Falk (Provencher, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Thank you to all of our witnesses at committee today. Your testimony has been very interesting.

Ms. Super, I'd like to ask you a few questions.

I took my pilot's licence about 20 years ago. I have my private pilot's licence, with just over 800 hours.

At the time, I thought the cost was expensive. I was really frustrated that I couldn't write it off as a furthering education expense. It wasn't tax deductible for me at all. I talked to our local flight school operator, Harv's Air, where I took my training.

My instructor, by the way, was a woman about 20 years my junior. I had no problems with that and she had no problems with training me. She did a great job. Her name is Dana Chepil, if I can give her a little shout-out. I think she is an examiner today.

I thought at the time that the cost was prohibitive. In talking to my flight school in the last couple of weeks, they said that retaining instructors is a huge challenge. You've mentioned a few things, but what do you think would really be the number one thing or the two things that you could do to retain instructors? You talked about increasing the hours to 1,500 before they can fly commercially. That's probably not a bad idea, because most of them are instructing just to log hours to get onto a carrier somewhere. Is that right?

Ms. Terri Super:

Yes, that's true. Flight schools have traditionally been the bottom-feeders. Instructors do not usually stay with instructing. It would be great if we could get some of the airline captains to come back. We're currently in talks with WestJet, one of the carriers, to see if we can work out something where they lend us one of their pilots for even one or two days a month, which would be a really good start.

I don't think you're ever going to cure that problem. You can throw more money at the instructors—higher salaries—but they're looking for the “big iron”, because most of them are young people and they want to fly larger aircraft, so you can only capture them for a short period of time.

That's where I think if there were some sort of loan forgiveness it might be an incentive, because the loans are significant for these students. That may be an incentive for them to stay in the flight instructional area longer and get more experience before they go out to their other jobs.

Mr. Ted Falk:

I don't know what your experience is with the pilots or the potential pilots that you're attracting, whether they're domestic or international. I know that Harv's Air in Steinbach attracts a lot of international students, but domestic ones not quite so much.

I talk to young people all the time about getting into aviation and getting their pilot's licence. The number one reason they cite is not that they're not interested and not that it's not exciting—it's the cost. One of the things that adds significantly to the cost, and I know it from operating an aircraft—my Mooney doesn't fly on fumes—is the cost of fuel.

You talked a bit about the carbon tax and what it is and will be. Just last week, the National Airlines Council of Canada released a statement saying that they had done two studies in 2018 showing the negative impacts a carbon tax would have for aviation, both on the cost of passenger travel and also on the cost for flight school operators, without really any measurable effect on reducing emissions. Could you comment on that?

(1235)

Ms. Terri Super:

The carbon tax that we have already in Alberta, and it is significant, does increase the costs.

We need the infrastructure. We need airlines. Everyone wants to fly. You guys all fly on an airline to get home on the weekends. We have to provide that.

The idea that the carbon tax will help people to reduce use of fossil fuels is just not going to be true for a flight school. The more students we put out, the more fuel we're going to use.

The one thing I see that has great potential is the use of simulation. At our school, we have an integrated course that we give to students. We have two simulators. They're flight training devices. They don't move, but they simulate flight very well, but we can't use all of that training for their licence.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Also, we heard previous testimony that the cost of simulators is very expensive, and you need to recover that cost somehow, as well. Perhaps there are some assistance programs you could have that would help you explore that avenue.

Ms. Terri Super:

Some sort of government matching for these costs—

Mr. Ted Falk:

I'm out of time in eight seconds, but if you have the opportunity to talk a little bit about infrastructure needs either at municipal airports or private airports, I'd appreciate that.

The Chair:

Please be very brief.

Ms. Terri Super:

I'm afraid I'm not really qualified to talk about the infrastructure at airports.

Mr. Ted Falk:

That's fine. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Ms. Super, when the transition between the panels was taking place, you met Ms. Farly from my riding. It was nice to learn about the other female airport owner. I just wanted to make that point; you hadn't mentioned that particular bit in your opening statement.

Are there other comments from the previous panel that you want to address? You indicated interest in doing so at the beginning and that in our early conversations there were things that were animating you.

Ms. Terri Super:

Yes. Now if I can think of them.... I'm getting a little older, so it takes me a little longer to—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's okay. Some flight planning is required.

I'll go to Mr. Ogden for a second. You mentioned the costs of the infrastructure burden on flight schools. Can you go more into detail on what those costs are and what the actual numbers are?

Mr. Gary Ogden:

I can't give you actual numbers because I'm sure it changes by airport, but you have hangarage fees and you have the controlled environment at an airport that needs to be maintained from a safety and security perspective. We have flight instructors basically going out and de-icing airplanes, pushing them back either by hand or by machine, adding oils and doing maintenance work while they are supposed to be flight instructors because there's just not the money there. Again, that's a vicious circle, and it puts people off being flight instructors.

I can speak to Sudbury a little better because we're going up there and have taken a facility. The cost of hangaring the airplanes and of keeping them in a weather-protected environment when we have weather exactly like what we have just seen is not cheap.

De-icing at airports is not cheap. With regard to our business, we simply don't fly at big airports, so we don't have the benefit of central facilities, but we are forced to buy de-icing equipment. I believe there was even a study released a couple of weeks ago which said that northern airports are somewhat lacking in their de-icing capability and coverage.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, a lot of flight schools are at grass strips and things like that, too, where there's very little infrastructure to speak of.

Mr. Gary Ogden:

Also, we have to wait until it thaws, or we have to wait until it goes.... I mean, we contemplated using Brampton, but we needed more access to better facilities—unfortunately, more expensive facilities. At Sudbury, we also have a second airport, just adjacent there, that we can use to increase our flying hours.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think I have a picture of that.

Just out of curiosity, what is the GO Green reference?

Mr. Gary Ogden:

GO Green is the company I started many years ago with respect to cleaning and greening the airport environment.

I personally am involved with a number of initiatives. One is to try to electrify more of the airport ramp—again, cleaning and greening that ramp, making it safer for our staff out there. That's the holding company that the consultancy goes out from, but I have joined with Aura to be a component of this flight school.

(1240)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, thank you.

Ms. Super, I'll come back to you now.

You talked about the cost of fuel in your presentation. Flight schools generally rent their aircraft wet. When you rent a plane, you rent it wet. Can you explain, for those don't fly, what that means and if that approach is sustainable over the long term?

Ms. Terri Super:

If the aircraft is “wet”, that means it has fuel in it. If a student or a renter is going to take one of our aircraft, it comes with fuel. If they go away to another airport, we will reimburse them at our cost. We won't reimburse them if they purchase fuel at a higher price at a different airport.

Some schools don't do it that way. Some operators actually do because the price of aviation fuel floats week to week, as the price of fuel does at the gas pumps. They rent it to the person dry, and for every flight, they figure out how much fuel has been used and apply the cost of the fuel onto the price of the flight.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It sounds like a lot of extra paperwork to keep track of how much fuel you will need.

Ms. Terri Super:

Yes, and that's why a lot of schools go with just wet.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That makes sense.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Graham.

We'll move to Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'd like to thank the witnesses for being here today. Hearing what they have to say is quite enlightening.

My question is for you, Ms. Bell. In an industry where the issues are complex, you've put your finger on a problem all the witnesses have talked about—the training costs for students who choose this career path.

The problem, as I see it, is that models seem to vary from province to province, even territory to territory. For example, in Quebec, which I know more about because I live there, students have the option to train at a wholly private school that meets Transport Canada's standards or a school that is integrated into the college system.

Is there a model Quebec should conform to in an effort to harmonize things and, by extension, examine the impact on training costs? [English]

Ms. Heather Bell:

Thank you for that question.

Yes. If there was a more consistent model across the country, I believe that we would see streamlined training, certainly from province to province. The issue that I spoke about was with respect to the availability of student funding and how that varies from province to province.

With respect to how the training organizations operate province to province, I'm not an expert in that, but I do know that the Air Transport Association of Canada has put forth a model with respect to approved training organizations that would make a more uniform training system. Right now, the Canadian aviation regulations regulate the number of hours that are required to be accomplished prior to any student pilot receiving any level of licensing. I think that some of that needs to be re-examined about how the training is applied with respect to time. As other people have said, a simulator would be a very valuable asset for a training organization, but right now, the regulations don't allow much simulator time to be applied to a licence. Yes, if there were more uniform federal regulations, it would be very helpful. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you for that information.

My next question is for Mr. Ogden.

Mr. Ogden, the name of your company, Go Green Aviation, is inspiring. In another study the committee did, on the impact of aircraft noise in the vicinity of major airports, we learned how difficult it was for aviation and civil society to coexist.

Is it now possible to train pilots on electric airplanes, where the cost of buying those planes is comparable to that of gas-fuelled planes?

Mr. Gary Ogden:

Thank you, Mr. Aubin.[English]

I'm a big believer that anything that improves our environmental stewardship at airports is a positive thing. I don't necessarily like following Europe, and even some U.S. states, in what we do in Canada because I think we should lead, not follow.

The use of any non-flying, non-gas burning alternative is a positive. I think simulators are certainly an answer. I think the use of simulators and ground school elements can help us get over the national carrier pilot accessibility, with respect to fatigue. Yes, those companies don't want their pilots doing flight time in their four days off or any number of days off. However, non-flying and more systems and aids-related flying with simulators and the like can serve a lot of purposes. It's a lot safer, a a lot cleaner and we do have access then to a more available labour pool in terms of flight instruction.

I'm sorry about speaking to electric airplanes. It's not an area of expertise that I have.

(1245)

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin, you have 30 seconds. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I hope we'll have an opportunity to hear more of what you have to say on the subject.

Mr. Armstrong, I'd like you to talk about the new agreement with Quebec on the development of digital pilot training. [English]

Mr. Joseph Armstrong:

I'm not familiar with which agreement you're talking about, unless you're referring to the agreement we have established with both the Quebec government and the federal government in terms of innovating, and the digital investments we are making in digitizing training.

I think the biggest change that's happened over the last, let's say, decade, has been a significant advancement in the science of learning and education, and applying the evolution of that science in learning to understanding better how to apply assets at various points along the pilot training curriculum. The whole concept of creating a system whereby you have a more efficient, more optimized, more tailored program to build people up to a level of competence can be done with things other than aircraft.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Armstrong.

We'll move to Mr. Sikand.

You have four minutes.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'm going to start off with a question for Mr. Ogden.

You hit some political trigger words for me: international and you choose Canada. I often like to amalgamate the two.

You said that the enemy for flight schools is attrition. Why is it that we can't turn to the international community to bring in trainers to help train Canadian pilots?

Mr. Gary Ogden:

Mr. Sikand, the concept is a very good one.

We have looked, and we are looking at establishing an international element to the flight school we have. It will come down to the age-old recognition of standards and credentials that we face in many fields in Canada.

I'm not really up for lowering standards, but I am for recognizing standards. If international students and international flight instructors can fill that necessary gap for us and all we have to do is match the accreditations, then that's on us. Let's do it, because the solutions it provides are geometric in their impact.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

I have less time than normal, so I'm going to move to Ms. Super.

You were mentioning the price on pollution and how that affects the cost of operation. If smaller flight schools or airlines were to be excluded in an initial program but the larger carriers were priced but then given a rebate as they improved technology or became more efficient and had less of an impact on the environment, is this a system that you think would be favourable?

Ms. Terri Super:

I can hardly hear you.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Sorry.

You were mentioning carbon and how things can be taxed and how that affects operations. If smaller carriers or flight schools were excluded initially but larger ones had a tax but then were given a rebate as they became more efficient or lowered their carbon footprint, is that a model which you think would be favourable?

Ms. Terri Super:

Yes, that could be feasible, as technology improves, for instance, with simulation or with the electric aircraft. They're not really at the stage where they're feasible to use for a flight school. The charge doesn't last long enough. Flight schools are required to have a minimum of 150 nautical mile cross-country flight for beginning students, and I don't believe there's any electric aircraft that can do that yet. I think that would be feasible if we could come up with something like that.

With the simulation, there needs to be, in my estimation, changes to the regulations on the amount of simulation that can be used. If that were possible, that would greatly aid it. For a commercial pilot, you need 25 hours of instrument time, of which only 10 hours can be used in a flight training device or simulator. If we could up the hours that are used in the simulator, that would greatly help and obviously reduce our carbon footprint.

(1250)

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

I'm going to jump in and with the 30 seconds I have left quickly ask Ms. Bell a question.

If the government were to subsidize training to help students become pilots, but then they had a return of service, that they had to serve in Canada or maybe with Canadian airlines, is this something that's possible? Would you be open to something like that?

Ms. Heather Bell:

Absolutely. One of the recommendations is that there be some student loan forgiveness for time spent as a flight instructor or flying in a northern and remote community. Certainly you've heard a lot about how schools are having trouble retaining instructors.

Also, I have fear that here in the province of British Columbia, one of the first places we're going to see the drop-off in our pilots are in those areas that are servicing remote communities. I have a fear that we are going to see some unfortunate incidents happen.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Bell.

We'll move to Mr. Fuhr.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Thank you, witnesses, for coming today.

I want to thank Ms. Bell. I used your letter. I got dozens of letters on this topic, and I used yours in its entirety in my remarks in the House.

Something that hasn't come up is we're losing a significant amount of the limited capacity we have due to foreign entities buying Canadian flight schools or foreign students coming here to get trained by Canadian flight schools and then leave. I want some feedback on that.

Ms. Bell, could you wade in on that issue?

Ms. Heather Bell:

Certainly in British Columbia we see a very high number of foreign students. When I speak to my members who are flight training unit operators, they don't see that as a problem in that those students are not taking spots that other students could be taking. More of a problem is getting the Canadian students in the pipeline to begin with. You have people there with the flight training unit who may have a different experience, but here in B.C., we're not seeing the uptake.

There is a further issue. I want to mention something about immigration and bringing in pilots from other countries. Some of our members would very much like to do that but they stumble across immigration rules that require that pilots coming into Canada not just meet the regulatory standards for being a pilot but also there is no real framework for how pilots should be hired from offshore.

They are considered to be like an engineer such that hours have to be guaranteed at 40 hours a week, a Monday-to-Friday type of job. These are not the kinds of jobs that people are hiring for. I wanted to have an opportunity to throw that out there. We don't see the intake of foreign students as a problem or as taking spots that Canadian students would take otherwise.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Thank you for that.

Mr. Armstrong, has the military looked at what future air crew training looks like, how that's going to be delivered? Do you think that, given both the domestic need and the global need for pilots, it could be structured in a way that it could incorporate some excess capacity to train civilians or accommodate a surge in production of pilots for the military and when that was no longer needed, we then...civilians.... It's complex and it's thinking outside the box, but given where we are and what we have to do, do you think that's possible? How do you think that would look?

Mr. Joseph Armstrong:

If you look at NATO flying training in Canada, which is the existing military flying training program, when it was crafted, it was created within the context of international contribution and international involvement from the get-go. Right now it's partly due to try to generate revenue to subsidize the cost of operating the training centre. The training centre is expensive because you're now operating military aircraft that have a different price point from what you would see on the civil aviation side.

Certainly I think the approach of building tailored flight training programs is what we need to be targeting because the idea of saying you're going to have a fixed cost base that you need to operate to be able to deliver a training service.... If I can build that fixed cost base that has variable capacity, then the ability to inject participation by other students, whether or not that's civilian or from foreign nations, absolutely goes a long way in being able to amortize that cost.

Certainly I think the mindset we need to have as Canadians—and we certainly see this within our company—and the success we've had globally is that the solution to these problems involves a global mindset. If we look at anything in isolation from the complete ecosystem of pilot training, then you're only looking at one piece of the problem and the solution is much larger than that.

Even the conversation about are foreign students in Canada creating problems or is it possible to bring in foreign instructors to supplement Canadian instructors, think about it in the inverse. The demand we see for pilot production and pilot training requirements is so high globally that it is creating a draw on Canadian capacity.

I go back to what the others have said and suggest we need to focus on a few things. One is building tailored competency-based training programs, and two, really focusing on and emphasizing the ability to recruit active students.

(1255)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Armstrong.

Thank you, Mr. Fuhr.

We'll move to Ms. Block for four minutes.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair. I want to thank you, and I appreciate the committee's indulgence as I take a few moments to move a motion regarding aviation safety, which was circulated to the members of the committee on January 2.

I'll give you a bit of back story. Nearly two years ago, on June 8, 2017, 21-year-old Alex, along with his girlfriend Sidney, rented a single-engine Piper Warrior from a flight school in Lethbridge, Alberta, and headed for Kamloops, B.C. Alex, being a certified pilot, flew the light aircraft, with Sidney as the sole passenger. After refuelling in Cranbrook, they departed but never arrived at their destination. An 11-day search was conducted over a vast area. During this 11-day period, 18 Royal Canadian Air Force and civil search and rescue aircraft flew a total of 576 hours and covered approximately 37,513 square kilometres. On average, 10 aircraft were deployed each day, with more than 70 Royal Canadian Air Force personnel and 137 volunteer pilots and spotters from civil search and rescue. Despite this extensive search and rescue mission, they were unable to find Alex, Sidney and their aircraft. It was at the end of this extensive search that Alex's father and stepmother, Matthew Simons and Natalie Lindgren, were notified that the emergency locator transmitter, ELT, on board the aircraft failed to activate, thus making the plane impossible to find. Sadly, this happens in 38% of crashes.

