header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-02-07 RNNR 127

Standing Committee on Natural Resources

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody. Thank you for joining us this afternoon.

We have two witnesses in our first hour. We're doing a study on international best practices and we have our first two international witnesses. Professor Turi is here with us today and Professor Hernes is joining us from Norway.

What's the time difference, Professor? It's quite late there, I believe, isn't it?

Professor Hans-Kristian Hernes (Professor, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, As an Individual):

I'm six hours ahead of you, so it's 9:30.

The Chair:

We're very grateful to you for taking the time, especially at that time of day.

The process for the meeting is that each of you will be given an opportunity to deliver opening remarks for up to 10 minutes and then, when both of you have concluded, we will open the floor to questions from around the table.

Professor Turi, since you're with us today, why don't we start with you?

Dr. Ellen Inga Turi (Associate Professor, Sámi University of Applied Sciences, As an Individual):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Let me first say that it's an honour for me to appear before the committee this afternoon. I work as a researcher on indigenous knowledge and environmental governance in the Nordics. I'm also indigenous Sami and I grew up in a reindeer-herding family in northern Norway.

I'm looking at your mandate and I've been thinking a little bit about what it is that I can contribute to your work. I'm not sure whether it will be best practices that I'm able to present this afternoon, but rather I believe my presentation will focus on challenges including indigenous knowledge and environmental governance and planning in the Nordics.

My testimony this afternoon represents research and engagement conducted by my fellow scientists and myself, in partnership with both reindeer herders and indigenous leaders over the past decade. I particularly want to acknowledge the Sámi University of Applied Sciences, the International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry and the Association of World Reindeer Herders as leading institutions in this work.

I will focus mainly on experiences from the Nordics and highlight challenges that we have identified for engaging indigenous peoples and indigenous knowledge in governance processes and then focusing on reindeer herding, in particular.

I'll give a very brief introduction to reindeer herding for those of you who are maybe not familiar with it. It's the primary livelihood for over 20 indigenous peoples throughout the circumpolar North. It involves more than 100,000 people and around 2.5 million semi-domesticated reindeer in nine nation states. Most of this is focused in Eurasia, but you do also have a small reindeer herd in Canada.

Reindeer herding is a nomadic livelihood, which is characterized by extensive, yet low-impact, use of land. In Norway, where I focus my research, we have some 250,000 reindeer on approximately 150,000 square kilometres, which is equivalent to 40% of all the land area of Norway, yet only about 3,000 people are involved.

Reindeer herding is a very land extensive livelihood, but doesn't involve a lot of people and is not a huge economy. It can be seen as a human-coupled ecosystem that has a high resilience to climate variability and change and it is an indigenous model for sustainable management of marginal areas in the Arctic. A key source of resilience for reindeer herding is indigenous knowledge that has been accumulated over generations.

In this context, what I mean by indigenous knowledge—and this is a definition that I'm borrowing from the work of the permanent participants at the Arctic Council—is: ...a systematic way of thinking and knowing that is elaborated and applied to phenomena across biological, physical, cultural and linguistic systems. [Indigenous] knowledge is owned by the holders of that knowledge, often collectively, and is uniquely expressed and transmitted through Indigenous languages. It is a body of knowledge generated through cultural practices, lived experiences including extensive and multi-generational observations, lessons and skills. It has been developed and verified over millennia and is still developing in a living process, including knowledge acquired today and in the future, and it is passed on from generation to generation.

Within reindeer herding, significant knowledge has been generated over time about both reindeer and the human relationships to them and relationships between animals and the environment. There's also accumulated knowledge of dramatic changes in the natural environment and about strategies of how to adapt to such challenges.

This kind of knowledge still forms the main basis for survival for reindeer-herding peoples. It has not been replaced or suspended by research-based knowledge. It's very much available and it's in use every day, but such knowledge has historically been neglected by research and policy. Based on our research, we argue that perhaps more than ever, indigenous knowledge is now crucial for the future survival of reindeer herding in the face of major change.

(1535)



As you all know, Arctic areas are undergoing a number of changes, ranging from social to environmental, and these are capable of adversely affecting traditional livelihoods. The extensive and nature-based character of reindeer herding means that it is directly impacted by the so-called “megatrends”, and by that I mean trends such as climate change, loss of biodiversity and land-use change. The impacts of these megatrends are inseparable.

Allow me to elaborate.

Future climate scenarios indicate that mean winter temperatures may increase by as much as 7°C to 8 °C over the next 100 years in Sami reindeer-herding pasturelands, and that the snow season may be one to three months shorter. This represents a significant shift, and it is likely that rapid and variable fluctuations between freezing and thawing will increase. Why is this important? Reindeer herding is a livelihood that depends on snow conditions for reindeer to be able to get through to the forage underneath. Warm temperatures and melting snow have periodically created bad grazing years in Sami reindeer herding. Extremely bad grazing conditions, which we in the Sami language call "goavvi", cause starvation and loss of reindeer and subsequently negatively impact reindeer herders' community and organization.

In the last 100 years, goavvi has occurred around 12 times in Guovdageaidnu, but we are seeing in climate projections that the frequency of this type of weather condition will likely increase in the future.

Yet, if you talk to Sami reindeer herders, they will often say they are much more alarmed by loss of grazing land than they are of climate change. Why? A reason for this is that mobility, moving your herd to a different area, is a key adaptive strategy for adverse snow conditions. Access to pasture resources will therefore be even more important under climate change. This has been recognized by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report, which points out that protection of grazing land will be the most important adaptive strategy for reindeer herders under climate change.

Loss of pastures is a significant challenge for reindeer husbandry in all places where it's practised, but this has been particularly pronounced in the Nordic countries. Pastures are lost due to all sorts of developments: roads, infrastructure, military activities, power lines, pipelines, dams, leisure homes and related activities that all have contributed to decline in reindeer pastures.

Loss of pastures occurs principally in two ways: first, the physical destruction of pastures; and second, the effective though non-destructive removal of habitat or reduction of its value as a resource. By that I mean the gradual abandonment by reindeer of previously high-use areas due to avoidance of areas that are disturbed by human activities. The numbers are alarming. Studies show that approximately 25% of grazing land in northern Norway is now strongly disturbed, including 35% of key coastal areas. This figure has been estimated to increase to as much as 78% by 2050 if no changes are made in national or regional policies. That means that up to 1% of summer grazing grounds used by Sami reindeer herders along the coast of Norway are lost every year.

(1540)



A major challenge for reindeer herding is that the majority of the loss of grazing land occurs through piecemeal loss. For example, in spite of Norway having ratified ILO convention 169 on the rights of indigenous people and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Sami reindeer herders have so far had very little influence on land rights and piecemeal development. Despite the fact that reindeer-herding groups and individuals are heard in decision-making processes—for example, through participatory processes—reindeer herders' indigenous knowledge is not included as part of the decision-making foundation.

Our research shows that the challenge of making use of indigenous knowledge in governance relates to more than just a conflict of what is known—i.e. an epistemological conflict—but also to a conflict in the logic of what constitutes appropriate functional and geographical scales of governance and, not least, what constitutes appropriate land use. Sectorial fragmentation in governmental administration leads to a situation in which assessments of the cumulative effects of all projects combined are not part of decision-making. In other words, one ministry is in charge of infrastructure, another is in charge of hydro power development, a third forestry, etc., while reindeer herding, on the other hand, due to its extensive nature and dependence on different types of pastures, constantly monitors and records any changes in land uses.

I argue that failure to integrate these perspectives into governance systems can be seen as a lost opportunity to account for cumulative long-term effects of land use changes in decision-making.

Our research suggests that the process of making use of indigenous knowledge in governance needs to start already at the policy formation stage; that is, when indigenous knowledge is not part of the policy formation process. Waiting until policy implementation to include it will be more challenging, if not downright impossible—

(1545)

The Chair:

Professor, I'm going to have to ask you to wrap up very quickly, if you can.

Dr. Ellen Inga Turi:

Yes.

I will end my testimony by giving you a very practical example in the words of reindeer herder Aslak Ante Sara, who has his reindeer in Hammerfest, the northern Norwegian city where Statoil has its LNG plant. He explains his experience with the planning process in Snøhvit as follows: We were sort of forgotten in the whole process and our perspectives were not focused on. Because the LNG-plant itself was not placed directly on reindeer pastures, we were not fully included in the total process of regulation. And with this start that we got, [when] we were not focussed on, we were continuously lagging behind in the process, not able to follow this up properly.... Due to the development we have seen an unexpected explosion in human activities. We have much more competition for our pastures now.... When you have this kind of major industrial development in Hammerfest, it makes the area around Hammerfest very attractive for other types of development. Also the society of Hammerfest is rapidly expanding because of the development. Now there is talk about several possible projects, and planning has begun. This includes petroleum development, new power lines, windmills, infrastructure development and roads. These are heavy investments driven by independent and influential economic sources, also in part independent of Statoil. We also see increasing human activities in our pasture areas in terms of outdoor leisure activities.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Professor Hernes.

Prof. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

Thank you very much for the invitation to take part in this meeting. I'm very honoured by it.

What I'm going to talk about is based on research projects here at UiT, The Arctic University of Norway. They are carried out through the co-operation of researchers in Norway, Sweden, Canada and Australia.

I must also say that I've thought a little bit about what Canada can learn from Norway. That was my first silly thought. But I've also been teaching in a joint master's program with a Canadian university and in my own, and I can see that we can learn from very different examples. What I'm going to talk about then is the situation in Norway. I have Norwegian examples, and maybe we can discuss how they can be used in the Canadian context.

Norway is a country very rich in resources, as you may know. I'm not going to go into the petroleum sector, but Norway has been a country rich in energy since about 100 years ago when Norway started to develop hydro power using waterfalls, building dams and using rivers to produce electricity. It was important for the development of Norway as an independent nation. After World War II, it was very important for having an income and developing the welfare state. Today we have a situation in which 95% of the electricity in Norway comes from hydro power.

It is a publicly owned resource, with 50% of the electricity production owned by the state, 40% owned by municipalities and counties, and only 10% owned privately. Today, if you are applying for a licence to build a new power plant, you need two-thirds public ownership and funding of that plant. In Norway there has for a long time been a political struggle for public ownership of electricity and electricity production and for national ownership of the perpetual resource that these rivers and dams represent.

Electricity has been important for infrastructure, for welfare in Norway, for the building industry, for employment, for export revenues and as a source of extra income for municipalities. Currently Norwegian municipalities receive about one billion Norwegian kroner each year in income from concession conditions on this electricity.

Electricity in Norway for many years was managed by the government. It still is. But between the two world wars and also after World War II, the state was the main actor. The state was controlling and the state was trying to control the system.

We got a new energy law in 1991, which changed the system radically, in the sense that the electricity system became market-based. Norway is connected to the Nordic electricity market and later also became connected to the European electricity market. The different producers compete in this market, whereas there is a monopoly on the grids, on the transmission lines, in Norway.

Today's debate is not so much about large hydro power projects. That era seems to be over. What we are debating today is wind and sun, and it's about the development of new renewable energy. Particularly wind farms are under debate as are, to some extent, solar plants. Wind farms are popping up in a lot of places in Norway. The production from wind is increasing. Figures from today, from Statistics Norway, show a 36% increase in 2018, but wind is still only 2.5% of the electricity production in Norway.

(1550)



Another debate or issue concerns grids or power transmission lines. The goal is to strengthen the power grid in Norway to connect the country. As the first speaker said, that puts pressure on the use of land in different parts of Norway, but particularly in northern Norway with the grazing land for reindeer herders.

In terms of energy and the role of indigenous peoples, there is a history of conflict. In Norway this is mostly illustrated by the conflict between the state and the Sami people over the Alta River in the early 1980s. The state wanted to build a big dam and the Sami said they were not included in the process. The Sami and those who were against this, including those in the environmental movement, lost this battle, but it was the beginning of developing the main Sami institutions in Norway.

I'm going to talk a little bit about the three relationship models when it comes to indigenous people and energy. The first one is this Alta River conflict, with a rejection of the energy projects by indigenous peoples. We have conflict, very little or no participation, and continuous struggles between the state or government and the indigenous peoples. In the second model, we have participation, involvement in the decision-making processes, and formal requirements for participation. The third model is the one where I would say indigenous peoples or local communities take ownership of energy production and use it for local development and possibly income.

In my opinion, this third model is not present in Norway for either wind or solar. As far as I know, it is developing a little bit in Canada, but not in the Nordic countries. I can give several explanations for that, but I won't do that here. We do not have impact and benefit agreements, but municipalities that host large hydro power stations are compensated. That's been the model for about 100 years.

If we are looking for a Norwegian model, my suggestion would be the second one, which is participation. I will give a brief presentation on that. For Norway, indigenous rights and indigenous politics have been very much based on, and have had major input from, international law. UNDRIP is an example, but ILO C169 has been the most central. ILO C169 became important for the development of consultations as a tool in the contact and co-operation between the Norwegian state and the Sami Parliament from 2005. The consultation agreement that's currently in use says that the state has to inform the Sami Parliament or other Sami actors about the upcoming cases. The Sami Parliament can then demand consultation, and then they should ideally exchange opinions. The goal is to reach an agreement or consent between the actors.

Where are we today? We have formal processes that are used. The Sami Parliament and reindeer herders are invited in. They do participate. Another observation is that the Sami representatives and the Norwegian state disagree, and they do not achieve the agreement or consent that is the goal of the consultation procedures. If we look at consultations in general, one of the observations that is made is that the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate is a challenging case for the Sami Parliament. They emphasize an energy economy and obligations for more renewable energy before they eventually turn to the question of Sami rights and the reindeer herders' situation.

There are large windmill or wind farm projects, either planned or under construction. The conflicts over them may well end up in the courts. This intensifies the conflict over areas in cases where the local ownership is rather low.

(1555)



So, if I return to the three models, we may argue that we are currently at the borderline between rejection and participation. Still, the track in Norway is still co-operation inspired by consultations. The government has said that it wants to change how the system of objections by the Sami Parliament can be managed. The question is, however, about making the system more efficient, not necessarily about finding solutions to the conflict. The trouble is to handle both the demand and the pressure for more renewable energy in Europe, and on the other hand to comply with indigenous rights at the international level. At the same time, there are very few benefits for local communities and also for Sami communities, because their energy prices are rather low, so there are very low taxes on the production of energy from wind parks.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you both.

Mr. Whalen, you're going to start us off.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

It is interesting for us to see an international perspective on how governments either appropriately engage or don't appropriately engage their indigenous peoples on resource development.

We are looking at some of the issues, Ellen, that you touched on earlier. In addition to trying to balance the larger majority state's view of how to develop prosperity in the country with the property rights or the lack of property rights for indigenous peoples, and cultural rights that aren't easily compensated for with money, there are things such as loss of territory for herding caribou, which is very land-intensive, or loss of respect between the cultures.

With this issue of ongoing usage expansion, what would you consider to be the best practice? When should indigenous people be engaged in megaprojects so that we get a better understanding of how to protect these cultural rights and these lesser economic rights that aren't easily accommodated for when people don't take a full view of what the project is going to entail and the other development that's going to come ancillary to the project?

Dr. Ellen Inga Turi:

As I said at the beginning of my presentation, reindeer herding is a minor livelihood, involving very few people, and it's perhaps understandable that we cannot win every single land-use case. But my research partners also tell me that if they had been included at a much earlier stage, even before you started drawing anything on a map, you could have, through very small adjustments, taken away the worst of the impacts. In other words, for example, if you're planning to build a new underwater tunnel.... This is a practical example from northern Tromsø. The reindeer-herding family there said that if they had been part of the process at an early enough stage to be able to influence the placement of that tunnel by a difference of only one kilometre, they would have avoided the major impacts. As the plan stands now, they are at risk of losing some very key areas, calving ground areas.

The earlier you engage, the better chance you have to make little adjustments like that.

(1600)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

You talked a bit about a definition of indigenous knowledge. In Canada we're struggling with this as well, and trying to make sure that we engage indigenous people on their traditional practice and obtain the oral knowledge from them. How do the Sami people collect, codify and use indigenous knowledge in a longitudinal way and apply a scientific method to their traditional knowledge?

Dr. Ellen Inga Turi:

Unfortunately, there hasn't been widespread systematic collection of traditional indigenous knowledge in Norway. However, there have been some good examples of how to do this. The Sami Parliament has initiated some minor work to document indigenous knowledge relating to particular topics, but also our experience is that when it comes to planning, for example, resource development projects in a certain area, you have to go to those certain people who are using the land there. Perhaps the best examples we have today are of either reindeer-herding communities themselves or research developers who have chosen to make special impact assessments that document traditional knowledge.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Once that knowledge is collected or used for a particular project, can it then be leveraged for future projects as a starting point? Would it be appropriate, then, to go back to indigenous people to get updated information that's more specific to how a secondary project may have changed versus the first one? Have you had any experience with secondary consultations for indigenous knowledge in the same area, but with different types of economic development?

Dr. Ellen Inga Turi:

I haven't had any experience with secondary assessments, unfortunately. The type of indigenous knowledge I've seen well documented that has perhaps been useful in these types of processes has been about historical land use and possible future land use for reindeer herding so that you get an understanding of how that area is actually used. That type of knowledge is, of course, useful for the future, as well, because it doesn't only concern the possible project that is coming.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Mr. Hernes, maybe you can help me understand a little bit about the history of why Scandinavian countries don't use impact and benefit agreements. Those are things that, in our earlier testimony this week, we heard are great to have in place. The major problems in Canada are when they're not followed. However, they are a cornerstone of any development that impacts traditional rights in Canada.

I'm wondering if you can describe why the legal regime in the Sami-Norway relationship doesn't include revenue sharing on megaprojects that occur on Sami land.

Prof. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

The main difference with Canada is that the Sami people don't own their land in Sami. We don't have the types of agreements you have. That's one reason.

When it comes to energy, energy has been seen as a national resource, and the income and so on have been given or transferred to the state. The state has then brought some of this money back. The Sami people, for example, are not involved in direct exchanges with companies or those that are building these new wind parks, for example. The Sami people are involved with the state. It's the state that regulates and takes care of the formalities.

(1605)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

To help me understand the testimony that comes in the rest of this session, maybe you could explain further. I tried to understand section 1-4, “The financial liability of the State”, in the Sámi Act. Could you describe how the state, which I'm presuming is Norway, funnels money back to the Sameting for use in local Sami municipal affairs? If Ellen has a comment on that as well, I think it will really guide our understanding of the rest of your testimony.

The Chair:

If you could both try to answer that very briefly, we'd be grateful.

Prof. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

The state, or the Norwegian national parliament, decides the budget for the Sami Parliament each year. It does not give but transfers money to the Sami Parliament as part of the state's budget. That's how it's done. It's part of its large budget. There is some sort of consultation on the budget, but it's mainly decided by the Norwegian national parliament.

The Chair:

Okay, great, thank you.

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Continuing with what Mr. Whalen started with, the budget is set at the state level, but does the Sami Parliament have the ability to veto...? I can open this up to either of you. I know you mentioned something, Professor Hernes, in your testimony. It's my understanding that it does not have the power to veto a project. Is that correct?

Prof. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

The Sami Parliament does not have the power to veto projects.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

You mentioned that the Sami Parliament, if I heard you correctly, had objections to certain projects, for a variety of reasons, and that it pushed its concerns on to the government, and for whatever reason, the process went forward.

Where do you see the shortcomings in this process and the fact that an elected body was there, and its feedback wasn't taken into account, I guess, for lack of a better word. I guess it was; it was debated, but it went in a different direction.

Prof. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

In some cases, the state and the Sami Parliament don't agree after this exchange of opinions, and what's been troubling for the Sami Parliament is the processes, during which they feel that their arguments haven't been heard and which they feel the state has done simply because there's a formal requirement to do consultations. I think that has also been one of the challenges, then, related to energy issues.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

When you talk about transfers from Norway to the Parliament, is the formula based on economic development, or is it just a set transfer regardless of how well a particular region is doing with energy infrastructure or whatever?

Prof. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

It's mainly decided on as a transfer to the Sami Parliament, and it's related to the different tasks they have. They may get new tasks and then they get more money. For example, if they are working on language issues, they probably get more money to deal with those, and to deal with the Sami or to take care of the Sami language. It's the same with museums and so on. All of this is decided on through a long process by the Norwegian Parliament and then based on the advice of the cabinet or government.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay.