ELTs are emergency transmission devices that are carried on board most aircraft. In the event of a crash, ELTs send distress signals on designated frequencies to help search and rescue locate the aircraft and its passengers. ELTs operate on two frequencies: 121.5 megahertz and 406 megahertz.

Since 2009, ELTs that operate at 121.5 megahertz are no longer monitored by satellite systems and are therefore ineffective. However, they are still mandated. Since June 2016, the Transportation Safety Board has put forward seven recommendations with regard to modernizing ELTs, but to date, these recommendations have not been acted upon. In many aircraft accidents, the ELT, if there is one, is damaged to the point that no distress signal can be sent. As a result, a number of light aircraft are never found. This was the case for Alex and Sidney, and it's the case for many others like them.

With this motion, I believe that we have the opportunity to help grieving parents like Matthew and Natalie by undertaking a short study that will help us to better understand the issue and make recommendations to Transport Canada. In particular, the motion requests that the committee look at the benefits, for search and rescue purposes, of using GPS technology that allows an aircraft's position to be determined via satellite navigation and periodically broadcast to a remote tracking system. The idea is that a GPS would be used in conjunction with a modern 406 megahertz ELT on light aircraft.

The chair of the Transportation Safety Board, Kathy Fox, has pointed out that when an aircraft crashes, it needs to be located quickly so that survivors can be rescued. The information that a simple GPS system could provide would empower search and rescue to respond quickly when a crash occurs, and would reduce lengthy searches for lost aircraft, thus saving lives and tax dollars.

In closing, I believe that together we have the opportunity to initiate a very important study in honour of Alex and Sidney, and I hope that all members of the committee would support this motion.

Thank you so much for allowing me to take this time.

(1300)

The Chair:

I have a couple of speakers. Please note the time. The next committee is prepared to come in at 1:00 p.m., so our time is very tight.

I have Mr. Graham, Mr. Aubin and Ms. Leitch. Please keep your comments brief.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I understand your motion and your intent. I think if we look at the intent of the motion, it is, quite frankly, to improve methods to ensure recovery of missing aircraft. That's the objective, right?

The motion is very prescriptive. I can't support the motion the way it's written, but I am willing to propose an amendment that I have put to your motion: “That the Committee conduct a study for the duration of 4-6 meetings, on:”—that's what you have—and from the colon all the way from (a) through to (e), we'd replace that with “improved methods to ensure recovery of missing aircraft, particularly in general aviation.”

I'd further amend it to remove the idea of reporting within four months, because we have quite a bit on the agenda for this committee at this time.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay, thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Obviously, it's an important issue. I won't oppose the motion.

I would, however, like to know whether you think the study should follow what we already have planned. For instance, a passenger rail study has been in the works for months. It had unanimous committee support.

If we tack the study on at the end, in terms of what's already on our plate, that's fine, but if we bump work that's already planned to accommodate the study, I think that's a problem.

I'd like to know where you stand on that. [English]

The Chair:

Yes, there's no question that we do have a full schedule. We have supplementary estimates coming up. We have to finish off two other reports and we have committed to four meetings on bus safety and a couple of meetings on rail safety. Those are things we've already committed to, so I would suggest that if the committee adopts either of the motions, it would start when we have completed what we currently have on the agenda. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

The passenger rail study is one of the items already on the agenda, isn't it? [English]

The Chair:

Yes.

Ms. Leitch.

Hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Thank you very much.

I'm commenting on this from my perspective of being a former minister of labour. I had heard from many families, as well as pilots and other professionals within the industry, the need for safety regulations, but also specifically for technology that would augment the safety and the ability of not just families but also the professionals working in the area to modernize the industry. The one thing I will say is that this industry modernization is required, this case being evidence alone, let alone the other cases that have taken place.

We as Canadians use GPS every day. My brother and sister, Michael and Melanie, use it to make sure they know where their children are. We could use this to make sure that families similar to Alex's and Sidney's families, are able to find their loved ones, hopefully so that they can actually be rescued and taken care of in a hospital, but if nothing else, for the families to have closure.

I recognize there is an amendment on the floor with regard to this motion, but the use of modern technology such as GPS and others is something that is fundamental to this motion. I'm sure you use it in your car to get home on occasion. Thus I would encourage the government to consider that those specific pieces of technology that we use every single day be things that we should be encouraging and facilitating for pilots and other people in the aviation industry to use as well.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Leitch.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My only point is that having the study include its conclusion is not how a study works. The study is on how to improve the recovery, not here's a solution to figure it out.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

(Amendment agreed to)

(Motion as amended agreed to)

The Chair: Thank you all very much.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(1100)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte la séance du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités de la 42e législature. Conformément à l'ordre de renvoi du mercredi 28 novembre 2018, nous poursuivons notre étude des défis que doivent relever les écoles de pilotage au Canada.

Bienvenue à tous dans notre nouvelle salle de réunion de l'édifice de l'Ouest, où nous tenons notre première séance. Le parrain de la motion, M. Fuhr, se joint aujourd'hui aux membres du Comité. Bienvenue.

Nous recevons aujourd'hui les témoins suivants: Caroline Farly, chef pilote et instructrice en chef d'Aéro Loisirs; le capitaine Mike Hoff, du Comité des affaires extérieures de l'Association des pilotes d'Air Canada; et Marc Vanderaegen, directeur de l'école de pilotage du Southern Interior Flight Centre de Carson Air.

Monsieur Vanderaegen, voudriez-vous faire en premier votre exposé de cinq minutes?

M. Marc Vanderaegen (directeur de l'école de pilotage, Southern Interior Flight Centre, Carson Air):

Madame la présidente, bonjour et merci de m'avoir invité à participer à la séance d'aujourd'hui. Je vais lire mes notes, car je veux être certain de ne rien omettre.

Le Southern Interior Flight Centre fait partie du groupe d'entreprises Carson, lequel offre de la formation de pilotage à Kelowna, en Colombie-Britannique, ainsi que des services d'évacuation médicale, de transport de fret, d'approvisionnement en carburant et de hangar à Kelowna, Calgary, Vancouver et Abbotsford. Nous sommes confrontés aux défis relatifs à la pénurie de pilotes à tous les égards et pas seulement sur le plan de la formation, sujet dont nous traitons aujourd'hui.

À l'école de pilotage, nous formons des étudiants pour qu'ils deviennent des pilotes amateurs, généraux, commerciaux et de ligne, ainsi que les instructeurs de pilotage. Nous offrons en outre un programme d'aviation commerciale avec diplôme en association avec le collège Okanagan. À cela s'ajoutent des partenariats officiels en matière de formation avec WestJet Encore, Jazz, Porter et Carson Air, ainsi que des liens informels avec de nombreuses entreprises qui s'intéressent à nos diplômés. Pour ce qui est des défis, vous en reconnaîtrez certains qui vous auront été présentés au cours de séances précédentes.

Sachez d'abord que l'aide financière aux étudiants est insuffisante. Le coût élevé de la formation initiale permettant d'obtenir un permis de pilote commercial, associé au faible financement, fait en sorte que les étudiants s'endettent lourdement. Les prêts offerts aux étudiants au Canada combinés à ceux offerts dans notre province, par exemple, totalisent un maigre 5 440 $ par trimestre, alors qu'il a été montré que la somme nécessaire s'élève à 23 519 $ par trimestre. Voilà qui laisse un manque à gagner de 18 000 $ par trimestre ou de plus de 90 000 $ pour un programme de diplomation de cinq trimestres.

En outre, les coûts de la formation augmentent. Pour engager des instructeurs, nous devons maintenant former des instructeurs de pilotage au prix de 10 000 $ par personne. Ce qui était autrefois une source de revenus parce que des pilotes commerciaux voulaient devenir instructeurs s'est transformé en coût, qui doit maintenant être refilé au groupe d'étudiants suivant la formation générale de pilotage, dont le fardeau financier s'accroît à l'avenant. Les coûts des pièces d'aéronefs et du carburant sont instables et augmentent considérablement. Par exemple, un monomoteur Cessna 172 sortant de l'usine, et dont il faut attendre la livraison pendant 14 mois, coûte actuellement 411 000 $US. Un aéronef usagé fera l'objet de guerres d'enchères et entraînera encore 50 à 75 % de nouveaux coûts, auxquels s'ajoutent les coûts élevés de la mise à niveau du moteur et des hélices.

Outre le fait que la demande en formation au pays a fait augmenter les ventes et les prix des avions, des entreprises étrangères achètent des aéronefs par groupes de 25 ou plus afin de les utiliser aux fins de formation. Cela se traduit non seulement par une augmentation des coûts, mais aussi par une diminution du nombre de techniciens d'entretien. Il faut donc proposer des salaires et des incitatifs plus intéressants pour attirer et garder en poste des employés d'entretien qualifiés.

Notre manque général d'accès aux employés potentiels constitue notre troisième défi. Avec la situation d'embauche actuelle dans notre industrie, les nouveaux pilotes n'ont pas besoin de passer du temps à offrir de la formation pour acquérir de l'expérience avant de devenir des pilotes commerciaux. De nombreux diplômés sont directement engagés par les compagnies aériennes ou d'autres entreprises dès leur sortie de l'école. Comme il y a moins d'instructeurs, moins nombreux sont ceux qui peuvent gravir les échelons du système de classification afin de devenir instructeurs superviseurs ou de pouvoir former de nouveaux instructeurs.

Il ne nous est pas possible d'embaucher des candidats étrangers qualifiés à titre d'instructeurs comme solution temporaire, car le processus d'évaluation de l'impact sur le marché du travail est trop lourd et le long processus de conversion de permis de Transports Canada ralentit le traitement administratif des demandes de candidats étrangers. Les exigences médicales sont également trop restrictives dans certaines situations, notamment en cas de daltonisme pouvant être corrigé. En outre, ces exigences empêchent des pilotes de ligne retraités qui n'ont plus d'autorisation médicale d'enseigner dans des simulateurs pour nous comme ils pouvaient déjà le faire pour les compagnies aériennes.

Pour relever ces défis, nous proposons des recommandations réparties en deux groupes.

Il faut d'abord accroître le financement destiné à l'aviation; je pense que cela saute aux yeux. Le gouvernement fédéral doit offrir aux étudiants davantage de prêts et de programmes de remise de dette. Il faut se pencher sur le financement fédéral offert sous la forme de subventions pour la formation ou le maintien en poste des instructeurs afin d'alléger le fardeau financier refilé aux étudiants. Le gouvernement fédéral doit également revoir le financement ou les crédits d'impôt accordés pour l'achat d'immobilisations afin de contribuer à réduire les coûts d'équipement élevés qui ne cessent d'augmenter.

Le second groupe de recommandations vise à accroître l'accès aux instructeurs. D'abord, une augmentation du financement offert aux étudiants permettrait aux unités de formation en pilotage de verser de meilleurs salaires aux instructeurs et aux techniciens d'entretien afin de pouvoir les garder à leur emploi. De plus, en facilitant à court terme l'accès aux employés étrangers au titre des programmes d'évaluation de l'impact sur le marché du travail, que ce soit en accélérant le processus ou en en exemptant complètement les candidats qualifiés, le gouvernement nous permettrait d'embaucher des pilotes ou des techniciens d'entretien étrangers pour combler les manques.

La réduction des délais de conversion de permis de Transports Canada...

(1105)

La présidente:

Pardonnez-moi, monsieur Vanderaegen; pourriez-vous clore votre propos, s'il vous plaît?

M. Marc Vanderaegen:

Bien sûr. En terminant, j'irai droit au but. Il faut réagir à ces défis pour que nous puissions non seulement poursuivre nos activités aujourd'hui, mais aussi les élargir pour répondre au besoin croissant qui se manifeste sur le marché.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Capitaine Hoff, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

Capitaine Mike Hoff (capitaine, Comité des affaires extérieures, Association des pilotes d'Air Canada):

Bonjour et merci.

Je m'appelle Michael Hoff. Je suis pilote de ligne et j'adore mon travail. Je suis capitaine d'appareils Boeing 787 pour Air Canada et je travaille depuis Vancouver. Je témoigne à titre de représentant de l'Association des pilotes d'Air Canada.

Avant de commencer mon exposé, je voudrais vous remercier tous de vous intéresser à cette question. L'accès stable et prévisible à l'aviation est important dans un pays aussi vaste que le nôtre. De nombreux secteurs sont aux prises avec des problèmes de main-d'oeuvre. Pour les pilotes, la question est complexe. Dans le mémoire que nous vous avons remis, vous constaterez que le coût de la formation des pilotes et l'accès restreint aux heures de vol de formation sont des facteurs qui entrent en compte, auxquels s'ajoutent les mauvaises conditions de sécurité et de travail des pilotes au niveau d'entrée. Ces facteurs sont confirmés par les recherches que nous avons réalisées pour montrer que les jeunes Canadiens sont plus susceptibles de s'intéresser à des emplois d'infirmier, de pompier ou même de joueur de jeux vidéo qu'à une carrière de pilote.

Je vous expliquerai plus facilement la situation en vous racontant mon expérience personnelle. Je ne suis pas seulement pilote; mon fils de 26 ans pilote des avions régionaux pour Jazz. Permettez-moi de vous expliquer ce qu'il en est. La formation de pilote peut s'élever jusqu'à 90 000 $, ce qui constitue un fardeau financier considérable pour les familles, qui peinent à faire valoir leur cas si elles constatent qu'elles ont besoin d'un prêt. Pour permettre à mon fils de suivre une formation et d'accumuler le nombre d'heures nécessaire, j'ai fini par acheter un petit avion de type PA-22, et nous avons engagé notre propre instructeur. Si vous vous posez la question, oui, c'est comme apprendre à conduire une voiture: cela va mieux quand quelqu'un d'autre dit à votre enfant ce qu'il faut faire.

Les écoles de pilotage au Canada sont fragmentées, certaines étant associées à des collèges accrédités, mais d'autres pas. Nombre d'entre elles sont de petites entreprises familiales. L'Agence du revenu du Canada ne reconnaît pas les droits de scolarité de toutes les écoles. Personnellement, je peux vous dire que je me suis battu pendant trois ans pour que l'Agence reconnaisse l'école de pilotage de mon fils aux fins d'impôt. Et ce n'est pas tout: je n'ai pas pu déduire le temps de vol de mon propre aéronef. Il a, au contraire, été très facile de déduire les droits de scolarité de mon autre fils.

Un grand nombre d'étudiants pensent qu'une fois qu'ils ont leur permis de pilote, ils peuvent obtenir un emploi chez WestJet ou Air Canada. En réalité, les choses se passent plus comme dans le domaine du sport professionnel: avant d'entrer dans les ligues majeures, il faut littéralement passer des milliers d'heures dans le club-école. Au Canada, cela signifie souvent qu'il faut piloter dans le Nord.

Permettez-moi d'être franc: la surveillance réglementaire quotidienne peut être complètement déconnectée de la réalité sur place. Les règles exigent une autosurveillance, ce qui signifie que les pilotes sont censés décider eux-mêmes s'ils sont aptes ou non au travail. C'est une décision qui peut être difficile à prendre quand on est nouveau et hors de son élément. Dans certaines entreprises, si un pilote indique qu'il est inapte au travail en raison de la fatigue, on lui demandera s'il veut une doudou et une suce pour faciliter sa sieste. C'est la culture.

Si on a besoin d'un emploi pour trouver un meilleur travail, cela peut soumettre les pilotes inexpérimentés à des pressions substantielles. C'est une des raisons pour lesquelles, quand on examine les taux d'accidents dans le secteur canadien de l'aviation, on constate que la majorité des pertes de coque — c'est-à-dire les pertes totales d'aéronefs et, bien trop souvent, des âmes à bord — se produisent dans le Nord. Je peux vous dire honnêtement qu'à titre de parent, je ne dors pas bien quand mon fils vole dans le Nord.

Que pouvons-nous faire à ce sujet? Le sondage que nous avons commandé montre très clairement qu'aujourd'hui, les parents et les étudiants sont plus attirés par les parcours stables et sécuritaires et les retombées immédiates que les emplois traditionnels pourraient offrir. Nous devons donc réduire et éliminer les obstacles auxquels les étudiants se heurtent.

Pour ce faire, il faut d'abord adopter des politiques pour contribuer à couvrir les coûts d'entrée, notamment en accordant des prêts et des crédits d'impôt pour les écoles de pilotage. Nous devons ensuite trouver des moyens de faciliter l'accumulation des heures de vol et de simulation. En outre, nous devons encourager les établissements publics accrédités à établir des écoles de pilotage. Enfin, nous devons rendre l'aviation plus sûre, notamment en assurant une surveillance réglementaire plus stricte là où nos nouveaux pilotes volent, particulièrement dans le Nord. Les statistiques montrent que nous devons faire mieux, et ce, pour protéger non seulement nos nouveaux pilotes, mais aussi leurs passagers.