Just out of curiosity, on the energy projects—you mentioned a couple in your testimony—do you know off the top of your head, by any chance, the period of time it took from the application being submitted by the proponent of that project to a decision being made to begin construction?

Prof. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

I would say it took at least five years for some of these wind projects, based on the information that we have, but the government has also tried to set more limits on these processes, because some of these permits have been given, and then construction hasn't started, and then the permit has been withdrawn. They need to do it within a set number of years.

(1610)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay.

Prof. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

My guess would be five years, and some of them have been going on for much longer, because it's a challenge to get funding for them. It might start out as a local project. We have a big wind park outside Tromsø that is now under construction. It's about three billion Norwegian kroner, which is about $500 million Canadian. That was started as a local project, but it's now owned by a German pension fund for doctors. They have come in and taken over, and that gave speed to the process, because the locals couldn't raise all that money.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Would you say the vast majority of these infrastructure projects were privately started or publicly started?

Prof. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

There have been some that have been started by some of these power companies owned by municipalities. The state is also involved in some large projects via their own Statkraft. This one outside Tromsø is an example of private ownership. There's a mixture, when it comes to wind parks, more than there is for hydro power in Norway, which is publicly owned.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

We have wind farms in my area, so I'm just curious as to whether you know this. You said some of the projects were approved, and there was a delay in starting construction for whatever reasons. Do you know, by any chance, what those reasons were? Were they economic? Were there other factors, like protests from the public or that type of thing?

Prof. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

The reason has been, to some extent, public protests, but it's mostly financial, I think, and also that they've found that the area isn't that good for production. There are also delays related to the new technology we can produce. We can have bigger windmills and we may then change the project, and then we have to go to a new round with the government on it. That might also cause a delay.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP):

Thanks to both of you for appearing before us. It is very interesting to get this international perspective, and I'm sure we're all learning a great deal about the Sami people and how they are dealing with these interactions with the state.

This study is about how to engage with indigenous people to the best effect for all concerned. I'll start by asking Professor Turi this question. The Sami are found not only in Norway, but in Sweden, Finland and Russia. Are there situations in those countries that are better in terms of the engagement of Sami peoples and their knowledge before resource projects are started?

Dr. Ellen Inga Turi:

I'm not sure that I'm able to put any of the countries above one another.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I wasn't saying to put them above one another, but are there differences in how they're dealt with?

Dr. Ellen Inga Turi:

I guess many Sami people consider Norway to be perhaps the country that has come the furthest in developing approaches to engage indigenous peoples, but there are still plenty of hurdles to go.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Right.

Professor Hernes, do you have any comments on that?

Prof. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

I think I would agree. The Sami Parliament in Norway is stronger. It has more resources than they do in Sweden and Finland. Norway is also the only one of those that has signed ILO C169 and developed tools such as consultation. There are some processes and landmarks in Norway that are important. Maybe that's related to the conflict that was there when the Sami Parliament was established and they got their amendment to the constitution and also Sami law.

My experience, or what people tell me, is that it's easier to go from the Norwegian Sami Parliament to decision-makers in Oslo, the Norwegian capital, than it is for the Swedish Sami Parliament and their politicians to go to the politicians in Stockholm, the capital of Sweden. I think Norway is a little bit ahead of the others.

(1615)

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I also wanted to follow up on ILO C169, which you mentioned. It's not an agreement that we hear much about here because Canada and much of the world didn't ratify it. Most of Latin America ratified it, as did Norway, Iceland, Spain, I think, and Bhutan. Is it considered to be a forerunner of UNDRIP? What are the differences? Maybe you could also expand on your comments about how Norway perhaps hasn't done a good job of living up to its commitments under ILO C169.

Prof. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

Norway was the first country to ratify ILO C169. It really became important for decisions or the process related to ownership or use of land and water in the northern parts of Norway. It became very important for development of the Finnmark Act, which was decided by the Parliament in 2005. In that sense, it has been important.

It has also been important in developing these consultations. Norway has a consultation agreement from 2005, and that's based on article 6 in ILO C169, so in that sense it's been important for Norway. The ILO has done quite a lot in developing or setting standards for consultations and also for the processes related to ownership, to land and water. I think that's the main impact as far as I know. My experience is perhaps that Norway doesn't speak as much about UNDRIP as you do in Canada, for example.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Thank you.

I'll go back to you, Professor Turi, and follow up on something that Mr. Whalen was talking about. It was with regard to indigenous knowledge. I used to work as an ecologist. I headed up a team on ecosystem recovery with a mandate to involve indigenous knowledge in British Columbia. This was 20 years ago, and it was very difficult; fraught with difficulty.

You mentioned the issues around ownership of the knowledge. In my area, each type of knowledge is kind of proprietary to certain families. Then you have the inevitable conflict sometimes when indigenous knowledge says one thing and western scientific knowledge says the other. Could you perhaps expand on how the Sami process has gotten around some of these things? It might be a little more straightforward there when it's just covering reindeer herding. As well, what kind of knowledge are we talking about here? Is it just reindeer herding or is it also climate changes and things like that?

Dr. Ellen Inga Turi:

To start, it's my impression that you have gotten quite a bit further in Canada than we have in Norway when it comes to dealing with indigenous knowledge. In Norway, even among academics, it's a relatively recent concept that hasn't had as much focus as you've had in Canada. Hence, as researchers, we are very inspired by Canadian researchers.

When it comes to including indigenous knowledge in policy-making, we haven't gotten that far there either. Perhaps the most successful best practice examples I have that include reindeer herding and indigenous knowledge—in something that is at least formative for policy—are the descriptions of Norway in Arctic Council documents. Perhaps it's because the Arctic Council is more used to working with indigenous knowledge than the Norwegian governments are. There are some processes, though, particularly initiated by the Sami Parliament, to make ground documents where you lay the foundation for what indigenous knowledge is, how you can work with it, and what type of benefits there can be. That involves knowledge concerning processes that might be beneficial to society at large—with regard to climate change, for example—and knowledge that's very specific to a single reindeer-herding area.

More generally, though, from my experience working with indigenous reindeer-herding knowledge, yes, you are right that sometimes there might be conflicts between what a scientist says and what an indigenous reindeer herder says, but if you spend enough time elaborating on what you're talking about, there's a tendency to get closer.

(1620)

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Harvey, you're last up.

Mr. T.J. Harvey (Tobique—Mactaquac, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

I'll start with you, Professor Hernes. Mr. Cannings made reference earlier to the ILO agreement. He compared it briefly with UNDRIP and maybe its possible deficiencies as compared with UNDRIP. I don't want to ask you about the comparative nature of the two but about your opinion on this. Number one, do you feel it has been successful in its mandate? And number two, even if you do feel it hasn't been successful in its mandate to achieve everything it set out to do, do you feel that the benefits of the agreement have still been for the greater good?

Prof. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

Thank you. What big questions those are.

I think the ILO has been successful, or has been a tool, then, for the Sami Parliament in establishing consultations, both on this Finnmark Act process in the Norwegian Parliament [Technical difficulty—Editor] 2003 [Technical difficulty—Editor] and before the law was passed in the parliament.

Consultation has been very important for the Sami Parliament in terms of getting in touch, co-operating and being involved in decision-making processes. It's related not only to land and water but also to education, language issues, the environment and so on. The Sami Parliament has really become a player or an actor in several processes in Norwegian politics and working with the Norwegian government. In that sense, it's been a success, I think we could say.

I'm sorry, I forgot your second question.

Mr. T.J. Harvey:

The second part of that question was about whether or not you feel, regardless of whether or not the agreement has met all of the objectives it set out to meet, it has been beneficial as a whole to the relationship between the Sami people and Norway as a whole.

Prof. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

I think it has been beneficial for the Sami Parliament, and the Sami Parliament wants to continue this co-operation. There is now a proposal in the Norwegian Parliament for a law on consultation or on including consultations in the Sami law. The Sami Parliament wants to continue this. They see this as a possible way to be involved at an early stage in the processes and to then have direct contact with government. The agreement also includes the President of the Norwegian Sami Parliament meeting the responsible minister for regional affairs in Norway twice a year. It's been institutionalized as a way that the Sami Parliament can work with the Norwegian government.

(1625)

Mr. T.J. Harvey:

Ms. Turi, based on your experience, do you feel that the relationship between the Sami people and the Government of Norway has benefited from this agreement? And if it hasn't been 100% successful in everything it had set out to do, do the Sami people as a whole feel that they're progressively making up ground as they go along?

Dr. Ellen Inga Turi:

I believe this agreement has been of benefit to the relationship between the Sami Parliament and the Norwegian government. Of course, the Sami people are diverse. They're involved in different livelihoods, all of which are not able to be...or are not as strongly represented by the Sami Parliament. The Sami Parliament is a relatively new and young organization that is developing, and the place it has among the Sami people is developing. I feel it has made quite major leaps, particularly over the past few years, but there have been times when, for example, Sami reindeer herders questioned whether or not Sami Parliament was the right institution to represent them on issues concerning land use negotiations.

That is why I say that I do feel that this agreement has very much been of benefit to the relationship between the Sami Parliament and the Norwegian government. To some extent, yes, the Sami Parliament does represent Sami people, but there are areas where that is also questioned.

Mr. T.J. Harvey:

Okay.

What are the top three things that the Government of Norway, in combination with the Sami Parliament, could do to address the concerns of those marginalized groups within the Sami population and to address some of the issues that they feel are not being considered?

Dr. Ellen Inga Turi:

You're putting me a little bit on the spot with “top three”.

Mr. T.J. Harvey:

Top two, then.

Dr. Ellen Inga Turi:

I think I can come up with maybe one or two.

The current way we decide on infrastructure projects in Norway is through environmental impact assessments. If the Sami Parliament and the Government of Norway decided to put some serious effort into developing the environmental impact assessment regime further, that could really help.

Among other things, indigenous knowledge is always rooted in indigenous languages. Putting more focus on also making impact assessments in indigenous languages, by indigenous researchers, could be a step on the way.

Mr. T.J. Harvey:

Thank you.

The Chair:

That's all the time we have, unfortunately. Thanks to both of you for joining us today by teleconference. It was very helpful to our study and very much appreciated.

We will suspend and get set up for the next two witnesses.

(1625)

(1630)

The Chair:

Welcome back, everybody. We have two more witnesses joining us for the second hour. With us we have Professor Greg Poelzer from the University of Saskatchewan.

Thank you for joining us. Based on the weather reports, I'm guessing you're glad you're here and not at home.

Professor Greg Poelzer (Professor, University of Saskatchewan, As an Individual):

Yes, exactly, though I could canoe here.

The Chair:

By video conference, we have Dr. Dalee Sambo Dorough, who is joining us from Hawaii although she is a professor at the University of Alaska. I understand that “Congratulations and happy anniversary” might be in order. I was told not to say that, but I'm saying it anyway. We really appreciate you taking the time out, especially when you're in Hawaii.

Were you able to hear us?

Dr. Dalee Sambo Dorough (Senior Scholar, University of Alaska Anchorage, As an Individual):

Yes, I'm able to hear you fine, and I was just going to thank the technicians who did the test run yesterday. I think we're all in good order.

The Chair:

We're going to jump right into things here. Each of you will have up to 10 minutes to deliver remarks, and then we'll go around the table with some questions.

Professor you're here, why don't you start us off?

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

Thank you very kindly for having us in on this obviously very important topic to our country, but also to our neighbouring countries in the circumpolar north.

And a hello to my colleague from Alaska, where I did my Fulbright. Folks in Alaska really treated me well, so I have a very fond affection for Alaska.

One of the things I know a lot of folks are thinking about when we're thinking about large energy projects is oil. It's a hot topic, as you might expect, in my home province, Saskatchewan. But I want to focus a little bit on what will be, in the long term, the bigger infrastructure energy projects that are coming down the line, which will be in electrical energy. I'm happy to talk about anything, but I want to focus on this one, especially as it relates to indigenous peoples in Canada.

When we think about this global energy transition, in my view it offers us the most important opportunity in the 21st century to renew indigenous relations through renewable energy. This will happen only if it's done right. If done badly, the transition to greener energy would be just another area of unnecessary, preventable conflict and lost opportunity for sustainable wealth generation in indigenous communities. It would truncate progress, in my view, with regard to the largest single environmental challenge of our times, which of course is climate change.

If we think about the national railway of the 19th century as the key infrastructure project that helped to build Canada from sea to sea, I would suggest that the global energy transition offers Canada the same opportunity in the 21st century, which can bind Canada together from sea to sea to sea.

I think nation building through energy could address two important dimensions, and I say this is with my prairie-Saskatchewan hat on. I think it provides us a once-in-a-generation opportunity to do better on our promise to one another that we are all treaty peoples. The energy transition can be a nation-building project that includes all founding peoples and contributes to our journey of reconciliation, through steel in the ground.

Being independent power producers, for first nations and Métis communities, offers real opportunities for indigenous equity ownership positions, in whole or in part. They provide sustainable revenue streams, employment and new business ventures.

Second, I think energy transition provides critical foundations for completing nation building, especially as it relates to the territorial and the provincial north. Energy access and energy security are everyday issues in almost all remote and rural communities in the territorial and provincial north. The high cost of energy often contributes to grinding poverty and the “heat or eat” dilemma in many communities. The lack of stable power is a deterrent to business development and business investment.

These are issues the vast majority of Canadians don't ever think about. They aren't on our horizon. But if we're truly going to complete nation building in this country, I think the energy sector is one thing, in terms of infrastructure, through which we can build Canada east, west and north. And it will enhance equality of opportunity, especially for first nations, Métis and Inuit Canadians, because their lack of equality of opportunity is largely grounded with energy. The energy transition we have in front of us provides that large-scale nation-building project.

(1635)



There are four lessons.

As for my own background, I've done a lot of work in Siberia over the last 30 years. I've done 30 field trips. I read, write and speak Russian. I've done a lot of work more recently in Scandinavia, particularly in Norway and Sweden, and more recently now in Alaska. I could give you about 20 or 40 lessons, but I'll stick with four.

One is to pay attention to social impact, not just physical and environmental impacts, in doing assessments. I think that's deadly important. A place that you wouldn't expect Canada could learn some lessons from is the Sakha Republic—Yakutia—in eastern Siberia. They had a delegation—some of them are our colleagues, in fact—looking at environmental assessment processes in Canada, which have tended historically to focus on the physical and environmental impacts. To their neglect, we don't have a robust process around social, cultural and economic impacts for indigenous communities.

They thought our process had something wanting. When they went back, they actually built in—yes, they have the standard physical and environmental ones in their EIA processes—and created a process to look at social and cultural impacts, and they have deployed it. They have deployed it on two railway projects in southwestern Yakutia and on a hydroelectric development project. The reports back are that it was largely successful. Yes, remuneration or compensation is not anything like we would expect in Canada, but the point is, there's a lesson that these things can be done.

The other lesson I want to draw on—I'm glad our Norwegian colleagues set the stage—is about the decentralization of electrical power. It's coming and it's going more global, but it also provides opportunities for democratization in decision-making at the local level. I think what's going on in Norway is instructive, especially in Finnmark county, the largest county in northern Norway. It has the largest indigenous population. At one point, 90% of the land was actually owned by the state, the national state, which was not typical for every other county in Norway. There was the Finnmark Estate, which allowed co-governance, or co-management, as it were—we might use that lingo in Canada—in which there were equal appointments by the county and the Sami Parliament.

That context is I think really important when you look at that kind of decentralization of electrical power. By Canadian standards, it's a small region. By Norwegian standards, it's large. By Canadian standards, there's a fairly good population, and by Norwegian standards it's quite sparse. There are seven or eight local utilities, including everything from private to municipal to co-operative, and they've all worked together under a single one, Finnmark Kraft. One of the interesting things is that there was supposed to be some national large-scale wind development. These things are still under debate, but the fact that the Finnmark Estate is there and the fact that Finnmark Kraft is operating has actually slowed this down to where there now is an opportunity to offer local decision-making about wind power development in a way that wouldn't have been possible otherwise. That's another lesson that I think Canada can take away to think about in our context.

The third lesson is that indigenous peoples can own and operate energy utilities. I'll tell you this. In terms of the other hat I wear, I'm a negotiator for SaskPower, so I'm on the industry side of the table and have been setting out in the last eight years the negotiating of a global settlement on a hydro facility in northern Saskatchewan. When you work across the electrical utilities, I think one of the mythologies in Canada is that indigenous peoples don't have the capability or capacity to own and operate electrical utilities, but you can look at the State of Alaska and at things like the Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, AVEC, which was founded in 1967. We're only 50 years behind Alaska, but we will catch up one day. It started with a handful of communities and now has 57 native Alaskan communities owning and operating it and making investments. It is the largest electricity co-operative in the world by territory. There are lessons for Canada. We can do that.

(1640)



One thing I'm working on and negotiating with SaskPower is to found the first generation and distribution utility that would be owned by first nations in Canada. There are nearly 200 projects of electrical ownership, but not in terms of utilities. That's not uncommon in the United States.

The last point I want to mention is the power of international co-operation in indigenous-led energy development. Again, I hearken back to the state of Alaska, our neighbour. The Alaska Centre for Energy and Power at UAF, with our friends in Iceland and funded as well by the Canadian government and the United States government, put together the Arctic Remote Energy Network Academy. It brought together energy champions from indigenous communities, from everywhere from Greenland to Canada to Alaska, to work on energy projects and build capacity together.

We worked in Saskatchewan with AVEC and Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation on the design of a locally owned utility and an assessment of what kind of renewable energy system could work and how it could be operated in a fiscally sustainable manner. We've taken those things, including from the Fulbright arctic initiative, and built a UArtic thematic network to sustain this kind of initiative into the future.

Here's one last thought I want to leave with you about the opportunity. I think it is profound. Sometimes Canada, and I have to say this about our country, I love this country, and no offence to my Alaskan colleague, but I think we live in the best country in the world—

(1645)

The Chair:

I'm going to have to ask you to wrap up very soon.

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

Okay. Last point.

What can we do? There are about two billion people on this planet who....around 1.3 billion who don't have electricity, and another billion or so we've tied to grids or are islanded. Imagine economies of scope: Alaska, Canada, Norway, Sweden and Greenland working together building an export market, building off economies of scope, that's indigenous-led. That's a future that's ahead of us.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Doctor, the floor is yours.

Dr. Dalee Sambo Dorough:

Thank you so much.

I just want to acknowledge some of the comments that Professor Poelzer has made. In fact, my father used to work for Alaska Village Electric Cooperative. I also want to add that I'm an entrepreneur myself, in addition to having a political career as well as the academic career.

I've provided a number of different documents as well as my presentation to you in writing. I am going to go full steam ahead. I hope everybody can stay with me on this.

I am happy to be invited to appear and would like to commend the committee for their interest in the views of indigenous peoples in relation to natural resource development and major energy projects. Though I'm the international chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Council, ICC, I expect that I've been asked to participate due to my background in international human rights and in particular in the drafting of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. I've chosen to testify as an individual and to share my views about incorporating the UN declaration into your study and your overall work.

The UN declaration and the rights affirmed therein are based on good-faith negotiations and dialogue between indigenous peoples and UN member states. Canada played a significant role in influencing these comprehensive normative standards while led by both Liberals and Conservatives over the 25 years of the declaration's negotiation.

As preambular paragraph 7 underscores, the rights affirmed are inherent or pre-existing. The UN declaration has achieved a universal consensus and has been unanimously reaffirmed in a wide range of UN General Assembly resolutions since its adoption in 2007. Furthermore, the rights affirmed in the UN declaration are minimum standards.

Legal scholars and courts have acknowledged that though the whole of the UN declaration is not legally binding, many of its key provisions constitute both general and customary international law and thereby create legally binding obligations in favour of indigenous peoples. The International Law Association has concluded that the UN declaration articles affirming the right to self-determination; the right to culture; land rights; and the right to redress, reparations and recourse are of a customary international law nature. Also, the rights elaborated on in the UN declaration are interrelated, indivisible and interdependent, and the change of one of its elements affects the whole.