Je suis fier d'être pilote. Rien ne me rend plus heureux que d'encourager les jeunes à envisager une carrière dans le domaine. Nous jouissons de la meilleure vue du monde de notre bureau, mais il y a du travail à faire.

Je vous remercie de porter attention à ces questions importantes.

(1110)



Je voudrais remercier particulièrement M. Fuhr d'avoir proposé cette motion.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, capitaine Hoff.

Madame Farly, vous pouvez faire votre exposé.

Mme Caroline Farly (chef pilote et instructrice en chef, Aéro Loisirs):

Merci. Je lirai moi aussi mon exposé. [Français]

Bonjour. Je vous remercie de m'accueillir aujourd'hui.

Je suis Caroline Farly, propriétaire de l'école de pilotage Aéroloisirs. J'y suis chef pilote et instructrice en chef, ainsi que responsable de l'entretien des avions et agente autorisée pour Transports Canada. Je suis devenue instructrice en 2011 dans le but d'en faire carrière.

Je tiens ici à remercier Mme Louise Gagnon, pilote et instructrice de classe 1 chez Cargair depuis 25 ans, ainsi que M. Rémi Cusach, fondateur de l'école de pilotage ALM, lui aussi instructeur de classe 1 pendant 25 ans et aujourd'hui retraité. Tous les deux sont actuellement examinateurs délégués de Transports Canada et m'ont aidé à préparer cette présentation.

Les longs délais d'admission des élèves sont un fléau pour les écoles de pilotage. La cause en est le manque d'instructeurs, qui n'est pas près de se résorber. Il est urgent de corriger notre incapacité de répondre à la demande actuelle et grandissante de candidats à une licence de pilote commercial.

Il n'est plus nécessaire de passer par le rituel de l'instruction pour accumuler des heures de vol. Seuls les pilotes qui en manifestent véritablement l'intérêt deviendront instructeurs. Il faut s'inspirer des constats de la présente étude pour revaloriser la profession d'instructeur de pilotage, dont la perception actuelle nuit assurément au recrutement de candidats.

Les pilotes qui ont choisi de faire carrière comme instructeurs sont peu nombreux dans le réseau et comptent notamment des fondateurs d'école, des examinateurs et des instructeurs en chef. Elles et ils possèdent un bagage incommensurable de connaissances sur l'instruction et sur l'aviation et jouent un rôle de premier plan depuis 30 ans dans la fondation des écoles de pilotage. Cependant, ils arrivent actuellement à l'âge de la retraite, vendent leurs écoles et laissent un énorme vide sur le terrain.

C'est ce qui est arrivé dans le cas de l'école dont j'ai pris la relève en 2013. Jusqu'au départ à la retraite du fondateur en 2018, nous étions deux instructeurs de carrière, mais je suis désormais seule. J'aime penser que notre enthousiasme a grandement influencé et inspiré les pilotes en formation chez nous à devenir instructeurs, car l'accès à des modèles ou à des mentors a toujours été une clé du succès dans le recrutement professionnel.

L'instruction est le domaine le moins valorisé et le moins bien payé dans le milieu de l'aviation. C'est une dure réalité. Les écoles versent des honoraires à des travailleurs autonomes plutôt que des salaires à des employés. Les pertes de revenus liées à la météo sont considérables, tant pour les écoles de pilotage que pour les travailleurs, sans oublier leur effet adverse dans la région qui héberge nos élèves. La demande pour nos services augmente nettement lorsque les élèves sont en congé durant les périodes estivales et les jours fériés. Les annulations de dernière minute dues à la météo ou aux bris mécaniques rendent difficile et coûteuse l'application des normes du travail.

Bien que les instructeurs de notre école soient relativement bien payés puisqu'ils touchent une prime appréciable, il reste que le coût de nos opérations nous impose un plafond. Les frais de maintenance et d'achat de pièces d'avion et de carburant augmentent pendant que nous faisons face aux variations de revenus. La formation de pilote est onéreuse et nous essayons d'en conserver les frais à des niveaux acceptables qui rendent l'aviation accessible. Ces frais fluctuent et augmentent, mais le prix du service, lui, ne peut pas suivre.

Une grande question se pose: qui va former les instructeurs de demain? Seuls les instructeurs les plus hauts gradés, ceux de classe 1, qui ont accumulé 750 heures de vol en qualité d'instructeurs, peuvent former des instructeurs de vol. C'est pour l'essentiel ce que dit la norme 421.72 du Règlement de l'aviation canadien.

Aujourd'hui, il est possible de devenir instructeur de classe 1 après seulement une saison ou deux. Les compagnies aériennes vont s'arracher les pilotes d'expérience, c'est-à-dire tous les instructeurs expérimentés et les instructeurs de classe 1, avant les autres instructeurs et les pilotes professionnels sans qualification supplémentaire. Nous assisterons progressivement à une baisse de la qualité de la formation et à la disparition de modèles et de mentors qui possèdent un riche bagage d'expérience et de connaissances opérationnelles et pratiques.

La réalité veut aussi que ce soient des instructeurs d'expérience qui étaient responsables de l'exploitation des écoles de pilotage partout au Canada. Une baisse du niveau d'expérience à ce chapitre risque certainement de se répercuter sur qualité de la formation des nouveaux instructeurs. À l'heure actuelle, Transports Canada mobilise les instructeurs de classe 1 pour faire face à ces défis, une initiative hautement appréciable et constructive qui démontre le sérieux du ministère à vouloir agir.

(1115)



Une majorité des instructeurs de classe 1 en fonction sont des gens âgés de plus de 50 ans et je crains personnellement de devenir l'une des rares instructrices de classe 1 possédant plus de 10 ans d'expérience. Je suis déjà l'une des rares, pour ne pas dire la seule, qui est femme et propriétaire d'une école de pilotage. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Je vous demanderais de conclure votre exposé. [Français]

Mme Caroline Farly:

En conclusion, l'une de mes dernières préoccupations est la disponibilité d'examinateurs de vol pour les instructeurs de vol. Il faut aborder ce dossier puisqu'un examinateur de vol pour instructeurs de vol doit à l'heure actuelle être pilote de ligne, ce qui complique la programmation des activités d'examen des instructeurs.

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux questions de nos membres.

Nous accordons la parole à Mme Block pour six minutes.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je veux souhaiter la bienvenue à nos invités ce matin et remercier moi aussi M. Fuhr d'avoir proposé sa motion. Je pense que le Comité l'a adoptée à l'unanimité; il admet donc le rôle très important que les écoles de pilotage jouent dans l'industrie aérienne.

Je veux revenir au témoignage du capitaine Hoff. Si vous voulez bien récapituler votre exposé pour moi, je pense que vous avez recommandé trois politiques que le gouvernement devrait adopter afin de résoudre les problèmes que doivent affronter les jeunes pilotes qui cherchent à acquérir plus d'expérience, afin de peut-être leur faciliter la tâche.

(1120)

Capt Mike Hoff:

J'ai proposé quatre mesures consistant à améliorer les conditions de travail des nouveaux pilotes dans le Nord canadien, à encourager les établissements publics accrédités à établir des écoles de pilotage, à faciliter l'accumulation des heures de vol et de simulation, et à examiner des solutions afin de réduire les coûts pour les étudiants, par exemple, en faisant en sorte qu'il soit plus facile d'obtenir des déductions fiscales pour leur éducation.

Mme Kelly Block:

Toutes ces mesures toucheraient les défis dont vous avez entendu parler, pas seulement de la part de votre fils en raison de son expérience, mais aussi d'autres jeunes pilotes pour qui ces problèmes constituent de réels problèmes alors qu'ils cherchent à faire carrière dans l'industrie.

Capt Mike Hoff:

C'est exact.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci. Je comprends.

Je voudrais donner suite au témoignage de Mme Farly. Je vous remercie d'avoir souligné, à la fin de votre exposé, que vous êtes une des rares femmes — ou la seule — à être propriétaires d'une école de pilotage.

Mme Caroline Farly:

Je pense être la seule. Comme je ne suis pas certaine s'il en y ait d'autres, je ne veux pas affirmer être la seule, mais je n'en connais aucune autre.

Mme Kelly Block:

D'accord.

Je sais que j'ai peu de temps, mais vous commenciez à vous engager dans une ligne de pensée. Vouliez-vous ajouter quelque chose à ce sujet?

Mme Caroline Farly:

Je pense que j'avais fait le tour de la question. Cependant, il y a toute une génération...

Je vais m'exprimer autrement.[Français]

L'idée ici est celle d'une continuité. Il y a à l'heure actuelle un manque de relève et il n'y a plus d'instructeurs. Même moi qui suis l'une des rares instructrices de classe 1 encore active et qui ai autant d'années d'expérience, j'ai besoin de soutien et d'un groupe de pairs, d'autres instructeurs de classe 1. Nous n'avons plus de modèles ni de soutien.

Il faut vraiment mettre en place un processus qui permette de conserver nos instructeurs et de faire de cette profession une vocation viable. En ce moment, la carrière d'instructeur est mal perçue parce que tout ce qui s'en dit, c'est qu'elle n'est pas bien rémunérée, ce qui est malheureusement vrai. Personne ne parle de la richesse de cette carrière et de l'expérience de voler avec autant de personnes différentes. Il faut vraiment se pencher sur toute cette question.[Traduction]

Je pense que c'était le principal point que je voulais souligner.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

Vous avez également évoqué les coûts d'exploitation d'une école de pilotage. Je me demande ce qu'il en est de l'autre côté du bilan: celui des revenus. D'où tirez-vous vos revenus?

Mme Caroline Farly:

Les envolées et les cours constituent les sources de revenus des écoles ou des services d'aviation. Nous donnons des cours théoriques qui nous procurent des revenus, mais nous avons aussi le bureau. Nous avons Internet; je ne m'attarderai pas à cette facette des activités, toutefois. Si nous ne donnons pas de cours théoriques et si les avions ne volent pas, nous n'avons pas de revenus. C'est aussi pourquoi les instructeurs...

Par exemple, nous avons tous vu le temps qu'il fait depuis novembre. Quand on travaille dans l'aviation, on ne considère pas la température de la même manière. Je ne sais pas si vous avez vu à quel point la température est peu propice aux vols. Cette situation se traduit par une baisse des revenus. Comment pouvons-nous offrir aux travailleurs autonomes un salaire stable sans la moindre garentie?

Nous disposons d'une bonne équipe d'instructeurs à l'heure actuelle. Comme nous sommes motivés par nos carrières, j'ai une excellente équipe, mais un instructeur quittera ses fonctions dans un an. Il veut rester, mais il est attiré par une autre entreprise. Il m'a promis qu'il ne serait parti qu'un an ou deux, car il veut rester dans la région. Il ne tient pas tant à piloter pour une compagnie aérienne, car il préfère rester dans la région, mais les salaires ne se comparent pas.

J'ai choisi d'être instructrice par amour du métier, mais aussi parce que j'ai un fils à la maison et que je voulais être sûre de rentrer chez moi le soir. Nous pouvons offrir divers incitatifs aux instructeurs, mais à l'heure actuelle, le salaire n'en fait malheureusement pas partie.

(1125)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

Me reste-t-il du temps?

La présidente:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

Mme Kelly Block:

D'accord.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Fuhr.

M. Stephen Fuhr (Kelowna—Lake Country, Lib.):

Merci à tous de témoigner. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Marc, comme vous avez manqué de temps, je veux vous donner l'occasion de terminer ce que vous vouliez dire. J'aurai ensuite une question.

M. Marc Vanderaegen:

Merci, monsieur Fuhr.

Il me restait à traiter des exigences médicales qu'il faut respecter quand on veut embaucher des pilotes ou des instructeurs. J'ai donné un petit exemple en parlant des daltoniens qui peuvent porter des lentilles correctrices pour rectifier le problème, comme nous le faisons avec des lentilles ordinaires pour corriger la vue. Cependant, les daltoniens ne sont toujours pas autorisés à voler de nuit et sont toujours contraints à avoir une radio et une zone de contrôle.

En ce qui concerne les exigences médicales, sachez aussi qu'un grand nombre de personnes d'expérience partent à la retraite actuellement. Bien entendu, quand on atteint un certain âge, il est plus difficile de satisfaire les exigences médicales. Si ces personnes travaillaient pour des lignes aériennes, elles pourraient continuer de donner de la formation sur des simulateurs, alors que nous ne pouvons pas recourir à elles afin d'inculquer les compétences exigées pour les permis dans les simulateurs de nos écoles de pilotage.

Qui d'autre que ces personnes qui partent à la retraite peut mieux former les étudiants en vue de leur carrière? Nous devons ajouter cette formation supplémentaire, et cela a un coût pour les étudiants, un coût qui s'ajoute à ce qu'ils paient déjà.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Merci de cette réponse.

Il est évident que nous avons besoin de plus d'étudiants. Nous devons éliminer les obstacles qui les empêchent de suivre une formation de pilotage. L'aspect financier fait évidemment partie de l'équation. C'est probablement l'obstacle le plus important à cet égard. Nous devons former les étudiants plus rapidement et embaucher plus d'instructeurs.

Pour ce qui est de former les étudiants plus rapidement, je me demande si vous pourriez me dire comment une formation axée sur les compétences pourrait accélérer le cycle de formation pour que les gens entrent plus rapidement sur le marché du travail. Caroline, avez-vous une opinion à ce sujet?

Mme Caroline Farly:

Pardonnez-moi, je dois vous demander de clarifier votre question.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Je parle de former les gens pour qu'ils soient compétents au lieu d'imposer un nombre d'heures pour une étape de la formation de pilotage. Ce n'est peut-être pas adéquat pour la formation pour débutants, mais ce le serait certainement pour une norme commerciale ou une norme de transport de ligne, une fois que le pilote est rendu aux étapes avancées du cycle de formation. Le système canadien exige essentiellement que les pilotes accomplissent un nombre donné d'heures et maîtrisent certaines compétences. Pensez-vous que si nous examinions la manière dont nous formons les gens, cela nous aiderait à les former plus rapidement une fois qu'ils sont inscrits?

La présidente:

Madame Farly, sentez-vous libre de vous exprimer comme bon vous semble.

Mme Caroline Farly:

D'accord. Merci.[Français]

Votre question est vraiment très intéressante et je vais vous donner mon point de vue. C'est déjà une approche que nous utilisons et je prends l'exemple de la formation de 45 heures requise pour être pilote privé. Il est bien rare qu'un candidat, même le plus talentueux, soit prêt après seulement 35 heures. Eny rajoutant des exercices, on arrive rapidement et de façon efficace à la fin de la période de formation de 45 heures. De plus, on ne peut pas passer à un autre exercice en vol sans avoir vraiment bien maîtrisé le précédent.[Traduction]

Je suis désolée, j'ai de la difficulté à répondre à cette question.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

D'accord. Je m'adresserai donc à Mike.

Mme Caroline Farly:

Oui, merci.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Avez-vous une opinion à ce sujet?

Capt Mike Hoff:

Oui. Je pense que cela fait partie de l'équation. Une partie des exigences sont désuètes, mais je pense qu'il faut prendre soin de ne pas réduire les exigences dans le cadre du processus afin de résoudre ce qu'on perçoit comme un problème. Il faut maintenir la norme, mais il existe des solutions.

Mon fils occupe le siège droit d'un appareil Dash 8 Q400, volant en cercle dans mon avion la nuit, car il doit cocher une case dans le formulaire de Transports Canada. Je ne pense pas vraiment que cela en fera un meilleur pilote, mais la case doit être cochée.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

En effet. Je suis d'accord avec vous: il faut maintenir la norme dans l'ensemble du processus. Selon moi et d'après mon expérience, ce ne serait certainement pas applicable à toutes les étapes de la formation de pilotage, mais je pense que cela pourrait accélérer le processus aux étapes où il serait sensé d'agir ainsi.

Marc, avez-vous une opinion à ce sujet?

(1130)

M. Marc Vanderaegen:

Oui. Je partage l'avis de M. Hoff: il faut veiller à maintenir la norme.

Nous utilisons une combinaison de formation axée sur les compétences et sur des scénarios, mais il faut quand même se conformer aux normes. Nous évaluons certains étudiants aux trois quarts de la formation. Ce serait plus que suffisant pour effectuer des vols commerciaux, mais nous devons accomplir encore 40 ou 50 heures avec eux. Ce sont des étudiants avec lesquels nous effectuons des manoeuvres avancées, donc ça va. Ici encore, ce serait une méthode qui permettrait de réduire les coûts pour ces étudiants. Par contre, il y aura probablement des étudiants pour lesquels il faudra dépasser les limites actuelles. Je suppose qu'il faut trouver un juste équilibre.

Je pense que les observations des compagnies aériennes... Il existe un imposant comité consultatif en matière de programmes. Si les gens offraient le même accès que nous fournissons à l'école, où nous ouvrons les livres et faisons état du rendement de chacun, je pense que cela contribuerait à maintenir les normes.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Merci beaucoup.

Je pense que mon temps est écoulé.