I draw your attention also to ILO convention 169 and the OAS American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples respectively because of the compatible and mutually reinforcing nature and the explicit reference to the UN declaration as well as their status as international human rights instruments specific to indigenous peoples.

Indeed, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights has held, through opinions that are binding upon the vast majority of states in the Americas that have acceded to its jurisdiction, that the rights of indigenous peoples to lands, territories and resources mean that both states and companies—third parties operating in those states—must respect the rights of indigenous peoples.

The international covenants affirm the right to self-determination, which is regarded as a prerequisite or a pre-condition to the exercise and enjoyment of all other human rights. This same right is affirmed in article 3 of the UN declaration. Legal scholars have characterized the right to self-determination as the free choice of peoples. That being the case, the right to free, prior and informed consent is an integral element of the right to self-determination.

Natural resource development and energy-related projects are often linked to indigenous peoples' lands, territories and resources. The UN declaration not only affirms rights to lands, territories and resources but also identifies the profound relationship that indigenous peoples have with their environment. These customary and historical connections also relate to indigenous systems of decision-making, as articulated in article 18 of the UN declaration with regard to the right to “maintain and develop their own indigenous decision-making institutions”, hence the importance of the rights of indigenous peoples to free, prior and informed consent, FPIC.

In addition to the explicit reference to FPIC in the UN declaration, there is a clear consensus in international human rights law about the state duty to consult with a goal of reaching consent, especially in the area of development projects and extractive industry activities, which more often than not require the consent of the indigenous peoples concerned.

(1650)



Therefore, states must dialogue and negotiate in good faith in order to achieve consent.

There are a number of other UN declaration provisions that require states to undertake actions in conjunction with, or in consultation and co-operation with, indigenous peoples. In addition, the language of article 26, paragraph 2, affirms that “Indigenous peoples have the right to own, use, develop and control the lands, territories and resources that they possess by reason of traditional ownership or other traditional occupation or use”.

Here, the term “control”, in its plain meaning, suggests having power over: to influence, manage, restrain, limit or prevent something from taking place. This is no way translates to a purported right of indigenous peoples to a veto, which the former Government of Canada erroneously characterized FPIC as. There's a major distinction between the procedural and substantive aspects of FPIC and the notion of the power to veto an action. The latter is often outlined and reserved to a legislative or constitutional authority and vested in a political leader such as a president or a governor of a state.

In contrast, FPIC entails negotiation, dialogue, partnership, consultation and co-operation between the parties concerned, in good faith, and again with the objective of achieving consent. Even then, the peoples concerned may choose to assert the right to give or withhold consent regarding what may or may not take place within their territory.

The procedural implementation of the right to FPIC must be sorted out by those who are the “self” in “self-determination” and addressed on a case-by-case basis according to conditions and the “situation” of the indigenous peoples concerned. States must recognize that human rights are not absolute, and that there's a constant tension between the rights and interests of indigenous peoples and all others. In some cases, this constant tension is manifested amongst and between the indigenous peoples concerned.

The Government of Canada, under this Prime Minister, has concerned itself with upholding the rights of indigenous peoples. This can and does include the right to determine our own priorities for development. In addition to the right of self-determination, article 32 of the UN declaration affirms that: Indigenous peoples have the right to determine and develop priorities and strategies for the development or use of their lands or territories and other resources.

The former special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, James Anaya, in the context of extractive industries and FPIC, referred to indigenous-driven development of their lands and resources as the “preferred model”. The outcomes of indigenous-initiated and indigenous-controlled development are bound to be far more responsive to the priorities, interests, concerns, cultural values and rights of indigenous peoples. He further suggested that states may initiate programs for assistance to those indigenous peoples who choose to pursue development enterprises.

However, much of his report is devoted to the standard scenario of imposed development that many indigenous peoples have experienced and the obligations of states and third parties to mitigate impacts; monitoring third party extraterritorial activities; due diligence; and, equitable agreements.

Sustainable and equitable development are important dimensions of indigenous human rights, and natural resources as well. The preamble of the UN declaration explicitly refers to the fact that “indigenous knowledge, cultures and traditional practices contributes to sustainable and equitable development and proper management of the environment”.

Indeed, “The future we want”, the 2012 General Assembly resolution, specifically states in paragraph 49: We stress the importance of the participation of indigenous peoples in the achievement of sustainable development. We also recognize the importance of the United Nations Declaration...in the context of global, regional, national and subnational implementation of sustainable development strategies.

(1655)



A recent development of significance for the Government of Canada, this committee and indigenous people is the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. One of its central objectives is, between now and 2030, to end poverty and hunger everywhere, to protect human rights and to ensure the lasting protection of the planet and its natural resources.

It is important to reference the body of work being conducted by the UN working group on business and human rights, and the important guidelines it has developed. I also urge you to review A Circumpolar Inuit Declaration on Resource Development Principles in Inuit Nunaat, from 2011.

Finally, due to recent dialogue in Canada and the fact that 2019 has been declared the International Year of Indigenous Languages by the UN, I want to underscore the importance of indigenous languages in any engagement process and also the reality of poor telecommunications infrastructure. I listened to Duane Smith and his testimony on Monday. I believe his words were to the effect that we are energy resource rich but infrastructure poor.

More important, all must acknowledge the solemn obligations undertaken by Canada in relation to developing, in collaboration with the indigenous peoples concerned, a national action plan to implement the UN declaration. This voluntarily made commitment could dramatically enhance and ensure the sustainable and equitable development of the natural resources of indigenous peoples, if they so choose, to the benefit of Canada and all Canadians.

I think the issues related to indigenous languages, which I know have been discussed in Canada, as well as infrastructure, which was highlighted by Professor Poelzer, are both matters that are worth following up on in the forthcoming dialogue.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Tan.

Mr. Geng Tan (Don Valley North, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses for being with us today, either physically or by video conference.

Since you are both scholars, and there might be some overlap of some of your research topics, my question can be answered by either or both of you.

The first question is on indigenous settlements and indigenous advice. You both talked about those in your presentations and shared your fears and insights with us. What might we learn, specifically, if we were to compare settlements, say the Alaska native settlement, the James Bay Indian and Inuit settlement, and the western Canadian Inuit settlement? What is our experience, and what can we improve in the future?

(1700)

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

That's a very good question. I'll defer to Alaska first.

Dr. Dalee Sambo Dorough:

I believe it's important to recognize that it would be very useful, to some extent maybe through this standing committee, to do a bit of a comparative analysis of the land claims agreements and the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971. For the purposes of energy projects and the focus of the Standing Committee on Natural Resources, I think it would be very useful to explore even further the real potential for indigenous-driven activities in relation to energy resources, as was discussed by Professor Poelzer, and to do so in a comparative analysis.

The opportunities for the Alaska native corporations created by the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act as well as for the economic development corporations created by the comprehensive land claims agreements across the Canadian Arctic offer some real potential, because, as I noted in my presentation, in the circumpolar declaration on resource development, from the indigenous perspective, and specifically from the Inuit perspective, there is a very real attempt to balance the kind of development that can proceed under indigenous development and in terms of energy resources, both renewable and, significantly, non-renewable.

This is an area that would afford some constructive and comparative analysis, to the benefit of Inuit and other indigenous peoples.

Mr. Geng Tan:

You mentioned that circumpolar settlement. The Inuit Circumpolar Council in Canada is a non-profit organization, led by directors, comprising elected leaders of four land claim settlement regimes. After 40 years, it has grown into a major international NGO, representing about 160,000 Inuit in Alaska, Canada, Greenland and Russia.

What can this model offer other countries, including Canada, that are seeking a pathway forward to successful engagement of indigenous communities?

Dr. Dalee Sambo Dorough:

To be clear and accurate, the Inuit Circumpolar Council is an international non-governmental organization, as you have stated, consisting of approximately 160,000 Inuit throughout our four member countries. I believe that the declarations we've adopted, including the one I've referenced already, the resource development declaration, and the declaration we have adopted on Arctic sovereignty and our particular interest throughout the Arctic region, can be very instructive in terms of our interest in becoming more self-sufficient. When these are combined with the comprehensive land claims agreements and the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, not only do we have clear rights and title to lands, territories and resources but we also have responsibilities. Some of those responsibilities have already been highlighted by this committee in terms of ensuring that the quality of life of our individual members as well as our communities can in fact be enhanced and improved.

The Inuit Circumpolar Council is not a rights-holding institution, but the objectives that we have attempted to move forward, including these declarations but also the 2017 Circumpolar Inuit Economic Summit, pointed to the need to look at the opportunities for sustainable and equitable development that is Inuit-driven so that we can achieve self-sufficiency. Some of these may in fact include natural energy resource development; again it really depends on the people concerned.

(1705)

Mr. Geng Tan:

I have 30 seconds to ask Professor Poelzer a quick question, because he hasn't answered any questions for me.

It's a domestic question. You talked about the best practices in other countries and you also gave us some recommendations but what about the made-in-Canada? Do we have any best practices? Is there anything we do very well on which we can actually share our best practices with other countries?

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

Sure. Sometimes we are first to look at what we don't do well, but I think we do a number of things well.

In terms of land rights, it's hard to find another country in which you have stronger land rights than you do in Canada.

To go back to your earlier question on the evolution of the different land claims agreements and settlements, you start from the Alaska model, which was also kind of instructive for James Bay to a certain degree, and the lessons from there. Then you go all the way to things like Nisga'a in British Columbia, with regard to which, arguably, some people could make a case for a third order of government. There is also the experiment with co-management, particularly in the Northwest Territories. I've seen that in action in the Mackenzie Delta. It can work. I think some of those things are noteworthy.

But I also think about even earlier experiments that we're doing now. Take First Nations Power Authority in Saskatchewan, which was constructed with premier Brad Wall at the time.

The Chair:

Professor, I'm going to have to ask you to wrap up very quickly if you can.

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

Okay.

The Chair:

Ted, you have the floor, I think.

Mr. Ted Falk (Provencher, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

You'll probably get a chance to continue.

Professor Poelzer, I'll speak to you first. I was very impressed with your optimism regarding the opportunities we as a country have to really embark on nation-building projects.

You likened it to the development of the railroads. I appreciate that. I like that kind of enthusiasm and positiveness. I think you're on the right track.

In fact, this committee some time ago studied electrical interties and whether we had the capacity to move electricity around in an efficient manner within our country. I think you were just starting to allude to that a little bit. If you could finish that up in 30 seconds, I'd invite you to do that. Then I'll move on.

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

To take the electricity one, here's a slam dunk that we should be looking at as a country. Look at the Northwest Territories and the intertie to Saskatchewan into northern Manitoba. In terms of a nation-building project to move electrons around, that's something we ought to do that would benefit northern communities.

I want to pick up on another one, and that's private-public partnerships and things we can do very quickly. Take your own home province of Manitoba. The North West Company has phenomenal logistics support. They could partner, as they did recently in Inuvik, with first nations, buy renewable energy in bulk, and have the support there. Indigenous communities across their network could buy power from them...or North West Company could buy power from them on capital investment that could be sold cheaper than any indigenous community could buy on its own.

For these kinds of public-private partnerships, we have the infrastructure right now.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Right. Good. Thank you.

Some time ago, the Saskatoon StarPhoenix published an article with respect to the uranium development—again, a partnership. When you were interviewed, you said at that time that it would be a mistake to see the duty to consult as either an aboriginal veto on resource development or a “perfunctory set of hoops you need to jump through in order to proceed”. You said, “It's really about setting up a relationship.”

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

A hundred per cent.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Could you elaborate on that a little bit more? We're in a situation now where we have a project we want to embark on, the government has actually committed our tax dollars to it, and 117 first nations communities will be affected. Six are not in agreement, and it's—

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

No, I know. Again, with the duty to consult, there's a misconception that it gives an automatic veto. It doesn't. Of course, there are thresholds in proximity communities. Impacts and all those things get taken into account. But I will tell you this: If we're going to do this successfully, there are two things here. First, don't be afraid of indigenous land ownership. I think Trans Mountain has demonstrated that there is strong indigenous interest in equity ownership in energy projects, whether that be in the fossil fuel industry or in renewables.

Then you have to do meaningful.... You can't just show up. You have to do the hard work. That cuts across governments of all stripes, provincial and federal. We have to do this and we have to take seriously that we are all treaty peoples. We have to build those relationships.

At some point, of course, you're not always going to get everyone to agree. One of the interesting things is that somebody will ask, “Why can't indigenous peoples all agree on something?”, and I will tell them that this would be like asking Prime Minister Trudeau, or someone previous, to make sure that every MP in the House agrees with everything.

That's just not realistic. That's not how human beings are. To the point you raised about relationship-building, that's where it is.

(1710)

Mr. Ted Falk:

That's the key.

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

A hundred per cent.

Mr. Ted Falk:

You touched on that in the very first point of the four you wanted to make when you talked about doing environmental impact assessments. You said we shouldn't lose focus on, or neglect giving attention to, the social and cultural impacts for all involved.

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

A hundred per cent, and I'll give you an anecdote. When I started negotiating with SaskPower with my negotiation hat on, I and my colleague at the time—Tom Molloy, who abandoned me when he picked up another day job, as Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan—sat down with them, and we originally couldn't get a contract on vegetation management on an expansion of a transmission facility. There are some history or legacy pieces around that, because there was obviously no consultation back in the 1920s when the dam was originally commissioned. Something we had to explain to people—and there's been an evolution at SaskPower, a very positive one—was this: “You might think that was 1920s and 1930s, but I can assure you that when you walk into those communities, it's as if that dam was built yesterday.”

Those kinds of socio-cultural impacts are legacy intergenerational impacts, something that a lot of mainstream society doesn't fundamentally appreciate. That's why I think that dimension is so important.

Mr. Ted Falk:

I know that in Manitoba we had to go back to some first nations communities long after the fact and do some land settlement issues and compensation for the flooded properties and lands—

Prof. Greg Poelzer: Sure.

Mr. Ted Falk: —created as a result of our dams.

Do I have a minute or something like that left?

The Chair:

You have a minute and a half.

Mr. Ted Falk:

You also made just a fleeting comment, which was that when we talk about our environmental impact assessments there's an expectation for compensation.

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

Here's one of the things historically around EIA processes. Often when there is any opportunity at consultation, even though traditionally EIA tends to focus on the physical/environmental perspective, on the community perspective they typically see this broadly. This is one of the big challenges we've had historically with EIA processes. That has caused a lot of consternation, because there's a misunderstanding and then there hasn't been a gateway to address those other issues.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Do you have suggestions?

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

Well, I'm sure the committee is aware.... I don't know if you guys have ever heard of Bill C-69?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Prof. Greg Poelzer: You know what—

Mr. Ted Falk:

Scrap it, right?

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

Well, it's a work-in-progress, okay? I'll call it—

Mr. Ted Falk:

That was very polite.

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

No, it's a work-in-progress. There are some critical goals in there. The pieces around what you could call the social and cultural pieces need to be embedded. A lot of it is pretty loosely defined. We don't know where that's going to end up. That's our challenge. If we stay only on the physical and environmental pieces and we don't have a mechanism for that, we're going to be banging our heads into the wall. We have to find a constructive way to get there that's reasonable.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Thank you.

I think I'm out of time.

The Chair:

You are. Thank you very much.

Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Thanks to both of you for being with us today.

I'm going to start again with Professor Poelzer. I was so intrigued by the last statement in your presentation about what's possible globally or in nation building. Could you just expand on that and how it links to indigenous communities and what this government should be doing?

(1715)

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

Absolutely. I'll go back to one thing.

One of the biggest indicators of entrepreneurship is business start-ups. First nations peoples' business start-ups are 500% greater than the mainstream ones. TD Waterhouse did a study not too long ago in terms of economic development in first nations communities. Notwithstanding the stereotype of over 8% growth in China, India and so on, first nations businesses have been growing over the last decade at 8.2%. Their growth is outstripping what OECD countries are doing.

My argument is that if you want to invest in the most entrepreneurial class in Canada, invest in first nations. If you look at where the growth future is, you look at green energy and renewable energy, which is doing a global transition. There's a massive market. Does somebody in Nepal or Samoa want to talk to somebody in New York? No. They want to talk to somebody in Alaska or northern Canada, and Alaskans are doing that now. If we were to do some investments in helping to facilitate and nurture that opportunity, working with Alaska across Canada.... We've already demonstrated—like the ICC—that we can work together. I think that's the enormous opportunity, in my view: to market that know-how around the world and build that electrical future that's indigenous and northern led.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

It's more a case of linking minds rather than electricity.

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

Exactly, yes.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Okay. That's sort of what I was trying to get at, in terms of whether you had some vision of big polar power lines or something.

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

No, no.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Okay.

I'll turn to you again, Professor Dorough. You ran through that coverage of UNDRIP and FPIC pretty quickly. I just wondered if you could comment on how in Canada the government has expressed a desire to include UNDRIP in its laws and the way it operates.

My colleague Romeo Saganash had his private member's bill, Bill C-262, passed in the House of Commons. It asked the government to include those provisions in the laws of this land. I'm just wondering if you could comment on that process, on where we are and maybe on where other countries might be that have also signed on to UNDRIP and what we could learn from that.

Dr. Dalee Sambo Dorough:

I think the efforts in Canada and this political enterprise to integrate the UN declaration standards into national law, legislation and policy are, to a large extent, the answer to some of the questions that have been posed to Professor Poelzer, in terms of natural resource use. The bottom line is that it is a matter of respecting indigenous peoples, recognizing their rights and moving forward in a fashion that takes all of them into account.

As an outside observer to the political arena in Canada and this objective of implementing the UN declaration, I think it would be extremely beneficial to not only the government but also all other interests in Canada to put the standards in place in a fashion that allows for the dialogue to move forward, whether it's in relation to health care or natural resources and major energy projects, and whether it relates to housing or education, so that the standards affirmed in the UN declaration can be instructive and useful guidelines in every matter of concern to Canadians, and more importantly to the indigenous peoples across Canada—first nations, Métis and Inuit.

I think that for many of the questions your colleague posed about energy and alternatives, there are real opportunities to perform outreach with the use of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as a framework for dialogue. It could be significant.

In contrast to other regions across the globe...unfortunately we have certainly not seen this kind of political commitment made and the efforts to push it home, and I'm hoping that between now and June, or now and November, something concrete is resolved in this regard. Unfortunately we've seen by other governments in other parts of the world more rights ritualism than concrete action to respect and recognize the rights affirmed in the UN declaration. When I say rights ritualism, I mean governments and UN member states taking action and making glowing reports about their wonderful human rights record in relation to indigenous peoples but not doing anything concrete in follow-up.

Thank you.

(1720)

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Quickly, just to come down to a very specific example, the Alaska Village Electric Cooperative has been mentioned.

I'm just wondering if there are any lessons that Canada could learn from that.

Dr. Dalee Sambo Dorough:

When Professor Poelzer was speaking, I was thinking of Buckminster Fuller and his redesign of a global energy grid, when in fact I think for AVEC and its early initiatives, we were really talking about small energy grids within communities.

With technology today, I think there's an opportunity to revisit what's going on in our small rural remote Arctic communities, which are scattered across the whole of the circumpolar Arctic, and look at the alternatives to enhance these small energy grids that were originally put in place by institutions like AVEC.

I think there's extraordinary opportunity, and the public-private partnership that Professor Poelzer also spoke of is one of the essential keys. When we say public-private partnership, it also means the indigenous peoples, not solely as groups or communities but as rights holders who have the right to self-determination.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Our last witnesses were from Norway, which is a really interesting country.

As you're no doubt aware, Norway has a heritage fund of about two and a half times their GDP, of about $1 trillion.

Have we ever done anything like that in Canada? Have we ever put the revenue from our resources aside to build something like the energy infrastructure you're talking about as the next railway?

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

Well, there's the Alberta Heritage Savings Trust Fund, which started well under then premier Lougheed, of course, and then was basically pillaged after.

In Saskatchewan, the Blakeney government started one, but it was really a run-through account. Currently there is one in the Northwest Territories.

I've actually written a paper on this particular topic. It's one we ought to be doing, frankly, in every province that's producing resources. We're selling the house furniture and not reinvesting. We're selling assets. This makes absolutely no sense to me.