La présidente:

Il l'est, en effet.

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je souhaite faire un bref commentaire avant de poser mes questions. Au tout début de la réunion, durant les présentations préliminaires, les interprètes nous ont signalé qu'ils n'avaient pas reçu les textes, ce qui compliquait leur travail. Je me demandais si nous ne pourrions pas faire un effort pour les prochaines réunions et nous assurer que les interprètes aient les textes avant que la séance ne commence.

Bonjour, mesdames et messieurs. Je vous remercie d'être parmi nous ce matin.

Vos témoignages sont très éclairants. Depuis que nous avons commencé notre étude, il me semble que la situation est complexe, mais relativement simple à résumer. Nous avons deux problèmes: comment attirer de nouveaux pilotes et comment les conserver, peu importe qu'ils soient professionnels ou instructeurs.

Nous parlons de la situation au Canada, mais le marché du pilotage est mondial. Comme il y a pénurie de pilotes, j'imagine que chacun d'entre eux a le beau jeu pour lorsque vient le temps de trouver la compagnie qui va lui offrir les meilleures conditions de travail.

Il y a environ un an et demi, nous avons mené une très grosse étude sur la sécurité aérienne. Il y avait été entre autres abondamment question des heures de vol imposées aux pilotes canadiens.

Mes premières questions s'adressent donc à vous, capitaine Hoff. Tout d'abord, est-ce que le nombre d'heures de vol imposées aux pilotes canadiens peut désavantager l'industrie canadienne et pousser nos pilotes à aller travailler à l'étranger dans de meilleures conditions? De plus, est-ce la nouvelle réglementation qui a été déposée par le ministre et par Transports Canada vous satisfait à cet effet? [Traduction]

Capt Mike Hoff:

Désolé, le volume a diminué, mais je pense que vous demandiez si les heures de vol sont adéquates et si le Canada était désavantagé à l'échelle internationale. Faites-vous référence aux heures de vol annuelles ou aux heures nécessaires à l'obtention d'un permis? [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Ma question est de savoir si le nombre d'heures a un rôle à jouer.

Est-ce que le nombre d'heures de vol qu'un pilote canadien doit effectuer par rapport à ce qui est exigé d'un pilote étranger peut influencer notre capacité à conserver nos pilotes au Canada? [Traduction]

Capt Mike Hoff:

Je pense que les heures de vol exigées aux fins de qualification correspondent à celles des pays membres de l'Organisation de l'aviation civile internationale. En fait, nous bénéficions d'un avantage par rapport au système des États-Unis où, en raison de... [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Si je peux me permettre, je ne parle pas des heures de formation, mais bien des heures de vol. [Traduction]

Capt Mike Hoff:

Je pense que nos pratiques correspondent assez bien à celles des pays membres de l'OACI. Je n'observe aucune disparité qui nous désavantagerait ou nous avantagerait. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je passe à une autre question. Dans vos propos préliminaires, vous avez rapidement fait mention de problèmes avec l'Agence du revenu du Canada qui auraient duré trois ans. Il me semble qu'il s'agit là d'une situation qui relève tout à fait du Parlement fédéral. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer les problèmes que vous avez eus avec l'Agence, pour que nous puissions déterminer les mesures qui pourraient faciliter la rétention des élèves? [Traduction]

Capt Mike Hoff:

Je suis vraiment content que vous me posiez cette question.

En fait, Marc et moi avons été au collège ensemble. Cet établissement n'existe malheureusement plus.

Un des gros problèmes que j'ai rencontrés, c'est le manque d'uniformité de la formation de pilotage au pays. L'Ontario et le Québec offrent des programmes de formation fort exhaustifs et intégrés verticalement, alors que dans l'Ouest, c'est vraiment devenu n'importe quoi. Certains collèges sont associés à une école de pilotage, mais les établissements n'ont aucune idée de ce qui se passe à l'aéroport. Ils ont constitué un ensemble de cours économiques donnant droit à ce qu'ils appellent un diplôme d'aviation d'affaires. Mais ce ne sont pas les instructeurs du collège qui sont à l'aéroport. Les établissements ne savent pas vraiment comment se déroule le programme, et quelque chose de magique se passe là.

Certaines écoles constituent d'excellents exemples de la manière dont il faut procéder adéquatement; l'ennui, c'est qu'il n'y a pas de continuité. C'était très intéressant de comparer les ressources offertes pour concrétiser le rêve de mon fils cadet, qui est ingénieur, avec celles dont pouvait se prévaloir mon fils aîné pour devenir pilote.

(1135)

[Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à Mme Farly.

Il est beaucoup question du coût de la formation d'un étudiant. C'est un sujet délicat et complexe parce que l'éducation relève aussi des compétences provinciales et que le gouvernement fédéral ne peut pas agir seul. Cependant, vous me disiez avoir acheté une entreprise dans laquelle vous travailliez déjà. Le gouvernement fédéral pourrait-il instaurer des mesures qui favoriseraient le transfert d'entreprises, permettant ainsi à une école de pilotage de trouver rapidement preneur au lieu de fermer?

Mme Caroline Farly:

C'est une excellente question. Dans les faits, j'ai pu bénéficier de programmes de soutien en région aux jeunes entrepreneurs de moins de 35 ans. La Société d'aide au développement des collectivités et le Centre local de développement m'ont grandement aidé à racheter cette entreprise, et ces mesures sont de celles auxquelles vous pensez.

À l'heure actuelle, les écoles de pilotage sont rachetées par des personnes qui ont la passion de l'aviation, mais qui ne sont pas nécessairement des instructeurs de vol. Au Québec, je ne connais aucune école qui ait fait faillite ou qui ait fermé, ce qui prouve que la transition a lieu. Pour le reste du Canada, par contre, je n'en sais rien. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous accordons la parole à M. Graham pour six minutes. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vais commencer en m'adressant à vous, madame Farly.

Dans votre conclusion, vous avez parlé du problème de disponibilité des examinateurs. Pouvez-vous m'en dire plus à ce sujet? Quel est le délai actuel pour les candidats à l'examen? Dans mon cas, cela ne m'a pris que quelques jours avant de passer l'examen. Combien de temps cela prend-il maintenant à un candidat avant de pouvoir passer l'examen, de recevoir ses résultats et de pouvoir exercer ses nouvelles fonctions, muni de son nouveau permis?

Mme Caroline Farly:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

Actuellement, il faut environ une semaine avant de pouvoir passer son examen de pilote privé ou de pilote commercial. Quand l'instructeur sent que l'élève est prêt, il peut appeler et programmer l'examen assez rapidement. Par ailleurs, cet examen de vol peut être annulé à cause de la météo, mais il est facile de le reprogrammer pour le lendemain, la fin de semaine ou la semaine suivante, le cas échéant.

Par contre, pour un examen en vol d'instructeur de vol, il faut prévoir au moins deux mois, sans possibilité d'un rendez-vous définitif puisque, pour l'instant, les examinateurs doivent être pilotes de ligne et ont donc d'autres obligations professionnelles. Étant donné que la formation d'un instructeur dure trois mois quand il la suit à temps plein, comme c'est généralement le cas chez nous, il est difficile de déterminer dès le début de la formation une date précise pour l'examen final, puisqu'il faut un préavis de deux mois, qui se répète si l'examen doit être reporté. Cela crée donc des délais importants. En parallèle, je connais présentement des instructeurs de classe 1 qui sont sur le terrain à titre d'examinateurs de vol et qui voudraient bien être examinateurs d'instructeurs de vol pour Transports Canada, mais qui essuient un refus parce qu'ils ne sont pas pilotes de ligne.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les examens théoriques sont-ils à jour? Sont-ils en phase avec les connaissances actuelles?

Mme Caroline Farly:

C'est une préoccupation que nous avons présentement sur le terrain. Les processus de révision ou de contestation des examens théoriques sont soit désuets soit inexistants. Nous sommes plusieurs instructeurs sur le terrain à être préoccupés par les sujets abordés dans les examens. Évidemment, leur contenu n'est pas dévoilé.

Je vous donne un exemple pour que vous ayez une idée de la situation. Je suis une agente autorisée pour Transports Canada et je suis affectée à la surveillance des examens. Mes empreintes digitales ont été prises par la GRC. J'ai un dossier. Je sais que je serai criminellement responsable si jamais il se passe quelque chose, mais j'aimerais que Transports Canada m'invite à participer à un comité chargé de réviser les examens. Nous sommes plusieurs sur le terrain à être préoccupés par les sujets considérés pour la mise à jour des examens théoriques. Certains élèves sont découragés, tant du côté privé que du côté commercial, ne serait-ce que parce que certains sujets ne reflètent plus la pratique et les normes actuelles.

(1140)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Au début de votre présentation, vous avez parlé de la pénurie de pilotes qui souhaitent devenir instructeurs Auparavant, beaucoup des pilotes voulaient uniquement accumuler des heures.

Est-ce que beaucoup de pilotes voudraient devenir instructeurs, mais ne le font pas parce que ce n'est pas viable économiquement?

Mme Caroline Farly:

J'en connaissais beaucoup il y a 25 ans et j'en connais beaucoup aujourd'hui. Chez moi, les pilotes qui deviennent instructeurs le font parce qu'ils le veulent et le peuvent. Ce sont des retraités qui travaillent à temps partiel. Cela fait partie de la réalité. Nous faisons affaire avec des instructeurs à temps partiel, ce qui demande toute une gestion de notre part. Par exemple, un de mes instructeurs fait ce travail et occupe un autre emploi parce qu'il veut voir sa conjointe le soir. Un autre, qui est un jeune pilote, sera instructeur l'année prochaine. Il a entamé le processus qui lui permettra de devenir instructeur. Il veut rester dans la région et travailler avec son père. Dans son cas, ce ne sera pas un emploi à temps plein. On parle ici de gens qui veulent être instructeurs et qui sont en mesure d'arriver financièrement en occupant un deuxième emploi. Tout cela complexifie la gestion et la stabilité. Il est difficile d'assurer que nos élèves cheminent avec le même instructeur alors que nous gérons une équipe d'instructeurs à temps partiel.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si un instructeur qui finit sa formation et dont les connaissances sont à jour trouve un autre emploi, y a-t-il moyen de le garder en l'employant à temps partiel comme instructeur, mais en lui offrant un plus grand nombre d'heures?

Mme Caroline Farly:

J'aimerais beaucoup pouvoir offrir un incitatif autre que la motivation. C'est le sentiment d'appartenance à une école et à une certaine culture, et non une motivation financière, qui peut les inciter à exercer le métier d'instructeur. Je ne crois pas que nos écoles soient en mesure de répondre à leurs attentes. Les salaires ne sont vraiment pas comparables. Pour l'instant, seuls la motivation et l'amour du métier d'instructeur peuvent les inciter à continuer à exercer celui-ci.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En réponse aux questions de M. Aubin, vous avez évoqué la contribution de la SADC et du CLD. Pouvez-vous nous parler davantage du programme vous a permis d'acheter l'école de pilotage?

Mme Caroline Farly:

Dans le cadre du projet, j'ai présenté un plan d'action. J'ai pu bénéficier d'une bourse pour les jeunes entrepreneurs. Il serait intéressant de s'inspirer de ce programme pour les instructeurs. Je ne me souviens malheureusement plus du nom du programme, mais la subvention permettait aux entrepreneurs de recevoir un salaire pendant la première année de l'entreprise. Celle-ci pouvait garder plus d'argent dans son fonds de roulement. C'était comme des prestations d'assurance-emploi sans en être vraiment. Cela m'a permis d'allouer des fonds et des revenus au démarrage ou du moins au roulement de la compagnie. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Rogers, vous avez la parole.

M. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente. Je remercie les témoins de comparaître aujourd'hui.

Je veux d'abord interroger Caroline.

Selon le rapport sur le marché du travail de mars 2018, les femmes représentent à peine 30 % des membres de l'industrie de l'aviation et 7 % des pilotes. À quoi attribuez-vous cette sous-représentation substantielle des femmes parmi les pilotes canadiens?

Est-elle parce que nous avons créé un fossé entre les sexes ou ciblé certaines personnes? Je sais qu'à une époque, les hommes étaient médecins et les femmes, infirmières. Nous avons la parité et l'égalité entre les sexes et toutes ces autres choses dont nous parlons, bien entendu, mais le problème est-il tel que les femmes et les groupes sous-représentés de la société, comme les groupes minoritaires, ne présentent pas de demande aux écoles de pilotage pour devenir pilotes? S'agit-il d'une des principales causes de la pénurie actuelle?

Mme Caroline Farly:

C'est une excellente question.

Je pense que nous avons tous l'image... Je suis désolée d'exprimer les choses ainsi, mais le capitaine Hoff incarne l'image du pilote que nous avons tous en tête. On ne voit pas beaucoup de femmes pilotes. Le fait est qu'on n'entend jamais de femmes annoncer que l'avion s'apprête à atterrir à Peterborough ou qu'il est prêt à atterrir. Les parents ne disent jamais aux jeunes filles qu'elles peuvent être pilotes de ligne. On ne leur présente pas cette possibilité. C'est quand elles sont plus âgées et qu'elles voient quelqu'un qu'elles ont l'occasion de voir les choses autrement.

À mon école, je pense que nous avons une certaine influence. J'influence les filles de mes pilotes. J'influence mes pilotes, qui disent qu'ils ont une fille et qu'ils pensent qu'elle devrait venir me rencontrer. À mon école, les femmes représentent bien plus de 7 % de pilotes, mais je pense qu'il y a une nouvelle génération et que de nombreuses initiatives s'adressent aux femmes dans l'aviation, comme Ninety-Nines et un grand nombre d'associations de femmes. Je pense que les pourcentages ne tarderont pas à augmenter.

Me permettez-vous d'ajouter autre chose, étant donné qu'on me demande de parler à de nombreuses femmes? Même si l'aviation est considérée comme un milieu d'homme, les femmes en font partie. Je n'ai jamais eu l'impression de faire l'objet de discrimination ou d'être une femme dans un groupe d'hommes. C'est une sororité, une fraternité, et il y a toujours de la place pour les femmes et pour tout le monde dans l'aviation. S'il est une chose qu'on apprend dans ce domaine, c'est qu'on ne peut pas être pilote si on n'a pas l'esprit d'équipe.

(1145)

M. Churence Rogers:

Merci de cette réponse. J'ai beaucoup voyagé en avion au cours de ma vie, et je pense que c'est l'an dernier que j'ai vu pour la première fois un vol où des femmes agissaient à titre de pilote et de copilote. C'était la première fois que je voyais cela.

Je veux poser mon autre question au capitaine Mike Hoff.

L'enseignement est une noble carrière. J'ai enseigné pendant 29 ans. J'adorais agir quotidiennement en interaction avec les élèves de niveau secondaire afin de leur inculquer des connaissances et de guider les jeunes alors qu'ils s'orientaient vers une variété de carrières et de domaines.

Dans votre association de pilotes, est-ce que la volonté d'agir à titre de mentor auprès des jeunes pilotes constitue une source d'inspiration dans le cadre de votre carrière?

Capt Mike Hoff:

Mais certainement. J'adorerais pouvoir participer au mentorat, une démarche à laquelle je crois fortement. J'ai connu une carrière formidable en raison des personnes altruistes qui me précédaient. Marc et moi avons eu la chance inouïe de fréquenter une école où travaillaient de nombreux pilotes de ligne et militaires retraités, ce qui nous a permis de bénéficier d'une excellente éducation.

Il est difficile de rendre au suivant dans le domaine de l'enseignement, car notre temps est limité et nous coûtons cher à nos compagnies. Si je vais enseigner ailleurs, j'ai moins de temps à offrir à mon employeur. Ce dernier est réfractaire à l'idée.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Rogers.

Nous entendrons maintenant Mme Leitch.

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch (Simcoe—Grey, PCC):

Je remercie les témoins de comparaître aujourd'hui. Mes questions s'adresseront à vous tous; sentez-vous donc libres d'y répondre.

Je pense que vous avez tous déploré le coût d'immobilisations élevé que les écoles de pilotage doivent de toute évidence assumer. Avez-vous eu l'occasion de proposer une bonification du Programme d'aide aux immobilisations aéroportuaires ou, à dire vrai, une modification de la déduction pour amortissement fiscal pour vos organisations? Nous évoquons fréquemment cette possibilité pour d'autres industries, mais avez-vous pu aborder le sujet avec le gouvernement en ce qui concerne vos écoles de pilotage et vos coûts indirects?

M. Marc Vanderaegen:

Je peux répondre brièvement à cette question.

Les programmes sont élaborés de telle sorte que l'aéroport ne peut se qualifier au chapitre des immobilisations relatives aux aéronefs parce qu'il est trop achalandé. Aucune initiative ne peut nous aider à cet égard. Même si l'aéroport pouvait se qualifier, il ne pourrait le faire en ce qui concerne l'équipement et les règles de...