The argument against doing the fund is, “We need to invest in other things right now.” Trust the people. It was the same in Norway. Politicians were afraid of that then, but people are supportive.

The example I use is the Heritage Savings Trust Fund. A sovereign wealth fund is like your RRSP. Then you have a mortgage, which is like the debt. People say that you have to pay off the debt first, before you can start. Well, does anyone say, “I'm going pay off my mortgage, and 25 years from now, I'll start saving for my pension”? No, you do both. People do that all the time. We can, and we ought to.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do other countries do it in an effective way that we know about?

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

Well, Norway does, and Alaska's not that bad, actually.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think she wants to talk about it.

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

It is the Alaska Permanent Fund.

Dr. Dalee Sambo Dorough:

Exactly, the permanent fund is, in essence, a sovereign wealth fund. However, in terms of the question of infrastructure, it hasn't been a focus of the permanent fund or the pool of funds generated by oil development in Alaska to deal with the issue of infrastructure or energy-related issues.

I wanted to make one other comment. It seems to me that the Arctic Council is in a perfect place to look at the issue of infrastructure throughout the entire circumpolar Arctic, at least for the like-minded states: the Nordic states, including Greenland and the Danish realm; Canada; Alaska and the United States. They could assess infrastructure needs and co-operate and collaborate in a way that helps us erase these borders that stifle the innovative and creative opportunities to achieve some of the objectives that each of the Arctic rim nation-states have committed themselves to and obligated themselves to, such as the sustainable development goals. I think there is extraordinary potential there. The Arctic Council should really look at the leadership role it can play and, state by state, make the important commitment to a pool of funds that can resolve some of these issues.

(1725)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We have had some really good philosophical testimony here, and I appreciate what you're saying, but we are trying to get to a lot of the practical stuff, the best practices that are in place. I'm going to go back to Alaska. How does the Alaska state government interact with indigenous peoples on these things? How about the federal government in the United States? What are the differences between the two? Do they get along in any useful way?

Dr. Dalee Sambo Dorough:

At the federal level, the national level, we recently had an Inuk woman from the North Slope of Alaska appointed assistant secretary for Indian Affairs, so it'll be interesting to see how that plays out, not only with the Inuit in the Arctic and the issues they're facing but also with indigenous people across the whole of the United States.

With regard to Alaska, some advances have been made. With our former administration, governor Bill Walker, there was quite a lot of dynamic dialogue and discussion about priorities. With this new administration, Governor Dunleavy, it remains to be seen what direction it will go, but I'm hopeful about sustaining the dialogue, especially in our rural communities. Unfortunately, we've had a bit of an urban-rural divide. It may be similar to a north-south divide in Canada. I don't know if that's accurate. Hopefully we can overcome some of those difficulties and do something much more responsive to all Alaskans, including Alaskan native people, as indigenous people.

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

If I may, I'd like to add one thing especially for our Canadian colleagues in terms of the State of Alaska and federal relations. Most of the land in Alaska is owned by the federal government. There are some western states that have very high federal government ownership of land, which is very different from the Midwest and going out to eastern parts of the United States, where there is very little federal land ownership.

You can imagine what kinds of conflicts that brings in between the state, the federal government and the native corporations on decisions about what kinds of resource development.... Whether it's a natural resource such as fossil fuels or even management of marine mammals and so on, it makes it a much more difficult situation than you would see in a province in Canada.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm from Quebec. I can't imagine any conflict between federal and provincial governments.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: You talked in your opening comments, Professor Poelzer, about the social impacts, not just the environmental impacts. You cited the case of Yakutia. Could you expand a bit on the social impacts and how to quantify them and how to approach them?

Prof. Greg Poelzer:

Sure. Quantifying is not easy. Some might pretend it is.

If we were to separate it out, it's people focused. It's community focused. If you're looking at the impact of a pipeline coming through, the first thing in our traditional EIA process is to look at it and say, okay, let's look at what it's going to do to the natural environment, to the land and the water, and potentially the air. Often, though, what is not built into it in any kind of robust way is to ask, “What's going to be the impact on the local communities and their livelihoods, whether that's hunting or fishing—if they're involved in traditional economic activities, as it were—and on their culture?” Some places have a lot of spiritual value as well to those communities.

It's those kinds of things that need to be brought in and assessed. Some things you could measure. You could measure what the impact is on herds of cariboo or moose populations or fish. Some things you could probably quantify as they relate to those economies and what that means in terms of incomes for communities. For other things, simply not....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you very much. I think our time is up.

(1730)

The Chair:

Yes, it is.

Thanks very much to both of you for joining us today. It's very helpful to our study. We appreciate you taking the time to join us. Sadly, we're out of time, so we're going to have to end there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Time is a limited natural resource.

The Chair:

Yes, time is a very limited natural resource. Exactly.

We're adjourned.

Comité permanent des ressources naturelles

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Je vous remercie d'être des nôtres cet après-midi.

Au cours de la première partie de notre séance, nous entendrons deux témoins. Nous menons une étude sur les pratiques exemplaires utilisées dans le monde et nous accueillons aujourd'hui nos premiers témoins d'autres pays. Mme Turi est ici avec nous et M. Hernes est en Norvège.

Quelle heure est-il chez vous, monsieur? Je crois qu'il se fait assez tard là-bas, non?

M. Hans-Kristian Hernes (professeur, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, à titre personnel):

Nous avons six heures d'avance. Il est 21 h 30.

Le président:

Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants de prendre le temps de témoigner, surtout à cette heure-là.

Je vous explique le déroulement de la séance. Chacun de vous aura l'occasion de faire une déclaration préliminaire d'au plus 10 minutes. Lorsque vous aurez tous les deux terminé, nous vous poserons des questions.

Madame Turi, puisque vous êtes parmi nous, pourquoi ne commencerions-nous pas par vous?

Mme Ellen Inga Turi (professeure agrégée, Sámi University of Applied Sciences, à titre personnel):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Permettez-moi de dire tout d'abord que c'est un honneur pour moi de comparaître devant le Comité. Je fais des recherches sur le savoir autochtone et la gouvernance environnementale dans les pays nordiques. Je suis également Autochtone, soit Samie, et j'ai grandi dans une famille d'éleveurs de rennes dans le Nord de la Norvège.

Je vois votre mandat et j'ai réfléchi un peu à ce que je peux apporter à vos travaux. Je ne sais pas si je serai en mesure de vous parler de pratiques exemplaires. Mon exposé portera plutôt sur les difficultés liées à l'inclusion du savoir autochtone et à la gouvernance et à la planification en matière environnementale dans les pays nordiques.

Mon témoignage d'aujourd'hui reflète les recherches et les échanges que mes collègues scientifiques et moi avons menés en partenariat avec des éleveurs de rennes et des dirigeants autochtones au cours de la dernière décennie. Je tiens particulièrement à remercier la Sámi University of Applied Sciences, le Centre international pour l'élevage des rennes et l'Association mondiale des éleveurs de rennes, des institutions de premier plan dans ces travaux.

Je parlerai surtout de l'expérience des pays nordiques et je mentionnerai tout particulièrement les difficultés que nous avons relevées concernant la participation des peuples autochtones et l'inclusion du savoir autochtone dans les processus de gouvernance. Il sera plus particulièrement question de l'élevage des rennes.

Je vais vous parler très brièvement de l'élevage des rennes, car peut-être que certains d'entre vous n'en savent pas beaucoup à ce sujet. Il s'agit du principal moyen de subsistance de plus de 20 peuples autochtones dans le Nord circumpolaire. Cela inclut plus de 100 000 personnes et environ 2,5 millions de rennes semi-domestiqués dans neuf États-nations. La plupart sont en Eurasie, mais il y a également un petit troupeau de rennes au Canada.

L'élevage des rennes est un moyen de subsistance nomade qui se caractérise par une utilisation importante des terres qui a toutefois peu de répercussions. La Norvège, pays sur lequel portent mes recherches, compte quelque 250 000 rennes sur environ 150 000 km2, ce qui équivaut à 40 % de la superficie terrestre du pays, mais cela concerne seulement 3 000 personnes environ.

L'élevage des rennes est un moyen de subsistance qui nécessite l'utilisation d'une grande partie des terres, mais peu de gens le pratiquent et il ne s'agit pas d'une énorme économie. Il peut être considéré comme un écosystème associé à l'humain très résilient à la variabilité et aux changements climatiques, et c'est un modèle autochtone pour la gestion durable des régions limitrophes dans l'Arctique. Le savoir autochtone qui a été acquis au fil des générations est une source principale de résilience pour l'élevage des rennes.

Dans ce contexte, je vais vous expliquer ce que j'entends par « savoir autochtone » — et la définition découle des travaux des participants permanents du Conseil de l'Arctique. ... [c'est] une façon systématique de penser et de savoir qui est élaborée, puis appliquée à des phénomènes sur les plans biologique, physique, culturel et linguistique. Le savoir [autochtone] appartient aux détenteurs de ce savoir, souvent de façon collective, et est exprimé et transmis uniquement au moyen des langues autochtones. Il s'agit d’un ensemble des connaissances acquises par l’intermédiaire de pratiques culturelles et d’expériences vécues, notamment des observations, des leçons et des compétences étendues et multigénérationnelles. Ce savoir a été établi et vérifié pendant des millénaires et continue à évoluer selon un processus dynamique, ce qui comprend le savoir acquis aujourd'hui et demain, et est transmis de génération en génération.

Dans l'élevage des rennes, d'importantes connaissances ont été acquises au fil du temps, tant sur les rennes que sur les liens entre l'humain et les rennes et entre les animaux et l'environnement. Des connaissances ont été accumulées sur les changements radicaux qui s'opèrent dans l'environnement naturel et sur les stratégies d'adaptation à de tels défis.

Ce type de savoir constitue toujours le principal fondement de la survie pour les éleveurs de rennes. Il n'a pas été remplacé par un savoir axé sur la recherche ou suspendu. Il est très accessible et il est utilisé tous les jours, mais un tel savoir est négligé depuis longtemps dans la recherche et les politiques. En nous basant sur nos recherches, nous disons que le savoir autochtone est peut-être maintenant plus que jamais essentiel à la survie de l'élevage des rennes compte tenu des changements majeurs.

(1535)



Comme vous le savez tous, les régions arctiques subissent un certain nombre de changements — sociaux et environnementaux — qui peuvent avoir des effets néfastes sur les moyens de subsistance traditionnels. Puisque l'élevage des rennes est d'une grande portée et qu'il est axé sur la nature, il est directement touché par ce qu'on appelle les tendances lourdes, et je parle ici des changements climatiques, de la perte de la biodiversité et du changement d'utilisation des terres. Les répercussions de ces tendances lourdes sont inséparables.

Permettez-moi de vous l'expliquer.

Les scénarios du climat à venir indiquent que les températures moyennes en hiver pourraient augmenter de 7 à 8 °C au cours du prochain siècle dans les pâturages où les Samis font l'élevage de rennes et que la saison d'enneigement pourrait être raccourcie de un à trois mois. Cela représente un changement important et les fluctuations rapides et variables concernant le passage entre le gel et le dégel s'observeront vraisemblablement de plus en plus. Pourquoi est-ce important? L'élevage des rennes est un moyen de subsistance qui dépend des conditions de neige; il faut que les rennes soient capables d'atteindre la nourriture en dessous. Le réchauffement et la fonte de la neige ont créé périodiquement de mauvaises années de pâturage dans l'élevage des rennes des Samis. Les conditions de pâturage extrêmement mauvaises, que nous appelons goavvi en langue samie, causent la famine et la perte des rennes, ce qui a des répercussions négatives sur la communauté et l'organisation des éleveurs de rennes.

Au cours du dernier siècle, ces conditions que nous appelons goavvi ont été créées à environ 12 reprises à Guovdageaidnu, mais les projections climatiques nous indiquent que ce ce type de conditions météorologiques deviendra probablement plus fréquent.

Souvent, des éleveurs samis diront qu'ils sont beaucoup plus préoccupés par la perte de pâturages que par les changements climatiques. Pourquoi? Entre autres, la mobilité, soit le déplacement du troupeau d'un endroit à un autre, est une stratégie d'adaptation clé concernant les conditions de neige difficiles. Par conséquent, l'accès aux ressources en pâturages sera encore plus important compte tenu des changements climatiques. C'est ce qu'a reconnu le Groupe d'experts intergouvernemental des Nations unies sur l'évolution du climat dans son cinquième rapport d'évaluation, qui signale que la protection des pâturages sera la stratégie d'adaptation la plus importante pour les éleveurs de rennes concernant les changements climatiques.

La perte de pâturages pose un défi de taille pour l'élevage des rennes partout où on le pratique, mais particulièrement dans les pays nordiques. La perte de pâturages est causée par toutes sortes d'éléments: routes, infrastructure, activités militaires, lignes de transport d'électricité, pipelines, barrages, loisirs et activités connexes; ils contribuent tous au déclin des pâturages des rennes.

La perte de pâturages se produit principalement de deux façons: la destruction physique des pâturages; et la suppression réelle, mais non destructrice, de l'habitat ou la réduction de sa valeur en tant que ressource. J'entends par là l'abandon graduel par les rennes de zones auparavant très utilisées en raison des perturbations causées par les activités humaines. Les chiffres sont alarmants. Des études révèlent qu'environ 25 % des pâturages dans le Nord de la Norvège sont maintenant fortement perturbés, ce qui inclut 35 % des principales zones côtières. On estime que cette proportion pourrait atteindre 78 % d'ici 2050 si aucun changement n'est apporté aux politiques nationales et régionales. Cela signifie qu'on perd jusqu'à 1 % des pâtis d'été utilisés par les éleveurs samis de rennes le long de la côte de la Norvège chaque année.

(1540)



Un problème majeur qui se pose concernant l'élevage des rennes, c'est que la majorité des pertes de pâturages se produit par la perte fragmentaire. Par exemple, bien que la Norvège a ratifié la Convention no 169 de l'Organisation internationale du Travail sur les droits des peuples autochtones et la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, jusqu'à présent, les éleveurs de rennes samis ont eu très peu d'influence sur les droits territoriaux et le développement fragmentaire. Malgré le fait que des groupes d'éleveurs de rennes et des individus s'expriment dans le cadre des processus décisionnels — par exemple, dans le cadre de processus participatifs — le savoir autochtone des éleveurs de rennes n'est pas inclus dans le fondement du processus décisionnel.

Nos recherches indiquent que l'obstacle à l'utilisation du savoir autochtone dans la gouvernance n'est pas lié qu'à un conflit quant à ce qui est connu — un conflit épistémologique — mais également à un conflit quant à la logique de ce qui constitue des échelles de gouvernance fonctionnelles et géographiques appropriées et, surtout, ce qui constitue une utilisation appropriée des terres. La fragmentation sectorielle de l'administration gouvernementale mène à une situation dans laquelle les évaluations des effets cumulatifs de l'ensemble des projets ne sont pas prises en compte dans le processus décisionnel. Autrement dit, un ministère est responsable de l'infrastructure, un autre est responsable du développement hydroélectrique, un autre, des forêts, etc., tandis que l'élevage des rennes, d'autre part, en raison de son étendue et de sa dépendance à différents types de pâturages, surveille et enregistre constamment tout changement dans l'utilisation des terres.

Je dis que le fait qu'on n'intègre pas ces approches dans les systèmes de gouvernance peut être considéré comme une occasion perdue de tenir compte des effets cumulatifs à long terme des changements dans l'utilisation des terres dans la prise de décisions.

Nos recherches semblent indiquer que l'utilisation du savoir autochtone dans la gouvernance doit se faire dès l'étape de l'élaboration des politiques; c'est-à-dire, lorsque le savoir autochtone n'est pas inclus dans le processus de l'élaboration des politiques. Si l'on attend à l'étape de la mise en oeuvre des politiques pour le faire, il sera difficile, voire carrément impossible...

(1545)

Le président:

Madame, je dois vous demander de conclure très rapidement si possible.

Mme Ellen Inga Turi:

Oui.

Je vais terminer mon exposé en vous donnant un exemple très concret. Il s'agit de ce qu'a dit Aslak Ante Sara, un éleveur de rennes de Hammerfest, la ville dans le nord du pays où l'on trouve une usine de gaz naturel liquéfié de Statoil. Voici comment il décrit son expérience dans le processus de planification pour le projet Snøhvit: On nous a en quelque sorte oubliés dans le processus, et nos points de vue n'étaient pas une préoccupation centrale. Parce que l'usine de gaz naturel liquéfié n'était pas située directement sur les pâturages des rennes, nous n'avons pas participé pleinement au processus de réglementation. Et après ce départ [où] on ne se souciait pas de nous, nous prenions continuellement du retard dans le processus, incapables de suivre correctement... Le développement s'est traduit par une explosion inattendue des activités humaines. Il y a plus de concurrence pour nos pâturages maintenant... Lorsque ce type de projet de développement industriel majeur est mené à Hammerfest, la région environnante devient alors très attrayante pour d'autres types de projets de développement. De plus, la société de Hammerfest prend de l'expansion rapidement en raison du développement. Il est maintenant question de plusieurs projets et la planification a commencé: exploitation pétrolière, nouvelles lignes de transport d'énergie, éoliennes, développement de l'infrastructure, routes, etc. Ce sont de gros investissements motivés par des sources économiques indépendantes et influentes, également en partie indépendantes de Statoil. Nous constatons également que de plus en plus d'activités de loisir ont lieu dans nos zones de pâturages.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Hernes.

M. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

Je vous remercie beaucoup de m'avoir invité à participer à votre séance. C'est pour moi un très grand honneur.

Le contenu de mon exposé se fonde sur des projets de recherches menés ici, à l'Université de l'Arctique de la Norvège. Ils sont réalisés dans le cadre d'une collaboration entre des chercheurs norvégiens, suédois, canadiens et australiens.

Je dois dire également que j'ai réfléchi un peu aux leçons que le Canada peut tirer de l'expérience de la Norvège. C'est en quelque sorte ce à quoi j'ai pensé en premier. Or, j'enseigne également dans un programme de maîtrise conjoint avec une université canadienne, et je vois que nous pouvons apprendre d'exemples très différents. Je vais alors parler de la situation en Norvège. J'ai des exemples norvégiens, et peut-être que nous pourrons discuter de la façon dont ils peuvent servir dans le contexte canadien.

Comme vous le savez peut-être, la Norvège est un pays très riche en ressources. Je ne parlerai pas du secteur pétrolier, mais la Norvège est riche en énergie depuis environ 100 ans; à l'époque, elle a commencé à produire de l'énergie hydroélectrique avec l'utilisation de chutes d'eau, la construction de barrages et l'utilisation de rivières. C'était important pour le développement de la Norvège en tant que nation indépendante. Après la Seconde Guerre mondiale, c'était très important sur le plan du revenu et de l'État providence. Aujourd'hui, 95 % de l'électricité est produite par l'hydroélectricité en Norvège.

Il s'agit d'une ressource publique; 50 % de la production d'électricité appartient à l'État, 40 % aux municipalités et aux cantons et seulement 10 % à des intérêts privés. De nos jours, si on fait une demande de permis pour construire une nouvelle centrale, il faut une prise en charge et un financement publics équivalant à deux tiers. En Norvège, il y a eu une longue lutte politique concernant la propriété publique de l'électricité et de la production électrique et la propriété nationale de la ressource perpétuelle que ces rivières et ces barrages représentent.

L'électricité est importante pour l'infrastructure, les services sociaux en Norvège, l'industrie de la construction, l'emploi et les revenus d'exportation, et elle est importante en tant que source de revenu supplémentaire pour les municipalités. À l'heure actuelle, les municipalités norvégiennes reçoivent environ un milliard de couronnes norvégiennes chaque année en revenu en raison des conditions de concession pour l'électricité.

Pendant de nombreuses années, l'électricité a été gérée par le gouvernement. C'est toujours le cas, mais dans l'entre-deux-guerres et après la Seconde Guerre mondiale, l'État était l'acteur principal. Il avait le contrôle et il essayait de contrôler le système.

En 1991, une nouvelle loi en matière d'énergie a été adoptée, ce qui a changé radicalement le système, en ce sens que le système d'électricité se baserait alors sur le marché. La Norvège est alors reliée au marché nordique de l'électricité et plus tard, au marché européen de l'électricité. Les différents producteurs se livrent concurrence dans ce marché, tandis qu'en Norvège, il y a un monopole sur les réseaux de distribution, les lignes de transport d'énergie.

De nos jours, le débat ne porte pas tellement sur les grands projets hydroélectriques. Cette époque semble révolue. Ce qui fait l'objet de débats aujourd'hui, ce sont les énergies éolienne et solaire, et il s'agit du développement de nouvelles sources d'énergie renouvelable. Les parcs éoliens en particulier font l'objet de débats tout comme, dans une certaine mesure, les centrales solaires. Des parcs éoliens surgissent à bien des endroits au pays. La production d'électricité à partir de l'énergie éolienne est en hausse. Selon les données des services de statistique de la Norvège, il y a eu une hausse de 36 % en 2018, mais l'énergie éolienne ne représente toujours que 2,5 % de la production d'électricité au pays.

(1550)



Un autre débat ou enjeu concerne les réseaux ou les lignes de transport d'énergie. L'objectif est de renforcer le réseau électrique de la Norvège pour connecter le pays. Comme la première intervenante l'a dit, cela exerce des pressions sur l'utilisation des terres dans différentes régions de la Norvège, mais surtout dans le Nord de la Norvège, en raison des pâturages dont se servent les éleveurs de rennes.

En ce qui concerne l'énergie et le rôle des peuples autochtones, l'histoire est jalonnée de conflits. En Norvège, cette situation est surtout illustrée par le conflit entre l'État et le peuple sami au sujet de la rivière Alta au début des années 1980. L'État souhaitait bâtir un gros barrage et les Samis ont dit qu'ils n'avaient pas été invités à participer au processus. Les Samis et ceux qui s'opposaient au projet, notamment les membres du mouvement écologiste, ont perdu cette bataille, mais cet événement a marqué la fondation des principales institutions samies en Norvège.

Je parlerai un peu des trois modèles de relations entre les peuples autochtones et l'énergie. Le premier est le conflit lié à la rivière Alta, lorsque les peuples autochtones rejettent des projets énergétiques. Il y a alors un conflit, une participation très limitée ou nulle et des luttes incessantes entre l'État ou le gouvernement et les peuples autochtones. Dans le deuxième modèle, il y a une participation aux processus décisionnels et des exigences liées à cette participation. Dans le troisième modèle, les peuples autochtones ou les communautés locales s'approprient la production énergétique et l'utilisent pour le développement local et possiblement pour engendrer des revenus.

Selon moi, le troisième modèle n'est pas utilisé pour l'énergie éolienne ou solaire en Norvège. À ma connaissance, il est un peu utilisé au Canada, mais pas dans les pays nordiques. Je pourrais offrir plusieurs explications pour cette situation, mais je ne le ferai pas ici. Nous n'avons pas d'ententes sur les répercussions et les avantages, mais les municipalités dans lesquelles se trouvent de grandes centrales hydroélectriques reçoivent une indemnisation. C'est le modèle utilisé depuis environ 100 ans.

Si vous souhaitez étudier un modèle norvégien, je vous suggère le deuxième, c'est-à-dire celui de la participation. Je le présenterai brièvement. En Norvège, les droits et les politiques relatives aux Autochtones se fondent en grande partie sur le droit international, qui les a beaucoup influencés. La DNUDPA est un bon exemple, mais le Bureau C169 de l'Organisation internationale du Travail est l'organisme principal. En effet, depuis 2005, ce bureau occupe une place importante dans l'élaboration de consultations à titre d'outil de communication et de coopération entre l'État norvégien et le Parlement sami. L'entente de consultation actuellement en vigueur indique que l'État doit informer le Parlement sami ou d'autres intervenants samis des projets à venir. Le Parlement sami peut ensuite exiger la tenue de consultations et on devrait idéalement échanger des opinions. L'objectif est de conclure une entente ou d'obtenir le consentement de tous les intervenants.

Où en sommes-nous aujourd'hui? Nous avons des processus officiels. Les intervenants du Parlement sami et les éleveurs de rennes sont invités à participer à ces processus, et ils le font. Il faut cependant préciser que les représentants samis et ceux de l'État norvégien sont en désaccord et qu'ils n'arrivent donc pas à conclure une entente ou à obtenir le consentement de toutes les parties, comme le demande l'objectif des processus de consultation. On peut observer que dans le cadre des consultations, la Direction générale des ressources et de l'énergie de la Norvège pose un défi pour le Parlement sami. En effet, cet organisme met d'abord l'accent sur les économies en matière d'énergie et les obligations liées à l'accroissement de la production d'énergie renouvelable avant d'aborder la question des droits du peuple sami et la situation des éleveurs de rennes.

De grands projets d'éoliennes ou de parcs éoliens sont à l'étape de la planification ou de la construction. Les conflits liés à ces projets pourraient se retrouver devant les tribunaux. Cela alimente le conflit lié aux régions où le taux de prise en charge locale n'est pas très élevé.

(1555)



Donc, si je reviens aux trois modèles, on pourrait faire valoir que nous sommes actuellement sur la limite entre le rejet et la participation. Toutefois, la voie suivie par la Norvège est toujours la coopération informée par des consultations. Le gouvernement a déclaré qu'il souhaite modifier la façon dont le système d'opposition par le Parlement sami peut être géré. Il s'agit cependant d'accroître l'efficacité du système, et pas nécessairement de trouver des solutions au conflit. Le problème, c'est qu'il faut gérer à la fois la demande et les pressions relatives à la production accrue d'énergie renouvelable en Europe tout en respectant les droits des Autochtones à l'échelon international. En même temps, il y a très peu d'avantages pour les collectivités locales et les collectivités samies, car les prix de l'énergie sont assez bas, ce qui réduit considérablement les taxes sur la production d'énergie par les parcs éoliens.

Merci.

Le président:

J'aimerais remercier les deux témoins.

Monsieur Whalen, vous avez la parole.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Il est intéressant d'avoir une perspective internationale sur la façon dont les gouvernements mobilisent adéquatement ou ne mobilisent pas adéquatement leurs peuples autochtones lors de la mise en valeur des ressources.

Nous examinons certains des enjeux, Ellen, dont vous avez parlé plus tôt. En plus de tenter d'atteindre un équilibre entre le point de vue largement majoritaire de l'État sur la façon d'accroître la prospérité du pays et les droits de propriété ou l'absence de ces droits chez les peuples autochtones — et les droits culturels qui ne sont pas faciles à indemniser avec de l'argent —, on doit relever des défis comme la perte de territoires pour l'élevage de caribous, une activité qui nécessite un vaste territoire, ou la perte du respect entre les cultures.

Quelle serait la meilleure pratique à adopter, selon vous, relativement à cet enjeu lié à l'accroissement de l'usage? Quand les peuples autochtones devraient-ils participer aux mégaprojets, afin que nous puissions mieux comprendre comment protéger les droits culturels et les droits qui sont moins économiques et qui sont donc plus difficiles à respecter lorsque les gens n'ont pas une vue d'ensemble du projet et de ses conséquences, ainsi que des développements connexes qui suivront?

Mme Ellen Inga Turi:

Comme je l'ai dit au début de mon exposé, l'élevage de rennes est un moyen de subsistance peu courant qui touche très peu de gens, et il est peut-être compréhensible que nous ne puissions pas remporter tous les cas liés à l'utilisation des terres. Toutefois, mes partenaires de recherche me disent également que si on les avait consultés beaucoup plus tôt dans le processus, avant même de commencer à dresser des cartes, on aurait pu, à l'aide de rajustements mineurs, éliminer les répercussions les plus graves. Autrement dit, par exemple, si vous planifiez la construction d'un nouveau tunnel sous-marin... C'est un exemple concret dans le Nord de Tromsø. Les éleveurs de rennes qui habitent là-bas ont affirmé que s'ils avaient participé au processus suffisamment tôt pour être en mesure d'influencer l'emplacement de ce tunnel en le déplaçant d'un seul kilomètre, cela aurait évité des répercussions majeures. Toutefois, dans le cadre du plan actuel, ces éleveurs risquent de perdre des régions de mise bas très importantes.

Plus on consulte les gens tôt dans le processus, plus il est possible d'arranger la situation en apportant de petits rajustements comme celui-là.

(1600)

M. Nick Whalen:

Vous avez parlé un peu de la définition des connaissances autochtones. C'est aussi une question qui soulève quelques difficultés au Canada, et nous tentons donc de veiller à consulter les peuples autochtones sur leurs pratiques traditionnelles et de nous informer sur leurs connaissances orales. Comment les Samis recueillent-ils, emploient-ils et utilisent-ils les connaissances autochtones de façon longitudinale et comment appliquent-ils la méthode scientifique à leur savoir traditionnel?

Mme Ellen Inga Turi:

Malheureusement, il n'y a pas eu de recensement systématique à grande échelle des connaissances autochtones traditionnelles en Norvège. Toutefois, il y a quelques bons exemples sur la façon de faire cela. En effet, le Parlement sami a entrepris quelques petits travaux pour documenter les connaissances autochtones sur des sujets particuliers. De plus, selon notre expérience, lorsqu'il s'agit de planifier, par exemple, un projet de mise en valeur des ressources dans une certaine région, il faut s'adresser aux gens qui exploitent les terres dans cette région. Les meilleurs exemples dont nous disposons aujourd'hui sont peut-être ceux des groupes d'éleveurs de rennes ou des chercheurs qui ont choisi de mener des évaluations d'impacts spéciales pour documenter les connaissances traditionnelles.

M. Nick Whalen:

Une fois que ces connaissances sont recueillies ou utilisées pour un projet précis, peuvent-elles être utilisées comme point de départ pour d'autres projets? Serait-il approprié de retourner voir le peuple autochtone qui a fourni ces connaissances pour obtenir d'autres renseignements qui visent plus précisément les différences entre un projet secondaire et le projet initial? Avez-vous eu des expériences de consultations secondaires liées à des connaissances autochtones dans la même région, mais pour différents types de développement économique?

Mme Ellen Inga Turi:

Malheureusement, je n'ai eu aucune expérience liée à une évaluation secondaire. Les types de connaissances autochtones qui ont été bien documentées, selon mes observations, et qui ont peut-être été utiles dans ces types de processus sont liés à l'utilisation traditionnelle des terres et à l'utilisation potentielle future des terres pour l'élevage des rennes, ce qui permet de comprendre comment la région est utilisée. Ce type de connaissances est manifestement utile pour l'avenir, car il ne vise pas seulement le projet potentiel.

M. Nick Whalen:

Monsieur Hernes, vous pourrez peut-être m'aider à comprendre un peu mieux les raisons historiques pour lesquelles les pays scandinaves n'utilisent pas les ententes sur les répercussions et les avantages. En effet, selon un témoignage que nous avons entendu plus tôt cette semaine, ces ententes sont formidables. Les plus gros problèmes liés à ces ententes au Canada émergent lorsqu'elles ne sont pas respectées. Toutefois, elles servent de fondement à tout développement qui a des répercussions sur les droits traditionnels au Canada.

J'aimerais que vous nous expliquiez pourquoi le régime législatif qui régit les relations entre la Norvège et les Samis n'inclut pas le partage des revenus pour les mégaprojets qui sont construits sur les terres des Samis.

M. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

La grande différence avec le Canada, c'est que le peuple sami n'est pas propriétaire de ces terres. Nous n'avons pas les types d'ententes que vous avez conclues. C'est l'une des raisons.

De plus, l'énergie est considérée comme étant une ressource nationale, et les revenus sont donnés ou transférés à l'État. L'État retransfère ensuite une partie de cet argent. Le peuple sami, par exemple, ne participe pas aux échanges directs avec les entreprises ou avec les constructeurs de nouveaux parcs éoliens, par exemple. Le peuple sami fait affaire avec l'État. C'est l'État qui prend des règlements et qui s'occupe des formalités.

(1605)

M. Nick Whalen:

Afin de m'aider à comprendre le reste de votre témoignage, j'aimerais que vous approfondissiez vos explications. J'ai tenté de comprendre l'article 1-4 sur la responsabilité financière de l'État dans la Loi sur les Samis. Pourriez-vous décrire comment l'État — et je présume qu'il s'agit de la Norvège — transfert des fonds au Sameting, le Parlement sami, pour qu'ils soient utilisés dans les affaires municipales des Samis? Si Ellen pouvait aussi répondre à cette question, je crois que cela nous aiderait vraiment à comprendre le reste de votre témoignage.

Le président:

Nous vous serions reconnaissants de fournir de brèves réponses.

M. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

L'État ou le Parlement national norvégien établit le budget annuel du Parlement sami. Il transfère — plutôt que de donner — des fonds au Parlement sami dans le cadre du budget de l'État. C'est la façon dont cela fonctionne. Cela fait partie du budget de l'État. Il y a quelques consultations au sujet du budget, mais c'est surtout le Parlement national norvégien qui prend ces décisions.

Le président:

D'accord. C'est très bien. Merci.

Monsieur Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Pour revenir aux questions de M. Whalen, le budget est établi par l'État, mais le Parlement sami a-t-il la possibilité d'opposer un veto...? Vous pouvez tous les deux répondre à cette question. Je sais que vous avez mentionné quelque chose à cet égard, monsieur Hernes, dans votre témoignage. Je crois comprendre que le Parlement ne peut pas opposer son veto à un projet. Est-ce exact?

M. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

Le Parlement sami ne peut pas opposer son veto à des projets.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Si je vous ai bien compris, vous avez mentionné que le Parlement sami avait formulé, pour une série de raisons, des objections à l'égard de certains projets et qu'il avait présenté ses préoccupations au gouvernement, mais que le processus est tout de même allé de l'avant, pour une raison quelconque.

À votre avis, quelles sont les lacunes de ce processus, étant donné que les membres d'un organe élu ont participé au processus, mais que leur avis n'a pas été pris en compte, je présume, à défaut d'une expression plus appropriée? Je présume qu'il a été pris en compte, car il a fait l'objet d'un débat, mais la décision a emprunté une voie différente.

M. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

Dans certains cas, l'État et le Parlement sami ne s'entendent pas après un échange d'opinions, mais ce sont les processus qui causent des difficultés au Parlement sami, car les membres du Parlement ont l'impression que leurs arguments ne sont pas écoutés et que l'État lance ces processus simplement pour satisfaire à l'exigence officielle en matière de consultations. Je crois que c'est aussi l'un des défis liés aux enjeux relatifs à l'énergie.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Lorsque vous parlez des transferts de la Norvège au Parlement, la formule utilisée est-elle fondée sur le développement économique ou s'agit-il seulement d'un transfert fixe qui ne tient pas compte de la situation favorable d'une région sur le plan de l'infrastructure énergétique ou d'autres facteurs?

M. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

Il s'agit surtout d'un transfert au Parlement sami et ce transfert se fonde sur les diverses tâches que doit accomplir le Parlement. Il se peut que le Parlement se voit confier de nouvelles tâches et il obtiendra alors plus d'argent. Par exemple, si le Parlement travaille sur des questions liées à la langue, il obtiendra probablement plus d'argent pour ces travaux et pour les travaux liés aux Samis ou à la langue des Samis. C'est la même chose pour les musées, etc. Toutes ces décisions sont prises par le Parlement norvégien dans le cadre d'un long processus qui se fonde également sur les conseils du Cabinet ou du gouvernement.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

Simplement par curiosité, en ce qui concerne les projets énergétiques — vous en avez mentionnés quelques-uns dans votre témoignage —, connaissez-vous, de mémoire, le temps qui s'est écoulé entre la présentation d'une demande par un promoteur de projets et la décision qui a permis de commencer les travaux de construction?

M. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

Je dirais qu'il a fallu au moins cinq ans dans le cas de certains projets éoliens, selon nos renseignements, mais le gouvernement a également tenté d'établir d'autres limites dans ces processus, car certains de ces permis ont été délivrés, mais les travaux de construction n'ont pas commencé, et ces permis ont été retirés. En effet, les travaux doivent être menés dans un délai d'un certain nombre d'années.

(1610)

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

M. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

Je dirais qu'il a fallu cinq ans, et parfois beaucoup plus de temps, car il est difficile d'obtenir du financement pour certains projets. Un projet peut commencer à l'échelle locale. Par exemple, un grand parc éolien est maintenant en construction à l'extérieur de Tromsø. Cela représente environ 3 milliards de couronnes norvégiennes, c'est-à-dire environ 500 millions de dollars canadiens. Au départ, il s'agissait d'un projet local, mais il appartient maintenant à une caisse de retraite de médecins allemands. Les gestionnaires de cette caisse de retraite ont donc pris les commandes, ce qui a accéléré le processus, car les habitants de l'endroit ne pouvaient pas amasser les fonds nécessaires.

M. Jamie Schmale:

À votre avis, la vaste majorité de ces projets d'infrastructure ont-ils été lancés par le secteur privé ou le secteur public?

M. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

Certains d'entre eux ont été lancés par des sociétés énergétiques appartenant à une municipalité. L'État participe aussi à certains grands projets par l'entremise de son propre Statkraft. Le projet à l'extérieur de Tromsø est un exemple de projet privé. En Norvège, les parcs éoliens profitent d'un modèle de propriété mixte plus souvent que les projets d'énergie hydroélectrique, car ces derniers appartiennent à l'État.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Il y a des parcs éoliens dans ma région; je serais donc curieux de savoir si vous savez ceci. Vous avez dit que certains projets avaient été approuvés, mais que le début de la construction avait été retardé pour des raisons quelconques. Savez-vous quelles étaient ces raisons? Étaient-elles économiques? Y avait-il d'autres facteurs tels que des manifestations publiques?

M. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

Les manifestations publiques sont un des facteurs, mais la raison principale est financière, je crois. Dans certains cas, on a découvert que la région n'était pas si bonne que cela pour la production. De plus, certains retards sont causés par les nouvelles technologies que nous pouvons développer. Nous pouvons construire de plus grandes éoliennes, ce qui vient modifier le projet; nous devons alors le resoumettre au gouvernement, ce qui peut aussi entraîner un retard.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Cannings.

M. Richard Cannings (Okanagan-Sud—Kootenay-Ouest, NPD):

Merci à vous deux de vous joindre à nous. C'est très intéressant de découvrir une perspective internationale, et je suis certain que nous en apprenons tous beaucoup sur le peuple sami et sur sa façon de gérer les interactions avec l'État.

Le but de notre étude est de trouver les meilleures façons possibles, pour toutes les parties concernées, de faire participer les peuples autochtones. Je vais m'adresser d'abord à Mme Turi. Les Samis habitent non seulement la Norvège, mais aussi la Suède, la Finlande et la Russie. Certains pays réussissent-ils mieux que d'autres à faire participer les Samis et à mettre leur savoir à contribution avant le début des projets d'exploitation des ressources?

Mme Ellen Inga Turi:

Je ne suis pas certaine de pouvoir affirmer que certains pays sont meilleurs que d'autres.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je ne vous demande pas si certains pays sont meilleurs que d'autres; je voudrais savoir s'il y a des différences dans leur approche.

Mme Ellen Inga Turi:

Je pense que de nombreux Samis considèrent la Norvège comme étant le pays le plus avancé sur le plan de l'élaboration d'approches favorisant la participation des peuples autochtones, mais il reste encore beaucoup d'obstacles.

M. Richard Cannings:

D'accord.

Monsieur Hernes, avez-vous quelque chose à dire à ce sujet?

M. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

Je dirais que je suis d'accord avec Mme Turi. Le Parlement sami de la Norvège est plus fort et il a plus de ressources que ceux de la Suède et de la Finlande. La Norvège est aussi le seul de ces pays à avoir signé la Convention 169 de l'OIT et à avoir mis en place des outils tels que la consultation. La Norvège a établi des procédures et posé des jalons importants. C'est peut-être lié au conflit qui a mené à la création du Parlement sami, à la modification de la Constitution et à l'adoption de la loi sur les Samis.

D'après mon expérience et selon ce que les gens me disent, il y a une meilleure relation entre le Parlement sami de la Norvège et les décideurs d'Oslo (la capitale de la Norvège) qu'entre le Parlement sami de la Suède et les politiciens de Stockholm (la capitale de la Suède). Je pense que la Norvège a une légère longueur d'avance sur les autres.