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Ce que je dis, c'est qu'il y a peut-être une occasion pour vous à cet égard. Je vous encouragerais à plaider votre cause, en ce qui concerne notamment le matériel de simulation, dont les coûts sont élevés. Je suis chirurgienne. Nous utilisons constamment des simulateurs. Vous êtes comme les anesthésistes de mon domaine: vous décollez et atterrissez, et j'interviens entre les deux à titre de chirurgienne. Nous utilisons tout le temps des simulateurs, dont le coût d'immobilisations est substantiel.

J'ai une deuxième question concernant l'éducation des jeunes pilotes. De toute évidence, le Programme canadien de prêts aux étudiants et un programme de radiation de dette sont offerts pour les études de premier cycle et des cycles supérieurs. Est-ce que vous ou un important chef de file de l'industrie comme Air Canada et d'autres compagnies ont fait valoir que les jeunes pilotes et les pilotes en formation devraient pouvoir se prévaloir de ce programme, comme c'est le cas pour les métiers spécialisés?

Je vous laisse le soin de répondre à cette question.

(1150)

[Français]

Mme Caroline Farly:

Relativement aux prêts pour les étudiants, si notre école n'est pas reliée à un programme d'attestation d'études collégiales, nos élèves ne sont pas admissibles à ces programmes.

Les écoles privées, même si elles ne sont pas reliées à ces systèmes collégiaux, ont des niveaux de performance reconnus par Transports Canada et sont tout aussi qualifiées. Idéalement, ce serait vraiment toute une initiative du gouvernement de permettre à nos élèves aussi de s'inscrire à ces programmes.

Pour l'instant, ce qui est permis, ce sont des prêts étudiants, des ententes spécifiques avec des banques pour la formation professionnelle dispensée dans notre région.[Traduction]

Je peux toutefois dire que je sais qu'[Français] on remet des reçus pour les frais de scolarité aux fins de déductions d'impôt. Récemment, mes élèves m'ont dit que, dans la déclaration de revenus, on a sérieusement diminué le pourcentage admissible des frais de scolarité déductibles dans le domaine de l'aviation.

Ne connaissant pas trop ce domaine, je sais qu'il vaudrait la peine d'examiner cela de plus près. Beaucoup d'élèves reviennent me dire qu'une modification a été faite dans les crédits d'impôt pour les études commerciales et que ceux-ci ont foncièrement diminué. [Traduction]

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Je pourrais peut-être vous interroger tous à propos d'une des autres questions qui ont été soulevées, car elle a un certain lien avec ce que Mme Farly vient de dire.

Cela concerne les règlements qui régissent les écoles de simulation et qui précisent qui devrait être admissible. Cela pourrait aussi donner une occasion d'indiquer aux gouvernements fédéral ou provinciaux que tous les étudiants devraient être admissibles. Si un seul ensemble de règlements indique qui peut utiliser ces installations et s'il existe une seule norme, alors toutes les organisations devraient, à l'évidence, être admissibles pour que leurs étudiants bénéficient d'un soutien financier.

Monsieur Hoff, vous avez l'air de vouloir répondre.

Capt Mike Hoff:

Oui, j'aimerais intervenir.

Je voudrais tout d'abord remercier mes deux collègues pour le travail qu'ils accomplissent dans ces écoles. Ces dernières ont magistralement réussi à combler un besoin...

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Absolument

Capt Mike Hoff:

... qui n'était pas là, car il avait été abandonné.

Le genre d'école que Marc et moi avons fréquenté avait l'avantage d'avoir acheté le simulateur. Cela n'enlève rien aux entreprises qui doivent faire du profit; comme elles doivent payer le simulateur, elles doivent imposer des frais pour son temps d'utilisation. Quand Marc et moi étions à l'école, notre collège était fort réputé pour ses diplômés, car nous avions accès en tout temps, et gratuitement, aux simulateurs. Nous pouvions aller les utiliser. Un établissement privé ne peut faire de même.

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Je ne suis pas de cet avis. Un établissement privé peut le faire; c'est une question de choix. Je pense que le problème se situe là. Il incombe à l'industrie, selon moi, de tenter d'améliorer ses pratiques. Pour assurer l'excellence, nous devrions former les gens pour qu'ils soient excellents.

Cela étant dit, je poserais ma question à Mme Farly et Marc Vanderaegen.

Ces règlements constitueraient-ils plus un fardeau pour votre compagnie ou accroîtraient-ils votre capacité à recevoir du financement et du soutien supplémentaires pour vos étudiants et votre établissement?

M. Marc Vanderaegen:

Je suppose que je tente de comprendre de quels règlements vous parlez au sujet du potentiel. Faites-vous référence aux règlements qui seraient établis pour permettre...

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Je parle des normes d'éducation.

M. Marc Vanderaegen:

Des normes d'éducation de...?

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Vous exploitez une école de pilotage. C'est un établissement d'enseignement.

M. Marc Vanderaegen:

Cela dépend de la façon dont c'est déployé, je pense bien, et de ce que la réglementation prévoit en fait.

En ce moment, en matière d'éducation, nous avons déjà les normes de Transports Canada. C'est donc du chevauchement tout simplement, comme c'est le cas avec le ministère de l'Éducation de la Colombie-Britannique, qui essaie de nous gérer également. Cela devient fastidieux, et cela n'aide pas vraiment les étudiants.

Non. Si les étudiants en tirent parti et que c'est gérable, c'est bon. N'oubliez pas que ce sont les étudiants qui vont payer les coûts, sauf s'il y a d'autres options de financement.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

C'est au tour de M. Badawey.

(1155)

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'ai une question pour M. Hoff concernant l'industrie et le partenariat qu'elle a peut-être avec l'Association des pilotes d'Air Canada, et en particulier avec Air Canada elle-même.

Dans mon ancienne vie, nous encouragions vraiment l'industrie, en partenariat avec les syndicats, les collectivités, les écoles secondaires et postsecondaires et ainsi de suite, à amener les jeunes à s'intéresser très tôt à divers métiers, diverses disciplines, et en plus à collaborer pour lancer le processus des coops, des formations en apprentissage, etc. Les jeunes allaient ensuite au postsecondaire dans ces disciplines, et se retrouvaient dans le domaine de compétence qu'ils souhaitaient.

Est-ce qu'il y a un tel partenariat entre l'Association et Air Canada, dans votre cas, afin d'amener les jeunes du secondaire à s'intéresser à cela et à se concentrer là-dessus pendant le reste du secondaire et pendant leurs études postsecondaires? Vous avez les programmes des cadets de l'air. Vous avez d'autres organisations qui sont intéressées. Est-ce qu'il y a un partenariat entre vous et Air Canada?

Capt Mike Hoff:

Je vais commencer par vous parler de l'élément qui touche mon employeur. J'ai approché mon employeur. Cet employeur est le prédateur supérieur. Il estime ne pas avoir de difficulté à trouver des pilotes. Il n'y a pas beaucoup d'intérêt de son côté. Personnellement, il me donne accès au simulateur et me permet d'emmener dans mon propre avion des personnes qui envisagent une carrière de pilote. Je les emmène aussi dans le simulateur. Je remercie Air Canada de me donner l'occasion d'utiliser ses simulateurs, mais c'est là que cela s'arrête.

Pour ce qui est de l'altruisme, parce que je sens le besoin de redonner, mon association est très réceptive. Les gens demandent pourquoi l'Association utilise les frais d'adhésion pour retenir les services de défenseurs et pour mener des études visant à recueillir des données. Les données n'étaient pas là. Je suis un pilote. J'ai besoin de données. Je ne peux venir ici et vous dire simplement que j'ai entendu dire ceci ou cela. Nous avons mené une étude. Nous avons approfondi les choses afin d'obtenir des données et nous essayons d'aider.

M. Vance Badawey:

Vous semblez faire très attention à ce que vous dîtes. J'aurai une petite discussion hors-ligne avec vous, après la réunion, au sujet…

Capt Mike Hoff:

Je vous en sais gré.

M. Vance Badawey:

… des choses que vous dîtes avec grande prudence.

Sur ce, je vais laisser la parole à M. Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci.

Bonjour. Je vous remercie de votre présence.

Madame Farly, je vous félicite pour le courage que vous avez eu de reprendre une entreprise qui était au bord de la faillite. En fait, je ne voulais pas dire qu'elle était au bord de la faillite, mais plutôt au bord de la fermeture. Excusez-moi.

Mme Caroline Farly:

D'accord.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Disons que vous l'avez sauvée de la faillite.

Mme Caroline Farly:

Je l'ai sauvée de la fermeture.

M. Angelo Iacono:

C'est exact.

Pouvez-vous nous décrire un peu les difficultés auxquelles vous avez fait face ou auxquelles vous continuez de faire face? Quelles sont les répercussions économiques pour les écoles d'aviation dans les régions?

Mme Caroline Farly:

Excusez-moi, parlez-vous des difficultés que j'ai dû surmonter pour remettre l'entreprise sur pied?

M. Angelo Iacono:

Oui, ainsi que celles auxquelles vous continuez de faire face.

Mme Caroline Farly:

Ouf! Il s'agit d'une grosse conversation.

La plus grande difficulté qui se pose en ce qui a trait à la relève pour cette école de pilotage est de trouver des instructeurs. Je ne parle pas d'instructeurs qui veulent juste faire quelques heures — de toute façon, cela n'existe plus —, mais d'instructeurs qui peuvent donner de la formation de grande qualité, à la hauteur de la réputation de l'école, et qui resteront chez nous. C'est notre plus grande difficulté, quand nous essayons d'assurer une pérennité.

Une autre difficulté que j'ai eue a été de gérer la demande. Juste en étant une ressource stable dans l'aviation, sans les nommer, je peux dire que cinq endroits voudraient que je mette sur pied une école de pilotage dans leur région. En ce moment, une de mes difficultés est de gérer mon école de pilotage, d'assurer sa stabilité et de la maintenir au niveau auquel son fondateur l'a toujours maintenue. J'y suis depuis 2010.

Il y a un besoin criant partout dans les régions pour des instructeurs de pilotage de bimoteurs — j'en parlais d'ailleurs à M. Vanderaegen. On forme partout des pilotes commerciaux et la demande pour ces pilotes va en augmentant, mais il n'y a plus de bimoteurs pour former des pilotes, étant donné le coût exorbitant de ces avions. Actuellement, le temps d'attente pour suivre une formation en pilotage de bimoteur est de deux à trois mois.

Si je laissais la compagnie aller, en dépit des frais de l'école qui ne cessent d'augmenter, j'irais m'acheter un avion de plus, j'irais m'acheter un bimoteur de plus, mais je ne peux pas me permettre d'augmenter le coût de la formation. Il faut que la formation reste accessible. J'essaie de payer mes instructeurs plus cher. J'aimerais offrir plus de formation en achetant un bimoteur et plus d'avions, mais j'ai des élèves qui ont de la misère à s'inscrire à mon école de pilotage parce que cela coûte cher. Il n'y a pas de programme de subventions.

La difficulté est d'ordre financier. J'essaie de garder des plafonds acceptables des deux côtés et de ne pas avoir des coûts d'exploitation trop élevés. Je veux protéger l'accessibilité de l'aviation pour mes pilotes.

(1200)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, mais nous n'avons plus de temps.

Merci beaucoup à tous nos témoins d'être venus aujourd'hui.

Nous allons nous arrêter un petit moment pour permettre au nouveau groupe de témoins de s'installer.

(1200)

(1205)

La présidente:

Bienvenue aux témoins qui participent à cette partie de la réunion. Par vidéo-conférence, nous avons Mme Bell, présidente du conseil d'administration du British Columbia Aviation Council. Nous accueillons Joseph Armstrong, vice-président et directeur général de CAE. Nous avons également la directrice générale de Super T Aviation, Terri Super, et le directeur général de Go Green Aviation, Gary Ogden. Bienvenue à vous tous.

Je vais vous demander de limiter vos exposés à cinq minutes, car les membres du Comité ont toujours de très nombreuses questions.

Nous allons commencer par Mme Bell, du British Columbia Aviation Council.

Mme Heather Bell (présidente du conseil d'administration, British Columbia Aviation Council):

Bonjour. Je tiens à remercier le Comité de me donner l'occasion de prendre la parole aujourd'hui, et je le remercie également de ses efforts pour résoudre cette question cruciale.

Je vous parle aujourd'hui en tant que présidente du conseil d'administration du British Columbia Aviation Council, organisme qui représente les intérêts du milieu de l'aviation en Colombie-Britannique. Personnellement, j'ai passé mes 36 ans de carrière à faire du contrôle de la circulation aérienne. J'ai travaillé comme contrôleuse à la tour et comme contrôleuse radar. Quand j'ai pris ma retraite de NAV Canada, j'étais la directrice générale de la région d'information de vol de Vancouver. J'étais responsable de tous les services de navigation aérienne de la province, ainsi que du groupe de plus de 500 employés chargés d'assurer ce service.

Je sais que le Comité a eu l'occasion d'entendre de nombreux professionnels respectés de l'industrie. C'est pourquoi je suis convaincue que vous êtes au courant de la grave pénurie de ressources que nous connaissons et que nous allons continuer de connaître dans l'industrie. Ces pénuries vont toucher notre industrie dans toutes ses facettes et vont comprendre, entre autres, les exploitants d'aéroports, les contrôleurs aériens, les techniciens d'entretien d'aéronefs et les pilotes.

Étant donné que la motion visant l'étude du Comité porte précisément sur les pilotes, je vais parler en particulier de la pénurie de pilotes et des difficultés relatives à la formation en vol. Cependant, je trouve important de souligner que la pénurie de pilotes, même si elle est critique, n'a rien de singulier. Le problème n'étant pas limité au groupe des pilotes, la solution n'est pas simple ou singulière non plus. Je sais que de nombreuses recommandations ont été soumises au Comité, et j'aimerais préciser que le BCAC appuie les quatre recommandations suivantes:

La première est d'améliorer et de rendre constant l'accès aux prêts étudiants pour la formation au pilotage. En ce moment, l'accès aux prêts étudiants pour la formation au pilotage varie d'une province à l'autre. Contrairement à d'autres provinces, le financement des prêts en Colombie-Britannique se fonde sur la durée de la formation plutôt que sur le coût de la formation. Comme on l'a indiqué au Comité, le coût de la formation au pilotage permettant l'obtention de la qualification IFR multimoteurs va dépasser les 75 000 $, ce qui est nettement plus que les frais de scolarité et le coût des manuels pour l'obtention d'un baccalauréat de quatre ans. Par conséquent, la mesure qui aurait le plus d'effet entre toutes serait la création d'un programme national de prêts étudiants appuyé par le gouvernement fédéral et offrant un degré de financement correspondant au coût de la formation au pilotage.

La deuxième est l'adoption d'initiatives permettant de recruter et de garder plus d'instructeurs de vol. Avant la pénurie de ressources, les écoles de pilotage et les exploitants aériens du Nord pouvaient compter sur les nouveaux pilotes qui accumulaient des heures de vol et de l'expérience en se qualifiant et en travaillant comme instructeurs de vol. Ils pouvaient aussi accepter des postes auprès d'exploitants qui desservaient les collectivités nordiques éloignées. Maintenant, nos unités de formation au pilotage et nos exploitants aériens du Nord ont de la difficulté à recruter et à conserver des employés. En plus de la conception d'un programme national de prêts étudiants, nous recommandons une matrice de radiation des dettes fondée sur le temps consacré à travailler comme instructeur de vol ou à piloter des avions desservant des régions éloignées désignées. En guise d'exemple, nous voyons des programmes semblables pour le personnel médical qui travaille dans des collectivités éloignées.

La troisième est l'appui à l'innovation en matière d'instruction. Les exigences réglementaires visant l'aviation peuvent constituer un frein à l'innovation et à la formation. Nous devons repenser la manière de donner la formation et le choix des instructeurs. L'aviation est un environnement extrêmement complexe. Il est donc intéressant que pour la formation au vol, nous ayons l'un des seuls systèmes, sinon le seul système où nous demandons à nos aviateurs les moins expérimentés de veiller à la formation de nos nouveaux aviateurs. Nous ne demandons pas à des étudiants en médecine de première année de veiller à la formation des nouveaux médecins, et nous ne demandons pas à des élèves du secondaire de former les générations suivantes d'enseignants. Pourtant, c'est ce que nous faisons avec les pilotes au début de leur carrière. Je ne dis pas que ce n'est pas sécuritaire et je ne dis pas que le produit est mauvais. Au contraire. Cependant, est-ce la meilleure manière?

L'ATAC, l'Association du transport aérien du Canada, a recommandé le modèle d’Organismes de formation agréés, ce qui permettrait de modifier, de simplifier et d'améliorer la formation tout en respectant les exigences réglementaires. Le BCAC appuie fermement cette initiative.

La quatrième est l'appui aux initiatives visant à supprimer les obstacles à l'entrée pour les femmes et les membres des peuples autochtones. Les femmes et les Autochtones continuent d'être sous-représentés dans cette industrie. Les femmes forment 50 % de notre population, et les jeunes Autochtones forment le groupe démographique qui connaît la plus forte croissance au Canada. Il serait donc avantageux à bien des égards de porter une attention particulière à ces groupes. Nous croyons fermement qu'il faut continuer de soutenir l'établissement de programmes de mobilisation pour les femmes comme Elevate Aviation.