(1615)

M. Richard Cannings:

Je voulais aussi revenir sur la Convention 169 de l'OIT, que vous avez mentionnée. Nous n'entendons pas beaucoup parler de cet accord ici parce que le Canada et une grande partie des pays du monde ne l'ont pas ratifié. La plupart des pays d'Amérique latine l'ont ratifié, ainsi que la Norvège, l'Islande, l'Espagne, je crois, et le Bhoutan. Cet accord est-il considéré comme le prédécesseur de la DNUDPA? Quelles sont les différences? Vous avez aussi laissé entendre que la Norvège n'avait peut-être pas respecté ses engagements en vertu de la Convention 169 de l'OIT; pouvez-vous nous en dire plus à ce sujet?

M. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

La Norvège a été le premier pays à ratifier la Convention 169 de l'OIT. La convention a joué un rôle important dans les décisions et le processus relatifs à la propriété ou à l'utilisation des terres et des cours d'eau situés dans le Nord de la Norvège. Elle a aussi beaucoup influencé l'élaboration de la Finnmark Act, qui a été adoptée par le Parlement en 2005. À ces égards, elle a joué un rôle important.

Elle a aussi eu une grande influence sur la mise en place du processus de consultation. La Norvège a conclu un accord sur la consultation en 2005, et cet accord est basé sur l'article 6 de la Convention 169 de l'OIT; elle a donc été importante pour la Norvège sur ce plan. L'OIT a beaucoup travaillé à l'élaboration et à l'établissement de normes relatives à la consultation, ainsi qu'aux processus liés à la propriété des terres et des cours d'eau. À ma connaissance, ce sont là les résultats principaux de la Convention 169. Je pense que la Norvège ne parle pas autant de la DNUDPA que le Canada, par exemple.

M. Richard Cannings:

Merci.

Madame Turi, j'aimerais revenir sur un sujet abordé par M. Whalen, soit le savoir autochtone. J'ai déjà été écologue. J'ai dirigé une équipe de rétablissement des écosystèmes qui avait le mandat de mettre le savoir autochtone à contribution en Colombie-Britannique. C'était il y a 20 ans, et c'était extrêmement difficile.

Vous avez mentionné les difficultés liées à la propriété du savoir. Dans mon domaine, chaque type de savoir appartient, en quelque sorte, à certaines familles. De plus, il y a le conflit inévitable qui survient lorsque le savoir autochtone et les connaissances scientifiques occidentales se contredisent. Pouvez-vous nous parler des solutions que les Samis ont trouvées pour surmonter ces difficultés? C'est peut-être plus simple s'il est seulement question de l'élevage des rennes. De quels types de savoir est-il question? S'agit-il seulement de l'élevage des rennes ou parle-t-on aussi, par exemple, des changements climatiques?

Mme Ellen Inga Turi:

Je dirais d'abord que j'ai l'impression que le Canada est bien plus avancé que la Norvège en ce qui a trait au savoir autochtone. En Norvège, même pour les chercheurs, il s'agit d'un concept relativement nouveau qui n'a pas reçu autant d'attention qu'au Canada. Nous, les chercheurs, nous inspirons donc beaucoup des chercheurs canadiens.

En ce qui concerne l'inclusion du savoir autochtone dans l'élaboration des politiques, nous ne sommes pas très avancés sur ce plan non plus. Les exemples de pratiques exemplaires les mieux réussies qui incluent l'élevage des rennes et le savoir autochtone, et qui ont au moins une certaine influence sur les politiques sont peut-être les descriptions de la Norvège contenues dans les documents du Conseil de l'Arctique. C'est peut-être parce que le Conseil de l'Arctique a plus l'habitude de travailler avec le savoir autochtone que les gouvernements de la Norvège. Toutefois, il existe des processus, mis en oeuvre surtout par le Parlement sami, qui visent à créer des documents de base dans lesquels on explique ce qu'est le savoir autochtone, comment le mettre à contribution et les avantages qu'il peut apporter. Il peut s'agir de savoir intéressant l'ensemble de la société — par exemple, le savoir relatif aux changements climatiques — ou de savoir très précis concernant une seule région d'élevage des rennes.

Or, de façon générale, d'après mon expérience et le travail que j'ai fait dans le domaine du savoir autochtone relatif à l'élevage des rennes, je dirais que vous avez raison: il y a parfois des contradictions entre les propos d'un scientifique et ceux d'un éleveur de rennes autochtone. Toutefois, si l'on prend le temps de bien s'expliquer, on a tendance à se rapprocher.

(1620)

M. Richard Cannings:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Harvey, vous êtes le dernier intervenant.

M. T.J. Harvey (Tobique—Mactaquac, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Hernes, je vais commencer par vous. M. Cannings a parlé de la convention de l'OIT. Il l'a comparée rapidement à la DNUDPA, en mentionnant ses faiblesses potentielles relativement à la DNUDPA. Je ne veux pas vous demander de les comparer; j'aimerais plutôt connaître votre opinion. Premièrement, croyez-vous que les objectifs de la convention ont été atteints? Deuxièmement, même si vous pensez que l'ensemble des objectifs n'ont pas été atteints, croyez-vous néanmoins que les avantages tirés de la convention ont servi l'intérêt général?

M. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

Merci. Ce sont de grandes questions.

À mon avis, la convention de l'OIT a porté des fruits; elle a servi d'outil qui a permis au Parlement sami d'établir des consultations, tant par rapport au processus de la Finnmark Act du Parlement norvégien [Difficultés techniques] 2003 [Difficultés techniques] et avant l'adoption de la loi.

La consultation a été très importante pour le Parlement sami, sur les plans de la communication, de la coopération et de la participation aux processus décisionnels. La consultation touche non seulement les dossiers liés aux terres et aux cours d'eau, mais aussi ceux relatifs à l'éducation, aux questions linguistiques, à l'environnement et plus encore. Le Parlement sami est devenu un réel participant à plusieurs processus politiques de la Norvège et il collabore avec le gouvernement norvégien. On peut donc dire, d'après moi, que la convention a été un succès.

Je suis désolé, j'ai oublié votre deuxième question.

M. T.J. Harvey:

La deuxième partie de la question est: d'après vous, qu'on ait réussi ou non à atteindre l'ensemble des objectifs, la convention a-t-elle été avantageuse, de façon générale, pour la relation entre le peuple sami et l'ensemble de la Norvège?

M. Hans-Kristian Hernes:

Je pense qu'elle a été avantageuse pour le Parlement sami, et le Parlement sami souhaite poursuivre sa collaboration. Le Parlement norvégien est saisi actuellement d'un projet de loi sur la consultation ou sur l'inclusion de la consultation dans la loi sur les Samis. Le Parlement sami souhaite continuer à collaborer. Selon lui, il s'agit d'une façon d'être inclus dès les premières étapes des processus et d'être en contact direct avec le gouvernement. L'entente comprend aussi l'obligation pour le président du Parlement sami de la Norvège de rencontrer le ministre responsable des affaires régionales de la Norvège deux fois par année. C'est une façon de rendre officielle la manière dont le Parlement sami travaille avec le gouvernement norvégien.

(1625)

M. T.J. Harvey:

Madame Turi, d'après votre expérience, la convention a-t-elle aidé à améliorer la relation entre les Samis et le gouvernement de la Norvège? Si l'on n'a pas réussi à atteindre l'ensemble des objectifs de la convention, les Samis sentent-ils tout de même, de façon générale, qu'ils avancent progressivement?

Mme Ellen Inga Turi:

À mon avis, la convention a aidé à améliorer la relation entre le Parlement sami et le gouvernement norvégien. Bien sûr, les Samis ne sont pas tous pareils. Ils ont divers moyens d'existence, qui ne peuvent pas tous être représentés aussi fortement par le Parlement sami. Le Parlement sami est une organisation relativement jeune qui continue à prendre forme, et la place qu'il occupe chez les Samis continue aussi à prendre forme. Selon moi, il a fait de grands bonds, surtout dans les dernières années. Or, il y a eu des moments où, par exemple, les éleveurs de rennes samis se sont demandé si le Parlement sami était l'institution la plus apte à les représenter dans les négociations sur l'utilisation des terres.

C'est pour cette raison que je dis que je suis d'avis que la convention a aidé à améliorer la relation entre le Parlement sami et le gouvernement norvégien. Dans une certaine mesure, oui, le Parlement sami représente les Samis, mais il y a des domaines où cette représentation est remise en question.

M. T.J. Harvey:

D'accord.

Quelles seraient les trois meilleures mesures que le gouvernement de la Norvège, en collaboration avec le Parlement sami, pourrait prendre pour répondre aux préoccupations des groupes marginalisés de la population samie et pour s'employer à résoudre les problèmes qui, selon ces groupes, sont ignorés?

Mme Ellen Inga Turi:

Vous me mettez un peu dans l'embarras en me demandant les trois meilleures mesures.

M. T.J. Harvey:

Les deux meilleures mesures, alors.

Mme Ellen Inga Turi:

Je pense que je peux en trouver une ou deux.

À l'heure actuelle, en Norvège, les décisions relatives aux projets d'infrastructure sont prises en fonction des évaluations environnementales. Si le Parlement sami et le gouvernement norvégien décidaient de s'efforcer d'améliorer le régime d'évaluation environnementale, cela pourrait vraiment aider.

Aussi, le savoir autochtone est toujours enraciné, entre autres, dans les langues autochtones. Une mesure positive pourrait être d'accorder plus d'importance à la réalisation, par des chercheurs autochtones, d'évaluations des répercussions sur les langues autochtones.

M. T.J. Harvey:

Merci.

Le président:

Malheureusement, notre temps est écoulé. Merci à vous deux de vous être joints à nous par téléconférence. Vous avez grandement contribué à notre étude, et nous vous en sommes reconnaissants.

Nous allons suspendre la séance afin de nous préparer à recevoir les deux prochains témoins.

(1625)

(1630)

Le président:

Reprenons. Deux autres témoins se joignent à nous pour la deuxième heure de la séance. Nous accueillons M. Greg Poelzer, professeur à l'Université de la Saskatchewan.

Merci d'être des nôtres. Compte tenu des conditions météorologiques, vous devez être heureux d'être ici et non à la maison.

M. Greg Poelzer (professeur, University of Saskatchewan, à titre personnel):

Oui, exactement, quoique j'aurais pu venir en canot.

Le président:

Mme Dalee Sambo Dorough se joint à nous par vidéoconférence d'Hawaï, bien qu'elle soit professeure à l'Université de l'Alaska. Félicitations et joyeux anniversaire! On m'a dit de ne pas dire cela, mais je l'ai fait tout de même. Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants du temps que vous nous accordez, surtout comme vous êtes à Hawaï.

Nous entendez-vous?

Mme Dalee Sambo Dorough (chercheuse principale, University of Alaska Anchorage, à titre personnel):

Oui, je vous entends bien. J'allais justement remercier les techniciens qui ont fait l'essai hier. Je crois que tout fonctionne bien.

Le président:

Nous allons commencer sans tarder. Chacun de vous a droit à 10 minutes pour faire une déclaration préliminaire. Nous passerons ensuite à la période de questions.

Puisque vous êtes ici, monsieur Poelzer, voulez-vous commencer?

M. Greg Poelzer:

Je vous remercie de nous permettre de témoigner sur ce sujet évidemment très important pour notre pays, mais aussi pour nos pays voisins dans le Nord circumpolaire.

Je souhaite saluer ma collègue de l'Alaska, où j'ai participé au programme Fulbright. Les gens là-bas m'ont très bien traité; c'est pourquoi j'affectionne l'Alaska.

Je sais que lorsqu'on pense à des projets énergétiques d'envergure, le pétrole vient à l'esprit de bien des gens. C'est un sujet d'actualité, comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, dans ma province natale, la Saskatchewan. Mais je veux m'attarder brièvement sur ce qui adviendra, à long terme, des importants projets d'infrastructures énergétiques qui seront menés dans le secteur de l'électricité. Je me ferai un plaisir de parler de n'importe quel sujet, mais je veux me concentrer sur celui-là, plus particulièrement parce qu'il se rapporte aux peuples autochtones au Canada.

Lorsque nous pensons à cette transition énergétique mondiale, je crois qu'elle nous offre l'occasion la plus importante au XXIe siècle de renouveler nos relations avec les Autochtones par l'entremise d'énergies renouvelables. Nous pourrons y parvenir si nous faisons les choses correctement. Autrement, la transition vers des énergies plus vertes serait seulement un autre secteur de conflits inutiles et évitables et des occasions ratées pour la création de richesses durables dans les collectivités autochtones. Cela limiterait les progrès pour lutter contre le défi environnemental le plus important de notre époque: les changements climatiques.

Si nous pensons au chemin de fer national du XIXe siècle comme étant le projet d'infrastructure clé qui a contribué à constituer le Canada d'un océan à l'autre, je dirais que la transition énergétique mondiale offre au Canada la même occasion au XXIe siècle, qui est d'unir le Canada d'un océan à l'autre.

Je pense que l'édification de la nation par l'entremise de l'énergie pourrait régler deux dimensions importantes, et je parle en tant qu'habitant des Prairies, de la Saskatchewan. Je pense qu'elle nous offre une occasion qui ne se présente qu'une fois par génération de mieux respecter notre promesse selon laquelle nous nous considérons tous comme étant des personnes visées par les traités. La transition énergétique peut être un projet d'édification de la nation qui peut inclure tous les partenaires fondateurs et contribuer à notre cheminement vers la réconciliation, par l'entremise de l'acier enfoui dans le sol.

En permettant aux Premières Nations et aux communautés métisses d'être des producteurs d'énergie indépendants, on leur offre des possibilités réelles de détenir une participation au capital, en partie ou en totalité. Ces possibilités fournissent des sources de revenus durables, des emplois et de nouveaux projets commerciaux.

Par ailleurs, je pense que la transition énergétique jette des assises solides pour procéder à l'édification de la nation, surtout dans les territoires et le Nord des provinces. L'accès à l'énergie et la sécurité énergétique sont des problèmes quotidiens dans presque toutes les collectivités éloignées et rurales dans les territoires et le Nord des provinces. Le coût élevé de l'énergie contribue souvent à une pauvreté accablante et au dilemme de choisir entre « manger ou chauffer » dans de nombreuses communautés. Le manque d'alimentation énergétique stable nuit au développement des entreprises et aux investissements.

Ce sont des problèmes auxquels la grande majorité des Canadiens ne pensent jamais. Ce ne sont pas des problèmes qui se posent pour nous. Mais si nous voulons parvenir à une édification complète de la nation, je pense que le secteur énergétique est important, pour ce qui est de l'infrastructure, pour bâtir l'Est, l'Ouest et le Nord du Canada. Il améliorera l'égalité des chances, surtout pour les Premières Nations et les Canadiens métis et inuits, car leur manque d'accès à l'égalité des chances repose grandement sur l'énergie. La transition énergétique dont nous sommes saisis fournit ce projet d'édification de la nation à grande échelle.

(1635)



Il y a quatre leçons.

Pour ma part, j'ai beaucoup travaillé en Sibérie au cours des 30 dernières années. J'ai effectué 30 sorties sur le terrain. Je lis, j'écris et je parle le russe. J'ai mené beaucoup de travaux plus récemment en Scandinavie, et plus particulièrement en Norvège et en Suède, et maintenant en Alaska. Je pourrais vous parler de 20 ou de 40 leçons, mais je vais m'en tenir à quatre.

L'une est de porter attention aux répercussions sociales, et pas seulement aux répercussions physiques et environnementales, lorsque nous effectuons des évaluations. Je pense que c'est extrêmement important. Un endroit où le Canada pourrait tirer des leçons est la République de Sakha — la Iakoutie —, dans l'Est de la Sibérie. Elle avait une délégation — certains membres étaient des collègues, en fait — qui examinait les processus d'évaluation environnementale au Canada, qui avaient tendance à mettre l'accent dans le passé sur les répercussions physiques et environnementales. Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas de processus robuste entourant les répercussions sociales, culturelles et économiques pour les collectivités autochtones.

Ces gens trouvaient que notre processus laissait à désirer. Lorsqu'ils ont examiné à nouveau les processus, ils ont intégré — oui, ils ont les normes physiques et environnementales dans leurs processus d'AIE — et créé un processus pour examiner les répercussions sociales et culturelles, puis ils l'ont déployé. Ils l'ont déployé dans le cadre de deux projets de chemins de fer au Sud-Ouest de la Iakoutie et d'un projet d'aménagement hydroélectrique. Les rapports ont révélé que ces projets ont été en grande partie fructueux. Oui, la rémunération et l'indemnisation ne ressemblent en rien à ce à quoi on s'attendrait au Canada, mais on a pris conscience que ces projets peuvent être menés à bien.

L'autre leçon que je veux aborder — et je suis ravi que nos collègues norvégiens ouvrent la voie — porte sur la décentralisation de l'électricité. C'est un phénomène de plus en plus mondial, mais il offre des possibilités de démocratisation dans la prise de décisions à l'échelle locale. Je pense que ce qui se passe en Norvège est intéressant, surtout dans le comté de Finnmark, le plus grand comté dans le Nord de la Norvège. Il compte la population autochtone la plus importante. À un moment donné, 90 % des terres appartenaient à l'État, l'État national, ce qui n'était pas habituel dans les autres comtés en Norvège. Il y avait le Finnmark Estate, qui permettait une gouvernance ou une gestion conjointe — nous pourrions utiliser ce jargon au Canada —, et le comté et le Parlement sami effectuaient le même nombre de nominations.

Je pense que ce contexte est très important lorsqu'on examine ce type de décentralisation de l'électricité. Selon les normes canadiennes, c'est une petite région. Selon les normes norvégiennes, c'est une vaste région. Selon les normes canadiennes, c'est une population assez dense et, selon les normes norvégiennes, c'est une population clairsemée. Il y a sept ou huit services publics locaux, appartenant à des intérêts privés, à la municipalité ou à une coopérative, et ils relèvent tous d'une seule entité: Finnmark Kraft. L'un des faits intéressants est qu'il devait y avoir une mise en valeur nationale de l'énergie éolienne à grande échelle. Ces projets font encore l'objet de débat, mais le fait que le Finnmark Estate existe et que Finnmark Kraft exerce ses activités a ralenti le processus, si bien que l'on peut désormais permettre la prise de décisions à l'échelle locale au sujet de la mise en valeur de l'énergie éolienne, ce qui n'aurait autrement pas été possible. C'est une autre leçon à laquelle le Canada peut réfléchir.

La troisième leçon est que les peuples autochtones peuvent détenir et exploiter des services publics. Je vais vous dire ceci. Je porte un autre chapeau, et c'est celui de négociateur pour SaskPower. Je suis donc du côté de l'industrie et, depuis les huit dernières années, je négocie un règlement global sur une installation hydroélectrique dans le Nord de la Saskatchewan. Lorsqu'on travaille avec des installations électriques, je pense que l'un des mythes au Canada est que les peuples autochtones n'ont pas les capacités de détenir et d'exploiter des services électriques, mais on peut examiner l'État de l'Alaska et des entités comme l'Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, AVEC, qui a été fondée en 1967. Nous n'avons que 50 années de retard sur l'Alaska, mais nous nous rattraperons un jour. Tout a commencé avec quelques collectivités et, maintenant, 57 collectivités autochtones de l'Alaska détiennent et exploitent des services et effectuent des investissements. C'est la coopérative d'électricité la plus importante dans le monde. Il y a des leçons à tirer pour le Canada. Nous pouvons le faire.

(1640)



Je travaille et négocie avec SaskPower pour trouver les services de première génération et de distribution qui seraient détenus par des Premières Nations au Canada. Il y a près de 200 projets de propriété pour l'électricité, mais il n'y a rien en ce qui a trait aux services. Ce n'est pas inhabituel aux États-Unis.

Le dernier point que je veux soulever est l'importance de la coopération internationale dans le développement énergétique dirigé par les Autochtones. Là encore, je vais revenir aux États-Unis, à notre voisin. L'Alaska Centre for Energy and Power à l'UAF, conjointement avec nos amis en Islande et avec l'aide du financement des gouvernements canadien et américain, a mis sur pied l'Arctic Remote Energy Network Academy. Il a réuni des champions de l'énergie de collectivités autochtones d'un peu partout — Groenland, Canada, Alaska — pour travailler à des projets énergétiques et renforcer leurs capacités.

Nous avons travaillé en Saskatchewan avec la coopérative AVEC et la nation crie de Peter Ballantyne à la conception d'un service appartenant à la localité et à une évaluation du type de système axé sur l'énergie propre qui pourrait fonctionner et la façon dont il pourrait être financièrement viable. Nous avons pris ces recherches, notamment celles menées dans le cadre de l'Initiative de recherche arctique Fulbright, et avons créé un réseau thématique UArctic pour mener à bien ce type d'initiative dans le futur.

J'ai une dernière remarque dont je veux vous faire part à propos de cette occasion. Je pense qu'elle est significative. Parfois, le Canada — et je dois dire ceci à propos de notre pays, même si j'aime ce pays, et sans vouloir offenser ma collègue de l'Alaska —, mais je pense que nous vivons dans le meilleur pays au monde...

(1645)

Le président:

Je vais vous demander de conclure vos remarques très bientôt.

M. Greg Poelzer:

D'accord. J'ai un dernier point.

Que pouvons-nous faire? Il y a environ deux milliards de personnes sur cette planète qui... environ 1,3 milliard de personnes qui n'ont pas d'électricité, et un autre milliard de personnes qui sont branchées au réseau ou îlotées. Imaginez des économies de gamme comme l'Alaska, le Canada, la Norvège, la Suède et le Groenland qui travaillent ensemble pour créer un marché d'exportation et des économies de gamme qui sont administrés par des Autochtones. C'est ce que l'avenir nous réserve.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame, la parole est à vous.

Mme Dalee Sambo Dorough:

Merci beaucoup.

Je veux seulement souligner quelques observations que M. Poelzer a formulées. En fait, mon père a travaillé pour l'Alaska Village Electric Cooperative. Je veux également ajouter que je suis entrepreneure, en plus d'avoir une carrière politique et universitaire.

Je vous ai remis différents documents et ma déclaration par écrit. J'entends faire mes remarques à plein régime. J'espère que tout le monde pourra me suivre.

Je suis ravie d'avoir été invitée à comparaître et j'aimerais féliciter le Comité de l'intérêt qu'il porte aux points de vue des peuples autochtones concernant l'exploitation des ressources naturelles et les projets énergétiques d'envergure. Même si je suis la présidente internationale de la Conférence circumpolaire inuite, la CCI, j'espère avoir été invitée à participer à votre étude en raison de mon expérience dans le domaine des droits de la personne internationaux et de ma participation à la rédaction de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones. J'ai choisi de témoigner à titre personnel et de faire part de mes opinions sur l'intégration de la déclaration des Nations unies dans votre étude et vos travaux.

La déclaration des Nations unies et les droits qu'elle reconnaît sont le fruit de négociations et de discussions de bonne foi entre les peuples autochtones et les États membres des Nations unies. Le Canada a joué un rôle important pour influer sur ces normes exhaustives, et les libéraux et les conservateurs ont dirigé pendant 25 ans les négociations sur la déclaration.

Comme le paragraphe 7 du préambule le souligne, les droits affirmés sont inhérents ou préexistants. La déclaration des Nations unies a fait l'objet d'un consensus universel et a été réaffirmée à l'unanimité dans un vaste éventail de résolutions de l'Assemblée générale des Nations unies depuis son adoption en 2007. De plus, les droits affirmés dans la déclaration des Nations unies sont les normes minimales.

Les juristes et les tribunaux ont reconnu que même si la déclaration des Nations unies dans son ensemble n'est pas juridiquement contraignante, bon nombre de ses dispositions clés constituent des dispositions du droit international général et coutumier et créent des obligations juridiquement contraignantes en faveur des peuples autochtones. L'Association du droit international a conclu que les articles de la déclaration des Nations unies confirment que le droit à l'autodétermination, le droit à la culture, les droits fonciers et le droit au recours et à la réparation font partie du droit international coutumier. De plus, les droits dans la déclaration des Nations unies sont interreliés, indivisibles et interdépendants, et la modification de l'un de ses éléments a des répercussions sur l'ensemble.

J'attire votre attention également sur la Convention no 169 de l'OIT et sur la Déclaration américaine des droits des peuples autochtones de l'Organisation des États américains en raison de leur nature compatible et complémentaire, sur le renvoi explicite à la déclaration des Nations unies, ainsi que sur leur statut en tant qu'instruments internationaux relatifs aux droits de la personne des peuples autochtones.

La Cour interaméricaine des droits de l'homme a statué, par l'entremise d'opinions qui lient la vaste majorité des États américains qui relèvent de sa compétence, que les droits des peuples autochtones à l'égard des terres, des territoires et des ressources signifient que les États et les entreprises — les tiers qui exploitent des installations dans ces États — doivent respecter les droits des peuples autochtones.

Les pactes internationaux affirment le droit à l'autodétermination, qui est considéré comme étant un prérequis ou une condition préalable à l'exercice et à la jouissance de tous les autres droits de la personne. Ce même droit est affirmé à l'article 3 de la déclaration des Nations unies. Les juristes ont qualifié le droit à l'autodétermination comme étant le libre choix des peuples. Ce faisant, le droit au consentement préalable, libre et éclairé fait partie intégrante du droit à l'autodétermination.

L'exploitation des ressources naturelles et les projets énergétiques sont souvent liés aux terres, aux territoires et aux ressources des peuples autochtones. La déclaration des Nations unies affirme non seulement les droits à l'égard des terres, des territoires et des ressources, mais reconnaît aussi la relation profonde que les peuples autochtones ont avec leur environnement. Ces liens coutumiers et historiques sont également liés aux systèmes autochtones de prise de décisions, tel qu'énoncé à l'article 18 de la déclaration des Nations unies concernant le droit « de conserver et de développer leurs propres institutions décisionnelles », d'où l'importance des droits des peuples autochtones à un consentement libre, préalable et éclairé, ou CLPE.

Outre le renvoi explicite au CLPE dans la déclaration des Nations unies, il existe un consensus clair en droit international des droits de la personne concernant l'obligation des États de consulter dans le but de parvenir à un consensus, surtout dans le secteur des projets de développement et des activités de l'industrie extractive qui, dans la plupart des cas, requièrent le consentement des peuples autochtones concernés.

(1650)



Par conséquent, les États doivent dialoguer et négocier de bonne foi pour qu'il y ait consentement.

Plusieurs autres dispositions de la déclaration de l'ONU exigent des États qu'ils prennent des mesures en collaboration avec les Autochtones ou qu'ils les consultent. De plus, en vertu du paragraphe 2 de l'article 26: « Les peuples autochtones ont le droit de posséder, d’utiliser, de mettre en valeur et de contrôler les terres, territoires et ressources qu’ils possèdent parce qu’ils leur appartiennent ou qu’ils les occupent ou les utilisent traditionnellement, ainsi que ceux qu’ils ont acquis. »

Ici, le verbe contrôler signifie le pouvoir d'influer, de gérer, de maîtriser, de limiter ou de prévenir. Il ne signifie en aucun cas que les Autochtones ont un droit de veto, ce qu'a fait valoir l'ancien gouvernement du Canada en faisant référence au consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause. Il était dans l'erreur. Il y a une grande différence entre les éléments procéduraux et les éléments substantifs du consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause et la notion relative au droit de veto. Ce droit est souvent réservé à l'autorité législative ou constitutionnelle et revient à un leader politique comme le président ou le gouverneur d'un État.

Par contre, le consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause comprend la négociation, le dialogue, les partenariats, la consultation et la collaboration de bonne foi entre les parties concernées, dans l'objectif d'obtenir le consentement. Même là, les personnes concernées peuvent choisir de donner ou de refuser leur consentement au sujet de ce qui se passe ou non au sein de leur territoire.

La mise en oeuvre des procédures associées au droit de consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause doit être réalisée par ceux qui sont concernés par l'autodétermination et abordée au cas par cas selon les conditions et la situation des Autochtones. Les États doivent reconnaître que les droits de la personne ne sont pas absolus et qu'une tension constante s'exerce entre les droits et les intérêts des Autochtones et ceux de tous les autres. Dans certains cas, cette tension se manifeste parmi les Autochtones concernés.

Sous l'égide de l'actuel premier ministre, le gouvernement du Canada se préoccupe de respecter les droits des Autochtones, ce qui peut comprendre — et qui comprend — le droit de déterminer nos propres priorités en matière de développement. En plus du droit à l'autodétermination, l'article 32 de la déclaration de l'ONU affirme ce qui suit: Les peuples autochtones ont le droit de définir et d’établir des priorités et des stratégies pour la mise en valeur et l’utilisation de leurs terres ou territoires et autres ressources.

Dans le contexte des industries extractives et du consentement préalable, donné librement et en connaissance de cause, l'ancien rapporteur spécial sur les droits des peuples autochtones, James Anaya, a fait référence au développement des terres et des ressources axé sur les Autochtones à titre de modèle privilégié. Les résultats du développement amorcé et contrôlé par les Autochtones correspondront davantage aux priorités, aux intérêts, aux préoccupations, aux valeurs culturelles et aux droits des Autochtones. De plus, il propose que les États lancent des programmes d'aide pour les Autochtones qui choisissent de créer des entreprises de développement.

Toutefois, une grande partie de son rapport se centre sur le scénario habituel du développement imposé que de nombreux Autochtones ont subi et sur les obligations des États et des tiers d'atténuer les répercussions, de surveiller les activités extraterritoriales des tiers, d'agir avec diligence raisonnable et de conclure des accords équitables.

Le développement durable et équitable représente une dimension importante du droit des Autochtones et des ressources naturelles. Le préambule de la déclaration de l'ONU mentionne explicitement que les savoirs, les cultures et les pratiques traditionnelles autochtones contribuent à une mise en valeur durable et équitable de l’environnement et à sa bonne gestion.

En effet, « L'avenir que nous voulons », la résolution adoptée par l'Assemblée générale en 2012, énonce ce qui suit au paragraphe 49: Nous insistons sur l’importance de la participation des peuples autochtones à la réalisation du développement durable. Nous reconnaissons également l’importance de la Déclaration des Nations Unies [...] dans le contexte de la mise en œuvre des stratégies de développement durable aux niveaux mondial, régional, national et infranational.

(1655)



Le Programme de développement durable d'ici 2030 représente un engagement important pour le gouvernement du Canada, le Comité et les Autochtones. L'un de ses principaux objectifs est de mettre fin à la pauvreté et à la faim partout d'ici 2030, de protéger les droits de la personne et de protéger la planète et ses ressources naturelles de façon durable.

Il est important de tenir compte des travaux du Groupe de travail de l'ONU sur les entreprises et les droits de l'homme et aux importantes lignes directrices qu'il a élaborées. Je vous exhorte aussi à lire la Déclaration inuite circumpolaire sur les principes de mise en valeur des ressources dans l’Inuit Nunaat, de 2011.

Enfin, étant donné les récents dialogues tenus au Canada et la désignation de 2019 à titre d'Année internationale des langues autochtones par l'ONU, je tiens à souligner l'importance des langues autochtones dans tous les processus d'engagement et aussi de la réalité des infrastructures de télécommunication, qui sont insuffisantes. J'écoutais le témoignage de Duane Smith lundi. Je crois qu'il a dit que nous avions d'excellentes ressources énergétiques, mais que nos infrastructures étaient déficientes.

De façon plus importante, nous devons tous reconnaître les obligations solennelles du Canada en ce qui a trait à l'élaboration d'un plan d'action national pour la mise en oeuvre de la déclaration de l'ONU, en collaboration avec les peuples autochtones concernés. Cet engagement volontaire permettrait d'assurer et de renforcer l'exploitation durable et équitable des ressources naturelles des Autochtones de manière importante, si tel est leur souhait, ce qui profiterait au Canada et à tous les Canadiens.

Je crois que les enjeux associés aux langues autochtones, qui ont fait l'objet de discussions au Canada, et ceux associés aux infrastructures, dont a parlé M. Poelzer, sont importants et doivent faire l'objet d'un suivi dans le cadre du dialogue à venir.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Tan, vous avez la parole.

M. Geng Tan (Don Valley-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins de leur présence, que ce soit ici en personne ou par vidéoconférence.

Comme vous êtes tous deux des universitaires et que vos sujets de recherche se chevauchent peut-être, ma question s'adresse à vous deux.

Elle porte sur les règlements et les conseils autochtones. Vous en avez tous deux parlé dans vos déclarations; vous nous avez fait part de vos craintes et de vos idées. Que pouvons-nous apprendre en comparant les divers règlements, comme celui des Autochtones de l'Alaska, celui des Indiens et des Inuits de la baie James et celui des Inuits de l'Ouest canadien? Quelle est votre expérience et que pourrions-nous améliorer?

(1700)

M. Greg Poelzer:

C'est une très bonne question. Je vais laisser la représentante de l'Alaska y répondre en premier.

Mme Dalee Sambo Dorough:

Je crois qu'il est important de reconnaître qu'il serait très utile — peut-être par l'entremise du Comité permanent, dans une certaine mesure — de réaliser une analyse comparative des accords sur les revendications territoriales et de l'Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971. Aux fins des projets énergétiques et du travail du Comité permanent des ressources naturelles, je crois qu'il serait très utile d'explorer plus en détail le réel potentiel des activités axées sur les Autochtones en ce qui a trait aux ressources énergétiques, comme l'a fait valoir M. Poelzer, et de le faire dans le cadre d'une analyse comparative.

Les possibilités pour les sociétés autochtones de l'Alaska émanant de l'Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act et celles pour les sociétés de développement économique émanant des revendications territoriales globales dans l'Arctique canadien offrent un réel potentiel puisque, comme je l'ai fait valoir dans mon exposé, du point de vue des Autochtones — et surtout du point de vue des Inuits —, la déclaration circumpolaire sur la mise en valeur des ressources se veut une réelle tentative d'atteindre un équilibre entre le développement possible et les ressources énergétiques, tant celles qui sont renouvelables que celles qui ne le sont pas.

C'est un domaine qui mériterait une analyse comparative constructive, qui profiterait aux Inuits et aux autres peuples autochtones.

M. Geng Tan:

Vous avez parlé du règlement circumpolaire. Le Conseil circumpolaire inuit du Canada est une organisation sans but lucratif gérée par des directeurs, notamment par les leaders élus de quatre régimes de règlement de revendications territoriales. Après 40 ans, le Conseil est devenu une ONG internationale représentant environ 160 000 Inuits de l'Alaska, du Canada, du Groenland et de la Russie.

Que peut offrir ce modèle aux autres pays, notamment le Canada, qui cherchent une façon efficace d'engager les communautés autochtones?

Mme Dalee Sambo Dorough:

À titre de précision, le Conseil circumpolaire et une organisation non gouvernementale internationale, comme vous l'avez dit, qui compte environ 160 000 Inuits répartis dans quatre pays membres. Je crois que les déclarations que nous avons adoptées, y compris celle à laquelle j'ai fait référence, la déclaration sur le développement des ressources et la déclaration sur la souveraineté de l'Arctique, et nos intérêts particuliers dans l'ensemble de la région arctique peuvent être très instructifs en vue d'accroître notre autonomie. Lorsqu'on associe cela aux ententes sur les revendications territoriales globales et à l'Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, on obtient des droits et des titres clairs à l'égard des terres, des territoires et des ressources, mais aussi des responsabilités. Certaines de ces responsabilités ont déjà été soulignées par le Comité. Elles visent à accroître et à améliorer la qualité de vie de nos membres et de nos communautés.

Le Conseil circumpolaire inuit n'est pas détenteur de droits, mais les objectifs que nous avons tenté de mettre de l'avant — notamment ces déclarations, mais aussi le sommet économique inuit circumpolaire — avaient trait aux possibilités de développement durable et équitable axé sur les Inuits, dans le but d'atteindre l'autonomie. L'exploitation des ressources énergétiques naturelles peut en faire partie; cela dépend des personnes concernées.

(1705)

M. Geng Tan:

Il me reste 30 secondes pour poser une courte question à M. Poelzer, parce qu'il n'a pas encore eu l'occasion de répondre à mes questions.

C'est une question d'ordre national. Vous avez parlé des pratiques exemplaires des autres pays. Vous nous avez aussi fait part de certaines recommandations, mais quelle est la situation au Canada? Avons-nous des pratiques exemplaires? Est-ce que nous excellons dans un certain domaine? Pourrions-nous transmettre nos pratiques exemplaires à d'autres pays?

M. Greg Poelzer:

Bien sûr. Parfois, on s'attarde surtout à ce qui ne fonctionne pas, mais je crois que nous réussissons dans bon nombre de domaines.

Par exemple, il est difficile de trouver un autre pays doté de meilleurs droits que le Canada.

Pour revenir à votre question précédente au sujet de l'évolution des divers accords sur les revendications territoriales et règlements, on commence par le modèle de l'Alaska, qui a aussi servi à la baie James dans une certaine mesure, et avec les leçons qu'on a tirées. Ensuite, on pense à ce qui s'est passé avec la nation Nisga'a en Colombie-Britannique. Certains pourraient plaider pour un troisième ordre de gouvernement à cet égard. Nous avons aussi une expérience en matière de cogestion, surtout dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest. J'ai vu cela en action dans le delta du Mackenzie. La réussite est possible. Je crois qu'il est important d'en prendre note.

Je pense aussi à d'autres expériences que nous réalisons. Prenons la First Nations Power Authority, en Saskatchewan, qui a été construite par l'ancien premier ministre Brad Wall.

Le président:

Monsieur, je vais devoir vous demander de conclure rapidement si c'est possible.

M. Greg Poelzer:

D'accord.

Le président:

Ted, vous avez la parole, je crois.

M. Ted Falk:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Vous aurez probablement l'occasion de poursuivre.

Monsieur Poelzer, je m'adresse à vous en premier. J'ai été très impressionné par votre optimisme en ce qui a trait aux possibilités que nous avons d'entreprendre des projets d'édification de la nation.

Vous avez établi un lien avec le développement des chemins de fer. J'aime votre enthousiasme et votre positivisme. Je crois que vous êtes sur la bonne voie.

En fait, il y a quelque temps, le Comité a étudié les interconnexions électriques. Nous voulions savoir si nous avions la capacité de déplacer l'électricité de manière efficace au pays. Je crois que vous avez effleuré ce sujet. J'aimerais que vous nous en parliez, en 30 secondes, si c'est possible. J'aurai ensuite une autre question.

M. Greg Poelzer:

En ce qui a trait à l'électricité, je crois que l'interconnexion entre la Saskatchewan et le nord du Manitoba est un exemple de réussite à étudier. Pour ce qui est d'un projet d'édification de la nation en vue de déplacer les électrons, il serait avantageux pour les collectivités nordiques.

J'aimerais aussi aborder le sujet des partenariats entre le secteur privé et le secteur public, rapidement. Prenons votre province de résidence: le Manitoba. La North West Company dispose d'un soutien logistique phénoménal. Elle pourrait — comme elle l'a fait récemment à Inuvik — conclure un partenariat avec les Premières Nations, acheter de l'énergie renouvelable en gros et offrir un soutien. Les collectivités autochtones de son réseau pourraient lui acheter de l'électricité... ou la North West Company pourrait acheter de l'électricité à titre d'investissement en capitaux, qu'elle pourrait vendre à un prix beaucoup moins élevé que ce que les collectivités autochtones paieraient d'elles-mêmes.

Nous avons les infrastructures nécessaires en vue de ces partenariats public-privé.

M. Ted Falk:

Très bien. Merci.

Il y a quelque temps, le Saskatoon StarPhoenix a publié un article sur l'exploitation de l'uranium... en partenariat encore une fois. Lorsqu'on vous a interviewé, vous avez dit qu'il serait erroné de considérer le devoir de consulter à titre de droit de veto des Autochtones sur l'exploitation des ressources ou comme un ensemble de cerceaux à travers lesquels il faut passer pour aller de l'avant. Vous avez dit qu'il fallait plutôt établir une relation.

M. Greg Poelzer:

Tout à fait.