Pour stimuler les membres des peuples autochtones, je crois qu'il faut un effort concerté pour présenter des programmes d'introduction et d'éducation adaptés à la culture dans les collectivités autochtones. J'ai cofondé un programme appelé Give them Wings, dont le but est de présenter à de jeunes Autochtones les carrières en aviation, l'accent étant mis sur les pilotes. Notre premier événement aura lieu en mars à l'aéroport de Boundary Bay. À cette occasion, nous établirons des liens avec les collectivités de Musqueam, de Tsawwassen et de Tsleil-Waututh. Avec de l'aide, nous espérons étendre la portée de cette initiative à toute la province et au-delà.

Dans le monde développé, on en est venu à tenir le transport par avion pour acquis.

(1210)



Les conséquences sociales et économiques d'une pénurie de pilotes seront au mieux agaçantes. Il serait agaçant que vos vacances soient gâchées par l'annulation de votre vol Vancouver-Penticton, ou l'inverse, faute de pilote, ce qui vous ferait manquer votre vol à destination de Rome, puis votre croisière.

(1215)

La présidente:

Je vais vous demander de conclure, madame Bell.

Mme Heather Bell:

Au pire, les conséquences seront dévastatrices, par exemple, s'il n'y a pas de pilote pour transporter votre enfant gravement malade et que l'impensable se produit.

Je remercie le Comité, et je serai ravie de répondre à toutes vos questions et de vous offrir notre aide.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant écouter M. Armstrong, de CAE.

M. Joseph Armstrong (vice-président et directeur général, CAE):

Bonjour, madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité. C'est pour moi un honneur d'être ici aujourd'hui, au nom de CAE, pour vous présenter nos points de vue sur la formation au pilotage au Canada et à l'étranger.

Je vais vous donner une brève leçon d'histoire. En 1939, avec ses alliés, le Canada établissait le Plan d'entraînement aérien du Commonwealth britannique, ou PEACB. Dans des collectivités de tous les coins du Canada, on a formé dans le cadre du PEACB plus de 130 000 membres d'équipage, hommes et femmes, sur une période de six ans. On estime aujourd'hui que c'est l'une des grandes contributions du Canada à la victoire des Alliés. Aujourd'hui, notre histoire en matière de formation au pilotage et notre robuste secteur aérospatial font partie de nos plus importants atouts nationaux. Les divers gouvernements qui se sont succédé ont donné la formation au pilotage comme étant une capacité industrielle clé.

S'appuyant sur l'héritage laissé par le PEACB, CAE a été fondée en 1947 par M. Ken Patrick, un ancien officier de l'Aviation royale canadienne qui voulait créer quelque chose de canadien et tirer parti d'une équipe formée à la guerre qui était extrêmement novatrice et fortement axée sur la technologie.

Revenons au présent. Nous sommes maintenant le chef de file mondial de la formation dans les domaines de l'aviation civile, de la défense et des soins de santé. Avec plus de 65 établissements de formation, nous avons le plus vaste réseau de formation en aviation civile dans le monde. Chaque année, nous formons plus de 220 000 professionnels pour l'aviation civile et la défense, y compris plus de 135 000 pilotes. La plupart des gens ne s'en rendent pas compte, mais où que vous alliez, il y a fort à parier que les pilotes ont été formés par CAE dans un simulateur que nous avons construit ici même au Canada ou dans un centre de formation situé ailleurs dans le monde.

Même si le nombre de pilotes que nous formons chaque année est impressionnant, il est loin de suffire aux besoins actuels et futurs. En 2018, nous avons publié le rapport Perspectives sur la demande de pilotes de ligne. Selon notre analyse, la population active combinée des pilotes de ligne et des pilotes de jet d’affaires dépassera un demi-million de pilotes d’ici 2028, et 300 000 de ces pilotes seront de nouveaux pilotes. De nombreux pilotes militaires choisissent une carrière dans le secteur commercial. Certains des facteurs déterminants sont la qualité de vie ainsi qu'un salaire plus élevé et de meilleures possibilités. L'attrition chez les pilotes militaires produit également un effet important sur les forces aériennes professionnelles, car cela réduit leurs capacités de maintenir une équipe de pilotes répondant aux besoins opérationnels ainsi que leur capacité de produire des instructeurs de vol qualifiés à l'appui de leurs volets d'instruction. Nous voyons l'effet que cela produit aujourd'hui sur les programmes d'instruction militaire que nous offrons ici même au Canada.

Dans ce contexte, il est plus important que jamais de maximiser le bassin de talents potentiels. Aujourd'hui, les femmes ne représentent que 5 % des pilotes professionnels et cadets à l'échelle du monde. S'attaquer aux inégalités entre les sexes corrigerait ce déséquilibre tout en donnant au milieu de l'aviation l'accès à un bassin de talents presque deux fois plus important.

Selon une enquête que nous avons menée récemment sur les élèves en aviation et les cadets, au Canada et à l'étranger, certains enjeux ont constamment été évoqués, entre autres le lourd fardeau financier à porter pour s'inscrire à la formation au pilotage, ainsi que l'absence de certitude quant à la carrière malgré cet investissement. Les femmes en particulier ont soulevé des préoccupations concernant leur capacité de s'intégrer dans un univers dominé par les hommes et d'atteindre un bon équilibre travail-famille. La rareté des modèles féminins dans l'aviation n'apaise pas leurs préoccupations.

Devant une telle pénurie, notre industrie cherche des solutions qui lui permettront de produire plus rapidement un plus grand nombre de pilotes. À cette fin, nous allons établir de nouveaux types de partenariats entre les exploitants de flotte et les fournisseurs de formation de sorte qu'il y ait de meilleurs liens entre les écoles de pilotage et les compagnies aériennes qui accueilleront au bout du compte ces étudiants. De nouveaux systèmes de formation qui font un meilleur usage des données et des analyses en temps réel facilitent la progression vers la formation axée sur les compétences. Nous profitons de l'IA et de l'analyse des mégadonnées.

La présidente:

Je suis désolée de vous interrompre, mais je vais vous demander de ralentir un peu. Je comprends que vous n'ayez que cinq minutes, mais les interprètes doivent…

M. Joseph Armstrong:

Oui. Pas de problème.

Je vais modérer mes transports. Il y a beaucoup d'information.

La présidente:

Merci.

M. Joseph Armstrong:

L'été dernier, de concert avec le gouvernement du Canada et le gouvernement du Québec, CAE a annoncé un projet de transformation numérique visant à développer la prochaine génération de solutions de formation. Nous investirons 1 milliard de dollars en innovation sur les cinq prochaines années, ce qui représente l'un des plus importants investissements de ce genre dans le secteur de la formation au pilotage à l'échelle mondiale.

Outre la technologie et l'amélioration de la formation, le véritable enjeu est d'attirer les étudiants et d'améliorer la diversité afin d'augmenter le bassin de talents pour l'aviation civile. Par exemple, grâce au programme de bourses Women in Flight lancé récemment par CAE, nous allons accorder un maximum de cinq bourses complètes à des femmes qu'une carrière comme pilote professionnelle passionne et qui souhaitent devenir des modèles.

Il faut des incitatifs afin de stimuler la production de pilotes pour le marché civil et le marché militaire, ainsi que pour compenser les coûts élevés associés aux frais de scolarité, aux investissements dans l'infrastructure et à la nécessité de faire évoluer la technologie de manière à optimiser la formation. Il faut que les investissements soient axés sur des aspects comme les bourses d'études à mettre en place à l'appui de la formation de pilotes au Canada, pour les étudiants et les cadets; l'infrastructure requise à l'appui d'une meilleure capacité de formation au pilotage; l'engagement à l'égard de la formation et de la simulation comme capacités industrielles clés; et l'IA et la formation axée sur les compétences.

Nous encourageons le Canada à augmenter le financement et à soutenir directement la formation au pilotage, puisqu'il s'agit d'un élément unique de notre héritage qu'il faut maintenir comme moteur économique clé de la croissance au Canada et à l'étranger, et comme domaine d'intérêt clé pour les jeunes Canadiens qui pourraient devenir membres du milieu mondial de l'aéronautique.

Merci beaucoup.

(1220)

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Armstrong.

C'est maintenant à Mme Super, de Super T Aviation.

Mme Terri Super (directrice générale, Super T Aviation):

Madame la présidente, c'est avec grand plaisir que je présente au Comité les préoccupations et les défis des écoles de pilotage au Canada. En tant que pilote en chef de Super T Aviation à Medecine Hat, en Alberta, j'ai accumulé plus de 13 000 heures de vol régulier et nolisé, d'évacuation médicale et de formation. J'ai remis au Comité un mémoire qui expose nos recommandations, mais j'aimerais souligner trois catégories que j'aimerais qu'il prenne en considération: l'aide aux étudiants, le maintien en poste des instructeurs et l'aide pour les écoles de pilotage.

Pour suivre la formation requise en vue de devenir pilote professionnel, un étudiant doit débourser entre 75 000 et 85 000 $, ce qui ne tient pas compte de ses frais de subsistance. Le manque ou l'absence de financement est souvent la raison pour laquelle les étudiants décrochent ou ne peuvent pas envisager une carrière en aviation. Nous demandons donc une hausse du financement et de l'aide provenant du gouvernement pour l'entraînement au vol. Les étudiants pourront ainsi obtenir du financement auprès du gouvernement ou dans le cadre d'un processus commercial et éliminer un obstacle majeur auquel se heurtent les Canadiens qui souhaitent devenir pilotes.

La modification du programme de subventions canadien et provincial pour permettre aux écoles de pilotage d'obtenir des fonds afin de former des employés sans devoir recourir aux services d'un tiers éliminerait un autre obstacle auquel se heurtent les pilotes qui veulent améliorer leurs compétences. La plupart des écoles de pilotage sont les seules à donner de la formation à un aéroport. Pour recevoir une formation avancée grâce à ce programme fédéral d'aide, ces pilotes doivent se rendre à l'aéroport d'une autre ville pour suivre une formation qui peut durer de un à six mois.

Le maintien en poste d'instructeurs de vol expérimentés est devenu un problème majeur du réseau des écoles de pilotage. Auparavant, les écoles de pilotage encadraient les instructeurs de vol pendant un an et demi à deux ans avant qu'ils passent aux appareils plus grands et plus rapides d'un affréteur ou à de petits exploitants de lignes aériennes, mais maintenant, la progression peut ne prendre que quelques mois. Cela exerce d'énormes pressions sur les écoles de pilotage, qui doivent constamment former et inscrire de nouveaux étudiants. Cela crée aussi un problème de sécurité, car des pilotes inexpérimentés se concentrent sur le passage à leur prochain emploi et finissent par piloter des appareils plus complexes sans avoir assez d'expérience.

Pour remédier à la situation, je recommande que le gouvernement offre aux instructeurs une exonération du remboursement des dettes semblable à ce qui est offert aux médecins qui travaillent dans des régions rurales et éloignées. Je recommande aussi l'adoption d'une mesure législative semblable à celle des États-Unis, où les pilotes doivent obtenir un minimum de 1 500 heures d'expérience de vol avant de pouvoir travailler pour les grandes compagnies aériennes. Ce genre de règles aideraient non seulement les écoles de pilotage, mais aussi les petits affréteurs et les personnes qui mènent des opérations d'évaluation sanitaire.

Nous devons aider les écoles de pilotage. Elles sont l'épine dorsale de l'industrie aérienne et ne peuvent pas répondre à la demande, compte tenu du coût élevé de la formation qui est en partie attribuable à une politique gouvernementale. Les aéronefs brûlent des combustibles fossiles, et c'est une dure réalité. Le carburant est une des principales dépenses d'une école de pilotage. De toute évidence, ce sont les étudiants qui assument cette dépense lorsqu'ils payent leurs frais d'instruction.

Pour contribuer à diminuer le coût de leur formation, nous recommandons ce qui suit au gouvernement fédéral: premièrement, exonérer les écoles de pilotage de la taxe sur le carbone, qui a fait ou qui fera augmenter considérablement le coût de la formation; deuxièmement, remettre la taxe d'accise fédérale sur le carburant pour les appareils d'instruction; troisièmement, appuyer la mise au point de biocarburants de remplacement pour les aéronefs ou d'appareils électriques; et quatrièmement, aider les écoles de pilotage à financer l'équipement spécialisé nécessaire à la formation de vol, y compris des dispositifs d'entraînement au vol communément appelés des simulateurs. Ces dispositifs permettent d'accroître les compétences et l'expérience dans un environnement contrôlé, mais ils coûtent de l'argent, habituellement beaucoup plus que ce que coûtent les autres immobilisations d'une école de pilotage.

En conclusion, différents témoins ayant comparu ici ont déjà donné à votre comité des chiffres sur la pénurie de pilotes. Ces chiffres et la pénurie sont réels. Les écoles de pilotage ont pour mission de former des pilotes professionnels fiables et capables de piloter en toute sécurité. Elles doivent en former de plus en plus d'une part pour répondre à la demande de l'industrie, et d'autre part pour assurer son expansion. Cela ne peut être possible qu'au moyen d'une collaboration entre le gouvernement et l'industrie aérienne en vue de fournir aux étudiants, aux instructeurs et aux écoles de pilotage les ressources et l'aide dont ils ont besoin.

Merci beaucoup du temps que vous m'avez accordé. Je suis impatiente de répondre à vos questions.

(1225)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à Go Green Aviation. Monsieur Ogden, vous avez cinq minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Gary Ogden (directeur général, Go Green Aviation):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les membres du Comité et les autres témoins.

Je m'appelle Gary Ogden — Gary Douglas Ogden, au cas où ma mère regarderait — et j'aimerais parler dans une perspective plus large. Mon collègue, Mike Rocha, un cadre de notre école de pilotage, s'adressera à votre comité le 19. J'aimerais aborder des aspects de notre entreprise et présenter une analyse d'une possible cause première de la situation dans laquelle nous nous trouvons actuellement.

Je viens du monde des aéroports, des compagnies aériennes et des fournisseurs de services au sol dans l'industrie aérienne. Je me suis rendu à l'aéroport à vélo en 1979 et je ne suis pas revenu à la maison depuis. J'ai commencé comme gardien de sécurité et je suis devenu PDG. L'entreprise et l'industrie comptent beaucoup pour nous tous, et elles offrent des possibilités.

J'ai cinq grands clients — y compris Aura Airlink, qui mènera ses activités au Central North Flying Club — qui ont tous de la difficulté à trouver des gens et à les maintenir en poste, ce qui me préoccupe. Nous faisons face à l'ennemi de l'attrition et du roulement dans le domaine de l'aviation.

J'ai travaillé à l'étranger, à des aéroports à Achkhabad, au Turkménistan, aux États-Unis et un peu partout. J'ai choisi de travailler au Canada parce que je suis fier de notre industrie aérienne, et comme mon collègue le dit, nous donnons de la formation depuis très longtemps. La formation que nous offrons est d'ailleurs reconnue mondialement. Je voulais, entre autres, travailler dans une école de pilotage au Canada avec Aura et le Central North Flying Club compte tenu de notre réputation et parce que nous devrions être en mesure d'attirer des étudiants du pays, et nous devrions très bien réussir à attirer aussi des étudiants internationaux.

Nous faisons ce travail pour deux raisons, dont une qui est holistique. Ces raisons existent encore. J'ai écouté mes collègues en parler plus tôt. Il y a des raisons holistiques de faire ce travail. Nous voyons une pénurie et nous voulons y remédier. Nous voulons accommoder le point de vue exprimé par l'OACI, l'IATA et l'ATAC, ainsi que tous les autres experts de l'industrie qui disent que le secteur est en croissance. Nous voulons accommoder cette croissance. Nous voulons faciliter l'accès aux régions. Nous ne voulons pas le perdre à défaut d'y offrir des services aériens. Nous voulons également desservir nos collectivités éloignées et nos peuples autochtones comme elles le méritent. Nous voulons construire des ponts et survoler les obstacles. Nous voulons le faire globalement, mais la réalité économique nous rattrape: les chiffres n'arrivent pas. Les compagnies aériennes et l'industrie proprement dite sont aux prises avec un certain nombre de problèmes. Le prix d'un billet aujourd'hui est probablement aussi faible ou peut-être moins élevé que dans les années 1980, mais les coûts que nous assumons sont beaucoup plus élevés.

Le Central North Flying Club prévoit offrir ses services à Sudbury. Un aéroport régional doit se démener pour attirer l'attention du gouvernement. Je salue M. Fuhr et les efforts du gouvernement actuel et des précédents pour remédier en partie à ce problème. Dans le secteur aérien en général, le problème aux aéroports régionaux est qu'ils ne génèrent pas de revenus. Ils ne sont généralement pas rentables. Au mieux, ils sont sans incidence sur les recettes. Nous n'avons pas de boutiques hors taxes. Nous n'avons pas de stationnement. Nous n'avons pas de revenus non aéronautiques pour soutenir l'aéroport.