M. Ted Falk:

Pourriez-vous nous en parler davantage? Nous avons un projet prêt à être lancé: le gouvernement a déjà engagé des fonds à cet égard et 117 collectivités des Premières Nations seront touchées. Parmi elles, six ne sont pas d'accord et...

M. Greg Poelzer:

Non, je sais. Encore une fois, il y a cette fausse idée voulant que le devoir de consulter donne automatiquement lieu à un droit de veto. Ce n'est pas le cas. Bien sûr, il y a certains seuils dans les collectivités à proximité. Il faut tenir compte des répercussions. Mais je dirais une chose: pour réussir, il faut d'abord ne pas avoir peur de la propriété des terres autochtones. Je crois que Trans Mountain a démontré que les peuples autochtones s'intéressaient grandement à la participation aux capitaux dans les projets énergétiques, que ce soit dans le domaine des combustibles fossiles ou des énergies renouvelables.

Ensuite, il faut prendre des mesures significatives... On ne peut pas atterrir là comme cela. Il faut travailler dur. Cela vaut tant pour les gouvernements provinciaux que pour le gouvernement fédéral. Il ne faut pas oublier que nous sommes tous liés par des traités. Il faut bâtir ces relations.

Bien sûr, à un certain point, les gens ne seront pas tous d'accord. Certaines personnes me demandent: « Pourquoi les Autochtones ne peuvent-ils pas tous être d'accord sur un sujet? » À cela, je réponds que ce serait comme de demander au premier ministre Trudeau ou à l'un de ses prédécesseurs de veiller à ce que tous les députés de la Chambre soient d'accord sur tous les sujets.

Ce n'est tout simplement pas réaliste. Et ce n'est pas humain. Vous avez soulevé un point au sujet de l'établissement des relations. Voilà ce qui est important.

(1710)

M. Ted Falk:

C'est la clé.

M. Greg Poelzer:

Absolument.

M. Ted Falk:

Vous avez évoqué cette question dans le cadre du premier des quatre points que vous avez abordés concernant la réalisation d'évaluations de l'impact environnemental. Vous avez dit que nous ne devions pas cesser de tenir compte de l'impact social et culturel sur toutes les personnes concernées, ou omettre d'y prêter attention.

M. Greg Poelzer:

Absolument. Je vais vous raconter une anecdote. Lorsque j'ai commencé à négocier avec SaskPower, mon collègue de l'époque — Tom Molloy, qui m'a depuis laissé tomber pour le poste de lieutenant-gouverneur de la Saskatchewan — et moi-même nous sommes réunis avec eux, et nous n'avons initialement pas réussi à conclure de marché relativement à la gestion de la végétation dans l'expansion d'une installation de transmission. Il existe des documents historiques à ce sujet, car, lorsque le barrage a été commandité, dans les années 1920, nous ne réalisions évidemment aucune consultation. Nous avons dû dire aux gens — et il y a eu une évolution très positive au sein de SaskPower — ce qui suit: « Vous pensez peut-être que les années 1920 et 1930 remontent à bien longtemps, mais lorsque vous vous rendez dans ces communautés, je vous assure que c'est comme si ce barrage avait été construit hier. »

Ce type d'impact socioculturel est intergénérationnel et historique, chose que bien des membres de la société ne comprennent pas réellement. C'est pourquoi j'estime que cette dimension est si importante.

M. Ted Falk:

Je sais qu'au Manitoba, nous avons dû retourner dans certaines communautés des Premières Nations longtemps après les faits pour régler des revendications territoriales et offrir des indemnisations pour l'inondation de propriétés et de terrains...

M. Greg Poelzer : D'accord.

M. Ted Falk :... causée par nos barrages.

Il me reste à peu près une minute?

Le président:

Il vous reste une minute et demie.

M. Ted Falk:

Vous avez également fait une brève allusion à l'idée que lorsque l'on parle de nos évaluations de l'impact environnemental, on s'attend à une indemnisation.

M. Greg Poelzer:

Voici un fait au sujet des évaluations de l'impact environnemental. Souvent, lorsqu'il est possible de tenir des consultations, même si les évaluations de l'impact environnemental portent habituellement sur des questions physiques et environnementales, les communautés adoptent une perspective générale. C'est l'une des principales difficultés auxquelles nous faisons habituellement face dans le cadre de ces processus d'évaluation. Cela a causé beaucoup de consternation, parce qu'il y a un malentendu, et parce que nous ne disposons d'aucun mécanisme pour régler ces autres problèmes.

M. Ted Falk:

Avez-vous des suggestions?

M. Greg Poelzer:

Je ne sais pas si le Comité est au courant... Avez-vous déjà entendu parler du projet de loi C-69?

Des voix : Ah! Ah!

M. Greg Poelzer: Vous savez ce que...

M. Ted Falk:

Il faut tout jeter, non?

M. Greg Poelzer:

Disons qu'il faut encore y travailler, d'accord? On va dire que...

M. Ted Falk:

Vous êtes très poli.

M. Greg Poelzer:

Non, c'est un travail en cours. Ce projet comporte des objectifs essentiels. Les éléments liés à ce que l'on pourrait appeler les aspects social et culturel doivent y être intégrés. Une grande partie de ce document reste assez vague. Nous ne savons pas à quoi cela va aboutir. C'est notre problème. Si l'on se concentre uniquement sur les aspects physique et environnemental, et que nous n'établissons pas de mécanisme à cette fin, nous n'irons nulle part. Nous devons trouver une façon constructive et acceptable d'atteindre notre but.

M. Ted Falk:

Merci.

Je pense que mon temps est écoulé.

Le président:

Oui. Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Cannings.

M. Richard Cannings:

Merci à vous deux d'être présents aujourd'hui.

Je vais commencer avec M. Poelzer. J'ai été très intrigué par la dernière déclaration que vous avez faite dans votre exposé au sujet des possibilités à l'échelle mondiale ou en matière de consolidation nationale. Pouvez-vous développer cette idée et nous dire quel est le lien avec les communautés autochtones, et ce que le gouvernement devrait faire?

(1715)

M. Greg Poelzer:

Certainement. Je vais revenir sur une chose.

L'un des principaux indicateurs d'entrepreneuriat est le nombre d'entreprises en démarrage. Chez les Premières Nations, celui-ci est cinq fois supérieur au nombre d'entreprises traditionnelles. TD Waterhouse a récemment réalisé une étude sur le développement économique dans les communautés des Premières Nations. Nous connaissons tous le stéréotype selon lequel la Chine, l'Inde, etc., connaissent une croissance de plus de 8 % mais, ces 10 dernières années, la croissance des entreprises des Premières Nations s'est élevée à 8,2 %, ce qui est nettement supérieur aux résultats des pays de l'OCDE.

Ce que je veux dire, c'est que si vous voulez investir dans la tranche de la population canadienne la plus entreprenante, investissez dans les Premières Nations. L'avenir de la croissance est dans le passage à l'énergie verte et renouvelable, qui est en cours dans le monde entier. Il s'agit d'un marché gigantesque. Est-ce que les Népalais ou les Samoans veulent parler à des personnes situées à New York? Non. Ils veulent faire affaire avec des personnes en Alaska ou dans le Nord du Canada, et c'est ce que font aujourd'hui les habitants de l'Alaska. Si nous réalisions des investissements en vue de faciliter et de promouvoir ces débouchés, de travailler avec l'Alaska dans tout le Canada... Nous avons déjà démontré, notamment avec l'ICC, que nous pouvions travailler ensemble. Je pense qu'il s'agit d'une occasion en or de promouvoir notre savoir-faire dans le monde et de bâtir un avenir électrique dirigé par des Autochtones et des habitants du Nord.

M. Richard Cannings:

C'est plus une question de connexion intellectuelle qu'électrique.

M. Greg Poelzer:

Oui, exactement.

M. Richard Cannings:

D'accord. Je voulais juste vérifier que vous n'imaginiez pas d'énormes lignes électriques polaires ou quelque chose du genre.

M. Greg Poelzer:

Non, non.

M. Richard Cannings:

D'accord.

Je reviens à vous, monsieur Dorough. Vous êtes passé très rapidement sur la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones et le consentement libre, préalable et en connaissance de cause. Pourriez-vous parler de la façon dont le gouvernement canadien a exprimé son souhait d'intégrer la déclaration à ses lois et à son fonctionnement?

La Chambre des communes a adopté le projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire de mon collègue Romeo Saganash, le projet de loi C-262. Celui-ci demandait au gouvernement d'intégrer ces dispositions aux lois de notre pays. Pourriez-vous nous parler de ce processus, nous dire où nous en sommes et, peut-être, où en sont les autres pays qui ont signé la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, et nous indiquer les leçons que nous pourrions en tirer?

Mme Dalee Sambo Dorough:

Je pense que les efforts déployés par le Canada dans le cadre de cette initiative politique visant à intégrer les normes de la déclaration des Nations unies aux lois et politiques nationales constituent, dans une grande mesure, la réponse à certaines des questions qui ont été posées à M. Poelzer relativement à l'utilisation des ressources naturelles. Le but ultime est le respect des Autochtones, la reconnaissance de leurs droits, et leur prise en compte à tous dans les avancées que nous réalisons.

À titre d'observateur externe de la scène politique canadienne, et de l'objectif visant à mettre en oeuvre la déclaration des Nations unies, je pense qu'il serait très utile, non seulement pour le gouvernement, mais aussi pour tous les autres intervenants du Canada, d'intégrer les normes d'une façon qui permette de faire progresser le dialogue, notamment au sujet des soins de santé, des ressources naturelles et des principaux projets énergétiques, et au sujet du logement ou de l'éducation, pour que les normes établies dans la déclaration des Nations unies puissent faire fonction de directives instructives et utiles relativement à toutes les questions qui concernent les Canadiens et, plus important encore, les Autochtones de tout le Canada: Premières Nations, Métis et Inuits.

Je pense que pour toutes les questions que votre collègue a posées au sujet de l'énergie et des énergies de remplacement, nous devrions réaliser des activités de sensibilisation en utilisant la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones pour encadrer le dialogue. Cela pourrait être très utile.

Contrairement à d'autres régions du monde... nous n'avons malheureusement pas observé ce type d'engagement politique ou la réalisation d'efforts en vue de concrétiser cette vision, et j'espère que d'ici juin ou novembre, des mesures concrètes seront prises à cet égard. Malheureusement, les gouvernements d'autres parties du monde se sont engagés davantage dans un ritualisme des droits que dans la prise de mesures concrètes en vue du respect et de la reconnaissance des droits affirmés dans la déclaration des Nations unies. Lorsque je parle de ritualisme des droits, je veux dire que les gouvernements et les États membres des Nations unies prennent des mesures et produisent des rapports extrêmement positifs au sujet de leur merveilleux bilan en matière de droits de la personne relativement aux Autochtones, mais ne font rien de concret pour y donner suite.

Merci.

(1720)

Le président:

Vous avez 30 secondes.

M. Richard Cannings:

Brièvement, pour en revenir à un exemple très précis, il a été question de l'Alaska Village Electric Cooperative.

Je me demande simplement si le Canada pourrait en tirer des leçons.

Mme Dalee Sambo Dorough:

Lorsque M. Poelzer parlait, je pensais à Buckminster Fuller et à sa nouvelle conception d'un réseau énergétique mondial, alors qu'en fait, je crois que dans le cas de l'Alaska Village Electric Cooperative et de ses premières initiatives, il était vraiment question de petits réseaux énergétiques au sein des collectivités.

Avec la technologie d'aujourd'hui, je pense qu'il est possible de réexaminer ce qui se passe dans nos petites collectivités rurales et éloignées dans l'Arctique, lesquelles sont éparpillées aux quatre coins de l'Arctique circumpolaire, et d'étudier les solutions de rechange pour rehausser ces petits réseaux énergétiques mis en place, à l'origine, par des institutions comme l'AVEC.

Je pense que les possibilités sont extraordinaires et que le partenariat public-privé dont a parlé M. Poelzer est primordial. Ce type de partenariat vise aussi les peuples autochtones, pas seulement comme groupes ou collectivités, mais aussi comme titulaires de droits qui ont droit à l'autodétermination.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Nos derniers témoins venaient de Norvège, qui est un pays vraiment intéressant.

Comme vous le savez sans doute, la Norvège est dotée d'un fonds du patrimoine approximativement deux fois et demie plus élevé que son PIB, d'environ 1 billion de dollars.

Avons-nous déjà fait quelque chose de semblable au Canada? Avons-nous déjà mis de côté les recettes tirées de nos ressources pour construire quelque chose comme l'infrastructure énergétique dont vous dites qu'il s'agit du prochain chemin de fer?

M. Greg Poelzer:

Il y a le Fonds du patrimoine de l'Alberta, qui a bien commencé à l'époque du premier ministre Lougheed, bien sûr, et qui a ensuite été pillé.

En Saskatchewan, le gouvernement Blakeney en a démarré un, mais il s'agissait vraiment d'un compte courant. À l'heure actuelle, il y en a un aux Territoires du Nord-Ouest.

J'ai, en fait, rédigé un article sur ce sujet en particulier. Honnêtement, nous avons intérêt à le faire dans chaque province qui exploite des ressources naturelles. Nous vendons les meubles de la maison sans réinvestir l'argent. Nous vendons des biens. Je trouve que cela n'a absolument aucun sens.

L'argument que l'on fait valoir en défaveur du fonds est qu'il nous faut investir dans d'autres choses en ce moment. Faites confiance aux gens. C'était pareil en Norvège. Les politiciens avaient peur de la même chose à l'époque, mais les gens y étaient favorables.

L'exemple que j'utilise est celui du Fonds du patrimoine. Un fonds souverain est comme votre REER. Ensuite, vous avez une hypothèque, qui est comme une dette. Les gens disent que vous devez rembourser votre dette avant de pouvoir commencer. Est-ce que quelqu'un dit qu'il va finir de payer son hypothèque et attendre 25 ans pour commencer à cotiser à son fonds de retraite? Non, il fait les deux. Les gens le font tout le temps. Nous pouvons le faire et nous avons intérêt à le faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Savons-nous si d'autres pays le font efficacement?

M. Greg Poelzer:

La Norvège le fait, et l'Alaska ne s'en tire pas trop mal, en fait.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pense qu'elle veut en parler.

M. Greg Poelzer:

Il s'agit du fonds permanent de l'Alaska.

Mme Dalee Sambo Dorough:

Exactement. Le fonds permanent est essentiellement un fonds souverain. Cependant, au chapitre de l'infrastructure, ce n'est pas un des éléments auxquels s'est attardé le fonds permanent ou la réserve de fonds générés par l'exploitation pétrolière en Alaska pour traiter la question de l'infrastructure ou les questions relatives à l'énergie.

Je voulais formuler un autre commentaire. Il me semble que le Conseil de l'Arctique est parfaitement placé pour se pencher sur la question de l'infrastructure dans l'ensemble de l'Arctique circumpolaire, du moins pour ce qui concerne les États ayant la même optique: les États nordiques, y compris le Groenland et le royaume danois; le Canada; l'Alaska et les États-Unis. Ils pourraient évaluer les besoins en matière d'infrastructure et collaborer de façon à nous aider à effacer les frontières qui étouffent l'innovation et nous empêchent de trouver les solutions originales qui nous permettraient d'atteindre une partie des objectifs que chaque nation-État en bordure de l'Arctique s'est engagée et s'est contrainte à atteindre, comme les objectifs de développement durable. Je pense qu'il y a là un potentiel extraordinaire. Le Conseil de l'Arctique devrait vraiment examiner le rôle de leader qu'il peut jouer et, État par État, prendre l'engagement important de créer une réserve de fonds qui permette de régler certaines de ces questions.

(1725)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avons eu des témoignages philosophiques vraiment très bien ici, et je comprends ce que vous dites, mais nous essayons de couvrir une bonne partie des questions pratiques, des pratiques exemplaires qui sont en place. Revenons à l'Alaska. Quelle est l'interaction entre le gouvernement de cet État et les peuples autochtones dans ces dossiers? Qu'en est-il du gouvernement fédéral des États-Unis? Quelles sont les différences entre les deux ordres? S'entendent-ils de façon utile?

Mme Dalee Sambo Dorough:

À l'échelon fédéral, soit l'échelon national, une Inuite du versant nord de l'Alaska a récemment été nommée secrétaire adjointe aux Affaires indiennes, alors il sera intéressant de voir ce qui en ressortira, non seulement en ce qui concerne les Inuits dans l'Arctique et les questions auxquelles ils sont confrontés, mais aussi en ce qui touche les peuples autochtones partout aux États-Unis.

On a réalisé des avancées concernant l'Alaska. Quand Bill Walker était gouverneur, le dialogue dynamique et les discussions concernant les priorités étaient monnaie courante. Reste à voir quelle direction prendra le nouveau gouvernement, dirigé par le gouverneur Dunleavy, mais j'ai espoir que nous puissions poursuivre le dialogue, surtout dans nos collectivités rurales. Malheureusement, il y a eu un certain clivage entre nos collectivités urbaines et rurales, peut-être semblable à un clivage Nord-Sud au Canada. J'ignore si c'est exact. Espérons que nous arriverons à surmonter une partie de ces difficultés et à prendre des décisions plus adaptées à tous les résidants de l'Alaska, y compris à ses peuples autochtones.

M. Greg Poelzer:

Si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais ajouter un point en particulier pour nos collègues canadiens en ce qui concerne l'État de l'Alaska et les relations fédérales. La majorité des terres en Alaska appartiennent au gouvernement fédéral. Dans certains États de l'Ouest du pays, le gouvernement est propriétaire d'une très grande partie des terres, ce qui n'est pas le cas dans le Midwest et vers l'Est des États-Unis, où très peu de terres appartiennent au fédéral.

Vous pouvez imaginer les types de conflits que cela crée entre l'État, le gouvernement fédéral et les sociétés autochtones lorsqu'il faut prendre des décisions concernant les types d'exploitation des ressources... Qu'il s'agisse de ressources naturelles comme les combustibles fossiles ou même la gestion des mammifères marins et autres, cela rend la situation beaucoup plus compliquée que ce serait le cas dans une province canadienne.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis originaire du Québec. J'ai du mal à imaginer le moindre conflit entre les gouvernements fédéral et provinciaux.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham: Monsieur Poelzer, dans vos remarques liminaires, vous avez parlé des répercussions sur le plan social et pas seulement environnemental. Vous avez parlé du cas de Yakutia. Pourriez-vous nous donner des précisions sur l'impact social et nous dire comment le quantifier et l'aborder?

M. Greg Poelzer:

Bien sûr. Il n'est pas facile à quantifier, contrairement à ce que certains pourraient prétendre.

Si je devais faire une distinction, l'impact se fait sentir sur les personnes et les collectivités. Si on prend les répercussions du passage d'un oléoduc, la première étape de nos études d'impact environnemental habituelles est d'examiner la situation et de se demander quelles seront les répercussions sur l'environnement naturel, les terres, les cours d'eau et, potentiellement, l'air. Cependant, il arrive souvent que l'étape qui n'y est pas solidement intégrée soit celle de s'interroger à propos des répercussions sur les collectivités locales, leurs moyens de subsistance, comme la chasse ou la pêche — si elles mènent des activités économiques traditionnelles, en fait — et leur culture. Certains endroits ont aussi une grande valeur spirituelle pour ces collectivités.

Ce sont ces types de choses qui doivent être soulevées et évaluées. Certaines peuvent être mesurées, comme les répercussions sur les troupeaux de caribous ou les populations d'orignaux ou de poissons. Certaines choses pourraient probablement être quantifiées parce qu'elles se rapportent à ces économies et aux revenus des collectivités. D'autres choses ne peuvent simplement pas l'être...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci beaucoup. Je pense que c'est tout le temps que nous avions.

(1730)

Le président:

En effet.

Merci beaucoup à vous deux de vous être joints à nous aujourd'hui. Vos témoignages ont bien éclairé notre étude. Nous vous savons gré d'avoir pris le temps de participer à notre réunion. Malheureusement, notre temps est écoulé. Nous allons donc devoir nous arrêter ici.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le temps est une ressource naturelle limitée.

Le président:

Oui, le temps est une ressource naturelle très limitée. Exactement.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on February 07, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.