Kelly, qui, je crois, n'est pas là pour l'instant, a mentionné le PAIA. Nous devons en faire plus pour les aéroports régionaux où se trouvent les écoles de pilotage afin d'éviter qu'elles soient accablées par l'infrastructure des aéroports. Nous devons voir les écoles de pilotage, les évacuations sanitaires, les affréteurs, le transport aérien de passagers et la formation comme étant essentiels, comme étant avantageux dans la filière de l'industrie aérienne.

Pour faire une analogie avec le hockey, il faut voir les écoles comme un club-école. À défaut d'en avoir un, de préparer la relève, on est voué à l'échec. Nous devons soutenir le club-école, les écoles de pilotage, et nous devons soutenir l'aviation régionale de notre mieux.

(1230)



Je vous remercie tous, car il y a un certain nombre d'initiatives comme des prêts, des programmes visant l'embauche d'étudiants et des études d'impact sur le marché du travail. Nous avons un certain nombre d'initiatives. Quant à ce que j'aimerais voir — j'en ai parlé avec mon ami, le député Sikand —, peut-être que nous devrions mieux diffuser notre information. Il y a peut-être des programmes, mais ils ne sont peut-être pas regroupés ni accessibles, ce qui signifie qu'une personne en difficulté... et que Dieu bénisse notre ami qui a repris une école de pilotage au moment où on pensait qu'elle allait fermer.

Nous pouvons peut-être faire quelque chose sur le plan de l'accès à l'information, peut-être même en visant des cibles faciles. Il faut donner aux gens l'information dont ils peuvent se servir pour avoir accès aux fonds à votre disposition. De plus, nous devons augmenter le financement et élargir les initiatives à cette fin.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Ogden.

Nous allons commencer les questions des députés.

Monsieur Falk, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Ted Falk (Provencher, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Merci à tous les témoins du Comité. Vos témoignages sont très intéressants.

Madame Super, j'aimerais vous poser quelques questions.

J'ai obtenu mon brevet de pilote il y a environ 20 ans. J'ai mon brevet de pilote privé et un peu plus de 800 heures de vol à mon actif.

À l'époque, je pensais que cela coûtait cher. J'étais très frustré de ne pas pouvoir déclarer cela comme des dépenses engagées pour poursuivre mes études. Ce n'était aucunement déductible d'impôt pour moi. J'ai parlé à l'entreprise, Harv's Air, responsable de notre école de pilotage locale, celle où j'ai suivi ma formation.

Mon instructrice était une femme d'environ 20 ans ma cadette. Cela ne m'a posé aucun problème, ni à elle non plus. Elle a fait un excellent travail. Son nom est Dana Chepil, pour lui faire un petit salut. Je pense qu'elle est maintenant examinatrice.

Je pensais à l'époque que le coût était prohibitif. Lorsque j'ai parlé aux gens de mon école de pilotage au cours des dernières semaines, ils ont dit qu'il est extrêmement difficile de maintenir les instructeurs en poste. Vous avez mentionné certaines choses, mais que seraient selon vous la mesure ou les deux mesures que vous pourriez prendre pour maintenir en poste les instructeurs? Vous avez parlé d'augmenter le nombre d'heures à 1 500 avant qu'ils puissent piloter des avions commerciaux. Ce n'est probablement pas une mauvaise idée, car la plupart d'entre eux ne sont instructeurs que pour accumuler les heures afin de travailler pour un transporteur quelque part, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Terri Super:

Oui, c'est vrai. Les écoles de pilotage sont depuis longtemps au bas de l'échelle. Les instructeurs passent habituellement à autre chose. Il serait formidable de pouvoir faire revenir des capitaines des compagnies aériennes. Nous discutons actuellement avec les gens de WestJet, l'un des transporteurs aériens, pour voir s'il serait possible qu'ils nous prêtent un de leurs pilotes, ne serait-ce qu'un ou deux jours par mois, ce qui serait vraiment un bon point de départ.

Je ne pense pas qu'on puisse un jour régler le problème. On peut donner plus d'argent aux instructeurs — des salaires plus élevés —, mais il s'agit surtout de jeunes qui veulent piloter les grands appareils, ce qui explique pourquoi on peut seulement les retenir pendant une courte période de temps.

Je crois que c'est ici qu'une sorte d'exonération de remboursement du prêt d'études pourrait constituer un incitatif, car les prêts de ces étudiants sont considérables. Cela pourrait les inciter à rester plus longtemps dans le domaine de l'instruction et à acquérir plus d'expérience avant d'occuper un autre emploi.

M. Ted Falk:

Je ne sais pas quelle est votre situation avec les pilotes ou les pilotes potentiels que vous attirez, s'ils viennent du pays ou de l'étranger. Je sais toutefois que Harv's Air à Steinbach attire beaucoup d'étudiants internationaux, mais pas autant qui viennent du pays.

Je propose tout le temps à des jeunes de se tourner vers l'aviation et d'obtenir un brevet de pilote. La principale raison pour expliquer leur refus n'est pas qu'ils ne sont pas intéressés et que ce n'est pas excitant, c'est le coût. L'une des choses qui augmente le coût de façon marquée, et je le sais parce que je pilote un avion — mon appareil Mooney ne vole pas le réservoir vide —, c'est le coût du carburant.

Vous avez parlé un peu de la taxe sur le carbone, de ce que c'est et de ce que cela sera. Pas plus tard que la semaine dernière, le Conseil national des lignes aériennes du Canada a publié une déclaration dans laquelle il mentionne deux études qu'il a réalisées en 2018 et qui montrent les répercussions négatives sur l'industrie aérienne de la taxe sur le carbone, tant pour le transport des voyageurs que pour les écoles de pilotage, sans qu'il n'y ait vraiment d'effet mesurable sur la réduction des émissions. Pouvez-vous dire ce que vous en pensez?

(1235)

Mme Terri Super:

La taxe sur le carbone que nous avons déjà en Alberta, et elle est considérable, augmente les coûts.

Nous avons besoin de l'infrastructure. Nous avons besoin des transporteurs aériens. Tout le monde veut voler. Vous prenez tous l'avion pour rentrer chez vous les fins de semaine. Nous devons fournir ce service.

L'idée que la taxe sur le carbone aidera les gens à réduire la consommation de combustibles fossiles ne fonctionnera pas pour une école de pilotage. Plus nous avons d'étudiants, plus nous consommerons de carburant.

La seule chose que je vois et qui a un grand potentiel est le recours à la simulation. À notre école, nous donnons aux étudiants un cours intégré. Nous avons deux simulateurs. Ce sont des dispositifs d'entraînement au vol. Ils ne bougent pas, mais ils simulent très bien le vol. Nous ne pouvons toutefois pas nous servir de toute la formation donnée ainsi pour accorder des brevets.

M. Ted Falk:

De plus, des témoins nous ont dit que les simulateurs coûtent très cher, et vous devez aussi recouvrer le coût d'une certaine façon. Il pourrait peut-être y avoir des programmes pour vous aider à examiner cette possibilité.

Mme Terri Super:

Une sorte de contribution gouvernementale de contrepartie...

M. Ted Falk:

Il ne me reste que huit secondes, mais si vous avez l'occasion de parler un peu des besoins en infrastructure aux aéroports municipaux ou privés, je vous en serais reconnaissant.

La présidente:

Veuillez être très brefs.

Mme Terri Super:

Je crains de ne pas être qualifié pour parler de l'infrastructure aux aéroports.

M. Ted Falk:

C'est bien. Merci.

La présidente:

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Madame Super, pendant la transition du premier groupe de témoins au deuxième, vous avez rencontré Mme Farly, qui vient de ma circonscription. Il était intéressant d'apprendre à connaître l'autre femme propriétaire d'un aéroport. Je tenais juste à le souligner; vous n'en avez pas parlé dans votre déclaration liminaire.

Y a-t-il des observations du groupe précédent de témoins dont vous voulez parler? Vous avez dit au début que vous en aviez l'intention et que des aspects de nos discussions précédentes vous préoccupaient.

Mme Terri Super:

Oui. Si je peux me le rappeler... Je commence à être vieille, et il me faut donc un peu de temps pour...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est bon. Un plan de vol est nécessaire.

Je vais passer à M. Ogden pour une seconde. Vous avez parlé du fardeau attribuable aux coûts de l'infrastructure des écoles de pilotage. Pouvez-vous parler plus en détail de ces coûts et donner les chiffres réels?

M. Gary Ogden:

Je ne peux pas vous donner de chiffres précis, parce que je suis certain qu'ils varient d'un aéroport à l'autre, mais il y a les frais d'entreposage en hangar, puis il y a tout l'environnement contrôlé de l'aéroport, qui doit être maintenu pour garantir la sûreté et la sécurité. On voit des instructeurs de vol faire le dégivrage des avions, pousser les dégivreurs manuellement ou mécaniquement, ajouter de l'huile aux moteurs ou faire toutes sortes de travaux d'entretien alors qu'ils sont censés enseigner le pilotage, parce que l'argent manque. Encore une fois, c'est un cercle vicieux qui nuit au travail des instructeurs de vol.

Je peux vous parler un peu plus de Sudbury, puisque nous occupons des installations là-bas. Les coûts d'entreposage des aéronefs dans des hangars pour les protéger des intempéries, quand les conditions météorologiques sont exactement celles que nous connaissons actuellement, sont non négligeables.

Les coûts de dégivrage des aéroports sont aussi non négligeables. Notre entreprise n'utilise simplement pas les grands aéroports, donc nous n'avons pas accès aux avantages des grandes installations centrales et nous sommes forcés d'acheter du matériel de dégivrage. Je pense qu'il y a même une étude qui a été publiée il y a quelques semaines, qui fait état d'un manque de capacité et de services de dégivrage dans les aéroports du Nord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Eh bien, il y a beaucoup d'écoles de pilotage qui utilisent des pistes gazonnées, par exemple, où il y a très peu d'infrastructure à proprement parler.

M. Gary Ogden:

Souvent, nous devons attendre un dégel ou... En fait, nous avons envisagé d'utiliser la piste de Brampton, mais nous aurions besoin d'avoir accès à de meilleures installations, des installations qui coûtent plus cher, malheureusement. À Sudbury, il y a un deuxième aéroport, adjacent au premier, que nous pouvons utiliser pour augmenter notre nombre d'heures de vol.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pense que j'en ai une photo.

Par curiosité, à quoi correspond la référence Go Green?

M. Gary Ogden:

Go Green est l'entreprise que j'ai fondée il y a déjà de nombreuses années pour le nettoyage et l'écologisation des aéroports.

Je participe personnellement à diverses initiatives. L'une d'elles vise à électrifier davantage l'aire de trafic de l'aéroport, l'idée étant encore une fois de la nettoyer et de la rendre plus écologique et donc, plus sûre pour notre personnel. C'est donc la société de portefeuille qui est le consultant principal, mais je travaille également avec Aura et l'école de pilotage.

(1240)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, merci.

Madame Super, je reviens à vous.

Vous avez parlé du coût du carburant dans votre exposé. Les écoles de pilotage louent habituellement des avions avec services. Quand on loue un avion, on le loue avec services. Pouvez-vous expliquer à ceux qui ne s'y connaissent pas ce que cela signifie et si cette façon de faire est viable à long terme?

Mme Terri Super:

Quand l'avion est loué avec services, cela signifie que le réservoir de carburant est plein. Si un étudiant ou un locataire utilise l'un de nos avions, le carburant est compris. S'il doit faire le plein dans un autre aéroport, nous le rembourserons selon notre grille de prix. Nous ne lui rembourserons pas la différence s'il achète du carburant à un prix plus élevé dans un autre aéroport.

Certaines écoles fonctionnent différemment. Certains exploitants le font parce que le prix du carburant d'aviation varie beaucoup d'une semaine à l'autre, comme le prix de l'essence à la pompe, d'ailleurs. L'avion sera donc loué à la personne avec un réservoir vide, et pour chaque vol, on calculera la quantité de carburant utilisé, puis le coût du carburant sera ajouté au prix du vol.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela semble représenter beaucoup de paperasse supplémentaire pour déterminer de combien de carburant on aura besoin.

Mme Terri Super:

Oui, et c'est la raison pour laquelle beaucoup d'écoles préféreront louer des avions avec services.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est logique.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Graham.

Passons à M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins d'être avec nous ce matin. Leurs témoignages sont éclairants.

Ma question s'adresse à vous, madame Bell. Dans une industrie où la situation semble assez complexe, vous avez mis le doigt sur un problème dont tous les témoins nous parlent, c'est-à-dire les coûts de formation pour les étudiants qui choisissent cette carrière.

Ce qui m'apparaît problématique, c'est que les modèles semblent différents d'une province à l'autre, voire d'un territoire à l'autre. Par exemple, au Québec, un milieu que je connais davantage puisque j'y suis, on a la possibilité d'une école totalement privée qui répond aux normes de Transports Canada ou d'une école intégrée au réseau scolaire collégial, notamment.

Y a-t-il un modèle sur lequel il faudrait s'aligner, au Québec, pour tenter une certaine harmonisation et, par le fait même, voir quelles sont les répercussions sur les coûts de la formation? [Traduction]

Mme Heather Bell:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

Oui. S'il y avait un modèle plus uniforme au pays, je pense que la formation serait simplifiée d'une province à l'autre. Le problème que je soulevais concerne l'accès à du financement étudiant et les écarts qui existent d'une province à l'autre.

Je ne connais pas très bien la façon dont les centres d'entraînement fonctionnent dans les différentes provinces, mais je sais que l'Association du transport aérien du Canada a proposé un modèle d'accréditation des organisations de formation pour uniformiser la formation. À l'heure actuelle, la réglementation canadienne en matière d'aviation régit le nombre d'heures requises pour qu'un apprenti pilote puisse recevoir une quelconque forme de licence. Je pense que certains critères devraient être revus, ainsi que la comptabilisation du temps de formation. Comme d'autres l'ont dit, il serait également très pertinent de doter les centres d'entraînement d'un simulateur, mais à l'heure actuelle, la réglementation ne permet pas d'utiliser beaucoup de temps passé dans des simulateurs pour obtenir une licence. Bref, ce serait effectivement très utile d'uniformiser la réglementation fédérale. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie de ces informations.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à M. Ogden.

Monsieur Ogden, le nom de votre entreprise, Go Green Aviation, est inspirant. Dans une autre étude sur le bruit entourant les grands aéroports, nous avons constaté la difficulté de cohabitation de l'aviation et de la société civile.

Est-il possible maintenant de former des pilotes au moyen d'avions électriques dont le coût d'achat serait comparable à celui d'avions à essence?

M. Gary Ogden:

Merci, monsieur Aubin.[Traduction]

Je crois fermement que tout ce qui peut améliorer l'intendance environnementale dans les aéroports sera positif. Je ne crois pas nécessairement qu'il faille suivre l'exemple de l'Europe, ni même de certains États américains, dans ce que nous faisons au Canada, parce que je pense que nous devons nous-mêmes donner l'exemple et non le suivre.

Le recours à une solution hors vol qui ne consommerait pas de carburant serait positif. Je pense que les simulateurs font certainement partie de la réponse. L'utilisation de simulateurs et d'outils d'entraînement au sol pourrait nous aider à réduire les problèmes d'accessibilité à la carrière nationale de pilote et à diminuer la fatigue. Il est vrai que les entreprises ne veulent pas que leurs pilotes volent pendant leurs quatre journées de congé ou tout autre congé, mais les systèmes hors vol et les autres aides au pilotage comme les simulateurs pourraient être utiles à bien des égards. C'est beaucoup plus sûr, plus écologique, et nous aurions alors accès à un plus grand nombre d'instructeurs de vol.

Je m'excuse de ne pas vous parler davantage des avions électriques. Cela ne fait pas partie de mes compétences.

(1245)

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin, vous avez 30 secondes. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

J'espère que nous aurons l'occasion de vous entendre davantage à ce sujet.

Monsieur Armstrong, j'aimerais que vous parliez de cette nouvelle entente avec le Québec concernant le développement numérique de la formation des pilotes. [Traduction]

M. Joseph Armstrong:

Je ne connais pas bien l'entente dont vous parlez, à moins que vous ne fassiez allusion à l'entente conclue avec le gouvernement du Québec et le gouvernement fédéral sur l'innovation et les investissements dans la formation numérique.

Je pense que le plus grand changement à s'être opéré au cours de la dernière dizaine d'années, environ, c'est l'avancement important des sciences de l'éducation et l'application des nouvelles données scientifiques sur l'apprentissage pour mieux comprendre comment nous pouvons utiliser nos ressources aux divers stades de la formation de pilote. L'idée est qu'on puisse se doter de programmes plus efficaces, optimisés et adaptés pour permettre aux candidats d'atteindre le niveau de compétence voulu par d'autres moyens que le pilotage direct d'un avion.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Armstrong.

Passons à M. Sikand.

Vous avez quatre minutes.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je commencerai par poser une question à M. Ogden.

Vous avez mentionné quelques mots clés politiques selon moi: l'international et le fait de choisir le Canada. J'aime souvent combiner les deux.

Vous avez affirmé que l'ennemi des écoles de pilotage était l'attrition. Comment se fait-il que nous n'arrivions pas à recruter à l'international des instructeurs qualifiés pour participer à la formation des pilotes canadiens?

M. Gary Ogden:

Monsieur Sikand, c'est une très bonne idée.

Nous avons fait nos devoirs et souhaitons ajouter un volet international à notre école de pilotage. Le grand enjeu sera la reconnaissance des anciennes normes et des titres de compétences dans toutes sortes de domaines au Canada.

Je ne suis pas vraiment en faveur d'un abaissement des normes, mais je suis pour la reconnaissance des normes existantes. Si les étudiants et les instructeurs de vol d'autres pays du monde pouvaient nous aider à combler nos besoins et qu'il suffisait de reconnaître les équivalences, alors la balle est dans notre camp. Allons-y, parce que cette solution pourrait être très avantageuse.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

J'ai moins de temps que d'ordinaire, donc je m'adresserai maintenant à Mme Super.

Vous avez mentionné la tarification de la pollution et son incidence sur les coûts de fonctionnement. Si les écoles de pilotage et les lignes aériennes les plus petites étaient exclues d'un premier programme, mais que les grands transporteurs se faisaient imposer un tarif, qui serait assorti d'une réduction au fur et à mesure qu'ils améliorent leur technologie et leur écoefficacité pour réduire leur empreinte environnementale, seriez-vous favorable à l'idée?

Mme Terri Super:

Je vous entends à peine.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Je m'excuse.

Vous avez mentionné le carbone, les taxes et leur incidence sur les activités. Si les petits transporteurs et les petites écoles de pilotage étaient exclus du programme initial, mais que les plus grands se faisaient imposer une taxe, qui serait également assortie d'une réduction au fur et à mesure qu'ils gagnent en efficacité et réduisent leur empreinte carbone, seriez-vous favorable à ce modèle?

Mme Terri Super:

Oui, ce pourrait être réaliste, les tarifs pourraient baisser au fur et à mesure que la technologie s'améliore, grâce aux simulateurs ou aux avions électriques, par exemple. Nous n'en sommes pas encore vraiment à l'étape où il soit possible de les utiliser dans une école de pilotage. La pile ne permet pas de voler assez longtemps encore. Les écoles de pilotage doivent assujettir les pilotes débutants à un vol national d'au moins 150 milles nautiques, et je crois qu'il n'y a pas encore d'avion électrique qui puisse voler aussi longtemps en continu. Je pense que ce serait faisable quand les avions électriques le permettront.

Pour ce qui est des simulateurs, je crois qu'il faut modifier la réglementation pour changer le nombre d'heures d'utilisation possible d'un simulateur. Si c'est possible, cela aiderait beaucoup. Pour obtenir une licence de pilote professionnel, il faut cumuler 25 heures de temps aux instruments, dont seulement 10 peuvent être cumulées dans un simulateur ou un dispositif d'entraînement au vol. Si l'on pouvait augmenter le nombre d'heures de formation en simulateur, cela aiderait beaucoup à réduire notre empreinte carbone, évidemment.

(1250)

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Je vous arrête. Je profiterai des 30 secondes qu'il me reste pour poser rapidement une question à Mme Bell.

Si le gouvernement subventionnait la formation des apprentis pilotes en échange d'une obligation de service au Canada ou peut-être pour les transporteurs aériens canadiens, serait-ce possible? Seriez-vous ouverte à une formule du genre?

Mme Heather Bell:

Absolument. L'une des recommandations serait que le gouvernement accorde une exonération du remboursement de prêt étudiant pour le temps passé comme instructeur de vol ou comme pilote dans une communauté nordique éloignée. Vous avez sûrement beaucoup entendu parler du mal qu'ont les écoles à conserver leurs instructeurs.

J'ai également peur qu'ici, en Colombie-Britannique, les services aux communautés éloignées soient parmi les premiers à souffrir d'une diminution du nombre de pilotes. Je crains que des incidents malheureux se produisent.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Bell.

Passons à M. Fuhr.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Je remercie nos témoins d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Je remercie particulièrement Mme Bell. J'ai utilisé votre lettre. J'en ai reçu des dizaines sur le même sujet, et j'ai utilisé la vôtre intégralement dans mes observations à la Chambre.

Il y a une question qui n'a pas encore été soulevée, c'est-à-dire que nous perdons énormément de nos ressources limitées parce que des entités étrangères achètent des écoles de pilotage canadiennes ou que des étudiants étrangers viennent suivre une formation dans nos écoles, puis repartent tout de suite après. J'aimerais vous entendre à ce sujet.

Madame Bell, pouvez-vous nous en parler un peu?

Mme Heather Bell:

ll faut dire qu'en Colombie-Britannique, il y a un très grand nombre d'étudiants étrangers. Quand j'en parle avec mes collègues exploitants d'unités de formation au pilotage, ils n'y voient aucun problème, puisque ces étudiants ne prennent pas la place d'autres étudiants. Le plus difficile, c'est d'attirer les étudiants canadiens. Il peut y avoir des gens dans l'unité de formation qui ont une expérience différente, mais ici, en Colombie-Britannique, il y a peu d'inscriptions.

Il y a un autre problème aussi. Je dois mentionner l'immigration et la difficulté d'embaucher des pilotes d'autres pays. Certains de nos membres aimeraient beaucoup en embaucher, mais se heurtent aux règles d'immigration qui dictent que les pilotes immigrant au Canada respectent les normes de pilotage prescrites par règlement, mais il n'y a pas véritablement de cadre prescrivant comment on peut recruter des pilotes à l'étranger.

Les pilotes sont considérés un peu comme les ingénieurs. Il faudrait leur garantir 40 heures par semaine, du lundi au vendredi, mais ce n'est pas le genre d'horaire qu'on peut offrir aux pilotes. Je tenais à le dire. Quoi qu'il en soit, nous ne voyons pas l'inscription d'étudiants étrangers comme un problème, pas plus que nous ne considérons qu'ils prennent la place d'étudiants canadiens.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Armstrong, l'armée s'est-elle penchée sur la forme que prendra la formation des équipages aériens à l'avenir, sur la façon dont elle sera donnée? Croyez-vous qu'en raison du besoin national et international de pilotes, la formation pourrait être conçue de manière à intégrer des étudiants civils ou à répondre d'abord au besoin accru de pilotes de l'armée, mais à permettre l'inclusion de civils quand les besoins de l'armée sont moins grands? C'est complexe, et ce n'est pas la façon de faire habituelle, mais compte tenu de la situation actuelle et des besoins futurs, croyez-vous que ce serait possible? Quelle forme cela pourrait-il prendre, d'après vous?

M. Joseph Armstrong:

Si l'on regarde le centre d'entraînement en vol de l'OTAN, au Canada, qui est le programme d'entraînement en vol de l'armée, à l'heure actuelle, il a été créé dans un contexte de contribution internationale et de participation internationale dès le départ. En ce moment, il faut notamment essayer de générer des revenus pour subventionner ses coûts de fonctionnement. Ils sont élevés, parce que les aéronefs militaires ne coûtent pas la même chose que les aéronefs civils.

Je pense que nous devons viser l'établissement de programmes de formation au pilotage sur mesure, parce que s'il y a des coûts de base fixes inévitables pour offrir de la formation... Si ces coûts de base fixes me permettent d'offrir toutes sortes de programmes différents, je serai beaucoup mieux en mesure d'amortir mes coûts, parce que je pourrai accepter des étudiants de l'extérieur, qu'il s'agisse de civils ou d'étudiants étrangers.

Je pense vraiment que les Canadiens doivent adopter une perspective globale — et c'est nettement la mentalité dans notre entreprise. C'est la clé de notre succès dans le monde et la solution à nos problèmes. Si l'on analyse la situation sans tenir compte de tout l'écosystème de la formation au pilotage, on ne verra qu'une facette du problème, alors que la solution est beaucoup plus large.

Pensons seulement à la question des étudiants étrangers au Canada. On se demande si leur présence ici pose problème ou s'il est possible de faire venir des instructeurs étrangers au Canada pour venir en aide aux instructeurs canadiens, mais renversons la prémisse. La demande pour la production de pilotes et la formation de pilote est tellement grande dans le monde qu'elle accapare des ressources canadiennes.

D'autres avant moi ont dit qu'il fallait mettre l'accent sur un certain nombre de choses. Il faudrait premièrement concevoir des programmes de formation sur mesure fondés sur les compétences et deuxièmement, vraiment mettre l'accent sur notre aptitude à recruter des étudiants actifs.

(1255)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Armstrong.

Merci, monsieur Fuhr.

Nous entendrons maintenant Mme Block pendant quatre minutes.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci infiniment, madame la présidente. Je tiens à vous remercier, comme je remercie le Comité de son indulgence, puisque je saisirai l'occasion pour déposer une motion sur la sécurité aérienne, que les membres du Comité ont reçue le 2 janvier.

Je vais vous faire un bref historique. Il y a presque deux ans, le 8 juin 2017, Alex, un jeune homme de 21 ans, a loué avec sa petite amie Sidney un monomoteur Piper Warrior d'une école de pilotage de Lethbridge, en Alberta, pour se rendre à Kamloops, en Colombie-Britannique. Alex, un pilote certifié, était aux commandes de l'avion, et Sidney en était l'unique passagère. Après s'être ravitaillés à Cranbrook, ils sont partis, mais ne sont jamais arrivés à destination. On les a cherchés pendant 11 jours sur un vaste territoire. Pendant cette période de 11 jours, 18 aéronefs de recherche et de sauvetage civils et de l'Aviation royale canadienne ont été mobilisés pendant 576 heures au total et ont parcouru environ 37 513 kilomètres carrés. En moyenne, 10 aéronefs ont été déployés chaque jour, de même que plus de 70 membres de l'Aviation royale canadienne et 137 pilotes et observateurs bénévoles de recherche et de sauvetage civils. Malgré cette vaste mission de recherche et de sauvetage, ils n'ont pas réussi à trouver Alex, Sidney et l'avion. Ce n'est qu'à la fin de cette vaste opération que le père et la belle-mère d'Alex, Matthew Simons et Natalie Lindgren, ont été avisés du fait que l'émetteur de localisation d'urgence (ELT) à bord de l'aéronef ne s'était pas activé, ce qui rendait l'avion impossible à localiser. Malheureusement, c'est ce qui arrive dans 38 % des cas d'écrasement.

Les ELT sont des appareils de localisation d'urgence installés à bord de la plupart des aéronefs. En cas d'écrasement, ils envoient des signaux de détresse sur des fréquences désignées pour aider les équipes de recherche et de sauvetage à localiser l'aéronef et ses passagers. Les ELT utilisent deux fréquences: celle de 121,5 mégahertz et celle de 406 mégahertz.

Depuis 2009, les ELT 121,5 mégahertz ne sont plus surveillés par satellite, si bien qu'ils ne sont plus opérants, sauf qu'ils demeurent obligatoires. En juin 2016, le Bureau de la sécurité des transports a présenté sept recommandations en vue de la modernisation des ELT, mais aucune n'a encore été suivie à ce jour. Dans bien des accidents d'aéronefs, l'ELT est endommagé au point de ne plus pouvoir émettre de signaux de détresse. Par conséquent, bien des aéronefs légers ne sont jamais retrouvés. C'est ce qui est arrivé dans le cas d'Alex et de Sidney, comme dans bien d'autres.

Grâce à cette motion, je crois que nous avons l'occasion d'alléger un peu la peine de parents endeuillés comme Matthew et Natalie en entreprenant une courte étude qui nous permettra de mieux comprendre le problème et de faire des recommandations à Transports Canada. Plus particulièrement, cette motion prescrit que le Comité examine les avantages, à des fins d'activités de recherche et de sauvetage, d'utiliser la technologie GPS pour déterminer la position d'un aéronef grâce à la navigation par satellite et la diffuser périodiquement à un système de localisation à distance. L'idée est que le GPS soit utilisé de concert avec un ELT 406 mégahertz moderne dans les aéronefs légers.

La présidente du Bureau de la sécurité des transports, Kathy Fox, a souligné que quand un aéronef s'écrase, il doit être localisé rapidement pour qu'on puisse secourir les survivants. L'information qu'un système de GPS simple fournirait permettrait aux équipes de recherche et de sauvetage de réagir rapidement après un écrasement, ce qui réduirait les longues recherches d'aéronefs perdus et nous permettrait à la fois de sauver des vies et d'économiser de l'argent des contribuables.

Pour terminer, je pense qu'ensemble, nous avons l'occasion d'effectuer une étude très importante en l'honneur d'Alex et de Sidney, et j'espère que tous les membres du Comité appuieront cette motion.

Je vous remercie infiniment de m'avoir permis de prendre la parole à ce sujet.

(1300)

La présidente:

Il y a quelques personnes qui ont manifesté le désir d'intervenir. Regardez bien l'heure. Le prochain comité est prêt à entrer à 13 heures, donc nous avons très peu de temps.

J'ai pris les noms de M. Graham, de M. Aubin et de Mme Leitch. Je vous prie d'être brefs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends votre motion et votre intention. Je pense que l'intention de la motion, honnêtement, est d'améliorer les méthodes nous permettant de retrouver les aéronefs disparus. C'est l'objectif, n'est-ce pas?

Cette motion est très prescriptive. Je ne peux pas appuyer le libellé actuel, mais je serais prêt à proposer un amendement, que j'ai préparé: « Que le Comité procède à une étude d'une durée de quatre à six réunions », comme vous l'écrivez vous-même dans votre motion, mais je remplacerais ensuite tout ce qui suit, de (a) à (e) par « sur les méthodes améliorées de récupération des aéronefs disparus, en particulier dans l’aviation générale. »

Je modifierais également la fin pour enlever l'obligation de présenter un rapport à la Chambre dans les quatre mois suivants, parce que le Comité aura un horaire très chargé pendant cette période.

Mme Kelly Block:

Très bien, merci.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Évidemment, le sujet est pertinent. Je ne vais pas m'opposer à la motion.

J'aimerais cependant savoir si, à votre avis, cette étude s'inscrit à la suite de ce que nous avons déjà au programme. Par exemple, il y a déjà une étude sur le transport ferroviaire passager qui attend dans les cartons depuis des mois et qui a été acceptée unanimement par ce comité.

Si on met cette étude à la suite des travaux que nous avons à faire, il n'y a pas de problème. Toutefois, si cela vient court-circuiter un travail que nous avons déjà à faire, cela peut poser problème.

J'aimerais connaître votre avis là-dessus. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Oui, il ne fait aucun doute que notre calendrier est déjà bien rempli. Il y a le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses qui s'en vient. Nous devons terminer deux autres rapports et nous nous sommes engagés à tenir quatre réunions sur la sécurité des autobus, puis quelques autres sur la sécurité ferroviaire. Ce sont les études que nous nous sommes déjà engagés à mener, donc je propose que si le Comité adopte l'une ou l'autre de ces motions, il commence cette étude quand nous aurons terminé ce que nous avons déjà au programme. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Ce que nous avons à l'ordre du jour comprend l'étude qui était prévue sur le transport ferroviaire passager, n'est-ce pas? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Oui.

Madame Leitch.

L’hon. K. Kellie Leitch:

Merci beaucoup.

Je m'exprime ici à titre d'ancienne ministre du Travail. J'ai entendu beaucoup de familles, de même que des pilotes et d'autres professionnels de l'industrie, parler de la nécessité d'adopter un règlement sur la sécurité aérienne, mais aussi d'adopter des technologies qui augmenteraient la sûreté des aéronefs et permettraient non seulement aux familles, mais aussi aux professionnels du secteur de moderniser cette industrie. Je vous dirais que cette modernisation est nécessaire, cet incident en est la preuve à lui seul, et c'est sans parler de tous les autres qui sont survenus.

Les Canadiens utilisent la technologie GPS tous les jours. Mon frère et ma soeur, Michael et Melanie, l'utilisent pour savoir où se trouvent leurs enfants. Nous pourrions nous aussi l'utiliser pour que des familles comme celles d'Alex et de Sidney arrivent à retrouver leurs proches, pour qu'on puisse leur porter secours et idéalement, les emmener à l'hôpital, mais sinon, pour que les familles puissent faire leur deuil.

Je suis consciente qu'un amendement à la motion a été déposé, mais je crois que l'utilisation de la technologie moderne, comme la technologie GPS, est au coeur de la question. Je suis certaine que vous l'utilisez dans votre voiture pour rentrer chez vous à l'occasion. J'encouragerais donc le gouvernement à envisager de favoriser l'utilisation de cette technologie, que nous utilisons tous les jours, pour faciliter le travail des pilotes et des autres membres de l'industrie de l'aviation.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Leitch.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je dirai seulement qu'on ne peut pas prévoir la conclusion d'une étude à l'avance, ce n'est pas ainsi qu'on mène une étude. Cette étude doit porter sur la façon d'améliorer la récupération et non sur une solution en particulier.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

(L'amendement est adopté.)

(La motion modifiée est adoptée.)

La présidente: Je vous remercie tous infiniment.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on February 07, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.